Science.gov

Sample records for customer satisfaction assessment

  1. Service Quality and Customer Satisfaction: An Assessment and Future Directions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernon, Peter; Nitecki, Danuta A.; Altman, Ellen

    1999-01-01

    Reviews the literature of library and information science to examine issues related to service quality and customer satisfaction in academic libraries. Discusses assessment, the application of a business model to higher education, a multiple constituency approach, decision areas regarding service quality, resistance to service quality, and future…

  2. Assessing customer satisfaction for improving NOAA's climate products and services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, J. C.; Hawkins, M. D.; Timofeyeva, M. M.

    2009-12-01

    NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) Climate Services Division (CSD) is developing a comprehensive climate user requirements process with the ultimate goal of producing climate services that meet the needs of NWS climate information users. An important part of this effort includes engaging users through periodical surveys conducted by the Claes Fornell International (CFI) Group using the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI). The CFI Group conducted a Climate Services Satisfaction (CSS) Survey in May of 2009 to measure customer satisfaction with current products and services and to gain insight on areas for improvement. The CSS Survey rates customer satisfaction on a range of NWS climate services data and products, including Climate Prediction Center (CPC) outlooks, drought monitoring, and ENSO monitoring and forecasts, as well as NWS local climate data services. In addition, the survey assesses the users of the products to give the NWS insight into its climate customer base. The survey also addresses specific topics such as NWS forecast category names, probabilistic nature of climate products, and interpretation issues. The survey results identify user requirements for improving existing NWS climate services and introducing new ones. CSD will merge the survey recommendations with available scientific methodologies and operational capabilities to develop requirements for improved climate products and services. An overview of the 2009 survey results will be presented, such as users' satisfaction with the accuracy, reliability, display and functionality of products and services.

  3. Customer Satisfaction Assessment at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Dale N.; Sours, Mardell L.

    2000-03-20

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing and implementing a customer satisfaction assessment program (CSAP) to assess the quality of research and development provided by the laboratory. We present the customer survey component of the PNNL CSAP. The customer survey questionnaire is composed of 2 major sections, Strategic Value and Project Performance. The Strategic Value section of the questionnaire consists of 5 questions that can be answered with a 5 point Likert scale response. These questions are designed to determine if a project is directly contributing to critical future national needs. The Project Performance section of the questionnaire consists of 9 questions that can be answered with a 5 point Likert scale response. These questions determine PNNL performance in meeting customer expectations. Many approaches could be used to analyze customer survey data. We present a statistical model that can accurately capture the random behavior of customer survey data. The properties of this statistical model can be used to establish a "gold standard'' or performance expectation for the laboratory, and then assess progress. The gold standard is defined from input from laboratory management --- answers to 4 simple questions, in terms of the information obtained from the CSAP customer survey, define the standard: *What should the average Strategic Value be for the laboratory project portfolio? *What Strategic Value interval should include most of the projects in the laboratory portfolio? *What should average Project Performance be for projects with a Strategic Value of about 2? *What should average Project Performance be for projects with a Strategic Value of about 4? We discuss how to analyze CSAP customer survey data with this model. Our discussion will include "lessons learned" and issues that can invalidate this type of assessment.

  4. Customer satisfaction assessment at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    DN Anderson; ML Sours

    2000-03-23

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing and implementing a customer satisfaction assessment program (CSAP) to assess the quality of research and development provided by the laboratory. This report presents the customer survey component of the PNNL CSAP. The customer survey questionnaire is composed of two major sections: Strategic Value and Project Performance. Both sections contain a set of questions that can be answered with a 5-point Likert scale response. The strategic value section consists of five questions that are designed to determine if a project directly contributes to critical future national needs. The project Performance section consists of nine questions designed to determine PNNL performance in meeting customer expectations. A statistical model for customer survey data is developed and this report discusses how to analyze the data with this model. The properties of the statistical model can be used to establish a gold standard or performance expectation for the laboratory, and then to assess progress. The gold standard is defined using laboratory management input--answers to four questions, in terms of the information obtained from the customer survey: (1) What should the average Strategic Value be for the laboratory project portfolio? (2) What Strategic Value interval should include most of the projects in the laboratory portfolio? (3) What should average Project Performance be for projects with a Strategic Value of about 2? (4) What should average Project Performance be for projects with a Strategic Value of about 4? To be able to provide meaningful answers to these questions, the PNNL customer survey will need to be fully implemented for several years, thus providing a link between management perceptions of laboratory performance and customer survey data.

  5. Measuring Customer Satisfaction. A Central Texas JTPA Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angel, P. Linda

    A study was conducted to determine the baseline by which to measure expected improvements in customer satisfaction for Central Texas Job Training Partnership (JTPA) programs. The survey was designed to facilitate assessment of the current level of customer satisfaction with service delivery and influences on customer satisfaction. Data were…

  6. Assessing Customer Satisfaction at the NIST Research Library: Essential Tool for Future Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Rosa; Allmang, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a campus-wide customer satisfaction survey undertaken by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Research Library in 2007. The methodology, survey instrument, data analysis, results, and actions taken in response to the survey are described. The outcome and recommendations will guide the library both…

  7. Employee and customer satisfaction in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Todd; Wood, Ben D

    2010-01-01

    There were multiple factors identified in a literature review that have a relationship to customer satisfaction, customer loyalty, employee satisfaction, and links between employee and customer satisfaction. Some of the factors identified were communication, wait times, perceived value, trust, dissatisfaction with management, changes in the workplace, vision,and fun at work. Managers must identify these topics to ensure customer satisfaction, customer loyalty,and employee satisfaction which will ultimately have a positive impact on their organizations. PMID:22279715

  8. Reinventing information services to increase customer satisfaction

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    In this paper, the author presents her view of the role of an information service and proposes means of improving information customer service and satisfaction. The emphasis of the paper is on placing the primary value on the information customer rather than on the information itself. After receiving a request for information, the information service should strive for speed and accuracy of service to provide full-text sources in a language and format convenient to the customer. The author stresses that information professionals need to re-evaluate their roles to correctly assess and rectify customers` information deficiencies.

  9. Customer Satisfaction with Training Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulder, Martin

    2001-01-01

    A model for evaluating customer satisfaction with training programs was tested with training purchasers. The model confirmed two types of projects: training aimed at achieving learning results and at changing job performance. The model did not fit for training intended to support organizational change. (Contains 31 references.) (SK)

  10. An Overview of Customer Satisfaction Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hom, Willard

    This document is a report on how California community colleges can incorporate customer satisfaction models and theories from business to better serve students. Emphasis is given to two levels of customer satisfaction: macro- and micro-models. Macro-models look at how customer satisfaction relates to other elements or priorities of community…

  11. A Simulation Model for Measuring Customer Satisfaction through Employee Satisfaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zondiros, Dimitris; Konstantopoulos, Nikolaos; Tomaras, Petros

    2007-12-01

    Customer satisfaction is defined as a measure of how a firm's product or service performs compared to customer's expectations. It has long been a subject of research due to its importance for measuring marketing and business performance. A lot of models have been developed for its measurement. This paper propose a simulation model using employee satisfaction as one of the most important factors leading to customer satisfaction (the others being expectations and disconfirmation of expectations). Data obtained from a two-year survey in customers of banks in Greece were used. The application of three approaches regarding employee satisfaction resulted in greater customer satisfaction when there is serious effort to keep employees satisfied.

  12. 48 CFR 11.203 - Customer satisfaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Customer satisfaction. 11... PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 11.203 Customer satisfaction... reflects the customer's needs and to obtain suggestions for corrective actions. Whenever practicable,...

  13. 48 CFR 11.203 - Customer satisfaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Customer satisfaction. 11... PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 11.203 Customer satisfaction... reflects the customer's needs and to obtain suggestions for corrective actions. Whenever practicable,...

  14. 48 CFR 11.203 - Customer satisfaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Customer satisfaction. 11... PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 11.203 Customer satisfaction... reflects the customer's needs and to obtain suggestions for corrective actions. Whenever practicable,...

  15. 48 CFR 11.203 - Customer satisfaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Customer satisfaction. 11... PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 11.203 Customer satisfaction... reflects the customer's needs and to obtain suggestions for corrective actions. Whenever practicable,...

  16. 48 CFR 11.203 - Customer satisfaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Customer satisfaction. 11... PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 11.203 Customer satisfaction... reflects the customer's needs and to obtain suggestions for corrective actions. Whenever practicable,...

  17. Student as Customer: Factors Affecting Satisfaction and Assessments of Institutional Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Beverly A.; Kaldenberg, Dennis O.; Browne, William G.; Brown, Daniel J.

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 736 college students investigated satisfaction with a university's business education program, with attention to ratings of services and educational quality, and their relationship to students' global satisfaction, willingness to recommend the institution, and satisfaction with educational value received. Results suggest institutions…

  18. Comprehensive Family Services and customer satisfaction outcomes.

    PubMed

    Huebner, Ruth A; Jones, Blake L; Miller, Viola P; Custer, Melba; Critchfield, Becky

    2006-01-01

    Comprehensive Family Services (CFS) is a strengths-based and partnership-oriented approach to casework implemented through multiple initiatives. This study examines the relationship between the practice of CFS and satisfaction of clients, foster parents, and community partners. CFS indicators are paired with statewide customer satisfaction survey results. CFS practices are associated with significantly higher customer satisfaction that improved over time for all groups. Although causality cannot be determined, the relationship is consistent, robust, and meaningful. PMID:17039825

  19. Customized rating assessment of climate suitability (CRACS): climate satisfaction evaluation based on subjective perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tzu-Ping; Yang, Shing-Ru; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Climate not only influences the behavior of people in urban environments but also affects people's schedules and travel plans. Therefore, providing people with appropriate long-term climate evaluation information is crucial. Therefore, we developed an innovative climate assessment system based on field investigations conducted in three cities located in Northern, Central, and Southern Taiwan. The field investigations included the questionnaire surveys and climate data collection. We first analyzed the relationship between the participants and climate parameters comprising physiologically equivalent temperature, air temperature, humidity, wind speed, solar radiation, cloud cover, and precipitation. Second, we established the neutral value, comfort range, and dissatisfied range of each parameter. Third, after verifying that the subjects' perception toward the climate parameters vary based on individual preferences, we developed the customized rating assessment of climate suitability (CRACS) approach, which featured functions such as personalized and default climate suitability information to be used by users exhibiting varying demands. Finally, we performed calculations using the climate conditions of two cities during the past 10 years to demonstrate the performance of the CRACS approach. The results can be used as a reference when planning activities in the city or when organizing future travel plans. The flexibility of the assessment system enables it to be adjusted for varying regions and usage characteristics.

  20. Customized rating assessment of climate suitability (CRACS): climate satisfaction evaluation based on subjective perception.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Ping; Yang, Shing-Ru; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Climate not only influences the behavior of people in urban environments but also affects people's schedules and travel plans. Therefore, providing people with appropriate long-term climate evaluation information is crucial. Therefore, we developed an innovative climate assessment system based on field investigations conducted in three cities located in Northern, Central, and Southern Taiwan. The field investigations included the questionnaire surveys and climate data collection. We first analyzed the relationship between the participants and climate parameters comprising physiologically equivalent temperature, air temperature, humidity, wind speed, solar radiation, cloud cover, and precipitation. Second, we established the neutral value, comfort range, and dissatisfied range of each parameter. Third, after verifying that the subjects' perception toward the climate parameters vary based on individual preferences, we developed the customized rating assessment of climate suitability (CRACS) approach, which featured functions such as personalized and default climate suitability information to be used by users exhibiting varying demands. Finally, we performed calculations using the climate conditions of two cities during the past 10 years to demonstrate the performance of the CRACS approach. The results can be used as a reference when planning activities in the city or when organizing future travel plans. The flexibility of the assessment system enables it to be adjusted for varying regions and usage characteristics. PMID:25900004

  1. Analysis of Customer Loyalty through Total Quality Service, Customer Relationship Management and Customer Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binsar Kristian P., Feliks Anggia; Panjaitan, Hotman

    2014-01-01

    This research talks about total quality service and customer relationship management effects toward customer satisfaction and its impact on customer loyalty. Fast food restaurant KFC, always strives to continue to make improvements in total quality service, so that customer satisfaction can be maintained, which in turn will have an impact on…

  2. Comprehensive Family Services and Customer Satisfaction Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huebner, Ruth A.; Jones, Blake L.; Miller, Viola P.; Custer, Melba; Critchfield, Becky

    2006-01-01

    Comprehensive Family Services (CFS) is a strengths-based and partnership-oriented approach to casework implemented through multiple initiatives. This study examines the relationship between the practice of CFS and satisfaction of clients, foster parents, and community partners. CFS indicators are paired with statewide customer satisfaction survey…

  3. NRMRL/TTSD CUSTOMER SATISFACTION FOCUS GROUP

    EPA Science Inventory

    TTB uses a variety of technology transfer products and tools to communicate risk and information about technologies and research. TTB has begun a project to use EPA's generic Customer Satisfaction Survey Information Collection Request (ICR) to determine satisfaction with their pr...

  4. 26 CFR 801.4 - Customer satisfaction measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 20 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Customer satisfaction measures. 801.4 Section... REVENUE SERVICE § 801.4 Customer satisfaction measures. The customer satisfaction goals and... may be employed to gather data regarding customer satisfaction. Information to measure...

  5. 39 CFR 3055.90 - Reporting of customer satisfaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting of customer satisfaction. 3055.90... SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.90 Reporting of customer satisfaction. For... report, unless a more frequent filing is specifically indicated, addressing customer...

  6. 39 CFR 3055.90 - Reporting of customer satisfaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reporting of customer satisfaction. 3055.90... SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.90 Reporting of customer satisfaction. For... report, unless a more frequent filing is specifically indicated, addressing customer...

  7. 39 CFR 3055.90 - Reporting of customer satisfaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting of customer satisfaction. 3055.90... SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.90 Reporting of customer satisfaction. For... report, unless a more frequent filing is specifically indicated, addressing customer...

  8. 39 CFR 3055.90 - Reporting of customer satisfaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting of customer satisfaction. 3055.90... SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.90 Reporting of customer satisfaction. For... report, unless a more frequent filing is specifically indicated, addressing customer...

  9. 77 FR 12073 - Proposed Renewal of Information Collection: American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-28

    ... Office of the Secretary Proposed Renewal of Information Collection: American Customer Satisfaction Index... concerning the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Government Customer Satisfaction Survey. DATES... INFORMATION: Title: American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Government Customer Satisfaction Survey....

  10. Customer satisfaction: a practical approach for hospitals.

    PubMed

    VanderVeen, L; Ritz, M

    1996-01-01

    A California hospital developed a program to better serve and satisfy its customers. This article details the hospital's plan to implement the program with the collection and use of data to measure success, promote staff accountability, and, ultimately, demonstrate improved customer satisfaction as measured by fewer complaints. The various activities initiated to promote staff education and recognize employees also are briefly addressed. PMID:10157248

  11. Cleaning up the customer satisfaction waste dump

    SciTech Connect

    Plunkett, C.; Katz, G.M.

    1994-11-01

    Most electric utilities have been measuring Customer Satisfaction for several years now with the explicit goal of inducing their employees to improve their handling of customers. While many companies experienced early improvements, the scores have now leveled off. Increasingly, utilities are finding that their Customer Satisfaction Measurement system has reverted to little more than a {open_quotes}report card,{close_quotes} with no clear connection to business practice or processes. Even more alarming is the fact that many companies are now questioning the value of this complicated and expensive effort. This phenomenon is not unique to the electric utility industry -- it is happening in almost every industry in America. What companies really need is a way to tie customer satisfaction to business practices. To accomplish this, the Southern Company, along with several other utilities, are using the Voice of the Customer Process, which came out of the Japanese auto industry. It combines Customer Satisfaction Measurement with Quality Function Deployment (QFD) in order to guide the company into linking specific customer wants and needs to explicit performance measures and business process improvement efforts.

  12. Applying statistics to improve internal customer satisfaction

    SciTech Connect

    Caplinger, W.H.

    1986-06-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation (WEC) is in the midst of an intense Quality Improvement Program (QIP). WHC operates the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) for the Department of Energy (DOE) which is our one external ''customer''. During 1984 WHC developed a Seven Point QIP. One of these points was ''Customer Satisfaction through Excellence''. Besides recognizing the importance of the external customer, DOE, a concept of ''internal customer'' was developed. We wished to identify our internal customer, to measure and to improve his satisfaction. A pilot program of seven groups from across the laboratory activities launched the effort. All seven group managers experienced the Deming Videotapes or Seminar. An analysis of the Deming method for this application led to a 15-step plan. The plan began with identification of customer(s) and product(s) and reached steady-state with iterative improving control charts. Each group proceeded at its own pace and progress was reported monthly. The results varied. The group with a single product and several customers achieved the greatest success. They went on to use statistical process control methods. The group with a single customer and several products also achieved considerable improvement. The successes achieved by the support groups, where a wide range of products were provided to a wide range of customers, were in areas selected specifically for investigation.

  13. Customer satisfaction in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Kelly

    2004-02-01

    Patient satisfaction is not merely a "smile and be nice" set of behaviors. It is a philosophy that is founded in the concept that the patient's experience of care is important and ultimately translates into their actual response to care. The improved response to care that patients exhibit makes patient satisfaction important from a clinical vantage point. That point alone is enough to justify implementation of and commitment to a customer satisfaction program. There are, however, other compelling reasons also. Customer satisfaction has profound ramifications for the financial status of the institution and for its professional reputation in the community. The caregivers who participate in a system of good customer satisfaction experience fewer malpractice suits than their counterparts. And they enjoy a work environment that is more stable and pleasant than other institutions. The implementation of a meaningful customer service program is a huge task. It is a fundamental culture change that requires vision, long-term commitment, and constant surveillance. The single most critical factor in the successful implementation of a program that produces all the gains that it promises is leadership. Leadership must set the stage, create the atmosphere,demand that staff meet expectations, reward success, provide an example,and shape the new culture. Without strong, clear leadership, any customer service initiative will be simply a hospital-wide exercise, and those staff members who harbor a cynical viewpoint will be proved right in the end.One major difference between a successful customer service initiative and an unsuccessful one is the level of sincerity the hospital and its staff have about the care they express for their patients. If the whole process is merely an exercise to improve scores, the success will be limited and without deep roots. If the push is to establish an atmosphere of genuine care and interest for patients, however, the results are more meaningful

  14. A customer satisfaction model for a utility service industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Jastini Mohd; Nawawi, Mohd Kamal Mohd; Ramli, Razamin

    2016-08-01

    This paper explores the effect of Image, Customer Expectation, Perceived Quality and Perceived Value on Customer Satisfaction, and to investigate the effect of Image and Customer Satisfaction on Customer Loyalty of mobile phone provider in Malaysia. The result of this research is based on data gathered online from international students in one of the public university in Malaysia. Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM) has been used to analyze the data that have been collected from the international students' perceptions. The results found that Image and Perceived Quality have significant impact on Customer Satisfaction. Image and Customer Satisfaction ware also found to have significantly related to Customer Loyalty. However, no significant impact has been found between Customer Expectation with Customer Satisfaction, Perceived Value with Customer Satisfaction, and Customer Expectation with Perceived Value. We hope that the findings may assist the mobile phone provider in production and promotion of their services.

  15. Customer satisfaction: key to improved service planning

    SciTech Connect

    McAleer, L.J.; Dukich, T.

    1985-06-13

    This article focuses on the accurate measurement of customer needs and requirements for service-planning purposes. It is based on the assumption that providing maximum service value per dollar paid to the utility is a primary objective of utility managers. Using customer satisfaction and perceived service value as a basis for utility service and market planning offers several key benefits. However, in order to take advantage of these benefits, the process used to measure customer satisfaction must meet a number of criteria. A methodology that meets these requirements is the measurement of perceived value (MPV). This technique was developed by the Melior Group and has been successfully applied to more than 6000 consumers in a variety of service industries, including public utilities. The basics of MPV are described.

  16. Voice of the customer: Customer satisfaction measurement results, recommendations and action plans

    SciTech Connect

    Schriber, J.B.; Feniger, E.

    1994-11-01

    Southern California Edison has instituted a new business plan in 1991 for its Customer Solutions Department. One of the goals is to increase customer satisfaction through the measurement and continuous enhancement of value in each major customer segment. One of many tactics employed to implement this strategy was the establishment of a customer satisfaction measurement program and a customer satisfaction implementation program. The measurement of customer satisfaction baselines and development of feedback systems focuses on business lines with a high volume of customer transactions: customer communication centers, local/front offices, field services/meter readers, energy efficiency services and the electric distribution system design function. The customer satisfaction surveys are administered to approximately 10,000 customers annually. Using the results of the customer satisfaction baseline measurements, more than 200 employees formed teams to identify and implement more than 225 action items aimed at improving customer satisfaction. These strategies remain in place for 1994 and beyond.

  17. Store manager performance and satisfaction: effects on store employee performance and satisfaction, store customer satisfaction, and store customer spending growth.

    PubMed

    Netemeyer, Richard G; Maxham, James G; Lichtenstein, Donald R

    2010-05-01

    Based on emotional contagion theory and the value-profit chain literatures, the present study posits a number of hypotheses that show how managers in the small store, small number of employees retail context may affect store employees, customers, and potentially store performance. With data from 306 store managers, 1,615 store customer-contact employees, and 57,656 customers of a single retail chain, the authors examined relationships among store manager job satisfaction and job performance, store customer-contact employee job satisfaction and job performance, customer satisfaction with the retailer, and a customer-spending-based store performance metric (customer spending growth over a 2-year period). Via path analysis, several hypothesized direct and interaction relations among these constructs are supported. The results suggest implications for academic researchers and retail managers. PMID:20476831

  18. 26 CFR 801.4 - Customer satisfaction measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 20 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Customer satisfaction measures. 801.4 Section... REVENUE PRACTICE BALANCED SYSTEM FOR MEASURING ORGANIZATIONAL AND EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE WITHIN THE INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE § 801.4 Customer satisfaction measures. The customer satisfaction goals...

  19. 26 CFR 801.4 - Customer satisfaction measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 20 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Customer satisfaction measures. 801.4 Section... REVENUE PRACTICE BALANCED SYSTEM FOR MEASURING ORGANIZATIONAL AND EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE WITHIN THE INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE § 801.4 Customer satisfaction measures. The customer satisfaction goals...

  20. 26 CFR 801.4 - Customer satisfaction measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 20 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Customer satisfaction measures. 801.4 Section... REVENUE PRACTICE BALANCED SYSTEM FOR MEASURING ORGANIZATIONAL AND EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE WITHIN THE INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE § 801.4 Customer satisfaction measures. The customer satisfaction goals...

  1. 26 CFR 801.4 - Customer satisfaction measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 20 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Customer satisfaction measures. 801.4 Section... REVENUE PRACTICE BALANCED SYSTEM FOR MEASURING ORGANIZATIONAL AND EMPLOYEE PERFORMANCE WITHIN THE INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE § 801.4 Customer satisfaction measures. The customer satisfaction goals...

  2. MedlinePlus: The ForeSee Customer Satisfaction Survey

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/survey/foreseesurvey.html The ForeSee Customer Satisfaction Survey To use the sharing features on this ... and MedlinePlus en español. NLM uses the ForeSee Customer Satisfaction Survey to measure online user satisfaction. The survey ...

  3. 76 FR 44351 - Proposed Renewal of Information Collection: 1090-0008, American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... Satisfaction Index (ACSI) E-Government Website Customer Satisfaction Survey AGENCY: National Business Center... is soliciting comments concerning the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) E-Government... Richard_Tate@nbc.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI)...

  4. 77 FR 36568 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request: Generic Customer Satisfaction Surveys

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request: Generic Customer Satisfaction... information: Title of Proposal: Generic--Customer Satisfaction Surveys. OMB Control Number, if applicable... our customers. HUD will conduct various customer satisfaction surveys to gather feedback and...

  5. Study on Customer Satisfaction with Facilities Management Services in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepkova, Natalija; Žūkaitė-Jefimovienė, Giedrė

    2012-12-01

    The article introduces the concept and content of facilities management (FM) services. The paper presents the concept of customer satisfaction and discusses the key factors which influence the opinions of customers and their satisfaction or dissatisfaction with the services provided. The article presents two studies: a brief survey of several FM service providers and a survey of customer satisfaction with FM services in Lithuania. The conclusions are given at the end of the article.

  6. Customer service providers' attitudes relating to customer service and customer satisfaction in the customer-server exchange.

    PubMed

    Susskind, Alex M; Kacmar, K Michele; Borchgrevink, Carl P

    2003-02-01

    The authors proposed and tested a model describing the relationship between customer service providers' perceptions and attitudes toward their service-related duties and their customers' perceptions of satisfaction with their service experiences. Results indicated that the perception of having standards for service delivery in an organization is strongly related to line-level employees' perceptions of support from coworkers and supervisors. Perceived support from coworkers was significantly related to service providers' customer orientation, whereas perceived support from supervisors showed a weaker relationship to a customer orientation. Ultimately, service providers' customer orientation was strongly related to customers' satisfaction with service. Finally, a set of post hoc analyses indicated that coworker and supervisory support explained a greater proportion of incremental variance in the model than did perceived organizational support alone. PMID:12675405

  7. 78 FR 21008 - Proposed Information Collection (NCA Customer Satisfaction Surveys (Headstone/Marker) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (NCA Customer Satisfaction Surveys (Headstone/Marker) Activity... solicits comments on the burden estimates relating to customer satisfaction surveys involving the National... information technology. Title: Generic Clearance for NCA, and IG Customer Satisfaction Surveys. OMB...

  8. Managing customer satisfaction: New approaches to measurement and implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, J.M.; Leon, G.H.

    1994-11-01

    This paper describes the development of Duke Power`s Customer Satisfaction Manager -- an innovative customer satisfaction measurement system -- from its inception to its application as a planning tool. It provides both market researchers and utility planners with the conceptual foundation for evaluating current satisfaction measurement systems and for moving toward the development of a satisfaction manager system. Importantly, it demonstrates the practical applications of the system and the various uses of the information that it yields by presenting results from customer requirement analyses and simulated service models. The paper concludes with discussions on Duke`s expansions of the approach to incorporate transaction-specific satisfaction measures and long-term satisfaction tracking methods.

  9. Building a new understanding of customer loyalty and satisfaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lineweber, D.; Leon, G.

    1995-04-01

    Customer loyalty is more than a matter of price. It also depends on other aspects of a utility`s relationship with its customers, such as its responsiveness to customer needs. This report examines one facet of the customer loyalty quesition: What is the relationship between measures of customer satisfaction and customer loyalty? In framing this issue, of 14 interviews with large industrial customers are summarized. The insights provided in this report may have significant implications for utilities regarding the way they must position themselves for retail competition.

  10. [Tangibles as predictors of customer satisfaction in sports services].

    PubMed

    Mañas Rodríguez, Miguel A; Giménez Guerrero, Guadalupe; Muyor Rodríguez, José María; Martínez Tur, Vicente; Moliner Cantos, Carolina P

    2008-05-01

    This study investigates the power of tangible dimensions of service quality to predict customer satisfaction. For this purpose, we statistically controlled the effects of dimensions of service quality that describe social interaction between employees and customers, both functionally and relationally. A field survey was conducted with the participation of 556 customers of a sports centre. The results showed that tangible dimensions of service quality predicted an additional and significant amount of customer satisfaction variance, beyond the effects of service quality of the social interaction. The article concludes with the discussion of the implications of these results. PMID:18413085

  11. Improving Customer Satisfaction in an R and D Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Anita; Liou, Y. H. Andrew

    1998-01-01

    Satisfying customer needs is critical to the sustained competitive advantage of service suppliers. It is therefore important to understand the types of customer needs which, if fulfilled or exceeded, add value and contribute to overall customer satisfaction. This study identifies the needs of various research and development (R&D) customers who contract for engineering and design support services. The Quality Function Deployment (QFD) process was used to organize and translate each customer need into performance measures that, if implemented, can improve customer satisfaction. This study also provides specific performance measures that will more accurately guide the efforts of the engineering supplier. These organizations can either implement the QFD methodology presented herein or extract a few performance measures that are specific to the quality dimensions in need of improvement. Listening to 'what' customers talk about is a good first start.

  12. 77 FR 61777 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Generic Customer Satisfaction Surveys

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ... customer satisfaction surveys to gather feedback and data directly from our customers to determine the kind... lists the following information: Title of Proposed: Generic Customer Satisfaction Surveys. OMB Approval... this data directly from our customers. HUD will conduct various customer satisfaction surveys to...

  13. 78 FR 73238 - Currently Approved Information Collection: Comment Request for Customer Satisfaction and Opinion...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-05

    ... United States Mint Currently Approved Information Collection: Comment Request for Customer Satisfaction... United States Mint customer satisfaction and opinion surveys and focus group interviews. DATES: Written... Customer Spend Trajectory Research Survey. OMB Number: 1525-0015. Abstract: The proposed...

  14. 78 FR 38809 - Agency Information Collection (NCA Customer Satisfaction Surveys (Headstone/Marker)) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (NCA Customer Satisfaction Surveys (Headstone/Marker)) Activity....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Generic Clearance for NCA, and IG Customer Satisfaction Surveys. OMB Control... 12862, Setting Customer Service Standards, requires Federal agencies and Departments to identify...

  15. The ForeSee Customer Satisfaction Survey

    MedlinePlus

    ... measure online user satisfaction. The survey measures users' expectations and perceptions by asking standard questions about site ... score based on users' answers to questions on expectations and experience with the site. To find out ...

  16. 77 FR 61623 - Proposed Renewal of Information Collection: 1090-0007, American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ... collection of information was published on February 28, 2012 (77 FR 12073-74). No comments were received... Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Government Customer Satisfaction Surveys AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, National... collection for the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Government Customer Satisfaction Surveys...

  17. Measuring Customer Satisfaction in Summer Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzo-Navarro, Mercedes; Pedraja-Iglesias, Marta; Rivera-Torres, M. Pilar

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The recent changes that have occurred in the Spanish university teaching environment, such as growing competition, have caused these courses to become an important differentiating element of what is offered by each university. Therefore, the authors propose to delve deeper into the relationship existing between satisfaction and the intent…

  18. The Impact of IT Capability on Employee Capability, Customer Value, Customer Satisfaction, and Business Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chae, Ho-Chang

    2009-01-01

    This study empirically examines the impact of IT capability on firms' performance and evaluates whether firms' IT capabilities play a role in improving employee capability, customer value, customer satisfaction, and ultimately business performance. The results were based on comparing the business performance of the IT leader companies with that of…

  19. Customer satisfaction survey with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level.

    PubMed

    Koh, Young Rae; Kim, Shine Young; Kim, In Suk; Chang, Chulhun L; Lee, Eun Yup; Son, Han Chul; Kim, Hyung Hoi

    2014-09-01

    We performed customer satisfaction surveys for physicians and nurses regarding clinical laboratory services, and for outpatients who used phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level to evaluate our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Thus, we wish to share our experiences with the customer satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Board members of our laboratory designed a study procedure and study population, and developed two types of questionnaire. A satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory services was conducted with 370 physicians and 125 nurses by using an online or paper questionnaire. The satisfaction survey for phlebotomy services was performed with 347 outpatients who received phlebotomy services by using computer-aided interviews. Mean satisfaction scores of physicians and nurses was 58.1, while outpatients' satisfaction score was 70.5. We identified several dissatisfactions with our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. First, physicians and nurses were most dissatisfied with the specimen collection and delivery process. Second, physicians and nurses were dissatisfied with phlebotomy services. Third, molecular genetic and cytogenetic tests were found more expensive than other tests. This study is significant in that it describes the first reference survey that offers a survey procedure and questionnaire to assess customer satisfaction with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level. PMID:25187892

  20. The Relationship between Earned Value Management Metrics and Customer Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plumer, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Information Technology (IT) products have a high rate of failure. Only 25% of IT projects were completed within budget and schedule, and 15% of completed projects were not operational. Researchers have not investigated the success of project management systems from the perspective of customer satisfaction. In this quantitative study, levels of…

  1. Interruption costs, customer satisfaction and expectations for service reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M.J.; Suddeth, B.N.; Vardell, T.; Vojdani, A.

    1996-05-01

    This paper summarizes results of a comprehensive study of the economic value of electric service carried out by Duke Power Company in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute. In the study, customer interruption costs were estimated for generation, transmission and distribution outages of differencing lengths occurring under varying circumstances. Interruption costs for momentary outages and voltage disturbances are also reported. In addition to these economic indicators of customer value of service, customer expectations for service reliability and power quality and their satisfaction with the service currently offered are reported. Statistical methods and procedures used in estimating interruption costs are described.

  2. The importance of measuring customer satisfaction in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Turriziani, Adriana; Attanasio, Gennaro; Scarcella, Francesco; Sangalli, Luisa; Scopa, Anna; Genualdo, Alessandra; Quici, Stefano; Nazzicone, Giulia; Ricciotti, Maria Adelaide; La Commare, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    In the last decades, palliative care has been more and more focused on the evaluation of patients' and families' satisfaction with care. However, the evaluation of customer satisfaction in palliative care presents a number of issues such as the presence of both patients and their families, the frail condition of the patients and the complexity of their needs, and the lack of standard quality indicators and appropriate measurement tools. In this manuscript, we critically review existing evidence and literature on the evaluation of satisfaction in the palliative care context. Moreover, we provide - as a practical example - the preliminary results of our experience in this setting with the development of a dedicated tool for the measurement of satisfaction. PMID:26837318

  3. 76 FR 17189 - Revision to Currently Approved Information Collection: Comment Request for Customer Satisfaction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... United States Mint customer satisfaction and opinion surveys and focus group interviews. DATES: Written...); YPollard@usmint.treas.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: United States Mint customer satisfaction and... United States Mint Revision to Currently Approved Information Collection: Comment Request for...

  4. 75 FR 35093 - Submission for Review: Customer Satisfaction Surveys, OMB Control No. 3206-0236.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Customer Satisfaction Surveys, OMB Control No. 3206-0236. AGENCY: U.S... on a revised information collection request (ICR) 3206-0236, Customer Satisfaction Surveys. As... performance in providing services. Customer satisfaction surveys are valuable tools to gather information...

  5. 78 FR 60020 - Proposed Collection: Comment Request for Voluntary Customer Satisfaction Surveys

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ... Bureau of the Fiscal Service Proposed Collection: Comment Request for Voluntary Customer Satisfaction... Customer Satisfaction Survey. DATES: Written comments should be received on or before November 30, 2013 to...: Title: Voluntary Customer Satisfaction Survey to Implement Executive Order 12862 OMB Number:...

  6. 78 FR 56229 - Information Collection; DigitalGov Customer Satisfaction Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ... ADMINISTRATION Information Collection; DigitalGov Customer Satisfaction Survey AGENCY: Office of Citizen Services... regarding the DigitalGov Web site Customer Satisfaction Survey. DATES: Submit comments on or before November... Customer Satisfaction Survey by any of the following methods: Regulations.gov :...

  7. 75 FR 3539 - Agency Information Collection (NCA Customer Satisfaction Surveys (Headstone/Marker)) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (NCA Customer Satisfaction Surveys (Headstone/Marker)) Activity.... National Cemetery Administration Mail Surveys a. Next of Kin National Customer Satisfaction Survey (Mail to... National Customer Satisfaction Survey (Mail to 5,000 respondents/30 minutes per survey) = 2,500 hours. ]...

  8. 49 CFR 579.5 - Notices, bulletins, customer satisfaction campaigns, consumer advisories, and other communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Notices, bulletins, customer satisfaction... General § 579.5 Notices, bulletins, customer satisfaction campaigns, consumer advisories, and other... to NHTSA a copy of each communication relating to a customer satisfaction campaign, consumer...

  9. 49 CFR 579.5 - Notices, bulletins, customer satisfaction campaigns, consumer advisories, and other communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notices, bulletins, customer satisfaction... General § 579.5 Notices, bulletins, customer satisfaction campaigns, consumer advisories, and other... to NHTSA a copy of each communication relating to a customer satisfaction campaign, consumer...

  10. 49 CFR 579.5 - Notices, bulletins, customer satisfaction campaigns, consumer advisories, and other communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Notices, bulletins, customer satisfaction... General § 579.5 Notices, bulletins, customer satisfaction campaigns, consumer advisories, and other... to NHTSA a copy of each communication relating to a customer satisfaction campaign, consumer...

  11. 49 CFR 579.5 - Notices, bulletins, customer satisfaction campaigns, consumer advisories, and other communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Notices, bulletins, customer satisfaction... General § 579.5 Notices, bulletins, customer satisfaction campaigns, consumer advisories, and other... to NHTSA a copy of each communication relating to a customer satisfaction campaign, consumer...

  12. A cross-lagged test of the association between customer satisfaction and employee job satisfaction in a relational context.

    PubMed

    Zablah, Alex R; Carlson, Brad D; Donavan, D Todd; Maxham, James G; Brown, Tom J

    2016-05-01

    Due to its practical importance, the relationship between customer satisfaction and frontline employee (FLE) job satisfaction has received significant attention in the literature. Numerous studies to date confirm that the constructs are related and rely on this empirical finding to infer support for the "inside-out" effect of FLE job satisfaction on customer satisfaction. In doing so, prior studies ignore the possibility that-as suggested by the Service Profit Chain's satisfaction mirror-a portion of the observed empirical effect may be due to the "outside-in" impact of customer satisfaction on FLE job satisfaction. Consequently, both the magnitude and direction of the causal relationship between the constructs remain unclear. To address this oversight, this study builds on multisource data, including longitudinal satisfaction data provided by 49,242 customers and 1,470 FLEs from across 209 retail stores, to examine the association between FLE job satisfaction and customer satisfaction in a context where service relationships are the norm. Consistent with predictions rooted in social exchange theory, the results reveal that (a) customer satisfaction and FLE job satisfaction are reciprocally related; (b) the outside-in effect of customer satisfaction on FLE job satisfaction is predominant (i.e., larger in magnitude than the inside-out effect); and (c) customer engagement determines the extent of this outside-in predominance. Contrary to common wisdom, the study's findings suggest that, in relational contexts, incentivizing FLEs to satisfy customers may prove to be more effective for enhancing FLE and customer outcomes than direct investments in FLE job satisfaction. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26783827

  13. Linking functional and relational service quality to customer satisfaction and loyalty: differences between men and women.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hernández, Rosa M; Martínez-Tur, Vicente; Peiró, José M; Moliner, Carolina

    2010-04-01

    This study assessed differences between men and women in the association of perceptions of service quality with customer evaluations. Functional (efficiency with which the service is delivered) and relational (customers' emotional benefits, beyond the core performance, related to the social interaction of customers with employees) dimensions of service quality were measured as well as customer satisfaction and loyalty. The sample of 277 customers (191 men, 86 women), surveyed in 29 Mexican hotels, had a mean age of 38.1 yr. (SD=9.7) for men and 34.5 yr. (SD=11.0) for women. To be eligible for survey, customers had to have spent at least one night in the hotel in question. Analysis indicated that the women and men differed in the association of functional and relational dimensions of service quality with their satisfaction and loyalty. Functional service quality was higher for the men than the women, while relational service quality showed greater predictive power for women than for men, although these accounted for only 4% of the customers' satisfaction variance and 6% of the loyalty variance. PMID:20524565

  14. A green vehicle routing problem with customer satisfaction criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshar-Bakeshloo, M.; Mehrabi, A.; Safari, H.; Maleki, M.; Jolai, F.

    2016-08-01

    This paper develops an MILP model, named Satisfactory-Green Vehicle Routing Problem. It consists of routing a heterogeneous fleet of vehicles in order to serve a set of customers within predefined time windows. In this model in addition to the traditional objective of the VRP, both the pollution and customers' satisfaction have been taken into account. Meanwhile, the introduced model prepares an effective dashboard for decision-makers that determines appropriate routes, the best mixed fleet, speed and idle time of vehicles. Additionally, some new factors evaluate the greening of each decision based on three criteria. This model applies piecewise linear functions (PLFs) to linearize a nonlinear fuzzy interval for incorporating customers' satisfaction into other linear objectives. We have presented a mixed integer linear programming formulation for the S-GVRP. This model enriches managerial insights by providing trade-offs between customers' satisfaction, total costs and emission levels. Finally, we have provided a numerical study for showing the applicability of the model.

  15. Healthscape role towards customer satisfaction in private healthcare.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Debajani; Ghosh, Tathagata

    2016-07-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to identify the motives that enforce consumers to find out the major determinants that frame healthscape in private healthcare service that leads to their satisfaction in a developing country like India. Design/methodology/approach - The generic motive dimensions are identified using an exploratory factor analysis. Next the reliability and validity of the factors are established followed by regression analysis using SPSS 20.0 s/w. Findings - This paper identifies six healthscape motives in the private healthcare sector named as service personnel conduct and cleanliness, service delivery and facilities, ambience, location and look, appealing decoration, and upgraded safety service, out of which only service delivery, ambience, location, and decorations contribute the most to build customer satisfaction as per their significance value. Research limitations/implications - The various dimensions of healthcare motives should be viewed as the levers of improving hospitals' service quality in the minds of its present and future customers. This finding can offer valuable insight to the forthcoming as well as existing developer who are planning to have their healthcare service presence in India. Practical implications - This study suggests some important strategic guidelines for service positioning and market segmentation of healthcare services as per customer requirements. In the recent past, availing services from hospitals were purely utilitarian in nature. Customers were more inclined to get proper and timely services and cared more about the service quality of the healthcare service provider. Originality/value - This paper is among the few works done on understanding private healthcare service delivery process in India and customer satisfaction level from those Hospitals. This study addresses the gap by identifying a set of dimensions that are relevant to customers for a unique healthcare experience. PMID:27298059

  16. Improving customer satisfaction: emerging lessons about strategy and implementation.

    PubMed

    Morton, J

    1995-01-01

    A six-phase strategy has been developed and tested to strategically improve customer satisfaction across an entire managed care system. This article summarizes the theoretical underpinnings of the approach and highlights the first two phases of the overall strategy. Emerging lessons about strategy and implementation are described. A follow-up article will include a description of the last four phases of the strategy and a summary of initial results associated with the implementation of this approach. PMID:10142022

  17. The effect of proposed software products' features on the satisfaction and dissatisfaction of potential customers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Azham; Mkpojiogu, Emmanuel O. C.; Yusof, Muhammad Mat

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the effect of proposed software products features on the satisfaction and dissatisfaction of potential customers of proposed software products. Kano model's functional and dysfunctional technique was used along with Berger et al.'s customer satisfaction coefficients. The result shows that only two features performed the most in influencing the satisfaction and dissatisfaction of would-be customers of the proposed software product. Attractive and one-dimensional features had the highest impact on the satisfaction and dissatisfaction of customers. This result will benefit requirements analysts, developers, designers, projects and sales managers in preparing for proposed products. Additional analysis showed that the Kano model's satisfaction and dissatisfaction scores were highly related to the Park et al.'s average satisfaction coefficient (r=96%), implying that these variables can be used interchangeably or in place of one another to elicit customer satisfaction. Furthermore, average satisfaction coefficients and satisfaction and dissatisfaction indexes were all positively and linearly correlated.

  18. An experimental investigation of justice-based service recovery on customer satisfaction, loyalty, and word-of-mouth intentions.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Terri; Nieman-Gonder, Jennifer M; Andreoli, Nicole A; Trimarco-Beta, Darlene

    2006-12-01

    Service recovery is related to many important organizational outcomes such as customer satisfaction, loyalty, and profitability. Within the theoretical framework of organizational justice, an experiment using a simulated "live" service failure was used to assess the effects of justice-based service-recovery strategies on customer satisfaction, loyalty, positive word-of-mouth intentions, and negative word-of-mouth intentions. Analysis indicated that strategies including interactional justice, distributive justice, and a combination of these were equally effective in maintaining customer satisfaction, loyalty, and positive word of mouth, and minimizing negative word of mouth after a service failure. No support for the service recovery paradox, that is, increased satisfaction following service failure and recovery compared to never having a problem, was found. Satisfaction and loyalty for those in the failure conditions were equal to, although not higher than, in the no-failure control condition. Practical implications for organizational practices are discussed. PMID:17305206

  19. Student Satisfaction with Canadian Music Programmes: The Application of the American Customer Satisfaction Model in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serenko, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to empirically investigate several antecedents and consequences of student satisfaction (SS) with Canadian university music programmes as well as to measure students' level of programme satisfaction. For this, the American Customer Satisfaction Model was tested through a survey of 276 current Canadian music students.…

  20. Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Network (EREN): Customer satisfaction survey

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.V.; Henderson, D.P.

    1996-04-22

    The Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Network (EREN) Customer Satisfaction Survey was developed and executed in support of EREN`s continuous quality improvement (CQI) plan. The study was designed to provide information about the demographic make up of EREN users, the value or benefits they derive from EREN, the kinds and quality of services they want, their levels of satisfaction with existing services, their preferences in both the sources of service and the means of delivery, and to provide benchmark data for the establishment of continuous quality improvement measures. The survey was performed by soliciting voluntary participation from members of the EREN Users Group. It was executed in two phases; the first being conducted by phone using a randomly selected group; and the second being conducted electronically and which was open to all of the remaining members of the Users Group. The survey results are described.

  1. 17 CFR 300.400 - Satisfaction of customer claims for standardized options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Satisfaction of customer... CORPORATION Closeout Or Completion of Open Contractual Commitments § 300.400 Satisfaction of customer claims... determining what a customer will receive in either (1) a liquidation proceeding pursuant to the Act or (2)...

  2. 17 CFR 300.400 - Satisfaction of customer claims for standardized options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Satisfaction of customer... CORPORATION Closeout Or Completion of Open Contractual Commitments § 300.400 Satisfaction of customer claims... determining what a customer will receive in either (1) a liquidation proceeding pursuant to the Act or (2)...

  3. 17 CFR 300.400 - Satisfaction of customer claims for standardized options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Satisfaction of customer... CORPORATION Closeout Or Completion of Open Contractual Commitments § 300.400 Satisfaction of customer claims... determining what a customer will receive in either (1) a liquidation proceeding pursuant to the Act or (2)...

  4. 17 CFR 300.400 - Satisfaction of customer claims for standardized options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Satisfaction of customer... CORPORATION Closeout Or Completion of Open Contractual Commitments § 300.400 Satisfaction of customer claims... determining what a customer will receive in either (1) a liquidation proceeding pursuant to the Act or (2)...

  5. Moderating effect of nurses' customer-oriented perception between organizational citizenship behaviors and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching Sheng; Chang, Hae Ching

    2010-08-01

    This study investigates whether organizational citizenship behaviors enhance job satisfaction among nursing personnel, while exploring whether customer-oriented perception has a moderating effect between nursing personnel's organizational citizenship behaviors and job satisfaction.The authors used a cross-sectional survey sent to 500 nurses with 232 valid responses. According to the research findings, nurses' organizational citizenship behaviors have a positive and significant influence on job satisfaction. Results also indicated that the moderating effect of nurses' customer-oriented perception on the relationship between their organizational citizenship behaviors and job satisfaction was stronger for high customer-oriented perception than it was low customer-oriented perception. PMID:20693338

  6. 75 FR 9277 - Proposed Information Collection (Nation-Wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activity: Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Nation-Wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activity: Comment.... Title: Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys, VA Forms 1465-2 through 1465-4. OMB Control...

  7. 77 FR 2349 - Proposed Information Collection (Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activity: Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activity: Comment... forms of information technology. Title: Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys, VA Forms 10-1465-...

  8. 75 FR 65040 - Submission for Review: Customer Satisfaction Surveys, OMB Control No. 3206-0236

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Customer Satisfaction Surveys, OMB Control No. 3206-0236 AGENCY: U.S... on a revised information collection request (ICR) 3206-0236, Customer Satisfaction Surveys. As... collection was previously published in the Federal Register on June 21, 2010 at 75 FR 35093 allowing for a...

  9. 78 FR 69643 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Generic Clearance for Customer Satisfaction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... extension of the generic clearance to conduct customer satisfaction research which may be in the form of... customer satisfaction research efforts. Each research design is reviewed for content, utility, and user... Census Bureau Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Generic Clearance for...

  10. 77 FR 3843 - Agency Information Collection (Board of Veterans' Appeals Customer Satisfaction With Hearing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Board of Veterans' Appeals Customer Satisfaction With Hearing... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: Board of Veterans' Appeals Customer Satisfaction with Hearing Survey, VA Form 0745. OMB Control Number: 2900-0548. Type of Review: Extension of...

  11. 39 CFR 3050.53 - Information on customer satisfaction and retail access. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information on customer satisfaction and retail access. 3050.53 Section 3050.53 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PERIODIC REPORTING § 3050.53 Information on customer satisfaction and retail access....

  12. 75 FR 38775 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Generic Clearance for Customer Satisfaction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ... extension of the generic clearance to conduct customer satisfaction research which may be in the form of... customer satisfaction research efforts. Each research design is reviewed for content, utility, and user.... Census Bureau Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Generic Clearance for...

  13. 75 FR 25320 - Agency Information Collection (Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activities Under OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activities Under OMB... INFORMATION: Title: Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys, VA Forms 1465-2 through 1465-4. OMB...

  14. 76 FR 44020 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Generic Clearance for Partners and Customer Satisfaction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-22

    ... Partners and Customer Satisfaction Surveys SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement of section 3506(c)(2... Satisfaction Surveys: Extension. The information collected in these surveys will be used by the Center for..., unbiased from outside influence, timely, and (4) To develop new modes of operation based on customer...

  15. 77 FR 64382 - Agency Information Collection (Nation-Wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activities Under OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Nation-Wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activities Under OMB....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys, VA Forms 10-1465- 2 through...

  16. An Electronic Service Quality Reference Model for Designing E-Commerce Websites Which Maximizes Customer Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaheen, Amer N.

    2011-01-01

    This research investigated Electronic Service Quality (E-SQ) features that contribute to customer satisfaction in an online environment. The aim was to develop an approach which improves E-CRM processes and enhances online customer satisfaction. The research design adopted mixed methods involving qualitative and quantitative methods to…

  17. Understanding the relationship between Kano model's customer satisfaction scores and self-stated requirements importance.

    PubMed

    Mkpojiogu, Emmanuel O C; Hashim, Nor Laily

    2016-01-01

    Customer satisfaction is the result of product quality and viability. The place of the perceived satisfaction of users/customers for a software product cannot be neglected especially in today competitive market environment as it drives the loyalty of customers and promotes high profitability and return on investment. Therefore understanding the importance of requirements as it is associated with the satisfaction of users/customers when their requirements are met is worth the pain considering. It is necessary to know the relationship between customer satisfactions when their requirements are met (or their dissatisfaction when their requirements are unmet) and the importance of such requirement. So many works have been carried out on customer satisfaction in connection with the importance of requirements but the relationship between customer satisfaction scores (coefficients) of the Kano model and users/customers self-stated requirements importance have not been sufficiently explored. In this study, an attempt is made to unravel the underlying relationship existing between Kano model's customer satisfaction indexes and users/customers self reported requirements importance. The results of the study indicate some interesting associations between these considered variables. These bivariate associations reveal that customer satisfaction index (SI), and average satisfaction coefficient (ASC) and customer dissatisfaction index (DI) and average satisfaction coefficient (ASC) are highly correlated (r = 96 %) and thus ASC can be used in place of either SI or DI in representing customer satisfaction scores. Also, these Kano model's customer satisfaction variables (SI, DI, and ASC) are each associated with self-stated requirements importance (IMP). Further analysis indicates that the value customers or users place on requirements that are met or on features that are incorporated into a product influences the level of satisfaction such customers derive from the product. The

  18. CSI Index Of Customer's Satisfaction Applied In The Area Of Public Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poliaková, Adela

    2015-06-01

    In Western countries, the new visions are applied in quality control for an integrated public transport system. Public transport puts the customer at the centre of our decision making in achieving customer satisfaction with provided service. Sustainable surveys are kept among customers. A lot of companies are collecting huge databases containing over 30,000 voices of customers, which demonstrates the current satisfaction levels across the public transport service. Customer satisfaction with a provided service is a difficult task. In this service, the quality criteria are not clearly defined, and it is therefore difficult to define customer satisfaction. The paper introduces a possibility of CSI index application in conditions of the Slovak Republic transport area.

  19. Customer emotion regulation in the service interactions: its relationship to employee ingratiation, satisfaction and loyalty intentions.

    PubMed

    Medler-Liraz, Hana; Yagil, Dana

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have explored emotional regulation on the part of service employees, and its antecedents. However, customers' emotional regulation in general, and how it is affected by service employee behavior in particular, have received only scant attention. The present article explores a model suggesting that service employees' ingratiatory behavior relates to customer emotion regulation strategies, which in turn are related to customer satisfaction and loyalty. The model was tested with 131 service employee-customer dyads. The results show that service employee ingratiation was positively related to customers' deep acting but not related to surface acting. Customers' deep acting was positively related to their satisfaction. A positive relationship was found between customer satisfaction and loyalty. PMID:23724700

  20. Targeting, Segmenting and Positioning the Market for College Students to Increase Customer Satisfaction and Overall Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have explored the relationship between marketing efforts and firm financial performance. Studies have looked at potential lifetime value of customers, to demonstrate the value of keeping customers. Various other studies have looked at the relationship between customer satisfaction and firm performance. However, few studies have…

  1. Financial health and customer satisfaction in private health care providers in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Schiozer, Rafael Felipe; Saito, Cristiana Checchia; Saito, Richard

    2011-11-01

    This paper analyzes the relationship between the financial health and organizational form of private health care providers in Brazil. It also examines the major determinants of customer satisfaction associated with the provider's organizational form. An adjusted Altman's z-score is used as an indicator of financial health. A proxy variable based on customer complaints filed at the Brazilian National Agency for Supplementary Health is used as an indicator for customer satisfaction. The study uses a sample of 270 private health care providers and their operations over the period 2003-2005. Panel data analysis includes control variables related to market, operations, and management. Principal results indicate that: (1) private health care providers benefit from economies of scale; (2) self-funded health plans have better financial health; (3) spending on marketing does not have a significant impact on customer satisfaction in Brazil; (4) weak empirical evidence exists showing that good financial performance enhances customer's satisfaction. PMID:22124495

  2. Web Evaluation at the US National Institutes of Health: Use of the American Customer Satisfaction Index Online Customer Survey

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Elliot R; Feldman, Sue; Love, Cynthia B; Rodrigues, Dennis; Malamud, Mark; Lagana, Marie; Crafts, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Background The National Institutes of Health (NIH), US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), realized the need to better understand its Web users in order to help assure that websites are user friendly and well designed for effective information dissemination. A trans-NIH group proposed a trans-NIH project to implement an online customer survey, known as the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) survey, on a large number of NIH websites—the first “enterprise-wide” ACSI application, and probably the largest enterprise Web evaluation of any kind, in the US government. The proposal was funded by the NIH Evaluation Set-Aside Program for two years at a cost of US $1.5 million (US $1.275 million for survey licenses for 60 websites at US $18,000 per website; US $225,000 for a project evaluation contractor). Objective The overall project objectives were to assess the value added to the participating NIH websites of using the ACSI online survey, identify any NIH-wide benefits (and limitations) of the ACSI, ascertain any new understanding about the NIH Web presence based on ACSI survey results, and evaluate the effectiveness of a trans-NIH approach to Web evaluation. This was not an experimental study and was not intended to evaluate the ACSI survey methodology, per se, or the impacts of its use on customer satisfaction with NIH websites. Methods The evaluation methodology included baseline pre-project websites profiles; before and after email surveys of participating website teams; interviews with a representative cross-section of website staff; observations of debriefing meetings with website teams; observations at quarterly trans-NIH Web staff meetings and biweekly trans-NIH leadership team meetings; and review and analysis of secondary data. Results Of the original 60 NIH websites signed up, 55 implemented the ACSI survey, 42 generated sufficient data for formal reporting of survey results for their sites, and 51 completed the final project survey. A

  3. Variables contributing to an excellent customer service management profile within the regulated electric utility industry: A comparison of self-concept with customer satisfaction for customer service management

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    This research sought to address the relationship between self-concept and customer satisfaction: can customer satisfaction with a major electric utility be explained in terms of the self-reported, self-concept of the utility's managers The population to which the results of this study were generalized consisted of customer service managers in public electric utilities across the United States. In order to represent this population, a sample was selected consisting of customer service managers at a midwestern electric utility based in a large metropolitan area. Participants in this study were managers of four direct customer contact service organizations within six geographic division organizations. The methodology included comparisons of these four customer contact service organizations on twelve independent, self-concept variables and six customer satisfaction dependent variables using Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), Scheffe' tests, Chi-Square, and Stepwise multiple regression. The groups were found not to be significantly different and knowledge of the self-concept scores for managers will not increase the ability to predict customer satisfaction over no knowledge of self-concept scores.

  4. The Link between Organizational Learning Culture and Customer Satisfaction: Confirming Relationship and Exploring Moderating Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantouvakis, Angelos; Bouranta, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to develop a theoretical framework and conduct an empirical study across different service sectors to investigate the inter-relationships between organizational learning culture, employee job satisfaction and their impact on customer satisfaction. It also aims to examine an individual-level variable (educational…

  5. 17 CFR 300.400 - Satisfaction of customer claims for standardized options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Satisfaction of a “Claim for Cash” or a “Claim for Securities” Source: Sections 300.500 through 300.503 appear... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Satisfaction of customer claims for standardized options. 300.400 Section 300.400 Commodity and Securities Exchanges...

  6. Applying Customer Satisfaction Theory to Community College Planning of Counseling Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hom, Willard C.

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses a framework in which a researcher may apply a customer satisfaction model to the planning of counseling services at the community college level. It also reviews some historical work on satisfaction research with the unique environment of student services in two-year colleges. The article suggests that readers could benefit…

  7. A research model of health-care competition and customer satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Asoh, Derek A; Rivers, Patrick A

    2007-11-01

    In all industries, competition among businesses has long been encouraged as a mechanism to increase value for customers. In other words, competition ensures the provision of better products and services to satisfy the needs of customers. Various perspectives of competition, the nature of service quality, health-care system costs and customer satisfaction in health care are examined. A model of the relationship among these variables is developed. The model depicts customer satisfaction as an outcome measure directly dependent on competition. Quality of care and health-care system costs, while also directly dependent on competition, are considered as determinants of customer satisfaction as well. The model is discussed in the light of propositions for empirical research. PMID:17958970

  8. Application of Gray Relational Analysis Method in Comprehensive Evaluation on the Customer Satisfaction of Automobile 4S Enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenglin, Yao

    The car sales enterprises could continuously boost sales and expand customer groups, an important method is to enhance the customer satisfaction. The customer satisfaction of car sales enterprises (4S enterprises) depends on many factors. By using the grey relational analysis method, we could perfectly combine various factors in terms of customer satisfaction. And through the vertical contrast, car sales enterprises could find specific factors which will improve customer satisfaction, thereby increase sales volume and benefits. Gray relational analysis method has become a kind of good method and means to analyze and evaluate the enterprises.

  9. Deriving models of customer satisfaction: A comparison of alternative quantitative approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, M.T.

    1994-11-01

    PECO Energy, like many other companies, measures customer satisfaction, and has gone through a discussion of how best to model the results. PECO Energy utilizes a model of customer satisfaction based upon multiple regression, where both independent and dependent variables are responses to survey questions using a fully anchored five point scale. In addition to multiple regression, there are a number of other multivariate procedures that can be used to develop a quantitative model of customer satisfaction. This paper compares and contrasts results obtained from standard multiple regression, multiple regression with dummy coding, discriminant function analysis, and logistic regression procedures. Findings suggest that each of these methods can yield satisfactory information regarding customer perception.

  10. Measuring patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Levin, Roger

    2005-03-01

    Many businesses use customer satisfaction surveys successfully. You may notice that you find one in almost every restaurant or hotel room. I do not think it is a coincidence that the hotel industry provides some of the finest customer service available. When it comes to providing excellent customer service, dental practices can learn from businesses that regularly assess customer satisfaction. PMID:15819351

  11. Student Satisfaction and the Customer Focus in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mark, Eddie

    2013-01-01

    Advocating a customer focus, the Total Quality Management model of leadership has led to success in raising performance levels throughout various manufacturing and service industries. Many education stakeholders, however, are resistant to the notion that postsecondary students benefit from being treated like customers. While many critics oppose…

  12. [2011 Shanghai customer satisfaction report of DSA/X-ray equipment's after-service].

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Qian, Jianguo; Cao, Shaoping; Zheng, Yunxin; Xu, Zitian; Wang, Lijun

    2012-11-01

    To improve the manufacturer's medical equipment after-sale service, the fifth Shanghai zone customer satisfaction survey was launched by the end of 2011. The DSA/X-ray equipment was setup as an independent category for the first time. From the survey we can show that the DSA/X-ray equipment's CSI is higher than last year, the customer satisfaction scores of preventive maintenance and service contract are lower than others, and CSI of local brand is lower than imported brand. PMID:23461127

  13. The interplay between customer participation and difficulty of design examples in the online designing process and its effect on customer satisfaction: mediational analyses.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Chi; Chen, Hui-Yun; Huang, I-Chiang

    2009-04-01

    In the current consumer-centric economy, consumers increasingly desire the opportunity to design their own products in order to express more effectively their self-image. Mass customization, based on efficient and flexible modulization designs, has provided individualized products to satisfy this desire. This work presents an experiment employed to demonstrate that customer participation leads to higher satisfaction. Specifically, the increment in customer satisfaction due to participation is greater when an easy example is provided than when either no example or a difficult one is provided. Additionally, self-congruity plays a mediating role on the customer participation-satisfaction relationship, and this mediating effect varies across different levels of the design example provided in the design process. When an easy design example is present, customer participation has a direct effect on satisfaction, in addition to the indirect effect of self-congruity. When a difficult example is provided, customer participation does not have incremental effects on either self-congruity or customer satisfaction. Finally, when no design example is shown to customers, contrary to our expectation, participation still enhances customer satisfaction due to an increased sense of self-congruity. PMID:19250014

  14. Choice, perceived control, and customer satisfaction: the psychology of online service recovery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Chi

    2008-06-01

    Service failures and consequent recoveries have been identified as critical determinants of customer retention. Therefore, effective service recovery programs warrant further exploration, particularly in the online shopping environment, where consumers can receive immediate and tangible service recovery. The results of the present study suggest that by providing a choice of recovery options, customers' sense of control is increased, as is their satisfaction with the particular recovery efforts and their overall satisfaction with the entire service experience. Also, service importance accentuated the impact of choice on perceived control. Specifically, when the service was of greater importance, giving customers a choice of recovery options augmented customers' sense of control more than when the service was of lesser importance. The implications of the findings are also discussed. PMID:18537502

  15. 78 FR 69703 - 10-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Generic Customer Satisfaction Surveys; Physical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... Surveys; Physical Inspection Pilot Program-- Solicitation of Interest (Survey) AGENCY: Office of the... Customer Satisfaction Surveys Physical Inspection Alignment Pilot Program--Expansion Announcement. OMB Approval Number: 2535-0116. Type of Request: Change Request. Form Number: N/A. Description of the need...

  16. Approaching Error-Free Customer Satisfaction through Process Change and Feedback Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berglund, Kristin M.; Ludwig, Timothy D.

    2009-01-01

    Employee-based errors result in quality defects that can often impact customer satisfaction. This study examined the effects of a process change and feedback system intervention on error rates of 3 teams of retail furniture distribution warehouse workers. Archival records of error codes were analyzed and aggregated as the measure of quality. The…

  17. SY 2008-09 Customer Satisfaction Survey Results (Full Report). DoDEA Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Defense Education Activity, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) Customer Satisfaction Survey is a biennial survey administered by DoDEA to parents and students to monitor DoDEA's success in meeting students' needs. The survey is administered every other year to sponsors with children in pre-kindergarten--12th grade and to students in grades 4-12. For the…

  18. SY 2010-11 Customer Satisfaction Survey Results (Full Report). DoDEA Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Defense Education Activity, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) Customer Satisfaction Survey is a biennial survey administered by DoDEA to parents and students to monitor DoDEA's success in meeting students' needs. The survey is administered every other year to sponsors with children in pre-kindergarten-12th grade and to students in grades 4-12. For the…

  19. 49 CFR 579.5 - Notices, bulletins, customer satisfaction campaigns, consumer advisories, and other communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... design specifications), whether or not such defect is safety-related. (b) Each manufacturer shall furnish to NHTSA a copy of each communication relating to a customer satisfaction campaign, consumer advisory..., other manufacturer, owner, or purchaser, in the United States. (c) If a notice or communication...

  20. A Brand Loyalty Model Utilizing Team Identification and Customer Satisfaction in the Licensed Sports Product Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Soonhwan; Shin, Hongbum; Park, Jung-Jun; Kwon, Oh-Ryun

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among the attitudinal brand loyalty variables (i.e., cognitive, affective, and conative components), team identification, and customer satisfaction by developing a structural equation model, based on Oliver's (1997) attitudinal brand loyalty model. The results of this study confirmed…

  1. [Analysis of on-call consultations with clinical pathologists--identification of customer's satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Yanai, M

    2000-09-01

    One aspect whereby effectiveness of clinical pathologists can be measured is customer service and satisfaction. Clinical pathologist should identify their customers, their processes and procedures to meet these needs to the customer's satisfaction. To identify customer's satisfaction, the records of on-call consultations with clinical pathologists were analyzed. Between January 1996 and December 1998, 1327 consultations were recorded, 40% of which were consultations from physicians, 50% from medical technologists. Physicians requested interpretation of laboratory data obtained, and clinical knowledge mainly concerning the microbiology and hematology during office hours. On holidays, physicians needed help performing emergency tests such as Gram stain and Wright-Giemsa stain. During office hours, medical technologists requested clinical information concerning patients in whom unreasonable data would be reported and the contact to the clinical side. Furthermore, technologists inquired about the methodology of laboratory tests during day duty on holidays. These results indicated that the clinical pathologist in our hospital could satisfy the customer(physicians and medical technologists), by providing 1) a wide range of clinical knowledge concerning not only the laboratory medicine but clinical medicine including therapeutics, 2) capability of performing emergency tests such as Gram stain and Wright-Giemsa stain, and 3) capability of interpreting the results obtained. Although these would not be adopted in every hospital, every clinical pathologist should examine his role in the hospital. PMID:11051798

  2. The Public Service Company of Colorado customer satisfaction index (examination of Anova and neural network models)

    SciTech Connect

    Baugh, K.A.; Greenwald, E.; Jones, C.V.; Mills, T.

    1994-11-01

    In 1993, Public Service Company of Colorado (PSCo) began a long-term effort to develop an index to measure and track customer satisfaction. The customer satisfaction index was designed to: measure of how well PSCo meets identified customer needs; and link PSCo performance well regulatory rate incentives and employee performance bonuses. To assure reliability, two modeling methods were developed in parallel throughout a 12 month period. An Anova-based approach known as Multiple Classification Analysis (MCA) provides an increasingly clear picture of the structure of customer wants and needs. The MCA analysis supports a predictive model linking overall customer satisfaction with service attributes. Additionally, a multi-layer feedforward neural network model was repeatedly estimated with the growing body of survey data. Application of the neural network model accomplished two important tasks. First, the neural network model provided validation for the attribute structure and intensity of parameter estimates for the MCA analysis. Second, the neural network model, working in conjunction with MCA output, helped produce slightly tighter fits amongst the data and thus improved the model`s predictive power. This paper will introduce you to PSCo`s overall research goals, provide insight into the qualitative methods that insured accuracy in the research instrument, describe overall research procedures, illustrate the modeling technology, and summarize opportunities for using these research results.

  3. Customer care. Patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting.

    PubMed

    Doering, G T

    1998-09-01

    The focus of the study was to prioritize six emergency medical service treatment factors in terms of their impact upon patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting. The six treatment areas analyzed were: EMS response time; medical care provided on scene; explanation of care by the provider; the provider's ability to reduce patient anxiety; the provider's ability to meet the patient's non-medical needs; and the level of courtesy/politeness shown by the EMS provider toward the patient. Telephone interviews were conducted with both patients and bystanders to obtain their perception of how well the system met their needs. The study analyzed how the six issues were rated and then evaluated the impact an individual's low score in a category had on that person's overall rating of the service provided. The overall satisfaction rating is not a calculated score, but an overall score specified by the respondent. The effect each issue had on the respondent's overall rating was determined by averaging the overall ratings for a category's low scorers, averaging the overall ratings for high scorers and then measuring the difference. Results of the study indicate that the factor with the greatest negative impact on patient satisfaction came from a perceived lack of crew courtesy and politeness. Respondents who indicated a fair to poor score in this category decreased their overall score by 60.2%. Ratings in other categories yielded the following results: When respondents rated the response time as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed an 18.4% decrease. When respondents rated the quality of medical care as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed a decrease of 22.6%. When the crew's ability to explain what was happening to the patient was rated as fair to poor, the average overall score dropped 33.6%. When the EMT's and medic's ability to reduce the patient's anxiety was rated fair to poor, average overall score declined by 32.6%. Finally, when the crew

  4. Customer satisfaction planning and industrial engineering move hospital towards in-house stockless program.

    PubMed

    Burton, R; Mauk, D

    1993-03-01

    By integrating customer satisfaction planning and industrial engineering techniques when examining internal costs and efficiencies, materiel managers are able to better realize what concepts will best meet their customers' needs. Defining your customer(s), applying industrial engineering techniques, completing work sampling studies, itemizing recommendations and benefits to each alternative, performing feasibility and cost-analysis matrixes and utilizing resources through productivity monitoring will get you on the right path toward selecting concepts to use. This article reviews the above procedures as they applied to one hospital's decision-making process to determine whether to incorporate a stockless inventory program. Through an analysis of customer demand, the hospital realized that stockless was the way to go, but not by outsourcing the function--the hospital incorporated an in-house stockless inventory program. PMID:10124470

  5. Assessment and correlation of customer and rater response to cold-start and warmup driveability

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    A program was conducted from January 14 through March 8, 1991, at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) in San Antonio, Texas, to establish a relationship between demerits observed in CRC Cold-Start and Warmup Driveability assessments to customer satisfaction levels, and to determine which of several performance deficiencies associated with low volatility gasolines are most troublesome to customers during normal vehicle warmup. Customers used their vehicles in daily service, and a subset of the test fleet was evaluated by trained raters using the established CRC test procedure. There were 7,206 driveability performance assessments by customers which were correlated with 661 trained-rater cold-start driveability evaluations. One hundred sixty-seven SwRI employees participated in the program. Hesitation was the most widely observed problem and was the primary cause of dissatisfaction. The gasoline-ethanol and hydrocarbon-only fuel sets had distinctly different malfunction patterns. Hesitation was strongly associated with gasoline ethanol blends, while surge and stumble were strongly associated with hydrocarbon-only fuels. The current total weighted demerit (TWD) system was found to correlate poorly with customer satisfaction; however, customer observations of problems correlated no better with customer satisfaction. If TWD is to be an indicator of customer perception of driveability performance there should be uniform weighting of rater-observed malfunctions, and start-time should be assigned a greater weighting and a shorter grace period.

  6. Customized Internet Assessment for Students and Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barot, Aekam B.; Barot, Bal

    2006-01-01

    The average age of students at Lake Michigan College (LMC) is twenty-eight years old. In the current study, the application of customized internet assessment for Chemistry 101, Introductory College Chemistry, from 2001 to 2005 is compared with traditional assessment from 1996 to 2000. The authors describe the ways in which computerized assessment…

  7. [A cross-level analysis of the links between service quality and disconfirmation of expectations and customer satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hernández, Rosa M; Martínez-Tur, Vicente; González-Morales, M Gloria; Ramos, José; Peiró, José M

    2009-08-01

    This article examines links between disconfirmation of expectations and functional and relational service quality perceived by employees and customer satisfaction. A total of 156 employees, who were working in 52 work units, participated in the research study. In addition, 517 customers who were assisted by these work units were surveyed. Using a cross-level approach, we used a random coefficient model to test the aforementioned relationships. A strong relationship between disconfirmation of expectations and customer satisfaction was observed. Also, the results confirmed that functional service quality maintains an additional and significant association with customer satisfaction. In contrast, there were no significant relationships between relational service quality and customer satisfaction. The article concludes with a discussion of these results. PMID:19622323

  8. Beyond Customer Satisfaction: Reexamining Customer Loyalty to Evaluate Continuing Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Jeff E.; Howell, Scott L.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides questionnaire items and a theoretical model of factors predictive of customer loyalty for use by administrators to determine ways to increase repeat purchasing in their continuing education programs. Prior studies in the literature are discussed followed by results of applying the model at one institution and a discussion of…

  9. Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Network (EREN) customer satisfaction survey, 1997. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.V.; Henderson, D.P.

    1997-07-01

    the EREN Customer Satisfaction Survey 1997 was designed to follow up the results of the 1995-96 Surveys, enabling comparison to the 1995- 96 baseline, and to provide additional qualitative feedback about EREN. Both the 1995-96 and 1997 Surveys had these objectives: Identify and define actual EREN users; Determine the value or benefits derived from the use of EREN; Determine the kind and quality of services that users want; Determine the users` levels of satisfaction with existing services; Determine users` preferences in both the sources of service and means of delivery; and Establish continuous quality improvement measures. This report presents the methodology used, scope and limitations of the study, description of the survey instrument, and findings regarding demographics, technical capabilities, usage patterns, general use, importance of and satisfaction with resources, and additional information and comments.

  10. Proactive patient rounding to increase customer service and satisfaction on an orthopaedic unit.

    PubMed

    Tea, Christine; Ellison, Michael; Feghali, Fadia

    2008-01-01

    Customer service and patient satisfaction have become increasingly important in the healthcare industry. Given limited resources and a myriad of choices, on which facets of patient satisfaction should healthcare providers focus? An analysis of 40,000 observations across 4 hospitals found 1 important intervention: timely staff responsiveness. Using the Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) quality methodology, the goal was set to improve staff responsiveness to orthopaedic patient needs and requests, thus improving patient satisfaction. A model to improve staff responsiveness was systematically developed and implemented. The I Care Rounding model places the emphasis on proactively meeting patient needs through hourly rounding, rather than caregivers providing care in a reactionary mode. After full implementation, positive improvement was demonstrated. PMID:18677250

  11. Measuring Customer Satisfaction and Quality of Service in Special Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Marilyn Domas; Abels, Eileen G.; Nitecki, Danuta

    This project tested the appropriateness of SERVQUAL (i.e., an instrument widely used in the service industry for assessing service quality based on repeated service encounters rather than a particular service encounter) to measure service quality in special libraries and developed a modified version for special libraries. SERVQUAL is based on an…

  12. DoDEA 2010-11 Customer Satisfaction Survey. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Defense Education Activity, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Every two years the Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) administers the DoDEA Customer Satisfaction Survey (CSS) to all parents with children attending DoDEA schools and all 4th-12th grade students enrolled in a DoDEA school. Parents were asked to complete one survey for each school in which they had a child enrolled. The purpose of…

  13. A modified dynamic evolving neural-fuzzy approach to modeling customer satisfaction for affective design.

    PubMed

    Kwong, C K; Fung, K Y; Jiang, Huimin; Chan, K Y; Siu, Kin Wai Michael

    2013-01-01

    Affective design is an important aspect of product development to achieve a competitive edge in the marketplace. A neural-fuzzy network approach has been attempted recently to model customer satisfaction for affective design and it has been proved to be an effective one to deal with the fuzziness and non-linearity of the modeling as well as generate explicit customer satisfaction models. However, such an approach to modeling customer satisfaction has two limitations. First, it is not suitable for the modeling problems which involve a large number of inputs. Second, it cannot adapt to new data sets, given that its structure is fixed once it has been developed. In this paper, a modified dynamic evolving neural-fuzzy approach is proposed to address the above mentioned limitations. A case study on the affective design of mobile phones was conducted to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. Validation tests were conducted and the test results indicated that: (1) the conventional Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) failed to run due to a large number of inputs; (2) the proposed dynamic neural-fuzzy model outperforms the subtractive clustering-based ANFIS model and fuzzy c-means clustering-based ANFIS model in terms of their modeling accuracy and computational effort. PMID:24385884

  14. A Modified Dynamic Evolving Neural-Fuzzy Approach to Modeling Customer Satisfaction for Affective Design

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, C. K.; Fung, K. Y.; Jiang, Huimin; Chan, K. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Affective design is an important aspect of product development to achieve a competitive edge in the marketplace. A neural-fuzzy network approach has been attempted recently to model customer satisfaction for affective design and it has been proved to be an effective one to deal with the fuzziness and non-linearity of the modeling as well as generate explicit customer satisfaction models. However, such an approach to modeling customer satisfaction has two limitations. First, it is not suitable for the modeling problems which involve a large number of inputs. Second, it cannot adapt to new data sets, given that its structure is fixed once it has been developed. In this paper, a modified dynamic evolving neural-fuzzy approach is proposed to address the above mentioned limitations. A case study on the affective design of mobile phones was conducted to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. Validation tests were conducted and the test results indicated that: (1) the conventional Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) failed to run due to a large number of inputs; (2) the proposed dynamic neural-fuzzy model outperforms the subtractive clustering-based ANFIS model and fuzzy c-means clustering-based ANFIS model in terms of their modeling accuracy and computational effort. PMID:24385884

  15. 24 CFR 902.50 - Resident service and satisfaction assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resident service and satisfaction... URBAN DEVELOPMENT PUBLIC HOUSING ASSESSMENT SYSTEM PHAS Indicator #4: Resident Service and Satisfaction § 902.50 Resident service and satisfaction assessment. (a) Objective. The objective of the...

  16. Nova Southeastern University's Employees Respond to a 1999 Office of Human Resources Customer Satisfaction Survey. Research and Planning Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFarland, Thomas W.

    In 1999 the Office of Human Resources at Nova Southeastern University (Florida) prepared a survey, based on a previous study, to gather information about employee satisfaction with the University's services. This report summarizes the results of this customer satisfaction survey. Surveys were returned by 466 of the 1,941 potential respondents, a…

  17. Links among high-performance work environment, service quality, and customer satisfaction: an extension to the healthcare sector.

    PubMed

    Scotti, Dennis J; Harmon, Joel; Behson, Scott J

    2007-01-01

    Healthcare managers must deliver high-quality patient services that generate highly satisfied and loyal customers. In this article, we examine how a high-involvement approach to the work environment of healthcare employees may lead to exceptional service quality, satisfied patients, and ultimately to loyal customers. Specifically, we investigate the chain of events through which high-performance work systems (HPWS) and customer orientation influence employee and customer perceptions of service quality and patient satisfaction in a national sample of 113 Veterans Health Administration ambulatory care centers. We present a conceptual model for linking work environment to customer satisfaction and test this model using structural equations modeling. The results suggest that (1) HPWS is linked to employee perceptions of their ability to deliver high-quality customer service, both directly and through their perceptions of customer orientation; (2) employee perceptions of customer service are linked to customer perceptions of high-quality service; and (3) perceived service quality is linked with customer satisfaction. Theoretical and practical implications of our findings, including suggestions of how healthcare managers can implement changes to their work environments, are discussed. PMID:17447538

  18. Job satisfaction in the home health care context: validating a customized instrument for application.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Grant B; Sherloch, John J; Ritchie, William J

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present the development and validation process of a customized job satisfaction instrument within the home health care setting. During development, home health care agency directors selected items from preexisting scales to create a new 15-item instrument designed to measure job satisfaction, supervisory relationships, and job environment. The instrument's reliability and validity were examined using a two-step approach. First, exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was carried out with a sample of 398 aides, and three factors were identified. Second, confirmatory factor analysis was conducted with an independent sample of 328 aides using the three-factor solution that was selected from the EFA. The reliability estimates for the job satisfaction, supervisory relationships, and job environment scales were 0.84, 0.93, and 0.74, respectively. Results from this study yield a statistically sound instrument that offers potential advantages to those interested in better understanding job satisfaction and two related constructs of employees in health-related fields. Both research and practical implications are discussed. The final instrument will be a valuable tool for collecting information from home health care workers, a population that has historically been difficult to access and measure. PMID:20210070

  19. Use of a customer satisfaction survey by health care regulators: a tool for total quality management.

    PubMed Central

    Andrzejewski, N; Lagua, R T

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To conduct a survey of health care providers to determine the quality of service provided by the staff of a regulatory agency; to collect information on provider needs and expectations; to identify perceived and potential problems that need improvement; and to make changes to improve regulatory services. METHODS: The authors surveyed health care providers using a customer satisfaction questionnaire developed in collaboration with a group of providers and a research consultant. The questionnaire contained 20 declarative statements that fell into six quality domains: proficiency, judgment, responsiveness, communication, accommodation, and relevance. A 10% level of dissatisfaction was used as the acceptable performance standard. RESULTS: The survey was mailed to 324 hospitals, nursing homes, home care agencies, hospices, ambulatory care centers, and health maintenance organizations. Fifty-six percent of provider agencies responded; more than half had written comments. The three highest levels of customer satisfaction were in courtesy of regulatory staff (90%), efficient use of onsite time (84%), and respect for provider employees (83%). The three lowest levels of satisfaction were in the judgment domain; only 44% felt that there was consistency among regulatory staff in the interpretation of regulations, only 45% felt that interpretations of regulations were flexible and reasonable, and only 49% felt that regulations were applied objectively. Nine of 20 quality indicators had dissatisfaction ratings of more than 10%; these were considered priorities for improvement. CONCLUSIONS: Responses to the survey identified a number of specific areas of concern; these findings are being incorporated into the continuous quality improvement program of the office. PMID:9160054

  20. Sexual satisfaction of infertile couples assessed using the Golombok-Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction (GRISS).

    PubMed

    Shoji, Mayumi; Hamatani, Toshio; Ishikawa, Shoko; Kuji, Naoaki; Ohta, Hiroaki; Matsui, Hideo; Yoshimura, Yasunori

    2014-01-01

    Recently, infertility treatment-related psychological effects are receiving increased attention. However, whether sexual satisfaction is reduced amongst infertile couples remains to be elucidated. In this study, sexual satisfaction of Japanese infertile couples was assessed using a validated questionnaire designed to assess the male and female partner individually, and the couple as a whole for the first time. This study randomly included 170 infertile couples seen at the outpatient clinic and 170 couples that had recently achieved spontaneous pregnancy. All couples were given the Japanese version of the Golombok-Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction (GRISS). In couples aged 35 years or older, the male partners showed significantly worse sexual satisfaction scores than the female partners. Sexual satisfaction also deteriorated with therapeutic interventions, with mental factors affected more than physical factors. Therapeutic interventions such as timed sexual intercourse and assisted reproductive technology were considered emotionally stressful for infertile couples, with sexual satisfaction accordingly lower in this group than in couples achieving spontaneous pregnancy. GRISS successfully evaluated lower sexual satisfaction associated with infertility, and hence is a useful tool for identifying couples whose sexual satisfaction could be enhanced by counselling or other stress-reduction modalities. PMID:24902628

  1. Organizational climate configurations: relationships to collective attitudes, customer satisfaction, and financial performance.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Mathis; Ostroff, Cheri; Shmulyian, Svetlana; Kinicki, Angelo

    2009-05-01

    Research on organizational climate has tended to focus on independent dimensions of climate rather than studying the total social context as configurations of multiple climate dimensions. The authors examined relationships between configurations of unit-level climate dimensions and organizational outcomes. Three profile characteristics represented climate configurations: (1) elevation, or the mean score across climate dimensions; (2) variability, or the extent to which scores across dimensions vary; and (3) shape, or the pattern of the dimensions. Across 2 studies (1,120 employees in 120 bank branches and 4,317 employees in 86 food distribution stores), results indicated that elevation was related to collective employee attitudes and service perceptions, while shape was related to customer satisfaction and financial performance. With respect to profile variability, results were mixed. The discussion focuses on future directions for taking a configural approach to organizational climate. PMID:19450003

  2. Investigation on the Influence of the Brand Image of Higher Educational Institutions on Satisfaction and Customer Lifetime Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Chin-Tsu; Chen, Chun-Fu

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to discuss the relationships among the brand image of universities (external variables), university satisfaction (mediating variables) and customer lifetime value (internal variables). The findings can serve as a reference for higher educational institutions in strengthening their advantages and overcoming their shortcomings, as…

  3. [Internal and external assessment of nursing home residents' satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Stéphane; Cohen, Nadia; Bertin-Hugault, François; Sanchez, Marc Antoine; Dramé, Moustapha; Denormandie, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Quality improvement procedures and measuring the satisfaction of nursing home residents is a major priority. A study assessed the differences between the results of a survey conducted by internal staff and of one carried out by an external service provider to evaluate the satisfaction of the residents of a nursing home. PMID:27449308

  4. Customer satisfaction in medical service encounters -- a comparison between obstetrics and gynecology patients and general medical patients.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Sheng; Weng, Hui-Ching; Chang, Hsin-Hsin; Hsu, Tsuen-Ho

    2006-03-01

    This study is concerned with the "service encounter", and seeks to describe, by use of the Service Encounter Evaluation Model, how the processes involved in the service encounter affect customer satisfaction. Its findings have implications for management practice and research directions, and recommendations are made. With the implementation of a national health insurance scheme, an ever-prospering economy and continually improving educational levels in Taiwan, demand among citizens for good health and medical care is ever increasing. Obstetrics and gynecology patients often differ greatly from general patients, in terms of their moods and emotions. This research involved an empirical study, whose subjects were 590 customers of general clinics and 339 customers of gynecology clinics, in various medical centers in southern Taiwan. By factor analysis, the study established four influencing factors, which were "Medical professionals", "Nursing professionals", "Service personnel" and "Space and facilities". Using the Linear Structural Relation Model (LISREL), it found that medical professionals, nursing professionals, service personnel and space and facilities were effective predictors of medical treatment satisfaction. We also found that the greatest positive impact on overall medical treatment satisfaction resulted from rises in satisfaction with medical professionals, but that the least impact was achieved in relation to service personnel in the general and gynecology clinics. PMID:16547902

  5. Health worker (internal customer) satisfaction and motivation in the public sector in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Agyepong, Irene Akua; Anafi, Patricia; Asiamah, Ebenezer; Ansah, Evelyn K; Ashon, Daniel A; Narh-Dometey, Christiana

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes factors affecting health worker motivation and satisfaction in the public sector in Ghana. The data are from a survey of public sector health care providers carried out in January 2002 and repeated in August 2003 using an interviewer administered structured questionnaire. It is part of a continuous quality improvement (CQI) effort in the health sector in the Greater Accra region of Ghana. Workplace obstacles identified that caused dissatisfaction and de-motivated staff in order of the most frequently mentioned were low salaries such that obtaining basic necessities of daily living becomes a problem; lack of essential equipment, tools and supplies to work with; delayed promotions; difficulties and inconveniences with transportation to work; staff shortages; housing, additional duty allowances and in-service (continuous) training. Others included children's education, vehicles to work with such as ambulances and pickups, staff transfer procedures, staff pre-service education inadequate for job requirements, and the effect of the job on family and other social factors. There were some differences in the percentages of staff selecting a given workplace obstacle between the purely rural districts, the highly urbanized Accra metropolis and the districts that were a mixture of urbanized and rural. It is unlikely that the Ghana Health Service can provide high quality of care to its end users (external customers) if workplace obstacles that de-motivate staff (internal customers) and negatively influence their performance are not properly recognized and addressed as a complex of inter-related problems producing a common result--dissatisfied poorly motivated staff and resulting poor quality services. PMID:15688876

  6. Improving customer satisfaction and quality: hospitals recognized by J.D. power and associates share insights on meeting patient and employee needs.

    PubMed

    2003-08-01

    For 35 years, J.D. Power and Associates has presented its much-coveted awards recognizing product and service quality and customer satisfaction in a variety of industries. This year, the company added a new category: hospitals. To better understand patients' reactions to their hospital experiences, the company looked at five key drivers of customer satisfaction: dignity and respect, speed and efficiency, comfort, information and communication, and emotional support. This issue looks at five hospitals recognized by the company for their service excellence and why they emphasize employee satisfaction as well as patient satisfaction. PMID:12961834

  7. [Evaluation of customer satisfaction with the hospital catering system in the city of Palermo (Italy)].

    PubMed

    Firenze, Alberto; Morici, Mariagrazia; Calamus, Giuseppe; Gelsomino, Viviana; Aprea, Luigi; Di Benedetto, Antonino; Muangala, Muana A Luila; Centineo, Giovanni; Romano, Nino

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate patients' customer satisfaction with the hospital catering services of two public hospitals and one private sector hospital in the city of Palermo (Italy). A multiple choice questionnaire was administered by face-to-face interview to 207 of 227 hospitalized patients. Positive responses regarding the perceived quality of food were given especially by patients of the private sector hospital, 80% of which reported being satisfied with the catering service. A higher percentage of patients in the private sector hospital were satisfied with the food distribution modalities with respect to the two public hospitals. Only 3% of patients in the private sector hospital required their families to bring food from home, with respect to 7.9% and 30% respectively in the two public hospitals. Private sector patients also reported appreciating the wide availability of food and the help given by health care workers (79% vs a mean of 55% in the two public hospitals). No differences were found amongst hospitals with regards to the hygienic characteristics of meals. The results of this study indicate the need to make changes in the management of the catering service of one of the involved public hospitals especially. PMID:19494921

  8. Assessing Student Satisfaction in Transnational Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Stephen; Balakrishnan, Melodena Stephens

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Given that there exists in the literature relatively little research into student experiences in transnational higher education, the purpose of this paper is to identify the determinants of student satisfaction at international branch campuses in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Design/methodology/approach: This quantitative study involved…

  9. The hidden competencies of healthcare: why self-esteem, accountability, and professionalism may affect hospital customer satisfaction scores.

    PubMed

    Decker, P J

    1999-01-01

    Data from 103 for-profit, nonprofit, and government-owned hospitals, spread across about half of the United States clearly show that there are common elements and several core competencies in all hospitals, some probably driven by JCAHO accreditation standards, but others coming from universal experience stemming from the changes in healthcare. The common competencies that are not, in my opinion, driven directly by the JCAHO standards include professionalism, accountability, self-esteem, customer service/focus, communication, information management/using data in decision making, and teamwork. There are several possible connections among the core competencies that suggest that the effects of accountability and possibly self-esteem on such outcomes as patient satisfaction and quality of care should be the subject of more research in healthcare settings. There are, however, several possible interventions to increase the core competency base of any hospital, which can be applied without this research. Executives and managers who attempt to measure and change these common competencies through selection, assessment, organizational system change, or reward and compensation systems will change the competence base of their workforce in critical areas needed in the future healthcare economy. Using a competence model incorporating these competencies may change the culture of the organization toward that which will be needed for survival in the twenty-first century. PMID:10847920

  10. Enhancing Nurses' Pain Assessment to Improve Patient Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Diana L; Hoffman, Leslie A; Fioravanti, Marie; Medley, Deborah Poskus; Zullo, Thomas G; Tuite, Patricia K

    2016-01-01

    Patient satisfaction with pain management has increasing importance with Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores tied to reimbursement. Previous studies indicate patient satisfaction is influenced by staff interactions. This single-group pre/post design study aimed to improve satisfaction with pain management in older adults undergoing total joint replacement. This was a single-group pre-/posttest design. Nurse (knowledge assessment) and patient (American Pain Society Patient Outcomes Questionnaire Revised [APS-POQ-R], HCAHPS) responses evaluated pre- and postimplementation of the online educational program. Nurse focus group followed intervention. Nurses' knowledge improved significantly (p < .006) postintervention. HCAHPS scores (3-month average) for items reflecting patient satisfaction improved from 70.2 ± 9.5 to 73.9 ± 6.0. APS-POQ-R scores did not change. Focus group comments indicated need for education regarding linkages between pain management and patient satisfaction. Education on linkages between patient satisfaction and pain management can improve outcomes; education on strategies to further improve practice may enhance ability to achieve benchmarks. PMID:27028687

  11. "Check This out": Assessing Customer Service at the Circulation Desk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Dallas

    2012-01-01

    The access services staff at Milner Library, Illinois State University, designed a customer service assessment to evaluate how effectively the department was carrying out its mission statement. Areas of assessment included the department's waiting times, helpfulness, and courtesy. The assessment activity focused on circulation services, which is…

  12. Customer Loyalty and Customer Relationship Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengwei; Li, Min; Jiao, Xiaojing; Zhou, Ruijin

    The contemporary company attaches great importance to marketing relationship and customer relations is the core of this relationship. Further, customer satisfaction and loyalty is the core of the customer relationship management. Sometimes, high customer satisfaction causes low profit because enterprises do not realize that strengthening the loyalty of the aimed customer is the key of customer relationship management.

  13. 78 FR 66750 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request; Customer and Other Partners Satisfaction Surveys

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... the perceptions of various Clinical Center customers and other partners of Clinical Center services... develop new services, based on customer need; (4) to evaluate the perceptions of various Clinical...

  14. Teachers Job Satisfaction and Motivation for School Effectiveness: An Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ololube, Nwachukwu Prince

    2006-01-01

    Significantly, job satisfaction and motivation are very essential to the continuing growth of educational systems around the world and they rank alongside professional knowledge and skills, center competencies, educational resources as well as strategies, in genuinely determining educational success and performance. This study assessed the…

  15. 77 FR 49831 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection, Comments Requested; Customer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ... Requested; Customer Satisfaction Assessment ACTION: 30-day notice of information collection under review... submission of responses. Overview of This Information Collection 1. Type of information collection: Customer survey. 2. The title of the form/collection: Customer Satisfaction Assessment. 3. The agency form...

  16. Patients' satisfaction: customer relationship management as a new opportunity for quality improvement in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Gaetano; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2012-11-01

    Clinical and nonclinical indicators of performance are meant to provide the surgeon with tools to identify weaknesses to be improved. The World Health Organization's Performance Evaluation Systems represent a multidimensional approach to quality measurement based on several categories made of different indicators. Indicators for patient satisfaction may include overall perceived quality, accessibility, humanization and patient involvement, communication, and trust in health care providers. Patient satisfaction is included among nonclinical indicators of performance in thoracic surgery and is increasingly recognized as one of the outcome measures for delivered quality of care. PMID:23084619

  17. Satisfaction with care in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kirchgessner, J; Perera-Chang, M; Klinkner, G; Soley, I; Marcelli, D; Arkossy, O; Stopper, A; Kimmel, P L

    2006-10-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important aspect of dialysis care, only recently evaluated in clinical studies. We developed a tool to assess peritoneal dialysis (PD) customer satisfaction, and sought to evaluate and validate the Customer Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ), quantifying PD patient satisfaction. The CSQ included questions regarding administrative issues, Delivery Service, PD Training, Handling Requests, and transportation. The study was performed using interviews in all Hungarian Fresenius Medical Care dialysis centers offering PD. CSQ results were compared with psychosocial measures to identify if patient satisfaction was associated with perception of social support and illness burden, or depression. We assessed CSQ internal consistency and validity. Factor analysis explored potential underlying dimensions of the CSQ. One hundred and thirty-three patients treated with PD for end-stage renal disease for more than 3 months were interviewed. The CSQ had high internal consistency. There was high patient satisfaction with customer service. PD patient satisfaction scores correlated with quality of life (QOL) and social support measures, but not with medical or demographic factors, or depressive affect. The CSQ is a reliable tool to assess PD customer satisfaction. PD patient satisfaction is associated with perception of QOL. Efforts to improve customer satisfaction may improve PD patients' quantity as well as QOL. PMID:16900092

  18. Customized Assessment Group Initiative: A Complementary Approach to Students' Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akindayomi, Akinloye

    2015-01-01

    This study, conducted in a US setting, examines the importance of group dynamics that emphasize cooperative team building through the proposed grouping strategy called Customized Assessment Group Initiative (CAGI). CAGI is a student grouping strategy designed to operationalize the mutual accountability concept central to the definition of teams by…

  19. A Longitudinal Sociological Monitoring of Customers' Satisfaction with the Quality of Educational Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaidukova, G. N.

    2014-01-01

    Research data on levels of satisfaction with educational services in a Russian university show room for improvement in such areas as vocational guidance work; range of opportunities in the choice of specialization and optional disciplines; availability of academic and methodological literature; the quality of food services; and amount of practical…

  20. [2011 after-service customer satisfaction survey of monitoring devices in Shanghai area].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijun; Li, Bin; Qian, Jianguo; Cao, Shaoping; He, Dehua; Zheng, Yunxin

    2013-01-01

    In 2011, Shanghai Medical Equipment Management Quality Control Center launched the fifth after-sale service satisfaction survey for medical devices in Shanghai area. There are 8 classes medical devices involving in the survey. This paper demonstrates the investigation results of monitoring devices which are from different manufacturers. PMID:23668048

  1. Water conservation quantities vs customer opinion and satisfaction with water efficient appliances in Miami, Florida.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mengshan; Tansel, Berrin

    2013-10-15

    During 2006-2007, Miami-Dade County, Florida, USA, provided incentives for low income and senior residents in single family homes for retrofitting with high efficiency fixtures. The participating residences were retrofitted with high-efficiency toilets, showerheads, and aerators. In 2012, a telephone survey was conducted to evaluate the satisfaction of the participants and the associated effects on water conservation practices. This study evaluates the attitudes and opinions of the participants relative to water use efficiency measures and the actual reduction in water consumption characteristics of the participating households. The participant characteristics were analyzed to identify correlations between the socio-demographic factors, program satisfaction and actual water savings. Approximately 65.5% of the survey respondents reported changes in their water use habits and 76.6% reported noticeable reduction in their water bills. The analyses showed that the satisfaction levels of the participants were closely correlated with the actual water savings. The results also showed that satisfaction level along with water saving potential (i.e., implementation of water efficiency devices) or change of water use habits has provided positive synergistic effect on actual water savings. The majority of the participants surveyed (81.3-89.1%) reported positive attitudes for water conservation incentive program and the benefits of the high efficiency fixtures. PMID:23850763

  2. Customer Satisfaction Perceptions of Dislocated Workers Served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washburn, Dava Michelle

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of satisfaction of dislocated workers served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium. Four WIN Job Centers participated in this study: Northeast Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Corinth, Northwest Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Oxford,…

  3. Los Angeles OneSource System Youth Participant Customer Satisfaction Survey, 2010-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heisley, Deborah D.; Moore, Richard W.; Patch, Robin N.

    2012-01-01

    As part of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, Los Angeles OneSource Centers offer low-income youth ages 14-21 services aimed at improving educational achievement, enhancing job skills, and preparing for college. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the youths' satisfaction with services received at 14 OneSource Centers throughout…

  4. Q methodology: a new way of assessing employee satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Chinnis, A S; Summers, D E; Doerr, C; Paulson, D J; Davis, S M

    2001-05-01

    As yet another nursing shortage faces the country, the issue of the satisfaction of nurses again becomes of critical concern to nursing managers in the interest of staff retention. The authors describe the use of the statistical technique Q methodology to assess the needs of nurses and other medical staff at a level one, tertiary care emergency department in the United States. Using the Q method, the authors were able to identify different, unique viewpoints concerning employee needs among the study population, as well as commonly shared views. This level of detail, not obtainable using more traditional statistical techniques, can aid in the design of more effective strategies aimed at fulfilling the needs of an organization's staff to increase their satisfaction. PMID:11388161

  5. Basic Skills for 100% Customer Satisfaction at First Chicago Corporation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center--Resources for Education, Des Plaines, IL.

    This document is the final report of a demonstration project during which the corporation First Chicago/NBD and a local education agency developed and delivered basic skills training to the corporation's nonexempt work force. The report describes the following key project activities: basic skill needs analyses for various customer services…

  6. AutoMOPS--B2B and B2C in mask making: mask manufacturing performance and customer satisfaction improvement through better information flow management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ridder, Luc; Filies, Olaf; Rodriguez, Ben; Kuijken, Aart

    2001-04-01

    Through application of modern supply chain concepts in combination with state-of-the-art information technology, mask manufacturing performance and customer satisfaction can be improved radically. The AutoMOPS solution emphasizes on the elimination of the order verification through paperless, electronically linked information sharing/exchange between chip design, mask production and prototype production stages.

  7. Using Research Case Studies in eCommerce Marketing Courses: Customer Satisfaction at Point-of-Purchase and Post-Purchase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nawi, Noorshella Che; Fong, Michelle; Tatnall, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a research case study of Internet apparel marketing by small businesses in Malaysia which can beneficially be included in postgraduate business courses for understanding the importance of measuring customer satisfaction at point-of-purchase and post-purchase in online purchases. The sample size in this research is 154…

  8. Assessing Student and Faculty Satisfaction in a Master of Counselling Distance Education Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Andrea; McBride, Dawn Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    This project proposal designs an empirical based study to assess student and faculty satisfaction in graduate distance education counselling programs. The proposed study includes two satisfaction surveys and associated administrative protocols. The surveys were developed based on the Sloan Consortium definition of satisfaction (Moore, 2002; 2005)…

  9. Assessing dysphagia via telerehabilitation: patient perceptions and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shobha; Ward, Elizabeth C; Burns, Clare; Theodoros, Deborah; Russell, Trevor

    2013-04-01

    To gain insight into factors which may influence future acceptance of dysphagia management via telerehabilitation, patients' perceptions were examined before and after a telerehabilitation assessment session. Forty adult patients with dysphagia (M =66 years, SD =16.25) completed pre- and post-session questionnaires which consisted of 14 matched questions worded to suit pre- and post-conditions. Questions explored comfort with the use of telerehabilitation, satisfaction with audio and video quality, benefits of telerehabilitation assessments and patients' preferred assessment modality. Questions were rated on a 5-point scale (1 = strongly disagree, 3 = unsure, 5 = strongly agree). Patients' comfort with assessment via telerehabilitation was high in over 80% of the group both pre- and post-assessment. Pre-assessment, patients were unsure what to expect with the auditory and visual aspects of the videoconference, however there were significant positive changes reported post-experience. In relation to perceived benefits of telerehabilitation services in general, most patients believed in the value of telerehabilitation and post-assessment this increased to 90-100% agreement. Although 92% felt they would be comfortable receiving services via telerehabilitation, 45% of patients indicated ultimate preference for a traditional face-to-face assessment. The data highlight that patients are interested in and willing to receive services via telerehabilitation; however, any concerns should be addressed pre-assessment. PMID:22663016

  10. Dental anxiety. Assessment, reduction and increasing patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Corah, N L

    1988-10-01

    A conceptual schema relating a number of patient and dentist variables to patient anxiety reduction and satisfaction was presented. Evidence was examined that indicates that patient compliance with preventive and treatment regimens can be influenced in a major fashion through variables that reduce anxiety and increase satisfaction with the dentist. An accounting of several studies that investigated behavioral strategies for reducing patient stress during dental procedures indicated that recorded relaxation instructions and the active distraction provided by playing a video game can be effective anxiety-reducing treatments. Attempts to find other useful behavioral strategies were unsuccessful--only relaxation and distraction were consistently successful in reducing stress in moderately anxious patients. Observations of dentist-patient interaction in the context of the behavioral strategy studies indicated that the doctor-patient relationship was an important dimension associated with patient anxiety reduction and satisfaction. A series of investigations were conducted to elucidate the dentist behaviors that were associated with these variables. We found that the dentist behaviors most closely associated with patient satisfaction were those portraying empathy, friendliness, and a calm, competent image to the patient. The most important behavior associated with anxiety reduction was the dentist's explicit promise to prevent pain. Other dentist behaviors--friendliness, being calm, giving moral support--were seen as providing an appropriate behavioral context in support of the pledge to prevent pain. Finally, we considered the need for the dentist to be aware of patient anxiety in order to effectively deal with it. If nothing else, asking about anxiety gives the patient permission to express concerns that are present. If the patient is not anxious, asking about anxiety will not produce it. Two types of measuring instruments were considered in relation to assessing

  11. Model for selecting quality standards for a salad bar through identifying elements of customer satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, D; Norback, J P

    1993-11-01

    Continuous quality improvement is the new requirement of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations. This means that meeting quality standards will not be enough. Dietitians will need to improve those standards and the way they are selected. Because quality is defined in terms of the customers, all quality improvement projects must start by defining what customers want. Using a salad bar as an example, this article presents and illustrates a technique developed in Japan to identify which elements in a product or service will satisfy or dissatisfy consumers. Using a model and a questionnaire format developed by Kano and coworkers, 273 students were surveyed to classify six quality elements of a salad bar. Four elements showed a dominant "must-be" characteristic: food freshness, labeling of the dressings, no spills in the food, and no spills on the salad bar. The two other elements (food easy to reach and food variety) showed a dominant one-dimensional characteristic. By better understanding consumer perceptions of quality elements, foodservice managers can select quality standards that focus on what really matters to their consumers. PMID:8227881

  12. A proposed instrument for the assessment of job satisfaction in Greek mental NHS hospitals.

    PubMed

    Labiris, Georgios; Gitona, Kleoniki; Drosou, Vasiliki; Niakas, Dimitrios

    2008-08-01

    Since its introduction in 1983, the Greek NHS is under an almost constant reform, aiming improvement on the efficiency and the quality of provided services. The national program of psychiatric reform "Psychargos" introduced new models of therapeutic approach to the care of the mentally ill, that required expansion of the existing roles and development of new roles of the healthcare staff. Consequently, the efficient management of the healthcare workforce in Greek mental facilities was identified as a primary determinant of the successful implementation of the program. Primary objective of this study was the development of a research framework for the assessment of job satisfaction in Greek Mental Health Hospitals. Among the objectives was the evaluation of the capacity of the underlying motivators and hygiene factors and the identification of potential correlations of the global job satisfaction and the motivation and retention factors with the demographic, social and occupational characteristics of the employees. A custom questionnaire was developed, based on Herzberg two-factor theory, after a systematic review of the relevant literature. The instrument was constructed by two parts and 37 items. Ten items addressed the sociodemographic characteristics of the subjects, while the remaining 27 items were distributed in 11 subscales which addressed the global satisfaction index and the "retention" and the "motivation" variables. The instrument was validated by means of the Cronbach alpha for each subscale and by confirmatory factor analysis. The study was conducted at the Public Mental Hospital of Chania (PMHC). From the 300 employees of the PMHC, 133 subjects successfully responded to the questionnaire (response rate, 44.3%). In accordance to former surveys, subjects presented average scores in the global satisfaction index (GSI). The professional category of the employee was identified as the primary determinant of the GSI. Nurses presented statistically

  13. Customer needs, expectations, and satisfaction with clinical neurophysiology services in Ireland: a case for tele-neurophysiology development.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimons, M; Ronan, L; Murphy, K; Browne, G; Connolly, S; McMenamin, J; Delanty, N

    2004-01-01

    Although equitable access to services should be based on need, geographical location of patients and their clinicians can give rise to inequalities in healthcare delivery. Development of tele-medicine services can improve equity of access. The specialty of Clinical Neurophysiology (CN), currently under-developed in Ireland provides an example of such potential. This study aimed to determine the needs, expectations, and satisfaction of CN customers, namely patients and referring clinicians. The goal was to examine geographical impediments to access that might be addressed by the introduction of tele-neurophysiology. Two customer surveys were conducted: CN referring clinicians and CN patients. Thirty-one North Western Health Board (NWHB) consultant clinicians responded to a postal survey. Distance and delays caused by long waiting lists were felt to deter or make CN referral irrelevant. Ninety-seven percent believed the lack of a local service negatively impacts on patient management and 93% would welcome the introduction of a tele-neurophysiology service. The geographical location of patient's residence and/or the location of the referring clinician's practice influenced waiting lists for CN. Fifty-eight (105/182) percent of patients living in a region with a CN service compared to 39% (50/128) of those living in a region with no service received an appointment within one month. In addition to the current insufficient CN service capacity in Ireland, these surveys highlighted geographical inequities. Tele-neurophysiology has the potential to speed-up diagnosis, result in more patients being appropriately investigated and be fairer to patients. PMID:15490998

  14. To empower or not to empower your sales force? An empirical examination of the influence of leadership empowerment behavior on customer satisfaction and performance.

    PubMed

    Ahearne, Michael; Mathieu, John; Rapp, Adam

    2005-09-01

    This research focuses on the impact of leadership empowerment behavior (LEB) on customer service satisfaction and sales performance, as mediated by salespeople's self-efficacy and adaptability. Moreover, the authors propose an interactive relationship whereby LEB will be differentially effective as a function of employees' empowerment readiness. The authors' hypotheses are tested using survey data from a sample of 231 salespeople in the pharmaceutical field, along with external ratings of satisfaction from 864 customers and archival sales performance information. Results indicated that contrary to popular belief, employees with low levels of product/industry knowledge and low experience benefit the most from leadership behaviors that are empowering, whereas high-knowledge and experienced employees reap no clear benefit. The authors conclude with directions for future research and application. PMID:16162066

  15. Hand Anthropometry and SMS Satisfaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, Vimala; Yeow, Paul H. P.

    The effect of hand anthropometry on Short Message Service (SMS) satisfaction was investigated using structured questionnaire interviews with 110 subjects, aged between 17-25 years old. Hand size was measured to assess its effect on mobile phone design factors satisfaction whereas thumb circumference and length were measured for keypad design factors. Small hand-sized subjects were found to be more satisfied with mobile phone dimensions than large hand-sized subjects. Thumb circumference significantly affects users` satisfaction towards key size and space between keys whereas thumb length significantly affects keypad layout satisfaction. Both thumb circumference and length significantly correlate negatively with the corresponding keypad design factors. Results confirm that hand anthropometry do affect users messaging satisfaction. These findings should prove useful to mobile phone designers who could look into the possibility of designing customized mobile phones that cater to large hand and thumb sized users, so as to increase their subjective satisfaction.

  16. Evaluation of Consumer Satisfaction with Information Derived from Neuropsychological Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benedict, Ralph H. B.; Horton, Arthur MacNeill, Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The utility of information derived from a consumer satisfaction questionnaire was demonstrated via an analysis of feedback from 22 referring health professionals (21 physicians and 1 clinical psychologist) who replied to questions about their satisfaction with neuropsychological evaluation reports. The questionnaire used was the Neuropsychology…

  17. Assessment of Self-Esteem and Satisfaction in Amputee Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, C. D.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The study involving six single and multiple amputee children (10 to 14 years old) was conducted to provide information on how situations affect the self esteem of amputee children, how situations affect satisfaction with their prostheses, and the relationship between amputee self esteem and their satisfaction with their prosthetic device.…

  18. Assessment of Job Satisfaction among Faculty Members and Its Relationship with Some Variables in Najran University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Smadi, Marwan Saleh; Qblan, Yahya Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    It is vital that colleges and universities monitor the satisfaction levels of their employees to secure high levels of their performance. The current study aimed to identify the impact of some variables (gender, Teaching experience and college type) on assessing the level of job satisfaction among faculty of Najran University. A survey was…

  19. A Meta-Analytic Examination of the Construct Validity of the Michigan Organizational Assessment Questionnaire Job Satisfaction Subscale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowling, Nathan A.; Hammond, Gregory D.

    2008-01-01

    Although several different measures have been developed to assess job satisfaction, large-scale examinations of the psychometric properties of most satisfaction scales are generally lacking. In the current study we used meta-analysis to examine the construct validity of the Michigan Organizational Assessment Questionnaire Job Satisfaction Subscale…

  20. S-shape relationship between customer satisfaction and willingness to pay premium prices for high quality cured pork products in Spain.

    PubMed

    Cotes-Torres, Alejandro; Muñoz-Gallego, Pablo A; Cotes-Torres, José Miguel

    2012-03-01

    This paper explores 2 different probabilistic models explaining willingness to pay premium prices for high-quality cured products from the swine industry. Seven cured pork products (sausage, fuet, ham, loin, shoulder, salami and pepperoni) were studied in 9 food-stores in Valladolid, Spain. Consumers of the products were interviewed (686 completed surveys). It was found by using mixed effect statistical models that the relationship between willingness to pay a premium price and customer satisfaction had nonlinear behavior, following an S-shape with inverted slope which was the first empirical evidence of this type of behavior in meat products in real market conditions. It was also established that the interaction between satisfaction and current expenditure on the product was significant and indispensable for explaining consumers' willingness to pay premium price for cured pork products. PMID:22118984

  1. Use of the Satisfaction With Amplification in Daily Life Questionnaire to Assess Patient Satisfaction Following Remote Hearing Aid Adjustments (Telefitting)

    PubMed Central

    Bento, Ricardo Ferreira; Battistella, Linamara Rizzo

    2014-01-01

    Background Hearing loss can affect approximately 15% of the pediatric population and up to 40% of the adult population. The gold standard of treatment for hearing loss is amplification of hearing thresholds by means of a hearing aid instrument. A hearing aid is an electronic device equipped with a topology of only three major components of aggregate cost. The gold standard of hearing aid fittings is face-to-face appointments in hearing aid centers, clinics, or hospitals. Telefitting encompasses the programming and adjustments of hearing aid settings remotely. Fitting hearing aids remotely is a relatively simple procedure, using minimal computer hardware and Internet access. Objective This project aimed to examine the feasibility and outcomes of remote hearing aid adjustments (telefitting) by assessing patient satisfaction via the Portuguese version of the Satisfaction With Amplification in Daily Life (SADL) questionnaire. Methods The Brazilian Portuguese version of the SADL was used in this experimental research design. Participants were randomly selected through the Rehabilitation Clinical (Espaco Reouvir) of the Otorhinolaryngology Department Medical School University of Sao Paulo. Of the 8 participants in the study, 5 were female and 3 were male, with a mean age of 71.5 years. The design consisted of two face-to-face sessions performed within 15 working days of each other. The remote assistance took place 15 days later. Results The average scores from this study are above the mean scores from the original SADL normative data. These indicate a high level of satisfaction in participants who were fitted remotely. Conclusions The use of an evaluation questionnaire is a simple yet effective method to objectively assess the success of a remote fitting. Questionnaire outcomes can help hearing stakeholders improve the National Policy on Hearing Health Care in Brazil. The results of this project indicated that patient satisfaction levels of those fitted remotely were

  2. A prospective, longitudinal, descriptive study of the effect of a customized wheelchair cushion on clinical variables, satisfaction, and functionality among patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Vilchis-Aranguren, Rodrigo; Gayol-Mérida, Diana; Quinzaños-Fresnedo, Jimena; Pérez-Zavala, Ramiro; Galíndez-Novoa, Carmen

    2015-02-01

    The Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación (Rehabilitation National Institute) (INR) developed a prototype wheelchair cushion (INR cushion) designed to adjust to the anthropometry of the user's ischiogluteal area and prevent pressure ulcer formation while maintaining or promoting functionality. A prospective, longitudinal, descriptive study was conducted from February 2010 to February 2011 to evaluate the effect of using the INR cushion on clinical variables, functionality, and user satisfaction. Sixteen patients were recruited (9 male, 7 female, average age 31.8 [range 22-47] years, average body mass index 25 [range 22-34], average time in a wheelchair 10.1 [range 3-26] years) who met the study protocol inclusion criteria of being pressure ulcer-free for at least 6 months and capable of propulsion and transfer without assistance, chronic spinal cord injury (>2 years), and without chronic-degenerative diseases or cognitive problems. Each participant received the cushion for a 2-month evaluation. Eight clinical variables were assessed: trunk control, posture, spasticity, transfer capacity, comfort, skin reaction, propulsion capacity, and pressure release capacity. The clinical assessment was performed using validated scales and instruments: Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), Functional Independence Measure™ (FIM), Norton Scale, and assessment of skin reaction. Interface pressures were measured using force sensing array, and participants completed a structured interview to assess user expectation, perceived functionality, perceived quality, and likelihood of recommending the device. Two patients withdrew due to appointment conflicts; of the remaining 14, significant differences between the user's experience with other products and the INR were found with regard to pressure redistribution (P = 0.012); all participants but 1 graded the INR as good in all interview categories. No participants developed a pressure ulcer during the study. The customized cushion was

  3. Customer premises services market demand assessment 1980 - 2000: Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, R. B.; Saporta, L.; Heidenrich, G. A.

    1983-01-01

    Potential customer premises service (CPS), telecommunication services, potential CPS user classes, a primary research survey, comparative economics, market demand forcasts, distance distribution of traffic, segmentation of market demand, and a nationwide traffic distribution model are discussed.

  4. Veterans' voices: use of the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Survey to identify My HealtheVet personal health record users' characteristics, needs, and preferences

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Consumer research reveals considerable interest in the use of Personal Health Records (PHRs), yet adoption remains relatively low. Both adopters and nonadopters represent important perspectives from which to understand this paradox. Objective This study focuses on direct feedback from adopters obtained using the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) survey on the My HealtheVet PHR portal (http://www.myhealth.va.gov) of the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). The results represent a source of direct feedback with which to better understand veterans' needs and preferences. Methods The ACSI Survey was implemented in October 2007 to measure satisfaction and elicit information about characteristics and preferences of My HealtheVet PHR adopters. The data represent a continuous random sample of site visitors who have navigated at least four pages on the site. A total of 100 617 surveys were completed (17.2%). Results Satisfaction with My HealtheVet is high (8.3/10.0), and users are highly likely to return to the site (8.6/10.0) and recommend the site to other veterans (9.1/10.0). The majority of system adopters are male (91%), between the ages of 51 and 70 (68%), and served in the Vietnam War (60%). Most veterans currently visit the site to utilize pharmacy-related features. Conclusion VHA has used the ACSI to monitor satisfaction, and to better understand the characteristics, needs, and preferences of early adopters. The data provide an important source of direct feedback to inform program development. Future research will include monitoring the impact of enhancements and new features on satisfaction, and conducting additional research with nonadopters to identify barriers to adoption and use. PMID:20190065

  5. Assessment of medical care by elderly people: general satisfaction and physician quality.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Y; Kasper, J D

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify personal characteristics and factors related to health and patterns of healthcare utilization associated with the elderly people's satisfaction with medical care. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING: Data from the 1991 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) on 8,859 persons age 65 and over living in the community. STUDY DESIGN: Items reflecting general satisfaction with care and views of physician quality are examined and, based on factor analysis, grouped in dimensions of two (global quality, access) and three (technical skills, interpersonal manner, information-giving), respectively. The relationship of high levels of satisfaction in each dimension to personal characteristics of elderly people, and to measures of access and utilization, is assessed using logistic regression. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: While satisfaction is high, with over 90 percent surveyed expressing some satisfaction, there is substantial variation with less likelihood of high satisfaction among those 80 or older, with less education and income and in poorer health. Longer waiting time at visits and less frequent visits are factors in lower satisfaction as well. A favorable perception of physician quality, especially regarding technical skills, appears to play a significant role in satisfaction with global quality of care. CONCLUSIONS: Studies of patient satisfaction in elderly people are rare. Some factors expected to be related to positive assessment based on earlier studies, were, e.g., better health and shorter waiting time, while others were not, e.g., increasing age. Elderly people appear to place greater importance on physician technical skills, as opposed to interpersonal dimensions, in assessing global quality. These findings suggest the need for a better understanding of how elderly people evaluate care and what they value in interactions with the healthcare system. Images Figure 1 PMID:9460484

  6. Modelling discrete choice variables in assessment of teaching staff work satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Mieilă, Mihai; Popescu, Constanţa; Tudorache, Ana-Maria; Toplicianu, Valerică

    2015-01-01

    Levels of self-reported job satisfaction and motivation were measured by survey in a sample of 286 teachers. Using the discrete choice framework, the paper tries to assess the relevance of the considered indicators (demographic, social, motivational) in overall teaching work satisfaction. The findings provide evidence that job satisfaction is correlated significantly with level of university degree held by the teacher, type of secondary school where the teacher is enrolled, revenues, and salary-tasks adequacy. This is important for the Romanian economy, since the education system is expected to provide future human resources with enhanced skills and abilities. PMID:25849295

  7. Modelling Discrete Choice Variables in Assessment of Teaching Staff Work Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Levels of self-reported job satisfaction and motivation were measured by survey in a sample of 286 teachers. Using the discrete choice framework, the paper tries to assess the relevance of the considered indicators (demographic, social, motivational) in overall teaching work satisfaction. The findings provide evidence that job satisfaction is correlated significantly with level of university degree held by the teacher, type of secondary school where the teacher is enrolled, revenues, and salary-tasks adequacy. This is important for the Romanian economy, since the education system is expected to provide future human resources with enhanced skills and abilities. PMID:25849295

  8. An Environmental Assessment of Community College Faculty Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Sonja Peters

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the perceptions and satisfaction levels of individuals employed as full-time teaching faculty at Polk Community College (PCC) (Florida), with regard to the environmental elements of formal influence, communication, collaboration, organizational structure, work design, and student focus. These elements…

  9. Patient satisfaction and service quality in the formation of customers' future purchase intentions in competitive health service settings.

    PubMed

    Baker, T L; Taylor, S A

    1997-01-01

    The following study provides evidence that the relationship between quality perceptions and satisfaction judgements in the formation of future purchase intentions may be very different in health service settings relative to other service settings. The study investigates Taylor and Baker's (1994) assertion that satisfaction judgements moderate the quality-->purchase intention relationship by testing the research model in both for-profit and not-for-profit hospital settings. The results of this study first support the growing view that satisfaction judgements are more closely related to outcome behaviors than quality perceptions in hospital settings. The results further support the assertion that the formation of important consumer outcomes, such as future purchase intentions, appears to be different for health services. Thus, health service managers are cautioned to empirically test models in the literature specific to their own competitive setting. The managerial and research implications of the reported study are presented and discussed. PMID:10179060

  10. Assessing informatics students' satisfaction with a web-based courseware system.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Todd R; Zhang, Jiajie; Tang, Zhihua; Johnson, Constance; Turley, James P

    2004-03-18

    This study assessed health informatics student satisfaction with two subsequent versions of Prometheus, a web-based courseware system. Prometheus versions 4 and 5 were assessed to gauge the effect of modifications to improve the usability of the system. The Questionnaire for User Interaction Satisfaction (QUIS, version 7.0) was administered at the end of fall semester 2001 (in which Prometheus version 4 was used) and again at the end of Spring 2002 (in which Prometheus version 5 was used). QUIS contains measures of user satisfaction of the overall system and 11 specific dimensions, including screen, terminology and system information, learning, system capabilities, manuals and online help, multimedia, and teleconferencing. In general, students had favorable judgments of Prometheus, and their satisfaction level remained relatively stable across the two versions. However, usability enhancements incorporated into version 5 produced no significant differences in student satisfaction ratings. The results of this study provide a benchmark for comparing the relative usability of alternative courseware systems and demonstrate the utility of user satisfaction surveys for assessing and improving courseware systems. With increases in the need for compliance education and the education of clinicians with 'just in time knowledge', courseware systems will become an integral part of the clinical information systems, increasing the importance of usability studies such as this one. PMID:15063378

  11. Assessment of client satisfaction in labor and delivery services at a maternity referral hospital in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Melese, Tadele; Gebrehiwot, Yirgu; Bisetegne, Daniel; Habte, Dereje

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Patients perception about service quality shapes their confidence with regard to use of the available health care facility. This study is aimed to assess the client`s satisfaction in a maternal health care setting. Methods This is an institution based cross sectional descriptive study. A total of 423 postpartum women were interviewed. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 20 statistical package. Results The proportion of mothers who are completely satisfied with health care ranges between 2.4 to 21%. Pain control was the poorest source of satisfaction with 82% reporting dissatisfaction. Provider's communication with clients yielded complete satisfaction rates ranging between 0.7 to 26%. Inadequate information about the drug prescribed and explanation of procedures to be done to the client were found to be major causes of dissatisfaction. The complete satisfaction rate with environmental factor of the hospital was between 3.3 to 40.2%. Age of the client, educational status, income of the client and client's address away from Addis Ababa were found to be the predictors of client satisfaction. Provider's attitude and communication, as well as longer duration of stay in the ward were independent predictors of client satisfaction. Conclusion Pain management, client privacy and client provider communication need to be addressed to ensure the satisfaction of maternity clients. The clients need to be involved in the management of their own health problems. PMID:25018826

  12. Customer Satisfaction versus Infrastructural Facilities in the Realm of Higher Education--A Case Study of Sri Venkateswara University Tirupati

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janardhana, G.; Rajasekhar, Mamilla

    2012-01-01

    This article analyses the levels of students' satisfaction and how institution provides infrastructure facilities in the field of higher education. Infrastructure is the fastest growing segment of the higher education scenario. Universities play a very vital role in a country in terms of their potential. It contributes to employment and growth.…

  13. Assessing the Validity of Single-item Life Satisfaction Measures: Results from Three Large Samples

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Felix; Lucas, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The present paper assessed the validity of single-item life satisfaction measures by comparing single-item measures to the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) - a more psychometrically established measure. Methods Two large samples from Washington (N=13,064) and Oregon (N=2,277) recruited by the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) and a representative German sample (N=1,312) recruited by the Germany Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP) were included in the present analyses. Single-item life satisfaction measures and the SWLS were correlated with theoretically relevant variables, such as demographics, subjective health, domain satisfaction, and affect. The correlations between the two life satisfaction measures and these variables were examined to assess the construct validity of single-item life satisfaction measures. Results Consistent across three samples, single-item life satisfaction measures demonstrated substantial degree of criterion validity with the SWLS (zero-order r = 0.62 – 0.64; disattenuated r = 0.78 – 0.80). Patterns of statistical significance for correlations with theoretically relevant variables were the same across single-item measures and the SWLS. Single-item measures did not produce systematically different correlations compared to the SWLS (average difference = 0.001 – 0.005). The average absolute difference in the magnitudes of the correlations produced by single-item measures and the SWLS were very small (average absolute difference = 0.015 −0.042). Conclusions Single-item life satisfaction measures performed very similarly compared to the multiple-item SWLS. Social scientists would get virtually identical answer to substantive questions regardless of which measure they use. PMID:24890827

  14. Computerized Assessment System for Academic Satisfaction (ASAS) for First-Year University Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medrano, Leonardo Adrian; Liporace, Mercedes Fernandez; Perez, Edgardo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Computerized tests have become one of the most widely used and efficient educational assessment methods. Increasing efforts to generate computerized assessment systems to identify students at risk for drop out have been recently noted. An important variable influencing student retention is academic satisfaction. Accordingly, the…

  15. Towards a Model and Methodology for Assessing Student Learning Outcomes and Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duque, Lola C.; Weeks, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is threefold: first, to introduce a conceptual model for assessing undergraduate student learning outcomes and satisfaction that involves concepts drawn from the services marketing and assessment literatures; second, to illustrate the utility of the model as implemented in an academic department (geography)…

  16. Teachers' assessments of children aged eight predict life satisfaction in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Honkanen, Meri; Meri, Honkanen; Hurtig, Tuula; Tuula, Hurtig; Taanila, Anja; Anja, Taanila; Moilanen, Irma; Irma, Moilanen; Koponen, Hannu; Hannu, Koponen; Mäki, Pirjo; Pirjo, Mäki; Veijola, Juha; Juha, Veijola; Puustjärvi, Anita; Anita, Puustjärvi; Ebeling, Hanna; Hanna, Ebeling; Koivumaa-Honkanen, Heli; Heli, Koivumaa-Honkanen

    2011-09-01

    The objective was to investigate how teachers' assessments of children predict life satisfaction in adolescence. This is a prospective cohort study on the population-based Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1986 (n = 8,959). Information was gathered from parents, teachers and adolescents using questionnaires at the age of 7, 8 and 15. Response rates were 80-90%. Emotional and behavioural problems were assessed with Rutter Children's Behavioural Questionnaires for teachers (RB2) and parents (RA2) during the first grade at age 8. At adolescence, self-reported life satisfaction was measured with a question including five response alternatives. According to teachers' assessments, 13.9% of the children had high emotional or behavioural problems (RB2 ≥9). These assessments predicted life dissatisfaction in adolescence (OR(crude) = 1.77; 95% CI 1.43-2.20) in several models including also health behaviour and use of psychotropic medicine. However, introducing all the significant variables in the same model, RB2 lost its significance (OR = 1.28; 0.96-1.70), but good school achievement assessed by teachers was still a significant predictor. Life satisfaction in adolescence was associated with a variety of favourable concurrent factors. In conclusion teachers' assessments of children during the first school year predicted life satisfaction in adolescence. In mental health promotion, teachers' early assessments should be utilized for the benefit of children. PMID:21789735

  17. Students-as-Customers' Satisfaction, Predictive Retention with Marketing Implications: The Case of Malaysian Higher Education Business Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Stephen; Yeo, Amy Chu-May

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate two areas of interest: first, to determine business student customer satisfiers that could be contributors to students' current and predicted retention in a higher educational institution (HEI) and second, to use these satisfiers to inform HEI marketing planning. Design/Methodology/Approach: The…

  18. The Development of an Instrument to Assess Perceptions of Residence Director Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, David A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was the creation of an instrument to assess perceptions of job satisfaction for professional staff fulfilling the role of residence directors. With many costs associated with the exit of an employee (Cascio, 1987), it is hoped that the instrument may be used by the senior housing administrators to limit lateral turnover,…

  19. Assessing User Needs, Satisfaction, and Library Performance at the University of Washington Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiller, Steve

    2001-01-01

    Discusses methods used at the University of Washington libraries to assess user needs, satisfaction, and library performance. Describes the triennial user surveys used in the past as well as the new ARL's (Association of Research Libraries) LibQUAL+ methodology that focused on quality of service and library support through a Web-based survey.…

  20. On the Relationship between Students' Perceptions of Teaching Quality, Methods of Assessment, and Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smimou, Kamal; Dahl, Darren W.

    2012-01-01

    Although the relationship between students' perceptions of quality of teaching and student satisfaction may seem self-evident, the interaction between these concepts and related methods of assessment is rarely examined. The findings reveal that the perceived teaching quality categorization emerges as a concept with multiple facets centered on…

  1. Assessment of Users Information Needs and Satisfaction in Selected Seminary Libraries in Oyo State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adekunjo, Olalekan Abraham; Adepoju, Samuel Olusegun; Adeola, Anuoluwapo Odebunmi

    2015-01-01

    The study assessed users' information needs and satisfaction in selected seminary libraries in Oyo State, Nigeria. This paper employed the descriptive survey research design, whereby the expost-facto was employed with a sample size of three hundred (300) participants, selected from six seminaries located in Ibadan, Oyo and Ogbomoso, all in Oyo…

  2. Assessment of Positive Psychology Course According to Comments and Life Satisfaction Levels of Counselor Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bas, Asli Uz

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the "Positive Psychology" course according to comments and life satisfaction levels of counselor candidates. The course was offered in Guidance and Psychological Counseling undergraduate program as an elective course. The participants of the study were 56 senior undergraduate students attended…

  3. Assessing Satisfaction with Selected Student Services Using SERVQUAL, a Market-Driven Model of Service Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruby, Carl A.

    1998-01-01

    Demonstrates how the use of SERVQUAL, a market-driven assessment model adapted from business, can be used to study student satisfaction with four areas of support services hypothetically related to enrollment management. The sample included 748 students enrolled in general education courses at ten different private institutions. (Contains 27…

  4. Satisfaction = Revenue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johannesen, Rhonda

    1999-01-01

    Colleges and universities are turning increasingly to private real estate and property management companies to boost customer satisfaction with, and income from, student housing. Issues to be considered are examined, including the market profile, facility types and needs, maintenance and housekeeping, communications technology, complementary…

  5. Customized versus Standardized Exams for Learning Outcomes Assessment in an Undergraduate Business Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, Amy L.; Spangler, William E.

    2013-01-01

    A standardized exam for program-level assessment can take the form of 1) a customized exam developed in-house by faculty and linked explicitly to program-level learning goals; or 2) a standardized exam developed externally by assessment experts and linked to a set of somewhat broader and more generalizable learning goals. This article discusses…

  6. Your customers may be satisfied, but are they loyal?

    SciTech Connect

    Heupler, K.; Dion, S.; Wilder, S.

    1994-11-01

    Utilities have long recognized the importance of addressing the issue of customer satisfaction in their marketing research efforts. However, as typically defined and evaluated by utilities, the concept of satisfaction is generally too limited, and overlooks the core issue of customer loyalty. Satisfaction with service performance attributes such as power delivery, billing accuracy, customer service, and rates does not guarantee customer loyalty to an electric service provider in the face of increasing competition. Although satisfaction is a key indicator of loyalty, additional elements including mobility, energy-use characteristics, location, cost-sensitivity, stability, psychographics, and previous experience will each play a role in determining the level of commitment a utility customer is willing to make. The challenge in assessing customer loyalty is in the measurement process itself. Utilities need an ongoing process to evaluate loyalty and convert their research into specific actions that can be used to gain or maintain a competitive foothold in the market. This paper explores the issue of loyalty from a utility perspective. Loyalty is explored primarily as it relates to commercial and industrial customers. However, many of the concepts and issues pertain to loyalty measurement in other industries is discussed from a historical perspective, and a framework is presented for measuring customer loyalty among utility customers. Finally, a model for translating loyalty research results into actionable measures is presented.

  7. Development of a Brief Instrument for Assessing Healthcare Employee Satisfaction in a Low-Income Setting

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Jennifer T.; McNatt, Zahirah; Tatek, Dawit; Lindfield, Tessa; Bradley, Elizabeth H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ethiopia is one of 57 countries identified by the World Health Report 2006 as having a severely limited number of health care professionals. In recognition of this shortage, the Ethiopian Federal Ministry of Health, through the Ethiopian Hospital Management Initiative, prioritized the need to improve retention of health care workers. Accordingly, we sought to develop the Satisfaction of Employees in Health Care (SEHC) survey for use in hospitals and health centers throughout Ethiopia. Methods Literature reviews and cognitive interviews were used to generate a staff satisfaction survey for use in the Ethiopian healthcare setting. We pretested the survey in each of the six hospitals and four health centers across Ethiopia (98% response rate). We assessed content validity and convergent validity using factor analysis and examined reliability using the Cronbach alpha coefficients to assess internal consistency. The final survey was comprised of 18 questions about specific aspects of an individual's work and two overall staff satisfaction questions. Results We found support for content validity, as data from the 18 responses factored into three factors, which we characterized as 1) relationship with management and supervisors, 2) job content, and 3) relationships with coworkers. Summary scores for two factors (relationship with management and supervisors and job content) were significantly associated (P-value, <0.001) with the two overall satisfaction items. Cronbach's alpha coefficients showed good to excellent internal consistency (Cronbach alpha coefficients >0.70) for the items in the three summary scores. Conclusions The introduction of consistent and reliable measures of staff satisfaction is crucial to understand and improve employee retention rates, which threaten the successful achievement of the Millennium Development Goals in low-income countries. The use of the SEHC survey in Ethiopian healthcare facilities has ample leadership support, which is

  8. Product Variety, Consumer Preferences, and Web Technology: Can the Web of Data Reduce Price Competition and Increase Customer Satisfaction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepp, Martin

    E-Commerce on the basis of current Web technology has created fierce competition with a strong focus on price. Despite a huge variety of offerings and diversity in the individual preferences of consumers, current Web search fosters a very early reduction of the search space to just a few commodity makes and models. As soon as this reduction has taken place, search is reduced to flat price comparison. This is unfortunate for the manufacturers and vendors, because their individual value proposition for a particular customer may get lost in the course of communication over the Web, and it is unfortunate for the customer, because he/she may not get the most utility for the money based on her/his preference function. A key limitation is that consumers cannot search using a consolidated view on all alternative offers across the Web. In this talk, I will (1) analyze the technical effects of products and services search on the Web that cause this mismatch between supply and demand, (2) evaluate how the GoodRelations vocabulary and the current Web of Data movement can improve the situation, (3) give a brief hands-on demonstration, and (4) sketch business models for the various market participants.

  9. The Assessment of Staff Satisfaction as Compared to Client Satisfaction in Two Department of Social Service Residential Treatment Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Amy; Decker, James T.

    2006-01-01

    This exploratory study looked at the rate of staff satisfaction as compared to client satisfaction in a residential treatment facility. Research has shown that staff who have negative attitudes, and are not satisfied with their positions, transport those negative feelings onto the clients they are serving (Balfour & Neff, 1993). While some…

  10. Assessment of social psychological determinants of satisfaction with childbirth in a cross-national perspective

    PubMed Central

    Christiaens, Wendy; Bracke, Piet

    2007-01-01

    Background The fulfilment of expectations, labour pain, personal control and self-efficacy determine the postpartum evaluation of birth. However, researchers have seldom considered the multiple determinants in one analysis. To explore to what extent the results can be generalised between countries, we analyse data of Belgian and Dutch women. Although Belgium and the Netherlands share the same language, geography and political system and have a common history, their health care systems diverge. The Belgian maternity care system corresponds to the ideal type of the medical model, whereas the Dutch system approaches the midwifery model. In this paper we examine multiple determinants, the fulfilment of expectations, labour pain, personal control and self-efficacy, for their association with satisfaction with childbirth in a cross-national perspective. Methods Two questionnaires were filled out by 605 women, one at 30 weeks of pregnancy and one within the first 2 weeks after childbirth either at home or in a hospital. Of these, 560 questionnaires were usable for analysis. Women were invited to participate in the study by independent midwives and obstetricians during antenatal visits in 2004–2005. Satisfaction with childbirth was measured by the Mackey Satisfaction with Childbirth Rating Scale, which takes into account the multidimensional nature of the concept. Labour pain was rated retrospectively using Visual Analogue Scales. Personal control was assessed with the Wijma Delivery Expectancy/Experience Questionnaire and Pearlin and Schooler's mastery scale. A hierarchical linear analysis was performed. Results Satisfaction with childbirth benefited most consistently from the fulfilment of expectations. In addition, the experience of personal control buffered the lowering impact of labour pain. Women with high self-efficacy showed more satisfaction with self-, midwife- and physician-related aspects of the birth experience. Conclusion Our findings focus the attention

  11. A study assessing patient satisfaction in a tertiary care hospital in India: the changing healthcare scenario.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Aashima; Garg, Shalini; Pareek, Udai

    2009-06-01

    The healthcare service scenario in India is expected to evolve into a more developed stage. More emphasis has been given on patient satisfaction as this is an important consideration for the assessment of the hospital services. The concept of patient satisfaction is also rapidly changing and the hospitals are using variety of techniques to improve patient care and organizational efficiency. Patient satisfaction questionnaire is a validated instrument to assess the level of the satisfaction of adult patients. The questionnaire was administered on those patients who were admitted in hospital for at least three days. In our study 88% patients were satisfied with treatment and medical care they had received. About 86% patients found that the hospital services were excellent. However, it is felt that patient values and culture should be explored for further improving patient doctor communication. There is hence a scope for improvement in meeting patient's needs and preferences and rendering hospital services. This can be achieved by some feedback system which could be available to the patients and later worked upon by the management, to improve the patient care by bridging the gap between senior management and patients. PMID:22010498

  12. Assessing the Value Dimensions for Customers in Knowledge Intensive Business Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sole, Francesco; Carlucci, Daniela; Schiuma, Giovanni

    With the rise of knowledge economy, the importance of Knowledge Intensive Business Services (KIBS) has gradually increased as well as their overall impact on economy. However, in comparison with the manufacturing sectors, KIBS sector remains poorly studied. Especially little prior research has been done about the description and assessment of service value dimensions from a business customer's perspective. This paper, on the basis of a literature review, identifies and describes eight different value dimensions. These dimensions represent the building blocks of a conceptual model proposed for assessing the value created by KIBS for business customers. Moreover, the paper describes an application of the model in a real case.

  13. Customer System Efficiency Improvement Assessment: Description and examination of system characterization data

    SciTech Connect

    Callaway, J.W.; DeSteese, J.G.

    1986-12-01

    This report describes three data bases that were developed in the Customer System Efficiency Improvement (CSEI) Assessment project to help characterize transmission and distribution (T and D) system losses experienced by utility customers in the Pacific Northwest. A principal objective of this project is to assess the potential for electric energy conservation in the T and D systems of BPA's utility customers. The three data bases provide essential input on the number and operating characteristics of T and D component stocks that was used in another task of the CSEI Project to estimate the conservation supply functions that result from replacing existing stocks with more efficient components (Tepel et al. 1986). This document describes the three data bases, provides a guide to their use, and presents a summary characterization of the principal loss-generating components (lines and transformers) of the region's T and D systems.

  14. Multidimensional Assessment of Life Satisfaction in Southern Appalachia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardi, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    People living in Southern Appalachia have been burdened by lack of resources, economic disparity, gender issues, and an increased probability to develop chronic disease linked to stress and anxiety. These problems can severely affect the individual's evaluation of the quality of life. In this study we assessed several predictors of life…

  15. Assessment of the Correlation between Appointment Scheduling and Patient Satisfaction in a Pediatric Dental Setup

    PubMed Central

    Katre, Amar N.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The practice of modern pediatric dentistry requires delivery of quality care in combination with adherence to excellent business as well as time management principles. A definite appointment schedule should be presented to the parents on the first or second appointment. More importantly, the prescribed schedule should be followed to the best of the professional abilities of the pediatric dentist. Aims. The aim of the study was to assess the co-relation between appointment scheduling and patient satisfaction in a pediatric dental setup with the objective of understanding the parameters related to appointment scheduling to increase patient satisfaction. Method. A total of 40 patients, who visited the Department of Pediatric and Preventive Dentistry, YMT Dental College & Hospital, for dental treatment were selected on a random basis. A questionnaire with a set of 6 questions with a rating scale of 1–5 to assess the patient satisfaction related to appointment scheduling was prepared. Results. A significant number of the patients were happy with the existing appointment scheduling system barring a few exceptions. PMID:25610464

  16. [Patient satisfaction in a laboratory test collection unit].

    PubMed

    de Moura, Gisela Maria Schebella Souto; Hilleshein, Eunice Fabiani; Schardosim, Juliana Machado; Delgado, Kátia Simone

    2008-06-01

    This exploratory descriptive study aimed at identifying customer satisfaction attributes in the field of laboratory tests. Data were collected in 2006, using 104 interviews in a laboratorial unit inside a teaching hospital, using the critical incident technique, and submitted to content analysis. Three attribute categories were identified: time spent in waiting for care, interpersonal contact, and technical skills. These results subsidize the assessment of the current satisfaction survey tool, and point to its reformulation. They also allow the identification of improvement needs in customer attention, and provide elements to be taken into account in personnel selection, training programs, personnel performance assessment. PMID:18822760

  17. Predicting health plan member retention from satisfaction surveys: the moderating role of intention and complaint voicing.

    PubMed

    Huppertz, John W

    2008-01-01

    Many health plans have tried to increase member retention by improving their scores on customer satisfaction surveys. However, prior research has demonstrated weak relationships between member satisfaction and retention, suggesting that other variables are needed to understand how satisfaction impacts member retention. In a longitudinal study 4,806 health plan members who completed satisfaction surveys were re-assessed three years later; we compared measures of satisfaction, intention, and complaining behavior from voluntary disenrollees and retained members. The relationship between satisfaction and retention was moderated by members' intentions to disenroll. The findings suggest that health plans can enhance the predictive validity of their satisfaction surveys by including measures of both satisfaction and intentions. PMID:19064478

  18. Schoolwork as Products, Professors as Customers: A Practical Teaching Approach in Business Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emery, Charles R.; Tian, Robert G.

    2002-01-01

    In a marketing course, students used the principles of product, price, place, and promotion to market their course work to the professor/customer. Assessment of 357 students over 4 semesters showed this experiential method resulted in higher achievement and greater understanding of customer expectations and satisfaction. (SK)

  19. Optical design of a novel instrument that uses the Hartmann-Shack sensor and Zernike polynomials to measure and simulate customized refraction correction surgery outcomes and patient satisfaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuoka, Fatima M. M.; Matos, Luciana; Cremasco, Antonio; Numajiri, Mirian; Marcato, Rafael; Oliveira, Otavio G.; Sabino, Luis G.; Castro N., Jarbas C.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Carvalho, Luis A. V.

    2016-03-01

    An optical system that conjugates the patient's pupil to the plane of a Hartmann-Shack (HS) wavefront sensor has been simulated using optical design software. And an optical bench prototype is mounted using mechanical eye device, beam splitter, illumination system, lenses, mirrors, mirrored prism, movable mirror, wavefront sensor and camera CCD. The mechanical eye device is used to simulate aberrations of the eye. From this device the rays are emitted and travelled by the beam splitter to the optical system. Some rays fall on the camera CCD and others pass in the optical system and finally reach the sensor. The eye models based on typical in vivo eye aberrations is constructed using the optical design software Zemax. The computer-aided outcomes of each HS images for each case are acquired, and these images are processed using customized techniques. The simulated and real images for low order aberrations are compared using centroid coordinates to assure that the optical system is constructed precisely in order to match the simulated system. Afterwards a simulated version of retinal images is constructed to show how these typical eyes would perceive an optotype positioned 20 ft away. Certain personalized corrections are allowed by eye doctors based on different Zernike polynomial values and the optical images are rendered to the new parameters. Optical images of how that eye would see with or without corrections of certain aberrations are generated in order to allow which aberrations can be corrected and in which degree. The patient can then "personalize" the correction to their own satisfaction. This new approach to wavefront sensing is a promising change in paradigm towards the betterment of the patient-physician relationship.

  20. The Impact of Two Types of Peer Assessment on Students' Performance and Satisfaction within a Wiki Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao, Yun; Lucking, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of two peer assessment methods on university students' academic writing performance and their satisfaction with peer assessment. This study also examined the validity and reliability of student generated assessment scores. Two hundred and thirty-two predominantly undergraduate students were…

  1. 75 FR 29567 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Aviation Security Customer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... OMB Review: Aviation Security Customer Satisfaction Performance Measurement Passenger Survey AGENCY... satisfaction of aviation security in an effort to more efficiently manage airport performance. DATES: Send your...; Aviation Security Customer Satisfaction Performance Measurement Passenger Survey. TSA, with OMB's...

  2. 78 FR 46594 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Aviation Security Customer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... OMB Review: Aviation Security Customer Satisfaction Performance Measurement Passenger Survey AGENCY... satisfaction of aviation security in an effort to more efficiently manage its security screening performance at.... Information Collection Requirement Title: Aviation Security Customer Satisfaction Performance...

  3. A cross-sectional study to assess inhalation device handling and patient satisfaction in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Miravitlles, Marc; Montero-Caballero, Jéssica; Richard, Frank; Santos, Salud; Garcia-Rivero, Juan Luis; Ortega, Francisco; Ribera, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Delivery of inhaled medications via an inhaler device underpins the effectiveness of treatment for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Correct inhaler technique among patients is also a predictor of achieving treatment compliance and adherence. Reporting of patient satisfaction with inhalers is therefore gaining increasing attention and is now recognized as an important patient-reported outcome in clinical trials involving patients with COPD or asthma. In this cross-sectional study, we use the validated Patient Satisfaction and Preference Questionnaire (PASAPQ) to assess the handling and satisfaction for Respimat® Soft Mist™ Inhaler (SMI) compared with the Breezhaler® dry powder inhaler (DPI) among patients with COPD in Spain. Patients were already assigned to therapy with either SPIRIVA® (tiotropium) Respimat® or with Hirobriz®/Onbrez®/Oslif® (indacaterol) Breezhaler® for at least 3 but not more than 6 months before completing the PASAPQ at a single visit to the study site. The primary endpoint of the trial was the mean total PASAPQ score. Secondary endpoints were the performance score domain of the PASAPQ, the convenience score domain of the PASAPQ, and the overall satisfaction score of the PASAPQ. For the primary endpoint, the mean PASAPQ total score in the Respimat® and Breezhaler® groups was 80.7 and 79.9, respectively (difference of 0.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] −2.9 to 4.5; P=0.67). The mean total performance scores were 82.5 and 78.2 (difference of 4.3, 95% CI −0.3 to 8.9; P=0.06), and the mean total convenience scores were 78.6 and 81.9 (difference of −3.3, 95% CI −7.0 to 0.4; P=0.08) for the Respimat® and Breezhaler® groups, respectively. Patients gave the Respimat® SMI and the Breezhaler® DPI overall satisfaction PASAPQ scores of 6.0 and 5.9, respectively, which shows that patients were satisfied with these inhalers. PMID:27013871

  4. Assessment of patient satisfaction with acute pain management service: Monitoring quality of care in clinical setting

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Fizzah; Khan, Robyna; Ahmed, Aliya

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Assessment of patient satisfaction is an important tool for monitoring the quality of care in hospitals. The aim of this survey was to develop a reliable tool to assess patient satisfaction with acute pain management service (APMS) and identify variables affecting this so that care can be improved. Methods: A questionnaire was developed and administered to patients after being discharged from APMS care by an unbiased person. Data collected from record included patient demographics, surgical procedure, analgesic modality, co-analgesics and dynamic and static pain scores. Questions included pain expected and pain experienced, APMS response time, quality of pain relief with treatment, professionalism of APMS team, overall experience of pain relief and choosing/suggesting same modality for themselves/family/friends again. Five-point Likert scale was used for most of the options. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 19. Results: Frequency and percentages were computed for qualitative observation and presented on pie chart and histogram. Seventy-one per cent patients expected severe pain while 43% actually experienced it. About 79.4% would choose same analgesia modality in future for self/family/friends. Ninety-nine per cent found APMS staff courteous and professional. About 89% rated their experience of pain management as excellent to very good. Conclusion: The survey of patients’ satisfaction to monitor the quality of care provided by APMS provided positive inputs on its role. This also helps to identify areas requiring improvement in care and as a tool to gauge the quality of care. PMID:27141107

  5. Enhancing library services: an exploration in meeting customer needs through total quality management.

    PubMed

    Cundari, L; Stutz, K

    1995-01-01

    Total Quality Management (TQM) is a process which focuses on understanding customer needs and improving customer service and satisfaction. A TQM committee was created at the Devereux Foundation's Professional Library to assess user satisfaction and make recommendations for improving library services to better meet consumer needs. The committee distributed a satisfaction survey to 156 of the most likely library users and 84 (54%) were returned. Overall, survey results indicate that most consumers are satisfied with the materials and services provided by the Professional Library. Recommendations for improving library services and strategies for implementing these recommendations are discussed. PMID:10144945

  6. Job and career satisfaction among staff nurses: effects of job setting and environment.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Katherine H; Lacey, Linda M

    2003-03-01

    Just as customer satisfaction is the key to retaining customers, satisfaction with job and career choices are important for keeping staff nurses on the job. The roles of employment setting, job commitment, tenure, years until retirement, short staffing, and patient load in predicting satisfaction were assessed for RN and LPN staff nurses. Results show that when RNs and LPNs feel short staffing interferes with their ability to meet patient care needs, they are also less satisfied with both their job and their career. In order not to exacerbate the current nursing shortage, employers must find ways to ensure adequate staffing to keep staff nurses satisfied and on the job. PMID:12629304

  7. Assessing the Validity of the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire--Short Form in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mick, Eric; Faraone, Stephen V.; Spencer, Thomas; Zhang, Huabin F.; Biederman, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors assessed the psychometric properties of the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire-Short Form (Q-LES-QSF) in adults with ADHD. Method: One hundred fifty ADHD and 134 non-ADHD adults from a case-control study and 173 adults randomized to placebo or methylphenidate were assessed with the Q-LES-QSF and the…

  8. Quantitative Assessment of Participant Knowledge and Evaluation of Participant Satisfaction in the CARES Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Melody S.; Si, Xuemei; Stafford, Jewel D.; Obasohan, Adesuwa; Mchunguzi, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of the Community Alliance for Research Empowering Social change (CARES) training program was to (1) train community members on evidence-based public health, (2) increase their scientific literacy, and (3) develop the infrastructure for community-based participatory research (CBPR). Objectives We assessed participant knowledge and evaluated participant satisfaction of the CARES training program to identify learning needs, obtain valuable feedback about the training, and ensure learning objectives were met through mutually beneficial CBPR approaches. Methods A baseline assessment was administered before the first training session and a follow-up assessment and evaluation was administered after the final training session. At each training session a pretest was administered before the session and a posttest and evaluation were administered at the end of the session. After training session six, a mid-training evaluation was administered. We analyze results from quantitative questions on the assessments, pre- and post-tests, and evaluations. Results CARES fellows knowledge increased at follow-up (75% of questions were answered correctly on average) compared with baseline (38% of questions were answered correctly on average) assessment; post-test scores were higher than pre-test scores in 9 out of 11 sessions. Fellows enjoyed the training and rated all sessions well on the evaluations. Conclusions The CARES fellows training program was successful in participant satisfaction and increasing community knowledge of public health, CBPR, and research method ology. Engaging and training community members in evidence-based public health research can develop an infrastructure for community–academic research partnerships. PMID:22982849

  9. Patient satisfaction as a predictor of return-to-provider behavior: analysis and assessment of financial implications.

    PubMed

    Garman, Andrew N; Garcia, Joanne; Hargreaves, Marcia

    2004-01-01

    Although customer loyalty is frequently cited as a benefit of patient satisfaction, an empirical link between the two has not, to our knowledge, ever been statistically established in a hospital setting. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between self-reported patient satisfaction measures and subsequent return to the provider for care at a large academic medical center. Data from all adult medical patients responding to a patient satisfaction survey distributed by a large midwestern academic medical center during fiscal year 1997 (n = 1485) were analyzed. Response patterns were examined as they related to whether patients returned to the provider during the subsequent 2-year period. Analyses suggested that return-to-provider was associated with only a minority of the satisfaction items (approx. 11%). All items showing a significant relationship measured perceptions of how well physicians and nurses attended to, and provided information to, patients and their families. Although the size of these relationships was generally small, the estimated financial implications are substantial. Other implications of these findings for planning effective service improvement initiatives as well as improving patient survey design are discussed. PMID:14976909

  10. Customer system efficiency improvement assessment: Supply curves for transmission and distribution conservation options

    SciTech Connect

    Tepel, R.C.; Callaway, J.W.; De Steese, J.G.

    1987-11-01

    This report documents the results of Task 6 in the Customer System Efficiency Improvement (CSEI) Assessment Project. A principal objective of this project is to assess the potential for energy conservation in the transmission and distribution (TandD) systems of electric utilities in the BPA service area. The scope of this assessment covers BPA customers in the Pacific Northwest region and all non-federal TandD systems, including those that currently place no load on the BPA system. Supply curves were developed to describe the conservation resource potentially available from TandD-system efficiency improvements. These supply curves relate the levelized cost of upgrading existing equipment to the estimated amount of energy saved. Stated in this form, the resource represented by TandD loss reductions can be compared with other conservation options and regional electrical generation resources to determine the most cost-effective method of supplying power to the Pacific Northwest. The development of the supply curves required data acquisition and methodology development that are also described in this report. 11 refs., 11 figs., 16 tabs.

  11. A diffuse reflectance spectral imaging system for tumor margin assessment using custom annular photodiode arrays

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Sulochana; Lo, Justin Y.; Palmer, Gregory M.; Brooke, Martin A.; Nichols, Brandon S.; Yu, Bing; Ramanujam, Nirmala; Jokerst, Nan M.

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) is a well-established method to quantitatively distinguish between benign and cancerous tissue for tumor margin assessment. Current multipixel DRS margin assessment tools are bulky fiber-based probes that have limited scalability. Reported herein is a new approach to multipixel DRS probe design, which utilizes direct detection of the DRS signal by using optimized custom photodetectors in direct contact with the tissue. This first fiberless DRS imaging system for tumor margin assessment consists of a 4 × 4 array of annular silicon photodetectors and a constrained free-space light delivery tube optimized to deliver light across a 256 mm2 imaging area. This system has 4.5 mm spatial resolution. The signal-to-noise ratio measured for normal and malignant breast tissue-mimicking phantoms was 35 dB to 45 dB for λ = 470 nm to 600 nm. PMID:23243571

  12. Grantee Satisfaction Survey. Final Report, August 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) is the national indicator of customer evaluations of the quality of goods and services available to U.S. residents. Since 1994, it has served as a uniform, cross-industry/government measure of customer satisfaction. A total of 10 groups, composed of eight program offices, EDFacts Coordinators, and…

  13. Assessing the Relationship between Airlines' Maintenance Outsourcing and Aviation Professionals' Job Satisfaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCamey, Rotorua

    The current economic and security challenges placed an additional burden on U.S. airlines to provide optimum service at reasonable costs to the flying public. In efforts to stay competitive, U.S. airlines increased foreign-based outsourcing of aircraft major repair and overhaul (MRO) mainly to reduce labor costs and conserve capital. This concentrated focus on outsourcing and restructuring, ignored job dissatisfaction among remaining employees which could reduce and or eliminate an airline's competitiveness. The purpose of this quantitative study was (a) to assess the relationship between increased levels of foreign-based MRO outsourcing and aviation professionals' job satisfaction (Y1); (b) to assess the influence of increased levels of foreign-based outsourcing on MRO control (Y2), MRO error rate (Y3), and MRO technical punctuality (Y4) as perceived by aviation professionals; and (c) to assess the influence of increased levels of foreign-based MRO outsourcing on technical skills (Y5) and morale ( Y6) as perceived by aviation professionals. The survey instrument was utilized based on Paul Spector's Job Satisfaction Questionnaire and MRO specific questions. A random sample of 300 U.S. airline participants was requested via MarketTools to meet required sample size of 110 as determined through a priori power analysis. Study data rendered 198 useable surveys of 213 total responses, and correlation, multiple regression, and ANOVA methods were used to test study hypotheses. The Spearman's rho for (Y 1) was statistically significant, p = .010 and multiple regression was statistically significant, p < .001. A one-way ANOVA indicated participants differed in their opinions of (Y2) through (Y6), Recommendations for future research include contrasting domestic and global MRO providers, and examining global aircraft parts suppliers and aviation technical training.

  14. Oximetry system performance assessment with POM (acetal) phantoms incorporating hemoglobin calibration standards and customized saturation levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Hyounguk; Singh, Karam; Wang, Hsing-Wen; Pfefer, T. J.; Chen, Yu

    2015-03-01

    Standardized approaches for performance assessment of biophotonic devices have the potential to facilitate system development and intercomparison, clinical trial standardization, recalibration, manufacturing quality control and quality assurance during clinical use. Evaluation of devices based on near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for detection of hemoglobin (Hb) content and oxygenation have often involved tissue-simulating phantoms incorporating artificial dyes or flow systems. Towards the development of simple, effective techniques for objective, quantitative evaluation of basic NIRS system performance, we have developed and evaluated two test methods. These methods are based on cuvette inserts in solid turbid phantoms for measuring commercially-available Hb oximetry standards and custom-formulated oxy/deoxy-Hb solutions. Both approaches incorporate solid acetal, or polyoxymethylene (POM), as a tissue-simulating matrix material. First, inverse-adding-doubling (IAD) based on measurements with a spectrophotometer and an integrating sphere was used to measure POM optical properties and their stability over time. Second, two fiberopticprobe- based NIRS systems were used to measure concentration change of oxy- and deoxy-Hb in standard Hb solutions and customized Hb solutions by adding yeast. Differences in system performance were likely due to differences in light source outputs and fiberoptic probe design. Our preliminary results indicate that simple phantom-based approaches based on commercially available polymers and inclusions containing Hb standards, or controlled oxygenation levels may be useful for benchtop assessment of NIRS device quality for a variety of biophotonic devices.

  15. The subjective assessment of the effect and satisfaction with dermocosmetics use by patients with skin disturbances

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Atopic dermatitis and different constellations and the severity of symptoms that not meet the criteria for this diagnosis are a common skin disturbances. An important component of the treatment of these diseases and the proper care of sensitive and dry skin is local dermocosmetics use. Aim To assess the frequency of skin disturbances and the effect and satisfaction with Atoperal products use as well as the source of information about these products. Material and methods A questionnaire survey about the type of skin disturbances, the subjective assessment of the effect and satisfaction with Atoperal products use and source of information about these products was performed by 787 general practitioners, internists, pediatricians, dermatologists, allergists and pulmonologists and 252 pharmacists in a group of 51 085 subjects with skin disturbances. Results In the group interviewed by doctors, the most common skin problem was atopic dermatitis (52.5%) and in the group interviewed by pharmacists, pruritus (70.0%). In both groups, respondents after Atoperal products use most frequently reported improving of the skin hydration and greasiness of the skin and reduction of itching. In both groups, over 90.0% of respondents were satisfied or very satisfied with Atoperal products use. In the group surveyed by doctors, 75.5% of respondents obtained information about these products from doctors and 17.4% from pharmacists, while in the group surveyed by pharmacists, 48.9% from pharmacists and 36.1% from doctors. Conclusions Atopic dermatitis was most frequently diagnosed in a group surveyed by doctors. The main skin disturbance that occurred in a group surveyed by pharmacists was skin pruritus. The main effect of Atoperal products use, independent of the place of the survey, included improving of skin hydration and greasiness of the skin and reduction of itching. In a study population, there was a high level of satisfaction from the use of Atoperal products. Doctors

  16. Listen to What They Have to Say! Assessing Distance Learners' Satisfaction with Library Services Using a Transactional Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alewine, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the evolution and findings of an on-going longitudinal study that is assessing the satisfaction of distance education students with library reference services through the use of a transaction-level survey. The survey's purpose is two-fold: first, it is used to garner valuable input from these students; and second, it also…

  17. Psychometric Evaluation of a Scale to Assess Satisfaction with Life among People with Intellectual Disabilities Living in Community Residences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergstrom, H.; Hochwalder, J.; Kottorp, A.; Elinder, L. S.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In the context of a health intervention among people with intellectual disabilities (ID), there was a need to assess satisfaction with some aspects of life, in order to monitor both potential positive and negative effects of the intervention. The aim of the present study was to develop and evaluate an easily administered scale for…

  18. A Flaw in Gerontological Assessment: The Weak Relationship of Elderly Superficial Life Satisfaction to Deep Psychological Well-Being.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Euler, Bryan L.

    1992-01-01

    Assessed degree of relationship between superficial and deep psychological adjustment among elderly individuals (n=86). Found only moderate correlation between shallow and deep psychological adjustment as measured by Cantril's Self-Anchoring Scale for life satisfaction (shallow) and Eriksonian-based Measures of Psychosocial Development (deep).…

  19. An Assessment of Teacher Education Students' Perceptions and Satisfaction of Their Learning Experiences in a Summer Pilot Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hicks, Terence; Lewis, Leontye; Munn, Geraldine; Jordon, Earlyn; Charles, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed teacher education students' perceptions and satisfaction of their learning experiences concerning an accelerated summer pilot program. In addition, the study provided information on the impact and teaching effectiveness of the accelerated teacher education summer pilot program on participating students. Results from this study…

  20. Assessment of Patient Satisfaction of the Quality of Health Care Provided by Outpatient Services of an Oncology Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Anastasia; Sarafis, Pavlos; Malliarou, Maria; Tsounis, Andreas; Igoumenidis, Michael; Bamidis, Panagiotis; Niakas, Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this research is to investigate the patient’s satisfaction (patient’s satisfaction) with medical services provided in Outpatients’ Departments of a Greek Anti-Cancer Hospital in morning and afternoon clinics. The assessment of patients and identification of factors that contribute to their satisfaction will highlight the organizational and operational problems of outpatient department and assist in finding solutions to upgrade the quality of services provided. Material and Methodology: For the collection of data, a questionnaire with closed answers in a five-point scale ‘Likert’ scale was used. The questions were related to demographics, social data users, and the overall service process in the outpatient Hospital. The sample consisted of 100 patients (RR: 76%) who visited the outpatient clinic in the morning or afternoon over a month long period of time. Results: The results of our research showed that cancer patients reported a high satisfaction rate with the health services provided in outpatient department of Anti-Cancer Hospital. The highest reported levels of satisfaction were related to working with medical staff because of the special relationship of trust that patients develop with their physician. Some problems were noted during the morning shift by patients. Patients reported frustration over long waiting times to get an appointment, last minute appointments, lack of flexibility when making appointments and long waiting times before being examined by a doctor. No statistically significant relationship was found between overall satisfaction with demographics’ and other factors, although the grading services seem to be affected by the health status of patients, education and sex. Conclusion: The problems that were identified leading to less patient satisfaction were the long waiting periods to get an appointment, last minute appointments, non-flexibility in making appointments and long waiting times to be examined by the

  1. 39 CFR 3055.92 - Customer Experience Measurement Surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. 3055.92... SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.92 Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. (a... instrument including: (1) A description of the customer type targeted by the survey; (2) The number...

  2. 39 CFR 3055.92 - Customer Experience Measurement Surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. 3055.92... SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.92 Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. (a) The report shall include a copy of each type of Customer Experience Measurement instrument, or...

  3. 39 CFR 3055.92 - Customer Experience Measurement Surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. 3055.92... SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.92 Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. (a) The report shall include a copy of each type of Customer Experience Measurement instrument, or...

  4. 39 CFR 3055.92 - Customer Experience Measurement Surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. 3055.92... SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.92 Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. (a) The report shall include a copy of each type of Customer Experience Measurement instrument, or...

  5. Assessing Insulin Delivery Device Satisfaction in Patients with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Snell-Bergeon, Janet K

    2015-11-01

    Over the past several decades, insulin treatment has changed drastically, not only with the development of further insulin analogs but also with the introduction of novel insulin delivery devices such as pumps and pens. In addition, adjunct devices such as continuous glucose monitors and sensor-augmented pumps have become increasingly used in clinical care, increasing the volume of information available to patients and providers. However, with the development of new devices it has become clear that along with the many benefits of these advances, the use of these devices can also present a burden to people with diabetes. For example, some patients report being overwhelmed by too much data when using continuous glucose monitors. Furthermore, there are concerns regarding the accuracy of some of these new devices, particularly for glucose monitoring. As a result, some patients may choose not to use available devices, despite the recognized benefits. Therefore, it is critical to understand how the various insulin delivery devices available currently and in the future affect patients in terms of their diabetes management and perceived burdens and to understand which patient characteristics may predict a lack of satisfaction with these devices. This critical gap in our knowledge is addressed in an article in this issue of the journal through the development of a questionnaire that allows for a better understanding of the impact of insulin delivery devices on quality of life and diabetes management among both type 1 diabetes and insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes patients. The novelty, as well as limitations, of this new instrument for the assessment of insulin delivery device satisfaction are discussed. PMID:26535926

  6. Customer-Driven Development for Rapid Production of Assessment Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Andrew; Williams, Shirley

    2006-01-01

    Customer-Driven Development is a technique from the software development method called extreme Programming (XP) where customers (most importantly including end users of all levels) are closely involved in the software design and redesign process. This method of producing software suitable for customers has been adapted to help in the production of…

  7. Validation of a Custom-made Software for DQE Assessment in Mammography Digital Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala-Domínguez, L.; Pérez-Ponce, H.; Brandan, M. E.

    2010-12-01

    This works presents the validation of a custom-made software, designed and developed in Matlab, intended for routine evaluation of detective quantum efficiency DQE, according to algorithms described in the IEC 62220-1-2 standard. DQE, normalized noise power spectrum NNPS and pre-sampling modulation transfer function MTF were calculated from RAW images from a GE Senographe DS (FineView disabled) and a Siemens Novation system. Calculated MTF is in close agreement with results obtained with alternative codes: MTF_tool (Maidment), ImageJ plug-in (Pérez-Ponce) and MIQuaELa (Ayala). Overall agreement better than ≈90% was found in MTF; the largest differences were observed at frequencies close to the Nyquist limit. For the measurement of NNPS and DQE, agreement is similar to that obtained in the MTF. These results suggest that the developed software can be used with confidence for image quality assessment.

  8. Validation of a Custom-made Software for DQE Assessment in Mammography Digital Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala-Dominguez, L.; Perez-Ponce, H.; Brandan, M. E.

    2010-12-07

    This works presents the validation of a custom-made software, designed and developed in Matlab, intended for routine evaluation of detective quantum efficiency DQE, according to algorithms described in the IEC 62220-1-2 standard. DQE, normalized noise power spectrum NNPS and pre-sampling modulation transfer function MTF were calculated from RAW images from a GE Senographe DS (FineView disabled) and a Siemens Novation system. Calculated MTF is in close agreement with results obtained with alternative codes: MTF lowbar tool (Maidment), ImageJ plug-in (Perez-Ponce) and MIQuaELa (Ayala). Overall agreement better than {approx_equal}90% was found in MTF; the largest differences were observed at frequencies close to the Nyquist limit. For the measurement of NNPS and DQE, agreement is similar to that obtained in the MTF. These results suggest that the developed software can be used with confidence for image quality assessment.

  9. Retaining and attracting large customers in a competitive market

    SciTech Connect

    Solger, S.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes marketing and customer satisfaction in the electric power industry and the experiences of Wal-Mart stores. Customer service, reliability, working relationships, and customer knowledge are discussed.

  10. Assessing Antecedents and Consequences of Student Satisfaction in Higher Education: Evidence from Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, M. M.; Lau, S. H.; Yusof, N. A. Mohamad; Chew, K. W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the interrelationships of the key influences on student satisfaction via multivariate analysis from three groups of university students in two popular private universities in Malaysia. The correlation coefficient and structural model indicated that student satisfaction is influenced not only by academic quality, but also by the…

  11. Assessing Quality in Higher Education: New Criteria for Evaluating Students' Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zineldin, Mosad; Akdag, Hatice Camgoz; Vasicheva, Valentina

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this research is to present a new quality assurance model (5Qs) and to examine the major factors affecting students' perception of cumulative satisfaction. The model includes behavioural dimensions of student satisfaction. The factors included in this cumulative summation are technical, functional, infrastructure, interaction and…

  12. Assessing the relationship between pharmacists' job satisfaction and over-the-counter counselling at community pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Urbonas, Gvidas; Kubilienė, Loreta

    2016-04-01

    Background Community pharmacies have an increasing role in self-medication and community health is dependent on the quality of counselling services provided to patients. Some studies show that pharmacists' job satisfaction affects their work quality; other studies found that higher involvement in clinical services increases pharmacists' job satisfaction. Objective To test the relationship between job satisfaction and over-the-counter counselling practice at community pharmacies. Setting Community pharmacies in Lithuania. Method A convenience sample (n = 305) of community pharmacists participated in the cross-sectional survey where they expressed satisfaction with job and reported on their over-the-counter counselling behaviour on self-report scales. The Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modelling approach was employed for data analysis. Main outcome measure The strength of the relationship between job satisfaction and over-the-counter counselling service. Results A bidirectional relationship between job satisfaction and over-the-counter counselling service was found. In addition, job satisfaction and over-the-counter counselling quality depended on pharmacists' age. Conclusion Organizations were recommended to create a counselling friendly environment that would increase pharmacists' job satisfaction and, in return, counselling quality. Also, additional motivation of the retired pharmacists, as well as development of counselling skills of the younger pharmacy workforce, were seen as a means to improve both organizational climate and counselling quality over the counter. PMID:26666908

  13. Analysis on online word-of-mouth of customer satisfaction in cultural and creative industries of Taiwan: using cultural heritage application and performance facilities as examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Li-Fen; Shaw, Jing-Chi; Wang, Pei-Wen; Shih, Meng-Long; Su, Yi-Jing

    2011-10-01

    This study aims to probe into customers' online word-of-mouth regarding cultural heritage applications and performance facilities in Cultural and Creative Industries. Findings demonstrate that, regarding online word-of-mouth for art museums, museums, and art villages, items valued by customers are design aesthetics of displays and collections, educational functions, and environments and landscapes. The percentages are 10.102%, 11.208% and 11.44%, respectively. In addition, cultural heritage applications and performance facility industries in Taiwan are highly valued in online word-of-mouth.

  14. Assessment of dental student satisfaction with regard to process of thesis educational courses

    PubMed Central

    Eslamipour, Faezeh; Noroozi, Zahra; Hosseinpour, Kobra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Ensuring achievement of research experience by students is one of the most important goals of the thesis-conduction process and evaluation of student satisfaction with this process is one of the most imperative challenges herein. Aims: The aim of this study is to investigate the satisfaction of dental students passing the thesis educational course from the Isfahan Dental School. Settings and Design: Sixty-two dental students who had graduated in2011, from the Isfahan Dental School, participated in this descriptive cross-sectional study Materials and Methods: The postgraduate Research Experience Questionnaire (PREQ) was used for data collection. The questionnaire evaluated student satisfaction in seven domains: Thesis supervision, skill development, intellectual climate, infrastructure, thesis examination, goals and expectations, and overall satisfaction. Statistical Analysis Used: The data were analyzed on an SPSS software using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results: The mean score of satisfaction of the participants was 75 ± 12. On the basis of their scores, satisfaction in 3.2% of them was slow, in 33.9%was medium, in 61.3% was good and in 1.6% was high. The highest satisfaction was found to be in thesis supervision and the least was in the intellectual climate domain. There was no significant statistical difference between satisfaction and gender (P = 0.46). Conclusions: Considering the results, to increase student satisfaction for passing the thesis courses, it is necessary to improve the intellectual climate in dental schools and also increase the research budget for more financial support of students to carry out their projects. PMID:27462643

  15. Assessment of satisfaction with different dry powder inhalation devices in Greek patients with COPD and asthma: the ANASA study

    PubMed Central

    Zervas, Eleftherios; Samitas, Konstantinos; Gaga, Mina

    2016-01-01

    Background Poor adherence to inhaled therapy is common in patients with asthma and COPD. An inhaler selection based on patients’ preference could be beneficial to adherence and treatment effectiveness. Properly designed questionnaires can assess patients’ satisfaction with their medication devices. The aim of this study was to estimate, using the Feeling of Satisfaction with Inhaler (FSI-10) questionnaire, the ease of use and satisfaction of patients regarding three different marketed dry powder inhalers (DPIs): Diskus® (DK), Elpenhaler® (EH), and Turbuhaler® (TH). The FSI-10 is a self-completed questionnaire to assess patients’ opinions regarding ease of use, portability, and usability of devices, irrespective of the drug used. Patients and methods We performed a 4-week, open, noninterventional, multicenter, parallel clinical study in 560 asthmatic and 561 COPD patients. During the first visit, patients were classified into three groups according to the DPI they were already using. Patients were regularly receiving their treatments (Seretide DK, Rolenium EH, and Symbicort TH) and agreed to complete the FSI-10 questionnaire in the second visit. Results A total of 517 COPD and 523 asthma patients completed the study. All DPIs tested received satisfactory results, while the EH obtained consistently higher scores in the FSI-10 in both COPD and asthma patients (44.7 and 44.1 vs 41.5 and 43 for TH, 40.8 and 41.4 for DK, P<0.001 and P<0.01, respectively). TH was rated better than DK by asthma patients. Patients suffering with severe COPD tended to express higher feeling of satisfaction than those with moderate or mild disease, irrespective of the device used. Conclusion All DPIs tested were highly acceptable by asthma and COPD patients of different ages; nevertheless, EH received significantly higher ratings in most of the questionnaire domains. COPD patients in advanced stages of the disease generally expressed higher level of satisfaction with their devices

  16. IT Enabled Risk Management for Taxation and Customs: The Case of AEO Assessment in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianwei; Tan, Yao-Hua; Hulstijn, Joris

    Building collaborative relationships with trusted businesses is a long-term strategy for EU governments. Recently, for the EU Tax and Customs Administration (TCA), the realization of this goal has become more visible with the emerging concept of the Authorized Economic Operator (AEO). Businesses in the member states can apply for the AEO certificate. When it is being granted, simplified control procedures and trade facilitation will be provided by the TCA. A possible “win-win situation” can be achieved, with increased trade efficiency and lowered administrative burden. However, without proper selection of trusted business partners, governments may be worse off due to the adverse selection problem caused by information asymmetry. In this paper, we analyze the cause and effect of the adverse selection in the Government-to-Business relationship building. Further, we show that an IT enabled risk assessment approach can effectively eliminate the G2B information asymmetry and solve the adverse selection problem. The AEO assessment approach of DutchTCA is analysed to give a real life application on how IT is enabling the general risk management approach of the DutchTCA.

  17. In their own words: assessment of satisfaction with residential location among migrants in Nairobi slums.

    PubMed

    Mudege, Netsayi Noris; Zulu, Eliya M

    2011-06-01

    Using qualitative data collected from a sample of rural-urban migrants over the age of 15 in two Nairobi slums interviewed in 2008, this paper discusses the migrants' extent of satisfaction with their residential location and decision to migrate. The study sheds light on why people continue to migrate to, and stay in, the rapidly growing slum settlements despite the high levels of poverty and poor health conditions in these areas. Tenure status is related to satisfaction for all ages. Environmental factors were frequently mentioned as a source of dissatisfaction. Life cycle and 'age-cohort effects' may also affect satisfaction for different age groups in terms of who is satisfied as well as the issues that are considered for satisfaction. High levels of dissatisfaction with slum life may be responsible for high out-migration in slum areas, although it does not mean that those who remain do so because they are satisfied. At the same time, challenges associated with slum life do not automatically signify dissatisfaction. Perceived success, as well as conditions in the area of origin can be used to explain and understand satisfaction/dissatisfaction with slum life. Satisfaction with migration and residential location may be related not only to the destination place, but also to events in the area of origin. PMID:20809178

  18. Women's Satisfaction with Their On-Going Primary Health Care Services: A Consideration of Visit-Specific and Period Assessments

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Roger T; Weisman, Carol S; Camacho, Fabian; Scholle, Sarah Hudson; Henderson, Jillian T; Farmer, Deborah F

    2007-01-01

    Objective To compare and contrast patient ratings of satisfaction with primary care on the day of visit versus over the last 12 months. Data Sources/Study Setting Survey data were collected from female participants at primary care centers affiliated with the University of Michigan, University of Pittsburgh, and Wake Forest University. Study Design One thousand and twenty-one patients attending a primary care visit with at least one prior visit to the study site were consented on site, enrolled in the study, and surveyed at two time points: pre- and immediately postvisit. Data Collection The previsit survey included demographics, self-rated health, visit history (site continuity), and expectations for health care; the postvisit survey focused on patient experiences during the visit, assessment of health care quality using the Primary Care Satisfaction Survey for Women instrument, and global satisfaction with visit and health care over the past 12 months. Expectation discrepancy scores were constructed from the linked expectation–experience ratings. Path analysis and indices of model fit were used to investigate the strength of theoretical links among the variables in an analytic model considering both day-of-visit and past-year ratings with global measures of patient satisfaction as the dependent variables. Principal Findings General health, site continuity and fulfillment of patient expectations for care were linked to global ratings of satisfaction through effects on communication, care coordination, and office staff and administration. Importantly, past-year ratings were mediated largely by care coordination and continuity; day-of-visit ratings were mediated by communication. Conclusion Ratings of health care quality for a specific visit appear to be conceptually distinct from ratings of care over the past 12 months, and thus are not interchangeable. PMID:17362212

  19. Racialized customer service in restaurants: a quantitative assessment of the statistical discrimination explanatory framework.

    PubMed

    Brewster, Zachary W

    2012-01-01

    Despite popular claims that racism and discrimination are no longer salient issues in contemporary society, racial minorities continue to experience disparate treatment in everyday public interactions. The context of full-service restaurants is one such public setting wherein racial minority patrons, African Americans in particular, encounter racial prejudices and discriminate treatment. To further understand the causes of such discriminate treatment within the restaurant context, this article analyzes primary survey data derived from a community sample of servers (N = 200) to assess the explanatory power of one posited explanation—statistical discrimination. Taken as a whole, findings suggest that while a statistical discrimination framework toward understanding variability in servers’ discriminatory behaviors should not be disregarded, the framework’s explanatory utility is limited. Servers’ inferences about the potential profitability of waiting on customers across racial groups explain little of the overall variation in subjects’ self-reported discriminatory behaviors, thus suggesting that other factors not explored in this research are clearly operating and should be the focus of future inquires. PMID:22379609

  20. Does better for the environment mean less tasty? Offering more climate-friendly meals is good for the environment and customer satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Visschers, Vivianne H M; Siegrist, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Food consumption comprises a significant portion of the total environmental impact of households. One way to reduce this impact may be to offer consumers more climate-friendly meal choices, such as when eating out. However, the environmental benefits of such an intervention will depend on not only consumers' liking of the climate-friendlier meals, but also on the perceived environmental impact. We therefore investigated the relationship between the global warming potential (GWP) of and consumers' liking of meals in two field studies in the same restaurant. Visitors to the restaurant were asked to rate the taste of the meal they had just consumed. These taste ratings were then related to the meals' GWP and number of purchases. In the second study, an intervention was tested consisting of a climate-friendly choice label and information posters. Contrary to expectations, it was found in both studies that the GWP of the meals was unrelated to the taste or the number of purchases. Offering more climate-friendly meals did not change consumer satisfaction. As expected, the introduction of the climate-friendly choice label increased the number of climate-friendly meal purchases. Therefore, offering more climate-friendly meals with a climate-friendly choice label can affect consumers' meal choices, but not their preferences or satisfaction, which is beneficial for the climate, consumers and gastronomic establishments. PMID:26278875

  1. Analysis on online word-of-mouth of customer satisfaction in cultural and creative industries of Taiwan: using crafts as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Li-Fen; Shaw, Jing-Chi; Wang, Pei-Wen; Shih, Meng-Long; Yang, Min-Chieh

    2011-10-01

    This study aims to analyze customers' online word-of-mouth for crafts in Cultural and Creative Industries of Taiwan, and extracts articles from Yahoo and Wretch Blogs by the online writing mining technique. The research scope is from Jan. 1, 2008 to Dec. 31, 2010. The subjects include 2457 valid articles on customers' online word-of-mouth regarding the craft industry of Taiwan. Findings demonstrate that, regarding online word-of-mouth, the most important word-of-mouth items of ceramics, stone craft, wood craft manufacturing, and metal craft is decoration and display of surroundings; while brand is valued in glass craft; and the most important item for consumers of paper craft is cultural characteristics of handicrafts.

  2. Delivering astounding customer service

    SciTech Connect

    Hedden, B.

    1995-05-01

    The elements needed to launch a successful quality customer service revolution are: vision and goals; inputs (time, money, and people); and systems. Flawlessly executed activities and behaviors result in quality, customer satisfaction, customer retention, profits, referrals, and growth. Feedback to keep your company on course is necessary. The revolution starts with the leader. Vision is what gets it started, and a sense of purpose is what keeps it going. Changing the organization`s culture requires an obsession, an almost fanatical devotion to exceeding customer expectations. If you don`t set the example and walk your talk, it won`t get off the ground. I can think of no better way to insure yourself a bright future than for you to make certain that each and every customer is extraordinarily satisfied.

  3. Assessing water company customer preferences and willingness to pay for service improvements: A stated choice analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Kenneth G.; Scarpa, Riccardo; Acutt, Melinda

    2005-02-01

    Water and sewerage companies are regional monopolies in the UK. A government agency regulates these companies, setting standards on quality of service to customers, and every 5 years sets prices that companies can charge customers over the ensuing quinquennium. We use a stated choice experiment model to estimate benefits to water company customers of changes across 14 water service factors. The estimated values were quite similar for each service factor across models (conditional logit (CL), CL quadratic, nested logit (NL), or NL quadratic). Estimates of the cost of infrastructure maintenance and improvement with risk of asset failure, along with CL benefit estimates, permit economic optimization across the water company's whole investment program.

  4. 77 FR 41798 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection, Comments Requested: CRS Customer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-16

    ... Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection, Comments Requested: CRS Customer Satisfaction Survey... effectiveness of service deliverables rendered. (2) Title of the Form/Collection: CRS--Customer Satisfaction... advocacy organizations, and vested formal and informal community leaders. Abstract: The CRS...

  5. 77 FR 26043 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed collection; Comments Requested: CRS Customer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ... Information Collection Activities; Proposed collection; Comments Requested: CRS Customer Satisfaction Survey... advocacy organizations, and vested formal and informal community leaders. Abstract: The CRS `Customer Satisfaction Survey' will help CRS maintain the highest standards of professional conciliation and...

  6. Newcastle satisfaction with nursing scales: an instrument for quality assessments of nursing care.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, L H; McColl, E; Priest, J; Bond, S; Boys, R J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To test the validity and reliability of scales for measuring patients' experiences of and satisfaction with nursing care; to test the ability of the scales to detect differences between hospitals and wards; and to investigate whether place of completion, hospital, or home influences response. DESIGN--Sample survey. SETTING--20 wards in five hospitals in the north east of England. PATIENTS--2078 patients in general medical and surgical wards. MAIN MEASURES-- Experiences of and satisfaction with nursing care. RESULTS--75% of patients approached to complete the questionnaires did so. Construct validity and internal consistency were both satisfactory. Both the experience and satisfaction scales were found to detect differences between randomly selected wards and hospitals. A sample of patients (102) were sent a further questionnaire to complete at home. 73% returned this; no significant differences were found in either experience or satisfaction scores between questionnaires given in hospital or at home. CONCLUSION--Scales to measure patients' experiences of and satisfaction with nursing in acute care have been developed and found to be valid, reliable, and able to detect differences between hospitals and wards. Questionnaires can be given before patients leave hospital or at home without affecting scores, but those given at home have a lower response rate. PMID:10158594

  7. Dissatisfied utility customers can be opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, S.

    1995-12-01

    While many utility companies boast about surveys showing high customer satisfaction, they might do well to switch their focus to working with dissatisfied customers. From a marketing perspective, the best opportunities are with those customers who are dissatisfied. By viewing customer problems as marketing and sales opportunities, utilities can reach customers when they are most willing to take action. The paper illustrates this principle by examples.

  8. The Chinese community patient’s life satisfaction, assessment of community medical service, and trust in community health delivery system

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although the Chinese government put a lot of effort into promoting the community patient’s life satisfaction, there still lacked the holistic and systematic approaches to promote the community patient’s life satisfaction in various regions of China. On the basis of the literature, it was found that both the community patient’s assessment of community medical service and trust in community health delivery system were important considerations when the community patient comprehensively evaluated community medical service to generate life satisfaction. So this study was set up to test whether and to what extent the community patient’s assessments of various major aspects of community medical service/various major aspects of the community patient’s trust in community health delivery system influenced life satisfaction in whole China/in various regions of China. Methods In order to explore the situation of China’s community health delivery system before 2009 and provide a reference for China’s community health delivery system reform, the data that could comprehensively and accurately reflect the community patient’s life satisfaction, assessment of community medical service, and trust in community health delivery system in various regions of China was needed, so this study collaborated with the National Bureau of Statistics of China to carry out a large-scale 2008 national community resident household survey (N = 3,306) for the first time in China. And the specified ordered probit models were established to analyze the dataset from this household survey. Results Among major aspects of community medical service, the medical cost (particularly in developed regions), the doctor-patient communication (particularly in developed regions), the medical facility and hospital environment (particularly in developed regions), and the medical treatment process (particularly in underdeveloped regions) were all key considerations (p<0.05 for t statistics) in

  9. Assessing Electronic Reserves at the University of Denver: A Faculty Satisfaction Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jennifer Everson; Sewell, Bethany B.

    2013-01-01

    With the migration from Docutek to Ares Course Reserves management system, the University of Denver's Penrose Course Reserves department reached out to faculty at the university through a mixed methods survey to determine their level of satisfaction. The Ares system, reserve-related improvements, and communication results are discussed. (Contains…

  10. Assessment of Knowledge and Level of Satisfaction of Nursing Undergraduates in a Pressure Ulcer Online Course

    PubMed Central

    Aroldi, Juscilynne B. C.; Peres, Heloisa H. H.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the effectiveness of two different educational modalities in an online course on pressure ulcers by comparing the degree of knowledge and level of satisfaction of nursing undergraduate students. The result will ground the adoption of Information and Communication Technologies in the teaching process in nursing. PMID:24199036

  11. Specifying the Determinants of Neighborhood Satisfaction: A Robust Assessment in 24 Metropolitan Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hipp, John R.

    2009-01-01

    Using a sample of households nested in census tracts in 24 metropolitan areas over four time points, this study provides a robust test of the determinants of neighborhood satisfaction, taking into account the census tract context. Consistent with social disorganization theory, the presence of racial/ethnic heterogeneity and single-parent…

  12. Assessing Psychological Need Satisfaction in Exercise Contexts: Issues of Score Invariance, Item Modification, and Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunnell, Katie E.; Wilson, Philip M.; Zumbo, Bruno D.; Mack, Diane E.; Crocker, Peter R. E.

    2012-01-01

    The researchers examined if scores from the original Psychological Need Satisfaction in Exercise Scale (Wilson, Rogers, Rodgers, & Wild, 2006) were invariant from a modified version specific to physical activity and then examined measurement invariance of scores across groups on the modified scale. Three groups were examined: (a) Students/staff…

  13. Work/Life Satisfaction Policy in ADVANCE Universities: Assessing Levels of Flexibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tower, Leslie E.; Dilks, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Work/life satisfaction policies are seen as key to recruiting, retaining, and advancing high quality faculty. This article explores the work/life policies prevalent at NSF ADVANCE institutions (PAID, Catalyst, and IT). We systematically review ADVANCE university websites (N = 124) and rank 9 categories of work/life policy including dual career…

  14. Assessment of Students' Satisfaction of Service Quality in Takoradi Polytechnic: The Students' Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anwowie, Samuel; Amoako, Joseph; Abrefa, Amma Adomaa

    2015-01-01

    Higher educational institutions are increasingly placing greater emphasis on meeting students' expectations and needs as student perceptions of higher educational facilities and services are becoming more important. To investigate students' satisfaction of service quality at the Takoradi Polytechnic, a study was conducted using the SERVQUAL…

  15. Assessing Disharmony and Disaffection in Intimate Relationships: Revision of the Marital Satisfaction Inventory Factor Scales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrington, Rachael L.; Mitchell, Alexandra E.; Castellani, Angela M.; Joseph, Jana I.; Snyder, Douglas K.; Gleaves, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has identified 2 broad components of distress in intimate relationships: overt conflict, or "disharmony", and emotional distance, or "disaffection". Using confirmatory factor analysis, the authors derived 2 broadband scales of disharmony and disaffection from the Marital Satisfaction Inventory-Revised (D. K. Snyder, 1997),…

  16. Correlates of Community Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Michael J.

    Communities, defined as either physical or sociocultural entities, vary widely in reported levels of resident satisfaction. Dimensions of community characteristics were studied to assess their relative importance to resident community satisfaction. A questionnaire about various community characteristics such as social life, physical…

  17. Methods and guidelines for assessing customer district energy needs. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Oliker, I.; Taranov, D.

    1998-12-01

    District heating systems have been in service in cities, universities, and industrial facilities for more than 100 years. In recent years there has also been a rapid increase in the number of district cooling systems constructed as well as being studied for possible implementation. Ever increasing building construction and electricity costs (particularly demand charges), continued emphasis on energy conservation, new and improved equipment and piping technologies, and revived technologies such as thermal storage, have all contributed to the need and benefits of larger more efficient district energy (heating and cooling) plans and distribution systems. District energy (DE) may be generated in an existing conventional power plant (converted to cogeneration), a new gas-fired combined cycle plant or by electrical and gas fired chillers and boilers. The district energy system permits substantial energy savings over individual building cooling and heating systems. Further, such systems provide conditions for added economic development and environment improvement in the cities. District energy systems (particularly cooling systems) become more important in the US with the introduction of retail wheeling of electricity. Connecting a customer to a district cooling system (as opposed to individual electric chillers) implies a long-term customer for this service. Therefore the major motivation for district cooling development is to retain electric customers who otherwise may switch to alternative generators. The purpose of this project is to develop a methodology for evaluation of customer`s peak hourly, and annual load profiles in terms of useful energy to be supplied by a district system.

  18. Estimating occupant satisfaction of HVAC system noise using quality assessment index.

    PubMed

    Forouharmajd, Farhad; Nassiri, Parvin; Monazzam, Mohammad R; Yazdchi, Mohammadreza

    2012-01-01

    Noise may be defined as any unwanted sound. Sound becomes noise when it is too loud, unexpected, uncontrolled, happens at the wrong time, contains unwanted pure tones or unpleasant. In addition to being annoying, loud noise can cause hearing loss, and, depending on other factors, can affect stress level, sleep patterns and heart rate. The primary object for determining subjective estimations of loudness is to present sounds to a sample of listeners under controlled conditions. In heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems only the ventilation fan industry (e.g., bathroom exhaust and sidewall propeller fans) uses loudness ratings. In order to find satisfaction, percent of exposure to noise is the valuable issue for the personnel who are working in these areas. The room criterion (RC) method has been defined by ANSI standard S12.2, which is based on measured levels of in HVAC systems noise in spaces and is used primarily as a diagnostic tool. The RC method consists of a family of criteria curves and a rating procedure. RC measures background noise in the building over the frequency range of 16-4000 Hz. This rating system requires determination of the mid-frequency average level and determining the perceived balance between high-frequency (HF) sound and low-frequency (LF) sound. The arithmetic average of the sound levels in the 500, 1000 and 2000 Hz octave bands is 44.6 dB; therefore, the RC 45 curve is selected as the reference for spectrum quality evaluation. The spectral deviation factors in the LF, medium-frequency sound and HF regions are 2.9, 7.5 and -2.3, respectively, giving a Quality Assessment Index (QAI) of 9.8. This concludes the QAI is useful in estimating an occupant's probable reaction when the system design does not produce optimum sound quality. Thus, a QAI between 5 and 10 dB represents a marginal situation in which acceptance by an occupant is questionable. However, when sound pressure levels in the 16 or 31.5 Hz octave bands exceed 65

  19. High self-assessment of disability and the surgeon's recommendation against surgical intervention may negatively impact satisfaction scores in patients with spinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Mazur, Marcus D; McEvoy, Sara; Schmidt, Meic H; Bisson, Erica F

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT Patient satisfaction scores have become a common metric for health care quality. Because satisfaction scores are right-skewed, even small differences in mean scores can have a large impact. Little information, however, is available on the specific factors that play a role in satisfaction in patients with spinal disorders. The authors investigated whether disability severity and the surgeon's recommendation for or against surgical intervention were associated with patient satisfaction scores. METHODS The authors conducted a retrospective cohort study involving adult patients who were referred to a spine surgeon for an outpatient evaluation of back pain. Patients completed the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) before their clinic appointment and a Press Ganey patient satisfaction survey after their visit. Patients were grouped by self-assessed disability severity: mild to moderate (ODI < 40%) and severe (≥ 40%). Satisfaction scores were graded from 0 (very poor) to 100 (very good). Nonparametric tests were used to evaluate the association between patient satisfaction and current disability self-assessment. The authors also investigated whether the surgeon's recommendation against surgery negatively affected patient satisfaction. RESULTS One hundred thirty patients completed the ODI questionnaire before and satisfaction surveys after seeing a spine surgeon for a new outpatient back pain consultation. Of these, 68 patients had severe disability, 62 had mild to moderate disability, 67 received a recommendation for surgery, and 63 received a recommendation against surgery. Composite satisfaction scores were lower among patients who had severe disability than among those with mild to moderate disability (median [interquartile range]: 91.7 [83.7-96.4] vs 95.8 [91.0-99.3], respectively; p = 0.0040). Patients who received a recommendation against surgery reported lower satisfaction scores than those who received a recommendation for surgery (91.7 [83.5-95.8] vs 95

  20. Understanding customer experience.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Christopher; Schwager, Andre

    2007-02-01

    Anyone who has signed up for cell phone service, attempted to claim a rebate, or navigated a call center has probably suffered from a company's apparent indifference to what should be its first concern: the customer experiences that culminate in either satisfaction or disappointment and defection. Customer experience is the subjective response customers have to direct or indirect contact with a company. It encompasses every aspect of an offering: customer care, advertising, packaging, features, ease of use, reliability. Customer experience is shaped by customers' expectations, which largely reflect previous experiences. Few CEOs would argue against the significance of customer experience or against measuring and analyzing it. But many don't appreciate how those activities differ from CRM or just how illuminating the data can be. For instance, the majority of the companies in a recent survey believed they have been providing "superior" experiences to customers, but most customers disagreed. The authors describe a customer experience management (CEM) process that involves three kinds of monitoring: past patterns (evaluating completed transactions), present patterns (tracking current relationships), and potential patterns (conducting inquiries in the hope of unveiling future opportunities). Data are collected at or about touch points through such methods as surveys, interviews, focus groups, and online forums. Companies need to involve every function in the effort, not just a single customer-facing group. The authors go on to illustrate how a cross-functional CEM system is created. With such a system, companies can discover which customers are prospects for growth and which require immediate intervention. PMID:17345685

  1. Customer premises services market demand assessment 1980 - 2000. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamble, R. B.; Saporta, L.; Heidenrich, G. A.

    1983-01-01

    Estimates of market demand for domestic civilian telecommunications services for the years 1980 to 2000 are provided. Overall demand, demand or satellite services, demand for satellite delivered Customer Premises Service (CPS), and demand for 30/20 GHz Customer Premises Services are covered. Emphasis is placed on the CPS market and demand is segmented by market, by service, by user class and by geographic region. Prices for competing services are discussed and the distribution of traffic with respect to distance is estimated. A nationwide traffic distribution model for CPS in terms of demand for CPS traffic and earth stations for each of the major SMSAs in the United States are provided.

  2. [Hospital at home: assessment of early discharge in terms of patients mortality and satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Damiani, G; Pinnarelli, L; Ricciardi, G

    2006-01-01

    New organizational models are essentials for European Hospitals because of restraining budget and ageing of population. Hospital at home is an alternative to inpatient care, effective both in clinical and economic ground. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of Hospital at Home in terms of decreased mortality and patient satisfaction. We carried out a meta-analysis of the literature about hospital at home interventions. We searched Medline (to December 2002), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (to October 2002) and other bibliographical databases, with a supplementary handsearching of literature. We used the following keywords: hospital at home, home hospitalization, mortality, patient satisfaction, cost, acute hospital care, conventional hospitalization. We included studies respecting the following criteria: analytical or experimental studies aimed at compare early discharge to hospital at home and continued care in an acute hospital. Review Manager 4.2 software was used to collect data and perform statistical analysis. We found 2420 articles searching for the chosen keywords. Twelve studies (2048 patients) were included for death outcome and six studies (1382 patients) were included for satisfaction outcome. The selected studies indicated a greater effect size of patient satisfaction in home patients than hospitalized ones (Odds Ratio: 1.58 95% CI: 1.25, 2.00) and showed no difference in terms of mortality (Risk Difference: -0.01 95% CI: -0.03, 0.02). Our results underline the effectiveness of this organizational model, as an alternative to continued care in an acute hospital. Further useful considerations could be drawn by economic evaluation studies carried out on field. PMID:16649506

  3. Quality of midwifery led care: assessing the effects of different models of continuity for women's satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, M.; Fenwick, N.; McKenzie, C.; Wolfe, C. D.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changing Childbirth (1993), a report on the future of maternity services in the United Kingdom, endorsed the development of a primarily community based midwifery led service for normal pregnancy, with priority given to the provision of "woman centred care". This has led to the development of local schemes emphasising continuity of midwifery care and increased choice and control for women. AIMS: To compare two models of midwifery group practices (shared caseload and personal caseload) in terms of: (a) the extent to which women see the same midwife antenatally and know the delivery midwife, and (b) women's preference for continuity and satisfaction with their care. METHODS: A review of maternity case notes and survey of a cohort of women at 36 weeks of gestation and 2 weeks postpartum who attended the two midwifery group practices. Questionnaires were completed by 247 women antenatally (72% response) and 222 (68%) postnatally. Outcome measures were the level of continuity experienced during antenatal, intrapartum, and postnatal care, women's preferences for continuity of carer, and ratings of satisfaction with care. RESULTS: The higher level of antenatal continuity of carer with personal caseload midwifery was associated with a lower percentage having previously met their main delivery midwife (60% v 74%). Women's preferences for antenatal continuity were significantly associated with their experiences. Postnatal rating of knowing the delivery midwife as "very important indeed" was associated with both previous antenatal ratings of its importance, and women's actual experiences. Personal continuity of carer was not a clear predictor of women's satisfaction with care. Of greater importance were women's expectations, their relations with midwives, communication, and involvement in decision making. CONCLUSIONS: Midwifery led schemes based on both shared and personal caseloads are acceptable to women. More important determinants of quality and women

  4. The effects assessment of firm environmental strategy and customer environmental conscious on green product development.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Tien; Chuang, Li-Min; Chao, Shu-Tsung; Chang, Hsiao-Ping

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine why both parties (industry and consumer market) have mutual interests in protecting the environment but they still are hesitant to act green. The study used two-stage sampling from consumer market to depict ideal green product characteristics and reliable toy companies, and visit these companies for the second sample collection to examine whether the organizational eco-innovation strategy with customer value has a positive effect on green product development. In other words, the customer's benefit is an important factor for new product development strategy for green toys. This research shows that the willingness to buy green toys increases if most people in society buy green toys. This represents that customers are environmentally conscious and care about protecting the environment, or buying green toys is the result of a new economic trend and childhood education. The willingness to buy green toys increases if customers think that green products implies an enhancement on new product development to toy manufacturers. Further, if manufacturers are able to manage the difficulty of cooperation with all parties in the supply chain and difficulties related to production, they are willing to adopt customers' perceived value on green toys for their new product development strategy. It is rare to find academic research discussing the perspectives of both consumers and manufacturers in the same study because the research topic is very broad and many conditions must be considered. This research aims to find the effect of consumer-perceived value and company eco-innovation on green product development. PMID:21818538

  5. Instruments to assess patient satisfaction after teleconsultation and triage: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Allemann Iseli, Martina; Kunz, Regina; Blozik, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction is crucial for the acceptance, use, and adherence to recommendations from teleconsultations regarding health care requests and triage services. Objectives Our objectives are to systematically review the literature for multidimensional instruments that measure patient satisfaction after teleconsultation and triage and to compare these for content, reliability, validity, and factor analysis. Methods We searched Medline, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and PsycINFO for literature on these instruments. Two reviewers independently screened all obtained references for eligibility and extracted data from the eligible articles. The results were presented using summary tables. Results We included 31 publications, describing 16 instruments in our review. The reporting on test development and psychometric characteristics was incomplete. The development process, described by ten of 16 instruments, included a review of the literature (n=7), patient or stakeholder interviews (n=5), and expert consultations (n=3). Four instruments evaluated factor structure, reliability, and validity; two of those four demonstrated low levels of reliability for some of their subscales. Conclusion A majority of instruments on patient satisfaction after teleconsultation showed methodological limitations and lack rigorous evaluation. Users should carefully reflect on the content of the questionnaires and their relevance to the application. Future research should apply more rigorously established scientific standards for instrument development and psychometric evaluation. PMID:25028538

  6. Incorporating Patient Satisfaction Metrics in Assessing Multidisciplinary Breast Cancer Care Quality

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Jennifer L.; De Costa, Anna-Maria A.; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Sterba, Katherine R.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The Medical University of South Carolina implemented a patient-centered multidisciplinary breast clinic program (MDBC) in August 2012. In this study, patient satisfaction with MDBC care delivery model and communication with healthcare providers was examined to inform the refinement of the MDBC program. Methods During the first 10 months of the MDBC, patients were asked to complete a 14-question postconsultation telephone survey. A statistical analysis was performed to explore potential associations between age, race, and stage with overall patient satisfaction scores. Results Overall, patients (N = 52, 56% white, 42% African American, 2% Hispanic; mean age 61 years) rated the quality of care highly (mean 4.7, range [1 = poor to 5 = excellent]) and felt comfortable with their plan of care (mean 1.63, range [1 = extremely comfortable to 5 = not at all comfortable]). No statistically significant differences in overall satisfaction were found by age, race, or stage; however, patient responses were commonly not optimal (ie, either “no” or “yes, but not as much as I would like”) when asked if the care team addressed the impact of their diagnosis on personal relationships (40.4%) or emotional health (28.9%). Conclusions Patients were highly satisfied with the care they received in the MDBC program. Findings suggest that this model is well suited to a diverse patient population and have highlighted quality improvement targets such as increased emphasis on providers’ communication about psychosocial issues. PMID:26079465

  7. Focusing on customer service.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    This booklet is devoted to a consideration of how good customer service in family planning programs can generate demand for products and services, bring customers back, and reduce costs. Customer service is defined as increasing client satisfaction through continuous concern for client preferences, staff accountability to clients, and respect for the rights of clients. Issues discussed include the introduction of a customer service approach and gaining staff commitment. The experience of PROSALUD in Bolivia in recruiting appropriate staff, supervising staff, soliciting client feedback, and marketing services is offered as an example of a successful customer service approach. The key customer service functions are described as 1) establishing a welcoming atmosphere, 2) streamlining client flow, 3) personalizing client services, and 4) organizing and providing clear information to clients. The role of the manager in developing procedures is explored, and the COPE (Client-Oriented Provider-Efficient) process is presented as a good way to begin to make improvements. Techniques in staff training in customer service include brainstorming, role playing, using case studies (examples of which are provided), and engaging in practice sessions. Training also leads to the development of effective customer service attitudes, and the differences between these and organizational/staff-focused attitudes are illustrated in a chart. The use of communication skills (asking open-ended questions, helping clients express their concerns, engaging in active listening, and handling difficult situations) is considered. Good recovery skills are important when things go wrong. Gathering and using client feedback is the next topic considered. This involves identifying, recording, and discussing customer service issues as well as taking action on these issues and evaluating the results. The booklet ends by providing a sample of customer service indicators, considering the maintenance of a

  8. Multinational development of a questionnaire assessing patient satisfaction with anticoagulant treatment: the 'Perception of Anticoagulant Treatment Questionnaire' (PACT-Q©)

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Martin H; Marrel, Alexia; Carita, Paulo; Anderson, David; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Crijns, Harry; Consoli, Silla; Arnould, Benoit

    2009-01-01

    Background The side effects and burden of anticoagulant treatments may contribute to poor compliance and consequently to treatment failure. A specific questionnaire is necessary to assess patients' needs and their perceptions of anticoagulant treatment. Methods A conceptual model of expectation and satisfaction with anticoagulant treatment was designed by an advisory board and used to guide patient (n = 31) and clinician (n = 17) interviews in French, US English and Dutch. Patients had either atrial fibrillation (AF), deep venous thrombosis (DVT), or pulmonary embolism (PE). Following interviews, three PACT-Q language versions were developed simultaneously and further pilot-tested by 19 patients. Linguistic validations were performed for additional language versions. Results Initial concepts were developed to cover three areas of interest: 'Treatment', 'Disease and Complications' and 'Information about disease and anticoagulant treatment'. After clinician and patient interviews, concepts were further refined into four domains and 17 concepts; test versions of the PACT-Q were then created simultaneously in three languages, each containing 27 items grouped into four domains: "Treatment Expectations" (7 items), "Convenience" (11 items), "Burden of Disease and Treatment" (2 items) and "Anticoagulant Treatment Satisfaction" (7 items). No item was deleted or added after pilot testing as patients found the PACT-Q easy to understand and appropriate in length in all languages. The PACT-Q was divided into two parts: the first part to measure the expectations and the second to measure the convenience, burden and treatment satisfaction, for evaluation prior to and after anticoagulant treatment, respectively. Eleven additional language versions were linguistically validated. Conclusion The PACT-Q has been rigorously developed and linguistically validated. It is available in 14 languages for use with thromboembolic patients, including AF, PE and DVT patients. Its validation and

  9. Patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Bhanu

    2010-09-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important and commonly used indicator for measuring the quality in health care. Patient satisfaction affects clinical outcomes, patient retention, and medical malpractice claims. It affects the timely, efficient, and patient-centered delivery of quality health care. Patient satisfaction is thus a proxy but a very effective indicator to measure the success of doctors and hospitals. This article discusses as to how to ensure patient satisfaction in dermatological practice. PMID:21430827

  10. 76 FR 2395 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Customer/Partner...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ... on voluntary customer satisfaction service surveys to implement Executive Order 12862. DATES: Submit... Collection; Comment Request; Customer/Partner Service Surveys AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... of information technology. Customer/Partner Service Surveys (OMB Control Number...

  11. 77 FR 20887 - Proposed Information Collection (National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... solicits comments on the information needed to measure customer satisfaction with delivered products and... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey) Activity...: Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey, VA Form 0863....

  12. Distinguishing between satisfaction and loyalty: Conceptual, methodological & analytical differences

    SciTech Connect

    Hinson, K.A.

    1994-11-01

    This paper briefly presents a discussion of the conceptual definition of {open_quotes}Customer Satisfaction{close_quotes} followed by review of operational definitions of {open_quotes}Satisfaction{close_quotes} as a criterion variable and the kinds of predictor variables and analytic methods employed in its modeling. A model of {open_quotes}Customer Satisfaction{close_quotes} is presented developed by the discussed methodology. Conceptual and operational definitions of {open_quotes}Customer Loyalty{close_quotes} are then reviewed, contrasting the kinds of predictor variables and analytic methods most appropriate for understanding a {open_quotes}Loyalty{close_quotes} decision and how these differ from {open_quotes}Customer Satisfaction.{close_quotes} A more fully specified model of {open_quotes}Customer Loyalty{close_quotes} is presented. Finally, the risks of employing a {open_quotes}Satisfaction{close_quotes} methodology in modeling {open_quotes}Customer Loyalty{close_quotes} are discussed.

  13. Identification with the retail organization and customer-perceived employee similarity: effects on customer spending.

    PubMed

    Netemeyer, Richard G; Heilman, Carrie M; Maxham, James G

    2012-09-01

    Two constructs important to academicians and managers are the degree to which employees and customers identify with an organization, employee organizational identification (employee OI) and customer-company identification (customer identification), respectively. This research examines the effects of these identification constructs and the related construct of customer perceived similarity to employees on customer spending. Via a 1-year multilevel study of 12,047 customers and 1,464 store employees (sales associates) covering 212 stores of a specialty apparel retailer, our study contributes to the literature in 2 critical ways. First, we expand the theoretical network of employee OI and customer identification by examining the related construct of a customer's perceived similarity to store employees. We examine the incremental (not fully mediated) main and interaction effects of customer-perceived similarity to employees and employee OI on customer spending. Second, we examine the effect of customer identification on customer spending relative to the effect of customer satisfaction on customer spending. Thus, our study also contributes by demonstrating a potential complementary route to achieve customer spending (customer identification), a route that may be more readily affected by management than the efforts required for a sustained increase in customer satisfaction. Implications for academics and managers are offered. PMID:22663556

  14. 77 FR 61473 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Voluntary Customer Surveys To Implement E.O. 12862...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ... determine levels of customer satisfaction, as well as determining issues that contribute to customer burden...: We will be conducting different customer satisfaction and opinion surveys and focus group interviews... satisfaction and opinion surveys and focus group interviews to be conducted over the next three years....

  15. Marketing health services: the engineering of satisfaction.

    PubMed

    MacStravic, R S

    1984-12-01

    Service marketing is the engineering of satisfaction, and the key to success is to identify and influence potential customers' expectations and then to fulfill those expectations. Patient satisfaction largely determines both a program's revenues and expenditures and the effectiveness of care received by patients. A program's ability to satisfy patients rests upon three basic elements: research, design, and communication. Research should be on two levels. The first is basic market assessment and analysis, and should reveal overall market potential by focusing on consumers' expectations, unmet needs, and level of satisfaction. From this stage of research, the organization should be able to identify current programs that are secure and stable, those which have significant growth potential, those which are threatened by competition, and those which have little future. This research also should indicate the potential for new programs and for new markets for existing programs. The second level of research focuses on a specific program (whether current or proposed) and is the basis for program design. The organization can tailor the program to consumers' expectations in everything from services provided to price of parking and other amenities. Research also provides a basis for communications. Not only can communications influence a potential customer to try a provider, but also care providers can use communications during and after the service experience to reinforce what might have been a casual decision. Ideally, all communication that occurs between patients and providers should serve marketing as well as diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. It can shape patients' expectations, reinforce satisfaction when those expectations have been fulfilled, and convey the provider's caring and concern. PMID:10269066

  16. Customer care in the NHS.

    PubMed

    Ruddick, Fred

    2015-01-20

    Viewing individuals in need of NHS care as customers has the potential to refocus the way their care is delivered. This article highlights some of the benefits of reframing the nurse-patient relationship in terms of customer care, and draws parallels between good customer care and the provision of high quality patient care in the NHS. It explores lessons to be learned from those who have studied the customer experience, which can be adapted to enhance the customer care experience within the health service. Developing professional expertise in the knowledge and skills that underpin good-quality interpersonal encounters is essential to improve the customer experience in health care and should be prioritised alongside the development of more technical skills. Creating a culture where emotional intelligence, caring and compassion are essential requirements for all nursing staff will improve patient satisfaction. PMID:25585766

  17. Assessing Intimate Relationships of Chinese Couples in Taiwan Using the Marital Satisfaction Inventory-Revised.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yu-Chiung; Lin, Chien-Heng; Chen, Chien-Min; Balderrama-Durbin, Christina; Snyder, Douglas K

    2016-06-01

    The current study examined the psychometric characteristics of the Chinese translation of the Marital Satisfaction Inventory-Revised (MSI-R) in a community sample of 117 couples from Taiwan. The Chinese MSI-R demonstrated moderate to strong internal consistency. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed similar scale factor structures in the Taiwanese and U.S. standardization samples. Mean profile comparisons between the current Taiwanese sample and the original MSI-R standardization sample revealed statistically significant but small differences on several subscales. Overall, the psychometric characteristics of the Chinese MSI-R lend support to its use with couples from diverse cultural backgrounds whose sole or preferred language is Chinese. It may also be appropriate to use the MSI-R in clinical settings for prevention or intervention efforts directed at Chinese-speaking couples. The implications of these findings for clinical and research purposes are discussed. PMID:26033114

  18. Building brand equity and customer loyalty

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, G.

    1995-05-01

    Customer satisfaction and customer loyalty are two different concepts, not merely two different phrases measuring a single consumer attitude. Utilities having identical customer satisfaction ratings based on performance in areas like power reliability, pricing, and quality of service differ dramatically in their levels of customer loyalty. As competitive markets establish themselves, discrepancies in customer loyalty will have profound impacts on each utility`s prospects for market retention, profitability, and ultimately, shareholder value. Meeting pre-existing consumer needs, wants and preferences is the foundation of any utility strategy for building customer loyalty and market retention. Utilities meet their underlying customer expectations by performing well in three discrete areas: product, customer service programs, and customer service transactions. Brand equity is an intervening variable standing between performance and the loyalty a utility desires. It is the totality of customer perceptions about the unique extra value the utility provides above and beyond its basic product, customer service programs and customer service transactions; it is the tangible, palpable reality of a branded utility that exists in the minds of consumers. By learning to manage their brand equity as well as they manage their brand performance, utilities gain control over all the major elements in the value-creation process that creates customer loyalty. By integrating brand performance and brand equity, electric utility companies can truly become in their customers` eyes a brand - a unique, very special, value-added energy services provider that can ask for and deserve a premium price in the marketplace.

  19. Getting More Value from the LibQUAL+® Survey: The Merits of Qualitative Analysis and Importance-Satisfaction Matrices in Assessing Library Patron Comments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Detlor, Brian; Ball, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the merit of conducting a qualitative analysis of LibQUAL+® survey comments as a means of leveraging quantitative LibQUAL+ results, and using importance-satisfaction matrices to present and assess qualitative findings. Comments collected from the authors' institution's LibQUAL+ survey were analyzed using a codebook based on…

  20. Assessment of United States and Japanese Athletic Trainers' Satisfaction with Current Ascension Pathways and Interest in Future Transnational Certification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Presuto, Dax A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this cross-system and cross-cultural study was to investigate the current athletic training systems in the US and Japan, to assess US and Japanese athletic trainers' satisfaction with current athletic training ascension pathways in their respective country and to determine their interest in future transnational…

  1. [Decision making satisfaction in health scale: instrument adapted and validated to Portuguese].

    PubMed

    Martinho, Maria Júlia Costa Marques; Martins, Maria Manuela Ferreira Pereira da Silva; Angelo, Margareth

    2014-01-01

    Decision making is an area of health research that has gained importance both for the partnership models of care that give prominence to the patient and family, either by growing concern about quality and customer satisfaction with the care provided. So we decided to make the cultural adaptation and to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Portuguese version "The Satisfaction with Decision Scale" de Holmes-Rovner (1996), which aims to assess satisfaction with the decisions taken in health. The sample consisted of 521 nursing students the School of Nursing of Porto. The results of reliability tests show good internal consistency for the total items (Alpha Cronbach = 0.88). The psychometric study allows us to state that the Portuguese version of "The Satisfaction with Decision Scale", we call "Escala da Satisfação com a Decisão em Saúde", is an instrument comparable with the original in terms of validity and reliability. PMID:25590878

  2. Staff Satisfaction with Administration as a Measure of Consumer Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanguma, Jesus; Luster, Jane Nell

    The school district in this study, "Special School District" (SSD), is under the administration of the Louisiana State Department of education and thus classified as a Louisiana state agency required to conform to the mandate that state agencies have performance indicators, including one for customer satisfaction. For the SSD, customer…

  3. Continuous Assessment Improved Academic Achievement and Satisfaction of Psychology Students in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrillo-de-la-Pena, Maria T.; Perez, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    The authors present the experience of a continuous assessment procedure carried out in the second term of a physiological psychology course during 3 consecutive academic years at a Spanish university. Each year, the academic outcomes of students under continuous assessment (the experimental group) were compared with those of students under…

  4. Patient satisfaction with quality of primary health care in Benghazi, Libya

    PubMed Central

    Salam, Asharaf Abdul; Alshekteria, Amina Abdulla; Abd Alhadi, Hana; Ahmed, Mariam; Mohammed, Anees

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The Libyan National Health System (LNHS) is debated for the paradox of its performance versus impact. It has poor performance, but the national health statistics are good and competitive. There are concerted efforts to manage health care services and to regain the lost trust. A primary health care (PHC) system that focuses on preventive and promotive care is the core focus of LNHS efforts. Objectives To assess patient satisfaction with quality of PHC assessed in terms of (a) customer profile, (b) patient satisfaction, and (c) health care-seeking behavior. Methodology A sample of nine health centers and seven polyclinics from various locations in Benghazi, Libya were selected for gathering information by structured face-to-face interviews. A total of 310 beneficiaries were interviewed by using an Arabic translation of the Charleston Psychiatric Outpatient Satisfaction Scale. Results The beneficiaries appear to be quite satisfied with the quality of services. Geographical zone, marital status of beneficiary, and type of facility are satisfaction-related factors. There are preferences for facilities located within the City Centre over those located elsewhere. There is also an interaction effect of the geographical zone and the type of facility in creating differences in satisfaction. Conclusions A customer-friendly facility concept that emphasizes reception, physician interaction, and cordiality shall add value. Polyclinics require more attention as does the Al Slawy area. A few utility services might also be considered. PMID:21483587

  5. Telephone & Self Completed Satisfaction Surveys. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton.

    This manual was developed to assist school jurisdiction personnel in implementing effective customer satisfaction surveys by telephone or through mailed surveys to be completed by the customer. It provides background information about market research field activities and processes and gives an overview of the entire data collection process,…

  6. WASTE MINIMIZATION ASSESSMENT FOR A MANUFACTURER OF CUSTOM MOLDED PLASTIC PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small- and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected ...

  7. Structural relationships between work environment and service quality perceptions as a function of customer contact intensity: implications for human service strategy.

    PubMed

    Scotti, Dennis J; Harmon, Joel; Behson, Scott J

    2009-01-01

    This study assesses the importance of customer-contact intensity at the service encounter level as a determinant of service quality assessments. Using data from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, it shows that performance-driven human resources practices play an important role as determinants of employee customer orientation and service capability in both high-contact (outpatient healthcare) and low-contact (benefits claim processing) human service contexts. However, there existed significant differences across service delivery settings in the salience of customer orientation and the congruence between employee and customer perceptions of service quality, depending on the intensity of customer contact. In both contexts, managerial attention to high-performance work systems and customer-orientation has the potential to favorably impact perceptions of service quality, amplify consumer satisfaction, and enhance operational efficiency. PMID:19803115

  8. Ensuring patient satisfaction in medical groups.

    PubMed

    Choong, P

    2000-01-01

    Delivering satisfaction to patients has become increasingly important among professionals in the medical community. However, administrators in medical group practices charged with the task of nurturing customer satisfaction are often required to allocate their limited funds across an array of initiatives intended to ensure the delivery of the right amount and types of services to improve satisfaction among their customers. This requires the ability to locate areas that yield the greatest response per unit of investment. This paper shows that the impact of attribute performance on satisfaction is asymmetric. Positive attribute performance is shown to have a smaller impact on satisfaction than negative attribute performance. The paper also discusses how an understanding of this asymmetry will enable administrators to allocate their resources more wisely as they decide whether to maintain or increase attribute-level performance. PMID:10787726

  9. Monitoring Users' Satisfactions of the NOAA NWS Climate Products and Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsfall, F. M.; Timofeyeva, M. M.; Dixon, S.; Meyers, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    The NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) Climate Services Division (CSD) ensures the relevance of NWS climate products and services. There are several ongoing efforts to identify the level of user satisfaction. One of these efforts includes periodical surveys conducted by Claes Fornell International (CFI) Group using the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI), which is "the only uniform, national, cross-industry measure of satisfaction with the quality of goods and services available in the United States" (http://www.cfigroup.com/acsi/overview.asp). The CFI Group conducted NWS Climate Products and Services surveys in 2004 and 2009. In 2010, a prominent routine was established for a periodical assessment of the customer satisfaction. From 2010 onward, yearly surveys will cover major climate services products and services. An expanded suite of climate products will be surveyed every other year. Each survey evaluated customer satisfaction with a range of NWS climate services, data, and products, including Climate Prediction Center (CPC) outlooks, drought monitoring, and ENSO monitoring and forecasts, as well as NWS local climate data and forecast products and services. The survey results provide insight into the NWS climate customer base and their requirements for climate services. They also evaluate whether we are meeting the needs of customers and the ease of their understanding for routine climate services, forecasts, and outlooks. In addition, the evaluation of specific topics, such as NWS forecast product category names, probabilistic nature of climate products, interpretation issues, etc., were addressed to assess how our users interpret prediction terminology. This paper provides an analysis of the following products: hazards, extended-range, long-lead and drought outlooks, El Nino Southern Oscillation monitoring and predictions as well as local climate data products. Two key issues make comparing the different surveys challenging, including the

  10. Job Satisfaction in Fisheries Compared

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollnac, Richard; Bavinck, Maarten; Monnereau, Iris

    2012-01-01

    This article draws comparative lessons from seven job satisfaction studies on marine capture fishing that were recently carried out in nine countries and three geographical regions--Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean. The seven studies made use of an identical job satisfaction assessment tool and present information on a selection of metiers mainly…

  11. Clinical education and training of student nurses in four moderately new European Union countries: Assessment of students' satisfaction with the learning environment.

    PubMed

    Antohe, Ileana; Riklikiene, Olga; Tichelaar, Erna; Saarikoski, Mikko

    2016-03-01

    Nurses underwent different models of education during various historical periods. The recent decade in Europe has been marked with educational transitions for the nursing profession related to Bologna Declaration and enlargement of the European Union. This paper aims to explore the situation of clinical placements for student nurses and assess students' satisfaction with the learning environment in four relatively new member states of European Union: the Czech Republic, Hungary, Lithuania and Romania. The data for cross-sectional quantitative study were collected during the exploratory phase of EmpNURS Project via a web based questionnaire which utilized a part of Clinical Learning Environment scale (CLES + T). The students evaluated their clinical learning environment mainly positively. The students' utter satisfaction with their clinical placements reached a high level and strongly correlated with the supervisory model. Although the commonest model for supervision was traditional group supervision, the most satisfied students had the experience of individualised supervision. The study gives a picture of the satisfaction of students with the learning environment and, moreover, with clinical placement education of student nurses in four EU countries. The results highlight the individualized supervision model as a crucial factor of students' total satisfaction during their clinical training periods. PMID:26750176

  12. The Type of Breast Reconstruction May Not Influence Patient Satisfaction in the Chinese Population: A Single Institutional Experience

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiaying; Chen, Ying; Hu, Zhen; Liu, Guangyu; Shen, Zhenzhou; Shao, Zhimin; Wu, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to evaluate patient satisfaction with four common types of breast reconstruction performed at our institution: latissimus dorsi myocutaneous (LDM) flap reconstruction with or without implants, pedicled transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap reconstruction, and free deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap reconstruction. Methods A custom survey consisting of questions that assessed general and aesthetic satisfaction was sent to patients who had undergone breast reconstruction in the last 5 years. The clinical data and details of the surgery were also collected from the patients who returned the surveys. We compared satisfaction rates across the four breast reconstruction types and analyzed the effects of various factors on overall general and aesthetic satisfaction rates using a binary logistic regression model. Result A total of 207 (72%) patients completed the questionnaires. Overall, significant differences in general and aesthetic satisfaction among the four procedures were not observed. A multivariate analysis revealed that the factor “complications” (p = 0.001) played a significant role in general satisfaction and that the factors “> 2 years since reconstruction” (p = 0.043) and “age > 35 years” (p = 0.05) played significant roles in overall aesthetic satisfaction. Conclusion The present study demonstrated that the type of breast reconstruction might not influence satisfaction in Chinese patients. PMID:26562294

  13. How Does Target Know so Much about Its Customers? Utilizing Customer Analytics to Make Marketing Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corrigan, Hope B.; Craciun, Georgiana; Powell, Allison M.

    2014-01-01

    Every time shoppers make a purchase at a store or browse a Web site, customer behavior is tracked, analyzed, and perhaps shared with other businesses. Target Corporation is a leader in analyzing vast amounts of data to identify buying patterns, improve customer satisfaction, predict future trends, select promotional strategies, and increase…

  14. Identifying patients in target customer segments using a two-stage clustering-classification approach: a hospital-based assessment.

    PubMed

    Chen, You-Shyang; Cheng, Ching-Hsue; Lai, Chien-Jung; Hsu, Cheng-Yi; Syu, Han-Jhou

    2012-02-01

    Identifying patients in a Target Customer Segment (TCS) is important to determine the demand for, and to appropriately allocate resources for, health care services. The purpose of this study is to propose a two-stage clustering-classification model through (1) initially integrating the RFM attribute and K-means algorithm for clustering the TCS patients and (2) then integrating the global discretization method and the rough set theory for classifying hospitalized departments and optimizing health care services. To assess the performance of the proposed model, a dataset was used from a representative hospital (termed Hospital-A) that was extracted from a database from an empirical study in Taiwan comprised of 183,947 samples that were characterized by 44 attributes during 2008. The proposed model was compared with three techniques, Decision Tree, Naive Bayes, and Multilayer Perceptron, and the empirical results showed significant promise of its accuracy. The generated knowledge-based rules provide useful information to maximize resource utilization and support the development of a strategy for decision-making in hospitals. From the findings, 75 patients in the TCS, three hospital departments, and specific diagnostic items were discovered in the data for Hospital-A. A potential determinant for gender differences was found, and the age attribute was not significant to the hospital departments. PMID:22177941

  15. Satisfaction With Teaching Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merwin, J. C.; DiVesta , F. J.

    As part of the instrumentation to assess the effectiveness of the Schools Without Failure (SEF) program in 10 elementary schools in the New Castle, Pa. School District, the Satisfaction with Teaching Questionnaire was used. In a study by its developers this scale discriminated between students choosing to be teachers and those choosing other…

  16. Assessment of students’ satisfaction with a student-led team-based learning course

    PubMed Central

    Bouw, Justin W.; Gupta, Vasudha; Hincapie, Ana L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To date, no studies in the literature have examined student delivery of team-based learning (TBL) modules in the classroom. We aimed to assess student perceptions of a student-led TBL elective. Methods: Third-year pharmacy students were assigned topics in teams and developed learning objectives, a 15-minute mini-lecture, and a TBL application exercise and presented them to student colleagues. Students completed a survey upon completion of the course and participated in a focus group discussion to share their views on learning. Results: The majority of students (n=23/30) agreed that creating TBL modules enhanced their understanding of concepts, improved their self-directed learning skills (n=26/30), and improved their comprehension of TBL pedagogy (n=27/30). However, 60% disagreed with incorporating student-generated TBL modules into core curricular classes. Focus group data identified student-perceived barriers to success in the elective, in particular the development of TBL application exercises. Conclusion: This study provides evidence that students positively perceived student-led TBL as encouraging proactive learning from peer-to-peer teaching. PMID:26063493

  17. Custom microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The goals of this program are to develop custom microcircuit technology, also known as Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) technology, for use in flight and ground programs. Supporting this effort are activities to investigate the effects of the space environment, and particularly ionizing radiation, on microcircuits and to develop a space qualification methodology. Another aspect of the program emphasizes innovative applications of custom microcircuit technology to image and signal processing and communications.

  18. Hedging customers.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Ravi; Glazer, Rashi

    2003-05-01

    You are a marketing director with $5 million to invest in customer acquisition and retention. Which customers do you acquire, and which do you retain? Up to a point, the choice is obvious: Keep the consistent big spenders and lose the erratic small ones. But what about the erratic big spenders and the consistent small ones? It's often unclear whether you should acquire or retain them and at what cost. Businesses have begun dealing with unpredictable customer behavior by following the practices of sophisticated investors who own portfolios comprising dozens of stocks with different, indeed divergent, histories and prospects. Each portfolio is diversified so as to produce the investor's desired returns at the particular level of uncertainty he or she can tolerate. Customers, too, are assets--risky assets. As with stocks, the cost of acquiring them is supposed to reflect the cash-flow values they are likely to generate. The authors explain how to construct a portfolio based on the notion that a customer's risk-adjusted lifetime value depends on its anticipated effect on the riskiness of the group it is joining. They also show how this approach was used to identify the best prospects for Myron Corporation, a global leader in the personalized business-gift industry. The concept of risk-adjusted lifetime value has a transforming power: For companies that rely on it, product managers will be replaced by customer managers, and the current method of accounting for profit and loss--which is by product--will be replaced by one that determines each customer's P&L. Once adjusted for risk, those P&Ls will become the firm's key performance and operational metric. PMID:12747165

  19. International Students' Course Satisfaction and Continuance Behavioral Intention in Higher Education Setting: An Empirical Assessment in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahijan, Milad Kalantari; Rezaei, Sajad; Amin, Muslim

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of perceived brand orientation, intercultural friendship, and university reputation on international students' course satisfaction and continuance behavioral intention towards the higher education in Malaysia. A total of 348 questionnaires, administered on international students, were collected to…

  20. Three-Step Approach for Developing Integrated Work-Ready Assessment Tools to Foster Student's Learning and Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adapa, Sujana

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the relevance of the three-step approach undertaken by a marketing academic working in the University of New England Business School to foster distance student's learning, satisfaction and overall study experience. This work is a reflection of the author's teaching practice whereby a multitude of innovative…

  1. An assessment of legal measures to trace, freeze and confiscate the proceeds of drug crimes in France: the Customs viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Jacquemart, C

    1984-01-01

    Well-organized drug traffickers and their associates use sophisticated methods, such as banking transactions, to conceal their illegally acquired assets under the cloak of quasi-legitimate operations. The Customs Code contains provisions that govern French Customs officials in their fight against drug crimes and the proceeds of such crimes. In any customs offence relating to illicit drugs, legal action is directed against all those associated with the offence. When convincing information is received on drug trafficking and the proceeds derived from it, customs officials are authorized, in conjunction with the police, to make house searches anywhere in the country, even if no court procedure has been initiated. The confiscation of property derived from drug crimes can be ordered only by a court of law. Once sentence has been pronounced, any illegally acquired property that has been seized is confiscated. The Customs check all financial movements, searching for any exchange infractions, and banking secrecy is not allowed to obstruct the performance of this function. Although legal provisions in France have proved effective, the results obtained in respect of confiscation of the proceeds of drug crimes have generally been limited. Insufficient international co-operation seems to a certain extent to account for this unsatisfactory situation and the author pleads for more effective co-operation between Governments in tracing and securing the confiscation of property derived from drug trafficking. PMID:6570699

  2. Employee retention: a customer service approach.

    PubMed

    Gerson, Richard F

    2002-01-01

    Employee retention is a huge problem. There are staff shortages in radiology because not enough people are entering the profession; too many people are leaving the profession for retirement, higher-paying jobs or jobs with less stress; and there are not enough opportunities for career advancement. Staff shortages are exacerbated by difficulty in retaining people who enter the profession. While much work has been focused on recruitment and getting more people "in the front door," I suggest that the bulk of future efforts be focused on employee retention and "closing the back door." Employee retention must be an ongoing process, not a program. Approaches to employee retention that focus on external things, i.e., things that the company can do to or for the employee, generally are not successful. The truth is that employee retention processes must focus on what the employee gets out of the job. The process must be a benefits-based approach that helps employees answer the question, "What's in it for me?" The retention processes must be ongoing and integrated into the daily culture of the company. The best way to keep your employees is to treat them like customers. Customer service works for external customers. We treat them nicely. We work to satisfy them. We help them achieve their goals. Why not do the same for our employees? If positive customer service policies and practices can satisfy and keep external customers, why not adapt these policies and practices for employees? And, there is a service/satisfaction link between employee retention and higher levels of customer satisfaction. Customers prefer dealing with the same employees over and over again. Employee turnover destroys a customer's confidence in the company. Just like a customer does not want to have to "train and educate" a new provider, they do not want to do the same for your "revolving door" employees. So, the key is to keep employees so they in turn will help you keep your customers. Because the

  3. Problems with measuring satisfaction with social care.

    PubMed

    Willis, Rosalind; Evandrou, Maria; Pathak, Pathik; Khambhaita, Priya

    2016-09-01

    The measurement of customer satisfaction has become widespread in both healthcare and social care services, and is informative for performance monitoring and service development. Satisfaction with social care services is routinely measured with a single question on overall satisfaction with care, comprising part of the Adult Social Care Survey. The measurement of satisfaction has been problematised, and existing satisfaction measures are known to be under-theorised. In this article, the process of making an evaluation of satisfaction with social care services is first informed by a literature review of the theoretical background, and second examined through qualitative interviews conducted in 2012-2013 with 82 service users and family carers in Hampshire, Portsmouth and Southampton. Participants in this study were from white British and South Asian backgrounds, and the influence of ethnicity in the process of satisfaction evaluation is discussed. The findings show that the majority of participants selected a positive satisfaction rating even though both positive and negative experiences with services were described in their narratives. It is recommended that surveys provide opportunity for service users and family carers to elaborate on their satisfaction ratings. This addition will provide more scope for services to review their strengths and weaknesses. PMID:25809928

  4. Loyalty and positive word-of-mouth: patients and hospital personnel as advocates of a customer-centric health care organization.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Ronald J; Paulin, Michele; Leiriao, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    The ability to attract and retain loyal customers depends on the successful implementation of a customer-centric strategy. Customer loyalty is an attitude about an organization and its' services that is manifested by intentions and behaviors of re-patronization and recommendation. In the context of many medical services, loyalty through repeat patronization is not pertinent, whereas loyalty through positive word-of mouth (WOM) recommendation can be a powerful marketing tool. The Shouldice Hospital, a well-known institution for the surgical correction of hernias, instituted a marketing plan to develop a stable base of patients by creating positive WOM advocacy. This study focused on the consequences of both hernia patient overall satisfaction (and overall service quality) and hospital personnel satisfaction on the level of positive WOM advocacy. Using a commitment ladder of positive WOM advocacy, respondents were divided into three categories described as passive supporters, active advocates and ambassador advocates. Patient assessments of overall satisfaction and service quality were significantly related to these progressive levels of WOM for recommending the hospital to potential patients. Similarly, the satisfaction of the hospital employees was also significantly related to these progressive levels of positive WOM about recommending the hospital to potential patients and to potential employees. High levels of satisfaction are required to create true ambassadors of a service organization. PMID:18681199

  5. Process Improvement: Customer Service.

    PubMed

    Cull, Donald

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing the comment section of patient satisfaction surveys, Clark Memorial Hospital in Jeffersonville, IN went through a thoughtful process to arrive at an experience that patients said they wanted. Two Lean Six Sigma tools were used--the Voice of the Customer (VoC) and the Affinity Diagram. Even when using these tools, a facility will not be able to accomplish everything the patient may want. Guidelines were set and rules were established for the Process Improvement Team in order to lessen frustration, increase focus, and ultimately be successful. The project's success is driven by the team members carrying its message back to their areas. It's about ensuring that everyone is striving to improve the patients' experience by listening to what they say is being done right and what they say can be done better. And then acting on it. PMID:26571974

  6. A three-model comparison of the relationship between quality, satisfaction and loyalty: an empirical study of the Chinese healthcare system

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous research has addressed the relationship between customer satisfaction, perceived quality and customer loyalty intentions in consumer markets. In this study, we test and compare three theoretical models of the quality–satisfaction–loyalty relationship in the Chinese healthcare system. Methods This research focuses on hospital patients as participants in the process of healthcare procurement. Empirical data were obtained from six Chinese public hospitals in Shanghai. A total of 630 questionnaires were collected in two studies. Study 1 tested the research instruments, and Study 2 tested the three models. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to assess the scales’ construct validity by testing convergent and discriminant validity. A structural equation model (SEM) specified the distinctions between each construct. A comparison of the three theoretical models was conducted via AMOS analysis. Results The results of the SEM demonstrate that quality and satisfaction are distinct concepts and that the first model (satisfaction mediates quality and loyalty) is the most appropriate one in the context of the Chinese healthcare environment. Conclusions In this study, we test and compare three theoretical models of the quality–satisfaction–loyalty relationship in the Chinese healthcare system. Findings show that perceived quality improvement does not lead directly to customer loyalty. The strategy of using quality improvement to maintain patient loyalty depends on the level of patient satisfaction. This implies that the measurement of patient experiences should include topics of importance for patients’ satisfaction with health care services. PMID:23198824

  7. The Customer Service Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Chip R.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses ways to embed customer service learning and customer loyalty including making customers think, examining every aspect of customers' service encounters with staff, providing follow-up, making learning fun, and involving customers in your business. (JOW)

  8. Knowledge Management and Information Technology in Customer Support: A Quantitative Assessment of the U.S. Navy's Distance Support Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Malley, Kevin Dermit

    2010-01-01

    Centralized customer support is an established industry method used to improve revenue and profitability. What remains unknown is whether this cost-saving commercial business practice is similarly applicable to the unique, often isolated military environment. This research study statistically tested a theoretical framework for knowledge management…

  9. Interpreting School Satisfaction Data from a Marketing Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandiani, John A.; James, Brad C.; Banks, Steven M.

    This paper presents results of a customer satisfaction survey of Vermont elementary and secondary public schools concerning satisfaction with mental health services during the 1996-97 school year. Analysis of completed questionnaires (N=233) are interpreted from a marketing perspective. Findings are reported for: (1) treated prevalence of…

  10. The assessment of job satisfaction for the healthcare providers in university clinics of Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo

    PubMed Central

    Mundongo, Tshamba Henri; Ditend, Yav Grevisse; VanCaillie, Didier; Malonga, Kaj Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In the world, the health policies are necessary to satisfy with efficiency the requirements of the quality management in the health sector. The laboratory of the academic clinics of Lubumbashi in Africa was inspired by the EFQM model to improve its performance and the quality of its services offered to the community. The aim of this survey is to evaluate the level of job satisfaction of the healthcare providers after implementation of the model. Methods Qualitative study used an anonymous questionnaire consisted of 16 semi directional dichotomous and 12 according to four modality of the Likert's scale; to evaluate the job satisfaction of the healthcare providers. 40 workers are concerned and their informed consent is obtained. Epi Info 3.5.3 and SPSS 19.0 software, the Student t test and Chi-square test and the threshold set at p ≤ 0.05 were used. The mean score was calculated. Cronbach's ‘ coefficient and principal component analysis allowed the validity measurement of the questionnaire, and the correlations has been calculated. Results This survey had a rate of answer of 80% on a set of all questionnaires. The Cronbach's coefficient of reliability is 0.72 on 40 complete observations with 12 questions. The Kaiser Meyer Olkin (0.564) and the Bartlett test is significant (χ2= 57, 30, p=0.001). The Physicians are very dissatisfied (2.363) against the nurses, and the biologists who are moderately dissatisfied (3 and 3.312). The relative results to the global satisfaction of the workers show a meaningful difference between the workers satisfied versus those non satisfied (p = 0.003). More of the half of the workers is satisfied after the setting up of the EFQM model. Conclusion A certain number of the factors act together and simultaneously on the satisfaction of the workers particular in the health sector. The EFQM model permits the job satisfaction in the hospital because it combines several factors acting on the individuals. PMID:25852808

  11. US Geological Survey customers speak out

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillespie, S.; Snyder, G.

    1995-01-01

    Provides results of a customer survey carried out in 1994 by the US Geological Survey. Uses of cartographic products are classified, as are application areas, accuracy satisfaction, media, Digital Line Graph requirements in update, and frequency of product use. USGS responses and plans for the future are noted. -M.Blakemore

  12. Setting new standards for customer advocacy.

    PubMed

    McDonald, L

    1993-01-01

    Dell Computer Corporation pioneered the direct marketing of personal computers in 1984 and became the first company in the PC industry to offer manufacturer-direct technical support. According to surveys of corporate buyers, the company provides the best after-sale service and support of any computer maker. Here's how Dell has institutionalized the delivery of customer satisfaction. PMID:10123419

  13. Establishing a Companywide Customer Orientation through Persuasive Internal Marketing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Kathleen K.; Enis, Ben

    1990-01-01

    Argues that applying persuasion strategies to internal marketing efforts can facilitate the adoption of a customer orientation among employees and elicit greater commitment to the company and its goals. Examines four specific persuasion strategies: defining the customer satisfaction link; encouraging self-efficacy; providing rewards; and creating…

  14. Engaging the Student as a Customer: A Relationship Marketing Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, Jana Lay-Hwa.

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly organizations are recognizing the value of establishing close relationships with their customers. Despite this, research has not deeply explored how the intangible aspects of relational exchange such as customer satisfaction, as well as affective commitment, calculative commitment, and trust, combine to determine loyalty in the…

  15. Do it right this time: the role of employee service recovery performance in customer-perceived justice and customer loyalty after service failures.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hui

    2007-03-01

    Integrating justice and customer service literatures, this research examines the role of customer service employees' behaviors of handling customer complaints, or service recovery performance (SRP), in conveying a just image of service organizations and achieving desirable customer outcomes. Results from a field study and a laboratory study demonstrate that the dimensions of SRP--making an apology, problem solving, being courteous, and prompt handling--positively influenced customer satisfaction and then customer repurchase intent through the mediation of customer-perceived justice. In addition, service failure severity and repeated failures reduced the positive impact of some dimensions of SRP on customer satisfaction, and customer-perceived justice again mediated these moderated effects. PMID:17371092

  16. AVPUC: automatic video production with user customization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bin; Nahrstedt, Klara

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, multiple video cameras are employed for live broadcast and recording of almost all major social events, and all these camera streams have to be aggregated and rendered into one video program for audiences. While this content composition process aims at presenting the most interesting perspective of an event, it leads to the problem of how to fully customize the finally composed video program to different audience interests without requiring too much input from the audience. The goal of this work is to solve this problem by proposing the Automatic Video Production with User Customization (AVPUC) system that separates the video stream interestingness comparison from video program rendering to provide space for maximized customization. Human-controlled video selection and automatic video evaluation are combined to support video content customization and reduce redundant audience inputs. Preliminary evaluation results confirm that AVPUC"s capturing-evaluation-render model for video production improves audiences" satisfaction for customized multi-perspective viewing of social events.

  17. AVPUC: automatic video production with user customization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Bin; Nahrstedt, Klara

    2004-12-01

    Nowadays, multiple video cameras are employed for live broadcast and recording of almost all major social events, and all these camera streams have to be aggregated and rendered into one video program for audiences. While this content composition process aims at presenting the most interesting perspective of an event, it leads to the problem of how to fully customize the finally composed video program to different audience interests without requiring too much input from the audience. The goal of this work is to solve this problem by proposing the Automatic Video Production with User Customization (AVPUC) system that separates the video stream interestingness comparison from video program rendering to provide space for maximized customization. Human-controlled video selection and automatic video evaluation are combined to support video content customization and reduce redundant audience inputs. Preliminary evaluation results confirm that AVPUC"s capturing-evaluation-render model for video production improves audiences" satisfaction for customized multi-perspective viewing of social events.

  18. Improving patient satisfaction at all points in the revenue cycle.

    PubMed

    Dee, J F

    1994-10-01

    A common expectation among consumers, whether in the market for a new automobile, a new home, or healthcare services, is that a certain level of customer service will be provided along with the product or service. And the level of customer service provided substantially influences a consumer's satisfaction with the purchase of a product or service. PMID:10138286

  19. Communication Satisfaction, Job Satisfaction, and Job Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pincus, J. David

    1986-01-01

    Explores the relationships between employee satisfaction with various types of organizational communication, employee job satisfaction, and job performance as evaluated by supervisors, in a field study of 327 hospital nurses. Correlates results with results of other studies. (MS)

  20. Leadership and satisfaction in change commitment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Feng

    2011-06-01

    Managerial transformational leadership skills may directly influence banking counter staff toward change commitment and improve job satisfaction and service quality, or the influence instead may be mediated by change commitment. For a sample comprised of 246 managers from four large Taiwanese banks, the following path relationships were tested: (1) the association of transformational leadership with change commitment, (2) the association of change commitment with job satisfaction, and (3) the direct or indirect (through the mediation of change commitment) effect of transformational leadership on job satisfaction. Regression was utilized to gain insight into the effects of transformational leadership and change commitment on job satisfaction. Transformational leadership may foster change by providing psychological support to the banking counter staff, enabling them to use their skills to meet the needs of individual customers in response to complex environments. PMID:21879618

  1. The linkage between employee and patient satisfaction in home healthcare.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Robert J; Marren, Joan M; Davin, Denise M; Morgan, Cynthia J

    2009-01-01

    Greater accountability for patient outcomes, reduced reimbursement, and a protracted nursing shortage have made employee and patient satisfaction results central performance metrics and strategic imperatives in healthcare. Key questions are whether the two interact and if so, how can that relationship be leveraged to obtain maximum gains in both employee and patient satisfaction. This article examines the experience of a large, nonprofit home care agency in exploring these issues. The agency found that organizational commitment to patient care and customer service are fundamental to patient satisfaction. The more employees perceived that the organization is focused on quality and customers, the more patient satisfaction increased. Among nurses, work-life balance, fair compensation, and regard for employees all influenced patient satisfaction. PMID:19350879

  2. Stepping over the line: What do you competitors` customers really want?

    SciTech Connect

    Prindle, B.

    1996-03-01

    This paper highlights the results of recent customer research conducted for utilities researching competitive pricing products with various service options. It draws upon the broader competitive customer research literature as context. The paper addresses issues related to market segmentation, customer attitudes and perceptions, satisfaction, preferences for new pricing methods, and needs regarding energy-related service offerings. It discusses potential strategies for pricing and/or service offerings that may enable utilities to create new customer relationships, retain current customers, or both.

  3. Development of custom fire behavior fuel models from FCCS fuelbeds for the Savannah River fuel assessment project.

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Joe, H.

    2009-07-23

    The purpose of this project is to create fire behavior fuel models that replicate the fire behavior characteristics (spread rate and fireline intensity) produced by 23 candidate FCCS fuelbeds developed for the Savannah River National Wildlife Refuge. These 23 fuelbeds were created by FERA staff in consultation with local fuel managers. The FCCS produces simulations of surface fire spread rate and flame length (and therefore fireline intensity) for each of these fuelbeds, but it does not produce maps of those fire behavior characteristics or simulate fire growth—those tasks currently require the use of the FARSITE and/or FlamMap software systems. FARSITE and FlamMap do not directly use FCCS fuelbeds, but instead use standard or custom fire behavior fuel models to describe surface fuel characteristics for fire modeling. Therefore, replicating fire growth and fire behavior potential calculations using FCCS-simulated fire characteristics requires the development of custom fuel models that mimic, as closely as possible, the fire behavior characteristics produced by the FCCS for each fuelbed, over a range of fuel moisture and wind speeds.

  4. 2015 Arte Poster Competition First Place Winner: Assessing the Correlation Between Patient Anxiety and Satisfaction for Mohs Surgery.

    PubMed

    Locke, Maren C; Wilkerson, Eric C; Mistur, Rachel L; Nisar, Mahrukh; Love, W Elliot

    2015-09-01

    Skin cancer and the surgical treatment thereof have the potential to be sources of great anxiety for patients. Examination of patient satisfaction, anxiety, and contributing factors has the potential to provide information surgeons can use to implement practices that have an impact on patient anxiety and satisfaction regarding dermatologic surgery. This study used a prospective interview to catalog patients' anxiety and experiences before and during the surgical process. Our results indicate that several pre- and perioperative factors have the potential to decrease a patient's overall anxiety. Notably, 33% of surgical patients reported a decrease in anxiety from the time of diagnosis until the day of surgery. Factors that contributed to this included a call discussing the diagnosis and what to expect on the day of surgery as well as reading written material or searching the internet for more information regarding the procedure. Furthermore, a call from the physician compared to a call from a nurse or other team member showed a greater effect on decreasing anxiety. During the surgical procedure, our results highlight several factors that can decrease a patient's anxiety. Most notably, eating, watching TV, bringing a guest, and engaging in small talk with surgeon and staff during the procedure subjectively decreased patients' anxiety. In summary, our results suggest that patients respond to a variety of factors to reduce anxiety and that each patient derives relief from anxiety in different manners. Therefore, offering a spectrum of comforting or distracting activities during the Mohs procedure is ideal and may reduce the need for pharmacologic anxiolytics. PMID:26355630

  5. Customer-focused planning: Demonstration project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    George, S.S. )

    1992-12-01

    To succeed in the increasingly competitive and dynamic markets in which they operate, electric utilities are focusing ever greater attention on understanding and meeting customer needs. EPRI's Customer Focused Planning (CFP) project was established to develop concepts and tools that will help utilities enhance their commitment to customer service. The project team conducted a series of interviews and meetings with participating utilities to collaboratively implement crucial steps in the CFP process. Although there is no unique set of tools or single management approach for improving product and service delivery, customer-focused companies have at least five ideals in common. They (1) define goals and objectives in concrete terms, (2) extend the planning boundaries of the organization to include all members of the energy services infrastructure, (3) painstakingly link functional activities directly to customer needs, (4) incorporate the customer's voice in new product/ service design, and (5) align performance measures with customer needs. In addition, customer-focused companies use a variety of methods to improve customer satisfaction and company performance. These methods include conducting market research, developing market processes such as demand-side management contracting or bidding to reveal customer preferences, and involving customers more directly in the planning process. This report summarizes two brief demonstration projects conducted as part of EPRI's CFP project, one at Commonwealth Edison Company (CECo) and one at PSI Energy. The CECo project emphasized developing customer-focused performance measures for telephone inquiries. The PSI Energy project involved a one-day workshop underscoring two important CFP elements-understanding customer wants and explicitly linking those wants to utility activities.

  6. Education and the Determinants of Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vila, Luis E.; Garcia-Mora, Belen

    2005-01-01

    Using a representative sample of Spanish individuals, we explore the effects of workers' education on self-assessed satisfaction with diverse specific aspects of their jobs. We find that the effects of education level on job satisfaction differ, both in size and direction, according to the aspect of the job considered, especially after controlling…

  7. Treatment Satisfaction Among Patients Taking Antidepressant Medication.

    PubMed

    López-Torres Hidalgo, Jesús; López Gallardo, Yolanda; Párraga Martínez, Ignacio; Del Campo Del Campo, José María; Villena Ferrer, Alejandro; Morena Rayo, Susana

    2016-08-01

    This study sought to assess treatment satisfaction among patients on antidepressants, ascertaining whether there might be an association with depressive symptomatology and other variables. Cross-sectional study conducted on 564 adult patients taking antidepressant medication. Satisfaction with antidepressant treatment was assessed using the Assessment of Satisfaction with Antidepressant Treatment Questionnaire (ESTA/Evaluación de la Satisfacción con el Tratamiento Antidepresivo). A moderate negative correlation was observed between satisfaction and intensity of depressive symptoms, as assessed with the Montgomery-Asberg scale. A weak negative correlation was observed between greater satisfaction and less favourable views about taking medication. Satisfaction scale scores were higher among those who took antidepressant medication for 1 year or more versus shorter periods. Most patients reported being satisfied with the antidepressant treatment but the level of satisfaction was higher among those who presented with less marked depressive symptoms, received longer-term treatment and viewed drug treatments favourably. Treatment satisfaction is one of the patient-reported outcome measures that can serve to complement clinical evaluation of depressive disorders. PMID:25833726

  8. Professional Satisfaction among California General Dentists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shugars, Daniel A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This study assessed professional satisfaction among 558 California general dentists using the Dentist Satisfaction Survey. Among findings were that dentists were most dissatisfied with the threat of malpractice, level of income, demands of managing the practice, and amount of personal time. Findings have implications for counseling predoctoral…

  9. Life Satisfaction in Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas-Carrasco, Ramona; Salvador-Carulla, Luis

    2012-01-01

    We appraised life satisfaction using the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), and analysed its psychometric properties in persons with intellectual disability (ID). Ninety-nine persons with ID from four services in Spain participated. A battery of subjective assessments was used, including the SWLS, a Quality of Life measure (WHOQOL-BREF), and…

  10. Education and Job Satisfaction: A Questionable Payoff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldi de Mandilovitch, Martha S.; Quinn, Robert P.

    The relationship between education and job satisfaction has not been sufficiently well documented to qualify as unquestionable. Published research on the subject either fails to adequately assess the influence of education on job satisfaction or is too occupationally and/or geographically limited to form the basis for generalization. To examine on…

  11. Mechanisms linking employee affective delivery and customer behavioral intentions.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wei-Chi; Huang, Yin-Mei

    2002-10-01

    Past empirical evidence has indicated that employee affective delivery can influence customer reactions (e.g., customer satisfaction, service quality evaluation). This study extends previous research by empirically examining mediating processes underlying the relationship between employee affective delivery and customer behavioral intentions. Data were collected from 352 employee-customer pairs in 169 retail shoe stores in Taiwan. Results showed that the influence of employee affective delivery on customers' willingness to return to the store and pass positive comments to friends was indirect through the mediating processes of customer in-store positive moods and perceived friendliness. The study also indicated that employee affective delivery influences customers' time spent in store, which, in turn, influences customer behavioral intentions. PMID:12395825

  12. The utility and its customer: A complex relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Covelli, L.; Williams, M.V.

    1994-11-01

    Developing methods of tracking customer satisfaction for utilities presents major problems since the customer reacts to the utility on many different levels. The more obvious are in relation to the product (energy) and the services the company provides. More recently there has been talk of the {open_quotes}brand{close_quotes} elements of the company-customer relationship. Ontario Hydro (OH) has developed a method utilizing four separate domains for measuring and tracking customer satisfaction: product, service, competitiveness, and institutional relationships. Ontario Hydro conducted a survey of over 1200 residential customers. The respondents received a detailed in-person survey of their estimation of the importance of specific aspects of customer service and their view of Ontario Hydro`s performance on those same issues. The data yielded 28 factors covered a large variety of separate concerns: customer service, and treatment of customers to export policy. OH concluded that the utility`s relationship with its customer is more complex than the susual customer-vendor interaction. A utility not only provides a product and a service, it has a institutional personality and provides an absolutely necessary product under an exclusive franchise and executes government policy as a regulated monopoly. It was found that customers are sensitive to all of these attributes.

  13. Internal Branding: Using Performance Technology To Create an Organization Focused on Customer Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosti, Donald T.; Stotz, Rodger

    2000-01-01

    Presents a performance technology approach to revenue enhancement, with the goal of improving customer retention through building customer value. Topics include internal branding, a way to make sure that what the company delivers matches what's promised in the advertising; product versus service brands; and customer satisfaction, including…

  14. Life Domain Satisfactions as Predictors of Overall Life Satisfaction Among Workers: Evidence from Chile.

    PubMed

    Loewe, Nicolas; Bagherzadeh, Mehdi; Araya-Castillo, Luis; Thieme, Claudio; Batista-Foguet, Joan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the subjective antecedents of life satisfaction of workers. Adopting a 'bottom-up' perspective, we assessed the unique influence that satisfaction with multiple life domains have on evaluative judgments of overall life satisfaction. Based on a nationwide sample of 530 Chilean workers, we simultaneously tested the effects of seven life domain satisfactions that have been consistently included in extant models of life satisfaction and subjective well-being. These were satisfaction with health, financial situation, social relationships, one's self-worth, leisure-time, family, and work. Having controlled for age and gender, results showed that satisfaction with one's financial situation was the dominant predictor of overall life satisfaction of workers, with a weight of .36. Satisfaction with family, work, and health had effects of .25, .14, and .14, respectively. Interestingly, satisfaction with one's self-worth, leisure-time, and social relationships did not have statistically significant effects on life satisfaction, although the first two showed t values near the critical value. PMID:25018580

  15. Effects of leadership characteristics on pediatric registered nurses' job satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Roberts-Turner, Reneé; Hinds, Pamela S; Nelson, John; Pryor, Juanda; Robinson, Nellie C; Wang, Jichuan

    2014-01-01

    Job satisfaction levels among registered nurses (RNs) influence RN recruitment, retention, turnover, and patient outcomes. Researchers examining the relationship between characteristics of nursing leadership and RN job satisfaction have treated RNs as a monolithic group with little research on the satisfaction of hospital-based pediatric RNs. This study assessed the relationship of transformational and transactional nursing leadership characteristics and RN job satisfaction reported by pediatric RNs. This single site study included 935 hospital-based pediatric RNs who completed validated survey items regarding nursing leadership and job satisfaction. A structural equation model (SEM) was applied to assess how autonomy (transformational leadership) and distributive justice (transactional leadership) influence RN job satisfaction, and how RN socio-demographic characteristics influence job satisfaction via autonomy and distributive justice. Findings revealed that both autonomy and distributive justice had significant positive effects on RN job satisfaction but the largest source of influence was autonomy. PMID:25929114

  16. Custom controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butell, Bart

    1996-02-01

    Microsoft's Visual Basic (VB) and Borland's Delphi provide an extremely robust programming environment for delivering multimedia solutions for interactive kiosks, games and titles. Their object oriented use of standard and custom controls enable a user to build extremely powerful applications. A multipurpose, database enabled programming environment that can provide an event driven interface functions as a multimedia kernel. This kernel can provide a variety of authoring solutions (e.g. a timeline based model similar to Macromedia Director or a node authoring model similar to Icon Author). At the heart of the kernel is a set of low level multimedia components providing object oriented interfaces for graphics, audio, video and imaging. Data preparation tools (e.g., layout, palette and Sprite Editors) could be built to manage the media database. The flexible interface for VB allows the construction of an infinite number of user models. The proliferation of these models within a popular, easy to use environment will allow the vast developer segment of 'producer' types to bring their ideas to the market. This is the key to building exciting, content rich multimedia solutions. Microsoft's VB and Borland's Delphi environments combined with multimedia components enable these possibilities.

  17. Caregiver Life Satisfaction: Relationship to Youth Symptom Severity through Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Athay, M. Michele

    2012-01-01

    This study utilized the Satisfaction with Life Scale to investigate the life satisfaction of caregivers for youth receiving mental health services (N = 383). Specifically, this study assessed how caregiver life satisfaction relates to youth symptom severity throughout treatment. Hierarchical linear modeling with a time-varying covariate was used…

  18. Business Faculty Research: Satisfaction with the Web versus Library Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewald, Nancy H.; Silvius, Matthew A.

    2005-01-01

    Business faculty members teaching at undergraduate campuses of the Pennsylvania State University were surveyed in order to assess their satisfaction with free Web sources and with subscription databases for their professional research. Although satisfaction with the Web's ease of use was higher than that for databases, overall satisfaction for…

  19. Student Gains in Self-Efficacy in an Advanced MSW Curriculum: A Customized Model for Outcomes Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rishel, Carrie W.; Majewski, Virginia

    2009-01-01

    The new Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS) identify assessment as "an integral component of competency-based education." It is not new, however, that programs must demonstrate plans to assess attainment of competencies or expected program outcomes and show how data collection and analysis inform curriculum decisions. Previous…

  20. Construct of Dialysis Employee Satisfaction: Acquiring Satisfaction Factors and Their Contributions.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiuzhu; Itoh, Kenji

    2015-10-01

    We developed a construct of dialysis employees' satisfaction as an assessment framework and identified the crucial factors that contribute to overall job satisfaction. We also seek to capture some important characteristics of dialysis professionals' job satisfaction/dissatisfaction in Japan. A questionnaire was developed, including 35 facet-specific job-related satisfaction and 10 general satisfaction items in closed-ended questions. A questionnaire-based survey was conducted between August and October 2013. A total of 799 valid responses (87% of response rate) were collected from 46 physicians, 470 nurses and 251 technologists in the dialysis department of 43 facilities in Japan. Five satisfaction factors were derived by applying principal component analysis with 61% of cumulative variance accounted for. Physicians, nurses and technologists in the dialysis department shared a similar trend of job satisfaction that they were more satisfied with leadership, and communication and teamwork among the five factors, whereas their satisfaction level was relatively low with salary and welfare conditions. Physicians expressed the strongest satisfaction with any factor while nurses were the least satisfied. Nurses' and technologists' overall job satisfaction was mostly determined by satisfaction with self-actualization, and work demands and workload. A five-factor construct of dialysis employee satisfaction was identified. Overall job satisfaction of dialysis nurses and technologists were not overly high in Japan, and this seems to be caused by their relatively low satisfaction with self-actualization and with work demands and workload. Therefore, it is suggested that their work conditions and environment must be improved to support their self-actualization and to reduce their workload. PMID:25808047

  1. AutoMOPS- B2B and B2C in mask making: Mask manufacturing performance and customer satisfaction improvement through better information flow management using generic models and standardized languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filies, Olaf; de Ridder, Luc; Rodriguez, Ben; Kujiken, Aart

    2002-03-01

    Semiconductor manufacturing has become a global business, in which companies of different size unite in virtual enterprises to meet new opportunities. Therefore Mask manufacturing is a key business, but mask ordering is a complex process and is always critical regarding design to market time, even though mask complexity and customer base are increasing using a wide variety of different mask order forms which are frequently faulty and very seldom complete. This is effectively blocking agile manufacturing and can tie wafer fabs to a single mask The goal of the project is elimination of the order verification through paperless, electronically linked information sharing/exchange between chip design, mask production and production stages, which will allow automation of the mask preparation. To cover these new techniques and their specifications as well as the common ones with automated tools a special generic Meta-model will be generated, based on the current standards for mask specifications, including the requirements from the involved partners (Alcatel Microelectronics, Altis, Compugraphics, Infineon, Nimble, Sigma-C), the project works out a pre-normative standard. The paper presents the current status of work. This work is partly funded by the Commission of the European Union under the Fifth Framework project IST-1999-10332 AutoMOPS.

  2. Talking about Customer Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Mary; Axelroth, Joan

    2001-01-01

    Discusses customer service in information centers and how to define it. Topics include the effects of competition, that give customers more choices; defining customers, and defining services; communications; physical environment; change, in customers and in technology; measuring customer service; and evaluating policies and procedures. (LRW)

  3. Effects of service provider attitudes and employment status on citizenship behaviors and customers' attitudes and loyalty behavior.

    PubMed

    Payne, Stephanie C; Webber, Sheila Simsarian

    2006-03-01

    The relationship among job satisfaction, affective commitment, service-oriented organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs), customer satisfaction, and customer loyalty were examined for a sample of 249 hairstylists and 1 of their corresponding customers. Employee satisfaction was positively related to service-oriented OCBs, customer satisfaction, and customer loyalty, whereas affective commitment was not related to these outcomes. The extent to which the predictor variables interacted with one another and the role of employment status on these relationships was also explored. High levels of job satisfaction or affective commitment resulted in more service-oriented OCBs for employees and self-employed workers, whereas high levels of both resulted in more service-oriented OCBs for owners. PMID:16551189

  4. Assessment of Learner Acceptance and Satisfaction with Video-Based Instructional Materials for Teaching Practical Skills at a Distance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donkor, Francis

    2011-01-01

    As video-based instructional materials become available to distance learners to learn practical skills at a distance, it is important to assess the instructional effectiveness of these materials and to understand how students respond to them. This paper is the second part of a larger exploratory study that assessed the instructional effectiveness…

  5. An alternative to satisfaction surveys: let the patients talk.

    PubMed

    Alemi, Farrokh; Jasper, Harry

    2014-01-01

    We propose to replace the standardized 27-item hospital version of the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) survey with 1-item questionnaire that asks "What worked well and what needs improvement?" Sentiment analysis can take the responses to this single question and reconstruct a report on frequency of dissatisfied customers and reasons for dissatisfaction similar to reports received from longer surveys. This article shows, by way of an example, how benchmarked and quantitative reports can be generated from patients' comments. The CAHPS survey asks more leading questions, is less granular in its feedback, has lower response rate, has costly repeated reminders, and may not be as timely as sentiment analysis of a single, open-ended question. This article also shows the implementation of the proposed approach in one critical access hospital and its affiliated clinic and calls for additional research to compare sentiment analysis and CAHPS satisfaction surveys. PMID:24368718

  6. Marital Satisfaction, Job Satisfaction, and Task Distribution in the Homemaker Job

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Ronald H.; Arvey, Richard D.

    1977-01-01

    Serveral facets of the homemaker job were analyzed in terms of the dynamic relationship between husband and wife. Husband and wife pairs (N=71) completed a questionnaire which assessed satisfaction with the homemaker job, marital satisfaction, distribution of responsibility for homemaker tasks between husband and wife, and other variables. (Author)

  7. Using a Satisfaction Index to Compare Students' Satisfaction during and after Higher Education Service Consumption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duarte, Paulo O.; Raposo, Mario B.; Alves, Helena B.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the factors that influence students' satisfaction with higher education services and assess how they change after graduation, when students enter the labour market. To achieve the objectives, a survey was performed on two occasions, 2002 and 2008. Data on satisfaction were collected from current and former students in order to…

  8. Analyzing Food-Related Life Satisfaction and other Predictors of Life Satisfaction in Central Chile.

    PubMed

    Schnettler, Berta; Lobos, Germán; Orellana, Ligia; Grunert, Klaus; Sepúlveda, José; Mora, Marcos; Denegri, Marianela; Miranda, Horacio

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of satisfaction with food-related life on life satisfaction among inhabitants of the main municipalities of central Chile. A survey was applied to a sample of 1,277 people, distributed proportionally by municipality. The questionnaire included the following scales: SWLS (Satisfaction with Life Scale), SWFL (Satisfaction with Food-related Life) and the Health-Related Quality of Life Index (HRQOL). Questions were asked regarding eating habits inside and outside the home, time available for meals at home, the assessment of five sources of happiness and the demographic characteristics of those surveyed. An ordered logit model was proposed, in which the dependent variable was satisfaction with life. Satisfaction with life was significantly related to the respondent's socioeconomic status, self-perception of health, degree of satisfaction with food-related life, monthly food expenditure, time available for supper with the family (p < .01); gender, self-reported number of days affected by mental health problems, frequency of supper with the family, the degree of agreement with respect to family being an important source of happiness (p < .05); and family size and frequency of food consumption in fast food outlets (p < .10). Satisfaction with life in the study sample is related to aspects associated with health, family and eating, and the family interaction associated with eating may play an important role in overall satisfaction with life. PMID:26083311

  9. The seven common pitfalls of customer service in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Rene T

    2015-01-01

    Operating simultaneously like a repair shop, prison, and hotel, hospitals are prone to seven common pitfalls in customer service. Patient care is often fragmented, inscrutable, inflexible, insensitive, reactive, myopic, and unsafe. Hospitals are vying to be more high-tech, rather than high-touch even though staff engagement with patients rather than facilities and equipment strongly influence patient satisfaction. Unless processes, policies, and people are made customer-centered, the high quality of the hospital's human and hardware resources will not translate into high patient satisfaction and patient loyalty. PMID:26058286

  10. Patient Satisfaction: What We Can Learn from Other Industries.

    PubMed

    Homisak, Lynn; Baum, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Most doctors are appreciated by their patients, and most patients are satisfied with the care they receive from their doctors. However, how many doctors are reaching out and asking, as New York's former Mayor Koch often did, "Hey, how am I doing?" This article reviews two examples of effective methods used by other industries to gather data and evaluate customer satisfaction, and provides ideas and suggestions to measure patient satisfaction in a medical practice. PMID:26223116

  11. Teaching Satisfaction Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Chung-Lim; Au, Wing-Tung

    2006-01-01

    The present study proposes a teaching satisfaction measure and examines the validity of its scores. The measure is based on the Life Satisfaction Scale (LSS). Scores on the five-item Teaching Satisfaction Scale (TSS) were validated on a sample of 202 primary and secondary school teachers and favorable psychometric properties were found. As…

  12. Assessment of Relationship-Specific Incentive and Threat Sensitivities: Predicting Satisfaction and Affect in Adult Intimate Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laurenceau, Jean-Philippe; Kleinman, Brighid M.; Kaczynski, Karen J.; Carver, Charles S.

    2010-01-01

    Self-report scales assessing relationship-specific incentive and threat sensitivity were created. Initial tests of factor structure and associations with relationship quality were conducted in a sample of persons in intimate relationships (Study 1). Associations with conceptually related measures were examined to determine convergent and…

  13. Survey Development to Assess Parental Satisfaction with Adapted Physical Education Teachers' Abilities Working with Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Columna, Luis; Cook, Allison; Foley, John T.; Bailey, JoEllen

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to systematically develop and validate an instrument to assess parental perceptions toward adapted physical education (APE) teachers, who work with children with autism. Methods: Participants included two expert panels and parents of children and youth with autism. The survey used a Likert-scale design where…

  14. A Case Study of Staff and Student Satisfaction with Assessment Feedback at a Small Specialised Higher Education Institution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maggs, Lindsey A.

    2014-01-01

    Feedback has been a major area of dissatisfaction according to the UK National Student Survey in recent years, despite general acceptance of its importance. A feedback strategy was implemented in October 2009 at a small specialised higher education institution (HEI). A case study was carried out to assess how satisfied staff and students are with…

  15. Business marketing: understand what customers value.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J C; Narus, J A

    1998-01-01

    How do you define the value of your market offering? Can you measure it? Few suppliers in business markets are able to answer those questions, and yet the ability to pinpoint the value of a product or service for one's customers has never been more important. By creating and using what the authors call customer value models, suppliers are able to figure out exactly what their offerings are worth to customers. Field value assessments--the most commonly used method for building customer value models--call for suppliers to gather data about their customers firsthand whenever possible. Through these assessments, a supplier can build a value model for an individual customer or for a market segment, drawing on data gathered form several customers in that segment. Suppliers can use customer value models to create competitive advantage in several ways. First, they can capitalize on the inevitable variation in customers' requirements by providing flexible market offerings. Second, they can use value models to demonstrate how a new product or service they are offering will provide greater value. Third, they can use their knowledge of how their market offerings specifically deliver value to craft persuasive value propositions. And fourth, they can use value models to provide evidence to customers of their accomplishments. Doing business based on value delivered gives companies the means to get an equitable return for their efforts. Once suppliers truly understand value, they will be able to realize the benefits of measuring and monitoring it for their customers. PMID:10187246

  16. 76 FR 1626 - Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-11

    ... Districts'' published in the Federal Register on September 27, 1995 (60 FR 49971). Section 1893 of the Tax... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2011 AGENCY: Customs and... provides notice to customs brokers that the annual fee of $138 that is assessed for each permit held by...

  17. 12 CFR 368.100 - Obligations concerning institutional customers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the bank and the customer regarding the nature of the relationship between the bank and the customer... consideration all the facts and circumstances of a particular bank/customer relationship, assessed in the... securities that the institutional customer has in its portfolio and/or under management. While...

  18. 12 CFR 368.100 - Obligations concerning institutional customers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the bank and the customer regarding the nature of the relationship between the bank and the customer... consideration all the facts and circumstances of a particular bank/customer relationship, assessed in the... securities that the institutional customer has in its portfolio and/or under management. While...

  19. 77 FR 74201 - Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... September 27, 1995 (60 FR 49971). Section 1893 of the Tax Reform Act of 1986 (Pub. L. 99-514) provides that... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2013 AGENCY: U.S. Customs... provides notice to customs brokers that the annual fee of $138 that is assessed for each permit held by...

  20. 76 FR 65741 - Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... Districts'' published in the Federal Register on September 27, 1995 (60 FR 49971). Section 1893 of the Tax... SECURITY Customs and Border Protection Customs Brokers User Fee Payment for 2012 AGENCY: Customs and Border... to customs brokers that the annual fee of $138 that is assessed for each permit held by a...

  1. 78 FR 3499 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request on Information Collection Tools Relating to Customer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request on Information Collection Tools Relating to Customer Satisfaction Surveys AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and...

  2. Improving customer service. It's not just what's in the box.

    PubMed

    Redling, Robert

    2003-08-01

    Patient satisfaction scores can plummet when medical emergencies throw schedules into disarray or a receptionist ignores a patient at the front desk. Patients' expectations of good customer service have been shaped by technological conveniences and the concerted efforts of retailers, restaurants and other service providers. Physician leaders and administrators can improve customer service by paying more attention to organizational culture, physician behavior, staff incentives, hiring practices and team-building. PMID:12959055

  3. Fostering employee service creativity: Joint effects of customer empowering behaviors and supervisory empowering leadership.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuntao; Liao, Hui; Chuang, Aichia; Zhou, Jing; Campbell, Elizabeth M

    2015-09-01

    Integrating insights from the literature on customers' central role in service and the literature on employee creativity, we offer theoretical and empirical account of how and when customer empowering behaviors can motivate employee creativity during service encounters and, subsequently, influence customer satisfaction with service experience. Using multilevel, multisource, experience sampling data from 380 hairstylists matched with 3550 customers in 118 hair salons, we found that customer empowering behaviors were positively related to employee creativity and subsequent customer satisfaction via employee state promotion focus. Results also showed that empowering behaviors from different agents function synergistically in shaping employee creativity: supervisory empowering leadership strengthened the indirect effect of customer empowering behaviors on employee creativity via state promotion focus. PMID:25774571

  4. 75 FR 9279 - Proposed Information Collection (Survey of Satisfaction With the Disability Evaluation System...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Survey of Satisfaction With the Disability Evaluation System (DES... of Satisfaction with the Disability Evaluation System (DES). OMB Control Number: 2900-New (DES). Type... and, if necessary, revise the way the DES Pilot is conducted in an effort to raise customer...

  5. Clients' Satisfaction with Monopolistic Services and Commitment to the Organization: A University Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, James L.; Cunningham, Brent J.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between monopolistic service providers and customer satisfaction and commitment. The authors investigated how the ethical perceptions of service consumers, their perceptions of service quality, and satisfaction effect commitment to the long-term relationship with monopolistic service providers. Results…

  6. The Importance of Institutional Image to Student Satisfaction and Loyalty within Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Robert M.; Mazzarol, Timothy William

    2009-01-01

    This paper outlines the findings of a study employing a partial least squares (PLS) structural equation methodology to test a customer satisfaction model of the drivers of student satisfaction and loyalty in higher education settings. Drawing upon a moderately large sample of students enrolled in four "types" of Australian universities, the…

  7. Participation Behaviour among International Students: The Role of Satisfaction with Service Augmentation and Brand Choice Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsharnouby, Tamer H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to integrate service marketing and higher education (HE) literature to develop and test a model that links customer participation behaviour with student overall satisfaction that stems from satisfaction with service augmentation elements. It also examines the influence of brand choice attainment on both…

  8. I want products my own way, but which way? The effects of different product categories and cues on customer responses to Web-based customizations.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Chi; Chen, Hui-Yun

    2009-02-01

    Mass customization is a strategy that has been adopted by companies to tailor their products in order to match customer needs more precisely. Therefore, to fully capture the value of mass customization, it is crucial to explore how customers react to mass customization. In previous studies, an implied premise has been that consumers are keen to embrace customized products, and this assumption has also been treated by firms as a prerequisite for successful mass customization strategies. However, an undesirable complexity may result from difficult configuration processes that may intimidate and confuse some customers. Hence, this study explores strategies that marketers can employ to facilitate the customization process. Specifically, this study investigates how to enhance customer satisfaction and purchase decision toward customized products by providing cues compatible with the product category. It is hypothesized that for search products, customers rely more on intrinsic cues when making configuration decisions. On the other hand, for experience products, customers perceive extrinsic cues to be more valuable in assisting them to make configuration decisions. The results suggest that consumers tend to respond more favorably toward customized search products when intrinsic cues are provided than when extrinsic or irrelevant ones are provided. In contrast, when customizing experience products, customers tend to depend more on extrinsic cues than on intrinsic or irrelevant ones. PMID:19113951

  9. An investigation into the effects of quality improvement method on patients' satisfaction: a semi experimental research in Iran.

    PubMed

    Navipour, Hasan; Nayeri, Nahid Dehghan; Hooshmand, Abbas; Zargar, Marjaneh Taghavi

    2011-01-01

    Today, to increase effectiveness is a Strategy for success of organizations and their viability. In health care organization not only service cost- effectiveness is a major problem for productivity and organizational management but also customer-centred is in first priority. Because of these reasons, most of health organization trend to patient satisfaction for their viability. If complex process implemented for viability without attention to patient satisfaction, this is no success result. The FOCUS PDCA process is a new strategy for effectiveness of service quality. To this reason, the recent research done and its objective is to assess effect of FOCUS PDCA process strategy on patient satisfaction in surgery units of hospitals affiliated to Tehran Medical University. This research is a semi experimental with non- equivalent design. The sample was all of patients who hospitalized in two selected surgery units. Self-report was method of data gathering. Patient satisfaction assessed with questionnaire in pre and posttest. Then manipulation implemented as post-operation care process selected. Modelling and opportunity statement Diagrams prepared and improvement team organized. Flow process, convergences and cause- effect charts used to prepare list of items to be improved. Executive program was written. This include personnel training, standard implementation, election and training of quality control nurses (Q.C Ns), daily QC of caring and providing appropriate feed back to personnel, forming group session for determining corrective actions. Then after 1 month patient satisfaction was assessed. Statistical analysis shows this process increase patient satisfaction and it leads to care effectiveness. The findings of the pre-intervention phase indicated that the satisfaction level had been low in both groups and it is not significantly different in the two groups (P> 0.05). There was a significant difference before and after following intervention in the case study

  10. Organizational culture associated with provider satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Scammon, Debra L.; Tabler, Jennifer; Brunisholz, Kimberly; Gren, Lisa H.; Kim, Jaewhan; Tomoaia-Cotisel, Andrada; Day, Julie; Farrell, Timothy W.; Waitzman, Norman J.; Magill, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Assess 1) provider satisfaction with specific elements of PCMH; 2) clinic organizational cultures; 3) associations between provider satisfaction and clinic culture. Methods Cross sectional study with surveys conducted in 2011 with providers and staff in 10 primary care clinics implementing their version of a PCMH: Care by Design™. Measures included the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) and the American Medical Group Association provider satisfaction survey. Results Providers were most satisfied with quality of care (M=4.14; scale=1–5) and interactions with patients (M=4.12) and least satisfied with time spent working (M=3.47), paper work (M =3.45) and compensation (M=3.35). Culture profiles differed across clinics with family/clan and hierarchical the most common. Significant correlations (p ≤ 0.05) between provider satisfaction and clinic culture archetypes included: family/clan negatively correlated with administrative work; entrepreneurial positively correlated with the Time Spent Working dimension; market/rational positively correlated with how practices were facing economic and strategic challenges; and hierarchical negatively correlated with Relationships with Staff and Resource dimensions. Discussion Provider satisfaction is an important metric for assessing experiences with features of a PCMH model. Conclusions Identification of clinic-specific culture archetypes and archetype associations with provider satisfaction can help inform practice redesign. Attention to effective methods for changing organizational culture is recommended. PMID:24610184

  11. Instructor Learning Styles as Indicators of Online Faculty Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLawhon, Ryan; Cutright, Marc

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between instructor learning style/preference and online faculty job satisfaction. Learning style was assessed using the Readiness for Education At a Distance Indicator (READI) now called Smarter Measure. Online faculty job satisfaction was assessed using the National Study of…

  12. Automatically Grading Customer Confidence in a Formal Specification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shukur, Zarina; Burke, Edmund; Foxley, Eric

    1999-01-01

    Describes an automatic grading system for a formal methods computer science course that is able to evaluate a formal specification written in the Z language. Quality is measured by considering first, specification correctness (syntax, semantics, and satisfaction of customer requirements), and second, specification maintainability (comparison of…

  13. Customer Strategies for Responding to Day-Ahead Market HourlyElectricity Pricing

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, Chuck; Hopper, Nicole; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Neenan,Bernie; Boisvert, Dick; Cappers, Peter; Pratt, Donna; Butkins, Kim

    2005-08-25

    Real-time pricing (RTP) has been advocated as an economically efficient means to send price signals to customers to promote demand response (DR) (Borenstein 2002, Borenstein 2005, Ruff 2002). However, limited information exists that can be used to judge how effectively RTP actually induces DR, particularly in the context of restructured electricity markets. This report describes the second phase of a study of how large, non-residential customers' adapted to default-service day-ahead hourly pricing. The customers are located in upstate New York and served under Niagara Mohawk, A National Grid Company (NMPC)'s SC-3A rate class. The SC-3A tariff is a type of RTP that provides firm, day-ahead notice of hourly varying prices indexed to New York Independent System Operator (NYISO) day-ahead market prices. The study was funded by the California Energy Commission (CEC)'s PIER program through the Demand Response Research Center (DRRC). NMPC's is the first and longest-running default-service RTP tariff implemented in the context of retail competition. The mix of NMPC's large customers exposed to day-ahead hourly prices is roughly 30% industrial, 25% commercial and 45% institutional. They have faced periods of high prices during the study period (2000-2004), thereby providing an opportunity to assess their response to volatile hourly prices. The nature of the SC-3A default service attracted competitive retailers offering a wide array of pricing and hedging options, and customers could also participate in demand response programs implemented by NYISO. The first phase of this study examined SC-3A customers' satisfaction, hedging choices and price response through in-depth customer market research and a Constant Elasticity of Substitution (CES) demand model (Goldman et al. 2004). This second phase was undertaken to answer questions that remained unresolved and to quantify price response to a higher level of granularity. We accomplished these objectives with a second customer

  14. Effect of E-Service Quality on Customer Online Repurchase Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Tung-Hsuan

    2012-01-01

    In the early years of online retailing, having an online presence and low prices were believed to be key drivers of success. More recently, electronic service quality has become essential as an online marketing strategy. Online stores provide higher service quality to create online customer loyalty, improve customer satisfaction, and keep a…

  15. The Customer Is Always Right: What the Business World Can Teach Us about Problem Patrons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Rebecca

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of problem patrons in libraries focuses on how businesses handle customer complaints, namely regarding them as opportunities to improve customer service and satisfaction. Suggests libraries need to provide channels for patrons to make complaints, follow up on them, and train staff to deal with user dissatisfaction. (Author/LRW)

  16. Sexual disclosures: connections to relational satisfaction and closeness.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Tina A; Hess, Jon A

    2014-01-01

    This study examines sexual communication by describing the content of sexual disclosures within marital relationships and assessing the association between sexual disclosures and relational outcomes, specifically relational satisfaction and closeness. A survey administered to 293 married individuals (58% female) who had an average age of 40 years (range = 20-73), 13.7 years of marriage (range = 1 month to 54 years), and who reported high levels of relational satisfaction assessed the relation between the content of sexual disclosures and satisfaction and closeness. While sexual disclosures are made infrequently, positive affect and sexual preferences are disclosed more than negative topics and disclosing sexual information is positively related to relationship satisfaction, rρ(280) =.26, p <.001; and closeness, rs(280) =.475, p <.01. Therapists can use these findings to show clients the positive relation between revealing sexual information and relationship satisfaction and closeness, as reported by individuals experiencing relationship satisfaction. PMID:24308272

  17. Client satisfaction of maternity care in Lorestan province Iran

    PubMed Central

    Changee, Farahnaz; Irajpour, Alireza; Simbar, Masoumeh; Akbari, Soheila

    2015-01-01

    Background: Client satisfaction is an important indicator for assessment of the quality of care provided. Detecting patients dissatisfaction and trying to find the most effective and costly services is the basic way for improvement of service quality. The purpose of this study was to determine the satisfaction level of women in the maternity care centers (hospitals) of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, the satisfaction level of 200 patients who received care during childbirth in province hospitals was assessed using a researcher-made questionnaire. Women in maternity care units completed the questionnaires. Results: The mean maternity care satisfaction score was 66.6 ± 3.5. The lowest satisfaction level was related to getting to know the delivery room (64%) and vaginal examination (66%). The highest satisfaction score was related to confidentiality of the information (86%) and trusting the midwife (84%). Regarding the environmental factors, the lowest satisfaction was related to respecting silence in the pain room (69.5%) and the highest was related to cleanliness and hygiene of the delivery room (84%). Conclusions: Our results suggest the relative satisfaction of women receiving care in the health centers of Lorestan province; but this level of satisfaction does not mean that the delivery of care in this province is perfect. By reviewing the policies and the existing care programs regarding promoting the quality of services, managers can increase clients’ satisfaction. PMID:26120342

  18. Marital and Family Role Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, Bruce A.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This paper reports the satisfaction between several independent variables and marital satisfaction. Adequacy of role performance of both self and spouse and spouse's conformity to expectations emerged as the strongest predictors of satisfaction derived from playing family roles. (Author)

  19. Clinicians' satisfaction with a hospital blood transfusion service: a marketing analysis of a monopoly supplier.

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, S J; McClelland, D B; Murphy, W G

    1993-01-01

    One of the objectives of the NHS reforms is to improve customer focus within the health service. In a study to assess the quality of customer service provided by the Edinburgh and South East Scotland Blood Transfusion Service a 19 item questionnaire survey of the main clinical users of the service was performed to ascertain their satisfaction, measured on a 5 point anchored scale, with important aspects of the service, including medical consultation, diagnostic services, blood and blood components or products and their delivery, and general satisfaction with the service. Of 122 clinicians in medical and surgical disciplines in five hospitals in Edinburgh, 72 (59%) replied. Fourteen (22%) indicated dissatisfaction with any aspect of the medical consultation service, owing to inadequate follow up of clinical contacts and unsatisfactory routing of incoming calls. Diagnostic services were criticised for the presentation, communication, and interpretation of results. The restricted availability of whole blood, the necessity to order platelets and plasma through the duty blood transfusion service doctor, and the use of a group and screen policy, attracted criticism from a small number of clinicians. Ten of 68 respondents expressed dissatisfaction with delivery of blood and components to the wards and theatres. The findings indicate that the clinicians served by this blood transfusion service are largely satisfied with the service. Changes are being implemented to improve reporting of laboratory results and measures taken to improve liaison with clinicians. PMID:10132458

  20. Satisfaction in Multigenerational Households.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mindel, Charles H.; Wright, Roosevelt, Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Using social exchange theory, examined satisfaction of the primary caregiver with living in a multigenerational household in 99 Midwestern families. Identified important predictors of satisfaction consisting of characteristics of the older person (indicators of dependency status, characteristics of the primary caregiver, and the situational…

  1. Customer-focused planning: Demonstration project summaries. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    George, S.S.

    1992-12-01

    To succeed in the increasingly competitive and dynamic markets in which they operate, electric utilities are focusing ever greater attention on understanding and meeting customer needs. EPRI`s Customer Focused Planning (CFP) project was established to develop concepts and tools that will help utilities enhance their commitment to customer service. The project team conducted a series of interviews and meetings with participating utilities to collaboratively implement crucial steps in the CFP process. Although there is no unique set of tools or single management approach for improving product and service delivery, customer-focused companies have at least five ideals in common. They (1) define goals and objectives in concrete terms, (2) extend the planning boundaries of the organization to include all members of the energy services infrastructure, (3) painstakingly link functional activities directly to customer needs, (4) incorporate the customer`s voice in new product/ service design, and (5) align performance measures with customer needs. In addition, customer-focused companies use a variety of methods to improve customer satisfaction and company performance. These methods include conducting market research, developing market processes such as demand-side management contracting or bidding to reveal customer preferences, and involving customers more directly in the planning process. This report summarizes two brief demonstration projects conducted as part of EPRI`s CFP project, one at Commonwealth Edison Company (CECo) and one at PSI Energy. The CECo project emphasized developing customer-focused performance measures for telephone inquiries. The PSI Energy project involved a one-day workshop underscoring two important CFP elements-understanding customer wants and explicitly linking those wants to utility activities.

  2. Assessing the "Good Life" in a Military Context: How Does Life and Work-Satisfaction Relate to Orientations to Happiness and Career-Success among Swiss Professional Officers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Proyer, Rene T.; Annen, Hubert; Eggimann, Nadine; Schneider, Andrea; Ruch, Willibald

    2012-01-01

    The study examines work- and life satisfaction along with orientation to happiness, and their relation to subjective but also objective career success, among Swiss military professional officers. They frequently report worsening of their working conditions due to two reforms that have recently been conducted. A total of N = 221 Swiss career…

  3. An Exploratory Study of Effective Online Learning: Assessing Satisfaction Levels of Graduate Students of Mathematics Education Associated with Human and Design Factors of an Online Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Joohi

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory research project investigated graduate students' satisfaction levels with online learning associated with human (professor/instructor and instructional associate) and design factors (course structure and technical aspects) using a survey study. A total of 81 graduate students (master's students who majored in math and…

  4. Development of the Contentment with Life Assessment Scale (CLAS): Using Daily Life Experiences to Verify Levels of Self-Reported Life Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavallee, Loraine F.; Hatch, P. Maurine; Michalos, Alex C.; McKinley, Tara

    2007-01-01

    On average, Anglo-Americans report that they are satisfied with their lives, but their global evaluations tend to deviate from their daily experiences (e.g., Oishi [2002, "Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin" 28(10), 1398-1406]). We explored the hypothesis that the average life satisfaction of Anglo-Americans is better characterized as…

  5. Satisfaction Surveys as Mechanisms to Assess the Success of an Institution of Higher Learning as an "Inviting Institution": A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brits, H. J.

    2011-01-01

    This study reflects on an institution of higher learning's study to determine the satisfaction and importance values of questions that relate to services rendered by the institution. This institution's Academic Plan and its teaching and learning strategies underpin theoretically socio-constructivism. This study was conducted from an invitational…

  6. Utilizing a Personal Smartphone Custom App to Assess the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) Depressive Symptoms in Patients With Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Patrick; Shanahan, Meghan; Lin, Charlie; Peck, Pamela; Keshavan, Matcheri; Onnela, Jukka-Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Background Accurate reporting of patient symptoms is critical for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring in psychiatry. Smartphones offer an accessible, low-cost means to collect patient symptoms in real time and aid in care. Objective To investigate adherence among psychiatric outpatients diagnosed with major depressive disorder in utilizing their personal smartphones to run a custom app to monitor Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) depression symptoms, as well as to examine the correlation of these scores to traditionally administered (paper-and-pencil) PHQ-9 scores. Methods A total of 13 patients with major depressive disorder, referred by their clinicians, received standard outpatient treatment and, in addition, utilized their personal smartphones to run the study app to monitor their symptoms. Subjects downloaded and used the Mindful Moods app on their personal smartphone to complete up to three survey sessions per day, during which a randomized subset of PHQ-9 symptoms of major depressive disorder were assessed on a Likert scale. The study lasted 29 or 30 days without additional follow-up. Outcome measures included adherence, measured by the percentage of completed survey sessions, and estimates of daily PHQ-9 scores collected from the smartphone app, as well as from the traditionally administered PHQ-9. Results Overall adherence was 77.78% (903/1161) and varied with time of day. PHQ-9 estimates collected from the app strongly correlated (r=.84) with traditionally administered PHQ-9 scores, but app-collected scores were 3.02 (SD 2.25) points higher on average. More subjects reported suicidal ideation using the app than they did on the traditionally administered PHQ-9. Conclusions Patients with major depressive disorder are able to utilize an app on their personal smartphones to self-assess their symptoms of major depressive disorder with high levels of adherence. These app-collected results correlate with the traditionally administered PHQ-9. Scores

  7. Courtesy in caring. The patient as customer.

    PubMed

    DeBaca, V

    1990-01-01

    If you were paying $500 a night for a hotel room,. would you be happy if you were told you would be sharing it with a stranger? While such a question cannot be literally asked about a hospital experience, metaphorically it can be--and is--asked every time a patient enters a hospital. The idea of patient-as-consumer is not longer just another trendy concept but an integral part of the way many hospitals do business, and it's the hospital manager's responsibility to ensure the customer's satisfaction. PMID:10105899

  8. The Effects of Need Satisfaction on EFL Online Learner Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Po-Hsuan; Adesope, Olusola

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the effects of need satisfaction (autonomy, competence, and relatedness) on English as a foreign language (EFL) online learner satisfaction and validated the Chinese versions of the need satisfaction scale (NSS) and online learner satisfaction scale (OLSS). We collected data from a questionnaire administered to 199 EFL students…

  9. Inpatients’ care experience and satisfaction study

    PubMed Central

    Binsalih, Salih A.; Waness, Abdelkarim O.; Tamim, Hani M.; Harakati, Mohamed S.; Al Sayyari, Abdulla A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective and Background: Measures to promote patient satisfaction are important components of the assessment of outcome and strategies for the delivery of health care. In this article, we assess satisfaction among inpatients and the impact of demographics on satisfaction levels. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional survey adapted from previously used survey tools and validated in our patient group included questions on demographics, communication skills, hospital environment, and the patients’ overall evaluation of the hospital. Inpatients from acute wards of five different specialties who stayed for at least 2 days were enrolled. Results: There were 988 respondents with a mean age of 39.1 years (25.9%) and the mean length of stay (LOS) of 10.0 days (24.1%). Illiteracy rate was 42.4%, and 43.1% were male. The overall satisfaction scores—out of five—were 4.3 (0.6%) for communication with nurses, 4.4 (0.4%) for communication with doctors, and 4.1 (0.3%) for hospital environment; 98.9% of the patients would recommend the hospital to their family and friends. The lowest score was for the “room environment” (3.99, 0.8%) and the highest for overall services of the hospital (4.7, 0.5%). Satisfaction levels drop significantly with LOS of more than 4 days (P < 0.006). The satisfaction was higher in females than males across all the three domains of care assessed (P < 0.005). The highest satisfaction seen in the obstetrics service could be explained by the nature of the condition normally seen in this department and the normally good outcome. There was higher satisfaction in the medical than surgical services but this reached a significant level for the overall center score domain only (4.1, 0.3% versus 4.0, 0.3%; P < 0.0001). Conclusion: The factors with positive impact on satisfaction were the female gender and shorter LOS. There was higher satisfaction in the medical than surgical services for all three domains reaching significant levels for center

  10. Defining the customer`s buying parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, B.

    1997-03-01

    Many customers are already implementing processes to select suppliers in anticipation of full customer choice, establishing price and risk parameters. Customers are also recognizing that transitional steps on the way to full competition, including such options as buy-through and real-time pricing, can lower costs at reasonable risk. Retail competition is transforming the US electricity market at a dazzling pace, promising major customers greater choices and better prices--and a lot of new headaches. Even though regulators have not yet put retail access into general practice, many customers are working diligently to make sure they are properly prepared to deal with the additional issues and complexities being created by electricity`s new world order. By the time retail competition is officially unleashed, many national buyers of electricity will have: (1) specified their service criteria (contract terms and conditions), (2) defined their price risk tolerances, (3) structured their purchasing organization/process, and (4) chosen their national/regional suppliers.

  11. The case for customer loyalty.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Arthur C

    2004-09-01

    How does customer loyalty grow? Through good customer experiences. Yet some organizations seem to genuinely fail to understand that they can keep or lose a customer in the proverbial blink of an eye. And in this era of increasing customer demands across all industries, it's important that healthcare financial managers understand the correlation between customer loyalty and customer experience. PMID:15460948

  12. Satisfaction with life, psychosocial health and materialism among Hungarian youth.

    PubMed

    Piko, Bettina F

    2006-11-01

    Previous research suggests that youth's life satisfaction may be influenced by health and certain socioeconomic/sociocultural factors, which may be important in a post-socialist country like Hungary. We investigated the relationship between youth's life satisfaction, materialism and their psychosocial health in a sample of secondary school students (N = 1114) in Hungary. Findings show that youth's psychosocial health may play an important role in their levels of life satisfaction, particularly depressive and psychosomatic symptoms and health behaviors (e.g. diet control and smoking). SES self-assessment and materialistic success were positively, while materialistic happiness was negatively related to youth's life satisfaction. PMID:17035255

  13. Job Satisfaction in Fisheries Compared.

    PubMed

    Pollnac, Richard; Bavinck, Maarten; Monnereau, Iris

    2012-10-01

    This article draws comparative lessons from seven job satisfaction studies on marine capture fishing that were recently carried out in nine countries and three geographical regions-Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean. The seven studies made use of an identical job satisfaction assessment tool and present information on a selection of métiers mainly in the small-scale and semi-industrial fishing sectors. The responses manifest statistically significant geographical variation. Multidimensional plots and cluster analyses lead the authors to identify three clusters: (1) Southeast Asian (Vietnam and Thailand); (2) Caribbean (Belize, Nicaragua, Dominican Republic) and (3) Afro-Indian (Senegal, Guinea Bissau, and India). Jamaica is a significant outlier. On a general level, the authors conclude that fishers who report that they are not interested in leaving the occupation of fishing score higher on three traditional job satisfaction scales-basic needs, social needs and self actualization. Those who say they would leave fishing for another occupation are younger, have less fishing experience and smaller households. The latter findings are of relevance with regard to the pressing need, felt by fisheries managers, to move fishers out of the fishery. PMID:22997480

  14. Patient satisfaction with antihypertensive therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, K; Chiou, C-F; Plauschinat, C A; Frech, F; Harper, A; Dubois, R

    2005-10-01

    The objective of the study was to assess factors associated with treatment satisfaction among patients receiving antihypertensive therapy. A weighted cross-sectional online survey was conducted with hypertensive patients participating in a chronic disease panel in the US. Patients on monotherapy with medications from the following classes were identified: ACE inhibitors (ACEIs), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), beta blockers (BBs), calcium channel blockers (CCBs), and diuretics. The control group included patients without treatment. Pairwise comparisons between groups were conducted for factors that may affect patients' satisfaction. The study population had a mean age of 54.7+/-14.2 years and was 56.7% female. Participants with blood pressure (BP) controlled to JNC 7 guidelines were more satisfied with their medication than those with uncontrolled BP (90.3 vs 71.5%, P<0.05). Patients who had not experienced adverse events had higher satisfaction than patients experiencing adverse events (90.9 vs 75.8%, P<0.05). The most frequently self-reported adverse events were frequent urination, sexual dysfunction, and fatigue ranging from 7.0 to 9.6% across classes. The adverse event rates differed by class and were lowest among the ARBs. Patients on ARBs were the most likely to have switched from a previous antihypertensive class as compared to other classes (57.1% ARBs vs 49.8% ACEIs, 38.7% diuretics, 36.3% CCBs, and 31.7% BBs). Physician recommendation was the most common reason for switching. In conclusion, the ability to effectively treat hypertension depends upon a patient's satisfaction with antihypertensive therapy, which may be improved by achieving BP control and minimizing the occurrence of adverse events. PMID:15951740

  15. Customer service revisited.

    PubMed

    Levin, R P

    2001-03-01

    Customer service requires a system, which includes, but is not limited to having pleasant staff members. It requires a systemized approach to every patient every day. The steps of customer service are as integral to the success of the practice as are those of scheduling and case presentation. Customer service is a unique opportunity to differentiate a practice, justify the value for fees, and satisfy almost every patient. PMID:11913255

  16. Communication with Parents and Body Satisfaction in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taniguchi, Emiko; Aune, R. Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study examined how communication with parents is related to college students' body satisfaction. Participants and Methods: Participants ("N" = 134; 58 males and 76 females) completed a survey in March 2011 assessing body satisfaction and perceptions of communication with mothers and fathers. Results: Daughters'…

  17. Resident Satisfaction and Its Components in Residential Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Shu-Chiung; Boldy, Duncan P.; Lee, Andy H.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the direction and magnitude of the effects among the components of resident satisfaction in residential aged care and to examine if the relationships among satisfaction components vary according to facility type (i.e., nursing home and hostel). Briefly, a hostel is a low-care facility in which…

  18. A Validity Scale for the Sharp Consumer Satisfaction Scales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, Barry A.; Stacy, Webb, Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A validity scale for the Sharp Consumer Satisfaction Scale was developed and used in experiments to assess patients' satisfaction with community mental health centers. The scale discriminated between clients who offered suggestions and those who did not. It also improved researcher's ability to predict true scores from obtained scores. (DWH)

  19. Beyond Health and Wealth: Predictors of Women's Retirement Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Christine A.; Balaswamy, Shantha

    2009-01-01

    Despite empirical support for the positive effects of health and wealth on retirement satisfaction, alternative variables also play a key role in helping to shape women's assessment of retirement. In the present study, we explore personal and psychosocial predictors of women's retirement satisfaction while controlling for financial security and…

  20. 42 CFR 423.156 - Consumer satisfaction surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Consumer satisfaction surveys. 423.156 Section 423... Improvement Requirements § 423.156 Consumer satisfaction surveys. Part D contracts with 600 or more enrollees as of July of the prior year must contract with approved Medicare Consumer Assessment of...

  1. Measuring Website Quality: Asymmetric Effect of User Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kincl, Tomas; Strach, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Website quality measurement tools have been largely static and have struggled to determine relevant attributes of user satisfaction. This study compares and contrasts attributes of user satisfaction based on usability guidelines seeking to identify practical easy-to-administer measurement tools. The website users assessed business school homepages…

  2. The Adult Student and Course Satisfaction: What Matters Most?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, George F.; Buck, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Student satisfaction with a course is important because it can contribute to student retention, and it can also be used as one way to assess faculty effectiveness. This investigative work suggests that course satisfaction among non-traditional, adult students seeking business degrees is positively influenced by giving attention to four specific…

  3. Incorporating Perceived Importance of Service Elements into Client Satisfaction Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Chang-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the need for incorporating perceived importance of service elements into client satisfaction measures. Method: A secondary analysis of client satisfaction data from 112 clients of an elderly case management setting was conducted. Results: This study found that the relationship between global…

  4. Maslow and the motivation hierarchy: measuring satisfaction of the needs.

    PubMed

    Taormina, Robert J; Gao, Jennifer H

    2013-01-01

    For each of the 5 needs in Maslow's motivational hierarchy (physiological, safety-security, belongingness, esteem, and self-actualization), operational definitions were developed from Maslow's theory of motivation. New measures were created based on the operational definitions (1) to assess the satisfaction of each need, (2) to assess their expected correlations (a) with each of the other needs and (b) with four social and personality measures (i.e., family support, traditional values, anxiety/worry, and life satisfaction), and (3) to test the ability of the satisfaction level of each need to statistically predict the satisfaction level of the next higher-level need. Psychometric tests of the scales conducted on questionnaire results from 386 adult respondents from the general population lent strong support for the validity and reliability of all 5 needs measures. Significant positive correlations among the scales were also found; that is, the more each lower-level need was satisfied, the more the next higher-level need was satisfied. Additionally, as predicted, family support, traditional values, and life satisfaction had significant positive correlations with the satisfaction of all 5 needs, and the anxiety/worry facet of neuroticism had significant negative correlations with the satisfaction of all the needs. Multiple regression analyses revealed that the satisfaction of each higher-level need was statistically predicted by the satisfaction of the need immediately below it in the hierarchy, as expected from Maslow's theory. PMID:23858951

  5. A patient satisfaction survey for haemophilia treatment centres.

    PubMed

    Hacker, M R; Primeaux, J; Manco-Johnson, M J

    2006-03-01

    The importance of patient satisfaction has continued to grow such that patient satisfaction is now viewed as a vital component of health-care delivery. This is evidenced by the expanding body of research in the area and the use of measures of patient satisfaction as indicators of health-care quality. The value of patient satisfaction is particularly apparent in the setting of chronic disease where medical care utilization is high, compliance with therapy is critical and the patient-provider relationship is often long-term. Although several validated tools exist to quantify general measures of patient satisfaction, there is a recognized need for disease-specific instruments. Not only are there issues that are unique to haemophilia, but many patients receive care via a specialized comprehensive clinic model. The authors were unaware of an instrument that could adequately address patient satisfaction issues specific to haemophilia; thus, they undertook to develop one. The patient satisfaction survey presented here contains fixed-choice, Likert-scale and open-ended questions adapted from previously validated questionnaires. Assessment of face validity and internal consistency indicate that the survey is measuring one underlying construct - patient satisfaction. Information acquired through this survey will provide a quantitative assessment of patient satisfaction within a clinic population of persons with bleeding disorders and could be used to guide decisions regarding provision of health-care services. PMID:16476091

  6. Implementing the Customer Contact Center: An Opportunity to Create a Valid Measurement System for Assessing and Improving a Library's Telephone Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Sarah Anne; Cerqua, Judith

    2012-01-01

    A customer contact center offers academic libraries the ability to consistently improve their telephone, e-mail, and IM services. This paper discusses the establishment of a contact center and the benefits of implementing the contact center model at this institution. It then introduces a practical methodology for developing a valid measurement…

  7. Determinants of Patient Satisfaction During Receipt of Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Famiglietti, Robin M. Neal, Emily C.; Edwards, Timothy J.; Allen, Pamela K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the correlations and relative contributions of components of a radiation oncology-specific patient satisfaction survey to their overall satisfaction scores. Methods and Materials: From September 2006 through August 2012, we prospectively collected data from 8069 patients receiving radiation treatments with a 26-question survey. Each question was rated on a 10-point Likert scale. We analyzed the correlation between scores for each question and the overall satisfaction question. We also dichotomized the scores to reflect satisfaction versus dissatisfaction and used logistic regression to assess the relationship between items in 4 domains (the patient–provider relationship, access and environmental issues, wait times, and educational information) and overall satisfaction. Results: Scores on all questions correlated with overall patient satisfaction scores (P<.0001). Satisfaction with patient–provider relationships had the greatest influence on overall satisfaction (R{sup 2}=0.4219), followed by wait times (R{sup 2}=0.4000), access/environment (R{sup 2}=0.3837), and patient education (R{sup 2}=0.3700). The specific variables with the greatest effect on patient satisfaction were the care provided by radiation therapists (odds ratio 1.91) and pain management (odds ratio 1.29). Conclusions: We found that patients' judgment of provider relationships in an outpatient radiation oncology setting were the greatest contributors to their overall satisfaction ratings. Other measures typically associated with patient satisfaction (phone access, scheduling, and ease of the check-in process) correlated less strongly with overall satisfaction. These findings may be useful for other practices preparing to assess patient ratings of quality of care.

  8. Patient satisfaction after acute admission for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Bø, Beate; Ottesen, Øyvind H; Gjestad, Rolf; Jørgensen, Hugo A; Kroken, Rune A; Løberg, Else-Marie; Johnsen, Erik

    2016-07-01

    Background Measuring patient satisfaction in mental health care potentially provides valuable information, but studies in acutely admitted psychosis patients are scarce. Aims The aims were to assess satisfaction among patients acutely admitted with psychosis, to compare satisfaction in voluntarily versus involuntarily admitted patients, and to assess the influence of symptom load and insight. Methods The UKU Consumer Satisfaction Rating Scale (UKU-ConSat) was used. A total of 104 patients completed the UKU-ConSat at discharge/follow-up (between 6-11 weeks after admittance if not discharged earlier) (mean duration of stay 4 weeks), thus corresponding to the end of the acute treatment phase. Results A total of 88.4% had total scores above zero (satisfied). Only three of the eight single items were statistically significantly different among patients admitted voluntarily versus involuntarily, and only the information item score remained significantly different in adjusted analyses. Insight level at admittance, and an increasing level of insight during the acute phase were positively associated with patient satisfaction, whereas levels and changes in positive and negative psychosis symptoms were indirectly related to satisfaction via this process of insight. Conclusions The vast majority of the acutely admitted patients were satisfied with treatment. There were few differences between the involuntarily and voluntarily admitted patient groups, except that the involuntary care group was clearly less satisfied with the information provided. Poor insight had a major negative impact on treatment satisfaction in psychosis. The provision of sufficient and adequate information is an important target for mental health care service improvement. PMID:26750532

  9. The coming battle for customer information.

    PubMed

    Hagel, J; Rayport, J F

    1997-01-01

    Companies collect information about customers to target valuable prospects more effectively, tailor their offerings to individual needs, improve customer satisfaction, and identify opportunities for new products or services. But managers' efforts to capture such information may soon be thwarted. The authors believe that consumers are going to take ownership of information about themselves and start demanding value in exchange for it. As a result, negotiating with customers for information will become costly and complex. How will that happen? Consumers are realizing that they get very little in exchange for the information they divulge so freely through their commercial transactions and survey responses. Now new technologies such as smart cards, World Wide Web browsers, and personal financial management software are allowing consumers to view comprehensive profiles of their commercial activities-- and to choose whether or not to release that information to companies. Their decision will hinge, in large part, on what vendors offer them in return for the data. Consumers will be unlikely to bargain with vendors on their own, however. The authors anticipate that companies they call infomediaries will broker information to businesses on consumers' behalf. In essence, infomediaries will be the catalyst for people to start demanding value in exchange for information about themselves. And most other companies will need to rethink how they obtain information and what they do with it if they want to find new customers and serve them better. PMID:10174454

  10. The Effects of Lecturer Commitment on Student Perceptions of Teaching Quality and Student Satisfaction in Chinese Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao, Jian; Wilkins, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Student satisfaction has become an important concept in higher education because students are paying higher tuition fees and increasingly seeing themselves as customers and because satisfaction is commonly used as an indicator of quality by quality assurance agencies and the compilers of rankings and league tables. In business organisations, it…

  11. Towards a Citizen-Centered E-Government: Exploring Citizens' Satisfaction with E-Government in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jianchuan

    2013-01-01

    E-government research has been practical and utilitarian, lacking theoretical concerns. Based on the literature of customer satisfaction with private-sector services, citizen/user satisfaction with public services, and information systems management, this study systematically investigates the following factors and their effects on citizen…

  12. Implementing a routine outcome assessment procedure to evaluate the quality of assistive technology service delivery for children with physical or multiple disabilities: Perceived effectiveness, social cost, and user satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Desideri, Lorenzo; Bizzarri, Martina; Bitelli, Claudio; Roentgen, Uta; Gelderblom, Gert-Jan; de Witte, Luc

    2016-01-01

    There is a lack of evidence on the effects and quality of assistive technology service delivery (ATSD). This study presents a quasi-experimental 3-months follow-up using a pre-test/post-test design aimed at evaluating outcomes of assistive technology (AT) interventions targeting children with physical and multiple disabilities. A secondary aim was to evaluate the feasibility of the follow-up assessment adopted in this study with a view to implement the procedure in routine clinical practice. Forty-five children aged 3-17 years were included. Parents were asked to complete the Individual Prioritised Problem Assessment (IPPA) for AT effectiveness; KWAZO (Kwaliteit van Zorg [Quality of Care]) and Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology (QUEST) 2.0 for satisfaction with ATSD; Siva Cost Analysis Instrument (SCAI) for estimating the social cost of AT interventions. At follow-up, 25 children used the AT recommended. IPPA effect sizes ranged from 1.4 to 0.7, showing a large effect of AT interventions. Overall, parents were satisfied with ATSD, but Maintenance, Professional Services, and AT Delivery were rated not satisfactory. SCAI showed more resources spent for AT intervention compared to human assistance without technological supports. AT may be an effective intervention for children with disabilities. Issues concerning responsiveness and feasibility of the IPPA and the SCAI instruments are discussed with a view to inform routine clinical practice. PMID:26479329

  13. Student Satisfaction Surveys: Measurements and Utilization Issues. AIR 1993 Annual Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Liz; Chan, Susy

    Student satisfaction surveys assess satisfaction with various facets of the university and includes key sets of questions on programs and services, university learning and social environment, university mission and values, educational preparation, transfer intent, general satisfaction, attitudes toward coursework, and student demographic…

  14. Online Education of Older Adults and Its Relation to Life Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorin, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the effect of participation in online education on the life satisfaction of the older adult. Life satisfaction was assessed by scores obtained using questions the from Nuegarten, Havighurst, and Tobin (1961) Life Satisfaction Index-A (LSI-A). Other data was obtained using demographic and procedural…

  15. The Multidisciplinary Hemodialysis Patient Satisfaction Scale: Reliability, Validity, and Scale Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Pamela Davis; Brantley, Philip J.; McKnight, G. Tipton; Jones, Glenn N.; Springer, Annette

    1997-01-01

    The development and preliminary reliability and validity studies are reported for the Multidisciplinary Hemodialysis Patient Satisfaction Scale, a 110-item Likert scale that assesses satisfaction with team health care services. The methods used to construct subscales may have implications for other psychometric studies of satisfaction and quality…

  16. Virginity Lost, Satisfaction Gained?

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Jenny A.; Trussell, James; Moore, Nelwyn B.; Davidson, J. Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Despite the literature's focus on (hetero)sexual initiation, we know little about the degree to which young people are satisfied by their first vaginal intercourse experience, let alone the factors that predict satisfaction. We analyzed data from a cross-sectional survey of 1986 non-Hispanic White and Black 18-25 year old respondents from four university campuses. Respondents were asked to rate the degree to which their first vaginal intercourse was physiologically and psychologically satisfying. Both Black and White women were significantly less likely than Black and White men to experience considerable or extreme satisfaction at first vaginal intercourse, particularly physiological satisfaction. Among all four gender-race groups, being in a committed relationship with one's sexual partner greatly increased psychological satisfaction, particularly among women. Experiencing less guilt at first sexual intercourse was also strongly associated with psychological satisfaction for women. Developing sexual relationships with partners they care for and trust will foster satisfaction among young people at first vaginal intercourse. Our findings highlight strong gender asymmetry in affective sexual experience. PMID:20401787

  17. British Sign Name Customs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Linda; Sutton-Spence, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Research presented here describes the sign names and the customs of name allocation within the British Deaf community. While some aspects of British Sign Language sign names and British Deaf naming customs differ from those in most Western societies, there are many similarities. There are also similarities with other societies outside the more…

  18. Customer Relationship Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fayerman, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Presents an approach increasingly employed by businesses to track and respond to their customers to provide better and faster services: customer relationship management. Discusses its applicability to the operations of higher education and institutional research and the role it plays in the knowledge management framework. (EV)

  19. Managing customer service.

    PubMed

    Paget, Zoe

    2015-02-28

    Zoe Paget is the customer services manager at YourVets. Her role includes managing the company's call centre, social media marketing, working with the marketing department to develop customer care initiatives and reporting service levels to the company's directors. PMID:25722341

  20. Customized Training Marketing Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lay, Ted

    This report outlines Oregon's Lane Community College's (LCC's) plan for marketing its customized training program for business, community organizations, public agencies, and their employees. Following a mission statement for the customized training program, a brief analysis is provided of the economic environment; of competition from educational…

  1. The Impact of e-Customer Relationship Marketing in Hotel Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Irene

    The present research investigates the extent to which Greek hotels had developed the electronic customer relationship marketing (E-CRM). The study verifies the practices that frequently appear in relationship marketing process within online operations or whether their Internet presence mainly depends on the basic actions of "supplying information" and "reservations". Also, it investigates the effects of e-CRM system on customer loyalty and satisfaction as well as the impact of relationship marketing practices to customer retention and acquisition. They have understood the importance of using electronic channels instead of traditional ones to implement their marketing strategies. Thus, e-crm system has assisted hotel business to manage more effectively their reservations and serve their customers as fast and as effective as possible. They did not seem to apply many of the relationship marketing strategies to emphasize customer retention and continual satisfaction because of difficulties in staff training.

  2. Predicting Satisfaction with Group Work Assignments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdett, Jane; Hastie, Brianne

    2009-01-01

    Universities are increasingly using group based assessment tasks; however, as with work-place teams, such tasks often elicit mixed feelings from participants. This study investigated factors that may predict student satisfaction with group work at university. Final-year business students completed a questionnaire addressing experiences of group…

  3. Genetic Counselling: Information Given, Recall and Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michie, Susan; McDonald, Valerie; Marteau, Theresa M.

    1997-01-01

    A questionnaire was sent to counselors (N=32) to categorize the key points given in genetic counseling; to assess the amount and type of information recalled; and to examine the relationships between counselees' knowledge, satisfaction with information received, the meeting of expectations, concern, and anxiety. Results emphasize the importance of…

  4. Evaluating Parent Satisfaction of School Nursing Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Read, Mary; Small, Patricia; Donaher, Kathleen; Gilsanz, Paola; Sheetz, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The Conceptual Model of Nursing Health Policy (CMNHP) was used to guide this study of client satisfaction as one component of an ongoing assessment of the Essential School Health Service (ESHS) Programs conducted by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. Random samples of parents/guardians of students who use the school nursing services…

  5. Human Capital Development Policies: Enhancing Employees Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wan, Hooi Lan

    2007-01-01

    Purpose--The aim of this article is to gain insight into some of the human capital development (HCD) policies that enhance employee satisfaction. A salient focus of the study is to assess whether employees in globalised foreign-owned MNCs are likely to be more satisfied with the HCD policies than with the practices employed by locally owned MNCs.…

  6. Graduate Development Programmes and Satisfaction Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Edel; Mangan, John; O'Connor, Marion

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceived progress of graduates who have been recruited by organisations and to assess their expectations and corresponding satisfaction levels. Drawing on the psychological contract and graduate development literature, the objective of the study was to compare the opinions of graduates from an…

  7. An explanatory model of nurse practitioner job satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Koelbel, P W; Fuller, S G; Misener, T R

    1991-01-01

    Job satisfaction influences employee retention, worker productivity, and performance quality. To retain qualified nurse practitioners (NPs), health administrators must identify sources of job satisfaction and dissatisfaction. Herzberg's dual-factor theory of job satisfaction addresses extrinsic and intrinsic work-related factors. Expansion of the model to include global job satisfaction and individual differences provided a broad framework for the assessment of nurse practitioner job satisfaction. The expanded model was used to analyze the job satisfaction of 132 NPs registered with the South Carolina State Board of Nursing in 1988 (final response rate = 90%). Participants completed the Index of Job Satisfaction (IJS), the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire-Short Form (MSQ-SF), and the Personal and Work Background Questionnaire (PWBQ). Although the NPs were moderately satisfied with their overall jobs, extrinsic factors were found to be major sources of dissatisfaction. The optimal combination of variables predicted by regression analysis to influence global job satisfaction were age, number of children, urban locations, achievement, company policies and practices, creativity, independence, and compensation. Implications for health administrators to improve the work environments of NPs are discussed. PMID:2007057

  8. Ready: how to keep your customers coming back.

    PubMed

    Eliscu, A T

    2000-01-01

    Customer service is a major, but often overlooked, issue in health care today. While other industries and organizations recognize how good customer relations can affect long-term success, many health care providers have yet to learn this valuable lesson. The Ritz-Carlton, which won the prestigious Baldridge Award for service, has a well-earned reputation for excellent customer service. Like health care providers, this hotel industry icon hires hourly workers, puts them in uniform and has them work in teams. Unlike health care, however, The Ritz-Carlton seems to be able to generate a much higher level of customer satisfaction. How? This chapter illustrates the techniques the hotel chain uses to accomplish its goal and how these important tools can apply to the health care industry. PMID:11010509

  9. Relationships among satisfaction, treatment motivation, and expectations in orthodontic patients: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weihong; Wang, Shimei; Zhang, Yanzhen

    2016-01-01

    Background Few research projects have looked at patient satisfaction with treatment outcome and factors contributing to satisfaction. The aim of this study was to examine treatment motivation and expectation associated with treatment-outcome satisfaction in a group of adolescent nonextraction orthodontic patients. We hypothesized that there would be significant correlations among treatment-outcome satisfaction, motivation, and expectations. Subjects and methods A sample of 120 patients who received orthodontic treatment at the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine completed two questionnaires. Before treatment, questionnaire 1 was given to patients to assess treatment motivation and expectations. When treatment had been completed, questionnaire 2, concerning treatment satisfaction, was assessed. Spearman’s rank correlation and regression analyses were used to assess the relationships among treatment satisfaction, expectations, and motivation. Results A total of 110 patients completed the two questionnaires. There was a tendency toward significant correlations between treatment motivation and overall satisfaction with treatment (β-coefficient −0.264, 95% confidence interval −0.456 to 2.314; P<0.001). However, correlations among treatment motivation and satisfaction with changes made and satisfaction with one’s appearance posttreatment were more fragmented. No relationship between treatment expectation and satisfaction was found (β-coefficient −0.126; 95% confidence interval −0.024 to 0.524; P>0.05). Conclusion Motivation was correlated with satisfaction with treatment outcome. Patients’ expectations had no correlation with treatment satisfaction. PMID:27110100

  10. Customer Communication Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This procedure communicates to the Customers of the Automation, Robotics and Simulation Division (AR&SD) Dynamics Systems Test Branch (DSTB) how to obtain services of the Six-Degrees-Of-Freedom Dynamic Test System (SDTS). The scope includes the major communication documents between the SDTS and its Customer. It established the initial communication and contact points as well as provides the initial documentation in electronic media for the customer. Contact the SDTS Manager (SM) for the names of numbers of the current contact points.

  11. Developing customer databases.

    PubMed

    Rao, S K; Shenbaga, S

    2000-01-01

    There is a growing consensus among pharmaceutical companies that more product and customer-specific approaches to marketing and selling a new drug can result in substantial increases in sales. Marketers and researchers taking a proactive micro-marketing approach to identifying, profiling, and communicating with target customers are likely to facilitate such approaches and outcomes. This article provides a working framework for creating customer databases that can be effectively mined to achieve a variety of such marketing and sales force objectives. PMID:11209474

  12. Patient satisfaction with Mentor inflatable penile prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Whalen, R K; Merrill, D C

    1991-06-01

    Patient satisfaction with the Mentor inflatable penile prosthesis was assessed by sending a thirty-six-item questionnaire to 251 patients who had undergone implantation of the device by the senior author (D.C.M.). A total of 152 (61%) of the patients responded. Recovery time, satisfaction, reasons for dissatisfaction, perceptions of erection quality, and psychosexual parameters were evaluated. Eight-eight percent of the patients were engaging in regular sexual activity. Depending on the definition of satisfaction, 81-89 percent of the respondents reported that they were satisfied with the prosthesis. Sixty-eight percent of the survey group were satisfied with the length, width, and firmness of their prosthetic-induced erection. The majority of patients reported improvement in psychosexual functioning after implantation. Reasons for dissatisfaction included inadequate penile length, insufficient firmness, and difficulty with inflation and deflation of the penile cylinders. PMID:2038786

  13. Body Satisfaction and Management in Iranian Students

    PubMed Central

    Garousi, Saeide; Garrusi, Behshid; Divsalar, Fatemeh; Divsalar, Kouros

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the importance of body satisfaction on self concept and well being, there is little study about it or its consequences in Iranian populations, a part of Asian culture. The aim of this study was the assessment of body satisfaction and body management strategies in Iranian university students. Work method: This survey was performed based on a self-administrated questionnaire in 535 university and post graduate students. Work results: About 2/3rd of the students had moderate to severe body dissatisfaction and 40% of the students were using body management methods. Rhinoplasty and heavy exercise were the most frequent body management methods in women and men, respectively. Conclusion: Widespread research on body satisfaction prevalence and its management behaviors in the general population can be effective in reducing the negative health, social and economic consequences of harmful behaviors. PMID:23922514

  14. 77 FR 27264 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ...--0960-0526. Under the auspices of Executive Order 12862, Setting Customer Service Standards, SSA conducts multiple customer satisfaction surveys each year. These voluntary customer satisfaction.... The purpose of these questionnaires is to assess customer satisfaction with the...

  15. Health centres' view of the services provided by a university hospital laboratory: Use of satisfaction surveys

    PubMed Central

    Oja, Paula; Kouri, Timo; Pakarinen, Arto

    2010-01-01

    Customer orientation has gained increasing attention in healthcare. A customer satisfaction survey is one way to raise areas and topics for quality improvement. However, it seems that customer satisfaction surveys have not resulted in quality improvement in healthcare. This article reports how the authors' university hospital laboratory has used customer satisfaction surveys targeted at the health centres in their hospital district. Closed-ended statements of the questionnaire were planned to cover the essential aspects of laboratory services. In addition, an open-ended question asked what was considered to be the most important problem in services. The questionnaires were sent to the medical directors of the health centres. The open-ended question proved to be very useful because the responses specified the main problems in service. Based on the responses, selected dissatisfied customers were contacted to specify their responses and possible corrective actions were taken. It is concluded that a satisfaction survey can be used as a screening tool to identify topics of dissatisfaction. In addition, further clarifications with selected customers are needed to specify the causes for their dissatisfaction and to undertake proper corrective actions. PMID:20205616

  16. Health centres' view of the services provided by a university hospital laboratory: use of satisfaction surveys.

    PubMed

    Oja, Paula; Kouri, Timo; Pakarinen, Arto

    2010-03-01

    Customer orientation has gained increasing attention in healthcare. A customer satisfaction survey is one way to raise areas and topics for quality improvement. However, it seems that customer satisfaction surveys have not resulted in quality improvement in healthcare. This article reports how the authors' university hospital laboratory has used customer satisfaction surveys targeted at the health centres in their hospital district. Closed-ended statements of the questionnaire were planned to cover the essential aspects of laboratory services. In addition, an open-ended question asked what was considered to be the most important problem in services. The questionnaires were sent to the medical directors of the health centres. The open-ended question proved to be very useful because the responses specified the main problems in service. Based on the responses, selected dissatisfied customers were contacted to specify their responses and possible corrective actions were taken. It is concluded that a satisfaction survey can be used as a screening tool to identify topics of dissatisfaction. In addition, further clarifications with selected customers are needed to specify the causes for their dissatisfaction and to undertake proper corrective actions. PMID:20205616

  17. Mandibular reconstruction using custom-made titanium mesh tray and particulate cancellous bone and marrow harvested from bilateral posterior ilia.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Nakaoka, Kazutoshi; Horiuchi, Toshikatsu; Kumagai, Kenichi; Ikawa, Tomoko; Shigeta, Yuko; Imamura, Eisaku; Iino, Mitsuyoshi; Ogawa, Takumi; Hamada, Yoshiki

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate usefulness of mandibular reconstructions using a custom-made titanium mesh (Ti-mesh) tray and particulate cancellous bone and marrow (PCBM). A consecutive nine patients who underwent mandibular reconstruction were enrolled in this study. They were five men and four women (mean age: 53.9 years). Virtual reality simulation was performed using computer software based on the pre-operative computed tomography data. A 3-dimensional (3-D) skull model was constructed using a 3-D printer. A tray was custom-made from a Ti-mesh sheet bent to adapt to the model. After PCBM harvesting from bilateral posterior ilia, the tray was fixed to the host bone. New bone formation and configuration of the reconstructed mandible were assessed radiologically. Complications were recorded in each patient during the follow-up period. Patients, satisfaction with post-operative facial contour was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS score, range = 0-100). In six of nine patients, excellent new bone formation was recognised and expected results were radiologically achieved. Complications occurred in four patients. These complications included Ti-mesh fracture, Ti-mesh exposure in the oral cavity, and delayed infection. Mean VAS score on patient satisfaction was 77.6. Although the data are preliminary, the results suggest that this method is clinically useful. PMID:24128312

  18. A customer's definition of quality.

    PubMed

    Miller, T O

    1992-01-01

    What's the best way to get "close to the customer"? One company has developed a customer feedback system to drive product design, sales, service, and support functions in order to ensure better customer responsiveness. PMID:10116010

  19. Large Customers (DR Sellers)

    SciTech Connect

    Kiliccot, Sila

    2011-10-25

    State of the large customers for demand response integration of solar and wind into electric grid; openADR; CAISO; DR as a pseudo generation; commercial and industrial DR strategies; California regulations

  20. Customization through Homeschooling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Brian D.

    2002-01-01

    Describes why home school is a natural environment for customizing instruction to meet the individual needs of students, especially those with special needs and talents. (Contains 19 references.) (PKP)

  1. The customer has escaped.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Paul F; Cespedes, Frank V

    2003-11-01

    Every company makes choices about the channels it will use to go to market. Traditionally, the decision to sell through a discount superstore or a pricey boutique, for instance, was guided by customer demographics. A company would identify a target segment of buyers and go with the channel that could deliver them. It was a fair assumption that certain customer types were held captive by certain channels--if not from cradle to grave, then at least from initial consideration to purchase. The problem, the authors say, is that today's customers have become unfettered. As their channel options have proliferated, they've come to recognize that different channels serve their needs better at different points in the buying process. The result is "value poaching." For example, certain channels hope to use higher margin sales to cover the cost of providing expensive high-touch services. Potential customers use these channels to do research, then leap to a cheaper channel when it's time to buy. Customers now hunt for bargains more aggressively; they've become more sophisticated about how companies market to them; and they are better equipped with information and technology to make advantageous decisions. What does this mean for your go-to-market strategy? The authors urge companies to make a fundamental shift in mind-set toward designing for buyer behaviors, not customer segments. A company should design pathways across channels to help its customers get what they need at each stage of the buying process--through one channel or another. Customers are not mindful of channel boundaries--and you shouldn't be either. Instead, they are mindful of the value of individual components in your channels--and you should be, too. PMID:14619155

  2. Perceptions of Overall Job Satisfaction and Facet Satisfaction of Principals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdaway, Edward A.; Johnson, Neil A.

    Learned opinion supports the relevance of satisfaction with job facets in studies of job satisfaction, but an analysis of the perceived importance of these facets concerning overall job satisfaction in education has largely been ignored. The relationships among Alberta (Canada) elementary and junior high school principals' job facet perceptions…

  3. Does the quality of advanced prosthetic dentistry determine patient satisfaction?

    PubMed

    Hakestam, U; Karlsson, T; Söderfeldt, B; Rydén, O; Glantz, P O

    1997-12-01

    In a clinical follow-up study 42 patients were selected from an original sample of 335 individuals who had undergone extensive prosthetic treatment. The selection was done in accordance with a treatment satisfaction measure. The selected patients' appliances were classified in accordance with the California Dental Association (CDA) quality assessment system. Altogether, most of the new reconstructions were rated as satisfactory. The removable partial dentures had a somewhat higher share of non-acceptable appliances according to the CDA criteria. There was an association between the CDA categories and patient satisfaction. Using logistic regression analysis and knowing the CDA rating, we could correctly classify 67% of the patients with regard to the satisfaction measure. The satisfaction measure was modified on the basis of an interview, improving the model to 83% correctly classified. It was concluded that the technical quality of the prosthodontic treatment was associated with patient satisfaction. PMID:9477029

  4. CRC customer versus rater octane number requirement program (1990)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    A CRC cooperative program was conducted to determine the difference in octane requirements between technical raters and 'customers' (the general driving public). The tests were conducted in two phases, with the second being a repeat of the first to verify the results obtained. The trained raters used the CRC E-15 procedure to determine the octane requirement of the vehicles while the customers' perception and objection to knock were determined through the use of a questionnaire. The customers' responses (perception and objection level) were based upon audible knock, acceleration performance, and after-run on a series of full-boiling-range customer/rater unleaded (FBRCU) reference-fuels. Data were analyzed from 168 1988-1991 model-year vehicles, with 126 of these tested in Phase II. The results showed that the customers, objections and perceptions were overwhelmingly based on knock, rather than acceleration performance or after-run. Two general methods, a population comparison and a delta analysis, were used to estimate the difference between customer and rater octane requirements. In the first method, the data were analyzed by comparing satisfaction curves for the technical and customer octane requirements (population comparison).

  5. Does psychological need satisfaction perceived online enhance well-being?

    PubMed

    Wang, Ligang; Tao, Ting; Fan, Chunlei; Gao, Wenbin

    2015-09-01

    The Internet has been building a new context, in which adolescents and young people complete their academic tasks, do their work, engage in social interaction, and even conduct anonymous identity experimentation. Therefore, it becomes very significant to assess psychological need satisfaction online, and to relate it to well-being. This study investigated the influence on well-being of psychological need satisfaction perceived online and the regulatory role in this relationship of psychological need satisfaction perceived in daily life. A total of 1,727 students from junior and senior high schools and universities in China were surveyed using the Basic Psychological Needs in General scale, the Basic Psychological Needs in the Online World scale, and the Index of Well-Being, Index of General Affect scale. The mean age of the adolescent sample was 17.47 years (ranging from 12.50 to 25.42 years). The results indicated that both need satisfaction perceived online and that perceived in daily life positively predicted psychological well-being, and psychological need satisfaction in daily life qualified the association between psychological need satisfaction perceived online and well-being. In particular, students who perceived higher psychological need satisfaction in daily life were found to benefit from psychological need satisfaction perceived online, but students with low psychological need satisfaction perceived in daily life did not. We suggest that people who perceive lower basic need satisfaction in daily life are more likely to use the Internet for socioaffective regulation and to consider cyberspace as a new world. Thus, need satisfaction perceived online may not transform into "real" happiness. PMID:26354155

  6. Patient Satisfaction with the Family Physician Program in Sabzevar, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Alireza; Raeissi, Pouran; Saffari, Ehsan; Reissi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Patient satisfaction with the family physician program is an important factor for more favorable treatment results. Evaluation of patient satisfaction improves the services and approximates them to patient’s preferences. The family physician program has been executed since late March, 2005 in Iran. This study aimed to measure patient satisfaction with family physician services and determines factors affecting the level of satisfaction in order to propose appropriate suggestions for providing medical services based on patients’ expectations. Methods: Forty-one centers provide healthcare services in rural and urban areas. The participants in this study comprised 1263 people. The data were collected by an inventory with 11 items about demographic specifications, waiting time and the importance of physician’s sex and 40 items for assessing the level of patient satisfaction. Results: A total of 1199 patients participated in the current study, 72.1% of them were female and 19.6% waited 10-20 minutes for receiving services. About 55.72% of the participants chose high and very high for the items of the inventory. Total satisfaction with the family physician program decreased with age (p-value= 0.029).Moreover, total satisfaction did not show any significant differences in different groups in terms of sex, place of residence, education level and marital status. Also family physicians’ sex did not affect patient satisfaction significantly. Based on results of regression model, an increase in patients’ age by one year decreased their satisfaction by 0.12 and level of satisfaction in rural patients was lower than that in urban patients by 7.93. Conclusions: The level of patient satisfaction with family physician services was moderate, which mostly arose from the components of the family physician program and services such as the waiting time, costs, welfare facilities, accessibility and the service-providing team rather than patients

  7. National Student Satisfaction Report, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    USA Group Noel-Levitz, Iowa City, IA.

    This report reveals the results of the seventh annual National Student Satisfaction Study conducted by the Noel-Levitz group to determine areas of highest importance to students, the areas of greatest and least satisfaction, and the greatest performance gaps between levels of importance and levels of satisfaction. It contains data from 1,045…

  8. Geography of European Life Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Adam

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of studies analyze life satisfaction at individual and/or country level. This study contributes with analysis of life satisfaction at the (sub-national) province level across multiple countries. The purpose of this study is to call attention to spatial aspects of life satisfaction. Literature does not discuss the fact that life…

  9. The Job Satisfaction of Finnish Nursing Staff: The Development of a Job Satisfaction Scale and Survey Results

    PubMed Central

    Kvist, Tarja; Mäntynen, Raija; Partanen, Pirjo; Turunen, Hannele; Miettinen, Merja; Vehviläinen-Julkunen, Katri

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the Kuopio University Hospital Job Satisfaction Scale (KUHJSS) and the results of the survey. The scale was developed through a systematic literature review, and its validity and reliability were assessed using several psychometric properties including expert evaluation (n = 5), a pilot survey (n = 172), and exploratory factor analysis. The final version of KUHJSS included 37 items. A large sample psychometric evaluation was made by nursing staff (n = 2708). The exploratory factor analysis revealed seven factors with modest internal consistency (0.64–0.92). The staff reported relatively high job satisfaction. The greatest satisfaction was derived from motivating factors associated with the work; the least, from the job's demands. Respondents who considered their working units to provide an excellent quality of care reported the highest job satisfaction in every subarea (P < .0001). The KUHJSS proved to be a reliable and valid tool for measuring job satisfaction in hospital care. PMID:23133750

  10. Business-unit-level relationship between employee satisfaction, employee engagement, and business outcomes: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Harter, James K; Schmidt, Frank L; Hayes, Theodore L

    2002-04-01

    Based on 7,939 business units in 36 companies, this study used meta-analysis to examine the relationship at the business-unit level between employee satisfaction-engagement and the business-unit outcomes of customer satisfaction, productivity, profit, employee turnover, and accidents. Generalizable relationships large enough to have substantial practical value were found between unit-level employee satisfaction-engagement and these business-unit outcomes. One implication is that changes in management practices that increase employee satisfaction may increase business-unit outcomes, including profit. PMID:12002955

  11. Life Satisfaction of Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torgoff, Irving; And Others

    The feelings and perceptions of adolescents, apart from objective indices, warrent attention from those who are concerned with adolescent development and psychological stress. There is a need for a reliable baseline measure of adolescent subjective well-being, as manifested by self-reports of life satisfaction, to which future measurements can be…

  12. The Satisfactions of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisner, Elliot

    2006-01-01

    A noted educator reflects on six satisfactions that he experienced during his career in teaching: introducing students to great ideas, getting a foothold on immortality, improvising on the job, enjoying teaching as a meaningful aesthetic experience, sharing your love of what you teach, and knowing you made a difference in a student's life.

  13. {open_quotes}Understanding district energy customer behavior - the key to getting customers and keeping them happy{close_quotes}

    SciTech Connect

    Kattner, J.F.

    1995-09-01

    The market share achieved by district energy systems is frequently represented as a percentage of a particular country`s total energy consumption, or as a percentage of the energy used for heating and cooling. While such characterizations of district energy`s market share are valid and important from a producer`s perspective, the position of the customer is not well represented. The effectiveness of communicating market share in this way greatly depends on the district energy customers` knowledge about the local, regional and national energy markets. It also fails to take into account the differences among customer buildings and their individual energy consumption patterns. An alternative view of market share is suggested when the perspective of the district energy markets shifts from that of the producer`s to the ends user`s. End users of district energy typically are responsible for the ownership and/or the operation of a building. This includes providing energy for comfort, lighting and any processes being conducted in the building. Fundamentally, district energy customers are in the property management business. Their business operations are represented and rated with respect to the building area they manage. Frequently, several buildings are managed by one company. An extensive amount of research has been done about the behavior of consumers when making buying decisions. This includes the fact that product and service buying behavior differs. Also, the field of customer satisfaction is rich with clues on how to keep our customers happy with their decisions to use district energy. This report presents key considerations about buyer behavior and customer satisfaction as they relate to marketing in the district energy field.

  14. Customer Loyalty in Virtual Environments: An Empirical Study in e-Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Yu; Lee, Gin-Yuan; Ho, Yung-Ching

    2009-08-01

    The advent of e-commerce has increased the importance of consumer financing operations. Internet banking helps banks to develop relationship marketing, thus improve customer loyalty. This study proposes a research framework to examine the relationships among e-service quality, customer satisfaction, customer trust and e-loyalty in e-bank in Taiwan. Data are collected through a survey using a structured questionnaire. The 442 valid respondents who have experience with e-bank are analyzed by partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) method. The managerial implication is e-bank must focus on e-service quality to increase customer satisfaction and trust for obtaining the e-loyalty.

  15. Workload and the trajectory of marital satisfaction in newlyweds: job satisfaction, gender, and parental status as moderators.

    PubMed

    van Steenbergen, Elianne F; Kluwer, Esther S; Karney, Benjamin R

    2011-06-01

    Stress, on average, is bad for relationships. Yet stress at work is not always associated with negative relationship outcomes. The premise of the current study was that associations between workload and trajectories of marital satisfaction depend on circumstances that may constrain or facilitate partners' ability to negotiate their multiple roles. We hypothesized that the covariance between changes in workload and marital satisfaction over time should be moderated by (a) the extent to which spouses like their work, (b) their parental status, and (c) their gender. Analyses drawing upon eight waves of data on workload, work satisfaction, and marital satisfaction from 169 newlywed couples assessed over four years confirmed these predictions. Specifically, across couples, demands at work covaried positively with marital satisfaction for spouses who were more satisfied with their jobs. For nonparent couples, increases in husbands' workload covaried with increases in marital satisfaction for both spouses. For parent couples, however, increases in husbands' workload covaried with declines in marital satisfaction for both spouses. Unexpectedly, for parent couples, increases in wives' workload corresponded with increased marital satisfaction. Finally, consistent with predictions, wives were more affected by their husbands' workload than vice versa. Thus, tension between work and marriage is not inevitable, instead depending on circumstances that facilitate or impair performance in multiple roles. Couples, employers, and practitioners should recognize the role that external circumstances play in determining how work and marital life interact. PMID:21553965

  16. The consumer revolution arrives. Using smart customer service to attract, educate, & retain satisfied members & lower costs.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, K

    1994-06-01

    Across the country, managed care organizations pursue ways to enhance customer service and maintain member satisfaction, without breaking the bank by authorizing unnecessary services. One method gaining popularity is reducing customer demand for inappropriate services through education. Approaches include welcome-to-the-plan calls, member education, automated and in-person answer lines, and 24-hour telephone coverage. Several firms have recognized the need for such services, and offer them to HMOs on an outsourcing basis, with generally positive results. PMID:10135273

  17. The consumer revolution arrives. Using smart customer service to attract, educate & retain satisfied members & lower costs.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, K

    1994-06-01

    Across the country, managed care organizations pursue ways to enhance customer service and maintain member satisfaction, without breaking the bank by authorizing unnecessary services. One method gaining popularity is reducing customer demand for inappropriate services through education. Approaches include welcome-to-the-plan calls, member education, automated and in-person answer lines, and 24-hour telephone coverage. Several firms have recognized the need for such services, and offer them to HMOs on an outsourcing basis, with generally positive results. PMID:10144403

  18. Linking hospital security to customer service: making the case for 'world class' security.

    PubMed

    Hill, Scott A

    2011-01-01

    The reluctance of many hospitals today to invest money and resources into security and safety while at the same time promoting customer good will is a fallacy that has to be corrected, according to the author. He demonstrates how high customer satisfaction scores, as well as regulatory compliance, can only be achieved if a hospital takes the steps necessary to provide adequate safety and security to patients, visitors, physicians and to all who come to the hospital. PMID:21916286

  19. Factors associated with job and personal satisfaction in adult Brazilian intensivists

    PubMed Central

    Nassar Junior, Antonio Paulo; de Azevedo, Luciano César Pontes

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate job and personal satisfaction rates in physicians who work in adult intensive care units and to identify the factors associated with satisfaction. Methods A cross-sectional study performed with physicians who participated in two intensive medicine online discussion groups. A questionnaire designed to assess the physician's sociodemographic profile and job was available for both groups for 3 months. At the end of the questionnaire, the participants addressed their degrees of job and personal satisfaction using a Likert scale in which 1 represented "very dissatisfied" and 5 represented "very satisfied". The association between sociodemographic and job characteristics with job and personal satisfaction was evaluated. Variables independently associated with satisfaction were identified using a logistic regression model. Results The questionnaire was answered by 250 physicians, of which 137 (54.8%) declared they were satisfied with their jobs and 34 (13.5%) were very satisfied. None of the evaluated characteristics were independently associated with job satisfaction. Regarding personal satisfaction, 136 (54.4%) physicians reported being satisfied, and 48 (19.9%) reported being very satisfied. Job satisfaction (OR = 7.21; 95%CI 3.21 - 16.20) and working in a university hospital (OR = 3.24; 95%CI 1.29 - 8.15) were factors independently associated with the personal satisfaction of the participants. Conclusion The participant physicians reported job and personal satisfaction with their work in intensive care. Job satisfaction and working in a university hospital were independently associated with greater personal satisfaction. PMID:27410405

  20. Long-term patient satisfaction of gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures

    PubMed Central

    Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Gkolfakis, Paraskevas; Triantafyllou, Maria; Ndini, Xhoela; Melissaratou, Anastasia; Moustafa, Giannis-Aimant; Xanthopoulou, Eleni; Tziatzios, Georgios; Vlachonikolou, Georgia; Papadopoulos, Vasilios; Pantelakis, Evdoxos; Malli, Chrysoula; Dimitriadis, George D.

    2016-01-01

    Background We prospectively assessed patient satisfaction in a Greek Academic endoscopy facility. Methods Consecutive outpatients filled a satisfaction questionnaire right after their endoscopy (D1), 3 days (D3) and 3 months (M3) later. Overall patient satisfaction was measured by their willingness to repeat endoscopy in our facility and to further recommend it. Participant satisfaction regarding pre-procedural, procedural and post-procedural issues was measured using a five-step Likert scale in 19 items with 4 and 5 scores indicating favorable responses. Pareto analysis was used to determine service issues requiring improvement. Late adverse events were recorded at D3 and M3 assessments. Results Over six months, 501 patients participated (89.4% and 87.8% response rate at D3 and M3 assessments, respectively). More than 97% of the participants would repeat the procedure in our facility and would recommend our endoscopy service, at all three assessments. Pareto analysis identified waiting time until the appointment and on the day of the examination, discomfort during and after the endoscopy, time to obtain the pathology report and overall management of the patient problems as the issues requiring improvement. No predictor of high satisfaction score has been identified. No serious late adverse events were reported. Conclusion Despite the overall high levels of patient satisfaction, management of patient discomfort and organizational issues need improvement. PMID:27065732

  1. Impact of customer churn [or turnover] on profitability. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hamblin, D.; Ratchford, B.T.

    1998-12-01

    This report responds to a concern of a newly deregulated industry about the impact of customer churn, or turnover, on both the bottom line and staying power of incumbent utility distribution companies and new-entrant energy services providers. This research effort identifies those issues that will be of greatest importance to an energy service provider within a historical context that looks at churn impacts in other industries in the US as well as privatized electricity markets abroad. Churn and price maintenance or market power impacts on profitability are examined by looking at privatization and deregulation experiences within the context of economics. The report also looks at the marketing literature describing and modeling customer satisfaction, customer churn or retention, and price maintenance or market power.

  2. Impact of patient satisfaction ratings on physicians and clinical care

    PubMed Central

    Zgierska, Aleksandra; Rabago, David; Miller, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    Background Although patient satisfaction ratings often drive positive changes, they may have unintended consequences. Objective The study reported here aimed to evaluate the clinician-perceived effects of patient satisfaction ratings on job satisfaction and clinical care. Methods A 26-item survey, developed by a state medical society in 2012 to assess the effects of patient satisfaction surveys, was administered online to physician members of a state-level medical society. Respondents remained anonymous. Results One hundred fifty five physicians provided responses (3.9% of the estimated 4,000 physician members of the state-level medical society, or approximately 16% of the state’s emergency department [ED] physicians). The respondents were predominantly male (85%) and practicing in solo or private practice (45%), hospital (43%), or academia (15%). The majority were ED (57%), followed by primary care (16%) physicians. Fifty-nine percent reported that their compensation was linked to patient satisfaction ratings. Seventy-eight percent reported that patient satisfaction surveys moderately or severely affected their job satisfaction; 28% had considered quitting their job or leaving the medical profession. Twenty percent reported their employment being threatened because of patient satisfaction data. Almost half believed that pressure to obtain better scores promoted inappropriate care, including unnecessary antibiotic and opioid prescriptions, tests, procedures, and hospital admissions. Among 52 qualitative responses, only three were positive. Conclusion These pilot-level data suggest that patient satisfaction survey utilization may promote, under certain circumstances, job dissatisfaction, attrition, and inappropriate clinical care among some physicians. This is concerning, especially in the context of the progressive incorporation of patient satisfaction ratings as a quality-of-care metric, and highlights the need for a rigorous evaluation of the optimal methods

  3. Readiness Scores as Indicators of Online Faculty Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLawhon, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationships between online readiness scores and online faculty job satisfaction. Online readiness was assessed using the Readiness for Education At a Distance Indicator (READI) assessment. The READI assessment tool incorporated the independent variables of learning preference, technical competency,…

  4. Emotion Analysis of Telephone Complaints from Customer Based on Affective Computing

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Shuangping; Dai, Yonghui; Ji, Jun; Wang, Jinzhao; Sun, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Customer complaint has been the important feedback for modern enterprises to improve their product and service quality as well as the customer's loyalty. As one of the commonly used manners in customer complaint, telephone communication carries rich emotional information of speeches, which provides valuable resources for perceiving the customer's satisfaction and studying the complaint handling skills. This paper studies the characteristics of telephone complaint speeches and proposes an analysis method based on affective computing technology, which can recognize the dynamic changes of customer emotions from the conversations between the service staff and the customer. The recognition process includes speaker recognition, emotional feature parameter extraction, and dynamic emotion recognition. Experimental results show that this method is effective and can reach high recognition rates of happy and angry states. It has been successfully applied to the operation quality and service administration in telecom and Internet service company. PMID:26633967

  5. Emotion Analysis of Telephone Complaints from Customer Based on Affective Computing.

    PubMed

    Gong, Shuangping; Dai, Yonghui; Ji, Jun; Wang, Jinzhao; Sun, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Customer complaint has been the important feedback for modern enterprises to improve their product and service quality as well as the customer's loyalty. As one of the commonly used manners in customer complaint, telephone communication carries rich emotional information of speeches, which provides valuable resources for perceiving the customer's satisfaction and studying the complaint handling skills. This paper studies the characteristics of telephone complaint speeches and proposes an analysis method based on affective computing technology, which can recognize the dynamic changes of customer emotions from the conversations between the service staff and the customer. The recognition process includes speaker recognition, emotional feature parameter extraction, and dynamic emotion recognition. Experimental results show that this method is effective and can reach high recognition rates of happy and angry states. It has been successfully applied to the operation quality and service administration in telecom and Internet service company. PMID:26633967

  6. Innovative Product Design Based on Comprehensive Customer Requirements of Different Cognitive Levels

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wu; Zheng, Yake; Wang, Rui; Wang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    To improve customer satisfaction in innovative product design, a topology structure of customer requirements is established and an innovative product approach is proposed. The topology structure provides designers with reasonable guidance to capture the customer requirements comprehensively. With the aid of analytic hierarchy process (AHP), the importance of the customer requirements is evaluated. Quality function deployment (QFD) is used to translate customer requirements into product and process design demands and pick out the technical requirements which need urgent improvement. In this way, the product is developed in a more targeted way to satisfy the customers. the theory of innovative problems solving (TRIZ) is used to help designers to produce innovative solutions. Finally, a case study of automobile steering system is used to illustrate the application of the proposed approach. PMID:25013862

  7. Innovative product design based on comprehensive customer requirements of different cognitive levels.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolong; Zhao, Wu; Zheng, Yake; Wang, Rui; Wang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    To improve customer satisfaction in innovative product design, a topology structure of customer requirements is established and an innovative product approach is proposed. The topology structure provides designers with reasonable guidance to capture the customer requirements comprehensively. With the aid of analytic hierarchy process (AHP), the importance of the customer requirements is evaluated. Quality function deployment (QFD) is used to translate customer requirements into product and process design demands and pick out the technical requirements which need urgent improvement. In this way, the product is developed in a more targeted way to satisfy the customers. the theory of innovative problems solving (TRIZ) is used to help designers to produce innovative solutions. Finally, a case study of automobile steering system is used to illustrate the application of the proposed approach. PMID:25013862

  8. Organizational Culture and Physician Satisfaction with Dimensions of Group Practice

    PubMed Central

    Zazzali, James L; Alexander, Jeffrey A; Shortell, Stephen M; Burns, Lawton R

    2007-01-01

    Research Objective To assess the extent to which the organizational culture of physician group practices is associated with individual physician satisfaction with the managerial and organizational capabilities of the groups. Study Design and Methods Physician surveys from 1997 to 1998 assessing the culture of their medical groups and their satisfaction with six aspects of group practice. Organizational culture was conceptualized using the Competing Values framework, yielding four distinct cultural types. Physician-level data were aggregated to the group level to attain measures of organizational culture. Using hierarchical linear modeling, individual physician satisfaction with six dimensions of group practice was predicted using physician-level variables and group-level variables. Separate models for each of the four cultural types were estimated for each of the six satisfaction measures, yielding a total of 24 models. Sample Studied Fifty-two medical groups affiliated with 12 integrated health systems from across the U.S., involving 1,593 physician respondents (38.3 percent response rate). Larger medical groups and multispecialty groups were over-represented compared with the U.S. as a whole. Principal Findings Our models explain up to 31 percent of the variance in individual physician satisfaction with group practice, with individual organizational culture scales explaining up to 5 percent of the variance. Group-level predictors: group (i.e., participatory) culture was positively associated with satisfaction with staff and human resources, technological sophistication, and price competition. Hierarchical (i.e., bureaucratic) culture was negatively associated with satisfaction with managerial decision making, practice level competitiveness, price competition, and financial capabilities. Rational (i.e., task-oriented) culture was negatively associated with satisfaction with staff and human resources, and price competition. Developmental (i.e., risk-taking) culture

  9. Chippewa Customs. Reprint Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Densmore, Frances

    Using information obtained between 1907 and 1925 from members of the Chippewa tribe, the Bureau of American Ethnology, and the United States National Museum, the book describes various Chippewa customs. Information, collected on six reservations in Minnesota and Wisconsin and the Manitou Rapids Reserve in Ontario, Canada, is provided concerning…

  10. Customer requirements process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Yvonne; Falsetti, Christine M.

    1991-01-01

    Customer requirements are presented through three viewgraphs. One graph presents the range of services, which include requirements management, network engineering, operations, and applications support. Another viewgraph presents the project planning process. The third viewgraph presents the programs and/or projects actively supported including life sciences, earth science and applications, solar system exploration, shuttle flight engineering, microgravity science, space physics, and astrophysics.

  11. Custom uniform source system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balcom, John L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose and scope of this final report is to provide information on the Custom Uniform Source System (CSTM-USS-4000). The report includes documentation and summaries of the results for the work performed under the contract. The Annex contain laboratory test findings, photographs, and drawings of the sphere system.

  12. Customer Service in Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogliore, Judy

    1997-01-01

    Examines how the child support enforcement program in Alaska has responded to the challenges of distance, weather, and cultural differences through training representatives, making waiting areas more comfortable, conducting random customer evaluation of services, establishing travel hubs in regional offices and meeting with community leaders and…

  13. Customized hazard maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Finding out about the historic occurrence of six different types of natural hazards in any region in the United States recently became a little easier.A Project Impact initiative of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and ESRI—a leading provider of Geographic Information System (GIS) software and a Project Impact partner—offers the public customized online hazard maps.

  14. Chinese Festivals and Customs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Sandra Aili

    Traditional festivals and customs of the Chinese people are described in this publication which can be used with secondary level students. In the margins of the text are numbers which indicate slides and cultural objects that relate to the text. The text, however, can be used without the slides and objects. The following festivals are described:…

  15. Students as Customers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuthbert, Rob

    2010-01-01

    The idea that students might be treated as customers triggers academics' antipathy, which in turn can lead to managerial irritation and political frustration. There are different discourses which barely overlap as their protagonists speak past one another. This article argues that these differences can be reconciled by re-conceiving the…

  16. Family Customs and Traditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGregor, Cynthia

    Recognizing the importance of maintaining open communication with immediate and extended family members, this book provides a compilation of ideas for family traditions and customs that are grounded in compassion and human kindness. The traditions were gathered from families in the United States and Canada who responded to advertisements in…

  17. The development and validation of the Incivility from Customers Scale.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Nicole L; Holmvall, Camilla M

    2013-07-01

    Scant research has examined customers as sources of workplace incivility, despite evidence suggesting that mistreatment is more common from organizational outsiders, including customers, than from organizational members (Grandey, Kern, & Frone, 2007; Schat & Kelloway, 2005). As an important step in extending the literature on customer incivility, we conducted two studies to develop and validate a measure of this construct. Study 1 used focus groups of retail and restaurant employees (n = 30) to elicit a list of uncivil customer behaviors, based on which we wrote initial scale items. Study 2 used a correlational survey design (n = 439) to pare down the number of scale items to 10 and to garner reliability and validity evidence for the scale. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses show that the scale is unidimensional and distinguishable from measures of the related, but distinct, constructs of interpersonal justice and psychological aggression from customers. Reliability analyses show that the scale is internally consistent. Significant correlations between the scale and individuals' job satisfaction, turnover intentions, and general and job-specific psychological strain provide evidence of criterion-related validity. Hierarchical regression analyses show that the scale significantly predicts three of four organizational and personal strain outcomes over and above a workplace incivility measure adapted for customer incivility, providing some evidence of incremental validity. Limitations and future research directions are discussed. PMID:23834446

  18. Smart customers, dumb companies.

    PubMed

    Locke, C

    2000-01-01

    Customers today are being bombarded with an overwhelming array of choices. To alleviate customer frustration, say Steven Cristol and Peter Sealey in Simplicity Marketing, companies should stop creating new brands and product extensions. Better to consolidate product and service functions by following a four R approach: replace, repackage, reposition, and replenish. That's an outmoded, dictatorial view of markets, says Christopher Locke. Far from being stymied by choices, customers are rapidly becoming smarter than the companies that pretend to serve them. In this networked economy, people are talking among themselves, and that changes everything. Locke predicts we'll see a growing number of well-defined micromarkets--groups of customers converging in real time around entertaining and knowledgeable voices--such as NPR's car guys and the Motley Fool investment site. "Micromedia" Web sites will replace traditional advertising because they'll provide credible user-supplied news about products and services. Locke contends that an open exchange of information solves the "problem" of choice much better than manipulative strategies like simplicity or even permission marketing. Companies can participate in micromarkets through what Locke dubs "gonzo marketing." If Ford, for example, discovers that a subset of its employees are organic gardeners, it may offer support to a big independent organic-gardening Web site with donations and employee volunteers. This marketing effort would be driven not by advertising managers but by people with genuine interest in each micromarket, so it would have credibility with customers. With gonzo marketing, both companies and their markets will benefit. PMID:11184973

  19. A Study To Determine the Job Satisfaction of the Engineering/Industrial Technology Faculty at Delgado Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterlee, Brian

    A study assessed job satisfaction among Engineering/Industrial Technology faculty at Delgado Community College (New Orleans, Louisiana). A secondary purpose was to confirm Herzberg's Two-Factor Theory of Job Satisfaction (1966) that workers derived satisfaction from the work itself and that causes of dissatisfaction stemmed from conditions…

  20. An Exploratory Qualitative Assessment of Self-Reported Treatment Outcomes and Satisfaction Among Patients Accessing an Innovative Voluntary Drug Treatment Centre in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Ghani, Mansur A.; Brown, Shan-Estelle; Khan, Farrah; Wickersham, Jeffrey A.; Lim, Sin How; Dhaliwal, Sangeeth K.; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L.

    2014-01-01

    Background In Malaysia, compulsory drug detention centres (CDDCs) hold suspected drug users for two years without adjudication. Acute detoxification without healthcare access has been documented. CDDCs are criticized globally due to ineffectiveness in treating addiction and human rights violations. In response, the Malaysian government began transitioning these facilities into voluntary drug treatment centres known as “Cure and Care” (C&C) centres that embrace a holistic treatment-based approach to drug addiction rehabilitation. Methods An explorative qualitative study was undertaken to explore patient perspectives and satisfaction regarding treatment and services at the new Cure and Care centre in Kota Bharu, Malaysia. A convenience sample of 20 patients was recruited to participate in semi-structured in-depth interviews. Content analysis approach was used to identify the salient themes. Results Patients identified methadone treatment, psychosocial programs, religious instruction, and recreational activities as important factors contributing to treatment success for addressing both health and addiction needs. Though many had previously been in a CDDC, adherence to treatment in the C&C centre was perceived to be facilitated by the degree of social support, the voluntary nature and the array of new programs available for selection. Conclusion C&Cs represents a dramatic shift in the Malaysian government’s approach to drug addiction. Our findings demonstrate positive patient experiences associated with the holistic treatment-based approach of these centres. This exploratory study provides additional evidence to document this ongoing policy transition and may guide continued expansion of new holistic drug treatment programs across the country. PMID:25577322