Science.gov

Sample records for current durability model

  1. Thermodynamic model of natural, medieval and nuclear waste glass durability

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.; Plodinec, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    A thermodynamic model of glass durability based on hydration of structural units has been applied to natural glass, medieval window glasses, and glasses containing nuclear waste. The relative durability predicted from the calculated thermodynamics correlates directly with the experimentally observed release of structural silicon in the leaching solution in short-term laboratory tests. By choosing natural glasses and ancient glasses whose long-term performance is known, and which bracket the durability of waste glasses, the long-term stability of nuclear waste glasses can be interpolated among these materials. The current Savannah River defense waste glass formulation is as durable as natural basalt from the Hanford Reservation (10/sup 6/ years old). The thermodynamic hydration energy is shown to be related to the bond energetics of the glass. 69 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  2. On the problems of stability and durability of field-emission current sources for electrovacuum devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakunin, Alexander N.; Aban'shin, Nikolay P.; Akchurin, Garif G.; Akchurin, Georgy G.; Avetisyan, Yuri A.

    2016-03-01

    The results of the practical implementation of the concept of field-emission current source with high average current density of 0.1-0.3 A-cm-2 are shown. The durability of cathode samples at a level of 6000 hours is achieved under conditions of technical vacuum. A phenomenological model is suggested that describes the tunneling of both equilibrium and nonequilibrium electrons in a vacuum from the zone of concentration of electrostatic field. Conditions are discussed as the resulting increase in the emission current due to the connection mechanism of the photoelectric effect is thermodynamically favorable, that is not accompanied by an undesirable increase in the temperature of the local emission zone. It is shown that to ensure stability and durability of the cathode is also important to limit the concentration of equilibrium carriers using composite structures «DLC film on Mo substrate." This helps to reduce the criticality of the CVC. A possible alternative is to use a restrictive resistance in the cathode. However, this increases the heat losses and thus decreases assembly efficiency. The results of experimental studies of the structure showing the saturation of photoemission current component with an increase in operating voltage. This fact suggests the existence of an effective mechanism for control of emission at constant operating voltage. This is fundamentally important for the stabilization of field emission cathode, providing a reliability and durability. The single-photon processes and the small thickness DLC films (15-20 nm) provide high-speed process of control.

  3. Evolutionary model of an anonymous consumer durable market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaldasch, Joachim

    2011-07-01

    An analytic model is presented that considers the evolution of a market of durable goods. The model suggests that after introduction goods spread always according to a Bass diffusion. However, this phase will be followed by a diffusion process for durable consumer goods governed by a variation-selection-reproduction mechanism and the growth dynamics can be described by a replicator equation. The theory suggests that products play the role of species in biological evolutionary models. It implies that the evolution of man-made products can be arranged into an evolutionary tree. The model suggests that each product can be characterized by its product fitness. The fitness space contains elements of both sites of the market, supply and demand. The unit sales of products with a higher product fitness compared to the mean fitness increase. Durables with a constant fitness advantage replace other goods according to a logistic law. The model predicts in particular that the mean price exhibits an exponential decrease over a long time period for durable goods. The evolutionary diffusion process is directly related to this price decline and is governed by Gompertz equation. Therefore it is denoted as Gompertz diffusion. Describing the aggregate sales as the sum of first, multiple and replacement purchase the product life cycle can be derived. Replacement purchase causes periodic variations of the sales determined by the finite lifetime of the good (Juglar cycles). The model suggests that both, Bass- and Gompertz diffusion may contribute to the product life cycle of a consumer durable. The theory contains the standard equilibrium view of a market as a special case. It depends on the time scale, whether an equilibrium or evolutionary description is more appropriate. The evolutionary framework is used to derive also the size, growth rate and price distribution of manufacturing business units. It predicts that the size distribution of the business units (products) is lognormal

  4. Durability evaluation techniques and modeling for highway materials

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, M.; Muchane, G.K.

    1995-06-01

    For satisfactory long-term performance of highway facilities, the authors are concerned about durability of materials, in addition to their initial strength. Besides conventional materials, such as Portland cement concrete and asphalt concrete, their interests include high-performance materials such as polymer concrete and polymer modified concrete. Degradation of materials may occur over time due to exposure to a number of aggravating conditions and environments. For investigation of durability, the aggravating exposures that the authors have considered include repeated loading, freeze-thaw cycling. Methods of evaluation of performance of materials include application of vibration spectral techniques for evaluating of material stiffness and damage. Materials are modeled to characterize their performance under repeated loads and other aggravating exposures.

  5. Progressive Damage Modeling of Durable Bonded Joint Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leone, Frank A.; Davila, Carlos G.; Lin, Shih-Yung; Smeltzer, Stan; Girolamo, Donato; Ghose, Sayata; Guzman, Juan C.; McCarville, Duglas A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of durable bonded joint technology for assembling composite structures for launch vehicles is being pursued for the U.S. Space Launch System. The present work is related to the development and application of progressive damage modeling techniques to bonded joint technology applicable to a wide range of sandwich structures for a Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle. The joint designs studied in this work include a conventional composite splice joint and a NASA-patented Durable Redundant Joint. Both designs involve a honeycomb sandwich with carbon/epoxy facesheets joined with adhesively bonded doublers. Progressive damage modeling allows for the prediction of the initiation and evolution of damage. For structures that include multiple materials, the number of potential failure mechanisms that must be considered increases the complexity of the analyses. Potential failure mechanisms include fiber fracture, matrix cracking, delamination, core crushing, adhesive failure, and their interactions. The joints were modeled using Abaqus parametric finite element models, in which damage was modeled with user-written subroutines. Each ply was meshed discretely, and layers of cohesive elements were used to account for delaminations and to model the adhesive layers. Good correlation with experimental results was achieved both in terms of load-displacement history and predicted failure mechanisms.

  6. Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) Durability Modeling; An Overview and Preliminary Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, A.; Bhatt, R. T.; Grady, J. E.; Zhu, D.

    2012-01-01

    A study outlining a fracture mechanics based model that is being developed to investigate crack growth and spallation of environmental barrier coating (EBC) under thermal cycling conditions is presented. A description of the current plan and a model to estimate thermal residual stresses in the coating and preliminary fracture mechanics concepts for studying crack growth in the coating are also discussed. A road map for modeling life and durability of the EBC and the results of FEA model(s) developed for predicting thermal residual stresses and the cracking behavior of the coating are generated and described. Further initial assessment and preliminary results showed that developing a comprehensive EBC life prediction model incorporating EBC cracking, degradation and spalling mechanism under stress and temperature gradients typically seen in turbine components is difficult. This is basically due to mismatch in thermal expansion difference between sub-layers of EBC as well as between EBC and substrate, diffusion of moisture and oxygen though the coating, and densification of the coating during operating conditions as well as due to foreign object damage, the EBC can also crack and spall from the substrate causing oxidation and recession and reducing the design life of the EBC coated substrate.

  7. Prediction of radioactive waste glass durability by the hydration thermodynamic model: Application to saturated repository environments

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M. ); Ramsey, W.G. . Dept. of Ceramic Engineering)

    1989-01-01

    The effects of groundwater chemistry on glass durability were examined using the hydration thermodynamic model. The relative durabilities of SiO{sub 2}, obsidians, basalts, nuclear waste glasses, medieval window glasses, and a frit glass were determined in tuffaceous groundwater, basaltic groundwater, WIPP-A brine, and Permian-A brine using the monolithic MCC-1 durability test. For all the groundwaters, the free energy of hydration, calculated from the glass composition and the final experimental pH, was linearly related to the logarithm of the measured silica concentration. The linear equation was identical to that observed previously for these glasses during MCC-1 testing in deionized water. In the groundwater-dominated MCC-1 experiments, the pH values for all the glasses tested appeared to be buffered by the groundwater-precipitate chemistry. The behavior of poorly durable glasses demonstrated that the silica release is a function of the ionic strength of the solution. The ionic strength, in turn, reflects the effect of the groundwater chemistry on the pH. Using the hydration thermodynamic model, nuclear waste glass durability in saturated repository environments can be predicted from the glass composition and the groundwater and the groundwater pH. 47 refs., 3 figs. 1 tab.

  8. Transparent superwetting nanofilms with enhanced durability at model physiological condition

    PubMed Central

    Hwangbo, Sunghee; Heo, Jiwoong; Lin, Xiangde; Choi, Moonhyun; Hong, Jinkee

    2016-01-01

    There have been many studies on superwetting surfaces owing to the variety of their potential applications. There are some drawbacks to developing these films for biomedical applications, such as the fragility of the microscopic roughness feature that is vital to ensure superwettability. But, there are still only a few studies that have shown an enhanced durability of nanoscale superwetting films at certain extreme environment. In this study, we fabricated intrinsically stable superwetting films using the organosilicate based layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly method in order to control nano-sized roughness of the multilayer structures. In order to develop mechanically and chemically robust surfaces, we successfully introduced polymeric silsesquioxane as a building block for LbL assembly with desired fashion. Even in the case that the superhydrophobic outer layers were damaged, the films maintained their superhydrophobicity because of the hydrophobic nature of their inner layers. As a result, we successfully fabricated superwetting nano-films and evaluated their robustness and stability. PMID:26764164

  9. Transparent superwetting nanofilms with enhanced durability at model physiological condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwangbo, Sunghee; Heo, Jiwoong; Lin, Xiangde; Choi, Moonhyun; Hong, Jinkee

    2016-01-01

    There have been many studies on superwetting surfaces owing to the variety of their potential applications. There are some drawbacks to developing these films for biomedical applications, such as the fragility of the microscopic roughness feature that is vital to ensure superwettability. But, there are still only a few studies that have shown an enhanced durability of nanoscale superwetting films at certain extreme environment. In this study, we fabricated intrinsically stable superwetting films using the organosilicate based layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly method in order to control nano-sized roughness of the multilayer structures. In order to develop mechanically and chemically robust surfaces, we successfully introduced polymeric silsesquioxane as a building block for LbL assembly with desired fashion. Even in the case that the superhydrophobic outer layers were damaged, the films maintained their superhydrophobicity because of the hydrophobic nature of their inner layers. As a result, we successfully fabricated superwetting nano-films and evaluated their robustness and stability.

  10. Current sheet model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The model of a rectenna based on the current sheet equivalency of a large planar array is described. The model is mathematically characterized by expression for the fraction of the incident plane wave that is reflected from the sheet. The model is conceptually justified for normal incidence by comparing it to the waveguide model in which evanescent modes, present as beyond and cutoff, correspond to the near field components which become negligible at any significant distance from the antenna array.

  11. Durability-Based Design Guide for an Automotive Structural Composite: Part 2. Background Data and Models

    SciTech Connect

    Corum, J.M.; Battiste, R.L.; Brinkman, C.R.; Ren, W.; Ruggles, M.B.; Weitsman, Y.J.; Yahr, G.T.

    1998-02-01

    This background report is a companion to the document entitled ''Durability-Based Design Criteria for an Automotive Structural Composite: Part 1. Design Rules'' (ORNL-6930). The rules and the supporting material characterization and modeling efforts described here are the result of a U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Automotive Materials project entitled ''Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures.'' The overall goal of the project is to develop experimentally based, durability-driven design guidelines for automotive structural composites. The project is closely coordinated with the Automotive Composites Consortium (ACC). The initial reference material addressed by the rules and this background report was chosen and supplied by ACC. The material is a structural reaction injection-molded isocyanurate (urethane), reinforced with continuous-strand, swirl-mat, E-glass fibers. This report consists of 16 position papers, each summarizing the observations and results of a key area of investigation carried out to provide the basis for the durability-based design guide. The durability issues addressed include the effects of cyclic and sustained loadings, temperature, automotive fluids, vibrations, and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and roadway kickups) on deformation, strength, and stiffness. The position papers cover these durability issues. Topics include (1) tensile, compressive, shear, and flexural properties; (2) creep and creep rupture; (3) cyclic fatigue; (4) the effects of temperature, environment, and prior loadings; (5) a multiaxial strength criterion; (6) impact damage and damage tolerance design; (7) stress concentrations; (8) a damage-based predictive model for time-dependent deformations; (9) confirmatory subscale component tests; and (10) damage development and growth observations.

  12. Modeling the Rate-Dependent Durability of Reduced-Ag SAC Interconnects for Area Array Packages Under Torsion Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivas, Vikram; Menon, Sandeep; Osterman, Michael; Pecht, Michael G.

    2013-08-01

    Solder durability models frequently focus on the applied strain range; however, the rate of applied loading, or strain rate, is also important. In this study, an approach to incorporate strain rate dependency into durability estimation for solder interconnects is examined. Failure data were collected for SAC105 solder ball grid arrays assembled with SAC305 solder that were subjected to displacement-controlled torsion loads. Strain-rate-dependent (Johnson-Cook model) and strain-rate-independent elastic-plastic properties were used to model the solders in finite-element simulation. Test data were then used to extract damage model constants for the reduced-Ag SAC solder. A generalized Coffin-Manson damage model was used to estimate the durability. The mechanical fatigue durability curve for reduced-silver SAC solder was generated and compared with durability curves for SAC305 and Sn-Pb from the literature.

  13. LDEF spacecraft, ground laboratory, and computational modeling implications on Space Station Freedom's solar array materials and surfaces durability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; De Groh, Kim K.; Auer, Bruce M.; Mirtich, Michael J.; Gebauer, Linda; Hill, Carol M.; Lebed, Richard F.

    1991-01-01

    The low earth orbital (LEO) durability of Space Station Freedom (SSF) solar array materials and surfaces is evaluated using results from the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), ground laboratory simulation tests, and Monte Carlo modeling. These results indicate that thin-film SiOx protective coatings are adequately durable to atomic oxygen, ultraviolet (UV) radiation, thermal cycling, and micrometeroid or debris impact.

  14. First-order model for durability of Hanford waste glasses as a function of composition

    SciTech Connect

    Hrma, P.; Piepel, G.F.; Schweiger, M.J.; Smith, D.E.

    1992-04-01

    Two standard chemical durability tests, the static leach test MCC-1 and product consistency test PCT, were conducted on simulated borosilicate glasses that encompass the expected range of compositions to be produced in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). A first-order empirical model was fitted to the data from each test method. The results indicate that glass durability is increased by addition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, moderately increased by addition of ZrO{sub 2} and SiO{sub 2}, and decreased by addition of Li{sub 2}O, Na{sub 2}O, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and MgO. Addition of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and CaO produce an indifferent or reducing effect on durability according to the test method. This behavior and a statistically significant lack of fit are attributed to the effects of multiple chemical reactions occurring during glass-water interaction. Liquid-liquid immiscibility is suspected to be responsible for extremely low durability of some glasses.

  15. Durability and life prediction modeling in polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binienda, Wieslaw K.

    1995-01-01

    Sudden appearance of cracks on a macroscopically smooth surface of brittle materials due to cooling or drying shrinkage is a phenomenon related to many engineering problems. Although conventional strength theories can be used to predict the necessary condition for crack appearance, they are unable to predict crack spacing and depth. On the other hand, fracture mechanics theory can only study the behavior of existing cracks. The theory of crack initiation can be summarized into three conditions, which is a combination of a strength criterion and laws of energy conservation, the average crack spacing and depth can thus be determined. The problem of crack initiation from the surface of an elastic half plane is solved and compares quite well with available experimental evidence. The theory of crack initiation is also applied to concrete pavements. The influence of cracking is modeled by the additional compliance according to Okamura's method. The theoretical prediction by this structural mechanics type of model correlates very well with the field observation. The model may serve as a theoretical foundation for future pavement joint design. The initiation of interactive cracks of quasi-brittle material is studied based on a theory of cohesive crack model. These cracks may grow simultaneously, or some of them may close during certain stages. The concept of crack unloading of cohesive crack model is proposed. The critical behavior (crack bifurcation, maximum loads) of the cohesive crack model are characterized by rate equations. The post-critical behavior of crack initiation is also studied.

  16. Legal and Regulatory Challenges Currently Facing Diabetes Treatment Providers and Related Durable Medical Equipment Suppliers

    PubMed Central

    Liles, Robert

    2013-01-01

    It has been estimated that 24 million Americans have diabetes, many of whom are Medicare beneficiaries. These individuals carefully monitor their blood glucose levels primarily through the use of in-home blood glucose testing kits. Although the test is relatively simple, the cumulative expense of providing glucose test strips and lancets to patients is ever increasing, both to the Medicare program and to uninsured individuals who must pay out-of-pocket for these testing supplies. This article discusses the diabetes durable medical equipment (DME) coverage under Part B Medicare, the establishment and role of DME Medicare administrative contractors, and national and local coverage requirements for diabetes DME suppliers. This article also discusses the federal government’s ongoing concerns regarding the improper billing of diabetes testing supplies. To protect the Medicare Trust Fund, the federal government has contracted with multiple private entities to conduct reviews and audits of questionable Medicare claims. These private sector contractors have conducted unannounced site visits of DME supplier offices, interviewed patients and their families, placed suppliers on prepayment review, and conducted extensive postpayment audits of prior paid Medicare claims. In more egregious administrative cases, Medicare contractors have recommended that problematic providers and/or DME suppliers have their Medicare numbers suspended or, in some instances, revoked. More serious infractions can lead to civil or criminal liability. In the final part of this article, we will examine the future of enforcement efforts by law enforcement and Medicare contractors and the importance of understanding and complying with federal laws when ordering and supplying diabetes testing strips and lancets. PMID:23566989

  17. Secondary emission magnetron injection gun as high current durable electron source

    SciTech Connect

    Cherenshchikov, S.A.; Opanassenko, A.N.; Dovbnya, A.N.; Zakutin, V.V.

    1995-07-05

    Peculiarities of operation of secondary electron emission cathodes and different types of their excitation are discussed. On the base of available experimental data possibilities are analyzed for obtaining maximum achievable beam currents and densities. It is shown that the cross-field geometry is best-suited for achieving the highest current densities and peak beam currents. Experimental observables as regards beam characteristics of the secondary-emission magnetron gun (SEMIG) are presented. Prospects for obtaining beam current densities in excess of 100 A/cm{sup 2} at beam current above 100 A are discussed for cathode life times 20 to 100 thousand hours. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  18. Application of the hydration thermodynamic model for glass durability under saturated tuff repository conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, W.G.; Jantzen, C.M.

    1990-12-31

    The effects of tuff repository groundwater on glass dissolution and surface layer formation was examined utilizing the hydration thermodynamic model. A 28 day MCC-1 monolithic durability test was performed on the following glasses: SiO{sub 2}, obsidian, basalt, medieval window glasses, frit glass, and simulated nuclear waste glass. Silica dissolution was compared with the pH corrected free energy of hydration and shown to have the theoretical slope, ln(1/2.303RT), in agreement with MCC-1 tests using deionized water. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy identified clays of the saponite family and carbonates, on the glass surfaces leached in tuff groundwater. 31 refs.

  19. Test validation of environmental barrier coating (EBC) durability and damage tolerance modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Najafi, Ali; Abdi, Frank; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Grady, Joseph E.

    2014-03-01

    Protection of Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) is rather an important element for the engine manufacturers and aerospace companies to help improve the durability of their hot engine components. The CMC's are typically porous materials which permits some desirable infiltration that lead to strength enhancements. However, they experience various durability issues such as degradation due to coating oxidation. These concerns are being addressed by introducing a high temperature protective system, Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) that can operate at temperature applications1, 3 In this paper, linear elastic progressive failure analyses are performed to evaluate conditions that would cause crack initiation in the EBC. The analysis is to determine the overall failure sequence under tensile loading conditions on different layers of material including the EBC and CMC in an attempt to develop a life/failure model. A 3D finite element model of a dogbone specimen is constructed for the analyses. Damage initiation, propagation and final failure is captured using a progressive failure model considering tensile loading conditions at room temperature. It is expected that this study will establish a process for using a computational approach, validated at a specimen level, to predict reliably in the future component level performance without resorting to extensive testing.

  20. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Reports Increase in Durability and Reliability for Current Generation Fuel Cell Buses (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in evaluating the durability and reliability of fuel cell buses being demonstrated in transit service. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technology Validation team in the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

  1. Detailed characterization of current North American portland cements and clinkers and the implications for the durability of modern concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjunan, P.

    The current study has been undertaken with a view to rationalize the relation between the cement characteristics and concrete properties with the fresh set of data collected from the North American portland cements. The important chemical and physical characteristics of the cement discussed are (a) chemical analysis, (b) phase calculations, (c) various particle characterizations and (d) rheological properties. The important concrete properties discussed are (a) alkali silica reactivity, (b) sulfate attack, (c) delayed ettringite formation (d) chloride ion permeability and (e) compressive strength. Relationship between the cement characteristics and concrete durability was determined using regression methods. The heat of hydration was mainly influenced by the variation in C 3A, SO3, equivalent Na2O contents, and fineness of portland cements. When there was no variation in C3A, SO 3, and fineness, the hydration kinetics of the cement was mainly controlled by the silicate phase hydration. The 7-day hydration was negatively correlated to C2S or C4AF content. As the C2S or C 4AF content increased, the 7-day heat of hydration decreased. C 3S content showed a positive correlation to 1 and 7-day heats of hydration, but significant negative correlation to 14 and 28-day hydration. Equivalent alkalis showed a strong positive correlation to ASR at 2 weeks. SO3 content of portland cement also showed a positive correlation to ASR expansion. A strong negative correlation was observed between C4AF content of portland cement and sulfate attack expansion at 4 and 6 months of exposure. The correlation to sulfate attack was stronger when the ratios of C3A/C4AF were taken into account. C3A content exhibited a negative correlation to chloride ion permeability. This correlation decreased as the curing period increased. SO 3 content also exhibited a negative correlation to the chloride ion permeability. Only alkalis showed a strong negative correlation to the compressive strength after 3

  2. Open circuit voltage durability study and model of catalyst coated membranes at different humidification levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sumit; Fowler, Michael W.; Simon, Leonardo C.; Abouatallah, Rami; Beydokhti, Natasha

    Fuel cell material durability is an area of extensive research today. Chemical degradation of the ionomer membrane is one important degradation mechanism leading to overall failure of fuel cells. This study examined the effects of relative humidity on the chemical degradation of the membrane during open circuit voltage testing. Five Gore™ PRIMEA ® series 5510 catalyst coated membranes were degraded at 100%, 75%, 50%, and 20% RH. Open circuit potential and cumulative fluoride release were monitored over time. Additionally scanning electron microscopy images were taken at end of the test. The results showed that with decreasing RH fluoride release rate increased as did performance degradation. This was attributed to an increase in gas crossover with a decrease in RH. Further, it is also shown that interruptions in testing may heavily influence cumulative fluoride release measurements where frequent stoppages in testing will cause fluoride release to be underestimated. SEM analysis shows that degradation occurred in the ionomer layer close to the cathode catalyst. A chemical degradation model of the ionomer membrane was used to model the results. The model was able to predict fluoride release trends, including the effects of interruptions, showing that changes in gas crossover with RH could explain the experimental results.

  3. Microstructural modeling and design optimization of adaptive thin-film nanocomposite coatings for durability and wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, James Deon

    Adaptive thin-film nanocomposite coatings comprised of crystalline ductile phases of gold and molybdenum disulfide, and brittle phases of diamond like carbon (DLC) and ytrria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) have been investigated by specialized microstructurally-based finite-element techniques. A new microstructural computational technique for efficiently creating models of nanocomposite coatings with control over composition, grain size, spacing and morphologies has been developed to account for length scales that range from nanometers to millimeters for efficient computations. The continuum mechanics model at the nanometer scale was verified with molecular dynamic models for nanocrystalline diamond. Using this new method, the interrelated effects of microstructural characteristics such as grain shapes and sizes, matrix thicknesses, local material behavior due to interfacial stresses and strains, varying amorphous and crystalline compositions, and transfer film adhesion and thickness on coating behavior have been investigated. A mechanistic model to account for experimentally observed transfer film adhesion modes and changes in thickness was also developed. One of the major objectives of this work is to determine optimal crystalline and amorphous compositions and behavior related to wear and durability over a wide range of thermo-mechanical conditions. The computational predictions, consistent with experimental observations, indicate specific interfacial regions between DLC and ductile metal inclusions are critical regions of stress and strain accumulation that can be precursors to material failure and wear. The predicted results underscore a competition between the effects of superior tribological properties associated with MoS 2 and maintaining manageable stress levels that would not exceed the coating strength. Varying the composition results in tradeoffs between lubrication, toughness, and strength, and the effects of critical stresses and strains can be controlled

  4. Time-Dependent Deformation Modelling for a Chopped-Glass Fiber Composite for Automotive Durability Design Criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, W

    2001-08-24

    Time-dependent deformation behavior of a polymeric composite with chopped-glass-fiber reinforcement was investigated for automotive applications, The material under stress was exposed to representative automobile service environments. Results show that environment has substantial effects on time-dependent deformation behavior of the material. The data were analyzed and experimentally-based models developed for the time-dependent deformation behavior as a basis for automotive structural durability design criteria.

  5. On tridimensional rip current modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesiello, Patrick; Benshila, Rachid; Almar, Rafael; Uchiyama, Yusuke; McWilliams, James C.; Shchepetkin, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Do lateral shear instabilities of nearshore circulation account for a substantial part of Very Low-Frequency (VLF) variability? If yes, it would promote stirring and mixing of coastal waters and surf-shelf exchanges. Another question is whether tridimensional transient processes are important for instability generation. An innovative modeling system with tridimensional wave-current interactions was designed to investigate transient nearshore currents and interactions between nearshore and innershelf circulations. We present here some validation of rip current modeling for the Aquitanian coast of France, using in-situ and remote video sensing. We then proceed to show the benefits of 3D versus 2D (depth-mean flow) modeling of rip currents and their low-frequency variability. It appears that a large part of VLF motions is due to intrinsic variability of the tridimensional flow. 3D models may thus provide a valuable, only marginally more expensive alternative to conventional 2D approaches that miss the vertical flow structure and its nonlinear interaction with the depth-averaged flow.

  6. Urban Decline and Durable Housing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaeser, Edward L.; Gyourko, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Urban decline is not the mirror image of growth, and durable housing is the primary reason the nature of decline is so different. This paper presents a model of urban decline with durable housing and verifies these implications of the model: (1) city growth rates are skewed so that cities grow more quickly than they decline; (2) urban decline is…

  7. Limitations of bootstrap current models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, E. A.; Candy, J.; Meneghini, O.; Osborne, T. H.

    2014-04-01

    We assess the accuracy and limitations of two analytic models of the tokamak bootstrap current: (1) the well-known Sauter model (1999 Phys. Plasmas 6 2834, 2002 Phys. Plasmas 9 5140) and (2) a recent modification of the Sauter model by Koh et al (2012 Phys. Plasmas 19 072505). For this study, we use simulations from the first-principles kinetic code NEO as the baseline to which the models are compared. Tests are performed using both theoretical parameter scans as well as core-to-edge scans of real DIII-D and NSTX plasma profiles. The effects of extreme aspect ratio, large impurity fraction, energetic particles, and high collisionality are studied. In particular, the error in neglecting cross-species collisional coupling—an approximation inherent to both analytic models—is quantified. Furthermore, the implications of the corrections from kinetic NEO simulations on MHD equilibrium reconstructions is studied via integrated modeling with kinetic EFIT.

  8. Durability of high performance Ni-yttria stabilized zirconia supported solid oxide electrolysis cells at high current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hjalmarsson, Per; Sun, Xiufu; Liu, Yi-Lin; Chen, Ming

    2014-09-01

    We report the durability of a solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) with a record low initial area specific resistance (ASR) and a record low degradation rate. The cell consists of a Ni-yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) cermet as support and active fuel electrode, a YSZ electrolyte, a gadolinia doped ceria (CGO) inter-diffusion barrier, and a strontium doped lanthanum cobaltite (LSC)-CGO composite oxygen electrode. The cell was tested at 800 °C and -1 A cm-2 converting 31% of a 0.1:0.45:0.45 mixture of H2:H2O:CO2 for approximately 2700 h, demonstrating an initial ASR of 200 mΩ cm2 and a steady degradation rate of ≤12 mV (or 0.9%) per 1000 h. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to study in situ changes in the electrochemical response of the cell and the retrieved data was treated to deconvolute resistive contributions from the physiochemical processes occurring within the cell. The results showed rapid initial fuel electrode degradation during the first 350 h followed by partial reactivation. The serial resistance was found to increase with time but in an exponentially decaying behavior. A discussion is made based on the detailed electrochemical results together with post-mortem microstructural analysis.

  9. WOODSTOVE DURABILITY TESTING PROTOCOL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the development of an accelerated laboratory test to simulate in-home woodstove aging and degradation. nown as a stress test, the protocol determines the long-term durability of woodstove models in a 1- to 2-week time frame. wo avenues of research have been t...

  10. Wave/current interaction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, A. K.

    1988-01-01

    The wave-current interaction for the application to remote sensing data via numerical simulations and data comparison is modelled. Using the field data of surface current shear, wind condition and ambient wave spectrum, the numerical simulations of directional wave spectrum evolution were used to interpret and to compare with the aircraft data from Radar Ocean Wave Spectrometer (ROWS) and Surface Contour Radar (SCR) across the front during Frontal Air Sea Interaction Experiment (FASINEX). The wave-ice interaction was inspired by the observation of large amplitude waves hundreds of kms inside the ice pack in the Weddell Sea, resulting in breakup of the ice pack. The developed analysis of processes includes the refraction of waves at the pack edge, the effects of pack compression on wave propagation, wave train stability and buckling stability in the ice pack. Sources of pack compression and interaction between wave momentum and pack compression are investigated. Viscous camping of propagating waves in the marginal ice zone are also studied. The analysis suggests an explanation for the change in wave dispersion observed from the ship and the sequence of processes that cause ice pack breakup, pressure ridge formation and the formation of open bands of water.

  11. Combustor liner durability analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, V.

    1981-01-01

    An 18 month combustor liner durability analysis program was conducted to evaluate the use of advanced three dimensional transient heat transfer and nonlinear stress-strain analyses for modeling the cyclic thermomechanical response of a simulated combustor liner specimen. Cyclic life prediction technology for creep/fatigue interaction is evaluated for a variety of state-of-the-art tools for crack initiation and propagation. The sensitivity of the initiation models to a change in the operating conditions is also assessed.

  12. Durability assessment results suggest a serviceable life of two, rather than three, years for the current long-lasting insecticidal (mosquito) net (LLIN) intervention in Benin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background LLIN distribution, every three years, is a key intervention of Benin’s malaria control strategy. However, data from the field indicate that LLIN lifespan appears to vary based on both intrinsic (to the LLIN) and extrinsic factors. Methods We monitored two indicators of LLIN durability, survivorship and integrity, to validate the three-year-serviceable-life assumption. Interviews with net owners were used to identify factors associated with loss of integrity. Results Observed survivorship, after 18 months, was significantly less (p<0.0001) than predicted, based on the assumption that nets last three years. Instead, it was closer to predicted survivorship based on a two-year LLIN serviceable life assumption (p=0.03). Furthermore, the integrity of nearly one third of ‘surviving’ nets was so degraded that they were in need of replacement. Five factors: washing frequency, proximity to water for washing, location of kitchen, type of cooking fuel, and low net maintenance were associated with loss of fabric integrity. Conclusion A two-year serviceable life for the current LLIN intervention in Benin would be a more realistic program assumption. PMID:24507444

  13. Modeling photoelectron currents through gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyatt, A. F. G.

    2007-06-01

    We reexamine the processes involved in a current flowing from a photocathode, through a gas, to a collector at a positive voltage. The current is determined by the electrons being scattered back to the photocathode as well as by the transport through the gas. We find that the current, as a function of gas pressure and applied electric field, is reasonably well described by Thomson’s equation if the velocities of the electrons are correctly defined and the measured scattering cross sections are used. At low pressures, the relevant electron energy is the emitted energy from the photocathode, as suggested by Loeb [The Kinetic Theory of Gases (McGraw-Hill, New York, 1934), p. 625]. At high pressures, the electrons that return to the photocathode are thermalized; while in the gas, the electrons have an extra energy from the electric field.

  14. Temperature stability and durability of MR fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping; Tang, Long; Yue, En; Luo, Shun-An; Zhao, Guang-ming

    2012-04-01

    Temperature stability and durability of magnetorheological fluids are important for engineering application. The damper with magnetorheological fluids were put in environment of -40°C to 130°C and the forces were measured under different currents. Durability was evaluated by performance experiments of 2×106, 3.5×106,and 5×106 cycles. The results show that magnetorheological fluids have ideal temperature stability and durability.

  15. Temperature stability and durability of MR fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ping; Tang, Long; Yue, En; Luo, Shun-An; Zhao, Guang-ming

    2011-11-01

    Temperature stability and durability of magnetorheological fluids are important for engineering application. The damper with magnetorheological fluids were put in environment of -40°C to 130°C and the forces were measured under different currents. Durability was evaluated by performance experiments of 2×106, 3.5×106,and 5×106 cycles. The results show that magnetorheological fluids have ideal temperature stability and durability.

  16. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell model for aging predictions: Simulated equivalent active surface area loss and comparisons with durability tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, C.; Gérard, M.; Quinaud, M.; d'Arbigny, J.; Bultel, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The prediction of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) lifetime is one of the major challenges to optimize both material properties and dynamic control of the fuel cell system. In this study, by a multiscale modeling approach, a mechanistic catalyst dissolution model is coupled to a dynamic PEMFC cell model to predict the performance loss of the PEMFC. Results are compared to two 2000-h experimental aging tests. More precisely, an original approach is introduced to estimate the loss of an equivalent active surface area during an aging test. Indeed, when the computed Electrochemical Catalyst Surface Area profile is fitted on the experimental measures from Cyclic Voltammetry, the computed performance loss of the PEMFC is underestimated. To be able to predict the performance loss measured by polarization curves during the aging test, an equivalent active surface area is obtained by a model inversion. This methodology enables to successfully find back the experimental cell voltage decay during time. The model parameters are fitted from the polarization curves so that they include the global degradation. Moreover, the model captures the aging heterogeneities along the surface of the cell observed experimentally. Finally, a second 2000-h durability test in dynamic operating conditions validates the approach.

  17. Current Status in Cavitation Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Ashok K.; Avva, Ram K.

    1993-01-01

    Cavitation is a common problem for many engineering devices in which the main working fluid is in liquid state. In turbomachinery applications, cavitation generally occurs on the inlet side of pumps. The deleterious effects of cavitation include: lowered performance, load asymmetry, erosion and pitting of blade surfaces, vibration and noise, and reduction of the overall machine life. Cavitation models in use today range from rather crude approximations to sophisticated bubble dynamics models. Details about bubble inception, growth and collapse are relevant to the prediction of blade erosion, but are not necessary to predict the performance of pumps. An engineering model of cavitation is proposed to predict the extent of cavitation and performance. The vapor volume fraction is used as an indicator variable to quantify cavitation. A two-phase flow approach is employed with the assumption of the thermal equilibrium between liquid and vapor. At present velocity slip between the two phases is selected. Preliminary analyses of 2D flows shows qualitatively correct results.

  18. Modeling Harris Current Sheets with Themis Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kepko, L.; Angelopoulos, V.; McPherron, R. L.; Apatenkov, S.; Glassmeier, K.-H.

    2010-01-01

    Current sheets are ubiquitous in nature. occurring in such varied locations as the solar atmosphere. the heliosphere, and the Earth's magnetosphere. The simplest current sheet is the one-dimensional Harris neutral sheet, with the lobe field strength and scale-height the only free parameters. Despite its simplicity, confirmation of the Harris sheet as a reasonable description of the Earth's current sheet has remained elusive. In early 2009 the orbits of the 5 THEMIS probes fortuitously aligned such that profiles of the Earth's current sheet could be modeled in a time dependent manner. For the few hours of alignment we have calculated the time history of the current sheet parameters (scale height and current) in the near-Earth region. during both quiet and active times. For one particular substorm. we further demonstrate good quantitative agreement with the diversion of cross tail current inferred from the Harris modeling with the ionospheric current inferred from ground magnetometer data.

  19. Mechanically durable superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Verho, Tuukka; Bower, Chris; Andrew, Piers; Franssila, Sami; Ikkala, Olli; Ras, Robin H A

    2011-02-01

    Development of durable non-wetting surfaces is hindered by the fragility of the microscopic roughness features that are necessary for superhydrophobicity. Mechanical wear on superhydrophobic surfaces usually shows as increased sticking of water, leading to loss of non-wettability. Increased wear resistance has been demonstrated by exploiting hierarchical roughness where nanoscale roughness is protected to some degree by large scale features, and avoiding the use of hydrophilic bulk materials is shown to help prevent the formation of hydrophilic defects as a result of wear. Additionally, self-healing hydrophobic layers and roughness patterns have been suggested and demonstrated. Nevertheless, mechanical contact not only causes damage to roughness patterns but also surface contamination, which shortens the lifetime of superhydrophobic surfaces in spite of the self-cleaning effect. The use of photocatalytic effect and reduced electric resistance have been suggested to prevent the accumulation of surface contaminants. Resistance to organic contaminants is more challenging, however, oleophobic surface patterns which are non-wetting to organic liquids have been demonstrated. While the fragility of superhydrophobic surfaces currently limits their applicability, development of mechanically durable surfaces will enable a wide range of new applications in the future. PMID:21274919

  20. Durable sequence stability and bone marrow tropism in a macaque model of human pegivirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Adam L.; Lauck, Michael; Mohns, Mariel; Peterson, Eric J.; Beheler, Kerry; Brunner, Kevin G.; Crosno, Kristin; Mejia, Andres; Mutschler, James; Gehrke, Matthew; Greene, Justin; Ericsen, Adam J.; Weiler, Andrea; Lehrer-Brey, Gabrielle; Friedrich, Thomas C.; Sibley, Samuel D.; Kallas, Esper G.; Capuano, Saverio; Rogers, Jeffrey; Goldberg, Tony L.; Simmons, Heather A.; O’Connor, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Human Pegivirus (HPgV) – formerly known as GB virus C and hepatitis G virus – is a poorly characterized RNA virus that infects approximately one-sixth of the global human population and is transmitted frequently in the blood supply. Here, we create an animal model of HPgV infection by infecting macaque monkeys with a new simian pegivirus (SPgV) discovered in wild baboons. Using this model, we provide a high-resolution, longitudinal picture of SPgV viremia where the dose, route, and timing of infection are known. We detail the highly-variable acute-phase of SPgV infection, showing that the viral load trajectory early in infection is dependent upon the infecting dose, whereas the chronic-phase viremic set-point is not. We also show that SPgV has an extremely low propensity for accumulating sequence variation, with no consensus-level variants detected during the acute phase of infection and an average of only 1.5 variants generated per 100 infection days. Finally, we show that SPgV RNA is highly concentrated in only two tissues: spleen and bone marrow, with bone marrow likely producing the majority of virus detected in plasma. Together, these results reconcile several paradoxical observations from cross-sectional analyses of HPgV in humans and provide an animal model for studying pegivirus biology. PMID:26378244

  1. Thermal fatigue durability for advanced propulsion materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.

    1989-01-01

    A review is presented of thermal and thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) crack initiation life prediction and cyclic constitutive modeling efforts sponsored recently by the NASA Lewis Research Center in support of advanced aeronautical propulsion research. A brief description is provided of the more significant material durability models that were created to describe TMF fatigue resistance of both isotropic and anisotropic superalloys, with and without oxidation resistant coatings. The two most significant crack initiation models are the cyclic damage accumulation model and the total strain version of strainrange partitioning. Unified viscoplastic cyclic constitutive models are also described. A troika of industry, university, and government research organizations contributed to the generation of these analytic models. Based upon current capabilities and established requirements, an attempt is made to project which TMF research activities most likely will impact future generation propulsion systems.

  2. Circulation-based Modeling of Gravity Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiburg, E. H.; Borden, Z.

    2013-05-01

    Atmospheric and oceanic flows driven by predominantly horizontal density differences, such as sea breezes, thunderstorm outflows, powder snow avalanches, and turbidity currents, are frequently modeled as gravity currents. Efforts to develop simplified models of such currents date back to von Karman (1940), who considered a two-dimensional gravity current in an inviscid, irrotational and infinitely deep ambient. Benjamin (1968) presented an alternative model, focusing on the inviscid, irrotational flow past a gravity current in a finite-depth channel. More recently, Shin et al. (2004) proposed a model for gravity currents generated by partial-depth lock releases, considering a control volume that encompasses both fronts. All of the above models, in addition to the conservation of mass and horizontal momentum, invoke Bernoulli's law along some specific streamline in the flow field, in order to obtain a closed system of equations that can be solved for the front velocity as function of the current height. More recent computational investigations based on the Navier-Stokes equations, on the other hand, reproduce the dynamics of gravity currents based on the conservation of mass and momentum alone. We propose that it should therefore be possible to formulate a fundamental gravity current model without invoking Bernoulli's law. The talk will show that the front velocity of gravity currents can indeed be predicted as a function of their height from mass and momentum considerations alone, by considering the evolution of interfacial vorticity. This approach does not require information on the pressure field and therefore avoids the need for an energy closure argument such as those invoked by the earlier models. Predictions by the new theory are shown to be in close agreement with direct numerical simulation results. References Von Karman, T. 1940 The engineer grapples with nonlinear problems, Bull. Am. Math Soc. 46, 615-683. Benjamin, T.B. 1968 Gravity currents and related

  3. Estimates of current debris from flux models

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1997-01-01

    Flux models that balance accuracy and simplicity are used to predict the growth of space debris to the present. Known and projected launch rates, decay models, and numerical integrations are used to predict distributions that closely resemble the current catalog-particularly in the regions containing most of the debris.

  4. Phase VI Glove Durability Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kathryn C.

    2010-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art space suit gloves, the Phase VI gloves, have an operational life of 25 - 8 hour Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) in a clean, controlled ISS environment. Future planetary outpost missions create the need for space suit gloves which can endure up to 90 - 8 hour traditional EVAs or 576 - 45 minute suit port-based EVAs in a dirty, uncontrolled planetary environment. Prior to developing improved space suit gloves for use in planetary environments, it is necessary to understand how the current state-of-the-art performs in these environments. The Phase VI glove operational life has traditionally been certified through cycle testing consisting of ISS-based tasks in a clean environment, and glove durability while performing planetary EVA tasks in a dirty environment has not previously been characterized. Testing was performed in the spring of 2010 by the NASA Johnson Space Center Crew and Thermal Systems Division to characterize the durability of the Phase VI Glove and identify areas of the glove design which need improvement to meet the requirements of future NASA missions. Lunar simulant was used in this test to help replicate the dirty lunar environment, and generic planetary surface EVA tasks were performed during testing. A total of 50 manned, pressurized test sessions were completed in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) using one pair of Phase VI gloves as the test article. The 50 test sessions were designed to mimic the total amount of pressurized cycling the gloves would experience over a 6 month planetary outpost mission. The gloves were inspected at periodic intervals throughout testing, to assess their condition at various stages in the test and to monitor the gloves for failures. Additionally, motion capture and force data were collected during 18 of the 50 test sessions to assess the accuracy of the cycle model predictions used in testing and to feed into the development of improved cycle model tables. This paper provides a

  5. Phase VI Glove Durability Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kathryn

    2011-01-01

    The current state-of-the-art space suit gloves, the Phase VI gloves, have an operational life of 25 -- 8 hour Extravehicular Activities (EVAs) in a dust free, manufactured microgravity EVA environment. Future planetary outpost missions create the need for space suit gloves which can endure up to 90 -- 8 hour traditional EVAs or 576 -- 45 minute suit port-based EVAs in a dirty, uncontrolled planetary environment. Prior to developing improved space suit gloves for use in planetary environments, it is necessary to understand how the current state-of-the-art performs in these environments. The Phase VI glove operational life has traditionally been certified through cycle testing consisting of International Space Station (ISS)-based EVA tasks in a clean environment, and glove durability while performing planetary EVA tasks in a dirty environment has not previously been characterized. Testing was performed in the spring of 2010 by the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Crew and Thermal Systems Division (CTSD) to characterize the durability of the Phase VI Glove and identify areas of the glove design which need improvement to meet the requirements of future NASA missions. Lunar simulant was used in this test to help replicate the dirty lunar environment, and generic planetary surface EVA tasks were performed during testing. A total of 50 manned, pressurized test sessions were completed in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) using one pair of Phase VI gloves as the test article. The 50 test sessions were designed to mimic the total amount of pressurized cycling the gloves would experience over a 6 month planetary outpost mission. The gloves were inspected periodically throughout testing, to assess their condition at various stages in the test and to monitor the gloves for failures. Additionally, motion capture and force data were collected during 18 of the 50 test sessions to assess the accuracy of the cycle model predictions used in testing and to feed into the

  6. Modeling Jupiter's current disc: Pioneer 10 outbound

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.E.; Melville, J.G. II; Blake, M.L.

    1980-07-01

    The magnetic field of the Jovian current disc has been modeled by using Euler functions and the Biot-Savart law applied to a series of concentric, but not necessarily coplanar, current rings. We find that a best fit to the Pioneer 10 outbound perturbation magnetic field data (B/sub total/-B/sub dipole/) is obtained if the current disc is twisted (outer edges increasingly lag behind inner edges with radial distance) and also bent so as to tend toward parallelism with the Jovigraphic equator. The inner and outer radii of the disc appear to be about 7 R/sub J/ and 150 R/sub J/, respectively, although some indication of a changing magnetopause location is apparent in the data. Because of the observed current disc penetrations, the bent disc also requires a deformation in the form of a bump or wrinkle whose axis tends also to exhibit spiraling. The radial dependence of the azimuthal current in the disc is not described by a simple power law, the outer region showing a smaller power law dependence. Modeling of the azimuthal field shows it to be due to a thin radial current sheet, but there is some evidence that this may, in fact, be due in large part to penetration of a tail current sheet as suggested by the Voyager observations.

  7. Three-dimensional ring current decay model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Moore, Thomas E.; Kozyra, Janet U.; Ho, George C.; Hamilton, Douglas C.

    1995-01-01

    This work is an extension of a previous ring current decay model. In the previous work, a two-dimensional kinetic model was constructed to study the temporal variations of the equatorially mirroring ring current ions, considering charge exchange and Coulomb drag losses along drift paths in a magnetic dipole field. In this work, particles with arbitrary pitch angle are considered. By bounce averaging the kinetic equation of the phase space density, information along magnetic field lines can be inferred from the equator. The three-dimensional model is used to simulate the recovery phase of a model great magnetic storm, similar to that which occurred in early February 1986. The initial distribution of ring current ions (at the minimum Dst) is extrapolated to all local times from AMPTE/CCE spacecraft observations on the dawnside and duskside of the inner magnetosphere spanning the L value range L = 2.25 to 6.75. Observations by AMPTE/CCE of ring current distributions over subsequent orbits during the storm recovery phase are compared to model outputs. In general, the calculated ion fluxes are consistent with observations, except for H(+) fluxes at tens of keV, which are always overestimated. A newly invented visualization idea, designated as a chromogram, is used to display the spatial and energy dependence of the ring current ion differential flux. Important features of storm time ring current, such as day-night asymmetry during injection and drift hole on the dayside at low energies (less than 10 keV), are manifested in the chromogram representation. The pitch angle distribution is well fit by the function, J(sub o)(1 + Ay(sup n)), where y is sine of the equatorial pitch angle. The evolution of the index n is a combined effect of charge exchange loss and particle drift. At low energies (less than 30 keV), both drift dispersion and charge exchange are important in determining n.

  8. Three-dimensional ring current decay model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fok, Mei Ching; Moore, Thomas E.; Kozyra, Janet U.; Ho, George C.; Hamilton, Douglas C.

    1995-06-01

    This work is an extension of a previous ring current decay model. In the previous work, a two-dimensional kinetic model was constructed to study the temporal variations of the equatorially mirroring ring current ions, considering charge exchange and Coulomb drag losses along drift paths in a magnetic dipole field. In this work, particles with arbitrary pitch angle are considered. By bounce averaging the kinetic equation of the phase space density, information along magnetic field lines can be inferred from the equator. The three-dimensional model is used to simulate the recovery phase of a model great magnetic storm, similar to that which occurred in early February 1986. The initial distribution of ring current ions (at the minimum Dst) is extrapolated to all local times from AMPTE/CCE spacecraft observations on the dawnside and duskside of the inner magnetosphere spanning the L value range L=2.25 to 6.75. Observations by AMPTE/CCE of ring current distributions over subsequent orbits during the storm recovery phase are compared to model outputs. In general, the calculated ion fluxes are consistent with observations, except for H+ fluxes at tens of keV, which are always overestimated. A newly invented visualization idea, designated as a chromogram, is used to display the spatial and energy dependence of the ring current ion diifferential flux. Important features of storm time ring current, such as day-night asymmetry during injection and drift hole on the dayside at low energies (<10 keV), are manifested in the chromogram representation. The pitch angle distribution is well fit by the function, j0(1+Ayn), where y is sine of the equatorial pitch angle. The evolution of the index n is a combined effect of charge exchange loss and particle drift. At low energies (<30 keV), both drift dispersion and charge exchange are important in determining n. ©American Geophysical 1995

  9. CODSTRAN: Composite durability structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    CODSTRAN (COmposite Durability STRuctural ANalysis) is an integrated computer program being developed for the prediction of defect growth and fracture of composite structures subjected to service loads and environments. CODSTRAN is briefly described with respect to organization, capabilities and present status. Application of CODSTRAN current capability to a flat composite laminate with a center slit which was subjected to axial tension loading predicted defect growth which is in good agreement with C-scan ultrasonic test records.

  10. Dynamic modeling of lower hybrid current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Ignat, D.W.; Valeo, E.J.; Jardin, S.C.

    1993-10-01

    A computational model of lower hybrid current drive in the presence of an electric field is described and some results are given. Details of geometry, plasma profiles and circuit equations are treated carefully. Two-dimensional velocity space effects are approximated in a one-dimensional Fokker-Planck treatment.

  11. Microscopic models for bridging electrostatics and currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, L.; DeAmbrosis, A.; Mascheretti, P.

    2007-03-01

    A teaching sequence based on the use of microscopic models to link electrostatic phenomena with direct currents is presented. The sequence, devised for high school students, was designed after initial work carried out with student teachers attending a school of specialization for teaching physics at high school, at the University of Pavia. The results obtained with them are briefly presented, because they directed our steps for the development of the teaching sequence. For both the design of the experiments and their interpretation, we drew inspiration from the original works of Alessandro Volta; in addition, a structural model based on the particular role of electrons as elementary charges both in electrostatic phenomena and in currents was proposed. The teaching sequence starts from experiments on charging objects by rubbing and by induction, and engages students in constructing microscopic models to interpret their observations. By using these models and by closely examining the ideas of tension and capacitance, the students acknowledge that a charging (or discharging) process is due to the motion of electrons that, albeit for short time intervals, represent a current. Finally, they are made to see that the same happens in transients of direct current circuits.

  12. Nearshore Operational Model for Rip Current Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sembiring, L. E.; Van Dongeren, A. R.; Van Ormondt, M.; Winter, G.; Roelvink, J.

    2012-12-01

    waves with peak period greater than 7 seconds and propagate relatively from the North. Further investigations will focus on these findings in order to improve model skill during swimming season. The flow model results are analyzed for the dominant tidal constituents. The results show that for tidal amplitude, differences between observation and modeled are in range of 2 cm to maximum 14 cm. For the tidal phase, all stations considered along the Dutch coastline give differences less than 10 degrees between observations and predictions. A local XBeach model for the Egmond aan Zee resort is constructed in order to predict rip currents events. This model is applied during the August 2011 period, where the bathymetry produced by model-data assimilation is compared against surveyed bathymetry. In general, this method is able to produce bathymetry converging towards the observations. An offshore bar exists in the field data can be reproduced by this method. Moreover, it shows a potential ability of depicting rip channels features near the shoreline. Rip currents flow fields simulated over measured and modeled bathymetries are compared in order to assess the performance of the proposed forecast system in terms of offshore rip current strength, location and duration, which are all important information for local life guards. Keywords: operational model, SWAN, Delft3D, bathymetry, Argus, rip currents, XBeach

  13. Current progress in patient-specific modeling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We present a survey of recent advancements in the emerging field of patient-specific modeling (PSM). Researchers in this field are currently simulating a wide variety of tissue and organ dynamics to address challenges in various clinical domains. The majority of this research employs three-dimensional, image-based modeling techniques. Recent PSM publications mostly represent feasibility or preliminary validation studies on modeling technologies, and these systems will require further clinical validation and usability testing before they can become a standard of care. We anticipate that with further testing and research, PSM-derived technologies will eventually become valuable, versatile clinical tools. PMID:19955236

  14. Electrode Models for Electric Current Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    CHENG, KUO-SHENG; ISAACSON, DAVID; NEWELL, J. C.; GISSER, DAVID G.

    2016-01-01

    This paper develops a mathematical model for the physical properties of electrodes suitable for use in electric current computed tomography (ECCT). The model includes the effects of discretization, shunt, and contact impedance. The complete model was validated by experiment. Bath resistivities of 284.0, 139.7, 62.3, 29.5 Ω · cm were studied. Values of “effective” contact impedance z used in the numerical approximations were 58.0, 35.0, 15.0, and 7.5 Ω · cm2, respectively. Agreement between the calculated and experimentally measured values was excellent throughout the range of bath conductivities studied. It is desirable in electrical impedance imaging systems to model the observed voltages to the same precision as they are measured in order to be able to make the highest resolution reconstructions of the internal conductivity that the measurement precision allows. The complete electrode model, which includes the effects of discretization of the current pattern, the shunt effect due to the highly conductive electrode material, and the effect of an “effective” contact impedance, allows calculation of the voltages due to any current pattern applied to a homogeneous resistivity field. PMID:2777280

  15. Highly Dispersed Alloy Catalyst for Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Vivek S. Murthi; Izzo, Elise; Bi, Wu; Guerrero, Sandra; Protsailo, Lesia

    2013-01-08

    Achieving DOE's stated 5000-hr durability goal for light-duty vehicles by 2015 will require MEAs with characteristics that are beyond the current state of the art. Significant effort was placed on developing advanced durable cathode catalysts to arrive at the best possible electrode for high performance and durability, as well as developing manufacturing processes that yield significant cost benefit. Accordingly, the overall goal of this project was to develop and construct advanced MEAs that will improve performance and durability while reducing the cost of PEMFC stacks. The project, led by UTC Power, focused on developing new catalysts/supports and integrating them with existing materials (membranes and gas diffusion layers (GDLs)) using state-of-the-art fabrication methods capable of meeting the durability requirements essential for automotive applications. Specifically, the project work aimed to lower platinum group metals (PGM) loading while increasing performance and durability. Appropriate catalysts and MEA configuration were down-selected that protects the membrane, and the layers were tailored to optimize the movements of reactants and product water through the cell to maximize performance while maintaining durability.

  16. Integrated water resources management of the Ichkeul basin taking into account the durability of its wetland ecosystem using WEAP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabou, M.; Lili-Chabaane, Z.; Gastli, W.; Chakroun, H.; Ben Abdallah, S.; Oueslati, I.; Lasram, F.; Laajimi, R.; Shaiek, M.; Romdhane, M. S.; Mnajja, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Conservation of coastal wetlands in the Mediterranean area is generally faced with development issues. It is the case of Tunisia where the precipitation is irregular in time and space. For the equity of water use (drinking, irrigation), there is a planning at the national level allowing the possibility of water transfer from regions rich in water resources to poor ones. This plan was initially done in Tunisia without taking into account the wetlands ecosystems and their specificities. The main purpose of this study is to find a model able to integrate simultaneously available resources and various water demands within a watershed by taking into account the durability of related wetland ecosystems. It is the case of the Ichkeul basin. This later is situated in northern of Tunisia, having an area of 2080 km2 and rainfall of about 600 mm/year. Downstream this basin, the Ichkeul Lake is characterized by a double alternation of seasonal high water and low salinity in winter and spring and low water levels and high salinity in summer and autumn that makes the Ichkeul an exceptional ecosystem. The originality of this hydrological system of Lake-marsh conditions is related to the presence of aquatic vegetation in the lake and special rich and varied hygrophilic in the marshes that constitutes the main source of food for large migrating water birds. After the construction of three dams on the principle rivers that are feeding the Ichkeul Lake, aiming particularly to supply the local irrigation and the drinking water demand of cities in the north and the east of Tunisia, freshwater inflow to the lake is greatly reduced causing a hydrological disequilibrium that influences the ecological conditions of the different species. Therefore, to ensure the sustainability of the water resources management, it's important to find a trade off between the existing hydrological and ecological systems taking into account water demands of various users (drinking, irrigation fishing, and

  17. Cryogenic Current Lead Analysis Model Program

    SciTech Connect

    1992-01-01

    CCLAMP was developed to provide a tool for tha analysis of superconducting or normal current leads used to supply electricity from a warm interface (usually room temperature) to a device at cryogenic temperatures. It determines the heat leak to the cryogenic connection and the mass flow of the cryogen (typically helium) for the lead and installation modelled. It may be used to thermally optimize a lead design for a particular application. The user provides relevant geometry details to model the electrical (length, diameter, superconducting length) and heat exchanger design of the lead (heat transfer coefficient, heat transfer area). It has a transient analysis capability so that lead transients such as cool down, current ramping, flow disruptions, and control simulations can be performed.

  18. Cryogenic Current Lead Analysis Model Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-01-01

    CCLAMP was developed to provide a tool for tha analysis of superconducting or normal current leads used to supply electricity from a warm interface (usually room temperature) to a device at cryogenic temperatures. It determines the heat leak to the cryogenic connection and the mass flow of the cryogen (typically helium) for the lead and installation modelled. It may be used to thermally optimize a lead design for a particular application. The user provides relevantmore » geometry details to model the electrical (length, diameter, superconducting length) and heat exchanger design of the lead (heat transfer coefficient, heat transfer area). It has a transient analysis capability so that lead transients such as cool down, current ramping, flow disruptions, and control simulations can be performed.« less

  19. Observing and modeling the California Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, A. J.; McWilliams, J. C.; Schneider, N.; Allen, J. S.; Barth, J. A.; Beardsley, R. C.; Chavez, F. P.; Chereskin, T. K.; Edwards, C. A.; Haney, R. L.; Kelly, K. A.; Kindle, J. C.; Ly, L. N.; Moisan, J. R.; Noble, M. A.; Niiler, P. P.; Oey, L. Y.; Schwing, F. B.; Shearman, R. K.; Swenson, M. S.

    The California Current System (CCS) is one of the best sampled ocean regions, yet it remains obscurely understood and inadequately sampled.Technological advances in ocean modeling and observational techniques can now change this situation.Enhanced understanding of the features and dynamics of the CCS can aid fisheries and wildlife management, prediction and abatement of pollution and toxic phytoplankton blooms, atmospheric and climate change forecasts, and shipping and military operations.

  20. The use of plasma ashers and Monte Carlo modeling for the projection of atomic oxygen durability of protected polymers in low Earth orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Auer, Bruce M.; Rutledge, Sharon K.; Degroh, Kim K.; Gebauer, Linda

    1992-01-01

    The results of ground laboratory and in-space exposure of polymeric materials to atomic oxygen has enabled the development of a Monte Carlo computational model which simulates the oxidation processes of both environments. The cost effective projection of long-term low-Earth-orbital durability of protected polymeric materials such as SiO(x)-coated polyimide Kapton photovoltaic array blankets will require ground-based testing to assure power system reliability. Although silicon dioxide thin film protective coatings can greatly extend the useful life of polymeric materials in ground-based testing, the projection of in-space durability based on these results can be made more reliable through the use of modeling which simulates the mechanistic properties of atomic oxygen interaction, and replicates test results in both environments. Techniques to project long-term performance of protected materials, such as the Space Station Freedom solar array blankets, are developed based on ground laboratory experiments, in-space experiments, and computational modeling.

  1. Benchmarking an Unstructured-Grid Model for Tsunami Current Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yinglong J.; Priest, George; Allan, Jonathan; Stimely, Laura

    2016-06-01

    We present model results derived from a tsunami current benchmarking workshop held by the NTHMP (National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program) in February 2015. Modeling was undertaken using our own 3D unstructured-grid model that has been previously certified by the NTHMP for tsunami inundation. Results for two benchmark tests are described here, including: (1) vortex structure in the wake of a submerged shoal and (2) impact of tsunami waves on Hilo Harbor in the 2011 Tohoku event. The modeled current velocities are compared with available lab and field data. We demonstrate that the model is able to accurately capture the velocity field in the two benchmark tests; in particular, the 3D model gives a much more accurate wake structure than the 2D model for the first test, with the root-mean-square error and mean bias no more than 2 cm s-1 and 8 mm s-1, respectively, for the modeled velocity.

  2. First principles process-product models for vitrification of nuclear waste: Relationship of glass composition to glass viscosity, resistivity, liquidus temperature, and durability

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Borosilicate glasses will be used in the USA and in Europe to immobilize radioactive high level liquid wastes (HLLW) for ultimate geologic disposal. Process and product quality models based on glass composition simplify the fabrication of the borosilicate glass while ensuring glass processability and quality. The process model for glass viscosity is based on a relationship between the glass composition and its structural polymerization. The relationship between glass viscosity and electrical resistivity is also shown to relate to glass polymerization. The process model for glass liquidus temperature calculates the solubility of the liquidus phases based on the free energies of formation of the precipitating species. The durability product quality model is based on the calculation of the thermodynamic hydration free energy from the glass composition.

  3. First principles process-product models for vitrification of nuclear waste: Relationship of glass composition to glass viscosity, resistivity, liquidus temperature, and durability

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1991-12-31

    Borosilicate glasses will be used in the USA and in Europe to immobilize radioactive high level liquid wastes (HLLW) for ultimate geologic disposal. Process and product quality models based on glass composition simplify the fabrication of the borosilicate glass while ensuring glass processability and quality. The process model for glass viscosity is based on a relationship between the glass composition and its structural polymerization. The relationship between glass viscosity and electrical resistivity is also shown to relate to glass polymerization. The process model for glass liquidus temperature calculates the solubility of the liquidus phases based on the free energies of formation of the precipitating species. The durability product quality model is based on the calculation of the thermodynamic hydration free energy from the glass composition.

  4. A study of model bivalve siphonal currents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monismith, Stephen G.; Koseff, Jeffrey R.; Thompson, Janet K.; O'Riordan, Catherine A.; Nepf, Heidi M.

    1990-01-01

    We carried out experiments studying the hydrodynamics of bivalve siphonal currents in a laboratory flume. Rather than use living animals, we devised a simple, model siphon pair connected to a pump. Fluorescence-based flow visualization was used to characterize siphon-jet flows for several geometric configurations and flow speeds. These measurements show that the boundary-layer velocity profile, siphon height, siphon pair orientation, and size of siphon structure all affect the vertical distribution of the excurrent flow downstream of the siphon pair and the fraction of excurrent that is refiltered. The observed flows may effect both the clearance rate of an entire population of siphonate bivalves as well as the efficiency of feeding of any individual. Our results imply that field conditions are properly represented in laboratory flume studies of phytoplankton biomass losses to benthic bivalves when the shear velocity and bottom roughness are matched to values found in the field. Numerical models of feeding by a bivalve population should include an effective sink distribution which is created by the combined incurrent-excurrent flow field. Near-bed flows need to be accounted for to properly represent these benthic-pelagic exchanges. We also present velocity measurements made with a laser-Doppler anemometer (LDA) for a single configuration (siphons flush with bed, inlet downstream) that show that the siphonal currents have a significant local effect on the properties of a turbulent boundary layer.

  5. Shallow-water models for gravity currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Patrick James

    Gravity currents, produced by the instantaneous release of a finite volume of dense fluid beneath a layer of lighter fluid and overlying a spatially-varying rigid bottom boundary, are modelled as discontinuous solutions to the systems of nonlinear hyperbolic conservation laws arising from a shallow-water model. Equations of motion for two stably-stratified fluids of constant density are derived for the incompressible Navier-Stokes Equations for small aspect ratio flow in an Eulerian fluid, and the equations are nondimensionalized using a gravity current scaling so that they may be stated as a first order system of partial differential equations. The model equations neglect the effects of turbulence, entrainment, density stratification, and viscosity, but include the Coriolis force, variable topography, and bottom friction. Special cases are stated for one-layer three-dimensional axisymmetric flow, and in the two-dimensional case for flow with a free surface, rigid lid, thin upper or lower layer, or small density differences. These equations are then stated as a nonlinear system of conservation laws. The model equations are classified as hyperbolic, with defined regions of hyperbolicity stated where possible. When in conservation form, discontinuous solutions are considered, and the Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions derived for solutions which are trivial on one side of the shock. The initial release problem is shown to be well-posed by the method of localization. By approximating a gravity current front as a vertical discontinuity, the initial release problem is solved numerically by use of a relaxation method designed for systems of hyperbolic conservation laws and adapted to include boundary conditions and forcing terms. The usefulness of this method is demonstrated by several diagrams which show the effects of bottom slope and friction in the two-dimensional case, and of bottom slope and rotation in the three-dimensional one. Since the relaxation method is

  6. Current Understanding and Remaining Challenges in Modeling Long-Term Degradation of Borosilicate Nuclear Waste Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Vienna, John D.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Gin, Stephane; Inagaki, Yaohiro

    2013-12-01

    Chemical durability is not a single material property that can be uniquely measured. Instead it is the response to a host of coupled material and environmental processes whose rates are estimated by a combination of theory, experiment, and modeling. High-level nuclear waste (HLW) glass is perhaps the most studied of any material yet there remain significant technical gaps regarding their chemical durability. The phenomena affecting the long-term performance of HLW glasses in their disposal environment include surface reactions, transport properties to and from the reacting glass surface, and ion exchange between the solid glass and the surrounding solution and alteration products. The rates of these processes are strongly influenced and are coupled through the solution chemistry, which is in turn influenced by the reacting glass and also by reaction with the near-field materials and precipitation of alteration products. Therefore, those processes must be understood sufficiently well to estimate or bound the performance of HLW glass in its disposal environment over geologic time-scales. This article summarizes the current state of understanding of surface reactions, transport properties, and ion exchange along with the near-field materials and alteration products influences on solution chemistry and glass reaction rates. Also summarized are the remaining technical gaps along with recommended approaches to fill those technical gaps.

  7. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOEpatents

    Schissel, Paul O.; Kennedy, Cheryl E.; Jorgensen, Gary J.; Shinton, Yvonne D.; Goggin, Rita M.

    1994-01-01

    A metallized polymer mirror construction having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate.

  8. Durable metallized polymer mirror

    DOEpatents

    Schissel, P.O.; Kennedy, C.E.; Jorgensen, G.J.; Shinton, Y.D.; Goggin, R.M.

    1994-11-01

    A metallized polymer mirror construction is disclosed having improved durability against delamination and tunneling, comprising: an outer layer of polymeric material; a metal oxide layer underlying the outer layer of polymeric material; a silver reflective layer underneath the metal oxide layer; and a layer of adhesive attaching the silver layer to a substrate. 6 figs.

  9. Lightning return stroke current models with specified channel-base current: A review and comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Nucci, C.A. ); Diendorfer, G.; Uman, M.A. ); Rachidi, F.; Ianoz, M. ); Mazzetti, C. )

    1990-11-20

    The authors compare five lightning return stroke current models, namely, the Bruce-Golde (BG) model, the transmission line (TL) model, the Master, Uman, Lin, and Standler (MULS) model, the Traveling Current Source (TCS) model, and the Modified Transmission Line (MTL) model, by assuming a common current wave shape at the channel base and then calculating the channel currents and charges and the resultant electric and magnetic fields. There are basically two characteristics that distinguish the models, namely, (1) the treatment of the return stroke wave front and (2) the spatial and temporal distribution of charge removed from the leader channel. The TCS model reduces to the BG model when the current injected downward by the traveling current source has an infinite speed. The MULS model is equivalent to the MTL model when the MULS uniform current is assumed to be zero. The BG and TCS models produce sharper initial field peaks than do the TL, MTL, and MULS models. The ratio of the peak field derivative to the peak current derivative is near the ratio of the peak field to the peak current for the MULS and MTL models and is equal for the TL model, whereas for the BG and TCS models the ratio of the peak derivatives is about twice the ratio of the peak field to peak current. The TL model is unrealistic for long-time field calculations due to the fact that no net charge is removed from the channel. The other four models produce overall fields which are reasonable approximations to measured fields from natural lightning even though, for the assumed channel-base current, the BG and TCS models do no reproduce the observed distant-field zero crossing and the MTL and MULS models do not reproduce the magnetic 'hump' observed after the initial field peak at close range. None of the models can reproduce the fine structure observed in the measured fields.

  10. Modeling Earth's Ring Current Using The CIMI Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, J. D., II; Perez, J. D.; Buzulukova, N.; Fok, M. C. H.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's ring current is a result of the injection of charged particles trapped in the magnetosphere from solar storms. The enhancement of the ring current particles produces magnetic depressions and disturbances to the Earth's magnetic field known as geomagnetic storms, which have been modeled using the comprehensive inner magnetosphere-ionosphere (CIMI) model. The purpose of this model is to identify and understand the physical processes that control the dynamics of the geomagnetic storms. The basic procedure was to use the CIMI model for the simulation of 15 storms since 2009. Some of the storms were run multiple times, but with varying parameters relating to the dynamics of the Earth's magnetic field, particle fluxes, and boundary conditions of the inner-magnetosphere. Results and images were placed in the TWINS online catalog page for further analysis and discussion. Particular areas of interest were extreme storm events. A majority of storms simulated had average DST values of -100 nT; these extreme storms exceeded DST values of -200 nT. The continued use of the CIMI model will increase knowledge of the interactions and processes of the inner-magnetosphere as well as lead to a better understanding of extreme solar storm events for the future advancement of space weather physics.

  11. Dark current model for ILC main linac

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.; Romanov, G.; Mokhov, N.V.; Eidelman, Y.; Tam, Wai-Ming; /Indiana U.

    2008-06-01

    In the ILC Main Linac, the dark current electrons, generated in SRF cavity can be accelerated to hundreds of MeV before being kicked out by quadrupoles and thus will originate electromagnetic cascade showers in the surrounding materials. Some of the shower secondaries can return back into vacuum and be re-accelerated again. The preliminary results of simulation of the dark current generation in ILC cavity, its dynamics in linac are discussing in this paper.

  12. Chemical durability of zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trocellier, Patrick; Delmas, Robert

    2001-07-01

    Zircon (ZrSiO 4) exhibits a strong structural affinity for uranium and thorium together with a very high chemical durability. This makes it a potential crystalline host matrix to immobilize actinides issued from separation of nuclear wastes. Irradiation induces amorphization of the crystalline structure (the metamictization process) and thus may decrease the chemical durability of the material. Leaching tests have been conducted on natural zircons from Brazil and Madagascar at 96°C for a period of 1 month, using deionized water. Leachates have been analysed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and UV-visible spectrophotometry. Zircon solid surfaces have been investigated by coupling scanning electron microscopy and X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EDX) with nuclear microprobe analysis ( μPIXE, μRBS and μERDA). From the mass balance between leachates and hydrated surfaces, the probable mechanisms of zircon aqueous alteration are presented and discussed.

  13. Durable superoleophobic polypropylene surfaces.

    PubMed

    Brown, Philip S; Bhushan, Bharat

    2016-08-01

    Polypropylene (PP) is a popular plastic material used in consumer packaging. It would be desirable if such plastic containers were liquid repellent and not so easily fouled by their contents. Existing examples of superoleophobic surfaces typically rely on poorly adhered coatings or delicate surface structures, resulting in poor mechanical durability. Here, we report a facile method for creating superoleophobic PP surfaces via incorporation of nanoparticles (NPs) into the polymer surface. A solvent-NP-PP mixture was spin coated at high temperature to achieve the necessary roughness. Such surfaces were further functionalized with fluorosilane to result in a durable, super-repellent surface. They were also found to exhibit some repellency towards shampoos. This method of incorporating NPs into polymer surfaces could also prove useful in improving the anti-bacterial, mechanical and liquid-repellent properties of plastic devices.This article is part of the themed issue 'Bioinspired hierarchically structured surfaces for green science'. PMID:27354730

  14. Diffusion Decision Model: Current Issues and History.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, Roger; Smith, Philip L; Brown, Scott D; McKoon, Gail

    2016-04-01

    There is growing interest in diffusion models to represent the cognitive and neural processes of speeded decision making. Sequential-sampling models like the diffusion model have a long history in psychology. They view decision making as a process of noisy accumulation of evidence from a stimulus. The standard model assumes that evidence accumulates at a constant rate during the second or two it takes to make a decision. This process can be linked to the behaviors of populations of neurons and to theories of optimality. Diffusion models have been used successfully in a range of cognitive tasks and as psychometric tools in clinical research to examine individual differences. In this review, we relate the models to both earlier and more recent research in psychology. PMID:26952739

  15. Cross-Resistance between Cry1 Proteins in Fall Armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) May Affect the Durability of Current Pyramided Bt Maize Hybrids in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bernardi, Daniel; Salmeron, Eloisa; Horikoshi, Renato Jun; Bernardi, Oderlei; Dourado, Patrick Marques; Carvalho, Renato Assis; Martinelli, Samuel; Head, Graham P.; Omoto, Celso

    2015-01-01

    , indicates that current Cry1-based maize hybrids face a challenge in managing S. frugiperda in Brazil and highlights the importance of effective insect resistance management for these technologies. PMID:26473961

  16. Cross-Resistance between Cry1 Proteins in Fall Armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) May Affect the Durability of Current Pyramided Bt Maize Hybrids in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Daniel; Salmeron, Eloisa; Horikoshi, Renato Jun; Bernardi, Oderlei; Dourado, Patrick Marques; Carvalho, Renato Assis; Martinelli, Samuel; Head, Graham P; Omoto, Celso

    2015-01-01

    , indicates that current Cry1-based maize hybrids face a challenge in managing S. frugiperda in Brazil and highlights the importance of effective insect resistance management for these technologies. PMID:26473961

  17. Energy modelling: Clean grids with current technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, Mark Z.

    2016-05-01

    The need for new energy storage is often seen as an obstacle to integrating renewable electricity into national power systems. Modelling shows that existing technologies could provide significant emissions reductions in the US without the need for storage, however.

  18. Current status: Animal models of nausea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    The advantages, and possible benefits of a valid, reliable animal model for nausea are discussed, and difficulties inherent to the development of a model are considered. A principle problem for developing models arises because nausea is a subjective sensation that can be identified only in humans. Several putative measures of nausea in animals are considered, with more detailed consideration directed to variation in cardiac rate, levels of vasopressin, and conditioned taste aversion. Demonstration that putative measures are associated with reported nausea in humans is proposed as a requirement for validating measures to be used in animal models. The necessity for a 'real-time' measure of nausea is proposed as an important factor for future research; and the need for improved understanding of the neuroanatomy underlying the emetic syndrome is discussed.

  19. 25. CURRENT METERS: GURLEY MODEL NO. 665 AT CENTER, GURLEY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. CURRENT METERS: GURLEY MODEL NO. 665 AT CENTER, GURLEY MODEL NO. 625 'PYGMY' CURRENT METER AT LEFT, AND WES MINIATURE PRICE-TYPE CURRENT METER AT RIGHT. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  20. Micromagnetic modeling with eddy current and current-induced spin torque effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadhwa, P.; Jalil, M. B. A.; Tan, S. G.

    2005-12-01

    We present a micromagnetic model which incorporates eddy current and spin transfer torque effects due to the passage of a spin-polarized current in the current-perpendicular-to-plane (CPP) geometry. Eddy current effects are modeled by solving Faraday's and Poisson's equations self-consistently with the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation, whereas spin transfer torque is modeled by including the Slonczewski spin torque term in the LLG equation. We consider a 50 nm cubic Co element, which forms the free layer of a pseudo-spin-valve structure. With a typical damping parameter of α =0.5, the eddy currents act to accelerate the magnetic reversal process. The spin torque effect can also assist the reversal process but at high current densities exceeding Jext=108A/cm2 onwards. At these current densities, spin transfer torque also causes a substantial reduction in the coercivity.

  1. Observational support for the current sheet catastrophe model of substorm current disruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, G. R.; Lopez, R. E.; Dusenbery, P. B.; Speiser, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    The principles of the current sheet catastrophe models are briefly reviewed, and observations of some of the signatures predicted by the theory are presented. The data considered here include AMPTE/CCE observations of fifteen current sheet disruption events. According to the model proposed here, the root cause of the current disruption is some process, as yet unknown, that leads to an increase in the k sub A parameter. Possible causes for the increase in k sub A are discussed.

  2. 24. CURRENT VELOCITYDIRECTION INDICATOR, AND GURLEY MODEL NO. 665 PRICETYPE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. CURRENT VELOCITY-DIRECTION INDICATOR, AND GURLEY MODEL NO. 665 PRICE-TYPE CURRENT METER. - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  3. Low Cost, Durable Seal

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, George; Parsons, Jason; Friedman, Jake

    2010-12-17

    Seal durability is critical to achieving the 2010 DOE operational life goals for both stationary and transportation PEM fuel cell stacks. The seal material must be chemically and mechanically stable in an environment consisting of aggressive operating temperatures, humidified gases, and acidic membranes. The seal must also be producible at low cost. Currentlyused seal materials do not meet all these requirements. This project developed and demonstrated a high consistency hydrocarbon rubber seal material that was able to meet the DOE technical and cost targets. Significant emphasis was placed on characterization of the material and full scale molding demonstrations.

  4. Current Density and Continuity in Discretized Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boykin, Timothy B.; Luisier, Mathieu; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Discrete approaches have long been used in numerical modelling of physical systems in both research and teaching. Discrete versions of the Schrodinger equation employing either one or several basis functions per mesh point are often used by senior undergraduates and beginning graduate students in computational physics projects. In studying…

  5. Current SPE Hydrodynamic Modeling and Path Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban

    2012-08-14

    Extensive work has been conducted on SPE analysis efforts: Fault effects Non-uniform weathered layer analysis MUNROU: material library incorporation, parallelization, and development of non-locking tets Development of a unique continuum-based-visco-plastic strain-rate-dependent material model With corrected SPE data path is now set for a multipronged approach to fully understand experimental series shot effects.

  6. Multinucleon Ejection Model for Two Body Current Neutrino Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sobczyk, Jan T.; /Fermilab

    2012-06-01

    A model is proposed to describe nucleons ejected from a nucleus as a result of two-body-current neutrino interactions. The model can be easily implemented in Monte Carlo neutrino event generators. Various possibilities to measure the two-body-current contribution are discussed. The model can help identify genuine charge current quasielastic events and allow for a better determination of the systematic error on neutrino energy reconstruction in neutrino oscillation experiments.

  7. Inter-Hemispherical Currents for Realistic Model of Ionospheric Conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyatsky, S.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2013-12-01

    We present results of modeling of the global 3-D ionosphere-magnetosphere current system including in addition to the R1 and R2 field-aligned currents also inter-hemispherical currents. The inter-hemispherical currents flow between Northern and Southern conjugate ionospheres in case of a North-South asymmetry in ionospheric conductivity in two hemispheres. These currents link together the ionospheric currents in two hemispheres, so the currents observed in one hemisphere can provide us with information about currents in the opposite hemisphere, which is especially important when their magnitude can not be obtained from direct observation (e.g., in Antarctica). In this study, we investigate the generation of the inter-hemispherical currents for several distributions of ionospheric conductivity in two hemispheres including a simplified model of ionospheric conductivity, which is important for better understanding of the expected distribution and magnitude of these currents, and a more realistic model of ionospheric conductivity, which is observed during magnetospheric substorms, when the geometry of the inter-hemispherical currents is more complicated. Simulation results show that the inter-hemispherical currents during substorms could play a very significant role, and neglecting these currents does not allow obtaining the correct picture of 3-D magnetosphere-ionosphere current system. These currents are an important part of 3-D field-aligned current system, and they are especially strong during summer-winter months, when they are comparable in magnitude with the R2 currents (about ~0.5 MA). Inter-hemispherical currents map. Left panel is related to Northern hemisphere, right panel to Southern. R1 and R2 currents are not shown; their locations are indicated by the red and blue dashed circles, respectively. The inter-hemispherical currents appear inside the auroral zone in the region of conductivity gradient. The currents in both hemispheres are equal in magnitude and

  8. Prediction of glass durability as a function of environmental conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Jantzen, C M

    1988-01-01

    A thermodynamic model of glass durability is applied to natural, ancient, and nuclear waste glasses. The durabilities of over 150 different natural and man-made glasses, including actual ancient Roman and Islamic glasses (Jalame ca. 350 AD, Nishapur 10-11th century AD and Gorgon 9-11th century AD), are compared. Glass durability is a function of the thermodynamic hydration free energy, ..delta..G/sub hyd/, which can be calculated from glass composition and solution pH. The durability of the most durable nuclear waste glasses examined was /approximately/10/sup 6/ years. The least durable waste glass formulations were comparable in durability to the most durable simulated medieval window glasses of /approximately/10/sup 3/ years. In this manner, the durability of nuclear waste glasses has been interpolated to be /approximately/10/sup 6/ years and no less than 10/sup 3/ years. Hydration thermodynamics have been shown to be applicable to the dissolution of glass in various natural environments. Groundwater-glass interactions relative to geologic disposal of nuclear waste, hydration rind dating of obsidians, andor other archeological studies can be modeled, e.g., the relative durabilities of six simulated medieval window glasses have been correctly predicted for both laboratory (one month) and burial (5 years) experiments. Effects of solution pH on glass dissolution has been determined experimentally for the 150 different glasses and can be predicted theoretically by hydration thermodynamics. The effects of solution redox on dissolution of glass matrix elements such as SI and B have shown to be minimal. The combined effects of solution pH and Eh have been described and unified by construction of thermodynamically calculated Pourbaix (pH-Eh) diagrams for glass dissolution. The Pourbaix diagrams have been quantified to describe glass dissolution as a function of environmental conditions by use of the data derived from hydration thermodynamics. 56 refs., 7 figs.

  9. Nanocomposites for Improved Physical Durability of Porous PVDF Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chi Yan; Groth, Andrew; Gray, Stephen; Duke, Mikel

    2014-01-01

    Current commercial polymer membranes have shown high performance and durability in water treatment, converting poor quality waters to higher quality suitable for drinking, agriculture and recycling. However, to extend the treatment into more challenging water sources containing abrasive particles, micro and ultrafiltration membranes with enhanced physical durability are highly desirable. This review summarises the current limits of the existing polymeric membranes to treat harsh water sources, followed by the development of nanocomposite poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes for improved physical durability. Various types of nanofillers including nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes (CNT) and nanoclays were evaluated for their effect on flux, fouling resistance, mechanical strength and abrasion resistance on PVDF membranes. The mechanisms of abrasive wear and how the more durable materials provide resistance was also explored. PMID:24957121

  10. Quantitative risk assessment of durable glass fibers.

    PubMed

    Fayerweather, William E; Eastes, Walter; Cereghini, Francesco; Hadley, John G

    2002-06-01

    This article presents a quantitative risk assessment for the theoretical lifetime cancer risk from the manufacture and use of relatively durable synthetic glass fibers. More specifically, we estimate levels of exposure to respirable fibers or fiberlike structures of E-glass and C-glass that, assuming a working lifetime exposure, pose a theoretical lifetime cancer risk of not more than 1 per 100,000. For comparability with other risk assessments we define these levels as nonsignificant exposures. Nonsignificant exposure levels are estimated from (a) the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) chronic rat inhalation bioassay of durable E-glass microfibers, and (b) the Research Consulting Company (RCC) chronic inhalation bioassay of durable refractory ceramic fibers (RCF). Best estimates of nonsignificant E-glass exposure exceed 0.05-0.13 fibers (or shards) per cubic centimeter (cm3) when calculated from the multistage nonthreshold model. Best estimates of nonsignificant C-glass exposure exceed 0.27-0.6 fibers/cm3. Estimates of nonsignificant exposure increase markedly for E- and C-glass when non-linear models are applied and rapidly exceed 1 fiber/cm3. Controlling durable fiber exposures to an 8-h time-weighted average of 0.05 fibers/cm3 will assure that the additional theoretical lifetime risk from working lifetime exposures to these durable fibers or shards is kept below the 1 per 100,000 level. Measured airborne exposures to respirable, durable glass fibers (or shards) in glass fiber manufacturing and fabrication operations were compared with the nonsignificant exposure estimates described. Sampling results for B-sized respirable E-glass fibers at facilities that manufacture or fabricate small-diameter continuous-filament products, from those that manufacture respirable E-glass shards from PERG (process to efficiently recycle glass), from milled fiber operations, and from respirable C-glass shards from Flakeglass operations indicate very low median exposures of 0

  11. Modeling of fracture and durability of paste-bonded composite joints subjected to hygro-thermal-mechanical loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David Lee

    The objective of the research is to characterize the behavior of composite/composite joints with paste adhesive using both experimental testing and analytical modeling. In comparison with the conventional tape adhesive, joining composites using paste adhesive provides several advantages. The carbon fiber laminate material systems employed in this study included IM7 carbon fibers and 977-3 epoxy matrix assembled in prepreg tape, and AS4 carbon fibers and 977-3 epoxy matrix as a five-harness satin weave. The adhesive employed was EA 9394 epoxy. All laminates and test specimens were fabricated and inspected by Boeing using their standard propriety procedures. Three types of test specimens were used in the program. They were bonded double-lap shear (DLS), bonded double cantilever beam (DCB) and bonded interlaminar tension (ILT) specimens. A group of specimens were conditioned at elevated temperature and humidity in an environmental chamber at Boeing's facility and their moisture absorption recorded with time. Specimens were tested at room temperature dry and elevated temperatures. DCB and DLS specimens were tested in fatigue as well as static conditions. Two-dimensional finite element models of the three configurations were developed for determining stresses and strains using the ABAQUS finite element package code. Due to symmetry, only the one-half of the specimen needed to be considered thus reducing computational time. The effect of the test fixture is not taken into account instead equivalent distributed stresses are applied directly on the composite laminates. For each of the specimen, the distribution of Mises stress and the first strain invariant J1 are obtained to identify potential failure locations within a specimen.

  12. Modeling coastal current transport in the Gulf of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetland, Robert D.; Signell, Richard P.

    2005-09-01

    A numerical simulation of the circulation in the Gulf of Maine is compared with observations taken during the spring and summer of 1994, focusing on two distinct coastal current systems. The eastern Maine coastal current is well mixed out to approximately 50m depth, with the influence of tidal mixing extending to 100m depth. In contrast, the western Maine coastal current consists mainly of a surface-trapped plume emanating from the Kennebec River. Various methods of model/data comparison are discussed, ranging from qualitative comparisons of surface temperature and currents to quantitative measurements of model skill. In particular, one primary metric of comparison is the amount and distribution of fresh water carried within the coastal current systems. In both coastal current systems, fresh-water flux has an approximately self-similar structure so that measurements taken at a single mooring location may be extrapolated to estimate the entire along-shore fresh-water flux. This self-similar structure is shown to be internally consistent within the model, and results in good model/data comparisons. The model has more skill at predicting fresh-water flux than other point-to-point surface property comparisons in all cases except surface salinity in the western Maine coastal current. This suggests fresh-water flux is a robust feature in the model, and a suitable metric for gauging the model ability to reproduce the broad-scale transport of the Maine coastal current system.

  13. Psychosocial themes in durable employment transitions.

    PubMed

    Allen, Shelley; Carlson, Glenys

    2003-01-01

    Loss of work capacity through illness or injury may result in loss of employment. The transition to durable employment with those reduced capacities poses many challenges. This paper is based on phenomenological research into the experiences of 13 people who had a disabling injury or chronic illness. These participants lost their capacity for their former employment. After a period of time, extending up to 14 years, the participants successfully changed employment in the open labor market, and retained their current employment for 13 weeks or longer. Data from in excess of 30 hours of in-depth semi-structured individual interviews and a focus group were transcribed and analyzed inductively. Analysis was aided by immersion in the data, reflections on entries in a researcher's log, and a computer program for analyzing textual data. Eleven psychosocial themes emerged. These themes were: pain, intense emotions, determination, financial concerns, role models, concealment, assistance, control, self-concept, satisfaction with employment, and personal change. Each theme is presented with representative text from participants and implications for work rehabilitation professionals. Further research to identify the extent of transferability of the findings is recommended. PMID:12775924

  14. Environmental durability of ceramics and ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Dennis S.

    1992-01-01

    An account is given of the current understanding of the environmental durability of both monolithic ceramics and ceramic-matrix composites, with a view to the prospective development of methods for the characterization, prediction, and improvement of ceramics' environmental durability. Attention is given to the environmental degradation behaviors of SiC, Si3N4, Al2O3, and glass-ceramic matrix compositions. The focus of corrosion prevention in Si-based ceramics such as SiC and Si3N4 is on the high and low sulfur fuel combustion-product effects encountered in heat engine applications of these ceramics; sintering additives and raw material impurities are noted to play a decisive role in ceramics' high temperature environmental response.

  15. Factors influencing chemical durability of nuclear waste glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Xiangdong; Bates, J.K.

    1993-03-01

    A short summary is given of our studies on the major factors that affect the chemical durability of nuclear waste glasses. These factors include glass composition, solution composition, SA/V (ratio of glass surface area to the volume of solution), radiation, and colloidal formation. These investigations have enabled us to gain a better understanding of the chemical durability of nuclear waste glasses and to accumulate.a data base for modeling the long-term durability of waste glass, which will be used in the risk assessment of nuclear waste disposal. This knowledge gained also enhances our ability to formulate optimal waste glass compositions.

  16. Factors influencing chemical durability of nuclear waste glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Xiangdong; Bates, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    A short summary is given of our studies on the major factors that affect the chemical durability of nuclear waste glasses. These factors include glass composition, solution composition, SA/V (ratio of glass surface area to the volume of solution), radiation, and colloidal formation. These investigations have enabled us to gain a better understanding of the chemical durability of nuclear waste glasses and to accumulate.a data base for modeling the long-term durability of waste glass, which will be used in the risk assessment of nuclear waste disposal. This knowledge gained also enhances our ability to formulate optimal waste glass compositions.

  17. Impact of Cooling Rate on the Durability of PHA Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, T.B.

    2001-06-04

    This study was conducted to determine the effect, if any, on the PCT responses of glasses cooled at different rates. Two bounding cooling profiles were used in this study: rapidly quenched and a canister centerline cooling curve. Glasses were selected based on a number of criteria, but mainly to challenge the regions where amorphous phase separation is expected based upon current model predictions. The current DWPF homogeneity constraint, imposed to preclude regions of phase separation, predicted that most of the glasses selected would be phase separated. It was, therefore, important to ensure that deleterious phase separation does not occur at either cooling profile. In this case, deleterious phase separation is defined as the formation of an amorphous phase in the glass that significantly decreases the glass durability as measured by the PCT response.

  18. Eddy current modeling of silicon steel for use on SPICE

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Toru; Tahara, Ryoichi

    1995-11-01

    The relation between the equivalent eddy current field He and the instantaneous flux density rate dB/dt is experimentally obtained for current transformers made of silicon steel. The results show that He is proportional to (dB/dt){sup 0.6-0.7} in the operating frequency range ({approximately}100 Hz) of the current transformers. The ac B-H loop calculated by combining the proposed eddy current model with the Jiles-Atherton model agrees well with the measured data. In addition, this combined model allows magnetic component characteristics using SPICE to be simulated. The simulated secondary voltage waveforms of current transformers are in satisfactory agreement with the measured values.

  19. Designing durable icephobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Golovin, Kevin; Kobaku, Sai P R; Lee, Duck Hyun; DiLoreto, Edward T; Mabry, Joseph M; Tuteja, Anish

    2016-03-01

    Ice accretion has a negative impact on critical infrastructure, as well as a range of commercial and residential activities. Icephobic surfaces are defined by an ice adhesion strength τice < 100 kPa. However, the passive removal of ice requires much lower values of τice, such as on airplane wings or power lines (τice < 20 kPa). Such low τice values are scarcely reported, and robust coatings that maintain these low values have not been reported previously. We show that, irrespective of material chemistry, by tailoring the cross-link density of different elastomeric coatings and by enabling interfacial slippage, it is possible to systematically design coatings with extremely low ice adhesion (τice < 0.2 kPa). These newfound mechanisms allow for the rational design of icephobic coatings with virtually any desired ice adhesion strength. By using these mechanisms, we fabricate extremely durable coatings that maintain τice < 10 kPa after severe mechanical abrasion, acid/base exposure, 100 icing/deicing cycles, thermal cycling, accelerated corrosion, and exposure to Michigan wintery conditions over several months. PMID:26998520

  20. Designing durable icephobic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Golovin, Kevin; Kobaku, Sai P. R.; Lee, Duck Hyun; DiLoreto, Edward T.; Mabry, Joseph M.; Tuteja, Anish

    2016-01-01

    Ice accretion has a negative impact on critical infrastructure, as well as a range of commercial and residential activities. Icephobic surfaces are defined by an ice adhesion strength τice < 100 kPa. However, the passive removal of ice requires much lower values of τice, such as on airplane wings or power lines (τice < 20 kPa). Such low τice values are scarcely reported, and robust coatings that maintain these low values have not been reported previously. We show that, irrespective of material chemistry, by tailoring the cross-link density of different elastomeric coatings and by enabling interfacial slippage, it is possible to systematically design coatings with extremely low ice adhesion (τice < 0.2 kPa). These newfound mechanisms allow for the rational design of icephobic coatings with virtually any desired ice adhesion strength. By using these mechanisms, we fabricate extremely durable coatings that maintain τice < 10 kPa after severe mechanical abrasion, acid/base exposure, 100 icing/deicing cycles, thermal cycling, accelerated corrosion, and exposure to Michigan wintery conditions over several months. PMID:26998520

  1. Modeled and Observed Transitions Between Rip Currents and Alongshore Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, M.; Elgar, S.; Warner, J. C.; Raubenheimer, B.

    2014-12-01

    Predictions of rip currents, alongshore currents, and the temporal transitions between these circulation patterns are important for swimmer safety and for estimating the transport of sediments, biota, and pollutants in the nearshore. Here, field observations are combined with hydrodynamic modeling to determine the dominant processes that lead rip currents to turn on and off with changing waves, bathymetry, and tidal elevation. Waves, currents, mean sea levels, and bathymetry were measured near and within five shore-perpendicular channels (on average 2-m deep, 30-m wide) that were dredged with the propellers of a landing craft at different times on a long straight Atlantic Ocean beach near Duck, NC in summer 2012. The circulation was measured for a range of incident wave conditions and channel sizes, and included rapid transitions between strong (0.5 to 1 m/s) rip current jets flowing offshore through the channels and alongshore currents flowing across the channels with no rip currents. Meandering alongshore currents (alongshore currents combined with an offshore jet at the downstream edge of the channel) also were observed. Circulation patterns near and within idealized rip channels simulated with COAWST (a three-dimensional phase-averaged model that couples ROMS and SWAN) are compared with the observations. In addition, the model is used to investigate the hydrodynamic response to a range of wave conditions (angle, height, period) and bathymetries (channel width, depth, and length; tidal elevations; shape of sandbar or terrace). Rip current speeds are largest for the deepest perturbations, and decrease as incident wave angles become more oblique. For obliquely incident waves, the rip currents are shifted in the direction of the alongshore flow, with an increasing shift for increasing alongshore current speed or increasing bathymetric perturbation depth.

  2. Ring Current Modeling in a Realistic Magnetic Field Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, M.-C.; Moore, T. E.

    1997-01-01

    A 3-dimensional kinetic model has been developed to study the dynamics of the storm time ring current in a dipole magnetic field. In this paper, the ring current model is extended to include a realistic, time-varying magnetic field model. The magnetic field is expressed as the cross product of the gradients of two Euler potentials and the bounce-averaged particle drifts are calculated in the Euler potential coordinates. A dipolarization event is modeled by collapsing a tail-like magnetosphere to a dipole-like configuration. Our model is able to simulate the sudden enhancements in the ring current ion fluxes and the corresponding ionospheric precipitation during the substorm expansion.

  3. Current concepts in Alzheimer's Disease: molecules, models and translational perspectives.

    PubMed

    Rutten, Bart P F; Steinbusch, Harry W M

    2013-01-01

    The field of neuroscience research in AD has been evolving rapidly over the last few years, and has pinpointed a number of candidate targets for molecules with crucial role in the pathophysiology of AD. Recent developments have furthermore enabled new ways of modeling the disease, while an increasing number of preclinically validated targets is currently being taken one step forward and tested in clinical trials. These recent developments are reviewed in the current Special Issues Series on "Current concepts in Alzheimer's disease research: molecules, models and translational perspectives" in a number of state-of-the-art manuscripts. PMID:24148188

  4. Residential energy demand models: Current status and future improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peabody, G.

    1980-12-01

    Two models currently used to analyze energy use by the residential sector are described. The ORNL model is used to forecast energy use by fuel type for various end uses on a yearly basis. The MATH/CHRDS model analyzes variations in energy expenditures by households of various socioeconomic and demographic characteristics. The essential features of the ORNL and MATH/CHRDS models are retained in a proposed model and integrated into a framework that is more flexible than either model. The important determinants of energy use by households are reviewed.

  5. Durability evaluation of reversible solid oxide cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; O'Brien, James E.; O'Brien, Robert C.; Housley, Gregory K.

    2013-11-01

    An experimental investigation on the performance and durability of single solid oxide cells (SOCs) is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory. Reversible operation of SOCs includes electricity generation in the fuel cell mode and hydrogen generation in the electrolysis mode. Degradation is a more significant issue when operating SOCs in the electrolysis mode. In order to understand and mitigate the degradation issues in high temperature electrolysis, single SOCs with different configurations from several manufacturers have been evaluated for initial performance and long-term durability. Cells were obtained from four industrial partners. Cells from Ceramatec Inc. and Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI) showed improved durability in electrolysis mode compared to previous stack tests. Cells from Saint Gobain Advanced Materials Inc. (St. Gobain) and SOFCPower Inc. demonstrated stable performance in the fuel cell mode, but rapid degradation in the electrolysis mode, especially at high current density. Electrolyte-electrode delamination was found to have a significant impact on degradation in some cases. Enhanced bonding between electrolyte and electrode and modification of the electrode microstructure helped to mitigate degradation. Polarization scans and AC impedance measurements were performed during the tests to characterize cell performance and degradation.

  6. Durability Evaluation of Reversible Solid Oxide Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaoyu Zhang; James E. O'Brien; Robert C. O'Brien; Gregory K. Housley

    2013-11-01

    An experimental investigation on the performance and durability of single solid oxide cells (SOCs) is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory. Reversible operation of SOCs includes electricity generation in the fuel cell mode and hydrogen generation in the electrolysis mode. Degradation is a more significant issue when operating SOCs in the electrolysis mode. In order to understand and mitigate the degradation issues in high temperature electrolysis, single SOCs with different configurations from several manufacturers have been evaluated for initial performance and long-term durability. A new test apparatus for single cell and small stack tests has been developed for this purpose. Cells were obtained from four industrial partners. Cells from Ceramatec Inc. and Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI) showed improved durability in electrolysis mode compared to previous stack tests. Cells from Saint Gobain Advanced Materials Inc. (St. Gobain) and SOFCPower Inc. demonstrated stable performance in the fuel cell mode, but rapid degradation in the electrolysis mode, especially at high current density. Electrolyte-electrode delamination was found to have a significant impact on degradation in some cases. Enhanced bonding between electrolyte and electrode and modification of the electrode microstructure helped to mitigate degradation. Polarization scans and AC impedance measurements were performed during the tests to characterize cell performance and degradation.

  7. Teaching Direct Current Theory Using a Field Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocklmayer, Susan

    2010-01-01

    Principles of direct current have long been recognised in the literature as presenting difficulties for learners. Most of these difficulties have been reported in the context of the traditional electron flow model. In this paper, an alternative approach for high school students using a field model is explored. Findings from a range of short pilot…

  8. A nonlinear viscoelastic approach to durability predictions for polymer based composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinson, Hal F.; Hiel, C. C.

    1990-01-01

    Current industry approaches for the durability assessment of metallic structures are briefly reviewed. For polymer based composite structures, it is suggested that new approaches must be adopted to include memory or viscoelastic effects which could lead to delayed failures that might not be predicted using current techniques. A durability or accelerated life assessment plan for fiber reinforced plastics (FRP) developed and documented over the last decade or so is reviewed and discussed. Limitations to the plan are outlined and suggestions to remove the limitations are given. These include the development of a finite element code to replace the previously used lamination theory code and the development of new specimen geometries to evaluate delamination failures. The new DCB model is reviewed and results are presented. Finally, it is pointed out that new procedures are needed to determine interfacial properties and current efforts underway to determine such properties are reviewed. Suggestions for additional efforts to develop a consistent and accurate durability predictive approach for FRP structures is outlined.

  9. Phenomenological Model of Current Sheet Canting in Pulsed Electromagnetic Accelerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markusic, Thomas; Choueiri, E. Y.

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenon of current sheet canting in pulsed electromagnetic accelerators is the departure of the plasma sheet (that carries the current) from a plane that is perpendicular to the electrodes to one that is skewed, or tipped. Review of pulsed electromagnetic accelerator literature reveals that current sheet canting is a ubiquitous phenomenon - occurring in all of the standard accelerator geometries. Developing an understanding of current sheet canting is important because it can detract from the propellant sweeping capabilities of current sheets and, hence, negatively impact the overall efficiency of pulsed electromagnetic accelerators. In the present study, it is postulated that depletion of plasma near the anode, which results from axial density gradient induced diamagnetic drift, occurs during the early stages of the discharge, creating a density gradient normal to the anode, with a characteristic length on the order of the ion skin depth. Rapid penetration of the magnetic field through this region ensues, due to the Hall effect, leading to a canted current front ahead of the initial current conduction channel. In this model, once the current sheet reaches appreciable speeds, entrainment of stationary propellant replenishes plasma in the anode region, inhibiting further Hall-convective transport of the magnetic field; however, the previously established tilted current sheet remains at a fairly constant canting angle for the remainder of the discharge cycle, exerting a transverse J x B force which drives plasma toward the cathode and accumulates it there. This proposed sequence of events has been incorporated into a phenomenological model. The model predicts that canting can be reduced by using low atomic mass propellants with high propellant loading number density; the model results are shown to give qualitative agreement with experimentally measured canting angle mass dependence trends.

  10. Modeling the Inner Magnetosphere: Radiation Belts, Ring Current, and Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glocer, Alex

    2011-01-01

    The space environment is a complex system defined by regions of differing length scales, characteristic energies, and physical processes. It is often difficult, or impossible, to treat all aspects of the space environment relative to a particular problem with a single model. In our studies, we utilize several models working in tandem to examine this highly interconnected system. The methodology and results will be presented for three focused topics: 1) Rapid radiation belt electron enhancements, 2) Ring current study of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs), Dst, and plasma composition, and 3) Examination of the outflow of ionospheric ions. In the first study, we use a coupled MHD magnetosphere - kinetic radiation belt model to explain recent Akebono/RDM observations of greater than 2.5 MeV radiation belt electron enhancements occurring on timescales of less than a few hours. In the second study, we present initial results of a ring current study using a newly coupled kinetic ring current model with an MHD magnetosphere model. Results of a dst study for four geomagnetic events are shown. Moreover, direct comparison with TWINS ENA images are used to infer the role that composition plays in the ring current. In the final study, we directly model the transport of plasma from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere. We especially focus on the role of photoelectrons and and wave-particle interactions. The modeling methodology for each of these studies will be detailed along with the results.

  11. Application of heat flow models to SOI current mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Feixia; Cheng, Ming-C.

    2004-11-01

    An analytical heat flow model for SOI circuits is presented. The model is able to account for heat exchanges among devices and heat loss from the silicon film and interconnects to the substrate through the buried oxide. The developed model can accurately and efficiently predict the temperature distribution in the interconnect/poly-lines and SOI devices. The model is applied to SOI current mirrors to study heat flow in different layout designs. The results from the developed model are verified with those from Raphael, a 3D numerical simulator that can provide the detailed 3D temperature distribution in interconnect/poly-lines.

  12. Currents, charges, and canonical structure of pseudodual chiral models

    SciTech Connect

    Curtright, T. ); Zachos, C. )

    1994-05-15

    We discuss the pseudodual chiral model to illustrate a class of two-dimensional theories which have an infinite number of conservation laws but allow particle production, at variance with naive expectations. We describe the symmetries of the pseudodual model, both local and nonlocal, as transmutations of the symmetries of the usual chiral model. We refine the conventional algorithm to more efficiently produce the nonlocal symmetries of the model, and we discuss the complete local current algebra for the pseudodual theory. We also exhibit the canonical transformation which connects the usual chiral model to its fully equivalent dual, further distinguishing the pseudodual theory.

  13. PEM fuel cell durability studies

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, Rodney L; Davey, John R; Ofstad, Axel B; Xu, Hui

    2008-01-01

    The durability of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization for stationary and transportation power applications. For transportation applications, the durability target for fuel cell power systems is a 5,000 hour lifespan and able to function over a range of vehicle operating conditions (-40{sup o} to +40{sup o}C). However, durability is difficult to quantify and improve because of the quantity and duration of testing required, and also because the fuel cell stack contains many components, for which the degradation mechanisms, component interactions and effects of operating conditions are not fully understood. These requirements have led to the development of accelerated testing protocols for PEM fuel cells. The need for accelerated testing methodology is exemplified by the times required for standard testing to reach their required targets: automotive 5,000 hrs = {approx} 7 months; stationary systems 40,000 hrs = {approx} 4.6 years. As new materials continue to be developed, the need for relevant accelerated testing increases. In this investigation, we examine the durability of various cell components, examine the effect of transportation operating conditions (potential cycling, variable RH, shut-down/start-up, freeze/thaw) and evaluate durability by accelerated durability protocols. PEM fuel cell durability testing is performed on single cells, with tests being conducted with steady-state conditions and with dynamic conditions using power cycling to simulate a vehicle drive cycle. Component and single-cell characterization during and after testing was conducted to identify changes in material properties and related failure mechanisms. Accelerated-testing experiments were applied to further examine material degradation.

  14. Numerical Model for Conduction-Cooled Current Lead Heat Loads

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.J.; Wang, X.L.; Brueck, H.D.; /DESY

    2011-06-10

    Current leads are utilized to deliver electrical power from a room temperature junction mounted on the vacuum vessel to a superconducting magnet located within the vacuum space of a cryostat. There are many types of current leads used at laboratories throughout the world; however, conduction-cooled current leads are often chosen for their simplicity and reliability. Conduction-cooled leads have the advantage of using common materials, have no superconducting/normal state transition, and have no boil-off vapor to collect. This paper presents a numerical model for conduction-cooled current lead heat loads. This model takes into account varying material and fluid thermal properties, varying thicknesses along the length of the lead, heat transfer in the circumferential and longitudinal directions, electrical power dissipation, and the effect of thermal intercepts. The model is validated by comparing the numerical model results to ideal cases where analytical equations are valid. In addition, the XFEL (X-Ray Free Electron Laser) prototype current leads are modeled and compared to the experimental results from testing at DESY's XFEL Magnet Test Stand (XMTS) and Cryomodule Test Bench (CMTB).

  15. Durably controlling bovine hypodermosis.

    PubMed

    Boulard, Chantal

    2002-01-01

    Cattle hypodermosis, due to insect larvae, is widely spread over the northern hemisphere. Very efficient insecticides are available and their use in most countries are done on an individual level but never cover the whole cattle population of a country. Untreated animals remain the reservoir of the disease and annually re-infest the cattle population. The economic effects of this disease on animal production (meat, milk and the leather industry) but also on the general cattle health status, have led many European countries to launch organised control programs. The first example of definitive hypodermosis control goes back one hundred years ago when Danish farmers eradicated hypodermosis from the Danish islands by manual elimination of the warbles. Since then, more and more European countries have considered the feasibility and economic returns of such programs. The various factors which foster these programs are related to (i) biological factors, (parasite cattle specificity, synchronous biological cycles of both species of insects involved), (ii) the development of more and more efficient insecticides used only once a year by systemic application, with high efficiency at very low dosages against the first larval stage of Hypoderma spp., (iii) the development of acute techniques of detection of the disease for the monitoring of hypodermosis free countries and (iv) the durable successful results obtained in more and more European countries. Although the programs were imposed by different partners of the livestock channel production (farmers, dairy industry, leather industry) and have been engaged within the last 50 years in many European countries (Denmark, The Netherlands, Ireland, the United Kingdom, the Czech Republic, Germany, France and Switzerland) common features have emerged among these different eradication programs. They all need a preliminary statement of the economic impact of this pest and the farmers' awareness of the economic returns of such programs

  16. Meson exchange current (MEC) models in neutrino interaction generators

    SciTech Connect

    Katori, Teppei

    2015-05-15

    Understanding of the so-called 2 particle-2 hole (2p-2h) effect is an urgent program in neutrino interaction physics for current and future oscillation experiments. Such processes are believed to be responsible for the event excesses observed by recent neutrino experiments. The 2p-2h effect is dominated by the meson exchange current (MEC), and is accompanied by a 2-nucleon emission from the primary vertex, instead of a single nucleon emission from the charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) interaction. Current and future high resolution experiments can potentially nail down this effect. For this reason, there are world wide efforts to model and implement this process in neutrino interaction simulations. In these proceedings, I would like to describe how this channel is modeled in neutrino interaction generators.

  17. Probability of detection models for eddy current NDE methods

    SciTech Connect

    Rajesh, S.N.

    1993-04-30

    The development of probability of detection (POD) models for a variety of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods is motivated by a desire to quantify the variability introduced during the process of testing. Sources of variability involved in eddy current methods of NDE include those caused by variations in liftoff, material properties, probe canting angle, scan format, surface roughness and measurement noise. This thesis presents a comprehensive POD model for eddy current NDE. Eddy current methods of nondestructive testing are used widely in industry to inspect a variety of nonferromagnetic and ferromagnetic materials. The development of a comprehensive POD model is therefore of significant importance. The model incorporates several sources of variability characterized by a multivariate Gaussian distribution and employs finite element analysis to predict the signal distribution. The method of mixtures is then used for estimating optimal threshold values. The research demonstrates the use of a finite element model within a probabilistic framework to the spread in the measured signal for eddy current nondestructive methods. Using the signal distributions for various flaw sizes the POD curves for varying defect parameters have been computed. In contrast to experimental POD models, the cost of generating such curves is very low and complex defect shapes can be handled very easily. The results are also operator independent.

  18. Community Benchmarking of Tsunami-Induced Nearshore Current Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynett, P. J.; Wilson, R. I.; Gately, K.

    2015-12-01

    To help produce accurate and consistent maritime hazard products, the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) Strategic Plan includes a requirement to develop and run a benchmarking workshop to evaluate the numerical tsunami modeling of currents. For this workshop, five different benchmarking datasets were organized. These datasets were selected based on characteristics such as geometric complexity, currents that are shear/separation driven (and thus are de-coupled from the incident wave forcing), tidal coupling, and interaction with the built environment. While tsunami simulation models have generally been well validated against wave height and runup, comparisons with speed data are much less common. As model results are increasingly being used to estimate or indicate damage to coastal infrastructure, understanding the accuracy and precision of speed predictions becomes of important. As a result of this 2-day workshop held in early 2015, modelers now have a better awareness of their ability to accurately capture the physics of tsunami currents, and therefore a better understanding of how to use these simulation tools for hazard assessment and mitigation efforts. In this presentation, the model results - from 14 different modelers - will be presented and summarized, with a focus on statistical and ensemble properties of the current predictions.

  19. Current noise of the interacting resonant level model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T. J.; Kennes, D. M.; Meden, V.

    2016-02-01

    We study the zero-frequency current noise of the interacting resonant level model for arbitrary bias voltages using a functional renormalization group approach. For this we extend the existing nonequilibrium scheme by deriving and solving flow equations for the current-vertex functions. On-resonance artificial divergences of the latter found in lowest-order perturbation theory in the two-particle interaction are consistently removed. Away from resonance they are shifted to higher orders. This allows us to gain a comprehensive picture of the current noise in the scaling limit. At high bias voltages, the current noise exhibits a universal power-law decay, whose exponent is, to leading order in the interaction, identical to that of the current. The effective charge on resonance is analyzed in detail, employing properties of the vertex correction. We find that it is only modified to second or higher order in the two-particle interaction.

  20. Cathode fall model and current-voltage characteristics of field emission driven direct current microplasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy

    2013-11-15

    The post-breakdown characteristics of field emission driven microplasma are studied theoretically and numerically. A cathode fall model assuming a linearly varying electric field is used to obtain equations governing the operation of steady state field emission driven microplasmas. The results obtained from the model by solving these equations are compared with particle-in-cell with Monte Carlo collisions simulation results for parameters including the plasma potential, cathode fall thickness, ion number density in the cathode fall, and current density vs voltage curves. The model shows good overall agreement with the simulations but results in slightly overpredicted values for the plasma potential and the cathode fall thickness attributed to the assumed electric field profile. The current density vs voltage curves obtained show an arc region characterized by negative slope as well as an abnormal glow discharge characterized by a positive slope in gaps as small as 10 μm operating at atmospheric pressure. The model also retrieves the traditional macroscale current vs voltage theory in the absence of field emission.

  1. (Durability of building materials and components)

    SciTech Connect

    Naus, D.J.

    1990-11-27

    The traveler participated in the fourth meeting of RILEM 100-TSL, Techniques for Service Life Prediction,'' and The Fifth International Conference on Durability of Building Materials and Components.'' In addition, the traveler met with staff members at Taywood Engineering Ltd., Electricite de France, and AEA Technology. The meeting pertained to performance of concrete materials in nuclear power plant structures, time variation of concrete material properties, methods for evaluating concrete structures, and modeling to predict the effects of degradation factors on concrete materials. As many of the concrete structures in general civil engineering applications as well as nuclear power plant applications in Europe are aging, there is increasing emphasis on assessing the durability of these structures. Information was provided of direct application to the Structural Aging Program which would not have been available without these visits. Of equal, or possibly more importance, was the individual contacts established at the organizations visited. Each organization was extremely interested in both the approach and scope of the Structural Aging Program and requested that they be informed of progress. The initial steps were taken to cooperate with several of these researchers and this should help the Structural Aging Program keep abreast of related European activities. In summary, information obtained during this trip will benefit the ongoing Structural Aging Program by informing Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) of the extensive European research programs addressing the durability of concrete structures, and also by forming and strengthening acquaintances with counterparts in other countries, thus enhancing the basis for possible international cooperation.

  2. Inverse problem for the current loop model: Possibilities and restrictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demina, I. M.; Farafonova, Yu. G.

    2016-07-01

    The possibilities of determining arbitrary current loop parameters based on the spatial structures of the magnetic field components generated by this loop on a sphere with a specified radius have been considered with the use of models. The model parameters were selected such that anomalies created by current loops on a sphere with a radius of 6378 km would be comparable in value with the different-scale anomalies of the observed main geomagnetic field (MGF). The least squares method was used to solve the inverse problem. Estimates close to the specified values were obtained for all current loop parameters except the current strength and radius. The radius determination error can reach ±120 km; at the same time, the magnetic moment value is determined with an accuracy of ±1%. The resolvability of the current force and radius can to a certain degree be improved by decreasing the observation sphere radius such that the ratio of the source distance to the current loop radius would be at least smaller than eight, which can be difficult to reach when modeling MGF.

  3. Structure of High Latitude Currents in Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltberger, M.; Rigler, E. J.; Merkin, V.; Lyon, J. G.

    2016-07-01

    Using three resolutions of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global magnetosphere-ionosphere model (LFM) and the Weimer 2005 empirical model we examine the structure of the high latitude field-aligned current patterns. Each resolution was run for the entire Whole Heliosphere Interval which contained two high speed solar wind streams and modest interplanetary magnetic field strengths. Average states of the field-aligned current (FAC) patterns for 8 interplanetary magnetic field clock angle directions are computed using data from these runs. Generally speaking the patterns obtained agree well with results obtained from the Weimer 2005 computing using the solar wind and IMF conditions that correspond to each bin. As the simulation resolution increases the currents become more intense and narrow. A machine learning analysis of the FAC patterns shows that the ratio of Region 1 (R1) to Region 2 (R2) currents decreases as the simulation resolution increases. This brings the simulation results into better agreement with observational predictions and the Weimer 2005 model results. The increase in R2 current strengths also results in the cross polar cap potential (CPCP) pattern being concentrated in higher latitudes. Current-voltage relationships between the R1 and CPCP are quite similar at the higher resolution indicating the simulation is converging on a common solution. We conclude that LFM simulations are capable of reproducing the statistical features of FAC patterns.

  4. A Dynamic Coupled Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Ring Current Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pembroke, Asher

    In this thesis we describe a coupled model of Earth's magnetosphere that consists of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation, the MIX ionosphere solver and the Rice Convection Model (RCM). We report some results of the coupled model using idealized inputs and model parameters. The algorithmic and physical components of the model are described, including the transfer of magnetic field information and plasma boundary conditions to the RCM and the return of ring current plasma properties to the LFM. Crucial aspects of the coupling include the restriction of RCM to regions where field-line averaged plasma-beta ¡=1, the use of a plasmasphere model, and the MIX ionosphere model. Compared to stand-alone MHD, the coupled model produces a substantial increase in ring current pressure and reduction of the magnetic field near the Earth. In the ionosphere, stronger region-1 and region-2 Birkeland currents are seen in the coupled model but with no significant change in the cross polar cap potential drop, while the region-2 currents shielded the low-latitude convection potential. In addition, oscillations in the magnetic field are produced at geosynchronous orbit with the coupled code. The diagnostics of entropy and mass content indicate that these oscillations are associated with low-entropy flow channels moving in from the tail and may be related to bursty bulk flows and bubbles seen in observations. As with most complex numerical models, there is the ongoing challenge of untangling numerical artifacts and physics, and we find that while there is still much room for improvement, the results presented here are encouraging. Finally, we introduce several new methods for magnetospheric visualization and analysis, including a fluid-spatial volume for RCM and a field-aligned analysis mesh for the LFM. The latter allows us to construct novel visualizations of flux tubes, drift surfaces, topological boundaries, and bursty-bulk flows.

  5. Intermediate Ethanol Blends Catalyst Durability Program

    SciTech Connect

    West, Brian H; Sluder, Scott; Knoll, Keith; Orban, John; Feng, Jingyu

    2012-02-01

    In the summer of 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends (also known as mid-level blends) on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program was to develop information important to assessing the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals for the use of renewable fuels. Through a wide range of experimental activities, DOE is evaluating the effects of E15 and E20 - gasoline blended with 15% and 20% ethanol - on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials. This report provides the results of the catalyst durability study, a substantial part of the overall test program. Results from additional projects will be reported separately. The principal purpose of the catalyst durability study was to investigate the effects of adding up to 20% ethanol to gasoline on the durability of catalysts and other aspects of the emissions control systems of vehicles. Section 1 provides further information about the purpose and context of the study. Section 2 describes the experimental approach for the test program, including vehicle selection, aging and emissions test cycle, fuel selection, and data handling and analysis. Section 3 summarizes the effects of the ethanol blends on emissions and fuel economy of the test vehicles. Section 4 summarizes notable unscheduled maintenance and testing issues experienced during the program. The appendixes provide additional detail about the statistical models used in the analysis, detailed statistical analyses, and detailed vehicle specifications.

  6. Total Storm Conduction Currents Derived Using a Global Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalb, C. P.; Deierling, W.; Peterson, M. J.; Liu, C.

    2015-12-01

    Electrified clouds are known to play a major role in the global electric circuit. These clouds produce upward currents from the top of thunderstorms which help maintain the potential difference between earth's surface and the upper atmosphere. Previously, currents for different types of electrified clouds were estimated from overflights of the NASA ER-2 aircraft and compared with radar derived dynamical and microphysical properties. In this study, model output from two simulations of the Community Earth System Model (CESM) are compared with conduction currents and other data derived from the lightning imaging sensor (LIS) and precipitation radar (RP) onboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite. The intention is to determine CESM's skill at representing these microphysical and dynamical properties of storms as well as to infer the global distributions of conduction currents over different spatial scales. Several variables from CESM were examined, including convective mass flux, in cloud ice water path, and convective precipitation. All three variables show a relationship with the derived currents based on TRMM measurements, yet these vary across different regimes and spatial scales. As will be shown, using the derived relationships, the total conduction current from CESM represents averaged diurnal variations of the fair weather electric field well. Also, averaged annual, monthly and diurnal variations of conduction currents will be shown for different regions of the world.

  7. A three-dimensional ring current decay model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, Mei-Ching; Moore, Thomas E.; Kozyra, Janet U.; Ho, George C.; Hamilton, Douglas C.

    1994-01-01

    This work is an extension of a previous ring current decay model. In the previous work, a two-dimensional kinetic model was constructed to study the temporal variations of the equatorially mirroring ring current ions, considering charge exchange and Coulomb drag losses along drift paths in a magnetic dipole field. In this work, particles with arbitrary pitch angle are considered. By bounce averaging the kinetic equation of the phase space density, information along magnetic field lines can be inferred from the equator. The three-dimensional model is used to simulate the recovery phase of a model great magnetic storm, similar to that which occurred in early February 1986. The initial distribution of ring current ions (at the minimum Dst) is extrapolated to all local times from AMPTE/CCE spacecraft observations on the dawn and dusk sides of the inner magnetosphere spanning the L value range L = 2.25 to 6.75. Observations by AMPTE/CCE of ring current distributions over subsequent orbits during the storm recovery phase are compared to model outputs. In general, the calculated ion fluxes are consistent with observations, except for H+ fluxes at tens of keV, which are always over-estimated. A newly-invented visualization idea, designated as a chromogram, is used to display the spatial and energy dependence of the ring current ion differential flux. Important features of storm-time ring current, such as day-night asymmetry during injection and drift hole on the dayside at low energies (less than 10 keV), are manifested in the chromogram representation. The pitch angle distribution is well fit by the function, j(sub o)(1+Ay(exp n)), where y is sine of the equatorial pitch angle. The evolution of the index n is a combined effect of charge exchange loss and particle drift. At low energies (less than 30 keV), both drift dispersion and charge exchange are important in determining n.

  8. Finite element modeling of pulsed eddy current NDT phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.; Ida, N.; Lord, W.

    1985-05-15

    Transient fields for nondestructive testing (pulsed eddy current methods) have been used experimentally for such applications as coating thickness measurements and the inspection of reactor fuel tubing. The lack of suitable models to facilitate understanding of the interaction of the pulsed field with the test specimen has hindered a wider acceptance of the method as a tool in NDT. Two models, based on the finite element technique are described. The first model, used for repetitive pulse train sources makes use of the Fourier series of the source current to solve a steady state problem for each significant harmonic. The harmonic solutions are then summed to produce the total EMF in the pickup coil. The second model is used for single pulse application. The response is calculated using an iterative time stepping solution. In both cases axisymmetric geometries are studied using a magnetic vector potential formulation. Solutions are compared with experimental results. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Relativistic quantum model of confinement and the current quark masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, L. D.

    1998-08-01

    We consider a relativistic quantum model of confined massive spinning quarks and antiquarks which describes the leading Regge trajectories of mesons. The quarks are described by the Dirac equations and the gluon contribution is approximated by the Nambu-Goto straight-line string. The string tension and the current quark masses are the main parameters of the model. Additional parameters are phenomenological constants which approximate nonstring short-range contributions. A comparison of the measured meson masses with the model predictions allows one to determine the current quark masses (in MeV) to be ms=227+/-5, mc=1440+/-10, and mb=4715+/-20. The chiral SU3 model makes it possible to estimate from here the u- and d-quark masses to be mu=6.2+/-0.2 Mev and md=11.1+/-0.4 Mev.

  10. Modelling of current loads on aquaculture net cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristiansen, Trygve; Faltinsen, Odd M.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we propose and discuss a screen type of force model for the viscous hydrodynamic load on nets. The screen model assumes that the net is divided into a number of flat net panels, or screens. It may thus be applied to any kind of net geometry. In this paper we focus on circular net cages for fish farms. The net structure itself is modelled by an existing truss model. The net shape is solved for in a time-stepping procedure that involves solving a linear system of equations for the unknown tensions at each time step. We present comparisons to experiments with circular net cages in steady current, and discuss the sensitivity of the numerical results to a set of chosen parameters. Satisfactory agreement between experimental and numerical prediction of drag and lift as function of the solidity ratio of the net and the current velocity is documented.

  11. Durable silver coating for mirrors

    DOEpatents

    Wolfe, Jesse D.; Thomas, Norman L.

    2000-01-01

    A durable multilayer mirror includes reflective layers of aluminum and silver and has high reflectance over a broad spectral range from ultraviolet to visible to infrared. An adhesion layer of a nickel and/or chromium alloy or nitride is deposited on an aluminum surface, and a thin layer of silver is then deposited on the adhesion layer. The silver layer is protected by a passivation layer of a nickel and/or chromium alloy or nitride and by one or more durability layers made of metal oxides and typically a first layer of metal nitride. The durability layers may include a composite silicon aluminum nitride and an oxinitride transition layer to improve bonding between nitride and oxide layers.

  12. A turbidity current model for real world applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macías, Jorge; Castro, Manuel J.; Morales, Tomás

    2016-04-01

    Traditional turbidity current models suffer from several drawbacks. Among them not preserving freshwater mass, a missing pressure term, or not including terms related to deposition, erosion and entrainment in the momentum equation. In Morales et al.(2009) a new turbidity current model was proposed trying to overcome all these drawbacks. This model takes into account the interaction between the turbidity current and the bottom, considering deposition and erosion effects as well as solid bedload transport of particles at the bed due to the current. Moreover, this model includes the effects of the deposition, erosion and water entrainment into the momentum equation,commonly neglected in this type of models and, finally, in the absence of water entrainment, freshwater mass in the turbidity current is preserved. Despite these improvements, the numerical results obtained by this model when applied to real river systems were not satisfactory due to the simple form of the friction term that was considered. In the present work we propose a different parameterization of this term, where bottom and interface fluid frictions are separately parameterized with more complex expressions. Moreover, the discretization of the deposition/erosion terms is now performed semi-implicitly which guarantees the positivity of the volumetric concentration of sediments in suspension and in the erodible sediment layer at the bed. The numerical simulations obtained with this new turbidity current model (component of HySEA numerical computing platform) greatly improve previous numerical results for simplified geometries as well as for real river systems. Acknowledgements: This research has been partially supported by the Junta de Andalucía research project TESELA (P11-RNM7069) and the Spanish Government Research project DAIFLUID (MTM2012-38383-C02-01) and Universidad de Málaga, Campus de Excelencia Andalucía TECH. References: T. Morales, M. Castro, C. Parés, and E. Fernández-Nieto (2009). On

  13. A Coupled Wave-Current-Sediment model for Skagit Bay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowles, G. W.; Holmes, E. M.; Ralston, D. K.

    2010-12-01

    Along with tidal currents, waves provide a dominant forcing mechanism for sediment transport on many tidal flats. In semi-enclosed regions such as Skagit Bay, Washington, the wave action is due mainly to local wind forcing that occurs over seasonal and event scales. Due to the limited fetch, variations in along-flat wave characteristics can drive gradients in the wave-induced bottom stress and resulting sediment transport. In this work, we use an unstructured grid, coupled wave-current-sediment model to study the influence of wave-induced near bottom stresses in the presence of tidal currents on the sediment transport within the Skagit River delta and Skagit Bay. The coupled model consists of three primary components: the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) for hydrodynamics, the unstructured grid model SWAN to compute the phase-averaged wave field, and the Community Sediment Transport Modeling System. Model sensitivities to the choice of coupling and bottom boundary layer formulations are examined. Results from process oriented simulations will be presented. The process studies use a realistic domain with controlled forcing conditions to quantify the influence of wave-induced bed stresses on the sediment dynamics in Skagit Bay.

  14. Modeling and strain gauging of eddy current repulsion deicing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Samuel O.

    1993-01-01

    Work described in this paper confirms and extends work done by Zumwalt, et al., on a variety of in-flight deicing systems that use eddy current repulsion for repelling ice. Two such systems are known as electro-impulse deicing (EIDI) and the eddy current repulsion deicing strip (EDS). Mathematical models for these systems are discussed for their capabilities and limitations. The author duplicates a particular model of the EDS. Theoretical voltage, current, and force results are compared directly to experimental results. Dynamic strain measurements results are presented for the EDS system. Dynamic strain measurements near EDS or EIDI coils are complicated by the high magnetic fields in the vicinity of the coils. High magnetic fields induce false voltage signals out of the gages.

  15. On current sheet approximations in models of eruptive flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bungey, T. N.; Forbes, T. G.

    1994-01-01

    We consider an approximation sometimes used for current sheets in flux-rope models of eruptive flares. This approximation is based on a linear expansion of the background field in the vicinity of the current sheet, and it is valid when the length of the current sheet is small compared to the scale length of the coronal magnetic field. However, we find that flux-rope models which use this approximation predict the occurrence of an eruption due to a loss of ideal-MHD equilibrium even when the corresponding exact solution shows that no such eruption occurs. Determination of whether a loss of equilibrium exists can only be obtained by including higher order terms in the expansion of the field or by using the exact solution.

  16. Numerical Modeling of HHFW Heating and Current Drive on NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. K.; Bell, R. E.; Hosea, J. C.; Leblanc, B. P.; Taylor, G.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Berry, L. A.; Jaeger, E. F.; Ryan, P. M.; Wilgen, J. B.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Harvey, R. W.; Yuh, H. Y.

    2008-11-01

    High harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive, at frequencies up to 15 times the fundamental deuterium cyclotron frequency, are being studied on NSTX. Recent experiments indicate that the core heating efficiency depends strongly on the antenna phasing and plasma conditions [1], and improves significantly at higher toroidal magnetic fields. Wave propagation, absorption and current drive characteristics for L-mode and H-mode NSTX discharges have been analyzed using both ray tracing and full wave models. Simulations obtained with the AORSA and TORIC full codes agree reasonably well with Motional Stark Effect measurements of the driven current, and indicate the importance of trapping effects on the driven current profile. Collisional damping effects on the wave absorption, particularly in edge regions, will be considered. [1] J. C. Hosea, et al, Phys. Plasmas 15, 056104 (2008).

  17. MHD Modeling of Conductors at Ultra-High Current Density

    SciTech Connect

    ROSENTHAL,STEPHEN E.; DESJARLAIS,MICHAEL P.; SPIELMAN,RICK B.; STYGAR,WILLIAM A.; ASAY,JAMES R.; DOUGLAS,M.R.; HALL,C.A.; FRESE,M.H.; MORSE,R.L.; REISMAN,D.B.

    2000-08-29

    In conjunction with ongoing high-current experiments on Sandia National Laboratories' Z accelerator, the authors have revisited a problem first described in detail by Heinz Knoepfel. Unlike the 1-Tesla MITLs of pulsed power accelerators used to produce intense particle beams, Z's disc transmission line (downstream of the current addition) is in a 100--1,200 Tesla regime, so its conductors cannot be modeled simply as static infinite conductivity boundaries. Using the MHD code MACH2 they have been investigating the conductor hydrodynamics, characterizing the joule heating, magnetic field diffusion, and material deformation, pressure, and velocity over a range of current densities, current rise-times, and conductor materials. Three purposes of this work are (1) to quantify power flow losses owing to ultra-high magnetic fields, (2) to model the response of VISAR diagnostic samples in various configurations on Z, and (3) to incorporate the most appropriate equation of state and conductivity models into the MHD computations. Certain features are strongly dependent on the details of the conductivity model.

  18. Stirling engine - Approach for long-term durability assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tong, Michael T.; Bartolotta, Paul A.; Halford, Gary R.; Freed, Alan D.

    1992-01-01

    The approach employed by NASA Lewis for the long-term durability assessment of the Stirling engine hot-section components is summarized. The approach consists of: preliminary structural assessment; development of a viscoplastic constitutive model to accurately determine material behavior under high-temperature thermomechanical loads; an experimental program to characterize material constants for the viscoplastic constitutive model; finite-element thermal analysis and structural analysis using a viscoplastic constitutive model to obtain stress/strain/temperature at the critical location of the hot-section components for life assessment; and development of a life prediction model applicable for long-term durability assessment at high temperatures. The approach should aid in the provision of long-term structural durability and reliability of Stirling engines.

  19. Analytical Modeling for the Grating Eddy Current Displacement Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Chunfeng; Tao, Wei; Lei, Huaming; Jiang, Yingying; Zhao, Hui

    2015-02-01

    As a new type of displacement sensor, grating eddy current displacement sensor (GECDS) combines traditional eddy current sensors and grating structure in one. The GECDS performs a wide range displacement measurement without precision reduction. This paper proposes an analytical modeling approach for the GECDS. The solution model is established in the Cartesian coordinate system, and the solving domain is limited to finite extents by using the truncated region eigenfunction expansion method. Based on the second order vector potential, expressions for the electromagnetic field as well as coil impedance related to the displacement can be expressed in closed-form. Theoretical results are then confirmed by experiments, which prove the suitability and effectiveness of the analytical modeling approach.

  20. New insights from modeling the neutral heliospheric current sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raath, J. L.; Strauss, R. D.; Potgieter, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Recently, the modulation of cosmic rays in the heliosphere has increasingly been studied by solving the well known transport equation via an approach based on stochastic differential equations. This approach, which is now well-established and published, allows for an in depth study of the modulation effects of the wavy heliospheric current sheet, in particular as its waviness increases with solar activity up to extreme maximum conditions. This is possible because of the numerical stability of the approach as well as its ability to trace pseudo-particles so that insightful trajectories of how they respond to the wavy heliospheric current sheet can be computed and displayed. Utilising such a stochastic model, we present valuable new insights into how the geometry of the wavy current sheet can affect the modulation of cosmic rays, especially at the highest levels of solar activity. This enables us to show, from a modeling perspective, why a certain choice for the current sheet profile is more suited than another at these high solar activity levels. We emphasise the importance of an effective tilt angle and illustrate how this concept can be employed effectively in interpreting results pertaining to the wavy current sheet as well as the modulation associated with this important heliospheric structure.

  1. Durability Assessment of Gamma Tial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draper, Susan L.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Pereira, J. Michael; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Arya, Vinod K.; Zhuang, Wyman

    2004-01-01

    Gamma TiAl was evaluated as a candidate alloy for low-pressure turbine blades in aeroengines. The durability of g-TiAl was studied by examining the effects of impact or fretting on its fatigue strength. Cast-to-size Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb was studied in impact testing with different size projectiles at various impact energies as the reference alloy and subsequently fatigue tested. Impacting degraded the residual fatigue life. However, under the ballistic impact conditions studied, it was concluded that the impacts expected in an aeroengine would not result in catastrophic damage, nor would the damage be severe enough to result in a fatigue failure under the anticipated design loads. In addition, other gamma alloys were investigated including another cast-to-size alloy, several cast and machined specimens, and a forged alloy. Within this Ti-48-2-2 family of alloys aluminum content was also varied. The cracking patterns as a result of impacting were documented and correlated with impact variables. The cracking type and severity was reasonably predicted using finite element models. Mean stress affects were also studied on impact-damaged fatigue samples. The fatigue strength was accurately predicted based on the flaw size using a threshold-based, fracture mechanics approach. To study the effects of wear due to potential applications in a blade-disk dovetail arrangement, the machined Ti-47-2-2 alloy was fretted against In-718 using pin-on-disk experiments. Wear mechanisms were documented and compared to those of Ti-6Al-4V. A few fatigue samples were also fretted and subsequently fatigue tested. It was found that under the conditions studied, the fretting was not severe enough to affect the fatigue strength of g-TiAl.

  2. Lightweight, durable lead-acid batteries

    DOEpatents

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar; An, Ke; Kiggans, Jr., James O; Dudney, Nancy J; Contescu, Cristian I; Baker, Frederick S; Armstrong, Beth L

    2013-05-21

    A lightweight, durable lead-acid battery is disclosed. Alternative electrode materials and configurations are used to reduce weight, to increase material utilization and to extend service life. The electrode can include a current collector having a buffer layer in contact with the current collector and an electrochemically active material in contact with the buffer layer. In one form, the buffer layer includes a carbide, and the current collector includes carbon fibers having the buffer layer. The buffer layer can include a carbide and/or a noble metal selected from of gold, silver, tantalum, platinum, palladium and rhodium. When the electrode is to be used in a lead-acid battery, the electrochemically active material is selected from metallic lead (for a negative electrode) or lead peroxide (for a positive electrode).

  3. Lightweight, durable lead-acid batteries

    DOEpatents

    Lara-Curzio, Edgar; An, Ke; Kiggans, Jr., James O.; Dudney, Nancy J.; Contescu, Cristian I.; Baker, Frederick S.; Armstrong, Beth L.

    2011-09-13

    A lightweight, durable lead-acid battery is disclosed. Alternative electrode materials and configurations are used to reduce weight, to increase material utilization and to extend service life. The electrode can include a current collector having a buffer layer in contact with the current collector and an electrochemically active material in contact with the buffer layer. In one form, the buffer layer includes a carbide, and the current collector includes carbon fibers having the buffer layer. The buffer layer can include a carbide and/or a noble metal selected from of gold, silver, tantalum, platinum, palladium and rhodium. When the electrode is to be used in a lead-acid battery, the electrochemically active material is selected from metallic lead (for a negative electrode) or lead peroxide (for a positive electrode).

  4. Modeling of current characteristics of segmented Langmuir probe on DEMETER

    SciTech Connect

    Imtiaz, Nadia; Marchand, Richard; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre

    2013-05-15

    We model the current characteristics of the DEMETER Segmented Langmuir probe (SLP). The probe is used to measure electron density and temperature in the ionosphere at an altitude of approximately 700 km. It is also used to measure the plasma flow velocity in the satellite frame of reference. The probe is partitioned into seven collectors: six electrically insulated spherical segments and a guard electrode (the rest of the sphere and the small post). Comparisons are made between the predictions of the model and DEMETER measurements for actual ionospheric plasma conditions encountered along the satellite orbit. Segment characteristics are computed numerically with PTetra, a three-dimensional particle in cell simulation code. In PTetra, space is discretized with an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, thus, enabling a good representation of the probe geometry. The model also accounts for several physical effects of importance in the interaction of spacecraft with the space environment. These include satellite charging, photoelectron, and secondary electron emissions. The model is electrostatic, but it accounts for the presence of a uniform background magnetic field. PTetra simulation results show different characteristics for the different probe segments. The current collected by each segment depends on its orientation with respect to the ram direction, the plasma composition, the magnitude, and the orientation of the magnetic field. It is observed that the presence of light H{sup +} ions leads to a significant increase in the ion current branch of the I-V curves of the negatively polarized SLP. The effect of the magnetic field is demonstrated by varying its magnitude and direction with respect to the reference magnetic field. It is found that the magnetic field appreciably affects the electron current branch of the I-V curves of certain segments on the SLP, whereas the ion current branch remains almost unaffected. PTetra simulations are validated by comparing the computed

  5. Low frequency eddy current benchmark study for model validation

    SciTech Connect

    Mooers, R. D.; Boehnlein, T. R.; Cherry, M. R.; Knopp, J. S.; Aldrin, J. C.; Sabbagh, H. A.

    2011-06-23

    This paper presents results of an eddy current model validation study. Precise measurements were made using an impedance analyzer to investigate changes in impedance due to Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) notches in aluminum plates. Each plate contained one EDM notch at an angle of 0, 10, 20, or 30 degrees from the normal of the plate surface. Measurements were made with the eddy current probe both scanning parallel and perpendicular to the notch length. The experimental response from the vertical and oblique notches will be reported and compared to results from different numerical simulation codes.

  6. Animal Models of Psychosis: Current State and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Alexandra D.; Coto, Carlos A.; Siegel, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Psychosis is an abnormal mental state characterized by disorganization, delusions and hallucinations. Animal models have become an increasingly important research tool in the effort to understand both the underlying pathophysiology and treatment of psychosis. There are multiple animal models for psychosis, with each formed by the coupling of a manipulation and a measurement. In this manuscript we do not address the diseases of which psychosis is a prominent comorbidity. Instead, we summarize the current state of affairs and future directions for animal models of psychosis. To accomplish this, our manuscript will first discuss relevant behavioral and electrophysiological measurements. We then provide an overview of the different manipulations that are combined with these measurements to produce animal models. The strengths and limitations of each model will be addressed in order to evaluate its cross-species comparability. PMID:25215267

  7. Physical model of bathymetric effects on the Antarctic circumpolar current

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, D.L.; Ruirong Chen; Lijun Tao ); Davies, P.A. )

    1993-02-15

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to simulate some of the effects of the bathymetry of the southern ocean on the physical characteristics of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC). An idealized zonal wind stress, which varied inversely with the distance from the model Antarctic continent, was simulated in the laboratory model by a radially inward sink-source flow in a thin layer along the surface of the circular test cell. The present model, however, has the limitation of not accounting for such factors as the longitudinal variations in the wind shear and the decrease in wind stress on approaching the Antarctic continent from the north. Planetary beta effects were neglected because the topographic beta term can be shown to dominate over large portions of the model area. The neglect of beta effects is also a limitation of the model. In spite of these limitations, however, the simulations of the physical model for both the homogeneous and linearly stratified cases were shown to be in good agreement with observations of the ACC. These include well-defined strong currents along the mid-ocean ridge; strong perturbations in the vicinity of the Macquarie Ridge, Campbell Plateau, and Kerguelen Gaussberg Plateau; strong meridional transport to the east of the Drake Passage; and anomalies to the south (wave troughs) and to the north (wave ridges) of the main circumpolar current over ocean basins and mountain ridges, respectively. It was shown that the Eltanin and Udintsev fracture zones in the vicinity of 135[degrees]W are important factors in directing the ACC eastward across the Southeast Pacific Basin to the Drake Passage. The estimated volume transports through the Drake Passage based on the model results are in fair agreement with oceanic observations. Estimates of the spin-up time of the system for homogeneous and stratified cases have been provided. 28 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Durability/life of fiber composites in hygrothermomechanical environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1981-01-01

    Statistical analysis and multiple regression were used to determine and quantify the significant hygrothermomechanical variables which infuence the tensile durability/life (cycle loading, fatigue) of boron-fiber/epoxy-matrix (B/E) and high-modulus-fiber/epoxy-matrix (HMS/E) composites. The use of the multiple regression analysis reduced the variables from fifteen, assumed initially, to six or less with a probability of greater than 0.999. The reduced variables were used to derive predictive models for compression an intralaminar shear durability/life of B/E and HMS/E composites assuming isoparametric fatigue behavior. The predictive models were subsequently generalized to predict the durability/life of graphite-fiber-r generalized model is of simple form, predicts conservative values compared with measured data and should be adequate for use in preliminary designs.

  9. Durability/life of fiber composites in hygrothermomechanical environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Statistical analysis and multiple regression were used to determine and quantify the significant hygrothermomechanical variables which influence the tensile durability/life (cycle loading, fatigue) of boron-fiber/epoxy-matrix (B/E) and high-modulus-fiber/epoxy-matrix (HMS/E) composites. The use of the multiple regression analysis reduced the variables from fifteen, assumed initially, to six or less with a probability of greater than 0.999. The reduced variables were used to derive predictive models for compression and intralaminar shear durability/life of B/E and HMS/E composites assuming isoparametric fatigue behavior. The predictive models were subsequently generalized to predict the durability/life of graphite/fiber-r generalized model is of simple form, predicts conservative values compared with measured data and should be adequate for use in preliminary designs. Previously announced in STAR as N82-14287

  10. A fluid mechanical model for current-generating-feeding jellyfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jifeng; Dabiri, John

    2008-11-01

    Many jellyfish species, e.g. moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita, use body motion to generate fluid currents which carry their prey to the vicinity of their capture appendages. In this study, a model was developed to understand the fluid mechanics for this current-generating-feeding mode of jellyfish. The flow generated by free-swimming Aurelia aurita was measured using digital particle image velocimetry. The dynamics of prey (e.g., brine shrimp Artemia) in the flow field were described by a modified Maxey-Riley equation which takes into consideration the inertia of prey and the escape forces, which prey exert in the presence of predator. A Lagrangian analysis was used to identify the region of the flow in which prey can be captured by the jellyfish and the clearance rate was quantified. The study provides a new methodology to study biological current-generating-feeding and the transport and mixing of particles in fluid flow in general.

  11. Modeling spin transport with current-sensing spin detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Appelbaum, Ian

    2010-03-01

    The impulse response (or ``Green's function'') of a current-sensing spin detector is derived analytically by incorporating the proper boundary conditions. This result is also compared to a Monte Carlo simulation (which automatically takes the proper boundary conditions into account) and an empirical spin transit time distribution obtained from experimental spin precession measurements. In the strong drift-dominated transport regime, this spin current impulse response can be approximated by multiplying the spin density impulse response by the average drift velocity. However, in weak drift fields, large modeling errors up to a factor of 3 in most-probable spin transit time can be incurred unless the full spin current Green's function is used.

  12. Modeling spin transport with current-sensing spin detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Appelbaum, Ian

    2009-10-01

    By incorporating the proper boundary conditions, we analytically derive the impulse response (or "Green's function") of a current-sensing spin detector. We also compare this result to a Monte Carlo simulation (which automatically takes the proper boundary condition into account) and an empirical spin transit time distribution obtained from experimental spin precession measurements. In the strong drift-dominated transport regime, this spin current impulse response can be approximated by multiplying the spin density impulse response by the average drift velocity. However, in weak drift fields, large modeling errors up to a factor of 3 in most-probable spin transit time can be incurred unless the full spin current Green's function is used.

  13. Current animal models of bladder cancer: Awareness of translatability (Review)

    PubMed Central

    DING, JIE; XU, DING; PAN, CHUNWU; YE, MIN; KANG, JIAN; BAI, QIANG; QI, JUN

    2014-01-01

    Experimental animal models are crucial in the study of biological behavior and pathological development of cancer, and evaluation of the efficacy of novel therapeutic or preventive agents. A variety of animal models that recapitulate human urothelial cell carcinoma have thus far been established and described, while models generated by novel techniques are emerging. At present a number of reviews on animal models of bladder cancer comprise the introduction of one type of method, as opposed to commenting on and comparing all classifications, with the merits of a certain method being explicit but the shortcomings not fully clarified. Thus the aim of the present study was to provide a summary of the currently available animal models of bladder cancer including transplantable (which could be divided into xenogeneic or syngeneic, heterotopic or orthotopic), carcinogen-induced and genetically engineered models in order to introduce their materials and methods and compare their merits as well as focus on the weaknesses, difficulties in operation, associated problems and translational potential of the respective models. Findings of these models would provide information for authors and clinicians to select an appropriate model or to judge relevant preclinical study findings. Pertinent detection methods are therefore briefly introduced and compared. PMID:25120584

  14. Two-temperature channel model of a direct current arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirpichnikov, A. P.

    1990-07-01

    A relatively simple method is proposed for computing the gas and electron temperatures in an arc plasmotron channel within the framework of the self-consistent two-temperature channel model of an arc discharge. This method affords the possibility of obtaining the gas and electron temperature distribution with good enough accuracy for given discharge parameters (current intensity in the discharge, power inserted in the discharge, etc.) as a function of the radial coordinate in both nonequilibrium (Te ≠ Tai) and quasi-equilibrium (Te = Tai within the current conducting channel) cases. The results obtained can be utilized in model computations to estimate the gas and electron temperatures as well, possibly, as in a number of engineering computations.

  15. Idealized model of polar cap currents, fields, and auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornwall, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    During periods of northward Bz, the electric field applied to the magnetosphere is generally opposite to that occurring during southward Bz and complicated patterns of convection result, showing some features reversed in comparison with the southward Bz case. A study is conducted of a simple generalization of early work on idealized convection models, which allows for coexistence of sunward convection over the central polar cap and antisunward convection elsewhere in the cap. The present model, valid for By approximately 0, has a four-cell convection pattern and is based on the combination of ionospheric current conservation with a relation between parallel auroral currents and parallel potential drops. Global magnetospheric issues involving, e.g., reconnection are not considered. The central result of this paper is an expression giving the parallel potential drop for polar cap auroras (with By approximately 0) in terms of the polar cap convection field profile.

  16. Compositional threshold for Nuclear Waste Glass Durability

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Albert A.; Farooqi, Rahmatullah; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-04-24

    Within the composition space of glasses, a distinct threshold appears to exist that separates "good" glasses, i.e., those which are sufficiently durable, from "bad" glasses of a low durability. The objective of our research is to clarify the origin of this threshold by exploring the relationship between glass composition, glass structure and chemical durability around the threshold region.

  17. 40 CFR 610.33 - Durability tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Durability tests. 610.33 Section 610... RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Test Requirement Criteria § 610.33 Durability tests. The Administrator may determine that a device under evaluation will require durability testing...

  18. 40 CFR 610.33 - Durability tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Durability tests. 610.33 Section 610... RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Test Requirement Criteria § 610.33 Durability tests. The Administrator may determine that a device under evaluation will require durability testing...

  19. 40 CFR 610.33 - Durability tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Durability tests. 610.33 Section 610... RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Test Requirement Criteria § 610.33 Durability tests. The Administrator may determine that a device under evaluation will require durability testing...

  20. 40 CFR 610.33 - Durability tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Durability tests. 610.33 Section 610... RETROFIT DEVICES Test Procedures and Evaluation Criteria Test Requirement Criteria § 610.33 Durability tests. The Administrator may determine that a device under evaluation will require durability testing...

  1. Current methods and research strategies for modeling atmospheric mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, O.R.

    1999-01-01

    The atmospheric pathway of the global mercury cycle is known to be the primary source of mercury contamination to most threatened aquatic ecosystems. While much effort has been made to quantify the total mass flux of mercury to the atmosphere from various natural and anthropogenic sources, discrimination of the chemical and physical forms of these emissions is just beginning in response to early modeling exercises showing this discrimination to be critical for accurate modeling estimates of the sources responsible for observed mercury deposition. In this paper, current atmospheric mercury modeling techniques and the information obtained from them are described. A strategy for future field research and numerical model development is proposed which is designed to confidently identify the sources of atmospheric mercury responsible for observed contamination of aquatic ecosystems.

  2. MNESIS: towards the integration of current multisystem models of memory

    PubMed Central

    Eustache, Francis; Desgranges, Béatrice

    2008-01-01

    After a brief description of the “diseases of memory” which have made the greatest contribution to theoretical developments in the past years, we turn our attention to the most important concepts to have arisen from the dissociations brought to light in different neuropsychological syndromes. This is followed by a critical review of the tasks currently used to assess each memory system. We then describe the monohierarchical model proposed by E. Tulving (1995), together with other recent concepts, notably Baddeley’s model of working memory with its latest component, the episodic buffer. Lastly, we attempt to reconcile these models with several other theoretical propositions, which we have linked together in a macromodel - the Memory NEo-Structural Inter-Systemic model (MNESIS). PMID:18311523

  3. Current plate motions. [continental groupings and global modelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demets, C.; Gordon, R. G.; Argus, D. F.; Stein, S.

    1990-01-01

    A global plate motion model, named NUVEL-1, which describes current plate motions between 12 rigid plates is described, with special attention given to the method, data, and assumptions used. Tectonic implications of the patterns that emerged from the results are discussed. It is shown that wide plate boundary zones can form not only within the continental lithosphere but also within the oceanic lithosphere; e.g., between the Indian and Australian plates and between the North American and South American plates. Results of the model also suggest small but significant diffuse deformation of the oceanic lithosphere, which may be confined to small awkwardly shaped salients of major plates.

  4. Operational advances in ring current modeling using RAM-SCB

    SciTech Connect

    Welling, Daniel T; Jordanova, Vania K; Zaharia, Sorin G; Morley, Steven K

    2010-12-03

    The Ring current Atmosphere interaction Model with Self-Consistently calculated 3D Magnetic field (RAM-SCB) combines a kinetic model of the ring current with a force-balanced model of the magnetospheric magnetic field to create an inner magnetospheric model that is magnetically self consistent. RAM-SCB produces a wealth of outputs that are valuable to space weather applications. For example, the anisotropic particle distribution of the KeV-energy population calculated by the code is key for predicting surface charging on spacecraft. Furthermore, radiation belt codes stand to benefit substantially from RAM-SCB calculated magnetic field values and plasma wave growth rates - both important for determining the evolution of relativistic electron populations. RAM-SCB is undergoing development to bring these benefits to the space weather community. Data-model validation efforts are underway to assess the performance of the system. 'Virtual Satellite' capability has been added to yield satellite-specific particle distribution and magnetic field output. The code's outer boundary is being expanded to 10 Earth Radii to encompass previously neglected geosynchronous orbits and allow the code to be driven completely by either empirical or first-principles based inputs. These advances are culminating towards a new, real-time version of the code, rtRAM-SCB, that can monitor the inner magnetosphere conditions on both a global and spacecraft-specific level. This paper summarizes these new features as well as the benefits they provide the space weather community.

  5. Modeling Electric Current Flow in 3D Fractured Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demirel, S.; Roubinet, D.; Irving, J.

    2014-12-01

    The study of fractured rocks is extremely important in a variety of research fields and applications such as hydrogeology, hydrocarbon extraction and long-term storage of toxic waste. As fractures are highly conductive structures in comparison to the surrounding rock, their presence can be either an advantage or a drawback. For hydrocarbon extraction, fractures allow for quick and easy access to the resource whereas for toxic waste storage their presence increases the risk of leakage and migration of pollutants. In both cases, the identification of fracture network characteristics is an essential step. Recently, we have developed an approach for modeling electric current flow in 2D fractured media. This approach is based on a discrete-dual-porosity model where fractures are represented explicitly, the matrix is coarsely discretized into blocks, and current flow exchange between the fractures and matrix is analytically evaluated at the fracture-scale and integrated at the block-scale [1]. Although this approach has shown much promise and has proven its efficiency for 2D simulations, its extension to 3D remains to be addressed. To this end, we assume that fractures can be represented as two-dimensional finite planes embedded in the surrounding matrix, and we express analytically the distribution of electric potential at the fracture scale. This fracture-scale expression takes into account the electric-current-flow exchange with the surrounding matrix and flow conservation is enforced at the fracture intersections. The fracture-matrix exchange is then integrated at the matrix-block scale where the electric current flow conservation at the block boundaries is formulated with a modified finite volume method. With the objective of providing a low-computational-cost modeling approach adapted to 3D simulations in fractured media, our model is (i) validated and compared to existing modeling approaches and, (ii) used to evaluate the impact of the presence of fractures on

  6. Resistive switching near electrode interfaces: Estimations by a current model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Herbert; Zurhelle, Alexander; Stemmer, Stefanie; Marchewka, Astrid; Waser, Rainer

    2013-02-01

    The growing resistive switching database is accompanied by many detailed mechanisms which often are pure hypotheses. Some of these suggested models can be verified by checking their predictions with the benchmarks of future memory cells. The valence change memory model assumes that the different resistances in ON and OFF states are made by changing the defect density profiles in a sheet near one working electrode during switching. The resulting different READ current densities in ON and OFF states were calculated by using an appropriate simulation model with variation of several important defect and material parameters of the metal/insulator (oxide)/metal thin film stack such as defect density and its profile change in density and thickness, height of the interface barrier, dielectric permittivity, applied voltage. The results were compared to the benchmarks and some memory windows of the varied parameters can be defined: The required ON state READ current density of 105 A/cm2 can only be achieved for barriers smaller than 0.7 eV and defect densities larger than 3 × 1020 cm-3. The required current ratio between ON and OFF states of at least 10 requests defect density reduction of approximately an order of magnitude in a sheet of several nanometers near the working electrode.

  7. Homology Modeling a Fast Tool for Drug Discovery: Current Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, V. K.; Ukawala, R. D.; Ghate, M.; Chintha, C.

    2012-01-01

    Major goal of structural biology involve formation of protein-ligand complexes; in which the protein molecules act energetically in the course of binding. Therefore, perceptive of protein-ligand interaction will be very important for structure based drug design. Lack of knowledge of 3D structures has hindered efforts to understand the binding specificities of ligands with protein. With increasing in modeling software and the growing number of known protein structures, homology modeling is rapidly becoming the method of choice for obtaining 3D coordinates of proteins. Homology modeling is a representation of the similarity of environmental residues at topologically corresponding positions in the reference proteins. In the absence of experimental data, model building on the basis of a known 3D structure of a homologous protein is at present the only reliable method to obtain the structural information. Knowledge of the 3D structures of proteins provides invaluable insights into the molecular basis of their functions. The recent advances in homology modeling, particularly in detecting and aligning sequences with template structures, distant homologues, modeling of loops and side chains as well as detecting errors in a model contributed to consistent prediction of protein structure, which was not possible even several years ago. This review focused on the features and a role of homology modeling in predicting protein structure and described current developments in this field with victorious applications at the different stages of the drug design and discovery. PMID:23204616

  8. Fokker-Planck modeling of current penetration during electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Merkulov, A.; Westerhof, E.; Schueller, F. C.

    2007-05-15

    The current penetration during electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) on the resistive time scale is studied with a Fokker-Planck simulation, which includes a model for the magnetic diffusion that determines the parallel electric field evolution. The existence of the synergy between the inductive electric field and EC driven current complicates the process of the current penetration and invalidates the standard method of calculation in which Ohm's law is simply approximated by j-j{sub cd}={sigma}E. Here it is proposed to obtain at every time step a self-consistent approximation to the plasma resistivity from the Fokker-Planck code, which is then used in a concurrent calculation of the magnetic diffusion equation in order to obtain the inductive electric field at the next time step. A series of Fokker-Planck calculations including a self-consistent evolution of the inductive electric field has been performed. Both the ECCD power and the electron density have been varied, thus varying the well known nonlinearity parameter for ECCD P{sub rf}[MW/m{sup -3}]/n{sub e}{sup 2}[10{sup 19} m{sup -3}] [R. W. Harvey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 62, 426 (1989)]. This parameter turns out also to be a good predictor of the synergetic effects. The results are then compared with the standard method of calculations of the current penetration using a transport code. At low values of the Harvey parameter, the standard method is in quantitative agreement with Fokker-Planck calculations. However, at high values of the Harvey parameter, synergy between ECCD and E{sub parallel} is found. In the case of cocurrent drive, this synergy leads to the generation of large amounts of nonthermal electrons and a concomitant increase of the electrical conductivity and current penetration time. In the case of countercurrent drive, the ECCD efficiency is suppressed by the synergy with E{sub parallel} while only a small amount of nonthermal electrons is produced.

  9. Analytic Modeling of Collector Current and Delay Time in Hbts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hee-Bum

    1992-01-01

    Collector current in abrupt Al_ {0.48}In_{0.52} As/In_{0.53}Ga _{0.47}As HBTs is investigated. Because tunneling plays an important role for abrupt heterojunctions, thermionic field emission (TF) mechanism is included, as a part of the model, in addition to thermionic emission (TE) theory. To model the modulation of the effective barrier height correctly, non-ideal doping profile across the heterojunction is considered. Calculations showed that under nominal operating conditions, TF is dominant over TE in determining the collector current. Furthermore, modulation of the effective barrier height manifests itself in the collector ideality factor that is greater than unity. It is shown that, by calculating the above mentioned transport mechanisms and including the barrier height modulation, the collector current and its temperature dependence in abrupt AlInAs/InGaAs HBTs can be predicted correctly. The detailed calculation is reduced to an analytical closed -form model by assuming a Gaussian energy spectrum for TF current. The model is determined to be accurate over a wide range of bias and temperatures. A simple TE/TF Ebers -Moll model for abrupt HBTs is derived. The classical expression for collector small signal delay time is inadequate for vertically scaled transistors where transient velocity effects can no longer be ignored. Analytical expressions for collector transit time and small signal delay time are proposed for circuit simulation. These models use a general non-uniform velocity profile described entirely in terms of five physical parameters: momentum and energy relaxation times, and initial, peak, and saturated velocities. A C_infty-continuous function approximation for the transit time is used to obtain analytical closed-form expressions for collector small signal delay time in terms of physically meaningful transport parameters. An accurate empirical two-piece model is also proposed. As the collector thickness is scaled down, the ratio of small signal

  10. Interpreting snowpack radiometry using currently existing microwave radiative transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Do-Hyuk; Tang, Shurun; Kim, Edward J.

    2015-10-01

    A radiative transfer model (RTM) to calculate the snow brightness temperatures (Tb) is a critical element in terrestrial snow parameter retrieval from microwave remote sensing observations. The RTM simulates the Tb based on a layered snow by solving a set of microwave radiative transfer equations. Even with the same snow physical inputs to drive the RTM, currently existing models such as Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS), Dense Media Radiative Transfer (DMRT-QMS), and Helsinki University of Technology (HUT) models produce different Tb responses. To backwardly invert snow physical properties from the Tb, differences from RTMs are first to be quantitatively explained. To this end, this initial investigation evaluates the sources of perturbations in these RTMs, and reveals the equations where the variations are made among the three models. Modelling experiments are conducted by providing the same but gradual changes in snow physical inputs such as snow grain size, and snow density to the 3 RTMs. Simulations are conducted with the frequencies consistent with the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer- E (AMSR-E) at 6.9, 10.7, 18.7, 23.8, 36.5, and 89.0 GHz. For realistic simulations, the 3 RTMs are simultaneously driven by the same snow physics model with the meteorological forcing datasets and are validated against the snow insitu samplings from the CLPX (Cold Land Processes Field Experiment) 2002-2003, and NoSREx (Nordic Snow Radar Experiment) 2009-2010.

  11. The spatial limitations of current neutral models of biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Etienne, Rampal S; Rosindell, James

    2011-01-01

    The unified neutral theory of biodiversity and biogeography is increasingly accepted as an informative null model of community composition and dynamics. It has successfully produced macro-ecological patterns such as species-area relationships and species abundance distributions. However, the models employed make many unrealistic auxiliary assumptions. For example, the popular spatially implicit version assumes a local plot exchanging migrants with a large panmictic regional source pool. This simple structure allows rigorous testing of its fit to data. In contrast, spatially explicit models assume that offspring disperse only limited distances from their parents, but one cannot as yet test the significance of their fit to data. Here we compare the spatially explicit and the spatially implicit model, fitting the most-used implicit model (with two levels, local and regional) to data simulated by the most-used spatially explicit model (where offspring are distributed about their parent on a grid according to either a radially symmetric Gaussian or a 'fat-tailed' distribution). Based on these fits, we express spatially implicit parameters in terms of spatially explicit parameters. This suggests how we may obtain estimates of spatially explicit parameters from spatially implicit ones. The relationship between these parameters, however, makes no intuitive sense. Furthermore, the spatially implicit model usually fits observed species-abundance distributions better than those calculated from the spatially explicit model's simulated data. Current spatially explicit neutral models therefore have limited descriptive power. However, our results suggest that a fatter tail of the dispersal kernel seems to improve the fit, suggesting that dispersal kernels with even fatter tails should be studied in future. We conclude that more advanced spatially explicit models and tools to analyze them need to be developed. PMID:21423724

  12. Encapsulation of TRISO particle fuel in durable soda-lime-silicate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Paul G.; Corkhill, Claire L.; Stennett, Martin C.; Hand, Russell J.; Meyer, Willem C. H. M.; Hyatt, Neil C.

    2013-05-01

    Tri-Structural Isotropic (TRISO) coated particle-fuel is a key component in designs for future high temperature nuclear reactors. This study investigated the suitability of three soda lime silicate glass compositions, for the encapsulation of simulant TRISO particle fuel. A cold press and sinter (CPS) methodology was employed to produce TRISO particle-glass composites. Composites produced were determined to have an aqueous durability, fracture toughness and Vickers' hardness comparable to glasses currently employed for the disposal of high level nuclear wastes. Sintering at 700 °C for 30 min was found to remove all interconnected porosity from the composite bodies and oxidation of the outer pyrolytic carbon layer during sintering was prevented by processing under a 5% H2/N2 atmosphere. However, the outer pyrolytic carbon layer was not effectively wetted by the encapsulating glass matrix. The aqueous durability of the TRISO particle-glass composites was investigated using PCT and MCC-1 tests combined with geochemical modelling. It was found that durability was dependent on silicate and calcium solution saturation. This study provides significant advancements in the preparation of TRISO particle encapsulant waste forms. The potential for the use of non-borosilicate sintered glass composites for TRISO particle encapsulation has been confirmed, although further refinements are required.

  13. Modeling past, current, and future time in medical databases.

    PubMed Central

    Kouramajian, V.; Fowler, J.

    1994-01-01

    Recent research has focused on increasing the power of medical information systems by incorporating time into the database system. A problem with much of this research is that it fails to differentiate between historical time and future time. The concept of bitemporal lifespan presented in this paper overcomes this deficiency. Bitemporal lifespan supports the concepts of valid time and transaction time and allows the integration of past, current, and future information in a unified model. The concept of bitemporal lifespan is presented within the framework of the Extended Entity-Relationship model. This model permits the characterization of temporal properties of entities, relationships, and attributes. Bitemporal constraints are defined that must hold between entities forming "isa" hierarchies and between entities and relationships. Finally, bitemporal extensions are presented for database query languages in order to provide natural high-level operators for bitemporal query expressions. PMID:7949941

  14. Evaluation of the Current State of Integrated Water Quality Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arhonditsis, G. B.; Wellen, C. C.; Ecological Modelling Laboratory

    2010-12-01

    Environmental policy and management implementation require robust methods for assessing the contribution of various point and non-point pollution sources to water quality problems as well as methods for estimating the expected and achieved compliance with the water quality goals. Water quality models have been widely used for creating the scientific basis for management decisions by providing a predictive link between restoration actions and ecosystem response. Modelling water quality and nutrient transport is challenging due a number of constraints associated with the input data and existing knowledge gaps related to the mathematical description of landscape and in-stream biogeochemical processes. While enormous effort has been invested to make watershed models process-based and spatially-distributed, there has not been a comprehensive meta-analysis of model credibility in watershed modelling literature. In this study, we evaluate the current state of integrated water quality modeling across the range of temporal and spatial scales typically utilized. We address several common modeling questions by providing a quantitative assessment of model performance and by assessing how model performance depends on model development. The data compiled represent a heterogeneous group of modeling studies, especially with respect to complexity, spatial and temporal scales and model development objectives. Beginning from 1992, the year when Beven and Binley published their seminal paper on uncertainty analysis in hydrological modelling, and ending in 2009, we selected over 150 papers fitting a number of criteria. These criteria involved publications that: (i) employed distributed or semi-distributed modelling approaches; (ii) provided predictions on flow and nutrient concentration state variables; and (iii) reported fit to measured data. Model performance was quantified with the Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency, the relative error, and the coefficient of determination. Further, our

  15. Current models of the intensely ionizing particle environment in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The Cosmic Ray Effects on MicroElectronics (CREME) model that is currently in use to estimate single event effect rates in spacecraft is described. The CREME model provides a description of the radiation environment in interplanetary space near the orbit of the earth that contains no major deficiencies. The accuracy of the galactic cosmic ray model is limited by the uncertainties in solar modulation. The model for solar energetic particles could be improved by making use of all the data that has been collected on solar energetic particle events. There remain major uncertainties about the environment within the earth's magnetosphere, because of the uncertainties over the charge states of the heavy ions in the anomalous component and solar flares, and because of trapped heavy ions. The present CREME model is valid only at 1 AU, but it could be extended to other parts of the heliosphere. There is considerable data on the radiation environment from 0.2 to 35 AU in the ecliptic plane. This data could be used to extend the CREME model.

  16. Interpreting snowpack radiometry using currently existing microwave radiative transfer models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, D. H.; Tan, S.; Kim, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    A radiative transfer model (RTM) to calculate a snow brightness temperature (Tb) is a critical element to retrieve terrestrial snow from microwave remote sensing observations. The RTM simulates the Tb based on a layered snow by solving a set of microwave radiative transfer formulas. Even with the same snow physical inputs used for the RTM, currently existing models such as Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS), Dense Media Radiative Transfer (DMRT-Tsang), and Helsinki University of Technology (HUT) models produce different Tb responses. To backwardly invert snow physical properties from the Tb, the differences from the RTMs are to be quantitatively explained. To this end, the paper evaluates the sources of perturbations in the RTMs, and reveals the equations where the variations are made among three models. Investigations are conducted by providing the same but gradual changes in snow physical inputs such as snow grain size, and snow density to the 3 RTMs. Simulations are done with the frequencies consistent with the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-E (AMSR-E) at 6.9, 10.7, 18.7, 23.8, 36.5, and 89.0 GHz. For realistic simulations, the 3 RTMs are simultaneously driven by the same snow physics model with the meteorological forcing datasets and are validated from the snow core samplings from the CLPX (Cold Land Processes Field Experiment) 2002-2003, and NoSREx (Nordic Snow Radar Experiment) 2009-2010.

  17. CODSTRAN - Composite durability structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Smith, G. T.

    1978-01-01

    CODSTRAN (COmposite Durability STRucture ANalysis) a NASA Lewis Center computer program for the prediction of defect growth and fracture of composite structures when subjected to service loads is presented. Organization, capabilities and present status are discussed. Organizational aspects include executive, input, output, analysis and composite mechanics modules. Capabilities include: durability assessment of large structures and complex structural parts from composites, structural response due to static, cyclic, transient impact and thermal loads, and criteria for static, cyclic, and dynamic fracture. At the present state of development some of CODSTRAN's analysis capabilities include composite mechanics, static failures, and lamination residual stresses. An application in which CODSTRAN is used to predict the defect growth in a flat specimen, with a center through-slit under tension is studied. When completed, CODSTRAN will account for geometry and material nonlinearities, environmental effects as well as static, cyclic and dynamic fracture.

  18. Advances in modeling of lower hybrid current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Nilsson, E.; Artaud, J.-F.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Hillairet, J.; Ding, B.; Li, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Shiraiwa, S.; Madi, M.

    2016-04-01

    First principle modeling of the lower hybrid (LH) current drive in tokamak plasmas is a longstanding activity, which is gradually gaining in accuracy thanks to quantitative comparisons with experimental observations. The ability to reproduce simulatenously the plasma current and the non-thermal bremsstrahlung radial profiles in the hard x-ray (HXR) photon energy range represents in this context a significant achievement. Though subject to limitations, ray tracing calculations are commonly used for describing wave propagation in conjunction with Fokker-Planck codes, as it can capture prominent features of the LH wave dynamics in a tokamak plasma-like toroidal refraction. This tool has been validated on several machines when the full absorption of the LH wave requires the transfer of a small fraction of power from the main lobes of the launched power spectrum to a tail at a higher parallel refractive index. Conversely, standard modeling based on toroidal refraction only becomes more challenging when the spectral gap is large, except if other physical mechanisms may dominate to bridge it, like parametric instabilities, as suggested for JET LH discharges (Cesario et al 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 175002), or fast fluctuations of the launched power spectrum or ‘tail’ LH model, as shown for Tore Supra (Decker et al 2014 Phys. Plasma 21 092504). The applicability of the heuristic ‘tail’ LH model is investigated for a broader range of plasma parameters as compared to the Tore Supra study and with different LH wave characteristics. Discrepancies and agreements between simulations and experiments depending upon the different models used are discussed. The existence of a ‘tail’ in the launched power spectrum significantly improves the agreement between modeling and experiments in plasma conditions for which the spectral gap is large in EAST and Alcator C-Mod tokamaks. For the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, the experimental evolution of the HXR profiles with density suggests

  19. International Low-Earth-Orbit Spacecraft Materials Test Program Initiated for Better Prediction of Durability and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1999-01-01

    Spacecraft in low Earth orbit (LEO) are subjected to many components of the environment, which can cause them to degrade much more rapidly than intended and greatly shorten their functional life. The atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation, and cross contamination present in LEO can affect sensitive surfaces such as thermal control paints, multilayer insulation, solar array surfaces, and optical surfaces. The LEO Spacecraft Materials Test (LEO-SMT) program is being conducted to assess the effects of simulated LEO exposure on current spacecraft materials to increase understanding of LEO degradation processes as well as to enable the prediction of in-space performance and durability. Using ground-based simulation facilities to test the durability of materials currently flying in LEO will allow researchers to compare the degradation evidenced in the ground-based facilities with that evidenced on orbit. This will allow refinement of ground laboratory test systems and the development of algorithms to predict the durability and performance of new materials in LEO from ground test results. Accurate predictions based on ground tests could reduce development costs and increase reliability. The wide variety of national and international materials being tested represent materials being functionally used on spacecraft in LEO. The more varied the types of materials tested, the greater the probability that researchers will develop and validate predictive models for spacecraft long-term performance and durability. Organizations that are currently participating in the program are ITT Research Institute (USA), Lockheed Martin (USA), MAP (France), SOREQ Nuclear Research Center (Israel), TNO Institute of Applied Physics (The Netherlands), and UBE Industries, Ltd. (Japan). These represent some of the major suppliers of thermal control and sensor materials currently flying in LEO. The participants provide materials that are exposed to selected levels of atomic oxygen, vacuum ultraviolet

  20. Massive fermion model in 3d and higher spin currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonora, L.; Cvitan, M.; Prester, P. Dominis; de Souza, B. Lima; Smolić, I.

    2016-05-01

    We analyze the 3d free massive fermion theory coupled to external sources. The presence of a mass explicitly breaks parity invariance. We calculate two- and three-point functions of a gauge current and the energy momentum tensor and, for instance, obtain the well-known result that in the IR limit (but also in the UV one) we reconstruct the relevant CS action. We then couple the model to higher spin currents and explicitly work out the spin 3 case. In the UV limit we obtain an effective action which was proposed many years ago as a possible generalization of spin 3 CS action. In the IR limit we derive a different higher spin action. This analysis can evidently be generalized to higher spins. We also discuss the conservation and properties of the correlators we obtain in the intermediate steps of our derivation.

  1. MEPAS exposure model updates to meet current EPA guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Strenge, D.L.; Droppo, J.G. Jr.

    1993-12-01

    The Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) is a software package developed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) as a management tool to screen the many potential hazardous waste problems at DOE facilities across the country. The program considers both radioactive and chemical pollutants in estimating potential human health risks based on site-specific waste, environmental transport, and exposure characteristics. To support various DOE programs, recent modifications have been made to MEPAS to increase its applicability in analyzing the problems of mixed hazardous waste. Such analyses are needed to evaluate remediation options for mixed hazardous waste sites. This paper presents an overview of the MEPAS program and summarizes the current models used to translate environmental concentration values into projected intake by humans and, finally, into estimates of health risk. The recent modifications are described consistent with current EPA guidance for exposure and human health impact assessment.

  2. Durable antistatic coating for polymethylmethacrylate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadek, V.; Somoano, R. B.; Rembaum, A. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A durable antistatic coating is achieved on polymethylmethacrylate plastic without affecting its optical clarity by applying to the surface of the plastic a low molecular weight solvent having a high electron affinity and a high dipole moment, such as acentonitrile or nitromethane alone or in the presence of photopolymerizable monomer. The treated polymethylmethacrylate plastic dissipates most of the induced electrostatic charge and retains its optical clarity. The antistatic behavior persists after washing, rubbing and vacuum treatment.

  3. Modeling of eddy current NDE probe for steam generator tubes.

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, F. C.; Bakhtiari, S.; Kupperman, D.

    2003-01-29

    Calculations were performed with a three-dimensional (3-D) finite-element model to describe the response of an eddy current (EC) probe to defects in steam generator (SG) tubing of a nuclear reactor. Such calculations could be very helpful in understanding and interpreting the EC probe response to complex tube/defect geometries associated with longitudinal inner/outer notches, roll transitions, sludge, and through-wall holes in SG tubes. The governing field equations are derived in terms of coupled magnetic vector and electric scalar potentials in the conducting media and total or reduced scalar potentials in the non-conducting regions. To assess the validity of the model, we compared the signal responses for two numerical approaches, stored-energy-and-power-loss approach and magnetic-flux approach for various tube/defect geometries. Simulation results are also presented on the tube/defect geometries for the pancake coil response and the transmitter/receiver (T/R) probe response. The results indicate that the eddy-current NDE modeling is capable of predicting EC probe response to flaws in steam generator tubes.

  4. A Model for Axial Magnetic Bearings Including Eddy Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kucera, Ladislav; Ahrens, Markus

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical method of modelling eddy currents inside axial bearings. The problem is solved by dividing an axial bearing into elementary geometric forms, solving the Maxwell equations for these simplified geometries, defining boundary conditions and combining the geometries. The final result is an analytical solution for the flux, from which the impedance and the force of an axial bearing can be derived. Several impedance measurements have shown that the analytical solution can fit the measured data with a precision of approximately 5%.

  5. Current state of genome-scale modeling in filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Brandl, Julian; Andersen, Mikael R

    2015-06-01

    The group of filamentous fungi contains important species used in industrial biotechnology for acid, antibiotics and enzyme production. Their unique lifestyle turns these organisms into a valuable genetic reservoir of new natural products and biomass degrading enzymes that has not been used to full capacity. One of the major bottlenecks in the development of new strains into viable industrial hosts is the alteration of the metabolism towards optimal production. Genome-scale models promise a reduction in the time needed for metabolic engineering by predicting the most potent targets in silico before testing them in vivo. The increasing availability of high quality models and molecular biological tools for manipulating filamentous fungi renders the model-guided engineering of these fungal factories possible with comprehensive metabolic networks. A typical fungal model contains on average 1138 unique metabolic reactions and 1050 ORFs, making them a vast knowledge-base of fungal metabolism. In the present review we focus on the current state as well as potential future applications of genome-scale models in filamentous fungi. PMID:25700817

  6. 40 CFR 86.094-13 - Light-duty exhaust durability programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and Heavy-Duty Engines, and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled... selection methods, durability data vehicle compliance requirements, in-use verification requirements... provisions of § 86.094-25. (3) Vehicle/component selection method. Durability data vehicles shall be...

  7. 40 CFR 86.094-13 - Light-duty exhaust durability programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and Heavy-Duty Engines, and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled... selection methods, durability data vehicle compliance requirements, in-use verification requirements... provisions of § 86.094-25. (3) Vehicle/component selection method. Durability data vehicles shall be...

  8. 40 CFR 86.094-13 - Light-duty exhaust durability programs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Heavy-Duty Engines, and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural Gas-Fueled... selection methods, durability data vehicle compliance requirements, in-use verification requirements... provisions of § 86.094-25. (3) Vehicle/component selection method. Durability data vehicles shall be...

  9. Ring current-atmosphere interactions model with stormtime magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vapirev, Alexander Emilov

    An improved version of the ring current-atmosphere interactions kinetic model (RAM) is presented in this thesis. The recent stormtime empirical model T04s and the IGRF model are used to represent the Earth's external and internal magnetic fields respectively. Particle drifts, losses due to charge exchange with geocoronal hydrogen and atmospheric losses are included in the model as they are considered the main mechanisms of ring current development and its following decay. A numerical technique for bounce-averaging along the field lines is introduced and results for the calculated bounce-averaged hydrogen densities and magnetic gradient-curvature drift velocities (general case) for the moderate storm of April 21-25, 2001, are presented. A comparison in the calculations between T04s and a dipole field shows that the bounce-averaged hydrogen density for T04s differs with ˜ 5% from that for a dipole field for quiet time and it may become 30% smaller for disturbed conditions on the nightside for L > 4. The gradient-curvature velocities for T04s at large L-shells are ˜ 20% higher on the nightside and 20% lower on the dayside than those for a dipole field for quiet time. For disturbed conditions they are respectively ˜ 200% higher and 20% lower than the dipole values. The contribution of the cross-B term to the magnetic drift is ˜ 5%. Results for the time evolution of the trapped equatorial flux for H+, He+, and O+ ions for various particle energies and pitch angles obtained by the new model with a non-dipole field (RAM-ND) are presented. The new computations for the April 2001 storm using a Volland-Stern convection model show a slight continued increase in the flux and the total ring current energy for the three ion species even after the storm main phase. A higher increase in the flux is observed towards the dusk side for the RAM-ND model compared to RAM due the difference in the charge exchange rates and the azimuthal drifts for the two different geomagnetic field

  10. [Culture and durability].

    PubMed

    Arizpe, L; Paz, F

    1992-01-01

    The concept of sustainability is usually defined according to specific socioeconomic contexts and is vague in application, but nevertheless essential for defining longterm objectives. This work seeks to demonstrate that the place of sustainability in a development model depends on the cultural values behind abstract ideas and on the perceptions and interests of different social and political groups regarding the environment more than it does on the biophysical exchanges between societies and the natural environment. The idea of sustainable development reflects a new political will to continue to live on earth in the same fashion as at present, but new forms on international organization, government, and commerce more conducive to sustainable development have not yet clearly emerged. Other concepts used in social and anthropological analysis, such as social reproduction, appear relevant in considering sustainability. Sustainable development should be analyzed and applied at both the macroeconomic and microeconomic levels. Demographic growth is a determining factor in use of natural resources in today's world, but its dysfunctionality at the macro level contrasts with its continuing functionality at the family level in many poor rural communities. An exploratory analysis of the living conditions of the natives of the tropical forest of southeast Mexico, the Lacandon, suggests how different populations understand the concept of sustainability and manage their vital resources accordingly. The Lacandon tropical forest of 1.4 million hectares had lost only 6% of its original cover through the early 1960s. But beginning in 1963, the Mexican government, as part of the Alliance for Progress program, began a colonization project that eventually led to disorganized migration and uncontrolled harvesting of tropical woods in the forests of Chiapas. A settlement program begun in the area nearest the Guatemalan border to control the movements of Guatemalan refugees and guerillas

  11. High durability cementitious material with mineral admixtures and carbonation curing

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, K. . E-mail: kenzo@kajima.com; Yokozeki, K.; Ashizawa, R.; Sakata, N.; Morioka, M.; Sakai, E.; Daimon, M.

    2006-07-01

    Nuclear waste repositories need highly durable cementitious materials to function for over thousands of years while resisting leaching and degradation. The durability of cementitious material can be effectively improved by reducing permeability and by changing cement hydrates to a less soluble matrix. This paper describes the properties of carbonated new cementitious materials containing belite-rich cement and {gamma}-2CaO . SiO{sub 2} as main components. In addition, the long-term leaching properties are investigated and compared with ordinary Portland cement by using a predictive leaching model.

  12. Beyond standard model physics at current and future colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhen

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a multinational experiment which began running in 2009, is highly expected to discover new physics that will help us understand the nature of the universe and begin to find solutions to many of the unsolved puzzles of particle physics. For over 40 years the Standard Model has been the accepted theory of elementary particle physics, except for one unconfirmed component, the Higgs boson. The experiments at the LHC have recently discovered this Standard-Model-like Higgs boson. This discovery is one of the most exciting achievements in elementary particle physics. Yet, a profound question remains: Is this rather light, weakly-coupled boson nothing but a Standard Model Higgs or a first manifestation of a deeper theory? Also, the recent discoveries of neutrino mass and mixing, experimental evidences of dark matter and dark energy, matter-antimatter asymmetry, indicate that our understanding of fundamental physics is currently incomplete. For the next decade and more, the LHC and future colliders will be at the cutting-edge of particle physics discoveries and will shed light on many of these unanswered questions. There are many promising beyond-Standard-Model theories that may help solve the central puzzles of particle physics. To fill the gaps in our knowledge, we need to know how these theories will manifest themselves in controlled experiments, such as high energy colliders. I discuss how we can probe fundamental physics at current and future colliders directly through searches for new phenomena such as resonances, rare Higgs decays, exotic displaced signatures, and indirectly through precision measurements on Higgs in this work. I explore beyond standard model physics effects from different perspectives, including explicit models such as supersymmetry, generic models in terms of resonances, as well as effective field theory approach in terms of higher dimensional operators. This work provides a generic and broad overview of the physics

  13. Multi-observation integrated model of troposphere - current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilgan, Karina; Rohm, Witold; Bosy, Jarosław; Sierny, Jan; Kapłon, Jan; Hadaś, Tomasz; Hordyniec, Paweł

    2014-05-01

    The Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and meteorological observation systems in the past decades were developed to address separate challenges and were used by different communities. Currently, the inter-dependence between meteorology and GNSS processing is growing up, providing both communities incentives, data and research challenges. The GNSS community uses meteorological observations as well as Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models to reduce the troposphere impact on the signal propagation (i.e. eliminate tropospheric delay). On the other hand, meteorology community is assimilating the GNSS observations into weather forecasting, nowcasting or climate studies. To seamlessly use observations from both sides of the GNSS and meteorology spectra, the data have to be interoperable. In this study we present a current status of establishing an integrated model of troposphere. We investigated and compared a number of meteorological and GNSS data sources that are going to be integrated into the troposphere model with high temporal and spatial resolution. The integrated model will provide values of meteorological and GNSS parameters at any point and any time with known accuracy. First step in building this model is to inter-compare all available data sources and to establish the accuracy of parameters. Three main data sources were compared: ground-based GNSS products on ASG-EUPOS stations, NWP model COAMPS (Coupled Ocean/ Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System) and meteorological parameters from three kinds of stations - EUREF Permanent Network (EPN) stations, meteorological sensors at airports and synoptic Institute of Meteorology and Water Management. Data was provided with different temporal and spatial resolution, so it had to be interpolated prior to inter-comparison. Afterwards, the quality of the data was established. The results show that NWP model data quality is: 4hPa in terms of air pressure, 2hPa in terms of water vapor partial pressure, and 6K in

  14. Modeling Surface Currents in the Eastern Levantine Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, Leila; Brajard, Julien; Fakhri, Milad; Mortier, Laurent; Poulain, Pierre-Marie

    2015-04-01

    We consider the problem of reconstructing the meso-scale features of the currents in the Eastern Levantine Mediterranean from combining in-situ and satellite altimetry data. Mathematically, this is an inverse problem where the objective is to invert Lagrangian trajectories, which are positions of drifters launched at sea, in order to improve the coarse Eulerian velocity, provided by the altimetric satellite measurements. We shall use a variational assimilation approach, whereby the eulerian velocity correction is obtained by minimizing the distance between the simulated position from a velocity background and actual observations. One important property of our approach is that it is model free, so that it is inexpensive and can be easily cast into real-time oceanic operational products. Our method is first validated with twin experiments, where we conduct sensitivity analysis to parameters such as number of drifters, assimilation time window and spatial filter length. The approach is next validated with past and present data from the Levantine Mediterranean by correcting velocity fields derived from altimetry by assimilating drifters' data. The drifters' data used here were collected in the context of the MedSVP program and more recently by the National Lebanese Marine Center (CNSM) in September 2013. The CNSM with its boat CANA has developed an important activity of data collection along the Lebanese coast so far and this activity will permit it to extend its collaborations further by integrating the modeling and data assimilation methods for reconstructing the surface currents.

  15. An Empirical Model of Saturn's Current Sheet Based on Global MHD Modeling of Saturn's Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, K. C.; Nickerson, J. S.; Gombosi, T. I.

    2014-12-01

    Cassini observations imply that during southern summer Saturn's magnetospheric current sheet is displaced northward above the rotational equator and should be similarly displaced southward during northern summer [C.S. Arridge et al., Warping of Saturn's magnetospheric and magnetotail current sheets, Journal of Geophysical Research, Vol. 113, August 2008]. Arridge et al. show that Cassini data from the noon, midnight and dawn local time sectors clearly indicate this bending and they present an azimuthally independent model to describe this bowl shaped geometry. We have used our global MHD model, BATS-R-US/SWMF, to study Saturn's magnetospheric current sheet under different solar wind dynamic pressures and solar zenith angle conditions. We find that under typical conditions the current sheet does bend upward and take on a basic shape similar to the Arridge model in the noon, midnight, and dawn sectors. However, the MHD model results show significant variations from the Arridge model including the degree of bending, variations away from a simple bowl shape, non-uniformity across local time sectors, drastic deviations in the dusk sector, and a dependence on the solar wind dynamic pressure. We will present a detailed description of our 3D MHD model results and the characteristics of the current sheet in the model. We will point out variations from the Arridge model. In addition, we will present a new empirical model of Saturn's current sheet that attempts to characterize the dependences on the local time sector and the solar wind dynamic pressure.

  16. Durability of Silicate Glasses: An Historical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Farges, Francois; Etcheverry, Marie-Pierre; Haddi, Amine; Trocellier, Patrick; Curti, Enzo; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-01-02

    We present a short review of current theories of glass weathering, including glass dissolution, and hydrolysis of nuclear waste glasses, and leaching of historical glasses from an XAFS perspective. The results of various laboratory leaching experiments at different timescales (30 days to 12 years) are compared with results for historical glasses that were weathered by atmospheric gases and soil waters over 500 to 3000 years. Good agreement is found between laboratory experiments and slowly leached historical glasses, with a strong enrichment of metals at the water/gel interface. Depending on the nature of the transition elements originally dissolved in the melt, increasing elemental distributions are expected to increase with time for a given glass durability context.

  17. Tsunami-HySEA model validation for tsunami current predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macías, Jorge; Castro, Manuel J.; González-Vida, José Manuel; Ortega, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Model ability to compute and predict tsunami flow velocities is of importance in risk assessment and hazard mitigation. Substantial damage can be produced by high velocity flows, particularly in harbors and bays, even when the wave height is small. Besides, an accurate simulation of tsunami flow velocities and accelerations is fundamental for advancing in the study of tsunami sediment transport. These considerations made the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) proposing a benchmark exercise focussed on modeling and simulating tsunami currents. Until recently, few direct measurements of tsunami velocities were available to compare and to validate model results. After Tohoku 2011 many current meters measurement were made, mainly in harbors and channels. In this work we present a part of the contribution made by the EDANYA group from the University of Malaga to the NTHMP workshop organized at Portland (USA), 9-10 of February 2015. We have selected three out of the five proposed benchmark problems. Two of them consist in real observed data from the Tohoku 2011 event, one at Hilo Habour (Hawaii) and the other at Tauranga Bay (New Zealand). The third one consists in laboratory experimental data for the inundation of Seaside City in Oregon. Acknowledgements: This research has been partially supported by the Junta de Andalucía research project TESELA (P11-RNM7069) and the Spanish Government Research project DAIFLUID (MTM2012-38383-C02-01) and Universidad de Málaga, Campus de Excelencia Andalucía TECH. The GPU and multi-GPU computations were performed at the Unit of Numerical Methods (UNM) of the Research Support Central Services (SCAI) of the University of Malaga.

  18. Structural Integrity and Durability of Reusable Space Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A two-day conference on the structural integrity and durability of reusable space propulsion systems was held on May 12 and 13, 1987, at the NASA Lewis research Center. Aerothermodynamic loads; instrumentation; fatigue, fracture, and constitutive modeling; and structural dynamics were discussed.

  19. Durable Tactile Glove for Human or Robot Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butzer, Melissa; Diftler, Myron A.; Huber, Eric

    2010-01-01

    A glove containing force sensors has been built as a prototype of tactile sensor arrays to be worn on human hands and anthropomorphic robot hands. The force sensors of this glove are mounted inside, in protective pockets; as a result of this and other design features, the present glove is more durable than earlier models.

  20. Modelling ac ripple currents in HTS coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhihan; Grilli, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Dc transmission using high temperature superconducting (HTS) coated conductors (CCs) offers a promising solution to the globally growing demand for effective, reliable and economic transmission of green energy up to the gigawatt level over very long distances. The credible estimation of the losses and thereby the heat dissipation involved, where ac ripples (introduced in rectification/ac-dc conversion) are viewed as a potential source of notable contribution, is highly essential for the rational design of practical HTS dc transmission cables and corresponding cryogenic systems to fulfil this demand. Here we report a targeted modelling study into the ac losses in a HTS CC subject to dc and ac ripple currents simultaneously, by solving Maxwell’s equations using the finite element method (FEM) in the commercial software package COMSOL. It is observed that the instantaneous loss exhibits only one peak per cycle in the HTS CC subject to sinusoidal ripples, given that the amplitude of the ac ripples is smaller than approximately 20% of that of the dc current. This is a distinct contrast to the usual observation of two peaks per cycle in a HTS CC subject to ac currents only. The unique mechanism is also revealed, which is directly associated with the finding that, around any local minima of the applied ac ripples, the critical state of -J c is never reached at the edges of the HTS CC, as it should be according to the Bean model. When running further into the longer term, it is discovered that the ac ripple loss of the HTS CC in full-wave rectification decays monotonically, at a speed which is found to be insensitive to the frequency of the applied ripples within our targeted situations, to a relatively low level of approximately 1.38 × 10-4 W m-1 in around 1.7 s. Comparison between this level and other typical loss contributions in a HTS dc cable implies that ac ripple currents in HTS CCs should only be considered as a minor source of dissipation in superconducting dc

  1. Effect of glass composition on waste form durability: A critical review

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, A.J.G.; Mazer, J.J.; Ebert, W.L.

    1994-11-01

    This report reviews literature concerning the relationship between the composition and durability of silicate glasses, particularly glasses proposed for immobilization of radioactive waste. Standard procedures used to perform durability tests are reviewed. It is shown that tests in which a low-surface area sample is brought into contact with a very large volume of solution provide the most accurate measure of the intrinsic durability of a glass composition, whereas high-surface area/low-solution volume tests are a better measure of the response of a glass to changes in solution chemistry induced by a buildup of glass corrosion products. The structural chemistry of silicate and borosilicate glasses is reviewed to identify those components with the strongest cation-anion bonds. A number of examples are discussed in which two or more cations engage in mutual bonding interactions that result in minima or maxima in the rheologic and thermodynamic properties of the glasses at or near particular optimal compositions. It is shown that in simple glass-forming systems such interactions generally enhance the durability of glasses. Moreover, it is shown that experimental results obtained for simple systems can be used to account for durability rankings of much more complex waste glass compositions. Models that purport to predict the rate of corrosion of glasses in short-term durability tests are evaluated using a database of short-term durability test results for a large set of glass compositions. The predictions of these models correlate with the measured durabilities of the glasses when considered in large groupings, but no model evaluated in this review provides accurate estimates of durability for individual glass compositions. Use of these models in long-term durability models is discussed. 230 refs.

  2. Shigella vaccine development: prospective animal models and current status.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-Jeong; Yeo, Sang-Gu; Park, Jae-Hak; Ko, Hyun-Jeong

    2013-01-01

    Shigella was first discovered in 1897 and is a major causative agent of dysenteric diarrhea. The number of affected patients has decreased globally because of improved sanitary conditions; however, Shigella still causes serious problems in many subjects, including young children and the elderly, especially in developing countries. Although antibiotics may be effective, a vaccine would be the most powerful solution to combat shigellosis because of the emergence of drug-resistant strains. However, the development of a vaccine is hampered by several problems. First, there is no suitable animal model that can replace human-based studies for the investigation of the in vivo mechanisms of Shigella vaccines. Mouse, guinea pig, rat, rabbit, and nonhuman primates could be used as models for shigellosis, but they do not represent human shigellosis and each has its own weaknesses. However, a recent murine model based on peritoneal infection with virulent S. flexneri 2a is promising. Moreover, although the inflammatory responses and mechanisms such as pathogenassociated molecular patterns and danger-associated molecular patterns have been studied, the pathology and immunology of Shigella are still not clearly defined. Despite these obstacles, many vaccine candidates have been developed, including live attenuated, killed whole cells, conjugated, and subunit vaccines. The development of Shigella vaccines also demands considerations of the cost, routes of administration, ease of storage (stability), cross-reactivity, safety, and immunogenicity. The main aim of this review is to provide a detailed introduction to the many promising vaccine candidates and animal models currently available, including the newly developed mouse model. PMID:24372251

  3. Validating and Applying Numerical Models for Current Energy Capture Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirlinger, C. Y.; James, S. C.; Cardenas, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    With the growing focus on renewable energy, there is increased interest in modeling and optimizing current energy capture (CEC) devices. The interaction of multiple wakes from CEC devices can affect optimal placement strategy, and issues of environmental impacts on sediment transport and large-scale flow should be examined. Numerical models of four flume-scale experiments were built using Sandia National Laboratories' Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (SNL-EFDC.) Model predictions were calibrated against measured velocities to estimate flow and turbine parameters. The velocity deficit was most sensitive to αmd, the dimensionless Smagorinsky constant related to horizontal momentum diffusion, and to CPB, the dimensionless partial blockage coefficient accounting for the physical displacement of fluid due to turbine blockage. Calibration to four data sets showed αmd ranged from 0.3 to 1.0 while CPB ranged from 40 to 300. Furthermore, results of parameter estimation indicated centerline velocity data were insufficient to uniquely identify the turbulence, flow, and device parameters; cross-channel velocity measurements at multiple locations downstream yielded important calibration information and it is likely that vertical velocity profiles would also be useful to the calibration effort. In addition to flume scale models, a full-scale implementation of a CEC device at Roza Canal in Yakima, WA was developed. The model was analyzed to find an appropriate grid size and to understand the sensitivity of downstream velocity profiles to horizontal momentum diffusion and partial blockage coefficients. Preliminary results generally showed that as CPB increased the wake was enhanced vertically.

  4. Current Capabilities of the Fuel Performance Modeling Code PARFUME

    SciTech Connect

    G. K. Miller; D. A. Petti; J. T. Maki; D. L. Knudson

    2004-09-01

    The success of gas reactors depends upon the safety and quality of the coated particle fuel. A fuel performance modeling code (called PARFUME), which simulates the mechanical and physico-chemical behavior of fuel particles during irradiation, is under development at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Among current capabilities in the code are: 1) various options for calculating CO production and fission product gas release, 2) a thermal model that calculates a time-dependent temperature profile through a pebble bed sphere or a prismatic block core, as well as through the layers of each analyzed particle, 3) simulation of multi-dimensional particle behavior associated with cracking in the IPyC layer, partial debonding of the IPyC from the SiC, particle asphericity, kernel migration, and thinning of the SiC caused by interaction of fission products with the SiC, 4) two independent methods for determining particle failure probabilities, 5) a model for calculating release-to-birth (R/B) ratios of gaseous fission products, that accounts for particle failures and uranium contamination in the fuel matrix, and 6) the evaluation of an accident condition, where a particle experiences a sudden change in temperature following a period of normal irradiation. This paper presents an overview of the code.

  5. Computational modeling of cardiac hemodynamics: Current status and future outlook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Rajat; Seo, Jung Hee; Vedula, Vijay; Choi, Young J.; Liu, Hang; Huang, H. Howie; Jain, Saurabh; Younes, Laurent; Abraham, Theodore; George, Richard T.

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of four-dimensional imaging technologies, increasing computational speeds, improved simulation algorithms, and the widespread availability of powerful computing platforms is enabling simulations of cardiac hemodynamics with unprecedented speed and fidelity. Since cardiovascular disease is intimately linked to cardiovascular hemodynamics, accurate assessment of the patient's hemodynamic state is critical for the diagnosis and treatment of heart disease. Unfortunately, while a variety of invasive and non-invasive approaches for measuring cardiac hemodynamics are in widespread use, they still only provide an incomplete picture of the hemodynamic state of a patient. In this context, computational modeling of cardiac hemodynamics presents as a powerful non-invasive modality that can fill this information gap, and significantly impact the diagnosis as well as the treatment of cardiac disease. This article reviews the current status of this field as well as the emerging trends and challenges in cardiovascular health, computing, modeling and simulation and that are expected to play a key role in its future development. Some recent advances in modeling and simulations of cardiac flow are described by using examples from our own work as well as the research of other groups.

  6. Modeling of current characteristics of Segmented Langmuir Probe on DEMETER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imtiaz, Nadia; Marchand, Richard

    2012-10-01

    We model current characteristics of a Segmented Langmuir probe mounted on DEMETER satellite. The probe is used to measure electron density and temperature in the ionosphere on DEMETER at altitudes of 700 km.It also serves as a Mach probe and used to measure the plasma flow velocities in satellite frame of reference.The probe is partitioned into seven segments: six electrically insulated spherical caps and a Guard electrode (sphere). Comparisons are made between the model predictions and measurements for characteristics of various segments for actual ionospheric plasma conditions encountered along DEMETER orbit. Segment characteristics are computed numerically with PTetra, a 3 D PIC simulation code. The model accounts for several physical effects of importance in the interaction of spacecraft with the space environment e.g. satellite charging, photoelectron and secondary electron emission. The supersonic flow of plasma results in different characteristics for different segments of the probe. This anisotropy in turn can be used to infer the velocity of the background plasma. It is observed in that a positive bias can significantly modify plasma sheath region and wake formation around the probe.Computed characteristics and their angular anisotropy are compared with measurements.

  7. Proton Therapy Expansion Under Current United States Reimbursement Models

    SciTech Connect

    Kerstiens, John; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To determine whether all the existing and planned proton beam therapy (PBT) centers in the United States can survive on a local patient mix that is dictated by insurers, not by number of patients. Methods and Materials: We determined current and projected cancer rates for 10 major US metropolitan areas. Using published utilization rates, we calculated patient percentages who are candidates for PBT. Then, on the basis of current published insurer coverage policies, we applied our experience of what would be covered to determine the net number of patients for whom reimbursement is expected. Having determined the net number of covered patients, we applied our average beam delivery times to determine the total number of minutes needed to treat that patient over the course of their treatment. We then calculated our expected annual patient capacity per treatment room to determine the appropriate number of treatment rooms for the area. Results: The population of patients who will be both PBT candidates and will have treatments reimbursed by insurance is significantly smaller than the population who should receive PBT. Coverage decisions made by insurers reduce the number of PBT rooms that are economically viable. Conclusions: The expansion of PBT centers in the US is not sustainable under the current reimbursement model. Viability of new centers will be limited to those operating in larger regional metropolitan areas, and few metropolitan areas in the US can support multiple centers. In general, 1-room centers require captive (non–PBT-served) populations of approximately 1,000,000 lives to be economically viable, and a large center will require a population of >4,000,000 lives. In areas with smaller populations or where or a PBT center already exists, new centers require subsidy.

  8. Space charge templates for high-current beam modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Vorobiev, Leonid G.; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    A computational method to evaluate space charge potential and gradients of charged particle beam in the presence of conducting boundaries, has been introduced. The three-dimensional (3D) field of the beam can be derived as a convolution of macro Green's functions (template fields), satisfying the same boundary conditions, as the original beam. Numerical experiments gave a confidence that space charge effects can be modeled by templates with enough accuracy and generality within dramatically faster computational times than standard combination: a grid density + Poisson solvers, realized in the most of Particle in Cell codes. The achieved rapidity may significantly broaden the high-current beam design space, making the optimization in automatic mode possible, which so far was only feasible for simplest self-field formulations such as rms envelope equations. The template technique may be used as a standalone program, or as an optional field solver in existing beam dynamics codes both in one-passage structures and in rings.

  9. Current Trends in Modeling Research for Turbulent Aerodynamic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatski, Thomas B.; Rumsey, Christopher L.; Manceau, Remi

    2007-01-01

    The engineering tools of choice for the computation of practical engineering flows have begun to migrate from those based on the traditional Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes approach to methodologies capable, in theory if not in practice, of accurately predicting some instantaneous scales of motion in the flow. The migration has largely been driven by both the success of Reynolds-averaged methods over a wide variety of flows as well as the inherent limitations of the method itself. Practitioners, emboldened by their ability to predict a wide-variety of statistically steady, equilibrium turbulent flows, have now turned their attention to flow control and non-equilibrium flows, that is, separation control. This review gives some current priorities in traditional Reynolds-averaged modeling research as well as some methodologies being applied to a new class of turbulent flow control problems.

  10. FINITE ELEMENT MODEL FOR TIDES AND CURRENTS WITH FIELD APPLICATIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, Roy A.

    1988-01-01

    A finite element model, based upon the shallow water equations, is used to calculate tidal amplitudes and currents for two field-scale test problems. Because tides are characterized by line spectra, the governing equations are subjected to harmonic decomposition. Thus the solution variables are the real and imaginary parts of the amplitude of sea level and velocity rather than a time series of these variables. The time series is recovered through synthesis. This scheme, coupled with a modified form of the governing equations, leads to high computational efficiency and freedom from excessive numerical noise. Two test-cases are presented. The first is a solution for eleven tidal constituents in the English Channel and southern North Sea, and three constituents are discussed. The second is an analysis of the frequency response and tidal harmonics for south San Francisco Bay.

  11. Wall conditioning for ITER: Current experimental and modeling activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douai, D.; Kogut, D.; Wauters, T.; Brezinsek, S.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.; Hong, S. H.; Lomas, P. J.; Lyssoivan, A.; Nunes, I.; Pitts, R. A.; Rohde, V.; de Vries, P. C.

    2015-08-01

    Wall conditioning will be required in ITER to control fuel and impurity recycling, as well as tritium (T) inventory. Analysis of conditioning cycle on the JET, with its ITER-Like Wall is presented, evidencing reduced need for wall cleaning in ITER compared to JET-CFC. Using a novel 2D multi-fluid model, current density during Glow Discharge Conditioning (GDC) on the in-vessel plasma-facing components (PFC) of ITER is predicted to approach the simple expectation of total anode current divided by wall surface area. Baking of the divertor to 350 °C should desorb the majority of the co-deposited T. ITER foresees the use of low temperature plasma based techniques compatible with the permanent toroidal magnetic field, such as Ion (ICWC) or Electron Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ECWC), for tritium removal between ITER plasma pulses. Extrapolation of JET ICWC results to ITER indicates removal comparable to estimated T-retention in nominal ITER D:T shots, whereas GDC may be unattractive for that purpose.

  12. Experimental modeling of eddy currents and deflections for tokamak limiters

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, T.Q.; Knott, M.J.; Turner, L.R.; Wehrle, R.B.

    1986-01-01

    In this study, experiments were performed to investigate deflection, current, and material stress in cantilever beams with the Fusion ELectromagnetic Induction eXperiment (FELIX) at the Argonne National Laboratory. Since structures near the plasma are typically cantilevered, the beams provide a good model for the limiter blades of a tokamak fusion reactor. The test pieces were copper, aluminum, phosphor bronze, and brass cantilever beams, clamped rigidly at one end with a nonconducting support frame inside the FELIX test volume. The primary data recorded as functions of time were the beam deflection measured with a noncontact electro-optical device, the total eddy current measured with a Rogowski coil and linking through a central hole in the beam, and the material stress extracted from strain gauges. Measurements of stress and deflection were taken at selected positions along the beam. The extent of the coupling effect depends on several factors. These include the size, the electrical and mechanical properties of the beam, segmenting of the beam, the decay rate of the dipole field, and the strength of the solenoid field.

  13. Current research outcomes from the spinal cord injury model systems.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuying; Deutsch, Anne; DeVivo, Michael J; Johnson, Kurt; Kalpakjian, Claire Z; Nemunaitis, Gregory; Tulsky, David

    2011-03-01

    This article serves as an introduction to this issue of the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation that is devoted to current research findings of the Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems (SCIMS) program. The SCIMS program began in 1970, with funding from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research in the U.S. Department of Education, to demonstrate a comprehensive care system for spinal cord injury (SCI) and also to conduct research to improve the health and quality of life of persons with SCI. Over the last 20 years, similar collaborative efforts for the dissemination of SCIMS research outcomes have produced conference proceedings in 1990, a book in 1995, and dedicated journal issues in 1999 and 2004. The collection of 24 articles in this issue shows the depth and breadth of work being carried out by the SCIMS investigators, from descriptive epidemiology to a randomized controlled trial, from neurologic recovery to community reintegration, and from health services utilization to assistive technology for mobility. Herein, we provide a brief overview of the SCIMS program, highlight the research initiatives currently underway, and describe the important findings of the original research articles contained in this issue. PMID:21353816

  14. Numerically Modeling Pulsed-Current, Kinked Wire Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filbey, Gordon; Kingman, Pat

    1999-06-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) has embarked on a program to provide far-term land fighting vehicles with electromagnetic armor protection. Part of this work seeks to establish robust simulations of magneto-solid-mechanics phenomena. Whether describing violent rupture of a fuse link resulting from a large current pulse or the complete disruption of a copper shaped-charge jet subjected to high current densities, the simulations must include effects of intense Lorentz body forces and rapid Ohmic heating. Material models are required that describe plasticity, flow and fracture, conductivity, and equation of state (EOS) parameters for media in solid, liquid, and vapor phases. An extended version of the Eulerian wave code CTH has been used to predict the apex motion of a V-shaped (``kinked'') copper wire 3mm in diameter during a 400 kilo-amp pulse. These predictions, utilizing available material, EOS, and conductivity data for copper and the known characteristics of an existing capacitor-bank pulsed power supply, were then used to configure an experiment. The experiments were in excellent agreement with the prior simulations. Both computational and experimental results (including electrical data and flash X-rays) will be presented.

  15. Durability Improvements Through Degradation Mechanism Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, Rodney L.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Spernjak, Dusan; Baker, Andrew M.; Lujan, Roger W.; Langlois, David Alan; Ahluwalia, Rajesh; Papadia, D. D.; Weber, Adam Z.; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Shi, Shouwnen; More, K. L.; Grot, Steve

    2015-08-03

    The durability of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. By investigating cell component degradation modes and defining the fundamental degradation mechanisms of components and component interactions, new materials can be designed to improve durability. To achieve a deeper understanding of PEM fuel cell durability and component degradation mechanisms, we utilize a multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary team with significant experience investigating these phenomena.

  16. Modeling the heliospheric current sheet: Solar cycle variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Pete; Linker, J. A.; Mikić, Z.

    2002-07-01

    In this report we employ an empirically driven, three-dimensional MHD model to explore the evolution of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) during the course of the solar cycle. We compare our results with a simpler ``constant-speed'' approach for mapping the HCS outward into the solar wind to demonstrate that dynamic effects can substantially deform the HCS in the inner heliosphere (<~5 AU). We find that these deformations are most pronounced at solar minimum and become less significant at solar maximum, when interaction regions are less effective. Although solar maximum is typically associated with transient, rather than corotating, processes, we show that even under such conditions, the HCS can maintain its structure over the course of several solar rotations. While the HCS may almost always be topologically equivalent to a ``ballerina skirt,'' we discuss an interval approaching the maximum of solar cycle 23 (Carrington rotations 1960 and 1961) when the shape would be better described as ``conch shell''-like. We use Ulysses magnetic field measurements to support the model results.

  17. Modelling the early evolution of a Loop Current ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auladell, M.; Pelegrí, J. L.; García-Olivares, A.; Kirwan, A. D., Jr.; Lipphardt, B. L., Jr.; Martín, J. M.; Pascual, A.; Sangrà, P.; Zweng, M.

    2010-03-01

    The Colorado University Princeton Ocean Model (CUPOM) is used here to study the early stages in the life of Millennium, a mesoscale anticyclonic ring that detached from the Loop Current on April 2001 and lasted for more than 100 days. The numerical near-surface velocity field for the Gulf of Mexico is validated with the altimetry geostrophic velocities. The first 30 days of numerical data, before Millennium interacts with other mesoscalar features, are closely examined both from Eulerian and Lagrangian perspectives. During this time Millennium had a near-constant rotation period of 6.5 days, and particles do not leave the ring. Nevertheless, the distributions of temperature, salinity, and angular velocity confirm the existence of significant (possibly numerical) radial diffusion. Polar-coordinate phase plots for temperature-salinity anomalies and tangential-radial velocities, at several depths, illustrate the presence of an evolving oscillating pattern. Radial and tangential velocities change in phase, associated with vertical displacements of the isothermal and isohaline surfaces. A simple diffusion model with an effective diffusion coefficient of 200 m 2 s - 1 is appropriate to grossly simulate the temporal evolution of angular velocity within Millennium.

  18. Durability-based design criteria for an automotive structural composite

    SciTech Connect

    Corum, J.M.; Battiste, R.L.; Brinkman, C.R.; Ren, W.; Ruggles, M.B.; Yahr, G.T.

    1998-11-01

    Before composite structures can be widely used in automotive applications, their long-term durability must be assured. The Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was established by the US Department of Energy to help provide that assurance. The project is closely coordinated with the Automotive Composites Consortium. The experimentally-based, durability-driven design criteria described in this paper are the result of the initial project thrust. The criteria address a single reference composite, which is an SRIM (Structural Reaction Injection Molded) polyurethane, reinforced with continuous strand, swirl-mat E-glass fibers. The durability issues addressed include the effects of cyclic and sustained loadings, temperature, automotive fluid environments, and low-energy impacts (e.g., tool drops and roadway kickups) on strength, stiffness, and deformation. The criteria provide design analysis guidance, a multiaxial strength criterion, time-independent and time-dependent allowable stresses, rules for cyclic loading, and damage tolerance design guidance. Environmental degradation factors and the degrading effects of prior loadings are included. Efforts are currently underway to validate the criteria by application to a second random-glass-fiber composite. Carbon-fiber composites are also being addressed.

  19. Dust Composition in Climate Models: Current Status and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez García-Pando, C.; Miller, R. L.; Perlwitz, J. P.; Kok, J. F.; Scanza, R.; Mahowald, N. M.

    2015-12-01

    Mineral dust created by wind erosion of soil particles is the dominant aerosol by mass in the atmosphere. It exerts significant effects on radiative fluxes, clouds, ocean biogeochemistry, and human health. Models that predict the lifecycle of mineral dust aerosols generally assume a globally uniform mineral composition. However, this simplification limits our understanding of the role of dust in the Earth system, since the effects of dust strongly depend on the particles' physical and chemical properties, which vary with their mineral composition. Hence, not only a detailed understanding of the processes determining the dust emission flux is needed, but also information about its size dependent mineral composition. Determining the mineral composition of dust aerosols is complicated. The largest uncertainty derives from the current atlases of soil mineral composition. These atlases provide global estimates of soil mineral fractions, but they are based upon massive extrapolation of a limited number of soil samples assuming that mineral composition is related to soil type. This disregards the potentially large variability of soil properties within each defined soil type. In addition, the analysis of these soil samples is based on wet sieving, a technique that breaks the aggregates found in the undisturbed parent soil. During wind erosion, these aggregates are subject to partial fragmentation, which generates differences on the size distribution and composition between the undisturbed parent soil and the emitted dust aerosols. We review recent progress on the representation of the mineral and chemical composition of dust in climate models. We discuss extensions of brittle fragmentation theory to prescribe the emitted size-resolved dust composition, and we identify key processes and uncertainties based upon model simulations and an unprecedented compilation of observations.

  20. Recent Simulation Results on Ring Current Dynamics Using the Comprehensive Ring Current Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Yihua; Zaharia, Sorin G.; Lui, Anthony T. Y.; Fok, Mei-Ching

    2010-01-01

    Plasma sheet conditions and electromagnetic field configurations are both crucial in determining ring current evolution and connection to the ionosphere. In this presentation, we investigate how different conditions of plasma sheet distribution affect ring current properties. Results include comparative studies in 1) varying the radial distance of the plasma sheet boundary; 2) varying local time distribution of the source population; 3) varying the source spectra. Our results show that a source located farther away leads to a stronger ring current than a source that is closer to the Earth. Local time distribution of the source plays an important role in determining both the radial and azimuthal (local time) location of the ring current peak pressure. We found that post-midnight source locations generally lead to a stronger ring current. This finding is in agreement with Lavraud et al.. However, our results do not exhibit any simple dependence of the local time distribution of the peak ring current (within the lower energy range) on the local time distribution of the source, as suggested by Lavraud et al. [2008]. In addition, we will show how different specifications of the magnetic field in the simulation domain affect ring current dynamics in reference to the 20 November 2007 storm, which include initial results on coupling the CRCM with a three-dimensional (3-D) plasma force balance code to achieve self-consistency in the magnetic field.

  1. Structural Analyses of Stirling Power Convertor Heater Head for Long-Term Reliability, Durability, and Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Shah, Ashwin; Arya, Vinod K.; Krause, David L.; Bartolotta, Paul A.

    2002-01-01

    Deep-space missions require onboard electric power systems with reliable design lifetimes of up to 10 yr and beyond. A high-efficiency Stirling radioisotope power system is a likely candidate for future deep-space missions and Mars rover applications. To ensure ample durability, the structurally critical heater head of the Stirling power convertor has undergone extensive computational analyses of operating temperatures (up to 650 C), stresses, and creep resistance of the thin-walled Inconel 718 bill of material. Durability predictions are presented in terms of the probability of survival. A benchmark structural testing program has commenced to support the analyses. This report presents the current status of durability assessments.

  2. Drought Duration Biases in Current Global Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Heewon; Gudmundsson, Lukas; Seneviratne, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    Several droughts in the recent past are characterized by their increased duration and intensity. In particular, substantially prolonged droughts have brought major societal and economic losses in certain regions, yet climate change projections of such droughts in terms of duration is subject to large uncertainties. This study analyzes the biases of drought duration in state-of-the-art global climate model (GCM) simulations from the 5th phase of Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Drought durations are defined as negative precipitation anomalies and evaluated with three observation-based datasets in the period of 1901-2010. Large spread in biases of GCMs is commonly found in all regions, with particular strong biases in North East Brazil, Africa, Northern Australia, Central America, Central and Northern Europe, Sahel and Asia. Also in most regions, the interquartile range of bias lies below 0, meaning that the GCMs tend to underestimate drought durations. Meanwhile in some regions such as Western South America, the Amazon, Sahel, West and South Africa, and Asia, considerable inconsistency among the three observation-based datasets were found. These results indicate substantial uncertainties and errors in current GCMs for simulating drought durations as well as a large spread in observation-based datasets, both of which are found to be particularly strong in those regions that are often considered to be hot spots of projected future drying. The underlying sources of these uncertainties need to be identified in further study and will be applied to constrain GCM-based drought projections under climate change.

  3. Organotypic liver culture models: Meeting current challenges in toxicity testing

    PubMed Central

    LeCluyse, Edward L.; Witek, Rafal P.; Andersen, Melvin E.; Powers, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Prediction of chemical-induced hepatotoxicity in humans from in vitro data continues to be a significant challenge for the pharmaceutical and chemical industries. Generally, conventional in vitro hepatic model systems (i.e. 2-D static monocultures of primary or immortalized hepatocytes) are limited by their inability to maintain histotypic and phenotypic characteristics over time in culture, including stable expression of clearance and bioactivation pathways, as well as complex adaptive responses to chemical exposure. These systems are less than ideal for longer-term toxicity evaluations and elucidation of key cellular and molecular events involved in primary and secondary adaptation to chemical exposure, or for identification of important mediators of inflammation, proliferation and apoptosis. Progress in implementing a more effective strategy for in vitro-in vivo extrapolation and human risk assessment depends on significant advances in tissue culture technology and increasing their level of biological complexity. This article describes the current and ongoing need for more relevant, organotypic in vitro surrogate systems of human liver and recent efforts to recreate the multicellular architecture and hemodynamic properties of the liver using novel culture platforms. As these systems become more widely used for chemical and drug toxicity testing, there will be a corresponding need to establish standardized testing conditions, endpoint analyses and acceptance criteria. In the future, a balanced approach between sample throughput and biological relevance should provide better in vitro tools that are complementary with animal testing and assist in conducting more predictive human risk assessment. PMID:22582993

  4. An analytical model of eddy current ferrite-core probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y.; Bowler, J. R.

    2012-05-01

    An analytical model of an axisymmetric eddy current probe with a cylindrical ferrite core above a layered conductive half-space is developed. Initially we consider the magnetic vector potential of a circular filament coaxial with a ferrite core over a layered conducting half-space. The principle of superposition is then used to derive close-form expressions for both the electromagnetic field and the impedance of a coil from the filament field. Rather than locating the probe in infinite space, it is confined coaxially within a circularly cylindrical boundary on which the vector potential field is zero. The radius of this artificial boundary is large in order to ensure that does not interfere substantially with the field near the probe. By using a truncated region in this way, the vector potential in the probe region can be expanded as a series rather than an integral form. Thus the solution of the problem amounts to finding the expansion coeefficients in the series. The numerical predictions of probe impedance have been compared with experimental data showing good agreement.

  5. Catapult current sheet relaxation model confirmed by THEMIS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, S.; Miyashita, Y.; Ieda, A.; Nose, M.; Angelopoulos, V.; McFadden, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we show the result of superposed epoch analysis on the THEMIS probe data during the period from November, 2007 to April, 2009 by setting the origin of time axis to the substorm onset determined by Nishimura with THEMIS all sky imager (THEMS/ASI) data (http://www.atmos.ucla.edu/~toshi/files/paper/Toshi_THEMIS_GBO_list_distribution.xls). We confirmed the presence of earthward flows which can be associated with north-south auroral streamers during the substorm growth phase. At around X = -12 Earth radii (Re), the northward magnetic field and its elevation angle decreased markedly approximately 4 min before substorm onset. A northward magnetic-field increase associated with pre-onset earthward flows was found at around X = -17Re. This variation indicates the occurrence of the local depolarization. Interestingly, in the region earthwards of X = -18Re, earthward flows in the central plasma sheet (CPS) reduced significantly about 3min before substorm onset. However, the earthward flows enhanced again at t = -60 sec in the region around X = -14 Re, and they moved toward the Earth. At t = 0, the dipolarization of the magnetic field started at X ~ -10 Re, and simultaneously the magnetic reconnection started at X ~ -20 Re. Synthesizing these results, we can confirm the validity of our catapult current sheet relaxation model.

  6. Environmental Durability of Electroplated Black Chromium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Report describes tests of durability of electroplated black chromium coatings on solar-collector panels in rural, industrial, and seacoast environments for 60, 36, and 13 months, respectively. Black-chromium coating showed exceptionally-good optical durability in all three environments.

  7. Ceramics: Durability and radiation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, R.C.; Lutze, W.; Weber, W.J.

    1996-05-01

    At present, there are three seriously considered options for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium: (1) incorporation, partial burn-up and direct disposal of MOX-fuel; (2) vitrification with defense waste and disposal as glass {open_quotes}logs{close_quotes}; (3) deep borehole disposal. The first two options provide a safeguard due to the high activity of fission products in the irradiated fuel and the defense waste. The latter option has only been examined in a preliminary manner, and the exact form of the plutonium has not been identified. In this paper, we review the potential for the immobilization of plutonium in highly durable crystalline ceramics apatite, pyrochlore, zirconolite, monazite and zircon. Based on available data, we propose zircon as the preferred crystalline ceramic for the permanent disposition of excess weapons plutonium.

  8. Durability of aircraft composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dextern, H. B.

    1982-01-01

    Confidence in the long term durability of advanced composites is developed through a series of flight service programs. Service experience is obtained by installing secondary and primary composite components on commercial and military transport aircraft and helicopters. Included are spoilers, rudders, elevators, ailerons, fairings and wing boxes on transport aircraft and doors, fairings, tail rotors, vertical fins, and horizontal stabilizers on helicopters. Materials included in the evaluation are boron/epoxy, Kevlar/epoxy, graphite/epoxy and boron/aluminum. Inspection, maintenance, and repair results for the components in service are reported. The effects of long term exposure to laboratory, flight, and outdoor environmental conditions are reported for various composite materials. Included are effects of moisture absorption, ultraviolet radiation, and aircraft fuels and fluids.

  9. The behavior of the MR fluid during durability test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roupec, J.; Mazůrek, I.; Strecker, Z.; Klapka, M.

    2013-02-01

    The article describes results of durability test of a magnetorheological fluid (MRF), which was carried out in rheometer of own design. The rheometer design enables to measure the rheological properties of MR fluid and to expose it to a long-term loading simultaneously, without any manipulation of the measured sample. During the durability test a change of the two most important parameters of Bingham model describing the behavior of MR fluids can be followed - dynamic viscosity and yield stress. In this paper the yield stress and viscosity were evaluated depending on temperature in OFF-state. The results show a significant change of yield strength during durability test depending on temperature of loading. Dependence of yield stress on temperature was proved. The viscosity decreased by 36% from its initial value after the dissipation of 9÷20kJcm-3 from total 1.2 MJcm-3 and then has remained the same until the end of durability test. Viscosity was evaluated depending on temperature.

  10. Modelling Monsoons: Understanding and Predicting Current and Future Behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, A; Sperber, K R; Slingo, J M; Meehl, G A; Mechoso, C R; Kimoto, M; Giannini, A

    2008-09-16

    including, but not limited to, the Mei-Yu/Baiu sudden onset and withdrawal, low-level jet orientation and variability, and orographic forced rainfall. Under anthropogenic climate change many competing factors complicate making robust projections of monsoon changes. Without aerosol effects, increased land-sea temperature contrast suggests strengthened monsoon circulation due to climate change. However, increased aerosol emissions will reflect more solar radiation back to space, which may temper or even reduce the strength of monsoon circulations compared to the present day. A more comprehensive assessment is needed of the impact of black carbon aerosols, which may modulate that of other anthropogenic greenhouse gases. Precipitation may behave independently from the circulation under warming conditions in which an increased atmospheric moisture loading, based purely on thermodynamic considerations, could result in increased monsoon rainfall under climate change. The challenge to improve model parameterizations and include more complex processes and feedbacks pushes computing resources to their limit, thus requiring continuous upgrades of computational infrastructure to ensure progress in understanding and predicting the current and future behavior of monsoons.

  11. Modeling of high-current devices with explosive electron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anishchenko, S. V.; Gurinovich, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Based on a detailed analysis of explosive electron emission in high-current electronic devices, we formulate a system of equations that describes the expansion of cathode plasma and the generation of high-current electron beams. The system underlies the numerical algorithm for the hybrid code which enables the simulation of the charged particles’ dynamics in high-current vircators with open resonators. Using the Gabor-Morlet transform, we perform a time-frequency analysis of vircator radiation.

  12. Modeling of a single-cycle current generator while forming a quasi-sinusoidal current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebennikov, V. V.; Yaroslavtsev, E. V.; Slobodenuk, A. B.; Evtushenko, T. G.

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents the results of investigation of the influence of the output voltage magnitude on the operating frequency of the switch in the single-cycle quasi-sinusoidal current generator circuit. Analytical expressions for calculating the time parameters for transients in the circuit under given assumptions have been obtained. The results presented in the paper can be used in the design of converters of this type.

  13. Durable Airtightness in Single-Family Dwellings - Field Measurementsand Analysis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chan, Wanyu R.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2015-06-01

    Here, durability of the building envelope is important to new homes that are increasingly built with improved levels of airtightness. It is also important to weatherized homes such that energy savings from retrofit measures, such as air sealing, are persistent. This paper presents a comparison of air leakage measurements collected in November 2013 through March 2014, with two sets of prior data collected between 2001-2003 from 17 new homes located near Atlanta, GA, and 17 homes near Boise, ID that were weatherized in 2007- 2008. The purpose of the comparison is to determine if there are changes to the airtightnessmore » of building envelopes over time. The air leakage increased in all but one of the new homes, with a mean increase of about 25%. The weatherized homes also showed an increase in the mean air leakage (12%). A regression analysis was performed to describe the relationship between prior and current measurements in terms of normalized leakage (NL). The best estimate of the ageing factor predicts a 15% increase in NL over ten years. Further analysis using ResDB data (LBNL’s Residential Diagnostic Database) showed the expected changes in air leakage if ageing were modelled. These results imply the need to examine the causes of increased leakage and methods to avoid them. This increase in leakage with time should be accounted for in long-term population-wide energy savings estimates, such as those used in ratings or energy savings programs.« less

  14. Durable Airtightness in Single-Family Dwellings - Field Measurementsand Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Wanyu R.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2015-06-01

    Here, durability of the building envelope is important to new homes that are increasingly built with improved levels of airtightness. It is also important to weatherized homes such that energy savings from retrofit measures, such as air sealing, are persistent. This paper presents a comparison of air leakage measurements collected in November 2013 through March 2014, with two sets of prior data collected between 2001-2003 from 17 new homes located near Atlanta, GA, and 17 homes near Boise, ID that were weatherized in 2007- 2008. The purpose of the comparison is to determine if there are changes to the airtightness of building envelopes over time. The air leakage increased in all but one of the new homes, with a mean increase of about 25%. The weatherized homes also showed an increase in the mean air leakage (12%). A regression analysis was performed to describe the relationship between prior and current measurements in terms of normalized leakage (NL). The best estimate of the ageing factor predicts a 15% increase in NL over ten years. Further analysis using ResDB data (LBNL’s Residential Diagnostic Database) showed the expected changes in air leakage if ageing were modelled. These results imply the need to examine the causes of increased leakage and methods to avoid them. This increase in leakage with time should be accounted for in long-term population-wide energy savings estimates, such as those used in ratings or energy savings programs.

  15. Numerical modeling of lower hybrid heating and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Valeo, E.J.; Eder, D.C.

    1986-03-01

    The generation of currents in toroidal plasma by application of waves in the lower hybrid frequency range involves the interplay of several physical phenomena which include: wave propagation in toroidal geometry, absorption via wave-particle resonances, the quasilinear generation of strongly nonequilibrium electron and ion distribution functions, and the self-consistent evolution of the current density in such a nonequilibrium plasma. We describe a code, LHMOD, which we have developed to treat these aspects of current drive and heating in tokamaks. We present results obtained by applying the code to a computation of current ramp-up and to an investigation of the possible importance of minority hydrogen absorption in a deuterium plasma as the ''density limit'' to current drive is approached.

  16. Predicting the Impact of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes on the Cement Hydration Products and Durability of Cementitious Matrix Using Artificial Neural Network Modeling Technique

    PubMed Central

    Fakhim, Babak; Hassani, Abolfazl; Rashidi, Alimorad; Ghodousi, Parviz

    2013-01-01

    In this study the feasibility of using the artificial neural networks modeling in predicting the effect of MWCNT on amount of cement hydration products and improving the quality of cement hydration products microstructures of cement paste was investigated. To determine the amount of cement hydration products thermogravimetric analysis was used. Two critical parameters of TGA test are PHPloss and CHloss. In order to model the TGA test results, the ANN modeling was performed on these parameters separately. In this study, 60% of data are used for model calibration and the remaining 40% are used for model verification. Based on the highest efficiency coefficient and the lowest root mean square error, the best ANN model was chosen. The results of TGA test implied that the cement hydration is enhanced in the presence of the optimum percentage (0.3 wt%) of MWCNT. Moreover, since the efficiency coefficient of the modeling results of CH and PHP loss in both the calibration and verification stages was more than 0.96, it was concluded that the ANN could be used as an accurate tool for modeling the TGA results. Another finding of this study was that the ANN prediction in higher ages was more precise. PMID:24489487

  17. Durability Challenges for Next Generation of Gas Turbine Engine Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive fuel burn and carbon dioxide emission reduction goals for future gas turbine engines will require higher overall pressure ratio, and a significant increase in turbine inlet temperature. These goals can be achieved by increasing temperature capability of turbine engine hot section materials and decreasing weight of fan section of the engine. NASA is currently developing several advanced hot section materials for increasing temperature capability of future gas turbine engines. The materials of interest include ceramic matrix composites with 1482 - 1648 C temperature capability, advanced disk alloys with 815 C capability, and low conductivity thermal barrier coatings with erosion resistance. The presentation will provide an overview of durability challenges with emphasis on the environmental factors affecting durability for the next generation of gas turbine engine materials. The environmental factors include gaseous atmosphere in gas turbine engines, molten salt and glass deposits from airborne contaminants, impact from foreign object damage, and erosion from ingestion of small particles.

  18. Comparison of Hemostatic Durability between N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate and Gelatin Sponge Particles in Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Acute Arterial Hemorrhage in a Coagulopathic Condition in a Swine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yonemitsu, Takafumi; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Sato, Morio Sonomura, Tetsuo; Takasaka, Isao; Nakai, Motoki; Minamiguchi, Hiroki; Sahara, Shinya; Iwasaki, Yasuhiro; Naka, Toshio; Shinozaki, Masahiro

    2010-12-15

    This study was designed to compare the efficacy of transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) with N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) or gelatin sponge particles (GSP) for acute arterial bleeding in a coagulopathic condition using a swine model. Four healthy swine were divided into two coagulopathic conditions: mild and severe. Five hemorrhages were created in each swine (10 hemorrhages per coagulopathy). Mild coagulopathy was achieved by bloodletting 10% of the total circulatory whole blood and preserving activated clotting time (ACT) less than 200 s (ACT < 200 s state); severe coagulopathy was achieved by bloodletting 30% and preserving ACT > 400 s (ACT > 400-second state). For each state, of ACT < 200 s or ACT > 400 s, TAE was conducted with GSP or NBCA to control five hemorrhages arising from artificially created renal and splenic injuries. Angiography immediately after TAE with GSP or NBCA showed complete occlusion in both coagulopathic conditions. In the ACT < 200-second state, follow-up angiography at 5-30 min after TAE with GSP or NBCA showed no evidence of recurrent hemorrhage. In the ACT > 400-second state, follow-up angiography showed recurrent hemorrhage in four (80%) of the five hemorrhages embolized with GSP and in one (20%) of the five hemorrhages embolized with NBCA. Microscopically, red thrombi were observed densely surrounding GSP in mild coagulopathy but were scarce in severe coagulopathy. In a condition with severe coagulopathy, TAE with NBCA was more effective in durability to cease active arterial bleeding than with GSP.

  19. A new 3D fully wave-current model MARS-WAVEWATCH : development, validation and application to the rip currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennis, A.; Ardhuin, F.; Dumas, F.; Bonneton, P.

    2010-12-01

    The interaction of waves with three-dimensional current structure is investigated using a two-way coupled modelling system combining MARS3D (Lazure and Dumas 2008) with WAVEWATCH III (Tolman 2008, Ardhuin et al. 2009) , a wave model (NOAA/NCEP, Tolman 2008). After a basic validation in two dimensions, the flow model MARS3D was adapted with three options that solve for the total momentum (Mellor 2003, 2008) or the quasi-Eulerian momentum (Ardhuin et al. 2008b). Adiabatic model results show that, as expected from theory (Ardhuin et al. 2008a), the total momentum fluxes parameterized by Mellor are not self-consistent and can lead to very large errors (Bennis and Ardhuin 2010). We thus use the model option to solve for the quasi-Eulerian momentum, including sources of momentum and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). The influence of these TKE sources is investigated in the case of the NSTS experiment (Thornton and Guza, 1986). The feedback of the currents on the waves is negligible in this case. The sources of TKE from wave breaking and wave bottom friction are found to have strong influence on the bottom friction, in a way consistent with the parameterizations by Longuet-Higgins (1970) and Mellor (2002). The complete model is then applied to a real case of a large rip current on the South-West coast of France (Bruneau et al., Cont. Shelf Res. 2009). The breaking of waves on the opposed current generates a strong coupling on the rip current that partially controls the strength of the current and it three-dimensional shape.

  20. The effect of chemical composition on the PCT durability of mixed waste glasses from wastewater treatment sludges

    SciTech Connect

    Resce, J.L.; Ragsdale, R.G.; Overcamp, T.J.; Bickford, D.F.; Cicero, C.A.

    1995-01-25

    An experimental program has been designed to examine the chemical durability of glass compositions derived from the vitrification of simulated wastewater treatment sludges. These sludges represent the majority of low-level mixed wastes currently in need of treatment by the US DOE. The major oxides in these model glasses included SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}O, CaO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. In addition, three minor oxides, BaO, NiO, and PbO, were added as hazardous metals. The major oxides were each varied at two levels resulting in 32 experimental glasses. The chemical durability was measured by the 7-Day Product Consistency Test (PCT). The normalized sodium release rates (NRR{sub Na}) of these glasses ranged from 0.01 to 4.99 g/m{sup 2}. The molar ratio of the glass-former to glass-modifier (F/M) was found to have the greatest effect on PCT durability. Glass-formers included SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, while Na{sub 2}O, CaO, BaO, NiO, and PbO were glass-modifiers. As this ratio increased from 0.75 to 2.0, NRR{sub Na} was found to decrease between one and two orders of magnitude. Another important effect on NRR{sub Na} was the Na{sub 2}O/CaO ratio. As this ratio increased from 0.5 to 2.0, NRR{sub Na} increased up to two orders of magnitude for the glasses with the low F/M ratio but almost no effect was observed for the glasses with the high F/M ratio. Increasing the iron oxide content from 2 to 18 mole% was found to decrease NRR{sub Na} one order of magnitude for the glasses with low F/M but iron had little effect on the glasses with the high F/M ratio. The durability also increased when 10 mole percent Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was included in low iron oxide glasses but no effect was observed with the high iron glasses. The addition of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} had little effect on durability. The effects of other composition parameters on durability are discussed as well.

  1. Durable coatings for IR windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Lee M.; Jha, Santosh K.; Gunda, Nilesh; Cooke, Rick; Agarwal, Neeta; Sastri, Suri A.; Harker, Alan; Kirsch, Jim

    2005-05-01

    Durable coatings of silicon-carbon-oxy-nitride (a.k.a. SiCON) are being developed to protect high-speed missile windows from the environmental loads during flight. Originally developed at Rockwell Scientific Corporation (RSC) these coatings exhibited substantial promise, but were difficult to deposit. Under a DoD DARPA SBIR Phase I program, Surmet Corporation, working closely with RSC, is depositing these coatings using an innovative vacuum vapor deposition process. High rate of coating deposition and the ease of manipulating the process variables, make Surmet"s process suitable for the deposition of substantially thick films (up to 30 μm) with precisely controlled chemistry. Initial work has shown encouraging results, and the refinement of the coating and coating process is still underway. Coupons of SiN and SiCON coatings with varying thickness on a variety of substrates such as Si-wafer, ZnS and ALON were fabricated and used for the study. This paper will present and discuss the results of SiN and SiCON coatings deposition and characterization (physical, mechanical and optical properties) as a basis for evaluating their suitability for high speed missile windows application.

  2. Method of determining glass durability

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, C.M.; Pickett, J.B.; Brown, K.G.; Edwards, T.B.

    1998-12-08

    A process is described for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, {Delta}G{sub p}, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, {Delta}G{sub a}, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup WA}, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, {Delta}G{sub a}{sup SB} associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, {Delta}G{sub f}. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log{sub 10}(N C{sub i}(g/L))=a{sub i} + b{sub i}{Delta}G{sub f}. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained. 4 figs.

  3. Method of determining glass durability

    DOEpatents

    Jantzen, Carol Maryanne; Pickett, John Butler; Brown, Kevin George; Edwards, Thomas Barry

    1998-01-01

    A process for determining one or more leachate concentrations of one or more components of a glass composition in an aqueous solution of the glass composition by identifying the components of the glass composition, including associated oxides, determining a preliminary glass dissolution estimator, .DELTA.G.sub.p, based upon the free energies of hydration for the component reactant species, determining an accelerated glass dissolution function, .DELTA.G.sub.a, based upon the free energy associated with weak acid dissociation, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.WA, and accelerated matrix dissolution at high pH, .DELTA.G.sub.a.sup.SB associated with solution strong base formation, and determining a final hydration free energy, .DELTA.G.sub.f. This final hydration free energy is then used to determine leachate concentrations for elements of interest using a regression analysis and the formula log.sub.10 (N C.sub.i (g/L))=a.sub.i +b.sub.i .DELTA.G.sub.f. The present invention also includes a method to determine whether a particular glass to be produced will be homogeneous or phase separated. The present invention is also directed to methods of monitoring and controlling processes for making glass using these determinations to modify the feedstock materials until a desired glass durability and homogeneity is obtained.

  4. Subsurface Counter Current beneath the Tsushima Warm Current Reproduced by a Data Assimilative Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuno, A.; Watanabe, T.; Takayama, K.

    2012-12-01

    In the Japan Sea, the Tsushima Warm Current (TWC) dominates the surface layer, and the TWC water flows roughly northeastward along the coast of Japan. From early summer to autumn, a seasonal circulation often forms beneath the TWC. This seasonal circulation is referred to as the subsurface counter current (SSCC) because it flows over the Japanese continental slope in the opposite direction to the surface TWC. The SSCC has been investigated in both observational and numerical studies, and some numerical studies have proposed that subsurface clockwise gyres that form off the Japanese coast induce the SSCC. However, the preceding numerical studies have focused on the climatological representation of the SSCC, and so more realistic year-to-year examination of the SSCC has been needed. Hence we analyzed 13-year data-assimilative products of JADE (JApan sea Data assimilation Experiment), an ocean forecast system operated at Japan Sea National Fisheries Research Institute, Fisheries Research Agency. The JADE products from 1999 to 2011 reproduced the climatological view of the SSCC reported by the preceding numerical studies: Subsurface clockwise gyres appeared off the Japanese coast from May to October, inducing the SSCC over the continental slope; Core of the SSCC (or the gyre) was found around 140-200 m depth. The subsurface gyres showed year-to-year variation in its position, magnitude and duration, thus magnitude and duration of the SSCC at a fixed location notably varied year-to-year. The reproduced SSCC showed 10-20 cm/s velocity that well corresponded to the observed values. Formation of the subsurface gyres was characterized by seasonal enhancement of clockwise vortices that were trapped in embayments of the bottom relief. The vortices were surface-intensified and showed vertically-coherent negative vorticity from the surface to about 300 m depth. Because the vortices were embedded into the more surface-intensified TWC, the clockwise gyre flow (or the SSCC) was

  5. The NRC's SPAR Models: Current Status, Future Development, and Modeling Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Robert F. Buell

    2008-09-01

    Probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) play an increasingly important role in the regulatory framework of the U.S. nuclear power industry. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) relies on a set of plant-specific Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) models to provide critical risk-based input to the regulatory process. The Significance Determination Process (SDP), Management Directive 8.3 - NRC Incident Investigation Program, Accident Sequence Precursor (ASP) and Mitigating Systems Performance Index (MSPI) programs are among the regulatory initiatives that receive significant input from the SPAR models. Other uses of the SPAR models include: Screening & Resolution of Generic Safety Issues, License Amendment reviews and Notice of Enforcement Discretion (NOEDs). This paper presents the current status of SPAR model development activities, future development objectives, and issues related to the development, verification and maintenance of the SPAR models.

  6. Current Trends in Distance Education: An Administrative Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compora, Daniel P.

    2003-01-01

    Current practices and procedures of distance education programs at selected institutions in higher education in Ohio were studied. Relevant data was found in the areas of: (1) content of the distance education program's mission statement; (2) needs assessment procedures; (3) student demographics; (4) course acquisition, development, and evaluation…

  7. Simulation of Current Generation in a 3-D Plasma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsung, F. S.; Dawson, J. M.

    1996-11-01

    In the advanced tokamak regime, transport phenomena can account for a signficant fraction of the toroidal current, possibly over that driven directly by the ohmic heating electric fields. Bootstrap theory accounts for contributions of the collisional modification of banana orbits on the toroidal currents. In our previous simulations in 21/2-D, currents were spontaneously generated in both the cylindrical and the toroidal geometries, contrary to neoclassical predictions. In these calculations, it was believed that the driving mechanism is the preferential loss of particles whose initial velocity is opposite to that of the plasma current. We are extending these simulations to three dimensions. A parallel 3-D electromagnetic PIC code running on the IBM SP2, with a localized field-solver has been developed to investigate the effects of perturbations parallel to the field lines, and direct comparisons has been made between the 21/2-D and 3-D simulations and we have found good agreements between the 2 1/2-D calculations and the 3-D results. We will present our new results at the meeting. Research partially supported by NSF and DOE.

  8. An Alternative to the Current Research Model of Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craige, Betty Jean

    1984-01-01

    Criticizes current practices of seeking and preserving knowledge which neither contribute to nor support the fields of "humanistic" interest. By confining specialized research to the scientists, it is suggested that a more generalized approach be taken towards literary studies, as a means of broadening and interrelating all the issues that affect…

  9. Current Experimental Basis for Modeling Ice Accretions on Swept Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario

    2005-01-01

    This work presents a review of the experimental basis for modeling ice accretions on swept wings. Experimental work related to ice accretion physics on swept wings conducted between 1954 and 2004 is reviewed. Proposed models or explanations of scallop formations are singled out and discussed. Special emphasis is placed on reviewing the work done to determine the basic macroscopic mechanisms of scallop formation. The role of feather growth and its connection to scallop growth is discussed. Conceptual steps in modeling scallop formations are presented. Research elements needed for modeling are discussed.

  10. Metabolic modeling of clostridia: current developments and applications.

    PubMed

    Dash, Satyakam; Ng, Chiam Yu; Maranas, Costas D

    2016-02-01

    Anaerobic Clostridium spp. is an important bioproduction microbial genus that can produce solvents and utilize a broad spectrum of substrates including cellulose and syngas. Genome-scale metabolic (GSM) models are increasingly being put forth for various clostridial strains to explore their respective metabolic capabilities and suitability for various bioconversions. In this study, we have selected representative GSM models for six different clostridia (Clostridium acetobutylicum, C. beijerinckii, C. butyricum, C. cellulolyticum, C. ljungdahlii and C. thermocellum) and performed a detailed model comparison contrasting their metabolic repertoire. We also discuss various applications of these GSM models to guide metabolic engineering interventions as well as assessing cellular physiology. PMID:26755502