Science.gov

Sample records for current error control

  1. Aircraft system modeling error and control error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Nilesh V. (Inventor); Kaneshige, John T. (Inventor); Krishnakumar, Kalmanje S. (Inventor); Burken, John J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method for modeling error-driven adaptive control of an aircraft. Normal aircraft plant dynamics is modeled, using an original plant description in which a controller responds to a tracking error e(k) to drive the component to a normal reference value according to an asymptote curve. Where the system senses that (1) at least one aircraft plant component is experiencing an excursion and (2) the return of this component value toward its reference value is not proceeding according to the expected controller characteristics, neural network (NN) modeling of aircraft plant operation may be changed. However, if (1) is satisfied but the error component is returning toward its reference value according to expected controller characteristics, the NN will continue to model operation of the aircraft plant according to an original description.

  2. Control by model error estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likins, P. W.; Skelton, R. E.

    1976-01-01

    Modern control theory relies upon the fidelity of the mathematical model of the system. Truncated modes, external disturbances, and parameter errors in linear system models are corrected by augmenting to the original system of equations an 'error system' which is designed to approximate the effects of such model errors. A Chebyshev error system is developed for application to the Large Space Telescope (LST).

  3. Retransmission error control with memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sindhu, P. S.

    1977-01-01

    In this paper, an error control technique that is a basic improvement over automatic-repeat-request ARQ is presented. Erroneously received blocks in an ARQ system are used for error control. The technique is termed ARQ-with-memory (MRQ). The general MRQ system is described, and simple upper and lower bounds are derived on the throughput achievable by MRQ. The performance of MRQ with respect to throughput, message delay and probability of error is compared to that of ARQ by simulating both systems using error data from a VHF satellite channel being operated in the ALOHA packet broadcasting mode.

  4. Automatic-repeat-request error control schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S.; Costello, D. J., Jr.; Miller, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    Error detection incorporated with automatic-repeat-request (ARQ) is widely used for error control in data communication systems. This method of error control is simple and provides high system reliability. If a properly chosen code is used for error detection, virtually error-free data transmission can be attained. Various types of ARQ and hybrid ARQ schemes, and error detection using linear block codes are surveyed.

  5. Superconducting fault current controller/current controller

    DOEpatents

    Cha, Yung S.

    2004-06-15

    A superconducting fault current controller/current controller employs a superconducting-shielded core reactor (SSCR) with a variable impedance in a secondary circuit to control current in a primary circuit such as an electrical distribution system. In a second embodiment, a variable current source is employed in a secondary circuit of an SSCR to control current in the primary circuit. In a third embodiment, both a variable impedance in one secondary circuit and a variable current source in a second circuit of an SSCR are employed for separate and independent control of current in the primary circuit.

  6. A posteriori error estimator and error control for contact problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Alexander; Wohlmuth, Barbara I.

    2009-09-01

    In this paper, we consider two error estimators for one-body contact problems. The first error estimator is defined in terms of H( div ) -conforming stress approximations and equilibrated fluxes while the second is a standard edge-based residual error estimator without any modification with respect to the contact. We show reliability and efficiency for both estimators. Moreover, the error is bounded by the first estimator with a constant one plus a higher order data oscillation term plus a term arising from the contact that is shown numerically to be of higher order. The second estimator is used in a control-based AFEM refinement strategy, and the decay of the error in the energy is shown. Several numerical tests demonstrate the performance of both estimators.

  7. A cascaded coding scheme for error control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasami, T.; Lin, S.

    1985-01-01

    A cascaded coding scheme for error control was investigated. The scheme employs a combination of hard and soft decisions in decoding. Error performance is analyzed. If the inner and outer codes are chosen properly, extremely high reliability can be attained even for a high channel bit-error-rate. Some example schemes are studied which seem to be quite suitable for satellite down-link error control.

  8. Evaluation and control of spatial frequency errors in reflective telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuejun; Zeng, Xuefeng; Hu, Haixiang; Zheng, Ligong

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the influence on the image quality of manufacturing residual errors was studied. By analyzing the statistical distribution characteristics of the residual errors and their effects on PSF and MTF, we divided those errors into low, middle and high frequency domains using the unit "cycles per aperture". Two types of mid-frequency errors, algorithm intrinsic and tool path induced were analyzed. Control methods in current deterministic polishing process, such as MRF or IBF were presented.

  9. A concatenated coding scheme for error control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S.

    1985-01-01

    A concatenated coding scheme for error contol in data communications was analyzed. The inner code is used for both error correction and detection, however the outer code is used only for error detection. A retransmission is requested if either the inner code decoder fails to make a successful decoding or the outer code decoder detects the presence of errors after the inner code decoding. Probability of undetected error of the proposed scheme is derived. An efficient method for computing this probability is presented. Throughout efficiency of the proposed error control scheme incorporated with a selective repeat ARQ retransmission strategy is analyzed.

  10. Linearization of Attitude-Control Error Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bach, Ralph; Paielli, Russell

    1993-01-01

    Direction cosines and quaternions are useful for representing rigid-body attitude because they exhibit no kinematic singularities. Each utilizes more variables than the minimum three degrees of freedom required to specify attitude. Therefore, application of a nonlinear inversion procedure to either formulation introduces singularities. Furthermore, in designing an attitude-control system, it is not appropriate to express attitude error as a difference of direction cosines (or quaternions). One should employ a measure of attitude error that not only is minimal but preserves orthogonal rotation properties as well. This note applies an inversion procedure to an appropriate measure of attitude error, so that the singularity occurs when the error reaches +/- 180 deg. This approach leads to the realization of a new model-follower attitude-control system that exhibits exact linear attitude-error dynamics.

  11. A neural fuzzy controller learning by fuzzy error propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nauck, Detlef; Kruse, Rudolf

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a procedure to integrate techniques for the adaptation of membership functions in a linguistic variable based fuzzy control environment by using neural network learning principles. This is an extension to our work. We solve this problem by defining a fuzzy error that is propagated back through the architecture of our fuzzy controller. According to this fuzzy error and the strength of its antecedent each fuzzy rule determines its amount of error. Depending on the current state of the controlled system and the control action derived from the conclusion, each rule tunes the membership functions of its antecedent and its conclusion. By this we get an unsupervised learning technique that enables a fuzzy controller to adapt to a control task by knowing just about the global state and the fuzzy error.

  12. A concatenated coding scheme for error control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S.

    1985-01-01

    A concatenated coding scheme for error control in data communications is analyzed. The inner code is used for both error correction and detection, however the outer code is used only for error detection. A retransmission is requested if the outer code detects the presence of errors after the inner code decoding. The probability of undetected error of the above error control scheme is derived and upper bounded. Two specific exmaples are analyzed. In the first example, the inner code is a distance-4 shortened Hamming code with generator polynomial (X+1)(X(6)+X+1) = X(7)+X(6)+X(2)+1 and the outer code is a distance-4 shortened Hamming code with generator polynomial (X+1)X(15+X(14)+X(13)+X(12)+X(4)+X(3)+X(2)+X+1) = X(16)+X(12)+X(5)+1 which is the X.25 standard for packet-switched data network. This example is proposed for error control on NASA telecommand links. In the second example, the inner code is the same as that in the first example but the outer code is a shortened Reed-Solomon code with symbols from GF(2(8)) and generator polynomial (X+1)(X+alpha) where alpha is a primitive element in GF(z(8)).

  13. Error Correction, Control Systems and Fuzzy Logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Earl B.

    2004-01-01

    This paper will be a discussion on dealing with errors. While error correction and communication is important when dealing with spacecraft vehicles, the issue of control system design is also important. There will be certain commands that one wants a motion device to execute. An adequate control system will be necessary to make sure that the instruments and devices will receive the necessary commands. As it will be discussed later, the actual value will not always be equal to the intended or desired value. Hence, an adequate controller will be necessary so that the gap between the two values will be closed.

  14. Performance of focused error control codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alajaji, Fady; Fuja, Thomas

    1994-02-01

    Consider an additive noise channel with inputs and outputs in the field GF(q) where qgreater than 2; every time a symbol is transmitted over such a channel, there are q - 1 different errors that can occur, corresponding to the q - 1 non-zero elements that the channel can add to the transmitted symbol. In many data communication/storage systems, there are some errors that occur much more frequently than others; however, traditional error correcting codes - designed with respect to the Hamming metric - treat each of these q - 1 errors the same. Fuja and Heegard have designed a class of codes, called focused error control codes, that offer different levels of protection against common and uncommon errors; the idea is to define the level of protection in a way based not only on the number of errors, but the kind as well. In this paper, the performance of these codes is analyzed with respect to idealized 'skewed' channels as well as realistic non-binary modulation schemes. It is shown that focused codes, used in conjunction with PSK and QAM signaling, can provide more than 1.0 dB of additional coding gain when compared with Reed-Solomon codes for small blocklengths.

  15. Error control in the GCF: An information-theoretic model for error analysis and coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adeyemi, O.

    1974-01-01

    The structure of data-transmission errors within the Ground Communications Facility is analyzed in order to provide error control (both forward error correction and feedback retransmission) for improved communication. Emphasis is placed on constructing a theoretical model of errors and obtaining from it all the relevant statistics for error control. No specific coding strategy is analyzed, but references to the significance of certain error pattern distributions, as predicted by the model, to error correction are made.

  16. Inrush Current Control Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Steven W. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An inrush current control circuit having an input terminal connected to a DC power supply and an output terminal connected to a load capacitor limits the inrush current that charges up the load capacitor during power up of a system. When the DC power supply applies a DC voltage to the input terminal, the inrush current control circuit produces a voltage ramp at the load capacitor instead of an abrupt DC voltage. The voltage ramp results in a constant low level current to charge up the load capacitor, greatly reducing the current drain on the DC power supply.

  17. Multijoint error compensation mediates unstable object control.

    PubMed

    Cluff, Tyler; Manos, Aspasia; Lee, Timothy D; Balasubramaniam, Ramesh

    2012-08-01

    A key feature of skilled object control is the ability to correct performance errors. This process is not straightforward for unstable objects (e.g., inverted pendulum or "stick" balancing) because the mechanics of the object are sensitive to small control errors, which can lead to rapid performance changes. In this study, we have characterized joint recruitment and coordination processes in an unstable object control task. Our objective was to determine whether skill acquisition involves changes in the recruitment of individual joints or distributed error compensation. To address this problem, we monitored stick-balancing performance across four experimental sessions. We confirmed that subjects learned the task by showing an increase in the stability and length of balancing trials across training sessions. We demonstrated that motor learning led to the development of a multijoint error compensation strategy such that after training, subjects preferentially constrained joint angle variance that jeopardized task performance. The selective constraint of destabilizing joint angle variance was an important metric of motor learning. Finally, we performed a combined uncontrolled manifold-permutation analysis to ensure the variance structure was not confounded by differences in the variance of individual joint angles. We showed that reliance on multijoint error compensation increased, whereas individual joint variation (primarily at the wrist joint) decreased systematically with training. We propose a learning mechanism that is based on the accurate estimation of sensory states. PMID:22623491

  18. Voltage controlled current source

    DOEpatents

    Casne, Gregory M.

    1992-01-01

    A seven decade, voltage controlled current source is described for use in testing intermediate range nuclear instruments that covers the entire test current range of from 10 picoamperes to 100 microamperes. High accuracy is obtained throughout the entire seven decades of output current with circuitry that includes a coordinated switching scheme responsive to the input signal from a hybrid computer to control the input voltage to an antilog amplifier, and to selectively connect a resistance to the antilog amplifier output to provide a continuous output current source as a function of a preset range of input voltage. An operator controlled switch provides current adjustment for operation in either a real-time simulation test mode or a time response test mode.

  19. Human error in hospitals and industrial accidents: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Spencer, F C

    2000-10-01

    Most data concerning errors and accidents are from industrial accidents and airline injuries. General Electric, Alcoa, and Motorola, among others, all have reported complex programs that resulted in a marked reduction in frequency of worker injuries. In the field of medicine, however, with the outstanding exception of anesthesiology, there is a paucity of information, most reports referring to the 1984 Harvard-New York State Study, more than 16 years ago. This scarcity of information indicates the complexity of the problem. It seems very unlikely that simple exhortation or additional regulations will help because the problem lies principally in the multiple human-machine interfaces that constitute modern medical care. The absence of success stories also indicates that the best methods have to be learned by experience. A liaison with industry should be helpful, although the varieties of human illness are far different from a standardized manufacturing process. Concurrent with the studies of industrial and nuclear accidents, cognitive psychologists have intensively studied how the brain stores and retrieves information. Several concepts have emerged. First, errors are not character defects to be treated by the classic approach of discipline and education, but are byproducts of normal thinking that occur frequently. Second, major accidents are rarely causedby a single error; instead, they are often a combination of chronic system errors, termed latent errors. Identifying and correcting these latent errors should be the principal focus for corrective planning rather than searching for an individual culprit. This nonpunitive concept of errors is a key basis for an effective reporting system, brilliantly demonstrated in aviation with the ASRS system developed more than 25 years ago. The ASRS currently receives more than 30,000 reports annually and is credited with the remarkable increase in safety of airplane travel. Adverse drug events constitute about 25% of hospital

  20. Error control coding for meteor burst channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, T. J.; Belkerdid, M. A.; Georgiopoulos, M.

    The performance of several error control coding schemes for a meteor burst channel is studied via analysis and simulation. These coding strategies are compared using the probability of successful transmission of a fixed size packet through a single burst as a performance measure. The coding methods are compared via simulation for several realizations of meteor burst. It is found that, based on complexity and probability of success, fixed-rate convolutional codes with soft decision Viterbi decoding provide better performance.

  1. Feedback Error Learning in neuromotor control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Abraham K.

    This thesis is concerned with adaptive human motor control. Adaptation is a highly desirable characteristic of any biological system. Failure is an undesirable, yet very real, characteristic of the human motor control systems. Variability is a ubiquitous observation in human movements that has no direct analogue in the design and analysis of robotic control algorithms. This thesis attempts to link these three aspects of motor control under the constraints of a biologically inspired control framework termed Feedback Error Learning (FEL). Utilizing nonlinear and adaptive control methods we prove conditions for which the FEL framework is stable and successful learning can occur. Utilizing singular perturbation methods, we derive conditions for which the system is guaranteed to fail. Variability is analyzed using Ito Calculus and stochastic Lyapunov functionals where signal dependent noise, a commonly observed phenomenon, enters in the learning algorithm. We also show how signal dependent noise might benefit biological control systems despite the inherent variability introduced into the motor control loops. Lastly, we investigate a force tracking control task, where subjects are asked to track a time-varying plant. Using basic control and system identification techniques, we probe the human motor learning system and extract learning rates with respect to the FEL model.

  2. Modeling-Error-Driven Performance-Seeking Direct Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Nilesh V.; Kaneshige, John; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Burken, John

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a stable discrete-time adaptive law that targets modeling errors in a direct adaptive control framework. The update law was developed in our previous work for the adaptive disturbance rejection application. The approach is based on the philosophy that without modeling errors, the original control design has been tuned to achieve the desired performance. The adaptive control should, therefore, work towards getting this performance even in the face of modeling uncertainties/errors. In this work, the baseline controller uses dynamic inversion with proportional-integral augmentation. Dynamic inversion is carried out using the assumed system model. On-line adaptation of this control law is achieved by providing a parameterized augmentation signal to the dynamic inversion block. The parameters of this augmentation signal are updated to achieve the nominal desired error dynamics. Contrary to the typical Lyapunov-based adaptive approaches that guarantee only stability, the current approach investigates conditions for stability as well as performance. A high-fidelity F-15 model is used to illustrate the overall approach.

  3. Direct current stimulation of prefrontal cortex modulates error-induced behavioral adjustments.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Farshad A; Fehring, Daniel J; Feizpour, Azadeh; Gaillard, Alexandra; Rosa, Marcello G P; Rajan, Ramesh; Jaberzadeh, Shapour

    2016-07-01

    Commission of errors and conflict between choices might induce behavioral modulations through adjustments in the executive control of behavior and altered patterns of these modulations are detected in neuropsychiatric disorders. We examined the effects of transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) applied over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) on error- and conflict-induced behavioral modulations. Two separate cohorts of participants performed two clinically relevant tests of executive control, respectively. In the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), the relevant rule for matching items frequently changed and therefore participants had to detect these unannounced changes by trial and error and alter their rule-based behavior. In the Stop task, participants had to rapidly respond to a directional go-signal but inhibit their responses when a stop signal appeared after the go-signal. Each participant received tDCS (sham, cathodal or anodal) in three separate sessions. Errors led to a slower response in the next trial (post-error slowing) in both tasks. The tDCS significantly modulated the post-error slowing in both tasks but did not affect the behavioral adjustments induced by the conflict. The modulation of post-error slowing by tDCS were polarity-dependent and also trial specific appearing immediately after errors. In the WCST and Stop task, the post-error slowing may reflect different processes involved in shifting the behavior-guiding rule and adjustments in inhibitory control of responses, respectively, and we found that the effective tDCS polarity differed between the two tasks. Here, we show that in two separate cognitive tasks direct current stimulation of DLPFC significantly modulated error-induced behavioral modulations. PMID:27207192

  4. An error control system with multiple-stage forward error corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takata, Toyoo; Fujiwara, Toru; Kasami, Tadao; Lin, Shu

    1990-01-01

    A robust error-control coding system is presented. This system is a cascaded FEC (forward error control) scheme supported by parity retransmissions for further error correction in the erroneous data words. The error performance and throughput efficiency of the system are analyzed. Two specific examples of the error-control system are studied. The first example does not use an inner code, and the outer code, which is not interleaved, is a shortened code of the NASA standard RS code over GF(28). The second example, as proposed for NASA, uses the same shortened RS code as the base outer code C2, except that it is interleaved to a depth of 2. It is shown that both examples provide high reliability and throughput efficiency even for high channel bit-error rates in the range of 0.01.

  5. Current control circuitry

    DOEpatents

    Taubman, Matthew S.

    2005-03-15

    Among the embodiments of the present invention is an apparatus that includes a transistor (30), a servo device (40), and a current source (50). The servo device (40) is operable to provide a common base mode of operation of the transistor (30) by maintaining an approximately constant voltage level at the transistor base (32b). The current source (150) is operable to provide a bias current to the transistor (30). A first device (24) provides an input signal to an electrical node (70) positioned between the emitter (32e) of the transistor (30) and the current source (50). A second device (26) receives an output signal from the collector (32c) of the transistor (30).

  6. A Java Applet for Illustrating Internet Error Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliday, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the author's experiences developing a Java applet that illustrates how error control is implemented in the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP). One section discusses the concepts which the TCP error control Java applet is intended to convey, while the nature of the Java applet is covered in another section. The author…

  7. Attitude control with realization of linear error dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paielli, Russell A.; Bach, Ralph E.

    1993-01-01

    An attitude control law is derived to realize linear unforced error dynamics with the attitude error defined in terms of rotation group algebra (rather than vector algebra). Euler parameters are used in the rotational dynamics model because they are globally nonsingular, but only the minimal three Euler parameters are used in the error dynamics model because they have no nonlinear mathematical constraints to prevent the realization of linear error dynamics. The control law is singular only when the attitude error angle is exactly pi rad about any eigenaxis, and a simple intuitive modification at the singularity allows the control law to be used globally. The forced error dynamics are nonlinear but stable. Numerical simulation tests show that the control law performs robustly for both initial attitude acquisition and attitude control.

  8. Current projects in Fuzzy Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugeno, Michio

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on current projects in fuzzy control are presented. Three projects on helicopter flight control are discussed. The projects are (1) radio control by oral instructions; (2) automatic autorotation entry in engine failure; and (3) unmanned helicopter for sea rescue.

  9. Reducing Pointing Errors During Cassini Reaction Control System Orbit Trim Maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizvi, Farheen

    2013-01-01

    The effect of altering a gain parameter in the Cassini reaction control system (RCS) delta-V controller on the maneuver execution errors during orbit trim maneuvers (OTMs) is explored. Cassini consists of two reaction control thruster branches (A & B) each with eight thrusters. Currently, the B-branch is operational while the A-branch serves as a back-up. The four Z-thrusters control the X and Y-axes, while the four Y-thrusters control the Z-axis. During an OTM, the Z-thrusters fire to maintain the X and Y-axes pointing within an attitude control dead-zone (-10 to 10 milliradians). The errors do not remain at zero due to pointing error sources such as spacecraft center of mass offset from the geometric center of the Z-facing thrusters, and variability in the thruster forces due to the thruster hardware differences. The delta-V reaction control system (RCS) controller ensures that the attitude error remains within this dead-zone. Gain parameters within the RCS delta-V controller affect the maneuver execution errors. Different parameter values are used to explore effect on these errors. It is found that pointing error decreases and magnitude error increases rapidly for gain parameters 10 times greater than the current parameter values used in the flight software.

  10. Designing to Control Flight Crew Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, Paul C.; Willshire, Kelli F.

    1997-01-01

    It is widely accepted that human error is a major contributing factor in aircraft accidents. There has been a significant amount of research in why these errors occurred, and many reports state that the design of flight deck can actually dispose humans to err. This research has led to the call for changes in design according to human factors and human-centered principles. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Langley Research Center has initiated an effort to design a human-centered flight deck from a clean slate (i.e., without constraints of existing designs.) The effort will be based on recent research in human-centered design philosophy and mission management categories. This design will match the human's model of the mission and function of the aircraft to reduce unnatural or non-intuitive interfaces. The product of this effort will be a flight deck design description, including training and procedures, and a cross reference or paper trail back to design hypotheses, and an evaluation of the design. The present paper will discuss the philosophy, process, and status of this design effort.

  11. Servo control booster system for minimizing following error

    DOEpatents

    Wise, William L.

    1985-01-01

    A closed-loop feedback-controlled servo system is disclosed which reduces command-to-response error to the system's position feedback resolution least increment, .DELTA.S.sub.R, on a continuous real-time basis for all operating speeds. The servo system employs a second position feedback control loop on a by exception basis, when the command-to-response error .gtoreq..DELTA.S.sub.R, to produce precise position correction signals. When the command-to-response error is less than .DELTA.S.sub.R, control automatically reverts to conventional control means as the second position feedback control loop is disconnected, becoming transparent to conventional servo control means. By operating the second unique position feedback control loop used herein at the appropriate clocking rate, command-to-response error may be reduced to the position feedback resolution least increment. The present system may be utilized in combination with a tachometer loop for increased stability.

  12. Online Error Reporting for Managing Quality Control Within Radiology.

    PubMed

    Golnari, Pedram; Forsberg, Daniel; Rosipko, Beverly; Sunshine, Jeffrey L

    2016-06-01

    Information technology systems within health care, such as picture archiving and communication system (PACS) in radiology, can have a positive impact on production but can also risk compromising quality. The widespread use of PACS has removed the previous feedback loop between radiologists and technologists. Instead of direct communication of quality discrepancies found for an examination, the radiologist submitted a paper-based quality-control report. A web-based issue-reporting tool can help restore some of the feedback loop and also provide possibilities for more detailed analysis of submitted errors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that data from use of an online error reporting software for quality control can focus our efforts within our department. For the 372,258 radiologic examinations conducted during the 6-month period study, 930 errors (390 exam protocol, 390 exam validation, and 150 exam technique) were submitted, corresponding to an error rate of 0.25 %. Within the category exam protocol, technologist documentation had the highest number of submitted errors in ultrasonography (77 errors [44 %]), while imaging protocol errors were the highest subtype error for computed tomography modality (35 errors [18 %]). Positioning and incorrect accession had the highest errors in the exam technique and exam validation error category, respectively, for nearly all of the modalities. An error rate less than 1 % could signify a system with a very high quality; however, a more likely explanation is that not all errors were detected or reported. Furthermore, staff reception of the error reporting system could also affect the reporting rate. PMID:26510753

  13. Error control for reliable digital data transmission and storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, D. J., Jr.; Deng, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    A problem in designing semiconductor memories is to provide some measure of error control without requiring excessive coding overhead or decoding time. In LSI and VLSI technology, memories are often organized on a multiple bit (or byte) per chip basis. For example, some 256K-bit DRAM's are organized in 32Kx8 bit-bytes. Byte oriented codes such as Reed Solomon (RS) codes can provide efficient low overhead error control for such memories. However, the standard iterative algorithm for decoding RS codes is too slow for these applications. In this paper we present some special decoding techniques for extended single-and-double-error-correcting RS codes which are capable of high speed operation. These techniques are designed to find the error locations and the error values directly from the syndrome without having to use the iterative alorithm to find the error locator polynomial. Two codes are considered: (1) a d sub min = 4 single-byte-error-correcting (SBEC), double-byte-error-detecting (DBED) RS code; and (2) a d sub min = 6 double-byte-error-correcting (DBEC), triple-byte-error-detecting (TBED) RS code.

  14. Composite Gauss-Legendre Quadrature with Error Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentice, J. S. C.

    2011-01-01

    We describe composite Gauss-Legendre quadrature for determining definite integrals, including a means of controlling the approximation error. We compare the form and performance of the algorithm with standard Newton-Cotes quadrature. (Contains 1 table.)

  15. High Dimensional Variable Selection with Error Control.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangjin; Halabi, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background. The iterative sure independence screening (ISIS) is a popular method in selecting important variables while maintaining most of the informative variables relevant to the outcome in high throughput data. However, it not only is computationally intensive but also may cause high false discovery rate (FDR). We propose to use the FDR as a screening method to reduce the high dimension to a lower dimension as well as controlling the FDR with three popular variable selection methods: LASSO, SCAD, and MCP. Method. The three methods with the proposed screenings were applied to prostate cancer data with presence of metastasis as the outcome. Results. Simulations showed that the three variable selection methods with the proposed screenings controlled the predefined FDR and produced high area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) scores. In applying these methods to the prostate cancer example, LASSO and MCP selected 12 and 8 genes and produced AUROC scores of 0.746 and 0.764, respectively. Conclusions. We demonstrated that the variable selection methods with the sequential use of FDR and ISIS not only controlled the predefined FDR in the final models but also had relatively high AUROC scores. PMID:27597974

  16. High Dimensional Variable Selection with Error Control

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. The iterative sure independence screening (ISIS) is a popular method in selecting important variables while maintaining most of the informative variables relevant to the outcome in high throughput data. However, it not only is computationally intensive but also may cause high false discovery rate (FDR). We propose to use the FDR as a screening method to reduce the high dimension to a lower dimension as well as controlling the FDR with three popular variable selection methods: LASSO, SCAD, and MCP. Method. The three methods with the proposed screenings were applied to prostate cancer data with presence of metastasis as the outcome. Results. Simulations showed that the three variable selection methods with the proposed screenings controlled the predefined FDR and produced high area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) scores. In applying these methods to the prostate cancer example, LASSO and MCP selected 12 and 8 genes and produced AUROC scores of 0.746 and 0.764, respectively. Conclusions. We demonstrated that the variable selection methods with the sequential use of FDR and ISIS not only controlled the predefined FDR in the final models but also had relatively high AUROC scores. PMID:27597974

  17. Error control coding for multi-frequency modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ives, Robert W.

    1990-06-01

    Multi-frequency modulation (MFM) has been developed at NPS using both quadrature-phase-shift-keyed (QPSK) and quadrature-amplitude-modulated (QAM) signals with good bit error performance at reasonable signal-to-noise ratios. Improved performance can be achieved by the introduction of error control coding. This report documents a FORTRAN simulation of the implementation of error control coding into an MFM communication link with additive white Gaussian noise. Four Reed-Solomon codes were incorporated, two for 16-QAM and two for 32-QAM modulation schemes. The error control codes used were modified from the conventional Reed-Solomon codes in that one information symbol was sacrificed to parity in order to use a simplified decoding algorithm which requires no iteration and enhances error detection capability. Bit error rates as a function of SNR and E(sub b)/N(sub 0) were analyzed, and bit error performance was weighed against reduction in information rate to determine the value of the codes.

  18. Research on error control and compensation in magnetorheological finishing.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yifan; Hu, Hao; Peng, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Jianmin; Shi, Feng

    2011-07-01

    Although magnetorheological finishing (MRF) is a deterministic finishing technology, the machining results always fall short of simulation precision in the actual process, and it cannot meet the precision requirements just through a single treatment but after several iterations. We investigate the reasons for this problem through simulations and experiments. Through controlling and compensating the chief errors in the manufacturing procedure, such as removal function calculation error, positioning error of the removal function, and dynamic performance limitation of the CNC machine, the residual error convergence ratio (ratio of figure error before and after processing) in a single process is obviously increased, and higher figure precision is achieved. Finally, an improved technical process is presented based on these researches, and the verification experiment is accomplished on the experimental device we developed. The part is a circular plane mirror of fused silica material, and the surface figure error is improved from the initial λ/5 [peak-to-valley (PV) λ=632.8 nm], λ/30 [root-mean-square (rms)] to the final λ/40 (PV), λ/330 (rms) just through one iteration in 4.4 min. Results show that a higher convergence ratio and processing precision can be obtained by adopting error control and compensation techniques in MRF. PMID:21743536

  19. Current profilers and current meters: compass and tilt sensors errors and calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Menn, M.; Lusven, A.; Bongiovanni, E.; Le Dû, P.; Rouxel, D.; Lucas, S.; Pacaud, L.

    2014-08-01

    Current profilers and current meters have a magnetic compass and tilt sensors for relating measurements to a terrestrial reference frame. As compasses are sensitive to their magnetic environment, they must be calibrated in the configuration in which they will be used. A calibration platform for magnetic compasses and tilt sensors was built, based on a method developed in 2007, to correct angular errors and guarantee a measurement uncertainty for instruments mounted in mooring cages. As mooring cages can weigh up to 800 kg, it was necessary to find a suitable place to set up this platform, map the magnetic fields in this area and dimension the platform to withstand these loads. It was calibrated using a GPS positioning technique. The platform has a table that can be tilted to calibrate the tilt sensors. The measurement uncertainty of the system was evaluated. Sinusoidal corrections based on the anomalies created by soft and hard magnetic materials were tested, as well as manufacturers’ calibration methods.

  20. When soft controls get slippery: User interfaces and human error

    SciTech Connect

    Stubler, W.F.; O`Hara, J.M.

    1998-12-01

    Many types of products and systems that have traditionally featured physical control devices are now being designed with soft controls--input formats appearing on computer-based display devices and operated by a variety of input devices. A review of complex human-machine systems found that soft controls are particularly prone to some types of errors and may affect overall system performance and safety. This paper discusses the application of design approaches for reducing the likelihood of these errors and for enhancing usability, user satisfaction, and system performance and safety.

  1. On the undetected error probability of a concatenated coding scheme for error control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deng, H.; Costello, D. J., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Consider a concatenated coding scheme for error control on a binary symmetric channel, called the inner channel. The bit error rate (BER) of the channel is correspondingly called the inner BER, and is denoted by Epsilon (sub i). Two linear block codes, C(sub f) and C(sub b), are used. The inner code C(sub f), called the frame code, is an (n,k) systematic binary block code with minimum distance, d(sub f). The frame code is designed to correct + or fewer errors and simultaneously detect gamma (gamma +) or fewer errors, where + + gamma + 1 = to or d(sub f). The outer code C(sub b) is either an (n(sub b), K(sub b)) binary block with a n(sub b) = mk, or an (n(sub b), k(Sub b) maximum distance separable (MDS) code with symbols from GF(q), where q = 2(b) and the code length n(sub b) satisfies n(sub)(b) = mk. The integerim is the number of frames. The outercode is designed for error detection only.

  2. Optimal estimation of large structure model errors. [in Space Shuttle controller design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.

    1979-01-01

    In-flight estimation of large structure model errors is usually required as a means of detecting inevitable deficiencies in large structure controller/estimator models. The present paper deals with a least-squares formulation which seeks to minimize a quadratic functional of the model errors. The properties of these error estimates are analyzed. It is shown that an arbitrary model error can be decomposed as the sum of two components that are orthogonal in a suitably defined function space. Relations between true and estimated errors are defined. The estimates are found to be approximations that retain many of the significant dynamics of the true model errors. Current efforts are directed toward application of the analytical results to a reference large structure model.

  3. Servo control booster system for minimizing following error

    DOEpatents

    Wise, W.L.

    1979-07-26

    A closed-loop feedback-controlled servo system is disclosed which reduces command-to-response error to the system's position feedback resolution least increment, ..delta..S/sub R/, on a continuous real-time basis, for all operational times of consequence and for all operating speeds. The servo system employs a second position feedback control loop on a by exception basis, when the command-to-response error greater than or equal to ..delta..S/sub R/, to produce precise position correction signals. When the command-to-response error is less than ..delta..S/sub R/, control automatically reverts to conventional control means as the second position feedback control loop is disconnected, becoming transparent to conventional servo control means. By operating the second unique position feedback control loop used herein at the appropriate clocking rate, command-to-response error may be reduced to the position feedback resolution least increment. The present system may be utilized in combination with a tachometer loop for increased stability.

  4. The importance of robust error control in data compression applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolley, S. I.

    1993-01-01

    Data compression has become an increasingly popular option as advances in information technology have placed further demands on data storage capabilities. With compression ratios as high as 100:1 the benefits are clear; however, the inherent intolerance of many compression formats to error events should be given careful consideration. If we consider that efficiently compressed data will ideally contain no redundancy, then the introduction of a channel error must result in a change of understanding from that of the original source. While the prefix property of codes such as Huffman enables resynchronisation, this is not sufficient to arrest propagating errors in an adaptive environment. Arithmetic, Lempel-Ziv, discrete cosine transform (DCT) and fractal methods are similarly prone to error propagating behaviors. It is, therefore, essential that compression implementations provide sufficient combatant error control in order to maintain data integrity. Ideally, this control should be derived from a full understanding of the prevailing error mechanisms and their interaction with both the system configuration and the compression schemes in use.

  5. Currently Realizable Quantum Error Detection/Correction Algorithms for Superconducting Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, Kyle; Korotkov, Alexander N.

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the efficiency of simple quantum error correction/detection codes for zero-temperature energy relaxation. We show that standard repetitive codes are not effective for error correction of energy relaxation, but can be efficiently used for quantum error detection. Moreover, only two qubits are necessary for this purpose, in contrast to the minimum of three qubits needed for conventional error correction. We propose and analyze specific two-qubit algorithms for superconducting phase qubits, which are currently realizable and can demonstrate quantum error detection; each algorithm can also be used for quantum error correction of a specific known error. In particular, we analyze needed requirements on experimental parameters and calculate the expected fidelities for these experimental protocols. This work was supported by NSA and IARPA under ARO grant No. W911NF-10-1-0334.

  6. Optimal control of quaternion propagation errors in spacecraft navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vathsal, S.

    1986-01-01

    Optimal control techniques are used to drive the numerical error (truncation, roundoff, commutation) in computing the quaternion vector to zero. The normalization of the quaternion is carried out by appropriate choice of a performance index, which can be optimized. The error equations are derived from Friedland's (1978) theoretical development, and a matrix Riccati equation results for the computation of the gain matrix. Simulation results show that a high precision of the order of 10 to the -12th can be obtained using this technique in meeting the q(T)q=1 constraint. The performance of the estimator in the presence of the feedback control that maintains the normalization, is studied.

  7. Reliability, Safety and Error Recovery for Advanced Control Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.

    2003-01-01

    For long-duration automated operation of regenerative life support systems in space environments, there is a need for advanced integration and control systems that are significantly more reliable and safe, and that support error recovery and minimization of operational failures. This presentation outlines some challenges of hazardous space environments and complex system interactions that can lead to system accidents. It discusses approaches to hazard analysis and error recovery for control software and challenges of supporting effective intervention by safety software and the crew.

  8. Magnetoelectric control of spin currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, J. E.; Vargas, J. M.; Avilés-Félix, L.; Butera, A.

    2016-06-01

    The ability to control the spin current injection has been explored on a hybrid magnetoelectric system consisting of a (011)-cut ferroelectric lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMNT) single crystal, a ferromagnetic FePt alloy, and a metallic Pt. With this PMNT/FePt/Pt structure we have been able to control the magnetic field position or the microwave excitation frequency at which the spin pumping phenomenon between FePt and Pt occurs. We demonstrate that the magnetoelectric heterostructure operating in the L-T (longitudinal magnetized-transverse polarized) mode couples the PMNT crystal to the magnetostrictive FePt/Pt bilayer, displaying a strong magnetoelectric coefficient of ˜140 Oe cm kV-1. Our results show that this mechanism can be effectively exploited as a tunable spin current intensity emitter and open the possibility to create an oscillating or a bistable switch to effectively manipulate spin currents.

  9. Continuous quantum error correction as classical hybrid control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabuchi, Hideo

    2009-10-01

    The standard formulation of quantum error correction (QEC) comprises repeated cycles of error estimation and corrective intervention in the free dynamics of a qubit register. QEC can thus be seen as a form of feedback control, and it is of interest to seek a deeper understanding of the connection between the associated theories. Here we present a focused case study within this broad program, connecting continuous QEC with elements of hybrid control theory. We show that canonical methods of the latter engineering discipline, such as recursive filtering and dynamic programming approaches to solving the optimal control problem, can be applied fruitfully in the design of separated controller structures for quantum memories based on coding and continuous syndrome measurement.

  10. Controlling qubit drift by recycling error correction syndromes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blume-Kohout, Robin

    2015-03-01

    Physical qubits are susceptible to systematic drift, above and beyond the stochastic Markovian noise that motivates quantum error correction. This parameter drift must be compensated - if it is ignored, error rates will rise to intolerable levels - but compensation requires knowing the parameters' current value, which appears to require halting experimental work to recalibrate (e.g. via quantum tomography). Fortunately, this is untrue. I show how to perform on-the-fly recalibration on the physical qubits in an error correcting code, using only information from the error correction syndromes. The algorithm for detecting and compensating drift is very simple - yet, remarkably, when used to compensate Brownian drift in the qubit Hamiltonian, it achieves a stabilized error rate very close to the theoretical lower bound. Against 1/f noise, it is less effective only because 1/f noise is (like white noise) dominated by high-frequency fluctuations that are uncompensatable. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE

  11. Developing control charts to review and monitor medication errors.

    PubMed

    Ciminera, J L; Lease, M P

    1992-03-01

    There is a need to monitor reported medication errors in a hospital setting. Because the quantity of errors vary due to external reporting, quantifying the data is extremely difficult. Typically, these errors are reviewed using classification systems that often have wide variations in the numbers per class per month. The authors recommend the use of control charts to review historical data and to monitor future data. The procedure they have adopted is a modification of schemes using absolute (i.e., positive) values of successive differences to estimate the standard deviation when only single incidence values are available in time rather than sample averages, and when many successive differences may be zero. PMID:10116719

  12. Controlling type-1 error rates in whole effluent toxicity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.; Johnson, S.C.

    1995-12-31

    A form of variability, called the dose x test interaction, has been found to affect the variability of the mean differences from control in the statistical tests used to evaluate Whole Effluent Toxicity Tests for compliance purposes. Since the dose x test interaction is not included in these statistical tests, the assumed type-1 and type-2 error rates can be incorrect. The accepted type-1 error rate for these tests is 5%. Analysis of over 100 Ceriodaphnia, fathead minnow and sea urchin fertilization tests showed that when the test x dose interaction term was not included in the calculations the type-1 error rate was inflated to as high as 20%. In a compliance setting, this problem may lead to incorrect regulatory decisions. Statistical tests are proposed that properly incorporate the dose x test interaction variance.

  13. Attitude-Control Algorithm for Minimizing Maneuver Execution Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Behcet

    2008-01-01

    A G-RAC attitude-control algorithm is used to minimize maneuver execution error in a spacecraft with a flexible appendage when said spacecraft must induce translational momentum by firing (in open loop) large thrusters along a desired direction for a given period of time. The controller is dynamic with two integrators and requires measurement of only the angular position and velocity of the spacecraft. The global stability of the closed-loop system is guaranteed without having access to the states describing the dynamics of the appendage and with severe saturation in the available torque. Spacecraft apply open-loop thruster firings to induce a desired translational momentum with an extended appendage. This control algorithm will assist this maneuver by stabilizing the attitude dynamics around a desired orientation, and consequently minimize the maneuver execution errors.

  14. Post-error slowing is influenced by cognitive control demand.

    PubMed

    Regev, Shirley; Meiran, Nachshon

    2014-10-01

    Post-error slowing (PES) has been shown to reflect a control failure due to automatic attentional capture by the error. Here we aimed to assess whether PES also involves an increase in cognitive control. Using a cued-task-switching paradigm (Experiment 1) and a Stroop task (Experiment 2), the demand for top down control was manipulated. In Experiment 1, one group received dimension cues indicating the relevant stimulus dimension (e.g., "number") without specifying the response-category-to-key mapping, hence requiring considerable top down control. Another group was shown mapping cues providing information regarding both the relevant task identity and its category-to-key mapping (e.g., "one three"), requiring less top down control, and the last group received both types of cues, intermixed. In Experiment 2, one group performed a pure incongruent Stroop condition (name ink color of incongruent color names, high control demand), and another group received a pure neutral Stroop condition (name color patches, low control demand). In Experiment 2a, participants received the two conditions, intermixed. A larger PES was observed with dimension cues as compared with mapping cues, and with incongruent Stroop stimuli as compared to neutral stimuli, but not when the conditions were intermixed. These findings reveal that PES is influenced by the control demands that characterize the given block-wide experimental context and show that proactive cognitive control is involved in PES. PMID:25089881

  15. Errors in paleomagnetism: Structural control on overlapped vectors - mathematical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Pintó, A.; Ramón, M. J.; Oliva-Urcia, B.; Pueyo, E. L.; Pocoví, A.

    2011-05-01

    The reliability of paleomagnetic data is a keystone to obtain trustable kinematics interpretations. The determination of the real paleomagnetic component recorded at certain time in the geological evolution of a rock can be affected by several sources of errors: inclination shallowing, declination biases caused by incorrect restoration to the ancient field, internal deformation of rock volumes and lack of isolation of the paleomagnetic primary vector during the laboratory procedures (overlapping of components). These errors will limit or impede the validity of paleomagnetism as the only three-dimension reference. This paper presents the first systematic modeling of the effect of overlapped vectors referred to declination, inclination and stability tests taking into account the key variables: orientation of a primary and secondary (overlapped to the primary) vectors, degree of overlapping (intensity ratio of primary and secondary paleomagnetic vectors) and the fold axis orientation and dip of bedding plane. In this way, several scenarios of overlapping have been modeled in different fold geometries considering both polarities and all the variables aforementioned, allowing to calculate the deviations of the vector obtained in the laboratory (overlapped) with respect to the paleomagnetic reference (not overlapped). Observations from the models confirm that declination errors are larger than the inclination ones. In addition to the geometry factor, errors are mainly controlled by the relative magnitude of the primary respect to the secondary component (P/S ratio). We observe larger asymmetries and bigger magnitudes of errors along the fold location if the primary and secondary records have different polarities. If the primary record (declination) and the fold axis orientation are perpendicular ( Ω = 90°), errors reach maximum magnitudes and larger asymmetries along the fold surface (different dips). The effect of overlapping in the fold and reversal tests is also

  16. Coordinated joint motion control system with position error correction

    DOEpatents

    Danko, George L.

    2016-04-05

    Disclosed are an articulated hydraulic machine supporting, control system and control method for same. The articulated hydraulic machine has an end effector for performing useful work. The control system is capable of controlling the end effector for automated movement along a preselected trajectory. The control system has a position error correction system to correct discrepancies between an actual end effector trajectory and a desired end effector trajectory. The correction system can employ one or more absolute position signals provided by one or more acceleration sensors supported by one or more movable machine elements. Good trajectory positioning and repeatability can be obtained. A two joystick controller system is enabled, which can in some cases facilitate the operator's task and enhance their work quality and productivity.

  17. Coordinated joint motion control system with position error correction

    DOEpatents

    Danko, George

    2011-11-22

    Disclosed are an articulated hydraulic machine supporting, control system and control method for same. The articulated hydraulic machine has an end effector for performing useful work. The control system is capable of controlling the end effector for automated movement along a preselected trajectory. The control system has a position error correction system to correct discrepancies between an actual end effector trajectory and a desired end effector trajectory. The correction system can employ one or more absolute position signals provided by one or more acceleration sensors supported by one or more movable machine elements. Good trajectory positioning and repeatability can be obtained. A two-joystick controller system is enabled, which can in some cases facilitate the operator's task and enhance their work quality and productivity.

  18. Error control techniques for satellite and space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, Daniel J., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Research activities related to error control techniques for satellite and space communication are reported. Specific areas of research include: coding gains for bandwidth efficient codes, hardware implementation of a bandwidth efficient coding scheme for the Hubble Space Telescope, construction of long trellis codes for use with sequential decoding, performance analysis of multilevel trellis codes, and M-algorithm decoding of trellis codes. Each topic is discussed in a corresponding paper that appears in the appendices.

  19. Error message recording and reporting in the SLC control system

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, N.; Bogart, J.; Phinney, N.; Thompson, K.

    1985-04-01

    Error or information messages that are signaled by control software either in the VAX host computer or the local microprocessor clusters are handled by a dedicated VAX process (PARANOIA). Messages are recorded on disk for further analysis and displayed at the appropriate console. Another VAX process (ERRLOG) can be used to sort, list and histogram various categories of messages. The functions performed by these processes and the algorithms used are discussed.

  20. Inhibitory control and error monitoring by human subthalamic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bastin, J; Polosan, M; Benis, D; Goetz, L; Bhattacharjee, M; Piallat, B; Krainik, A; Bougerol, T; Chabardès, S; David, O

    2014-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) has been shown to be implicated in the control of voluntary action, especially during tasks involving conflicting choice alternatives or rapid response suppression. However, the precise role of the STN during nonmotor functions remains controversial. First, we tested whether functionally distinct neuronal populations support different executive control functions (such as inhibitory control or error monitoring) even within a single subterritory of the STN. We used microelectrode recordings during deep brain stimulation surgery to study extracellular activity of the putative associative-limbic part of the STN while patients with severe obsessive-compulsive disorder performed a stop-signal task. Second, 2–4 days after the surgery, local field potential recordings of STN were used to test the hypothesis that STN oscillations may also reflect executive control signals. Extracellular recordings revealed three functionally distinct neuronal populations: the first one fired selectively before and during motor responses, the second one selectively increased their firing rate during successful inhibitory control, and the last one fired selectively during error monitoring. Furthermore, we found that beta band activity (15–35 Hz) rapidly increased during correct and incorrect behavioral stopping. Taken together, our results provide critical electrophysiological support for the hypothesized role of the STN in the integration of motor and cognitive-executive control functions. PMID:25203170

  1. Error analysis of a direct current electromagnetic tracking system in digitizing 3-dimensional surface geometries.

    PubMed

    Milne, A D; Lee, J M

    1999-01-01

    The direct current electromagnetic tracking device has seen increasing use in biomechanics studies of joint kinematics and anatomical surface geometry. In these applications, a stylus is attached to a sensor to measure the spatial location of three-dimensional landmarks. Stylus calibration is performed by rotating the stylus about a fixed point in space and using regression analysis to determine the tip offset vector. Measurement errors can be induced via several pathways, including; intrinsic system errors in sensor position or angle and tip offset calibration errors. A detailed study was performed to determine the errors introduced in digitizing small surfaces with different stylus lengths (35, 55, and 65 mm) and approach angles (30 and 45 degrees) using a plastic calibration board and hemispherical models. Two-point discrimination errors increased to an average of 1.93 mm for a 254 mm step size. Rotation about a single point produced mean errors of 0.44 to 1.18 mm. Statistically significant differences in error were observed with increasing approach angles (p < 0.001). Errors of less than 6% were observed in determining the curvature of a 19 mm hemisphere. This study demonstrates that the "Flock of Birds" can be used as a digitizing tool with accuracy better than 0.76% over 254 mm step sizes. PMID:11143353

  2. Artificial neural network implementation of a near-ideal error prediction controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcvey, Eugene S.; Taylor, Lynore Denise

    1992-01-01

    A theory has been developed at the University of Virginia which explains the effects of including an ideal predictor in the forward loop of a linear error-sampled system. It has been shown that the presence of this ideal predictor tends to stabilize the class of systems considered. A prediction controller is merely a system which anticipates a signal or part of a signal before it actually occurs. It is understood that an exact prediction controller is physically unrealizable. However, in systems where the input tends to be repetitive or limited, (i.e., not random) near ideal prediction is possible. In order for the controller to act as a stability compensator, the predictor must be designed in a way that allows it to learn the expected error response of the system. In this way, an unstable system will become stable by including the predicted error in the system transfer function. Previous and current prediction controller include pattern recognition developments and fast-time simulation which are applicable to the analysis of linear sampled data type systems. The use of pattern recognition techniques, along with a template matching scheme, has been proposed as one realizable type of near-ideal prediction. Since many, if not most, systems are repeatedly subjected to similar inputs, it was proposed that an adaptive mechanism be used to 'learn' the correct predicted error response. Once the system has learned the response of all the expected inputs, it is necessary only to recognize the type of input with a template matching mechanism and then to use the correct predicted error to drive the system. Suggested here is an alternate approach to the realization of a near-ideal error prediction controller, one designed using Neural Networks. Neural Networks are good at recognizing patterns such as system responses, and the back-propagation architecture makes use of a template matching scheme. In using this type of error prediction, it is assumed that the system error

  3. Cognitive control of conscious error awareness: error awareness and error positivity (Pe) amplitude in moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI)

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Dustin M.; Hill, Kyle R.; Larson, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Poor awareness has been linked to worse recovery and rehabilitation outcomes following moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (M/S TBI). The error positivity (Pe) component of the event-related potential (ERP) is linked to error awareness and cognitive control. Participants included 37 neurologically healthy controls and 24 individuals with M/S TBI who completed a brief neuropsychological battery and the error awareness task (EAT), a modified Stroop go/no-go task that elicits aware and unaware errors. Analyses compared between-group no-go accuracy (including accuracy between the first and second halves of the task to measure attention and fatigue), error awareness performance, and Pe amplitude by level of awareness. The M/S TBI group decreased in accuracy and maintained error awareness over time; control participants improved both accuracy and error awareness during the course of the task. Pe amplitude was larger for aware than unaware errors for both groups; however, consistent with previous research on the Pe and TBI, there were no significant between-group differences for Pe amplitudes. Findings suggest possible attention difficulties and low improvement of performance over time may influence specific aspects of error awareness in M/S TBI. PMID:26217212

  4. Precision electronic speed controller for an alternating-current motor

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, V.W.

    A high precision controller for an alternating-current multi-phase electrical motor that is subject to a large inertial load. The controller was developed for controlling, in a neutron chopper system, a heavy spinning rotor that must be rotated in phase-locked synchronism with a reference pulse train that is representative of an ac power supply signal having a meandering line frequency. The controller includes a shaft revolution sensor which provides a feedback pulse train representative of the actual speed of the motor. An internal digital timing signal generator provides a reference signal which is compared with the feedback signal in a computing unit to provide a motor control signal. The motor control signal is a weighted linear sum of a speed error voltage, a phase error voltage, and a drift error voltage, each of which is computed anew with each revolution of the motor shaft. The speed error signal is generated by a novel vernier-logic circuit which is drift-free and highly sensitive to small speed changes. The phase error is also computed by digital logic, with adjustable sensitivity around a 0 mid-scale value. The drift error signal, generated by long-term counting of the phase error, is used to compensate for any slow changes in the average friction drag on the motor. An auxillary drift-byte status sensor prevents any disruptive overflow or underflow of the drift-error counter. An adjustable clocked-delay unit is inserted between the controller and the source of the reference pulse train to permit phase alignment of the rotor to any desired offset angle. The stator windings of the motor are driven by two amplifiers which are provided with input signals having the proper quadrature relationship by an exciter unit consisting of a voltage controlled oscillator, a binary counter, a pair of read-only memories, and a pair of digital-to-analog converters.

  5. Straight to the Source: Detecting Aggregate Objects in Astronomical Images with Proper Error Control.

    PubMed

    Friedenberg, David A; Genovese, Christopher R

    2013-07-01

    The next generation of telescopes, coming on-line in the next decade, will acquire terabytes of image data each night. Collectively, these large images will contain billions of interesting objects, which astronomers call sources. One critical task for astronomers is to construct from the image data a detailed source catalog that gives the sky coordinates and other properties of all detected sources. The source catalog is the primary data product produced by most telescopes and serves as an important input for studies that build and test new astrophysical theories. To construct an accurate catalog, the sources must first be detected in the image. A variety of effective source detection algorithms exist in the astronomical literature, but few if any provide rigorous statistical control of error rates. A variety of multiple testing procedures exist in the statistical literature that can provide rigorous error control over pixelwise errors, but these do not provide control over errors at the level of sources, which is what astronomers need. In this paper, we propose a technique that is effective at source detection while providing rigorous control on source-wise error rates. We demonstrate our approach with data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory Satellite. Our method is competitive with existing astronomical methods, even finding two new sources that were missed by previous studies, while providing stronger performance guarantees and without requiring costly follow up studies that are commonly required with current techniques. PMID:24068849

  6. Straight to the Source: Detecting Aggregate Objects in Astronomical Images with Proper Error Control

    PubMed Central

    Friedenberg, David A.; Genovese, Christopher R.

    2013-01-01

    The next generation of telescopes, coming on-line in the next decade, will acquire terabytes of image data each night. Collectively, these large images will contain billions of interesting objects, which astronomers call sources. One critical task for astronomers is to construct from the image data a detailed source catalog that gives the sky coordinates and other properties of all detected sources. The source catalog is the primary data product produced by most telescopes and serves as an important input for studies that build and test new astrophysical theories. To construct an accurate catalog, the sources must first be detected in the image. A variety of effective source detection algorithms exist in the astronomical literature, but few if any provide rigorous statistical control of error rates. A variety of multiple testing procedures exist in the statistical literature that can provide rigorous error control over pixelwise errors, but these do not provide control over errors at the level of sources, which is what astronomers need. In this paper, we propose a technique that is effective at source detection while providing rigorous control on source-wise error rates. We demonstrate our approach with data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory Satellite. Our method is competitive with existing astronomical methods, even finding two new sources that were missed by previous studies, while providing stronger performance guarantees and without requiring costly follow up studies that are commonly required with current techniques. PMID:24068849

  7. Error field optimization in DIII-D using extremum seeking control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanctot, M. J.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Capella, M.; Humphreys, D. A.; Eidietis, N.; Hanson, J. M.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Strait, E. J.; Walker, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    DIII-D experiments have demonstrated a new real-time approach to tokamak error field control based on maximizing the toroidal angular momentum. This approach uses extremum seeking control theory to optimize the error field in real time without inducing instabilities. Slowly-rotating n  =  1 fields (the dither), generated by external coils, are used to perturb the angular momentum, monitored in real-time using a charge-exchange spectroscopy diagnostic. Simple signal processing of the rotation measurements extracts information about the rotation gradient with respect to the control coil currents. This information is used to converge the control coil currents to a point that maximizes the toroidal angular momentum. The technique is well-suited for multi-coil, multi-harmonic error field optimizations in disruption sensitive devices as it does not require triggering locked tearing modes or plasma current disruptions. Control simulations highlight the importance of the initial search direction on the rate of the convergence, and identify future algorithm upgrades that may allow more rapid convergence that projects to convergence times in ITER on the order of tens of seconds.

  8. Elimination of the induced current error in magnetometers using superconducting flux transformers

    SciTech Connect

    Dummer, D.; Weyhmann, W.

    1987-10-01

    The changing magnetization of a sample in a superconducting flux transformer coupled magnetometer induces a current in the transformer which in turn changes the field at the sample. This ''image'' field and the error caused by it can be eliminated by sensing the current in the loop and nulling it by feedback through a mutual inductance. We have tested the technique on the superconducting transition of indium in an applied magnetic field and shown that the observed width of the transition is greatly reduced by maintaining zero current in the flux transformer.

  9. Optimal conditional error functions for the control of conditional power.

    PubMed

    Brannath, Werner; Bauer, Peter

    2004-09-01

    Ethical considerations and the competitive environment of clinical trials usually require that any given trial have sufficient power to detect a treatment advance. If at an interim analysis the available data are used to decide whether the trial is promising enough to be continued, investigators and sponsors often wish to have a high conditional power, which is the probability to reject the null hypothesis given the interim data and the alternative of interest. Under this requirement a design with interim sample size recalculation, which keeps the overall and conditional power at a prespecified value and preserves the overall type I error rate, is a reasonable alternative to a classical group sequential design, in which the conditional power is often too small. In this article two-stage designs with control of overall and conditional power are constructed that minimize the expected sample size, either for a simple point alternative or for a random mixture of alternatives given by a prior density for the efficacy parameter. The presented optimality result applies to trials with and without an interim hypothesis test; in addition, one can account for constraints such as a minimal sample size for the second stage. The optimal designs will be illustrated with an example, and will be compared to the frequently considered method of using the conditional type I error level of a group sequential design. PMID:15339294

  10. A concatenated coded modulation scheme for error control (addition 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shu

    1988-01-01

    A concatenated coded modulation scheme for error control in data communications is described. The scheme is achieved by concatenating a Reed-Solomon outer code and a bandwidth efficient block inner code for M-ary PSK modulation. Error performance of the scheme is analyzed for an AWGN channel. It is shown that extremely high reliability can be attained by using a simple M-ary PSK modulation inner code and a relatively powerful Reed-Solomon outer code. Furthermore, if an inner code of high effective rate is used, the bandwidth expansion required by the scheme due to coding will be greatly reduced. The proposed scheme is particularly effective for high-speed satellite communications for large file transfer where high reliability is required. This paper also presents a simple method for constructing block codes for M-ary PSK modulation. Some short M-ary PSK codes with good minimum squared Euclidean distance are constructed. These codes have trellis structure and hence can be decoded with a soft-decision Viterbi decoding algorithm. Furthermore, some of these codes are phase invariant under multiples of 45 deg rotation.

  11. A concatenated coded modulation scheme for error control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shu

    1988-01-01

    A concatenated coded modulation scheme for error control in data communications is presented. The scheme is achieved by concatenating a Reed-Solomon outer code and a bandwidth efficient block inner code for M-ary PSK modulation. Error performance of the scheme is analyzed for an AWGN channel. It is shown that extremely high reliability can be attained by using a simple M-ary PSK modulation inner code and a relatively powerful Reed-Solomon outer code. Furthermore, if an inner code of high effective rate is used, the bandwidth expansion required by the scheme due to coding will be greatly reduced. The proposed scheme is very effective for high speed satellite communications for large file transfer where high reliability is required. A simple method is also presented for constructing codes for M-ary PSK modulation. Some short M-ary PSK codes with good minimum squared Euclidean distance are constructed. These codes have trellis structure and hence can be decoded with a soft decision Viterbi decoding algorithm. Furthermore, some of these codes are phase invariant under multiples of 45 deg rotation.

  12. A concatenated coded modulation scheme for error control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasami, Tadao; Lin, Shu

    1988-01-01

    A concatenated coded modulation scheme for error control in data communications is presented. The scheme is achieved by concatenating a Reed-Solomon outer code and a bandwidth efficient block inner code for M-ary PSK modulation. Error performance of the scheme is analyzed for an AWGN channel. It is shown that extremely high reliability can be attained by using a simple M-ary PSK modulation inner code and relatively powerful Reed-Solomon outer code. Furthermore, if an inner code of high effective rate is used, the bandwidth expansion required by the scheme due to coding will be greatly reduced. The proposed scheme is particularly effective for high speed satellite communication for large file transfer where high reliability is required. Also presented is a simple method for constructing block codes for M-ary PSK modulation. Some short M-ary PSK codes with good minimum squared Euclidean distance are constructed. These codes have trellis structure and hence can be decoded with a soft decision Viterbi decoding algorithm.

  13. Deciphering the genetic regulatory code using an inverse error control coding framework.

    SciTech Connect

    Rintoul, Mark Daniel; May, Elebeoba Eni; Brown, William Michael; Johnston, Anna Marie; Watson, Jean-Paul

    2005-03-01

    We have found that developing a computational framework for reconstructing error control codes for engineered data and ultimately for deciphering genetic regulatory coding sequences is a challenging and uncharted area that will require advances in computational technology for exact solutions. Although exact solutions are desired, computational approaches that yield plausible solutions would be considered sufficient as a proof of concept to the feasibility of reverse engineering error control codes and the possibility of developing a quantitative model for understanding and engineering genetic regulation. Such evidence would help move the idea of reconstructing error control codes for engineered and biological systems from the high risk high payoff realm into the highly probable high payoff domain. Additionally this work will impact biological sensor development and the ability to model and ultimately develop defense mechanisms against bioagents that can be engineered to cause catastrophic damage. Understanding how biological organisms are able to communicate their genetic message efficiently in the presence of noise can improve our current communication protocols, a continuing research interest. Towards this end, project goals include: (1) Develop parameter estimation methods for n for block codes and for n, k, and m for convolutional codes. Use methods to determine error control (EC) code parameters for gene regulatory sequence. (2) Develop an evolutionary computing computational framework for near-optimal solutions to the algebraic code reconstruction problem. Method will be tested on engineered and biological sequences.

  14. Voltage controller/current limiter for ac

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, T. T.

    1980-01-01

    Circuit protects ac power systems for overload failures, limits power surge and short-circuit currents to 150 percent of steady state level, regulates ac output voltage, and soft starts loads. Limiter generates dc error signal in response to line fluctuations and dumps power when overload is reached. Device is inserted between ac source and load.

  15. Current Concepts in Conception Control

    PubMed Central

    Ringrose, C. A. Douglas

    1963-01-01

    The progressive increase in world population has become a most urgent global problem in recent years. Man has, however, been interested in controlling his reproductivity at the family level for many centuries. Historical aspects of this saga are reviewed. The modern era of conception control was ushered in by Makepeace et al. in 1937 when ovulation inhibition by progesterone was demonstrated. Confirmation of this by Pincus and associates, and development of the potent oral progestational agents, the 19-norsteroids, have made efficient reliable contraception a reality. Experience with one of these agents (Ortho-Novum, 2 mg.) in 115 patients through 805 cycles is presented. Conception control was 100% effective at this dosage. Side effects were minimal. Only three of the women discontinued the tablets because of these effects. All but five in this group of 115 preferred the oral contraceptives to methods previously employed. PMID:13973987

  16. Noradrenergic control of error perseveration in medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Marcelo S; Jin, Lu E; Harenberg, Linda; Stachenfeld, Kimberly L; Arnsten, Amy F T; Laubach, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) plays a key role in behavioral variability, action monitoring, and inhibitory control. The functional role of mPFC may change over the lifespan due to a number of aging-related issues, including dendritic regression, increased cAMP signaling, and reductions in the efficacy of neuromodulators to influence mPFC processing. A key neurotransmitter in mPFC is norepinephrine. Previous studies have reported aging-related changes in the sensitivity of mPFC-dependent tasks to noradrenergic agonist drugs, such as guanfacine. Here, we assessed the effects of yohimbine, an alpha-2 noradrenergic antagonist, in cohorts of younger and older rats in a classic test of spatial working memory (using a T-maze). Older rats (23-29 mo.) were impaired by a lower dose of yohimbine compared to younger animals (5-10 mo.). To determine if the drug acts on alpha-2 noradrenergic receptors in mPFC and if its effects are specific to memory-guided performance, we made infusions of yohimbine into mPFC of a cohort of young rats (6 mo.) using an operant delayed response task. The task involved testing rats in blocks of trials with memory- and stimulus-guided performance. Yohimbine selectively impaired memory-guided performance and was associated with error perseveration. Infusions of muscimol (a GABA-A agonist) at the same sites also selectively impaired memory-guided performance, but did not lead to error perseveration. Based on these results, we propose several potential interpretations for the role for the noradrenergic system in the performance of delayed response tasks, including the encoding of previous response locations, task rules (i.e., using a win-stay strategy instead of a win-shift strategy), and performance monitoring (e.g., prospective encoding of outcomes). PMID:23293590

  17. Noradrenergic control of error perseveration in medial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Caetano, Marcelo S.; Jin, Lu E.; Harenberg, Linda; Stachenfeld, Kimberly L.; Arnsten, Amy F. T.; Laubach, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) plays a key role in behavioral variability, action monitoring, and inhibitory control. The functional role of mPFC may change over the lifespan due to a number of aging-related issues, including dendritic regression, increased cAMP signaling, and reductions in the efficacy of neuromodulators to influence mPFC processing. A key neurotransmitter in mPFC is norepinephrine. Previous studies have reported aging-related changes in the sensitivity of mPFC-dependent tasks to noradrenergic agonist drugs, such as guanfacine. Here, we assessed the effects of yohimbine, an alpha-2 noradrenergic antagonist, in cohorts of younger and older rats in a classic test of spatial working memory (using a T-maze). Older rats (23–29 mo.) were impaired by a lower dose of yohimbine compared to younger animals (5–10 mo.). To determine if the drug acts on alpha-2 noradrenergic receptors in mPFC and if its effects are specific to memory-guided performance, we made infusions of yohimbine into mPFC of a cohort of young rats (6 mo.) using an operant delayed response task. The task involved testing rats in blocks of trials with memory- and stimulus-guided performance. Yohimbine selectively impaired memory-guided performance and was associated with error perseveration. Infusions of muscimol (a GABA-A agonist) at the same sites also selectively impaired memory-guided performance, but did not lead to error perseveration. Based on these results, we propose several potential interpretations for the role for the noradrenergic system in the performance of delayed response tasks, including the encoding of previous response locations, task rules (i.e., using a win-stay strategy instead of a win-shift strategy), and performance monitoring (e.g., prospective encoding of outcomes). PMID:23293590

  18. Current challenges in tobacco control.

    PubMed

    Slama, K

    2004-10-01

    Tobacco is the world's biggest preventable killer, but the circumstances of its history, the power and influence of its commerce and the nature of addiction make it a very difficult public health issue. Determinants of smoking are both individual and environmental. Genetics and environment influence to varying degrees all of the steps in a smoker's career. Persistence of use, degree of addiction to nicotine and difficulty in stopping are influenced by inherited traits and nicotine susceptibility, whereas the social environment and the individual's cognitions are the key factors in starting smoking and successfully stopping smoking. The tools available to tobacco control include influencing the social and cultural norms concerning tobacco; legislative and regulatory measures to protect the population and to limit tobacco industry marketing tactics, now encapsulated in the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control; and programmes to enhance the chance of not starting and successfully stopping. Strategies for tobacco control must work at both societal and individual levels, and directions are being taken that include genetic, pharmacological, behavioural, socio-cultural and international approaches. PMID:15527147

  19. Theoretical inputs and errors in the new hadronic currents in TAUOLA

    SciTech Connect

    Roig, P.; Nugent, I. M.; Przedzinski, T.; Shekhovtsova, O.; Was, Z.

    2012-10-23

    The new hadronic currents implemented in the TAUOLA library are obtained in the unified and consistent framework of Resonance Chiral Theory: a Lagrangian approach in which the resonances exchanged in the hadronic tau decays are active degrees of freedom included in a way that reproduces the low-energy results of Chiral Perturbation Theory. The short-distance QCD constraints on the imaginary part of the spin-one correlators yield relations among the couplings that render the theory predictive. In this communication, the obtaining of the two- and three-meson form factors is sketched. One of the criticisms to our framework is that the error may be as large as 1/3, since it is a realization of the large-N{sub C} limit of QCD in a meson theory. A number of arguments are given which disfavor that claim pointing to smaller errors, which would explain the phenomenological success of our description in these decays. Finally, other minor sources of error and current improvements of the code are discussed.

  20. Measurement of Turbulence with Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers - Sources of Error and Laboratory Results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nystrom, E.A.; Oberg, K.A.; Rehmann, C.R.

    2002-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) provide a promising method for measuring surface-water turbulence because they can provide data from a large spatial range in a relatively short time with relative ease. Some potential sources of errors in turbulence measurements made with ADCPs include inaccuracy of Doppler-shift measurements, poor temporal and spatial measurement resolution, and inaccuracy of multi-dimensional velocities resolved from one-dimensional velocities measured at separate locations. Results from laboratory measurements of mean velocity and turbulence statistics made with two pulse-coherent ADCPs in 0.87 meters of water are used to illustrate several of inherent sources of error in ADCP turbulence measurements. Results show that processing algorithms and beam configurations have important effects on turbulence measurements. ADCPs can provide reasonable estimates of many turbulence parameters; however, the accuracy of turbulence measurements made with commercially available ADCPs is often poor in comparison to standard measurement techniques.

  1. Variable current speed controller for eddy current motors

    DOEpatents

    Gerth, H.L.; Bailey, J.M.; Casstevens, J.M.; Dixon, J.H.; Griffith, B.O.; Igou, R.E.

    1982-03-12

    A speed control system for eddy current motors is provided in which the current to the motor from a constant frequency power source is varied by comparing the actual motor speed signal with a setpoint speed signal to control the motor speed according to the selected setpoint speed. A three-phase variable voltage autotransformer is provided for controlling the voltage from a three-phase power supply. A corresponding plurality of current control resistors is provided in series with each phase of the autotransformer output connected to inputs of a three-phase motor. Each resistor is connected in parallel with a set of normally closed contacts of plurality of relays which are operated by control logic. A logic circuit compares the selected speed with the actual motor speed obtained from a digital tachometer monitoring the motor spindle speed and operated the relays to add or substract resistance equally in each phase of the motor input to vary the motor current to control the motor at the selected speed.

  2. An Optimal Current Observer for Predictive Current Controlled Buck DC-DC Converters

    PubMed Central

    Min, Run; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zou, Xuecheng; Tong, Qiaoling; Zhang, Qiao

    2014-01-01

    In digital current mode controlled DC-DC converters, conventional current sensors might not provide isolation at a minimized price, power loss and size. Therefore, a current observer which can be realized based on the digital circuit itself, is a possible substitute. However, the observed current may diverge due to the parasitic resistors and the forward conduction voltage of the diode. Moreover, the divergence of the observed current will cause steady state errors in the output voltage. In this paper, an optimal current observer is proposed. It achieves the highest observation accuracy by compensating for all the known parasitic parameters. By employing the optimal current observer-based predictive current controller, a buck converter is implemented. The converter has a convergently and accurately observed inductor current, and shows preferable transient response than the conventional voltage mode controlled converter. Besides, costs, power loss and size are minimized since the strategy requires no additional hardware for current sensing. The effectiveness of the proposed optimal current observer is demonstrated experimentally. PMID:24854061

  3. An optimal current observer for predictive current controlled buck DC-DC converters.

    PubMed

    Min, Run; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Xiaodong; Zou, Xuecheng; Tong, Qiaoling; Zhang, Qiao

    2014-01-01

    In digital current mode controlled DC-DC converters, conventional current sensors might not provide isolation at a minimized price, power loss and size. Therefore, a current observer which can be realized based on the digital circuit itself, is a possible substitute. However, the observed current may diverge due to the parasitic resistors and the forward conduction voltage of the diode. Moreover, the divergence of the observed current will cause steady state errors in the output voltage. In this paper, an optimal current observer is proposed. It achieves the highest observation accuracy by compensating for all the known parasitic parameters. By employing the optimal current observer-based predictive current controller, a buck converter is implemented. The converter has a convergently and accurately observed inductor current, and shows preferable transient response than the conventional voltage mode controlled converter. Besides, costs, power loss and size are minimized since the strategy requires no additional hardware for current sensing. The effectiveness of the proposed optimal current observer is demonstrated experimentally. PMID:24854061

  4. Automatic generation control of a hydrothermal system with new area control error considering generation rate constraint

    SciTech Connect

    Das, D.; Nanda, J.; Kothari, M.L.; Kothari, D.P. )

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents an analysis of the automatic generation control based on a new area control error strategy for an interconnected hydrothermal system in the discrete-mode considering generation rate constraints (GRCs). The investigations reveal that the system dynamic performances following a step load perturbation in either of the areas with constrained optimum gain settings and unconstrained optimum gain settings are not much different, hence optimum controller settings can be achieved without considering GRCs in the mathematical model.

  5. Precision electronic speed controller for an alternating-current

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, Victor W.

    1988-01-01

    A high precision controller for an alternating-current multi-phase electrical motor that is subject to a large inertial load. The controller was developed for and is particularly suitable for controlling, in a neutron chopper system, a heavy spinning rotor that must be rotated in phase-locked synchronism with a reference pulse train that is representative of an ac power supply signal having a meandering line frequency. The controller includes a shaft revolution sensor which provides a feedback pulse train representative of the actual speed of the motor. An internal digital timing signal generator provides a reference signal which is compared with the feedback signal in a computing unit to provide a motor control signal. In the preferred embodiment, the motor control signal is a weighted linear sum of a speed error voltage, a phase error voltage, and a drift error voltage, each of which is computed anew with each revolution of the motor shaft. The stator windings of the motor are driven by two amplifiers which are provided with input signals having the proper quadrature relationship by an exciter unit consisting of a voltage controlled oscillator, a binary counter, a pair of readonly memories, and a pair of digital-to-analog converters.

  6. Types and severity of medication errors in Iran; a review of the current literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Medication error (ME) is the most common single preventable cause of adverse drug events which negatively affects patient safety. ME prevalence is a valuable safety indicator in healthcare system. Inadequate studies on ME, shortage of high-quality studies and wide variations in estimations from developing countries including Iran, decreases the reliability of ME evaluations. In order to clarify the status of MEs, we aimed to review current available literature on this subject from Iran. We searched Scopus, Web of Science, PubMed, CINAHL, EBSCOHOST and also Persian databases (IranMedex, and SID) up to October 2012 to find studies on adults and children about prescription, transcription, dispensing, and administration errors. Two authors independently selected and one of them reviewed and extracted data for types, definitions and severity of MEs. The results were classified based on different stages of drug delivery process. Eighteen articles (11 Persian and 7 English) were included in our review. All study designs were cross-sectional and conducted in hospital settings. Nursing staff and students were the most frequent populations under observation (12 studies; 66.7%). Most of studies did not report the overall frequency of MEs aside from ME types. Most of studies (15; 83.3%) reported prevalence of administration errors between 14.3%-70.0%. Prescribing error prevalence ranged from 29.8%-47.8%. The prevalence of dispensing and transcribing errors were from 11.3%-33.6% and 10.0%-51.8% respectively. We did not find any follow up or repeated studies. Only three studies reported findings on severity of MEs. The most reported types of and the highest percentages for any type of ME in Iran were administration errors. Studying ME in Iran is a new area considering the duration and number of publications. Wide ranges of estimations for MEs in different stages may be because of the poor quality of studies with diversity in definitions, methods, and populations. For gaining

  7. Improved Conflict Detection for Reducing Operational Errors in Air Traffic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paielli, Russell A.; Erzberger, Hainz

    2003-01-01

    An operational error is an incident in which an air traffic controller allows the separation between two aircraft to fall below the minimum separation standard. The rates of such errors in the US have increased significantly over the past few years. This paper proposes new detection methods that can help correct this trend by improving on the performance of Conflict Alert, the existing software in the Host Computer System that is intended to detect and warn controllers of imminent conflicts. In addition to the usual trajectory based on the flight plan, a "dead-reckoning" trajectory (current velocity projection) is also generated for each aircraft and checked for conflicts. Filters for reducing common types of false alerts were implemented. The new detection methods were tested in three different ways. First, a simple flightpath command language was developed t o generate precisely controlled encounters for the purpose of testing the detection software. Second, written reports and tracking data were obtained for actual operational errors that occurred in the field, and these were "replayed" to test the new detection algorithms. Finally, the detection methods were used to shadow live traffic, and performance was analysed, particularly with regard to the false-alert rate. The results indicate that the new detection methods can provide timely warnings of imminent conflicts more consistently than Conflict Alert.

  8. Fault tolerance control of phase current in permanent magnet synchronous motor control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kele; Chen, Ke; Chen, Xinglong; Li, Jinying

    2014-08-01

    As the Photoelectric tracking system develops from earth based platform to all kinds of moving platform such as plane based, ship based, car based, satellite based and missile based, the fault tolerance control system of phase current sensor is studied in order to detect and control of failure of phase current sensor on a moving platform. By using a DC-link current sensor and the switching state of the corresponding SVPWM inverter, the failure detection and fault control of three phase current sensor is achieved. Under such conditions as one failure, two failures and three failures, fault tolerance is able to be controlled. The reason why under the method, there exists error between fault tolerance control and actual phase current, is analyzed, and solution to weaken the error is provided. The experiment based on permanent magnet synchronous motor system is conducted, and the method is proven to be capable of detecting the failure of phase current sensor effectively and precisely, and controlling the fault tolerance simultaneously. With this method, even though all the three phase current sensors malfunction, the moving platform can still work by reconstructing the phase current of the motor.

  9. IM Direct Torque Control with no flux distortion and no static torque error.

    PubMed

    Lokriti, Abdesslam; Salhi, Issam; Doubabi, Said

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to improve DTC control strategy performances. In fact, we propose controlling both stator flux components (real and imaginary) through two hysteresis controllers. Thus, a new switching table which is independent from sector determination, and does not introduce zero voltage vectors is established; with much reduced size when compared to Takahashi's one. The proposed strategy has allowed cutting off with flux and current harmonics related to distortion caused by sector exchanges. Also, we provide theoretical evidence about the existence of static torque error in classical DTC, and propose a simple PI-type controller to cancel it. The proposed strategy is validated by simulation and practically on a DSPace 1104 board, for a 1.5 (kW) induction motor and various torque references. PMID:26391487

  10. Post-error action control is neurobehaviorally modulated under conditions of constant speeded response

    PubMed Central

    Soshi, Takahiro; Ando, Kumiko; Noda, Takamasa; Nakazawa, Kanako; Tsumura, Hideki; Okada, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Post-error slowing (PES) is an error recovery strategy that contributes to action control, and occurs after errors in order to prevent future behavioral flaws. Error recovery often malfunctions in clinical populations, but the relationship between behavioral traits and recovery from error is unclear in healthy populations. The present study investigated the relationship between impulsivity and error recovery by simulating a speeded response situation using a Go/No-go paradigm that forced the participants to constantly make accelerated responses prior to stimuli disappearance (stimulus duration: 250 ms). Neural correlates of post-error processing were examined using event-related potentials (ERPs). Impulsivity traits were measured with self-report questionnaires (BIS-11, BIS/BAS). Behavioral results demonstrated that the commission error for No-go trials was 15%, but PES did not take place immediately. Delayed PES was negatively correlated with error rates and impulsivity traits, showing that response slowing was associated with reduced error rates and changed with impulsivity. Response-locked error ERPs were clearly observed for the error trials. Contrary to previous studies, error ERPs were not significantly related to PES. Stimulus-locked N2 was negatively correlated with PES and positively correlated with impulsivity traits at the second post-error Go trial: larger N2 activity was associated with greater PES and less impulsivity. In summary, under constant speeded conditions, error monitoring was dissociated from post-error action control, and PES did not occur quickly. Furthermore, PES and its neural correlate (N2) were modulated by impulsivity traits. These findings suggest that there may be clinical and practical efficacy of maintaining cognitive control of actions during error recovery under common daily environments that frequently evoke impulsive behaviors. PMID:25674058

  11. Error control techniques for satellite and space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, Daniel J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    An expurgated upper bound on the event error probability of trellis coded modulation is presented. This bound is used to derive a lower bound on the minimum achievable free Euclidean distance d sub (free) of trellis codes. It is shown that the dominant parameters for both bounds, the expurgated error exponent and the asymptotic d sub (free) growth rate, respectively, can be obtained from the cutoff-rate R sub O of the transmission channel by a simple geometric construction, making R sub O the central parameter for finding good trellis codes. Several constellations are optimized with respect to the bounds.

  12. Error control techniques for satellite and space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, Daniel J., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The unequal error protection capabilities of convolutional and trellis codes are studied. In certain environments, a discrepancy in the amount of error protection placed on different information bits is desirable. Examples of environments which have data of varying importance are a number of speech coding algorithms, packet switched networks, multi-user systems, embedded coding systems, and high definition television. Encoders which provide more than one level of error protection to information bits are called unequal error protection (UEP) codes. In this work, the effective free distance vector, d, is defined as an alternative to the free distance as a primary performance parameter for UEP convolutional and trellis encoders. For a given (n, k), convolutional encoder, G, the effective free distance vector is defined as the k-dimensional vector d = (d(sub 0), d(sub 1), ..., d(sub k-1)), where d(sub j), the j(exp th) effective free distance, is the lowest Hamming weight among all code sequences that are generated by input sequences with at least one '1' in the j(exp th) position. It is shown that, although the free distance for a code is unique to the code and independent of the encoder realization, the effective distance vector is dependent on the encoder realization.

  13. IPTV multicast with peer-assisted lossy error control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Begen, Ali C.; Girod, Bernd

    2010-07-01

    Emerging IPTV technology uses source-specific IP multicast to deliver television programs to end-users. To provide reliable IPTV services over the error-prone DSL access networks, a combination of multicast forward error correction (FEC) and unicast retransmissions is employed to mitigate the impulse noises in DSL links. In existing systems, the retransmission function is provided by the Retransmission Servers sitting at the edge of the core network. In this work, we propose an alternative distributed solution where the burden of packet loss repair is partially shifted to the peer IP set-top boxes. Through Peer-Assisted Repair (PAR) protocol, we demonstrate how the packet repairs can be delivered in a timely, reliable and decentralized manner using the combination of server-peer coordination and redundancy of repairs. We also show that this distributed protocol can be seamlessly integrated with an application-layer source-aware error protection mechanism called forward and retransmitted Systematic Lossy Error Protection (SLEP/SLEPr). Simulations show that this joint PARSLEP/ SLEPr framework not only effectively mitigates the bottleneck experienced by the Retransmission Servers, thus greatly enhancing the scalability of the system, but also efficiently improves the resistance to the impulse noise.

  14. Stray currents -- Generation, interference effects and control

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolakakos, S.

    1998-12-31

    Stray currents, mostly known for their detrimental corrosion affects on the underground structures, can be effectively controlled by the implementation of specific measures at both the source of generation and at the affected structure(s). This paper discusses the most serious sources of stray current generation, the resulting problems and the numerous control methods that can be utilized to minimize corrosion and safety problems. Safety concerns associated with dc power systems are also discussed.

  15. Summary and analysis of prototypic current control

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, J.E.; Pike, C.T.

    1993-12-31

    A synopsis of current control operational history at the CDIF is presented. A brief discussion of the current control function is provided, along with the rationale and background of previous current control activities. Current control circuit performance during channel power operations is then reviewed. The review reveals that the circuits performed without failure for normal channel operations, including large load current fluctuations, and tests following emergency shutdowns. The mode of failure of the current control circuits which failed during off-normal conditions was analyzed using a computer program to model the electrical behavior. The circuit analysis clearly demonstrated that the circuits can be overstressed when subjected to extraordinary fault conditions and cause component failures as a result of the applied transients. Based upon the operational history and analysis of the failed circuits, it is determined that the circuits are adequately designed for their intended purpose. They have proven reliable for hundreds of hours of testing over a wide variety of operating conditions, and function properly to enhance channel lifetime by conditioning the current profiles and protecting the channel from adverse voltages.

  16. When Errors Do Not Matter: Weakening Belief in Intentional Control Impairs Cognitive Reaction to Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigoni, Davide; Wilquin, Helene; Brass, Marcel; Burle, Boris

    2013-01-01

    The belief that one can exert intentional control over behavior is deeply rooted in virtually all human beings. It has been shown that weakening such belief--e.g. by exposure to "anti-free will" messages--can lead people to display antisocial tendencies. We propose that this cursory and irresponsible behavior may be facilitated by a breakdown of…

  17. Learning arm's posture control using reinforcement learning and feedback-error-learning.

    PubMed

    Kambara, H; Kim, J; Sato, M; Koike, Y

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a learning model using the Actor-Critic method and the feedback-error-learning scheme. The Actor-Critic method, which is one of the major frameworks in reinforcement learning, has attracted attention as a computational learning model in the basal ganglia. Meanwhile, the feedback-error-learning is learning architecture proposed as a computationally coherent model of cerebellar motor learning. This learning architecture's purpose is to acquire a feed-forward controller by using a feedback controller's output as an error signal. In past researches, a predetermined constant gain feedback controller was used for the feedback-error-learning. We use the Actor-Critic method for obtaining a feedback controller in the feedback-error-earning. By applying the proposed learning model to an arm's posture control, we show that high-performance feedback and feed-forward controller can be acquired from only by using a scalar value of reward. PMID:17271719

  18. New current control concept -- Minimum time current control in the three-phase PWM converter

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.W.; Sul, S.K.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, a new current controller that guarantees the fastest transient response is proposed. The basic concept is to find the optimal control voltage for tracking the reference current with minimum time under the voltage limit constraint. Though this minimum time control concept is also applicable to all the machine drive systems, this paper focuses on the current regulation in the three-phase pulse width modulation (PWM) converter. In the simulation and experimental results, it is observed that the proposed controller has much less transient time than the conventional synchronous PI regulator and the performance of the dc link voltage control is also greatly improved with the proposed current controller.

  19. An error-resistant linguistic protocol for air traffic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cushing, Steven

    1989-01-01

    The research results described here are intended to enhance the effectiveness of the DATALINK interface that is scheduled by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to be deployed during the 1990's to improve the safety of various aspects of aviation. While voice has a natural appeal as the preferred means of communication both among humans themselves and between humans and machines as the form of communication that people find most convenient, the complexity and flexibility of natural language are problematic, because of the confusions and misunderstandings that can arise as a result of ambiguity, unclear reference, intonation peculiarities, implicit inference, and presupposition. The DATALINK interface will avoid many of these problems by replacing voice with vision and speech with written instructions. This report describes results achieved to date on an on-going research effort to refine the protocol of the DATALINK system so as to avoid many of the linguistic problems that still remain in the visual mode. In particular, a working prototype DATALINK simulator system has been developed consisting of an unambiguous, context-free grammar and parser, based on the current air-traffic-control language and incorporated into a visual display involving simulated touch-screen buttons and three levels of menu screens. The system is written in the C programming language and runs on the Macintosh II computer. After reviewing work already done on the project, new tasks for further development are described.

  20. Error control techniques for satellite and space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, D. J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The performance of NASA Telecommand System was analyzed. A random coding approach was taken to determine the optimum code rate to use in forward error correcting (FEC) system with a fixed signal energy to noise power density ration, but no bandwidth constraint. Capacity and cutoff rates of concatened coding systems were determined. A lower bound on the minium distance growth rate between unmerged codewords was obtained for time invarient convolutional codes.

  1. Performance analysis of a hybrid ARQ error control scheme for near earth satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shu

    1987-01-01

    A robust error control coding scheme is presented. The scheme is a cascaded forward error correction (FEC) scheme supported by parity retransmissions for further error correction in the erroneous data words. The error performance and throughput efficiency of the scheme are analyzed. Two specific schemes are proposed for NASA near earth satellite communications. It is shown that both schemes provide high reliability and throughput efficiency even for high channel bit error rates in the range of .002. The schemes are suitable for high data rate file transfer.

  2. ANALYSIS OF CASE-CONTROL DATA WITH COVARIATE MEASUREMENT ERROR: APPLICATION TO DIET AND COLON CANCER

    EPA Science Inventory

    We propose a method for estimating odds ratios from case-control data in which ovariates are subject to mesurement error. he mesurement error may contain both a random component and a systematic difference between cases and controls (recall bias). ultivariate normal discriminant ...

  3. DTI quality control assessment via error estimation from Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzinfar, Mahshid; Li, Yin; Verde, Audrey R.; Oguz, Ipek; Gerig, Guido; Styner, Martin A.

    2013-03-01

    Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) is currently the state of the art method for characterizing the microscopic tissue structure of white matter in normal or diseased brain in vivo. DTI is estimated from a series of Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) volumes. DWIs suffer from a number of artifacts which mandate stringent Quality Control (QC) schemes to eliminate lower quality images for optimal tensor estimation. Conventionally, QC procedures exclude artifact-affected DWIs from subsequent computations leading to a cleaned, reduced set of DWIs, called DWI-QC. Often, a rejection threshold is heuristically/empirically chosen above which the entire DWI-QC data is rendered unacceptable and thus no DTI is computed. In this work, we have devised a more sophisticated, Monte-Carlo (MC) simulation based method for the assessment of resulting tensor properties. This allows for a consistent, error-based threshold definition in order to reject/accept the DWI-QC data. Specifically, we propose the estimation of two error metrics related to directional distribution bias of Fractional Anisotropy (FA) and the Principal Direction (PD). The bias is modeled from the DWI-QC gradient information and a Rician noise model incorporating the loss of signal due to the DWI exclusions. Our simulations further show that the estimated bias can be substantially different with respect to magnitude and directional distribution depending on the degree of spatial clustering of the excluded DWIs. Thus, determination of diffusion properties with minimal error requires an evenly distributed sampling of the gradient directions before and after QC.

  4. One Unequal Error Control Method for Telemetric Data Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirner, Tomáš; Farkaš, Peter; Krile, Srečko

    2011-05-01

    In wireless sensor networks (WSN) it is necessary to use very simple codes for transmission of information since the nodes in these networks have usually only limited energy available not only for transmission but also for processing. On the other hand, common codes do not usually take into account the fact that in case of telemetric information the weights of individual orders are not equal and errors in different orders cause different deviations from correct value. In this contribution, new very simple codes for transmission of telemetric information on WSN will be presented, which take into account the above-mentioned requirements. Resulting square deviation will be used as a quality evaluation criterion.

  5. Error Control Coding Techniques for Space and Satellite Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, Daniel J., Jr.; Cabral, Hermano A.; He, Jiali

    1997-01-01

    Bootstrap Hybrid Decoding (BHD) (Jelinek and Cocke, 1971) is a coding/decoding scheme that adds extra redundancy to a set of convolutionally encoded codewords and uses this redundancy to provide reliability information to a sequential decoder. Theoretical results indicate that bit error probability performance (BER) of BHD is close to that of Turbo-codes, without some of their drawbacks. In this report we study the use of the Multiple Stack Algorithm (MSA) (Chevillat and Costello, Jr., 1977) as the underlying sequential decoding algorithm in BHD, which makes possible an iterative version of BHD.

  6. Error control techniques for satellite and space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, D. J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The performance anlaysis of NASA's telecommand systems was summarized. It is assumed that the decoded frames are scrambled prior to decoding by the outer code. The average decoded bit error rate are examined which allows the possibility of evaluating many different frame coding options. The capacity and cutoff rate of the outer channel formed by the combination of the actual physical channel and the inner encoder and decoder in a concatenated coding system were analyzed. The best combination of inner and outer codes to use in a concatenated coding system were determined. It was established that in general: (1) it is better not to interleave between the inner and outer codes; and (2) for a fixed overall code rate, it is better to use higher rate inner codes and lower rate outer codes. Inner convolutional codes are considered. The analysis is more difficult in this case because the inner decoder error events do not appear in blocks of fixed length but can be of many different lengths.

  7. Error control techniques for satellite and space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, Daniel J., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    This report focuses on the results obtained during the PI's recent sabbatical leave at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich, Switzerland, from January 1, 1995 through June 30, 1995. Two projects investigated various properties of TURBO codes, a new form of concatenated coding that achieves near channel capacity performance at moderate bit error rates. The performance of TURBO codes is explained in terms of the code's distance spectrum. These results explain both the near capacity performance of the TURBO codes and the observed 'error floor' for moderate and high signal-to-noise ratios (SNR's). A semester project, entitled 'The Realization of the Turbo-Coding System,' involved a thorough simulation study of the performance of TURBO codes and verified the results claimed by previous authors. A copy of the final report for this project is included as Appendix A. A diploma project, entitled 'On the Free Distance of Turbo Codes and Related Product Codes,' includes an analysis of TURBO codes and an explanation for their remarkable performance. A copy of the final report for this project is included as Appendix B.

  8. Error control techniques for satellite and space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, D. J., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    High rate concatenated coding systems with trellis inner codes and Reed-Solomon (RS) outer codes for application in satellite communication systems are considered. Two types of inner codes are studied: high rate punctured binary convolutional codes which result in overall effective information rates between 1/2 and 1 bit per channel use; and bandwidth efficient signal space trellis codes which can achieve overall effective information rates greater than 1 bit per channel use. Channel capacity calculations with and without side information performed for the concatenated coding system. Concatenated coding schemes are investigated. In Scheme 1, the inner code is decoded with the Viterbi algorithm and the outer RS code performs error-correction only (decoding without side information). In scheme 2, the inner code is decoded with a modified Viterbi algorithm which produces reliability information along with the decoded output. In this algorithm, path metrics are used to estimate the entire information sequence, while branch metrics are used to provide the reliability information on the decoded sequence. This information is used to erase unreliable bits in the decoded output. An errors-and-erasures RS decoder is then used for the outer code. These two schemes are proposed for use on NASA satellite channels. Results indicate that high system reliability can be achieved with little or no bandwidth expansion.

  9. Error analysis in the measurement of average power with application to switching controllers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maisel, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    The behavior of the power measurement error due to the frequency responses of first order transfer functions between the input sinusoidal voltage, input sinusoidal current and the signal multiplier was studied. It was concluded that this measurement error can be minimized if the frequency responses of the first order transfer functions are identical.

  10. Error bounds of adaptive dynamic programming algorithms for solving undiscounted optimal control problems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Derong; Li, Hongliang; Wang, Ding

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we establish error bounds of adaptive dynamic programming algorithms for solving undiscounted infinite-horizon optimal control problems of discrete-time deterministic nonlinear systems. We consider approximation errors in the update equations of both value function and control policy. We utilize a new assumption instead of the contraction assumption in discounted optimal control problems. We establish the error bounds for approximate value iteration based on a new error condition. Furthermore, we also establish the error bounds for approximate policy iteration and approximate optimistic policy iteration algorithms. It is shown that the iterative approximate value function can converge to a finite neighborhood of the optimal value function under some conditions. To implement the developed algorithms, critic and action neural networks are used to approximate the value function and control policy, respectively. Finally, a simulation example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed algorithms. PMID:25751878

  11. ERP evidence of adaptive changes in error processing and attentional control during rhythm synchronization learning.

    PubMed

    Padrão, Gonçalo; Penhune, Virginia; de Diego-Balaguer, Ruth; Marco-Pallares, Josep; Rodriguez-Fornells, Antoni

    2014-10-15

    The ability to detect and use information from errors is essential during the acquisition of new skills. There is now a wealth of evidence about the brain mechanisms involved in error processing. However, the extent to which those mechanisms are engaged during the acquisition of new motor skills remains elusive. Here we examined rhythm synchronization learning across 12 blocks of practice in musically naïve individuals and tracked changes in ERP signals associated with error-monitoring and error-awareness across distinct learning stages. Synchronization performance improved with practice, and performance improvements were accompanied by dynamic changes in ERP components related to error-monitoring and error-awareness. Early in learning, when performance was poor and the internal representations of the rhythms were weaker we observed a larger error-related negativity (ERN) following errors compared to later learning. The larger ERN during early learning likely results from greater conflict between competing motor responses, leading to greater engagement of medial-frontal conflict monitoring processes and attentional control. Later in learning, when performance had improved, we observed a smaller ERN accompanied by an enhancement of a centroparietal positive component resembling the P3. This centroparietal positive component was predictive of participant's performance accuracy, suggesting a relation between error saliency, error awareness and the consolidation of internal templates of the practiced rhythms. Moreover, we showed that during rhythm learning errors led to larger auditory evoked responses related to attention orientation which were triggered automatically and which were independent of the learning stage. The present study provides crucial new information about how the electrophysiological signatures related to error-monitoring and error-awareness change during the acquisition of new skills, extending previous work on error processing and cognitive

  12. Reed Solomon codes for error control in byte organized computer memory systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S.; Costello, D. J., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    A problem in designing semiconductor memories is to provide some measure of error control without requiring excessive coding overhead or decoding time. In LSI and VLSI technology, memories are often organized on a multiple bit (or byte) per chip basis. For example, some 256K-bit DRAM's are organized in 32Kx8 bit-bytes. Byte oriented codes such as Reed Solomon (RS) codes can provide efficient low overhead error control for such memories. However, the standard iterative algorithm for decoding RS codes is too slow for these applications. Some special decoding techniques for extended single-and-double-error-correcting RS codes which are capable of high speed operation are presented. These techniques are designed to find the error locations and the error values directly from the syndrome without having to use the iterative algorithm to find the error locator polynomial.

  13. Error control techniques for satellite and space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, Daniel J., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Worked performed during the reporting period is summarized. Construction of robustly good trellis codes for use with sequential decoding was developed. The robustly good trellis codes provide a much better trade off between free distance and distance profile. The unequal error protection capabilities of convolutional codes was studied. The problem of finding good large constraint length, low rate convolutional codes for deep space applications is investigated. A formula for computing the free distance of 1/n convolutional codes was discovered. Double memory (DM) codes, codes with two memory units per unit bit position, were studied; a search for optimal DM codes is being conducted. An algorithm for constructing convolutional codes from a given quasi-cyclic code was developed. Papers based on the above work are included in the appendix.

  14. Deep space communications, weather effects, and error control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posner, Edward C.

    1989-01-01

    Deep space telemetry is and will remain signal-to-noise limited and vulnerable to interference. A need exists to increase received signal power and decrease noise. This includes going to Ka-band in the mid-1990's to increase directivity. The effects of a wet atmosphere can increase the noise temperature by a factor of 5 or more, even at X-band, but the order of magnitude increase in average data rate obtainable at Ka-band relative to X-band makes the increased uncertainty a good trade. Lowbit error probabilities required by data compression are available both theoretically and practically with coding, at an infinitesimal power penalty rather than the 10 to 15 dB more power required to reduce error probabilities without coding. Advances are coming rapidly in coding, as with the new constraint-length 15 rate 1/4 convolutional code concatenated with the already existing Reed-Solomon code to be demonstrated on Galileo. In addition, high density spacecraft data storage will allow selective retransmissions, even from the edge of the Solar System, to overcome weather effects. In general, deep space communication was able to operate, and will continue to operate, closer to theoretical limits than any other form of communication. These include limits in antenna area and directivity, system noise temperature, coding efficiency, and everything else. The deep space communication links of the mid-90's and beyond will be compatible with new instruments and compression algorithms and represent a sensible investment in an overall end-to-end information system design.

  15. Finite Time Control Design for Bilateral Teleoperation System With Position Synchronization Error Constrained.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yana; Hua, Changchun; Guan, Xinping

    2016-03-01

    Due to the cognitive limitations of the human operator and lack of complete information about the remote environment, the work performance of such teleoperation systems cannot be guaranteed in most cases. However, some practical tasks conducted by the teleoperation system require high performances, such as tele-surgery needs satisfactory high speed and more precision control results to guarantee patient' health status. To obtain some satisfactory performances, the error constrained control is employed by applying the barrier Lyapunov function (BLF). With the constrained synchronization errors, some high performances, such as, high convergence speed, small overshoot, and an arbitrarily predefined small residual constrained synchronization error can be achieved simultaneously. Nevertheless, like many classical control schemes only the asymptotic/exponential convergence, i.e., the synchronization errors converge to zero as time goes infinity can be achieved with the error constrained control. It is clear that finite time convergence is more desirable. To obtain a finite-time synchronization performance, the terminal sliding mode (TSM)-based finite time control method is developed for teleoperation system with position error constrained in this paper. First, a new nonsingular fast terminal sliding mode (NFTSM) surface with new transformed synchronization errors is proposed. Second, adaptive neural network system is applied for dealing with the system uncertainties and the external disturbances. Third, the BLF is applied to prove the stability and the nonviolation of the synchronization errors constraints. Finally, some comparisons are conducted in simulation and experiment results are also presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed method. PMID:25823053

  16. Beam current controller for laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-10-28

    The present invention relates to the design and use of an ion source with a rapid beam current controller for experimental and medicinal purposes. More particularly, the present invention relates to the design and use of a laser ion source with a magnetic field applied to confine a plasma flux caused by laser ablation.

  17. Solar Cell Short Circuit Current Errors and Uncertainties During High Altitude Calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, David D.

    2012-01-01

    High altitude balloon based facilities can make solar cell calibration measurements above 99.5% of the atmosphere to use for adjusting laboratory solar simulators. While close to on-orbit illumination, the small attenuation to the spectra may result in under measurements of solar cell parameters. Variations of stratospheric weather, may produce flight-to-flight measurement variations. To support the NSCAP effort, this work quantifies some of the effects on solar cell short circuit current (Isc) measurements on triple junction sub-cells. This work looks at several types of high altitude methods, direct high altitude meas urements near 120 kft, and lower stratospheric Langley plots from aircraft. It also looks at Langley extrapolation from altitudes above most of the ozone, for potential small balloon payloads. A convolution of the sub-cell spectral response with the standard solar spectrum modified by several absorption processes is used to determine the relative change from AMO, lscllsc(AMO). Rayleigh scattering, molecular scatterin g from uniformly mixed gases, Ozone, and water vapor, are included in this analysis. A range of atmosph eric pressures are examined, from 0. 05 to 0.25 Atm to cover the range of atmospheric altitudes where solar cell calibrations a reperformed. Generally these errors and uncertainties are less than 0.2%

  18. Error mapping controller: a closed loop neuroprosthesis controlled by artificial neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Ferrante, Simona; De Momi, Elena; Ferrigno, Giancarlo

    2006-01-01

    Background The design of an optimal neuroprostheses controller and its clinical use presents several challenges. First, the physiological system is characterized by highly inter-subjects varying properties and also by non stationary behaviour with time, due to conditioning level and fatigue. Secondly, the easiness to use in routine clinical practice requires experienced operators. Therefore, feedback controllers, avoiding long setting procedures, are required. Methods The error mapping controller (EMC) here proposed uses artificial neural networks (ANNs) both for the design of an inverse model and of a feedback controller. A neuromuscular model is used to validate the performance of the controllers in simulations. The EMC performance is compared to a Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) included in an anti wind-up scheme (called PIDAW) and to a controller with an ANN as inverse model and a PID in the feedback loop (NEUROPID). In addition tests on the EMC robustness in response to variations of the Plant parameters and to mechanical disturbances are carried out. Results The EMC shows improvements with respect to the other controllers in tracking accuracy, capability to prolong exercise managing fatigue, robustness to parameter variations and resistance to mechanical disturbances. Conclusion Different from the other controllers, the EMC is capable of balancing between tracking accuracy and mapping of fatigue during the exercise. In this way, it avoids overstressing muscles and allows a considerable prolongation of the movement. The collection of the training sets does not require any particular experimental setting and can be introduced in routine clinical practice. PMID:17029636

  19. Current control of light by nonreciprocal magnetoplasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Yongkang; Li, Kang; Carver, Sara; Martinez, Juan Jose; Huang, Jungang; Thueux, Yoann; Avlonitis, Nick; Copner, Nigel

    2015-05-01

    The ability to actively control light has long been a major scientific and technological goal. We proposed a scheme that allows for active control of light by utilizing the nonreciprocal magnetoplasmonic effect. As a proof of concept, we applied current signal through an ultrathin metallic film in a magneto-plasmonic multilayer and found that dynamic photonic nonreciprocity appears in magnetic-optical material layer due to the magnetic field being induced from current signal and modulates surface plasmon polaritons trapped in the metal surface and the light reflected. The proposed concept provides a possible way for the active control of light and could find potential applications such as ultrafast optoelectronic signal processing for plasmonic nanocircuit technology and ultrafast/large-aperture free-space electro-optic modulation platform for wireless laser communication technology.

  20. Current control of light by nonreciprocal magnetoplasmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Yongkang Li, Kang; Carver, Sara; Martinez, Juan Jose; Huang, Jungang; Copner, Nigel; Thueux, Yoann; Avlonitis, Nick

    2015-05-11

    The ability to actively control light has long been a major scientific and technological goal. We proposed a scheme that allows for active control of light by utilizing the nonreciprocal magnetoplasmonic effect. As a proof of concept, we applied current signal through an ultrathin metallic film in a magneto-plasmonic multilayer and found that dynamic photonic nonreciprocity appears in magnetic-optical material layer due to the magnetic field being induced from current signal and modulates surface plasmon polaritons trapped in the metal surface and the light reflected. The proposed concept provides a possible way for the active control of light and could find potential applications such as ultrafast optoelectronic signal processing for plasmonic nanocircuit technology and ultrafast/large-aperture free-space electro-optic modulation platform for wireless laser communication technology.

  1. Learner Control and Error Correction in ICALL: Browsers, Peekers, and Adamants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heift, Trude

    2002-01-01

    Reports a study on the impact of learner control on the error correction process within a web-based Intelligent Language Tutoring System (ILTS). During three 1-hour grammar practice sessions, 33 students used an ILTS for German that provided error-specific and individualized feedback. Results indicate the majority of students (85%) sought to…

  2. The Accuracy of Webcams in 2D Motion Analysis: Sources of Error and Their Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, A.; Moreno, R.; Candelas, P.; Belmar, F.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we show the potential of webcams as precision measuring instruments in a physics laboratory. Various sources of error appearing in 2D coordinate measurements using low-cost commercial webcams are discussed, quantifying their impact on accuracy and precision, and simple procedures to control these sources of error are presented.…

  3. Effects of locomotion mode recognition errors on volitional control of powered above-knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Liu, Ming; Huang, He

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have reported various methods that recognize amputees' intent regarding locomotion modes, which is potentially useful for volitional control of powered artificial legs. However, occasional errors in locomotion mode recognition are inevitable. When these intent recognition decisions are used for volitional prosthesis control, the effects of the decision errors on the operation of the prosthesis and user's task performance is unknown. Hence, the goals of this study were to 1) systematically investigate the effects of locomotion mode recognition errors on volitional control of powered prosthetic legs and the user's gait stability, and 2) identify the critical mode recognition errors that impact safe and confident use of powered artificial legs in lower limb amputees. Five able-bodied subjects and two above-knee (AK) amputees were recruited and tested when wearing a powered AK prosthesis. Four types of locomotion mode recognition errors with different duration and at different gait phases were purposely applied to the prosthesis control. The subjects' gait stabilities were subjectively and objectively quantified. The results showed that not all of the mode recognition errors in volitional prosthesis control disturb the subjects' gait stability. The effects of errors on the user's balance depended on 1) the gait phase when the errors happened and 2) the amount of mechanical work change applied on the powered knee caused by the errors. Based on the study results, "critical errors" were defined and suggested as a new index to evaluate locomotion mode recognition algorithms for artificial legs. The outcome of this study might aid the future design of volitionally-controlled powered prosthetic legs that are reliable and safe for practice. PMID:25486645

  4. Error Control Techniques for Satellite and Space Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, Daniel J., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    In this report, we present the results of our recent work on turbo coding in two formats. Appendix A includes the overheads of a talk that has been given at four different locations over the last eight months. This presentation has received much favorable comment from the research community and has resulted in the full-length paper included as Appendix B, 'A Distance Spectrum Interpretation of Turbo Codes'. Turbo codes use a parallel concatenation of rate 1/2 convolutional encoders combined with iterative maximum a posteriori probability (MAP) decoding to achieve a bit error rate (BER) of 10(exp -5) at a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of only 0.7 dB. The channel capacity for a rate 1/2 code with binary phase shift-keyed modulation on the AWGN (additive white Gaussian noise) channel is 0 dB, and thus the Turbo coding scheme comes within 0.7 DB of capacity at a BER of 10(exp -5).

  5. VOC Control: Current practices and future trends

    SciTech Connect

    Moretti, E.C.; Mukhopadhyay, N. )

    1993-07-01

    One of the most formidable challenges posed by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) is the search for efficient and economical control strategies for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are precursors to ground-level ozone, a major component in the formation of smog. Under the CAAA, thousands of currently unregulated sources will be required to reduce or eliminate VOC emissions. In addition, sources that are currently regulated may seek to evaluate alternative VOC control strategies to meet stricter regulatory requirements such as the maximum achievable control technology (MACT) requirements in Title III of the CAAA. Because of the increasing attention being given to VOC control, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers' (AIChE) Center for Waste Reduction Technologies (CWRT) initiated a study of VOC control technologies and regulatory initiatives. A key objective of the project was to identify and describe existing VOC control technologies and air regulations, as well as emerging technologies and forthcoming regulations. That work is the basis for this article.

  6. Minimum sliding mode error feedback control for fault tolerant reconfigurable satellite formations with J2 perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Lu; Chen, Xiaoqian; Misra, Arun K.

    2014-03-01

    Minimum Sliding Mode Error Feedback Control (MSMEFC) is proposed to improve the control precision of spacecraft formations based on the conventional sliding mode control theory. This paper proposes a new approach to estimate and offset the system model errors, which include various kinds of uncertainties and disturbances, as well as smoothes out the effect of nonlinear switching control terms. To facilitate the analysis, the concept of equivalent control error is introduced, which is the key to the utilization of MSMEFC. A cost function is formulated on the basis of the principle of minimum sliding mode error; then the equivalent control error is estimated and fed back to the conventional sliding mode control. It is shown that the sliding mode after the MSMEFC will approximate to the ideal sliding mode, resulting in improved control performance and quality. The new methodology is applied to spacecraft formation flying. It guarantees global asymptotic convergence of the relative tracking error in the presence of J2 perturbations. In addition, some fault tolerant situations such as thruster failure for a period of time, thruster degradation and so on, are also considered to verify the effectiveness of MSMEFC. Numerical simulations are performed to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed methodology to maintain and reconfigure the satellite formation with the existence of initial offsets and J2 perturbation effects, even in the fault-tolerant cases.

  7. Current limiting remote power control module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, Douglas C.

    1990-01-01

    The power source for the Space Station Freedom will be fully utilized nearly all of the time. As such, any loads on the system will need to operate within expected limits. Should any load draw an inordinate amount of power, the bus voltage for the system may sag and disrupt the operation of other loads. To protect the bus and loads some type of power interface between the bus and each load must be provided. This interface is most crucial when load faults occur. A possible system configuration is presented. The proposed interface is the Current Limiting Remote Power Controller (CL-RPC). Such an interface should provide the following power functions: limit overloading and resulting undervoltage; prevent catastrophic failure and still provide for redundancy management within the load; minimize cable heating; and provide accurate current measurement. A functional block diagram of the power processing stage of a CL-RPC is included. There are four functions that drive the circuit design: rate control of current; current sensing; the variable conductance switch (VCS) technology; and the algorithm used for current limiting. Each function is discussed separately.

  8. An error recovery technique for a satellite channel assignment system with distributed control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emstad, P. J.; Halaas, A.

    1980-09-01

    A distributed control system for a set of earth stations sharing satellite communication channels is studied. The stations communicate by messages which may be corrupted by errors. A sufficient set of message types are defined to allow stations to enter and leave the system, to arbitrate for communication channels, and to recover from error situations. The error processes assumed are of a transient nature, mainly existing on the interstation control channels. The signaling communication protocols are informally described in a Pascal-like language. The protocols are simulated in Simula and are found to work correctly in all cases studied.

  9. DTI Quality Control Assessment via Error Estimation From Monte Carlo Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Farzinfar, Mahshid; Li, Yin; Verde, Audrey R.; Oguz, Ipek; Gerig, Guido; Styner, Martin A.

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) is currently the state of the art method for characterizing microscopic tissue structure in the white matter in normal or diseased brain in vivo. DTI is estimated from a series of Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) volumes. DWIs suffer from a number of artifacts which mandate stringent Quality Control (QC) schemes to eliminate lower quality images for optimal tensor estimation. Conventionally, QC procedures exclude artifact-affected DWIs from subsequent computations leading to a cleaned, reduced set of DWIs, called DWI-QC. Often, a rejection threshold is heuristically/empirically chosen above which the entire DWI-QC data is rendered unacceptable and thus no DTI is computed. In this work, we have devised a more sophisticated, Monte-Carlo simulation based method for the assessment of resulting tensor properties. This allows for a consistent, error-based threshold definition in order to reject/accept the DWI-QC data. Specifically, we propose the estimation of two error metrics related to directional distribution bias of Fractional Anisotropy (FA) and the Principal Direction (PD). The bias is modeled from the DWI-QC gradient information and a Rician noise model incorporating the loss of signal due to the DWI exclusions. Our simulations further show that the estimated bias can be substantially different with respect to magnitude and directional distribution depending on the degree of spatial clustering of the excluded DWIs. Thus, determination of diffusion properties with minimal error requires an evenly distributed sampling of the gradient directions before and after QC. PMID:23833547

  10. Static current profile control and RFP confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheffel, Jan; Schnack, Dalton D.; Mirza, Ahmed A.

    2013-11-01

    Static current profile control (CPC) is shown numerically to substantially enhance plasma confinement in the reversed-field pinch (RFP). By suitable application of an auxiliary electric field and adjustment of its internal location, width and amplitude, strongly decreased levels of dynamo fluctuations are obtained. The simulations are performed using a fully non-linear, resistive magnetohydrodynamic model, including the effects of ohmic heating as well as parallel and perpendicular heat conduction along stochastic field lines. The importance of controlling the parallel current profile in the core plasma to minimize the effects of tearing modes on confinement is thus confirmed. A near three-fold increase in energy confinement is found and poloidal plasma beta increases by 30% from 0.20 to 0.27. The edge heat flux is reduced to a third of that of the conventional RFP. The high-confinement phase is interrupted here by a crash, characterized by a rapid decrease in confinement. A detailed study of the crash phase is carried out by the standard Δ‧ theory and a fully resistive linearized time-spectral method; the generalized weighted residual method. The analysis suggests that the instability is caused by pressure-driven, resistive g-modes. Inclusion of anisotropic thermal conduction reduces the linear growth rates. As compared with our earlier numerical studies of CPC in the RFP, employing feedback control, the present static control scheme should be more easily implemented experimentally.

  11. Suspended sediment fluxes in a tidal wetland: Measurement, controlling factors, and error analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ganju, N.K.; Schoellhamer, D.H.; Bergamaschi, B.A.

    2005-01-01

    Suspended sediment fluxes to and from tidal wetlands are of increasing concern because of habitat restoration efforts, wetland sustainability as sea level rises, and potential contaminant accumulation. We measured water and sediment fluxes through two channels on Browns Island, at the landward end of San Francisco Bay, United States, to determine the factors that control sediment fluxes on and off the island. In situ instrumentation was deployed between October 10 and November 13, 2003. Acoustic Doppler current profilers and the index velocity method were employed to calculate water fluxes. Suspended sediment concentrations (SSC) were determined with optical sensors and cross-sectional water sampling. All procedures were analyzed for their contribution to total error in the flux measurement. The inability to close the water balance and determination of constituent concentration were identified as the main sources of error; total error was 27% for net sediment flux. The water budget for the island was computed with an unaccounted input of 0.20 m 3 s-1 (22% of mean inflow), after considering channel flow, change in water storage, evapotranspiration, and precipitation. The net imbalance may be a combination of groundwater seepage, overland flow, and flow through minor channels. Change of island water storage, caused by local variations in water surface elevation, dominated the tidalty averaged water flux. These variations were mainly caused by wind and barometric pressure change, which alter regional water levels throughout the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta. Peak instantaneous ebb flow was 35% greater than peak flood flow, indicating an ebb-dominant system, though dominance varied with the spring-neap cycle. SSC were controlled by wind-wave resuspension adjacent to the island and local tidal currents that mobilized sediment from the channel bed. During neap tides sediment was imported onto the island but during spring tides sediment was exported because the main

  12. Dynamically corrected gates for singlet-triplet spin qubits with control-dependent errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, N. Tobias; Witzel, Wayne M.; Nielsen, Erik; Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2013-03-01

    Magnetic field inhomogeneity due to random polarization of quasi-static local magnetic impurities is a major source of environmentally induced error for singlet-triplet double quantum dot (DQD) spin qubits. Moreover, for singlet-triplet qubits this error may depend on the applied controls. This effect is significant when a static magnetic field gradient is applied to enable full qubit control. Through a configuration interaction analysis, we observe that the dependence of the field inhomogeneity-induced error on the DQD bias voltage can vary systematically as a function of the controls for certain experimentally relevant operating regimes. To account for this effect, we have developed a straightforward prescription for adapting dynamically corrected gate sequences that assume control-independent errors into sequences that compensate for systematic control-dependent errors. We show that accounting for such errors may lead to a substantial increase in gate fidelities. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. On Zero Steady-State Error Voltage Control of Single-Phase PWM Inverters With Different Load Types

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Dong; Timothy, Thacker; Burgos, Rolando; Wang, Fei; Boroyevich, Dushan

    2011-01-01

    This paper comprehensively investigates and compares different multiloop linear control schemes for single-phase pulsewidth modulation inverters, both in stationary and synchronous (d-q) frames, by focusing on their steady-state error under different loading conditions. Specifically, it is shown how proportional plus resonant (P + R) control and load current feedback (LCF) control can, respectively, improve the steady-state and transient performance of the inverter, leading to the proposal of a PID + R + LCF control scheme. Furthermore, the LCF control and capacitive current feedback control schemes are shown to be subject to stability issues under second and higher order filter loads. Additionally, the equivalence between the stationary frame and d-q frame controllers is discussed depending on the orthogonal term generation method, and a d-q frame voltage control strategy is proposed eliminating the need for the generation of this orthogonal component. This is achieved while retaining all the advantages of operating in the synchronous d-q frame, i.e., zero steady-state error and ease of implementation. All theoretical findings are validated experimentally using a 1.5 kW laboratory prototype.

  14. Output feedback direct adaptive neural network control for uncertain SISO nonlinear systems using a fuzzy estimator of the control error.

    PubMed

    Chemachema, Mohamed

    2012-12-01

    A direct adaptive control algorithm, based on neural networks (NN) is presented for a class of single input single output (SISO) nonlinear systems. The proposed controller is implemented without a priori knowledge of the nonlinear systems; and only the output of the system is considered available for measurement. Contrary to the approaches available in the literature, in the proposed controller, the updating signal used in the adaptive laws is an estimate of the control error, which is directly related to the NN weights instead of the tracking error. A fuzzy inference system (FIS) is introduced to get an estimate of the control error. Without any additional control term to the NN adaptive controller, all the signals involved in the closed loop are proven to be exponentially bounded and hence the stability of the system. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. PMID:23037773

  15. Stress regulation and cognitive control: evidence relating cortisol reactivity and neural responses to errors.

    PubMed

    Compton, Rebecca J; Hofheimer, Julia; Kazinka, Rebecca

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we tested the relationship between error-related signals of cognitive control and cortisol reactivity, investigating the hypothesis of common systems for cognitive and emotional self-regulation. Eighty-three participants completed a Stroop task while electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded. Three error-related indices were derived from the EEG: the error-related negativity (ERN), error positivity (Pe), and error-related alpha suppression (ERAS). Pre- and posttask salivary samples were assayed for cortisol, and cortisol change scores were correlated with the EEG variables. Better error-correct differentiation in the ERN predicted less cortisol increase during the task, whereas greater ERAS predicted greater cortisol increase during the task; the Pe was not correlated with cortisol changes. We concluded that an enhanced ERN, part of an adaptive cognitive control system, predicts successful stress regulation. In contrast, an enhanced ERAS response may reflect error-related arousal that is not adaptive. The results support the concept of overlapping systems for cognitive and emotional self-regulation. PMID:23055094

  16. Automatic Time Stepping with Global Error Control for Groundwater Flow Models

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Guoping

    2008-09-01

    An automatic time stepping with global error control is proposed for the time integration of the diffusion equation to simulate groundwater flow in confined aquifers. The scheme is based on an a posteriori error estimate for the discontinuous Galerkin (dG) finite element methods. A stability factor is involved in the error estimate and it is used to adapt the time step and control the global temporal error for the backward difference method. The stability factor can be estimated by solving a dual problem. The stability factor is not sensitive to the accuracy of the dual solution and the overhead computational cost can be minimized by solving the dual problem using large time steps. Numerical experiments are conducted to show the application and the performance of the automatic time stepping scheme. Implementation of the scheme can lead to improvement in accuracy and efficiency for groundwater flow models.

  17. Error Control with Perfectly Matched Layer or Damping Layer Treatments for Computational Aeroacoustics with Jet Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodrich, John W.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we show by means of numerical experiments that the error introduced in a numerical domain because of a Perfectly Matched Layer or Damping Layer boundary treatment can be controlled. These experimental demonstrations are for acoustic propagation with the Linearized Euler Equations with both uniform and steady jet flows. The propagating signal is driven by a time harmonic pressure source. Combinations of Perfectly Matched and Damping Layers are used with different damping profiles. These layer and profile combinations allow the relative error introduced by a layer to be kept as small as desired, in principle. Tradeoffs between error and cost are explored.

  18. Many Tests of Significance: New Methods for Controlling Type I Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keselman, H. J.; Miller, Charles W.; Holland, Burt

    2011-01-01

    There have been many discussions of how Type I errors should be controlled when many hypotheses are tested (e.g., all possible comparisons of means, correlations, proportions, the coefficients in hierarchical models, etc.). By and large, researchers have adopted familywise (FWER) control, though this practice certainly is not universal. Familywise…

  19. Cognitive control and the salience network: an investigation of error processing and effective connectivity.

    PubMed

    Ham, Timothy; Leff, Alex; de Boissezon, Xavier; Joffe, Anna; Sharp, David J

    2013-04-17

    The Salience Network (SN) consists of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and bilateral insulae. The network responds to behaviorally salient events, and an important question is how its nodes interact. One theory is that the dACC provides the earliest cortical signal of behaviorally salient events, such as errors. Alternatively, the anterior right insula (aRI) has been proposed to provide an early cognitive control signal. As these regions frequently coactivate, it has been difficult to disentangle their roles using conventional methods. Here we use dynamic causal modeling and a Bayesian model evidence technique to investigate the causal relationships between nodes in the SN after errors. Thirty-five human subjects performed the Simon task. The task has two conditions (congruent and incongruent) producing two distinct error types. Neural activity associated with errors was investigated using fMRI. Subjects made a total of 1319 congruent and 1617 incongruent errors. Errors resulted in robust activation of the SN. Dynamic causal modeling analyses demonstrated that input into the SN was most likely via the aRI for both error types and that the aRI was the only region intrinsically connected to both other nodes. Only incongruent errors produced behavioral adaptation, and the strength of the connection between the dACC and the left insulae correlated with the extent of this behavioral change. We conclude that the aRI, not the dACC, drives the SN after errors on an attentionally demanding task, and that a change in the effective connectivity of the dACC is associated with behavioral adaptation after errors. PMID:23595766

  20. Discrete-mode automatic generation control of a two-area reheat thermal system with new area control error

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, M.L.; Nanda, J.; Kothari, D.P.; Das, D.

    1989-05-01

    This paper deals with discrete-mode automatic generation control of an interconnected reheat thermal system considering a new area control error (ACEN) based on tie-power deviation, frequency deviation, time error and inadvertent interchange. Optimum integral and proportional integral controllers using the concept of stability margin and ISE technique have been obtained with conventional ACE and new ACE, and their dynamic performances compared for a step load perturbation. Results reveal that regulator based on the new ACE concept always guarantees zero steady state time error and inadvertent interchange unlike in the case of a controller based on conventional ACE. The settling time for tie-power and frequency deviations is however, somewhat more with the controller based on new ACE.

  1. Effects of modeling errors on trajectory predictions in air traffic control automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Michael R. C.; Zhao, Yiyuan; Slattery, Rhonda

    1996-01-01

    Air traffic control automation synthesizes aircraft trajectories for the generation of advisories. Trajectory computation employs models of aircraft performances and weather conditions. In contrast, actual trajectories are flown in real aircraft under actual conditions. Since synthetic trajectories are used in landing scheduling and conflict probing, it is very important to understand the differences between computed trajectories and actual trajectories. This paper examines the effects of aircraft modeling errors on the accuracy of trajectory predictions in air traffic control automation. Three-dimensional point-mass aircraft equations of motion are assumed to be able to generate actual aircraft flight paths. Modeling errors are described as uncertain parameters or uncertain input functions. Pilot or autopilot feedback actions are expressed as equality constraints to satisfy control objectives. A typical trajectory is defined by a series of flight segments with different control objectives for each flight segment and conditions that define segment transitions. A constrained linearization approach is used to analyze trajectory differences caused by various modeling errors by developing a linear time varying system that describes the trajectory errors, with expressions to transfer the trajectory errors across moving segment transitions. A numerical example is presented for a complete commercial aircraft descent trajectory consisting of several flight segments.

  2. Stress regulation and cognitive control: evidence relating cortisol reactivity and neural responses to errors

    PubMed Central

    Hofheimer, Julia; Kazinka, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we tested the relationship between error-related signals of cognitive control and cortisol reactivity, investigating the hypothesis of common systems for cognitive and emotional self-regulation. Eighty-three participants completed a Stroop task while electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded. Three error-related indices were derived from the EEG: the error-related negativity (ERN), error positivity (Pe), and error-related alpha suppression (ERAS). Pre- and posttask salivary samples were assayed for cortisol, and cortisol change scores were correlated with the EEG variables. Better error–correct differentiation in the ERN predicted less cortisol increase during the task, whereas greater ERAS predicted greater cortisol increase during the task; the Pe was not correlated with cortisol changes. We concluded that an enhanced ERN, part of an adaptive cognitive control system, predicts successful stress regulation. In contrast, an enhanced ERAS response may reflect error-related arousal that is not adaptive. The results support the concept of overlapping systems for cognitive and emotional self-regulation. PMID:23055094

  3. The effect of sensor and actuator errors on static shape control for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, R. T.; Adelman, H. M.

    1985-01-01

    An analytical study was performed to predict and assess the effect of actuator and sensor errors on the performance of a shape control procedure for flexible space structures using applied temperatures. Approximate formulas were derived for the expected value and variance of the rms distortion ratio (ratio of rms distortions with and without corrections) based on the assumption of zero-mean normally distributed random errors in measured distortions and actuator output temperatures. Studies were carried out for a 55-meter radiometer antenna reflector distorted from its ideal parabolic shape by nonuniform orbital heating. The first study consisted of varying the sensor and actuator errors for the case of 12 actuators and computing the distortion ratio. In the second study, sensor and actuator errors were prescribed and the effect of increasing the number of actuators was evaluated.

  4. Effect of sensor and actuator errors on static shape control for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haftka, Raphael T.; Adelman, Howard M.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical study was performed to predict and assess the effect of actuator and sensor errors on the performance of a shape control procedure for flexible space structures using applied temperatures. Approximate formulas were derived for the expected value and variance of the rms distortion ratio (ratio of rms distortions with and without corrections) based on the assumption of zero-mean normally distributed random errors in measured distortions and actuator output temperatures. Studies were carried out for a 55-meter radiometer antenna reflector distorted from its ideal parabolic shape by nonuniform orbital heating. The first study consisted of varying the sensor and actuator errors for the case of 12 actuators and computing the distortion ratio. In the second study, sensor and actuator errors were prescribed and the effect of increasing the number of actuators was evaluated.

  5. A cerebellar thalamic cortical circuit for error-related cognitive control

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Jaime S.; Li, Chiang-shan Ray

    2010-01-01

    Error detection and behavioral adjustment are core components of cognitive control. Numerous studies have focused on the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) as a critical locus of this executive function. Our previous work showed greater activation in the dorsal ACC and subcortical structures during error detection, and activation in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC) during post-error slowing (PES) in a stop signal task (SST). However, the extent of error-related cortical or subcortical activation across subjects was not correlated with VLPFC activity during PES. So then, what causes VLPFC activation during PES? To address this question, we employed Granger causality mapping (GCM) and identified regions that Granger caused VLPFC activation in 54 adults performing the SST during fMRI. These brain regions, including the supplementary motor area (SMA), cerebellum, a pontine region, and medial thalamus, represent potential targets responding to errors in a way that could influence VLPFC activation. In confirmation of this hypothesis, the error-related activity of these regions correlated with VLPFC activation during PES, with the cerebellum showing the strongest association. The finding that cerebellar activation Granger causes prefrontal activity during behavioral adjustment supports a cerebellar function in cognitive control. Furthermore, multivariate GCA described the “flow of information” across these brain regions. Through connectivity with the thalamus and SMA, the cerebellum mediates error and post-error processing in accord with known anatomical projections. Taken together, these new findings highlight the role of the cerebello-thalamo-cortical pathway in an executive function that has heretofore largely been ascribed to the anterior cingulate-prefrontal cortical circuit. PMID:20656038

  6. Predicting Human Error in Air Traffic Control Decision Support Tools and Free Flight Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogford, Richard; Kopardekar, Parimal

    2001-01-01

    The document is a set of briefing slides summarizing the work the Advanced Air Transportation Technologies (AATT) Project is doing on predicting air traffic controller and airline pilot human error when using new decision support software tools and when involved in testing new air traffic control concepts. Previous work in this area is reviewed as well as research being done jointly with the FAA. Plans for error prediction work in the AATT Project are discussed. The audience is human factors researchers and aviation psychologists from government and industry.

  7. Effect of gyro verticality error on lateral autoland tracking performance for an inertially smoothed control law

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thibodeaux, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a simulation study performed to determine the effects of gyro verticality error on lateral autoland tracking and landing performance are presented. A first order vertical gyro error model was used to generate the measurement of the roll attitude feedback signal normally supplied by an inertial navigation system. The lateral autoland law used was an inertially smoothed control design. The effect of initial angular gyro tilt errors (2 deg, 3 deg, 4 deg, and 5 deg), introduced prior to localizer capture, were investigated by use of a small perturbation aircraft simulation. These errors represent the deviations which could occur in the conventional attitude sensor as a result of the maneuver-induced spin-axis misalinement and drift. Results showed that for a 1.05 deg per minute erection rate and a 5 deg initial tilt error, ON COURSE autoland control logic was not satisfied. Failure to attain the ON COURSE mode precluded high control loop gains and localizer beam path integration and resulted in unacceptable beam standoff at touchdown.

  8. A synchronous generator stabilizer design using neuro inverse controller and error reduction network

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Y.M.; Hyun, S.H.; Lee, J.H.

    1996-11-01

    A neuro power system stabilizer (PSS) is developed for multimachine power systems. Each machine is identified in its inverse relation by an artificial neural network named Inverse Dynamics Neural Network (IDNN) off line, which is used as a local inverse controller. The control error due to the interactions between generators is predicted and compensated through another network called Error Reduction Network (ERN). The ERN consists of several IDNNs in the linear combination form. In most neuro controllers, two neural nets are required, one for system emulation, the other for control. In the proposed controller, the only network requiring training is the IDNN. Simulations are performed on two typical cases: an unstable single machine power system of non-minimum phase, and a multimachine power system.

  9. State and model error estimation for distributed parameter systems. [in large space structure control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.

    1979-01-01

    In-flight estimation of large structure model errors in order to detect inevitable deficiencies in large structure controller/estimator models is discussed. Such an estimation process is particularly applicable in the area of shape control system design required to maintain a prescribed static structural shape and, in addition, suppress dynamic disturbances due to the vehicle vibrational modes. The paper outlines a solution to the problem of static shape estimation where the vehicle shape must be reconstructed from a set of measurements discretely located throughout the structure. The estimation process is based on the principle of least-squares that inherently contains the definition and explicit computation of model error estimates that are optimal in some sense. Consequently, a solution is provided for the problem of estimation of static model errors (e.g., external loads). A generalized formulation applicable to distributed parameters systems is first worked out and then applied to a one-dimensional beam-like structural configuration.

  10. Design methodology accounting for fabrication errors in manufactured modified Fresnel lenses for controlled LED illumination.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jongmyeong; Kim, Joongeok; Lee, Jinhyung; Park, Changsu; Cho, Eikhyun; Kang, Shinill

    2015-07-27

    The increasing demand for lightweight, miniaturized electronic devices has prompted the development of small, high-performance optical components for light-emitting diode (LED) illumination. As such, the Fresnel lens is widely used in applications due to its compact configuration. However, the vertical groove angle between the optical axis and the groove inner facets in a conventional Fresnel lens creates an inherent Fresnel loss, which degrades optical performance. Modified Fresnel lenses (MFLs) have been proposed in which the groove angles along the optical paths are carefully controlled; however, in practice, the optical performance of MFLs is inferior to the theoretical performance due to fabrication errors, as conventional design methods do not account for fabrication errors as part of the design process. In this study, the Fresnel loss and the loss area due to microscopic fabrication errors in the MFL were theoretically derived to determine optical performance. Based on this analysis, a design method for the MFL accounting for the fabrication errors was proposed. MFLs were fabricated using an ultraviolet imprinting process and an injection molding process, two representative processes with differing fabrication errors. The MFL fabrication error associated with each process was examined analytically and experimentally to investigate our methodology. PMID:26367631

  11. Two hybrid ARQ error control schemes for near earth satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Shu; Kasami, Tadao

    1986-01-01

    Two hybrid automatic repeat request (ARQ) error control schemes are proposed for NASA near earth satellite communications. Both schemes are adaptive in nature, and employ cascaded codes to achieve both high reliability and throughput efficiency for high data rate file transfer.

  12. Two hybrid ARQ error control schemes for near Earth satellite communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S.

    1986-01-01

    Two hybrid Automatic Repeat Request (ARQ) error control schemes are proposed for NASA near Earth satellite communications. Both schemes are adaptive in nature, and employ cascaded codes to achieve both high reliability and throughput efficiency for high data rate file transfer.

  13. Short Communication: Effectiveness of sample duplication to control error in ruminant digestion studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eight ruminally-cannulated lactating dairy cows from a study on the effect of dietary rumen-degraded protein on production and digestion of nutrients were used to assess using sample duplication to control day-to-day variation within animals and errors associated with sampling and laboratory analyse...

  14. Relative and Absolute Error Control in a Finite-Difference Method Solution of Poisson's Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prentice, J. S. C.

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm for error control (absolute and relative) in the five-point finite-difference method applied to Poisson's equation is described. The algorithm is based on discretization of the domain of the problem by means of three rectilinear grids, each of different resolution. We discuss some hardware limitations associated with the algorithm,…

  15. A parallel row-based algorithm with error control for standard-cell replacement on a hypercube multiprocessor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargent, Jeff Scott

    1988-01-01

    A new row-based parallel algorithm for standard-cell placement targeted for execution on a hypercube multiprocessor is presented. Key features of this implementation include a dynamic simulated-annealing schedule, row-partitioning of the VLSI chip image, and two novel new approaches to controlling error in parallel cell-placement algorithms; Heuristic Cell-Coloring and Adaptive (Parallel Move) Sequence Control. Heuristic Cell-Coloring identifies sets of noninteracting cells that can be moved repeatedly, and in parallel, with no buildup of error in the placement cost. Adaptive Sequence Control allows multiple parallel cell moves to take place between global cell-position updates. This feedback mechanism is based on an error bound derived analytically from the traditional annealing move-acceptance profile. Placement results are presented for real industry circuits and the performance is summarized of an implementation on the Intel iPSC/2 Hypercube. The runtime of this algorithm is 5 to 16 times faster than a previous program developed for the Hypercube, while producing equivalent quality placement. An integrated place and route program for the Intel iPSC/2 Hypercube is currently being developed.

  16. Direct Adaptive Control Methodologies for Flexible-Joint Space Manipulators with Uncertainties and Modeling Errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, Steve

    This work addresses the direct adaptive trajectory tracking control problem associated with lightweight space robotic manipulators that exhibit elastic vibrations in their joints, and which are subject to parametric uncertainties and modeling errors. Unlike existing adaptive control methodologies, the proposed flexible-joint control techniques do not require identification of unknown parameters, or mathematical models of the system to be controlled. The direct adaptive controllers developed in this work are based on the model reference adaptive control approach, and manage modeling errors and parametric uncertainties by time-varying the controller gains using new adaptation mechanisms, thereby reducing the errors between an ideal model and the actual robot system. More specifically, new decentralized adaptation mechanisms derived from the simple adaptive control technique and fuzzy logic control theory are considered in this work. Numerical simulations compare the performance of the adaptive controllers with a nonadaptive and a conventional model-based controller, in the context of 12.6 m xx 12.6 m square trajectory tracking. To validate the robustness of the controllers to modeling errors, a new dynamics formulation that includes several nonlinear effects usually neglected in flexible-joint dynamics models is proposed. Results obtained with the adaptive methodologies demonstrate an increased robustness to both uncertainties in joint stiffness coefficients and dynamics modeling errors, as well as highly improved tracking performance compared with the nonadaptive and model-based strategies. Finally, this work considers the partial state feedback problem related to flexible-joint space robotic manipulators equipped only with sensors that provide noisy measurements of motor positions and velocities. An extended Kalman filter-based estimation strategy is developed to estimate all state variables in real-time. The state estimation filter is combined with an adaptive

  17. Control of noisy quantum systems: Field-theory approach to error mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hipolito, Rafael; Goldbart, Paul M.

    2016-04-01

    We consider the basic quantum-control task of obtaining a target unitary operation (i.e., a quantum gate) via control fields that couple to the quantum system and are chosen to best mitigate errors resulting from time-dependent noise, which frustrate this task. We allow for two sources of noise: fluctuations in the control fields and fluctuations arising from the environment. We address the issue of control-error mitigation by means of a formulation rooted in the Martin-Siggia-Rose (MSR) approach to noisy, classical statistical-mechanical systems. To do this, we express the noisy control problem in terms of a path integral, and integrate out the noise to arrive at an effective, noise-free description. We characterize the degree of success in error mitigation via a fidelity metric, which characterizes the proximity of the sought-after evolution to ones that are achievable in the presence of noise. Error mitigation is then best accomplished by applying the optimal control fields, i.e., those that maximize the fidelity subject to any constraints obeyed by the control fields. To make connection with MSR, we reformulate the fidelity in terms of a Schwinger-Keldysh (SK) path integral, with the added twist that the "forward" and "backward" branches of the time contour are inequivalent with respect to the noise. The present approach naturally and readily allows the incorporation of constraints on the control fields—a useful feature in practice, given that constraints feature in all real experiments. In addition to addressing the noise average of the fidelity, we consider its full probability distribution. The information content present in this distribution allows one to address more complex questions regarding error mitigation, including, in principle, questions of extreme value statistics, i.e., the likelihood and impact of rare instances of the fidelity and how to harness or cope with their influence. We illustrate this MSR-SK reformulation by considering a model

  18. Circuit Controls Turn-On Current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, K. G.

    1972-01-01

    Single choke used in primary circuit with diode arrangement, maintaining dc current flow through choke and setting up a unidirectional magnetic field, limits turn-on current of transformer-rectifier power supply. Technique reduces number and weight of components and minimizes effect of initial inrush surge current on source.

  19. Least squares support vector machines for direction of arrival estimation with error control and validation.

    SciTech Connect

    Christodoulou, Christos George (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Abdallah, Chaouki T. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Rohwer, Judd Andrew

    2003-02-01

    The paper presents a multiclass, multilabel implementation of least squares support vector machines (LS-SVM) for direction of arrival (DOA) estimation in a CDMA system. For any estimation or classification system, the algorithm's capabilities and performance must be evaluated. Specifically, for classification algorithms, a high confidence level must exist along with a technique to tag misclassifications automatically. The presented learning algorithm includes error control and validation steps for generating statistics on the multiclass evaluation path and the signal subspace dimension. The error statistics provide a confidence level for the classification accuracy.

  20. Correcting errors in a quantum gate with pushed ions via optimal control

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, Uffe V.; Sklarz, Shlomo; Tannor, David; Calarco, Tommaso

    2010-07-15

    We analyze in detail the so-called pushing gate for trapped ions, introducing a time-dependent harmonic approximation for the external motion. We show how to extract the average fidelity for the gate from the resulting semiclassical simulations. We characterize and quantify precisely all types of errors coming from the quantum dynamics and reveal that slight nonlinearities in the ion-pushing force can have a dramatic effect on the adiabaticity of gate operation. By means of quantum optimal control techniques, we show how to suppress each of the resulting gate errors in order to reach a high fidelity compatible with scalable fault-tolerant quantum computing.

  1. Phantom Effects in School Composition Research: Consequences of Failure to Control Biases Due to Measurement Error in Traditional Multilevel Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Televantou, Ioulia; Marsh, Herbert W.; Kyriakides, Leonidas; Nagengast, Benjamin; Fletcher, John; Malmberg, Lars-Erik

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to quantify the impact of failing to account for measurement error on school compositional effects. Multilevel structural equation models were incorporated to control for measurement error and/or sampling error. Study 1, a large sample of English primary students in Years 1 and 4, revealed a significantly…

  2. A Simplified Sensorless Vector Control Based on Average DC Bus Current for Fan Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumita, Satoshi; Tobari, Kazuaki; Aoyagi, Shigehisa; Maeda, Daisuke

    This paper describes a simplified sensorless vector control based on the average DC bus current for PMSM. This method can be used to design a drive control system at a relatively low cost because the microcontroller does not require a precise timer and the calculation load is slight. In the proposed method, one of the two possible current estimation processes is chosen according to the operation mode. First, the controller estimates d-axis current and identifies the back-EMF parameter in the synchronous operation mode at low speeds. The error in the back-EMF identification affects the efficiency of the proposed system, so it needs to be zero. Second, the controller estimates q-axis current in vector control mode. The identified parameter and q-axis current define voltage reference to realize high efficiency drive. The obtained experimental results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  3. Analog-digital simulation of transient-induced logic errors and upset susceptibility of an advanced control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carreno, Victor A.; Choi, G.; Iyer, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    A simulation study is described which predicts the susceptibility of an advanced control system to electrical transients resulting in logic errors, latched errors, error propagation, and digital upset. The system is based on a custom-designed microprocessor and it incorporates fault-tolerant techniques. The system under test and the method to perform the transient injection experiment are described. Results for 2100 transient injections are analyzed and classified according to charge level, type of error, and location of injection.

  4. Investigations of stability and dynamic performances of switching regulators employing current-injected control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F. C.; Carter, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    The stability and dynamic performances of a buck/boost regulator employing a current-injected control are examined. Small-signal models for the power state, the multi-loop error processor and the duty-cycle pulse-modulator are developed. The error-processor model which incorporates the current-injected loop, the dc loop and the compensation network permits evaluation of the effects of each individual control loop and their combined efforts toward shaping the performance characteristics of the closed-loop system. Comparisons are made between this modeling approach and earlier approaches. Some important yet subtle dissimilarities are discussed. This model predicts the constant-frequency 50 percent duty-cycle instability which is inherent to the current-injected control.

  5. EVALUATION OF CONSTANT CURRENT WELD CONTROL FOR PINCH WELDING

    SciTech Connect

    Korinko, P; STANLEY, S; HOWARD, H

    2005-10-11

    Modern weld controllers typically use current to control the weld process. SRS uses a legacy voltage control method. This task was undertaken to determine if the improvements in the weld control equipment could be implemented to provide improvements to the process control. The constant current mode of operation will reduce weld variability by about a factor of 4. The constant voltage welds were slightly hotter than the constant current welds of the same nominal current. The control mode did not appear to adversely affect the weld quality, but appropriate current ranges need to be established and a qualification methodology for both welding and shunt calibrations needs to be developed and documented.

  6. 49 CFR 192.473 - External corrosion control: Interference currents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false External corrosion control: Interference currents... for Corrosion Control § 192.473 External corrosion control: Interference currents. (a) Each operator whose pipeline system is subjected to stray currents shall have in effect a continuing program...

  7. 49 CFR 192.473 - External corrosion control: Interference currents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false External corrosion control: Interference currents... for Corrosion Control § 192.473 External corrosion control: Interference currents. (a) Each operator whose pipeline system is subjected to stray currents shall have in effect a continuing program...

  8. 49 CFR 192.473 - External corrosion control: Interference currents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false External corrosion control: Interference currents... for Corrosion Control § 192.473 External corrosion control: Interference currents. (a) Each operator whose pipeline system is subjected to stray currents shall have in effect a continuing program...

  9. 49 CFR 192.473 - External corrosion control: Interference currents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false External corrosion control: Interference currents... for Corrosion Control § 192.473 External corrosion control: Interference currents. (a) Each operator whose pipeline system is subjected to stray currents shall have in effect a continuing program...

  10. 49 CFR 192.473 - External corrosion control: Interference currents.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false External corrosion control: Interference currents... for Corrosion Control § 192.473 External corrosion control: Interference currents. (a) Each operator whose pipeline system is subjected to stray currents shall have in effect a continuing program...

  11. Systematic Error in UAV-derived Topographic Models: The Importance of Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Robson, S.; d'Oleire-Oltmanns, S.

    2014-12-01

    UAVs equipped with consumer cameras are increasingly being used to produce high resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for a wide variety of geoscience applications. Image processing and DEM-generation is being facilitated by parallel increases in the use of software based on 'structure from motion' algorithms. However, recent work [1] has demonstrated that image networks from UAVs, for which camera pointing directions are generally near-parallel, are susceptible to producing systematic error in the resulting topographic surfaces (a vertical 'doming'). This issue primarily reflects error in the camera lens distortion model, which is dominated by the radial K1 term. Common data processing scenarios, in which self-calibration is used to refine the camera model within the bundle adjustment, can inherently result in such systematic error via poor K1 estimates. Incorporating oblique imagery into such data sets can mitigate error by enabling more accurate calculation of camera parameters [1]. Here, using a combination of simulated image networks and real imagery collected from a fixed wing UAV, we explore the additional roles of external ground control and the precision of image measurements. We illustrate similarities and differences between a variety of structure from motion software, and underscore the importance of well distributed and suitably accurate control for projects where a demonstrated high accuracy is required. [1] James & Robson (2014) Earth Surf. Proc. Landforms, 39, 1413-1420, doi: 10.1002/esp.3609

  12. Displacement sensor with controlled measuring force and its error analysis and precision verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liangen; Wang, Xuanze; Lv, Wei

    2011-05-01

    A displacement sensor with controlled measuring force and its error analysis and precision verification are discussed in this paper. The displacement sensor consists of an electric induction transducer with high resolution and a voice coil motor (VCM). The measuring principles, structure, method enlarging measuring range, signal process of the sensor are discussed. The main error sources such as parallelism error and incline of framework by unequal length of leaf springs, rigidity of measuring rods, shape error of stylus, friction between iron core and other parts, damping of leaf springs, variation of voltage, linearity of induction transducer, resolution and stability are analyzed. A measuring system for surface topography with large measuring range is constructed based on the displacement sensor and 2D moving platform. Measuring precision and stability of the measuring system is verified. Measuring force of the sensor in measurement process of surface topography can be controlled at μN level and hardly changes. It has been used in measurement of bearing ball, bullet mark, etc. It has measuring range up to 2mm and precision of nm level.

  13. Displacement sensor with controlled measuring force and its error analysis and precision verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liangen; Wang, Xuanze; Lv, Wei

    2010-12-01

    A displacement sensor with controlled measuring force and its error analysis and precision verification are discussed in this paper. The displacement sensor consists of an electric induction transducer with high resolution and a voice coil motor (VCM). The measuring principles, structure, method enlarging measuring range, signal process of the sensor are discussed. The main error sources such as parallelism error and incline of framework by unequal length of leaf springs, rigidity of measuring rods, shape error of stylus, friction between iron core and other parts, damping of leaf springs, variation of voltage, linearity of induction transducer, resolution and stability are analyzed. A measuring system for surface topography with large measuring range is constructed based on the displacement sensor and 2D moving platform. Measuring precision and stability of the measuring system is verified. Measuring force of the sensor in measurement process of surface topography can be controlled at μN level and hardly changes. It has been used in measurement of bearing ball, bullet mark, etc. It has measuring range up to 2mm and precision of nm level.

  14. Impact of complexity and computer control on errors in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Fraass, B A

    2012-01-01

    A number of recent publications in both the lay and scientific press have described major errors in patient radiation treatments, and this publicity has galvanised much work to address and mitigate potential safety issues throughout the radiation therapy planning and delivery process. The complexity of modern radiotherapy techniques and equipment, including computer-controlled treatment machines and treatment management systems, as well as sophisticated treatment techniques that involve intensity-modulated radiation therapy, image-guided radiation therapy, stereotactic body radiation therapy, volumetric modulated arc therapy, respiratory gating, and others, leads to concern about safety issues related to that complexity. This article illustrates the relationship between complexity and computer control, and various safety problems and errors that have been reported, and describes studies that address the issue of these modern techniques and whether their complexity does, in fact, result in more errors or safety-related problems. Clinical implications of these results are discussed, as are some of the ways in which the field should respond to the ongoing concerns about errors and complexity in radiation therapy. PMID:23089018

  15. Constant-current control method of multi-function electromagnetic transmitter.

    PubMed

    Xue, Kaichang; Zhou, Fengdao; Wang, Shuang; Lin, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Based on the requirements of controlled source audio-frequency magnetotelluric, DC resistivity, and induced polarization, a constant-current control method is proposed. Using the required current waveforms in prospecting as a standard, the causes of current waveform distortion and current waveform distortion's effects on prospecting are analyzed. A cascaded topology is adopted to achieve 40 kW constant-current transmitter. The responsive speed and precision are analyzed. According to the power circuit of the transmitting system, the circuit structure of the pulse width modulation (PWM) constant-current controller is designed. After establishing the power circuit model of the transmitting system and the PWM constant-current controller model, analyzing the influence of ripple current, and designing an open-loop transfer function according to the amplitude-frequency characteristic curves, the parameters of the PWM constant-current controller are determined. The open-loop transfer function indicates that the loop gain is no less than 28 dB below 160 Hz, which assures the responsive speed of the transmitting system; the phase margin is 45°, which assures the stabilization of the transmitting system. Experimental results verify that the proposed constant-current control method can keep the control error below 4% and can effectively suppress load change caused by the capacitance of earth load. PMID:25725863

  16. Constant-current control method of multi-function electromagnetic transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Kaichang; Zhou, Fengdao; Wang, Shuang; Lin, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Based on the requirements of controlled source audio-frequency magnetotelluric, DC resistivity, and induced polarization, a constant-current control method is proposed. Using the required current waveforms in prospecting as a standard, the causes of current waveform distortion and current waveform distortion's effects on prospecting are analyzed. A cascaded topology is adopted to achieve 40 kW constant-current transmitter. The responsive speed and precision are analyzed. According to the power circuit of the transmitting system, the circuit structure of the pulse width modulation (PWM) constant-current controller is designed. After establishing the power circuit model of the transmitting system and the PWM constant-current controller model, analyzing the influence of ripple current, and designing an open-loop transfer function according to the amplitude-frequency characteristic curves, the parameters of the PWM constant-current controller are determined. The open-loop transfer function indicates that the loop gain is no less than 28 dB below 160 Hz, which assures the responsive speed of the transmitting system; the phase margin is 45°, which assures the stabilization of the transmitting system. Experimental results verify that the proposed constant-current control method can keep the control error below 4% and can effectively suppress load change caused by the capacitance of earth load.

  17. A Criterion to Control Nonlinear Error in the Mixed-Mode Bending Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.

    2002-01-01

    The mixed-mode bending test ha: been widely used to measure delamination toughness and was recently standardized by ASTM as Standard Test Method D6671-01. This simple test is a combination of the standard Mode I (opening) test and a Mode II (sliding) test. This test uses a unidirectional composite test specimen with an artificial delamination subjected to bending loads to characterize when a delamination will extend. When the displacements become large, the linear theory used to analyze the results of the test yields errors in the calcu1ated toughness values. The current standard places no limit on the specimen loading and therefore test data can be created using the standard that are significantly in error. A method of limiting the error that can be incurred in the calculated toughness values is needed. In this paper, nonlinear models of the MMB test are refined. One of the nonlinear models is then used to develop a simple criterion for prescribing conditions where thc nonlinear error will remain below 5%.

  18. Using Fast-Steering Mirror Control to Reduce Instrument Pointing Errors Caused by Spacecraft Jitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antol, Jeffery; Holtz, Ted M.; Cuda, Vince; Johnson, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    The scope of this study was to investigate the benefit of using feedback control of a Fast Steering Mirror (FSM) to reduce instrument pointing errors. Initially, the study identified FSM control technologies and categorized them according to their use, range of applicability, and physical requirements. Candidate payloads were then evaluated according to their relevance in use of fast steering minor control technologies. This leads to the mission and instrument selection which served as the candidate mission for numerical modeling. A standard SmallSat was designed in order to accommodate the payload requirements (weight, size, power, etc.). This included sizing the SmallSat bus, sizing the solar array, choosing appropriate antennas, and identifying an attitude control system (ACS). A feedback control system for the FSM compensation was then designed, and the instrument pointing error and SmallSat jitter environment for open-loop and closed-loop FSM control were evaluated for typical SmallSat disturbances. The results were then compared to determine the effectiveness of the FSM feedback control system.

  19. Effects of flight instrumentation errors on the estimation of aircraft stability and control derivatives. [including Monte Carlo analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, W. H.; Hodge, W. F.

    1974-01-01

    An error analysis program based on an output error estimation method was used to evaluate the effects of sensor and instrumentation errors on the estimation of aircraft stability and control derivatives. A Monte Carlo analysis was performed using simulated flight data for a high performance military aircraft, a large commercial transport, and a small general aviation aircraft for typical cruise flight conditions. The effects of varying the input sequence and combinations of the sensor and instrumentation errors were investigated. The results indicate that both the parameter accuracy and the corresponding measurement trajectory fit error can be significantly affected. Of the error sources considered, instrumentation lags and control measurement errors were found to be most significant.

  20. Third-order 2N-storage Runge-Kutta schemes with error control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Kennedy, Christopher A.

    1994-01-01

    A family of four-stage third-order explicit Runge-Kutta schemes is derived that requires only two storage locations and has desirable stability characteristics. Error control is achieved by embedding a second-order scheme within the four-stage procedure. Certain schemes are identified that are as efficient and accurate as conventional embedded schemes of comparable order and require fewer storage locations.

  1. Control for stochastic sampling variation and qualitative sequencing error in next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Blomquist, Thomas; Crawford, Erin L.; Yeo, Jiyoun; Zhang, Xiaolu; Willey, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clinical implementation of Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) is challenged by poor control for stochastic sampling, library preparation biases and qualitative sequencing error. To address these challenges we developed and tested two hypotheses. Methods Hypothesis 1: Analytical variation in quantification is predicted by stochastic sampling effects at input of (a) amplifiable nucleic acid target molecules into the library preparation, (b) amplicons from library into sequencer, or (c) both. We derived equations using Monte Carlo simulation to predict assay coefficient of variation (CV) based on these three working models and tested them against NGS data from specimens with well characterized molecule inputs and sequence counts prepared using competitive multiplex-PCR amplicon-based NGS library preparation method comprising synthetic internal standards (IS). Hypothesis 2: Frequencies of technically-derived qualitative sequencing errors (i.e., base substitution, insertion and deletion) observed at each base position in each target native template (NT) are concordant with those observed in respective competitive synthetic IS present in the same reaction. We measured error frequencies at each base position within amplicons from each of 30 target NT, then tested whether they correspond to those within the 30 respective IS. Results For hypothesis 1, the Monte Carlo model derived from both sampling events best predicted CV and explained 74% of observed assay variance. For hypothesis 2, observed frequency and type of sequence variation at each base position within each IS was concordant with that observed in respective NTs (R2 = 0.93). Conclusion In targeted NGS, synthetic competitive IS control for stochastic sampling at input of both target into library preparation and of target library product into sequencer, and control for qualitative errors generated during library preparation and sequencing. These controls enable accurate clinical diagnostic reporting of

  2. Many Phenotypes Without Many False Discoveries: Error Controlling Strategies for Multitrait Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Christine B.; Bogomolov, Marina; Benjamini, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The genetic basis of multiple phenotypes such as gene expression, metabolite levels, or imaging features is often investigated by testing a large collection of hypotheses, probing the existence of association between each of the traits and hundreds of thousands of genotyped variants. Appropriate multiplicity adjustment is crucial to guarantee replicability of findings, and the false discovery rate (FDR) is frequently adopted as a measure of global error. In the interest of interpretability, results are often summarized so that reporting focuses on variants discovered to be associated to some phenotypes. We show that applying FDR‐controlling procedures on the entire collection of hypotheses fails to control the rate of false discovery of associated variants as well as the expected value of the average proportion of false discovery of phenotypes influenced by such variants. We propose a simple hierarchical testing procedure that allows control of both these error rates and provides a more reliable basis for the identification of variants with functional effects. We demonstrate the utility of this approach through simulation studies comparing various error rates and measures of power for genetic association studies of multiple traits. Finally, we apply the proposed method to identify genetic variants that impact flowering phenotypes in Arabidopsis thaliana, expanding the set of discoveries. PMID:26626037

  3. Many Phenotypes Without Many False Discoveries: Error Controlling Strategies for Multitrait Association Studies.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Christine B; Bogomolov, Marina; Benjamini, Yoav; Sabatti, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The genetic basis of multiple phenotypes such as gene expression, metabolite levels, or imaging features is often investigated by testing a large collection of hypotheses, probing the existence of association between each of the traits and hundreds of thousands of genotyped variants. Appropriate multiplicity adjustment is crucial to guarantee replicability of findings, and the false discovery rate (FDR) is frequently adopted as a measure of global error. In the interest of interpretability, results are often summarized so that reporting focuses on variants discovered to be associated to some phenotypes. We show that applying FDR-controlling procedures on the entire collection of hypotheses fails to control the rate of false discovery of associated variants as well as the expected value of the average proportion of false discovery of phenotypes influenced by such variants. We propose a simple hierarchical testing procedure that allows control of both these error rates and provides a more reliable basis for the identification of variants with functional effects. We demonstrate the utility of this approach through simulation studies comparing various error rates and measures of power for genetic association studies of multiple traits. Finally, we apply the proposed method to identify genetic variants that impact flowering phenotypes in Arabidopsis thaliana, expanding the set of discoveries. PMID:26626037

  4. Mixed control for perception and action: timing and error correction in rhythmic ball-bouncing.

    PubMed

    Siegler, I A; Bazile, C; Warren, W H

    2013-05-01

    The task of bouncing a ball on a racket was adopted as a model system for investigating the behavioral dynamics of rhythmic movement, specifically how perceptual information modulates the dynamics of action. Two experiments, with sixteen participants each, were carried out to definitively answer the following questions: How are passive stability and active stabilization combined to produce stable behavior? What informational quantities are used to actively regulate the two main components of the action-the timing of racket oscillation and the correction of errors in bounce height? We used a virtual ball-bouncing setup to simultaneously perturb gravity (g) and ball launch velocity (v b) at impact. In Experiment 1, we tested the control of racket timing by varying the ball's upward half-period t up while holding its peak height h p constant. Conversely, in Experiment 2, we tested error correction by varying h p while holding t up constant. Participants adopted a mixed control mode in which information in the ball's trajectory is used to actively stabilize behavior on a cycle-by-cycle basis, in order to keep the system within or near the passively stable region. The results reveal how these adjustments are visually controlled: the period of racket oscillation is modulated by the half-period of the ball's upward flight, and the change in racket velocity from the previous impact (via a change in racket amplitude) is governed by the error to the target. PMID:23515627

  5. Estimation of Aperture Errors with Direct Interferometer-Output Feedback for Spacecraft Formation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Hui-Ling; Cheng, Victor H. L.; Leitner, Jesse A.; Carpenter, Kenneth G.

    2004-01-01

    Long-baseline space interferometers involving formation flying of multiple spacecraft hold great promise as future space missions for high-resolution imagery. The major challenge of obtaining high-quality interferometric synthesized images from long-baseline space interferometers is to control these spacecraft and their optics payloads in the specified configuration accurately. In this paper, we describe our effort toward fine control of long-baseline space interferometers without resorting to additional sensing equipment. We present an estimation procedure that effectively extracts relative x/y translational exit pupil aperture deviations from the raw interferometric image with small estimation errors.

  6. The cross talk of multi-errors impact on lithography performance and the method of its control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanqiu; Han, Chunying; Guo, Xuejia; Liu, Lihui; Wang, Xuxia; Yang, Jianhong

    2012-10-01

    As semiconductor feature sizes continue to shrink, the allowable error margins for Critical Dimension (CD) is getting increasingly tight. However multiple errors are inherent in the lithography system which could have severe impact on CD control and process latitude. It is indispensable to analyze and balance the influences of various errors in order to get larger tolerance for errors within allowable error margins for CD. In this paper, by using PROLITHTM X3 and in-house software IntLitho, we study the cross-talk of the dominative errors of numerical aperture, coherent factors, mask CD, flare and analyze its influence on lithography performance. The results show that the tolerance for the errors can be released when some errors impact on CD is counterpoised by that arising from another error in usable process window. Moreover multiple combinations of errors or tolerances can be used for such compensations. Finally we supply a method to perform the compensation of multi errors impact on CD and process window, which is the essence of co-design or cooptimization of lithography tool for rigorous CD control.

  7. Empirical versus time stepping with embedded error control for density-driven flow in porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younes, Anis; Ackerer, Philippe

    2010-08-01

    Modeling density-driven flow in porous media may require very long computational time due to the nonlinear coupling between flow and transport equations. Time stepping schemes are often used to adapt the time step size in order to reduce the computational cost of the simulation. In this work, the empirical time stepping scheme which adapts the time step size according to the performance of the iterative nonlinear solver is compared to an adaptive time stepping scheme where the time step length is controlled by the temporal truncation error. Results of the simulations of the Elder problem show that (1) the empirical time stepping scheme can lead to inaccurate results even with a small convergence criterion, (2) accurate results are obtained when the time step size selection is based on the truncation error control, (3) a non iterative scheme with proper time step management can be faster and leads to more accurate solution than the standard iterative procedure with the empirical time stepping and (4) the temporal truncation error can have a significant effect on the results and can be considered as one of the reasons for the differences observed in the Elder numerical results.

  8. Emission current control system for multiple hollow cathode devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, John R. (Inventor); Hancock, Donald J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An emission current control system for balancing the individual emission currents from an array of hollow cathodes has current sensors for determining the current drawn by each cathode from a power supply. Each current sensor has an output signal which has a magnitude proportional to the current. The current sensor output signals are averaged, the average value so obtained being applied to a respective controller for controlling the flow of an ion source material through each cathode. Also applied to each controller are the respective sensor output signals for each cathode and a common reference signal. The flow of source material through each hollow cathode is thereby made proportional to the current drawn by that cathode, the average current drawn by all of the cathodes, and the reference signal. Thus, the emission current of each cathode is controlled such that each is made substantially equal to the emission current of each of the other cathodes. When utilized as a component of a multiple hollow cathode ion propulsion motor, the emission current control system of the invention provides for balancing the thrust of the motor about the thrust axis and also for preventing premature failure of a hollow cathode source due to operation above a maximum rated emission current.

  9. How the credit assignment problems in motor control could be solved after the cerebellum predicts increases in error

    PubMed Central

    Verduzco-Flores, Sergio O.; O'Reilly, Randall C.

    2015-01-01

    We present a cerebellar architecture with two main characteristics. The first one is that complex spikes respond to increases in sensory errors. The second one is that cerebellar modules associate particular contexts where errors have increased in the past with corrective commands that stop the increase in error. We analyze our architecture formally and computationally for the case of reaching in a 3D environment. In the case of motor control, we show that there are synergies of this architecture with the Equilibrium-Point hypothesis, leading to novel ways to solve the motor error and distal learning problems. In particular, the presence of desired equilibrium lengths for muscles provides a way to know when the error is increasing, and which corrections to apply. In the context of Threshold Control Theory and Perceptual Control Theory we show how to extend our model so it implements anticipative corrections in cascade control systems that span from muscle contractions to cognitive operations. PMID:25852535

  10. Pain control following inguinal herniorrhaphy: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Bjurstrom, Martin F; Nicol, Andrea L; Amid, Parviz K; Chen, David C

    2014-01-01

    Inguinal hernia repair is one of the most common surgeries performed worldwide. With the success of modern hernia repair techniques, recurrence rates have significantly declined, with a lower incidence than the development of chronic postherniorrhaphy inguinal pain (CPIP). The avoidance of CPIP is arguably the most important clinical outcome and has the greatest impact on patient satisfaction, health care utilization, societal cost, and quality of life. The etiology of CPIP is multifactorial, with overlapping neuropathic and nociceptive components contributing to this complex syndrome. Treatment is often challenging, and no definitive treatment algorithm exists. Multidisciplinary management of this complex problem improves outcomes, as treatment must be individualized. Current medical, pharmacologic, interventional, and surgical management strategies are reviewed. PMID:24920934

  11. Apparatus for electrode current control in linear MHD generators

    DOEpatents

    Demirjian, Ara M.; Solbes, Albert

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for controlling a plurality of opposing, electrode, direct-currents at pre-set locations across a channel that comprises a converter for converting each electrode current into first and second periodic control signals which are 180.degree. out of phase with respect to each other and which have equal magnitudes corresponding to the magnitude of the associated electrode current; and couplers for magnetically coupling individual ones of the first control signals and for magnetically coupling individual ones of the second signals such that the corresponding electrode currents are equalized or rendered proportional by balancing the same in the same or constant ratios in accordance with the locations of the electrode currents.

  12. Quality controls in integrative approaches to detect errors and inconsistencies in biological databases.

    PubMed

    Ghisalberti, Giorgio; Masseroli, Marco; Tettamanti, Luca

    2010-01-01

    Numerous biomolecular data are available, but they are scattered in many databases and only some of them are curated by experts. Most available data are computationally derived and include errors and inconsistencies. Effective use of available data in order to derive new knowledge hence requires data integration and quality improvement. Many approaches for data integration have been proposed. Data warehousing seams to be the most adequate when comprehensive analysis of integrated data is required. This makes it the most suitable also to implement comprehensive quality controls on integrated data. We previously developed GFINDer (http://www.bioinformatics.polimi.it/GFINDer/), a web system that supports scientists in effectively using available information. It allows comprehensive statistical analysis and mining of functional and phenotypic annotations of gene lists, such as those identified by high-throughput biomolecular experiments. GFINDer backend is composed of a multi-organism genomic and proteomic data warehouse (GPDW). Within the GPDW, several controlled terminologies and ontologies, which describe gene and gene product related biomolecular processes, functions and phenotypes, are imported and integrated, together with their associations with genes and proteins of several organisms. In order to ease maintaining updated the GPDW and to ensure the best possible quality of data integrated in subsequent updating of the data warehouse, we developed several automatic procedures. Within them, we implemented numerous data quality control techniques to test the integrated data for a variety of possible errors and inconsistencies. Among other features, the implemented controls check data structure and completeness, ontological data consistency, ID format and evolution, unexpected data quantification values, and consistency of data from single and multiple sources. We use the implemented controls to analyze the quality of data available from several different biological

  13. Detecting errors and anomalies in computerized materials control and accountability databases

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteson, R.; Hench, K.; Yarbro, T.; Baumgart, C.

    1998-12-31

    The Automated MC and A Database Assessment project is aimed at improving anomaly and error detection in materials control and accountability (MC and A) databases and increasing confidence in the data that they contain. Anomalous data resulting in poor categorization of nuclear material inventories greatly reduces the value of the database information to users. Therefore it is essential that MC and A data be assessed periodically for anomalies or errors. Anomaly detection can identify errors in databases and thus provide assurance of the integrity of data. An expert system has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory that examines these large databases for anomalous or erroneous data. For several years, MC and A subject matter experts at Los Alamos have been using this automated system to examine the large amounts of accountability data that the Los Alamos Plutonium Facility generates. These data are collected and managed by the Material Accountability and Safeguards System, a near-real-time computerized nuclear material accountability and safeguards system. This year they have expanded the user base, customizing the anomaly detector for the varying requirements of different groups of users. This paper describes the progress in customizing the expert systems to the needs of the users of the data and reports on their results.

  14. Dynamic Programming and Error Estimates for Stochastic Control Problems with Maximum Cost

    SciTech Connect

    Bokanowski, Olivier; Picarelli, Athena; Zidani, Hasnaa

    2015-02-15

    This work is concerned with stochastic optimal control for a running maximum cost. A direct approach based on dynamic programming techniques is studied leading to the characterization of the value function as the unique viscosity solution of a second order Hamilton–Jacobi–Bellman (HJB) equation with an oblique derivative boundary condition. A general numerical scheme is proposed and a convergence result is provided. Error estimates are obtained for the semi-Lagrangian scheme. These results can apply to the case of lookback options in finance. Moreover, optimal control problems with maximum cost arise in the characterization of the reachable sets for a system of controlled stochastic differential equations. Some numerical simulations on examples of reachable analysis are included to illustrate our approach.

  15. Separable responses to error, ambiguity, and reaction time in cingulo-opercular task control regions.

    PubMed

    Neta, Maital; Schlaggar, Bradley L; Petersen, Steven E

    2014-10-01

    The dorsal anterior cingulate (dACC), along with the closely affiliated anterior insula/frontal operculum, have been demonstrated to show three types of task control signals across a wide variety of tasks. One of these signals, a transient signal that is thought to represent performance feedback, shows greater activity to error than correct trials. Other work has found similar effects for uncertainty/ambiguity or conflict, though some argue that dACC activity is, instead, modulated primarily by other processes more reflected in reaction time. Here, we demonstrate that, rather than a single explanation, multiple information processing operations are crucial to characterizing the function of these brain regions, by comparing operations within a single paradigm. Participants performed two tasks in an fMRI experimental session: (1) deciding whether or not visually presented word pairs rhyme, and (2) rating auditorily presented single words as abstract or concrete. A pilot was used to identify ambiguous stimuli for both tasks (e.g., word pair: BASS/GRACE; single word: CHANGE). We found greater cingulo-opercular activity for errors and ambiguous trials than clear/correct trials, with a robust effect of reaction time. The effects of error and ambiguity remained when reaction time was regressed out, although the differences decreased. Further stepwise regression of response consensus (agreement across participants for each stimulus; a proxy for ambiguity) decreased differences between ambiguous and clear trials, but left error-related differences almost completely intact. These observations suggest that trial-wise responses in cingulo-opercular regions monitor multiple performance indices, including accuracy, ambiguity, and reaction time. PMID:24887509

  16. Control System for Suppressing Tracking Error Offset and Multiharmonic Disturbance in High-Speed Optical Disk Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabata, Yuta; Nakazaki, Tatsuya; Ogata, Tokoku; Ohishi, Kiyoshi; Miyazaki, Toshimasa; Sazawa, Masaki; Koide, Daiichi; Takano, Yoshimichi; Tokumaru, Haruki

    This paper proposes a control system for suppressing tracking error offset and multiharmonic disturbance in high speed optical disk systems. Residual tracking error consists of primary harmonics, high-order harmonics, and offset. Therefore, this paper proposes a tracking control system for suppressing residual tracking error, including primary harmonics, high order harmonics disturbance, and offset. The cause of the offset included in the residual tracking error is discussed. The cause is found to be the operation error in the fixed-point DSP (digital signal processor) and the phase lag of the LPF (low pass filter). Moreover, the proposed control system is designed for two types of high-speed optical disk system. The experimental results show that the proposed system enables an optical disk system to achieve a fine tracking performance.

  17. Impact of random and systematic recall errors and selection bias in case--control studies on mobile phone use and brain tumors in adolescents (CEFALO study).

    PubMed

    Aydin, Denis; Feychting, Maria; Schüz, Joachim; Andersen, Tina Veje; Poulsen, Aslak Harbo; Prochazka, Michaela; Klaeboe, Lars; Kuehni, Claudia E; Tynes, Tore; Röösli, Martin

    2011-07-01

    Whether the use of mobile phones is a risk factor for brain tumors in adolescents is currently being studied. Case--control studies investigating this possible relationship are prone to recall error and selection bias. We assessed the potential impact of random and systematic recall error and selection bias on odds ratios (ORs) by performing simulations based on real data from an ongoing case--control study of mobile phones and brain tumor risk in children and adolescents (CEFALO study). Simulations were conducted for two mobile phone exposure categories: regular and heavy use. Our choice of levels of recall error was guided by a validation study that compared objective network operator data with the self-reported amount of mobile phone use in CEFALO. In our validation study, cases overestimated their number of calls by 9% on average and controls by 34%. Cases also overestimated their duration of calls by 52% on average and controls by 163%. The participation rates in CEFALO were 83% for cases and 71% for controls. In a variety of scenarios, the combined impact of recall error and selection bias on the estimated ORs was complex. These simulations are useful for the interpretation of previous case-control studies on brain tumor and mobile phone use in adults as well as for the interpretation of future studies on adolescents. PMID:21294138

  18. Current control loop of 3-phase grid-connected inverter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbar, A. F.; Mansor, M.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a comparative study of current control loop in 3-phase inverter which is used to control the active and reactive output power. Generally, current control loop, power control loop and phase lock-loop are the conventional parameters that can be found in an inverter system controlled by the conventional linear control type, for instance proportional (P), integral (I) and derivative (D). If the grid remains stable throughout the day, PID control can be use. However variation of magnitude, frequency, voltage dips, transient, and other related power quality issues occur in a 3-phase grid often affects the control loop. This paper aims to provide an overall review on the available current control techniques used in grid connected system.

  19. Non-iterative adaptive time stepping with truncation error control for simulating variable-density flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirthe, E. M.; Graf, T.

    2012-04-01

    Fluid density variations occur due to changes in the solute concentration, temperature and pressure of groundwater. Examples are interaction between freshwater and seawater, radioactive waste disposal, groundwater contamination, and geothermal energy production. The physical coupling between flow and transport introduces non-linearity in the governing mathematical equations, such that solving variable-density flow problems typically requires very long computational time. Computational efficiency can be attained through the use of adaptive time-stepping schemes. The aim of this work is therefore to apply a non-iterative adaptive time-stepping scheme based on local truncation error in variable-density flow problems. That new scheme is implemented into the code of the HydroGeoSphere model (Therrien et al., 2011). The new time-stepping scheme is applied to the Elder (1967) and the Shikaze et al. (1998) problem of free convection in porous and fractured-porous media, respectively. Numerical simulations demonstrate that non-iterative time-stepping based on local truncation error control fully automates the time step size and efficiently limits the temporal discretization error to the user-defined tolerance. Results of the Elder problem show that the new time-stepping scheme presented here is significantly more efficient than uniform time-stepping when high accuracy is required. Results of the Shikaze problem reveal that the new scheme is considerably faster than conventional time-stepping where time step sizes are either constant or controlled by absolute head/concentration changes. Future research will focus on the application of the new time-stepping scheme to variable-density flow in complex real-world fractured-porous rock.

  20. Fuzzy Current-Mode Control and Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    2000-01-01

    In this paper a current-mode control (CMC) methodology is developed for a buck converter by using a fuzzy logic controller. Conventional CMC methodologies are based on lead-lag compensation with voltage and inductor current feedback. In this paper the converter lead-lag compensation will be substituted with a fuzzy controller. A small-signal model of the fuzzy controller will also be developed in order to examine the stability properties of this buck converter control system. The paper develops an analytical approach, introducing fuzzy control into the area of CMC.

  1. Improved Load Compensation using Harmonic Compensator in dq0 Current Controller for DSTATCOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geddada, Nagesh; Mishra, Mahesh Kumar

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents distribution static compensator (DSTATCOM) with dq0 current controller and sine pulse width modulation (SPWM) switching for compensation of unbalanced nonlinear load in distribution system. DSTATCOM, connected in parallel to load at the point of common coupling (PCC), is used for supplying reactive and harmonic components of load current demand. This dq0 current controller is implemented in synchronous reference frame (SRF) rotating at fundamental frequency and consists of harmonic compensation (HC) regulator along with proportional integrator (PI) regulator. HC regulator is realized by number of sinusoidal signal integrators (SSIs) in parallel. The SSI provides high gain for tuned harmonic frequency and helps in minimizing filter current tracking error while compensating for load harmonic currents. Zero-axis controller, which compensates load neutral current and helps in obtaining balanced utility currents, is provided along with d, q controllers. SPWM switching generates inverter gating pulses at constant frequency, which reduces stress levels on VSI switches and simplifies the design of interface filter. Simulation studies of DSTATCOM load compensation with dq0 current controller are carried out in Matlab/Simulink and experimental verification is done using dSpace 1104 with Matlab real-time interface (RTI).

  2. Ion beam machining error control and correction for small scale optics.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xuhui; Zhou, Lin; Dai, Yifan; Li, Shengyi

    2011-09-20

    Ion beam figuring (IBF) technology for small scale optical components is discussed. Since the small removal function can be obtained in IBF, it makes computer-controlled optical surfacing technology possible to machine precision centimeter- or millimeter-scale optical components deterministically. Using a small ion beam to machine small optical components, there are some key problems, such as small ion beam positioning on the optical surface, material removal rate, ion beam scanning pitch control on the optical surface, and so on, that must be seriously considered. The main reasons for the problems are that it is more sensitive to the above problems than a big ion beam because of its small beam diameter and lower material ratio. In this paper, we discuss these problems and their influences in machining small optical components in detail. Based on the identification-compensation principle, an iterative machining compensation method is deduced for correcting the positioning error of an ion beam with the material removal rate estimated by a selected optimal scanning pitch. Experiments on ϕ10 mm Zerodur planar and spherical samples are made, and the final surface errors are both smaller than λ/100 measured by a Zygo GPI interferometer. PMID:21947039

  3. Universal control and error correction in multi-qubit spin registers in diamond.

    PubMed

    Taminiau, T H; Cramer, J; van der Sar, T; Dobrovitski, V V; Hanson, R

    2014-03-01

    Quantum registers of nuclear spins coupled to electron spins of individual solid-state defects are a promising platform for quantum information processing. Pioneering experiments selected defects with favourably located nuclear spins with particularly strong hyperfine couplings. To progress towards large-scale applications, larger and deterministically available nuclear registers are highly desirable. Here, we realize universal control over multi-qubit spin registers by harnessing abundant weakly coupled nuclear spins. We use the electron spin of a nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond to selectively initialize, control and read out carbon-13 spins in the surrounding spin bath and construct high-fidelity single- and two-qubit gates. We exploit these new capabilities to implement a three-qubit quantum-error-correction protocol and demonstrate the robustness of the encoded state against applied errors. These results transform weakly coupled nuclear spins from a source of decoherence into a reliable resource, paving the way towards extended quantum networks and surface-code quantum computing based on multi-qubit nodes. PMID:24487650

  4. The definition of the railway position control error in the plane and profile using the optical-electronic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulin, Anton V.; Timofeev, Alexandr N.; Nekrylov, Ivan S.

    2015-05-01

    Continuous development of high-speed railway traffic in the world toughens requirements, including to the accuracy of installation and control of provision of a railway track. For the current technologies of service of a railway track using its absolute coordinates the perspective decision is creation along railway lines of a special fiducial network. In this case by means of optical-electronic systems, concerning reference points, obtaining the objective information on actual position of a railway track in a longitudinal cross-section and the plan with a margin error which isn't exceeding 1,5 mm in rather severe conditions of continuous operation of traveling machines at speeds up to 10 km/h is possible.

  5. Path-tracking control of underactuated ships under tracking error constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Khac Duc

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a constructive design of new controllers that force underactuated ships under constant or slow time-varying sea loads to asymptotically track a parameterized reference path, that guarantees the distance from the ship to the reference path always be within a specified value. The control design is based on a global exponential disturbance observer, a transformation of the ship dynamics to an almost spherical form, an interpretation of the tracking errors in an earth-fixed frame, an introduction of dynamic variables to compensate for relaxation of the reference path generation, p-times differentiable step functions, and backstepping and Lyapunov's direct methods. The effectiveness of the proposed results is illustrated through simulations.

  6. Novel prescribed performance neural control of a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle with unknown initial errors.

    PubMed

    Bu, Xiangwei; Wu, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Fujing; Huang, Jiaqi; Ma, Zhen; Zhang, Rui

    2015-11-01

    A novel prescribed performance neural controller with unknown initial errors is addressed for the longitudinal dynamic model of a flexible air-breathing hypersonic vehicle (FAHV) subject to parametric uncertainties. Different from traditional prescribed performance control (PPC) requiring that the initial errors have to be known accurately, this paper investigates the tracking control without accurate initial errors via exploiting a new performance function. A combined neural back-stepping and minimal learning parameter (MLP) technology is employed for exploring a prescribed performance controller that provides robust tracking of velocity and altitude reference trajectories. The highlight is that the transient performance of velocity and altitude tracking errors is satisfactory and the computational load of neural approximation is low. Finally, numerical simulation results from a nonlinear FAHV model demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed strategy. PMID:26456727

  7. Detection and reconstruction of error control codes for engineered and biological regulatory systems.

    SciTech Connect

    May, Elebeoba Eni; Rintoul, Mark Daniel; Johnston, Anna Marie; Pryor, Richard J.; Hart, William Eugene; Watson, Jean-Paul

    2003-10-01

    determining similar parameters for a received, noisy, error-control encoded data set. In addition to these goals, we initiated exploration of algorithmic approaches to determine if a data set could be approximated with an error-control code and performed initial investigations into optimization based methodologies for extracting the encoding algorithm given the coding rate of an encoded noise-free and noisy data stream.

  8. Bio-inspired adaptive feedback error learning architecture for motor control.

    PubMed

    Tolu, Silvia; Vanegas, Mauricio; Luque, Niceto R; Garrido, Jesús A; Ros, Eduardo

    2012-10-01

    This study proposes an adaptive control architecture based on an accurate regression method called Locally Weighted Projection Regression (LWPR) and on a bio-inspired module, such as a cerebellar-like engine. This hybrid architecture takes full advantage of the machine learning module (LWPR kernel) to abstract an optimized representation of the sensorimotor space while the cerebellar component integrates this to generate corrective terms in the framework of a control task. Furthermore, we illustrate how the use of a simple adaptive error feedback term allows to use the proposed architecture even in the absence of an accurate analytic reference model. The presented approach achieves an accurate control with low gain corrective terms (for compliant control schemes). We evaluate the contribution of the different components of the proposed scheme comparing the obtained performance with alternative approaches. Then, we show that the presented architecture can be used for accurate manipulation of different objects when their physical properties are not directly known by the controller. We evaluate how the scheme scales for simulated plants of high Degrees of Freedom (7-DOFs). PMID:22907270

  9. Calibration of an instrumented treadmill using a precision-controlled device with artificial neural network-based error corrections.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hong-Jung; Lin, Hsiu-Chen; Lu, Hsuan-Lun; Chen, Ting-Yi; Lu, Tung-Wu

    2016-03-01

    Instrumented treadmills (ITs) are used to measure reaction forces (RF) and center of pressure (COP) movements for gait and balance assessment. Regular in situ calibration is essential to ensure their accuracy and to identify conditions when a factory re-calibration is needed. The current study aimed to develop and calibrate in situ an IT using a portable, precision-controlled calibration device with an artificial neural network (ANN)-based correction method. The calibration device was used to apply static and dynamic calibrating loads to the surface of the IT at 189 and 25 grid-points, respectively, at four belt speeds (0, 4, 6 and 8 km/h) without the need of a preset template. Part of the applied and measured RF and COP were used to train a threelayered, back-propagation ANN model while the rest of the data were used to evaluate the performance of the ANN. The percent errors of Fz and errors of the Px and Py were significantly decreased from a maximum of -1.15%, -1.64 mm and -0.73 mm to 0.02%, 0.02 mm and 0.03 mm during static calibration, respectively. During dynamic calibration, the corresponding values were decreasing from -3.65%, 2.58 mm and -4.92 mm to 0.30%, -0.14 mm and -0.47 mm, respectively. The results suggest that the calibration device and associated ANN will be useful for correcting measurement errors in vertical loads and COP for ITs. PMID:26979909

  10. Automatic component calibration and error diagnostics for model-based accelerator control. Phase I final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Carl Stern; Dr. Martin Lee

    1999-06-28

    Phase I work studied the feasibility of developing software for automatic component calibration and error correction in beamline optics models. A prototype application was developed that corrects quadrupole field strength errors in beamline models.

  11. The impact of a brief mindfulness meditation intervention on cognitive control and error-related performance monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Michael J.; Steffen, Patrick R.; Primosch, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Meditation is associated with positive health behaviors and improved cognitive control. One mechanism for the relationship between meditation and cognitive control is changes in activity of the anterior cingulate cortex-mediated neural pathways. The error-related negativity (ERN) and error positivity (Pe) components of the scalp-recorded event-related potential (ERP) represent cingulate-mediated functions of performance monitoring that may be modulated by mindfulness meditation. We utilized a flanker task, an experimental design, and a brief mindfulness intervention in a sample of 55 healthy non-meditators (n = 28 randomly assigned to the mindfulness group and n = 27 randomly assigned to the control group) to examine autonomic nervous system functions as measured by blood pressure and indices of cognitive control as measured by response times, error rates, post-error slowing, and the ERN and Pe components of the ERP. Systolic blood pressure significantly differentiated groups following the mindfulness intervention and following the flanker task. There were non-significant differences between the mindfulness and control groups for response times, post-error slowing, and error rates on the flanker task. Amplitude and latency of the ERN did not differ between groups; however, amplitude of the Pe was significantly smaller in individuals in the mindfulness group than in the control group. Findings suggest that a brief mindfulness intervention is associated with reduced autonomic arousal and decreased amplitude of the Pe, an ERP associated with error awareness, attention, and motivational salience, but does not alter amplitude of the ERN or behavioral performance. Implications for brief mindfulness interventions and state vs. trait affect theories of the ERN are discussed. Future research examining graded levels of mindfulness and tracking error awareness will clarify relationship between mindfulness and performance monitoring. PMID:23847491

  12. Systematic review of ERP and fMRI studies investigating inhibitory control and error processing in people with substance dependence and behavioural addictions

    PubMed Central

    Luijten, Maartje; Machielsen, Marise W.J.; Veltman, Dick J.; Hester, Robert; de Haan, Lieuwe; Franken, Ingmar H.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Several current theories emphasize the role of cognitive control in addiction. The present review evaluates neural deficits in the domains of inhibitory control and error processing in individuals with substance dependence and in those showing excessive addiction-like behaviours. The combined evaluation of event-related potential (ERP) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) findings in the present review offers unique information on neural deficits in addicted individuals. Methods We selected 19 ERP and 22 fMRI studies using stop-signal, go/no-go or Flanker paradigms based on a search of PubMed and Embase. Results The most consistent findings in addicted individuals relative to healthy controls were lower N2, error-related negativity and error positivity amplitudes as well as hypoactivation in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), inferior frontal gyrus and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. These neural deficits, however, were not always associated with impaired task performance. With regard to behavioural addictions, some evidence has been found for similar neural deficits; however, studies are scarce and results are not yet conclusive. Differences among the major classes of substances of abuse were identified and involve stronger neural responses to errors in individuals with alcohol dependence versus weaker neural responses to errors in other substance-dependent populations. Limitations Task design and analysis techniques vary across studies, thereby reducing comparability among studies and the potential of clinical use of these measures. Conclusion Current addiction theories were supported by identifying consistent abnormalities in prefrontal brain function in individuals with addiction. An integrative model is proposed, suggesting that neural deficits in the dorsal ACC may constitute a hallmark neurocognitive deficit underlying addictive behaviours, such as loss of control. PMID:24359877

  13. Partially Key Distribution with Public Key Cryptosystem Based on Error Control Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavallaei, Saeed Ebadi; Falahati, Abolfazl

    Due to the low level of security in public key cryptosystems based on number theory, fundamental difficulties such as "key escrow" in Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) and a secure channel in ID-based cryptography, a new key distribution cryptosystem based on Error Control Codes (ECC) is proposed . This idea is done by some modification on McEliece cryptosystem. The security of ECC cryptosystem obtains from the NP-Completeness of block codes decoding. The capability of generating public keys with variable lengths which is suitable for different applications will be provided by using ECC. It seems that usage of these cryptosystems because of decreasing in the security of cryptosystems based on number theory and increasing the lengths of their keys would be unavoidable in future.

  14. Design implementation and control of MRAS error dynamics. [Model-Reference Adaptive System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colburn, B. K.; Boland, J. S., III

    1974-01-01

    Use is made of linearized error characteristic equation for model-reference adaptive systems to determine a parameter adjustment rule for obtaining time-invariant error dynamics. Theoretical justification of error stability is given and an illustrative example included to demonstrate the utility of the proposed technique.

  15. Improving Interference Control in ADHD Patients with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS)

    PubMed Central

    Breitling, Carolin; Zaehle, Tino; Dannhauer, Moritz; Bonath, Björn; Tegelbeckers, Jana; Flechtner, Hans-Henning; Krauel, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    The use of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been suggested as a promising alternative to psychopharmacological treatment approaches due to its local and network effects on brain activation. In the current study, we investigated the impact of tDCS over the right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG) on interference control in 21 male adolescents with ADHD and 21 age matched healthy controls aged 13–17 years, who underwent three separate sessions of tDCS (anodal, cathodal, and sham) while completing a Flanker task. Even though anodal stimulation appeared to diminish commission errors in the ADHD group, the overall analysis revealed no significant effect of tDCS. Since participants showed a considerable learning effect from the first to the second session, performance in the first session was separately analyzed. ADHD patients receiving sham stimulation in the first session showed impaired interference control compared to healthy control participants whereas ADHD patients who were exposed to anodal stimulation, showed comparable performance levels (commission errors, reaction time variability) to the control group. These results suggest that anodal tDCS of the right inferior frontal gyrus could improve interference control in patients with ADHD. PMID:27147964

  16. Improving Interference Control in ADHD Patients with Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS).

    PubMed

    Breitling, Carolin; Zaehle, Tino; Dannhauer, Moritz; Bonath, Björn; Tegelbeckers, Jana; Flechtner, Hans-Henning; Krauel, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    The use of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has been suggested as a promising alternative to psychopharmacological treatment approaches due to its local and network effects on brain activation. In the current study, we investigated the impact of tDCS over the right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG) on interference control in 21 male adolescents with ADHD and 21 age matched healthy controls aged 13-17 years, who underwent three separate sessions of tDCS (anodal, cathodal, and sham) while completing a Flanker task. Even though anodal stimulation appeared to diminish commission errors in the ADHD group, the overall analysis revealed no significant effect of tDCS. Since participants showed a considerable learning effect from the first to the second session, performance in the first session was separately analyzed. ADHD patients receiving sham stimulation in the first session showed impaired interference control compared to healthy control participants whereas ADHD patients who were exposed to anodal stimulation, showed comparable performance levels (commission errors, reaction time variability) to the control group. These results suggest that anodal tDCS of the right inferior frontal gyrus could improve interference control in patients with ADHD. PMID:27147964

  17. Piezocomposite Actuator Arrays for Correcting and Controlling Wavefront Error in Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradford, Samuel Case; Peterson, Lee D.; Ohara, Catherine M.; Shi, Fang; Agnes, Greg S.; Hoffman, Samuel M.; Wilkie, William Keats

    2012-01-01

    Three reflectors have been developed and tested to assess the performance of a distributed network of piezocomposite actuators for correcting thermal deformations and total wave-front error. The primary testbed article is an active composite reflector, composed of a spherically curved panel with a graphite face sheet and aluminum honeycomb core composite, and then augmented with a network of 90 distributed piezoelectric composite actuators. The piezoelectric actuator system may be used for correcting as-built residual shape errors, and for controlling low-order, thermally-induced quasi-static distortions of the panel. In this study, thermally-induced surface deformations of 1 to 5 microns were deliberately introduced onto the reflector, then measured using a speckle holography interferometer system. The reflector surface figure was subsequently corrected to a tolerance of 50 nm using the actuators embedded in the reflector's back face sheet. Two additional test articles were constructed: a borosilicate at window at 150 mm diameter with 18 actuators bonded to the back surface; and a direct metal laser sintered reflector with spherical curvature, 230 mm diameter, and 12 actuators bonded to the back surface. In the case of the glass reflector, absolute measurements were performed with an interferometer and the absolute surface was corrected. These test articles were evaluated to determine their absolute surface control capabilities, as well as to assess a multiphysics modeling effort developed under this program for the prediction of active reflector response. This paper will describe the design, construction, and testing of active reflector systems under thermal loads, and subsequent correction of surface shape via distributed peizeoelctric actuation.

  18. Automatic method of measuring silicon-controlled-rectifier holding current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslowski, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    Development of automated silicon controlled rectifier circuit for measuring minimum anode current required to maintain rectifiers in conducting state is discussed. Components of circuit are described and principles of operation are explained. Illustration of circuit is provided.

  19. Low-voltage, wide-range, current-controlled DC current generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, M.; Hart, B. L.; Hayatleh, K.; Lidgey, F. J.

    2011-08-01

    Operating from a 1 V rail supply, a proposed CMOS current-controlled DC current generator can function as a repeater, attenuator or amplifier over the input current range, 1 µA to 1 mA, with a current-transfer ratio accuracy better than 1% using IBM technology, characterised by a process with a 0.13 µm minimum feature size. In repeater mode, the incremental output resistance exceeds 30 MΩ for an output current of 500 µA at an output voltage of 0.20 V, and exceeds 1 MΩ for an output current of 1 mA at an output voltage of 0.22 V. For zero input current, the circuit dissipation is 117 µW.

  20. Analysis of Solar Two Heliostat Tracking Error Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.A.; Stone, K.W.

    1999-01-28

    This paper explores the geometrical errors that reduce heliostat tracking accuracy at Solar Two. The basic heliostat control architecture is described. Then, the three dominant error sources are described and their effect on heliostat tracking is visually illustrated. The strategy currently used to minimize, but not truly correct, these error sources is also shown. Finally, a novel approach to minimizing error is presented.

  1. Indirect control of antiferromagnetic domain walls with spin current.

    PubMed

    Wieser, R; Vedmedenko, E Y; Wiesendanger, R

    2011-02-11

    The indirect controlled displacement of an antiferromagnetic domain wall by a spin current is studied by Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert spin dynamics. The antiferromagnetic domain wall can be shifted both by a spin-polarized tunnel current of a scanning tunneling microscope or by a current driven ferromagnetic domain wall in an exchange coupled antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic layer system. The indirect control of antiferromagnetic domain walls opens up a new and promising direction for future spin device applications based on antiferromagnetic materials. PMID:21405493

  2. Stray current control for the St. Louis Metrolink rail system

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, J.H. III

    1995-01-01

    The new 18-mile (11-km) Metrolink light rail transit system, which runs from St. Louis, Missouri, to East St. Louis, Illinois, was constructed in an area devoid of rail transit for decades and thus unprepared for the effects of stray current on newer underground structures. Various steps were taken to control stray current because of the complexity of the underground structures along the right of way. The rail system is now in operation, and the effectiveness of the stray current control program is being evaluated.

  3. Effects of model error on control of large flexible space antenna with comparisons of decoupled and linear quadratic regulator control procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamer, H. A.; Johnson, K. G.

    1986-01-01

    An analysis was performed to determine the effects of model error on the control of a large flexible space antenna. Control was achieved by employing two three-axis control-moment gyros (CMG's) located on the antenna column. State variables were estimated by including an observer in the control loop that used attitude and attitude-rate sensors on the column. Errors were assumed to exist in the individual model parameters: modal frequency, modal damping, mode slope (control-influence coefficients), and moment of inertia. Their effects on control-system performance were analyzed either for (1) nulling initial disturbances in the rigid-body modes, or (2) nulling initial disturbances in the first three flexible modes. The study includes the effects on stability, time to null, and control requirements (defined as maximum torque and total momentum), as well as on the accuracy of obtaining initial estimates of the disturbances. The effects on the transients of the undisturbed modes are also included. The results, which are compared for decoupled and linear quadratic regulator (LQR) control procedures, are shown in tabular form, parametric plots, and as sample time histories of modal-amplitude and control responses. Results of the analysis showed that the effects of model errors on the control-system performance were generally comparable for both control procedures. The effect of mode-slope error was the most serious of all model errors.

  4. Exploring the Current Landscape of Intravenous Infusion Practices and Errors (ECLIPSE): protocol for a mixed-methods observational study

    PubMed Central

    Blandford, Ann; Furniss, Dominic; Chumbley, Gill; Iacovides, Ioanna; Wei, Li; Cox, Anna; Mayer, Astrid; Schnock, Kumiko; Bates, David Westfall; Dykes, Patricia C; Bell, Helen; Dean Franklin, Bryony

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intravenous medication is essential for many hospital inpatients. However, providing intravenous therapy is complex and errors are common. ‘Smart pumps’ incorporating dose error reduction software have been widely advocated to reduce error. However, little is known about their effect on patient safety, how they are used or their likely impact. This study will explore the landscape of intravenous medication infusion practices and errors in English hospitals and how smart pumps may relate to the prevalence of medication administration errors. Methods and analysis This is a mixed-methods study involving an observational quantitative point prevalence study to determine the frequency and types of errors that occur in the infusion of intravenous medication, and qualitative interviews with hospital staff to better understand infusion practices and the contexts in which errors occur. The study will involve 5 clinical areas (critical care, general medicine, general surgery, paediatrics and oncology), across 14 purposively sampled acute hospitals and 2 paediatric hospitals to cover a range of intravenous infusion practices. Data collectors will compare each infusion running at the time of data collection against the patient's medication orders to identify any discrepancies. The potential clinical importance of errors will be assessed. Quantitative data will be analysed descriptively; interviews will be analysed using thematic analysis. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from an NHS Research Ethics Committee (14/SC/0290); local approvals will be sought from each participating organisation. Findings will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at conferences for academic and health professional audiences. Results will also be fed back to participating organisations to inform local policy, training and procurement. Aggregated findings will inform the debate on costs and benefits of the NHS investing in smart pump technology

  5. Electron cyclotron current drive and current profile control in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Luce, T.C.; Petty, C.C.

    1998-07-01

    Recent work in many tokamaks has indicated that optimization of the current profile is a key element needed to sustain modes of improved confinement and stability. Generation of localized current through application of electron cyclotron (EC) waves offers a means of accomplishing this. In addition to profile control, electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) is useful for sustaining the bulk current in a steady state manner and for instability suppression. ECCD is particularly well suited for control of the current profile because the location of the driven current can be regulated by external means, through steering of the incident EC waves and setting the magnitude of the toroidal magnetic field. Under most conditions the location of the driven current is insensitive to the plasma parameters. Central ECCD has been studied in a number of tokamaks and found to have characteristics commensurate with theory as expressed through ray tracing and Fokker-Planck computer codes. The present experiments on DIII-D explore central current drive and are the first to test off-axis ECCD. These experiments are unique in using internal measurements of the magnetic field to determine the magnitude and profile of driven current.

  6. Application of parameter estimation to aircraft stability and control: The output-error approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maine, Richard E.; Iliff, Kenneth W.

    1986-01-01

    The practical application of parameter estimation methodology to the problem of estimating aircraft stability and control derivatives from flight test data is examined. The primary purpose of the document is to present a comprehensive and unified picture of the entire parameter estimation process and its integration into a flight test program. The document concentrates on the output-error method to provide a focus for detailed examination and to allow us to give specific examples of situations that have arisen. The document first derives the aircraft equations of motion in a form suitable for application to estimation of stability and control derivatives. It then discusses the issues that arise in adapting the equations to the limitations of analysis programs, using a specific program for an example. The roles and issues relating to mass distribution data, preflight predictions, maneuver design, flight scheduling, instrumentation sensors, data acquisition systems, and data processing are then addressed. Finally, the document discusses evaluation and the use of the analysis results.

  7. Non-Gaussian Based Buddy Check and Gross Error Check Observational Quality Control Measures and Their Impacts on Non-Gaussian Based Data Assimilation Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, S. J.; Kliewer, A.; Jones, A. S.; Forsythe, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    With the recent derivation of a mixed distribution based incremental VAR data assimilation system, the need to adapt the current Gaussian based quality control measures to allow for the correct assessment of lognormal distribution based observational errors has to be addressed. In this paper we take the "buddy check" system and show that it is possible to derive a similar measure in terms of a linearization with respect to ln x and not x. The gross error check is also discussed in the framework of which statistic, mean, mode of median, is the measure to be "centered" about, given the skewness of lognormal distribution. The final part of this paper is concerned with comparing the impact of using the current Gaussian and the new lognormal based distribution with an incremental mixed distribution based 4DVAR system with the Lorenz 1963 model.

  8. Detecting and correcting partial errors: Evidence for efficient control without conscious access.

    PubMed

    Rochet, N; Spieser, L; Casini, L; Hasbroucq, T; Burle, B

    2014-09-01

    Appropriate reactions to erroneous actions are essential to keeping behavior adaptive. Erring, however, is not an all-or-none process: electromyographic (EMG) recordings of the responding muscles have revealed that covert incorrect response activations (termed "partial errors") occur on a proportion of overtly correct trials. The occurrence of such "partial errors" shows that incorrect response activations could be corrected online, before turning into overt errors. In the present study, we showed that, unlike overt errors, such "partial errors" are poorly consciously detected by participants, who could report only one third of their partial errors. Two parameters of the partial errors were found to predict detection: the surface of the incorrect EMG burst (larger for detected) and the correction time (between the incorrect and correct EMG onsets; longer for detected). These two parameters provided independent information. The correct(ive) responses associated with detected partial errors were larger than the "pure-correct" ones, and this increase was likely a consequence, rather than a cause, of the detection. The respective impacts of the two parameters predicting detection (incorrect surface and correction time), along with the underlying physiological processes subtending partial-error detection, are discussed. PMID:24347086

  9. AMF phasing—A precise control of the ignition timing of AKM for reduction of the injection error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma, Masanori; Utajima, Masayoshi; Okamoto, Toshio; Hiraishi, Kenji; Takezawa, Susumu

    This paper deals with a new concept, named "AMF Phasing", which intends to minimize the effect of injection error that would result during apogee motor firing (AMF) of the spinning spacecraft. The characteristic of velocity increment error is derived analytically, based on the disturbed spinning motion during AMF. In order to precisely estimate the amount of fuel required for post-AMF orbital correction maneuvers, a probability model is proposed which estimates the total injection error probability combining the dominant error factors, i.e. pre-AMF attitude determination error and velocity increment error during AMF. It is shown that a substantial saving in fuel normally consumed for post-AMF can be expected, when the resultant velocity increment error contribution, which otherwise would be randomly directed in inertial space, is controlled so that it appears in the direction of local right ascension by igniting AKM at the proper instant (AMF Phasing). The procedure for AMF phasing, using a Sun pulse as a reference signal for the ignition timing is described in this paper. It was actually applied for GMS-2, Japan's second Geostationary Meteorological Satellite (HIMAWARI-II). The HIMAWARI-II post-AMF orbit determination shows that AMF Phasing worked successfully and it is concluded that a substantial fuel saving was achieved.

  10. Amount of defocus is not used as an error signal in the control system of accommodation dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yamada, T; Ukai, K

    1997-01-01

    Usually defocus is considered as the error signal in the negative feedback system of accommodation control. However it is difficult to estimate the amount of defocus from the contrast reduction of a retinal image because both defocus and the spatial structure of the target determine the contrast. To investigate whether the accommodation control system can perceive the amount of error signal (defocus) from the contrast reduction of a retinal image, step responses for various amplitudes of stimuli were measured. The traces were analysed using an exponential curve fitting method in which not only time constant, but also final value of the curve, could be estimated from a portion of the exponential curve. The near-to-far (or -intermediate) step responses have a common path and show that the curve initially goes towards a certain position around the dark focus of the subject and is suddenly clipped around the correct focus position. The time constant and the destination of the curve are independent from the stimulus step amplitude (amount of error). This fact suggests that the accommodative control system does not refer to the amount of error signal when error is large, and that the system monitors only whether retinal blur exists or not. When the system judges the retinal image to be no longer blurred during the preprogrammed fast movement, accommodative response is stopped suddenly and the control is transferred to the other mechanism to hold correct focusing. PMID:9135813

  11. Antecedent Control of Oral Reading Errors and Self-Corrections by Mentally Retarded Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Nirbhay N.; Singh, Judy

    1984-01-01

    The study evaluated effects of manipulating two antecedent stimulus events with respect to oral reading errors and self-corrections of four mentally retarded adolescents. Oral reading errors decreased and self-corrections increased when the children previewed the target text with their teacher before reading it orally. (Author/CL)

  12. Control of mid-spatial frequency errors considering the pad groove feature in smoothing polishing process.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xuqing; Li, Shengyi; Hu, Hao; Li, Qi

    2014-10-01

    Mid-spatial frequency error (MSFR) should be strictly controlled in modern optical systems. As an effective approach to suppress MSFR, the smoothing polishing (SP) process is not easy to handle because it can be affected by many factors. This paper mainly focuses on the influence of the pad groove, which has not been researched yet. The SP process is introduced, and the important role of the pad groove is explained in detail. The relationship between the contact pressure distribution and the groove feature including groove section type, groove width, and groove depth is established, and the optimized result is achieved with the finite element method. The different kinds of groove patterns are compared utilizing the numerical superposition method established scrupulously. The optimal groove is applied in the verification experiment conducted on a self-developed SP machine. The root mean square value of the MSFR after the SP process is diminished from 2.38 to 0.68 nm, which reveals that the selected pad can smooth out the MSFR to a great extent with proper SP parameters, while the newly generated MSFR due to the groove can be suppressed to a very low magnitude. PMID:25322215

  13. Exponential parameter and tracking error convergence guarantees for adaptive controllers without persistency of excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhary, Girish; Mühlegg, Maximilian; Johnson, Eric

    2014-08-01

    In model reference adaptive control (MRAC) the modelling uncertainty is often assumed to be parameterised with time-invariant unknown ideal parameters. The convergence of parameters of the adaptive element to these ideal parameters is beneficial, as it guarantees exponential stability, and makes an online learned model of the system available. Most MRAC methods, however, require persistent excitation of the states to guarantee that the adaptive parameters converge to the ideal values. Enforcing PE may be resource intensive and often infeasible in practice. This paper presents theoretical analysis and illustrative examples of an adaptive control method that leverages the increasing ability to record and process data online by using specifically selected and online recorded data concurrently with instantaneous data for adaptation. It is shown that when the system uncertainty can be modelled as a combination of known nonlinear bases, simultaneous exponential tracking and parameter error convergence can be guaranteed if the system states are exciting over finite intervals such that rich data can be recorded online; PE is not required. Furthermore, the rate of convergence is directly proportional to the minimum singular value of the matrix containing online recorded data. Consequently, an online algorithm to record and forget data is presented and its effects on the resulting switched closed-loop dynamics are analysed. It is also shown that when radial basis function neural networks (NNs) are used as adaptive elements, the method guarantees exponential convergence of the NN parameters to a compact neighbourhood of their ideal values without requiring PE. Flight test results on a fixed-wing unmanned aerial vehicle demonstrate the effectiveness of the method.

  14. Integration of auditory and somatosensory error signals in the neural control of speech movements

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yongqiang; Gracco, Vincent L.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated auditory and somatosensory feedback contributions to the neural control of speech. In task I, sensorimotor adaptation was studied by perturbing one of these sensory modalities or both modalities simultaneously. The first formant (F1) frequency in the auditory feedback was shifted up by a real-time processor and/or the extent of jaw opening was increased or decreased with a force field applied by a robotic device. All eight subjects lowered F1 to compensate for the up-shifted F1 in the feedback signal regardless of whether or not the jaw was perturbed. Adaptive changes in subjects' acoustic output resulted from adjustments in articulatory movements of the jaw or tongue. Adaptation in jaw opening extent in response to the mechanical perturbation occurred only when no auditory feedback perturbation was applied or when the direction of adaptation to the force was compatible with the direction of adaptation to a simultaneous acoustic perturbation. In tasks II and III, subjects' auditory and somatosensory precision and accuracy were estimated. Correlation analyses showed that the relationships 1) between F1 adaptation extent and auditory acuity for F1 and 2) between jaw position adaptation extent and somatosensory acuity for jaw position were weak and statistically not significant. Taken together, the combined findings from this work suggest that, in speech production, sensorimotor adaptation updates the underlying control mechanisms in such a way that the planning of vowel-related articulatory movements takes into account a complex integration of error signals from previous trials but likely with a dominant role for the auditory modality. PMID:21562187

  15. A Sensorless Predictive Current Controlled Boost Converter by Using an EKF with Load Variation Effect Elimination Function

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Qiaoling; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Qiao; Zou, Xuecheng

    2015-01-01

    To realize accurate current control for a boost converter, a precise measurement of the inductor current is required to achieve high resolution current regulating. Current sensors are widely used to measure the inductor current. However, the current sensors and their processing circuits significantly contribute extra hardware cost, delay and noise to the system. They can also harm the system reliability. Therefore, current sensorless control techniques can bring cost effective and reliable solutions for various boost converter applications. According to the derived accurate model, which contains a number of parasitics, the boost converter is a nonlinear system. An Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is proposed for inductor current estimation and output voltage filtering. With this approach, the system can have the same advantages as sensored current control mode. To implement EKF, the load value is necessary. However, the load may vary from time to time. This can lead to errors of current estimation and filtered output voltage. To solve this issue, a load variation elimination effect elimination (LVEE) module is added. In addition, a predictive average current controller is used to regulate the current. Compared with conventional voltage controlled system, the transient response is greatly improved since it only takes two switching cycles for the current to reach its reference. Finally, experimental results are presented to verify the stable operation and output tracking capability for large-signal transients of the proposed algorithm. PMID:25928061

  16. A Sensorless Predictive Current Controlled Boost Converter by Using an EKF with Load Variation Effect Elimination Function.

    PubMed

    Tong, Qiaoling; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Qiao; Zou, Xuecheng

    2015-01-01

    To realize accurate current control for a boost converter, a precise measurement of the inductor current is required to achieve high resolution current regulating. Current sensors are widely used to measure the inductor current. However, the current sensors and their processing circuits significantly contribute extra hardware cost, delay and noise to the system. They can also harm the system reliability. Therefore, current sensorless control techniques can bring cost effective and reliable solutions for various boost converter applications. According to the derived accurate model, which contains a number of parasitics, the boost converter is a nonlinear system. An Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is proposed for inductor current estimation and output voltage filtering. With this approach, the system can have the same advantages as sensored current control mode. To implement EKF, the load value is necessary. However, the load may vary from time to time. This can lead to errors of current estimation and filtered output voltage. To solve this issue, a load variation elimination effect elimination (LVEE) module is added. In addition, a predictive average current controller is used to regulate the current. Compared with conventional voltage controlled system, the transient response is greatly improved since it only takes two switching cycles for the current to reach its reference. Finally, experimental results are presented to verify the stable operation and output tracking capability for large-signal transients of the proposed algorithm. PMID:25928061

  17. Systematic errors inherent in the current modeling of the reflected downward flux term used by remote sensing models.

    PubMed

    Turner, David S

    2004-04-10

    An underlying assumption of satellite data assimilation systems is that the radiative transfer model used to simulate observed satellite radiances has no errors. For practical reasons a fast-forward radiative transfer model is used instead of a highly accurate line-by-line model. The fast model usually replaces the spectral integration of spectral quantities with their monochromatic equivalents, and the errors due to these approximations are assumed to be negligible. The reflected downward flux term contains many approximations of this nature, which are shown to introduce systematic errors. In addition, many fast-forward radiative transfer models simulate the downward flux as the downward radiance along a path defined by the secant of the mean emergent angle, the diffusivity factor. The diffusivity factor is commonly set to 1.66 or to the secant of the satellite zenith angle. Neither case takes into account that the diffusivity factor varies with optical depth, which introduces further errors. I review the two most commonly used methods for simulating reflected downward flux by fast-forward radiative transfer models and point out their inadequacies and limitations. An alternate method of simulating the reflected downward flux is proposed. This method transforms the surface-to-satellite transmittance profile to a transmittance profile suitable for simulating the reflected downward flux by raising the former transmittance to the power of kappa, where kappa itself is a function of channel, surface pressure, and satellite zenith angle. It is demonstrated that this method reduces the fast-forward model error for low to moderate reflectivities. PMID:15098841

  18. Errors and electronic prescribing: a controlled laboratory study to examine task complexity and interruption effects

    PubMed Central

    Li, Simon Y W; Day, Richard O; Coiera, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of interruptions and task complexity on error rates when prescribing with computerized provider order entry (CPOE) systems, and to categorize the types of prescribing errors. Design Two within-subject factors: task complexity (complex vs simple) and interruption (interruption vs no interruption). Thirty-two hospital doctors used a CPOE system in a computer laboratory to complete four prescribing tasks, half of which were interrupted using a counterbalanced design. Measurements Types of prescribing errors, error rate, resumption lag, and task completion time. Results Errors in creating and updating electronic medication charts that were measured included failure to enter allergy information; selection of incorrect medication, dose, route, formulation, or frequency of administration from lists and drop-down menus presented by the CPOE system; incorrect entry or omission in entering administration times, start date, and free-text qualifiers; and omissions in prescribing and ceasing medications. When errors occurred, the error rates across the four prescribing tasks ranged from 0.5% (1 incorrect medication selected out of 192 chances for selecting a medication or error opportunities) to 16% (5 failures to enter allergy information out of 32 error opportunities). Any impact of interruptions on prescribing error rates and task completion times was not detected in our experiment. However, complex tasks took significantly longer to complete (F(1, 27)=137.9; p<0.001) and when execution was interrupted they required almost three times longer to resume compared to simple tasks (resumption lag complex=9.6 seconds, SD=5.6; resumption lag simple=3.4 seconds, SD=1.7; t(28)=6.186; p<0.001). Conclusion Most electronic prescribing errors found in this study could be described as slips in using the CPOE system to create and update electronic medication charts. Cues available within the user interface may have aided resumption of interrupted tasks

  19. Parallel Transmission Pulse Design with Explicit Control for the Specific Absorption Rate in the Presence of Radiofrequency Errors

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Adrian; Schiavi, Emanuele; Eryaman, Yigitcan; Herraiz, Joaquin L.; Gagoski, Borjan; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Wald, Lawrence L.; Guerin, Bastien

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A new framework for the design of parallel transmit (pTx) pulses is presented introducing constraints for local and global specific absorption rate (SAR) in the presence of errors in the radiofrequency (RF) transmit chain. Methods The first step is the design of a pTx RF pulse with explicit constraints for global and local SAR. Then, the worst possible SAR associated with that pulse due to RF transmission errors (“worst-case SAR”) is calculated. Finally, this information is used to re-calculate the pulse with lower SAR constraints, iterating this procedure until its worst-case SAR is within safety limits. Results Analysis of an actual pTx RF transmit chain revealed amplitude errors as high as 8% (20%) and phase errors above 3° (15°) for spokes (spiral) pulses. Simulations show that using the proposed framework, pulses can be designed with controlled “worst-case SAR” in the presence of errors of this magnitude at minor cost of the excitation profile quality. Conclusion Our worst-case SAR-constrained pTx design strategy yields pulses with local and global SAR within the safety limits even in the presence of RF transmission errors. This strategy is a natural way to incorporate SAR safety factors in the design of pTx pulses. PMID:26147916

  20. Evaluating the impact of sequencing error correction for RNA-seq data with ERCC RNA spike-in controls

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Li; Yang, Cheng; Wu, Po-Yen; Wang, May D.

    2016-01-01

    Sequencing errors are a major issue for several next-generation sequencing-based applications such as de novo assembly and single nucleotide polymorphism detection. Several error-correction methods have been developed to improve raw data quality. However, error-correction performance is hard to evaluate because of the lack of a ground truth. In this study, we propose a novel approach which using ERCC RNA spike-in controls as the ground truth to facilitate error-correction performance evaluation. After aligning raw and corrected RNA-seq data, we characterized the quality of reads by three metrics: mismatch patterns (i.e., the substitution rate of A to C) of reads aligned with one mismatch, mismatch patterns of reads aligned with two mismatches and the percentage increase of reads aligned to reference. We observed that the mismatch patterns for reads aligned with one mismatch are significantly correlated between ERCC spike-ins and real RNA samples. Based on such observations, we conclude that ERCC spike-ins can serve as ground truths for error correction beyond their previous applications for validation of dynamic range and fold-change response. Also, the mismatch patterns for ERCC reads aligned with one mismatch can serve as a novel and reliable metric to evaluate the performance of error-correction tools. PMID:27532064

  1. Control of coupling mass balance error in a process-based numerical model of surface-subsurface flow interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorentini, Marcello; Orlandini, Stefano; Paniconi, Claudio

    2015-07-01

    A process-based numerical model of integrated surface-subsurface flow is analyzed in order to identify, track, and reduce the mass balance errors affiliated with the model's coupling scheme. The sources of coupling error include a surface-subsurface grid interface that requires node-to-cell and cell-to-node interpolation of exchange fluxes and ponding heads, and a sequential iterative time matching procedure that includes a time lag in these same exchange terms. Based on numerical experiments carried out for two synthetic test cases and for a complex drainage basin in northern Italy, it is shown that the coupling mass balance error increases during the flood recession limb when the rate of change in the fluxes exchanged between the surface and subsurface is highest. A dimensionless index that quantifies the degree of coupling and a saturated area index are introduced to monitor the sensitivity of the model to coupling error. Error reduction is achieved through improvements to the heuristic procedure used to control and adapt the time step interval and to the interpolation algorithm used to pass exchange variables from nodes to cells. The analysis presented illustrates the trade-offs between a flexible description of surface and subsurface flow processes and the numerical errors inherent in sequential iterative coupling with staggered nodal points at the land surface interface, and it reveals mitigation strategies that are applicable to all integrated models sharing this coupling and discretization approach.

  2. Control of bootstrap current in the pedestal region of tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K. C.; Lai, A. L.

    2013-12-15

    The high confinement mode (H-mode) plasmas in the pedestal region of tokamaks are characterized by steep gradient of the radial electric field, and sonic poloidal U{sub p,m} flow that consists of poloidal components of the E×B flow and the plasma flow velocity that is parallel to the magnetic field B. Here, E is the electric field. The bootstrap current that is important for the equilibrium, and stability of the pedestal of H-mode plasmas is shown to have an expression different from that in the conventional theory. In the limit where ‖U{sub p,m}‖≫ 1, the bootstrap current is driven by the electron temperature gradient and inductive electric field fundamentally different from that in the conventional theory. The bootstrap current in the pedestal region can be controlled through manipulating U{sub p,m} and the gradient of the radial electric. This, in turn, can control plasma stability such as edge-localized modes. Quantitative evaluations of various coefficients are shown to illustrate that the bootstrap current remains finite when ‖U{sub p,m}‖ approaches infinite and to provide indications how to control the bootstrap current. Approximate analytic expressions for viscous coefficients that join results in the banana and plateau-Pfirsch-Schluter regimes are presented to facilitate bootstrap and neoclassical transport simulations in the pedestal region.

  3. Control of bootstrap current in the pedestal region of tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaing, K. C.; Lai, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    The high confinement mode (H-mode) plasmas in the pedestal region of tokamaks are characterized by steep gradient of the radial electric field, and sonic poloidal Up ,m flow that consists of poloidal components of the E ×B flow and the plasma flow velocity that is parallel to the magnetic field B. Here, E is the electric field. The bootstrap current that is important for the equilibrium, and stability of the pedestal of H-mode plasmas is shown to have an expression different from that in the conventional theory. In the limit where |Up ,m| ≫ 1, the bootstrap current is driven by the electron temperature gradient and inductive electric field fundamentally different from that in the conventional theory. The bootstrap current in the pedestal region can be controlled through manipulating Up ,m and the gradient of the radial electric. This, in turn, can control plasma stability such as edge-localized modes. Quantitative evaluations of various coefficients are shown to illustrate that the bootstrap current remains finite when |Up ,m| approaches infinite and to provide indications how to control the bootstrap current. Approximate analytic expressions for viscous coefficients that join results in the banana and plateau-Pfirsch-Schluter regimes are presented to facilitate bootstrap and neoclassical transport simulations in the pedestal region.

  4. 13. VIEW OF CONTROL CONSOLE CURRENTLY USED ON OCCASION FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. VIEW OF CONTROL CONSOLE CURRENTLY USED ON OCCASION FOR AMATUER RADIO AND TO PERIODICALLY ACTIVE STATION KPS. NOTE CLOCK ON WALL. SHADED PORTIONS ON 24HR CLOCK (15-18 AND 45-48 MINUTES) INDICATED MINUTES EACH HOUR WHEN STATIONS WOULD NOT TRANSMIT AND LISTEN FOR WEAK DISTRESS SIGNALS. - Marconi Radio Sites, Receiving, Point Reyes Station, Marin County, CA

  5. VCSELs with optically controlled current confinement: experiments and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bader, Sven; Gerlach, Philipp; Michalzik, Rainer

    2016-04-01

    We have devised a novel oxide-free and regrowth-free approach for optically controlled current confinement in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). This is realized with a monolithically integrated phototransistor (PT), which is configured as an optical switch and embedded between the two Bragg reflectors. We have fabricated functional PT-VCSELs by one-step epitaxial growth plus metal deposition with different top contact sizes. We present light-current-voltage characteristics of the lasers as well as a simple theoretical model explaining the occurrence of a distinct turn-on point and clarify epitaxial design requirements to reach strong optically controlled current confinement.

  6. On the Power of Multiple Independent Tests when the Experimentwise Error Rate Is Controlled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Louis M.

    1980-01-01

    The problem addressed is of assessing the loss of power which results from keeping the probability that at least one Type I error will occur in a family of N statistical tests at a tolerably low level. (Author/BW)

  7. Development of a current-controlled defibrillator for clinical tests.

    PubMed

    Fischer, M; Schönegg, M; Schöchlin, J; Bolz, A

    2002-01-01

    The work presented here is only a part of the development for a new current-controlled defibrillator. In the diploma thesis "Development and construction of a current-controlled defibrillator for clinical tests" the most important part was the control and safety of the defibrillator. To ensure a safe circuit design, a risk-analysis and a Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) were necessary. Another major part was the programming of a microcontroller in embedded C and a programmable logic device in Very High Speed Integrated Circuit Description Language (VHDL). The circuit had to be constructed, and the defibrillator was optically decoupled from the laptop for safety reasons. The waveform-data can be transmitted to the microcontroller from the laptop, and the logged data is then transmitted back. PMID:12465307

  8. Cognitive Errors, Anxiety Sensitivity, and Anxiety Control Beliefs: Their Unique and Specific Associations with Childhood Anxiety Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weems, Carl F.; Costa, Natalie M.; Watts, Sarah E.; Taylor, Leslie K.; Cannon, Melinda F.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the interrelations among negative cognitive errors, anxiety sensitivity, and anxiety control beliefs and explored their unique and specific associations with anxiety symptoms in a community sample of youth. Existing research has suggested that these constructs are related to childhood anxiety disorder symptoms; however,…

  9. Method of alignment error control in free-form surface metrology with the tilted-wave-interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jia; Shen, Hua; Zhu, Rihong

    2016-04-01

    Compared with conventional optical elements, free-form surface optical elements, as a kind of nonrotationally symmetrical shaped component, can provide more freedom in optical design, optimize the structure of the optical system, and improve its performance. However, the difficulties involved in the measurement of free-form elements restrict their manufacture and application. A tilted-wave-interferometer (TWI) can achieve high precision in free-form surface measurement, but it requires higher space attitude error control. We analyze the relation between the alignment error and the measurement error introduced by the misalignment in free-form surface metrology with TWI. The attitude control method in the rotation direction is proposed based on the moire fringe technique. Then, combining it with the five-dimensional space attitude control method of aspherical elements, we put forward an alignment error control process in measuring the free-form surface. An experiment of measuring a free-form surface using TWI shows the effectiveness of our method.

  10. Cross-Language Intrusion Errors in Aging Bilinguals Reveal the Link Between Executive Control and Language Selection

    PubMed Central

    Gollan, Tamar H.; Sandoval, Tiffany; Salmon, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Bilinguals outperform monolinguals on measures of executive control, but it is not known how bilingualism introduces these advantages. To address this question, we investigated whether language-control failures increase with aging-related declines in executive control. Eighteen younger and 18 older Spanish-English bilinguals completed a verbal-fluency task, in which they produced words in 18 categories (9 in each language), and a flanker task. Performance on both tasks exhibited robust effects of aging, but cross-language and within-language errors on the verbal-fluency task differed in a number of ways. Within-language errors occurred relatively often and decreased with higher levels of education in both younger and older bilinguals. In contrast, cross-language intrusions (e.g., inadvertently saying an English word on a Spanish-language trial) were rarely produced, were not associated with education level, and were strongly associated with flanker-task errors in older but not younger bilinguals. These results imply that executive control plays a role in maintaining language selection, but they also suggest the presence of independent forces that prevent language-selection errors. PMID:21775653

  11. Smart monitoring system based on adaptive current control for superconducting cable test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arpaia, Pasquale; Ballarino, Amalia; Daponte, Vincenzo; Montenero, Giuseppe; Svelto, Cesare

    2014-12-01

    A smart monitoring system for superconducting cable test is proposed with an adaptive current control of a superconducting transformer secondary. The design, based on Fuzzy Gain Scheduling, allows the controller parameters to adapt continuously, and finely, to the working variations arising from transformer nonlinear dynamics. The control system is integrated in a fully digital control loop, with all the related benefits, i.e., high noise rejection, ease of implementation/modification, and so on. In particular, an accurate model of the system, controlled by a Fuzzy Gain Scheduler of the superconducting transformer, was achieved by an experimental campaign through the working domain at several current ramp rates. The model performance was characterized by simulation, under all the main operating conditions, in order to guide the controller design. Finally, the proposed monitoring system was experimentally validated at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in comparison to the state-of-the-art control system [P. Arpaia, L. Bottura, G. Montenero, and S. Le Naour, "Performance improvement of a measurement station for superconducting cable test," Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 095111 (2012)] of the Facility for the Research on Superconducting Cables, achieving a significant performance improvement: a reduction in the system overshoot by 50%, with a related attenuation of the corresponding dynamic residual error (both absolute and RMS) up to 52%.

  12. Smart monitoring system based on adaptive current control for superconducting cable test

    SciTech Connect

    Arpaia, Pasquale; Ballarino, Amalia; Montenero, Giuseppe; Daponte, Vincenzo; Svelto, Cesare

    2014-12-15

    A smart monitoring system for superconducting cable test is proposed with an adaptive current control of a superconducting transformer secondary. The design, based on Fuzzy Gain Scheduling, allows the controller parameters to adapt continuously, and finely, to the working variations arising from transformer nonlinear dynamics. The control system is integrated in a fully digital control loop, with all the related benefits, i.e., high noise rejection, ease of implementation/modification, and so on. In particular, an accurate model of the system, controlled by a Fuzzy Gain Scheduler of the superconducting transformer, was achieved by an experimental campaign through the working domain at several current ramp rates. The model performance was characterized by simulation, under all the main operating conditions, in order to guide the controller design. Finally, the proposed monitoring system was experimentally validated at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in comparison to the state-of-the-art control system [P. Arpaia, L. Bottura, G. Montenero, and S. Le Naour, “Performance improvement of a measurement station for superconducting cable test,” Rev. Sci. Instrum.83, 095111 (2012)] of the Facility for the Research on Superconducting Cables, achieving a significant performance improvement: a reduction in the system overshoot by 50%, with a related attenuation of the corresponding dynamic residual error (both absolute and RMS) up to 52%.

  13. Smart monitoring system based on adaptive current control for superconducting cable test.

    PubMed

    Arpaia, Pasquale; Ballarino, Amalia; Daponte, Vincenzo; Montenero, Giuseppe; Svelto, Cesare

    2014-12-01

    A smart monitoring system for superconducting cable test is proposed with an adaptive current control of a superconducting transformer secondary. The design, based on Fuzzy Gain Scheduling, allows the controller parameters to adapt continuously, and finely, to the working variations arising from transformer nonlinear dynamics. The control system is integrated in a fully digital control loop, with all the related benefits, i.e., high noise rejection, ease of implementation/modification, and so on. In particular, an accurate model of the system, controlled by a Fuzzy Gain Scheduler of the superconducting transformer, was achieved by an experimental campaign through the working domain at several current ramp rates. The model performance was characterized by simulation, under all the main operating conditions, in order to guide the controller design. Finally, the proposed monitoring system was experimentally validated at European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in comparison to the state-of-the-art control system [P. Arpaia, L. Bottura, G. Montenero, and S. Le Naour, "Performance improvement of a measurement station for superconducting cable test," Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 095111 (2012)] of the Facility for the Research on Superconducting Cables, achieving a significant performance improvement: a reduction in the system overshoot by 50%, with a related attenuation of the corresponding dynamic residual error (both absolute and RMS) up to 52%. PMID:25554330

  14. The bridge-type fault current controller--a new facts controller

    SciTech Connect

    Boenig, Heinrich J.; Mielke, C. H.; Burley, B. L.; Chen, Hong; Waynert, J. A.; Willis, J. O.

    2002-01-01

    The operation of a novel current controller, which can also function as a fault current limiter and as a solid-state ac circuit breaker, is presented. The controller, which consists of a thyristor bridge, an inductor, and an optional bias power supply, is installed in series with the voltage source and the load, For load current values smaller than a preset value, the inductor of the current controller presents no impedance to the ac current flow. For values higher than the preset current value, the inductor is switched automatically into the ac circuit and limits the amount of current flow. Theoretical results in the form of circuit simulations and experimental results with a single-phase unit, operating on a 13.7 kV three-phase system with peak short-circuit currents of 3140 Arms, are presented.

  15. The importance of environmental variability and management control error to optimal harvest policies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, C.M.; Runge, M.C.

    2004-01-01

    State-dependent strategies (SDSs) are the most general form of harvest policy because they allow the harvest rate to depend, without constraint, on the state of the system. State-dependent strategies that provide an optimal harvest rate for any system state can be calculated, and stochasticity can be appropriately accommodated in this optimization. Stochasticity poses 2 challenges to harvest policies: (1) the population will never be at the equilibrium state; and (2) stochasticity induces uncertainty about future states. We investigated the effects of 2 types of stochasticity, environmental variability and management control error, on SDS harvest policies for a white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) model, and contrasted these with a harvest policy based on maximum sustainable yield (MSY). Increasing stochasticity resulted in more conservative SDSs; that is, higher population densities were required to support the same harvest rate, but these effects were generally small. As stochastic effects increased, SDSs performed much better than MSY. Both deterministic and stochastic SDSs maintained maximum mean annual harvest yield (AHY) and optimal equilibrium population size (Neq) in a stochastic environment, whereas an MSY policy could not. We suggest 3 rules of thumb for harvest management of long-lived vertebrates in stochastic systems: (1) an SDS is advantageous over an MSY policy, (2) using an SDS rather than an MSY is more important than whether a deterministic or stochastic SDS is used, and (3) for SDSs, rankings of the variability in management outcomes (e.g., harvest yield) resulting from parameter stochasticity can be predicted by rankings of the deterministic elasticities.

  16. Controlled motion of electrically neutral microparticles by pulsed direct current

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinfang; Qin, Rongshan

    2015-01-01

    A controlled motion of electrically neutral microparticles in a conductive liquid at high temperatures has not yet been realized under the uniform direct electric current field. We propose a simple method, which employs pulsed direct current to a conductive liquid metal containing low-conductivity objects at high temperature. The electric current enables the low-conductivity particles to pass from the centre towards the various surfaces of the high-conductivity liquid metal. Most interestingly, the directionality of microparticles can be controlled and their speed can be easily regulated by adjusting pulsed current density. We find that the movement may arise from the configuration of electrical domains which generates a driving force which exceeds the force of gravity and viscous friction. All of these features are of potential benefit in separating the particles of nearly equal density but distinctly different electrical conductivities, and also offer considerable promise for the precise and selective positioning of micro-objects or the controlled motion of minute quantities of surrounding fluids. PMID:25955864

  17. Myoelectric hand prosthesis force control through servo motor current feedback.

    PubMed

    Sono, Tálita Saemi Payossim; Menegaldo, Luciano Luporini

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents the prehension force closed-loop control design of a mechanical finger commanded by electromyographic signal (EMG) from a patient's arm. The control scheme was implemented and tested in a mechanical finger prototype with three degrees of freedom and one actuator, driven by arm muscles EMG of normal volunteers. Real-time indirect estimation of prehension force was assessed by measuring the DC servo motor actuator current. A model of the plant comprising finger, motor, and grasped object was proposed. Model parameters were identified experimentally and a classical feedback phase-lead compensator was designed. The controlled mechanical finger was able to provide a more accurate prehension force modulation of a compliant object when compared to open-loop control. PMID:19681841

  18. Electric Machine with Boosted Inductance to Stabilize Current Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, Steve

    2013-01-01

    High-powered motors typically have very low resistance and inductance (R and L) in their windings. This makes the pulse-width modulated (PWM) control of the current very difficult, especially when the bus voltage (V) is high. These R and L values are dictated by the motor size, torque (Kt), and back-emf (Kb) constants. These constants are in turn set by the voltage and the actuation torque-speed requirements. This problem is often addressed by placing inductive chokes within the controller. This approach is undesirable in that space is taken and heat is added to the controller. By keeping the same motor frame, reducing the wire size, and placing a correspondingly larger number of turns in each slot, the resistance, inductance, torque constant, and back-emf constant are all increased. The increased inductance aids the current control but ruins the Kt and Kb selections. If, however, a fraction of the turns is moved from their "correct slot" to an "incorrect slot," the increased R and L values are retained, but the Kt and Kb values are restored to the desired values. This approach assumes that increased resistance is acceptable to a degree. In effect, the heat allocated to the added inductance has been moved from the controller to the motor body, which in some cases is preferred.

  19. Prevention and control of schistosomiasis: a current perspective

    PubMed Central

    Inobaya, Marianette T; Olveda, Remigio M; Chau, Thao NP; Olveda, David U; Ross, Allen GP

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease that ranks second only to malaria in terms of human suffering in the tropics and subtropics. Five species are known to infect man and there are currently over 240 million people infected worldwide. The cornerstone of control to date has been mass drug administration with 40 mg/kg of praziquantel but there are problems with this approach. Human and bovine vaccines are in various stages of development. Integrated control, targeting the life cycle, is the only approach that will lead to sustainability and future elimination. PMID:25400499

  20. Reversible control of current across lipid membranes by local heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Patrick; Kirchner, Silke R.; Mühlbauer, Christian; Lohmüller, Theobald; Feldmann, Jochen

    2016-03-01

    Lipid membranes are almost impermeable for charged molecules and ions that can pass the membrane barrier only with the help of specialized transport proteins. Here, we report how temperature manipulation at the nanoscale can be employed to reversibly control the electrical resistance and the amount of current that flows through a bilayer membrane with pA resolution. For this experiment, heating is achieved by irradiating gold nanoparticles that are attached to the bilayer membrane with laser light at their plasmon resonance frequency. We found that controlling the temperature on the nanoscale renders it possible to reproducibly regulate the current across a phospholipid membrane and the membrane of living cells in absence of any ion channels.

  1. Reversible control of current across lipid membranes by local heating

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Patrick; Kirchner, Silke R.; Mühlbauer, Christian; Lohmüller, Theobald; Feldmann, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Lipid membranes are almost impermeable for charged molecules and ions that can pass the membrane barrier only with the help of specialized transport proteins. Here, we report how temperature manipulation at the nanoscale can be employed to reversibly control the electrical resistance and the amount of current that flows through a bilayer membrane with pA resolution. For this experiment, heating is achieved by irradiating gold nanoparticles that are attached to the bilayer membrane with laser light at their plasmon resonance frequency. We found that controlling the temperature on the nanoscale renders it possible to reproducibly regulate the current across a phospholipid membrane and the membrane of living cells in absence of any ion channels. PMID:26940847

  2. Stray current control in rehabilitating rail transit facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, J.H. III; Bosma, R.; Paladines, F.

    1999-05-01

    An old Chicago direct current electrified railway yard and shop are being rehabilitated. Modern stray current control techniques are being introduced. Efficient rail operation and safety for the public and operating personnel are paramount. Metra is Chicago's commuter railroad, serving six counties in the metropolitan area. The Electric District, which was electrified in 1926, is a heavy rail system from downtown, serving the south side and suburbs. Operating on the same tracks from Randolph St., to Kensington is America's last electric interurban line, the Chicago South Shore and South Bend Railroad. All trains operate on 1,500-V direct current (DC) propulsion from an overhead catenary system, with the running rails as the negative return.

  3. Cancer pain and current theory for pain control.

    PubMed

    Kahan, Brian

    2014-05-01

    This article discusses current trends in managing cancer pain, with specific regard to opioid transmission, descending pathway inhabitation, and ways to facilitate the endogenous antinociceptive chemicals in the human body. Various techniques for opioid and nonopioid control of potential pain situations of patients with cancer are discussed. The benefits of using pharmacogenetics to assess the appropriate medications are addressed. Finally, specific treatment of abdominal cancer pain using radiofrequency lesioning is discussed. PMID:24787342

  4. Optimization of WDM lightwave systems (BAC) design using error control coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mruthyunjaya, H. S.; Umesh, G.; Sathish Kumar, M.

    2007-04-01

    In a binary asymmetric channel (BAC) it may be necessary to correct only those errors which result from incorrect transmission of one of the two code elements. In optical fiber multichannel systems, the optical amplifiers are critical components and amplified spontaneous emission noise in the optical amplifiers is the major source of noise in it. The property of erbium doped fiber amplifier is nearly ideal for application in lightwave long haul transmission. We investigate performance of error correcting codes in such systems in presence of stimulated Raman scattering and amplified spontaneous emission noise with asymmetric channel statistics. Performance of some best known concatenated coding schemes is reported.

  5. Automatic parameter estimation of multicompartmental neuron models via minimization of trace error with control adjustment

    PubMed Central

    Goeritz, Marie L.; Marder, Eve

    2014-01-01

    We describe a new technique to fit conductance-based neuron models to intracellular voltage traces from isolated biological neurons. The biological neurons are recorded in current-clamp with pink (1/f) noise injected to perturb the activity of the neuron. The new algorithm finds a set of parameters that allows a multicompartmental model neuron to match the recorded voltage trace. Attempting to match a recorded voltage trace directly has a well-known problem: mismatch in the timing of action potentials between biological and model neuron is inevitable and results in poor phenomenological match between the model and data. Our approach avoids this by applying a weak control adjustment to the model to promote alignment during the fitting procedure. This approach is closely related to the control theoretic concept of a Luenberger observer. We tested this approach on synthetic data and on data recorded from an anterior gastric receptor neuron from the stomatogastric ganglion of the crab Cancer borealis. To test the flexibility of this approach, the synthetic data were constructed with conductance models that were different from the ones used in the fitting model. For both synthetic and biological data, the resultant models had good spike-timing accuracy. PMID:25008414

  6. High-Speed Current dq PI Controller for Vector Controlled PMSM Drive

    PubMed Central

    Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne; Rahman, Labonnah Farzana; Chang, Tae Gyu

    2014-01-01

    High-speed current controller for vector controlled permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) is presented. The controller is developed based on modular design for faster calculation and uses fixed-point proportional-integral (PI) method for improved accuracy. Current dq controller is usually implemented in digital signal processor (DSP) based computer. However, DSP based solutions are reaching their physical limits, which are few microseconds. Besides, digital solutions suffer from high implementation cost. In this research, the overall controller is realizing in field programmable gate array (FPGA). FPGA implementation of the overall controlling algorithm will certainly trim down the execution time significantly to guarantee the steadiness of the motor. Agilent 16821A Logic Analyzer is employed to validate the result of the implemented design in FPGA. Experimental results indicate that the proposed current dq PI controller needs only 50 ns of execution time in 40 MHz clock, which is the lowest computational cycle for the era. PMID:24574913

  7. DSP-based adaptive backstepping using the tracking errors for high-performance sensorless speed control of induction motor drive.

    PubMed

    Zaafouri, Abderrahmen; Ben Regaya, Chiheb; Ben Azza, Hechmi; Châari, Abdelkader

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a modified structure of the backstepping nonlinear control of the induction motor (IM) fitted with an adaptive backstepping speed observer. The control design is based on the backstepping technique complemented by the introduction of integral tracking errors action to improve its robustness. Unlike other research performed on backstepping control with integral action, the control law developed in this paper does not propose the increase of the number of system state so as not increase the complexity of differential equations resolution. The digital simulation and experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed control compared to the conventional PI control. The results analysis shows the characteristic robustness of the adaptive control to disturbances of the load, the speed variation and low speed. PMID:26653141

  8. Reducing Check-in Errors at Brigham Young University through Statistical Process Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spackman, N. Andrew

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between the library and its patrons is damaged and the library's reputation suffers when returned items are not checked in. An informal survey reveals librarians' concern for this problem and their efforts to combat it, although few libraries collect objective measurements of errors or the effects of improvement efforts. Brigham…

  9. IMPROVEMENT OF SMVGEAR II ON VECTOR AND SCALAR MACHINES THROUGH ABSOLUTE ERROR TOLERANCE CONTROL (R823186)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computer speed of SMVGEAR II was improved markedly on scalar and vector machines with relatively little loss in accuracy. The improvement was due to a method of frequently recalculating the absolute error tolerance instead of keeping it constant for a given set of chemistry. ...

  10. Dynamics and stabilization of peak current-mode controlled buck converter with constant current load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Min-Rui; Zhou, Guo-Hua; Zhang, Kai-Tun; Li, Zhen-Hua

    2015-10-01

    The discrete iterative map model of peak current-mode controlled buck converter with constant current load (CCL), containing the output voltage feedback and ramp compensation, is established in this paper. Based on this model the complex dynamics of this converter is investigated by analyzing bifurcation diagrams and the Lyapunov exponent spectrum. The effects of ramp compensation and output voltage feedback on the stability of the converter are investigated. Experimental results verify the simulation and theoretical analysis. The stability boundary and chaos boundary are obtained under the theoretical conditions of period-doubling bifurcation and border collision. It is found that there are four operation regions in the peak current-mode controlled buck converter with CCL due to period-doubling bifurcation and border-collision bifurcation. Research results indicate that ramp compensation can extend the stable operation range and transfer the operating mode, and output voltage feedback can eventually eliminate the coexisting fast-slow scale instability. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61371033), the Fok Ying-Tung Education Foundation for Young Teachers in the Higher Education Institutions of China (Grant No. 142027), the Sichuan Provincial Youth Science and Technology Fund, China (Grant Nos. 2014JQ0015 and 2013JQ0033), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. SWJTU11CX029).

  11. Design of a constant-voltage and constant-current controller with dual-loop and adaptive switching frequency control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingping, Chen; Zhiqian, Li

    2015-05-01

    A 5.0-V 2.0-A flyback power supply controller providing constant-voltage (CV) and constant-current (CC) output regulation without the use of an optical coupler is presented. Dual-close-loop control is proposed here due to its better regulation performance of tolerance over process and temperature compared with open loop control used in common. At the same time, the two modes, CC and CV, could switch to each other automatically and smoothly according to the output voltage level not sacrificing the regulation accuracy at the switching phase, which overcomes the drawback of the digital control scheme depending on a hysteresis comparator to change the mode. On-chip compensation using active capacitor multiplier technique is applied to stabilize the voltage loop, eliminate an additional package pin, and save on the die area. The system consumes as little as 100 mW at no-load condition without degrading the transient response performance by utilizing the adaptive switching frequency control mode. The proposed controller has been implemented in a commercial 0.35-μm 40-V BCD process, and the active chip area is 1.5 × 1.0 mm2. The total error of the output voltage due to line and load variations is less than ±1.7%.

  12. The impact of transcranial direct current stimulation on inhibitory control in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Loftus, Andrea M; Yalcin, Ozgur; Baughman, Frank D; Vanman, Eric J; Hagger, Martin S

    2015-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence that the dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), a brain region related to reward and motivational processes, is involved in effective response inhibition and that decreased activity in this region coincides with reduced inhibitory capacity. Using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) to manipulate cortical activation, this study examined whether cross-hemispheric tDCS over the DLPFC affected performance on an inhibitory control task. Methods Neurologically intact participants performed a modified Stroop color-word matching task before and after completing one of two tDCS conditions; (1) anodal stimulation over the left DLPFC or (2) sham tDCS. Results There was a statistically significant effect of tDCS condition on Stroop reaction time (RT) pre-post tDCS change scores. Participants who received anodal stimulation over the left DLPFC demonstrated statistically significant faster RT change scores on the Stroop items compared to participants in the sham condition. Although errors on Stroop incongruent items decreased before and after receiving the tDCS treatment, there were no significant differences in errors on Stroop items between the anodal stimulation over left DLPFC and sham tDCS conditions. Anodal tDCS, which is known to elevate neural excitation, may have enhanced activation levels in the left DLPFC and minimized impairment of inhibitory control, resulting in better task performance. Conclusions Current findings provide preliminary evidence that increased excitation of the left DLPFC improves inhibitory control and are a step toward understanding the potential of tDCS for moderating deficits in inhibitory control. PMID:25874165

  13. Controls on macrotidal rip current circulation and hazard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Tim; Masselink, Gerd; Austin, Martin J.; Russell, Paul

    2014-06-01

    Rip currents are strong, narrow seaward-flowing currents in the surf zone and are common on energetic sandy beaches. They are generally associated with distinct beach morphology, comprising nearshore sand bars and channels, and represent a real natural hazard to surf zone users. Rip current circulation is primarily driven by spatial gradients in wave breaking and water levels in the surf zone, which in turn are controlled by beach morphology, offshore wave conditions and tidal level. These factors, which are highly variable over hours (tides), days (waves) and weeks (morphology), also control the rip risk to bathers. However, the precise roles of these different environmental factors in controlling rip dynamics on meso- to macro-tidal beaches are not exactly known and thresholds separating different types of rip circulation and flow strengths, and hence rip risk, have not been quantified. Here, the analysis of 5-year lifeguard incident records from 20 beaches in southwest England showed that high-risk, high-exposure scenarios for bathers occur disproportionately around mean low water on days with low wave height (Hs < 1 m), long wave period (Tp > 10 s), shore-normal wave approach and light winds (> 5 m s- 1). Detailed in-situ Lagrangian field measurements of rip currents collected on 23 different days from Perranporth beach, UK identified waves (characterised by HsTp) and active morphology (characterised by tidal elevation) as the key controlling factors determining the mode of rip behaviour. Maximum hazard was associated with the combination of maximum rip exits and rip flow speeds. These conditions occurred when HsTp was at or just below average values and when those waves were acting on the active morphological template, around mean low water. The thresholds in wave conditions and tidal elevation identified here were effective in discriminating between observed coast-wide high-risk incident events, illustrating that such mass rescue events have a considerable

  14. Design and control of the phase current of a brushless dc motor to eliminate cogging torque

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, G. H.; Lee, C. J.

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents a design and control method of the phase current to reduce the torque ripple of a brushless dc (BLDC) motor by eliminating cogging torque. The cogging torque is the main source of torque ripple and consequently of speed error, and it is also the excitation source to generate the vibration and noise of a motor. This research proposes a modified current wave form, which is composed of main and auxiliary currents. The former is the conventional current to generate the commutating torque. The latter generates the torque with the same magnitude and opposite sign of the corresponding cogging torque at the given position in order to eliminate the cogging torque. Time-stepping finite element method simulation considering pulse-width-modulation switching method has been performed to verify the effectiveness of the proposed method, and it shows that this proposed method reduces torque ripple by 36%. A digital-signal-processor-based controller is also developed to implement the proposed method, and it shows that this proposed method reduces the speed ripple significantly.

  15. Historical origins of current problems in cancer control

    PubMed Central

    Hayter, C R

    1998-01-01

    Canada's provinces have some of the most highly developed cancer control systems in the world, but the recent crisis in waiting times for radiotherapy has drawn attention to many weaknesses and inadequacies. Focusing on the province with the largest cancer control system, Ontario, this paper explores the historical origins of current problems in cancer control and shows that they are directly related to policy decisions made in the early years of the system. The development of cancer control in Ontario from the 1920s to the present is outlined, and the historical origins of 3 specific problems related to patient care are discussed: fragmentation of care, which has resulted from an emphasis on radiotherapy rather than comprehensive care and from tensions between the medical profession and government; variation in practice, which can be traced to the empirical origin of much cancer treatment and the slow implementation of research programs; and inequitable access to care, which can be attributed to the emphasis on geographic centralization of services. Attempts to reform Ontario's cancer control system are unlikely to be successful unless these fundamental issues are recognized and addressed. PMID:9676551

  16. Application of generalized minimum distance decoding to hybrid-ARQ error control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Michael

    1994-02-01

    Generalized Minimum Distance (GMD) decoding is modified to allow simultaneous error detection and error correction. The soft-decision information retained by the generalized minimum distance concept is used as a source of reliability information which determines when a retransmission of the received packet should be requested. The performance of hybrid-ARQ GMD decoding is shown to be comparable to the ideal reliability metrics proposed by Loeliger and superior to the performance of hard-decision decoders. Performance expressions are derived for low to moderate signal-to-noise ratios and bounds are derived for high signal-to-noise ratios which are loose by 0.5 to 1.0 dB.

  17. Robust current control of AC machines using the internal model control method

    SciTech Connect

    Harnefors, L.; Nee, H.P.

    1995-12-31

    In the present paper, the internal model control (IMC) method is introduced and applied to ac machine current control. A permanent-magnet synchronous machine is used as an example. It is shown that the IMC design is straightforward and the resulting controller is simple to implement. The controller parameters are expressed in the machine parameters and the desired closed-loop rise time. The extra cost of implementation compared to PI control is negligible. It is further shown that IMC is able to outperform PI control with as well as without decoupling with respect to dq variable interaction in the presence of parameter deviations.

  18. Reducing prospective memory error and costs in simulated air traffic control: External aids, extending practice, and removing perceived memory requirements.

    PubMed

    Loft, Shayne; Chapman, Melissa; Smith, Rebekah E

    2016-09-01

    In air traffic control (ATC), forgetting to perform deferred actions-prospective memory (PM) errors-can have severe consequences. PM demands can also interfere with ongoing tasks (costs). We examined the extent to which PM errors and costs were reduced in simulated ATC by providing extended practice, or by providing external aids combined with extended practice, or by providing external aids combined with instructions that removed perceived memory requirements. Participants accepted/handed-off aircraft and detected conflicts. For the PM task, participants were required to substitute alternative actions for routine actions when accepting aircraft. In Experiment 1, when no aids were provided, PM errors and costs were not reduced by practice. When aids were provided, costs observed early in practice were eliminated with practice, but residual PM errors remained. Experiment 2 provided more limited practice with aids, but instructions that did not frame the PM task as a "memory" task led to high PM accuracy without costs. Attention-allocation policies that participants set based on expected PM demands were modified as individuals were increasingly exposed to reliable aids, or were given instructions that removed perceived memory requirements. These findings have implications for the design of aids for individuals who monitor multi-item dynamic displays. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27608067

  19. Hardware and software configuration control - History and current status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlack, H. R.

    1982-11-01

    Attention is given to the activity and maturation of the design process from 1953 to the present time. During the period of 1953 to mid-1962, the prevailing design control document was the Air Force Navy Aeronautical (ANA) Bulletin 390 and 319A, Engineering Changes, Deviations and Waivers. In June of 1962, the first definitive requirements for configuration control were published by the U.S. Air Force as AFSCM/AFLCM 375-1, titled 'Configuration Management'. In July of 1968, DOD Directive 5010.19, Configuration Management, was issued, followed by DOD Instruction 5010.21, Configuration Management Implementation Guidance. The issuance of DOD Directive 5000.29 - Management of Computer Resources in Major Defense Systems, in April 1976, was DOD's official recognition of the emerging software requirements. Attention is given to the current status, taking into account documents, standards, and specifications which prevail today.

  20. Resistive wall mode feedback control in EXTRAP T2R with improved steady-state error and transient response

    SciTech Connect

    Brunsell, P. R.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Frassinetti, L.; Drake, J. R.

    2007-10-15

    Experiments in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsa ring ker, M. Cecconello et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 43, 1457 (2001)] on feedback control of m=1 resistive wall modes (RWMs) are compared with simulations using the cylindrical linear magnetohydrodynamic model, including the dynamics of the active coils and power amplifiers. Stabilization of the main RWMs (n=-11,-10,-9,-8,+5,+6) is shown using modest loop gains of the order G{approx}1. However, other marginally unstable RWMs (n=-2,-1,+1,+2) driven by external field errors are only partially canceled at these gains. The experimental system stability limit is confirmed by simulations showing that the latency of the digital controller {approx}50 {mu}s is degrading the system gain margin. The transient response is improved with a proportional-plus-derivative controller, and steady-state error is improved with a proportional-plus-integral controller. Suppression of all modes is obtained at high gain G{approx}10 using a proportional-plus-integral-plus-derivative controller.

  1. Adaptive tracking control for double-pendulum overhead cranes subject to tracking error limitation, parametric uncertainties and external disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Menghua; Ma, Xin; Rong, Xuewen; Tian, Xincheng; Li, Yibin

    2016-08-01

    In a practical application, overhead cranes are usually subjected to system parameter uncertainties, such as uncertain payload masses, cable lengths, frictions, and external disturbances, such as air resistance. Most existing crane control methods treat the payload swing as that of a single-pendulum. However, certain types of payloads and hoisting mechanisms result in double-pendulum dynamics. The double-pendulum effects will make most existing crane control methods fail to work normally. Therefore, an adaptive tracking controller for double-pendulum overhead cranes subject to parametric uncertainties and external disturbances is developed in this paper. The proposed adaptive tracking control method guarantees that the trolley tracking error is always within a prior set of boundary conditions and converges to zero rapidly. The asymptotic stability of the closed-loop system's equilibrium point is assured by Lyapunov techniques and Barbalat's Lemma. Simulation results show that the proposed adaptive tracking control method is robust with respect to system parametric uncertainties and external disturbances.

  2. Adaptive dynamic programming for finite-horizon optimal control of discrete-time nonlinear systems with ε-error bound.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei-Yue; Jin, Ning; Liu, Derong; Wei, Qinglai

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study the finite-horizon optimal control problem for discrete-time nonlinear systems using the adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) approach. The idea is to use an iterative ADP algorithm to obtain the optimal control law which makes the performance index function close to the greatest lower bound of all performance indices within an ε-error bound. The optimal number of control steps can also be obtained by the proposed ADP algorithms. A convergence analysis of the proposed ADP algorithms in terms of performance index function and control policy is made. In order to facilitate the implementation of the iterative ADP algorithms, neural networks are used for approximating the performance index function, computing the optimal control policy, and modeling the nonlinear system. Finally, two simulation examples are employed to illustrate the applicability of the proposed method. PMID:20876014

  3. Anodisation with dynamic current control for tailored alumina coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieber, M.; Althöfer, I.; Höhlich, D.; Scharf, I.; Böttger, D.; Böttger, S.; Böttger, E.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    The anodic oxidation process is commonly used to refine the surface of aluminium and its alloys. Compared to the substrate, the alumina layers produced by anodising exhibit an increased hardness and chemical resistance. Thus, the corrosion and wear resistance are generally improved. The coatings are also electrically isolating and may serve decorative purposes. Applying a time-variant, dynamic electrical process control by pulse-current or current-steps is a promising approach to improve the coating properties, which is partially deployed in an industrial scale. In the present work, the influence of dynamic electrical process control on the coating properties is examined by means of a design of experiments (DOE). The effects of various electrolyte compositions and temperatures as well as processing time are considered with regard to coating thickness, hardness, wear resistance and the electrical energy consumption during the formation of the coatings. Information about the statistical significance of the effects of the parameters on the considered properties is obtained by an analysis of variance (ANOVA).

  4. Restoration and testing of an HTS fault current controller

    SciTech Connect

    Waynert, J. A.; Boenig, H.; Mielke, C. H.; Willis, J. O.; Burley, B. L.

    2002-01-01

    A three-phase, 1200 A, 12.5 kV fault current controller using three HTS 4 mH coils, was built by industry and tested in 1999 at the Center Substation of Southern California Edison in Norwalk, CA. During the testing, it appeared that each of the three single-phase units had experienced a voltage breakdown, one externally and two internally. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was asked by DOE to restore the operation of the fault current controller provided the HTS coils had not been damaged during the initial substation tests. When the internally-failed coil vacuum vessels were opened it became evident that in these two vessels, a flashover had occurred at the high voltage bus section leading to the terminals of the superconducting coil. An investigation into the failure mechanism resulted in six possible causes for the flashover. Based on these causes, the high voltage bus was completely redesigned. Single-phase tests were successfully performed on the modified unit at a 13.7 kV LANL substation. This paper presents the postulated voltage flashover failure mechanisms, the new high voltage bus design which mitigates the failure mechanisms, the sequence of tests used to validate the new design, and finally, the results of variable load and short-circuit tests with the single-phase unit operating on the LANL 13.7 kV substation.

  5. The effects of weighting function errors on spatial filters for structural control. [sensors for vibration damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindner, Douglas K.; Reichard, Karl M.

    1992-01-01

    Distributed-effect sensors, which respond to spatially distributed inputs over a significant gauge length, encompass piezoelectric laminate films, modal-domain optical fiber sensors, and holographic sensors; they can be fabricated with spatially varying sensitivity to a distributed measurand for spatial filtering. Such spatial filters are configurable to extract various structural parameters from distributed measurements that cannot be directly measured by sensors. A modeling is presently conducted for distributed-effect sensors' integration into state-space structural models, noting the effects of fabrication errors on sensor operation.

  6. Slotted Aloha multiple access and error control coding for land mobile satellite networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Erich

    1992-10-01

    This paper considers a satellite network with data messages being transmitted by land mobile users according to slotted Aloha multiple access. The mobile communication links suffering from multipath fading and signal shadowing are modelled as Gilbert-Elliott channels. FEC block coding is used to correct transmission errors. The maximum achievable information throughput and the mean packet delay are derived from a combined analysis of the multiple access and FEC/ARQ protocol. The results show that the additional overhead necessary for FEC is outweighed by the benefit in throughput and delay. Finally, the capture effect and its consequences are discussed.

  7. Recommendations for choosing an analysis method that controls Type I error for unbalanced cluster sample designs with Gaussian outcomes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jacqueline L; Kreidler, Sarah M; Catellier, Diane J; Murray, David M; Muller, Keith E; Glueck, Deborah H

    2015-11-30

    We used theoretical and simulation-based approaches to study Type I error rates for one-stage and two-stage analytic methods for cluster-randomized designs. The one-stage approach uses the observed data as outcomes and accounts for within-cluster correlation using a general linear mixed model. The two-stage model uses the cluster specific means as the outcomes in a general linear univariate model. We demonstrate analytically that both one-stage and two-stage models achieve exact Type I error rates when cluster sizes are equal. With unbalanced data, an exact size α test does not exist, and Type I error inflation may occur. Via simulation, we compare the Type I error rates for four one-stage and six two-stage hypothesis testing approaches for unbalanced data. With unbalanced data, the two-stage model, weighted by the inverse of the estimated theoretical variance of the cluster means, and with variance constrained to be positive, provided the best Type I error control for studies having at least six clusters per arm. The one-stage model with Kenward-Roger degrees of freedom and unconstrained variance performed well for studies having at least 14 clusters per arm. The popular analytic method of using a one-stage model with denominator degrees of freedom appropriate for balanced data performed poorly for small sample sizes and low intracluster correlation. Because small sample sizes and low intracluster correlation are common features of cluster-randomized trials, the Kenward-Roger method is the preferred one-stage approach. PMID:26089186

  8. Controllability of mixing errors in a coupled physical biogeochemical model of the North Atlantic: a nonlinear study using anamorphosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béal, D.; Brasseur, P.; Brankart, J.-M.; Ourmières, Y.; Verron, J.

    2009-06-01

    In biogeochemical models coupled to ocean circulation models, vertical mixing is an important physical process which governs the nutrient supply and the plankton residence in the euphotic layer. However, mixing is often poorly represented in numerical simulations because of approximate parameterizations of sub-grid scale turbulence, wind forcing errors and other mis-represented processes such as restratification by mesoscale eddies. Getting a sufficient knowledge of the nature and structure of these error sources is necessary to implement appropriate data assimilation methods and to evaluate their controllability by a given observation system. In this paper, Monte Carlo simulations are conducted to study mixing errors induced by approximate wind forcings in a three-dimensional coupled physical-biogeochemical model of the North Atlantic with a 1/4° horizontal resolution. An ensemble forecast involving 200 members is performed during the 1998 spring bloom, by prescribing realistic wind perturbations to generate mixing errors. It is shown that the biogeochemical response can be rather complex because of nonlinearities and threshold effects in the coupled model. In particular, the response of the surface phytoplankton depends on the region of interest and is particularly sensitive to the local stratification. We examine the robustness of the statistical relationships computed between the various physical and biogeochemical variables, and we show that significant information on the ecosystem can be obtained from observations of chlorophyll concentration or sea surface temperature. In order to improve the analysis step of sequential assimilation schemes, we propose to perform a simple nonlinear change of variables that operates separately on each state variable, by mapping their ensemble percentiles on the Gaussian percentiles. It is shown that this method is able to substantially reduce the estimation error with respect to the linear estimates computed by the Kalman

  9. Non-iterative adaptive time-stepping scheme with temporal truncation error control for simulating variable-density flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirthe, Eugenia M.; Graf, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    The automatic non-iterative second-order time-stepping scheme based on the temporal truncation error proposed by Kavetski et al. [Kavetski D, Binning P, Sloan SW. Non-iterative time-stepping schemes with adaptive truncation error control for the solution of Richards equation. Water Resour Res 2002;38(10):1211, http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2001WR000720.] is implemented into the code of the HydroGeoSphere model. This time-stepping scheme is applied for the first time to the low-Rayleigh-number thermal Elder problem of free convection in porous media [van Reeuwijk M, Mathias SA, Simmons CT, Ward JD. Insights from a pseudospectral approach to the Elder problem. Water Resour Res 2009;45:W04416, http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2008WR007421.], and to the solutal [Shikaze SG, Sudicky EA, Schwartz FW. Density-dependent solute transport in discretely-fractured geological media: is prediction possible? J Contam Hydrol 1998;34:273-91] problem of free convection in fractured-porous media. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the proposed scheme efficiently limits the temporal truncation error to a user-defined tolerance by controlling the time-step size. The non-iterative second-order time-stepping scheme can be applied to (i) thermal and solutal variable-density flow problems, (ii) linear and non-linear density functions, and (iii) problems including porous and fractured-porous media.

  10. Fiducial registration error as a statistical process control metric in image-guidance radiotherapy with fiducial markers.

    PubMed

    Ung, N M; Wee, L

    2011-12-01

    Portal imaging of implanted fiducial markers has been in use for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of prostate cancer, with ample attention to localization accuracy and organ motion. The geometric uncertainties in point-based rigid-body matching algorithms during localization of prostate fiducial markers can be quantified in terms of a fiducial registration error (FRE). In this study, the aim is to demonstrate how statistical process control (SPC) can be used to intercept potential problems with rigid-body matching algorithms in a retrospective study of FRE for a pilot cohort of 34 patients with fiducial markers. A procedure for estimating control parameters of a SPC control chart (x-chart) from a small number of initial observations (N) of FRE was implemented. The sensitivity analysis of N on the number of 'in-control' and 'out-of-control' x-charts was also performed. Uncorrected rotational offsets of an individual patient were examined to elucidate possible correlations with the behaviours of an x-chart. Four specific types of qualitative x-chart behaviour have been observed. The number of out-of-control processes was insensitive to the choice of N, provided N ≥ 5. Residual errors of rigid-body registration were contributed from uncorrected rotational offsets in 5 out of 15 'out-of-control' x-charts. Out-of-control x-charts were also shown to be correlated with potential changes in the IGRT processes, which may compromise the quality of the radiation treatment delivery. The SPC methodology, implemented in the form of individually customized x-charts, has been shown to be a useful tool for monitoring process reliability during fiducial-based IGRT for prostate cancer. PMID:22080792

  11. Fiducial registration error as a statistical process control metric in image-guidance radiotherapy with fiducial markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ung, N. M.; Wee, L.

    2011-12-01

    Portal imaging of implanted fiducial markers has been in use for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of prostate cancer, with ample attention to localization accuracy and organ motion. The geometric uncertainties in point-based rigid-body matching algorithms during localization of prostate fiducial markers can be quantified in terms of a fiducial registration error (FRE). In this study, the aim is to demonstrate how statistical process control (SPC) can be used to intercept potential problems with rigid-body matching algorithms in a retrospective study of FRE for a pilot cohort of 34 patients with fiducial markers. A procedure for estimating control parameters of a SPC control chart (x-chart) from a small number of initial observations (N) of FRE was implemented. The sensitivity analysis of N on the number of 'in-control' and 'out-of-control' x-charts was also performed. Uncorrected rotational offsets of an individual patient were examined to elucidate possible correlations with the behaviours of an x-chart. Four specific types of qualitative x-chart behaviour have been observed. The number of out-of-control processes was insensitive to the choice of N, provided N >= 5. Residual errors of rigid-body registration were contributed from uncorrected rotational offsets in 5 out of 15 'out-of-control' x-charts. Out-of-control x-charts were also shown to be correlated with potential changes in the IGRT processes, which may compromise the quality of the radiation treatment delivery. The SPC methodology, implemented in the form of individually customized x-charts, has been shown to be a useful tool for monitoring process reliability during fiducial-based IGRT for prostate cancer.

  12. Active control of aircraft engine inlet noise using compact sound sources and distributed error sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdisso, Ricardo (Inventor); Fuller, Chris R. (Inventor); O'Brien, Walter F. (Inventor); Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Dungan, Mary E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An active noise control system using a compact sound source is effective to reduce aircraft engine duct noise. The fan noise from a turbofan engine is controlled using an adaptive filtered-x LMS algorithm. Single multi channel control systems are used to control the fan blade passage frequency (BPF) tone and the BPF tone and the first harmonic of the BPF tone for a plane wave excitation. A multi channel control system is used to control any spinning mode. The multi channel control system to control both fan tones and a high pressure compressor BPF tone simultaneously. In order to make active control of turbofan inlet noise a viable technology, a compact sound source is employed to generate the control field. This control field sound source consists of an array of identical thin, cylindrically curved panels with an inner radius of curvature corresponding to that of the engine inlet. These panels are flush mounted inside the inlet duct and sealed on all edges to prevent leakage around the panel and to minimize the aerodynamic losses created by the addition of the panels. Each panel is driven by one or more piezoelectric force transducers mounted on the surface of the panel. The response of the panel to excitation is maximized when it is driven at its resonance; therefore, the panel is designed such that its fundamental frequency is near the tone to be canceled, typically 2000-4000 Hz.

  13. Active control of aircraft engine inlet noise using compact sound sources and distributed error sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burdisso, Ricardo (Inventor); Fuller, Chris R. (Inventor); O'Brien, Walter F. (Inventor); Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor); Dungan, Mary E. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An active noise control system using a compact sound source is effective to reduce aircraft engine duct noise. The fan noise from a turbofan engine is controlled using an adaptive filtered-x LMS algorithm. Single multi channel control systems are used to control the fan blade passage frequency (BPF) tone and the BPF tone and the first harmonic of the BPF tone for a plane wave excitation. A multi channel control system is used to control any spinning mode. The multi channel control system to control both fan tones and a high pressure compressor BPF tone simultaneously. In order to make active control of turbofan inlet noise a viable technology, a compact sound source is employed to generate the control field. This control field sound source consists of an array of identical thin, cylindrically curved panels with an inner radius of curvature corresponding to that of the engine inlet. These panels are flush mounted inside the inlet duct and sealed on all edges to prevent leakage around the panel and to minimize the aerodynamic losses created by the addition of the panels. Each panel is driven by one or more piezoelectric force transducers mounted on the surface of the panel. The response of the panel to excitation is maximized when it is driven at its resonance; therefore, the panel is designed such that its fundamental frequency is near the tone to be canceled, typically 2000-4000 Hz.

  14. Force to Rebalance Control of HRG and Suppression of Its Errors on the Basis of FPGA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Wu, Wenqi; Luo, Bing; Fang, Zhen; Li, Yun; Jiang, Qingan

    2011-01-01

    A novel design of force to rebalance control for a hemispherical resonator gyro (HRG) based on FPGA is demonstrated in this paper. The proposed design takes advantage of the automatic gain control loop and phase lock loop configuration in the drive mode while making full use of the quadrature control loop and rebalance control loop in controlling the oscillating dynamics in the sense mode. First, the math model of HRG with inhomogeneous damping and frequency split is theoretically analyzed. In addition, the major drift mechanisms in the HRG are described and the methods that can suppress the gyro drift are mentioned. Based on the math model and drift mechanisms suppression method, four control loops are employed to realize the manipulation of the HRG by using a FPGA circuit. The reference-phase loop and amplitude control loop are used to maintain the vibration of primary mode at its natural frequency with constant amplitude. The frequency split is readily eliminated by the quadrature loop with a DC voltage feedback from the quadrature component of the node. The secondary mode response to the angle rate input is nullified by the rebalance control loop. In order to validate the effect of the digital control of HRG, experiments are carried out with a turntable. The experimental results show that the design is suitable for the control of HRG which has good linearity scale factor and bias stability. PMID:22247692

  15. Error control in the set-up of stereo camera systems for 3d animal tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavagna, A.; Creato, C.; Del Castello, L.; Giardina, I.; Melillo, S.; Parisi, L.; Viale, M.

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional tracking of animal systems is the key to the comprehension of collective behavior. Experimental data collected via a stereo camera system allow the reconstruction of the 3d trajectories of each individual in the group. Trajectories can then be used to compute some quantities of interest to better understand collective motion, such as velocities, distances between individuals and correlation functions. The reliability of the retrieved trajectories is strictly related to the accuracy of the 3d reconstruction. In this paper, we perform a careful analysis of the most significant errors affecting 3d reconstruction, showing how the accuracy depends on the camera system set-up and on the precision of the calibration parameters.

  16. Control Spin Current and Data Recording on Spin Storage Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupa, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    The paper presents the results of experimental studies of the physical mechanisms and dynamics of magnetization reversal of the films Al2O3/Tb25Co5Fe70/Al2O3, Al2O3/Tb22Co5Fe73/Al2O3, Al2O3/Tb19Co5Fe76/Al2O3, Al2O3/Co30Fe70/Al2O3 with a single magnetic layer and the films Al2O3/Tb22Co5Fe73/Pr6O11/Tb19Co5Fe76/Al2O3, Al2O3/Co80Fe20/Pr6O11/Co30Fe70/Al2O3 with two magnetic layers radiated by picosecond (τi ≈ 80 ps) and femtosecond (τi ≈ 130 fs) laser pulses. The experimental samples of spin transistors and data recording devices on the spin storage medium are also described. The results of studies have shown that magnetic switching effects in the nanolayers under femtosecond laser pulses can be used for creation of systems of high-speed controlling of spin currents with the response time τ ≤ 10-11s. Conclusions from the studies are the following: thermomagnetic switching under the influence of an external magnetic field or a demagnetization field, magnetic switching of antiferromagnetic films under the influence of an effective internal field of antiferromagnetic interaction between magnetic sublattices rare-earth and transitive metals, magnetic switching under the influence of a magnetic field of the inverse Faraday effect, or under the influence of a magnetic field of a spin current. The magnetic switching of magnetic layers under action of the magnetic field of a spin current is the most important for practical use in elements of spintronics. This mechanism of magnetic reversal takes place only in multilayer nanofilms and the heterogeneous multilayer magnetic nanofilms are the base material for creation of spintronic devices. The great advantage of the magnetization reversal of magnetic nanolayers of the spin current is that the mechanism of magnetization reversal is working in the films with perpendicular anisotropy and in the films with in-plane anisotropy. The injection of polarized electrons can also be realized using short electrical pulses. That is

  17. Improved current control makes inverters the power sources of choice

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, H.; Harada, S.; Ueyama, T.

    1997-02-01

    It is now generally understood that by increasing the operating or switching frequency of a power source the size of the main transformer and main reactor can be shrunk. Thus, a 300-A DC welding power source weighing well under 100 lb can be produced. This makes the inverter power source an ideal choice for applications requiring equipment maneuverability. It is also generally understood that due to higher switching frequencies, a smoother output is obtained from inverter power sources. In the late 1980s, the company developed a new double-inverter power source by which inverted DC weld output is inverted back to AC weld output. This product was the first of its kind in the world. Again, the small compact size of this product was of great interest. Utilizing current waveform control, it was realized that fast response switching from electrode negative to electrode positive could be accurately controlled, offering benefits such as AC GTA welding with high-frequency start only, even at a low welding current. The primary benefit is the ability to limit the electrode positive half cycle to less than 5%. The electrode positive half cycle is responsible for tungsten erosion, which also creates the balling effect of a tungsten electrode. By limiting the electrode positive portion of the AC cycle to a very low level, a rather sharp point can be maintained on the tungsten, which creates a very concentrated, focused arc column. This ability provides excellent joint penetration in fillet welding of aluminum alloys, especially on thick plate. It also reduces the heat-affected zone in AC GTA welding of aluminum.

  18. Transcranial direct current stimulation influences the cardiac autonomic nervous control.

    PubMed

    Montenegro, Rafael Ayres; Farinatti, Paulo de Tarso Veras; Fontes, Eduardo Bodnariuc; Soares, Pedro Paulo da Silva; Cunha, Felipe Amorim da; Gurgel, Jonas Lírio; Porto, Flávia; Cyrino, Edilson Serpeloni; Okano, Alexandre Hideki

    2011-06-15

    To investigate whether the manipulation of brain excitability by transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) modulates the heart rate variability (HRV), the effect of tDCS applied at rest on the left temporal lobe in athletes (AG) and non-athletes (NAG) was evaluated. The HRV parameters (natural logarithms of LF, HF, and LF/HF) was assessed in 20 healthy men before, and immediately after tDCS and sham stimulation. After anodal tDCS in AG the parasympathetic activity (HF(log)) increased (P<0.01) and the sympathetic activity (LF(log)) and sympatho-vagal balance (LF/HF(log)) decreased (P<0.01), whereas no significant effects were detected in NAG (P>0.05). No significant changes in HRV indexes were provoked by sham stimulation in both AG and NAG (P>0.05). In conclusion, tDCS applied on the left temporal lobe significantly increased the overall HRV in AG, enhancing the parasympathetic and decreasing the sympathetic modulation of heart rate. Consequently the sympatho-vagal balance decreased at rest in AG but not in NAG. Releasing a weak electric current to stimulate selected brain areas may induce favorable effects on the autonomic control to the heart in highly fit subjects. PMID:21527314

  19. Variational quality control of hydrographic profile data with non-Gaussian errors for global ocean variational data assimilation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storto, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Quality control procedures aiming at identifying observations suspected of gross errors are an important component of modern ocean data assimilation systems. On the one hand, assimilating observations whose departures from the background state are large may result in detrimental analyses and compromise the stability of the ocean analysis system. On the other hand, the rejection of these observations may prevent the analysis from ingesting useful information, especially in areas of large variability. In this work, we investigate the quality control of in-situ hydrographic profiles through modifying the probability density function (PDF) of the observational errors and relaxing the assumption of Gaussian PDF. The new PDF is heavier-tailed than Gaussian, thus accommodating the assimilation of observations with large misfits, albeit with smaller weight given to them in the analysis. This implies a different observational term in the analysis equation, and an adaptive quality control procedure based on the innovation statistics themselves. Implemented in a global ocean variational data assimilation system at moderate horizontal resolution, the scheme proves robust and successful in assimilating more observations with respect to the simpler background quality check scheme. This leads to better skill scores against both conventional and satellite observing systems. This approach proves superior also to the case where no quality control is considered. Furthermore, the implementation considers switching on the modified cost function at the 10th iteration of the minimization so that innovation statistics are based on a good approximation of the analysis. Neglecting this strategy and turning on the variational quality control since the beginning of the minimization exhibits worse scores, qualitatively similar to those of the experiment without quality control, suggesting that in this case quality control procedures are too gentle. A specific study investigating the upper

  20. Current Status of Malaria and Potential for Control

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, R. S.

    2001-01-01

    Malaria remains one of the world's worst health problems with 1.5 to 2.7 million deaths annually; these deaths are primarily among children under 5 years of age and pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa. Of significance, more people are dying from malaria today than 30 years ago. This review considers the factors which have contributed to this gloomy picture, including those which relate to the vector, the female anopheline mosquito; to human activity such as creating new mosquito breeding sites, the impact of increased numbers of people, and how their migratory behavior can increase the incidence and spread of malaria; and the problems of drug resistance by the parasites to almost all currently available antimalarial drugs. In a selective manner, this review describes what is being done to ameliorate this situation both in terms of applying existing methods in a useful or even crucial role in control and prevention and in terms of new additions to the antimalarial armory that are being developed. Topics covered include biological control of mosquitoes, the use of insecticide-impregnated bed nets, transgenic mosquitoes manipulated for resistance to malaria parasites, old and new antimalarial drugs, drug resistance and how best to maintain the useful life of antimalarials, immunity to malaria and the search for antimalarial vaccines, and the malaria genome project and the potential benefits to accrue from it. PMID:11148010

  1. Historical water control maps - key to understand current challenges?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, János

    2014-05-01

    The 19th century and post-World War II decades were the main eras of water controlling in former Hungarian Kingdom and Hungary. Due to those large projects, the number and frequency of big floods were minimized but changes caused several other problems what we have to face off in the present. The main help to understand or highlight the fundamentals of those problems can be the flood control maps which, in some cases, show the original, natural riverbed and neighbouring areas of the river. There is other advantage of these maps compared to other surveys: while the main focus of the water control surveys was the river, there was sufficient time to measure the fine differences of land-use and relief in detail. Our sample area is the middle part of Tisza river and three different maps were chosen to show the changes before and after the regulations: Map of the Middle-Tisza, mapping until 1790 by János Lietzner This map is the earliest, known, topographic scale map about the river. Due to its age, the sheets are in bad state, especially their parts close to the edges and corners. A photographed, greyscale copy exists about the sheets, that was used in our research. Despite such bad conditions, it contains lots of information about the river and settlements, as well as detailed land-use before any flood regulation. New survey of Tisza river, mapping until 1932 by the Directorate of Water and Construction Because of the changes, due to time and regulation, several new surveys were ordered at the end of 19th century and between the world wars. During those new surveys, the river was re-triangulated and mapped, although cross and longitudinal section measurements also were carried out. This map clearly shows the results and changes of regulations, especially on populated areas, newly built dykes etc. but before the changes happened between 1950 and 1980. Topographic maps of the Hungarian Defence Forces - Geoinformation Services As a current, base-dataset, topographic maps

  2. Sinusoidal Current-Tracking Control for Utility Interactive Inverter with an LCL Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Toshiji; Inoue, Kaoru; Donomoto, Yoshihisa

    A voltage source inverter with an LCL filter is often used for a utility interface to control its output current to a grid side because of its harmonic reduction advantages. The integral compensator is often used to reduce the steady-state errors. However, there is always a control delay due to sinusoidal variations. This paper proposes a digital sinusoidal compensator which is based on the internal model principle to realize a fast sinusoidal response with no delay. It is based on the internal model principle to realize a response with no deviation for a periodic sinusoidal reference input. It has a simple numerator and a denominator z2-2zcosωT +1 of a transfer function which is equal to the z function of a sinusoidal waveform of the angular frequency ω and the sample time T. Compensator and feedback gains of the inverter are determined by the dead-beat or the optimal control principle. The proposed method is investigated for performances and it is validated through simulation and experimental results by a DSP control system.

  3. Common vs. independent limb control in sequential vertical aiming: The cost of potential errors during extensions and reversals.

    PubMed

    Roberts, James W; Elliott, Digby; Lyons, James L; Hayes, Spencer J; Bennett, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    The following study explored movement kinematics in two-component aiming contexts that were intended to modulate the potential cost of overshoot or undershoot errors in up and down directions by having participants perform a second extension movement (Experiment 1) or a reversal movement (Experiment 2). For both experiments, the initial movement toward a downward target took longer, and had lower peak acceleration and peak velocity than upward movements. These movement characteristics may reflect a feedback-based control strategy designed to prevent energy-consuming limb modifications against gravitational forces. The between-component correlations of displacement at kinematic landmarks (i.e., trial-by-trial correlation between the first and second components) increased as both components unfolded. However, the between-component correlations of extensions were primarily negative, while reversals were positive. Thus, movement extensions appear to be influenced by the use of continuous on-line sensory feedback to update limb position at the second component based on the position attained in the first component. In contrast, reversals seem to be driven by pre-planned feedforward procedures where the position of the first component is directly replicated in the second component. Finally, the between-component correlations for the magnitude of kinematic landmarks showed that aiming up generated stronger positive correlations during extensions, and weaker positive correlations toward the end of the first component during reversals. These latter results suggest the cost of potential errors associated with the upcoming second component directly influence the inter-dependence between components. Therefore, the cost of potential errors is not only pertinent to one-component discrete contexts, but also two-component sequence aims. Together, these findings point to an optimized movement strategy designed to minimize the cost of errors, which is specific to the two

  4. Preventing (impulsive) errors: Electrophysiological evidence for online inhibitory control over incorrect responses

    PubMed Central

    van den Wildenberg, Wery P. M.; Spieser, Laure; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In a rich environment, with multiple action affordances, selective action inhibition is critical in preventing the execution of inappropriate responses. Here, we studied the origin and the dynamics of incorrect response inhibition and how it can be modulated by task demands. We used EEG in a conflict task where the probability of compatible and incompatible trials was varied. This allowed us to modulate the strength of the prepotent response, and hence to increase the risk of errors, while keeping the probability of the two responses equal. The correct response activation and execution was not affected by compatibility or by probability. In contrast, incorrect response inhibition in the primary motor cortex ipsilateral to the correct response was more pronounced on incompatible trials, especially in the condition where most of the trials were compatible, indicating a modulation of inhibitory strength within the course of the action. Two prefrontal activities, one medial and one lateral, were also observed before the response, and their potential links with the observed inhibitory pattern observed are discussed. PMID:27005956

  5. Biometrics based key management of double random phase encoding scheme using error control codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, Nirmala; Sinha, Aloka

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, an optical security system has been proposed in which key of the double random phase encoding technique is linked to the biometrics of the user to make it user specific. The error in recognition due to the biometric variation is corrected by encoding the key using the BCH code. A user specific shuffling key is used to increase the separation between genuine and impostor Hamming distance distribution. This shuffling key is then further secured using the RSA public key encryption to enhance the security of the system. XOR operation is performed between the encoded key and the feature vector obtained from the biometrics. The RSA encoded shuffling key and the data obtained from the XOR operation are stored into a token. The main advantage of the present technique is that the key retrieval is possible only in the simultaneous presence of the token and the biometrics of the user which not only authenticates the presence of the original input but also secures the key of the system. Computational experiments showed the effectiveness of the proposed technique for key retrieval in the decryption process by using the live biometrics of the user.

  6. Reducing current reversal time in electric motor control

    SciTech Connect

    Bredemann, Michael V

    2014-11-04

    The time required to reverse current flow in an electric motor is reduced by exploiting inductive current that persists in the motor when power is temporarily removed. Energy associated with this inductive current is used to initiate reverse current flow in the motor.

  7. [Prevention and control of leishmaniasis vectors: current approaches].

    PubMed

    Maroli, M; Khoury, C

    2004-06-01

    Phlebotomine sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae) are the suspected or proven vectors of Leishmania spp. in at least 88 countries, including over 40 Phlebotomus species in the Old World and a further 30 belonging to the genus Lutzomyia in the New World. In recent years, both cutaneous (CL) and zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (ZVL) have become increasingly prevalent in urban areas, including large Latin American cities. A similar trend has been recorded in all Mediterranean areas during the last decade. Based on mathematical models, insecticidal control of sandflies appears to represent a more effective way of reducing Leishmania infantum transmission than the present strategy of culling infected dogs in Latin America as well as being more acceptable to the human population. Since man is a dead-end host of most Leishmania species, treatment of existing human cases generally does not affect transmission. Interruption of the cycle by vector control may offer a cheaper, more practical solution to treatment and improved knowledge of the alternatives available could lead to preventative measures being undertaken in more leishmaniasis foci. In this note a review of current knowledge on sandfly control is presented. Different measures to control phlebotomine sandflies, including residual spraying of dwellings and animal shelters, insecticide treated nets, application of repellents/insecticides to skin or to fabrics and impregnated dog collars are discussed. Although effective in urban areas with high concentrations of sandflies, residual spraying of insecticides is no often longer tenable in most situations. In rural areas where dwellings are more dispersed and surrounded by large, untargeted "reservoir" populations of sandflies, residual spraying of houses may be both impractical for logistic reasons and ineffective. Actually, this control measure depends on the availability of a suitable public health infrastructure, including adequate supplies of insecticide, spraying

  8. Macroscopic strain controlled ion current in an elastomeric microchannel

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Chin-Chang; Nguyen, Du; Buchsbaum, Steven; Innes, Laura; Dennin, Michael; Li, Yongxue; Esser-Kahn, Aaron P.; Valdevit, Lorenzo; Sun, Lizhi; Siwy, Zuzanna

    2015-05-07

    We report on the fabrication of an ultra-high aspect ratio ionically conductive single microchannel with tunable diameter from ≈ 20 μm to fully closed. The 4 mm-long channel is fabricated in a Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold and its cross-sectional area is controlled by applying macroscopic compressive strain to the mold in a direction perpendicular to the channel length. We investigated the ionic conduction properties of the channel. For a wide range of compressive strain up to ≈ 0.27, the strain dependence of the resistance is monotonic and fully reversible. For strain > 0.27, ionic conduction suddenly shuts off and the system becomes hysteretic (whereby a finite strain reduction is required to reopen the channel). Upon unloading, the original behavior is retrieved. This reversible behavior is observed over 200 compression cycles. The cross-sectional area of the channel can be inferred from the ion current measurement, as confirmed by a Nano-Computed Tomography investigation. We show that the cross-sectional area decreases monotonically with the applied compressive strain in the reversible range, in qualitative agreement with linear elasticity theory. We find that the shut-off strain is affected by the spatial extent of the applied strain, which provides additional tunability. Our tunable channel is well-suited for multiple applications in micro/nano-fluidic devices.

  9. Central neural control of the cardiovascular system: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dampney, Roger A L

    2016-09-01

    This brief review, which is based on a lecture presented at the American Physiological Society Teaching Refresher Course on the Brain and Systems Control as part of the Experimental Biology meeting in 2015, aims to summarize current concepts of the principal mechanisms in the brain that regulate the autonomic outflow to the cardiovascular system. Such cardiovascular regulatory mechanisms do not operate in isolation but are closely coordinated with respiratory and other regulatory mechanisms to maintain homeostasis. The brain regulates the cardiovascular system by two general means: 1) feedforward regulation, often referred to as "central command," and 2) feedback or reflex regulation. In most situations (e.g., during exercise, defensive behavior, sleep, etc.), both of these general mechanisms contribute to overall cardiovascular homeostasis. The review first describes the mechanisms and central circuitry subserving the baroreceptor, chemoreceptor, and other reflexes that work together to regulate an appropriate level of blood pressure and blood oxygenation and then considers the brain mechanisms that defend the body against more complex environmental challenges, using dehydration and cold and heat stress as examples. The last section of the review considers the central mechanisms regulating cardiovascular function associated with different behaviors, with a specific focus on defensive behavior and exercise. PMID:27445275

  10. 76 FR 67315 - Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Quality Control Error Tolerance Threshold

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ..., and related Notice (48 FR 29115, June 24, 1983), this program is included in the scope of Executive... / Tuesday, November 1, 2011 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Food and Nutrition Service 7 CFR Part 275 RIN 0584-AE24 Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Quality Control...

  11. USE OF QUALITY CONTROL PROCEDURES TO ASSESS ERRORS IN MEASURING FOREST CANOPY CONDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quality control data collected during the measurement of ponderosa pine canopy cover and sugar maple crown damage was analyzed. easurement precision (root mean square of differences in replicate measurements) of pine canopy cover was high (+2.6-4.0%) was similar for field replica...

  12. Failing to Forget: Prospective Memory Commission Errors Can Result from Spontaneous Retrieval and Impaired Executive Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scullin, Michael K.; Bugg, Julie M.

    2013-01-01

    Prospective memory (PM) research typically examines the ability to remember to execute delayed intentions but often ignores the ability to forget finished intentions. We had participants perform (or not perform; control group) a PM task and then instructed them that the PM task was finished. We later (re)presented the PM cue. Approximately 25% of…

  13. Exploiting Task Constraints for Self-Calibrated Brain-Machine Interface Control Using Error-Related Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Iturrate, Iñaki; Grizou, Jonathan; Omedes, Jason; Oudeyer, Pierre-Yves; Lopes, Manuel; Montesano, Luis

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach for self-calibration BCI for reaching tasks using error-related potentials. The proposed method exploits task constraints to simultaneously calibrate the decoder and control the device, by using a robust likelihood function and an ad-hoc planner to cope with the large uncertainty resulting from the unknown task and decoder. The method has been evaluated in closed-loop online experiments with 8 users using a previously proposed BCI protocol for reaching tasks over a grid. The results show that it is possible to have a usable BCI control from the beginning of the experiment without any prior calibration. Furthermore, comparisons with simulations and previous results obtained using standard calibration hint that both the quality of recorded signals and the performance of the system were comparable to those obtained with a standard calibration approach. PMID:26131890

  14. Exploiting Task Constraints for Self-Calibrated Brain-Machine Interface Control Using Error-Related Potentials.

    PubMed

    Iturrate, Iñaki; Grizou, Jonathan; Omedes, Jason; Oudeyer, Pierre-Yves; Lopes, Manuel; Montesano, Luis

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach for self-calibration BCI for reaching tasks using error-related potentials. The proposed method exploits task constraints to simultaneously calibrate the decoder and control the device, by using a robust likelihood function and an ad-hoc planner to cope with the large uncertainty resulting from the unknown task and decoder. The method has been evaluated in closed-loop online experiments with 8 users using a previously proposed BCI protocol for reaching tasks over a grid. The results show that it is possible to have a usable BCI control from the beginning of the experiment without any prior calibration. Furthermore, comparisons with simulations and previous results obtained using standard calibration hint that both the quality of recorded signals and the performance of the system were comparable to those obtained with a standard calibration approach. PMID:26131890

  15. Bandwidth efficient coding: Theoretical limits and real achievements. Error control techniques for satellite and space communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costello, Daniel J., Jr.; Courturier, Servanne; Levy, Yannick; Mills, Diane G.; Perez, Lance C.; Wang, Fu-Quan

    1993-01-01

    In his seminal 1948 paper 'The Mathematical Theory of Communication,' Claude E. Shannon derived the 'channel coding theorem' which has an explicit upper bound, called the channel capacity, on the rate at which 'information' could be transmitted reliably on a given communication channel. Shannon's result was an existence theorem and did not give specific codes to achieve the bound. Some skeptics have claimed that the dramatic performance improvements predicted by Shannon are not achievable in practice. The advances made in the area of coded modulation in the past decade have made communications engineers optimistic about the possibility of achieving or at least coming close to channel capacity. Here we consider the possibility in the light of current research results.

  16. Steam generator degradation: Current mitigation strategies for controlling corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Millett, P.

    1997-02-01

    Steam Generator degradation has caused substantial losses of power generation, resulted in large repair and maintenance costs, and contributed to significant personnel radiation exposures in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) operating throughout the world. EPRI has just published the revised Steam Generator Reference Book, which reviews all of the major forms of SG degradation. This paper discusses the types of SG degradation that have been experienced with emphasis on the mitigation strategies that have been developed and implemented in the field. SG degradation is presented from a world wide perspective as all countries operating PWRs have been effected to one degree or another. The paper is written from a US. perspective where the utility industry is currently undergoing tremendous change as a result of deregulation of the electricity marketplace. Competitive pressures are causing utilities to strive to reduce Operations and Maintenance (O&M) and capital costs. SG corrosion is a major contributor to the O&M costs of PWR plants, and therefore US utilities are evaluating and implementing the most cost effective solutions to their corrosion problems. Mitigation strategies developed over the past few years reflect a trend towards plant specific solutions to SG corrosion problems. Since SG degradation is in most cases an economic problem and not a safety problem, utilities can focus their mitigation strategies on their unique financial situation. Accordingly, the focus of R&D has shifted from the development of more expensive, prescriptive solutions (e.g. reduced impurity limits) to corrosion problems to providing the utilities with a number of cost effective mitigation options (e.g. molar ratio control, boric acid treatment).

  17. Spin current control of damping in YIG/Pt nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safranski, Christopher; Barsukov, Igor; Lee, Han Kyu; Schneider, Tobias; Jara, Alejandro; Smith, Andrew; Chang, Houchen; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Wu, Mingzhong; Krivorotov, Ilya

    Understanding of spin transport at ferromagnet/normal metal interfaces is of great importance for spintronics applications. We report the effect of pure spin currents in YIG(30 nm)/Pt(6 nm) nanowires. The samples show magneto-resistance from two distinct mechanisms: (i) spin Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) and (ii) inverse spin Hall effect (iSHE) along with spin Seebeck current (SSC) induced by Ohmic heating of the Pt layer. Using the SMR and iSHE effects, we measure the spin wave eigenmodes by spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance (ST-FMR). Direct current applied to the Pt layer results in injection of spin Hall current into YIG that acts as damping or anti-damping spin torque depending on the polarity. In addition, Ohmic heating gives rise to a SSC acting as anti-damping regardless of current polarity. ST-FMR reveals current-induced variation of the spin wave mode linewidth that is asymmetric in the bias current and decreases to zero for anti-damping spin Hall current. Near this current, we observe complex interaction among the spin wave eigenmodes that we asses using micromagnetic simulations. Our results advance understanding of magnetization dynamics driven by pure spin currents.

  18. Refractive Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... and lens of your eye helps you focus. Refractive errors are vision problems that happen when the ... cornea, or aging of the lens. Four common refractive errors are Myopia, or nearsightedness - clear vision close ...

  19. Relational Control: Historical Perspective and Current Empirical Status.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenberg, James W.; Wettersten, Kara B.

    The notion of relational control in therapy has evolved as a concept over the past 30 years. This paper reviews the evolution of the construct of relational control as it relates to counseling and therapy. It analyzes the various ways that relational control has been used in process research and explores the manner in which counselors and clients…

  20. A linearly controlled direct-current power source for high-current inductive loads in a magnetic suspension wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, John S.; Daniels, Taumi S.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Langley 6 inch magnetic suspension and balance system (MSBS) requires an independently controlled bidirectional DC power source for each of six positioning electromagnets. These electromagnets provide five-degree-of-freedom control over a suspended aerodynamic test model. Existing power equipment, which employs resistance coupled thyratron controlled rectifiers as well as AC to DC motor generator converters, is obsolete, inefficient, and unreliable. A replacement six phase bidirectional controlled bridge rectifier is proposed, which employs power MOSFET switches sequenced by hybrid analog/digital circuits. Full load efficiency is 80 percent compared to 25 percent for the resistance coupled thyratron system. Current feedback provides high control linearity, adjustable current limiting, and current overload protection. A quenching circuit suppresses inductive voltage impulses. It is shown that 20 kHz interference from positioning magnet power into MSBS electromagnetic model position sensors results predominantly from capacitively coupled electric fields. Hence, proper shielding and grounding techniques are necessary. Inductively coupled magnetic interference is negligible.

  1. Quantitative analysis of the reconstruction errors of the currently popular algorithm of magnetic resonance electrical property tomography at the interfaces of adjacent tissues.

    PubMed

    Duan, Song; Xu, Chao; Deng, Guanhua; Wang, Jiajia; Liu, Feng; Xin, Sherman Xuegang

    2016-06-01

    This work quantitatively analyzed the reconstruction errors (REs) of electrical property (EP) images using a currently popular algorithm of magnetic resonance electrical property tomography (MREPT), which occurred along the tissue interfaces. Transmitted magnetic fields B1+ were acquired at 3 T using a birdcage coil loaded with a phantom consisting of various adjacent tissues. Homogeneous Helmholtz was employed to calculate the EP maps by Laplacian computation of central differences. The maps of absolute REs (aREs) and relative REs (rREs) were calculated. The maximum and mean rREs, in addition to rRE distributions at the interfaces, were presented. Reconstructed EP maps showed various REs along different interface boundaries. Among all the investigated tissue interfaces, the kidney-fat interface presented the maximum mean rREs for both conductivity and relative permittivity. The minimum mean rRE of conductivity was observed at the spleen-muscle interface, and the minimum mean rRE of relative permittivity was detected along the lung-heart interface. The mean rREs ranged from 0.3986 to 36.11 for conductivity and 0.2218 to 11.96 for relative permittivity. Overall, this research indicates that different REs occur at various tissue boundaries, as shown by the currently popular algorithm of MREPT. Thus, REs should be considered when applying MREPT to reconstruct the EP distributions inside the human body. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27037715

  2. Attention modulates cortical processing of pitch feedback errors in voice control.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huijing; Liu, Ying; Guo, Zhiqiang; Li, Weifeng; Liu, Peng; Chen, Shaozhen; Liu, Hanjun

    2015-01-01

    Considerable evidence has shown that unexpected alterations in auditory feedback elicit fast compensatory adjustments in vocal production. Although generally thought to be involuntary in nature, whether these adjustments can be influenced by attention remains unknown. The present event-related potential (ERP) study aimed to examine whether neurobehavioral processing of auditory-vocal integration can be affected by attention. While sustaining a vowel phonation and hearing pitch-shifted feedback, participants were required to either ignore the pitch perturbations, or attend to them with low (counting the number of perturbations) or high attentional load (counting the type of perturbations). Behavioral results revealed no systematic change of vocal response to pitch perturbations irrespective of whether they were attended or not. At the level of cortex, there was an enhancement of P2 response to attended pitch perturbations in the low-load condition as compared to when they were ignored. In the high-load condition, however, P2 response did not differ from that in the ignored condition. These findings provide the first neurophysiological evidence that auditory-motor integration in voice control can be modulated as a function of attention at the level of cortex. Furthermore, this modulatory effect does not lead to a general enhancement but is subject to attentional load. PMID:25589447

  3. Attention Modulates Cortical Processing of Pitch Feedback Errors in Voice Control

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Huijing; Liu, Ying; Guo, Zhiqiang; Li, Weifeng; Liu, Peng; Chen, Shaozhen; Liu, Hanjun

    2015-01-01

    Considerable evidence has shown that unexpected alterations in auditory feedback elicit fast compensatory adjustments in vocal production. Although generally thought to be involuntary in nature, whether these adjustments can be influenced by attention remains unknown. The present event-related potential (ERP) study aimed to examine whether neurobehavioral processing of auditory-vocal integration can be affected by attention. While sustaining a vowel phonation and hearing pitch-shifted feedback, participants were required to either ignore the pitch perturbations, or attend to them with low (counting the number of perturbations) or high attentional load (counting the type of perturbations). Behavioral results revealed no systematic change of vocal response to pitch perturbations irrespective of whether they were attended or not. At the level of cortex, there was an enhancement of P2 response to attended pitch perturbations in the low-load condition as compared to when they were ignored. In the high-load condition, however, P2 response did not differ from that in the ignored condition. These findings provide the first neurophysiological evidence that auditory-motor integration in voice control can be modulated as a function of attention at the level of cortex. Furthermore, this modulatory effect does not lead to a general enhancement but is subject to attentional load. PMID:25589447

  4. (abstract) Experimental Results From Internetworking Data Applications Over Various Wireless Networks Using a Single Flexible Error Control Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanai, T.; Kramer, M.; McAuley, A. J.; Nowack, S.; Pinck, D. S.; Ramirez, G.; Stewart, I.; Tohme, H.; Tong, L.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes results from several wireless field trials in New Jersey, California, and Colorado, conducted jointly by researchers at Bellcore, JPL, and US West over the course of 1993 and 1994. During these trials, applications communicated over multiple wireless networks including satellite, low power PCS, high power cellular, packet data, and the wireline Public Switched Telecommunications Network (PSTN). Key goals included 1) designing data applications and an API suited to mobile users, 2) investigating internetworking issues, 3) characterizing wireless networks under various field conditions, and 4) comparing the performance of different protocol mechanisms over the diverse networks and applications. We describe experimental results for different protocol mechanisms and parameters, such as acknowledgment schemes and packet sizes. We show the need for powerful error control mechanisms such as selective acknowledgements and combining data from multiple transmissions. We highlight the possibility of a common protocol for all wireless networks, from micro-cellular PCS to satellite networks.

  5. Polycrystalline Superconducting Thin Films: Texture Control and Critical Current Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Feng

    1995-01-01

    The growth processes of polycrystalline rm YBa_2CU_3O_{7-X} (YBCO) and yttria-stabilized-zirconia (YSZ) thin films have been developed. The effectiveness of YSZ buffer layers on suppression of the reaction between YBCO thin films and metallic substrates was carefully studied. Grown on the chemically inert surfaces of YSZ buffer layers, YBCO thin films possessed good quality of c-axis alignment with the c axis parallel to the substrate normal, but without any preferred in-plane orientations. This leads to the existence of a large percentage of the high-angle grain boundaries in the YBCO films. The critical current densities (rm J_{c}'s) found in these films were much lower than those in single crystal YBCO thin films, which was the consequence of the weak -link effect of the high-angle grain boundaries in these films. It became clear that the in-plane alignment is vital for achieving high rm J_{c }s in polycrystalline YBCO thin films. To induce the in-plane alignment, ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) technique was integrated into the conventional pulsed laser deposition process for the growth of the YSZ buffer layers. It was demonstrated that using IBAD the in-plane orientations of the YSZ grains could be controlled within a certain range of a common direction. This ion -bombardment induced in-plane texturing was explained using the anisotropic sputtering yield theory. Our observations and analyses have provided valuable information on the optimization of the IBAD process, and shed light on the texturing mechanism in YSZ. With the in-plane aligned YSZ buffer layers, YBCO thin films grown on metallic substrates showed improved rm J_{c}s. It was found that the in-plane alignment of YSZ and that of YBCO were closely related. A direct correlation was revealed between the rm J_{c} value and the degree of the in-plane alignment for the YBCO thin films. To explain this correlation, a numerical model was applied to multi-grain superconducting paths with different

  6. The Insufficiency of Error Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammarberg, B.

    1974-01-01

    The position here is that error analysis is inadequate, particularly from the language-teaching point of view. Non-errors must be considered in specifying the learner's current command of the language, its limits, and his learning tasks. A cyclic procedure of elicitation and analysis, to secure evidence of errors and non-errors, is outlined.…

  7. A systematic review of current and emergent manipulator control approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajwad, Syed Ali; Iqbal, Jamshed; Ullah, Muhammad Imran; Mehmood, Adeel

    2015-06-01

    Pressing demands of productivity and accuracy in today's robotic applications have highlighted an urge to replace classical control strategies with their modern control counterparts. This recent trend is further justified by the fact that the robotic manipulators have complex nonlinear dynamic structure with uncertain parameters. Highlighting the authors' research achievements in the domain of manipulator design and control, this paper presents a systematic and comprehensive review of the state-of-the-art control techniques that find enormous potential in controlling manipulators to execute cuttingedge applications. In particular, three kinds of strategies, i.e., intelligent proportional-integral-derivative (PID) scheme, robust control and adaptation based approaches, are reviewed. Future trend in the subject area is commented. Open-source simulators to facilitate controller design are also tabulated. With a comprehensive list of references, it is anticipated that the review will act as a firsthand reference for researchers, engineers and industrialinterns to realize the control laws for multi-degree of freedom (DOF) manipulators.

  8. Control of Hall angle of Skyrmion driven by electric current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao-Bin, Liu; Da, Li; de Chatel, P. F.; Jian, Wang; Wei, Liu; Zhi-Dong, Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Skyrmions are very promising for applications in spintronics and magnetic memory. It is desired to manipulate and operate a single skyrmion. Here we report on the thermal effect on the motion of current-driven magnetic Skyrmions in magnetic metal. The results show that the magnon current induced by the thermal gradient acts on Skyrmions via magnonic spin-transfer torque, an effect of the transverse and longitudinal Skyrmions drift velocities, thus leading to the effective manipulation of the Hall angle through the ratio of thermal gradient to electric current density, which can be used as a Skyrmion valve. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51331006) and the Fund from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. KJZD-EW-M05).

  9. Research in mosquito control: current challenges for a brighter future.

    PubMed

    Benelli, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) are a key threat for millions of people worldwide, since they act as vectors for devastating pathogens and parasites. In this scenario, vector control is crucial. Mosquito larvae are usually targeted using organophosphates, insect growth regulators, and microbial agents. Indoor residual spraying and insecticide-treated bed nets are also employed. However, these chemicals have negative effects on human health and the environment and induce resistance in a number of vectors. Newer and safer tools have been recently implemented to enhance control of mosquitoes. Here, I focus on some crucial challenges about eco-friendly control of mosquito vectors, mainly the improvement of behavior-based control strategies (sterile insect technique ("SIT") and "boosted SIT") and plant-borne mosquitocidals, including green-synthesized nanoparticles. A number of hot areas that need further research and cooperation among parasitologists, entomologists, and behavioral ecologists are highlighted. PMID:26093499

  10. Melanoma control in the United States: current status.

    PubMed

    Koh, H K; Geller, A C

    1995-01-01

    Screening and education for melanoma/skin cancer are receiving increasing worldwide attention. In an attempt to improve melanoma control in the United States, where incidence and mortality rates continue to increase, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) has provided free skin cancer screenings to more than 600,000 Americans and prevention messages to millions more. This chapter reviews and summarizes ongoing melanoma control activities in the United States, including prevention, education, and early detection/screening. We also address outcome measures in melanoma control and suggest that the unique external and visible nature of skin cancer blurs the distinction between screening and education. Measuring and evaluating the benefits of international melanoma control activities presents many challenging tasks. Future collaborative work must include complementary strategies in melanoma/skin cancer prevention, education, and screening to combat the worldwide increase in melanoma incidence and mortality. PMID:7597293

  11. SU-D-BRD-07: Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Statistical Process Control Methods to Detect Systematic Errors For Routine Electron Energy Verification

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the ability of statistical process control methods to detect systematic errors when using a two dimensional (2D) detector array for routine electron beam energy verification. Methods: Electron beam energy constancy was measured using an aluminum wedge and a 2D diode array on four linear accelerators. Process control limits were established. Measurements were recorded in control charts and compared with both calculated process control limits and TG-142 recommended specification limits. The data was tested for normality, process capability and process acceptability. Additional measurements were recorded while systematic errors were intentionally introduced. Systematic errors included shifts in the alignment of the wedge, incorrect orientation of the wedge, and incorrect array calibration. Results: Control limits calculated for each beam were smaller than the recommended specification limits. Process capability and process acceptability ratios were greater than one in all cases. All data was normally distributed. Shifts in the alignment of the wedge were most apparent for low energies. The smallest shift (0.5 mm) was detectable using process control limits in some cases, while the largest shift (2 mm) was detectable using specification limits in only one case. The wedge orientation tested did not affect the measurements as this did not affect the thickness of aluminum over the detectors of interest. Array calibration dependence varied with energy and selected array calibration. 6 MeV was the least sensitive to array calibration selection while 16 MeV was the most sensitive. Conclusion: Statistical process control methods demonstrated that the data distribution was normally distributed, the process was capable of meeting specifications, and that the process was centered within the specification limits. Though not all systematic errors were distinguishable from random errors, process control limits increased the ability to detect systematic errors

  12. Measles: Current Status and Outbreak Control on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amler, Robert W.; Orenstein, Walter A.

    1984-01-01

    The current effort to eliminate measles in the United States has caused record low levels of the disease. This strategy must continue to be applied in order to break the transmission of measles on college campuses through high immunization levels, promotion of rapid reporting of cases, and quick responses to outbreaks. (Author/DF)

  13. Pattern recognition and data mining techniques to identify factors in wafer processing and control determining overlay error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Auguste; Ypma, Alexander; Gatefait, Maxime; Deckers, David; Koopman, Arne; van Haren, Richard; Beltman, Jan

    2015-03-01

    On-product overlay can be improved through the use of context data from the fab and the scanner. Continuous improvements in lithography and processing performance over the past years have resulted in consequent overlay performance improvement for critical layers. Identification of the remaining factors causing systematic disturbances and inefficiencies will further reduce overlay. By building a context database, mappings between context, fingerprints and alignment & overlay metrology can be learned through techniques from pattern recognition and data mining. We relate structure (`patterns') in the metrology data to relevant contextual factors. Once understood, these factors could be moved to the known effects (e.g. the presence of systematic fingerprints from reticle writing error or lens and reticle heating). Hence, we build up a knowledge base of known effects based on data. Outcomes from such an integral (`holistic') approach to lithography data analysis may be exploited in a model-based predictive overlay controller that combines feedback and feedforward control [1]. Hence, the available measurements from scanner, fab and metrology equipment are combined to reveal opportunities for further overlay improvement which would otherwise go unnoticed.

  14. Error-control and processes optimization of (223/224)Ra measurement using Delayed Coincidence Counter (RaDeCC).

    PubMed

    Xiaoqing, Cheng; Lixin, Yi; Lingling, Liu; Guoqiang, Tang; Zhidong, Wang

    2015-11-01

    RaDeCC has proved to be a precise and standard way to measure (224)Ra and (223)Ra in water samples and successfully made radium a tracer of several environmental processes. In this paper, the relative errors of (224)Ra and (223)Ra measurement in water samples via a Radium Delayed Coincidence Count system are analyzed through performing coincidence correction calculations and error propagation. The calculated relative errors range of 2.6% ∼ 10.6% for (224)Ra and 9.6% ∼ 14.2% for (223)Ra. For different radium activities, effects of decay days and counting time on final radium relative errors are evaluated and the results show that these relative errors can decrease by adjusting the two measurement factors. Finally, to minimize propagated errors in Radium activity, a set of optimized RaDeCC measurement parameters are proposed. PMID:26233651

  15. Proposal of Current Control Method for High-Speed AC Motor System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furutani, Shinichi; Satake, Akira

    In this paper, current control method for High-Speed AC Motor System is proposed. In High-Speed driving operation, Current controller tends to lose stability because of dead time caused by computational delay and Electromagnetic coupling included AC Motor Model. The Main purpose of the proposed method is reduction of dead time on current controller. Proposed method based model predictive control and optimizing of start timing. The Effectiveness of proposed method is confirmed by simulation results.

  16. A Novel Current Angle Control Scheme in a Current Source Inverter Fed Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor Drive for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Lixin; Su, Gui-Jia

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a novel speed control scheme to operate a current source inverter (CSI) driven surface-mounted permanent magnet synchronous machine (SPMSM) for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) applications. The idea is to use the angle of the current vector to regulate the rotor speed while keeping the two dc-dc converter power switches on all the time to boost system efficiency. The effectiveness of the proposed scheme was verified with a 3 kW CSI-SPMSM drive prototype.

  17. Space-charge-controlled field emission model of current conduction through Al2O3 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraiwa, Atsushi; Matsumura, Daisuke; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    This study proposes a model for current conduction in metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitors, assuming the presence of two sheets of charge in the insulator, and derives analytical formulae of field emission (FE) currents under both negative and positive bias. Since it is affected by the space charge in the insulator, this particular FE differs from the conventional FE and is accordingly named the space-charge-controlled (SCC) FE. The gate insulator of this study was a stack of atomic-layer-deposition Al2O3 and underlying chemical SiO2 formed on Si substrates. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics simulated using the SCC-FE formulae quantitatively reproduced the experimental results obtained by measuring Au- and Al-gated Al2O3/SiO2 MIS capacitors under both biases. The two sheets of charge in the Al2O3 films were estimated to be positive and located at a depth of greater than 4 nm from the Al2O3/SiO2 interface and less than 2 nm from the gate. The density of the former is approximately 1 × 1013 cm-2 in units of electronic charge, regardless of the type of capacitor. The latter forms a sheet of dipoles together with image charges in the gate and hence causes potential jumps of 0.4 V and 1.1 V in the Au- and Al-gated capacitors, respectively. Within a margin of error, this sheet of dipoles is ideally located at the gate/Al2O3 interface and effectively reduces the work function of the gate by the magnitude of the potential jumps mentioned above. These facts indicate that the currents in the Al2O3/SiO2 MIS capacitors are enhanced as compared to those in ideal capacitors and that the currents in the Al-gated capacitors under negative bias (electron emission from the gate) are more markedly enhanced than those in the Au-gated capacitors. The larger number of gate-side dipoles in the Al-gated capacitors is possibly caused by the reaction between the Al and Al2O3, and therefore gate materials that do not react with underlying gate insulators should be chosen

  18. Current Issues in Human Spacecraft Thermal Control Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K.

    2008-01-01

    Efficient thermal management of Earth-orbiting human spacecraft, lunar transit spacecraft and landers, as well as a lunar habitat will require advanced thermal technology. These future spacecraft will require more sophisticated thermal control systems that can dissipate or reject greater heat loads at higher input heat fluxes while using fewer of the limited spacecraft mass, volume and power resources. The thermal control designs also must accommodate the harsh environments associated with these missions including dust and high sink temperatures. The lunar environment presents several challenges to the design and operation of active thermal control systems. During the Apollo program, landings were located and timed to occur at lunar twilight, resulting in a benign thermal environment. The long duration polar lunar bases that are foreseen in 15 years will see extremely cold thermal environments. Long sojourns remote from low-Earth orbit will require lightweight, but robust and reliable systems. Innovative thermal management components and systems are needed to accomplish the rejection of heat from lunar bases. Advances are required in the general areas of radiators, thermal control loops and equipment. Radiators on the Moon's poles must operate and survive in very cold environments. Also, the dusty environment of an active lunar base may require dust mitigation and removal techniques to maintain radiator performance over the long term.

  19. CURRENT CORROSION BY-PRODUCTS AND CORROSION CONTROL RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    USEPA research in the area of corrosion control consists of a combination of in-house research and extramural projects. he extramural projects have recently addressed the corrosion of solder in some Long Island water supplies, impacts of municipal ion-exchange softening on corros...

  20. Current Offerings in Automated Authority Control: A Survey of Vendors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Sarah Hager

    1989-01-01

    Describes a survey of library systems and software vendors that examined the sources, management, and use of authority records in their systems and the functions of an authority control module within an integrated system. Several tables and graphs offer summaries and comparisons of vendors' offerings and capabilities. The questionnaire used is…

  1. Femtosecond control of electric currents in metallic ferromagnetic heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Huisman, T J; Mikhaylovskiy, R V; Costa, J D; Freimuth, F; Paz, E; Ventura, J; Freitas, P P; Blügel, S; Mokrousov, Y; Rasing, Th; Kimel, A V

    2016-05-01

    The idea to use not only the charge but also the spin of electrons in the operation of electronic devices has led to the development of spintronics, causing a revolution in how information is stored and processed. A novel advancement would be to develop ultrafast spintronics using femtosecond laser pulses. Employing terahertz (10(12) Hz) emission spectroscopy and exploiting the spin-orbit interaction, we demonstrate the optical generation of electric photocurrents in metallic ferromagnetic heterostructures at the femtosecond timescale. The direction of the photocurrent is controlled by the helicity of the circularly polarized light. These results open up new opportunities for realizing spintronics in the unprecedented terahertz regime and provide new insights in all-optical control of magnetism. PMID:26854566

  2. Femtosecond control of electric currents in metallic ferromagnetic heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, T. J.; Mikhaylovskiy, R. V.; Costa, J. D.; Freimuth, F.; Paz, E.; Ventura, J.; Freitas, P. P.; Blügel, S.; Mokrousov, Y.; Rasing, Th.; Kimel, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    The idea to use not only the charge but also the spin of electrons in the operation of electronic devices has led to the development of spintronics, causing a revolution in how information is stored and processed. A novel advancement would be to develop ultrafast spintronics using femtosecond laser pulses. Employing terahertz (1012 Hz) emission spectroscopy and exploiting the spin–orbit interaction, we demonstrate the optical generation of electric photocurrents in metallic ferromagnetic heterostructures at the femtosecond timescale. The direction of the photocurrent is controlled by the helicity of the circularly polarized light. These results open up new opportunities for realizing spintronics in the unprecedented terahertz regime and provide new insights in all-optical control of magnetism.

  3. Rigid topographic control of currents in the Nordic Seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Søiland, H.; Prater, M. D.; Rossby, T.

    2008-09-01

    Neutrally buoyant floats, deployed across the northern slope of the Iceland-Faroe Ridge at 800m depth, reveal tight topographic control of their movement: a cluster of 22 floats drifts southeast to the Faroe-Shetland Channel where it bifurcates such that floats deployed over the upper slope turn south and eventually exit the Norwegian Sea through the Faroe Bank Channel, and floats over the deeper slope turn north in the Norwegian Sea. A subset of the latter group moves quickly north along the western slope of the Vøring Plateau and divides with most of the floats turning east into the Lofoten Basin and the remainder circulating cyclonically around the Norwegian Basin. This study establishes that i) the Faroe Bank Channel overflow waters must come from along the slope north of the Faroes, not the interior of the Norwegian Sea, and ii) exchange of intermediate waters between basins takes place along topographically controlled routes.

  4. Current status of link access control and encryption system

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, E.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop necessary technologies for the secure protection of data communication networks. Data encryption equipment, using the federal government's Data Encryption Standard (DES) algorithm, was designed and developed. This equipment is the Link Access Control and Encryption (Link ACE) system. It protects unclassified sensitive data transmissions over unprotected lines between central computers and remote terminals. Link ACE units have been installed and are operational in the Department of Energy's Central Personnel Clearance Index (CPCI) system.

  5. The current status of controlled thermal expansion superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wanner, E.A.; Deantonio, D.A.; Smith, D.F.; Smith, J.S. Inco Alloys International, Inc., Huntington, WV )

    1991-03-01

    Controlled-thermal-expansion superalloys being developed for aerospace applications are briefly surveyed. Consideration is given to precipitation-strengthened (PS) alloys containing Nb, Ti, and Al and their susceptibilty to oxidation and oxygen embrittlement; PS alloys containing Nb and Ti (development and physical metallurgy); PS alloys containing Nb, Ti, and Si; and processing sensitivities in Alloy 909. Graphs, micrographs, and tables of numerical data are provided. 24 refs.

  6. The current status of controlled thermal expansion superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanner, E. A.; Deantonio, D. A.; Smith, D. F.; Smith, J. S.

    1991-03-01

    Controlled thermal expansion superalloys, used primarily in aerospace applications at temperatures up to 649°C, provide coefficients of thermal expansion approximately 40 percent less than those of conventional superalloys. Since their first introduction in the early 1970s, continued progress has increased the capability of these materials. Various alterations in alloying elements were found to have a profound effect on the properties of the materials; ongoing work is aimed at extending the progress.

  7. Alternating current-generated plasma discharges for the controlled direct current charging of ferroelectrets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cury Basso, Heitor; Monteiro, José Roberto B. de A.; Baladelli Mazulquim, Daniel; Teixeira de Paula, Geyverson; Gonçalves Neto, Luiz; Gerhard, Reimund

    2013-09-01

    The standard charging process for polymer ferroelectrets, e.g., from polypropylene foams or layered film systems involves the application of high DC fields either to metal electrodes or via a corona discharge. In this often-used process, the DC field triggers the internal breakdown and limits the final charge densities inside the ferroelectret cavities and, thus, the final polarization. Here, an AC + DC charging procedure is proposed and demonstrated in which a high-voltage high-frequency (HV-HF) wave train is applied together with a DC poling voltage. Thus, the internal dielectric-barrier discharges in the ferroelectret cavities are induced by the HV-HF wave train, while the final charge and polarization level is controlled separately through the applied DC voltage. In the new process, the frequency and the amplitude of the HV-HF wave train must be kept within critical boundaries that are closely related to the characteristics of the respective ferroelectrets. The charging method has been tested and investigated on a fluoropolymer-film system with a single well-defined cylindrical cavity. It is found that the internal electrical polarization of the cavity can be easily controlled and increases linearly with the applied DC voltage up to the breakdown voltage of the cavity. In the standard charging method, however, the DC voltage would have to be chosen above the respective breakdown voltage. With the new method, control of the HV-HF wave-train duration prevents a plasma-induced deterioration of the polymer surfaces inside the cavities. It is observed that the frequency of the HV-HF wave train during ferroelectret charging and the temperature applied during poling of ferroelectrics serve an analogous purpose. The analogy and the similarities between the proposed ferroelectret charging method and the poling of ferroelectric materials or dipole electrets at elevated temperatures with subsequent cooling under field are discussed.

  8. Error coding simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Viveca K.

    1993-01-01

    There are various elements such as radio frequency interference (RFI) which may induce errors in data being transmitted via a satellite communication link. When a transmission is affected by interference or other error-causing elements, the transmitted data becomes indecipherable. It becomes necessary to implement techniques to recover from these disturbances. The objective of this research is to develop software which simulates error control circuits and evaluate the performance of these modules in various bit error rate environments. The results of the evaluation provide the engineer with information which helps determine the optimal error control scheme. The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) recommends the use of Reed-Solomon (RS) and convolutional encoders and Viterbi and RS decoders for error correction. The use of forward error correction techniques greatly reduces the received signal to noise needed for a certain desired bit error rate. The use of concatenated coding, e.g. inner convolutional code and outer RS code, provides even greater coding gain. The 16-bit cyclic redundancy check (CRC) code is recommended by CCSDS for error detection.

  9. Error coding simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Viveca K.

    1993-11-01

    There are various elements such as radio frequency interference (RFI) which may induce errors in data being transmitted via a satellite communication link. When a transmission is affected by interference or other error-causing elements, the transmitted data becomes indecipherable. It becomes necessary to implement techniques to recover from these disturbances. The objective of this research is to develop software which simulates error control circuits and evaluate the performance of these modules in various bit error rate environments. The results of the evaluation provide the engineer with information which helps determine the optimal error control scheme. The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) recommends the use of Reed-Solomon (RS) and convolutional encoders and Viterbi and RS decoders for error correction. The use of forward error correction techniques greatly reduces the received signal to noise needed for a certain desired bit error rate. The use of concatenated coding, e.g. inner convolutional code and outer RS code, provides even greater coding gain. The 16-bit cyclic redundancy check (CRC) code is recommended by CCSDS for error detection.

  10. Building a World-Class Safety Culture: The National Ignition Facility and the Control of Human and Organizational Error

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C T; Stalnaker, G

    2002-12-06

    Accidents in complex systems send us signals. They may be harbingers of a catastrophe. Some even argue that a ''normal'' consequence of operations in a complex organization may not only be the goods it produces, but also accidents and--inevitably--catastrophes. We would like to tell you the story of a large, complex organization, whose history questions the argument ''that accidents just happen.'' Starting from a less than enviable safety record, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has accumulated over 2.5 million safe hours. The story of NIF is still unfolding. The facility is still being constructed and commissioned. But the steps NIF has taken in achieving its safety record provide a principled blueprint that may be of value to others. Describing that principled blueprint is the purpose of this paper. The first part of this paper is a case study of NIF and its effort to achieve a world-class safety record. This case study will include a description of (1) NIF's complex systems, (2) NIF's early safety history, (3) factors that may have initiated its safety culture change, and (4) the evolution of its safety blueprint. In the last part of the paper, we will compare NIF's safety culture to what safety industry experts, psychologists, and sociologists say about how to shape a culture and control organizational error.

  11. Real-time quality control of pipes using neural network prediction error signals for defect detection in time area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmetshin, Alexander M.; Gvozdak, Andrey P.

    1999-08-01

    The magnetic-induction method of quality control of seamless pipes in real-time characterized by a high level of structural noises having the composite law of an elementary probability law varying from batch to a batch, of a varying form. The traditional method of a detection of defects of pipes is depend to usage of ethanol defects. However shape of actual defects is casual, that does not allow to use methods of an optimum filtration for their detection. Usage of adaptive variants of a Kalman filter not ensures the solutions of a problem of a detection because of poor velocity of adaptation and small relation a signal/the correlated noise. For the solution of a problem was used structural Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) which was trained by delivery of every possible variants of signals without defects of sites of pipes filed by transducer system. As an analyzable signal the error signal of the prognosis ANFIS was considered. The carried out experiments have shown, that the method allows to ooze a signal of casual extended defects even in situations when a signal-noise ratio was less unity and the traditional amplitudes methods of selection of signals of defects did not determine.

  12. Synchronizing theta oscillations with direct-current stimulation strengthens adaptive control in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Reinhart, Robert M. G.; Zhu, Julia; Park, Sohee; Woodman, Geoffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Executive control and flexible adjustment of behavior following errors are essential to adaptive functioning. Loss of adaptive control may be a biomarker of a wide range of neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly in the schizophrenia spectrum. Here, we provide support for the view that oscillatory activity in the frontal cortex underlies adaptive adjustments in cognitive processing following errors. Compared with healthy subjects, patients with schizophrenia exhibited low frequency oscillations with abnormal temporal structure and an absence of synchrony over medial-frontal and lateral-prefrontal cortex following errors. To demonstrate that these abnormal oscillations were the origin of the impaired adaptive control in patients with schizophrenia, we applied noninvasive dc electrical stimulation over the medial-frontal cortex. This noninvasive stimulation descrambled the phase of the low-frequency neural oscillations that synchronize activity across cortical regions. Following stimulation, the behavioral index of adaptive control was improved such that patients were indistinguishable from healthy control subjects. These results provide unique causal evidence for theories of executive control and cortical dysconnectivity in schizophrenia. PMID:26124116

  13. Current and Future Developments in Air Traffic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Joseph; Green, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    Current and future energy demands, end uses, and cost used to characterize typical applications services in the industrial sector of the United States are examined. A review and evaluation of existing industrial energy data bases was undertaken to assess their potential for supporting SERI research market suitability analysis; (2) market development; (3) end use matching; (4) industrial application studies; and (5) identification of cost and performance goals for solar systems and typical information requirements for industrial energy end use. The focus was on fuels and electric energy used for heat and power purchased by the manufacturing subsector and listed by 2, 3, and 4 digit SIC, primary fuel. The effects of federal and state industrial energy conservation programs on future industrial sector demands were assessed.

  14. Current methods of controlling post-operative pain.

    PubMed Central

    Sinatra, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    Until recently, the clinical significance of post-surgical pain and its undertreatment were for the most part unappreciated. Recognition that inadequate analgesia adversely affects the patient's cardiovascular, pulmonary, and emotional status has spurred development of new and highly effective methods of controlling pain. With the introduction of spinal opioid and patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) came the realization that, while such forms of therapy provided superior pain relief, they were not without their own unique and occasionally serious side effects. For this reason, both techniques are more safely provided by highly trained members of a dedicated acute/post-surgical pain service. Although spinal opioid (epidural, intrathecal) techniques are invasive and require patient cooperation, they have a high degree of safety in low-risk populations (ASA 1 and 2). The major therapeutic advantage of spinal opioids is their ability to prevent pain from being perceived. PCA permits patients to titrate intravenous opioids in proportion to their particular level of pain intensity. Although PCA provides effective pain "relief," the technique is incapable of preventing pain from being appreciated. A number of studies have observed that pain scores in patients successfully employing PCA were significantly higher than those noted in individuals treated with epidural opioids. Nevertheless, the control gained by self-administration, uniformity of analgesia, and low level of adverse results associated with PCA provides higher patient satisfaction and decreased sedation when compared with traditional intramuscular dosing. The effectiveness of PCA may be improved by adjusting for patient variables, utilizing opioids having rapid onset, the addition of a basal infusion, and supplementation with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents. Interpleural analgesia represents an important therapeutic option in patients sensitive to opioid-induced respiratory depression. The technique is

  15. Control of voltage reversal in serially stacked microbial fuel cells through manipulating current: Significance of critical current density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Junyeong; Sim, Junyoung; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2015-06-01

    Voltage reversal is a critical issue for serially stacking microbial fuel cells (MFCs). It occurs when current density in stacked MFCs increases over critical current density (jcritical). In this study, we clearly show that no voltage reversal occurs in stacked MFCs if current density is maintained below jcritical where the anode and the cathode potential in an inferior unit become identical, with an external resistance placed between individual MFCs. We define threshold resistance (Rthreshold) that enables current density below jcritical in stacked MFCs, and demonstrate the validity of Rthreshold theoretically and experimentally. Voltage reversal is controlled in the stacked MFC equipped with Rthreshold by which the current density in the stacked MFC is kept below jcritical. In comparison, a stacked MFC without Rthreshold faces voltage reversal over jcritical. Energy loss in Rthreshold is comparable to energy loss with other voltage control methods, such as passive or active methods. However, the Rthreshold approach is a simple, inexpensive way of controlling voltage reversal, especially for small MFCs (<50 mL).

  16. Sensor-based control in eddy current separation of incinerator bottom ash.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Abdur; Bakker, M C M

    2013-06-01

    A sensor unit was placed online in the particle stream produced by an eddy current separator (ECS) to investigate its functionality in non-ferrous metals recovery. The targeted feed was the 1-6mm size fraction bottom ash from a municipal waste incinerator. The sensor unit was attached to the ECS splitter, where it counted in real-time metal and mineral particles and accurately measured the grade of the stream in the metals product. Influence of segregation (e.g. due to particle size or density) on the metals concentrate were detected and studied using the sensor data collected at different splitter distances. Tests were performed in the laboratory and in a bottom ash processing plant with two different types of ECS and two sources of bottom ash with different moisture content. The measured metal grades matched the manual analyses with errors 0%, 1.5% and 3.1% for moist, dry and very wet feed, respectively. For very wet feed the ECS metals recovery dropped, which was observed from the strongly reduced particle counts and the large changes in cumulative particle properties. The measured sample proved representative for the whole metals concentrate if it is collected at a representative position within the metals particle trajectory fan produced by the ECS. ECS-performance proved sensitively dependent on splitter distance, since a 10mm shift may result in 10% change in metal recovery and 18% change in grade. The main functionalities of the sensor unit are determined as online quality control and facilitation of automatic control over the ECS splitter distance. These functionalities translate in significant improvements in ECS metals recovery which in turn is linked to economic benefits, increased recycling rate of scrap metals and a further reduction of the ecological drawbacks of incinerator bottom ash. PMID:23490354

  17. Vaccine adjuvants - Current status and prospects on controlled release adjuvancity.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, S M; Safhi, Mohammed M; Kannadasan, M; Sukumaran, N

    2011-10-01

    The strategy of World Health Organization is to develop efficient and inexpensive vaccine against various infectious diseases amongst children's population. Vaccination is considered as the most cost effective health intervention known to public. Since 90 years various substances have been added in vaccine formulation but still alum is considered as the safest adjuvant for human use licensed by United States Food and Drug Administration. MF 59 and ASO4 are the adjuvants were developed recently and approved for human use. Due to poor adjuvancity, conventional vaccines require multiple recall injection at approximately time intervals to attain optimal immune response. For past approximately two decades the vaccine research has been focused towards the alternation of alum type of adjuvant in order to increase the immunogenicity. The development of new vaccines, is more efficacious or easier to deliver, or both have become an area of research that can certainly benefit from controlled release technology. Especially, the conversion of multiple administration vaccine into single administration vaccine may represent an improved advancement towards the betterment of human health care and welfare. Biodegradable polymer microparticles have been evaluated for delivering antigens in native form, sustained release keeping in mind the safety aspects. In this article we review the overall concept of adjuvants in vaccine technology with special focus towards the prospects of controlled release antigens. PMID:23960760

  18. Detecting Glaucoma Progression From Localized Rates of Retinal Changes in Parametric and Nonparametric Statistical Framework With Type I Error Control

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Madhusudhanan; Arias-Castro, Ery; Medeiros, Felipe A.; Kriegman, David J.; Bowd, Christopher; Weinreb, Robert N.; Holst, Michael; Sample, Pamela A.; Zangwill, Linda M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We evaluated three new pixelwise rates of retinal height changes (PixR) strategies to reduce false-positive errors while detecting glaucomatous progression. Methods. Diagnostic accuracy of nonparametric PixR-NP cluster test (CT), PixR-NP single threshold test (STT), and parametric PixR-P STT were compared to statistic image mapping (SIM) using the Heidelberg Retina Tomograph. We included 36 progressing eyes, 210 nonprogressing patient eyes, and 21 longitudinal normal eyes from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study. Multiple comparison problem due to simultaneous testing of retinal locations was addressed in PixR-NP CT by controlling family-wise error rate (FWER) and in STT methods by Lehmann-Romano's k-FWER. For STT methods, progression was defined as an observed progression rate (ratio of number of pixels with significant rate of decrease; i.e., red-pixels, to disk size) > 2.5%. Progression criterion for CT and SIM methods was presence of one or more significant (P < 1%) red-pixel clusters within disk. Results. Specificity in normals: CT = 81% (90%), PixR-NP STT = 90%, PixR-P STT = 90%, SIM = 90%. Sensitivity in progressing eyes: CT = 86% (86%), PixR-NP STT = 75%, PixR-P STT = 81%, SIM = 39%. Specificity in nonprogressing patient eyes: CT = 49% (55%), PixR-NP STT = 56%, PixR-P STT = 50%, SIM = 79%. Progression detected by PixR in nonprogressing patient eyes was associated with early signs of visual field change that did not yet meet our definition of glaucomatous progression. Conclusions. The PixR provided higher sensitivity in progressing eyes and similar specificity in normals than SIM, suggesting that PixR strategies can improve our ability to detect glaucomatous progression. Longer follow-up is necessary to determine whether nonprogressing eyes identified as progressing by these methods will develop glaucomatous progression. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00221897.) PMID:24519427

  19. Air gun wounding and current UK laws controlling air weapons.

    PubMed

    Bruce-Chwatt, Robert Michael

    2010-04-01

    Air weapons whether rifles or pistols are, potentially, lethal weapons. The UK legislation is complex and yet little known to the public. Hunting with air weapons and the laws controlling those animals that are permitted to be shot with air weapons is even more labyrinthine due to the legal power limitations on the possession of air weapons. Still relatively freely available by mail order or on the Internet, an increasing number of deaths have been reported from the misuse of air weapons or accidental discharges. Ammunition for air weapons has become increasingly sophisticated, effective and therefore increasingly dangerous if misused, though freely available being a mere projectile without a concomitant cartridge containing a propellant and an initiator. PMID:20211450

  20. Chemopreventive opportunities to control basal cell carcinoma: Current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Cynthia; Deep, Gagan; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2015-09-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is a major health problem with approximately 2.8 million new cases diagnosed each year in the United States. BCC incidences have continued to rise due to lack of effective chemopreventive options. One of the key molecular characteristics of BCC is the sustained activation of hedgehog signaling through inactivating mutations in the tumor suppressor gene patch (Ptch) or activating mutations in Smoothened. In the past, several studies have addressed targeting the activated hedgehog pathway for the treatment and prevention of BCC, although with toxic effects. Other studies have attempted BCC chemoprevention through targeting the promotional phase of the disease especially the inflammatory component. The compounds that have been utilized in pre-clinical and/or clinical studies include green and black tea, difluoromethylornithine, thymidine dinucleotide, retinoids, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, vitamin D3, and silibinin. In this review, we have discussed genetic and epigenetic modifications that occur during BCC development as well as the current state of BCC pre-clinical and clinical chemoprevention studies. PMID:26053157

  1. Slowing after Observed Error Transfers across Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lijun; Pan, Weigang; Tan, Jinfeng; Liu, Congcong; Chen, Antao

    2016-01-01

    After committing an error, participants tend to perform more slowly. This phenomenon is called post-error slowing (PES). Although previous studies have explored the PES effect in the context of observed errors, the issue as to whether the slowing effect generalizes across tasksets remains unclear. Further, the generation mechanisms of PES following observed errors must be examined. To address the above issues, we employed an observation-execution task in three experiments. During each trial, participants were required to mentally observe the outcomes of their partners in the observation task and then to perform their own key-press according to the mapping rules in the execution task. In Experiment 1, the same tasksets were utilized in the observation task and the execution task, and three error rate conditions (20%, 50% and 80%) were established in the observation task. The results revealed that the PES effect after observed errors was obtained in all three error rate conditions, replicating and extending previous studies. In Experiment 2, distinct stimuli and response rules were utilized in the observation task and the execution task. The result pattern was the same as that in Experiment 1, suggesting that the PES effect after observed errors was a generic adjustment process. In Experiment 3, the response deadline was shortened in the execution task to rule out the ceiling effect, and two error rate conditions (50% and 80%) were established in the observation task. The PES effect after observed errors was still obtained in the 50% and 80% error rate conditions. However, the accuracy in the post-observed error trials was comparable to that in the post-observed correct trials, suggesting that the slowing effect and improved accuracy did not rely on the same underlying mechanism. Current findings indicate that the occurrence of PES after observed errors is not dependent on the probability of observed errors, consistent with the assumption of cognitive control account

  2. Medication Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... to reduce the risk of medication errors to industry and others at FDA. Additionally, DMEPA prospectively reviews ... List of Abbreviations Regulations and Guidances Guidance for Industry: Safety Considerations for Product Design to Minimize Medication ...

  3. Medication Errors

    MedlinePlus

    Medicines cure infectious diseases, prevent problems from chronic diseases, and ease pain. But medicines can also cause harmful reactions if not used ... You can help prevent errors by Knowing your medicines. Keep a list of the names of your ...

  4. Turbine Engine Clearance Control Systems: Current Practices and Future Directions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lattime, Scott B.; Steinetz, Bruce M.

    2002-01-01

    Improved blade tip sealing in the high pressure compressor (HPC) and high pressure turbine (HPT) can provide dramatic reductions in specific fuel consumption (SFC), time-on-wing, compressor stall margin, and engine efficiency as well as increased payload and mission range capabilities. Maintenance costs to overhaul large commercial gas turbine engines can easily exceed $1M. Engine removal from service is primarily due to spent exhaust gas temperature (EGT) margin caused mainly by the deterioration of HPT components. Increased blade tip clearance is a major factor in hot section component degradation. As engine designs continue to push the performance envelope with fewer parts and the market drives manufacturers to increase service life, the need for advanced sealing continues to grow. A review of aero gas turbine engine HPT performance degradation and the mechanisms that promote these losses are discussed. Benefits to the HPT due to improved clearance management are identified. Past and present sealing technologies are presented along with specifications for next generation engine clearance control systems.

  5. Current knowledge on groundwater microbial pathogens and their control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macler, Bruce A.; Merkle, Jon C.

    Those who drink groundwater that has not been disinfected are at increased risk of infection and disease from pathogenic microorganisms. Recent studies have shown that up to half of all US drinking-water wells tested had evidence of fecal contamination. A significant fraction of all waterborne disease outbreaks is associated with groundwater. An estimated 750,000 to 5.9million illnesses per year result from contaminated groundwaters in the US. Mortality from these illnesses may be 1400-9400 deaths per year. Control of these pathogens starts with source-water protection activities to prevent fecal contamination of aquifers and wells. These include assessment of wellhead vulnerability to fecal contamination and correction of identified deficiencies. Correction may include control of sources or rehabilitation of the well itself. Disinfection can serve as a useful barrier and is recommended as a prudent public-health policy for all groundwater systems. Ceux qui boivent une eau souterraine non désinfectée présentent un risque accru d'infection et de maladie par des germes pathogènes. De récentes études ont montré que près de la moitié de tous les puits américains testés, captés pour l'eau potable, sont soumis à une contamination fécale. Une fraction significative de l'ensemble des premières manifestations de maladies liées à l'eau est associée aux eaux souterraines. On estime qu'entre 750 000 et 5,9millions de personnes sont malades chaque année aux États-Unis à cause d'eaux souterraines polluées. La mortalité parmi ces malades doit ètre de l'ordre de 1400 à 9400 décès par an. La protection contre ces germes pathogènes commence avec des mesures prises au niveau du captage pour empècher la pollution des aquifères et des puits. Celles-ci comprennent une évaluation de la vulnérabilité des tètes de puits à la pollution fécale et une correction des insuffisances mises en évidence. Cette correction peut comprendre une maîtrise des sources

  6. Continuous Path Tracking Control by Considering Voltage Saturation and Current Saturation for AC Servo Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazawa, Masaki; Ohishi, Kiyoshi; Katsura, Seiichiro

    Continuous path tracking control is an important technology for the position control system such as factory automation field. Particulaly, large torque is required for continuous path tracking control at its start position and its goal position. Each AC servo motor of continuous path tracking control have limitation of current and voltage. Therefore, in controlling a multi-degree-of-freedom continuous path tracking control system, even if only the motor torque of one axis has the current limitation, the actual position response is not often equal to the desired trajectory reference. In order to overcome these problems, this paper proposes a new continuous path tracking control algorithm by considering both the saturation of voltage and current. The proposed method assures the coordinated motion by considering the saturation of voltage and current. The effectiveness of the proposed method is confirmed by the experimental results in this paper.

  7. 20 Tips to Help Prevent Medical Errors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevent Medical Errors 20 Tips to Help Prevent Medical Errors: Patient Fact Sheet This information is for ... current information. Select to Download PDF (295 KB). Medical errors can occur anywhere in the health care ...

  8. Current Control for Utility Interactive Inverter Using Multisampling Method Based on FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Tomoki; Komiyama, Tsuyoshi; Shimada, Eigo

    In this paper, a new control method is proposed for the utility interactive inverter based on the deadbeat control with the FPGA-based hardware controller to improve the control response of an utility current. Deadbeat control is one method to ensure the output voltage or current matches with the references at the sampling instant; therefore, by adopting this control law to the utility interactive inverter, the response of the system is much improved compared with the conventional PI control. The utility interactive inverter is linked to the commercial source via the interactive inductor, and so the inverter controls the output voltage based on the deadbeat control to regulate the output current through the interactive inductor. As a result, a very fast transient response of the utility current can be achieved. The current control method using voltage deadbeat control and PLL control with quasi dq transformation with multisampling parallel processing method are implemented in the FPGA-based hardware controller for the single phase utility interactive inverter.

  9. Current control of magnetic anisotropy via stress in a ferromagnetic metal waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Kyongmo; Ma, Xin; Pai, Chi-Feng; Yang, Jusang; Olsson, Kevin S.; Erskine, James L.; Ralph, Daniel C.; Buhrman, Robert A.; Li, Xiaoqin

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate that in-plane charge current can effectively control the spin precession resonance in an A l2O3/CoFeB /Ta heterostructure. Brillouin light scattering was used to detect the ferromagnetic resonance field under microwave excitation of spin waves at fixed frequencies. The current control of spin precession resonance originates from modification of the in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy field Hk, which changes symmetrically with respect to the current direction. Numerical simulation suggests that the anisotropic stress introduced by joule heating plays an important role in controlling Hk. These results provide new insight into current manipulation of magnetic properties and have broad implications for spintronic devices.

  10. Performance Assessment of Model-Based Optimal Feedforward and Feedback Current Profile Control in NSTX-U using the TRANSP Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilhan, Z.; Wehner, W. P.; Schuster, E.; Boyer, M. D.; Gates, D. A.; Gerhardt, S.; Menard, J.

    2015-11-01

    Active control of the toroidal current density profile is crucial to achieve and maintain high-performance, MHD-stable plasma operation in NSTX-U. A first-principles-driven, control-oriented model describing the temporal evolution of the current profile has been proposed earlier by combining the magnetic diffusion equation with empirical correlations obtained at NSTX-U for the electron density, electron temperature, and non-inductive current drives. A feedforward + feedback control scheme for the requlation of the current profile is constructed by embedding the proposed nonlinear, physics-based model into the control design process. Firstly, nonlinear optimization techniques are used to design feedforward actuator trajectories that steer the plasma to a desired operating state with the objective of supporting the traditional trial-and-error experimental process of advanced scenario planning. Secondly, a feedback control algorithm to track a desired current profile evolution is developed with the goal of adding robustness to the overall control scheme. The effectiveness of the combined feedforward + feedback control algorithm for current profile regulation is tested in predictive simulations carried out in TRANSP. Supported by PPPL.

  11. Analysis of DGPS/INS and MLS/INS final approach navigation errors and control performance data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueschen, Richard M.; Spitzer, Cary R.

    1992-01-01

    Flight tests were conducted jointly by NASA Langley Research Center and Honeywell, Inc., on a B-737 research aircraft to record a data base for evaluating the performance of a differential DGPS/inertial navigation system (INS) which used GPS Course/Acquisition code receivers. Estimates from the DGPS/INS and a Microwave Landing System (MLS)/INS, and various aircraft parameter data were recorded in real time aboard the aircraft while flying along the final approach path to landing. This paper presents the mean and standard deviation of the DGPS/INS and MLS/INS navigation position errors computed relative to the laser tracker system and of the difference between the DGPS/INS and MLS/INS velocity estimates. RMS errors are presented for DGPS/INS and MLS/INS guidance errors (localizer and glideslope). The mean navigation position errors and standard deviation of the x position coordinate of the DGPS/INS and MLS/INS systems were found to be of similar magnitude while the standard deviation of the y and z position coordinate errors were significantly larger for DGPS/INS compared to MLS/INS.

  12. Methods, systems and apparatus for controlling operation of two alternating current (AC) machines

    DOEpatents

    Gallegos-Lopez, Gabriel; Nagashima, James M.; Perisic, Milun; Hiti, Silva

    2012-06-05

    A system is provided for controlling two alternating current (AC) machines via a five-phase PWM inverter module. The system comprises a first control loop, a second control loop, and a current command adjustment module. The current command adjustment module operates in conjunction with the first control loop and the second control loop to continuously adjust current command signals that control the first AC machine and the second AC machine such that they share the input voltage available to them without compromising the target mechanical output power of either machine. This way, even when the phase voltage available to either one of the machines decreases, that machine outputs its target mechanical output power.

  13. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron beam control using an inductive current divider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.

    2015-11-01

    Kinetic, time-dependent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations of the inductive current divider are presented. The inductive current divider is a passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam's return current. The current divider concept was proposed and studied theoretically in a previous publication [Swanekamp et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 023107 (2015)]. A central post carries a portion of the return current (I1), while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I2) with the injected beam current given by Ib = I1 + I2. The simulations are in agreement with the theory which predicts that the total force on the beam trajectory is proportional to (I2-I1) and the force on the beam envelope is proportional to Ib. Independent control over both the current density and the beam angle at the target is possible by choosing the appropriate current-divider geometry. The root-mean-square (RMS) beam emittance (ɛRMS) varies as the beam propagates through the current divider to the target. For applications where control of the beam trajectory is desired and the current density at the target is similar to the current density at the entrance foil, there is a modest 20% increase in ɛRMS at the target. For other applications where the beam is pinched to a current density ˜5 times larger at the target, ɛRMS is 2-3 times larger at the target.

  14. Method for measuring and controlling beam current in ion beam processing

    DOEpatents

    Kearney, Patrick A.; Burkhart, Scott C.

    2003-04-29

    A method for producing film thickness control of ion beam sputter deposition films. Great improvements in film thickness control is accomplished by keeping the total current supplied to both the beam and suppressor grids of a radio frequency (RF) in beam source constant, rather than just the current supplied to the beam grid. By controlling both currents, using this method, deposition rates are more stable, and this allows the deposition of layers with extremely well controlled thicknesses to about 0.1%. The method is carried out by calculating deposition rates based on the total of the suppressor and beam currents and maintaining the total current constant by adjusting RF power which gives more consistent values.

  15. Adaptive Fuzzy Hysteresis Band Current Controller for Four-Wire Shunt Active Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamoudi, F.; Chaghi, A.; Amimeur, H.; Merabet, E.

    2008-06-01

    This paper presents an adaptive fuzzy hysteresis band current controller for four-wire shunt active power filters to eliminate harmonics and to compensate reactive power in distribution systems in order to keep currents at the point of common coupling sinusoidal and in phase with the corresponding voltage and the cancel neutral current. The conventional hysteresis band known for its robustness and its advantage in current controlled applications is adapted with a fuzzy logic controller to change the bandwidth according to the operating point in order to keep the frequency modulation at tolerable limits. The algorithm used to identify the reference currents is based on the synchronous reference frame theory (dqγ). Finally, simulation results using Matlab/Simulink are given to validate the proposed control.

  16. The poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer, 1778): current situation and future prospects for control.

    PubMed

    Chauve, C

    1998-11-16

    The current importance of Dermanyssus gallinae, mainly in egg layer, in Europe is pointed out. The limits of conventional control methods are underlined (development of mite resistance--future insecticide legislation and animal welfare legislation). Alternative control methods such as feeding deterrents or biological control, are reviewed in the context of poultry pest management. PMID:9823064

  17. Error-Compensated Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meinel, Aden B.; Meinel, Marjorie P.; Stacy, John E.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed reflecting telescope includes large, low-precision primary mirror stage and small, precise correcting mirror. Correcting mirror machined under computer control to compensate for error in primary mirror. Correcting mirror machined by diamond cutting tool. Computer analyzes interferometric measurements of primary mirror to determine shape of surface of correcting mirror needed to compensate for errors in wave front reflected from primary mirror and commands position and movement of cutting tool accordingly.

  18. Development and validation of the control variable transformation operators using the cubed-sphere grid system to represent a background error covariance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwun, Jihye; Song, Hyo-Jong; Ha, Ji-Hyun

    2014-05-01

    A background error covariance matrix is essential in a data assimilation system in terms of its spreading out dynamically balanced increments to the horizontal model grid points and the vertical levels. The full representation of the matrix is impossible because of its huge size, the matrix is therefore constructed implicitly by means of a control variable transformation. It is assumed that the forecast errors in the control variables are statistically independent. We utilized two approaches to dividing the unbalanced and the balanced parts; a method is using balance operators derived based on numerical discretization of partial differential equations, and the other is a regression-based approach. We used the spectral element method accompanying the cubed-sphere grid system, which guarantees a scalable performance in the configuration of using multiple CPUs. To model the background error covariance matrix, horizontal wind was decomposed into a rotational component and a divergent component by introducing stream function and velocity potential as control variables. The dynamical constraint of a balance between mass and wind was imposed by applying the linear balance operator and the nonlinear balance operator including cyclonic wind terms. The unbalanced velocity potential and the unbalanced mass variable is defined by using regression coefficients. The experimental background error statistics has been calculated by exploiting the ensemble samples of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) - Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter (LETKF). In order to understand the structure of the background error covariance, we performed single observation experiments using a three-dimensional variational data assimilation system on the cubed-sphere grid with the spectral transformation that was developed by Korea Institute of Atmospheric Prediction Systems(KIAPS) of which results will be presented.

  19. [An automatic torque control system for a bicycle ergometer equipped with an eddy current brake].

    PubMed

    Kikinev, V V

    2007-01-01

    The main elements of the loading device of a bicycle ergometer, including an eddy current brake and a torque sensor, are described. The automatic torque control system, which includes the loading device, is equipped with a stabilizing feedback controller that optimally approximates the closed-loop transfer function of the target model. The reduced transfer function model of the controller is of the fourth order. A method featuring a modulation-demodulation loop is suggested for implementation of the control system. PMID:17598478

  20. Current and Future Research in Active Control of Lightweight, Flexible Structures Using the X-56 Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, John J.; Bosworth, John T.; Burken, John J.; Suh, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    The X-56 Multi-Utility Technology Testbed aircraft system is a versatile experimental research flight platform. The system was primarily designed to investigate active control of lightweight flexible structures, but is reconfigurable and capable of hosting a wide breadth of research. Current research includes flight experimentation of a Lockheed Martin designed active control flutter suppression system. Future research plans continue experimentation with alternative control systems, explore the use of novel sensor systems, and experiments with the use of novel control effectors. This paper describes the aircraft system, current research efforts designed around the system, and future planned research efforts that will be hosted on the aircraft system.

  1. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron beam control using an inductive current divider

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.

    2015-11-18

    Kinetic, time-dependent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations of the inductive current divider are presented. The inductive current divider is a passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam’s return current. The current divider concept was proposed and studied theoretically in a previous publication [Phys. Plasmas 22, 023107 (2015)] A central post carries a portion of the return current (I1) while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I2) with the injected beam current given by Ib=I1+I2. The simulations are in agreement with the theory which predicts that the total forcemore » on the beam trajectory is proportional to (I2-I1) and the force on the beam envelope is proportional to Ib. For a fixed central post, the beam trajectory is controlled by varying the outer conductor radius which changes the inductance in the return-current path. The simulations show that the beam emittance is approximately constant as the beam propagates through the current divider to the target. As a result, independent control over both the current density and the beam angle at the target is possible by choosing the appropriate return-current geometry.« less

  2. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron beam control using an inductive current divider

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.

    2015-11-18

    Kinetic, time-dependent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations of the inductive current divider are presented. The inductive current divider is a passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam’s return current. The current divider concept was proposed and studied theoretically in a previous publication [Phys. Plasmas 22, 023107 (2015)] A central post carries a portion of the return current (I1) while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I2) with the injected beam current given by Ib=I1+I2. The simulations are in agreement with the theory which predicts that the total force on the beam trajectory is proportional to (I2-I1) and the force on the beam envelope is proportional to Ib. For a fixed central post, the beam trajectory is controlled by varying the outer conductor radius which changes the inductance in the return-current path. The simulations show that the beam emittance is approximately constant as the beam propagates through the current divider to the target. As a result, independent control over both the current density and the beam angle at the target is possible by choosing the appropriate return-current geometry.

  3. Controlling electrode gap during vacuum arc remelting at low melting current

    DOEpatents

    Williamson, Rodney L.; Zanner, Frank J.; Grose, Stephen M.

    1997-01-01

    An apparatus and method for controlling electrode gap in a vacuum arc remelting furnace, particularly at low melting currents. Spectrographic analysis is performed of the metal vapor plasma, from which estimates of electrode gap are derived.

  4. Controlling electrode gap during vacuum arc remelting at low melting current

    DOEpatents

    Williamson, R.L.; Zanner, F.J.; Grose, S.M.

    1997-04-15

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for controlling electrode gap in a vacuum arc remelting furnace, particularly at low melting currents. Spectrographic analysis is performed of the metal vapor plasma, from which estimates of electrode gap are derived. 5 figs.

  5. Design Method of ILQ Robust Current Control System for Synchronous Reluctance Electrical Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amano, Yoko; Takami, Hiroshi; Fujii, Takao

    In this paper, a robust current control system for a synchronous reluctance electrical motor by an ILQ (Inverse Linear Quadratic) design method is proposed newly. First, for performing simultaneously decouple and large region linearization of an d-q axes system in the synchronous reluctance electrical motor using nonlinear state feedback, it is derived that a linear current-voltage state equation linearized model by the d-q axes decouple of the synchronous reluctance electrical motor. Next, according to the ILQ design method, an optimum solution and an optimal condition that achieve the robust current control system for the synchronous reluctance electrical motor are analytically derived, then the robust current control system can be designed. Finally, in practical experiments, we compare the proposed method with the PI (Proportional Integral) control method, the creativity and the usefulness of the proposed method are confirmed by experimental results.

  6. Experimental quantum error correction with high fidelity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingfu; Gangloff, Dorian; Moussa, Osama; Laflamme, Raymond

    2011-09-01

    More than ten years ago a first step toward quantum error correction (QEC) was implemented [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.81.2152 81, 2152 (1998)]. The work showed there was sufficient control in nuclear magnetic resonance to implement QEC, and demonstrated that the error rate changed from ɛ to ˜ɛ2. In the current work we reproduce a similar experiment using control techniques that have been since developed, such as the pulses generated by gradient ascent pulse engineering algorithm. We show that the fidelity of the QEC gate sequence and the comparative advantage of QEC are appreciably improved. This advantage is maintained despite the errors introduced by the additional operations needed to protect the quantum states.

  7. Experimental quantum error correction with high fidelity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jingfu; Gangloff, Dorian; Moussa, Osama; Laflamme, Raymond

    2011-09-15

    More than ten years ago a first step toward quantum error correction (QEC) was implemented [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 2152 (1998)]. The work showed there was sufficient control in nuclear magnetic resonance to implement QEC, and demonstrated that the error rate changed from {epsilon} to {approx}{epsilon}{sup 2}. In the current work we reproduce a similar experiment using control techniques that have been since developed, such as the pulses generated by gradient ascent pulse engineering algorithm. We show that the fidelity of the QEC gate sequence and the comparative advantage of QEC are appreciably improved. This advantage is maintained despite the errors introduced by the additional operations needed to protect the quantum states.

  8. Stray current control for the new St.Louis Metrolink light rail system

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, J.H. III

    1994-12-31

    The new Metrolink light rail transit system runs from Lambert International Airport into downtown St. Louis and across the Eads bridge to East St. Louis, Illinois. Various steps have been taken to control stray current because of the complexity of underground structures along the right of way. The rail system is now in operation and the effectiveness of the stray current control program is being evaluated through a test program and the cooperation of all concerned.

  9. Digital control of a direct current converter for a hybrid vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, Juan Manuel

    The nonlinear feedback loops permitting the large signal control of pulse width modulators in direct current converters are discussed. A digital feedback loop on a converter controlling the coupling of a direct current machine is described. It is used in the propulsion of a hybrid vehicle (thermal-electric) with regenerative braking. The protection of the power switches is also studied. An active protection of the MOST bipolar transistor association is proposed.

  10. Stability synthesis of control system in current fed inverter driven induction motor

    SciTech Connect

    Veda, R.; Irisa, T.; Ito, T.; Mochizuki, T.; Sonoda, T.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents a new method of synthesizing a stabilizing control system in current fed inverter driven induction motor (CFIDIM). The method is focused on rotor dynamics and a concept of ''damping torque coefficient (DTC)'' is introduced concerning the electrical torque. At first the control system is synthesized on the assumption that an induction motor is driven by an ideally controllable current source. Then perturbed linearized technique indicates that the system can be stabilized if the stator current or frequency is controlled so as to make the DTC positive by feeding back a signal composed of rotor speed. Next, based on this fact, an approach of synthesizing the converter output voltage is presented under a fixed stator frequency. This result clarifies that the stable operation can be achieved by controlling the voltage in proportion to the acceleration of rotor speed or the deviation of electrical torque. These analytical results are verified with laboratory field tests.

  11. Rapid mapping of volumetric errors

    SciTech Connect

    Krulewich, D.; Hale, L.; Yordy, D.

    1995-09-13

    This paper describes a relatively inexpensive, fast, and easy to execute approach to mapping the volumetric errors of a machine tool, coordinate measuring machine, or robot. An error map is used to characterize a machine or to improve its accuracy by compensating for the systematic errors. The method consists of three steps: (1) modeling the relationship between the volumetric error and the current state of the machine; (2) acquiring error data based on length measurements throughout the work volume; and (3) optimizing the model to the particular machine.

  12. Estimation of Model Error Variances During Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dee, Dick

    2003-01-01

    Data assimilation is all about understanding the error characteristics of the data and models that are used in the assimilation process. Reliable error estimates are needed to implement observational quality control, bias correction of observations and model fields, and intelligent data selection. Meaningful covariance specifications are obviously required for the analysis as well, since the impact of any single observation strongly depends on the assumed structure of the background errors. Operational atmospheric data assimilation systems still rely primarily on climatological background error covariances. To obtain error estimates that reflect both the character of the flow and the current state of the observing system, it is necessary to solve three problems: (1) how to account for the short-term evolution of errors in the initial conditions; (2) how to estimate the additional component of error caused by model defects; and (3) how to compute the error reduction in the analysis due to observational information. Various approaches are now available that provide approximate solutions to the first and third of these problems. However, the useful accuracy of these solutions very much depends on the size and character of the model errors and the ability to account for them. Model errors represent the real-world forcing of the error evolution in a data assimilation system. Clearly, meaningful model error estimates and/or statistics must be based on information external to the model itself. The most obvious information source is observational, and since the volume of available geophysical data is growing rapidly, there is some hope that a purely statistical approach to model error estimation can be viable. This requires that the observation errors themselves are well understood and quantifiable. We will discuss some of these challenges and present a new sequential scheme for estimating model error variances from observations in the context of an atmospheric data

  13. The control of the upstream movement of fish with pulsated direct current

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLain, Alberton L.

    1957-01-01

    In the Silver River, 78,648 fish comprising 21 species were taken from the trap of the direct-current diversion device. The total kill of fish moving upstream, including 289 sea lampreys, was 1,016, or 1.3 percent. This river had presented a serious problem in the operation of an alternating-current control device during previous seasons. In 1955, 85.5 percent of three important species of fish were killed at the control structure. During 1956, this mortality was reduced to 8.1 percent by the operation of the direct-current equipment.

  14. Current Control in ITER Steady State Plasmas With Neutral Beam Steering

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny

    2009-09-10

    Predictions of quasi steady state DT plasmas in ITER are generated using the PTRANSP code. The plasma temperatures, densities, boundary shape, and total current (9 - 10 MA) anticipated for ITER steady state plasmas are specified. Current drive by negative ion neutral beam injection, lower-hybrid, and electron cyclotron resonance are calculated. Four modes of operation with different combinations of current drive are studied. For each mode, scans with the NNBI aimed at differing heights in the plasma are performed to study effects of current control on the q profile. The timeevolution of the currents and q are calculated to evaluate long duration transients. Quasi steady state, strongly reversed q profiles are predicted for some beam injection angles if the current drive and bootstrap currents are sufficiently large.

  15. Towards Current Profile Control in ITER: Potential Approaches and Research Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, E.; Barton, J. E.; Wehner, W. P.

    2014-10-01

    Many challenging plasma control problems still need to be addressed in order for the ITER Plasma Control System (PCS) to be able to successfully achieve the ITER project goals. For instance, setting up a suitable toroidal current density profile is key for one possible advanced scenario characterized by noninductive sustainment of the plasma current and steady-state operation. The nonlinearity and high dimensionality exhibited by the plasma demand a model-based current-profile control synthesis procedure that can accommodate this complexity through embedding the known physics within the design. The development of a model capturing the dynamics of the plasma relevant for control design enables not only the design of feedback controllers for regulation or tracking but also the design of optimal feedforward controllers for a systematic model-based approach to scenario planning, the design of state estimators for a reliable real-time reconstruction of the plasma internal profiles based on limited and noisy diagnostics, and the development of a fast predictive simulation code for closed-loop performance evaluation before implementation. Progress towards control-oriented modeling of the current profile evolution and associated control design has been reported following both data-driven and first-principles-driven approaches. An overview of these two approaches will be provided, as well as a discussion on research needs associated with each one of the model applications described above. Supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-SC0001334 and DE-SC0010661.

  16. Preclinical assessment of abuse liability of biologics: In defense of current regulatory control policies.

    PubMed

    Gauvin, David V; Zimmermann, Zachary J; Baird, Theodore J

    2015-10-01

    Current regulatory policies of both the US Food and Drug Administration and Drug Enforcement Administration do not delineate automatic exceptions for biologics with respect to preclinical assessments for abuse liability of all new entities. As defined in current guidance documents and drug control policies, an exception may be given upon thorough review of available data, therapeutic target and in consultation with the Controlled Substances Staff within the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research of the FDA, but a blanket exception for all biological entities is not currently available. We review the abuse liability testing of four known biologics with definitive positive abuse liability signals in the three core abuse liability assays, self-administration, drug discrimination, and dependence potential described in the FDA draft guidance document. Interestingly, while all four examplars have positive abuse liability signals in all three assays, two of these biologics are controlled under the Comprehensive Drug Abuse and Control Act (CSA, 1970) and the other two are not currently controlled. Admittedly, these four biologics are small molecule entities. However, there is no reference to "molecular size" in the legally-binding statutory definition of biologics under the FD&C act or in the Controlled Substances Act. Neither of these drug control policy mandates have a bifurcated control status in which to make exceptions based solely on molecular size. With the current pharmaceutical focus on new technologies, such as "Trojan Horses", targeting the active transport of large molecule entities directly into the CNS, an argument to automatically exempt new molecular entities solely on molecular size is untenable. We argue that for the safety and health of general public the current regulatory control status be maintained until definitive criteria for exceptions can be identified and amended to both the FD&CA and CSA, if warranted. PMID:26107292

  17. Insulin use: preventable errors.

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Insulin is vital for patients with type 1 diabetes and useful for certain patients with type 2 diabetes. The serious consequences of insulin-related medication errors are overdose, resulting in severe hypoglycaemia, causing seizures, coma and even death; or underdose, resulting in hyperglycaemia and sometimes ketoacidosis. Errors associated with the preparation and administration of insulin are often reported, both outside and inside the hospital setting. These errors are preventable. By analysing reports from organisations devoted to medication error prevention and from poison control centres, as well as a few studies and detailed case reports of medication errors, various types of error associated with insulin use have been identified, especially in the hospital setting. Generally, patients know more about the practicalities of their insulin treatment than healthcare professionals with intermittent involvement. Medication errors involving insulin can occur at each step of the medication-use process: prescribing, data entry, preparation, dispensing and administration. When prescribing insulin, wrong-dose errors have been caused by the use of abbreviations, especially "U" instead of the word "units" (often resulting in a 10-fold overdose because the "U" is read as a zero), or by failing to write the drug's name correctly or in full. In electronic prescribing, the sheer number of insulin products is a source of confusion and, ultimately, wrong-dose errors, and often overdose. Prescribing, dispensing or administration software is rarely compatible with insulin prescriptions in which the dose is adjusted on the basis of the patient's subsequent capillary blood glucose readings, and can therefore generate errors. When preparing and dispensing insulin, a tuberculin syringe is sometimes used instead of an insulin syringe, leading to overdose. Other errors arise from confusion created by similar packaging, between different insulin products or between insulin and other

  18. Modeling Analysis and Study of the Weinberg Converter with Current Programming Control for Space Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Weijun; Wan, Chenan; Han, Bo

    2008-09-01

    A more accurate small-signal model of the non-isolated Weinberg converter with the current programming control is proposed, which acts as BDR (Battery Discharge Regulator) in the PCU (Power Condition Unit). The model is developed using the small-signal model of the non-isolated Weinberg converter presented in [1]. The derivations are mainly come from the analysis of the ramp voltage compensation in the current control, which effects the current and interpreted by the mathematics, then the more accurate small signal model transfer functions of the current programming control are derived. The simulation and experiment were carried out with different compensator to show the usefulness of the proposed models. Partly practical waveforms are also given. The two were found to be in good agreement.

  19. Particle-in-cell simulations of electron beam control using an inductive current divider

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Ottinger, P. F.; Richardson, A. S.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.

    2015-11-15

    Kinetic, time-dependent, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations of the inductive current divider are presented. The inductive current divider is a passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam's return current. The current divider concept was proposed and studied theoretically in a previous publication [Swanekamp et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 023107 (2015)]. A central post carries a portion of the return current (I{sub 1}), while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I{sub 2}) with the injected beam current given by I{sub b} = I{sub 1} + I{sub 2}. The simulations are in agreement with the theory which predicts that the total force on the beam trajectory is proportional to (I{sub 2}−I{sub 1}) and the force on the beam envelope is proportional to I{sub b}. Independent control over both the current density and the beam angle at the target is possible by choosing the appropriate current-divider geometry. The root-mean-square (RMS) beam emittance (ε{sub RMS}) varies as the beam propagates through the current divider to the target. For applications where control of the beam trajectory is desired and the current density at the target is similar to the current density at the entrance foil, there is a modest 20% increase in ε{sub RMS} at the target. For other applications where the beam is pinched to a current density ∼5 times larger at the target, ε{sub RMS} is 2–3 times larger at the target.

  20. A Novel Hybrid Error Criterion-Based Active Control Method for on-Line Milling Vibration Suppression with Piezoelectric Actuators and Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xingwu; Wang, Chenxi; Gao, Robert X; Yan, Ruqiang; Chen, Xuefeng; Wang, Shibin

    2016-01-01

    Milling vibration is one of the most serious factors affecting machining quality and precision. In this paper a novel hybrid error criterion-based frequency-domain LMS active control method is constructed and used for vibration suppression of milling processes by piezoelectric actuators and sensors, in which only one Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is used and no Inverse Fast Fourier Transform (IFFT) is involved. The correction formulas are derived by a steepest descent procedure and the control parameters are analyzed and optimized. Then, a novel hybrid error criterion is constructed to improve the adaptability, reliability and anti-interference ability of the constructed control algorithm. Finally, based on piezoelectric actuators and acceleration sensors, a simulation of a spindle and a milling process experiment are presented to verify the proposed method. Besides, a protection program is added in the control flow to enhance the reliability of the control method in applications. The simulation and experiment results indicate that the proposed method is an effective and reliable way for on-line vibration suppression, and the machining quality can be obviously improved. PMID:26751448

  1. A Novel Hybrid Error Criterion-Based Active Control Method for on-Line Milling Vibration Suppression with Piezoelectric Actuators and Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xingwu; Wang, Chenxi; Gao, Robert X.; Yan, Ruqiang; Chen, Xuefeng; Wang, Shibin

    2016-01-01

    Milling vibration is one of the most serious factors affecting machining quality and precision. In this paper a novel hybrid error criterion-based frequency-domain LMS active control method is constructed and used for vibration suppression of milling processes by piezoelectric actuators and sensors, in which only one Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) is used and no Inverse Fast Fourier Transform (IFFT) is involved. The correction formulas are derived by a steepest descent procedure and the control parameters are analyzed and optimized. Then, a novel hybrid error criterion is constructed to improve the adaptability, reliability and anti-interference ability of the constructed control algorithm. Finally, based on piezoelectric actuators and acceleration sensors, a simulation of a spindle and a milling process experiment are presented to verify the proposed method. Besides, a protection program is added in the control flow to enhance the reliability of the control method in applications. The simulation and experiment results indicate that the proposed method is an effective and reliable way for on-line vibration suppression, and the machining quality can be obviously improved. PMID:26751448

  2. The Venus ionopause current sheet - Thickness length scale and controlling factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elphic, R. C.; Russell, C. T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Scarf, F. L.; Brace, L. H.

    1981-01-01

    Data from the fluxgate magnetometer, plasma wave experiment and Langmuir probe aboard Pioneer Venus are used to investigate the characteristic thickness length scale of the ionopause current sheet, as well as how this length scale is controlled. Thickness is found to be a bistatic quality, large scales being associated with high field strengths and current sheet altitudes below 300 km, while smaller scales are found with lower field strengths and ionopause altitudes above 300 km. Ion collisions and plasma wave activity contribute to the formation of the broader, low-altitude ionopause current sheets. Although evidence suggests that the wave activity influences the thin ionopause current sheets, a simple model points to the control of the thin ionopause current sheets by ionospheric ion and electron temperatures

  3. Gyrotron Output Power Stabilization by PID Feedback Control of Heater Current and Anode Voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khutoryan, E. M.; Idehara, T.; Kuleshov, A. N.; Ueda, K.

    2014-12-01

    To provide stable output power of a gyrotron during long operation time the power stabilization was achieved by two schemes with PID feedback control of heater current and anode voltage. It was based on the dependence of the output power on both the anode voltage and the beam current and also on the dependence of the beam current on the gun heater current. Both schemes provided decrease of the power standard deviation to 0.3-0.5%. The comparison between parameters of both schemes is discussed in the paper.

  4. Generation and coherent control of pure spin currents via terahertz pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Schüler, Michael Berakdar, Jamal

    2014-04-21

    We inspect the time and spin-dependent, inelastic tunneling in engineered semiconductor-based double quantum well driven by time-structured terahertz pulses. An essential ingredient is an embedded spin-active structure with vibrational modes that scatter the pulse driven carriers. Due to the different time scales of the charge and spin dynamics, the spin-dependent electron-vibron coupling may result in pure net spin current (with negligible charge current). Heating the vibrational site may affect the resulting spin current. Furthermore, by controlling the charge dynamics, the spin dynamics and the generated spin current can be manipulated and switched on and off coherently.

  5. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry Uranium Error Propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, D P; Maclean, S; Shepley, D; Shaw, R K

    2001-07-01

    The Hazards Control Department at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) uses Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP/MS) technology to analyze uranium in urine. The ICP/MS used by the Hazards Control Department is a Perkin-Elmer Elan 6000 ICP/MS. The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program requires that the total error be assessed for bioassay measurements. A previous evaluation of the errors associated with the ICP/MS measurement of uranium demonstrated a {+-} 9.6% error in the range of 0.01 to 0.02 {micro}g/l. However, the propagation of total error for concentrations above and below this level have heretofore been undetermined. This document is an evaluation of the errors associated with the current LLNL ICP/MS method for a more expanded range of uranium concentrations.

  6. Concurrent error detection using watchdog processors - A survey

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmood, A.; McCluskey, E.J.

    1988-02-01

    This is a survey of concurrent system-level error detection techniques using a watchdog processor. A watchdog processor is a small and simple coprocessor that detects errors by monitoring the behavior of a system. Like replication it does not depend on any fault model for error detection. However, it requires less hardware as compared to replication. It is shown that a large number of errors can be detected by monitoring the control flow and memory access behavior. Two techniques of control flow checking are discussed and compared to the current error detection techniques. A scheme for memory access checking based on capability-based addressing is described. The design of a watchdog for performing reasonableness checks on the output of a main processor, by executing assertions, is also discussed.

  7. Optimal control of electric drive with simultaneous control inputs for motor current and flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pansyuk, V. I.

    1984-08-01

    A detailed mathematical analysis of the optimal control of a dc electric drive with a variable magnetic flux is presented. Expressions are found for the optimal controller. When this controller uses real time microprocessors control hardware, formulas are also derived for the various portions of the optimal process as well as the logic expressions for the switching of these parts of the process. The resulting optimal process differs from previous determinations in that the braking portion, when a resistance moment is present, contains a free run-down (passive braking) region, before and after which there can be regions of active braking, when the motor produces an electromagnetic moment. In one numerical example of step dc motor control, which is used to compare the optimal process found here with one developed earlier, power losses are found to be reduced by 5.44% with the new process. The entire solution of the problem using the procedure presented here reduces to finding the conditional extremum of some function of several variables whose number is no greater than the dimensionality of the system and does not lead to a boundary value problem.

  8. Advances in tokamak control: from multi-actuator MHD control to model-based current profile tailoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felici, Federico

    2012-10-01

    Recent experiments on TCV have demonstrated integrated control of the sawtooth and Neoclassical Tearing Mode (NTM) instabilities in a combined preemption-suppression strategy. This strategy is enabled by new sawtooth control methods (sawtooth pacing) in which modulation of sawtooth-stabilizing electron cyclotron power during the sawtooth cycle stimulates the advent of the crash. Rather than controlling the average sawtooth period, the precise timing of each individual crash can now be prescribed. Using this knowledge, efficient preemptive stabilization of NTMs becomes possible by applying power on the rational surface only at the instant of the crash-generating seed island. TCV experiments demonstrate that this approach, reinforced by NTM stabilization as a backup strategy, is effectively failsafe. This opens the road to inductive H-mode scenarios with long sawteeth providing longer inter-crash periods of high density and temperature. Also Edge Localized Modes are susceptible to EC modulation and it is shown that individual ELM events can be controlled using similar techniques. For advanced tokamak scenarios, MHD control is to be combined with optimization and control of the plasma kinetic and magnetic profile evolution in time. Real-time simulation of a physical model (RAPTOR) of current transport, including bootstrap current, neoclassical conductivity and auxiliary current drive, yields complete knowledge of the relevant profiles at any given time. The pilot implementation on TCV shows that these calculations can indeed be done in real-time and the resulting profiles have been included in feedback control schemes. Integration of this model with time-varying equilibria and internal current profile diagnostics provides a new framework for real-time interpretation of diagnostic data for plasma prediction, scenario monitoring, disruption prevention and feedback control.

  9. Quality Control Analysis of Selected Aspects of Programs Administered by the Bureau of Student Financial Assistance. Error-Prone Model Derived from 1978-1979 Quality Control Study. Data Report. [Task 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saavedra, Pedro; Kuchak, JoAnn

    An error-prone model (EPM) to predict financial aid applicants who are likely to misreport on Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) applications was developed, based on interviews conducted with a quality control sample of 1,791 students during 1978-1979. The model was designed to identify corrective methods appropriate for different types of…

  10. Experimental Quantum Error Detection

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xian-Min; Yi, Zhen-Huan; Yang, Bin; Zhou, Fei; Yang, Tao; Peng, Cheng-Zhi

    2012-01-01

    Faithful transmission of quantum information is a crucial ingredient in quantum communication networks. To overcome the unavoidable decoherence in a noisy channel, to date, many efforts have been made to transmit one state by consuming large numbers of time-synchronized ancilla states. However, such huge demands of quantum resources are hard to meet with current technology and this restricts practical applications. Here we experimentally demonstrate quantum error detection, an economical approach to reliably protecting a qubit against bit-flip errors. Arbitrary unknown polarization states of single photons and entangled photons are converted into time bins deterministically via a modified Franson interferometer. Noise arising in both 10 m and 0.8 km fiber, which induces associated errors on the reference frame of time bins, is filtered when photons are detected. The demonstrated resource efficiency and state independence make this protocol a promising candidate for implementing a real-world quantum communication network. PMID:22953047

  11. Controlling hollow relativistic electron beam orbits with an inductive current divider

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Richardson, A. S.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Ottinger, P. F.; Rittersdorf, I. M.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.; Zier, J. C.

    2015-02-06

    A passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam is proposed using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam's return current. A central post carries a portion of the return current (I1), while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I2). An envelope equation appropriate for a hollow electron beam is derived and applied to the current divider. The force on the beam trajectory is shown to be proportional to (I2-I1), while the average force on the envelope (the beam width) is proportional to the beam current Ib = (I2 + I1). The values of I1 and I2 depend on the inductances in the return-current path geometries. Proper choice of the return-current geometries determines these inductances and offers control over the beam trajectory. As a result, solutions using realistic beam parameters show that, for appropriate choices of the return-current-path geometry, the inductive current divider can produce a beam that is both pinched and straightened so that it approaches a target at near-normal incidence with a beam diameter that is on the order of a few mm.

  12. Controlling hollow relativistic electron beam orbits with an inductive current divider

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Richardson, A. S.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Ottinger, P. F.; Rittersdorf, I. M.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.; Zier, J. C.

    2015-02-06

    A passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam is proposed using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam's return current. A central post carries a portion of the return current (I1), while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I2). An envelope equation appropriate for a hollow electron beam is derived and applied to the current divider. The force on the beam trajectory is shown to be proportional to (I2-I1), while the average force on the envelope (the beam width) is proportional to the beam current Ib = (I2 + I1). The values of I1more » and I2 depend on the inductances in the return-current path geometries. Proper choice of the return-current geometries determines these inductances and offers control over the beam trajectory. As a result, solutions using realistic beam parameters show that, for appropriate choices of the return-current-path geometry, the inductive current divider can produce a beam that is both pinched and straightened so that it approaches a target at near-normal incidence with a beam diameter that is on the order of a few mm.« less

  13. Controlling hollow relativistic electron beam orbits with an inductive current divider

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, S. B.; Richardson, A. S.; Angus, J. R.; Cooperstein, G.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Ottinger, P. F.; Rittersdorf, I. M.; Schumer, J. W.; Weber, B. V.; Zier, J. C.

    2015-02-15

    A passive method for controlling the trajectory of an intense, hollow electron beam is proposed using a vacuum structure that inductively splits the beam's return current. A central post carries a portion of the return current (I{sub 1}), while the outer conductor carries the remainder (I{sub 2}). An envelope equation appropriate for a hollow electron beam is derived and applied to the current divider. The force on the beam trajectory is shown to be proportional to (I{sub 2}-I{sub 1}), while the average force on the envelope (the beam width) is proportional to the beam current I{sub b} = (I{sub 2} + I{sub 1}). The values of I{sub 1} and I{sub 2} depend on the inductances in the return-current path geometries. Proper choice of the return-current geometries determines these inductances and offers control over the beam trajectory. Solutions using realistic beam parameters show that, for appropriate choices of the return-current-path geometry, the inductive current divider can produce a beam that is both pinched and straightened so that it approaches a target at near-normal incidence with a beam diameter that is on the order of a few mm.

  14. Quality Control Analysis of Selected Aspects of Programs Administered by the Bureau of Student Financial Assistance. Task 1 and Quality Control Sample; Error-Prone Modeling Analysis Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saavedra, Pedro; And Others

    Parameters and procedures for developing an error-prone model (EPM) to predict financial aid applicants who are likely to misreport on Basic Educational Opportunity Grant (BEOG) applications are introduced. Specifications to adapt these general parameters to secondary data analysis of the Validation, Edits, and Applications Processing Systems…

  15. Ultrafast helicity control of surface currents in topological insulators with near-unity fidelity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastl, Christoph; Karnetzky, Christoph; Karl, Helmut; Holleitner, Alexander W.

    2015-03-01

    In recent years, a class of solid-state materials, called three-dimensional topological insulators, has emerged. In the bulk, a topological insulator behaves like an ordinary insulator with a band gap. At the surface, conducting gapless states exist showing remarkable properties such as helical Dirac dispersion and suppression of backscattering of spin-polarized charge carriers. The characterization and control of the surface states via transport experiments is often hindered by residual bulk contributions. Here we show that surface currents in Bi2Se3 can be controlled by circularly polarized light on a picosecond timescale with a fidelity near unity even at room temperature. We reveal the temporal separation of such ultrafast helicity-dependent surface currents from photo-induced thermoelectric and drift currents in the bulk. Our results uncover the functionality of ultrafast optoelectronic devices based on surface currents in topological insulators.

  16. Ultrafast helicity control of surface currents in topological insulators with near-unity fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Kastl, Christoph; Karnetzky, Christoph; Karl, Helmut; Holleitner, Alexander W.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a class of solid-state materials, called three-dimensional topological insulators, has emerged. In the bulk, a topological insulator behaves like an ordinary insulator with a band gap. At the surface, conducting gapless states exist showing remarkable properties such as helical Dirac dispersion and suppression of backscattering of spin-polarized charge carriers. The characterization and control of the surface states via transport experiments is often hindered by residual bulk contributions. Here we show that surface currents in Bi2Se3 can be controlled by circularly polarized light on a picosecond timescale with a fidelity near unity even at room temperature. We reveal the temporal separation of such ultrafast helicity-dependent surface currents from photo-induced thermoelectric and drift currents in the bulk. Our results uncover the functionality of ultrafast optoelectronic devices based on surface currents in topological insulators. PMID:25808213

  17. Ultrafast helicity control of surface currents in topological insulators with near-unity fidelity.

    PubMed

    Kastl, Christoph; Karnetzky, Christoph; Karl, Helmut; Holleitner, Alexander W

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a class of solid-state materials, called three-dimensional topological insulators, has emerged. In the bulk, a topological insulator behaves like an ordinary insulator with a band gap. At the surface, conducting gapless states exist showing remarkable properties such as helical Dirac dispersion and suppression of backscattering of spin-polarized charge carriers. The characterization and control of the surface states via transport experiments is often hindered by residual bulk contributions. Here we show that surface currents in Bi2Se3 can be controlled by circularly polarized light on a picosecond timescale with a fidelity near unity even at room temperature. We reveal the temporal separation of such ultrafast helicity-dependent surface currents from photo-induced thermoelectric and drift currents in the bulk. Our results uncover the functionality of ultrafast optoelectronic devices based on surface currents in topological insulators. PMID:25808213

  18. New Current Control Method of DC Power Supply for Magnetic Perturbation Coils on J-TEXT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Wubing; Ding, Yonghua; Yi, Bin; Xu, Hangyu; Rao, Bo; Zhang, Ming; Liu, Minghai

    2014-11-01

    In order to advance the research on suppressing tearing modes and driving plasma rotation, a DC power supply (PS) system has been developed for dynamic resonant magnetic perturbation (DRMP) coils and applied in the J-TEXT experiment. To enrich experimental phenomena in the J-TEXT tokamak, applying the circulating current four-quadrant operation mode in the DRMP DC PS system is proposed. By using the circulating current four-quadrant operation, DRMP coils can be smoothly controlled without the dead-time when the current polarity reverses. Essential circuit analysis, control optimization and simulation of desired scenarios have been performed for normal current. Relevant simulation and test results are also presented.

  19. Current Status Of SMOS Quality Control Operations Under The Ideas Contract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatton, Emma; Martin-Porqueras, Fernando; Haria, Kajal

    2013-12-01

    Operational Quality Control (QC) of ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission is currently carried out under the Instrument Data quality Evaluation and Analysis Service (IDEAS). This paper provides a summary of the current status of the instrument health, data processing and data quality. It also provides details of the information available to users of SMOS data and where this information can be accessed.

  20. Compact disk error measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, D.; Harriman, K.; Tehranchi, B.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of this project are as follows: provide hardware and software that will perform simple, real-time, high resolution (single-byte) measurement of the error burst and good data gap statistics seen by a photoCD player read channel when recorded CD write-once discs of variable quality (i.e., condition) are being read; extend the above system to enable measurement of the hard decision (i.e., 1-bit error flags) and soft decision (i.e., 2-bit error flags) decoding information that is produced/used by the Cross Interleaved - Reed - Solomon - Code (CIRC) block decoder employed in the photoCD player read channel; construct a model that uses data obtained via the systems described above to produce meaningful estimates of output error rates (due to both uncorrected ECC words and misdecoded ECC words) when a CD disc having specific (measured) error statistics is read (completion date to be determined); and check the hypothesis that current adaptive CIRC block decoders are optimized for pressed (DAD/ROM) CD discs. If warranted, do a conceptual design of an adaptive CIRC decoder that is optimized for write-once CD discs.

  1. Tradeoff between no-call reduction in genotyping error rate and loss of sample size for genetic case/control association studies.

    PubMed

    Kang, S J; Gordon, D; Brown, A M; Ott, J; Finch, S J

    2004-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) may be genotyped for use in case-control designs to test for association between a SNP marker and a disease using a 2 x 3 chi-squared test of independence. Genotyping is often based on underlying continuous measurements, which are classified into genotypes. A "no-call" procedure is sometimes used in which borderline observations are not classified. This procedure has the simultaneous effect of reducing the genotype error rate and the expected number of genotypes observed. Both quantities affect the power of the statistic. We develop methods for calculating the genotype error rate, the expected number of genotypes observed, and the expected power of the resulting test as a function of the no-call procedure. We examine the statistical properties of the chi-squared test using a no-call procedure when the underlying continuous measure of genotype classification is a three-component mixture of univariate normal distributions under a range of parameter specifications. The genotype error rate decreases as the no-call region is increased. The expected number of observations genotyped also decreases. Our key finding is that the expected power of the chi-squared test is not sensitive to the no-call procedure. That is, the benefits of reduced genotype error rate are almost exactly balanced by the losses due to reduced genotype observations. For an underlying univariate normal mixture of genotype classification to be analyzed with a 2 x 3 chi-squared test, there is little, if any, increase in power using a no-call procedure. PMID:14992497

  2. Spin polarized current controlled dynamics of domain walls in magnetic films with in-plane anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippov, B. N.; Dubovik, M. N.; Korzunin, L. G.

    2016-06-01

    We study the dynamic properties of asymmetric vortex Bloch walls and classical 1D Néel walls controlled by a spin-polarized current in magnetic films with in-plane anisotropy. It is shown that fairly high velocities of domain walls (up to 100 m/s) can be obtained for the current density in the range j = 106-108 A/cm2. The nonlinear dependence of the wall velocity on the film thickness and the linear dependence of the velocity on the current density and inverse damping parameter are found.

  3. Note. Switch-Mode Hybrid Current Controllers for Quantum Cascade Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Taubman, Matthew S.

    2013-01-07

    Chemical sensing in the mid-infrared has been revolutionized by the advent of quantum cascade lasers. Their higher current and voltage demands compared to laser diodes however, negatively impact size, weight and power footprint for fieldable systems, particularly in hot environments. This letter presents a switch-mode/linear hybrid controller design, furnishing low-noise drive current up to 2 amperes at compliance voltages up to 15 volts, with noise levels close to the Johnson noise of the internal resistors. Current modulation from near zero to 1.8 Amps is also demonstrated at frequencies up to a kilohertz.

  4. Voltage-controllable generator of pure spin current: A three-terminal model

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Zheng; Wu, Reng-Lai; Yu, Ya-Bin Wang, Miao

    2014-07-28

    Three-terminal devices have been frequently proposed to generate the pure spin current. However, the controllability and stability of pure spin current still needs to be improved. In this paper, a three-terminal device, composed of a ferromagnetic metallic lead and two nonmagnetic semiconductor leads coupled with a quantum dot, is employed to study the properties of electron spin transport. The results show that when the external voltage on one of nonmagnetic semiconductor leads is adjusted to a proper range, a pure spin current plateau or a fully spin-polarized current plateau appears in another nonmagnetic semiconductor lead. In a wide range of external voltage, the pure spin current or the spin-polarized current is kept unchanged. Since the change of temperature may considerably influence the spin-polarization of current and is inevitable actually, we studied the corresponding compensation to keep the pure spin current unchanged. Furthermore, the effect of device parameters on the pure spin current is also investigated.

  5. Measurement error revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Robert K.

    1999-12-01

    It is widely accepted in the electronics industry that measurement gauge error variation should be no larger than 10% of the related specification window. In a previous paper, 'What Amount of Measurement Error is Too Much?', the author used a framework from the process industries to evaluate the impact of measurement error variation in terms of both customer and supplier risk (i.e., Non-conformance and Yield Loss). Application of this framework in its simplest form suggested that in many circumstances the 10% criterion might be more stringent than is reasonably necessary. This paper reviews the framework and results of the earlier work, then examines some of the possible extensions to this framework suggested in that paper, including variance component models and sampling plans applicable in the photomask and semiconductor businesses. The potential impact of imperfect process control practices will be examined as well.

  6. Current Level of Mission Control Automation at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maks, Lori; Breed, Julie; Rackley, Michael; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA is particularly concerned with reducing mission operations costs through increased automation. This paper examines the operations procedures within NASA Mission Control Centers in order to uncover the level of automation that currently exists within them. Based on an assessment of mission operations procedures within three representative control centers, this paper recommends specific areas where there is potential for mission cost reduction through increased automation.

  7. [Current situation of endemic status, prevention and control of neglected zoonotic diseases in China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Zhu, Hong-Run; Yang, Guo-Jing

    2013-06-01

    Neglected zoonotic diseases not only threaten the health of human, especially to the livestock keepers in poverty-stricken areas but also cause great economic losses to the animal husbandry. This paper reviews the current situation of the endemic status, prevention and control of neglected zoonotic diseases existing in China including rabies, bovine tuberculosis, brucellosis, anthrax, leptospirosis, echinococcosis, cysticercosis, leishmaniasis and fascioliasis, so as to provide the basic information for better controlling, even eliminating, the neglected zoonotic diseases in China. PMID:24024457

  8. Mapping Transmission Risk of Lassa Fever in West Africa: The Importance of Quality Control, Sampling Bias, and Error Weighting

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, A. Townsend; Moses, Lina M.; Bausch, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    Lassa fever is a disease that has been reported from sites across West Africa; it is caused by an arenavirus that is hosted by the rodent M. natalensis. Although it is confined to West Africa, and has been documented in detail in some well-studied areas, the details of the distribution of risk of Lassa virus infection remain poorly known at the level of the broader region. In this paper, we explored the effects of certainty of diagnosis, oversampling in well-studied region, and error balance on results of mapping exercises. Each of the three factors assessed in this study had clear and consistent influences on model results, overestimating risk in southern, humid zones in West Africa, and underestimating risk in drier and more northern areas. The final, adjusted risk map indicates broad risk areas across much of West Africa. Although risk maps are increasingly easy to develop from disease occurrence data and raster data sets summarizing aspects of environments and landscapes, this process is highly sensitive to issues of data quality, sampling design, and design of analysis, with macrogeographic implications of each of these issues and the potential for misrepresenting real patterns of risk. PMID:25105746

  9. Mapping transmission risk of Lassa fever in West Africa: the importance of quality control, sampling bias, and error weighting.

    PubMed

    Peterson, A Townsend; Moses, Lina M; Bausch, Daniel G

    2014-01-01

    Lassa fever is a disease that has been reported from sites across West Africa; it is caused by an arenavirus that is hosted by the rodent M. natalensis. Although it is confined to West Africa, and has been documented in detail in some well-studied areas, the details of the distribution of risk of Lassa virus infection remain poorly known at the level of the broader region. In this paper, we explored the effects of certainty of diagnosis, oversampling in well-studied region, and error balance on results of mapping exercises. Each of the three factors assessed in this study had clear and consistent influences on model results, overestimating risk in southern, humid zones in West Africa, and underestimating risk in drier and more northern areas. The final, adjusted risk map indicates broad risk areas across much of West Africa. Although risk maps are increasingly easy to develop from disease occurrence data and raster data sets summarizing aspects of environments and landscapes, this process is highly sensitive to issues of data quality, sampling design, and design of analysis, with macrogeographic implications of each of these issues and the potential for misrepresenting real patterns of risk. PMID:25105746

  10. Power Management Based Current Control Technique for Photovoltaic-Battery Assisted Wind-Hydro Hybrid System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ram Prabhakar, J.; Ragavan, K.

    2013-07-01

    This article proposes new power management based current control strategy for integrated wind-solar-hydro system equipped with battery storage mechanism. In this control technique, an indirect estimation of load current is done, through energy balance model, DC-link voltage control and droop control. This system features simpler energy management strategy and necessitates few power electronic converters, thereby minimizing the cost of the system. The generation-demand (G-D) management diagram is formulated based on the stochastic weather conditions and demand, which would likely moderate the gap between both. The features of management strategy deploying energy balance model include (1) regulating DC-link voltage within specified tolerances, (2) isolated operation without relying on external electric power transmission network, (3) indirect current control of hydro turbine driven induction generator and (4) seamless transition between grid-connected and off-grid operation modes. Furthermore, structuring of the hybrid system with appropriate selection of control variables enables power sharing among each energy conversion systems and battery storage mechanism. By addressing these intricacies, it is viable to regulate the frequency and voltage of the remote network at load end. The performance of the proposed composite scheme is demonstrated through time-domain simulation in MATLAB/Simulink environment.

  11. Recall bias in melanoma risk factors and measurement error effects: a nested case-control study within the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study.

    PubMed

    Parr, Christine L; Hjartåker, Anette; Laake, Petter; Lund, Eiliv; Veierød, Marit B

    2009-02-01

    Case-control studies of melanoma have the potential for recall bias after much public information about the relation with ultraviolet radiation. Recall bias has been investigated in few studies and only for some risk factors. A nested case-control study of recall bias was conducted in 2004 within the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study: 208 melanoma cases and 2,080 matched controls were invited. Data were analyzed for 162 cases (response, 78%) and 1,242 controls (response, 77%). Questionnaire responses to several host factors and ultraviolet exposures collected at enrollment in 1991-1997 and in 2004 were compared stratified on case-control status. Shifts in responses were observed among both cases and controls, but a shift in cases was observed only for skin color after chronic sun exposure, and a larger shift in cases was observed for nevi. Weighted kappa was lower for cases than for controls for most age intervals of sunburn, sunbathing vacations, and solarium use. Differences in odds ratio estimates of melanoma based on prospective and retrospective measurements indicate measurement error that is difficult to characterize. The authors conclude that indications of recall bias were found in this sample of Norwegian women, but that the results were inconsistent for the different exposures. PMID:19011116

  12. Teratogenic inborn errors of metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, J. V.

    1986-01-01

    Most children with inborn errors of metabolism are born healthy without malformations as the fetus is protected by the metabolic activity of the placenta. However, certain inborn errors of the fetus have teratogenic effects although the mechanisms responsible for the malformations are not generally understood. Inborn errors in the mother may also be teratogenic. The adverse effects of these may be reduced by improved metabolic control of the biochemical disorder. PMID:3540927

  13. 78 FR 17142 - Current Good Manufacturing Practice and Hazard Analysis and Risk-Based Preventive Controls for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... correcting the January 16, 2013 (78 FR 3646), proposed rule entitled ``Current Good Manufacturing Practice... Appendix in which all references are numbered incorrectly. This document corrects those errors. In FR Doc... proposed rule to establish CGMP requirements for dietary ingredients and dietary supplements (68 FR...

  14. Simple voltage-controlled current source for wideband electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy: circuit dependences and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seoane, F.; Macías, R.; Bragós, R.; Lindecrantz, K.

    2011-11-01

    In this work, the single Op-Amp with load-in-the-loop topology as a current source is revisited. This circuit topology was already used as a voltage-controlled current source (VCCS) in the 1960s but was left unused when the requirements for higher frequency arose among the applications of electrical bioimpedance (EBI). The aim of the authors is not only limited to show that with the currently available electronic devices it is perfectly viable to use this simple VCCS topology as a working current source for wideband spectroscopy applications of EBI, but also to identify the limitations and the role of each of the circuit components in the most important parameter of a current for wideband applications: the output impedance. The study includes the eventual presence of a stray capacitance and also an original enhancement, driving with current the VCCS. Based on the theoretical analysis and experimental measurements, an accurate model of the output impedance is provided, explaining the role of the main constitutive elements of the circuit in the source's output impedance. Using the topologies presented in this work and the proposed model, any electronic designer can easily implement a simple and efficient current source for wideband EBI spectroscopy applications, e.g. in this study, values above 150 kΩ at 1 MHz have been obtained, which to the knowledge of the authors are the largest values experimentally measured and reported for a current source in EBI at this frequency.

  15. The Current Status of Unsteady CFD Approaches for Aerodynamic Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Mark H.; Singer, Bart A.; Yamaleev, Nail; Vatsa, Veer N.; Viken, Sally A.; Atkins, Harold L.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of the current status of time dependent algorithms is presented. Special attention is given to algorithms used to predict fluid actuator flows, as well as other active and passive flow control devices. Capabilities for the next decade are predicted, and principal impediments to the progress of time-dependent algorithms are identified.

  16. A Controlled Evaluation of Reminiscence and Current Topics Discussion Groups in a Nursing Home Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rattenbury, Christine; Stones, M. J.

    1989-01-01

    Compared psychological well-being of elderly nursing home residents who participated in reminiscence and current topics group discussions with control group of residents. Rated participants' happiness/depression, activity, mood, and functional levels before and after intervention. Intervention had significant effect only on happiness/depression…

  17. A Student Activity Fee Primer: Current Research on Collection, Control and Allocation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meabon, David; And Others

    The past and current status of the student activity fee is reviewed from the perspectives of the legislature, state agency or state board of control, case law, and institutional trends. The analysis is based upon four national studies, a review of case law, and a campus model for the administration of student activity fees. Various states have…

  18. Filtering and Control of High Speed Motor Current in a Flywheel Energy Storage System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Barbara H.; Santiago, Walter

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has been developing technology to enable the use of high speed flywheel energy storage units in future spacecraft for the last several years. An integral part of the flywheel unit is the three phase motor/generator that is used to accelerate and decelerate the flywheel. The motor/generator voltage is supplied from a pulse width modulated (PWM) inverter operating from a fixed DC voltage supply. The motor current is regulated through a closed loop current control that commands the necessary voltage from the inverter to achieve the desired current. The current regulation loop is the innermost control loop of the overall flywheel system and, as a result, must be fast and accurate over the entire operating speed range (20,000 to 60,000 rpm) of the flywheel. The voltage applied to the motor is a high frequency PWM version of the DC bus voltage that results in the commanded fundamental value plus higher order harmonics. Most of the harmonic content is at the switching frequency and above. The higher order harmonics cause a rapid change in voltage to be applied to the motor that can result in large voltage stresses across the motor windings. In addition, the high frequency content in the motor causes sensor noise in the magnetic bearings that leads to disturbances for the bearing control. To alleviate these problems, a filter is used to present a more sinusoidal voltage to the motor/generator. However, the filter adds additional dynamics and phase lag to the motor system that can interfere with the performance of the current regulator. This paper will discuss the tuning methodology and results for the motor/generator current regulator and the impact of the filter on the control. Results at speeds up to 50,000 rpm are presented.

  19. Modeling the Spin Motor Current of the International Space Station's Control Moment Gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pereira, Miguel A.

    2008-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) attitude control is provided by two means: The Russian Segment uses thrusters and the U.S. Segment uses double-gimbaled control moment gyroscopes (CMG). CMGs are used as momentum exchange devices, providing non propulsive attitude control for the vehicle. The CMGs are very important for the ISS program because, first, they save propellant - which needs to be transferred to the Station in special cargo vehicles - and, second, they provide the microgravity environment on the Station - which is necessary for scientific experiments planned for the ISS mission. Since 2002, when one of the CMG on the ISS failed, all CMGs are closely monitored. High gimbal rates, vibration spikes, unusual variations of spin motor current and bearing temperatures are of great concern, since these parameters are the CMG health indicators. The telemetry analysis of these and some other CMG parameters is used to determine constrains and make changes to the CMGs operation on board. These CMG limitations, in turn, may limit the ISS attitude control capabilities and may be critical to ISS operation. Therefore, it is important to know whether the CMG parameter is nominal or out of family, and why. The goal of this project is to analyze an important CMG parameter - spin motor current. Some operational decisions are made now based on the spin motor current signatures. The spin motor current depends on gimbal rates, ISS rates, and spin bearing friction. The spin bearing friction in turn depends on the bearing temperatures, wheel rates, normal load - which is a function of gimbal and wheel rates - lubrication, etc. The first task of this project is to create a spin motor current mathematical model based on CMG dynamics model and the current knowledge on bearing friction in microgravity.

  20. Plasma Charge Current for Controlling and Monitoring Electron Beam Welding with Beam Oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Trushnikov, Dmitriy; Belenkiy, Vladimir; Shchavlev, Valeriy; Piskunov, Anatoliy; Abdullin, Aleksandr; Mladenov, Georgy

    2012-01-01

    Electron beam welding (EBW) shows certain problems with the control of focus regime. The electron beam focus can be controlled in electron-beam welding based on the parameters of a secondary signal. In this case, the parameters like secondary emissions and focus coil current have extreme relationships. There are two values of focus coil current which provide equal value signal parameters. Therefore, adaptive systems of electron beam focus control use low-frequency scanning of focus, which substantially limits the operation speed of these systems and has a negative effect on weld joint quality. The purpose of this study is to develop a method for operational control of the electron beam focus during welding in the deep penetration mode. The method uses the plasma charge current signal as an additional informational parameter. This parameter allows identification of the electron beam focus regime in electron-beam welding without application of additional low-frequency scanning of focus. It can be used for working out operational electron beam control methods focusing exactly on the welding. In addition, use of this parameter allows one to observe the shape of the keyhole during the welding process. PMID:23242276

  1. Plasma charge current for controlling and monitoring electron beam welding with beam oscillation.

    PubMed

    Trushnikov, Dmitriy; Belenkiy, Vladimir; Shchavlev, Valeriy; Piskunov, Anatoliy; Abdullin, Aleksandr; Mladenov, Georgy

    2012-01-01

    Electron beam welding (EBW) shows certain problems with the control of focus regime. The electron beam focus can be controlled in electron-beam welding based on the parameters of a secondary signal. In this case, the parameters like secondary emissions and focus coil current have extreme relationships. There are two values of focus coil current which provide equal value signal parameters. Therefore, adaptive systems of electron beam focus control use low-frequency scanning of focus, which substantially limits the operation speed of these systems and has a negative effect on weld joint quality. The purpose of this study is to develop a method for operational control of the electron beam focus during welding in the deep penetration mode. The method uses the plasma charge current signal as an additional informational parameter. This parameter allows identification of the electron beam focus regime in electron-beam welding without application of additional low-frequency scanning of focus. It can be used for working out operational electron beam control methods focusing exactly on the welding. In addition, use of this parameter allows one to observe the shape of the keyhole during the welding process. PMID:23242276

  2. Improved PHIP polarization using a precision, low noise, voltage controlled current source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agraz, Jose; Grunfeld, Alexander; Cunningham, Karl; Li, Debiao; Wagner, Shawn

    2013-10-01

    Existing para-hydrogen induced polarization (PHIP) instrumentation relies on magnetic fields to hyperpolarize substances. These hyperpolarized substances have enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals over 10,000 fold, allowing for MRI at the molecular level. Required magnetic fields are generated by energizing a solenoid coil with current produced by a voltage controlled voltage source (VCVS), also known as a power supply. A VCVS lacks the current regulation necessary to keep magnetic field fluctuations to a minimum, which results in low PHIP polarization. A voltage controlled current source (VCCS) is an electric circuit that generates a steady flow of electrons proportional to an input voltage. A low noise VCCS provides the solenoid current flow regulation necessary to generate a stable static magnetic field (Bo). We discuss the design and implementation of a low noise, high stability, VCCS for magnetic field generation with minimum variations. We show that a precision, low noise, voltage reference driving a metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) based current sink, results in the current flow control necessary for generating a low noise and high stability Bo. In addition, this work: (1) compares current stability for ideal VCVS and VCCS models using transfer functions (TF), (2) develops our VCCS design's TF, (3) measures our VCCS design's thermal & 1/f noise, and (4) measures and compares hydroxyethyl-propionate (HEP) polarization obtained using a VCVS and our VCCS. The hyperpolarization of HEP was done using a PHIP instrument developed in our lab. Using our VCCS design, HEP polarization magnitude data show a statistically significant increase in polarization over using a VCVS. Circuit schematic, bill of materials, board layout, TF derivation, and Matlab simulations code are included as supplemental files.

  3. Joule heating of the ITER TF cold structure: Effects of vertical control coil currents and ELMS

    SciTech Connect

    Radovinsky, A.; Pillsbury, R.D. Jr.

    1993-11-09

    The toroidal field coil and support structures for ITER are maintained at cryogenic temperatures. The time-varying currents in the poloidal field coil system will induce eddy currents in these structures. The associated Joule dissipation will cause local heating and require heat removal which will show up as a load on the cryogenic system. Studies of Joule heating of the ITER TF cold structure (TFCS) due to the currents in the poloidal field coil system are presented. The two regimes considered in this study are the plasma vertical stability control and the Edge Loss Mode (ELM) events. The 3-D, thin-shell, eddy current program, EDDYCUFF was used to analyze the eddy currents and Joule losses in the cold structure. The current versus time scenarios were defined. Four control coil options were studied. All schemes use coils external to the TF cold structure. Analyses of power depositions during the plasma vertical stability control were performed for each of the four options. For each of these options three different recovery times were assumed. The times were 3, 1, and 1/3 seconds. Sets of four sequential ELMs, as well as isolated ELMs have been studied for various sets of active PF coils. The results showed that the lowest average power dissipation in the TF cold structure occurs when a subset of PF2 and PF7 are active, and all the other PF coils are passive. The general conclusion is that to minimize power dissipation in the TF cold structure it is preferable that only coils PF2 and PF7 are active. The other coils (PF3-PF6) should be passive and driven by a condition of constant flux. It is recommended in particular, that coils PF3 and PF5 be allowed to change currents to conserve flux, since they provide the maximum shielding of the TFCS from the fields caused by the active coils.

  4. Controlling Type I Error Rate in Evaluating Differential Item Functioning for Four DIF Methods: Use of Three Procedures for Adjustment of Multiple Item Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jihye

    2010-01-01

    In DIF studies, a Type I error refers to the mistake of identifying non-DIF items as DIF items, and a Type I error rate refers to the proportion of Type I errors in a simulation study. The possibility of making a Type I error in DIF studies is always present and high possibility of making such an error can weaken the validity of the assessment.…

  5. Fast pulsed operation of a small non-radioactive electron source with continuous emission current control

    SciTech Connect

    Cochems, P.; Kirk, A. T.; Bunert, E.; Runge, M.; Goncalves, P.; Zimmermann, S.

    2015-06-15

    Non-radioactive electron sources are of great interest in any application requiring the emission of electrons at atmospheric pressure, as they offer better control over emission parameters than radioactive electron sources and are not subject to legal restrictions. Recently, we published a simple electron source consisting only of a vacuum housing, a filament, and a single control grid. In this paper, we present improved control electronics that utilize this control grid in order to focus and defocus the electron beam, thus pulsing the electron emission at atmospheric pressure. This allows short emission pulses and excellent stability of the emitted electron current due to continuous control, both during pulsed and continuous operations. As an application example, this electron source is coupled to an ion mobility spectrometer. Here, the pulsed electron source allows experiments on gas phase ion chemistry (e.g., ion generation and recombination kinetics) and can even remove the need for a traditional ion shutter.

  6. Fast pulsed operation of a small non-radioactive electron source with continuous emission current control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochems, P.; Kirk, A. T.; Bunert, E.; Runge, M.; Goncalves, P.; Zimmermann, S.

    2015-06-01

    Non-radioactive electron sources are of great interest in any application requiring the emission of electrons at atmospheric pressure, as they offer better control over emission parameters than radioactive electron sources and are not subject to legal restrictions. Recently, we published a simple electron source consisting only of a vacuum housing, a filament, and a single control grid. In this paper, we present improved control electronics that utilize this control grid in order to focus and defocus the electron beam, thus pulsing the electron emission at atmospheric pressure. This allows short emission pulses and excellent stability of the emitted electron current due to continuous control, both during pulsed and continuous operations. As an application example, this electron source is coupled to an ion mobility spectrometer. Here, the pulsed electron source allows experiments on gas phase ion chemistry (e.g., ion generation and recombination kinetics) and can even remove the need for a traditional ion shutter.

  7. Fast pulsed operation of a small non-radioactive electron source with continuous emission current control.

    PubMed

    Cochems, P; Kirk, A T; Bunert, E; Runge, M; Goncalves, P; Zimmermann, S

    2015-06-01

    Non-radioactive electron sources are of great interest in any application requiring the emission of electrons at atmospheric pressure, as they offer better control over emission parameters than radioactive electron sources and are not subject to legal restrictions. Recently, we published a simple electron source consisting only of a vacuum housing, a filament, and a single control grid. In this paper, we present improved control electronics that utilize this control grid in order to focus and defocus the electron beam, thus pulsing the electron emission at atmospheric pressure. This allows short emission pulses and excellent stability of the emitted electron current due to continuous control, both during pulsed and continuous operations. As an application example, this electron source is coupled to an ion mobility spectrometer. Here, the pulsed electron source allows experiments on gas phase ion chemistry (e.g., ion generation and recombination kinetics) and can even remove the need for a traditional ion shutter. PMID:26133868

  8. Skills, rules and knowledge in aircraft maintenance: errors in context

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, Alan; Williamson, Ann

    2002-01-01

    Automatic or skill-based behaviour is generally considered to be less prone to error than behaviour directed by conscious control. However, researchers who have applied Rasmussen's skill-rule-knowledge human error framework to accidents and incidents have sometimes found that skill-based errors appear in significant numbers. It is proposed that this is largely a reflection of the opportunities for error which workplaces present and does not indicate that skill-based behaviour is intrinsically unreliable. In the current study, 99 errors reported by 72 aircraft mechanics were examined in the light of a task analysis based on observations of the work of 25 aircraft mechanics. The task analysis identified the opportunities for error presented at various stages of maintenance work packages and by the job as a whole. Once the frequency of each error type was normalized in terms of the opportunities for error, it became apparent that skill-based performance is more reliable than rule-based performance, which is in turn more reliable than knowledge-based performance. The results reinforce the belief that industrial safety interventions designed to reduce errors would best be directed at those aspects of jobs that involve rule- and knowledge-based performance.

  9. RF current profile control studies in the alcator C-mod tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonoli, P. T.; Porkolab, M.; Wukitch, S. J.; Bernabei, S.; Kaita, R.; Mikkelsen, D.; Phillips, C. K.; Schilling, G.

    1999-09-01

    Time dependent calculations of lower hybrid (LH) current profile control in Alcator C-Mod have been done using the TRANSP [1], FPPRF [2], and LSC [3] codes. Up to 3 MW of LH current drive power was applied in plasmas with high power ICRF minority heating (PICH=1.8-3 MW) and fast current ramp up. Using the experimentally measured temperature profiles, off-axis current generation resulted in nonmonotonic q-profiles with qmin~=1.6. Self-consistent effects of off-axis electron heating by the LH power were also included in the analysis and significant broadening of the electron temperature profile was found with qmin>~2 and a larger shear reversal radius.

  10. Over-limiting Current and Control of Dendritic Growth by Surface Conduction in Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ji-Hyung; Khoo, Edwin; Bai, Peng; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding over-limiting current (faster than diffusion) is a long-standing challenge in electrochemistry with applications in desalination and energy storage. Known mechanisms involve either chemical or hydrodynamic instabilities in unconfined electrolytes. Here, it is shown that over-limiting current can be sustained by surface conduction in nanopores, without any such instabilities, and used to control dendritic growth during electrodeposition. Copper electrodeposits are grown in anodized aluminum oxide membranes with polyelectrolyte coatings to modify the surface charge. At low currents, uniform electroplating occurs, unaffected by surface modification due to thin electric double layers, but the morphology changes dramatically above the limiting current. With negative surface charge, growth is enhanced along the nanopore surfaces, forming surface dendrites and nanotubes behind a deionization shock. With positive surface charge, dendrites avoid the surfaces and are either guided along the nanopore centers or blocked from penetrating the membrane. PMID:25394685

  11. Measurement Errors in Organizational Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutka, Solomon; Frankel, Lester R.

    1993-01-01

    Describes three classes of measurement techniques: (1) interviewing methods; (2) record retrieval procedures; and (3) observation methods. Discusses primary reasons for measurement error. Concludes that, although measurement error can be defined and controlled for, there are other design factors that also must be considered. (CFR)

  12. Slow walking on a treadmill desk does not negatively affect executive abilities: an examination of cognitive control, conflict adaptation, response inhibition, and post-error slowing.

    PubMed

    Larson, Michael J; LeCheminant, James D; Carbine, Kaylie; Hill, Kyle R; Christenson, Edward; Masterson, Travis; LeCheminant, Rick

    2015-01-01

    An increasing trend in the workplace is for employees to walk on treadmills while working to attain known health benefits; however, the effect of walking on a treadmill during cognitive control and executive function tasks is not well known. We compared the cognitive control processes of conflict adaptation (i.e., congruency sequence effects-improved performance following high-conflict relative to low-conflict trials), post-error slowing (i.e., Rabbitt effect), and response inhibition during treadmill walking (1.5 mph) relative to sitting. Understanding the influence of treadmill desks on these cognitive processes may have implications for worker health and productivity. Sixty-nine individuals were randomized to either a sitting (n = 35) or treadmill-walking condition (n = 34). Groups did not differ in age or body mass index. All participants completed a computerized Eriksen flanker task and a response-inhibition go/no-go task in random order while either walking on a treadmill or seated. Response times (RTs) and accuracy were analyzed separately for each task using mixed model analysis of variance. Separate ANOVAs for RTs and accuracy showed the expected conflict adaptation effects, post-error slowing, and response inhibition effects when collapsed across sitting and treadmill groups (all Fs > 78.77, Ps < 0.001). There were no main effects or interactions as a function of group for any analyses (Fs < 0.79, Ps > 0.38), suggesting no decrements or enhancements in conflict-related control and adjustment processes or response inhibition for those walking on a treadmill versus sitting. We conclude that cognitive control performance remains relatively unaffected during slow treadmill walking relative to sitting. PMID:26074861

  13. Slow walking on a treadmill desk does not negatively affect executive abilities: an examination of cognitive control, conflict adaptation, response inhibition, and post-error slowing

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Michael J.; LeCheminant, James D.; Carbine, Kaylie; Hill, Kyle R.; Christenson, Edward; Masterson, Travis; LeCheminant, Rick

    2015-01-01

    An increasing trend in the workplace is for employees to walk on treadmills while working to attain known health benefits; however, the effect of walking on a treadmill during cognitive control and executive function tasks is not well known. We compared the cognitive control processes of conflict adaptation (i.e., congruency sequence effects—improved performance following high-conflict relative to low-conflict trials), post-error slowing (i.e., Rabbitt effect), and response inhibition during treadmill walking (1.5 mph) relative to sitting. Understanding the influence of treadmill desks on these cognitive processes may have implications for worker health and productivity. Sixty-nine individuals were randomized to either a sitting (n = 35) or treadmill-walking condition (n = 34). Groups did not differ in age or body mass index. All participants completed a computerized Eriksen flanker task and a response-inhibition go/no-go task in random order while either walking on a treadmill or seated. Response times (RTs) and accuracy were analyzed separately for each task using mixed model analysis of variance. Separate ANOVAs for RTs and accuracy showed the expected conflict adaptation effects, post-error slowing, and response inhibition effects when collapsed across sitting and treadmill groups (all Fs > 78.77, Ps < 0.001). There were no main effects or interactions as a function of group for any analyses (Fs < 0.79, Ps > 0.38), suggesting no decrements or enhancements in conflict-related control and adjustment processes or response inhibition for those walking on a treadmill versus sitting. We conclude that cognitive control performance remains relatively unaffected during slow treadmill walking relative to sitting. PMID:26074861

  14. Computation of stationary 3D halo currents in fusion devices with accuracy control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettini, Paolo; Specogna, Ruben

    2014-09-01

    This paper addresses the calculation of the resistive distribution of halo currents in three-dimensional structures of large magnetic confinement fusion machines. A Neumann electrokinetic problem is solved on a geometry so complicated that complementarity is used to monitor the discretization error. An irrotational electric field is obtained by a geometric formulation based on the electric scalar potential, whereas three geometric formulations are compared to obtain a solenoidal current density: a formulation based on the electric vector potential and two geometric formulations inspired from mixed and mixed-hybrid Finite Elements. The electric vector potential formulation is usually considered impractical since an enormous computing power is wasted by the topological pre-processing it requires. To solve this challenging problem, we present novel algorithms based on lazy cohomology generators that enable to save orders of magnitude computational time with respect to all other state-of-the-art solutions proposed in literature. Believing that our results are useful in other fields of scientific computing, the proposed algorithm is presented as a detailed pseudocode in such a way that it can be easily implemented.

  15. Computation of stationary 3D halo currents in fusion devices with accuracy control

    SciTech Connect

    Bettini, Paolo; Specogna, Ruben

    2014-09-15

    This paper addresses the calculation of the resistive distribution of halo currents in three-dimensional structures of large magnetic confinement fusion machines. A Neumann electrokinetic problem is solved on a geometry so complicated that complementarity is used to monitor the discretization error. An irrotational electric field is obtained by a geometric formulation based on the electric scalar potential, whereas three geometric formulations are compared to obtain a solenoidal current density: a formulation based on the electric vector potential and two geometric formulations inspired from mixed and mixed-hybrid Finite Elements. The electric vector potential formulation is usually considered impractical since an enormous computing power is wasted by the topological pre-processing it requires. To solve this challenging problem, we present novel algorithms based on lazy cohomology generators that enable to save orders of magnitude computational time with respect to all other state-of-the-art solutions proposed in literature. Believing that our results are useful in other fields of scientific computing, the proposed algorithm is presented as a detailed pseudocode in such a way that it can be easily implemented.

  16. Methods and apparatus for controlling respective load currents of multiple series-connected loads

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Michael; Lys, Ihor

    2014-05-27

    A lighting apparatus (100) includes one or more first LEDs (202) for generating a first spectrum of radiation (503), and one or more second LEDs (204) for generating a second different spectrum radiation (505). The first and second LEDs are electrically connected in series between a first node (516A) and a second node (516B), between which a series current (550) flows with the application of an operating voltage (516) across the nodes. A controllable current path (518) is connected in parallel with one or both of the first and second LEDs so as to at least partially divert the series current, such that a first current (552) through the first LED(s) and a second current (554) through the second LED(s) are different. Such current diversion techniques may be employed to compensate for shifts in color or color temperature of generated light during thermal transients, due to different temperature-dependent current-to-flux relationships for different types of LEDs.

  17. A theory of human error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcruer, D. T.; Clement, W. F.; Allen, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Human error, a significant contributing factor in a very high proportion of civil transport, general aviation, and rotorcraft accidents is investigated. Correction of the sources of human error requires that one attempt to reconstruct underlying and contributing causes of error from the circumstantial causes cited in official investigative reports. A validated analytical theory of the input-output behavior of human operators involving manual control, communication, supervisory, and monitoring tasks which are relevant to aviation operations is presented. This theory of behavior, both appropriate and inappropriate, provides an insightful basis for investigating, classifying, and quantifying the needed cause-effect relationships governing propagation of human error.

  18. Detecting and Correcting Errors in Rapid Aiming Movements: Effects of Movement Time, Distance, and Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherwood, David E.

    2010-01-01

    According to closed-loop accounts of motor control, movement errors are detected by comparing sensory feedback to an acquired reference state. Differences between the reference state and the movement-produced feedback results in an error signal that serves as a basis for a correction. The main question addressed in the current study was how…

  19. [Diagnostic Errors in Medicine].

    PubMed

    Buser, Claudia; Bankova, Andriyana

    2015-12-01

    The recognition of diagnostic errors in everyday practice can help improve patient safety. The most common diagnostic errors are the cognitive errors, followed by system-related errors and no fault errors. The cognitive errors often result from mental shortcuts, known as heuristics. The rate of cognitive errors can be reduced by a better understanding of heuristics and the use of checklists. The autopsy as a retrospective quality assessment of clinical diagnosis has a crucial role in learning from diagnostic errors. Diagnostic errors occur more often in primary care in comparison to hospital settings. On the other hand, the inpatient errors are more severe than the outpatient errors. PMID:26649954

  20. Effective variable switching point predictive current control for ac low-voltage drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolze, Peter; Karamanakos, Petros; Kennel, Ralph; Manias, Stefanos; Endisch, Christian

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents an effective model predictive current control scheme for induction machines driven by a three-level neutral point clamped inverter, called variable switching point predictive current control. Despite the fact that direct, enumeration-based model predictive control (MPC) strategies are very popular in the field of power electronics due to their numerous advantages such as design simplicity and straightforward implementation procedure, they carry two major drawbacks. These are the increased computational effort and the high ripples on the controlled variables, resulting in a limited applicability of such methods. The high ripples occur because in direct MPC algorithms the actuating variable can only be changed at the beginning of a sampling interval. A possible remedy for this would be to change the applied control input within the sampling interval, and thus to apply it for a shorter time than one sample. However, since such a solution would lead to an additional overhead which is crucial especially for multilevel inverters, a heuristic preselection of the optimal control action is adopted to keep the computational complexity at bay. Experimental results are provided to verify the potential advantages of the proposed strategy.

  1. A method of controlling floating potential for space station based on ion current magnification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jianguo; Liu, Guoqing; Jiang, Lixiang; Zhang, Chao; Jiao, Zilong

    2014-09-01

    The charging events of the International Space Station have been a focus of concern in recent years. Hollow cathode plasma contactors were applied to control the floating potential for their high emission currents of amps order. The in flight measurements showed that the floating potential was much smaller than predicted originally, and the actual emitted currents by the plasma contactors were well below amps level. In such case, a simpler method to control the floating potential may be applicable and suggested in the paper. By application of a metal sphere, which is biased at a high negative voltage relative to the structure and used as an ion current collector, the electron charging current of the structure can be effectively neutralized and the structure's floating potential can be controlled nearly to zero. The mechanism is introduced and the constraint condition for the system is investigated. Finally, a range of parameters for design are presented. Typically, for 100 V high voltage array, a sphere of r=0.3-0.7 m and biased at 500-200 V is enough. For its simplicity, the method has obvious advantages, such as no requirement of working gas, high reliability and long life, etc.

  2. A new approach to control a deflection of an electroplated microstructure: dual current electroplating methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hyun-Ho; Seo, Min-Ho; Han, Chang-Hoon; Yoon, Jun-Bo

    2013-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate a simple and novel method to control the deflection in a suspended microstructure by using a dual current electroplating (DuCE) method. The key concept of this method is to divide the structure into two layers—a bottom layer and a top layer—and then apply respective current densities in electroplating to those two layers while all other conditions are kept the same. In addition to a flat structure, the direction of structure bending is freely controlled by virtue of the DuCE method. Cantilever Ni beams with a length of 400 µm, which were electroplated by the conventional single current electroplating method, bent downward with a deflection of 3.4 µm. On the contrary, by the DuCE method, cantilever beams with a length of 400 µm showed an almost flat structure as desired. (The current densities of the bottom layer, the top layer, and the ratio of the two current densities, are 0.15, 1.24 A dm-2, and 8.3, respectively.) Consequently, a nickel electroplated spiral structure with a length of 8600 µm was suspended flat with an end deflection of less than 0.7 µm (the ratio between the deflection and length is 0.007%). This work therefore represents the unprecedented ultra-long suspended microstructure with submicrometer deflection.

  3. RHIC 12x150A current lead temperature controller: design and implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Mi, C.; Seberg, S.; Ganetis, Hamdi, K.; Louie, W.; Heppner, G.; Jamilkowski, J.; Bruno, D.; DiLieto, A.; Sirio, C.; Tuozzolo, J.; Sandberg, J.; Unger, K.

    2011-03-28

    There are 60 12 x 150A current leads distributed in six RHIC service buildings; each lead delivers power supply current from room temperature to cryogenic temperature in RHIC. Due to the humid environment, condensation occurs frequently and ice forms quickly during operation, especially during an extensive storage period. These conditions generate warnings and alarms to which personnel must respond and establish temporary solutions to keep the machine operating. In here, we designed a temperature control system to avoid such situations. This paper discusses its design, implementation, and some results. There are six service buildings in the RHIC complex; each building has two valve boxes that transfer room-temperature current cables from the power supplies into superconducting leads, and then transport them into the RHIC tunnel. In there, the transition between the room-temperature lead into superconducting lead is critical and essential; smooth running during the physics store is crucial for the machine's continuing operation. One of the problems that often occurred previously was the icing of these current leads that could result in a potential leakage current onto ground, thereby preventing a continuous supply of physics store. Fig. 1 illustrates a typical example on a power lead. Among the modifications of the design of the valve box, we list below the new requirements for designing the temperature controller to prevent icing occurring: (1) Remotely control, monitor, and record each current lead's temperature in real time. Prevent icing or overheating of a power lead. (2) Include a temperature alarm for the high/low level threshold. In this paper we discuss the design, implementation, upgrades to, and operation of this new system.

  4. Electric control of the Josephson current-phase relation in a topological circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Hao, L.; Liu, Jun-Feng

    2016-04-01

    We study the current-phase relation of a topological ring-shape Josephson junction, where the ring structure is defined by one-dimensional topological interface states constructed in a two-dimensional honeycomb-lattice system. We show that control of the potential difference between the two ring arms can lead to a φ0 Josephson junction. The physics origin is the superconducting electron- and holelike quasiparticles possessing a valley-dependent chirality and moving separately in the two ring arms. Our findings provide a purely electric way to consecutively manipulate the Josephson current-phase relation.

  5. Complete bifurcation analysis of DC-DC converters under current mode control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikulin, D.

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate to what extend application of novel method of complete bifurcation groups to the analysis of global dynamics of piecewise-smooth hybrid systems enables one to highlight new nonlinear effects before periodic and chaotic regimes. Results include the construction of complete one and two-parameter bifurcation diagrams, detection of various types of bifurcation groups and investigation of their interactions, localization of rare attractors, and the investigation of different principles of birth of chaotic attractors. Effectiveness of the approach is illustrated in respect to one of the most widely used switching systems-boost converter under current mode control operating in continuous current mode.

  6. Unscented fuzzy-controlled current statistic model and adaptive filtering for tracking maneuvering targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hongtao; Jing, Zhongliang; Hu, Shiqiang

    2006-12-01

    A novel adaptive algorithm for tracking maneuvering targets is proposed. The algorithm is implemented with fuzzy-controlled current statistic model adaptive filtering and unscented transformation. A fuzzy system allows the filter to tune the magnitude of maximum accelerations to adapt to different target maneuvers, and unscented transformation can effectively handle nonlinear system. A bearing-only tracking scenario simulation results show the proposed algorithm has a robust advantage over a wide range of maneuvers and overcomes the shortcoming of the traditional current statistic model and adaptive filtering algorithm.

  7. Spatial frequency domain error budget

    SciTech Connect

    Hauschildt, H; Krulewich, D

    1998-08-27

    The aim of this paper is to describe a methodology for designing and characterizing machines used to manufacture or inspect parts with spatial-frequency-based specifications. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, one of our responsibilities is to design or select the appropriate machine tools to produce advanced optical and weapons systems. Recently, many of the component tolerances for these systems have been specified in terms of the spatial frequency content of residual errors on the surface. We typically use an error budget as a sensitivity analysis tool to ensure that the parts manufactured by a machine will meet the specified component tolerances. Error budgets provide the formalism whereby we account for all sources of uncertainty in a process, and sum them to arrive at a net prediction of how "precisely" a manufactured component can meet a target specification. Using the error budget, we are able to minimize risk during initial stages by ensuring that the machine will produce components that meet specifications before the machine is actually built or purchased. However, the current error budgeting procedure provides no formal mechanism for designing machines that can produce parts with spatial-frequency-based specifications. The output from the current error budgeting procedure is a single number estimating the net worst case or RMS error on the work piece. This procedure has limited ability to differentiate between low spatial frequency form errors versus high frequency surface finish errors. Therefore the current error budgeting procedure can lead us to reject a machine that is adequate or accept a machine that is inadequate. This paper will describe a new error budgeting methodology to aid in the design and characterization of machines used to manufacture or inspect parts with spatial-frequency-based specifications. The output from this new procedure is the continuous spatial frequency content of errors that result on a machined part. If the machine

  8. Postural Control Impairments in Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Critical Review of Current Literature

    PubMed Central

    Memari, Amir Hossein; Ghanouni, Parisa; Shayestehfar, Monir; Ghaheri, Banafsheh

    2014-01-01

    Context: Motor impairments in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have been frequently reported. In this review, we narrow our focus on postural control impairments to summarize current literature for patterns, underlying mechanisms, and determinants of posture in this population. Evidence Acquisition: A literature search was conducted through Medline, ISI web of Knowledge, Scopus and Google Scholar to include studies between 1992 and February 2013. Results: Individuals with ASD have problems in maintaining postural control in infancy that well persists into later years. However, the patterns and underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Conclusions: Examining postural control as an endophenotype or early diagnostic marker of autism is a conceptual premise which should be considered in future investigations. At the end of the review, methodological recommendations on the assessment of postural control have also been provided. PMID:25520765

  9. Stochastic optimal control as non-equilibrium statistical mechanics: calculus of variations over density and current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyak, Vladimir Y.; Chertkov, Michael; Bierkens, Joris; Kappen, Hilbert J.

    2014-01-01

    In stochastic optimal control (SOC) one minimizes the average cost-to-go, that consists of the cost-of-control (amount of efforts), cost-of-space (where one wants the system to be) and the target cost (where one wants the system to arrive), for a system participating in forced and controlled Langevin dynamics. We extend the SOC problem by introducing an additional cost-of-dynamics, characterized by a vector potential. We propose derivation of the generalized gauge-invariant Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation as a variation over density and current, suggest hydrodynamic interpretation and discuss examples, e.g., ergodic control of a particle-within-a-circle, illustrating non-equilibrium space-time complexity.

  10. Carrier lifetime and turn-off current control by electron irradiation of MCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyavsky, E. V.; Popov, V. P.; Krasnikov, Yu. I.; Safronov, L. N.

    2002-01-01

    Lifetime control in power devices is an effective means of their speeding. To reduce the turn-off time of such devices, irradiation with fast electrons may be used. The main advantage of the electron irradiation as a means of lifetime control is the possibility to irradiate the devices after their packaging. Required characteristics of devices can be finally adjusted by varying the dose given to them. An MOS controlled thyristor (MCT) with a blocking voltage of 3000 V was used to demonstrate the possibilities offered by this method. Before irradiation, the turn-off time of the MCT was 30 μs. After irradiating the thyristor with 2 MeV electrons up to the dose 5×10 12 cm-2, the turn-off time was reduced to 2.5 μs. The on-voltage was increased to 7.5 V at a highest controlled current density of 160 A/ cm2. The experiments showed that, using electron irradiation, it is possible to control the minority carrier lifetime in the range between 30 and 2 μs with acceptable increase in the on-voltage (from 2.8 to 7.5 V). The most interesting consequences of the above treatment were an increase in the current density which could be controlled by the thyristor (up to 160 A/ cm2 ) and the possibility of device operation at a total current of 55 A. Thermal stability of the radiation-reduced changes was compared with the case of proton-irradiated MCT crystals.

  11. Low-cost computer-controlled current stimulator for the student laboratory.

    PubMed

    Güçlü, Burak

    2007-06-01

    Electrical stimulation of nerve and muscle tissues is frequently used for teaching core concepts in physiology. It is usually expensive to provide every student group in the laboratory with an individual stimulator. This article presents the design and application of a low-cost [about $100 (U.S.)] isolated stimulator that can be controlled by two analog-output channels (e.g., output channels of a data-acquisition card or onboard audio channels) of a computer. The device is based on a voltage-to-current converter circuit and can produce accurate monopolar and bipolar current pulses, pulse trains, arbitrary current waveforms, and a trigger output. The compliance of the current source is +/-15 V, and the maximum available current is +/-1.5 mA. The device was electrically tested by using the audio output of a personal computer. In this condition, the device had a dynamic range of 46 dB and the available pulse-width range was 0.1-10 ms. The device is easily programmable, and a freeware MATLAB script is posted on the World Wide Web. The practical use of the device was demonstrated by electrically stimulating the sciatic nerve of a frog and recording compound action potentials. The newly designed current stimulator is a flexible and effective tool for teaching in the physiology laboratory, and it can increase the efficiency of learning by maximizing performance-to-cost ratio. PMID:17562915

  12. Evidence for current-controlled sedimentation along the southern Mozambique continental margin since Early Miocene times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preu, Benedict; Spieß, Volkhard; Schwenk, Tilmann; Schneider, Ralph

    2011-12-01

    Major plastered drift sequences were imaged using high-resolution multichannel seismics during R/V Meteor cruises M63/1 and M75/3 south of the Mozambique Channel along the continental margin of Mozambique off the Limpopo River. Detailed seismic-stratigraphic analyses enabled the reconstruction of the onset and development of the modern, discontinuous, eddy-dominated Mozambique Current. Major drift sequences can first be identified during the Early Miocene. Consistent with earlier findings, a progressive northward shift of the depocenter indicates that, on a geological timescale, a steady but variable Mozambique Current existed from this time onward. It can furthermore be shown that, during the Early/Middle Miocene, a coast-parallel current was established off the Limpopo River as part of a lee eddy system driven by the Mozambique Current. Modern sedimentation is controlled by the interplay between slope morphology and the lee eddy system, resulting in upwelling of Antarctic Intermediate Water. Drift accumulations at larger depths are related to the reworking of sediment by deep-reaching eddies that migrate southward, forming the Mozambique Current and eventually merging with the Agulhas Current.

  13. Error coding simulations in C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Viveca K.

    1994-01-01

    When data is transmitted through a noisy channel, errors are produced within the data rendering it indecipherable. Through the use of error control coding techniques, the bit error rate can be reduced to any desired level without sacrificing the transmission data rate. The Astrionics Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center has decided to use a modular, end-to-end telemetry data simulator to simulate the transmission of data from flight to ground and various methods of error control. The simulator includes modules for random data generation, data compression, Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) transfer frame formation, error correction/detection, error generation and error statistics. The simulator utilizes a concatenated coding scheme which includes CCSDS standard (255,223) Reed-Solomon (RS) code over GF(2(exp 8)) with interleave depth of 5 as the outermost code, (7, 1/2) convolutional code as an inner code and CCSDS recommended (n, n-16) cyclic redundancy check (CRC) code as the innermost code, where n is the number of information bits plus 16 parity bits. The received signal-to-noise for a desired bit error rate is greatly reduced through the use of forward error correction techniques. Even greater coding gain is provided through the use of a concatenated coding scheme. Interleaving/deinterleaving is necessary to randomize burst errors which may appear at the input of the RS decoder. The burst correction capability length is increased in proportion to the interleave depth. The modular nature of the simulator allows for inclusion or exclusion of modules as needed. This paper describes the development and operation of the simulator, the verification of a C-language Reed-Solomon code, and the possibility of using Comdisco SPW(tm) as a tool for determining optimal error control schemes.

  14. Error coding simulations in C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noble, Viveca K.

    1994-10-01

    When data is transmitted through a noisy channel, errors are produced within the data rendering it indecipherable. Through the use of error control coding techniques, the bit error rate can be reduced to any desired level without sacrificing the transmission data rate. The Astrionics Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center has decided to use a modular, end-to-end telemetry data simulator to simulate the transmission of data from flight to ground and various methods of error control. The simulator includes modules for random data generation, data compression, Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) transfer frame formation, error correction/detection, error generation and error statistics. The simulator utilizes a concatenated coding scheme which includes CCSDS standard (255,223) Reed-Solomon (RS) code over GF(2(exp 8)) with interleave depth of 5 as the outermost code, (7, 1/2) convolutional code as an inner code and CCSDS recommended (n, n-16) cyclic redundancy check (CRC) code as the innermost code, where n is the number of information bits plus 16 parity bits. The received signal-to-noise for a desired bit error rate is greatly reduced through the use of forward error correction techniques. Even greater coding gain is provided through the use of a concatenated coding scheme. Interleaving/deinterleaving is necessary to randomize burst errors which may appear at the input of the RS decoder. The burst correction capability length is increased in proportion to the interleave depth. The modular nature of the simulator allows for inclusion or exclusion of modules as needed. This paper describes the development and operation of the simulator, the verification of a C-language Reed-Solomon code, and the possibility of using Comdisco SPW(tm) as a tool for determining optimal error control schemes.

  15. A theory of human error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcruer, D. T.; Clement, W. F.; Allen, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Human errors tend to be treated in terms of clinical and anecdotal descriptions, from which remedial measures are difficult to derive. Correction of the sources of human error requires an attempt to reconstruct underlying and contributing causes of error from the circumstantial causes cited in official investigative reports. A comprehensive analytical theory of the cause-effect relationships governing propagation of human error is indispensable to a reconstruction of the underlying and contributing causes. A validated analytical theory of the input-output behavior of human operators involving manual control, communication, supervisory, and monitoring tasks which are relevant to aviation, maritime, automotive, and process control operations is highlighted. This theory of behavior, both appropriate and inappropriate, provides an insightful basis for investigating, classifying, and quantifying the needed cause-effect relationships governing propagation of human error.

  16. Real-time MSE measurements for current profile control on KSTAR.

    PubMed

    De Bock, M F M; Aussems, D; Huijgen, R; Scheffer, M; Chung, J

    2012-10-01

    To step up from current day fusion experiments to power producing fusion reactors, it is necessary to control long pulse, burning plasmas. Stability and confinement properties of tokamak fusion reactors are determined by the current or q profile. In order to control the q profile, it is necessary to measure it in real-time. A real-time motional Stark effect diagnostic is being developed at Korean Superconducting Tokamak for Advanced Research for this purpose. This paper focuses on 3 topics important for real-time measurements: minimize the use of ad hoc parameters, minimize external influences and a robust and fast analysis algorithm. Specifically, we have looked into extracting the retardance of the photo-elastic modulators from the signal itself, minimizing the influence of overlapping beam spectra by optimizing the optical filter design and a multi-channel, multiharmonic phase locking algorithm. PMID:23126864

  17. Dataset on coherent control of fields and induced currents in nonlinear multiphoton processes in a nanosphere.

    PubMed

    McArthur, Duncan; Hourahine, Ben; Papoff, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We model a scheme for the coherent control of light waves and currents in metallic nanospheres which applies independently of the nonlinear multiphoton processes at the origin of waves and currents. Using exact mathematical formulae, we calculate numerically with a custom fortran code the effect of an external control field which enable us to change the radiation pattern and suppress radiative losses or to reduce absorption, enabling the particle to behave as a perfect scatterer or as a perfect absorber. Data are provided in tabular, comma delimited value format and illustrate narrow features in the response of the particles that result in high sensitivity to small variations in the local environment, including subwavelength spatial shifts. PMID:26601699

  18. Chemical feed control using coagulation computer models and a streaming current detector.

    PubMed

    Yavich, Alex A; Van De Wege, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the use of both the streaming current detector (SCD) and coagulation computer models to provide real-time data for required coagulant feed rates. The method for computer modeling of coagulation and other water treatment processes/operations was originally developed for Lake Michigan Filtration Plant in Grand Rapids, Michigan (MI). Since the initial implementation, a number of water treatment plants (WTPs) in the United States have begun routinely utilizing computer models for chemical feed control and process performance optimization. One plant, Holland WTP in Holland, MI, currently employs both an SCD and a coagulation computer model for chemical feed control. Case studies presented in this paper compare the performance of coagulation computer models and the SCD in full-scale operation. PMID:23787322

  19. Dataset on coherent control of fields and induced currents in nonlinear multiphoton processes in a nanosphere

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, Duncan; Hourahine, Ben; Papoff, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We model a scheme for the coherent control of light waves and currents in metallic nanospheres which applies independently of the nonlinear multiphoton processes at the origin of waves and currents. Using exact mathematical formulae, we calculate numerically with a custom fortran code the effect of an external control field which enable us to change the radiation pattern and suppress radiative losses or to reduce absorption, enabling the particle to behave as a perfect scatterer or as a perfect absorber. Data are provided in tabular, comma delimited value format and illustrate narrow features in the response of the particles that result in high sensitivity to small variations in the local environment, including subwavelength spatial shifts. PMID:26601699

  20. Foot-and-mouth disease in pigs: current epidemiological situation and control methods.

    PubMed

    León, Emilio A

    2012-03-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is the paradigm of a transboundary animal disease. Beyond any doubt, it is the most serious challenge for livestock's health. Official Veterinary Services from free countries invest considerable amount of money to prevent its introduction, whereas those from endemic countries invest most of their resources in the control of the disease. A very important volume of scientific production is developed every year in different aspects of FMD, and for that reason, the current knowledge makes the diagnosis of the disease easier to a great extent. However, FMD is still endemic in about two-thirds of the countries, and periodically re-emergent in several countries. This paper is a review of recent publications, focusing mainly on control measures and current world epidemiological situation, emphasizing primarily pigs. PMID:22225815

  1. Real-time MSE measurements for current profile control on KSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    De Bock, M. F. M.; Aussems, D.; Huijgen, R.; Scheffer, M.; Chung, J.

    2012-10-15

    To step up from current day fusion experiments to power producing fusion reactors, it is necessary to control long pulse, burning plasmas. Stability and confinement properties of tokamak fusion reactors are determined by the current or q profile. In order to control the q profile, it is necessary to measure it in real-time. A real-time motional Stark effect diagnostic is being developed at Korean Superconducting Tokamak for Advanced Research for this purpose. This paper focuses on 3 topics important for real-time measurements: minimize the use of ad hoc parameters, minimize external influences and a robust and fast analysis algorithm. Specifically, we have looked into extracting the retardance of the photo-elastic modulators from the signal itself, minimizing the influence of overlapping beam spectra by optimizing the optical filter design and a multi-channel, multiharmonic phase locking algorithm.

  2. Direct current control of three magnon scattering processes in spin-valve nanocontacts.

    PubMed

    Schultheiss, H; Janssens, X; van Kampen, M; Ciubotaru, F; Hermsdoerfer, S J; Obry, B; Laraoui, A; Serga, A A; Lagae, L; Slavin, A N; Leven, B; Hillebrands, B

    2009-10-01

    We have investigated the generation of spin waves in the free layer of an extended spin-valve structure with a nanoscaled point contact driven by both microwave and direct electric current using Brillouin light scattering microscopy. Simultaneously with the directly excited spin waves, strong nonlinear effects are observed, namely, the generation of eigenmodes with integer multiple frequencies (2f, 3f, 4f) and modes with noninteger factors (0.5f, 1.5f) with respect to the excitation frequency f. The origin of these nonlinear modes is traced back to three-magnon-scattering processes. The direct current influence on the generation of the fundamental mode at frequency f is related to the spin-transfer torque, while the efficiency of three-magnon-scattering processes is controlled by the Oersted field as an additional effect of the direct current. PMID:19905663

  3. Dynamic control of spin wave spectra using spin-polarized currents

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qi; Zhang, Huaiwu Tang, Xiaoli; Bai, Feiming; Zhong, Zhiyong; Fangohr, Hans

    2014-09-15

    We describe a method of controlling the spin wave spectra dynamically in a uniform nanostripe waveguide through spin-polarized currents. A stable periodic magnetization structure is observed when the current flows vertically through the center of nanostripe waveguide. After being excited, the spin wave is transmitted at the sides of the waveguide. Numerical simulations of spin-wave transmission and dispersion curves reveal a single, pronounced band gap. Moreover, the periodic magnetization structure can be turned on and off by the spin-polarized current. The switching process from full rejection to full transmission takes place within less than 3 ns. Thus, this type magnonic waveguide can be utilized for low-dissipation spin wave based filters.

  4. An ultrahigh stability, low-noise laser current driver with digital control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Christopher J.; Van Zijll, Marshall; Doermann, Greg; Durfee, Dallin S.

    2008-07-01

    We present a low-noise, high modulation-bandwidth design for a laser current driver with excellent long-term stability. The driver improves upon the commonly used Hall-Libbrecht design. The current driver can be operated remotely by way of a microprocessing unit, which controls the current set point digitally. This allows precise repeatability and improved accuracy and stability. It also allows the driver to be placed near the laser for reduced noise and for lower phase lag when using the modulation input. We present the theory of operation for our driver in detail, and give a thorough characterization of its stability, noise, set-point accuracy and repeatability, temperature dependence, transient response, and modulation bandwidth.

  5. Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation in children with dystonia: a sham-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Young, Scott J; Bertucco, Matteo; Sanger, Terence D

    2014-02-01

    Increased motor cortex excitability is a common finding in dystonia, and transcranial direct current stimulation can reduce motor cortex excitability. In an earlier study, we found that cathodal direct-current stimulation decreased motor overflow for some children with dystonia. To investigate this observation further, we performed a sham-controlled, double-blind, crossover study of 14 children with dystonia. We found a significant reduction in overflow following real stimulation, when participants performed the experimental task with the hand contralateral to the cathode. While these results suggest that cathodal stimulation may help some children to reduce involuntary overflow, the size of the effect is small. Further research will need to investigate ways to increase the magnitude of the effect of cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation. PMID:23760989

  6. Modeling of Optimization and Control of EBW Heating and Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Jakub; Decker, Joan; Peysson, Yves; Preinhaelter, Josef; Taylor, Gary; Vahala, Linda; Vahala, George

    2009-11-01

    We present a modeling of Electron Bernstein waves (EBWs) by recently coupled AMR (Antenna---Mode-conversion---Ray-tracing) and LUKE (3D Fokker-Planck) codes. The electrostatic EBW is a promising candidate for localized heating and current drive in high-β plasmas, where the standard electron cyclotron O- and X-waves are cutoff. EBW heating and current drive is simulated here in spherical tokamak conditions, particularly in typical NSTX and MAST equilibria and also in equilibria predicted by transport modeling. The EBW injection parameters are varied in order to find optimized scenarios and a possible way to control the deposition location and the driven current. This task is rather challenging because EBW ray trajectories and N spectra are strongly dependent on the plasma parameters.

  7. Controlling the HIV/AIDS epidemic: current status and global challenges

    PubMed Central

    Demberg, Thorsten; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2012-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the current status of the global HIV pandemic and strategies to bring it under control. It updates numerous preventive approaches including behavioral interventions, male circumcision (MC), pre- and post-exposure prophylaxis (PREP and PEP), vaccines, and microbicides. The manuscript summarizes current anti-retroviral treatment options, their impact in the western world, and difficulties faced by emerging and resource-limited nations in providing and maintaining appropriate treatment regimens. Current clinical and pre-clinical approaches toward a cure for HIV are described, including new drug compounds that target viral reservoirs and gene therapy approaches aimed at altering susceptibility to HIV infection. Recent progress in vaccine development is summarized, including novel approaches and new discoveries. PMID:22912636

  8. Summary of Current and Future MSFC International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Charles D.; Carrasquillo, Robyn L.; Minton-Summers, Silvia

    1997-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of current work accomplished under technical task agreement (TTA) by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) regarding the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) as well as future planning activities in support of the International Space Station (ISS). Current activities include ECLSS computer model development, component design and development, subsystem integrated system testing, life testing, and government furnished equipment delivered to the ISS program. A long range plan for the MSFC ECLSS test facility is described whereby the current facility would be upgraded to support integrated station ECLSS operations. ECLSS technology development efforts proposed to be performed under the Advanced Engineering Technology Development (AETD) program are also discussed.

  9. Precision control of high temperature furnaces using an auxiliary power supply and charged practice current flow

    DOEpatents

    Pollock, George G.

    1997-01-01

    Two power supplies are combined to control a furnace. A main power supply heats the furnace in the traditional manner, while the power from the auxiliary supply is introduced as a current flow through charged particles existing due to ionized gas or thermionic emission. The main power supply provides the bulk heating power and the auxiliary supply provides a precise and fast power source such that the precision of the total power delivered to the furnace is improved.

  10. Precision control of high temperature furnaces using an auxiliary power supply and charged particle current flow

    DOEpatents

    Pollock, G.G.

    1997-01-28

    Two power supplies are combined to control a furnace. A main power supply heats the furnace in the traditional manner, while the power from the auxiliary supply is introduced as a current flow through charged particles existing due to ionized gas or thermionic emission. The main power supply provides the bulk heating power and the auxiliary supply provides a precise and fast power source such that the precision of the total power delivered to the furnace is improved. 5 figs.

  11. Control of plasma process by use of harmonic frequency components of voltage and current

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Paul A.; Kamon, Mattan

    1994-01-01

    The present invention provides for a technique for taking advantage of the intrinsic electrical non-linearity of processing plasmas to add additional control variables that affect process performance. The technique provides for the adjustment of the electrical coupling circuitry, as well as the electrical excitation level, in response to measurements of the reactor voltage and current and to use that capability to modify the plasma characteristics to obtain the desired performance.

  12. A 540-[Formula: see text] Duty Controlled RSSI With Current Reusing Technique for Human Body Communication.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jaeeun; Lee, Yongsu; Cho, Hyunwoo; Yoo, Hoi-Jun

    2016-08-01

    An ultra-low-power duty controlled received signal strength indicator (RSSI) is implemented for human body communication (HBC) in 180 nm CMOS technology under 1.5 V supply. The proposed RSSI adopted 3 following key features for low-power consumption; 1) current reusing technique (CR-RSSI) with replica bias circuit and calibration unit, 2) duty controller, and 3) reconfigurable gm-boosting LNA. The CR-RSSI utilizes stacked amplifier-rectifier-cell (AR-cell) to reuse the supply current of each blocks. As a result, the power consumption becomes 540 [Formula: see text] with +/-2 dB accuracy and 75 dB dynamic range. The replica bias circuit and calibration unit are adopted to increase the reliability of CR-RSSI. In addition, the duty controller turns off the RSSI when it is not required, and this function leads 70% power reduction. At last, the gm-boosting reconfigurable LNA can adaptively vary its noise and linearity performance with respect to input signal strength. Fro current reusing technique m this feature, we achieve 62% power reduction in the LNA. Thanks to these schemes, compared to the previous works, we can save 70% of power in RSSI and LNA. PMID:27416605

  13. Malaria in Uganda: challenges to control on the long road to elimination. I. Epidemiology and current control effort

    PubMed Central

    Yeka, Adoke; Gasasira, Anne; Mpimbaza, Arthur; Achan, Jane; Nankabirwa, Joaniter; Nsobya, Sam; Staedke, Sarah G.; Donnelly, Martin J.; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Talisuna, Ambrose; Dorsey, Grant; Kamya, Moses R.; Rosenthal, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    In the recent past there have been several reports of successes in malaria control, leading some public health experts to conclude that Africa is witnessing an epidemiological transition, from an era of failed malaria control to progression from successful control to elimination. Successes in control have been attributed to increased international donor support leading to increased intervention coverage. However, these changes are not uniform across Africa. In Uganda, where baseline transmission is very high and intervention coverage not yet to scale, the malaria burden is not declining and has even likely increased in the last decade. In this article we present perspectives for the future for Uganda and other malaria endemic countries with high baseline transmission intensity and significant health system challenges. For these high burden areas,malaria elimination is currently not feasible, and early elimination programs are inappropriate, as they would further fragment already fragmented and inefficient malaria control systems. Rather, health impacts will be maximized by aiming to achieve universal coverage of proven interventions in the context of a strengthened health system. PMID:21756863

  14. A novel deletion/insertion caused by a replication error in the β-globin gene locus control region.

    PubMed

    Joly, Philippe; Lacan, Philippe; Garcia, Caroline; Meley, Roland; Pondarré, Corinne; Francina, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Deletions in the β-globin locus control region (β-LCR) lead to (εγδβ)(0)-thalassemia [(εγδβ)(0)-thal]. In patients suffering from these rare deletions, a normal hemoglobin (Hb), phenotype is found, contrasting with a hematological thalassemic phenotype. Multiplex-ligation probe amplification (MLPA) is an efficient tool to detect β-LCR deletions combined with long-range polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing to pinpoint deletion breakpoints. We present here a novel 11,155 bp β-LCR deletion found in a French Caucasian patient which removes DNase I hypersensitive site 2 (HS2) to HS4 of the β-LCR. Interestingly, a 197 bp insertion of two inverted sequences issued from the HS2-HS3 inter-region is present and suggests a complex rearrangement during replication. Carriers of this type of thalassemia can be misdiagnosed as an α-thal trait. Consequently, a complete α- and β-globin gene cluster analysis is required to prevent a potentially damaging misdiagnosis in genetic counselling. PMID:21797698

  15. Tailoring the optimal control cost function to a desired output: application to minimizing phase errors in short broadband excitation pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Thomas E.; Reiss, Timo O.; Luy, Burkhard; Khaneja, Navin; Glaser, Steffen J.

    2005-01-01

    The de facto standard cost function has been used heretofore to characterize the performance of pulses designed using optimal control theory. The freedom to choose new, creative quality factors designed for specific purposes is demonstrated. While the methodology has more general applicability, its utility is illustrated by comparison to a consistently chosen example—broadband excitation. The resulting pulses are limited to the same maximum RF amplitude used previously and tolerate the same variation in RF homogeneity deemed relevant for standard high-resolution NMR probes. Design criteria are unchanged: transformation of Iz → Ix over resonance offsets of ±20 kHz and RF variability of ±5%, with a peak RF amplitude equal to 17.5 kHz. However, the new cost effectively trades a small increase in residual z magnetization for improved phase in the transverse plane. Compared to previous broadband excitation by optimized pulses (BEBOP), significantly shorter pulses are achievable, with only marginally reduced performance. Simulations transform Iz to greater than 0.98 Ix, with phase deviations of the final magnetization less than 2°, over the targeted ranges of resonance offset and RF variability. Experimental performance is in excellent agreement with the simulations.

  16. Study of geopotential error models used in orbit determination error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, C.; Kelbel, D.; Lee, T.; Samii, M. V.; Mistretta, G. D.; Hart, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    The uncertainty in the geopotential model is currently one of the major error sources in the orbit determination of low-altitude Earth-orbiting spacecraft. The results of an investigation of different geopotential error models and modeling approaches currently used for operational orbit error analysis support at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) are presented, with emphasis placed on sequential orbit error analysis using a Kalman filtering algorithm. Several geopotential models, known as the Goddard Earth Models (GEMs), were developed and used at GSFC for orbit determination. The errors in the geopotential models arise from the truncation errors that result from the omission of higher order terms (omission errors) and the errors in the spherical harmonic coefficients themselves (commission errors). At GSFC, two error modeling approaches were operationally used to analyze the effects of geopotential uncertainties on the accuracy of spacecraft orbit determination - the lumped error modeling and uncorrelated error modeling. The lumped error modeling approach computes the orbit determination errors on the basis of either the calibrated standard deviations of a geopotential model's coefficients or the weighted difference between two independently derived geopotential models. The uncorrelated error modeling approach treats the errors in the individual spherical harmonic components as uncorrelated error sources and computes the aggregate effect using a combination of individual coefficient effects. This study assesses the reasonableness of the two error modeling approaches in terms of global error distribution characteristics and orbit error analysis results. Specifically, this study presents the global distribution of geopotential acceleration errors for several gravity error models and assesses the orbit determination errors resulting from these error models for three types of spacecraft - the Gamma Ray Observatory, the Ocean Topography Experiment, and the Cosmic

  17. Sun compass error model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blucker, T. J.; Ferry, W. W.

    1971-01-01

    An error model is described for the Apollo 15 sun compass, a contingency navigational device. Field test data are presented along with significant results of the test. The errors reported include a random error resulting from tilt in leveling the sun compass, a random error because of observer sighting inaccuracies, a bias error because of mean tilt in compass leveling, a bias error in the sun compass itself, and a bias error because the device is leveled to the local terrain slope.

  18. Onorbit IMU alignment error budget

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The Star Tracker, Crew Optical Alignment Sight (COAS), and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) from a complex navigation system with a multitude of error sources were combined. A complete list of the system errors is presented. The errors were combined in a rational way to yield an estimate of the IMU alignment accuracy for STS-1. The expected standard deviation in the IMU alignment error for STS-1 type alignments was determined to be 72 arc seconds per axis for star tracker alignments and 188 arc seconds per axis for COAS alignments. These estimates are based on current knowledge of the star tracker, COAS, IMU, and navigation base error specifications, and were partially verified by preliminary Monte Carlo analysis.

  19. Patient-Controlled Analgesia Basal Infusion Overdose; Life-threatening Errors with Flecainide Suspension in Children; Medical Product Error-Prevention Efforts Need to Be Shared and Harmonized Internationally.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael R; Smetzer, Judy L

    2015-09-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again-perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers' names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters' wishes as to the level of detail included in publications. PMID:26715797

  20. Patient-Controlled Analgesia Basal Infusion Overdose; Life-threatening Errors with Flecainide Suspension in Children; Medical Product Error-Prevention Efforts Need to Be Shared and Harmonized Internationally

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Michael R.; Smetzer, Judy L.

    2015-01-01

    These medication errors have occurred in health care facilities at least once. They will happen again—perhaps where you work. Through education and alertness of personnel and procedural safeguards, they can be avoided. You should consider publishing accounts of errors in your newsletters and/or presenting them at your inservice training programs. Your assistance is required to continue this feature. The reports described here were received through the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) Medication Errors Reporting Program. Any reports published by ISMP will be anonymous. Comments are also invited; the writers’ names will be published if desired. ISMP may be contacted at the address shown below. Errors, close calls, or hazardous conditions may be reported directly to ISMP through the ISMP Web site (www.ismp.org), by calling 800-FAIL-SAFE, or via e-mail at ismpinfo@ismp.org. ISMP guarantees the confidentiality and security of the information received and respects reporters’ wishes as to the level of detail included in publications. PMID:26715797