Science.gov

Sample records for curve fitting approach

  1. Longitudinal Changes in Physical Fitness Performance in Youth: A Multilevel Latent Growth Curve Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Chee Keng John; Pyun, Do Young; Liu, Woon Chia; Lim, Boon San Coral; Li, Fuzhong

    2013-01-01

    Using a multilevel latent growth curve modeling (LGCM) approach, this study examined longitudinal change in levels of physical fitness performance over time (i.e. four years) in young adolescents aged from 12-13 years. The sample consisted of 6622 students from 138 secondary schools in Singapore. Initial analyses found between-school variation on…

  2. NLINEAR - NONLINEAR CURVE FITTING PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    A common method for fitting data is a least-squares fit. In the least-squares method, a user-specified fitting function is utilized in such a way as to minimize the sum of the squares of distances between the data points and the fitting curve. The Nonlinear Curve Fitting Program, NLINEAR, is an interactive curve fitting routine based on a description of the quadratic expansion of the chi-squared statistic. NLINEAR utilizes a nonlinear optimization algorithm that calculates the best statistically weighted values of the parameters of the fitting function and the chi-square that is to be minimized. The inputs to the program are the mathematical form of the fitting function and the initial values of the parameters to be estimated. This approach provides the user with statistical information such as goodness of fit and estimated values of parameters that produce the highest degree of correlation between the experimental data and the mathematical model. In the mathematical formulation of the algorithm, the Taylor expansion of chi-square is first introduced, and justification for retaining only the first term are presented. From the expansion, a set of n simultaneous linear equations are derived, which are solved by matrix algebra. To achieve convergence, the algorithm requires meaningful initial estimates for the parameters of the fitting function. NLINEAR is written in Fortran 77 for execution on a CDC Cyber 750 under NOS 2.3. It has a central memory requirement of 5K 60 bit words. Optionally, graphical output of the fitting function can be plotted. Tektronix PLOT-10 routines are required for graphics. NLINEAR was developed in 1987.

  3. Automatic detection of mitochondria from electron microscope tomography images: a curve fitting approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasel, Serdar F.; Hassanpour, Reza; Mumcuoglu, Erkan U.; Perkins, Guy C.; Martone, Maryann

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondria are sub-cellular components which are mainly responsible for synthesis of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) and involved in the regulation of several cellular activities such as apoptosis. The relation between some common diseases of aging and morphological structure of mitochondria is gaining strength by an increasing number of studies. Electron microscope tomography (EMT) provides high-resolution images of the 3D structure and internal arrangement of mitochondria. Studies that aim to reveal the correlation between mitochondrial structure and its function require the aid of special software tools for manual segmentation of mitochondria from EMT images. Automated detection and segmentation of mitochondria is a challenging problem due to the variety of mitochondrial structures, the presence of noise, artifacts and other sub-cellular structures. Segmentation methods reported in the literature require human interaction to initialize the algorithms. In our previous study, we focused on 2D detection and segmentation of mitochondria using an ellipse detection method. In this study, we propose a new approach for automatic detection of mitochondria from EMT images. First, a preprocessing step was applied in order to reduce the effect of nonmitochondrial sub-cellular structures. Then, a curve fitting approach was presented using a Hessian-based ridge detector to extract membrane-like structures and a curve-growing scheme. Finally, an automatic algorithm was employed to detect mitochondria which are represented by a subset of the detected curves. The results show that the proposed method is more robust in detection of mitochondria in consecutive EMT slices as compared with our previous automatic method.

  4. Fitting curves to cyclic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langbein, W.B.

    1955-01-01

    A common problem in hydrology is to fit a smooth curve to cyclic or periodic data, either to define the most probable values of the data or to test some principle that one wishes to demonstrate.  This study treats of those problems where the length or period of the cycle is know beforehand - as a day, year, or meander length for example.  Curve-fitting can be made by free-hand drawing, and where the data are closely aligned this method offers the simplest and most direct course.  However, there are many problems where the best fit is far from obvious, and analytical methods may be necessary.

  5. AKLSQF - LEAST SQUARES CURVE FITTING

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, A. V.

    1994-01-01

    The Least Squares Curve Fitting program, AKLSQF, computes the polynomial which will least square fit uniformly spaced data easily and efficiently. The program allows the user to specify the tolerable least squares error in the fitting or allows the user to specify the polynomial degree. In both cases AKLSQF returns the polynomial and the actual least squares fit error incurred in the operation. The data may be supplied to the routine either by direct keyboard entry or via a file. AKLSQF produces the least squares polynomial in two steps. First, the data points are least squares fitted using the orthogonal factorial polynomials. The result is then reduced to a regular polynomial using Sterling numbers of the first kind. If an error tolerance is specified, the program starts with a polynomial of degree 1 and computes the least squares fit error. The degree of the polynomial used for fitting is then increased successively until the error criterion specified by the user is met. At every step the polynomial as well as the least squares fitting error is printed to the screen. In general, the program can produce a curve fitting up to a 100 degree polynomial. All computations in the program are carried out under Double Precision format for real numbers and under long integer format for integers to provide the maximum accuracy possible. AKLSQF was written for an IBM PC X/AT or compatible using Microsoft's Quick Basic compiler. It has been implemented under DOS 3.2.1 using 23K of RAM. AKLSQF was developed in 1989.

  6. Interpolation and Polynomial Curve Fitting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Yajun; Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2014-01-01

    Two points determine a line. Three noncollinear points determine a quadratic function. Four points that do not lie on a lower-degree polynomial curve determine a cubic function. In general, n + 1 points uniquely determine a polynomial of degree n, presuming that they do not fall onto a polynomial of lower degree. The process of finding such a…

  7. Bounded Population Growth: A Curve Fitting Lesson.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathews, John H.

    1992-01-01

    Presents two mathematical methods for fitting the logistic curve to population data supplied by the U.S. Census Bureau utilizing computer algebra software to carry out the computations and plot graphs. (JKK)

  8. Measuring Systematic Error with Curve Fits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupright, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Systematic errors are often unavoidable in the introductory physics laboratory. As has been demonstrated in many papers in this journal, such errors can present a fundamental problem for data analysis, particularly when comparing the data to a given model. In this paper I give three examples in which my students use popular curve-fitting software…

  9. Modeling and Fitting Exoplanet Transit Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millholland, Sarah; Ruch, G. T.

    2013-01-01

    We present a numerical model along with an original fitting routine for the analysis of transiting extra-solar planet light curves. Our light curve model is unique in several ways from other available transit models, such as the analytic eclipse formulae of Mandel & Agol (2002) and Giménez (2006), the modified Eclipsing Binary Orbit Program (EBOP) model implemented in Southworth’s JKTEBOP code (Popper & Etzel 1981; Southworth et al. 2004), or the transit model developed as a part of the EXOFAST fitting suite (Eastman et al. in prep.). Our model employs Keplerian orbital dynamics about the system’s center of mass to properly account for stellar wobble and orbital eccentricity, uses a unique analytic solution derived from Kepler’s Second Law to calculate the projected distance between the centers of the star and planet, and calculates the effect of limb darkening using a simple technique that is different from the commonly used eclipse formulae. We have also devised a unique Monte Carlo style optimization routine for fitting the light curve model to observed transits. We demonstrate that, while the effect of stellar wobble on transit light curves is generally small, it becomes significant as the planet to stellar mass ratio increases and the semi-major axes of the orbits decrease. We also illustrate the appreciable effects of orbital ellipticity on the light curve and the necessity of accounting for its impacts for accurate modeling. We show that our simple limb darkening calculations are as accurate as the analytic equations of Mandel & Agol (2002). Although our Monte Carlo fitting algorithm is not as mathematically rigorous as the Markov Chain Monte Carlo based algorithms most often used to determine exoplanetary system parameters, we show that it is straightforward and returns reliable results. Finally, we show that analyses performed with our model and optimization routine compare favorably with exoplanet characterizations published by groups such as the

  10. Multivariate curve-fitting in GAUSS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunck, C.M.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    Multivariate curve-fitting techniques for repeated measures have been developed and an interactive program has been written in GAUSS. The program implements not only the one-factor design described in Morrison (1967) but also includes pairwise comparisons of curves and rates, a two-factor design, and other options. Strategies for selecting the appropriate degree for the polynomial are provided. The methods and program are illustrated with data from studies of the effects of environmental contaminants on ducklings, nesting kestrels and quail.

  11. Curve fitting of mixed-mode isopachics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebb, R. I.; Dulieu-Barton, J. M.; Worden, K.; Tatum, P.

    2009-08-01

    Recent work has focused on exploiting the observation that the stress-sum contours (isopachics), obtained from TSA, in the vicinity of the tip take the form of a simple curve - the cardioid. The analysis made use of the cardioid nature of the isopachics by deriving expressions for the SIFs in terms of the cardioid area and the positions of certain tangents to the curve. Both Genetic Algorithms (GAs) and Differential Evolution (DE) have also proved successful for parameter estimation, but some of the curve-fits indicated that the cardioid form was inappropriate for the base model, particularly for mixed-mode cracks. The effect of crack-tip interaction has been explored and shows this has a small effect on the cardioid form. New, higher resolution infra-red detectors have become available since the original data was collected, so the object of the current paper is to use new techniques to extract the cardioid form and use a GA to perform the curve fitting.

  12. D Catenary Curve Fitting for Geometric Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, T.-O.; Lichti, D. D.

    2011-09-01

    In modern road surveys, hanging power cables are among the most commonly-found geometric features. These cables are catenary curves that are conventionally modelled with three parameters in 2D Cartesian space. With the advent and popularity of the mobile mapping system (MMS), the 3D point clouds of hanging power cables can be captured within a short period of time. These point clouds, similarly to those of planar features, can be used for feature-based self-calibration of the system assembly errors of an MMS. However, to achieve this, a well-defined 3D equation for the catenary curve is needed. This paper proposes three 3D catenary curve models, each having different parameters. The models are examined by least squares fitting of simulated data and real data captured with an MMS. The outcome of the fitting is investigated in terms of the residuals and correlation matrices. Among the proposed models, one of them could estimate the parameters accurately and without any extreme correlation between the variables. This model can also be applied to those transmission lines captured by airborne laser scanning or any other hanging cable-like objects.

  13. Simplified curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, S.; Tannehill, J. C.; Weilmuenster, K. J.

    1987-01-01

    New, improved curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air have been developed. The curve fits are for pressure, speed of sound, temperature, entropy, enthalpy, density, and internal energy. These curve fits can be readily incorporated into new or existing computational fluid dynamics codes if real gas effects are desired. The curve fits are constructed from Grabau-type transition functions to model the thermodynamic surfaces in a piecewise manner. The accuracies and continuity of these curve fits are substantially improved over those of previous curve fits. These improvements are due to the incorporation of a small number of additional terms in the approximating polynomials and careful choices of the transition functions. The ranges of validity of the new curve fits are temperatures up to 25 000 K and densities from 10 to the -7 to 10 to the 3d power amagats.

  14. Evaluating Latent Growth Curve Models Using Individual Fit Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coffman, Donna L.; Millsap, Roger E.

    2006-01-01

    The usefulness of assessing individual fit in latent growth curve models was examined. The study used simulated data based on an unconditional and a conditional latent growth curve model with a linear component and a small quadratic component and a linear model was fit to the data. Then the overall fit of linear and quadratic models to these data…

  15. Simplified curve fits for the transport properties of equilibrium air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, S.; Tannehill, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    New, improved curve fits for the transport properties of equilibruim air have been developed. The curve fits are for viscosity and Prandtl number as functions of temperature and density, and viscosity and thermal conductivity as functions of internal energy and density. The curve fits were constructed using grabau-type transition functions to model the tranport properties of Peng and Pindroh. The resulting curve fits are sufficiently accurate and self-contained so that they can be readily incorporated into new or existing computational fluid dynamics codes. The range of validity of the new curve fits are temperatures up to 15,000 K densities from 10 to the -5 to 10 amagats (rho/rho sub o).

  16. Fitting Richards' curve to data of diverse origins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, D.H.; Sargeant, A.B.; Allen, S.H.

    1975-01-01

    Published techniques for fitting data to nonlinear growth curves are briefly reviewed, most techniques require knowledge of the shape of the curve. A flexible growth curve developed by Richards (1959) is discussed as an alternative when the shape is unknown. The shape of this curve is governed by a specific parameter which can be estimated from the data. We describe in detail the fitting of a diverse set of longitudinal and cross-sectional data to Richards' growth curve for the purpose of determining the age of red fox (Vulpes vulpes) pups on the basis of right hind foot length. The fitted curve is found suitable for pups less than approximately 80 days old. The curve is extrapolated to pre-natal growth and shown to be appropriate only for about 10 days prior to birth.

  17. Simplified curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, S.; Tannehill, J. C.; Weilmuenster, K. J.

    1986-01-01

    New improved curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air were developed. The curve fits are for p = p(e,rho), a = a(e,rho), T = T(e,rho), s = s(e,rho), T = T(p,rho), h = h(p,rho), rho = rho(p,s), e = e(p,s) and a = a(p,s). These curve fits can be readily incorporated into new or existing Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes if real-gas effects are desired. The curve fits were constructed using Grabau-type transition functions to model the thermodynamic surfaces in a piecewise manner. The accuracies and continuity of these curve fits are substantially improved over those of previous curve fits appearing in NASA CR-2470. These improvements were due to the incorporation of a small number of additional terms in the approximating polynomials and careful choices of the transition functions. The ranges of validity of the new curve fits are temperatures up to 25,000 K and densities from 10 to the minus 7th to 100 amagats (rho/rho sub 0).

  18. Curve fitting methods for solar radiation data modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Karim, Samsul Ariffin Abdul E-mail: balbir@petronas.com.my; Singh, Balbir Singh Mahinder E-mail: balbir@petronas.com.my

    2014-10-24

    This paper studies the use of several type of curve fitting method to smooth the global solar radiation data. After the data have been fitted by using curve fitting method, the mathematical model of global solar radiation will be developed. The error measurement was calculated by using goodness-fit statistics such as root mean square error (RMSE) and the value of R{sup 2}. The best fitting methods will be used as a starting point for the construction of mathematical modeling of solar radiation received in Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (UTP) Malaysia. Numerical results indicated that Gaussian fitting and sine fitting (both with two terms) gives better results as compare with the other fitting methods.

  19. Curve fitting methods for solar radiation data modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Samsul Ariffin Abdul; Singh, Balbir Singh Mahinder

    2014-10-01

    This paper studies the use of several type of curve fitting method to smooth the global solar radiation data. After the data have been fitted by using curve fitting method, the mathematical model of global solar radiation will be developed. The error measurement was calculated by using goodness-fit statistics such as root mean square error (RMSE) and the value of R2. The best fitting methods will be used as a starting point for the construction of mathematical modeling of solar radiation received in Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS (UTP) Malaysia. Numerical results indicated that Gaussian fitting and sine fitting (both with two terms) gives better results as compare with the other fitting methods.

  20. Real-Time Exponential Curve Fits Using Discrete Calculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    An improved solution for curve fitting data to an exponential equation (y = Ae(exp Bt) + C) has been developed. This improvement is in four areas -- speed, stability, determinant processing time, and the removal of limits. The solution presented avoids iterative techniques and their stability errors by using three mathematical ideas: discrete calculus, a special relationship (be tween exponential curves and the Mean Value Theorem for Derivatives), and a simple linear curve fit algorithm. This method can also be applied to fitting data to the general power law equation y = Ax(exp B) + C and the general geometric growth equation y = Ak(exp Bt) + C.

  1. Analysis of Surface Plasmon Resonance Curves with a Novel Sigmoid-Asymmetric Fitting Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Jang, Daeho; Chae, Geunhyoung; Shin, Sehyun

    2015-01-01

    The present study introduces a novel curve-fitting algorithm for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) curves using a self-constructed, wedge-shaped beam type angular interrogation SPR spectroscopy technique. Previous fitting approaches such as asymmetric and polynomial equations are still unsatisfactory for analyzing full SPR curves and their use is limited to determining the resonance angle. In the present study, we developed a sigmoid-asymmetric equation that provides excellent curve-fitting for the whole SPR curve over a range of incident angles, including regions of the critical angle and resonance angle. Regardless of the bulk fluid type (i.e., water and air), the present sigmoid-asymmetric fitting exhibited nearly perfect matching with a full SPR curve, whereas the asymmetric and polynomial curve fitting methods did not. Because the present curve-fitting sigmoid-asymmetric equation can determine the critical angle as well as the resonance angle, the undesired effect caused by the bulk fluid refractive index was excluded by subtracting the critical angle from the resonance angle in real time. In conclusion, the proposed sigmoid-asymmetric curve-fitting algorithm for SPR curves is widely applicable to various SPR measurements, while excluding the effect of bulk fluids on the sensing layer. PMID:26437414

  2. Analysis of Surface Plasmon Resonance Curves with a Novel Sigmoid-Asymmetric Fitting Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Daeho; Chae, Geunhyoung; Shin, Sehyun

    2015-01-01

    The present study introduces a novel curve-fitting algorithm for surface plasmon resonance (SPR) curves using a self-constructed, wedge-shaped beam type angular interrogation SPR spectroscopy technique. Previous fitting approaches such as asymmetric and polynomial equations are still unsatisfactory for analyzing full SPR curves and their use is limited to determining the resonance angle. In the present study, we developed a sigmoid-asymmetric equation that provides excellent curve-fitting for the whole SPR curve over a range of incident angles, including regions of the critical angle and resonance angle. Regardless of the bulk fluid type (i.e., water and air), the present sigmoid-asymmetric fitting exhibited nearly perfect matching with a full SPR curve, whereas the asymmetric and polynomial curve fitting methods did not. Because the present curve-fitting sigmoid-asymmetric equation can determine the critical angle as well as the resonance angle, the undesired effect caused by the bulk fluid refractive index was excluded by subtracting the critical angle from the resonance angle in real time. In conclusion, the proposed sigmoid-asymmetric curve-fitting algorithm for SPR curves is widely applicable to various SPR measurements, while excluding the effect of bulk fluids on the sensing layer. PMID:26437414

  3. Sensitivity of Fit Indices to Misspecification in Growth Curve Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Wei; West, Stephen G.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the sensitivity of fit indices to model misspecification in within-individual covariance structure, between-individual covariance structure, and marginal mean structure in growth curve models. Five commonly used fit indices were examined, including the likelihood ratio test statistic, root mean square error of…

  4. Curve fitting for RHB Islamic Bank annual net profit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadarajan, Dineswary; Noor, Noor Fadiya Mohd

    2015-05-01

    The RHB Islamic Bank net profit data are obtained from 2004 to 2012. Curve fitting is done by assuming the data are exact or experimental due to smoothing process. Higher order Lagrange polynomial and cubic spline with curve fitting procedure are constructed using Maple software. Normality test is performed to check the data adequacy. Regression analysis with curve estimation is conducted in SPSS environment. All the eleven models are found to be acceptable at 10% significant level of ANOVA. Residual error and absolute relative true error are calculated and compared. The optimal model based on the minimum average error is proposed.

  5. Evaluating Model Fit for Growth Curve Models: Integration of Fit Indices from SEM and MLM Frameworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Wei; West, Stephen G.; Taylor, Aaron B.

    2009-01-01

    Evaluating overall model fit for growth curve models involves 3 challenging issues. (a) Three types of longitudinal data with different implications for model fit may be distinguished: balanced on time with complete data, balanced on time with data missing at random, and unbalanced on time. (b) Traditional work on fit from the structural equation…

  6. Viscosity Coefficient Curve Fits for Ionized Gas Species Grant Palmer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Grant; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Viscosity coefficient curve fits for neutral gas species are available from many sources. Many do a good job of reproducing experimental and computational chemistry data. The curve fits are usually expressed as a function of temperature only. This is consistent with the governing equations used to derive an expression for the neutral species viscosity coefficient. Ionized species pose a more complicated problem. They are subject to electrostatic as well as intermolecular forces. The electrostatic forces are affected by a shielding phenomenon where electrons shield the electrostatic forces of positively charged ions beyond a certain distance. The viscosity coefficient for an ionized gas species is a function of both temperature and local electron number density. Currently available curve fits for ionized gas species, such as those presented by Gupta/Yos, are a function of temperature only. What they did was to assume an electron number density. The problem is that the electron number density they assumed was unrealistically high. The purpose of this paper is two-fold. First, the proper expression for determining the viscosity coefficient of an ionized species as a function of both temperature and electron number density will be presented. Then curve fit coefficients will be developed using the more realistic assumption of an equilibrium electron number density. The results will be compared against previous curve fits and against highly accurate computational chemistry data.

  7. Fitting age-specific fertility with the Makeham curve.

    PubMed

    Luther, N Y

    1984-01-01

    The Makeham curve has long been recognized for its empirically good fit of adult mortality experience. However, it has never been seriously used in fertility estimation. This paper aims to show that the Makeham curve provides a very good fit of cumulative age-specific fertility over the full range of the fertility experience. Presented here is a simple linearization procedure, easily executed by hand calcualtor, for the estimation of cumulative age-specific fertility per woman (or parity) ar exact age x. The procedure provides a check for the fit of the Makeham curve to cumulative age-specific fertility, locally or globally--that is, the fit to local ratios over any range of ages. The procedure also determines the parameters of optimum fit over any range of ages. To carry out the procedure, one must simply check the linearity of points in each of 2 data plots and determine the Makeham curve from the slopes and intercepts of the fitted straight lines. The mathematical methodology for the procedure is presented and the global goodness of fit studied. Because it is of a local nature, and since it elicits an explicit analytic formula for the fitted Makeham curve, the procedure is conducive to interpolation and extrapolation applications, including the completion of incomplete schedules of age-specific fertility rates at the tails of the reproductive age span. The use of the procedure for extrapolation purposes is illustrated with data from the 1968 Population Growth Survey of Pakistan. It suggests results that, for the most part, are consistent with the thesis of general age exaggeration of reporting women. However, further evidence is needed to be conclusive. PMID:12313262

  8. Extracting gene-gene interactions through curve fitting.

    PubMed

    Das, Ranajit; Mitra, Sushmita; Murthy, C A

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a simple and novel curve fitting approach for generating simple gene regulatory subnetworks from time series gene expression data. Microarray experiments simultaneously generate massive data sets and help immensely in the large-scale study of gene expression patterns. Initial biclustering reduces the search space in the high-dimensional microarray data. The least-squares error between fitting of gene pairs is minimized to extract a set of gene-gene interactions, involving transcriptional regulation of genes. The higher error values are eliminated to retain only the strong interacting gene pairs in the resultant gene regulatory subnetwork. Next the algorithm is extended to a generalized framework to enhance its capability. The methodology takes care of the higher-order dependencies involving multiple genes co-regulating a single gene, while eliminating the need for user-defined parameters. It has been applied to the time-series Yeast data, and the experimental results biologically validated using standard databases and literature. PMID:22997274

  9. Quantifying and Reducing Curve-Fitting Uncertainty in Isc

    SciTech Connect

    Campanelli, Mark; Duck, Benjamin; Emery, Keith

    2015-06-14

    Current-voltage (I-V) curve measurements of photovoltaic (PV) devices are used to determine performance parameters and to establish traceable calibration chains. Measurement standards specify localized curve fitting methods, e.g., straight-line interpolation/extrapolation of the I-V curve points near short-circuit current, Isc. By considering such fits as statistical linear regressions, uncertainties in the performance parameters are readily quantified. However, the legitimacy of such a computed uncertainty requires that the model be a valid (local) representation of the I-V curve and that the noise be sufficiently well characterized. Using more data points often has the advantage of lowering the uncertainty. However, more data points can make the uncertainty in the fit arbitrarily small, and this fit uncertainty misses the dominant residual uncertainty due to so-called model discrepancy. Using objective Bayesian linear regression for straight-line fits for Isc, we investigate an evidence-based method to automatically choose data windows of I-V points with reduced model discrepancy. We also investigate noise effects. Uncertainties, aligned with the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM), are quantified throughout.

  10. Quantifying and Reducing Curve-Fitting Uncertainty in Isc: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Campanelli, Mark; Duck, Benjamin; Emery, Keith

    2015-09-28

    Current-voltage (I-V) curve measurements of photovoltaic (PV) devices are used to determine performance parameters and to establish traceable calibration chains. Measurement standards specify localized curve fitting methods, e.g., straight-line interpolation/extrapolation of the I-V curve points near short-circuit current, Isc. By considering such fits as statistical linear regressions, uncertainties in the performance parameters are readily quantified. However, the legitimacy of such a computed uncertainty requires that the model be a valid (local) representation of the I-V curve and that the noise be sufficiently well characterized. Using more data points often has the advantage of lowering the uncertainty. However, more data points can make the uncertainty in the fit arbitrarily small, and this fit uncertainty misses the dominant residual uncertainty due to so-called model discrepancy. Using objective Bayesian linear regression for straight-line fits for Isc, we investigate an evidence-based method to automatically choose data windows of I-V points with reduced model discrepancy. We also investigate noise effects. Uncertainties, aligned with the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM), are quantified throughout.

  11. How Graphing Calculators Find Curves of Best Fit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Mark; Shore, JoAnna; Boggs, Stacey

    2004-01-01

    For over a decade mathematics instructors have been using graphing calculators in courses ranging from developmental mathematics (Beginning and Intermediate Algebra) to Calculus and Statistics. One of the key functions that make them so powerful in the teaching and learning process is their ability to find curves of best fit. Instructors may use…

  12. Students' Models of Curve Fitting: A Models and Modeling Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupta, Shweta

    2010-01-01

    The Models and Modeling Perspectives (MMP) has evolved out of research that began 26 years ago. MMP researchers use Model Eliciting Activities (MEAs) to elicit students' mental models. In this study MMP was used as the conceptual framework to investigate the nature of students' models of curve fitting in a problem-solving environment consisting of…

  13. Curve fitting air sample filter decay curves to estimate transuranic content.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Robert B; Chiou, Hung Cheng

    2004-01-01

    By testing industry standard techniques for radon progeny evaluation on air sample filters, a new technique is developed to evaluate transuranic activity on air filters by curve fitting the decay curves. The industry method modified here is simply the use of filter activity measurements at different times to estimate the air concentrations of radon progeny. The primary modification was to not look for specific radon progeny values but rather transuranic activity. By using a method that will provide reasonably conservative estimates of the transuranic activity present on a filter, some credit for the decay curve shape can then be taken. By carrying out rigorous statistical analysis of the curve fits to over 65 samples having no transuranic activity taken over a 10-mo period, an optimization of the fitting function and quality tests for this purpose was attained. PMID:14695010

  14. BGFit: management and automated fitting of biological growth curves

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Existing tools to model cell growth curves do not offer a flexible integrative approach to manage large datasets and automatically estimate parameters. Due to the increase of experimental time-series from microbiology and oncology, the need for a software that allows researchers to easily organize experimental data and simultaneously extract relevant parameters in an efficient way is crucial. Results BGFit provides a web-based unified platform, where a rich set of dynamic models can be fitted to experimental time-series data, further allowing to efficiently manage the results in a structured and hierarchical way. The data managing system allows to organize projects, experiments and measurements data and also to define teams with different editing and viewing permission. Several dynamic and algebraic models are already implemented, such as polynomial regression, Gompertz, Baranyi, Logistic and Live Cell Fraction models and the user can add easily new models thus expanding current ones. Conclusions BGFit allows users to easily manage their data and models in an integrated way, even if they are not familiar with databases or existing computational tools for parameter estimation. BGFit is designed with a flexible architecture that focus on extensibility and leverages free software with existing tools and methods, allowing to compare and evaluate different data modeling techniques. The application is described in the context of bacterial and tumor cells growth data fitting, but it is also applicable to any type of two-dimensional data, e.g. physical chemistry and macroeconomic time series, being fully scalable to high number of projects, data and model complexity. PMID:24067087

  15. Double-mass curves; with a section fitting curves to cyclic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Searcy, James K.; Hardison, Clayton H.; Langein, Walter B.

    1960-01-01

    The double.-mass curve is used to check the consistency of many kinds of hydrologic data by comparing data for a single station with that of a pattern composed of the data from several other stations in the area The double-mass curve can be used to adjust inconsistent precipitation data. The graph of the cumulative data of one variable versus the cumulative data of a related variable is a straight line so long as the relation between the variables is a fixed ratio. Breaks in the double-mass curve of such variables are caused by changes in the relation between the variables. These changes may be due to changes in the method of data collection or to physical changes that affect the relation. Applications of the double-mass curve to precipitation, streamflow, and sediment data, and to precipitation-runoff relations are described. A statistical test for significance of an apparent break in the slope of the double-mass curve is described by an example. Poor correlation between the variables can prevent detection of inconsistencies in a record, but an increase in the length of record tends to offset the effect of poor correlation. The residual-mass curve, which is a modification of the double-mass curve, magnifies imperceptible breaks in the double-mass curve for detailed study. Of the several methods of fitting a smooth curve to cyclic or periodic data, the moving-arc method and the double-integration method deserve greater use in hydrology. Both methods are described in this manual. The moving-arc method has general applicability, and the double integration method is useful in fitting a curve to cycles of sinusoidal form.

  16. Using LISREL to Fit Nonlinear Latent Curve Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blozis, Shelley A.; Harring, Jeffrey R.; Mels, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Latent curve models offer a flexible approach to the study of longitudinal data when the form of change in a response is nonlinear. This article considers such models that are conditionally linear with regard to the random coefficients at the 2nd level. This framework allows fixed parameters to enter a model linearly or nonlinearly, and random…

  17. An automated fitting procedure and software for dose-response curves with multiphasic features

    PubMed Central

    Veroli, Giovanni Y. Di; Fornari, Chiara; Goldlust, Ian; Mills, Graham; Koh, Siang Boon; Bramhall, Jo L; Richards, Frances M.; Jodrell, Duncan I.

    2015-01-01

    In cancer pharmacology (and many other areas), most dose-response curves are satisfactorily described by a classical Hill equation (i.e. 4 parameters logistical). Nevertheless, there are instances where the marked presence of more than one point of inflection, or the presence of combined agonist and antagonist effects, prevents straight-forward modelling of the data via a standard Hill equation. Here we propose a modified model and automated fitting procedure to describe dose-response curves with multiphasic features. The resulting general model enables interpreting each phase of the dose-response as an independent dose-dependent process. We developed an algorithm which automatically generates and ranks dose-response models with varying degrees of multiphasic features. The algorithm was implemented in new freely available Dr Fit software (sourceforge.net/projects/drfit/). We show how our approach is successful in describing dose-response curves with multiphasic features. Additionally, we analysed a large cancer cell viability screen involving 11650 dose-response curves. Based on our algorithm, we found that 28% of cases were better described by a multiphasic model than by the Hill model. We thus provide a robust approach to fit dose-response curves with various degrees of complexity, which, together with the provided software implementation, should enable a wide audience to easily process their own data. PMID:26424192

  18. A curve fitting method for solving the flutter equation. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    A curve fitting approach was developed to solve the flutter equation for the critical flutter velocity. The psi versus nu curves are approximated by cubic and quadratic equations. The curve fitting technique utilized the first and second derivatives of psi with respect to nu. The method was tested for two structures, one structure being six times the total mass of the other structure. The algorithm never showed any tendency to diverge from the solution. The average time for the computation of a flutter velocity was 3.91 seconds on an IBM Model 50 computer for an accuracy of five per cent. For values of nu close to the critical root of the flutter equation the algorithm converged on the first attempt. The maximum number of iterations for convergence to the critical flutter velocity was five with an assumed value of nu relatively distant from the actual crossover.

  19. Asteroid Phase Curves: Two- And Three-parameter Fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oszkiewicz, Dagmara; Muinonen, K.; Bowell, E.; Trilling, D.

    2010-10-01

    We apply the two-parameter H, G12 and the three-parameter H, G1, G2 magnitude phase functions (Muinonen et al., Icarus, in press) to photometric data from the Minor Planet Center, as modified in observational data files at Lowell Observatory, to derive improved absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters for individual asteroids (G12) and for groups of asteroids: e.g., main-belt zones, families (G1, G2). The Lowell Observatory orbital data file comprises about 535,000 records. Most of the photometric data are of low precision (generally rounded to 0.1 mag) and low accuracy (rms magnitude uncertainties of ± 0.5 mag are typical). To offset the low accuracy, the photometric data are very numerous: about 73,000,000 individual, largely independent magnitude estimates exist. Here we present our preliminary estimates of absolute magnitudes using the H, G1, G2 magnitude phase functions and compare them with the values derived using the H, G12 two-parameter phase functions. A java applet version of the fitting procedures will soon be available on the web. In future, we plan to combine the derived absolute magnitudes with thermal data from the "Spitzer Asteroid Catalog". The Spitzer catalog includes observations of several hundred near-Earth asteroids and about 100,000 main-belt asteroids most of them observed at 24 micrometer wavelength. The catalog contains fluxes, derived albedos, and diameters. By far the biggest source of error in the catalog stems from inaccurate visible magnitudes. Improved asteroid absolute magnitudes will also lead to better visible magnitude prediction and hence better calibrated asteroid albedos derived from thermal-models. Further, we plan to explore correlations among taxa, color indices, albedos, and phase curves. A significant data product will be a frequently updated list of asteroid photometric parameters and their uncertainties. Research supported, by Magnus Ehrnrooth Foundation, Spitzer Science Center and Lowell Observatory.

  20. Locally-Based Kernal PLS Smoothing to Non-Parametric Regression Curve Fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosipal, Roman; Trejo, Leonard J.; Wheeler, Kevin; Korsmeyer, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a novel smoothing approach to non-parametric regression curve fitting. This is based on kernel partial least squares (PLS) regression in reproducing kernel Hilbert space. It is our concern to apply the methodology for smoothing experimental data where some level of knowledge about the approximate shape, local inhomogeneities or points where the desired function changes its curvature is known a priori or can be derived based on the observed noisy data. We propose locally-based kernel PLS regression that extends the previous kernel PLS methodology by incorporating this knowledge. We compare our approach with existing smoothing splines, hybrid adaptive splines and wavelet shrinkage techniques on two generated data sets.

  1. FIT-MART: Quantum Magnetism with a Gentle Learning Curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Larry; Garland, Scott C.; Rainey, Cameron; Freeman, Ray A.

    We present a new open-source software package, FIT-MART, that allows non-experts to quickly get started sim- ulating quantum magnetism. FIT-MART can be downloaded as a platform-idependent executable Java (JAR) file. It allows the user to define (Heisenberg) Hamiltonians by electronically drawing pictures that represent quantum spins and operators. Sliders are automatically generated to control the values of the parameters in the model, and when the values change, several plots are updated in real time to display both the resulting energy spectra and the equilibruim magnetic properties. Several experimental data sets for real magnetic molecules are included in FIT-MART to allow easy comparison between simulated and experimental data, and FIT-MART users can also import their own data for analysis and compare the goodness of fit for different models.

  2. Code System for Data Plotting and Curve Fitting.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-07-23

    Version 00 PLOTnFIT is used for plotting and analyzing data by fitting nth degree polynomials of basis functions to the data interactively and printing graphs of the data and the polynomial functions. It can be used to generate linear, semilog, and log-log graphs and can automatically scale the coordinate axes to suit the data. Multiple data sets may be plotted on a single graph. An auxiliary program, READ1ST, is included which produces an on-line summarymore » of the information contained in the PLOTnFIT reference report.« less

  3. Item Characteristic Curves: A New Theoretical Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia-Perez, Miguel A.; Frary, Robert B.

    A new approach to the development of the item characteristic curve (ICC), which expresses the functional relationship between the level of performance on a given task and an independent variable that is relevant to the task, is presented. The approach focuses on knowledge states, decision processes, and other circumstances underlying responses to…

  4. Catmull-Rom Curve Fitting and Interpolation Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jerome, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Computer graphics and animation experts have been using the Catmull-Rom smooth curve interpolation equations since 1974, but the vector and matrix equations can be derived and simplified using basic algebra, resulting in a simple set of linear equations with constant coefficients. A variety of uses of Catmull-Rom interpolation are demonstrated,…

  5. Fitting photosynthetic carbon dioxide response curves for C(3) leaves.

    PubMed

    Sharkey, Thomas D; Bernacchi, Carl J; Farquhar, Graham D; Singsaas, Eric L

    2007-09-01

    Photosynthetic responses to carbon dioxide concentration can provide data on a number of important parameters related to leaf physiology. Methods for fitting a model to such data are briefly described. The method will fit the following parameters: V(cmax), J, TPU, R(d) and g(m)[maximum carboxylation rate allowed by ribulose 1.5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), rate of photosynthetic electron transport (based on NADPH requirement), triose phosphate use, day respiration and mesophyll conductance, respectively]. The method requires at least five data pairs of net CO(2) assimilation (A) and [CO(2)] in the intercellular airspaces of the leaf (C(i)) and requires users to indicate the presumed limiting factor. The output is (1) calculated CO(2) partial pressure at the sites of carboxylation, C(c), (2) values for the five parameters at the measurement temperature and (3) values adjusted to 25 degrees C to facilitate comparisons. Fitting this model is a way of exploring leaf level photosynthesis. However, interpreting leaf level photosynthesis in terms of underlying biochemistry and biophysics is subject to assumptions that hold to a greater or lesser degree, a major assumption being that all parts of the leaf are behaving in the same way at each instant. PMID:17661745

  6. Accuracy improvement in peak positioning of spectrally distorted fiber Bragg grating sensors by Gaussian curve fitting

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Park, Hyoung-Jun; Lee, June-Ho; Song, Minho

    2007-04-20

    To improve measurement accuracy of spectrally distorted fiber Bragg grating temperature sensors, reflection profiles were curve fitted to Gaussian shapes, of which center positions were transformed into temperature information.By applying the Gaussian curve-fitting algorithm in a tunable bandpass filter demodulation scheme,{approx}0.3 deg. C temperature resolution was obtained with a severely distorted grating sensor, which was much better than that obtained using the highest peak search algorithm. A binary search was also used to retrieve the optimal fitting curves with the least amount of processing time.

  7. Curve fitting of aeroelastic transient response data with exponential functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, R. M.; Desmarais, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    The extraction of frequency, damping, amplitude, and phase information from unforced transient response data is considered. These quantities are obtained from the parameters determined by fitting the digitized time-history data in a least-squares sense with complex exponential functions. The highlights of the method are described, and the results of several test cases are presented. The effects of noise are considered both by using analytical examples with random noise and by estimating the standard deviation of the parameters from maximum-likelihood theory.

  8. A QUMOND galactic N-body code - I. Poisson solver and rotation curve fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angus, G. W.; van der Heyden, K. J.; Famaey, B.; Gentile, G.; McGaugh, S. S.; de Blok, W. J. G.

    2012-04-01

    Here we present a new particle-mesh galactic N-body code that uses the full multigrid algorithm for solving the modified Poisson equation of the quasi-linear formulation of modified Newtonian dynamics (QUMOND). A novel approach for handling the boundary conditions using a refinement strategy is implemented and the accuracy of the code is compared with analytical solutions of Kuzmin discs. We then employ the code to compute the predicted rotation curves for a sample of five spiral galaxies from the THINGS sample. We generated static N-body realizations of the galaxies according to their stellar and gaseous surface densities and allowed their distances, mass-to-light ratios (M/L values) and both the stellar and gas scale-heights to vary in order to estimate the best-fitting parameters. We found that NGC 3621, NGC 3521 and DDO 154 are well fitted by MOND using expected values of the distance and M/L. NGC 2403 required a moderately larger M/L than expected and NGC 2903 required a substantially larger value. The surprising result was that the scale-height of the dominant baryonic component was well constrained by the rotation curves: the gas scale-height for DDO 154 and the stellar scale-height for the others. In fact, if the suggested stellar scale-height (one-fifth the stellar scale-length) was used in the case of NGC 3621 and NGC 3521 it would not be possible to produce a good fit to the inner rotation curve. For each of the four stellar dominated galaxies, we calculated the vertical velocity dispersions which we found to be, on the whole, quite typical compared with observed stellar vertical velocity dispersions of face-on spirals. We conclude that modelling the gas scale-heights of the gas-rich dwarf spiral galaxies will be vital in order to make precise conclusions about MOND.

  9. Lmfit: Non-Linear Least-Square Minimization and Curve-Fitting for Python

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newville, Matthew; Stensitzki, Till; Allen, Daniel B.; Rawlik, Michal; Ingargiola, Antonino; Nelson, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Lmfit provides a high-level interface to non-linear optimization and curve fitting problems for Python. Lmfit builds on and extends many of the optimization algorithm of scipy.optimize, especially the Levenberg-Marquardt method from optimize.leastsq. Its enhancements to optimization and data fitting problems include using Parameter objects instead of plain floats as variables, the ability to easily change fitting algorithms, and improved estimation of confidence intervals and curve-fitting with the Model class. Lmfit includes many pre-built models for common lineshapes.

  10. TTF HOM Data Analysis with Curve Fitting Method

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, S.; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Bane, K.; Smith, J.; /SLAC

    2009-07-14

    To investigate the possibility of using HOM signals induced in SC cavities as beam and cavity diagnostics, narrow band (20 MHz) data was recorded around the strong TE111-6(6{pi}/9-like) dipole modes (1.7 GHz) in the 40 L-band (1.3 GHz) cavities at the DESY TTF facility. The analyses of these data have so far focused on using a Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) technique to correlate the signals with each other and data from conventional BPMs to show the dipole signals provide an alternate means of measuring the beam trajectory. However, these analyses do not extract the modal information (i.e., frequencies and Q's of the nearly degenerate horizontal and vertical modes). In this paper, we described a method to fit the signal frequency spectrum to obtain this information, and then use the resulting mode amplitudes and phases together with conventional BPM data to determine the mode polarizations and relative centers and tilts. Compared with the SVD analysis, this method is more physical, and can also be used to obtain the beam position and trajectory angle.

  11. Fitting Nonlinear Curves by use of Optimization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Scott A.

    2005-01-01

    MULTIVAR is a FORTRAN 77 computer program that fits one of the members of a set of six multivariable mathematical models (five of which are nonlinear) to a multivariable set of data. The inputs to MULTIVAR include the data for the independent and dependent variables plus the user s choice of one of the models, one of the three optimization engines, and convergence criteria. By use of the chosen optimization engine, MULTIVAR finds values for the parameters of the chosen model so as to minimize the sum of squares of the residuals. One of the optimization engines implements a routine, developed in 1982, that utilizes the Broydon-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS) variable-metric method for unconstrained minimization in conjunction with a one-dimensional search technique that finds the minimum of an unconstrained function by polynomial interpolation and extrapolation without first finding bounds on the solution. The second optimization engine is a faster and more robust commercially available code, denoted Design Optimization Tool, that also uses the BFGS method. The third optimization engine is a robust and relatively fast routine that implements the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm.

  12. "asymptotic Parabola" FITS for Smoothing Generally Asymmetric Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrych, K. D.; Andronov, I. L.; Chinarova, L. L.; Marsakova, V. I.

    A computer program is introduced, which allows to determine statistically optimal approximation using the "Asymptotic Parabola" fit, or, in other words, the spline consisting of polynomials of order 1,2,1, or two lines ("asymptotes") connected with a parabola. The function itself and its derivative is continuous. There are 5 parameters: two points, where a line switches to a parabola and vice versa, the slopes of the line and the curvature of the parabola. Extreme cases are either the parabola without lines (i.e.the parabola of width of the whole interval), or lines without a parabola (zero width of the parabola), or "line+parabola" without a second line. Such an approximation is especially effective for pulsating variables, for which the slopes of the ascending and descending branches are generally different, so the maxima and minima have asymmetric shapes. The method was initially introduced by Marsakova and Andronov (1996OAP.....9...127M) and realized as a computer program written in QBasic under DOS. It was used for dozens of variable stars, particularly, for the catalogs of the individual characteristics of pulsations of the Mira (1998OAP....11...79M) and semi-regular (200OAP....13..116C) pulsating variables. For the eclipsing variables with nearly symmetric shapes of the minima, we use a "symmetric" version of the "Asymptotic parabola". Here we introduce a Windows-based program, which does not have DOS limitation for the memory (number of observations) and screen resolution. The program has an user-friendly interface and is illustrated by an application to the test signal and to the pulsating variable AC Her.

  13. On the Use of Nonparametric Item Characteristic Curve Estimation Techniques for Checking Parametric Model Fit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Young-Sun; Wollack, James A.; Douglas, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the model fit of a 2PL through comparison with the nonparametric item characteristic curve (ICC) estimation procedures. Results indicate that three nonparametric procedures implemented produced ICCs that are similar to that of the 2PL for items simulated to fit the 2PL. However for misfitting items,…

  14. Cuckoo Search with Lévy Flights for Weighted Bayesian Energy Functional Optimization in Global-Support Curve Data Fitting

    PubMed Central

    Gálvez, Akemi; Iglesias, Andrés; Cabellos, Luis

    2014-01-01

    The problem of data fitting is very important in many theoretical and applied fields. In this paper, we consider the problem of optimizing a weighted Bayesian energy functional for data fitting by using global-support approximating curves. By global-support curves we mean curves expressed as a linear combination of basis functions whose support is the whole domain of the problem, as opposed to other common approaches in CAD/CAM and computer graphics driven by piecewise functions (such as B-splines and NURBS) that provide local control of the shape of the curve. Our method applies a powerful nature-inspired metaheuristic algorithm called cuckoo search, introduced recently to solve optimization problems. A major advantage of this method is its simplicity: cuckoo search requires only two parameters, many fewer than other metaheuristic approaches, so the parameter tuning becomes a very simple task. The paper shows that this new approach can be successfully used to solve our optimization problem. To check the performance of our approach, it has been applied to five illustrative examples of different types, including open and closed 2D and 3D curves that exhibit challenging features, such as cusps and self-intersections. Our results show that the method performs pretty well, being able to solve our minimization problem in an astonishingly straightforward way. PMID:24977175

  15. Cuckoo search with Lévy flights for weighted Bayesian energy functional optimization in global-support curve data fitting.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, Akemi; Iglesias, Andrés; Cabellos, Luis

    2014-01-01

    The problem of data fitting is very important in many theoretical and applied fields. In this paper, we consider the problem of optimizing a weighted Bayesian energy functional for data fitting by using global-support approximating curves. By global-support curves we mean curves expressed as a linear combination of basis functions whose support is the whole domain of the problem, as opposed to other common approaches in CAD/CAM and computer graphics driven by piecewise functions (such as B-splines and NURBS) that provide local control of the shape of the curve. Our method applies a powerful nature-inspired metaheuristic algorithm called cuckoo search, introduced recently to solve optimization problems. A major advantage of this method is its simplicity: cuckoo search requires only two parameters, many fewer than other metaheuristic approaches, so the parameter tuning becomes a very simple task. The paper shows that this new approach can be successfully used to solve our optimization problem. To check the performance of our approach, it has been applied to five illustrative examples of different types, including open and closed 2D and 3D curves that exhibit challenging features, such as cusps and self-intersections. Our results show that the method performs pretty well, being able to solve our minimization problem in an astonishingly straightforward way. PMID:24977175

  16. SWRC fit - a nonlinear fitting program with a water retention curve for soils having unimodal and bimodal pore structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, K.

    2007-02-01

    The soil hydraulic parameters for analyzing soil water movement can be determined by fitting a soil water retention curve to a certain function, i.e., a soil hydraulic model. For this purpose, the program "SWRC Fit," which performs nonlinear fitting of soil water retention curves to 5 models by Levenberg-Marquardt method, was developed. The five models are the Brooks and Corey model, the van Genuchten model, Kosugi's log-normal pore-size distribution model, Durner's bimodal pore-size distribution model, and a bimodal log-normal pore-size distribution model propose in this study. This program automatically determines all the necessary conditions for the nonlinear fitting, such as the initial estimate of the parameters, and, therefore, users can simply input the soil water retention data to obtain the necessary parameters. The program can be executed directly from a web page at http://purl.org/net/swrc/; a client version of the software written in numeric calculation language GNU Octave is included in the electronic supplement of this paper. The program was used for determining the soil hydraulic parameters of 420 soils in UNSODA database. After comparing the root mean square error of the unimodal models, the van Genuchten and Kosugi's models were better than the Brooks and Corey model. The bimodal log-normal pore-size distribution model had similar fitting performance to Durner's bimodal pore-size distribution model.

  17. A Predictive Study of Dirichlet Process Mixture Models for Curve Fitting

    PubMed Central

    WADE, SARA; WALKER, STEPHEN G.; PETRONE, SONIA

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the use of Dirichlet process (DP) mixtures for curve fitting. An important modelling aspect in this setting is the choice between constant or covariate-dependent weights. By examining the problem of curve fitting from a predictive perspective, we show the advantages of using covariate-dependent weights. These advantages are a result of the incorporation of covariate proximity in the latent partition. However, closer examination of the partition yields further complications, which arise from the vast number of total partitions. To overcome this, we propose to modify the probability law of the random partition to strictly enforce the notion of covariate proximity, while still maintaining certain properties of the DP. This allows the distribution of the partition to depend on the covariate in a simple manner and greatly reduces the total number of possible partitions, resulting in improved curve fitting and faster computations. Numerical illustrations are presented. PMID:25395718

  18. A two-component model for fitting light curves of core-collapse supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, A. P.; Vinkó, J.

    2016-05-01

    We present an improved version of a light curve model that is able to estimate the physical properties of different types of core-collapse supernovae that have double-peaked light curves and do so in a quick and efficient way. The model is based on a two-component configuration consisting of a dense inner region and an extended low-mass envelope. Using this configuration, we estimate the initial parameters of the progenitor by fitting the shape of the quasi-bolometric light curves of 10 SNe, including Type IIP and IIb events, with model light curves. In each case we compare the fitting results with available hydrodynamic calculations and also match the derived expansion velocities with the observed ones. Furthermore, we compare our calculations with hydrodynamic models derived by the SNEC code and examine the uncertainties of the estimated physical parameters caused by the assumption of constant opacity and the inaccurate knowledge of the moment of explosion.

  19. Ionization constants by curve fitting: application to the determination of partition coefficients.

    PubMed

    Clarke, F H

    1984-02-01

    A multiparametric curve-fitting technique for pKa calculation has been adapted for use with a programmable calculator or microcomputer. This method provides for the convenient and accurate determination of the ionization constant in aqueous solution and of the apparent ionization constant in the presence of octanol. From these parameters, partition coefficients and apparent partition coefficients are easily calculated and agree with data reported using the shaker technique or HPLC. The curve-fitting method has been applied to the differential titration technique in which the solvent curve is subtracted from the solution curve before calculations are begun. This method has been applied to the potentiometric titration of aqueous solutions of the salts of bases with a very low solubility in water. PMID:6707889

  20. [A fitting power curve equation for the accumulative inhaling volume in Chinese under 19 years old].

    PubMed

    Shang, Q; Zhou, H

    2000-03-30

    A fitting power curve equation based on the breath frequency and body weight for the accumulative inhaling volume in Chinese under 19 years old was established. The equation is Y = 754.37 + 258.34 X1.9038, and the fitting is good (R2 = 0.9974). It is useful for estimating the degree of exposure to air pollutants of people in their young period. PMID:12725097

  1. An Algorithm for Obtaining Reliable Priors for Constrained-Curve Fits

    SciTech Connect

    Terrence Draper; Shao-Jing Dong; Ivan Horvath; Frank Lee; Nilmani Mathur; Jianbo Zhang

    2004-03-01

    We introduce the ''Sequential Empirical Bayes Method'', an adaptive constrained-curve fitting procedure for extracting reliable priors. These are then used in standard augmented-chi-square fits on separate data. This better stabilizes fits to lattice QCD overlap-fermion data at very low quark mass where a priori values are not otherwise known. We illustrate the efficacy of the method with data from overlap fermions, on a quenched 16{sup 3} x 28 lattice with spatial size La = 3.2 fm and pion mass as low as {approx} 180 MeV.

  2. A flight evaluation of curved landing approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gee, S. W.; Barber, M. R.; Mcmurtry, T. C.

    1972-01-01

    The development of STOL technology for application to operational short-haul aircraft is accompanied by the requirement for solving problems in many areas. One of the most obvious problems is STOL aircraft operations in the terminal area. The increased number of terminal operations needed for an economically viable STOL system as compared with the current CTOL system and the incompatibility of STOL and CTOL aircraft speeds are positive indicators of an imminent problem. The high cost of aircraft operations, noise pollution, and poor short-haul service are areas that need improvement. A potential solution to some of the operational problems lies in the capability of making curved landing approaches under both visual and instrument flight conditions.

  3. Optimization of Active Muscle Force-Length Models Using Least Squares Curve Fitting.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Goran Abdulrahman; Hou, Ming

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to propose an asymmetric Gaussian function as an alternative to the existing active force-length models, and to optimize this model along with several other existing models by using the least squares curve fitting method. The minimal set of coefficients is identified for each of these models to facilitate the least squares curve fitting. Sarcomere simulated data and one set of rabbits extensor digitorum II experimental data are used to illustrate optimal curve fitting of the selected force-length functions. The results shows that all the curves fit reasonably well with the simulated and experimental data, while the Gordon-Huxley-Julian model and asymmetric Gaussian function are better than other functions in terms of statistical test scores root mean squared error and R-squared. However, the differences in RMSE scores are insignificant (0.3-6%) for simulated data and (0.2-5%) for experimental data. The proposed asymmetric Gaussian model and the method of parametrization of this and the other force-length models mentioned above can be used in the studies on active force-length relationships of skeletal muscles that generate forces to cause movements of human and animal bodies. PMID:26276984

  4. Taxometrics, Polytomous Constructs, and the Comparison Curve Fit Index: A Monte Carlo Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Glenn D.; McGrath, Robert E.; Knight, Raymond A.

    2010-01-01

    The taxometric method effectively distinguishes between dimensional (1-class) and taxonic (2-class) latent structure, but there is virtually no information on how it responds to polytomous (3-class) latent structure. A Monte Carlo analysis showed that the mean comparison curve fit index (CCFI; Ruscio, Haslam, & Ruscio, 2006) obtained with 3…

  5. On Fitting Nonlinear Latent Curve Models to Multiple Variables Measured Longitudinally

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blozis, Shelley A.

    2007-01-01

    This article shows how nonlinear latent curve models may be fitted for simultaneous analysis of multiple variables measured longitudinally using Mx statistical software. Longitudinal studies often involve observation of several variables across time with interest in the associations between change characteristics of different variables measured…

  6. WPerfit: A Program for Computing Parametric Person-Fit Statistics and Plotting Person Response Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.; Lorenzo, Urbano

    2000-01-01

    Describes a program for computing different person-fit measures under different parametric item response models for binary items. The indexes can be computed for the Rasch model and the two- and three-parameter logistic models. The program can plot person response curves to allow the researchers to investigate the nonfitting response behavior of…

  7. Identification of non-specific hybridization using an empirical equation fitted to non-equilibrium dissociation curves.

    PubMed

    Baushke, Samuel W; Stedtfeld, Robert D; Tourlousse, Dieter M; Ahmad, Farhan; Wick, Lukas M; Gulari, Erdogan; Tiedje, James M; Hashsham, Syed A

    2012-07-01

    Non-equilibrium dissociation curves (NEDCs) have the potential to identify non-specific hybridizations on high throughput, diagnostic microarrays. We report a simple method for the identification of non-specific signals by using a new parameter that does not rely on comparison of perfect match and mismatch dissociations. The parameter is the ratio of specific dissociation temperature (T(d-w)) to theoretical melting temperature (T(m)) and can be obtained by automated fitting of a four-parameter, sigmoid, empirical equation to the thousands of curves generated in a typical experiment. The curves fit perfect match NEDCs from an initial experiment with an R(2) of 0.998±0.006 and root mean square of 108±91 fluorescent units. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed low temperature hybridization signals (20-48°C) to be as effective as area under the curve as primary data filters. Evaluation of three datasets that target 16S rRNA and functional genes with varying degrees of target sequence similarity showed that filtering out hybridizations with T(d-w)/T(m)<0.78 greatly reduced false positive results. In conclusion, T(d-w)/T(m) successfully screened many non-specific hybridizations that could not be identified using single temperature signal intensities alone, while the empirical modeling allowed a simplified approach to the high throughput analysis of thousands of NEDCs. PMID:22537822

  8. Conversion of infrared grey-level image into temperature field by polynomial curve fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Terry Y.; Kuo, Ming-Hsuan

    2015-02-01

    A simple method to convert the infrared gray-level image into temperature field is developed by using least squares polynomial curve fitting. In this method, the correspondence between the infrared gray-level image and the associated temperature field for various emissivity values and temperature range is analyzed first. Then a second-order polynomial can be applied to fit the correspondence between the gray-level image and the associated temperature field as a function of emissivity. For multiple conversions of temperature ranges, the constants of the fitted polynomial in multiple ranges can be further fitted as a function of emissivity and temperature range. Test of the method on a cup of hot water was done. An average error less than 1% was achieved between the proposed method and the commercial ones.

  9. STRITERFIT, a least-squares pharmacokinetic curve-fitting package using a programmable calculator.

    PubMed

    Thornhill, D P; Schwerzel, E

    1985-05-01

    A program is described that permits iterative least-squares nonlinear regression fitting of polyexponential curves using the Hewlett Packard HP 41 CV programmable calculator. The program enables the analysis of pharmacokinetic drug level profiles with a high degree of precision. Up to 15 data pairs can be used, and initial estimates of curve parameters are obtained with a stripping procedure. Up to four exponential terms can be accommodated by the program, and there is the option of weighting data according to their reciprocals. Initial slopes cannot be forced through zero. The program may be interrupted at any time in order to examine convergence. PMID:3839530

  10. An approach to fast fits of the unintegrated gluon density

    SciTech Connect

    Knutsson, Albert; Bacchetta, Alessandro; Kutak, Krzyzstof; Jung, Hannes

    2009-01-01

    An approach to fast fits of the unintegrated gluon density has been developed and used to determine the unintegrated gluon density by fits to deep inelastic scatting di-jet data from HERA. The fitting method is based on the determination of the parameter dependence by help of interpolating between grid points in the parameter-observable space before the actual fit is performed.

  11. Interactive application of quadratic expansion of chi-square statistic to nonlinear curve fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badavi, F. F.; Everhart, Joel L.

    1987-01-01

    This report contains a detailed theoretical description of an all-purpose, interactive curve-fitting routine that is based on P. R. Bevington's description of the quadratic expansion of the Chi-Square statistic. The method is implemented in the associated interactive, graphics-based computer program. Taylor's expansion of Chi-Square is first introduced, and justifications for retaining only the first term are presented. From the expansion, a set of n simultaneous linear equations is derived, then solved by matrix algebra. A brief description of the code is presented along with a limited number of changes that are required to customize the program of a particular task. To evaluate the performance of the method and the goodness of nonlinear curve fitting, two typical engineering problems are examined and the graphical and tabular output of each is discussed. A complete listing of the entire package is included as an appendix.

  12. Fitting sediment rating curves using regression analysis: a case study of Russian Arctic rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tananaev, N. I.

    2015-03-01

    Published suspended sediment data for Arctic rivers is scarce. Suspended sediment rating curves for three medium to large rivers of the Russian Arctic were obtained using various curve-fitting techniques. Due to the biased sampling strategy, the raw datasets do not exhibit log-normal distribution, which restricts the applicability of a log-transformed linear fit. Non-linear (power) model coefficients were estimated using the Levenberg-Marquardt, Nelder-Mead and Hooke-Jeeves algorithms, all of which generally showed close agreement. A non-linear power model employing the Levenberg-Marquardt parameter evaluation algorithm was identified as an optimal statistical solution of the problem. Long-term annual suspended sediment loads estimated using the non-linear power model are, in general, consistent with previously published results.

  13. Evaluation of fatigue-crack growth rates by polynomial curve fitting. [Ti alloy plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, K. B.; Feddersen, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    Fundamental characterization of the constant-amplitude fatigue crack propagation is achieved by an analysis of the rate of change of crack length with change in number of applied loading cycles, defining the rate values such that they are consistent with the basic assumption of smoothness and continuity in the fatigue crack growth process. The technique used to satisfy the analytical conditions and minimize the effects of local material anomalies and experimental errors is that of fitting a smooth curve to the entire set of basic data by least square regression. This yields a well-behaved function relating the number of cycles to the crack length. By taking the first derivative of the function, the crack growth rate is obtained for each point. The class of curve fitting functions used in the analysis is the polynomial of degree n.

  14. Fitting integrated enzyme rate equations to progress curves with the use of a weighting matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Franco, R; Aran, J M; Canela, E I

    1991-01-01

    A method is presented for fitting the pairs of values product formed-time taken from progress curves to the integrated rate equation. The procedure is applied to the estimation of the kinetic parameters of the adenosine deaminase system. Simulation studies demonstrate the capabilities of this strategy. A copy of the FORTRAN77 program used can be obtained from the authors by request. PMID:2006914

  15. Fitting integrated enzyme rate equations to progress curves with the use of a weighting matrix.

    PubMed

    Franco, R; Aran, J M; Canela, E I

    1991-03-01

    A method is presented for fitting the pairs of values product formed-time taken from progress curves to the integrated rate equation. The procedure is applied to the estimation of the kinetic parameters of the adenosine deaminase system. Simulation studies demonstrate the capabilities of this strategy. A copy of the FORTRAN77 program used can be obtained from the authors by request. PMID:2006914

  16. The Predicting Model of E-commerce Site Based on the Ideas of Curve Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Zhang; Li, Zhang; Dingjun, Chen

    On the basis of the idea of the second multiplication curve fitting, the number and scale of Chinese E-commerce site is analyzed. A preventing increase model is introduced in this paper, and the model parameters are solved by the software of Matlab. The validity of the preventing increase model is confirmed though the numerical experiment. The experimental results show that the precision of preventing increase model is ideal.

  17. Methodology for fast curve fitting to modulated Voigt dispersion lineshape functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westberg, Jonas; Wang, Junyang; Axner, Ove

    2014-01-01

    Faraday rotation spectroscopy (FAMOS) as well as other modulated techniques that rely on dispersion produce lock-in signals that are proportional to various Fourier coefficients of modulated dispersion lineshape functions of the molecular transition targeted. In order to enable real-time curve fitting to such signals a fast methodology for calculating the Fourier coefficients of modulated lineshape functions is needed. Although there exist an analytical expression for such Fourier coefficients of modulated Lorentzian absorption and dispersion lineshape functions, there is no corresponding expression for a modulated Voigt dispersion function. The conventional computational route of such Fourier coefficients has therefore so far either consisted of using various approximations to the modulated Voigt lineshape function or solving time-consuming integrals, which has precluded accurate real-time curve fitting. Here we present a new methodology to calculate Fourier coefficients of modulated Voigt dispersion lineshape functions that is significantly faster (several orders of magnitude) and more accurate than previous approximative calculation procedures, which allows for real-time curve fitting to FAMOS signals also in the Voigt regime.

  18. Statistically generated weighted curve fit of residual functions for modal analysis of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bookout, P. S.

    1995-01-01

    A statistically generated weighting function for a second-order polynomial curve fit of residual functions has been developed. The residual flexibility test method, from which a residual function is generated, is a procedure for modal testing large structures in an external constraint-free environment to measure the effects of higher order modes and interface stiffness. This test method is applicable to structures with distinct degree-of-freedom interfaces to other system components. A theoretical residual function in the displacement/force domain has the characteristics of a relatively flat line in the lower frequencies and a slight upward curvature in the higher frequency range. In the test residual function, the above-mentioned characteristics can be seen in the data, but due to the present limitations in the modal parameter evaluation (natural frequencies and mode shapes) of test data, the residual function has regions of ragged data. A second order polynomial curve fit is required to obtain the residual flexibility term. A weighting function of the data is generated by examining the variances between neighboring data points. From a weighted second-order polynomial curve fit, an accurate residual flexibility value can be obtained. The residual flexibility value and free-free modes from testing are used to improve a mathematical model of the structure. The residual flexibility modal test method is applied to a straight beam with a trunnion appendage and a space shuttle payload pallet simulator.

  19. Inclusive fitness maximization: An axiomatic approach.

    PubMed

    Okasha, Samir; Weymark, John A; Bossert, Walter

    2014-06-01

    Kin selection theorists argue that evolution in social contexts will lead organisms to behave as if maximizing their inclusive, as opposed to personal, fitness. The inclusive fitness concept allows biologists to treat organisms as akin to rational agents seeking to maximize a utility function. Here we develop this idea and place it on a firm footing by employing a standard decision-theoretic methodology. We show how the principle of inclusive fitness maximization and a related principle of quasi-inclusive fitness maximization can be derived from axioms on an individual׳s 'as if preferences' (binary choices) for the case in which phenotypic effects are additive. Our results help integrate evolutionary theory and rational choice theory, help draw out the behavioural implications of inclusive fitness maximization, and point to a possible way in which evolution could lead organisms to implement it. PMID:24530825

  20. Reducing respirator fit test errors: a multi-donning approach.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D L; Coffey, C C; Jensen, P A; Zhuang, Z

    2005-08-01

    As a continuation of recent studies to assess the accuracy of existing fit test methods, a multi-donning approach to fit testing is presented. As an example of that approach, a multi-donning quantitative fit test for filtering-facepiece respirators is presented and analyzed by comparing its error rates with those of the single-donning approach of current fit test methods. That analysis indicates the multi-donning fit test has the potential to reduce both the alpha error and the beta error to half that of single-donning fit tests. The alpha error is the error of failing a respirator that should pass; the beta error is the error of passing a respirator that should fail. Lowering fit test error rates for filtering-facepiece respirators is important because fit testing is an essential means of helping assure that an individual has selected an adequately fitting respirator. To reduce the alpha and beta error inherent in current fit test methods, the proposed fit test for filtering-facepiece respirators incorporates five donnings of the facepiece, unlike the single donning of existing fit test methods. The analysis presented here indicates that the multiple-donning approach reduces the element of chance in the fit test result and thereby increases the consistency and accuracy of the fit tests. The time to conduct the multi-donning test can approximate the time for current, single-donning tests by shortening the time the respirator is worn after each donning to about 10 sec. And, unlike current fit tests for filtering-facepieces that measure only faceseal leakage, the example multiple-donning fit test considered here is based on a measurement of total leakage (faceseal plus filter). Utilizing total respirator leakage can result in simpler quantitative fit test instrumentation and a fit test that is more relevant to the workplace. Further trials with human subjects are recommended in order to validate the proposed multi-donning approach. PMID:16080261

  1. A Healthy Approach to Fitness Center Security.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    2000-01-01

    Examines techniques for keeping college fitness centers secure while maintaining an inviting atmosphere. Building access control, preventing locker room theft, and suppressing causes for physical violence are discussed. (GR)

  2. The Sequential Empirical Bayes Method: An Adaptive Constrained-Curve Fitting Algorithm for Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Ying Chen; Shao-Jing Dong; Terrence Draper; Ivan Horvath; Keh-Fei Liu; Nilmani Mathur; Sonali Tamhankar; Cidambi Srinivasan; Frank X. Lee; Jianbo Zhang

    2004-05-01

    We introduce the ''Sequential Empirical Bayes Method'', an adaptive constrained-curve fitting procedure for extracting reliable priors. These are then used in standard augmented-{chi}{sup 2} fits on separate data. This better stabilizes fits to lattice QCD overlap-fermion data at very low quark mass where a priori values are not otherwise known. Lessons learned (including caveats limiting the scope of the method) from studying artificial data are presented. As an illustration, from local-local two-point correlation functions, we obtain masses and spectral weights for ground and first-excited states of the pion, give preliminary fits for the a{sub 0} where ghost states (a quenched artifact) must be dealt with, and elaborate on the details of fits of the Roper resonance and S{sub 11}(N{sup 1/2-}) previously presented elsewhere. The data are from overlap fermions on a quenched 16{sup 3} x 28 lattice with spatial size La = 3.2 fm and pion mass as low as {approx}180 MeV.

  3. Measurement of focused ultrasonic fields based on colour edge detection and curve fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H.; Chang, S.; Yang, P.; He, L.

    2016-03-01

    This paper utilizes firstly both a scanning device and an optic fiber hydrophone to establish a measurement system, and then proposes the parameter measurement of the focused transducer based on edge detection of the visualized acoustic data and curve fitting. The measurement system consists of a water tank with wedge absorber, stepper motors driver, system controller, a focused transducer, an optic fiber hydrophone and data processing software. On the basis of the visualized processing for the original scanned data, the -3 dB beam width of the focused transducer is calculated using the edge detection of the acoustic visualized image and circle fitting method by minimizing algebraic distance. Experiments on the visualized ultrasound data are implemented to verify the feasibility of the proposed method. The data obtained from the scanning device are utilized to reconstruct acoustic fields, and it is found that the -3 dB beam width of the focused transducer can be predicted accurately.

  4. [Aging Process of Puer Black Tea Studied by FTIR Spectroscopy Combined with Curve-Fitting Analysis].

    PubMed

    Li, Dong-yu; Shi, You-ming; Yi, Shi Lai

    2015-07-01

    For better determination of the chemical components in the Puer black tea, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used for obtaining vibrational spectra of Puer black tea at different aging time. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra indicated that the chemical components had change in Puer black tea at different aging time. The leaf of Puer black tea was a complex system, its Fourier transform infrared spectrum showed a total overlap of each absorption spectrum of various components. Each band represented an overall overlap of some characteristic absorption peaks of functional groups in the Puer black tea. In order to explore the change of characteristic absorption peaks of functional groups with aging time, the prediction positions and the number of second peaks in the range of 1900-900 cm(-1) were determined by Fourier self-deconvolution at first, and later the curve fitting analysis was performed in this overlap band. At different aging time of Puer black tea, the wave number of second peaks of amide II, tea polyphenol, pectin and polysaccharides at overlap band were assigned by curve fitting analysis. The second peak at 1520 cm(-1) was characteristic absorption band of amide II, the second peaks of tea polyphenol and pectin appeared at 1278 and 1103 cm(-1) respectively. Two second peaks at 1063 and 1037 cm(-1), corresponds mainly to glucomannan and arabinan. The relative area of these second peaks could be indicated the content of protein, tea polyphenol, pectin and polysaccharides in the Puer black tea. The results of curve fitting analysis showed that the relative area of amide II was increasing first and then decreasing, it indicated the change of protein in Puer black tea. At the same time, the content of tea polyphenol and pectin were decreased with the increase of aging time, but the glucomannan and arabinan were increased in reverse. It explained that the bitter taste was become weak and a sweet taste appeared in the tea with the increase of

  5. Curve fitting toxicity test data: Which comes first, the dose response or the model?

    SciTech Connect

    Gully, J.; Baird, R.; Bottomley, J.

    1995-12-31

    The probit model frequently does not fit the concentration-response curve of NPDES toxicity test data and non-parametric models must be used instead. The non-parametric models, trimmed Spearman-Karber, IC{sub p}, and linear interpolation, all require a monotonic concentration-response. Any deviation from a monotonic response is smoothed to obtain the desired concentration-response characteristics. Inaccurate point estimates may result from such procedures and can contribute to imprecision in replicate tests. The following study analyzed reference toxicant and effluent data from giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera), purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus), red abalone (Haliotis rufescens), and fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) bioassays using commercially available curve fitting software. The purpose was to search for alternative parametric models which would reduce the use of non-parametric models for point estimate analysis of toxicity data. Two non-linear models, power and logistic dose-response, were selected as possible alternatives to the probit model based upon their toxicological plausibility and ability to model most data sets examined. Unlike non-parametric procedures, these and all parametric models can be statistically evaluated for fit and significance. The use of the power or logistic dose response models increased the percentage of parametric model fits for each protocol and toxicant combination examined. The precision of the selected non-linear models was also compared with the EPA recommended point estimation models at several effect.levels. In general, precision of the alternative models was equal to or better than the traditional methods. Finally, use of the alternative models usually produced more plausible point estimates in data sets where the effects of smoothing and non-parametric modeling made the point estimate results suspect.

  6. Calculations and curve fits of thermodynamic and transport properties for equilibrium air to 30000 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Roop N.; Lee, Kam-Pui; Thompson, Richard A.; Yos, Jerrold M.

    1991-01-01

    A self-consistent set of equilibrium air values were computed for enthalpy, total specific heat at constant pressure, compressibility factor, viscosity, total thermal conductivity, and total Prandtl number from 500 to 30,000 K over a range of 10(exp -4) atm to 10(exp 2) atm. The mixture values are calculated from the transport and thermodynamic properties of the individual species provided in a recent study by the authors. The concentrations of the individual species, required in the mixture relations, are obtained from a free energy minimization calculation procedure. Present calculations are based on an 11-species air model. For pressures less than 10(exp -2) atm and temperatures of about 15,000 K and greater, the concentrations of N(++) and O(++) become important, and consequently, they are included in the calculations determining the various properties. The computed properties are curve fitted as a function of temperature at a constant value of pressure. These curve fits reproduce the computed values within 5 percent for the entire temperature range considered here at specific pressures and provide an efficient means for computing the flowfield properties of equilibrium air, provided the elemental composition remains constant at 0.24 for oxygen and 0.76 for nitrogen by mass.

  7. Multiperiodicity, modulations and flip-flops in variable star light curves. I. Carrier fit method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelt, J.; Olspert, N.; Mantere, M. J.; Tuominen, I.

    2011-11-01

    Context. The light curves of variable stars are commonly described using simple trigonometric models, that make use of the assumption that the model parameters are constant in time. This assumption, however, is often violated, and consequently, time series models with components that vary slowly in time are of great interest. Aims: In this paper we introduce a class of data analysis and visualization methods which can be applied in many different contexts of variable star research, for example spotted stars, variables showing the Blazhko effect, and the spin-down of rapid rotators. The methods proposed are of explorative type, and can be of significant aid when performing a more thorough data analysis and interpretation with a more conventional method. Methods: Our methods are based on a straightforward decomposition of the input time series into a fast "clocking" periodicity and smooth modulating curves. The fast frequency, referred to as the carrier frequency, can be obtained from earlier observations (for instance in the case of photometric data the period can be obtained from independently measured radial velocities), postulated using some simple physical principles (Keplerian rotation laws in accretion disks), or estimated from the data as a certain mean frequency. The smooth modulating curves are described by trigonometric polynomials or splines. The data approximation procedures are based on standard computational packages implementing simple or constrained least-squares fit -type algorithms. Results: Using both artificially generated data sets and observed data, we demonstrate the utility of the proposed methods. Our interest is mainly focused on cases where multiperiodicity, trends or abrupt changes take place in the variable star light curves. Conclusions: The presented examples show that the proposed methods significantly enrich the traditional toolbox for variable star researchers. Applications of the methods to solve problems of astrophysical interest

  8. Advantages of estimating parameters of photosynthesis model by fitting A-Ci curves at multiple subsaturating light intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, W.; Gu, L.; Hoffman, F. M.

    2013-12-01

    The photosynthesis model of Farquhar, von Caemmerer & Berry (1980) is an important tool for predicting the response of plants to climate change. So far, the critical parameters required by the model have been obtained from the leaf-level measurements of gas exchange, namely the net assimilation of CO2 against intercellular CO2 concentration (A-Ci) curves, made at saturating light conditions. With such measurements, most points are likely in the Rubisco-limited state for which the model is structurally overparameterized (the model is also overparameterized in the TPU-limited state). In order to reliably estimate photosynthetic parameters, there must be sufficient number of points in the RuBP regeneration-limited state, which has no structural over-parameterization. To improve the accuracy of A-Ci data analysis, we investigate the potential of using multiple A-Ci curves at subsaturating light intensities to generate some important parameter estimates more accurately. Using subsaturating light intensities allow more RuBp regeneration-limited points to be obtained. In this study, simulated examples are used to demonstrate how this method can eliminate the errors of conventional A-Ci curve fitting methods. Some fitted parameters like the photocompensation point and day respiration impose a significant limitation on modeling leaf CO2 exchange. The multiple A-Ci curves fitting can also improve over the so-called Laisk (1977) method, which was shown by some recent publication to produce incorrect estimates of photocompensation point and day respiration. We also test the approach with actual measurements, along with suggested measurement conditions to constrain measured A-Ci points to maximize the occurrence of RuBP regeneration-limited photosynthesis. Finally, we use our measured gas exchange datasets to quantify the magnitude of resistance of chloroplast and cell wall-plasmalemma and explore the effect of variable mesophyll conductance. The variable mesophyll conductance

  9. A curve fitting method for extrinsic camera calibration from a single image of a cylindrical object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, A. W.; Zagar, B. G.

    2013-08-01

    An important step in the process of optical steel coil quality assurance is to measure the proportions of width and radius of steel coils as well as the relative position and orientation of the camera. This work attempts to estimate these extrinsic parameters from single images by using the cylindrical coil itself as the calibration target. Therefore, an adaptive least-squares algorithm is applied to fit parametrized curves to the detected true coil outline in the acquisition. The employed model allows for strictly separating the intrinsic and the extrinsic parameters. Thus, the intrinsic camera parameters can be calibrated beforehand using available calibration software. Furthermore, a way to segment the true coil outline in the acquired images is motivated. The proposed optimization method yields highly accurate results and can be generalized even to measure other solids which cannot be characterized by the identification of simple geometric primitives.

  10. Modal analysis using a Fourier analyzer, curve-fitting, and modal tuning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, R. R., Jr.; Chung, Y. T.

    1981-01-01

    The proposed modal test program differs from single-input methods in that preliminary data may be acquired using multiple inputs, and modal tuning procedures may be employed to define closely spaced frquency modes more accurately or to make use of frequency response functions (FRF's) which are based on several input locations. In some respects the proposed modal test proram resembles earlier sine-sweep and sine-dwell testing in that broadband FRF's are acquired using several input locations, and tuning is employed to refine the modal parameter estimates. The major tasks performed in the proposed modal test program are outlined. Data acquisition and FFT processing, curve fitting, and modal tuning phases are described and examples are given to illustrate and evaluate them.

  11. Fitness

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov home http://www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Fitness Fitness Want to look and feel your best? Physical ... are? Check out this info: What is physical fitness? top Physical fitness means you can do everyday ...

  12. Assessment of Person Fit Using Resampling-Based Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinharay, Sandip

    2016-01-01

    De la Torre and Deng suggested a resampling-based approach for person-fit assessment (PFA). The approach involves the use of the [math equation unavailable] statistic, a corrected expected a posteriori estimate of the examinee ability, and the Monte Carlo (MC) resampling method. The Type I error rate of the approach was closer to the nominal level…

  13. Open Versus Closed Hearing-Aid Fittings: A Literature Review of Both Fitting Approaches.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Alexandra; Latzel, Matthias; Holube, Inga

    2016-01-01

    One of the main issues in hearing-aid fittings is the abnormal perception of the user's own voice as too loud, "boomy," or "hollow." This phenomenon known as the occlusion effect be reduced by large vents in the earmolds or by open-fit hearing aids. This review provides an overview of publications related to open and closed hearing-aid fittings. First, the occlusion effect and its consequences for perception while using hearing aids are described. Then, the advantages and disadvantages of open compared with closed fittings and their impact on the fitting process are addressed. The advantages include less occlusion, improved own-voice perception and sound quality, and increased localization performance. The disadvantages associated with open-fit hearing aids include reduced benefits of directional microphones and noise reduction, as well as less compression and less available gain before feedback. The final part of this review addresses the need for new approaches to combine the advantages of open and closed hearing-aid fittings. PMID:26879562

  14. Open Versus Closed Hearing-Aid Fittings: A Literature Review of Both Fitting Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Latzel, Matthias; Holube, Inga

    2016-01-01

    One of the main issues in hearing-aid fittings is the abnormal perception of the user’s own voice as too loud, “boomy,” or “hollow.” This phenomenon known as the occlusion effect be reduced by large vents in the earmolds or by open-fit hearing aids. This review provides an overview of publications related to open and closed hearing-aid fittings. First, the occlusion effect and its consequences for perception while using hearing aids are described. Then, the advantages and disadvantages of open compared with closed fittings and their impact on the fitting process are addressed. The advantages include less occlusion, improved own-voice perception and sound quality, and increased localization performance. The disadvantages associated with open-fit hearing aids include reduced benefits of directional microphones and noise reduction, as well as less compression and less available gain before feedback. The final part of this review addresses the need for new approaches to combine the advantages of open and closed hearing-aid fittings. PMID:26879562

  15. ANALYTICAL LIGHT CURVE MODELS OF SUPERLUMINOUS SUPERNOVAE: {chi}{sup 2}-MINIMIZATION OF PARAMETER FITS

    SciTech Connect

    Chatzopoulos, E.; Wheeler, J. Craig; Vinko, J.; Horvath, Z. L.; Nagy, A.

    2013-08-10

    We present fits of generalized semi-analytic supernova (SN) light curve (LC) models for a variety of power inputs including {sup 56}Ni and {sup 56}Co radioactive decay, magnetar spin-down, and forward and reverse shock heating due to supernova ejecta-circumstellar matter (CSM) interaction. We apply our models to the observed LCs of the H-rich superluminous supernovae (SLSN-II) SN 2006gy, SN 2006tf, SN 2008am, SN 2008es, CSS100217, the H-poor SLSN-I SN 2005ap, SCP06F6, SN 2007bi, SN 2010gx, and SN 2010kd, as well as to the interacting SN 2008iy and PTF 09uj. Our goal is to determine the dominant mechanism that powers the LCs of these extraordinary events and the physical conditions involved in each case. We also present a comparison of our semi-analytical results with recent results from numerical radiation hydrodynamics calculations in the particular case of SN 2006gy in order to explore the strengths and weaknesses of our models. We find that CS shock heating produced by ejecta-CSM interaction provides a better fit to the LCs of most of the events we examine. We discuss the possibility that collision of supernova ejecta with hydrogen-deficient CSM accounts for some of the hydrogen-deficient SLSNe (SLSN-I) and may be a plausible explanation for the explosion mechanism of SN 2007bi, the pair-instability supernova candidate. We characterize and discuss issues of parameter degeneracy.

  16. New Horizons approach photometry of Pluto and Charon: light curves and Solar phase curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangari, A. M.; Buie, M. W.; Buratti, B. J.; Verbiscer, A.; Howett, C.; Weaver, H. A., Jr.; Olkin, C.; Ennico Smith, K.; Young, L. A.; Stern, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    While the most captivating images of Pluto and Charon were shot by NASA's New Horizons probe on July 14, 2015, the spacecraft also imaged Pluto with its LOng Range Reconnaissance Imager ("LORRI") during its Annual Checkouts and Approach Phases, with campaigns in July 2013, July 2014, January 2015, March 2015, April 2015, May 2015 and June 2015. All but the first campaign provided full coverage of Pluto's 6.4 day rotation. Even though many of these images were taken when surface features on Pluto and Charon were unresolved, these data provide a unique opportunity to study Pluto over a timescale of several months. Earth-based data from an entire apparition must be combined to create a single light curve, as Pluto is never otherwise continuously available for observing due to daylight, weather and scheduling. From the spacecraft, Pluto's sub-observer latitude remained constant to within 0.05 degrees of 43.15 degrees, comparable to a week's worth of change as seen from Earth near opposition. During the July 2013 to June 2015 period, Pluto's solar phase curve increased from 11 degrees to 15 degrees, a small range, but large compared to Earth's 2 degree limit. The slope of the solar phase curve hints at properties such as surface roughness. Using PSF photometry that takes into account the ever-increasing sizes of Pluto and Charon as seen from New Horizons, as well as surface features discovered at closest approach, we present rotational light curves and solar phase curves of Pluto and Charon. We will connect these observations to previous measurements of the system from Earth.

  17. Fitting Item Characteristic Curves with Spline Functions. [Program Statistics Research Technical Report Series].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winsberg, Suzanne; And Others

    In most item response theory models a particular mathematical form is assumed for all item characteristic curves, e.g., a logistic function. It could be desirable, however, to estimate the shape of the item characteristic curves without prior restrictive assumptions about its mathematical form. We have developed a practical method of estimating…

  18. Multiparametric curve fitting-IX Simultaneous regression estimation of stoichiometry and stability constants of complexes.

    PubMed

    Havel, J; Meloun, M

    1986-05-01

    A chemical model (i.e., the number of complexes, their stoichiometry and stability constants with molar absorptivities) in solution equilibria may be established by (i) the trial-and-error method in which stability constants are estimated for an assumed set of complexes in the mixture and a fitness test is used to resolve a choice of plausible models to find the true one; (ii) the simultaneous estimation of the stoichiometry and stability constants for species divided into "certain" species for which the parameters beta(pqr), (p, q, r) are known and held constant, and "uncertain" species with unknown parameters which are determined by regression analysis. The interdependence of stability constants and particular sets of stoichiometric indices requires that the computational strategy should be chosen carefully for each particular case. The benefits and limitations of both approaches are compared by means of examples of potentiometric titration data analysis by the POLET(84) program and of spectrophotometric data analysis by the SQUAD(84) program. A strategy for efficient computation is suggested. PMID:18964117

  19. Neural network approach for modification and fitting of digitized data in reverse engineering.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hua; Wang, Wen; Xie, Jin; Chen, Zi-chen

    2004-01-01

    Reverse engineering in the manufacturing field is a process in which the digitized data are obtained from an existing object model or a part of it, and then the CAD model is reconstructed. This paper presents an RBF neural network approach to modify and fit the digitized data. The centers for the RBF are selected by using the orthogonal least squares learning algorithm. A mathematically known surface is used for generating a number of samples for training the networks. The trained networks then generated a number of new points which were compared with the calculating points from the equations. Moreover, a series of practice digitizing curves are used to test the approach. The results showed that this approach is effective in modifying and fitting digitized data and generating data points to reconstruct the surface model. PMID:14663856

  20. A comparison of approaches in fitting continuum SEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yao; Madlener, David; Wolf, Sebastian; Wang, Hong-Chi

    2013-04-01

    We present a detailed comparison of two approaches, the use of a pre-calculated database and simulated annealing (SA), for fitting the continuum spectral energy distribution (SED) of astrophysical objects whose appearance is dominated by surrounding dust. While pre-calculated databases are commonly used to model SED data, only a few studies to date employed SA due to its unclear accuracy and convergence time for this specific problem. From a methodological point of view, different approaches lead to different fitting quality, demand on computational resources and calculation time. We compare the fitting quality and computational costs of these two approaches for the task of SED fitting to provide a guide to the practitioner to find a compromise between desired accuracy and available resources. To reduce uncertainties inherent to real datasets, we introduce a reference model resembling a typical circumstellar system with 10 free parameters. We derive the SED of the reference model with our code MC3 D at 78 logarithmically distributed wavelengths in the range [0.3 μm, 1.3 mm] and use this setup to simulate SEDs for the database and SA. Our result directly demonstrates the applicability of SA in the field of SED modeling, since the algorithm regularly finds better solutions to the optimization problem than a pre-calculated database. As both methods have advantages and shortcomings, a hybrid approach is preferable. While the database provides an approximate fit and overall probability distributions for all parameters deduced using Bayesian analysis, SA can be used to improve upon the results returned by the model grid.

  1. Modeling and Maximum Likelihood Fitting of Gamma-Ray and Radio Light Curves of Millisecond Pulsars Detected with Fermi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. J.; Harding, A. K.; Venter, C.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed gamma rays have been detected with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) from more than 20 millisecond pulsars (MSPs), some of which were discovered in radio observations of bright, unassociated LAT sources. We have fit the radio and gamma-ray light curves of 19 LAT-detected MSPs in the context of geometric, outermagnetospheric emission models assuming the retarded vacuum dipole magnetic field using a Markov chain Monte Carlo maximum likelihood technique. We find that, in many cases, the models are able to reproduce the observed light curves well and provide constraints on the viewing geometries that are in agreement with those from radio polarization measurements. Additionally, for some MSPs we constrain the altitudes of both the gamma-ray and radio emission regions. The best-fit magnetic inclination angles are found to cover a broader range than those of non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars.

  2. An interactive graphics program to retrieve, display, compare, manipulate, curve fit, difference and cross plot wind tunnel data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, R. D.; Werner, N. M.; Baker, W. M.

    1975-01-01

    The Aerodynamic Data Analysis and Integration System (ADAIS), developed as a highly interactive computer graphics program capable of manipulating large quantities of data such that addressable elements of a data base can be called up for graphic display, compared, curve fit, stored, retrieved, differenced, etc., was described. The general nature of the system is evidenced by the fact that limited usage has already occurred with data bases consisting of thermodynamic, basic loads, and flight dynamics data. Productivity using ADAIS of five times that for conventional manual methods of wind tunnel data analysis is routinely achieved. In wind tunnel data analysis, data from one or more runs of a particular test may be called up and displayed along with data from one or more runs of a different test. Curves may be faired through the data points by any of four methods, including cubic spline and least squares polynomial fit up to seventh order.

  3. Re-Evaluating Sexual Violence Prevention Through Bystander Education: A Latent Growth Curve Approach.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jessica; Janulis, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Recently, there has been a call for more advanced analytic techniques in violence against women research, particularly in community interventions that use longitudinal designs. The current study re-evaluates experimental evaluation data from a sexual violence bystander intervention program. Using an exploratory latent growth curve approach, we were able to model the longitudinal growth trajectories of individual participants over the course of the entire study. Although the results largely confirm the original evaluation findings, the latent growth curve approach better fits the demands of "messy" data (e.g., missing data, varying number of time points per participant, and unequal time spacing within and between participants) that are frequently obtained during a community-based intervention. The benefits of modern statistical techniques to practitioners and researchers in the field of sexual violence prevention, and violence against women more generally, are further discussed. PMID:25888503

  4. Broadband fitting approach for the application of supercontinuum broadband laser absorption spectroscopy to combustion environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göran Blume, Niels; Ebert, Volker; Dreizler, Andreas; Wagner, Steven

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a novel broadband fitting approach for quantitative in-flame measurements using supercontinuum broadband laser absorption spectroscopy (SCLAS) is presented. The application and verification of this approach in an atmospheric, laminar, non-premixed CH4/air flame (Wolfhard-Parker burner, WHP) is discussed. The developed fitting scheme allows for an automatic recognition and fitting of a B-spline curve reference intensity for SCLAS broadband measurements while automatically removing the influence of absorption peaks. This approach improves the fitting residual locally (in between absorption lines) and globally by 23% and 13% respectively, while improving the in-flame SNR by a factor of 2. Additionally, the approach inherently improves the time-wavelength-correlation based on recorded in-flame measurements itself in combination with a theoretical spectrum of the analyte. These improvements have allowed for the recording of complete spatially resolved methane concentration profiles in the WHP burner. Comparison of the measured absolute mole fraction profile for methane with previously measured reference data shows excellent agreement in position, shape and absolute values. These improvements are a prerequisite for the application of SCLAS in high-pressure combustion systems.

  5. Perturbation approach to dispersion curves calculation for nonlinear Lamb waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packo, Pawel; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Uhl, Tadeusz; Leamy, Michael J.

    2015-05-01

    Analysis of elastic wave propagation in nonlinear media has gained recent research attention due to the recognition of their amplitude-dependent behavior. This creates opportunities for increased accuracy of damage detection and localization, development of new structural monitoring strategies, and design of new structures with desirable acoustic behavior (e.g., amplitude-dependent frequency bandgaps, wave beaming, and filtering). This differs from more traditional nonlinear analysis approaches which target the prediction of higher harmonic growth. Of particular interest in this work is the analysis of amplitude-dependent shifts in Lamb wave dispersion curves. Typically, dispersion curves are calculated for nominally linear material parameters and geometrical features of a waveguide, even when the constitutive law is nonlinear. Instead, this work employs a Lindstedt - Poincare perturbation approach to calculate amplitude-dependent dispersion curves, and shifts thereof, for nonlinearly-elastic plates. As a result, a set of first order corrections to frequency (or equivalently wavenumber) are calculated. These corrections yield significant amplitude dependence in the spectral characteristics of the calculated waves, especially for high frequency waves, which differs fundamentally from linear analyses. Numerical simulations confirm the analytical shifts predicted. Recognition of this amplitude-dependence in Lamb wave dispersion may suggest, among other things, that the analysis of guided wave propagation phenomena within a fully nonlinear framework needs to revisit mode-mode energy flux and higher harmonics generation conditions.

  6. Improved curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air suitable for numerical computation using time-dependent or shock-capturing methods, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tannehill, J. C.; Mugge, P. H.

    1974-01-01

    Simplified curve fits for the thermodynamic properties of equilibrium air were devised for use in either the time-dependent or shock-capturing computational methods. For the time-dependent method, curve fits were developed for p = p(e, rho), a = a(e, rho), and T = T(e, rho). For the shock-capturing method, curve fits were developed for h = h(p, rho) and T = T(p, rho). The ranges of validity for these curves fits were for temperatures up to 25,000 K and densities from 10 to the minus 7th power to 10 to the 3d power amagats. These approximate curve fits are considered particularly useful when employed on advanced computers such as the Burroughs ILLIAC 4 or the CDC STAR.

  7. Prediction of an Epidemic Curve: A Supervised Classification Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nsoesie, Elaine O.; Beckman, Richard; Marathe, Madhav; Lewis, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Classification methods are widely used for identifying underlying groupings within datasets and predicting the class for new data objects given a trained classifier. This study introduces a project aimed at using a combination of simulations and classification techniques to predict epidemic curves and infer underlying disease parameters for an ongoing outbreak. Six supervised classification methods (random forest, support vector machines, nearest neighbor with three decision rules, linear and flexible discriminant analysis) were used in identifying partial epidemic curves from six agent-based stochastic simulations of influenza epidemics. The accuracy of the methods was compared using a performance metric based on the McNemar test. The findings showed that: (1) assumptions made by the methods regarding the structure of an epidemic curve influences their performance i.e. methods with fewer assumptions perform best, (2) the performance of most methods is consistent across different individual-based networks for Seattle, Los Angeles and New York and (3) combining classifiers using a weighting approach does not guarantee better prediction. PMID:22997545

  8. Reliability of temperature determination from curve-fitting in multi-wavelength pyrometery

    SciTech Connect

    Ni, P. A.; More, R. M.; Bieniosek, F. M.

    2013-08-04

    Abstract This paper examines the reliability of a widely used method for temperature determination by multi-wavelength pyrometry. In recent WDM experiments with ion-beam heated metal foils, we found that the statistical quality of the fit to the measured data is not necessarily a measure of the accuracy of the inferred temperature. We found a specific example where a second-best fit leads to a more realistic temperature value. The physics issue is the wavelength-dependent emissivity of the hot surface. We discuss improvements of the multi-frequency pyrometry technique, which will give a more reliable determination of the temperature from emission data.

  9. Curve fitting and modeling with splines using statistical variable selection techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. L.

    1982-01-01

    The successful application of statistical variable selection techniques to fit splines is demonstrated. Major emphasis is given to knot selection, but order determination is also discussed. Two FORTRAN backward elimination programs, using the B-spline basis, were developed. The program for knot elimination is compared in detail with two other spline-fitting methods and several statistical software packages. An example is also given for the two-variable case using a tensor product basis, with a theoretical discussion of the difficulties of their use.

  10. Simulator evaluation of manually flown curved instrument approaches. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sager, D.

    1973-01-01

    Pilot performance in flying horizontally curved instrument approaches was analyzed by having nine test subjects fly curved approaches in a fixed-base simulator. Approaches were flown without an autopilot and without a flight director. Evaluations were based on deviation measurements made at a number of points along the curved approach path and on subject questionnaires. Results indicate that pilots can fly curved approaches, though less accurately than straight-in approaches; that a moderate wind does not effect curve flying performance; and that there is no performance difference between 60 deg. and 90 deg. turns. A tradeoff of curve path parameters and a paper analysis of wind compensation were also made.

  11. Adaptive virulence evolution: the good old fitness-based approach.

    PubMed

    Alizon, Samuel; Michalakis, Yannis

    2015-05-01

    Infectious diseases could be expected to evolve towards complete avirulence to their hosts if given enough time. However, this is not the case. Often, virulence is maintained because it is linked to adaptive advantages to the parasite, a situation that is often associated with the hypothesis known as the transmission-virulence trade-off hypothesis. Here, we argue that this hypothesis has three limitations, which are related to how virulence is defined, the possibility of multiple trade-offs, and the difficulty of testing the hypothesis empirically. By adopting a fitness-based approach, where the relation between virulence and the fitness of the parasite throughout its life cycle is directly assessed, it is possible to address these limitations and to determine directly whether virulence is adaptive. PMID:25837917

  12. Fitting mathematical models to lactation curves from Holstein cows in the southwestern region of the state of Parana, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Abílio G T; Henrique, Douglas S; Vieira, Ricardo A M; Maeda, Emilyn M; Valotto, Altair A

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate four mathematical models with regards to their fit to lactation curves of Holstein cows from herds raised in the southwestern region of the state of Parana, Brazil. Initially, 42,281 milk production records from 2005 to 2011 were obtained from "Associação Paranaense de Criadores de Bovinos da Raça Holandesa (APCBRH)". Data lacking dates of drying and total milk production at 305 days of lactation were excluded, resulting in a remaining 15,142 records corresponding to 2,441 Holstein cows. Data were sorted according to the parity order (ranging from one to six), and within each parity order the animals were divided into quartiles (Q25%, Q50%, Q75% and Q100%) corresponding to 305-day lactation yield. Within each parity order, for each quartile, four mathematical models were adjusted, two of which were predominantly empirical (Brody and Wood) whereas the other two presented more mechanistic characteristics (models Dijkstra and Pollott). The quality of fit was evaluated by the corrected Akaike information criterion. The Wood model showed the best fit in almost all evaluated situations and, therefore, may be considered as the most suitable model to describe, at least empirically, the lactation curves of Holstein cows raised in Southwestern Parana. PMID:25806994

  13. Learning Curves: Making Quality Online Health Information Available at a Fitness Center

    PubMed Central

    Dobbins, Montie T.; Tarver, Talicia; Adams, Mararia; Jones, Dixie A.

    2012-01-01

    Meeting consumer health information needs can be a challenge. Research suggests that women seek health information from a variety of resources, including the Internet. In an effort to make women aware of reliable health information sources, the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center – Shreveport Medical Library engaged in a partnership with a franchise location of Curves International, Inc. This article will discuss the project, its goals and its challenges. PMID:22545020

  14. A covariance fitting approach for correlated acoustic source mapping.

    PubMed

    Yardibi, Tarik; Li, Jian; Stoica, Petre; Zawodny, Nikolas S; Cattafesta, Louis N

    2010-05-01

    Microphone arrays are commonly used for noise source localization and power estimation in aeroacoustic measurements. The delay-and-sum (DAS) beamformer, which is the most widely used beamforming algorithm in practice, suffers from low resolution and high sidelobe level problems. Therefore, deconvolution approaches, such as the deconvolution approach for the mapping of acoustic sources (DAMAS), are often used for extracting the actual source powers from the contaminated DAS results. However, most deconvolution approaches assume that the sources are uncorrelated. Although deconvolution algorithms that can deal with correlated sources, such as DAMAS for correlated sources, do exist, these algorithms are computationally impractical even for small scanning grid sizes. This paper presents a covariance fitting approach for the mapping of acoustic correlated sources (MACS), which can work with uncorrelated, partially correlated or even coherent sources with a reasonably low computational complexity. MACS minimizes a quadratic cost function in a cyclic manner by making use of convex optimization and sparsity, and is guaranteed to converge at least locally. Simulations and experimental data acquired at the University of Florida Aeroacoustic Flow Facility with a 63-element logarithmic spiral microphone array in the absence of flow are used to demonstrate the performance of MACS. PMID:21117743

  15. Computer user's manual for a generalized curve fit and plotting program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlagheck, R. A.; Beadle, B. D., II; Dolerhie, B. D., Jr.; Owen, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    A FORTRAN coded program has been developed for generating plotted output graphs on 8-1/2 by 11-inch paper. The program is designed to be used by engineers, scientists, and non-programming personnel on any IBM 1130 system that includes a 1627 plotter. The program has been written to provide a fast and efficient method of displaying plotted data without having to generate any additions. Various output options are available to the program user for displaying data in four different types of formatted plots. These options include discrete linear, continuous, and histogram graphical outputs. The manual contains information about the use and operation of this program. A mathematical description of the least squares goodness of fit test is presented. A program listing is also included.

  16. Characterization of acid functional groups of carbon dots by nonlinear regression data fitting of potentiometric titration curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Larissa A.; de Castro, Arthur H.; de Mendonça, Fernanda G.; de Mesquita, João P.

    2016-05-01

    The oxygenated functional groups present on the surface of carbon dots with an average size of 2.7 ± 0.5 nm were characterized by a variety of techniques. In particular, we discussed the fit data of potentiometric titration curves using a nonlinear regression method based on the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The results obtained by statistical treatment of the titration curve data showed that the best fit was obtained considering the presence of five Brønsted-Lowry acids on the surface of the carbon dots with constant ionization characteristics of carboxylic acids, cyclic ester, phenolic and pyrone-like groups. The total number of oxygenated acid groups obtained was 5 mmol g-1, with approximately 65% (∼2.9 mmol g-1) originating from groups with pKa < 6. The methodology showed good reproducibility and stability with standard deviations below 5%. The nature of the groups was independent of small variations in experimental conditions, i.e. the mass of carbon dots titrated and initial concentration of HCl solution. Finally, we believe that the methodology used here, together with other characterization techniques, is a simple, fast and powerful tool to characterize the complex acid-base properties of these so interesting and intriguing nanoparticles.

  17. Segmentation of neuronal structures using SARSA (λ)-based boundary amendment with reinforced gradient-descent curve shape fitting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fei; Liu, Quan; Fu, Yuchen; Shen, Bairong

    2014-01-01

    The segmentation of structures in electron microscopy (EM) images is very important for neurobiological research. The low resolution neuronal EM images contain noise and generally few features are available for segmentation, therefore application of the conventional approaches to identify the neuron structure from EM images is not successful. We therefore present a multi-scale fused structure boundary detection algorithm in this study. In the algorithm, we generate an EM image Gaussian pyramid first, then at each level of the pyramid, we utilize Laplacian of Gaussian function (LoG) to attain structure boundary, we finally assemble the detected boundaries by using fusion algorithm to attain a combined neuron structure image. Since the obtained neuron structures usually have gaps, we put forward a reinforcement learning-based boundary amendment method to connect the gaps in the detected boundaries. We use a SARSA (λ)-based curve traveling and amendment approach derived from reinforcement learning to repair the incomplete curves. Using this algorithm, a moving point starts from one end of the incomplete curve and walks through the image where the decisions are supervised by the approximated curve model, with the aim of minimizing the connection cost until the gap is closed. Our approach provided stable and efficient structure segmentation. The test results using 30 EM images from ISBI 2012 indicated that both of our approaches, i.e., with or without boundary amendment, performed better than six conventional boundary detection approaches. In particular, after amendment, the Rand error and warping error, which are the most important performance measurements during structure segmentation, were reduced to very low values. The comparison with the benchmark method of ISBI 2012 and the recent developed methods also indicates that our method performs better for the accurate identification of substructures in EM images and therefore useful for the identification of imaging

  18. Segmentation of Neuronal Structures Using SARSA (λ)-Based Boundary Amendment with Reinforced Gradient-Descent Curve Shape Fitting

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fei; Liu, Quan; Fu, Yuchen; Shen, Bairong

    2014-01-01

    The segmentation of structures in electron microscopy (EM) images is very important for neurobiological research. The low resolution neuronal EM images contain noise and generally few features are available for segmentation, therefore application of the conventional approaches to identify the neuron structure from EM images is not successful. We therefore present a multi-scale fused structure boundary detection algorithm in this study. In the algorithm, we generate an EM image Gaussian pyramid first, then at each level of the pyramid, we utilize Laplacian of Gaussian function (LoG) to attain structure boundary, we finally assemble the detected boundaries by using fusion algorithm to attain a combined neuron structure image. Since the obtained neuron structures usually have gaps, we put forward a reinforcement learning-based boundary amendment method to connect the gaps in the detected boundaries. We use a SARSA (λ)-based curve traveling and amendment approach derived from reinforcement learning to repair the incomplete curves. Using this algorithm, a moving point starts from one end of the incomplete curve and walks through the image where the decisions are supervised by the approximated curve model, with the aim of minimizing the connection cost until the gap is closed. Our approach provided stable and efficient structure segmentation. The test results using 30 EM images from ISBI 2012 indicated that both of our approaches, i.e., with or without boundary amendment, performed better than six conventional boundary detection approaches. In particular, after amendment, the Rand error and warping error, which are the most important performance measurements during structure segmentation, were reduced to very low values. The comparison with the benchmark method of ISBI 2012 and the recent developed methods also indicates that our method performs better for the accurate identification of substructures in EM images and therefore useful for the identification of imaging

  19. Exploring Alternative Characteristic Curve Approaches to Linking Parameter Estimates from the Generalized Partial Credit Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, James S.; Bao, Han; Huang, Chun-Wei; Gagne, Phill

    Characteristic curve approaches for linking parameters from the generalized partial credit model were examined for cases in which common (anchor) items are calibrated separately in two groups. Three of these approaches are simple extensions of the test characteristic curve (TCC), item characteristic curve (ICC), and operating characteristic curve…

  20. Traditional African Dance: An Excellent Approach to Fitness and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Iola

    This paper argues that traditional African dance can develop fitness and health particularly for those interested in both health and African culture. A discussion of fitness concludes that this quality enables the body to perform physical activities with greater efficiency and that all the qualities commonly found in notions of fitness are found…

  1. U-Shaped Curves in Development: A PDP Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Timothy T.; Rakison, David H.; McClelland, James L.

    2004-01-01

    As the articles in this issue attest, U-shaped curves in development have stimulated a wide spectrum of research across disparate task domains and age groups and have provoked a variety of ideas about their origins and theoretical significance. In the authors' view, the ubiquity of the general pattern suggests that U-shaped curves can arise from…

  2. A Comprehensive Approach for Assessing Person Fit with Test-Retest Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrando, Pere J.

    2014-01-01

    Item response theory (IRT) models allow model-data fit to be assessed at the individual level by using person-fit indices. This assessment is also feasible when IRT is used to model test-retest data. However, person-fit developments for this type of modeling are virtually nonexistent. This article proposes a general person-fit approach for…

  3. Curved spacetimes and curved graphene: A status report of the Weyl symmetry approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, Alfredo

    2015-02-01

    This is a status report about the ongoing work on the realization of quantum field theory on curved graphene spacetimes that uses Weyl symmetry. The programme is actively pursued from many different perspectives. Here we point to what has been done, and to what needs to be done.

  4. Multiparametric curve fitting-XI: POLET computer program for estimation of formation constants and stoichiometric indices from normalized potentiometric data.

    PubMed

    Havel, J; Meloun, M

    1986-06-01

    The FORTRAN computer program POLET(84) analyses a set of normalized potentiometric titration curves to find a chemical model, i.e., the number of species present and their stoichiometry, and to determine the corresponding stability constants log beta(pqrs) and unknown stoichiometric indices p, q, r, and s of up to quaternary M(p)L(q)Y(r)H(s) complexes. The program belongs to the ABLET family, based on the LETAG subroutine, and can use an algorithmic and/or heuristic minimization strategy, or a beneficial combination of both. The data, a set of potentiometric titration curves plotted as volume and potential, are converted into normalized variables (formation function, pH) and then a computer-assisted search for a chemical model by POLET(84) is applied. The procedure for efficient application of POLET(84) in an equilibrium analysis is described and the program is validated by use of literature and simulated data. The reliability of the chemical model and its parameters is established by the degree-of-fit achieved, and the closeness of the stoichiometric indices to integral values. PMID:18964133

  5. Quantitative Evaluation of Cross-Peak Volumes in Multidimensional Spectra by Nonlinear-Least-Squares Curve Fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sze, K. H.; Barsukov, I. L.; Roberts, G. C. K.

    A procedure for quantitative evaluation of cross-peak volumes in spectra of any order of dimensions is described; this is based on a generalized algorithm for combining appropriate one-dimensional integrals obtained by nonlinear-least-squares curve-fitting techniques. This procedure is embodied in a program, NDVOL, which has three modes of operation: a fully automatic mode, a manual mode for interactive selection of fitting parameters, and a fast reintegration mode. The procedures used in the NDVOL program to obtain accurate volumes for overlapping cross peaks are illustrated using various simulated overlapping cross-peak patterns. The precision and accuracy of the estimates of cross-peak volumes obtained by application of the program to these simulated cross peaks and to a back-calculated 2D NOESY spectrum of dihydrofolate reductase are presented. Examples are shown of the use of the program with real 2D and 3D data. It is shown that the program is able to provide excellent estimates of volume even for seriously overlapping cross peaks with minimal intervention by the user.

  6. Curve Fitting of the Corporate Recovery Rates: The Comparison of Beta Distribution Estimation and Kernel Density Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rongda; Wang, Ze

    2013-01-01

    Recovery rate is essential to the estimation of the portfolio’s loss and economic capital. Neglecting the randomness of the distribution of recovery rate may underestimate the risk. The study introduces two kinds of models of distribution, Beta distribution estimation and kernel density distribution estimation, to simulate the distribution of recovery rates of corporate loans and bonds. As is known, models based on Beta distribution are common in daily usage, such as CreditMetrics by J.P. Morgan, Portfolio Manager by KMV and Losscalc by Moody’s. However, it has a fatal defect that it can’t fit the bimodal or multimodal distributions such as recovery rates of corporate loans and bonds as Moody’s new data show. In order to overcome this flaw, the kernel density estimation is introduced and we compare the simulation results by histogram, Beta distribution estimation and kernel density estimation to reach the conclusion that the Gaussian kernel density distribution really better imitates the distribution of the bimodal or multimodal data samples of corporate loans and bonds. Finally, a Chi-square test of the Gaussian kernel density estimation proves that it can fit the curve of recovery rates of loans and bonds. So using the kernel density distribution to precisely delineate the bimodal recovery rates of bonds is optimal in credit risk management. PMID:23874558

  7. Curve fitting of the corporate recovery rates: the comparison of Beta distribution estimation and kernel density estimation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rongda; Wang, Ze

    2013-01-01

    Recovery rate is essential to the estimation of the portfolio's loss and economic capital. Neglecting the randomness of the distribution of recovery rate may underestimate the risk. The study introduces two kinds of models of distribution, Beta distribution estimation and kernel density distribution estimation, to simulate the distribution of recovery rates of corporate loans and bonds. As is known, models based on Beta distribution are common in daily usage, such as CreditMetrics by J.P. Morgan, Portfolio Manager by KMV and Losscalc by Moody's. However, it has a fatal defect that it can't fit the bimodal or multimodal distributions such as recovery rates of corporate loans and bonds as Moody's new data show. In order to overcome this flaw, the kernel density estimation is introduced and we compare the simulation results by histogram, Beta distribution estimation and kernel density estimation to reach the conclusion that the Gaussian kernel density distribution really better imitates the distribution of the bimodal or multimodal data samples of corporate loans and bonds. Finally, a Chi-square test of the Gaussian kernel density estimation proves that it can fit the curve of recovery rates of loans and bonds. So using the kernel density distribution to precisely delineate the bimodal recovery rates of bonds is optimal in credit risk management. PMID:23874558

  8. An approach for ensuring accuracy in pediatric hearing instrument fitting.

    PubMed

    Seewald, Richard C; Scollie, Susan D

    2003-01-01

    Hearing instrument fitting with infants and young children differs in several important ways relative to the fitting process with adults. In developing the Desired Sensation Level method, we have attempted to account for those factors that are uniquely associated with pediatric hearing instrument fitting. Within this article we describe how the external ear acoustics of infants and young children have been systematically accounted for in developing the Desired Sensation Level method. Specific evidence-based procedures that can be applied with infants and young children for the purposes of audiometric assessment, electroacoustic selection, and verification of hearing instrument performance are described. PMID:15004646

  9. MAPCLUS: A Mathematical Programming Approach to Fitting the ADCLUS Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arabie, Phipps

    1980-01-01

    A new computing algorithm, MAPCLUS (Mathematical Programming Clustering), for fitting the Shephard-Arabie ADCLUS (Additive Clustering) model is presented. Details and benefits of the algorithm are discussed. (Author/JKS)

  10. Fitting of m*/m with Divergence Curve for He3 Fluid Monolayer using Hole-driven Mott Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Tak

    2012-02-01

    The electron-electron interaction for strongly correlated systems plays an important role in formation of an energy gap in solid. The breakdown of the energy gap is called the Mott metal-insulator transition (MIT) which is different from the Peierls MIT induced by breakdown of electron-phonon interaction generated by change of a periodic lattice. It has been known that the correlated systems are inhomogeneous. In particular, He3 fluid monolayer [1] and La1-xSrxTiO3 [2] are representative strongly correlated systems. Their doping dependence of the effective mass of carrier in metal, m*/m, indicating the magnitude of correlation (Coulomb interaction) between electrons has a divergence behavior. However, the fitting remains unfitted to be explained by a Mott-transition theory with divergence. In the case of He3 regarded as the Fermi system with one positive charge (2 electrons + 3 protons), the interaction between He3 atoms is regarded as the correlation in strongly correlated system. In this presentation, we introduce a Hole-driven MIT with a divergence near the Mott transition [3] and fit the m*/m curve in He3 [1] and La1-xSrxTiO3 systems with the Hole-driven MIT with m*/m=1/(1-ρ^4) where ρ is band filling. Moreover, it is shown that the physical meaning of the effective mass with the divergence is percolation in which m*/m increases with increasing doping concentration, and that the magnitude of m*/m is constant.[4pt] [1] Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 115301 (2003).[0pt] [2] Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 2126 (1993).[0pt] [3] Physica C 341-348, 259 (2000); Physica C 460-462, 1076 (2007).

  11. Predicting Change in Postpartum Depression: An Individual Growth Curve Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Trey

    Recently, methodologists interested in examining problems associated with measuring change have suggested that developmental researchers should focus upon assessing change at both intra-individual and inter-individual levels. This study used an application of individual growth curve analysis to the problem of maternal postpartum depression.…

  12. Structural modeling of age specific fertility curves in Peninsular Malaysia: An approach of Lee Carter method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanafiah, Hazlenah; Jemain, Abdul Aziz

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, the study of fertility has been getting a lot of attention among research abroad following fear of deterioration of fertility led by the rapid economy development. Hence, this study examines the feasibility of developing fertility forecasts based on age structure. Lee Carter model (1992) is applied in this study as it is an established and widely used model in analysing demographic aspects. A singular value decomposition approach is incorporated with an ARIMA model to estimate age specific fertility rates in Peninsular Malaysia over the period 1958-2007. Residual plots is used to measure the goodness of fit of the model. Fertility index forecast using random walk drift is then utilised to predict the future age specific fertility. Results indicate that the proposed model provides a relatively good and reasonable data fitting. In addition, there is an apparent and continuous decline in age specific fertility curves in the next 10 years, particularly among mothers' in their early 20's and 40's. The study on the fertility is vital in order to maintain a balance between the population growth and the provision of facilities related resources.

  13. Clarifications regarding the use of model-fitting methods of kinetic analysis for determining the activation energy from a single non-isothermal curve

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This paper provides some clarifications regarding the use of model-fitting methods of kinetic analysis for estimating the activation energy of a process, in response to some results recently published in Chemistry Central journal. Findings The model fitting methods of Arrhenius and Savata are used to determine the activation energy of a single simulated curve. It is shown that most kinetic models correctly fit the data, each providing a different value for the activation energy. Therefore it is not really possible to determine the correct activation energy from a single non-isothermal curve. On the other hand, when a set of curves are recorded under different heating schedules are used, the correct kinetic parameters can be clearly discerned. Conclusions Here, it is shown that the activation energy and the kinetic model cannot be unambiguously determined from a single experimental curve recorded under non isothermal conditions. Thus, the use of a set of curves recorded under different heating schedules is mandatory if model-fitting methods are employed. PMID:23383684

  14. Empirical mode decomposition apparatus, method and article of manufacture for analyzing biological signals and performing curve fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A computer implemented physical signal analysis method includes four basic steps and the associated presentation techniques of the results. The first step is a computer implemented Empirical Mode Decomposition that extracts a collection of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) from nonlinear, nonstationary physical signals. The decomposition is based on the direct extraction of the energy associated with various intrinsic time scales in the physical signal. Expressed in the IMF's, they have well-behaved Hilbert Transforms from which instantaneous frequencies can be calculated. The second step is the Hilbert Transform which produces a Hilbert Spectrum. Thus, the invention can localize any event on the time as well as the frequency axis. The decomposition can also be viewed as an expansion of the data in terms of the IMF's. Then, these IMF's, based on and derived from the data, can serve as the basis of that expansion. The local energy and the instantaneous frequency derived from the IMF's through the Hilbert transform give a full energy-frequency-time distribution of the data which is designated as the Hilbert Spectrum. The third step filters the physical signal by combining a subset of the IMFs. In the fourth step, a curve may be fitted to the filtered signal which may not have been possible with the original, unfiltered signal.

  15. Empirical mode decomposition apparatus, method and article of manufacture for analyzing biological signals and performing curve fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Norden E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A computer implemented physical signal analysis method includes four basic steps and the associated presentation techniques of the results. The first step is a computer implemented Empirical Mode Decomposition that extracts a collection of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF) from nonlinear, nonstationary physical signals. The decomposition is based on the direct extraction of the energy associated with various intrinsic time scales in the physical signal. Expressed in the IMF's, they have well-behaved Hilbert Transforms from which instantaneous frequencies can be calculated. The second step is the Hilbert Transform which produces a Hilbert Spectrum. Thus, the invention can localize any event on the time as well as the frequency axis. The decomposition can also be viewed as an expansion of the data in terms of the IMF's. Then, these IMF's, based on and derived from the data, can serve as the basis of that expansion. The local energy and the instantaneous frequency derived from the IMF's through the Hilbert transform give a full energy-frequency-time distribution of the data which is designated as the Hilbert Spectrum. The third step filters the physical signal by combining a subset of the IMFs. In the fourth step, a curve may be fitted to the filtered signal which may not have been possible with the original, unfiltered signal.

  16. Using growth curves to forecast regional resource recovery: approaches, analytics and consistency tests.

    PubMed

    Sorrell, Steve; Speirs, Jamie

    2014-01-13

    There is growing concern about the depletion of hydrocarbon resources and the risk of near-term peaks in production. These concerns hinge upon contested estimates of the recoverable resources of different regions and the associated forecasts of regional production. Beginning with Hubbert, an influential group of analysts have used growth curves both to estimate recoverable resources and to forecast future production. Despite widespread use, these 'curve-fitting' techniques remain a focus of misunderstanding and dispute. The aim of this paper is to classify and explain these techniques and to identify both their relative suitability in different circumstances and the expected level of confidence in their results. The paper develops a mathematical framework that maps curve-fitting techniques onto the available data for conventional oil and highlights the critical importance of the so-called 'reserve growth'. It then summarizes the historical origins, contemporary application and strengths and weaknesses of each group of curve-fitting techniques and uses illustrative data from a number of oil-producing regions to explore the extent to which these techniques provide consistent estimates of recoverable resources. The paper argues that the applicability of curve-fitting techniques is more limited than adherents claim, the confidence bounds on the results are wider than commonly assumed and the techniques have a tendency to underestimate recoverable resources. PMID:24298074

  17. The conical fit approach to modeling ionospheric total electron content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, L.; Komjathy, A.; Mannucci, A. J.

    2002-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) can be used to measure the integrated electron density along raypaths between satellites and receivers. Such measurements may, in turn, be used to construct regional and global maps of the ionospheric total electron content (TEC). Maps are generated by fitting measurements to an assumed ionospheric model.

  18. Determination of a melting curve using the one-phase approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchizaki, Kazuhiro; Okamoto, Kazuma

    2016-01-01

    The melting curve of the modified Lennard-Jones solid is derived using a one-phase approach. The Padé approximation employed for solving the melting-curve equation converges at the middle stage, giving rise to the well-known Simon curve that satisfactorily captures the actual melting curve found from a molecular dynamics simulation over a pressure range of four orders of magnitude. This situation is justified because the solid under consideration was shown to satisfy the thermodynamic condition under which Simon's curve becomes exact.

  19. A new approach to the analysis of Mira light curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennessier, M. O.; Barthes, D.; Mattei, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    Two different but complementary methods for predicting Mira luminosities are presented. One method is derived from a Fourier analysis, it requires performing deconvolution, and its results are not certain due to the inherent instability of deconvolution problems. The other method is a learning method utilizing artificial intelligence techniques where a light curve is presented as an ordered sequence of pseudocycles, and rules are learned by linking the characteristics of several consecutive pseudocycles to one characteristic of the future cycle. It is observed that agreement between these methods is obtainable when it is possible to eliminate similar false frequencies from the preliminary power spectrum and to improve the degree of confidence in the rules.

  20. Estimation of channel mismatches in time-interleaved analog-to-digital converters based on fractional delay and sine curve fitting.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lianping; Tian, Shulin; Jiang, Jun

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes an algorithm to estimate the channel mismatches in time-interleaved analog-to-digital converter (TIADC) based on fractional delay (FD) and sine curve fitting. Choose one channel as the reference channel and apply FD to the output samples of reference channel to obtain the ideal samples of non-reference channels with no mismatches. Based on least square method, the sine curves are adopted to fit the ideal and the actual samples of non-reference channels, and then the mismatch parameters can be estimated by comparing the ideal sine curves and the actual ones. The principle of this algorithm is simple and easily understood. Moreover, its implementation needs no extra circuits, lowering the hardware cost. Simulation results show that the estimation accuracy of this algorithm can be controlled within 2%. Finally, the practicability of this algorithm is verified by the measurement results of channel mismatch errors of a two-channel TIADC prototype. PMID:25832264

  1. EZ-FIT: a practical curve-fitting microcomputer program for the analysis of enzyme kinetic data on IBM-PC compatible computers.

    PubMed

    Perrella, F W

    1988-11-01

    EZ-FIT, an interactive microcomputer software package, has been developed for the analysis of enzyme kinetic and equilibrium binding data. EZ-FIT was designed as a user-friendly menu-driven package that has the facility for data entry, editing, and filing. Data input permits the conversion of cpm, dpm, or optical density to molar per minute per milligram protein. Data can be fit to any of 14 model equations including Michaelis-Menten, Hill, isoenzyme, inhibition, dual substrate, agonist, antagonist, and modified integrated Michaelis-Menten. The program uses the Nelder-Mead simplex and Marquardt nonlinear regression algorithms sequentially. A report of the results includes the parameter estimates with standard errors, a Student t test to determine the accuracy of the parameter values, a Runs statistic test of the residuals, identification of outlying data, an Akaike information criterion test for goodness-of-fit, and, when the experimental variance is included, a chi 2 statistic test for goodness-of-fit. Several different graphs can be displayed: an X-Y, a Scatchard, an Eadie-Hofstee, a Lineweaver-Burk, a semilogarithmic, and a residual plot. A data analysis report and graphs are designed to evaluate the goodness-of-fit of the data to a particular model. PMID:3239747

  2. Statistical model to perform error analysis of curve fits of wind tunnel test data using the techniques of analysis of variance and regression analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    The considered research had the objective to design a statistical model that could perform an error analysis of curve fits of wind tunnel test data using analysis of variance and regression analysis techniques. Four related subproblems were defined, and by solving each of these a solution to the general research problem was obtained. The capabilities of the evolved true statistical model are considered. The least squares fit is used to determine the nature of the force, moment, and pressure data. The order of the curve fit is increased in order to delete the quadratic effect in the residuals. The analysis of variance is used to determine the magnitude and effect of the error factor associated with the experimental data.

  3. A computational approach to the twin paradox in curved spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Kenneth K. H.; Clark, Hamish A.; Lewis, Geraint F.; Wu, Xiaofeng

    2016-09-01

    Despite being a major component in the teaching of special relativity, the twin ‘paradox’ is generally not examined in courses on general relativity. Due to the complexity of analytical solutions to the problem, the paradox is often neglected entirely, and students are left with an incomplete understanding of the relativistic behaviour of time. This article outlines a project, undertaken by undergraduate physics students at the University of Sydney, in which a novel computational method was derived in order to predict the time experienced by a twin following a number of paths between two given spacetime coordinates. By utilising this method, it is possible to make clear to students that following a geodesic in curved spacetime does not always result in the greatest experienced proper time.

  4. Frequency curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riggs, H.C.

    1968-01-01

    This manual describes graphical and mathematical procedures for preparing frequency curves from samples of hydrologic data. It also discusses the theory of frequency curves, compares advantages of graphical and mathematical fitting, suggests methods of describing graphically defined frequency curves analytically, and emphasizes the correct interpretations of a frequency curve.

  5. Dynamic Regulation of a Cell Adhesion Protein Complex Including CADM1 by Combinatorial Analysis of FRAP with Exponential Curve-Fitting

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai-Yageta, Mika; Maruyama, Tomoko; Suzuki, Takashi; Ichikawa, Kazuhisa; Murakami, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    Protein components of cell adhesion machinery show continuous renewal even in the static state of epithelial cells and participate in the formation and maintenance of normal epithelial architecture and tumor suppression. CADM1 is a tumor suppressor belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecule and forms a cell adhesion complex with an actin-binding protein, 4.1B, and a scaffold protein, MPP3, in the cytoplasm. Here, we investigate dynamic regulation of the CADM1-4.1B-MPP3 complex in mature cell adhesion by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) analysis. Traditional FRAP analysis were performed for relatively short period of around 10min. Here, thanks to recent advances in the sensitive laser detector systems, we examine FRAP of CADM1 complex for longer period of 60 min and analyze the recovery with exponential curve-fitting to distinguish the fractions with different diffusion constants. This approach reveals that the fluorescence recovery of CADM1 is fitted to a single exponential function with a time constant (τ) of approximately 16 min, whereas 4.1B and MPP3 are fitted to a double exponential function with two τs of approximately 40-60 sec and 16 min. The longer τ is similar to that of CADM1, suggesting that 4.1B and MPP3 have two distinct fractions, one forming a complex with CADM1 and the other present as a free pool. Fluorescence loss in photobleaching analysis supports the presence of a free pool of these proteins near the plasma membrane. Furthermore, double exponential fitting makes it possible to estimate the ratio of 4.1B and MPP3 present as a free pool and as a complex with CADM1 as approximately 3:2 and 3:1, respectively. Our analyses reveal a central role of CADM1 in stabilizing the complex with 4.1B and MPP3 and provide insight in the dynamics of adhesion complex formation. PMID:25780926

  6. An interactive user-friendly approach to surface-fitting three-dimensional geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatwood, F. Mcneil; Dejarnette, Fred R.

    1988-01-01

    A surface-fitting technique has been developed which addresses two problems with existing geometry packages: computer storage requirements and the time required of the user for the initial setup of the geometry model. Coordinates of cross sections are fit using segments of general conic sections. The next step is to blend the cross-sectional curve-fits in the longitudinal direction using general conics to fit specific meridional half-planes. Provisions are made to allow the fitting of fuselages and wings so that entire wing-body combinations may be modeled. This report includes the development of the technique along with a User's Guide for the various menus within the program. Results for the modeling of the Space Shuttle and a proposed Aeroassist Flight Experiment geometry are presented.

  7. Physical fitness: An operator's approach to coping with shift work

    SciTech Connect

    Hanks, D.H.

    1989-01-01

    There is a strong correlation between a shift worker's ability to remain alert and the physical fitness of the individual. Alertness is a key element of a nuclear plant operator's ability to effectively monitor and control plant status. The constant changes in one's metabolism caused by the rotation of work (and sleep) hours can be devastating to his or her health. Many workers with longevity in the field, however, have found it beneficial to maintain some sort of workout or sport activity, feeling that this activity offsets the physical burden of backshift. The author's experience working shifts for 10 years and his reported increase in alertness through exercise and diet manipulation are described in this paper.

  8. Multiscale approach to contour fitting for MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rueckert, Daniel; Burger, Peter

    1996-04-01

    We present a new multiscale contour fitting process which combines information about the image and the contour of the object at different levels of scale. The algorithm is based on energy minimizing deformable models but avoids some of the problems associated with these models. The segmentation algorithm starts by constructing a linear scale-space of an image through convolution of the original image with a Gaussian kernel at different levels of scale, where the scale corresponds to the standard deviation of the Gaussian kernel. At high levels of scale large scale features of the objects are preserved while small scale features, like object details as well as noise, are suppressed. In order to maximize the accuracy of the segmentation, the contour of the object of interest is then tracked in scale-space from coarse to fine scales. We propose a hybrid multi-temperature simulated annealing optimization to minimize the energy of the deformable model. At high levels of scale the SA optimization is started at high temperatures, enabling the SA optimization to find a global optimal solution. At lower levels of scale the SA optimization is started at lower temperatures (at the lowest level the temperature is close to 0). This enforces a more deterministic behavior of the SA optimization at lower scales and leads to an increasingly local optimization as high energy barriers cannot be crossed. The performance and robustness of the algorithm have been tested on spin-echo MR images of the cardiovascular system. The task was to segment the ascending and descending aorta in 15 datasets of different individuals in order to measure regional aortic compliance. The results show that the algorithm is able to provide more accurate segmentation results than the classic contour fitting process and is at the same time very robust to noise and initialization.

  9. Curve fits of predicted inviscid stagnation-point radiative heating rates, cooling factors, and shock standoff distances for hyperbolic earth entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suttles, J. T.; Sullivan, E. M.; Margolis, S. B.

    1974-01-01

    Curve-fit formulas are presented for the stagnation-point radiative heating rate, cooling factor, and shock standoff distance for inviscid flow over blunt bodies at conditions corresponding to high-speed earth entry. The data which were curve fitted were calculated by using a technique which utilizes a one-strip integral method and a detailed nongray radiation model to generate a radiatively coupled flow-field solution for air in chemical and local thermodynamic equilibrium. The range of free-stream parameters considered were altitudes from about 55 to 70 km and velocities from about 11 to 16 km.sec. Spherical bodies with nose radii from 30 to 450 cm and elliptical bodies with major-to-minor axis ratios of 2, 4, and 6 were treated. Powerlaw formulas are proposed and a least-squares logarithmic fit is used to evaluate the constants. It is shown that the data can be described in this manner with an average deviation of about 3 percent (or less) and a maximum deviation of about 10 percent (or less). The curve-fit formulas provide an effective and economic means for making preliminary design studies for situations involving high-speed earth entry.

  10. Evaluation of different lactation curve models fitted for milk viscosity recorded by an automated on-line California Mastitis Test.

    PubMed

    Neitzel, Anne-Christin; Stamer, Eckhard; Junge, Wolfgang; Thaller, Georg

    2015-05-01

    Laboratory somatic cell count (LSCC) records are usually recorded monthly and provide an important information source for breeding and herd management. Daily milk viscosity detection in composite milking (expressed as drain time) with an automated on-line California Mastitis Test (CMT) could serve immediately as an early predictor of udder diseases and might be used as a selection criterion to improve udder health. The aim of the present study was to clarify the relationship between the well-established LSCS and the new trait,'drain time', and to estimate their correlations to important production traits. Data were recorded on the dairy research farm Karkendamm in Germany. Viscosity sensors were installed on every fourth milking stall in the rotary parlour to measure daily drain time records. Weekly LSCC and milk composition data were available. Two data sets were created containing records of 187,692 milkings from 320 cows (D1) and 25,887 drain time records from 311 cows (D2). Different fixed effect models, describing the log-transformed drain time (logDT), were fitted to achieve applicable models for further analysis. Lactation curves were modelled with standard parametric functions (Ali and Schaeffer, Legendre polynomials of second and third degree) of days in milk (DIM). Random regression models were further applied to estimate the correlations between cow effects between logDT and LSCS with further important production traits. LogDT and LSCS were strongest correlated in mid-lactation (r = 0.78). Correlations between logDT and production traits were low to medium. Highest correlations were reached in late lactation between logDT and milk yield (r = -0.31), between logDT and protein content (r = 0.30) and in early as well as in late lactation between logDT and lactose content (r = -0.28). The results of the present study show that the drain time could be used as a new trait for daily mastitis control. PMID:25731191

  11. A Global Fitting Approach For Doppler Broadening Thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amodio, Pasquale; Moretti, Luigi; De Vizia, Maria Domenica; Gianfrani, Livio

    2014-06-01

    Very recently, a spectroscopic determination of the Boltzmann constant, kB, has been performed at the Second University of Naples by means of a rather sophisticated implementation of Doppler Broadening Thermometry (DBT)1. Performed on a 18O-enriched water sample, at a wavelength of 1.39 µm, the experiment has provided a value for kB with a combined uncertainty of 24 parts over 106, which is the best result obtained so far, by using an optical method. In the spectral analysis procedure, the partially correlated speed-dependent hard-collision (pC-SDHC) model was adopted. The uncertainty budget has clearly revealed that the major contributions come from the statistical uncertainty (type A) and from the uncertainty associated to the line-shape model (type B)2. In the present work, we present the first results of a theoretical and numerical work aimed at reducing these uncertainty components. It is well known that molecular line shapes exhibit clear deviations from the time honoured Voigt profile. Even in the case of a well isolated spectral line, under the influence of binary collisions, in the Doppler regime, the shape can be quite complicated by the joint occurrence of velocity-change collisions and speed-dependent effects. The partially correlated speed-dependent Keilson-Storer profile (pC-SDKS) has been recently proposed as a very realistic model, capable of reproducing very accurately the absorption spectra for self-colliding water molecules, in the near infrared3. Unfortunately, the model is so complex that it cannot be implemented into a fitting routine for the analysis of experimental spectra. Therefore, we have developed a MATLAB code to simulate a variety of H218O spectra in thermodynamic conditions identical to the one of our DBT experiment, using the pC-SDKS model. The numerical calculations to determine such a profile have a very large computational cost, resulting from a very sophisticated iterative procedure. Hence, the numerically simulated spectra

  12. Examining the Earnings Trajectories of Community College Students Using a Piecewise Growth Curve Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaggars, Shanna Smith; Xu, Di

    2016-01-01

    Policymakers have become increasingly concerned with measuring--and holding colleges accountable for--students' labor market outcomes. In this article we introduce a piecewise growth curve approach to analyzing community college students' labor market outcomes, and we discuss how this approach differs from two popular econometric approaches:…

  13. Wavelet transform approach for fitting financial time series data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Amel Abdoullah; Ismail, Mohd Tahir

    2015-10-01

    This study investigates a newly developed technique; a combined wavelet filtering and VEC model, to study the dynamic relationship among financial time series. Wavelet filter has been used to annihilate noise data in daily data set of NASDAQ stock market of US, and three stock markets of Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region, namely, Egypt, Jordan, and Istanbul. The data covered is from 6/29/2001 to 5/5/2009. After that, the returns of generated series by wavelet filter and original series are analyzed by cointegration test and VEC model. The results show that the cointegration test affirms the existence of cointegration between the studied series, and there is a long-term relationship between the US, stock markets and MENA stock markets. A comparison between the proposed model and traditional model demonstrates that, the proposed model (DWT with VEC model) outperforms traditional model (VEC model) to fit the financial stock markets series well, and shows real information about these relationships among the stock markets.

  14. Model Fitting Versus Curve Fitting: A Model of Renormalization Provides a Better Account of Age Aftereffects Than a Model of Local Repulsion

    PubMed Central

    Mac, Amy; Rhodes, Gillian; Webster, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we proposed that the aftereffects of adapting to facial age are consistent with a renormalization of the perceived age (e.g., so that after adapting to a younger or older age, all ages appear slightly older or younger, respectively). This conclusion has been challenged by arguing that the aftereffects can also be accounted for by an alternative model based on repulsion (in which facial ages above or below the adapting age are biased away from the adaptor). However, we show here that this challenge was based on allowing the fitted functions to take on values which are implausible and incompatible across the different adapting conditions. When the fits are constrained or interpreted in terms of standard assumptions about normalization and repulsion, then the two analyses both agree in pointing to a pattern of renormalization in age aftereffects. PMID:27551353

  15. Latent Trait Theory Approach to Measuring Person-Organization Fit: Conceptual Rationale and Empirical Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chernyshenko, Oleksandr S.; Stark, Stephen; Williams, Alex

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to offer a new approach to measuring person-organization (P-O) fit, referred to here as "Latent fit." Respondents were administered unidimensional forced choice items and were asked to choose the statement in each pair that better reflected the correspondence between their values and those of the organization;…

  16. Comparisons of Wilson-Fowler and Parametric Cubic Splines with the Curve-Fitting Algorithms of Several Computer-Aided Design Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Birchler, W.D.; Schilling, S.A.

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to demonstrate that modern computer-aided design (CAD), computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), and computer-aided engineering (CAE) systems can be used in the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) to design new and remodel old products, fabricate old and new parts, and reproduce legacy data within the inspection uncertainty limits. In this study, two two-dimensional splines are compared with several modern CAD curve-fitting modeling algorithms. The first curve-fitting algorithm is called the Wilson-Fowler Spline (WFS), and the second is called a parametric cubic spline (PCS). Modern CAD systems usually utilize either parametric cubic and/or B-splines.

  17. A Bayesian approach for characterizing direction tuning curves in the supplementary motor area of behaving monkeys.

    PubMed

    Taubman, Hadas; Vaadia, Eilon; Paz, Rony; Chechik, Gal

    2013-06-01

    Neural responses are commonly studied in terms of "tuning curves," characterizing changes in neuronal response as a function of a continuous stimulus parameter. In the motor system, neural responses to movement direction often follow a bell-shaped tuning curve for which the exact shape determines the properties of neuronal movement coding. Estimating the shape of that tuning curve robustly is hard, especially when directions are sampled unevenly and at a coarse resolution. Here, we describe a Bayesian estimation procedure that improves the accuracy of curve-shape estimation even when the curve is sampled unevenly and at a very coarse resolution. Using this approach, we characterize the movement direction tuning curves in the supplementary motor area (SMA) of behaving monkeys. We compare the SMA tuning curves to tuning curves of neurons from the primary motor cortex (M1) of the same monkeys, showing that the tuning curves of the SMA neurons tend to be narrower and shallower. We also show that these characteristics do not depend on the specific location in each region. PMID:23468391

  18. An optimization approach for fitting canonical tensor decompositions.

    SciTech Connect

    Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Acar, Evrim; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2009-02-01

    Tensor decompositions are higher-order analogues of matrix decompositions and have proven to be powerful tools for data analysis. In particular, we are interested in the canonical tensor decomposition, otherwise known as the CANDECOMP/PARAFAC decomposition (CPD), which expresses a tensor as the sum of component rank-one tensors and is used in a multitude of applications such as chemometrics, signal processing, neuroscience, and web analysis. The task of computing the CPD, however, can be difficult. The typical approach is based on alternating least squares (ALS) optimization, which can be remarkably fast but is not very accurate. Previously, nonlinear least squares (NLS) methods have also been recommended; existing NLS methods are accurate but slow. In this paper, we propose the use of gradient-based optimization methods. We discuss the mathematical calculation of the derivatives and further show that they can be computed efficiently, at the same cost as one iteration of ALS. Computational experiments demonstrate that the gradient-based optimization methods are much more accurate than ALS and orders of magnitude faster than NLS.

  19. Consensus among flexible fitting approaches improves the interpretation of cryo-EM data.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Aqeel; Whitford, Paul C; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y; Tama, Florence

    2012-02-01

    Cryo-elecron microscopy (cryo-EM) can provide important structural information of large macromolecular assemblies in different conformational states. Recent years have seen an increase in structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) by fitting a high-resolution structure into its low-resolution cryo-EM map. A commonly used protocol for accommodating the conformational changes between the X-ray structure and the cryo-EM map is rigid body fitting of individual domains. With the emergence of different flexible fitting approaches, there is a need to compare and revise these different protocols for the fitting. We have applied three diverse automated flexible fitting approaches on a protein dataset for which rigid domain fitting (RDF) models have been deposited in the PDB. In general, a consensus is observed in the conformations, which indicates a convergence from these theoretically different approaches to the most probable solution corresponding to the cryo-EM map. However, the result shows that the convergence might not be observed for proteins with complex conformational changes or with missing densities in cryo-EM map. In contrast, RDF structures deposited in the PDB can represent conformations that not only differ from the consensus obtained by flexible fitting but also from X-ray crystallography. Thus, this study emphasizes that a "consensus" achieved by the use of several automated flexible fitting approaches can provide a higher level of confidence in the modeled configurations. Following this protocol not only increases the confidence level of fitting, but also highlights protein regions with uncertain fitting. Hence, this protocol can lead to better interpretation of cryo-EM data. PMID:22019767

  20. Consensus among flexible fitting approaches improves the interpretation of cryo-EM data

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Aqeel; Whitford, Paul C.; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.; Tama, Florence

    2011-01-01

    Cryo-elecron microscopy (Cryo-EM) can provide important structural information of large macromolecular assemblies in different conformational states. Recent years have seen an increase in structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) by fitting a high-resolution structure into its low-resolution cryo-EM map. A commonly used protocol for accommodating the conformational changes between the X-ray structure and the cryo-EM map is rigid body fitting of individual domains. With the emergence of different flexible fitting approaches, there is a need to compare and revise these different protocols for the fitting. We have applied three diverse automated flexible fitting approaches on a protein dataset for which rigid domain fitting (RDF) models have been deposited in the PDB. In general, a consensus is observed in the conformations, which indicates a convergence from these theoretically different approaches to the most probable solution corresponding to the cryo-EM map. However, the result shows that the convergence might not be observed for proteins with complex conformational changes or with missing densities in cryo-EM map. In contrast, RDF structures deposited in the PDB can represent conformations that not only differ from the consensus obtained by flexible fitting but also from X-ray crystallography. Thus, this study emphasizes that a “consensus” achieved by the use of several automated flexible fitting approaches can provide a higher level of confidence in the modeled configurations. Following this protocol not only increases the confidence level of fitting, but also highlights protein regions with uncertain fitting. Hence, this protocol can lead to better interpretation of cryo-EM data. PMID:22019767

  1. A new approach for magnetic curves in 3D Riemannian manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Bozkurt, Zehra Gök, Ismail Yaylı, Yusuf Ekmekci, F. Nejat

    2014-05-15

    A magnetic field is defined by the property that its divergence is zero in a three-dimensional oriented Riemannian manifold. Each magnetic field generates a magnetic flow whose trajectories are curves called as magnetic curves. In this paper, we give a new variational approach to study the magnetic flow associated with the Killing magnetic field in a three-dimensional oriented Riemann manifold, (M{sup 3}, g). And then, we investigate the trajectories of the magnetic fields called as N-magnetic and B-magnetic curves.

  2. Bradford Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rousseau, Ronald

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of informetric distributions shows that generalized Leimkuhler functions give proper fits to a large variety of Bradford curves, including those exhibiting a Groos droop or a rising tail. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test is used to test goodness of fit, and least-square fits are compared with Egghe's method. (Contains 53 references.) (LRW)

  3. Analytical computation of process noise matrix in Kalman filter for fitting curved tracks in magnetic field within dense, thick scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Kolahal; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Mondal, Naba K.

    2016-07-01

    In the context of track fitting problems by a Kalman filter, the appropriate functional forms of the elements of the random process noise matrix are derived for tracking through thick layers of dense materials and magnetic field. This work complements the form of the process noise matrix obtained by Mankel [1].

  4. TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA DISTANCE MODULUS BIAS AND DISPERSION FROM K-CORRECTION ERRORS: A DIRECT MEASUREMENT USING LIGHT CURVE FITS TO OBSERVED SPECTRAL TIME SERIES

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, C.; Aldering, G.; Aragon, C.; Bailey, S.; Childress, M.; Fakhouri, H. K.; Kim, A. G.; Antilogus, P.; Bongard, S.; Canto, A.; Cellier-Holzem, F.; Guy, J.; Baltay, C.; Buton, C.; Chotard, N.; Copin, Y.; Gangler, E.; and others

    2015-02-10

    We estimate systematic errors due to K-corrections in standard photometric analyses of high-redshift Type Ia supernovae. Errors due to K-correction occur when the spectral template model underlying the light curve fitter poorly represents the actual supernova spectral energy distribution, meaning that the distance modulus cannot be recovered accurately. In order to quantify this effect, synthetic photometry is performed on artificially redshifted spectrophotometric data from 119 low-redshift supernovae from the Nearby Supernova Factory, and the resulting light curves are fit with a conventional light curve fitter. We measure the variation in the standardized magnitude that would be fit for a given supernova if located at a range of redshifts and observed with various filter sets corresponding to current and future supernova surveys. We find significant variation in the measurements of the same supernovae placed at different redshifts regardless of filters used, which causes dispersion greater than ∼0.05 mag for measurements of photometry using the Sloan-like filters and a bias that corresponds to a 0.03 shift in w when applied to an outside data set. To test the result of a shift in supernova population or environment at higher redshifts, we repeat our calculations with the addition of a reweighting of the supernovae as a function of redshift and find that this strongly affects the results and would have repercussions for cosmology. We discuss possible methods to reduce the contribution of the K-correction bias and uncertainty.

  5. Comparing Angular and Curved Shapes in Terms of Implicit Associations and Approach/Avoidance Responses

    PubMed Central

    Palumbo, Letizia; Ruta, Nicole; Bertamini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Most people prefer smoothly curved shapes over more angular shapes. We investigated the origin of this effect using abstract shapes and implicit measures of semantic association and preference. In Experiment 1 we used a multidimensional Implicit Association Test (IAT) to verify the strength of the association of curved and angular polygons with danger (safe vs. danger words), valence (positive vs. negative words) and gender (female vs. male names). Results showed that curved polygons were associated with safe and positive concepts and with female names, whereas angular polygons were associated with danger and negative concepts and with male names. Experiment 2 used a different implicit measure, which avoided any need to categorise the stimuli. Using a revised version of the Stimulus Response Compatibility (SRC) task we tested with a stick figure (i.e., the manikin) approach and avoidance reactions to curved and angular polygons. We found that RTs for approaching vs. avoiding angular polygons did not differ, even in the condition where the angles were more pronounced. By contrast participants were faster and more accurate when moving the manikin towards curved shapes. Experiment 2 suggests that preference for curvature cannot derive entirely from an association of angles with threat. We conclude that smoothly curved contours make these abstract shapes more pleasant. Further studies are needed to clarify the nature of such a preference. PMID:26460610

  6. Comparing Angular and Curved Shapes in Terms of Implicit Associations and Approach/Avoidance Responses.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, Letizia; Ruta, Nicole; Bertamini, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Most people prefer smoothly curved shapes over more angular shapes. We investigated the origin of this effect using abstract shapes and implicit measures of semantic association and preference. In Experiment 1 we used a multidimensional Implicit Association Test (IAT) to verify the strength of the association of curved and angular polygons with danger (safe vs. danger words), valence (positive vs. negative words) and gender (female vs. male names). Results showed that curved polygons were associated with safe and positive concepts and with female names, whereas angular polygons were associated with danger and negative concepts and with male names. Experiment 2 used a different implicit measure, which avoided any need to categorise the stimuli. Using a revised version of the Stimulus Response Compatibility (SRC) task we tested with a stick figure (i.e., the manikin) approach and avoidance reactions to curved and angular polygons. We found that RTs for approaching vs. avoiding angular polygons did not differ, even in the condition where the angles were more pronounced. By contrast participants were faster and more accurate when moving the manikin towards curved shapes. Experiment 2 suggests that preference for curvature cannot derive entirely from an association of angles with threat. We conclude that smoothly curved contours make these abstract shapes more pleasant. Further studies are needed to clarify the nature of such a preference. PMID:26460610

  7. An Intuitive Approach to Geometric Continuity for Parametric Curves and Surfaces (Extended Abstract)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derose, T. D.; Barsky, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    The notion of geometric continuity is extended to an arbitrary order for curves and surfaces, and an intuitive development of constraints equations is presented that are necessary for it. The constraints result from a direct application of the univariate chain rule for curves, and the bivariate chain rule for surfaces. The constraints provide for the introduction of quantities known as shape parameters. The approach taken is important for several reasons: First, it generalizes geometric continuity to arbitrary order for both curves and surfaces. Second, it shows the fundamental connection between geometric continuity of curves and geometric continuity of surfaces. Third, due to the chain rule derivation, constraints of any order can be determined more easily than derivations based exclusively on geometric measures.

  8. Bromsulphalein plasma kinetics after obstruction of the common bile duct in rats: curve fitting with a programmable calculator.

    PubMed

    Ristanović, D; Ristanović, D; Malesević, J; Milutinović, B

    1983-01-01

    Plasma kinetics of bromsulphalein (BSP) after a single injection into the bloodstream of the rat with total obstruction of the common bile duct was examined. The concentrations of BSP were determined colorimetrically. A monoexponential plus a general first-degree function in time with four unknown parameters was fitted. Two programs were developed for the Texas Instruments 59 programmable calculator to estimate the values of all the parameters by an iteration procedure. The programs executed at about twice normal speed. PMID:6617168

  9. The analysis of dose-response curve from bioassays with quantal response: Deterministic or statistical approaches?

    PubMed

    Mougabure-Cueto, G; Sfara, V

    2016-04-25

    Dose-response relations can be obtained from systems at any structural level of biological matter, from the molecular to the organismic level. There are two types of approaches for analyzing dose-response curves: a deterministic approach, based on the law of mass action, and a statistical approach, based on the assumed probabilities distribution of phenotypic characters. Models based on the law of mass action have been proposed to analyze dose-response relations across the entire range of biological systems. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the principles that determine the dose-response relations. Dose-response curves of simple systems are the result of chemical interactions between reacting molecules, and therefore are supported by the law of mass action. In consequence, the shape of these curves is perfectly sustained by physicochemical features. However, dose-response curves of bioassays with quantal response are not explained by the simple collision of molecules but by phenotypic variations among individuals and can be interpreted as individual tolerances. The expression of tolerance is the result of many genetic and environmental factors and thus can be considered a random variable. In consequence, the shape of its associated dose-response curve has no physicochemical bearings; instead, they are originated from random biological variations. Due to the randomness of tolerance there is no reason to use deterministic equations for its analysis; on the contrary, statistical models are the appropriate tools for analyzing these dose-response relations. PMID:26952004

  10. A curve-fitting technique for the determination of gain and saturation intensity in homogeneously-broadened gas lasers: Application to a waveguide CO2 laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degnan, J. J.; Walker, H. E.; Mcelroy, J. H.; Mcavoy, N.; Zagwodski, T.

    1972-01-01

    A least squares curve-fitting algorithm is derived which allows the simultaneous estimation of the small signal gain and the saturation intensity from an arbitrary number of data points relating power output to the incidence angle of an internal coupling plate. The method is used to study the dependence of the two parameters on tube pressure and discharge current in a waveguide CO2 laser having a 2 mm diameter capillary. It is found that, at pressures greater than 28 torr, rising CO2 temperature degrades the small signal gain at current levels as low as three milliamperes.

  11. Least squares fit of data to hyperbolic dose-response curves using a programmed minicalculator (TI-59).

    PubMed

    Schiff, J D

    1983-05-01

    Equations of the Michaelis-Menten form are frequently encountered in a number of areas of biochemical and pharmacological research. A program is presented for use on the programmable TI-59 calculator with added printer which performs an iterative least-squares fit of up to 80 data pairs to this equation and estimates the standard deviations and standard errors of the determined parameters. The program assigns equal weights to errors over the entire data range and is thus appropriate for situations in which data precision is independent of amplitude. PMID:6874133

  12. A supervised fitting approach to force field parametrization with application to the SIBFA polarizable force field.

    PubMed

    Devereux, Mike; Gresh, Nohad; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Meuwly, Markus

    2014-08-01

    A supervised, semiautomated approach to force field parameter fitting is described and applied to the SIBFA polarizable force field. The I-NoLLS interactive, nonlinear least squares fitting program is used as an engine for parameter refinement while keeping parameter values within a physical range. Interactive fitting is shown to avoid many of the stability problems that frequently afflict highly correlated, nonlinear fitting problems occurring in force field parametrizations. The method is used to obtain parameters for the H2O, formamide, and imidazole molecular fragments and their complexes with the Mg(2+) cation. Reference data obtained from ab initio calculations using an auc-cc-pVTZ basis set exploit advances in modern computer hardware to provide a more accurate parametrization of SIBFA than has previously been available. PMID:24965869

  13. Understanding the distribution of fitness effects of mutations by a biophysical-organismal approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bershtein, Shimon

    2011-03-01

    The distribution of fitness effects of mutations is central to many questions in evolutionary biology. However, it remains poorly understood, primarily due to the fact that a fundamental connection that exists between the fitness of organisms and molecular properties of proteins encoded by their genomes is largely overlooked by traditional research approaches. Past efforts to breach this gap followed the ``evolution first'' paradigm, whereby populations were subjected to selection under certain conditions, and mutations which emerged in adapted populations were analyzed using genomic approaches. The results obtained in the framework of this approach, while often useful, are not easily interpretable because mutations get fixed due to a convolution of multiple causes. We have undertaken a conceptually opposite strategy: Mutations with known biophysical and biochemical effects on E. coli's essential proteins (based on computational analysis and in vitro measurements) were introduced into the organism's chromosome and the resulted fitness effects were monitored. Studying the distribution of fitness effects of such fully controlled replacements revealed a very complex fitness landscape, where impact of the microscopic properties of the mutated proteins (folding, stability, and function) is modulated on a macroscopic, whole genome level. Furthermore, the magnitude of the cellular response to the introduced mutations seems to depend on the thermodynamic status of the mutant.

  14. A Selective Refinement Approach for Computing the Distance Functions of Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Laney, D A; Duchaineau, M A; Max, N L

    2000-12-01

    We present an adaptive signed distance transform algorithm for curves in the plane. A hierarchy of bounding boxes is required for the input curves. We demonstrate the algorithm on the isocontours of a turbulence simulation. The algorithm provides guaranteed error bounds with a selective refinement approach. The domain over which the signed distance function is desired is adaptively triangulated and piecewise discontinuous linear approximations are constructed within each triangle. The resulting transform performs work only were requested and does not rely on a preset sampling rate or other constraints.

  15. Fast and non-approximate methodology for calculation of wavelength-modulated Voigt lineshape functions suitable for real-time curve fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westberg, Jonas; Wang, Junyang; Axner, Ove

    2012-11-01

    Wavelength modulation (WM) produces lock-in signals that are proportional to various Fourier coefficients of the modulated lineshape function of the molecular transition targeted. Unlike the case for the Lorentzian lineshape function, there is no known analytical expression for the Fourier coefficients of a modulated Voigt lineshape function; they consist of nested integrals that have to be solved numerically, which is often time-consuming and prevents real-time curve fitting. Previous attempts to overcome these limitations have so far consisted of approximations of the Voigt lineshape function, which brings in inaccuracies. In this paper we demonstrate a new means to calculate the lineshape of nf-WM absorption signals from a transition with a Voigt profile. It is shown that the signal can conveniently be expressed as a convolution of one or several Fourier coefficients of a modulated Lorentzian lineshape function, for which there are analytical expressions, and the Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution for the system under study. Mathematically, the procedure involves no approximations, wherefore its accuracy is limited only by the numerical precision of the software used (in this case ˜10-16) while the calculation time is reduced by roughly three orders of magnitude (10-3) as compared to the conventional methodology, i.e. typically from the second to the millisecond range. This makes feasible real-time curve fitting to lock-in output signals from modulated Voigt profiles.

  16. ATWS Analysis with an Advanced Boiling Curve Approach within COBRA 3-CP

    SciTech Connect

    Gensler, A.; Knoll, A.; Kuehnel, K.

    2007-07-01

    In 2005 the German Reactor Safety Commission issued specific requirements on core coolability demonstration for PWR ATWS (anticipated transients without scram). Thereupon AREVA NP performed detailed analyses for all German PWRs. For a German KONVOI plant the results of an ATWS licensing analysis are presented. The plant dynamic behavior is calculated with NLOOP, while the hot channel analysis is performed with the thermal hydraulic computer code COBRA 3-CP. The application of the fuel rod model included in COBRA 3-CP is essential for this type of analysis. Since DNB (departure from nucleate boiling) occurs, the advanced post DNB model (advanced boiling curve approach) of COBRA 3-CP is used. The results are compared with those gained with the standard BEEST model. The analyzed ATWS case is the emergency power case 'loss of main heat sink with station service power supply unavailable'. Due to the decreasing coolant flow rate during the transient the core attains film boiling conditions. The results of the hot channel analysis strongly depend on the performance of the boiling curve model. The BEEST model is based on pool boiling conditions whereas typical PWR conditions - even in most transients - are characterized by forced flow for which the advanced boiling curve approach is particularly suitable. Compared with the BEEST model the advanced boiling curve approach in COBRA 3-CP yields earlier rewetting, i.e. a shorter period in film boiling. Consequently, the fuel rod cladding temperatures, that increase significantly due to film boiling, drop back earlier and the high temperature oxidation is significantly diminished. The Baker-Just-Correlation was used to calculate the value of equivalent cladding reacted (ECR), i.e. the reduction of cladding thickness due to corrosion throughout the transient. Based on the BEEST model the ECR value amounts to 0.4% whereas the advanced boiling curve only leads to an ECR value of 0.2%. Both values provide large margins to the 17

  17. Macronutrient modifications of optimal foraging theory: an approach using indifference curves applied to some modern foragers

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, K.

    1988-06-01

    The use of energy (calories) as the currency to be maximized per unit time in Optimal Foraging Models is considered in light of data on several foraging groups. Observations on the Ache, Cuiva, and Yora foragers suggest men do not attempt to maximize energetic return rates, but instead often concentration on acquiring meat resources which provide lower energetic returns. The possibility that this preference is due to the macronutrient composition of hunted and gathered foods is explored. Indifference curves are introduced as a means of modeling the tradeoff between two desirable commodities, meat (protein-lipid) and carbohydrate, and a specific indifference curve is derived using observed choices in five foraging situations. This curve is used to predict the amount of meat that Mbuti foragers will trade for carbohydrate, in an attempt to test the utility of the approach.

  18. A Bayesian Approach to Person Fit Analysis in Item Response Theory Models. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glas, Cees A. W.; Meijer, Rob R.

    A Bayesian approach to the evaluation of person fit in item response theory (IRT) models is presented. In a posterior predictive check, the observed value on a discrepancy variable is positioned in its posterior distribution. In a Bayesian framework, a Markov Chain Monte Carlo procedure can be used to generate samples of the posterior distribution…

  19. An Assessment of the Nonparametric Approach for Evaluating the Fit of Item Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Tie; Wells, Craig S.; Hambleton, Ronald K.

    2014-01-01

    As item response theory has been more widely applied, investigating the fit of a parametric model becomes an important part of the measurement process. There is a lack of promising solutions to the detection of model misfit in IRT. Douglas and Cohen introduced a general nonparametric approach, RISE (Root Integrated Squared Error), for detecting…

  20. Work-to-Family Conflict, Positive Spillover, and Boundary Management: A Person-Environment Fit Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zheng; Powell, Gary N.; Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.

    2009-01-01

    This study adopted a person-environment fit approach to examine whether greater congruence between employees' preferences for segmenting their work domain from their family domain (i.e., keeping work matters at work) and what their employers' work environment allowed would be associated with lower work-to-family conflict and higher work-to-family…

  1. A flight investigation with a STOL airplane flying curved, descending instrument approach paths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, M. S.; Mclaughlin, M. D.; Sawyer, R. H.; Vangunst, R.; Ryan, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    A flight investigation using a De Havilland Twin Otter airplane was conducted to determine the configurations of curved, 6 deg descending approach paths which would provide minimum airspace usage within the requirements for acceptable commercial STOL airplane operations. Path configurations with turns of 90 deg, 135 deg, and 180 deg were studied; the approach airspeed was 75 knots. The length of the segment prior to turn, the turn radius, and the length of the final approach segment were varied. The relationship of the acceptable path configurations to the proposed microwave landing system azimuth coverage requirements was examined.

  2. ESR dosimetry of fossil enamel: some comments about measurement precision, long-term signal fading and dose-response curve fitting.

    PubMed

    Duval, M; Guilarte Moreno, V; Grün, R

    2013-12-01

    This work deals with the specific studies of three main sources of uncertainty in electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry/dating of fossil tooth enamel: (1) the precision of the ESR measurements, (2) the long-term signal fading the selection of the fitting function. They show a different influence on the equivalent dose (D(E)) estimates. Repeated ESR measurements were performed on 17 different samples: results show a mean coefficient of variation of the ESR intensities of 1.20 ± 0.23 %, inducing a mean relative variability of 3.05 ± 2.29 % in the D(E) values. ESR signal fading over 5 y was also observed: its magnitude seems to be quite sample dependant but is nevertheless especially important for the most irradiated aliquots. This fading has an apparent random effect on the D(E) estimates. Finally, the authors provide new insights and recommendations about the fitting of ESR dose-response curves of fossil enamel with a double saturating exponential (DSE) function. The potential of a new variation of the DSE was also explored. Results of this study also show that the choice of the fitting function is of major importance, maybe more than the other sources previously mentioned, in order to get accurate final D(E) values. PMID:23832975

  3. Robust Spatial Approximation of Laser Scanner Point Clouds by Means of Free-form Curve Approaches in Deformation Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bureick, Johannes; Alkhatib, Hamza; Neumann, Ingo

    2016-03-01

    In many geodetic engineering applications it is necessary to solve the problem of describing a measured data point cloud, measured, e. g. by laser scanner, by means of free-form curves or surfaces, e. g., with B-Splines as basis functions. The state of the art approaches to determine B-Splines yields results which are seriously manipulated by the occurrence of data gaps and outliers. Optimal and robust B-Spline fitting depend, however, on optimal selection of the knot vector. Hence we combine in our approach Monte-Carlo methods and the location and curvature of the measured data in order to determine the knot vector of the B-Spline in such a way that no oscillating effects at the edges of data gaps occur. We introduce an optimized approach based on computed weights by means of resampling techniques. In order to minimize the effect of outliers, we apply robust M-estimators for the estimation of control points. The above mentioned approach will be applied to a multi-sensor system based on kinematic terrestrial laserscanning in the field of rail track inspection.

  4. Aerobic fitness ecological validity in elite soccer players: a metabolic power approach.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Vincenzo; Impellizzeri, Franco; Castagna, Carlo

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the association between match metabolic power (MP) categories and aerobic fitness in elite-level male soccer players. Seventeen male professional soccer players were tested for VO2max, maximal aerobic speed (MAS), VO2 at ventilatory threshold (VO2VT and %VO2VT), and speed at a selected blood lactate concentration (4 mmol·L(-1), V(L4)). Aerobic fitness tests were performed at the end of preseason and after 12 and 24 weeks during the championship. Aerobic fitness and MP variables were considered as mean of all seasonal testing and of 16 Championship home matches for all the calculations, respectively. Results showed that VO2max (from 0.55 to 0.68), MAS (from 0.52 to 0.72), VO2VT (from 0.72 to 0.83), %VO2maxVT (from 0.62 to 0.65), and V(L4) (from 0.56 to 0.73) were significantly (p < 0.05 to 0.001) large to very large associated with MP variables. These results provide evidence to the ecological validity of aerobic fitness in male professional soccer. Strength and conditioning professionals should consider aerobic fitness in their training program when dealing with professional male soccer players. The MP method resulted an interesting approach for tracking external load in male professional soccer players. PMID:24345968

  5. B-737 flight test of curved-path and steep-angle approaches using MLS guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branstetter, J. R.; White, W. F.

    1989-01-01

    A series of flight tests were conducted to collect data for jet transport aircraft flying curved-path and steep-angle approaches using Microwave Landing System (MLS) guidance. During the test, 432 approaches comprising seven different curved-paths and four glidepath angles varying from 3 to 4 degrees were flown in NASA Langley's Boeing 737 aircraft (Transport Systems Research Vehicle) using an MLS ground station at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility. Subject pilots from Piedmont Airlines flew the approaches using conventional cockpit instrumentation (flight director and Horizontal Situation Indicator (HSI). The data collected will be used by FAA procedures specialists to develop standards and criteria for designing MLS terminal approach procedures (TERPS). The use of flight simulation techniques greatly aided the preliminary stages of approach development work and saved a significant amount of costly flight time. This report is intended to complement a data report to be issued by the FAA Office of Aviation Standards which will contain all detailed data analysis and statistics.

  6. CADAVERIC STUDY ON THE LEARNING CURVE OF THE TWO-APPROACH GANZ PERIACETABULAR OSTEOTOMY

    PubMed Central

    Ferro, Fernando Portilho; Ejnisman, Leandro; Miyahara, Helder Souza; Trindade, Christiano Augusto de Castro; Faga, Antônio; Vicente, José Ricardo Negreiros

    2016-01-01

    Objective : The Bernese periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) is a widely used technique for the treatment of non-arthritic, dysplastic, painful hips. It is considered a highly complex procedure with a steep learning curve. In an attempt to minimize complications, a double anterior-posterior approach has been described. We report on our experience while performing this technique on cadaveric hips followed by meticulous dissection to verify possible complications. Methods : We operated on 15 fresh cadaveric hips using a combined posterior Kocher-Langenbeck and an anterior Smith-Petersen approach, without fluoroscopic control. The PAO cuts were performed and the acetabular fragment was mobilized. A meticulous dissection was carried out to verify the precision of the cuts. Results : Complications were observed in seven specimens (46%). They included a posterior column fracture, and posterior and anterior articular fractures. The incidence of complications decreased over time, from 60% in the first five procedures to 20% in the last five procedures. Conclusions : We concluded that PAO using a combined anterior-posterior approach is a reproducible technique that allows all cuts to be done under direct visualization. The steep learning curve described in the classic single incision approach was also observed when using two approaches. Evidence Level: IV, Cadaveric Study. PMID:26981046

  7. Flexibility and applicability of β-expectation tolerance interval approach to assess the fitness of purpose of pharmaceutical analytical methods.

    PubMed

    Bouabidi, A; Talbi, M; Bourichi, H; Bouklouze, A; El Karbane, M; Boulanger, B; Brik, Y; Hubert, Ph; Rozet, E

    2012-12-01

    An innovative versatile strategy using Total Error has been proposed to decide about the method's validity that controls the risk of accepting an unsuitable assay together with the ability to predict the reliability of future results. This strategy is based on the simultaneous combination of systematic (bias) and random (imprecision) error of analytical methods. Using validation standards, both types of error are combined through the use of a prediction interval or β-expectation tolerance interval. Finally, an accuracy profile is built by connecting, on one hand all the upper tolerance limits, and on the other hand all the lower tolerance limits. This profile combined with pre-specified acceptance limits allows the evaluation of the validity of any quantitative analytical method and thus their fitness for their intended purpose. In this work, the approach of accuracy profile was evaluated on several types of analytical methods encountered in the pharmaceutical industrial field and also covering different pharmaceutical matrices. The four studied examples depicted the flexibility and applicability of this approach for different matrices ranging from tablets to syrups, different techniques such as liquid chromatography, or UV spectrophotometry, and for different categories of assays commonly encountered in the pharmaceutical industry i.e. content assays, dissolution assays, and quantitative impurity assays. The accuracy profile approach assesses the fitness of purpose of these methods for their future routine application. It also allows the selection of the most suitable calibration curve, the adequate evaluation of a potential matrix effect and propose efficient solution and the correct definition of the limits of quantification of the studied analytical procedures. PMID:22615163

  8. A projection-based approach to diffraction tomography on curved boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Gregory T.

    2014-01-01

    An approach to diffraction tomography is investigated for two-dimensional image reconstruction of objects surrounded by an arbitrarily-shaped curve of sources and receivers. Based on the integral theorem of Helmholtz and Kirchhoff, the approach relies upon a valid choice of the Green’s functions for selected conditions along the (possibly-irregular) boundary. This allows field projections from the receivers to an arbitrary external location. When performed over all source locations, it will be shown that the field caused by a hypothetical source at this external location is also known along the boundary. This field can then be projected to new external points that may serve as a virtual receiver. Under such a reformation, data may be put in a form suitable for image construction by synthetic aperture methods. Foundations of the approach are shown, followed by a mapping technique optimized for the approach. Examples formed from synthetic data are provided. PMID:25598570

  9. The New Vector Fitting Approach to Multiple Convex Obstacles Modeling for UWB Propagation Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Górniak, P.; Bandurski, W.

    This chapter presents the new approach to time-domain modeling of UWB channels containing multiple convex obstacles. Vector fitting (VF) algorithm (rational approximation) was used for deriving the closed form impulse response of multiple diffraction ray creeping on a cascade of convex obstacles. VF algorithm was performed with respect to new generalized variables proportional to frequency but including geometrical parameters of the obstacles also. The limits of approximation domain for vector fitting algorithm follow the range of ultra-wideband (UWB) channel parameters that can be met in practical UWB channel scenarios. Finally, the closed form impulse response of a creeping UTD ray was obtained. As the result we obtained impulse response of the channel as a function of normalized, with respect to geometrical parameters of the obstacles, time. It permits for calculation of channel responses for various objects without changing the body of a rational function. In that way the presented approach is general, simple, and effective.

  10. Thermoanalytical and Fourier transform infrared spectral curve-fitting techniques used to investigate the amorphous indomethacin formation and its physical stability in Indomethacin-Soluplus® solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shan-Yang; Lin, Hong-Liang; Chi, Ying-Ting; Huang, Yu-Ting; Kao, Chi-Yu; Hsieh, Wei-Hsien

    2015-12-30

    The amorphous form of a drug has higher water solubility and faster dissolution rate than its crystalline form. However, the amorphous form is less thermodynamically stable and may recrystallize during manufacturing and storage. Maintaining the amorphous state of drug in a solid dosage form is extremely important to ensure product quality. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively determine the amount of amorphous indomethacin (INDO) formed in the Soluplus® solid dispersions using thermoanalytical and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectral curve-fitting techniques. The INDO/Soluplus® solid dispersions with various weight ratios of both components were prepared by air-drying and heat-drying processes. A predominate IR peak at 1683cm(-1) for amorphous INDO was selected as a marker for monitoring the solid state of INDO in the INDO/Soluplus® solid dispersions. The physical stability of amorphous INDO in the INDO/Soluplus® solid dispersions prepared by both drying processes was also studied under accelerated conditions. A typical endothermic peak at 161°C for γ-form of INDO (γ-INDO) disappeared from all the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) curves of INDO/Soluplus® solid dispersions, suggesting the amorphization of INDO caused by Soluplus® after drying. In addition, two unique IR peaks at 1682 (1681) and 1593 (1591)cm(-1) corresponded to the amorphous form of INDO were observed in the FTIR spectra of all the INDO/Soluplus® solid dispersions. The quantitative amounts of amorphous INDO formed in all the INDO/Soluplus® solid dispersions were increased with the increase of γ-INDO loaded into the INDO/Soluplus® solid dispersions by applying curve-fitting technique. However, the intermolecular hydrogen bonding interaction between Soluplus® and INDO were only observed in the samples prepared by heat-drying process, due to a marked spectral shift from 1636 to 1628cm(-1) in the INDO/Soluplus® solid dispersions. The INDO/Soluplus® solid

  11. Corvettes, Curve Fitting, and Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murawska, Jaclyn M.; Nabb, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Sometimes the best mathematics problems come from the most unexpected situations. Last summer, a Corvette raced down a local quarter-mile drag strip. The driver, a family member, provided the spectators with time and distance-traveled data from his time slip and asked "Can you calculate how many seconds it took me to go from 0 to 60…

  12. An evolutionary approach to modelling the soil-water characteristic curve in unsaturated soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahangar-Asr, A.; Johari, A.; Javadi, A. A.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper a new approach is presented based on evolutionary polynomial regression (EPR) for modelling of soil-water characteristic curve in unsaturated soils. EPR is an evolutionary data mining technique that generates a transparent and structured representation of the behaviour of a system directly from data. This method can operate on large quantities of data in order to capture nonlinear and complex relationships between variables of the system. It also has the additional advantage that it allows the user to gain insight into the behaviour of the system. Results from pressure plate tests carried out on clay, silty clay, sandy loam, and loam are used for developing and validating the EPR model. The model inputs are the initial void ratio, initial gravimetric water content, logarithm of suction normalised with respect to atmospheric air pressure, clay content, and silt content. The model output is the gravimetric water content corresponding to the assigned input suction. The EPR model predictions are compared with the experimental results as well as the models proposed by previous researches. The results show that the proposed approach is very effective and robust in modelling the soil-water characteristic curve in unsaturated soils. The merits and advantages of the proposed approach are highlighted.

  13. A fixed-base simulation study of two STOL aircraft flying curved, descending instrument approach paths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, M. S.; Sawyer, R. H.; Mclaughlin, M. D.

    1973-01-01

    A real-time, fixed-base simulation study has been conducted to determine the curved, descending approach paths (within passenger-comfort limits) that would be acceptable to pilots, the flight-director-system logic requirements for curved-flight-path guidance, and the paths which can be flown within proposed microwave landing system (MLS) coverage angles. Two STOL aircraft configurations were used in the study. Generally, no differences in the results between the two STOL configurations were found. The investigation showed that paths with a 1828.8 meter turn radius and a 1828.8 meter final-approach distance were acceptable without winds and with winds up to at least 15 knots for airspeeds from 75 to 100 knots. The altitude at roll-out from the final turn determined which final-approach distances were acceptable. Pilots preferred to have an initial straight leg of about 1 n. mi. after MLS guidance acquisition before turn intercept. The size of the azimuth coverage angle necessary to meet passenger and pilot criteria depends on the size of the turn angle: plus or minus 60 deg was adequate to cover all paths execpt ones with a 180 deg turn.

  14. Age-Infusion Approach to Derive Injury Risk Curves for Dummies from Human Cadaver Tests

    PubMed Central

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Banerjee, Anjishnu; Pintar, Frank A.

    2015-01-01

    Injury criteria and risk curves are needed for anthropomorphic test devices (dummies) to assess injuries for improving human safety. The present state of knowledge is based on using injury outcomes and biomechanical metrics from post-mortem human subject (PMHS) and mechanical records from dummy tests. Data from these models are combined to develop dummy injury assessment risk curves (IARCs)/dummy injury assessment risk values (IARVs). This simple substitution approach involves duplicating dummy metrics for PMHS tested under similar conditions and pairing with PMHS injury outcomes. It does not directly account for the age of each specimen tested in the PMHS group. Current substitution methods for injury risk assessments use age as a covariate and dummy metrics (e.g., accelerations) are not modified so that age can be directly included in the model. The age-infusion methodology presented in this perspective article accommodates for an annual rate factor that modifies the dummy injury risk assessment responses to account for the age of the PMHS that the injury data were based on. The annual rate factor is determined using human injury risk curves. The dummy metrics are modulated based on individual PMHS age and rate factor, thus “infusing” age into the dummy data. Using PMHS injuries and accelerations from side-impact experiments, matched-pair dummy tests, and logistic regression techniques, the methodology demonstrates the process of age-infusion to derive the IARCs and IARVs. PMID:26697422

  15. Real time refractivity from clutter using a best fit approach improved with physical information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douvenot, RéMi; Fabbro, Vincent; Gerstoft, Peter; Bourlier, Christophe; Saillard, Joseph

    2010-02-01

    Refractivity from clutter (RFC) retrieves the radio frequency refractive conditions along a propagation path by inverting the measured radar sea clutter return. In this paper, a real-time RFC technique is proposed called "Improved Best Fit" (IBF). It is based on finding the environment with best fit to one of many precomputed, modeled radar returns for different environments in a database. The method is improved by considering the mean slope of the propagation factor, and physical considerations are added: smooth variations of refractive conditions with azimuth and smooth variations of duct height with range. The approach is tested on data from 1998 Wallops Island, Virginia, measurement campaign with good results on most of the data, and questionable results are detected with a confidence criterion. A comparison between the refractivity structures measured during the measurement campaign and the ones retrieved by inversion shows a good match. Radar coverage simulations obtained from these inverted refractivity structures demonstrate the potential utility of IBF.

  16. Characterizing Synergistic Water and Energy Efficiency at the Residential Scale Using a Cost Abatement Curve Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillwell, A. S.; Chini, C. M.; Schreiber, K. L.; Barker, Z. A.

    2015-12-01

    Energy and water are two increasingly correlated resources. Electricity generation at thermoelectric power plants requires cooling such that large water withdrawal and consumption rates are associated with electricity consumption. Drinking water and wastewater treatment require significant electricity inputs to clean, disinfect, and pump water. Due to this energy-water nexus, energy efficiency measures might be a cost-effective approach to reducing water use and water efficiency measures might support energy savings as well. This research characterizes the cost-effectiveness of different efficiency approaches in households by quantifying the direct and indirect water and energy savings that could be realized through efficiency measures, such as low-flow fixtures, energy and water efficient appliances, distributed generation, and solar water heating. Potential energy and water savings from these efficiency measures was analyzed in a product-lifetime adjusted economic model comparing efficiency measures to conventional counterparts. Results were displayed as cost abatement curves indicating the most economical measures to implement for a target reduction in water and/or energy consumption. These cost abatement curves are useful in supporting market innovation and investment in residential-scale efficiency.

  17. Transfer function approach based on simulation results for the determination of pod curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demeyer, S.; Jenson, F.; Dominguez, N.; Iakovleva, E.

    2012-05-01

    POD curves estimations are based on statistical studies of empirical data which are obtained thru costly and time consuming experimental campaigns. Currently, cost reduction of POD trials is a major issue. A proposed solution is to replace some of the experimental data required to determine the POD with model based results. Following this idea, the concept of Model Assisted POD (MAPOD) has been introduced first in the US in 2004 through the constitution of the MAPOD working group. One approach to Model Assisted POD is based on a transfer function which uses empirical data and models to transfer POD measured for one specific application to another related application. The objective of this paper is to show how numerical simulations could help to determine such transfer functions. A practical implementation of the approach to a high frequency eddy current inspection for fatigue cracks is presented. Empirical data is available for the titanium alloy plates. A model based transfer function is used to assess a POD curve for the inspection of aluminum components.

  18. A universal approach to the calculation of the transit light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubekerov, M. K.; Gostev, N. Yu.

    2013-07-01

    We have developed a universal approach to compute accurately the brightness of eclipsing binary systems during the transit of a planet in front of the stellar disc. This approach is uniform for all values of the system parameters and applicable to most limb-darkening laws used in astrophysics. In the cases of the linear and quadratic limb-darkening laws, we obtained analytical expressions for the light curve and its derivatives in terms of elementary functions, elliptic integrals and a piecewise-defined function of one variable. In the cases of the logarithmic and square-root laws of limb darkening, the flux and its derivatives were expressed in terms of integrals which can be efficiently computed using the Gaussian quadrature formula, taking into account singularities of the integrand.

  19. Permutation invariant polynomial neural network approach to fitting potential energy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2013-08-01

    A simple, general, and rigorous scheme for adapting permutation symmetry in molecular systems is proposed and tested for fitting global potential energy surfaces using neural networks (NNs). The symmetry adaptation is realized by using low-order permutation invariant polynomials (PIPs) as inputs for the NNs. This so-called PIP-NN approach is applied to the H + H2 and Cl + H2 systems and the analytical potential energy surfaces for these two systems were accurately reproduced by PIP-NN. The accuracy of the NN potential energy surfaces was confirmed by quantum scattering calculations.

  20. The BestFIT trial: A SMART approach to developing individualized weight loss treatments.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Nancy E; Butryn, Meghan L; Forman, Evan M; Almirall, Daniel; Seburg, Elisabeth M; Lauren Crain, A; Kunin-Batson, Alicia S; Hayes, Marcia G; Levy, Rona L; Jeffery, Robert W

    2016-03-01

    Behavioral weight loss programs help people achieve clinically meaningful weight losses (8-10% of starting body weight). Despite data showing that only half of participants achieve this goal, a "one size fits all" approach is normative. This weight loss intervention science gap calls for adaptive interventions that provide the "right treatment at the right time for the right person." Sequential Multiple Assignment Randomized Trials (SMART), use experimental design principles to answer questions for building adaptive interventions including whether, how, or when to alter treatment intensity, type, or delivery. This paper describes the rationale and design of the BestFIT study, a SMART designed to evaluate the optimal timing for intervening with sub-optimal responders to weight loss treatment and relative efficacy of two treatments that address self-regulation challenges which impede weight loss: 1) augmenting treatment with portion-controlled meals (PCM) which decrease the need for self-regulation; and 2) switching to acceptance-based behavior treatment (ABT) which boosts capacity for self-regulation. The primary aim is to evaluate the benefit of changing treatment with PCM versus ABT. The secondary aim is to evaluate the best time to intervene with sub-optimal responders. BestFIT results will lead to the empirically-supported construction of an adaptive intervention that will optimize weight loss outcomes and associated health benefits. PMID:26825020

  1. A Comparison of Isoconversional and Model-Fitting Approaches to Kinetic Parameter Estimation and Application Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Burnham, A K

    2006-05-17

    Chemical kinetic modeling has been used for many years in process optimization, estimating real-time material performance, and lifetime prediction. Chemists have tended towards developing detailed mechanistic models, while engineers have tended towards global or lumped models. Many, if not most, applications use global models by necessity, since it is impractical or impossible to develop a rigorous mechanistic model. Model fitting acquired a bad name in the thermal analysis community after that community realized a decade after other disciplines that deriving kinetic parameters for an assumed model from a single heating rate produced unreliable and sometimes nonsensical results. In its place, advanced isoconversional methods (1), which have their roots in the Friedman (2) and Ozawa-Flynn-Wall (3) methods of the 1960s, have become increasingly popular. In fact, as pointed out by the ICTAC kinetics project in 2000 (4), valid kinetic parameters can be derived by both isoconversional and model fitting methods as long as a diverse set of thermal histories are used to derive the kinetic parameters. The current paper extends the understanding from that project to give a better appreciation of the strengths and weaknesses of isoconversional and model-fitting approaches. Examples are given from a variety of sources, including the former and current ICTAC round-robin exercises, data sets for materials of interest, and simulated data sets.

  2. Examining the Earnings Trajectories of Community College Students Using a Piecewise Growth Curve Modeling Approach. A CAPSEE Working Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaggars, Shanna Smith; Xu, Di

    2015-01-01

    Policymakers have become increasingly concerned with measuring--and holding colleges accountable for--students' labor market outcomes. In this paper we introduce a piecewise growth curve approach to analyzing community college students' labor market outcomes, and we discuss how this approach differs from Mincerian and fixed-effects approaches. Our…

  3. Beyond the SCS curve number: A new stochastic spatial runoff approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, M. S., Jr.; Parolari, A.; McDonnell, J.; Porporato, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Soil Conservation Service curve number (SCS-CN) method is the standard approach in practice for predicting a storm event runoff response. It is popular because its low parametric complexity and ease of use. However, the SCS-CN method does not describe the spatial variability of runoff and is restricted to certain geographic regions and land use types. Here we present a general theory for extending the SCS-CN method. Our new theory accommodates different event based models derived from alternative rainfall-runoff mechanisms or distributions of watershed variables, which are the basis of different semi-distributed models such as VIC, PDM, and TOPMODEL. We introduce a parsimonious but flexible description where runoff is initiated by a pure threshold, i.e., saturation excess, that is complemented by fill and spill runoff behavior from areas of partial saturation. To facilitate event based runoff prediction, we derive simple equations for the fraction of the runoff source areas, the probability density function (PDF) describing runoff variability, and the corresponding average runoff value (a runoff curve analogous to the SCS-CN). The benefit of the theory is that it unites the SCS-CN method, VIC, PDM, and TOPMODEL as the same model type but with different assumptions for the spatial distribution of variables and the runoff mechanism. The new multiple runoff mechanism description for the SCS-CN enables runoff prediction in geographic regions and site runoff types previously misrepresented by the traditional SCS-CN method. In addition, we show that the VIC, PDM, and TOPMODEL runoff curves may be more suitable than the SCS-CN for different conditions. Lastly, we explore predictions of sediment and nutrient transport by applying the PDF describing runoff variability within our new framework.

  4. A Nonparametric Approach for Assessing Goodness-of-Fit of IRT Models in a Mixed Format Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Tie; Wells, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Investigating the fit of a parametric model plays a vital role in validating an item response theory (IRT) model. An area that has received little attention is the assessment of multiple IRT models used in a mixed-format test. The present study extends the nonparametric approach, proposed by Douglas and Cohen (2001), to assess model fit of three…

  5. Travelling wave expansion: a model fitting approach to the inverse problem of elasticity reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Baghani, Ali; Salcudean, Septimiu; Honarvar, Mohammad; Sahebjavaher, Ramin S; Rohling, Robert; Sinkus, Ralph

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, a novel approach to the problem of elasticity reconstruction is introduced. In this approach, the solution of the wave equation is expanded as a sum of waves travelling in different directions sharing a common wave number. In particular, the solutions for the scalar and vector potentials which are related to the dilatational and shear components of the displacement respectively are expanded as sums of travelling waves. This solution is then used as a model and fitted to the measured displacements. The value of the shear wave number which yields the best fit is then used to find the elasticity at each spatial point. The main advantage of this method over direct inversion methods is that, instead of taking the derivatives of noisy measurement data, the derivatives are taken on the analytical model. This improves the results of the inversion. The dilatational and shear components of the displacement can also be computed as a byproduct of the method, without taking any derivatives. Experimental results show the effectiveness of this technique in magnetic resonance elastography. Comparisons are made with other state-of-the-art techniques. PMID:21813354

  6. Fit for purpose? Introducing a rational priority setting approach into a community care setting.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Evelyn; Mitton, Craig; Davidson, Alan; Reid, Colin; Hole, Rachelle; Visockas, Anne-Marie; Smith, Neale

    2016-06-20

    Purpose - Program budgeting and marginal analysis (PBMA) is a priority setting approach that assists decision makers with allocating resources. Previous PBMA work establishes its efficacy and indicates that contextual factors complicate priority setting, which can hamper PBMA effectiveness. The purpose of this paper is to gain qualitative insight into PBMA effectiveness. Design/methodology/approach - A Canadian case study of PBMA implementation. Data consist of decision-maker interviews pre (n=20), post year-1 (n=12) and post year-2 (n=9) of PBMA to examine perceptions of baseline priority setting practice vis-à-vis desired practice, and perceptions of PBMA usability and acceptability. Findings - Fit emerged as a key theme in determining PBMA effectiveness. Fit herein refers to being of suitable quality and form to meet the intended purposes and needs of the end-users, and includes desirability, acceptability, and usability dimensions. Results confirm decision-maker desire for rational approaches like PBMA. However, most participants indicated that the timing of the exercise and the form in which PBMA was applied were not well-suited for this case study. Participant acceptance of and buy-in to PBMA changed during the study: a leadership change, limited organizational commitment, and concerns with organizational capacity were key barriers to PBMA adoption and thereby effectiveness. Practical implications - These findings suggest that a potential way-forward includes adding a contextual readiness/capacity assessment stage to PBMA, recognizing organizational complexity, and considering incremental adoption of PBMA's approach. Originality/value - These insights help us to better understand and work with priority setting conditions to advance evidence-informed decision making. PMID:27296887

  7. Learning theoretic approach to differential and perceptual geometry: I. Curvature and torsion are the independent components of space curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assadi, Amir H.; Eghbalnia, Hamid

    2000-06-01

    In standard differential geometry, the Fundamental Theorem of Space Curves states that two differential invariants of a curve, namely curvature and torsion, determine its geometry, or equivalently, the isometry class of the curve up to rigid motions in the Euclidean three-dimensional space. Consider a physical model of a space curve made from a sufficiently thin, yet visible rigid wire, and the problem of perceptual identification (by a human observer or a robot) of two given physical model curves. In a previous paper (perceptual geometry) we have emphasized a learning theoretic approach to construct a perceptual geometry of the surfaces in the environment. In particular, we have described a computational method for mathematical representation of objects in the perceptual geometry inspired by the ecological theory of Gibson, and adhering to the principles of Gestalt in perceptual organization of vision. In this paper, we continue our learning theoretic treatment of perceptual geometry of objects, focusing on the case of physical models of space curves. In particular, we address the question of perceptually distinguishing two possibly novel space curves based on observer's prior visual experience of physical models of curves in the environment. The Fundamental Theorem of Space Curves inspires an analogous result in perceptual geometry as follows. We apply learning theory to the statistics of a sufficiently rich collection of physical models of curves, to derive two statistically independent local functions, that we call by analogy, the curvature and torsion. This pair of invariants distinguish physical models of curves in the sense of perceptual geometry. That is, in an appropriate resolution, an observer can distinguish two perceptually identical physical models in different locations. If these pairs of functions are approximately the same for two given space curves, then after possibly some changes of viewing planes, the observer confirms the two are the same.

  8. Flight demonstrations of curved, descending approaches and automatic landings using time referenced scanning beam guidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. F. (Compiler)

    1978-01-01

    The Terminal Configured Vehicle (TCV) program operates a Boeing 737 modified to include a second cockpit and a large amount of experimental navigation, guidance and control equipment for research on advanced avionics systems. Demonstration flights to include curved approaches and automatic landings were tracked by a phototheodolite system. For 50 approaches during the demonstration flights, the following results were obtained: the navigation system, using TRSB guidance, delivered the aircraft onto the 3 nautical mile final approach leg with an average overshoot of 25 feet past centerline, subjet to a 2-sigma dispersion of 90 feet. Lateral tracking data showed a mean error of 4.6 feet left of centerline at the category 1 decision height (200 feet) and 2.7 feet left of centerline at the category 2 decision height (100 feet). These values were subject to a sigma dispersion of about 10 feet. Finally, the glidepath tracking errors were 2.5 feet and 3.0 feet high at the category 1 and 2 decision heights, respectively, with a 2 sigma value of 6 feet.

  9. Linking occurrence and fitness to persistence: Habitat-based approach for endangered Greater Sage-Grouse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aldridge, C.L.; Boyce, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    Detailed empirical models predicting both species occurrence and fitness across a landscape are necessary to understand processes related to population persistence. Failure to consider both occurrence and fitness may result in incorrect assessments of habitat importance leading to inappropriate management strategies. We took a two-stage approach to identifying critical nesting and brood-rearing habitat for the endangered Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in Alberta at a landscape scale. First, we used logistic regression to develop spatial models predicting the relative probability of use (occurrence) for Sage-Grouse nests and broods. Secondly, we used Cox proportional hazards survival models to identify the most risky habitats across the landscape. We combined these two approaches to identify Sage-Grouse habitats that pose minimal risk of failure (source habitats) and attractive sink habitats that pose increased risk (ecological traps). Our models showed that Sage-Grouse select for heterogeneous patches of moderate sagebrush cover (quadratic relationship) and avoid anthropogenic edge habitat for nesting. Nests were more successful in heterogeneous habitats, but nest success was independent of anthropogenic features. Similarly, broods selected heterogeneous high-productivity habitats with sagebrush while avoiding human developments, cultivated cropland, and high densities of oil wells. Chick mortalities tended to occur in proximity to oil and gas developments and along riparian habitats. For nests and broods, respectively, approximately 10% and 5% of the study area was considered source habitat, whereas 19% and 15% of habitat was attractive sink habitat. Limited source habitats appear to be the main reason for poor nest success (39%) and low chick survival (12%). Our habitat models identify areas of protection priority and areas that require immediate management attention to enhance recruitment to secure the viability of this population. This novel

  10. Assessment of Shape Changes of Mistletoe Berries: A New Software Approach to Automatize the Parameterization of Path Curve Shaped Contours

    PubMed Central

    Derbidge, Renatus; Feiten, Linus; Conradt, Oliver; Heusser, Peter; Baumgartner, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Photographs of mistletoe (Viscum album L.) berries taken by a permanently fixed camera during their development in autumn were subjected to an outline shape analysis by fitting path curves using a mathematical algorithm from projective geometry. During growth and maturation processes the shape of mistletoe berries can be described by a set of such path curves, making it possible to extract changes of shape using one parameter called Lambda. Lambda describes the outline shape of a path curve. Here we present methods and software to capture and measure these changes of form over time. The present paper describes the software used to automatize a number of tasks including contour recognition, optimization of fitting the contour via hill-climbing, derivation of the path curves, computation of Lambda and blinding the pictures for the operator. The validity of the program is demonstrated by results from three independent measurements showing circadian rhythm in mistletoe berries. The program is available as open source and will be applied in a project to analyze the chronobiology of shape in mistletoe berries and the buds of their host trees. PMID:23565255

  11. Ab initio yield curve dynamics [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, Raymond J.; Roy Frieden, B.; D'Anna, Joseph L.

    2005-09-01

    We derive an equation of motion for interest-rate yield curves by applying a minimum Fisher information variational approach to the implied probability density. By construction, solutions to the equation of motion recover observed bond prices. More significantly, the form of the resulting equation explains the success of the Nelson Siegel approach to fitting static yield curves and the empirically observed modal structure of yield curves. A practical numerical implementation of this equation of motion is found by using the Karhunen Lòeve expansion and Galerkin's method to formulate a reduced-order model of yield curve dynamics.

  12. Fitting additive hazards models for case-cohort studies: a multiple imputation approach.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jinhyouk; Harel, Ofer; Kang, Sangwook

    2016-07-30

    In this paper, we consider fitting semiparametric additive hazards models for case-cohort studies using a multiple imputation approach. In a case-cohort study, main exposure variables are measured only on some selected subjects, but other covariates are often available for the whole cohort. We consider this as a special case of a missing covariate by design. We propose to employ a popular incomplete data method, multiple imputation, for estimation of the regression parameters in additive hazards models. For imputation models, an imputation modeling procedure based on a rejection sampling is developed. A simple imputation modeling that can naturally be applied to a general missing-at-random situation is also considered and compared with the rejection sampling method via extensive simulation studies. In addition, a misspecification aspect in imputation modeling is investigated. The proposed procedures are illustrated using a cancer data example. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26194861

  13. Introducing a Bayesian Approach to Determining Degree of Fit With Existing Rorschach Norms.

    PubMed

    Giromini, Luciano; Viglione, Donald J; McCullaugh, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    This article offers a new methodological approach to investigate the degree of fit between an independent sample and 2 existing sets of norms. Specifically, with a new adaptation of a Bayesian method, we developed a user-friendly procedure to compare the mean values of a given sample to those of 2 different sets of Rorschach norms. To illustrate our technique, we used a small, U.S. community sample of 80 adults and tested whether it resembled more closely the standard Comprehensive System norms (CS 600; Exner, 2003), or a recently introduced, internationally based set of Rorschach norms (Meyer, Erdberg, & Shaffer, 2007 ). Strengths and limitations of this new statistical technique are discussed. PMID:25257792

  14. Lifting a veil on diversity: a Bayesian approach to fitting relative-abundance models.

    PubMed

    Golicher, Duncan J; O'Hara, Robert B; Ruíz-Montoya, Lorena; Cayuela, Luis

    2006-02-01

    Bayesian methods incorporate prior knowledge into a statistical analysis. This prior knowledge is usually restricted to assumptions regarding the form of probability distributions of the parameters of interest, leaving their values to be determined mainly through the data. Here we show how a Bayesian approach can be applied to the problem of drawing inference regarding species abundance distributions and comparing diversity indices between sites. The classic log series and the lognormal models of relative- abundance distribution are apparently quite different in form. The first is a sampling distribution while the other is a model of abundance of the underlying population. Bayesian methods help unite these two models in a common framework. Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation can be used to fit both distributions as small hierarchical models with shared common assumptions. Sampling error can be assumed to follow a Poisson distribution. Species not found in a sample, but suspected to be present in the region or community of interest, can be given zero abundance. This not only simplifies the process of model fitting, but also provides a convenient way of calculating confidence intervals for diversity indices. The method is especially useful when a comparison of species diversity between sites with different sample sizes is the key motivation behind the research. We illustrate the potential of the approach using data on fruit-feeding butterflies in southern Mexico. We conclude that, once all assumptions have been made transparent, a single data set may provide support for the belief that diversity is negatively affected by anthropogenic forest disturbance. Bayesian methods help to apply theory regarding the distribution of abundance in ecological communities to applied conservation. PMID:16705973

  15. Ensuring the consistancy of Flow Direction Curve reconstructions: the 'quantile solidarity' approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poncelet, Carine; Andreassian, Vazken; Oudin, Ludovic

    2015-04-01

    Flow Duration Curves (FDCs) are a hydrologic tool describing the distribution of streamflows at a catchment outlet. FDCs are usually used for calibration of hydrological models, managing water quality and classifying catchments, among others. For gauged catchments, empirical FDCs can be computed from streamflow records. For ungauged catchments, on the other hand, FDCs cannot be obtained from streamflow records and must therefore be obtained in another manner, for example through reconstructions. Regression-based reconstructions are methods relying on the evaluation of quantiles separately from catchments' attributes (climatic or physical features).The advantage of this category of methods is that it is informative about the processes and it is non-parametric. However, the large number of parameters required can cause unwanted artifacts, typically reconstructions that do not always produce increasing quantiles. In this paper we propose a new approach named Quantile Solidarity (QS), which is applied under strict proxy-basin test conditions (Klemes, 1986) to a set of 600 French catchments. Half of the catchments are considered as gauged and used to calibrate the regression and compute residuals of the regression. The QS approach consists in a three-step regionalization scheme, which first links quantile values to physical descriptors, then reduces the number of regression parameters and finally exploits the spatial correlation of the residuals. The innovation is the utilisation of the parameters continuity across the quantiles to dramatically reduce the number of parameters. The second half of catchment is used as an independent validation set over which we show that the QS approach ensures strictly growing FDC reconstructions in ungauged conditions. Reference: V. KLEMEŠ (1986) Operational testing of hydrological simulation models, Hydrological Sciences Journal, 31:1, 13-24

  16. A new approach to the analysis of vessel residence time distribution curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferro, Sergio P.; Principe, R. Javier; Goldschmit, Marcela B.

    2001-12-01

    Mathematical models for the evaluation of residence time distribution (RTD) curves on a large variety of vessels are presented. These models have been constructed by combination of different tanks or volumes. In order to obtain a good representation of RTD curves, a new volume (called convection diffusion volume) is introduced. The convection-diffusion volume allows the approximation of different experimental or numerical RTD curves with very simple models. An algorithm has been developed to calculate the parameters of the models for any given set of RTD curve experimental points. Validation of the models is carried out by comparison with experimental RTD curves taken from the literature and with a numerical RTD curve obtained by three-dimensional simulation of the flow inside a tundish.

  17. A Practical Approach of Curved Ray Prestack Kirchhoff Time Migration on GPGPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiaohua; Li, Chuang; Wang, Xu; Li, Kang

    We introduced four prototypes of General Purpose GPU solutions by Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) on NVidia GeForce 8800GT and Tesla C870 for a practical Curved Ray Prestack Kirchhoff Time Migration program, which is one of the most widely adopted imaging methods in the seismic data processing industry. We presented how to re-design and re-implement the original CPU code to efficient GPU code step by step. We demonstrated optimization methods, such as how to reduce the overhead of memory transportation on PCI-E bus, how to significantly increase the kernel thread numbers on GPU cores, how to buffer the inputs and outputs of CUDA kernel modules, and how to utilize the memory streams to overlap GPU kernel execution time, etc., to improve the runtime performance on GPUs. We analyzed the floating point errors between CPUs and GPUs. We presented the images generated by CPU and GPU programs for the same real-world seismic data inputs. Our final approach of Prototype-IV on NVidia GeForce 8800GT is 16.3 times faster than its CPU version on Intel’s P4 3.0G.

  18. Pluto and Charon Color Light Curves from New Horizons on Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Howett, C. J. A.; Olkin, C. B.; Reuter, D. C.; Buratti, B. J.; Buie, M. W.; Grundy, W. M.; Parker, A. H.; Zangari, A. M.; Binzel, R. P.; Cook, J. C.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Earle, A. M.; Jennings, D. E.; Linscott, I. R.; Parker, J. Wm.; Protopapa, S.; Singer, K. N.; Spencer, J. R.; Stern, S. A.; Tsang, C. C. C.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Weaver, H. A.; Young, L. A.

    2015-11-01

    On approach to the Pluto system, New Horizons’ Ralph Instrument’s Multicolor Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) observed Pluto and Charon, spatially separated, between April 9 and June 23, 2015. In this period, Pluto and Charon were observed to transition from unresolved objects to resolved and their integrated disk intensities were measured in four MVIC filters: blue (400-550 nm), red (540-700 nm), near-infrared (780-975 nm), and methane (860-910 nm). The measurement suite sampled the bodies over all longitudes. We will present the color rotational light curves for Pluto and Charon and compare them to previous (Buie, M. et al. 2010 AJ 139, 1117; Buratti, B.J. et al 2015 ApJ 804, L6) and concurrent ground-based BVR monitoring. We will also compare these data to color images of the encounter hemisphere taken during New Horizons’ July 14, 2015 Pluto and Charon flyby, as this data set provides a unique bridge between Pluto & Charon as viewed as astronomical targets versus the complex worlds that early data from New Horizons has revealed them to be. This work was supported by NASA’s New Horizons project.

  19. Regulation of Neutrophil Degranulation and Cytokine Secretion: A Novel Model Approach Based on Linear Fitting

    PubMed Central

    Naegelen, Isabelle; Beaume, Nicolas; Plançon, Sébastien; Schenten, Véronique; Tschirhart, Eric J.; Bréchard, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils participate in the maintenance of host integrity by releasing various cytotoxic proteins during degranulation. Due to recent advances, a major role has been attributed to neutrophil-derived cytokine secretion in the initiation, exacerbation, and resolution of inflammatory responses. Because the release of neutrophil-derived products orchestrates the action of other immune cells at the infection site and, thus, can contribute to the development of chronic inflammatory diseases, we aimed to investigate in more detail the spatiotemporal regulation of neutrophil-mediated release mechanisms of proinflammatory mediators. Purified human neutrophils were stimulated for different time points with lipopolysaccharide. Cells and supernatants were analyzed by flow cytometry techniques and used to establish secretion profiles of granules and cytokines. To analyze the link between cytokine release and degranulation time series, we propose an original strategy based on linear fitting, which may be used as a guideline, to (i) define the relationship of granule proteins and cytokines secreted to the inflammatory site and (ii) investigate the spatial regulation of neutrophil cytokine release. The model approach presented here aims to predict the correlation between neutrophil-derived cytokine secretion and degranulation and may easily be extrapolated to investigate the relationship between other types of time series of functional processes. PMID:26579547

  20. New approaches to the simulation of heat-capacity curves and phase diagrams of pseudobinary phospholipid mixtures.

    PubMed Central

    Johann, C; Garidel, P; Mennicke, L; Blume, A

    1996-01-01

    A simulation program using least-squares minimization was developed to calculate and fit heat capacity (cp) curves to experimental thermograms of dilute aqueous dispersions of phospholipid mixtures determined by high-sensitivity differential scanning calorimetry. We analyzed cp curves and phase diagrams of the pseudobinary aqueous lipid systems 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylglycerol/ 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3phosphatidylcholine (DMPG/DPPC) and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidic acid/1, 2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DMPA/DPPC) at pH 7. The simulation of the cp curves is based on regular solution theory using two nonideality parameters rho g and rho l for symmetric nonideal mixing in the gel and the liquid-crystalline phases. The broadening of the cp curves owing to limited cooperativity is incorporated into the simulation by convolution of the cp curves calculated for infinite cooperativity with a broadening function derived from a simple two-state transition model with the cooperative unit size n = delta HVH/delta Hcal as an adjustable parameter. The nonideality parameters and the cooperative unit size turn out to be functions of composition. In a second step, phase diagrams were calculated and fitted to the experimental data by use of regular solution theory with four different model assumptions. The best fits were obtained with a four-parameter model based on nonsymmetric, nonideal mixing in both phases. The simulations of the phase diagrams show that the absolute values of the nonideality parameters can be changed in a certain range without large effects on the shape of the phase diagram as long as the difference of the nonideality parameters for rho g for the gel and rho l for the liquid-crystalline phase remains constant. The miscibility in DMPG/DPPC and DMPA/DPPC mixtures differs remarkably because, for DMPG/DPPC, delta rho = rho l -rho g is negative, whereas for DMPA/DPPC this difference is positive. For DMPA/DPPC, this

  1. Building Spiritual Fitness in the Army: An Innovative Approach to a Vital Aspect of Human Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pargament, Kenneth I.; Sweeney, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the development of the spiritual fitness component of the Army's Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) program. Spirituality is defined in the human sense as the journey people take to discover and realize their essential selves and higher order aspirations. Several theoretically and empirically based reasons are articulated…

  2. Approach-Avoidance Motivational Profiles in Early Adolescents to the PACER Fitness Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garn, Alex; Sun, Haichun

    2009-01-01

    The use of fitness testing is a practical means for measuring components of health-related fitness, but there is currently substantial debate over the motivating effects of these tests. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the cross-fertilization of achievement and friendship goal profiles for early adolescents involved in the…

  3. An assessment of the suspended sediment rating curve approach for load estimation on the Rivers Bandon and Owenabue, Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Seán T.; Harrington, Joseph R.

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the suspended sediment rating curve approach for load estimation on the Rivers Bandon and Owenabue in Ireland. The rivers, located in the South of Ireland, are underlain by sandstone, limestones and mudstones, and the catchments are primarily agricultural. A comprehensive database of suspended sediment data is not available for rivers in Ireland. For such situations, it is common to estimate suspended sediment concentrations from the flow rate using the suspended sediment rating curve approach. These rating curves are most commonly constructed by applying linear regression to the logarithms of flow and suspended sediment concentration or by applying a power curve to normal data. Both methods are assessed in this paper for the Rivers Bandon and Owenabue. Turbidity-based suspended sediment loads are presented for each river based on continuous (15 min) flow data and the use of turbidity as a surrogate for suspended sediment concentration is investigated. A database of paired flow rate and suspended sediment concentration values, collected between the years 2004 and 2011, is used to generate rating curves for each river. From these, suspended sediment load estimates using the rating curve approach are estimated and compared to the turbidity based loads for each river. Loads are also estimated using stage and seasonally separated rating curves and daily flow data, for comparison purposes. The most accurate load estimate on the River Bandon is found using a stage separated power curve, while the most accurate load estimate on the River Owenabue is found using a general power curve. Maximum full monthly errors of - 76% to + 63% are found on the River Bandon with errors of - 65% to + 359% found on the River Owenabue. The average monthly error on the River Bandon is - 12% with an average error of + 87% on the River Owenabue. The use of daily flow data in the load estimation process does not result in a significant loss of accuracy on

  4. Practical model fitting approaches to the direct extraction of NMR parameters simultaneously from all dimensions of multidimensional NMR spectra.

    PubMed

    Chylla, R A; Volkman, B F; Markley, J L

    1998-08-01

    A maximum likelihood (ML)-based approach has been established for the direct extraction of NMR parameters (e.g., frequency, amplitude, phase, and decay rate) simultaneously from all dimensions of a D-dimensional NMR spectrum. The approach, referred to here as HTFD-ML (hybrid time frequency domain maximum likelihood), constructs a time-domain model composed of a sum of exponentially-decaying sinusoidal signals. The apodized Fourier transform of this time-domain signal is a model spectrum that represents the 'best-fit' to the equivalent frequency-domain data spectrum. The desired amplitude and frequency parameters can be extracted directly from the signal model constructed by the HTFD-ML algorithm. The HTFD-ML approach presented here, as embodied in the software package CHIFIT, is designed to meet the challenges posed by model fitting of D-dimensional NMR data sets, where each consists of many data points (10(8) is not uncommon) encoding information about numerous signals (up to 10(5) for a protein of moderate size) that exhibit spectral overlap. The suitability of the approach is demonstrated by its application to the concerted analysis of a series of ten 2D 1H-15N HSQC experiments measuring 15N T1 relaxation. In addition to demonstrating the practicality of performing maximum likelihood analysis on large, multidimensional NMR spectra, the results demonstrate that this parametric model-fitting approach provides more accurate amplitude and frequency estimates than those obtained from conventional peak-based analysis of the FT spectrum. The improved performance of the model fitting approach derives from its ability to take into account the simultaneous contributions of all signals in a crowded spectral region (deconvolution) as well as to incorporate prior knowledge in constructing models to fit the data. PMID:9751999

  5. BayeSED: A GENERAL APPROACH TO FITTING THE SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yunkun; Han, Zhanwen E-mail: zhanwenhan@ynao.ac.cn

    2014-11-01

    We present a newly developed version of BayeSED, a general Bayesian approach to the spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting of galaxies. The new BayeSED code has been systematically tested on a mock sample of galaxies. The comparison between the estimated and input values of the parameters shows that BayeSED can recover the physical parameters of galaxies reasonably well. We then applied BayeSED to interpret the SEDs of a large K{sub s} -selected sample of galaxies in the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field with stellar population synthesis models. Using the new BayeSED code, a Bayesian model comparison of stellar population synthesis models has been performed for the first time. We found that the 2003 model by Bruzual and Charlot, statistically speaking, has greater Bayesian evidence than the 2005 model by Maraston for the K{sub s} -selected sample. In addition, while setting the stellar metallicity as a free parameter obviously increases the Bayesian evidence of both models, varying the initial mass function has a notable effect only on the Maraston model. Meanwhile, the physical parameters estimated with BayeSED are found to be generally consistent with those obtained using the popular grid-based FAST code, while the former parameters exhibit more natural distributions. Based on the estimated physical parameters of the galaxies in the sample, we qualitatively classified the galaxies in the sample into five populations that may represent galaxies at different evolution stages or in different environments. We conclude that BayeSED could be a reliable and powerful tool for investigating the formation and evolution of galaxies from the rich multi-wavelength observations currently available. A binary version of the BayeSED code parallelized with Message Passing Interface is publicly available at https://bitbucket.org/hanyk/bayesed.

  6. BayeSED: A General Approach to Fitting the Spectral Energy Distribution of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yunkun; Han, Zhanwen

    2014-11-01

    We present a newly developed version of BayeSED, a general Bayesian approach to the spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting of galaxies. The new BayeSED code has been systematically tested on a mock sample of galaxies. The comparison between the estimated and input values of the parameters shows that BayeSED can recover the physical parameters of galaxies reasonably well. We then applied BayeSED to interpret the SEDs of a large Ks -selected sample of galaxies in the COSMOS/UltraVISTA field with stellar population synthesis models. Using the new BayeSED code, a Bayesian model comparison of stellar population synthesis models has been performed for the first time. We found that the 2003 model by Bruzual & Charlot, statistically speaking, has greater Bayesian evidence than the 2005 model by Maraston for the Ks -selected sample. In addition, while setting the stellar metallicity as a free parameter obviously increases the Bayesian evidence of both models, varying the initial mass function has a notable effect only on the Maraston model. Meanwhile, the physical parameters estimated with BayeSED are found to be generally consistent with those obtained using the popular grid-based FAST code, while the former parameters exhibit more natural distributions. Based on the estimated physical parameters of the galaxies in the sample, we qualitatively classified the galaxies in the sample into five populations that may represent galaxies at different evolution stages or in different environments. We conclude that BayeSED could be a reliable and powerful tool for investigating the formation and evolution of galaxies from the rich multi-wavelength observations currently available. A binary version of the BayeSED code parallelized with Message Passing Interface is publicly available at https://bitbucket.org/hanyk/bayesed.

  7. A BAYESIAN APPROACH TO THE ANALYSIS OF TIME SYMMETRY IN LIGHT CURVES: RECONSIDERING SCORPIUS X-1 OCCULTATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Blocker, Alexander W.; Protopapas, Pavlos; Alcock, Charles R.

    2009-08-20

    We present a new approach to the analysis of time symmetry in light curves, such as those in the X-ray at the center of the Scorpius X-1 occultation debate. Our method uses a new parameterization for such events (the bilogistic event profile) and provides a clear, physically relevant characterization of each event's key features. We also demonstrate a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to carry out this analysis, including a novel independence chain configuration for the estimation of each event's location in the light curve. These tools are applied to the Scorpius X-1 light curves presented in Chang et al., providing additional evidence based on the time series that the events detected thus far are most likely not occultations by trans-Neptunian objects.

  8. A Person-Centered Approach to P-E Fit Questions Using a Multiple-Trait Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Fruyt, Filip

    2002-01-01

    Employed college students (n=401) completed the Self-Directed Search and NEO Personality Inventory-Revised. Person-environment fit across Holland's six personality types predicted job satisfaction and skill development. Five-Factor Model traits significantly predicted intrinsic career outcomes. Use of the five-factor, person-centered approach to…

  9. Technological growth curves. A competition of forecasting models

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P.

    1993-12-01

    In order to determine procedures for appropriate model selection of technological growth curves, numerous time series that were representative of growth behavior were collected and categorized according to data characteristics. Nine different growth curve models were each fitted onto the various data sets in an attempt to determine which growth curve models achieved the best forecasts for differing types of growth data. The analysis of the results gives rise to a new approach for selecting appropriate growth curve models for a given set of data, prior to fitting the models, based on the characteristics of the data sets. 58 refs., 9 tabs.

  10. R-Curve Approach to Describe the Fracture Resistance of Tool Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picas, Ingrid; Casellas, Daniel; Llanes, Luis

    2016-04-01

    This work addresses the events involved in the fracture of tool steels, aiming to understand the effect of primary carbides, inclusions, and the metallic matrix on their effective fracture toughness and strength. Microstructurally different steels were investigated. It is found that cracks nucleate on carbides or inclusions at stress values lower than the fracture resistance. It is experimentally evidenced that such cracks exhibit an increasing growth resistance as they progressively extend, i.e., R-curve behavior. Ingot cast steels present a rising R-curve, which implies that the effective toughness developed by small cracks is lower than that determined with long artificial cracks. On the other hand, cracks grow steadily in the powder metallurgy tool steel, yielding as a result a flat R-curve. Accordingly, effective toughness for this material is mostly independent of the crack size. Thus, differences in fracture toughness values measured using short and long cracks must be considered when assessing fracture resistance of tool steels, especially when tool performance is controlled by short cracks. Hence, material selection for tools or development of new steel grades should take into consideration R-curve concepts, in order to avoid unexpected tool failures or to optimize microstructural design of tool steels, respectively.

  11. R-Curve Approach to Describe the Fracture Resistance of Tool Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picas, Ingrid; Casellas, Daniel; Llanes, Luis

    2016-06-01

    This work addresses the events involved in the fracture of tool steels, aiming to understand the effect of primary carbides, inclusions, and the metallic matrix on their effective fracture toughness and strength. Microstructurally different steels were investigated. It is found that cracks nucleate on carbides or inclusions at stress values lower than the fracture resistance. It is experimentally evidenced that such cracks exhibit an increasing growth resistance as they progressively extend, i.e., R-curve behavior. Ingot cast steels present a rising R-curve, which implies that the effective toughness developed by small cracks is lower than that determined with long artificial cracks. On the other hand, cracks grow steadily in the powder metallurgy tool steel, yielding as a result a flat R-curve. Accordingly, effective toughness for this material is mostly independent of the crack size. Thus, differences in fracture toughness values measured using short and long cracks must be considered when assessing fracture resistance of tool steels, especially when tool performance is controlled by short cracks. Hence, material selection for tools or development of new steel grades should take into consideration R-curve concepts, in order to avoid unexpected tool failures or to optimize microstructural design of tool steels, respectively.

  12. A novel approach for quantification of time-intensity curves in a DCE-MRI image series with an application to prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Fabijańska, Anna

    2016-06-01

    This paper considers the problem of an automatic quantification of DCE-MRI curve shape patterns. In particular, the semi-quantitative approach which classifies DCE time-intensity curves into clusters representing the tree main shape patterns is proposed. The approach combines heuristic rules with the naive Bayes classifier. In particular, the descriptive parameters are firstly derived from pixel-by-pixel analysis of the DCE time intensity curves and then used to recognise the curves which without a doubt represent the three main shape patterns. These curves are next used to train the naive Bayes classifier intended to classify the remaining curves within the dataset. Results of applying the proposed approach to the DCE-MRI scans of patients with prostate cancer are presented and discussed. Additionally, the overall performance of the approach is estimated through the comparison with the ground truth results provided by the expert. PMID:27107675

  13. A European approach to categorizing medicines for fitness to drive: outcomes of the DRUID project

    PubMed Central

    Ravera, Silvia; Monteiro, Susana P; de Gier, Johan Jacob; van der Linden, Trudy; Gómez-Talegón, Trinidad; Álvarez, F Javier

    2012-01-01

    AIMS To illustrate (i) the criteria and the development of the DRUID categorization system, (ii) the number of medicines that have currently been categorized, (iii) the added value of the DRUID categorization system and (iv) the next steps in the implementation of the DRUID system. METHODS The development of the DRUID categorization system was based on several criteria. The following steps were considered: (i) conditions of use of the medicine, (ii) pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic data, (iii) pharmacovigilance data, including prevalence of undesirable effects, (iv) experimental and epidemiological data, (v) additional data derived from the patient information leaflet, existing categorization systems and (vi) final categorization. DRUID proposed four tiered categories for medicines and driving. RESULTS In total, 3054 medicines were reviewed and over 1541 medicines were categorized (the rest were no longer on the EU market). Nearly half of the 1541 medicines were categorized 0 (no or negligible influence on fitness to drive), about 26% were placed in category I (minor influence on fitness to drive) and 17% were categorized as II or III (moderate or severe influence on fitness to drive). CONCLUSIONS The current DRUID categorization system established and defined standardized and harmonized criteria to categorize commonly used medications, based on their influence on fitness to drive. Further efforts are needed to implement the DRUID categorization system at a European level and further activities should be undertaken in order to reinforce the awareness of health care professionals and patients on the effects of medicines on fitness to drive. PMID:22452358

  14. SURVEY DESIGN FOR SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION FITTING: A FISHER MATRIX APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Acquaviva, Viviana; Gawiser, Eric; Bickerton, Steven J.; Grogin, Norman A.; Guo Yicheng; Lee, Seong-Kook

    2012-04-10

    The spectral energy distribution (SED) of a galaxy contains information on the galaxy's physical properties, and multi-wavelength observations are needed in order to measure these properties via SED fitting. In planning these surveys, optimization of the resources is essential. The Fisher Matrix (FM) formalism can be used to quickly determine the best possible experimental setup to achieve the desired constraints on the SED-fitting parameters. However, because it relies on the assumption of a Gaussian likelihood function, it is in general less accurate than other slower techniques that reconstruct the probability distribution function (PDF) from the direct comparison between models and data. We compare the uncertainties on SED-fitting parameters predicted by the FM to the ones obtained using the more thorough PDF-fitting techniques. We use both simulated spectra and real data, and consider a large variety of target galaxies differing in redshift, mass, age, star formation history, dust content, and wavelength coverage. We find that the uncertainties reported by the two methods agree within a factor of two in the vast majority ({approx}90%) of cases. If the age determination is uncertain, the top-hat prior in age used in PDF fitting to prevent each galaxy from being older than the universe needs to be incorporated in the FM, at least approximately, before the two methods can be properly compared. We conclude that the FM is a useful tool for astronomical survey design.

  15. Perceived social isolation, evolutionary fitness and health outcomes: a lifespan approach

    PubMed Central

    Hawkley, Louise C.; Capitanio, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Sociality permeates each of the fundamental motives of human existence and plays a critical role in evolutionary fitness across the lifespan. Evidence for this thesis draws from research linking deficits in social relationship—as indexed by perceived social isolation (i.e. loneliness)—with adverse health and fitness consequences at each developmental stage of life. Outcomes include depression, poor sleep quality, impaired executive function, accelerated cognitive decline, unfavourable cardiovascular function, impaired immunity, altered hypothalamic pituitary–adrenocortical activity, a pro-inflammatory gene expression profile and earlier mortality. Gaps in this research are summarized with suggestions for future research. In addition, we argue that a better understanding of naturally occurring variation in loneliness, and its physiological and psychological underpinnings, in non-human species may be a valuable direction to better understand the persistence of a ‘lonely’ phenotype in social species, and its consequences for health and fitness. PMID:25870400

  16. A preliminary study of multi-parameter POD curves for a guided waves based SHM approach to lightweight materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianneo, A.; Carboni, M.; Giglio, M.

    2016-02-01

    In view of an extensive literature about guided waves propagation, interaction and numerical simulation in plate-like structures made of metallic and composite materials, a lack of information is pointed out regarding their reliability in structural health monitoring approaches. Typically, because of uncertainties in the inspection process, the capability of non-destructive testing systems is expressed by means of suitable probability of detection curves. Based on Berens' model, a linear relationship is established between probability of detection and flaw size. Although the uncertain factors differ from a non-destructive inspection technique and a structural health monitoring approach, the same mathematical framework can be assumed. Hence, the authors investigated the application of a recently developed non-destructive testing Multi-Parameter POD approach to a guided waves based SHM one: numerical simulations as well as experimental data from flawed plates were combined to bring about a "master" POD curve. Once established, it can be used to build the POD curves of the single key factors as flaw size, orientation, structural attenuation and so on.

  17. 3D Modeling of Spectra and Light Curves of Hot Jupiters with PHOENIX; a First Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Torres, J. J.

    2016-04-01

    A detailed global circulation model was used to feed the PHOENIX code and calculate 3D spectra and light curves of hot Jupiters. Cloud free and dusty radiative fluxes for the planet HD179949b were modeled to show differences between them. The PHOENIX simulations can explain the broad features of the observed 8 μm light curves, including the fact that the planet-star flux ratio peaks before the secondary eclipse. The PHOENIX reflection spectrum matches the Spitzer secondary-eclipse depth at 3.6 μm and underpredicts eclipse depths at 4.5, 5.8 and 8.0 μm. These discrepancies result from the chemical composition and suggest the incorporation of different metallicities in future studies.

  18. Curve aligning approach for gait authentication based on a wearable accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hu; Yuao, Tao

    2012-06-01

    Gait authentication based on a wearable accelerometer is a novel biometric which can be used for identity identification, medical rehabilitation and early detection of neurological disorders. The method for matching gait patterns tells heavily on authentication performances. In this paper, curve aligning is introduced as a new method for matching gait patterns and it is compared with correlation and dynamic time warping (DTW). A support vector machine (SVM) is proposed to fuse pattern-matching methods in a decision level. Accelerations collected from ankles of 22 walking subjects are processed for authentications in our experiments. The fusion of curve aligning with backward-forward accelerations and DTW with vertical accelerations promotes authentication performances substantially and consistently. This fusion algorithm is tested repeatedly. Its mean and standard deviation of equal error rates are 0.794% and 0.696%, respectively, whereas among all presented non-fusion algorithms, the best one shows an EER of 3.03%. PMID:22621972

  19. A methodological approach to short-term tracking of youth physical fitness: the Oporto Growth, Health and Performance Study.

    PubMed

    Souza, Michele; Eisenmann, Joey; Chaves, Raquel; Santos, Daniel; Pereira, Sara; Forjaz, Cláudia; Maia, José

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, three different statistical approaches were used to investigate short-term tracking of cardiorespiratory and performance-related physical fitness among adolescents. Data were obtained from the Oporto Growth, Health and Performance Study and comprised 1203 adolescents (549 girls) divided into two age cohorts (10-12 and 12-14 years) followed for three consecutive years, with annual assessment. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed with 1-mile run/walk test; 50-yard dash, standing long jump, handgrip, and shuttle run test were used to rate performance-related physical fitness. Tracking was expressed in three different ways: auto-correlations, multilevel modelling with crude and adjusted model (for biological maturation, body mass index, and physical activity), and Cohen's Kappa (κ) computed in IBM SPSS 20.0, HLM 7.01 and Longitudinal Data Analysis software, respectively. Tracking of physical fitness components was (1) moderate-to-high when described by auto-correlations; (2) low-to-moderate when crude and adjusted models were used; and (3) low according to Cohen's Kappa (κ). These results demonstrate that when describing tracking, different methods should be considered since they provide distinct and more comprehensive views about physical fitness stability patterns. PMID:26890706

  20. Mode width fitting with a simple Bayesian approach. Application to CoRoT targets HD 181420 and HD 49933

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaulme, P.; Appourchaux, T.; Boumier, P.

    2009-10-01

    Aims: We investigate the asteroseismology of two solar-like targets as observed with the CoRoT satellite, with particular attention paid to the mode fitting. HD 181420 and HD 49933 are typical CoRoT solar-like targets (156 and 60-day runs). The low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of about 3{-}10 prevents us from unambiguously identifying the individual oscillation modes. In particular, convergence problems appear at the edges of the oscillation spectrum. Methods: We apply a Bayesian approach to the analysis of these data. We compare the global fitting of the power spectra obtained by the classical maximum likelihood (MLE) and the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimators. Results: We examine the impact of the choice of the priors upon the fitted parameters. We also propose to reduce the number of free parameters in the fitting, by replacing the individual estimate of mode height associated with each overtone by a continuous function of frequency (Gaussian profile). Conclusions: The MAP appears as a powerful tool to constrain the global fits, but it must be used carefully and only with reliable priors. The mode width of the stars increases with the frequency over all the oscillation spectrum. The CoRoT space mission, launched on 2006 December 27, was developed and is operated by the CNES, with participation of the Science Programs of ESA, ESA's RSSD, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Germany and Spain.

  1. Computerized detection of retina blood vessel using a piecewise line fitting approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Suicheng; Zhen, Yi; Wang, Ningli; Pu, Jiantao

    2013-03-01

    Retina vessels are important landmarks in fundus images, an accurate segmentation of the vessels may be useful for automated screening for several eye diseases or systematic diseases, such as diebetes. A new method is presented for automated segmentation of blood vessels in two-dimensional color fundus images. First, a coherence filter and a followed mean filter are applied to the green channel of the image. The green channel is selected because the vessels have the maximal contrast at the green channel. The coherence filter is to enhance the line strength of the original image and the mean filter is to discard the intensity variance among different regions. Since the vessels are darker than the around tissues depicted on the image, the pixels with small intensity are then retained as points of interest (POI). A new line fitting algorithm is proposed to identify line-like structures in each local circle of the POI. The proposed line fitting method is less sensitive to noise compared to the least squared fitting. The fitted lines with higher scores are regarded as vessels. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, a public available database DRIVE with 20 test images is selected for experiments. The mean accuracy on these images is 95.7% which is comparable to the state-of-art.

  2. Hydrothermal germination models: comparison of two data-fitting approaches with probit optimization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Probit models for estimating hydrothermal germination rate yield model parameters that have been associated with specific physiological processes. The desirability of linking germination response to seed physiology must be weighed against expectations of model fit and the relative accuracy of predi...

  3. Goodness of Fit of Skills Assessment Approaches: Insights from Patterns of Real vs. Synthetic Data Sets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beheshti, Behzad; Desmarais, Michel C.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the issue of the goodness of fit of different skills assessment models using both synthetic and real data. Synthetic data is generated from the different skills assessment models. The results show wide differences of performances between the skills assessment models over synthetic data sets. The set of relative performances…

  4. A novel approach for fit analysis of thermal protective clothing using three-dimensional body scanning.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yehu; Song, Guowen; Li, Jun

    2014-11-01

    The garment fit played an important role in protective performance, comfort and mobility. The purpose of this study is to quantify the air gap to quantitatively characterize a three-dimensional (3-D) garment fit using a 3-D body scanning technique. A method for processing of scanned data was developed to investigate the air gap size and distribution between the clothing and human body. The mesh model formed from nude and clothed body was aligned, superimposed and sectioned using Rapidform software. The air gap size and distribution over the body surface were analyzed. The total air volume was also calculated. The effects of fabric properties and garment size on air gap distribution were explored. The results indicated that average air gap of the fit clothing was around 25-30 mm and the overall air gap distribution was similar. The air gap was unevenly distributed over the body and it was strongly associated with the body parts, fabric properties and garment size. The research will help understand the overall clothing fit and its association with protection, thermal and movement comfort, and provide guidelines for clothing engineers to improve thermal performance and reduce physiological burden. PMID:24793820

  5. Physical activity, physical fitness and academic achievement in adolescents: a self-organizing maps approach.

    PubMed

    Pellicer-Chenoll, Maite; Garcia-Massó, Xavier; Morales, Jose; Serra-Añó, Pilar; Solana-Tramunt, Mònica; González, Luis-Millán; Toca-Herrera, José-Luis

    2015-06-01

    The relationship among physical activity, physical fitness and academic achievement in adolescents has been widely studied; however, controversy concerning this topic persists. The methods used thus far to analyse the relationship between these variables have included mostly traditional lineal analysis according to the available literature. The aim of this study was to perform a visual analysis of this relationship with self-organizing maps and to monitor the subject's evolution during the 4 years of secondary school. Four hundred and forty-four students participated in the study. The physical activity and physical fitness of the participants were measured, and the participants' grade point averages were obtained from the five participant institutions. Four main clusters representing two primary student profiles with few differences between boys and girls were observed. The clustering demonstrated that students with higher energy expenditure and better physical fitness exhibited lower body mass index (BMI) and higher academic performance, whereas those adolescents with lower energy expenditure exhibited worse physical fitness, higher BMI and lower academic performance. With respect to the evolution of the students during the 4 years, ∼25% of the students originally clustered in a negative profile moved to a positive profile, and there was no movement in the opposite direction. PMID:25953972

  6. Physical Activity, Physical Fitness and Academic Achievement in Adolescents: A Self-Organizing Maps Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellicer-Chenoll, Maite; Garcia-Massó, Xavier; Morales, Jose; Serra-Añó, Pilar; Solana-Tramunt, Mònica; González, Luis-Millán; Toca-Herrera, José-Luis

    2015-01-01

    The relationship among physical activity, physical fitness and academic achievement in adolescents has been widely studied; however, controversy concerning this topic persists. The methods used thus far to analyse the relationship between these variables have included mostly traditional lineal analysis according to the available literature. The…

  7. Health and Fitness Courses in Higher Education: A Historical Perspective and Contemporary Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjerke, Wendy

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity among 18- to 24-year-olds has steadily increased. Given that the majority of young American adults are enrolled in colleges and universities, the higher education setting could be an appropriate environment for health promotion programs. Historically, health and fitness in higher education have been provided via…

  8. Pre-Service Music Teachers' Satisfaction: Person-Environment Fit Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkmen, Serkan; Cevik, Beste; Alkan, Mahir

    2012-01-01

    Guided by three theoretical frameworks in vocational psychology, (i) theory of work adjustment, (ii) two factor theory, and (iii) value discrepancy theory, the purpose of this study was to investigate Turkish pre-service music teachers' values and the role of fit between person and environment in understanding vocational satisfaction. Participants…

  9. On the Usefulness of a Multilevel Logistic Regression Approach to Person-Fit Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conijn, Judith M.; Emons, Wilco H. M.; van Assen, Marcel A. L. M.; Sijtsma, Klaas

    2011-01-01

    The logistic person response function (PRF) models the probability of a correct response as a function of the item locations. Reise (2000) proposed to use the slope parameter of the logistic PRF as a person-fit measure. He reformulated the logistic PRF model as a multilevel logistic regression model and estimated the PRF parameters from this…

  10. An engineering time-domain model for curve squeal: Tangential point-contact model and Green's functions approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenzerovic, I.; Kropp, W.; Pieringer, A.

    2016-08-01

    Curve squeal is a strong tonal sound that may arise when a railway vehicle negotiates a tight curve. In contrast to frequency-domain models, time-domain models are able to capture the nonlinear and transient nature of curve squeal. However, these models are computationally expensive due to requirements for fine spatial and time discretization. In this paper, a computationally efficient engineering model for curve squeal in the time-domain is proposed. It is based on a steady-state point-contact model for the tangential wheel/rail contact and a Green's functions approach for wheel and rail dynamics. The squeal model also includes a simple model of sound radiation from the railway wheel from the literature. A validation of the tangential point-contact model against Kalker's transient variational contact model reveals that the point-contact model performs well within the squeal model up to at least 5 kHz. The proposed squeal model is applied to investigate the influence of lateral creepage, friction and wheel/rail contact position on squeal occurrence and amplitude. The study indicates a significant influence of the wheel/rail contact position on squeal frequencies and amplitudes. Friction and lateral creepage show an influence on squeal occurrence and amplitudes, but this is only secondary to the influence of the contact position.

  11. The Fitness Landscape of HIV-1 Gag: Advanced Modeling Approaches and Validation of Model Predictions by In Vitro Testing

    PubMed Central

    Omarjee, Saleha; Walker, Bruce D.; Chakraborty, Arup; Ndung'u, Thumbi

    2014-01-01

    Viral immune evasion by sequence variation is a major hindrance to HIV-1 vaccine design. To address this challenge, our group has developed a computational model, rooted in physics, that aims to predict the fitness landscape of HIV-1 proteins in order to design vaccine immunogens that lead to impaired viral fitness, thus blocking viable escape routes. Here, we advance the computational models to address previous limitations, and directly test model predictions against in vitro fitness measurements of HIV-1 strains containing multiple Gag mutations. We incorporated regularization into the model fitting procedure to address finite sampling. Further, we developed a model that accounts for the specific identity of mutant amino acids (Potts model), generalizing our previous approach (Ising model) that is unable to distinguish between different mutant amino acids. Gag mutation combinations (17 pairs, 1 triple and 25 single mutations within these) predicted to be either harmful to HIV-1 viability or fitness-neutral were introduced into HIV-1 NL4-3 by site-directed mutagenesis and replication capacities of these mutants were assayed in vitro. The predicted and measured fitness of the corresponding mutants for the original Ising model (r = −0.74, p = 3.6×10−6) are strongly correlated, and this was further strengthened in the regularized Ising model (r = −0.83, p = 3.7×10−12). Performance of the Potts model (r = −0.73, p = 9.7×10−9) was similar to that of the Ising model, indicating that the binary approximation is sufficient for capturing fitness effects of common mutants at sites of low amino acid diversity. However, we show that the Potts model is expected to improve predictive power for more variable proteins. Overall, our results support the ability of the computational models to robustly predict the relative fitness of mutant viral strains, and indicate the potential value of this approach for understanding viral immune evasion

  12. Transfer matrix approach to the curve crossing problems of two exponential diabatic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diwaker; Chakraborty, Aniruddha

    2015-11-01

    In the present manuscript, we have presented a method of calculation of non-adiabatic transition probability using transfer matrix technique. As an example for the two-state curve crossing problem, we have considered two diabatic potentials (two exponential potentials in the present case) with opposite sign of slopes which crosses each other and there is a coupling between the two diabatic potentials. The coupling is chosen as a Gaussian coupling which is further expressed as a collection of Dirac Delta potentials and the transition probability from one diabatic potential to another is calculated.

  13. Kinetic approach for the enzymatic determination of levodopa and carbidopa assisted by multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares.

    PubMed

    Grünhut, Marcos; Garrido, Mariano; Centurión, Maria E; Fernández Band, Beatriz S

    2010-07-12

    A combination of kinetic spectroscopic monitoring and multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS) was proposed for the enzymatic determination of levodopa (LVD) and carbidopa (CBD) in pharmaceuticals. The enzymatic reaction process was carried out in a reverse stopped-flow injection system and monitored by UV-vis spectroscopy. The spectra (292-600 nm) were recorded throughout the reaction and were analyzed by multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares. A small calibration matrix containing nine mixtures was used in the model construction. Additionally, to evaluate the prediction ability of the model, a set with six validation mixtures was used. The lack of fit obtained was 4.3%, the explained variance 99.8% and the overall prediction error 5.5%. Tablets of commercial samples were analyzed and the results were validated by pharmacopeia method (high performance liquid chromatography). No significant differences were found (alpha=0.05) between the reference values and the ones obtained with the proposed method. It is important to note that a unique chemometric model made it possible to determine both analytes simultaneously. PMID:20630175

  14. Permutation invariant polynomial neural network approach to fitting potential energy surfaces. III. Molecule-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2014-07-01

    The permutation invariant polynomial-neural network (PIP-NN) method for constructing highly accurate potential energy surfaces (PESs) for gas phase molecules is extended to molecule-surface interaction PESs. The symmetry adaptation in the NN fitting of a PES is achieved by employing as the input symmetry functions that fulfill both the translational symmetry of the surface and permutation symmetry of the molecule. These symmetry functions are low-order PIPs of the primitive symmetry functions containing the surface periodic symmetry. It is stressed that permutationally invariant cross terms are needed to avoid oversymmetrization. The accuracy and efficiency are demonstrated in fitting both a model PES for the H2 + Cu(111) system and density functional theory points for the H2 + Ag(111) system.

  15. A Multiple Criteria Decision Modelling approach to selection of estimation techniques for fitting extreme floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duckstein, L.; Bobée, B.; Ashkar, F.

    1991-09-01

    The problem of fitting a probability distribution, here log-Pearson Type III distribution, to extreme floods is considered from the point of view of two numerical and three non-numerical criteria. The six techniques of fitting considered include classical techniques (maximum likelihood, moments of logarithms of flows) and new methods such as mixed moments and the generalized method of moments developed by two of the co-authors. The latter method consists of fitting the distribution using moments of different order, in particular the SAM method (Sundry Averages Method) uses the moments of order 0 (geometric mean), 1 (arithmetic mean), -1 (harmonic mean) and leads to a smaller variance of the parameters. The criteria used to select the method of parameter estimation are: - the two statistical criteria of mean square error and bias; - the two computational criteria of program availability and ease of use; - the user-related criterion of acceptability. These criteria are transformed into value functions or fuzzy set membership functions and then three Multiple Criteria Decision Modelling (MCDM) techniques, namely, composite programming, ELECTRE, and MCQA, are applied to rank the estimation techniques.

  16. Craniodental features in male Mandrillus may signal size and fitness: an allometric approach.

    PubMed

    Klopp, Emily B

    2012-04-01

    According to a hypothesis in the broader mammalian literature, secondary sexual characteristics that have evolved to signal fitness and size to other conspecifics should exhibit positive allometry across adult males within a species. Here this hypothesis is tested in the genus Mandrillus. The overbuilding of bony features in larger individuals necessitates a functional explanation as bone is metabolically expensive to produce and maintain. Canine size and size of the maxillary ridge are scaled against a body size surrogate in intraspecific samples of male Mandrillus sphinx (mandrills) and Mandrillus leucophaeus (drills). Areal dimensions are weighted more heavily as they represent the size of a feature as it is viewed by individuals. Measures of the maxillary ridge and canine tooth are significantly correlated with the size surrogate and scale with positive allometry in both samples supporting the hypothesis that these features function to advertise a male's body size and fitness to other males competing for mates and potential discerning females. This is the first study in primates to test for intraspecific positive allometric scaling of bony facial features in adult males based on a theory of fitness signaling and sexual selection. PMID:22328467

  17. Approaches to automatic parameter fitting in a microscopy image segmentation pipeline: An exploratory parameter space analysis

    PubMed Central

    Held, Christian; Nattkemper, Tim; Palmisano, Ralf; Wittenberg, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Research and diagnosis in medicine and biology often require the assessment of a large amount of microscopy image data. Although on the one hand, digital pathology and new bioimaging technologies find their way into clinical practice and pharmaceutical research, some general methodological issues in automated image analysis are still open. Methods: In this study, we address the problem of fitting the parameters in a microscopy image segmentation pipeline. We propose to fit the parameters of the pipeline's modules with optimization algorithms, such as, genetic algorithms or coordinate descents, and show how visual exploration of the parameter space can help to identify sub-optimal parameter settings that need to be avoided. Results: This is of significant help in the design of our automatic parameter fitting framework, which enables us to tune the pipeline for large sets of micrographs. Conclusion: The underlying parameter spaces pose a challenge for manual as well as automated parameter optimization, as the parameter spaces can show several local performance maxima. Hence, optimization strategies that are not able to jump out of local performance maxima, like the hill climbing algorithm, often result in a local maximum. PMID:23766941

  18. Modeling LiH potential-energy curves: An approach based on integration in finite space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altunata, S. N.; Field, R. W.

    2003-02-01

    In this paper, we introduce a finite-space integration method to shed physical insight into the interactions of a Rydberg electron with a molecular ion core, as sampled by the potential-energy curves (PECs) of various electronic states of LiH. We postulate that these interactions are dominated by two independent electron-atom processes: (1) scattering of the Rydberg electron at negative energy solely off of the lithium atomic core and (2) a transition from the lithium scattering state to the lithium valence orbital necessarily accompanied by an excitation of the hydrogen atom. It is shown that the ratio of the amplitudes for the occurrences of these two processes can be obtained by means of bounded integrations inside a small region of space where the electron-electron repulsion term in the Hamiltonian is dominant. Our theory and approximations are verified by a comparison of derived potential-energy curves with those produced by ab initio calculations as well as another empirical model that uses the Fermi approximation. It is observed that the complicated features of the PECs, which reflect the nodal structure of the Rydberg orbitals, are reproduced well within our treatment.

  19. Effect of irrigation on the Budyko curve: a process-based stochastic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vico, Giulia; Destouni, Georgia

    2015-04-01

    Currently, 40% of food production is provided by irrigated agriculture. Irrigation ensures higher and less variable yields, but such water input alters the balance of transpiration and other losses from the soil. Thus, accounting for the impact of irrigation is crucial for the understanding of the local water balance. A probabilistic model of the soil water balance is employed to explore the effects of different irrigation strategies within the Budyko framework. Shifts in the Budyko curve are explained in a mechanistic way. At the field level and assuming unlimited irrigation water, irrigation shifts the Budyko curve upward towards the upper limit imposed by energy availability, even in dry climates. At the watershed scale and assuming that irrigation water is obtained from sources within the same watershed, the application of irrigation over a fraction of the watershed area allows a more efficient use of water resources made available through precipitation. In this case, however, mean transpiration remains upper-bounded by rainfall over the whole watershed.

  20. Single-centre experience of retroperitoneoscopic approach in urology with tips to overcome the steep learning curve

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Aneesh; Sureka, Sanjoy Kumar; Vashishtha, Saurabh; Agarwal, Shikhar; Ansari, Md Saleh; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: The retroperitoneoscopic or retroperitoneal (RP) surgical approach has not become as popular as the transperitoneal (TP) one due to the steeper learning curve. AIMS: Our single-institution experience focuses on the feasibility, advantages and complications of retroperitoneoscopic surgeries (RS) performed over the past 10 years. Tips and tricks have been discussed to overcome the steep learning curve and these are emphasised. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: This study made a retrospective analysis of computerised hospital data of patients who underwent RP urological procedures from 2003 to 2013 at a tertiary care centre. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Between 2003 and 2013, 314 cases of RS were performed for various urological procedures. We analysed the operative time, peri-operative complications, time to return of bowel sound, length of hospital stay, and advantages and difficulties involved. Post-operative complications were stratified into five grades using modified Clavien classification (MCC). RESULTS: RS were successfully completed in 95.5% of patients, with 4% of the procedures electively performed by the combined approach (both RP and TP); 3.2% required open conversion and 1.3% were converted to the TP approach. The most common cause for conversion was bleeding. Mean hospital stay was 3.2 ± 1.2 days and the mean time for returning of bowel sounds was 16.5 ± 5.4 h. Of the patients, 1.4% required peri-operative blood transfusion. A total of 16 patients (5%) had post-operative complications and the majority were grades I and II as per MCC. The rates of intra-operative and post-operative complications depended on the difficulty of the procedure, but the complications diminished over the years with the increasing experience of surgeons. CONCLUSION: Retroperitoneoscopy has proven an excellent approach, with certain advantages. The tips and tricks that have been provided and emphasised should definitely help to minimise the steep learning curve. PMID:27073300

  1. Determination of silicon cell model parameters using a least-squares-fit to experimental spectral response and the V-I curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masden, G. W.

    An algorithm for the determination of photovoltaic cell parameters and absolute spectral response from terminal V-I measurements is presented. Input consists of V-I curve data measured with the cell operating under full-test illumination, the spectral distribution of the test illumination, the short circuit current response to superimposed quasi-monochromatic illumination and the spectral distribution of the quasi-monochromatic illumination. The algorithm yields internal spectral response and approximate values for cell model parameters such as minority carrier lifetimes, doping densities, junction depth, recombination velocities, and/or others provided the sensitivity of the cell response to changes in the parameter allows a satisfactory resolution of the parameter. Effects of measurement errors on the computed spectral response and parameters are presented.

  2. Simple solution for a complex problem: proanthocyanidins, galloyl glucoses and ellagitannins fit on a single calibration curve in high performance-gel permeation chromatography.

    PubMed

    Stringano, Elisabetta; Gea, An; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Mueller-Harvey, Irene

    2011-10-28

    This study was undertaken to explore gel permeation chromatography (GPC) for estimating molecular weights of proanthocyanidin fractions isolated from sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia). The results were compared with data obtained by thiolytic degradation of the same fractions. Polystyrene, polyethylene glycol and polymethyl methacrylate standards were not suitable for estimating the molecular weights of underivatized proanthocyanidins. Therefore, a novel HPLC-GPC method was developed based on two serially connected PolarGel-L columns using DMF that contained 5% water, 1% acetic acid and 0.15 M LiBr at 0.7 ml/min and 50 °C. This yielded a single calibration curve for galloyl glucoses (trigalloyl glucose, pentagalloyl glucose), ellagitannins (pedunculagin, vescalagin, punicalagin, oenothein B, gemin A), proanthocyanidins (procyanidin B2, cinnamtannin B1), and several other polyphenols (catechin, epicatechin gallate, epicallocatechin gallate, amentoflavone). These GPC predicted molecular weights represented a considerable advance over previously reported HPLC-GPC methods for underivatized proanthocyanidins. PMID:21930278

  3. Multiperiodicity, modulations, and flip-flops in variable star light curves. III. Carrier fit analysis of LQ Hydrae photometry for 1982-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olspert, N.; Käpylä, M. J.; Pelt, J.; Cole, E. M.; Hackman, T.; Lehtinen, J.; Henry, G. W.

    2015-05-01

    Aims: We study LQ Hya photometry for 1982-2014 with the carrier fit (CF) method and compare our results to earlier photometric analysis and recent Doppler imaging maps. Methods: As the rotation period of the object is not known a priori, we utilize different types of statistical methods first (least-squares fit of harmonics, phase dispersion statistics) to estimate various candidates for the carrier period for the CF method. Secondly, a global fit to the whole data set and local fits to shorter segments are computed with the period that is found to be optimal. Results: The harmonic least-squares analysis of all the available data reveals a short period, of close to 1.6 days, as a limiting value for a set of significant frequencies. We interpret this as the rotation period of the spots near the equatorial region. In addition, the distribution of the significant periods is found to be bimodal, hinting of a longer-term modulating period, which we set out to study with a two-harmonic CF model. A weak modulation signal is, indeed retrieved, with a period of roughly 6.9 yr. The phase dispersion analysis gives a clear symmetric minimum for coherence times lower than and around 100 days. We interpret this as the mean rotation pattern of the spots. Of these periods, the most significant and physically most plausible period statistically is the mean spot rotation period 1 .^d60514, which is chosen to be used as the carrier period for the CF analysis. With the CF method, we seek any systematic trends in the spot distribution in the global time frame, and locally look for previously reported abrupt phase changes in rapidly rotating objects. During 2003-2009, the global CF reveals a coherent structure rotating with a period of 1 .^d6037, while during most other times the spot distribution appears somewhat random in phase. Conclusions: The evolution of the spot distribution of the object is found to be very chaotic, with no clear signs of an azimuthal dynamo wave that would

  4. A universal self-adaptive time-varying function for extracellular concentration during osmotic shift for curve-fitting permeability coefficients of cell membrane.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gang

    2010-01-01

    A universal self-adaptive time-varying function of extracellular concentration history during osmotic shift for measuring cell membrane permeability was presented in this study. The feasibility and accuracy of the assumed function were verified based on the experimental data obtained from the microperfusion chamber method. It was found that the assumed function could always give out the very satisfactory coefficient of determination, and there were no significant differences between the hydraulic conductivity values fitted using the laser interferometer measured extracellular concentration profile and the predicted one by the assumed piecewise function (student's t test, p > 0.05). Due to the adaptive feature of the assumed function for the concentration of extracellular solution, the function was suggest to be used for all the similar studies for measurement of cell membrane permeability by osmotic shift. PMID:20919457

  5. A numerical approach to 14C wiggle-match dating of organic deposits: best fits and confidence intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaauw, Maarten; Heuvelink, Gerard B. M.; Mauquoy, Dmitri; van der Plicht, Johannes; van Geel, Bas

    2003-06-01

    14C wiggle-match dating (WMD) of peat deposits uses the non-linear relationship between 14C age and calendar age to match the shape of a sequence of closely spaced peat 14C dates with the 14C calibration curve. A numerical approach to WMD enables the quantitative assessment of various possible wiggle-match solutions and of calendar year confidence intervals for sequences of 14C dates. We assess the assumptions, advantages, and limitations of the method. Several case-studies show that WMD results in more precise chronologies than when individual 14C dates are calibrated. WMD is most successful during periods with major excursions in the 14C calibration curve (e.g., in one case WMD could narrow down confidence intervals from 230 to 36 yr).

  6. Hugoniot curve calculation of nitromethane decomposition mixtures: A reactive force field molecular dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng; Zhang, Hong; Hu, Hai-Quan; Cheng, Xin-Lu; Zhang, Li-Yan

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the Hugoniot curve, shock-particle velocity relations, and Chapman-Jouguet conditions of the hot dense system through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The detailed pathways from crystal nitromethane to reacted state by shock compression are simulated. The phase transition of N2 and CO mixture is found at about 10 GPa, and the main reason is that the dissociation of the C-O bond and the formation of C-C bond start at 10.0-11.0 GPa. The unreacted state simulations of nitromethane are consistent with shock Hugoniot data. The complete pathway from unreacted to reacted state is discussed. Through chemical species analysis, we find that the C-N bond breaking is the main event of the shock-induced nitromethane decomposition. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11374217) and the Shandong Provincial Natural Science Foundation, China (Grant No. ZR2014BQ008).

  7. Navigation and flight director guidance for the NASA/FAA helicopter MLS curved approach flight test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phatak, A. V.; Lee, M. G.

    1985-01-01

    The navigation and flight director guidance systems implemented in the NASA/FAA helicopter microwave landing system (MLS) curved approach flight test program is described. Flight test were conducted at the U.S. Navy's Crows Landing facility, using the NASA Ames UH-lH helicopter equipped with the V/STOLAND avionics system. The purpose of these tests was to investigate the feasibility of flying complex, curved and descending approaches to a landing using MLS flight director guidance. A description of the navigation aids used, the avionics system, cockpit instrumentation and on-board navigation equipment used for the flight test is provided. Three generic reference flight paths were developed and flown during the test. They were as follows: U-Turn, S-turn and Straight-In flight profiles. These profiles and their geometries are described in detail. A 3-cue flight director was implemented on the helicopter. A description of the formulation and implementation of the flight director laws is also presented. Performance data and analysis is presented for one pilot conducting the flight director approaches.

  8. Assessing Goodness of Fit in Item Response Theory with Nonparametric Models: A Comparison of Posterior Probabilities and Kernel-Smoothing Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sueiro, Manuel J.; Abad, Francisco J.

    2011-01-01

    The distance between nonparametric and parametric item characteristic curves has been proposed as an index of goodness of fit in item response theory in the form of a root integrated squared error index. This article proposes to use the posterior distribution of the latent trait as the nonparametric model and compares the performance of an index…

  9. Curved descending landing approach guidance and control. M.S. Thesis - George Washington Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    Linear optimal regulator theory is applied to a nonlinear simulation of a transport aircraft performing a helical landing approach. A closed form expression for the quasi-steady nominal flight path is presented along with the method for determining the corresponding constant nominal control inputs. The Jacobian matrices and the weighting matrices in the cost functional are time varying. A method of solving for the optimal feedback gains is reviewed. The control system is tested on several alternative landing approaches using both three and six degree flight path angles. On each landing approach, the aircraft was subjected to large random initial state errors and to randomly directed crosswinds. The system was also tested for sensitivity to changes in the parameters of the aircraft and of the atmosphere. Performance of the optimal controller on all the three degree approaches was very good, and the control system proved to be reasonably insensitive to parametric uncertainties.

  10. Effect of motion cues during complex curved approach and landing tasks: A piloted simulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scanlon, Charles H.

    1987-01-01

    A piloted simulation study was conducted to examine the effect of motion cues using a high fidelity simulation of commercial aircraft during the performance of complex approach and landing tasks in the Microwave Landing System (MLS) signal environment. The data from these tests indicate that in a high complexity MLS approach task with moderate turbulence and wind, the pilot uses motion cues to improve path tracking performance. No significant differences in tracking accuracy were noted for the low and medium complexity tasks, regardless of the presence of motion cues. Higher control input rates were measured for all tasks when motion was used. Pilot eye scan, as measured by instrument dwell time, was faster when motion cues were used regardless of the complexity of the approach tasks. Pilot comments indicated a preference for motion. With motion cues, pilots appeared to work harder in all levels of task complexity and to improve tracking performance in the most complex approach task.

  11. A unified approach for nonlinear vibration analysis of curved structures using non-uniform rational B-spline representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askari, H.; Esmailzadeh, E.; Barari, A.

    2015-09-01

    A novel procedure for the nonlinear vibration analysis of curved beam is presented. The Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) is combined with the Euler-Bernoulli beam theory to define the curvature of the structure. The governing equation of motion and the general frequency formula, using the NURBS variables, is applicable for any type of curvatures, is developed. The Galerkin procedure is implemented to obtain the nonlinear ordinary differential equation of curved system and the multiple time scales method is utilized to find the corresponding frequency responses. As a case study, the nonlinear vibration of carbon nanotubes with different shapes of curvature is investigated. The effect of oscillation amplitude and the waviness on the natural frequency of the curved nanotube is evaluated and the primary resonance case of system with respect to the variations of different parameters is discussed. For the sake of comparison of the results obtained with those from the molecular dynamic simulation, the natural frequencies evaluated from the proposed approach are compared with those reported in literature for few types of carbon nanotube simulation.

  12. Building spiritual fitness in the Army: an innovative approach to a vital aspect of human development.

    PubMed

    Pargament, Kenneth I; Sweeney, Patrick J

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the development of the spiritual fitness component of the Army's Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) program. Spirituality is defined in the human sense as the journey people take to discover and realize their essential selves and higher order aspirations. Several theoretically and empirically based reasons are articulated for why spirituality is a necessary component of the CSF program: Human spirituality is a significant motivating force, spirituality is a vital resource for human development, and spirituality is a source of struggle that can lead to growth or decline. A conceptual model developed by Sweeney, Hannah, and Snider (2007) is used to identify several psychological structures and processes that facilitate the development of the human spirit. From this model, an educational, computer-based program has been developed to promote spiritual resilience. This program consists of three tiers: (a) building awareness of the self and the human spirit, (b) building awareness of resources to cultivate the human spirit, and (c) building awareness of the human spirit of others. Further research will be needed to evaluate the effectiveness of this innovative and potentially important program. PMID:21219049

  13. Virus fitness differences observed between two naturally occurring isolates of Ebola virus Makona variant using a reverse genetics approach.

    PubMed

    Albariño, César G; Guerrero, Lisa Wiggleton; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Kainulainen, Markus H; Whitmer, Shannon L M; Welch, Stephen R; Nichol, Stuart T

    2016-09-01

    During the large outbreak of Ebola virus disease that occurred in Western Africa from late 2013 to early 2016, several hundred Ebola virus (EBOV) genomes have been sequenced and the virus genetic drift analyzed. In a previous report, we described an efficient reverse genetics system designed to generate recombinant EBOV based on a Makona variant isolate obtained in 2014. Using this system, we characterized the replication and fitness of 2 isolates of the Makona variant. These virus isolates are nearly identical at the genetic level, but have single amino acid differences in the VP30 and L proteins. The potential effects of these differences were tested using minigenomes and recombinant viruses. The results obtained with this approach are consistent with the role of VP30 and L as components of the EBOV RNA replication machinery. Moreover, the 2 isolates exhibited clear fitness differences in competitive growth assays. PMID:27366976

  14. Full empirical potential curves for the X(1)Σ(+) and A(1)Π states of CH(+) from a direct-potential-fit analysis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Young-Sang; Le Roy, Robert J

    2016-01-14

    All available "conventional" absorption/emission spectroscopic data have been combined with photodissociation data and translational spectroscopy data in a global analysis that yields analytic potential energy and Born-Oppenheimer breakdown functions for the X(1)Σ(+) and A(1)Π states of CH(+) and its isotopologues that reproduce all of the data (on average) within their assigned uncertainties. For the ground X(1)Σ(+) state, this fully quantum mechanical "Direct-Potential-Fit" analysis yielded an improved empirical well depth of e = 34 362.8(3) cm(-1) and equilibrium bond length of re = 1.128 462 5 (58) Å. For the A(1)Π state, the resulting well depth and equilibrium bond length are e = 10 303.7(3) cm(-1) and re = 1.235 896 (14) Å, while the electronic isotope shift from the hydride to the deuteride is ΔTe = - 5.99(±0.08) cm(-1). PMID:26772575

  15. Suryanamaskar: An equivalent approach towards management of physical fitness in obese females

    PubMed Central

    Jakhotia, Komal A; Shimpi, Apurv P; Rairikar, Savita A; Mhendale, Priyanka; Hatekar, Renuka; Shyam, Ashok; Sancheti, Parag K

    2015-01-01

    Background: In India, obesity is highly prevalent in women as compared to men. As the obesity epidemic spreads, there are growing concerns about efficient obesity management. Aims: To compare between circuit training (CT), treadmill (TM) walking and suryanamaskar (SN) training in weight management and physical fitness enhancement in obese females. Settings and Designs: Comparative controlled study conducted in a community setting. Materials and Methods: 119 females of age between 20 and 40 years of body mass index (BMI) between 25.1 and 34.9 kg/m2. 87 participants completed the study. Group 1: CT; group 2: TM walking; group 3: Modified SN; group 4: Control. Outcome Measures: Body composition, cardio-respiratory and muscle endurance, flexibility. Statistical Analysis: Within-group data was analyzed with the paired t-test. P =0.05. Analysis between the groups was done using one way ANOVA test. Analysis between the groups was done using ANCOVA test controlling for baseline differences only for those variables that have significant differences at baseline. For those which do not have significant difference at baseline, RMANOVA was done at end of 8 weeks. Results: Reducation in mean body weight in CT group (2.2%), TM (1.7%) and SN (1.6%), (P < 0.05), BMI in all the three groups (P < 0.01), total body fat % in the CT (5%) and SN (3.7%), (P < 0.01), metabolic age with CT (2%) and TM (2%), (P = 0.001). Improvement in muscle mass in CT (4%, P = 0.009), VO2max in CT group by 17.2%, SN (14%), TM group (8%) (P < 0.05). Upper limb Muscle endurance in CT (51.3%), SN group (51.24%) and in TM group (40%), (P = 0.05), in lower limb TM (21.2%) and SN (24.5%) (P = 0.05), flexibility in SN (12.4%, P = 0.0001). Conclusions: All three methods were effective in weight and physical fitness management. CT and SN were more effective in improving cardio-respiratory fitness and upper limb muscle endurance while only SN was effective in improving body flexibility. PMID:25558131

  16. Inward leakage variability between respirator fit test panels - Part II. Probabilistic approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuewei; Zhuang, Ziqing; Coffey, Christopher C; Rengasamy, Samy; Niezgoda, George

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to quantify the variability between different anthropometric panels in determining the inward leakage (IL) of N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) and elastomeric half-mask respirators (EHRs). We enrolled 144 experienced and non-experienced users as subjects in this study. Each subject was assigned five randomly selected FFRs and five EHRs, and performed quantitative fit tests to measure IL. Based on the NIOSH bivariate fit test panel, we randomly sampled 10,000 pairs of anthropometric 35 and 25 member panels without replacement from the 144 study subjects. For each pair of the sampled panels, a Chi-Square test was used to test the hypothesis that the passing rates for the two panels were not different. The probability of passing the IL test for each respirator was also determined from the 20,000 panels and by using binomial calculation. We also randomly sampled 500,000 panels with replacement to estimate the coefficient of variation (CV) for inter-panel variability. For both 35 and 25 member panels, the probability that passing rates were not significantly different between two randomly sampled pairs of panels was higher than 95% for all respirators. All efficient (passing rate ≥80%) and inefficient (passing rate ≤60%) respirators yielded consistent results (probability >90%) for two randomly sampled panels. Somewhat efficient respirators (passing rate between 60% and 80%) yielded inconsistent results. The passing probabilities and error rates were found to be significantly different between the simulation and binomial calculation. The CV for the 35-member panel was 16.7%, which was slightly lower than that for the 25-member panel (19.8%). Our results suggested that IL inter-panel variability exists, but is relatively small. The variability may be affected by passing level and passing rate. Facial dimension-based fit test panel stratification was also found to have significant impact on inter-panel variability, i.e., it can reduce alpha

  17. A unified approach for a posteriori high-order curved mesh generation using solid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poya, Roman; Sevilla, Ruben; Gil, Antonio J.

    2016-06-01

    The paper presents a unified approach for the a posteriori generation of arbitrary high-order curvilinear meshes via a solid mechanics analogy. The approach encompasses a variety of methodologies, ranging from the popular incremental linear elastic approach to very sophisticated non-linear elasticity. In addition, an intermediate consistent incrementally linearised approach is also presented and applied for the first time in this context. Utilising a consistent derivation from energy principles, a theoretical comparison of the various approaches is presented which enables a detailed discussion regarding the material characterisation (calibration) employed for the different solid mechanics formulations. Five independent quality measures are proposed and their relations with existing quality indicators, used in the context of a posteriori mesh generation, are discussed. Finally, a comprehensive range of numerical examples, both in two and three dimensions, including challenging geometries of interest to the solids, fluids and electromagnetics communities, are shown in order to illustrate and thoroughly compare the performance of the different methodologies. This comparison considers the influence of material parameters and number of load increments on the quality of the generated high-order mesh, overall computational cost and, crucially, the approximation properties of the resulting mesh when considering an isoparametric finite element formulation.

  18. A unified approach for a posteriori high-order curved mesh generation using solid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poya, Roman; Sevilla, Ruben; Gil, Antonio J.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents a unified approach for the a posteriori generation of arbitrary high-order curvilinear meshes via a solid mechanics analogy. The approach encompasses a variety of methodologies, ranging from the popular incremental linear elastic approach to very sophisticated non-linear elasticity. In addition, an intermediate consistent incrementally linearised approach is also presented and applied for the first time in this context. Utilising a consistent derivation from energy principles, a theoretical comparison of the various approaches is presented which enables a detailed discussion regarding the material characterisation (calibration) employed for the different solid mechanics formulations. Five independent quality measures are proposed and their relations with existing quality indicators, used in the context of a posteriori mesh generation, are discussed. Finally, a comprehensive range of numerical examples, both in two and three dimensions, including challenging geometries of interest to the solids, fluids and electromagnetics communities, are shown in order to illustrate and thoroughly compare the performance of the different methodologies. This comparison considers the influence of material parameters and number of load increments on the quality of the generated high-order mesh, overall computational cost and, crucially, the approximation properties of the resulting mesh when considering an isoparametric finite element formulation.

  19. Permutation invariant polynomial neural network approach to fitting potential energy surfaces. II. Four-atom systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2013-11-01

    A rigorous, general, and simple method to fit global and permutation invariant potential energy surfaces (PESs) using neural networks (NNs) is discussed. This so-called permutation invariant polynomial neural network (PIP-NN) method imposes permutation symmetry by using in its input a set of symmetry functions based on PIPs. For systems with more than three atoms, it is shown that the number of symmetry functions in the input vector needs to be larger than the number of internal coordinates in order to include both the primary and secondary invariant polynomials. This PIP-NN method is successfully demonstrated in three atom-triatomic reactive systems, resulting in full-dimensional global PESs with average errors on the order of meV. These PESs are used in full-dimensional quantum dynamical calculations.

  20. Permutation invariant polynomial neural network approach to fitting potential energy surfaces. II. Four-atom systems

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jun; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua

    2013-11-28

    A rigorous, general, and simple method to fit global and permutation invariant potential energy surfaces (PESs) using neural networks (NNs) is discussed. This so-called permutation invariant polynomial neural network (PIP-NN) method imposes permutation symmetry by using in its input a set of symmetry functions based on PIPs. For systems with more than three atoms, it is shown that the number of symmetry functions in the input vector needs to be larger than the number of internal coordinates in order to include both the primary and secondary invariant polynomials. This PIP-NN method is successfully demonstrated in three atom-triatomic reactive systems, resulting in full-dimensional global PESs with average errors on the order of meV. These PESs are used in full-dimensional quantum dynamical calculations.

  1. AGNfitter: SED-fitting code for AGN and galaxies from a MCMC approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calistro Rivera, Gabriela; Lusso, Elisabeta; Hennawi, Joseph F.; Hogg, David W.

    2016-07-01

    AGNfitter is a fully Bayesian MCMC method to fit the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and galaxies from the sub-mm to the UV; it enables robust disentanglement of the physical processes responsible for the emission of sources. Written in Python, AGNfitter makes use of a large library of theoretical, empirical, and semi-empirical models to characterize both the nuclear and host galaxy emission simultaneously. The model consists of four physical emission components: an accretion disk, a torus of AGN heated dust, stellar populations, and cold dust in star forming regions. AGNfitter determines the posterior distributions of numerous parameters that govern the physics of AGN with a fully Bayesian treatment of errors and parameter degeneracies, allowing one to infer integrated luminosities, dust attenuation parameters, stellar masses, and star formation rates.

  2. A-Track: A New Approach for Detection of Moving Objects in FITS Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kılıç, Yücel; Karapınar, Nurdan; Atay, Tolga; Kaplan, Murat

    2016-07-01

    Small planet and asteroid observations are important for understanding the origin and evolution of the Solar System. In this work, we have developed a fast and robust pipeline, called A-Track, for detecting asteroids and comets in sequential telescope images. The moving objects are detected using a modified line detection algorithm, called ILDA. We have coded the pipeline in Python 3, where we have made use of various scientific modules in Python to process the FITS images. We tested the code on photometrical data taken by an SI-1100 CCD with a 1-meter telescope at TUBITAK National Observatory, Antalya. The pipeline can be used to analyze large data archives or daily sequential data. The code is hosted on GitHub under the GNU GPL v3 license.

  3. Fusion of hyperspatial imagery and LiDAR waveform at the object level for land cover classification using curve matching approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yuhong

    Light detection and ranging (LiDAR) waveform data have been increasingly available for performing land cover classification. To utilize waveforms, numerous studies have focused on either discretizing waveforms into multiple returns or extracting metrics from waveforms to characterize their shapes. The direct use of the waveform curve itself, which contains more comprehensive and accurate information on the vertical structure of ground features, has been scarcely investigated. The first objective of this study was to utilize the complete waveform curve directly to differentiate among objects having distinct vertical structures using different curve matching approaches. Six curve matching approaches were developed, including curve root sum squared differential area (CRSSDA), curve angle mapper (CAM), Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) distance, Kullback-Leibler (KL) divergence, cumulative curve root sum squared differential area (CRSSDA), and cumulative curve angle mapper (CCAM) to quantify the similarity between two full-waveforms. To evaluate the performances of curve matching approaches, a widely adopted metrics-based method was also implemented. The second objective of this study was to further incorporate spectral information from hyperspatial resolution imagery with waveform from LiDAR at the object level to achieve a more detailed land cover classification using the same curve matching approaches. To fuse LiDAR waveform and image objects, object-level pseudo-waveforms were first synthesized using discrete-return LiDAR data and then fused with the object-level spectral histograms from hyperspatial resolution WorldView-2 imagery to classify image objects using one of the curve matching approaches. Results showed that the use of the full-waveform curve to discriminate between objects with distinct vertical structures over level terrain provided an alternative to existing metrics-based methods using a limited number of parameters derived from the waveforms. By taking the

  4. First experiences with the direct anterior approach in lateral decubitus position: learning curve and 1 year complication rate.

    PubMed

    Melman, Wietse P R; Mollen, Bas P; Kollen, Boudewijn J; Verheyen, Cees C P M

    2015-01-01

    The direct anterior approach (DAA) in supine position for hip arthroplasty has been reported to suffer from high complication rates initially. The DAA with the patient in lateral decubitus position is believed to provide better visibility and especially femoral accessibility with potential fewer complications.The first cohort of total hip prostheses, which were implanted by a single surgeon using DAA in lateral decubitus position more than 1 year ago, was analysed retrospectively.In total 182 hip prostheses (172 patients) were analysed. Three consecutive time periods based on equal number of surgical procedures were compared. The technical complication rate and operating time improved significantly between the 3 consecutive groups. The 1 year infection rate was 0.5% and survival rate of 98.9%.This is the first series of patients that were subjected to a hip replacement based on the direct anterior approach in a lateral decubitus position in which decreasing complication rates suggest the presence of a learning curve in surgeons conducting this type of surgery. Initial complication rate was high but decreased significantly in time and was acceptable certainly in the third group of our cohort. An unacceptable complication rate with the straight uncemented stem forced us to discontinue this configuration after only 7 surgical procedures. Complication, infection and revision rates were acceptable for the all cemented hip replacements using a curved anatomical stem. PMID:25684251

  5. Industry-Cost-Curve Approach for Modeling the Environmental Impact of Introducing New Technologies in Life Cycle Assessment.

    PubMed

    Kätelhön, Arne; von der Assen, Niklas; Suh, Sangwon; Jung, Johannes; Bardow, André

    2015-07-01

    The environmental costs and benefits of introducing a new technology depend not only on the technology itself, but also on the responses of the market where substitution or displacement of competing technologies may occur. An internationally accepted method taking both technological and market-mediated effects into account, however, is still lacking in life cycle assessment (LCA). For the introduction of a new technology, we here present a new approach for modeling the environmental impacts within the framework of LCA. Our approach is motivated by consequential life cycle assessment (CLCA) and aims to contribute to the discussion on how to operationalize consequential thinking in LCA practice. In our approach, we focus on new technologies producing homogeneous products such as chemicals or raw materials. We employ the industry cost-curve (ICC) for modeling market-mediated effects. Thereby, we can determine substitution effects at a level of granularity sufficient to distinguish between competing technologies. In our approach, a new technology alters the ICC potentially replacing the highest-cost producer(s). The technologies that remain competitive after the new technology's introduction determine the new environmental impact profile of the product. We apply our approach in a case study on a new technology for chlor-alkali electrolysis to be introduced in Germany. PMID:26061620

  6. Inward Leakage Variability between Respirator Fit Test Panels - Part I. Deterministic Approach.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Ziqing; Liu, Yuewei; Coffey, Christopher C; Miller, Colleen; Szalajda, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Inter-panel variability has never been investigated. The objective of this study was to determine the variability between different anthropometric panels used to determine the inward leakage (IL) of N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) and elastomeric half-mask respirators (EHRs). A total of 144 subjects, who were both experienced and non-experienced N95 FFR users, were recruited. Five N95 FFRs and five N95 EHRs were randomly selected from among those models tested previously in our laboratory. The PortaCount Pro+ (without N95-Companion) was used to measure IL of the ambient particles with a detectable size range of 0.02 to 1 μm. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration standard fit test exercises were used for this study. IL test were performed for each subject using each of the 10 respirators. Each respirator/subject combination was tested in duplicate, resulting in a total 20 IL tests for each subject. Three 35-member panels were randomly selected without replacement from the 144 study subjects stratified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health bivariate panel cell for conducting statistical analyses. The geometric mean (GM) IL values for all 10 studied respirators were not significantly different among the three randomly selected 35-member panels. Passing rate was not significantly different among the three panels for all respirators combined or by each model. This was true for all IL pass/fail levels of 1%, 2%, and 5%. Using 26 or more subjects to pass the IL test, all three panels had consistent passing/failing results for pass/fail levels of 1% and 5%. Some disagreement was observed for the 2% pass/fail level. Inter-panel variability exists, but it is small relative to the other sources of variation in fit testing data. The concern about inter-panel variability and other types of variability can be alleviated by properly selecting: pass/fail level (IL 1-5%); panel size (e.g., 25 or 35); and minimum number of subjects

  7. Inward Leakage Variability between Respirator Fit Test Panels – Part I. Deterministic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Ziqing; Liu, Yuewei; Coffey, Christopher C.; Miller, Colleen; Szalajda, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Inter-panel variability has never been investigated. The objective of this study was to determine the variability between different anthropometric panels used to determine the inward leakage (IL) of N95 filtering facepiece respirators (FFRs) and elastomeric half-mask respirators (EHRs). A total of 144 subjects, who were both experienced and non-experienced N95 FFR users, were recruited. Five N95 FFRs and five N95 EHRs were randomly selected from among those models tested previously in our laboratory. The PortaCount Pro+ (without N95-Companion) was used to measure IL of the ambient particles with a detectable size range of 0.02 to 1 μm. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration standard fit test exercises were used for this study. IL test were performed for each subject using each of the 10 respirators. Each respirator/subject combination was tested in duplicate, resulting in a total 20 IL tests for each subject. Three 35-member panels were randomly selected without replacement from the 144 study subjects stratified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health bivariate panel cell for conducting statistical analyses. The geometric mean (GM) IL values for all 10 studied respirators were not significantly different among the three randomly selected 35-member panels. Passing rate was not significantly different among the three panels for all respirators combined or by each model. This was true for all IL pass/fail levels of 1%, 2%, and 5%. Using 26 or more subjects to pass the IL test, all three panels had consistent passing/failing results for pass/fail levels of 1% and 5%. Some disagreement was observed for the 2% pass/fail level. Inter-panel variability exists, but it is small relative to the other sources of variation in fit testing data. The concern about inter-panel variability and other types of variability can be alleviated by properly selecting: pass/fail level (IL 1–5%); panel size (e.g., 25 or 35); and minimum number of subjects

  8. Electrically detected magnetic resonance modeling and fitting: An equivalent circuit approach

    SciTech Connect

    Leite, D. M. G.; Batagin-Neto, A.; Nunes-Neto, O.; Gómez, J. A.; Graeff, C. F. O.

    2014-01-21

    The physics of electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) quadrature spectra is investigated. An equivalent circuit model is proposed in order to retrieve crucial information in a variety of different situations. This model allows the discrimination and determination of spectroscopic parameters associated to distinct resonant spin lines responsible for the total signal. The model considers not just the electrical response of the sample but also features of the measuring circuit and their influence on the resulting spectral lines. As a consequence, from our model, it is possible to separate different regimes, which depend basically on the modulation frequency and the RC constant of the circuit. In what is called the high frequency regime, it is shown that the sign of the signal can be determined. Recent EDMR spectra from Alq{sub 3} based organic light emitting diodes, as well as from a-Si:H reported in the literature, were successfully fitted by the model. Accurate values of g-factor and linewidth of the resonant lines were obtained.

  9. Imprecision Medicine: A One-Size-Fits-Many Approach for Muscle Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Breitbart, Astrid; Murry, Charles E

    2016-04-01

    There is still no curative treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Young et al. (2016) demonstrate a genome editing approach applicable to 60% of DMD patients with CRISPR/Cas9 using one pair of guide RNAs. PMID:27058929

  10. Differences in Adolescent Physical Fitness: A Multivariate Approach and Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Schutte, Nienke M; Nederend, Ineke; Hudziak, James J; de Geus, Eco J C; Bartels, Meike

    2016-03-01

    Physical fitness can be defined as a set of components that determine exercise ability and influence performance in sports. This study investigates the genetic and environmental influences on individual differences in explosive leg strength (vertical jump), handgrip strength, balance, and flexibility (sit-and-reach) in 227 healthy monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs and 38 of their singleton siblings (mean age 17.2 ± 1.2). Heritability estimates were 49 % (95 % CI 35-60 %) for vertical jump, 59 % (95 % CI 46-69 %) for handgrip strength, 38 % (95 % CI 22-52 %) for balance, and 77 % (95 % CI 69-83 %) for flexibility. In addition, a meta-analysis was performed on all twin studies in children, adolescents and young adults reporting heritability estimates for these phenotypes. Fifteen studies, including results from our own study, were meta-analyzed by computing the weighted average heritability. This showed that genetic factors explained most of the variance in vertical jump (62 %; 95 % CI 47-77 %, N = 874), handgrip strength (63 %; 95 % CI 47-73 %, N = 4516) and flexibility (50 %; 95 % CI 38-61 %, N = 1130) in children and young adults. For balance this was 35 % (95 % CI 19-51 %, N = 978). Finally, multivariate modeling showed that the phenotypic correlations between the phenotypes in current study (0.07 < r < 0.27) were mostly driven by genetic factors. It is concluded that genetic factors contribute significantly to the variance in muscle strength, flexibility and balance; factors that may play a key role in the individual differences in adolescent exercise ability and sports performance. PMID:26481792

  11. In Search of Golden Rules: Comment on Hypothesis-Testing Approaches to Setting Cutoff Values for Fit Indexes and Dangers in Overgeneralizing Hu and Bentler's (1999) Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Herbert W.; Hau, Kit-Tai; Wen, Zhonglin

    2004-01-01

    Goodness-of-fit (GOF) indexes provide "rules of thumb"?recommended cutoff values for assessing fit in structural equation modeling. Hu and Bentler (1999) proposed a more rigorous approach to evaluating decision rules based on GOF indexes and, on this basis, proposed new and more stringent cutoff values for many indexes. This article discusses…

  12. Learning curve approach to projecting cost and performance for photovoltaic technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, George D.; Tiedje, Thomas

    1997-10-01

    The current cost of electricity generated by PV power is still extremely high with respect to power supplied by the utility grid, and there remain questions as to whether PV power can ever be competitive with electricity generated by fossil fuels. An objective approach to this important question was given in a previous paper by the authors which introduced analytical tools to define and project the technical/economic status of PV power from 1988 through the year 2010. In this paper, we apply these same tools to update the conclusions of our earlier study in the context of recent announcements by Amoco/Enron-Solar of projected sales of PV power at rates significantly less than the U.S. utility average.

  13. A learning curve approach to projecting cost and performance for photovoltaic technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cody, George D.; Tiedje, Thomas

    1997-04-01

    The current cost of electricity generated by PV power is still extremely high with respect to power supplied by the utility grid, and there remain questions as to whether PV power can ever be competitive with electricity generated by fossil fuels. An objective approach to this important question was given in a previous paper by the authors which introduced analytical tools to define and project the technical/economic status of PV power from 1988 through the year 2010. In this paper, we apply these same tools to update the conclusions of our earlier study in the context of recent announcements by Amoco/Enron-Solarex of projected sales of PV power at rates significantly less than the US utility average.

  14. Ecosystems Biology Approaches To Determine Key Fitness Traits of Soil Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodie, E.; Zhalnina, K.; Karaoz, U.; Cho, H.; Nuccio, E. E.; Shi, S.; Lipton, M. S.; Zhou, J.; Pett-Ridge, J.; Northen, T.; Firestone, M.

    2014-12-01

    The application of theoretical approaches such as trait-based modeling represent powerful tools to explain and perhaps predict complex patterns in microbial distribution and function across environmental gradients in space and time. These models are mostly deterministic and where available are built upon a detailed understanding of microbial physiology and response to environmental factors. However as most soil microorganisms have not been cultivated, for the majority our understanding is limited to insights from environmental 'omic information. Information gleaned from 'omic studies of complex systems should be regarded as providing hypotheses, and these hypotheses should be tested under controlled laboratory conditions if they are to be propagated into deterministic models. In a semi-arid Mediterranean grassland system we are attempting to dissect microbial communities into functional guilds with defined physiological traits and are using a range of 'omics approaches to characterize their metabolic potential and niche preference. Initially, two physiologically relevant time points (peak plant activity and prior to wet-up) were sampled and metagenomes sequenced deeply (600-900 Gbp). Following assembly, differential coverage and nucleotide frequency binning were carried out to yield draft genomes. In addition, using a range of cultivation media we have isolated a broad range of bacteria representing abundant bacterial genotypes and with genome sequences of almost 40 isolates are testing genomic predictions regarding growth rate, temperature and substrate utilization in vitro. This presentation will discuss the opportunities and challenges in parameterizing microbial functional guilds from environmental 'omic information for use in trait-based models.

  15. Short- and Mid-Term Effects of Violent Victimization on Delinquency: A Multilevel Growth-Curve Modeling Approach.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young S; Lo, Celia C

    2016-10-01

    The present study investigates how adolescents' experiences of violent victimization exert short- and mid-term effects on their involvement in delinquency. The study compares and contrasts delinquency trajectories of youths whose experiences of violent victimization differ. A multilevel growth-curve modeling approach is applied to analyze data from five waves of the National Youth Survey. The results show that, although delinquency involvement increases as youths experience violent victimization, delinquency trajectories differ with the type of violent victimization, specifically, parental versus non-parental victimization. Violent victimization by parents produced a sharp initial decline in delinquency (short-term effect) followed by a rapid acceleration (mid-term effect). In turn, non-parental violence showed a stable trend over time. The findings have important implications for prevention and treatment services. PMID:25888502

  16. A Comparison of Two-Stage Approaches for Fitting Nonlinear Ordinary Differential Equation Models with Mixed Effects.

    PubMed

    Chow, Sy-Miin; Bendezú, Jason J; Cole, Pamela M; Ram, Nilam

    2016-01-01

    Several approaches exist for estimating the derivatives of observed data for model exploration purposes, including functional data analysis (FDA; Ramsay & Silverman, 2005 ), generalized local linear approximation (GLLA; Boker, Deboeck, Edler, & Peel, 2010 ), and generalized orthogonal local derivative approximation (GOLD; Deboeck, 2010 ). These derivative estimation procedures can be used in a two-stage process to fit mixed effects ordinary differential equation (ODE) models. While the performance and utility of these routines for estimating linear ODEs have been established, they have not yet been evaluated in the context of nonlinear ODEs with mixed effects. We compared properties of the GLLA and GOLD to an FDA-based two-stage approach denoted herein as functional ordinary differential equation with mixed effects (FODEmixed) in a Monte Carlo (MC) study using a nonlinear coupled oscillators model with mixed effects. Simulation results showed that overall, the FODEmixed outperformed both the GLLA and GOLD across all the embedding dimensions considered, but a novel use of a fourth-order GLLA approach combined with very high embedding dimensions yielded estimation results that almost paralleled those from the FODEmixed. We discuss the strengths and limitations of each approach and demonstrate how output from each stage of FODEmixed may be used to inform empirical modeling of young children's self-regulation. PMID:27391255

  17. Urinary biomarkers of smokers’ exposure to tobacco smoke constituents in tobacco products assessment: a fit for purpose approach

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Evan O.; Minet, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    There are established guidelines for bioanalytical assay validation and qualification of biomarkers. In this review, they were applied to a panel of urinary biomarkers of tobacco smoke exposure as part of a “fit for purpose” approach to the assessment of smoke constituents exposure in groups of tobacco product smokers. Clinical studies have allowed the identification of a group of tobacco exposure biomarkers demonstrating a good doseresponse relationship whilst others such as dihydroxybutyl mercapturic acid and 2-carboxy-1-methylethylmercapturic acid – did not reproducibly discriminate smokers and non-smokers. Furthermore, there are currently no agreed common reference standards to measure absolute concentrations and few inter-laboratory trials have been performed to establish consensus values for interim standards. Thus, we also discuss in this review additional requirements for the generation of robust data on urinary biomarkers, including toxicant metabolism and disposition, method validation and qualification for use in tobacco products comparison studies. PMID:23902266

  18. Band analysis by spectral curve fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. L.; Shaw, J. H.; Calvert, J. G.

    1980-01-01

    A method of estimating the values of the parameters in the models describing the positions, widths, and intensities of the lines in rotation-vibration bands of gases, without the need for line by line analysis, is described. To illustrate the technique, portions of the 1-0 bands of HCl and CO have been analyzed. The values of up to 27 parameters, their standard deviations, and the correlations between the parameters required to describe the spectra have been obtained.

  19. A policy-driven multifaceted approach for early childhood physical fitness promotion: impacts on body composition and physical fitness in young Chinese children

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of obesity increased while certain measures of physical fitness deteriorated in preschool children in China over the past decade. This study tested the effectiveness of a multifaceted intervention that integrated childcare center, families, and community to promote healthy growth and physical fitness in preschool Chinese children. Methods This 12-month study was conducted using a quasi-experimental pretest/posttest design with comparison group. The participants were 357 children (mean age = 4.5 year) enrolled in three grade levels in two childcare centers in Beijing, China. The intervention included: 1) childcare center intervention (physical activity policy changes, teacher training, physical education curriculum and food services training), 2) family intervention (parent education, internet website for support, and family events), and 3) community intervention (playground renovation and community health promotion events). The study outcome measures included body composition (percent body fat, fat mass, and muscle mass), Body Mass Index (BMI) and BMI z-score and physical fitness scores in 20-meter agility run (20M-AR), broad jump for distance (BJ), timed 10-jumps, tennis ball throwing (TBT), sit and reach (SR), balance beam walk (BBW), 20-meter crawl (20M-C)), 30-meter sprint (30M-S)) from a norm referenced test. Measures of process evaluation included monitoring of children’s physical activity (activity time and intensity) and food preparation records, and fidelity of intervention protocol implementation. Results Children in the intervention center significantly lowered their body fat percent (−1.2%, p < 0.0001), fat mass (−0.55 kg, p <0.0001), and body weight (0.36 kg, p <0.02) and increased muscle mass (0.48 kg, p <0.0001), compared to children in the control center. They also improved all measures of physical fitness except timed 10-jumps (20M-AR: −0.74 seconds, p < 0.0001; BJ: 8.09 cm, p < 0.0001; TBT: 0

  20. Detection of quasi-periodic processes in repeated measurements: New approach for the fitting and clusterization of different data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigmatullin, R.; Rakhmatullin, R.

    2014-12-01

    yields the description of the identified QP process. To suggest some computing algorithm for fitting of the QP data to the analytical function that follows from the solution of the corresponding functional equation. The content of this paper is organized as follows. In the Section 2 we will try to find the answers on the problem posed in this introductory section. It contains also the mathematical description of the QP process and interpretation of the meaning of the generalized Prony's spectrum (GPS). The GPS includes the conventional Fourier decomposition as a partial case. Section 3 contains the experimental details associated with receiving of the desired data. Section 4 includes some important details explaining specific features of application of general algorithm to concrete data. In Section 5 we summarize the results and outline the perspectives of this approach for quantitative description of time-dependent random data that are registered in different complex systems and experimental devices. Here we should notice that under the complex system we imply a system when a conventional model is absent[6]. Under simplicity of the acceptable model we imply the proper hypothesis ("best fit" model) containing minimal number of the fitting parameters that describes the behavior of the system considered quantitatively. The different approaches that exist in nowadays for description of these systems are collected in the recent review [7].

  1. Modified One-piece Supraorbital Approach for Orbital Tumors: Widely Preserved Orbital Roof in a Self-fitting Flap.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Satoru; Osawa, Shigeyuki; Sekiguchi, Tomoko; Mochizuki, Takahiro; Oka, Hidehiro; Kumabe, Toshihiro

    2015-12-01

    Objectives The one-piece supraorbital approach is a rational approach for the removal of orbital tumors. However, cutting the roof through the orbit is often difficult. We modified the technique to facilitate the osteotomy and improve the cosmetic effect. Design Three burr holes are made: the first, the MacCarty keyhole (burr hole 1), exposes the anterior cranial fossa and orbit; the second is placed above the supraorbital nerve (burr hole 2); and the third on the superior temporal line. Through burr hole 2, a small hole is created on the roof, 10 mm in depth. Next the roof is rongeured through burr hole 1 toward the preexisting small hole. Seamless osteotomies using a diamond-coated threadwire saw and the preexisting four holes are performed. Lastly the flap is removed. On closure, sutures are passed through holes in the cuts made with the threadwire saw, and tied. Results We applied our technique to address orbital tumors in two adult patients. The osteotomies in the roof were easy, and most parts of the roof were repositioned. Conclusions Our modification results in orbital osteotomies with greater preservation of the roof. Because the self-fitting flap does not require the use of fixation devices, the reconstruction is cosmetically satisfactory. PMID:26682124

  2. Little Italy: An Agent-Based Approach to the Estimation of Contact Patterns- Fitting Predicted Matrices to Serological Data

    PubMed Central

    Iozzi, Fabrizio; Trusiano, Francesco; Chinazzi, Matteo; Billari, Francesco C.; Zagheni, Emilio; Merler, Stefano; Ajelli, Marco; Del Fava, Emanuele; Manfredi, Piero

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of social contact patterns still represents the most critical step for understanding the spread of directly transmitted infections. Data on social contact patterns are, however, expensive to obtain. A major issue is then whether the simulation of synthetic societies might be helpful to reliably reconstruct such data. In this paper, we compute a variety of synthetic age-specific contact matrices through simulation of a simple individual-based model (IBM). The model is informed by Italian Time Use data and routine socio-demographic data (e.g., school and workplace attendance, household structure, etc.). The model is named “Little Italy” because each artificial agent is a clone of a real person. In other words, each agent's daily diary is the one observed in a corresponding real individual sampled in the Italian Time Use Survey. We also generated contact matrices from the socio-demographic model underlying the Italian IBM for pandemic prediction. These synthetic matrices are then validated against recently collected Italian serological data for Varicella (VZV) and ParvoVirus (B19). Their performance in fitting sero-profiles are compared with other matrices available for Italy, such as the Polymod matrix. Synthetic matrices show the same qualitative features of the ones estimated from sample surveys: for example, strong assortativeness and the presence of super- and sub-diagonal stripes related to contacts between parents and children. Once validated against serological data, Little Italy matrices fit worse than the Polymod one for VZV, but better than concurrent matrices for B19. This is the first occasion where synthetic contact matrices are systematically compared with real ones, and validated against epidemiological data. The results suggest that simple, carefully designed, synthetic matrices can provide a fruitful complementary approach to questionnaire-based matrices. The paper also supports the idea that, depending on the transmissibility level of

  3. A physical approach of vulnerability mapping in karst area based on a new interpretation of tracer breakthrough curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailly-Comte, V.; Pistre, S.

    2011-12-01

    Strategies for groundwater protection mostly use vulnerability maps to contamination; therefore, a lot of methods have been developed since the 90's with a particular attention to operational techniques. These easy-to-use methods are based on the superposition of relative rating systems applied to critical hydrogeological factors; their major drawback is the subjectivity of the determination of the rating scale and the weighting coefficients. Thus, in addition to vulnerability mapping, empirical results given by tracer tests are often needed to better assess groundwater vulnerability to accidental contamination in complex hydrosystems such as karst aquifers. This means that a lot of data about tracer breakthrough curves (BTC) in karst area are now available for hydrologists. In this context, we propose a physical approach to spatially distributed simulation of tracer BTC based on macrodispersive transport in 1D. A new interpretation of tracer tests performed in various media is shown as a validation of our theoretical development. The vulnerability map is then given by the properties of the simulated tracer BTC (modal time, mean residence time, duration over a given concentration threshold etc.). In this way, our method expresses the vulnerability with units, which makes it possible the comparison from one system to another. In addition, previous or new tracer tests can be used as a validation of the map for the same hydrological conditions. Even if this methodology is not limited to karsts hydrosystems, this seems particularly suitable for these complex environments for which understanding the origin of accidental contamination is crucial.

  4. Improving the reliability of POD curves in NDI methods using a Bayesian inversion approach for uncertainty quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Abdessalem, A.; Jenson, F.; Calmon, P.

    2016-02-01

    This contribution provides an example of the possible advantages of adopting a Bayesian inversion approach to uncertainty quantification in nondestructive inspection methods. In such problem, the uncertainty associated to the random parameters is not always known and needs to be characterised from scattering signal measurements. The uncertainties may then correctly propagated in order to determine a reliable probability of detection curve. To this end, we establish a general Bayesian framework based on a non-parametric maximum likelihood function formulation and some priors from expert knowledge. However, the presented inverse problem is time-consuming and computationally intensive. To cope with this difficulty, we replace the real model by a surrogate one in order to speed-up the model evaluation and to make the problem to be computationally feasible for implementation. The least squares support vector regression is adopted as metamodelling technique due to its robustness to deal with non-linear problems. We illustrate the usefulness of this methodology through the control of tube with enclosed defect using ultrasonic inspection method.

  5. On the convexity of ROC curves estimated from radiological test results

    PubMed Central

    Pesce, Lorenzo L.; Metz, Charles E.; Berbaum, Kevin S.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Although an ideal observer’s receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve must be convex — i.e., its slope must decrease monotonically — published fits to empirical data often display “hooks.” Such fits sometimes are accepted on the basis of an argument that experiments are done with real, rather than ideal, observers. However, the fact that ideal observers must produce convex curves does not imply that convex curves describe only ideal observers. This paper aims to identify the practical implications of non-convex ROC curves and the conditions that can lead to empirical and/or fitted ROC curves that are not convex. Materials and Methods This paper views non-convex ROC curves from historical, theoretical and statistical perspectives, which we describe briefly. We then consider population ROC curves with various shapes and analyze the types of medical decisions that they imply. Finally, we describe how sampling variability and curve-fitting algorithms can produce ROC curve estimates that include hooks. Results We show that hooks in population ROC curves imply the use of an irrational decision strategy, even when the curve doesn’t cross the chance line, and therefore usually are untenable in medical settings. Moreover, we sketch a simple approach to improve any non-convex ROC curve by adding statistical variation to the decision process. Finally, we sketch how to test whether hooks present in ROC data are likely to have been caused by chance alone and how some hooked ROCs found in the literature can be easily explained as fitting artifacts or modeling issues. Conclusion In general, ROC curve fits that show hooks should be looked upon with suspicion unless other arguments justify their presence. PMID:20599155

  6. The direct fitting approach for total ozone column retrievals: a sensitivity study on GOME-2/MetOp-A measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassmann, A.; Borsdorff, T.; aan de Brugh, J. M. J.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Aben, I.; Landgraf, J.

    2015-10-01

    We present a sensitivity study of the direct fitting approach to retrieve total ozone columns from the clear sky Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2/MetOp-A (GOME-2/MetOp-A) measurements between 325 and 335 nm in the period 2007-2010. The direct fitting of the measurement is based on adjusting the scaling of a reference ozone profile and requires accurate simulation of GOME-2 radiances. In this context, we study the effect of three aspects that introduce forward model errors if not addressed appropriately: (1) the use of a clear sky model atmosphere in the radiative transfer demanding cloud filtering, (2) different approximations of Earth's sphericity to address the influence of the solar zenith angle, and (3) the need of polarization in radiative transfer modeling. We conclude that cloud filtering using the operational GOME-2 FRESCO (Fast Retrieval Scheme for Clouds from the Oxygen A band) cloud product, which is part of level 1B data, and the use of pseudo-spherical scalar radiative transfer is fully sufficient for the purpose of this retrieval. A validation with ground-based measurements at 36 stations confirms this showing a global mean bias of -0.1 % with a standard deviation (SD) of 2.7 %. The regularization effect inherent to the profile scaling approach is thoroughly characterized by the total column averaging kernel for each individual retrieval. It characterizes the effect of the particular choice of the ozone profile to be scaled by the inversion and is part of the retrieval product. Two different interpretations of the data product are possible: first, regarding the retrieval product as an estimate of the true column, a direct comparison of the retrieved column with total ozone columns from ground-based measurements can be done. This requires accurate a priori knowledge of the reference ozone profile and the column averaging kernel is not needed. Alternatively, the retrieval product can be interpreted as an effective column defined by the total column

  7. Item Characteristic Curve Estimation of Signal Detection Theory-Based Personality Data: A Two-Stage Approach to Item Response Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Kevin M.; Zumbo, Bruno D.

    2003-01-01

    Developed an item characteristic curve estimation of signal detection theory based personality data. Results for 266 college students taking the Overclaiming Questionnaire (D. Paulhus and N. Bruce, 1990) suggest that this method is a reasonable approach to describing item functioning and that there are advantages to this method over traditional…

  8. Flight-test evaluation of STOL control and flight director concepts in a powered-lift aircraft flying curved decelerating approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindson, W. S.; Hardy, G. H.; Innis, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    Flight tests were carried out to assess the feasibility of piloted steep curved, and decelerating approach profiles in powered lift STOL aircraft. Several STOL control concepts representative of a variety of aircraft were evaluated in conjunction with suitably designed flight directions. The tests were carried out in a real navigation environment, employed special electronic cockpit displays, and included the development of the performance achieved and the control utilization involved in flying 180 deg turning, descending, and decelerating approach profiles to landing. The results suggest that such moderately complex piloted instrument approaches may indeed be feasible from a pilot acceptance point of view, given an acceptable navigation environment. Systems with the capability of those used in this experiment can provide the potential of achieving instrument operations on curved, descending, and decelerating landing approaches to weather minima corresponding to CTOL Category 2 criteria, while also providing a means of realizing more efficient operations during visual flight conditions.

  9. A regret theory approach to decision curve analysis: A novel method for eliciting decision makers' preferences and decision-making

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Decision curve analysis (DCA) has been proposed as an alternative method for evaluation of diagnostic tests, prediction models, and molecular markers. However, DCA is based on expected utility theory, which has been routinely violated by decision makers. Decision-making is governed by intuition (system 1), and analytical, deliberative process (system 2), thus, rational decision-making should reflect both formal principles of rationality and intuition about good decisions. We use the cognitive emotion of regret to serve as a link between systems 1 and 2 and to reformulate DCA. Methods First, we analysed a classic decision tree describing three decision alternatives: treat, do not treat, and treat or no treat based on a predictive model. We then computed the expected regret for each of these alternatives as the difference between the utility of the action taken and the utility of the action that, in retrospect, should have been taken. For any pair of strategies, we measure the difference in net expected regret. Finally, we employ the concept of acceptable regret to identify the circumstances under which a potentially wrong strategy is tolerable to a decision-maker. Results We developed a novel dual visual analog scale to describe the relationship between regret associated with "omissions" (e.g. failure to treat) vs. "commissions" (e.g. treating unnecessary) and decision maker's preferences as expressed in terms of threshold probability. We then proved that the Net Expected Regret Difference, first presented in this paper, is equivalent to net benefits as described in the original DCA. Based on the concept of acceptable regret we identified the circumstances under which a decision maker tolerates a potentially wrong decision and expressed it in terms of probability of disease. Conclusions We present a novel method for eliciting decision maker's preferences and an alternative derivation of DCA based on regret theory. Our approach may be intuitively more

  10. New approaches to measuring the performance of programs that generate differential diagnoses using ROC curves and other metrics.

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, H. S.; Naimi, S.; Long, W. J.

    2000-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Evaluation of computer programs which generate multiple diagnoses can be hampered by a lack of effective, well recognized performance metrics. We have developed a method to calculate mean sensitivity and specificity for multiple diagnoses and generate ROC curves. METHODS: Data came from a clinical evaluation of the Heart Disease Program (HDP). Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value (PPV, NPV) were calculated for each diagnosis type in the study. A weighted mean of overall sensitivity and specificity was derived and used to create an ROC curve. Alternative metrics Comprehensiveness and Relevance were calculated for each case and compared to the other measures. RESULTS: Weighted mean sensitivity closely matched Comprehensiveness and mean PPV matched Relevance. Plotting the Physician's sensitivity and specificity on the ROC curve showed that their discrimination was similar to the HDP but sensitivity was significantly lower. CONCLUSIONS: These metrics give a clear picture of a program's diagnostic performance and allow straightforward comparison between different programs and different studies. PMID:11079884

  11. Adaptive Strategies and Person-Environment Fit among Functionally Limited Older Adults Aging in Place: A Mixed Methods Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Laura L.; Steggell, Carmen D.; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Older adults prefer to age in place, necessitating a match between person and environment, or person-environment (P-E) fit. In occupational therapy practice, home modifications can support independence, but more knowledge is needed to optimize interventions targeting the housing situation of older adults. In response, this study aimed to explore the accessibility and usability of the home environment to further understand adaptive environmental behaviors. Mixed methods data were collected using objective and perceived indicators of P-E fit among 12 older adults living in community-dwelling housing. Quantitative data described objective P-E fit in terms of accessibility, while qualitative data explored perceived P-E fit in terms of usability. While accessibility problems were prevalent, participants’ perceptions of usability revealed a range of adaptive environmental behaviors employed to meet functional needs. A closer examination of the P-E interaction suggests that objective accessibility does not always stipulate perceived usability, which appears to be malleable with age, self-perception, and functional competency. Findings stress the importance of evaluating both objective and perceived indicators of P-E fit to provide housing interventions that support independence. Further exploration of adaptive processes in older age may serve to deepen our understanding of both P-E fit frameworks and theoretical models of aging well. PMID:26404352

  12. Adaptive Strategies and Person-Environment Fit among Functionally Limited Older Adults Aging in Place: A Mixed Methods Approach.

    PubMed

    Lien, Laura L; Steggell, Carmen D; Iwarsson, Susanne

    2015-09-01

    Older adults prefer to age in place, necessitating a match between person and environment, or person-environment (P-E) fit. In occupational therapy practice, home modifications can support independence, but more knowledge is needed to optimize interventions targeting the housing situation of older adults. In response, this study aimed to explore the accessibility and usability of the home environment to further understand adaptive environmental behaviors. Mixed methods data were collected using objective and perceived indicators of P-E fit among 12 older adults living in community-dwelling housing. Quantitative data described objective P-E fit in terms of accessibility, while qualitative data explored perceived P-E fit in terms of usability. While accessibility problems were prevalent, participants' perceptions of usability revealed a range of adaptive environmental behaviors employed to meet functional needs. A closer examination of the P-E interaction suggests that objective accessibility does not always stipulate perceived usability, which appears to be malleable with age, self-perception, and functional competency. Findings stress the importance of evaluating both objective and perceived indicators of P-E fit to provide housing interventions that support independence. Further exploration of adaptive processes in older age may serve to deepen our understanding of both P-E fit frameworks and theoretical models of aging well. PMID:26404352

  13. A trapezoid approach for the experimental total-to-peak efficiency curve used in the determination of true coincidence summing correction factors in a HPGe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahiner, Eren; Meriç, Niyazi

    2014-03-01

    In this work, a simple method for true coincidence correction is suggested for a voluminous source measured in close detection geometry for a HPGe detector. TrueCoinc program based on Sudár's algorithm was used to determine true coincidence summing correction (TCS) factors by using full energy peak (FEP) efficiency, and total-to-peak (TTP) efficiency curves in which experimental efficiencies are obtained from almost coincident-free radionuclides such as 54Mn, 57Co, 65Zn, 109Cd, 137Cs and 241Am. In order to calculate TTP efficiency curve three different approaches were tested. One of them is new and here called trapezoid approach which was used successfully in determining total count of spectrum for the TTP efficiency curves. According to different TTP determination methods, the changes in true coincidence factors are observed. The FEP efficiency curves are also established for a cylindrical source. Then, TCS factors were determined for the particular peaks of daughters of 226Ra, 238U, and 232Th using the suggested method. Those activities measured from some certified reference materials such as IAEA RGU-1 and RGTh-1 are used to validate the present TCS correction procedure.

  14. Tool For Making Curved Holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allard, Robert; Calve, Andrew; Pastreck, Edwin; Padden, Edward

    1992-01-01

    Tool for use in electrical-discharge machining (EDM) guides EDM electrode in making curved holes. Guide rod fits in slot in arm, which moves through arc. Motion drives electrode into workpiece along desired curved path. Electrode burns into workpiece while arm rotates on spindle. Discharge cuts hole of same radius of curvature.

  15. Identifying Longitudinal Growth Trajectories of Learning Domains in Problem-Based Learning: A Latent Growth Curve Modeling Approach Using SEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wimmers, Paul F.; Lee, Ming

    2015-01-01

    To determine the direction and extent to which medical student scores (as observed by small-group tutors) on four problem-based-learning-related domains change over nine consecutive blocks during a two-year period (Domains: Problem Solving/Use of Information/Group Process/Professionalism). Latent growth curve modeling is used to analyze…

  16. Probing exoplanet clouds with optical phase curves.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Antonio García; Isaak, Kate G

    2015-11-01

    Kepler-7b is to date the only exoplanet for which clouds have been inferred from the optical phase curve--from visible-wavelength whole-disk brightness measurements as a function of orbital phase. Added to this, the fact that the phase curve appears dominated by reflected starlight makes this close-in giant planet a unique study case. Here we investigate the information on coverage and optical properties of the planet clouds contained in the measured phase curve. We generate cloud maps of Kepler-7b and use a multiple-scattering approach to create synthetic phase curves, thus connecting postulated clouds with measurements. We show that optical phase curves can help constrain the composition and size of the cloud particles. Indeed, model fitting for Kepler-7b requires poorly absorbing particles that scatter with low-to-moderate anisotropic efficiency, conclusions consistent with condensates of silicates, perovskite, and silica of submicron radii. We also show that we are limited in our ability to pin down the extent and location of the clouds. These considerations are relevant to the interpretation of optical phase curves with general circulation models. Finally, we estimate that the spherical albedo of Kepler-7b over the Kepler passband is in the range 0.4-0.5. PMID:26489652

  17. Growth Curves of Preschool Children in the Northeast of Iran: A Population Based Study Using Quantile Regression Approach

    PubMed Central

    Payande, Abolfazl; Tabesh, Hamed; Shakeri, Mohammad Taghi; Saki, Azadeh; Safarian, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Growth charts are widely used to assess children’s growth status and can provide a trajectory of growth during early important months of life. The objectives of this study are going to construct growth charts and normal values of weight-for-age for children aged 0 to 5 years using a powerful and applicable methodology. The results compare with the World Health Organization (WHO) references and semi-parametric LMS method of Cole and Green. Methods: A total of 70737 apparently healthy boys and girls aged 0 to 5 years were recruited in July 2004 for 20 days from those attending community clinics for routine health checks as a part of a national survey. Anthropometric measurements were done by trained health staff using WHO methodology. The nonparametric quantile regression method obtained by local constant kernel estimation of conditional quantiles curves using for estimation of curves and normal values. Results: The weight-for-age growth curves for boys and girls aged from 0 to 5 years were derived utilizing a population of children living in the northeast of Iran. The results were similar to the ones obtained by the semi-parametric LMS method in the same data. Among all age groups from 0 to 5 years, the median values of children’s weight living in the northeast of Iran were lower than the corresponding values in WHO reference data. The weight curves of boys were higher than those of girls in all age groups. Conclusion: The differences between growth patterns of children living in the northeast of Iran versus international ones necessitate using local and regional growth charts. International normal values may not properly recognize the populations at risk for growth problems in Iranian children. Quantile regression (QR) as a flexible method which doesn’t require restricted assumptions, proposed for estimation reference curves and normal values. PMID:23618470

  18. A novel approach to fit testing the N95 respirator in real time in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Or, Peggy; Chung, Joanne; Wong, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    The instant measurements provided by the Portacount fit-test instrument have been used as the gold standard in predicting the protection of an N95 respirator in a laboratory environment. The conventional Portacount fit-test method, however, cannot deliver real-time measurements of face-seal leakage when the N95 respirator is in use in clinical settings. This research was divided into two stages. Stage 1 involved developing and validating a new quantitative fit-test method called the Personal Respiratory Sampling Test (PRST). In Stage 2, PRST was evaluated in use during nursing activities in clinical settings. Eighty-four participants were divided randomly into four groups and were tested while performing bedside nursing procedures. In Stage 1, a new PRST method was successfully devised and validated. Results of Stage 2 showed that the new PRST method could detect different concentrations and different particle sizes inside the respirator while the wearer performed different nursing activities. This new fit-test method, PRST, can detect face seal leakage of an N95 respirator being worn while the wearer performs clinical activities. Thus, PRST can help ensure that the N95 respirator actually fulfils its function of protecting health-care workers from airborne pathogens. PMID:24828795

  19. Approach for selecting boundary value to retrieve Mie-scattering lidar data based on segmentation and two-component fitting methods.

    PubMed

    Mao, Feiyue; Wang, Wei; Min, Qilong; Gong, Wei

    2015-06-01

    Fernald method is regarded as the standard method for retrieving lidar data, but the retrieval can be performed only when a boundary value is given. Generally, we can select clear atmosphere above the tropopause as a reference to determine the boundary value, but we need to use the slope method to fit the boundary value when the detecting range is lower than the tropopause. The slope method involves significant uncertainty because this algorithm is based on two hypotheses: one is that aerosol vertical distribution is homogeneous, and the other is that either molecule or aerosol components exist in the atmosphere. To reduce the uncertainty, we proposed a new approach, which segments a signal into "uniform" sub-signals to avoid the first hypothesis, and then uses nonlinear two-component fitting to avoid the second one. Compared with the approach based on the slope method, the new approach obtained more accurate boundary values and retrieving results for both of the simulated and real signals. Thus the automatic segmentation algorithm and the two-component fitting method are useful for determining the reference bin and boundary values when the effective detecting range of lidar is lower than the tropopause. PMID:26072885

  20. Configuration-Space Sampling in Potential Energy Surface Fitting: A Space-Reduced Bond-Order Grid Approach.

    PubMed

    Rampino, Sergio

    2016-07-14

    Potential energy surfaces (PESs) for use in dynamics calculations of few-atom reactive systems are commonly modeled as functional forms fitting or interpolating a set of ab initio energies computed at many nuclear configurations. An automated procedure is here proposed for optimal configuration-space sampling in generating this set of energies as part of the grid-empowered molecular simulator GEMS (Laganà et al., J. Grid Comput. 2010, 8, 571-586). The scheme is based on a space-reduced formulation of the so-called bond-order variables allowing for a balanced representation of the attractive and repulsive regions of a diatom configuration space. Uniform grids based on space-reduced bond-order variables are proven to outperform those defined on the more conventional bond-length variables in converging the fitted/interpolated PES to the computed ab initio one with increasing number of grid points. Benchmarks are performed on the one- and three-dimensional prototype systems H2 and H3 using both a local-interpolation (modified Shepard) and a global-fitting (Aguado-Paniagua) scheme. PMID:26674105

  1. The Informative Analysis of Individual Trend Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Roderick P.

    2004-01-01

    Additive and non-additive models for an individual trend curve are examined, and five methods for fitting these to a set of individuals are described. It is suggested that classical fitting methods are more informative than latent curve methods, and commonly preferable. A limited study of the effect of time-structure is reported, and results on…

  2. Ion mobility spectrometry nuisance alarm threshold analysis for illicit narcotics based on environmental background and a ROC-curve approach.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Thomas P; Najarro, Marcela

    2016-07-21

    The discriminative potential of an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for trace detection of illicit narcotics relative to environmental background was investigated with a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve framework. The IMS response of cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), and Δ(9)-tetrahydro-cannabinol (THC) was evaluated against environmental background levels derived from the screening of incoming delivery vehicles at a federal facility. Over 20 000 samples were collected over a multiyear period under two distinct sets of instrument operating conditions, a baseline mode and an increased desorption/drift tube temperature and sampling time mode. ROC curves provided a quantifiable representation of the interplay between sensitivity (true positive rate, TPR) and specificity (1 - false positive rate, FPR). A TPR of 90% and minimized FPR were targeted as the detection limits of IMS for the selected narcotics. MDMA, THC, and cocaine demonstrated single nanogram sensitivity at 90% TPR and <10% FPR, with improvements to both MDMA and cocaine in the elevated temperature/increased sampling mode. Detection limits in the tens of nanograms with poor specificity (FPR ≈ 20%) were observed for methamphetamine and heroin under baseline conditions. However, elevating the temperature reduced the background in the methamphetamine window, drastically improving its response (90% TPR and 3.8% FPR at 1 ng). On the contrary, the altered mode conditions increased the level of background for THC and heroin, partially offsetting observed enhancements to desorption. The presented framework demonstrated the significant effect environmental background distributions have on sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27206280

  3. The play approach to learning in the context of families and schools: an alternative paradigm for nutrition and fitness education in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Rickard, K A; Gallahue, D L; Gruen, G E; Tridle, M; Bewley, N; Steele, K

    1995-10-01

    An alternative paradigm for nutrition and fitness education centers on understanding and developing skill in implementing a play approach to learning about healthful eating and promoting active play in the context of the child, the family, and the school. The play approach is defined as a process for learning that is intrinsically motivated, enjoyable, freely chosen, nonliteral, safe, and actively engaged in by young learners. Making choices, assuming responsibility for one's decisions and actions, and having fun are inherent components of the play approach to learning. In this approach, internal cognitive transactions and intrinsic motivation are the primary forces that ultimately determine healthful choices and life habits. Theoretical models of children's learning--the dynamic systems theory and the cognitive-developmental theory of Jean Piaget--provide a theoretical basis for nutrition and fitness education in the 21st century. The ultimate goal is to develop partnerships of children, families, and schools in ways that promote the well-being of children and translate into healthful life habits. The play approach is an ongoing process of learning that is applicable to learners of all ages. PMID:7560683

  4. A methodological approach to estimate the lactation curve and net energy and protein requirements of beef cows using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling.

    PubMed

    Albertini, T Z; Medeiros, S R; Torres, R A A; Zocchi, S S; Oltjen, J W; Strathe, A B; Lanna, D P D

    2012-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate methods to predict the secretion of milk and net energy and protein requirements of beef cows (Bos indicus and B. taurus) after approximately 1 mo postpartum using nonlinear mixed-effect modeling (NLME). Twenty Caracu × Nellore (CN) and 10 Nellore (NL) cows were inseminated to Red Angus bulls, and 10 Angus × Nellore (AN) were bred to Canchim bulls. Cows were evaluated from just after calving (25 ± 11 d) to weaning (220 d). Milk yield was estimated by weighing calves before and after suckling (WSW) and by machine milking (MM) methods at 25, 52, 80, 109, 136, 164, 193, and 220 ± 11 d of lactation. Brody and simple linear equations were consecutively fitted to the data and compared using information criteria. For the Brody equation, a NLME model was used to estimate all lactation profiles incorporating different sources of variation (calf sex and breed of cow, cow as a nested random effect, and within-cow auto-correlation). The CV for the MM method (29%) was less than WSW (45%). Consequently, the WSW method was responsible for reducing the variance about 1.5 times among individuals, which minimized the ability to detect differences among cows. As a result, only milk yield MM data were used in the NLME models. The Brody equation provided the best fit to this dataset, and inclusion of a continuous autoregressive process improved fit (P < 0.01). Milk, energy and protein yield at the beginning of lactation were affected by cow genotype and calf sex (P < 0.001). The exponential decay of the lactation curves was affected only by genotype (P < 0.001). Angus × Nellore cows produced 15 and 48% more milk than CN and NL during the trial, respectively (P < 0.05). Caracu × Nellore cows produced 29% more milk than NL (P < 0.05). The net energy and net protein requirements for milk yield followed a similar ranking. Male calves stimulated their dams to produce 11.7, 11.4, and 11.9% more milk, energy and protein, respectively (P < 0

  5. Probing exoplanet clouds with optical phase curves

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Antonio García; Isaak, Kate G.

    2015-01-01

    Kepler-7b is to date the only exoplanet for which clouds have been inferred from the optical phase curve—from visible-wavelength whole-disk brightness measurements as a function of orbital phase. Added to this, the fact that the phase curve appears dominated by reflected starlight makes this close-in giant planet a unique study case. Here we investigate the information on coverage and optical properties of the planet clouds contained in the measured phase curve. We generate cloud maps of Kepler-7b and use a multiple-scattering approach to create synthetic phase curves, thus connecting postulated clouds with measurements. We show that optical phase curves can help constrain the composition and size of the cloud particles. Indeed, model fitting for Kepler-7b requires poorly absorbing particles that scatter with low-to-moderate anisotropic efficiency, conclusions consistent with condensates of silicates, perovskite, and silica of submicron radii. We also show that we are limited in our ability to pin down the extent and location of the clouds. These considerations are relevant to the interpretation of optical phase curves with general circulation models. Finally, we estimate that the spherical albedo of Kepler-7b over the Kepler passband is in the range 0.4–0.5. PMID:26489652

  6. Testing MONDian dark matter with galactic rotation curves

    SciTech Connect

    Edmonds, Doug; Farrah, Duncan; Minic, Djordje; Takeuchi, Tatsu; Ho, Chiu Man; Ng, Y. Jack E-mail: farrah@vt.edu E-mail: takeuchi@vt.edu E-mail: yjng@physics.unc.edu

    2014-09-20

    MONDian dark matter (MDM) is a new form of dark matter quantum that naturally accounts for Milgrom's scaling, usually associated with modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND), and theoretically behaves like cold dark matter (CDM) at cluster and cosmic scales. In this paper, we provide the first observational test of MDM by fitting rotation curves to a sample of 30 local spiral galaxies (z ≈ 0.003). For comparison, we also fit the galactic rotation curves using MOND and CDM. We find that all three models fit the data well. The rotation curves predicted by MDM and MOND are virtually indistinguishable over the range of observed radii (∼1 to 30 kpc). The best-fit MDM and CDM density profiles are compared. We also compare with MDM the dark matter density profiles arising from MOND if Milgrom's formula is interpreted as Newtonian gravity with an extra source term instead of as a modification of inertia. We find that discrepancies between MDM and MOND will occur near the center of a typical spiral galaxy. In these regions, instead of continuing to rise sharply, the MDM mass density turns over and drops as we approach the center of the galaxy. Our results show that MDM, which restricts the nature of the dark matter quantum by accounting for Milgrom's scaling, accurately reproduces observed rotation curves.

  7. Differential association of cardiorespiratory fitness and central adiposity among US adolescents and adults: A quantile regression approach.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Samantha M; Ortaglia, Andrew; Bottai, Matteo; Supino, Christina

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies assessing the association between cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and waist circumference (WC) have often restricted their evaluation to the association of CRF on average WC. Consequently, the assessment of important variations in the relationship of CRF across the WC distribution was precluded. The purpose of this study was to comprehensively evaluate the association between CRF and the distribution of WC using quantile regression. Secondary data analysis was conducted using data from the 1999-2004 NHANES. Participants (n=8260) aged 12-49years with complete data on estimated maximal oxygen consumption and WC were included. Quantile regression models were performed to assess the association between CRF and the 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th and 90th WC percentiles and were adjusted for age and race/ethnicity. For male and female adolescents with high CRF compared to low-fit counterparts, significant negative estimates (2.8 to 20.2cm and 2.3 to 11.2cm, respectively) were observed across most WC percentiles. Similarly, among male and female adults, high CRF was associated with significant reductions in WC across all percentiles (9.5 to 12.0cm and 3.7 to 9.2cm, respectively). For both populations, an increasing trend in the magnitude of the association of high CRF across the WC percentiles was observed. CRF appears to have a differential relationship across the WC distribution with the largest reductions in WC were found among high-fit individuals with the greatest amount of central adiposity (WC≥90th percentile). Additionally, this differential association highlights the significant limitations of statistical techniques used in previous analyses which focused on the center of the distribution. PMID:27002254

  8. A transformation approach for the derivation of boundary conditions between a curved porous medium and a free fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobberschütz, Sören; Böhm, Michael

    2010-02-01

    The behaviour of a free fluid flow above a porous medium, both separated by a curved interface, is investigated. By carrying out a coordinate transformation, we obtain the description of the flow in a domain with a straight interface. Using periodic homogenisation, the effective behaviour of the transformed partial differential equations in the porous part is given by a Darcy law with non-constant permeability matrix. Then the fluid behaviour at the porous-liquid interface is obtained with the help of generalised boundary-layer functions: Whereas the velocity in normal direction is continuous across the interface, a jump appears in tangential direction. Its magnitude seems to be related to the slope of the interface. Therefore the results indicate a generalised law of Beavers and Joseph.

  9. Compression of contour data through exploiting curve-to-curve dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yalabik, N.; Cooper, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    An approach to exploiting curve-to-curve dependencies in order to achieve high data compression is presented. One of the approaches to date of along curve compression through use of cubic spline approximation is taken and extended by investigating the additional compressibility achievable through curve-to-curve structure exploitation. One of the models under investigation is reported on.

  10. Mobility, strength, and fitness after a graded activity program for patients with subacute low back pain. A randomized prospective clinical study with a behavioral therapy approach.

    PubMed

    Lindström, I; Ohlund, C; Eek, C; Wallin, L; Peterson, L E; Nachemson, A

    1992-06-01

    Patients with nonspecific mechanical low back pain (n = 103), examined by an orthopaedic surgeon and a social worker, were randomized to an activity group (n = 51) and a control group (n = 52). Patients with defined orthopaedic, medical, or psychiatric diagnoses were excluded before randomization. No patients were excluded due to place of birth or difficulties in speaking or understanding the Swedish language. The purpose of the study was to compare mobility, strength and fitness after traditional care and after traditional care plus a graded activity program with a behavioral therapy approach. A graded activity program, with a behavioral therapy approach was given under the guidance of a physical therapist. The endpoint of the graded activity program was return to work. This program significantly increased mobility, strength, and fitness more than could be explained by only a time recovery effect, especially in males. The patients in the activity group returned to work earlier than did the patients in the control group. Spinal rotation, abdominal muscle endurance time and lifting capacity were significantly correlated to rate of return to work. Traditional care plus a graded activity program were superior to only traditional care, evaluated in terms of mobility, strength and fitness. The graded activity program proved to be a successful method of restoring occupational function and facilitating return to work in subacute low back pain patients. The patients in the graded activity program learned that it is safe to move, while regaining function. PMID:1385658

  11. A Bayesian Approach to Infer Radial and Azimuthal Anisotropy of the Crust and Upper Mantle from Surface-Wave Dispersion Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravenna, M.; Lebedev, S.

    2015-12-01

    A reliable approach to quantify non-uniqueness and to provide error estimates in nonlinear inversion problems, as the surface-wave dispersion curves inversion for the seismic velocity structure of the earth, is Monte Carlo sampling in a Bayesian statistical framefork. We develop a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method for joint inversion of Rayleigh- and Love-wave dispersion curves that is able to yield robust radially and azimuthally anisotropic shear velocity profiles, with resolution to depths down to the transition zone.The inversion technique doesn't involve any linearization procedure or strong a priori bounds around a reference model. In a fixed dimensional Bayesian formulation, we choose to set the number of parameters relatively high, with a more dense parametrization in the uppermost mantle in order to have a good resolution of the Litosphere-Astenosphere Boundary region. We apply the MCMC algorithm to the inversion of surface-wave phase velocities accurately determined in broad period ranges in a few test regions. In the Baikal-Mongolia region we invert Rayleigh- and Love- wave dispersion curves for radially anisotropic structure (Vsv,Vsh) of the crust and upper mantle. In the Tuscany region, where we have phase velocity data with good azimuthal coverage, a different implementation of the algorithm is applied that is able to resolve azimuthal anisotropy; the Rayleigh wave dispersion curves measured at different azimuths have been inverted for the Vsv structure and the depth distribution of the 2-ψ azimuthal anisotropy of the region, with good resolution down to asthenospheric and transition zone depths.

  12. Multilevel Models for the Analysis of Angle-Specific Torque Curves with Application to Master Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Humberto M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to outline a multilevel modeling approach to fit individual angle-specific torque curves describing concentric knee extension and flexion isokinetic muscular actions in Master athletes. The potential of the analytical approach to examine between individual differences across the angle-specific torque curves was illustrated including between-individuals variation due to gender differences at a higher level. Torques in concentric muscular actions of knee extension and knee extension at 60º·s−1 were considered within a range of motion between 5º and 85º (only torques “truly” isokinetic). Multilevel time series models with autoregressive covariance structures with standard multilevel models were superior fits compared with standard multilevel models for repeated measures to fit angle-specific torque curves. Third and fourth order polynomial models were the best fits to describe angle-specific torque curves of isokinetic knee flexion and extension concentric actions, respectively. The fixed exponents allow interpretations for initial acceleration, the angle at peak torque and the decrement of torque after peak torque. Also, the multilevel models were flexible to illustrate the influence of gender differences on the shape of torque throughout the range of motion and in the shape of the curves. The presented multilevel regression models may afford a general framework to examine angle-specific moment curves by isokinetic dynamometry, and add to the understanding mechanisms of strength development, particularly the force-length relationship, both related to performance and injury prevention. PMID:26839603

  13. Analysis of the fine sediment dynamics in the River Thames catchment (UK) using a sediment rating curve approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussi, Gianbattista; Dadson, Simon

    2015-04-01

    The effect of natural and anthropogenic disturbances on sediment transport in lowland rivers is a relevant factor in river management, especially in the context of changing climate and environment. Nevertheless, many of the processes that cause alterations in the sediment cycle are poorly understood, often due to lack of accurate data. In this study, we use a low-frequency suspended sediment sampling dataset to assess the spatial and temporal variations of sediment fluxes in the River Thames (UK). Several sediment rating curves (SRCs) were built in order to analyse spatio-temporal variations of catchment erodibility and sediment transport. First, changes in SRC coefficients in nine different sub-catchments were analysed and related to environmental factors including land cover, geology and vegetation. Then, the temporal variability of SRCs was investigated, both on a seasonal and inter-annual basis. Lastly, a simple dynamic SRC model was implemented in order to provide an estimation of the of sediment transport in the River Thames, and its performances were evaluated. The results quantify the spatial variability of sediment transport within the catchment and reveal a seasonal flushing effect, in which sediment loads are typically substantially higher during the first floods after the summer dry period. We estimate that, for the River Thames, the sediment loads of the first floods after summer are around double that of other floods. We also observed a decrease in the flushing effect which began in the late 1990s.

  14. A Bayesian approach to incorporating maximum entropy-derived signal parameter statistics into the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culver, R. Lee; Sibul, Leon H.; Bradley, David L.; Ballard, Jeffrey A.; Camin, H. John

    2005-09-01

    Our goal is to develop a probabilistic sonar performance prediction methodology that can make use of limited knowledge of random or uncertain environment, target, and sonar system parameters, but does not make unwarranted assumptions. The maximum entropy method (MEM) can be used to construct probability density functions (pdfs) for relevant environmental and source parameters, and an ocean acoustic propagation model can use those pdfs to predict the variability of received signal parameter. At this point, the MEM can be used once again to produce signal parameter pdfs. A Bayesian framework allows these pdfs to be incorporated into the signal processor to produce ROC curves in which, for example, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is a random variable for which a pdf has been calculated. One output of such a processor could be a range-dependent probability of detection for fixed probability of false alarm, which would be more useful than the conventional range of the day that is still in use in some areas. [Work supported by ONR Code 321US.

  15. An adaptive spectral/DG method for a reduced phase-space based level set approach to geometrical optics on curved elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cockburn, Bernardo; Kao, Chiu-Yen; Reitich, Fernando

    2014-02-01

    We present an adaptive spectral/discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method on curved elements to simulate high-frequency wavefronts within a reduced phase-space formulation of geometrical optics. Following recent work, the approach is based on the use of level sets defined by functions satisfying the Liouville equations in reduced phase-space and, in particular, it relies on the smoothness of these functions to represent them by rapidly convergent spectral expansions in the phase variables. The resulting (hyperbolic) system of equations for the coefficients in these expansions are then amenable to a high-order accurate treatment via DG approximations. In the present work, we significantly expand on the applicability and efficiency of the approach by incorporating mechanisms that allow for its use in scattering simulations and for a reduced overall computational cost. With regards to the former we demonstrate that the incorporation of curved elements is necessary to attain any kind of accuracy in calculations that involve scattering off non-flat interfaces. With regards to efficiency, on the other hand, we also show that the level-set formulation allows for a space p-adaptive scheme that under-resolves the level-set functions away from the wavefront without incurring in a loss of accuracy in the approximation of its location. As we show, these improvements enable simulations that are beyond the capabilities of previous implementations of these numerical procedures.

  16. Fracture toughness curve shift method

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R.K.; Sokolov, M.A.; McCabe, D.E.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this task is to examine the technical basis for the currently accepted methods for shifting fracture toughness curves to account for irradiation damage, and to work through national codes and standards bodies to revise those methods, if a change is warranted. During this reporting period, data from all the relevant HSSI Programs were acquired and stored in a database and evaluated. The results from that evaluation have been prepared in a draft letter report and are summarized here. A method employing Weibull statistics was applied to analyze fracture toughness properties of unirradiated and irradiated pressure vessel steels. Application of the concept of a master curve for irradiated materials was examined and used to measure shifts of fracture toughness transition curves. It was shown that the maximum likelihood approach gave good estimations of the reference temperature, T{sub o}, determined by rank method and could be used for analyzing of data sets where application of the rank method did not prove to be feasible. It was shown that, on average, the fracture toughness shifts generally exceeded the Charpy 41-J shifts; a linear least-squares fit to the data set yielded a slope of 1.15. The observed dissimilarity was analyzed by taking into account differences in effects of irradiation on Charpy impact and fracture toughness properties. Based on these comparisons, a procedure to adjust Charpy 41-J shifts for achieving a more reliable correlation with the fracture toughness shifts was evaluated. An adjustment consists of multiplying the 41-J energy level by the ratio of unirradiated to irradiated Charpy upper shelves to determine an irradiated transition temperature, and then subtracting the unirradiated transition temperature determined at 41 J. For LUS welds, however, an unirradiated level of 20 J (15 ft-1b) was used for the corresponding adjustment for irradiated material.

  17. Adiabatic potential-energy curves of long-range Rydberg molecules: Two-electron R -matrix approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarana, Michal; Čurík, Roman

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a computational method developed for study of long-range molecular Rydberg states of such systems that can be approximated by two electrons in a model potential of the atomic cores. Only diatomic molecules are considered. The method is based on a two-electron R -matrix approach inside a sphere centered on one of the atoms. The wave function is then connected to a Coulomb region outside the sphere via a multichannel version of the Coulomb Green's function. This approach is put into a test by its application to a study of Rydberg states of the hydrogen molecule for internuclear distances R from 20 to 400 bohrs and energies corresponding to n from 3 to 22. The results are compared with previous quantum chemical calculations (lower quantum numbers n ) and computations based on contact-potential models (higher quantum numbers n ).

  18. The effect of strain rate on the viscoelastic response of aortic valve tissue: a direct-fit approach.

    PubMed

    Doehring, Todd C; Carew, Evelyn O; Vesely, Ivan

    2004-02-01

    Knowledge of strain-rate sensitivity of soft tissue viscoelastic and nonlinear elastic properties is important for accurate predictions of biomechanical behavior and for quantitative assessment of the effects of disease or surgical/pharmaceutical intervention. Soft tissues are known to exhibit mild rate sensitivity, but experimental artifacts related to testing system control can confound estimation of these effects. "Perfect" ramp-and-hold stress-relaxation tests become difficult at high strain rates because of problems related to undershoot/overshoot error and vibrations. These errors can introduce unwanted bias into parameter estimation methods that rely on idealizations of the applied ramp-and-hold displacement. To address these problems, we describe a new method for estimating quasilinear viscoelastic (QLV) parameters that directly fits the QLV constitutive model to the actual point-wise stress-time history of the test, using an adaptive grid refinement (AGR) global optimization algorithm. This new method significantly improves the accuracy and predictivity of QLV parameter estimates for heart valve tissues, compared to traditional methods that use idealized displacement data. We estimated QLV parameters for aortic valve tissue over a range of physiologic displacement rates, finding that the viscoelastic content parameter (C) increased slightly with increasing strain rate, but the fast (tau1) and slow (tau2) time constants were strain rate insensitive. PMID:15008370

  19. Fitness Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... that gets your heart pumping, such as dancing, running, or swimming laps. How hard you exercise matters, too. You can learn how to measure your workout to see if it is light, medium, or intense. Fitness for all Do you have an illness or ...

  20. The Circle of Trust[R] Approach and a Counselor Training Program: A Hand in Glove Fit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodell, Judith A.

    2012-01-01

    The Circle of Trust[R] approach (www.couragerenewal.org) is dedicated to principles and practices that support exploration of the inner landscape of one's life. Participants share time in a trustworthy environment, connect with inner wisdom, and seek harmony in their personal and professional selves. In this chapter, the author describes her…

  1. Cognitive fitness.

    PubMed

    Gilkey, Roderick; Kilts, Clint

    2007-11-01

    Recent neuroscientific research shows that the health of your brain isn't, as experts once thought, just the product of childhood experiences and genetics; it reflects your adult choices and experiences as well. Professors Gilkey and Kilts of Emory University's medical and business schools explain how you can strengthen your brain's anatomy, neural networks, and cognitive abilities, and prevent functions such as memory from deteriorating as you age. The brain's alertness is the result of what the authors call cognitive fitness -a state of optimized ability to reason, remember, learn, plan, and adapt. Certain attitudes, lifestyle choices, and exercises enhance cognitive fitness. Mental workouts are the key. Brain-imaging studies indicate that acquiring expertise in areas as diverse as playing a cello, juggling, speaking a foreign language, and driving a taxicab expands your neural systems and makes them more communicative. In other words, you can alter the physical makeup of your brain by learning new skills. The more cognitively fit you are, the better equipped you are to make decisions, solve problems, and deal with stress and change. Cognitive fitness will help you be more open to new ideas and alternative perspectives. It will give you the capacity to change your behavior and realize your goals. You can delay senescence for years and even enjoy a second career. Drawing from the rapidly expanding body of neuroscience research as well as from well-established research in psychology and other mental health fields, the authors have identified four steps you can take to become cognitively fit: understand how experience makes the brain grow, work hard at play, search for patterns, and seek novelty and innovation. Together these steps capture some of the key opportunities for maintaining an engaged, creative brain. PMID:18159786

  2. Analysis of fuel-conservative curved decelerating approach trajectories for powered-lift and CTOL jet aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuman, F.

    1980-01-01

    A method for determining fuel conservative terminal approaches that include changes in altitude, speed, and heading are described. Three different guidance system concepts for STOL aircraft were evaluated in flight: (1) a fixed trajectory system; (2) a system that included a fixed path and a real time synthesized capture flight path; and (3) a trajectory synthesizing system. Simulation results for the augmentor wing jet STOL research aircraft and for the Boeing 727 aircraft are discussed. The results indicate that for minimum fuel consumption, two guidance deceleration segments are required.

  3. Two-electron R-matrix approach to calculations of potential-energy curves of long-range Rydberg molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarana, Michal; Čurík, Roman

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a computational method developed for study of long-range molecular Rydberg states of such systems that can be approximated by two electrons in a model potential of the atomic cores. The method is based on a two-electron R-matrix approach inside a sphere centered on one of the atoms. The wave function is then connected to a Coulomb region outside the sphere via a multichannel version of the Coulomb Green's function. This approach is applied to a study of Rydberg states of Rb2 for internuclear separations R from 40 to 320 bohrs and energies corresponding to n from 7 to 30. We report bound states associated with the low-lying 3Po resonance and with the virtual state of the rubidium atom that turn into ion-pair-like bound states in the Coulomb potential of the atomic Rydberg core. The results are compared with previous calculations based on single-electron models employing a zero-range contact-potential and short-range modele potential. Czech Science Foundation (Project No. P208/14-15989P).

  4. A Quantitative Genomic Approach for Analysis of Fitness and Stress Related Traits in a Drosophila melanogaster Model Population

    PubMed Central

    Duun Rohde, Palle; Krag, Kristian; Loeschcke, Volker; Overgaard, Johannes; Sørensen, Peter; Nygaard Kristensen, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    The ability of natural populations to withstand environmental stresses relies partly on their adaptive ability. In this study, we used a subset of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel, a population of inbred, genome-sequenced lines derived from a natural population of Drosophila melanogaster, to investigate whether this population harbors genetic variation for a set of stress resistance and life history traits. Using a genomic approach, we found substantial genetic variation for metabolic rate, heat stress resistance, expression of a major heat shock protein, and egg-to-adult viability investigated at a benign and a higher stressful temperature. This suggests that these traits will be able to evolve. In addition, we outline an approach to conduct pathway associations based on genomic linear models, which has potential to identify adaptive genes and pathways, and therefore can be a valuable tool in conservation genomics. PMID:27274984

  5. An evaluation of the Bayesian approach to fitting the N-mixture model for use with pseudo-replicated count data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toribo, S.G.; Gray, B.R.; Liang, S.

    2011-01-01

    The N-mixture model proposed by Royle in 2004 may be used to approximate the abundance and detection probability of animal species in a given region. In 2006, Royle and Dorazio discussed the advantages of using a Bayesian approach in modelling animal abundance and occurrence using a hierarchical N-mixture model. N-mixture models assume replication on sampling sites, an assumption that may be violated when the site is not closed to changes in abundance during the survey period or when nominal replicates are defined spatially. In this paper, we studied the robustness of a Bayesian approach to fitting the N-mixture model for pseudo-replicated count data. Our simulation results showed that the Bayesian estimates for abundance and detection probability are slightly biased when the actual detection probability is small and are sensitive to the presence of extra variability within local sites.

  6. A bayesian MCMC approach to assess the complete distribution of fitness effects of new mutations: uncovering the potential for adaptive walks in challenging environments.

    PubMed

    Bank, Claudia; Hietpas, Ryan T; Wong, Alex; Bolon, Daniel N; Jensen, Jeffrey D

    2014-03-01

    The role of adaptation in the evolutionary process has been contentious for decades. At the heart of the century-old debate between neutralists and selectionists lies the distribution of fitness effects (DFE)--that is, the selective effect of all mutations. Attempts to describe the DFE have been varied, occupying theoreticians and experimentalists alike. New high-throughput techniques stand to make important contributions to empirical efforts to characterize the DFE, but the usefulness of such approaches depends on the availability of robust statistical methods for their interpretation. We here present and discuss a Bayesian MCMC approach to estimate fitness from deep sequencing data and use it to assess the DFE for the same 560 point mutations in a coding region of Hsp90 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae across six different environmental conditions. Using these estimates, we compare the differences in the DFEs resulting from mutations covering one-, two-, and three-nucleotide steps from the wild type--showing that multiple-step mutations harbor more potential for adaptation in challenging environments, but also tend to be more deleterious in the standard environment. All observations are discussed in the light of expectations arising from Fisher's geometric model. PMID:24398421

  7. Test fittings for dimensionally critical tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagler, R.

    1980-01-01

    Method using lightweight fitting protects tubes and tube stubs during testing and through to final welding. Fitting does not interfere with final welding or brazing like temporary test fittings, and is not heavy like machined-on integral fittings with face-seal 0-rings. Fitting approach is adaptable to many types of components, including valves, transducers, and filters.

  8. Deviance statistics in model fit and selection in ROC studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Tianhu; Bae, K. Ty

    2013-03-01

    A general non-linear regression model-based Bayesian inference approach is used in our ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristics) study. In the sampling of posterior distribution, two prior models - continuous Gaussian and discrete categorical - are used for the scale parameter. How to judge Goodness-of-Fit (GOF) of each model and how to criticize these two models, Deviance statistics and Deviance information criterion (DIC) are adopted to address these problems. Model fit and model selection focus on the adequacy of models. Judging model adequacy is essentially measuring agreement of model and observations. Deviance statistics and DIC provide overall measures on model fit and selection. In order to investigate model fit at each category of observations, we find that the cumulative, exponential contributions from individual observations to Deviance statistics are good estimates of FPF (false positive fraction) and TPF (true positive fraction) on which the ROC curve is based. This finding further leads to a new measure for model fit, called FPF-TPF distance, which is an Euclidean distance defined on FPF-TPF space. It combines both local and global fitting. Deviance statistics and FPFTPF distance are shown to be consistent and in good agreement. Theoretical derivation and numerical simulations for this new method for model fit and model selection of ROC data analysis are included. Keywords: General non-linear regression model, Bayesian Inference, Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, Goodness-of-Fit (GOF), Model selection, Deviance statistics, Deviance information criterion (DIC), Continuous conjugate prior, Discrete categorical prior. ∗

  9. Impact of entrainment and impingement on fish populations in the Hudson River estuary. Volume III. An analysis of the validity of the utilities' stock-recruitment curve-fitting exercise and prior estimation of beta technique. Environmental Sciences Division publication No. 1792

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, S. W.; Goodyear, C. P.; Kirk, B. L.

    1982-03-01

    This report addresses the validity of the utilities' use of the Ricker stock-recruitment model to extrapolate the combined entrainment-impingement losses of young fish to reductions in the equilibrium population size of adult fish. In our testimony, a methodology was developed and applied to address a single fundamental question: if the Ricker model really did apply to the Hudson River striped bass population, could the utilities' estimates, based on curve-fitting, of the parameter alpha (which controls the impact) be considered reliable. In addition, an analysis is included of the efficacy of an alternative means of estimating alpha, termed the technique of prior estimation of beta (used by the utilities in a report prepared for regulatory hearings on the Cornwall Pumped Storage Project). This validation methodology should also be useful in evaluating inferences drawn in the literature from fits of stock-recruitment models to data obtained from other fish stocks.

  10. Identification of Reliable Components in Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS): a Data-Driven Approach across Metabolic Processes

    PubMed Central

    Motegi, Hiromi; Tsuboi, Yuuri; Saga, Ayako; Kagami, Tomoko; Inoue, Maki; Toki, Hideaki; Minowa, Osamu; Noda, Tetsuo; Kikuchi, Jun

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing need to use multivariate statistical methods for understanding biological functions, identifying the mechanisms of diseases, and exploring biomarkers. In addition to classical analyses such as hierarchical cluster analysis, principal component analysis, and partial least squares discriminant analysis, various multivariate strategies, including independent component analysis, non-negative matrix factorization, and multivariate curve resolution, have recently been proposed. However, determining the number of components is problematic. Despite the proposal of several different methods, no satisfactory approach has yet been reported. To resolve this problem, we implemented a new idea: classifying a component as “reliable” or “unreliable” based on the reproducibility of its appearance, regardless of the number of components in the calculation. Using the clustering method for classification, we applied this idea to multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS). Comparisons between conventional and modified methods applied to proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectral datasets derived from known standard mixtures and biological mixtures (urine and feces of mice) revealed that more plausible results are obtained by the modified method. In particular, clusters containing little information were detected with reliability. This strategy, named “cluster-aided MCR-ALS,” will facilitate the attainment of more reliable results in the metabolomics datasets. PMID:26531245

  11. [Photosynthetic Parameters Inversion Algorithm Study Based on Chlorophyll Fluorescence Induction Kinetics Curve].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiao-han; Zhang, Yu-jun; Yin, Gao-fang; Shi, Chao-yi; Yu, Xiao-ya; Zhao, Nan-jing; Liu, Wen-qing

    2015-08-01

    The fast chlorophyll fluorescence induction curve contains rich information of photosynthesis. It can reflect various information of vegetation, such as, the survival status, the pathological condition and the physiology trends under the stress state. Through the acquisition of algae fluorescence and induced optical signal, the fast phase of chlorophyll fluorescence kinetics curve was fitted. Based on least square fitting method, we introduced adaptive minimum error approaching method for fast multivariate nonlinear regression fitting toward chlorophyll fluorescence kinetics curve. We realized Fo (fixedfluorescent), Fm (maximum fluorescence yield), σPSII (PSII functional absorption cross section) details parameters inversion and the photosynthetic parameters inversion of Chlorella pyrenoidosa. And we also studied physiological variation of Chlorella pyrenoidosa under the stress of Cu(2+). PMID:26672292

  12. For Fit's Sake: A Norms-Based Approach to Healthy Behaviors Through Influence of Presumed Media Influence.

    PubMed

    Ho, Shirley S; Lee, Edmund W J; Ng, Kaijie; Leong, Grace S H; Tham, Tiffany H M

    2016-09-01

    Based on the influence of presumed media influence (IPMI) model as the theoretical framework, this study examines how injunctive norms and personal norms mediate the influence of healthy lifestyle media messages on public intentions to engage in two types of healthy lifestyle behaviors-physical activity and healthy diet. Nationally representative data collected from 1,055 adults in Singapore demonstrate partial support for the key hypotheses that make up the extended IPMI model, highlighting the importance of a norms-based approach in health communication. Our results indicate that perceived media influence on others indirectly shaped public intentions to engage in healthy lifestyle behaviors through personal norms and attitude, providing partial theoretical support for the extended IPMI model. Practical implications for health communicators in designing health campaigns media messages to motivate the public to engage in healthy lifestyle are discussed. PMID:26799846

  13. Novel isotopic N, N-dimethyl leucine (iDiLeu) reagents enable absolute quantification of peptides and proteins using a standard curve approach

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Tyler; Lietz, Christopher B.; Xiang, Feng; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Absolute quantification of protein targets using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is a key component of candidate biomarker validation. One popular method combines multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) using a triple quadrupole instrument with stable isotope-labeled standards (SIS) for absolute quantification (AQUA). LC-MRM AQUA assays are sensitive and specific, but they are also expensive due to the cost of synthesizing stable isotope peptide standards. While the chemical modification approach using Mass Differential Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantification (mTRAQ) represents a more economical approach when quantifying large numbers of peptides, these reagents are costly and still suffer from lower throughput because only two concentration values per peptide can be obtained in a single LC-MS run. Here, we have developed and applied a set of five novel mass difference reagents, isotopic N,N-dimethyl leucine (iDiLeu). These labels contain an amine reactive group, triazine ester, are cost effective due to their synthetic simplicity, and have increased throughput compared to previous LC-MS quantification methods by allowing construction of a four-point standard curve in one run. iDiLeu-labeled peptides show remarkably similar retention time shifts, slightly lower energy thresholds for higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) fragmentation, and high quantification accuracy for trypsin-digested protein samples (median errors <15%). By spiking in an iDiLeu-labeled neuropeptide, allatostatin, into mouse urine matrix, two quantification methods are validated. The first uses one labeled peptide as an internal standard to normalize labeled peptide peak areas across runs (<19% error) while the second enables standard curve creation and analyte quantification in one run (<8% error). PMID:25377360

  14. Novel isotopic N, N-Dimethyl Leucine (iDiLeu) Reagents Enable Absolute Quantification of Peptides and Proteins Using a Standard Curve Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greer, Tyler; Lietz, Christopher B.; Xiang, Feng; Li, Lingjun

    2015-01-01

    Absolute quantification of protein targets using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is a key component of candidate biomarker validation. One popular method combines multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) using a triple quadrupole instrument with stable isotope-labeled standards (SIS) for absolute quantification (AQUA). LC-MRM AQUA assays are sensitive and specific, but they are also expensive because of the cost of synthesizing stable isotope peptide standards. While the chemical modification approach using mass differential tags for relative and absolute quantification (mTRAQ) represents a more economical approach when quantifying large numbers of peptides, these reagents are costly and still suffer from lower throughput because only two concentration values per peptide can be obtained in a single LC-MS run. Here, we have developed and applied a set of five novel mass difference reagents, isotopic N, N-dimethyl leucine (iDiLeu). These labels contain an amine reactive group, triazine ester, are cost effective because of their synthetic simplicity, and have increased throughput compared with previous LC-MS quantification methods by allowing construction of a four-point standard curve in one run. iDiLeu-labeled peptides show remarkably similar retention time shifts, slightly lower energy thresholds for higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) fragmentation, and high quantification accuracy for trypsin-digested protein samples (median errors <15%). By spiking in an iDiLeu-labeled neuropeptide, allatostatin, into mouse urine matrix, two quantification methods are validated. The first uses one labeled peptide as an internal standard to normalize labeled peptide peak areas across runs (<19% error), whereas the second enables standard curve creation and analyte quantification in one run (<8% error).

  15. A simple, efficient, and high-order accurate curved sliding-mesh interface approach to spectral difference method on coupled rotating and stationary domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bin; Liang, Chunlei

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a simple, efficient, and high-order accurate sliding-mesh interface approach to the spectral difference (SD) method. We demonstrate the approach by solving the two-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations on quadrilateral grids. This approach is an extension of the straight mortar method originally designed for stationary domains [7,8]. Our sliding method creates curved dynamic mortars on sliding-mesh interfaces to couple rotating and stationary domains. On the nonconforming sliding-mesh interfaces, the related variables are first projected from cell faces to mortars to compute common fluxes, and then the common fluxes are projected back from the mortars to the cell faces to ensure conservation. To verify the spatial order of accuracy of the sliding-mesh spectral difference (SSD) method, both inviscid and viscous flow cases are tested. It is shown that the SSD method preserves the high-order accuracy of the SD method. Meanwhile, the SSD method is found to be very efficient in terms of computational cost. This novel sliding-mesh interface method is very suitable for parallel processing with domain decomposition. It can be applied to a wide range of problems, such as the hydrodynamics of marine propellers, the aerodynamics of rotorcraft, wind turbines, and oscillating wing power generators, etc.

  16. Novel Approach for Positioning Sensor Lead Wires on SiC-Based Monolithic Ceramic and FRCMC Components/Subcomponents Having Flat and Curved Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiser, J. Douglas; Singh, Mrityunjay; Lei, Jin-Fen; Martin, Lisa C.

    1999-01-01

    A novel attachment approach for positioning sensor lead wires on silicon carbide-based monolithic ceramic and fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composite (FRCMC) components has been developed. This approach is based on an affordable, robust ceramic joining technology, named ARCJoinT, which was developed for the joining of silicon carbide-based ceramic and fiber reinforced composites. The ARCJoinT technique has previously been shown to produce joints with tailorable thickness and good high temperature strength. In this study, silicon carbide-based ceramic and FRCMC attachments of different shapes and sizes were joined onto silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix (SiC/ SiC) composites having flat and curved surfaces. Based on results obtained in previous joining studies. the joined attachments should maintain their mechanical strength and integrity at temperatures up to 1350 C in air. Therefore they can be used to position and secure sensor lead wires on SiC/SiC components that are being tested in programs that are focused on developing FRCMCs for a number of demanding high temperature applications in aerospace and ground-based systems. This approach, which is suitable for installing attachments on large and complex shaped monolithic ceramic and composite components, should enhance the durability of minimally intrusive high temperature sensor systems. The technology could also be used to reinstall attachments on ceramic components that were damaged in service.

  17. Learning curves of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy in transforaminal approach at the L4/5 and L5/S1 levels: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xin-bo; Fan, Guo-xin; Gu, Xin; Shen, Tu-gang; Guan, Xiao-fei; Hu, An-nan; Zhang, Hai-long; He, Shi-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to compare the learning curves of percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) in a transforaminal approach at the L4/5 and L5/S1 levels. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the first 60 cases at the L4/5 level (Group I) and the first 60 cases at the L5/S1 level (Group II) of PELD performed by one spine surgeon. The patients were divided into subgroups A, B, and C (Group I: A cases 1–20, B cases 21–40, C cases 41–60; Group II: A cases 1–20, B cases 21–40, C cases 41–60). Operation time was thoroughly analyzed. Results: Compared with the L4/5 level, the learning curve of transforaminal PELD at the L5/S1 level was flatter. The mean operation times of Groups IA, IB, and IC were (88.75±17.02), (67.75±6.16), and (64.85±7.82) min, respectively. There was a significant difference between Groups A and B (P<0.05), but no significant difference between Groups B and C (P=0.20). The mean operation times of Groups IIA, IIB, and IIC were (117.25±13.62), (109.50±11.20), and (92.15±11.94) min, respectively. There was no significant difference between Groups A and B (P=0.06), but there was a significant difference between Groups B and C (P<0.05). There were 6 cases of postoperative dysesthesia (POD) in Group I and 2 cases in Group IIA (P=0.27). There were 2 cases of residual disc in Group I, and 4 cases in Group II (P=0.67). There were 3 cases of recurrence in Group I, and 2 cases in Group II (P>0.05). Conclusions: Compared with the L5/S1 level, the learning curve of PELD in a transforaminal approach at the L4/5 level was steeper, suggesting that the L4/5 level might be easier to master after short-term professional training. PMID:27381732

  18. Revisiting the learning curve (once again)

    PubMed Central

    Glautier, Steven

    2013-01-01

    The vast majority of published work in the field of associative learning seeks to test the adequacy of various theoretical accounts of the learning process using average data. Of course, averaging hides important information, but individual departures from the average are usually designated “error” and largely ignored. However, from the perspective of an individual differences approach, this error is the data of interest; and when associative models are applied to individual learning curves the error is substantial. To some extent individual differences can be reasonably understood in terms of parametric variations of the underlying model. Unfortunately, in many cases, the data cannot be accomodated in this way and the applicability of the underlying model can be called into question. Indeed several authors have proposed alternatives to associative models because of the poor fits between data and associative model. In the current paper a novel associative approach to the analysis of individual learning curves is presented. The Memory Environment Cue Array Model (MECAM) is described and applied to two human predictive learning datasets. The MECAM is predicated on the assumption that participants do not parse the trial sequences to which they are exposed into independent episodes as is often assumed when learning curves are modeled. Instead, the MECAM assumes that learning and responding on a trial may also be influenced by the events of the previous trial. Incorporating non-local information the MECAM produced better approximations to individual learning curves than did the Rescorla–Wagner Model (RWM) suggesting that further exploration of the approach is warranted. PMID:24421774

  19. Inclusive fitness in agriculture

    PubMed Central

    Kiers, E. Toby; Denison, R. Ford

    2014-01-01

    Trade-offs between individual fitness and the collective performance of crop and below-ground symbiont communities are common in agriculture. Plant competitiveness for light and soil resources is key to individual fitness, but higher investments in stems and roots by a plant community to compete for those resources ultimately reduce crop yields. Similarly, rhizobia and mycorrhizal fungi may increase their individual fitness by diverting resources to their own reproduction, even if they could have benefited collectively by providing their shared crop host with more nitrogen and phosphorus, respectively. Past selection for inclusive fitness (benefits to others, weighted by their relatedness) is unlikely to have favoured community performance over individual fitness. The limited evidence for kin recognition in plants and microbes changes this conclusion only slightly. We therefore argue that there is still ample opportunity for human-imposed selection to improve cooperation among crop plants and their symbionts so that they use limited resources more efficiently. This evolutionarily informed approach will require a better understanding of how interactions among crops, and interactions with their symbionts, affected their inclusive fitness in the past and what that implies for current interactions. PMID:24686938

  20. Inclusive fitness in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Kiers, E Toby; Denison, R Ford

    2014-05-19

    Trade-offs between individual fitness and the collective performance of crop and below-ground symbiont communities are common in agriculture. Plant competitiveness for light and soil resources is key to individual fitness, but higher investments in stems and roots by a plant community to compete for those resources ultimately reduce crop yields. Similarly, rhizobia and mycorrhizal fungi may increase their individual fitness by diverting resources to their own reproduction, even if they could have benefited collectively by providing their shared crop host with more nitrogen and phosphorus, respectively. Past selection for inclusive fitness (benefits to others, weighted by their relatedness) is unlikely to have favoured community performance over individual fitness. The limited evidence for kin recognition in plants and microbes changes this conclusion only slightly. We therefore argue that there is still ample opportunity for human-imposed selection to improve cooperation among crop plants and their symbionts so that they use limited resources more efficiently. This evolutionarily informed approach will require a better understanding of how interactions among crops, and interactions with their symbionts, affected their inclusive fitness in the past and what that implies for current interactions. PMID:24686938

  1. Digital-voltage curve generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlman, M.

    1970-01-01

    Curve generator capable of producing precisely repeatable curve for any single-valued function of voltage versus time uses digital approach, implemented by means of clocked feedback shift register, large scale integrated circuit diode matrix comprising about 12,000 diodes, counter, and digital-to-analog converter.

  2. A revealed preference approach to estimating supply curves for ecosystem services: use of auctions to set payments for soil erosion control in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Jack, B Kelsey; Leimona, Beria; Ferraro, Paul J

    2009-04-01

    To supply ecosystem services, private landholders incur costs. Knowledge of these costs is critical for the design of conservation-payment programs. Estimating these costs accurately is difficult because the minimum acceptable payment to a potential supplier is private information. We describe how an auction of payment contracts can be designed to elicit this information during the design phase of a conservation-payment program. With an estimate of the ecosystem-service supply curve from a pilot auction, conservation planners can explore the financial, ecological, and socioeconomic consequences of alternative scaled-up programs. We demonstrate the potential of our approach in Indonesia, where soil erosion on coffee farms generates downstream ecological and economic costs. Bid data from a small-scale, uniform-price auction for soil-conservation contracts allowed estimates of the costs of a scaled-up program, the gain from integrating biophysical and economic data to target contracts, and the trade-offs between poverty alleviation and supply of ecosystem services. Our study illustrates an auction-based approach to revealing private information about the costs of supplying ecosystem services. Such information can improve the design of programs devised to protect and enhance ecosystem services. PMID:18983597

  3. Deming's General Least Square Fitting

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-02-18

    DEM4-26 is a generalized least square fitting program based on Deming''s method. Functions built into the program for fitting include linear, quadratic, cubic, power, Howard''s, exponential, and Gaussian; others can easily be added. The program has the following capabilities: (1) entry, editing, and saving of data; (2) fitting of any of the built-in functions or of a user-supplied function; (3) plotting the data and fitted function on the display screen, with error limits if requested,more » and with the option of copying the plot to the printer; (4) interpolation of x or y values from the fitted curve with error estimates based on error limits selected by the user; and (5) plotting the residuals between the y data values and the fitted curve, with the option of copying the plot to the printer. If the plot is to be copied to a printer, GRAPHICS should be called from the operating system disk before the BASIC interpreter is loaded.« less

  4. Mouse Curve Biometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, Douglas A.

    2007-10-08

    A biometric system suitable for validating user identity using only mouse movements and no specialized equipment is presented. Mouse curves (mouse movements with little or no pause between them) are individually classied and used to develop classication histograms, which are representative of an individual's typical mouse use. These classication histograms can then be compared to validate identity. This classication approach is suitable for providing continuous identity validation during an entire user session.

  5. Forgetting Curves: Implications for Connectionist Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikstrom, Sverker

    2002-01-01

    Forgetting in long-term memory, as measured in a recall or a recognition test, is faster for items encoded more recently than for items encoded earlier. Data on forgetting curves fit a power function well. In contrast, many connectionist models predict either exponential decay or completely flat forgetting curves. This paper suggests a…

  6. Beam-hardening correction by a surface fitting and phase classification by a least square support vector machine approach for tomography images of geological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, F.; Enzmann, F.; Kersten, M.

    2015-12-01

    In X-ray computed microtomography (μXCT) image processing is the most important operation prior to image analysis. Such processing mainly involves artefact reduction and image segmentation. We propose a new two-stage post-reconstruction procedure of an image of a geological rock core obtained by polychromatic cone-beam μXCT technology. In the first stage, the beam-hardening (BH) is removed applying a best-fit quadratic surface algorithm to a given image data set (reconstructed slice), which minimizes the BH offsets of the attenuation data points from that surface. The final BH-corrected image is extracted from the residual data, or the difference between the surface elevation values and the original grey-scale values. For the second stage, we propose using a least square support vector machine (a non-linear classifier algorithm) to segment the BH-corrected data as a pixel-based multi-classification task. A combination of the two approaches was used to classify a complex multi-mineral rock sample. The Matlab code for this approach is provided in the Appendix. A minor drawback is that the proposed segmentation algorithm may become computationally demanding in the case of a high dimensional training data set.

  7. Targets for parathyroid hormone in secondary hyperparathyroidism: is a “one-size-fits-all” approach appropriate? A prospective incident cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recommendations for secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) consider that a “one-size-fits-all” target enables efficacy of care. In routine clinical practice, SHPT continues to pose diagnosis and treatment challenges. One hypothesis that could explain these difficulties is that dialysis population with SHPT is not homogeneous. Methods EPHEYL is a prospective, multicenter, pharmacoepidemiological study including chronic dialysis patients (≥3 months) with newly SHPT diagnosis, i.e. parathyroid hormone (PTH) ≥500 ng/L for the first time, or initiation of cinacalcet, or parathyroidectomy. Multiple correspondence analysis and ascendant hierarchical clustering on clinico-biological (symptoms, PTH, plasma phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase) and treatment of SHPT (cinacalcet, vitamin D, calcium, or calcium-free calcic phosphate binder) were performed to identify distinct phenotypes. Results 305 patients (261 with incident PTH ≥ 500 ng/L; 44 with cinacalcet initiation) were included. Their mean age was 67 ± 15 years, and 60% were men, 92% on hemodialysis and 8% on peritoneal dialysis. Four subgroups of SHPT patients were identified: 1/ “intermediate” phenotype with hyperphosphatemia without hypocalcemia (n = 113); 2/ younger patients with severe comorbidities, hyperphosphatemia and hypocalcemia, despite SHPT multiple medical treatments, suggesting poor adherence (n = 73); 3/ elderly patients with few cardiovascular comorbidities, controlled phospho-calcium balance, higher PTH, and few treatments (n = 75); 4/ patients who initiated cinacalcet (n = 43). The quality criterion of the model had a cut-off of 14 (>2), suggesting a relevant classification. Conclusion In real life, dialysis patients with newly diagnosed SHPT constitute a very heterogeneous population. A “one-size-fits-all” target approach is probably not appropriate. Therapeutic management needs to be adjusted to the 4 different phenotypes. PMID:25123022

  8. Curves and Their Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yates, Robert C.

    This volume, a reprinting of a classic first published in 1952, presents detailed discussions of 26 curves or families of curves, and 17 analytic systems of curves. For each curve the author provides a historical note, a sketch or sketches, a description of the curve, a discussion of pertinent facts, and a bibliography. Depending upon the curve,…

  9. Targeted Peptide Measurements in Biology and Medicine: Best Practices for Mass Spectrometry-based Assay Development Using a Fit-for-Purpose Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, Steven A.; Abbateillo, Susan E.; Ackermann, Bradley L.; Borchers, Christoph H.; Domon, Bruno; Deutsch, Eric W.; Grant, Russel; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Huttenhain, Ruth; Koomen, John M.; Liebler, Daniel; Liu, Tao; MacLean, Brendan; Mani, DR; Mansfield, Elizabeth; Neubert, Hendrik; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Reiter, Lukas; Vitek, Olga; Aebersold, Ruedi; Anderson, Leigh N.; Bethem, Robert; Blonder, Josip; Boja, Emily; Botelho, Julianne; Boyne, Michael; Bradshaw, Ralph A.; Burlingame, Alma S.; Chan, Daniel W.; Keshishian, Hasmik; Kuhn, Eric; Kingsinger, Christopher R.; Lee, Jerry S.; Lee, Sang-Won; Moritz, Robert L.; Oses-Prieto, Juan; Rifai, Nader; Ritchie, James E.; Rodriguez, Henry; Srinivas, Pothur R.; Townsend, Reid; Van Eyk , Jennifer; Whiteley, Gordon; Wiita, Arun; Weintraub, Susan

    2014-01-14

    Adoption of targeted mass spectrometry (MS) approaches such as multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) to study biological and biomedical questions is well underway in the proteomics community. Successful application depends on the ability to generate reliable assays that uniquely and confidently identify target peptides in a sample. Unfortunately, there is a wide range of criteria being applied to say that an assay has been successfully developed. There is no consensus on what criteria are acceptable and little understanding of the impact of variable criteria on the quality of the results generated. Publications describing targeted MS assays for peptides frequently do not contain sufficient information for readers to establish confidence that the tests work as intended or to be able to apply the tests described in their own labs. Guidance must be developed so that targeted MS assays with established performance can be made widely distributed and applied by many labs worldwide. To begin to address the problems and their solutions, a workshop was held at the National Institutes of Health with representatives from the multiple communities developing and employing targeted MS assays. Participants discussed the analytical goals of their experiments and the experimental evidence needed to establish that the assays they develop work as intended and are achieving the required levels of performance. Using this “fit-for-purpose” approach, the group defined three tiers of assays distinguished by their performance and extent of analytical characterization. Computational and statistical tools useful for the analysis of targeted MS results were described. Participants also detailed the information that authors need to provide in their manuscripts to enable reviewers and readers to clearly understand what procedures were performed and to evaluate the reliability of the peptide or protein quantification measurements reported. This paper presents a summary of the meeting and

  10. Targeted Peptide Measurements in Biology and Medicine: Best Practices for Mass Spectrometry-based Assay Development Using a Fit-for-Purpose Approach*

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Steven A.; Abbatiello, Susan E.; Ackermann, Bradley L.; Borchers, Christoph; Domon, Bruno; Deutsch, Eric W.; Grant, Russell P.; Hoofnagle, Andrew N.; Hüttenhain, Ruth; Koomen, John M.; Liebler, Daniel C.; Liu, Tao; MacLean, Brendan; Mani, DR; Mansfield, Elizabeth; Neubert, Hendrik; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Reiter, Lukas; Vitek, Olga; Aebersold, Ruedi; Anderson, Leigh; Bethem, Robert; Blonder, Josip; Boja, Emily; Botelho, Julianne; Boyne, Michael; Bradshaw, Ralph A.; Burlingame, Alma L.; Chan, Daniel; Keshishian, Hasmik; Kuhn, Eric; Kinsinger, Christopher; Lee, Jerry S.H.; Lee, Sang-Won; Moritz, Robert; Oses-Prieto, Juan; Rifai, Nader; Ritchie, James; Rodriguez, Henry; Srinivas, Pothur R.; Townsend, R. Reid; Van Eyk, Jennifer; Whiteley, Gordon; Wiita, Arun; Weintraub, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Adoption of targeted mass spectrometry (MS) approaches such as multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) to study biological and biomedical questions is well underway in the proteomics community. Successful application depends on the ability to generate reliable assays that uniquely and confidently identify target peptides in a sample. Unfortunately, there is a wide range of criteria being applied to say that an assay has been successfully developed. There is no consensus on what criteria are acceptable and little understanding of the impact of variable criteria on the quality of the results generated. Publications describing targeted MS assays for peptides frequently do not contain sufficient information for readers to establish confidence that the tests work as intended or to be able to apply the tests described in their own labs. Guidance must be developed so that targeted MS assays with established performance can be made widely distributed and applied by many labs worldwide. To begin to address the problems and their solutions, a workshop was held at the National Institutes of Health with representatives from the multiple communities developing and employing targeted MS assays. Participants discussed the analytical goals of their experiments and the experimental evidence needed to establish that the assays they develop work as intended and are achieving the required levels of performance. Using this “fit-for-purpose” approach, the group defined three tiers of assays distinguished by their performance and extent of analytical characterization. Computational and statistical tools useful for the analysis of targeted MS results were described. Participants also detailed the information that authors need to provide in their manuscripts to enable reviewers and readers to clearly understand what procedures were performed and to evaluate the reliability of the peptide or protein quantification measurements reported. This paper presents a summary of the meeting and

  11. Surface fitting three-dimensional bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejarnette, F. R.; Ford, C. P., III

    1975-01-01

    The geometry of general three-dimensional bodies was generated from coordinates of points in several cross sections. Since these points may not be on smooth curves, they are divided into groups forming segments and general conic sections are curve fit in a least-squares sense to each segment of a cross section. The conic sections are then blended in the longitudinal direction through longitudinal curves. Both the cross-sectional and longitudinal curves may be modified by specifying particular segments as straight lines or specifying slopes at selected points. This method was used to surface fit a 70 deg slab delta wing and the HL-10 Lifting Body. The results for the delta wing were very close to the exact geometry. Although there is no exact solution for the lifting body, the surface fit generated a smooth surface with cross-sectional planes very close to prescribed coordinate points.

  12. fits2hdf: FITS to HDFITS conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, D. C.; Barsdell, B. R.; Greenhill, L. J.

    2015-05-01

    fits2hdf ports FITS files to Hierarchical Data Format (HDF5) files in the HDFITS format. HDFITS allows faster reading of data, higher compression ratios, and higher throughput. HDFITS formatted data can be presented transparently as an in-memory FITS equivalent by changing the import lines in Python-based FITS utilities. fits2hdf includes a utility to port MeasurementSets (MS) to HDF5 files.

  13. Standard Mastery Curves and Skew Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warries, Egbert

    The objective of the study is to convince educational researchers of the necessity for "standard mastery curves" for the graphical representation of scores on summative tests for a group of students. Attention is drawn to the study of theoretical and empirical skew curves in education and biology. Use of standard mastery curves and study of skew…

  14. Fitting the cervical cap.

    PubMed

    Brokaw, A K; Baker, N N; Haney, S L

    1988-07-01

    The cervical cap is now available for general use by American women. Several steps are necessary to select women who are good candidates for cap usage and to successfully fit the cap. Many women are not good candidates for the cap. The cap is generally not suitable for women who have recently become sexually active or who are first-time contraceptors. Many users are women who cannot use more widely available contraceptives. Successful cap use requires a highly motivated, persistent woman who will correctly insert and remove her cap. The size, shape, length, position and location of the cervix must be assessed by the clinician prior to fitting the cap. The cervix should be visually inspected for lesions or cervicitis and a Pap smear should be taken. After an initial cap is selected, the stability of the cap, gaps between the cap and cervix, areas of uncovered cervix and the adequacy of the suction seal should be assessed. The woman should be taught how to insert and remove the cap. Additionally, she should be instructed to use a backup method of contraception until she is sure that the cap will remain in place during sexual intercourse. Successful cap fitting requires a careful, methodical approach by the clinician and a carefully selected, highly motivated client. This article presents the steps of cervical cap fitting. PMID:3405494

  15. Craniofacial reconstruction using rational cubic ball curves.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Abdul; Mt Piah, Abd Rahni; Gobithaasan, R U; Yahya, Zainor Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the reconstruction of craniofacial fracture using rational cubic Ball curve. The idea of choosing Ball curve is based on its robustness of computing efficiency over Bezier curve. The main steps are conversion of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom) images to binary images, boundary extraction and corner point detection, Ball curve fitting with genetic algorithm and final solution conversion to Dicom format. The last section illustrates a real case of craniofacial reconstruction using the proposed method which clearly indicates the applicability of this method. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) has also been developed for practical application. PMID:25880632

  16. Craniofacial Reconstruction Using Rational Cubic Ball Curves

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Abdul; Mt Piah, Abd Rahni; Gobithaasan, R. U.; Yahya, Zainor Ridzuan

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes the reconstruction of craniofacial fracture using rational cubic Ball curve. The idea of choosing Ball curve is based on its robustness of computing efficiency over Bezier curve. The main steps are conversion of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (Dicom) images to binary images, boundary extraction and corner point detection, Ball curve fitting with genetic algorithm and final solution conversion to Dicom format. The last section illustrates a real case of craniofacial reconstruction using the proposed method which clearly indicates the applicability of this method. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) has also been developed for practical application. PMID:25880632

  17. Hamiltonian inclusive fitness: a fitter fitness concept

    PubMed Central

    Costa, James T.

    2013-01-01

    In 1963–1964 W. D. Hamilton introduced the concept of inclusive fitness, the only significant elaboration of Darwinian fitness since the nineteenth century. I discuss the origin of the modern fitness concept, providing context for Hamilton's discovery of inclusive fitness in relation to the puzzle of altruism. While fitness conceptually originates with Darwin, the term itself stems from Spencer and crystallized quantitatively in the early twentieth century. Hamiltonian inclusive fitness, with Price's reformulation, provided the solution to Darwin's ‘special difficulty’—the evolution of caste polymorphism and sterility in social insects. Hamilton further explored the roles of inclusive fitness and reciprocation to tackle Darwin's other difficulty, the evolution of human altruism. The heuristically powerful inclusive fitness concept ramified over the past 50 years: the number and diversity of ‘offspring ideas’ that it has engendered render it a fitter fitness concept, one that Darwin would have appreciated. PMID:24132089

  18. Deviations from Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The possibility of complicated curves for simple kinetic schemes and the computer fitting of experimental data for acetylcholinesterase, acid phosphatase, adenosine deaminase, arylsulphatase, benzylamine oxidase, chymotrypsin, fumarase, galactose dehydrogenase, beta-galactosidase, lactate dehydrogenase, peroxidase and xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Bardsley, W G; Leff, P; Kavanagh, J; Waight, R D

    1980-01-01

    -reciprocal convexity and decrease in degree by cancellation of common factors between numerator and denominator of rate equations. These conclusions apply with even more force when catalytic steps are included, for then the rate equations, are for multi-site mechanisms, of higher degree, allowing increasingly complex curve shapes. A number of enzymes were studied and initial-rate data were fitted by computer.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:6821369

  19. Explicit superconic curves.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sunggoo

    2016-09-01

    Conics and Cartesian ovals are extremely important curves in various fields of science. In addition, aspheric curves based on conics are useful in optical design. Superconic curves, recently suggested by Greynolds, are extensions of both conics and Cartesian ovals and have been applied to optical design. However, they are not extensions of aspheric curves based on conics. In this work, we investigate another type of superconic curves. These superconic curves are extensions of not only conics and Cartesian ovals but also aspheric curves based on conics. Moreover, these are represented in explicit form, while Greynolds's superconic curves are in implicit form. PMID:27607506

  20. Frequency-Domain Identification With Composite Curve Fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.

    1994-01-01

    Improved method of parameter identification based on decomposing single wide-band model into two or more component systems in parallel. Each component model predominates in specific frequency range. Wide-band mathematical model of system identified as two narrow-band models: one containing most of information on high-frequency components of dynamics, and one containing most of information on low-frequency components. Applicable to diverse systems, including vibrating structures, electronic circuits, and control systems.

  1. Curve Fitting Solar Cell Degradation Due to Hard Particle Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Edward M.; Cikoski, Rebecca; Mekadenaumporn, Danchai

    2003-01-01

    This paper investigates the suitability of the equation for accurately defining solar cell parameter degradation as a function of hard particle radiation. The paper also provides methods for determining the constants in the equation and compares results from this equation to those obtained by the more traditionally used.

  2. One-loop stress-tensor renormalization in curved background: The relation between ζ-function and point-splitting approaches, and an improved point-splitting procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Valter

    1999-08-01

    We conclude the rigorous analysis of a previous paper [V. Moretti, Commun. Math. Phys. 201, 327 (1999)] concerning the relation between the (Euclidean) point-splitting approach and the local ζ-function procedure to renormalize physical quantities at one-loop in (Euclidean) Quantum Field Theory in curved space-time. The case of the stress tensor is now considered in general D-dimensional closed manifolds for positive scalar operators -Δ+V(x). Results obtained formally in previous works [in the case D=4 and V(x)=ξR(x)+m2] are rigorously proven and generalized. It is also proven that, in static Euclidean manifolds, the method is compatible with Lorentzian-time analytic continuations. It is proven that the result of the ζ-function procedure is the same obtained from an improved version of the point-splitting method which uses a particular choice of the term w0(x,y) in the Hadamard expansion of the Green's function, given in terms of heat-kernel coefficients. This version of the point-splitting procedure works for any value of the field mass m. If D is even, the result is affected by an arbitrary one-parameter class of (conserved in absence of external source) symmetric tensors, dependent on the geometry locally, and it gives rise to the general correct trace expression containing the renormalized field fluctuations as well as the conformal anomaly term. Furthermore, it is proven that, in the case D=4 and V(x)=ξR(x)+m2, the given procedure reduces to the Euclidean version of Wald's improved point-splitting procedure provided the arbitrary mass scale present in the ζ-function is chosen opportunely. It is finally argued that the found point-splitting method should work generally, also dropping the hypothesis of a closed manifold, and not depending on the ζ-function procedure. This fact is indeed checked in the Euclidean section of Minkowski space-time for A=-Δ+m2 where the method gives rise to the correct Minkowski stress tensor for m2⩾0 automatically.

  3. Simultaneous Fitting of Absorption Spectra and Their Second Derivatives for an Improved Analysis of Protein Infrared Spectra.

    PubMed

    Baldassarre, Maurizio; Li, Chenge; Eremina, Nadejda; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Barth, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is a powerful tool in protein science due to its sensitivity to changes in secondary structure or conformation. In order to take advantage of the full power of infrared spectroscopy in structural studies of proteins, complex band contours, such as the amide I band, have to be decomposed into their main component bands, a process referred to as curve fitting. In this paper, we report on an improved curve fitting approach in which absorption spectra and second derivative spectra are fitted simultaneously. Our approach, which we name co-fitting, leads to a more reliable modelling of the experimental data because it uses more spectral information than the standard approach of fitting only the absorption spectrum. It also avoids that the fitting routine becomes trapped in local minima. We have tested the proposed approach using infrared absorption spectra of three mixed α/β proteins with different degrees of spectral overlap in the amide I region: ribonuclease A, pyruvate kinase, and aconitase. PMID:26184143

  4. UNSUPERVISED TRANSIENT LIGHT CURVE ANALYSIS VIA HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN INFERENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Sanders, N. E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Betancourt, M.

    2015-02-10

    Historically, light curve studies of supernovae (SNe) and other transient classes have focused on individual objects with copious and high signal-to-noise observations. In the nascent era of wide field transient searches, objects with detailed observations are decreasing as a fraction of the overall known SN population, and this strategy sacrifices the majority of the information contained in the data about the underlying population of transients. A population level modeling approach, simultaneously fitting all available observations of objects in a transient sub-class of interest, fully mines the data to infer the properties of the population and avoids certain systematic biases. We present a novel hierarchical Bayesian statistical model for population level modeling of transient light curves, and discuss its implementation using an efficient Hamiltonian Monte Carlo technique. As a test case, we apply this model to the Type IIP SN sample from the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey, consisting of 18,837 photometric observations of 76 SNe, corresponding to a joint posterior distribution with 9176 parameters under our model. Our hierarchical model fits provide improved constraints on light curve parameters relevant to the physical properties of their progenitor stars relative to modeling individual light curves alone. Moreover, we directly evaluate the probability for occurrence rates of unseen light curve characteristics from the model hyperparameters, addressing observational biases in survey methodology. We view this modeling framework as an unsupervised machine learning technique with the ability to maximize scientific returns from data to be collected by future wide field transient searches like LSST.

  5. Unsupervised Transient Light Curve Analysis via Hierarchical Bayesian Inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, N. E.; Betancourt, M.; Soderberg, A. M.

    2015-02-01

    Historically, light curve studies of supernovae (SNe) and other transient classes have focused on individual objects with copious and high signal-to-noise observations. In the nascent era of wide field transient searches, objects with detailed observations are decreasing as a fraction of the overall known SN population, and this strategy sacrifices the majority of the information contained in the data about the underlying population of transients. A population level modeling approach, simultaneously fitting all available observations of objects in a transient sub-class of interest, fully mines the data to infer the properties of the population and avoids certain systematic biases. We present a novel hierarchical Bayesian statistical model for population level modeling of transient light curves, and discuss its implementation using an efficient Hamiltonian Monte Carlo technique. As a test case, we apply this model to the Type IIP SN sample from the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey, consisting of 18,837 photometric observations of 76 SNe, corresponding to a joint posterior distribution with 9176 parameters under our model. Our hierarchical model fits provide improved constraints on light curve parameters relevant to the physical properties of their progenitor stars relative to modeling individual light curves alone. Moreover, we directly evaluate the probability for occurrence rates of unseen light curve characteristics from the model hyperparameters, addressing observational biases in survey methodology. We view this modeling framework as an unsupervised machine learning technique with the ability to maximize scientific returns from data to be collected by future wide field transient searches like LSST.

  6. Physical Fitness at Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Thomas B.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Describes decline in youth fitness, emphasizing role of camping programs in youth fitness education. Describes Michigan camp's fitness program, consisting of daily workouts, fitness education, and record keeping. Describes fitness consultants' role in program. Discusses program's highlights and problems, suggesting changes for future use. Shows…

  7. Probabilistic Multi-Factor Interaction Model for Evaluating Continuous Smooth Curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2009-01-01

    The Multi-Factor Interaction Model (MFIM) is used to evaluate the divot weight (foam weight ejected) from launch external tanks. The MFIM has sufficient degrees of freedom to evaluate a large number of factors that may contribute to the divot ejection. It also accommodates all interactions by its product form. Each factor has an exponent that satisfies only two points the initial and final points. They are selected so that the MFIM will generate a common curve to fit the individual point data. The results show that the approach used generates the continuous curve.

  8. Partnerships for the Fit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golding, Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    The YMCA has helped train and employ fitness leaders while educating the public on physical fitness. Colleges and universities can help develop careers in fitness while maintaining their traditional role of developing teachers and coaches. (DF)

  9. A causal dispositional account of fitness.

    PubMed

    Triviño, Vanessa; Nuño de la Rosa, Laura

    2016-09-01

    The notion of fitness is usually equated to reproductive success. However, this actualist approach presents some difficulties, mainly the explanatory circularity problem, which have lead philosophers of biology to offer alternative definitions in which fitness and reproductive success are distinguished. In this paper, we argue  that none of these alternatives is satisfactory and, inspired by Mumford and Anjum's dispositional theory of causation, we offer a definition of fitness as a causal dispositional property. We argue that, under this framework, the distinctiveness that biologists usually attribute to fitness-namely, the fact that fitness is something different from both the physical traits of an organism and the number of offspring it leaves-can be explained, and the main problems associated with the concept of fitness can be solved. Firstly, we introduce Mumford and Anjum's dispositional theory of causation and present our definition of fitness as a causal disposition. We explain in detail each of the elements involved in our definition, namely: the relationship between fitness and the functional dispositions that compose it, the emergent character of fitness, and the context-sensitivity of fitness. Finally, we explain how fitness and realized fitness, as well as expected and realized fitness are distinguished in our approach to fitness as a causal disposition. PMID:27338570

  10. Light Curve Models for Type IA Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Inmaculada

    1993-05-01

    The most widely accepted scenario for Type Ia supernovae is the thermonuclear explosion of a C+O white dwarf which, by accretion from a companion, approaches the Chandrasekhar mass. Whilst this scenario can account for most of the observed properties of SNe Ia, the exact nature of the explosion mechanism remains uncertain. This thesis presents the results obtained from hydrodynamical model calculations of post-explosion envelope expansion. The hydrodynamics are followed in spherical symmetry using a Lagrangean code, the energy equation being solved in the diffusion approximation. The conversion of decay gamma-rays into thermal energy is treated as an absorption process, while the time-dependent opacity is calculated as a function of composition, density, temperature and velocity gradient. The results of these models--light-curve shape, maximum luminosities, and expansion velocity profiles---are compared with the bolometric observational data (SN1981B, SN1972E and the composite light curve obtained by Leibundgut for 9 SNe Ia in Virgo) and current theoretical models of the explosion mechanism. Delayed detonation and deflagration models (Bravo 1990), adopting different C ignition densities, have been investigated. In all cases, the resulting light curve is in satisfactory agreement with observations. As the ignition density varies, the maximum of light remains nearly constant and the dispersion in the rates of decline of the light curve is compatible with observations. Moreover, variation in the ignition density readily accounts for the dispersion of 1000 km s^-1 in the observed expansion velocities. Delayed detonation models yield high kinetic energies, that result in (especially for the highest ignition densities) high expansion velocities, steep post-peak declines of the light curves and velocity distribution of intermediate-mass elements that are higher than that inferred from observations. Conversely, deflagration models provide less energetic explosions. However

  11. A comparison of weight average and direct boundary fitting of sedimentation velocity data for indefinite polymerizing systems.

    PubMed

    Sontag, C A; Stafford, W F; Correia, J J

    2004-03-01

    Analysis of sedimentation velocity data for indefinite self-associating systems is often achieved by fitting of weight average sedimentation coefficients (s(20,w)) However, this method discriminates poorly between alternative models of association and is biased by the presence of inactive monomers and irreversible aggregates. Therefore, a more robust method for extracting the binding constants for indefinite self-associating systems has been developed. This approach utilizes a set of fitting routines (SedAnal) that perform global non-linear least squares fits of up to 10 sedimentation velocity experiments, corresponding to different loading concentrations, by a combination of finite element simulations and a fitting algorithm that uses a simplex convergence routine to search parameter space. Indefinite self-association is analyzed with the software program isodesfitter, which incorporates user provided functions for sedimentation coefficients as a function of the degree of polymerization for spherical, linear and helical polymer models. The computer program hydro was used to generate the sedimentation coefficient values for the linear and helical polymer assembly mechanisms. Since this curve fitting method directly fits the shape of the sedimenting boundary, it is in principle very sensitive to alternative models and the presence of species not participating in the reaction. This approach is compared with traditional fitting of weight average data and applied to the initial stages of Mg(2+)-induced tubulin self-associating into small curved polymers, and vinblastine-induced tubulin spiral formation. The appropriate use and limitations of the methods are discussed. PMID:15043931

  12. Beyond model fitting SEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreras, Ignacio

    2012-08-01

    Extracting star formation histories from spectra is a process plagued by numerous degeneracies among the parameters that contribute to the definition of the underlying stellar populations. Traditional approaches to overcome such degeneracies involve carefully defined line strength or spectral fitting procedures. However, all these methods rely on comparisons with population synthesis models. This paper illustrates alternative approaches based on the statistical properties of the information that can be extracted from uniformly selected samples of observed spectra, without any prior reference to modelling. Such methods are more useful with large datasets, such as surveys, where the information from thousands of spectra can be exploited to classify galaxies. An illustrative example is presented on the classification of early-type galaxies with optical spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey.

  13. Visualization and Curve-Parameter Estimation Strategies for Efficient Exploration of Phenotype Microarray Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Vaas, Lea A. I.; Sikorski, Johannes; Michael, Victoria; Göker, Markus; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Background The Phenotype MicroArray (OmniLog® PM) system is able to simultaneously capture a large number of phenotypes by recording an organism's respiration over time on distinct substrates. This technique targets the object of natural selection itself, the phenotype, whereas previously addressed ‘-omics’ techniques merely study components that finally contribute to it. The recording of respiration over time, however, adds a longitudinal dimension to the data. To optimally exploit this information, it must be extracted from the shapes of the recorded curves and displayed in analogy to conventional growth curves. Methodology The free software environment R was explored for both visualizing and fitting of PM respiration curves. Approaches using either a model fit (and commonly applied growth models) or a smoothing spline were evaluated. Their reliability in inferring curve parameters and confidence intervals was compared to the native OmniLog® PM analysis software. We consider the post-processing of the estimated parameters, the optimal classification of curve shapes and the detection of significant differences between them, as well as practically relevant questions such as detecting the impact of cultivation times and the minimum required number of experimental repeats. Conclusions We provide a comprehensive framework for data visualization and parameter estimation according to user choices. A flexible graphical representation strategy for displaying the results is proposed, including 95% confidence intervals for the estimated parameters. The spline approach is less prone to irregular curve shapes than fitting any of the considered models or using the native PM software for calculating both point estimates and confidence intervals. These can serve as a starting point for the automated post-processing of PM data, providing much more information than the strict dichotomization into positive and negative reactions. Our results form the basis for a freely

  14. Thermodynamically Constrained Averaging Theory Approach for Modeling Flow and Transport Phenomena in Porous Medium Systems: 8. Interface and Common Curve Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Gray, William G.; Miller, Cass T.

    2010-01-01

    This work is the eighth in a series that develops the fundamental aspects of the thermodynamically constrained averaging theory (TCAT) that allows for a systematic increase in the scale at which multiphase transport phenomena is modeled in porous medium systems. In these systems, the explicit locations of interfaces between phases and common curves, where three or more interfaces meet, are not considered at scales above the microscale. Rather, the densities of these quantities arise as areas per volume or length per volume. Modeling of the dynamics of these measures is an important challenge for robust models of flow and transport phenomena in porous medium systems, as the extent of these regions can have important implications for mass, momentum, and energy transport between and among phases, and formulation of a capillary pressure relation with minimal hysteresis. These densities do not exist at the microscale, where the interfaces and common curves correspond to particular locations. Therefore, it is necessary for a well-developed macroscale theory to provide evolution equations that describe the dynamics of interface and common curve densities. Here we point out the challenges and pitfalls in producing such evolution equations, develop a set of such equations based on averaging theorems, and identify the terms that require particular attention in experimental and computational efforts to parameterize the equations. We use the evolution equations developed to specify a closed two-fluid-phase flow model. PMID:21197134

  15. Analysis of Exoplanet Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, A.; Budding, E.; Rhodes, M. D.; Püsküllü, Ç.; Soydugan, F.; Soydugan, E.; Tüysüz, M.; Demircan, O.

    2015-07-01

    We have applied the close binary system analysis package WINFITTER to a variety of exoplanet transiting light curves taken both from the NASA Exoplanet Archive and our own ground-based observations. WINFitter has parameter options for a realistic physical model, including gravity brightening and structural parameters derived from Kopal's applications of the relevant Radau equation, and it includes appropriate tests for determinacy and adequacy of its best fitting parameter sets. We discuss a number of issues related to empirical checking of models for stellar limb darkening, surface maculation, Doppler beaming, microvariability, and transit time variation (TTV) effects. The Radau coefficients used in the light curve modeling, in principle, allow structural models of the component stars to be tested.

  16. PROFIT: Emission-line PROfile FITting routine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffel, Rogemar A.

    2012-04-01

    The PROFIT is an IDL routine to do automated fitting of emission-line profiles by Gaussian curves or Gauss-Hermite series otimized for use in Integral Field and Fabry-Perot data cubes. As output PROFIT gives two-dimensional FITS files for the emission-line flux distribution, centroid velocity, velocity dispersion and higher order Gauss-Hermite moments (h3 and h4).

  17. Replication and Analysis of Ebbinghaus’ Forgetting Curve

    PubMed Central

    Murre, Jaap M. J.; Dros, Joeri

    2015-01-01

    We present a successful replication of Ebbinghaus’ classic forgetting curve from 1880 based on the method of savings. One subject spent 70 hours learning lists and relearning them after 20 min, 1 hour, 9 hours, 1 day, 2 days, or 31 days. The results are similar to Ebbinghaus' original data. We analyze the effects of serial position on forgetting and investigate what mathematical equations present a good fit to the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve and its replications. We conclude that the Ebbinghaus forgetting curve has indeed been replicated and that it is not completely smooth but most probably shows a jump upwards starting at the 24 hour data point. PMID:26148023

  18. Physical Fitness Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdes, Alice

    This document presents baseline data on physical fitness that provides an outline for assessing the physical fitness of students. It consists of 4 tasks and a 13-item questionnaire on fitness-related behaviors. The fitness test evaluates cardiorespiratory endurance by a steady state jog; muscular strength and endurance with a two-minute bent-knee…

  19. A Quantitative Fitness Analysis Workflow

    PubMed Central

    Lydall, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative Fitness Analysis (QFA) is an experimental and computational workflow for comparing fitnesses of microbial cultures grown in parallel1,2,3,4. QFA can be applied to focused observations of single cultures but is most useful for genome-wide genetic interaction or drug screens investigating up to thousands of independent cultures. The central experimental method is the inoculation of independent, dilute liquid microbial cultures onto solid agar plates which are incubated and regularly photographed. Photographs from each time-point are analyzed, producing quantitative cell density estimates, which are used to construct growth curves, allowing quantitative fitness measures to be derived. Culture fitnesses can be compared to quantify and rank genetic interaction strengths or drug sensitivities. The effect on culture fitness of any treatments added into substrate agar (e.g. small molecules, antibiotics or nutrients) or applied to plates externally (e.g. UV irradiation, temperature) can be quantified by QFA. The QFA workflow produces growth rate estimates analogous to those obtained by spectrophotometric measurement of parallel liquid cultures in 96-well or 200-well plate readers. Importantly, QFA has significantly higher throughput compared with such methods. QFA cultures grow on a solid agar surface and are therefore well aerated during growth without the need for stirring or shaking. QFA throughput is not as high as that of some Synthetic Genetic Array (SGA) screening methods5,6. However, since QFA cultures are heavily diluted before being inoculated onto agar, QFA can capture more complete growth curves, including exponential and saturation phases3. For example, growth curve observations allow culture doubling times to be estimated directly with high precision, as discussed previously1. Here we present a specific QFA protocol applied to thousands of S. cerevisiae cultures which are automatically handled by robots during inoculation, incubation and imaging

  20. A quantitative fitness analysis workflow.

    PubMed

    Banks, A P; Lawless, C; Lydall, D A

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative Fitness Analysis (QFA) is an experimental and computational workflow for comparing fitnesses of microbial cultures grown in parallel(1,2,3,4). QFA can be applied to focused observations of single cultures but is most useful for genome-wide genetic interaction or drug screens investigating up to thousands of independent cultures. The central experimental method is the inoculation of independent, dilute liquid microbial cultures onto solid agar plates which are incubated and regularly photographed. Photographs from each time-point are analyzed, producing quantitative cell density estimates, which are used to construct growth curves, allowing quantitative fitness measures to be derived. Culture fitnesses can be compared to quantify and rank genetic interaction strengths or drug sensitivities. The effect on culture fitness of any treatments added into substrate agar (e.g. small molecules, antibiotics or nutrients) or applied to plates externally (e.g. UV irradiation, temperature) can be quantified by QFA. The QFA workflow produces growth rate estimates analogous to those obtained by spectrophotometric measurement of parallel liquid cultures in 96-well or 200-well plate readers. Importantly, QFA has significantly higher throughput compared with such methods. QFA cultures grow on a solid agar surface and are therefore well aerated during growth without the need for stirring or shaking. QFA throughput is not as high as that of some Synthetic Genetic Array (SGA) screening methods(5,6). However, since QFA cultures are heavily diluted before being inoculated onto agar, QFA can capture more complete growth curves, including exponential and saturation phases(3). For example, growth curve observations allow culture doubling times to be estimated directly with high precision, as discussed previously(1). Here we present a specific QFA protocol applied to thousands of S. cerevisiae cultures which are automatically handled by robots during inoculation, incubation and

  1. Learning curves in classification with microarray data.

    PubMed

    Hess, Kenneth R; Wei, Caimiao

    2010-02-01

    The performance of many repeated tasks improves with experience and practice. This improvement tends to be rapid initially and then decreases. The term "learning curve" is often used to describe the phenomenon. In supervised machine learning, the performance of classification algorithms often increases with the number of observations used to train the algorithm. We use progressively larger samples of observations to train the algorithm and then plot performance against the number of training observations. This yields the familiar negatively accelerating learning curve. To quantify the learning curve, we fit inverse power law models to the progressively sampled data. We fit such learning curves to four large clinical cancer genomic datasets, using three classifiers (diagonal linear discriminant analysis, K-nearest-neighbor with three neighbors, and support vector machines) and four values for the number of top genes included (5, 50, 500, 5,000). The inverse power law models fit the progressively sampled data reasonably well and showed considerable diversity when multiple classifiers are applied to the same data. Some classifiers showed rapid and continued increase in performance as the number of training samples increased, while others showed little if any improvement. Assessing classifier efficiency is particularly important in genomic studies since samples are so expensive to obtain. It is important to employ an algorithm that uses the predictive information efficiently, but with a modest number of training samples (>50), learning curves can be used to assess the predictive efficiency of classification algorithms. PMID:20172367

  2. Model-Free Estimation of Tuning Curves and Their Attentional Modulation, Based on Sparse and Noisy Data.

    PubMed

    Helmer, Markus; Kozyrev, Vladislav; Stephan, Valeska; Treue, Stefan; Geisel, Theo; Battaglia, Demian

    2016-01-01

    Tuning curves are the functions that relate the responses of sensory neurons to various values within one continuous stimulus dimension (such as the orientation of a bar in the visual domain or the frequency of a tone in the auditory domain). They are commonly determined by fitting a model e.g. a Gaussian or other bell-shaped curves to the measured responses to a small subset of discrete stimuli in the relevant dimension. However, as neuronal responses are irregular and experimental measurements noisy, it is often difficult to determine reliably the appropriate model from the data. We illustrate this general problem by fitting diverse models to representative recordings from area MT in rhesus monkey visual cortex during multiple attentional tasks involving complex composite stimuli. We find that all models can be well-fitted, that the best model generally varies between neurons and that statistical comparisons between neuronal responses across different experimental conditions are affected quantitatively and qualitatively by specific model choices. As a robust alternative to an often arbitrary model selection, we introduce a model-free approach, in which features of interest are extracted directly from the measured response data without the need of fitting any model. In our attentional datasets, we demonstrate that data-driven methods provide descriptions of tuning curve features such as preferred stimulus direction or attentional gain modulations which are in agreement with fit-based approaches when a good fit exists. Furthermore, these methods naturally extend to the frequent cases of uncertain model selection. We show that model-free approaches can identify attentional modulation patterns, such as general alterations of the irregular shape of tuning curves, which cannot be captured by fitting stereotyped conventional models. Finally, by comparing datasets across different conditions, we demonstrate effects of attention that are cell- and even stimulus

  3. Model-Free Estimation of Tuning Curves and Their Attentional Modulation, Based on Sparse and Noisy Data

    PubMed Central

    Helmer, Markus; Kozyrev, Vladislav; Stephan, Valeska; Treue, Stefan; Geisel, Theo; Battaglia, Demian

    2016-01-01

    Tuning curves are the functions that relate the responses of sensory neurons to various values within one continuous stimulus dimension (such as the orientation of a bar in the visual domain or the frequency of a tone in the auditory domain). They are commonly determined by fitting a model e.g. a Gaussian or other bell-shaped curves to the measured responses to a small subset of discrete stimuli in the relevant dimension. However, as neuronal responses are irregular and experimental measurements noisy, it is often difficult to determine reliably the appropriate model from the data. We illustrate this general problem by fitting diverse models to representative recordings from area MT in rhesus monkey visual cortex during multiple attentional tasks involving complex composite stimuli. We find that all models can be well-fitted, that the best model generally varies between neurons and that statistical comparisons between neuronal responses across different experimental conditions are affected quantitatively and qualitatively by specific model choices. As a robust alternative to an often arbitrary model selection, we introduce a model-free approach, in which features of interest are extracted directly from the measured response data without the need of fitting any model. In our attentional datasets, we demonstrate that data-driven methods provide descriptions of tuning curve features such as preferred stimulus direction or attentional gain modulations which are in agreement with fit-based approaches when a good fit exists. Furthermore, these methods naturally extend to the frequent cases of uncertain model selection. We show that model-free approaches can identify attentional modulation patterns, such as general alterations of the irregular shape of tuning curves, which cannot be captured by fitting stereotyped conventional models. Finally, by comparing datasets across different conditions, we demonstrate effects of attention that are cell- and even stimulus

  4. A Novel Approach Utilizing Biofilm Time-Kill Curves To Assess the Bactericidal Activity of Ceftaroline Combinations against Biofilm-Producing Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Katie E.; Werth, Brian J.; McRoberts, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Medical device infections frequently require combination therapy. Beta-lactams combined with glycopeptides/lipopeptides are bactericidal against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Novel macrowell kill-curve methods tested synergy between ceftaroline or cefazolin plus daptomycin, vancomycin, or rifampin against biofilm-producing MRSA. Ceftaroline combinations demonstrated the most pronounced bacterial reductions. Ceftaroline demonstrated greatest kill with daptomycin (4.02 ± 0.59 log10 CFU/cm2), compared to combination with vancomycin (3.36 ± 0.35 log10 CFU/cm2) or rifampin (2.68 ± 0.61 log10 CFU/cm2). These data suggest that beta-lactam combinations are useful against MRSA biofilms. PMID:24614378

  5. Phenomenological modelling of eclipsing system light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulášek, Zdeněk

    2015-12-01

    Context. The observed light curves of most eclipsing binaries and stars with transiting planets can be described well and interpreted by current advanced physical models that also allow for determining many of the physical parameters of eclipsing systems. However, for several common practical tasks, there is no need to know the detailed physics of a variable star, but only the shapes of their light curves or other phase curves. Aims: We present a set of phenomenological models for the light curves of eclipsing systems. Methods: We express the observed light curves of eclipsing binaries and stars, which are transited by their exoplanets orbiting in circular trajectories, by a sum of special, analytical, few-parameter functions that enable fitting their light curves with an accuracy of better than 1%. The proposed set of phenomenological models of eclipsing variable light curves were then tested on several real systems. For XY Bootis, we also give a detailed comparison of the results obtained using our phenomenological modelling with those found using available physical models. Results: We demonstrate that the proposed phenomenological models of transiting exoplanet and eclipsing binary light curves applied to ground-based photometric observations yield results compatible with those obtained by applying more complex physical models. Conclusions: The suggested phenomenological modelling appears useful for solving a number of common tasks in the field of eclipsing variable research.

  6. Development of an Innovative Process Evaluation Approach for the Families Improving Together (FIT) for Weight Loss Trial in African American Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Alia, Kassandra; Wilson, Dawn K.; McDaniel, Tyler; St. George, Sara M.; Kitzman-Ulrich, Heather; Smith, Kelsey; Heatley, VaShawn; Wise, Courtney

    2015-01-01

    This study demonstrates how a multi-theoretical, multilevel process evaluation was used to assess implementation of Families Improving Together (FIT) for weight loss intervention. FIT is a randomized controlled trial evaluating a culturally tailored, motivational plus family-based program on weight loss in African American adolescents and their parents. Social Cognitive, Self Determination, Family Systems theories and cultural tailoring principles guided the conceptualization of essential elements across individual/family, facilitator, and group levels. Data collection included an observational rating tool, attendance records, and a validated psychosocial measure. Results. Attendance records (0=absent, 1=present, criteria=≥70%) indicated that 71.5% of families attended each session. The survey (1=false, 6=true, criteria=≥4.5) indicated that participants perceived a positive group climate (M=5.16, SD=.69). A trained evaluator reported that facilitator dose delivered (0=no, 1=yes, criteria=≥75%) was high (99.6%), and fidelity (1=none to 4=all, criteria=≥3) was adequate at facilitator (M=3.63, SD=.41) and group levels (M=3.35, SD=.49). Five cultural topics were raised by participants related to eating (n=3) and physical activity (n=2) behaviors and were integrated as part of the final curriculum. Discussion. Results identify areas for program improvement related to delivery of multi-theoretical and cultural tailoring elements. Findings may inform future strategies for implementing effective weight loss programs for ethnic minority families. PMID:25614139

  7. Superelastic Ball Bearings: Materials and Design to Avoid Mounting and Dismounting Brinell Damage in an Inaccessible Press-Fit Application-. I ; Design Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Howard, S. Adam

    2015-01-01

    Ball bearings require proper fit and installation into machinery structures (onto shafts and into bearing housings) to ensure optimal performance. For some applications, both the inner and outer race must be mounted with an interference fit and care must be taken during assembly and disassembly to avoid placing heavy static loads between the balls and races otherwise Brinell dent type damage can occur. In this paper, a highly dent resistant superelastic alloy, 60NiTi, is considered for rolling element bearing applications that encounter excessive static axial loading during assembly or disassembly. A small (R8) ball bearing is designed for an application in which access to the bearing races to apply disassembly tools is precluded. First Principles analyses show that by careful selection of materials, raceway curvature and land geometry, a bearing can be designed that allows blind assembly and disassembly without incurring raceway damage due to ball denting. Though such blind assembly applications are uncommon, the availability of bearings with unusually high static load capability may enable more such applications with additional benefits, especially for miniature bearings.

  8. A novel approach to fitting the von Bertalanffy relationship to a mixed stock of Atlantic sturgeon harvested off the New Jersey Coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.; McKenna, James E., Jr.; Dropkin, David S.; Andrews, William D.

    2005-01-01

    We examined the growth characteristics of 303 Atlantic sturgeon, Acipenser oxyrinchus, caught in the commercial fishery off the New Jersey coast from 1992 to 1994 (fork length range: 93–219 cm). Sections taken from the leading pectoral fin ray were used to age each sturgeon. Ages ranged from 5–26 years. Von Bertalanffy growth models for males and females fit well, but test statistics (t-test, maximum likelihood) failed to reject the null hypothesis that growth was not significantly different between sexes. Consequently, all data were pooled and the combined data gave L∞ and K estimates of 174.2 cm and 0.144, respectively. Our growth data do not fit the pattern of slower growth and increased size in more northernly latitudes for Atlantic sturgeon observed in other work. Lack of uniformity of our growth data may be due to (1) the sturgeon fishery harvesting multiple stocks having different growth rates, and (2) size limits for the commercial fishery having created a bias in estimating growth parameters.

  9. ACSM Fit Society Page

    MedlinePlus

    ... Exercise Current Sports Medicine Reports Exercise and Sport Sciences Reviews ACSM's Health & Fitness Journal Guidelines Books & Multimedia Sports Medicine Basics Fact Sheets Sports Medicine & Physical Activity Marketplace Health & Physical Activity Reference Database Fit ...

  10. Proper fitting shoes (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... should be comfortable and fit well when you buy them. Never buy shoes that are tight, hoping they will stretch ... should be comfortable and fit well when you buy them. Never buy shoes that are tight, hoping ...

  11. Fitness Shoes and Clothes

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Go4Life Get Free Stuff Be a Partner Fitness Shoes and Clothes Choosing the right clothing and ... be a great motivator! Download the Tip Sheet Fitness Shoes and Clothes (PDF, 436.87 KB) You ...

  12. Family Activities for Fitness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosse, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses how families can increase family togetherness and improve physical fitness. The author provides easy ways to implement family friendly activities for improving and maintaining physical health. These activities include: walking, backyard games, and fitness challenges.

  13. ACSM Fit Society Page

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physical Activity Marketplace Health & Physical Activity Reference Database Public Information Newsletters ACSM Blog ACSM Blog Search By ... Activity Marketplace Health & Physical Activity Reference Database Home Public Information Newsletters Fit Society Page ACSM Fit Society ® ...

  14. Symmetry Properties of Potentiometric Titration Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macca, Carlo; Bombi, G. Giorgio

    1983-01-01

    Demonstrates how the symmetry properties of titration curves can be efficiently and rigorously treated by means of a simple method, assisted by the use of logarithmic diagrams. Discusses the symmetry properties of several typical titration curves, comparing the graphical approach and an explicit mathematical treatment. (Author/JM)

  15. Mixture Modeling of Individual Learning Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Streeter, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We show that student learning can be accurately modeled using a mixture of learning curves, each of which specifies error probability as a function of time. This approach generalizes Knowledge Tracing [7], which can be viewed as a mixture model in which the learning curves are step functions. We show that this generality yields order-of-magnitude…

  16. Reaching Your Fitness Goals

    MedlinePlus

    Everyday Fitness Ideas from the National Institute on Aging at NIH www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Reaching Your Fitness Goals You’ll begin to see results in ... longer, and more easily. As you increase your fitness level, you also might find that you need ...

  17. Reliable estimation of biochemical parameters from C3 leaf photosynthesis-intercellular carbon dioxide response curves

    SciTech Connect

    Wullschleger, Stan D; Gu, Lianhong; Pallardy, Stephen G.; Tu, Kevin; Law, Beverly E.

    2010-01-01

    The Farquhar-von Caemmerer-Berry (FvCB) model of photosynthesis is a change-point model and structurally overparameterized for interpreting the response of leaf net assimilation (A) to intercellular CO{sub 2} concentration (Ci). The use of conventional fitting methods may lead not only to incorrect parameters but also several previously unrecognized consequences. For example, the relationships between key parameters may be fixed computationally and certain fits may be produced in which the estimated parameters result in contradictory identification of the limitation states of the data. Here we describe a new approach that is better suited to the FvCB model characteristics. It consists of four main steps: (1) enumeration of all possible distributions of limitation states; (2) fitting the FvCB model to each limitation state distribution by minimizing a distribution-wise cost function that has desirable properties for parameter estimation; (3) identification and correction of inadmissible fits; and (4) selection of the best fit from all possible limitation state distributions. The new approach implemented theoretical parameter resolvability with numerical procedures that maximally use the information content of the data. It was tested with model simulations, sampled A/Ci curves, and chlorophyll fluorescence measurements of different tree species. The new approach is accessible through the automated website leafweb.ornl.gov.

  18. Transition energy and potential energy curves for ionized inner-shell states of CO, O2 and N 2 calculated by several inner-shell multiconfigurational approaches.

    PubMed

    Moura, Carlos E V de; Oliveira, Ricardo R; Rocha, Alexandre B

    2013-05-01

    Potential energy curves and inner-shell ionization energies of carbon monoxide, oxygen and nitrogen molecules were calculated using several forms of the inner-shell multiconfigurational self-consistent field (IS-MCSCF) method-a recently proposed protocol to obtain specifically converged inner-shell states at this level. The particular forms of the IS-MCSCF method designated IS-GVB-PP, IS-FVBL and IS-CASSCF stand for perfect pairing generalized valence bond, full valence bond-like MCSCF and complete active space self consistent field, respectively. A comparison of these different versions of the IS-MCSCF method was carried out for the first time. The results indicate that inner-shell states are described accurately even for the simplest version of the method (IS-GVB-PP). Dynamic correlation was recovered by multireference configuration interaction or multireference perturbation theory. For molecules not having equivalent atoms, all methods led to comparable and accurate transition energies. For molecules with equivalent atoms, the most accurate results were obtained by multireference perturbation theory. Scalar relativistic effects were accounted for using the Douglas-Kroll-Hess Hamiltonian. PMID:23070335

  19. rpoB gene high-resolution melt curve analysis: a rapid approach for diagnosis and screening of drug resistance in tuberculous meningitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kusum; Modi, Manish; Kaur, Harsimran; Sharma, Aman; Ray, Pallab; Varma, Subhash

    2015-10-01

    Timely and rapid diagnosis of multidrug resistance in tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is a challenge both for a microbiologist and neurologist. The present study was conducted to evaluate role of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using rpoB, IS6110, and MPB64 as targets in diagnosis of TBM in 110 patients and subsequent high-resolution melt (HRM) curve analysis of rpoB gene amplicons for screening of drug resistance. The sensitivity of smear, culture, and real-time PCR was 1.8%, 10.9%, and 83.63%, respectively. All 120 control patients showed negative results. With HRM rpoB analysis, rifampicin resistance was detected in 3 out of 110 cases of TBM (3.33%). Subsequently, results of HRM analysis were confirmed by rpoB gene sequencing, and mutations were observed at 516 (2 patients) and 531 (1 patient) codons, respectively. rpoB HRM analysis can be a promising tool for rapid diagnosis and screening of drug resistance in TBM patients in 90minutes. PMID:26254140

  20. Deformable Face Fitting with Soft Correspondence Constraints

    PubMed Central

    Saragih, Jason M.; Lucey, Simon; Cohn, Jeffrey F.

    2010-01-01

    Despite significant progress in deformable model fitting over the last decade, the problem of efficient and accurate person-independent face fitting remains a challenging problem. In this work, a reformulation of the generative fitting objective is presented, where only soft correspondences between the model and the image are enforced. This has the dual effect of improving robustness to unseen faces as well as affording fitting time which scales linearly with the model’s complexity. This approach is compared with three state-of-the-art fitting methods on the problem of person independent face fitting, where it is shown to closely approach the accuracy of the currently best performing method while affording significant computational savings. PMID:20411036

  1. Regime Switching in the Latent Growth Curve Mixture Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolan, Conor V.; Schmittmann, Verena D.; Lubke, Gitta H.; Neale, Michael C.

    2005-01-01

    A linear latent growth curve mixture model is presented which includes switching between growth curves. Switching is accommodated by means of a Markov transition model. The model is formulated with switching as a highly constrained multivariate mixture model and is fitted using the freely available Mx program. The model is illustrated by analyzing…

  2. Spiral Galaxy Central Bulge Tangential Speed of Revolution Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taff, Laurence

    2013-03-01

    The objective was to, for the first time in a century, scientifically analyze the ``rotation curves'' (sic) of the central bulges of scores of spiral galaxies. I commenced with a methodological, rational, geometrical, arithmetic, and statistical examination--none of them carried through before--of the radial velocity data. The requirement for such a thorough treatment is the paucity of data typically available for the central bulge: fewer than 10 observations and frequently only five. The most must be made of these. A consequence of this logical handling is the discovery of a unique model for the central bulge volume mass density resting on the positive slope, linear, rise of its tangential speed of revolution curve and hence--for the first time--a reliable mass estimate. The deduction comes from a known physics-based, mathematically valid, derivation (not assertion). It rests on the full (not partial) equations of motion plus Poisson's equation. Following that is a prediction for the gravitational potential energy and thence the gravitational force. From this comes a forecast for the tangential speed of revolution curve. It was analyzed in a fashion identical to that of the data thereby closing the circle and demonstrating internal self-consistency. This is a hallmark of a scientific method-informed approach to an experimental problem. Multiple plots of the relevant quantities and measures of goodness of fit will be shown. Astronomy related

  3. IAEA Coordinated Research Project on Master Curve Approach to Monitor Fracture Toughness of RPV Steels: Final Results of the Experimental Exercise to Support Constraint Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, Randy K

    2009-01-01

    The precracked Charpy single-edge notched bend, SE(B), specimen (PCC) is the most likely specimen type to be used for determination of the reference temperature, T0, with reactor pressure vessel (RPV) surveillance specimens. Unfortunately, for many RPV steels, significant differences have been observed between the T0 temperature for the PCC specimen and that obtained from the 25-mm thick compact specimen [1TC(T)], generally considered the standard reference specimen for T0. This difference in T0 has often been designated a specimen bias effect, and the primary focus for explaining this effect is loss of constraint in the PCC specimen. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has developed a coordinated research project (CRP) to evaluate various issues associated with the fracture toughness Master Curve for application to light-water RPVs. Topic Area 1 of the CRP is focused on the issue of test specimen geometry effects, with emphasis on determination of T0 with the PCC specimen and the bias effect. Topic Area 1 has an experimental part and an analytical part. Participating organizations for the experimental part of the CRP performed fracture toughness testing of various steels, including the reference steel JRQ (A533-B-1) often used for IAEA studies, with various types of specimens under various conditions. Additionally, many of the participants took part in a round robin exercise on finite element modeling of the PCVN specimen, discussed in a separate paper. Results from fracture toughness tests are compared with regard to effects of specimen size and type on the reference temperature T0. It is apparent from the results presented that the bias observed between the PCC specimen and larger specimens for Plate JRQ is not nearly as large as that obtained for Plate 13B (-11 C vs -37 C) and for some of the results in the literature (bias values as much as -45 C). This observation is consistent with observations in the literature that show significant variations in

  4. A new methodology for free wake analysis using curved vortex elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bliss, Donald B.; Teske, Milton E.; Quackenbush, Todd R.

    1987-01-01

    A method using curved vortex elements was developed for helicopter rotor free wake calculations. The Basic Curve Vortex Element (BCVE) is derived from the approximate Biot-Savart integration for a parabolic arc filament. When used in conjunction with a scheme to fit the elements along a vortex filament contour, this method has a significant advantage in overall accuracy and efficiency when compared to the traditional straight-line element approach. A theoretical and numerical analysis shows that free wake flows involving close interactions between filaments should utilize curved vortex elements in order to guarantee a consistent level of accuracy. The curved element method was implemented into a forward flight free wake analysis, featuring an adaptive far wake model that utilizes free wake information to extend the vortex filaments beyond the free wake regions. The curved vortex element free wake, coupled with this far wake model, exhibited rapid convergence, even in regions where the free wake and far wake turns are interlaced. Sample calculations are presented for tip vortex motion at various advance ratios for single and multiple blade rotors. Cross-flow plots reveal that the overall downstream wake flow resembles a trailing vortex pair. A preliminary assessment shows that the rotor downwash field is insensitive to element size, even for relatively large curved elements.

  5. Floating shock fitting via Lagrangian adaptive meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanrosendale, John

    1995-01-01

    In recent work we have formulated a new approach to compressible flow simulation, combining the advantages of shock-fitting and shock-capturing. Using a cell-centered on Roe scheme discretization on unstructured meshes, we warp the mesh while marching to steady state, so that mesh edges align with shocks and other discontinuities. This new algorithm, the Shock-fitting Lagrangian Adaptive Method (SLAM), is, in effect, a reliable shock-capturing algorithm which yields shock-fitted accuracy at convergence.

  6. Research and optimization on stator curve for roller pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, G. L.; Zhang, J. F.; Su, H. S.; Zhang, L. Q.

    2013-12-01

    By analyzing the advantages and disadvantages of common roller pump's stator curve (assuming that the roller on this stator curve has eliminated the void point), using curve fitting transitional method to pass the soft and hard impact point, then we can obtain a high order stator curve which has lower noise. By creating a smooth stator curve (and an inflection point with a common tangent) radial velocity mutation is eliminated. In order to avoid radial velocity mutation a symmetrical radial acceleration curve is used. In order to eliminate radial acceleration mutation, both ends of the radial acceleration change rate curve are valued zero. The results showed that due to the catastrophe point of the roller's stator curve, improving its stator curve eliminates the void point and the soft and hard impact point of the roller on the stator transitional curve. Compare the eighth-power stator curve with the improved stator curve, the improved curve also has the same superior performance. On the improved stator curve, the flow pulsation could be decreased by 241.39mL/min, with which the abrasion of the roller, the impact of the pump and the noise of the pump can be reduced.

  7. The Skipping Rope Curve

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordmark, Arne; Essen, Hanno

    2007-01-01

    The equilibrium of a flexible inextensible string, or chain, in the centrifugal force field of a rotating reference frame is investigated. It is assumed that the end points are fixed on the rotation axis. The shape of the curve, the skipping rope curve or "troposkien", is given by the Jacobi elliptic function sn. (Contains 3 figures.)

  8. Anodic Polarization Curves Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Yue; Drew, Michael G. B.; Liu, Ying; Liu, Lin

    2013-01-01

    An experiment published in this "Journal" has been revisited and it is found that the curve pattern of the anodic polarization curve for iron repeats itself successively when the potential scan is repeated. It is surprising that this observation has not been reported previously in the literature because it immediately brings into…

  9. Flow-duration curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Searcy, James Kincheon

    1959-01-01

    The flow-duration curve is a cumulative frequency curve that shows the percent of time specified discharges were equaled or exceeded during a given period. It combines in one curve the flow characteristics of a stream throughout the range of discharge, without regard to the sequence of occurrence. If the period upon which the curve is based represents the long-term flow of a stream, the curve may be used to predict the distribution of future flows for water- power, water-supply, and pollution studies. This report shows that differences in geology affect the low-flow ends of flow-duration curves of streams in adjacent basins. Thus, duration curves are useful in appraising the geologic characteristics of drainage basins. A method for adjusting flow-duration curves of short periods to represent long-term conditions is presented. The adjustment is made by correlating the records of a short-term station with those of a long-term station.

  10. CUBIC SPLINE SMOOTHING: A USEFUL TOOL FOR CURVE ESTIMATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Data analysis frequently involves fitting curves to data. Often the investigator has no idea what the underlying functional relationship is and ordinary functions or polynomials fit poorly. This is especially common with experimental data that has a lot of noise and/or measuremen...

  11. A new curriculum for fitness education.

    PubMed Central

    Boone, J L

    1983-01-01

    Regular exercise is important in a preventive approach to health care because it exerts a beneficial effect on many risk factors in the development of coronary heart disease. However, many Americans lack the skills required to devise and carry out a safe and effective exercise program appropriate for a life-time of fitness. This inability is partly due to the lack of fitness education during their school years. School programs in physical education tend to neglect training in the health-related aspects of fitness. Therefore, a new curriculum for fitness education is proposed that would provide seventh, eighth, and ninth grade students with (a) a basic knowledge of their physiological response to exercise, (b) the means to develop their own safe and effective physical fitness program, and (c) the motivation to incorporate regular exercise into their lifestyle. This special 4-week segment of primarily academic study is designed to be inserted into the physical education curriculum. Daily lessons cover health-related fitness, cardiovascular fitness, body fitness, and care of the back. A final written examination covering major areas of information is given to emphasize this academic approach to exercise. Competition in athletic ability is deemphasized, and motivational awards are given based on health-related achievements. The public's present lack of knowledge about physical fitness, coupled with the numerous anatomical and physiological benefits derived from regular, vigorous exercise, mandate an intensified curriculum of fitness education for school children. PMID:6414039

  12. Discovering an Accessible Enzyme: Salivary [alpha]-Amylase--"Prima Digestio Fit in Ore"--A Didactic Approach for High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, Isabella

    2005-01-01

    Human salivary [alpha]-amylase is used in this experimental approach to introduce biology high school students to the concept of enzyme activity in a dynamic way. Through a series of five easy, rapid, and inexpensive laboratory experiments students learn what the activity of an enzyme consists of: first in a qualitative then in a semi-quantitative…

  13. What Current Research Tells Us About Physical Fitness for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cundiff, David E.

    The author distinguishes between the terms "physical fitness" and "motor performance," summarizes the health and physical status of adults, surveys the physical fitness status of children, and proposes a lifestyle approach to the development and lifetime maintenance of health and physical fitness. The distinctions between "physical fitness" as…

  14. The Very Essentials of Fitness for Trial Assessment in Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newby, Diana; Faltin, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Fitness for trial constitutes the most frequent referral to forensic assessment services. Several approaches to this evaluation exist in Canada, including the Fitness Interview Test and Basic Fitness for Trial Test. The following article presents a review of the issues and a method for basic fitness for trial evaluation.

  15. Method and models for R-curve instability calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, Thomas W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a simple method for performing elastic R-curve instability calculations. For a single material-structure combination, the calculations can be done on some pocket calculators. On microcomputers and larger, it permits the development of a comprehensive program having libraries of driving force equations for different configurations and R-curve model equations for different materials. The paper also presents several model equations for fitting to experimental R-curve data, both linear elastic and elastoplastic. The models are fit to data from the literature to demonstrate their viability.

  16. Method and models for R-curve instability calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orange, Thomas W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents a simple method for performing elastic R-curve instability calculations. For a single material-structure combination, the calculations can be done on some pocket calculators. On microcomputers and larger, it permits the development of a comprehensive program having libraries of driving force equations for different configurations and R-curve model equations for different materials. The paper also presents several model equations for fitting to experimental R-curve data, both linear elastic and elastoplastic. The models are fit to data from the literature to demonstrate their viability.

  17. Leak test fitting

    DOEpatents

    Pickett, P.T.

    A hollow fitting for use in gas spectrometry leak testing of conduit joints is divided into two generally symmetrical halves along the axis of the conduit. A clip may quickly and easily fasten and unfasten the halves around the conduit joint under test. Each end of the fitting is sealable with a yieldable material, such as a piece of foam rubber. An orifice is provided in a wall of the fitting for the insertion or detection of helium during testing. One half of the fitting also may be employed to test joints mounted against a surface.

  18. Leak test fitting

    DOEpatents

    Pickett, Patrick T.

    1981-01-01

    A hollow fitting for use in gas spectrometry leak testing of conduit joints is divided into two generally symmetrical halves along the axis of the conduit. A clip may quickly and easily fasten and unfasten the halves around the conduit joint under test. Each end of the fitting is sealable with a yieldable material, such as a piece of foam rubber. An orifice is provided in a wall of the fitting for the insertion or detection of helium during testing. One half of the fitting also may be employed to test joints mounted against a surface.

  19. Mechanics of Curved Folds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Marcelo A.; Santangelo, Christian D.

    2011-03-01

    Despite an almost two thousand year history, origami, the art of folding paper, remains a challenge both artistically and scientifically. Traditionally, origami is practiced by folding along straight creases. A whole new set of shapes can be explored, however, if, instead of straight creases, one folds along arbitrary curves. We present a mechanical model for curved fold origami in which the energy of a plastically-deformed crease is balanced by the bending energy of developable regions on either side of the crease. Though geometry requires that a sheet buckle when folded along a closed curve, its shape depends on the elasticity of the sheet. NSF DMR-0846582.

  20. HfS: Hyperfine Structure fitting tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estalella, Robert

    2016-07-01

    HfS fits the hyperfine structure of spectral lines, with multiple velocity components. The HfS_nh3 procedures included in HfS fit simultaneously the hyperfine structure of the NH3 (J,K)= (1,1) and (2,2) inversion transitions, and perform a standard analysis to derive the NH3 column density, rotational temperature Trot, and kinetic temperature Tk. HfS uses a Monte Carlo approach for fitting the line parameters, with special attention to the derivation of the parameter uncertainties. HfS includes procedures that make use of parallel computing for fitting spectra from a data cube.

  1. Development of a Single Station 6C-Approach for Array Analysis and Microzonation: Using Vertical Rotation Rate to Estimate Love-Wave Disperion Curves and Direction Finding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassermann, J. M.; Wietek, A.; Hadziioannou, C.; Igel, H.

    2014-12-01

    Microzonation, i.e. the estimation of (shear) wave velocity profiles of the upper few 100m in dense 2D surface grids is one of the key methods to understand the variation in seismic hazard caused by ground shaking events. In this presentation we introduce a novel method for estimating the Love-wave phase velocity dispersion by using ambient noise recordings. We use the vertical component of rotational motions inherently present in ambient noise and the well established relation to simultaneous recordings of transverse acceleration. In this relation the frequency dependent phase velocity of a plane SH (or Love)-type wave acts as a proportionality factor between the anti-correlated amplitudes of both measures. In a first step we used synthetic data sets with increasing complexity to evaluate the proposed technique and the developed algorithm to extract the direction and amplitude of the incoming ambient noise wavefield measured at a single site. Since reliable weak rotational motion sensors are not yet readily available, we apply array derived rotation measurements in order to test our method. We next use the technique to analyze different real data sets of ambient noise measurements as well as seismic recordings at active volcanoes and compare these results with findings of the Spatial AutoCorrelation technique which was applied to the same data set. We demonstrate that the newly developed technique shows comparable results to more classical, strictly array based methods. Furthermore, we show that as soon as portable weak motion rotational motion sensors are available, a single 6C-station approach will be feasible, not only for microzonation but also for general array applications, with performance comparable to more classical techniques. An important advantage, especially in urban environments, is that with this approach, the number of seismic stations needed is drastically reduced.

  2. Optical conductivity of curved graphene.

    PubMed

    Chaves, A J; Frederico, T; Oliveira, O; de Paula, W; Santos, M C

    2014-05-01

    We compute the optical conductivity for an out-of-plane deformation in graphene using an approach based on solutions of the Dirac equation in curved space. Different examples of periodic deformations along one direction translates into an enhancement of the optical conductivity peaks in the region of the far- and mid-infrared frequencies for periodicities ∼100 nm. The width and position of the peaks can be changed by dialling the parameters of the deformation profiles. The enhancement of the optical conductivity is due to intraband transitions and the translational invariance breaking in the geometrically deformed background. Furthermore, we derive an analytical solution of the Dirac equation in a curved space for a general deformation along one spatial direction. For this class of geometries, it is shown that curvature induces an extra phase in the electron wave function, which can also be explored to produce interference devices of the Aharonov-Bohm type. PMID:24759188

  3. Fitting C2 Continuous Parametric Surfaces to Frontiers Delimiting Physiologic Structures

    PubMed Central

    Bayer, Jason D.

    2014-01-01

    We present a technique to fit C2 continuous parametric surfaces to scattered geometric data points forming frontiers delimiting physiologic structures in segmented images. Such mathematical representation is interesting because it facilitates a large number of operations in modeling. While the fitting of C2 continuous parametric curves to scattered geometric data points is quite trivial, the fitting of C2 continuous parametric surfaces is not. The difficulty comes from the fact that each scattered data point should be assigned a unique parametric coordinate, and the fit is quite sensitive to their distribution on the parametric plane. We present a new approach where a polygonal (quadrilateral or triangular) surface is extracted from the segmented image. This surface is subsequently projected onto a parametric plane in a manner to ensure a one-to-one mapping. The resulting polygonal mesh is then regularized for area and edge length. Finally, from this point, surface fitting is relatively trivial. The novelty of our approach lies in the regularization of the polygonal mesh. Process performance is assessed with the reconstruction of a geometric model of mouse heart ventricles from a computerized tomography scan. Our results show an excellent reproduction of the geometric data with surfaces that are C2 continuous. PMID:24782911

  4. Curve Stitching in LOGO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muscat, Jean-Paul

    1992-01-01

    Uses LOGO to enhance the applicability of curve stitching in the mathematics curriculum. Presents the formulas and computer programs for the construction of parabolas, concentric circles, and epicycloids. Diagrams of constructed figures are provided. (MDH)

  5. Fun Fitness Runs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scantling, Ed; Strand, Brad

    1997-01-01

    Fitness runs are planned activities that make running more interesting. The paper outlines five types of fitness runs, all of which can be modified to conform to different facilities, age groups, or available time. The activities have students playing detective, playing cards, deciphering words, learning about calories, and playing wolf. (SM)

  6. Fitness and Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nordholm, Catherine R.

    This document makes a number of observations about physical fitness in America. Among them are: (1) the symptoms of aging (fat accumulation, lowered basal metabolic rate, loss of muscular strength, reduction in motor fitness, reduction in work capacity, etc.) are not the result of disease but disuse; (2) society conditions the individual to…

  7. Fun & Fitness with Balloons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Anne; Faigenbaum, Avery; Radler, Tracy

    2010-01-01

    The urgency to improve fitness levels and decrease the rate of childhood obesity has been at the forefront of physical education philosophy and praxis. Few would dispute that school-age youth need to participate regularly in physical activities that enhance and maintain both skill- and health-related physical fitness. Regular physical activity…

  8. Fitness in Special Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shephard, Roy J.

    This book examines fitness research among special populations, including research on fitness assessment, programming, and performance for persons with various forms of physical disabilities. The book covers such topics as diseases that complicate life in a wheelchair, disability classifications, physiological responses to training, positive…

  9. Fitness Day. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Jeanne

    This lesson plan introduces students to the concept of supply and demand by appealing to bodily/kinesthetic intelligences. Students participate in a fitness class and then analyze the economic motives behind making an individual feel better after a fitness activity; i.e., analyzing how much an individual would pay for a drink and snack after a…

  10. Fit 2-B FATHERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiorano, Joseph J.

    2001-01-01

    Fit 2-B FATHERS is a parenting-skills education program for incarcerated adult males. The goals of this program are for participants to have reduced recidivism rates and a reduced risk of their children acquiring criminal records. These goals are accomplished by helping participants become physically, practically, and socially fit for the demands…

  11. Physical Fitness and Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helmkamp, Jill M.

    Human beings are a delicate balance of mind, body, and spirit, so an imbalance in one domain affects all others. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects that physical fitness may have on such human characteristics as personality and behavior. A review of the literature reveals that physical fitness is related to, and can affect,…

  12. Highly curved microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Cully, S.; Warren, J.; Gaines, G. A.; Priedhorsky, W.; Bloch, J.

    1990-01-01

    Several spherically curved microchannel plate (MCP) stack configurations were studied as part of an ongoing astrophysical detector development program, and as part of the development of the ALEXIS satellite payload. MCP pairs with surface radii of curvature as small as 7 cm, and diameters up to 46 mm have been evaluated. The experiments show that the gain (greater than 1.5 x 10 exp 7) and background characteristics (about 0.5 events/sq cm per sec) of highly curved MCP stacks are in general equivalent to the performance achieved with flat MCP stacks of similar configuration. However, gain variations across the curved MCP's due to variations in the channel length to diameter ratio are observed. The overall pulse height distribution of a highly curved surface MCP stack (greater than 50 percent FWHM) is thus broader than its flat counterpart (less than 30 percent). Preconditioning of curved MCP stacks gives comparable results to flat MCP stacks, but it also decreases the overall gain variations. Flat fields of curved MCP stacks have the same general characteristics as flat MCP stacks.

  13. GInaFiT, a freeware tool to assess non-log-linear microbial survivor curves.

    PubMed

    Geeraerd, A H; Valdramidis, V P; Van Impe, J F

    2005-06-25

    This contribution focuses on the presentation of GInaFiT (Geeraerd and Van Impe Inactivation Model Fitting Tool), a freeware Add-in for Microsoft Excel aiming at bridging the gap between people developing predictive modelling approaches and end-users in the food industry not familiar with or not disposing over advanced non-linear regression analysis tools. More precisely, the tool is useful for testing nine different types of microbial survival models on user-specific experimental data relating the evolution of the microbial population with time. As such, the authors believe to cover all known survivor curve shapes for vegetative bacterial cells. The nine model types are: (i) classical log-linear curves, (ii) curves displaying a so-called shoulder before a log-linear decrease is apparent, (iii) curves displaying a so-called tail after a log-linear decrease, (iv) survival curves displaying both shoulder and tailing behaviour, (v) concave curves, (vi) convex curves, (vii) convex/concave curves followed by tailing, (viii) biphasic inactivation kinetics, and (ix) biphasic inactivation kinetics preceded by a shoulder. Next to the obtained parameter values, the following statistical measures are automatically reported: standard errors of the parameter values, the Sum of Squared Errors, the Mean Sum of Squared Errors and its Root, the R(2) and the adjusted R(2). The tool can help the end-user to communicate the performance of food preservation processes in terms of the number of log cycles of reduction rather than the classical D-value and is downloadable via the KULeuven/BioTeC-homepage at the topic "Downloads" (Version 1.4, Release date April 2005). PMID:15893399

  14. Comparison of Two Algebraic Methods for Curve/curve Intersection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demontaudouin, Y.; Tiller, W.

    1985-01-01

    Most geometric modeling systems use either polynomial or rational functions to represent geometry. In such systems most computational problems can be formulated as systems of polynomials in one or more variables. Classical elimination theory can be used to solve such systems. Here Cayley's method of elimination is summarized and it is shown how it can best be used to solve the curve/curve intersection problem. Cayley's method was found to be a more straightforward approach. Furthermore, it is computationally simpler, since the elements of the Cayley matrix are one variable instead of two variable polynomials. Researchers implemented and tested both methods and found Cayley's to be more efficient. Six pairs of curves, representing mixtures of lines, circles, and cubic arcs were used. Several examples had multiple intersection points. For all six cases Cayley's required less CPU time than the other method. The average time ratio of method 1 to method 2 was 3.13:1, the least difference was 2.33:1, and the most dramatic was 6.25:1. Both of the above methods can be extended to solve the surface/surface intersection problem.

  15. Limitations of inclusive fitness.

    PubMed

    Allen, Benjamin; Nowak, Martin A; Wilson, Edward O

    2013-12-10

    Until recently, inclusive fitness has been widely accepted as a general method to explain the evolution of social behavior. Affirming and expanding earlier criticism, we demonstrate that inclusive fitness is instead a limited concept, which exists only for a small subset of evolutionary processes. Inclusive fitness assumes that personal fitness is the sum of additive components caused by individual actions. This assumption does not hold for the majority of evolutionary processes or scenarios. To sidestep this limitation, inclusive fitness theorists have proposed a method using linear regression. On the basis of this method, it is claimed that inclusive fitness theory (i) predicts the direction of allele frequency changes, (ii) reveals the reasons for these changes, (iii) is as general as natural selection, and (iv) provides a universal design principle for evolution. In this paper we evaluate these claims, and show that all of them are unfounded. If the objective is to analyze whether mutations that modify social behavior are favored or opposed by natural selection, then no aspect of inclusive fitness theory is needed. PMID:24277847

  16. Limitations of inclusive fitness

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Benjamin; Nowak, Martin A.; Wilson, Edward O.

    2013-01-01

    Until recently, inclusive fitness has been widely accepted as a general method to explain the evolution of social behavior. Affirming and expanding earlier criticism, we demonstrate that inclusive fitness is instead a limited concept, which exists only for a small subset of evolutionary processes. Inclusive fitness assumes that personal fitness is the sum of additive components caused by individual actions. This assumption does not hold for the majority of evolutionary processes or scenarios. To sidestep this limitation, inclusive fitness theorists have proposed a method using linear regression. On the basis of this method, it is claimed that inclusive fitness theory (i) predicts the direction of allele frequency changes, (ii) reveals the reasons for these changes, (iii) is as general as natural selection, and (iv) provides a universal design principle for evolution. In this paper we evaluate these claims, and show that all of them are unfounded. If the objective is to analyze whether mutations that modify social behavior are favored or opposed by natural selection, then no aspect of inclusive fitness theory is needed. PMID:24277847

  17. A "one size fits all" approach to language fMRI: increasing specificity and applicability by adding a self-paced component.

    PubMed

    Máté, Adrienn; Lidzba, Karen; Hauser, Till-Karsten; Staudt, Martin; Wilke, Marko

    2016-03-01

    We have previously established an fMRI task battery suitable for mapping the language processing network in children. Among the tasks used, the synonyms and the vowel identification task induced robust task-related activations in children with average language abilities; however, the fixed presentation time seems to be a drawback in participants with above- or below-average language abilities. This feasibility study in healthy adults (n = 20) was aimed at adapting these tasks to the individual level of each patient by implementing a self-paced stimulus presentation. The impact of using a block- versus an event-related statistical approach was also evaluated. The self-paced modification allowed our participants with above-average language abilities to process stimuli much faster than originally implemented, likely increasing task adherence. A higher specificity of the event-related analysis was confirmed by stronger left inferior frontal and crossed cerebellar activations. We suggest that self-paced paradigms and event-related analyses may both increase specificity and applicability. PMID:26514810

  18. Study of galactic rotation curves in wormhole spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahaman, Farook; Sen, Banashree; Chakraborty, Koushik; Shit, G. C.

    2016-03-01

    The spacetime of the galactic halo region is described by a wormhole like line element. We assume violation of Null Energy Condition (NEC) in the galactic halo. The Einstein Field equations are solved for two different conditions of pressure and density to obtain physical parameters like tangential velocity of test particles and parameters related to the wormhole geometry. The theoretical rotation curve of the test particles is plotted and compared the same with an observed rotation curve. We obtain a satisfactory fit between the observed curve and the curve obtained from the present theory for the radial distances in the range 9 Kpc to 100 Kpc.

  19. AN Fitting Reconditioning Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Jason

    2011-01-01

    A tool was developed to repair or replace AN fittings on the shuttle external tank (ET). (The AN thread is a type of fitting used to connect flexible hoses and rigid metal tubing that carry fluid. It is a U.S. military-derived specification agreed upon by the Army and Navy, hence AN.) The tool is used on a drill and is guided by a pilot shaft that follows the inside bore. The cutting edge of the tool is a standard-size replaceable insert. In the typical Post Launch Maintenance/Repair process for the AN fittings, the six fittings are removed from the ET's GUCP (ground umbilical carrier plate) for reconditioning. The fittings are inspected for damage to the sealing surface per standard operations maintenance instructions. When damage is found on the sealing surface, the condition is documented. A new AN reconditioning tool is set up to cut and remove the surface damage. It is then inspected to verify the fitting still meets drawing requirements. The tool features a cone-shaped interior at 36.5 , and may be adjusted at a precise angle with go-no-go gauges to insure that the cutting edge could be adjusted as it wore down. One tool, one setting block, and one go-no-go gauge were fabricated. At the time of this reporting, the tool has reconditioned/returned to spec 36 AN fittings with 100-percent success of no leakage. This tool provides a quick solution to repair a leaky AN fitting. The tool could easily be modified with different-sized pilot shafts to different-sized fittings.

  20. Flared tube attachment fitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkire, I. D.; King, J. P., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Tubes can be flared first, then attached to valves and other flow line components, with new fitting that can be disassembled and reused. Installed fitting can be disassembled so parts can be inspected. It can be salvaged and reused without damaging flared tube; tube can be coated, tempered, or otherwise treated after it has been flared, rather than before, as was previously required. Fitting consists of threaded male portion with conical seating surface, hexagonal nut with hole larger than other diameter of flared end of tube, and split ferrule.

  1. Surface fitting three-dimensional bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejarnette, F. R.

    1974-01-01

    The geometry of general three-dimensional bodies is generated from coordinates of points in several cross sections. Since these points may not be smooth, they are divided into segments and general conic sections are curve fit in a least-squares sense to each segment of a cross section. The conic sections are then blended in the longitudinal direction by fitting parametric cubic-spline curves through coordinate points which define the conic sections in the cross-sectional planes. Both the cross-sectional and longitudinal curves may be modified by specifying particular segments as straight lines and slopes at selected points. Slopes may be continuous or discontinuous and finite or infinite. After a satisfactory surface fit has been obtained, cards may be punched with the data necessary to form a geometry subroutine package for use in other computer programs. At any position on the body, coordinates, slopes and second partial derivatives are calculated. The method is applied to a blunted 70 deg delta wing, and it was found to generate the geometry very well.

  2. Integrating the Levels of Person-Environment Fit: The Roles of Vocational Fit and Group Fit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Ryan M.; Feldman, Daniel C.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research on fit has largely focused on person-organization (P-O) fit and person-job (P-J) fit. However, little research has examined the interplay of person-vocation (P-V) fit and person-group (P-G) fit with P-O fit and P-J fit in the same study. This article advances the fit literature by examining these relationships with data collected…

  3. Exercise and Physical Fitness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Increase your chances of living longer Fitting regular exercise into your daily schedule may seem difficult at ... fine. The key is to find the right exercise for you. It should be fun and should ...

  4. WOLF: FITS file processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamir, Lior

    2012-12-01

    WOLF processes FITS files and generates photometry files, annotated JPGs, opacity maps, background, transient detection and luminance changes detection. This software was used to process data for the Night Sky Live project.

  5. Exercise and Physical Fitness

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancers Strengthen your bones and muscles Improve your mental health and mood Improve your ability to do daily activities and prevent falls, if you're an older adult Increase your chances of living longer Fitting regular exercise ...

  6. The Langley Fitness Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    NASA Langley recognizes the importance of healthy employees by committing itself to offering a complete fitness program. The scope of the program focuses on promoting overall health and wellness in an effort to reduce the risks of illness and disease and to increase productivity. This is accomplished through a comprehensive Health and Fitness Program offered to all NASA employees. Various aspects of the program are discussed.

  7. FPGA curved track fitters and a multiplierless fitter scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jinyuan; Wang, M.; Gottschalk, E.; Shi, Z.; /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    The standard least-squares curved track fitting process is tailored for FPGA implementation so that only integer multiplications and additions are needed. To further eliminate multiplication, coefficients in the fitting matrices are carefully chosen so that only shift and accumulation operations are used in the process. Comparison in an example application shows that the fitting errors of the multiplierless implementation are less than 4% bigger than the fitting errors of the exact least-squares algorithm. The implementation is suitable for low-cost, low-power applications in high energy physics detector trigger systems.

  8. Semistable modifications of families of curves and compactified Jacobians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteves, Eduardo; Pacini, Marco

    2016-04-01

    Given a family of nodal curves, a semistable modification of it is another family made up of curves obtained by inserting chains of rational curves of any given length at certain nodes of certain curves of the original family. We give comparison theorems between torsion-free, rank-1 sheaves in the former family and invertible sheaves in the latter. We apply them to show that there are functorial isomorphisms between the compactifications of relative Jacobians of families of nodal curves constructed through Caporaso's approach and those constructed through Pandharipande's approach.

  9. IGMtransmission: Transmission curve computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Christopher M.; Meiksin, Avery; Stock, David

    2015-04-01

    IGMtransmission is a Java graphical user interface that implements Monte Carlo simulations to compute the corrections to colors of high-redshift galaxies due to intergalactic attenuation based on current models of the Intergalactic Medium. The effects of absorption due to neutral hydrogen are considered, with particular attention to the stochastic effects of Lyman Limit Systems. Attenuation curves are produced, as well as colors for a wide range of filter responses and model galaxy spectra. Photometric filters are included for the Hubble Space Telescope, the Keck telescope, the Mt. Palomar 200-inch, the SUBARU telescope and UKIRT; alternative filter response curves and spectra may be readily uploaded.

  10. Do the Kepler AGN light curves need reprocessing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasliwal, Vishal P.; Vogeley, Michael S.; Richards, Gordon T.; Williams, Joshua; Carini, Michael T.

    2015-10-01

    We gauge the impact of spacecraft-induced effects on the inferred variability properties of the light curve of the Seyfert 1 AGN Zw 229-15 observed by Kepler. We compare the light curve of Zw 229-15 obtained from the Kepler MAST data base with a reprocessed light curve constructed from raw pixel data. We use the first-order structure function, SF(δt), to fit both light curves to the damped power-law PSD (power spectral density) of Kasliwal et al. On short time-scales, we find a steeper log PSD slope (γ = 2.90 to within 10 per cent) for the reprocessed light curve as compared to the light curve found on MAST (γ = 2.65 to within 10 per cent) - both inconsistent with a damped random walk (DRW) which requires γ = 2. The log PSD slope inferred for the reprocessed light curve is consistent with previous results that study the same reprocessed light curve. The turnover time-scale is almost identical for both light curves (27.1 and 27.5 d for the reprocessed and MAST data base light curves). Based on the obvious visual difference between the two versions of the light curve and on the PSD model fits, we conclude that there remain significant levels of spacecraft-induced effects in the standard pipeline reduction of the Kepler data. Reprocessing the light curves will change the model inferenced from the data but is unlikely to change the overall scientific conclusions reached by Kasliwal et al. - not all AGN light curves are consistent with the DRW.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of the melting curve of NiAl alloy under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Wenjin; Peng, Yufeng; Liu, Zhongli

    2014-05-15

    The melting curve of B2-NiAl alloy under pressure has been investigated using molecular dynamics technique and the embedded atom method (EAM) potential. The melting temperatures were determined with two approaches, the one-phase and the two-phase methods. The first one simulates a homogeneous melting, while the second one involves a heterogeneous melting of materials. Both approaches reduce the superheating effectively and their results are close to each other at the applied pressures. By fitting the well-known Simon equation to our melting data, we yielded the melting curves for NiAl: 1783(1 + P/9.801){sup 0.298} (one-phase approach), 1850(1 + P/12.806){sup 0.357} (two-phase approach). The good agreement of the resulting equation of states and the zero-pressure melting point (calc., 1850 ± 25 K, exp., 1911 K) with experiment proved the correctness of these results. These melting data complemented the absence of experimental high-pressure melting of NiAl. To check the transferability of this EAM potential, we have also predicted the melting curves of pure nickel and pure aluminum. Results show the calculated melting point of Nickel agrees well with experiment at zero pressure, while the melting point of aluminum is slightly higher than experiment.

  12. Nonlinear bulging factor based on R-curve data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeong, David Y.; Tong, Pin

    1994-01-01

    In this paper, a nonlinear bulging factor is derived using a strain energy approach combined with dimensional analysis. The functional form of the bulging factor contains an empirical constant that is determined using R-curve data from unstiffened flat and curved panel tests. The determination of this empirical constant is based on the assumption that the R-curve is the same for both flat and curved panels.

  13. Transit Model Fitting in the Kepler Science Operations Center Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Burke, C. J.; Jenkins, J. M.; Quintana, E. V.; Rowe, J. F.; Seader, S. E.; Tenenbaum, P.; Twicken, J. D.

    2012-05-01

    We describe the algorithm and performance of the transit model fitting of the Kepler Science Operations Center (SOC) Pipeline. Light curves of long cadence targets are subjected to the Transiting Planet Search (TPS) component of the Kepler SOC Pipeline. Those targets for which a Threshold Crossing Event (TCE) is generated in the transit search are subsequently processed in the Data Validation (DV) component. The light curves may span one or more Kepler observing quarters, and data may not be available for any given target in all quarters. Transit model parameters are fitted in DV to transit-like signatures in the light curves of target stars with TCEs. The fitted parameters are used to generate a predicted light curve based on the transit model. The residual flux time series of the target star, with the predicted light curve removed, is fed back to TPS to search for additional TCEs. The iterative process of transit model fitting and transiting planet search continues until no TCE is generated from the residual flux time series or a planet candidate limit is reached. The transit model includes five parameters to be fitted: transit epoch time (i.e. central time of first transit), orbital period, impact parameter, ratio of planet radius to star radius and ratio of semi-major axis to star radius. The initial values of the fit parameters are determined from the TCE values provided by TPS. A limb darkening model is included in the transit model to generate the predicted light curve. The transit model fitting results are used in the diagnostic tests in DV, such as the centroid motion test, eclipsing binary discrimination tests, etc., which helps to validate planet candidates and identify false positive detections. Funding for the Kepler Mission has been provided by the NASA Science Mission Directorate.

  14. Graphing Polar Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawes, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Graphing polar curves typically involves a combination of three traditional techniques, all of which can be time-consuming and tedious. However, an alternative method--graphing the polar function on a rectangular plane--simplifies graphing, increases student understanding of the polar coordinate system, and reinforces graphing techniques learned…

  15. The Bacterial Growth Curve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulton, Richard J. L.

    1991-01-01

    A procedure that allows students to view an entire bacterial growth curve during a two- to three-hour student laboratory period is described. Observations of the lag phase, logarithmic phase, maximum stationary phase, and phase of decline are possible. A nonpathogenic, marine bacterium is used in the investigation. (KR)

  16. Textbook Factor Demand Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Joe C.

    1994-01-01

    Maintains that teachers and textbook graphics follow the same basic pattern in illustrating changes in demand curves when product prices increase. Asserts that the use of computer graphics will enable teachers to be more precise in their graphic presentation of price elasticity. (CFR)

  17. Rules, culture, and fitness.

    PubMed

    Baum, W M

    1995-01-01

    Behavior analysis risks intellectual isolation unless it integrates its explanations with evolutionary theory. Rule-governed behavior is an example of a topic that requires an evolutionary perspective for a full understanding. A rule may be defined as a verbal discriminative stimulus produced by the behavior of a speaker under the stimulus control of a long-term contingency between the behavior and fitness. As a discriminative stimulus, the rule strengthens listener behavior that is reinforced in the short run by socially mediated contingencies, but which also enters into the long-term contingency that enhances the listener's fitness. The long-term contingency constitutes the global context for the speaker's giving the rule. When a rule is said to be "internalized," the listener's behavior has switched from short- to long-term control. The fitness-enhancing consequences of long-term contingencies are health, resources, relationships, or reproduction. This view ties rules both to evolutionary theory and to culture. Stating a rule is a cultural practice. The practice strengthens, with short-term reinforcement, behavior that usually enhances fitness in the long run. The practice evolves because of its effect on fitness. The standard definition of a rule as a verbal statement that points to a contingency fails to distinguish between a rule and a bargain ("If you'll do X, then I'll do Y"), which signifies only a single short-term contingency that provides mutual reinforcement for speaker and listener. In contrast, the giving and following of a rule ("Dress warmly; it's cold outside") can be understood only by reference also to a contingency providing long-term enhancement of the listener's fitness or the fitness of the listener's genes. Such a perspective may change the way both behavior analysts and evolutionary biologists think about rule-governed behavior. PMID:22478201

  18. On the cost of approximating and recognizing a noise perturbed straight line or a quadratic curve segment in the plane. [central processing units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, D. B.; Yalabik, N.

    1975-01-01

    Approximation of noisy data in the plane by straight lines or elliptic or single-branch hyperbolic curve segments arises in pattern recognition, data compaction, and other problems. The efficient search for and approximation of data by such curves were examined. Recursive least-squares linear curve-fitting was used, and ellipses and hyperbolas are parameterized as quadratic functions in x and y. The error minimized by the algorithm is interpreted, and central processing unit (CPU) times for estimating parameters for fitting straight lines and quadratic curves were determined and compared. CPU time for data search was also determined for the case of straight line fitting. Quadratic curve fitting is shown to require about six times as much CPU time as does straight line fitting, and curves relating CPU time and fitting error were determined for straight line fitting. Results are derived on early sequential determination of whether or not the underlying curve is a straight line.

  19. Ames Fitness Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, Randy

    1993-01-01

    The Ames Fitness Program services 5,000 civil servants and contractors working at Ames Research Center. A 3,000 square foot fitness center, equipped with cardiovascular machines, weight training machines, and free weight equipment is on site. Thirty exercise classes are held each week at the Center. A weight loss program is offered, including individual exercise prescriptions, fitness testing, and organized monthly runs. The Fitness Center is staffed by one full-time program coordinator and 15 hours per week of part-time help. Membership is available to all employees at Ames at no charge, and there are no fees for participation in any of the program activities. Prior to using the Center, employees must obtain a physical examination and complete a membership package. Funding for the Ames Fitness Program was in jeopardy in December 1992; however, the employees circulated a petition in support of the program and collected more than 1500 signatures in only three days. Funding has been approved through October 1993.

  20. Optimization of inclusive fitness.

    PubMed

    Grafen, Alan

    2006-02-01

    The first fully explicit argument is given that broadly supports a widespread belief among whole-organism biologists that natural selection tends to lead to organisms acting as if maximizing their inclusive fitness. The use of optimization programs permits a clear statement of what this belief should be understood to mean, in contradistinction to the common mathematical presumption that it should be formalized as some kind of Lyapunov or even potential function. The argument reveals new details and uncovers latent assumptions. A very general genetic architecture is allowed, and there is arbitrary uncertainty. However, frequency dependence of fitnesses is not permitted. The logic of inclusive fitness immediately draws together various kinds of intra-genomic conflict, and the concept of 'p-family' is introduced. Inclusive fitness is thus incorporated into the formal Darwinism project, which aims to link the mathematics of motion (difference and differential equations) used to describe gene frequency trajectories with the mathematics of optimization used to describe purpose and design. Important questions remain to be answered in the fundamental theory of inclusive fitness. PMID:16046225

  1. Analysis of selected Kepler Mission planetary light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, M. D.; Budding, E.

    2014-06-01

    We have modified the graphical user interfaced close binary system analysis program CurveFit to the form WinKepler and applied it to 16 representative planetary candidate light curves found in the NASA Exoplanet Archive (NEA) at the Caltech website http://exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu, with an aim to compare different analytical approaches. WinKepler has parameter options for a realistic physical model, including gravity-brightening and structural parameters derived from the relevant Radau equation. We tested our best-fitting parameter-sets for formal determinacy and adequacy. A primary aim is to compare our parameters with those listed in the NEA. Although there are trends of agreement, small differences in the main parameter values are found in some cases, and there may be some relative bias towards a 90∘ value for the NEA inclinations. These are assessed against realistic error estimates. Photometric variability from causes other than planetary transits affects at least 6 of the data-sets studied; with small pulsational behaviour found in 3 of those. For the false positive KOI 4.01, we found that the eclipses could be modelled by a faint background classical Algol as effectively as by a transiting exoplanet. Our empirical checks of limb-darkening, in the cases of KOI 1.01 and 12.01, revealed that the assigned stellar temperatures are probably incorrect. For KOI 13.01, our empirical mass-ratio differs by about 7 % from that of Mislis and Hodgkin (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 422:1512, 2012), who neglected structural effects and higher order terms in the tidal distortion. Such detailed parameter evaluation, additional to the usual main geometric ones, provides an additional objective for this work.

  2. Trend analyses with river sediment rating curves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrick, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    Sediment rating curves, which are fitted relationships between river discharge (Q) and suspended-sediment concentration (C), are commonly used to assess patterns and trends in river water quality. In many of these studies it is assumed that rating curves have a power-law form (i.e., C = aQb, where a and b are fitted parameters). Two fundamental questions about the utility of these techniques are assessed in this paper: (i) How well to the parameters, a and b, characterize trends in the data? (ii) Are trends in rating curves diagnostic of changes to river water or sediment discharge? As noted in previous research, the offset parameter, a, is not an independent variable for most rivers, but rather strongly dependent on b and Q. Here it is shown that a is a poor metric for trends in the vertical offset of a rating curve, and a new parameter, â, as determined by the discharge-normalized power function [C = â (Q/QGM)b], where QGM is the geometric mean of the Q values sampled, provides a better characterization of trends. However, these techniques must be applied carefully, because curvature in the relationship between log(Q) and log(C), which exists for many rivers, can produce false trends in â and b. Also, it is shown that trends in â and b are not uniquely diagnostic of river water or sediment supply conditions. For example, an increase in â can be caused by an increase in sediment supply, a decrease in water supply, or a combination of these conditions. Large changes in water and sediment supplies can occur without any change in the parameters, â and b. Thus, trend analyses using sediment rating curves must include additional assessments of the time-dependent rates and trends of river water, sediment concentrations, and sediment discharge.

  3. Prediction and extension of curves of distillation of vacuum residue using probability functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    León, A. Y.; Riaño, P. A.; Laverde, D.

    2016-02-01

    The use of the probability functions for the prediction of crude distillation curves has been implemented in different characterization studies for refining processes. The study of four functions of probability (Weibull extreme, Weibull, Kumaraswamy and Riazi), was analyzed in this work for the fitting of curves of distillation of vacuum residue. After analysing the experimental data was selected the Weibull extreme function as the best prediction function, the fitting capability of the best function was validated considering as criterions of estimation the AIC (Akaike Information Criterion), BIC (Bayesian information Criterion), and correlation coefficient R2. To cover a wide range of composition were selected fifty-five (55) vacuum residue derived from different hydrocarbon mixture. The parameters of the probability function Weibull Extreme were adjusted from simple measure properties such as Conradson Carbon Residue (CCR), and compositional analysis SARA (saturates, aromatics, resins and asphaltenes). The proposed method is an appropriate tool to describe the tendency of distillation curves and offers a practical approach in terms of classification of vacuum residues.

  4. Personality and reproductive fitness.

    PubMed

    Eaves, L J; Martin, N G; Heath, A C; Hewitt, J K; Neale, M C

    1990-09-01

    The relationship between reproductive success (number of biological children) and personality was explored in 1101 postmenopausal females from the Australian twin registry. The quadratic response surface relating fitness to extraversion (E) and neuroticism (N) showed a saddle point at intermediate levels of E and N. Selection was shown to be stabilizing, i.e., having an intermediate optimum, along the axis low E, low N-high E, high N and more mildly disruptive, having greater fitness in the extremes, along the axis low N, high E-high N, low E. Neither dimension of personality considered by itself showed a significant linear or quadratic relationship to reproductive success. Sections through the fitness surface, however, show selection tends to favor high neuroticism levels in introverts and low neuroticism levels in extroverts. PMID:2288546

  5. Investigation of learning and experience curves

    SciTech Connect

    Krawiec, F.; Thornton, J.; Edesess, M.

    1980-04-01

    The applicability of learning and experience curves for predicting future costs of solar technologies is assessed, and the major test case is the production economics of heliostats. Alternative methods for estimating cost reductions in systems manufacture are discussed, and procedures for using learning and experience curves to predict costs are outlined. Because adequate production data often do not exist, production histories of analogous products/processes are analyzed and learning and aggregated cost curves for these surrogates estimated. If the surrogate learning curves apply, they can be used to estimate solar technology costs. The steps involved in generating these cost estimates are given. Second-generation glass-steel and inflated-bubble heliostat design concepts, developed by MDAC and GE, respectively, are described; a costing scenario for 25,000 units/yr is detailed; surrogates for cost analysis are chosen; learning and aggregate cost curves are estimated; and aggregate cost curves for the GE and MDAC designs are estimated. However, an approach that combines a neoclassical production function with a learning-by-doing hypothesis is needed to yield a cost relation compatible with the historical learning curve and the traditional cost function of economic theory.

  6. Mathematics Difficulties: Does One Approach Fit All?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gifford, Sue; Rockliffe, Freda

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the nature of learning difficulties in mathematics and, in particular, the nature and prevalence of dyscalculia, a condition that affects the acquisition of arithmetical skills. The evidence reviewed suggests that younger children (under the age of 10) often display a combination of problems, including minor physical…

  7. The learning curves of competitive programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Jose R.; Aguirre, Vanessa E.

    2014-10-01

    Universities around the world have implemented competitive programming as an approach to teach computer science courses. They have empirically validated this approach as a successful pedagogical tool. However, there are no conclusive results that describe the degree in which competitive programming affects the learning process of the students. In this paper, we report on the learning curves obtained from analyzing ten years of TopCoder algorithm competitions. We discuss on how these learning curves apply to university courses and can help us explain the influence of competitive programming in a class.

  8. Factorization with genus 2 curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosset, Romain

    2010-04-01

    The elliptic curve method (ECM) is one of the best factorization methods available. It is possible to use hyperelliptic curves instead of elliptic curves but it is in theory slower. We use special hyperelliptic curves and Kummer surfaces to reduce the complexity of the algorithm. Our implementation GMP-HECM is faster than GMP-ECM for factoring large numbers.

  9. Global Expression for Representing Diatomic Potential-Energy Curves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, John; Schlosser, Herbert; Smith, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A three-parameter expression that gives an accurate fit to diatomic potential curves over the entire range of separation for charge transfers between 0 and 1. It is based on a generalization of the universal binding-energy relation of Smith et al. (1989) with a modification that describes the crossover from a partially ionic state to the neutral state at large separations. The expression is tested by comparison with first-principles calculations of the potential curves ranging from covalently bonded to ionically bonded. The expression is also used to calculate spectroscopic constants form a curve fit to the first-principles curves. A comparison is made with experimental values of the spectroscopic constants.

  10. Estimation of median growth curves for children up two years old based on biresponse local linear estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamidah, Nur; Rifada, Marisa

    2016-03-01

    There is significant of the coeficient correlation between weight and height of the children. Therefore, the simultaneous model estimation is better than partial single response approach. In this study we investigate the pattern of sex difference in growth curve of children from birth up to two years of age in Surabaya, Indonesia based on biresponse model. The data was collected in a longitudinal representative sample of the Surabaya population of healthy children that consists of two response variables i.e. weight (kg) and height (cm). While a predictor variable is age (month). Based on generalized cross validation criterion, the modeling result based on biresponse model by using local linear estimator for boy and girl growth curve gives optimal bandwidth i.e 1.41 and 1.56 and the determination coefficient (R2) i.e. 99.99% and 99.98%,.respectively. Both boy and girl curves satisfy the goodness of fit criterion i.e..the determination coefficient tends to one. Also, there is difference pattern of growth curve between boy and girl. The boy median growth curves is higher than those of girl curve.

  11. Atlas of fatigue curves

    SciTech Connect

    Boyer, H.E.

    1986-01-01

    This Atlas was developed to serve engineers who are looking for fatigue data on a particular metal or alloy. Having these curves compiled in a single book will also facilitate the computerization of the involved data. It is pointed out that plans are under way to make the data in this book available in ASCII files for analysis by computer programs. S-N curves which typify effects of major variables are considered along with low-carbon steels, medium-carbon steels, alloy steels, HSLA steels, high-strength alloy steels, heat-resisting steels, stainless steels, maraging steels, cast irons, and heat-resisting alloys. Attention is also given to aluminum alloys, copper alloys, magnesium alloys, molybdenum, tin alloys, titanium and titanium alloys, zirconium, steel castings, closed-die forgings, powder metallurgy parts, composites, effects of surface treatments, and test results for component parts.

  12. Aerobic Fitness for the Severely and Profoundly Mentally Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Dan

    1981-01-01

    The booklet discusses the aerobic fitness capacities of severely/profoundly retarded students and discusses approaches for improving their fitness. An initial section describes a method for determining the student's present fitness level on the basis of computations of height, weight, blood pressure, resting pulse, and Barach Index and Crampton…

  13. Goodness-of-Fit Assessment of Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The article provides an overview of goodness-of-fit assessment methods for item response theory (IRT) models. It is now possible to obtain accurate "p"-values of the overall fit of the model if bivariate information statistics are used. Several alternative approaches are described. As the validity of inferences drawn on the fitted model…

  14. Evaluating Goodness-of-Fit Indexes for Testing Measurement Invariance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Gordon W.; Rensvold, Roger B.

    2002-01-01

    Examined 20 goodness-of-fit indexes based on the minimum fit function using a simulation under the 2-group situation. Results support the use of the delta comparative fit index, delta Gamma hat, and delta McDonald's Noncentrality Index to evaluation measurement invariance. These three approaches are independent of model complexity and sample size.…

  15. Spinal curves and scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Susan M

    2007-01-01

    Scoliosis, an abnormal side-to-side curve of the spine with associated vertebral rotation, affects as many as 4% of all adolescents. Several different categories of scoliosis exist, and treatment can range from observation and follow-up to bracing and surgical correction. This article discusses special imaging series for scoliosis and emphasizes the need for proper radiation protection techniques for patients with scoliosis, most of whom are girls in their early to mid-teens. PMID:17848532

  16. Linking the Fits, Fitting the Links: Connecting Different Types of PO Fit to Attitudinal Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Aegean; Chaturvedi, Sankalp

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we explore the linkages among various types of person-organization (PO) fit and their effects on employee attitudinal outcomes. We propose and test a conceptual model which links various types of fits--objective fit, perceived fit and subjective fit--in a hierarchical order of cognitive information processing and relate them to…

  17. Learning curves in health professions education.

    PubMed

    Pusic, Martin V; Boutis, Kathy; Hatala, Rose; Cook, David A

    2015-08-01

    Learning curves, which graphically show the relationship between learning effort and achievement, are common in published education research but are not often used in day-to-day educational activities. The purpose of this article is to describe the generation and analysis of learning curves and their applicability to health professions education. The authors argue that the time is right for a closer look at using learning curves-given their desirable properties-to inform both self-directed instruction by individuals and education management by instructors.A typical learning curve is made up of a measure of learning (y-axis), a measure of effort (x-axis), and a mathematical linking function. At the individual level, learning curves make manifest a single person's progress towards competence including his/her rate of learning, the inflection point where learning becomes more effortful, and the remaining distance to mastery attainment. At the group level, overlaid learning curves show the full variation of a group of learners' paths through a given learning domain. Specifically, they make overt the difference between time-based and competency-based approaches to instruction. Additionally, instructors can use learning curve information to more accurately target educational resources to those who most require them.The learning curve approach requires a fine-grained collection of data that will not be possible in all educational settings; however, the increased use of an assessment paradigm that explicitly includes effort and its link to individual achievement could result in increased learner engagement and more effective instructional design. PMID:25806621

  18. The Stephan Curve revisited.

    PubMed

    Bowen, William H

    2013-01-01

    The Stephan Curve has played a dominant role in caries research over the past several decades. What is so remarkable about the Stephan Curve is the plethora of interactions it illustrates and yet acid production remains the dominant focus. Using sophisticated technology, it is possible to measure pH changes in plaque; however, these observations may carry a false sense of accuracy. Recent observations have shown that there may be multiple pH values within the plaque matrix, thus emphasizing the importance of the milieu within which acid is formed. Although acid production is indeed the immediate proximate cause of tooth dissolution, the influence of alkali production within plaque has received relative scant attention. Excessive reliance on Stephan Curve leads to describing foods as "safe" if they do not lower the pH below the so-called "critical pH" at which point it is postulated enamel dissolves. Acid production is just one of many biological processes that occur within plaque when exposed to sugar. Exploration of methods to enhance alkali production could produce rich research dividends. PMID:23224410

  19. Numerical reconstruction of spectral reflectance curves of oil painting on canvas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivieso, L. G.; Osorio, C. A.; Guerrero, J. E.

    2011-08-01

    Unlike the color -which is a quality without physical meaning and that involves subjective estimation of interaction of electromagnetic radiation with surfaces- spectral reflectance is a physical property that characterizes different materials, no matter what chromatic content of illuminant and the spectral response of the sensor. This means that the spectral reflectance is a magnitude of particular interes in both reconstruction and reproduction in digital color systems. In this paper, two approaches to the numerical reconstruction of spectral reflectance curves of samples of oil painting on canvas, are presented. These approaches need a set of spectral reflectance curves, given by a spectrophotometer, and their respective sampling using color filters placed in front of a monochrome CCD camera. The first approach is based on the interpolation of the camera response to each color filter. The second one, relies in obtain a vectorial base and appropiate coefficients to reconstruct the spectral reflectance curve. Goodness of fit coefficient (GFC) and absolute mean error (ABE) are the metrics used to evaluate the performance of the proposed procedures.

  20. Water Fit to Drink.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Edward P.

    The major objective of this module is to help students understand how water from a source such as a lake is treated to make it fit to drink. The module, consisting of five major activities and a test, is patterned after Individualized Science Instructional System (ISIS) modules. The first activity (Planning) consists of a brief introduction and a…