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Sample records for current treatment concepts

  1. Female pattern hair loss: Current treatment concepts

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Quan Q; Sinclair, Rodney

    2007-01-01

    Fewer than 45% of women go through life with a full head of hair. Female pattern hair loss is the commonest cause of hair loss in women and prevalence increases with advancing age. Affected women may experience psychological distress and impaired social functioning. In most cases the diagnosis can be made clinically and the condition treated medically. While many women using oral antiandrogens and topical minoxidil will regrow some hair, early diagnosis and initiation of treatment is desirable as these treatments are more effective at arresting progression of hair loss than stimulating regrowth. Adjunctive nonpharmacological treatment modalities such as counseling, cosmetic camouflage and hair transplantation are important measures for some patients. The histology of female pattern hair loss is identical to that of male androgenetic alopecia. While the clinical pattern of the hair loss differs between men, the response to oral antiandrogens suggests that female pattern hair loss is an androgen dependant condition, at least in the majority of cases. Female pattern hair loss is a chronic progressive condition. All treatments need to be continued to maintain the effect. An initial therapeutic response often takes 12 or even 24 months. Given this delay, monitoring for treatment effect through clinical photography or standardized clinical severity scales is helpful. PMID:18044135

  2. Hip Instability: Current Concepts and Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Guillaume D

    2016-07-01

    Instability of the hip can manifest in a wide range of settings, with presenting symptoms including subtle discomfort at end range of motion or more dramatic dislocation of the joint. It can result from traumatic injury with dislocation or subluxation; atraumatic capsular laxity; structural bony abnormality, such as acetabular dysplasia; and iatrogenic injury. Initial treatment of the concentrically reduced joint often begins with physical therapy to strengthen dynamic stabilizers and to allow time for resolution of acute symptoms. Surgical treatment is aimed at repairing injured soft tissue structures, including static stabilizers, and addressing underlying bony structural deficiencies. PMID:27343395

  3. Syringomyelia: current concepts in pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Rusbridge, Clare; Greitz, Dan; Iskandar, Bermans J

    2006-01-01

    Syringomyelia is a condition that results in fluid-containing cavities within the parenchyma of the spinal cord as a consequence of altered cerebrospinal fluid dynamics. This review discusses the history and the classification of the disorder, the current theories of pathogenesis, and the advanced imaging modalities used in the diagnosis. The intramedullary pulse pressure theory (a new pathophysiologic concept of syringomyelia) also is presented. In addition, the current understanding of the painful nature of this condition is discussed and the current trends in medical and surgical management are reviewed. PMID:16734077

  4. Current concepts in diagnosis and treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Roliński, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most commonly diagnosed type of leukemia in Western Europe and North America, and represents about 30% of all leukemias in adults. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is a disease of the elderly, who are often in poorer general health and burdened with multiple comorbidities. These factors affect the decision making when choosing an appropriate method of treatment. In recent years there has been significant progress in the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, first due to the introduction of immunochemotherapy with monoclonal antibodies and latterly small molecules, like tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting B-cell receptor signaling. This article discusses the current diagnostic principles, the most important prognostic factors and therapeutic options, available in first-line treatment and in refractory/resistant disease, including high-risk CLL, both for patients with good and those with poor performance status. It also presents important novel molecules which have been evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:26793019

  5. Current concepts in the treatment of adolescent femoroacetabular impingement.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Manoj; Azegami, Shin; Hosalkar, Harish S

    2013-03-01

    There is growing evidence that symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement leads to intra-articular damage and the development of early-onset osteoarthritis. Symptoms of femoroacetabular impingement often do not manifest until adulthood, but have been increasingly recognised in the paediatric and adolescent population. The surgical treatment of femoroacetabular impingement is aimed at restoring a more normal femoral head-neck offset in order to increase the clearance and prevent femoral abutment against the acetabular edge. Current methods include open and arthroscopic techniques. The latter has been combined with an open approach to gain access to the head-neck junction for osteochondroplasty. Proximal femoral and/or periacetabular osteotomies are used to treat femoroacetabular impingement associated with deformity secondary to childhood hip conditions, such as slipped capital femoral epiphysis and Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease. Some adolescents have severe degenerative joint disease at the time of presentation and may require arthroplasty or arthrodesis. The aim of this review is to identify the major trends and advancements in the management of femoroacetabular impingement in adolescents, including the outcome of studies of the surgical treatment modalities used. PMID:24432063

  6. Irritable bowel syndrome: a concise review of current treatment concepts.

    PubMed

    Wall, Geoffrey C; Bryant, Ginelle A; Bottenberg, Michelle M; Maki, Erik D; Miesner, Andrew R

    2014-07-21

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders causing patients to seek medical treatment. It is relatively resource intensive and the source of significant morbidity. Recent insights into the pathophysiology and treatment of IBS has given clinicians more options than ever to contend with this disorder. The purpose of our paper is to review older, "classic" treatments for IBS as well as newer agents and "alternative" therapies. We discuss the evidence base of these drugs and provide context to help develop appropriate treatment plans for IBS patients. PMID:25083054

  7. Irritable bowel syndrome: A concise review of current treatment concepts

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Geoffrey C; Bryant, Ginelle A; Bottenberg, Michelle M; Maki, Erik D; Miesner, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders causing patients to seek medical treatment. It is relatively resource intensive and the source of significant morbidity. Recent insights into the pathophysiology and treatment of IBS has given clinicians more options than ever to contend with this disorder. The purpose of our paper is to review older, “classic” treatments for IBS as well as newer agents and “alternative” therapies. We discuss the evidence base of these drugs and provide context to help develop appropriate treatment plans for IBS patients. PMID:25083054

  8. [Current conception of rheumatoid polyarthritis treatment: towards a therapeutic revolution?].

    PubMed

    Sany, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a frequent, heterogenous crippling disease. The diagnosis must be made as soon as possible in order to begin quickly the treatment. The improvement of our knowledge in the immunopathology of RA allowed the development of new biotherapies directed against harmful mediators such as TNF alpha and Interleukin 1. With anti-TNF alpha agents excellent clinical and biological results are observed in methotrexate refractory RA patients in 70% of cases. Moreover these drugs are able to stop the X ray evolution of the disease. They can be considered as a very important new step in the treatment of RA. Other targeted drugs such as anti-IL1, anti-IL6 agents, anti-B lymphocytes monoclonal antibody (Rituximab), CTL4 IgG are already used or under study. In this paper the modern treatment of RA is reviewed with a special emphasis on anti-TNF alpha and anti-IL1 biotherapies. PMID:14979059

  9. Current Concepts in Examination and Treatment of Elbow Tendon Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ellenbecker, Todd S.; Nirschl, Robert; Renstrom, Per

    2013-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the tendons of the elbow occur frequently in the overhead athlete, creating a significant loss of function and dilemma to sports medicine professionals. A detailed review of the anatomy, etiology, and pathophysiology of tendon injury coupled with comprehensive evaluation and treatment information is needed for clinicians to optimally design treatment programs for rehabilitation and prevention. Evidence Acquisitions: The PubMed database was searched in January 2012 for English-language articles pertaining to elbow tendon injury. Results: Detailed information on tendon pathophysiology was found along with incidence of elbow injury in overhead athletes. Several evidence-based reviews were identified, providing a thorough review of the recommended rehabilitation for elbow tendon injury. Conclusions: Humeral epicondylitis is an extra-articular tendon injury that is common in athletes subjected to repetitive upper extremity loading. Research is limited on the identification of treatment modalities that can reduce pain and restore function to the elbow. Eccentric exercise has been studied in several investigations and, when coupled with a complete upper extremity strengthening program, can produce positive results in patients with elbow tendon injury. Further research is needed in high-level study to delineate optimal treatment methods. PMID:24427389

  10. Breast Cancer and Pregnancy: Current Concepts in Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Theriault, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of breast cancer diagnosed during pregnancy presents a challenging situation for the patient, family, and caregivers. Case series have demonstrated the efficacy and safety of using anthracycline-based chemotherapy during the second and third trimesters. Additionally, patients should be seen, evaluated, and treated in a multidisciplinary setting with facilitated communication among the medical oncologist, surgical oncologist, obstetrician, radiation oncologist, pathologist, and radiologist. This review details the available data regarding the diagnosis and management of the pregnant breast cancer patient. PMID:21147871

  11. [Diabetic neuropathy. Current concepts on etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment].

    PubMed

    Zorrilla Hernández, E; Frati Munari, A; Lozano Castañeda, O; Villalpando Hernández, S; Boulton, A J

    1994-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is chronic complication which occurs in 50% of long standing diabetes mellitus. DN is a consequence of hyperglycemia probably through the following mechanisms: a) activation of aldose-reductase, intracellular sorbitol accumulation and myoinositol depletion, reduced activity of Na+/K+ATPase, loss of Na+ channels and demyelination; b) proteins glycation; c) microangiopathy; the first mechanism being the best known and the most reliable. DN may be subclinical or clinical. The main clinical picture is a peripheral, bilateral, symmetric polyneuropathy with a "socks and gloves" sensory impairment, muscular weakness, hyporeflexia, plantar ulcers and arthropathy. Less frequent syndromes are proximal motor neuropathy and mononeuropathy of cranial nerves or thoraco-abdominal roots. Diagnosis is based on clinical data, and may be sustained on impaired nerve conduction velocity, abnormal evoked somatosensory potentials, or sural nerve biopsy. These methods are highly sensitive but unspecific. Etiopathogenic treatment is based on glycemic control and aldose reductase inhibitors. Improvement in clinical, electrophysiologic and histopathologic data have been obtained with the latter. Symptomatic treatment includes carbamazepin, phenytoin, tricyclic antidepressives and a phenotiazin. Mononeuropathies tend to complete recovery in less than 6 months. Polyneuropathy is thought to be irreversible and progressive; however, with excellent glycemic control or with aldose reductase inhibitors nerve damage may be stabilized or even reversed. PMID:7557046

  12. Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Current Concepts in Diagnosis, Staging and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Schütte, Kerstin; Schulz, Christian; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) significantly contributes to the global burden of cancer. Liver cancer is the third most frequent cause of cancer-related death, with HCC representing more than 90% of primary liver cancers. During the last decade, much progress has been made with respect to the definition of patient populations at risk who may benefit from surveillance strategies, as well as in the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Summary New locoregional and systemic therapies have significantly increased the survival of patients with HCC. A multitude of clinical trials addressing patients with HCC have led to advancements in the allocation of subgroups of patients to their optimal individual treatment strategy. This review provides an overview on recent developments in diagnostic and therapeutic modalities and an outlook on future directions in the management of HCC. Key Message New locoregional and systemic therapies in patients with HCC have significantly improved clinical outlook and patient survival. This review provides an overview of recent developments in diagnostics and therapeutics, as well as an outlook on future directions in the management of HCC. Practical Implications Transabdominal ultrasound is the method of choice for the surveillance of patients at risk of developing HCC, and any suspicious focal lesion in the liver should be characterized. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound with application of second-generation contrast agents enables visualization of tumor vascularity. The Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) system is the most widely used classification system to guide the clinical management of HCC. Liver resection should be considered for patients with well-preserved liver function and without portal hypertension or elevated bilirubin. Patients not suitable for resection should undergo local tumor ablation. Candidates who are eligible for liver transplantation may benefit from bridging therapy during their waiting period. Patients

  13. Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Wolfstadt, Jesse I.; Cole, Brian J.; Ogilvie-Harris, Darrell J.; Viswanathan, Sowmya; Chahal, Jaskarndip

    2015-01-01

    Context: The number of adults with osteoarthritis in the United States is expected to nearly double from 21.4 million in 2005 to 41.1 million by 2030. As a result, medical costs and associated comorbidity will exponentially increase in the coming decades. In the past decade, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have emerged as a novel treatment for degenerative joint disease. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed (from 1990 to 2013) was searched to identify relevant studies. Reference lists of included studies were also reviewed. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Results: We identified 9 animal and 7 human studies investigating the use of MSCs in the treatment of osteoarthritis, with varying levels of support for this therapy. Conclusion: While MSCs have shown potential for improving function and decreasing inflammation in animal studies, translation to patients is still in question. There is a great deal of heterogeneity in treatment methods. Standardizing the manufacturing and characterization of MSCs will allow for better comparisons. PMID:25553211

  14. Severe alcoholic hepatitis-current concepts, diagnosis and treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won; Kim, Dong Joon

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic hepatitis (AH) is an acute hepatic manifestation occurring from heavy alcohol ingestion. Alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH) is histologically characterized by steatosis, inflammation, and fibrosis in the liver. Despite the wide range of severity at presentation, those with severe ASH (Maddrey’s discriminant function ≥ 32) typically present with fever, jaundice, and abdominal tenderness. Alcohol abstinence is the cornerstone of therapy for AH and, in the milder forms, is sufficient for clinical recovery. Severe ASH may progress to multi-organ failure including acute kidney injury and infection. Thus, infection and renal failure have a major impact on survival and should be closely monitored in patients with severe ASH. Patients with severe ASH have a reported short-term mortality of up to 40%-50%. Severe ASH at risk of early death should be identified by one of the available prognostic scoring systems before considering specific therapies. Corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment for severe ASH. When corticosteroids are contraindicated, pentoxifylline may be alternatively used. Responsiveness to steroids should be assessed at day 7 and stopping rules based on Lille score should come into action. Strategically, future studies for patients with severe ASH should focus on suppressing inflammation based on cytokine profiles, balancing hepatocellular death and regeneration, limiting activation of the innate immune response, and maintaining gut mucosal integrity. PMID:25349640

  15. Evolution of the Treatment Integrity Concept: Current Status and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gresham, Frank M.

    2009-01-01

    The concept of treatment integrity cuts across a diversity of fields involved with providing treatments or interventions to individuals. In medical treatments, the concept of "treatment compliance" or "treatment adherence" is an important and problematic issue. In the field of nutrition, the concept of "dietary adherence" is important for…

  16. Current concepts in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    de Rezende, Márcia Uchôa; de Campos, Gustavo Constantino; Pailo, Alexandre Felício

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of joint disease, affects mainly the hips, knees, hands and feet, leading to severe disability and loss of quality of life, particularly in the elderly population. Its importance grows every year with the aging of the population, with a large increase in the elderly population compared to younger patients. The progressive understanding of the pathophysiology of OA, the perception that the process is not purely mechanical and / or aging, and clarification of the inflammatory pathways involved led recently to the clinical application of various drugs and other measures. This update aims to expose the current concepts on the pathophysiology and treatment of OA. PMID:24453655

  17. Treatment of brain metastases from HER-2-positive breast cancer: current status and new concepts.

    PubMed

    Bartolotti, Marco; Franceschi, Enrico; Brandes, Alba A

    2013-11-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common source of brain metastases (BM). The incidence of BM in breast cancer patients has increased over the past decade, especially among patients with HER-2-positive breast cancer. This is probably due to how aggressive the HER-2-positive disease is but also to the prolongation of survival obtained with current treatments, which allow good control of extracranial disease but are unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. At present, whole-brain radiotherapy, surgery and radiosurgery/stereotactic radiotherapy represent the cornerstone of treatment for BM, while the role of pharmacological therapy remains uncertain. Lapatinib demonstrated activity against BM from HER-2-positive breast cancer in small Phase II and retrospective studies, mainly in combination with capecitabine, and cases of dramatic responses to such treatment are present in literature. In this review we focus on the available clinical data regarding the treatment of BM from HER-2-positive breast cancer and on new concepts about the treatment and evaluation of the CNS response. PMID:24156325

  18. Current Concepts in Conception Control

    PubMed Central

    Ringrose, C. A. Douglas

    1963-01-01

    The progressive increase in world population has become a most urgent global problem in recent years. Man has, however, been interested in controlling his reproductivity at the family level for many centuries. Historical aspects of this saga are reviewed. The modern era of conception control was ushered in by Makepeace et al. in 1937 when ovulation inhibition by progesterone was demonstrated. Confirmation of this by Pincus and associates, and development of the potent oral progestational agents, the 19-norsteroids, have made efficient reliable contraception a reality. Experience with one of these agents (Ortho-Novum, 2 mg.) in 115 patients through 805 cycles is presented. Conception control was 100% effective at this dosage. Side effects were minimal. Only three of the women discontinued the tablets because of these effects. All but five in this group of 115 preferred the oral contraceptives to methods previously employed. PMID:13973987

  19. Snapping scapula syndrome: current concepts review in conservative and surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    Merolla, Giovanni; Cerciello, Simone; Paladini, Paolo; Porcellini, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Summary The snapping scapula, also called “washboard syndrome” is a controversial condition attributed to bony and soft tissue abnormalities. The syndrome was understimated for long time and often associated only with specific osseous abnormalities. The nodal point in the overview of the syndrome is that crepitus associated with symptomatic bursitis may be physiologic and is not uncommon a clinical presentation without any form of crepitus or craquement. In the current rewiew we analyzed the current concepts in the conservative and surgical management of snapping scapula syndrome, preceded by a description of scapular anatomy, pathophysiology of scapulothoracic articulation and clinical features of snapping scapula. PMID:23888290

  20. Birdshot chorioretinopathy: current knowledge and new concepts in pathophysiology, diagnosis, monitoring and treatment.

    PubMed

    Minos, Evangelos; Barry, Robert J; Southworth, Sue; Folkard, Annie; Murray, Philip I; Duker, Jay S; Keane, Pearse A; Denniston, Alastair K

    2016-01-01

    Birdshot chorioretinopathy (BCR) is a rare form of chronic, bilateral, posterior uveitis with a distinctive clinical phenotype, and a strong association with HLA-A29. It predominantly affects people in middle age. Given its rarity, patients often encounter delays in diagnosis leading to delays in adequate treatment, and thus risking significant visual loss. Recent advances have helped increase our understanding of the underlying autoimmune mechanisms involved in disease pathogenesis, and new diagnostic approaches such as multimodality imaging have improved our ability to both diagnose and monitor disease activity. Whilst traditional immunosuppressants may be effective in BCR, increased understanding of immune pathways is enabling development of newer treatment modalities, offering the potential for targeted modulation of immune mediators. In this review, we will discuss current understanding of BCR and explore recent developments in diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of this disease. Synonyms for BCR: Birdshot chorioretinopathy, Birdshot retinochoroiditis, Birdshot retino-choroidopathy, Vitiliginous choroiditis. Orphanet number: ORPHA179 OMIM: 605808. PMID:27175923

  1. Diffuse-type tenosynovial giant cell tumour: Current treatment concepts and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Staals, Eric L; Ferrari, Stefano; Donati, Davide M; Palmerini, Emanuela

    2016-08-01

    At present, the optimal treatment strategy in patients with diffuse-type tenosynovial giant cell tumour (D-TGCT) is unclear. The purpose of this review was to describe current treatment options, and to highlight recent developments in the knowledge of the molecular pathogenesis of D-TGCT as well as related therapeutic implications. Epidemiology, clinical features, and the pathogenesis of D-TGCT and the most widely used treatment modalities are described. D-TGCT is a benign clonal neoplastic proliferation arising from the synovium. Patients are often symptomatic and require multiple surgical procedures during their lifetime. Currently, surgery is the main treatment for patients with D-TGCT, with relapse rates ranging from 14% to 55%. Radiosynovectomy and external beam radiotherapy have been used in combination with surgical excision or as single modalities. The finding that D-TGCT cells overexpress colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1), resulting in recruitment of CSF1 receptor (CSF1R)-bearing macrophages that are polyclonal and make up the bulk of the tumour, has led to clinical trials with CSF1R inhibitors. These inhibitors include small molecules such as imatinib, nilotinib, PLX3397, and the monoclonal antibody RG7155. In conclusion, D-TGCT impairs patients' quality of life significantly. The evidence that the pathogenetic loop of D-TGCT can be inhibited could potentially change the therapeutic armamentarium for this condition. Clinical trials of agents that target D-TGCT are currently ongoing. In the meantime, international registries should be activated in order to provide useful information on this relatively rare tumour. PMID:27267143

  2. Football injuries: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Olson, David E; Sikka, Robby Singh; Hamilton, Abigail; Krohn, Austin

    2011-01-01

    Football is one of the most popular sports in the United States and is the leading cause of sports-related injury. A large focus in recent years has been on concussions, sudden cardiac death, and heat illness, all thought to be largely preventable health issues in the young athlete. Injury prevention through better understanding of injury mechanisms, education, proper equipment, and practice techniques and preseason screening may aid in reducing the number of injuries. Proper management of on-field injuries and health emergencies can reduce the morbidity associated with these injuries and may lead to faster return to play and reduced risk of future injury. This article reviews current concepts surrounding frequently seen football-related injuries. PMID:23531977

  3. Multimodality Imaging of the Painful Elbow: Current Imaging Concepts and Image-Guided Treatments for the Injured Thrower's Elbow.

    PubMed

    Gustas, Cristy N; Lee, Kenneth S

    2016-09-01

    Elbow pain in overhead sport athletes is not uncommon. Repetitive throwing can lead to chronic overuse and/or acute injury to tendons, ligaments, bones, or nerves about the elbow. A thorough history and physical examination of the thrower's elbow frequently establishes the diagnosis for pain. Imaging can provide additional information when the clinical picture is unclear or further information is necessary for risk stratification and treatment planning. This article focuses on current imaging concepts and image-guided treatments for injuries commonly affecting the adult throwing athlete's elbow. PMID:27545422

  4. Intratumor heterogeneity, variability and plasticity: questioning the current concepts in classification and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In the classical view, the formation of a primary tumor is the consequence of a mutational event that first affects a single cell that subsequently passes through a multitude of consecutive hyperplastic and dysplastic stages. At the end of this pathogenetic sequence a cell arises that is potentially able to expanse infinitely having capacity to form a homogenous tumor mass. In contrary to this clonal expansion concept, the majority of primary human tumors display already a startling heterogeneity that can be reflected in different morphological features, physiological activities, and genetic diversity. In the past it was speculated that this cancer cell plasticity within a tumor is the result of an adaptive process that is induced by specific inhibiting therapies. In regard to the formation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) this dogma was once challenged in a recent study that analysed tumor areas that were taken from HCC patients without medical pretreatment. Most of the analyzed samples showed highly significant intratumor heterogeneity. This affected morphological attributes, immunohistochemical stainability of five tumor-associated markers [α-fetoprotein (AFP), EpCAM, CK7, CD44 and glutamine synthetase], and integrity of genes (β-catenin and p53) that are critically involved in the pathogenesis of HCC. Altogether, this study showed that intratumor heterogeneity is a frequent finding in HCC that may contribute to treatment failure and drug resistance in HCC patients. PMID:27115013

  5. Intratumor heterogeneity, variability and plasticity: questioning the current concepts in classification and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    In the classical view, the formation of a primary tumor is the consequence of a mutational event that first affects a single cell that subsequently passes through a multitude of consecutive hyperplastic and dysplastic stages. At the end of this pathogenetic sequence a cell arises that is potentially able to expanse infinitely having capacity to form a homogenous tumor mass. In contrary to this clonal expansion concept, the majority of primary human tumors display already a startling heterogeneity that can be reflected in different morphological features, physiological activities, and genetic diversity. In the past it was speculated that this cancer cell plasticity within a tumor is the result of an adaptive process that is induced by specific inhibiting therapies. In regard to the formation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) this dogma was once challenged in a recent study that analysed tumor areas that were taken from HCC patients without medical pretreatment. Most of the analyzed samples showed highly significant intratumor heterogeneity. This affected morphological attributes, immunohistochemical stainability of five tumor-associated markers [α-fetoprotein (AFP), EpCAM, CK7, CD44 and glutamine synthetase], and integrity of genes (β-catenin and p53) that are critically involved in the pathogenesis of HCC. Altogether, this study showed that intratumor heterogeneity is a frequent finding in HCC that may contribute to treatment failure and drug resistance in HCC patients. PMID:27115013

  6. Current Concepts and Ongoing Research in the Prevention and Treatment of Open Fracture Infections

    PubMed Central

    Hannigan, Geoffrey D.; Pulos, Nicholas; Grice, Elizabeth A.; Mehta, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Open fractures are fractures in which the bone has violated the skin and soft tissue. Because of their severity, open fractures are associated with complications that can result in increased lengths of hospital stays, multiple operative interventions, and even amputation. One of the factors thought to influence the extent of these complications is exposure and contamination of the open fracture with environmental microorganisms, potentially those that are pathogenic in nature. Recent Advances: Current open fracture care aims to prevent infection by wound classification, prophylactic antibiotic administration, debridement and irrigation, and stable fracture fixation. Critical Issues: Despite these established treatment paradigms, infections and infection-related complications remain a significant clinical burden. To address this, improvements need to be made in our ability to detect bacterial infections, effectively remove wound contamination, eradicate infections, and treat and prevent biofilm formation associated with fracture fixation hardware. Future Directions: Current research is addressing these critical issues. While culture methods are of limited value, culture-independent molecular techniques are being developed to provide informative detection of bacterial contamination and infection. Other advanced contamination- and infection-detecting techniques are also being investigated. New hardware-coating methods are being developed to minimize the risk of biofilm formation in wounds, and immune stimulation techniques are being developed to prevent open fracture infections. PMID:25566415

  7. Current concepts and controversies in the diagnosis and treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Jensen, P S

    2000-04-01

    Concerns about possible over-diagnosis and over-treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been prominent in media reports, as have various competing claims about the safety and efficacy of the various treatments for ADHD. Drawing upon the results of the recent National Institutes of Health Consensus Conference, this paper reviews the evidence concerning these controversial areas. Although there do appear to be pockets of over-prescribing in selected communities, the best available evidence suggests that across the United States substantial underdiagnosis continues to occur, and only 50% of all children with ADHD are being treated with stimulant medications. Among those who are treated with stimulant medications, inadequate treatment is quite common. Substantial evidence suggests that for ADHD symptoms, stimulants are more effective than behavioral therapies in head-to-head comparisons. Combined medication and behavioral treatments do not offer any meaningful advantages over medication treatments alone for ADHD symptoms. For other areas of functioning, however (social skills, academic performance, etc.), combined treatments appear to offer some modest advantages over single treatment approaches. Although research findings show that ADHD can indeed be rigorously and reliably diagnosed under optimal conditions, and that carefully delivered treatments can yield substantial benefits, such best practices do not appear to be taking place in the real world. Thus, although the above controversies are facing some resolution in principal, in practice much remains to be done. PMID:11122941

  8. Current concepts in the evaluation and treatment of mallet finger injury.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Jacob M P; Khouri, Joseph S; Hammert, Warren C

    2013-10-01

    The mallet finger is a frequently encountered fingertip injury that leads to extensor lag of the distal phalanx. Classification systems stratify these injuries as ranging from soft-tissue disruption of the extensor mechanism alone to those that have articular involvement and volar subluxation. The management of mallet finger injuries varies based on injury pattern and surgeon preference. These treatment options include splinting regimens, closed reduction and percutaneous pinning, and open reduction and internal fixation. Although the final goal of treatment is to establish a congruent joint, the efficacy of each treatment modality has been shown to vary. PMID:24076703

  9. Tic Disorders and Tourette Syndrome: Current Concepts of Etiology and Treatment in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tagwerker Gloor, Friederike; Walitza, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    Tic disorders (TD), including chronic/persistent TD (CTD) and Tourette syndrome, have been described and studied for many years. Within the last two decades, intensified study efforts led to more specific assumptions about genesis and influences of both hereditary and environmental factors. TD in children and adolescents are very often accompanied by attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorders and obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD) as comorbid disorders. Comorbidities are aggravating factors concerning prognosis and treatment opportunities. Therefore, etiological considerations and treatment strategies have to take associated psychiatric disorders into account. Treatment approaches are symptom targeted and include behavioral treatments and/or medication and show positive outcomes concerning tic symptomatology, global functioning, and associated psychopathology. This review presents an update of the research, definitions, and classification according to ICD-10 and DSM-5 and summarizes the diagnostic procedures and most effective clinical strategies. PMID:26829367

  10. Current concepts of oral and maxillofacial rehabilitation and treatment in aviation.

    PubMed

    Yuce, Esra; Koçer, Gulperi; Çini, Turan Atila

    2016-01-01

    Aerospace medicine is the medical discipline responsible for assessing and conserving the health, safety, and performance of individuals involved in air and space travel. With the upward trend in airline travel, flight-related oral conditions requiring treatment have become a source of concern for aircrew members. Awareness and treatment of any potential physiological problems for these aircrews have always been critical components of aviation safety. In a flight situation, oral and maxillofacial problems may in fact become life-threatening clinical conditions. The unusual nature of aerospace medicine requires practitioners to have unique expertise. Special attention to aerospace medicine will open the way for professionals to develop and apply their skills and capabilities. Both dentists and aviators should be aware of the issues involved in aviation dentistry. This article presents the principles of prevention, treatment guidelines, and dental-related flight restrictions. PMID:27599281

  11. Current concepts in psychodermatology.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Madhulika A; Gupta, Aditya K

    2014-06-01

    Several diagnoses in the new DSM-5 chapter on 'Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders' directly relate to psychodermatology. The new excoriation (skin-picking) disorder (SPD) and trichotillomania (TTM) both manifest as recurrent body-focused repetitive behaviors that have compulsive and dissociative features, the latter being more prevalent in TTM than SPD. The DSM-5 refers to SPD and TTM occurring without full awareness or preceding tension, however does not specifically mention the possible role of dissociation. This has important treatment implications, as patients with high dissociative symptoms are not likely to respond to the standard treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder. Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), which is frequently associated with cutaneous body image (CBI) dissatisfaction, is present in 9%-15% of dermatology patients. Treatment guidelines in dermatology are increasingly considering the psychosocial morbidity related to CBI in their treatment outcome measures. The presence of BDD, if unrecognized, may therefore directly affect the dermatologic treatment regimens offered to the patient. PMID:24740235

  12. [Current concepts on Scheuermann kyphosis: clinical presentation, diagnosis and controversies around treatment].

    PubMed

    Tomé-Bermejo, F; Tsirikos, A I

    2012-01-01

    Scheuermann kyphosis is a structural deformity of the thoracic or thoracolumbar spine that develops prior to puberty and deteriorates during adolescence. There is limited information on its natural history but many patients are expected to have a benign course. Severe kyphosis can progress into adult life and cause significant deformity and debilitating back pain. Conservative treatment includes bracing and physical therapy, but although widely prescribed they have not been scientifically validated. Surgical treatment may be considered in the presence of a progressive kyphosis producing severe pain resistant to conservative measures, neurological compromise, or unacceptable deformity. This is associated with significant risks of major complications that should be discussed with the patients and their families. Modern techniques allow better correction of the deformity through posterior-only surgery with lower complication rates. Simultaneous shortening of the posterior vertebral column across the apical levels, along with spinal cord monitoring, reduces the risk of neurological deficits. PMID:23594948

  13. Current Concepts in the Evaluation and Treatment of the Shoulder in Overhead Throwing Athletes, Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Reinold, Michael M.; Gill, Thomas J.; Wilk, Kevin E.; Andrews, James R.

    2010-01-01

    The overhead throwing athlete is an extremely challenging patient in sports medicine. The repetitive microtraumatic stresses imposed on the athlete’s shoulder joint complex during the throwing motion constantly place the athlete at risk for injury. Treatment of the overhead athlete requires the understanding of several principles based on the unique physical characteristics of the overhead athlete and the demands endured during the act of throwing. These principles are described and incorporated in a multiphase progressive rehabilitation program designed to prevent injuries and rehabilitate the injured athlete, both nonoperatively and postoperatively. PMID:23015928

  14. HIV Disease: Current Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeling, Richard P.

    1993-01-01

    Describes human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), newly characterized human retrovirus which causes chronic, progressive, immune deficiency disease, the most severe phase of which is Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Reviews most important current epidemiologic, clinical, and virologic information about HIV and HIV disease and provides…

  15. Current concepts in the pathogenesis and treatment of chronic suppurative otitis media.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Rahul; Lisi, Christopher V; Gerring, Robert; Mittal, Jeenu; Mathee, Kalai; Narasimhan, Giri; Azad, Rajeev K; Yao, Qi; Grati, M'hamed; Yan, Denise; Eshraghi, Adrien A; Angeli, Simon I; Telischi, Fred F; Liu, Xue-Zhong

    2015-10-01

    Otitis media (OM) is an inflammation of the middle ear associated with infection. Despite appropriate therapy, acute OM (AOM) can progress to chronic suppurative OM (CSOM) associated with ear drum perforation and purulent discharge. The effusion prevents the middle ear ossicles from properly relaying sound vibrations from the ear drum to the oval window of the inner ear, causing conductive hearing loss. In addition, the inflammatory mediators generated during CSOM can penetrate into the inner ear through the round window. This can cause the loss of hair cells in the cochlea, leading to sensorineural hearing loss. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are the most predominant pathogens that cause CSOM. Although the pathogenesis of AOM is well studied, very limited research is available in relation to CSOM. With the emergence of antibiotic resistance as well as the ototoxicity of antibiotics and the potential risks of surgery, there is an urgent need to develop effective therapeutic strategies against CSOM. This warrants understanding the role of host immunity in CSOM and how the bacteria evade these potent immune responses. Understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to CSOM will help in designing novel treatment modalities against the disease and hence preventing the hearing loss. PMID:26248613

  16. [Digestive endometriosis. Current concepts].

    PubMed

    Caligaris, P; Ducassou, M J; Masselot, R; Maurin, B; Cardon, J M; Bricot, R

    1982-12-01

    Endometriosis involving the digestive tract accounts for 1% of all cases of the disease. There is a marked predominance in the recto-sigmoid and terminal ileal loops. Symptomatology is dominated by disturbances in intestinal transit, sub-occlusion or acute obstruction, pain worsening at the time of menstruation and by a haemorrhagic rectal discharge again accompanying menstruation. Apart from classical aetiopathogenic theories such as grafting onto the digestive tract by tubal, lymph vessel or venous propagation, it would appear that prostaglandins and in particular a change in the (formula; see text) ratio may play a large role. Operative resection of localised stenosis combined with oophorectomy, if the latter is possible in view of the patient's age, or prolonged medical treatment with progestational agents or even better Danazol results in cure and avoids recurrences. PMID:6891703

  17. Stroke: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Albertson, Megan; Sharma, Jitendra

    2014-11-01

    , but so far they are only experimental treatment options. The best preventative measures for first time or recurrent stroke are: starting or switching antiplatelet therapy, treatment of cardiovascular risk factors (atrial fibrillation and carotid stenosis), optimization of hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus management, and smoking cessation. PMID:25508996

  18. Stroke: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Albertson, Megan; Sharma, Jitendra

    2014-11-01

    , but so far they are only experimental treatment options. The best preventative measures for first time or recurrent stroke are: starting or switching antiplatelet therapy, treatment of cardiovascular risk factors (atrial fibrillation and carotid stenosis), optimization of hypertension, dyslipidemia and diabetes mellitus management, and smoking cessation. PMID:25490795

  19. Current concepts: scapular dyskinesis.

    PubMed

    Kibler, W Ben; Sciascia, Aaron

    2010-04-01

    The scapula serves many roles in order for proper shoulder function to occur. These roles include providing synchronous scapular rotation during humeral motion, serving as a stable base for rotator cuff activation and functioning as a link in the kinetic chain. Each role is vital to proper arm function and can only occur when the anatomy around the shoulder is uncompromised. The presence of bony and soft tissue injury as well as muscle weakness and inflexibility can alter the roles of the scapula and alter scapular resting position and/or dynamic motion. This altered scapular position/movement has been termed 'scapular dyskinesis'. Although it occurs in a large number of shoulder injuries, it appears that scapular dyskinesis is a non-specific response to a painful condition in the shoulder rather than a specific response to certain glenohumeral pathology. The presence or absence of scapular dyskinesis needs to be determined during the clinical examination. An examination consisting of visual inspection of the scapular position at rest and during dynamic humeral movements, along with the performance of objective posture measurements and scapular corrective maneuvers, will help the clinician ascertain the extent to which the scapula is involved in the shoulder injury. Treatment of scapular dyskinesis should begin with optimised anatomy and then progress to the restoration of dynamic scapular stability by strengthening of the scapular stabilisers utilising kinetic chain-based rehabilitation protocols. PMID:19996329

  20. Bone strength: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Turner, Charles H

    2006-04-01

    Bones serve several mechanical functions, including acoustic amplification in the middle ear, shielding vital organs from trauma, and serving as levers for muscles to contract against. Bone is a multiphase material made up of a tough collagenous matrix intermingled with rigid mineral crystals. The mineral gives bone its stiffness. Without sufficient mineralization, bones will plastically deform under load. Collagen provides toughness to bone making it less brittle so that it better resists fracture. Bone adapts to mechanical stresses largely by changing its size and shape, which are major determinants of its resistance to fracture. Tissue is added in regions of high mechanical stress providing an efficient means for improving bone strength. Experiments have shown that small additions of bone mineral density (BMD) (5-8%) caused by mechanical loading can improve bone strength by over 60% and extend bone fatigue life by 100-fold. Consequently, it is clear that bone tissue possesses a mechanosensing apparatus that directs osteogenesis to where it is most needed for improving bone strength. The biological processes involved in bone mechanotransduction are poorly understood and further investigation of the molecular mechanisms involved might uncover drug targets for osteoporosis. Several pathways are emerging from current research, including membrane ion channels, ATP signaling, second messengers, such as prostaglandins and nitric oxide, insulin-like growth factors, and Wnt signaling. PMID:16831941

  1. Cervical arterial dissection: current concepts .

    PubMed

    Menon, Ranjith K; Norris, John W

    2008-10-01

    The increasing use and safety of noninvasive imaging in recent years has revealed the surprising frequency of dissection of the carotid and vertebral arteries (cervical arterial dissection [CAD]) as a cause of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. This review is an overview of current concepts and practice of patients with CAD, but our ideas are constantly evolving with new discoveries from neurovascular imaging and medical and surgical management in this area. PMID:18990128

  2. Current Concept of Geometrical Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görög, Augustín; Görögová, Ingrid

    2014-06-01

    Within the solving VEGA 1/0615/12 research project "Influence of 5-axis grinding parameters on the shank cutteŕs geometric accuracy", the research team will measure and evaluate geometrical accuracy of the produced parts. They will use the contemporary measurement technology (for example the optical 3D scanners). During the past few years, significant changes have occurred in the field of geometrical accuracy. The objective of this contribution is to analyse the current standards in the field of geometric tolerance. It is necessary to bring an overview of the basic concepts and definitions in the field. It will prevent the use of outdated and invalidated terms and definitions in the field. The knowledge presented in the contribution will provide the new perspective of the measurement that will be evaluated according to the current standards.

  3. [Compliance with psychiatric legal ordinance section 63 STGB. Legal principles--current status--treatment concepts--perspectives].

    PubMed

    Nedopil, N; Müller-Isberner, R

    1995-11-01

    According to German law, delinquents who are considered either not fully responsible or not responsible at all for their actions because of a mental disorder receive no punishment or a lesser degree of punishment in criminal trials. They may, however, be sentenced to psychiatric treatment either in a psychiatric hospital or in an addiction centre, if the risk of them committing such offenses in the future is considered to be high. This article reviews the current situation of mentally ill offenders in hospitals and explores possible developments in forensic psychiatry. It outlines the legal framework, and the current and developing treatment strategies, and finally raises the question of whether these developments will lead to further specialization of forensic psychiatry or to a reintegration of forensic knowledge into general psychiatry. PMID:8532095

  4. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank—Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 2

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Iain R.; LaPrade, Robert F.; Musahl, Volker; Geeslin, Andrew G.; Zlotnicki, Jason P.; Mann, Barton J.; Petrigliano, Frank A.

    2016-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common and result in considerable morbidity. Tears within the tendon substance or at its insertion into the humeral head represent a considerable clinical challenge because of the hostile local environment that precludes healing. Tears often progress without intervention, and current surgical treatments are inadequate. Although surgical implants, instrumentation, and techniques have improved, healing rates have not improved, and a high failure rate remains for large and massive rotator cuff tears. The use of biologic adjuvants that contribute to a regenerative microenvironment have great potential for improving healing rates and function after surgery. This article presents a review of current and emerging biologic approaches to augment rotator cuff tendon and muscle regeneration focusing on the scientific rationale, preclinical, and clinical evidence for efficacy, areas for future research, and current barriers to advancement and implementation. PMID:27099865

  5. Current concepts of severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Ray, Anuradha; Raundhal, Mahesh; Oriss, Timothy B; Ray, Prabir; Wenzel, Sally E

    2016-07-01

    The term asthma encompasses a disease spectrum with mild to very severe disease phenotypes whose traditional common characteristic is reversible airflow limitation. Unlike milder disease, severe asthma is poorly controlled by the current standard of care. Ongoing studies using advanced molecular and immunological tools along with improved clinical classification show that severe asthma does not identify a specific patient phenotype, but rather includes patients with constant medical needs, whose pathobiologic and clinical characteristics vary widely. Accordingly, in recent clinical trials, therapies guided by specific patient characteristics have had better outcomes than previous therapies directed to any subject with a diagnosis of severe asthma. However, there are still significant gaps in our understanding of the full scope of this disease that hinder the development of effective treatments for all severe asthmatics. In this Review, we discuss our current state of knowledge regarding severe asthma, highlighting different molecular and immunological pathways that can be targeted for future therapeutic development. PMID:27367183

  6. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank—Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 3

    PubMed Central

    Zlotnicki, Jason P.; Geeslin, Andrew G.; Murray, Iain R.; Petrigliano, Frank A.; LaPrade, Robert F.; Mann, Barton J.; Musahl, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Focal chondral defects of the articular surface are a common occurrence in the field of orthopaedics. These isolated cartilage injuries, if not repaired surgically with restoration of articular congruency, may have a high rate of progression to posttraumatic osteoarthritis, resulting in significant morbidity and loss of function in the young, active patient. Both isolated and global joint disease are a difficult entity to treat in the clinical setting given the high amount of stress on weightbearing joints and the limited healing potential of native articular cartilage. Recently, clinical interest has focused on the use of biologically active compounds and surgical techniques to regenerate native cartilage to the articular surface, with the goal of restoring normal joint health and overall function. This article presents a review of the current biologic therapies, as discussed at the 2015 American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) Biologics Think Tank, that are used in the treatment of focal cartilage deficiencies. For each of these emerging therapies, the theories for application, the present clinical evidence, and specific areas for future research are explored, with focus on the barriers currently faced by clinicians in advancing the success of these therapies in the clinical setting. PMID:27123466

  7. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: Current Concepts.

    PubMed

    Yu, Eun-Mi; Kittai, Adam; Tabbara, Imad A

    2015-10-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common type of leukemia in adults, and while in early, asymptomatic stages treatment is not indicated, the threat to the quality of life and increased mortality of patients posed by more advanced-stage disease necessitate therapeutic intervention. Guidelines of when and how to treat are not well-established because CLL is a disease of the elderly and it is important to balance preservation of functional status and control of the disease. Advances in molecular and genetic profiling has led to the ability to identify sub-groups of patients with CLL whose disease may respond to selected therapy. This review discusses current standard therapies in the major sub-groups of CLL based on age and functional status, in both the front-line and relapsed/refractory settings. It also provides a concise review of novel agents that have shown considerable efficacy in CLL. PMID:26408673

  8. Current Concepts of Maternal Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Lowensohn, Richard I.; Stadler, Diane D.; Naze, Christie

    2016-01-01

    Background A nutrient-rich maternal diet before and during pregnancy is associated with improved fetal health, more appropriate birth weight, and increased rates of maternal and infant survival. Physicians need a better understanding of the role of diet in shaping fetal outcomes. Given this background, we reviewed and summarized articles on maternal nutrition found in MEDLINE since 1981, written in English, and limited to human subjects. For the Offspring Maternal diets high in sugar and fat lead to an increased incidence of metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease later in life. Folic acid should be supplemented prior to conception and continued through at least the first 28 days of fetal life to prevent neural tube defects, and vitamin C should be given to women who smoke to lower the incidence of asthma and wheezing in the children. Iodine deficiency is increasing, and iodine should be included in prenatal supplements. If the maternal hemoglobin is 7 g/dL or more, there is no evidence that iron supplementation is needed. Fish intake during pregnancy is protective against atopic outcomes, whereas high-meat diets contribute to elevated adult blood pressure and hypersecretion of cortisol. For the Mother Calcium supplementation lowers the risk of preeclampsia and hypertensive disease in pregnancy. Conclusions Given the limits of our current knowledge, a diet rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and selected fish is desirable for the best outcomes. Diets high in sugar and fat lead to higher rates of diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. Folic acid, iodine, and calcium in all pregnant women and vitamin C in smokers are the only supplements so far shown to be of value for routine use. The physician treating a pregnant woman should be ready to advise a healthy diet for the benefit of the fetus. Target Audience Obstetricians and gynecologists, family physicians Learning Objectives After participating in this activity, the

  9. Combotherapy and current concepts as well as future strategies for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ling-Yun; Chiu, Ming-Jang

    2014-01-01

    It has been estimated that 35.6 million people globally had dementia in 2010 and the prevalence of dementia has been predicted to double every 20 years. Thus, 115.4 million people may be living with dementia in 2050. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia and is present in 60%–70% of people with dementia. Unfortunately, there are few approved drugs that can alleviate the cognitive or behavioral symptoms of AD dementia. Recent studies have revealed that pathophysiological changes related to AD occur decades before the appearance of clinical symptoms of dementia. This extended preclinical phase of AD provides a critical chance for disease-modifying agents to halt or delay the relentless process of AD. Although several trials targeting various pathological processes are ongoing, the examination of the combined use of different approaches to combat AD seems warranted. In this article, we will review current therapies, future strategies, and ongoing clinical trials for the treatment of AD with a special focus on combination therapies. Furthermore, preventive strategies for cognitively normal subjects in the presymptomatic stages of AD will also be addressed. In this review, we discuss current hypotheses of the disease process. In the decades since the approval of cholinesterase inhibitors, no new drug has ultimately demonstrated clear success in clinical trials. Given the difficulties that have been encountered in attempts to identify a single drug that can treat AD, we must pursue effective multi-target strategies, ie, combination therapies. The combination of cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine is considered well tolerated and safe, and this combination benefits patients with moderate-to-severe AD. In contrast, with the exception of adjuvant therapies of conventional drugs, combinations of different disease-modifying agents with different mechanisms may have promising synergic effects and benefit cognition, behavior, and daily living

  10. Burning mouth syndrome: Current concepts.

    PubMed

    Nasri-Heir, Cibele; Zagury, Julyana Gomes; Thomas, Davis; Ananthan, Sowmya

    2015-01-01

    Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic pain condition. It has been described by the International Headache Society as "an intra-oral burning or dysesthetic sensation, recurring daily for more than 2 h/day for more than 3 months, without clinically evident causative lesions." BMS is frequently seen in women in the peri-menopausal and menopausal age group in an average female/male ratio of 7:1. The site most commonly affected is the anterior two-thirds of the tongue. The patient may also report taste alterations and oral dryness along with the burning. The etiopathogenesis is complex and is not well-comprehended. The more accepted theories point toward a neuropathic etiology, but the gustatory system has also been implicated in this condition. BMS is frequently mismanaged, partly because it is not well-known among healthcare providers. Diagnosis of BMS is made after other local and systemic causes of burning have been ruled out as then; the oral burning is the disease itself. The management of BMS still remains a challenge. Benzodiazepines have been used in clinical practice as the first-line medication in the pharmacological management of BMS. Nonpharmacological management includes cognitive behavioral therapy and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The aim of this review is to familiarize healthcare providers with the diagnosis, pathogenesis, and general characteristics of primary BMS while updating them with the current treatment options to better manage this group of patients. PMID:26929531

  11. Distal radius fractures: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Schneppendahl, Johannes; Windolf, Joachim; Kaufmann, Robert A

    2012-08-01

    Despite the frequency of distal radius fractures, the optimal treatment remains without consensus opinion. A trend toward increased distal radius fracture open reduction and internal fixation has been identified, with biomechanical and clinical studies suggesting treatment advantages of certain fixation methods over others. Well-controlled patient trials are still missing to lend objective findings to management algorithms. This article reviews the literature over the past 5 years to guide our management regarding this common upper-extremity injury. PMID:22763062

  12. Current concepts in wrist arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chloros, George D; Wiesler, Ethan R; Poehling, Gary G

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the recent literature on arthroscopic treatment of distal radius fractures (DRFs), triangular fibrocartilage complex injuries, intercarpal ligament injuries, and ganglion cysts, including the use of electrothermal devices. A major advantage of arthroscopy in the treatment of DRFs is the accurate assessment of the status of the articular surfaces and the detection of concomitant injuries. Nonrandomized studies of arthroscopically assisted reduction of DRFs show satisfactory results, but there is only 1 prospective randomized study showing the benefits of arthroscopy compared with open reduction-internal fixation. Wrist arthroscopy plays an important role as part of the treatment for DRFs; however, the treatment for each practitioner and each patient needs to be individualized. Wrist arthroscopy is the gold standard in the diagnosis and treatment of triangular fibrocartilage complex injuries. Type 1A injuries may be successfully treated with debridement, whereas the repair of type 1B, 1C, and 1D injuries gives satisfactory results. For type 2 injuries, the arthroscopic wafer procedure is equally effective as ulnar shortening osteotomy but is associated with fewer complications in the ulnar positive wrist. With interosseous ligament injuries, arthroscopic visualization provides critical diagnostic value. Debridement and pinning in the acute setting of complete ligament tears are promising and proven. In the chronic patient, arthroscopy can guide reconstructive options based on cartilage integrity. The preliminary results of wrist arthroscopy using electrothermal devices are encouraging; however, complications have been reported, and therefore, their use is controversial. In dorsal wrist ganglia, arthroscopy has shown excellent results, a lower rate of recurrence, and no incidence of scapholunate interosseous ligament instability compared with open ganglionectomy. Arthroscopy in the treatment of volar wrist ganglia has yielded

  13. Current concepts in combination therapy for the treatment of hypertension: combined calcium channel blockers and RAAS inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Guerra, Alberto F; Castro-Serna, David; Barrera, Cesar I Elizalde; Ramos-Brizuela, Luz M

    2009-01-01

    Recent guidelines for the management of hypertension recommend target blood pressures <140/90 mmHg in hypertensive patients, or <130/80 mmHg in subjects with diabetes, chronic kidney disease, or coronary artery disease. Despite the availability and efficacy of antihypertensive drugs, most hypertensive patients do not reach the recommended treatment targets with monotherapy, making combination therapy necessary to achieve the therapeutic goal. Combination therapy with 2 or more agents is the most effective method for achieving strict blood pressure goals. Fixed-dose combination simplifies treatment, reduces costs, and improves adherence. There are many drug choices for combination therapy, but few data are available about the efficacy and safety of some specific combinations. Combination therapy of calcium antagonists and inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) are efficacious and safe, and have been considered rational by both the JNC 7 and the 2007 European Society of Hypertension – European Society of Cardiology guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension. The aim of this review is to discuss some relevant issues about the use of combinations with calcium channel blockers and RAAS inhibitors in the treatment of hypertension. PMID:21949615

  14. Current concepts in pediatric endocrinology

    SciTech Connect

    Styne, D.M.; Brook, C.G.D.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains seven chapters. They are: Recombinant DNA Technology; The HLA System in Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia; Neuroendocrinology; Circadian Rhythms; Basic Aspects and Pediatric Implications; New Treatment Methods in Diabetes Mellitus; The Insulin-Like Growth Factors; and Hypopituitarism: Review of Behavioral Data.

  15. Current Concepts of Treating Vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Theresa

    1977-01-01

    Vaginitis can be a frustrating entity to treat, since the incidence of recurrence is high. This paper examines evidence from the literature concerning diagnosis and treatment of Candida albicans, Trichomonas vaginalis, Corynebacterium vaginale, herpes simplex type 2 and gonorrhea. A protocol based on these readings is outlined. PMID:21304797

  16. Current Concepts for Patellar Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Petri, Maximilian; Ettinger, Max; Stuebig, Timo; Brand, Stephan; Krettek, Christian; Jagodzinski, Michael; Omar, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Context: Patellar dislocation usually occurs to the lateral side, leading to ruptures of the Medial Patellofemoral Ligament (MPFL) in about 90% of the cases. Even though several prognostic factors are identified for patellofemoral instability after patellar dislocation so far, the appropriate therapy remains a controversial issue. Evidence Acquisition: Authors searched the Medline library for studies on both surgical and conservative treatment for patellar dislocation and patellofemoral instability. Additionally, the reference list of each article was searched for additional studies. Results: A thorough analysis of the anatomical risk factors with a particular focus on patella alta, increased Tibial Tuberosity-Trochlear Groove (TT-TG) distance, trochlear dysplasia as well as torsional abnormalities should be performed early after the first dislocation to allow adequate patient counseling. Summarizing the results of all published randomized clinical trials and comparing surgical and conservative treatment after the first-time patellar dislocation until today indicated no significant evident difference for children, adolescents, and adults. Therefore, nonoperative treatment was indicated after a first-time patellar dislocation in the vast majority of patients. Conclusions: Surgical treatment for patellar dislocation is indicated primarily in case of relevant concomitant injuries such as osteochondral fractures, and secondarily for recurrent dislocations. PMID:26566512

  17. Wrisberg-variant discoid lateral meniscus: current concepts, treatment options, and imaging features with emphasis on dynamic ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Jose, Jean; Buller, Leonard T; Rivera, Sebastian; Carvajal Alba, Jaime A; Baraga, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Discoid lateral menisci represent a range of morphologic abnormalities of the lateral meniscus. The Wrisberg-variant discoid lateral meniscus is an unstable type that lacks posterior ligament attachments, resulting in "snapping knee syndrome." Abnormally mobile discoid lateral menisci are difficult to diagnose both clinically and with traditional static imaging, such as magnetic resonance imaging. In this article, we discuss the pathophysiology, clinical features, imaging findings, and treatment options for Wrisberg-variant discoid lateral menisci. We focus on the role of dynamic ultrasonography in revealing lateral meniscal subluxation during provocative maneuvers. PMID:25750948

  18. Current Concepts in Ejaculatory Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Wolters, Jeffrey P; Hellstrom, Wayne J. G

    2006-01-01

    Although erectile dysfunction has recently become the most well-known aspect of male sexual dysfunction, the most prevalent male sexual disorders are ejaculatory dysfunctions. Ejaculatory disorders are divided into 4 categories: premature ejaculation (PE), delayed ejaculation, retrograde ejaculation, and anejaculation/anorgasmia. Pharmacologic treatment for certain ejaculatory disorders exists, for example the off-label use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for PE. Unfortunately, the other ejaculatory disorders are less studied and not as well understood. This review revisits the physiology of the normal ejaculatory response, specifically explores the mechanisms of anejaculation, and presents emerging data. The neurophysiology of the ejaculatory reflex is complex, making classification of the role of individual neurotransmitters extremely difficult. However, recent research has elucidated more about the role of serotonin and dopamine at the central level in the physiology of both arousal and orgasm. Other recent studies that look at differing pharmacokinetic profiles and binding affinities of the α1-antagonists serve as an indication of the centrally mediated role of ejaculation and orgasm. As our understanding of the interaction between central and peripheral modulations and regulation of the process of ejaculation increases, the probability of developing centrally acting pharmaceutical agents for the treatment of sexual dysfunction approaches reality. PMID:17215997

  19. Myasthenia Gravis—Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Christian; Lindstrom, Jon M.; Keesey, John C.; Mulder, Donald G.

    1985-01-01

    An edited summary of an Interdepartmental Conference arranged by the Department of Medicine of the UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles. The Director of Conferences is William M. Pardridge, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine. Current findings indicate that autoimmune myasthenia gravis is an acquired immune complex disorder of neuromuscular transmission in voluntary striated muscle. There is a break in immunologic tolerance leading to blocking and degradation of acetylcholine receptors, together with widening of the synaptic cleft associated with partial destruction, simplification and shortening of the postjunctional membrane. Thymic hyperplasia and thymoma may be present. A decremental response to nerve-muscle stimulation, blocking and jitter on single-fiber electromyography and circulating antibodies to acetylcholine receptor are detectable in most patients with generalized weakness. Although the cause of this abnormal immunologic mechanism remains to be discovered, anticholinesterases, corticosteroids, immunosuppressants, plasmapheresis or thymectomy (individually or in combination) provide control and better prognosis in most patients. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:3895751

  20. Anorectal Human Papillomavirus: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Assi, Roland; Reddy, Vikram; Einarsdottir, Hulda; Longo, Walter E.

    2014-01-01

    Increased anorectal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is related to the recent trends in sexual behavior in both homosexual and heterosexual groups and prevalence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Clinical presentation and natural history depend on the serotype involved. HPV 6 and 11 are found in the benign wart. Local control can be achieved with a wide selection of surgical and topical techniques. HPV 16, 18, and 31 are found in dysplastic lesions and have the potential to progress to invasive anal squamous cell carcinoma. Recognition and early management of dysplastic lesions is crucial to prevent the morbidity and mortality associated with anal cancer. While low-grade lesions can be closely observed, high-grade lesions should be eradicated. Different strategies can be used to eradicate the disease while preserving anorectal function. Studies on the efficacy of vaccination on anorectal HPV showed promising results in select population groups and led to the recent expansion of current vaccination recommendations. PMID:25506286

  1. Current concepts in malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef

    2002-12-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) is a rare, potentially lethal, clinically and genetically heterogeneous pharmacogenic myopathy, which during or after general anesthesia manifests as MH crisis (MHC) in genetically predisposed, but otherwise mostly normal, individuals (MH susceptibles) in response to anesthetic-triggering agents. MHC can also occur in patients with central core disease. MCH-like crises have been reported in those with Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy, myotonic dystrophy, mitochondriopathy, and various other conditions. MH susceptibility is diagnosed if there is an MHC in the individual or family history or by the in vitro caffeine-halothane contracture test. Although screening for mutations in the ryanodine-receptor-1 gene and the dihydropyridine-receptor gene, respectively, could further substantiate the diagnosis, the caffeine-halothane-contracture test still remains the gold standard for diagnosing MH susceptibility. The most well-known triggers of an MHC are depolarizing muscle relaxants and volatile anesthetics. Therapy of an MHC comprises discontinuation of triggering agents, oxygenation, and correction of the acidosis and electrolyte disturbances, treatment of arrhythmias, cooling, and dantrolene. If MH susceptibility is not known preoperatively and an MHC unexpectedly interrupts anesthesia, consultation by a specialist in MH susceptibility after anesthesia is essential to investigate the patient for MH susceptibility or subclinical myopathy, guide laboratory investigations, manage therapy, and counsel the family on further risk. To further reduce morbidity and mortality of those with MHC, anesthesiologists and neurologists should be well educated and should strengthen their clinical vigilance. Research should be intensified and extended with regard to the development of new in vitro tests to further elucidate the heterogeneous genetic background of MH susceptibility. PMID:19078692

  2. Prefrontal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation for Treatment of Schizophrenia With Predominant Negative Symptoms: A Double-Blind, Sham-Controlled Proof-of-Concept Study.

    PubMed

    Palm, Ulrich; Keeser, Daniel; Hasan, Alkomiet; Kupka, Michael J; Blautzik, Janusch; Sarubin, Nina; Kaymakanova, Filipa; Unger, Ina; Falkai, Peter; Meindl, Thomas; Ertl-Wagner, Birgit; Padberg, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Negative symptoms are highly relevant in the long-term course of schizophrenia and are an important target domain for the development of novel interventions. Recently, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the prefrontal cortex has been investigated as a treatment option in schizophrenia. In this proof-of-concept study, 20 schizophrenia patients with predominantly negative symptoms were randomized to either 10 sessions of add-on active (2 mA, 20min) or sham tDCS (anode: left DLPFC/F3; cathode: right supraorbital/F4). Primary outcome measure was the change in the Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms (SANS) sum score; secondary outcomes included reduction in Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) scores and improvement of depressive symptoms, cognitive processing speed, and executive functioning. Sixteen patients underwent 4 functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) scans (pre and post 1st and pre and post 10th tDCS) to investigate changes in resting state network connectivity after tDCS. Per-protocol analysis showed a significantly greater decrease in SANS score after active (-36.1%) than after sham tDCS (-0.7%). PANSS sum scores decreased significantly more with active (-23.4%) than with sham stimulation (-2.2%). Explorative analysis of fcMRI data indicated changes in subgenual cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) connectivity within frontal-thalamic-temporo-parietal networks. The results of this first proof-of-concept study indicate that prefrontal tDCS may be a promising intervention for treatment of schizophrenia with predominant negative symptoms. Large-scale randomized controlled studies are needed to further establish prefrontal tDCS as novel treatment for negative symptoms in schizophrenia. PMID:27098066

  3. Current Concepts in Neuroendocrine Disruption

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years, it has become clear that a wide variety of environmental contaminants have specific effects on neuroendocrine systems in fish, amphibians, birds and mammals. While it is beyond the scope of this review to provide a comprehensive examination of all of these neuroendocrine disruptors, we will focus on select representative examples. Organochlorine pesticides bioaccumulate in neuroendocrine areas of the brain that directly regulate GnRH neurons, thereby altering the expression of genes downstream of GnRH signaling. Organochlorine pesticides can also agonize or antagonize hormone receptors, adversely affecting crosstalk between neurotransmitter systems. The impacts of polychlorinated biphenyls are varied and in many cases subtle. This is particularly true for neuroedocrine and behavioral effects of exposure. These effects impact sexual differentiation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and other neuroendocrine systems regulating the thyroid, metabolic, and stress axes and their physiological responses. Weakly estrogenic and anti-androgenic pollutants such as bisphenol A, phthalates, phytochemicals, and the fungicide vinclozolin can lead to severe and widespread neuroendocrine disruptions in discrete brain regions, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus, resulting in behavioral changes in a wide range of species. Behavioral features that have been shown to be affected by one or more these chemicals include cognitive deficits, heightened anxiety or anxiety-like, sociosexual, locomotor, and appetitive behaviors. Neuroactive pharmaceuticals are now widely detected in aquatic environments and water supplies through the release of wastewater treatment plant effluents. The antidepressant fluoxetine is one such pharmaceutical neuroendocrine disruptor. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that can affect multiple neuroendocrine pathways and behavioral circuits, including disruptive effects on reproduction and

  4. Migraine: current concepts and emerging therapies.

    PubMed

    Arulmozhi, D K; Veeranjaneyulu, A; Bodhankar, S L

    2005-09-01

    Migraine is a recurrent incapacitating neurovascular disorder characterized by attacks of debilitating pain associated with photophobia, phonophobia, nausea and vomiting. Migraine affects a substantial fraction of world population and is a major cause of disability in the work place. Though the pathophysiology of migraine is still unclear three major theories proposed with regard to the mechanisms of migraine are vascular (due to cerebral vasodilatation), neurological (abnormal neurological firing which causes the spreading depression and migraine) and neurogenic dural inflammation (release of inflammatory neuropeptides). The modern understanding of the pathogenesis of migraine is based on the concept that it is a neurovascular disorder. The drugs used in the treatment of migraine either abolish the acute migraine headache or aim its prevention. The last decade has witnessed the advent of Sumatriptan and the 'triptan' class of 5-HT1B/1D receptor agonists which have well established efficacy in treating migraine. Currently prophylactic treatments for migraine include calcium channel blockers, 5-HT2 receptor antagonists, beta adrenoceptor blockers and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) agonists. Unfortunately, many of these treatments are non specific and not always effective. Despite such progress, in view of the complexity of the etiology of migraine, it still remains undiagnosed and available therapies are underused. In this article, the diverse pieces of evidence that have linked the different theories of migraine with its pathophysiology are reviewed. Furthermore, the present therapeutic targets and futuristic approaches for the acute and prophylactic treatment of migraine, with a special emphasis to calcitonin gene-related peptide, are critically evaluated. PMID:16099727

  5. Current therapeutic concepts in peripartum cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Krejci, Jan; Poloczkova, Hana; Nemec, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a relatively rare disease characterized by systolic heart failure occuring towards the end of pregnancy or during the months following birth. It is most often seen in women of African descent, and its incidence seems to be slightly increasing in recent years. Other etiologies of heart failure should be excluded to determine the diagnosis of PPCM. The clinical picture corresponds to systolic heart failure. The rapid onset of the symptoms in relation to pregnancy is striking. The essential diagnostic procedures such as echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and endomyocardial biopsy may be beneficial in certain situations. The etiology of the disease remains unclear. Speculated causes include myocarditis, autoimmune disorders, cardiotropic virus infection, and abnormal responses to hemodynamic and hormonal changes during pregnancy. Particular attention is currently given to the concept of increased oxidative stress inducing production of proapoptotic, angiostatic and proinflammatory mediators. Recovery of left ventricular systolic function occurs in about half of the cases. Mortality has been decreasing in recent years, especially in the United States, but is still between 10-15% in less developed countries where therapeutic possibilities are limited. In addition to standard heart failure therapy, specific treatments (pentoxyfilline, bromocriptine, immunomodulatory therapy) have been tested. Mechanical circulatory support is sometimes needed. Heart transplantation is the therapeutic option for the most severe heart failure and is used in about 10% of the cases. Recurrence in subsequent pregnancy is common and therefore, another pregnancy is not recommended in many cases. PMID:25483952

  6. Achalasia: current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Familiari, Pietro; Greco, Santi; Volkanovska, Ance; Gigante, Giovanni; Cali, Anna; Boškoski, Ivo; Costamagna, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Achalasia is a rare esophageal motility disorder, characterized by impaired swallow-induced, lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation and defective esophageal peristalsis. Unfortunately, there are no etiological therapies for achalasia. Patients present with dysphagia, chest pain and regurgitation of undigested food, often leading to weight loss. The currently available treatments have the common aim of relieving symptoms by decreasing the pressure of the LES. This can be achieved with some medications, by inhibiting the cholinergic innervation (botulinum toxin), by stretching (endoscopic dilation) or cutting (surgery) the LES. Recently, other therapeutic options, including per-oral endoscopic myotomy have been developed and are gaining international consensus. The authors report on the benefits and weaknesses of the different therapies and provide an updated approach to the management of achalasia. PMID:26186641

  7. Aphasia: Current Concepts in Theory and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Tippett, Donna C.; Niparko, John K.; Hillis, Argye E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging contribute to a new insights regarding brain-behavior relationships and expand understanding of the functional neuroanatomy of language. Modern concepts of the functional neuroanatomy of language invoke rich and complex models of language comprehension and expression, such as dual stream networks. Increasingly, aphasia is seen as a disruption of cognitive processes underlying language. Rehabilitation of aphasia incorporates evidence based and person-centered approaches. Novel techniques, such as methods of delivering cortical brain stimulation to modulate cortical excitability, such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation, are just beginning to be explored. In this review, we discuss the historical context of the foundations of neuroscientific approaches to language. We sample the emergent theoretical models of the neural substrates of language and cognitive processes underlying aphasia that contribute to more refined and nuanced concepts of language. Current concepts of aphasia rehabilitation are reviewed, including the promising role of cortical stimulation as an adjunct to behavioral therapy and changes in therapeutic approaches based on principles of neuroplasticity and evidence-based/person-centered practice to optimize functional outcomes. PMID:24904925

  8. Anticoagulation in Atrial Fibrillation – Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Katritsis, Demosthenes G; Gersh, Bernard J; Camm, A John

    2015-01-01

    This article presents the current status of the use of anticoagulation for the treatment of AF, particularly with the use of non-vitamin K-dependent anticoagulants. Comparisons between these agents and warfarin are made and methods for assessment of anticoagulant activity and reversal are discussed. PMID:26835109

  9. Current concepts in the management of gonorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Tapsall, John

    2002-02-01

    The incidence of gonorrhoea is again rising in developed countries and a high disease rate has been maintained in less developed regions for a number of years. The need not only for treatment of the individual but also for control of gonorrhoea at a community level has increased significantly following recognition of its role in the amplification of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission. A sustainable decrease in the incidence of gonorrhoea and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) requires an integrated approach combining improved prevention, better diagnosis and optimal treatment. Effective antibiotic treatment is an essential element of this approach. However, antibiotic treatment of gonorrhoea has been severely hampered by the development of antibiotic resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, to the extent that many therapies are no longer effective. Those treatments that retain acceptable efficacy are often unaffordable where they are most needed. Penicillins and tetracyclines should no longer be used in gonococcal disease, there are limitations on the effectiveness of newer macrolides and spectinomycin and in many parts of the world quinolones have been withdrawn from schedules for the treatment of gonorrhoea. Of all the current agents used to treat all forms of gonococcal disease, only the third generation cephalosporins (most notably ceftriaxone) have retained their efficacy; however, decreased susceptibility to these antibiotics has also appeared. Continuing reliance on antibiotic treatment for controlling gonorrhoea in the absence of other necessary approaches will see a further deterioration in the situation. In these circumstances the possibility that gonorrhoea will be untreatable becomes more real. PMID:11829728

  10. Current concepts in premature ovarian insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Maclaran, Kate; Panay, Nick

    2015-03-01

    Premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) is a life-changing diagnosis, with profound physical and psychological consequences. Unfortunately, there are many deficiencies in our understanding of the condition as the underlying etiology and optimum management strategies are poorly understood. Improved awareness of POI and its long-term implications has led to increased research interest in recent years. Current research has allowed a greater understanding of the changing epidemiology in POI, genetic factors in its etiology and randomized controlled trials of hormone therapy are underway to provide evidence for treatment. This article reviews the latest literature on POI to summarize current understanding and future directions. PMID:25776291

  11. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank-Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 2: Rotator Cuff.

    PubMed

    Murray, Iain R; LaPrade, Robert F; Musahl, Volker; Geeslin, Andrew G; Zlotnicki, Jason P; Mann, Barton J; Petrigliano, Frank A

    2016-03-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common and result in considerable morbidity. Tears within the tendon substance or at its insertion into the humeral head represent a considerable clinical challenge because of the hostile local environment that precludes healing. Tears often progress without intervention, and current surgical treatments are inadequate. Although surgical implants, instrumentation, and techniques have improved, healing rates have not improved, and a high failure rate remains for large and massive rotator cuff tears. The use of biologic adjuvants that contribute to a regenerative microenvironment have great potential for improving healing rates and function after surgery. This article presents a review of current and emerging biologic approaches to augment rotator cuff tendon and muscle regeneration focusing on the scientific rationale, preclinical, and clinical evidence for efficacy, areas for future research, and current barriers to advancement and implementation. PMID:27099865

  12. [Food allergies in paediatrics: Current concepts].

    PubMed

    Plaza-Martin, Ana María

    2016-07-01

    The concept of allergic reaction currently includes all those where an immunological reaction depends on a reaction mediated by IgE, as well as those that involve other immune mechanisms, such as T-cell regulators. There are many different clinical situations, like the classic immediate reactions (IgE mediated) such as urticaria, angioedema, immediate vomiting, abdominal pain, both upper respiratory (aphonia or rhinitis) and lower (wheezing or dyspnoea) symptom, and cardiovascular symptoms. The reactions that involve more than one organ, such as anaphylaxis, which could be an anaphylactic shock if there is cardiovascular involvement. The clinical signs and symptoms produced by non-IgE mediated reactions are usually more insidious in how they start, such as vomiting hours after the ingestion of food in enterocolitis, diarrhoea after days or weeks from starting food, dermatitis sometime after starting food. In these cases it is more difficult to associate these clinical symptoms directly with food. In this article, we attempt to clarify some concepts such as sensitisation/allergy, allergen/allergenic source, or the relationship of different clinical situations with food allergy, in order to help the paediatrician on the one hand, to prescribe strict diets in case of a suspicion based on the cause/effect relationship with the food, and on the other hand not to introduce unnecessary diets that very often have to last an excessively long time, and could lead to nutritional deficiencies in the children. PMID:26969248

  13. Psoriasis pathophysiology: current concepts of pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, J; Bowcock, A

    2005-01-01

    Psoriasis vulgaris is a common skin disorder characterised by focal formation of inflamed, raised plaques that constantly shed scales derived from excessive growth of skin epithelial cells. The disease is defined by a series of linked cellular changes in the skin: hyperplasia of epidermal keratinocytes, vascular hyperplasia and ectasia, and infiltration of T lymphocytes, neutrophils, and other types of leucocyte in affected skin. In a relatively short period, psoriasis vulgaris has been conceptualised as a T lymphocyte mediated autoimmune disease and new biological therapies that target T cells have just entered routine clinical practice. Similarly, rapid progress has been made towards dissecting cellular and molecular pathways of inflammation that contribute to disease pathogenesis. This short review presents current pathogenic concepts that have emerged from genetic, genomic, and cellular information obtained in basic studies and from clinical studies of selective immune targeting drugs. PMID:15708932

  14. Current concepts in the pathophysiology of glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Renu; Gupta, Suresh K; Agarwal, Puneet; Saxena, Rohit; Agrawal, Shyam S

    2009-01-01

    Glaucoma, the second leading cause of blindness, is characterized by changes in the optic disc and visual field defects. The elevated intraocular pressure was considered the prime factor responsible for the glaucomatous optic neuropathy involving death of retinal ganglion cells and their axons. Extensive investigations into the pathophysiology of glaucoma now reveal the role of multiple factors in the development of retinal ganglion cell death. A better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the onset and progression of glaucomatous optic neuropathy is crucial in the development of better therapeutic options. This review is an effort to summarize the current concepts in the pathophysiology of glaucoma so that newer therapeutic targets can be recognized. The literature available in the National Medical Library and online Pubmed search engine was used for literature review. PMID:19574692

  15. Current concepts in the management of radial head fractures

    PubMed Central

    Kodde, Izaäk F; Kaas, Laurens; Flipsen, Mark; van den Bekerom, Michel PJ; Eygendaal, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Fracture of the radial head is a common injury. Over the last decades, the radial head is increasingly recognized as an important stabilizer of the elbow. In order to maintain stability of the injured elbow, goals of treatment of radial head fractures have become more and more towards restoring function and stability of the elbow. As treatment strategies have changed over the years, with an increasing amount of literature on this subject, the purpose of this article was to provide an overview of current concepts of the management of radial head fractures. PMID:26716091

  16. Current Biomechanical Concepts for Rotator Cuff Repair

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    For the past few decades, the repair of rotator cuff tears has evolved significantly with advances in arthroscopy techniques, suture anchors and instrumentation. From the biomechanical perspective, the focus in arthroscopic repair has been on increasing fixation strength and restoration of the footprint contact characteristics to provide early rehabilitation and improve healing. To accomplish these objectives, various repair strategies and construct configurations have been developed for rotator cuff repair with the understanding that many factors contribute to the structural integrity of the repaired construct. These include repaired rotator cuff tendon-footprint motion, increased tendon-footprint contact area and pressure, and tissue quality of tendon and bone. In addition, the healing response may be compromised by intrinsic factors such as decreased vascularity, hypoxia, and fibrocartilaginous changes or aforementioned extrinsic compression factors. Furthermore, it is well documented that torn rotator cuff muscles have a tendency to atrophy and become subject to fatty infiltration which may affect the longevity of the repair. Despite all the aforementioned factors, initial fixation strength is an essential consideration in optimizing rotator cuff repair. Therefore, numerous biomechanical studies have focused on elucidating the strongest devices, knots, and repair configurations to improve contact characteristics for rotator cuff repair. In this review, the biomechanical concepts behind current rotator cuff repair techniques will be reviewed and discussed. PMID:23730471

  17. Safety pharmacology — Current and emerging concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Hamdam, Junnat; Sethu, Swaminathan; Smith, Trevor; Alfirevic, Ana; Alhaidari, Mohammad; Atkinson, Jeffrey; Ayala, Mimieveshiofuo; Box, Helen; Cross, Michael; Delaunois, Annie; Dermody, Ailsa; Govindappa, Karthik; Guillon, Jean-Michel; Jenkins, Rosalind; Kenna, Gerry; Lemmer, Björn; Meecham, Ken; Olayanju, Adedamola; Pestel, Sabine; Rothfuss, Andreas; and others

    2013-12-01

    Safety pharmacology (SP) is an essential part of the drug development process that aims to identify and predict adverse effects prior to clinical trials. SP studies are described in the International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) S7A and S7B guidelines. The core battery and supplemental SP studies evaluate effects of a new chemical entity (NCE) at both anticipated therapeutic and supra-therapeutic exposures on major organ systems, including cardiovascular, central nervous, respiratory, renal and gastrointestinal. This review outlines the current practices and emerging concepts in SP studies including frontloading, parallel assessment of core battery studies, use of non-standard species, biomarkers, and combining toxicology and SP assessments. Integration of the newer approaches to routine SP studies may significantly enhance the scope of SP by refining and providing mechanistic insight to potential adverse effects associated with test compounds. - Highlights: • SP — mandatory non-clinical risk assessments performed during drug development. • SP organ system studies ensure the safety of clinical participants in FiH trials. • Frontloading in SP facilitates lead candidate drug selection. • Emerging trends: integrating SP-Toxicological endpoints; combined core battery tests.

  18. Biologic Treatments for Sports Injuries II Think Tank-Current Concepts, Future Research, and Barriers to Advancement, Part 3: Articular Cartilage.

    PubMed

    Zlotnicki, Jason P; Geeslin, Andrew G; Murray, Iain R; Petrigliano, Frank A; LaPrade, Robert F; Mann, Barton J; Musahl, Volker

    2016-04-01

    Focal chondral defects of the articular surface are a common occurrence in the field of orthopaedics. These isolated cartilage injuries, if not repaired surgically with restoration of articular congruency, may have a high rate of progression to posttraumatic osteoarthritis, resulting in significant morbidity and loss of function in the young, active patient. Both isolated and global joint disease are a difficult entity to treat in the clinical setting given the high amount of stress on weightbearing joints and the limited healing potential of native articular cartilage. Recently, clinical interest has focused on the use of biologically active compounds and surgical techniques to regenerate native cartilage to the articular surface, with the goal of restoring normal joint health and overall function. This article presents a review of the current biologic therapies, as discussed at the 2015 American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine (AOSSM) Biologics Think Tank, that are used in the treatment of focal cartilage deficiencies. For each of these emerging therapies, the theories for application, the present clinical evidence, and specific areas for future research are explored, with focus on the barriers currently faced by clinicians in advancing the success of these therapies in the clinical setting. PMID:27123466

  19. Subtalar joint instability: current clinical concepts.

    PubMed

    Budny, Adam

    2004-07-01

    There has been extensive research and investigation into the subtalar joint (STJ), yet the biomechanics that relate to its anatomic function, especially instability after injury, are surrounded by controversy. With a mechanism of injury closely related to the classic inversion ankle sprain, chronic instability can result following trauma to the lateral ligamentous support network of either joint. Over the past decades there have been countless examples in the literature challenging the current standard of evaluation and treatment of the "subtalar sprain." New technologies have offered varied approaches to diagnostic capability, each with its own strengths and weaknesses, ranging from standard radiographs to CT and MRI. A review of the literature should aid in deciphering the controversy surrounding this aspect of podiatric medicine. PMID:15246150

  20. Current Concepts in Adult Acute Rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Aring, Ann M; Chan, Miriam M

    2016-07-15

    Acute rhinosinusitis is one of the most common conditions that physicians treat in ambulatory care. Most cases of acute rhinosinusitis are caused by viral upper respiratory infections. A meta-analysis based on individual patient data found that common clinical signs and symptoms were not effective for identifying patients with rhinosinusitis who would benefit from antibiotics. C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate are somewhat useful tests for confirming acute bacterial maxillary sinusitis. Four signs and symptoms that significantly increase the likelihood of a bacterial cause when present are double sickening, purulent rhinorrhea, erythrocyte sedimentation rate greater than 10 mm per hour, and purulent secretion in the nasal cavity. Although cutoffs vary depending on the guideline, antibiotic therapy should be considered when rhinosinusitis symptoms fail to improve within seven to 10 days or if they worsen at any time. First-line antibiotics include amoxicillin with or without clavulanate. Current guidelines support watchful waiting within the first seven to 10 days after upper respiratory symptoms first appear. Evidence on the use of analgesics, intranasal corticosteroids, and saline nasal irrigation for the treatment of acute rhinosinusitis is poor. Nonetheless, these therapies may be used to treat symptoms within the first 10 days of upper respiratory infection. Radiography is not recommended in the evaluation of uncomplicated acute rhinosinusitis. For patients who do not respond to treatment, computed tomography of the sinuses without contrast media is helpful to evaluate for possible complications or anatomic abnormalities. Referral to an otolaryngologist is indicated when symptoms persist after maximal medical therapy and if any rare complications are suspected. PMID:27419326

  1. Melanotic and non-melanotic malignancies of the face and external ear - A review of current treatment concepts and future options.

    PubMed

    Kolk, Andreas; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Smeets, Ralf; Kesting, Marco; Hein, Rüdiger; Eckert, Alexander W

    2014-08-01

    Skin has the highest incidence and variety of tumors of all organs. Its structure is of great complexity, and every component has the potential to originate a skin neoplasm (SN). Because of its exposed nature, skin is vulnerable to carcinogenic stimuli such as UV radiation. Various entities can cause SN. Nonmelanotic skin cancers (NMSC) are the most common of all cancers, with over one million cases diagnosed annually in the US. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) accounts for approximately 80% of all NMSC, most of the remaining 20% being squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). The skin of the head and neck is the most common site for tumors, accounting for more than 80% of all NMSC. BCC, SCC, and malignant melanomas (MM) represent 85-90% of all SN. Merkel cell tumors (MCC), lymphoepithelioma-like carcinomas of the skin (LELCS), dermato-fibro-sarcomas, leiomyosarkomas, and Kaposi-sarcomas are less frequent in the facial skin region and the external ear. Based on data from the German Federal Cancer Registry (2003/2004), 140,000 people in Germany were affected by SN (100,000 BCC, 22,000 SCC, 22,000 MM). This number increases considerably if malignant precursors, such as actinic keratosis, are included. Each year, the frequency of SN diagnosis rises by 3-7%. Among all known malignant tumors, MM exhibits the highest rate of increase in incidence. In the past, SN was primarily diagnosed in people aged 50 years or older. However, recently, the risk for developing SN has shifted, and younger people are also affected. Early diagnosis is significantly correlated with prognosis. Resection of SN creates defects that must be closed with local or microvascular flaps to avoid functional disturbing scar formation and deflection of the nose, eyelids, or lips. All therapeutic strategies for SN, the current standard for adjuvant and systemic treatment, and the management of the increasing number of patients under permanent blood thinner medication are described with regard to the treatment of SN

  2. Distal humerus fractures: a review of current therapy concepts.

    PubMed

    Amir, Steinitz; Jannis, Sailer; Daniel, Rikli

    2016-06-01

    Fractures of the distal humerus in the adult comprise approximately one third of all humeral fractures. Successful management of distal humerus fractures depends on correct reduction of the fracture, reconstruction of the articular surface if needed, stability and rigidity of the fixation, and appropriate rehabilitation. In this review, we evaluated the available literature and highlighted current therapy concepts. We assessed the evolution of internal fixation and elbow arthroplasty focusing on the established surgical approaches against the background of a growing incidence of distal humeral fractures in an aging patient population. Therefore evaluating the aspect and influence of age-dependent comorbidities like osteoporosis on successful treatment. PMID:27039395

  3. Treatment concepts of oral cancer.

    PubMed

    Bredell, M; Rordorf, T; Studer, G

    2012-11-01

    The mortality of oral cancer (OC) has shown only moderate improvement over recent decades. Treatment of OC remains mainly surgical with increasing contributions from radio- and chemotherapy. Early diagnosis and adequate management improves patient prognosis whilst lymphatic spread worsens the prognosis significantly. Copious extirpation of the tumour achieving tumour-free margins, as well as the effective removal of affected or suspect lymph nodes are vital steps to ensure long-term survival. Reconstructive ablities have improved to such an extent that many patients can be fully integrated in society after treatment. New modalities such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) ensures selective radiation and significantly contributes to improved quality of life. Photodynamic therapy and other targeted therapy options will play an increasingly important role in the future. PMID:23957099

  4. Management of femoral head osteonecrosis: Current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Sujit Kumar; Goyal, Tarun; Sen, Ramesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) is a disabling condition of young individuals with ill-defined etiology and pathogenesis. Remains untreated, about 70-80% of the patients progress to secondary hip arthritis. Both operative and nonoperative treatments have been described with variable success rate. Early diagnosis and treatment is the key for success in preserving the hip joint. Once femoral head collapses (>2 mm) or if there is secondary degeneration, hip conservation procedures become ineffective and arthroplasty remains the only better option. We reviewed 157 studies that evaluate different treatment modalities of ONFH and then a final consensus on treatment was made. PMID:25593355

  5. Current Endoscopic Treatment of Dysphonia

    PubMed Central

    Ossoff, Robert H.

    2000-01-01

    Benign laryngeal disorders result in dysphonia because of effects on glottic closure and the vibratory characteristics of the true vocal fold. Treatment is initially directed at reversing medical conditions and patterns of abuse with surgery reserved for unresolving lesions resulting in troublesome dysphonia. Benign lesions that require surgery are excised as precisely as possible sparing overlying mucosa and the underlying vocal ligament. Vocal fold scarring is currently best treated by augmentation procedures, and atrophy may be compensated for by medialization thyroplasty or by adding bulk to the affected folds. Application of current knowledge of laryngeal histology and physiology is prerequisite to endoscopic surgical intervention. PMID:18493531

  6. Brain damage in alcoholism: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Lishman, W A; Jacobson, R R; Acker, C

    1987-01-01

    Current views concerning the brain damage occasioned by alcohol abuse are reviewed. Diffuse cerebral changes appear to be common and partially reversible with prolonged abstinence. The possible determinants of such changes, and their relevance to functional deficits are discussed, with illustrations from work currently proceeding at the Institute of Psychiatry. Possible interactions between cortical and subcortical pathologies in contributing to the cognitive deficits shown by alcoholic patients are emphasised. PMID:3478970

  7. Electrical stimulation therapies for spinal fusions: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    Electrical stimulation therapies have been used for more than 30 years to enhance spinal fusions. Although their positive effects on spinal fusions have been widely reported, the mechanisms of action of the technologies were only recently identified. Three types of technologies are available clinically: direct current, capacitive coupling, and inductive coupling. The latter is the basis of pulsed electromagnetic fields and combined magnetic fields. This review summarizes the current concepts on the mechanisms of action, animal and clinical studies, and cost justification for the use of electrical stimulation for spinal fusions. Scientific studies support the validity of electrical stimulation treatments. The mechanisms of action of each of the three electrical stimulation therapies are different. New data demonstrates that the upregulation of several growth factors may be responsible for the clinical success seen with the use of such technologies. PMID:16604354

  8. Current Concepts in Bacterial Sexually Transmitted Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are the most common infectious diseases worldwide, with over 350 million new cases occurring each year, and have far-reaching health, social, and economic consequences. Failure to diagnose and treat STDs at an early stage may result in serious complications and sequelae. STDs are passed from person to person primarily by sexual contact and are classified into varied groups. Some cause mild, acute symptoms and some are life-threatening. They are caused by many different infectious organisms and are treated in different ways. Syphilis and gonorrhea are ancient afflictions. Now, however, Chlamydia is prevalent and has become the most common bacterial STD. Antimicrobial resistance of several sexually transmitted pathogens is increasing, rendering some regimens ineffective, adding to therapeutic problems. A standardized treatment protocol for STDs is recommended to ensure that all patients receive adequate treatment. Appropriate treatment of STDs is an important public health measure. PMID:22025952

  9. Posterolateral Corner of the Knee: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Chahla, Jorge; Moatshe, Gilbert; Dean, Chase S.; LaPrade, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Injuries to the posterolateral corner (PLC) comprise a significant portion of knee ligament injuries. A high index of suspicion is necessary when evaluating the injured knee to detect these sometimes occult injuries. Moreover, a thorough physical examination and a comprehensive review of radiographic studies are necessary to identify these injuries. In this sense, stress radiographs can help to objectively determine the extent of these lesions. Non-operative and operative treatment options have been reported depending on the extent of the injury. Complete PLC lesions rarely heal with non-operative treatment, and are therefore most often treated surgically. The purpose of this article was to review the anatomy and clinically relevant biomechanics, diagnosis algorithms, treatment and rehabilitation protocols for PLC injuries. PMID:27200384

  10. [Current concept of insulin therapy intensification, and the role of human regular insulin and rapid-acting insulin analogs in insulin treatment].

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, Tomoya; Sadahiro, Katsuhiko; Satoh, Tomomi

    2015-03-01

    The evolution of insulin therapy from animal insulin to recombinant human regular insulin has improved diabetes treatment. Generating of rapid-acting insulin analogs, mimicking physiologic insulin action enables us to provide better control of post-prandial glucose level and lower incidence of hypoglycemia compared with human regular insulin. These rapid-acting insulin analogs show lower susceptibility of insulin precipitation and catheter occlusions, and are suitable for insulin pump therapy of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Insulin lispro and insulin aspart are also applicable for diabetic patients with pregnancy, requiring excellent glycemic control. In some studies, stepwise addition of prandial insulin, as well as full basal-bolus regimen can improve glycemic control with less hypoglycemia. Treatment intensification with rapid-acting insulin analogs may offer a proper method to reach glycemic goals. PMID:25812371

  11. Current Concepts in Dermatology: Part I

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Robert

    1963-01-01

    Some of the more recent advances and newer concepts about certain dermatological conditions are presented. Untoward reactions to drugs, whether to systemic or topical agents, are discussed in detail; emphasis is placed on their frequency and on the diversity of clinical findings. In the management of certain skin tumours (hemangiomas and melanocytic nevi) it is essential that the natural history of the lesion be considered. It is generally agreed that the answer to the problem of staphylococcal infection of the skin will be found in the host rather than the staphylococcus. Keratoacanthoma is a pseudocarcinoma of unknown etiology and sometimes gives rise to considerable difficulty in diagnosis. Diffuse alopecia in women is now a common dermatological problem, the cause of which is unknown. The hair loss associated with it is not permanent. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:13964259

  12. Current Concepts and Future Directions of CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macelroy, R. D.; Bredt, J.

    1985-01-01

    Bioregenerative life support systems for use in space were studied. Concepts of such systems include the use of higher plants and/or microalgae as sources of food, potable water and oxygen, and as sinks for carbon dioxide and metabolic wastes. Recycling of materials within the system will require processing of food organism and crew wastes using microbiological and/or physical chemical techniques. The dynamics of material flow within the system will require monitoring, control, stabilization and maintenance imposed by computers. Studies included higher plant and algal physiology, environmental responses, and control; flight experiments for testing responses of organisms to weightlessness and increased radiation levels; and development of ground based facilities for the study of recycling within a bioregenerative life support system.

  13. Current Concepts in Anaesthesia for Shoulder Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Lutfi; MacFarlane, Robert J; Waseem, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    There has been an exponential growth in the volume of shoulder surgery in the last 2 decades and a very wide variety of anaesthetic techniques have emerged to provide anaesthesia and post-operative analgesia. In this article we examine current opinion, risks, benefits and practicalities of anaesthetic practice and the provision of post-operative analgesia for shoulder surgery. PMID:24082970

  14. Lung Cancer—Current Concepts and Controversies

    PubMed Central

    Pett, Stuart B.; Wernly, Jorge A.; Akl, Bechara F.

    1986-01-01

    The recent literature contains a variety of controversial management alternatives for patients with pulmonary malignancy that affect all aspects of the lung cancer problem. Revisions in the classification system have been advanced in which the prognostic implications of specific ultrastructural and histochemical information are acknowledged. Computed tomography and, to a lesser extent, nuclide scanning have revolutionized the staging process, but limitations in these procedures are emerging. Improved survival following aggressive surgical treatment has challenged the adequacy of the standard staging system. The palliative role of radiotherapy is becoming more widely appreciated. Results of immunotherapy are equivocal and gains from chemotherapy are modest. Combinations of treatment modalities will require further documentation before they can be recommended with confidence. PMID:3529632

  15. Current Concepts in Orthostatic Hypotension Management

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Amy C.; Shibao, Cyndya

    2013-01-01

    Orthostatic hypotension is a condition commonly affecting the elderly and is often accompanied by disabling presyncopal symptoms, syncope and impaired quality of life. The pathophysiology of orthostatic hypotension is linked to abnormal blood pressure regulatory mechanisms and autonomic insufficiency. As part of its diagnostic evaluation, a comprehensive history and medical examination focused on detecting symptoms and physical findings of autonomic neuropathy should be performed. In individuals with substantial falls in blood pressure upon standing, autonomic function tests are recommended to detect impairment of autonomic reflexes. Treatment should always follow a stepwise approach with initial use of nonpharmacologic interventions including avoidance of hypotensive medications, high-salt diet and physical counter maneuvers. If these measures are not sufficient, medications such as fludrocortisone and midodrine can be added. The goals of treatment are to improve symptoms and to make the patient as ambulatory as possible instead of targeting arbitrary blood pressure values. PMID:23832761

  16. Current concepts review: Fractures of the patella

    PubMed Central

    Gwinner, Clemens; Märdian, Sven; Schwabe, Philipp; Schaser, Klaus-D.; Krapohl, Björn Dirk; Jung, Tobias M.

    2016-01-01

    Fractures of the patella account for about 1% of all skeletal injuries and can lead to profound impairment due to its crucial function in the extensor mechanism of the knee. Diagnosis is based on the injury mechanism, physical examination and radiological findings. While the clinical diagnosis is often distinct, there are numerous treatment options available. The type of treatment as well as the optimum timing of surgical intervention depends on the underlying fracture type, the associated soft tissue damage, patient factors (i.e. age, bone quality, activity level and compliance) and the stability of the extensor mechanism. Regardless of the treatment method an early rehabilitation is recommended in order to avoid contractures of the knee joint capsule and cartilage degeneration. For non-displaced and dislocated non-comminuted transverse patellar fractures (2-part) modified anterior tension band wiring is the treatment of choice and can be combined – due to its biomechanical superiority – with cannulated screw fixation. In severe comminuted fractures, open reduction and fixation with small fragment screws or new angular stable plates for anatomic restoration of the retropatellar surface and extension mechanism results in best outcome. Additional circular cerclage wiring using either typical metal cerclage wires or resorbable PDS/non-resorbable FiberWires increases fixation stability and decreases risk for re-dislocation. Distal avulsion fractures should be fixed with small fragment screws and should be protected by a transtibial McLaughlin cerclage. Partial or complete patellectomy should be regarded only as a very rare salvage operation due to its severe functional impairment. PMID:26816667

  17. Current concepts review: Fractures of the patella.

    PubMed

    Gwinner, Clemens; Märdian, Sven; Schwabe, Philipp; Schaser, Klaus-D; Krapohl, Björn Dirk; Jung, Tobias M

    2016-01-01

    Fractures of the patella account for about 1% of all skeletal injuries and can lead to profound impairment due to its crucial function in the extensor mechanism of the knee. Diagnosis is based on the injury mechanism, physical examination and radiological findings. While the clinical diagnosis is often distinct, there are numerous treatment options available. The type of treatment as well as the optimum timing of surgical intervention depends on the underlying fracture type, the associated soft tissue damage, patient factors (i.e. age, bone quality, activity level and compliance) and the stability of the extensor mechanism. Regardless of the treatment method an early rehabilitation is recommended in order to avoid contractures of the knee joint capsule and cartilage degeneration. For non-displaced and dislocated non-comminuted transverse patellar fractures (2-part) modified anterior tension band wiring is the treatment of choice and can be combined - due to its biomechanical superiority - with cannulated screw fixation. In severe comminuted fractures, open reduction and fixation with small fragment screws or new angular stable plates for anatomic restoration of the retropatellar surface and extension mechanism results in best outcome. Additional circular cerclage wiring using either typical metal cerclage wires or resorbable PDS/non-resorbable FiberWires increases fixation stability and decreases risk for re-dislocation. Distal avulsion fractures should be fixed with small fragment screws and should be protected by a transtibial McLaughlin cerclage. Partial or complete patellectomy should be regarded only as a very rare salvage operation due to its severe functional impairment. PMID:26816667

  18. Aging Periodontium, Aging Patient: Current Concepts.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Mark

    2015-08-01

    A functioning natural dentition is essential to maintaining overall health in the elderly patient. While age-related alterations in periodontal tissues and the immune system may make an elderly patient more susceptible to periodontal breakdown, age itself is not a major risk factor for periodontal diseases. Rather, individual age-associated factors such as systemic diseases, medications and changes in behavior, motor function and cognitive function should be considered for each elderly patient when making treatment decisions. PMID:26357815

  19. Antiviral therapy: current concepts and practices.

    PubMed Central

    Bean, B

    1992-01-01

    Drugs capable of inhibiting viruses in vitro were described in the 1950s, but real progress was not made until the 1970s, when agents capable of inhibiting virus-specific enzymes were first identified. The last decade has seen rapid progress in both our understanding of antiviral therapy and the number of antiviral agents on the market. Amantadine and ribavirin are available for treatment of viral respiratory infections. Vidarabine, acyclovir, ganciclovir, and foscarnet are used for systemic treatment of herpesvirus infections, while ophthalmic preparations of idoxuridine, trifluorothymidine, and vidarabine are available for herpes keratitis. For treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infections, zidovudine and didanosine are used. Immunomodulators, such as interferons and colony-stimulating factors, and immunoglobulins are being used increasingly for viral illnesses. While resistance to antiviral drugs has been seen, especially among AIDS patients, it has not become widespread and is being intensely studied. Increasingly, combinations of agents are being used: to achieve synergistic inhibition of viruses, to delay or prevent resistance, and to decrease dosages of toxic drugs. New approaches, such as liposomes carrying antiviral drugs and computer-aided drug design, are exciting and promising prospects for the future. PMID:1576586

  20. Historical origins of current concepts of carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lawley, P D

    1994-01-01

    The first attempts to understand the causes of cancer were based on generalizations of what might now be termed a "holistic" nature, and hereditary influences were recognized at an early stage; these views survive principally through a supposed positive connection between psychological factors such as stress and diminished ability to combat the progressive development of tumors through some form of immunologically mediated rejection of potentially cancerous cells. While evidence for immunosurveillance is generally accepted, it is now widely regarded as almost wholly confined to instances where tumor viruses are involved as causative agents. The earliest theorists drew an analogy between the processes of carcinogenesis and of evolution; the cancer cells acquired the ability to outstrip their normal counterparts in their capacity for proliferation. This was even before evolution had been interpreted as involving a continuous succession of mutations. Evidence was already to hand before the end of the 18th century that exogenous agents, notably soot, a product of the "industrial revolution," could cause skin cancer. Somewhat over 100 years later, another industrial innovation, the manufacture of synthetic dyestuffs, implicated specific chemical compounds that could act systemically to cause bladder cancer. Meanwhile, the 19th century saw the establishment of the fundamentals of modern medical science; of particular relevance to cancer was the demonstration that it involved abnormalities in the process of cell division. The commencement of the 20th century was marked by a rediscovery of the concept of mutation; and it was proposed that cancer originated through uncontrolled division of somatically mutated cells. At around this time, two further important exogenous causative agents were discovered: X-rays and tumor viruses. In the late 1920s, x-radiation became the first established exogenous cause of mutagenesis. The discoverer of this phenomenon, H. J. Muller

  1. Current concepts in negative pressure wound therapy.

    PubMed

    Howe, Lisa M

    2015-05-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is becoming recognized in veterinary medicine as a viable option for the management of complex wounds. NPWT has many advantages over traditional wound care and results in quicker and improved wound healing in many instances. This article discusses the art and science of NPWT, as well as the many current indications, complications, advantages and disadvantages, and future directions of NPWT in small animal veterinary medicine. This therapy will likely have a growing role in veterinary medical practice for complicated wound management and other usages in coming years. PMID:25744142

  2. Current Concepts in the Use of Bellafill.

    PubMed

    Joseph, John H; Eaton, Laura L; Cohen, Steven R

    2015-11-01

    As demonstrated by American Society of Plastic Surgeons statistics (2013), patients seeking nonsurgical facial rejuvenation are increasing. A variety of temporary and semipermanent soft-tissue fillers, such as hyaluronic acid, poly-L-lactic acid, and calcium hydroxylapatite, are readily available; however, they have not been proven effective in treating facial acne scarring. Patient tolerance for the inconvenience and repeat cost of short-term, temporary fillers is waning as newer generation fillers with longer durations are coming on the market. Permanent injectable fillers, such a Bellafill (Suneva Medical Inc., San Diego, Calif.), represent a desirable solution for patients who want a long-term result. With the recent Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of moderate-to-severe, atrophic, distensible facial acne scars on the cheek(s) in patients over the age of 21 years, Bellafill (polymethylmethacrylate collagen) represents an effective solution for the treatment of facial acne scarring of the face while maintaining an excellent safety profile. PMID:26441096

  3. Concussion: current concepts in diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Borich, Michael R; Cheung, Katharine L; Jones, Paul; Khramova, Vera; Gavrailoff, Lauren; Boyd, Lara A; Virji-Babul, Naznin

    2013-09-01

    Current understanding of the term "concussion" is fraught with misconceptions regarding the extent and nature of brain injury. Despite increasing attention in popular media and within the context of sports, considerable gaps exist in our knowledge of the diagnosis, underlying brain pathology, recovery of function, and optimal interventions for concussion. In this special interest article, we discuss the definition and risk factors associated with concussion, summarize and highlight some of the most widely used assessment tools, and critique the evidence for current principles of concussion management. Our evaluation has identified opportunities for novel neuroimaging techniques to improve the understanding of the pathophysiology of concussion and to evaluate the changes in the recovering brain in response to rehabilitation. In summary, a clear definition of the underlying brain pathology, the potential long-term consequences, and the risk factors of injury and recovery will help guide future research aiming to minimize the impact of injury and develop innovative and successful therapeutic approaches aimed at ameliorating the functional impairments associated with concussion. PMID:23872682

  4. Battlefield analgesia: a brief review of current trends and concepts in the treatment of pain in US military casualties from the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan.

    PubMed

    Plunkett, Anthony; Turabi, Ali; Wilkinson, Indy

    2012-05-01

    SUMMARY Battlefield analgesia and post-injury pain management is a high priority within the military medical community. The combined military services of the USA have developed a Pain Task Force and clinical practice guidelines to ensure that adequate analgesia is provided to our wounded soldiers as far forward as the point of injury on the battlefield. As a result of this emphasis, novel analgesic techniques and equipment have led to improved pain management. Continuous peripheral nerve blocks, intranasal ketamine, battlefield acupuncture and other adjuncts have all been utilized safely and successfully. The ability to provide rapid analgesia as early in the course of injury as possible not only helps with the immediate pain of the soldier, but potentially minimizes the risk of developing chronic postinjury pain. During the long medical evacuation system the risks of both undertreatment and overtreatment of pain are very real. Future studies and observation will help to delineate best treatment regimens and pave the way for the next generation of medical providers to positively impact a soldier's recovery. This article is written from the perspective of the USA with a focus on the conflicts in Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom) and Iraq (Operation Iraqi Freedom). PMID:24654665

  5. Medial thighplasty: Current concepts and practices.

    PubMed

    Bertheuil, N; Carloni, R; De Runz, A; Herlin, C; Girard, P; Watier, E; Chaput, B

    2016-02-01

    Medial thighplasty, also known as medial thigh lift, is a procedure that has been carried out for five decades. The original "Lewis" technique has undergone many changes, and thereby been rendered widely available to plastic surgeons. Given the increasingly high number of surgical reconstructions after massive weight loss, this technique is now an integral part of a surgeon's therapeutic arsenal as he strives to meet the evolving demands of patients. The objective of this article, which is based on a comprehensive review of the literature, is to summarize current knowledge on medial thighplasty and thereby allow plastic surgeons to adopt the operating technique best suited to the deformations presented by their patients and to the overall context. The different techniques, outcomes and complications are successively discussed. PMID:26433317

  6. Current concepts on airborne particles and health

    SciTech Connect

    Mauderly, J.L.

    1994-11-01

    Epidemiological evidence of associations between environmental particulate concentrations and both acute and chronic health effects has grown with numerous recent studies conducted in the US and other countries. An association between short-term changes in particulate levels and acute mortality now seems certain. The association is consistent among studies and coherent among indicators of mortality and morbidity. Effects observed at surprisingly low pollution levels have raised concern for current exposures even in modestly polluted cities. Toxicology did not predict the acute mortality effect, and causal mechanisms are difficult to rationalize. Present data suggest that the fine fraction of particulate pollution is more toxic than larger particles, but the contribution of specific particulate species is poorly understood.

  7. Current concepts of ocular adnexal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Borrelli, Maria; Geerling, Gerd

    2013-01-01

    Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery is a specialized area of ophthalmology that deals with the management of deformities and abnormalities of the eyelids, lacrimal system and the orbit. An ophthalmoplastic surgeon is able to identify and correct abnormalities of the ocular adnexae such as ectropion, lid retraction, conjunctival scarring with severe entropion, that can cause secondary ocular surface disorders; manage patients with watering eye, and when needed intervene with a dacryocystorhinostomy by external or endonasal approach and moreover minimize disfigurement following enucleation or evisceration and prevent further corneal damage, alleviate complains of tearing and grittiness, but also cosmetic complaints in patients with Graves’ orbitopathy. Aim of this manuscript was to review current established and recently evolving surgical procedures. PMID:26504698

  8. Current concepts in total femoral replacement

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Deepak; Siqueira, Marcelo BP; Klika, Alison K; Higuera, Carlos A; Barsoum, Wael K; Joyce, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Total femoral replacement (TFR) is a salvage arthroplasty procedure used as an alternative to lower limb amputation. Since its initial description in the mid-20th century, this procedure has been used in a variety of oncologic and non-oncologic indications. The most compelling advantage of TFR is the achievement of immediate fixation which permits early mobilization. It is anticipated that TFR will be increasingly performed as the rate of revision arthroplasty rises worldwide. The existing literature is mainly composed of a rather heterogeneous mix of retrospective case series and a wide assortment of case reports. Numerous TFR prostheses are currently available and the surgeon must understand the unique implications of each implant design. Long-term functional outcomes are dependent on adherence to proper technique and an appropriate physical therapy program for postoperative rehabilitation. Revision TFR is mainly performed for periprosthetic infection and the severe femoral bone loss associated with aseptic revisions. Depending on the likelihood of attaining infection clearance, it may sometimes be advisable to proceed directly to hip disarticulation without attempting salvage of the TFR. Other reported complications of TFR include hip joint instability, limb length discrepancy, device failure, component loosening, patellar maltracking and delayed wound healing. Further research is needed to better characterize the long-term functional outcomes and complications associated with this complex procedure. PMID:26716087

  9. The pediatric knee: current concepts in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Beck, Nicholas A; Patel, Neeraj M; Ganley, Theodore J

    2014-01-01

    As the popularity and intensity of children's athletics have increased, so has the risk for knee injuries. Fractures of the tibial eminence may be treated operatively or nonoperatively depending on fracture classification, but arthrofibrosis is a potentially significant complication. Anterior cruciate ligament rupture presents treatment challenges as regards the optimal timing and method of reconstruction. A number of novel reconstructive techniques have been developed to minimize risks to the physes in this population. Recent studies have focused on the prognosis, surgical indications, and operative techniques for osteochondritis dissecans in children. A number of authors have also sought to better-define the optimal diagnostic testing and management of patellar dislocation. In this review, we provide an update on current concepts for tibial eminence fractures, anterior cruciate ligament injuries, osteochondritis dissecans of the knee, and patellar dislocation in young athletes. PMID:24045503

  10. Lumbar stabilization: core concepts and current literature, Part 1.

    PubMed

    Barr, Karen P; Griggs, Miriam; Cadby, Todd

    2005-06-01

    The factors that affect lumbar stability have been an area of extensive research. The clinical application of this research in the form of lumbar stabilization exercise programs has become a common treatment of low back pain and is also increasingly used by athletes to improve performance and by the general public for health and the prevention of injury. This article includes a review of the key concepts behind lumbar stabilization. The literature regarding how those with low back pain differ in their ability to stabilize the spine from those without low back pain is discussed, and an overview of current research that assesses the benefits of a lumbar stabilization program to treat low back pain is provided. PMID:15905663

  11. Current concepts in gastric motility in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    De Block, Christophe E M; De Leeuw, Ivo H; Pelckmans, Paul A; Van Gaal, Luc F

    2006-02-01

    This review addresses the current concepts in our understanding of the epidemiology, mechanisms, symptoms, clinical consequences, diagnosis and treatment of delayed gastric emptying in patients with diabetes. Upper gastrointestinal symptoms, particularly postprandial fullness, nausea, vomiting and abdominal bloating, occur in 30-50% of patients with diabetes. The use of scintigraphic techniques, and more recently breath test, has shown that as many as 50% of diabetic patients have gastroparesis. Diabetic gastroparesis comprises a decrease in fundic and antral motor activity, a reduction or a lack of the interdigestive migrating motor complex, gastric dysrhythmias, and pylorospasms. The mechanisms involved include: autonomic neuropathy, acute hyperglycaemia, and abnormalities in gastrointestinal hormones and neuropeptides. Other possible contributing factors such as hypothyroidism and H. pylori infection are discussed as well. Because treatment is possible by means of dietary advise, prokinetics or surgical procedures, it is important to identify risk factors for and to diagnose gastroparesis to prevent morbidity by controlling gastrointestinal symptoms, and to enhance glucoregulation. Understanding the current advances is key to the development of novel therapeutic strategies and for making rational choices in the management of diabetic gastroparesis. PMID:18220621

  12. Current concepts and controversies on adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: Part I

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Alok; Tsirikos, Athanasios I

    2013-01-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis is the most common spinal deformity encountered by General Orthopaedic Surgeons. Etiology remains unclear and current research focuses on genetic factors that may influence scoliosis development and risk of progression. Delayed diagnosis can result in severe deformities which affect the coronal and sagittal planes, as well as the rib cage, waistline symmetry, and shoulder balance. Patient's dissatisfaction in terms of physical appearance and mechanical back pain, as well as the risk for curve deterioration are usually the reasons for treatment. Conservative management involves mainly bracing with the aim to stop or slow down scoliosis progression during growth and if possible prevent the need for surgical treatment. This is mainly indicated in young compliant patients with a large amount of remaining growth and progressive curvatures. Scoliosis correction is indicated for severe or progressive curves which produce significant cosmetic deformity, muscular pain, and patient discontent. Posterior spinal arthrodesis with Harrington instrumentation and bone grafting was the first attempt to correct the coronal deformity and replace in situ fusion. This was associated with high pseudarthrosis rates, need for postoperative immobilization, and flattening of sagittal spinal contour. Segmental correction techniques were introduced along with the Luque rods, Harri-Luque, and Wisconsin systems. Correction in both coronal and sagittal planes was not satisfactory and high rates of nonunion persisted until Cotrel and Dubousset introduced the concept of global spinal derotation. Development of pedicle screws provided a powerful tool to correct three-dimensional vertebral deformity and opened a new era in the treatment of scoliosis. PMID:23682172

  13. Current Treatments in Familial Dysautonomia

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Jose-Alberto; Kaufmann, Lucy; Fuente, Cristina; Percival, Leila; Mendoza, Carlos; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a rare hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (type III). The disease is caused by a point mutation in the IKBKAP gene that affects the splicing of the elongator-1 protein (also known as IKAP). Patients have dramatic blood pressure instability due to baroreflex failure, chronic kidney disease, and impaired swallowing leading to recurrent aspiration pneumonia, which results in chronic lung disease. Diminished pain and temperature perception results in neuropathic joints and thermal injuries. Impaired proprioception leads to gait ataxia. Optic neuropathy and corneal opacities lead to progressive visual loss. Areas covered This article reviews current therapeutic strategies for the symptomatic treatment of FD, as well as the potential of new gene modifying agents. Expert opinion Therapeutic focus on FD is centered on reducing the catecholamine surges caused by baroreflex failure. Managing neurogenic dysphagia with effective protection of the airway passages and prompt treatment of aspiration pneumonias is necessary to prevent respiratory failure. Sedative medications should be used cautiously due to risk of respiratory depression. Non-invasive ventilation during sleep effectively manages apneas and prevents hypercapnia. Clinical trials of compounds that increase levels of IKAP (ELP-1) are underway and will determine whether they can reverse or slow disease progression. PMID:25323828

  14. Current Treatments for Alopecia Areata.

    PubMed

    Hordinsky, Maria K

    2015-11-01

    Selection of a therapy for a patient with alopecia areata (AA) is frequently based on the age of the patient, disease extent, perhaps disease duration, patient expectations, cost of therapy in terms of time commitment, and financial resources, as well as the results of screening laboratory studies that rule out the presence of other co-morbidities such as anemia, low iron stores, thyroid abnormalities, low vitamin D, or other autoimmune diseases. Although there is currently no cure for AA and no universally proven therapy that induces and sustains remission, many therapies are available which can be of benefit to both affected children and adults. Before selecting a treatment for patients with extensive long-standing AA, a scalp biopsy may provide useful information about the degree of inflammation and follicle differentiation. Recent clinical and translational research observations with the systemic Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors and interleukin-2 (IL-2) have excited the clinical and AA patient communities and have led to clinical trials, as well as to the off-label use of these more expensive and targeted systemic therapies. PMID:26551946

  15. Current concepts and future approaches to vestibular rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Tjernström, Fredrik; Zur, Oz; Jahn, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decades methods of vestibular rehabilitation to enhance adaptation to vestibular loss, habituation to changing sensory conditions, and sensory reweighting in the compensation process have been developed. However, the use of these techniques still depends to a large part on the educational background of the therapist. Individualized assessment of deficits and specific therapeutic programs for different disorders are sparse. Currently, vestibular rehabilitation is often used in an unspecific way in dizzy patients irrespective of the clinical findings. When predicting the future of vestibular rehabilitation, it is tempting to foretell advances in technology for assessment and treatment only, but the current intense exchange between clinicians and basic scientists also predicts advances in truly understanding the complex interactions between the peripheral senses and central adaptation mechanisms. More research is needed to develop reliable techniques to measure sensory dependence and to learn how this knowledge can be best used-by playing off the patient's sensory strength or working on the weakness. To be able using the emerging concepts, the neuro-otological community must strive to educate physicians, physiotherapists and nurses to perform the correct examinations for assessment of individual deficits and to look for factors that might impede rehabilitation. PMID:27083886

  16. Current treatment of Graves' disease

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, T.; Shimaoka, K.; Mimura, T.; Ito, K.

    1987-04-01

    In this review we have described the rationale for the appropriate treatment of patients with Graves' disease. Because the etiology of this disorder remains obscure, its management remains controversial. Since antithyroid drugs and radioiodine became readily available in the early 1950s, they have been widely used for the treatment of thyrotoxicosis, and the number of cases treated surgically has markedly decreased. However, almost four decades of experience have disclosed an unexpectedly high incidence of delayed hypothyroidism after radioiodine treatment and a low remission rate after antithyroid therapy. As a result, surgery is again being advocated as the treatment of choice. The three modalities of treatment have different advantages and disadvantages, and selection of treatment is of importance. In principle, we believe that for most patients a subtotal thyroidectomy should be performed after the patient has been rendered euthyroid by antithyroid drugs. We attempt to leave a thyroid remnant of 6 to 8 gm.36 references.

  17. Current treatment of alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Jerry

    2013-12-01

    Treatment of alopecia areata is dependent on age of patient as well as the extent and duration of scalp involvement. Treatments include steroids, topical immunotherapy, topical minoxidil, anthralin, and immunosuppressants. Each case must be dealt with on a customized individual basis. PMID:24326551

  18. [Strongyloidiasis and its current treatment].

    PubMed

    Prokopowicz, D; Lachowicz-Wawrzyniak, A; Sosnowska, D

    1990-04-15

    A case of strongyloidosis and giardiasis was observed in a women aged 62 years. The treatment included tinidazole, metronidazole and ercefuryl. Modern views on the epidemiology, clinical course and therapy of this parasitic infestation are discussed. PMID:2402923

  19. Current concepts in wound management and wound healing products.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Jacqueline R

    2015-05-01

    Current concepts in wound management are summarized. The emphasis is on selection of the contact layer of the bandage to promote a moist wound environment. Selection of an appropriate contact layer is based on the stage of wound healing and the amount of wound exudate. The contact layer can be used to promote autolytic debridement and enhance wound healing. PMID:25744144

  20. Tinnitus--Current Concepts in Diagnosis and Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epstein, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the causes of tinnitus, sound or noise in the ears or head without any external stimulation. Classification of tinnitus, the essentials of medical evaluation of a patient with tinnitus, essential test procedures, and current concepts in the management of tinnitus are addressed. (CR)

  1. Current Treatment of Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Massin, Edward K.

    1991-01-01

    Within the last decade, the treatment for patients with dilated cardiomyopathy has changed. Clinical management of these patients is aimed at controlling congestive heart failure, treating arrhythmias, preventing pulmonary and systemic emboli, and managing chest pain. The goals of treatment for patients with dilated cardiomyopathy are to make the patient feel better and live longer. To achieve this, we direct treatment to improving left ventricular function and cardiac output and controlling arrhythmias and thromboemboli. Basic treatment begins with inotropic therapy, preload reduction, and afterload reduction. For patients with symptomatic disease, we recommend diuretics, digoxin, and converting enzyme inhibitors for first-line therapy. Patients with arrhythmias may be treated by the addition of amiodarone, a pacemaker, or an automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator; and most such patients need to be anticoagulated. All patients need close follow-up for possible drug toxicity associated with their regimens. Heart transplantation can be considered for patients refractory to medical treatment. Although the incidence of dilated cardiomyopathy continues to increase, we are learning better ways to treat it. In the future, new drugs with fewer side effects should be available to treat, and perhaps impede, the development of dilated cardiomyopathy. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1991;18:41-9) PMID:15227507

  2. Current Evidence for Osteoarthritis Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Anandacoomarasamy, Ananthila; March, Lyn

    2010-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and the leading cause of chronic disability among older people. The burden of the disease is expected to rise with an aging population and the increasing prevalence of obesity. Despite this, there is as yet no cure for OA. However, in recent years, a number of potential therapeutic advances have been made, in part due to improved understanding of the underlying pathophysiology. This review provides the current evidence for symptomatic management of OA including nonpharmacological, pharmacological and surgical approaches. The current state of evidence for disease-modifying therapy in OA is also reviewed. PMID:22870434

  3. [Current treatment of venous thrombembolism].

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Ionuţ

    2013-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, considered to be different manifestations of the same disease - venous thromboembolism, have few differences regarding the anticoagulant treatment. However, there are some issues which will be discussed. The therapy objectives in patients with venous thromboembolism include: prevention of death by pulmonary embolism, relieving symptoms in the affected leg, preventing morbidity and prevention of recurrent thromboembolism or postthrombotic syndrome, or minimize symptoms of post-thrombotic syndrome. For most patients, treatment goals are achieved using appropriate anticoagulant therapy, reducing the risk of recurrence in the first three months after diagnosis from over 25% to under 4%. Using of compression socks, providing a gradient of 30-40 mmHg at the ankle for 2 years after the diagnosis, reduce the risk of postthrombotic syndrome. Thrombolysis, applied either systemic or directly by catheter, is indicated in selected cases to prevent onset of postthrombotic syndrome or remove quickly the symptoms due to high venous obstruction. Thrombolytic therapy should be continued with anticoagulant therapy to prevent recurrence of venous thromboembolism. The use of an inferior vena cava filter is indicated for prevention of death by pulmonary embolism in patients who have contraindications to anticoagulant therapy, or anticoagulant treatment that was properly administered remains inefficient. Surgical treatment is recommended in case of chronic pulmonary hypertension, due to thromboembolic disease. PMID:23781572

  4. Treatment planning concepts for the ageing patient.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, R L

    2015-03-01

    There is an ageing imperative in Australia as in many other industrialized nations, and these populations are extremely heterogeneous. In young adults, the factors which influence decision making for oral health care are whether the patient has the will, the time or the finances to pay for care, while for clinicians, the decisions are whether they have the skill and the resources to carry out the treatment plan. For older adults, the decision making includes all of the previous identified factors, but they are now complicated by the patient's medical and medication problems, the side effects of the medications they are taking, their cognitive status as well as the cumulative effects of a lifetime of physiological, traumatic and iatrogenic effects on the dentition and the oral cavity. The decision-making process which has evolved has been called many names, from cost-effective care to minimal invasive dentistry to rational dental care. Fundamentally, they are similar. Rational dental care has been defined as the process of decision making, which develops a treatment plan that is in the best interest of the patient after evaluating all of the modifying factors. This article will discuss the various concepts, and the strengths and weaknesses of some of these systems. It will also illustrate some of the clinical problems as there is very little evidence-based data to support any of these concepts. However, treatment planning is still an art, which can only be carried out for an individual and not a group, and the result must serve the needs of the patient and enhance the quality of his or her life. PMID:25762044

  5. Current concepts in Alzheimer's Disease: molecules, models and translational perspectives.

    PubMed

    Rutten, Bart P F; Steinbusch, Harry W M

    2013-01-01

    The field of neuroscience research in AD has been evolving rapidly over the last few years, and has pinpointed a number of candidate targets for molecules with crucial role in the pathophysiology of AD. Recent developments have furthermore enabled new ways of modeling the disease, while an increasing number of preclinically validated targets is currently being taken one step forward and tested in clinical trials. These recent developments are reviewed in the current Special Issues Series on "Current concepts in Alzheimer's disease research: molecules, models and translational perspectives" in a number of state-of-the-art manuscripts. PMID:24148188

  6. [Current treatments for corneal neovascularization].

    PubMed

    Benayoun, Y; Petellat, F; Leclerc, O; Dost, L; Dallaudière, B; Reddy, C; Robert, P-Y; Salomon, J-L

    2015-12-01

    The extension of blood vessels into the normally avascular stroma defines corneal neovascularization. Though this phenomenon, pathophysiological and clinical features are well characterized, therapeutic modalities have been hindered by a lack of safe, efficacious and non-controversial treatments. In this literature review, we focus on available therapeutic options in light of recent evidence provided by animal and clinical studies. First, this review will focus on pharmacological treatments that target angiogenesis. The low cost and market availability of bevacizumab make it the first anti-angiogenic therapy choice, and it has demonstrable efficacy in reducing corneal neovascularization when administered topically or subconjunctivally. However, novel anti-angiogenic molecules targeting the intracellular pathways of angiogenesis (siRNA, antisense oligonucleotides) provide a promising alternative. Laser therapy (direct photocoagulation or photo-dynamic therapy) and fine needle diathermy also find a place in the treatment of stabilized corneal neovascularization alone or in association with anti-angiogenic therapy. Additionally, ocular surface reconstruction using amniotic membrane graft or limbal stem cell transplantation is essential when corneal neovascularization is secondary to primary or acquired limbal deficiency. PMID:26522890

  7. New current control concept -- Minimum time current control in the three-phase PWM converter

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J.W.; Sul, S.K.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, a new current controller that guarantees the fastest transient response is proposed. The basic concept is to find the optimal control voltage for tracking the reference current with minimum time under the voltage limit constraint. Though this minimum time control concept is also applicable to all the machine drive systems, this paper focuses on the current regulation in the three-phase pulse width modulation (PWM) converter. In the simulation and experimental results, it is observed that the proposed controller has much less transient time than the conventional synchronous PI regulator and the performance of the dc link voltage control is also greatly improved with the proposed current controller.

  8. [Current treatment of postabortion sepsis].

    PubMed

    Grishchenko, V I; Vorontsov, Iu M; Reznikov, V A

    1986-08-01

    The results of combined treatment of 83 women (17-43 years old) with septic complications following abortion in a nonhospital setting are reviewed. The group included 9 primigravida and 74 secundigravida. Almost all women had a history of extragenital diseases and 52 had a history of genital tract inflammations. Pregnancy was terminated in the first trimester in 56 and in second trimester in 27. Septic complications (endometritis and adnexitis) developed on day 2-20 after abortion. Of 83 patients, 10 (12%) died in spite of prolonged and unsuccessful treatment. 22 women with diffuse peritonitis and peritoneal abscess underwent surgery (extirpation of the uterus and tubes in 17, supravaginal amputation of the uterus in 1, and opening of the abscess in 4) and 51 underwent curettage of the uterine cavity. Postoperative treatment included antibiotics, administration of plasma substitutes, heparin, correction of electrolyte imbalance, administration of immunostimulants, and transfusion of the autologous blood irradiated with ultraviolet rays. Antibiotic therapy usually consisted of at least 2 drugs in maximum doses (1 antibiotic was given iv). The most frequent combination was penicillin (6-8 g/day) together with aminoglycosides or cephalosporins. Antibiotics were given for 7-10 days. Indications for extirpation of the uterus and tubes included anaerobic septic process in the uterus, dissemination of the infection outside the uterus, renal-hepatic failure, perforation or necrosis of the uterine wall. Instead of peritoneal dialysis, the patients received irrigation of the peritoneal cavity with a mixture of kanamycin, furagin and novocain. All 72 patients survived surgery or curettage and were cured. PMID:2945471

  9. Thirty Meter Telescope: current operations concepts and plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, David R.

    2008-07-01

    The Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) will be a ground-based, 30-m optical-IR telescope with a highly segmented primary mirror located in a remote location. From the start of operations, TMT will provide a rich and diverse mix of seeing-limited and diffraction-limited instrumentation. Initially, only classical observing will be supported, although remote observing will follow almost immediately. Queue (or service) observing may be supported at a later date. TMT users will expect high facility uptime and observing efficiency as well as effective user support for planning and execution of observations. Those expectations are captured in the high-level Operations Concept Definition (OCD) document. The services and staffing needed to implement those concepts are described in the TMT Operations Plan. In this paper, high-level TMT operational concepts are summarized followed by a description of the current operations plan, including staffing model.

  10. Retinal vein occlusion: current treatment.

    PubMed

    Lattanzio, Rosangela; Torres Gimeno, Ana; Battaglia Parodi, Maurizio; Bandello, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is a pathology noted for more than 150 years. Although a lot has been written on the matter, it is still a frequent condition with multifactorial etiopathogenesis with many unclear aspects. The RVO pathogenesis has varied systemic and local implications that make it difficult to elaborate treatment guidelines. The management of the patient with RVO is very complex and a multidisciplinary approach is required in order to identify and correct the associated risk factors. Laser therapy remains the gold standard in RVO, but only modest functional improvement has been shown in branch retinal occlusion forms. Multicenter studies of intravitreal drugs present them as an option to combine with laser. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor, corticosteroids and sustained-release implants are the future weapons to stop disease progression and get a better visual outcome. Consequently, it is useful to clarify some aspects of the pathology that allow a better patient management. PMID:20938213

  11. Long Term Treatment Concepts and Proactive Therapy for Atopic Eczema

    PubMed Central

    Ehmann, Laura Maximiliane

    2012-01-01

    Atopic eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis, is a frequent, highly pruritic, chronic skin disease, which is typically running in flares. The traditional treatment mainly consists of the reactive application of topical anti-inflammatory agents such as topical corticosteroids and topical calcineurin inhibitors. The short term benefit of this approach is well known, but long term remission between flares is difficult to achieve. Therefore, innovative long-term treatment strategies targeting flare prevention and skin barrier stabilization are needed. We and others have shown that normal looking, non-lesional skin of atopic dermatitis patients is immunobiologially not normal but characterized by an invisible inflammation and barrier defect. This has led to the novel concept of proactive therapy, which is defined as long-term, low-dose intermittent application of anti-inflammatory therapy to the previously affected skin, together with an ongoing emollient treatment of unaffected skin. This review article describes the most important long-term treatment options for atopic dermatitis, which includes emollient therapy, the novel concept of proactive treatment, the different ultraviolet light modalities and a selection of systemic immunosuppressive drugs and biologics. Current trial data, licensed indications, off-label use and relevant side effects of the different treatment modalities are summarized. PMID:22879707

  12. The Role of Current Techniques and Concepts in Peripheral Nerve Repair

    PubMed Central

    Houschyar, K. S.; Momeni, A.; Pyles, M. N.; Cha, J. Y.; Maan, Z. N.; Duscher, D.; Jew, O. S.; Siemers, F.; van Schoonhoven, J.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with peripheral nerve injuries, especially severe injury, often face poor nerve regeneration and incomplete functional recovery, even after surgical nerve repair. This review summarizes treatment options of peripheral nerve injuries with current techniques and concepts and reviews developments in research and clinical application of these therapies. PMID:26904282

  13. The Role of Current Techniques and Concepts in Peripheral Nerve Repair.

    PubMed

    Houschyar, K S; Momeni, A; Pyles, M N; Cha, J Y; Maan, Z N; Duscher, D; Jew, O S; Siemers, F; van Schoonhoven, J

    2016-01-01

    Patients with peripheral nerve injuries, especially severe injury, often face poor nerve regeneration and incomplete functional recovery, even after surgical nerve repair. This review summarizes treatment options of peripheral nerve injuries with current techniques and concepts and reviews developments in research and clinical application of these therapies. PMID:26904282

  14. Tropical and travel-associated norovirus: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Sarah-Blythe; Saito, Mayuko; Mirelman, Andrew J.; Bern, Caryn; Gilman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review We highlight recent advances relevant to understanding norovirus infections in the tropics, both in populations living in developing settings and travelers to these regions. Recent findings Because of the decrease in diarrheal disease associated with the global rollout of vaccines against rotavirus, norovirus is emerging as the predominant cause of diarrhea morbidity among children in the tropics, and evidence suggests that it contributes to adult disease in endemic populations and travelers. In addition to identifying potential target populations for preventive measures, we provide an update on norovirus vaccine development and concepts related to their implementation in low-income and middle-income countries. Summary These current concepts related to norovirus-attributable disease burden, clinical significance, and economic impact can potentially be applied to tailoring efforts to prevent and mitigate the effects of this important enteropathogen. PMID:26237546

  15. Anemia associated with chronic heart failure: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ravish; Agarwal, Anil K

    2013-01-01

    Anemia is a frequent comorbidity of heart failure and is associated with poor outcomes. Anemia in heart failure is considered to develop due to a complex interaction of iron deficiency, kidney disease, and cytokine production, although micronutrient insufficiency and blood loss may contribute. Currently, treatment of anemia of heart failure lacks clear targets and specific therapy is not defined. Intravenous iron use has been shown to benefit anemic as well as nonanemic patients with heart failure. Treatment with erythropoietin-stimulating agents has been considered alone or in combination with iron, but robust evidence to dictate clear guidelines is not currently available. Available and emerging new agents in the treatment of anemia of heart failure will need to be tested in randomized, controlled studies. PMID:23403618

  16. Current and future treatment options in SIADH

    PubMed Central

    Zietse, Robert; van der Lubbe, Nils; Hoorn, Ewout J.

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of hyponatraemia due to SIADH is not always as straightforward as it seems. Although acute treatment with hypertonic saline and chronic treatment with fluid restriction are well established, both approaches have severe limitations. These limitations are not readily overcome by addition of furosemide, demeclocycline, lithium or urea to the therapy. In theory, vasopressin-receptor antagonists would provide a more effective method to treat hyponatraemia, by virtue of their ability to selectively increase solute-free water excretion by the kidneys (aquaresis). In this review we explore the limitations of the current treatment of SIADH and describe emerging therapies for the treatment of SIADH-induced hyponatraemia. PMID:19881932

  17. Current Treatment Options in Vestibular Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Obermann, Mark; Strupp, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 1% of the general population in western industrialized countries suffers from vestibular migraine. However, it remains widely unknown and often under diagnosed despite the recently published diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine. Treatment trials that specialize on vestibular migraine are scarce and systematic randomized controlled clinical trials are now only emerging. This review summarizes the knowledge on the currently available treatment options that were tested specifically for vestibular migraine and gives an evidence-based, informed treatment recommendation with all its limitations. To date only two randomized controlled treatment trials provide limited evidence for the use of rizatriptan and zolmitriptan for the treatment of vestibular migraine attacks because of methodological shortcomings. There is an ongoing multicenter randomized placebo-controlled trial testing metoprolol 95 mg vs. placebo (PROVEMIG-trial). Therefore, the therapeutic recommendations for the prophylactic treatment of vestibular migraine are currently widely based on the guidelines of migraine with and without aura as well as expert opinion. PMID:25538676

  18. Bovine digital dermatitis: Current concepts from laboratory to farm.

    PubMed

    Evans, N J; Murray, R D; Carter, S D

    2016-05-01

    Bovine digital dermatitis (DD) is a severe infectious disease causing lameness in dairy cattle worldwide and is an important ruminant welfare problem that has considerable economic issues. Bovine DD is endemic in many regions worldwide and it is important to understand this major disease so that effective control strategies can be identified. There is substantial evidence that specific treponeme phylotypes play an important causative role in bovine DD. This review considers current research, including DD Treponema spp. investigations, associated DD pathobiology, and current and potential treatment and control options. Epidemiological data, alongside new microbiological data, help delineate important transmission routes and reservoirs of infection that allow effective interventions to be identified. Better on-farm housing hygiene, pasture access, routine footbathing and claw trimming with disinfected equipment need to be implemented to significantly reduce the incidence of DD. There is a paucity of peer reviewed research into both commonly used and novel treatments. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility studies of DD treponemes and effective treatment of human treponematoses clearly indicate that antibiotics frequently selected for DD treatments are not the most efficacious. Whilst there are understandable concerns over milk withdrawal times in dairy cattle, more needs to be done to identify, license and implement more appropriate antibiotic treatments, since continued overuse of less efficacious antibiotics, applied incorrectly, will lead to increased disease recurrence and transmission. More research is needed into methods of preventing DD that circumvent the use of antibiotics, including vaccination and transmission blocking studies, to reduce or hopefully eradicate DD in the future. PMID:27061657

  19. Current State of Clostridium difficile Treatment Options

    PubMed Central

    Venugopal, Anilrudh A.; Johnson, Stuart

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports of reduced response to standard therapies for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) and the risk for recurrent CDI that is common with all currently available treatment agents have posed a significant challenge to clinicians. Current recommendations include metronidazole for treatment of mild to moderate CDI and vancomycin for severe CDI. Results from small clinical trials suggest that nitazoxanide and teicoplanin may be alternative options to standard therapies, whereas rifaximin has demonstrated success in uncontrolled trials for the management of multiple recurrences. Anecdotal reports have also suggested that tigecycline might be useful as an adjunctive agent for the treatment of severe complicated CDI. Reports of resistance will likely limit the clinical use of fusidic acid and bacitracin and, possibly, rifaximin if resistance to this agent becomes widespread. Treatment of patients with multiple CDI recurrences and those with severe complicated CDI is based on limited clinical evidence, and new treatments or strategies are needed. PMID:22752868

  20. Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis: A review of current concepts in management

    PubMed Central

    Pihos, Andria M.

    2012-01-01

    Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (EKC) is an ocular surface infection caused by adenovirus. To date, there are no approved topical antiadenoviral therapeutics to treat EKC. Recent research reveals that treatment with topical corticosteroids for symptomatic relief of EKC enhances adenovirus replication and delays cell shedding from the ocular surface which delays adenovirus elimination. The current management of EKC largely revolves around accurate diagnosis of the condition and implementation of disinfection protocol to prevent its spread. Development of an effective antiviral treatment that addresses inflammation and does not prolong viral shedding would provide significant benefit. The literature reports on a variety of therapeutics that could potentially satisfy this deficiency. Topical ganciclovir and povidone-iodine combination drops have shown the most recent potential, but both therapeutics need to be investigated in larger scale studies. Until an antiadenoviral option is produced, the treatment of EKC should maintain a judicious case by case approach aiming to contain its dissemination and prevent visual consequences.

  1. [Understanding a new conception of addiction in current clinical practices].

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Toshihiko

    2012-02-01

    This paper described the historical process that the conception of "addiction" and "dependence" have been formed and changed. Before, the "addiction" was a prejudiced word used when people contempt an individual with compulsive drinking or taking psychoactive drugs, and this word implied moralistic and ethical faults of the individual. After that, this word describing an individual without control of drinking was taken place by the "dependence." This is the neutral and medical conception, defined by presence of tolerance and withdrawal symptoms, although it was based on the "alcoholism." which originated in the citizen movement in 1930s in U.S. Recently some professionals have preferred to use the "addiction" when describing an individual losing control of deviated, impulsive, and repetitive behavior including pathological gambling and compulsive buying. These behaviors have been discriminated form substance dependence, while clinically applied to analogical treatment to substance dependence. However, the DSM-5 draft which the American Psychiatric Association has published as a draft of new diagnostic criteria for mental disorders has classified both of substance dependence and addictive behavior into the same category, and has removed the word "dependence" in the description. In this paper, we looked back on historical conflicts between the two words of "dependence" and "addiction," and discussed the clinical meanings and problems of these words. PMID:22586939

  2. Current concepts regarding developmental mechanisms in diabetic retinopathy in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Yin; Hsu, Yuan-Man; Lin, Ying-Ju; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Chen, Chao-Jung; Lin, Wei-De; Liao, Wen-Lin; Chen, Yng-Tay; Lin, Wei-Yong; Liu, Yu-Huei; Yang, Jai-Sing; Sheu, Jinn-Chyuan; Tsai, Fuu-Jen

    2016-06-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is one of the most feared complications of diabetes and is a leading cause of acquired blindness in working adults. The prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes in Taiwan is about 4%, and the annual incidence of T2D (Type 2 Diabetes) in Taiwan is 1.8% following the 1985 WHO criteria. Multiple mechanisms have been shown in T2DR with some signaling pathways, including the polyol pathway, PKC pathway, AGEs pathway, and MAPK pathway. However, the cause of vision loss in diabetic retinopathy is complex and remains incompletely understood. Herein, we try to fully understand the new concepts regarding hyperglycemia-induced biochemical pathways contributing to DR pathophysiology. Our work may be able to provide new strategies for the prevention and treatment of diabetic vascular complications. PMID:27154195

  3. Age-related macular degeneration: current treatments

    PubMed Central

    Hubschman, Jean Pierre; Reddy, Shantan; Schwartz, Steven D

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Although important progress has been made in understanding age-related macular degeneration (AMD), management of the disease continues to be a challenge. AMD research has led to a widening of available treatment options and improved prognostic perspectives. This essay reviews these treatment options. Design: Interpretative essay. Methods: Literature review and interpretation. Results: Current treatments to preserve vision in patients with non-exudative AMD include antioxidant vitamins and mineral supplementations. Exudative AMD is currently most often treated monthly with anti-VEGF intravitreal injections. However, investigators are beginning to experiment with combination therapy and surgical approaches in an attempt to limit the number of treatment and reduce the financial burden on the health care system. Conclusion: By better understanding the basis and pathogenesis of AMD, newer therapies will continue to be developed that target specific pathways in patients with AMD, with the hoped for outcome of better management of the disease and improved visual acuity. PMID:19668560

  4. Immunotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: current concepts and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Mayor, Marissa; Yang, Neng; Sterman, Daniel; Jones, David R; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2016-05-01

    Recent successes in immunotherapeutic strategies are being investigated to combat cancers that have less than ideal responses to standard of care treatment, such as non-small-cell lung cancer. In this paper, we summarize concepts and the current status of immunotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer, including salient features of the major categories of immunotherapy-monoclonal antibody therapy, immune checkpoint blockade, immunotoxins, anticancer vaccines, and adoptive cell therapy. PMID:26516195

  5. Current Mined Geologic Disposal System concept of operations

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, R.B.; Teraoka, G.M.

    1998-07-01

    The concept of operations for the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) provides an integrated, conceptual description of the physical architecture and operating concept of the potential repository. The document facilitates a common understanding of the operations among system planners, developers and implementors by summarizing design solutions and operating concepts. During this past year, the MGDS Concept of Operations document was updated to reflect the Viability Assessment (VA) design and operating concept. Previously, this document reflected the Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD). This paper presents a description of the significant operational changes from ACD to VA design that are now captured in the concept of operations document.

  6. Current concepts in management of slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Bittersohl, Bernd; Hosalkar, Harish S; Zilkens, Christoph; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a common hip condition that can be disabling. In this review, we provide an orientation on current trends in the clinical management of SCFE including conventional procedures and specialised surgical developments. Different methods of fixation of the epiphysis, risks of complications, and the rationale of addressing deformity, primarily or secondarily, are presented. Although improved understanding of the anatomy, vascularity and implications of residual deformity have changed management strategies, the best modality of treatment that would restore complete vascularity to the femoral head and prevent any residual deformity, impingement and early osteoarthritis remains elusive. PMID:25362879

  7. BIOREMEDIATION USING THE LAND TREATMENT CONCEPT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is designed to be used by those who are involved with the use of land treatment technologies for the remediation of contaminated solid phase materials. In addition to a discussion of the basic processes which drive land treatment applications, the parameters involv...

  8. Current treatment options for Dientamoeba fragilis infections.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Noriyuki; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John; Ellis, John T; Stark, Damien

    2012-12-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis belongs to the trichomonad group of protozoan parasites and it has been implicated as a cause of gastrointestinal disease with world-wide prevalences ranging from 0.5% to 16%. The majority of patients with dientamoebiasis present with gastrointestinal complaints. Chronic symptoms are common with up to a third of patients exhibiting persistent diarrhoea. Numerous studies have successfully demonstrated parasite clearance, coupled with complete resolution of clinical symptoms following treatment with various antiparasitic compounds. Treatments reported to be successful for dientamoebiasis include carbarsone, diphetarsone, tetracyclines, paromomycin, erythromycin, hydroxyquinolines and the 5-nitroimidazoles, including metronidazole, secnidazole, tinidazole and ornidazole. It is of note that most current treatment data is based only on small number of case reports. No large scale double blind randomised placebo controlled trials testing the efficacy of antimicrobial agents against D. fragilis has been undertaken highlighting the need for further study. In addition there is very little in vitro susceptibility data available for the organism making some current treatment options questionable. The aim of this review is to critically discuss all treatment options currently available for dientamoebiasis. PMID:24533282

  9. Current treatment options for Dientamoeba fragilis infections

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Noriyuki; Marriott, Deborah; Harkness, John; Ellis, John T.; Stark, Damien

    2012-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis belongs to the trichomonad group of protozoan parasites and it has been implicated as a cause of gastrointestinal disease with world-wide prevalences ranging from 0.5% to 16%. The majority of patients with dientamoebiasis present with gastrointestinal complaints. Chronic symptoms are common with up to a third of patients exhibiting persistent diarrhoea. Numerous studies have successfully demonstrated parasite clearance, coupled with complete resolution of clinical symptoms following treatment with various antiparasitic compounds. Treatments reported to be successful for dientamoebiasis include carbarsone, diphetarsone, tetracyclines, paromomycin, erythromycin, hydroxyquinolines and the 5-nitroimidazoles, including metronidazole, secnidazole, tinidazole and ornidazole. It is of note that most current treatment data is based only on small number of case reports. No large scale double blind randomised placebo controlled trials testing the efficacy of antimicrobial agents against D. fragilis has been undertaken highlighting the need for further study. In addition there is very little in vitro susceptibility data available for the organism making some current treatment options questionable. The aim of this review is to critically discuss all treatment options currently available for dientamoebiasis. PMID:24533282

  10. Current concepts on osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Moya-Angeler, Joaquin; Gianakos, Arianna L; Villa, Jordan C; Ni, Amelia; Lane, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that 20000 to 30000 new patients are diagnosed with osteonecrosis annually accounting for approximately 10% of the 250000 total hip arthroplasties done annually in the United States. The lack of level 1 evidence in the literature makes it difficult to identify optimal treatment protocols to manage patients with pre-collapse avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and early intervention prior to collapse is critical to successful outcomes in joint preserving procedures. There have been a variety of traumatic and atraumatic factors that have been identified as risk factors for osteonecrosis, but the etiology and pathogenesis still remains unclear. Current osteonecrosis diagnosis is dependent upon plain anteroposterior and frog-leg lateral radiographs of the hip, followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Generally, the first radiographic changes seen by radiograph will be cystic and sclerotic changes in the femoral head. Although the diagnosis may be made by radiograph, plain radiographs are generally insufficient for early diagnosis, therefore MRI is considered the most accurate benchmark. Treatment options include pharmacologic agents such as bisphosphonates and statins, biophysical treatments, as well as joint-preserving and joint-replacing surgeries. the surgical treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head can be divided into two major branches: femoral head sparing procedures (FHSP) and femoral head replacement procedures (FHRP). In general, FHSP are indicated at pre-collapse stages with minimal symptoms whereas FHRP are preferred at post-collapse symptomatic stages. It is difficult to know whether any treatment modality changes the natural history of core decompression since the true natural history of core decompression has not been delineated. PMID:26396935

  11. Current concepts on osteonecrosis of the femoral head.

    PubMed

    Moya-Angeler, Joaquin; Gianakos, Arianna L; Villa, Jordan C; Ni, Amelia; Lane, Joseph M

    2015-09-18

    It is estimated that 20000 to 30000 new patients are diagnosed with osteonecrosis annually accounting for approximately 10% of the 250000 total hip arthroplasties done annually in the United States. The lack of level 1 evidence in the literature makes it difficult to identify optimal treatment protocols to manage patients with pre-collapse avascular necrosis of the femoral head, and early intervention prior to collapse is critical to successful outcomes in joint preserving procedures. There have been a variety of traumatic and atraumatic factors that have been identified as risk factors for osteonecrosis, but the etiology and pathogenesis still remains unclear. Current osteonecrosis diagnosis is dependent upon plain anteroposterior and frog-leg lateral radiographs of the hip, followed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Generally, the first radiographic changes seen by radiograph will be cystic and sclerotic changes in the femoral head. Although the diagnosis may be made by radiograph, plain radiographs are generally insufficient for early diagnosis, therefore MRI is considered the most accurate benchmark. Treatment options include pharmacologic agents such as bisphosphonates and statins, biophysical treatments, as well as joint-preserving and joint-replacing surgeries. the surgical treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head can be divided into two major branches: femoral head sparing procedures (FHSP) and femoral head replacement procedures (FHRP). In general, FHSP are indicated at pre-collapse stages with minimal symptoms whereas FHRP are preferred at post-collapse symptomatic stages. It is difficult to know whether any treatment modality changes the natural history of core decompression since the true natural history of core decompression has not been delineated. PMID:26396935

  12. Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease: Current and Future Concepts of Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Taher, Fadi; Essig, David; Lebl, Darren R.; Hughes, Alexander P.; Sama, Andrew A.; Cammisa, Frank P.; Girardi, Federico P.

    2012-01-01

    Low back pain as a result of degenerative disc disease imparts a large socioeconomic impact on the health care system. Traditional concepts for treatment of lumbar disc degeneration have aimed at symptomatic relief by limiting motion in the lumbar spine, but novel treatment strategies involving stem cells, growth factors, and gene therapy have the theoretical potential to prevent, slow, or even reverse disc degeneration. Understanding the pathophysiological basis of disc degeneration is essential for the development of treatment strategies that target the underlying mechanisms of disc degeneration rather than the downstream symptom of pain. Such strategies ideally aim to induce disc regeneration or to replace the degenerated disc. However, at present, treatment options for degenerative disc disease remain suboptimal, and development and outcomes of novel treatment options currently have to be considered unpredictable. PMID:22567411

  13. Current concepts and controversies on adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: Part II

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Alok; Tsirikos, Athanasios I

    2013-01-01

    A new era in the surgical treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) opened with the introduction of pedicle screw instrumentation, which provides 3-column vertebral fixation and allows major deformity correction on the coronal, sagittal, and axial planes. A steep learning curve can be expected for spinal surgeons to become familiar with pedicle screw placement and correction techniques. Potential complications including injury to adjacent neural, vascular, and visceral structures can occur due to screw misplacement or pull-out during correction maneuvers. These major complications are better recognized as pedicle screw techniques become more popular and may result in serious morbidity and mortality. Extensive laboratory and clinical training is mandatory before pedicle screw techniques in scoliosis surgery are put to practice. Wider application, especially in developing countries, is limited by the high cost of implants. Refined correction techniques are currently developed and these utilize a lesser number of pedicle anchors which are strategically positioned to allow optimum deformity correction while reducing the neurological risk, surgical time, and blood loss, as well as instrumentation cost. Such techniques can be particularly attractive at a time when cost has major implications on provision of health care as they can make scoliosis treatment available to a wider population of patients. Pedicle screw techniques are currently considered the gold standard for scoliosis correction due to their documented superior biomechanical properties and ability to produce improved clinical outcomes as reflected by health-related quality-of-life questionnaires. Ongoing research promises further advances with the future of AIS treatment incorporating genetic counseling and possibly fusionless techniques. PMID:23798750

  14. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training.

    PubMed

    Embong, Nurul Haswani; Soh, Yee Chang; Ming, Long Chiau; Wong, Tin Wui

    2015-10-01

    Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and the training for reflexology practitioners. PubMed, SCOPUS, Google Scholar, and SpringerLink databases were utilized to search the following medical subject headings or keywords: foot massage, reflexology, foot reflexotherapy, reflexological treatment, and zone therapy. The articles published for the last 10 years were included. Previous systematic reviews failed to show concrete evidence for any specific effect of reflexology in any conditions. Due to its non-invasive, non-pharmacological complementary nature, reflexology is widely accepted and anecdotal evidence of positive effect reflexology in a variety of health conditions are available. Adequate training for practitioners is necessary to ensure the consistency of service provided. PMID:26587391

  15. Revisiting reflexology: Concept, evidence, current practice, and practitioner training

    PubMed Central

    Embong, Nurul Haswani; Soh, Yee Chang; Ming, Long Chiau; Wong, Tin Wui

    2015-01-01

    Reflexology is basically a study of how one part of the human body relates to another part of the body. Reflexology practitioners rely on the reflexes map of the feet and hands to all the internal organs and other human body parts. They believe that by applying the appropriate pressure and massage certain spots on the feet and hands, all other body parts could be energized and rejuvenated. This review aimed to revisit the concept of reflexology and examine its effectiveness, practices, and the training for reflexology practitioners. PubMed, SCOPUS, Google Scholar, and SpringerLink databases were utilized to search the following medical subject headings or keywords: foot massage, reflexology, foot reflexotherapy, reflexological treatment, and zone therapy. The articles published for the last 10 years were included. Previous systematic reviews failed to show concrete evidence for any specific effect of reflexology in any conditions. Due to its non-invasive, non-pharmacological complementary nature, reflexology is widely accepted and anecdotal evidence of positive effect reflexology in a variety of health conditions are available. Adequate training for practitioners is necessary to ensure the consistency of service provided. PMID:26587391

  16. Current and future treatments for hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Schlachterman, Alexander; Craft Jr, Willie W; Hilgenfeldt, Eric; Mitra, Avir; Cabrera, Roniel

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents a unique challenge for physicians and patients. There is no definitively curative treatment. Rather, many treatment and management modalities exist with differing advantages and disadvantages. Both current guidelines and individual patient concerns must be taken into account in order to properly manage HCC. In addition, quality of life issues are particularly complex in patients with HCC and these concerns must also be factored into treatment strategies. Thus, considering all the options and their various pros and cons can quickly become complex for both clinicians and patients. In this review, we systematically discuss the current treatment modalities available for HCC, detailing relevant clinical data, risks and rewards and overall outcomes for each approach. Surgical options discussed include resection, transplantation and ablation. We also discuss the radiation modalities: conformal radiotherapy, yttrium 90 microspheres and proton and heavy ion radiotherapy. The biologic agent Sorafenib is discussed as a promising new approach, and recent clinical trials are reviewed. We then detail currently described molecular pathways implicated in the initiation and progression of HCC, and we explore the potential of each pathway as an avenue for drug exploitation. We hope this comprehensive and forward-looking review enables both clinicians and patients to understand various options and thereby make more informed decisions regarding this disease. PMID:26229392

  17. Diabetes and haemochromatosis: current concepts, management and prevention.

    PubMed

    Yaouanq, J M

    1995-12-01

    Haemochromatosis is a common autosomal recessive disorder of iron metabolism caused by a gene in tight linkage with HLA class I genes. Despite intensive research, the molecular defect and underlying biochemical anomaly are still unknown. Diabetes, a serious complication of haemochromatosis, is frequently associated with cirrhosis which reduces life expectancy. Its development is related to iron excess, directly or through associated liver involvement, although the precise mechanisms of iron toxicity remain unclear. New concepts concerning its pathogenesis include insulin resistance and beta-cell dysfunction which are apparent well before insulin deficiency and can be reversed if iron depletion is promptly initiated. Today, earlier recognition of iron overload through active diagnostic approaches has a direct impact in reducing the frequency of diabetes among hemochromatosis patients. Presymptomatic diagnosis in the general population and among relatives of affected subjects currently relies on the detection of increased iron stores through medical awareness and family screening. Indirect gene diagnosis with serological and molecular markers of the HLA region can be provided for relatives of proven cases. As part of a genetic counselling process, this allows the identification of at-risk subjects before the onset of iron accumulation. Isolation of the gene and identification of the metabolic defect leading to increased iron absorption may have significant implications for future diagnostic procedures and preventive strategies in haemochromatosis. PMID:8586148

  18. Human error in hospitals and industrial accidents: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Spencer, F C

    2000-10-01

    Most data concerning errors and accidents are from industrial accidents and airline injuries. General Electric, Alcoa, and Motorola, among others, all have reported complex programs that resulted in a marked reduction in frequency of worker injuries. In the field of medicine, however, with the outstanding exception of anesthesiology, there is a paucity of information, most reports referring to the 1984 Harvard-New York State Study, more than 16 years ago. This scarcity of information indicates the complexity of the problem. It seems very unlikely that simple exhortation or additional regulations will help because the problem lies principally in the multiple human-machine interfaces that constitute modern medical care. The absence of success stories also indicates that the best methods have to be learned by experience. A liaison with industry should be helpful, although the varieties of human illness are far different from a standardized manufacturing process. Concurrent with the studies of industrial and nuclear accidents, cognitive psychologists have intensively studied how the brain stores and retrieves information. Several concepts have emerged. First, errors are not character defects to be treated by the classic approach of discipline and education, but are byproducts of normal thinking that occur frequently. Second, major accidents are rarely causedby a single error; instead, they are often a combination of chronic system errors, termed latent errors. Identifying and correcting these latent errors should be the principal focus for corrective planning rather than searching for an individual culprit. This nonpunitive concept of errors is a key basis for an effective reporting system, brilliantly demonstrated in aviation with the ASRS system developed more than 25 years ago. The ASRS currently receives more than 30,000 reports annually and is credited with the remarkable increase in safety of airplane travel. Adverse drug events constitute about 25% of hospital

  19. Current Concepts of Articular Cartilage Restoration Techniques in the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Christopher L.; Stuart, Michael J.; Krych, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Articular cartilage injuries are common in patients presenting to surgeons with primary complaints of knee pain or mechanical symptoms. Treatment options include comprehensive nonoperative management, palliative surgery, joint preservation operations, and arthroplasty. Evidence Acquisition: A MEDLINE search on articular cartilage restoration techniques of the knee was conducted to identify outcome studies published from 1993 to 2013. Special emphasis was given to Level 1 and 2 published studies. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Results: Current surgical options with documented outcomes in treating chondral injuries in the knee include the following: microfracture, osteochondral autograft transfer, osteochondral allograft transplant, and autologous chondrocyte transplantation. Generally, results are favorable regarding patient satisfaction and return to sport when proper treatment algorithms and surgical techniques are followed, with 52% to 96% of patients demonstrating good to excellent clinical outcomes and 66% to 91% returning to sport at preinjury levels. Conclusion: Clinical, functional, and radiographic outcomes may be improved in the majority of patients with articular cartilage restoration surgery; however, some patients may not fully return to their preinjury activity levels postoperatively. In active and athletic patient populations, biological techniques that restore the articular surface may be options that provide symptom relief and return patients to their prior levels of function. PMID:24790697

  20. Current concepts of oxygen management in retinopathy of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Owen, Leah A; Hartnett, M Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a potentially blinding disorder in premature infants. The underlying pathophysiology is incompletely understood, limiting the prevention and treatment of this devastating condition. Current therapies are directed toward management of aberrant neovascularization thought to result from retinal ischemia in the developing preterm retina. The molecular mediators important for development of retinal ischemia and subsequent neovascular pathology are not fully understood. However, oxygen has been shown to be a key mediator of disease and the oxygen environment for preterm infants has been extensively studied. Despite this, the optimal oxygen environment for preterm infants remains unclear and recent works seeking to clarify this relationship demonstrate somewhat disparate findings. These data further substantiate that ROP is a complex disease with multifactorial etiology including genetic and environmental factors. Therefore, while environmental factors such as oxygen are important to our understanding of the disease process and care of preterm infants, identification of the molecular mediators downstream of oxygen which are necessary for development of ROP pathology will be critical to improve prevention, diagnosis and treatment strategies. PMID:24982738

  1. Current challenges in interventional mitral valve treatment

    PubMed Central

    Candreva, Alessandro; Pozzoli, Alberto; Guidotti, Andrea; Gaemperli, Oliver; Nietlispach, Fabian; Barthelmes, Jens; Emmert, Maximilian Y.; Weber, Alberto; Benussi, Stefano; Alfieri, Ottavio; Maisano, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter mitral valve therapies have emerged as an alternative option in high surgical risk or inoperable patients with severe and symptomatic mitral regurgitation (MR). As multiple technologies and different approaches will become available in the field of mitral valve interventions, different challenges are emerging, both patient- (clinical challenges) and procedure-related (technical challenges). This review will briefly explore the current open challenges in the evolving fields of interventional mitral valve treatment. PMID:26543599

  2. Current Concepts in the Management of Rheumatoid Hand

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Petrillo, Stefano; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease caused by a T cell-driven autoimmune process, which majorly involves the diarthrodial joints. It affects 1% of the US population, and approximately 70% of patients with RA develop pathologies of the hand, especially of the metacarpophalangeal joints (MCP). Furthermore, also the extensor and flexor tendons of the fingers are frequently involved. The first line of treatment should be conservative. Three general classes of drugs are currently available for RA: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs), corticosteroids, and disease modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Encouraging results have been obtained using DMARDs. However, when severe deformities occur or when patients are unresponsive to medical management and injections therapy, surgical intervention should be performed to relieve pain and restore function. Several surgical options have been described for the management of MCP joint deformities, including soft tissue procedures, arthrodesis, and prosthetic replacement. Tendons ruptures are generally managed with tendon transfer surgery, while different surgical procedures are available to treat fingers deformities. The aim of the present review is to report the current knowledge in the management of MCP joint deformities, as well as tendons damage and fingers deformities, in patients with RA. PMID:26236341

  3. The current treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Kenneth Scott

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular hypertension in general is a progressive, nearly always fatal condition that until recently has had very few treatment options. Our understanding of the pulmonary vascular disease process has opened the window to earlier screening techniques, diagnosis, and treatment options. However, all current treatment options are complex and expensive and therefore require clinical support strategies often necessitating specialized pulmonary hypertension treatment centers. Whether idiopathic or secondary, pulmonary arterial hypertension is characterized by the deregulated proliferation of pulmonary artery endothelial cells and intimal smooth muscle cells, both resistant to cellular apoptosis. Early recognition of such disregulation may lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment and thus alteration in the disease process. Screening of high-risk populations such as those with connective tissue disorders, HIV disease, congenital heart disease, portal hypertension, and those exposed to certain drugs and toxins such as methamphetamines and the diet drugs Dexfenfluramine and Fenfluramine is of utmost importance. Similarly, early symptom recognition in these high-risk groups is essential to earlier diagnosis and treatment. PMID:20073161

  4. Bone pain: current and future treatments.

    PubMed

    Frost, Charlotte Ørsted; Hansen, Rikke Rie; Heegaard, Anne-Marie

    2016-06-01

    Skeletal conditions are common causes of chronic pain and there is an unmet medical need for improved treatment options. Bone pain is currently managed with disease modifying agents and/or analgesics depending on the condition. Disease modifying agents affect the underlying pathophysiology of the disease and reduce as a secondary effect bone pain. Antiresorptive and anabolic agents, such as bisphosphonates and intermittent parathyroid hormone (1-34), respectively, have proven effective as pain relieving agents. Cathepsin K inhibitors and anti-sclerostin antibodies hold, due to their disease modifying effects, promise of a pain relieving effect. NSAIDs and opioids are widely employed in the treatment of bone pain. However, recent preclinical findings demonstrating a unique neuronal innervation of bone tissue and sprouting of sensory nerve fibers open for new treatment possibilities. PMID:26940053

  5. Lymphangioleiomyomatosis: Current understanding and potential treatments.

    PubMed

    Moir, Lyn M

    2016-02-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare neoplastic disease affecting predominantly young women. Clinical symptoms of this progressive disease include dyspnoea, cough, recurrent pneumothorax, hemoptysis and chylothorax. LAM is generally aggressive in nature and ultimately results in respiratory failure. Important hallmark features of this metastatic disease include the formation of lesions of abnormal smooth muscle cells, cystic destruction of the lung tissue and lymphangiogenesis affecting the lungs, abdomen and lymphatics. Research over the last 10-15 years has significantly enhanced our understanding of the molecular and cellular processes associated with LAM. These processes include mutational inactivation of the tuberous sclerosis complex genes, TSC1 and TSC2, activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, enhanced cell proliferation and migration, lymphangiogenesis, metastatic spread through the blood and lymphatic circulations, sex steroid sensitivity and dysregulated autophagy. Despite this increased knowledge there is currently no cure for LAM and treatment options remain limited. Whilst the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin has shown some benefit in patients with LAM, with stabilisation of lung function and improved quality of life, cessation of treatment results in recurrence of the disease progression. This highlights the urgent need to identify novel targets and new treatment regimens. The focus of this review is to summarise our current understanding of the cellular and molecular processes associated with LAM and highlight emerging treatments. PMID:26713679

  6. Anaplastic glioma: current treatment and management.

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, Emilie; Taillibert, Sophie; Chamberlain, Marc C

    2015-06-01

    Anaplastic glioma (AG) is divided into three morphology-based groups (anaplastic astrocytoma, anaplastic oligodendroglioma, anaplastic oligoastrocytoma) as well as three molecular groups (glioma-CpG island methylation phenotype [G-CIMP] negative, G-CIMP positive non-1p19q codeleted tumors and G-CIMP positive codeleted tumors). The RTOG 9402 and EORTC 26951 trials established radiotherapy plus (procarbazine, lomustine, vincristine) chemotherapy as the standard of care in 1p/19q codeleted AG. Uni- or non-codeleted AG are currently best treated with radiotherapy only or alkylator-based chemotherapy only as determined by the NOA-04 trial. Maturation of NOA-04 and results of the currently accruing studies, CODEL (for codeleted AG) and CATNON (for uni or non-codeleted AG), will likely refine current up-front treatment recommendations for AG. PMID:25936680

  7. Stereotactic radiosurgery of glomus jugulare tumors: current concepts, recent advances and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sager, Omer; Dincoglan, Ferrat; Beyzadeoglu, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), a very highly focused form of therapeutic irradiation, has been widely recognized as a viable treatment option in the management of intracranial pathologies including benign tumors, malign tumors, vascular malformations and functional disorders. The applications of SRS are continuously expanding thanks to the ever-increasing advances and corresponding improvements in neuroimaging, radiation treatment techniques, equipment, treatment planning and delivery systems. In the context of glomus jugulare tumors (GJT), SRS is being more increasingly used both as the upfront management modality or as a complementary or salvage treatment option. As its safety and efficacy is being evident with compiling data from studies with longer follow-up durations, SRS appears to take the lead in the management of most patients with GJT. Herein, we address current concepts, recent advances and future perspectives in SRS of GJT in light of the literature. PMID:25768334

  8. Current treatment options for latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Bocchino, Marialuisa; Matarese, Alessandro; Sanduzzi, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    Treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is a key component in TB control strategies worldwide. However, as people with LTBI are neither symptomatic nor contagious, any screening decision should be weighed carefully against the potential benefit of preventing active disease in those who are known to be at higher risk and are willing to accept therapy for LTBI. This means that a targeted approach is desirable to maximize cost effectiveness and to guarantee patient adherence. We focus on LTBI treatment strategies in patient populations at increased risk of developing active TB, including candidates for treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α blockers. In the last 40 years, isoniazid (INH) has represented the keystone of LTBI therapy across the world. Although INH remains the first therapeutic option, alternative treatments that are effective and associated with increased adherence and economic savings are available. Current recommendations, toxicity, compliance, and cost issues are discussed in detail in this review. A balanced relationship between the patient and healthcare provider could increase adherence, while cost-saving treatment strategies with higher effectiveness, fewer side effects, and of shorter duration should be offered as preferred. PMID:24789003

  9. Pathophysiological Concepts and Treatment of Camptocormia

    PubMed Central

    Margraf, N.G.; Wrede, A.; Deuschl, G.; Schulz-Schaeffer, W.J.

    2016-01-01

    Camptocormia is a disabling pathological, non-fixed, forward bending of the trunk. The clinical definition using only the bending angle is insufficient; it should include the subjectively perceived inability to stand upright, occurrence of back pain, typical individual complaints, and need for walking aids and compensatory signs (e.g. back-swept wing sign). Due to the heterogeneous etiologies of camptocormia a broad diagnostic approach is necessary. Camptocormia is most frequently encountered in movement disorders (PD and dystonia) and muscles diseases (myositis and myopathy, mainly facio-scapulo-humeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD)). The main diagnostic aim is to discover the etiology by looking for signs of the underlying disease in the neurological examination, EMG, muscle MRI and possibly biopsy. PD and probably myositic camptocormia can be divided into an acute and a chronic stage according to the duration of camptocormia and the findings in the short time inversion recovery (STIR) and T1 sequences of paravertebral muscle MRI. There is no established treatment of camptocormia resulting from any etiology. Case series suggest that deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN-DBS) is effective in the acute but not the chronic stage of PD camptocormia. In chronic stages with degenerated muscles, treatment options are limited to orthoses, walking aids, physiotherapy and pain therapy. In acute myositic camptocormia an escalation strategy with different immunosuppressive drugs is recommended. In dystonic camptocormia, as in dystonia in general, case reports have shown botulinum toxin and DBS of the globus pallidus internus (GPi-DBS) to be effective. Camptocormia in connection with primary myopathies should be treated according to the underlying illness. PMID:27314757

  10. Bilateral cochlear implantation: current concepts, indications, and results.

    PubMed

    Basura, Gregory J; Eapen, Rose; Buchman, Craig A

    2009-12-01

    The optimal treatment for bilateral hearing loss continues to evolve as cochlear implant (CI) and hearing aid technologies advance, as does our understanding of the central auditory system. Ongoing discussions continue on the validity and feasibility of bilateral CI in terms of performance, justification of need, medical/surgical safety concerns, and economics. The purpose of this review article is to provide an update on the advantages and disadvantages of bilateral CI and to provide a discussion on timing (simultaneous vs. sequential), technology (bimodal vs. binaural) and feasibility. Binaural advantages are found in both adult and pediatric bilateral CI recipients, the greatest being the head shadow effect and improvements in localization and loudness summation. This theoretically offers an advantage over their unilateral implanted counterparts in terms of improved sound localization and enhanced speech perception under noisy conditions. Most investigators agree that bilateral stimulation during critical periods of development is paramount for optimizing auditory functioning in children. Currently, bilateral CI is widely accepted as a safe and effective means of bilateral auditory stimulation. PMID:19894280

  11. Pituitary tumors. Current concepts in diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Aron, D C; Tyrrell, J B; Wilson, C B

    1995-01-01

    Diagnostic advances have resulted in earlier and more frequent recognition of pituitary tumors. Pituitary tumors cause problems owing to the hormones they secrete or the effects of an expanding sellar mass--hypopituitarism, visual field abnormalities, and neurologic deficits. Prolactin-secreting tumors (prolactinomas), which cause amenorrhea, galactorrhea, and hypogonadism, constitute the most common type of primary pituitary tumors, followed by growth hormone-secreting tumors, which cause acromegaly, and corticotropin-secreting tumors, which cause Cushing's syndrome. Hypersecretion of thyroid-stimulating hormone, the gonadotrophins, or alpha-subunits is unusual. Nonfunctional tumors currently represent only 10% of all clinically diagnosed pituitary adenomas, and some of these are alpha-subunit-secreting adenomas. Insights into the pathogenesis and biologic behavior of these usually benign tumors have been gained from genetic studies. We review some of the recent advances and salient features of the diagnosis and management of pituitary tumors, including biochemical and radiologic diagnosis, transsphenoidal surgery, radiation therapy, and medical therapy. Each type of lesion requires a comprehensive but individualized treatment approach, and regardless of the mode of therapy, careful follow-up is essential. Images PMID:7747500

  12. Postural tachycardia syndrome--current experience and concepts.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Christopher J; Low, David A; Iodice, Valeria; Owens, Andrew P; Kirbis, Mojca; Grahame, Rodney

    2012-01-01

    Postural tachycardia syndrome (PoTS) is a poorly understood but important cause of orthostatic intolerance resulting from cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction. PoTS is distinct from the syndromes of autonomic failure usually associated with orthostatic hypotension, such as pure autonomic failure and multiple system atrophy. Individuals affected by PoTS are mainly young (aged between 15 years and 40 years) and predominantly female. The symptoms--palpitations, dizziness and occasionally syncope--mainly occur when the patient is standing upright, and are often relieved by sitting or lying flat. Common stimuli in daily life, such as modest exertion, food ingestion and heat, are now recognized to be capable of exacerbating the symptoms. Onset of the syndrome can be linked to infection, trauma, surgery or stress. PoTS can be associated with various other disorders; in particular, joint hypermobility syndrome (also known as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type, formerly termed Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type III). This Review describes the characteristics and neuroepidemiology of PoTS, and outlines possible pathophysiological mechanisms of this syndrome, as well as current and investigational treatments. PMID:22143364

  13. Exercise after breast cancer treatment: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dieli-Conwright, Christina M; Orozco, Breanna Z

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, great strides have been made in the field of exercise-oncology research, particularly with breast cancer. This area of research is particularly important since there are >2.8 million breast cancer survivors who are in need of an intervention that can offset treatment-related side effects. Noticeable reductions in physical fitness (ie, cardiopulmonary fitness and muscular strength), negative changes in body composition (ie, increase in body mass, decrease in lean body mass, and increase in fat mass), increased fatigue, depression, or anxiety are some of the common side effects of cancer treatments that negatively impact overall quality of life and increase the risk for the development of comorbidities. Exercise plays a vital role in improving cardiopulmonary function, psychological events, muscular strength, and endurance in breast cancer survivors, and thus should be considered as a key factor of lifestyle intervention to reverse negative treatment-related side effects. The purpose of this review is to address current perspectives on the benefits of aerobic and resistance exercise after breast cancer treatments. This review is focused on the well-established benefits of exercise on physical and emotional well-being, bone health, lymphedema management, and the postulated benefits of exercise on risk reduction for recurrence of breast cancer. PMID:26543382

  14. Hepatitis C treatment: current and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Munir, Saira; Saleem, Sana; Idrees, Muhammad; Tariq, Aaliyah; Butt, Sadia; Rauff, Bisma; Hussain, Abrar; Badar, Sadaf; Naudhani, Mahrukh; Fatima, Zareen; Ali, Muhmmad; Ali, Liaqat; Akram, Madiha; Aftab, Mahwish; Khubaib, Bushra; Awan, Zunaira

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a member of Flaviviridae family and one of the major causes of liver disease. There are about 175 million HCV infected patients worldwide that constitute 3% of world's population. The main route of HCV transmission is parental however 90% intravenous drug users are at highest risk. Standard interferon and ribavirin remained a gold standard of chronic HCV treatment having 38-43% sustained virological response rates. Currently the standard therapy for HCV is pegylated interferon (PEG-INF) with ribavirin. This therapy achieves 50% sustained virological response (SVR) for genotype 1 and 80% for genotype 2 & 3. As pegylated interferon is expensive, standard interferon is still the main therapy for HCV treatment in under developed countries. On the other hand, studies showed that pegylated IFN and RBV therapy has severe side effects like hematological complications. Herbal medicines (laccase, proanthocyandin, Rhodiola kirilowii) are also being in use as a natural and alternative way for treatment of HCV but there is not a single significant report documented yet. Best SVR indicators are genotype 3 and 2, < 0.2 million IU/mL pretreatment viral load, rapid virological response (RVR) rate and age <40 years. New therapeutic approaches are under study like interferon related systems, modified forms of ribavirin, internal ribosome entry site (HCV IRES) inhibitors, NS3 and NS5a inhibitors, novel immunomodulators and specifically targeted anti-viral therapy for hepatitis C compounds. More remedial therapies include caspase inhibitors, anti-fibrotic agents, antibody treatment and vaccines. PMID:21040548

  15. Exercise after breast cancer treatment: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Dieli-Conwright, Christina M; Orozco, Breanna Z

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 2 decades, great strides have been made in the field of exercise-oncology research, particularly with breast cancer. This area of research is particularly important since there are >2.8 million breast cancer survivors who are in need of an intervention that can offset treatment-related side effects. Noticeable reductions in physical fitness (ie, cardiopulmonary fitness and muscular strength), negative changes in body composition (ie, increase in body mass, decrease in lean body mass, and increase in fat mass), increased fatigue, depression, or anxiety are some of the common side effects of cancer treatments that negatively impact overall quality of life and increase the risk for the development of comorbidities. Exercise plays a vital role in improving cardiopulmonary function, psychological events, muscular strength, and endurance in breast cancer survivors, and thus should be considered as a key factor of lifestyle intervention to reverse negative treatment-related side effects. The purpose of this review is to address current perspectives on the benefits of aerobic and resistance exercise after breast cancer treatments. This review is focused on the well-established benefits of exercise on physical and emotional well-being, bone health, lymphedema management, and the postulated benefits of exercise on risk reduction for recurrence of breast cancer. PMID:26543382

  16. Current Surgical Treatment of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rönn, Karolin; Reischl, Nikolaus; Gautier, Emanuel; Jacobi, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Osteoathritis (OA) of the knee is common, and the chances of suffering from OA increase with age. Its treatment should be initially nonoperative—and requires both pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment modalities. If conservative therapy fails, surgery should be considered. Surgical treatments for knee OA include arthroscopy, cartilage repair, osteotomy, and knee arthroplasty. Determining which of these procedures is most appropriate depends on several factors, including the location, stage of OA, comorbidities on the one side and patients suffering on the other side. Arthroscopic lavage and débridement is often carried out, but does not alter disease progression. If OA is limited to one compartment, unicompartmental knee arthroplasty or unloading osteotomy can be considered. They are recommended in young and active patients in regard to the risks and limited durability of total knee replacement. Total arthroplasty of the knee is a common and safe method in the elderly patients with advanced knee OA. This paper summarizes current surgical treatment strategies for knee OA, with a focus on the latest developments, indications and level of evidence. PMID:22046517

  17. Current state of sewage treatment in China.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lingyun; Zhang, Guangming; Tian, Huifang

    2014-12-01

    The study reported and analyzed the current state of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in urban China from the aspects of scale, treatment processes, sludge handling, geographical distribution, and discharge standards. By 2012, there were 3340 WWTPs in operation in China with a capacity of 1.42 × 10(8) m(3)/d. The number of medium-scale WWTPs (1-10 × 10(4) m(3)/d) counted for 75% of total WWTPs. On average, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiencies of small-scale, medium-scale, large-scale and super-large-scale WWTPs were 81, 85.5, 87.5 and 86.5%, respectively. Generally speaking, the nutrients removal instead of COD removal was of concern. As to the different processes, oxidation ditch, anaerobic-anoxic-oxic (A(2)/O) and sequencing batch reactor (SBR) were the mainstream technologies in China. These technologies had minor difference in terms of overall COD removal efficiency. The sludge treatment in WWTPs was basically "thickening-coagulation-mechanical dehydration" and the major disposal method was sanitary landfill in China. The distributions of WWTPs and their utilization showed significant regional characteristics. The sewage treatment capacity of China concentrated on the coastal areas and middle reaches of Yangtze River, which were the economically developed zones. Besides, most WWTPs enforced the Class 1 or Class 2 discharge standards, but few realized wastewater reuse. Finally, existing problems were discussed, including low removal efficiency of nitrogen and phosphorus, emerging contaminants, low reuse of reclaimed water, poor sludge treatment and disposal, low execution standard of effluent, and emissions of greenhouse gas from WWTPs. Suggestions regarding potential technical and administrative measures were given. PMID:25189479

  18. Dhat syndrome: Evolution of concept, current understanding, and need of an integrated approach

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Sujita Kumar; Sarkar, Siddharth

    2015-01-01

    Dhat syndrome has often been construed as a culture-bound sexual neurosis of the Indian subcontinent. Symptoms similar to that of Dhat syndrome has been described in other cultures across different time periods. The present paper looks at the evolution of the concept of Dhat syndrome in India. The review also takes an overview of the current understanding of this syndrome in terms of nosological status as a distinct entity and its “culture-bound” status. The narrative finally attempts to discuss the integrated approach for the treatment of this disorder. PMID:26538854

  19. Chemotherapy for Good-Risk Nonseminomatous Germ Cell Tumors: Current Concepts and Controversies.

    PubMed

    In, Gino; Dorff, Tanya

    2015-08-01

    The rate of diagnosis of germ cell tumors has remained fairly constant. By the International Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Classification, roughly 60% of all metastatic germ cell tumors are classified as good risk. This group of patients has an excellent prognosis, with greater than 90% expectation of cure. Treatment standards have not changed much in recent years. This article focuses on key concepts in the development of the currently accepted first-line regimens and addresses some evolving areas of interest, if not controversy. PMID:26216822

  20. Cutaneous wound healing: Current concepts and advances in wound care

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Kenneth C; Guha, Somes Chandra

    2014-01-01

    A non-healing wound is defined as showing no measurable signs of healing for at least 30 consecutive treatments with standard wound care.[1] It is a snapshot of a patient's total health as well as the ongoing battle between noxious factors and the restoration of optimal macro and micro circulation, oxygenation and nutrition. In practice, standard therapies for non-healing cutaneous wounds include application of appropriate dressings, periodic debridement and eliminating causative factors.[2] The vast majority of wounds would heal by such approach with variable degrees of residual morbidity, disability and even mortality. Globally, beyond the above therapies, newer tools of healing are selectively accessible to caregivers, for various logistical or financial reasons. Our review will focus on the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT), as used at our institution (CAMC), and some other modalities that are relatively accessible to patients. HBOT is a relatively safe and technologically simpler way to deliver care worldwide. However, the expense for including HBOT as standard of care for recognized indications per UHMS(Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society) may vary widely from country to country and payment system.[3] In the USA, CMS (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services) approved indications for HBOT vary from that of the UHMS for logistical reasons.[1] We shall also briefly look into other newer therapies per current clinical usage and general acceptance by the medical community. Admittedly, there would be other novel tools with variable success in wound healing worldwide, but it would be difficult to include all in this treatise. PMID:25593414

  1. Viral encephalitis: current treatments and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Renan Barros

    2012-12-01

    Several viruses may cause central nervous system infections that lead to a broad range of clinical manifestations. The course of the viral encephalitis can be acute, sub acute, or chronic. Some viruses have the ability to enter into the brain and cause direct injury, while others activate inflammatory cells that attack the central nervous system (CNS) secondarily. Some types of viral encephalitis occur in previously healthy individuals, while others affect immunocompromised patients. The epidemiology of viral encephalitis has undergone changes in recent years. Factors such as evolving lifestyles and ecological changes have had a considerable impact on the epidemiology of some types of viral encephalitis. The result is a change in the etiology spectrum of viral encephalitis, with new types of encephalitis arising or returning from time to time. Many scientific achievements in neuroimaging, molecular diagnosis, antiviral therapy, immunomodulatory treatments, and neurointensive care have allowed more precise and earlier diagnoses and more efficient treatments, resulting in improved outcomes. Despite these advances, there is still considerable morbidity and mortality related to these disorders. This aim of this article is to review the current knowledge of the current drugs used in the management of the most important viral encephalitis, focusing on the mechanisms of action, efficacy, and side effects of the drugs. In addition, future perspectives in this area will be addressed. Despite the technological advances, much effort has yet to be undertaken to reduce the impact of these potentially devastating diseases. PMID:22640219

  2. The current treatment of Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Arleo, Andrea; Mangia, Alessandra

    2016-06-01

    The development of potent antivirals able to directly block multiple step of viral lifecycle (DAAs) led to a revolution in HCV treatment. These compounds are associated with unprecedent high rates of SVR and can be administered orally, regardless of the severity of the associated liver disease, allowing treatment of large number of HCV infected patients. Three main classes of DAAs are currently available, NS3/4 inhibitors, NS5A inhibitors and NS5B inhibitors. They can be combined according to 2 different strategies, the use of a backbone drug with high barrier of resistance as the NS5B inhibitor sofosbuvir, with the addition of a second drug either NS3/4 or NS5A, or the use of more than 1 drug from different classes to simultaneously attack the virus at different sequence sites. DAAs can be administered for 12 or 24 weeks in the majority of patients, although attempts to reduce to 6-8 weeks the treatment duration in patients with baseline favorable characteristics are ongoing. Overall, SVR rates ensured by the currently approved combinations, are 90% or higher. Although cirrhotic patients and in particular patients with decompensated disease may represent a difficult to cure group, data from real life confirm evidence derived from phase III studies, showing improvement in biochemical parameters, even in such a special populations. We can expect, the number of patients with unmet medical needs will decline over time in the next 4 years. This review aims to discuss updated regimens by HCV genotype and to provide a brief summary of the coming strategies. PMID:26799657

  3. Current status in diabetic macular edema treatments.

    PubMed

    Romero-Aroca, Pedro

    2013-10-15

    Diabetes is a serious chronic condition, which increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases, kidney failure and nerve damage leading to amputation. Furthermore the ocular complications include diabetic macular edema, is the leading cause of blindness among adults in the industrialized countries. Today, blindness from diabetic macular edema is largely preventable with timely detection and appropriate interventional therapy. The treatment should include an optimized control of glycemia, arterial tension, lipids and renal status. The photocoagulation laser is currently restricted to focal macular edema in some countries, but due the high cost of intravitreal drugs, the use of laser treatment for focal and diffuse diabetic macular edema (DME), can be valid as gold standard in many countries. The intravitreal anti vascular endothelial growth factor drugs (ranibizumab and bevacizumab), are indicated in the treatment of all types of DME, but the correct protocol for administration should be defined for the different Retina Scientific Societies. The corticosteroids for diffuse DME, has a place in pseudophakic patients, but its complications restricted the use of these drugs for some patients. Finally the intravitreal interface plays an important role and its exploration is mandatory in all DME patients. PMID:24147200

  4. Science Teachers' Alternate Conceptions about Direct-Currents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardhan, Harcharan; Bano, Yasmeen

    2001-01-01

    Reports on a qualitative research study on electricity carried out in 1998 on alternative conceptions (ACs) held by a select group of middle school teachers. The study was designed to identify the nature and origin of the ACs of these teachers and relate them to other similar studies carried out by other researchers. (Contains 27 references.)…

  5. Some Current Concepts, Techniques, and Recent Findings in Urban Geography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getis, Arthur; Getis, Judith

    1972-01-01

    The question, Are there good reasons to teach urban geography to secondary and college students?'' is answered positively by briefly exploring (1) the concepts of wave theory analog, the critical isochrone, filtering, and equifinality; (2) the techniques of analysis of computer mapping, probabiltiy, models, and remote sensing; and (3) some recent…

  6. Medicalization: Current Concept and Future Directions in a Bionic Society

    PubMed Central

    Maturo, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The article illustrates the main features of the concept of medicalization, starting from its theoretical roots. Although it is the process of extending the medical gaze on human conditions, it appears that medicalization cannot be strictly connected to medical imperialism anymore. Other “engines” of medicalization are influential: consumers, biotechnology and managed care. The growth of research and theoretical reflections on medicalization has led to the proposal of other parallel concepts like pharmaceuticalization, genetization and biomedicalization. These new theoretical tools could be useful in the analysis of human enhancement. Human enhancement can be considered as the use of biomedical technology to improve performance on a human being who is not in need of a cure: a practice that is increasingly spreading in what might be defined as a “bionic society”. PMID:22654387

  7. Medicalization: current concept and future directions in a bionic society.

    PubMed

    Maturo, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The article illustrates the main features of the concept of medicalization, starting from its theoretical roots. Although it is the process of extending the medical gaze on human conditions, it appears that medicalization cannot be strictly connected to medical imperialism anymore. Other "engines" of medicalization are influential: consumers, biotechnology and managed care. The growth of research and theoretical reflections on medicalization has led to the proposal of other parallel concepts like pharmaceuticalization, genetization and biomedicalization. These new theoretical tools could be useful in the analysis of human enhancement. Human enhancement can be considered as the use of biomedical technology to improve performance on a human being who is not in need of a cure: a practice that is increasingly spreading in what might be defined as a "bionic society". PMID:22654387

  8. Current concepts in the diagnosis and management of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Guttman, Mark; Kish, Stephen J.; Furukawa, Yoshiaki

    2003-01-01

    PARKINSON'S DISEASE IS A PROGRESSIVE NEUROLOGICAL disorder characterized by rest tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity and postural instability. The cause is unknown, but growing evidence suggests that it may be due to a combination of environmental and genetic factors. Treatment during the early stage of Parkinson's disease has evolved, and evidence suggests that dopamine agonist monotherapy may prevent the response fluctuations that are associated with disease progression. L-dopa therapy, however, remains the most efficacious treatment. Treatment during the advanced stage focuses on improving control of a number of specific clinical problems. Successful management of motor response fluctuations (e.g., “wearing off,” on–off fluctuations, nighttime deterioration, early morning deterioration and dyskinesias) and of psychiatric problems is often possible with specific treatment strategies. Surgical treatment is an option for a defined patient population. PMID:12566335

  9. MCL Injuries of the Knee: Current Concepts Review

    PubMed Central

    Phisitkul, Phinit; James, Stan L; Wolf, Brian R; Amendola, Annunziato

    2006-01-01

    Medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury is one of the most common knee injuries, especially in young athletic patients. Most MCL injuries can be managed conservatively with good results. However, a complete understanding of knee anatomy and the involved structures is necessary to make intelligent treatment decisions. We will review the anatomy and biomechanics of the MCL, classification systems for MCL injuries, and operative and nonoperative treatment for acute and chronic MCL injuries. PMID:16789454

  10. Evaluation of a Salutogenetic Concept for Inpatient Psychosomatic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Loew, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The increase of psychosomatic disorders due to cultural changes requires enhanced therapeutic models. This study investigated a salutogenetic treatment concept for inpatient psychosomatic treatment, based on data from more than 11000 patients of a psychosomatic clinic in Germany. The clinic aims at supporting patients' health improvement by fostering values such as humanity, community, and mindfulness. Most of patients found these values realized in the clinical environment. Self-assessment questionnaires addressing physical and mental health as well as symptom ratings were available for analysis of pre-post-treatment effects and long-term stability using one-year follow-up data, as well as for a comparison with other clinics. With respect to different diagnoses, symptoms improved in self-ratings with average effect sizes between 0.60 and 0.98. About 80% of positive changes could be sustained as determined in a 1-year follow-up survey. Patients with a lower concordance with the values of the clinic showed less health improvement. Compared to 14 other German psychosomatic clinics, the investigated treatment concept resulted in slightly higher decrease in symptoms (e.g., depression scale) and a higher self-rated mental and physical improvement in health. The data suggest that a successfully implemented salutogenetic clinical treatment concept not only has positive influence on treatment effects but also provides long-term stability. PMID:24159352

  11. Pediatric craniofacial surgery for craniosynostosis: Our experience and current concepts: Part -1

    PubMed Central

    Anantheswar, Y. N.; Venkataramana, N. K.

    2009-01-01

    Craniostenosis is a disease characterized by untimely fusion of cranial sutures resulting in a variety of craniofacial deformities and neurological sequelae due to alteration in cranial volume and restriction of brain growth. This involves vault sutures predominantly, but cranial base is not immune. Association with a variety of syndromes makes the management decision complex. These children need careful evaluation by multiple specialists to have strategic treatment options. Parental counseling is an important and integral part of the treatment. Recent advancements in the surgical techniques and concept of team approach have significantly enhanced the safety and outcome of these children. We had an opportunity of treating 57 children with craniostenosis in the last 15 years at our craniofacial service. Out of them, 40 were nonsyndromic and 17 were syndromic variety. We describe our successful results along with individualized operative technical modifications adopted based on the current understanding of the disease. PMID:21887189

  12. Current Concepts in Primary Biliary Cirrhosis and Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Sclair, Seth N; Little, Ester; Levy, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are chronic, cholestatic diseases of the liver with common clinical manifestations. Early diagnosis and treatment of PBC slows progression and decreases the need for transplant. However, one-third of patients will progress regardless of treatment. Bilirubin <1.0 and alkaline phosphatase <2.0 x the upper limit of normal at 1 year after treatment appear to predict 10-year survival. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is the recommended treatment for PBC, and recent studies with obeticholic acid showed promising results for UDCA non-responders. Unlike PBC, no therapy has been shown to alter the natural history of PSC. The recommended initial diagnostic test for PSC is magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, typically showing bile duct wall thickening, focal bile duct dilatation, and saccular dilatation of the intra- and/or extrahepatic bile ducts. Immunoglobulin 4-associated cholangitis must be excluded when considering the diagnosis of PSC, to allow for proper treatment, and monitoring of disease progression. In addition to the lack of therapy, PSC is a pre-malignant condition and close surveillance is indicated. PMID:26312413

  13. Current and future treatment of amyloid diseases.

    PubMed

    Ankarcrona, M; Winblad, B; Monteiro, C; Fearns, C; Powers, E T; Johansson, J; Westermark, G T; Presto, J; Ericzon, B-G; Kelly, J W

    2016-08-01

    There are more than 30 human proteins whose aggregation appears to cause degenerative maladies referred to as amyloid diseases or amyloidoses. These disorders are named after the characteristic cross-β-sheet amyloid fibrils that accumulate systemically or are localized to specific organs. In most cases, current treatment is limited to symptomatic approaches and thus disease-modifying therapies are needed. Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder with extracellular amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) fibrils and intracellular tau neurofibrillary tangles as pathological hallmarks. Numerous clinical trials have been conducted with passive and active immunotherapy, and small molecules to inhibit Aβ formation and aggregation or to enhance Aβ clearance; so far such clinical trials have been unsuccessful. Novel strategies are therefore required and here we will discuss the possibility of utilizing the chaperone BRICHOS to prevent Aβ aggregation and toxicity. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is symptomatically treated with insulin. However, the underlying pathology is linked to the aggregation and progressive accumulation of islet amyloid polypeptide as fibrils and oligomers, which are cytotoxic. Several compounds have been shown to inhibit islet amyloid aggregation and cytotoxicity in vitro. Future animal studies and clinical trials have to be conducted to determine their efficacy in vivo. The transthyretin (TTR) amyloidoses are a group of systemic degenerative diseases compromising multiple organ systems, caused by TTR aggregation. Liver transplantation decreases the generation of misfolded TTR and improves the quality of life for a subgroup of this patient population. Compounds that stabilize the natively folded, nonamyloidogenic, tetrameric conformation of TTR have been developed and the drug tafamidis is available as a promising treatment. PMID:27165517

  14. Ayurvedic medicine. Core concept, therapeutic principles, and current relevance.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Arvind; Doiphode, Vijay V

    2002-01-01

    In the prebiblical Ayurvedic origins, every creation inclusive of a human being is a model of the universe. In this model, the basic matter and the dynamic forces (Dosha) of the nature determine health and disease, and the medicinal value of any substance (plant and mineral). The Ayurvedic practices (chiefly that of diet, life style, and the Panchkarama) aim to maintain the Dosha equilibrium. Despite a holistic approach aimed to cure disease, therapy is customized to the individual's constitution (Prakruti). Numerous Ayurvedic medicines (plant derived in particular) have been tested for their biological (especially immunomodulation) and clinical potential using modern ethnovalidation, and thereby setting an interface with modern medicine. To understand Ayurvedic medicine, it would be necessary to first understand the origin, basic concept and principles of Ayurveda. PMID:11795092

  15. Myopic choroidal neovascularisation: current concepts and update on clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Tien Y; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko; Leveziel, Nicolas; Holz, Frank G; Lai, Timothy Y; Yu, Hyeong Gon; Lanzetta, Paolo; Chen, Youxin; Tufail, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) is a common vision-threatening complication of myopia and pathological myopia. Despite significant advances in understanding the epidemiology, pathogenesis and natural history of myopic CNV, there is no standard definition of myopic CNV and its relationship to axial length and other myopic degenerative changes. Several treatments are available to ophthalmologists, but with the advent of new therapies there is a need for further consensus and clinical management recommendations. Verteporfin photodynamic therapy has been an established treatment for subfoveal myopic CNV for many years, but this treatment does not restore visual acuity and is associated with long-term chorioretinal atrophy. More recently, clinical trials investigating the efficacy and safety of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents in patients with myopic CNV have demonstrated substantial visual acuity gains and quality of life increases compared with photodynamic therapy. These enhanced outcomes provide updated evidence-based clinical management guidelines of myopic CNV, and increase the need for a generally accepted definition for myopic CNV. This review critically summarises the latest myopic CNV literature in the context of clinical experience and recommends a myopic CNV treatment algorithm. PMID:24990871

  16. Myopic choroidal neovascularisation: current concepts and update on clinical management.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tien Y; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko; Leveziel, Nicolas; Holz, Frank G; Lai, Timothy Y; Yu, Hyeong Gon; Lanzetta, Paolo; Chen, Youxin; Tufail, Adnan

    2015-03-01

    Choroidal neovascularisation (CNV) is a common vision-threatening complication of myopia and pathological myopia. Despite significant advances in understanding the epidemiology, pathogenesis and natural history of myopic CNV, there is no standard definition of myopic CNV and its relationship to axial length and other myopic degenerative changes. Several treatments are available to ophthalmologists, but with the advent of new therapies there is a need for further consensus and clinical management recommendations. Verteporfin photodynamic therapy has been an established treatment for subfoveal myopic CNV for many years, but this treatment does not restore visual acuity and is associated with long-term chorioretinal atrophy. More recently, clinical trials investigating the efficacy and safety of anti-vascular endothelial growth factor agents in patients with myopic CNV have demonstrated substantial visual acuity gains and quality of life increases compared with photodynamic therapy. These enhanced outcomes provide updated evidence-based clinical management guidelines of myopic CNV, and increase the need for a generally accepted definition for myopic CNV. This review critically summarises the latest myopic CNV literature in the context of clinical experience and recommends a myopic CNV treatment algorithm. PMID:24990871

  17. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN MANAGEMENT OF ORAL CANCER – SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jatin P.; Gil, Ziv

    2014-01-01

    Oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, with a high prevalence in South Asia. Tobacco and alcohol consumption remain the most dominant etiologic factors, however HPV has been recently implicated in oral cancer. Surgery is the most well established mode of initial definitive treatment for a majority of oral cancers. The factors that affect choice of treatment are related to the tumor and the patient. Primary site, location, size, proximity to bone, and depth of infiltration are factors which influence a particular surgical approach. Tumors that approach or involve the mandible require specific understanding of the mechanism of bone involvement. This facilitates the employment of mandible sparing approaches such as marginal mandibulectomy and mandibulotomy. Reconstruction of major surgical defects in the oral cavity requires use of a free flap. The radial forearm free flap provides excellent soft tissue and lining for soft tissue defects in the oral cavity. The fibula free flap remains the choice for mandibular reconstruction. Over the course of the past thirty years there has been improvement in the overall survival of patients with oral carcinoma largely due to the improved understanding of the biology of local progression, early identification and treatment of metastatic lymph nodes in the neck, and employment of adjuvant postoperative radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. The role of surgery in primary squamous cell carcinomas in other sites in the head and neck has evolved with integration of multidisciplinary treatment approaches employing chemotherapy and radiotherapy either sequentially or concurrently. Thus, larynx preservation with concurrent chemoradiotherapy has become the standard of care for locally advanced carcinomas of the larynx or pharynx requiring total laryngectomy. On the other hand, for early staged tumors of the larynx and pharynx, transoral laser microsurgery has become an effective means of local control of these lesions

  18. Radionuclide liver cancer therapies: from concept to current clinical status.

    PubMed

    Vente, Maarten A D; Hobbelink, Monique G G; van Het Schip, Alfred D; Zonnenberg, Bernard A; Nijsen, Johannes F W

    2007-07-01

    Primary and secondary liver cancer have longtime been characterized by an overall poor prognosis since the majority of patients are not candidates for surgical resection with curative intent, systemic chemotherapy alone has rarely resulted in long-term survival, and the role of conventional external beam radiation therapy has traditionally been limited due to the relative sensitivity of the liver parenchyma to radiation. Therefore, a host of new treatment options have been developed and clinically introduced, including radioembolization techniques, which are the main topic of this paper. In these locoregional treatments liver malignancies are passively targeted because, unlike the normal liver, the blood supply of intrahepatic tumors is almost uniquely derived from the hepatic artery. These internal radiation techniques consist of injecting either yttrium-90 ((90)Y) microspheres, or iodine-131 ((131)I) or rhenium-188 ((188)Re) labeled lipiodol into the hepatic artery. Radioactive lipiodol is used exclusively for treatment of primary liver cancer, whereas (90)Y microsphere therapy is applied for treatment of both primary and metastatic liver cancers. Favorable clinical results have been achieved, particularly when (90)Y microspheres were used in conjunction with systemic chemotherapy. The main advantages of radiolabeled lipiodol treatment are that it is relatively inexpensive (especially (188)Re-HDD-lipiodol) and that the administration procedure is somewhat less complex than that of the microspheres. Holmium-166 ((166)Ho) loaded poly(L-lactic acid) microspheres have also been developed and are about to be clinically introduced. Since (166)Ho is a combined beta-gamma emitter and highly paramagnetic as well, it allows for both (quantitative) scintigraphic and magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:17630919

  19. LLNL current meter array--concept and system description

    SciTech Connect

    Mantrom, D.D.

    1994-11-15

    A measurement capability using a horizontal array of 10 S4 current meters mounted on a stiff floating structure with 35 m aperture has been developed to support interpretation of radar imaging of surface effects associated with internal waves. This system has been fielded three times and most recently, has collected data alongside the sea-surface footprint of a land-fixed radar imaging ship-generated internal waves. The underlying need for this measurement capability is described. The specifications resulting from this need are presented and the engineering design and deployment procedures of the platform and systems that resulted are described The current meter data are multiplexed along with meteorological and system status data on board the floating platform and are telemetered to a shore station and on to a data acquisition system. The raw data are recorded, and are then processed to form space-time images of current and strain rate (a spatial derivative of the current field). Examples of raw and processed data associated with ship-generated internal waves are presented.

  20. Current sensing for navigated electrosurgery: proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, K.; Lasso, A.; Ungi, T.; Morin, E.; Fichtinger, G.

    2016-03-01

    PURPOSE: Tracked power-tools are routinely used in computer-assisted intervention and surgical systems. In order to properly perform temporal and spatial monitoring of the tracked tool with the navigation system, it is important to know when the tool, such as an electrosurgical cauterizer, is being activated during surgery. We have developed a general purpose current sensor that can be augmented to tracked surgical devices in order to inform the surgeon and the navigation system when the tool is activated. METHODS: Two non-invasive AC current sensors, two peak detector circuits, one voltage comparator circuit, and a microcontroller were used to detect when an electrosurgical cauterizer is being powered on and differentiate between the cut and coagulation modes. The system was tested by cauterizing various substances at varied power ratings. RESULTS: By comparing the ratio of amplitudes as well as the frequencies of the signals, the current sensing system is able to differentiate between on/off, cut/coagulation, as well as when cauterizer tissue. DISCUSSION: The current sensing system is able to detect when the cauterizer is being powered on and can differentiate between monopolar cut and coagulation modes. CONCLUSION: This system shows promise for detecting when the cauterizer is being powered on and in the future could be integrated with a navigation system in order to easily temporally monitor the electrosurgical tool.

  1. Lactic Acidosis: Current Treatments and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Kraut, Jeffrey A; Madias, Nicolaos E

    2016-09-01

    Mortality rates associated with severe lactic acidosis (blood pH<7.2) due to sepsis or low-flow states are high. Eliminating the triggering conditions remains the most effective therapy. Although recommended by some, administration of sodium bicarbonate does not improve cardiovascular function or reduce mortality. This failure has been attributed to both reduction in serum calcium concentration and generation of excess carbon dioxide with intracellular acidification. In animal studies, hyperventilation and infusion of calcium during sodium bicarbonate administration improves cardiovascular function, suggesting that this approach could allow expression of the positive aspects of sodium bicarbonate. Other buffers, such as THAM or Carbicarb, or dialysis might also provide base with fewer untoward effects. Examination of these therapies in humans is warranted. The cellular injury associated with lactic acidosis is partly due to activation of NHE1, a cell-membrane Na(+)/H(+) exchanger. In animal studies, selective NHE1 inhibitors improve cardiovascular function, ameliorate lactic acidosis, and reduce mortality, supporting future research into their possible use in humans. Two main mechanisms contribute to lactic acid accumulation in sepsis and low-flow states: tissue hypoxia and epinephrine-induced stimulation of aerobic glycolysis. Targeting these mechanisms could allow for more specific therapy. This Acid-Base and Electrolyte Teaching Case presents a patient with acute lactic acidosis and describes current and future approaches to treatment. PMID:27291485

  2. Halitosis: Current concepts on etiology, diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Uditi; Sharma, Gaurav; Juneja, Manish; Nagpal, Archna

    2016-01-01

    Halitosis or oral malodor is an offensive odor originating from the oral cavity, leading to anxiety and psychosocial embarrassment. A patient with halitosis is most likely to contact primary care practitioner for the diagnosis and management. With proper diagnosis, identification of the etiology and timely referrals certain steps are taken to create a successful individualized therapeutic approach for each patient seeking assistance. It is significant to highlight the necessity of an interdisciplinary method for the treatment of halitosis to prevent misdiagnosis or unnecessary treatment. The literature on halitosis, especially with randomized clinical trials, is scarce and additional studies are required. This article succinctly focuses on the development of a systematic flow of events to come to the best management of the halitosis from the primary care practitioner's point of view. PMID:27095913

  3. Halitosis: Current concepts on etiology, diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Uditi; Sharma, Gaurav; Juneja, Manish; Nagpal, Archna

    2016-01-01

    Halitosis or oral malodor is an offensive odor originating from the oral cavity, leading to anxiety and psychosocial embarrassment. A patient with halitosis is most likely to contact primary care practitioner for the diagnosis and management. With proper diagnosis, identification of the etiology and timely referrals certain steps are taken to create a successful individualized therapeutic approach for each patient seeking assistance. It is significant to highlight the necessity of an interdisciplinary method for the treatment of halitosis to prevent misdiagnosis or unnecessary treatment. The literature on halitosis, especially with randomized clinical trials, is scarce and additional studies are required. This article succinctly focuses on the development of a systematic flow of events to come to the best management of the halitosis from the primary care practitioner's point of view. PMID:27095913

  4. Hip replacement in femoral head osteonecrosis: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Scaglione, Michelangelo; Fabbri, Luca; Celli, Fabio; Casella, Francesco; Guido, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteonecrosis of the femoral head is a destructive disease that usually affects young adults with high functional demands and can have devastating effects on hip joint. The treatment depends on extent and location of the necrosis lesion and on patient’s factors, that suggest disease progression, collapse probability and also implants survival. Non-idiopathic osteonecrosis patients had the worst outcome. There is not a gold standard treatment and frequently it is necessary a multidisciplinary approach. Preservation procedures of the femoral head are the first choice and can be attempted in younger patients without head collapse. Replacement procedure remains the main treatment after failure of preserving procedures and in the late-stage ONFH, involving collapse of the femoral head and degenerative changes to the acetabulum. Resurfacing procedure still has good results but the patient selection is a critical factor. Total hip arthroplasties had historically poor results in patients with osteonecrosis. More recently, reports have shown excellent results, but implant longevity and following revisions are still outstanding problems. PMID:27134633

  5. Acute kidney injury: current concepts and new insights

    PubMed Central

    Koza, Yavuzer

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Acute kidney injury, which was previously named as acute renal failure, is a complex clinical disorder and continues to be associated with poor outcomes. It is frequently seen in hospitalized patients, especially in critically ill patients. The primary causes of acute kidney injury are divided into three categories: prerenal, intrinsic renal and postrenal. The definition and staging of acute kidney injury are mainly based on the risk, injury, failure, loss, end-stage kidney disease (RIFLE) criteria and the acute kidney injury network (AKIN) criteria, which have previously been defined. However the clinical utility of these criteria is still uncertain. Several biomarkers such as Cystatin C and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin have been suggested for the diagnosis, severity classification and most importantly, the modification of outcome in acute kidney injury. Methods: Current literature on the definition, biomarkers, management and epidemiology of acute kidney injury was reviewed by searching keywords in Medline and PubMed databases. Results: The epidemiology, pathophysiology and diagnosis of acute kidney injury were discussed. The clinical implications of novel biomarkers and management of acute kidney injury were also discussed. Conclusions: The current definitions of acute kidney injury are based on the RIFLE, AKIN and KDIGO criteria. Although these criteria have been widely validated, some of limitations are still remain. Since acute kidney injury is common and harmful, all preventive measures should be taken to avoid its occurrence. Currently, there is no a definitive role for novel biomarkers. PMID:26804946

  6. Current concepts of blood-brain barrier development.

    PubMed

    Liebner, Stefan; Czupalla, Cathrin J; Wolburg, Hartwig

    2011-01-01

    Homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) microenvironment is essential for its normal function and is maintained by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The BBB proper is made up of endothelial cells (ECs) interconnected by tight junctions (TJs) that reveal a unique morphology and biochemical composition of the body's vasculature. In this article, we focus on developmental aspects of the BBB and describe morphological as well as molecular special features of the neuro-vascular unit (NVU) involved in barrier induction. Recently, we and others identified the Wnt/b-catenin pathway as crucial for brain angiogenesis, TJ and BBB formation. Based on these findings we discuss other pathways and molecular interactions for BBB establishment and maintenance. At the morphological level, our concept favors a major role for polarized astrocytes (ACs) therein. Orthogonal arrays of particles (OAPs) that are the morphological correlate of the water channel protein aquaporin-4 (AQP4) are specifically formed in the membrane of the AC endfoot. The polarized AC endfoot and hence OAPs are dependent on agrin and dystroglycan, of which agrin is a developmentally regulated extracellular matrix (ECM) component. Understanding the mechanisms leading to BBB development will be key to the understanding of barrier maintenance that is crucial for, but frequently disturbed, in the diseased adult brain. PMID:21769778

  7. Current concepts in the management of rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation and joint destruction that causes significant morbidity and mortality. However, the combined use of methotrexate, a synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD), and biologic DMARD has revolutionized treatment of RA. Clinical remission is now realistic targets, achieved by a large proportion of RA patients, and rapid and appropriate induction of remission by intensive treatment with biological DMARD and methotrexate is prerequisite to halt joint damage and functional disabilities. However, biological DMARD is limited to intravenous or subcutaneous uses and orally available small but strong molecules have been developed. Oral administration of tofacitinib targeting the Janus kinase (JAK) is significantly effective than placebo in active patients with methotrexatenaïve, inadequately responsive to methotrexate or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-inhibitors. The efficacy was rapid and as strong as adalimumab, a TNF-inhibitor. Meanwhile, association of tofacitinib on carcinogenicity and malignancy is under debate and further investigation on post-marketing survey would be warranted. On the other hand, discontinuation of a biological DMARD without disease flare is our next goal and desirable from the standpoint of risk reduction and cost effectiveness, especially for patients with clinical remission. Recent reports indicate that more than half of early RA patients could discontinue TNF-targeted biological DMARD without clinical flare and functional impairment after obtaining clinical remission. Contrarily, for established RA, fewer patients sustained remission after the discontinuation of biological DMARD and “deep remission” at the discontinuation was a key factor to keep the treatment holiday of biological DMARD. PMID:26932398

  8. Current concepts in the management of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2016-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation and joint destruction that causes significant morbidity and mortality. However, the combined use of methotrexate, a synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD), and biologic DMARD has revolutionized treatment of RA. Clinical remission is now realistic targets, achieved by a large proportion of RA patients, and rapid and appropriate induction of remission by intensive treatment with biological DMARD and methotrexate is prerequisite to halt joint damage and functional disabilities. However, biological DMARD is limited to intravenous or subcutaneous uses and orally available small but strong molecules have been developed. Oral administration of tofacitinib targeting the Janus kinase (JAK) is significantly effective than placebo in active patients with methotrexatenaïve, inadequately responsive to methotrexate or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-inhibitors. The efficacy was rapid and as strong as adalimumab, a TNF-inhibitor. Meanwhile, association of tofacitinib on carcinogenicity and malignancy is under debate and further investigation on post-marketing survey would be warranted. On the other hand, discontinuation of a biological DMARD without disease flare is our next goal and desirable from the standpoint of risk reduction and cost effectiveness, especially for patients with clinical remission. Recent reports indicate that more than half of early RA patients could discontinue TNF-targeted biological DMARD without clinical flare and functional impairment after obtaining clinical remission. Contrarily, for established RA, fewer patients sustained remission after the discontinuation of biological DMARD and "deep remission" at the discontinuation was a key factor to keep the treatment holiday of biological DMARD. PMID:26932398

  9. Infection post-total knee replacement: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Alijanipour, Pouya; Parvizi, Javad

    2014-06-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection is a hot topic for investigation because it represents a challenging clinical problem with considerable burden for patients, institutions, and health systems. Despite our substantial knowledge, many details in prevention, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious complications following total knee arthroplasty remain to be controversial with the available evidence being insufficient and at times conflictive. This manuscript is an attempt to approach the most recently published literature regarding the aforementioned details and aims to provide the reader with an updated perspective in the management of periprosthetic joint infection of the knee. PMID:24706155

  10. Use of lasers in orthopedic surgery: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Abelow, S P

    1993-05-01

    A surgical laser is a new, multipurpose tool that can cut, coagulate, and vaporize tissues. It utilizes a low profile handpiece that allows easy access to tight places and small joints. The holmium laser at 2.1 microns wavelength is gaining wide acceptance among orthopedic surgeons as a useful arthroscopic surgical tool. It has a minimal amount of thermal necrosis and is able to cut and ablate tissues with great ease. Current investigation with laser tissue--agglutination and tissue welding--may make it possible to repair torn tissues with laser energy. The future will bring minimally invasive and minimally damaging laser orthopedic surgery. PMID:8327382

  11. Natural history of hepatocellular carcinoma and current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Raoul, Jean-Luc

    2008-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most frequent primary liver cancer and the most severe complication of chronic liver disease. The annual number of new cases worldwide is approximately 550,000, representing more than 5% of human cancers and is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths. The stages of the malignancy as well as the severity of the underlying liver disease are essential factors in planning the therapeutic approach. Curative treatment options are represented mainly by surgery (ie, resection or transplantation), but most patients are not candidates for a curative option, and only palliative treatment could be given to these patients. Among palliative treatments, only chemoembolization has been proven to be effective, but other options are currently being investigated. Major risk factors for HCC are well known and are dependent on the geographic area. In Europe, the United States, and Japan, the main risk factors are liver cirrhosis, hepatitis B and C virus, alcohol, and tobacco; in contrast, in Africa and Asia, these factors are hepatitis B and C virus, tobacco use, and aflatoxin exposure. Cirrhosis from any cause is a predisposing factor for HCC and could be considered as a premalignant condition. The present concept of carcinogenesis in HCC is a multistage process. This article describes the natural history of HCC and discusses the various treatment options available at present. PMID:18243838

  12. Current Status of Interventional Radiology Treatment of Infrapopliteal Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, T.; Uberoi, R.

    2013-06-15

    Treatment of infrapopliteal arteries has developed to a standard technique during the past two decades. With the introduction of innovative devices, a variety of techniques has been created and is still under investigation. Treatment options range from plain balloon angioplasty (POBA), all sorts of stent applications, such as bare metal, balloon expanding, self-expanding, coated and drug-eluting stents, and bio-absorbable stents, to latest developments, such as drug-eluting balloons. Regarding the scientific background, several prospective, randomized studies with relevant numbers of patients have been (or will be) published that are Level I evidence. In contrast to older studies, which primarily were based mostly on numeric parameters, such as diameters or residual stenoses, more recent study concepts focus increasingly on clinical features, such as amputation rate improvement or changes of clinical stages and quality of life standards. Although it is still not decided, which of the individual techniques might be the best one, we can definitely conclude that whatever treatment of infrapopliteal arteries will be used it is of substantial benefit for the patient. Therefore, the goal of this review is to give an overview about the current developments and techniques for the treatment of infrapopliteal arteries, to present clinical and technical results, to weigh individual techniques, and to discuss the recent developments.

  13. Management of achilles tendon injury: A current concepts systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Vivek; Jaggard, Matthew; Al-Nammari, Shafic Said; Uzoigwe, Chika; Gulati, Pooja; Ismail, Nizar; Gibbons, Charles; Gupte, Chinmay

    2015-01-01

    Achilles tendon rupture has been on the rise over recent years due to a variety of reasons. It is a debilitating injury with a protracted and sometimes incomplete recovery. Management strategy is a controversial topic and evidence supporting a definite approach is limited. Opinion is divided between surgical repair and conservative immobilisation in conjunction with functional orthoses. A systematic search of the literature was performed. Pubmed, Medline and EmBase databases were searched for Achilles tendon and a variety of synonymous terms. A recent wealth of reporting suggests that conservative regimens with early weight bearing or mobilisation have equivalent or improved rates of re-rupture to operative regimes. The application of dynamic ultrasound assessment of tendon gap may prove crucial in minimising re-rupture and improving outcomes. Studies employing functional assessments have found equivalent function between operative and conservative treatments. However, no specific tests in peak power, push off strength or athletic performance have been reported and whether an advantage in operative treatment exists remains undetermined. PMID:25992315

  14. Management of achilles tendon injury: A current concepts systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Vivek; Jaggard, Matthew; Al-Nammari, Shafic Said; Uzoigwe, Chika; Gulati, Pooja; Ismail, Nizar; Gibbons, Charles; Gupte, Chinmay

    2015-05-18

    Achilles tendon rupture has been on the rise over recent years due to a variety of reasons. It is a debilitating injury with a protracted and sometimes incomplete recovery. Management strategy is a controversial topic and evidence supporting a definite approach is limited. Opinion is divided between surgical repair and conservative immobilisation in conjunction with functional orthoses. A systematic search of the literature was performed. Pubmed, Medline and EmBase databases were searched for Achilles tendon and a variety of synonymous terms. A recent wealth of reporting suggests that conservative regimens with early weight bearing or mobilisation have equivalent or improved rates of re-rupture to operative regimes. The application of dynamic ultrasound assessment of tendon gap may prove crucial in minimising re-rupture and improving outcomes. Studies employing functional assessments have found equivalent function between operative and conservative treatments. However, no specific tests in peak power, push off strength or athletic performance have been reported and whether an advantage in operative treatment exists remains undetermined. PMID:25992315

  15. Current concepts and management approaches in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Attar, Bashar M; Van Thiel, David H

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common cause of liver dysfunction worldwide. NAFLD may progress to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and in turn cirrhosis. Importantly, hepatic cancer can occur in NASH in the absence of cirrhosis. The cardinal histologic feature of NAFLD is the presence of an excessive accumulation of triacylglycerols and diacylglycerols in hepatocytes. The presence of obesity and insulin resistance lead to an increased hepatic-free fatty acid (FFA) flux creating an environment appropriate for the development of NAFLD. The generation of toxic reactive oxygen species with the production of hepatic injury and inflammation as a consequence of FFA oxidation will ultimately lead to the initiation and progression of fibrosis. Lifestyle modifications specifically weight loss, physical exercise, and cognitive behavior therapy have been recommended as treatments for NASH. Dietary fructose is an independent risk factor for the development of NAFLD. Pioglitazone can be used to treat biopsy-proven NASH; however, its safety risks should be considered carefully. Greater consumption for coffee, independent of its caffeine component, has been associated with a significant reduced risk of advanced fibrosis in NASH. Additional data are needed before recommending bariatric surgery as an established option for the specific treatment of NASH. PMID:23576902

  16. Hepatic Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury and Trauma: Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Dimitrios; Siempis, Thomas; Theodorakou, Eleni; Tsoulfas, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Context Ischemia-reperfusion injury is a fascinating topic which has drawn a lot of interest in the last several years. Hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury may occur in a variety of clinical situations. These include transplantation, liver resection, trauma, and vascular surgery. Evidence Acquisition The purpose of this review was to outline the molecular mechanisms underlying hepatic I/R injury and present the latest approaches, both surgical and pharmacological, regarding the prevention of it. A comprehensive electronic literature search in MEDLINE/PubMed was performed to identify relative articles published within the last 2 years. Results The basic mechanism of hepatic ischemia – reperfusion injury is one of blood deprivation during ischemia, followed by the return of flow during reperfusion. It involves a complex series of events, such as mitochondrial deenergization, adenosine-5'-triphosphate depletion, alterations of electrolyte homeostasis, as well as Kupffer cell activation, oxidative stress changes and upregulation of proinflammatory cytokine signaling. The great number of variable pathways, with several mediators interacting with each other, leads to a high number of candidates for potential therapeutic intervention. As far as surgical approaches are concerned, the modification of existing clamping techniques and the ischemic preconditioning are the most promising techniques till recently. In the search for novel techniques of protecting against hepatic ischemia reperfusion injury, many different strategies have been used in experimental models. The biggest part of this research lies around antioxidant therapy, but other potential solutions have been explored as well. Conclusions The management of hepatic trauma, in spite of the fact that it has become increasingly nonoperative, there still remains the possibility of hepatic resection in the hepatic trauma setting, especially in severe injuries. Hence, clinicians should be familiar with the concept of

  17. [Headache. Current status of research and treatment].

    PubMed

    Straube, A; Gaul, C

    2015-10-01

    The starting point for German headache research and clinical education was the engagement of D. Soyka in the 1970s, which enabled the foundation of the German Headache Society (DMKG) on 28 June 1979 and, some years later, the founding congress of the International Headache Society (IHS) in Munich 1982. As a result of these activities, in 1988 the first international classification of headache disorders was published. This classification was one of the major milestones in the development of basic as well as clinical headache research. In the following years, epidemiological studies all over the world showed a 1-year prevalence for headache of approximately 60%, making headaches one of the most frequent medical complaints. Basic research showed an involvement of serotonergic mechanisms in migraine pain and triptans were one of the first drugs designed to influence these mechanisms. Functional brain imaging studies in migraine patients further showed a cyclic modulation of the activity of brainstem areas independent of the current pain state. Various research groups were involved in the clarification of the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in migraine and cluster headache. A specific development in the German headache scene is the establishment of integrated headache centers and reflects the primarily multimodal treatment approach in Germany which contrasts with the settings in other countries. These successful developments are increasingly being undermined by the fact that the low financial support of headache research, for example, by the German science council is causing a decreasing interest in headache research, with the consequence that the clinical education of students as well as young medical doctors shows increasing deficits. The consequence for the future will be a deficit in the clinical care of the population. PMID:26264901

  18. Current concepts and prospects of herbal nutraceutical: A review.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Baby; Kumar, Gopal; Kalam, Nazia; Ansari, Shahid H

    2013-01-01

    Nutraceuticals are food or part of food that provides medical or health benefits including the prevention and/or treatment of a disease. Nutraceutical has advantage over the medicine because they avoid side effect, have naturally dietary supplement, etc. Nutraceutical; on the basis of their natural source, chemical grouping, categories into three key terms -nutrients, herbals, dietary supplements, dietary fiber, etc. The most rapidly growing segments of the industry were dietary supplements (19.5 percent per year) and natural/herbal products (11.6 percent per year). Global nutraceutical market is estimated as USD 117 billion. FDA regulated dietary supplements as foods to ensure that they were safe. In 2006, the Indian government passed Food Safety and Standard Act to regulate the nutraceutical industry. Herbal nutraceutical is used as a powerful instrument in maintaining health and to act against nutritionally induced acute and chronic diseases, thereby promoting optimal health, longevity, and quality of life. PMID:23662276

  19. Scapholunate instability: current concepts in diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Kitay, Alison; Wolfe, Scott W

    2012-10-01

    Injuries to the scapholunate joint are the most frequent cause of carpal instability and account for a considerable degree of wrist dysfunction, lost time from work, and interference with activities. Although it is insufficient to cause abnormal carpal posture or collapse on static radiographs, an isolated injury to the scapholunate interosseous ligament may be the harbinger of a relentless progression to abnormal joint mechanics, cartilage wear, and degenerative changes. Intervention for scapholunate instability is aimed at arresting the degenerative process by restoring ligament continuity and normalizing carpal kinematics. In this review, we discuss the anatomy, kinematics, and biomechanical properties of the scapholunate articulation and provide a foundation for understanding the spectrum of scapholunate ligament instability. We propose an algorithm for treatment based on the stage of injury and the degree of secondary ligamentous damage and arthritic change. PMID:23021178

  20. Comorbidities of epilepsy: current concepts and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Keezer, Mark R; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Sander, Josemir W

    2016-01-01

    The burden of comorbidity in people with epilepsy is high. Several diseases, including depression, anxiety, dementia, migraine, heart disease, peptic ulcers, and arthritis are up to eight times more common in people with epilepsy than in the general population. Several mechanisms explain how epilepsy and comorbidities are associated, including shared risk factors and bidirectional relations. There is a pressing need for new and validated screening instruments and guidelines to help with the early detection and treatment of comorbid conditions. Preliminary evidence suggests that some conditions, such as depression and migraine, negatively affect seizure outcome and quality of life. Further investigation is needed to explore these relations and the effects of targeted interventions. Future advances in the investigation of the comorbidities of epilepsy will strengthen our understanding of epilepsy and could play an important part in stratification for genetic studies. PMID:26549780

  1. Current concepts in psoriatic arthritis: pathogenesis and management.

    PubMed

    de Vlam, Kurt; Gottlieb, Alice B; Mease, Philip J

    2014-11-01

    Psoriatic arthritis occurs in a subset of psoriasis patients and is therefore commonly encountered in dermatology practice. Although its exact pathogenesis is unknown, psoriatic arthritis is thought to share common mechanisms with psoriatic skin symptoms. Innate and adaptive immune responses are abnormally activated in psoriasis and may acquire the ability to attack peripheral joints and other sites following an environmental trigger (e.g. mechanical stress, trauma, infection) in genetically susceptible patients. The increased cardiovascular risk inherent in psoriasis appears further enhanced in psoriatic arthritis, likely reflecting the overall burden of systemic inflammation contributing to atherogenic processes. Basic research and clinical trials have suggested that tumour necrosis factor is important in psoriatic arthritis pathophysiology, and accumulating evidence suggests that Th17 cells and interleukin-17A may also be important. Basic research and clinical trials inform our understanding of psoriatic arthritis pathophysiology and, in turn, help dermatologists to make better treatment decisions. PMID:24573106

  2. Current Concepts in Osteoradionecrosis after Head and Neck Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dhanda, J; Pasquier, D; Newman, L; Shaw, R

    2016-07-01

    Osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the jaws is a feared complication of head and neck radiotherapy. ORN causes significant morbidity for patients and controversy among clinicians. This overview considers the variations in definition and classification of the condition that affect estimates of incidence and also the interpretation of evidence. The influence of newer radiotherapy techniques in reducing ORN through reduced dose and xerostomia is balanced against a probable increase in a vulnerable population through a rising head and neck cancer incidence. Theories of pathophysiology of ORN include radiation-induced osteomyelitis, hypoxic and hypovascular theory and fibroatrophic theory. Prevention strategies include restorative dentistry and radiation planning techniques. Treatments range from conservative 'watch and wait' through to more radical surgical strategies. Newer medical management strategies are available with a limited evidence base. The use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy remains controversial and the background and need for newer hyperbaric oxygen trials is discussed. PMID:27038708

  3. Current concepts and prospects of herbal nutraceutical: A review

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Baby; Kumar, Gopal; Kalam, Nazia; Ansari, Shahid H.

    2013-01-01

    Nutraceuticals are food or part of food that provides medical or health benefits including the prevention and/or treatment of a disease. Nutraceutical has advantage over the medicine because they avoid side effect, have naturally dietary supplement, etc. Nutraceutical; on the basis of their natural source, chemical grouping, categories into three key terms -nutrients, herbals, dietary supplements, dietary fiber, etc. The most rapidly growing segments of the industry were dietary supplements (19.5 percent per year) and natural/herbal products (11.6 percent per year). Global nutraceutical market is estimated as USD 117 billion. FDA regulated dietary supplements as foods to ensure that they were safe. In 2006, the Indian government passed Food Safety and Standard Act to regulate the nutraceutical industry. Herbal nutraceutical is used as a powerful instrument in maintaining health and to act against nutritionally induced acute and chronic diseases, thereby promoting optimal health, longevity, and quality of life. PMID:23662276

  4. Biomechanics of Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty: 
Current Concepts.

    PubMed

    Lorenzetti, Adam J; Stone, Geoffrey P; Simon, Peter; Frankle, Mark A

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of reverse shoulder arthroplasty has provided surgeons with new solutions for many complex shoulder problems. A primary goal of orthopaedics is the restoration or re-creation of functional anatomy to reduce pain and improve function, which can be accomplished by either repairing injured structures or replacing them as anatomically as possible. If reconstructible tissue is lacking or not available, which is seen in patients who have complex shoulder conditions such as an irreparable rotator cuff-deficient shoulder, cuff tear arthropathy, or severe glenoid bone loss, substantial problems may arise. Historically, hemiarthroplasty or glenoid grafting with total shoulder arthroplasty yielded inconsistent and unsatisfactory results. Underlying pathologies in patients who have an irreparable rotator cuff-deficient shoulder, cuff tear arthropathy, or severe glenoid bone loss can considerably alter the mechanical function of the shoulder and create treatment dilemmas that are difficult to overcome. A better biomechanical understanding of these pathologic adaptations has improved treatment options. In the past three decades, reverse total shoulder arthroplasty was developed to treat these complex shoulder conditions not by specifically re-creating the anatomy but by using the remaining functional tissue to improve shoulder balance. Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty has achieved reliable improvements in both pain and function. Initial implant designs lacked scientific evidence to support the design rationale, and many implants failed because surgeons did not completely understand the forces involved or the pathology being treated. Implant function and clinical results will continue to improve as surgeons' biomechanical understanding of shoulder disease and reverse shoulder arthroplasty implants increases. PMID:27049186

  5. Current concepts in the therapeutic management of osteoarthritis with glucosamine.

    PubMed

    Reginster, Jean-Yves; Bruyere, Olivier; Fraikin, Genevieve; Henrotin, Yves

    2005-01-01

    Over the last 10 years, several studies have investigated the ability of glucosamine sulfate to improve the symptoms (pain and function) and to delay the structural progression of osteoarthritis. There is now a large, convergent body of evidence that glucosamine sulfate, given at a daily oral dose of 1,500 mg, is able to significantly reduce the symptoms of osteoarthritis in the lower limbs and spine. This effect is usually seen with a minimal time for the onset of significant action - around 2 weeks. A similar dose of glucosamine sulfate has also been shown, in two independent studies, to prevent the joint space narrowing observed at the femorotibial compartment in patients with mild to moderate knee osteoarthritis. This effect, which is not affected by the radiographic technique used for the assessment of joint space width, also translated into a 50% reduction in the incidence of osteoarthritis-related surgery of the lower limbs during a 5-year period following the withdrawal of the treatment. There is a high degree of consistency in the literature showing that when glucosamine sulfate is used for the treatment of osteoarthritis, an efficacious response with minimum side effects can be expected. Since some discrepancies have been described between the results of studies performed with a patent-protected formulation of glucosamine sulfate distributed as a drug and those having used glucosamine preparations purchased from global suppliers, packaged, and sold over-the-counter as nutritional supplements (not regulated as drugs and with some potential issues concerning the reliability of their content), caution should be used when extrapolating conclusive results obtained with prescription drugs to over-the-counter or food supplements. PMID:16536216

  6. Current concepts of immunology and diagnosis in amniotic fluid embolism.

    PubMed

    Benson, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Amniotic fluid embolism (AFE) is one of the leading causes of maternal mortality and morbidity in developed countries. Current thinking about pathophysiology has shifted away from embolism toward a maternal immune response to the fetus. Two immunologic mechanisms have been studied to date. Anaphylaxis appears to be doubtful while the available evidence supports a role for complement activation. With the mechanism remaining to be elucidated, AFE remains a clinical diagnosis. It is diagnosed based on one or more of four key signs/symptoms: cardiovascular collapse, respiratory distress, coagulopathy, and/or coma/seizures. The only laboratory test that reliably supports the diagnosis is the finding of fetal material in the maternal pulmonary circulation at autopsy. Perhaps the most compelling mystery surrounding AFE is not why one in 20,000 parturients are afflicted, but rather how the vast majority of women can tolerate the foreign antigenic presence of their fetus both within their uterus and circulation? PMID:21969840

  7. Acute Compartment Syndrome of the Limbs: Current Concepts and Management

    PubMed Central

    Mabvuure, Nigel Tapiwa; Malahias, Marco; Hindocha, Sandip; Khan, Wasim; Juma, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Acute compartment syndrome (ACS) of the limb refers to a constellation of symptoms, which occur following a rise in the pressure inside a limb muscle compartment. A failure or delay in recognising ACS almost invariably results in adverse outcomes for patients. Unrecognised ACS can leave patients with nonviable limbs requiring amputation and can also be life–threatening. Several clinical features indicate ACS. Where diagnosis is unclear there are several techniques for measuring intracompartmental pressure described in this review. As early diagnosis and fasciotomy are known to be the best determinants of good outcomes, it is important that surgeons are aware of the features that make this diagnosis likely. This clinical review discusses current knowledge on the relevant clinical anatomy, aetiology, pathophysiology, risk factors, clinical features, diagnostic procedures and management of an acute presentation of compartment syndrome. PMID:23248724

  8. Vitamin D and assisted reproduction technologies: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence from animal and human studies suggests that vitamin D is involved in many functions of the human reproductive system in both genders, but no comprehensive analysis of the potential relationship between vitamin D status and Assisted Reproduction Technologies (ART) outcomes is currently available. On this basis, the purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to perform an in-depth evaluation of clinical studies assessing whether vitamin D status of patients undergoing ART could be related to cycle outcome variables. This issue is of interest considering that vitamin D deficiency is easily amenable to correction and oral vitamin D supplementation is cheap and without significant side effects. Surprisingly, no studies are currently available assessing vitamin D status among male partners of couples undergoing ART, while seven studies on vitamin D status of women undergoing controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH) for ART were found and included in the review. Results show that vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent among women undergoing COH, ranging from 21% to 31% across studies conducted in Western countries and reaching 75-99% in Iranian studies. Data on vitamin D deficiency (25-hydroxyvitamin D serum levels <20 ng/ml) in relation to ART outcomes could be extracted from three studies and included in the meta-analysis, yielding a common risk ratio (RR) of 0.89 (95% CI 0.53-1.49) and showing a lower but not statistically significant likelihood of clinical pregnancy for vitamin-D-deficient women compared with vitamin-D-sufficient patients. In conclusion, there is insufficient evidence to support the routine assessment of vitamin D status to predict the clinical pregnancy rate in couples undergoing ART. The partly conflicting results of the available studies, potentially explaining the lack of statistical significance for a negative influence of vitamin D deficiency on clinical pregnancy rate, are likely secondary to confounders

  9. Current concepts related to hypertrophic scarring in burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Ryan S; Borovikova, Anna A; King, Kassandra; Banyard, Derek A; Lalezari, Shadi; Toranto, Jason D; Paydar, Keyianoosh Z; Wirth, Garrett A; Evans, Gregory R D; Widgerow, Alan D

    2016-05-01

    Scarring following burn injury and its accompanying aesthetic and functional sequelae still pose major challenges. Hypertrophic scarring (HTS) can greatly impact patients' quality of life related to appearance, pain, pruritus and even loss of function of the injured body region. The identification of molecular events occurring in the evolution of the burn scar has increased our knowledge; however, this information has not yet translated into effective treatment modalities. Although many of the pathophysiologic pathways that bring about exaggerated scarring have been identified, certain nuances in burn scar formation are starting to be recognized. These include the effects of neurogenic inflammation, mechanotransduction, and the unique interactions of burn wound fluid with fat tissue in the deeper dermal layers, all of which may influence scarring outcome. Tension on the healing scar, pruritus, and pain all induce signaling pathways that ultimately result in increased collagen formation and myofibroblast phenotypic changes. Exposure of the fat domes in the deep dermis is associated with increased HTS, possibly on the basis of altered interaction of adipose-derived stem cells and the deep burn exudate. These pathophysiologic patterns related to stem cell-cytokine interactions, mechanotransduction, and neurogenic inflammation can provide new avenues of exploration for possible therapeutic interventions. PMID:27027596

  10. Scapholunate instability: current concepts in diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Christina E; Wolfe, Scott W

    2008-01-01

    Injuries to the scapholunate joint are the most frequent cause of carpal instability and account for a considerable degree of wrist dysfunction, lost time from work, and interference with activities. The complex arrangement and kinematics of the 2 rows of carpal bones allows for an enormous degree of physiologic motion, and a hierarchy of primary and secondary ligaments serves to balance an inherently unstable structure. Although insufficient to cause abnormal carpal posture or collapse on static radiographs, an isolated injury to the scapholunate interosseous ligament may be the harbinger of a relentless progression to abnormal joint mechanics, cartilage wear, and degenerative change. Intervention for scapholunate instability is aimed at arresting the degenerative process by restoring ligament continuity and normalizing carpal kinematics. In this review, we discuss the anatomy, kinematics, and biomechanical properties of the scapholunate articulation and provide a foundation for understanding the spectrum of scapholunate ligament instability. We propose an algorithm for treatment based on the stage of injury, degree of secondary ligamentous damage, and arthritic change. PMID:18656780

  11. Current concepts in the pathogenesis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is characterized by fibrotic obstruction of the proximal pulmonary arteries, and it is believed to result from incomplete thrombus resolution after acute pulmonary embolism. While treatment for this condition with surgery and medical therapy has improved outcomes, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying CTEPH is incomplete. Numerous risk factors have been associated with the development of CTEPH, including but not limited to acquired thrombophilias and chronic inflammatory states. A minority of patients with CTEPH have an abnormal fibrin structure that may delay thrombus resolution. Recently, examination of resected scar material in patients with CTEPH has suggested that deficient angiogenesis may play a role in thrombus nonresolution, and there is increasing interest in factors that drive intravascular scar formation. An additional challenge in CTEPH research is understanding the etiology and implications of the small-vessel disease present in many patients. Future work will likely be directed at understanding the pathways important to disease pathogenesis through further examinations of resected tissue material, continued work on animal models, and genomic approaches to identify alterations in gene expression or gene variants that may distinguish CTEPH from other forms of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27252839

  12. Genetics in diabetic retinopathy: current concepts and new insights.

    PubMed

    Simó-Servat, Olga; Hernández, Cristina; Simó, Rafael

    2013-08-01

    There is emerging evidence which indicates the essential role of genetic factors in the development of diabetic retinopathy (DR). In this regard it should be highlighted that genetic factors account for 25-50% of the risk of developing DR. Therefore, the use of genetic analysis to identify those diabetic patients most prone to developing DR might be useful in designing a more individualized treatment. In this regard, there are three main research strategies: candidate gene studies, linkage studies and Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS). In the candidate gene approach, several genes encoding proteins closely related to DR development have been analyzed. The linkage studies analyze shared alleles among family members with DR under the assumption that these predispose to a more aggressive development of DR. Finally, Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) are a new tool involving a massive evaluation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in large samples. In this review the available information using these three methodologies is critically analyzed. A genetic approach in order to identify new candidates in the pathogenesis of DR would permit us to design more targeted therapeutic strategies in order to decrease this devastating complication of diabetes. Basic researchers, ophthalmologists, diabetologists and geneticists should work together in order to gain new insights into this issue. PMID:24403848

  13. Vestibular compensation and vestibular rehabilitation. Current concepts and new trends.

    PubMed

    Deveze, A; Bernard-Demanze, L; Xavier, F; Lavieille, J-P; Elziere, M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present the current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the vestibular compensation and demonstrating how the vestibular rehabilitation is conducted to help the recovery of balance function. Vestibular rehabilitation is based on improving the natural phenomenon called vestibular compensation that occurs after acute vestibular disturbance or chronic and gradual misbalance. Central compensation implies three main mechanisms namely adaptation, substitution and habituation. The compensation, aided by the rehabilitation aimed to compensate and/or to correct the underused or misused of the visual, proprioceptive and vestibular inputs involved in the postural control. As the strategy of equilibration is not corrected, the patient is incompletely cured and remains with inappropriate balance control with its significance on the risk of fall and impact on quality of life. The vestibular rehabilitation helps to correct inappropriate strategy of equilibrium or to accelerate a good but slow compensation phenomenon. Nowadays, new tools are more and more employed for the diagnosis of vestibular deficit (that may include various sources of impairment), the assessment of postural deficit, the control of the appropriate strategy as well to facilitate the efficiency of the rehabilitation especially in elderly people. PMID:24502905

  14. Neural Synchrony in Cortical Networks: History, Concept and Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Uhlhaas, Peter J.; Pipa, Gordon; Lima, Bruss; Melloni, Lucia; Neuenschwander, Sergio; Nikolić, Danko; Singer, Wolf

    2009-01-01

    Following the discovery of context-dependent synchronization of oscillatory neuronal responses in the visual system, the role of neural synchrony in cortical networks has been expanded to provide a general mechanism for the coordination of distributed neural activity patterns. In the current paper, we present an update of the status of this hypothesis through summarizing recent results from our laboratory that suggest important new insights regarding the mechanisms, function and relevance of this phenomenon. In the first part, we present recent results derived from animal experiments and mathematical simulations that provide novel explanations and mechanisms for zero and nero-zero phase lag synchronization. In the second part, we shall discuss the role of neural synchrony for expectancy during perceptual organization and its role in conscious experience. This will be followed by evidence that indicates that in addition to supporting conscious cognition, neural synchrony is abnormal in major brain disorders, such as schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders. We conclude this paper with suggestions for further research as well as with critical issues that need to be addressed in future studies. PMID:19668703

  15. LDL–cholesterol transport to the endoplasmic reticulum: current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Pfisterer, Simon G.; Peränen, Johan; Ikonen, Elina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review In this article, we summarize the present information related to the export of LDL-derived cholesterol from late endosomes, with a focus on Nieman-Pick disease, type C1 (NPC1) cholesterol delivery toward the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We review data suggesting that several pathways may operate in parallel, including membrane transport routes and membrane contact sites (MCSs). Recent findings There is increasing appreciation that MCSs provide an important mechanism for intermembrane lipid transfer. In late endosome–ER contacts, three protein bridges involving oxysterol binding protein related protein (ORP)1L-vesicle associated membrane protein-associated protein (VAP), steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR)D3-VAP and ORP5-NPC1 proteins have been reported. How much they contribute to the flux of LDL–cholesterol to the ER is currently open. Studies for lipid transfer via MCSs have been most advanced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Recently, a new sterol-binding protein family conserved between yeast and man was identified. Its members localize at MCSs and were named lipid transfer protein anchored at membrane contact sites (Lam) proteins. In yeast, sterol transfer between the ER and the yeast lysosome may be facilitated by a Lam protein. Summary Increasing insights into the role of MCSs in directional sterol delivery between membranes propose that they might provide routes for LDL–cholesterol transfer to the ER. Future work should reveal which specific contacts may operate for this, and how they are controlled by cholesterol homeostatic machineries. PMID:27054443

  16. Current concepts for oil decontamination of crush injuries: a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This anecdotal, non-systematic review serves to explore the principles and methods of effective oil decontamination from cutaneous wounds, particularly crush injuries. The current expansion of the petroleum industry is necessary to meet increasing world demands for oil. Most stages of oil refining and applications involve significant injury risks, particularly for crush injuries that become contaminated with petroleum compounds. A literature review regarding a standard of care for effective cutaneous oil decontamination is lacking. Based on case reports, animal models, and in vitro studies identified in our expert opinion review, standard water and soap cleansing may not be an appropriate approach. Instead, the principle of ‘like dissolves like’ guides the use of lipophilic, petroleum-derived solvents to attract and subsequently dissolve the petroleum contaminant from the skin injury. Limitations include paucity of and dated literature sources regarding the topic as well as no models specifically addressing crush injuries. Our literature review found that oil decontamination of cutaneous injuries may be best accomplished with oil-based cleansers. Certainly, this topic has significant importance for the potentially carcinogenic petroleum compounds that pervade virtually every aspect of modern human life. PMID:24855490

  17. Current Concepts in the Management of Necrotizing Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Misiakos, Evangelos P.; Bagias, George; Patapis, Paul; Sotiropoulos, Dimitrios; Kanavidis, Prodromos; Machairas, Anastasios

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a severe, rare, potentially lethal soft tissue infection that develops in the scrotum and perineum, the abdominal wall, or the extremities. The infection progresses rapidly, and septic shock may ensue; hence, the mortality rate is high (median mortality 32.2%). Prognosis becomes poorer in the presence of co-morbidities, such as diabetes mellitus, immunosuppression, chronic alcohol disease, chronic renal failure, and liver cirrhosis. NF is classified into four types, depending on microbiological findings. Most cases are polymicrobial, classed as type I. The clinical status of the patient varies from erythema, swelling, and tenderness in the early stage to skin ischemia with blisters and bullae in the advanced stage of infection. In its fulminant form, the patient is critically ill with signs and symptoms of severe septic shock and multiple organ dysfunction. The clinical condition is the most important clue for diagnosis. However, in equivocal cases, the diagnosis and severity of the infection can be secured with laboratory-based scoring systems, such as the laboratory risk indicator for necrotizing fasciitis score or Fournier’s gangrene severity index score, especially in regard to Fournier’s gangrene. Computed tomography or ultrasonography can be helpful, but definitive diagnosis is attained by exploratory surgery at the infected sites. Management of the infection begins with broad-spectrum antibiotics, but early and aggressive drainage and meticulous debridement constitute the mainstay of treatment. Postoperative management of the surgical wound is also important for the patient’s survival, along with proper nutrition. The vacuum-assisted closure system has proved to be helpful in wound management, with its combined benefits of continuous cleansing of the wound and the formation of granulation tissue. PMID:25593960

  18. Current concepts of immunopathogenesis, diagnosis and therapy in Whipple's disease.

    PubMed

    Deriban, G; Marth, T

    2006-01-01

    Whipple's disease (WD) is a rare chronic infectious disorder caused by the rod- shaped bacterium Tropheryma whipplei. The disorder is characterized clinically by arthralgia, abdominal pain, diarrhea, malabsorbtion and progressive weight loss. Other important sites of infection include the heart (resulting in the clinical picture of endocarditis and heart failure) and the central nervous system (CNS) (manifestations include confusion, memory loss, focal cranial nerve signs, nystagmus and ophtalmoplegia). The bacterium is presumed to be ubiquitously present. A defect in cellular immune response may predispose patients for an infection with T. whipplei and this might explain the rarity of the disorder despite the ubiquitous bacterial presence. The presumed immunological defect is likely to be quite specific for T. whipplei, since patients are not generally affected by other infections. Decreased production of Interleukin(IL)-12, IL-2 and Interferon (IFN)-g accompanied by an increased secretion of IL-4 are the main features of this defective immunological response. The finding of periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive macrophages in the lamina propria of tissue samples obtained by duodenal biopsy usually establishes the diagnosis. The PAS-positive inclusions represent the remnants of the bacteria. Attempts to isolate the causative agent were unsuccessful for nearby 100 years after the first recognition of the disease. In the year 2000, the bacterium was finally successfully grown on a human fibroblast cell line. Untreated WD patients suffer from a chronic progressive disorder which possibly leads to death. Most patients show a fast clinical improvement to antibiotic therapy, but clinical relapses are described frequently. There is a number of patients, unable to eradicate the bacterium even after several antibiotic treatments and patients with CNS disease, in both of whom alternative therapy strategies are necessary. PMID:17073638

  19. Comprehensive management of pressure ulcers in spinal cord injury: current concepts and future trends.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Erwin A; Pires, Marilyn; Ngann, Yvette; Sterling, Michelle; Rubayi, Salah

    2013-11-01

    Pressure ulcers in spinal cord injury represent a challenging problem for patients, their caregivers, and their physicians. They often lead to recurrent hospitalizations, multiple surgeries, and potentially devastating complications. They present a significant cost to the healthcare system, they require a multidisciplinary team approach to manage well, and outcomes directly depend on patients' education, prevention, and compliance with conservative and surgical protocols. With so many factors involved in the successful treatment of pressure ulcers, an update on their comprehensive management in spinal cord injury is warranted. Current concepts of local wound care, surgical options, as well as future trends from the latest wound healing research are reviewed to aid medical professionals in treating patients with this difficult problem. PMID:24090179

  20. Comprehensive management of pressure ulcers in spinal cord injury: Current concepts and future trends

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Erwin A.; Pires, Marilyn; Ngann, Yvette; Sterling, Michelle; Rubayi, Salah

    2013-01-01

    Pressure ulcers in spinal cord injury represent a challenging problem for patients, their caregivers, and their physicians. They often lead to recurrent hospitalizations, multiple surgeries, and potentially devastating complications. They present a significant cost to the healthcare system, they require a multidisciplinary team approach to manage well, and outcomes directly depend on patients' education, prevention, and compliance with conservative and surgical protocols. With so many factors involved in the successful treatment of pressure ulcers, an update on their comprehensive management in spinal cord injury is warranted. Current concepts of local wound care, surgical options, as well as future trends from the latest wound healing research are reviewed to aid medical professionals in treating patients with this difficult problem. PMID:24090179

  1. Leishmaniases of the New World: current concepts and implications for future research.

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi, G; Tesh, R B

    1993-01-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies indicate that leishmaniasis in the Americas is far more abundant and of greater public health importance than was previously recognized. The disease in the New World is caused by a number of different parasite species that are capable of producing a wide variety of clinical manifestations. The outcome of leishmanial infection in humans is largely dependent on the immune responsiveness of the host and the virulence of the infecting parasite strain. This article reviews current concepts of the clinical forms, immunology, pathology, laboratory diagnosis, and treatment of the disease as well as aspects of its epidemiology and control. Recommendations for future research on the disease and its control are made. PMID:8358705

  2. [Current surgical and adjuvant therapy concepts of malignant tumors of the facial skin and the pinna].

    PubMed

    Kolk, A; Wermker, K; Bier, H; Götz, C; Eckert, A W

    2015-02-01

    Malignant tumors of the skin had been a rare entity 2 decades ago. Today they are spread rapidly worldwide. Malignant neoplasms of the skin, the largest human organ, may occur from all structures and layers. While previously skin cancer -occurred mainly after the age of 60, the incidence increases now in younger ages. Strong sunburns in the childhood and before the age of 20 are important risk factors for the development of malignancies of the skin. An increased exposure to UV rays is found especially in the facial skin, where basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, malignant melanoma and Merkel cell carcinomas are the most common malignancies. Early diagnosis of malignancies and therapy-oriented mostly surgical approaches are crucial for the prognosis of all skin cancers. Therefore under the aspect of the increasing incidence these topics will be pointed out according to the latest findings including current multimodal therapy concepts and future treatment options. PMID:25658862

  3. Current perspectives in the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Valdespino, Victor; Tsagozis, Panagiotis; Pisa, Pavel

    2007-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) continues to be an important world health problem for men. Patients with locally confined PC are treated with either radiotherapy or surgery. However, treatment of more advanced stages of the disease is problematic. Initially, androgen deprivation offers a period of clinical stability, which is however invariably followed by progression to non-responsiveness to hormonal manipulation. Current management of patients with androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC) displays modest response rates and achieves only short-term benefit. Recently, knowledge in the complex pathophysiology of advanced PC has led to the identification of mechanisms and target molecules permitting the introduction of new therapies. Consequently, many investigational treatments are ongoing for AIPC in Phase-II and Phase-III trials aiming at the combination of chemotherapeutic regimens along with immunotherapy targeting PC-associated antigens. Other attractive options are gene therapy, as well as the targeting of survival signaling, differentiation, and apoptosis of the malignant PC cells. Further treatment modalities are directed against the tumor microenvironment, bone metastasis, or both. Collectively, the aforementioned efforts introduce a new era in the management of advanced PC. Novel pharmaceutical compounds and innovative approaches, integrated into the concept of individualized therapy will hopefully, during the next decade, improve the outcome and survival for hundreds of thousands of men worldwide. PMID:17873302

  4. Current Treatment Strategies in Pediatric Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Etienne; Lee, Joyce SS; Tang, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is a non-scarring autoimmune disease of the hair follicle that can present at any age. Pediatric cases are commonly seen in a dermatology clinic, and management can potentially be challenging, with a small proportion of cases experiencing a chronic relapsing course marked by distressing hair loss that can bring about significant psychosocial morbidity. We review the established treatments for pediatric alopecia areata, alongside second and third line therapies that have shown to be efficacious. We also offer a treatment algorithm as a guide to the treatment of pediatric AA. PMID:23248364

  5. Concept Development in Learning Physics: The Case of Electric Current and Voltage Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koponen, Ismo T.; Huttunen, Laura

    2013-09-01

    In learning conceptual knowledge in physics, a common problem is the development and differentiation of concepts in the learning process. An important part of this development process is the re-organisation or re-structuring process in which students' conceptual knowledge and concepts change. This study proposes a new view of concept development with explicit attention given to concept development from the level of knowledge-as-pieces to the level of knowledge-as-theory. The proposed new picture is based on the view that concepts are complex constructs essentially embedded in a larger system of knowledge. Three closely connected aspects require our attention: (1) conceptions of concepts, (2) conceptions of knowledge systems, and finally, (3) conceptions of the process of change. The potential advantages of this prospective are demonstrated through the re-analysis of the concept development in the well-known case of electric current and voltage. The results show that in the concept development process, both causal knowledge and coherence of the knowledge system play crucial roles. Finally, the study points out how the theoretical position proposed here directly impacts conceptions of learning and instruction as well as what solutions are sought for problems in learning—or even what is considered a problem or success in learning.

  6. Current treatment strategies in autoimmune hemolytic disorders.

    PubMed

    Barcellini, Wilma

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is a heterogeneous disease usually classified according to the thermal range of the autoantibody in warm, cold and mixed forms. The treatment of AIHA is still not evidence-based. Corticosteroids are the first-line therapy for warm AIHA. For refractory/relapsed cases, the choice is between splenectomy (effective in ∼70% cases but with a presumed cure rate of 20%) and rituximab (effective in ∼70-80% of cases), which is becoming the preferred second-line treatment, and thereafter any of the immunosuppressive drugs (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin, mycophenolate mofetil). Additional therapies are intravenous immunoglobulins and danazol. For severe or refractory cases, last option treatments are plasma-exchange, high-dose cyclophosphamide and alemtuzumab. As regards cold agglutinin disease, rituximab is now recommended as first-line treatment. PMID:26343892

  7. University of Swaziland Bachelor of Education Students' Conception of Current Ideas about Writing Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jabulani, S.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated University of Swaziland Bachelor of Education degree (B.Ed) (Primary and secondary) students' conception of the current trends in writing instruction. The extent of their conception of these trends was examined on only four selected writing ideas namely collaborative writing, the process approach to writing, teacher…

  8. Current Controversies With Recent Cholesterol Treatment Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Elizabeth; Saseen, Joseph J

    2016-02-01

    Several guidelines and expert recommendations have been published recently regarding the prevention and treatment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk. The American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guidelines recommend a drastic paradigm change in the treatment of cholesterol where treatment, based on level of cardiovascular risk, is based around using a fixed statin intensity therapy. This approach is endorsed by the American Diabetes Association. However, recommendations by the National Lipid Association (NLA) consist of the traditional approach of titrating therapy to achieve patient-specific lipoprotein targets. Despite the differences in overall approaches, the use of statin therapy as the cornerstone of treatment to reduce risk of cardiovascular events in at risk patients is a strong common theme. Clinicians should be aware of these differences, as they represent controversies with the overall treatment of ASCVD risk. Additional controversies related to the treatment of patients with ASCVD risk pertain to the role of nonstatin drugs and approaches to managing side effects. These topics are reviewed within this article and discuss implications for patient care. PMID:26611871

  9. Acute respiratory distress syndrome following cardiovascular surgery: current concepts and novel therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Hoegl, Sandra; Zwissler, Bernhard; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Vohwinkel, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This review gives an update on current treatment options and novel concepts on the prevention and treatment of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in cardiovascular surgery patients. Recent findings The only proven beneficial therapeutic options in ARDS are those that help to prevent further ventilator-induced lung injury, such as prone position, use of lung-protective ventilation strategies, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. In the future also new approaches like mesenchymal cell therapy, activation of hypoxia-elicited transcription factors or targeting of purinergic signaling may be successful outside the experimental setting. Owing to the so far limited treatment options, it is of great importance to determine patients at risk for developing ARDS already perioperatively. In this context, serum biomarkers and lung injury prediction scores could be useful. Summary Preventing ARDS as a severe complication in the cardiovascular surgery setting may help to reduce morbidity and mortality. As cardiovascular surgery patients are of greater risk to develop ARDS, preventive interventions should be implemented early on. Especially, use of low tidal volumes, avoiding of fluid overload and restrictive blood transfusion regimes may help to prevent ARDS. PMID:26598954

  10. Current concepts in the pathophysiology and treatment of aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Young, Neal S.; Calado, Rodrigo T.; Scheinberg, Phillip

    2006-01-01

    Aplastic anemia, an unusual hematologic disease, is the paradigm of the human bone marrow failure syndromes. Almost universally fatal just a few decades ago, aplastic anemia can now be cured or ameliorated by stem-cell transplantation or immunosuppressive drug therapy. The pathophysiology is immune mediated in most cases, with activated type 1 cytotoxic T cells implicated. The molecular basis of the aberrant immune response and deficiencies in hematopoietic cells is now being defined genetically; examples are telomere repair gene mutations in the target cells and dysregulated T-cell activation pathways. Immunosuppression with antithymocyte globulins and cyclosporine is effective at restoring blood-cell production in the majority of patients, but relapse and especially evolution of clonal hematologic diseases remain problematic. Allogeneic stem-cell transplant from histocompatible sibling donors is curative in the great majority of young patients with severe aplastic anemia; the major challenges are extending the benefits of transplantation to patients who are older or who lack family donors. Recent results with alternative sources of stem cells and a variety of conditioning regimens to achieve their engraftment have been promising, with survival in small pediatric case series rivaling conventional transplantation results. PMID:16778145

  11. Current and new treatments of photodamaged skin.

    PubMed

    Shamban, Ava T

    2009-12-01

    Patients with photodamaged skin need guidance in selecting treatment plans that optimize outcomes, minimize downtime, and reduce adverse effects. The gold standard among cosmeceuticals is the topical retinoids, such as tretinoin. A topical formulation of folic acid and creatine appears to be a viable treatment option for the treatment of photodamaged skin. The use of specific topical cosmeceuticals in combination with nonablative photorejuvenation is recommended in choosing modalities that address the concerns of the patient. A combination of intense pulsed light (IPL), low-intensity diode light, and biostimulating drugs has been shown to provide results superior to those of IPL alone for photorejuvenation. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) is the treatment of choice for type C photodamage. Low-strength 5-ALA (1 to 2%) applied several times, every 10 to 15 minutes, and incubated for 30 to 60 minutes with 550 to 630 nm, 530 to 1200 nm, or 570 to 1200 nm light activation improved hyperpigmented lesions, skin smoothing, and skin elasticity with high patient satisfaction. The use of 0.5% liposome-encapsulated 5-ALA spraying has been shown to be an alternative to 20% 5-ALA in a cream base in patients undergoing photorejuvenation. Adipose-derived stem cells and their derived secretory factors may have potential as treatments of photodamage. PMID:20024876

  12. Evolution of Concept - But Not Action - in Addiction Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Arria, Amelia M.; McLellan, A. Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The Western approach to drug abuse treatment involves a medical or disease orientation to understanding the onset, course and management of addiction and a clinical goal of abstinence or very significant reductions in drug use, usually with a combination of behavioral and pharmacological interventions. Even within this Western approach, and despite several consensually accepted features of addiction, a significant mismatch remains between what this culture has come to accept as the nature of the disease and how that same culture continues to treat the disease. This paper discusses the evolution of these Western concepts over the past decade without a corresponding evolution in the nature, duration or evaluation standards for addiction treatment1. Here we take the position that continuing care and adaptive treatment protocols, combining behavioral therapies, family and social supports, and where needed, medications show much promise to address the typically chronic, relapsing, and heterogeneous nature of most cases of serious addiction. By extension, methods to evaluate effectiveness of addiction treatment should focus upon the functional status of patients during the course of their treatment instead of after treatment has stopped as is the evaluation practice used with most other chronic illnesses. PMID:22676571

  13. Current medical treatment in pediatric urolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Akın, Yiğit; Uçar, Murat; Yücel, Selçuk

    2013-01-01

    Although the prevalence of urolithiasis is nearly 2–3% in childhood, the risk of recurrence may range from 6.5–54%. There has been an increase in urinary stone disease among pediatric age groups, and stone disease has a multifactorial etiology. After the diagnosis, detailed metabolic evaluation is required. High recurrence rates, therapeutic irregularities and deficiency in diagnosis may lead to comorbidities such as loss of kidney function. Following diagnosis, the requirement for surgery, such as stone extraction and correction of anatomical anomalies, is determined. Medical and supportive treatments are also needed to prevent recurrence and urinary tract infections and to preserve renal function. Supportive care includes increased fluid intake and dietary modifications. Medical treatment is dependent on the cause of the urinary stone disease. The morbidities associated with pediatric urolithiasis can be prevented by early diagnosis, detailed metabolic analysis, regular follow-up and medical treatment protocols. PMID:26328120

  14. Early-onset scoliosis: current treatment.

    PubMed

    Cunin, V

    2015-02-01

    Early-onset scoliosis, which appears before the age of 10, can be due to congenital vertebral anomalies, neuromuscular diseases, scoliosis-associated syndromes, or idiopathic causes. It can have serious consequences for lung development and significantly reduce the life expectancy compared to adolescent scoliosis. Extended posterior fusion must be avoided to prevent the crankshaft phenomenon, uneven growth of the trunk and especially restrictive lung disease. Conservative (non-surgical) treatment is used first. If this fails, fusionless surgery can be performed to delay the final fusion procedure until the patient is older. The gold standard delaying surgical treatment is the implantation of growing rods as described by Moe and colleagues in the mid-1980s. These rods, which are lengthened during short surgical procedures at regular intervals, curb the scoliosis progression until the patient reaches an age where fusion can be performed. Knowledge of this technique and its complications has led to several mechanical improvements being made, namely use of rods that can be distracted magnetically on an outpatient basis, without the need for anesthesia. Devices based on the same principle have been designed that preferentially attach to the ribs to specifically address chest wall and spine dysplasia. The second category of surgical devices consists of rods used to guide spinal growth that do not require repeated surgical procedures. The third type of fusionless surgical treatment involves slowing the growth of the scoliosis convexity to help reduce the Cobb angle. The indications are constantly changing. Improvements in surgical techniques and greater surgeon experience may help to reduce the number of complications and make this lengthy treatment acceptable to patients and their family. Long-term effects of surgery on the Cobb angle have not been compared to those involving conservative "delaying" treatments. Because the latter has fewer complications associated with

  15. [Current trends in neovascular glaucoma treatment].

    PubMed

    Vancea, P P; Abu-Taleb, A

    2005-01-01

    Neovascular glaucoma is divided in three clinical stages: rubeosis iridis, secondary open-angle glaucoma, and synechia of the angle-closure glaucoma. 36% of neovascular glaucomas occurs after central retinal vein occlusion, 32% after diabetic proliferative retinopathy, and 13% occurs after carotid artery obstructive. The key of success in the treatment of neovascular glaucoma is the early and rightly diagnosis, the treatment is aimed mainly at relieving pain, as the prognosis for maintaining visual function is extremely poor. The most important surgical procedures are trabeculectomy, artificial drainage shunts and cyclo-distraction by trans-scleral diode laser. This essay presents a synthesis of modern principle data concerning neovascular glaucoma. PMID:16607783

  16. The various types of neurogenic bladder dysfunction: an update of current therapeutic concepts.

    PubMed

    Madersbacher, H

    1990-05-01

    Increased experience with treatment strategies developed during the last 10 years in the field of neurourology justifies an update of current therapeutic concepts. Based on a rather simple, but clinically useful, classification of detrusor-sphincter dysfunction the therapeutic concepts now available for four prototypes of detrusor-sphincter dysfunction are discussed. (1) For the combination of a hyperreflexive detrusor with a hyperreflexive (spastic) sphincter, characteristic for the reflex- and the uninhibited neuropathic bladder, detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia (DSD) is still the greatest problem, and transurethral sphincterotomy is the method of choice if this situation cannot otherwise be managed. One concept is to convert detrusor hyperreflexia into hyporeflexia by adequate pharmacotherapy, which is nowadays available, and to assist or to accomplish bladder emptying by clean intermittent (self-) catheterisation (CIC) with the advantage of dry intervals in between. Japanese colleagues recommend bladder overdistension during the spinal shock phase to achieve detrusor hyporeflexia, but this procedure is rather decisive at an early stage of the disability, leaving the detrusor no chance for further rehabilitation. Another possibility is rhizotomy of the sacral posterior roots to eliminate detrusor hyperreflexia, and the simultaneous implantation of a sacral anterior root stimulator (Brindley) to achieve electrically induced micturition. From our personal experience with 12 patients this concept is ideal for female patients with unbalanced reflex bladder and otherwise uncontrollable reflex incontinence. (2) The combination of a weak detrusor with a spastic sphincter is a clear indication for CIC, as the bladder is emptied regularly, and due to the spastic sphincter, the patient stays continent as long as controlled fluid intake prohibits overflow incontinence. The implantation of an anterior sacral root stimulator is an alternative approach provided that at least

  17. Treatment-resistant panic disorder: clinical significance, concept and management.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mu-Hong; Tsai, Shih-Jen

    2016-10-01

    Panic disorder is commonly prevalent in the population, but the treatment response for panic disorder in clinical practice is much less effective than that in our imagination. Increasing evidence suggested existence of a chronic or remitting-relapsing clinical course in panic disorder. In this systematic review, we re-examine the definition of treatment-resistant panic disorder, and present the potential risk factors related to the treatment resistance, including the characteristics of panic disorder, other psychiatric and physical comorbidities, and psychosocial stresses. Furthermore, we summarize the potential pathophysiologies, such as genetic susceptibility, altered brain functioning, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and long-term inflammation, to explain the treatment resistance. Finally, we conclude the current therapeutic strategies for treating treatment-resistant panic disorder from pharmacological and non-pharmacological views. PMID:26850787

  18. Current Directions in ADHD and Its Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norvilitis, Jill M., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is a matter of ongoing research and debate, with considerable data supporting both psychopharmacological and behavioral approaches. Researchers continue to search for new interventions to be used in conjunction with or in place of the more traditional approaches. These interventions run the…

  19. Gastric cancer: current and evolving treatment landscape.

    PubMed

    Sun, Weijing; Yan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Gastric (including gastroesophageal junction) cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. In China, an estimated 420,000 patients were diagnosed with gastric cancer in 2011, ranking this malignancy the second most prevalent cancer type and resulting in near 300,000 deaths. The treatment landscape of gastric cancer has evolved in recent years. Although systemic chemotherapy is still the mainstay treatment of metastatic disease, the introduction of agents targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 and vascular endothelial growth factor/vascular endothelia growth factor receptor has brought this disease into the molecular and personalized medicine era. The preliminary yet encouraging clinical efficacy observed with immune checkpoint inhibitors, e.g., anti-programmed cell death protein 1/programmed death-ligand 1, will further shape the treatment landscape for gastric cancer. Molecular characterization of patients will play a critical role in developing new agents, as well as in implementing new treatment options for this disease. PMID:27581465

  20. Diabetic retinopathy: current and new treatment options.

    PubMed

    Giuliari, Gian P

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus has become a major health concern worldwide and its incidence is projected to increase. Diabetic macular edema (DME) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) are considered the most sight-threatening ocular complications in these patients. Pivotal studies, such as the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) and the Diabetic Retinopathy Study (DRS), have established macular and pan-retinal laser as the gold-standard of treatment for these complications. The recent discovery of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its role in the development of proliferative disease, has led to a movement towards treating PDR and DME with anti-angiogenic medications alone or in conjunction with the gold-standard of care. Due to the severity of the diabetic ocular complications and the rising incidence of diabetes worldwide, it is important for the non-ophthalmologist care provider to be informed of the new treatments available for these conditions in an effort to better guide their patients. In this review, I will discuss the importance of these new methods of treatment as well as the significance of systemic glucose control, vitreous surgery and laser photocoagulation. PMID:22352446

  1. Cardiac Remodeling: Concepts, Clinical Impact, Pathophysiological Mechanisms and Pharmacologic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Paula S.; Polegato, Bertha F.; Minicucci, Marcos F.; Paiva, Sergio A. R.; Zornoff, Leonardo A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac remodeling is defined as a group of molecular, cellular and interstitial changes that manifest clinically as changes in size, mass, geometry and function of the heart after injury. The process results in poor prognosis because of its association with ventricular dysfunction and malignant arrhythmias. Here, we discuss the concepts and clinical implications of cardiac remodeling, and the pathophysiological role of different factors, including cell death, energy metabolism, oxidative stress, inflammation, collagen, contractile proteins, calcium transport, geometry and neurohormonal activation. Finally, the article describes the pharmacological treatment of cardiac remodeling, which can be divided into three different stages of strategies: consolidated, promising and potential strategies. PMID:26647721

  2. Current concepts in targeting COPD pharmacotherapy: making progress towards personalized management

    PubMed Central

    Woodruff, Prescott G.; Agusti, Alvar; Roche, Nicolas; Singh, Dave; Martinez, Fernando J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common, complex and heterogeneous condition which is responsible for considerable and growing morbidity, mortality and healthcare expense worldwide. In order to decipher the complexity of COPD, it is imperative that we identify groups of patients with similar clinical characteristics, prognosis and/or therapeutic needs, so called clinical phenotypes. This strategy is logical for research but it may be of limited clinical value because clinical phenotypes may overlap in the same patient and the same clinical phenotype could result from different biological mechanisms. With the goal of matching assessment to treatment choices, the most recent iteration of GOLD reorganized treatment objectives into two categories (improving symptoms, i.e., dyspnoea and health status, and decreasing future risk, as predicted by FEV1 level and exacerbations history), thus moving closer to individualized medicine using currently available bronchodilators and anti-inflammatory medications. Yet, future therapeutic options are likely to include targeting endotypes which reflect subtypes of patients defined by a distinct pathophysiological mechanism. Specific biomarkers of these endotypes would be particularly useful for clinical practice, especially when clinical phenotype alone is insufficient to identify the underlying endotype. Currently, a limited series of potential COPD endotypes and biomarkers have been suggested. We will gain empiric knowledge from proof of concept trials in COPD with emerging drugs that target specific inflammatory pathways. In each instance, specific endotyping and biomarker efforts will likely be required for success of these trials, since the pathways are likely to be operative in only a subset of patients. Network analysis of human diseases offers the possibility of a better understanding of disease patho-biologic complexity while facilitating the development of new therapeutic alternatives and, importantly, a

  3. Current Antioxidant Treatments in Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shaojun; Xue, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the key mechanisms affecting the outcome throughout the course of organ transplantation. It is widely believed that the redox balance is dysregulated during ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) and causes subsequent oxidative injury, resulting from the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Moreover, in order to alleviate organ shortage, increasing number of grafts is retrieved from fatty, older, and even non-heart-beating donors that are particularly vulnerable to the accumulation of ROS. To improve the viability of grafts and reduce the risk of posttransplant dysfunction, a large number of studies have been done focusing on the antioxidant treatments for the purpose of maintaining the redox balance and thereby protecting the grafts. This review provides an overview of these emerging antioxidant treatments, targeting donor, graft preservation, and recipient as well. PMID:27403232

  4. Current treatment options of acquired flatfoot.

    PubMed

    Lesić, Aleksandar R; Atkinson, Henry Dushan E; Zagorac, Slavisa G; Bumbasirević, Marko

    2013-01-01

    Symptomatic acquired flatfoot is an important orthopaedic problem, due to progressive loss of whole foot function and the increasing problem of patient disability. It is a complex entity, involving the tibialis posterior tendon, ankle joint, hindfoot and midfoot. In most cases the posterior tibial tendon (PTT) is the root cause of acquired flat foot, but there are other contributors and many different factors have an influence. The clinical picture varies depending on the stage of the deformity, as well as the treatment approach. Initially soft tissue procedures, synoviectomy and augmentation of the PTT are advised. In stage 2, lateral column lengthening and calcaneal osteotomy, with soft tissue - tendon transfers (TA, FHL, FDL) are recommended. In stage 3 subtalar, double or triplearthodesis is preferable, while in stage 4 pantalar fusion is indicated. This article elaborates on the etiology, the clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment modalities. PMID:24669559

  5. Current and emerging treatments for severe asthma

    PubMed Central

    Al Efraij, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Severe asthma, which is poorly controlled despite the elimination of modifiable factors and the correct use of standard therapy, accounts only for 5% of people with asthma but it contributes to approximately 50% of the economic costs of asthma. Because of this unmet need, novel therapies have been developed for optimal treatment of these patients. The use of tiotropium, omalizumab, mepolizumab and thermoplasty in well-selected patients provides better control and most importantly a reduction in asthma exacerbations. PMID:26716048

  6. Current approach to treatments for prolactinomas.

    PubMed

    Tirosh, Amit; Shimon, Ilan

    2016-09-01

    Prolactinomas are pituitary tumors that originate from the adenohypophysis lactotroph cells. These tumors constitute one third of all pituitary adenomas, making them the most common functional pituitary neoplasms. The signs and symptoms of patients harboring prolactin (PRL) secreting tumors may derive from hyperprolactinemia itself, as well as from direct pressure of the expanding mass on the normal pituitary gland and other surrounding tissues, in cases of invasive tumors. This review will focus on practical aspects of the medical treatment of patients with prolactinomas, and on the main differences between the treatment strategy of micro- and macroprolactinomas. Medical therapy with dopamine agonists (DA) is the preferred treatment for the vast majority of patients harboring prolactinomas. Cabergoline (CAB) is the main agent used for treating prolactinomas, achieving normoprolactinemia in 80-100% of patients with microprolactinomas, and in 75-95% of those with macroprolactinomas. Second line therapies include surgery and radiation therapy, and are indicated only in rare cases, such as patients intolerant to, or with contraindication for DAs, or patients harboring malignant or DA resistant tumors. The management principles of pregnant women with prolactinomas and of patients with suspected malignant prolactinoma are distinct from other patient populations, and are discussed separately in our review. PMID:26399371

  7. Current Diagnosis and Treatment of Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bystritsky, Alexander; Khalsa, Sahib S.; Cameron, Michael E.; Schiffman, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental health conditions. Although they are less visible than schizophrenia, depression, and bipolar disorder, they can be just as disabling. The diagnoses of anxiety disorders are being continuously revised. Both dimensional and structural diagnoses have been used in clinical treatment and research, and both methods have been proposed for the new classification in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV (DSM-5). However, each of these approaches has limitations. More recently, the emphasis in diagnosis has focused on neuroimaging and genetic research. This approach is based partly on the need for a more comprehensive understanding of how biology, stress, and genetics interact to shape the symptoms of anxiety. Anxiety disorders can be effectively treated with psychopharmacological and cognitive–behavioral interventions. These inter ventions have different symptom targets; thus, logical combinations of these strategies need to be further studied in order to improve future outcomes. New developments are forthcoming in the field of alternative strategies for managing anxiety and for treatment-resistant cases. Additional treatment enhancements should include the development of algorithms that can be easily used in primary care and with greater focus on managing functional impairment in patients with anxiety. PMID:23599668

  8. Current treatment of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Bernard S.; Ruebner, Rebecca L.; Spinale, Joann M.; Copelovitch, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Summary Tremendous advances have been made in understanding the pathogenesis of atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS), an extremely rare disease. Insights into the molecular biology of aHUS resulted in rapid advances in treatment with eculizumab (Soliris®, Alexion Pharmaceuticals Inc.). Historically, aHUS was associated with very high rates of mortality and morbidity. Prior therapies included plasma therapy and/or liver transplantation. Although often life saving, these were imperfect and had many complications. We review the conditions included under the rubric of aHUS: S. pneumoniae HUS (SpHUS), inborn errors of metabolism, and disorders of complement regulation, emphasizing their differences and similarities. We focus on the clinical features, diagnosis, and pathogenesis, and treatment of aHUS that results from mutations in genes encoding alternative complement regulators, SpHUS and HUS associated with inborn errors of metabolism. Mutations in complement genes, or antibodies to their protein products, result in unregulated activity of the alternate complement pathway, endothelial injury, and thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Eculizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that inhibits the production of the terminal complement components C5a and the membrane attack complex (C5b-9) by binding to complement protein C5a. This blocks the proinflammatory and cytolytic effects of terminal complement activation. Eculizumab use has been reported in many case reports, and retrospective and prospective clinical trials in aHUS. There have been few serious side effects and no reports of tachphylaxis or drug resistance. The results are very encouraging and eculizumab is now recognized as the treatment of choice for aHUS. PMID:25343125

  9. Current Treatment Options for Auricular Hematomas.

    PubMed

    MacPhail, Catriona

    2016-07-01

    Ear disease, such as otitis externa, resulting in aggressive head shaking or ear scratching, is the most common cause of the development of aural hematomas in dogs and cats. An underlying immunologic cause has also been proposed to explain cartilage and blood vessel fragility. Numerous options exist for management of aural hematomas, from medical management alone with corticosteroids, to simple hematoma centesis, to surgical intervention. Because this condition is usually secondary to another disease process, regardless of mode of treatment, likelihood of recurrence is low if the underlying condition is managed properly. PMID:27012935

  10. Gynecomastia – evaluation and current treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ruth E; Kermott, Cindy A; Murad, M Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question: What is the best management approach for gynecomastia? Results: In most patients, surgical correction usually leads to immediate cosmetic and symptomatic improvement and is considered the best approach. In men who are being treated with antiandrogen therapies, pharmacological intervention with tamoxifen is the most effective approach, followed by radiotherapy. Implementation: Pitfalls to avoid when treating gynecomastia Failure to detect the very rare male breast cancerOverly aggressive early intervention or evaluationAppropriate medical interventionWhen to refer to specialist treatment PMID:21479145

  11. [Current diagnosis and treatment of migraine].

    PubMed

    Diener, H-C; Katsarava, Z; Limmroth, V

    2008-02-01

    Headaches are one of the most common disorders and symptoms in daily medical practice. The prevalence of migraine is 8% in men and 12-15% in women. Dramatic progress in the areas of epidemiology, pathophysiology, and acute and preventive therapy of migraine has been made over the past 100 years, with triptans being the breakthrough for treating acute migraine attacks. Beta blockers, calcium antagonists, and neuromodulators are available for preventive migraine therapy. Nonpharmacologic treatment also plays an important role in migraine prevention. New medical care structures such as integrated headache care provide better support for patients with migraine, particularly those with chronic migraine. PMID:18219499

  12. [Current diagnosis and treatment of migraine].

    PubMed

    Diener, H-C; Katsarava, Z; Limmroth, V

    2008-05-01

    Headaches are one of the most common disorders and symptoms in daily medical practice. The prevalence of migraine is 8% in men and 12-15% in women. Dramatic progress in the areas of epidemiology, pathophysiology, and acute and preventive therapy of migraine has been made over the past 100 years, with triptans being the breakthrough for treating acute migraine attacks. Beta blockers, calcium antagonists, and neuromodulators are available for preventive migraine therapy. Nonpharmacologic treatment also plays an important role in migraine prevention. New medical care structures such as integrated headache care provide better support for patients with migraine, particularly those with chronic migraine. PMID:18483757

  13. Current concepts on spinal arthrodesis in degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Lykissas, Marios G; Aichmair, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Back pain is a common chronic disorder that represents a large burden for the health care system. There is a broad spectrum of available treatment options for patients suffering from chronic lower back pain in the setting of degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine, including both conservative and operative approaches. Lumbar arthrodesis techniques can be divided into sub-categories based on the part of the vertebral column that is addressed (anterior vs posterior). Furthermore, one has to differentiate between approaches aiming at a solid fusion in contrast to motion-sparing techniques with the proposed advantage of a reduced risk of developing adjacent disc disease. However, the field of application and long-term outcomes of these novel motion-preserving surgical techniques, including facet arthroplasty, nucleus replacement, and lumbar disc arthroplasty, need to be more precisely evaluated in long-term prospective studies. Innovative surgical treatment strategies involving minimally invasive techniques, such as lateral lumbar interbody fusion or transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion, as well as percutaneous implantation of transpedicular or transfacet screws, have been established with the reported advantages of reduced tissue invasiveness, decreased collateral damage, reduced blood loss, and decreased risk of infection. The aim of this study was to review well-established procedures for lumbar spinal fusion with the main focus on current concepts on spinal arthrodesis and motion-sparing techniques in degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine. PMID:24303453

  14. Access to an optimal treatment. Current situation.

    PubMed

    Ugarte-Gil, Manuel F; Silvestre, Adriana M R; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A

    2015-03-01

    Access to an optimal treatment is determined by several factors, like availability, pricing/funding, and acceptability. In Latin America (LA), one of the regions with more disparities particularly on healthcare in the world, access is affected by other factors, including socio-demographic factors like poverty, living in rural regions, and/or health coverage. Regarding rheumatoid arthritis (RA), an inadequate access to specialists leads to diagnosis and treatment delays diminishing the probability of remission or control. Unfortunately, in almost every LA country, there are cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants without rheumatologists; furthermore, a primary care reference system is present in only about half the countries. In the public health system, coverage of biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs occurs for less than 10 % of the patients in about half of the countries. Also, as healthcare providers based their funding decisions mainly in direct costs instead of on patient-centered healthcare quality indicators, access to new drugs is more complicated in this region than in high-income countries. More accurate epidemiological data from LA need to be obtained in order to improve the management of patients with rheumatic diseases in general and RA in particular. PMID:26188617

  15. Herbal treatment for osteoporosis: a current review.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ping-Chung; Siu, Wing-Sum

    2013-04-01

    Osteoporosis is an aging problem. The declining bone mineral density (BMD) enhances the chances of fractures during minor falls. Effective pharmaceuticals are available for a rapid improvement of BMD. However, hormonal treatment gives serious complications, and bisphosphonates may lead to odd fractures of long bones, resulting from excessive rigidity of the cortical components. Many medicinal herbs used in Traditional Chinese Medicine, known as kidney tonics, have been tested for their effects on bone metabolism in the laboratory and clinically. Three of these, viz. Herba epimedii (, Yín Yáng Huò), Fructus ligustri lucidi (, Nǚ Zhēn Zi), and Fructus psoraleae (, Bǔ Gǔ Zhī) were chosen to form a herbal formula, ELP. ELP was tested on in vitro platforms and was shown to have both osteoblastic and anti- osteoclastic action. ELP tested on ovariectomized rats also showed BMD protection. ELP was then put on a placebo- controlled randomized clinical trial. BMD protection was obvious among those women with the onset of menopause beyond 10 years (P < 0.05). A general protective trend was observed among all women under trial (P > 0.05). Although a thorough literature review on the herbal treatment effects did not give convincing answers to the use of Chinese herbs in osteoporosis, our study supports more research and trials in this area, while we are looking for safe and effective agents to keep the bone metabolism in a balanced state. PMID:24716161

  16. Recurrent anterior shoulder instability: Review of the literature and current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Sofu, Hakan; Gürsu, Sarper; Koçkara, Nizamettin; Öner, Ali; Issın, Ahmet; Çamurcu, Yalkın

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review article is to discuss the clinical spectrum of recurrent traumatic anterior shoulder instability with the current concepts and controversies at the scientific level. Because of increasing participation of people from any age group of the population in sports activities, health care professionals dealing with the care of trauma patients must have a thorough understanding of the anatomy, patho-physiology, risk factors, and management of anterior shoulder instability. The risk factors for recurrent shoulder dislocation are young age, participation in high demand contact sports activities, presence of Hill-Sachs or osseous Bankart lesion, previous history of ipsilateral traumatic dislocation, ipsilateral rotator cuff or deltoid muscle insufficiency, and underlying ligamentous laxity. Achieving the best result for any particular patient depends on the procedure that allows observation of the joint surfaces, provides the anatomical repair, maintains range of motion, and also can be applied with low rates of complications and recurrence. Although various surgical techniques have been described, a consensus does not exist and thus, orthopedic surgeons should follow and try to improve the current evidence-based treatment modalities for the patients. PMID:25405191

  17. [Review of current pharmacologic treatment of pain].

    PubMed

    Brasseur, L

    1997-01-01

    Pain is the main reason prompting patients to consult their physicians. In acute conditions, pain has a very particular significance as a warning sign, enabling the physician to attempt a diagnosis. Nevertheless, its detrimental effect upon the individual (even in the case of acute pain) and its cost to society are now widely acknowledged. There can be no doubt about the physical component of pain, but the psychological and social aspects should not be ignored, particularly in the case of chronic pain. There is no single therapeutic approach to pain and, more often than not, successful treatment comprises a combination of several. Pharmacological treatments are undeniably the most common approach. In clinical practice, recent advances have been based upon an improved understanding of 'old' substances such as morphine and, at the same time, research continues in the hope of finding the 'ideal' analgesic-effective in most situations but without adverse effects: this appears to be a somewhat utopian arm at present, considering the number of different causes of pain. An improved understanding of the physiological mechanisms of pain has led, within the field of clinical practice, to several methods of differentiating pain. These depend on whether or not pain responds to morphine, or on the type of pain: pain due to an excess of nociception, pain resulting from deafferentation (caused by damage to nerve pathways) in the central or peripheral nervous system and psychogenic (idiopathic) pain. Likewise, there are several different ways of classifying analgesic treatments: according to the intensity of pain, as with use of the WHO ladder (which is based on the notion of steps) for the treatment of cancer pain; according to the presumed physiopathological mechanism and, in particular, the response to morphine, and according to the presumed central or peripheral mechanism of the drugs. In reality, peripherally acting drugs can also have a central mechanism of action, just as

  18. Clinical Characteristics and Current Treatment of Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Laura P.; Pasquale, Louis R.

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disorder in which degenerating retinal ganglion cells (RGC) produce significant visual disability. Clinically, glaucoma refers to an array of conditions associated with variably elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) that contributes to RGC loss via mechanical stress, vascular abnormalities, and other mechanisms, such as immune phenomena. The clinical diagnosis of glaucoma requires assessment of the ocular anterior segment with slit lamp biomicroscopy, which allows the clinician to recognize signs of conditions that can produce elevated IOP. After measurement of IOP, a specialized prismatic lens called a gonioscope is used to determine whether the angle is physically open or closed. The structural manifestation of RGC loss is optic nerve head atrophy and excavation of the neuroretinal rim tissue. Treatment is guided by addressing secondary causes for elevated IOP (such as inflammation, infection, and ischemia) whenever possible. Subsequently, a variety of medical, laser, and surgical options are used to achieve a target IOP. PMID:24890835

  19. Current diagnosis and treatment of Castleman's disease.

    PubMed

    González García, A; Moreno Cobo, M Á; Patier de la Peña, J L

    2016-04-01

    Castleman's disease is not just a single disease but rather an uncommon, heterogeneous group of nonclonal lymphoproliferative disorders, which have a broad spectrum of clinical expression. Three histological types have been reported, along with several clinical forms according to clinical presentation, histological substrate and associated diseases. Interleukin-6, its receptor polymorphisms, the human immunodeficiency virus and the human herpes virus 8 are involved in the etiopathogenesis of Castleman's disease. The study of this disease has shed light on a syndrome whose incidence is unknown. Despite recent significant advances in our understanding of this disease and the increasing therapeutic experience with rituximab, tocilizumab and siltuximab, there are still difficult questions concerning its aetiology, prognosis and optimal treatment. PMID:26749192

  20. New treatment concept for steam generators technical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, A.; Wirendal, B.O.; Lindberg, M.

    2007-07-01

    The project that will be described is a co-operation development project (SAGA) between Studsvik and the Ringhals NPP. The objective for this development project was, to show that it is possible to perform effective waste treatment of a Steam Generator(SG), to minimize the volume that in the end will have to be finally disposed of and to recycle as much of the metals as possible. Another objective for the project was to do this in a safe way and without a large dose load to the personnel. The treatment concept contains the whole chain of activities from loading of the steam generator at Ringhals NPP onto the special vessel M/S Sigyn, and the transportation of the SG from Ringhals NPP on the west coast of Sweden to Studsvik on the east coast, to the recycling of the metals and the packing of waste in final packages suitable for disposal. The volume for a final repository before treatment was about 400 m3 for the SG and after treatment the volume for final disposal is < 35 m{sup 3} which gives a volume reduction factor of about 11. The amount of material from the steam generator that has clearance for free release is 75-80 % of the weight. A project is started to analyse the experience from the project above and to come forward with recommendations for how to lower the dose exposure, minimize the secondary waste for final disposal and to decrease the treatment time. Some actions are already taken: - A new larger treatment facility is built at Studsvik, > 1000 m{sup 2}, planned to be operational in April 2007. - Investments in a larger band saw. - Improvements of the blasting equipment. - Improvements of the method of segmentation of the tube bundle. - Improvements of the method of volume reduction for the tube bundle. (authors)

  1. [Current diagnosis and treatment of acromegaly].

    PubMed

    Melgar, Virgilio; Espinosa, Etual; Cuenca, Dalia; Valle, Vanessa; Mercado, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Acromegaly is a rare condition characterized by the excessive secretion of growth hormone (GH), usually by a pituitary adenoma. The clinical manifestations of acromegaly include enlarged hands, feet and face, headaches, arthralgias, fatigue and hyperhydrosis. This condition is also associated with comorbidities such as hypertension and diabetes in a significant proportion of patients and frequently compromises life quality and life expectancy. The biochemical diagnosis of acromegaly rests on the demonstration of an autonomous secretion of GH by means of the measurement of glucose-suppressed GH levels and the serum concentration of insulin like growth factor type 1 (IGF-1). The localizing method of choice is magnetic resonance image of the selar area, which in 70 % of the cases reveals the presence of a macroadenoma. Even though the primary treatment is usually the transsphenoidal resection of the adenoma, the majority of patients require a multimodal intervention that includes radiotherapy, as well as pharmacological therapy with somatostatin analogs and dopamine agonists. The latter approach has resulted in a significant reduction in mortality and in an improvement in the quality of life. PMID:25680646

  2. [Current diagnosis and treatment of hyperprolactinemia].

    PubMed

    Melgar, Virgilio; Espinosa, Etual; Sosa, Ernesto; Rangel, María José; Cuenca, Dalia; Ramírez, Claudia; Mercado, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    Hyperprolactinemia is a frequent neuroendocrinological condition that should be approached in an orderly and integral fashion, starting with a complete clinical history. Once physiological causes such as pregnancy, systemic disorders such as primary hypothyroidism and the use of drugs with dopamine antagonistic actions such as metochlopramide have been ruled out, the most common cause of hyperprolactinemia is a PRL-secreting pituitary adenoma or prolactinoma. Prolactinomas are usually classified as microprolactinomas (less than 1 cm) or macroprolactinomas (larger than 1 cm), which can either be confined or invasive. The hormonal consequence of hypeprolactinemia is hypogonadism; in women, this is manifested as amenorrhea/oligomenorreha, anovulation and galactorrhea, whereas in men the main complaints are a diminished libido and erectile dysfunction. Macroprolactinomas can also present with symptoms and signs resulting form mass effect of the tumor, such as headaches and visual field defects. Other structural causes of hyperprolactinemia include non-functioning pituitary adenomas and infiltrative disorders, which can interrupt the inhibitory, descending dopaminergic tone. The primary treatment of prolactinomas is pharmacological with dopamine agonists such as cabergoline. PMID:26820213

  3. [Diabetic nephropathy: current diagnostics and treatment].

    PubMed

    Werth, S; Lehnert, H; Steinhoff, J

    2015-05-01

    Diabetic kidney disease is a leading cause of renal failure in Germany. Albuminuria is an early diagnostic indicator of renal damage in diabetes and, aside from renal failure, a major risk factor of cardiovascular disease. An early diagnosis of diabetic kidney disease is of great importance to reduce associated cardiovascular mortality; glycemic control should aim for HbA1c levels of < 7 %. Guidelines on blood pressure differ, but it should generally be reduced to < 140/90 mmHg; stricter limits should be applied if albuminuria is present. ACE inhibitors (ACE-I) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) should be preferred for blood pressure control. A combination of ACE-Is and ARBs or a renin-inhibitor therapy does not improve cardiovascular outcome, instead it increases the rate of adverse events, e.g., hyperkalemia or renal failure. Lipid control, usually with statins, should be started at an early phase of renal failure. Vitamin D receptor activation and uric acid reduction might play a future role in the treatment of diabetic kidney disease. Pharmacological modification of inflammatory signaling appears to be promising but is not yet of clinical relevance. PMID:25762007

  4. Current and emerging treatments for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Ba, Jenny Lin; Jandial, Rahul; Nesbit, Amanda; Badie, Behnam; Chen, Mike

    2015-04-01

    Brain metastasis in patients with cancer can be indicative of multisystem spread or lead to neurological demise if not locally controlled, and is associated with poor survival and high morbidity. Compared with metastasis to other areas of the body, brain metastasis possesses a unique biology that confers high resistance to systemic therapies. This phenomenon has been historically attributed to the inability of chemotherapeutic agents to pass through the blood-brain barrier. Recent studies challenge this premise, revealing other potentially targetable mechanism(s). Therapies that exploit recent advances in the understanding of brain metastasis are still in early stages of development. Encouragingly, and discovered by happenstance, some molecularly targeted drugs already appear to have efficacy against certain tumors and accompanying cerebral edema. In the meantime, conventional treatment modalities such as surgery and radiation have iteratively reached new levels of refinement. However, these achievements are somewhat muted by the emergence of magnetic resonance (MR)-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy, a minimally invasive neuroablative technique. On the horizon, MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery is similarly intriguing. Even in the absence of further advances, local control is frequently achieved with state-of-the-art therapies. Dramatic improvements will likely require sophisticated approaches that account for the particular effects of the microenvironment of the central nervous system on metastasis. PMID:25952487

  5. Birdshot uveitis: current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Menezo, Victor; Taylor, Simon RJ

    2014-01-01

    Birdshot chorioretinopathy is a relatively uncommon subtype of idiopathic posterior uveitis with distinct clinical characteristics and a strong genetic association with the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-A29 allele. The diagnosis remains clinical and is based on the presence of typical clinical features, including multiple, distinctive, hypopigmented choroidal lesions throughout the fundus. The long-term visual prognosis of this disorder, however, remains guarded – central visual acuity can be preserved until late in the disease and it is not uncommon for patients to receive inadequate immunosuppressive treatment, leading to a poor long-term outcome in which peripheral retinal damage eventually leads to visual deterioration. Birdshot chorioretinopathy has proven a particularly attractive area of study within the field of uveitis, as it is a relatively easily defined disease with an associated human leukocyte antigen haplotype. Despite this, however, the immune mechanisms involved in its pathogenesis remain unclear, and some patients continue to lose retinal function despite therapy with corticosteroids and conventional immunosuppressive agents. Laboratory research continues to investigate the underlying mechanisms of disease, and clinical research is now being driven to improve the phenotyping and monitoring of this condition as, in the era of so-called personalized medicine, it is becoming increasingly important to identify patients at risk of visual loss early so that they can be treated more aggressively with targeted therapies such as the newer biological agents. This approach requires the formation of collaborative groups, as the relative rarity of the condition makes it difficult for one center to accumulate enough patients for worthwhile studies. Nevertheless, results obtained with newer therapies, such as biological agents directed against particular cytokines or cell-surface receptors, demonstrate ever improving control of the inflammation in refractory

  6. Current and emerging treatments for pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Regine, W F; John, W J; Mohiuddin, M

    1997-10-01

    The worldwide annual pancreatic cancer death rate equals its estimated annual incidence. Surgery has been considered the only curative modality for this disease, but only 5 to 15% of patients are candidates for potentially curative resection. Evidence that postoperative adjuvant treatment improves outcome has been limited to a single randomised trial of a well tolerated split-course chemoradiation regimen. More intensive regimens have since been developed and are associated with, at best, a modest improvement in patient outcome. The potentially significant morbidity associated with pancreaticoduodenectomy, which can compromise the delivery of postoperative adjuvant chemoradiation, has led to the development of preoperative adjuvant ('neoadjuvant') chemoradiation in these patients. Although experience suggests that such an approach is feasible, its ultimate impact awaits further evaluation. Combined modality therapy has produced the most promising results in patients with unresectable or locally advanced disease. However, only modest improvements in median survival and minimal increases in long term survival have so far been achieved. This observation has encouraged many investigators to devise innovative methods of delivering therapy, including radioisotope implantation and intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). Combined modality therapy with radioisotope implantation appears to have the greatest potential for improving local control and survival in these patients. IORT may be associated with lower morbidity than radioisotope implantation, but its impact may be limited by the radiobiological disadvantage associated with single dose boost therapy. Although new radiosensitising drugs are being tested, the problem of distant metastasis remains significant. New chemotherapeutic agents such as gemcitabine appear to have the potential to produce better results than those achieved over the last 35 years with fluorouracil. Investigations into the optimal integration of

  7. Use Dose Bricks Concept to Implement Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jia-Ming; Yu, Tsan-Jung; Yeh, Shyh-An; Chao, Pei-Ju; Huang, Chih-Jou

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. A “dose bricks” concept has been used to implement nasopharyngeal carcinoma treatment plan; this method specializes particularly in the case with bell shape nasopharyngeal carcinoma case. Materials and Methods. Five noncoplanar fields were used to accomplish the dose bricks technique treatment plan. These five fields include (a) right superior anterior oblique (RSAO), (b) left superior anterior oblique (LSAO), (c) right anterior oblique (RAO), (d) left anterior oblique (LAO), and (e) superior inferior vertex (SIV). Nondivergence collimator central axis planes were used to create different abutting field edge while normal organs were blocked by multileaf collimators in this technique. Results. The resulting 92% isodose curves encompassed the CTV, while maximum dose was about 115%. Approximately 50% volume of parotid glands obtained 10–15% of total dose and 50% volume of brain obtained less than 20% of total dose. Spinal cord receives only 5% from the scatter dose. Conclusions. Compared with IMRT, the expenditure of planning time and costing, “dose bricks” may after all be accepted as an optional implementation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma conformal treatment plan; furthermore, this method also fits the need of other nonhead and neck lesions if organ sparing and noncoplanar technique can be executed. PMID:24967395

  8. Current status on prevention and treatment of canine leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Reguera, Rosa M; Morán, Miguel; Pérez-Pertejo, Yolanda; García-Estrada, Carlos; Balaña-Fouce, Rafael

    2016-08-30

    Canine leishmaniasis (CanL) is a parasite-borne disease mainly induced by Leishmania infantum in the Old World and Leishmania chagasi (infantum) in the New World. CanL is a zoonosis transmitted by the bite of infected Phlebotominae flies that act as vectors. CanL is a very serious disease that usually produces death when remains untreated and can be a focus of transmission to other dogs or humans. Infected dogs and other domestic and wild animals act as reservoirs and are a real threat to uninfected/healthy dogs and humans in endemic areas where the sand flies are present. Prevention of new infections in dogs can help to stop the current increase of the disease in humans, reinforcing the concept of "One Health" approach. The management of CanL is being performed using prophylactic measures in healthy dogs - insecticides impregnated in collars or immunostimulants applied by spot-on devices - and chemotherapy in animals that suffer from the disease. Antimonials as first-line monotherapy have proven efficacy in reducing most of the clinical signs of CanL, but they need to be administered during several days, and no complete parasite clearance is achieved, favouring the presence of relapses among treated dogs. Therefore, new drugs, such as miltefosine, or combinations of this drug or antimonials with allopurinol are in the pipeline of clinical treatment of CanL. Recently, there has been an emergence of protective - prophylactic - and curative - autogenous vaccines - immunotherapy tools to face CanL, whose results are still under study. This review highlights the current use of preventive and eradicative weapons to fight against this disease, which is a scourge for dogs and a continuous threat to human beings. PMID:27523945

  9. The concept of treatment-free remission in chronic myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Saußele, S; Richter, J; Hochhaus, A; Mahon, F-X

    2016-01-01

    The advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) into the management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) has profoundly improved prognosis. Survival of responders is approaching that of the general population but lifelong treatment is still recommended. In several trials, TKI treatment has been stopped successfully in approximately half of the patients with deep molecular response. This has prompted the development of a new concept in the evaluation of CML patients known as ‘treatment-free remission'. The future in CML treatment will be to define criteria for the safe and most promising discontinuation of TKI on one hand, and, on the other, to increase the number of patients available for such an attempt. Until safe criteria have been defined, discontinuation of therapy is still experimental and should be restricted to clinical trials or registries. This review will provide an overview of current knowledge as well as an outlook on future challenges. PMID:27133824

  10. Patients with atrial fibrillation undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: current concepts and concerns: part II.

    PubMed

    Dzeshka, Mikhail S; Brown, Richard A; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) and coronary artery disease (CAD) often present concomitantly. Given the increased risk of thrombotic complications with either of them but different pathogenesis of clot formation, combined antithrombotic therapy is necessary in patients developing acute coronary syndrome and/or undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Different antithrombotic regimens in this group of patients have been summarized and discussed earlier. Triple therapy remains the treatment of choice in these patients despite the increased risk of hemorrhagic complications. Given the absence of evidence from randomized controlled trials, balancing the risk of stroke and stent thrombosis against the risk of major bleeding is a challenge. Precise stroke and bleeding risk assessment is an essential part of the decision making process regarding antithrombotic management. Continuing the discussion of current concepts and concerns of antithrombotic management in AF patients undergoing PCI, we emphasize the importance of various strategies to reduce bleeding in the modern era, namely, radial access combined with careful selection of a P2Y₁₂ receptor inhibitor, use of newer drug-eluting stents, and uninterrupted anticoagulation for patients undergoing procedures. We also focus on the role of the non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (novel oral anticoagulants, eg, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban) which are increasingly used for stroke prevention in AF. Finally, recent recommendations on the management of antithrombotic therapy in AF patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome and/or undergoing PCI as well as ongoing clinical trials and future directions are highlighted. PMID:25534093

  11. [New and Current Concepts of Therapy in Non-CF Bronchiectasis].

    PubMed

    Allewelt, Markus; de Roux, Andrés

    2016-05-01

    Non-CF (NCF)-bronchiectasis is a syndrome of chronic inflammation leading to dilatation of airways and structural lung damage. Improvements of diagnostic procedures increase its perceived frequency. In Germany, recent data suggest a prevalence of 67/100 000.The outcome of therapeutic interventions is critically related to thorough diagnostic procedures. Genetical or immunological disorders (cystic fibrosis, alpha-1-AT deficiency, immune deficiency syndromes) require treatment options different from idiopathic NCF-bronchiectasis.Therapy is aimed at suppression of chronic inflammation and includes continuous mobilisation of secretions, immunomodulatory strategies and antibiotic therapy, whenever required. Surgical procedures are limited to specific complications (e. g. destroyed lung after airway obstruction, uncontrolled hemorrhage)Macrolides show a variety of immunological properties with favourable results in reduction of symptoms and frequency of exacerbations. Longtime tolerance is good, if individual risk factors are excluded.Antibiotics are given according to resistance patterns in acute exacerbations and in first-time detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and MRSA. Inhaled antibiotics for NCF-bronchiectasis will gain importance, depending on future studies. Currently, they are only used in individualized concepts of therapy. PMID:27176062

  12. Self-Recirculating Casing Treatment Concept for Enhanced Compressor Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    A state-of-the-art CFD code (APNASA) was employed in a computationally based investigation of the impact of casing bleed and injection on the stability and performance of a moderate speed fan rotor wherein the stalling mass flow is controlled by tip flow field breakdown. The investigation was guided by observed trends in endwall flow characteristics (e.g., increasing endwall aerodynamic blockage) as stall is approached and based on the hypothesis that application of bleed or injection can mitigate these trends. The "best" bleed and injection configurations were then combined to yield a self-recirculating casing treatment concept. The results of this investigation yielded: 1) identification of the fluid mechanisms which precipitate stall of tip critical blade rows, and 2) an approach to recirculated casing treatment which results in increased compressor stall range with minimal or no loss in efficiency. Subsequent application of this approach to a high speed transonic rotor successfully yielded significant improvements in stall range with no loss in compressor efficiency.

  13. [Current issues on the treatment of chronic constipation].

    PubMed

    Hong, Kyoung Sup; Jung, Kee Wook; Lee, Tae Hee; Lee, Bong Eun; Park, Sun-Young; Shin, Jeong Eun; Kim, Seong-Eun; Park, Kyung Sik; Choi, Suck Chei

    2014-09-25

    Chronic constipation is a very common clinical problem with its prevalence of up to 14% in the general population. It is not a life-threatening disease, but since patient's satisfaction to the treatment is known to be as low as 50%, chronic constipation still remains a clinically challenging problem. Fortunately, many new treatments have been introduced or are to be introduced in the near future. This article will review the basic concepts and the results of recent studies on the new treatments for chronic constipation. PMID:25252863

  14. Historical Aspects of the Concept of "Compulsory Education": Rethinking the Rhetoric of Debates in Current Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Manabu

    2008-01-01

    Current Educational Reform in Japan is oddly captured with confused conceptions of "compulsory education." The Ministry of Education blankets such connotations of it, as a national budget system, mandated school curriculum, responsible partnership of school with community and accountabilities of local school board, in defense of vested national…

  15. Migraine preventive therapy: current and emerging treatment options.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, A M; Bigal, M E

    2005-05-01

    In this paper we review new treatment options for migraine prevention. We start with an overview about migraine and then briefly discuss current indications for migraine prevention and new and emerging preventive medications. PMID:15926007

  16. 6. View north of the treatment house currently named the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View north of the treatment house currently named the Whitney Water Center. When the water company went to a pre-chlorination process the equipment was housed in this building adjacent to the inlet from the Lake Whitney Dam. The treatment house is currently the building used as an environmental learning center for school children. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Lake Whitney Dam, East side of Whitney Avenue near intersection with Armory Street, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  17. A new concept for noninvasive tinnitus treatment utilizing multimodal pathways.

    PubMed

    Gloeckner, Cory D; Smith, Benjamin T; Markovitz, Craig D; Lim, Hubert H

    2013-01-01

    Current noninvasive treatments for tinnitus have shown mixed results. There have been encouraging developments in using invasive brain or vagal nerve stimulation to modulate neural populations driving the tinnitus percept. However, these invasive treatments can only be used in a small patient population with severe conditions. In this preliminary study, we present a new treatment option we call Multimodal Synchronization Therapy (MST), which attempts to achieve synchronized and localized brain activation without invasive neural stimulation. MST combines multiple sensory, motor, limbic, and cognitive inputs to elicit activation of multimodal neurons to potentially modulate specific neurons driving the tinnitus percept. We present preliminary data in a guinea pig model showing activation of somatosensory and auditory pathways to alter neural activity within the inferior colliculus, a multimodal integration region that has shown pathological changes in animals and patients with tinnitus. Electrical stimulation of different body locations induced excitatory responses in the inferior colliculus, eliciting responses in up to 41% of all recording sites for a given somatic site. Paired somatic and acoustic stimulation resulted in enhanced or suppressed acoustic-driven neural activity in the inferior colliculus that varied depending on stimulation and recording location. Similar modulation effects were observed in the auditory cortex, which may relate to changes in auditory perception. Further studies need to incorporate multiple multimodal pathways and must also confirm that MST can suppress the abnormal neural patterns that directly drive the tinnitus percept. PMID:24110389

  18. [ERRORS IN DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF IMMUNODEPENDENT PATHOLOGY (ORIGINAL CONCEPT)].

    PubMed

    Kazmirchuk, V E; Tsaryk, V V; Maltsev, D V; Dyseeva, V V; Voytyuk, T V; Sidorenko, E I; Solon'ko, I I; Pyankova, A V

    2015-01-01

    Based on many years of experience in 2009, we developed the original concept of a mixed approach to the treatment of infectious diseases in patients. During 2.5 years(from 2013 to June 2015) to have applied for consultative-diagnostic help of 3965 patients who had not verified the primary diagnosis. The basic principle of verification of the pathology of the removal of various causes immunosuppression. Based on our extensive, research and observation was often found in patients ascaridosis (55%) and giardiasis (65%), as a possible cause of immunosuppression. In 13% of patients was found the mucosal candidiasis. Among frequently and chronically ill persons we identified the active forms of Epstein-Barr virus (quantitative polymerase chain reaction in saliva) in 40%. The criterion for assessing performance immunogram was a decrease of two sigmal deviation from the lower age limit. In the study of neutrophil myeloperoxidase content observed decline (< 60%) in 99 (9.7%) of 1015 patients, indicating a fairly common cause of long-term permit infection in the tissues and persistence C. albicans. In the study of lymphocyte subpopulations often demonstrated reduction in the number of natural killer cells (26.7% of subjects), which shows a decline of one of the most important factors of congenital immunity. Among the humoral immune disorders often noted the decrease of total IgG (2.4%) and its subclass IgG1 (22.1%), indicating a significant diagnostic value determination of IgG subclasses it even with normal serum total. Thus, approximately 76% of patients often suffer set of a decrease immunity. Patients developed with mixed infections caused by various bacterial, fungal, viral and protozoan agents and worms. Immunological study of patients should be redynamics after eliminating the causes immunosuppression and sanitation foci of infection. Only multi-level examination of the patient will determine the final diagnosis and adequate treatment. PMID:27491144

  19. Current concepts in Alzheimer’s Disease: molecules, models and translational perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The field of neuroscience research in AD has been evolving rapidly over the last few years, and has pinpointed a number of candidate targets for molecules with crucial role in the pathophysiology of AD. Recent developments have furthermore enabled new ways of modeling the disease, while an increasing number of preclinically validated targets is currently being taken one step forward and tested in clinical trials. These recent developments are reviewed in the current Special Issues Series on “Current concepts in Alzheimer's disease research: molecules, models and translational perspectives” in a number of state-of-the-art manuscripts. PMID:24148188

  20. Personalized medicine and treatment approaches in hypertension: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, James Brian

    2016-01-01

    In the US, hypertension affects one in three adults. Current guideline-based treatment of hypertension involves little diagnostic testing. A more personalized approach to the treatment of hypertension might be of use. Several methods of personalized treatment have been proposed and vetted to varying degrees. The purpose of this narrative review is to discuss the rationale for personalized therapy in hypertension, barriers to its development and implementation, some influential examples of proposed personalization measures, and a view of future efforts. PMID:27103841

  1. Current and emerging treatment options for myopic choroidal neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    El Matri, Leila; Chebil, Ahmed; Kort, Fedra

    2015-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is the main cause of visual impairment in highly myopic patients younger than 50 years of age. There are different treatments for myopic CNV (mCNV), with 5- to 10-year outcomes currently. Chorioretinal atrophy is still the most important determinant factor for visual outcome. The purpose of this study is to provide an overview of the current treatments for mCNV, including laser, surgical management, verteporfin photodynamic therapy, and mainly anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy. Emerging treatment options are also discussed. PMID:25987831

  2. Current and emerging treatment options for myopic choroidal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    El Matri, Leila; Chebil, Ahmed; Kort, Fedra

    2015-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) is the main cause of visual impairment in highly myopic patients younger than 50 years of age. There are different treatments for myopic CNV (mCNV), with 5- to 10-year outcomes currently. Chorioretinal atrophy is still the most important determinant factor for visual outcome. The purpose of this study is to provide an overview of the current treatments for mCNV, including laser, surgical management, verteporfin photodynamic therapy, and mainly anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapy. Emerging treatment options are also discussed. PMID:25987831

  3. [Consideration on revision of current sanitary standard for non-hazardous treatment of night soil].

    PubMed

    Hai-Chun, Wei

    2011-02-01

    With the decrease of parasitic ovum in night soil, the current Sanitary Standard for the Non-hazardous Treatment of Night Soil is not suitable for health situation of populations and actually sanitary state of night soil. The concept of green decontamination should be introduced into the design, construction, utilization and management. The feasibility of the current standard need to be improved. Considering the current sanitary state of night soil, decontamination, the impact to environment, actual constructing situations of sanitary toilet and its implementation, it is necessary to establish a new assessment system by adding environmental indicators and sensitive markers reflecting terminal contaminated state. PMID:22164392

  4. The Current Situation of Treatment Systems for Alcoholism in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jee Wook; Lee, Boung Chul; Kang, Tae-Cheon

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholism is becoming one of the most serious issues in Korea. The purpose of this review article was to understand the present status of the treatment system for alcoholism in Korea compared to the United States and to suggest its developmental direction in Korea. Current modalities of alcoholism treatment in Korea including withdrawal treatment, pharmacotherapy, and psychosocial treatment are available according to Korean evidence-based treatment guidelines. Benzodiazepines and supportive care including vitamin and nutritional support are mainly used to treat alcohol withdrawal in Korea. Naltrexone and acamprosate are the drugs of first choice to treat chronic alcoholism. Psychosocial treatment methods such as individual psychotherapy, group psychotherapy, family therapy, cognitive behavior therapy, cue exposure therapy, 12-step facilitation therapy, self-help group therapy, and community-based treatment have been carried out to treat chronic alcoholism in Korea. However, current alcohol treatment system in Korea is not integrative compared to that in the United States. To establish the treatment system, it is important to set up an independent governmental administration on alcohol abuse, to secure experts on alcoholism, and to conduct outpatient alcoholism treatment programs and facilities in an open system including some form of continuing care. PMID:23400047

  5. Bordetella pertussis: new concepts in pathogenesis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Carbonetti, Nicholas H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this review is to summarize and discuss recent findings and selected topics of interest in Bordetella pertussis virulence and pathogenesis and treatment of pertussis. It is not intended to cover issues on immune responses to B. pertussis infection or problems with currently used pertussis vaccines. Recent findings Studies on the activities of various B. pertussis virulence factors include the immunomodulatory activities of filamentous hemagglutinin, fimbriae, and adenylate cyclase toxin. Recently emerging B. pertussis strains show evidence of genetic selection for vaccine escape mutants, with changes in vaccine antigen-expressing genes, some of which may have increased the virulence of this pathogen. Severe and fatal pertussis in young infants continues to be a problem, with several studies highlighting predictors of fatality, including the extreme leukocytosis associated with this infection. Treatments for pertussis are extremely limited, though early antibiotic intervention may be beneficial. Neutralizing pertussis toxin activity may be an effective strategy, as well as targeting two host proteins, pendrin and sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors, as novel potential therapeutic interventions. Summary Pertussis is reemerging as a major public health problem and continued basic research is revealing information on bacterial virulence and disease pathogenesis, as well as potential novel strategies for vaccination and targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26906206

  6. Sonodynamic Therapy: Concept, Mechanism and Application to Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    McHale, Anthony P; Callan, John F; Nomikou, Nikolitsa; Fowley, Colin; Callan, Bridgeen

    2016-01-01

    Sonodynamic therapy (SDT) represents an emerging approach that offers the possibility of non-invasively eradicating solid tumors in a site-directed manner. It involves the sensitization of target tissues with a non-toxic sensitizing chemical agent and subsequent exposure of the sensitized tissues to relatively low-intensity ultrasound. Essentially, both aspects (the sensitization and ultrasound exposure) are harmless, and cytotoxic events occur when both are combined. Due to the significant depth that ultrasound penetrates tissue, the approach provides an advantage over similar alternative approaches, such as photodynamic therapy (PDT), in which less penetrating light is employed to provide the cytotoxic effect in sensitized tissues. This suggests that sonodynamic therapy may find wider clinical application, particularly for the non-invasive treatment of less accessible lesions. Early SDT-based approaches employed many of the sensitizers used in PDT, although the manner in which ultrasound activates the sensitizer differs from activation events in PDT. Here we will review the currently accepted mechanisms by which ultrasound activates sensitizers to elicit cytotoxic effects. In addition, we will explore the breath of evidence from in-vitro and in-vivo SDT-based studies, providing the reader with an insight into the therapeutic potential offered by SDT in the treatment of cancer. PMID:26486350

  7. Current options for the treatment of pathological scarring.

    PubMed

    Poetschke, Julian; Gauglitz, Gerd G

    2016-05-01

    Scarring is the consequence of surgery, trauma or different skin diseases. Apart from fresh, immature scars,that transform into mature scars over the course of would healing and that do not require further treatment,linear hypertrophic scars, widespread hypertrophic scars, keloids and atrophic scars exist. Symptoms like pruritusand pain, stigmatization as well as functional and aesthetic impairments that are very disturbing for the affected patients can bethe basis for the desire for treatment. Today, a multitude of options for the treatment and prevention of scars exists. Topical agents based on silicone or onion extract, intralesional injections of cristalline glucocorticoids (oftentimes in combinationwith cryotherapy) or 5-Fluorouracil as well as ablative and nonablative laser treatment are used. Current guidelines summarize the multitude of available treatment options and the currently available datafor the treating physicians, allowing them to make clear therapy recommendations for every single scar type. Relieving patients of their discomfort and doing their aesthetic demands justice is thus possible. Apart from scar prevention becoming more and more important, the increased use of modernlaser treatment options constitutes a key point in clinical scar treatment. At the same time the attention is turned to evaluating current therapeutic options with the help of contemporary study designs so as to graduallyimprove the level of evidence in scar treatment. PMID:27119465

  8. Treatment for primary hypothyroidism: current approaches and future possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Chakera, Ali J; Pearce, Simon HS; Vaidya, Bijay

    2012-01-01

    Primary hypothyroidism is the most common endocrine disease. Although the diagnosis and treatment of hypothyroidism is often considered simple, there are large numbers of people with this condition who are suboptimally treated. Even in those people with hypothyroidism who are biochemically euthyroid on levothyroxine replacement there is a significant proportion who report poorer quality of life. This review explores the historical and current treatment options for hypothyroidism, reasons for and potential solutions to suboptimal treatment, and future possibilities in the treatment of hypothyroidism. PMID:22291465

  9. Sportsman hernia; the review of current diagnosis and treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Paksoy, Melih; Sekmen, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    Groin pain is an important clinical entity that may affect a sportsman’s active sports life. Sportsman’s hernia is a chronic low abdominal and groin pain syndrome. Open and laparoscopic surgical treatment may be chosen in case of conservative treatment failure. Studies on sportsman’s hernia, which is a challenging situation in both diagnosis and treatment, are ongoing in many centers. We reviewed the treatment results of 37 patients diagnosed and treated as sportsman’s hernia at our hospital between 2011–2014, in light of current literature. PMID:27436937

  10. Sportsman hernia; the review of current diagnosis and treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Paksoy, Melih; Sekmen, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    Groin pain is an important clinical entity that may affect a sportsman's active sports life. Sportsman's hernia is a chronic low abdominal and groin pain syndrome. Open and laparoscopic surgical treatment may be chosen in case of conservative treatment failure. Studies on sportsman's hernia, which is a challenging situation in both diagnosis and treatment, are ongoing in many centers. We reviewed the treatment results of 37 patients diagnosed and treated as sportsman's hernia at our hospital between 2011-2014, in light of current literature. PMID:27436937

  11. Historical and Current Concepts of Fibrillogenesis and In vivo Amyloidogenesis: Implications of Amyloid Tissue Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Kisilevsky, Robert; Raimondi, Sara; Bellotti, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Historical and current concepts of in vitro fibrillogenesis are considered in the light of disorders in which amyloid is deposited at anatomic sites remote from the site of synthesis of the corresponding precursor protein. These clinical conditions set constraints on the interpretation of information derived from in vitro fibrillogenesis studies. They suggest that in addition to kinetic and thermodynamic factors identified in vitro, fibrillogenesis in vivo is determined by site specific factors most of which have yet to be identified. PMID:27243018

  12. Historical and Current Concepts of Fibrillogenesis and In vivo Amyloidogenesis: Implications of Amyloid Tissue Targeting.

    PubMed

    Kisilevsky, Robert; Raimondi, Sara; Bellotti, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Historical and current concepts of in vitro fibrillogenesis are considered in the light of disorders in which amyloid is deposited at anatomic sites remote from the site of synthesis of the corresponding precursor protein. These clinical conditions set constraints on the interpretation of information derived from in vitro fibrillogenesis studies. They suggest that in addition to kinetic and thermodynamic factors identified in vitro, fibrillogenesis in vivo is determined by site specific factors most of which have yet to be identified. PMID:27243018

  13. Leading-edge vortex research: Some nonplanar concepts and current challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. F.; Osborn, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    Some background information is provided for the Vortex Flow Aerodynamics Conference and that current slender wing airplanes do not use variable leading edge geometry to improve transonic drag polar is shown. Highlights of some of the initial studies combining wing camber, or flaps, with vortex flow are presented. Current vortex flap studies were reviewed to show that there is a large subsonic data base and that transonic and supersonic generic studies have begun. There is a need for validated flow field solvers to calculate vortex/shock interactions at transonic and supersonic speeds. Many important research opportunities exist for fundamental vortex flow investigations and for designing advanced fighter concepts.

  14. Treatment of myasthenia gravis: current practice and future directions.

    PubMed

    Ciafaloni, Emma; Sanders, Donald B

    2002-09-01

    Myasthenia gravis is the best understood of the autoimmune diseases and a number of treatments are currently used to produce clinical improvement. However, due to the scarcity of evidence-based and comparative data, there is still no consensus on many therapeutic issues. Even a widely accepted treatment like thymectomy has never been proven effective by a well-designed trial. These are just some of the unanswered questions: What is the best treatment algorithm and safest long-term management of myasthenia gravis? What patients are likely to benefit from thymectomy? How long should myasthenia gravis patients be treated? Is it possible to discontinue immunotherapy once remission has been achieved? What are the risks associated with long-term immunosuppression? In this article, we review current therapeutic strategies and these unresolved questions about myasthenia gravis treatment. PMID:19810991

  15. Treatment compliance in chronic illness: Current situation and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Conthe, P; Márquez Contreras, E; Aliaga Pérez, A; Barragán García, B; Fernández de Cano Martín, M N; González Jurado, M; Ollero Baturone, M; Pinto, J L

    2014-01-01

    Long-term chronic diseases have a high mortality rate around the world, affecting both genders equally. Despite improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of various health problems, lack of treatment compliance remains an obstacle to improving health and patient quality of life, and it carries a high associated socio-healthcare cost. The objectives of this study were to develop the concept of «therapeutic adherence», which includes both pharmacological compliance as well as non-pharmacological (level of agreement and patient involvement, lifestyle changes, etc.) treatments. The study also aimed to establish the clinical and socio-health impact of non-compliance, the reasons for non-compliance, and methods and strategies to improve compliance. The results of this study support therapeutic adherence as an essential goal of the healthcare system that encompasses all stakeholders involved in patient health. PMID:24816042

  16. Update on xerostomia: current treatment modalities and future trends.

    PubMed

    Givens, Edward

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses some of the current treatment modalities available to those who suffer from xerostomia and looks at some therapies currently being explored to ameliorate the condition. With the number of elderly patients in the U.S. population expected to increase--concomitant with the increase in incidence of xerostomia in this group as well as other special patient population groups (that is, postradiation, Sjogren's syndrome, and so forth)--it is increasingly important that dentists maintain an awareness of the clinical implications of xerostomia and a knowledge of appropriate treatment recommendations. PMID:16689063

  17. Retroperitoneal Liposarcoma: Current Insights in Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Matthyssens, Lucas E.; Creytens, David; Ceelen, Wim P.

    2015-01-01

    Retroperitoneal liposarcoma (RLS) is a rare, biologically heterogeneous tumor that present considerable challenges due to its size and deep location. As a consequence, the majority of patients with high-grade RLS will develop locally recurrent disease following surgery, and this constitutes the cause of death in most patients. Here, we review current insights and controversies regarding histology, molecular biology, extent of surgery, (neo)adjuvant treatment, and systemic treatment including novel targeted agents in RLS. PMID:25713799

  18. Current Thoughts in Fungal Keratitis: Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Zubair; Miller, Darlene; Galor, Anat

    2013-01-01

    Fungal keratitis remains a challenging and often elusive diagnosis in geographic regions where it is endemic. Marred by delays in diagnosis, the sequelae of corneal fungal infections, though preventable, can be irreversible. Recent studies and advances in the arena have broadened the approach and treatment to mycotic keratitis. This review will discuss current diagnostic modalities of fungal keratitis and will particularly focus on treatment regimens. It will also explore future therapeutic models and critique the potential benefit of each. PMID:24040467

  19. Occlusion for implant-supported fixed dental prostheses in partially edentulous patients: a literature review and current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Sukotjo, Cortino

    2013-01-01

    Implant treatment has become the treatment of choice to replace missing teeth in partially edentulous areas. Dental implants present different biological and biomechanical characteristics than natural teeth. Occlusion is considered to be one of the most important factors contributing to implant success. Most literature on implant occlusal concepts is based on expert opinion, anecdotal experiences, in vitro and animal studies, and only limited clinical research. Furthermore, scientific literature regarding implant occlusion, particularly in implant-supported fixed dental prostheses remains controversial. In this study, the current status of implant occlusion was reviewed and discussed. Further randomized clinical research to investigate the correlation between implant occlusion, the implant success rate, and its risk factors is warranted to determine best clinical practices. PMID:23678387

  20. Occlusion for implant-supported fixed dental prostheses in partially edentulous patients: a literature review and current concepts.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Judy Chia-Chun; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2013-04-01

    Implant treatment has become the treatment of choice to replace missing teeth in partially edentulous areas. Dental implants present different biological and biomechanical characteristics than natural teeth. Occlusion is considered to be one of the most important factors contributing to implant success. Most literature on implant occlusal concepts is based on expert opinion, anecdotal experiences, in vitro and animal studies, and only limited clinical research. Furthermore, scientific literature regarding implant occlusion, particularly in implant-supported fixed dental prostheses remains controversial. In this study, the current status of implant occlusion was reviewed and discussed. Further randomized clinical research to investigate the correlation between implant occlusion, the implant success rate, and its risk factors is warranted to determine best clinical practices. PMID:23678387

  1. In vitro testing to a panel of potential chemotherapeutics and current concepts of chemotherapy in benign meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Balik, Vladimir; Sulla, Igor; Park, Hun Ho; Sarissky, Marek

    2015-09-01

    Treatment of benign meningiomas remains a challenge, especially when they involve the skull-base or when surgery and radiation fail. Moreover, a recent in vitro MTT (3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide) study testing hydroxyurea, temozolomide and other targeting agents failed to identify drugs effective in their treatment; therefore the search for further more effective agents continues. We performed a thorough review of in vitro investigations, animal studies and human clinical trials and endeavoured to integrate our results of MTT assay into current concepts of chemotherapy in benign meningiomas. Our results demonstrated that other chemotherapeutics with various mechanisms of action have the potential to be incorporated into second line therapy. Our study shows for the first time that chemosensitivity/resistance may be associated with histopathological variants of benign meningiomas. PMID:26099192

  2. Occlusion in implant dentistry. A review of the literature of prosthetic determinants and current concepts.

    PubMed

    Gross, M D

    2008-06-01

    Today the clinician is faced with widely varying concepts regarding the number, location, distribution and inclination of implants required to support the functional and parafunctional demands of occlusal loading. Primary clinical dilemmas of planning for maximal or minimal numbers of implants, their axial inclination, lengths and required volume and quality of supporting bone remain largely unanswered by adequate clinical outcome research. Planning and executing optimal occlusion schemes is an integral part of implant supported restorations. In its wider sense this includes considerations of multiple inter-relating factors of ensuring adequate bone support, implant location number, length, distribution and inclination, splinting, vertical dimension aesthetics, static and dynamic occlusal schemes and more. Current concepts and research on occlusal loading and overloading are reviewed together with clinical outcome and biomechanical studies and their clinical relevance discussed. A comparison between teeth and implants regarding their proprioceptive properties and mechanisms of supporting functional and parafunctional loading is made and clinical applications made regarding current concepts in restoring the partially edentulous dentition. The relevance of occlusal traumatism and fatigue microdamage alone or in combination with periodontal or peri-implant inflammation is reviewed and applied to clinical considerations regarding splinting of adjacent implants and teeth, posterior support and eccentric guidance schemes. Occlusal restoration of the natural dentition has classically been divided into considerations of planning for sufficient posterior support, occlusal vertical dimension and eccentric guidance to provide comfort and aesthetics. Mutual protection and anterior disclusion have come to be considered as acceptable therapeutic modalities. These concepts have been transferred to the restoration of implant-supported restoration largely by default. However, in

  3. Newer concepts regarding resistance in the treatment Helicobacter pylori infections

    PubMed Central

    Graham, David Y.; Shiotani, Akiko

    2010-01-01

    Summary The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance is now such that all patients should be considered as having resistant infections. Ideally therapy is based on pretreatment susceptibility testing. Empiric therapies should assume antimicrobial resistance and use higher doses for 14 days. Acceptable results are 90–94% cure intention to treat (Grade B) or greater. Clarithromycin-containing triple therapies now typically produce ≤80% cure ITT (Grade F) and are no longer acceptable empiric therapy. Current initial therapy options are between sequential therapy, concomitant therapy, and bismuth containing quadruple therapy. Sequential therapy has the potential to be improved to ≥95% cure ITT (Grade A) by continuing the amoxicillin through the second and/or by increasing the duration. Better appreciation of the role of acidity in phenotypic resistance has resulted in high cure rates with high dose PPI plus amoxicillin dual therapy; additional studies to devise better dual-based multidrug regimes are still needed. Antimicrobial choices following treatment failure is best approached by susceptibility testing. If not available, we recommended a bismuth containing quadruple therapy substituting a new drug for metronidazole/tinidazole and/or clarithromycin if they have been used previously. The alternate would be to use a 14 day high dose PPI, amoxicillin-based triple therapy with rifabutin, a fluoroquinolone, or furazolidone. PMID:18446147

  4. Modern concepts of treatment and prevention of lightning injuries.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Farinholt, Heidi-Marie A; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D; Long, William B

    2005-01-01

    Lightning is the second most common cause of weather-related death in the United States. Lightning is a natural atmospheric discharge that occurs between regions of net positive and net negative electric charges. There are several types of lightning, including streak lightning, sheet lightning, ribbon lightning, bead lightning, and ball lightning. Lightning causes injury through five basic mechanisms: direct strike, flash discharge (splash), contact, ground current (step voltage), and blunt trauma. While persons struck by lightning show evidence of multisystem derangement, the most dramatic effects involve the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. Cardiopulmonary arrest is the most common cause of death in lightning victims. Immediate resuscitation of people struck by lightning greatly affects the prognosis. Electrocardiographic changes observed following lightning accidents are probably from primary electric injury or burns of the myocardium without coronary artery occlusion. Lightning induces vasomotor spasm from direct sympathetic stimulation resulting in severe loss of pulses in the extremities. This vasoconstriction may be associated with transient paralysis. Damage to the central nervous system accounts for the second most debilitating group of injuries. Central nervous system injuries from lightning include amnesia and confusion, immediate loss of consciousness, weakness, intracranial injuries, and even brief aphasia. Other organ systems injured by lightning include the eye, ear, gastrointestinal system, skin, and musculoskeletal system. The best treatment of lightning injuries is prevention. The Lightning Safety Guidelines devised by the Lightning Safety Group should be instituted in the United States and other nations to prevent these devastating injuries. PMID:15777170

  5. Fault current limiter based on high temperature superconductors - different concepts, test results, simulations, applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, W.; Chen, M.; Lakner, M.; Rhyner, J.; Braun, D.; Lanz, W.

    2001-05-01

    All electric equipment in a power system has to be designed to withstand the mechanical and thermal stresses of potential short-circuit currents. Any reduction of these currents can lead to significant cost savings. Among all current limiting devices, superconducting fault current limiters (SCFCL) offer ideal performance: in normal operation the SCFCL is in its superconducting state and has negligible impedance, in the event of a fault, the transition into the normal conducting state passively limits the current. Different high temperature superconductors (HTS) materials, like YBCO films, Bi2223 wires or Bi2212 bulk are under development for the use in SCFCL. Due to the brittle nature of HTS and the hot-spot problem, most HTS components for current limitation are composites comprising the HTS, a mechanical substrate or support, and an electrical bypass. The performance of the composites largely depend on the parameters: critical current density, I- V characteristics, thermal conductivity, thermal mass, and electrical bypass. Mainly two different concepts of SCFCL, namely, the “resistive” and the “shielded core” concept have been pursued in the past. In 1996 the first ever SCFCL was installed in a hydro-power plant. The device had a rated power of 1.2 MVA, it was of the “shielded core” type and was based on tubes of Bi2212-bulk material. The feasibility of the technology has been demonstrated in a one-year-endurance test. Recently more compact “resistive” SCFCLs based on the same Bi2212-bulk material have been developed. Theoretical models for the SCFCL show good agreement with experimental data. They are used to study the influence of SCFCLs in power systems in order to evaluate technical and economical advantages.

  6. Current treatment of choice for chronic hepatitis C infection

    PubMed Central

    Yasin, Tareq; Riley, Thomas R; Schreibman, Ian R

    2011-01-01

    More than three million Americans have chronic hepatitis C infection, and the disease remains one of the most common blood-borne infections in the US. Treatment is focused on the chronic form of the disease, because the acute one tends to be self-limiting. In this article, we review the recent literature regarding the most effective therapy against hepatitis C infection, to confirm the current treatment of choice for the disease. We conclude that combination therapy with pegylated interferon and ribavirin remains the initial treatment of choice. New research focusing on adjuvant therapies, such as protease and polymerase inhibitors, has yielded early data that appear to be promising. PMID:21694905

  7. Current Strategies for the Treatment of Aneurysmal Bone Cysts.

    PubMed

    Tsagozis, Panagiotis; Brosjö, Otte

    2015-12-28

    Aneurysmal bone cysts are benign bone tumors that usually present in childhood and early adulthood. They usually manifest as expansile osteolytic lesions with a varying potential to be locally aggressive. Since their first description in 1942, a variety of treatment methods has been proposed. Traditionally, these tumors were treated with open surgery. Either intralesional surgical procedures or en bloc excisions have been described. Furthermore, a variety of chemical or physical adjuvants has been utilized in order to reduce the risk for local recurrence after excision. Currently, there is a shift to more minimally invasive procedures in order to avoid the complications of open surgical excision. Good results have been reported during percutaneous surgery, or the use of embolization. Recently, sclerotherapy has emerged as a promising treatment, showing effective consolidation of the lesions and functional results that appear to be superior to the ones of open surgery. Lastly, non-invasive treatment, such as pharmaceutical intervention with denosumab or bisphosphonates has been reported to be effective in the management of the disease. Radiotherapy has also been shown to confer good local control, either alone or in conjunction to other treatment modalities, but is associated with serious adverse effects. Here, we review the current literature on the methods of treatment of aneurysmal bone cysts. The indication for each type of treatment along reported outcome of the intervention, as well as potential complications are systematically presented. Our review aims to increase awareness of the different treatment modalities and facilitate decision-making regarding each individual patient. PMID:26793296

  8. Current Strategies for the Treatment of Aneurysmal Bone Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Brosjö, Otte

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cysts are benign bone tumors that usually present in childhood and early adulthood. They usually manifest as expansile osteolytic lesions with a varying potential to be locally aggressive. Since their first description in 1942, a variety of treatment methods has been proposed. Traditionally, these tumors were treated with open surgery. Either intralesional surgical procedures or en bloc excisions have been described. Furthermore, a variety of chemical or physical adjuvants has been utilized in order to reduce the risk for local recurrence after excision. Currently, there is a shift to more minimally invasive procedures in order to avoid the complications of open surgical excision. Good results have been reported during percutaneous surgery, or the use of embolization. Recently, sclerotherapy has emerged as a promising treatment, showing effective consolidation of the lesions and functional results that appear to be superior to the ones of open surgery. Lastly, non-invasive treatment, such as pharmaceutical intervention with denosumab or bisphosphonates has been reported to be effective in the management of the disease. Radiotherapy has also been shown to confer good local control, either alone or in conjunction to other treatment modalities, but is associated with serious adverse effects. Here, we review the current literature on the methods of treatment of aneurysmal bone cysts. The indication for each type of treatment along reported outcome of the intervention, as well as potential complications are systematically presented. Our review aims to increase awareness of the different treatment modalities and facilitate decision-making regarding each individual patient. PMID:26793296

  9. Fabry Disease – Current Treatment and New Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Motabar, Omid; Sidransky, Ellen; Goldin, Ehud; Zheng, Wei

    2010-01-01

    Fabry disease is a rare inherited lysosomal storage disorder caused by a partial or complete deficiency of α-galactosidase A (GLA), resulting in the storage of excess cellular glycosphingolipids. Enzyme replacement therapy is available for the treatment of Fabry disease, but it is a costly, intravenous treatment. Alternative therapeutic approaches, including small molecule chaperone therapy, are currently being explored. High throughput screening (HTS) technologies can be utilized to discover other small molecule compounds, including non-inhibitory chaperones, enzyme activators, molecules that reduce GLA substrate, and molecules that activate GLA gene promoters. This review outlines the current therapeutic approaches, emerging treatment strategies, and the process of drug discovery and development for Fabry disease. PMID:21127742

  10. Translational research in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: current evidence and future concepts.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Stephan; Haas, Michael; Ormanns, Steffen; Bächmann, Sibylle; Siveke, Jens T; Kirchner, Thomas; Heinemann, Volker; Boeck, Stefan

    2014-08-21

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is one of the major causes for cancer death worldwide. Treatment of metastatic disease remains challenging as only certain patients benefit from advances made with the intensified chemotherapy regimen folinic acid, irinotecan and oxaliplatin, the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib or the recently FDA-approved nab-paclitaxel. Up to date, no established approach for prediction of treatment response or specific treatment allocation exists. Translational research was able to identify a number of potential biomarkers that might help to improve the dismal prognosis of PDA by facilitating upfront treatment allocation. This topic highlight is focused on current evidence on potential biomarkers for tumor biology, prognosis and prediction of treatment efficacy. PMID:25152580

  11. Anaphylaxis treatment: current barriers to adrenaline auto-injector use.

    PubMed

    Song, T T; Worm, M; Lieberman, P

    2014-08-01

    Anaphylaxis is a life-threatening condition that is increasing in prevalence in the developed world. There is universal expert agreement that rapid intramuscular injection of adrenaline is life-saving and constitutes the first-line treatment of anaphylaxis. The unpredictable nature of anaphylaxis and its rapid progression makes necessary the availability of a portable emergency treatment suitable for self-administration. Thus, anaphylaxis treatment guidelines recommend that at-risk patients are provided with adrenaline auto-injectors (AAIs). Despite these clear recommendations, current emergency treatment of anaphylaxis continues to be inadequate in many cases. The aim of this review is to highlight the barriers that exist to the use and availability of AAIs and that prevent proper management of anaphylaxis. In addition, we review the characteristics of all AAIs that are presently available in Europe and the USA and discuss the need for regulatory requirements to establish the performance characteristics of these devices. PMID:24835773

  12. Treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration: Current therapies

    PubMed Central

    Augustin, Albert J; Scholl, Stefan; Kirchhof, Janna

    2009-01-01

    Choroidal neovascularization (CNV) secondary to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is now the leading cause of blindness and severe vision loss among people over the age of 40 in the Western world. Its prevalence is certain to increase substantially as the population ages. Treatments currently available for the disease include laser photocoagulation, verteporfin photodynamic therapy, and intravitreal injections of corticosteroids and anti-angiogenic agents. Many studies have reported the benefits of each of these treatments, although none is without its risks. No intervention actually cures AMD, nor the neovascularization associated with it. However, its symptoms are treated with varying degrees of success. Some treatments stabilize or arrest the progress of the disease. Others have been shown to reverse some of the damage that has already been done. These treatments can even lead to visual improvement. This paper will review the major classes of drugs and therapies designed to treat this condition. PMID:19668562

  13. Current and Emerging Directions in the Treatment of Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Tiffany A.; Keel, Pamela K.

    2012-01-01

    Eating disorders are a significant source of psychiatric morbidity in young women and demonstrate high comorbidity with mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders. Thus, clinicians may encounter eating disorders in the context of treating other conditions. This review summarizes the efficacy of current and emerging treatments for anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder (BED). Treatment trials were identified using electronic and manual searches and by reviewing abstracts from conference proceedings. Family based therapy has demonstrated superiority for adolescents with AN but no treatment has established superiority for adults. For BN, both 60 mg fluoxetine and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) have well-established efficacy. For BED, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, CBT, and interpersonal psychotherapy have demonstrated efficacy. Emerging directions for AN include investigation of the antipsychotic olanzapine and several novel psychosocial treatments. Future directions for BN and BED include increasing CBT disseminability, targeting affect regulation, and individualized stepped-care approaches. PMID:22879753

  14. Current and emerging directions in the treatment of eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Brown, Tiffany A; Keel, Pamela K

    2012-01-01

    Eating disorders are a significant source of psychiatric morbidity in young women and demonstrate high comorbidity with mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders. Thus, clinicians may encounter eating disorders in the context of treating other conditions. This review summarizes the efficacy of current and emerging treatments for anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder (BED). Treatment trials were identified using electronic and manual searches and by reviewing abstracts from conference proceedings. Family based therapy has demonstrated superiority for adolescents with AN but no treatment has established superiority for adults. For BN, both 60 mg fluoxetine and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) have well-established efficacy. For BED, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, CBT, and interpersonal psychotherapy have demonstrated efficacy. Emerging directions for AN include investigation of the antipsychotic olanzapine and several novel psychosocial treatments. Future directions for BN and BED include increasing CBT disseminability, targeting affect regulation, and individualized stepped-care approaches. PMID:22879753

  15. Current and emerging options for the drug treatment of narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    De la Herrán-Arita, Alberto K; García-García, Fabio

    2013-11-01

    Narcolepsy/hypocretin deficiency (now called type 1 narcolepsy) is a lifelong neurologic disorder with well-established diagnostic criteria and etiology. Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and symptoms of dissociated rapid eye movement sleep such as cataplexy (sudden loss of muscle tone), hypnagogic hallucinations (sensory events that occur at the transition from wakefulness to sleep), sleep paralysis (inability to perform movements upon wakening or sleep onset), and nocturnal sleep disruption. As these symptoms are often disabling, most patients need life-long treatment. The treatment of narcolepsy is well defined, and, traditionally, amphetamine-like stimulants (i.e., dopaminergic release enhancers) have been used for clinical management to improve EDS and sleep attacks, whereas tricyclic antidepressants have been used as anticataplectics. However, treatments have evolved to better-tolerated compounds such as modafinil or armodafinil (for EDS) and adrenergic/serotonergic selective reuptake inhibitors (as anticataplectics). In addition, night-time administration of a short-acting sedative, c-hydroxybutyrate (sodium oxybate), has been used for the treatment for EDS and cataplexy. These therapies are almost always needed in combination with non-pharmacologic treatments (i.e., behavioral modification). A series of new drugs is currently being tested in animal models and in humans. These include a wide variety of hypocretin agonists, melanin- concentrating hormone receptor antagonists, antigenspecific immunopharmacology, and histamine H3 receptor antagonists/inverse agonists (e.g., pitolisant), which have been proposed for specific therapeutic applications, including the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, epilepsy, and more recently, narcolepsy. Even though current treatment is strictly symptomatic, based on the present state of knowledge of the pathophysiology of

  16. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: current treatment options and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovic, Dejan; Patera, Andriani C.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Gerber, Marianne; Liu, Maggie

    2015-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a rare but debilitating and frequently fatal viral disease of the central nervous system, primarily affecting individuals with chronically and severely suppressed immune systems. The disease was relatively obscure until the outbreak of HIV/AIDS, when it presented as one of the more frequent opportunistic infections in this immune deficiency syndrome. It attracted additional attention from the medical and scientific community following the discovery of significant PML risk associated with natalizumab, a monoclonal antibody used for treatment of relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis. This was followed by association of PML with other immunosuppressive or immunomodulating drugs. PML is currently untreatable disease with poor outcomes, so it is a significant concern when developing new immunotherapies. Current prophylaxis and treatment of PML are focused on immune reconstitution, restoration of immune responses to JC virus infection, and eventual suppression of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. This approach was successful in reducing the incidence of PML and improved survival of PML patients with HIV infection. However, the outcome for the majority of PML patients, regardless of their medical history, is still relatively poor. There is a high unmet need for both prophylaxis and treatment of PML. The aim of this review is to discuss potential drug candidates for prophylaxis and treatment of PML with a critical review of previously conducted and completed PML treatment studies as well as to provide perspectives for future therapies. PMID:26600871

  17. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: current treatment options and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pavlovic, Dejan; Patera, Andriani C; Nyberg, Fredrik; Gerber, Marianne; Liu, Maggie

    2015-11-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a rare but debilitating and frequently fatal viral disease of the central nervous system, primarily affecting individuals with chronically and severely suppressed immune systems. The disease was relatively obscure until the outbreak of HIV/AIDS, when it presented as one of the more frequent opportunistic infections in this immune deficiency syndrome. It attracted additional attention from the medical and scientific community following the discovery of significant PML risk associated with natalizumab, a monoclonal antibody used for treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. This was followed by association of PML with other immunosuppressive or immunomodulating drugs. PML is currently untreatable disease with poor outcomes, so it is a significant concern when developing new immunotherapies. Current prophylaxis and treatment of PML are focused on immune reconstitution, restoration of immune responses to JC virus infection, and eventual suppression of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. This approach was successful in reducing the incidence of PML and improved survival of PML patients with HIV infection. However, the outcome for the majority of PML patients, regardless of their medical history, is still relatively poor. There is a high unmet need for both prophylaxis and treatment of PML. The aim of this review is to discuss potential drug candidates for prophylaxis and treatment of PML with a critical review of previously conducted and completed PML treatment studies as well as to provide perspectives for future therapies. PMID:26600871

  18. Parametric Weight Comparison of Current and Proposed Thermal Protection System (TPS) Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, David E.; Martin, Carl J.; Blosser, Max L.

    1999-01-01

    A parametric weight assessment of advanced metallic panel, ceramic blanket, and ceramic tile thermal protection systems (TPS) was conducted using an implicit, one-dimensional (1 -D) thermal finite element sizing code. This sizing code contained models to ac- count for coatings, fasteners, adhesives, and strain isolation pads. Atmospheric entry heating profiles for two vehicles, the Access to Space (ATS) rocket-powered single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) vehicle and a proposed Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), were used to ensure that the trends were not unique to a particular trajectory. Eight TPS concepts were compared for a range of applied heat loads and substructural heat capacities to identify general trends. This study found the blanket TPS concepts have the lightest weights over the majority of their applicable ranges, and current technology ceramic tiles and metallic TPS concepts have similar weights. A proposed, state-of-the-art metallic system which uses a higher temperature alloy and efficient multilayer insulation was predicted to be significantly lighter than the ceramic tile systems and approaches blanket TPS weights for higher integrated heat loads.

  19. Current and Novel Therapeutics in Treatment of SLE

    PubMed Central

    Yildirim-Toruner, Cagri; Diamond, Betty

    2011-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with significant clinical heterogeneity. Recent advances in our understanding of the genetic, molecular and cellular basis of autoimmune diseases and especially SLE have led to the application of novel and targeted treatments. While many treatment modalities are effective in lupus-prone mice, the situation is more complex in humans. This article reviews the general approach to the therapy of SLE, focusing on current approved therapies and novel approaches that might be used in the future. PMID:21281862

  20. The ‘structure-function’ relationship in glaucoma – past thinking and current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Rizwan; Swanson, William H.; Garway-Heath, David F

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of the relationship between functional and structural measures in primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is necessary for both grading the severity of disease and for understanding the natural history of the condition. This article outlines the current evidence for the nature of this relationship, and highlights the current mathematical models linking structure and function. Large clinical trials demonstrate that both structural and functional change are apparent in advanced stages of disease, while, at an individual level, detectable structural abnormality may precede functional abnormality in some patients whilst the converse in true in other patients. Although the exact nature of the ‘structure-function’ relationship in POAG is still the topic of scientific debate and the subject of continuing research, this article aims to provide the clinician with an understanding of the past concepts and contemporary thinking in relation to the structure-function relationship in POAG. PMID:22339936

  1. Current Concepts on Diabetic Nephropathy and 2014 Data on Diabetic Renal Failure in Texas.

    PubMed

    Pazmino, Patricio A

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the United States and other developed countries. In 1982, diabetes accounted for 27% of patients with ESRD in the United States and rose to 36% by 1992 and to 47% in 2012. Currently, the number of prevalent cases of ESRD in the country (dialysis and transplant) exceeds more than 636,900. Primary care practitioners (PCP) provide more than 90% of the diabetic care and are well-positioned to identify, prevent, and treat initially DN. PCPs should identify DN with a urine microalbumin test, obtain a serum creatinine and glomerular filtration rate, monitor hemoglobin A1c, and treat hypertension and dyslipidemia according to current guidelines. This article reviews basic concepts and goals for DN as well as the 2014 data for diabetic renal failure in the most populous counties in Texas. The Texas counties bordering Mexico show an excessive prevalence of diabetic renal failure. PMID:27441426

  2. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: current and emerging treatment options.

    PubMed

    Ihler, Friedrich; Canis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Ragweed (Ambrosia spp.) is an annually flowering plant whose pollen bears high allergenic potential. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis has long been seen as a major immunologic condition in Northern America with high exposure and sensitization rates in the general population. The invasive occurrence of ragweed (A. artemisiifolia) poses an increasing challenge to public health in Europe and Asia as well. Possible explanations for its worldwide spread are climate change and urbanization, as well as pollen transport over long distances by globalized traffic and winds. Due to the increasing disease burden worldwide, and to the lack of a current and comprehensive overview, this study aims to review the current and emerging treatment options for ragweed-induced rhinoconjunctivitis. Sound clinical evidence is present for the symptomatic treatment of ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis with oral third-generation H1-antihistamines and leukotriene antagonists. The topical application of glucocorticoids has also been efficient in randomized controlled clinical trials. Combined approaches employing multiple agents are common. The mainstay of causal treatment to date, especially in Northern America, is subcutaneous immunotherapy with the focus on the major allergen, Amb a 1. Beyond this, growing evidence from several geographical regions documents the benefit of sublingual immunotherapy. Future treatment options promise more specific symptomatic treatment and fewer side effects during causal therapy. Novel antihistamines for symptomatic treatment are aimed at the histamine H3-receptor. New adjuvants with toll-like receptor 4 activity or the application of the monoclonal anti-immunoglobulin E antibody, omalizumab, are supposed to enhance conventional immunotherapy. An approach targeting toll-like receptor 9 by synthetic cytosine phosphate-guanosine oligodeoxynucleotides promises a new treatment paradigm that aims to modulate the immune response, but it has

  3. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis: current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Ihler, Friedrich; Canis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Ragweed (Ambrosia spp.) is an annually flowering plant whose pollen bears high allergenic potential. Ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis has long been seen as a major immunologic condition in Northern America with high exposure and sensitization rates in the general population. The invasive occurrence of ragweed (A. artemisiifolia) poses an increasing challenge to public health in Europe and Asia as well. Possible explanations for its worldwide spread are climate change and urbanization, as well as pollen transport over long distances by globalized traffic and winds. Due to the increasing disease burden worldwide, and to the lack of a current and comprehensive overview, this study aims to review the current and emerging treatment options for ragweed-induced rhinoconjunctivitis. Sound clinical evidence is present for the symptomatic treatment of ragweed-induced allergic rhinoconjunctivitis with oral third-generation H1-antihistamines and leukotriene antagonists. The topical application of glucocorticoids has also been efficient in randomized controlled clinical trials. Combined approaches employing multiple agents are common. The mainstay of causal treatment to date, especially in Northern America, is subcutaneous immunotherapy with the focus on the major allergen, Amb a 1. Beyond this, growing evidence from several geographical regions documents the benefit of sublingual immunotherapy. Future treatment options promise more specific symptomatic treatment and fewer side effects during causal therapy. Novel antihistamines for symptomatic treatment are aimed at the histamine H3-receptor. New adjuvants with toll-like receptor 4 activity or the application of the monoclonal anti-immunoglobulin E antibody, omalizumab, are supposed to enhance conventional immunotherapy. An approach targeting toll-like receptor 9 by synthetic cytosine phosphate–guanosine oligodeoxynucleotides promises a new treatment paradigm that aims to modulate the immune response, but it has

  4. REHABILITATION AFTER ARTHROSCOPIC ROTATOR CUFF REPAIR: CURRENT CONCEPTS REVIEW AND EVIDENCE-BASED GUIDELINES

    PubMed Central

    Westgard, Paul; Chandler, Zachary; Gaskill, Trevor R.; Kokmeyer, Dirk; Millett, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To provide an overview of the characteristics and timing of rotator cuff healing and provide an update on treatments used in rehabilitation of rotator cuff repairs. The authors' protocol of choice, used within a large sports medicine rehabilitation center, is presented and the rationale behind its implementation is discussed. Background: If initial nonsurgical treatment of a rotator cuff tear fails, surgical repair is often the next line of treatment. It is evident that a successful outcome after surgical rotator cuff repair is as much dependent on surgical technique as it is on rehabilitation. To this end, rehabilitation protocols have proven challenging to both the orthopaedic surgeon and the involved physical therapist. Instead of being based on scientific rationale, traditionally most rehabilitation protocols are solely based on clinical experience and expert opinion. Methods: A review of currently available literature on rehabilitation after arthroscopic rotator cuff tear repair on PUBMED / MEDLINE and EMBASE databases was performed to illustrate the available evidence behind various postoperative treatment modalities. Results: There is little high-level scientific evidence available to support or contest current postoperative rotator cuff rehabilitation protocols. Most existing protocols are based on clinical experience with modest incorporation of scientific data. Conclusion: Little scientific evidence is available to guide the timing of postsurgical rotator cuff rehabilitation. To this end, expert opinion and clinical experience remains a large facet of rehabilitation protocols. This review describes a rotator cuff rehabilitation protocol that incorporates currently available scientific literature guiding rehabilitation. PMID:22530194

  5. Current concepts in the management of recurrent anterior gleno-humeral joint instability with bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Ramhamadany, Eamon; Modi, Chetan S

    2016-01-01

    The management of recurrent anterior gleno-humeral joint instability is challenging in the presence of bone loss. It is often seen in young athletic patients and dislocations related to epileptic seizures and may involve glenoid bone deficiency, humeral bone deficiency or combined bipolar lesions. It is critical to accurately identify and assess the amount and position of bone loss in order to select the most appropriate treatment and reduce the risk of recurrent instability after surgery. The current literature suggests that coracoid and iliac crest bone block transfers are reliable for treating glenoid defects. The treatment of humeral defects is more controversial, however, although good early results have been reported after arthroscopic Remplissage for small defects. Larger humeral defects may require complex reconstruction or partial resurfacing. There is currently very limited evidence to support treatment strategies when dealing with bipolar lesions. The aim of this review is to summarise the current evidence regarding the best imaging modalities and treatment strategies in managing this complex problem relating particularly to contact athletes and dislocations related to epileptic seizures. PMID:27335809

  6. Current concepts in the management of recurrent anterior gleno-humeral joint instability with bone loss.

    PubMed

    Ramhamadany, Eamon; Modi, Chetan S

    2016-06-18

    The management of recurrent anterior gleno-humeral joint instability is challenging in the presence of bone loss. It is often seen in young athletic patients and dislocations related to epileptic seizures and may involve glenoid bone deficiency, humeral bone deficiency or combined bipolar lesions. It is critical to accurately identify and assess the amount and position of bone loss in order to select the most appropriate treatment and reduce the risk of recurrent instability after surgery. The current literature suggests that coracoid and iliac crest bone block transfers are reliable for treating glenoid defects. The treatment of humeral defects is more controversial, however, although good early results have been reported after arthroscopic Remplissage for small defects. Larger humeral defects may require complex reconstruction or partial resurfacing. There is currently very limited evidence to support treatment strategies when dealing with bipolar lesions. The aim of this review is to summarise the current evidence regarding the best imaging modalities and treatment strategies in managing this complex problem relating particularly to contact athletes and dislocations related to epileptic seizures. PMID:27335809

  7. Current Standards and Novel Treatment Options for Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Benjamin A; Yabar, Cinthya S; Brody, Jonathan R; Pishvaian, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal solid tumors. The prognosis of metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains dismal, with a median survival of less than 1 year, due in large part to the fact that pancreatic adenocarcinoma is notoriously refractory to chemotherapy. However, there recently have been significant improvements in outcomes for patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma: ongoing trials have shown promise, and these may lead to still further progress. Here we review the current treatment paradigms for metastatic disease, focusing on ways to ameliorate symptoms and lengthen survival. We then summarize recent advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular aspects of pancreatic cancer. Finally, we outline new approaches currently under development for the treatment of metastatic disease, arising from our improved understanding of the genetic and nongenetic alterations within pancreatic cancer cells-and of interactions between cancer cells, the tumor microenvironment, and the immune system. PMID:26573060

  8. Current aortic endografts for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Colvard, Benjamin; Georg, Yannick; Chakfe, Nabil; Swanstrom, Lee

    2016-05-01

    Endovascular Aneurysm Repair is a widely adopted method of treatment for patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms. The minimally invasive approach offered with EVAR has become popular not only among physicians and patients, but in the medical device industry as well. Over the past 25 years the global market for aortic endografts has increased rapidly, resulting in a wide range of devices from various companies. Currently, there are seven endografts approved by the FDA for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms. These devices offer a wide range of designs intended to increase inclusion criteria while decreasing technical complications such as endoleak and migration. Despite advances in device design, secondary interventions and follow-up requirements remain a significant issue. New devices are currently being studied in the U.S. and abroad and may significantly reduce complications and secondary interventions. PMID:26959727

  9. Antibacterial treatment of bacterial vaginosis: current and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Menard, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common cause of malodorous vaginal discharge. It is also associated with sexually transmitted infections and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The magnitude of the gynecological and obstetrical consequences has stimulated therapeutic research and led to the testing of several therapies. The objective of this work is to present the currently available therapeutic strategies for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis and associated recommendations, and discuss the emerging therapies. PMID:21976983

  10. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection: Current and future insights.

    PubMed

    Safavi, Maliheh; Sabourian, Reyhaneh; Foroumadi, Alireza

    2016-01-16

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is an important major cause of peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancies such as mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric adenocarcinoma worldwide. H. pylori treatment still remains a challenge, since many determinants for successful therapy are involved such as individual primary or secondary antibiotics resistance, mucosal drug concentration, patient compliance, side-effect profile and cost. While no new drug has been developed, current therapy still relies on different mixture of known antibiotics and anti-secretory agents. A standard triple therapy consisting of two antibiotics and a proton-pump inhibitor proposed as the first-line regimen. Bismuth-containing quadruple treatment, sequential treatment or a non-bismuth quadruple treatment (concomitant) are also an alternative therapy. Levofloxacin containing triple treatment are recommended as rescue treatment for infection of H. pylori after defeat of first-line therapy. The rapid acquisition of antibiotic resistance reduces the effectiveness of any regimens involving these remedies. Therefore, adding probiotic to the medications, developing anti-H. pylori photodynamic or phytomedicine therapy, and achieving a successful H. pylori vaccine may have the promising to present synergistic or additive consequence against H. pylori, because each of them exert different effects. PMID:26798626

  11. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection: Current and future insights

    PubMed Central

    Safavi, Maliheh; Sabourian, Reyhaneh; Foroumadi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is an important major cause of peptic ulcer disease and gastric malignancies such as mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma and gastric adenocarcinoma worldwide. H. pylori treatment still remains a challenge, since many determinants for successful therapy are involved such as individual primary or secondary antibiotics resistance, mucosal drug concentration, patient compliance, side-effect profile and cost. While no new drug has been developed, current therapy still relies on different mixture of known antibiotics and anti-secretory agents. A standard triple therapy consisting of two antibiotics and a proton-pump inhibitor proposed as the first-line regimen. Bismuth-containing quadruple treatment, sequential treatment or a non-bismuth quadruple treatment (concomitant) are also an alternative therapy. Levofloxacin containing triple treatment are recommended as rescue treatment for infection of H. pylori after defeat of first-line therapy. The rapid acquisition of antibiotic resistance reduces the effectiveness of any regimens involving these remedies. Therefore, adding probiotic to the medications, developing anti-H. pylori photodynamic or phytomedicine therapy, and achieving a successful H. pylori vaccine may have the promising to present synergistic or additive consequence against H. pylori, because each of them exert different effects. PMID:26798626

  12. Current approach in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Luigi; Zoratto, Federica; Papa, Anselmo; Iodice, Francesca; Minozzi, Marina; Frati, Luigi; Tomao, Silverio

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common malignant hepatobiliary disease; it is responsible for about 1 million deaths per year. Risk factors include hepatitis B and C, hepatic cirrhosis, including alcohol related hepatitis, metabolic and nutritional hepatic damage. The main modality of diffusion is intrahepatic in the natural course of the disease. There are two leading types of treatment: local and systemic. Surgical resection and liver transplantation constitute the most appropriate local treatments and are considered the only real possibility for recovery. Other local approaches include: radiofrequency ablation, percutaneous ethanol ablation, hepatic endoarterial chemoembolization and intrahepatic radiotherapy (SIRT: selective internal radiation therapy). These last treatments are used to control the disease when surgery or transplantation is not achievable; in some cases they are able to prolong survival while they constitute mainly a palliative treatment. Systemic treatments include: chemotherapy, immunological and hormonal therapies and, more recently, the introduction of new specific molecular target drugs. At the moment, in this group, the only drug that has given positive results during phase III trials (SHARP study) is Sorafenib. Sorafenib represents the only primary systemic therapy that has demonstrated, unlike the other treatments previously described, an increase in survival rate in patients affected with advanced HCC. Currently, other studies are taking place that are further developing the potential of this drug. These studies, including phase III trials, are directed in order to test the activity and safety of new emerging drugs with targeted activity. Examples of these new agents are: Sunitinib, Gefitinib, Cetuximab, Bevacizumab and Erlotinib. PMID:21160806

  13. Current primary open-angle glaucoma treatments and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Beidoe, Gabriel; Mousa, Shaker A

    2012-01-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is a leading cause of blindness with no known cure. Management of the disease focuses on lowering intraocular pressure (IOP) with current classes of drugs like prostaglandin analogs, beta-blockers, alpha-agonists, and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors. These treatments have not helped all patients. Some patients continue to experience deterioration in the optic nerve even though their IOPs are within the normal range. New views have surfaced about other pathophysiological processes (such as oxidative stress, vascular dysfunction, and retinal cell apoptosis) being involved in POAG progression, and adjunctive treatments with drugs like memantine, bis(7)-tacrine, nimodipine, and mirtogenol are advocated. This review examines the current and proposed treatments for POAG. Some of the proposed drugs (bis(7)-tacrine, nimodipine, vitamin E, and others) have shown good promise, mostly as monotherapy in various clinical trials. It is recommended that both the current and proposed drugs be put through further robust trials in concurrent administration and evaluated. PMID:23118520

  14. Treatment of Nail Psoriasis: Common Concepts and New Trends

    PubMed Central

    Oram, Yasemin; Akkaya, A. Deniz

    2013-01-01

    The lifetime incidence of nail involvement in psoriatic patients is estimated to be 80–90%, and the nails can be affected in 10% to 55% of psoriatic patients. Psoriasis may also solely involve the nails, without any other skin findings, in which the treatment can be more challenging. Nail psoriasis may lead to considerable impairment in quality of life due to aesthetic concerns and more importantly limitations in daily activities resulting from the associated pain, which may be overlooked by the physicians. Several topical and systemic treatment modalities, as well as radiation and light systems, have been used in the treatment of nail psoriasis. In the last decade, the introduction of biologic agents and the utilization of laser systems have brought a new insight into the treatment of nail psoriasis. This paper focuses on the recent advances, as well as the conventional methods, in treating nail psoriasis in adults and children, in reference to an extensive literature search. PMID:23762032

  15. Pressure ulcers: Current understanding and newer modalities of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the mechanism, symptoms, causes, severity, diagnosis, prevention and present recommendations for surgical as well as non-surgical management of pressure ulcers. Particular focus has been placed on the current understandings and the newer modalities for the treatment of pressure ulcers. The paper also covers the role of nutrition and pressure-release devices such as cushions and mattresses as a part of the treatment algorithm for preventing and quick healing process of these wounds. Pressure ulcers develop primarily from pressure and shear; are progressive in nature and most frequently found in bedridden, chair bound or immobile people. They often develop in people who have been hospitalised for a long time generally for a different problem and increase the overall time as well as cost of hospitalisation that have detrimental effects on patient's quality of life. Loss of sensation compounds the problem manifold, and failure of reactive hyperaemia cycle of the pressure prone area remains the most important aetiopathology. Pressure ulcers are largely preventable in nature, and their management depends on their severity. The available literature about severity of pressure ulcers, their classification and medical care protocols have been described in this paper. The present treatment options include various approaches of cleaning the wound, debridement, optimised dressings, role of antibiotics and reconstructive surgery. The newer treatment options such as negative pressure wound therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, cell therapy have been discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages of current and newer methods have also been described. PMID:25991879

  16. Pressure ulcers: Current understanding and newer modalities of treatment.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, R K

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the mechanism, symptoms, causes, severity, diagnosis, prevention and present recommendations for surgical as well as non-surgical management of pressure ulcers. Particular focus has been placed on the current understandings and the newer modalities for the treatment of pressure ulcers. The paper also covers the role of nutrition and pressure-release devices such as cushions and mattresses as a part of the treatment algorithm for preventing and quick healing process of these wounds. Pressure ulcers develop primarily from pressure and shear; are progressive in nature and most frequently found in bedridden, chair bound or immobile people. They often develop in people who have been hospitalised for a long time generally for a different problem and increase the overall time as well as cost of hospitalisation that have detrimental effects on patient's quality of life. Loss of sensation compounds the problem manifold, and failure of reactive hyperaemia cycle of the pressure prone area remains the most important aetiopathology. Pressure ulcers are largely preventable in nature, and their management depends on their severity. The available literature about severity of pressure ulcers, their classification and medical care protocols have been described in this paper. The present treatment options include various approaches of cleaning the wound, debridement, optimised dressings, role of antibiotics and reconstructive surgery. The newer treatment options such as negative pressure wound therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, cell therapy have been discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages of current and newer methods have also been described. PMID:25991879

  17. Treatment Perspectives Based on Our Current Understanding of Concussion.

    PubMed

    Gay, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Sports-related concussion also referred to in the literature as mild traumatic brain injury remains a popular area of study for physicians, neurologists, neuropsychologists, neuroimaging, athletic trainers, and researchers across the other areas of brain sciences. Treatment for concussion is an emerging area of focus with investigators seeking to improve outcomes and protect patients from the deleterious short-term and long-term consequences which have been extensively studied and identified. Broadly, current treatment strategies for athletes recovering from concussion have remained largely unchanged since early 2000s. Knowledge of the complex pathophysiology surrounding injury should improve or advance our ability to identify processes which may serve as targets for therapeutic intervention. Clinicians working with athletes recovering from sports-related concussion should have an advanced understanding of the injury cascade and also be aware of the current efforts within the research to treat concussion. In addition, how clinicians use the word "treatment" should be carefully defined and promoted so the patient is aware of the level of intervention and what stage of recovery or healing is being affected by a specific intervention. The purpose of this review is to bring together efforts across disciplines of brain science into 1 platform where clinicians can assimilate this information before making best practices decisions regarding the treatment of patients and athletes under their care. PMID:27482780

  18. Advanced gastric cancer: Current treatment landscape and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Digklia, Antonia; Wagner, Anna Dorothea

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer currently ranks fourth in cancer-related mortality worldwide. In the western world, it is most often diagnosed at an advanced stage, after becoming metastatic at distant sites. Patients with advanced disease (locally advanced or metastatic) have a somber prognosis, with a median overall survival of 10-12 mo, and palliative chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment. In recent years, novel approaches using inhibition of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have demonstrated significant improvements in progression-free and overall survival, compared with chemotherapy alone, in first-line treatment of patients with overexpression of HER2. In addition, both second-line chemotherapy and treatment with the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-inhibitor ramucirumab demonstrated significant benefits in terms of overall survival, compared with best supportive care, in randomized studies. Moreover, ramucirumab in combination with chemotherapy demonstrated further significant benefits in terms of progression-free and overall survival, compared with chemotherapy alone, in second-line treatment for patients with metastatic gastric cancer. A recently published molecular classification of gastric cancer is expected to improve patient stratification and selection for clinical trials and provide a roadmap for future drug development. Nevertheless, despite these developments the prognosis of patients with advanced gastric cancer remains poor. In this review we discuss current standards of care and outline major topics of drug development in gastric cancer. PMID:26937129

  19. Treatment of Convergence Insufficiency in Childhood: A Current Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Scheiman, Mitchell; Rouse, Michael; Kulp, Marjean Taylor; Cotter, Susan; Hertle, Richard; Mitchell, G. Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To provide a current perspective on the management of CI in children by summarizing the findings and discussing the clinical implications from three recent randomized clinical trials in which we evaluated various treatments for children with symptomatic CI. We then present an evidence-based treatment approach for symptomatic CI based upon the results of these trials. Finally, we discuss unanswered questions and suggest directions for future research in this area. Methods We reviewed 3 multi-center randomized clinical trials comparing treatments for symptomatic CI in children 9 to 17 years old (one study 9 to 18 years old). Two trials evaluated active therapies for CI. These trials compared the effectiveness of office-based vergence/accommodative therapy, office-based placebo therapy, and home-based therapy (pencil push-ups alone [both trials], home-based computer vergence/accommodative therapy and pencil push-ups [large-scale study]). One trial compared the effectiveness of base-in prism reading glasses to placebo reading glasses. All studies included well-defined criteria for the diagnosis of CI, a placebo group, and masked examiners. The primary outcome measure was the Convergence Insufficiency Symptom Survey score. Secondary outcomes were near point of convergence and positive fusional vergence at near. Results Office-based vergence/accommodative therapy was significantly more effective than home-based or placebo therapies. Base-in prism reading glasses were no more effective than placebo reading glasses for the treatment of symptomatic CI in children. Conclusions Recent clinical trials showed that office-based vision therapy was successful in about 75% of patients (resulting in normal or significantly improved symptoms and signs) and was the only treatment studied which was more effective than placebo treatments for children with symptomatic CI. Eye care providers who do not currently offer this treatment may consider referring these patients to a

  20. Lumbar pseudarthrosis: a review of current diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Chun, Danielle S; Baker, Kevin C; Hsu, Wellington K

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Failed solid bony fusion, or pseudarthrosis, is a well-known complication of lumbar arthrodesis. Recent advances in radiographic technology, biologics, instrumentation, surgical technique, and understanding of the local biology have all aided in the prevention and treatment of pseudarthrosis. Here, the current literature on the diagnosis and management of lumbar pseudarthroses is reviewed. METHODS A systematic literature review was conducted using the MEDLINE and Embase databases in order to search for the current radiographie diagnosis and surgical treatment methods published in the literature (1985 to present). Inclusion criteria included: 1) published in English; 2) level of evidence I-III; 3) diagnosis of degenerative lumbar spine conditions and/or history of lumbar spine fusion surgery; and 4) comparative studies of 2 different surgical techniques or comparative studies of imaging modality versus surgical exploration. RESULTS Seven studies met the inclusion criteria for current radiographie imaging used to diagnose lumbar pseudarthrosis. Plain radiographs and thin-cut CT scans were the most common method for radiographie diagnosis. PET has been shown to be a valid imaging modality for monitoring in vivo active bone formation. Eight studies compared the surgical techniques for managing and preventing failed lumbar fusion. The success rates for the treatment of pseudarthrosis are enhanced with the use of rigid instrumentation. CONCLUSIONS Spinal fusion rates have improved secondary to advances in biologies, instrumentation, surgical techniques, and understanding of local biology. Treatment of lumbar pseudarthrosis includes a variety of surgical options such as replacing loose instrumentation, use of more potent biologies, and interbody fusion techniques. Prevention and recognition are important tenets in the algorithm for the management of spinal pseudarthrosis. PMID:26424334

  1. Current approaches for the treatment of autoimmune hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Jaime-Pérez, José Carlos; Rodríguez-Martínez, Marisol; Gómez-de-León, Andrés; Tarín-Arzaga, Luz; Gómez-Almaguer, David

    2013-10-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) is an infrequent group of diseases defined by autoantibody mediated red blood cell destruction. Correct diagnosis and classification of this condition are essential to provide appropriate treatment. AIHA is divided into warm and cold types according to the characteristics of the autoantibody involved and by the presence of an underlying or associated disorder into primary and secondary AIHA. Due to its low frequency, treatment for AIHA is largely based on small prospective trials, case series, and empirical observations. This review describes in detail the different treatment approaches for autoimmune hemolytic anemia. Warm antibody type AIHA should be treated with steroids, to which most patients respond, although relapse can occur and maintenance doses are frequently required. Splenectomy is an effective second line treatment and can provide long-term remission without medication. Rituximab is a useful alternative for steroid refractory patients, those requiring high maintenance doses and unfavorable candidates for surgery. Promising therapeutic modifications with this monoclonal antibody are emerging including drug combinations, lower doses, and long-term use. Primary cold agglutinin disease has been recognized as having a lymphoproliferative monoclonal origin. It is unresponsive to both steroids and splenectomy. Rituximab is currently the best therapeutic alternative for this condition, and several treatment regimens are available with variable responses. PMID:23689532

  2. Concepts in local treatment of extensive paediatric burns

    PubMed Central

    Ungureanu, M

    2014-01-01

    Abstract There is a wide variety of local therapeutical methods for extensive burns. This article aims to be a general overview of the most common methods used in the local treatment for extensive burns, both in our clinic and globally. Clinical examples are shown from our clinic; cases of the last 8 years. None of the less there is no such thing as the "perfect method of treatment" but a thin balance between the clinical experience of plastic surgeons, every case particularities and specified characteristics, meaning advantages, disadvantages and limited indications of local topics or methods of skin covering. PMID:25408723

  3. Concepts in local treatment of extensive paediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Ungureanu, M

    2014-06-15

    There is a wide variety of local therapeutical methods for extensive burns. This article aims to be a general overview of the most common methods used in the local treatment for extensive burns, both in our clinic and globally. Clinical examples are shown from our clinic; cases of the last 8 years. None of the less there is no such thing as the "perfect method of treatment" but a thin balance between the clinical experience of plastic surgeons, every case particularities and specified characteristics, meaning advantages, disadvantages and limited indications of local topics or methods of skin covering. PMID:25408723

  4. [From the concept of mistreatment to that of positive treatment, a path full of pitfalls].

    PubMed

    Duportet, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    Mistreatment is a recent, "concrete" concept. Positive treatment is an even more recent, "vague" concept. While one is not the opposite of the other, it is impossible to study one without the other. Between passive tolerance and blind repression, there is room for reasoned, humble and comprehensive analysis which does not lose sight of the desire to care for others. PMID:20677498

  5. Modern and Traditional Medical Practices of Vietnam. Vietnamese Concepts of Illness and Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieu, Le Tai

    This paper discusses superstitious, folk, traditional, and modern medical practices of Vietnam. Concepts of illness, somatization, behavior labeling, diagnostic attempts, and attitudes toward treatment among Vietnamese are also reviewed. (APM)

  6. Current and emerging treatment options for hairy cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    López-Rubio, Montserrat; Garcia-Marco, Jose Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a lymphoproliferative B-cell disorder characterized by pancytopenia, splenomegaly, and characteristic cytoplasmic hairy projections. Precise diagnosis is essential in order to differentiate classic forms from HCL variants, such as the HCL-variant and VH4-34 molecular variant, which are more resistant to available treatments. The current standard of care is treatment with purine analogs (PAs), such as cladribine or pentostatin, which provide a high rate of long-lasting clinical remissions. Nevertheless, ~30%–40% of the patients relapse, and moreover, some of these are difficult-to-treat refractory cases. The use of the monoclonal antibody rituximab in combination with PA appears to produce even higher responses, and it is often employed to minimize or eliminate residual disease. Currently, research in the field of HCL is focused on identifying novel therapeutic targets and potential agents that are safe and can universally cure the disease. The discovery of the BRAF mutation and progress in understanding the biology of the disease has enabled the scientific community to explore new therapeutic targets. Ongoing clinical trials are assessing various treatment strategies such as the combination of PA and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, recombinant immunotoxins targeting CD22, BRAF inhibitors, and B-cell receptor signal inhibitors. PMID:26316784

  7. Overview and Current Status of Analyses of Potential LEU Design Concepts for TREAT

    SciTech Connect

    Connaway, H. M.; Kontogeorgakos, D. C.; Papadias, D. D.; Wright, A. E.

    2015-10-01

    Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analyses have been performed to evaluate the performance of different low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel design concepts for the conversion of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) from its current high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel. TREAT is an experimental reactor developed to generate high neutron flux transients for the testing of nuclear fuels. The goal of this work was to identify an LEU design which can maintain the performance of the existing HEU core while continuing to operate safely. A wide variety of design options were considered, with a focus on minimizing peak fuel temperatures and optimizing the power coupling between the TREAT core and test samples. Designs were also evaluated to ensure that they provide sufficient reactivity and shutdown margin for each control rod bank. Analyses were performed using the core loading and experiment configuration of historic M8 Power Calibration experiments (M8CAL). The Monte Carlo code MCNP was utilized for steady-state analyses, and transient calculations were performed with the point kinetics code TREKIN. Thermal analyses were performed with the COMSOL multi-physics code. Using the results of this study, a new LEU Baseline design concept is being established, which will be evaluated in detail in a future report.

  8. Endovascular and microsurgical treatment of cerebral arteriovenous malformations: Current recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Conger, Andrew; Kulwin, Charles; Lawton, Michael T.; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) can be a heterogeneous pathological entity whose management requires a complex decision-making process due to the risks associated with their treatment and natural history. Despite the recently published conclusions of the aborted Randomized Trial of Brain Unruptured AVMs (ARUBA) trial, the authors of this article believe multimodality intervention in general and microsurgical resection in particular continue to play a major role in the management of carefully selected ruptured or unruptured AVMs. Methods: The authors provide an overview of their methodology for endovascular intervention and microsurgical resection and share their technical nuances for successful embolization and microsurgical resection of AVMs with special emphasis on complication avoidance. Results: The authors have achieved successful outcomes in embolization and resection of cerebral AVMs when using their methodology. Conclusions: These lesions are among the most technically difficult pathological entities handled by the cerebrovascular specialist, and an overview of technical concepts to help systematize this challenging and variable endeavor can improve the safety of their treatment. PMID:25883831

  9. Futility of medical treatment in current medical practice.

    PubMed

    Botha, John; Tiruvoipati, Ravindranath; Goldberg, David

    2013-09-27

    Intensive care provides support for acute reversible organ failure and most patients who receive intensive care recover from their illness. In some patients organ failure may become irreversible and in these patients further treatment or organ support may be considered futile. Emerging technologies and expertise can enable the medical profession to prolong life / death indefinitely without curing or controlling the underlying disease process. Introduction of ultramodern organ supports such as extracorporeal life-support systems, ventricular assist devices and organ transplantation surgeries have introduced some degree of ambiguity in defining futility of care. Furthermore medico legal implications of futility of care introduce further complexities in defining and instituting futile treatments. In this review we discuss the evolution of the concept of futility of care, review the various meanings of the term "futility of care", explore the complexities of management when care is considered futile, offer suggestions as to how such patients and their families could be managed. We also review the legal framework when consensus is not achieved. PMID:24157992

  10. Spontaneous fractures of the mandible concept & treatment strategy

    PubMed Central

    Marcussen, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Background Spontaneous fractures of the mandible dispose a surgical challenge in comparisons to fractures caused by trauma due to several complicating factors. Additionally: controversies exist concerning the terminology of the field. Material and Methods We conducted a retrospective study of all patients with mandibular fractures, with exclusion of fractures of the coronoid process and the alveolar process, treated at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark between February 2003 and February 2013. Data collected from the medical records included sex, age, cause of fracture, site of fracture, and treatment. Results We identified 517 patients with 684 mandible fractures. Twenty-five of these were spontaneous fractures and 659 fractures were of traumatic origin. Condylar fractures rarely occur spontaneously, but constitute the majority of the traumatic fractures. Excluding these fractures from the analysis, we found a non-surgical approach in 14 of 24 (58%) of the spontaneous fractures and 110 of 376 (29%) of the traumatic fractures. This was statistically significant. Conclusions We found a statistical significant difference in favor of non-surgical approach in spontaneous fractures and we discussed the treatment challenges of these fractures. We addressed the terminological controversies regarding pathological fractures, and suggested the term spontaneous fractures denoting a fracture occurring during normal jaw function being either pathological or non-pathological. Key words:Mandibular fractures, spontaneous fractures, pathological fractures, traumatic fractures, treatment. PMID:26636905

  11. Concept of the pathogenesis and treatment of cholelithiasis

    PubMed Central

    Reshetnyak, Vasiliy Ivanovich

    2012-01-01

    Gallstone disease (GD) is a chronic recurrent hepatobiliary disease, the basis for which is the impaired metabolism of cholesterol, bilirubin and bile acids, which is characterized by the formation of gallstones in the hepatic bile duct, common bile duct, or gallbladder. GD is one of the most prevalent gastrointestinal diseases with a substantial burden to health care systems. GD can result in serious outcomes, such as acute gallstone pancreatitis and gallbladder cancer. The epidemiology, pathogenesis and treatment of GD are discussed in this review. The prevalence of GD varies widely by region. The prevalence of gallstone disease has increased in recent years. This is connected with a change in lifestyle: reduction of motor activity, reduction of the physical load and changes to diets. One of the important benefits of early screening for gallstone disease is that ultrasonography can detect asymptomatic cases, which results in early treatment and the prevention of serious outcomes. The pathogenesis of GD is suggested to be multifactorial and probably develops from complex interactions between many genetic and environmental factors. It suggests that corticosteroids and oral contraceptives, which contain hormones related to steroid hormones, may be regarded as a model system of cholelithiasis development in man. The achievement in the study of the physiology of bile formation and the pathogenesis of GD has allowed expanding indications for therapeutic treatment of GD. PMID:22400083

  12. Current status of immunotherapy for the treatment of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murala, Sanjay; Alli, Vamsi; Kreisel, Daniel; Gelman, Andrew E; Krupnick, Alexander S

    2010-01-01

    Immunotherapy is a novel approach for the treatment of systemic malignancies. Passive and adaptive immunotherapy have been applied to the treatment of a wide variety of solid tumors such as malignant melanoma (1), renal cell carcinoma (2) and ovarian cancer (3). Several early clinical trials of immune based therapy for both non-small (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) have demonstrated limited or no success (3),(4) but recent trials of antigen-specific cancer immunotherapy have shown early therapeutic potential and are now being rigorously evaluated on a larger scale (5). In this communication we briefly review the historic aspects of immune based therapy for solid cancer, describe therapeutic strategies aimed at targeting lung cancer, and discuss limitations of current therapy and future directions of this field. PMID:22263052

  13. Trigeminal neuralgia: An insight into the current treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Punyani, Silky Rajesh; Jasuja, Vishal Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is one of the most excruciating pain syndromes afflicting the orofacial region. Trigeminal neuralgia may be primary i.e. idiopathic or secondary, resulting from trauma or a CNS lesion. Considering the agonizing nature of the disease and TN being the commonest of the neural maladies affecting the orofacial region it is important for the oral physician to be aware of all available treatment options. This article makes an attempt to present a brief insight into the current treatment modalities that are on hand to treat this condition. From the perspective of the oral physician the pharmacotherapy constitutes the cornerstone in the management of TN. At the same time, it is also important to be aware and updated of the role of the oral surgeon and radiologist in the application of the array of interventional procedures available for treating TN. PMID:25737864

  14. Eddy current characterization of magnetic treatment of nickel 200

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, E. J.

    1993-01-01

    Eddy current methods have been applied to characterize the effect of magnetic treatments on component service-life extension. Coil impedance measurements were acquired and analyzed on nickel 200 specimens that have been subjected to many mechanical and magnetic engineering processes: annealing, applied strain, magnetic field, shot peening, and magnetic field after peening. Experimental results have demonstrated a functional relationship between coil impedance, resistance and reactance, and specimens subjected to various engineering processes. It has shown that magnetic treatment does induce changes in electromagnetic properties of nickel 200 that then exhibit evidence of stress relief. However, further fundamental studies are necessary for a thorough understanding of the exact mechanism of the magnetic field processing effect on machine-tool service life.

  15. The antimicrobial armamentarium: evaluating current and future treatment options.

    PubMed

    Bosso, John A

    2005-10-01

    The development and introduction of new antibiotics has, unfortunately, not kept pace with the development of bacterial resistance, and the need for new agents is becoming acute. Although some currently marketed agents remain valuable tools in the treatment of infectious diseases, few new drugs have reached the market in the last decade. In recent years, antibiotics with activity against certain problematic resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, including linezolid and daptomycin, have been approved for clinical practice. Recently, tigecycline, a minocycline derivative, received approval by the United States Food and Drug Administration for treatment of complicated skin and skin structure and intraabdominal infections; the agent is also active against a variety of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Of the other agents in phase III development, ceftobiprole--a cephalosporin, and faropenem and doripenem--both carbapenems, have wide antibacterial spectra. Antimicrobial agents in the pipeline with marked gram-positive activity include dalbavancin, telavancin, and oritavancin. PMID:16178676

  16. The Current and Future Treatment of Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Hardesty, Douglas A; Nakaji, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases are the most common intracranial malignancy, accounting for significant morbidity and mortality in oncology patients. The current treatment paradigm for brain metastasis depends on the patient's overall health status, the primary tumor pathology, and the number and location of brain lesions. Herein, we review the modern management options for these tumors, including surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Recent operative advances, such as fluorescence, confocal microscopy, and brachytherapy, are highlighted. With an increased understanding of the pathophysiology of brain metastasis come increased future therapeutic options. Therapy targeted to specific tumor molecular pathways, such as those involved in blood-brain barrier transgression, cell-cell adhesion, and angiogenesis, are also reviewed. A personalized plan for each patient, based on molecular characterizations of the tumor that are used to better target radiotherapy and chemotherapy, is undoubtedly the future of brain metastasis treatment. PMID:27252942

  17. Anal cancer treatment: Current status and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Ghosn, Marwan; Kourie, Hampig Raphael; Abdayem, Pamela; Antoun, Joelle; Nasr, Dolly

    2015-01-01

    Anal cancers (AC) are relatively rare tumors. Their incidence is increasing, particularly among men who have sex with other men due to widespread infection by human papilloma virus. The majority of anal cancers are squamous cell carcinomas, and they are treated according to stage. In local and locally advanced AC, concomitant chemoradiation therapy based on mitomycin C and 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is the current best treatment, while metastatic AC, chemotherapy with 5-FU and cisplatin remains the gold standard. There are no indications for induction or maintenance therapies in locally advanced tumors. Many novel strategies, such as targeted therapies, vaccination, immunotherapy and photodynamic therapy are in clinical trials for the treatment of AC, with promising results in some indications. PMID:25741135

  18. Trigeminal neuralgia: An insight into the current treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Punyani, Silky Rajesh; Jasuja, Vishal Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is one of the most excruciating pain syndromes afflicting the orofacial region. Trigeminal neuralgia may be primary i.e. idiopathic or secondary, resulting from trauma or a CNS lesion. Considering the agonizing nature of the disease and TN being the commonest of the neural maladies affecting the orofacial region it is important for the oral physician to be aware of all available treatment options. This article makes an attempt to present a brief insight into the current treatment modalities that are on hand to treat this condition. From the perspective of the oral physician the pharmacotherapy constitutes the cornerstone in the management of TN. At the same time, it is also important to be aware and updated of the role of the oral surgeon and radiologist in the application of the array of interventional procedures available for treating TN. PMID:25737864

  19. The Current and Future Treatment of Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Hardesty, Douglas A.; Nakaji, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases are the most common intracranial malignancy, accounting for significant morbidity and mortality in oncology patients. The current treatment paradigm for brain metastasis depends on the patient’s overall health status, the primary tumor pathology, and the number and location of brain lesions. Herein, we review the modern management options for these tumors, including surgical resection, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. Recent operative advances, such as fluorescence, confocal microscopy, and brachytherapy, are highlighted. With an increased understanding of the pathophysiology of brain metastasis come increased future therapeutic options. Therapy targeted to specific tumor molecular pathways, such as those involved in blood–brain barrier transgression, cell–cell adhesion, and angiogenesis, are also reviewed. A personalized plan for each patient, based on molecular characterizations of the tumor that are used to better target radiotherapy and chemotherapy, is undoubtedly the future of brain metastasis treatment. PMID:27252942

  20. Controversies in Glaucoma: Current Medical Treatment and Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Bucolo, Claudio; Platania, Chiara Bianca Maria; Reibaldi, Michele; Bonfiglio, Vincenza; Longo, Antonio; Salomone, Salvatore; Drago, Filippo

    2015-01-01

    Elevated eye pressure is the main risk factor for glaucoma; intraocular pressure rises when the ratio between aqueous humor formation (inflow) and its outflow is unbalanced. Currently, the main goal of medical treatment is the reduction of intraocular pressure. Five main classes of topical drugs are available; they include betablockers, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, prostaglandin derivatives, sympathomimetics and miotics. Beta-blockers and carbonic anhydrase inhibitors slow the formation of aqueous humor and may be considered as "inflow" drugs; the other three classes reduce the resistance to the drainage of aqueous humor and may be considered as "outflow" drugs. Despite the variety of drugs accessible in the market, there is a real need for ophthalmologists to have more potent medications for this disease. This review focuses on medical treatment of glaucoma with particular attention to novel molecules in pre-clinical or clinical development. PMID:26350532

  1. Metastatic melanoma - a review of current and future treatment options.

    PubMed

    Maverakis, Emanual; Cornelius, Lynn A; Bowen, Glen M; Phan, Tiffany; Patel, Falin B; Fitzmaurice, Sarah; He, Young; Burrall, Barbara; Duong, Christopher; Kloxin, April M; Sultani, Hawa; Wilken, Reason; Martinez, Steve R; Patel, Forum

    2015-05-01

    Despite advances in treatment and surveillance, melanoma continues to claim approximately 9,000 lives in the US annually (SEER 2013). The National Comprehensive Cancer Network currently recommends ipilumumab, vemurafenib, dabrafenib, and high-dose IL-2 as first line agents for Stage IV melanoma. Little data exists to guide management of cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases despite the fact that they are relatively common. Existing options include intralesional Bacillus Calmette-Guérin, isolated limb perfusion/infusion, interferon-α, topical imiquimod, cryotherapy, radiation therapy, interferon therapy, and intratumoral interleukin-2 injections. Newly emerging treatments include the anti-programmed cell death 1 receptor agents (nivolumab and pembrolizumab), anti-programmed death-ligand 1 agents, and oncolytic vaccines (talimogene laherparepevec). Available treatments for select sites include adoptive T cell therapies and dendritic cell vaccines. In addition to reviewing the above agents and their mechanisms of action, this review will also focus on combination therapy as these strategies have shown promising results in clinical trials for metastatic melanoma treatment. PMID:25520039

  2. Penile rehabilitation following prostate cancer treatment: review of current literature

    PubMed Central

    Clavell-Hernandez, Jonathan; Wang, Run

    2015-01-01

    Radical prostatectomy (RP) and radiotherapy (RT) are highly effective in improving prostate cancer survival. However, both have a detrimental effect on erectile function (EF). Penile rehabilitation consists of understanding the mechanisms that cause erectile dysfunction (ED) and utilizing pharmacologic agents, devices or interventions to promote male sexual function. For the past decade, many researchers have pursued to define effective treatment modalities to improve ED after prostate cancer treatment. Despite the understanding of the mechanisms and well-established rationale for postprostate treatment penile rehabilitation, there is still no consensus regarding effective rehabilitation programs. This article reviews a contemporary series of trials that assess penile rehabilitation and explore treatment modalities that might play a role in the future. Published data and trials related to penile rehabilitation after RP and RT were reviewed and presented. Although recent trials have shown that most therapies are well-tolerated and aid in some degree on EF recovery, we currently do not have tangible evidence to recommend an irrefutable penile rehabilitation algorithm. However, advancements in research and technology will ultimately create and refine management options for penile rehabilitation. PMID:25851656

  3. Current and emerging treatment options for Peyronie’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Ahmet; Wang, Julie C; Powers, Mary K; Hellstrom, Wayne JG

    2013-01-01

    Peyronie’s disease (PD) is a condition of the penis, characterized by the presence of localized fibrotic plaque in the tunica albuginea. PD is not an uncommon disorder, with recent epidemiologic studies documenting a prevalence of 3–9% of adult men affected. The actual prevalence of PD may be even higher. It is often associated with penile pain, anatomical deformities in the erect penis, and difficulty with intromission. As the definitive pathophysiology of PD has not been completely elucidated, further basic research is required to make progress in the understanding of this enigmatic condition. Similarly, research on effective therapies is limited. Currently, nonsurgical treatments are used for those men who are in the acute stage of PD, whereas surgical options are reserved for men with established PD who cannot successfully penetrate. Intralesional treatments are growing in clinical popularity as a minimally invasive approach in the initial treatment of PD. A surgical approach should be considered when men with PD do not respond to conservative, medical, or minimally invasive therapies for approximately 1 year and cannot have satisfactory sexual intercourse. As scientific breakthroughs in the understanding of the mechanisms of this disease process evolve, novel treatments for the many men suffering with PD are anticipated. PMID:24400231

  4. Current Treatment Strategies for Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Il

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in United States and the fifth most common cancer in men in Korea. Although the majority of patients with metastatic prostate cancer initially respond to androgen deprivation therapy, almost all patients will eventually progress to develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Treatment options for CRPC remain limited. Prostate cancer was considered unresponsive to chemotherapy until the mid-1990s, when mitoxantrone combined with prednisone was shown to play a role in the palliative treatment of patients with CRPC. In 2004, two large randomized clinical trials demonstrated for the first time a small but significant survival advantage of docetaxel-based chemotherapy compared with mitoxantrone in patients with metastatic CRPC. Recently, cabazitaxel was shown to improve survival in patients with metastatic CRPC who progressed after docetaxel-based chemotherapy. Sipuleucel-T was also demonstrated to improve overall survival in patients with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic metastatic CRPC. Along with mitoxantrone and docetaxel, cabazitaxel and sipuleucel-T are now approved for use in metastatic CRPC by the US Food and Drug Administration. There have been multiple early-phase clinical trials of various agents for the treatment of CRPC, and some are in phase III development. This review focuses on the key clinical trials of various treatment options of CRPC currently in use and under investigation. PMID:21461278

  5. Current status of treatments for dyslexia: critical review.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Ann W; Slinger-Constant, Anne-Marie

    2004-10-01

    The acquisition of reading is a complex neurobiologic process. Identifying the most effective instruction and remedial intervention methods for children at risk of developing reading problems and for those who are already struggling is equally complex. This article aims to provide the clinician with a review of more current findings on the prevention and remediation of reading problems in children, along with an approach to considering the diagnosis and treatment of a child with dyslexia. The first part of the review describes interventions targeted at preventing reading difficulties in the at-risk younger child. The second part of the review discusses the efficacy of approaches to treat the older, reading-disabled child ("intervention studies"). Factors that impact the response to treatment are also discussed, as are neuroimaging studies that offer insight into how the brain responds to treatment interventions. With appropriate instruction, at-risk readers can become both accurate and fluent readers. In contrast, although intensive, evidence-based remedial interventions can markedly improve reading accuracy in older, reading-disabled children, they have been significantly less effective in closing the fluency gap. Owing to the dynamic course of language development and the changes in language demands over time, even after a child has demonstrated a substantial response to treatment interventions, his or her subsequent progress should be carefully tracked to ensure optimal progress toward the development of functional reading and written language skills. PMID:15559890

  6. Penile rehabilitation following prostate cancer treatment: review of current literature.

    PubMed

    Clavell-Hernandez, Jonathan; Wang, Run

    2015-01-01

    Radical prostatectomy (RP) and radiotherapy (RT) are highly effective in improving prostate cancer survival. However, both have a detrimental effect on erectile function (EF). Penile rehabilitation consists of understanding the mechanisms that cause erectile dysfunction (ED) and utilizing pharmacologic agents, devices or interventions to promote male sexual function. For the past decade, many researchers have pursued to define effective treatment modalities to improve ED after prostate cancer treatment. Despite the understanding of the mechanisms and well-established rationale for postprostate treatment penile rehabilitation, there is still no consensus regarding effective rehabilitation programs. This article reviews a contemporary series of trials that assess penile rehabilitation and explore treatment modalities that might play a role in the future. Published data and trials related to penile rehabilitation after RP and RT were reviewed and presented. Although recent trials have shown that most therapies are well-tolerated and aid in some degree on EF recovery, we currently do not have tangible evidence to recommend an irrefutable penile rehabilitation algorithm. However, advancements in research and technology will ultimately create and refine management options for penile rehabilitation. PMID:25851656

  7. Eddy current characterization of magnetic treatment of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, E. James

    1992-01-01

    Eddy current impedance measuring methods have been applied to study the effect that magnetically treated materials have on service life extension. Eddy current impedance measurements have been performed on Nickel 200 specimens that have been subjected to many mechanical and magnetic engineering processes: annealing, applied strain, magnetic field, shot peening, and magnetic field after peening. Experimental results have demonstrated a functional relationship between coil impedance, resistance and reactance, and specimens subjected to various engineering processes. It has shown that magnetic treatment does induce changes in a material's electromagnetic properties and does exhibit evidence of stress relief. However, further fundamental studies are necessary for a thorough understanding of the exact mechanism of the magnetic-field processing effect on machine tool service life.

  8. Hemobilia--evolution of current diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Merrell, S. W.; Schneider, P. D.

    1991-01-01

    "Hemobilia," upper gastrointestinal tract bleeding that originates from within the biliary tract, has become widely recognized due to an increased clinical awareness of the disorder and to improvements in diagnostic techniques. In addition, the growing use of percutaneous liver puncture for the diagnosis of and therapy for hepatobiliary diseases and the increased incidence of both blunt and penetrating hepatic trauma have contributed to a rising incidence of hemobilia. We review the history, pathophysiology, and current approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of this disease. Images PMID:1812632

  9. Complement inhibition: a promising concept for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pio, Ruben; Ajona, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2013-01-01

    For decades, complement has been recognized as an effector arm of the immune system that contributes to the destruction of tumor cells. In fact, many therapeutic strategies have been proposed that are based on the intensification of complement-mediated responses against tumors. However, recent studies have challenged this paradigm by demonstrating a tumor-promoting role for complement. Cancer cells seem to be able to establish a convenient balance between complement activation and inhibition, taking advantage of complement initiation without suffering its deleterious effects. Complement activation may support chronic inflammation, promote an immunosuppressive microenvironment, induce angiogenesis, and activate cancer-related signaling pathways. In this context, inhibition of complement activation would be a therapeutic option for treating cancer. This concept is relatively novel and deserves closer attention. In this paper, we will summarize the mechanisms of complement activation on cancer cells, the cancer-promoting effect of complement initiation, and the rationale behind the use of complement inhibition as a therapeutic strategy against cancer. PMID:23706991

  10. Current recommendations for the treatment of genital herpes.

    PubMed

    Leung, D T; Sacks, S L

    2000-12-01

    The incidence of genital herpes continues to increase in epidemic-like fashion. Aciclovir (acyclovir) has been the original gold standard of therapy. The recent addition of famciclovir and valaciclovir as antiherpes drugs has improved convenience as well as the efficacy of treatment. Although aciclovir remains a widely prescribed and reliable drug, its administration schedule falls short of the ease of usage that the newer nucleoside analogues offer, for both episodic and suppressive therapy. Suppression of symptomatic disease and asymptomatic shedding from the genitalia have both become popular approaches, if not the primary targets of antiviral therapy. Knowing that asymptomatic disease leads to most cases of transmission strongly suggests that suppression with antiviral agents could reduce transmission risk in discordant couples. Unfortunately, the role for antivirals in reducing transmission remains to be proven in clinical trials. Neonatal herpes is now successfully treated using aciclovir. Current randomised clinical trials are examining aciclovir and valaciclovir administration, as well as safety and efficacy for post-acute suppressive therapy. Prevention of recurrences in pregnancy is also a topic under investigation, with a view to reducing the medical need for Cesarean section, or alternatively (and far less likely to be accomplished) to protect the neonate. Although resistance is largely limited to the immunocompromised and a change in resistance patterns is not expected, several drugs are available for the treatment of aciclovir-resistant strains of herpes simplex. Foscarnet is the main alternative with proven efficacy in this setting. Unfortunately, administration of foscarnet requires intravenous therapy, although a single anecdote of topical foscarnet efficacy in this setting has been published. Alternatives include cidofovir gel, which is not commercially available but can be formulated locally from the intravenous preparation. Less effective

  11. Turbulent boundary layers under irregular waves and currents: Experiments and the equivalent-wave concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jing

    2016-04-01

    A full-scale experimental study of turbulent boundary layer flows under irregular waves and currents is conducted with the primary objective to investigate the equivalent-wave concept by Madsen (1994). Irregular oscillatory flows following the bottom-velocity spectrum under realistic surface irregular waves are produced over two fixed rough bottoms in an oscillatory water tunnel, and flow velocities are measured using a Particle Image Velocimetry. The root-mean-square (RMS) value and representative phase lead of wave velocities have vertical variations very similar to those of the first-harmonic velocity of periodic wave boundary layers, e.g., the RMS wave velocity follows a logarithmic distribution controlled by the physical bottom roughness in the very near-bottom region. The RMS wave bottom shear stress and the associated representative phase lead can be accurately predicted using the equivalent-wave approach. The spectra of wave bottom shear stress and boundary layer velocity are found to be proportional to the spectrum of free-stream velocity. Currents in the presence of irregular waves exhibit the classic two-log-profile structure with the lower log-profile controlled by the physical bottom roughness and the upper log-profile controlled by a much larger apparent roughness. Replacing the irregular waves by their equivalent sinusoidal waves virtually makes no difference for the coexisting currents. These observations, together with the excellent agreement between measurements and model predictions, suggest that the equivalent-wave representation adequately characterizes the basic wave-current interaction under irregular waves.

  12. Concepts in Onychomycosis Treatment and Recurrence Prevention: An Update.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Theodore

    2016-03-01

    In considering therapy for onychomycosis, the most important factor to take into account is patient selection rather than treatment selection. Patients should be screened and evaluated for the extent of nail involvement, the amount of subungual debris, the degree of dystrophy, their ability and willingness to follow the regimen, and whether comorbidities are present that may affect the efficacy and/or safety of one or more therapies. Onychomycosis is a chronic disease with a high recurrence rate. Commonsense measures to reduce the risk for reinfection include patient education and a clinician-patient team approach to long-term management. PMID:27074701

  13. Current concepts on the management of orbital blow-out fractures.

    PubMed

    Koornneef, L

    1982-09-01

    Surgical versus nonsurgical treatment of orbital blow-out fractures has been controversial in the past. In the 1950s it was advocated that all blow-out fractures be treated surgically based on the conception that extraocular muscles were blown out and trapped in the fracture hole, causing double vision and enophthalmos. Gradually, however, a shift to a more conservative approach occurred, probably because of the complications of surgery, the disappointing results in improvement of motility and enophthalmos, and the growing evidence of spontaneous improvement of double vision. This article analyzes the literature chronologically and blends this analysis with the results of a new anatomical approach to the human orbit. New theories on the mechanism of blow-out fractures are postulated. No longer is entrapment of muslces in a blow-out fracture held responsible for the severe motility problems; rather it is viewed as caused by a dysfunction of the entire motility apparatus in the fracture region. Consequently, conventional surgical treatment, repairing the orbital floor only, seems to have lost its theoretical foundation and a conservative approach is advocated until microsurgical techniques become more readily avaliable to treat the sequelae of blow-out fractures at their origin. PMID:7137815

  14. Evolution of Biomarker Guided Therapy for Heart Failure: Current Concepts and Trial Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Pruett, Amanda E; Lee, Amanda K; Patterson, Herbert; Schwartz, Todd A; Glotzer, Jana M; Adams, Jr, Kirkwood F

    2015-01-01

    Optimizing management of patients with heart failure remains quite challenging despite many significant advances in drug and device therapy for this syndrome. Although a large body of evidence from robust clinical trials supports multiple thera-pies, utilization of these well-established treatments remains inconsistent and outcomes suboptimal in “real-world” patients with heart failure. Disease management programs may be effective, but are difficult to implement due to cost and logistical issues. Another approach to optimizing therapy is to utilize biomarkers to guide therapeutic choices. Natriuretic peptides pro-vide additional information of significant clinical value in the diagnosis and estimation of risk inpatients with heart failure. Ongoing research suggests a potential important added role for natriuretic peptides in heart failure. Guiding therapy based on serial changes in these biomarkers may be an effective strategy to optimize treatment and achieve better outcomes in this syn-drome. Initial, innovative, proof-of-concept studies have provided encouraging results and important insights into key as-pects of this strategy, but well designed, large-scale, multicenter, randomized, outcome trials are needed to definitively estab-lish this novel approach to management. Given the immense and growing public health burden of heart failure, identification of cost-effective ways to decrease the morbidity and mortality due to this syndrome is critical. PMID:24251462

  15. Evolution of biomarker guided therapy for heart failure: current concepts and trial evidence.

    PubMed

    Pruett, Amanda E; Lee, Amanda K; Patterson, J Herbert; Schwartz, Todd A; Glotzer, Jana M; Adams, Kirkwood F

    2015-01-01

    Optimizing management of patients with heart failure remains quite challenging despite many significant advances in drug and device therapy for this syndrome. Although a large body of evidence from robust clinical trials supports multiple therapies, utilization of these well-established treatments remains inconsistent and outcomes suboptimal in "real-world" patients with heart failure. Disease management programs may be effective, but are difficult to implement due to cost and logistical issues. Another approach to optimizing therapy is to utilize biomarkers to guide therapeutic choices. Natriuretic peptides provide additional information of significant clinical value in the diagnosis and estimation of risk inpatients with heart failure. Ongoing research suggests a potential important added role for natriuretic peptides in heart failure. Guiding therapy based on serial changes in these biomarkers may be an effective strategy to optimize treatment and achieve better outcomes in this syndrome. Initial, innovative, proof-of-concept studies have provided encouraging results and important insights into key aspects of this strategy, but well designed, large-scale, multicenter, randomized, outcome trials are needed to definitively establish this novel approach to management. Given the immense and growing public health burden of heart failure, identification of cost-effective ways to decrease the morbidity and mortality due to this syndrome is critical. PMID:24251462

  16. Fibromyalgia--new concepts of pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Lucas, H J; Brauch, C M; Settas, L; Theoharides, T C

    2006-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FMS) is a debilitating disorder characterized by chronic diffuse muscle pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression and skin sensitivity. There are no genetic or biochemical markers and patients often present with other comorbid diseases, such as migraines, interstitial cystitis and irritable bowel syndrome. Diagnosis includes the presence of 11/18 trigger points, but many patients with early symptoms might not fit this definition. Pathogenesis is still unknown, but there has been evidence of increased corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and substance P (SP) in the CSF of FMS patients, as well as increased SP, IL-6 and IL-8 in their serum. Increased numbers of activated mast cells were also noted in skin biopsies. The hypothesis is put forward that FMS is a neuro-immunoendocrine disorder where increased release of CRH and SP from neurons in specific muscle sites triggers local mast cells to release proinflammatory and neurosensitizing molecules. There is no curative treatment although low doses of tricyclic antidepressants and the serotonin-3 receptor antagonist tropisetron, are helpful. Recent nutraceutical formulations containing the natural anti-inflammatory and mast cell inhibitory flavonoid quercetin hold promise since they can be used together with other treatment modalities. PMID:16569342

  17. Current Concepts for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Criterion–Based Rehabilitation Progression

    PubMed Central

    ADAMS, DOUGLAS; LOGERSTEDT, DAVID; HUNTER-GIORDANO, AIRELLE; AXE, MICHAEL J.; SNYDER-MACKLER, LYNN

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The management of patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction should be evidence based. Since our original published guidelines in 1996, successful outcomes have been consistently achieved with the rehabilitation principles of early weight bearing, using a combination of weight-bearing and non–weight-bearing exercise focused on quadriceps and lower extremity strength, and meeting specific objective requirements for return to activity. As rehabilitative evidence and surgical technology and procedures have progressed, the original guidelines should be revisited to ensure that the most up-to-date evidence is guiding rehabilitative care. Emerging evidence on rehabilitative interventions and advancements in concomitant surgeries, including those addressing chondral and meniscal injuries, continues to grow and greatly affect the rehabilitative care of patients with anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The aim of this article is to update previously published rehabilitation guidelines, using the most recent research to reflect the most current evidence for management of patients after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The focus will be on current concepts in rehabilitation interventions and modifications needed for concomitant surgery and pathology. PMID:22402434

  18. Ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head: A focus on current diagnostic and surgical concepts

    PubMed Central

    Ouaïssi, Mehdi; Giger, Urs; Louis, Guillaume; Sielezneff, Igor; Farges, Olivier; Sastre, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Complete surgical resection still remains the only possibility of curing pancreatic cancer, however, only 10% of patients undergo curative surgery. Pancreatic resection currently remains the only method of curing patients, and has a 5-year overall survival rate between 7%-34% compared to a median survival of 3-11 mo for unresected cancer. Pancreatic surgery is a technically demanding procedure requiring highly standardized surgical techniques. Nevertheless, even in experienced hands, perioperative morbidity rates (delayed gastric emptying, pancreatic fistula etc.) are as high as 50%. Different strategies to reduce postoperative morbidity, such as different techniques of gastroenteric reconstruction (pancreatico-jejunostomy vs pancreatico-gastrostomy), intraoperative placement of a pancreatic main duct stent or temporary sealing of the main pancreatic duct with fibrin glue have not led to a significant improvement in clinical outcome. The perioperative application of somatostatin or its analogues may decrease the incidence of pancreatic fistulas in cases with soft pancreatic tissue and a small main pancreatic duct (< 3 mm). The positive effects of external pancreatic main duct drainage and antecolic gastrointestinal reconstruction have been observed to decrease the rate of pancreatic fistulas and delayed gastric emptying, respectively. Currently, the concept of extended radical lymphadenectomy has been found to be associated with higher perioperative morbidity, but without any positive impact on overall survival. However, there is growing evidence that portal vein resections can be performed with acceptable low perioperative morbidity and mortality but does not achieve a cure. PMID:22791941

  19. Central retinal vein occlusion: modifying current treatment protocols.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, M; Souka, A A R; Singh, R P

    2016-04-01

    Central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) is a common retinal vascular disorder that can result in severe visual acuity loss. The randomized control study, CRUISE, helped establish anti-VEGFs as the standard of care in cases with CRVO. The extension studies for CRUISE; HORIZON and RETAIN showed that not all visual gains are maintained beyond the first year. In addition, patients showed different behavior patterns; with some patients showing complete response with few recurrences, whereas others showed partial or even no response with multiple recurrences. Long-term follow-up demonstrated that patients responding poorly to anti-VEGFs tended to do so early in the course of treatment. It also demonstrated the effectiveness of a pro re nata (PRN) protocol for improving vision and maintaining these gains over long-term follow-ups. The SHORE study further illustrated this point by demonstrating that there were minimal differences in visual outcomes between patients receiving monthly injections and patients being treated PRN. In this review we analyzed the data from the major randomized clinical trials (RCT) that looked at anti-VEGFs as the primary treatment modality in patients with CRVO (CRUISE and the extension studies HORIZON and RETAIN for ranibizumab as well as GALILEO and COPERNICUS for aflibercept). In addition, we looked at SCORE and GENEVA to help determine whether there is a place for steroids as a first line therapy in current treatment practice. We then explored alternative treatment regimens such as laser therapy and switching between anti-VEGF agents and/or steroids for non or partially responding patients. Finally, we propose a simplified modified treatment algorithm for patients with CRVO for better long-term outcomes in all types of responders. PMID:26869163

  20. Current status of urban wastewater treatment plants in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q H; Yang, W N; Ngo, H H; Guo, W S; Jin, P K; Dzakpasu, Mawuli; Yang, S J; Wang, Q; Wang, X C; Ao, D

    2016-01-01

    The study reported and analyzed the current state of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in urban China from the perspective of treatment technologies, pollutant removals, operating load and effluent discharge standards. By the end of 2013, 3508 WWTPs have been built in 31 provinces and cities in China with a total treatment capacity of 1.48×10(8)m(3)/d. The uneven population distribution between China's east and west regions has resulted in notably different economic development outcomes. The technologies mostly used in WWTPs are AAO and oxidation ditch, which account for over 50% of the existing WWTPs. According to statistics, the efficiencies of COD and NH3-N removal are good in 656 WWTPs in 70 cities. The overall average COD removal is over 88% with few regional differences. The average removal efficiency of NH3-N is up to 80%. Large differences exist between the operating loads applied in different WWTPs. The average operating loading rate is approximately 83%, and 52% of WWTPs operate at loadings of <80%, treating up to 40% of the wastewater generated. The implementation of discharge standards has been low. Approximately 28% of WWTPs that achieved the Grade I-A Discharge Standard of Pollutants for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant (GB 18918-2002) were constructed after 2010. The sludge treatment and recycling rates are only 25%, and approximately 15% of wastewater is inefficiently treated. Approximately 60% of WWTPs have capacities of 1×10(4)m(3)/d-5×10(4)m(3)/d. Relatively high energy consumption is required for small-scale processing, and the utilization rate of recycled wastewater is low. The challenges of WWTPs are discussed with the aim of developing rational criteria and appropriate technologies for water recycling. Suggestions regarding potential technical and administrative measures are provided. PMID:27045705

  1. Current treatment of antiphospholipid syndrome: lights and shadows.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Gerard; Cervera, Ricard

    2015-10-01

    For patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), the consensus is to treat those who develop thrombosis with long-term oral anticoagulation therapy and to prevent obstetric manifestations by use of aspirin and heparin. These recommendations are based on data from randomized controlled trials and observational studies. Despite this body of knowledge, areas of uncertainty regarding the management of APS exist where evidence is scarce or nonexistent. In other words, for a subset of patients the course of management is unclear. Some examples are patients with 'seronegative' APS, those who do not fulfil the formal (clinical or serological) classification criteria for definite APS, and those with recurrent thrombotic events despite optimal anticoagulation. Other challenges include the treatment of clinical manifestations not included in the classification criteria, such as haematologic manifestations (thrombocytopenia and haemolytic anaemia), neurologic manifestations (chorea, myelitis and multiple sclerosis-like lesions), and nephropathy and heart valve disease associated with antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL), as well as the possible withdrawal of anticoagulation treatment in selected cases of thrombotic APS in which assays for aPL become persistently negative. This Review focuses on the current recommendations for thrombotic and obstetric manifestations of APS, as well as the management of difficult cases. Some aspects of treatment, such as secondary prophylaxis of venous thrombosis, are based on strong evidence--the 'lights' of APS treatment. Conversely, other areas, such as the treatment of non-criteria manifestations of APS, are based only on expert consensus or common sense and remain the 'shadows' of APS therapy. PMID:26122952

  2. Fluorescein Sodium-Guided Surgery of Malignant Brain Tumors: History, Current Concepts, and Future Project.

    PubMed

    Schebesch, Karl-Michael; Brawanski, Alexander; Hohenberger, Christoph; Hohne, Julius

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescein sodium (FL)-guided resection has become an important and beneficial treatment method for malignant brain tumors. FL-guided resection improves the rate of gross total resection in high-grade gliomas (HGG) and cerebral metastases (CM). FL sensitively visualizes the disruption of the blood-brain barrier in the area surrounding malignant lesions, similar to contrast-enhanced T1-weighted MR sequences. This review of the current literature summarizes the history of FL in neurosurgery from 1946 until today. We discuss the molecular mechanism of FL accumulation in cerebral malignant tumors and provide an overview of the current practice of using FL and applying a dedicated surgical microscope filter. Additionally, we outline and discuss ongoing trials and future projects. PMID:26956810

  3. Current Pharmaceutical Treatments and Alternative Therapies of Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jie; Cui, Yanhua; Li, Song; Le, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Over the decades, pharmaceutical treatments, particularly dopaminergic (DAergic) drugs have been considered as the main therapy against motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). It is proposed that DAergic drugs in combination with other medications, such as monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors, catechol-O-methyl transferase inhibitors, anticholinergics and other newly developed non-DAergic drugs can make a better control of motor symptoms or alleviate levodopa-induced motor complications. Moreover, non-motor symptoms of PD, such as cognitive, neuropsychiatric, sleep, autonomic and sensory disturbances caused by intrinsic PD pathology or drug-induced side effects, are gaining increasing attention and urgently need to be taken care of due to their impact on quality of life. Currently, neuroprotective therapies have been investigated extensively in pre-clinical studies, and some of them have been subjected to clinical trials. Furthermore, non-pharmaceutical treatments, including deep brain stimulation (DBS), gene therapy, cell replacement therapy and some complementary managements, such as Tai chi, Yoga, traditional herbs and molecular targeted therapies have also been considered as effective alternative therapies to classical pharmaceutics. This review will provide us updated information regarding the current drugs and non-drugs therapies for PD. PMID:26585523

  4. Current and future treatment options for polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Griesshammer, Martin; Gisslinger, Heinz; Mesa, Ruben

    2015-06-01

    Patients with polycythemia vera (PV), a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by an elevated red blood cell mass, are at high risk of vascular and thrombotic complications and have reduced quality of life due to a substantial symptom burden that includes pruritus, fatigue, constitutional symptoms, microvascular disturbances, and bleeding. Conventional therapeutic options aim at reducing vascular and thrombotic risk, with low-dose aspirin and phlebotomy as first-line recommendations for patients at low risk of thrombotic events and cytoreductive therapy (usually hydroxyurea or interferon alpha) recommended for high-risk patients. However, long-term effective and well-tolerated treatments are still lacking. The discovery of mutations in Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) as the underlying molecular basis of PV has led to the development of several targeted therapies, including JAK inhibitors, and results from the first phase 3 clinical trial with a JAK inhibitor in PV are now available. Here, we review the current treatment landscape in PV, as well as therapies currently in development. PMID:25832853

  5. Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis: an overview of current thinking and treatment.

    PubMed

    Goon, Peter; Sonnex, Chris; Jani, Piyush; Stanley, Margaret; Sudhoff, Holger

    2008-02-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) infection in benign laryngeal papillomas is well established. The vast majority of recurrent respiratory papillomatosis lesions are due to HPV types 6 and 11. Human papillomaviruses are small non-enveloped viruses (>8 kb), that replicate within the nuclei of infected host cells. Infected host basal cell keratinocytes and papillomas arise from the disordered proliferation of these differentiating keratinocytes. Surgical debulking of papillomas is currently the treatment of choice; newer surgical approaches utilizing microdebriders are replacing laser ablation. Surgery aims to secure an adequate airway and improve and maintain an acceptable quality of voice. Adjuvant treatments currently used include cidofovir, indole-3-carbinol, ribavirin, mumps vaccine, and photodynamic therapy. The recent licensing of prophylactic HPV vaccines is a most interesting development. The low incidence of RRP does pose significant problems in recruitment of sufficient numbers to show statistical significance. Large multi-centre collaborative clinical trials are therefore required. Even so, sufficient clinical follow-up data would take several years. PMID:18046565

  6. Radiation treatment of brain tumors: Concepts and strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Marks, J.E. )

    1989-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has demonstrated clinical value for a multitude of CNS tumors. Application of the different physical modalities available has made it possible for the radiotherapist to concentrate the radiation in the region of the tumor with relative sparing of the surrounding normal tissues. Correlation of radiation dose with effect on cranial soft tissues, normal brain, and tumor has shown increasing effect with increasing dose. By using different physical modalities to alter the distribution of radiation dose, it is possible to increase the dose to the tumor and reduce the dose to the normal tissues. Alteration of the volume irradiated and the dose delivered to cranial soft tissues, normal brain, and tumor are strategies that have been effective in improving survival and decreasing complications. The quest for therapeutic gain using hyperbaric oxygen, neutrons, radiation sensitizers, chemotherapeutic agents, and BNCT has met with limited success. Both neoplastic and normal cells are affected simultaneously by all modalities of treatment, including ionizing radiation. Consequently, one is unable to totally depopulate a tumor without irreversibly damaging the normal tissues. In the case of radiation, it is the brain that limits delivery of curative doses, and in the case of chemical additives, it is other organ systems, such as bone marrow, liver, lung, kidneys, and peripheral nerves. Thus, the major obstacle in the treatment of malignant gliomas is our inability to preferentially affect the tumor with the modalities available. Until it is possible to directly target the neoplastic cell without affecting so many of the adjacent normal cells, the quest for therapeutic gain will go unrealized.72 references.

  7. Current treatment practice and outcomes. Report of the hyponatremia registry.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Arthur; Verbalis, Joseph G; Amin, Alpesh N; Burst, Volker R; Chiodo, Joseph A; Chiong, Jun R; Dasta, Joseph F; Friend, Keith E; Hauptman, Paul J; Peri, Alessandro; Sigal, Samuel H

    2015-07-01

    Current management practices for hyponatremia (HN) are incompletely understood. The HN Registry has recorded diagnostic measures, utilization, efficacy, and outcomes of therapy for eu- or hypervolemic HN. To better understand current practices, we analyzed data from 3087 adjudicated adult patients in the registry with serum sodium concentration of 130 mEq/l or less from 225 sites in the United States and European Union. Common initial monotherapy treatments were fluid restriction (35%), administration of isotonic (15%) or hypertonic saline (2%), and tolvaptan (5%); 17% received no active agent. Median (interquartile range) mEq/l serum sodium increases during the first day were as follows: no treatment, 1.0 (0.0-4.0); fluid restriction, 2.0 (0.0-4.0); isotonic saline, 3.0 (0.0-5.0); hypertonic saline, 5.0 (1.0-9.0); and tolvaptan, 4.0 (2.0-9.0). Adjusting for initial serum sodium concentration with logistic regression, the relative likelihoods for correction by 5 mEq/l or more (referent, fluid restriction) were 1.60 for hypertonic saline and 2.55 for tolvaptan. At discharge, serum sodium concentration was under 135 mEq/l in 78% of patients and 130 mEq/l or less in 49%. Overly rapid correction occurred in 7.9%. Thus, initial HN treatment often uses maneuvers of limited efficacy. Despite an association with poor outcomes and availability of effective therapy, most patients with HN are discharged from hospital still hyponatremic. Studies to assess short- and long-term benefits of correction of HN with effective therapies are needed. PMID:25671764

  8. High-Voltage Pulsed Current Electrical Stimulation in Wound Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Polak, Anna; Franek, Andrzej; Taradaj, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    Significance: A range of studies point to the efficacy of electrical stimulation (ES) in wound treatment, but the methodology of its application has not been determined to date. This article provides a critical review of the results of clinical trials published by researchers using high-voltage pulsed current (HVPC) to treat chronic wounds. In describing the methodology of the trials, the article gives special attention to electric stimulus parameters, the frequency of procedures and total treatment duration. Recent Advances: HVPC is a monophasic pulsed electric current that consists of double-peaked impulses (5–200 μs), at very high peak-current amplitude (2–2.5 A), and high voltage (up to 500 V), at a frequency of 1–125 pulses per second. HVPC can activate “skin battery” and cellular galvanotaxis, and improves blood flow and capillary density. Critical Issues: HVPC efficacy was evaluated in conservatively treated patients with diabetic foot, venous leg and pressure ulcers (PUs), and in some patients with surgically treated venous insufficiency. Future Directions: The efficacy of HVPC as one of several biophysical energies promoting venous leg ulcer (VLU) and PU healing has been confirmed. Additional studies are needed to investigate its effect on the healing of other types of soft tissue defects. Other areas that require more research include the identification of the therapeutic effect of HVPC on infected wounds, the determination of the efficacy of cathodal versus anodal stimulation, and the minimal daily/weekly duration of HVPC required to ensure optimal promotion of wound healing. PMID:24761351

  9. High-Voltage Pulsed Current Electrical Stimulation in Wound Treatment.

    PubMed

    Polak, Anna; Franek, Andrzej; Taradaj, Jakub

    2014-02-01

    Significance: A range of studies point to the efficacy of electrical stimulation (ES) in wound treatment, but the methodology of its application has not been determined to date. This article provides a critical review of the results of clinical trials published by researchers using high-voltage pulsed current (HVPC) to treat chronic wounds. In describing the methodology of the trials, the article gives special attention to electric stimulus parameters, the frequency of procedures and total treatment duration. Recent Advances: HVPC is a monophasic pulsed electric current that consists of double-peaked impulses (5-200 μs), at very high peak-current amplitude (2-2.5 A), and high voltage (up to 500 V), at a frequency of 1-125 pulses per second. HVPC can activate "skin battery" and cellular galvanotaxis, and improves blood flow and capillary density. Critical Issues: HVPC efficacy was evaluated in conservatively treated patients with diabetic foot, venous leg and pressure ulcers (PUs), and in some patients with surgically treated venous insufficiency. Future Directions: The efficacy of HVPC as one of several biophysical energies promoting venous leg ulcer (VLU) and PU healing has been confirmed. Additional studies are needed to investigate its effect on the healing of other types of soft tissue defects. Other areas that require more research include the identification of the therapeutic effect of HVPC on infected wounds, the determination of the efficacy of cathodal versus anodal stimulation, and the minimal daily/weekly duration of HVPC required to ensure optimal promotion of wound healing. PMID:24761351

  10. Phenylketonuria: a review of current and future treatments

    PubMed Central

    Al Hafid, Naz

    2015-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by a deficiency in the hepatic enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). If left untreated, the main clinical feature is intellectual disability. Treatment, which includes a low Phe diet supplemented with amino acid formulas, commences soon after diagnosis within the first weeks of life. Although dietary treatment has been successful in preventing intellectual disability in early treated PKU patients, there are major issues with dietary compliance due to palatability of the diet. Other potential issues associated with dietary therapy include nutritional deficiencies especially vitamin D and B12. Suboptimal outcomes in cognitive and executive functioning have been reported in patients who adhere poorly to dietary therapy. There have been continuous attempts at improving the quality of medical foods including their palatability. Advances in dietary therapy such as the use of large neutral amino acids (LNAA) and glycomacropeptides (GMP; found within the whey fraction of bovine milk) have been explored. Gene therapy and enzyme replacement or substitution therapy have yielded more promising data in the recent years. In this review the current and possible future treatments for PKU are discussed. PMID:26835392

  11. Current and emerging treatment options in the management of lupus.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Natasha; D'Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with variable clinical manifestations. While the clearest guidelines for the treatment of SLE exist in the context of lupus nephritis, patients with other lupus manifestations such as neuropsychiatric, hematologic, musculoskeletal, and severe cutaneous lupus frequently require immunosuppression and/or biologic therapy. Conventional immunosuppressive agents such as mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide are widely used in the management of SLE with current more rationalized treatment regimens optimizing the use of these agents while minimizing potential toxicity. The advent of biologic therapies has advanced the treatment of SLE particularly in patients with refractory disease. The CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-BLyS agent belimumab are now widely in use in clinical practice. Several other biologic agents are in ongoing clinical trials. While immunosuppressive and biologic agents are the foundation of inflammatory disease control in SLE, the importance of managing comorbidities such as cardiovascular risk factors, bone health, and minimizing susceptibility to infection should not be neglected. PMID:27529058

  12. Current status of atypical antipsychotics for the treatment of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Rico-Villademoros, F; Calandre, E P; Slim, M

    2014-06-01

    The treatment of fibromyalgia requires pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies. The pharmacological treatment of fibromyalgia is limited to a few drugs that have been demonstrated to be moderately effective in some but not all dimensions of the disease. Therefore, the search for new drugs to treat this condition is warranted. Atypical antipsychotics offered an attractive alternative because they had been shown to be active against several key symptoms of fibromyalgia. The results of open-label studies, however, appear to indicate that atypical antipsychotics are poorly tolerated in patients with fibromyalgia, and only quetiapine XR has been studied in randomized controlled trials. Quetiapine XR has demonstrated effectiveness in treating comorbid major depression, anxiety and sleep disturbance. However, in two randomized controlled trials, quetiapine XR was not differentiated from placebo and failed to demonstrate noninferiority to amitriptyline in terms of improving overall symptomatology. The effect of quetiapine XR on pain and its usefulness as part of a combination pharmacological regimen should be further evaluated. Overall, the use of quetiapine (initiated at a low dose and slowly titrated) in fibromyalgia should be limited to patients with comorbid major depression or patients who are currently receiving other treatments and have unresolved and disabling depressive and/or anxiety symptoms. PMID:24983591

  13. SAPHO Syndrome: Current Developments and Approaches to Clinical Treatment.

    PubMed

    Firinu, Davide; Garcia-Larsen, Vanessa; Manconi, Paolo Emilio; Del Giacco, Stefano R

    2016-06-01

    SAPHO syndrome (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis) is a rare autoimmune disease which, due to its clinical presentation and symptoms, is often misdiagnosed and unrecognized. Its main features are prominent inflammatory cutaneous and articular manifestations. Treatments with immunosuppressive drugs have been used for the management of SAPHO with variable results. To date, the use of anti-TNF-α agents has proved to be an effective alternative to conventional treatment for unresponsive or refractory SAPHO cases. TNF-α is a pro-inflammatory cytokine and pivotal regulator of other cytokines, including IL-1 β, IL-6, and IL-8, involved in inflammation, acute-phase response induction, and chemotaxis. IL-1 inhibition strategies with anakinra have shown efficacy as first and second lines of treatment. In this review, we will describe the main characteristics of biological drugs currently used for SAPHO syndrome. We also describe some of the promising therapeutic effects of ustekinumab, an antibody against the p40 subunit of IL-12 and IL-23, after failure of multiple drugs including anti-TNF-α and anakinra. We discuss the use and impact of the new anti-IL-1 antagonists involved in the IL-17 blockade, in particular for the most difficult-to-treat SAPHO cases. PMID:27108452

  14. Current and emerging treatment options in the management of lupus

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Natasha; D’Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with variable clinical manifestations. While the clearest guidelines for the treatment of SLE exist in the context of lupus nephritis, patients with other lupus manifestations such as neuropsychiatric, hematologic, musculoskeletal, and severe cutaneous lupus frequently require immunosuppression and/or biologic therapy. Conventional immunosuppressive agents such as mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide are widely used in the management of SLE with current more rationalized treatment regimens optimizing the use of these agents while minimizing potential toxicity. The advent of biologic therapies has advanced the treatment of SLE particularly in patients with refractory disease. The CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-BLyS agent belimumab are now widely in use in clinical practice. Several other biologic agents are in ongoing clinical trials. While immunosuppressive and biologic agents are the foundation of inflammatory disease control in SLE, the importance of managing comorbidities such as cardiovascular risk factors, bone health, and minimizing susceptibility to infection should not be neglected. PMID:27529058

  15. Current and Emerging Treatment Options for Fecal Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Fecal incontinence (FI) is a multifactorial disorder that imposes considerable social and economic burdens. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of current and emerging treatment options for FI. A MEDLINE search was conducted for English-language articles related to FI prevalence, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment published from January 1, 1990 through June 1, 2013. The search was extended to unpublished trials on ClinicalTrials.gov and relevant publications cited in included articles. Conservative approaches, including dietary modifications, medications, muscle-strengthening exercises, and biofeedback, have been shown to provide short-term benefits. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation was considered ineffective in a randomized clinical trial. Unlike initial studies, sacral nerve stimulation has shown reasonable short-term effectiveness and some complications. Dynamic graciloplasty and artificial sphincter and bowel devices lack randomized controlled trials and have shown inconsistent results and high rates of explantation. Of injectable bulking agents, dextranomer microspheres in non-animal stabilized hyaluronic acid (NASHA Dx) has shown significant improvement in incontinence scores and frequency of incontinence episodes, with generally mild adverse effects. For the treatment of FI, conservative measures and biofeedback therapy are modestly effective. When conservative therapies are ineffective, invasive procedures, including sacral nerve stimulation, may be considered, but they are associated with complications and lack randomized, controlled trials. Bulking agents may be an appropriate alternative therapy to consider before more aggressive therapies in patients who fail conservative therapies. PMID:25014235

  16. Phenylketonuria: a review of current and future treatments.

    PubMed

    Al Hafid, Naz; Christodoulou, John

    2015-10-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism caused by a deficiency in the hepatic enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). If left untreated, the main clinical feature is intellectual disability. Treatment, which includes a low Phe diet supplemented with amino acid formulas, commences soon after diagnosis within the first weeks of life. Although dietary treatment has been successful in preventing intellectual disability in early treated PKU patients, there are major issues with dietary compliance due to palatability of the diet. Other potential issues associated with dietary therapy include nutritional deficiencies especially vitamin D and B12. Suboptimal outcomes in cognitive and executive functioning have been reported in patients who adhere poorly to dietary therapy. There have been continuous attempts at improving the quality of medical foods including their palatability. Advances in dietary therapy such as the use of large neutral amino acids (LNAA) and glycomacropeptides (GMP; found within the whey fraction of bovine milk) have been explored. Gene therapy and enzyme replacement or substitution therapy have yielded more promising data in the recent years. In this review the current and possible future treatments for PKU are discussed. PMID:26835392

  17. [Treatment of chronic itch in systemic disease. Current standards].

    PubMed

    Mettang, T; Ständer, S; Kremer, A E

    2015-12-01

    Chronic itch (CI) is a frequent and sometimes tormenting symptom in many skin and systemic diseases. In systemic diseases, it mostly appears on primarily unaffected skin. As a sequelae of intense scratching, secondary skin lesions such as excoriations, scars, and prurigo nodularis may occur. Due to the lack of valid pathogenetic concepts and good clinical trials, the therapy of CI remains mostly symptomatic. In Europe almost all drugs used to treat CI are not approved for this indication. CI is frequent in patients with chronic kidney diseases in advanced stages. Gabapentin and pregabalin, anticonvulsants, and centrally acting calcium channel blockers have been shown to exert a profound effect in CI. Furthermore, UVB phototherapy has been proven to attenuate pruritus in uremic patients. Randomized controlled studies have recently shown that nalfurafine, a κ-opioid receptor agonist, is able to ameliorate itch in patients with uremic itch. In patients suffering from cholestatic itch, the anion exchange resin colestyramine and rifampicin are effective antipruritic drugs. Furthermore, µ-opioid receptor antagonists and sertraline may be used to alleviate CI in hepatic diseases. In refractory cases, naso-biliary drainage or albumin dialysis are effective invasive procedures. For the treatment of chronic itch in hematological diseases no controlled trials have been performed so far. The mainstay in these cases is to treat the underlying disease. PMID:26585238

  18. [Septic shock in intensive care units. Current focus on treatment].

    PubMed

    Arriagada S, Daniela; Donoso F, Alejandro; Cruces R, Pablo; Díaz R, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Essential therapeutic principles in children with septic shock persist over time, although some new concepts have been recently incorporated, and fully awareness of pediatricians and intensivists is essential. Fluid resuscitation is a fundamental intervention, but the kind of ideal fluid has not been established yet, as each of these interventions has specific limitations and there is no evidence supportive of the superiority of one type of fluid. Should septic shock persists despite adequate fluid resuscitation, the use of inotropic medication and/or vasopressors is indicated. New vasoactive drugs can be used in refractory septic shock caused by vasopressors, and the use of hydrocortisone should be considered in children with suspected adrenal insufficiency, as it reduces the need for vasopressors. The indications for red blood cells transfusion or the optimal level of glycemia are still controversial, with no consensus on the threshold value for the use of these blood products or the initiation of insulin administration, respectively. Likewise, the use of high-volume hemofiltration is a controversial issue and further study is needed on the routine recommendation in the course of septic shock. Nutritional support is crucial, as malnutrition is a serious complication that should be properly prevented and treated. The aim of this paper is to provide update on the most recent advances as concerns the treatment of septic shock in the pediatric population. PMID:26323988

  19. Current concepts and controversies in the management of early stage Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Lauren S.; Lee, Mark; Advani, Ranjana H.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past three decades, due to the recognition of late effects related to high-dose extended field radiotherapy and heavy alkylator chemotherapy, combined modality therapy with abbreviated chemotherapy and limited field radiotherapy has emerged as the standard of care for early stage Hodgkin lymphoma, with cure rates in excess of 80%. Currently, however, controversy remains over identifying the most appropriate criteria to risk-stratify patients with early stage disease, so that those with a favorable prognosis receive limited treatment without compromising cure rates and those with unfavorable risk receive more intensified therapy. The optimal risk stratification system remains unclear, with variable definitions of favorable and unfavorable disease used by research groups in North America and Europe. Thus, comparison of clinical trial results has been challenging, and additional controversies persist regarding optimal chemotherapy regimens, duration of therapy, and the role of radiotherapy. Investigations are ongoing to assess the potential of functional imaging and biomarkers as tools for risk stratification. The collective goal is to further refine current stratification strategies to allow for an individualized, risk-adapted treatment approach that minimizes long-term late effects without compromising high cure rates. PMID:21463118

  20. Prehospital stroke diagnosis and treatment in ambulances and helicopters-a concept paper.

    PubMed

    Hölscher, Thilo; Dunford, James V; Schlachetzki, Felix; Boy, Sandra; Hemmen, Thomas; Meyer, Brett C; Serra, John; Powers, Jeff; Voie, Arne

    2013-04-01

    Stroke is the second common cause of death and the primary cause of early invalidity worldwide. Different from other diseases is the time sensitivity related to stroke. In case of an ischemic event occluding a brain artery, 2000000 neurons die every minute. Stroke diagnosis and treatment should be initiated at the earliest time point possible, preferably at the site or during patient transport. Portable ultrasound has been used for prehospital diagnosis for applications other than stroke, and its acceptance as a valuable diagnostic tool "in the field" is growing. The intrahospital use of transcranial ultrasound for stroke diagnosis has been described extensively in the literature. Beyond its diagnostic use, first clinical trials as well as numerous preclinical work demonstrate that ultrasound can be used to accelerate clot lysis (sonothrombolysis) in presence as well as in absence of tissue plasminogen activator. Hence, the use of transcranial ultrasound for diagnosis and possibly treatment of stroke bares the potential to add to current stroke care paradigms significantly. The purpose of this concept article is to describe the opportunities presented by recent advances in transcranial ultrasound to diagnose and potentially treat large vessel embolic stroke in the prehospital environment. PMID:23415600

  1. Current Advances in Detection and Treatment of Babesiosis

    PubMed Central

    Mosqueda, J; Olvera-Ramírez, A; Aguilar-Tipacamú, G; Cantó, GJ

    2012-01-01

    Babesiosis is a disease with a world-wide distribution affecting many species of mammals principally cattle and man. The major impact occurs in the cattle industry where bovine babesiosis has had a huge economic effect due to loss of meat and beef production of infected animals and death. Nowadays to those costs there must be added the high cost of tick control, disease detection, prevention and treatment. In almost a century and a quarter since the first report of the disease, the truth is: there is no a safe and efficient vaccine available, there are limited chemotherapeutic choices and few low-cost, reliable and fast detection methods. Detection and treatment of babesiosis are important tools to control babesiosis. Microscopy detection methods are still the cheapest and fastest methods used to identify Babesia parasites although their sensitivity and specificity are limited. Newer immunological methods are being developed and they offer faster, more sensitive and more specific options to conventional methods, although the direct immunological diagnoses of parasite antigens in host tissues are still missing. Detection methods based on nucleic acid identification and their amplification are the most sensitive and reliable techniques available today; importantly, most of those methodologies were developed before the genomics and bioinformatics era, which leaves ample room for optimization. For years, babesiosis treatment has been based on the use of very few drugs like imidocarb or diminazene aceturate. Recently, several pharmacological compounds were developed and evaluated, offering new options to control the disease. With the complete sequence of the Babesia bovis genome and the B. bigemina genome project in progress, the post-genomic era brings a new light on the development of diagnosis methods and new chemotherapy targets. In this review, we will present the current advances in detection and treatment of babesiosis in cattle and other animals, with additional

  2. Current treatment for Alzheimer disease and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Tariot, Pierre N; Federoff, Howard J

    2003-01-01

    A cascade of pathophysiological events is triggered in Alzheimer disease (AD) that ultimately involves common cellular signaling pathways and leads to cellular and network dysfunction, failure of neurotransmission, cell death, and a common clinical outcome. The process is asynchronous, meaning that viable neurons remain as targets for therapy even in the diseased state, and each stage of the cascade affords the possibility for therapeutic intervention. Cholinesterase inhibitors are the only available treatment in the United States for patients with mild to moderate AD, helping maintain cognitive and functional abilities in most patients and conferring beneficial behavioral effects in some. Memantine is an NMDA receptor antagonist that has recently been approved in Europe for treatment of moderately severe to severe AD and is under investigation in the United States. Its mechanism of action may include enhanced neurotransmission in several systems as well as antiexcitotoxic effects. There are data regarding the effectiveness of the combination of memantine with cholinesterase inhibitors that will be useful for the practicing clinician. Other agents have shown some benefit in clinical trials, including the antioxidants vitamin E, selegiline, and Ginkgo biloba extracts, although the weight of evidence regarding their effects is not sufficient to define clinical practice. Potential future therapies currently are in development that target multiple aspects of the illness cascade, including aberrant inflammation, neurotrophic function, and processing of beta amyloid and tau proteins. These newer approaches hold promise for disease modification but are as yet unproven. Whether or not disease-modifying or preventive therapies become a reality, clinicians will be faced with AD patients who require treatment at all stages of illness for the indefinite future. Cholinergic and emerging noncholinergic medications will likely prevail as the standards of treatment for years to

  3. Viruses and disease: emerging concepts for prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Herrington, C S; Coates, P J; Duprex, W P

    2015-01-01

    Viruses cause a wide range of human diseases, ranging from acute self-resolving conditions to acute fatal diseases. Effects that arise long after the primary infection can also increase the propensity for chronic conditions or lead to the development of cancer. Recent advances in the fields of virology and pathology have been fundamental in improving our understanding of viral pathogenesis, in providing improved vaccination strategies and in developing newer, more effective treatments for patients worldwide. The reviews assembled here focus on the interface between virology and pathology and encompass aspects of both the clinical pathology of viral disease and the underlying disease mechanisms. Articles on emerging diseases caused by Ebola virus, Marburg virus, coronaviruses such as SARS and MERS, Nipah virus and noroviruses are followed by reviews of enteroviruses, HIV infection, measles, mumps, human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), influenza, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and varicella zoster virus (VZV). The issue concludes with a series of articles reviewing the relationship between viruses and cancer, including the role played by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the pathogenesis of lymphoma and carcinoma; how human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are involved in the development of skin cancer; the involvement of hepatitis B virus infection in hepatocellular carcinoma; and the mechanisms by which Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) leads to Kaposi's sarcoma. We hope that this collection of articles will be of interest to a wide range of scientists and clinicians at a time when there is a renaissance in the appreciation of the power of pathology as virologists dissect the processes of disease. PMID:25366544

  4. Current and future treatment options for adult chronic rhinosinusitis: Focus on nasal polyposis.

    PubMed

    Bachert, Claus; Zhang, Luo; Gevaert, Phillippe

    2015-12-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) affects more than 10% of the population in the United States and Europe. Recent findings point to a considerable variation of inflammatory subtypes in patients with CRS with nasal polyps and patients with CRS without nasal polyps. According to current guidelines, glucocorticosteroids and antibiotics are the principle pharmacotherapeutic approaches; however, they fail in a group of patients who share common clinical and laboratory markers. Several clinical phenotypes often leading to uncontrolled disease, including adult nasal polyposis, aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, and allergic fungal rhinosinusitis, are characterized by a common endotype: a TH2 bias is associated with a higher likelihood of comorbid asthma and recurrence after surgical treatment. As a consequence, several innovative approaches targeting the TH2 bias with humanized mAbs have been subjected to proof-of-concept studies in patients with CRS with nasal polyps with or without comorbid asthma: omalizumab, reslizumab, mepolizumab, and recently dupilumab. Future concepts using upstream targets, such as GATA-3, also focus on this endotype. This current development might result in advantages in the treatment of patients with the most severe CRS. PMID:26654192

  5. Current and future medical treatment in primary dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Delnooz, Cathérine C.S.

    2012-01-01

    Dystonia is a hyperkinetic movement disorder, characterized by involuntary and sustained contractions of opposing muscles causing twisting movements and abnormal postures. It is often a disabling disorder that has a significant impact on physical and psychosocial wellbeing. The medical therapeutic armamentarium used in practice is quite extensive, but for many of these interventions formal proof of efficacy is lacking. Exceptions are the use of botulinum toxin in patients with cervical dystonia, some forms of cranial dystonia (in particular, blepharospasm) and writer’s cramp; deep brain stimulation of the pallidum in generalized and segmental dystonia; and high-dose trihexyphenidyl in young patients with segmental and generalized dystonia. In order to move this field forward, we not only need better trials that examine the effect of current treatment interventions, but also a further understanding of the pathophysiology of dystonia as a first step to design and test new therapies that are targeted at the underlying biologic and neurophysiologic mechanisms. PMID:22783371

  6. Drug treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension: current and future agents.

    PubMed

    Hoeper, Marius M

    2005-01-01

    During the last decade we have witnessed substantial improvements in the therapeutic options for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), including true innovations targeting some of the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this devastating disease. Intravenous epoprostenol was the first drug to improve symptoms and survival of patients with PAH. Novel prostanoids, including subcutaneous treprostinil and inhaled iloprost, also have beneficial effects in many patients, although their long-term efficacy is less well known. Among the newer treatments for PAH, endothelin receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors have reshaped clinical practice. The endothelin receptor antagonist bosentan has been approved in many parts of the world and most current guidelines recommend this drug as first-line treatment for patients with PAH in functional class III. Novel endothelin receptor antagonists such as sitaxsentan sodium and ambrisentan are currently being investigated. The PDE5 sildenafil is also being intensively studied in patients with pulmonary hypertension, and most of the available data look promising, although approval for PAH is still pending. Other PDE5 inhibitors have not yet undergone extensive study in PAH. The increasing insight into the pathogenesis of PAH opens several new therapeutic opportunities, which include vasoactive intestinal peptide, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, adrenomedullin and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins). However, PAH is a complex disorder and targeting a single pathway can not be expected to be uniformly successful. Thus, combining substances with different modes of action is expected to improve symptoms, haemodynamics and survival in PAH patients, although combination therapy has yet to undergo the scrutiny of large randomised clinical trials. PMID:15977967

  7. Intestinal Tissue Engineering: Current Concepts and Future Vision of Regenerative Medicine in the Gut

    PubMed Central

    Bitar, Khalil N.; Raghavan, Shreya

    2011-01-01

    Background and Purpose Functional tissue engineering of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a complex process aiming to aid the regeneration of structural layers of smooth muscle, intrinsic enteric neuronal plexuses, specialized mucosa and epithelial cells as well as interstitial cells. The final tissue engineered construct is intended to mimic the native GI tract anatomically and physiologically. Physiological functionality of tissue engineered constructs is of utmost importance while considering clinical translation. The construct comprises of cellular components as well as biomaterial scaffolding components. Together, these determine the immune-response a tissue engineered construct would elicit from a host upon implantation. Over the last decade, significant advances have been made to mitigate adverse host reactions. These include a quest for identifying autologous cell sources like embryonic and adult stem cells, bone marrow-derived cells, neural crest-derived cells and muscle-derived stem cells. Scaffolding biomaterials have been fabricated with increasing biocompatibility and biodegradability. Manufacturing processes have advanced to allow for precise spatial architecture of scaffolds in order to mimic in vivo milieu closely and achieve neovascularization. This review will focus on the current concepts and the future vision of functional tissue engineering of the diverse neuromuscular structures of the GI tract from the esophagus to the internal anal sphincter. PMID:22188325

  8. Current Concepts and Occurrence of Epithelial Odontogenic Tumors: I. Ameloblastoma and Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Sook

    2013-01-01

    Ameloblastomas and adenomatoid odontogenic tumors (AOTs) are common epithelial tumors of odontogenic origin. Ameloblastomas are clinico-pathologically classified into solid/multicystic, unicystic, desmoplastic, and peripheral types, and also divided into follicular, plexiform, acanthomatous, granular types, etc., based on their histological features. Craniopharyngiomas, derived from the remnants of Rathke's pouch or a misplaced enamel organ, are also comparable to the odontogenic tumors. The malignant transformation of ameloblastomas results in the formation of ameloblastic carcinomas and malignant ameloblastomas depending on cytological dysplasia and metastasis, respectively. AOTs are classified into follicular, extrafollicular, and peripheral types. Ameloblastomas are common, have an aggressive behavior and recurrent course, and are rarely metastatic, while AOTs are hamartomatous benign lesions derived from the complex system of the dental lamina or its remnants. With advances in the elucidation of molecular signaling mechanisms in cells, the cytodifferentiation of epithelial tumor cells in ameloblastomas and AOTs can be identified using different biomarkers. Therefore, it is suggested that comprehensive pathological observation including molecular genetic information can provide a more reliable differential diagnosis for the propagation and prognosis of ameloblastomas and AOTs. This study aimed to review the current concepts of ameloblastomas and AOTs and to discuss their clinico-pathological features relevant to tumorigenesis and prognosis. PMID:23837011

  9. Current concepts: tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications in the ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    Correia, S. I.; Pereira, H.; Silva-Correia, J.; Van Dijk, C. N.; Espregueira-Mendes, J.; Oliveira, J. M.; Reis, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine (TERM) has caused a revolution in present and future trends of medicine and surgery. In different tissues, advanced TERM approaches bring new therapeutic possibilities in general population as well as in young patients and high-level athletes, improving restoration of biological functions and rehabilitation. The mainstream components required to obtain a functional regeneration of tissues may include biodegradable scaffolds, drugs or growth factors and different cell types (either autologous or heterologous) that can be cultured in bioreactor systems (in vitro) prior to implantation into the patient. Particularly in the ankle, which is subject to many different injuries (e.g. acute, chronic, traumatic and degenerative), there is still no definitive and feasible answer to ‘conventional’ methods. This review aims to provide current concepts of TERM applications to ankle injuries under preclinical and/or clinical research applied to skin, tendon, bone and cartilage problems. A particular attention has been given to biomaterial design and scaffold processing with potential use in osteochondral ankle lesions. PMID:24352667

  10. Neurogenic ejaculatory disorders: focus on current and future treatments.

    PubMed

    Calabrò, Rocco S; Polimeni, Giovanni; Ciurleo, Rosella; Casella, Carmela; Bramanti, Placido

    2011-09-01

    Ejaculation is a complex and still poorly understood neurological mechanism, at both spinal and cerebral levels as it is closely associated with orgasm. Physiologically, ejaculation is defined as the expulsion of seminal fluid from the urethral meatus and consists of two phases, namely emission and expulsion. Ejaculation is mediated by a spinal control center, referred to as a spinal pattern generator that coordinates sympathetic, parasympathetic and motor (somatic) outflows, integrating the latter with the inputs from the supraspinal sites in brainstem, hypothalamus and preoptic area. Premature ejaculation (PE) is the most common sexual dysfunction among young men, and it has been considered mostly psychogenic in origin, although it can be associated to diverse urological and neurological diseases. On the contrary, retrograde ejaculation and anejaculation are predominantly related to organic causes, particularly to neurogenic ones. Since ejaculation is mostly a spinal reflex, it is comprehensible that ejaculatory disorders are more frequent in spinal cord injury than in other neurological disorders. Over the past decades, research has focused on PE, and evidence from clinical studies showed a beneficial effect of antidepressants for the treatment of men with PE. Other ejaculatory disorders, especially painful ejaculation, have been less investigated and the proper therapy is still controversial. Aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive description of both currently available treatments and most promising future therapies, including assigned patents, for the neurogenic ejaculatory disorders. PMID:21834782

  11. Cancer Treatment Using Peptides: Current Therapies and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Thundimadathil, Jyothi

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of peptides in cancer therapy with special emphasis on peptide drugs which are already approved and those in clinical trials. The potential of peptides in cancer treatment is evident from a variety of different strategies that are available to address the progression of tumor growth and propagation of the disease. Use of peptides that can directly target cancer cells without affecting normal cells (targeted therapy) is evolving as an alternate strategy to conventional chemotherapy. Peptide can be utilized directly as a cytotoxic agent through various mechanisms or can act as a carrier of cytotoxic agents and radioisotopes by specifically targeting cancer cells. Peptide-based hormonal therapy has been extensively studied and utilized for the treatment of breast and prostate cancers. Tremendous amount of clinical data is currently available attesting to the efficiency of peptide-based cancer vaccines. Combination therapy is emerging as an important strategy to achieve synergistic effects in fighting cancer as a single method alone may not be efficient enough to yield positive results. Combining immunotherapy with conventional therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy or combining an anticancer peptide with a nonpeptidic cytotoxic drug is an example of this emerging field. PMID:23316341

  12. Approaches to overcome current limitations of HIFU treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umemura, Shin-Ichiro; Kawabata, Ken-Ichi; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Azuma, Takashi; Ishida, Kazunari; Kubota, Jun; Ichihara, Mitsuyoshi; Okai, Takashi

    2001-05-01

    Noninvasive therapy with HIFU has been successfully applied to transrectal treatment of prostate cancer as well as benign prostate hyperplasia. However, there are two major technical reasons why its clinical application to other organs is currently limited: (1) low throughput of treatment and (2) lack of penetration to deep tissues. To multiply the throughput, a split-focus technique, in which the focal spot is enlarged primarily in the lateral direction, was developed. An electronically variable focus array transducer was also developed to enhance the throughput. An approach to treat a large volume of uterus myoma by coagulating its feeding arteries has been studied. The tissue volume to be coagulated can be thereby reduced by orders of magnitude. The penetration and throughput can potentially be improved at the same time by delivering a microbubble agent to the target tissue. It was theoretically predicted that a microbubble agent could multiply the ultrasonic tissue absorption. The effectiveness of this approach was confirmed in animal experiments using Optison. Real-time monitoring of tissue coagulation during HIFU exposure also can enhance the throughput through preventing excess deposition of ultrasonic energy. Monitoring coagulation by imaging local displacement in tissue with ultrasound will be discussed as well.

  13. An update of current treatments for adult acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Gardin, Claude

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) biology and its genetic landscape should ultimately lead to more subset-specific AML therapies, ideally tailored to each patient's disease. Although a growing number of distinct AML subsets have been increasingly characterized, patient management has remained disappointingly uniform. If one excludes acute promyelocytic leukemia, current AML management still relies largely on intensive chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), at least in younger patients who can tolerate such intensive treatments. Nevertheless, progress has been made, notably in terms of standard drug dose intensification and safer allogeneic HSCT procedures, allowing a larger proportion of patients to achieve durable remission. In addition, improved identification of patients at relatively low risk of relapse should limit their undue exposure to the risks of HSCT in first remission. The role of new effective agents, such as purine analogs or gemtuzumab ozogamicin, is still under investigation, whereas promising new targeted agents are under clinical development. In contrast, minimal advances have been made for patients unable to tolerate intensive treatment, mostly representing older patients. The availability of hypomethylating agents likely represents an encouraging first step for this latter population, and it is hoped will allow for more efficient combinations with novel agents. PMID:26660429

  14. Current Research Therapeutic Strategies for Alzheimer's Disease Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Folch, Jaume; Petrov, Dmitry; Ettcheto, Miren; Abad, Sonia; Sánchez-López, Elena; García, M. Luisa; Olloquequi, Jordi; Beas-Zarate, Carlos; Auladell, Carme; Camins, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) currently presents one of the biggest healthcare issues in the developed countries. There is no effective treatment capable of slowing down disease progression. In recent years the main focus of research on novel pharmacotherapies was based on the amyloidogenic hypothesis of AD, which posits that the beta amyloid (Aβ) peptide is chiefly responsible for cognitive impairment and neuronal death. The goal of such treatments is (a) to reduce Aβ production through the inhibition of β and γ secretase enzymes and (b) to promote dissolution of existing cerebral Aβ plaques. However, this approach has proven to be only modestly effective. Recent studies suggest an alternative strategy centred on the inhibition of the downstream Aβ signalling, particularly at the synapse. Aβ oligomers may cause aberrant N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation postsynaptically by forming complexes with the cell-surface prion protein (PrPC). PrPC is enriched at the neuronal postsynaptic density, where it interacts with Fyn tyrosine kinase. Fyn activation occurs when Aβ is bound to PrPC-Fyn complex. Fyn causes tyrosine phosphorylation of the NR2B subunit of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5). Fyn kinase blockers masitinib and saracatinib have proven to be efficacious in treating AD symptoms in experimental mouse models of the disease. PMID:26881137

  15. Current indications for the surgical treatment of prolactinomas.

    PubMed

    Smith, Timothy R; Hulou, M Maher; Huang, Kevin T; Gokoglu, Abdulkerim; Cote, David J; Woodmansee, Whitney W; Laws, Edward R

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the current indications for transsphenoidal surgery in the prolactinoma patient population, and to determine the outcomes of patients who undergo such operations. Transsphenoidal surgery may be indicated in prolactinoma patients who are resistant and/or intolerant to dopamine agonist (DA) therapy. We performed a retrospective review of the medical records of prolactinoma patients over a 6 year period (April 2008 to April 2014) at a large volume academic center. The median follow-up time was 12.0 months (range: 3-69). All patients who were included in the study (n=66) were treated with DA therapy and subsequently underwent an endonasal transsphenoidal operation. Of the 66 patients, 44 were women (mean age 34.2 years) and 22 were men (mean 41.7 years). There were 29 (43.9%) intolerant patients and 29 (43.9%) resistant patients. Postoperatively, 18 intolerant patients (66.7%) had normalized prolactin levels without the need for DA therapy, and five (17.2%) required DA to normalize their prolactin levels (p=0.02). Six patients (20.6%) had persistently elevated prolactin levels but were no longer receiving DA treatment (p<0.001). Postoperatively, 10 resistant patients (35.7%) had normal prolactin levels without DA therapy, and seven patients (25%) were treated with DA therapy to normalize their prolactin levels (p=0.22). Eight patients (28.6%) had supraphysiologic prolactin levels but were no longer taking a DA (p<0.001). Three patients (10.7%) were hyperprolactinemic, despite postoperative treatment with DA (p<0.001). After an appropriate treatment interval with multiple DA, radiographic follow-up, and careful clinical evaluation, prolactinoma patients can be offered surgery as an effective therapeutic option. PMID:26277642

  16. Current and emerging treatment strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mah, Jean K

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in childhood. It is caused by mutations of the DMD gene, leading to progressive muscle weakness, loss of independent ambulation by early teens, and premature death due to cardiorespiratory complications. The diagnosis can usually be made after careful review of the history and examination of affected boys presenting with developmental delay, proximal weakness, and elevated serum creatine kinase, plus confirmation by muscle biopsy or genetic testing. Precise characterization of the DMD mutation is important for genetic counseling and individualized treatment. Current standard of care includes the use of corticosteroids to prolong ambulation and to delay the onset of secondary complications. Early use of cardioprotective agents, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, and other supportive strategies has improved the life expectancy and health-related quality of life for many young adults with DMD. New emerging treatment includes viral-mediated microdystrophin gene replacement, exon skipping to restore the reading frame, and nonsense suppression therapy to allow translation and production of a modified dystrophin protein. Other potential therapeutic targets involve upregulation of compensatory proteins, reduction of the inflammatory cascade, and enhancement of muscle regeneration. So far, data from DMD clinical trials have shown limited success in delaying disease progression; unforeseen obstacles included immune response against the generated mini-dystrophin, inconsistent evidence of dystrophin production in muscle biopsies, and failure to demonstrate a significant improvement in the primary outcome measure, as defined by the 6-minute walk test in some studies. The long-term safety and efficacy of emerging treatments will depend on the selection of appropriate clinical end points and sensitive biomarkers to detect meaningful changes in disease progression. Correction of the underlying

  17. Current issues regarding treatment of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation disorders.

    PubMed

    Spiekerkoetter, Ute; Bastin, Jean; Gillingham, Melanie; Morris, Andrew; Wijburg, Frits; Wilcken, Bridget

    2010-10-01

    Treatment recommendations in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO) defects are diverse. With implementation of newborn screening and identification of asymptomatic patients, it is necessary to define whom to treat and how strictly. We here discuss critical questions that are currently under debate. For some asymptomatic long-chain defects, long-chain fat restriction plays a minor role, and a normal diet may be introduced. For patients presenting only with myopathic symptoms, e.g., during exercise, treatment may be adapted to energy demand. As a consequence, patients with exercise-induced myopathy may be able to return to normal activity when provided with medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) prior to exercise. There is no need to limit participation in sports. Progression of retinopathy in disorders of the mitochondrial trifunctional protein complex is closely associated with hydroxyacylcarnitine accumulation. A strict low-fat diet with MCT supplementation is recommended to slow or prevent progression of chorioretinopathy. Additional docosahexanoic acid does not prevent the decline in retinal function but does promote nonspecific improvement in visual acuity and is recommended. There is no evidence that L-carnitine supplementation is beneficial. Thus, supplementation with L-carnitine in a newborn identified by screening with either a medium-chain or long-chain defect is not supported. With respect to the use of the odd-chain medium-chain triglyceride triheptanoin in myopathic phenotypes, randomized trials are needed to establish whether triheptanoin is more effective than even-chain MCT. With increasing pathophysiological knowledge, new treatment options have been identified and are being clinically evaluated. These include the use of bezafibrates in myopathic long-chain defects. PMID:20830526

  18. Current and emerging treatment strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Jean K

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in childhood. It is caused by mutations of the DMD gene, leading to progressive muscle weakness, loss of independent ambulation by early teens, and premature death due to cardiorespiratory complications. The diagnosis can usually be made after careful review of the history and examination of affected boys presenting with developmental delay, proximal weakness, and elevated serum creatine kinase, plus confirmation by muscle biopsy or genetic testing. Precise characterization of the DMD mutation is important for genetic counseling and individualized treatment. Current standard of care includes the use of corticosteroids to prolong ambulation and to delay the onset of secondary complications. Early use of cardioprotective agents, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, and other supportive strategies has improved the life expectancy and health-related quality of life for many young adults with DMD. New emerging treatment includes viral-mediated microdystrophin gene replacement, exon skipping to restore the reading frame, and nonsense suppression therapy to allow translation and production of a modified dystrophin protein. Other potential therapeutic targets involve upregulation of compensatory proteins, reduction of the inflammatory cascade, and enhancement of muscle regeneration. So far, data from DMD clinical trials have shown limited success in delaying disease progression; unforeseen obstacles included immune response against the generated mini-dystrophin, inconsistent evidence of dystrophin production in muscle biopsies, and failure to demonstrate a significant improvement in the primary outcome measure, as defined by the 6-minute walk test in some studies. The long-term safety and efficacy of emerging treatments will depend on the selection of appropriate clinical end points and sensitive biomarkers to detect meaningful changes in disease progression. Correction of the underlying

  19. Current and investigational antiobesity agents and obesity therapeutic treatment targets.

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold E

    2004-08-01

    Public health efforts and current antiobesity agents have not controlled the increasing epidemic of obesity. Investigational antiobesity agents consist of 1) central nervous system agents that affect neurotransmitters or neural ion channels, including antidepressants (bupropion), selective serotonin 2c receptor agonists, antiseizure agents (topiramate, zonisamide), some dopamine antagonists, and cannabinoid-1 receptor antagonists (rimonabant); 2) leptin/insulin/central nervous system pathway agents, including leptin analogues, leptin transport and/or leptin receptor promoters, ciliary neurotrophic factor (Axokine), neuropeptide Y and agouti-related peptide antagonists, proopiomelanocortin and cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript promoters, alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone analogues, melanocortin-4 receptor agonists, and agents that affect insulin metabolism/activity, which include protein-tyrosine phosphatase-1B inhibitors, peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma receptor antagonists, short-acting bromocriptine (ergoset), somatostatin agonists (octreotide), and adiponectin; 3) gastrointestinal-neural pathway agents, including those that increase cholecystokinin activity, increase glucagon-like peptide-1 activity (extendin 4, liraglutide, dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors), and increase protein YY3-36 activity and those that decrease ghrelin activity, as well as amylin analogues (pramlintide); 4) agents that may increase resting metabolic rate ("selective" beta-3 stimulators/agonist, uncoupling protein homologues, and thyroid receptor agonists); and 5) other more diverse agents, including melanin concentrating hormone antagonists, phytostanol analogues, functional oils, P57, amylase inhibitors, growth hormone fragments, synthetic analogues of dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, antagonists of adipocyte 11B-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 activity, corticotropin-releasing hormone agonists, inhibitors of fatty acid synthesis, carboxypeptidase

  20. Anti-IgE therapy with omalizumab for severe asthma: current concepts and potential developments.

    PubMed

    Pelaia, Girolamo; Vatrella, Alessandro; Busceti, Maria Teresa; Gallelli, Luca; Terracciano, Rosa; Maselli, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    The humanized monoclonal anti-IgE antibody omalizumab is currently the only biologic drug approved for asthma treatment. Omalizumab inhibits allergic responses by binding to serum immunoglobulins E (IgE), thus preventing their interactions with cellular IgE receptors. Omalizumab is also capable of down-regulating the expression of high affinity IgE receptors on inflammatory cells, as well as the numbers of eosinophils in both peripheral blood and induced sputum. The clinical effects of omalizumab include relevant improvements in respiratory symptoms and quality of life, paralleled by a marked reduction of asthma exacerbations, emergency room visits, and use of systemic corticosteroids and rescue bronchodilators. Moreover, some recent studies suggest potential benefits of omalizumab also in non allergic phenotypes of severe asthma. Very interesting are also further recent reports referring to the potential inhibitory effect of omalizumab with regard to bronchial structural changes, especially occurring in severe asthma and globally defined as airway remodeling. Omalizumab is relatively well tolerated, and only very rarely induces anaphylactic reactions. Therefore, this drug represents a valid option as add-on therapy for patients with severe persistent asthma, inadequately controlled by high doses of standard inhaled treatments. PMID:25523898

  1. Allogeneic hematopoietic SCT in children with ALL: current concepts of ongoing prospective SCT trials.

    PubMed

    Schrauder, A; von Stackelberg, A; Schrappe, M; Cornish, J; Peters, Christina

    2008-06-01

    The definition of indications for allogeneic SCT in children with high-risk (HR) ALL in the first remission or after the first or subsequent relapse depends on biological features, response to treatment and survival after chemotherapy alone. As the results of frontline and relapse protocols are improving over time, there is a strong need for prospective SCT trials, ensuring a well-standardized procedure regarding all relevant components that are potentially responsible for heterogeneity in post-SCT outcome. Therefore, in 2003, the ALL-BFM and the ALL-REZ BFM Study Group initiated a prospective, international, multicenter trial (ALL-SCT-BFM 2003). This trial will now be extended to a larger consortium, trial ALL-SCT-BFM-international (ALL-SCT-BFMi). Strict rules define HLA-typing, donor selection, conditioning regimen, GvHD prophylaxis and therapy as well as standards of supportive care to reduce treatment-related mortality and establish an early GVL effect. Moreover, comprehensive and closely reviewed documentation and serious adverse event reporting shall ensure high study quality. Case-by-case discussions of any fatal or critical course during annual meetings will improve the culture of failure management and lead to modifications of guidelines of supportive care. Finally, the results of these prospective trials will determine the current potential of the different SCT procedures in HR or relapsed childhood ALL. PMID:18545248

  2. Teach for Fitness: A Manual for Teaching Fitness Concepts in K-12 Physical Education. Current Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Priest, Laurie

    This book is designed to aid and to encourage physical education teachers to incorporate the concepts of physical fitness into the physical education curriculum. The activities are written in an outline format using the following headings: (1) concept; (2) activity and/or knowledge level; (3) location (school or home); (4) time needed; (5)…

  3. Plastic Solar Cells: A Multidisciplinary Field to Construct Chemical Concepts from Current Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez, Rafael; Segura, Jose L.

    2007-01-01

    Examples of plastic solar-cell technology to illustrate core concepts in chemistry are presented. The principles of operations of a plastic solar cell could be used to introduce key concepts, which are fundamentally important to understand photosynthesis and the basic process that govern most novel optoelectronic devices.

  4. Concept Development in Learning Physics: The Case of Electric Current and Voltage Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koponen, Ismo T.; Huttunen, Laura

    2013-01-01

    In learning conceptual knowledge in physics, a common problem is the development and differentiation of concepts in the learning process. An important part of this development process is the re-organisation or re-structuring process in which students' conceptual knowledge and concepts change. This study proposes a new view of concept…

  5. Economic Thresholds in Soybean-Integrated Pest Management: Old Concepts, Current Adoption, and Adequacy.

    PubMed

    Bueno, A F; Paula-Moraes, S V; Gazzoni, D L; Pomari, A F

    2013-10-01

    Increasing global demands for food underline the need for higher crop yields. The relatively low costs of the most commonly used insecticides in combination with increasing soybean market prices led growers and technical advisors to debate the adequacy of recommended economic thresholds (ETs). The adoption of ETs and pest sampling has diminished in Brazil, leading to excessive pesticide use on soybean. The reduced efficacy of natural biological control, faster pest resurgence, and environment contamination are among the side-effects of pesticide abuse. To address these problems and maximize agricultural production, pest control programs must be guided by a proper integrated pest management (IPM) approach, including the ET concept. Therefore, the most appropriate time to initiate insecticide spraying in soybean is indicated by the available ETs which are supported by experiments over the last 40 years in different edapho-climatic conditions and regions with distinct soybean cultivars. Published scientific data indicate that preventive insecticide use is an expensive and harmful use of chemicals that increases the negative impact of pesticides in agroecosystems. However, the established ETs are for a limited number of species (key pests), and they only address the use of chemicals. There is a lack of information regarding secondary pests and other control strategies in addition to insecticides. It is clear then that much progress is still needed to improve ETs for pest management decisions. Nevertheless, using the current ETs provides a basis for reducing the use of chemicals in agriculture without reducing yields and overall production, thereby improving sustainability. PMID:27023207

  6. A discussion of current issues and concepts in the practice of skull-photo/craniofacial superimposition.

    PubMed

    Gordon, G M; Steyn, M

    2016-05-01

    A recent review paper on cranio-facial superimposition (CFS) stated that "there have been specific conceptual variances" from the original methods used in the practice of skull-photo superimposition, leading to poor results as far as accuracy is concerned. It was argued that the deviations in the practice of the technique have resulted in the reduced accuracies (for both failure to include and failure to exclude) that are noted in several recent studies. This paper aims to present the results from recent research to highlight the advancement of skull-photo/cranio-facial superimposition, and to discuss some of the issues raised regarding deviations from original techniques. The evolving methodology of CFS is clarified in context with the advancement of technology, forensic science and specifically within the field of forensic anthropology. Developments in the skull-photo/cranio-facial superimposition techniques have largely focused on testing reliability and accuracy objectively. Techniques now being employed by forensic anthropologists must conform to rigorous scientific testing and methodologies. Skull-photo/cranio-facial superimposition is constantly undergoing accuracy and repeatability testing which is in line with the principles of the scientific method and additionally allows for advancement in the field. Much of the research has indicated that CFS is useful in exclusion which is consistent with the concept of Popperian falsifiability - a hypothesis and experimental design which is falsifiable. As the hypothesis is disproved or falsified, another evolves to replace it and explain the new observations. Current and future studies employing different methods to test the accuracy and reliability of skull-photo/cranio-facial superimposition will enable researchers to establish the contribution the technique can have for identification purposes. PMID:26970657

  7. Current medical treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lumachi, Franco; Santeufemia, Davide A; Basso, Stefano MM

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 80% of breast cancers (BC) are estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and thus endocrine therapy (ET) should be considered complementary to surgery in the majority of patients. The advantages of oophorectomy, adrenalectomy and hypophysectomy in women with advanced BC have been demonstrated many years ago, and currently ET consist of (1) ovarian function suppression (OFS), usually obtained using gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa); (2) selective estrogen receptor modulators or down-regulators (SERMs or SERDs); and (3) aromatase inhibitors (AIs), or a combination of two or more drugs. For patients aged less than 50 years and ER+ BC, there is no conclusive evidence that the combination of OFS and SERMs (i.e., tamoxifen) or chemotherapy is superior to OFS alone. Tamoxifen users exhibit a reduced risk of BC, both invasive and in situ, especially during the first 5 years of therapy, and extending the treatment to 10 years further reduced the risk of recurrences. SERDs (i.e., fulvestrant) are especially useful in the neoadjuvant treatment of advanced BC, alone or in combination with either cytotoxic agents or AIs. There are two types of AIs: type I are permanent steroidal inhibitors of aromatase, while type II are reversible nonsteroidal inhibitors. Several studies demonstrated the superiority of the third-generation AIs (i.e., anastrozole and letrozole) compared with tamoxifen, and adjuvant therapy with AIs reduces the recurrence risk especially in patients with advanced BC. Unfortunately, some cancers are or became ET-resistant, and thus other drugs have been suggested in combination with SERMs or AIs, including cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitors (palbociclib) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors, such as everolimus. Further studies are required to confirm their real usefulness. PMID:26322178

  8. Diagnostic approach and current treatment options in childhood vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Barut, Kenan; Şahin, Sezgin; Adroviç, Amra; Kasapçopur, Özgür

    2015-01-01

    All inflammatory changes in the vessel wall are defined as vasculitis. Pediatric vasculitis may present with different clinical findings. Although Henoch-Schönlein purpura which is the most common pediatric vasculitis generally recovers spontaneously, it should be monitorized closely because of the risk of renal failure. Although Kawasaki disease is easy to diagnose with its classical findings, the diagnosis may be delayed in case of incomplete Kawasaki disease. Kawasaki disease should be considered especially in infants in case of prolonged fever even if the criteria are not fully met and intravenous immunoglobulin treatment should be administered without delay in order to prevent development of coronary artery aneurism. Reaction at the site of administration of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine may be observed as commonly as cervical lymphadenopathy in Kawasaki disease and may be used as a valuable finding in suspicious cases. Although anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides are rare in children, renal involvement is more common and progression is more severe compared to adults. Hence, efficient and aggressive treatment is required. Takayasu’s arteritis is observed commonly in young adult women and rarely in adolescent girls. Therefore, a careful physical examination and blood pressure measurement should be performed in addition to a detailed history in daily practice. In children with unexplained neurological findings, cerebral vasculitis should be considered in the absence of other systemic vasculitides and necessary radiological investigations should be performed in this regard. This review will provide an insight into the understanding of pediatric vasculitis, current diagnostic approaches and prognosis by the aid of new studies. PMID:26884688

  9. Electrochemical treatment of mouse and rat fibrosarcomas with direct current

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, C.K.; McDougall, J.A.; Ahn, C.; Vora, N.

    1997-03-01

    Electrochemical treatment (ECT) of cancer utilizes direct current to produce chemical changes in tumors. ECT has been suggested as an effective alternative local cancer therapy. However, a methodology is not established, and mechanisms are not well studied. In vivo studies were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of ECT on animal tumor models. Radiation-induced fibrosarcomas were implanted subcutaneously in 157 female C3H/HeJ mice. Larger rat fibrosarcomas were implanted on 34 female Fisher 344 rats. When the spheroidal tumors reached 10 mm in the mice, two to five platinum electrodes were inserted into the tumors at various spacings and orientations. Ten rats in a pilot group were treated when their ellipsoidal tumors were about 25 mm long; electrode insertion was similar to the later part of the mouse study; i.e., two at the base and two at the center. A second group of 24 rats was treated with six or seven electrodes when their tumors were about 20 mm long; all electrodes were inserted at the tumor base. Of the 24 rats, 12 of these were treated once, 10 were treated twice, and 2 were treated thrice. All treated tumors showed necrosis and regression for both mice and rats; however, later tumor recurrence reduced long-term survival. When multiple treatments were implemented, the best 3 month mouse tumor cure rate was 59.3%, and the best 6 month rat tumor cure rate was 75.0%. These preliminary results indicate that ECT is effective on the radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) mouse tumor and rat fibrosarcoma. The effectiveness is dependent on electrode placement and dosage.

  10. Current and emerging pharmacological treatments for sarcoidosis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Beegle, Scott H; Barba, Kerry; Gobunsuy, Romel; Judson, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of sarcoidosis is not standardized. Because sarcoidosis may never cause significant symptoms or organ dysfunction, treatment is not mandatory. When treatment is indicated, oral corticosteroids are usually recommended because they are highly likely to be effective in a relative short period of time. However, because sarcoidosis is often a chronic condition, long-term treatment with corticosteroids may cause significant toxicity. Therefore, corticosteroid sparing agents are often indicated in patients requiring chronic therapy. This review outlines the indications for treatment, corticosteroid treatment, and corticosteroid sparing treatments for sarcoidosis. PMID:23596348

  11. Polymeric nanoparticles for targeted treatment in oncology: current insights

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Rashmi H; Patravale, Vandana B; Joshi, Medha D

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy, a major strategy for cancer treatment, lacks the specificity to localize the cancer therapeutics in the tumor site, thereby affecting normal healthy tissues and advocating toxic adverse effects. Nanotechnological intervention has greatly revolutionized the therapy of cancer by surmounting the current limitations in conventional chemotherapy, which include undesirable biodistribution, cancer cell drug resistance, and severe systemic side effects. Nanoparticles (NPs) achieve preferential accumulation in the tumor site by virtue of their passive and ligand-based targeting mechanisms. Polymer-based nanomedicine, an arena that entails the use of polymeric NPs, polymer micelles, dendrimers, polymersomes, polyplexes, polymer–lipid hybrid systems, and polymer–drug/protein conjugates for improvement in efficacy of cancer therapeutics, has been widely explored. The broad scope for chemically modifying the polymer into desired construct makes it a versatile delivery system. Several polymer-based therapeutic NPs have been approved for clinical use. This review provides an insight into the advances in polymer-based targeted nanocarriers with focus on therapeutic aspects in the field of oncology. PMID:25678788

  12. Liver transplantation for malignancy: Current treatment strategies and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hackl, Christina; Schlitt, Hans J; Kirchner, Gabriele I; Knoppke, Birgit; Loss, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In 1967, Starzl et al performed the first successful liver transplantation for a patient diagnosed with hepatoblastoma. In the following, liver transplantation was considered ideal for complete tumor resection and potential cure from primary hepatic malignancies. Several reports of liver transplantation for primary and metastatic liver cancer however showed disappointing results and the strategy was soon dismissed. In 1996, Mazzaferro et al introduced the Milan criteria, offering liver transplantation to patients diagnosed with limited hepatocellular carcinoma. Since then, liver transplantation for malignant disease is an ongoing subject of preclinical and clinical research. In this context, several aspects must be considered: (1) Given the shortage of deceased-donor organs, long-term overall and disease free survival should be comparable with results obtained in patients transplanted for non-malignant disease; (2) In this regard, living-donor liver transplantation may in selected patients help to solve the ethical dilemma of optimal individual patient treatment vs organ allocation justice; and (3) Ongoing research focusing on perioperative therapy and anti-proliferative immunosuppressive regimens may further reduce tumor recurrence in patients transplanted for malignant disease and thus improve overall survival. The present review gives an overview of current indications and future perspectives of liver transplantation for malignant disease. PMID:24833863

  13. Polymeric nanoparticles for targeted treatment in oncology: current insights.

    PubMed

    Prabhu, Rashmi H; Patravale, Vandana B; Joshi, Medha D

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy, a major strategy for cancer treatment, lacks the specificity to localize the cancer therapeutics in the tumor site, thereby affecting normal healthy tissues and advocating toxic adverse effects. Nanotechnological intervention has greatly revolutionized the therapy of cancer by surmounting the current limitations in conventional chemotherapy, which include undesirable biodistribution, cancer cell drug resistance, and severe systemic side effects. Nanoparticles (NPs) achieve preferential accumulation in the tumor site by virtue of their passive and ligand-based targeting mechanisms. Polymer-based nanomedicine, an arena that entails the use of polymeric NPs, polymer micelles, dendrimers, polymersomes, polyplexes, polymer-lipid hybrid systems, and polymer-drug/protein conjugates for improvement in efficacy of cancer therapeutics, has been widely explored. The broad scope for chemically modifying the polymer into desired construct makes it a versatile delivery system. Several polymer-based therapeutic NPs have been approved for clinical use. This review provides an insight into the advances in polymer-based targeted nanocarriers with focus on therapeutic aspects in the field of oncology. PMID:25678788

  14. Current efforts and trends in the treatment of NASH.

    PubMed

    Ratziu, Vlad; Goodman, Zachary; Sanyal, Arun

    2015-04-01

    Of all the aspects of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), the slowest advances have occurred in the therapeutic field. Thirty-five years after its formal description and after 15 years of intense scrutiny from researchers worldwide, there is still no approved drug for the treatment of non-alcoholic steatohepatits (NASH). In the meantime, progress in the understanding of pathophysiology, diagnosis - both invasive and non-invasive, epidemiology and even natural history have been substantial or, at times, spectacular. In contrast, hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy underwent constant improvement and even before the great acceleration of the past few years, patients were already being offered approved therapies that were increasingly more efficient. What then explains such a slow pace of therapeutic advances in NASH, and will this change in the near future? Here we will review commonly-held myths that have diverted attention from therapy of NASH, obstacles that have slowed down industrial development of drugs for this indication, and recent achievements that will create better conditions for drug development programs. We will also briefly review current knowledge of non-pharmacological and pharmacological management in this early era of NASH therapies. PMID:25920092

  15. Family Aided Community Treatment for the Treatment of Early Psychosis: A Proof of Concept Study.

    PubMed

    Melton, Ryan P; Dykeman, Cass

    2016-08-01

    Major psychotic disorders are one of the leading causes of disability worldwide. If these conditions are identified early and treatment promptly implemented, the prognosis is improved. This study examined the impact of a yearlong family aided community treatment (FACT) intervention upon psychiatric symptoms. Psychiatric symptom scores improved with the FACT intervention. Improved training on early recognition for mental health clinicians, implementation of a specific treatment model in community settings and policy around treatment funding allocation are implications of this study. PMID:26738497

  16. Current Concepts in the Molecular Genetics and Management of Thyroid Cancer: An Update for Radiologists.

    PubMed

    Kelil, Tatiana; Keraliya, Abhishek R; Howard, Stephanie A; Krajewski, Katherine M; Braschi-Amirfarzan, Marta; Hornick, Jason L; Ramaiya, Nikhil H; Tirumani, Sree Harsha

    2016-01-01

    Substantial improvement in the understanding of the oncogenic pathways in thyroid cancer has led to identification of specific molecular alterations, including mutations of BRAF and RET in papillary thyroid cancer, mutation of RAS and rearrangement of PPARG in follicular thyroid cancer, mutation of RET in medullary thyroid cancer, and mutations of TP53 and in the phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3K)/AKT1 pathway in anaplastic thyroid cancer. Ultrasonography (US) and US-guided biopsy remain cornerstones in the initial workup of thyroid cancer. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment, with radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy reserved for differentiated subtypes. Posttreatment surveillance of thyroid cancer is done with US of the thyroid bed as well as monitoring of tumor markers such as serum thyroglobulin and serum calcitonin. Computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, and fluorine 18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT are used in the follow-up of patients with negative iodine 131 imaging and elevated tumor markers. Certain mutations, such as mutations of BRAF in papillary thyroid carcinoma and mutations in RET codons 883, 918, and 928, are associated with an aggressive course in medullary thyroid carcinoma, and affected patients need close surveillance. Treatment options for metastatic RAI-refractory thyroid cancer are limited. Currently, Food and Drug Administration-approved molecularly targeted therapies for metastatic RAI-refractory thyroid cancer, including sorafenib, lenvatinib, vandetanib, and cabozantinib, target the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and RET kinases. Imaging plays an important role in assessment of response to these therapies, which can be atypical owing to antiangiogenic effects. A wide spectrum of toxic effects is associated with the molecularly targeted therapies used in thyroid cancer and can be detected at restaging scans. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID:27618325

  17. Current Concepts in Pediatric Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bernt, Kathrin M.; Hunger, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    The t(9;22)(q34;q11) or Philadelphia chromosome creates a BCR–ABL1 fusion gene encoding for a chimeric BCR–ABL1 protein. It is present in 3–4% of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ ALL), and about 25% of adult ALL cases. Prior to the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), Ph+ ALL was associated with a very poor prognosis despite the use of intensive chemotherapy and frequently hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) in first remission. The development of TKIs revolutionized the therapy of Ph+ ALL. Addition of the first generation ABL1 class TKI imatinib to intensive chemotherapy dramatically increased the survival for children with Ph+ ALL and established that many patients can be cured without HSCT. In parallel, the mechanistic understanding of Ph+ ALL expanded exponentially through careful mapping of pathways downstream of BCR–ABL1, the discovery of mutations in master regulators of B-cell development such as IKZF1 (Ikaros), PAX5, and early B-cell factor (EBF), the recognition of the complex clonal architecture of Ph+ ALL, and the delineation of genomic, epigenetic, and signaling abnormalities contributing to relapse and resistance. Still, many important basic and clinical questions remain unanswered. Current clinical trials are testing second generation TKIs in patients with newly diagnosed Ph+ ALL. Neither the optimal duration of therapy nor the optimal chemotherapy backbone are currently defined. The role of HSCT in first remission and post-transplant TKI therapy also require further study. In addition, it will be crucial to continue to dig deeper into understanding Ph+ ALL at a mechanistic level, and translate findings into complementary targeted approaches. Expanding targeted therapies hold great promise to decrease toxicity and improve survival in this high-risk disease, which provides a paradigm for how targeted therapies can be incorporated into treatment of other high-risk leukemias. PMID:24724051

  18. Regenerative healing, scar-free healing and scar formation across the species: current concepts and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ud-Din, Sara; Volk, Susan W; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2014-09-01

    All species have evolved mechanisms of repair to restore tissue function following injury. Skin scarring is an inevitable and permanent endpoint for many postnatal organisms except for non-amniote vertebrates such as amphibians, which are capable of tissue regeneration. Furthermore, mammalian foetuses through mid-gestation are capable of rapid wound repair in the absence of scar formation. Notably, excessive cutaneous scar formation, such as hypertrophic and keloid scars, is a species limited clinical entity as it occurs only in humans, although wounds on the distal limbs of horses are also prone to heal with fibroproliferative pathology known as equine exuberant granulation tissue. Currently, there are no reliable treatment options to eradicate or prevent scarring in humans and vertebrates. The limited number of vertebrate models for either hypertrophic or keloid scarring has been an impediment to mechanistic studies of these diseases and the development of therapies. In this viewpoint essay, we highlight the current concepts of regenerative, scar-free and scar-forming healing compared across a number of species and speculate on areas for future research. Furthermore, in-depth investigative research into the mechanisms of scarless repair may allow for the development of improved animal models and novel targets for scar prevention. As the ability to heal in both a scarless manner and propensity for healing with excessive scar formation is highly species dependent, understanding similarities and differences in healing across species as it relates to the regenerative process may hold the key to improve scarring and guide translational wound-healing studies. PMID:24863070

  19. Changes in Perception of Selected Concepts That Accompany Differing Leadership Treatments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callan, Laurence Brian

    A study was made of effects of two different leadership treatments on perception of nonverbal stimuli relating to concepts of leaders, authority, and cohesion as measured by changes in the Semantic Differential Scale. Subjects (28 Yaqui Indian and Mexican-American members of the Neighborhood Youth Corps) were randomly assigned to an autocratic…

  20. A Study of Second-Year Engineering Students' Alternative Conceptions about Electric Potential, Current Intensity and Ohm's Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Periago, M. Cristina; Bohigas, Xavier

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate and analyse second-year industrial engineering and chemical engineering students prior knowledge of conceptual aspects of "circuit theory". Specifically, we focused on the basic concepts of electric potential and current intensity and on the fundamental relationship between them as expressed by Ohm's law.…

  1. Alternative concepts for treatment and disposal of Hanford site high-level waste in tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Claghorn, R.D.; Powell, W.J.

    1994-12-01

    Some innovative approaches have recently been proposed that may have significant schedule, cost, or environmental advantages which could improve the current HLW program strategy. Three general categories of alternative concepts are now under consideration: (1) process/product alternatives, (2) facility layout options, and (3) contracting strategies. This report compares the alternate approaches to the current program baseline to illustrate their potential significance and to identify the risks associated with each approach.

  2. Current concepts in the diagnosis and management of cytokine release syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daniel W.; Gardner, Rebecca; Porter, David L.; Louis, Chrystal U.; Ahmed, Nabil; Jensen, Michael; Grupp, Stephan A.

    2014-01-01

    As immune-based therapies for cancer become potent, more effective, and more widely available, optimal management of their unique toxicities becomes increasingly important. Cytokine release syndrome (CRS) is a potentially life-threatening toxicity that has been observed following administration of natural and bispecific antibodies and, more recently, following adoptive T-cell therapies for cancer. CRS is associated with elevated circulating levels of several cytokines including interleukin (IL)-6 and interferon γ, and uncontrolled studies demonstrate that immunosuppression using tocilizumab, an anti-IL-6 receptor antibody, with or without corticosteroids, can reverse the syndrome. However, because early and aggressive immunosuppression could limit the efficacy of the immunotherapy, current approaches seek to limit administration of immunosuppressive therapy to patients at risk for life-threatening consequences of the syndrome. This report presents a novel system to grade the severity of CRS in individual patients and a treatment algorithm for management of CRS based on severity. The goal of our approach is to maximize the chance for therapeutic benefit from the immunotherapy while minimizing the risk for life threatening complications of CRS. PMID:24876563

  3. Current Concepts and Diagnosis of IgG4-Related Pancreatitis (Type 1 AIP).

    PubMed

    Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2016-08-01

    Although now considered to be a member of the systemic entity of immunoglobulin G4- (IgG4-) related disease, IgG4-related pancreatitis is generally referred to as type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). Type 1 AIP was established based on a pathological background of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis, high serum IgG4 concentration, and abundant IgG4-bearing plasma cell infiltration. The characteristic clinical features of type 1 AIP, such as elderly male preponderance, obstructive jaundice, and mass-forming lesions in the pancreas, often mimic those of pancreatic cancer. However, because AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid treatment, careful differentiation from pancreatic cancer is required. An AIP diagnosis is currently based on the 2011 International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria for AIP, which are based on high sensitivity, selectivity, and accuracy. Over the long term, AIP can progress to a chronic condition, with pancreatic stone formation and atrophy resembling that of chronic pancreatitis. Although AIP has been linked to the complication of malignancies, it remains controversial whether an association exists between the disease and tumor formation. PMID:27466795

  4. Orthopedic disorders of the knee in hemophilia: A current concept review

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos; Valentino, Leonard A

    2016-01-01

    The knee is frequently affected by severe orthopedic changes known as hemophilic arthropathy (HA) in patients with deficiency of coagulation factor VIII or IX and thus this manuscript seeks to present a current perspective of the role of the orthopedic surgeon in the management of these problems. Lifelong factor replacement therapy (FRT) is optimal to prevent HA, however adherence to this regerous treatment is challenging leading to breakthrough bleeding. In patients with chronic hemophilic synovitis, the prelude to HA, radiosynovectomy (RS) is the optimal to ameliorate bleeding. Surgery in people with hemophilia (PWH) is associated with a high risk of bleeding and infection, and must be performed with FRT. A coordinated effort including orthopedic surgeons, hematologists, physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians, physiotherapists and other team members is key to optimal outcomes. Ideally, orthopedic procedures should be performed in specialized hospitals with experienced teams. Until we are able to prevent orthopedic problems of the knee in PWH will have to continue performing orthopedic procedures (arthrocentesis, RS, arthroscopic synovectomy, hamstring release, arthroscopic debridement, alignment osteotomy, and total knee arthroplasty). By using the aforementioned procedures, the quality of life of PWH will be improved. PMID:27335812

  5. Immune responses towards intestinal bacteria--current concepts and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Duchmann, R; Neurath, M; Märker-Hermann, E; Meyer Zum Büschenfelde, K H

    1997-05-01

    The intestinal mucosa constitutes an important barrier as it separates each individual from a large array of antigens within the bowel lumen. These luminal antigens may either be derived from pathogens or may be derived from harmless constituents such as ingested food or the normal intestinal flora. The dichotomy of potentially harmful and potentially harmless antigens encountered by the mucosal immune system poses the important task that, with regard to bacteria-derived antigens, the gut associated immune system is required to mount an efficient host defense against pathogenic bacteria but to maintain at the same time the regulatory control mechanisms which protect the human organism from hyperresponsiveness, and thus chronic inflammation, towards antigens from the normal intestinal flora. In the present review, we discuss variable host and bacterial factors which are likely to determine whether the immune response to pathogenic or normal intestinal bacteria will have beneficial or detrimental consequences for the human organism. Using infections with the prototype enteropathogens V. cholerae and enteropathogenic E. coli (ETEC), Y. enterocolitica induced reactive arthritis (ReA) and in more detail, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) as exemplary clinical situations, we review current hypotheses of how bacteria or their products are encountered by cellular components of the specific immune system and how this may relate to disease pathogenesis and the development of new treatment strategies. PMID:9188147

  6. Orthopedic disorders of the knee in hemophilia: A current concept review.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos; Valentino, Leonard A

    2016-06-18

    The knee is frequently affected by severe orthopedic changes known as hemophilic arthropathy (HA) in patients with deficiency of coagulation factor VIII or IX and thus this manuscript seeks to present a current perspective of the role of the orthopedic surgeon in the management of these problems. Lifelong factor replacement therapy (FRT) is optimal to prevent HA, however adherence to this regerous treatment is challenging leading to breakthrough bleeding. In patients with chronic hemophilic synovitis, the prelude to HA, radiosynovectomy (RS) is the optimal to ameliorate bleeding. Surgery in people with hemophilia (PWH) is associated with a high risk of bleeding and infection, and must be performed with FRT. A coordinated effort including orthopedic surgeons, hematologists, physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians, physiotherapists and other team members is key to optimal outcomes. Ideally, orthopedic procedures should be performed in specialized hospitals with experienced teams. Until we are able to prevent orthopedic problems of the knee in PWH will have to continue performing orthopedic procedures (arthrocentesis, RS, arthroscopic synovectomy, hamstring release, arthroscopic debridement, alignment osteotomy, and total knee arthroplasty). By using the aforementioned procedures, the quality of life of PWH will be improved. PMID:27335812

  7. Magnetic Field Due to a Finite Length Current-Carrying Wire Using the Concept of Displacement Current

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buschauer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In undergraduate E&M courses the magnetic field due to a finite length, current-carrying wire can be calculated using the Biot-Savart law. However, to the author's knowledge, no textbook presents the calculation of this field using the Ampere-Maxwell law: ?B [multiplied by] dl = µ[subscript 0] (I + e[subscript 0] dF/dt) [multiplied by] 1

  8. Current approaches to treatments for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, part I: an overview and medical treatments.

    PubMed

    Chien, Wai Tong; Yip, Annie Lk

    2013-01-01

    During the last three decades, an increasing understanding of the etiology, psychopathology, and clinical manifestations of schizophrenia spectrum disorders, in addition to the introduction of second-generation antipsychotics, has optimized the potential for recovery from the illness. Continued development of various models of psychosocial intervention promotes the goal of schizophrenia treatment from one of symptom control and social adaptation to an optimal restoration of functioning and/or recovery. However, it is still questionable whether these new treatment approaches can address the patients' needs for treatment and services and contribute to better patient outcomes. This article provides an overview of different treatment approaches currently used in schizophrenia spectrum disorders to address complex health problems and a wide range of abnormalities and impairments resulting from the illness. There are different treatment strategies and targets for patients at different stages of the illness, ranging from prophylactic antipsychotics and cognitive-behavioral therapy in the premorbid stage to various psychosocial interventions in addition to antipsychotics for relapse prevention and rehabilitation in the later stages of the illness. The use of antipsychotics alone as the main treatment modality may be limited not only in being unable to tackle the frequently occurring negative symptoms and cognitive impairments but also in producing a wide variety of adverse effects to the body or organ functioning. Because of varied pharmacokinetics and treatment responsiveness across agents, the medication regimen should be determined on an individual basis to ensure an optimal effect in its long-term use. This review also highlights that the recent practice guidelines and standards have recommended that a combination of treatment modalities be adopted to meet the complex health needs of people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. In view of the heterogeneity of the risk

  9. Municipal wastewater treatment in Mexico: current status and opportunities for employing ecological treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Zurita, Florentina; Roy, Eric D; White, John R

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the current status of municipal wastewater (MWW) treatment in Mexico, as well as to assess opportunities for using ecological treatment systems, such as constructed wetlands. In 2008, Mexico had 2101 MWW treatment plants that treated only 84 m3/s of wastewater (208 m3/s ofMWW were collected in sewer systems). Unfortunately, most treatment plants operate below capacity owing to a lack of maintenance and paucity of properly trained personnel. The main types of treatment systems applied in Mexico are activated sludge and waste stabilization ponds, which treat 44.3% and 18% of the MWW collected, respectively. As in many other developing nations around the world, there is a great need in Mexico for low-cost, low-maintenance wastewater treatment systems that are both economically and environmentally sustainable. In 2005, 24.3 million Mexicans lived in villages of less than 2500 inhabitants and 14.1 million lived in towns with 2500-15,000 inhabitants. An opportunity exists to extend the use of ecological treatment systems to these low population density areas and considerably increase the percentage of MWW that is treated in Mexico. Small-scale and medium-size constructed wetlands have been built successfully in some states, primarily during the past five years. Several barriers need to be overcome to increase the adoption and utilization of ecological wastewater technology in Mexico, including: a lack of knowledge about this technology, scarce technical information in Spanish, and the government's concentration on constructing MWW treatment plants solely in urban areas. PMID:22856284

  10. Current approaches to treatments for schizophrenia spectrum disorders, part I: an overview and medical treatments

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Wai Tong; Yip, Annie LK

    2013-01-01

    During the last three decades, an increasing understanding of the etiology, psychopathology, and clinical manifestations of schizophrenia spectrum disorders, in addition to the introduction of second-generation antipsychotics, has optimized the potential for recovery from the illness. Continued development of various models of psychosocial intervention promotes the goal of schizophrenia treatment from one of symptom control and social adaptation to an optimal restoration of functioning and/or recovery. However, it is still questionable whether these new treatment approaches can address the patients’ needs for treatment and services and contribute to better patient outcomes. This article provides an overview of different treatment approaches currently used in schizophrenia spectrum disorders to address complex health problems and a wide range of abnormalities and impairments resulting from the illness. There are different treatment strategies and targets for patients at different stages of the illness, ranging from prophylactic antipsychotics and cognitive–behavioral therapy in the premorbid stage to various psychosocial interventions in addition to antipsychotics for relapse prevention and rehabilitation in the later stages of the illness. The use of antipsychotics alone as the main treatment modality may be limited not only in being unable to tackle the frequently occurring negative symptoms and cognitive impairments but also in producing a wide variety of adverse effects to the body or organ functioning. Because of varied pharmacokinetics and treatment responsiveness across agents, the medication regimen should be determined on an individual basis to ensure an optimal effect in its long-term use. This review also highlights that the recent practice guidelines and standards have recommended that a combination of treatment modalities be adopted to meet the complex health needs of people with schizophrenia spectrum disorders. In view of the heterogeneity of the

  11. Current Issues in the Evaluation and Treatment of Sexual Disturbance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beutler, Larry E.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses causes of sexual disturbance, assessment of sexual dysfunction, treatment of sexual dysfunction, psychological issues associated with chronic physical illness and sexual behavior, theory and treatment in child molestation, and the psychosocial outcomes of sex reassignment surgery. (BL)

  12. The choice of the concept of magnetic field lines or of electric current lines: Alfvén medal lecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akasofu, S.-I.

    2011-07-01

    In 1967, at the Birkeland Symposium in Sandefjord, Norway, Professor Hannes Alfvén stated that the second approach (in solving unsolved problems by the standard MHD theory) to cosmic electrodynamics is to "thaw" the "frozen-in" magnetic field lines. "We can illustrate essential properties of the electromagnetic state of space either by depicting the magnetic field lines or by depicting electric current lines," he said. There has been much progress in space physics since the Birkeland Symposium more than 40 years ago, but unfortunately our scientific community has not really succeeded in thawing the frozen-in field lines. Instead, it has pursued magnetic reconnection, a concept that Alfvén had been critical of. It is shown here that we have to study many unsolved problems and problems thought to be solved in terms of both the magnetic field line concept and the current system concept. In taking Alfvén's approach, we must consider the whole system, including the power supply (dynamo process) and its transmission and distribution (electric currents) and observed phenomena (power dissipation processes). Such a consideration can provide physical insight into many of our unsolved problems and problems thought to be solved. In this paper, we consider substorm onset processes, the substorm current system, sunspots, solar flares, coronal mass ejections, the interplanetary current sheet, and the magnetic field configuration of the heliosphere in terms of the current system concept. In particular, it is shown that a study of the current system is essential in substorm studies, more than changes of the magnetic field configuration in the magnetotail.

  13. Various treatment options for benign prostatic hyperplasia: A current update

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Alankar; Gupta, Vipin B.

    2012-01-01

    In benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) there will be a sudden impact on overall quality of life of patient. This disease occurs normally at the age of 40 or above and also is associated with sexual dysfunction. Thus, there is a need of update on current medications of this disease. The presented review provides information on medications available for BPH. Phytotherapies with some improvements in BPH are also included. Relevant articles were identified through a search of the English-language literature indexed on MEDLINE, PUBMED, Sciencedirect and the proceedings of scientific meetings. The search terms were BPH, medications for BPH, drugs for BPH, combination therapies for BPH, Phytotherapies for BPH, Ayurveda and BPH, BPH treatments in Ayurveda. Medications including watchful waitings, Alpha one adrenoreceptor blockers, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, combination therapies including tamsulosin-dutasteride, doxazosin-finasteride, terazosin-finasteride, tolterodine-tamsulosin and rofecoxib-finasteride were found. Herbal remedies such as Cernilton, Saxifraga stolonifera, Zi-Shen Pill (ZSP), Orbignya speciosa, Phellodendron amurense, Ganoderma lucidum, Serenoa Repens, pumpkin extract and Lepidium meyenii (Red Maca) have some improvements on BPH are included. Other than these discussions on Ayurvedic medications, TURP and minimally invasive therapies (MITs) are also included. Recent advancements in terms of newly synthesized molecules are also discussed. Specific alpha one adrenoreceptor blockers such as tamsulosin and alfuzosin will remain preferred choice of urologists for symptom relief. Medications with combination therapies are still needs more investigation to establish as preference in initial stage for fast symptom relief reduced prostate growth and obviously reduce need for BPH-related surgery. Due to lack of proper evidence Phytotherapies are not gaining much advantage. MITs and TURP are expensive and are rarely supported by healthcare systems. PMID:22923974

  14. Various treatment options for benign prostatic hyperplasia: A current update.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Alankar; Gupta, Vipin B

    2012-01-01

    In benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) there will be a sudden impact on overall quality of life of patient. This disease occurs normally at the age of 40 or above and also is associated with sexual dysfunction. Thus, there is a need of update on current medications of this disease. The presented review provides information on medications available for BPH. Phytotherapies with some improvements in BPH are also included. Relevant articles were identified through a search of the English-language literature indexed on MEDLINE, PUBMED, Sciencedirect and the proceedings of scientific meetings. The search terms were BPH, medications for BPH, drugs for BPH, combination therapies for BPH, Phytotherapies for BPH, Ayurveda and BPH, BPH treatments in Ayurveda. Medications including watchful waitings, Alpha one adrenoreceptor blockers, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, combination therapies including tamsulosin-dutasteride, doxazosin-finasteride, terazosin-finasteride, tolterodine-tamsulosin and rofecoxib-finasteride were found. Herbal remedies such as Cernilton, Saxifraga stolonifera, Zi-Shen Pill (ZSP), Orbignya speciosa, Phellodendron amurense, Ganoderma lucidum, Serenoa Repens, pumpkin extract and Lepidium meyenii (Red Maca) have some improvements on BPH are included. Other than these discussions on Ayurvedic medications, TURP and minimally invasive therapies (MITs) are also included. Recent advancements in terms of newly synthesized molecules are also discussed. Specific alpha one adrenoreceptor blockers such as tamsulosin and alfuzosin will remain preferred choice of urologists for symptom relief. Medications with combination therapies are still needs more investigation to establish as preference in initial stage for fast symptom relief reduced prostate growth and obviously reduce need for BPH-related surgery. Due to lack of proper evidence Phytotherapies are not gaining much advantage. MITs and TURP are expensive and are rarely supported by healthcare systems. PMID:22923974

  15. Current status of intragastric balloon for obesity treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Han; Chun, Hoon Jai; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Jeen, Yoon Tae

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic bariatric therapy may be a useful alternative to pharmacological treatment for obesity, and it provides greater efficacy with lower risks than do conventional surgical procedures. Among the various endoscopic treatments for obesity, the intragastric balloon is associated with significant efficacy in body weight reduction and relief of comorbid disease symptoms. Anatomically, this treatment is based on gastric space-occupying effects that increase the feeling of satiety and may also affect gut neuroendocrine signaling. The simplicity of the intragastric balloon procedure may account for its widespread role in obesity treatment and its applicability to various degrees of obesity. However, advances in device properties and procedural techniques are still needed in order to improve its safety and cost-effectiveness. Furthermore, verification of the physiological outcomes of intragastric balloon treatment and the clinical predictive factors for treatment responses should be considered. In this article, we discuss the types, efficacy, safety, and future directions of intragastric balloon treatment. PMID:27350727

  16. Current status of bioresorbable scaffolds in the treatment of coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, Jens; Nef, Holger M; Hamm, Christian W

    2014-12-16

    State-of-the-art drug-eluting metal stents are the gold standard for interventional treatment of coronary artery disease. Although they overcome some disadvantages and limitations of plain balloon angioplasty and bare-metal stents, some limitations apply, most notably a chronic local inflammatory reaction due to permanent implantation of a foreign body, restriction of vascular vasomotion due to a metal cage, and the risk of late and very late stent thrombosis. The development of biodegradable scaffolds is a new approach that attempts to circumvent these drawbacks. These devices provide short-term scaffolding of the vessel and then dissolve, which should theoretically circumvent the side effects of metal drug-eluting stents. Various types of these bioresorbable scaffolds are currently under clinical evaluation. This review discusses different concepts of bioresorbable scaffolds with respect to material, design, and drug elution and presents the most recent evidence. PMID:25500240

  17. The greenhouse gas and energy balance of different treatment concepts for bio-waste.

    PubMed

    Ortner, Maria E; Müller, Wolfgang; Bockreis, Anke

    2013-10-01

    The greenhouse gas (GHG) and energy performance of bio-waste treatment plants been investigated for three characteristic bio-waste treatment concepts: composting; biological drying for the production of biomass fuel fractions; and anaerobic digestion. Compared with other studies about the environmental impacts of bio-waste management, this study focused on the direct comparison of the latest process concepts and state-of-the-art emission control measures. To enable a comparison, the mass balance and products were modelled for all process concepts assuming the same bio-waste amounts and properties. In addition, the value of compost as a soil improver was included in the evaluation, using straw as a reference system. This aspect has rarely been accounted for in other studies. The study is based on data from operational facilities combined with literature data. The results show that all three concepts contribute to a reduction of GHG emissions and show a positive balance for cumulated energy demand. However, in contrast to other studies, the advantage of anaerobic digestion compared with composting is smaller as a result of accounting for the soil improving properties of compost. Still, anaerobic digestion is the environmentally superior solution. The results are intended to inform decision makers about the relevant aspects of bio-waste treatment regarding the environmental impacts of different bio-waste management strategies. PMID:24008328

  18. Self-Concept and the Perception of Facial Appearance in Children and Adolescents Seeking Orthodontic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Ceib; Beal, Kimberly N. Edwards

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine, in adolescents with mild to moderate malocclusion, the relationship between self-concept and demographic characteristics, a clinical assessment of malocclusion, self-perception of malocclusion, and self-perception of facial attractiveness. Methods and Materials Fifty-nine consecutive patients ages 9 to 15 years scheduled for initial records in a graduate orthodontic clinic consented to participate. Each subject independently completed the Multidimensional Self-Concept Scale (MSCS), the Facial Image Scale, and the Index of Treatment Need–Aesthetic Component (IOTN-AC). Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) scores were obtained from the patients’ diagnostic dental casts. Forward multiple-regression analysis with a backward overlook was used to analyze the effect of the demographic, clinical, and self-perception measures on each of the six self-concept (MSCS) domains. Results Self-perception of the dentofacial region was the only statistically significant predictor (P < .05) for the Global, Competence, Affect, Academic, and Physical domains of self-concept, while age, parental marital status, and the adolescent's self-perception of the dentofacial region were statistically significant predictors (P < .05) of Social Self-Concept. Conclusion The self-perceived level of the attractiveness or “positive” feelings toward the dentofacial region is more strongly related to self-concept than the severity of the malocclusion as indicated by the PAR score or by the adolescent's perception of their malocclusion. PMID:19123700

  19. Attention Deficits: Current Concepts, Controversies, Management, and Approaches to Classroom Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Betsy

    1993-01-01

    This article reviews diagnostic criteria for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and undifferentiated attention deficit disorder; typical presenting features; theories of the biological basis of attentional disorders; and treatments, including medical treatments with stimulants and tricyclic antidepressants and nonmedical treatments such as…

  20. [Weizsäcker's concept of time from the current viewpoint].

    PubMed

    Kiefer, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker's concept of time is deeply based on the asymmetry between past and future, which he considers as a fundamental aspect of Nature. I review these ideas and their philosophical back ground and confront them with a presentation of the concept of time in modern physics. I argue that the observed irreversibility of our world can be understood from fundamental laws which are invariant under time reversal. I conclude with an outlook on the expected theory of quantum gravity. PMID:24974601

  1. RMF concept: a rotating-magnetic-field technique for driving steady plasma currents in compact toroid devices

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, K.F.

    1980-09-01

    The generation and/or sustaining of a Compact Toroid (CT) configuration using the RMF technique is a relatively new and unknown concept. In this report the basic principles, historical development, and current theoretical understanding of this concept are reviewed. Significant experimental and theoretical results, potential problem areas, and recommendations for the direction of future work are discussed. An illustrative analysis of the application of the RMF technique to a CT reactor is presented. The results of a recent experiment, the Rotamak, in which a Spheromak-like CT plasma was produced using the RMF technique, are presented.

  2. [Current Conservative Treatment and Management Strategies of Skeletal Muscle Injuries].

    PubMed

    Hotfiel, T; Carl, H-D; Swoboda, B; Heinrich, M; Heiß, R; Grim, C; Engelhardt, M

    2016-06-01

    Muscle injuries frequently occur during sport and are one of the commonest injuries. The diagnosis and treatment of muscle injuries impose high demands on medical treatment, in order to ensure successful regeneration and a rapid return to sport. Most of the injuries can be treated conservatively, as skeletal muscles have a high endogenous capacity for repair and regeneration. Conservative treatment includes initial on-field therapy. This is known as the "RICE" principle and is common and recommended for initial treatment for most sports injuries. The primary therapy target is to reduce pain, swelling and bleeding and thus to limit the initial inflammatory process and prevent further damage. During the first days after injury, brief immobilization helps to reduce the re-injury rate and accelerates the formation of granulation tissue. There are many possible additional treatments, including intramuscular injections, manipulation of the sacroiliac joint or rehabilitation programs, including stretching and strengthening. If the acute treatment phase is complete after 3 to 5 days, more active treatment, including trunk stabilisation, stretching and strengthening, can be started gradually. Despite their high prevalence, there have only been a few studies on the treatment and management of these injuries. The aim of this manuscript is to review the literature on the classification, pathobiology and treatment strategies for muscle injuries. PMID:27351158

  3. Patient Centered Event Representation for the Treatment of Multifactorial Diseases: Current Progress and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yihan; Gaebel, Jan; Denecke, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Events such as clinical interventions, adverse drug events are one of the basic semantic units in the clinical workflow and are the foundation of the pathway representation. Current research has mainly concentrated on event recognition through concept mapping using from medical ontologies (UMLS, SNOMED CT) and gene relation detection in the biological context. However, the analysis of the patient status and the interaction between the patient status and a context event is still at the primary stage. In order to realize an efficient personalized treatment design and pathway planning, the correlation between a patient status and different types of clinical events should be analyzed. In this paper, we will provide a summary of the current research progress in clinical event detection in the biomedical domain and compare two approaches of event acquisition: an event schema produced using a guideline-based method and an expert-based annotation. We will apply the approaches to generate a structured annotation corpus and a special case of an event schema based on the complication classification and risk management in treatment of laryngeal cancer. PMID:27577352

  4. Preschool Children's Conceptions about the Electric Current and the Functioning of Electric Appliances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomonidou, Christina; Kakana, Domna-Mika

    2000-01-01

    Examined 5- and 6-year-olds' ideas about the functioning of common electrical appliances and properties of electric current. Found that children represented current in a static way, thinking it was included in the appliance, and confounded electric current and water flow, believing external electricity was different from internal. They were…

  5. ASME code post weld heat treatment requirements: Current issues

    SciTech Connect

    McEnerney, J.W.

    1995-12-31

    An understanding of current ASME Code PWHT issues requires consideration of various governing factors. These include: historical perspective regarding rule development and needs for PWHT, design criteria dictating the purpose, potential adverse effects, validity of existing and/or need for additional global PWHT parameters, and fundamental questions and/or inadequate current requirements regarding local PWHT. Various activities to address the current issues are in progress at different code task groups and organizations.

  6. Current treatment options for management of anal intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Weis, Stephen E

    2013-01-01

    Anal squamous cell cancer is an uncommon malignancy caused by infection with oncogenic strains of Human papilloma virus. Anal cancer is much more common in immunocompromised persons, including those infected with Human immunodeficiency virus. High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the precursor of anal cancer, is identified by clinicians providing care for patients with anorectal disease, and is increasingly being identified during screening of immunosuppressed patients for anal dysplasia. The traditional treatment for HGAIN has been excision of macroscopic disease with margins. This approach is effective for patients with small unifocal HGAIN lesions. Patients with extensive multifocal HGAIN frequently have recurrence of HGAIN after excision, and may have postoperative complications of anal stenosis or fecal incontinence. This led to the suggestion by some that treatment for HGAIN should be delayed until patients developed anal cancer. Alternative approaches in identification and treatment have been developed to treat patients with multifocal or extensive HGAIN lesions. High-resolution anoscopy combines magnification with anoscopy and is being used to identify HGAIN and determine treatment margins. HGAIN can then be ablated with a number of modalities, including infrared coagulation, CO2 laser, and electrocautery. These methods for HGAIN ablation can be performed with local anesthesia on outpatients and are relatively well tolerated. High-resolution anoscopy-directed HGAIN ablation is evolving into a standard approach for initial treatment and then subsequent monitoring of a disease which should be expected to be recurrent. Another treatment approach for HGAIN is topical treatment, principally with 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod. Topical therapies have the advantage of being nonsurgical and are well suited for treating widespread multifocal disease. Topical treatments have the disadvantage of requiring extended treatment courses and causing a symptomatic

  7. Current treatment options for management of anal intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Weis, Stephen E

    2013-01-01

    Anal squamous cell cancer is an uncommon malignancy caused by infection with oncogenic strains of Human papilloma virus. Anal cancer is much more common in immunocompromised persons, including those infected with Human immunodeficiency virus. High-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN), the precursor of anal cancer, is identified by clinicians providing care for patients with anorectal disease, and is increasingly being identified during screening of immunosuppressed patients for anal dysplasia. The traditional treatment for HGAIN has been excision of macroscopic disease with margins. This approach is effective for patients with small unifocal HGAIN lesions. Patients with extensive multifocal HGAIN frequently have recurrence of HGAIN after excision, and may have postoperative complications of anal stenosis or fecal incontinence. This led to the suggestion by some that treatment for HGAIN should be delayed until patients developed anal cancer. Alternative approaches in identification and treatment have been developed to treat patients with multifocal or extensive HGAIN lesions. High-resolution anoscopy combines magnification with anoscopy and is being used to identify HGAIN and determine treatment margins. HGAIN can then be ablated with a number of modalities, including infrared coagulation, CO2 laser, and electrocautery. These methods for HGAIN ablation can be performed with local anesthesia on outpatients and are relatively well tolerated. High-resolution anoscopy-directed HGAIN ablation is evolving into a standard approach for initial treatment and then subsequent monitoring of a disease which should be expected to be recurrent. Another treatment approach for HGAIN is topical treatment, principally with 5-fluorouracil or imiquimod. Topical therapies have the advantage of being nonsurgical and are well suited for treating widespread multifocal disease. Topical treatments have the disadvantage of requiring extended treatment courses and causing a symptomatic

  8. The Attitudes of the High School Students of Hail, Saudi Arabia towards the Current Educational Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khasawneh, Kholoud Ahmed Saleem

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the attitudes of public secondary school students in the State of Hail towards the modern educational concepts, and what are the differences between them. It has been used in the study descriptive analytical method. The study was conducted on a sample of 400 male and female students, chosen randomly according to the…

  9. Environmental Education in Ecuador: Conceptions and Currents in Quito's Private Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viteri, Fátima; Clarebout, Geraldine; Crauwels, Marion

    2013-01-01

    While key conceptions and the status of environmental education (EE) have been reported at various international, regional, national and local levels, those in play in the schools of Quito (Ecuador) are still relatively unknown. Of particular interest to this study are private schools: they are considerable in number in Ecuador and elsewhere, yet…

  10. An overview of engineering concepts and current design algorithms for probabilistic structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, S. F.; Hu, J.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    The article begins by examining the fundamentals of traditional deterministic design philosophy. The initial section outlines the concepts of failure criteria and limit state functions two traditional notions that are embedded in deterministic design philosophy. This is followed by a discussion regarding safety factors (a possible limit state function) and the common utilization of statistical concepts in deterministic engineering design approaches. Next the fundamental aspects of a probabilistic failure analysis are explored and it is shown that deterministic design concepts mentioned in the initial portion of the article are embedded in probabilistic design methods. For components fabricated from ceramic materials (and other similarly brittle materials) the probabilistic design approach yields the widely used Weibull analysis after suitable assumptions are incorporated. The authors point out that Weibull analysis provides the rare instance where closed form solutions are available for a probabilistic failure analysis. Since numerical methods are usually required to evaluate component reliabilities, a section on Monte Carlo methods is included to introduce the concept. The article concludes with a presentation of the technical aspects that support the numerical method known as fast probability integration (FPI). This includes a discussion of the Hasofer-Lind and Rackwitz-Fiessler approximations.

  11. Inflammatory bowel disease. Current concepts of pathogenesis and implications for therapy.

    PubMed

    Fiocchi, C

    2002-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) still presents major challenges to the understanding of its cause, mechanisms of inflammation, and therapeutic choices to control the damaged tissue. Both types of IBD, ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, have been known and investigated for over half century but neither one is fully understood nor can be satisfactorily managed. While many gaps in our knowledge still exist, the last two decades have witnessed an unprecedented progress not only in the etiology but mainly in the mechanisms underlying the chronic inflammatory response. The pattern of IBD epidemiology has drastically changed since World War II, with an increased frequency in countries that have adopted a ''westernized'' life style. A parallel and important phenomenon is the continuous drop in age of onset in children. Unfortunately, only few epidemiological clues are available, with the exception of smoking and diet. What in smoking alters the course of IBD is still a mystery and which, among thousands of additives, could represent a risk factor will remain unknown for the foreseeable future. The current emphasis on the study of the enteric flora as the source of potential antigens against which the mucosal immune system reacts appear well justified. The data from animal models appears particularly convincing. Thus, after decades of relying almost exclusively on patient-derived information, numerous animal models are generating precious new information on IBD pathogenesis. In experimental IBD the genetic background of the animal markedly influences the course of the disease, and the same is probably true in humans. The identification of NOD2 as the first mutated gene associated with a subgroup of Crohn's disease patients is the first evidence that genetics are pointing to the right direction for understanding how the environment interacts with genes to cause IBD. For many years immunology has been the main source of scientific information on mechanisms of IBD

  12. [Current treatment of systemic sclerosis. Part II. Vascular and antifibrotic treatment].

    PubMed

    Sicińska, Justyna; Rudnicka, Lidia

    2008-08-01

    Microvascular abnormalities and fibrosis are important targets of therapy in systemic sclerosis (scleroderma). Calcium channel blockers, ACE inhibitors, sartans, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors and serotonin re-uptake blockers are used for Raynaud's phenomenon. Intravenous prostanoids (alprostadil, iloprost, epoprostenol, treprostinil) and endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, sitaxsentan, ambrisentan) show efficacy in treatment of pulmonary hypertension and distal ischemia. Successful treatment of digital ulcers secondary to systemic sclerosis was possible with sildenafil and bosentan. A platelet gel is currently in clinical trials for scleroderma-related digital ulcers. Several drugs, which directly reduce excessive production of collagens and other connective tissue proteins have been applied in systemic sclerosis. These include interferon gamma, d-penicillamine, kolchichicine, calcitriol, and imanitib. However, so far, strategies to control fibrosis by directly reducing excessive connective tissue production have been disappointing in controlled studies. PMID:18942347

  13. Health literacy: applying current concepts to improve health services and reduce health inequalities.

    PubMed

    Batterham, R W; Hawkins, M; Collins, P A; Buchbinder, R; Osborne, R H

    2016-03-01

    The concept of 'health literacy' refers to the personal and relational factors that affect a person's ability to acquire, understand and use information about health and health services. For many years, efforts in the development of the concept of health literacy exceeded the development of measurement tools and interventions. Furthermore, the discourse about and development of health literacy in public health and in clinical settings were often substantially different. This paper provides an update about recently developed approaches to measurement that assess health literacy strengths and limitations of individuals and of groups across multiple aspects of health literacy. This advancement in measurement now allows diagnostic and problem-solving approaches to developing responses to identified strengths and limitations. In this paper, we consider how such an approach can be applied across the diverse range of settings in which health literacy has been applied. In particular, we consider some approaches to applying health literacy in the daily practice of health-service providers in many settings, and how new insights and tools--including approaches based on an understanding of diversity of health literacy needs in a target community--can contribute to improvements in practice. Finally, we present a model that attempts to integrate the concept of health literacy with concepts that are often considered to overlap with it. With careful consideration of the distinctions between prevailing concepts, health literacy can be used to complement many fields from individual patient care to community-level development, and from improving compliance to empowering individuals and communities. PMID:26872738

  14. Joint Custody: Current Issues and Implications for Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Carol A.; Goldenberg, Irene

    1985-01-01

    Describes what joint physical custody involves, the kinds of families who currently have this type of custody arrangement, and the effects on parents and children. Current research supporting two perspectives on joint custody, one emphasizing the continuity of psychological care from one parent, the other emphasizing the importance of the father's…

  15. Cognitive-behavioral treatment for panic disorder: current status.

    PubMed

    Landon, Terri M; Barlow, David H

    2004-07-01

    Is cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) appropriate for panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (PDA) in children, adolescents, and adults? Are its effects durable? In this review, we survey various psychological approaches to the treatment of PDA and examine the relative efficacy and clinical utility of each. A growing body of research demonstrates that CBT is well-tolerated, cost-effective, and produces substantial treatment gains for individuals with PDA over the short- and long-term. Nevertheless, not everyone benefits and there is room for improvement among those who do. We address these shortcomings and consider recent developments. PMID:15552543

  16. Current advances in the treatment of adolescent drug use

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Ken C; Tanner-Smith, Emily E; Bresani, Elena; Meyers, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Research on the development and efficacy of drug abuse treatment for adolescents has made great strides recently. Several distinct models have been studied, and these approaches range from brief interventions to intensive treatments. This paper has three primary aims: to provide an overview of conceptual issues relevant to treating adolescents suspected of drug-related problems, including an overview of factors believed to contribute to a substance use disorder, to review the empirical treatment outcome literature, and to identify areas of need and promising directions for future research. PMID:25429247

  17. [Medical aspects of current flight safety concept of air forces of the Russian Federation].

    PubMed

    Blaginin, A A; Lizogub, I N

    2012-12-01

    Issues of medical supply of aviation operations, that is part of general system of flight safety are analyzed in this article. One of the main issues is development of the system of vocational preparation of medical personnel, taking part in organization and carrying flights. This issue consists of several themes: formation of united system of education from primary to post graduate; formation of modern training facility; assurance of high potential in academic and teaching staff and providing of good basic training and high learning motivation of applicants, who wants to become a air medical officer. Fundamental principles of developed concept of medical supply of flight safety are presented. It is shown that the essential condition of good implementation of the given concept is informaltion support of all its structures. PMID:23479904

  18. Hepatocellular carcinoma review: current treatment, and evidence-based medicine.

    PubMed

    Raza, Ali; Sood, Gagan K

    2014-04-21

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common tumor worldwide. Multiple treatment options are available for HCC including curative resection, liver transplantation, radiofrequency ablation, trans-arterial chemoembolization, radioembolization and systemic targeted agent like sorafenib. The treatment of HCC depends on the tumor stage, patient performance status and liver function reserve and requires a multidisciplinary approach. In the past few years with significant advances in surgical treatments and locoregional therapies, the short-term survival of HCC has improved but the recurrent disease remains a big problem. The pathogenesis of HCC is a multistep and complex process, wherein angiogenesis plays an important role. For patients with advanced disease, sorafenib is the only approved therapy, but novel systemic molecular targeted agents and their combinations are emerging. This article provides an overview of treatment of early and advanced stage HCC based on our extensive review of relevant literature. PMID:24764650

  19. Current Issues in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stubert, J.; Gerber, B.

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial carcinoma is the most common carcinoma of the female genital tract. Its most important clinical sign is postmenopausal bleeding. An endometrial biopsy is essential for diagnosis. Treatment decisions are governed by tumour risk assessment and patient comorbidity, which is often present. Pelvic and paraaortic lymph node dissection is unnecessary in low risk cases (definition: pT1 a, G1/2) and adjuvant radiotherapy and systemic treatments are usually avoidable. Treatment of high-risk patients (G3 and/or pT1b) and palliative cases is difficult and not well standardised. New molecular-based subtype classification may help treatment decision making in future. PMID:26941450

  20. Hepatocellular carcinoma review: Current treatment, and evidence-based medicine

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Ali; Sood, Gagan K

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common tumor worldwide. Multiple treatment options are available for HCC including curative resection, liver transplantation, radiofrequency ablation, trans-arterial chemoembolization, radioembolization and systemic targeted agent like sorafenib. The treatment of HCC depends on the tumor stage, patient performance status and liver function reserve and requires a multidisciplinary approach. In the past few years with significant advances in surgical treatments and locoregional therapies, the short-term survival of HCC has improved but the recurrent disease remains a big problem. The pathogenesis of HCC is a multistep and complex process, wherein angiogenesis plays an important role. For patients with advanced disease, sorafenib is the only approved therapy, but novel systemic molecular targeted agents and their combinations are emerging. This article provides an overview of treatment of early and advanced stage HCC based on our extensive review of relevant literature. PMID:24764650