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Sample records for curvula schrad nees

  1. Nutritional and Sensory Evaluation of Injera Prepared from tef and Eragrostis curvula (Schrad.) Nees. Flours with Sorghum Blends

    PubMed Central

    Ghebrehiwot, Habteab M.; Shimelis, Hussein A.; Kirkman, Kevin P.; Laing, Mark D.; Mabhaudhi, Tafadzwanashe

    2016-01-01

    Injera is a fermented, sour bread consumed as a staple food in Eritrea and Ethiopia. The bread can be prepared from various cereals but tef [Eragrostis tef (Zucc.) Trotter] is the most preferred ingredient. This study assessed the acceptability of injera prepared using grains of a closely related but underutilized grass, Eragrostis curvula (Schrad.) Nees. The nutritive value of the grains was compared and the sensory attributes of injera made from flours of tef (control) and E. curvula, each combined with 0, 5, and 10% of sorghum flour, were assessed using a tasting panel. Nutrient analysis showed that E. curvula contains more than double the amount of crude protein found in tef. E. curvula also contains higher fat, dietary fiber and mineral nutrients than tef. Injera made of E. tef and E. curvula flours showed non-significant differences in taste, texture, appearance and overall acceptability. This suggest that E. curvula has the potential to serve as a novel source of gluten-free flour for human consumption. Agronomically viewed, growing E. curvula could be more advantageous for smallholder farmers on marginal lands because the species is a perennial that can produce a seed harvest twice a year, unlike tef, which is annual crop. It also tolerates acidic soils better than tef. PMID:27489554

  2. Nutritional and Sensory Evaluation of Injera Prepared from tef and Eragrostis curvula (Schrad.) Nees. Flours with Sorghum Blends.

    PubMed

    Ghebrehiwot, Habteab M; Shimelis, Hussein A; Kirkman, Kevin P; Laing, Mark D; Mabhaudhi, Tafadzwanashe

    2016-01-01

    Injera is a fermented, sour bread consumed as a staple food in Eritrea and Ethiopia. The bread can be prepared from various cereals but tef [Eragrostis tef (Zucc.) Trotter] is the most preferred ingredient. This study assessed the acceptability of injera prepared using grains of a closely related but underutilized grass, Eragrostis curvula (Schrad.) Nees. The nutritive value of the grains was compared and the sensory attributes of injera made from flours of tef (control) and E. curvula, each combined with 0, 5, and 10% of sorghum flour, were assessed using a tasting panel. Nutrient analysis showed that E. curvula contains more than double the amount of crude protein found in tef. E. curvula also contains higher fat, dietary fiber and mineral nutrients than tef. Injera made of E. tef and E. curvula flours showed non-significant differences in taste, texture, appearance and overall acceptability. This suggest that E. curvula has the potential to serve as a novel source of gluten-free flour for human consumption. Agronomically viewed, growing E. curvula could be more advantageous for smallholder farmers on marginal lands because the species is a perennial that can produce a seed harvest twice a year, unlike tef, which is annual crop. It also tolerates acidic soils better than tef. PMID:27489554

  3. Expressed sequence tag analysis and development of gene associated markers in a near-isogenic plant system of Eragrostis curvula.

    PubMed

    Cervigni, Gerardo D L; Paniego, Norma; Díaz, Marina; Selva, Juan P; Zappacosta, Diego; Zanazzi, Darío; Landerreche, Iñaki; Martelotto, Luciano; Felitti, Silvina; Pessino, Silvina; Spangenberg, Germán; Echenique, Viviana

    2008-05-01

    Eragrostis curvula (Schrad.) Nees is a forage grass native to the semiarid regions of Southern Africa, which reproduces mainly by pseudogamous diplosporous apomixis. A collection of ESTs was generated from four cDNA libraries, three of them obtained from panicles of near-isogenic lines with different ploidy levels and reproductive modes, and one obtained from 12 days-old plant leaves. A total of 12,295 high-quality ESTs were clustered and assembled, rendering 8,864 unigenes, including 1,490 contigs and 7,394 singletons, with a genome coverage of 22%. A total of 7,029 (79.11%) unigenes were functionally categorized by BLASTX analysis against sequences deposited in public databases, but only 37.80% could be classified according to Gene Ontology. Sequence comparison against the cereals genes indexes (GI) revealed 50% significant hits. A total of 254 EST-SSRs were detected from 219 singletons and 35 from contigs. Di- and tri- motifs were similarly represented with percentages of 38.95 and 40.16%, respectively. In addition, 190 SNPs and Indels were detected in 18 contigs generated from 3 to 4 libraries. The ESTs and the molecular markers obtained in this study will provide valuable resources for a wide range of applications including gene identification, genetic mapping, cultivar identification, analysis of genetic diversity, phenotype mapping and marker assisted selection. PMID:18196464

  4. Does weeping lovegrass maintain its crude protein content at the expense of its neighbors?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data would suggest that weeping lovegrass [Eragrostis curvula (Schrad.) Nees] does maintain its crude protein (CP) content at a steady state at the expense of its surrounding neighbors. While studying the combining ability effects of binary mixtures of cool- and warm-season grasses and legumes it w...

  5. Ecological characterisation of supina bluegrass (Poa supina Schrad.) germplasm from the Italian Alps

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Supina bluegrass (Poa supina Schrad.) is a potential turfgrass species for cool, northern type climates, yet few genetic resources for research and development are very limited. As a result, a field exploration for P. supina was conduction in the Italian Alps in 2008. Altogether, 55 populations of...

  6. Increased apomixis expression concurrent with genetic and epigenetic variation in a newly synthesized Eragrostis curvula polyploid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappacosta, Diego C.; Ochogavía, Ana C.; Rodrigo, Juan M.; Romero, José R.; Meier, Mauro S.; Garbus, Ingrid; Pessino, Silvina C.; Echenique, Viviana C.

    2014-04-01

    Eragrostis curvula includes biotypes reproducing through obligate and facultative apomixis or, rarely, full sexuality. We previously generated a ``tetraploid-dihaploid-tetraploid'' series of plants consisting of a tetraploid apomictic plant (T), a sexual dihaploid plant (D) and a tetraploid artificial colchiploid (C). Initially, plant C was nearly 100% sexual. However, its capacity to form non-reduced embryo sacs dramatically increased over a four year period (2003-2007) to reach levels of 85-90%. Here, we confirmed high rates of apomixis in plant C, and used AFLPs and MSAPs to characterize the genetic and epigenetic variation observed in this plant in 2007 as compared to 2003. Of the polymorphic sequences, some had no coding potential whereas others were homologous to retrotransposons and/or protein-coding-like sequences. Our results suggest that in this particular plant system increased apomixis expression is concurrent with genetic and epigenetic modifications, possibly involving transposable elements.

  7. Increased apomixis expression concurrent with genetic and epigenetic variation in a newly synthesized Eragrostis curvula polyploid.

    PubMed

    Zappacosta, Diego C; Ochogavía, Ana C; Rodrigo, Juan M; Romero, José R; Meier, Mauro S; Garbus, Ingrid; Pessino, Silvina C; Echenique, Viviana C

    2014-01-01

    Eragrostis curvula includes biotypes reproducing through obligate and facultative apomixis or, rarely, full sexuality. We previously generated a "tetraploid-dihaploid-tetraploid" series of plants consisting of a tetraploid apomictic plant (T), a sexual dihaploid plant (D) and a tetraploid artificial colchiploid (C). Initially, plant C was nearly 100% sexual. However, its capacity to form non-reduced embryo sacs dramatically increased over a four year period (2003-2007) to reach levels of 85-90%. Here, we confirmed high rates of apomixis in plant C, and used AFLPs and MSAPs to characterize the genetic and epigenetic variation observed in this plant in 2007 as compared to 2003. Of the polymorphic sequences, some had no coding potential whereas others were homologous to retrotransposons and/or protein-coding-like sequences. Our results suggest that in this particular plant system increased apomixis expression is concurrent with genetic and epigenetic modifications, possibly involving transposable elements. PMID:24710346

  8. Development of plant regeneration and transformation protocols for the desiccation-sensitive weeping lovegrass Eragrostis curvula.

    PubMed

    Ncanana, Sandile; Brandt, Wolf; Lindsey, George; Farrant, Jill

    2005-08-01

    A tissue culture protocol, suitable for transformation, was established for the pasture grass Eragrostis curvula. Callus was generated in the dark from leaf and seed tissues on a medium comprising MS salts supplemented with 2 mg/l 2,4-D, 0.01 mg/l BAP and 2% sucrose. Plant regeneration occurred via organogenesis on the same medium with 6% and 3% sucrose for shoot and root formation, respectively. Optimal regeneration (50 plantlets per callus) occurred when light of 45 micromol/m2 per s was used. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae Hsp12 gene was cloned into the Sac1 of the pCAMBIAUbeeQ vector and callus was transformed by biolistic bombardment. Best transformation (30%) occurred when the target tissue was bombarded twice at a distance of 70 mm using a bombardment pressure of 9,100 kPa. Although successful transformation and transcription of the Hsp12 gene occurred, no Hsp12 protein was found present in tissue extracts of transformed grass. PMID:15776238

  9. Variation in cytosine methylation patterns during ploidy level conversions in Eragrostis curvula.

    PubMed

    Ochogavía, Ana C; Cervigni, Gerardo; Selva, Juan P; Echenique, Viviana C; Pessino, Silvina C

    2009-05-01

    In many species polyploidization involves rearrangements of the progenitor genomes, at both genetic and epigenetic levels. We analyzed the cytosine methylation status in a 'tetraploid-diploid-tetraploid' series of Eragrostis curvula with a common genetic background by using the MSAP (Methylation-sensitive Amplified Polymorphism) technique. Considerable levels of polymorphisms were detected during ploidy conversions. The total level of methylation observed was lower in the diploid genotype compared to the tetraploid ones. A significant proportion of the epigenetic modifications occurring during the tetraploid-diploid conversion reverted during the diploid-tetraploid one. Genetic and expression data from previous work were used to analyze correlation with methylation variation. All genetic, epigenetic and gene expression variation data correlated significantly when compared by pairs in simple Mantel tests. Dendrograms reflecting genetic, epigenetic and expression distances as well as principal coordinate analysis suggested that plants of identical ploidy levels present similar sets of data. Twelve (12) different genomic fragments displaying different methylation behavior during the ploidy conversions were isolated, sequenced and characterized. PMID:19160057

  10. Effects of cadmium on aquatic hyphomycetes. [Alatospora acuminata; Clavariopsis aquatica; Flagellospora curvula; Heliscus lugdunesis; Tetracladium marchalianum

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, T.H.; Baerlocher, F.

    1984-08-01

    Two kinds of experiments, sporulation and growth experiments, were carried out to demonstrate the effect of cadmium on aquatic hyphomycetes. Oak (Quercus petraea L.) leaves were exposed in a hard-water stream (Luessel, Swiss Jura) and a soft-water stream (Ibach, Black Forest) for 2 months. In the laboratory, fungal sporulation on the leaves in stream water enriched with cadmium (as CdCl/sub 2/) was studied. A measureable effect was found when the cadmium concentration exceeded 0.1 ppm (0.1 mg/liter). Concentrations higher than 100 ppm inhibited conidium production completely. This toxic effect of cadmium was species dependent and much higher in soft water (water with low concentrations of calcium and magnesium) than in hard water. Growth experiments with Alatospora acuminata Ingold, Clavaropsis aquatica De Wildeman, Flagellospora curvula Ingold, Heliscus lugdunensis Saccardo and Therry, and Tetracladium marchalianum De Wildeman showed the same pattern of cadmium sensitivity as that seen in the sporulation experiments. Mycelial growth was less sensitive to cadmium than was fungal sporulation. High concentrations of competing cations (e.g., calcium and zinc) or potential ligands could reduce cadmium toxicity. Calcium content seems to be the most important factor responsible for the different sensitivity of aquatic hyphomycetes in hard and soft water.

  11. Gene expression in diplosporous and sexual Eragrostis curvula genotypes with differing ploidy levels.

    PubMed

    Cervigni, Gerardo D L; Paniego, Norma; Pessino, Silvina; Selva, Juan P; Díaz, Marina; Spangenberg, Germán; Echenique, Viviana

    2008-05-01

    The molecular nature of gene expression during the initiation and progress of diplosporous apomixis is still unknown. Moreover, the basis of the close correlation between diplospory and polyploidy is not clarified yet. A comparative expression analysis was performed based on expressed sequence tags (ESTs) sequencing and differential display in an Eragrostis curvula diplosporous tetraploid genotype (T, 4x apo), a sexual diploid derivative obtained from tissue culture (D, 2x sex) and an artificial sexual tetraploid obtained from the diploid seeds after colchicine treatment (C, 4x sex). From a total of 8,884 unigenes sequenced from inflorescence-derived libraries, 112 (1.26%) showed significant differential expression in individuals with different ploidy level and/or variable reproductive mode. Independent comparisons between plants with different reproductive mode (same ploidy) or different ploidy level (same reproductive mode) allowed the identification of genes modulated in response to diplosporous development or polyploidization, respectively. Surprisingly, a group of genes (Group 3) were differentially expressed or silenced only in the 4x sex plant, presenting similar levels of expression in the 4x apo and the 2x sex genotypes. A group of randomly selected differential genes was validated by QR-PCR. Differential display analysis showed that in general the 4x apo and 4x sex expression profiles were more related and different from the 2x sex one, but confirmed the existence of Group 3-type genes, in both inflorescences and leaves. The possible biological significance for the occurrence of this particular group of genes is discussed. In silico mapping onto the rice genome was used to identify candidates mapping to the region syntenic to the diplospory locus. PMID:18311543

  12. Microsporogenesis in Paspalum conspersum Schrad. (Virgata group) with different ploidy levels.

    PubMed

    Janke, L; Souza, F H D; Valls, J F M; Pagliarini, M S

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge about the cytology and reproductive behavior of a species is indispensable for hybridization programs. This is especially true for species belonging to the genus Paspalum, among which apomixis and a wide range of ploidy levels are frequently found. Paspalum conspersum Schrad. is a robust and warm-season perennial bunchgrass native to South America. Previous studies have indicated that both tetraploid and hexaploid races exist in this species; however, only information related to tetraploids has been applied to another taxon. In this study, a cytological investigation in two Brazilian accessions collected in different regions revealed tetraploidy in the accession BRA-012823 (2n = 4x = 40), with chromosome pairing in bivalents and normal meiosis and tetrad formation, and pentaploidy (2n = 5x = 50) in the accession BRA-022748, which presented total asynapsis. In this latter accession, 50 univalents could be scored at diakinesis. After alignment at the metaphase plate, sister chromatids segregated to the poles. Only one meiotic division (equational) occurred, and after cytokinesis, 100% of the dyads that formed had 2n microspores. The meiotic behavior during microsporogenesis, which showed 10 delayed univalents to reach the metaphase plate, suggests that this accession is a recent natural hybrid constituted by a parental genome with 40 chromosomes and another with 10 chromosomes. The potential usage of these accessions in Paspalum breeding has been discussed. PMID:24301755

  13. Mosquito larvicidal activity of oleic and linoleic acids isolated from Citrullus colocynthis (Linn.) Schrad.

    PubMed

    Rahuman, A Abdul; Venkatesan, P; Gopalakrishnan, Geetha

    2008-11-01

    In mosquito control programs, botanical origin may have the potential to be used successfully as larvicides. The larvicidal activity of crude acetone, hexane, ethyl acetate, methanol, and petroleum ether extracts of the leaf of Centella asiatica Linn., Datura metal Linn., Mukia scabrella Arn., Toddalia asiatica (Linn.) Lam, extracts of whole plant of Citrullus colocynthis (Linn.) Schrad, and Sphaeranthus indicus Linn. were assayed for their toxicity against the early fourth instar larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae). The larval mortality was observed after 24 h exposure. All extracts showed moderate larvicidal effects; however, the highest larval mortality was found in whole plant petroleum ether extract of C. colocynthis. In the present study, bioassay-guided fractionation of petroleum ether extract led to the separation and identification of fatty acids; oleic acid and linoleic acid were isolated and identified as mosquito larvicidal compounds. Oleic and Linoleic acids were quite potent against fourth instar larvae of Aedes aegypti L. (LC50 8.80, 18.20 and LC90 35.39, 96.33 ppm), Anopheles stephensi Liston (LC50 9.79, 11.49 and LC90 37.42, 47.35 ppm), and Culex quinquefasciatus Say (LC50 7.66, 27.24 and LC90 30.71, 70.38 ppm). The structure was elucidated from infrared, ultraviolet, 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance, 13C-NMR, and mass spectral data. This is the first report on the mosquito larvicidal activity of the reported isolated compounds from C. colocynthis. PMID:18688644

  14. Peroxisomal membrane manganese superoxide dismutase: characterization of the isozyme from watermelon (Citrullus lanatus Schrad.) cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Serrano, María; Romero-Puertas, María C; Pastori, Gabriela M; Corpas, Francisco J; Sandalio, Luisa M; del Río, Luis A; Palma, José M

    2007-01-01

    In this work the manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) bound to peroxisomal membranes of watermelon cotyledons (Citrullus lanatus Schrad.) was purified to homogeneity and some of its molecular properties were determined. The stepwise purification procedure consisted of ammonium sulphate fractionation, batch anion-exchange chromatography, and anion-exchange and gel-filtration column chromatography using a fast protein liquid chromatography system. Peroxisomal membrane Mn-SOD (perMn-SOD; EC 1.15.1.1) was purified 5600-fold with a yield of 2.6 mug of enzyme g(-1) of cotyledons, and had a specific activity of 480 U mg(-1) of protein. The native molecular mass determined for perMn-SOD was 108 000 Da, and it was composed of four equal subunits of 27 kDa, which indicates that perMn-SOD is a homotetramer. Ultraviolet and visible absorption spectra of the enzyme showed a shoulder at 275 nm and two absorption maxima at 448 nm and 555 nm, respectively. By isoelectric focusing, a pI of 5.75 was determined for perMn-SOD. In immunoblot assays, purified perMn-SOD was recognized by a polyclonal antibody against Mn-SOD from pea leaves, and the peroxisomal enzyme rapidly dissociated in the presence of dithiothreitol and SDS. The potential binding of the Mn-SOD isozyme to the peroxisomal membrane was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy analysis. The properties of perMn-SOD and the mitMn-SOD are compared and the possible function in peroxisomal membranes of the peripheral protein Mn-SOD is discussed. PMID:17545229

  15. NeeMDB: Convenient Database for Neem Secondary Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Hatti, Kaushik S; Muralitharan, Lakshmi; Hegde, Rajendra; Kush, Anil

    2014-01-01

    Indian Neem tree is known for its pesticidal and medicinal properties for centuries. Structure elucidation of large number of secondary metabolites responsible for its diverse properties has been achieved. However, this data is spread over various books, scientific reports and publications and difficult to access. We have compiled and stored structural details of neem metabolites in NeeMDB, a database which can be easily accessed, queried and downloaded. NeeMDB would be central in dissipating structural information of neem secondary metabolites world over. PMID:24966540

  16. A decade of continuous NEE measurements at a Scottish peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfter, Carole; Campbell, Claire; Coyle, Mhairi; Anderson, Margaret; Drewer, Julia; Levy, Peter; Famulari, Daniela; Twigg, Marsailidh; Skiba, Ute; Billett, Michael; Dinsmore, Kerry; Nemitz, Eiko; Sutton, Mark

    2013-04-01

    Eddy-covariance measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes have been running continuously at the Auchencorth Moss peatland site in Scotland (55o47'32N, 3o14'35W, 267 m a.s.l.) since the spring of 2002 which makes this study one of the longest ones to date on a peatland system. Auchencorth Moss is a low-lying, ombrotrophic peatland situated ca. 20 km south-west of Edinburgh. Peat depth ranges from <0.5 m to >0.5 m and the site has a mean annual precipitation of 1155 mm. The open moorland site has an extensive uniform fetch of blanket bog to the south, west and north. The vegetation present within the flux measurement footprint comprises mixed grass species, heather and substantial areas of moss species (Sphagnum spp. and Polytrichum spp.). The eddy-covariance system consists of a Licor 7000 closed-path infrared gas analyser operating at 10 Hz for the simultaneous measurement of carbon dioxide and water vapour and of a Gill Windmaster Pro ultrasonic anemometer, operating at 20 Hz, and mounted atop a 3 m mast. The effective measurement height is 3.5 m with a vertical separation of 20 cm between the anemometer and the inlet of the sampling line. Air is sampled at 20 litres per minute through a 40 m long Dekabon line (internal diameter 4 mm). In addition to eddy-covariance measurements, the site is equipped with a weather station, soil temperature measurements, total solar radiation and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) sensors, a tipping bucket for rainfall and, since April 2007, water table depth has been recorded at half-hourly interval. On an annual basis, the peatland at Auchencorth Moss has consistently been a net sink of CO2 in the study period 2002-2012 with a mean net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of - 69.1 ± 33.6 g C-CO2 m-2 yr-1. This value is at the high end of other recent studies as is the inter-annual range of NEE (-31.4 to -135.9 g C-CO2 m-2 yr-1). Inter-annual variations in NEE are significant and strongly correlated to the length of the growing

  17. Is the Interannual Variability of NEE Controlled by Dryness?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, C.; Ricciuto, D. M.

    2008-12-01

    The global rate of fossil fuel combustion continues to rise, but the amount of CO2 accumulating in the atmosphere has not increased accordingly. The relative magnitudes of carbon sinks are widely debated. In particular, the locations and mechanisms that drive interannual variability of atmospheric CO2 are highly uncertain. Terrestrial carbon reservoirs are believed to cause more interannual variability of atmospheric CO2 than oceanic carbon reservoirs (Bousquet et al., 2001). Determining controlling factors of interannual variability of terrestrial carbon sequestration is a key to understanding of essential processes of terrestrial carbon sinks and sources. We pose a hypothesis that the interannual variability of the ecosystem-atmosphere exchange (NEE) of CO2 is controlled by dryness. We use the data from the regional and global networks of flux towers to test this hypothesis. The dryness is a dimensionless parameter defined by Budyko (1974) as the ratio of the potential evapotranspiration to precipitation (P), Dryness = Rn/(LP) Where Rn is annual sum of net radiation, and L is the enthalpy of vaporization. Therefore, Rn/L is the potential evapotranspiration. Budyko used the dryness parameter to successfully classify geobotanic zones globally. Our initial analysis demonstrated that the annual NEE numbers are well organized by dryness parameter based on the data from several flux towers in the AmeriFlux network. We are using improved methodologies for filling missing flux, Rn and P data and are extending this analysis to include a larger number of sites. Although this model is oversimplified, dryness may play an important role in determination of annual variability of NEE of CO2 because this parameter has two features: (1) annual water balance (potential evapotranspiration to actual precipitation; and (2) energy balance (available radiation energy to latent heat). The fundamental understanding of the link between dryness and terrestrial carbon sequestration is that

  18. Central Nervous System Effects of Iso-6-spectaline Isolated from Senna Spectabilis var. Excelsa (Schrad) in Mice.

    PubMed

    Silva, Fo; Silva, Mgv; Cerqueira, Gs; Sabino, Eb; Almeida, Aac; Costa, Jp; Freitas, Rm

    2011-07-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) depressant and anticonvulsant activities of iso-6-spectaline (SPEC) were investigated in animal models. The SPEC from Senna spectabilis var. excelsa (Schrad) (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/ kg) injected by oral route (p.o.) in mice caused a significant decrease in the motor activity up to 30 days after the administration and in the dose of 1.0 mg/kg significantly reduced the remaining time on the Rota-rod apparatus. Additionally, SPEC (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0 mg/kg, p.o.) was also capable of promoting increase of latency for development of convulsions induced by pentylenetetrazole. This SPEC was also capable of promoting an increase of latency for development of convulsions induced by picrotoxin at highest dose. In the same way, the anticonvulsant effect of SPEC was affected by pretreatment with flumazenil, a selective antagonist of the benzodiazepine site of the GABA(A) receptor. These results suggest possible CNS depressant and anticonvulsant activities in mice that needs further investigation. PMID:21897664

  19. Evaluation and characterisation of Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrad seed oil: Comparison with Helianthus annuus (sunflower) seed oil.

    PubMed

    Nehdi, Imededdine Arbi; Sbihi, Hassen; Tan, Chin Ping; Al-Resayes, Saud Ibrahim

    2013-01-15

    The physicochemical properties, fatty acid, tocopherol, thermal properties, (1)H NMR, FTIR and profiles of non-conventional oil extracted from Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrad seeds were evaluated and compared with conventional sunflower seed oil. In addition, the antioxidant properties of C. colocynthis seed oil were also evaluated. The oil content of the C. colocynthis seeds was 23.16%. The main fatty acids in the oil were linoleic acid (66.73%) followed by oleic acid (14.78%), palmitic acid (9.74%), and stearic acid (7.37%). The tocopherol content was 121.85 mg/100g with γ-tocopherol as the major one (95.49%). The thermogravimetric analysis showed that the oil was thermally stable up to 286.57°C, and then began to decompose in four stages namely at 377.4°C, 408.4°C, 434.9°C and 559.2°C. The present study showed that this non-conventional C. colocynthis seed oil can be used for food and non-food applications to supplement or replace some of the conventional oils. PMID:23122069

  20. Variation of NEE and its affecting factors in a vineyard of arid region of northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, W. H.; Kang, S. Z.; Li, F. S.; Li, S. E.

    2014-02-01

    To understand the variation of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) in orchard ecosystem and it's affecting factors, carbon flux was measured using eddy covariance system in a wine vineyard in arid northwest China during 2008-2010. Results show that vineyard NEE was positive value at the early growth stage, higher negative value at the mid-growth stage, and lower negative value at the later growth stage. Diurnal variation of NEE was "W" shaped curve in sunny day, but "U" shaped curve in cloudy day. Irrigation and pruning did not affect diurnal variation shape of NEE, however, irrigation reduced the difference between maximal and minimal value of NEE and pruning reduced the carbon sink capacity. The main factors affecting hourly NEE were canopy conductance (gc) and net radiation (Rn). The hourly NEE increased with the increase of gc or Rn when gc was less than 0.02 m·s-1 or Rn was between 0 and 200 W·m-2. The main factors affecting both daily and seasonal NEE were gc, air temperature (Ta), atmospheric CO2 density, vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and soil moisture content.

  1. Partitioning components of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) in a suburban landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, E. B.; McFadden, J.

    2011-12-01

    Developed land - cities, suburbs, and exurban settlements - is a significant and growing fraction of the land-use in many regions over which we hope to construct carbon budgets. While anthropogenic CO2 fluxes have been estimated using emissions inventories and atmospheric tracers, there is very little data on the net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) of vegetation and soil in developed areas. Quantifying NEE in these areas requires a component-based approach to distinguish ecological CO2 fluxes from anthropogenic emissions as well as to quantify how different components of a developed landscape contribute to the total net CO2 exchange. At the KUOM tower site in a suburban neighborhood of Minneapolis-Saint Paul, Minnesota, USA, we simultaneously measured NEE and its main ecosystem component fluxes using eddy covariance systems on the tall tower and on a turfgrass lawn, heat dissipation sap flux measurements on trees within the tower footprint, and leaf gas exchange measurements. We scaled up our continuous component measurements to the KUOM tower footprint using a 2.4-m resolution satellite vegetation map and the Kljun et al. (2004) model to estimate the flux source area for every 30-minute flux measurement. Over a two-year period, we quantified the relative contribution of plant functional types (evergreen needleleaf tree, deciduous broadleaf tree, cool-season turfgrass) to seasonal and spatial variations in NEE. Evergreen needleleaf trees had the highest growing season (Apr-Nov) sums of carbon uptake on a per canopy area basis (-603 gC m-2), followed by deciduous broadleaf trees (-216 gC m-2), irrigated turfgrass (-215 gC m-2), and non-irrigated turfgrass (-121 gC m-2). The scaled-up component NEE estimates agreed closely with NEE measurements from the tall tower, although the imbalance varied seasonally, due to temporal differences in heating emissions, and by wind sector, due to spatial differences in traffic. In recreational land-use areas, turfgrasses represented

  2. Genome polymorphisms and gene differential expression in a 'back-and-forth' ploidy-altered series of weeping lovegrass (Eragrostis curvula).

    PubMed

    Mecchia, Martín A; Ochogavía, Ana; Pablo Selva, Juan; Laspina, Natalia; Felitti, Silvina; Martelotto, Luciano G; Spangenberg, Germán; Echenique, Viviana; Pessino, Silvina C

    2007-08-01

    Molecular markers were used to analyze the genomic structure of an euploid series of Eragrostis curvula, obtained after a tetraploid dihaploidization procedure followed by chromosome re-doubling with colchicine. Considerable levels of genome polymorphisms were detected between lines. Curiously, a significant number of molecular markers showed a revertant behavior following the successive changes of ploidy, suggesting that genome alterations were specific and conferred genetic structures characteristic of a given ploidy level. Genuine reversion was confirmed by sequencing. Cluster analysis demonstrated grouping of tetraploids while the diploid was more distantly related with respect to the rest of the plants. Polymorphic revertant sequences involved mostly non-coding regions, although some of them displayed sequence homology to known genes. A revertant sequence corresponding to a P-type adenosine triphosphatase was found to be differentially represented in cDNA libraries obtained from the diploid and a colchiploid, but was not found expressed in the original tetraploid. Transcriptome profiling of inflorescence followed by real-time polymerase chain reaction validation showed 0.34% polymorphic bands between apomictic tetraploid and sexual diploid plants. Several of the polymorphic sequences corresponded to known genes. Possible correlation between the results observed here and a recently reported genome-wide non-Mendelian inheritance mechanism in Arabidopsis thaliana are discussed. PMID:16919366

  3. Scaling for Robust Empirical Modeling and Predictions of Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) from Diverse Wetland Ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishtiaq, K. S.; Abdul-Aziz, O. I.

    2014-12-01

    We developed a scaling-based, simple empirical model for spatio-temporally robust prediction of the diurnal cycles of wetland net ecosystem exchange (NEE) by using an extended stochastic harmonic algorithm (ESHA). A reference-time observation from each diurnal cycle was utilized as the scaling parameter to normalize and collapse hourly observed NEE of different days into a single, dimensionless diurnal curve. The modeling concept was tested by parameterizing the unique diurnal curve and predicting hourly NEE of May to October (summer growing and fall seasons) between 2002-12 for diverse wetland ecosystems, as available in the U.S. AmeriFLUX network. As an example, the Taylor Slough short hydroperiod marsh site in the Florida Everglades had data for four consecutive growing seasons from 2009-12; results showed impressive modeling efficiency (coefficient of determination, R2 = 0.66) and accuracy (ratio of root-mean-square-error to the standard deviation of observations, RSR = 0.58). Model validation was performed with an independent year of NEE data, indicating equally impressive performance (R2 = 0.68, RSR = 0.57). The model included a parsimonious set of estimated parameters, which exhibited spatio-temporal robustness by collapsing onto narrow ranges. Model robustness was further investigated by analytically deriving and quantifying parameter sensitivity coefficients and a first-order uncertainty measure. The relatively robust, empirical NEE model can be applied for simulating continuous (e.g., hourly) NEE time-series from a single reference observation (or a set of limited observations) at different wetland sites of comparable hydro-climatology, biogeochemistry, and ecology. The method can also be used for a robust gap-filling of missing data in observed time-series of periodic ecohydrological variables for wetland or other ecosystems.

  4. Seasonal and inter-annual variability in rangeland NEE: Contributions of climatic anomalies and fluctuations in daytime and night-time CO2 fluxes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) of terrestrial ecosystems varies seasonally and inter-annually partly because of climatic variability. If we are to predict climate-driven variation in NEE, we must understand how climatic anomalies at different temporal scales influence NEE and its components, ...

  5. Discerning the cows from the pasture when determining annual NEE and carbon budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ammann, Christof; Felber, Raphael; Neftel, Albrecht

    2015-04-01

    The CO2 exchange of ecosystems and the resulting annual net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and total carbon budget (soil carbon sequestration) is commonly investigated using the eddy covariance (EC) technique. For the carbon budget of managed ecosystems also the import and export of organic carbon has to be taken into account. Grazed pasture systems represent a special challenge because their respiration can considerably contribute to the measured CO2 flux, but this contribution depends on the spatial distribution of the cows relative to the footprint and thus is variable in time. This has implications for the gap filling of CO2 flux time series necessary to determine annual NEE. In few existing studies two procedures have been suggested to determine the NEE of grazed pasture: (a) discarding all cases with cows in the footprint and gap-filling the remaining dataset; (b) treating the cow respiration as part of total ecosystem respiration and gap fill the entire flux dataset including cow contributions. Both approaches rely on idealized assumptions and have limitations. In our study we evaluated and compared the two approaches (for the first time to our knowledge) for a grazed pasture in Switzerland. For this purpose, the grazing cows were equipped with GPS sensors to monitor their position relative to the flux footprint. We found that the resulting annual NEE strongly depends on the flux data selection (e.g. u* filtering) and the applied gap filling procedure. Using an optimized procedure, the annual NEE with approach (b) was several times larger than the result of approach (a), but the difference agreed fairly well with independent estimates of cow respiration. Necessary assumptions and requirements of the two approaches for the determination of the pasture carbon budget will be discussed.

  6. Evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity of Solanum xanthocarpum Schrad and Wendl (Kaṇṭakāri) extract in laboratory animals

    PubMed Central

    More, Shraddha K.; Lande, Anirudha A.; Jagdale, Priti G.; Adkar, Prafulla P.; Ambavade, Shirishkumar D.

    2013-01-01

    Context: Solanum xanthocarpum Schrad and Wendl (Kaṇṭakāri) is a diffuse herb with prickly stem, traditionally used for the treatment of inflammation and one in the group of daśamūla (group of ten herbs) herbs commonly used drug in Ayurveda. Aims: In continuation of search for potent natural anti-inflammatory agents, the present research work was planned to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of ethanol extract of S. xanthocarpum whole plant. Settings and Design: The ethanol extract was evaluated at dose 10, 30 and 100 mg/kg p.o. in rats. Materials and Methods: Using pharmacological screening models carrageenan induced rat paw edema, histamine induced rat paw edema and cotton pellet granuloma in rats. Statistical Analysis Used: Data obtained was analyzed statistically using analysis of variance followed by post-hoc Dunnett test, P < 0.05 is considered as statistically significant. Results: Acute treatment didn’t show anti-inflammatory activity against carrageenan and histamine induced paw edema. However, administration of 100 mg/kg p.o for 7 day reduced the granuloma formation in cotton pellet granuloma model. Conclusions: Present results support the traditional use of plant for anti-inflammatory activity. In brief, the results provide scientific pharmacological basis for the therapeutic use of S. xanthocarpum. PMID:24991071

  7. Nucleosynthesis in novae - A source of Ne-E and Al-26

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillebrandt, W.; Thielemann, F.-K.

    1982-01-01

    It is shown upon computation of the nucleosynthesis products of explosive hydrogen burning, in the framework of recent nova models, that nova condensates will probably contain isotopic anomalies in Ne-22, from Na-22 decay, and Mg-26, from Al-26 decay. It is found, for all the models considered, that while too much Ne-20 and -21 is produced relative to Ne-22 to explain the presumably almost pure Ne-22 meteoritic Ne-E component, the Na-22 abundance is high enough to explain Ne-E as its decay product if nova condensates are preserved in Ne samples. It is also determined that while Al-26 is coproduced with Na-22, its total amount strongly depends on the uncertain, Si-27(p, gamma)P-28 reaction rate. The abundances of all nuclides, up to Ar, are computed and found to be clearly nonsolar in many cases.

  8. Research Highlights and Recent Enhancements at the NEES@UCSB Permanently Instrumented Field Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steidl, J. H.; Hegarty, P.; Seale, S. H.; Lamere, T.; Stinson, E.; Wojcik, K.

    2012-12-01

    The NEES@UCSB facility consists of experimental facilities and cyber infrastructure for active testing and passive earthquake monitoring at instrumented geotechnical field sites. There have been a number of facility enhancements to both the experimental facilities and the cyber infrastructure for facilitating research at the sites and access to the data they produce. Through both the maintenance and operations and the NEES Research program funding sources, the scope of monitoring at the field sites continues to expand. A permanent cross-hole source and sensor array has been installed at both the Wildlife Liquefaction Array (WLA) and at the Garner Valley Downhole Array (GVDA) field sites. This enhancement provides daily measurements of shear-wave velocity and automated post-earthquake observations of velocity to examine soil modulus reduction and recovery. After a very large event, where nonlinear soil behavior is expected, cross-hole hammer source time intervals are as short as 5 minutes. While waiting for larger earthquakes to occur, the daily cross-hole hammer tests are providing interesting data on shear-wave velocity changes with seasonal water table height. Testing of a small reconfigurable structure at both the WLA and GVDA sites was conducted using the NEES@UCLA mobile shakers. The structure, which is a smaller version of a permanent structure at GVDA, has been left at the GVDA site and can be used for future experiments or site instrumentation enhancements. The large soil-foundation-interaction structure at GVDA has a 1D shaker mounted under its roof slab. This shaker runs nightly and the data provide insight into the influence of environmental conditions on the response of the structure. At WLA, additional sensors have been installed in a dense Shape Accelerometer Array (SAA). Each of the seven arrays contain 24 3-component MEMS accelerometers at approximately 0.3 meter spacing that span the upper 8 meters of the site, from above to below the liquefiable

  9. BOREAS TGB-1/TGB-3 NEE Data over the NSA Fen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bellisario, Lianne; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor); Moore, Tim R.

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Trace Gas Biogeochemistry (BOREAS TGB-1) and TGB-3 teams collected several data sets that contributed to understanding the measured trace gas fluxes over sites in the Northern Study Area (NSA). This data set contains Net Ecosystem Exchange of CO2 (NEE) measurements collected with chambers at the NSA fen in 1994 and 1996. Gas samples were extracted approximately every 7 days from chambers and analyzed at the NSA lab facility. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files.

  10. Anterior Segment Dysgenesis and Early-Onset Glaucoma in nee Mice with Mutation of Sh3pxd2b

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Mao; Hedberg-Buenz, Adam; Koehn, Demelza; John, Simon W. M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Mutations in SH3PXD2B cause Frank-Ter Haar syndrome, a rare condition characterized by congenital glaucoma, as well as craniofacial, skeletal, and cardiac anomalies. The nee strain of mice carries a spontaneously arising mutation in Sh3pxd2b. The purpose of this study was to test whether nee mice develop glaucoma. Methods. Eyes of nee mutants and strain-matched controls were comparatively analyzed at multiple ages by slit lamp examination, intraocular pressure recording, and histologic analysis. Cross sections of the optic nerve were analyzed to confirm glaucomatous progression. Results. Slit lamp examination showed that, from an early age, nee mice uniformly exhibited severe iridocorneal adhesions around the entire circumference of the eye. Presumably as a consequence of aqueous humor outflow blockage, they rapidly developed multiple indices of glaucoma. By 3 to 4 months of age, they exhibited high intraocular pressure (30.8 ± 12.5 mm Hg; mean ± SD), corneal opacity, and enlarged anterior chambers. Although histologic analyses at P17 did not reveal any indices of damage, similar analysis at 3 to 4 months of age revealed a course of progressive retinal ganglion cell loss, optic nerve head excavation, and axon loss. Conclusions. Eyes of nee mice exhibit anterior segment dysgenesis and early-onset glaucoma. Because SH3PXD2B is predicted to be a podosome adaptor protein, these findings implicate podosomes in normal development of the iridocorneal angle and the genes influencing podosomes as candidates in glaucoma. Because of the early-onset, high-penetrance glaucoma, nee mice offer many potential advantages as a new mouse model of the disease. PMID:21282566

  11. Anti-inflammatory activity of the leaf extacts of Gendarussa vulgaris Nees

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, TK Mohamed; Azeem, AK; Dilip, C; Sankar, C; Prasanth, NV; Duraisami, R

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the anti-inflammatory property of the leaf exacts of Gendarussa vulgaris (G. vulgaris) Nees. Methods G. vulgaris Nees of the family Apocynaceae is a medium sized tree grown in semishade or no shade and is common in the Ernad and Nilambur taluks of Kerala.Various parts of this plant have been used in the treatment of ulcers, sores, inflammation, dyspepsia, healing of wounds, etc. The present study aimed at the evaluation of anti-inflammatory property of the aqueous and alcoholic extracts of the leaves by both in vitro and in vivo methods. In vitro method was estimated by human red blood cell membrane stabilisation (HRBC) method and in vivo method was estimated on the carrageenan induced paw oedima. Results Both the methods showed significant anti-inflammatory property of the different extracts tested. Conclusions The alcoholic extract at a concentration of 300 mg/mL showed potent activity on comparing with the standard drug diclofenac sodium. PMID:23569746

  12. NEE and GPP dynamic evolution at two biomes in the upper Spanish plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, María Luisa; Pardo, Nuria; Pérez, Isidro Alberto; García, Maria de los Angeles

    2014-05-01

    In order to assess the ability of dominant biomes to act as a CO2 sink, two eddy correlation stations close to each other in central Spain have been concurrently operational since March 2008 until the present. The land use of the first station, AC, is a rapeseed rotating crop consisting of annual rotation of non-irrigated rapeseed, barley, peas, rye, and sunflower, respectively. The land use of the second, CIBA, is a mixture of open shrubs/crops, with open shrubs being markedly dominant. The period of measurements covered variable general meteorological conditions. 2009 and 2012 were dominated by drought, whereas 2010 was the rainiest year. Annual rainfall during 2008 and 2009 was close to the historical averaged annual means. This paper presents the dynamic evolution of NEE-8d and GPP-8d observed at the AC station over five years and compares the results with those concurrently observed at the CIBA station. GGP 8-d estimates at both stations were determined using a Light Use Efficiency Model, LUE. Input data for the LUE model were the FPAR 8-d products supplied by MODIS, PAR in situ measurements, and a scalar f, varying between 0 and 1, to take account of the reduction in maximum PAR conversion efficiency, ɛ0, under limiting environmental conditions. f values were assumed to be dependent on air temperature and evaporative fraction, EF, which was considered a proxy of soil moisture. ɛ0, a key parameter, which depends on land use types, was derived through the results of a linear regression fit between the GPP 8-d eddy covariance composites observed and the LUE concurrent 8-d model estimates. Over the five-year study period, both biomes behaved as CO2 sinks. However, the ratio of the NEE-8d total accumulated at AC and CIBA, respectively, was close to a factor two, revealing the effectiveness of the studied crops as CO2 sinks. On an annual basis, accumulated NEE-8d exhibited major variability in both biomes. At CIBA, the results were largely dominated by the

  13. Improvement in the yield and quality of kalmegh (Andrographis paniculata Nees) under the sustainable production system.

    PubMed

    Verma, Rajesh Kumar; Verma, Sanjeet K; Pankaj, Umesh; Gupta, Anand K; Khan, Khushboo; Shankar, Karuna

    2015-02-01

    Andrographis paniculata Nees is an annual erect herb with wide medicinal and pharmacological applications due to the presence of andrographolide and other active chemical constituents. The large-scale cultivation of the kalmegh is not in practice. The aim of this study was to establish sustainable production systems of A. paniculata cv CIM-Megha with the application of different bioinoculants and chemical fertilisers. A. paniculata herb and andrographolide yield in the dried leaves was found to be highest (218% and 61.3%, respectively) in treatment T3 (NPK+Bacillus sp.) compared with T1 (control). The soil organic carbon, soil microbial respiration, soil enzymes activity and available nutrients improved significantly with combined application of bioinoculants and chemical fertilisers. PMID:25348874

  14. Epichloae infection in a native South African grass, Festuca costata Nees.

    PubMed

    McGranahan, D A; Burgdorf, R; Kirkman, K P

    2015-07-01

    Fungal endophytes have been documented in almost all terrestrial plant groups. Although the endophyte infection syndrome in agronomic cultivars is well studied, relatively little work addresses questions of spatial ecology and fire effects on epichloae endophyte infection in native grasses, and none, to our knowledge, in sub-Saharan Africa. We sampled seven populations of the native Festuca costata Nees along the spline of the Drakensberg range in South Africa at several spatial scales, including both recently burned and unburned stands. We tested epichloae presence and prevalence with immunoblot assays, PCR and genetic sequencing. We found epichloae endophytes were present and prevalent (38-98% infection rates depending on location). Variation in infection rates occurred primarily among locations, but also among bunches. There was little evidence that endophyte infection rates varied with fire. Novel evidence of epichloae infection of a native Festuca in South Africa opens the door to several new research questions, from the phylogenetic relationship between epichloae of sub-Saharan Africa and other continents to the ecological advantages or disadvantages that endophytes confer upon their hosts, especially in a fire-prone ecosystem vulnerable to global environmental change. PMID:25619128

  15. Clara Haber, nee Immerwahr (1870–1915): Life, Work and Legacy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We examine the life, work, and legacy of Clara Haber, nee Immerwahr, who became the first woman to earn a doctorate from the University of Breslau, in 1900. In 1901 she married the chemist Fritz Haber. With no employment available for female scientists, Clara freelanced as an instructor in the continued education of women, mainly housewives, while struggling not to become a housewife herself. Her duties as a designated head of a posh household hardly brought fulfillment to her life. The outbreak of WWI further exacerbated the situation, as Fritz Haber applied himself in extraordinary ways to aid the German war effort. The night that he celebrated the “success” of the first chlorine cloud attack, Clara committed suicide. We found little evidence to support claims that Clara was an outspoken pacifist who took her life because of her disapproval of Fritz Haber's involvement in chemical warfare. We conclude by examining “the myth of Clara Immerwahr” that took root in the 1990s from the perspective offered by the available scholarly sources, including some untapped ones. PMID:27099403

  16. Cytotoxic, radical scavenging and antimicrobial activities of sesquiterpenoids from the Tahitian liverwort Mastigophora diclados (Brid.) Nees (Mastigophoraceae).

    PubMed

    Komala, Ismiarni; Ito, Takuya; Nagashima, Fumihiro; Yagi, Yasuyuki; Asakawa, Yoshinori

    2010-10-01

    A drimane, (+)-drimenol (1), five known herbertanes, (-)-alpha-herbertenol (2), (-)-herbertenediol (3), mastigophorene A (4), (-)-mastigophorene C (5) and (-)-mastigophorene D (6), a pimarane, (-)-ent-pimara-8(14),15-dien-19-oic acid (7), and two eudesmanolides, (-)-diplophyllolide A (8) and (-)-diplophyllin (9) were isolated from the Tahitian Mastigophora diclados (Brid.) Nees. Herbertane sesquiterpenes (2, 3, 5 and 6) showed cytotoxicity against HL-60 and KB cell lines, radical scavenging activity and antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis. (-)-Diplophyllolide A (8) also exhibited cytotoxicity against HL-60 and KB cell lines. PMID:20458547

  17. Potential NEE Budget and Prediction of Future Emissions under Climate Change in an Arctic Wet Sedge Tundra, Barrow, Alaska .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalhori, A. A. M.; Oechel, W. C.; Burba, G. G.; Gioli, B.; Zona, D.; Murphy, P.; Goodrich, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic ecosystems are critically affected by climate change and also play an important role in the global carbon budget. Presented here is a 14-year study of growing season CO2 fluxes in an Alaskan wet sedge tundra ecosystem -which is about 2 km south of the Arctic Ocean and is adjacent to the NOAA Climate Monitoring & Diagnostic Laboratory (CMDL)- and the key environmental controls on these fluxes. We have measured net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) using the eddy covariance technique from 1998 to 2014 in order to quantify the long-term seasonal and inter-annual variability in the CO2 budget over this period. The WPL correction and the surface heating correction were applied to all CO2 flux data from the open-path instrument (Burba et al., 2008). Despite several gaps in measurement years, we found that growing season net CO2 uptake has significantly increased since the 2000s and that NEE is sensitive to dry conditions in tundra. Our data suggest this increase in CO2 uptake (larger than -6 μmol m-2 s-1) occurred during the initial thawing period and during the June-August growing season. However, there is a decreasing trend in total summer uptake beginning in 2011, continuing until the end of 2014. The mean diurnal pattern for the summer period over the course of 14 years (Figure below), indicates inter-annual variability associated with the key environmental controls on these CO2 fluxes. Monthly trends in Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR), net radiation, relative humidity as well as air temperature and soil temperature have consistently simultaneous effects on the variation in NEE. More significant effect of PAR than temperature on summer NEE had been observed for the first period of this study, however our ANOVA, multiple regression and t-test results showed a stronger effect of temperature than PAR in the recent years assuming that Arctic warming will be greater than average global warming. Also the diurnal pattern shows that the maximum daily carbon

  18. An approach to assess NEE and C-costs associated with an energy-crop production at different erosion-induced transient states in a typical Northeastern Germany landscape using process-based agroecosystem modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatskikh, D.; Nendel, C.; Hagemann, U.; Specka, X.; Augustin, J.; Sommer, M.; Van Oost, K.

    2012-04-01

    Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) and C-costs associated with energy-crop production systems which are outside of NEE must be determined to suggest optimal mitigation options. In theory, NEE can be positive, if SOC is building up, neutral or balanced, with no change in SOC, or negative, if SOC is lost as a result of a soil degradation processes. Unclearness in complex multiscale interactions between different processes in the landscape in combination with a well-known wide range of uncertainties around NEE estimations makes these estimations for landscape scale scarce. In this study we used a process-based modeling to assess C-costs associated with soil erosion, assessing NEE at different erosion-induced transient states in the experiment settled Northeastern Germany (near Dedelow) in a representative section of younger landscape of hummocky ground moraine (CarboZALF-D). We used Monica, a soil-crop-atmosphere model, which is well-validated for various crops and soil in Germany. In the model, NEE (=-NEP) refer to NPP minus C losses in heterotrophic respiration, while NBE (=-NBP) refers to the change in SOC stocks after C losses due to regular (e.g. soil erosion) or occasional (e.g. harvest) disturbances. In this study we applied Monica to analyze relationships between past geomorphic processes, landscape position, crop growth and NEE. In this study we were interested in general trends and associated agroecosystem properties, rather than on magnitude of the fluxes. The results showed that past soil redistribution affected NEE at both positions, while the Monica-based scenarios in combination with data-based interpolations helped to interpret the NEE budgets. The model captured the magnitude of differences in the daily NEE values, but also the differences in an accumulated NEE fluxes between different erosion-induced transient states. Thus for both eroded and deposited positions NEE was negative. However absolute values of NEE were smaller for the deposited site compare to

  19. NEES Tsunami "Product" Example : Standards and Guidelines for Construction of Coastal Structures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Synolakis, C. E.; Eskijian, M.; Borrero, J. C.; McCarthy, D.

    2003-12-01

    heights, as well as impact loads from ships and floating debris. While small scale data on forces on piles and walls have been obtained in collaborative NSF-funded studies (Harry Yeh, pers. comm.), predictions from these data sets at prototype scales have yet to be validated. Also, no predictions for tsunami forces from numerical models have yet been compared with lab data. Large scale laboratory experiments planned under NEES will allow for the validation of numerical predictions for wave velocities and forces, the extrapolation from small scale lab experiments, and the translation of force predictions to construction standards. It is anticipated that the latter will include performance guidelines for the design of seawalls, wharfs, piers, and structures to mitigate both direct and indirect tsunamigenic losses. References Borrero, J.C., 2002, Analysis of Tsunami Hazards in Southern California, PhD thesis, USC, 262p. Eskijian, M.S. Heffron, R.E., Dahlgren, T., 2003.. Engineering Standards for Marine Oil Terminals, in Submarine Landslides and Tsunamis, Yacliner, A. et al (eds), NATO Science Series, Kluwer Academic Publishers. Yeh, H. Liu, P.L-F., Synolakis, Long Wave Runup Models, World Scientific. Marine Oil Terminal Engineering and Maintenance Standards, (MOTEMS), July 2003, published by the California State Lands Commission.

  20. Comparing three methods of NEE-flux partitioning from the same grassland ecosystem: the 13C, 18O isotope approach and using simulated Ecosystem respiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegwolf, R.; Bantelmann, E.; Saurer, M.; Eugster, W.; Buchmann, N.

    2007-12-01

    As a change in the global climate occurs with increasing temperatures, the Carbon exchange processes of terrestrial ecosystems will change as well. However, it is difficult to quantify the degree to what ecosystem respiration will change relative to the CO2 uptake by photosynthesis. To estimate the carbon sequestration potential of terrestrial vegetation cover it is essential to know both fluxes: ecosystem respiration and the carbon uptake by the vegetation cover. Therefore the net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) was measured with the eddy covariance method and separated into assimilation and respiration flux. We applied three different approaches, 1) the conventional method, applying the nighttime relationship between soil temperature and NEE for calculating the respiration flux during the day, 2) the use of stable carbon and 3) oxygen isotopes. We compared the results of the three partitioning exercises for a temperate grassland ecosystem in the pre-Alps of Switzerland for four days in June 2004. The assimilation flux derived with the conventional NEE partitioning approach, was best represented at low PAR and low temperatures, in the morning between 5 and 9 am. With increasing temperature and PAR the assimilation for the whole canopy was underestimated. For partitioning NEE via 18O approach, correlations of temperature and radiation with assimilation and respiration flux were significantly higher for the partitioning approach with 18O than for the 13C NEE partitioning. A sensitivity analysis showed the importance of an accurate determination of the equilibrium term θ between CO2 and leaf water δ18O for the NEE partitioning with 18O. For using 13C to partition NEE, the correct magnitude of the 13C fractionation and for the respiration term is essential. The analysis of the data showed that for low light and low morning temperatures the conventional method delivers reasonably good results. When the temperatures exceeded 21°C the isotope approach provided the

  1. What have we Learned after a Decade of Experiments and Monitoring at the NEES@UCSB Permanently Instrumented Field Sites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steidl, J. H.; Civilini, F.; Seale, S. H.; Hegarty, P.

    2013-12-01

    The Wildlife Liquefaction Array (WLA) and Garner Valley Downhole Array (GVDA) located in southern California are facilities that for the last decade have been supported under the National Science Foundations George E. Brown, Jr., Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) program. These densely instrumented geotechnical and structural engineering field sites continuously record both acceleration and pore pressure, with accelerometers located on the surface and at various depths below the surface, and pore pressure transducers installed at depth within the liquefiable layers. Permanently instrumented structures for examining soil-foundation-structure interaction and a permanent cross-hole array at the sites have transformed these sites into multi-disciplinary earthquake engineering research facilities. Over the last decade, local and regional seismic activity, including multiple extremely active earthquake swarms, have produced a valuable new data set providing a unique opportunity to observe site response and the evolution of pore pressure generation with time throughout the liquefiable layer at an unprecedented level of detail. In addition to the earthquakes provided by nature, active testing experiments using the mobile shakers from NEES@UTexas and NEES@UCLA have produced an equally valuable data set on both site characterization studies and soil-foundation-structure interaction. The new observations of pore pressure and acceleration with depth are providing in situ empirical evidence documenting the range of ground motion levels at which the onset of nonlinear behavior and excess pore pressure begins, augmenting previous case history data, and laboratory data from cyclic tri-axial and centrifuge testing. The largest static pore pressure increases observed in the 'NEES' decade of monitoring were generated by four events at the WLA site, ranging in magnitude from 4.6 to 5.4 and all at distances less than 10km from the site. The largest peak horizontal

  2. Evaluation of the Allelopathic Potential of Leaf, Stem, and Root Extracts of Ocotea pulchella Nees et Mart.

    PubMed

    Candido, Lafayette P; Varela, Rosa M; Torres, Ascensión; Molinillo, José M G; Gualtieri, Sonia C J; Macías, Francisco A

    2016-08-01

    Despite the increase in recent decades in herbicide research on the potential of native plants, current knowledge is considered to be low. Very few studies have been carried out on the chemical profile or the biological activity of the Brazilian savanna (Cerrado) species. In the study reported here, the allelopathic activity of AcOEt and MeOH extracts of leaves, stems, and roots from Ocotea pulchella Nees was evaluated. The extracts were assayed on etiolated wheat coleoptiles. The AcOEt leaf extract was the most active and this was tested on standard target species (STS). Lycopersicon esculentum and Lactuca sativa were the most sensitive species in this test. A total of eleven compounds have been isolated and characterized. Compounds 1, 2, 4, and 6 have not been identified previously from O. pulchella and ocoteol (9) is reported for the first time in the literature. Eight compounds were tested on wheat coleoptile growth, and spathulenol, benzyl salicylate, and benzyl benzoate showed the highest activities. These compounds showed inhibitory activity on L. esculentum. The values obtained correspond to the activity exhibited by the extract and these compounds may therefore be responsible for the allelopathic activity shown by O. pulchella. PMID:27482860

  3. Protective activity of andrographolide and arabinogalactan proteins from Andrographis paniculata Nees. against ethanol-induced toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Singha, Prajjal K; Roy, Somenath; Dey, Satyahari

    2007-04-20

    To find out the active principles against ethanol-induced toxicity in mice, Andrographis paniculata Nees. (Ap) was chosen and isolated andrographolide (ANDRO) and arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs). ANDRO was detected by HPTLC, FTIR and quantified by HPLC (10mg/g of Ap powder). AGPs was detected by beta-glucosyl Yariv staining of SDS-PAGE gel, FTIR and quantified by single radial gel diffusion assay with beta-glucosyl Yariv reagent (0.5mg/g Ap powder). The mice are pretreated intra-peritoneally (i.p.) with different doses (62.5, 125, 250, and 500mg/kg) of body weight of mice] of ANDRO and AGPs for 7 days and then ethanol (7.5g/kg of body weight) was injected, i.p. Besides, silymarin was used as standard hepatoprotective agent for comparative study with ANDRO and AGPs. The ameliorative activity of ANDRO and AGP against hepatic renal alcohol toxicity was measured by assessing GOT, GPT, ACP, ALP and LP levels in liver and kidney. It has been observed that pretreatment of mice with ANDRO and AGPs at 500mg/kg of body weight and 125mg/kg of body weight respectively could able to minimize the toxicity in compare to ethanol treated group as revealed by the different enzymatic assay in liver and kidney tissues and the results were comparable with silymarin. Hence, out of several ill-defined compounds present in Ap, ANDRO and AGPs are the potential bioactive compounds responsible for protection against ethanol-induced toxicity. PMID:17127022

  4. Coupling of Pore Pressure and Ground Motion: Further Studies using Data Recorded at the NEES@UCSB Wildlife Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seale, S. H.; Lavallee, D.; Archuleta, R. J.; Steidl, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    Pore pressure built up during an earthquake and the hazard associated with soil liquefaction present a major challenge for our society, as has been dramatically illustrated by recent large events (e.g. the 2011 Tohoku-oki, Japan, earthquake). There is consensus among scientists that a better assessment of the liquefaction risk requires a better understanding of the coupling between pore pressure and ground motion time histories. There is a basic need to investigate coupling as a function of the frequency content of the ground motion. The 2010 M7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah event has provided a remarkable opportunity to investigate and model the coupling. The event was well recorded at the NEES@UCSB Wildlife station located 110 km from the hypocenter. The station is equipped with three-component strong-motion accelerometers at the surface and in boreholes at various depths and with pore pressure transducers located in a saturated, liquefiable layer. The recorded pore pressure and ground motion time histories both have frequency content that is a function of time. We have applied a wavelet decomposition technique to the El Mayor ground motion and pore pressure data, looking for a linear relationship between the signals. The analysis shows that the early P-wave accelerations (vertical component) initiate pore pressure response. However, the pore pressure records contain a low-frequency component that dominates the signal with no corresponding low-frequency component in the ground motion signals recorded near-by. Although uncommon, a similar behavior has been also reported in the literature for pore pressure signals recoded during the 1980 Mammoth Lakes, California, earthquake. We have extended this work to the analysis of 4 other seismic events that have induced an increase in pore pressure at WLA. As the response of pore pressure is potentially a local phenomenon, we have restricted our analysis to recordings from the same site. These events include the M5.8 Ocotillo

  5. Direct Analysis in Real Time by Mass Spectrometric Technique for Determining the Variation in Metabolite Profiles of Cinnamomum tamala Nees and Eberm Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vineeta; Gupta, Atul Kumar; Singh, S. P.; Kumar, Anil

    2012-01-01

    Cinnamomum tamala Nees & Eberm. is an important traditional medicinal plant, mentioned in various ancient literatures such as Ayurveda. Several of its medicinal properties have recently been proved. To characterize diversity in terms of metabolite profiles of Cinnamomum tamala Nees and Eberm genotypes, a newly emerging mass spectral ionization technique direct time in real time (DART) is very helpful. The DART ion source has been used to analyze an extremely wide range of phytochemicals present in leaves of Cinnamomum tamala. Ten genotypes were assessed for the presence of different phytochemicals. Phytochemical analysis showed the presence of mainly terpenes and phenols. These constituents vary in the different genotypes of Cinnamomum tamala. Principal component analysis has also been employed to analyze the DART data of these Cinnamomum genotypes. The result shows that the genotype of Cinnamomum tamala could be differentiated using DART MS data. The active components present in Cinnamomum tamala may be contributing significantly to high amount of antioxidant property of leaves and, in turn, conditional effects for diabetic patients. PMID:22701361

  6. Long-term impacts of peatland restoration on the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of blanket bogs in Northern Scotland.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hambley, Graham; Hill, Timothy; Saunders, Matthew; Arn Teh, Yit

    2016-04-01

    Unmanaged peatlands represent an important long-term C sink and thus play an important part of the global C cycle. Despite covering only 12 % of the UK land area, peatlands are estimated to store approximately 20 times more carbon than the UK's forests, which cover 13% of the land area. The Flow Country of Northern Scotland is the largest area of contiguous blanket bog in the UK, and one of the biggest in Europe, covering an area in excess of 4000 km2 and plays a key role in mediating regional atmospheric exchanges of greenhouse gases (GHGs) such as carbon dioxide (CO2), and water vapour (H2O). However, these peatlands underwent significant afforestation in the 1980s, when over 670 km2 of blanket bog were drained and planted with Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) and Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta). This resulted in modifications to hydrology, micro-topography, vegetation and soil properties all of which are known to influence the production, emission and sequestration of key GHGs. Since the late 1990s restoration work has been carried out to remove forest plantations and raise water tables, by drain blocking, to encourage the recolonisation of Sphagnum species and restore ecosystem functioning. Here, we report findings of NEE and its constituent fluxes, GPP and Reco, from a study investigating the impacts of restoration on C dynamics over a chronosequence of restored peatlands. The research explored the role of environmental variables and microtopography in modulating land-atmosphere exchanges, using a multi-scale sampling approach that incorporated eddy covariance measurements with dynamic flux chambers. Key age classes sampled included an undrained peatland; an older restored peatland (17 years old); and a more recently restored site (12 years old). The oldest restored site showed the strongest uptake of C, with an annual assimilation rate of 858 g C m-2 yr-1 compared to assimilation rates of 501g C m-2 yr-1 and 575g C m-2 yr-1 from the younger restored site and

  7. Anti-Infective Metabolites of a Newly Isolated Bacillus thuringiensis KL1 Associated with Kalmegh (Andrographis paniculata Nees.), a Traditional Medicinal Herb

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sudipta; Yasmin, Sahana; Ghosh, Subhadeep; Bhattacharya, Somesankar; Banerjee, Debdulal

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to isolate endophytic bacteria possessing anti-infective property from Kalmegh (Andrographis paniculata Nees.), a well-known medicinal plant. A total of 23 strains were isolated from this plant among which the strain KL1, isolated from surface-sterilized leaf of this medicinal herb, showed broad-spectrum antagonism against an array of Gram-positive and -negative bacterial pathogens. Ethyl acetate extract of KL1-fermented media yielded a greenish amorphous substance retaining anti-infective property. Solvent-extracted crude material was separated by thin-layer chromatography, and the active ingredient was located by autobiogram analysis. The purified anti-infective compound was found as anthracene derivative as analyzed by ultraviolet and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The strain was identified as Bacillus thuringiensis KL1 from cultural, physiochemical, and molecular aspects. The above results indicate the pharmaceutical potential of the candidate isolate. PMID:26997870

  8. Anti-Infective Metabolites of a Newly Isolated Bacillus thuringiensis KL1 Associated with Kalmegh (Andrographis paniculata Nees.), a Traditional Medicinal Herb.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sudipta; Yasmin, Sahana; Ghosh, Subhadeep; Bhattacharya, Somesankar; Banerjee, Debdulal

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to isolate endophytic bacteria possessing anti-infective property from Kalmegh (Andrographis paniculata Nees.), a well-known medicinal plant. A total of 23 strains were isolated from this plant among which the strain KL1, isolated from surface-sterilized leaf of this medicinal herb, showed broad-spectrum antagonism against an array of Gram-positive and -negative bacterial pathogens. Ethyl acetate extract of KL1-fermented media yielded a greenish amorphous substance retaining anti-infective property. Solvent-extracted crude material was separated by thin-layer chromatography, and the active ingredient was located by autobiogram analysis. The purified anti-infective compound was found as anthracene derivative as analyzed by ultraviolet and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The strain was identified as Bacillus thuringiensis KL1 from cultural, physiochemical, and molecular aspects. The above results indicate the pharmaceutical potential of the candidate isolate. PMID:26997870

  9. Does Casing Material Influence Downhole Accelerometer Recordings? a Controlled Study of Earthquake and Experimental Data Recorded at the NEES@UCSB Wildlife Liquefaction Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huthsing, D. A.; Seale, S. H.; Steidl, J. H.; Ratzesberger, H.; Hegarty, P.; Nees@Ucsb

    2010-12-01

    In 2004, NEES@UCSB outfitted the Wildlife Liquefaction Array (WLA) with new instrumentation and initiated an experiment to test whether casing material influences downhole recordings of strong ground motion. Two 5.5m boreholes were drilled meters apart. One of the boreholes was cased with traditional rigid PVC and the other with flexible Corex® drain pipe. Three-component strong-motion accelerometers were installed in both boreholes. Recently we have obtained a unique set of data at WLA that has allowed us to conduct a controlled study. On 15 June 2010, a Mw 5.7 event occurred near Ocotillo, CA, 57 km SW from WLA. A set of 60 aftershocks with M > 3.0 were recorded at WLA with good signal-to-noise ratio. These data are ideal for our study, as the events are approximately co-located relative to the site and they have similar focal mechanisms. We computed frequency spectra for the three components of motion for these events and we computed average spectral ratios between the data in the two boreholes. The spectral ratios are not flat ( = 1): certain frequencies within the range of engineering interest ( f < 20 Hz) recorded in the flexible borehole show amplification and damping relative to the recordings from the rigid borehole. An amplification factor of 1.4 is the maximum in this frequency range. In May 2010, NEES@UTexas visited WLA with the vibroseis truck T-Rex. We have performed spectral analysis of borehole recordings from 30 T-Rex pulses with frequencies ranging from 3 to 16 Hz. We present these spectral ratios for comparison with the ones computed from earthquake data.

  10. Dehydroandrographolide, an iNOS inhibitor, extracted from Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Nees, induces autophagy in human oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Lin, Chiao-Wen; Chiou, Hui-Ling; Yang, Shun-Fa; Chen, Mu-Kuan

    2015-10-13

    Autophagy, which is constitutively executed at the basal level in all cells, promotes cellular homeostasis by regulating the turnover of organelles and proteins. Andrographolide and dehydroandrographolide (DA) are the two principle components of Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Nees. and are the main contributors to its therapeutic properties. However, the pharmacological activities of dehydroandrographolide (DA) remain unclear. In this study, DA induces oral cancer cell death by activating autophagy. Treatment with autophagy inhibitors inhibited DA-induced human oral cancer cell death. In addition, DA increased LC3-II expression and reduced p53 expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, DA induced autophagy and decreased cell viability through modulation of p53 expression. DA-induced autophagy was triggered by an activation of JNK1/2 and an inhibition of Akt and p38. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that DA induced autophagy in human oral cancer cells by modulating p53 expression, activating JNK1/2, and inhibiting Akt and p38. Finally, an administration of DA effectively suppressed the tumor formation in the oral carcinoma xenograft model in vivo. This is the first study to reveal the novel function of DA in activating autophagy, suggesting that DA could serve as a new and potential chemopreventive agent for treating human oral cancer. PMID:26356821

  11. Dehydroandrographolide, an iNOS inhibitor, extracted from from Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Nees, induces autophagy in human oral cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ming-Ju; Lin, Chiao-Wen; Chiou, Hui-Ling; Yang, Shun-Fa; Chen, Mu-Kuan

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, which is constitutively executed at the basal level in all cells, promotes cellular homeostasis by regulating the turnover of organelles and proteins. Andrographolide and dehydroandrographolide (DA) are the two principle components of Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Nees. and are the main contributors to its therapeutic properties. However, the pharmacological activities of dehydroandrographolide (DA) remain unclear. In this study, DA induces oral cancer cell death by activating autophagy. Treatment with autophagy inhibitors inhibited DA-induced human oral cancer cell death. In addition, DA increased LC3-II expression and reduced p53 expression in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, DA induced autophagy and decreased cell viability through modulation of p53 expression. DA-induced autophagy was triggered by an activation of JNK1/2 and an inhibition of Akt and p38. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that DA induced autophagy in human oral cancer cells by modulating p53 expression, activating JNK1/2, and inhibiting Akt and p38. Finally, an administration of DA effectively suppressed the tumor formation in the oral carcinoma xenograft model in vivo. This is the first study to reveal the novel function of DA in activating autophagy, suggesting that DA could serve as a new and potential chemopreventive agent for treating human oral cancer. PMID:26356821

  12. Soil transfers from valley oak (Quercus lobata Nee) stands increase ectomycorrhizal diversity and alter root and shoot growth on valley oak seedlings.

    PubMed

    Berman, J T; Bledsoe, C S

    1998-02-01

    Soils from valley oak (Quercus lobata Nee) riparian areas of the Cosumnes River Nature Conservancy Preserve near Sacramento, California were added to growth medium of valley oak seedlings grown in a greenhouse or in agricultural fields at Cosumnes which probably once supported valley oak trees and are now replanted with native riparian vegetation or allowed to revegetate naturally. Agricultural field soil from the Cosumnes River Preserve was presumed to be low or lacking in ectomycorrhizal inoculum. The study was designed to (1) determine whether valley oak stand soil transfer could cause mycorrhizal infection on valley oak seedlings in an agricultural field and in a greenhouse, (2) describe ectomycorrhizal morphological types formed on valley oak seedlings, and (3) determine whether seedling growth is enhanced more by transfer of natural valley oak stand soil than agricultural field soil. In the field study, transfer of forest soil increased average ectomycorrhizal diversity (2.4 types) more than transfer of agricultural field soil (1.2 types). Valley oak seedlings were responsive to ectomycorrhizal infection in the field study. With increase in mycorrhizal infection there was an increase in shoot growth at the expense of root growth. In the greenhouse study, both percent mycorrhizal infection and mycorrhizal diversity were increased more by transfer of oak forest and woodland soils than agricultural field soil. Eight morphotypes occurred on seedlings in forest and woodland soils but only three morphotypes in agricultural soil. This result strongly suggests that the agricultural field also harbors ectomycorrhizal propagules but forest and woodland soils support a more abundant and diverse ectomycorrhizal flora. PMID:24578047

  13. Antioxidant and antibacterial activities of the leaf essential oil and its constituents furanodienone and curzerenone from Lindera pulcherrima (Nees.) Benth. ex hook. f.

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Subhash C.; Mathela, Chandra S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Lindera pulcherrima (Nees.) Benth. ex Hook. f. (Family: Lauraceae), an evergreen shrub, is an important medicinal plant distributed in temperate Himalayan regions. The leaves and bark are used as spice in cold, fever, and cough. Materials and Methods: In this study, the terpenoid composition, antioxidant, and antibacterial activities of the leaf essential oil and its major constituents are being analyzed. Conclusion: The in vitro antioxidant activity showed a potent free radical scavenging activity for the essential oil as evidenced by a low IC50 value for DPPH radical followed by furanodienone (0.087 ± 0.03 and 1.164 ± 0.58 mg/ml respectively) and the inhibition of lipid peroxidation for the oil and furanodienone also followed the same order (IC50 0.74 ± 0.13 and 2.12 ± 0.49 mg/ml, respectively). The oil and the constituents were also tested against three Gram negative (Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica enterica, and (Pasturella multocida) and one Gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria. The essential oil was effective against S. aureus (IZ = 19.0 ± 0.34; MIC 3.90 μl/ml) while furanodienone showed potent activity against E. coli and S. enterica enterica (IZ = 18.0 ± 0.14 and 16.0 ± 0.10 respectively). On the other hand, curzerenone was found to be slightly effective against E. coli (IZ = 10.8 ± 0.52). The MIC value of the essential oil was least against S. aureus (MIC = 3.90 μl/ml) and that of furanodienone against E. coli (MIC = 3.90 μl/ml). PMID:22518079

  14. Coupling of Pore Pressure and Ground Motion Data Recorded During the 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah (Baja California) Earthquake at the NEES@UCSB Wildlife Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavallee, D.; Seale, S. H.; Steidl, J. H.

    2011-12-01

    Pore pressure built up during an earthquake and the hazard associated with soil liquefaction present a major challenge for our society, as was dramatically displayed during the 2011 Higashi Nihon Daishinsai (Tohoku-oki, Japan) earthquake. Currently, there is a consensus among scientists that a better assessment of the risk associated with liquefaction requires a better understanding of the coupling between pore pressure time histories and ground motion time histories. Specifically, there is a basic need to investigate the coupling as a function of the frequency content of the ground motion. The 2010 El Mayor-Cucapah (Baja California) earthquake (M 7.2) provides a remarkable opportunity to undertake such an investigation and lay the basis to model the coupling. The event was well recorded at the NEES@UCSB Wildlife station located 110 km from the hypocenter. The station is equipped with three-component strong-motion accelerometers at the surface and in boreholes at various depths and with pore pressure transducers located in a saturated, liquefiable layer. The recorded pore pressure and ground motion time histories are both characterized by a frequency content that is a function of time. A wavelet representation is a natural approach to investigate non-stationary time histories. To study the coupling between two signals we use the following procedure: We first compute the wavelet coefficients associated with the two signals. Then we compute the correlation between the wavelet coefficients of the two signals as a function of the frequency. Correlation coefficients provide information about the degree of linear dependence between the two signals. To account for the presence of multiplicative constants relating the wavelet coefficients of the first signal to the wavelet coefficients of the second signal, we compare the square norm of the wavelet coefficients of the two signals for the available frequency range. Additionally, investigating the distribution of the square

  15. Hybrid analysis (barcode-high resolution melting) for authentication of Thai herbal products, Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Wall.ex Nees

    PubMed Central

    Osathanunkul, Maslin; Suwannapoom, Chatmongkon; Khamyong, Nuttaluck; Pintakum, Danupol; Lamphun, Santisuk Na; Triwitayakorn, Kanokporn; Osathanunkul, Kitisak; Madesis, Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Background: Andrographis paniculata Nees is a medicinal plant with multiple pharmacological properties. It has been used over many centuries as a household remedy. A. paniculata products sold on the markets are in processed forms so it is difficult to authenticate. Therefore buying the herbal products poses a high-risk of acquiring counterfeited, substituted and/or adulterated products. Due to these issues, a reliable method to authenticate products is needed. Materials and Methods: High resolution melting analysis coupled with DNA barcoding (Bar-HRM) was applied to detect adulteration in commercial herbal products. The rbcL barcode was selected to use in primers design for HRM analysis to produce standard melting profile of A. paniculata species. DNA of the tested commercial products was isolated and their melting profiles were then generated and compared with the standard A. paniculata. Results: The melting profiles of the rbcL amplicons of the three closely related herbal species (A. paniculata, Acanthus ebracteatus and Rhinacanthus nasutus) are clearly separated so that they can be distinguished by the developed method. The method was then used to authenticate commercial herbal products. HRM curves of all 10 samples tested are similar to A. paniculata which indicated that all tested products were contained the correct species as labeled. Conclusion: The method described in this study has been proved to be useful in aiding identification and/or authenticating A. paniculata. This Bar-HRM analysis has allowed us easily to determine the A. paniculata species in herbal products on the markets even they are in processed forms. SUMMARY We propose the use of DNA barcoding combined with High Resolution Melting analysis for authenticating of Andrographis paniculata products.The developed method can be used regardless of the type of the DNA template (fresh or dried tissue, leaf, and stem).rbcL region was chosen for the analysis and work well with our samplesWe can easily

  16. Ho-Nee-Um Trail.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Harriet; And Others

    Appreciation and concern for the preservation of our natural resources by all citizens is the primary concern of this teacher's guide for use in the elementary grades. It employes the use of a filmstrip in conjunction with a local nature trail, to guide students in developing awareness - by looking closely, listening, touching, and smelling. Major…

  17. Influence of protein type and level on nitrogen and forage use in cows consuming low-quality forage.

    PubMed

    Sawyer, J E; Mulliniks, J T; Waterman, R C; Petersen, M K

    2012-07-01

    Minimal quantities of ruminally degradable protein from supplements may improve supplement use efficiency of ruminants grazing dormant forages. In Exp. 1, N retention, ruminal NH(3), serum urea N, and NDF digestibility were evaluated for 12 ruminally cannulated cows (Bos spp.) in an incomplete Latin Square design with 3 periods of 42 d each. Cows were fed weeping lovegrass [Eragrostis curvula (Schrad.) Nees] hay (4.1% CP, 75% NDF, OM basis) at 1.3 % BW/d and offered 1 of 3 sources of CP [urea, cottonseed (Gossypium spp.) meal (CSM); or 50% blood meal and 50% feather meal combination (BFM)] fed to supply 0, 40, 80, or 160 g/d of CP. Beginning on d 22 of supplementation, ruminal contents and serum samples were collected at -2, 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, 24, 30, 36, and 48 h relative to the morning offering of hay. On Day 24, feces and urine were collected for 72 h. In Exp. 2, 4 ruminally cannulated steers were used in a replicated 4 by 4 Latin Square to evaluate use of supplements differing in quantity and ruminal CP degradability. Steers were fed 6.8 kg/d chopped sudangrass [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench nothosubsp. drummondii (Steud.) de Wet ex Davidse] hay (3.7% CP, 74% NDF on OM basis) and supplemented with 56 g/d of a salt mineral mix (CON); CON + 28 g/d blood meal + 28 g/d feather meal (BFM); CON + 98 g/d CSM (LCS); or CON + 392 g/d CSM (HCS). Treatments provided 0, 40, 40, or 160 g/d of CP for CON, BFM, LCS, and HCS respectively. In Exp. 1, N use and total tract NDF digestibility were not affected by protein sources or amounts (P ≥ 0.18). Ruminal NH(3) concentrations exhibited a quadratic response over time for UREA (P < 0.05) and was greater with increasing inclusion of urea (P < 0.05); whereas BFM or CSM did not differ (P > 0.05) by amount or across time. In Exp. 2, supplementation had a tendency (P = 0.09) to increase DM disappearance. Supplementation also increased (P < 0.01) serum glucose concentrations; however, no difference (P ≥ 0.28) was found between

  18. Cucurbitacins from the Leaves of Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrad.

    PubMed

    Chawech, Rachid; Jarraya, Raoudha; Girardi, Cynthia; Vansteelandt, Marieke; Marti, Guillaume; Nasri, Imen; Racaud-Sultan, Claire; Fabre, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Two new tetracyclic cucurbitane-type triterpene glycosides were isolated from an ethyl acetate extract of Citrullus colocynthis leaves together with four known cucurbitacins. Their structures were established on the basis of their spectroscopic data (mainly NMR and mass spectrometry). Evaluation of the in vitro cytotoxic activity of the isolated compounds against two human colon cancer cell lines (HT29 and Caco-2) and one normal rat intestine epithelial cell line (IEC6), revealed that one of the isolated compounds presented interesting specific cytotoxic activity towards colorectal cell lines. PMID:26437392

  19. A review on antidiabetic activity of Citrullus colocynthis Schrad.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chenghe; Karim, Sabiha; Wang, Chunyong; Zhao, Mingjing; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2014-01-01

    Current studies have elaborated diabetes mellitus as one of the most prevalent endocrine disorder throughout the world. Citrullus colocynthis (C. colocynthis) is one of the most common traditional plants used as remedy against diabetes mellitus. It is well recognized by its hypoglycemic effect, which is substantiated in current phytotherapy. Its undesired effects include the disturbance of gastrointestinal and urinary tracts. This review article encompasses various blood glucose lowering studies that have been carried out till date. Various parts of plants used in extract preparation were roots, fruits, seeds, rinds and leaves. The nature of these extracts was ethnolic, methanolic, or aqueous and their doses varied from 10 to 500 mg/kg body weight/day. All these published articles elaborate C. colocynthis as a potential antiglycemic medicinal plant. PMID:25265814

  20. Separation of five compounds from leaves of Andrographis paniculata (Burm. f.) Nees by off-line two-dimensional high-speed counter-current chromatography combined with gradient and recycling elution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Qi; Yu, Jingang; Zeng, Hualiang; Jiang, Shujing; Chen, Xiaoqing

    2015-05-01

    An off-line two-dimensional high-speed counter-current chromatography method combined with gradient and recycling elution mode was established to isolate terpenoids and flavones from the leaves of Andrographis paniculata (Burm. f.) Nees. By using the solvent systems composed of n-hexane/ethyl acetate/methanol/water with different volume ratios, five compounds including roseooside, 5,4'-dihydroxyflavonoid-7-O-β-d-pyranglucuronatebutylester, 7,8-dimethoxy-2'-hydroxy-5-O-β-d-glucopyranosyloxyflavon, 14-deoxyandrographiside, and andrographolide were successfully isolated. Purities of these isolated compounds were all over 95% as determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Their structures were identified by UV, mass spectrometry, and (1) H NMR spectroscopy. It has been demonstrated that the combination of off-line two-dimensional high-speed counter-current chromatography with different elution modes is an efficient technique to isolate compounds from complex natural product extracts. PMID:25675944

  1. ED-XRF spectrometric analysis of comparative elemental composition of in vivo and in vitro roots of Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Wall. ex Nees--a multi-medicinal herb.

    PubMed

    Behera, P R; Nayak, P; Barik, D P; Rautray, T R; Thirunavoukkarasu, M; Chand, P K

    2010-12-01

    The multi-elemental composition of in vitro--proliferated root tissues of Andrographis paniculata (Burm.f.) Wall. ex Nees was compared with that of the naturally grown in vivo plants. Trace elements namely Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Se, Rb, Sr and Pb in addition to two macro-elements K and Ca were identified and quantified in root tissues of both sources using the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF) technique. ED-XRF analysis was performed using Mo K X-rays generated from a secondary molybdenum target. The elemental content of in vitro roots was found to be at par with that of naturally grown plants of the same species. This opens up a possibility of exploiting in vitro root cultures as a viable, alternative and renewable source of phytochemicals of relevance, besides providing a means for conservation of the valuable natural resources. PMID:20637644

  2. Estimating Seasonal Cycles of Atmospheric CO2 and APO Resulting from Terrestrial NEE and Air-Sea O2 Fluxes using the Transcom T3L2 Pulse-Response Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevison, C. D.

    2011-12-01

    We present a method for translating modeled terrestrial net ecosystem exchange (NEE) fluxes of carbon into the corresponding annual mean cycles in atmospheric CO2. The method is based on the pulse-response functions from the Transcom 3 atmospheric tracer transport model (ATM) intercomparison. An oceanic version of the method is applied to air-sea O2 fluxes to estimate the corresponding annual mean cycles in atmospheric potential oxygen (APO). The estimated atmospheric seasonal cycles can be evaluated against observed atmospheric CO2 and APO data, which are measured at high precision at a wide range of monitoring sites and reflect the integrated impact of surface CO2 and O2 fluxes, respectively, across broad regions. The pulse-response function method is considerably faster than a full forward ATM simulation, allowing seasonal cycles from 13 different ATMS to be computed in minutes, rather than the days or weeks required for a single forward simulation. We evaluate the method against the results of full forward ATM simulations and examine the uncertainties associated with neglecting additional surface fluxes, e.g., from fossil fuel combustion, that may contribute to the observed seasonal cycles of CO2 and APO.

  3. Fermi (nee GLAST) at Six Months

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, Steve

    2009-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, formerly called GLAST, is a mission to measure the cosmic gamma-ray flux in the energy range 20 MeV to >300 GeV, with supporting measurements for gamma-ray bursts from 8 keV to 30 MeV. In addition to breakthrough capabilities in energy coverage and localization, the very large field of view enables observations of 20% of the sky at any instant, and the entire sky on a timescale of a few hours. With its recent launch on 11 June 2008, Fermi now opens a new and important window on a wide variety of phenomena, including pulsars, black holes and active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, the origin of cosmic rays and supernova remnants, and searches for hypothetical new phenomena such as supersymmetric dark matter annihilations. In addition to early results and the science opportunities, this talk includes a description of the instruments and the mission status and plans.

  4. Confessions of a Professor, nee Actor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soenksen, Roger

    Relying on key characteristics of teaching excellence documented by research in higher education, a college professor details how personal undergraduate stage-acting experience helped to develop his teaching. The following comparisons are illuminating: (1) students distinguish professors' interest and enthusiasm toward their subjects as an…

  5. Water uptake, priming, drying and storage effects in Cassia excelsa Schrad seeds.

    PubMed

    Jeller, H; Perez, S C; Raizer, J

    2003-02-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of osmotic potential on the water uptake curve in Cassia excelsa seeds and use the results to analyze the effects of dehydration and storage on primed seed germination. Seeds were imbibed in distilled water and polyethylene glicol (PEG 6000) osmotic solutions at -0.2, -0.4, and -0.6 MPa, at 20 degrees C. The radicle emergence and seed moisture content were evaluated at 6-hour intervals during 240 hours. Afterwards, seeds were primed in distilled water and PEG 6000 solutions at -0.2, -0.4, and -0.6 MPa for 48, 72, 96, and 168 hours at 20 degrees C, followed by air drying and storage for 15 days at 5 degrees C. The lower the osmotic potential, the higher the time required for priming. The osmoconditioning yields benefits with PEG solutions at 0.0 and -0.2 MPa; seed improvements were maintained during storage for 15 days at 5 degrees C, but were reverted by seed drying. PMID:12914415

  6. Biomedical potential of silver nanoparticles synthesized from calli cells of Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrad

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background An increasingly common application is the use of silver nanoparticles for antimicrobial coatings, wound dressings, and biomedical devices. In this present investigation, we report, biomedical potential of silver nanopaticles synthesized from calli extract of Citrullus colocynthis on Human epidermoid larynx carcinoma (HEp -2) cell line. Methods The callus extract react with silver nitrate solution confirmed silver nanoparticles synthesis through the steady change of greenish colour to reddish brown and characterized by using FT-IR, AFM. Toxicity on HEp 2 cell line assessed using MTT assay, caspase -3 assay, Lactate dehydrogenase leakage assay and DNA fragmentation assay. Results The synthesized silver nanoparticles were generally found to be spherical in shape with size 31 nm by AFM. The molar concentration of the silver nanoparticles solution in our present study is 1100 nM/10 mL. The results exhibit that silver nanoparticles mediate a dose-dependent toxicity for the cell tested, and the silver nanoparticles at 500 nM decreased the viability of HEp 2 cells to 50% of the initial level. LDH activities found to be significantly elevated after 48 h of exposure in the medium containing silver nanoparticles when compared to the control and Caspase 3 activation suggested that silver nanoparticles caused cell death through apoptosis, which was further supported by cellular DNA fragmentation, showed that the silver nanoparticles treated HEp2 cells exhibited extensive double strand breaks, thereby yielding a ladder appearance (Lane 2), while the DNA of control HEp2 cells supplemented with 10% serum exhibited minimum breakage (Lane 1). This study revealed completely would eliminate the use of expensive drug for cancer treatment. PMID:21943321

  7. Oil and fatty acid content in seed of Citrullus lanatus Schrad.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intact seed of 475 genebank accessions of Citrullus (C. lanatus var. lanatus and C. lanatus var. citroides) were analyzed for percent oil content using TD-NMR. Extracts from whole seed of 96 accessions of Citrullus lanatus (30 var. citroides, 33 var. lanatus and 33 egusi), Citrullus colocynthis (n =...

  8. Oil and fatty acid contents in seed of Citrullus lanatus Schrad.

    PubMed

    Jarret, Robert L; Levy, Irvin J

    2012-05-23

    Intact seed of 475 genebank accessions of Citrullus ( C. lanatus var. lanatus and C. lanatus var. citroides) were analyzed for percent oil content using TD-NMR. Extracts from whole seed of 96 accessions of C. lanatus (30 var. citroides, 33 var. lanatus, and 33 egusi), C. colocynthis (n = 3), C. ecirrhosus (n = 1), C. rehmii (n = 1), and Benincasa fistulosa (n = 3) were also analyzed for their fatty acids content. Among the materials analyzed, seed oil content varied from 14.8 to 43.5%. Mean seed oil content in egusi types of C. lanatus was significantly higher (mean = 35.6%) than that of either var. lanatus (mean = 23.2%) or var. citroides (mean = 22.6%). Egusi types of C. lanatus had a significantly lower hull/kernel ratio when compared to other C. lanatus var. lanatus or C. lanatus var. citroides. The principal fatty acid in all C. lanatus materials examined was linoleic acid (43.6-73%). High levels of linoleic acid were also present in the materials of C. colocynthis (71%), C. ecirrhosus (62.7%), C. rehmii (75.8%), and B. fistulosa (73.2%), which were included for comparative purposes. Most all samples contained traces (<0.5%) of arachidonic acid. The data presented provide novel information on the range in oil content and variability in the concentrations of individual fatty acids present in a diverse array of C. lanatus, and its related species, germplasm. PMID:22540530

  9. Exploring Ho-Nee-Um in the Spring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madison Public Schools, WI.

    Appreciation and concern for the preservation of our natural resources by all citizens is the primary concern of this teacher's guide for use in grades three and four. It employs the use of a filmstrip in conjunction with a local nature trail, to guide students in developing awareness--by looking closely, listening, touching, and smelling. The…

  10. A Winter Walk at Ho-Nee-Um.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irwin, Harriet; And Others

    Appreciation and concern for the preservation of our natural resources by all citizens is the primary concern of this teacher's guide for use in the lower primary grades. It employs the use of a filmstrip in conjunction with a local nature trail, to guide students in developing awareness - by looking closely, listening, touching, and smelling. The…

  11. Evaluation of central nervous system effects of iso-6-cassine isolated from Senna spectabilis var. excelsa (Schrad) in mice.

    PubMed

    Silva, Fábio de Oliveira; Silva, Maria Goretti de Vasconcelos; Feng, Dejiang; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes

    2011-03-01

    The depressant and anticonvulsant activities of iso-6-cassine (ISO) from Senna spectabilis (0.5, 1.0 and 1.5mg/kg) injected by oral route in mice caused a significant decrease in the motor activity of animals when compared with the control group, up to 30 days after the administration and at dose of 1.5mg/kg, it reduced the remaining time of animals on Rota-rod apparatus. Additionally, ISO at doses tested was also capable to promote an increase of latency for development of convulsions induced by pentylenetetrazole and picrotoxin. These results suggest possible depressant and anticonvulsant activities in mice that need further investigation. PMID:20940032

  12. High efficient somatic embryogenesis development from leaf cultures of Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrad for generating true type clones.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, D; Shasthree, T

    2016-04-01

    We report an efficient somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration system using leaf cultures of Citrullus colocynthis (L.) and assessed the effect of plant growth regulators on the regeneration process. Initially leaf explants were cultured on Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with different concentrations of auxins viz., 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 1-naphthaleneacetic acid, gibberellic acid alone and along with combination of 6-benzylaminopurine. The different forms of calli such as compact, white friable, creamy friable, brownish nodular, green globular and green calli were induced from the leaf explants on MS medium containing different concentrations of auxins and gibberellins. Subsequently initial callus was subcultured at 1.5 mg L(-1) BAP + 1.0 mg L(-1) 2,4-D which resulted in 25 % somatic embryos from 85 % nodular embryogenic nodular callus that is highest percentage. Similarly the lowest percentage of somatic embryos was recorded at 2.5 mg L(-1) BAP + 0.5 mg L(-1) NAA from 55 % embryogenic globular callus i.e., 16 %. High frequency of embryo development takes place at intermittent light when compared with continuous light in the individual subcultures. The cotyledonary embryos were developed into complete platelets on MS medium. In vitro regenerated plantlets were washed to remove the traces of agar and then transferred to sterile vermiculite and sand (2:1) containing pot. PMID:27436919

  13. A Classical Genetic Solution to Enhance the Biosynthesis of Anticancer Phytochemicals in Andrographis paniculata Nees

    PubMed Central

    Talei, Daryush; Abdul Kadir, Mihdzar; Rafii, Mohd Yusop; Sagineedu, Sreenivasa Rao

    2014-01-01

    Andrographolides, the diterpene lactones, are major bioactive phytochemicals which could be found in different parts of the medicinal herb Andrographis paniculata. A number of such compounds namely andrographolide (AG), neoandrographolide (NAG), and 14-deoxy-11,12-didehydroandrographolide (DDAG) have already attracted a great deal of attention due to their potential therapeutic effects in hard-to-treat diseases such as cancers and HIV. Recently, they have also been considered as substrates for the discovery of novel pharmaceutical compounds. Nevertheless, there is still a huge gap in knowledge on the genetic pattern of the biosynthesis of these bioactive compounds. Hence, the present study aimed to investigate the genetic mechanisms controlling the biosynthesis of these phytochemicals using a diallel analysis. The high performance liquid chromatography analysis of the three andrographolides in 210 F1 progenies confirmed that the biosynthesis of these andrographolides was considerably increased via intraspecific hybridization. The results revealed high, moderate and low heterosis for DDAG, AG and NAG, respectively. Furthermore, the preponderance of non-additive gene actions was affirmed in the enhancement of the three andrographolides contents. The consequence of this type of gene action was the occurrence of high broad-sense and low narrow-sense heritabilities for the above mentioned andrographolides. The prevalence of non-additive gene action suggests the suitability of heterosis breeding and hybrid seed production as a preferred option to produce new plant varieties with higher andrographolide contents using the wild accessions of A. paniculata. Moreover, from an evolutionary point of view, the occurrence of population bottlenecks in the Malaysian accessions of A. paniculata was unveiled by observing a low level of additive genetic variance (VA) for all the andrographolides. PMID:24586262

  14. Transcriptome sequencing of a thalloid bryophyte; Dumortiera hirsuta (Sw) Nees: assembly, annotation, and marker discovery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harpal; Rai, Krishan Mohan; Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Pant, Poonam; Verma, Praveen Chandra; Singh, Ajit Pratap; Singh, Pradhyumna Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Bryophytes are the first land plants but are scarcely studied at the molecular level. Here, we report transcriptome sequencing and functional annotation of Dumortiera hirsuta, as a representative bryophyte. Approximately 0.5 million reads with ~195 Mb data were generated by sequencing of mRNA using 454 pyrosequencer. De novo assembly of reads yielded 85,240 unigenes (12,439 contigs and 72,801 singletons). BlastX search at NCBI-NR database showed similarity of 33,662 unigenes with 10-10 e-value. A total of 23,685 unigenes were annotated at TAIR10 protein database. The annotated unigenes were further classified using the Gene Ontology. Analysis at Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway database identified 95 pathways with significant scores, among which metabolic and biosynthesis of secondary metabolite were the major ones. Phenylpropanoid pathway was elucidated and selected genes were characterized by real time qPCR. We identified 447 transcription factors belonging to 41 families and 1594 eSSRs in 1479 unigenes. D. hirsuta unigenes showed homology across the taxa from algae to angiosperm indicating their role as the connecting link between aquatic and terrestrial plants. This could be a valuable genomic resource for molecular and evolutionary studies. Further, it sheds light for the isolation and characterization of new genes with unique functions. PMID:26481431

  15. Refined Geographic Distribution of the Oriental ALDH2*504Lys (nee 487Lys) Variant

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Borinskaya, Svetlana; Yoshimura, Kimio; Kal’ina, Nina; Marusin, Andrey; Stepanov, Vadim A.; Qin, Zhendong; Khaliq, Shagufta; Lee, Mi-Young; Yang, Yajun; Mohyuddin, Aisha; Gurwitz, David; Mehdi, Syed Qasim; Rogaev, Evgeny; Jin, Li; Yankovsky, Nikolay K.; Kidd, Judith R.; Kidd, Kenneth K.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) is one of the most important enzymes in human alcohol metabolism. The oriental ALDH2*504Lys variant functions as a dominant negative greatly reducing activity in heterozygotes and abolishing activity in homozygotes. This allele is associated with serious disorders such as alcohol liver disease, late onset Alzheimer disease, colorectal cancer, and esophageal cancer, and is best known for protection against alcoholism. Many hundreds of papers in various languages have been published on this variant, providing allele frequency data for many different populations. To develop a highly refined global geographic distribution of ALDH2*504Lys, we have collected new data on 4,091 individuals from 86 population samples and assembled published data on a total of 80,691 individuals from 366 population samples. The allele is essentially absent in all parts of the world except East Asia. The ALDH2*504Lys allele has its highest frequency in Southeast China, and occurs in most areas of China, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, and Indochina with frequencies gradually declining radially from Southeast China. As the indigenous populations in South China have much lower frequencies than the southern Han migrants from Central China, we conclude that ALDH2*504Lys was carried by Han Chinese as they spread throughout East Asia. Esophageal cancer, with its highest incidence in East Asia, may be associated with ALDH2*504Lys because of a toxic effect of increased acetaldehyde in the tissue where ingested ethanol has its highest concentration. While the distributions of esophageal cancer and ALDH2*504Lys do not precisely correlate, that does not disprove the hypothesis. In general the study of fine scale geographic distributions of ALDH2*504Lys and diseases may help in understanding the multiple relationships among genes, diseases, environments, and cultures. PMID:19456322

  16. Antiinflammatory, Diuretic and Antimicrobial Activities of Rungia pectinata Linn. and Rungia repens Nees

    PubMed Central

    Swain, S. R.; Sinha, B. N.; Murthy, P. N.

    2008-01-01

    The hydroalcoholic extracts prepared from leaves of Rungia pectinata and Rungia repens were investigated for antiinflammatory and diuretic activity in wistar rats. The results obtained were compared with that of standard drug aspirin and frusemide for their antiinflammatory and diuretic activity respectively. The acute toxicity study was also carried out using adult swiss albino mice of either sex which indicates the safety of the extracts even at a dose of 4000 mg/kg. R. pectinata showed better anti-inflammatory activity than R. repens. In the present study, it was demonstrated that hydroalcoholic extracts of both R. repens and R. pectinata produce diuretic effect by increasing the excretion of Na+, K+ and Cl−. Results showed that R. repens is most effective in increasing urinary electrolyte concentration of Na+ and K+ ions. The antimicrobial potency of the aerial parts of Rungia pectinata and Rungia repens have been studied using the petroleum ether, benzene, chloroform, acetone and ethanol extract against a wide number of bacteria and fungi by disc diffusion method. The ethanol extract at a concentration of 30 to 60 μg/disc showed significant activity against the bacteria and fungus investigated. All the extracts of R. pectinata and R. repens have got moderate action but chloroform and acetone extracts of R. repens and ethanol extract of R. pectinata have got significant activity against Trichophyton mentagrophytes. PMID:21394276

  17. [Principles and Methods for Formulating National Standards of "Regulations of Acupuncture-nee- dle Manipulating techniques"].

    PubMed

    Gang, Wei-juan; Wang, Xin; Wang, Fang; Dong, Guo-feng; Wu, Xiao-dong

    2015-08-01

    The national standard of "Regulations of Acupuncture-needle Manipulating Techniques" is one of the national Criteria of Acupuncturology for which a total of 22 items have been already established. In the process of formulation, a series of common and specific problems have been met. In the present paper, the authors expound these problems from 3 aspects, namely principles for formulation, methods for formulating criteria, and considerations about some problems. The formulating principles include selection and regulations of principles for technique classification and technique-related key factors. The main methods for formulating criteria are 1) taking the literature as the theoretical foundation, 2) taking the clinical practice as the supporting evidence, and 3) taking the expounded suggestions or conclusions through peer review. PMID:26502549

  18. Andrographis paniculata (Burm. f.) Wall. ex Nees: A Review of Ethnobotany, Phytochemistry, and Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Sule, Abubakar; Rahman, K. M. Hafizur

    2014-01-01

    As aboriginal sources of medications, medicinal plants are used from the ancient times. Andrographis paniculata is one of the highly used potential medicinal plants in the world. This plant is traditionally used for the treatment of common cold, diarrhoea, fever due to several infective cause, jaundice, as a health tonic for the liver and cardiovascular health, and as an antioxidant. It is also used to improve sexual dysfunctions and serve as a contraceptive. All parts of this plant are used to extract the active phytochemicals, but the compositions of phytoconstituents widely differ from one part to another and with place, season, and time of harvest. Our extensive data mining of the phytoconstituents revealed more than 55 ent-labdane diterpenoids, 30 flavonoids, 8 quinic acids, 4 xanthones, and 5 rare noriridoids. In this review, we selected only those compounds that pharmacology has already reported. Finally we focused on around 46 compounds for further discussion. We also discussed ethnobotany of this plant briefly. Recommendations addressing extraction process, tissue culture, and adventitious rooting techniques and propagation under abiotic stress conditions for improvement of phytoconstituents are discussed concisely in this paper. Further study areas on pharmacology are also proposed where needed. PMID:25950015

  19. Ni Zhisinisszi. Nee Nahnah Aideenau (I Speak Cheyenne. I Speak Arapaho).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlin, William

    This is a primary-level reader to be used in connection with a bilingual education program. The story is preceded by a pronunciation guide, which lists Cheyenne and Arapaho sound symbols and their approximate English equivalents. Each illustrated page contains a Cheyenne and an Arapaho caption with an English translation. (AM)

  20. Amauroderma rugosum (Blume & T. Nees) Torrend: Nutritional Composition and Antioxidant and Potential Anti-Inflammatory Properties

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Pui-Mun; Kanagasabapathy, Gowri; Tan, Yee-Shin; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary; Kuppusamy, Umah Rani

    2013-01-01

    Amauroderma rugosum is a wild mushroom that is worn as a necklace by the indigenous communities in Malaysia to prevent fits and incessant crying by babies. The aim of this study was to investigate the nutritive composition and antioxidant potential and anti-inflammatory effects of A. rugosum extracts on LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Nutritional analysis of freeze-dried mycelia of A. rugosum (KUM 61131) from submerged culture indicated a predominant presence of carbohydrates, proteins, dietary fibre, phosphorus, potassium, and sodium. The ethanol crude extract (EE), its hexane (HF), ethyl acetate (EAF), and aqueous (AF) fractions of mycelia of A. rugosum grown in submerged culture were evaluated for antioxidant potential and anti-inflammatory effects. EAF exhibited the highest total phenolic content and the strongest antioxidant activity based on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) assays. HF showed dose-dependent inhibition of NO production in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells and NO radical scavenging activity. Gas chromatographic analysis of HF revealed the presence of ethyl linoleate and ergosterol, compounds with known anti-inflammatory properties. In conclusion, the nutritive compositions and significant antioxidant potential and anti-inflammatory effects of mycelia extracts of A. rugosum have the potential to serve as a therapeutic agent or adjuvant in the management of inflammatory disorders. PMID:24371454

  1. Transcriptome sequencing of a thalloid bryophyte; Dumortiera hirsuta (Sw) Nees: assembly, annotation, and marker discovery.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harpal; Rai, Krishan Mohan; Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Pant, Poonam; Verma, Praveen Chandra; Singh, Ajit Pratap; Singh, Pradhyumna Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Bryophytes are the first land plants but are scarcely studied at the molecular level. Here, we report transcriptome sequencing and functional annotation of Dumortiera hirsuta, as a representative bryophyte. Approximately 0.5 million reads with ~195 Mb data were generated by sequencing of mRNA using 454 pyrosequencer. De novo assembly of reads yielded 85,240 unigenes (12,439 contigs and 72,801 singletons). BlastX search at NCBI-NR database showed similarity of 33,662 unigenes with 10-(10) e-value. A total of 23,685 unigenes were annotated at TAIR10 protein database. The annotated unigenes were further classified using the Gene Ontology. Analysis at Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway database identified 95 pathways with significant scores, among which metabolic and biosynthesis of secondary metabolite were the major ones. Phenylpropanoid pathway was elucidated and selected genes were characterized by real time qPCR. We identified 447 transcription factors belonging to 41 families and 1594 eSSRs in 1479 unigenes. D. hirsuta unigenes showed homology across the taxa from algae to angiosperm indicating their role as the connecting link between aquatic and terrestrial plants. This could be a valuable genomic resource for molecular and evolutionary studies. Further, it sheds light for the isolation and characterization of new genes with unique functions. PMID:26481431

  2. Piptochaetium fuscum (Nees ex Steud.) Barkworth, Ciald., & Gandhi, a new combination replacing Piptochaetium setosum (Trin.) Arechav.

    PubMed Central

    Barkworth, Mary E.; Cialdella, Ana María; Gandhi, Kanchi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A new name, Piptochaetium fuscum, is provided for a taxon hitherto known as Piptochaetium setosum (Trin.) Arechav. Morphological, anatomical, and molecular studies that argue against including Piptochaetium in Stipa, and hence use of S. purpurata (Phil.) Columbus & J.P. Sm., are cited. PMID:24843286

  3. Revegetation on a coal fine ash disposal site in South Africa

    SciTech Connect

    Van Rensburg, L.; De Sousa Correia, R.I.; Booysen, J.; Ginster, M.

    1998-11-01

    Eight medium amendments were conducted on top of a fine ash coal dump (i) to evaluate a few cost-effective treatments that could determine the minimum fertility status required for the local ash to support the establishment of a viable vegetation cover, and (ii) to select suitable grass species that would establish on the ash and could serve as a foundation for long-term rehabilitation. Degree and success of grass establishment per medium amelioration treatment is expressed in terms of total biomass, percentage basal cover, and in terms of a condition assessment model. Both the chemical and physical nature of the ash medium before and after amendment was characterized, as were the concentrations of some essential and potentially toxic elements in leaf samples. In terms of medium amelioration 5000 kg ha{sup {minus}1} compost, or 500 kg ha{sup {minus}1} kraal manure or 480 kg 2:3:2 ha{sup {minus}1} proved to be most effective. The grass species that occurred with the highest frequency, irrespective of treatment, were the perennials bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) pers. var dactylon], weeping lovegrass [Eragrostis curvula (Schrader) Nees], and the annual teff [Eragrostis tef (Zuccagni) Trotter]. Of the potentially toxic extractable metals monitored in the leaves of vegetation on the dump, only Se accumulated to an average level of 4.4 mg kg{sup {minus}1} that could be toxic to livestock.

  4. Polyphenolic Composition and Evaluation of Antioxidant Activity, Osmotic Fragility and Cytotoxic Effects of Raphiodon echinus (Nees & Mart.) Schauer.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Antonia Eliene; Waczuk, Emily Pansera; Roversi, Katiane; da Silva, Maria Arlene Pessoa; Barros, Luiz Marivando; da Cunha, Francisco Assis Bezerra; de Menezes, Irwin Rose Alencar; da Costa, José Galberto Martins; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Ademiluyi, Adedayo Oluwaseun; Kamdem, Jean Paul; Rocha, João Batista Teixeira; Burger, Marilise Escobar

    2015-01-01

    Raphiodon echinus (R. echinus) is used in Brazilian folk medicine for the treatment of inflammation, coughs, and infectious diseases. However, no information is available on the potential antioxidant, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of this plant. In this study, the polyphenolic constituents, antioxidant capacity and potential toxic effects of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of R. echinus on human erythrocytes and leukocytes were investigated for the first time. R. echinus extracts showed the presence of Gallic, chlorogenic, caffeic and ellagic acids, rutin, quercitrin and quercetin. Aqueous and ethanolic extracts of R. echinus exhibited antioxidant activity in DPPH radical scavenging with IC50 = 111.9 μg/mL (EtOH extract) and IC50 = 227.9 μg/mL (aqueous extract). The extracts inhibited Fe(2+) (10 μM) induced thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formation in rat brain and liver homogenates. The extracts (30-480 μg/mL) did not induce genotoxicity, cytotoxicity or osmotic fragility in human blood cells. The findings of this present study therefore suggest that the therapeutic effect of R. echinus may be, in part, related to its antioxidant potential. Nevertheless, further in vitro and in vivo studies are required to ascertain the safety margin of its use in folk medicine. PMID:26729080

  5. Intra-specific hybridization: generator of genetic diversification and heterosis in Andrographis paniculata Nees. A bridge from extinction to survival.

    PubMed

    Valdiani, Alireza; Kadir, Mihdzar Abdul; Saad, Mohd Said; Talei, Daryush; Tan, Soon-Guan

    2012-08-15

    Andrographis paniculata (AP) has been stated as a low-diverse, endangered and red-listed plant species. Self-pollinated mating system, being an introduced species and experiencing a bottleneck as well as over exploitation cause such a consequence. Inter and intra-specific hybridizations have been suggested as essential techniques for generating genetic diversity. To test the effect of intra-specific hybridization on diversification and heterosis of AP, seven accessions were outcrossed manually in all 21 possible combinations. Three types of markers including morphological, phytochemical and RAPD markers were employed to evaluate the mentioned hypothesis. The results revealed that hybridization acted as a powerful engine for diversification of AP as it caused heterotic expression of the studied traits, simultaneously. Initially, it seems that additive and non-additive gene effects both can be considered as the genetic basis of heterosis in AP for the investigated traits. Agronomic and morphological traits were differentiated from each other, while positive heterosis was recorded mainly for agronomic traits but not for the morphological traits. Intra-specific hybridization increased the genetic diversity in AP population. Nevertheless, a part of this variation could also be attributed to the negative heterosis. The current exploration demonstrated the first ever conducted manual intra-specific hybridization among AP accessions in a mass scale. However, the 17 RAPD primers produced a monomorph pattern, but perhaps increasing the number of markers can feature a new genetic profile in this plant. PMID:22683537

  6. Na-22, Ne-E, extinct radioactive anomalies and unsupported Ar-40. [in cooling ejecta of explosive nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, D. D.

    1975-01-01

    The possibility that the origin of extinct radioactivities depended on their living long enough for grains to form in the expanding nucleosynthetic envelope, rather than on their living long enough for meteorites to form, is examined. As an example, the interpretation of Na-22 as a detectable extinct radioactivity, with a half life of only 2.6 years, is explored and related to Ne-22 occurrence. Similar arguments involving He-4, Ar-40, K-40, K-41, and calcium, titanium, chromium, manganese, iron, nickel, and cobalt isotopes are briefly presented.

  7. BIOASSAY-GUIDED FRACTIONATION AND ANTIHYPERTENSIVE PROPERTIES OF FRACTIONS AND CRUDE EXTRACTS OF PERISTROPHE BICALYCULATA (RETZ) NEES.

    PubMed

    Abdulazeez, Mansurah A; Ibrahim, Sani; Ameh, Danladi A; Ameh, Danladi Amodu; Ayo, Joseph O; Carvalho, Luiz J C B; Manosroi, Jiradej; Ibrahim, Abdulrazak B

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is an important public health issue in both developed and developing countries due to its high incidence and morbidity. This has motivated researchers especially in developing countries to search for strategies for the treatment using different plant parts. The use of the aqueous decoction of the leaves of Peristiophe bicalyculata in the treatment of hypertension has been documented. This study was designed to carry out a bioassay-guided isolation of the antihypertensive components of the leaves of Peristrophe bicalyculata in L-NAME hypertensive rats, determine the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of the extracts and fractions obtained and identify the constituent(s) present. From our results, L-NAME hypertensive rats given the cold water extract had significantly (p < 0.05) lower mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) with longer duration of action than other extracts. Also, the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of the cold water extract was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than that of other extracts. From the GC-MS analysis of the most effective fraction (fraction 4), P,P,P-triphenyl-imino(triphenyl)phosphorane and andrographolide 2(3H)-furanone were identified among others. The present work demonstrates the hypotensive effect of the cold water extract of Peiistiophe bicalyculata on L-NAME hypertensive rats, which further justifies the folkloric application of extracts of the plant in the management as well as treatment of hypertension. PMID:26642682

  8. Salt stress-induced protein pattern associated with photosynthetic parameters and andrographolide content in Andrographis paniculata Nees.

    PubMed

    Talei, Daryush; Valdiani, Alireza; Maziah, Mahmood; Sagineedu, Sreenivasa Rao; Abiri, Rambod

    2015-01-01

    Andrographis paniculata is a multifunctional medicinal plant and a potent source of bioactive compounds. Impact of environmental stresses such as salinity on protein diversification, as well as the consequent changes in the photosynthetic parameters and andrographolide content (AG) of the herb, has not yet been thoroughly investigated. The present study showed that the salinity affects the protein pattern, and subsequently, it decreased the photosynthetic parameters, protein content, total dry weight, and total crude extract. Exceptionally, the AG content was increased (p ≤ 0.01). Moreover, it was noticed that the salinity at 12 dS m(-1) led to the maximum increase in AG content in all accessions. Interestingly, the leaf protein analysis revealed that the two polymorphic protein bands as low- and medium-sized of 17 and 45 kDa acted as the activator agents for the photosynthetic parameters and AG content. Protein sequencing and proteomic analysis can be conducted based on the present findings in the future. PMID:25384250

  9. Road systems, land use, and related patterns of valley oak (Quercus lobata Nee) populations, seedling recruitment, and herbivory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhn, Bill Ahlering

    This research investigates the interactions of road systems and land use on the population dynamics and recruitment of a long-lived tree in Mediterranean climate California. In the case of Valley oak (Quercus lobata), habitat conversion and limited recruitment of new individuals has resulted in widespread declines throughout Santa Barbara County and California. This pattern contrasts with high recruitment rates along roadsides, offering a unique opportunity to examine the effects of roads on the population dynamics of a native species. The pattern of roadside recruits is described, mapped, and a complete survey of the biophysical environment along 109 kilometers of road was conducted. The biophysical factors of the road and road system were of four types: (1) the general roadside environment; (2) the acorn supply; (3) a measure of ungulate deterrence; and, (4) roadside management. Seven individual or aggregate factors were then related to the pattern of seedling and sapling densities along roads. Univariate analysis and regression trees determined that acorn supply and total woody cover within the roadside plots explained 49% of the variation in Valley oak seedling densities. These results support the conclusion that the recruitment pattern is due to the roadsides serving as refugia from browsers (cattle and deer). The change in Valley oak populations within roadsides, croplands, rangelands, and urban/suburban lands over a 59 year period is examined using georeferenced aerial photos from 1938 and 1997. While population per capita growth rates were less than one (declining) within both rangelands and croplands, rates were greater than one (increasing) in urban/suburban populations. While roadside growth rates were even higher than those in urban/suburban areas, high variance resulted in a rate neither positive nor negative. Finally, seedlings were planted along roadsides and within adjacent grazed and ungrazed uplands to test browsing pressure. Seedlings within roadsides experienced significantly less browsing than those within the adjacent lands, lending support to the theory that roadsides provide refugia from browsing for Valley oak. Results are important for a deeper understanding of the causes and consequences of human land use and for assisting in the management of Valley oak and others similarly affected.

  10. Proteomic Analysis of the Salt-Responsive Leaf and Root Proteins in the Anticancer Plant Andrographis paniculata Nees

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, Mohd Yusop; Maziah, Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Separation of proteins based on the physicochemical properties with different molecular weight and isoelectric points would be more accurate. In the current research, the 45-day-old seedlings were treated with 0 (control) and 12 dS m−1 of sodium chloride in the hydroponic system. After 15 days of salt exposure, the total protein of the fresh leaves and roots was extracted and analyzed using two-dimensional electrophoresis system (2-DE). The analysis led to the detection of 32 induced proteins (19 proteins in leaf and 13 proteins in the root) as well as 12 upregulated proteins (four proteins in leaf and eight proteins in the root) in the salt-treated plants. Of the 44 detected proteins, 12 were sequenced, and three of them matched with superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase and ribulose-1, 5-bisphosphate oxygenase whereas the rest remained unknown. The three known proteins associate with plants response to environmental stresses and could represent the general stress proteins in the present study too. In addition, the proteomic feedback of different accessions of A. paniculata to salt stress can potentially be used to breed salt-tolerant varieties of the herb. PMID:25423252

  11. Reproductive biology of Syzygiella rubricaulis (Nees) Steph. (Adelanthaceae, Marchantiophyta), a liverwort disjunctly distributed in high-altitude Neotropical mountains.

    PubMed

    Maciel-Silva, A S; Gaspar, E P; da Conceição, F P; Dias Dos Santos, N; Pinheiro da Costa, D

    2016-07-01

    Syzygiella rubricaulis is a dioecious leafy liverwort disjunctly distributed and restricted to high-altitude mountains in the Neotropics and the Azores. This study is part of a larger project examining the phylogeography of S. rubricaulis in the Neotropics, and our main goals were to understand its reproductive biology, where sex expression occurs, if vegetative propagules are frequently found, how the sexes are distributed in populations, how frequently sporophytes are formed and what environmental conditions influence sexual expression. S. rubricaulis patches are mostly female, but all patches also contain non sex-expressing shoots. Out of 42 patches examined, 29 (69%) were sex-expressing: 25 were unisexual (21 female and four male) and four of mixed sex (two male-biased and two unbiased). At shoot level, out of 4200 shoots 18% were female and 7% male; among sex-expressing shoots, 73% were female, representing a sex ratio of 0.8 (female-biased). We encountered a total of 33 sporophytes in six patches (in Brazil, Venezuela and Ecuador). Leaf regenerants were found in one patch in Mexico. Low rates of sporophytes were likely related to low frequencies of male shoots and large distances between the sexes. As 25% of S. rubricaulis shoots expressed sex (occasionally producing sporophytes), we suggest that short-distance (and rarely long-distance) spore dispersal events occur in mountainous areas on a short-term basis. On a long-term basis, however, these events likely contribute to dynamic exchanges among populations in the Neotropics. PMID:26929143

  12. EBAC-DCC Analysis of World Data of pi N, gamma N, and N(e,e') Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hiroyuki Kamano,Tsung-Shung Lee

    2012-04-01

    The development, results, and prospect of the Dynamical Coupled-Channels analysis at Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC-DCC) are reported. In this contribution, we report on the development, results, and prospect of EBAC. The EBAC project has three components, as illustrated in Fig. 1. The first task is to perform a dynamical coupled-channels analysis of the world data of {pi}N, {gamma}*N {yields} {pi}N, {eta}N, {pi}{pi}N, K{Lambda}, K{Sigma}, {omega}N, {hor_ellipsis} to determine the meson-baryon partial-wave amplitudes. The second step is to develop a procedure to extract the N* parameters from the determined partial-wave amplitudes. The third step is to investigate the interpretations of the extracted N* properties in terms of the available hadron models and Lattice QCD.

  13. Amelioratory effect of Andrographis paniculata Nees on liver, kidney, heart, lung and spleen during nicotine induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Neogy, Sreeparna; Das, Subhasis; Mahapatra, Santanu Kar; Mandal, Nirjal; Roy, Somenath

    2008-05-01

    The ameliorative properties of bioactive compound andrographolide (ANDRO), aqueous extract of Andrographis paniculata (AE-AP) and vitamin E (vit.E) were tested against nicotine induced liver, kidney, heart, lung and spleen toxicity. A group of male Wistar rats were intraperitoneally administered vehicle, nicotine (1mg/kg body weight/day), nicotine+ANDRO (250mg/kg body weight/day), nicotine+AE-AP (250mg/kg body weight/day) and nicotine+vit.E (50mg/kg body weight/day) for the period of 7 days. The significantly increased levels of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and the decreased antioxidant enzyme status were noted in nicotine treated group as compared to vehicle treated group. ANDRO, AE-AP and vit.E significantly reduced the lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and increased the antioxidant enzyme status. This indicates A. paniculata and vit.E may act as putative protective agent against nicotine induced tissue injury and may pave a new path to develop suitable drug therapy. PMID:21783869

  14. Improving Hatchery Effectiveness as Related to Smoltification: Proceedings of a Workshop held at Kah-Nee-Tah Lodge, Warm Springs, Oregon, May 20-23, 1985.

    SciTech Connect

    Bouck, Gerald R.

    1987-05-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) intends to develop a smoltification research effort that would have broad support among the interested parties. BPA sponsored this workshop on smoltification and related research to gather leading technical experts in the field in smoltification, permit them to exchange information about the state of the art of smoltification research, and allow them to identify and rank high-priority projects. This document includes keynote speeches, technical papers, and other sessions that summarize both what is known and what information is needed.

  15. An experimental study of the mechanism of andrographis paniculata nees (APN) in alleviating the Ca(2+)-overloading in the process of myocardial ischemic reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Guo, Z L; Zhao, H Y; Zheng, X H

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this experiment is to study the mechanism of APN in alleviating the Ca(2+)-overloading in dog model during the process of ischemic reperfusion. In comparison with the sustained ischemic group, the parameters in the ischemic reperfusion group demonstrated: Ca(2+) of ischemic region of myocardial cell increased (P < 0.05), Na+ increased remarkably (P < 0.01), the activity of Ca(2+)-ATPase dropped remarkably (P < 0.01), and MDA increased significantly (P < 0.01). Whereas in the group pretreated with APN, the Ca(2+) in the relevant area reduced (P < 0.05), Na+ decreased significantly (P < 0.01), the activity of Ca(2+)-ATPase and Na+-K+ ATPase increased remarkably (P < 0.01), and MDA decreased significantly (P < 0.01). These findings indicate tha APN may improve the activity of sarcolemma ATPase in alleviating the Ca(2+) and Na+ -overloading by decreasing the harmful effect of oxygen free radicals. PMID:8731924

  16. Validation of a method for the determination of sterols and triterpenes in the aerial part of Justicia anselliana (Nees) T. Anders by capillary gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kpoviéssi, Dossou Sika Salomé; Gbaguidi, Fernand; Gbénou, Joachim; Accrombessi, Georges; Moudachirou, Mansourou; Rozet, Eric; Hubert, Philippe; Quetin-Leclercq, Joëlle

    2008-12-01

    An accurate and sensitive method, combining soxhlet extraction, solid phase-extraction and capillary gas chromatography is described for the quantitative determination of one triterpene (lupeol) and three sterols (stigmasterol, campesterol and beta-sitosterol) and the detection of another triterpene (alpha-amyrin) from the aerial part of Justicia anselliana. This is the first method allowing the quantification of sterols and triterpenes in this plant. It has been fully validated in order to be able to compare the sterol and triterpene composition of different samples of J. anselliana and therefore help to explain the allelopathic activity due to these compounds. This method showed that the aerial part of J. anselliana contained (292+/-2)mg/kg of lupeol, (206+/-1)mg/kg of stigmasterol, (266+/-2)mg/kg of campesterol and (184+/-9)mg/kg of beta-sitosterol. PMID:18951746

  17. [Verification of the plum pox virus (PPV) using the tray test (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Kröll, J

    1978-01-01

    A comparison of 6 host plants reacting by local lesion if infected by the Plum Pox Virus (PPV) demonstrated that beside Chenopodium foetidum Schrad. also Nicandra physaloides (L). Gärtner, Nicardra physaloides violacea Bitter and Verbena officinalis L. are pretty well suitable to verify the PPV serving as locally reacting test plants. Using the tray test, the PPV was verifiable by separated leaves of C. foetidum Schrad., N. physaloides violacea Bitter, N. physaloides (L.) Gärtner and V. officinalis L. Applying experimental conditions precisely defined, an abridgement of the period between infections and development of the symptomes by three days was acquired here, compared with the plant test. PMID:664936

  18. Attenuation of Inflammatory Mediators (TNF-α and Nitric Oxide) and Up-Regulation of IL-10 by Wild and Domesticated Basidiocarps of Amauroderma rugosum (Blume & T. Nees) Torrend in LPS-Stimulated RAW264.7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Amauroderma rugosum, commonly known as “Jiǎzī” in China, is a wild mushroom traditionally used by the Chinese to reduce inflammation, to treat diuretic and upset stomach, and to prevent cancer. It is also used by the indigenous communities in Malaysia to prevent epileptic episodes and incessant crying by babies. The aim of this study was to compare the wild and domesticated basidiocarps of A. rugosum for antioxidant and in vitro anti-inflammatory effects in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. The wild basidiocarps of A. rugosum were collected from the Belum Forest, Perak, Malaysia and the domesticated basidiocarps of A. rugosum were cultivated in the mushroom house located in the University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Both the wild and domesticated basidiocarps were subjected to ethanolic extraction and the extracts were tested for antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, the crude ethanolic extract of wild (WB) and domesticated (DB) basidiocarps of A. rugosum had comparable total phenolic content and DPPH scavenging activity. However, WB (EC50 = 222.90 μg/mL) displayed a better ABTS cation radical scavenging activity than DB (EC50 = 469.60 μg/mL). Both WB and DB were able to scavenge nitric oxide (NO) radical and suppress the NO production in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells and this effect was mediated through the down-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) gene. In addition, both WB and DB caused down-regulation of the inflammatory gene TNF-α and the up-regulation of the anti-inflammatory gene IL-10. There was no inhibitory effect of WB and DB on nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65. In conclusion, the wild and domesticated basidiocarps of A. rugosum possessed antioxidant and in vitro anti-inflammatory properties. WB and DB inhibited downstream inflammatory mediators (TNF-α and NO) and induced anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 production. No inhibitory effects shown on upstream nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65. WB and DB exhibited antioxidant activity and attenuation of proinflammatory mediators and therefore, A. rugosum may serve as a potential therapeutic agent in the management of inflammation. PMID:26427053

  19. FINAL REPORT: EDDY-COVARIANCE FLUX TOWER AND TRACER TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA PROPOSAL: FROM TOWER TO PIXEL: INTEGRATION OF PATCH-SIZE NEE USING EXPERIMENTAL MODELING FOOTPRINT ANALYSIS.

    SciTech Connect

    LEWIN,K.F.; NAGY, J.; WATSON, T.B.

    2007-09-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has been funded since October of 2000 to provide assistance to the University of Georgia in conducting footprint analyses of individual towers based on meteorology and trace gas measurements. Brookhaven researchers conducted air flow measurements using perfluorocarbon tracers and meteorological instrumentation for three experimental campaigns at an AmeriFlux research site maintained by Dr. Monique Leclerc near Gainesville, FL. In addition, BNL provided assistance with remote data collection and distribution from remote field sites operated by Dr. John Hom of the US Forest Service in the Pine Barrens of New Jersey and at FACE research sites in North Carolina and Wisconsin.

  20. Dimethyl 3, 3', 4, 4'-tetrahydroxy-δ-truxinate isolated from the leaves of Andrographis lineata.Wall. ex. Nees suppress adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Deepa, Vijayakumar Sudarshana; Rajaram, Krishnasamy; Sureshkumar, Periyasamy

    2015-03-01

    The present investigation elucidates the isolation and characterization of bioactive compound from the ethanolic leaf extract of Andrographis lineata (EtALL) which suppress the differentiation of 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The ethanolic leaf extract was subjected to bioassay guided fractionation in 3T3-L1 cell lines. Five fractions were isolated from the EtALL extract by column chromatography. All the Fractions (I-V) along with EtALL were screened for adipogenesis activity (Oil-Red-O staining).The fraction which showed maximum adipogenesis activity was purified by thin layer chromatography. The bioactive Fraction IV was found to have maximum adipogenic (96.83%) activity and the activity was comparable to Rosiglitazone. The spectroscopic data analysis reveals that, the isolated bioactive compound was Dimethyl 3, 3', 4, 4'-tetrahydroxy-δ-truxinate (DTδT), a combination of truxillic and truxinic acid derivative. DTδT showed insulin mimicking (131.2%), sensitizing (810.02%) and adipogenic activity (80.23%). Hence our present study concluded that, Dimethyl 3, 3', 4, 4'-tetrahydroxy-δ-truxinate isolated from the ethanolic leaf extract of Andrographis lineata stimulates glucose uptake, potentiates insulin-stimulated glucose in 3T3-L1 adipocytes without increasing adiposity. PMID:25730801

  1. Wild Forms of Watermelon and Genomic Resources

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this chapter, we reviewed the characteristics, phylogenetic information of all the species in Citrullus genera, including Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum and Nakai., C. lanatus var. citrides (Bailey; Mansf.), C. ecirrhosus Cogn., C. rehmii De Winter., C. colocynthis (L.) Schrad, an...

  2. Notes on Citrullius spp. and Acanthosicyos naudinianus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scanning electron and light microscopy were utilized to examine pollen of the currently recognized species (and forms) within the genus Citrullus (Cucurbitaceae). Materials examined included: C. lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai including the citron (C. amarus Schrad.) and egusi (C. lanatus subsp. mu...

  3. Genetic relationships in the desert watermelon citrullus colocynthis as viewed with high-frequency, oligonucleotide–targeting active gene (HFO–TAG) markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    U.S. Plant Introductions (PIs) of Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrad. are a viable source for enhancing disease and pest resistance in watermelon cultivars. However, there is information about their genetic diversity and relationships to watermelon cultivars. Genetic diversity and relationships were ...

  4. Observations on anatomical aspects of the fruit, leaf and stem tissues of four Citrullus spp.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Morphological characteristics of the fruit, stem and leaf tissues of four species of Citrullus (L.) Schrad. were examined using standard histological methods. Plant materials included the cultivated watermelon (C. lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai) and three of its related species; C. colocynthis (...

  5. 'Snowstorm' a new forage kochia cultivar with improved stature, productivity, and nutritional content for enhanced fall and winter grazing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'Snowstorm' forage kochia (Bassia prostrata [L.] A.J. Scott) (synonym=Kochia prostrata [L.] Schrad.) (Reg. No. CV-_____, PI _____) was released on March 22, 2012, by the USDA-ARS and the Utah Agricultural Experiment Station. Snowstorm was evaluated as OTVSEL and Otavny-select, and was developed as ...

  6. Climatic regulation of seasonal and inter-annual variability in net ecosystem exchange of CO2 on rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) from terrestrial ecosystems varies seasonally and inter-annually because of temporal variation in climate. If we are predict climate-caused variation in NEE, we must understand how climatic variation influences NEE and its components, CO2 uptake and CO2 loss. ...

  7. Plastic traits of an exotic grass contribute to its abundance but are not always favourable.

    PubMed

    Firn, Jennifer; Prober, Suzanne M; Buckley, Yvonne M

    2012-01-01

    In herbaceous ecosystems worldwide, biodiversity has been negatively impacted by changed grazing regimes and nutrient enrichment. Altered disturbance regimes are thought to favour invasive species that have a high phenotypic plasticity, although most studies measure plasticity under controlled conditions in the greenhouse and then assume plasticity is an advantage in the field. Here, we compare trait plasticity between three co-occurring, C(4) perennial grass species, an invader Eragrostis curvula, and natives Eragrostis sororia and Aristida personata to grazing and fertilizer in a three-year field trial. We measured abundances and several leaf traits known to correlate with strategies used by plants to fix carbon and acquire resources, i.e. specific leaf area (SLA), leaf dry matter content (LDMC), leaf nutrient concentrations (N, C:N, P), assimilation rates (Amax) and photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency (PNUE). In the control treatment (grazed only), trait values for SLA, leaf C:N ratios, Amax and PNUE differed significantly between the three grass species. When trait values were compared across treatments, E. curvula showed higher trait plasticity than the native grasses, and this correlated with an increase in abundance across all but the grazed/fertilized treatment. The native grasses showed little trait plasticity in response to the treatments. Aristida personata decreased significantly in the treatments where E. curvula increased, and E. sororia abundance increased possibly due to increased rainfall and not in response to treatments or invader abundance. Overall, we found that plasticity did not favour an increase in abundance of E. curvula under the grazed/fertilized treatment likely because leaf nutrient contents increased and subsequently its' palatability to consumers. E. curvula also displayed a higher resource use efficiency than the native grasses. These findings suggest resource conditions and disturbance regimes can be manipulated to disadvantage

  8. A neon-E rich phase in Orgueil - Results of stepwise heating experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberhardt, P.

    1978-01-01

    A Ne-E rich phase was separated from the Orgeuil carbonaceous chondrite. He and Ne were analyzed in this phase and in an Orgueil residual bulk silicate sample using the stepwise heating technique. Ne-E was found to be released from the Ne-E rich phase at temperatures as low as 500 C; however, gas richest in Ne-E is observed at the highest temperatures (1230 C). The following limits for the isotopic composition of Ne-E were obtained: Ne-20/Ne-22 less than 1.52; Ne-21/Ne-22 less than 0.0244.

  9. Biological and chemical study of paico (Chenopodium chilense, Chenopodiaceae).

    PubMed

    García, R; Lemus, I; Rivera, P; Erazo, S

    1997-07-01

    The methanolic extract of the aerial portion of Chenopodium chilense Schrad., used in Chilean traditional medicine as a remedy for stomach-ache, has been found to exert the major spasmolytic activity in acetylcholine contracted rat ileum. This extract, with a complex flavonoid patterns on thin layer chromatography (TLC) analysis, is practically non-toxic both for rats and brine shrimp Artemia salina in acute toxicity test. PMID:9254110

  10. Contributions to the study of the Ethiopian Lepidoptera. I. The genus Melittia Hübner, 1819 ["1816"] (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae) with description of a new species.

    PubMed

    Gorbunov, Oleg G

    2015-01-01

    The genus Melittia Hübner, 1819 ["1816"] (Sesiidae) is reviewed for the country of Ethiopia. Melittia ambo sp. nov. is described from vicinities of Ambo, West Shewa zone, Oromia. Adults, including male and female genitalia, and the larval host plant, Citrullus colocynthis (L.) Schrad. (Cucurbitaceae), are illustrated. Additional, Melittia pyropis Hampson, 1919 is recorded for Ethiopia for the first time, and the holotype of M. abyssiniensis Hampson, 1919 is illustrated. PMID:26624423

  11. In situ effects of elevated CO 2 on chlorophyll fluorescences and chloroplast pigments of alpine plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thron, Ch.; Hahn, K.; Lütz, C.

    Alpine vegetation responds to elevated CO 2 with downward adjustment of photosynthesis. The experiments should show if doubling of ambient CO 2 reduces the maximum quantum yield and the chlorophylls thus altering the pigment composition of the thylakoid membranes in typical species of an alpine grassland ( Caricetum curvulae). The studies were part of a CO 2 enrichment experiment with open-top chambers in the Swiss Central Alps in 2 470 m altitude over a period of four years. The leaves of Carex curvula and Trifolium alpinum were analysed in situ under ambient (355 μl/l) or elevated (680 μl/l) CO 2 and at two different nutrient levels. In each vegetation period both species showed a tendency to lower ratios of variable to maximum fluorescence (F v/F m) in plants with elevated CO 2 treatment compared to the ambient variants. These reductions in F v/F m were statistically different only for Carex curvula in 1993 and 1995. CO 2 enrichment caused reductions of leaf pigment concentrations of 10-30% especially for Trifolium alpinum whereas Carex curvula was less affected. The lower pigment contents per leaf were probably due to reductions of thylakoid membranes. In most cases, the influences of elevated CO 2 or of nutrient treatments on pigment composition and primary photochemistry were very small. This indicates that the downward regulation begins at early stages in the photosynthetic process. Some changes of the photosynthetic apparatus are species-specific and possibly reflect different strategies of protective acclimation processes of alpine vegetation.

  12. Contrasting microbial biogeographical patterns between anthropogenic subalpine grasslands and natural alpine grasslands.

    PubMed

    Geremia, Roberto A; Pușcaș, Mihai; Zinger, Lucie; Bonneville, Jean-Marc; Choler, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    The effect of plant species composition on soil microbial communities was studied at the multiregional level. We compared the soil microbial communities of alpine natural grasslands dominated by Carex curvula and anthropogenic subalpine pastures dominated by Nardus stricta. We conducted paired sampling across the Carpathians and the Alps and used Illumina sequencing to reveal the molecular diversity of soil microbes. We found that bacterial and fungal communities exhibited contrasting regional distributions and that the distribution in each grassland is well discriminated. Beta diversity of microbial communities was much higher in C. curvula grasslands due to a marked regional effect. The composition of grassland-type core microbiomes suggest that C. curvula, and N. stricta to a lesser extent, tend to select a cohort of microbes related to antibiosis/exclusion, pathogenesis and endophytism. We discuss these findings in light of the postglacial history of the studied grasslands, the habitat connectivity and the disturbance regimes. Human-induced disturbance in the subalpine belt of European mountains has led to homogeneous soil microbial communities at large biogeographical scales. Our results confirm the overarching role of the dominant grassland plant species in the distribution of microbial communities and highlight the relevance of biogeographical history. PMID:26443332

  13. Pan-Arctic modelling of net ecosystem exchange of CO2.

    PubMed

    Shaver, G R; Rastetter, E B; Salmon, V; Street, L E; van de Weg, M J; Rocha, A; van Wijk, M T; Williams, M

    2013-08-19

    Net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of C varies greatly among Arctic ecosystems. Here, we show that approximately 75 per cent of this variation can be accounted for in a single regression model that predicts NEE as a function of leaf area index (LAI), air temperature and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). The model was developed in concert with a survey of the light response of NEE in Arctic and subarctic tundras in Alaska, Greenland, Svalbard and Sweden. Model parametrizations based on data collected in one part of the Arctic can be used to predict NEE in other parts of the Arctic with accuracy similar to that of predictions based on data collected in the same site where NEE is predicted. The principal requirement for the dataset is that it should contain a sufficiently wide range of measurements of NEE at both high and low values of LAI, air temperature and PAR, to properly constrain the estimates of model parameters. Canopy N content can also be substituted for leaf area in predicting NEE, with equal or greater accuracy, but substitution of soil temperature for air temperature does not improve predictions. Overall, the results suggest a remarkable convergence in regulation of NEE in diverse ecosystem types throughout the Arctic. PMID:23836790

  14. Impact of precipitation dynamics on net ecosystem exchange

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Net ecosystem carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange (NEE) was measured on shortgrass steppe (SGS) vegetation at the USDA Central Plains Experimental Range in northeastern Colorado from 2001-2003. Large year-to-year differences were observed in annual NEE, with > 95% of the net carbon uptake occurring during...

  15. CO2 exchange in Thuringia, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthoni, P. M.; Knohl, A.; Freibauer, A.; Ziegler, W.; Kolle, O.; Schulze, E.-D.

    2003-04-01

    Eddy covariance technique is used to measure the net CO_2 exchange (NEE) over forest and agricultural areas in Thuringia, Germany. Measurements are performed at a managed and unmanaged Beech stand, a managed Spruce stand and an agricultural field with Winter Wheat in 2001 and Potato in 2002. Large contrasts were found in NEE rates between the ecosystems. Though managed and unmanaged Beech had very similar NEE rates, main differences between those two sites arose because of an earlier leaf emergence at the managed beech site. Spruce had higher NEE in spring but substantially lower NEE in summer than the Beech stands. Overall resulting in a substantially lower annual NEE, which is mainly attributable to an almost two times higher ecosystem respiration, despite lower ecosystem temperatures at the Spruce site. Crops had high NEE uptake rates, but growing season length is short compared to the forest ecosystems. Therefore agricultural land had moderate annual NEE uptake rates (1--2tC ha-1), but when harvest is taken into account the agricultural ecosystems are a source for CO_2 (1--3tC ha-1). Forests cover about 30% of the area in Thuringia, 50% is agriculture, and 20% grassland and other land-use types. Agriculture seems to loose carbon and forest gain carbon, indicating that Thuringia would probably be a carbon source, or not be statistically different from being carbon neutral.

  16. Pan-Arctic modelling of net ecosystem exchange of CO2

    PubMed Central

    Shaver, G. R.; Rastetter, E. B.; Salmon, V.; Street, L. E.; van de Weg, M. J.; Rocha, A.; van Wijk, M. T.; Williams, M.

    2013-01-01

    Net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of C varies greatly among Arctic ecosystems. Here, we show that approximately 75 per cent of this variation can be accounted for in a single regression model that predicts NEE as a function of leaf area index (LAI), air temperature and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). The model was developed in concert with a survey of the light response of NEE in Arctic and subarctic tundras in Alaska, Greenland, Svalbard and Sweden. Model parametrizations based on data collected in one part of the Arctic can be used to predict NEE in other parts of the Arctic with accuracy similar to that of predictions based on data collected in the same site where NEE is predicted. The principal requirement for the dataset is that it should contain a sufficiently wide range of measurements of NEE at both high and low values of LAI, air temperature and PAR, to properly constrain the estimates of model parameters. Canopy N content can also be substituted for leaf area in predicting NEE, with equal or greater accuracy, but substitution of soil temperature for air temperature does not improve predictions. Overall, the results suggest a remarkable convergence in regulation of NEE in diverse ecosystem types throughout the Arctic. PMID:23836790

  17. Biologically-Effective Rainfall Pulses in Mediterranean and Monsoonal Regions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In semiarid regions rainfall pulses provide intermittent opportunities for biological activity. These pulses have been shown to affect the activity of microbes and plant differently, altering the net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide (NEE) from these ecosystems. We examine NEE and its components ...

  18. Observation and modeling of the impact of forestry and CO2 fertilization on the carbon cycle in the Upper Midwest, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, A. R.; Moorcroft, P. R.; Bolstad, P. V.; Davis, K. J.

    2006-05-01

    Forest management is known to be a significant factor in explaining the observed land carbon sink, but improvement is needed in modeling and evaluating its effect on net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE). We applied the Ecosystem Demography (ED) dynamic vegetation model in a forested landscape to test the roles of forestry and CO2 on NEE. The model has multiple plant types, multi-layer canopy structure, stand age variability, disturbance, land use change and management. ED was tuned to observations from the Chequamegon Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study including ecological measurements, forest inventory and records of land cover and use, meteorology and CO2. Model NEE was highly correlated on monthly and annual timescales to 7 yrs of NEE observed at a 396-m tall eddy covariance (EC) tower and to 2 yrs of growing season NEE from 13 stand-scale EC sites of varying cover and age. Jun-Aug NEE was biased high for the tall tower and mature hardwood sites, and correlation to ecosystem respiration at some sites was poor. Exclusion of forestry led to overestimation of plant biomass accumulation by 109% between two inventory cycles (1996-2004), an error smaller than exclusion of natural disturbance and reproduction (171%), but larger than neglecting interannual climate variability (38%). On the long-term (200 yrs), forestry significantly altered ecosystem cover and age and increased NEE by 32%. The increase was due to a shift toward rapidly growing species in younger stands and export of biomass leading to lower respiration and soil carbon input. CO2 fertilization increased NEE by 93% due to a doubling of plant density. While harvest and afforestation had smaller impacts on NEE than CO2 increase, they were still significant and cannot be neglected when making future NEE predictions. Lack of decision-based management, forest product lifecycle tracking and downregulation of CO2 assimilation in ED and other models require further investigation and future refinement.

  19. Estimation of Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange for the Conterminous UnitedStates by Combining MODIS and AmeriFlux Data

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jingfeng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Law, Beverly E.; Richardson, Andrew D.; Chen, Jiquan; Oren, Ram; Starr, Gregory; Noormets, Asko; Ma, Siyan; Verma, Shashi B.; Wharton, Sonia; Wofsy, Steven C.; Bolstad, Paul V.; Burns, Sean P.; Cook, David R.; Curtis, Peter S.; Drake, Bert G.; Falk, Matthias; Fischer, Marc L.; Foster, David R.; Gu, Lianhong; Hadley, Julian L.; Hollinger, David Y.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Litvak, Marcy; Martin, Timothy A.; Matamala, Roser; McNulty, Steve; Meyers, Tilden P.; Monson, Russell K.; Munger, J. William; Oechel, Walter C.; U, Kyaw Tha Paw; Schmid, Hans Peter; Scott, Russell L.; Sun, Ge; Suyker, Andrew E.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2009-03-06

    Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) for a wide range of climate and biome types. However, these measurements only represent the carbon fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. To quantify the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere for regions or continents, flux tower measurements need to be extrapolated to these large areas. Here we used remotely-sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on board NASA's Terra satellite to scale up AmeriFlux NEE measurements to the continental scale. We first combined MODIS and AmeriFlux data for representative U.S. ecosystems to develop a predictive NEE model using a regression tree approach. The predictive model was trained and validated using NEE data over the periods 2000-2004 and 2005-2006, respectively. We found that the model predicted NEE reasonably well at the site level. We then applied the model to the continental scale and estimated NEE for each 1 km x 1 km cell across the conterminous U.S. for each 8-day period in 2005 using spatially-explicit MODIS data. The model generally captured the expected spatial and seasonal patterns of NEE. Our study demonstrated that our empirical approach is effective for scaling up eddy flux NEE measurements to the continental scale and producing wall-to-wall NEE estimates across multiple biomes. Our estimates may provide an independent dataset from simulations with biogeochemical models and inverse modeling approaches for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of NEE and constraining terrestrial carbon budgets for large areas.

  20. Estimation of net ecosystem carbon exchange for the conterminous United States by combining MODIS and AmeriFlux data

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jingfeng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Bolstad, Paul V.; Burns, Sean P.; Chen, Jiquan; Cook, David R.; Curtis, Peter S.; Drake, Bert G.; Foster, David R.; Gu, Lianhong; Hadley, Julian L.; Hollinger, David Y.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Law, Beverly E.; Litvak, Marcy; Ma, Siyan; Martin, Timothy A.; Matamala, Roser; McNulty, Steve; Meyers, Tilden P.; Monson, Russell K.; Munger, J. William; Noormets, Asko; Oechel, Walter C.; Oren, Ram; Richardson, Andrew D.; Schmid, Hans Peter; Scott, Russell L.; Starr, Gregory; Sun, Ge; Suyker, Andrew E.; Torn, Margaret S.; Paw, Kyaw; Verma, Shashi B.; Wharton, Sonia; Wofsy, Steven C.

    2008-10-01

    Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) for a wide range of climate and biome types. However, these measurements only represent the carbon fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. To quantify the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere for regions or continents, flux tower measurements need to be extrapolated to these large areas. Here we used remotely sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on board the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Terra satellite to scale up AmeriFlux NEE measurements to the continental scale. We first combined MODIS and AmeriFlux data for representative U.S. ecosystems to develop a predictive NEE model using a modified regression tree approach. The predictive model was trained and validated using eddy flux NEE data over the periods 2000-2004 and 2005-2006, respectively. We found that the model predicted NEE well (r = 0.73, p < 0.001). We then applied the model to the continental scale and estimated NEE for each 1 km x 1 km cell across the conterminous U.S. for each 8-day interval in 2005 using spatially explicit MODIS data. The model generally captured the expected spatial and seasonal patterns of NEE as determined from measurements and the literature. Our study demonstrated that our empirical approach is effective for scaling up eddy flux NEE measurements to the continental scale and producing wall-to-wall NEE estimates across multiple biomes. Our estimates may provide an independent dataset from simulations with biogeochemical models and inverse modeling approaches for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of NEE and constraining terrestrial carbon budgets over large areas.

  1. Estimation of net ecosystem carbon exchange for the conterminous United States by combining MODIS and AmeriFlux data

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jingfeng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Baldocchi, Dennis; Ma, Siyan; Law, Beverly E.; Richardson, Andrew D; Chen, Jiquan; Oren, Ram

    2008-10-01

    Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) for a wide range of climate and biome types. However, these measurements only represent the carbon fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. To quantify the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere for regions or continents, flux tower measurements need to be extrapolated to these large areas. Here we used remotely sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on board the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Terra satellite to scale up AmeriFlux NEE measurements to the continental scale.We first combined MODIS and AmeriFlux data for representative U.S. ecosystems to develop a predictive NEE model using a modified regression tree approach. The predictive model was trained and validated using eddy flux NEE data over the periods 2000 2004 and 2005 2006, respectively. We found that the model predicted NEE well (r = 0.73, p < 0.001). We then applied the model to the continental scale and estimated NEE for each 1 km 1 km cell across the conterminous U.S. for each 8-day interval in 2005 using spatially explicit MODIS data. The model generally captured the expected spatial and seasonal patterns of NEE as determined from measurements and the literature. Our study demonstrated that our empirical approach is effective for scaling up eddy flux NEE measurements to the continental scale and producing wall-to-wall NEE estimates across multiple biomes. Our estimates may provide an independent dataset from simulations with biogeochemical models and inverse modeling approaches for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of NEE and constraining terrestrial carbon budgets over large areas.

  2. Seasonal and interannual variations of carbon exchange over a rice-wheat rotation system on the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chen; Li, Dan; Gao, Zhiqiu; Tang, Jianwu; Guo, Xiaofeng; Wang, Linlin; Wan, Bingcheng

    2015-10-01

    Rice-wheat (R-W) rotation systems are ubiquitous in South and East Asia, and play an important role in modulating the carbon cycle and climate. Long-term, continuous flux measurements help in better understanding the seasonal and interannual variation of the carbon budget over R-W rotation systems. In this study, measurements of CO2 fluxes and meteorological variables over an R-W rotation system on the North China Plain from 2007 to 2010 were analyzed. To analyze the abiotic factors regulating Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE), NEE was partitioned into gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration. Nighttime NEE or ecosystem respiration was controlled primarily by soil temperature, while daytime NEE was mainly determined by photosythetically active radiation (PAR). The responses of nighttime NEE to soil temperature and daytime NEE to light were closely associated with crop development and photosynthetic activity, respectively. Moreover, the interannual variation in GPP and NEE mainly depended on precipitation and PAR. Overall, NEE was negative on the annual scale and the rotation system behaved as a carbon sink of 982 g C m-2 per year over the three years. The winter wheat field took up more CO2 than the rice paddy during the longer growing season, while the daily NEE for wheat and rice were -2.35 and -3.96 g C m-2, respectively. After the grain harvest was subtracted from the NEE, the winter wheat field became a moderately strong carbon sink of 251-334 g C m-2 per season, whereas the rice paddy switched to a weak carbon sink of 107-132 per season.

  3. Antecedent moisture and seasonal precipitation influence the response of canopy-scale carbon and water exchange to rainfall pulses in a semi-arid grassland.

    PubMed

    Potts, D L; Huxman, T E; Cable, J M; English, N B; Ignace, D D; Eilts, J A; Mason, M J; Weltzin, J F; Williams, D G

    2006-01-01

    The influences of prior monsoon-season drought (PMSD) and the seasonal timing of episodic rainfall ('pulses') on carbon and water exchange in water-limited ecosystems are poorly quantified. *In the present study, we estimated net ecosystem exchange of CO(2) (NEE) and evapotranspiration (ET) before, and for 15 d following, experimental irrigation in a semi-arid grassland during June and August 2003. Rainout shelters near Tucson, Arizona, USA, were positioned on contrasting soils (clay and sand) and planted with native (Heteropogon contortus) or non-native invasive (Eragrostis lehmanniana) C4 bunchgrasses. Plots received increased ('wet') or decreased ('dry') monsoon-season (July-September) rainfall during 2002 and 2003. Following a June 2003 39-mm pulse, species treatments had similar NEE and ET dynamics including 15-d integrated NEE (NEE(pulse)). Contrary to predictions, PMSD increased net C uptake during June in plots of both species. Greater flux rates after an August 2003 39-mm pulse reflected biotic activity associated with the North American Monsoon. Furthermore, August NEE(pulse) and ecosystem pulse-use efficiency (PUE(e) = NEE(pulse)/ET(pulse)) was greatest in Heteropogon plots. PMSD and rainfall seasonal timing may interact with bunchgrass invasions to alter NEE and ET dynamics with consequences for PUE(e) in water-limited ecosystems. PMID:16684243

  4. Cropland carbon fluxes in the United States: increasing Geospatial Resolution of Inventory-Based Carbon Accounting

    SciTech Connect

    West, Tristram O.; Brandt, Craig C; Baskaran, Latha Malar; Hellwinckel, Chad M; Marland, Gregg; Nelson, Richard G; De La Torre Ugarte, Daniel G; Post, Wilfred M

    2010-01-01

    Net annual soil carbon change, fossil fuel emissions from cropland production, and cropland net primary productivity were estimated and spatially distributed using land cover defined by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and by the Cropland Data Layer (CDL). Spatially resolved estimates of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB) were developed. NEE represents net on-site vertical fluxes of carbon. NECB represents all on-site and off-site carbon fluxes associated with crop production. Estimates of cropland NEE using moderate resolution (~1km2) land cover data were generated for the conterminous US and compared with higher resolution (30m) estimates of NEE and with direct measurements of CO2 flux from croplands in Illinois and Nebraska. Estimates of NEE using the CDL (30m resolution) had a higher correlation with eddy covariance flux tower estimates compared with estimates of NEE using MODIS. Estimates of NECB are primarily driven by net soil carbon change, fossil-fuel emissions associated with crop production, and CO2 emissions from the application of agricultural lime. NEE and NECB for US croplands were -274 and 7 Tg C yr-1 for 2004, respectively. Use of moderate to high resolution satellite-based land cover data enables improved estimates of cropland carbon dynamics.

  5. Contemporary mire net ecosystem green-house gas balance: controls and susceptibility to change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Mats; Eriksson, Tobias; Grelle, Achim; Larsson, Anna; Laudon, Hjalmar; Lindroth, Anders; Ottosson-Löfvenius, Mikaell; Peichl, Matthias; Sagerfors, Jörgen; Ågren, Anneli; Öquist, Mats

    2015-04-01

    In this presentation I will address three main issues: 1 - What is the contemporary carbon sequestration function of high latitude mire ecosystems relative to Holocene average? 2 - The relative importance of the component carbon (C) fluxes for the annual mire Net Ecosystem Carbon Balance (NECB); 3 - The importance of gross primary production (GPP) versus ecosystem respiration (Reco) for the annual Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE); The annual boreal mire NECB is made up principally by the biosphere-atmosphere exchange of CO2 (NEE) and CH4 and the runoff C-export. One important research issue is to further understand what controls the relative contribution from the component fluxes to the annual mire NECB. A second important major research issue is to reveal the relative importance of gross photosynthesis (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco) respectively for the annual mire NEE. The relative importance of GPP and Reco respectively for the NECB also encounters the effect of changes in the lengths of the growing season and non-growing season respectively. In this presentation we use ten years of data on annual fluxes of NEE, methane and water discharge C export at a nutrient poor minerogenic boreal mire, Degerö Stormyr, in northern Sweden to address the above questions. Winter time NEE together with methane emission and water discharge C export reduces the growing season NEE with approximately 60%, thus substantially controlling the annual boreal mire NEE.

  6. Voltammetry of redox analytes at trace concentrations with nanoelectrode ensembles.

    PubMed

    Moretto, Ligia Maria; Pepe, Niki; Ugo, Paolo

    2004-04-19

    Gold nanoelectrodes ensembles (NEEs) have been prepared by electroless plating of Au nanoelectrode elements within the pores of a microporous polycarbonate template membrane. Cyclic voltammograms recorded in (ferrocenylmethyl) trimethylammonium hexafluorophosphate (FA(+) PF(6)(-)) solutions showed that these NEEs operate in the "total-overlap" response regime, giving well resolved peak shaped voltammograms. Experimental results show that the faradaic/background currents ratios at the NEE are independent on the total geometric area of the ensemble, so that NEE can be enlarged or miniaturized at pleasure without influencing the very favorable signal/noise ratio. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) at the NEE is optimized for direct determinations at trace levels. DPV at NEE allowed the determination (with no preconcentration) of trace amounts of FA(+), with a detection limit of 0.02muM. The use of NEE and DPV in cytochrome c (cyt c) solutions showed the possibility to observe the direct electrochemistry of submicromolar concentration of the protein, even without the need of adding any promoter or mediator. PMID:18969398

  7. Net Ecosystem Exchange of CO2 with Rapidly Changing High Arctic Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmerton, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    High Arctic landscapes are expansive and changing rapidly. However our understanding of their functional responses and potential to mitigate or enhance anthropogenic climate change is limited by few measurements. We collected eddy covariance measurements to quantify the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 with polar semidesert and meadow wetland landscapes at the highest-latitude location measured to date (82°N). We coupled these rare data with ground and satellite vegetation production measurements (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index; NDVI) to evaluate the effectiveness of upscaling local to regional NEE. During the growing season, the dry polar semidesert landscape was a near zero sink of atmospheric CO2 (NEE: -0.3±13.5 g C m-2). A nearby meadow wetland accumulated over two magnitudes more carbon (NEE: -79.3±20.0 g C m-2) than the polar semidesert landscape, and was similar to meadow wetland NEE at much more southern latitudes. Polar semidesert NEE was most influenced by moisture, with wetter surface soils resulting in greater soil respiration and CO2 emissions. At the meadow wetland, soil heating enhanced plant growth, which in turn increased CO2 uptake. Our upscaling assessment found that polar semidesert NDVI measured on site was low (mean: 0.120-0.157) and similar to satellite measurements (mean: 0.155-0.163). However, weak plant growth resulted in poor satellite NDVI-NEE relationships and created challenges for remotely-detecting changes in the cycling of carbon on the polar semidesert landscape. The meadow wetland appeared more suitable to assess plant production and NEE via remote-sensing, however high Arctic wetland extent is constrained by topography to small areas that may be difficult to resolve with large satellite pixels. We predict that until summer precipitation and humidity increases substantially, climate-related changes of dry high Arctic landscapes may be restricted by poor soil moisture retention, and therefore have some inertia against

  8. Neuroepithelial endocrine cells in the lung of the lungfish Protopterus aethiopicus. An electron- and fluorescence-microscopical investigation.

    PubMed

    Adriaensen, D; Scheuermann, D W; Timmermans, J P; De Groodt-Lasseel, M H

    1990-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of neuroepithelial endocrine (NEE) cells was demonstrated electron- and fluorescence-microscopically in the lungfish Protopterus aethiopicus. They were only found to occur solitarily in the basal part of the cilio-mucous epithelium which is restricted to the pneumatic duct and adjacent parts of the common anterior chamber. The NEE cells show a yellow, formaldehyde-induced fluorescence. Electron-microscopically, all the NEE cells are characterized by membrane-bound electron-dense secretory granules with varying diameters, ranging from 75 to 150 nm. These granules are distributed throughout the cytoplasm with a higher concentration in the basal region. The NEE cells were regularly found to contain paracrystalline inclusions with a tubule-like substructural arrangement. A small part of the NEE cells appeared to reach the luminal surface by means of a long slender process bearing specialized beaded microvilli on its apical pole. Intraepithelial nerve fibres, with the ultrastructural characteristics of afferent fibres, were found running parallel to the airway surface. Nerve profiles, largely resembling the latter, can be seen in the proximity of the basolateral plasma membrane of the NEE cells. In addition, nerve terminals containing an aggregation of small clear vesicles are in close contact with the NEE cells. In conclusion, it appears that, as has so far been assumed in higher vertebrates, the NEE cells in the lung of Protopterus may perceive changes in the airway gases whereupon they could respond by releasing a chemical modulator, influencing contacting afferent nerve terminals or nearby smooth muscle bundles. Furthermore, intraepithelial nerve fibres or NEE cells might be stretch-sensitive. PMID:2288194

  9. Aquatic hyphomycetes as endophytes of riparian plant roots.

    PubMed

    Sati, S C; Belwal, M

    2005-01-01

    Eighteen species of aquatic hyphomycetes were recorded as root endophytes in roots of living plants including grasses and pteridophytes from wet fields near ravine areas. Alatospora acuminata, A. pulchella, Acaulopage tetraceros, Anguillospora crassa, Campylospora chaetocladia, Lemonniera cornuta, L. pseudofloscula, L. terrestris, Pestalotiopsis submersus and Tetrachaetum elegans were found for the first time as root endophytes. A. longissima, Campylospora purvula, Clavariopsis aquatica, Cylindrocarpon aquaticum, Heliscus lugdunensis, Lunulospora curvula, Tetracladium marchalianum and T. setigerum, which were known previously as root endophytes, are reported here on new hosts. Maximum occurrence was found in November and December. PMID:16389955

  10. Disentangling the confounding effects of PAR and air temperature on net ecosystem exchange in time and scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    yang, Z.; Chen, J.; Becker, R.; Chu, H.; Xie, J.; Shao, C.

    2013-12-01

    Net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) in temperate forests is modulated by microclimatic factors. The effects of those factors differ at different time scales and during different time periods. Some of them are correlated across a number of time scales, so their effects on NEE are confounded by each other. PAR and air temperature (Ta) are among the two most important drivers of NEE in temperate forests, and among the two most correlated microclimatic factors. PAR and Ta have similar daily, seasonal, and annual cycles. Their influence on NEE is confounded by each other and entangled together especially at those scales. In this study, we tried to disentangle the confounding effects of them on NEE at different time scales and during different time periods. To accomplish this objective, we applied the innovative spectral analysis techniques including Continuous Wavelet Transformation (CWT), Cross Wavelet Transformation (XWT), Wavelet Coherent (WTC), and Partial Wavelet Coherence (PWC) on seven years time series (2004-2010) of PAR, Ta and NEE from the Ohio Oak Openings site (N 41.5545°, W 83.8438°), USA for spectral analysis. We found that PAR is the major driver at short time scales (e.g. semidiurnal and daily) and Ta is the major driver at long time scales (e.g. seasonal and annual). At daily scale during growing seasons, PAR is anti-phase with NEE with no time delay while Ta lagged PAR about 2-3 hours, which could be explained by the strong dependence of photosynthesis on PAR and a 2-3 hours lags of the daily course of Ta to PAR. At daily scale during non-growing season, NEE has little variation and thus neither Ta nor PAR has high common wavelet power and significant coherence with NEE. At annual scale, Ta is anti-phase with NEE and PAR leads NEE about 34 days, which could be explained by the strong dependence of LAI dynamics on Ta and the lag between the LAI/biomass development and the progress of sunlight. We also found that NEE distributes most of its variation

  11. Host ranges of gregarious muscoid fly parasitoids: Muscidifurax raptorellus (Kogan and Legner) (Hymenoptera:Pteromalidae), Tachinaephagus zealandicus Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), and Trichopria (Hymenoptera: Diapriidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Attack rates, progeny production, sex ratios and host utilization efficiency of Muscidifurax raptorellus (Kogan and Legner) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), Tachinaephagus zealandicus Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae), and Trichopria nigra (Nees) (Hymenoptera: Diapriidae) were evaluated in laboratory bi...

  12. Pernicious Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Pernicious Anemia? Pernicious anemia (per-NISH-us uh-NEE-me-uh) is ... nervous system working properly. People who have pernicious anemia can't absorb enough vitamin B12 from food. ...

  13. What Is Aplastic Anemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Aplastic Anemia? Aplastic anemia (a-PLAS-tik uh-NEE-me-uh) is ... heart, heart failure , infections, and bleeding. Severe aplastic anemia can even cause death. Overview Aplastic anemia is ...

  14. Hemolytic Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Hemolytic Anemia? Hemolytic anemia (HEE-moh-lit-ick uh-NEE-me-uh) ... blood cells to replace them. However, in hemolytic anemia, the bone marrow can't make red blood ...

  15. What Are Some of the Basics of Infant Health?

    MedlinePlus

    ... movements usually consist of a thick, black or dark green substance called meconium (pronounced mi-KOH-nee- ... In a healthy child, urine is light to dark yellow in color. (The darker the color, the ...

  16. GROUND WATER SAMPLING - A WORKSHOP SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The dissemination review and implementation of new environmental research findings is essential in providing the background information required for practitioners and policy makers working in the areas of environmental protection and restoration. his information is critically nee...

  17. APPLICATIONS OF A CONCEPTUAL MODEL (THE BIOLOGICAL CONDITION GRADIENT) TO DEFINE AQUATIC REFERENCE CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Clean Water Act currently offers no definitions to interpret the Act's objective to "restore and maintain physical, chemical and biological integrity of the Nation's waters". Operative definitions, independent of differences in assessment methodologies, are nee...

  18. A neon-E rich phase in Orgueil - Results obtained on density separates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhardt, P.; Jungck, M. H. A.; Meier, F. O.; Niederer, F. R.

    1981-09-01

    A stepwise heating technique was used on eight density separates from the neon-E rich phase G4j of the carbonaceous chondrite Orgueil to measure He, Ne and Ar. The density separation technique was found to further enrich the Ne-E carrier phases, allowing the Ne-E to be identified as virtually pure Ne-22. At least two separable carrier phases exist: (1) the l-carrier phase, which releases its Ne-E at temperatures below 900 C and is heavily enriched in the low-density separate; and (2) the h-carrier phase. The h-carrier is found to be highly retentive, with release temperatures above 900 C, and is associated with higher-density material. It is concluded that Ne-E and its carrier phases are probably of presolar origin.

  19. Estimation of Carbon Flux of Forest Ecosystem over Qilian Mountains by BIOME-BGC Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Min; Tian, Xin; Li, Zengyuan; Chen, Erxue; Li, Chunmei

    2014-11-01

    The gross primary production (GPP) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) are important indicators for carbon fluxes. This study aims at evaluating the forest GPP and NEE over the Qilian Mountains using meteorological, remotely sensed and other ancillary data at large scale. To realize this, the widely used ecological-process-based model, Biome-BGC, and remote-sensing-based model, MODIS GPP algorithm, were selected for the simulation of the forest carbon fluxes. The combination of these two models was based on calibrating the Biome-BGC by the optimized MODIS GPP algorithm. The simulated GPP and NEE values were evaluated against the eddy covariance observed GPPs and NEEs, and the well agreements have been reached, with R2=0.76, 0.67 respectively.

  20. What Causes Heart Murmurs?

    MedlinePlus

    ... include fever, anemia (uh-NEE-me-eh), and hyperthyroidism. Anemia is a condition in which the body ... lower than normal number of red blood cells. Hyperthyroidism is a condition in which the body has ...

  1. INNOVATIVE METHODS FOR EMISSION-INVENTORY DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION: WORKSHOP SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emission inventories are an essential tool for evaluating, managing, and regulating air pollution. Refinements and innovations in instruments that measure air pollutants, models that calculate emissions as well as techniques for data management and uncertainty assessment are nee...

  2. Rh Incompatibility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant Heart Failure Hemolytic Anemia Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... baby's red blood cells. This can lead to hemolytic anemia (HEE-moh-lit-ick uh-NEE-me-uh) ...

  3. Athlete's Foot

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of tinea, athlete's foot. The Basics on Tinea Infections Tinea (pronounced: TIH-nee-uh) is the medical name ... or scalp, including athlete's foot, jock itch , and ringworm (despite its name, ringworm is not a worm). ...

  4. Validation Of DEM Data Dvied From World View 3 Stero Imagery For Low Elevation Majuro Atoll, Marchall Islands

    EPA Science Inventory

    The availability of surface elevation data for the Marshall Islands has been identified as a "massive" data gap for conducting vulnerability assessments and the subsequent development of climate change adaption strategies. Specifically, digital elevation model (DEM) data are nee...

  5. Relationship Between Ecosystem Productivity and Photosynthetically Active Radiation for Northern Peatlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frolking, S. E.; Bubier, J. L.; Moore, T. R.; Ball, T.; Bellisario, L. M.; Bhardwaj, A.; Carroll, P.; Crill, P. M.; Lafleur, P. M.; McCaughey, J. H.; Roulet, N. T.; Suyker, A. E.; Verma, S. B.; Waddington, J. M.; Whiting, G. J.

    1998-01-01

    We analyzed the relationship between net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide (NEE) and irradiance (as photosynthetic photon flux density or PPFD), using published and unpublished data that have been collected during midgrowing season for carbon balance studies at seven peatlands in North America and Europe, NEE measurements included both eddy-correlation tower and clear, static chamber methods, which gave very similar results. Data were analyzed by site, as aggregated data sets by peatland type (bog, poor fen, rich fen, and all fens) and as a single aggregated data set for all peatlands. In all cases, a fit with a rectangular hyperbola (NEE = alpha PPFD P(sub max)/(alpha PPFD + P(sub max) + R) better described the NEE-PPFD relationship than did a linear fit (NEE = beta PPFD + R). Poor and rich fens generally had similar NEE-PPFD relationships, while bogs had lower respiration rates (R = -2.0 micro mol m(exp -2) s(exp -1) for bogs and -2.7 micro mol m(exp -2) s(exp -1)) for fens) and lower NEE at moderate and high light levels (P(sub max)= 5.2 micro mol m(exp -2) s(exp -1) for bogs and 10.8 micro mol m(exp -2) s(exp -1) for fens). As a single class, northern peatlands had much smaller ecosystem respiration (R = -2.4 micro mol m(exp -2) s(exp -1)) and NEE rates (alpha = 0.020 and P(sub max)= 9.2 micro mol m(exp -2) s(exp -1)) than the upland ecosystems (closed canopy forest, grassland, and cropland). Despite this low productivity, northern peatland soil carbon pools are generally 5-50 times larger than upland ecosystems because of slow rates of decomposition caused by litter quality and anaerobic, cold soils.

  6. Hamiltonian structures of nonlinear evolution equations connected with a polynomial pencil

    SciTech Connect

    Gadzhiev, I.T.; Gerdzhikov, V.S.; Ivanov, M.I.

    1986-09-10

    For a generalized Zakharov-Shabat system in which the matrix potential is a polynomial in the spectral parameter a generating operator is constructed which makes it possible to compactly write out the nonlinear evolution equations (NEE) connected with the system. The eigenfunctions of the generating operator - the squares of solutions of the original system - are found. The Hamiltonian property of the NEE and the existence of a hierarchy of Hamiltonian structures are established.

  7. Hamiltonian structures of nonlinear evolution equations associated with a polynomial bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Gadzhiev, I.T.; Gerdzhikov, V.S.; Ivanov, M.I.

    1987-05-20

    For the generalized Zakharov-Shabat system with the matrix potential a polynomial in the spectral parameter, they construct a generating operator which leads to a compact representation of the nonlinear evolution equations (NEE) associated with the system. The eigenfunctions of the generating operator are obtained as the squares of the solutions of the original system. The Hamiltonian nature of the NEE and the existence of a hierarchy of Hamiltonian structures is established.

  8. Hamiltonian structures of nonlinear evolution equations connected with a polynomial pencil

    SciTech Connect

    Gadzhiev, I.T.; Gerdzhikov, V.S.; Ivanov, M.I.

    1986-09-01

    For a generalized Zakharov-Shabat system in which the matrix potential is a polynomial in the spectral parameter a generating operator is constructed which makes it possible to compactly write out the nonlinear evolution equations (NEE) connected with the system. The eigenfunctions of the generating operator - the ''squares'' of solutions of the original system - are found. The Hamiltonian property of the NEE and the existence of a hierachy of Hamiltonian structures are established.

  9. Latest results on charmed baryons. xi. /sup +//sub /ital c// and. cap omega. /sup 0//sub /ital c//

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, V. J.

    1989-04-25

    The observation of charmed-strange baryons ..xi../sup +//sub /ital c//(nee /ital A//sup +/)and ..cap omega../sup 0//sub /ital c// (nee T/sup 0/) at the Cern-SPS and Fermilab is discussed.Some questions about the production and decay of these particles are mentioned,and currently proposed experiments to address these questions are brieflypresented.

  10. Regional scaling of soil moisture dynamics on the semiarid grasslands of Mexico through remotely sensed vegetation indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrera-Hernandez, J. J.; Mata-Martinez, A.; Huber-Sannwald, E.; Arredondo, T.

    2014-12-01

    Soil moisture dynamics for both native (Bouteloa gracilis) and introduced (Eragrostis curvula) species within the semiarid grasslands in Mexico are analyzed. The semiarid grasslands of Mexico are part of the shortgrass steppe ecosystem, which extends from the North American midwest in the north to Llanos de Ojuelos in the south, where the study site is located. Soil moisture dynamics are measured on two homogeneous fields; one dominated by the native species (Bouteloa gracilis), and another with an introduced species (Eragrostis curvula) at three different depths with high temporal resolution along with standard climatological data. These data are related to measured Leaf Area Index (LAI) and spectra at 16 different wavelengths, both of which, in turn, are related to remotely sensed imagery through different vegetation indices (NDVI, SAVI, EVI and Modified Chlorophyll Absorption Ratio Index (MCARI)) for different sensors (LANDSAT, SPOT, Pleiades) at different growth stages. To date, the MCARI exhibits a larger correlation with LAI for all sensors and growing stages for both grass species (ongoing field work will provide additional data). Regionalization of soil moisture dynamics (i.e. recharge) will be done using a numerical model of the vadose zone that will be linked to the temporal variation of MCARI. Financial support by the Mexico's CONACYT (project CB 158370) and UNAM's PAPIIT program (project IA100613) is acknowledged.

  11. Diagnostic outcomes of inpatient video electroencephalography: nonepileptic events in South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Koontz, Elizabeth H; Hanson, Jarom; Pritchard, Paul B

    2013-09-01

    The Epilepsy Monitoring Unit (EMU) was established at the Medical University Hospital to assist in the diagnosis of epilepsy and the evaluation of other paroxysmal neurological symptoms, including non-epileptic events (NEEs), which are often confused with epileptic seizures. Correct diagnosis can prevent inappropriate treatment with antiepileptic drugs, avoid some of the restrictions imposed by epileptic seizures, and facilitate appropriate treatment for NEEs. A retrospective review of patients admitted to the EMU over a two year period showed the percentage of patients diagnosed with NEEs (39%) is greater than those diagnosed with epilepsy alone (36%). This incidence of NEE is higher than in other academic medical centers. The explanations for this disparity are not fully defined, but warrant further study as to patient demographics, risk factors, and referral patterns in South Carolina. The average time from when patients began having events to accurate diagnosis of NEEs was 4.5 years, and 21 patients had NEEs for at least 10 years prior to diagnosis. PMID:24261154

  12. Authentication of true cinnamon (Cinnamon verum) utilising direct analysis in real time (DART)-QToF-MS.

    PubMed

    Avula, Bharathi; Smillie, Troy J; Wang, Yan-Hong; Zweigenbaum, Jerry; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2015-01-01

    The use of cinnamon as a spice and flavouring agent is widespread throughout the world. Many different species of plants are commonly referred to as 'cinnamon'. 'True cinnamon' refers to the dried inner bark of Cinnamomum verum J. S. Presl (syn. C. zeylanicum) (Lauraceae). Other 'cinnamon' species, C. cassia (Nees & T. Nees) J. Presl (syn. C. aromaticum Nees) (Chinese cassia), C. loureiroi Nees (Saigon cassia), and C. burmannii (Nees & T. Nees) Blume (Indonesian cassia), commonly known as cassia, are also marketed as cinnamon. Since there is a prevalence of these various types of 'cinnamons' on the market, there is a need to develop a rapid technique that can readily differentiate between true cinnamon (C. verum) and other commonly marketed species. In the present study, coumarin and other marker compounds indicative of 'cinnamon' were analysed using DART-QToF-MS in various samples of cinnamon. This method involved the use of [M + H](+) ions in positive mode in addition to principal component analysis (PCA) using Mass Profiler Professional software to visualise several samples for quality and to discriminate 'true cinnamon' from other Cinnamomum species using the accurate mass capabilities of QToF-MS. PMID:25421162

  13. Regional Eddy Covariance Measurements of CO2 Exchange from a Tall Tower near Boulder, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, E. B.; Wolfe, D. E.; Blanken, P.

    2010-12-01

    Many researchers have been able to adequately describe net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) at small spatial scales from relatively short towers, but regional-scale NEE is still poorly understood, especially in regions with heterogeneous terrain, land cover, and land use. We are investigating the spatial and temporal variability in NEE across a range of land uses and covers at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) in Erie, CO. Continuous measurements of NEE, based on the eddy covariance method (at 300-m above ground) and CO2 concentration profiles (at 22, 100, and 300-m) together with ancillary meteorological data, have been made since February 2010. The surrounding landscape within the turbulent flux footprint of the tower was separated into six major categories based on LandSat 5 TM imagery: fallow fields, crops, roads, water, mountainous regions, and residential areas. Preliminary results indicate slightly positive NEE (net CO2 release) from late February through June of 2010. The site experiences prevailing westerly winds, and storage flux accounts for approximately 1% of NEE. The results of this study have implications for the assessment of top-down regional carbon models and increased understanding of regional-scale carbon dynamics.

  14. The full annual carbon balance of Eurasian boreal forests is highly sensitive to precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öquist, Mats; Bishop, Kevin; Grelle, Achim; Klemedtsson, Leif; Köhler, Stephan; Laudon, Hjalmar; Lindroth, Anders; Ottosson Löfvenius, Mikaell; Wallin, Marcus; Nilsson, Mats

    2013-04-01

    Boreal forest biomes are identified as one of the major sinks for anthropogenic atmospheric CO2 and are also predicted to be particularly sensitive to climate change. Recent advances in understanding the carbon balance of these biomes stems mainly from eddy-covariance measurements of the net ecosystem exchange (NEE). However, NEE includes only the vertical CO2 exchange driven by photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration. A full net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB) also requires inclusion of lateral carbon export (LCE) through catchment discharge. Currently LCE is often regarded as negligible for the NECB of boreal forest ecosystems of the northern hemisphere, commonly corresponding to ~5% of annual NEE. Here we use long term (13 year) data showing that annual LCE and NEE are strongly correlated (p=0.003); years with low C sequestration by the forest coincide with years when lateral C loss is high. The fraction of NEE lost annually through LCE varied markedly from <3% to ca. 25%. Deviation in annual precipitation from the 28-year average (1980-2008) explained 90% of the variation observed in the fraction of C lost annually by LCE. The relationship suggests that an increase in annual precipitation of 10-20% in the boreal region would approximately double the fraction of NEE lost annually from the terrestrial system to surface waters. The correlation between NEE and LCE arises because the annual precipitation is correlated with both NEE (p<0.004) and LCE (p<0.001). Both these strong correlations contribute to an overall correlation between annual NECB and precipitation. The likely mechanism behind decreased NEE in response to increasing precipitation is a reduction in incoming solar radiation caused by clouds. The dual effect of precipitation implies that both the observed and the predicted increases in annual precipitation at high latitudes may reduce NECB in boreal forest ecosystems. Based on regional scaling of hydrological discharge and observed spatio

  15. Effects of biased CO2 flux measurements by open-path sensors on the interpretation of CO2 flux dynamics at contrasting ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helbig, Manuel; Humphreys, Elyn; Bogoev, Ivan; Quinton, William L.; Wischnweski, Karoline; Sonnentag, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    Long-term measurements of net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) are conducted across a global network of flux tower sites. These sites are characterised by varying climatic and vegetation conditions, but also differ in the type of CO2/H2O gas analyser used to obtain NEE. Several studies have observed a systematic bias in measured NEE when comparing open-path (OP) and closed-path (CP) sensors with consistently more negative daytime NEE measurements when using OP sensors, both during the growing and non-growing season. A surface heating correction has been proposed in the literature, but seems not to be universally applicable. Systematic biases in NEE measurements are particularly problematic for synthesis papers and inter-comparison studies between sites where the 'true' NEE is small compared to the potential instrument bias. For example, NEE estimates for boreal forest sites derived from OP sensors show large, ecologically unreasonable winter CO2 uptake. To better understand the causes and the magnitude of this potential bias, we conducted a sensor inter-comparison study at the Mer Bleue peatland near Ottawa, ON, Canada. An eddy covariance system with a CP (LI7000 & GILL R3-50) and an OP sensor (EC150 & CSAT3A) was used. Measurements were made between September 2012 and January 2013 and covered late summer, fall, and winter conditions. Flux calculations were made as consistently as possible to minimise differences due to differing processing procedures (e.g. spectral corrections). The latent (LE, slope of orthogonal linear regression of LEOP on LECP: 1.02 ± 0.01 & intercept: -0.2 ± 0.6 W m-2 and sensible heat fluxes (H, slope of HCSAT3A on HGILL: 0.96 ± 0.01 & intercept: 0.1 ± 0.03 W m-2) did not show any significant bias. However, a significant bias was apparent in the NEE measurements (slope of NEEOP on NEECP: 1.36 ± 0.02 & intercept: -0.1 ± 0.05). The differences between NEEOP and NEECP were linearly related to the magnitude of HCSAT3A with a slope of -0

  16. Cropland carbon fluxes in the United States: increasing geospatial resolution of inventory-based carbon accounting.

    PubMed

    West, Tristram O; Brandt, Craig C; Baskaran, Latha M; Hellwinckel, Chad M; Mueller, Richard; Bernacchi, Carl J; Bandaru, Varaprasad; Yang, Bai; Wilson, Bradly S; Marland, Gregg; Nelson, Richard G; De la Torre Ugarte, Daniel G; Post, Wilfred M

    2010-06-01

    Net annual soil carbon change, fossil fuel emissions from cropland production, and cropland net primary production were estimated and spatially distributed using land cover defined by NASA's moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) and by the USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) cropland data layer (CDL). Spatially resolved estimates of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and net ecosystem carbon balance (NECB) were developed. The purpose of generating spatial estimates of carbon fluxes, and the primary objective of this research, was to develop a method of carbon accounting that is consistent from field to national scales. NEE represents net on-site vertical fluxes of carbon. NECB represents all on-site and off-site carbon fluxes associated with crop production. Estimates of cropland NEE using moderate resolution (approximately 1 km2) land cover data were generated for the conterminous United States and compared with higher resolution (30-m) estimates of NEE and with direct measurements of CO2 flux from croplands in Illinois and Nebraska, USA. Estimates of NEE using the CDL (30-m resolution) had a higher correlation with eddy covariance flux tower estimates compared with estimates of NEE using MODIS. Estimates of NECB are primarily driven by net soil carbon change, fossil fuel emissions associated with crop production, and CO2 emissions from the application of agricultural lime. NEE and NECB for U.S. croplands were -274 and 7 Tg C/yr for 2004, respectively. Use of moderate- to high-resolution satellite-based land cover data enables improved estimates of cropland carbon dynamics. PMID:20597291

  17. Drivers of long-term variability in CO2 net ecosystem exchange in a temperate peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfter, C.; Campbell, C.; Dinsmore, K. J.; Drewer, J.; Coyle, M.; Anderson, M.; Skiba, U.; Nemitz, E.; Billett, M. F.; Sutton, M. A.

    2015-03-01

    Land-atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) in peatlands exhibits marked seasonal and inter-annual variability, which subsequently affects the carbon (C) sink strength of catchments across multiple temporal scales. Long-term studies are needed to fully capture the natural variability and therefore identify the key hydrometeorological drivers in the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2. Since 2002, NEE has been measured continuously by eddy-covariance at Auchencorth Moss, a temperate lowland peatland in central Scotland. Hence this is one of the longest peatland NEE studies to date. For 11 years, the site was a consistent, yet variable, atmospheric CO2 sink ranging from -5.2 to -135.9 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1 (mean of -64.1 ± 33.6 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1). Inter-annual variability in NEE was positively correlated to the length of the growing season. Mean winter air temperature explained 87% of the inter-annual variability in the sink strength of the following summer, indicating an effect of winter climate on local phenology. Ecosystem respiration (Reco) was enhanced by drought, which also depressed gross primary productivity (GPP). The CO2 uptake rate during the growing season was comparable to three other sites with long-term NEE records; however, the emission rate during the dormant season was significantly higher. To summarise, the NEE of the peatland studied is modulated by two dominant factors: - phenology of the plant community, which is driven by winter air temperature and impacts photosynthetic potential and net CO2 uptake during the growing season (colder winters are linked to lower summer NEE), - water table level, which enhanced soil respiration and decreased GPP during dry spells. Although summer dry spells were sporadic during the study period, the positive effects of the current climatic trend towards milder winters on the site's CO2 sink strength could be offset by changes in precipitation patterns especially during the growing season.

  18. Variability in net ecosystem exchange from hourly to inter-annual time scales at adjacent pine and hardwood forests: a wavelet analysis.

    PubMed

    Stoy, Paul C; Katul, Gabriel G; Siqueira, Mario B S; Juang, Jehn-Yih; McCarthy, Heather R; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Oishi, A Christopher; Oren, Ram

    2005-07-01

    Orthonormal wavelet transformation (OWT) is a computationally efficient technique for quantifying underlying frequencies in nonstationary and gap-infested time series, such as eddy-covariance-measured net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE). We employed OWT to analyze the frequency characteristics of synchronously measured and modeled NEE at adjacent pine (PP) and hardwood (HW) ecosystems. Wavelet cospectral analysis showed that NEE at PP was more correlated to light and vapor pressure deficit at the daily time scale, and NEE at HW was more correlated to leaf area index (LAI) and temperature, especially soil temperature, at seasonal time scales. Models were required to disentangle the impacts of environmental drivers on the components of NEE, ecosystem carbon assimilation (Ac) and ecosystem respiration (RE). Sensitivity analyses revealed that using air temperature rather than soil temperature in RE models improved the modeled wavelet spectral frequency response on time scales longer than 1 day at both ecosystems. Including LAI improved RE model fit on seasonal time scales at HW, and incorporating parameter variability improved the RE model response at annual time scales at both ecosystems. Resolving variability in canopy conductance, rather than leaf-internal CO2, was more important for modeling Ac at both ecosystems. The PP ecosystem was more sensitive to hydrologic variables that regulate canopy conductance: vapor pressure deficit on weekly time scales and soil moisture on seasonal to interannual time scales. The HW ecosystem was sensitive to water limitation on weekly time scales. A combination of intrinsic drought sensitivity and non-conservative water use at PP was the basis for this response. At both ecosystems, incorporating variability in LAI was required for an accurate spectral representation of modeled NEE. However, nonlinearities imposed by canopy light attenuation were of little importance to spectral fit. The OWT revealed similarities and differences in

  19. Inescapable variation - effects of a non-homogeneous flux tower footprint on diurnal and seasonal carbon fluxes in a temperate forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Stefan K.; Griebel, Anne; Bennett, Lauren T.

    2015-04-01

    A homogenous flux tower footprint is an underpinning assumption of the eddy covariance method, typically requiring even terrain and uniform vegetation structure and species composition. However, large tracts of uniform native forests are rare in south-eastern Australia, where variable topography is confounded by local-scale variations in disturbance history (harvesting, prescribed fire, and wildfire). From 2010 to 2014, the Wombat Forest Flux site in central Victoria (south-eastern Australia) was a strong carbon sink compared with other flux sites in Australia, but net ecosystem exchange (NEE) varied widely (e.g. 2013: NEE~4 t C ha-1yr-1, 2012: NEE~12 t C ha-1yr-1), and was not clearly associated with inter-annual climatic variation only. Concomitantly, intra-annual variation was greater in 2014 than 2013, and was highly correlated with air temperature, which also varied with wind direction. We examined the implications of a non-homogenous flux tower footprint on diurnal and seasonal variation in NEE. The approach included characterisation of the variation in topography and forest structure in each of four directional sectors, and analysis of diurnal and seasonal variability in carbon fluxes and associated weather with wind direction. Our results indicate that the S/SE footprint sector (lower relative stem densities, more recent harvesting disturbance) was a seasonally-persistent strong sink (particularly in summer and autumn), while the N/NE sector (higher relative stem densities with numerous resprouts, no recent harvesting or thinning) was a weaker sink. Lower annual NEE in 2013 coincided with predominantly northerly winds, and greater annual NEE in 2014 with a predominance of southerly/south-easterly winds. Our data demonstrate that seasonal and annual variations in main wind directions and therefore also flux tower footprint can have significant implications on the magnitude of seasonal and annual estimates of NEE from flux towers.

  20. Benchmarking the seasonal cycle of CO2 fluxes simulated by terrestrial ecosystem models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shushi; Ciais, Philippe; Chevallier, Frédéric; Peylin, Philippe; Cadule, Patricia; Sitch, Stephen; Piao, Shilong; Ahlström, Anders; Huntingford, Chris; Levy, Peter; Li, Xiran; Liu, Yongwen; Lomas, Mark; Poulter, Benjamin; Viovy, Nicolas; Wang, Tao; Wang, Xuhui; Zaehle, Sönke; Zeng, Ning; Zhao, Fang; Zhao, Hongfang

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the seasonality of CO2 fluxes simulated by nine terrestrial ecosystem models of the TRENDY project against (1) the seasonal cycle of gross primary production (GPP) and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) measured at flux tower sites over different biomes, (2) gridded monthly Model Tree Ensembles-estimated GPP (MTE-GPP) and MTE-NEE obtained by interpolating many flux tower measurements with a machine-learning algorithm, (3) atmospheric CO2 mole fraction measurements at surface sites, and (4) CO2 total columns (XCO2) measurements from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). For comparison with atmospheric CO2 measurements, the LMDZ4 transport model was run with time-varying CO2 fluxes of each model as surface boundary conditions. Seven out of the nine models overestimate the seasonal amplitude of GPP and produce a too early start in spring at most flux sites. Despite their positive bias for GPP, the nine models underestimate NEE at most flux sites and in the Northern Hemisphere compared with MTE-NEE. Comparison with surface atmospheric CO2 measurements confirms that most models underestimate the seasonal amplitude of NEE in the Northern Hemisphere (except CLM4C and SDGVM). Comparison with TCCON data also shows that the seasonal amplitude of XCO2 is underestimated by more than 10% for seven out of the nine models (except for CLM4C and SDGVM) and that the MTE-NEE product is closer to the TCCON data using LMDZ4. From CO2 columns measured routinely at 10 TCCON sites, the constrained amplitude of NEE over the Northern Hemisphere is of 1.6 ± 0.4 gC m-2 d-1, which translates into a net CO2 uptake during the carbon uptake period in the Northern Hemisphere of 7.9 ± 2.0 PgC yr-1.

  1. Tracking CO2 flux: Seasonal Patterns, Net Ecosystem Exchange and Site Comparisons of Environmental Variables at a Boreal Peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, G.; Bubier, J. L.

    2001-05-01

    Peatlands play a significant role in the global carbon cycle sequestering approximately one-third of the global pool of soil carbon. An increased understanding of the carbon cycle in these critical ecosystems is imperative to further our comprehension of the role they play in future global warming. Net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of carbon dioxide was measured at Mer Bleue Bog in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada from May through August 2000. Dominant species at Mer Bleue included Ledum groenlandicum, Chamaedaphne calyculata, Eriophorum vaginatum, Carex oligosperma and Sphagnum species. In order to understand the controls and variability of NEE a range of sites were considered, including a beaver pond, a bog and a poor fen. This study aimed at comparing overall seasonal patterns and ranges of NEE, photosynthesis and respiration and understanding the relationships with photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), water table, temperature, species composition and plant biomass. A clear lexan and teflon film climate-controlled chamber was used to measure the rate of respiration and photosynthesis on a bi-weekly basis in all sites. The chamber was attached to a LI-COR 6200 portable photosynthesis system, which included a LI-6250 infrared gas analyzer, quantum sensor and data logger. Shrouds of different mesh sizes were used to regulate the amount of light entering the chamber in order to measure NEE at a wide range of PAR. An opaque shroud was used to measure ecosystem respiration. Photosynthesis was calculated as the difference between NEE and respiration. Seasonal patterns showed a peak season from June 23rd through July 15th where higher PAR and temperature levels led to increased photosynthesis and respiration measurements. Although NEE rates at the sites varied, during peak season NEE ranged in increasing order: bog hummock and hollow (6 to -6.5 μ mol CO2 m{-2} s{-1}) < beaver pond (6 to -7 μ mol CO2 m{-2} s{-1}) < poor fen (10 to -8 μ mol CO2 m{-2}s {-1}).

  2. A Conceptual model of Ecophysiological Function across the Amazon Basin using a Synthesis of Observed and Model Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, I. T.; Denning, A. S.; Harper, A. B.

    2008-12-01

    Observations of the seasonal cycle of Net Ecosystem Exchange of Carbon (NEE) are variable across the Amazon Basin. NEE has been observed to be nearly uniform through the year at sites such as Cueiras Reserve in Amazonas. A pattern of efflux during the wet season and uptake during seasonal drought has been observed at multiple sites in the Tapajos River National Forest, while the opposite pattern (uptake during wet season, efflux during seasonal drought) has been observed at several sites in Mato Grosso . Using a synthesis of eddy covariance flux observations from multiple sites across vegetation and moisture gradients in the Amazon basin and a biophysical model (Simple Biosphere Model, SiB), we construct a conceptual model of the patterns of ecophysiological function that determine annual cycles and interannual variability in observed NEE across tropical Amazonia. We identify several factors that determine the behavior of Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and respiration fluxes, while NEE is determined by their sum. We evaluate our conceptual model across a pseudo-latitudinal gradient from extremely wet (more than 2000 mm annual precipitation) in the north to drier cerrado (savanna) regions in the south. In the extremely wet regions near the equator we find little or no stress on photosynthesis and, subsequently, little or no variability in annual cycles of energy or carbon flux. In these regions NEE is determined by vegetation response to high-frequency meteorological events. As precipitation decreases, the flux seasonality increases and phase relationships between GPP and respiration determine annual NEE cycles. As GPP/respiration cycles transition from an out-of-phase relationship in wetter regions to an in-phase pattern in the cerrado, NEE changes from dry to wet season carbon uptake.

  3. Reducing uncertainty in model estimates of North American polar net ecosystem exchange by including remote sensing observations of snow cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luus, K. A.; Lin, J. C.; Kelly, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    Uncertainty exists in high-latitude estimates of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) due to a variety of factors such as a limited number of high-latitude eddy covariance stations, and challenges in remote sensing of polar CO2 concentrations and land surface properties. Furthermore, although in situ studies have indicated that a substantial portion of annual NEE in polar regions occurs during the snow season, and that the timing and magnitude of photosynthesis and subnivean respiration are influenced by snow cover, previous estimates of NEE have not explicitly represented snow properties. The objective of this study was to examine the uncertainty in simulated estimates of NEE from the Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM) by contrasting values generated with, versus without, an explicit representation of snow cover. VPRM is a biospheric carbon flux model that generates high resolution estimates of NEE from remote sensing observations of temperature, shortwave radiation and a vegetation index (NDVI) using a simple mathematical structure with only four parameters per vegetation class. In the standard VPRM formulation, photosynthesis is limited during the cold season by low air temperatures, diminished shortwave radiation and low NDVI values. Respiration is assumed to be constant below a threshold air temperature and is otherwise calculated as a linear function of air temperature. In this study, MODIS observations of fractional snow cover were incorporated into VPRM in order to represent the influence of snow cover on suppressing photosynthetic uptake by vegetation and allowing subnivean respiration to persist at cold air temperatures by insulating the soil from heat loss. Photosynthesis was first calculated using the standard VPRM formulation, and the rate of photosynthesis was then reduced according to the fractional snow cover such that the rate of photosynthesis on an 80% snow covered pixel would be reduced by 80%. When a pixel's snow cover area was

  4. Carbon exchange between the atmosphere and subtropical forested cypress and pine wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, W. B.; Anderson, F.; Barr, J. G.; Graham, S. L.; Botkin, D. B.

    2015-04-01

    Carbon dioxide exchange between the atmosphere and forested subtropical wetlands is largely unknown. Here we report a first step in characterizing this atmospheric-ecosystem carbon (C) exchange, for cypress strands and pine forests in the Greater Everglades of Florida as measured with eddy covariance methods at three locations (Cypress Swamp, Dwarf Cypress and Pine Upland) for 2 years. Links between water and C cycles are also examined at these three sites, as are methane emission measured only at the Dwarf Cypress site. Each forested wetland showed net C uptake from the atmosphere both monthly and annually, as indicated by the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of carbon dioxide (CO2). For this study, NEE is the difference between photosynthesis and respiration, with negative values representing uptake from the atmosphere that is retained in the ecosystem or transported laterally via overland flow (unmeasured for this study). Atmospheric C uptake (NEE) was greatest at the Cypress Swampp (-900 to -1000 g C m2 yr-1), moderate at the Pine Upland (-650 to -700 g C m2 yr-1) and least at the Dwarf Cypress (-400 to -450 g C m2 yr-1). Changes in NEE were clearly a function of seasonality in solar insolation, air temperature and flooding, which suppressed heterotrophic soil respiration. We also note that changes in the satellite-derived enhanced vegetation index (EVI) served as a useful surrogate for changes in NEE at these forested wetland sites.

  5. Ecosystem carbon exchange in response to locust outbreaks in a temperate steppe.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Wu, Dandan; Shao, Pengshuai; Hui, Dafeng; Wan, Shiqiang

    2015-06-01

    It is predicted that locust outbreaks will occur more frequently under future climate change scenarios, with consequent effects on ecological goods and services. A field manipulative experiment was conducted to examine the responses of gross ecosystem productivity (GEP), net ecosystem carbon dioxide (CO2) exchange (NEE), ecosystem respiration (ER), and soil respiration (SR) to locust outbreaks in a temperate steppe of northern China from 2010 to 2011. Two processes related to locust outbreaks, natural locust feeding and carcass deposition, were mimicked by clipping 80 % of aboveground biomass and adding locust carcasses, respectively. Ecosystem carbon (C) exchange (i.e., GEP, NEE, ER, and SR) was suppressed by locust feeding in 2010, but stimulated by locust carcass deposition in both years (except SR in 2011). Experimental locust outbreaks (i.e., clipping plus locust carcass addition) decreased GEP and NEE in 2010 whereas they increased GEP, NEE, and ER in 2011, leading to neutral changes in GEP, NEE, and SR across the 2 years. The responses of ecosystem C exchange could have been due to the changes in soil ammonium nitrogen, community cover, and aboveground net primary productivity. Our findings of the transient and neutral changes in ecosystem C cycling under locust outbreaks highlight the importance of resistance, resilience, and stability of the temperate steppe in maintaining reliable ecosystem services, and facilitate the projections of ecosystem functioning in response to natural disturbance and climate change. PMID:25663332

  6. Differential responses of net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide to light and temperature between spring and neap tides in subtropical mangrove forests.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Lu, Weizhi; Chen, Hui; Luo, Yiqi; Lin, Guanghui

    2014-01-01

    The eddy flux data with field records of tidal water inundation depths of the year 2010 from two mangroves forests in southern China were analyzed to investigate the tidal effect on mangrove carbon cycle. We compared the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and its responses to light and temperature, respectively, between spring tide and neap tide inundation periods. For the most time of the year 2010, higher daytime NEE values were found during spring tides than during neap tides at both study sites. Regression analysis of daytime NEE to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) using the Landsberg model showed increased sensitivity of NEE to PAR with higher maximum photosynthetic rate during spring tides than neap tides. In contrast, the light compensation points acquired from the regression function of the Landsberg model were smaller during spring tides than neap tides in most months. The dependence of nighttime NEE on soil temperature was lower under spring tide than under neap tides. All these results above indicated that ecosystem carbon uptake rates of mangrove forests were strengthened, while ecosystem respirations were inhibited during spring tides in comparison with those during neap tides, which needs to be considered in modeling mangrove ecosystem carbon cycle under future sea level rise scenarios. PMID:25133267

  7. Estimating carbon dioxide fluxes from temperate mountain grasslands using broad-band vegetation indices

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Pilloni, S.; Hörtnagl, L.; Hammerle, A.

    2013-01-01

    The broad-band normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the simple ratio (SR) were calculated from measurements of reflectance of photosynthetically active and short-wave radiation at two temperate mountain grasslands in Austria and related to the net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) measured concurrently by means of the eddy covariance method. There was no significant statistical difference between the relationships of midday mean NEE with narrow- and broad-band NDVI and SR, measured during and calculated for that same time window, respectively. The skill of broad-band NDVI and SR in predicting CO2 fluxes was higher for metrics dominated by gross photosynthesis and lowest for ecosystem respiration, with NEE in between. A method based on a simple light response model whose parameters were parameterised based on broad-band NDVI allowed to improve predictions of daily NEE and is suggested to hold promise for filling gaps in the NEE time series. Relationships of CO2 flux metrics with broad-band NDVI and SR however generally differed between the two studied grassland sites indicting an influence of additional factors not yet accounted for. PMID:24339832

  8. Carbon exchange between the atmosphere and subtropical forested cypress and pine wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shoemaker, W. Barclay; Anderson, Frank E.; Barr, Jordan G.; Graham, Scott L.; Botkin, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide exchange between the atmosphere and forested subtropical wetlands is largely unknown. Here we report a first step in characterizing this atmospheric–ecosystem carbon (C) exchange, for cypress strands and pine forests in the Greater Everglades of Florida as measured with eddy covariance methods at three locations (Cypress Swamp, Dwarf Cypress and Pine Upland) for 2 years. Links between water and C cycles are also examined at these three sites, as are methane emission measured only at the Dwarf Cypress site. Each forested wetland showed net C uptake from the atmosphere both monthly and annually, as indicated by the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of carbon dioxide (CO2). For this study, NEE is the difference between photosynthesis and respiration, with negative values representing uptake from the atmosphere that is retained in the ecosystem or transported laterally via overland flow (unmeasured for this study). Atmospheric C uptake (NEE) was greatest at the Cypress Swampp (−900 to −1000 g C m2 yr−1), moderate at the Pine Upland (−650 to −700 g C m2 yr−1) and least at the Dwarf Cypress (−400 to −450 g C m2 yr−1). Changes in NEE were clearly a function of seasonality in solar insolation, air temperature and flooding, which suppressed heterotrophic soil respiration. We also note that changes in the satellite-derived enhanced vegetation index (EVI) served as a useful surrogate for changes in NEE at these forested wetland sites.

  9. Theory and experiments for voltammetric and SECM investigations and application to ORR electrocatalysis at nanoelectrode ensembles of ultramicroelectrode dimensions.

    PubMed

    Fernández, José L; Wijesinghe, Manjula; Zoski, Cynthia G

    2015-01-20

    Theoretical and experimental approaches to characterizing nanoelectrode (NE) ensembles of ultramicroelectrode dimensions (UME-NEEs) as a function of fraction of active area and random NE distribution are described. UME-NEEs were fabricated by addressing microregions of a gold-filled polycarbonate membrane through the UMEs of an underlying microfabricated addressable array. Results of Comsol Multiphysics 3D simulations based on randomly spaced NEs of 15 nm radius on a UME disk geometry of radii up to 5 μm are shown for steady-state voltammetry (SSV) and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) experiments. Analytical equations were developed to describe the diffusion-limited steady-state current and steady-state voltammogram at an UME-NEE. These equations are shown to be in good agreement with the simulations and enabled evaluation of experimental SSVs. Comparison of experimental and simulated SECM approach curves, images, and tip voltammograms enabled the fraction of active area and distribution of NEs to be visualized and determined for individual UME-NEEs. Gold UME-NEEs are shown to be unique platforms for electrodeposition in forming nanoparticle electrodes (UME-NPEs). Electrocatalysis results for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on Pt UME-NPEs in 0.1 M H2SO4 are also shown. PMID:25495486

  10. Differential Responses of Net Ecosystem Exchange of Carbon Dioxide to Light and Temperature between Spring and Neap Tides in Subtropical Mangrove Forests

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing; Lu, Weizhi; Chen, Hui; Luo, Yiqi; Lin, Guanghui

    2014-01-01

    The eddy flux data with field records of tidal water inundation depths of the year 2010 from two mangroves forests in southern China were analyzed to investigate the tidal effect on mangrove carbon cycle. We compared the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and its responses to light and temperature, respectively, between spring tide and neap tide inundation periods. For the most time of the year 2010, higher daytime NEE values were found during spring tides than during neap tides at both study sites. Regression analysis of daytime NEE to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) using the Landsberg model showed increased sensitivity of NEE to PAR with higher maximum photosynthetic rate during spring tides than neap tides. In contrast, the light compensation points acquired from the regression function of the Landsberg model were smaller during spring tides than neap tides in most months. The dependence of nighttime NEE on soil temperature was lower under spring tide than under neap tides. All these results above indicated that ecosystem carbon uptake rates of mangrove forests were strengthened, while ecosystem respirations were inhibited during spring tides in comparison with those during neap tides, which needs to be considered in modeling mangrove ecosystem carbon cycle under future sea level rise scenarios. PMID:25133267

  11. Growing season net ecosystem CO2 exchange of two desert ecosystems with alkaline soils in Kazakhstan

    PubMed Central

    Li, Longhui; Chen, Xi; van der Tol, Christiaan; Luo, Geping; Su, Zhongbo

    2014-01-01

    Central Asia is covered by vast desert ecosystems, and the majority of these ecosystems have alkaline soils. Their contribution to global net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) is of significance simply because of their immense spatial extent. Some of the latest research reported considerable abiotic CO2 absorption by alkaline soil, but the rate of CO2 absorption has been questioned by peer communities. To investigate the issue of carbon cycle in Central Asian desert ecosystems with alkaline soils, we have measured the NEE using eddy covariance (EC) method at two alkaline sites during growing season in Kazakhstan. The diurnal course of mean monthly NEE followed a clear sinusoidal pattern during growing season at both sites. Both sites showed significant net carbon uptake during daytime on sunny days with high photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) but net carbon loss at nighttime and on cloudy and rainy days. NEE has strong dependency on PAR and the response of NEE to precipitation resulted in an initial and significant carbon release to the atmosphere, similar to other ecosystems. These findings indicate that biotic processes dominated the carbon processes, and the contribution of abiotic carbon process to net ecosystem CO2 exchange may be trivial in alkaline soil desert ecosystems over Central Asia. PMID:24455157

  12. Studies on Kochiae Fructus. V. Antipruritic effects of oleanolic acid glycosides and the structure-requirement.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, H; Dai, Y; Ido, Y; Murakami, T; Matsuda, H; Yoshikawa, M; Kubo, M

    1998-11-01

    We examined the antipruritic effects of various oleanolic acid glycosides from natural medicines such as Kochiae Fructus (the fruit of Kochia scoparia SCHRAD.) and Momordicae Radix (the roots of Momordica cochinchinensis SPRENG.) using a compound 48/80-induced pruritic model in mice. Oleanolic acid 3-O-monodesmosides showed an antipruritic effect, while oleanolic acid 3,28-O-bisdesmosides and their common sapogenol oleanolic acid lacked the activity. This evidence indicated that the 3-O-glycoside moiety and the 28-carboxyl group in oleanolic acid glycosides were essential for exhibiting the antipruritic effect. Furthermore, it was found that the 3-O-glucuronides showed more potent activity than the corresponding 3-O-glucosides. PMID:9853421

  13. Wall Analyses of Lophocolea Seta Cells (Bryophyta) Before and After Elongation 1

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Robert J.

    1977-01-01

    Lophocolea heterophylla (Schrad.) Dum. (a leafy liverwort) produces sporophytes with seta cells that elongate 50-fold in 3 to 4 days. Wall components of these cells have been characterized by microscopic histochemistry, colorimetry, and gas chromatography of neutral sugars. Seta cell walls are qualitatively similar to primary cell walls of higher plants. The pectic fraction, however, responds differently to standard histochemical staining and extraction. Quantitatively, mannose, fucose, and rhamnose are in higher percentage, and arabinose and xylose are lower than typically found in vascular plants. Hexuronic acids increase on a percentage basis during elongation; pentoses decrease slightly, while hexose levels remain about the same. Increase in total wall carbohydrate after 2,400% elongation of setae was 1.8-fold. Images PMID:16659846

  14. Morpho-histological studies in the aromatic species of Chenopodium from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Bonzani, N E; Barboza, G E; Bugatti, M A; Ariza Espinar, L

    2003-04-01

    A morpho-histological study of the vegetative organs (stem and leaf) of the aromatic species of Chenopodium L. from Argentina [C. ambrosioides L., C. burkartii (Aellen) Vorosch., C. carinatum R. Br., C. chilense Schrad., C. graveolens Willd. var. bangii (Murr) Aellen, C. haumanii Ulbr., C. multifidum L., C. oblanceolatum (Speg.) Giusti, C. pumilio R. Br., C. retusum (Moq.) Moq., and C. venturii (Aellen) Cabrera] was carried out. Classifications for the glandular and non-glandular trichomes are established and their presence among species is presented. A variant in both the dorsiventral and isobilateral mesophyll is reported; some data are valuable for systematic purposes and for the identification of dried and smashed material used as vegetal drug. PMID:12727484

  15. Responses of ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange to nitrogen addition in a freshwater marshland in Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lihua; Song, Changchun; Nkrumah, Philip N

    2013-09-01

    It has widely been documented that nitrogen (N) stimulates plant growth and net primary production. But how N affects net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) is still dispute. We conduct an experimental study to assess the response of NEE to N addition in a freshwater marsh. Experimental treatments involved elevated N and control treatments on triplicate 1 m(2) plots. Gas exchange, air temperature, plant biomass and leaf area as well as N% of leaf were measured from 2004 to 2005. The results indicated that N addition initially decreased the CO2 sequestration but the trend changed in the second year. It was concluded that N addition enhanced the greenhouse effect in marshland as far as global warming potential (GWP) is concerned. This increase was attributed to a substantial increase in CH4 and N2O emissions after N addition. We recommended long-term studies to further clarify the effect of N addition on NEE. PMID:23727568

  16. An annotated catalogue of the Iranian Euphorinae, Gnamptodontinae, Helconinae, Hormiinae and Rhysipolinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    PubMed

    Gadallah, Neveen S; Ghahari, Hassan; Achterberg, Kees Van

    2016-01-01

    The Iranian species diversity of five braconid subfamilies, Euphorinae (54 species in 16 genera and 8 tribes), Gnamptodontinae (4 species in 1 genus and 1 tribe), Helconinae (9 species in 5 genera and 2 tribes), Hormiinae (8 species in 4 genera and 2 tribe) and Rhysipolinae (3 species in 2 genera) are summarized in this catalogue. A faunistic list is given comprising both local and global distribution of each species under study as well as host records. In the present study ten new records are added to the Iranian fauna: Centistes (Ancylocentrus) ater (Nees), Centistes cuspidatus (Haliday), Meteorus affinis (Wesmael), Meteorus rufus (DeGeer), Microctonus brevicollis (Haliday), Microctonus falciger Ruthe, Peristenus nitidus (Curtis) (Euphorinae), Aspicolpus carinator (Nees), Diospilus capito (Nees) and Diospilus productus Marshall (Helconinae s.l.). Euphorus pseudomitis Hedwig, 1957 is transferred to the subfamily Hormiinae and Hormisca pseudomitis (Hedwig, 1957) is a new combination. PMID:27395908

  17. CO2 Flux Measurement Uncertainty Estimates for NACP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, A.; Hollinger, D.; Richardson, A. D.

    2009-12-01

    We evaluated the uncertainties in eddy-covariance net ecosystem exchange NEE, total ecosystem respiration RE and gross primary production GPP associated with (a) random measurement error and (b) uncertainties in the u* (friction velocity) threshold u*Th for all site-years in the NACP site-level synthesis. The analyses required automated evaluation of the u*Th filter used to identify and reject bad NEE measurements during low-turbulence periods at night. The u*Th detection algorithm was adapted from Papale et al. (2006), modified to use a standard change-point detection algorithm. Uncertainty in the u*Th was estimated by bootstrapping, conducted annually with 1,000 draws per site-year, then pooling all years and calculating the lower and upper 95% confidence intervals from the median and 2.5 and 97.5 percentiles of the pooled u*Th values. Random uncertainties in NEE, RE and GPP were estimated following Richardson et al. (2007). The NEE random uncertainty characteristic curve, which characterizes random uncertainty in NEE as a function of NEE, was estimated for each site-year based on the differences between the measured data and the output of a simple and robust gap-filling model. The estimation procedure began with synthetic NEE data generated by the gap-filling model, introduced gaps (as in the measured data after u*Th filtering), added synthetic noise (defined by the NEE random uncertainty characteristic curve using a Monte-Carlo approach), then filled the gaps in the noisy, gappy synthetic data. The process was repeated 1,000 times for each site-year, and the random uncertainty was estimated from median and the 2.5 and 97.5 percentiles of the gap-filled data. The uncertainties in NEE, RE and GPP associated with uncertainties in the u*Th were evaluated by running the gap-filling routine at 1,000 u*Th values, drawn randomly from the pooled annual bootstrapping estimates. This produced 1,000 realizations of the gap-filled NEE, RE and GPP time series. The

  18. Using the Minnesota Multiphasic Inventory 2, EEGs, and clinical data to predict nonepileptic events.

    PubMed

    Schramke, Carol J; Valeri, April; Valeriano, James P; Kelly, Kevin M

    2007-11-01

    Minnesota Multiphasic Inventory 2 (MMPI-2) scale 3, duration of illness, and routine EEGs have been used to predict nonepileptic events (NEEs) with a high degree of accuracy in patients referred for video/EEG (vEEG) monitoring. This study tested the Storzbach logistic regression equation in our patients with definitive epileptic seizures (n=57) or NEEs without evidence of epileptiform activity (n=51) during vEEG monitoring, yielding an overall classification accuracy of 81%, sensitivity of 80%, and specificity of 81%. This study also replicated previous findings of significant group differences in duration (years) of spells, number of elevations on the MMPI-2, MMPI-2 elevations on scales 1, 2, 3, and 8, and incidence of the conversion valley on the MMPI-2. Our findings indicated that combined use of the MMPI-2 and clinical variables was most predictive of patients with NEEs. PMID:17904912

  19. Glucose Biosensors Based on Carbon Nanotube Nanoelectrode Ensembles

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yuehe ); Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi; Ren, Zhifeng

    2004-02-12

    This paper describes the development of glucose biosensors based on carbon nanotube (CNT) nanoelectrode ensembles (NEEs) for the selective detection of glucose. Glucose oxidase was covalently immobilized on CNT NEEs via carbodiimide chemistry by forming amide linkages between their amine residues and carboxylic acid groups on the CNT tips. The catalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide liberated from the enzymatic reaction of glucose oxidase upon the glucose and oxygen on CNT NEEs leads to the selective detection of glucose. The biosensor effectively performs selective electrochemical analysis of glucose in the presence of common interferents (e.g. acetaminophen, uric and ascorbic acids), avoiding the generation of an overlapping signal from such interferents. Such an operation eliminates the need for permselective membrane barriers or artificial electron mediators, thus greatly simplifying the sensor design and fabrication.

  20. Modelling Net Ecosystem Exchange and LUE in Mediterranean Oak Forest by Satellite Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramontana, Gianluca; Papale, Dario

    2011-01-01

    Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) is a key factor defining CO2 fluxes between atmosphere and ecosystems and CO2 flux measurements at individual eddy covariance flux sites provide valuable information on the seasonal dynamics of NEE. In this work, we developed and validated a satellite-based Light Use Efficiency (LUE) model to estimate NEE for a typical oak forest located in Central Italy. Satellite data were acquired by Moderate resolution spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor installed on board Terra satellite. Oak forest studied is coppice managed; 2 eddy-covariance towers are located inside two forests parcels having different ages. We proposed to estimate LUE like function of mean brightness temperature, Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) and Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI). Empirical multiple regressions models (MR) and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) were parameterized and validated using subset of data acquired by both the stations. Daily, 8-day and monthly temporal resolutions were investigated and accuracy estimation in space and time was performed.

  1. Reducing uncertainty in model estimates of high-latitude net ecosystem exchange by incorporating remote sensing observations of snow cover area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luus, Kristina; Lin, John; Kelly, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Recent high-latitude studies have indicated that the seasonal timing of initial snow accumulation and final snow melt each year substantially influence net ecosystem exchange (NEE). Previous terrestrial biogeochemical models have either not simulated the influence of snow season processes on NEE, or have used process-based estimates of snow depth or subnivean temperature to estimate snow season NEE. As predictions indicate that the northern carbon balance is likely to be altered by cumulative and interconnected changes in Arctic air temperature, precipitation, and snowpack dynamics, uncertainty in estimates of NEE may be reduced by incorporating independent remote sensing observations of fractional snow cover into terrestrial biogeochemical models. The objective of this study was to examine whether uncertainty in Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM) estimates of North American NEE north of 55°N could be reduced by using remote sensing observations to explicitly represent the influence of fractional snow cover on NEE. VPRM is a biospheric carbon flux model that generates high resolution estimates of NEE from remote sensing observations of air temperature, shortwave radiation and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). In the standard VPRM (VPRM0) formulation, photosynthesis is limited during the cold season by low air temperatures, diminished shortwave radiation and low NDVI values, and respiration is assumed to be constant below a threshold air temperature. Conversely, in the new VRPMsnow formulation, moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) observations of fractional snow cover are used to simulate the effects snow has on suppressing photosynthetic uptake by vegetation and decoupling soil and air temperatures. Therefore, when MODIS observations indicate that snow is present at a location, the rate of photosynthetic uptake by vegetation is diminished as a function of the fractional snow cover area, and when a region is

  2. Detection of DNA Hybridization by Methylene Blue Electrochemistry at Activated Nanoelectrode Ensembles.

    PubMed

    Silvestrini, Morena; Fruk, Ljiljana; Moretto, Ligia Maria; Ugo, Paolo

    2015-05-01

    Nanoelectrode ensembles (NEEs) obtained by electroless gold deposition in track-etched poly-carbonate (PC) membranes are functionalized and applied for DNA hybridization detection, using methylene blue (MB) as electroactive probe. To this aim, an amine terminated (ss)DNA probe is immobilized on the PC surface of the NEE by reaction via carbodiimide and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide. In order to increase the number of carboxylic groups present on PC and suitable for the functionalization, the surface of NEEs is oxidized with potassium permanganate. The presence of carboxylic functionalities is verified by spectrochemical titration with thionin acetate (THA) and the effect of the activation treatment on the electrode performances is evaluated by cyclic voltammetry (CV). After activation and functionalization with the probes, the NEE-based sensor is hybridized with complementary target sequences. The effect of the functionalization of the NEEs both with the (ss)DNA probe alone and after hybridization with the target, is studied by measuring the changes in the MB reduction signal by square wave voltammetry (SWV), after incubation in a suitable MB solution, rinsing and transfer to the measurement cell. It was observed that this peak signal decreases significantly after hybridization of the probe with the complementary target. Experimental evidences suggest that the interaction between MB and the guanines of (ss)DNA and (ds)DNA is at the basis of the development of the here observed analytical signal. The proposed approach allows the easy preparation and testing of NEE-based sensors for the electrochemical DNA hybridization detection. PMID:26504963

  3. Quantifying Typhoon Impact on Net Carbon Ecosystem Exchange in a Sub-tropical Mangrove Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Lu, W.; Yan, G.; Yang, S.; Lin, G.

    2011-12-01

    Although typhoon is a natural disturbance for mangrove forests, research of typhoon impact on net carbon ecosystem exchange (NEE) of mangrove wetlands has not reached final conclusion. In this study we investigated possible effects of typhoons with different forces on the NEE of a subtropical mangrove forest in Fujian, China (117°23'E, 23°55'N). In 2010, Typhoon Lionrock, Fanapi and Megi made landfall with a speed of 23, 35 and 38 m s-1 near our mangrove field station in Zhangjiang Estuary National Mangrove Nature Reserve on September 2, September 20 and October 23, respectively. In October 2009, total of 16 litter traps and an eddy covariance system were instated at this field station. Litter production was monitored at the biweekly intervals while the NEE was measured continuously. The litter production and NEE values were compared before and after each typhoon landed. Strong winds and torrential rains from these typhoons caused the amount of litter production more than double over the same period a year before when there was no typhoon landing. Moreover, about 5~25% green leaves and twigs were found in the litter traps after the typhoons, indicating significant defoliation by the typhoons. Typhoon Lionrock and Fanapi did not significantly reduce NEE, while Typhoo Fanapi reduced gross ecosystem production (GEP) by about 12%. However, NEE was increased by Typhoon Megi, which resulted from lower daily ecosystem respiration (Re) following the typhoon. Our results indicate that, although theses typhoons caused significant defoliation, they had little effect on ecosystem carbon exchange over the short periods following the typhoons.

  4. Response of carbon dioxide exchange to grazing intensity over typical steppes in a semi-arid area of Inner Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Huizhi; Bernhofer, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The eddy covariance technique was used to measure the CO2 flux over four differently grazed Leymus chinensis steppe ecosystems (ungrazed since 1979 (UG79), winter grazed (WG), continuously grazed (CG), and heavily grazed (HG) sites) during four growing seasons (May to September) from 2005 to 2008, to investigate the response of the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) over grassland ecosystems to meteorological factors and grazing intensity. At UG79, the optimal air temperature for the half-hourly NEE occurred between 17 and 20 °C, which was relatively low for semi-arid grasslands. The saturated NEE (NEEsat) and temperature sensitivity coefficient (Q 10) of ecosystem respiration (RE) exhibited clear seasonal and interannual variations, which increased with canopy development and the soil water content (SWC, at 5 cm). The total NEE values for the growing seasons from 2005 to 2008 were -32.0, -41.5, -66.1, and -89.8 g C m-2, respectively. Both the amounts and distribution of precipitation during the growing season affected the NEE. The effects of grazing on the CO2 flux increased with the grazing intensity. During the peak growth stage, heavy grazing and winter grazing decreased NEEsat and gross primary production (45 % for HG and 34 % for WG) due to leaf area removal. Both RE and Q 10 were clearly reduced by heavy grazing. Heavy grazing changed the ecosystem from a CO2 sink into a CO2 source, and winter grazing reduced the total CO2 uptake by 79 %. In the early growing season, there was no difference in the NEE between CG and UG79. In addition to the grazing intensity, the effects of grazing on the CO2 flux also varied with the vegetation growth stages and SWC.

  5. Global Sensitivity Analysis and Parameter Calibration for an Ecosystem Carbon Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safta, C.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Sargsyan, K.; Najm, H. N.; Debusschere, B.; Thornton, P. E.

    2013-12-01

    We present uncertainty quantification results for a process-based ecosystem carbon model. The model employs 18 parameters and is driven by meteorological data corresponding to years 1992-2006 at the Harvard Forest site. Daily Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) observations were available to calibrate the model parameters and test the performance of the model. Posterior distributions show good predictive capabilities for the calibrated model. A global sensitivity analysis was first performed to determine the important model parameters based on their contribution to the variance of NEE. We then proceed to calibrate the model parameters in a Bayesian framework. The daily discrepancies between measured and predicted NEE values were modeled as independent and identically distributed Gaussians with prescribed daily variance according to the recorded instrument error. All model parameters were assumed to have uninformative priors with bounds set according to expert opinion. The global sensitivity results show that the rate of leaf fall (LEAFALL) is responsible for approximately 25% of the total variance in the average NEE for 1992-2005. A set of 4 other parameters, Nitrogen use efficiency (NUE), base rate for maintenance respiration (BR_MR), growth respiration fraction (RG_FRAC), and allocation to plant stem pool (ASTEM) contribute between 5% and 12% to the variance in average NEE, while the rest of the parameters have smaller contributions. The posterior distributions, sampled with a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm, exhibit significant correlations between model parameters. However LEAFALL, the most important parameter for the average NEE, is not informed by the observational data, while less important parameters show significant updates between their prior and posterior densities. The Fisher information matrix values, indicating which parameters are most informed by the experimental observations, are examined to augment the comparison between the calibration and global

  6. The influence of drought on net ecosystem CO2 exchange in the southeastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pingintha, N.; Leclerc, M. Y.; Beasley, J. P.; Zhang, G.; Senthong, C.

    2009-12-01

    The principal mechanisms connecting CO2 fluxes to water relations in an agricultural ecosystem were studied using the eddy-covariance (EC) method in the southeastern US. During optimum environmental conditions, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) was the primary climatic factor controlling daytime net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE), accounting for 67 to 89% of variations in NEE. However, soil water content (SWC) was the dominant factor limiting the NEE-PAR response during the peak growth stage, as NEE was significantly depressed when PAR exceeding 1300 µmol photons m-2 s-1coincided with a very low soil water content (SWC < 0.04 m3 m-3). Pronounced hysteresis in NEE was observed in both non-stress and water stress conditions as a function of PAR. However, the magnitude of hysteresis was larger in the water stress days than the non-water stress days, which is related to the variation of leaf surface conductance (gs) with water stress. It was found that without the limitation of PAR (> 1000 µmol photons m-2 s-1), 95% of variation in gs was explained by the changes in vapor pressure deficit (VPD) during water stressed days. Stomatal sensitivity to VPD increased in the afternoon and therefore the degree of closure increased, causing a reduction in CO2 uptake. These results inferred that the stomatal limitation caused by soil water insufficiency was responsible for a large hysteresis loop. The systematic presence of hysteresis in the response of NEE to PAR suggests that the gap-filling technique based on a non-linear regression ought to take into account the presence of extreme environmental conditions such as drought. This would be valuable in predicting ecosystem responses to climate change.

  7. Drivers of long-term variability in CO2 net ecosystem exchange in a temperate peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfter, C.; Campbell, C.; Dinsmore, K. J.; Drewer, J.; Coyle, M.; Anderson, M.; Skiba, U.; Nemitz, E.; Billett, M. F.; Sutton, M. A.

    2014-10-01

    Land-atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) in peatlands exhibits marked seasonal and inter-annual variability, which subsequently affects the carbon sink strength of catchments across multiple temporal scales. Long-term studies are needed to fully capture the natural variability and therefore identify the key hydrometeorological drivers in the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2. NEE has been measured continuously by eddy-covariance at Auchencorth Moss, a temperate lowland peatland in central Scotland, since 2002. Hence this is one of the longest peatland NEE studies to date. For 11 yr, the site was a consistent, yet variable, atmospheric CO2 sink ranging from -5.2 to -135.9 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1 (mean of -64.1 ± 33.6 g CO2-C m-2 yr-1). Inter-annual variability in NEE was positively correlated to the length of the growing season. Mean winter air temperature explained 87% of the inter-annual variability in the sink strength of the following summer, indicating a phenological memory-effect. Plant productivity exhibited a marked hysteresis with respect to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) over the growing season, indicative of two separate growth regimes. Ecosystem respiration (Reco) and gross primary productivity (GPP) were closely correlated (ratio 0.74), suggesting that autotrophic processes were dominant. Whilst the site was wet most of the year (water table depth <5 cm) there were indications that heterotrophic respiration was enhanced by drought, which also depressed GPP. NEE was compared to 5 other peatland sites which have published long-term NEE records. The CO2 uptake rate during the growing season was comparable to 3 other European sites, however the emission rate during the dormant season was significantly higher.

  8. Constraining ecosystem carbon dynamics in a data-limited world: integrating ecological "common sense" in a model-data fusion framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, A. A.; Williams, M.

    2015-03-01

    Many of the key processes represented in global terrestrial carbon models remain largely unconstrained. For instance, plant allocation patterns and residence times of carbon pools are poorly known globally, except perhaps at a few intensively studied sites. As a consequence of data scarcity, carbon models tend to be underdetermined, and so can produce similar net fluxes with very different parameters and internal dynamics. To address these problems, we propose a series of ecological and dynamic constraints (EDCs) on model parameters and initial conditions, as a means to constrain ecosystem variable inter-dependencies in the absence of local data. The EDCs consist of a range of conditions on (a) carbon pool turnover and allocation ratios, (b) steady-state proximity, and (c) growth and decay of model carbon pools. We use a simple ecosystem carbon model in a model-data fusion framework to determine the added value of these constraints in a data-poor context. Based only on leaf area index (LAI) time series and soil carbon data, we estimate net ecosystem exchange (NEE) for (a) 40 synthetic experiments and (b) three AmeriFlux tower sites. For the synthetic experiments, we show that EDCs lead to an overall 34% relative error reduction in model parameters, and a 65% reduction in the 3 yr NEE 90% confidence range. In the application at AmeriFlux sites all NEE estimates were made independently of NEE measurements. Compared to these observations, EDCs resulted in a 69-93% reduction in 3 yr cumulative NEE median biases (-0.26 to +0.08 kg C m-2), in comparison to standard 3 yr median NEE biases (-1.17 to -0.84 kg C m-2). In light of these findings, we advocate the use of EDCs in future model-data fusion analyses of the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  9. Constraining ecosystem carbon dynamics in a data-limited world: integrating ecological "common sense" in a model-data-fusion framework.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloom, A. A.; Williams, M.

    2014-08-01

    Many of the key processes represented in global terrestrial carbon models remain largely unconstrained. For instance, plant allocation patterns and residence times of carbon pools are poorly known globally, except perhaps at a few intensively studied sites. As a consequence of data scarcity, carbon models tend to be underdetermined, and so can produce similar net fluxes with very different parameters and internal dynamics. To address these problems, we propose a series of ecological and dynamic constraints (EDCs) on model parameters and initial conditions, as a means to constrain ecosystem variable inter-dependencies in the absence of local data. The EDCs consist of a range of conditions on (a) carbon pool turnover and allocation ratios, (b) steady state proximity, and (c) growth and decay of model carbon pools. We use a simple ecosystem carbon model in a model-data fusion framework to determine the added value of these constraints in a data-poor context. Based only on leaf area index (LAI) time series and soil carbon data, we estimate net ecosystem exchange (NEE) for (a) 40 synthetic experiments and (b) three AMERIFLUX tower sites. For the synthetic experiments, we show that EDCs lead to an an overall 34% relative error reduction in model parameters, and a 65% reduction in the 3 yr NEE 90% confidence range. In the application at AMERIFLUX sites all NEE estimates were made independently of NEE measurements. Compared to these observations, EDCs resulted in a 69-93% reduction in 3 yr cumulative NEE median biases (-0.26 to +0.08 kg C m-2), in comparison to standard 3 yr median NEE biases (-1.17 to -0.84 kg C m-2). In light of these findings, we advocate the use of EDCs in future model-data fusion analyses of the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  10. Recent variations in Amazon carbon balance driven by climate anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding tropical rainforest response to heat and drought is critical for quantifying the effects of climate change on tropical ecosystems, including global climate-carbon feedbacks. Of particular importance for the global carbon budget is net ecosystem exchange of CO2 with the atmosphere (NEE), a metric that represents the total integrated signal of carbon fluxes into and out of ecosystems. Sub-annual and sub-basin NEE estimates have previously been derived from process-based biosphere models, despite often disagreeing with plot-scale observations. Our analysis of airborne CO2 and CO measurements reveals monthly, sub-Basin scale (~106 km2) NEE variations in a framework that is largely independent of bottom-up estimates. As such, our approach provides new insights about tropical forest response to climate. We find acute sensitivity of NEE to daily and monthly climate extremes. In particular, increased central-Amazon NEE was associated with wet-season heat and dry-season drought in 2010. We analyze satellite proxies for photosynthesis and find that suppression of photosynthesis may have contributed to increased carbon loss in the 2010 drought, consistent with recent analysis of plot-scale measurements. In the eastern Amazon, pulses of increased NEE (i.e. net respiration) persisted through 2011, suggesting legacy effects of the drought that occurred in 2010. Regional differences in post-drought recovery in 2011 and 2012 appear related to long-term water availability. These results provide novel evidence of the vulnerability of Amazon carbon stocks to short-term temperature and moisture extremes.

  11. Toward Verifying Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions with the CMAQ Model: Motivation, Model Description and Initial Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhen; Bambha, Ray P.; Pinto, Joseph P.; Zeng, Tao; Boylan, Jim; Huang, Maoyi; Lei, Huimin; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Shishi; Mao, Jiafu; Schwalm, Christopher R.; Shi, Xiaoying; Wei, Yaxing; Michelsen, Hope A.

    2014-03-14

    Motivated by the urgent need for emission verification of CO2 and other greenhouse gases, we have developed regional CO2 simulation with CMAQ over the contiguous U.S. Model sensitivity experiments have been performed using three different sets of inputs for net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and two fossil fuel emission inventories, to understand the roles of fossil fuel emissions, atmosphere-biosphere exchange and transport in regulating the spatial and diurnal variability of CO2 near the surface, and to characterize the well-known ‘signal-to-noise’ problem, i.e. the interference from the biosphere on the interpretation of atmospheric CO2 observations. It is found that differences in the meteorological conditions for different urban areas strongly contribute to the contrast in concentrations. The uncertainty of NEE, as measured by the difference among the three different NEE inputs, has notable impact on regional distribution of CO2 simulated by CMAQ. Larger NEE uncertainty and impact are found over eastern U.S. urban areas than along the western coast. A comparison with tower CO2 measurements at Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) shows that the CMAQ model using hourly varied and high-resolution CO2 emission from the Vulcan inventory and CarbonTracker optimized NEE reasonably reproduce the observed diurnal profile, whereas switching to different NEE inputs significantly degrades the model performance. Spatial distribution of CO2 is found to correlate with NOx, SO2 and CO, due to their similarity in emission sources and transport processes. These initial results from CMAQ demonstrate the power of a state-of-the art CTM in helping interpret CO2 observations and verify fossil fuel emissions. The ability to simulate CO2 in CMAQ will also facilitate investigations of the utility of traditionally regulated pollutants and other species as tracers to CO2 source attribution.

  12. On the difference in the net ecosystem exchange of CO2 between deciduous and evergreen forests in the southeastern United States.

    PubMed

    Novick, Kimberly A; Oishi, A Christopher; Ward, Eric J; Siqueira, Mario B S; Juang, Jehn-Yih; Stoy, Paul C

    2015-02-01

    The southeastern United States is experiencing a rapid regional increase in the ratio of pine to deciduous forest ecosystems at the same time it is experiencing changes in climate. This study is focused on exploring how these shifts will affect the carbon sink capacity of southeastern US forests, which we show here are among the strongest carbon sinks in the continental United States. Using eight-year-long eddy covariance records collected above a hardwood deciduous forest (HW) and a pine plantation (PP) co-located in North Carolina, USA, we show that the net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) was more variable in PP, contributing to variability in the difference in NEE between the two sites (ΔNEE) at a range of timescales, including the interannual timescale. Because the variability in evapotranspiration (ET) was nearly identical across the two sites over a range of timescales, the factors that determined the variability in ΔNEE were dominated by those that tend to decouple NEE from ET. One such factor was water use efficiency, which changed dramatically in response to drought and also tended to increase monotonically in nondrought years (P < 0.001 in PP). Factors that vary over seasonal timescales were strong determinants of the NEE in the HW site; however, seasonality was less important in the PP site, where significant amounts of carbon were assimilated outside of the active season, representing an important advantage of evergreen trees in warm, temperate climates. Additional variability in the fluxes at long-time scales may be attributable to slowly evolving factors, including canopy structure and increases in dormant season air temperature. Taken together, study results suggest that the carbon sink in the southeastern United States may become more variable in the future, owing to a predicted increase in drought frequency and an increase in the fractional cover of southern pines. PMID:25168968

  13. Impact of cloudiness on net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide in different types of forest ecosystems in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Yu, G.-R.; Zhang, L.-M.; Sun, X.-M.; Wen, X.-F.; Han, S.-J.; Yan, J.-H.

    2010-02-01

    Clouds can significantly affect carbon exchange process between forest ecosystems and the atmosphere by influencing the quantity and quality of solar radiation received by ecosystem's surface and other environmental factors. In this study, we analyzed the effects of cloudiness on net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide (NEE) in a temperate broad-leaved Korean pine mixed forest at Changbaishan (CBS) and a subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest at Dinghushan (DHS), based on the flux data obtained during June-August from 2003 to 2006. The results showed that the response of NEE of forest ecosystems to photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) differed under clear skies and cloudy skies. Compared with clear skies, the light-saturated maximum photosynthetic rate (Pec,max) at CBS under cloudy skies during mid-growing season (from June to August) increased by 34%, 25%, 4% and 11% in 2003, 2004, 2005 and 2006, respectively. In contrast, Pec,max of the forest ecosystem at DHS was higher under clear skies than under cloudy skies from 2004 to 2006. When the clearness index (kt) ranged between 0.4 and 0.6, the NEE reached its maximum at both CBS and DHS. However, the NEE decreased more dramatically at CBS than at DHS when kt exceeded 0.6. The results indicate that cloudy sky conditions are beneficial to net carbon uptake in the temperate forest ecosystem and the subtropical forest ecosystem. Under clear skies, vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and air temperature increased due to strong light. These environmental conditions led to greater decrease in gross ecosystem photosynthesis (GEP) and greater increase in ecosystem respiration (Re) at CBS than at DHS. As a result, clear sky conditions caused more reduction of NEE in the temperate forest ecosystem than in the subtropical forest ecosystem. The response of NEE of different forest ecosystems to the changes in cloudiness is an important factor that should be included in evaluating regional carbon budgets under climate change

  14. Updated checklist of Iranian Opiinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    PubMed

    Gadallah, Neveen S; Ghahari, Hassan; Peris-Felipo, Francisco Javier; Fischer, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    An updated checklist of Opiinae from Iran is provided including 101 species from 11 genera (Atormus van Achterberg, 1997, Biosteres Foerster, 1862, Eurytenes Forster, 1862, Fopius Wharton, 1987, Indiopius Fischer, 1966, Opius Wesmael, 1835, Phaedrotoma Forster, 1862, Pokomandya Fischer, 1959, Psyttalia Walker, 1860, Utetes Forster, 1862 and Xynobius Forster, 1862) belonging to two tribes (Biosterini and Opiini). Moreover, seven species Biosteres (Chilotrichia) punctiscuta (Thomson, 1895), Biosteres (Biosteres) remigii Fischer, 1971, Eurytenes (Eurytenes) abnormis (Wesmael, 1835), Opius (Hypocynodus) ponticus Fischer, 1958, Opius pygmaeator (Nees, 1811), Opius (Nosopoea) speciosus Fischer, 1959 and Phaedrotoma nitidulator (Nees, 1834) are recorded for the first time from Iran. PMID:27395527

  15. Net ecosystem exchange of CO2 with rapidly changing high Arctic landscapes.

    PubMed

    Emmerton, Craig A; St Louis, Vincent L; Humphreys, Elyn R; Gamon, John A; Barker, Joel D; Pastorello, Gilberto Z

    2016-03-01

    High Arctic landscapes are expansive and changing rapidly. However, our understanding of their functional responses and potential to mitigate or enhance anthropogenic climate change is limited by few measurements. We collected eddy covariance measurements to quantify the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 with polar semidesert and meadow wetland landscapes at the highest latitude location measured to date (82°N). We coupled these rare data with ground and satellite vegetation production measurements (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index; NDVI) to evaluate the effectiveness of upscaling local to regional NEE. During the growing season, the dry polar semidesert landscape was a near-zero sink of atmospheric CO2 (NEE: -0.3 ± 13.5 g C m(-2) ). A nearby meadow wetland accumulated over 300 times more carbon (NEE: -79.3 ± 20.0 g C m(-2) ) than the polar semidesert landscape, and was similar to meadow wetland NEE at much more southerly latitudes. Polar semidesert NEE was most influenced by moisture, with wetter surface soils resulting in greater soil respiration and CO2 emissions. At the meadow wetland, soil heating enhanced plant growth, which in turn increased CO2 uptake. Our upscaling assessment found that polar semidesert NDVI measured on-site was low (mean: 0.120-0.157) and similar to satellite measurements (mean: 0.155-0.163). However, weak plant growth resulted in poor satellite NDVI-NEE relationships and created challenges for remotely detecting changes in the cycling of carbon on the polar semidesert landscape. The meadow wetland appeared more suitable to assess plant production and NEE via remote sensing; however, high Arctic wetland extent is constrained by topography to small areas that may be difficult to resolve with large satellite pixels. We predict that until summer precipitation and humidity increases enough to offset poor soil moisture retention, climate-related changes to productivity on polar semideserts may be restricted. PMID:26279166

  16. BOREAS TGB-3 Plant Species Composition Data over the NSA Fen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bubier, Jill L.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study Trace Gas Biogeochemistry (BOREAS TGB-3) team collected several data sets that contributed to understanding the measured trace gas fluxes over sites in the Northern Study Area (NSA). This data set contains information about the composition of plant species that were within the collars used to measure Net Ecosystem Exchange of CO2 (NEE). The species composition was identified to understand the differences in NEE among the various plant communities in the NSA fen. The data were collected in July of 1994 and 1996. The data are contained in comma-delimited, ASCII files.

  17. Estimation of Ecosystem Parameters of the Community Land Model with DREAM: Evaluation of the Potential for Upscaling Net Ecosystem Exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks Franssen, H. J.; Post, H.; Vrugt, J. A.; Fox, A. M.; Baatz, R.; Kumbhar, P.; Vereecken, H.

    2015-12-01

    Estimation of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) by land surface models is strongly affected by uncertain ecosystem parameters and initial conditions. A possible approach is the estimation of plant functional type (PFT) specific parameters for sites with measurement data like NEE and application of the parameters at other sites with the same PFT and no measurements. This upscaling strategy was evaluated in this work for sites in Germany and France. Ecosystem parameters and initial conditions were estimated with NEE-time series of one year length, or a time series of only one season. The DREAM(zs) algorithm was used for the estimation of parameters and initial conditions. DREAM(zs) is not limited to Gaussian distributions and can condition to large time series of measurement data simultaneously. DREAM(zs) was used in combination with the Community Land Model (CLM) v4.5. Parameter estimates were evaluated by model predictions at the same site for an independent verification period. In addition, the parameter estimates were evaluated at other, independent sites situated >500km away with the same PFT. The main conclusions are: i) simulations with estimated parameters reproduced better the NEE measurement data in the verification periods, including the annual NEE-sum (23% improvement), annual NEE-cycle and average diurnal NEE course (error reduction by factor 1,6); ii) estimated parameters based on seasonal NEE-data outperformed estimated parameters based on yearly data; iii) in addition, those seasonal parameters were often also significantly different from their yearly equivalents; iv) estimated parameters were significantly different if initial conditions were estimated together with the parameters. We conclude that estimated PFT-specific parameters improve land surface model predictions significantly at independent verification sites and for independent verification periods so that their potential for upscaling is demonstrated. However, simulation results also indicate

  18. Influence of the Asian monsoon on net ecosystem carbon exchange in two major ecosystems in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, H.; Kim, J.; Hong, J.; Lim, J.-H.

    2010-05-01

    Considering the feedback in radiation, temperature, and soil moisture with alterations in rainfall patterns, the influence of the changing monsoon on Net Ecosystem CO2 Exchange (NEE) can be critical to the estimation of carbon balance in Asia. In this paper, we examined CO2 fluxes measured by the eddy covariance method from 2004 to 2008 in two major ecosystems in the KoFlux sites in Korea, i.e., the Gwangneung Deciduous forest (GDK) and the Haenam Farmland (HFK). Our objectives were to identify the repeatability of the mid-season depression of NEE encountered at the two sites based on the single-year observation, and to further scrutinize its cause, effect, and interannual variability by using multi-year observations. In both GDK and HFK sites, the mid-season depression of NEE was reproduced each year but with different timing, magnitude, and mechanism. At the GDK site, a predominant factor causing the mid-season depression was a decreased solar radiation and the consequent reduction in Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) during the summer monsoon period. At the HFK site, however, the monsoonal effect was less pronounced and the apparent mid-season depression was mainly a result of the management practices such as cultivation of spring barley and rice transplantation. Other flux observation sites in East Asia also showed a decline in radiation but with a lesser degree during the monsoon season, resulting in less pronounced depression in NEE. In our study, the observed depressions in NEE caused both GDK and HFK sites to become a weaker carbon sink or even a source in the middle of the growing season. On average, the GDK site (with maximum leaf area index of ~5) was a weak carbon sink with NEE of -84 gC m-2 y-1. Despite about 20% larger GPP (of 1321 gC m-2y-1) in comparison with the GDK site, the HFK site (with maximum leaf area index of 3-4) was a weaker carbon sink with NEE of -58 gC m-2 y-1 because of greater ecosystem respiration (of 1263 gC m-2 y-1). These NEE

  19. Effects of drought - altered seasonality and low rainfall - in net ecosystem carbon exchange of three contrasting Mediterranean ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, J. S.; Mateus, J. A.; Aires, L. M.; Pita, G.; Pio, C.; Andrade, V.; Banza, J.; David, T. S.; Rodrigues, A.; David, J. S.

    2007-06-01

    Droughts cause reductions in gross primary production (GPP) and also in net ecosystem exchange (NEE), contributing to most of the inter-annual variability in terrestrial carbon sequestration. In seasonally dry climates (Mediterranean) droughts result from reductions in annual rainfall and from changes in rain seasonality. In western Iberia, the hydrological-year (i.e., from October to September) of 2004-2005 was extremely dry, with precipitation 50% below the long-term mean (691 mm in 1961-1990), but 2005-2006 was normal. We compared the carbon fluxes measured by the eddy covariance technique from three contrasting ecosystems in southern Portugal: an evergreen oak woodland (savannah-like) with ca. 21% tree cover; a Mediterranean C3/C4 grassland; and a coppiced eucalyptus plantation. During the dry hydrological-year of 2004-2005, NEE was lowest, the highest sink strength was in the eucalypt plantation (NEE = -399 g C m -2 year-1) as compared to the oak woodland (NEE = -88 g C m -2 year-1), and the grassland (NEE = +49 g C m -2 year -1). The latter was a source of carbon dioxide. The NEE values of the dry year were, however, much lower than those for wetter years, e.g. NEE = -861 g C m-2 year -1 in 2002-2003 in the eucalypt plantation. The NEE of the grassland and the oak savannah in the 2005-2006 hydrological-year, with annual precipitation above the long term mean, were -190 and -120 g C m -2 year-1, respectively. All ecosystems studied increased their rain-use efficiency (GPP per unit of rain volume) increased in dry years. In the case of annual vegetation - grassland and low tree density woodland, however &ndash, rain-use efficiency decreased with severe drought. However, this was more pronounced in the eucalypt plantation due to greater GPP and the use of deep soil water resources. Although both calendar years of 2004 and 2005 had equally low rainfall, the effect of drought on the eucalypt plantation was delayed until the second dry year. This suggests that the

  20. Inter-annual variability in Alaskan net ecosystem CO2 exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luus, Kristina; Lindaas, Jakob; Commane, Roisin; Euskirchen, Eugenie; Oechel, Walter; Zona, Donatella; Chang, Rachel; Kelly, Richard; Miller, Charles; Wofsy, Steven; Lin, John

    2015-04-01

    The high-latitude biospheric carbon cycle's responses to climate change are predicted to have an important role in determining future atmospheric concentrations of CO2. In response to warming soil and air temperatures, Arctic wetlands have been observed to increase rates of both soil C efflux and vegetation C uptake through photosynthesis. However, insights into the regional-scale consequences of these processes for net C uptake have been limited by the large uncertainties existing in process-based model estimates of Arctic net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE). The Polar Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (PolarVPRM) instead provides data-driven, satellite-based estimates of high-latitude NEE, using a framework which specifically accounts for polar influences on NEE. PolarVPRM calculates NEE as the sum of respiration (R) and gross ecosystem exchange (GEE), where GEE refers to the light-dependent portion of NEE: NEE= -GEE + R. Meteorological inputs for PolarVPRM are provided by the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR), and land surface inputs are acquired from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Growing season R is calculated from air temperature, and subnivean R is calculated according to soil temperature. GEE is calculated according to shortwave radiation, air temperature, and MODIS-derived estimates of soil moisture and vegetation biomass. Previously, model validation has indicated that PolarVPRM showed reasonably good agreement with eddy covariance observations at nine North American Arctic sites, of which three were used for calibration purposes. For this project, PolarVPRM NEE was calculated year-round across Alaska at a three-hourly temporal resolution and a spatial resolution of 1 6°×1 4° (latitude × longitude). The objective of this work was to gain insight into inter-annual variability in Alaskan NEE, R and GEE, and an understanding of which meteorological and land surface drivers account for these observed patterns

  1. Stimulation of Mojave Desert net ecosystem CO2 uptake after winter precipitation with the opposite effect after summer rains based on 7 years of flux data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasoni, Richard; Arnone, John; Fenstermaker, Lynn; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2014-05-01

    Eddy covariance measurements of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) in the Mojave Desert (Jasoni et al. 2005-Global Change Biology 11:749-756; Wohlfahrt et al. 2008-Global Change Biology 14:1475-1487), and in other deserts of the world (e.g., Hastings et al. 2005- Global Change Biology 14:927-939, indicate greater rates of net CO2 uptake (more negative NEE values) and net ecosystem productivity (NEP) than would have been expected for deserts (as high as -120 g C m-2 year-1). We continue to observe high rates of NEE and NEP and seek explanations for these findings at interannual, seasonal, and sub-seasonal time scales. Because moisture availability most strongly constrains biological activity in deserts, responses to rains probably play a significant role in defining components of NEE-namely net primary productivity (NPP, or roughly net photosynthesis by vascular and non-vascular plants) and heterotrophic respiration (Rh, mainly by soil microorganisms). Most precipitation in the Mojave Desert falls from October through April and periodically in the summer as convective storms. The main objective of this study was to quantify the extent to which NEE and the net flux of CO2 from/to biological soil crust (BSC) covered soil surfaces respond to rain pulses occurring during cool/cold and warm/hot times of the year. Flux data from 7 years (2005-2011) of measurements at our shub land desert site (average 150 mm rain per year) located 120 km northwest of Las Vegas showed a range in NEP from -111±34 to -47±28 g C m-2 year-1. Cool season rains usually stimulated NEE (more negative NEE values or net CO2 uptake) while warm season rains reversed this effect and led to positive NEE values (net ecosystem CO2 efflux. Cool season stimulation of NEE often occurred in the absence of green leaves on vascular plants, suggesting that photosynthesis of BSCs (up to 70% of soil surface covered by cyanobacteria, mosses, and lichens) were responsible for this net uptake. At other times during

  2. ELEVATED CO2 AND TEMPERATURE ALTER THE ECOSYSTEM C EXCHANGE IN A YOUNG DOUGLAS FIR MESOCOSM EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    We investigated the effects of elevated CO2 (EC) [ambient CO2 (AC) + 190 ppm] and elevated temperature (ET) [ambient temperature (AT) + 3.6 °C] on net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of seedling Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) mesocosms. As the study utilized seedlings in reconstruc...

  3. Scaling-up knowledge of growing-season net ecosystem exchange for long-term assessment of North Dakota grasslands under the Conservation Reserve Program

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scaling-up knowledge of land-atmosphere net ecosystem exchange (NEE) from a single experimental site to numerous perennial grass fields in the Northern Great Plains (NGP) requires appropriate scaling protocols. We addressed this problem using synoptic data available from the Landsat sensor for ten ...

  4. Insect pests and diseases in bioenergy crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Louisiana sugarcane, Saccharum spp., and other grassy crops (e.g., grain sorghum, Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench, and hybrids involving sugarcane; sorghum; sudangrass, Sorghum bicolor ssp. drummondii (Nees ex Steud.) de Wet and Harlan, and others) with potential for bioenergy production are susceptible...

  5. The soil moisture active passive validation experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12): pre-launch calibration and validation of the SMAP satellite

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite is scheduled for launch in November 2014. In order to develop robust soil moisture retrieval algorithms that fully exploit the unique capabilities of SMAP, algorithm developers had identified a nee...

  6. Site-Specific Weed Management: Myth or Magic?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Site-specific weed management (SSWM) is a potential method to reduce the risks of herbicide use on water quality and public health without impacting crop yield. With site-specific weed management, areas of the field are left untreated where control is not economically justified. Where control is nee...

  7. Spatially distributed evapotranspiration estimation using remote sensing and ground-based radiometers over cotton at Maricopa, Arizona

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spatially distributed estimates of evapotranspiration (ET) over agricultural lands could be valuable for water management in arid environments and for monitoring irrigated croplands. In recent year various ET estimation approaches have been developed that utilize remote sense data to provide the nee...

  8. Women in History--Mary Seacole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmer, Bonnie

    2005-01-01

    Born in Jamaica in 1805, Mary Seacole (nee Grant), was the daughter of a Black Creole boarding house owner and a Scottish Army officer. Like many Creole doctress women, Seacole was taught African herbal medicine arts from her mother. In addition to understanding traditional herbal medicine, she gleaned an understanding of Western medicine from the…

  9. 76 FR 11821 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Survey of Principal Investigators on Earthquake...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request Survey of Principal Investigators on Earthquake Engineering... Investigators on Earthquake Engineering Research Awards Made by the National Science Foundation, 2003-2009. Type... George E. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES). The purpose of the...

  10. Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy Analysis of Modified Cotton Trash Extracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a previous study, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was utilized in identifying different types of botanical cotton trash as each was subjected to simulations of ginning and textile processing. Changes in the infrared spectra that occurred after heat treatment indicated that the nee...

  11. The utility of the internal transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS2) in confirming species boundaries in the genus Gonatocerus:comparison to the cytochrome oxidase subunit I(COI) gene and taxonomic data: molecular key based on ITS2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We sequenced the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region 2(ITS2) from several glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS) [Homalodisca vitripennis Germar (=H.coagulata Say)] egg parasitoid species (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae) belonging to the genus Gonatocerus Nees to test the utility of this fragmen...

  12. Carbon isotope ratios document that the elytra of western corn rootworm reflects adult versus larval feeding and later instar larvae prefer Bt corn to alternate hosts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The western corn rootworm (WCR), Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, is a major pest of maize, Zea mays L., worldwide. While exploring conventional approaches to management and more recently bioengineering, extended research has been conducted on ways to manage its root-feeding larvae. The nee...

  13. Polyacetylated labdane-type diterpenoids, ptychantins P-R from Chinese liverwort Ptychanthus striatus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing-Yi; Zhang, Jiao-Zhen; Kang, Ya-Qi; Wang, Xiao; Fan, Pei-Hong; Zhou, Jin-Chuan; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2015-05-01

    Three new polyacetylated labdane diterpenoids ptychantins P-R (1-3) and four known compounds (4-7) were isolated from an EtOH extract of the Chinese liverwort Ptychanthus striatus (Lehm. & Lindenb.) Nees. Their structures were established by extensive analysis of spectroscopic data (IR, UV, HRESIMS, 1D NMR, and 2D NMR). PMID:25677361

  14. Relationship between annual canopy photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration in humid-temperate pastures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing nitrogen fertilization of a mature cool-season pasture increased annual photosynthetic C uptake (GPP) and forage yield but also increased ecosystem respiration (Re), such that net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and soil C sequestration were not affected by the increased fertility. A nine-year s...

  15. A new Gonatocerus (Hymenoptera:Mymaridae) from Argentina, with taxonomic notes and molecular data on the G. tuberculifemur species complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gonatocerus deleoni Triapitsyn, Logarzo & Virla sp. n., reared from sentinel eggs of Tapajosa rubromarginata (Signoret) (Cicadellidae: Cicadellinae: Proconiini) on citrus plants, a new member of the ater species group of Gonatocerus Nees (Mymaridae), is described from the state of Mendoza, Argentina...

  16. Carbon dioxide and water vapour exchange in a tropical dry forest as influenced by the North American Monsoon System (NAMS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To better understand the effects and relationship between precipitation, net ecosystem carbon dioxide (NEE) and water vapor exchange (ET), we report a study conducted in the tropical dry forest (TDF) in the northwest of Mexico. Ecosystem gas exchange was measured using the eddy correlation technique...

  17. Nutritional Needs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The dramatic growth of infants during the 1st yr of life (a 3-fold increase in weight; a 50% increase in length) and continued growth, albeit at lower rates, from 1 yr of age through adolescence impose unique nutritional needs. The needs for growth are superimposed on relatively high maintenance nee...

  18. OPTIMAL OPERATION OF ELECTRIC ARC FURNACES (EAF) TO MINIMIZE THE GENERATION OF AIR POLLUTANTS AT THE SOURCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manufacture of steel by electric arc furnaces (EAF) is continuing to increase in usage in the United States with current production estimated to be over 63 million tons per year. The reduction of emissions from steel producers has been slow for two main reasons: the nee...

  19. Estimation of Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange for the Conterminous United States by Combining MODIS and AmeriFlux Data 1961

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) for a wide range of climate and biome types. However, these measurements only represent the carbon fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. To quantify the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the...

  20. Modeling Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange of Alpine Grasslands with a Satellite-Driven Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuping; Zhang, Xianzhou; Fan, Yuzhi; Shi, Peili; He, Yongtao; Yu, Guirui; Li, Yingnian

    2015-01-01

    Estimate of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) between the atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystems, the balance of gross primary productivity (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Reco) has significant importance for studying the regional and global carbon cycles. Using models driven by satellite data and climatic data is a promising approach to estimate NEE at regional scales. For this purpose, we proposed a semi-empirical model to estimate NEE in this study. In our model, the component GPP was estimated with a light response curve of a rectangular hyperbola. The component Reco was estimated with an exponential function of soil temperature. To test the feasibility of applying our model at regional scales, the temporal variations in the model parameters derived from NEE observations in an alpine grassland ecosystem on Tibetan Plateau were investigated. The results indicated that all the inverted parameters exhibit apparent seasonality, which is in accordance with air temperature and canopy phenology. In addition, all the parameters have significant correlations with the remote sensed vegetation indexes or environment temperature. With parameters estimated with these correlations, the model illustrated fair accuracy both in the validation years and at another alpine grassland ecosystem on Tibetan Plateau. Our results also indicated that the model prediction was less accurate in drought years, implying that soil moisture is an important factor affecting the model performance. Incorporating soil water content into the model would be a critical step for the improvement of the model. PMID:25849325

  1. MaizeGDB: everything old is new again! [abstract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The focus of genetic, genomic, and breeding research evolves over time, making it necessary to continually redefine the paradigm for data access and data analysis tools. Here we report the reinvention of MaizeGDB, the maize genetics and genomics database, to meet maize researchers’ ever changing nee...

  2. The EV-1 airborne microwave observatory of subcanopy and subsurface (AirMOSS) investigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    AirMOSS is one of the five Earth Venture-1 investigations selected in May 2010, with the goal of improving the estimates of the North American net ecosystem exchange (NEE) through high-resolution observations of root zone soil moisture (RZSM). The 5-year AirMOSS investigation is deigned to overlap w...

  3. A new Gonatocerus (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae) from Argentina, with taxonomic notes and molecular data on the G. tuberculifemur species complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new member of the ater species group of Gonatocerus Nees (Mymaridae) is described from the state of Mendoza in Argentina. Specimens of G. deleoni Triapitsyn, Logarzo & Virla sp. n. were first reared in San Rafael from sentinel eggs of the proconiine sharpshooter Tapajosa rubromarginata (Signoret) ...

  4. Collection and seed production of Allium acuminatum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a component of Greater Sage-Grouse and Southern Idaho Ground Squirrel habitat, Allium acuminatum Hook. (Taper-tip onion) has been targeted for use in restoration projects and conservation. Before a native plant can be used in large or small projects in the landscape quantities of propagules nee...

  5. Electrochemical immunosensor based on ensemble of nanoelectrodes for immunoglobulin IgY detection: application to identify hen's egg yolk in tempera paintings.

    PubMed

    Bottari, Fabio; Oliveri, Paolo; Ugo, Paolo

    2014-02-15

    A nanostructured electrochemical biosensor for detecting proteins of interest in work of art, in particular in tempera paintings, is presented. To determine egg yolk we focus here on the determination of immunoglobulin IgY. The transducers are nanoelectrode ensembles (NEEs), prepared via membrane templated electroless deposition of gold. Because of their geometrical and diffusion characteristics, NEEs are characterized by significantly low detection limits, moreover they display the capability of capturing proteins by interaction with the polycarbonate membrane of the NEE. At first, the proteic component of the paint is extracted by ultrasonication in an aqueous buffer, then IgY is captured by incubation on the NEE. The immunoglobulin is detected by treatment with anti-IgY labeled with horse radish peroxidase (Anti-IgY-HRP). The binding of the Anti-IgY-HRP is detected by recording the electrocatalytic signal caused by addition of H2O2 and methylene blue. The sensor detection capabilities are tested by analyzing both paint models, prepared in the lab, and real samples, from paintings of the XVIII-XX century. Multivariate exploratory analysis is applied to classify the voltammetric patterns, confirming the capability to differentiate egg-yolk tempera from other kind of tempera binders as well as from acrylic or oil paints. PMID:24096186

  6. Large interannual variability in net ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange of a disturbed temperate peatland.

    PubMed

    Aslan-Sungur, Guler; Lee, Xuhui; Evrendilek, Fatih; Karakaya, Nusret

    2016-06-01

    Peatland ecosystems play an important role in the global carbon (C) cycle as significant C sinks. However, human-induced disturbances can turn these sinks into sources of atmospheric CO2. Long-term measurements are needed to understand seasonal and interannual variability of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and effects of hydrological conditions and their disturbances on C fluxes. Continuous eddy-covariance measurements of NEE were conducted between August 2010 and April 2014 at Yenicaga temperate peatland (Turkey), which was drained for agricultural usage and for peat mining until 2009. Annual NEE during the three full years of measurement indicated that the peatland acted as a CO2 source with large interannual variability, at rates of 246, 244 and 663 g Cm(-2)yr(-1) for 2011, 2012, and 2013 respectively, except for June 2011, and May to July 2012. The emission strengths were comparable to those found for severely disturbed tropical peatlands. The peak CO2 emissions occurred in the dry summer of 2013 when water table level (WTL) was below a threshold value of -60 cm and soil water content (SCW) below a threshold value of 70% by volume. Water availability index was found to have a stronger explanatory power for variations in monthly ecosystem respiration (ER) than the traditional water status indicators (SCW and WTL). Air temperature, evapotranspiration and vapor pressure deficient were the most significant variables strongly correlated with NEE and its component fluxes of gross primary production and ER. PMID:26950633

  7. Effects of rodent-induced land degradation on ecosytem carbon fluxes in alpine meadow in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, F.; Quangang, Y.; Xue, X.; Guo, J.; Wang, T.

    2014-10-01

    Land degradation induced by rodent activities is extensively occurred in alpine meadow ecosystem in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau that would affect the ecosystem carbon (C) balance. We conducted a field experiment with six levels of land degradation (D1-D6, degradation aggravates from D1 to D6) to investigate the effects of land degradation on ecosystem C fluxes. Soil respiration (Rs), net ecosystem exchange (NEE), ecosystem respiration (ER) and gross ecosystem production (GEP) were measured from June to September 2012. Soil respiration, ER, GEP and above-ground biomass (AGB) was significantly higher in slightly degraded (D3 and D6) than in severely degraded land (D1, D2, D4 and D5). Positive averages of NEE in the growing season indicate that alpine meadow ecosystem is a weak C sink during the growing season. Net ecosystem exchange had no significant difference among different degraded levels, but the average NEE in slightly degraded group was 33.6% higher than in severely degraded group. Soil respiration, ER and NEE were positively correlated with AGB whereas soil organic C, labile soil C, total nitrogen (N) and inorganic nitrogen were associated with root biomass (RB). Our results highlight the decline of vegetation C storage of alpine meadow ecosystem with increasing number of rodent holes and suggest the control of AGB on ecosystem C fluxes, and the control of RB on soil C and N with development of land degradation.

  8. Root expression from a Beta vulgaris promoter in transgenic Arabidopsis plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tighter control of gene expression can be achieved by using promoters for expressing genes in a tissue-specific and temporal manner without imparting deleterious effects on non-target tissue. Inducible gene promoters that are specifically activated by pathogen invasion or insect pest attack are nee...

  9. Consequences of cool-season drought induced plant mortality to Chihuahuan Desert grassland ecosystem and soil respiration dynamics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Global climate change is predicted to increase the severity and frequency of cool-season drought across the arid Southwest US. We quantified net ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange (NEE), ecosystem respiration (Reco), and gross ecosystem photosynthesis (GEP) in response to interannual seasonal precip...

  10. Functionalized ensembles of nanoelectrodes as affinity biosensors for DNA hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Silvestrini, Morena; Fruk, Ljiljana; Ugo, Paolo

    2013-02-15

    A novel electrochemical biosensor for DNA hybridization detection based on nanoelectrode ensembles (NEEs) is presented. NEEs are prepared by electroless deposition of gold into the pores of a templating track-etched polycarbonate (PC) membrane. The wide surface of the templating membrane surrounding the nanoelectrodes is exploited to bind the capture DNA probes via amide coupling with the carboxylic groups present on the PC surface. The probes are then hybridized with the complementary target labelled with glucose oxidase (GO(x)). The occurrence of the hybridization event is detected by adding, to the supporting electrolyte, excess glucose as the substrate and the (ferrocenylmethyl) trimethylammonium cation (FA(+)) as suitable redox mediator. In the case of positive hybridization, an electrocatalytic current is detected. In the proposed sensor, the biorecognition event and signal transduction occur in different but neighbouring sites, i.e., the PC surface and the nanoelectrodes, respectively; these sites are separated albeit in close proximity on a nanometer scale. Finally, the possibility to activate the PC surface by treatment with permanganate is demonstrated and the analytical performances of biosensors prepared with KMnO(4)-treated NEEs and native NEEs are compared and critically evaluated. The proposed biosensor displays high selectivity and sensitivity, with the capability to detect few picomoles of target DNA. PMID:22898659

  11. Analysis of isotopic labeling in peptide fragments by tandem mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cellular phenotype is the consequence of dynamic metabolic events that occur in a spacially dependent fashion. This spatial and temporal complexity presents challenges for investigating primary metabolism and improved methods to probe biochemical events such as amino acid biosynthesis may be nee...

  12. Linda S. Gottfredson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wainer, Howard; Robinson, Daniel H.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Linda Gottfredson (nee Howarth), who obtained her BA (psychology, Phi Beta Kappa) from UC Berkeley in 1969, served in the Peace Corps in the Malaysian Health Service from 1969 to 1972, and received her PhD (sociology) from Johns Hopkins University (JHU) in 1976. She was Research Scientist at JHU's Center for…

  13. CARBON FLUXES ON NORTH AMERICAN RANGELANDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seasonal patterns of growth and thus carbon uptake are relevant to both scientists who study ecosystem properties and managers who strive to maintain rangeland productivity. We studied seasonal patterns of net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE) on 11 US rangelands over a 6-year period. All sites w...

  14. Climatic Versus Biotic Constraints on Carbon and Water Fluxes in Seasonally Drought-affected Ponderosa Pine Ecosystems. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, P. A.; Law, B. E.; Williams, M.; Irvine, J.; Kurpius, M.; Moore, D.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the relative importance of climatic versus biotic controls on gross primary production (GPP) and water vapor fluxes in seasonally drought-affected ponderosa pine forests. The study was conducted in young (YS), mature (MS), and old stands (OS) over 4 years at the AmeriFlux Metolius sites. Model simulations showed that interannual variation of GPP did not follow the same trends as precipitation, and effects of climatic variation were smallest at the OS (50%), and intermediate at the YS (<20%). In the young, developing stand, interannual variation in leaf area has larger effects on fluxes than climate, although leaf area is a function of climate in that climate can interact with age-related shifts in carbon allocation and affect whole-tree hydraulic conductance. Older forests, with well-established root systems, appear to be better buffered from effects of seasonal drought and interannual climatic variation. Interannual variation of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) was also lowest at the OS, where NEE is controlled more by interannual variation of ecosystem respiration, 70% of which is from soil, than by the variation of GPP, whereas variation in GPP is the primary reason for interannual changes in NEE at the YS and MS. Across spatially heterogeneous landscapes with high frequency of younger stands resulting from natural and anthropogenic disturbances, interannual climatic variation and change in leaf area are likely to result in large interannual variation in GPP and NEE.

  15. Exploring the Adolescent's Creative Pathways: Mindfulness, Role Fluidity, Story, and the Dramatic Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNees, David

    2015-01-01

    David McNees' deep foray into creativity theory and drama begins with mindfulness as a preparation for adolescent focus. This article discusses role incarnation, the correlation of the three-period lesson to Landy's role theory, the creation and re-creation of personal story and identity, archetypal heroes, and how the adaptability learned in…

  16. Registration of N614, A3N615, N616, and N617 Shattercane Genetic Stocks with cytoplasmic or nuclear male-sterility and juicy or dry midribs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four shattercane [Sorghum bicolor subsp. drummondii (Nees ex Steud) de Wet & Harlan] genetic stocks, N614, A3N615, N616, N617 (Reg. No. XXX, PI 665683 to 665686), with A3 cytoplasmic male-sterility or nuclear male-sterility gene ms3 containing either juicy (dd) or dry (DD) culms were developed joint...

  17. 21 CFR 172.510 - Natural flavoring substances and natural substances used in conjunction with flavors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... root and flowers Althea officinalis L Amyris (West Indian sandalwood) Amyris balsamifera L Angola weed Roccella fuciformis Ach In alcoholic beverages only Arnica flowers Arnica montana L., A. fulgens Pursh, A... Peumus boldus Mol Do. Boronia flowers Boronia megastigma Nees Bryonia root Bryonia alba L., or B....

  18. 21 CFR 172.510 - Natural flavoring substances and natural substances used in conjunction with flavors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Mill. and A. spicata Baker Althea root and flowers Althea officinalis L Amyris (West Indian sandalwood) Amyris balsamifera L Angola weed Roccella fuciformis Ach In alcoholic beverages only Arnica flowers... Eubatus Boldus (boldo) leaves Peumus boldus Mol Do. Boronia flowers Boronia megastigma Nees Bryonia...

  19. Elevated carbon dioxide alters impacts of precipitation pulses on ecosystem photosynthesis and respiration in a semi-arid grassland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Predicting net carbon (C) balance under future global change scenarios requires a comprehensive understanding of photosynthetic (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (Re) responses to atmospheric CO2 concentration and water availability. We measured net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE), GPP and Re prior to...

  20. A new species of Gonatocerus (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae) from Argentina, an egg parasitoid of Tapajosa rubromarginata (Hemiptera: Cleadellidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new species from the ater species group of Gonatocerus Nees (Mymaridae) is described from Argentina. Specimens of G. virlai S. Triapitsyn, Logarzo & de León sp. n. were reared mostly from wild-collected and sentinel eggs of the proconiine sharpshooter Tapajosa rubromarginata (Signoret) (Cicadelli...

  1. Interannual variability in carbon dioxide fluxes and flux-climate relationships on grazed and ungrazed northern mixed-grass prairie

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The annual carbon (C) budget of grasslands is highly dynamic, dependent on grazing history and on direct and indirect effects of interannual variability (IAV) in climate on carbon dioxide (CO2) fluxes. We measured net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) and its diurnal components, daytime ecosystem CO2...

  2. Antioxidant Effect of Nanoemulsions Containing Extract of Achyrocline satureioides (Lam) D.C.-Asteraceae.

    PubMed

    Zorzi, Giovanni Konat; Caregnato, Fernanda; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca; Teixeira, Helder Ferreira; Carvalho, Edison Luis Santana

    2016-08-01

    Ethanolic extracts of Achyrocline satureioides have pronounced antioxidant activity mainly due to the presence of the flavonoid quercetin. However, direct topical application of the extract is not possible due to the presence of high amounts of ethanol. In this sense, nanoemulsions arise as an alternative for topical formulation associating molecules with limited aqueous solubility. This article describes the development of topical nanoemulsions containing either A. satureioides extract or one of its most abundant flavonoid, quercetin. Nanoemulsions composed of octyldodecanol, egg lecithin, water and extract (NEE), or quercetin (NEQ) were prepared by spontaneous emulsification. This process led to monodisperse nanoemulsions presenting a mean droplet size of approximately 200-300 nm, negative zeta potential, and high association efficiency. A study of quercetin skin retention using porcine skin which was performed using a Franz diffusion cell revealed a higher accumulation of quercetin in skin for NEE when compared to NEQ. Finally, the antioxidant activity of formulations was measured by thiobarbituric acid-reactive species and the APPH model. A lower lipoperoxidation for the extract in respect to quercetin solution was observed. However, no difference between NEQ and NEE lipoperoxidation could be seen. The protection against lipoperoxidation by the formulations was also measured in the skin, where lower formation of reactive species was observed after treatment with NEE. In conclusion, this study shows the formulation effect on the physicochemical properties of nanoemulsions as well as on the skin retention and antioxidant activity of quercetin. PMID:26361953

  3. Sh3pxd2b mice are a model for craniofacial dysmorphology and otitis media.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Tian, Cong; Zhang, Zhi-guang; Han, Feng-chan; Azem, Rami; Yu, Heping; Zheng, Ye; Jin, Ge; Arnold, James E; Zheng, Qing Y

    2011-01-01

    Craniofacial defects that occur through gene mutation during development increase vulnerability to eustachian tube dysfunction. These defects can lead to an increased incidence of otitis media. We examined the effects of a mutation in the Sh3pxd2b gene (Sh3pxd2b(nee)) on the progression of otitis media and hearing impairment at various developmental stages. We found that all mice that had the Sh3pxd2b(nee) mutation went on to develop craniofacial dysmorphologies and subsequently otitis media, by as early as 11 days of age. We found noteworthy changes in cilia and goblet cells of the middle ear mucosa in Sh3pxd2b(nee) mutant mice using scanning electronic microscopy. By measuring craniofacial dimensions, we determined for the first time in an animal model that this mouse has altered eustachian tube morphology consistent with a more horizontal position of the eustachian tube. All mutants were found to have hearing impairment. Expression of TNF-α and TLR2, which correlates with inflammation in otitis media, was up-regulated in the ears of mutant mice when examined by immunohistochemistry and semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The mouse model with a mutation in the Sh3pxd2b gene (Sh3pxd2b(nee)) mirrors craniofacial dysmorphology and otitis media in humans. PMID:21818352

  4. Thermal adaptation of net ecosystem exchange

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thermal adaptation of gross primary production and ecosystem respiration has been well documented over broad thermal gradients. However, no study has examined their interaction as a function of temperature, i.e. the thermal responses of net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE). In this study, we const...

  5. Effects of episodic flooding on the net ecosystem CO2 exchange of a supratidal wetland in the Yellow River Delta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Guangxuan; Chu, Xiaojing; Xing, Qinghui; Li, Dejun; Yu, Junbao; Luo, Yiqi; Wang, Guangmei; Mao, Peili; Rafique, Rashad

    2015-08-01

    Episodic flooding due to intense rainfall events is characteristic in many wetlands, which may modify wetland-atmosphere exchange of CO2. However, the degree to which episodic flooding affects net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) is poorly documented in supratidal wetlands of coastal zone, where rainfall-driven episodic flooding often occurs. To address this issue, the ecosystem CO2 fluxes were continuously measured using the eddy covariance technique for 4 years (2010-2013) in a supratidal wetland in the Yellow River Delta. Our results showed that over the growing season, the daily average uptake in the supratidal wetland was -1.4, -1.3, -1.0, and -1.3 g C m-2 d-1 for 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013, respectively. On the annual scale, the supratidal wetland functioned as a strong sink for atmospheric CO2, with the annual NEE of -223, -164, and -247 g C m-2 yr-1 for 2011, 2012, and 2013, respectively. The mean diurnal pattern of NEE exhibited a smaller range of variation before episodic flooding than after it. Episodic flooding reduced the average daytime net CO2 uptake and the maximum rates of photosynthesis. In addition, flooding clearly suppressed the nighttime CO2 release from the wetland but increased its temperature sensitivity. Therefore, effects of episodic flooding on the direction and magnitude of NEE should be considered when predicting the ecosystem responses to future climate change in supratidal wetlands.

  6. The Needs of Tribal Men and the Social Service Providers on or Near the Nez Perce Indian Nation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    High Eagle, Gordon; And Others

    This report results from an action research project of the Nee Mee Poom Ha Hum (Men's Coalition), investigating the needs of tribal men in the Nez Perce Indian Nation, as part of planning to improve men's development. Research was directed toward interviewing a stratified random sample of tribal men and interviewing the directors and employees of…

  7. Indigenous Educational Models for Contemporary Practice: In Our Mother's Voice. Sociocultural, Political, and Historical Studies in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nee-Benham, Maenette Kape'ahiokalani Padeken Ah, Ed.

    This book presents a collection of papers on the rights of indigenous students to an equal education. The 15 chapters include: (1) "Gathering Together To Travel to the Source: A Vision for a Language and Culture-Based Educational Model" (Maenette Kape'ahiokalani Padeken Ah Nee-Benham and Joanne Elizabeth Cooper); (2) "Building a Child-Centered…

  8. Continuum estimates of rotational dielectric friction and polar solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Maroncelli, M.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamical solvation data recently obtained with the probe solute coumarin 153 are used to test the reliability of dielectric continuum models for estimating dielectric friction effects. In particular, the predictions of the Nee{endash}Zwanzig theory of rotational dielectric friction are examined in some detail. The analysis undertaken here uncovers an error made in virtually all previous applications of the Nee{endash}Zwanzig formalism. The error involves neglect of the solvent{close_quote}s electronic polarizability when calculating dielectric friction constants. In highly polar solvents the effect of this neglect is shown to be minor, so that the results of past studies should not be appreciably altered. However, in weakly polar and especially in nondipolar solvents, the proper inclusion of electronic polarizability terms is essential. The equivalence between the Nee{endash}Zwanzig theory of dielectric friction and more general continuum treatments of polar solvation dynamics is also demonstrated. This equivalence enables the use of solvation data to test the reliability of the Nee{endash}Zwanzig description of electrical interactions between a solute and solvent that form the core of this and related continuum theories of dielectric friction. Comparisons to experimental data show that, with the important exception of nondipolar solvents, such continuum treatments provide reasonably accurate ({plus_minus}40{percent}) predictors of time-dependent solvation and/or dielectric friction. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. 4. Building 15 interior showing sliding doors that open to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Building 15 interior showing sliding doors that open to Building 16, second floor and to the triangular staircase. View looking NEE. - John & James Dobson Carpet Mill (West Parcel), Building No. 15, 4041-4055 Ridge Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  10. Infection of Guinea Pigs with Vesicular Stomatitis New Jersey Virus Transmitted by Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interpretive Biting midges,Culicoides sonorensis were shown to be capable of transmitting vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus (VSNJV) to guinea pigs. Despite seroconversion for VSNJV, none of the guinea pigs developed clinical signs when infected in the abdomen by either infected insects or by nee...