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Sample records for current uk practice

  1. Current UK practices in the management of subacromial impingement

    PubMed Central

    Drury, Colin; Tait, Gavin R

    2015-01-01

    Background Controversy presently exists surrounding the management of patients with subacromial impingement. This study aims to highlight current UK practices in the management of these patients. Methods BESS members were invited to complete a questionnaire and responses were received from 157 consultant shoulder surgeons. Results Physiotherapy is an integral part of management for 93% of surgeons with a minimum period of 12 weeks being most popular prior to consideration of arthroscopic subacromial decompression. Subacromial steroid injection is used by 95% and 86% repeat this if the patient has failed to respond to a previous injection by the general practioner. From initial presentation, 77% felt there should be at least 3 months of conservative management before proceeding to surgery. Good but transient response to subacromial injection was considered the best predictor of good surgical outcome by 77%. The coracoacromial ligament is fully released by 78%, although there was greater variation in how aggressive surgeons were with acromioplasty. Most (59%) do not include the nontender acromioclavicular joint to any extent in routine acromioplasty. Hospital physiotherapy protocols are used by 63% for postoperative rehabilitation. Conclusions Variation exists in the management regimes offered to patients with subacromial impingement, but most employ a minimum period of 12 weeks of conservative management incorporating physiotherapy and at least 2 subacromial steriod injections.

  2. Rehabilitation following rotator cuff repair: a survey of current UK practice

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff disorders, including rotator cuff tears, are common and can be treated conservatively or surgically. Data suggest that the incidence of surgery to repair the rotator cuff is rising. Despite this rise, the most effective approach to postoperative rehabilitation, a critical component of the recovery process, is not well developed. The present study aimed to describe current practice in the UK in relation to rehabilitation following rotator cuff repair. Methods An electronic survey was developed and disseminated to UK based physiotherapists and surgeons involved with rotator cuff repair. Results One hundred valid responses were received. Although there is a degree of variation, current practice for the majority of respondents consists of sling immobilization for 4 weeks to 6 weeks. During this time, passive movement would be commenced before active movement is introduced towards the end of this phase. Resisted exercise begins 7 weeks to 12 weeks postoperatively, alongside return to light work. A progressive resumption of function, including manual work and sport, is advised from approximately 13 weeks. Conclusions In the context of the current literature, it might be suggested that the current approach to rehabilitation following rotator cuff repair for the majority of respondents is somewhat cautious and has not progressed for over a decade.

  3. Protein Biomarker Research in UK Hospital Clinical Biochemistry Laboratories: A Survey of Current Practice and Views

    PubMed Central

    Hepburn, Sophie; Banks, Rosamonde E; Thompson, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Background: With the increasing drive for more and better disease biomarkers to underpin the stratified or personalised medicine agenda, clinical biochemistry laboratories should be ideally placed to play a major role in their translation into clinical practice. However, little is known about the current extent of biomarker-related research activity in UK National Health Service clinical biochemistry departments. Methods: In December 2010, an online questionnaire was sent to active UK members of the Association for Clinical Biochemistry (ACB) to determine the extent of their current research activity and involvement in protein biomarker discovery and translation, including an assessment of the awareness of proteomics. Results: A total of 198 eligible responses (19% response rate) was received from across the UK. Of a further 50 eligible people who responded to a follow-up for initial non-responders, most cited insufficient knowledge about the topic as the reason for non-response (24% total response rate). The results illustrate the highly skilled nature of the workforce with many having experience in a research environment (75%) with postgraduate qualifications. However, more than half spend <10% of their time undertaking research in their current role, and many (61%) would like to be more research active. Encouragingly, approximately a third were involved in biomarker discovery activities, even though for <10% of their time, with slightly more reporting involvement in biomarker translation. Conclusions: Although there are people with the necessary skills and desire to be involved in biomarker research in clinical biochemistry departments, their involvement is small, predominantly due to issues with capacity and resources. It is likely that the majority of biomarker programmes will therefore continue to be carried out by a small number of academic groups, hopefully with collaborative input from hospital laboratories. PMID:25210209

  4. Survey of current practice in clinical transvaginal ultrasound scanning in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Adam; Lees, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    During transvaginal ultrasound scanning, the fetus and other sensitive tissues are placed close to the transducer. Heating of these tissues occurs by direct conduction from the transducer and by absorption of ultrasound in the tissue. The extent of any heating will depend on the equipment and settings used, the duration of the scan, imaging modes and other aspects of scanning practice. To ensure that scans are performed with minimum risk, staff should have an appropriate knowledge of safety and follow guidelines issued by professional bodies. An online survey aiming to document current practice in transvaginal ultrasound in the UK was created and distributed to individuals performing this type of scanning. The survey posed questions about the respondents, the departments where scans were performed, the equipment used, knowledge of ultrasound safety, scanning practice and the frequency, duration and mode of transvaginal ultrasound scans for gynaecology, obstetrics and fertility applications. In all, 294 responses were obtained, mostly from sonographers (94%). From the analysis of the responses, it was clear that there was a good understanding of the general meaning of thermal and mechanical index and high awareness of guidelines issued by professional bodies. However, 40% of respondents stated that they rarely or never monitor Thermal or Mechanical indices during scanning. Scanning practice was consistent in terms of the duration of scans, scan protocols followed and use of imaging modes. The results highlight the importance of continued ultrasound safety training and promotion of safety guidelines to users. PMID:27433250

  5. Prisoners as research participants: current practice and attitudes in the UK.

    PubMed

    Charles, Anna; Rid, Annette; Davies, Hugh; Draper, Heather

    2016-04-01

    The use of prisoners as research participants is controversial. Efforts to protect them in response to past exploitation and abuse have led to strict regulations and reluctance to involve them as participants. Hence, prisoners are routinely denied the opportunity to participate in research. In the absence of comprehensive information regarding prisoners' current involvement in research, we examined UK prisoners' involvement through review of research applications to the UK National Research Ethics Service. We found that prisoners have extremely limited access to research participation. This analysis was augmented by a survey of those involved in research and research governance (UK researchers and Research Ethics Committee members). Our results suggest that pragmatic concerns regarding the perceived burden of including prisoners are far more prominent in motivating their exclusion than ethical concerns or knowledge of regulations. While prisoners may remain a vulnerable research population due to constraints upon their liberty and autonomy and the coercive nature of the prison environment, routine exclusion from participation may be disadvantageous. Rigorous ethical oversight and the shift in the prevailing attitude towards the risks and benefits of participation suggest that it may be time for research to be more accessible to prisoners in line with the principle of equivalence in prison healthcare. We suggest the necessary first step in this process is a re-examination of current guidance in the UK and other countries with exclusions. PMID:24958334

  6. Current practice in treatment approach for bullous pemphigoid: comparison between national surveys from the Netherlands and the UK.

    PubMed

    Meijer, J M; Jonkman, M F; Wojnarowska, F; Wiliams, H C; Kirtschig, G

    2016-07-01

    Treatment approaches for bullous pemphigoid (BP), the most common autoimmune skin blistering disease, are largely based on national and international guidelines. We conducted a national survey among dermatologists in the Netherlands to explore the current treatment of BP, and compared the results with those of a previously published survey from the UK. Almost all responders in the Netherlands (n = 175) used very potent topical corticosteroids, both as monotherapy and as adjunctive therapy. In contrast to UK dermatologists, the majority recommended whole-body application rather than local application to lesions. Systemic antibiotics were used by > 70% of responders. Half of the responders in the Netherlands considered systemic steroids the first-choice treatment, with the majority also using adjunctive therapy as a routine. Despite many similarities in treatment approach between the two countries, these surveys provide an important insight into the gap between actual and recommended practice at a country level in relation to the best external evidence. PMID:26940484

  7. Gynaecological cancer follow-up: national survey of current practice in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Leeson, Simon; Stuart, Nick; Sylvestre, Yvonne; Hall, Liz; Whitaker, Rhiannon

    2013-01-01

    Objective To establish a baseline of national practice for follow-up after treatment for gynaecological cancer. Design Questionnaire survey. Setting Gynaecological cancer centres and units. Geographical location UK. Participants Members of the British Gynaecological Cancer Society and the National Forum of Gynaecological Oncology Nurses. Interventions A questionnaire survey. Outcome measures To determine schedules of follow-up, who provides it and what routine testing is used for patients who have had previous gynaecological cancer. Results A total of 117 responses were obtained; 115 (98%) reported hospital scheduled regular follow-up appointments. Two involved general practitioners. Follow-up was augmented or replaced by telephone follow-up in 29 responses (25%) and patient-initiated appointments in 38 responses (32%). A total of 80 (68%) cancer specialists also offered combined follow-up clinics with other specialties. Clinical examinations for hospital-based follow-up were mainly performed by doctors (67% for scheduled regular appointments and 63% for patient-initiated appointments) while telephone follow-up was provided in the majority by nurses (76%). Most respondents (76/117 (65%)) provided routine tests, of which 66/76 (87%) reported carrying out surveillance tests for ovarian cancer, 35/76 (46%) for cervical cancer, 8/76 (11%) for vulval cancer and 7/76 (9%) for endometrial cancer. Patients were usually discharged after 5 years (82/117 (70%)), whereas three (3%) were discharged after 4 years, nine (8%) after three years and one (1%) after 2 years. Conclusions Practice varied but most used a standard hospital-based protocol of appointments for 5 years and routine tests were performed usually for women with ovarian cancer. A minority utilised nurse-led or telephone follow-up. General practitioners were rarely involved in routine care. A randomised study comparing various models of follow-up could be considered. PMID:23883880

  8. Internationalization of U.K. University Business Schools: A Survey of Current Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Roger; Kane, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    A questionnaire was sent to the heads of internationalization in the business schools of all U.K. universities. Sixty-five replies were received. The document covered, inter alia, the internationalization activities undertaken by the respondents' schools, the intensities with which internationalization had been implemented, motives for…

  9. Sperm storage for cancer patients in the UK: a review of current practice.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vinay

    2011-11-01

    An increasing number of cancer patients can now hope to have a full and normal life due to significant improvements in treatment outcomes and survival rates. The application of cryobiology to store fertile gametes before sterilizing treatments has been a natural progression. Greater awareness has markedly increased the worldwide demand for long-term storage of sperm, and has prompted the UK Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority to extend the period of storage permitted by their regulations to 55 years. Other patients undergoing sterilizing chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy such as haemoglobinopathies requiring bone marrow transplantation and autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis may further increase the indications for sperm storage. Most adult and adolescent patients and their relatives/spouses/parents/guardians value this service even though very few eventually use the sperm. There is an urgent need to develop national and international guidelines for the provision, organization, maintenance and management of the cryopreservation services. PMID:21873609

  10. Radiotherapy treatment of non-melanoma skin cancer: a survey of current UK practice and commentary

    PubMed Central

    Slevin, N J; Sykes, A J; Rembielak, A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In the ongoing absence of available trial data, a national survey was carried out to provide details on radiotherapy treatment strategy for non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Methods: A survey of clinical oncologists treating NMSC was performed. The respondents were asked for basic information on workload as well as a proposed treatment strategy for various clinical scenarios for patients of varying fitness. Results: A total of 43 completed and 20 partially completed surveys were received. There was a wide variation in the workload and additional disease sites that respondents had responsibility for. Kilovoltage radiotherapy was available to 81% of responders. The respondents' approach was affected by the fitness of patients, with longer fractionation regimes proposed for younger, fitter patients and shorter or non-standard fractionations more likely for the infirm elderly. Four daily fractionation regimes (18–20 Gy in 1 fraction, 35 Gy in 5 fractions, 45 Gy in 10 fractions and 55 Gy in 20 fractions) were most commonly suggested. There was a large degree of variation in non-standard fractions proposed with significant potential differences in radiobiological effect. Concern over the use of kilovoltage photons on skin over cartilage was apparent, as was a reluctance to use radiotherapy in areas of increased risk of poor wound healing. Conclusion: The survey results largely showed practice to be in line with available published evidence. The variation seen in some areas, such as non-standard fractionation, would benefit from the publication of local outcomes to achieve a more consistent approach. Advances in knowledge: This study provides information on national practices and identifies variations, particularly within widespread use of non-standard fractionation. PMID:25189280

  11. Developing new models of shared primary and specialist HIV care in the UK: a survey of current practice.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Jane; Sutcliffe, Loma J; Williams, Andy J; Estcourt, Claudia S

    2016-07-01

    HIV care in the UK is led by hospital-based specialists with limited general practitioner (GP) involvement. As GPs have expertise in some non-microbial HIV-associated co-morbidities (e.g. cardiovascular disease), and more people are disclosing their HIV status to their GPs, there could be benefits in sharing HIV care. We describe contemporary models of shared HIV care in relevant developed world settings to inform future shared HIV care in the UK. An interview survey of key informants was used to explore experiences and models of shared care, and identify promoting and inhibiting factors. We interviewed ten key informants from six shared care models. There were three broad categories of shared care, with varying degrees of GP involvement. Strong clinical leadership in primary care, good professional relationships and communication, and tailored GP training were facilitators. Barriers included stigma, confidentiality concerns, and low prevalence of HIV outside major conurbations. Contemporary shared HIV care models have emerged organically and seem to work when grounded in good collaboration between a small number of dedicated GPs and specialist units. We propose two models for further study which may only be feasible in high HIV caseload practices. User acceptability, clinical and cost effectiveness must be considered. PMID:26113516

  12. Toward the use of a standardized assessment for young children with autism: current assessment practices in the UK.

    PubMed

    Martin, Neil T; Bibby, Peter; Mudford, Oliver C; Eikeseth, Svein

    2003-09-01

    Little is known about the progress of autistic children following specific interventions in England. Nor do we know how frequently standardized assessments are used to monitor progress or to evaluate specific educational interventions. The reports of 75 children with autism, for whom special educational provision had been determined by a local education authority, were reviewed. Parents were interviewed and educational psychologists were contacted for details of any norm-referenced assessments. Of these children, 39 percent had no standardized assessments before education authorities determined their provision, and only 9 percent had follow-up assessments that could be used to evaluate progress. Children with autism in the UK rarely have sufficient assessments to allow an objective evaluation of their progress. There is currently no standardized assessment protocol to prescribe a specific educational intervention, to evaluate the progress of children or to make comparisons between interventions. We recommend the development of such a protocol. PMID:14516063

  13. Effort testing in contemporary UK neuropsychological practice.

    PubMed

    McCarter, Renee J; Walton, Nigel H; Brooks, D Neil; Powell, Graham E

    2009-08-01

    A survey of members of the British Psychological Society Division of Neuropsychology (N = 588) was conducted via email to ascertain current practice with respect to the use of symptom validity testing (SVT) in clinical and legal neuropsychological assessments. Replies were received from 130 practicing neuropsychologists. Results showed that 59% frequently use SVT in legal assessments, but a minority (15%) employ them in clinical assessments. Practice in the UK is only moderately different to that in North America with respect to frequency of use of SVT, although methods employed showed greater diversity. Favored tests, respondents' justifications for use of SVT and rationales for not using SVT are reported. PMID:19235633

  14. Knowledge Exchange between Universities and the Creative Industries in the UK: A Case Study of Current Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Morag

    2014-01-01

    The importance to the economy of knowledge exchange between universities and industry has long been recognized, and in the UK a number of initiatives are in place to support such activities. These initiatives have helped to stimulate engagement between universities and the creative industries, a sector of increasing importance to the UK economy.…

  15. Leadership Practices in German and UK Organisations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Grace

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this research was to determine whether leadership practices vary between German and UK organisations. Design/methodology/approach: The author used self-assessment documents submitted by German and UK organisations to the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM), to identify leadership practices in both countries. A…

  16. Undergraduate teaching of neurosurgery - what is the current practice in the UK and is there a need for improvement?

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Kathrin J; Moore, Anne J

    2015-01-01

    There has been concern that the move towards generalism means that specialties, such as neurosurgery, are being pushed out of the undergraduate syllabus. Surveys were created, along with the Society of British Neurological Surgeons, and sent to medical school representatives (MSRs) and neurosurgery programme directors (NPDs) in the United Kingdom (UK). 60% of MSRs and 71% of NPDs responded. Neurosurgical topics were taught by a variety of specialties, and in one medical school, a MSR said that neurosurgery was not taught at all. 83% of MSRs and 80% of NPDs said that neurosurgeons should be more involved in undergraduate education, with 70% of NPDs saying that their unit would be willing to have increased involvement. All NPDs, but only 72% of MSRs, said that neurosurgery should be taught in medical school. Those MSRs who disagreed opined that it was a postgraduate subject, and could be difficult to engage all students. The majority of MSRs and NPDs thought that neurosurgery guidelines would be useful. The most popular forms of guidance were in the forms of curriculum/guidelines, website and powerpoint presentations. It is therefore recommended that neurosurgeons, under the umbrella of the Society of British Neurological Surgeons, create national guidelines for the teaching of undergraduate students; to aid their educational colleagues and ensure that accurate, standardised teaching occurs. Care must be taken not to be over-prescriptive in these endeavours. PMID:26083138

  17. Tuberculosis screening in patients with HIV: An audit against UK national guidelines to assess current practice and the effectiveness of an electronic tuberculosis-screening prompt.

    PubMed

    Fox-Lewis, A; Brima, N; Muniina, P; Grant, A D; Edwards, S G; Miller, R F; Pett, S L

    2016-09-01

    A retrospective clinical audit was performed to assess if the British HIV Association 2011 guidelines on routine screening for tuberculosis in HIV are being implemented in a large UK urban clinic, and if a tuberculosis-screening prompt on the electronic patient record for new attendees was effective. Of 4658 patients attending during the inclusion period, 385 were newly diagnosed first-time attendees and routine tuberculosis screening was recommended in 165. Of these, only 6.1% of patients had a completed tuberculosis screening prompt, and 12.1% underwent routine tuberculosis screening. This audit represents the first published UK data on routine screening rates for tuberculosis in HIV and demonstrates low rates of tuberculosis screening despite an electronic screening prompt designed to simplify adherence to the national guideline. Reasons why tuberculosis screening rates were low, and the prompt ineffective, are unclear. A national audit is ongoing, and we await the results to see if our data reflect a lack of routine tuberculosis screening in HIV-infected patients at a national level. PMID:26792282

  18. Learning the law: practical proposals for UK medical education.

    PubMed

    Margetts, J K

    2016-02-01

    Ongoing serious breaches in medical professionalism might be avoided if UK doctors rethink their approach to law. UK medical education has a role in creating a climate of change by re-examining how law is taught to medical students. Adopting a more insightful approach in the UK to the impact of The Human Rights Act and learning to manipulate legal concepts, such as conflict of interest, need to be taught to medical students now if UK doctors are to manage complex decision-making in the NHS of the future. The literature is reviewed from a unique personal perspective of a doctor and lawyer, and practical proposals for developing medical education in law in the UK are suggested. PMID:23161613

  19. Theorising Dyslexic Student Discussion/Action Groups in UK Higher Education: Research in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Jenny; Herrington, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    This "research in practice" analyses the experience of operating discussion/action groups with dyslexic students in higher education in three British universities which reflects a shift from the practice of developing "support groups" to a more developmental, proactive stance. It does so in the current UK legislative context which requires higher…

  20. Developing Competence Frameworks in UK Healthcare: Lessons from Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Lindsay; Boak, George

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this article is to review the use of competence frameworks in the UK healthcare sector and to explore characteristics of the sector that may influence the success of projects to develop new frameworks. Design/methodology/approach: The paper draws on project reports and evaluations of practice in a range of recent projects…

  1. Exploring the role of national culture on knowledge practices: a comparison between Spain and the UK.

    PubMed

    Cegarra-Navarro, Juan Gabriel; Sánchez Vidal, M Eugenia; Cegarra-Leiva, David

    2011-11-01

    In the context of a competitive knowledge-based economy, the knowledge provided by a firm's founders is one of the most important measures of success. This paper aims to identify the role of national culture on a founder's knowledge practices in a modern organisation. Using data collected from 258 Small to Medium sized Enterprises (SME(S)) in the Spanish and UK telecommunication industries (130 from Spain and 128 from the UK), we propose three knowledge management practices to be analysed; namely transfer, transformation and open-mindedness. This paper provides evidence that while Spanish SME(S) are more positively associated with higher levels of transfer and transformation of knowledge, UK SME(S) are more positively associated with higher levels of open-mindedness. Hence, this study serves as an important contribution to the small amount of literature currently available in this field by examining different practices that can be explained by the cultural characteristics of both countries. PMID:22059326

  2. A survey of the practice and management of radiotherapy linear accelerator quality control in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, A; Kearton, J; Hayman, O

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to determine current radiotherapy linear accelerator quality control (QC) practice in the UK, as a comparative benchmark and indicator of development needs, and to raise awareness of QC as a key performance indicator. Methods All UK radiotherapy centres were invited to complete an online questionnaire regarding their local QC processes, and submit their QC schedules. The range of QC tests, frequency of measurements and acceptable tolerances in use across the UK were analysed, and consensus and range statistics determined. Results 72% of the UK's 62 radiotherapy centres completed the questionnaire and 40% provided their QC schedules. 60 separate QC tests were identified from the returned schedules. There was a large variation in the total time devoted to QC between centres: interquartile range from 13 to 26 h per linear accelerator per month. There has been a move from weekly to monthly testing of output calibration in the last decade, with reliance on daily constancy testing equipment. 33% of centres thought their schedules were in need of an update and only 30% used risk-assessment approaches to determine local QC schedule content. Less than 30% of centres regularly complete all planned QC tests each month, although 96% achieve over 80% of tests. Conclusions A comprehensive “snapshot” of linear accelerator QC testing practice in the UK has been collated, which demonstrates reasonable agreement between centres in their stated QC test frequencies. However, intelligent design of QC schedules and management is necessary to ensure efficiency and appropriateness. PMID:22674707

  3. Current management of Paget-Schroetter syndrome in the UK.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shaukat N.; Stansby, Gerard

    2004-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Untreated symptomatic patients with Paget-Schroetter syndrome (PSS) can sustain chronic disability from venous obstruction, with arm swelling, pain and early exercise fatigue. This may result in significant loss of occupational productivity and quality of life. For this reason, active management is recommended in the majority of the recent literature. The objective of the this study was to assess current trends of management of PSS in the UK. METHODS: A 9-part questionnaire was sent to 90 ordinary members of the Vascular Surgical Society of Great Britain and Ireland (VSS-GBI). Names and addresses were selected by highlighting every fourth ordinary member from the UK, in the 2000 VSS-GBI handbook. Ordinary members of the VSS-GBI who were clearly radiologists were excluded. RESULTS: Of the 90 questionnaires sent, 60 were returned (66.67%). The majority of respondents used both duplex and venography (61%) as the major investigative tools though some employed duplex only (17%). Multimodality treatment (radiological and operative) was the favoured approach. Only 17% still favoured conservative management alone. Thrombolysis was the most common intervention (86.7%) usually followed by elective thoracic outlet decompression. Most favoured a delayed approach for surgery of 6-12 weeks. First rib resection was the most commonly performed operation (58%), usually by the transaxillary approach (55%). Most of the respondents were doubtful of the role of stenting in this condition and did not use it. CONCLUSIONS: There is no definite consensus on treatment of this condition in the UK. A majority tend to favour a multimodal approach. Thrombolysis is the most common form of treatment employed and first rib resection via the transaxillary approach remains the most popular surgical procedure. The lack of consensus of this potentially disabling condition highlights the need for randomised clinical trials to guide management. PMID:15005942

  4. Smartphone Applications for the Clinical Oncologist in UK Practice.

    PubMed

    Rozati, Hamoun; Shah, Sonya Pratik; Shah, Neha

    2015-06-01

    A number of medical smartphone applications have been developed to assist clinical oncology specialists. Concerns have arisen that the information provided may not be under sufficient scrutiny. This study aims to analyse the current applications available for clinical oncologists in the UK. Applications aimed specifically at physician clinical oncologists were searched for on the major smartphone operating systems: Apple iOS; Google Android; Microsoft Windows OS; and Blackberry OS. All applications were installed and analysed. The applications were scrutinised to assess the following information: cost; whether the information included was referenced; when the information was last updated; and whether they made any reference to UK guidelines. A novel rating score based on these criteria was applied to each application. Fifty applications were identified: 24 for Apple's iOS; 23 for Google's Android; 2 for Blackberry OS; and 1 for Windows OS. The categories of applications available were: drug reference; journal reference; learning; clinical calculators; decision support; guidelines; and dictionaries. Journal reference and guideline applications scored highly on our rating system. Drug reference application costs were prohibitive. Learning tools were poorly referenced and not up-to-date. Smartphones provide easy access to information. There are numerous applications devoted to oncology physicians, many of which are free and contain referenced, up-to-date data. The cost and quality of drug reference and learning applications have significant scope for improvement. A regulatory body is needed to ensure the presence of peer-reviewed, validated applications to ensure their reliability. PMID:24903139

  5. Staffing UK University Campuses Overseas: Lessons from MNE Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salt, John; Wood, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This article suggests that as their internal labor markets become more multinational in scope, UK universities may acquire similar staffing characteristics to commercial multinational enterprises (MNEs). Comparing evidence from four UK universities with several surveys of MNEs it concludes that, although there are broad similarities in the…

  6. The current status of the UK-FMOS spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosh, Ian A.; Woodhouse, Guy F.; Froud, Tim; Dowell, Allan; Patel, Mukesh; Wallner, Mattias; Lewis, Ian J.; Dalton, Gavin B.; Holmes, Alan; Brooks, Barney; Band, Cyril; Bonfield, David G.; Murray, Graham J.; Robertson, David J.; Dipper, Nigel A.

    2004-09-01

    FMOS is a near-IR OH-suppressed multi-fibre fed spectrograph for the Subaru telescope. The spectrograph will accept 200 optical fibres from the ECHIDNA positioner system at the 30arcmin Prime focus of the telescope. We will describe the recent activities here in the UK in progressing the instrument from its conceptual phase through detailed design and into manufacture. A variety of technical areas will be described including: the opto-mechanical system design and construction, development of the HAWAII-II detector control system, the thermal system design & control and OH suppression techniques.

  7. Genomics education for medical professionals - the current UK landscape.

    PubMed

    Slade, Ingrid; Subramanian, Deepak N; Burton, Hilary

    2016-08-01

    Genomics education in the UK is at an early stage of development, and its pace of evolution has lagged behind that of the genomics research upon which it is based. As a result, knowledge of genomics and its applications remains limited among non-specialist clinicians. In this review article, we describe the complex landscape for genomics education within the UK, and highlight the large number and variety of organisations that can influence, direct and provide genomics training to medical professionals. Postgraduate genomics education is being shaped by the work of the Health Education England (HEE) Genomics Education Programme, working in conjunction with the Joint Committee on Genomics in Medicine. The success of their work will be greatly enhanced by the full cooperation and engagement of the many groups, societies and organisations involved with medical education and training (such as the royal colleges). Without this cooperation, there is a risk of poor coordination and unnecessary duplication of work. Leadership from an organisation such as the HEE Genomics Education Programme will have a key role in guiding the formulation and delivery of genomics education policy by various stakeholders among the different disciplines in medicine. PMID:27481379

  8. Air gun wounding and current UK laws controlling air weapons.

    PubMed

    Bruce-Chwatt, Robert Michael

    2010-04-01

    Air weapons whether rifles or pistols are, potentially, lethal weapons. The UK legislation is complex and yet little known to the public. Hunting with air weapons and the laws controlling those animals that are permitted to be shot with air weapons is even more labyrinthine due to the legal power limitations on the possession of air weapons. Still relatively freely available by mail order or on the Internet, an increasing number of deaths have been reported from the misuse of air weapons or accidental discharges. Ammunition for air weapons has become increasingly sophisticated, effective and therefore increasingly dangerous if misused, though freely available being a mere projectile without a concomitant cartridge containing a propellant and an initiator. PMID:20211450

  9. Accidental dural puncture rates in UK obstetric practice.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, C M; Reynolds, F

    1998-10-01

    Headache following epidural analgesia is a common cause of complaint, but accidental dural puncture rates vary among hospitals and with techniques. We were therefore interested to discover the extent of audit of dural puncture, the dural puncture rates in those UK centres that kept reliable records, and the techniques they used for detecting the epidural space. Consultants in charge of anaesthetic services to all 257 obstetric units in the UK were sent a questionnaire requesting numbers of obstetric epidurals, techniques used to detect the epidural space and the numbers of accidental dural punctures in the years 1991-1995. Replies were received from 191 respondents (74%) of whom 104 were able to provide some information about dural puncture rates. Dural puncture rate was inversely related to the number of epidurals performed; the highest recorded rate was 3.6% in a unit with < 300 epidurals annually, and the lowest 0.19% in a unit with > 1000. Most respondents did not record the loss of resistance technique used but among those who did, the dural puncture rate using mainly saline was 0.69% and using mainly air was 1.11% (P<0.001). Since accurate patient information is crucial for informed consent, audit needs to be improved in many centres. Though the accidental dural puncture rate may be under-reported in this survey, our data are in agreement with other findings that loss of resistance to saline is safer than loss of resistance to air. PMID:15321187

  10. The regulation of general practice in the UK.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, W

    1996-01-01

    When health professionals offer primary health services on a private market a number of problems can arise to do with choice, quality and supplier-induced demand. Professional self-regulation through qualification requirements and licensing procedures may offset some of the worst problems. However, in the UK, the primary health care sector is also subject to additional regulatory controls set within the context of the NHS. Private practitioners within the NHS function in a quasi-market setting, in which they are funded by public health authorities to provide services free at the point of delivery to their patients. Within this context there is regulation of quality, entry, prices and profits. This system can be contrasted with the much less extensive set of regulations applied to more market-based systems operating in countries such as the USA. Recent reforms in the UK have, however, initiated a movement towards a market-led system, extended the autonomy of health care practitioners, and increased the scope of financial incentives as a mechanism to promote professional quality and innovation. This article draws on the insights developed in Propper (1993) in her study of regulation and quasi-markets in secondary health care, education and community care. Its focus is on the extent of regulation in primary health care services; the effects of increased financial incentives on professional performance brought about by the NHS reforms; and, the scope for further deregulation of professional services in primary care. PMID:10157063

  11. Translating comparative effectiveness research into clinical practice: the UK experience.

    PubMed

    Walley, Tom

    2012-01-22

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) is not new but its potential to improve the effectiveness of healthcare has not yet been exploited in the US. Other countries such as the UK have more experience of this. Key points of the UK experience are summarized here and some possible pointers for the US are drawn. These include the following: how to go beyond the evidence and apply judgements to make recommendations with authority and in a timely manner; how to implement these recommendations; how to identify suitable topics; and how to be open and transparently fair to all stakeholders. The quality of the science of CER is key but this needs developing, and not just in biomedical or statistical terms but also in how to understand public expectations, and how to implement its recommendations. A key issue is the role of health economics, which seems to have been marginalized by the CER legislation, but perhaps this is more apparent than real. Clearly this is a matter for much further debate. It is hard to see how CER can deliver its potential without active consideration of both benefits and costs. Although other countries have more experience of this than does the US, the context for such work is always very specific and the US will have to find its own way, while trying to avoid some of the errors made elsewhere. PMID:22268389

  12. Ensuring reliability in UK written tests of general practice: the MRCGP examination 1998-2003.

    PubMed

    Munro, Neil; Denney, Mei Ling; Rughani, Amar; Foulkes, John; Wilson, Andrew; Tate, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Reliability in written examinations is taken very seriously by examination boards and candidates alike. Within general education many factors influence reliability including variations between markers, within markers, within candidates and within teachers. Mechanisms designed to overcome, or at least minimize, the impact of such variables are detailed. Methods of establishing reliability are also explored in the context of a range of assessment situations. In written tests of general practice within the Membership of the Royal College of General Practitioner (MRCGP) examination considerable effort has put been put into achieving acceptable levels of reliability. Current mechanisms designed to ensure high reliability are described and related to the evolution of the written component of the examination. In addition to description of marker selection and training, question development including construct a detailed example of specific and generic marking schedules is provided. Examination results for the Written Paper of the MRCGP from 1998 to 2003 are reported including Cronbach's alpha coefficients and standard error of measurements, mean scores (and SD) and pass rates. In addition individual discrimination scores for each question in the October 2002 paper are shown. Consistent high reliability of the written component of the MRCGP examination provides valuable lessons in terms of selection, training and monitoring of markers as well as practical methods of moderating factors affecting candidate variability. The challenge for examination developers is to carry these important lessons forward into a modernized assessment structure of UK general practice. PMID:16147769

  13. Business Education: A Portrait of Current Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "Business Education--a portrait of current practice" is one in a series of portraits by Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education (HMIE), depicting current practice in key aspects of the Scottish curriculum. The portrait series is a recent initiative by HMIE, flowing from the "Improving Scottish Education" (ISE) report. It is intended to promote…

  14. Current Practice of Duodenoscope Reprocessing.

    PubMed

    Kim, Stephen; Muthusamy, V Raman

    2016-10-01

    Numerous outbreaks of duodenoscope-associated transmission of multi-drug resistant bacteria have recently been reported. Unlike prior episodes of endoscope-transmitted infections, the latest outbreaks have occurred despite strict adherence to duodenoscope reprocessing guidelines. The current standard for all flexible endoscope reprocessing includes pre-cleaning, leak testing, an additional manual cleaning step, and high-level disinfection. When these steps are strictly followed, the risk of infection transmission during endoscopy is exceedingly rare. However, due to its complex design, the duodenoscope may not be able to be adequately disinfected using the current reprocessing standards. Supplemental measures to enhance scope reprocessing have subsequently been recommended to reduce the infection risk in patients undergoing endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. These methods are likely short-term solutions that have yet to be validated regarded their effectiveness. Additional approaches to monitor the quality of duodenoscope reprocessing may also be useful. Ultimately, a definitive, yet logistically feasible, method of duodenoscope reprocessing is required to ensure the safety of our patients. PMID:27595583

  15. PET-CT in the UK: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Scarsbrook, A F; Barrington, S F

    2016-07-01

    Combined positron-emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) has taken the oncological world by storm since being introduced into the clinical domain in the early 21(st) century and is firmly established in the management pathway of many different tumour types. Non-oncological applications of PET-CT represent a smaller but steadily growing area of interest. PET-CT continues to be the focus of a large number of research studies and keeping up-to-date with the literature is important but represents a challenge. Consequently guidelines recommending PET-CT usage need to be revised regularly to encompass new developments. The purpose of this article is twofold: first, it provides a detailed review of the evidence-base underpinning the major uses of PET-CT in clinical practice, which may be of value to a wide-range of individuals, including those directly involved with PET-CT and to a much larger group with limited exposure, but for whom a précis of the current state-of-play may help inform other radiology and multidisciplinary team (MDT) work; the second purpose is as a companion to revised guidelines on evidence-based indications for PET-CT in the UK (being published concurrently) providing a detailed commentary on new indications with a summary of emerging data supporting these additional clinical uses of the technique. PMID:27044903

  16. Mark My Words: The Role of Assessment Criteria in UK Higher Education Grading Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloxham, Sue; Boyd, Peter; Orr, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This article seeks to illuminate the gap between UK policy and practice in relation to the use of criteria for allocating grades. It critiques criterion-referenced grading from three perspectives. Twelve lecturers from two universities were asked to "think aloud" as they graded two written assignments. The study found that assessors made holistic…

  17. Evaluation, or Just Data Collection? An Exploration of the Evaluation Practice of Selected UK Environmental Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Sarah Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the evaluation practices of environmental educators. Questionnaires and discussion groups with a convenience sample of UK-based practitioners were used to uncover their evaluation methods. Although many report that they are evaluating regularly, this is mainly monitoring numbers of participants or an assessment of enjoyment.…

  18. Language Practices and Language Management in a UK Yemeni Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Gibson Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Through observation, questionnaires and, particularly, ethnographic interviews with parents, pupils, teachers and community organisers associated with a Yemeni complementary school, this paper develops a portrait of language repertoires, practices and preferences in a Yemeni diasporic community in a northern English city. Also investigated are the…

  19. Broken Voices or a Broken Curriculum? The Impact of Research on UK School Choral Practice with Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashley, Martin R.

    2013-01-01

    Work such as that of John Cooksey on boys' changing voices has influenced choral practice in the USA and in certain UK youth choirs, but has hitherto had little impact in UK schools where many teachers continue to believe that boys' voices "break". Different practices are found across the independent and maintained sectors of…

  20. Carotid endarterectomy. A survey of UK anaesthetic practice.

    PubMed

    Knighton, J D; Stoneham, M D

    2000-05-01

    We conducted a postal questionnaire survey of the members of the Vascular Anasthesia Society of Great Britain and Ireland, asking questions about the provision of anasthesia for carotid endartectomy. Of 215 respondents, 187 were currently providing anasthesia for carotid endarterectomy. The majority of respondents (69%) always use general anasthesia for this operation but 99/215 (46%) had some experience of regional anasthesia for carotid endartectomy. Amongst those currently using regional anasthesia, combined deep and superficial cervical plexus block was the technique used by 71%. Other regional techniques used included local infiltration and superficial block alone. During regional anasthesia, most (66%) anasthetists used cerebral monitoring techniques such as stump pressure or transcranial Doppler as well as keeping the patient awake. However, in a significant proportion of cases (37%) under general anasthesia no cerebral monitoring was used. Reported surgical shunt insertion rates were lower in awake (mean 42%) patients than those receiving general anasthesia (61%). Respondents using regional anasthesia were more likely to feel that their technique was appropriate than those using general anasthesia. PMID:10792144

  1. Air pollution control residues from waste incineration: Current UK situation and assessment of alternative technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Amutha Rani, D.; Boccaccini, A.R.; Deegan, D.; Cheeseman, C.R.

    2008-11-15

    Current disposal options for APC residues in the UK and alternative treatment technologies developed world-wide have been reviewed. APC residues are currently landfilled in the UK where they undergo in situ solidification, although the future acceptability of this option is uncertain because the EU waste acceptance criteria (WAC) introduce strict limits on leaching that are difficult to achieve. Other APC residue treatment processes have been developed which are reported to reduce leaching to below relevant regulatory limits. The Ferrox process, the VKI process, the WES-PHix process, stabilisation/solidification using cementitious binders and a range of thermal treatment processes are reviewed. Thermal treatment technologies convert APC residues combined with other wastes into inert glass or glass-ceramics that encapsulate heavy metals. The waste management industry will inevitably use the cheapest available option for treating APC residues and strict interpretation and enforcement of waste legislation is required if new, potentially more sustainable technologies are to become commercially viable.

  2. Survey of Oxygen Delivery Practices in UK Paediatric Intensive Care Units

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Administration of supplemental oxygen is common in paediatric intensive care. We explored the current practice of oxygen administration using a case vignette in paediatric intensive care units (PICU) in the united kingdom. Methods. We conducted an online survey of Paediatric Intensive Care Society members in the UK. The survey outlined a clinical scenario followed by questions on oxygenation targets for 5 common diagnoses seen in critically ill children. Results. Fifty-three paediatric intensive care unit members from 10 institutions completed the survey. In a child with moderate ventilatory requirements, 21 respondents (42%) did not follow arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PaO2) targets. In acute respiratory distress syndrome, cardiac arrest, and sepsis, there was a trend to aim for lower PaO2 as the fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) increased. Conversely, in traumatic brain injury and pulmonary hypertension, respondents aimed for normal PaO2 even as the FiO2 increased. Conclusions. In this sample of clinicians PaO2 targets were not commonly used. Clinicians target lower PaO2 as FiO2 increases in acute respiratory distress syndrome, cardiac arrest, and sepsis whilst targeting normal range irrespective of FiO2 in traumatic brain injury and pulmonary hypertension. PMID:27516901

  3. Group Therapy for School-Aged Children Who Stutter: A Survey of Current Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liddle, Hilary; James, Sarah; Hardman, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Although group therapy is recommended for school-aged children who stutter (CWS), it is not widely researched. This study aimed to explore this provision, using a postal survey which investigated the current practices of Speech & Language Therapists (SLTs) in the UK. Seventy percent of SLT services provided some group therapy, but the level of…

  4. Integrating Radiology and Anatomy Teaching in Medical Education in the UK--The Evidence, Current Trends, and Future Scope.

    PubMed

    Heptonstall, N B; Ali, T; Mankad, K

    2016-04-01

    This review article presents the current evidence of the importance of integrating radiology and anatomy in medical education in the UK, a recommendation by a number of key anatomy, education, and radiology organizations. Current evidence highlights that on average only 5% of total teaching time in medical education is dedicated to radiology. Often, radiology teaching does not adequately fulfill students' learning needs and potentially leaves them underprepared for medical practice. Benefits of integrating radiology and anatomy include improved clinical application of anatomy, an increase in student's interest in anatomy, and ultimately improved radiological interpretation. Various modalities exist for the integration of radiology and anatomy, facilitated by the vast portability of radiological images. It appears that combining radiological resources with traditional anatomy teaching methodology in a blended approach is most beneficial. PMID:26970390

  5. Fever management: Evidence vs current practice

    PubMed Central

    El-Radhi, A Sahib Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Fever is a very common complaint in children and is the single most common non-trauma-related reason for a visit to the emergency department. Parents are concerned about fever and it’s potential complications. The biological value of fever (i.e., whether it is beneficial or harmful) is disputed and it is being vigorously treated with the belief of preventing complications such as brain injury and febrile seizures. The practice of alternating antipyretics has become widespread at home and on paediatric wards without supporting scientific evidence. There is still a significant contrast between the current concept and practice, and the scientific evidence. Why is that the case in such a common complaint like fever The article will discuss the significant contrast between the current concepts and practice of fever management on one hand, and the scientific evidence against such concepts and practice. PMID:25254165

  6. A study of young peoples' attitudes to opportunistic Chlamydia testing in UK general practice

    PubMed Central

    Heritage, Joanne; Jones, Melvyn

    2008-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to assess young people's perceptions of being offered a chlamydia screening test in United Kingdom (UK) general practice. Methods This is qualitative study that uses focus groups and individual interviews with young adults (age 16 – 18) to assess their views. Results These young adults were a difficult group to gain access to. Two focus groups, one in a school, the other in a general practice (family practice), and 2 individual interviews were undertaken (total sample 18). Respondents were unfamiliar with Chlamydia, but broadly aware of sexually transmitted infections. General practice (family practice) was perceived as an acceptable place to deliver opportunistic screening, but participants felt that tests should not be initiated by GP receptionists. Novel delivery routes such as schools and "Pub"/Bar dispensing machines were discussed. Issues around stigma and confidentiality were also raised. Conclusion Opportunistic Chlamydia screening in UK general practice (family practic seems acceptable to young adults. While this is a difficult group to gain access to for research, attempts need to made to ensure acceptability to users of this programme. PMID:19099571

  7. Current economic trends in equine practice.

    PubMed

    Clark, Andrew R

    2009-12-01

    Current economic trends in equine practice are trends of weakness. Most practices, after a decade of double-digit growth, have migrated to survival mode within a few months. Understanding that all regions and disciplines are affected differently, using the Porter five forces model, we can identify changes that must be made in our business models first to survive and then to position ourselves to prosper when the recession ends. If we are to avoid long-term damage to our practices, we must use cost control and work efficiency in addition to price concessions. PMID:19945636

  8. Cross-sectional survey of antimicrobial prescribing patterns in UK small animal veterinary practice.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Laura A; Williams, Nicola; Clegg, Peter; Callaby, Rebecca; Nuttall, Tim; Coyne, Karen; Pinchbeck, Gina; Dawson, Susan

    2012-05-01

    The increase in the prevalence of antimicrobial resistance has resulted in both human and veterinary antimicrobial use coming under increased scrutiny. The aim of this study was to characterise antimicrobial prescribing patterns in small-animal veterinary practices in the UK. A cross-sectional survey of UK small animal veterinarians was undertaken. A postal questionnaire to evaluate antimicrobial prescribing habits was sent to 900 clinicians. Data were collected on the clinicians, their practices and their sources of information regarding antimicrobials and their use. Respondents were asked if they would prescribe antimicrobials to animals described in four clinical scenarios, and, if so, to provide details of the prescription(s). Questionnaires were completed by 51% of the veterinarians. Only 3.5% of clinicians reported that their practice had an antimicrobial use policy. Penicillins were most commonly prescribed in three clinical scenarios, and 1st generation cephalosporins were most commonly prescribed in a scenario about canine pyoderma. In one scenario, fluoroquinolones and 3rd generation cephalosporins accounted for 10% and 13% of prescriptions respectively. Five percent of all prescriptions were under the recommended dose and 20% were over the recommended dose. Overall, 2.3% of prescriptions were not licensed for use in dogs or cats in the UK. Associations between the use of various antimicrobial drugs and independent variables were analysed using multivariable logistic regression models. Off-license prescriptions and inaccurate dosing of antimicrobials by small-animal clinicians in the UK appears to occur. Antimicrobial use guidelines are rare in small animal practice. The introduction of such guidelines has been shown to lead to more appropriate use of antimicrobials and is therefore recommended. PMID:22225772

  9. "Teamwork" or "Working as a Team"? The Theory and Practice of Top Team Working in UK Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodfield, Steve; Kennie, Tom

    2008-01-01

    This article focuses on the theory and practice of teamwork in "top management teams" in UK higher education institutions. It is informed by some of the key findings from a recent two-year research project sponsored by the Leadership Foundation for Higher Education that investigated the different ways in which UK higher education institutions…

  10. How Advertising History Helps Explain Current Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanfranco, Leonard W.

    Students majoring in advertising can benefit from a study of that field in its historical context because such study helps them to understand current practices and to foresee future developments. One model of teaching advertising history within a required course about advertising and society begins with some basic definitions of the advertising…

  11. CURRENT PRACTICES IN QSAR DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current Practices in QSAR Development and Applications

    Although it is commonly assumed that the structure and properties of a single chemical determines its activity in a particular biological system, it is only through study of how biological activity varies with changes...

  12. Current Practices in Resident Assistant Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Virginia Albaneso

    2016-01-01

    Developing resident assistant (RA) training is a challenge for most housing and residence life staff. Grounded in the author's doctoral research on the curricular design of RA training programs, this study summarizes current practices in three types of RA training programs--preservice training, in-service training, and academic courses--and…

  13. Teaching Math Online: Current Practices in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akdemir, Omur

    2011-01-01

    Changing nature of student population, developments in technology, and insufficient number of traditional universities have made online courses popular around the globe. This study was designed to investigate the current practices of teaching mathematics online in Turkish Universities through a qualitative inquiry. The snowball sampling method was…

  14. Thymomas: Review of Current Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Tomaszek, Sandra; Wigle, Dennis A.; Keshavjee, Shaf; Fischer, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Thymomas are the most common tumors of the mediastinum. The introduction of multimodality treatment strategies, as well as novel approaches to the diagnosis of these tumors, has led to changes in the clinical management of thymomas. Here we review the literature for current clinical practice in the diagnosis, management, and treatment of thymomas. PMID:19463649

  15. Sedation at the end of life: a hospice's decision-making practices in the UK.

    PubMed

    Dean, Antonia; Miller, Barbara; Woodwork, Catherine

    2014-10-01

    The administration of sedative drugs at the end of life raises both clinical and ethical challenges. This article details the evolution of sedation decision-making practices at a 14-bedded UK hospice over the course of 5 years through an initial review and two follow-up audits. Key areas, such as documented consideration of hydration status and discussion with family members, have been improved following the implementation of a checklist of decision-making prompts, demonstrating how practice can be improved and sustained over time. PMID:25350213

  16. Percutaneous coronary intervention in the UK: recommendations for good practice 2015

    PubMed Central

    Banning, Adrian P; Baumbach, Andreas; Blackman, Dan; Curzen, Nick; Devadathan, Sen; Fraser, Douglas; Ludman, Peter; Norell, Micheal; Muir, Dougie; Nolan, James; Redwood, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 35 years, there has been dramatic progress in the technology and applicability of percutaneous techniques to treat obstructive coronary heart disease. Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has a considerable evidence base and it is firmly established as the most common procedure used in the invasive treatment of patients with coronary heart disease in the UK. This set of guidelines aims to address specifically issues relating to PCI and not the growing subspecialty of structural heart disease intervention. It is not intended to provide a review of the entire evidence base for coronary intervention. The evidence base relating to PCI is extensively reviewed in international guidelines and the British Cardiovascular Intervention society endorses these guidelines and their updates. The guidelines presented here focus on issues pertinent to practice within the UK and set out a recommended template to ensure optimal delivery of patient care. PMID:26041756

  17. Drugs to support smoking cessation in UK general practice: are evidence based guidelines being followed?

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, A; Sinfield, P; Rodgers, S; Hammersley, V; Coleman, T

    2006-01-01

    Background Prescribing drugs to support smoking cessation is one of the most cost effective interventions in primary care, but there is evidence they are underused. Little is known about how far guidelines have been adopted. Aims To examine the context in which nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) and bupropion are prescribed in UK general practice and whether guidelines are being followed. Design Patient questionnaire survey. Setting Twenty five general practices from the Trent Focus Collaborative Research Network in South Yorkshire and East Midlands, UK. Methods Participating practices posted a questionnaire to up to 40 patients prescribed NRT and bupropion respectively in the previous 3–9 months. Results The response rate for people prescribed NRT was 44.7% (323/723) and for bupropion 42.5% (77/181). Patients reported initiating the prescription request in 258 cases (65%), whereas GPs were reported as suggesting it in 49 (12%), smoking cessation services (SCS) in 38 (10%), and practice nurses in 36 (9%). Of those who could recall the content of the consultation in which NRT or bupropion was prescribed, 191 (79%) reported receiving advice on treatment use and 209 (68%) were encouraged to set a quit date. Follow up by SCS was recommended to 186 (64%) and practice follow up was offered to 212 (63%), but 41 (15%) reported no offer of follow up support. Conclusions The majority of patients reported receiving advice and follow up in line with guidelines. However, relatively few prescriptions were suggested by GPs or practice nurses and, in a significant minority of cases, neither follow up by the practice nor additional support from SCS was recommended. More active implementation of guidelines could increase the impact of general practice on the prevalence of smoking. PMID:16885254

  18. Current loop signal conditioning: Practical applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Karl F.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a variety of practical application circuits based on the current loop signal conditioning paradigm. Equations defining the circuit response are also provided. The constant current loop is a fundamental signal conditioning circuit concept that can be implemented in a variety of configurations for resistance-based transducers, such as strain gages and resistance temperature detectors. The circuit features signal conditioning outputs which are unaffected by extremely large variations in lead wire resistance, direct current frequency response, and inherent linearity with respect to resistance change. Sensitivity of this circuit is double that of a Wheatstone bridge circuit. Electrical output is zero for resistance change equals zero. The same excitation and output sense wires can serve multiple transducers. More application arrangements are possible with constant current loop signal conditioning than with the Wheatstone bridge.

  19. Short QT Syndrome in Current Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Khera, Sahil; Jacobson, Jason T

    2016-01-01

    Short QT syndrome is a rare inherited autosomal dominant cardiac channelopathy associated with malignant ventricular and atrial arrhythmias. A shortened corrected QT interval is a marker for risk of malignant arrhythmias, which are secondary to increased transmural dispersion of repolarization. The underlying gain of function mutations in the potassium channels are most common but genetic testing remains low yield. This review discusses the cellular mechanisms, genetic involvement, clinical presentation, and current recommended management of patients with short QT syndrome relevant to current clinical practice. PMID:26440650

  20. Investigation into the dosage form attributes of currently UK licensed cardiovascular and Parkinson's disease drug products.

    PubMed

    Hanning, S M; Muhamed, J; Orlu-Gul, M

    2015-02-01

    Globally, there is a continuous rise in the older population (over 65 years), particularly in developed countries. As many diseases are age-related, older adults represent a highly heterogeneous cohort. This presents a major challenge for both the pharmaceutical industry and healthcare professionals. The purpose of this research was to attract attention towards the appropriateness of geriatric formulations by investigating the dosage form attributes of currently UK licensed cardiovascular and Parkinson's disease drug products. Medication available in the UK for cardiovascular disorders and Parkinson's disease were screened and the available formulations, packaging and patient information leaflets of these medicines were analysed, with the goal of raising awareness of the need to cater for elderly patients with increasing difficulty in managing their medication. It emerged that although cardiovascular disorders and Parkinson's disease are more prevalent in older people, many treatment options have not been optimised for this cohort. In particular, older patient centred dosage forms, specific dosing requirements, excipients, patient-friendly packaging and easy-to-follow patient information were highlighted as areas to be considered in order to optimise health outcomes in the ageing population. PMID:25556052

  1. Training in clinical forensic medicine in the UK--perceptions of current regulatory standards.

    PubMed

    Stark, Margaret M; Norfolk, Guy A

    2011-08-01

    As clinical forensic medicine (CFM) is not currently recognised as a speciality in the UK there are no nationally agreed mandatory standards for training forensic physicians in either general forensic (GFM) or sexual offence medicine (SOM). The General Medical Council (GMC), the medical regulator in the UK, has issued clear standards for training in all specialities recommending that "trainees must be supported to acquire the necessary skills and experience through induction, effective educational supervision, an appropriate workload and time to learn". In order to evaluate the current situation in the field of clinical forensic medicine, doctors who have recently (within the last two years) started working in the field "trainees" (n = 38), and trainers (n = 61) with responsibility for clinical and educational supervision of new trainees, were surveyed by questionnaire to gather their perceptions of how the relevant GMC standards are being met in initial on-the-job training. Telephone interviews were performed with eleven doctors working as clinical or medical directors to determine their views. It is clear that currently the quality of training in CFM is sub-standard and inconsistent and that the published standards, as to the minimum requirement for training that must be met by post-graduate medical and training providers at all levels, are not being met. The Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine (FFLM) needs to set explicit minimum standards which will comply with the regulator and work to pilot credentialing for forensic physicians. A number of recommendations are made for urgent FFLM development. PMID:21771557

  2. The Current Use of Online Services in U.K. Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Allan; Akeroyd, John

    This update of a survey taken by the authors in April 1978 on the use of online services in British academic libraries (Online Review; v3 n2 p195-204 1979) concentrates on the following areas: (1) general pattern of use; (2) current arguments for charging users for online services; (3) current academic library practice on charging; (4) specific…

  3. Assessing governance theory and practice in health-care organizations: a survey of UK hospices.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Naomi; Benson, Lawrence; Boyd, Alan; Girling, Jeff

    2012-05-01

    This paper sets out a theoretical framework for analyzing board governance, and describes an empirical study of corporate governance practices in a subset of non-profit organizations (hospices in the UK). It examines how practices in hospice governance compare with what is known about effective board working. We found that key strengths of hospice boards included a strong focus on the mission and the finances of the organizations, and common weaknesses included a lack of involvement in strategic matters and a lack of confidence, and some nervousness about challenging the organization on the quality of clinical care. Finally, the paper offers suggestions for theoretical development particularly in relation to board governance in non-profit organizations. It develops an engagement theory for boards which comprises a triadic proposition of high challenge, high support and strong grip. PMID:22673698

  4. A practical guide to attaining research ethics approval in the U.K.

    PubMed

    Tod, Angela Mary; Allmark, Peter; Alison, Althea

    This article examines the permissions and approvals required for nurses and other health professionals to conduct research in the NHS in the U.K. today. A fictitious example of a research study conducted by a nurse who did not obtain NHS research ethics committee (REC) approval is provided. The current position regarding the REC approval process, including the role of ethics in research governance, is explored. The differences between research, audit and service evaluation are explained. Finally, the main ethical issues to be addressed in an application for REC approval are summarised. PMID:19323124

  5. Current management of male‐to‐female gender identity disorder in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Tugnet, Nicola; Goddard, Jonathan Charles; Vickery, Richard M; Khoosal, Deenesh; Terry, Tim R

    2007-01-01

    Gender identity disorder (GID), or transsexualism as it is more commonly known, is a highly complex clinical entity. Although the exact aetiology of GID is unknown, several environmental, genetic and anatomical theories have been described. The diagnosis of GID can be a difficult process but is established currently using standards of care as defined by the Harry Benjamin International Gender Dysphoria Association. Patients go through extensive psychiatric assessment, including the Real Life Experience, which entails living in the desired gender role 24 h a day for a minimum period of 12 months. The majority of GID patients will eventually go on to have gender realignment surgery, which includes feminising genitoplasty. The clinical features, diagnostic approach and management of male‐to‐female GID in the UK are reviewed, including the behavioural, psychological and surgical aspects. PMID:17916872

  6. Qualitative study of factors associated with antimicrobial usage in seven small animal veterinary practices in the UK.

    PubMed

    Mateus, Ana L P; Brodbelt, David C; Barber, Nick; Stärk, Katharina D C

    2014-11-01

    Responsible use of antimicrobials by veterinarians is essential to contain antimicrobial resistance in pathogens relevant to public health. Inappropriate antimicrobial use has been previously described in practice. However, there is scarce information on factors influencing antimicrobial usage in dogs and cats. We investigated intrinsic and extrinsic factors influencing decision-making of antimicrobial usage in first opinion small animal practices in the UK through the application of qualitative research methods. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 veterinarians from seven veterinary first opinion practices in the UK in 2010. Topics investigated included: a) criteria used for selection of antimicrobials, b) influences by colleagues, c) influences by clients, d) pet characteristics, e) sources of knowledge, f) awareness of guidelines and g) protocols implemented in practice that may affect antimicrobial usage by veterinarians. Hypothetical scenarios selected to assess appropriateness of antimicrobial usage were: a) vomiting in a Yorkshire Terrier due to dietary indiscretion, b) deep pyoderma in a Shar-Pei, c) Feline Lower Urinary Tract disease in an 7 year-old male neutered cat and d) neutering of a 6-months dog. Interviews were recorded and transcribed by the interviewer. Thematic analysis was used to analyse content of transcribed interviews. Data management and analysis was conducted with qualitative analysis software NVivo8 (QSR International Pty Ltd). Antimicrobial usage by participants was influenced by factors other than clinical evidence and scientific knowledge. Intrinsic factors included veterinarian's preference of substances and previous experience. Extrinsic factors influencing antimicrobial selection were; perceived efficacy, ease of administration of formulations, perceived compliance, willingness and ability to treat by pet owners, and animal characteristics. Cost of therapy was only perceived as an influential factor in low, mixed

  7. Recording and treatment of premenstrual syndrome in UK general practice: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Sammon, Cormac J; Nazareth, Irwin; Petersen, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the rate of recording of premenstrual syndrome diagnoses in UK primary care and describe pharmacological treatments initiated following a premenstrual syndrome (PMS) diagnosis. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting UK primary care. Participants Women registered with a practice contributing to The Health Improvement Network primary care database between 1995 and 2013. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome was the rate of first premenstrual syndrome records per 1000 person years, stratified by calendar year and age. The secondary outcome was the proportions of women with a premenstrual syndrome record prescribed a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, progestogen, oestrogen, combined oral contraceptive, progestin only contraceptive, gonadotrophin-releasing hormone, danazol and vitamin B6. Results The rate of recording of premenstrual syndrome diagnoses decreased over calendar time from 8.43 in 1995 to 1.72 in 2013. Of the 38 614 women without treatment in the 6 months prior to diagnosis, 54% received a potentially premenstrual syndrome-related prescription on the day of their first PMS record while 77% received a prescription in the 24 months after. Between 1995 and 1999, the majority of women were prescribed progestogens (23%) or vitamin B6 (20%) on the day of their first PMS record; after 1999, these figures fell to 3% for progestogen and vitamin B6 with the majority of women instead being prescribed a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (28%) or combined oral contraceptive (17%). Conclusions Recording of premenstrual syndrome diagnoses in UK primary care has declined substantially over time and preferred prescription treatment has changed from progestogen to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and combined oral contraceptives. PMID:26993623

  8. Aphasia: Current Concepts in Theory and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Tippett, Donna C.; Niparko, John K.; Hillis, Argye E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging contribute to a new insights regarding brain-behavior relationships and expand understanding of the functional neuroanatomy of language. Modern concepts of the functional neuroanatomy of language invoke rich and complex models of language comprehension and expression, such as dual stream networks. Increasingly, aphasia is seen as a disruption of cognitive processes underlying language. Rehabilitation of aphasia incorporates evidence based and person-centered approaches. Novel techniques, such as methods of delivering cortical brain stimulation to modulate cortical excitability, such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation, are just beginning to be explored. In this review, we discuss the historical context of the foundations of neuroscientific approaches to language. We sample the emergent theoretical models of the neural substrates of language and cognitive processes underlying aphasia that contribute to more refined and nuanced concepts of language. Current concepts of aphasia rehabilitation are reviewed, including the promising role of cortical stimulation as an adjunct to behavioral therapy and changes in therapeutic approaches based on principles of neuroplasticity and evidence-based/person-centered practice to optimize functional outcomes. PMID:24904925

  9. Current CFD Practices in Launch Vehicle Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, Dochan; Kiris, Cetin

    2012-01-01

    The quest for sustained space exploration will require the development of advanced launch vehicles, and efficient and reliable operating systems. Development of launch vehicles via test-fail-fix approach is very expensive and time consuming. For decision making, modeling and simulation (M&S) has played increasingly important roles in many aspects of launch vehicle development. It is therefore essential to develop and maintain most advanced M&S capability. More specifically computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been providing critical data for developing launch vehicles complementing expensive testing. During the past three decades CFD capability has increased remarkably along with advances in computer hardware and computing technology. However, most of the fundamental CFD capability in launch vehicle applications is derived from the past advances. Specific gaps in the solution procedures are being filled primarily through "piggy backed" efforts.on various projects while solving today's problems. Therefore, some of the advanced capabilities are not readily available for various new tasks, and mission-support problems are often analyzed using ad hoc approaches. The current report is intended to present our view on state-of-the-art (SOA) in CFD and its shortcomings in support of space transport vehicle development. Best practices in solving current issues will be discussed using examples from ascending launch vehicles. Some of the pacing will be discussed in conjunction with these examples.

  10. Slaying the dragon myth: an ethnographic study of receptionists in UK general practice

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Jonathan; Gravenhorst, Katja; Funnell, Emma; Beatty, Susan; Hibbert, Derek; Lamb, Jonathan; Burroughs, Heather; Kovandžić, Marija; Gabbay, Mark; Dowrick, Christopher; Gask, Linda; Waheed, Waquas; Chew-Graham, Carolyn A

    2013-01-01

    Background General practice receptionists fulfil an essential role in UK primary care, shaping patient access to health professionals. They are often portrayed as powerful ‘gatekeepers’. Existing literature and management initiatives advocate more training to improve their performance and, consequently, the patient experience. Aim To explore the complexity of the role of general practice receptionists by considering the wider practice context in which they work. Design and setting Ethnographic observation in seven urban general practices in the north-west of England. Method Seven researchers conducted 200 hours of ethnographic observation, predominantly in the reception areas of each practice. Forty-five receptionists were involved in the study and were asked about their work as they carried out their activities. Observational notes were taken. Analysis involved ascribing codes to incidents considered relevant to the role and organising these into related clusters. Results Receptionists were faced with the difficult task of prioritising patients, despite having little time, information, and training. They felt responsible for protecting those patients who were most vulnerable, however this was sometimes made difficult by protocols set by the GPs and by patients trying to ‘play’ the system. Conclusion Framing the receptionist–patient encounter as one between the ‘powerful’ and the ‘vulnerable’ gets in the way of fully understanding the complex tasks receptionists perform and the contradictions that are inherent in their role. Calls for more training, without reflective attention to practice dynamics, risk failing to address systemic problems, portraying them instead as individual failings. PMID:23561784

  11. Human resource management in general practice: survey of current practice.

    PubMed Central

    Newton, J; Hunt, J; Stirling, J

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The organization and management of general practice is changing as a result of government policies designed to expand primary health care services. One aspect of practice management which has been underresearched concerns staffing: the recruitment, retention, management and motivation of practice managers. AIM: A study set out to find out who is routinely involved in making decisions about staffing matters in general practice, to establish the extent to which the human resource management function is formalized and specialized, and to describe the characteristics of the practice managers. METHOD: A postal questionnaire was sent to a stratified random sample of 750 general practices in England and Wales in February 1994 enquiring about the practice (for example, the fundholding status and number of general practitioner partners), how the practice dealt with a range of staffing matters and about the practice manager (for example, employment background and training in human resource management). Practices were classed as small (single-handed and two or three general practitioner partners), medium (four or five partners) or large (six or more partners). RESULTS: Replies were received from 477 practices (64%). Practice managers had limited authority to make decisions alone in the majority of practices although there was a greater likelihood of them taking independent action as the size of practice increased. Formality in handling staffing matters (as measured by the existence and use of written policies and procedures) also increased with practice size. Larger practices were more likely than smaller practices to have additional tiers in their management structure through the creation of posts with the titles assistant practice manager, fund manager and senior receptionist. Most practice managers had been recruited from within general practice but larger practices were more likely than smaller practices to recruit from outwith general practice. Three quarters

  12. Module Technology: Current Practice and Issues (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlgemuth, J.

    2010-10-05

    PV modules must provide mechanical support for the cells, protect the world from the voltages inside, protect the cells, diodes and interconnects from the weather outside, couple as much light as possible into the PV cells and minimize the temperature increase of the cells. The package must continue to serve these functions for at least 25 years as that is the typical module warranty period today. Furthermore the package must do all this for as low a cost as possible since the key to large scale PV growth is a reduction in cost while retaining excellent module reliability and durability. This paper will review current module construction practices for both crystalline silicon and thin film PV with emphasis on explaining why the present designs and materials have been selected. Possible long term issues with today's designs and materials will be discussed. Several proposed solutions to these issues will be presented, highlighting the research efforts that will be necessary in order to verify that they can cost effectively solve the identified issues.

  13. Variation in assessment and standard setting practices across UK undergraduate medicine and the need for a benchmark

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The principal aim of this study is to provide an account of variation in UK undergraduate medical assessment styles and corresponding standard setting approaches with a view to highlighting the importance of a UK national licensing exam in recognizing a common standard. Methods Using a secure online survey system, response data were collected during the period 13 - 30 January 2014 from selected specialists in medical education assessment, who served as representatives for their respective medical schools. Results Assessment styles and corresponding choices of standard setting methods vary markedly across UK medical schools. While there is considerable consensus on the application of compensatory approaches, individual schools display their own nuances through use of hybrid assessment and standard setting styles, uptake of less popular standard setting techniques and divided views on norm referencing. Conclusions The extent of variation in assessment and standard setting practices across UK medical schools validates the concern that there is a lack of evidence that UK medical students achieve a common standard on graduation. A national licensing exam is therefore a viable option for benchmarking the performance of all UK undergraduate medical students. PMID:26520472

  14. 21 CFR 1271.150 - Current good tissue practice requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Current good tissue practice requirements. 1271... HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Current Good Tissue Practice § 1271.150 Current good tissue practice requirements. (a) General. This subpart D and subpart C of this part...

  15. 21 CFR 226.1 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 226.1 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR TYPE A MEDICATED ARTICLES General Provisions § 226.1 Current good manufacturing practice. (a) The criteria in §§ 226.10 through 226.115,...

  16. 21 CFR 1271.150 - Current good tissue practice requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Current good tissue practice requirements. 1271... HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Current Good Tissue Practice § 1271.150 Current good tissue practice requirements. (a) General. This subpart D and subpart C of this part...

  17. 21 CFR 226.1 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 226.1 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR TYPE A MEDICATED ARTICLES General Provisions § 226.1 Current good manufacturing practice. (a) The criteria in §§ 226.10 through 226.115,...

  18. 21 CFR 226.1 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 226.1 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR TYPE A MEDICATED ARTICLES General Provisions § 226.1 Current good manufacturing practice. (a) The criteria in §§ 226.10 through 226.115,...

  19. 21 CFR 225.1 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 225.1 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS General Provisions § 225.1 Current good manufacturing practice. (a) Section 501(a)(2)(B) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  20. 21 CFR 225.1 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 225.1 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS General Provisions § 225.1 Current good manufacturing practice. (a) Section 501(a)(2)(B) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  1. 21 CFR 110.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 110.5 Section...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PACKING, OR HOLDING HUMAN FOOD General Provisions § 110.5 Current good manufacturing practice. (a) The criteria...

  2. 21 CFR 1271.150 - Current good tissue practice requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Current good tissue practice requirements. 1271... HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Current Good Tissue Practice § 1271.150 Current good tissue practice requirements. (a) General. This subpart D and subpart C of this part...

  3. 21 CFR 110.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 110.5 Section...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PACKING, OR HOLDING HUMAN FOOD General Provisions § 110.5 Current good manufacturing practice. (a) The criteria...

  4. 21 CFR 1271.150 - Current good tissue practice requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good tissue practice requirements. 1271... HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Current Good Tissue Practice § 1271.150 Current good tissue practice requirements. (a) General. This subpart D and subpart C of this part...

  5. 21 CFR 1271.150 - Current good tissue practice requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Current good tissue practice requirements. 1271... HUMAN CELLS, TISSUES, AND CELLULAR AND TISSUE-BASED PRODUCTS Current Good Tissue Practice § 1271.150 Current good tissue practice requirements. (a) General. This subpart D and subpart C of this part...

  6. 21 CFR 226.1 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 226.1 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR TYPE A MEDICATED ARTICLES General Provisions § 226.1 Current good manufacturing practice. (a) The criteria in §§ 226.10 through 226.115,...

  7. 21 CFR 110.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 110.5 Section...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PACKING, OR HOLDING HUMAN FOOD General Provisions § 110.5 Current good manufacturing practice. (a) The criteria...

  8. 21 CFR 110.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 110.5 Section...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PACKING, OR HOLDING HUMAN FOOD General Provisions § 110.5 Current good manufacturing practice. (a) The criteria...

  9. 21 CFR 110.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 110.5 Section...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE IN MANUFACTURING, PACKING, OR HOLDING HUMAN FOOD General Provisions § 110.5 Current good manufacturing practice. (a) The criteria...

  10. 21 CFR 225.1 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 225.1 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS General Provisions § 225.1 Current good manufacturing practice. (a) Section 501(a)(2)(B) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  11. 21 CFR 225.1 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 225.1 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS General Provisions § 225.1 Current good manufacturing practice. (a) Section 501(a)(2)(B) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  12. 21 CFR 226.1 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 226.1 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR TYPE A MEDICATED ARTICLES General Provisions § 226.1 Current good manufacturing practice. (a) The criteria in §§ 226.10 through 226.115,...

  13. 21 CFR 225.1 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 225.1 Section...) DRUGS: GENERAL CURRENT GOOD MANUFACTURING PRACTICE FOR MEDICATED FEEDS General Provisions § 225.1 Current good manufacturing practice. (a) Section 501(a)(2)(B) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic...

  14. Globalisation and Education: A Review of Conflicting Perspectives and their Effect on Policy and Professional Practice in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Many disparate groups have written about the effects of globalisation on education. Some have promoted its benefits; others have warned against its ill-effects. This paper is an attempt at coalescing and juxtaposing the respective arguments as they relate to schooling policy and practice in the UK. The growing international pressures of…

  15. The current epidemiology of pertussis in the developed world: UK and West Germany.

    PubMed

    Miller, E; Farrington, C P

    1988-01-01

    The existence of well established national reporting systems for monitoring pertussis incidence and vaccine uptake in the United Kingdom has allowed the epidemiology of whooping cough and the impact of vaccination to be studied in detail. The increase in pertussis morbidity that followed the decline in vaccine uptake in recent years confirms the continuing need for mass vaccination in a developed country. There is also evidence that pertussis may be responsible for many more deaths than official mortality statistics show. A national study of vaccine efficacy demonstrated over 80% protection against clinical disease during the first 5 years after vaccination. However, there is evidence that the current whole cell vaccine may protect less well against infection with agglutinogen serotype 3 than type 2 organisms which supports the view that both these antigens should be included in acellular vaccines to achieve good protection. In West Germany, unlike the UK, there are no national statistics on pertussis incidence, no national vaccination policy and no figures for vaccine uptake. Local studies have shown that vaccination rates are low and that pertussis is prevalent, particularly in the 2-4 year age-group, which is typical of a country with low uptake; similarly serotype 2 predominates. PMID:3273623

  16. Myasthenia in pregnancy: best practice guidelines from a U.K. multispecialty working group.

    PubMed

    Norwood, Fiona; Dhanjal, Mandish; Hill, Marguerite; James, Natalie; Jungbluth, Heinz; Kyle, Pippa; O'Sullivan, Geraldine; Palace, Jacqueline; Robb, Stephanie; Williamson, Catherine; Hilton-Jones, David; Nelson-Piercy, Catherine

    2014-05-01

    A national U.K. workshop to discuss practical clinical management issues related to pregnancy in women with myasthenia gravis was held in May 2011. The purpose was to develop recommendations to guide general neurologists and obstetricians and facilitate best practice before, during and after pregnancy. The main conclusions were (1) planning should be instituted well in advance of any potential pregnancy to allow time for myasthenic status and drug optimisation; (2) multidisciplinary liaison through the involvement of relevant specialists should occur throughout pregnancy, during delivery and in the neonatal period; (3) provided that their myasthenia is under good control before pregnancy, the majority of women can be reassured that it will remain stable throughout pregnancy and the postpartum months; (4) spontaneous vaginal delivery should be the aim and actively encouraged; (5) those with severe myasthenic weakness need careful, multidisciplinary management with prompt access to specialist advice and facilities; (6) newborn babies born to myasthenic mothers are at risk of transient myasthenic weakness, even if the mother's myasthenia is well-controlled, and should have rapid access to neonatal high-dependency support. PMID:23757420

  17. Receptionist input to quality and safety in repeat prescribing in UK general practice: ethnographic case study

    PubMed Central

    Greenhalgh, Trisha; Russell, Jill; Myall, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe, explore, and compare organisational routines for repeat prescribing in general practice to identify contributors and barriers to safety and quality. Design Ethnographic case study. Setting Four urban UK general practices with diverse organisational characteristics using electronic patient records that supported semi-automation of repeat prescribing. Participants 395 hours of ethnographic observation of staff (25 doctors, 16 nurses, 4 healthcare assistants, 6 managers, and 56 reception or administrative staff), and 28 documents and other artefacts relating to repeat prescribing locally and nationally. Main outcome measures Potential threats to patient safety and characteristics of good practice. Methods Observation of how doctors, receptionists, and other administrative staff contributed to, and collaborated on, the repeat prescribing routine. Analysis included mapping prescribing routines, building a rich description of organisational practices, and drawing these together through narrative synthesis. This was informed by a sociological model of how organisational routines shape and are shaped by information and communications technologies. Results Repeat prescribing was a complex, technology-supported social practice requiring collaboration between clinical and administrative staff, with important implications for patient safety. More than half of requests for repeat prescriptions were classed as “exceptions” by receptionists (most commonly because the drug, dose, or timing differed from what was on the electronic repeat list). They managed these exceptions by making situated judgments that enabled them (sometimes but not always) to bridge the gap between the idealised assumptions about tasks, roles, and interactions that were built into the electronic patient record and formal protocols, and the actual repeat prescribing routine as it played out in practice. This work was creative and demanded both explicit and tacit knowledge

  18. Current management practices and interventions prioritised as part of a nationwide mastitis control plan

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, A. J.; Breen, J. E.; Hudson, C. D.; Green, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to report performance and management data taken from a sample of UK dairy farms that have participated in the Agriculture and Horticulture Development Board Dairy Mastitis Control Plan (DMCP) and to identify important mastitis prevention practices that are not currently widely implemented. A total of 234 UK dairy herds were included in the study from which farm management and udder health data were collected. Herds were grouped according to their mastitis epidemiology and could be classed as (i) environmental dry period (EDP) (i.e. environmental pathogen with majority of infections being acquired during the dry period), (ii) environmental lactation (EL), (iii) contagious dry period (CDP) or (iv) contagious lactation (CL). The results of this study showed that many mastitis-related management practices that are generally considered to be important were not widely performed. A better understanding of those practices not widely adopted by UK dairy farmers at present may aid practitioners in identifying and overcoming potential barriers to improved mastitis control. PMID:26966249

  19. Distribution of natural disturbance due to wave and tidal bed currents around the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bricheno, Lucy M.; Wolf, Judith; Aldridge, John

    2015-10-01

    The UK continental shelf experiences large tidal ranges and winter storm events, which can both generate strong near-bed currents. The regular tidal bottom currents from tides plus wind driven 'benthic storms' (dominated by wave-driven oscillatory currents in shallow water) are a major source of disturbance to benthic communities, particularly in shallow waters. We aim to identify and map the relative impact of the tides and storm events on the shallower parts of the North West European continental shelf. A 10-year simulation of waves, tides and surges on the continental shelf was performed. The shelf model was validated against current meter observations and the Centre for Environmental, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science (CEFAS) network of SmartBuoys. Next, the model performance was assessed against seabed lander data from two sites in the Southern North Sea; one in deep water and another shallow water site at Sea Palling, and a third in Liverpool Bay. Both waves and currents are well simulated at the offshore Southern North Sea site. A large storm event was also well captured, though the model tends to underpredict bottom orbital velocity. Poorer results were achieved at the Sea Palling site, thought to be due to an overly deep model water depth, and missing wave-current interactions. In Liverpool Bay tides were well modelled and good correlations (average R2=0.89) are observed for significant wave height, with acceptable values (average R2=0.79) for bottom orbital velocity. Using the full 10-year dataset, return periods can be calculated for extreme waves and currents. Mapping these return periods presents a spatial picture of extreme bed disturbance, highlighting the importance of rare wave disturbances (e.g. with a return period of 1 in 10 years). Annual maximum currents change little in their magnitude and distribution from year to year, with mean speeds around 0.04 m s-1, and maximums exceeding 3 m s-1. Wave conditions however are widely variable throughout

  20. Preparticipation medical evaluation in professional sport in the UK: theory or practice?

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, C W; Ojelade, E O; Taylor, A

    2007-01-01

    Objective To determine the level of pre‐employment, pre‐season, and post‐injury medical evaluation of players undertaken within UK professional team sports. Design A postal, whole population survey. Setting Elite professional sports teams in England. Population Six groups comprising the following clubs: professional football (Premiership, 15 of 20; Championship, 22 of 24), rugby union (Premiership, 9 of 12; Division 1, 11 of 14), rugby league (Super League, 6 of 11) and cricket (County, 12 of 18). Main outcome measures Number (percentage) of clubs recording players' medical history and undertaking medical examinations of players' cardiovascular, respiratory, neurological, and musculoskeletal systems at pre‐employment, pre‐season and post‐injury. Results The overall response to the survey was 74%, with a range from 55% to 92% among groups. Almost 90% of football (Premiership and Championship) and rugby union (Premiership) clubs took a pre‐employment history of players' general health, cardiovascular, respiratory, neurological, and musculoskeletal systems, but fewer than 50% of cricket and rugby union (Division 1) clubs recorded a history. The majority of football (Premiership and Championship) and rugby union (Premiership) clubs implemented both cardiovascular and musculoskeletal examinations of players before employment. Fewer than 25% of clubs in any of the groups implemented neurological examinations of players at pre‐employment, although 100% of rugby union (Premiership) and rugby league clubs implemented neurological testing during pre‐season. Conclusions None of the sports implemented best practice guidelines for the preparticipation evaluation of players at all stages of their employment. Departures from best practice guidelines and differences in practices between clubs within the same sport leave club physicians vulnerable if their players sustain injuries or ill health conditions that could have been identified and avoided through the

  1. 21 CFR 129.1 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 129.1 Section... Current good manufacturing practice. The applicable criteria in part 110 of this chapter, as well as the... manufacturing practice to assure that bottled drinking water is safe and that it has been processed,...

  2. Evaluation of a novel compule-based gingival retraction system in UK general dental practices.

    PubMed

    Burke, F J Trevor; Crisp, Russell John

    2014-06-01

    Twelve members were selected at random from the PREP panel, a group of UK-based dentists who are prepared to carry out research in their practices. A questionnaire was designed to determine the views of the participants, who were asked to use the retraction paste capsules where clinically indicated. They were asked to return the questionnaire after 8 weeks and the information contained therein was collated and presented mainly on visual analogue scales (VAS). A total of 160 impressions were taken using the Astringent Retraction Paste (3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) plus use in the placement of 25 restorations. Of evaluators, 83% (n = 10) agreed that Astringent Retraction Paste was a suitable product for gingival retraction and 75% (n = 9) agreed that it had good haemostatic properties. Overall dispensing and handling of the paste was rated as 4.9 on a VAS scale where 1 = Inconvenient and 5 = Convenient. The viscosity of the paste was rated as 3.6 on a VAS where 1 = too thin and 5 = too thick. Good scores were achieved across all criteria for the product. Clinical Relevance: Practitioners may wish to be aware of a novel compule-based gingival retraction system. PMID:25073225

  3. 'Personal Care' and General Practice Medicine in the UK: A qualitative interview study with patients and General Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    Background Recent policy and organisational changes within UK primary care have emphasised graduated access to care, speed of access to the first available general practitioner (GP) and care being provided by a range of healthcare professionals. These trends have been strengthened by the current GP contract and Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF). Concern has been expressed that the potential for personal care is being diminished as a result and that this will reduce quality standards. This paper presents data from a study that explored with patients and GPs what personal care means and whether it has continuing importance to them. Methods A semi-structured questionnaire was used to interview participants and Framework Analysis supported analysis of emerging themes. Twenty-nine patients, mainly women with young children, and twenty-three GPs were interviewed from seven practices in Lothian, Scotland, ranged by practice size and relative deprivation score. Results and Discussion Personal care was defined mainly, though not exclusively, as care given within the context of a continuing relationship in which there is an interpersonal connection and the doctor adopts a particular consultation style. Defined in this way, it was reported to have benefits for both health outcomes and patients' experience of care. In particular, such care was thought to be beneficial in attending to the emotions that can be elicited when seeking and receiving health care and in enabling patients to be known by doctors as legitimate seekers of care from the health service. Its importance was described as being dependent upon the nature of the health problem and patients' wider familial and social circumstances. In particular, it was found to provide support to patients in their parenting and other familial caring roles. Conclusion Personal care has continuing salience to patients and GPs in modern primary care in the UK. Patients equate the experience of care, not just outcomes, with high

  4. Current Capabilities, Requirements and a Proposed Strategy for Interdependency Analysis in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, Robin; Chozos, Nick; Salako, Kizito

    The UK government recently commissioned a research study to identify the state-of-the-art in Critical Infrastructure modelling and analysis, and the government/industry requirements for such tools and services. This study (Cetifs) concluded with a strategy aiming to bridge the gaps between the capabilities and requirements, which would establish interdependency analysis as a commercially viable service in the near future. This paper presents the findings of this study that was carried out by CSR, City University London, Adelard LLP, a safety/security consultancy and Cranfield University, defense academy of the UK.

  5. Home Education: A Look at Current Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bliss, Barbara A.

    Described are practices of 70 home-schooling families who resided in southwestern lower Michigan in Fall, 1987. A literature review discusses: (1) philosophical roots of the home education movement; (2) concern for the socialization of home-educated children; (3) reasons why home-schooling is considered a good educational alternative; (4) state…

  6. Going E-Only: A Feasible Option in the Current UK Journals Marketplace?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Provides a case study of the acquisitions processes that were necessary when Cardiff University's School of Engineering made a decision to subscribe to electronic-only versions of journals where such subscriptions were less expensive than the print equivalent. In doing so, addresses issues of electronic subscriptions management in UK academic…

  7. Technology and Special Needs Provision in the UK: Is Current Law Satisfactory?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kariyawasam, Rohan

    2007-01-01

    Recently, the government has issued legislation on disability discrimination (the UK "Disability Discrimination Act" 2005) that is silent on the issue of access to technology for those adults and minors with special needs/disabilities either in the classroom or out of the classroom. At the same time, commercial legislation from Europe drives…

  8. Does current provision of undergraduate education prepare UK medical students in ENT? A systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Gary R; Bacila, Irina A; Swamy, Meenakshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To systematically identify and analyse all published literature relating to the provision of undergraduate education for preparedness in ear, nose and throat (ENT) surgery, as perceived by medical students and clinicians in the UK. Design Systematic literature review. Data sources 5 major databases were searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, ERIC, Cochrane and Web of Science. The literature search was conducted from February to April 2015. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Primary research or studies that report on the provision of undergraduate education for preparedness in ENT, from the perspective of medical students and clinicians in the UK. The timescale of searches was limited from 1999 onwards (ie, the past 15 years). Data extraction The literature search was conducted by 2 independent reviewers. Search terms used involved the combination and variation of 5 key concepts, namely: medical student, clinician, ENT, undergraduate medical education and UK. A data extraction form was designed for and used in this study, based on guidelines provided by the UK National Health Service (NHS) Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Textual narrative synthesis was used for data analysis. Results A total of 7 studies were included in the final review. 4 main themes were identified: confidence in managing patients, teaching delivery, student assessment and duration of rotations. A consistent finding in this review was that the majority of final year medical students and junior doctors did not feel adequately prepared to practise ENT. Important factors influencing preparedness in ENT included the duration of clinical rotations, the opportunity for hands-on learning and formal assessment. Conclusions The findings of this review suggest the need for further development of the ENT undergraduate curricula across the UK. However, there is insufficient evidence from which to draw strong conclusions; this in itself is beneficial as it highlights a gap in the existing

  9. Emergency laparoscopy – current best practice

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Oliver; Kinross, James; Paraskeva, Paraskevas; Darzi, Ara

    2006-01-01

    Emergency laparoscopic surgery allows both the evaluation of acute abdominal pain and the treatment of many common acute abdominal disorders. This review critically evaluates the current evidence base for the use of laparoscopy, both diagnostic and interventional, in the emergency abdomen, and provides guidance for surgeons as to current best practise. Laparoscopic surgery is firmly established as the best intervention in acute appendicitis, acute cholecystitis and most gynaecological emergencies but requires further randomised controlled trials to definitively establish its role in other conditions. PMID:16945124

  10. Impact of omalizumab on treatment of severe allergic asthma in UK clinical practice: a UK multicentre observational study (the APEX II study)

    PubMed Central

    Niven, Robert M; Saralaya, Dinesh; Chaudhuri, Rekha; Masoli, Matthew; Clifton, Ian; Mansur, Adel H; Hacking, Victoria; McLain-Smith, Susan; Menzies-Gow, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the impact of omalizumab on asthma management in patients treated as part of normal clinical practice in the UK National Health Service (NHS). Design A non-interventional, mixed methodology study, combining retrospective and prospective data collection for 12 months pre-omalizumab and post-omalizumab initiation, respectively. Setting Data were collected in 22 UK NHS centres, including specialist centres and district general hospitals in the UK. Participants 258 adult patients (aged ≥16 years; 65% women) with severe persistent allergic asthma treated with omalizumab were recruited, of whom 218 (84.5%) completed the study. Primary and secondary outcome measures The primary outcome measure was change in mean daily dose of oral corticosteroids (OCS) between the 12-month pre-omalizumab and post-omalizumab initiation periods. A priori secondary outcome measures included response to treatment, changes in OCS dosing, asthma exacerbations, lung function, employment/education, patient-reported outcomes and hospital resource utilisation. Results The response rate to omalizumab at 16 weeks was 82.4%. Comparing pre-omalizumab and post-omalizumab periods, the mean (95% CIs) daily dose of OCS decreased by 1.61 (−2.41 to −0.80) mg/patient/day (p<0.001) and hospital exacerbations decreased by 0.97 (−1.19 to −0.75) exacerbations/patient (p<0.001). Compared with baseline, lung function, assessed by percentage of forced expiratory volume in 1 s, improved by 4.5 (2.7 to 6.3)% at 16 weeks (p<0.001; maintained at 12 months) and patient quality of life (Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire) improved by 1.38 (1.18 to 1.58) points at 16 weeks (p<0.001, maintained at 12 months). 21/162 patients with complete employment data gained employment and 6 patients lost employment in the 12-month post-omalizumab period. The mean number of A&E visits, inpatient hospitalisations, outpatient visits (excluding for omalizumab) and number of bed days

  11. School travel mode, parenting practices and physical activity among UK Year 5 and 6 children

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background School travel mode and parenting practices have been associated with children’s physical activity (PA). The current study sought to examine whether PA parenting practices differ by school travel mode and whether school travel mode and PA parenting practices are associated with PA. Methods 469 children (aged 9-11) wore accelerometers from which mean weekday and after-school (3.30 to 8.30 pm) minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA) and counts per minute (CPM) were derived. Mode of travel to and from school (passive vs. active) and PA parenting practices (maternal and paternal logistic support and modelling behaviour) were child-reported. Results Children engaged in an average of 59.7 minutes of MVPA per weekday. Active travel to school by girls was associated with 5.9 more minutes of MVPA per day compared with those who travelled to school passively (p = 0.004). After-school CPM and MVPA did not differ by school travel mode. There was no evidence that physical activity parenting practices were associated with school travel mode. Conclusions For girls, encouraging active travel to school is likely to be important for overall PA. Further formative research may be warranted to understand how both parental logistic support and active travel decisions are operationalized in families as a means of understanding how to promote increased PA among pre-adolescent children. PMID:24739338

  12. Science: A Portrait of Current Practice in Scottish Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "Science: A portrait of current practice" is part of a series of portraits by Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education (HMIE) which builds on the messages of the "Improving Scottish Education" report. This portrait reviews the extent to which current practice in science is successfully promoting the four capacities of Curriculum for Excellence. The…

  13. 21 CFR 113.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 113.5 Section 113.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... CONTAINERS General Provisions § 113.5 Current good manufacturing practice. The criteria in §§ 113.10,...

  14. 21 CFR 113.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 113.5 Section 113.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... CONTAINERS General Provisions § 113.5 Current good manufacturing practice. The criteria in §§ 113.10,...

  15. 21 CFR 120.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 120.5 Section 120.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 120.5 Current good manufacturing practice. Part 110 of this chapter applies in...

  16. 21 CFR 120.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 120.5 Section 120.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 120.5 Current good manufacturing practice. Part 110 of this chapter applies in...

  17. 21 CFR 129.1 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 129.1 Section 129.1 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Current good manufacturing practice. The applicable criteria in part 110 of this chapter, as well as...

  18. 21 CFR 129.1 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 129.1 Section 129.1 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Current good manufacturing practice. The applicable criteria in part 110 of this chapter, as well as...

  19. 21 CFR 129.1 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 129.1 Section 129.1 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Current good manufacturing practice. The applicable criteria in part 110 of this chapter, as well as...

  20. 21 CFR 129.1 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 129.1 Section 129.1 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Current good manufacturing practice. The applicable criteria in part 110 of this chapter, as well as...

  1. 21 CFR 113.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 113.5 Section 113.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... CONTAINERS General Provisions § 113.5 Current good manufacturing practice. The criteria in §§ 113.10,...

  2. 21 CFR 120.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 120.5 Section 120.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 120.5 Current good manufacturing practice. Part 110 of this chapter applies in...

  3. 21 CFR 120.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 120.5 Section 120.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 120.5 Current good manufacturing practice. Part 110 of this chapter applies in...

  4. 21 CFR 113.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 113.5 Section 113.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... CONTAINERS General Provisions § 113.5 Current good manufacturing practice. The criteria in §§ 113.10,...

  5. Geography: A Portrait of Current Practice in Scottish Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "Geography--a portrait of current practice" in Scottish secondary schools is one of a developing series of publications by Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education (HMIE), designed to reflect current good practice in subjects and aspects of Scottish education and identify areas for further improvement. The portrait series is a new initiative by…

  6. Technical Education: A Portrait of Current Practice in Scottish Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    "Technical Education--a portrait of current practice" is one in a series of portraits by Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Education (HMIE), illustrating current practice in key aspects of the Scottish curriculum. The portrait series is a recent initiative by HMIE, flowing from the "Improving Scottish Education" (ISE) report. It is intended to promote…

  7. 21 CFR 123.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 123.5 Section...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FISH AND FISHERY PRODUCTS General Provisions § 123.5 Current good manufacturing practice. (a) Part 110 of this chapter applies in determining whether the facilities,...

  8. 21 CFR 120.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 120.5 Section 120.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 120.5 Current good manufacturing practice. Part 110 of this chapter applies in...

  9. 21 CFR 113.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 113.5 Section 113.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... CONTAINERS General Provisions § 113.5 Current good manufacturing practice. The criteria in §§ 113.10,...

  10. VOC Control: Current practices and future trends

    SciTech Connect

    Moretti, E.C.; Mukhopadhyay, N. )

    1993-07-01

    One of the most formidable challenges posed by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA) is the search for efficient and economical control strategies for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOCs are precursors to ground-level ozone, a major component in the formation of smog. Under the CAAA, thousands of currently unregulated sources will be required to reduce or eliminate VOC emissions. In addition, sources that are currently regulated may seek to evaluate alternative VOC control strategies to meet stricter regulatory requirements such as the maximum achievable control technology (MACT) requirements in Title III of the CAAA. Because of the increasing attention being given to VOC control, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers' (AIChE) Center for Waste Reduction Technologies (CWRT) initiated a study of VOC control technologies and regulatory initiatives. A key objective of the project was to identify and describe existing VOC control technologies and air regulations, as well as emerging technologies and forthcoming regulations. That work is the basis for this article.

  11. Assessment and management of the communication difficulties of children with cerebral palsy: a UK survey of SLT practice

    PubMed Central

    Mary Watson, Rose; Pennington, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    Background Communication difficulties are common in cerebral palsy (CP) and are frequently associated with motor, intellectual and sensory impairments. Speech and language therapy research comprises single-case experimental design and small group studies, limiting evidence-based intervention and possibly exacerbating variation in practice. Aims To describe the assessment and intervention practices of speech–language therapist (SLTs) in the UK in their management of communication difficulties associated with CP in childhood. Methods & Procedures An online survey of the assessments and interventions employed by UK SLTs working with children and young people with CP was conducted. The survey was publicized via NHS trusts, the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists (RCSLT) and private practice associations using a variety of social media. The survey was open from 5 December 2011 to 30 January 2012. Outcomes & Results Two hundred and sixty-five UK SLTs who worked with children and young people with CP in England (n = 199), Wales (n = 13), Scotland (n = 36) and Northern Ireland (n = 17) completed the survey. SLTs reported using a wide variety of published, standardized tests, but most commonly reported assessing oromotor function, speech, receptive and expressive language, and communication skills by observation or using assessment schedules they had developed themselves. The most highly prioritized areas for intervention were: dysphagia, alternative and augmentative (AAC)/interaction and receptive language. SLTs reported using a wide variety of techniques to address difficulties in speech, language and communication. Some interventions used have no supporting evidence. Many SLTs felt unable to estimate the hours of therapy per year children and young people with CP and communication disorders received from their service. Conclusions & Implications The assessment and management of communication difficulties associated with CP in childhood varies widely in the

  12. Medial thighplasty: Current concepts and practices.

    PubMed

    Bertheuil, N; Carloni, R; De Runz, A; Herlin, C; Girard, P; Watier, E; Chaput, B

    2016-02-01

    Medial thighplasty, also known as medial thigh lift, is a procedure that has been carried out for five decades. The original "Lewis" technique has undergone many changes, and thereby been rendered widely available to plastic surgeons. Given the increasingly high number of surgical reconstructions after massive weight loss, this technique is now an integral part of a surgeon's therapeutic arsenal as he strives to meet the evolving demands of patients. The objective of this article, which is based on a comprehensive review of the literature, is to summarize current knowledge on medial thighplasty and thereby allow plastic surgeons to adopt the operating technique best suited to the deformations presented by their patients and to the overall context. The different techniques, outcomes and complications are successively discussed. PMID:26433317

  13. Current assessment practices for noncancer end points.

    PubMed Central

    Shoaf, C R

    1991-01-01

    The need for assessing noncancer risks for agents to which humans are routinely exposed indoors arises from the large amount of time spent indoors (i.e., employed persons spend about 60% of their time at home indoors, 30% at work indoors, and 5% in transit). Sources of air pollutants include heating and cooling systems, combustion appliances, personal use products, furnishings, tobacco products, pesticides, bioeffluents from humans and animals, and other microbial contamination such as toxins from molds. The purpose of this paper is to describe current dose-response assessment methods applicable to assessing risk following exposure to indoor air pollutants. The role of structure-activity relationships in hazard identification is also described. Risk assessments from exposure to indoor air pollutants require exposure assessments and dose-response assessments. Dose-response assessment methodologies include the inhalation reference concentration (RfC), structure-activity relationships, dose-response models, and the decision analytic approach. The RfC is an estimate (with uncertainty spanning perhaps an order of magnitude) of a daily exposure to the human population (including sensitive subgroups) that is likely to be without an appreciable risk of deleterious effects during a lifetime. The current RfC method provides guidelines for making the necessary dosimetric adjustments for gases and aerosols. Human equivalent concentrations for no-observed-adverse-effect levels in animals are determined by using mathematical relationships that adjust for regional deposition, solubility, ventilation rate, and blood:air partition coefficients. The RfC methodology exists as an interim methodology. Future scientific advancements are expected to further refine the approach. PMID:1821364

  14. UK and Italian EIA systems: A comparative study on management practice and performance in the construction industry

    SciTech Connect

    Bassi, Andrea; Howard, Robert; Geneletti, Davide; Ferrari, Simone

    2012-04-15

    This study evaluates and contrasts the management practice and the performance that characterise Environmental Impact Assessments (EIA) in Italy and in the UK. The methodology relies on the investigation of six carefully selected case studies, critically reviewed by referring to EIA and project design information, as well as collecting the opinion of key project participants. The study focuses on the construction industry and on specific key sectors like infrastructure for transport and renewable energy and commercial and tourism development. A main term of reference for the analyses has been established by critically reviewing international literature so as to outline common good practice, requirements for the enhancement of sustainability principles and typically incurred drawbacks. The proposed approach enhances transfer of knowledge and of experiences between the analyzed contexts and allows the provision of guidelines for practitioners. Distinctive differences between the UK and the Italian EIA systems have been detected for pivotal phases and elements of EIA, like screening, scoping, analysis of alternatives and of potential impacts, definition of mitigation strategies, review, decision making, public participation and follow up. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Italian and the UK Environmental Impact Assessment systems are compared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The research is centred on the construction industry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Issues and shortcomings are analysed by investigating six case studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integration of EIA with sustainability principles is appraised. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer General guidelines are provided to assist practitioners in the two national contexts.

  15. Verbal autopsy: current practices and challenges.

    PubMed Central

    Soleman, Nadia; Chandramohan, Daniel; Shibuya, Kenji

    2006-01-01

    Cause-of-death data derived from verbal autopsy (VA) are increasingly used for health planning, priority setting, monitoring and evaluation in countries with incomplete or no vital registration systems. In some regions of the world it is the only method available to obtain estimates on the distribution of causes of death. Currently, the VA method is routinely used at over 35 sites, mainly in Africa and Asia. In this paper, we present an overview of the VA process and the results of a review of VA tools and operating procedures used at demographic surveillance sites and sample vital registration systems. We asked for information from 36 field sites about field-operating procedures and reviewed 18 verbal autopsy questionnaires and 10 cause-of-death lists used in 13 countries. The format and content of VA questionnaires, field-operating procedures, cause-of-death lists and the procedures to derive causes of death from VA process varied substantially among sites. We discuss the consequences of using varied methods and conclude that the VA tools and procedures must be standardized and reliable in order to make accurate national and international comparisons of VA data. We also highlight further steps needed in the development of a standard VA process. PMID:16583084

  16. Miniature bioreactors: current practices and future opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Betts, Jonathan I; Baganz, Frank

    2006-01-01

    This review focuses on the emerging field of miniature bioreactors (MBRs), and examines the way in which they are used to speed up many areas of bioprocessing. MBRs aim to achieve this acceleration as a result of their inherent high-throughput capability, which results from their ability to perform many cell cultivations in parallel. There are several applications for MBRs, ranging from media development and strain improvement to process optimisation. The potential of MBRs for use in these applications will be explained in detail in this review. MBRs are currently based on several existing bioreactor platforms such as shaken devices, stirred-tank reactors and bubble columns. This review will present the advantages and disadvantages of each design together with an appraisal of prototype and commercialised devices developed for parallel operation. Finally we will discuss how MBRs can be used in conjunction with automated robotic systems and other miniature process units to deliver a fully-integrated, high-throughput (HT) solution for cell cultivation process development. PMID:16725043

  17. Telehealth: current practices and future directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, Yadin B.

    1996-02-01

    When we review the positive impact that the integration of ostensibly independent patient-care services have on the efficient management of quality care, education, and collaborative research, it is not surprising that telehealth deployment is on the rise. The forces that drive this phenomenon include: the need to manage the entire disease episode; the desire for wider geographically-distributed quality health care; the escalation of customer expectations; globalization of healthcare and its support services; an increase in patient and provider convenience; and the acceptance of the present technological community. At the Telehealth Center at the Texas Children's Hospital, current classifications of clinical applications are listed: (1) initial urgent evaluation of patients, (2) triage decisions and pretransfer arrangements, (3) medical and surgical follow-up and medication review, (4) consultation for primary care encounters, (5) real-time subspecialty care consultation and planning, (6) management of chronic diseases and conditions, (7) extended diagnostic work-ups, (8) review of diagnostic images, and (9) preventive medicine and patient education. The delivery of such services is associated with challenges and opportunities. As we move forward from limited data processing to an integrated communication system, from centralized main frame functions to personalized and location-independent workstations, and from hospitals to clinics and homecare, an increase in the minimum features provided by the equipment and the communication systems must accompany the widening variety of clinical applications. Future expansion of telehealth systems stands to revolutionize the delivery of services to the benefits of providers' networks, our economy, and patients through integration.

  18. Capsule endoscopy: Current practice and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Melissa F; Sidhu, Reena; McAlindon, Mark E

    2014-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy (CE) has transformed investigation of the small bowel providing a non-invasive, well tolerated means of accurately visualising the distal duodenum, jejunum and ileum. Since the introduction of small bowel CE thirteen years ago a high volume of literature on indications, diagnostic yields and safety profile has been presented. Inclusion in national and international guidelines has placed small bowel capsule endoscopy at the forefront of investigation into suspected diseases of the small bowel. Most commonly, small bowel CE is used in patients with suspected bleeding or to identify evidence of active Crohn’s disease (CD) (in patients with or without a prior history of CD). Typically, CE is undertaken after upper and lower gastrointestinal flexible endoscopy has failed to identify a diagnosis. Small bowel radiology or a patency capsule test should be considered prior to CE in those at high risk of strictures (such as patients known to have CD or presenting with obstructive symptoms) to reduce the risk of capsule retention. CE also has a role in patients with coeliac disease, suspected small bowel tumours and other small bowel disorders. Since the advent of small bowel CE, dedicated oesophageal and colon capsule endoscopes have expanded the fields of application to include the investigation of upper and lower gastrointestinal disorders. Oesophageal CE may be used to diagnose oesophagitis, Barrett’s oesophagus and varices but reliability in identifying gastroduodenal pathology is unknown and it does not have biopsy capability. Colon CE provides an alternative to conventional colonoscopy for symptomatic patients, while a possible role in colorectal cancer screening is a fascinating prospect. Current research is already addressing the possibility of controlling capsule movement and developing capsules which allow tissue sampling and the administration of therapy. PMID:24976712

  19. The current provision of community-based teaching in UK medical schools: an online survey and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sandra W W; Clement, Naomi; Tang, Natalie; Atiomo, William

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the current provision and outcome of community-based education (CBE) in UK medical schools. Design and data sources An online survey of UK medical school websites and course prospectuses and a systematic review of articles from PubMed and Web of Science were conducted. Articles in the systematic review were assessed using Rossi, Lipsey and Freeman's approach to programme evaluation. Study selection Publications from November 1998 to 2013 containing information related to community teaching in undergraduate medical courses were included. Results Out of the 32 undergraduate UK medical schools, one was excluded due to the lack of course specifications available online. Analysis of the remaining 31 medical schools showed that a variety of CBE models are utilised in medical schools across the UK. Twenty-eight medical schools (90.3%) provide CBE in some form by the end of the first year of undergraduate training, and 29 medical schools (93.5%) by the end of the second year. From the 1378 references identified, 29 papers met the inclusion criteria for assessment. It was found that CBE mostly provided advantages to students as well as other participants, including GP tutors and patients. However, there were a few concerns regarding the lack of GP tutors’ knowledge in specialty areas, the negative impact that CBE may have on the delivery of health service in education settings and the cost of CBE. Conclusions Despite the wide variations in implementation, community teaching was found to be mostly beneficial. To ensure the relevance of CBE for ‘Tomorrow's Doctors’, a national framework should be established, and solutions sought to reduce the impact of the challenges within CBE. Strengths and limitations of this study This is the first study to review how community-based education is currently provided throughout Medical Schools in the UK. The use of Rossi, Lipsey and Freeman's method of programme evaluation means that the literature was analysed

  20. Reference dosimetry on TomoTherapy: an addendum to the 1990 UK MV dosimetry code of practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S. J.; Aspradakis, M. M.; Byrne, J. P.; Chalmers, G.; Duane, S.; Rogers, J.; Thomas, R. A. S.; Tudor, G. S. J.; Twyman, N.

    2014-03-01

    The current UK code of practice for high-energy photon therapy dosimetry (Lillicrap et al 1990 Phys. Med. Biol. 35 1355-60) gives instructions for measuring absorbed dose to water under reference conditions for megavoltage photons. The reference conditions and the index used to specify beam quality require that a machine be able to set a 10 cm × 10 cm field at the point of measurement. TomoTherapy machines have a maximum collimator setting of 5 cm × 40 cm at a source to axis distance of 85 cm, making it impossible for users of these machines to follow the code. This addendum addresses the specification of reference irradiation geometries, the choice of ionization chambers and the determination of dosimetry corrections, the derivation of absorbed dose to water calibration factors and choice of appropriate chamber correction factors, for carrying out reference dosimetry measurements on TomoTherapy machines. The preferred secondary standard chamber remains the NE2611 chamber, which with its associated secondary standard electrometer, is calibrated at the NPL through the standard calibration service for MV photon beams produced on linear accelerators with conventional flattening filters. Procedures are given for the derivation of a beam quality index specific to the TomoTherapy beam that can be used in the determination of a calibration coefficient for the secondary standard chamber from its calibration certificate provided by the NPL. The recommended method of transfer from secondary standard to field instrument is in a static beam, at a depth of 5 cm, by sequential substitution or by simultaneous side by side irradiation in either a water phantom or a water-equivalent solid phantom. Guidance is given on the use of a field instrument in reference fields.

  1. Spatio-temporal elements of articulation work in the achievement of repeat prescribing safety in UK general practice.

    PubMed

    Grant, Suzanne; Mesman, Jessica; Guthrie, Bruce

    2016-02-01

    Prescribing is the most common healthcare intervention, and is both beneficial and risky. An important source of risk in UK general practice is the management of 'repeat prescriptions', which are typically requested from and issued by non-clinically trained reception staff with only intermittent reauthorisation by a clinical prescriber. This paper ethnographically examines the formal and informal work employed by GPs and receptionists to safely conduct repeat prescribing work in primary care using Strauss's (1985, 1988, 1993) concept of 'articulation work' across eight UK general practices. The analytical lens of articulation work provided an investigative framing to contextually map the informal, invisible resources of resilience and strength employed by practice team members in the achievement of repeat prescribing safety, where risk and vulnerability were continually relocated across space and time. In particular, the paper makes visible the micro-level competencies and collaborative practices that were routinely employed by both GPs and receptionists across different socio-cultural contexts, with informal, cross-hierarchical communication usually considered more effective than the formal structures of communication that existed (e.g. protocols). While GPs held formal prescribing authority, this paper also examines the key role of receptionists in both the initiation and safe coordination of the repeat prescribing routine. PMID:26283462

  2. At the crossroads of anthropology and epidemiology: Current research in cultural psychiatry in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Bhui, Kamaldeep Singh

    2013-01-01

    Cultural psychiatry research in the UK comprises a broad range of diverse methodologies, academic disciplines, and subject areas. Methodologies range from epidemiological to anthropological/ethnographic to health services research; mixed methods research is becoming increasingly popular, as are public health and health promotional topics. After briefly outlining the history of cultural psychiatry in the UK we will discuss contemporary research. Prominent themes include: the epidemiology of schizophrenia among Africans/Afro-Caribbeans, migration and mental health, racism and mental health, cultural identity, pathways to care, explanatory models of mental illness, cultural competence, and the subjective experiences of healthcare provision among specific ethnic groups such as Bangladeshis and Pakistanis. Another strand of research that is attracting increasing academic attention focuses upon the relationship between religion, spirituality, and mental health, in particular, the phenomenology of religious experience and its mental health ramifications, as well as recent work examining the complex links between theology and psychiatry. The paper ends by appraising the contributions of British cultural psychiatrists to the discipline of cultural psychiatry and suggesting promising areas for future research. PMID:24114263

  3. Improving medication safety in UK care homes: challenges and current perspective.

    PubMed

    Fahrni, Mathumalar Loganathan; Franklin, Bryony Dean; Rawaf, Salman; Majeed, Azeem

    2014-02-01

    In the UK, there are policy and regulatory concerns regarding the governance of care homes and healthcare provision within these homes. From a public health perspective, these issues can pose significant challenges to the provision of safe and quality medication use services to care home residents. The objective of this paper is to highlight an important and neglected issue for the growing population of institutionalized older adults. We reviewed relevant literature for the years 2000 to present and identified recent efforts undertaken to improve medication safety standards in UK care homes. We consider the limitations and reasons for the National Health Service's restricted role and lack of leadership in providing medical services for this institutionalized population. The efforts taken by the Department of Health and other healthcare authorities targeting medication safety in care homes are also highlighted. In order to improve the quality of healthcare, specifically in areas related to medication safety and quality use of medicines, interventions need to be taken by the national government and similarly by local authorities and NHS commissioners. PMID:25057369

  4. Injectable opiate maintenance in the UK: Is it good clinical practice?

    PubMed

    Zador, D

    2001-04-01

    This paper reviews the current practice of injectable opiate treatment (IOT) in the United Kingdom, i.e. the "British system" of prescribing injectable heroin and methadone, and considers some of the clinical and ethical issues it raises. There is very limited research evidence supporting either the safety or effectiveness of IOT as practised in Britain. In particular there is almost no evaluation of long-term outcomes of IOT, which is of potential concern given the possibility of some patients remaining indefinitely in IOT, the risk of vascular complications, and its higher cost compared with oral maintenance. It would be easy to assess this controversial intervention as in need of further research. However, striving towards best practice in IOT involves more than generating evidence. The likelihood of a patient receiving IOT in the United Kingdom appears to be influenced more by the personal inclinations of prescribers than by outcome data (if any), or identified community needs for access to IOT. The author asks is this good clinical practice and is it sustainable? The "British system" needs to modernise itself consistent with international paradigms of continuous quality improvement, and the NHS's own agenda of clinical governance. PMID:11300958

  5. The Creative Countryside: Policy and Practice in the UK Rural Cultural Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, David; Jayne, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores emerging policymaking and research into rural creative industries, drawing on a case study from the county of Shropshire in the UK. It begins with a critique of existing creative industries policy, which is argued to focus almost exclusively on the urban as the site of creative work. The paper highlights an emerging body of…

  6. Developments in UK Early Years Policy and Practice: Can They Improve Outcomes for Disadvantaged Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Carol A.

    2007-01-01

    Despite strenuous attempts made by the New Labour government in the UK to progress towards its goal of eradicating child poverty by 2020, educational outcomes for disadvantaged children remain depressed compared to those of more advantaged children. The fact that children from poorer socio-economic backgrounds are at much greater risk of language…

  7. Using Applied Behaviour Analysis as Standard Practice in a UK Special Needs School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foran, Denise; Hoerger, Marguerite; Philpott, Hannah; Jones, Elin Walker; Hughes, J. Carl; Morgan, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    This article describes how applied behaviour analysis can be implemented effectively and affordably in a maintained special needs school in the UK. Behaviour analysts collaborate with classroom teachers to provide early intensive behaviour education for young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and function based behavioural…

  8. Middle Managers in UK Higher Education Conceptualising Experiences in Support of Reflective Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birds, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the role of reflexivity in supporting middle managers in understanding and facilitating large-scale change management projects in their organisations. Utilising an example from a UK university, it is argued that the development of a conceptual model to fit local circumstances enables deeper understanding and better informed…

  9. Recruiting Teachers Online: Marketing Strategies and Information Dissemination Practices of UK-Based Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Villiers, Rian; Books, Sue

    2009-01-01

    A review of the websites of 43 UK-based agencies that are recruiting teachers in South Africa and other countries finds that important information about what to expect often is missing. An analysis of the marketing strategies shows that agencies overall are promising schools thorough vetting of candidates and low fees, are promising prospective…

  10. Politics, Policies and Practice: Assessing the Impact of Sexual Harassment Policies in UK Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Alison M.

    2004-01-01

    Since sexual harassment was first named and identified as an obstacle to women's equality in the mid 1970s, concern about both its prevalence and its damaging effects has resulted in the widespread introduction of anti-harassment policies in UK universities, as in other work and educational settings. The study reported here sought to assess the…

  11. The Search for next Practice: A UK Approach to Innovation in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannon, Valerie

    2009-01-01

    In 2002, the Labor Government in the UK established an Innovation Unit, within government, to support practitioner-led innovation in schools. Two considerations led to this action. First, there was an increasing sense that amidst the plethora of national strategies and change programs, an important element was in danger of being lost: the…

  12. Employer Engagement Practices of UK Business Schools and Departments: An Empirical Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Roger; Kane, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    A survey of managers in charge of employer engagement activities in UK business schools and departments was completed to ascertain: (1) the employer engagement methods that were most commonly used by institutions; (2) business school managers' attitudes towards employers' involvement in course design; and (3) the respondents' perceptions of the…

  13. Current Practices in the Delivery of Undergraduate Exercise Physiology Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Michele M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify current practices for the delivery of exercise physiology content at the undergraduate level. An anonymous 22-item survey was sent to instructors of exercise physiology to collect information concerning the structure of course offerings and instructional practices. One hundred ten instructors responded to…

  14. Evaluating Teaching: A Guide to Current Thinking and Best Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stronge, James, Ed.

    This guide presents current research and thinking about teacher evaluation and combines that research with practice. Chapters contain illustrations and examples to make a research-practice connection and present a comprehensive approach to designing, implementing, and monitoring quality teacher-evaluation systems. Chapters include: (1) "Improving…

  15. A summarized discussion of current good manufacturing practice regulations.

    PubMed

    Allen, Loyd V

    2013-01-01

    In light of recent events and discussions of compounding pharmacy, it is important to discuss and understand the purpose of good manufacturing practices. This article provides a summary of the current Good Manufacturing Practice Regulations which were established by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. PMID:24046937

  16. Using Technology in Undergraduate Admission: Current Practices and Future Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindbeck, Robin; Fodrey, Brian

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the current practices and future plans for using technology in admission practices at four-year colleges and universities. This study collected data through an online survey. The survey was largely quantitative but also included several qualitative questions, and focused on 12 broad categories of…

  17. Pre- admission clinics in ENT: a national audit of UK practice and opinion.

    PubMed

    el Naggar, M; Welsh, A; Dickenson, A J; Flood, L M; Gibb, J G

    1997-04-01

    A one-year prospective audit (1989) of patient non-attendance for elective surgery in our department showed that of those summoned, five per cent defaulted on the day of admission without contacting the hospital (Hampal and Flood, 1992). Contributing factors such as lengthy waiting lists and inefficient communication with the patients were amenable to correction by the hospital. However, the current admission policy made inevitable a significant waste of theatre time. The pre-admission clinic (PAC), an outpatient attendance shortly before surgery, was recommended in ENT practice by Robin (1991) and introduced into our department the year. Failure to attend the PAC allowed adequate time for replacement on the theatre list and was recommended as a solution to the problem of unfilled theatre sessions (Dingle et al., 1993). A subsequent four-year experience of conducting PACs has confirmed several expected advantages. However, some of the hopes for development expressed in our earlier work (Dingle et al., 1993) have failed to materialize. This study aims to review retrospectively our experience and compare it with the admission practice and desires of ENT departments in the United Kingdom as revealed by a postal survey. The findings are of relevance to all surgical specialties and to anaesthetic departments wishing to adopt this system of admission. PMID:9176619

  18. Mitigation potential of horizontal ground coupled heat pumps for current and future climatic conditions: UK environmental modelling and monitoring studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García González, Raquel; Verhoef, Anne; Vidale, Pier Luigi; Gan, Guohui; Wu, Yupeng; Hughes, Andrew; Mansour, Majdi; Blyth, Eleanor; Finch, Jon; Main, Bruce

    2010-05-01

    model predictions of soil moisture content and soil temperature with measurements at different GCHP locations over the UK. The combined effect of environment dynamics and horizontal GCHP technical properties on long-term GCHP performance will be assessed using a detailed land surface model (JULES: Joint UK Land Environment Simulator, Meteorological Office, UK) with additional equations embedded describing the interaction between GCHP heat exchangers and the surrounding soil. However, a number of key soil physical processes are currently not incorporated in JULES, such as groundwater flow, which, especially in lowland areas, can have an important effect on the heat flow between soil and HE. Furthermore, the interaction between HE and soil may also cause soil vapour and moisture fluxes. These will affect soil thermal conductivity and hence heat flow between the HE and the surrounding soil, which will in turn influence system performance. The project will address these issues. We propose to drive an improved version of JULES (with equations to simulate GCHP exchange embedded), with long-term gridded (1 km) atmospheric, soil and vegetation data (reflecting current and future environmental conditions) to reliably assess the mitigation potential of GCHPs over the entire domain of the UK, where uptake of GCHPs has been low traditionally. In this way we can identify areas that are most suitable for the installation of GCHPs. Only then recommendations can be made to local and regional governments, for example, on how to improve the mitigation potential in less suitable areas by adjusting GCHP configurations or design.

  19. 21 CFR 123.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 123.5 Section 123.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FISH AND FISHERY PRODUCTS General Provisions § 123.5 Current...

  20. 21 CFR 114.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 114.5 Section 114.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION ACIDIFIED FOODS General Provisions § 114.5 Current good...

  1. 21 CFR 123.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 123.5 Section 123.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FISH AND FISHERY PRODUCTS General Provisions § 123.5 Current...

  2. 21 CFR 114.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 114.5 Section 114.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION ACIDIFIED FOODS General Provisions § 114.5 Current good...

  3. 21 CFR 123.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 123.5 Section 123.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FISH AND FISHERY PRODUCTS General Provisions § 123.5 Current...

  4. 21 CFR 123.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 123.5 Section 123.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FISH AND FISHERY PRODUCTS General Provisions § 123.5 Current...

  5. 21 CFR 114.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 114.5 Section 114.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION ACIDIFIED FOODS General Provisions § 114.5 Current good...

  6. 21 CFR 114.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 114.5 Section 114.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION ACIDIFIED FOODS General Provisions § 114.5 Current good...

  7. 21 CFR 114.5 - Current good manufacturing practice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Current good manufacturing practice. 114.5 Section 114.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION ACIDIFIED FOODS General Provisions § 114.5 Current good...

  8. Preliminary Evidence That Yoga Practice Progressively Improves Mood and Decreases Stress in a Sample of UK Prisoners.

    PubMed

    Bilderbeck, Amy C; Brazil, Inti A; Farias, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. In the first randomized controlled trial of yoga on UK prisoners, we previously showed that yoga practice was associated with improved mental wellbeing and cognition. Here, we aimed to assess how class attendance, self-practice, and demographic factors were related to outcome amongst prisoners enrolled in the 10-week yoga intervention. Methods. The data of 55 participants (52 male, 3 female) who completed a 10-week yoga course were analysed. Changes in pre- and postyoga measures of affect, perceived stress, and psychological symptoms were entered into linear regression analyses with bias-corrected and accelerated bootstrap confidence intervals. Class attendance, self-practice, demographic variables, and baseline psychometric variables were included as regressors. Results. Participants who attended more yoga classes and those who engaged in frequent (5 times or more) self-practice reported significantly greater decreases in perceived stress. Decreases in negative affect were also significantly related to high frequency self-practice and greater class attendance at a near-significant level. Age was positively correlated with yoga class attendance, and higher levels of education were associated with greater decreases in negative affect. Conclusions. Our results suggest that there may be progressive beneficial effects of yoga within prison populations and point to subpopulations who may benefit the most from this practice. PMID:26294928

  9. Preliminary Evidence That Yoga Practice Progressively Improves Mood and Decreases Stress in a Sample of UK Prisoners

    PubMed Central

    Bilderbeck, Amy C.; Brazil, Inti A.; Farias, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. In the first randomized controlled trial of yoga on UK prisoners, we previously showed that yoga practice was associated with improved mental wellbeing and cognition. Here, we aimed to assess how class attendance, self-practice, and demographic factors were related to outcome amongst prisoners enrolled in the 10-week yoga intervention. Methods. The data of 55 participants (52 male, 3 female) who completed a 10-week yoga course were analysed. Changes in pre- and postyoga measures of affect, perceived stress, and psychological symptoms were entered into linear regression analyses with bias-corrected and accelerated bootstrap confidence intervals. Class attendance, self-practice, demographic variables, and baseline psychometric variables were included as regressors. Results. Participants who attended more yoga classes and those who engaged in frequent (5 times or more) self-practice reported significantly greater decreases in perceived stress. Decreases in negative affect were also significantly related to high frequency self-practice and greater class attendance at a near-significant level. Age was positively correlated with yoga class attendance, and higher levels of education were associated with greater decreases in negative affect. Conclusions. Our results suggest that there may be progressive beneficial effects of yoga within prison populations and point to subpopulations who may benefit the most from this practice. PMID:26294928

  10. Diagnosis and management of non-IgE-mediated cow’s milk allergy in infancy - a UK primary care practical guide

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The UK NICE guideline on the Diagnosis and Assessment of Food Allergy in Children and Young People was published in 2011, highlighting the important role of primary care physicians, dietitians, nurses and other community based health care professionals in the diagnosis and assessment of IgE and non-IgE-mediated food allergies in children. The guideline suggests that those with suspected IgE-mediated disease and those suspected to suffer from severe non-IgE-mediated disease are referred on to secondary or tertiary level care. What is evident from this guideline is that the responsibility for the diagnostic food challenge, ongoing management and determining of tolerance to cow’s milk in children with less severe non-IgE-mediated food allergies is ultimately that of the primary care/community based health care staff, but this discussion fell outside of the current NICE guideline. Some clinical members of the guideline development group (CV, JW, ATF, TB) therefore felt that there was a particular need to extend this into a more practical guideline for cow’s milk allergy. This subset of the guideline development group with the additional expertise of a paediatric gastroenterologist (NS) therefore aimed to produce a UK Primary Care Guideline for the initial clinical recognition of all forms of cow’s milk allergy and the ongoing management of those with non-severe non-IgE-mediated cow’s milk allergy in the form of algorithms. These algorithms will be discussed in this review paper, drawing on guidance primarily from the UK NICE guideline, but also from the DRACMA guidelines, ESPGHAN guidelines, Australian guidelines and the US NIAID guidelines. PMID:23835522

  11. Identifying critical success factors for designing selection processes into postgraduate specialty training: the case of UK general practice.

    PubMed

    Plint, Simon; Patterson, Fiona

    2010-06-01

    The UK national recruitment process into general practice training has been developed over several years, with incremental introduction of stages which have been piloted and validated. Previously independent processes, which encouraged multiple applications and produced inconsistent outcomes, have been replaced by a robust national process which has high reliability and predictive validity, and is perceived to be fair by candidates and allocates applicants equitably across the country. Best selection practice involves a job analysis which identifies required competencies, then designs reliable assessment methods to measure them, and over the long term ensures that the process has predictive validity against future performance. The general practitioner recruitment process introduced machine markable short listing assessments for the first time in the UK postgraduate recruitment context, and also adopted selection centre workplace simulations. The key success factors have been identified as corporate commitment to the goal of a national process, with gradual convergence maintaining locus of control rather than the imposition of change without perceived legitimate authority. PMID:20547597

  12. The Working Practices and Clinical Experiences of Paediatric Speech and Language Therapists: A National UK Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pring, Tim; Flood, Emma; Dodd, Barbara; Joffe, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    Background: The majority of speech and language therapists (SLTs) work with children who have speech, language and communication needs. There is limited information about their working practices and clinical experience and their views of how changes to healthcare may impact upon their practice. Aims: To investigate the working practices and…

  13. Restricted Creativity: Advertising Agency Work Practices in the U.S., Canada and the UK.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Douglas

    1993-01-01

    The extent to which relationships and work practices within advertising agencies differ in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom and degree of similarity to practices of artists were examined. Responses from Senior Creative Directors at 303 agencies suggested that work practices did not differ significantly but were limited in efforts…

  14. The UK immunisation schedule: changes to vaccine policy and practice in 2013/14

    PubMed Central

    Hassounah, Sondus

    2015-01-01

    Summary Vaccination programmes are implemented either as new vaccines become available or evidence about them accumulates, or in response to specific situations. In the United Kingdom, development and implementation of the national immunisation programme is centrally coordinated and funded by the Department of Health on behalf of England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. A number of significant changes were made to the UK immunisation schedule for 2013/2014. Three new vaccines were introduced: intranasal influenza and oral rotavirus for children and subcutaneous shingles for older adults. To ensure protection against meningococcal C infection into adulthood, there has been a change to the schedule for meningitis C vaccination. The temporary pertussis vaccination programme for pregnant women, set up in response to an increase in the number of cases of pertussis particularly among young babies, has been extended until further notice. Furthermore, in response to large outbreaks of measles in south Wales and other parts of the UK, a national measles, mumps and rubella catch-up campaign specifically targeted at unvaccinated children aged 10–16 years was launched to ensure that all children and young people have received two doses of measles, mumps and rubella vaccine. This review describes the rationale behind these policy changes. PMID:25973215

  15. New Migrants in the UK: Education, Training and Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillimore, Jenny; Goodson, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    This study of the education, training and employment of asylum seekers and refugees in the UK is based on the academic and policy literature and empirical data from five major studies. It sets out the political context to seeking asylum in the UK, explores current policy and practice regarding the education, training and employment of new migrants…

  16. Bone marrow examination in newly diagnosed Hodgkin's disease: current practice in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, M. R.; Taylor, P. R.; Lucraft, H. H.; Taylor, M. J.; Proctor, S. J.

    1995-01-01

    In the UK Hodgkin's disease is usually treated by either clinical oncologists or haematologists. A national study of the performance of bone marrow examination in newly diagnosed Hodgkin's disease was undertaken to establish current practice. A total of 620 questionnaires were despatched, and replies were received from 60% of consultants (45% of clinical oncologists and 70% of haematologists). Bone marrow examination was performed in all new cases significantly more often by haematologists than by clinical oncologists (74% vs 40%, P < 0.001). Among haematologists, there was no correlation between the number of new patients seen annually and practice, however clinical oncologists were even less likely to perform routine bone marrow biopsies if they saw more than ten patients per year (P < 0.02). Where bone marrow examination was performed selectively, the most common criteria used were peripheral blood cytopenia and advanced-stage disease. These criteria were applied in the same way by both clinical oncologists and haematologists. Bone marrow biopsy, an invasive and often painful procedure, is currently performed more frequently in Hodgkin's disease than can be recommended on the basis of recent studies in the literature and associated guidelines. There is a significant difference in practice between clinical oncologists and haematologists, and this raises the wider issue of the influence of hospital specialisation on patient management. PMID:7819042

  17. Perioperative use of methotrexate--a survey of clinical practice in the UK.

    PubMed

    Steuer, A; Keat, A C

    1997-09-01

    We have surveyed the use of methotrexate in the perioperative period in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) undergoing surgery. A total of 200 consultant rheumatologists and 200 consultant orthopaedic surgeons in the UK were sent a postal questionnaire. Thirty-five per cent of rheumatologists and 46% of orthopaedic surgeons were concerned that the drug may increase the risk of post-operative complications, although significantly less 'always' stopped the drug around the time of surgery. There was great variation in the timing of stopping the drug with most stopping treatment within 2 weeks before surgery and restarting within 2 weeks after surgery. The majority of clinicians surveyed (70%) felt that national guidelines for the perioperative use of methotrexate would be helpful. PMID:9376976

  18. Practice experiences of running UK DonorLink, a voluntary information exchange register for adults related through donor conception.

    PubMed

    Crawshaw, Marilyn; Marshall, Lyndsey

    2008-12-01

    Previous practices of withholding information from those conceived through donor conception are changing. However, little is known about the service needs of those affected. In response to this, the UK Government-funded pilot voluntary information exchange and contact register, UK DonorLink, was launched in 2004, covering conceptions prior to August 1991. It is the only register worldwide that relies primarily on DNA testing to establish genetic connectedness in the absence of written records. Approximately 150 adults came forward to register in the first three years of operation, drawn from all interested parties. Matches between half-siblings have been made, but none yet between donor and offspring. Employing staff with expertise in post-adoption work has proved effective, as long as additional training and support specific to donor issues is provided. The infrastructure required to promote and deliver the service reflects the complex mix of skills and tasks required, and confirms that a service provided through independent counsellors alone would be inappropriate. Having a geographically and socially widespread potential registrant group, together with a limited budget, has limited the effectiveness of advertising and promotion campaigns. Ethical and emotional complexities arising through the direct service are highlighted, including those presented by DNA use. PMID:19085259

  19. Endocannabinoid system modulator use in everyday clinical practice in the UK and Spain.

    PubMed

    García-Merino, Antonio

    2013-02-01

    Spasticity is a disabling complication of multiple sclerosis. Some commonly used oral medications include baclofen, tizanidine, anticonvulsants and benzodiazepines, but their benefits are modest. Sativex® (GW Pharmaceuticals PLC, Porton Down, UK; Laboratorios Almirall, SA, Barcelona, Spain) is a unique cannabinoid-based medicine with two main active ingredients; 9-δ-tetrahydrocannabinol, which acts mainly on cannabinoid 1 receptors in the CNS and plays a key role in the modulation of spasticity and spasms, and cannabidiol, which has different properties, including minimization of the psychoactivity associated with 9-δ-tetrahydrocannabinol. Sativex is indicated for symptomatic improvement in adult patients with moderate-to-severe multiple sclerosis-related spasticity who have not responded adequately to other first- or second-line antispasticity medications, and who demonstrate clinically significant improvement in spasticity-related symptoms during an initial trial of therapy. Over the past couple of years, Sativex has been approved for use in a number of European countries and ongoing postmarketing studies are evaluating the possible risks associated with Sativex treatment by systematically collecting all suspected adverse reactions that occur in patients from the start of treatment. Interim data from the UK as well as Spanish Sativex safety registries confirm that clinical benefit is maintained over the longer term despite the expected trend for deterioration owing to disease progression. Even after more than 2 years of use, no new safety/tolerability signals have emerged with Sativex, including no evidence of driving impairment and no relevant incidence of falls or other adverse events of concern, such as psychiatric or nervous system events. Sativex appears to be a well-tolerated and useful add-on therapy in patients who have not achieved an adequate response with traditional antispastic agents. PMID:23369054

  20. UK prescribing practices as proxy markers of unmet need in allergic rhinitis: a retrospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Price, David B; Scadding, Glenis; Bachert, Claus; Saleh, Hesham; Nasser, Shuaib; Carter, Victoria; von Ziegenweidt, Julie; Durieux, Alice M S; Ryan, Dermot

    2016-01-01

    Little data on UK prescribing patterns and treatment effectiveness for allergic rhinitis (AR) are available. We quantified unmet pharmacologic needs in AR by assessing AR treatment effectiveness based on the prescribing behaviour of UK general practitioners (GP) during two consecutive pollen seasons (2009 and 2010). We conducted a retrospective observational study with the data from the Optimum Patient Care Research Database. We assessed diagnoses and prescription data for patients with a recorded diagnosis of rhinitis who took rhinitis medication during the study period. We assessed the data from 25,069 patients in 2009 and 22,381 patients in 2010. Monotherapy was the initial prescription of the season for 67% of patients with seasonal AR (SAR) and 77% of patients with nonseasonal upper airways disease (NSUAD), for both years. Initial oral antihistamine (OAH) or intranasal corticosteroid (INS) monotherapy proved insufficient for >20% of SAR and >37% of NSUAD patients. Multiple therapy was the initial prescription for 33% of SAR and 23% of NSUAD in both years, rising to 45% and >50% by season end, respectively. For NSUAD, dual-therapy prescriptions doubled and triple-therapy prescriptions almost tripled during both seasons. Many patients revisited their GP regardless of initial prescription. Initial OAH or INS monotherapy provides insufficient symptom control for many AR patients. GPs often prescribe multiple therapies at the start of the season, with co-prescription becoming more common as the season progresses. However, patients prescribed multiple therapies frequently revisit their GP, presumably to adjust treatment. These data suggest the need for more effective AR treatment and management strategies. PMID:27334893

  1. UK prescribing practices as proxy markers of unmet need in allergic rhinitis: a retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Price, David B; Scadding, Glenis; Bachert, Claus; Saleh, Hesham; Nasser, Shuaib; Carter, Victoria; von Ziegenweidt, Julie; Durieux, Alice M S; Ryan, Dermot

    2016-01-01

    Little data on UK prescribing patterns and treatment effectiveness for allergic rhinitis (AR) are available. We quantified unmet pharmacologic needs in AR by assessing AR treatment effectiveness based on the prescribing behaviour of UK general practitioners (GP) during two consecutive pollen seasons (2009 and 2010). We conducted a retrospective observational study with the data from the Optimum Patient Care Research Database. We assessed diagnoses and prescription data for patients with a recorded diagnosis of rhinitis who took rhinitis medication during the study period. We assessed the data from 25,069 patients in 2009 and 22,381 patients in 2010. Monotherapy was the initial prescription of the season for 67% of patients with seasonal AR (SAR) and 77% of patients with nonseasonal upper airways disease (NSUAD), for both years. Initial oral antihistamine (OAH) or intranasal corticosteroid (INS) monotherapy proved insufficient for >20% of SAR and >37% of NSUAD patients. Multiple therapy was the initial prescription for 33% of SAR and 23% of NSUAD in both years, rising to 45% and >50% by season end, respectively. For NSUAD, dual-therapy prescriptions doubled and triple-therapy prescriptions almost tripled during both seasons. Many patients revisited their GP regardless of initial prescription. Initial OAH or INS monotherapy provides insufficient symptom control for many AR patients. GPs often prescribe multiple therapies at the start of the season, with co-prescription becoming more common as the season progresses. However, patients prescribed multiple therapies frequently revisit their GP, presumably to adjust treatment. These data suggest the need for more effective AR treatment and management strategies. PMID:27334893

  2. Practical Support from Fathers and Grandmothers Is Associated with Lower Levels of Breastfeeding in the UK Millennium Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mothers face trade-offs between infant care and subsistence/economic activities. In traditional populations, allomothers such as fathers and grandmothers support mothers with young infants, allowing them to reduce labour activities and focus on breastfeeding. Similarly, the positive impact of social support on breastfeeding has been highlighted in developed populations. However, these studies have generally focused on emotional support from fathers, peers and healthcare professionals. Given the availability of formula milk in developed populations, an evolutionary anthropological perspective highlights that practical support, unlike emotional support, may have negative associations with breastfeeding by enabling substitution of maternal care. Other kin, mainly grandmothers, may also be important allomothers influencing maternal breastfeeding levels. Here we explore the associations between different types of social support mothers receive from fathers/grandmothers and breastfeeding in the UK Millennium Cohort Study. We find frequent grandmother contact and father’s parenting involvement are both associated with lower levels of breastfeeding, suggesting a negative relationship between practical support and breastfeeding. In contrast, father presence, potentially capturing emotional support, is associated with greater breastfeeding initiation. Our findings suggest that practical support and emotional support functions differently, and practical support may not encourage breastfeeding in developed populations. PMID:26192993

  3. The Current State of Sustainability in Bioscience Laboratories: A Statistical Examination of a UK Tertiary Institute

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Hazel A.; Ironside, Joseph E.; Gwynn-Jones, Dylan

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to identify the current barriers to sustainability in the bioscience laboratory setting and to determine which mechanisms are likely to increase sustainable behaviours in this specialised environment. Design/methodology/approach: The study gathers qualitative data from a sample of laboratory researchers presently…

  4. Exploring Current Arts Practice in Kindergartens and Preparatory Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garvis, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    The arts are an important area of development for young children in their early years. By engaging with arts activities, young children are able to use their senses to explore the world. This paper reports on current arts practice in two kindergartens and two preparatory classrooms in Queensland, Australia. All sites are located in neighbouring…

  5. Current Best Practices in Learning Disabilities in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gumpel, Thomas P.; Sharoni, Varda

    2007-01-01

    We present an analysis of the current state of practice in the diagnosis and treatment of learning disabilities (LD) in Israel. Through an examination of the cultural, historical, and demographic background of the country ("deep structures"), we show how a fragmented society has developed; it segregates different ethnicities and social groups and…

  6. Narrative, Poststructuralism, and Social Justice: Current Practices in Narrative Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Combs, Gene; Freedman, Jill

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a review of current practice in narrative therapy with a focus on how it is attractive and useful for therapists who wish to work for social justice. The authors describe narrative therapy's roots in poststructuralist philosophy and social science. They illustrate its major theoretical constructs, including the "narrative metaphor,"…

  7. Current Practice and Infrastructures for Campus Centers of Community Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Marshall; Saltmarsh, John

    2013-01-01

    This article provides an overview of current practice and essential infrastructure of campus community engagement centers in their efforts to establish and advance community engagement as part of the college experience. The authors identified key characteristics and the prevalence of activities of community engagement centers at engaged campuses…

  8. Autism Spectrum Disorders: Neurobiology and Current Assessment Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Ryan A.; Robins, Diana L.; Decker, Scott L.

    2008-01-01

    This study reviews recent research related to the neurobiology of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) an provides an empirical analysis of current assessment practices. Data were collected through a survey of 117 school psychologists. The Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS), Gilliam Autism Rating Scale (GARS), and Gilliam Asperger's Disorder Scale…

  9. Crystallization screening: the influence of history on current practice.

    PubMed

    Luft, Joseph R; Newman, Janet; Snell, Edward H

    2014-07-01

    While crystallization historically predates crystallography, it is a critical step for the crystallographic process. The rich history of crystallization and how that history influences current practices is described. The tremendous impact of crystallization screens on the field is discussed. PMID:25005076

  10. Serving Wounded Warriors: Current Practices in Postsecondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, Mary Lee; Miller, Wayne K., II

    2009-01-01

    From September to October 2009 the Association on Higher Education and Disabilities (AHEAD) invited anonymous voluntary responses from 2,500 members and affiliates to complete a 29-question online survey on current practices in postsecondary education for serving veterans with disabilities (wounded warriors). Two hundred and thirty seven complete…

  11. Crystallization screening: the influence of history on current practice

    PubMed Central

    Luft, Joseph R.; Newman, Janet; Snell, Edward H.

    2014-01-01

    While crystallization historically predates crystallography, it is a critical step for the crystallographic process. The rich history of crystallization and how that history influences current practices is described. The tremendous impact of crystallization screens on the field is discussed. PMID:25005076

  12. Superintendent Performance Evaluation: Current Practice and Directions for Improvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Candoli, Carl; And Others

    The school district superintendent plays a critical role in the education of America's students. This guidebook asserts that districts are not being well served by their present systems for evaluating superintendents. It outlines some of the problems and deficiencies in current evaluation practice and offers professionally based leads for…

  13. Survey of UK Speech and Language Therapists' Assessment and Treatment Practices for People with Progressive Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collis, Jessica; Bloch, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dysarthria knowledge is predominantly impairment-based. As a result, speech and language therapists (SLTs) have traditionally adopted impairment-focused management practices. However, guidance for best practice suggests that SLTs should consider the client holistically, including the impact of dysarthria beyond the impairment. Aims: To…

  14. Contemporary chiropractic practice in the UK: a field study of a chiropractor and his patients in a suburban chiropractic clinic

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Two recent surveys of chiropractors in Great Britain suggest that there are discrepancies between chiropractic practice as defined in regulatory guidelines and day-to-day chiropractic clinical practice and there is in general a paucity of information regarding the characteristics of contemporary chiropractic practice in the United Kingdom. This field study describes the daily practice of a contemporary British UK-trained chiropractor. Methods The fieldwork took place during the spring and summer of 2008 when the author spent one day per week observing consultations and interviewing patients in a chiropractic clinic. The chiropractor was subjected to interviews on two occasions. The author also registered as a patient. Field notes were taken by the author, interviews were recorded and the transcripts were corrected and analysed by the author. Results A total of 25 patients took part in the study. The interaction that took place between patients and staff in reception could be considered as a prelude to consultation facilitating the transformation from individual to patient and back to individual. Coupled with the continuous physical contact between the chiropractor and each patient there was a substantial amount of verbal and non-verbal communication throughout treatment visits. The patients presented with predominantly musculo-skeletal pain and the majority had consulted the chiropractor as a result of recommendations from others in their close social environment. The majority of the interviewed patients had either an inaccurate or at best rudimentary understanding of the mechanisms of chiropractic treatment. A few of the interviewed patients indicated that they had at first experienced concerns about the nature of chiropractic treatment or getting undressed. The author was able to gain some insight into how the chiropractor's experiences, opinions and beliefs had shaped his approach to chiropractic treatment and how this formed the basis of his clinical

  15. Good practice recommendations for paediatric outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (p-OPAT) in the UK: a consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sanjay; Abrahamson, Ed; Goldring, Stephen; Green, Helen; Wickens, Hayley; Laundy, Matt

    2015-02-01

    There is compelling evidence to support the rationale for managing children on intravenous antimicrobial therapy at home whenever possible, including parent and patient satisfaction, psychological well-being, return to school/employment, reductions in healthcare-associated infection and cost savings. As a joint collaboration between the BSAC and the British Paediatric Allergy, Immunity and Infection Group, we have developed good practice recommendations to highlight good clinical practice and governance within paediatric outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (p-OPAT) services across the UK. These guidelines provide a practical approach for safely delivering a p-OPAT service in both secondary care and tertiary care settings, in terms of the roles and responsibilities of members of the p-OPAT team, the structure required to deliver the service, identifying patients and pathologies that are suitable for p-OPAT, ensuring appropriate vascular access, antimicrobial choice and delivery and the clinical governance aspects of delivering a p-OPAT service. The process of writing a business case to support the introduction of a p-OPAT service is also addressed. PMID:25331058

  16. Concierge and Second-Opinion Radiology: Review of Current Practices.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Shehbaz; Bafana, Rounak; Halabi, Safwan S

    2016-01-01

    Radiology's core assets include the production, interpretation, and distribution of quality imaging studies. Second-opinion services and concierge practices in radiology aim to augment traditional services by providing patient-centered and physician-centered care, respectively. Patient centeredness enhances patients' understanding and comfort with their radiology tests and procedures and allows them to make better decisions about their health care. As the fee-for-service paradigm shifts to value-based care models, radiology practices have begun to diversify imaging service delivery and communication to coincide with the American College of Radiology Imaging 3.0 campaign. Physician-centered consultation allows for communication of evidence-based guidelines to assist referring physicians and other providers in making the most appropriate imaging or treatment decision for a specific clinical condition. There are disparate practice models and payment schema for the various second-opinion and concierge practices. This review article explores the current state and payment models of second-opinion and concierge practices in radiology. This review also includes a discussion on the benefits, roadblocks, and ethical issues that surround these novel types of practices. PMID:26305521

  17. Soft governance, restratification and the 2004 general medical services contract: the case of UK primary care organisations and general practice teams.

    PubMed

    Grant, Suzanne; Ring, Adele; Gabbay, Mark; Guthrie, Bruce; McLean, Gary; Mair, Frances S; Watt, Graham; Heaney, David; O'Donnell, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    In the UK National Health Service, primary care organisation (PCO) managers have traditionally relied on the soft leadership of general practitioners based on professional self-regulation rather than direct managerial control. The 2004 general medical services contract (nGMS) represented a significant break from this arrangement by introducing new performance management mechanisms for PCO managers to measure and improve general practice work. This article examines the impact of nGMS on the governance of UK general practice by PCO managers through a qualitative analysis of data from an empirical study in four UK PCOs and eight general practices, drawing on Hood's four-part governance framework. Two hybrids emerged: (i) PCO managers emphasised a hybrid of oversight, competition (comptrol) and peer-based mutuality by granting increased support, guidance and autonomy to compliant practices; and (ii) practices emphasised a broad acceptance of increased PCO oversight of clinical work that incorporated a restratified elite of general practice clinical peers at both PCO and practice levels. Given the increased international focus on the quality, safety and efficiency in primary care, a key issue for PCOs and practices will be to achieve an effective, contextually appropriate balance between the counterposing governance mechanisms of peer-led mutuality and externally led comptrol. PMID:25601063

  18. Naturalness as an ethical stance: idea(l)s and practices of care in western herbal medicine in the UK.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Nina

    2015-01-01

    An association of non-biomedical healthcare with appeals to nature and naturalness, and an invocation of a rhetoric of gentleness, goodness, purity and moral power has been noted previously, and some scholars argue that nature has taken on a meaning broadly opposed to the rational scientific order of modernity. Drawing on an ethnographic study of women's practice and use of western herbal medicine (WHM) in the UK, the intertwining of the perceived naturalness of WHM with distinct care practices points to a further avenue for exploration. To examine patients' and herbalists' discourses of the naturalness of WHM and associated idea(l)s and practices of care, understandings of nature and a feminist ethics of care are utilized as analytical frameworks. The analysis presented suggests that, through WHM, patients and herbalists become embedded in a complex spatio-temporal wholeness and web of care that intertwines past, present and future, self and others, and local and global concerns. In the emerging 'ordinary ethics of care', naturalness constitutes a sign of goodness and of a shared humanity within the organic world, while care, underpinned by idea(l)s of natural and holistic care practices, links human and non-human others. Thus, the naturalness of WHM, as perceived by some patients and herbalists, engages and blends with a continually unfolding field of relationships in the lifeworld(s), where care practices, caring relations and collective wellbeing may constitute an ethical stance that raises deeper questions about the significance of relationality, the values of care/caring and the mutual involvement of nature and human being(s). PMID:26001272

  19. Practices used for recommending sickness certification by general practitioners: a conversation analytic study of UK primary care consultations.

    PubMed

    Wheat, Hannah C; Barnes, Rebecca K; Byng, Richard

    2015-02-01

    Existing research indicates that many patients and doctors find the process of negotiating sickness certification for time off work to be a difficult one. This study examined how patients and general practitioners (GPs) managed these negotiations in a sample of UK primary care consultations. The study made use of an existing dataset of audio-recorded consultations between 13 GPs and 506 unselected adult patients in five general practices in London. Forty-nine consultations included discussions for both initial and repeat sickness certification across a wide range of conditions. Here we report our findings on doctor practices for recommending, as opposed to patient practices for advocating for, sickness certification (n = 26 cases). All cases were transcribed in detail and analysed using conversation analytic methods. Four main communication practices were observed: (1) declarative statements of need for sickness certification; (2) 'do you need' offers for sickness certification; (3) 'do you want' offers for sickness certification; and (4) conditional 'If X, Y' offers for sickness certification. These different communication practices indexed doctor agency, doctor endorsement and patient entitlement to varying degrees. In the main, recommendations to patients presenting with biomedical problems or a repeat occurrence of a psychosocial problem displayed stronger doctor endorsement and patient entitlement. Contrastingly, recommendations to patients presenting with new psychosocial and biopsychosocial problems, displayed weaker endorsement and patient entitlement. This study offers new evidence to support the Parsonian argument that becoming sick involves entering a social role with special rights and obligations. Through documenting doctors' orientations to their gatekeeping role as well as patients' orientations to differential rights vis à vis legitimacy, we demonstrate the contrasting stances of doctors in situ when giving sick notes for biomedical problems as

  20. Trends in sexually transmitted infections in general practice 1990-2000: population based study using data from the UK general practice research database

    PubMed Central

    Cassell, Jackie A; Mercer, Catherine H; Sutcliffe, Lorna; Petersen, Irene; Islam, Amir; Brook, M Gary; Ross, Jonathan D; Kinghorn, George R; Simms, Ian; Hughes, Gwenda; Majeed, Azeem; Stephenson, Judith M; Johnson, Anne M; Hayward, Andrew C

    2006-01-01

    Objective To describe the contribution of primary care to the diagnosis and management of sexually transmitted infections in the United Kingdom, 1990-2000, in the context of increasing incidence of infections in genitourinary medicine clinics. Design Population based study. Setting UK primary care. Participants Patients registered in the UK general practice research database. Main outcome measures Incidence of diagnosed sexually transmitted infections in primary care and estimation of the proportion of major such infections diagnosed in primary care. Results An estimated 23.0% of chlamydia cases in women but only 5.3% in men were diagnosed and treated in primary care during 1998-2000, along with 49.2% cases of non-specific urethritis and urethral discharge in men and 5.7% cases of gonorrhoea in women and 2.9% in men. Rates of diagnosis in primary care rose substantially in the late 1990s. Conclusions A substantial and increasing number of sexually transmitted infections are diagnosed and treated in primary care in the United Kingdom, with sex ratios differing from those in genitourinary medicine clinics. Large numbers of men are treated in primary care for presumptive sexually transmitted infections. PMID:16439371

  1. Current good manufacturing practice for positron emission tomography drugs.

    PubMed

    2009-12-10

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing regulations on current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) for positron emission tomography (PET) drugs. The regulations are intended to ensure that PET drugs meet the requirements of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) regarding safety, identity, strength, quality, and purity. In this final rule, we are establishing CGMP regulations for approved PET drugs. For investigational and research PET drugs, the final rule states that the requirement to follow CGMP may be met by complying with these regulations or by producing PET drugs in accordance with the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) general chapter on compounding PET radiopharmaceuticals. We are establishing these CGMP requirements for PET drugs under the provisions of the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (the Modernization Act). Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, we are announcing the availability of a guidance entitled "PET Drugs--Current Good Manufacturing Practice (CGMP)." PMID:20169678

  2. Does the current regulation of assisted reproductive techniques in the UK safeguard animal welfare?

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Madeleine L.H.

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive medicine is one of the fastest-developing fields of veterinary medicine, Regulation of veterinary assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) is currently divided between the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act (1986); the Veterinary Surgeons Act 1966, and the Animal Welfare Act (2006). None of those pieces of legislation was purpose designed to protect the welfare of animals undergoing ARTs, either directly or by determining which veterinary ART procedures may or may not be performed. Consequently, due to the lack of reference to such procedures, the welfare protection aims of the legislation are sometimes ambiguous. It is therefore difficult to ascertain whether the aims of the legislation are being fulfilled, but, in the opinion of this author, the legislation is anyway inadequate in scope, most particularly because it fails to provide a reporting function. It is unclear whether all or any veterinary ART procedures being undertaken on post-natal animals are associated with suffering. Some ARTs may cause discomfort, stress or pain: study or review of the welfare effects of these would be valuable. Any future review of the legislation regulating veterinary ARTs, be that an overall review or a review of one of the relevant statutes (for example the VSA), should take into account the interface between research and clinical medicine; the potentially welfare-compromising gaps between the Acts; the need to introduce reporting functions in order to build an evidence base, and the issue of veterinary specialisation and whether specialised techniques should be carried out only by those with specialist post-graduate qualifications. PMID:26973381

  3. Routine mortality monitoring for detecting mass murder in UK general practice: test of effectiveness using modelling

    PubMed Central

    Guthrie, Bruce; Love, Tom; Kaye, Rebecca; MacLeod, Margaret; Chalmers, Jim

    2008-01-01

    Background The Shipman Inquiry recommended mortality rate monitoring if it could be ‘shown to be workable’ in detecting a future mass murderer in general practice. Aim To examine the effectiveness of cumulative sum (CUSUM) charts, cross-sectional Shewhart charts, and exponentially-weighted, moving-average control charts in mortality monitoring at practice level. Design of study Analysis of Scottish routine general practice data combined with estimation of control chart effectiveness in detecting a ‘murderer’ in a simulated dataset. Method Practice stability was calculated from routine data to determine feasible lengths of monitoring. A simulated dataset of 405 000 ‘patients’ was created, registered with 75 ‘practices’ whose underlying mortality rates varied with the same distribution as case-mix-adjusted mortality in all Scottish practices. The sensitivity of each chart to detect five and 10 excess deaths was examined in repeated simulations. The sensitivity of control charts to excess deaths in simulated data, and the number of alarm signals when control charts were applied to routine data were estimated. Results Practice instability limited the length of monitoring and modelling was consequently restricted to a 3-year period. Monitoring mortality over 3 years, CUSUM charts were most sensitive but only reliably achieved >50% successful detection for 10 excess deaths per year and generated multiple false alarms (>15%). Conclusion At best, mortality monitoring can act as a backstop to detect a particularly prolific serial killer when other means of detection have failed. Policy should focus on changes likely to improve detection of individual murders, such as reform of death certification and the coroner system. PMID:18482483

  4. Multicentre prospective survey of SeHCAT provision and practice in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Peacock, Janet; Coker, Bolaji; McMillan, Viktoria; Ofuya, Mercy; Lewis, Cornelius; Keevil, Stephen; Logan, Robert; McLaughlin, John; Reid, Fiona

    2016-01-01

    Objective A clinical diagnosis of bile acid malabsorption (BAM) can be confirmed using SeHCAT (tauroselcholic (75selenium) acid), a radiolabelled synthetic bile acid. However, while BAM can be the cause of chronic diarrhoea, it is often overlooked as a potential diagnosis. Therefore, we investigated the use of SeHCAT for diagnosis of BAM in UK hospitals. Design A multicentre survey was conducted capturing centre and patient-level information detailing patient care-pathways, clinical history, SeHCAT results, treatment with bile acid sequestrants (BAS), and follow-up in clinics. Eligible data from 38 centres and 1036 patients were entered into a validated management system. Results SeHCAT protocol varied between centres, with no standardised patient positioning, and differing referral systems. Surveyed patients had a mean age of 50 years and predominantly women (65%). The mean SeHCAT retention score for all patients was 19% (95% CI 17.8% to 20.3%). However, this differed with suspected BAM type: type 1: 9% (95% CI 6.3% to 11.4%), type 2: 21% (95% CI 19.2% to 23.0%) and type 3: 22% (95% CI 19.6% to 24.2%). Centre-defined ‘abnormal’ and ‘borderline’ results represented over 50% of the survey population. BAS treatment was prescribed to only 73% of patients with abnormal results. Conclusions The study identified a lack of consistent cut-off/threshold values, with differing centre criteria for defining an ‘abnormal’ SeHCAT result. BAS prescription was not related in a simple way to the SeHCAT result, nor to the centre-defined result, highlighting a lack of clear patient care-pathways. There is a clear need for a future diagnostic accuracy study and a better understanding of optimal management pathways. PMID:27252882

  5. Calcium channel blockers and cancer: a risk analysis using the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD)

    PubMed Central

    Grimaldi-Bensouda, Lamiae; Klungel, Olaf; Kurz, Xavier; de Groot, Mark C H; Maciel Afonso, Ana S; de Bruin, Marie L; Reynolds, Robert; Rossignol, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Objective The evidence of an association between calcium channel blockers (CCBs) and cancer is conflicting. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the risk of cancer (all, breast, prostate and colon cancers) in association with exposure to CCB. Methods This is a population-based cohort study in patients exposed to CCBs from across the UK, using two comparison cohorts: (1) patients with no exposure to CCB (non-CCB) matched on age and gender and (2) unmatched patients unexposed to CCB and at least one other antihypertensive (AHT) prescription. Cancer incidence rates computed in the exposed and the two unexposed groups were compared using HRs and 95% CIs obtained from multivariate Cox regression analyses. Results Overall, 150 750, 557 931 and 156 966 patients were included, respectively, in the CCB, non-CCB and AHT cohorts. Crude cancer incidence rates per 1000 person-years were 16.51, 15.75 and 10.62 for the three cohorts, respectively. Adjusted HRs (CI) for all cancers comparing CCB, non-CCB and AHT cohorts were 0.88 (0.86 to 0.89) and 1.01 (0.98 to 1.04), respectively. Compared to the AHT cohort, adjusted HRs (CI) for breast, prostate and colon cancer for the CCB cohort were 0.95 (0.87 to 1.04), 1.07 (0.98 to 1.16) and 0.89 (0.81 to 0.98), respectively. Analyses by duration of exposure to CCB did not show excess risk. Conclusions This large population-based study provides strong evidence that CCB use is not associated with an increased risk of cancer. The analyses yielded robust results across all types of cancer and different durations of exposure to CCBs. PMID:26747033

  6. The safe practice of CT coronary angiography in adult patients in UK imaging departments.

    PubMed

    Harden, S P; Bull, R K; Bury, R W; Castellano, E A; Clayton, B; Hamilton, M C K; Morgan-Hughes, G J; O'Regan, D; Padley, S P G; Roditi, G H; Roobottom, C A; Stirrup, J; Nicol, E D

    2016-08-01

    Computed tomography coronary angiography is increasingly used in imaging departments in the investigation of patients with chest pain and suspected coronary artery disease. Due to the routine use of heart rate controlling medication and the potential for very high radiation doses during these scans, there is a need for guidance on best practice for departments performing this examination, so the patient can be assured of a good quality scan and outcome in a safe environment. This article is a summary of the document on 'Standards of practice of computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) in adult patients' published by the Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) in December 2014. PMID:27207375

  7. The Legal Implications of Student Use of Social Networking Sites in the UK and US: Current Concerns and Lessons for the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Mark R.; Lee, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a comparative snapshot of the current state of the law in the US and UK with respect to potential liability of university and college students for use (and misuse) of social networking sites. It reviews the limited case law on this topic, highlights the differences in the two nations' laws of defamation and the various possible…

  8. Examining variations in prescribing safety in UK general practice: cross sectional study using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink

    PubMed Central

    Kontopantelis, Evangelos; Akbarov, Artur; Rodgers, Sarah; Avery, Anthony J; Ashcroft, Darren M

    2015-01-01

    Study question What is the prevalence of different types of potentially hazardous prescribing in general practice in the United Kingdom, and what is the variation between practices? Methods A cross sectional study included all adult patients potentially at risk of a prescribing or monitoring error defined by a combination of diagnoses and prescriptions in 526 general practices contributing to the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) up to 1 April 2013. Primary outcomes were the prevalence of potentially hazardous prescriptions of anticoagulants, anti-platelets, NSAIDs, β blockers, glitazones, metformin, digoxin, antipsychotics, combined hormonal contraceptives, and oestrogens and monitoring by blood test less frequently than recommended for patients with repeated prescriptions of angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and loop diuretics, amiodarone, methotrexate, lithium, or warfarin. Study answer and limitations 49 927 of 949 552 patients at risk triggered at least one prescribing indicator (5.26%, 95% confidence interval 5.21% to 5.30%) and 21 501 of 182 721 (11.8%, 11.6% to 11.9%) triggered at least one monitoring indicator. The prevalence of different types of potentially hazardous prescribing ranged from almost zero to 10.2%, and for inadequate monitoring ranged from 10.4% to 41.9%. Older patients and those prescribed multiple repeat medications had significantly higher risks of triggering a prescribing indicator whereas younger patients with fewer repeat prescriptions had significantly higher risk of triggering a monitoring indicator. There was high variation between practices for some indicators. Though prescribing safety indicators describe prescribing patterns that can increase the risk of harm to the patient and should generally be avoided, there will always be exceptions where the indicator is clinically justified. Furthermore there is the possibility that some information is not captured by CPRD for some practices—for example, INR results in

  9. Test result communication in primary care: a survey of current practice

    PubMed Central

    Litchfield, Ian; Bentham, Louise; Lilford, Richard; McManus, Richard J; Hill, Ann; Greenfield, Sheila

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of blood tests ordered in primary care continues to increase and the timely and appropriate communication of results remains essential. However, the testing and result communication process includes a number of participants in a variety of settings and is both complicated to manage and vulnerable to human error. In the UK, guidelines for the process are absent and research in this area is surprisingly scarce; so before we can begin to address potential areas of weakness there is a need to more precisely understand the strengths and weaknesses of current systems used by general practices and testing facilities. Methods We conducted a telephone survey of practices across England to determine the methods of managing the testing and result communication process. In order to gain insight into the perspectives from staff at a large hospital laboratory we conducted paired interviews with senior managers, which we used to inform a service blueprint demonstrating the interaction between practices and laboratories and identifying potential sources of delay and failure. Results Staff at 80% of practices reported that the default method for communicating normal results required patients to telephone the practice and 40% of practices required that patients also call for abnormal results. Over 80% had no fail-safe system for ensuring that results had been returned to the practice from laboratories; practices would otherwise only be aware that results were missing or delayed when patients requested results. Persistent sources of missing results were identified by laboratory staff and included sample handling, misidentification of samples and the inefficient system for collating and resending misdirected results. Conclusions The success of the current system relies on patients both to retrieve results and in so doing alert staff to missing and delayed results. Practices appear slow to adopt available technological solutions despite their potential for

  10. Nature and Quality of Antipsychotic Prescribing Practice in UK Psychiatry of Intellectual Disability Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paton, C.; Flynn, A.; Shingleton-Smith, A.; McIntyre, S.; Bhaumik, S.; Rasmussen, J.; Hardy, S.; Barnes, T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Antipsychotics are perceived to be over-used in the management of behavioural problems in people with an intellectual disability (ID). Published guidelines have set good practice standards for the use of these drugs for behavioural indications. We sought to identify the range of indications for which antipsychotic drugs are prescribed…

  11. Health and Safety in Practical Science in Schools: A UK Perspective 2, Using Model Risk Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borrows, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The previous article in this series explained the difference between hazard and risk. If the risk is too high, steps must be taken to reduce it to a sufficiently low level by adopting suitable protective control measures. If a practical activity in a science lesson has some risk associated with it then one way of reducing the risk might be to…

  12. "Cascades, Torrents & Drowning" in Information: Seeking Help in the Contemporary General Practitioner Practice in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holley, Debbie; Santos, Patricia; Cook, John; Kerr, Micky

    2016-01-01

    This paper responds to the Alpine Rendez-Vous "crisis" in technology-enhanced learning. It takes a contested area of policy as well as a rapid change in the National Health Service, and documents the responses to "information overload" by a group of general practitioners practices in the North of England. Located between the…

  13. Recovery from mental illness as an emergent concept and practice in Australia and the UK.

    PubMed

    Ramon, Shulamit; Healy, Bill; Renouf, Noel

    2007-03-01

    The language of recovery is now widely used in mental health policy, services, and research. Yet the term has disparate antecedents, and is used in a variety of ways. Some of the history of the use of the term recovery is surveyed, with particular attention to the new meaning of the term, especially as identified by service users, supported and taken up to various degrees by research and in the professional literature. Policy and practice in two countries--Australia and the United Kingdom--are examined to determine the manner and extent to which the concept of recovery is evident. In its new meaning, the concept of recovery has the potential to bring about profound and needed changes in mental health theory and practice. It is being taken up differently in different settings. It is clear that--at least in Australia and the United Kingdom--there are promising new recovery models and practices that support recovery, but the widespread use of recovery language is not enough to ensure that the core principles of the recovery model are implemented. PMID:17472085

  14. Current issues in dental practice management. Part 1. The importance of shared values.

    PubMed

    Newsome, Philip R H

    2003-04-01

    There can be few who would argue with the notion that the nature of dental practice in the United Kingdom has changed dramatically over the last couple of decades. A variety of factors, including new clinical techniques, growing consumerism, a much greater awareness of health-related and well-being issues in the public at large, as well as a marked deregulation within the dental profession, the development of vocational training and recently mandatory lifelong learning, the growing number of females working in the profession, and an increasing reluctance of young dentists to finance dental practices have all combined to create an environment which has enabled and encouraged a move away from traditional forms of dental care delivery. Instead, there has been considerable growth in independently-funded practice and a commensurate growth in the number of practices operating under a corporate body umbrella of one form or another. Currently there are 27 corporate bodies registered with the General Dental Council (GDC) with the likelihood of more in the future given the proposed GDC review. This will no doubt take into consideration European law, under which the restriction within the Dentist's Act on the number of corporate bodies is likely to be untenable. Although they still have only a small share of the dental market--with 4% of all dentists in the UK in 1999--they have expanded rapidly from a small base. The data available at the time the paper was written indicate that the global total of fees earned from dentistry in the UK in the financial year 2001/2002 was almost 3 billion Pounds, of which 1.9 billion Pounds (64%) came from NHS fees and 1.1 billion Pounds (36%) from private fees. Of this 1.9 billion Pounds received in NHS fees in 2001/2002, 0.55 billion Pounds were paid by patients who were not exempt from charges, bringing the total amount actually paid out of patients' pockets for dental treatment to 1.65 billion Pounds. Compare these figures with 1996

  15. Current clinical practices in stroke rehabilitation: regional pilot survey.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Pradeep; Oelschlager, Ashley; Agah, Arvin; Pohl, Patricia S; Ahmad, S Omar; Liu, Wen

    2008-01-01

    This study was aimed at understanding the current physical and occupational therapy practices in stroke rehabilitation in the Midwest. The insights gained from this pilot study will be used in a future study aimed at understanding stroke rehabilitation practices across the nation. Researchers and clinicians in the field of stroke rehabilitation were interviewed, and past studies in the literature were analyzed. Through these activities, we developed a 37-item questionnaire that was sent to occupational and physical therapists practicing in Kansas and Missouri who focus on the care of people who have had a stroke (n = 320). A total of 107 respondents returned a com pleted questionnaire, which gives a response rate of about 36%. The majority of respondents had more than 12 years of experience treating patients with stroke. Consensus of 70% or more was found for 80% of the items. The preferred approaches for the rehabilitation of people who have had a stroke are the Bobath and Brunnstrom methods, which are being used by 93% and 85% of the physical and occupational therapists, respectively. Even though some variability existed in certain parts of the survey, in general clinicians agreed on different treatment approaches in issues dealing with muscle tone, weakness, and limited range of motion in stroke rehabilitation. Some newer treatment approaches that have been proven to be effective are practiced only by a minority of clinicians. The uncertainty among clinicians in some sections of the survey reveals that more evidence on clinical approaches is needed to ensure efficacious treatments. PMID:19009470

  16. Nutritional supplement practices in UK junior national track and field athletes

    PubMed Central

    Nieper, A

    2005-01-01

    Methods: The nutritional supplementation practices of 32 national track and field athletes competing at the 2004 World Junior Championships were studied using an anonymous questionnaire. Information was sought on the prevalence and type of supplement used, the reasons for use, knowledge of supplements, and sources of information. Results: Use of supplements was widespread with 62% of respondents declaring supplement use. Prevalence in female athletes (75%) was higher than in males (55%) but was not statistically significant. No differences were found for age, training volume, or type of event. Seventeen different supplements were taken, with each athlete using an average of 2.4 products, multivitamins and minerals being the most popular. Reasons for using supplements were for health (45%), to enhance the immune system (40%), and to improve performance (25%). Of all respondents 48% believed they had an average knowledge of supplements, but three quarters felt that they required further information. Those not using supplements were more likely to think supplements were associated with health risks than those taking them (p = 0.03). Most athletes (72%) have access to a sports dietician but underutilise this resource. Coaches (65%) had the greatest influence on supplementation practices, with doctors (25%) and sports dieticians (30%) being less important. Conclusions: Supplementation practices were widespread among the population studied. The findings of this investigation could be used to enable the sports dietician and physician to identify common misconceptions held by adolescent athletes regarding nutritional supplements and to implement educational programs, which should include members of the non-medical support team. PMID:16118303

  17. 76 FR 47593 - Guidance for Small Business Entities on Current Good Manufacturing Practice for Positron Emission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... a guidance for small business entities entitled ``PET Drugs--Current Good Manufacturing Practice... entitled ``PET Drugs--Current Good Manufacturing Practice (CGMP); Small Entity Compliance Guide.'' This... Manufacturing Practice for Positron Emission Tomography Drugs; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug...

  18. Principles of Lifeworld Led Public Health Practice in the UK and Sweden: Reducing Health Inequalities.

    PubMed

    Hemingway, Ann; Norton, Liz; Aarts, Clara

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to consider the role of the lifeworld perspective in reducing inequalities in health and we explain how the public health practitioner can use this perspective to address public health issues with individuals and groups. We offer ideas for public health actions that are based on and deal with the lifeworld context of individual people or families. Each of the dimensions of the lifeworld temporality, spatiality, intersubjectivity, embodiment and mood are outlined and their significance explained in relation to health inequalities. Suggestions for action to reduce health inequalities are made and overall principles of lifeworld led public health practice are proposed by way of conclusion. The principles comprise understanding the community members' lifeworld view, understanding their view of their potential, offering resources and facilitating empowerment, and sharing lifeworld case studies and lobbying to influence local and national policy in relation to both the individual and communities. PMID:25642346

  19. Principles of Lifeworld Led Public Health Practice in the UK and Sweden: Reducing Health Inequalities

    PubMed Central

    Hemingway, Ann; Norton, Liz; Aarts, Clara

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to consider the role of the lifeworld perspective in reducing inequalities in health and we explain how the public health practitioner can use this perspective to address public health issues with individuals and groups. We offer ideas for public health actions that are based on and deal with the lifeworld context of individual people or families. Each of the dimensions of the lifeworld temporality, spatiality, intersubjectivity, embodiment and mood are outlined and their significance explained in relation to health inequalities. Suggestions for action to reduce health inequalities are made and overall principles of lifeworld led public health practice are proposed by way of conclusion. The principles comprise understanding the community members' lifeworld view, understanding their view of their potential, offering resources and facilitating empowerment, and sharing lifeworld case studies and lobbying to influence local and national policy in relation to both the individual and communities. PMID:25642346

  20. Reconsidering sore throats. Part I: Problems with current clinical practice.

    PubMed Central

    McIsaac, W. J.; Goel, V.; Slaughter, P. M.; Parsons, G. W.; Woolnough, K. V.; Weir, P. T.; Ennet, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide evidence-based answers to clinical questions posed by family physicians about Group A streptococcus pharyngitis and to further understanding of why management is controversial. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Evidence from randomized trials was not found for most questions. The most critical information came from high-quality community prevalence studies and criterion standard studies of physician clinical judgement. MAIN FINDINGS: Expert recommendations for physician management are not likely to help prevent rheumatic fever, as most people with sore throats do not seek medical care. Current clinical practices result in overuse of antibiotics because accuracy of clinical judgment is limited. CONCLUSIONS: Costs associated with visits for upper respiratory infections as well as increasing antibiotic resistance necessitate reconsidering the current clinical approach. An alternative management strategy is presented in part 2. PMID:9116520

  1. The challenge of risk characterization: current practice and future directions.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, G M; Cohen, J T; Graham, J D

    1993-01-01

    Risk characterization is perhaps the most important part of risk assessment. As currently practiced, risk characterizations do not convey the degree of uncertainty in a risk estimate to risk managers, Congress, the press, and the public. Here, we use a framework put forth by an ad hoc study group of industry and government scientists and academics to critique the risk characterizations contained in two risks assessments of gasoline vapor. After discussing the strengths and weaknesses of each assessment's risk characterization, we detail an alternative approach that conveys estimates in the form of a probability distribution. The distributional approach can make use of all relevant scientific data and knowledge, including alternative data sets and all plausible mechanistic theories of carcinogenesis. As a result, this approach facilitates better public health decisions than current risk characterization procedures. We discuss methodological issues, as well as strengths and weaknesses of the distributional approach. PMID:8020444

  2. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: current clinical practice, coding, and reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Schuerer, Douglas J E; Kolovos, Nikoleta S; Boyd, Kayla V; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2008-07-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a technique for providing life support for patients experiencing both pulmonary and cardiac failure by maintaining oxygenation and perfusion until native organ function is restored. ECMO is used routinely at many specialized hospitals for infants and less commonly for children with respiratory or cardiac failure from a variety of causes. Its usage is more controversial in adults, but select medical centers have reported favorable findings in patients with ARDS and other causes of severe pulmonary failure. ECMO is also rarely used as a rescue therapy in a small subset of adult patients with cardiac failure. This article will review the current uses and techniques of ECMO in the critical care setting as well as the evidence supporting its usage. In addition, current practice management related to coding and reimbursement for this intensive therapy will be discussed. PMID:18628221

  3. Chinese Students in a UK Business School: Hearing the Student Voice in Reflective Teaching and Learning Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Yvonne

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the outcomes of a study carried out in 2001-2002 with nine postgraduate students from China, enrolled on taught master's programmes in a UK university business school. The aims of the research were to explore the development of the students' orientations to learning during their year of study in the UK, and to explore how the…

  4. Endocrinopathies: The current and changing perspectives in anesthesia practice

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Kaur, Gurpreet

    2015-01-01

    The gateways to advancements in medical fields have always been accessed through the coalition between various specialties. It is almost impossible for any specialty to make rapid strides of its own. However, the understanding of deeper perspectives of each specialty or super specialty is essential to take initiatives for the progress of the other specialty. Endocrinology and anesthesiology are two such examples which have made rapid progress in the last three decades. Somehow the interaction and relationship among these medical streams have been only scarcely studied. Diabetes and thyroid pathophysiologies have been the most researched endocrine disorders so far in anesthesia practice but even their management strategies have undergone significant metamorphosis over the last three decades. As such, anesthesia practice has been influenced vastly by these advancements in endocrinology. However, a comprehensive understanding of the relationship between these two partially related specialties is considered to be an essential cornerstone for further progress in anesthesia and surgical sciences. The current review is an attempt to imbibe the current and the changing perspectives so as to make the understanding of the relationship between these two medical streams a little simple and clearer. PMID:26180760

  5. The Long and Winding Road: A Review of the Policy, Practice and Development of the Internationalisation of Higher Education in the UK

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humfrey, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Internationalisation is a key element in the evolving role and function of the UK higher education (HE) sector. Its perceived benefits are promoted widely and sought assiduously. It has come to be believed by many practitioners that internationalisation and the quest for quality and status in HE are synonymous. In the current phase of…

  6. Supporting pre-registration students in practice: A review of current ICT use.

    PubMed

    Ward, Rod; Moule, Pam

    2007-01-01

    It is unclear how current healthcare students based in the United Kingdom (UK) use information and communication technology (ICT) to support their learning and care delivery in practice environments. This position reflects the dearth of current empirical evidence that needs development in this rapidly changing field. Using focus group interviews involving 16 students from nursing and the allied health professions, to reflect the interprofessional nature of healthcare education, this research explored how students employ technology in placement settings. The students drew on networked resources for personal learning and gave examples of use to meet patient and user needs. Technology also provided a vehicle for communication with the University, though use was complicated by a number of issues. Access to computers and the Internet whilst in placement environments proved problematic for some, with the culture not seeming to support ICT use. Lack of time, attitudes towards computers and ICT skills also affected student engagement. These findings provide information to guide the development of ICT use in placement settings. PMID:16624450

  7. Championing mental health at work: emerging practice from innovative projects in the UK.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Mark; Tilford, Sylvia; Branney, Peter; Kinsella, Karina

    2014-09-01

    This paper examines the value of participatory approaches within interventions aimed at promoting mental health and wellbeing in the workplace. Specifically the paper explores data from the thematic evaluation of the Mental Health and Employment project strand within the Altogether Better programme being implemented in England in the Yorkshire and Humber region, which was funded through the BIG Lottery and aimed to empower people across the region to lead better lives. The evaluation combined a systematic evidence review with semi-structured interviews across mental health and employment projects. Drawing on both evaluation elements, the paper examines the potential of workplace-based 'business champions' to facilitate organizational culture change within enterprises within a deprived regional socio-economic environment. First, the paper identifies key policy drivers for interventions around mental health and employment, summarizes evidence review findings and describes the range of activities within three projects. The role of the 'business champion' emerged as crucial to these interventions and therefore, secondly, the paper examines how champions' potential to make a difference depends on the work settings and their existing roles, skills and motivation. In particular, champions can proactively coordinate project strands, embed the project, encourage participation, raise awareness, encourage changes to work procedures and strengthen networks and partnerships. The paper explores how these processes can facilitate changes in organizational culture. Challenges of implementation are identified, including achieving leverage with senior management, handover of ownership to fellow employees, assessing impact and sustainability. Finally, implications for policy and practice are discussed, and conclusions drawn concerning the roles of champions within different workplace environments. PMID:23300189

  8. Three-year evaluation of best practice guidelines for nematode control on commercial sheep farms in the UK.

    PubMed

    Learmount, Jane; Stephens, Nathalie; Boughtflower, Valerie; Barrecheguren, Alba; Rickell, Kayleigh; Massei, Giovanna; Taylor, Mike

    2016-08-15

    Anthelmintics are commonly used on the majority of UK commercial sheep farms to reduce major economic losses associated with parasitic diseases. With increasing anthelmintic resistance worldwide, several countries have produced evidence-based, best practice guidelines with an example being the UK's Sustainable Control of Parasites in Sheep (SCOPS) initiative. In 2012, a pilot study demonstrated that SCOPS-managed farms used fewer anthelmintic treatments than traditionally managed farms, with no impact on lamb productivity and worm burden. Building on these results, we collected data for three consecutive years (2012-2014) with the following aims: (1) To compare the effects of traditional and SCOPS-based parasite management on lamb productivity and worm burden; (2) To evaluate the effect of region and farm type on lamb productivity and worm burden; (3) To compare the frequency and patterns of use of anthelmintic treatment on traditional and SCOPS-managed farms. The study was carried out on 16 farms located in the North east and the South west of England and Wales. Lamb productivity was assessed by quantifying birth, mid-season and finish weights and calculating daily live-weight gains and time to finish in a cohort of 40-50 lambs on each farm. Five annual faecal egg counts were carried out on each farm to assess worm burden. No differences in lamb productivity and worm burdens were found between farms that adopted SCOPS guidelines and traditional farms across the three years. However, mean infection levels increased for both the SCOPS and the traditional groups. Lamb production was not significantly different for farm type and region but the effect of region on infection was significant. For both ewes and lambs, SCOPS farms carried out significantly fewer anthelmintic treatments per year, and used fewer anthelmintic doses/animal than traditional farms. The data suggest a trend to increasing use of anthelmintics in ewes on traditional but not on the SCOPS farms and a

  9. Are We Ready? The Construct of Subjective Cognitive Impairment and its Utilization in Clinical Practice: A Preliminary UK-Based Service Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Amy; Tales, Andrea; Tree, Jeremy; Bayer, Antony

    2015-09-24

    Extensive research on the concept of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) as a potential prodromal stage of dementia has highlighted the likelihood that abnormalities in information processing occur at even earlier stages in the disease process with research increasingly focused on the relatively new concept of subjective cognitive impairment (SCI). An individual with SCI will experience cognitive impairment solely on a subjective level, which is in contrast to an individual with MCI who will also experience cognitive impairment at an objective level. SCI is believed to be a risk factor for development of MCI. This qualitative service evaluation aimed to determine how much is known about SCI and how it is currently managed in specialist clinical practice in the UK. An email-based questionnaire containing a vignette of an individual presenting with SCI was distributed to 112 memory clinics requesting information on their most likely approach to such an individual. The 21% response rate evinces potential time pressure within clinical services that may preclude research participation and/or a lack of issue salience at present. However, the data from those who responded provide an important insight into 'where we are now' in relation to this issue. Analysis revealed main themes associated with SCI, namely the factors that influence what action is taken when an individual presents and what further investigations are performed, the multiplicity of potential outcomes experienced, and the barriers clinicians may face. The findings highlight the need for a coherent and consistent framework in relation to the management of SCI. PMID:26445273

  10. Current Clinical Practice Scenario of Osteoporosis Management in India

    PubMed Central

    Jhaveri, Shailesh; Upashani, Tejas; Bhadauria, Jitendra; Patel, Kamlesh

    2015-01-01

    Background Various osteoporosis guidelines are available for practice. Aim To understand the current clinical practice scenario from the perspective of Indian orthopaedicians, especially about the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, approach to diagnosis and management and patient compliance patterns to long term treatment. Materials and Methods A pre-validated structured questionnaire containing questions (mostly objective, some open-ended) catering to various objectives of the study was circulated amongst orthopaedic surgeons across India by means of post/courier, after giving a brief overview of the study telephonically. Data was extracted from the completed questionnaires, and analysed using Microsoft Excel software. Results The questionnaire was filled by a total of 84 orthopaedicians throughout India. The prevalence of osteoporosis in India according to the orthopaedic surgeons was 38.4% and there was a female preponderance. Most of the respondents felt out of every 100 osteoporosis patients in India, less than 20 patients are actually diagnosed and treated for osteoporosis. The most common initial presenting feature of established osteoporosis cases was general symptoms. Most respondents preferred Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) as the initial investigation for the diagnosis of osteoporosis in a patient presenting with typical features. While most respondents preferred once-a-month oral over intravenous (IV) bisphosphonates, they agreed that IV administration had advantages such as lower gastrointestinal side effects and improved compliance. The average duration of therapy of oral bisphosphonates was the longest (27.04 months) among the other anti- osteoporosis therapies that they used. On an average, the patient compliance rate in osteoporosis management was around 64%. IV Zoledronic acid (ZA) and intranasal calcitonin were infrequently used than other anti- osteoporosis therapies. While concerns about cost and availability deterred more frequent

  11. Research Reproducibility in Geosciences: Current Landscape, Practices and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, An

    2016-04-01

    Reproducibility of research can gauge the validity of its findings. Yet currently we lack understanding of how much of a problem research reproducibility is in geosciences. We developed an online survey on faculty and graduate students in geosciences, and received 136 responses from research institutions and universities in Americas, Asia, Europe and other parts of the world. This survey examined (1) the current state of research reproducibility in geosciences by asking researchers' experiences with unsuccessful replication work, and what obstacles that lead to their replication failures; (2) the current reproducibility practices in community by asking what efforts researchers made to try to reproduce other's work and make their own work reproducible, and what the underlying factors that contribute to irreproducibility are; (3) the perspectives on reproducibility by collecting researcher's thoughts and opinions on this issue. The survey result indicated that nearly 80% of respondents who had ever reproduced a published study had failed at least one time in reproducing. Only one third of the respondents received helpful feedbacks when they contacted the authors of a published study for data, code, or other information. The primary factors that lead to unsuccessful replication attempts are insufficient details of instructions in published literature, and inaccessibility of data, code and tools needed in the study. Our findings suggest a remarkable lack of research reproducibility in geoscience. Changing the incentive mechanism in academia, as well as developing policies and tools that facilitate open data and code sharing are the promising ways for geosciences community to alleviate this reproducibility problem.

  12. Typography and layout of technical reports - Survey of current practices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinelli, T. E.; Cordle, V. M.; Mccullough, R.

    1985-01-01

    As part of a review of the NASA Langley Research Center scientific and technical information program, 50 technical reports from industry, research institutions, and government agencies were systematically examined and analyzed to determine current usage and practice in regard to (1) typography, including composition method, type style, type size, and margin treatment; (2) graphic design, including layout and imposition of material on the page; and (3) physical media, including paper, ink, and binding methods. The results indicate that approximately 50 percent of the reports were typeset, 70 percent used Roman (serif) type, 80 percent used 10- or 11-point type for text, 60 percent used a ragged right-hand margin, slightly more than half used paragraph indentation, 75 percent used a single-column layout, 65 percent had one or more figures or tables placed perpendicular to (not aligned with) the text, and perfect binding was the most frequently used binding method.

  13. Surfactant therapy: the current practice and the future trends

    PubMed Central

    Altirkawi, Khalid

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of surfactant preparations used in the prevention and treatment of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is a well known fact; however, many controversies remain. The debate over which surfactant to be used, when and what is the best mode of delivery is still raging. Currently, animal-derived surfactants are preferred and clearly recommended by various practice guidelines, but new synthetic surfactants containing peptides that mimic the action of surfactant proteins are emerging and they seem to have a comparable efficacy profile to the natural surfactants. It is hoped that with further improvements, they will outperform their natural counterparts in terms of reliability and cost-effectiveness. Early surfactant administration was shown to further reduce the risk of RDS and its complications. However, as nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) is becoming increasingly the preferred first-line therapy for RDS, the less invasive approaches of respiratory support along with early selective surfactant administration (e.g. INSURE) appears to provide a better option. Although neonatal RDS is still the main indication of surfactant therapy, other pathological processes received considerable attention and major research has been dedicated to explore the role of surfactant in their management, Meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS) and congenital pneumonia are two worthy examples. The most updated practice guidelines do recommend the use of endotracheal instillation as the preferred mode of surfactant delivery. However, aerosolization and other non-invasive methods are being investigated with some success; nonetheless, further improvements are very much in need. PMID:27493353

  14. REVIEW OF CURRENT PRACTICE IN CHARACTERIZATION AND MONITORING

    SciTech Connect

    M.A.Ebadian, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01

    Characterization and monitoring are important parts of environmental remediation of contaminated sites by the Department of Energy--Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM). The actual remediation process often cannot begin or even be planned until characterization is complete. Monitoring is essential to verify the progress of remediation and of the waste stream. However, some contaminated sites are difficult, costly, or have a high exposure risk to personnel to characterize or monitor using the baseline technology or current practice. Therefore, development of new characterization and monitoring technologies is time-critical to remediate these sites. The main task of the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program (CMST-CP) is to develop and deploy innovative characterization and monitoring technologies that improve performance and reduce personnel exposure, cost, and detection limits. However, to evaluate different proposals for new technologies to decide which ones to develop or deploy, it is necessary to compare their cost and performance to the baseline technology. The goal of this project is to facilitate the direct comparison of new technologies to the baseline technology by documenting the current practices for site characterization and monitoring at DOE sites and by presenting the information in an easy-to-use, concise database. The database will assist the CMST-CP and others in evaluating or designing new technologies by identifying the baseline technologies and describing their performance and cost. The purpose of this document is to report on the completion of this project and to describe the database. Section 2.0 describes the data assessment methodology. Section 3.0 presents the database and serves as a user manual. Section 4.0 lists the references used for each baseline technology in the database. The full references can be found in the Appendix.

  15. The position of diagnostic laparoscopy in current fertility practice.

    PubMed

    Bosteels, Jan; Van Herendael, Bruno; Weyers, Steven; D'Hooghe, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    In everyday clinical practice, it is not always clear if and when exactly in the fertility work-up a diagnostic laparoscopy should be offered. The aim of this review is to analyse the available evidence with respect to alternative diagnostic methods for detecting tuboperitoneal infertility and with respect to the position of diagnostic laparoscopy in women with infertility. A literature search of the National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health (PubMed) was performed using the key words 'diagnostic laparoscopy and infertility'. The study methodology was carefully considered in an effort to present conclusions preferably based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The routine use of diagnostic laparoscopy for the evaluation of all cases of female infertility is currently under debate. According to data published in retrospective non-controlled studies, diagnostic laparoscopy after several failed cycles of ovulation induction enables the detection of a significant proportion of pelvic pathology amenable to treatment. A Cochrane review has shown that laparoscopic ovarian diathermy in clomiphene-resistant polycystic ovarian syndrome is at least as effective as gonadotrophin treatment, and results in a lower multiple pregnancy rate. The role of laparoscopy before the start of treatment with intrauterine insemination is controversial, according to one RCT. In women with bilateral ultrasonically visible hydrosalpinges, two RCTs have demonstrated increased implantation and pregnancy rates in IVF cycles after salpingectomy. Although RCTs which have studied the benefit of laparoscopic surgery in moderate or severe endometriosis are still lacking, its value has generally been accepted. In conclusion, some specific clinical settings, solid evidence is available to recommend the use of diagnostic laparoscopy in current fertility practice. There is however a need for more RCTs to answer remaining questions regarding its value in the diagnosis and

  16. Current treatment practice and outcomes. Report of the hyponatremia registry.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Arthur; Verbalis, Joseph G; Amin, Alpesh N; Burst, Volker R; Chiodo, Joseph A; Chiong, Jun R; Dasta, Joseph F; Friend, Keith E; Hauptman, Paul J; Peri, Alessandro; Sigal, Samuel H

    2015-07-01

    Current management practices for hyponatremia (HN) are incompletely understood. The HN Registry has recorded diagnostic measures, utilization, efficacy, and outcomes of therapy for eu- or hypervolemic HN. To better understand current practices, we analyzed data from 3087 adjudicated adult patients in the registry with serum sodium concentration of 130 mEq/l or less from 225 sites in the United States and European Union. Common initial monotherapy treatments were fluid restriction (35%), administration of isotonic (15%) or hypertonic saline (2%), and tolvaptan (5%); 17% received no active agent. Median (interquartile range) mEq/l serum sodium increases during the first day were as follows: no treatment, 1.0 (0.0-4.0); fluid restriction, 2.0 (0.0-4.0); isotonic saline, 3.0 (0.0-5.0); hypertonic saline, 5.0 (1.0-9.0); and tolvaptan, 4.0 (2.0-9.0). Adjusting for initial serum sodium concentration with logistic regression, the relative likelihoods for correction by 5 mEq/l or more (referent, fluid restriction) were 1.60 for hypertonic saline and 2.55 for tolvaptan. At discharge, serum sodium concentration was under 135 mEq/l in 78% of patients and 130 mEq/l or less in 49%. Overly rapid correction occurred in 7.9%. Thus, initial HN treatment often uses maneuvers of limited efficacy. Despite an association with poor outcomes and availability of effective therapy, most patients with HN are discharged from hospital still hyponatremic. Studies to assess short- and long-term benefits of correction of HN with effective therapies are needed. PMID:25671764

  17. Infant care practices related to sudden infant death syndrome in South Asian and White British families in the UK.

    PubMed

    Ball, Helen L; Moya, Eduardo; Fairley, Lesley; Westman, Janette; Oddie, Sam; Wright, John

    2012-01-01

    In the UK, infants of South Asian parents have a lower rate of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) than White British infants. Infant care and life style behaviours are strongly associated with SIDS risk. This paper describes and explores variability in infant care between White British and South Asian families (of Bangladeshi, Indian or Pakistani origin) in Bradford, UK (the vast majority of which were Pakistani) and identifies areas for targeted SIDS intervention. A cross-sectional telephone interview study was conducted involving 2560 families with 2- to 4-month-old singleton infants enrolled in the Born in Bradford cohort study. Outcome measures were prevalence of self-reported practices in infant sleeping environment, sharing sleep surfaces, breast feeding, use of dummy or pacifier, and life style behaviours. We found that, compared with White British infants, Pakistani infants were more likely to: sleep in an adult bed (OR = 8.48 [95% CI 2.92, 24.63]); be positioned on their side for sleep (OR = 4.42 [2.85, 6.86]); have a pillow in their sleep environment (OR = 9.85 [6.39, 15.19]); sleep under a duvet (OR = 3.24 [2.39, 4.40]); be swaddled for sleep (OR = 1.49 [1.13, 1.97]); ever bed-share (OR = 2.13 [1.59, 2.86]); regularly bed-share (OR = 3.57 [2.23, 5.72]); ever been breast-fed (OR = 2.00 [1.58, 2.53]); and breast-fed for 8+ weeks (OR = 1.65 [1.31, 2.07]). Additionally, Pakistani infants were less likely to: sleep in a room alone (OR = 0.05 [0.03, 0.09]); use feet-to-foot position (OR = 0.36 [0.26, 0.50]); sleep with a soft toy (OR = 0.52 [0.40, 0.68]); use an infant sleeping bag (OR = 0.20 [0.16, 0.26]); ever sofa-share (OR = 0.22 [0.15, 0.34]); be receiving solid foods (OR = 0.22 [0.17, 0.30]); or use a dummy at night (OR = 0.40 [0.33, 0.50]). Pakistani infants were also less likely to be exposed to maternal smoking (OR = 0.07 [0.04, 0.12]) and to alcohol consumption by either parent. No difference was found in the prevalence of prone sleeping (OR = 1

  18. Understanding flucloxacillin prescribing trends and treatment non-response in UK primary care: a Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) study

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Nick A.; Hood, Kerenza; Lyons, Ronan; Butler, Christopher C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The volume of prescribed antibiotics is associated with antimicrobial resistance and, unlike most other antibiotic classes, flucloxacillin prescribing has increased. We aimed to describe UK primary care flucloxacillin prescribing and factors associated with subsequent antibiotic prescribing as a proxy for non-response. Patients and methods Clinical Practice Research Datalink patients with acute prescriptions for oral flucloxacillin between January 2004 and December 2013, prescription details, associated Read codes and patient demographics were identified. Monthly prescribing rates were plotted and logistic regression identified factors associated with having a subsequent antibiotic prescription within 28 days. Results 3 031 179 acute prescriptions for 1 667 431 patients were included. Average monthly prescription rates increased from 4.74 prescriptions per 1000 patient-months in 2004 to 5.74 (increase of 21.1%) in 2013. The highest prescribing rates and the largest increases in rates were seen in older adults (70+ years), but the overall increase in prescribing was not accounted for by an ageing population. Prescribing 500 mg tablets/capsules rather than 250 mg became more common. Children were frequently prescribed low doses and small volumes (5 day course) and prescribing declined for children, including for impetigo. Only 4.2% of new prescriptions involved co-prescription of another antibiotic. Age (<5 and ≥60 years), diagnosis of ‘cellulitis or abscess’ or no associated code, and 500 mg dose were associated with a subsequent antibiotic prescription, which occurred after 17.6% of first prescriptions. Conclusions There is a need to understand better the reasons for increased prescribing of flucloxacillin in primary care, optimal dosing (and the need to co-prescribe other antibiotics) and the reasons why one in five patients are prescribed a further antibiotic within 4 weeks. PMID:27090629

  19. GPs' views on the practice of physician-assisted suicide and their role in proposed UK legalisation: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tariq; White, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Background A bill to legalise assisted dying in the UK has been proposed in Parliament's House of Lords three times since 2003. The House of Lords Select Committee concluded in 2005 that ‘the few attempts to understand the basis of doctors' views have shown equivocal data varying over time’. Fresh research was recommended to gain a fuller understanding of health sector views. Aim To examine GPs' views of the practice of physician-assisted suicide as defined by the 2005/2006 House of Lords (Joffe) Bill and views of their role in the proposed legislation; and to explore the influences determining GPs' views on physician-assisted suicide. Design of study Qualitative interview study. Setting Primary care in South London, England. Method Semi-structured interviews with GPs were conducted by a lead interviewer and analysed in a search for themes, using the framework approach. Results Thirteen GPs were interviewed. GPs who had not personally witnessed terminal suffering that could justify assisted dying were against the legislation. Some GPs felt their personal religious views, which regarded assisted dying as morally wrong, could not be the basis of a generalisable medical ethic for others. GPs who had witnessed a person's suffering that, in their opinion, justified physician-assisted suicide were in favour of legislative change. Some GPs felt a specialist referral pathway to provide assisted dying would help to ensure proper standards were met. Conclusion GPs' views on physician-assisted suicide ranged from support to opposition, depending principally on their interpretation of their experience of patients' suffering at the end of life. The goal to lessen suffering of the terminally ill, and apprehensions about patients being harmed, were common to both groups. Respect for autonomy and the right of self-determination versus the need to protect vulnerable people from the potential for harm from social coercion were the dominant themes. PMID:19861029

  20. Current status in outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy: a practical view.

    PubMed

    Candel, F J; Julián-Jiménez, A; González-Del Castillo, J

    2016-04-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) programs are a current and widely spread trend in clinical practice because of it´s a cost-effective option, it´s associated with a greater comfort for the patient, a lower risk of nosocomial complications and an important cost saving for the health care system. OPAT is used for treating a wide range of infections, including skin and soft tissue infections, osteoarticular infections, bacteraemia, endocarditis and complex intra-abdominal and urinary tract infections, even in presence of multiresistant microorganisms. Correct choice of antimicrobial agent and adequate patient selection are crucial for reaching therapeutic success and avoiding readmissions, treatment prolongation or treatment-related toxicity. The optimal antimicrobial for OPAT must be highly effective, have a long half-life and an adequate spectrum of action. Ceftriaxone and teicoplanin are currently the most prescribed antibiotics for OPAT, though daptomycin and ertapenem are also on the rise, due to their high efficiency, safety and wide spectrum of action. Antibiotics that are stable at room temperature can be administered through a continuous perfusion, though self-administration is preferable although it requires training of the patient or the caregiver. Factors that are most frequently associated with OPAT failure include advanced age, recent hospitalization and isolation of multiresistant microorganisms. PMID:27014770

  1. GPAQ-R: development and psychometric properties of a version of the General Practice Assessment Questionnaire for use for revalidation by general practitioners in the UK

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The General Practice Assessment Questionnaire (GPAQ) has been widely used to assess patient experience in general practice in the UK since 2004. In 2013, new regulations were introduced by the General Medical Council (GMC) requiring UK doctors to undertake periodic revalidation, which includes assessment of patient experience for individual doctors. We describe the development of a new version of GPAQ – GPAQ-R which addresses the GMC’s requirements for revalidation as well as additional NHS requirements for surveys that GPs may need to carry out in their own practices. Methods Questionnaires were given out by doctors or practice staff after routine consultations in line with the guidance given by the General Medical Council for surveys to be used for revalidation. Data analysis and practice reports were provided independently. Results Data were analysed for questionnaires from 7258 patients relating to 164 GPs in 29 general practices. Levels of missing data were generally low (typically 4.5-6%). The number of returned questionnaires required to achieve reliability of 0.7 were around 35 for individual doctor communication items and 29 for a composite score based on doctor communication items. This suggests that the responses to GPAQ-R had similar reliability to the GMC’s own questionnaire and we recommend 30 completed GPAQ-R questionnaires are sufficient for revalidation purposes. However, where an initial screen raises concern, the survey might be repeated with 50 completed questionnaires in order to increase reliability. Conclusions GPAQ-R is a development of a well-established patient experience questionnaire used in general practice in the UK since 2004. This new version can be recommended for use in order to meet the UK General Medical Council’s requirements for surveys to be used in revalidation of doctors. It also meets the needs of GPs to ask about patient experience relating to aspects of practice care that are not specific to individual

  2. Is dosimetry still a necessity in current dental practice?

    PubMed

    Reddy, S S; Rakesh, N; Chauhan, Pallavi; Clint, Joseph Ben; Sharma, Shivani

    2015-12-01

    Today, dentists have a wide range of imaging modalities to choose from, the film based techniques, digital techniques, and the recent introduction of 3D volumetric or cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). The inherent design features of the new generation dental x-ray equipment has significantly improved over the years with no evidence of substandard x-ray units in operation. In dental facilities radiological workload is comparatively low, newer radiation equipments and accessories follow safety guidelines and employ better radiation protection measures for the patient and the operator. Dentists' knowledge and expertise in radiation protection measures is good, enabling them to carry out riskfree radiation procedures in their practice. Therefore, the present study is aimed at assessing the need for dosimeters in current dental scenario. 'Is there currently a significant risk from dental radiography to merit the use of personal dosimetery in dental practice. 'Dental health professionals (Oral radiologists) and radiographic assistants of fourteen dental colleges in Karnataka state participated in this questionnaire study. The questionnaire consisted of the following questions--the make, type, year of manufacture of radiographic machines used in their setup, number of radiographs made per day in the institution, type of receptors used, number of personnel at risk for radiation exposure, radiation protection measures used, regular monitoring by personal dosimeters, equivalent dosage readings for the past 12 months and whether the reading of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) for any personnel had exceeded the recommended exposure value in the last 3 years. Dosimetry records of the radiology staff in the last three years shows doses no more than 1.50 mSv per year. The various institutions' dose (person mSv) was in the range of 3.70 mSv-3.90 mSv. Personal monitoring for Dentists can be omitted in the dental colleges since the estimated dose of oral radiologists

  3. Spurious claims for health-care products: an experimental approach to evaluating current UK legislation and its implementation.

    PubMed

    Rose, Leslie B; Posadzki, Paul; Ernst, Edzard

    2012-01-01

    The lay media, and especially the Internet, contain many misleading claims for health products which have previously been inadequately regulated by consumer law. This was an experimental interventional survey within a consumer health-care setting. Three health products were chosen on the basis of being widely available on the UK market and having no available evidence of effectiveness. Twelve volunteers submitted 39 complaints to Consumer Direct (UK portal for the regulator Trading Standards) regarding false health claims, and 36 complaints were followed up for a maximum of 4.8 months. The mean time from submission of complaints to Consumer Direct to acknowledgement by the relevant Trading Standards office was 13 days. There were no responses from Trading Standards for 22% of complaints. At the end of the study one supplier had amended their website following Trading Standards advice, but did not stop all health claims. Another stopped advertising their product on the Internet and the third continued the health claims unchanged. EU directive 2005/29/EC is largely ineffective in preventing misleading health claims for consumer products in the UK. PMID:22403120

  4. Life cycle assessment part 2: current impact assessment practice.

    PubMed

    Pennington, D W; Potting, J; Finnveden, G; Lindeijer, E; Jolliet, O; Rydberg, T; Rebitzer, G

    2004-07-01

    Providing our society with goods and services contributes to a wide range of environmental impacts. Waste generation, emissions and the consumption of resources occur at many stages in a product's life cycle-from raw material extraction, energy acquisition, production and manufacturing, use, reuse, recycling, through to ultimate disposal. These all contribute to impacts such as climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, photooxidant formation (smog), eutrophication, acidification, toxicological stress on human health and ecosystems, the depletion of resources and noise-among others. The need exists to address these product-related contributions more holistically and in an integrated manner, providing complimentary insights to those of regulatory/process-oriented methodologies. A previous article (Part 1, Rebitzer et al., 2004) outlined how to define and model a product's life cycle in current practice, as well as the methods and tools that are available for compiling the associated waste, emissions and resource consumption data into a life cycle inventory. This article highlights how practitioners and researchers from many domains have come together to provide indicators for the different impacts attributable to products in the life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) phase of life cycle assessment (LCA). PMID:15051247

  5. Targeted temperature management: Current evidence and practices in critical care

    PubMed Central

    Saigal, Saurabh; Sharma, Jai Prakash; Dhurwe, Ritika; Kumar, Sanjay; Gurjar, Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Targeted temperature management (TTM) in today's modern era, especially in intensive care units represents a promising multifaceted therapy for a variety of conditions. Though hypothermia is being used since Hippocratic era, the renewed interest of late has been since early 21st century. There have been multiple advancements in this field and varieties of cooling devices are available at present. TTM requires careful titration of its depth, duration and rewarming as it is associated with side-effects. The purpose of this review is to find out the best evidence-based clinical practice criteria of therapeutic hypothermia in critical care settings. TTM is an unique therapeutic modality for salvaging neurological tissue viability in critically ill patients viz. Post-cardiac arrest, traumatic brain injury (TBI), meningitis, acute liver failure and stroke. TTM is standard of care in post-cardiac arrest situations; there has been a lot of controversy of late regarding temperature ranges to be used for the same. In patients with TBI, it reduces intracranial pressure, but has not shown any favorable neurologic outcome. Hypothermia is generally accepted treatment for hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy in newborns. The current available technology to induce and maintain hypothermia allows for precise temperature control. Future studies should focus on optimizing hypothermic treatment to full benefit of our patients and its application in other clinical scenarios. PMID:26430341

  6. Respiratory safety pharmacology - current practice and future directions.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Dennis J

    2014-06-01

    Current practice in respiratory safety pharmacology generally follows the guidance provided by the ICH document S7A and, in general, focuses on measures of pulmonary ventilation. Respiratory rate, tidal volume and/or a measure of arterial blood gases are the recommended ventilatory measurement parameters. Although these parameters will provide a measure of ventilation, other ventilatory parameters, which can provide mechanistic insight, should also be considered. Such parameters include inspiratory and expiratory times and flows and apneic time. Stimulation models involving exercise and exposure to elevated CO2 or reduced O2 should also be considered when enhancing measurement sensitivity or quantifying reductions in ventilatory functional reserve are desired. Although ventilatory measurements are capable of assessing the functional status of the respiratory pumping apparatus, such measurements are generally not capable of assessing the status of the other functional component of the respiratory system, namely, the gas exchange unit or lung. To characterize drug-induced effects on the gas exchange unit, measures of airway patency, lung elastic recoil and gas diffusion capacity need to be considered. Thus, a variety of methodologies and measurement endpoints are available for detecting and characterizing drug-induced respiratory dysfunction in animal models and should be considered when designing respiratory safety pharmacology studies. PMID:24280358

  7. Robin sequence: A European survey on current practice patterns.

    PubMed

    van Lieshout, Manouk J S; Joosten, Koen F M; Mathijssen, Irene M J; Koudstaal, Maarten J; Hoeve, Hans L J; van der Schroeff, Marc P; Wolvius, Eppo B

    2015-10-01

    To provide an overview of current practice patterns with regard to Robin sequence (RS) patients in Europe, a survey was conducted among European clinicians. This online survey consisted of different sections assessing characteristics of the respondent and clinic, definition, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. In total, surveys from 101 different European clinics were included in the analysis, and 56 different RS definitions were returned. The majority (72%) of the respondents used a sleep study system to determine the severity of the airway obstruction. A total of 63% used flexible endoscopy and 16% used rigid endoscopy in the diagnostic process. Treatment of the airway obstruction differed considerably between the different countries. Prone positioning for mild airway obstruction was the treatment modality used most often (63%). When prone positioning was not successful, a nasopharyngeal airway was used (62%). Surgical therapies varied considerably among countries. For severe obstruction, mandibular distraction was performed most frequently. Three-quarters of the respondents noted the presence of catch-up growth in their patient population. This first European survey study on definition and management of RS shows that there are considerable differences within Europe. Therefore, we would encourage the establishment of national (and international) guidelines to optimize RS patient care. PMID:26315273

  8. Preparation of intravenous cholesterol tracer using current good manufacturing practices.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaobo; Ma, Lina; Racette, Susan B; Swaney, William P; Ostlund, Richard E

    2015-12-01

    Studies of human reverse cholesterol transport require intravenous infusion of cholesterol tracers. Because insoluble lipids may pose risk and because it is desirable to have consistent doses of defined composition available over many months, we investigated the manufacture of cholesterol tracer under current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) conditions appropriate for phase 1 investigation. Cholesterol tracer was prepared by sterile admixture of unlabeled cholesterol or cholesterol-d7 in ethanol with 20% Intralipid(®). The resulting material was filtered through a 1.2 micron particulate filter, stored at 4°C, and tested at time 0, 1.5, 3, 6, and 9 months for sterility, pyrogenicity, autoxidation, and particle size and aggregation. The limiting factor for stability was a rise in thiobarbituric acid-reacting substances of 9.6-fold over 9 months (P < 0.01). The emulsion was stable with the Z-average intensity-weighted mean droplet diameter remaining at 60 nm over 23 months. The zeta potential (a measure of negative surface charge protecting from aggregation) was unchanged at -36.2. Rapid cholesterol pool size was 25.3 ± 1.3 g. Intravenous cholesterol tracer was stable at 4°C for 9 months postproduction. CGMP manufacturing methods can be achieved in the academic setting and need to be considered for critical components of future metabolic studies. PMID:26416797

  9. Gender relations and health research: a review of current practices

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The importance of gender in understanding health practices and illness experiences is increasingly recognized, and key to this work is a better understanding of the application of gender relations. The influence of masculinities and femininities, and the interplay within and between them manifests within relations and interactions among couples, family members and peers to influence health behaviours and outcomes. Methods To explore how conceptualizations of gender relations have been integrated in health research a scoping review of the existing literature was conducted. The key terms gender relations, gender interactions, relations gender, partner communication, femininities and masculinities were used to search online databases. Results Through analysis of this literature we identified two main ways gender relations were integrated in health research: a) as emergent findings; and b) as a basis for research design. In the latter, gender relations are included in conceptual frameworks, guide data collection and are used to direct data analysis. Conclusions Current uses of gender relations are typically positioned within intimate heterosexual couples whereby single narratives (i.e., either men or women) are used to explore the influence and/or impact of intimate partner gender relations on health and illness issues. Recommendations for advancing gender relations and health research are discussed. This research has the potential to reduce gender inequities in health. PMID:22151578

  10. Guide to clinical practice guidelines: the current state of play

    PubMed Central

    Kredo, Tamara; Bernhardsson, Susanne; Machingaidze, Shingai; Young, Taryn; Louw, Quinette; Ochodo, Eleanor; Grimmer, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Extensive research has been undertaken over the last 30 years on the methods underpinning clinical practice guidelines (CPGs), including their development, updating, reporting, tailoring for specific purposes, implementation and evaluation. This has resulted in an increasing number of terms, tools and acronyms. Over time, CPGs have shifted from opinion-based to evidence-informed, including increasingly sophisticated methodologies and implementation strategies, and thus keeping abreast of evolution in this field of research can be challenging. Methods This article collates findings from an extensive document search, to provide a guide describing standards, methods and systems reported in the current CPG methodology and implementation literature. This guide is targeted at those working in health care quality and safety and responsible for either commissioning, researching or delivering health care. It is presented in a way that can be updated as the field expands. Conclusion CPG development and implementation have attracted the most international interest and activity, whilst CPG updating, adopting (with or without contextualization), adapting and impact evaluation are less well addressed. PMID:26796486