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Sample records for cvd facility technical

  1. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Technical Safety Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    KRAHN, D.E.

    2000-08-08

    The Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility define acceptable conditions, safe boundaries, bases thereof, and management or administrative controls required to ensure safe operation during receipt of multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) containing spent nuclear fuel. removal of free water from the MCOs using the cold vacuum drying process, and inerting and testing of the MCOs before transport to the Canister Storage Building. Controls required for public safety, significant defense in depth, significant worker safety, and for maintaining radiological and toxicological consequences below risk evaluation guidelines are included.

  2. CVD facility electrical system captor/dapper study

    SciTech Connect

    SINGH, G.

    1999-10-28

    Project W-441, CVD Facility Electrical System CAPTOWDAPPER Study validates Meier's hand calculations. This study includes Load flow, short circuit, voltage drop, protective device coordination, and transient motor starting (TMS) analyses.

  3. Facility for continuous CVD coating of ceramic fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Arthur W.

    1992-01-01

    An inductively heated CVD furnace of pilot-plant scale, whose hot zone is 150 mm in diameter x 300 mm in length, has been adapted for continuous coating of ceramic yarns. Coatings at very low pressures are possible in this facility due to the fact that the entire apparatus, including yarn feeding and collecting equipment, is under vacuum. SiC yarn has been coated with 0.1-0.2 microns of BN at yarn speeds of 60 cm/min; a 500-m spool; was coated in about 14 hrs. Coating capacity was tripled by adding pulleys to allow three yarn passes through the furnace.

  4. Engineering directorate technical facilities catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloy, Joseph E.

    1993-01-01

    The Engineering Directorate Technical Facilities Catalog is designed to provide an overview of the technical facilities available within the Engineering Directorate at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas. The combined capabilities of these engineering facilities are essential elements of overall JSC capabilities required to manage and perform major NASA engineering programs. The facilities are grouped in the text by chapter according to the JSC division responsible for operation of the facility. This catalog updates the facility descriptions for the JSC Engineering Directorate Technical Facilities Catalog, JSC 19295 (August 1989), and supersedes the Engineering Directorate, Principle test and Development Facilities, JSC, 19962 (November 1984).

  5. Cold Vacuum Dryer (CVD) Facility Fire Protection System Design Description (SYS 24)

    SciTech Connect

    SINGH, G.

    2000-10-17

    This system design description (SDD) addresses the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility fire protection system (FPS). The primary features of the FPS for the CVD are a fire alarm and detection system, automatic sprinklers, and fire hydrants. The FPS also includes fire extinguishers located throughout the facility and fire hydrants to assist in manual firefighting efforts. In addition, a fire barrier separates the operations support (administrative) area from the process bays and process bay support areas. Administrative controls to limit combustible materials have been established and are a part of the overall fire protection program. The FPS is augmented by assistance from the Hanford Fire Department (HED) and by interface systems including service water, electrical power, drains, instrumentation and controls. This SDD, when used in conjunction with the other elements of the definitive design package, provides a complete picture of the FPS for the CVD Facility.

  6. Consolidated incineration facility technical support

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, D.; Looper, M.G.

    1993-12-31

    In 1996, the Savannah River Site plans to begin operation of the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) to treat solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) leads an extensive technical support program designed to obtain incinerator and air pollution control equipment performance data to support facility start-up and operation. Key components of this technical support program include recently completed waste burn tests at both EPA`s Incineration Research Facility and at Energy and Environmental Research Corporation`s Solid Waste Incineration Test Facility. The main objectives for these tests were determining the fate of heavy metals, measuring organics destruction and removal efficiencies, and quantifying incinerator offgas particulate loading and size distribution as a function of waste feed characteristics and incineration conditions. In addition to these waste burning tests, the SRTC has recently completed installations of the Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF), a 1/10 scale CIF offgas system pilot plant. This pilot facility will be used to demonstrate system operability and maintainability, evaluate and optimize equipment and instrument performance, and provide direct CIF start-up support. Technical support programs of this type are needed to resolve technical issues related with treatment and disposal of combustible hazardous, mixed, and low-level radioactive waste. Implementation of this program will minimize facility start-up problems and help insure compliance with all facility performance requirements.

  7. CVD Diamond Detector Stability Issues for Operation at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, G J; Koch, J A; Moran, M J; Lerche, R A; Izumi, N; Phillips, T W; Glebov, V Y; Sangster, T C; Stoeckl, C

    2003-08-22

    Synthetic diamond crystals produced by the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) technique can serve as fast, radiation hard, neutron sensors for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Here we explore the stability issues, such as charge trapping and high-flux saturation, that will be relevant to operation at the NIF.

  8. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Diesel Generator Fire Protection

    SciTech Connect

    SINGH, G.

    2000-04-25

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the Fire Protection and Detection System installed by Project W-441 (Cold Vacuum Drying Facility and Diesel Generator Building) functions as required by project specifications.

  9. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Hazards Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect

    CROWE, R.D.

    2000-08-07

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Hazard Analysis to support the CVDF Final Safety Analysis Report and documents the results. The hazard analysis was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports,'' and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, ''Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.''

  10. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation

    SciTech Connect

    PIEPHO, M.G.

    1999-10-20

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Annex B, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, ''Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR).'' All assumptions, parameters and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the FSAR.

  11. Fire Hazard Analysis for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, B.H.

    1999-08-19

    This Fire Hazard Analysis assesses the risk from fire within individual fire areas in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility at the Hanford Site in relation to existing or proposed fire protection features to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE Order 5480.7A Fire Protection are met.

  12. Cold Vacuum Dryer (CVD) Facility Security System Design Description (SYS 54)

    SciTech Connect

    WHITEHURST, R.

    2000-09-11

    This system design description (SDD) addresses the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility security system. The system's primary purpose is to provide reasonable assurance that breaches of security boundaries are detected and assessment information is provided to protective force personnel. In addition, the system is utilized by Operations to support reduced personnel radiation goals and to provide reasonable assurance that only authorized personnel are allowed to enter designated security areas.

  13. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect

    IRWIN, J.J.

    2000-02-03

    This document provides the Operations Manual for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The Manual was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of the Processing Systems (Garvin 1998) and, the HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1997, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, Rev. 3a. The Operations Manual contains general descriptions of all the process, safety and facility systems in the CVDF, a general CVD operations sequence, and has been developed for the spent nuclear fuel project (SNFP) Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

  14. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-07-02

    This document provides the Operations Manual for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The Manual was developed in conjunction with HNF-553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report Annex B--Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1999, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, Rev. 4, and the CVDF Final Design Report. The Operations Manual contains general descriptions of all the process, safety and facility systems in the CVDF, a general CVD operations sequence and references to the CVDF System Design Descriptions (SDDs). This manual has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

  15. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility General Service Helium System Design Description

    SciTech Connect

    SHAPLEY, B.J.

    2000-04-20

    The purpose of this System Design Description (SDD) is to describe the characteristics of the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility general service helium system. The general service helium system is a general service facility process support system, but does include safety-class structures, systems and components (SSCs) providing protection to the offsite public. The general service helium system also performs safety-significant functions that provide protection to onsite workers. The general helium system essential function is to provide helium (He) to support process functions during all phases of facility operations. General service helium is used to purge the cask and the MCO in order to maintain their internal atmospheres below hydrogen flammability concentrations. The general service helium system also supplies helium to purge the process water conditioning (PWC) lines and components and the vacuum purge system (VPS) vacuum pump. The general service helium system, if available following an Safety Class Instrument and Control System (SCIC) Isolation and Purge (IS0 and PURGE) Trip, can provide an alternate general service helium system source to supply the Safety-Class Helium (SCHe) System.

  16. Fire Hazard Analysis for the Cold Vacuum Drying facility (CVD) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    SINGH, G.

    2000-09-06

    The CVDF is a nonreactor nuclear facility that will process the Spent Nuclear Fuels (SNF) presently stored in the 105-KE and 105-KW SNF storage basins. Multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) will be loaded (filled) with K Basin fuel transported to the CVDF. The MCOs will be processed at the CVDF to remove free water from the fuel cells (packages). Following processing at the CVDF, the MCOs will be transported to the CSB for interim storage until a long-term storage solution can be implemented. This operation is expected to start in November 2000. A Fire Hazard Analysis (FHA) is required for all new facilities and all nonreactor nuclear facilities, in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.7A, Fire Protection. This FHA has been prepared in accordance with DOE 5480.7A and HNF-PRO-350, Fire Hazard Analysis Requirements. Additionally, requirements or criteria contained in DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) RL Implementing Directive (RLID) 5480.7, Fire Protection, or other DOE documentation are cited, as applicable. This FHA comprehensively assesses the risk of fire at the CVDF to ascertain whether the specific objectives of DOE 5480.7A are met. These specific fire protection objectives are: (1) Minimize the potential for the occurrence of a fire. (2) Ensure that fire does not cause an onsite or offsite release of radiological and other hazardous material that will threaten the public health and safety or the environment. (3) Establish requirements that will provide an acceptable degree of life safety to DOE and contractor personnel and ensure that there are no undue hazards to the public from fire and its effects in DOE facilities. (4) Ensure that vital DOE programs will not suffer unacceptable delays as a result of fire and related perils. (5) Ensure that property damage from fire and related perils does not exceed an acceptable level. (6) Ensure that process control and safety systems are not damaged by fire or related perils. This FHA is based on the

  17. High Exposure Facility Technical Description

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, Gregory L.; Stithem, Arthur R.; Murphy, Mark K.; Smith, Alex K.

    2008-02-12

    The High Exposure Facility is a collimated high-level gamma irradiator that is located in the basement of the 318 building. It was custom developed by PNNL back in 1982 to meet the needs for high range radiological instrument calibrations and dosimeter irradiations. At the time no commercially available product existed that could create exposure rates up to 20,000 R/h. This document is intended to pass on the design criteria that was employed to create this unique facility, while maintaining compliance with ANSI N543-1974, "General Safety Standard for Installations Using Non-Medical X-Ray and Sealed Gamma-Ray Sources, Energies up to 10 MeV."

  18. A facile process for soak-and-peel delamination of CVD graphene from substrates using water

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Priti; Dongare, Pratiksha D.; Grover, Sameer; Dubey, Sudipta; Mamgain, Hitesh; Bhattacharya, Arnab; Deshmukh, Mandar M.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple technique to transfer chemical vapour deposited (CVD) graphene from copper and platinum substrates using a soak-and-peel delamination technique utilizing only hot deionized water. The lack of chemical etchants results in cleaner CVD graphene films minimizing unintentional doping, as confirmed by Raman and electrical measurements. The process allows the reuse of substrates and hence can enable the use of oriented substrates for growth of higher quality graphene, and is an inherently inexpensive and scalable process for large-area production. PMID:24457558

  19. A facile process for soak-and-peel delamination of CVD graphene from substrates using water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Priti; Dongare, Pratiksha D.; Grover, Sameer; Dubey, Sudipta; Mamgain, Hitesh; Bhattacharya, Arnab; Deshmukh, Mandar M.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple technique to transfer chemical vapour deposited (CVD) graphene from copper and platinum substrates using a soak-and-peel delamination technique utilizing only hot deionized water. The lack of chemical etchants results in cleaner CVD graphene films minimizing unintentional doping, as confirmed by Raman and electrical measurements. The process allows the reuse of substrates and hence can enable the use of oriented substrates for growth of higher quality graphene, and is an inherently inexpensive and scalable process for large-area production.

  20. Technical bases DWPF Late Washing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, D.L.; Landon, L.F.

    1992-08-10

    A task force recommended that the technical feasibility of a Late Wash' facility be assessed [1]. In this facility, each batch of tetraphenylborate slurry from Tank 49 would be given a final wash to reduce the concentrations of nitrite and radiolysis products to acceptable levels. Laboratory-scale studies have demonstrated that d the nitrite content of the slurry fed to DWPF is reduced to 0.01 M or less (and at least a 4X reduction in concentration of the soluble species is attained), (1) the need for HAN during hydrolysis is eliminated (eliminating the production of ammonium ion during hydrolysis), (2) hydrolysis may be done with a catalyst concentration that will not exceed the copper solubility in glass and (3) the non-polar organic production during hydrolysis is significantly reduced. The first phase of an aggressive research and development program has been completed and all test results obtained to date support the technical feasibility of Late Washing. Paralleling this research and development effort is an aggressive design study directed by DWPF to scope and cost retrofitting the Auxiliary Pump Pit (APP) to enable performing a final wash of each batch of precipitate slurry before R is transferred into the DWPF Soft Processing Cell (SPC). An initial technical bases for the Late Wash Facility was transmitted to DWPF on June 15, 1992. Research and development activities are continuing directed principally at optimization of the cross-f low fitter decontamination methodology and pilot-scale validation of the recommended benzene stripping metodology.

  1. Technical Facilities Management, Loan Pool, and Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    My work at JPL for the SURF program began on June 11, 2012 with the Technical Facilities Management group (TFM). As well as TFM, I worked with Loan Pool and Metrology to help them out with various tasks. Unlike a lot of other interns, I did not have a specific project rather many different tasks to be completed over the course of the 10 weeks.The first task to be completed was to sort through old certification reports in 6 different boxes to locate reports that needed to be archived into a digital database. There were no reports within these boxes that needed to be archived but rather were to be shredded. The reports went back to the early 1980's and up to the early 2000's. I was looking for reports dated from 2002 to 2012

  2. CVD for the facile synthesis of hybrid nanobiomaterials integrating functional supramolecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Gautam; Rathod, Shailendra B; Staggs, Kyle W; Ista, Linnea K; Abbou Oucherif, Kaoutar; Atanassov, Plamen B; Tartis, Michaelann S; Montaño, Gabriel A; López, Gabriel P

    2009-12-01

    In this letter, we present a simple one-step, versatile, scalable chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-based process for the encapsulation and stabilization of a host of single or multicomponent supramolecular assemblies (proteoliposomes, microbubbles, lipid bilayers, and photosynthetic antennae complexes and other biological materials) to form functional hybrid nanobiomaterials. In each case, it is possible (i) to form thin silica layers or gels controllably that enable the preservation of the supramolecular assembly over time and under adverse environmental conditions and (ii) to tune the structure of the silica gels so as to optimize solute accessibility while at the same time preserving functional dynamic properties of the encapsulated phospholipid assembly. The process allows precise temporal and spatial control of silica polymerization kinetics through the control of precursor delivery at room temperature and does not require or produce high concentrations of injurious chemicals that can compromise the function of biomolecular assemblies; it also does not require additives. This process differs from the conventional sol-gel process in that it does not involve the use of cosolvents (alcohols) and catalysts (acid or base). PMID:19883092

  3. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility General Service Helium System Design Description

    SciTech Connect

    FARWICK, C.C.

    1999-07-06

    This document describes the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility general service helium system (GSHe). The GSHe is a general service facility process support system, but does include safety-class systems, structures and components providing protection to the offsite public. The GSHe also performs safety-significant functions that provide protection to onsite workers. The GSHe essential function is to provide helium to support process functions during all phases of facility operations. GSHe helium is used to purge the cask and the MCO in order to maintain their internal atmospheres below hydrogen flammability concentrations. The GSHe also supplies helium to purge the PWC lines and components and the VPS vacuum pump.

  4. Criticality Safety Evaluation Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facilities Process Water Handling System

    SciTech Connect

    KESSLER, S.F.

    2000-08-10

    This report addresses the criticality concerns associated with process water handling in the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. The controls and limitations on equipment design and operations to control potential criticality occurrences are identified.

  5. Technical Assistance for Arts Facilities: A Sourcebook. A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Facilities Labs., Inc., New York, NY.

    This booklet is a directory of sources of technical assistance on problems relating to physical facilities for arts organizations. Wherever possible, agencies and organizations are described in their own words. Technical assistance in the area of physical facilities encompasses planning, financing, acquiring, renovating, designing, and maintaining…

  6. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Safety Class Instrumentation & Control System Design Description

    SciTech Connect

    WHITEHURST, R.

    1999-12-01

    This document describes the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Safety Class Instrumentation and Control system (SCIC). The SCIC provides safety functions and features to protect the environment, off-site and on-site personnel and equipment. The function of the SCIC is to provide automatic trip features, valve interlocks, alarms, indication and control for the cold vacuum drying process.

  7. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Master Equipment List

    SciTech Connect

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-09-21

    This document provides the master equipment list (MEL) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The MEL was prepared to comply with DOE Standard 3024-98, Content of System Design Descriptions. The MEL was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems and the CVDF System Design Descriptions (SDD). The MEL identifies the SSCs and their safety functions, the design criteria, codes and standards, and quality assurance requirements that are required for establishing the safety design basis of the SSCs. The MEL also includes operating parameters, manufacturer information, and references the procurement specifications for the SSCs. This MEL shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future phases of the CVDF SAR, the SDD's, and CVDF operations.

  8. Using X-Rays to Test CVD Diamond Detectors for Areal Density Measurement at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dauffy, L S; Koch, J A; Tommasini, R; Izumi, N

    2008-05-06

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), 192 laser beams will compress a target containing a mixture of deuterium and tritium (DT) that will release fusion neutrons, photons, and other radiation. Diagnostics are being designed to measure this emitted radiation to infer crucial parameters of an ignition shot. Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) diamond is one of the ignition diagnostics that will be used as a neutron time-of-flight detector for measuring primary (14.1 MeV) neutron yield, ion temperature, and plasma areal density. This last quantity is the subject of this study and is inferred from the number of downscattered neutrons arriving late in time, divided by the number of primary neutrons. We determine in this study the accuracy with which this detector can measure areal density, when the limiting factor is detector and electronics saturation. We used laser-produced x-rays to reproduce NIF signals in terms of charge carriers density, time between pulses, and amplitude contrast and found that the effect of the large pulse on the small pulse is at most 8.4%, which is less than the NIF accuracy requirement of {+-} 10%.

  9. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect

    IRWIN, J.J.

    2000-11-18

    The mission of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) is to achieve the earliest possible removal of free water from Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCOs). The MCOs contain metallic uranium SNF that have been removed from the 100K Area fuel storage water basins (i.e., the K East and K West Basins) at the US. Department of Energy Hanford Site in Southeastern Washington state. Removal of free water is necessary to halt water-induced corrosion of exposed uranium surfaces and to allow the MCOs and their SNF payloads to be safely transported to the Hanford Site 200 East Area and stored within the SNF Project Canister Storage Building (CSB). The CVDF is located within a few hundred yards of the basins, southwest of the 165KW Power Control Building and the 105KW Reactor Building. The site area required for the facility and vehicle circulation is approximately 2 acres. Access and egress is provided by the main entrance to the 100K inner area using existing roadways. The CVDF will remove free. water from the MCOs to reduce the potential for continued fuel-water corrosion reactions. The cold vacuum drying process involves the draining of bulk water from the MCO and subsequent vacuum drying. The MCO will be evacuated to a pressure of 8 torr or less and backfilled with an inert gas (helium). The MCO will be sealed, leak tested, and then transported to the CSB within a sealed shipping cask. (The MCO remains within the same shipping Cask from the time it enters the basin to receive its SNF payload until it is removed from the Cask by the CSB MCO handling machine.) The CVDF subproject acquired the required process systems, supporting equipment, and facilities. The cold vacuum drying operations result in an MCO containing dried fuel that is prepared for shipment to the CSB by the Cask transportation system. The CVDF subproject also provides equipment to dispose of solid wastes generated by the cold vacuum drying process and transfer process water removed

  10. Facile synthesis of graphene on dielectric surfaces using a two-temperature reactor CVD system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Man, B. Y.; Yang, C.; Jiang, S. Z.; Liu, M.; Chen, C. S.; Xu, S. C.; Sun, Z. C.; Gao, X. G.; Chen, X. J.

    2013-10-01

    Direct deposition of graphene on a dielectric substrate is demonstrated using a chemical vapor deposition system with a two-temperature reactor. The two-temperature reactor is utilized to offer sufficient, well-proportioned floating Cu atoms and to provide a temperature gradient for facile synthesis of graphene on dielectric surfaces. The evaporated Cu atoms catalyze the reaction in the presented method. C atoms and Cu atoms respectively act as the nuclei for forming graphene film in the low-temperature zone and the zones close to the high-temperature zones. A uniform and high-quality graphene film is formed in an atmosphere of sufficient and well-proportioned floating Cu atoms. Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy confirm the presence of uniform and high-quality graphene.

  11. Technical Design of Hadron Therapy Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    Radiation therapy with hadron beams now has a 40-year track record at many accelerator laboratories around the world, essentially all of these originally physics-research oriented. The great promise shown for treating cancer has led the medical community to seek dedicated accelerator facilities in a hospital setting, where more rapid progress can be made in clinical research. This paper will discuss accelerator and beam characteristics relevant to hadron therapy, particularly as applied to hospital-based facilities. A survey of currently-operating and planned hadron therapy facilities will be given, with particular emphasis on Lorna Linda (the first dedicated proton facility in a hospital) and HIMAC (the first dedicated heavy-ion medical facility).

  12. Technical design of hadron therapy facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Alonso, J.R.

    1993-08-01

    Radiation therapy with hadron beams now has a 40-year track record at many accelerator laboratories around the world, essentially all of these originally physics-research oriented. The great promise shown for treating cancer has led the medical community to seek dedicated accelerator facilities in a hospital setting, where more rapid progress can be made in clinical research. This paper will discuss accelerator and beam characteristics relevant to hadron therapy, particularly as applied to hospital-based facilities. A survey of currently-operating and planned hadron therapy facilities will be given, with particular emphasis on Loma Linda (the first dedicated proton facility in a hospital) and HIMAC (the first dedicated heavy-ion medical facility).

  13. Innovative Planning Techniques for Vocational-Technical Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midjaas, Carl L.

    A suggested approach, termed value analysis, to studying the cost effectiveness of alternative plans for vocational-technical facilities presents a series of cost diagrams and decision matrices, with explication. The diagrammed steps are: (1) Value-Analysis Cost Schedule, representing a hypothetical facility being planned and showing estimated…

  14. Ramjet engine test facility (RJTF). Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-01

    The National Aerospace Laboratory of Japan constructed a ramjet engine test facility (RJTF) at the Kakuda Research Center in 1994. It can duplicate engine test conditions in the range of flight Mach numbers from 4 to 8. The facility can supply non-vitiated air for M4 and M6 to identify the contamination effect in the vitiated air, to provide the basis for evaluating engine performance in the M8 flight condition. This paper outlines the unique features and operating characteristics of the RJTF. The quality of air stream obtained during facility calibration, and the facility-engine interaction are described. Finally the authors review tests of an H2-fueled scramjet that are currently underway.

  15. F/H effluent treatment facility. Technical data summary

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, J P; Stimson, R E

    1984-12-01

    This document provides the technical basis for the design of the facility. Some of the sections are described with options to permit simplification of the process, depending on the effluent quality criteria that the facility will have to meet. Each part of the F/HETF process is reviewed with respect to decontamination and concentration efficiency, operability, additional waste generation, energy efficiency, and compatability with the rest of the process.

  16. 129. Back side technical facilities passageways between turnaround trans. & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    129. Back side technical facilities passageways between turnaround trans. & building no. 104, "plans, sections & elevations" - architectural, AS-BLT AW 36-25-13, sheet 9 of 40, dated 23 November, 1960. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  17. 123. Back side technical facilities passageways, "key plan" architectural, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    123. Back side technical facilities passageways, "key plan" - architectural, AS-BLT AW 36-25-13, sheet 1 of 40, dated 23 November, 1960. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  18. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities May 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Laycak, D. T.

    2014-04-16

    This document contains the Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Building 693 (B693) Yard Area of the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) at LLNL. The TSRs constitute requirements for safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analyses for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2011). The analysis presented therein concluded that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts of waste from other DOE facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities.

  19. Technical viability and development needs for waste forms and facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Pegg, I.; Gould, T.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this breakout session was to provide a forum to discuss technical issues relating to plutonium-bearing waste forms and their disposal facilities. Specific topics for discussion included the technical viability and development needs associated with the waste forms and/or disposal facilities. The expected end result of the session was an in-depth (so far as the limited time would allow) discussion of key issues by the session participants. The session chairs expressed allowance for, and encouragement of, alternative points of view, as well as encouragement for discussion of any relevant topics not addressed in the paper presentations. It was not the intent of this session to recommend or advocate any one technology over another.

  20. Plasma-assisted CVD of fluorinated, hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Final technical report, September 15, 1979-September 15, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, J. H.; Hammes, J. P.; Wiesmann, H. J.

    1980-01-01

    During the past year, approximately 300 large-area (400 cm/sup 2/) PIN hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells were fabricated and tested. a-Si:H PIN cells which were plasma deposited at 200/sup 0/ to 350/sup 0/ were found to have high internal currents (13mA/cm/sup 2/), whereas those which were deposited by CVD at 500/sup 0/ to 650/sup 0/C had low internal currents. When corrected for optical losses in the top electrode, the internal quantum efficiency vs wavelength for the PIN cells indicated a peak value above 80% at about 525nm, which decreased monotonically to zero at about 725 nm. When the published values of RCA and EXXON were corrected similarly for optical loss, nearly identical values of internal quantum efficiencies were found. Calculations based on a model proposed by Cody et al of EXXON indicated that the depletion width was less than 0.4 microns for all PIN cells, thereby limiting junction efficiency in the red portion of the solar spectrum since the 1/e photon range exceeds this value. A novel inverted NIP cell was tested and found to have its maximum quantum response shifted to 625 nm. Also, an amorphous boron (a-B) layer deposited on a-Si:H to form a PIN heterojunction improved blue response and Voc. A combination of the red-responsive cells and the a-B heterojunction cells could raise efficiency to 8%.

  1. Technical bases DWPF Late Washing Facility. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Fish, D.L.; Landon, L.F.

    1992-08-10

    A task force recommended that the technical feasibility of a ``Late Wash` facility be assessed [1]. In this facility, each batch of tetraphenylborate slurry from Tank 49 would be given a final wash to reduce the concentrations of nitrite and radiolysis products to acceptable levels. Laboratory-scale studies have demonstrated that d the nitrite content of the slurry fed to DWPF is reduced to 0.01 M or less (and at least a 4X reduction in concentration of the soluble species is attained), (1) the need for HAN during hydrolysis is eliminated (eliminating the production of ammonium ion during hydrolysis), (2) hydrolysis may be done with a catalyst concentration that will not exceed the copper solubility in glass and (3) the non-polar organic production during hydrolysis is significantly reduced. The first phase of an aggressive research and development program has been completed and all test results obtained to date support the technical feasibility of Late Washing. Paralleling this research and development effort is an aggressive design study directed by DWPF to scope and cost retrofitting the Auxiliary Pump Pit (APP) to enable performing a final wash of each batch of precipitate slurry before R is transferred into the DWPF Soft Processing Cell (SPC). An initial technical bases for the Late Wash Facility was transmitted to DWPF on June 15, 1992. Research and development activities are continuing directed principally at optimization of the cross-f low fitter decontamination methodology and pilot-scale validation of the recommended benzene stripping metodology.

  2. The Injection Facility at Ketzin: Technical Installations & Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, F.; Bannach, A.; Becker, W.; Koehler, S.

    2009-04-01

    The injection facility consists of 5 main plunger pumps (0…1.000 kg/h), a heating device (305 kWel.) and two intermediate storage tanks (50 to, each). One additional smaller pump has been installed to allow for smaller injection rates (around 300 kg/h). The facility is designed to implement a CO2 stream of 300 kg/h to 3.250 kg/h (200 kg/h stepwise) at 50 °C at the heater outlet, resulting in a maximum amount of 78 to per day. An overall control and automation system is in place for steering the entire injection process and monitoring the relevant parameters (i.e. CO2 flow, temperature along the injection string, pressure data from the formation and the wellheads etc.). All emergency shut-down (ESD) functionality is software independent and has been certified by local authorities and technical control boards. Besides the presentation of of the technical facilities the talk will give an overview on the legal organisation of the injection operation and will light on so far experienced wellbore and reservoir behaviour.

  3. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, H L

    2007-09-07

    This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 612 (A612) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2006). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., drum crushing, size reduction, and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A612 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A612 fenceline is approximately 220 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A612 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage

  4. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Laycak, D T

    2010-03-05

    This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities (DSA) (LLNL 2009). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A625 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A625 fenceline is approximately 225 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A625 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas, consisting

  5. Technical Safety Requirements for the Waste Storage Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Laycak, D T

    2008-06-16

    This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES, which include Area 625 (A625) and the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) Storage Area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES. These TSRs are derived from the 'Documented Safety Analysis for the Waste Storage Facilities' (DSA) (LLNL 2008). The analysis presented therein determined that the WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 2 non-reactor nuclear facilities. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits and controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard and accident analyses. Further, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls sections of the TSRs. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are used by RHWM to handle and store hazardous waste, TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE, LOW-LEVEL WASTE (LLW), mixed waste, California combined waste, nonhazardous industrial waste, and conditionally accepted waste generated at LLNL as well as small amounts from other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, as described in the DSA. In addition, several minor treatments (e.g., size reduction and decontamination) are carried out in these facilities. The WASTE STORAGE FACILITIES are located in two portions of the LLNL main site. A625 is located in the southeast quadrant of LLNL. The A625 fenceline is approximately 225 m west of Greenville Road. The DWTF Storage Area, which includes Building 693 (B693), Building 696 Radioactive Waste Storage Area (B696R), and associated yard areas and storage areas within the yard, is located in the northeast quadrant of LLNL in the DWTF complex. The DWTF Storage Area fenceline is approximately 90 m west of Greenville Road. A625 and the DWTF Storage Area are subdivided into various facilities and storage areas

  6. Technical issues in licensing low-level radioactive waste facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Junkert, R.

    1993-03-01

    The California Department of Health Service spent two years in the review of an application for a low-level radioactive waste disposal facility in California. During this review period a variety of technical issues had to be evaluated and resolved. One of the first issues was the applicability and use of NRC guidance documents for the development of LLW disposal facilities. Other technical issues that required intensive evaluations included surface water hydrology, seismic investigation, field and numerical analysis of the unsaturated zone, including a water infiltration test. Source term verification became an issue because of one specific isotope that comprised more than 90% of the curies projected for disposal during the operational period. The use of trench liners and the proposed monitoring of the unsaturated zone were reviewed by a highly select panel of experts to provide guidance on the need for liners and to ensure that the monitoring system was capable of monitoring sufficient representative areas for radionuclides in the soil, soil gas, and soil moisture. Finally, concerns about the quality of the preoperational environmental monitoring program, including data, sample collection procedures, laboratory analysis, data review and interpretation and duration of monitoring caused a significant delay in completing the licensing review.

  7. Surface Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report-Constructor Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    R.E. Flye

    2000-10-24

    The purpose of this Fire Hazards Analysis Technical Report (hereinafter referred to as Technical Report) is to assess the risk from fire within individual fire areas to ascertain whether the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fire safety objectives are met. The objectives identified in DOE Order 420.1, Change 2, Facility Safety, Section 4.2, establish requirements for a comprehensive fire and related hazards protection program for facilities sufficient to minimize the potential for: The occurrence of a fire or related event; A fire that causes an unacceptable on-site or off-site release of hazardous or radiological material that will threaten the health and safety of employees, the public, or the environment; Vital DOE programs suffering unacceptable interruptions as a result of fire and related hazards; Property losses from a fire and related events exceeding defined limits established by DOE; and Critical process controls and safety class systems being damaged as a result of a fire and related events.

  8. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Safety Class Instrumentation and Control System Design Description SYS 93-2

    SciTech Connect

    WHITEHURST, R.

    1999-07-02

    This document describes the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Safety Class Instrumentation and Control system (SCIC). The SCIC provides safety functions and features to protect the environment, off-site and on-site personnel and equipment. The function of the SCIC is to provide automatic trip features, valve interlocks, alarms, indication and control for the cold vacuum drying process.

  9. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Vacuum Purge System Chilled Water System Design Description (SYS 47-4)

    SciTech Connect

    IRWIN, J.J.

    2000-06-13

    This system design description (SDD) addresses the Vacuum Purge System Chilled Water (VPSCHW) system. The discussion that follows is limited to the VPSCHW system and its interfaces with associated systems. The reader's attention is directed to Drawings H-1-82162, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Process Equipment Skid P&ID Vacuum System, and H-1-82224, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Mechanical Utilities Process Chilled Water P&ID. Figure 1-1 shows the location and equipment arrangement for the VPSCHW system. The VPSCHW system provides chilled water to the Vacuum Purge System (VPS). The chilled water provides the ability to condense water from the multi-canister overpack (MCO) outlet gases during the MCO vacuum and purge cycles. By condensing water from the MCO purge gas, the VPS can assist in drying the contents of the MCO.

  10. Technical evaluation of proposed Ukrainian Central Radioactive Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, R.; Glukhov, A.; Markowski, F.

    1996-06-01

    This technical report is a comprehensive evaluation of the proposal by the Ukrainian State Committee on Nuclear Power Utilization to create a central facility for radioactive waste (not spent fuel) processing. The central facility is intended to process liquid and solid radioactive wastes generated from all of the Ukrainian nuclear power plants and the waste generated as a result of Chernobyl 1, 2 and 3 decommissioning efforts. In addition, this report provides general information on the quantity and total activity of radioactive waste in the 30-km Zone and the Sarcophagus from the Chernobyl accident. Processing options are described that may ultimately be used in the long-term disposal of selected 30-km Zone and Sarcophagus wastes. A detailed report on the issues concerning the construction of a Ukrainian Central Radioactive Waste Processing Facility (CRWPF) from the Ukrainian Scientific Research and Design institute for Industrial Technology was obtained and incorporated into this report. This report outlines various processing options, their associated costs and construction schedules, which can be applied to solving the operating and decommissioning radioactive waste management problems in Ukraine. The costs and schedules are best estimates based upon the most current US industry practice and vendor information. This report focuses primarily on the handling and processing of what is defined in the US as low-level radioactive wastes.

  11. Professional technical support services for the Mining Equipment Test Facility. First quarterly technical progress report, April 14-June 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Garson, R.C.

    1981-07-01

    The Department of Energy recently began the operation of its Mining Equipment Test Facility. One component at that facility is the highly sophisticated Mine Roof Simulator (MRS) for research and development of roof support equipment. Because of its previous experience, the University of Pittsburgh was contracted to assist the Facilities Manager by providing professional technical support services, principally for the MRS. This technical progress report briefly describes the services provided during the reporting period and planned for the next period. No significant technical disclosures of interest to those not associated with the MRS are contained herein.

  12. Professional technical support services for the Mining Equipment Test Facility. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, 1 January-31 March 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Garson, R.C.

    1982-04-01

    The Department of Energy recently began the operation of its Mining Equipment Test Facility. One component at that facility is the highly sophisticated Mine Roof Simulator (MRS) for research and development of roof support equipment. Because of its previous experience, the University of Pittsburgh was contracted to assist the Facilities Manager by providing professional technical support services, principally for the MRS. This technical progress report briefly describes the services provided during the reporting period and planned for the next period. No significant technical disclosures of interest to those not associated with the MRS are contained herein.

  13. Technical Review of the Laboratory Biosphere Closed Ecological System Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempster, W.; van Thillo, M.; Alling, A.; Allen, J.; Silverstone, S.; Nelson, M.

    The "Laboratory Biosphere", a new closed ecological system facility in Santa Fe, New Mexico (USA) has been constructed and became operational in May 2002. Built and operated by the Global Ecotechnics consortium (Biosphere Technologies and Biosphere Foundation with Biospheric Design Inc., and the Institute of Ecotechnics), the research apparatus for intensive crop growth, biogeochemical cycle dynamics and recycling of inedible crop biomass comprises a sealed cylindrical steel chamber and attached variable volume chamber (lung) to prevent pressures caused by the expansion and contraction of the contained air. The cylindrical growing chamber is 3.7m (12 feet) long and 3.7m (12 foot) diameter, giving an internal volume of 34 m3 (1200 ft 3 ). The two crop growth beds cover 5.5 m2, with a soil depth of 0.3m (12 inches), with 12 x 1000 watt high-pressure sodium lights capable of variable lighting of 40-70 mol per m2 per day. A small soil bed reactor in the chamber can be activated to help with metabolism of chamber trace gases. The volume of the attached variable volume chamber (lung) can range between 0-11 m3 (0-400 ft 3 ). Evapotranspired and soil leachate water are collected, combined and recycled to water the planting beds. Sampling ports enable testing of water quality of leachate, condensate and irrigation water. Visual inspection windows provide views of the entire interior and growing beds. The chamber is also outfitted with an airlock to minimize air exchange when people enter and work in the chamber. Continuous sensors include atmospheric CO2 and oxygen, temperature, humidity, soil moisture, light level and water levels in reservoirs. Both "sniffer" (air ports) and "sipper" (water ports) will enable collection of water or air samples for detailed analysis. This paper reports on the development of this new soil-based bioregenerative life support closed system apparatus and its technical challenges and capabilities.

  14. Technical Specifications for the Neutron Radiography Facility (TRIGA Mark 1 Reactor). Revision 6

    SciTech Connect

    Tomlinson, R.L.; Perfect, J.F.

    1988-04-01

    These Technical Specifications state the limits under which the Neutron Radiography Facility, with its associated TRIGA Mark I Reactor, is operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. These specifications cover operation of the Facility for the purpose of examination of specimens (including contained fissile material) by neutron radiography, for the irradiation of specimens in the pneumatic transfer system and approved in-core or in-pool irradiation facilities and operator training. The Final Safety Analysis Report (TC-344) and its supplements, and these Technical Specifications are the basic safety documents of the Neutron Radiography Facility.

  15. TECHNICAL GUIDANCE DOCUMENT: QUALITY ASSURANCE AND QUALITY CONTROL FOR WASTE CONTAINMENT FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Technical Guidance Document provides comprehensive guidance on procedures for quality assurance and quality control for waste containment facilities. he document includes a discussion of principles and concepts, compacted soil liners, soil drainage systems, geosynthetic drai...

  16. TECHNICAL GUIDANCE DOCUMENT: QUALITY ASSURANCE AND QUALITY CONTROL FOR WASTE CONTAINMENT FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Technical Guidance Document provides comprehensive guidance on procedures for quality assurance and quality control for waste containment facilities. The document includes a discussion of principles and concepts, compacted soil liners, soil drainage systems, geosynthetic dr...

  17. CVD diamond for nuclear detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergonzo, P.; Brambilla, A.; Tromson, D.; Mer, C.; Guizard, B.; Marshall, R. D.; Foulon, F.

    2002-01-01

    Chemically vapour deposited (CVD) diamond is a remarkable material for the fabrication of radiation detectors. In fact, there exist several applications where other standard semiconductor detectors do not fulfil the specific requirements imposed by corrosive, hot and/or high radiation dose environments. The improvement of the electronic properties of CVD diamond has been under intensive investigations and led to the development of a few applications that are addressing specific industrial needs. Here, we report on CVD diamond-based detector developments and we describe how this material, even though of a polycrystalline nature, is readily of great interest for applications in the nuclear industry as well as for physics experiments. Improvements in the material synthesis as well as on device fabrication especially concern the synthesis of films that do not exhibit space charge build up effects which are often encountered in CVD diamond materials and that are highly detrimental for detection devices. On a pre-industrial basis, CVD diamond detectors have been fabricated for nuclear industry applications in hostile environments. Such devices can operate in harsh environments and overcome limitations encountered with the standard semiconductor materials. Of these, this paper presents devices for the monitoring of the alpha activity in corrosive nuclear waste solutions, such as those encountered in nuclear fuel assembly reprocessing facilities, as well as diamond-based thermal neutron detectors exhibiting a high neutron to gamma selectivity. All these demonstrate the effectiveness of a demanding industrial need that relies on the remarkable resilience of CVD diamond.

  18. Professional technical support services for the Mining Equipment Test Facility. First annual technical progress report, April 14-September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Garson, R C

    1981-10-01

    The Department of Energy recently began the operation of its Mining Equipment Test Facility. One component at that facility is the highly sophisticated Mine Roof Simulator (MRS) for research and development of roof support equipment. Because of its previous experience, the University of Pittsburgh was contracted to assist the Facilities Manager by providing professional technical support services, principally for the MRS. This technical progress report briefly describes the services provided during the reporting period and planned for the next period. No significant technical disclosures of interest to those not associated with the MRS are contained herein. One of the four units of the US government-owned METF is the Mine Roof Simulator. This unique $10 million test facility was designed to simulate underground mine roof loads and motions. The MRS is a hybrid, analog-digital, computer-controlled, closed-loop, electro-hydraulic, research device capable of applying either loads or displacements in the vertical and one horizontal axis. Its vertical capacity of 3,000,000 pounds can be applied over its 20 by 20 foot active test area. The horizontal load capacity is 1,600,000 pounds. It can simulate coal seam heights of up to 16 feet. Automatic data acquisition and real time display are provided. The most modern, sophisticated technology was used in its design and construction.

  19. Crowder College MARET Center Facility Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, Amy

    2013-08-20

    This project was a research facility construction project and did not include actual research. The new facility will benefit the public by providing training opportunities for students, as well as incubator and laboratory space for entrepreneurs in the areas of alternative and renewable energies. The 9,216 -square-foot Missouri Alternative and Renewable Energy Technology (MARET) Center was completed in late 2011. Classes in the MARET Center began in the spring 2012 semester. Crowder College takes pride in the MARET Center, a focal point of the campus, as the cutting edge in education, applied research and commercial development in the growing field of green technology.

  20. Space Station Furnace Facility. Volume 2: Summary of technical reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Space Station Furnace Facility (SSFF) is a modular facility for materials research in the microgravity environment of the Space Station Freedom (SSF). The SSFF is designed for crystal growth and solidification research in the fields of electronic and photonic materials, metals and alloys, and glasses and ceramics, and will allow for experimental determination of the role of gravitational forces in the solidification process. The facility will provide a capability for basic scientific research and will evaluate the commercial viability of low-gravity processing of selected technologically important materials. In order to accommodate the furnace modules with the resources required to operate, SSFF developed a design that meets the needs of the wide range of furnaces that are planned for the SSFF. The system design is divided into subsystems which provide the functions of interfacing to the SSF services, conditioning and control for furnace module use, providing the controlled services to the furnace modules, and interfacing to and acquiring data from the furnace modules. The subsystems, described in detail, are as follows: Power Conditioning and Distribution Subsystem; Data Management Subsystem; Software; Gas Distribution Subsystem; Thermal Control Subsystem; and Mechanical Structures Subsystem.

  1. Technical energy audit of the Rifle Correctional Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This energy audit was initiated to pinpoint the reasons for the disproportionate budget share of energy costs at the Rifle Correctional Facility, one of Colorado's newest prisons. Conservation options and retrofits are discussed in detail as are the economics of improvements and rising energy costs. Because of the site's geographic situation, techniques of solar adaptation are discussed, although emphasis is on conservation strategies. Partial wood heating is also considered. Rifle's particular security system may also work to its advantage through the use of inmate labor as a cost-saving measure both during the improvements and as a long-term strategy.

  2. Strategically planning the successful delivery of highly technical facilities.

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, M. S.

    2001-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is located in Los Alamos, New Mexico and is operated by the University of California (UC) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The primary mission of Los Alainos National Laboratory is to support the nuclear weapons program for the Department of Energy. There are over 10,000 personnel at Los Alamos employed by DOE, UC and various subcontractors. The Strategic Computing Complex (SCC) supports the weapons program by computer simulation of weapon detonations, taking the place of underground testing banned by international treaty. The SCC is a 300,000 square foot, three story facility that will hold approximately 300 personnel that perform the simulations required to certify the U.S. weapons stockpile. The SCC is basically a support system for up to two large computers, weapons designers, physicists, and computer scientists. The heart of the facility is a 43,500 square foot computer room that is designed to hold computers that did not yet exist.

  3. SRTC criticality technical review: Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation 93-18 Uranium Solidification Facility`s Waste Handling Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbun, R.

    1993-10-01

    Separate review of NMP-NCS-930058, {open_quotes}Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation 93-18 Uranium Solidification Facility`s Waste Handling Facility (U), August 17, 1993,{close_quotes} was requested of SRTC Applied Physics Group. The NCSE is a criticality assessment to determine waste container uranium limits in the Uranium Solidification Facility`s Waste Handling Facility. The NCSE under review concludes that the NDA room remains in a critically safe configuration for all normal and single credible abnormal conditions. The ability to make this conclusion is highly dependent on array limitation and inclusion of physical barriers between 2{times}2{times}1 arrays of boxes containing materials contaminated with uranium. After a thorough review of the NCSE and independent calculations, this reviewer agrees with that conclusion.

  4. Fort Hood solar cogeneration facility conceptual design study. Volume 1. Technical report. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    A central receiver cogeneration facility is studied for a Texas military facility. A solar-heated heat-transfer salt provides heat to a steam generator and providing space heating and air conditioning and hot water for the complex. The site and its climate are described briefly. Candidate site-specific system configurations, technology assessments, system sizing, and the results of numerous trade studies leading toward the selection of the preferred system configuration are presented. A system level conceptual design of the cogeneration facility is presented, and the conceptual design of the major subsystems (heliostats, receiver, tower, energy transport and storage, fossil energy subsystem, electric power generation subsystem, control, space conditioning and domestic hot water subsystem) are described. Results of the economic analysis of the cogeneration facility are presented, including a description of analysis methods used, assumptions and rationale, simulation models used, a brief summary of capital and operations and maintenance costs, fuel savings, results of the economic evaluations and an economic scenario for future applications. The results of the development planning are presented, including all major activities required during the detailed design, construction, and initial operational phases. An assessment of the proposed facility by the Department of the Army at Fort Hood is presented. (LEW)

  5. MECHANIZATION STUDY OF THE TECHNICAL LIBRARY U.S. NAVAL AVIONICS FACILITY, INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KERSHAW, G.A.; AND OTHERS

    THE NAVAL AVIONICS FACILITY, INDIANAPOLIS (NAFI) TECHNICAL LIBRARY IS PLANNING A MECHANIZED SYSTEM TO PRODUCE A PERMUTED INDEX OF PERTINENT PERIODICAL REFERENCES AND PROCEEDINGS, WITH BOOKS AND DOCUMENTS TO BE ADDED LATER. INPUT TO THE SYSTEM IS PUNCHED PAPER TAPE PREPARED FROM THE SOURCE MATERIAL, AND THE PRIMARY PROGRAM IS A "CANNED" GENERAL…

  6. 112. Back side technical facilities S.R. scanner building no. 105, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    112. Back side technical facilities S.R. scanner building no. 105, "elevations C & D" - architectural, AS-BLT AW 35-03-90, sheet 4 of 39, dated 23 November, 1960. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  7. 111. Back side technical facilities S.R. scanner building no. 105, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    111. Back side technical facilities S.R. scanner building no. 105, "elevations A & B" - architectural, AS BLT AW 35-03-90, sheet 3 of 39, dated 23 November, 1960. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  8. Nutrition and CVD risk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a wide range of dietary approaches purported to decrease the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). Some were first identified early in the 20th century whereas others have been recognized more recently. Some have stood the test of time and others have not. None are without contro...

  9. Thermal Analysis of Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF)

    SciTech Connect

    PIEPHO, M.G.

    2000-03-23

    The thermal analysis examined transient thermal and chemical behavior of the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) container for a broad range of cases that represent the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) processes. The cases were defined to consider both normal and off-normal operations at the CVD Facility for an MCO with N Reactor spent fuel. This analysis provides the basis for the MCO thermal behavior at the CVD Facility in support of the safety basis documentation.

  10. 48 CFR 801.602-80 - Legal and technical review-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery Administration. 801.602-80 Section... Responsibilities 801.602-80 Legal and technical review-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery Administration. An Office of Construction and Facilities Management or National...

  11. 48 CFR 801.602-80 - Legal and technical review-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery Administration. 801.602-80 Section... Responsibilities 801.602-80 Legal and technical review-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery Administration. An Office of Construction and Facilities Management or National...

  12. 48 CFR 801.602-80 - Legal and technical review-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery Administration. 801.602-80 Section... Responsibilities 801.602-80 Legal and technical review-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery Administration. An Office of Construction and Facilities Management or National...

  13. 48 CFR 801.602-80 - Legal and technical review-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery Administration. 801.602-80 Section... Responsibilities 801.602-80 Legal and technical review-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery Administration. An Office of Construction and Facilities Management or National...

  14. 48 CFR 801.602-80 - Legal and technical review-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery Administration. 801.602-80 Section... Responsibilities 801.602-80 Legal and technical review-Office of Construction and Facilities Management and National Cemetery Administration. An Office of Construction and Facilities Management or National...

  15. Native American Technical Assistance and Training for Renewable Energy Resource Development and Electrical Generation Facilities Management

    SciTech Connect

    A. David Lester

    2008-10-17

    The Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) will facilitate technical expertise and training of Native Americans in renewable energy resource development for electrical generation facilities, and distributed generation options contributing to feasibility studies, strategic planning and visioning. CERT will also provide information to Tribes on energy efficiency and energy management techniques.This project will provide facilitation and coordination of expertise from government agencies and private industries to interact with Native Americans in ways that will result in renewable energy resource development, energy efficiency program development, and electrical generation facilities management by Tribal entities. The intent of this cooperative agreement is to help build capacity within the Tribes to manage these important resources.

  16. Facile preparation of carbon coated magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles by a combined reduction/CVD process

    SciTech Connect

    Tristao, Juliana C.; Oliveira, Aline A.S.; Ardisson, Jose D.; Dias, Anderson; Lago, Rochel M.

    2011-05-15

    Graphical abstract: Magnetic carbon coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles are prepared by a one step combined reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} together with a CVD process of using methane. Analyses show that the Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} is reduced by methane to produce mainly Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles coated with amorphous carbon. These materials can be separated into two fractions by simple dispersion in water and can be used as adsorbents, catalyst supports and rapid coagulation systems. Research highlights: {yields} Magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles coated with a very thin layer of amorphous carbon (4 wt%). {yields} Combined reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} with a Chemical Vapor Deposition process using methane. {yields} Nanoparticles with an average size of 100-200 nm. {yields} Uses as adsorbent, catalyst support and rapid coagulation systems. -- Abstract: In this work, we report a simple method for the preparation of magnetic carbon coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles by a single step combined reduction of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} together with a Chemical Vapor Deposition process using methane. The temperature programmed reaction monitored by Moessbauer, X-ray Diffraction and Raman analyses showed that Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} is directly reduced by methane at temperatures between 600 and 900 {sup o}C to produce mainly Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles coated with up to 4 wt% of amorphous carbon. These magnetic materials can be separated into two fractions by simple dispersion in water, i.e., a settled material composed of large magnetic particles and a suspended material composed of nanoparticles with an average size of 100-200 nm as revealed by Scanning Electron Microscopy and High-resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy. Different uses for these materials, e.g., adsorbents, catalyst supports, rapid coagulation systems, are proposed.

  17. 110. Back side technical facilities S.R. scanner building no. 104, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    110. Back side technical facilities S.R. scanner building no. 104, "first floor plan & sections" - structural, AS-BLT AW 35-03-89, sheet 20 of 40, dated 23 November, 1960. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  18. 109. Back side technical facilities S.R. scanner building no. 104, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    109. Back side technical facilities S.R. scanner building no. 104, "cross & longitudinal sections & roof plan" - architectural, AS-BLT AW 35-03-89, sheet 5 of 40, dated 23 November, 1960. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  19. 108. Back side technical facilities S.R. (scanning radar), scanner building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    108. Back side technical facilities S.R. (scanning radar), scanner building no. 104, "first floor & mezzanine plan" - architectural, AS-BLT AW 35-03-89, sheet 1 of 40, dated November, 1960. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  20. 113. Back side technical facilities S.R. antenna foundations nos. 107, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    113. Back side technical facilities S.R. antenna foundations nos. 107, 108 & 109, "grounding system general plans & details" - electrical, AS-BLT AW 35-03-92, sheet 4, dated 6 June, 1960. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  1. 120. Back side technical facilities S.R. radar transmitter & computer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    120. Back side technical facilities S.R. radar transmitter & computer building no. 102, section II "foundation & first floor plan" - structural, AS-BLT AW 35-46-04, sheet 65, dated 23 January, 1961. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  2. 119. Back side technical facilities S.R. radar transmitter & computer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    119. Back side technical facilities S.R. radar transmitter & computer building no. 102, section I "tower plan, sections & details" - structural, AS-BLT AW 35-46-04, sheet 62, dated 23 January, 1961. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  3. 118. Back side technical facilities S.R. radar transmitter & computer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    118. Back side technical facilities S.R. radar transmitter & computer building no. 102, "building sections - sheet I" - architectural, AS-BLT AW 35-46-04, sheet 13, dated 23 January, 1961. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  4. 122. Back side technical facilities S.R. radar transmitter & computer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    122. Back side technical facilities S.R. radar transmitter & computer building no. 102, section II "elevations & details" - structural, AS-BLT AW 35-46-04, sheet 73, dated 23 January, 1961. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  5. 117. Back side technical facilities S.R. radar transmitter & computer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    117. Back side technical facilities S.R. radar transmitter & computer building no. 102, "building sections - sheet I" - architectural, AS-BLT AW 35-46-04, sheet 12, dated 23 January, 1961. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  6. 121. Back side technical facilities S.R. radar transmitter & computer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    121. Back side technical facilities S.R. radar transmitter & computer building no. 102, section II "sections & elevations" - structural, AS-BLT AW 35-46-04, sheet 72, dated 23 January, 1961. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  7. The Birth of a New Vocational-Technical Center. National Vocational-Technical Facility Planning Conference (Las Vegas, Nevada, May, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farnsworth, Clayton

    The principal of the Southern Nevada Vocational-Technical Center at Las Vegas, Nevada, briefly outlines its development and function. The facility cost approximately 3 million dollars and was built on 390 acres of land purchased from the Federal government. The PERT method was used in planning. Instructional facilities, including those for auto…

  8. TRIGA reactor facility at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute: a simplified technical description. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.L.; Elsasser, S.

    1986-05-01

    In support of its mission the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) operates a medium-sized research nuclear reactor. The reactor is used to generate radiations, primarily neutrons and gamma rays, which are used to conduct experimental biomedical research and to produce isotopes. The radiations are delivered to the experiments in one of two ways: a pulse operation delivers a very short burst of high power, or a steady-state operation delivers a longer, continuous low- to medium-power exposure. The reactor is also used to train military personnel in reactor operations. TRIGA is an acronym for Training, Research, and Isotope, General Atomics. Mark-F is the specific General Atomics Reactor model, distinguished by a pool, a movable core, exposure-room facilities, and the ability to pulse to momentary high powers. Reactor operations at AFRRI began is 1962. In 1965, a change was made from aluminum-clad to stainless steel-clad fuel elements. Currently more than 150 multiple exposure experiments are performed each year using the reactor.

  9. The design and implementation of the Technical Facilities Controller (TFC) for the Goldstone deep space communications complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killian, D. A.; Menninger, F. J.; Gorman, T.; Glenn, P.

    1988-01-01

    The Technical Facilities Controller is a microprocessor-based energy management system that is to be implemented in the Deep Space Network facilities. This system is used in conjunction with facilities equipment at each of the complexes in the operation and maintenance of air-conditioning equipment, power generation equipment, power distribution equipment, and other primary facilities equipment. The implementation of the Technical Facilities Controller was completed at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex and is now operational. The installation completed at the Goldstone Complex is described and the utilization of the Technical Facilities Controller is evaluated. The findings will be used in the decision to implement a similar system at the overseas complexes at Canberra, Australia, and Madrid, Spain.

  10. CVD amorphous silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hegedus, S.S.; Baron, B.N.; Rocheleau, R.E.

    1984-05-01

    Development of all-CVD TCO/p-i-n/metal/substrate a-Si devices made by CVD from disilane is reported. The reactor and conditions for depositing device quality CVD a-Si at growth rates up to 10 A/sec are described. Conductivity, optical properties and density of states of CVD i layers are described. Photovoltaic device characteristics of all - CVD and hybrid (CVD/GD) pin and nip devices are compared. Efficiencies up to 4% were achieved. An analysis of collection efficiency indicates a hole ..mu../tau/ of 1 - 4 X 10/sup -9/ cm/sup 2//V. Cell performance is consistent with a series connected double junction model.

  11. Power systems development facility. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Second Quarter of the Second Budget Period, July 1 through September 30, 1993, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scaleup of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source. Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams; Combustion Gas Turbine; and Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility.

  12. Lead Coolant Test Facility Technical and Functional Requirements, Conceptual Design, Cost and Construction Schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Soli T. Khericha

    2006-09-01

    This report presents preliminary technical and functional requirements (T&FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research need listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements of basis are identified: Develop and Demonstrate Prototype Lead/Lead-Bismuth Liquid Metal Flow Loop Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control Demonstrate Safe Operation and Provision for Future Testing. These five broad areas are divided into twenty-one (21) specific requirements ranging from coolant temperature to design lifetime. An overview of project engineering requirements, design requirements, QA and environmental requirements are also presented. The purpose of this T&FRs is to focus the lead fast reactor community domestically on the requirements for the next unique state of the art test facility. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 420oC. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M. It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

  13. Power systems development facility. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the last quarter of the Second Budget Period, January 1 through March 31, 1994, entitled {open_quotes}Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.{close_quotes} The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particulate control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size.

  14. Technical Aspects Regarding the Management of Radioactive Waste from Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Dragolici, F.; Turcanu, C. N.; Rotarescu, G.; Paunica, I.

    2003-02-25

    The proper application of the nuclear techniques and technologies in Romania started in 1957, once with the commissioning of the Research Reactor VVR-S from IFIN-HH-Magurele. During the last 45 years, appear thousands of nuclear application units with extremely diverse profiles (research, biology, medicine, education, agriculture, transport, all types of industry) which used different nuclear facilities containing radioactive sources and generating a great variety of radioactive waste during the decommissioning after the operation lifetime is accomplished. A new aspect appears by the planning of VVR-S Research Reactor decommissioning which will be a new source of radioactive waste generated by decontamination, disassembling and demolition activities. By construction and exploitation of the Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant (STDR)--Magurele and the National Repository for Low and Intermediate Radioactive Waste (DNDR)--Baita, Bihor county, in Romania was solved the management of radioactive wastes arising from operation and decommissioning of small nuclear facilities, being assured the protection of the people and environment. The present paper makes a review of the present technical status of the Romanian waste management facilities, especially raising on treatment capabilities of ''problem'' wastes such as Ra-266, Pu-238, Am-241 Co-60, Co-57, Sr-90, Cs-137 sealed sources from industrial, research and medical applications. Also, contain a preliminary estimation of quantities and types of wastes, which would result during the decommissioning project of the VVR-S Research Reactor from IFIN-HH giving attention to some special category of wastes like aluminum, graphite and equipment, components and structures that became radioactive through neutron activation. After analyzing the technical and scientific potential of STDR and DNDR to handle big amounts of wastes resulting from the decommissioning of VVR-S Research Reactor and small nuclear facilities, the necessity of

  15. Nuts and CVD.

    PubMed

    Ros, Emilio

    2015-04-01

    Nuts are nutrient-dense foods with complex matrices rich in unsaturated fatty acids and other bioactive compounds, such as l-arginine, fibre, healthful minerals, vitamin E, phytosterols and polyphenols. By virtue of their unique composition, nuts are likely to beneficially affect cardiovascular health. Epidemiological studies have associated nut consumption with a reduced incidence of CHD in both sexes and of diabetes in women, but not in men. Feeding trials have clearly demonstrated that consumption of all kinds of nuts has a cholesterol-lowering effect, even in the context of healthy diets. There is increasing evidence that nut consumption has a beneficial effect on oxidative stress, inflammation and vascular reactivity. Blood pressure, visceral adiposity and the metabolic syndrome also appear to be positively influenced by nut consumption. Contrary to expectations, epidemiological studies and clinical trials suggest that regular nut consumption is not associated with undue weight gain. Recently, the PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea randomised clinical trial of long-term nutrition intervention in subjects at high cardiovascular risk provided first-class evidence that regular nut consumption is associated with a 50 % reduction in incident diabetes and, more importantly, a 30 % reduction in CVD. Of note, incident stroke was reduced by nearly 50 % in participants allocated to a Mediterranean diet enriched with a daily serving of mixed nuts (15 g walnuts, 7.5 g almonds and 7.5 g hazelnuts). Thus, it is clear that frequent nut consumption has a beneficial effect on CVD risk that is likely to be mediated by salutary effects on intermediate risk factors. PMID:26148914

  16. Technical justification for a request to reclassify the former CCC/USDA facility at Canada, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-12-21

    Contamination in groundwater at Canada, Kansas, was discovered in 1997, during limited private well sampling near former grain storage facilities of the Commodity Credit Corporation, U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). Subsequent investigations by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) confirmed carbon tetrachloride and nitrate concentrations in groundwater above the respective maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) of 5.0 {micro}g/L and 10.0 mg/L. The KDHE investigations identified both the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility and a private grain storage facility as likely sources for the carbon tetrachloride contamination. The CCC/USDA funded extension of a rural water district line to provide a permanent alternate water supply, and the KDHE has conducted long-term monitoring under the State Water Plan. This document presents an analysis of the available information for the Canada site, acquired in previous investigations and the long-term KDHE monitoring. This analysis forms the technical justification for a request to reclassify the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility at Canada as a site requiring no further action under the Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) between the KDHE and the USDA's Farm Service Agency. The KDHE's long-term water level monitoring results indicate a consistent groundwater flow direction to the east-southeast. Consequently, the wells with the highest overall concentrations of carbon tetrachloride are downgradient from the private grain storage facility but not downgradient from the former CCC/USDA facility. The KDHE criterion for reclassification of a site is that contamination there should not pose an unacceptable risk, on the basis of analytical results for four consecutive, equally timed, sequenced sampling episodes over a period of no less than two years. In seven KDHE sampling events over a period of six years (2001-2007), the concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in the monitoring well on the former CCC

  17. Diagnostic development and support of MHD Test Facilities. Technical progress report, October 1991--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University (MSU) is developing diagnostic instruments for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery (HRSR) support, are being refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics are being developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems are being interfaced with DIAL`s computers. Technical support for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort is being provided. DIAL personnel also cooperate with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs.

  18. PFBC HGCU Test Facility. Technical progress report: Third Quarter, CY 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This is the sixteenth Technical Progress Report submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) in connection with the cooperative agreement between the DOE and Ohio Power Company for the Tidd PFBC (pressurized fluidized-bed combustion) Hot Gas Clean Up Test Facility (HGCU). This report covers the period of work completed during the Third Quarter of CY 1993. During this quarter, the Advanced Particle Filter (APF) was operated for a total of 1295 hours. This represents 58% availability during July, August, September, and including June 30 of the previous quarter. The operating dates and times since initial operation are summarized. The APF operating temperatures and differential pressures are provided. Details of the APF runs during this quarter are included in this report.

  19. PFBC HGCU Test Facility. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, CY 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This is the ninth technical progress report submitted to the Department of Energy in connection with the Cooperative Agreement between DOE and Ohio Power Company for the Tidd PFBC Hot Gas Clean Up Test Facility. This report covers the period of work completed during the Fourth Quarter of CY 1991. During the reporting period, work focused on completing Task 2, Hot Gas Clean Up (HGCU) Detailed Design and Task 4, Procurement Activities to support the installation of the Westinghouse advanced particle filter (APE). The following significant events occurred during this report period: The mechanical/structural contractor (Pullman Power Products) mobilized at the Tidd site in December and began erecting steel framing for the APF. A contract modification was issued to Babcock & Wilcox Co. for the supply of piping materials required for the combustor internal modifications. A contract was awarded to ANARAD, Inc. for a gas analysis system. A contract was prepared and is being processed for electrical erection.

  20. Diagnostic development and support of MHD test facilities. Technical progress report, January--March 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Shepard, W.S.; Cook, R.L.

    1991-12-31

    The Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) at Mississippi State University (MSU) is developing diagnostic instruments for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) power train data acquisition and for support of MHD component development test facilities. Microprocessor-controlled optical instruments, initially developed for Heat Recovery/Seed Recovery (HRSR) support, are being refined, and new systems to measure temperatures and gas-seed-slag stream characteristics are being developed. To further data acquisition and analysis capabilities, the diagnostic systems are being interfaced with DIAL`S computers. Technical support for the diagnostic needs of the national MHD research effort is being provided. DIAL personnel also cooperate with government agencies and private industries to improve the transformation of research and development results into processes, products and services applicable to their needs.

  1. Letter technical plan for the hydrazine blending and storage facility groundwater investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-13

    This draft final letter technical plan presents the proposed scope of work for the hydrazine blending and storage facility ground water investigation. The purposes of the investigation are to assess the nature and extent of hydrazine fuel compounds (hydrazine, UDMH, MMH, NDMA) in ground water at or near the HBSF and evaluate the potential for migration of the fuel compounds. The scope of work proposed includes: collecting ground water samples from 12 wells near the HBSF; collecting 1 effluent sample at the basin a neck treatment system; collecting 1 influent sample at both the north and northwest boundary systems. This plan describes the following: field program - sampling locations and procedures, decontamination; analytical program - parameters, certified reporting limits; QA/QC control.

  2. Technical progress report for the Magnetohydrodynamics Coal-Fired Flow Facility, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    In this quarterly technical progress report, UTSI reports on the status of a multi-task contract to develop the technology for the steam bottoming portion of a MHD Steam Combined Cycle Power Plant. The report describes the facility maintenance and environmental work completed, status of completing technical reports and certain key administrative actions occurring during the quarter. In view of current year budget reductions and program reductions to closeout the MHD program, downsizing of the UTSI work force took place. No further testing has occurred or is scheduled, and the planned effort for this period was to maintain the DOE CFFF facility in a standby status and to complete test reports.

  3. Technical progress report for the magnetohydrodynamics coal-fired flow facility for the period April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    In this quarterly technical progress report, UTSI reports on the status of a multitask contract to develop the technology for the steam bottoming portion of a MHD Steam Combined Cycle Power Plant. The report describes the facility maintenance and environmental work completed, status of completing technical reports and certain key administrative actions occurring during the quarter. In view of current year budget reductions and program reductions to closeout the MHD program, downsizing of the UTSI work force took place. No further testing occurred or was scheduled during the quarter, but the DOE CFFF facility was maintained in a standby status.

  4. Technical Review of Retrieval and Closure Plans for the INEEL INTEC Tank Farm Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Judith A; Burks, Barry L; Quigley, Keith D; Falter, Diedre D

    2001-09-28

    The purpose of this report is to document the conclusions of a technical review of retrieval and closure plans for the Idaho National Energy and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Tank Farm Facility. In addition to reviewing retrieval and closure plans for these tanks, the review process served as an information exchange mechanism so that staff in the INEEL High Level Waste (HLW) Program could become more familiar with retrieval and closure approaches that have been completed or are planned for underground storage tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Hanford sites. This review focused not only on evaluation of the technical feasibility and appropriateness of the approach selected by INEEL but also on technology gaps that could be addressed through utilization of technologies or performance data available at other DOE sites and in the private sector. The reviewers, Judith Bamberger of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Dr. Barry Burks of The Providence Group Applied Technology, have extensive experience in the development and application of tank waste retrieval technologies for nuclear waste remediation.

  5. Projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on the projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the first quarter of FY94. The CDIF is a major US Department of Energy test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: MHD Proof-of-Concept project; mine waste technology pilot program; plasma projects; resource recovery project; sodium sulfide/ferrous sulfate project; soil washing project; and spray casting project.

  6. Projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on the projects at the component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the first quarter of FY93. The CDIF is a major US Department of Energy (DOE) test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: MHD proof-of-concept project; mine waste pilot program; plasma projects; resource recovery project; sodium sulfide/ferrous sulfate project; soil washing project; and spray casting project.

  7. Projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on the projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the second quarter of FY94. The CDIF is a major US Department of Energy test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: Biomass Remediation Project; Heavy Metal-Contaminated Soil Project; MHD Shutdown; Mine Waste Technology Pilot Program; Plasma Projects; Resource Recovery Project; Sodium Sulfide/Ferrous Sulfate Project; and Spray Casting Project.

  8. Projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on the projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the third quarter of FY93. The CDIF is a major US Department of Energy test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: MHD Proof-of-Concept Project; Mine Waste Technology Program; Plasma Projects; Resource Recovery Project; Sodium Sulfide/Ferrous Sulfate Project; Soil Washing Project; and Spray Casting Project.

  9. DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 1: Technical standard

    SciTech Connect

    1998-05-01

    This Department of Energy (DOE) technical standard (referred to as the Standard) provides guidance for integrating and enhancing worker, public, and environmental protection during facility disposition activities. It provides environment, safety, and health (ES and H) guidance to supplement the project management requirements and associated guidelines contained within DOE O 430.1A, Life-Cycle Asset Management (LCAM), and amplified within the corresponding implementation guides. In addition, the Standard is designed to support an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), consistent with the guiding principles and core functions contained in DOE P 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, and discussed in DOE G 450.4-1, Integrated Safety Management System Guide. The ISMS guiding principles represent the fundamental policies that guide the safe accomplishment of work and include: (1) line management responsibility for safety; (2) clear roles and responsibilities; (3) competence commensurate with responsibilities; (4) balanced priorities; (5) identification of safety standards and requirements; (6) hazard controls tailored to work being performed; and (7) operations authorization. This Standard specifically addresses the implementation of the above ISMS principles four through seven, as applied to facility disposition activities.

  10. Boiling eXperiment Facility (BXF) Fluid Toxicity Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM) with the Payload Safety Review Panel (PSRP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheredy, William A.

    2012-01-01

    A Technical Interchange meeting was held between the payload developers for the Boiling eXperiment Facility (BXF) and the NASA Safety Review Panel concerning operational anomaly that resulted in overheating one of the fluid heaters, shorted a 24VDC power supply and generated Perfluoroisobutylene (PFiB) from Perfluorohexane.

  11. TRIGA reactor facility at the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute: A simplified technical description. revision. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    This publication provides a simplified technical description of the TRIGA research reactor at AFRRI. Topics covered include general principles of reactor operation and a description of the TRIGA reactor and its unique features.

  12. Space Station Furnace Facility Core. Requirements definition and conceptual design study. Volume 2: Technical report. Appendix 6: Technical summary reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Space Station Furnace Facility (SSFF) is a modular facility for materials research in the microgravity environment of the Space Station Freedom (SSF). The SSFF is designed for crystal growth and solidification research in the fields of electronic and photonic materials, metals and alloys, and glasses and ceramics and will allow for experimental determination of the role of gravitational forces in the solidification process. The facility will provide a capability for basic scientific research and will evaluate the commercial viability of low-gravity processing of selected technologically important materials. The facility is designed to support a complement of furnace modules as outlined in the Science Capabilities Requirements Document (SCRD). The SSFF is a three rack facility that provides the functions, interfaces, and equipment necessary for the processing of the furnaces and consists of two main parts: the SSFF Core Rack and the two Experiment Racks. The facility is designed to accommodate two experimenter-provided furnace modules housed within the two experiment racks, and is designed to operate these two furnace modules simultaneously. The SCRD specifies a wide range of furnace requirements and serves as the basis for the SSFF conceptual design. SSFF will support automated processing during the man-tended operations and is also designed for crew interface during the permanently manned configuration. The facility is modular in design and facilitates changes as required, so the SSFF is adept to modifications, maintenance, reconfiguration, and technology evolution.

  13. Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Sixth Quarter of the First Budget Period, January 1 through March 31, 1992, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. The major emphasis during this reporting period was expanding the test facility to address system integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced power generation systems. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include additional modules for the expansion of the test facility, which is referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSOF). A letter agreement was negotiated between Southern Company Services (SCS) and Foster Wheeler (FW) for the conceptual design of the Advanced Pressurized Fluid-Bed Combustion (APFBC)/Topping Combustor/Gas Turbine System to be added to the facility. The expanded conceptual design also included modifications to the existing conceptual design for the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility (HGCTF), facility layout and balance of plant design for the PSOF. Southern Research Institute (SRI) began investigating the sampling requirements for the expanded facility and assisted SCS in contacting Particulate Control Device (PCD) vendors for additional information. SCS also contacted the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and two molten carbonate fuel cell vendors for input on the fuel cell module for the PSDF.

  14. CVD Diamond Dielectric Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Gat, R.

    2009-01-22

    The electrical and mechanical properties of diamond make it an ideal candidate material for use in dielectric accelerating structures: high RF breakdown field, extremely low dielectric losses and the highest available thermoconductive coefficient. Using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) cylindrical diamond structures have been manufactured with dimensions corresponding to fundamental TM{sub 01} mode frequencies in the GHz to THz range. Surface treatments are being developed to reduce the secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficient below unity to reduce the possibility of multipactor. The diamond CVD cylindrical waveguide technology developed here can be applied to a variety of other high frequency, large-signal applications.

  15. PFBC HGCU Test Facility. Second quarterly technical progress report, CY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This is the eleventh technical progress report submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) in connection with the Cooperative Agreement between DOE and Ohio Power company for the Tidd Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) Hot Gas Clean Up Test Facility. This report covers the period of work completed during the Second Quarter of CY 1992. Activities included: The Tidd combustor internals were modified to connect the hot gas system for slipstream operation; Various pre-operational activities were completed, including pneumatic leak testing of the HGCU system, operation of the closed cycle cooling water system, operation of the back pulse compressor and air preheater, and checkout of the back pulse skid. Initial operation of the system using the bypass cyclone occurred during May 21--23, 1992; On May 23, 1992, an expansion joint ruptured, forcing the unit to be shut down. The failure was later determined to be due to stress corrosion. Following the expansion joint failure, a complete engineering review of the system was undertaken and is continuing; Contract Modification No. 6 was issued to Westinghouse during this quarter. This modification is for APF surveillance testing services; A purchase order was issued to Battelle for ash sampling hardware and testing services.

  16. The Magnetohydrodynamics Coal-Fired Flow Facility technical progress report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    In this quarterly technical progress report, UTSI reports on a multi-task research contract directed toward developing the technology for an MHD steam combined cycle power plant. During the period two tests were conducted in the DOE Coal Fired FLow Facility. Both of these tests were part of the western coal proof-of-concept (POC) test series. The report describes the performance of the tests and provides some preliminary performance data on particulate removal systems during the tests. The performance of ceramic tubes being tested for high temperature air heater application is described. Performance of advanced diagnostics equipment from both UTSI and MSU is summarized. The results of experiments designed to determine the effects of potassium compounds on combustion are included. Plans for analysis of metal tube specimens previously removed from the test train are discussed. Modeling and analysis of previous test data include a deposition model to predict ash deposition on tubes, mass balance results, automated data screening and chemical analyses and the data base containing these analyses. Laboratory tests on sealing ceramic tubes and corrosion analyses of previously tested tubes are reported.

  17. PFBC HGCU Test Facility. Technical progress report No. 24, Third quarter, CY 1995

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    This is the twenty-fourth and final Technical Progress Report submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) in connection with the cooperative agreement between the DOE and Ohio Power Company for the Tidd PFBC Hot Gas Clean Up Test Facility. This report covers the work completed during the Third Quarter of CY 1995. All activity this quarter was directed toward the completion of the program final report. A draft copy of the final report was forwarded to DOE during this quarter, and DOE submitted their comments on the report to AEPSC. DOE requested that Westinghouse write an appendix to the report covering the performance of the fail-safe regenerator devices during Tad operation, and Westinghouse subsequently prepared the appendix. Additional DOE comments were incorporated into the report, and it will be issued in camera-ready form by the end of October, 1995, which is the program end date. Appendix 1 presents the results of filter candle posttest examination by Westinghouse performed on selected filter candles following final shutdown of the system.

  18. PFBC HGCU Test Facility. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, CY 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This is the thirteenth Technical Progress Report submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) in connection with the cooperative agreement between the DOE and Ohio Power Company for the Tidd PFBC Hot Gas Clean Up Test Facility. This report covers the period of work completed during the Fourth Quarter of CY 1992. The following are highlights of the activities that occurred during this report period: Initial operation of the Advanced Particle Filter (APF) occurred during this quarter. The following table summarizes the operating dates and times. HGCU ash lockhopper valve plugged with ash. Primary cyclone ash pluggage. Problems with the coal water paste. Unit restarted warm 13 hours later. HGCU expansion joint No. 7 leak in internal ply of bellows. Problems encountered during these initial tests included hot spots on the APP, backup cyclone and instrumentation spools, two breakdowns of the backpulse air compressor, pluggage of the APF hopper and ash removal system, failure (breakage) of 21 filter candles, leakage of the inner ply of one (1) expansion joint bellows, and numerous other smaller problems. These operating problems are discussed in detail in a subsequent section of this report. Following shutdown and equipment inspection in December, design modifications were initiated to correct the problems noted above. The system is scheduled to resume operation in March, 1993.

  19. Changes in CVD risk factors in the activity counseling trial

    PubMed Central

    Baruth, Meghan; Wilcox, Sara; Sallis, James F; King, Abby C; Marcus, Bess H; Blair, Steven N

    2011-01-01

    Primary care facilities may be a natural setting for delivering interventions that focus on behaviors that improve cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. The purpose of this study was to examine the 24-month effects of the Activity Counseling Trial (ACT) on CVD risk factors, to examine whether changes in CVD risk factors differed according to baseline risk factor status, and to examine whether changes in fitness were associated with changes in CVD risk factors. ACT was a 24-month multicenter randomized controlled trial to increase physical activity. Participants were 874 inactive men and women aged 35–74 years. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three arms that varied by level of counseling, intensity, and resource requirements. Because there were no significant differences in change over time between arms on any of the CVD risk factors examined, all arms were combined, and the effects of time, independent of arm, were examined separately for men and women. Time × Baseline risk factor status interactions examined whether changes in CVD risk factors differed according to baseline risk factor status. Significant improvements in total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, the ratio of total cholesterol to HDL-C, and triglycerides were seen in both men and women who had high (or low for HDL-C) baseline levels of risk factors, whereas significant improvements in diastolic blood pressure were seen only in those men with high baseline levels. There were no improvements in any risk factors among participants with normal baseline levels. Changes in fitness were associated with changes in a number of CVD risk factors. However, most relationships disappeared after controlling for changes in body weight. Improvements in lipids from the ACT interventions could reduce the risk of coronary heart disease in people with already high levels of lipids by 16%–26% in men and 11%–16% in women

  20. Report of work done for technical assistance agreement 1269 between Sandia National Laboratories and the Watkins-Johnson Company: Chemical reaction mechanisms for computational models of SiO{sub 2} CVD

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, P.; Johannes, J.; Kudriavtsev, V.

    1997-10-01

    The use of computational modeling to improve equipment and process designs for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors is becoming increasingly common. Commercial codes are available that facilitate the modeling of chemically-reacting flows, but chemical reaction mechanisms must be separately developed for each system of interest. One f the products of the Watkins-Johnson Company (WJ) is a reactor marketed to semiconductor manufacturers for the atmospheric-pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of silicon oxide films. In this process, TEOS (tetraethoxysilane, Si(OC{sub 2}H{sub 5}){sub 4}) and ozone (O{sub 3}) are injected (in nitrogen and oxygen carrier gases) over hot silicon wafers that are being carried through the system on a moving belt. As part of their equipment improvement process, WJ is developing computational models of this tool. In this effort, they are collaborating with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to draw on Sandia`s experience base in understanding and modeling the chemistry of CVD processes.

  1. Technical Safety Requirements for the B695 Segment of the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, H L

    2007-09-07

    This document contains Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) for the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) Division's B695 Segment of the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The TSRs constitute requirements regarding the safe operation of the B695 Segment of the DWTF. The TSRs are derived from the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for the B695 Segment of the DWTF (LLNL 2004). The analysis presented there determined that the B695 Segment of the DWTF is a low-chemical hazard, Hazard Category 3, nonreactor nuclear facility. The TSRs consist primarily of inventory limits as well as controls to preserve the underlying assumptions in the hazard analyses. Furthermore, appropriate commitments to safety programs are presented in the administrative controls section of the TSRs. The B695 Segment of the DWTF (B695 and the west portion of B696) is a waste treatment and storage facility located in the northeast quadrant of the LLNL main site. The approximate area and boundary of the B695 Segment of the DWTF are shown in the B695 Segment of the DWTF DSA. Activities typically conducted in the B695 Segment of the DWTF include container storage, lab-packing, repacking, overpacking, bulking, sampling, waste transfer, and waste treatment. B695 is used to store and treat radioactive, mixed, and hazardous waste, and it also contains equipment used in conjunction with waste processing operations to treat various liquid and solid wastes. The portion of the building called Building 696 Solid Waste Processing Area (SWPA), also referred to as B696S in this report, is used primarily to manage solid radioactive waste. Operations specific to the SWPA include sorting and segregating low-level waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste, lab-packing, sampling, and crushing empty drums that previously contained LLW. A permit modification for B696S was submitted to DTSC in January 2004 to store and treat hazardous and mixed

  2. Astronomic Telescope Facility: Preliminary systems definition study report. Volume 2: Technical description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobeck, Charlie (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The Astrometric Telescope Facility (AFT) is to be an earth-orbiting facility designed specifically to measure the change in relative position of stars. The primary science investigation for the facility will be the search for planets and planetary systems outside the solar system. In addition the facility will support astrophysics investigations dealing with the location or motions of stars. The science objective and facility capabilities for astrophysics investigations are discussed.

  3. Projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This quarterly technical progress report presents progress on several different projects at the Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) during the second quarter of FY93. The CDIF is a major US Department of Energy test facility in Butte, Montana, operated by MSE, Inc. Projects in progress include: MHD Proof-of-Concept Project; Mine Waste Technology Pilot Program; Plasma Furnace Projects for waste destruction; Resource Recovery Project; Sodium Sulfide/Ferrous Sulfate Project; Soil Washing Project for removal of radioactive materials; and Spray Casting Project.

  4. PFBC HGCU test facility technical progress report. First Quarter, CY 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This is the eighteenth Technical Progress Report submitted in connection with the cooperative agreement between the DOE and Ohio Power Company for the Tidd PFBC Hot Gas Clean Up Test Facility. During this quarter, the Tidd Hot Gas Clean Up System operated for 835 hours during six separate test runs. The system was starting into a seventh run at the end of the quarter. Highlights of this period are summarized below: the longest run during the quarter was approximately 333 hours; filter pressure drop was stable during all test runs this quarter using spoiling air to the primary cyclone upstream of the Advanced Particle Filter (APF); the tempering air system was commissioned this quarter which enabled the unit to operate at full load conditions while limiting the gas temperature in the APF to 1,400 F; during a portion of the one run, the tempering air was removed and the filter operated without problems up to 1,450 F; ash sampling was performed by Battelle personnel upstream and downstream of the APF and ash loading and particle size distribution data were obtained, a summary report is included; a hot area on the APF head was successfully repaired in service; a hot spot on the top of an expansion joint was successfully repaired by drilling holes from the inside of the pipe and pumping in refractory insulation; a corrosion inspection program for the HGCU system was issued giving recommendations for points to inspect; filter internal inspections following test runs 13 and 17 revealed a light coating (up to 1/4 inch thick) of residual ash on the candles and some ash bridging between the dust sheds and inner rows of candles. Data from these inspections are included with this report.

  5. Interim Control Strategy for the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Sewage Treatment Facility Disposal Pond - Two-year Update

    SciTech Connect

    L. V. Street

    2007-04-01

    The Idaho Cleanup Project has prepared this interim control strategy for the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office pursuant to DOE Order 5400.5, Chapter 11.3e (1) to support continued discharges to the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Sewage Treatment Facility Disposal Pond. In compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, a 2-year review of the Interim Control Strategy document has been completed. This submittal documents the required review of the April 2005 Interim Control Strategy. The Idaho Cleanup Project's recommendation is unchanged from the original recommendation. The Interim Control Strategy evaluates three alternatives: (1) re-route the discharge outlet to an uncontaminated area of the TSF-07; (2) construct a new discharge pond; or (3) no action based on justification for continued use. Evaluation of Alternatives 1 and 2 are based on the estimated cost and implementation timeframe weighed against either alternative's minimal increase in protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Evaluation of Alternative 3, continued use of the TSF-07 Disposal Pond under current effluent controls, is based on an analysis of four points: - Record of Decision controls will protect workers and the public - Risk of increased contamination is low - Discharge water will be eliminated in the foreseeable future - Risk of contamination spread is acceptable. The Idaho Cleanup Project recommends Alternative 3, no action other than continued implementation of existing controls and continued deactivation, decontamination, and dismantlement efforts at the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility.

  6. Electronic properties of CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebel, C. E.

    2003-03-01

    The electronic properties of chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond are reviewed based on data measured by transient and spectrally resolved photoconductivity experiments, photo-thermal deflection spectroscopy (PDS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) where substitutional nitrogen (P1-centre) and carbon defects (H1-centre) are detected. The results show that nominally undoped high quality polycrystalline CVD diamond is a n-type semiconductor due to the presence of substitutional nitrogen. The sub-band-gap optical absorption is governed by amorphous graphite present at grain boundaries. Spectrally resolved photoconductivity experiments measured in the same regime are partially dominated by diamond bulk properties which are comparable to single crystalline Ib and IIa diamond and partially by grain boundaries. Mobilities and drift length of carriers are discussed and compared to properties of single crystalline diamond.

  7. Numerical Facilities: A Review of the Literature. Technical Report 1985-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tal, Joseph S.

    This review of the relevant literature in the area of numerical facility attempts to clarify the construct of numerical facility and provide guidance for items tapping this ability. The review is presented in five parts. The first section introduces two approaches that can be used to investigate numerical facility, including factor analysis.…

  8. Fort Hood solar cogeneration facility conceptual design study. Volume II. System specification. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    The characteristics and design and the environmental requirements for a solar cogeneration facility at a Texas military facility are specified. In addition, the conceptual design and performance characteristics, cost and economic data and other information for the cogeneration facility designed to meet the requirements are summarized. (LEW)

  9. Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-01

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Seventh Quarter of the First Budget Period, April 1 through June 30, 1992, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion will include the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source; Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams. Combustion Gas Turbine; Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment; and Externally Fired Gas Turbine/Water Augmented Gas Turbine. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF).

  10. Low-level liquid radioactive waste treatment at Murmansk, Russia: Technical design and review of facility upgrade and expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, R.S.; Diamante, J.M.; Duffey, R.B.

    1996-07-01

    The governments of Norway and the US have committed their mutual cooperation and support the Murmansk Shipping Company (MSCo) to expand and upgrade the Low-Level Liquid Radioactive Waste (LLRW) treatment system located at the facilities of the Russian company RTP Atomflot, in Murmansk, Russia. RTP Atomflot provides support services to the Russian icebreaker fleet operated by the MSCo. The objective is to enable Russia to permanently cease disposing of this waste in Arctic waters. The proposed modifications will increase the facility`s capacity from 1,200 m{sup 3} per year to 5,000 m{sup 3} per year, will permit the facility to process high-salt wastes from the Russian Navy`s Northern fleet, and will improve the stabilization and interim storage of the processed wastes. The three countries set up a cooperative review of the evolving design information, conducted by a joint US and Norwegian technical team from April through December, 1995. To ensure that US and Norwegian funds produce a final facility which will meet the objectives, this report documents the design as described by Atomflot and the Russian business organization, ASPECT, both in design documents and orally. During the detailed review process, many questions were generated, and many design details developed which are outlined here. The design is based on the adsorption of radionuclides on selected inorganic resins, and desalination and concentration using electromembranes. The US/Norwegian technical team reviewed the available information and recommended that the construction commence; they also recommended that a monitoring program for facility performance be instituted.

  11. Technical Basis Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Radiation and Contamination Trending Program

    SciTech Connect

    KURTZ, J.E.

    2000-05-10

    This report documents the technical basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Program radiation and contamination trending program. The program consists of standardized radiation and contamination surveys of the KE Basin, radiation surveys of the KW basin, and radiation surveys of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVD) with the associated tracking. This report also discusses the remainder of radiological areas within the SNFP that do not have standardized trending programs and the basis for not having this program in those areas.

  12. HANDBOOK: GUIDE TO TECHNICAL RESOURCES FOR THE DESIGN OF LAND DISPOSAL FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Handbook facilitates the preparation and processing of land disposal permit applications. It directs the regulated community and the regulators to the appropriate EPA technical resource documents, as they prepare or review permits required under PL 480 (RCRA). Topics discuss...

  13. [Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion]. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This quarterly technical progress report summarizes work completed during the Second Quarter of the Second Budget Period, October 1 through December 31, 1993, under the Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-90MC25140 entitled ``Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion.`` The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scaleup of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: (1) Carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; (2) hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; (3) combustion gas turbine; (4) fuel cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF).

  14. Power Systems Development Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: 1. Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source. 2. Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams. 3. Combustion Gas Turbine. 4. Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility, finalizing the selection for the Carbonizer/Transport and the circulating pressurized fluidized-bed combustor (CPFBC) particulate control devices (PCDs), drafting the air permit for the facility and continue the installation of the transport reactor development unit (TRDU). The detailed design of the PSDF continued to refine interface points to streamline the design of the facility.

  15. MHD coal-fired flow facility. Annual technical progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Alstatt, M.C.; Attig, R.C.; Brosnan, D.A.

    1981-03-01

    The University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) reports on significant activity, task status, planned research, testing, development, and conclusions for the Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Coal-Fired Flow Faclity (CFFF) and the Energy Conversion Facility (ECF).

  16. Preliminary technical data summary No. 3 for the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Landon, L.F.

    1980-05-01

    This document presents an update on the best information presently available for the purpose of establishing the basis for the design of a Defense Waste Processing Facility. Objective of this project is to provide a facility to fix the radionuclides present in Savannah River Plant (SRP) high-level liquid waste in a high-integrity form (glass). Flowsheets and material balances reflect the alternate CAB case including the incorporation of low-level supernate in concrete. (DLC)

  17. Power systems development facility. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: (1) Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source. (2) Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams. (3) Combustion Gas Turbine. (4) Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF).

  18. Analysis of decommissioning costs for the AFRRI TRIGA reactor facility. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Forsbacka, M.; Moore, M.

    1989-12-01

    This report provides a cost analysis for decommissioning the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute (AFRRI) TRIGA reactor facility. AFRRI is not suggesting that the AFRRI TRIGA reactor facility be decommissioned. This report was prepared in compliance with paragraph 50.33 of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, which requires that funding for the decommissioning of reactor facilities be available when licensed activities cease. The planned method of decommissioning is complete decontamination (DECON) of the AFRRI TRIGA reactor site to allow for restoration of the site to full public access. The cost of DECON in 1990 dollars is estimated to be $3,200,000. The anticipated ancillary costs of facility site demobilization and spent fuel shipment will be an additional $600,000. Thus, the total cost of terminating reactor operations at AFRRI will be about $3,800,000. The primary basis for developing this cost estimate was a study of the decommissioning costs of similar reactor facility performed by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory, as provided in U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission publication NUREG/CR-1756. The data in this study were adapted to reflect the decommissioning requirements of the AFRRI TRIGA reactor facility.

  19. Diamond film by hot filament CVD method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirose, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Diamond synthesis by the hot filament CVD method is discussed. A hot filament decomposes gas mixtures and oxygen containing organic compounds such as alcohols. which are carbon sources. The resulting thin films, growth mechanisms, and characteristics and problems associated with the hot filament CVD method are analyzed and evaluated.

  20. FTIR monitoring of industrial scale CVD processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopfe, V.; Mosebach, H.; Meyer, M.; Sheel, D.; Grählert, W.; Throl, O.; Dresler, B.

    1998-06-01

    The goal is to improve chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and infiltration (CVI) process control by a multipurpose, knowledge based feedback system. For monitoring the CVD/CVI process in-situ FTIR spectroscopic data has been identified as input information. In the presentation, three commonly used, and distinctly different, types of industrial CVD/CVI processes are taken as test cases: (i) a thermal high capacity CVI batch process for manufacturing carbon fibre reinforced SiC composites for high temperature applications, (ii) a continuously driven CVD thermal process for coating float glass for energy protection, and (iii) a laser stimulated CVD process for continuously coating bundles of thin ceramic fibers. The feasibility of the concept with FTIR in-situ monitoring as a core technology has been demonstrated. FTIR monitoring sensibly reflects process conditions.

  1. Electronic properties of CVD and synthetic diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebel, C. E.; Müautnz, J.; Stutzmann, M.; Zachai, R.; Güautttler, H.

    1997-04-01

    Transport and contact properties of synthetic IIb- and intrinsic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) -diamond films are discussed. The samples have been investigated by time-of-flight and transient photoconductivity experiments using Cr/Au contacts. A hole depletion layer at the Cr/Au-IIb-diamond interface and an electron depletion layer at the Cr/Au-CVD-diamond interface is detected. The data indicate that our normally undoped CVD-diamond films are n-type semiconductors. In IIb diamond the mobilities of electrons and holes have been measured, while in CVD diamond no carrier transit can be detected due to the short Schubweg less than or equal to 1 μm. Two trap levels located approximately 190 meV below the conduction band and 670 meV above the valence band are deduced. Electron spin resonance experiments demonstrate that these CVD films are highly defective, containing about 1018 cm-3 carbon related defects (g=2.0029).

  2. Quality assurance project plan for the UMTRA technical assistance contractor hydrochemistry facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-07-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) hydrochemistry facility is used to perform a limited but important set of services for the UMTRA Project. Routine services include support of field-based hydrological and geochemical operations and water sampling activities. Less commonly, the hydrology and geochemistry staff undertake special studies and site characterization studies at this facility. It is also used to train hydrologists, geochemists, and groundwater sampling crews. A review of this Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) shall be accomplished once each calendar year. This review will be targeted to be accomplished not sooner than 6 months and not later than 18 months after the last review.

  3. CVD diamond layers for electrochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalska, M.; Fabisiak, K.; Wrzyszczyński, A.; Banaszak, A.; Szybowicz, M.; Paprocki, K.; Bała, W.; Bylicki, F.

    2014-09-01

    Diamond electrodes of different morphologies and qualities were manufactured by hot filament chemical deposition (HF CVD) techniques by changing the parameters of diamond growth process. The estimation of diamond quality and identification of different carbon phases was performed by Raman spectroscopy measurements. The effect of diamond quality and amorphous carbon phase content on the electrochemical response of an obtained diamond electrode in 0.5 M H2SO4 as supporting electrolyte was investigated by cyclic voltammetry with [Fe(CN)6]4-/3- as a redox probe. The kinetic parameters such as catalytic reaction rate constant k0 and electron transfer coefficient α were determined. The obtained results show that the analytical performance of undoped diamond electrodes can be implemented just by the change of diamond layers quality.

  4. Design and construction of the NMSU Geothermally Heated Greenhouse Research Facility: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenmackers, R.

    1988-11-01

    This report describes the design, construction, and performance of the New Mexico State University (NMSU) Geothermal Greenhouse Research Facility. Two 6000-square-foot greenhouses were built on the NMSU campus and supplied with geothermal energy for heating. The geothermal water is pumped from one of three wells producing water at temperatures from 141/degree/F to 148/degree/F. Heat is delivered to the greenhouse space by means of overhead fan-coil unit heaters. The two greenhouses are double-glazed on roof and wall surfaces employing a total of four different film materials: Tedlar/Reg Sign/, Melinex/Reg Sign/, Softglass/Reg Sign/, and Agrifilm/Reg Sign/. One greenhouse is cooled using a traditional fan and pad cooling system. The second greenhouse is cooled with a high-pressure fog system and natural ventilation through roof and side vents. A 2400-square-foot metal building next to the greenhouses provides office, work, and storage space for the facility. The greenhouse facility was leased to two commerical tenants who produced a variety of crops. The performance of the greenhouses was monitored and reported both qualitatively and quantitatively. Results from the tenant's pilot-scale studies in the NMSU greenhouse facility were transferred and applied to two commercial greenhouse ranges that were built in southern New Mexico during 1986/87. 9 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Operation, Maintenance and Management of Wastewater Treatment Facilities: A Bibliography of Technical Documents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Himes, Dottie

    This is an annotated bibliography of wastewater treatment manuals. Fourteen manuals are abstracted including: (1) A Planned Maintenance Management System for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plants; (2) Anaerobic Sludge Digestion, Operations Manual; (3) Emergency Planning for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facilities; (4) Estimating Laboratory Needs…

  6. 44 CFR 352.24 - Provision of technical assistance and Federal facilities and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS COMMERCIAL NUCLEAR POWER... and Federal facilities and resources. (a) Under a determination under subpart A (44 CFR 352.5(f) and... subpart A (44 CFR 352.6(c)(1)(2)). Upon a determination under subpart A (44 CFR 352.6(d)) that...

  7. Investigation of the Millimeter-Wave Plasma Assisted CVD Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Vikharev, A; Gorbachev, A; Kozlov, A; Litvak, A; Bykov, Y; Caplan, M

    2005-07-21

    A polycrystalline diamond grown by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique is recognized as a unique material for high power electronic devices owing to unrivaled combination of properties such as ultra-low microwave absorption, high thermal conductivity, high mechanical strength and chemical stability. Microwave vacuum windows for modern high power sources and transmission lines operating at the megawatt power level require high quality diamond disks with a diameter of several centimeters and a thickness of a few millimeters. The microwave plasma-assisted CVD technique exploited today to produce such disks has low deposition rate, which limits the availability of large size diamond disk windows. High-electron-density plasma generated by the millimeter-wave power was suggested for enhanced-growth-rate CVD. In this paper a general description of the 30 GHz gyrotron-based facility is presented. The output radiation of the gyrotron is converted into four wave-beams. Free localized plasma in the shape of a disk with diameter much larger than the wavelength of the radiation is formed in the intersection area of the wave-beams. The results of investigation of the plasma parameters, as well as the first results of diamond film deposition are presented. The prospects for commercially producing vacuum window diamond disks for high power microwave devices at much lower costs and processing times than currently available are outlined.

  8. Fort Hood solar cogeneration facility conceptual design study. Volume 1: Technical report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-08-01

    A solar heated heat transfer salt provides heat to a steam generation and provides space heating and air conditioning and hot water for the complex. The site and its climate are described briefly. Candidate site specific system configurations, technology assessments, system sizing, and the results of numerous trade studies leading toward the selection of the preferred system configuration are presented. A system level conceptual design of the cogeneration facility is presented, and the conceptual design of the subsystems (heliostats, receiver, tower, energy transport and storage, fossil energy subsystem, electric power generation subsystem, control, space conditioning and domestic hot water subsystem) are described. Results of the economic analysis of the cogeneration facility are presented, including a description of analysis methods used, assumptions and rationale, simulation models used, a brief summary of capital and operations and maintenance costs, fuel savings, results of the economic evaluations and an economic scenario for future applications.

  9. Technical publications of the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, 1980 through 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, J. N.

    1984-01-01

    This bibliography lists the publications sponsored by the NASA Wallops Flight Center/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Wallops Flight Facility during the period 1980 through 1983. The compilation contains citations listed by type of publication; i.e., NASA formal report, NASA contractor report, journal article, or presentation; by contract/grant number; and by accession number. Oceanography, astrophysics, artificial satellites, fluid mechanics, and sea ice are among the topics covered.

  10. 44 CFR 352.24 - Provision of technical assistance and Federal facilities and resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and Federal facilities and resources. (a) Under a determination under subpart A (44 CFR 352.5(f) and... subpart A (44 CFR 352.6(c)(1)(2)). Upon a determination under subpart A (44 CFR 352.6(d)) that Federal... implementing the determinations made under subpart A (44 CFR 352.5(f) and 352.6(d)) so that each Federal...

  11. Technical site characterization of the Mercer County Ash Disposal Facility: A case history

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.C.; Walton, C.G.; Zweig, L.T. )

    1993-03-01

    The Waste-Tech Services, Inc., Mercer County Ash Disposal Facility is a proposed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facility located SW of Princeton, Missouri. The facility is to accept, store, treat and landfill ash residues from RCRA-permitted hazardous waste incineration. The site was characterized for a permit application submitted to the Missouri Department of Natural Resource (MDNR). MDNR was involved during all site characterization stages, including MDNR review, input and oversight during the planning, field execution and report-preparation stages. Both parties agreed upon the needs required for characterizing the sites prior field work, and the MDNR ensured that scope of work stipulations were implemented in the field and reported. Three broad characterization categories were defined: (1) physical characteristics; (2) biological characteristics; and, (3) socio-economic considerations. Physical criteria include the geologic, geotechnical, hydrogeologic and hydrologic site conditions. Threatened and Endangered Species and Wetlands comprised the biologic issues. Socio-economics considered cultural resources, such as history and archeology, market proximity, capacity assurance and transportation.

  12. Aggregated technical and economic indicators and facilities coefficient in the building industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagy, Juraj

    2012-06-01

    Budgetary indicators, such as technical-economic indicators, are valuation tools commonly used in assessing indicative costs in civil engineering. Their applications are used across the professional construction spectrum, from preparation of the investment process to checking implementation of the construction, in the banking, insurance and property value estimation systems. The catalogues of specific financial indicators may have significant differences between them. These differences can result from different ways of processing the catalogues. As a result of the differences, situations may occur in practice in which a disparity pertains between the values obtained and the effect of the results of planning, implementation, monitoring or other activities related to the buildings.

  13. CVD silicon carbide mirrors for EUV applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keski-Kuha, Ritva A.; Osantowski, John F.; Leviton, Douglas B.; Saha, Timo T.; Wright, Geraldine A.; Boucarut, Rene A.; Fleetwood, Charles M.; Madison, Timothy J.

    1995-10-01

    Advances in optical coating and materials technology have made possible the development of instruments with substantially improved efficiency in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV). For example, the development of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) SiC mirrors provides an opportunity to extend the range of normal incidence instruments down to 60 nm. CVD-SiC is a highly polishable material yielding low scatter surfaces. High UV reflectivity and desirable mechanical and thermal properties make CVD-SiC an attractive mirror and/or coating material for EUV applications. The EUV performance of SiC mirrors as well as some strengths and problem areas are discussed.

  14. Decarbonized fuel production facility -- A technical strategy for coal in the next century

    SciTech Connect

    Badin, J.; DeLallo, M.; Temchin, J.

    1999-07-01

    The US electricity market is undergoing major changes. Deregulation, increased competition, and growing environmental concerns are major challenges facing the electric power industry. These challenges also have the potential to significantly inhibit the future use of coal to produce electricity. In this paper, the authors describe a technical strategy for the coal industry that can help assure coal's competitiveness during the next century as the industry responds to these major challenges. Recently, the US Department of Energy unveiled a new concept. ``Vision 21''--a futuristic way of combining high-efficiency power technologies with advanced coal processing technologies and environmental controls to create a near-zero discharge, multi-product energy complex. This paper presents one conceptualization of a Vision 21 Plant that focuses on production of hydrogen from coal. It will show how the concept can help assure that coal can remain competitive with natural gas as a fuel for baseload electricity generation for existing and new power plants. It can also provide a feedstock for chemical and liquid fuels production, even if emissions of carbon dioxide must be controlled. Analyses are presented that provide the basis for the projected economic and technical performance objectives.

  15. Materials sciences research. [research facilities, research projects, and technical reports of materials tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Research projects involving materials research conducted by various international test facilities are reported. Much of the materials research is classified in the following areas: (1) acousto-optic, acousto-electric, and ultrasonic research, (2) research for elucidating transport phenomena in well characterized oxides, (3) research in semiconductor materials and semiconductor devices, (4) the study of interfaces and interfacial phenomena, and (5) materials research relevant to natural resources. Descriptions of the individual research programs are listed alphabetically by the name of the author and show all personnel involved, resulting publications, and associated meeting speeches.

  16. Materials Science Clean Room Facility at Tulane University (Final Technical Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Altiero, Nicholas

    2014-10-28

    The project involves conversion of a 3,000 sq. ft. area into a clean room facility for materials science research. It will be accomplished in phases. Phase I will involve preparation of the existing space, acquisition and installation of clean room equipped with a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) processing system, and conversion of ancillary space to facilitate the interface with the clean room. From a capital perspective, Phases II and III will involve the acquisition of additional processing, fabrication, and characterization equipment and capabilities.

  17. Saturation of CVD Diamond Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lucile S. Dauffy; Richard A. Lerche; Greg J. Schmid; Jeffrey A. Koch; Christopher Silbernagel

    2005-01-01

    A 5 x 0.25 mm Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) diamond detector, with a voltage bias of + 250V, was excited by a 400 nm laser (3.1 eV photons) in order to study the saturation of the wafer and its surrounding electronics. In a first experiment, the laser beam energy was increased from a few tens of a pJ to about 100 µJ, and the signal from the diamond was recorded until full saturation of the detection system was achieved. Clear saturation of the detection system was observed at about 40 V, which corresponds with the expected saturation at 10% of the applied bias (250V). The results indicate that the interaction mechanism of the 3.1 eV photons in the diamond (Ebandgap = 5.45 eV) is not a multi-photon process but is linked to the impurities and defects of the crystal. In a second experiment, the detector was irradiated by a saturating first laser pulse and then by a delayed laser pulse of equal or smaller amplitude with delays of 5, 10, and 20 ns. The results suggest that the diamond and associated electronics recover within 10 to 20 ns after a strong saturating pulse.

  18. MHD Coal-Fired Flow Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Altstatt, M. C.; Attig, R. C.; Baucum, W. E.

    1980-07-31

    Significant activity, task status, planned research, testing, development, and conclusions for the Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) and the Energy Conversion Facility (ECF), formerly the Research and Development Laboratory, are reported. CFFF Bid Package construction is now virtually complete. The remaining construction effort is being conducted by UTSI. On the quench system, another Task 1 effort, the cyclone was erected on schedule. On Tasks 2 through 6, vitiation heater and nozzle fabrication were completed, an investigation of a fish kill (in no way attributable to CFFF operations) in Woods Reservoir was conducted, major preparation for ambient air quality monitoring was made, a broadband data acquisition system for enabling broadband data to be correlated with all general performance data was selected, a Coriolis effect coal flow meter was installed at the CFFF. On Task 7, an analytical model of the coal flow combustor configuration was prepared, MHD generator testing which, in part, involved continued materials evaluation and the heat transfer characteristics of capped and uncapped electrodes was conducted, agglomerator utilization was studied, and development of a laser velocimeter system was nearly completed.

  19. Technical report for the generic site add-on facility for plutonium polishing

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, E. D.

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide environmental data and reference process information associated with incorporating plutonium polishing steps (dissolution, impurity removal, and conversion to oxide powder) into the genetic-site Mixed-Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MOXFF). The incorporation of the plutonium polishing steps will enable the removal of undesirable impurities, such as gallium and americium, known to be associated with the plutonium. Moreover, unanticipated impurities can be removed, including those that may be contained in (1) poorly characterized feed materials, (2) corrosion products added from processing equipment, and (3) miscellaneous materials contained in scrap recycle streams. These impurities will be removed to the extent necessary to meet plutonium product purity specifications for MOX fuels. Incorporation of the plutonium polishing steps will mean that the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) will need to produce a plutonium product that can b e dissolved at the MOXFF in nitric acid at a suitable rate (sufficient to meet overall production requirements) with the minimal usage of hydrofluoric acid, and its complexing agent, aluminum nitrate. This function will require that if the PDCF product is plutonium oxide powder, that powder must be produced, stored, and shipped without exceeding a temperature of 600 C.

  20. MHD Coal Fired Flow Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, July-September 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Altstatt, M. C.; Attig, R. C.; Brosnan, D. A.

    1980-11-01

    Significant activity, task status, planned research, testing, development, and conclusions for the Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) and the Energy Conversion Facility (ECF) are described. On Task 1, the first phase of the downstream quench system was completed. On Task 2, all three combustor sections were completed, hydrotested, ASME code stamped, and delivered to UTSI. The nozzle was also delivered. Fabrication of support stands and cooling water manifolds for the combustor and vitiation heater were completed, heat transfer and thermal stress analysis, along with design development, were conducted on the generator and radiant furnace and secondary combustor installation progressed as planned. Under Task 3 an Elemental Analyzer and Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer/Graphite Furnace were received and installed, sites were prepared for two air monitoring stations, phytoplankton analysis began, and foliage and soil sampling was conducted using all study plots. Some 288 soil samples were combined to make 72 samples which were analyzed. Also, approval was granted to dispose of MHD flyash and slag at the Franklin County landfill. Task 4 effort consisted of completing all component test plans, and establishing the capability of displaying experimental data in graphical format. Under Task 7, a preliminary testing program for critical monitoring of the local current and voltage non-uniformities in the generator electrodes was outlined, electrode metal wear characteristics were documented, boron nitride/refrasil composite interelectrode sealing was improved, and several refractories for downstream MHD applications were evaluated with promising results.

  1. Fracture Characteristics of Monolayer CVD-Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Hwangbo, Yun; Lee, Choong-Kwang; Kim, Sang-Min; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Kwang-Seop; Jang, Bongkyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Lee, Seoung-Ki; Kim, Seong-Su; Ahn, Jong-Hyun; Lee, Seung-Mo

    2014-01-01

    We have observed and analyzed the fracture characteristics of the monolayer CVD-graphene using pressure bulge testing setup. The monolayer CVD-graphene has appeared to undergo environmentally assisted subcritical crack growth in room condition, i.e. stress corrosion cracking arising from the adsorption of water vapor on the graphene and the subsequent chemical reactions. The crack propagation in graphene has appeared to be able to be reasonably tamed by adjusting applied humidity and stress. The fracture toughness, describing the ability of a material containing inherent flaws to resist catastrophic failure, of the CVD-graphene has turned out to be exceptionally high, as compared to other carbon based 3D materials. These results imply that the CVD-graphene could be an ideal candidate as a structural material notwithstanding environmental susceptibility. In addition, the measurements reported here suggest that specific non-continuum fracture behaviors occurring in 2D monoatomic structures can be macroscopically well visualized and characterized. PMID:24657996

  2. Preliminary design for a Zero Gravity Test Facility (ZGTF). Volume 1: Technical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germain, A.

    1981-01-01

    The functional requirements and best conceptual design of a test facility that simulates weightless operating conditions for a high gain antenna systems (HGAS), that will broadcast to the Tracking Data Relay Satellites were defined. The typical HGAS defined is mounted on a low Earth orbiting satellite, and consists of an antenna with a double gimbal pointing system mounted on a 13 foot long mast. Typically, the gimbals are driven by pulse modulated dc motors or stepper motors. These drivers produce torques on the mast, with jitter that excites the satellite and may cause disturbances to sensitive experiments. The dynamic properties of the antenna support structure (mast), including flexible mode characteristics were defined. The torque profile induced on the spacecraft by motion of the high gain antenna was estimated. Gain and phase margins of the servo control loop of the gimbal drive electronics was also verified.

  3. Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. Technical progress report, November 1, 1993--October 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, A.J.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics in order to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks and in particular to understand the role of turbulence. So that they can continue to study the physics that is most relevant to the fusion program, TEXT completed a significant device upgrade this year. The new capabilities of the device and new and innovative diagnostics were exploited in all main program areas including: (1) configuration studies; (2) electron cyclotron heating physics; (3) improved confinement modes; (4) edge physics/impurity studies; (5) central turbulence and transport; and (6) transient transport. Details of the progress in each of the research areas are described.

  4. Design of the Grimethorpe Experimental Facility as of March 1981: a technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    The Experimental Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor, which has been built as an extension to the National Coal Board Power Station, which is adjacent to Grimethorpe Colliery, Yorkshire, England, is described in this report. The Governments of the United Kingdom, the United States of America and the Federal Republic of Germany, under the auspices of the International Energy Agency, have agreed to share equally between them the costs of building and operating the plant. Control of the project was vested in an Executive Committee consisting of one representative of each Government with all decisions requiring unanimity. The actual operation of the project was vested in an Operating Agent, NCB (IEA Services) Ltd., a wholly owned subsidiary of the National Coal Board. The Implementing Agreement envisages a seven year project to be executed in four stages: (1) Procurement of Design Study with accompanying tender documents. (2) Tendering for construction of the Plant; study of appraisal of tenders. (3) Construction and acceptance of the Plant. (4) Operation of the Plant. The project is now towards the end of Stage 3. Construction has been completed and commissioning is in progress to prepare the plant for the start of the operational phase in Autumn 1981. Because of the confidentiality of much of the design information, for the purposes of this report technical descriptions have been confined to that of a general appraisal.

  5. MHD Coal-Fired Flow Facility. Quarterly/annual technical progress report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Dicks, J. B.; Chapman, J. N.; Crawford, L. W.

    1980-02-01

    In this Fourth Quarterly/Annual Report submitted under DOE contracts EX-76-C-01-1760 and DE-AC02-79ET10815, the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) reports on significant activity, task status, planned research, testing, and development, and conclusions for the Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) and the Research and Development Laboratory. Work on the CFFF progressed with only minor problems. Total construction activity for all site work presently awarded is nearly 98% complete. Water analysis shows that Woods Reservoir baseline conditions are within EPA or Tennessee drinking water standards. For the primary combustor, the vitiation heater and primary combustor fabrication drawings were completed and the nozzle design was completed. The drum module for the radiant slagging furnace was awarded. On the MHD Power Generator, development continued in several areas of advanced analysis including development of time-dependent models for use with the one-dimensional code. For seed regeneration, the tentative determination is that the Tomlinson Tampella is the most economically viable method. With regard to capped electrode erosion, investigations have shown that the major degradation of the cladding still present is at the leading edge of the capped anode. To alleviate this, plans are to hot work the noble metal in the bending operation. In resolving another problem, a system employing the modified line-reversal method has been assembled and successfully tested to measure absolute plasma temperatures.

  6. Technical assessment of workplace air sampling requirements at tank farm facilities. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, P.A.

    1994-09-21

    WHC-CM-1-6 is the primary guidance for radiological control at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). It was written to implement DOE N 5480.6 ``US Department of Energy Radiological Control Manual`` as it applies to programs at Hanford which are now overseen by WHC. As such, it complies with Title 10, Part 835 of the Code of Federal Regulations. In addition to WHC-CM-1-6, there is HSRCM-1, the ``Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual`` and several Department of Energy (DOE) Orders, national consensus standards, and reports that provide criteria, standards, and requirements for workplace air sampling programs. This document provides a summary of these, as they apply to WHC facility workplace air sampling programs. This document also provides an evaluation of the compliance of Tank Farms` workplace air sampling program to the criteria, standards, and requirements and documents compliance with the requirements where appropriate. Where necessary, it also indicates changes needed to bring specific locations into compliance.

  7. Improving measurement quality assurance for photon irradiations at Department of Energy facilities. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    For radiation-instrument calibration to be generally acceptable throughout the US, direct or indirect traceability to a primary standard is required. In most instances, one of the primary standards established at NIST is employed for this purpose. The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is an example of a program employing dosimetry based on the NIST primary photon-, beta particle- and neutron-dosimetry standards. The NIST primary dosimetry standards for bremsstrahlung were first established in the 1950s. They have been updated since then on several occasions. In the 1970s, Technical Committee 85 of the International Standards Organization (ISO) started its work on establishing sets of internationally acceptable, well-characterized photon beams for the calibration of radiation-protection instruments. It is the intent of this paper to make a detailed comparison between the current NIST and the most up-to-date ISO techniques. At present, 41 bremsstrahlung techniques are specified in ISO 4037 while NIST supports a total of 32 techniques. Given the existing equivalences, it makes sense to try to extend the NIST techniques to cover more of the ISO Narrow Spectrum and High Air-Kerma Rate Series. These extensions will also allow the possibility for use of ISO beam techniques in future revisions of the DOELAP standard, which has been suggested by DOE. To this end, NIST was funded by DOE to procure material and make adaptations to the existing NIST x-ray calibration ranges to allow NIST to have the capability of producing all the ISO bremsstrahlung techniques. The following sections describe the steps that were taken to achieve this.

  8. CVD 908, CVD 908-htrA, and CVD 909 live oral typhoid vaccines: a logical progression.

    PubMed

    Tacket, Carol O; Levine, Myron M

    2007-07-15

    Typhoid fever remains an important public health problem in many parts of the world. Despite the availability of oral Ty21a (Vivotif; Berna Biotech) and parenteral Vi polysaccharide vaccine (Typhim Vi; Aventis Pasteur), improved typhoid fever vaccines have been sought. These include a series of vaccine candidates developed at the Center for Vaccine Development, University of Maryland, based on attenuation of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi by deletions in the aroC, aroD, and htrA genes. These vaccine candidates, designated "CVD 908," "CVD 908-htrA," and "CVD 909," have been developed and tested in volunteers with variable success. This review summarizes the clinical data that directed the logical progression of this vaccine development strategy. PMID:17582563

  9. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Electrical System Design Description

    SciTech Connect

    BRISBIN, S.A.

    1999-06-17

    This document provides a technical explanation of the design and operation of the electrical system for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. This document identifies the requirements, and the basis for the requirements and details on how the requirements have been implemented in the design and construction of the facility. This document also provides general guidance for the surveillance, testing, and maintenance of this system.

  10. Variability in Chemical Vapor Deposited Zinc Sulfide: Assessment of Legacy and International CVD ZnS Materials

    SciTech Connect

    McCloy, John S.; Korenstein, Ralph

    2009-10-06

    Samples of CVD ZnS from the United States, Germany, Israel, and China were evaluated using transmission spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and biaxial flexure testing. Visible and near-infrared scattering, 6 μm absorption, and ultraviolet cut-on edge varied substantially in tested materials. Crystallographic hexagonality and texture was determined and correlated with optical scattering. Transmission cut-on (ultraviolet edge) blue-shifts with annealing and corresponds to visible color but not the 6 μm absorption. Photoluminescence results suggest that CVD ZnS exhibits a complex suite of electronic bandgap defects. All CVD ZnS tested with biaxial flexure exhibit similar fracture strength values and Weibull moduli. This survey suggests that technical understanding of the structure and optical properties CVD ZnS is still in its infancy.

  11. Technical progress report for the Magnetohydrodynamics Coal-Fired Flow Facility, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    In this quarterly technical progress report, UTSI reports on progress in developing the technology for the steam bottoming portion of the MHD Steam Combined Cycle power plant. The experimental program was effectively terminated and reoriented to preparation of reports on previous tests and maintaining the DOE facility. In this report, the results of tube corrosion studies for the samples removed after 500 hours of western coal testing are summarized. Plans for evaluating the tube samples after termination of the tests at 1,047 hours are discussed. The status of development of models to predict ash deposition on conductive heat transfer tubes and their validation with experimental data is presented. Modeling and experiments to induce agglomeration of particulate are also discussed. Significant accomplishments, findings and conclusions include: In summary, corrosion measurements on typical, commercial stainless steels and on low and intermediate chromium steels after 639 hours of LMF5 exposure in the SHTM test sections revealed corrosion that was generally acceptable in magnitude if corrosion kinetics are parabolic, but, except for the higher chromium alloys 253MA and 310, not if kinetics are linear. The production of bilayer scales, and the large amount of scale separation and fragmentation make long term parabolic kinetics unlikely, and result in a high likelihood for breakaway corrosion.

  12. Solution based CVD of main group materials.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Caroline E; Carmalt, Claire J

    2016-02-21

    This critical review focuses on the solution based chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of main group materials with particular emphasis on their current and potential applications. Deposition of thin films of main group materials, such as metal oxides, sulfides and arsenides, have been researched owing to the array of applications which utilise them including solar cells, transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) and window coatings. Solution based CVD processes, such as aerosol-assisted (AA)CVD have been developed due to their scalability and to overcome the requirement of suitably volatile precursors as the technique relies on the solubility rather than volatility of precursors which vastly extends the range of potentially applicable compounds. An introduction into the applications and precursor requirements of main group materials will be presented first followed by a detailed discussion of their deposition reviewed according to this application. The challenges and prospects for further enabling research in terms of emerging main group materials will be discussed. PMID:26446057

  13. Iridium-coated rhenium thrusters by CVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, J. T.; Kazaroff, J. M.; Appel, M. A.

    1989-01-01

    Operation of spacecraft thrusters at increased temperature reduces propellant requirements. Inasmuch as propellant comprises the bulk of a satellite's mass, even a small percentage reduction makes possible a significant enhancement of the mission in terms of increased payload. Because of its excellent high temperature strength, rhenium is often the structural material of choice. It can be fabricated into free-standing shapes by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) onto an expendable mandrel. What rhenium lacks is oxidation resistance, but this can be provided by a coating of iridium, also by CVD. This paper describes the process used by Ultramet to fabricate 22-N (5-lbf) and, more recently, 445-N (100-lbf) Ir/Re thrusters; characterizes the CVD-deposited materials; and summarizes the materials effects of firing these thrusters. Optimal propellant mixture ratios can be employed because the materials withstand an oxidizing environment up to the melting temperature of iridium, 2400 C (4350 F).

  14. Iridium-coated rhenium thrusters by CVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, John T.; Kazaroff, John M.; Appel, Marshall A.

    1988-01-01

    Operation of spacecraft thrusters at increased temperature reduces propellant requirements. Inasmuch as propellant comprises the bulk of a satellite's mass, even a small percentage reduction makes possible a significant enhancement of the mission in terms of increased payload. Because of its excellent high temperature strength, rhenium is often the structural material of choice. It can be fabricated into free-standing shapes by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) onto an expendable mandrel. What rhenium lacks is oxidation resistance, but this can be provided by a coating of iridium, also by CVD. This paper describes the process used by Ultramet to fabricate 22-N (5-lbf) and, more recently, 445-N (100-lbf) Ir/Re thrusters; characterizes the CVD-deposited materials; and summarizes the materials effects of firing these thrusters. Optimal propellant mixture ratios can be employed because the materials withstand an oxidizing environment up to the meltimg temperature of iridium, 2400 C (4350 F).

  15. Annual Report for Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011

    SciTech Connect

    French, Sean B.; Shuman, Rob

    2012-05-22

    As a condition to the Disposal Authorization Statement issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) on March 17, 2010, a comprehensive performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program must be implemented for the Technical Area 54, Area G disposal facility. Annual determinations of the adequacy of the performance assessment and composite analysis are to be conducted under the maintenance program to ensure that the conclusions reached by those analyses continue to be valid. This report summarizes the results of the fiscal year 2011 annual review for Area G. Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis was issued in 2008 and formally approved in 2009. These analyses are expected to provide reasonable estimates of the long-term performance of Area G and, hence, the disposal facility's ability to comply with Department of Energy (DOE) performance objectives. Annual disposal receipt reviews indicate that smaller volumes of waste will require disposal in the pits and shafts at Area G relative to what was projected for the performance assessment and composite analysis. The future inventories are projected to decrease modestly for the pits but increase substantially for the shafts due to an increase in the amount of tritium that is projected to require disposal. Overall, however, changes in the projected future inventories of waste are not expected to compromise the ability of Area G to satisfy DOE performance objectives. The Area G composite analysis addresses potential impacts from all waste disposed of at the facility, as well as other sources of radioactive material that may interact with releases from Area G. The level of knowledge about the other sources included in the composite analysis has not changed sufficiently to call into question the validity of that analysis. Ongoing environmental surveillance activities are conducted at, and in the vicinity of, Area G. However, the information generated by many

  16. Thin CVD Coating Protects Titanium Aluminide Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Ronald; Wallace, Terryl; Cunnington, George; Robinson, John

    1994-01-01

    Feasibility of using very thin CVD coatings to provide both protection against oxidation and surfaces of low catalytic activity for thin metallic heat-shield materials demonstrated. Use of aluminum in compositions increases emittances of coatings and reduces transport of oxygen through coatings to substrates. Coatings light in weight and applied to foil-gauge materials with minimum weight penalties.

  17. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 2): Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center (Area B Navy Fire Test Facility), Atlantic County, Atlantic City International Airport, NJ, September 20, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for Area B, the Navy Fire Test Facility, at the FAA Technical Center, Atlantic City Internatioal Airport, New Jersey. The selected remedy for Area B includes: Installation of additional monitoring wells; Continued ground water and surface water monitoring; Installation and operation of air sparging wells, vapor extraction wells and monitoring probes; On-site vapor treatment (if necessary); and Five year reviews.

  18. Gas Composition Transients in the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    PACKER, M.J.

    2000-05-10

    The purpose of this document is to evaluate selected problems involving the prediction of transient gas compositions during Cold Vacuum Drying operations. The problems were evaluated to answer specific design questions. The document is formatted as a topical report with each section representing a specific problem solution. The problem solutions are reported in the calculation format specified in HNF-1613, Rev. 0, EP 7.6.

  19. Comparison of Perceived and Technical Healthcare Quality in Primary Health Facilities: Implications for a Sustainable National Health Insurance Scheme in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Alhassan, Robert Kaba; Duku, Stephen Opoku; Janssens, Wendy; Nketiah-Amponsah, Edward; Spieker, Nicole; van Ostenberg, Paul; Arhinful, Daniel Kojo; Pradhan, Menno; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Quality care in health facilities is critical for a sustainable health insurance system because of its influence on clients’ decisions to participate in health insurance and utilize health services. Exploration of the different dimensions of healthcare quality and their associations will help determine more effective quality improvement interventions and health insurance sustainability strategies, especially in resource constrained countries in Africa where universal access to good quality care remains a challenge. Purpose To examine the differences in perceptions of clients and health staff on quality healthcare and determine if these perceptions are associated with technical quality proxies in health facilities. Implications of the findings for a sustainable National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) in Ghana are also discussed. Methods This is a cross-sectional study in two southern regions in Ghana involving 64 primary health facilities: 1,903 households and 324 health staff. Data collection lasted from March to June, 2012. A Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test was performed to determine differences in client and health staff perceptions of quality healthcare. Spearman’s rank correlation test was used to ascertain associations between perceived and technical quality care proxies in health facilities, and ordered logistic regression employed to predict the determinants of client and staff-perceived quality healthcare. Results Negative association was found between technical quality and client-perceived quality care (coef. = -0.0991, p<0.0001). Significant staff-client perception differences were found in all healthcare quality proxies, suggesting some level of unbalanced commitment to quality improvement and potential information asymmetry between clients and service providers. Overall, the findings suggest that increased efforts towards technical quality care alone will not necessarily translate into better client-perceived quality care and willingness to

  20. Moving Bed, Granular Bed Filter Development Program: Option 1, Component Test Facility. Task 2, Identification of technical issues

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, J.C.; Wilson, K.B.

    1994-03-01

    Combustion Power, under the auspices of the US Department of Energy, is developing a moving granular-bed filter for the control of particulate in gasification and pressurized fluidized bed environments. In Task 2, technical issues are identified which need to be resolved for the granular-bed filter to be commercially viable. The technical issues are ranked in relative importance.

  1. CVD-Enabled Graphene Manufacture and Technology.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Stephan; Braeuninger-Weimer, Philipp; Weatherup, Robert S

    2015-07-16

    Integrated manufacturing is arguably the most challenging task in the development of technology based on graphene and other 2D materials, particularly with regard to the industrial demand for “electronic-grade” large-area films. In order to control the structure and properties of these materials at the monolayer level, their nucleation, growth and interfacing needs to be understood to a level of unprecedented detail compared to existing thin film or bulk materials. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has emerged as the most versatile and promising technique to develop graphene and 2D material films into industrial device materials and this Perspective outlines recent progress, trends, and emerging CVD processing pathways. A key focus is the emerging understanding of the underlying growth mechanisms, in particular on the role of the required catalytic growth substrate, which brings together the latest progress in the fields of heterogeneous catalysis and classic crystal/thin-film growth. PMID:26240694

  2. CVD-Enabled Graphene Manufacture and Technology

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Integrated manufacturing is arguably the most challenging task in the development of technology based on graphene and other 2D materials, particularly with regard to the industrial demand for “electronic-grade” large-area films. In order to control the structure and properties of these materials at the monolayer level, their nucleation, growth and interfacing needs to be understood to a level of unprecedented detail compared to existing thin film or bulk materials. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has emerged as the most versatile and promising technique to develop graphene and 2D material films into industrial device materials and this Perspective outlines recent progress, trends, and emerging CVD processing pathways. A key focus is the emerging understanding of the underlying growth mechanisms, in particular on the role of the required catalytic growth substrate, which brings together the latest progress in the fields of heterogeneous catalysis and classic crystal/thin-film growth. PMID:26240694

  3. Picosecond photoconductivity of natural and CVD diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnov, Serge V.; Pimenov, Sergej M.; Ralchenko, Victor G.; Klimentov, Sergei M.; Konov, Vitali I.; Korotoushenko, K. G.; Obraztsova, E. D.; Plotnikova, S. P.; Sagatelyan, D. M.; Holly, Sandor

    1995-07-01

    Photoexcitation and recombination of nonequilibrium charge carriers in both natural gemstone diamonds and CVD (chemical vapor deposition) polycrystalline diamond films in UV spectrum regions have been investigated. Transient picosecond photoconductivity technique applied permitted to conduct measurements with the time resolution better than 200 picoseconds and to register a charge carrier concentration value as low as 1020 - 1013 cm-3. The dependencies of photocurrent amplitude as a function of incident laser radiation intensity in the range from 103 to 1010 W/cm2 have been obtained. Charge carrier lifetimes had been measured and charge carrier drift mobility were estimated. It is shown that the electronic properties of high quality thick CVD diamond films are comparable to those of the most perfect natural type IIa crystals. Investigation of Raman and luminescence spectra of diamonds have been performed along with scanning electron microscopy studies to characterize bulk and surface structure of tested specimens.

  4. Scrolling of Suspended CVD Graphene Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynov, Oleg; Yeom, Sinchul; Bockrath, Marc; UC: Riverside Team

    Carbon Nanoscrolls, one dimensional spiral forms of graphitic carbon, have attracted recent interest due to their novel proposed properties. Although various production methods and studies of carbon nanoscrolls have been performed, low yield and poor controllability of their synthesis have slowed progress in this field. Suspended graphene membranes and carbon nanotubes have been predicted as promising systems for the formation of graphene scrolls. We have suspended chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown graphene over large holes in a Si/SiO2 substrate to make suspended membranes upon which nanotubes are placed. Initial experiments have been performed showing that tears or cuts of the suspended sheet can initiate scrolling. Our latest progress towards carbon nanotube initiated formation of graphene scrolls and suspended CVD graphene scrolling, along with measurements of these novel structures will be presented.

  5. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Electrical System Design Description

    SciTech Connect

    SINGH, G.

    2000-05-01

    This system design description (SDD) provides a technical explanation of the design and operation of the electrical system for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). This SDD also identifies the requirements, and the basis for the requirements and details on how the requirements have been implemented in the design and construction of the facility. This SDD also provides general guidance for the surveillance, testing, and maintenance of this system.

  6. Technical Basis Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Radiation and Contamination Trending Program

    SciTech Connect

    ELGIN, J.C.

    2000-10-02

    This report documents the technical basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Program radiation and contamination trending program. The program consists of standardized radiation and contamination surveys of the KE Basin, radiation surveys of the KW basin, radiation surveys of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVD), and radiation surveys of the Canister Storage Building (CSB) with the associated tracking. This report also discusses the remainder of radiological areas within the SNFP that do not have standardized trending programs and the basis for not having this program in those areas.

  7. Homocysteine, B-vitamins and CVD.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Helene; Pentieva, Kristina; Hoey, Leane; Ward, Mary

    2008-05-01

    There is considerable interest in plasma homocysteine (tHcy) as a CVD risk factor. Although the secondary prevention trials published to date have been inconclusive in confirming a benefit of tHcy-lowering treatment with B-vitamins on CVD events generally, such studies are widely recognised to have been insufficiently powered to detect a significant effect for the predicted magnitude of association between tHcy and heart disease risk, and therefore cannot be interpreted as evidence that no relationship exists. In fact, a recent meta-analysis of clinical trials has confirmed that folic acid supplementation reduces the risk of stroke, particularly in individuals without a history of stroke. Evidence supporting a causal relationship between elevated tHcy and heart disease also comes from genetic studies. The most important genetic determinant of tHcy in the general population is the common C677T variant in methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) that results in higher tHcy. Individuals with the homozygous mutant (TT) genotype have a significantly higher (14-21%) risk of heart disease. Plasma tHcy is very responsive to intervention with the B-vitamins required for its metabolism, in particular folic acid, and to a lesser extent vitamins B12 and B6. Thus, although primarily aimed at reducing neural-tube defects, folic acid fortification may have an important role in the primary prevention of CVD via tHcy lowering. Besides folate, riboflavin is required as a cofactor for MTHFR and enhanced riboflavin status results in a marked lowering in tHcy specifically in individuals with the TT genotype, presumably by neutralising the variant form of the enzyme. About 10% of the UK and Irish populations have the TT genotype. In the present paper the potential role of folate and related B-vitamins in the primary prevention of CVD and the implications for nutrition policy are explored. PMID:18412997

  8. Technical assistance to Ohio closure sites; Technologies to address leachate from the on-site disposal facility at Fernald Environmental Management Project, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry

    2002-08-26

    On August 6-7, 2002, a Technical Assistance Team (''Team'') from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) met with Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) personnel in Ohio to assess approaches to remediating uranium-contaminated leachate from the On-Site Disposal Facility (OSDF). The Team was composed of technical experts from national labs, technology centers, and industry and was assembled in response to a request from the FEMP Aquifer Restoration Project. Dave Brettschneider of Fluor Fernald, Inc., requested that a Team of experts be convened to review technologies for the removal of uranium in both brine ion exchange regeneration solution from the Advanced Wastewater Treatment facility and in the leachate from the OSDF. The Team was asked to identify one or more technologies for bench-scale testing as a cost effective alternative to remove uranium so that the brine regeneration solution from the Advanced Waste Water Treatment facility and the leachate from the OSDF can be discharged without further treatment. The Team was also requested to prepare a recommended development and demonstration plan for the alternative technologies. Finally, the Team was asked to make recommendations on the optimal technical solution for field implementation. The Site's expected outcomes for this effort are schedule acceleration, cost reduction, and better long-term stewardship implementation. To facilitate consideration of the most appropriate technologies, the Team was divided into two groups to consider the brine and the leachate separately, since they represent different sources with different constraints on solutions, e.g., short-term versus very long-term and concentrated versus dilute contaminant matrices. This report focuses on the technologies that are most appropriate for the leachate from the OSDF. Upon arriving at FEMP, project personnel asked the Team to concentrate its efforts on evaluating potential technologies and

  9. Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source; Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams; Combustion Gas Turbine; and Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility.

  10. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR DOE STANDARD 3013 EQUIVALENCY SUPPORTING REDUCED TEMPERATURE STABILIZATION OF OXALATE-DERIVED PLUTONIUM DIOXIDE PRODUCED BY THE HB-LINE FACILITY AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, J. M.; Livingston, R. R.; Berg, J. M.; Veirs, D. K.

    2013-02-06

    This report documents the technical basis for determining that stabilizing highpurity PuO{sub 2} derived from oxalate precipitation at the SRS HB-Line facility at a minimum of 625 {degree}C for at least four hours in an oxidizing atmosphere is equivalent to stabilizing at a minimum of 950 {degree}C for at least two hours as regards meeting the objectives of stabilization defined by DOE-STD-3013 if the material is handled in a way to prevent excessive absorption of water.

  11. Technical/commercial feasibility study of the production of fuel-grade ethanol from corn: 100-million-gallon-per-year production facility in Myrtle Grove, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-05-01

    The technical and engineering plan for an ethanol from corn fuel grade production facility is given. Included is a review of current technology, process technology recommendation, single vs. multi by-product process, process description, resource requirements, utilities, use of boiler flue gas for by-product drying, plant layout alternatives, production schedule, and procurement plan. As components of production the following are covered: corn supply, other raw materials supply, site selection, and the socio-economic environment of the area. The community infrastructure of Plaquemines Parish is described.

  12. An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Aaron K; Webber, Michael E

    2012-07-01

    This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price. PMID:22425189

  13. An integrated analytical framework for quantifying the LCOE of waste-to-energy facilities for a range of greenhouse gas emissions policy and technical factors

    SciTech Connect

    Townsend, Aaron K.; Webber, Michael E.

    2012-07-15

    This study presents a novel integrated method for considering the economics of waste-to-energy (WTE) facilities with priced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions based upon technical and economic characteristics of the WTE facility, MSW stream, landfill alternative, and GHG emissions policy. The study demonstrates use of the formulation for six different policy scenarios and explores sensitivity of the results to ranges of certain technical parameters as found in existing literature. The study shows that details of the GHG emissions regulations have large impact on the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of WTE and that GHG regulations can either increase or decrease the LCOE of WTE depending on policy choices regarding biogenic fractions from combusted waste and emissions from landfills. Important policy considerations are the fraction of the carbon emissions that are priced (i.e. all emissions versus only non-biogenic emissions), whether emissions credits are allowed due to reducing fugitive landfill gas emissions, whether biogenic carbon sequestration in landfills is credited against landfill emissions, and the effectiveness of the landfill gas recovery system where waste would otherwise have been buried. The default landfill gas recovery system effectiveness assumed by much of the industry yields GHG offsets that are very close to the direct non-biogenic GHG emissions from a WTE facility, meaning that small changes in the recovery effectiveness cause relatively larger changes in the emissions factor of the WTE facility. Finally, the economics of WTE are dependent on the MSW stream composition, with paper and wood being advantageous, metal and glass being disadvantageous, and plastics, food, and yard waste being either advantageous or disadvantageous depending upon the avoided tipping fee and the GHG emissions price.

  14. Role of sulodexide in the treatment of CVD.

    PubMed

    Andreozzi, G M

    2014-06-01

    Treatment of vascular diseases should be based on established pathophysiological concepts, and this also applies to chronic venous disease (CVD). On the basis of the latest research in this field, this paper summarizes the most advanced pathophysiological knowledge regarding the hemodynamics of the large veins and of the microcirculation, the endothelial function and inflammation, and the use of sulodexide in the treatment of CVD. The emerging theories on the pathophysiology of CVD consider inflammation, endothelial glycocalyx dysfunction, and the consequent changes in the extracellular matrix to play key roles in the development of CVD, and support a renewed interest in the research and application of sulodexide. As part of active approach to the treatment of CVD including edema and trophic venous alterations, sulodexide could help to alleviate progressive signs and symptoms of disease in any clinical CEAP class of CVD, from C1 to C6. PMID:24936534

  15. CVD diamond as an optical material for adverse environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snail, Keith A.

    A status report is presented on the obstacles and current research related to using CVD diamond as an optical material. Problems discussed include properties of CVD carbon deposits, including structure, thermal conductivity and oxidation resistance, which are relevant to the optical uses of diamond; absorption coefficient measurements on CVD diamond in the visible and IR; and a review of various aspects of the synthesis of CVD diamond, including the growth of transparent and translucent diamond, efforts to grow diamond at low substrate temperatures, and approches to reducing the optical scatter of as grown polycrystalline diamond films and windows. Particular attention is given to techniques for reducing optical scatter which involve modifying materials morphologies during the growth process by controlling nucleation density, renucleaton frequency, and/or the orientation of crystal faces at film surfaces; techniques for postdeposition polishing of the surface of CVD diamond films and windows; and optical applications for CVD diamond.

  16. CVD diamond as an optical material for adverse environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snail, Keith A.

    1991-01-01

    A status report is presented on the obstacles and current research related to using CVD diamond as an optical material. Problems discussed include properties of CVD carbon deposits, including structure, thermal conductivity and oxidation resistance, which are relevant to the optical uses of diamond; absorption coefficient measurements on CVD diamond in the visible and IR; and a review of various aspects of the synthesis of CVD diamond, including the growth of transparent and translucent diamond, efforts to grow diamond at low substrate temperatures, and approches to reducing the optical scatter of as grown polycrystalline diamond films and windows. Particular attention is given to techniques for reducing optical scatter which involve modifying materials morphologies during the growth process by controlling nucleation density, renucleaton frequency, and/or the orientation of crystal faces at film surfaces; techniques for postdeposition polishing of the surface of CVD diamond films and windows; and optical applications for CVD diamond.

  17. Modeling for CVD of Solid Oxide Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, T.L.

    2002-09-18

    Because of its low thermal conductivity, high thermal expansion and high oxygen ion conductivity yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the material of choice for high temperature electrolyte applications. Current coating fabrication methods have their drawbacks, however. Air plasma spray (APS) is a relatively low-cost process and is suitable for large and relatively complex shapes. it is difficult to produce uniform, relatively thin coatings with this process, however, and the coatings do not exhibit the columnar microstructure that is needed for reliable, long-term performance. The electron-beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) process does produce the desirable microstructure, however, the capital cost of these systems is very high and the line-of-sight nature of the process limits coating uniformity and the ability to coat large and complex shapes. The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process also produces the desirable columnar microstructure and--under proper conditions--can produce uniform coatings over complex shapes. CVD has been used for many materials but is relatively undeveloped for oxides, in general, and for zirconia, in particular. The overall goal of this project--a joint effort of the University of Louisville and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)--is to develop the YSZ CVD process for high temperature electrolyte applications. This report describes the modeling effort at the University of Louisville, which supports the experimental work at ORNL. Early work on CVD of zirconia and yttria used metal chlorides, which react with water vapor to form solid oxide. Because of this rapid gas-phase reaction the water generally is formed in-situ using the reverse water-gas-shift reaction or a microwave plasma. Even with these arrangements gas-phase nucleation and powder formation are problems when using these precursors. Recent efforts on CVD of zirconia and YSZ have focused on use of metal-organic precursors (MOCVD). These are more stable in the gas

  18. Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the existing Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Gas Source; hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams; and Combustion Gas Turbine. Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF).

  19. Observation of twinning in diamond CVD films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciniak, W.; Fabisiak, K.; Orzeszko, S.; Rozploch, F.

    1992-10-01

    Diamond particles prepared by dc-glow-discharge enhanced HF-CVD hybrid method, from a mixture of acetone vapor and hydrogen gas have been examined by TEM, RHEED and dark field method of observation. Results suggest the presence of twinned diamond particles, which can be reconstructed by a sequence of twinning operations. Contrary to the 'stick model' of the lattice, very common five-fold symmetry of diamond microcrystals may be obtained by applying a number of edge dislocations rather than the continuous deformation of many tetrahedral C-C bonds.

  20. CVD growth of graphene at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Changgan

    2012-02-01

    Graphene has attracted a lot of research interest owing to its exotic properties and a wide spectrum of potential applications. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from gaseous hydrocarbon sources has shown great promises for large-scale graphene growth. However, high growth temperature, typically 1000^oC, is required for such growth. In this talk, I will show a revised CVD route to grow graphene on Cu foils at low temperature, adopting solid and liquid hydrocarbon feedstocks. For solid PMMA and polystyrene precursors, centimeter-scale monolayer graphene films are synthesized at a growth temperature down to 400^oC. When benzene is used as the hydrocarbon source, monolayer graphene flakes with excellent quality are achieved at a growth temperature as low as 300^oC. I will also talk about our recent progress on low-temperature graphene growth using paraterphenyl as precursor. The successful low-temperature growth can be qualitatively understood from the first principles calculations. Our work might pave a way to economical and convenient growth route of graphene, as well as better control of the growth pattern of graphene at low temperature.

  1. Comparative evaluation of CVD diamond technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of diamonds occurs from hydrogen-hydrocarbon gas mixtures in the presence of atomic hydrogen at subatmospheric pressures. Most CVD methods are based on different means of generating and transporting atomic hydrogen in a particular system. Evaluation of these different techniques involves their capital costs, material costs, energy costs, labor costs and the type and quality of diamond that they produce. Currently, there is no universal agreement on which is the best technique and technique selection has been largely driven by the professional background of the user as well as the particular application of interest. This article discusses the criteria for evaluating a process for low-pressure deposition of diamond. Next, a brief history of low-pressure diamond synthesis is reviewed. Several specific processes are addressed, including the hot filament process, hot filament electron-assisted chemical vapor deposition, and plasma generation of atomic hydrogen by glow discharge, microwave discharge, low pressure radio frequency discharge, high pressure DC discharge, high pressure microwave discharge jets, high pressure RF discharge, and high and low pressure flames. Other types of diamond deposition methods are also evaluated. 101 refs., 15 figs.

  2. CVD boron on calcium chromate powder

    SciTech Connect

    Coonen, R.M.

    1984-09-01

    This study was an experimental effort to improve the compositional homogeneity of a pyrotechnic mixture of boron and calcium chromate (CaCrO/sub 4/). Boron was deposited onto calcium chromate powders at 350/sup 0/C from a diborane and hydrogen gas mixture at a pressure of 40 torr by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). The B:CaCrO/sub 4/ ratio of the coated powders was analyzed by inductively-coupled plasma spectroscopy and the distribution of the two phases was observed by electron microprobe analysis. The pyrotechnic activity was determined by differential thermal analysis. In addition to varying the composition of the mixture, an attempt was made to vary the boron distribution by coating both sized and unsized CaCrO/sub 4/ powders. Boron was deposited for 2 h onto sized CaCrO/sub 4/ powder, which resulted in a higher weight percentage of boron in comparison to the unsized powder. CVD coated CaCrO/sub 4/ powders began their pyrotechnic activity at an auto ignition temperature that was lower than the auto ignition temperature observed for mechanically blended mixtures. The coating of sized CaCrO/sub 4/ powder improved the uniformity of boron deposition of CaCrO/sub 4/, but it also decreased the pyrotechnic activity.

  3. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes Array by CVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, S.; Su, C.; Cochrane, J. C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Muntele, I.; Ila, D.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are superior in many devices such as electronics and sensors, many efforts have been involved in synthesizing particular structural or dimensional MWCNT. Uniform aligned MWCNT array is one of the prototype structures for devices such as filed emission device and microelectromechanical systems in which a large length to diameter ratio may also be required. Most aligned MWCNT recently synthesized by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have cone shaped structures. This presentation will illustrate aligned MWCNT array synthesized on silicon substrates using thermal CVD that could produce MWCNT with uniform diameter. An array of nickel particles was used as catalyst for MWCNT growth. A thin Ti or Au buffer layer was coated on the substrate prior to depositing nickel particles. Because the MWCNT size depends on the catalyst particle size, the nickel particle size annealed at various temperatures was investigated. MWCNT were grown on the substrate in the temperature range of 700 C - 1000 C and the pressure range of 1 to 300 torr. Methane and hydrogen gases with methane content of 1 - 10 % were used for the MWCNT synthesis. Morphology, length and diameter of MWCNT were determined by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The detailed results of synthesis and characterizations will be discussed in the presentation.

  4. Hydrogen-induced effects on the CVD growth of high-quality graphene structures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xianfeng; Ning, Jing; Li, Xianglong; Wang, Bin; Hao, Long; Liang, Minghui; Jin, Meihua; Zhi, Linjie

    2013-09-21

    In this work, the hydrogen-induced effects on the CVD growth of high-quality graphene have been systematically studied by regulating the growth parameters mainly related to hydrogen. Experimental results demonstrate that under a high hydrogen flow rate, the competitive etching effect during the growth process is more prominent and even shows macroscopic selectivity. Based on these understandings, the hexagonal graphene domains with diverse edge modalities are controllably synthesized on a large scale by elaborately managing the competitive etching effect of hydrogen that existed during the formation of graphene. This study not only contributes to the understanding of the mechanism of CVD growth, especially the effects of hydrogen used in the system, but also provides a facile method to synthesize high-quality graphene structures with trimmed edge morphologies. PMID:23715011

  5. Plutonium Equivalent Inventory for Belowground Radioactive Waste at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011

    SciTech Connect

    French, Sean B.; Shuman, Rob

    2012-04-18

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) generates radioactive waste as a result of various activities. Many aspects of the management of this waste are conducted at Technical Area 54 (TA-54); Area G plays a key role in these management activities as the Laboratory's only disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste (LLW). Furthermore, Area G serves as a staging area for transuranic (TRU) waste that will be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for disposal. A portion of this TRU waste is retrievably stored in pits, trenches, and shafts. The radioactive waste disposed of or stored at Area G poses potential short- and long-term risks to workers at the disposal facility and to members of the public. These risks are directly proportional to the radionuclide inventories in the waste. The Area G performance assessment and composite analysis (LANL, 2008a) project long-term risks to members of the public; short-term risks to workers and members of the public, such as those posed by accidents, are addressed by the Area G Documented Safety Analysis (LANL, 2011a). The Documented Safety Analysis uses an inventory expressed in terms of plutonium-equivalent curies, referred to as the PE-Ci inventory, to estimate these risks. The Technical Safety Requirements for Technical Area 54, Area G (LANL, 2011b) establishes a belowground radioactive material limit that ensures the cumulative projected inventory authorized for the Area G site is not exceeded. The total belowground radioactive waste inventory limit established for Area G is 110,000 PE-Ci. The PE-Ci inventory is updated annually; this report presents the inventory prepared for 2011. The approach used to estimate the inventory is described in Section 2. The results of the analysis are presented in Section 3.

  6. Technical progress report for the Magnetohydrodynamics Coal-Fired Flow Facility. January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    Progress is reported in developing technology for steam bottoming cycle of the coal-fired MHD Steam Combined Cycle Power Plant. During this period, no testing was scheduled in the DOE Coal-Fired Flow Facility. The report covers facilities modification and maintenance in preparation for a 225 hour POC test that is scheduled for early next quarter. The modifications to the dry ESP to replace the electrodes with smaller diameter wires is discussed. Continued work on the rotary vacuum filter, which is designed to separate the more soluble potassium carbonate from the potassium sulfate and fly ash, is reported. Environmental activities for the quarter are summarized.

  7. A PLANNING GUIDE FOR VOCATIONAL-INDUSTRIAL AND VOCATIONAL-TECHNICAL BUILDING FACILITIES FOR COMPREHENSIVE HIGH SCHOOLS, NUMBER 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Albany.

    THIS BOOKLET IS INTENDED AS A GUIDE FOR THOSE RESPONSIBLE FOR PLANNING VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL FACILITIES. DISCUSSION OF TYPES OF INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION, PLANNING PROCEDURES, AND GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS ARE INCLUDED AND INFORMATION IS GIVEN ON--(1) SIZES, SHAPES, AND NUMBER OF SHOPS, (2) BUILDING FLEXIBILITY, (3) LAYOUT OF FLOOR SPACE, (4) SERVICES IN…

  8. Experimental Facilities in Water Resources Education. A Contribution to the International Hydrological Programme. UNESCO Technical Papers in Hydrology No. 24.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France).

    This monograph is intended to guide teachers of water resources, technicians and university students in establishing physical facilities which can introduce learners to methods, techniques, and instruments used in water resources management and assessment. It is not intended to serve as an exhaustive list of equipment and their descriptions or as…

  9. Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility project. Executive summary: Volume 1, Program summary information; Volume 2, Waste stream technical summary: Draft

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. The engineering studies, initiated in July 1991, identified 37 mixed waste streams, and 55 low-level waste streams. This report documents the waste stream information and potential treatment strategies, as well as the regulatory requirements for the Department of Energy-owned treatment facility option. The total report comprises three volumes and two appendices. This report consists of Volume 1, which explains the overall program mission, the guiding assumptions for the engineering studies, and summarizes the waste stream and regulatory information, and Volume 2, the Waste Stream Technical Summary which, encompasses the studies conducted to identify the INEL`s waste streams and their potential treatment strategies.

  10. Diet and lifestyle in CVD prevention and treatment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries and more recently in developing countries. Modifications to habitual dietary patterns and lifestyle behaviors (physical activity and tobacco use) can strongly influence the risk of developing CVD. Thi...

  11. Technical Competencies for the Safe Interim Storage and Management of 233U at U.S. Department of Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, D.O.; Krichinsky, A.M.; Laughlin, S.S.; Van Essen, D.C.; Yong, L.K.

    1999-02-17

    Uranium-233 (with concomitant {sup 232}U) is a man-made fissile isotope of uranium with unique nuclear characteristics which require high-integrity alpha containment biological shielding, and remote handling. The special handling considerations and the fact that much of the {sup 233}U processing and large-scale handling was performed over a decade ago underscore the importance of identifying the people within the DOE complex who are currently working with or have worked with {sup 233}U. The availability of these key personnel is important in ensuring safe interim storage, management and ultimate disposition of {sup 233}U at DOE facilities. Significant programs are ongoing at several DOE sites with actinides. The properties of these actinide materials require many of the same types of facilities and handling expertise as does {sup 233}U.

  12. Technical documentation in support of the project-specific analysis for construction and operation of the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Lazaro, M.A.; Vinikour, W.; Allison, T.

    1996-09-01

    This document provides information that supports or supplements the data and impact analyses presented in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project-Specific Analysis (PSA). The purposes of NIF are to achieve fusion ignition in the laboratory for the first time with inertial confinement fusion (ICF) technology and to conduct high- energy-density experiments ins support of national security and civilian application. NIF is an important element in the DOE`s science-based SSM Program, a key mission of which is to ensure the reliability of the nation`s enduring stockpile of nuclear weapons. NIF would also advance the knowledge of basic and applied high-energy- density science and bring the nation a large step closer to developing fusion energy for civilian use. The NIF PSA includes evaluations of the potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating the facility at one of five candidate site and for two design options.

  13. Small-Scale Hydroelectric Power Demonstration Project: reactivation of the Elk Rapids Hydroelectric Facility. Final technical and construction cost report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    The Elk Rapids powerhouse dam is located on the Elk River channel in the Village of Elk Rapids, Michigan. Together with a small spillway structure located approximately 500 ft south of the dam, it constitutes the outlet to Lake Michigan for Elk Lake, Skegemog Lake, Torch Lake, Lake Bellaire, Clam Lake, and several smaller lakes. Power has been generated at the Elk Rapids site since the late nineteenth century, but the history of the present facility goes back to 1916 with the construction of the existing powerhouse dam by the Elk Rapids Iron Works Company. The facility was designed to contain four vertical-shaft generating units; however, only a single 270 hp Leffel type K unit was installed in 1916. In 1929, two additional Leffel units, rated 525 hp, were installed, and in 1930 a third 525 hp Leffel unit was added completely utilizing the capacity of the powerhouse and bringing the combined turbine capacity to 1845 hp.

  14. Technical Approach and Plan for Transitioning Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Facilities to the Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    SKELLY, W.A.

    1999-10-06

    This document describes the approach and process in which the 100-K Area Facilities are to be deactivated and transitioned over to the Environmental Restoration Program after spent nuclear fuel has been removed from the K Basins. It describes the Transition Project's scope and objectives, work breakdown structure, activity planning, estimated cost, and schedule. This report will be utilized as a planning document for project management and control and to communicate details of project content and integration.

  15. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Set Point Determination

    SciTech Connect

    PHILIPP, B.L.

    2000-01-12

    This document provides the calculations used to determine the error of safety class signals used for the CVD process These errors are used with the Parameter limits to arrive at the initial set point. The Safety Class Instrumentation and Control (SCIC) system provides active detection and response to process anomalies that, if unmitigated would result in a safety event. Specifically actuation of the SCIC system includes two portions. The portion which isolates the MCO and initiates the safety-class helium (SCHe) purge, and the portion which detects and stops excessive heat input to the MCO on high tempered water MCO inlet temperature. For the MCO isolation and purge the SCIC receives signals from MCO pressure (both positive pressure and vacuum) helium flow rate, bay high temperature switches, seismic trips and time under vacuum trips.

  16. The Japanese tsunami and resulting nuclear emergency at the Fukushima Daiichi power facility: technical, radiologic, and response perspectives.

    PubMed

    Dauer, Lawrence T; Zanzonico, Pat; Tuttle, R Michael; Quinn, Dennis M; Strauss, H William

    2011-09-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power facility, in the Futaba District of the Fukushima Prefecture in Japan, was severely damaged by the earthquake and ensuing tsunami that struck off the northern coast of the island of Honshu on March 11, 2011. The resulting structural damage to the plant disabled the reactor's cooling systems and led to significant, ongoing environmental releases of radioactivity, triggering a mandatory evacuation of a large area surrounding the plant. The status of the facility continues to change, and permanent control of its radioactive inventory has not yet been achieved. The purpose of this educational article is to summarize the short-term chronology, radiologic consequences, emergency responses, and long-term challenges associated with this event. Although there is ongoing debate on preparedness before the event and the candor of responsible entities in recognizing and disclosing its severity, it largely appears that appropriate key actions were taken by the Japanese authorities during the event that should mitigate any radiologic health impact. These actions include an organized evacuation of over 200,000 inhabitants from the vicinity of the site and areas early in the emergency; monitoring of food and water and placement of radiation limits on such foodstuffs; distribution of stable potassium iodide; and systematic scanning of evacuees. However, the risk of additional fuel damage and of further, perhaps substantial, releases persists. The situation at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear facility remains fluid, and the long-term environmental and health impact will likely take years to fully delineate. PMID:21799088

  17. High-temperature oxidation of CVD silicon-based ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Takashi; Hirai, Toshio; Iguchi, Yasutaka

    1996-12-31

    Oxidation behavior of CVD SiC and CVD Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} was studied at 1773 to 2023 K in Ar-O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}-O{sub 2} and CO-CO{sub 2} atmospheres. In Ar-O{sub 2} and N{sub 2}-O{sub 2} atmospheres, the active oxidation rates for CVD SiC and CVD Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} were dominated by oxygen diffusion through a gas boundary layer. The active-to-passive transition oxygen partial pressures for CVD SiC were slightly greater than those for CVD Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. In CO-CO{sub 2} atmospheres, at PCO{sub 2}/PCO < 10{sup -3} inward diffusion of CO{sub 2} gas controlled the active oxidation rates for CVD SiC; however, a chemical reaction controlled the rates for CVD Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. At PCO{sub 2}/PCO > 10 {sup -2}, SiO{sub 2} particles or layers formed during the active oxidation; the decomposition of SiO{sub 2} could control the active oxidation rates. The Wagner model can be used to explain the active-to-passive transition in these atmospheres for both CVD SiC and CVD Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. The volatility diagram and thermodynamic calculation, including mass balance relationship, were also useful to understand the transition behavior.

  18. Nanoelectronic biosensors based on CVD grown graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yinxi; Dong, Xiaochen; Shi, Yumeng; Li, Chang Ming; Li, Lain-Jong; Chen, Peng

    2010-08-01

    Graphene, a single-atom-thick and two-dimensional carbon material, has attracted great attention recently. Because of its unique electrical, physical, and optical properties, graphene has great potential to be a novel alternative to carbon nanotubes in biosensing. We demonstrate the use of large-sized CVD grown graphene films configured as field-effect transistors for real-time biomolecular sensing. Glucose or glutamate molecules were detected by the conductance change of the graphene transistor as the molecules are oxidized by the specific redox enzyme (glucose oxidase or glutamic dehydrogenase) functionalized onto the graphene film. This study indicates that graphene is a promising candidate for the development of real-time nanoelectronic biosensors.Graphene, a single-atom-thick and two-dimensional carbon material, has attracted great attention recently. Because of its unique electrical, physical, and optical properties, graphene has great potential to be a novel alternative to carbon nanotubes in biosensing. We demonstrate the use of large-sized CVD grown graphene films configured as field-effect transistors for real-time biomolecular sensing. Glucose or glutamate molecules were detected by the conductance change of the graphene transistor as the molecules are oxidized by the specific redox enzyme (glucose oxidase or glutamic dehydrogenase) functionalized onto the graphene film. This study indicates that graphene is a promising candidate for the development of real-time nanoelectronic biosensors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: AFM images of graphene film before and after functionalization, transfer curves of graphene after every step, SEM image of CNT-net, and detection results using CNT-net devices. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00142b

  19. Premature menopause linked to CVD and osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Claire; Overton, Caroline

    2010-03-01

    Premature menopause affects 1% of women under the age of 40, the usual age of the menopause is 51. Most women will present with irregular periods or no periods at all with or without climacteric symptoms. Around 10% of women present with primary amenorrhoea. A careful history and examination are required. It is important to ask specifically about previous chemotherapy or radiotherapy and to look for signs of androgen excess e.g. polycystic ovarian syndrome, adrenal problems e.g. galactorrhoea and thyroid goitres. Once pregnancy has been excluded, a progestagen challenge test can be performed in primary care. Norethisterone 5 mg tds po for ten days or alternatively medroxyprogesterone acetate 10 mg daily for ten days is prescribed. A withdrawal bleed within a few days of stopping the norethisterone indicates the presence of oestrogen and bleeding more than a few drops is considered a positive withdrawal bleed. The absence of a bleed indicates low levels of oestrogen, putting the woman at risk of CVD and osteoporosis. FSH levels above 30 IU/l are an indicator that the ovaries are failing and the menopause is approaching or has occurred. It should be remembered that FSH levels fluctuate during the month and from one month to the next, so a minimum of two measurements should be made at least four to six weeks apart. The presence of a bleed should not exclude premature menopause as part of the differential diagnosis as there can be varying and unpredictable ovarian function remaining. The progestagen challenge test should not be used alone, but in conjunction with FSH, LH and oestradiol. There is no treatment for premature menopause. Women desiring pregnancy should be referred to a fertility clinic and discussion of egg donation. Women not wishing to become pregnant should be prescribed HRT until the age of 50 to control symptoms of oestrogen deficiency and reduce the risks of osteoporosis and CVD. PMID:20408329

  20. Evolution of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory to the Astromaterial Sample Curation Facility: Technical Tensions Between Containment and Cleanliness, Between Particulate and Organic Cleanliness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allton, J. H.; Zeigler, R. A.; Calaway, M. J.

    2016-01-01

    The Lunar Receiving Laboratory (LRL) was planned and constructed in the 1960s to support the Apollo program in the context of landing on the Moon and safely returning humans. The enduring science return from that effort is a result of careful curation of planetary materials. Technical decisions for the first facility included sample handling environment (vacuum vs inert gas), and instruments for making basic sample assessment, but the most difficult decision, and most visible, was stringent biosafety vs ultra-clean sample handling. Biosafety required handling of samples in negative pressure gloveboxes and rooms for containment and use of sterilizing protocols and animal/plant models for hazard assessment. Ultra-clean sample handling worked best in positive pressure nitrogen environment gloveboxes in positive pressure rooms, using cleanable tools of tightly controlled composition. The requirements for these two objectives were so different, that the solution was to design and build a new facility for specific purpose of preserving the scientific integrity of the samples. The resulting Lunar Curatorial Facility was designed and constructed, from 1972-1979, with advice and oversight by a very active committee comprised of lunar sample scientists. The high precision analyses required for planetary science are enabled by stringent contamination control of trace elements in the materials and protocols of construction (e.g., trace element screening for paint and flooring materials) and the equipment used in sample handling and storage. As other astromaterials, especially small particles and atoms, were added to the collections curated, the technical tension between particulate cleanliness and organic cleanliness was addressed in more detail. Techniques for minimizing particulate contamination in sample handling environments use high efficiency air filtering techniques typically requiring organic sealants which offgas. Protocols for reducing adventitious carbon on sample

  1. SRTC criticality safety technical review: Nuclear criticality safety evaluation 94-02, uranium solidification facility pencil tank module spacing

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbun, R.

    1994-04-26

    Review of NMP-NCS-94-0087, ``Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation 94-02: Uranium Solidification Facility Pencil Tank Module Spacing (U), April 18, 1994,`` was requested of the SRTC Applied Physics Group. The NCSE is a criticality assessment to show that the USF process module spacing, as given in Non-Conformance Report SHM-0045, remains safe for operation. The NCSE under review concludes that the module spacing as given in Non-Conformance Report SHM-0045 remains in a critically safe configuration for all normal and single credible abnormal conditions. After a thorough review of the NCSE, this reviewer agrees with that conclusion.

  2. CVD Diamond Detectors for Current Mode Neutron Time-of-Flight Spectroscopy at OMEGA/NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, G J; Friensehner, A F; Glebov, V Y; Hargrove, D R; Hatchett, S P; Izumi, N; Lerche, R A; Phillips, T W; Sangster, T C; Sibernagel, C; Stoeckl, C

    2001-06-19

    As part of a laser fusion diagnostic development program, we have performed pulsed neutron and pulsed laser tests of a CVD diamond detector manufactured from DIAFILM, a commercial grade of CVD diamond. The laser tests were performed at the short pulse UV laser at Bechtel Nevada in Livermore, CA. The pulsed neutrons were provided by DT capsule implosions at the OMEGA laser fusion facility in Rochester, NY. From these tests, we have determined the impulse response to be 250 ps fwhm for an applied E-field of 500 V/mm. Additionally, we have determined the sensitivity to be 2.8 mA/W at 500 V/mm and 4.5 mA/W at 1000 V/mm (2 to 6x times higher than reported values for natural Type IIa diamond). These detector characteristics allow us to conceive of a neutron time-of-flight current mode spectrometer based on CVD diamond. Such an instrument would sit inside the laser fusion target chamber close to TCC, and would record neutron spectra fast enough such that backscattered neutrons and y rays from the target chamber wall would not be a concern. However, the data we have taken show that the Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) noise could be a limiting factor in performance. Determining the degree to which this noise can be shielded will be an important subject of future tests.

  3. CVD Diamond Detectors for Current Mode Neutron Time-of-Flight Spectroscopy at OMEGA/NIF

    SciTech Connect

    G. J. Schmid; V. Yu. Glebov; A. V. Friensehner; D. R. Hargrove; S. P. Hatchett; N. Izumi; R. A. Lerche; T. W. Phillips; T. C. Sangster; C. Silbernagel; C. Stoecki

    2001-07-01

    We have performed pulsed neutron and pulsed laser tests of a CVD diamond detector manufactured from DIAFILM, a commercial grade of CVD diamond. The laser tests were performed at the short pulse UV laser at Bechtel Nevada in Livermore, CA. The pulsed neutrons were provided by DT capsule implosions at the OMEGA laser fusion facility in Rochester, NY. From these tests, we have determined the impulse response to be 250 ps fwhm for an applied E-field of 500 V/mm. Additionally, we have determined the sensitivity to be 2.4 mA/W at 500 V/mm and 4.0 mA/W at 1000 V/mm. These values are approximately 2 to 5x times higher than those reported for natural Type IIa diamond at similar E-field and thickness (1mm). These characteristics allow us to conceive of a neutron time-of-flight current mode spectrometer based on CVD diamond. Such an instrument would sit inside the laser fusion target chamber close to target chamber center (TCC), and would record neutron spectra fast enough such that backscattered neutrons and x-rays from the target chamber wall would not be a concern. The acquired neutron spectra could then be used to extract DD fuel areal density from the downscattered secondary to secondary ratio.

  4. Technical Support for Improving the Licensing Regulatory Base for Selected Facilities Associated with the Front End of the Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, R. G.; Schreiber, R. E.; Jamison, J. D.; Davenport, L. C.; Brite, D. W.

    1982-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was asked by the NRC Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards (NMSS) to determine the adequacy of its health, safety and environmental regulatory base as a guide to applicants for licenses to operate UF{sub 6} conversion facilities and fuel fabrication plants. The regulatory base was defined as the body of documented requirements and guidance to licensees, including laws passed by Congress, Federal Regulations developed by the NRC to implement the laws, license conditions added to each license to deal with special requirements for that specific license, and Regulatory Guides. The study concentrated on the renewal licensing accomplished in the last few years at five typical facilities, and included analyses of licensing documents and interviews with individuals involved with different aspects of the licensing process. Those interviewed included NMSS staff, Inspection and Enforcement (IE) officials, and selected licensees. From the results of the analyses and interviews, the PNL study team concludes that the regulatory base is adequate but should be codified for greater visibility. PNL recommends that NMSS clarify distinctions among legal requirements of the licensee, acceptance criteria employed by NMSS, and guidance used by all. In particular, a prelicensing conference among NMSS, IE and each licensee would be a practical means of setting license conditions acceptable to all parties.

  5. Cold Vacuum Drying facility civil structural system design description (SYS 06)

    SciTech Connect

    PITKOFF, C.C.

    1999-07-06

    This document describes the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility civil - structural system. This system consists of the facility structure, including the administrative and process areas. The system's primary purpose is to provide for a facility to house the CVD process and personnel and to provide a tertiary level of containment. The document provides a description of the facility and demonstrates how the design meets the various requirements imposed by the safety analysis report and the design requirements document.

  6. How Gene Networks Can Uncover Novel CVD Players

    PubMed Central

    Parnell, Laurence D; Casas-Agustench, Patricia; Iyer, Lakshmanan K; Ordovas, Jose M

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are complex, involving numerous biological entities from genes and small molecules to organ function. Placing these entities in networks where the functional relationships among the constituents are drawn can aid in our understanding of disease onset, progression and prevention. While networks, or interactomes, are often classified by a general term, say lipids or inflammation, it is a more encompassing class of network that is more informative in showing connections among the active entities and allowing better hypotheses of novel CVD players to be formulated. A range of networks will be presented whereby the potential to bring new objects into the CVD milieu will be exemplified. PMID:24683432

  7. How Gene Networks Can Uncover Novel CVD Players.

    PubMed

    Parnell, Laurence D; Casas-Agustench, Patricia; Iyer, Lakshmanan K; Ordovas, Jose M

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are complex, involving numerous biological entities from genes and small molecules to organ function. Placing these entities in networks where the functional relationships among the constituents are drawn can aid in our understanding of disease onset, progression and prevention. While networks, or interactomes, are often classified by a general term, say lipids or inflammation, it is a more encompassing class of network that is more informative in showing connections among the active entities and allowing better hypotheses of novel CVD players to be formulated. A range of networks will be presented whereby the potential to bring new objects into the CVD milieu will be exemplified. PMID:24683432

  8. MASFLO: a computer code to calculate mass flow rates in the Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF). Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.D.

    1980-05-01

    This report documents a modular data interpretation computer code. The MASFLO code is a Fortran code used in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Blowdown Heat Transfer Program to convert measured quantities of density, volumetric flow, and momentum flux into a calculated quantity: mass flow rate. The code performs both homogeneous and two-velocity calculations. The homogeneous models incorporate various combinations of the Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility instrumented spool piece turbine flow meter, gamma densitometer, and drag disk readings. The two-velocity calculations also incorporate these instruments, but in models developed by Aya, Rouhani, and Popper. Each subroutine is described briefly, and input instructions are provided in the appendix along with a sample of the code output.

  9. Testing low mass flow train in the DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility. Quarterly technical progress report, July-September 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    UTSI reports on testing of the Low Mass Flow Train in the DOE Coal Fired Flow Facility. During this period eight tests were conducted, which complete the seed/slag interaction test series. Preliminary results of these tests are reported. Additional nitrogen oxide (NO/sub x/) measurements are included, as are SO/sub 2/ removal results. An analysis of deposit accumulation on the tubes in the materials test module is reported. Data obtained from high velocity thermocouple (HVT) probes in the radiant furnace are included for the first time and show essentially a flat temperature profile in the furnace. Heat transfer calculations for the flow train are correlated with experimental measurements, including those obtained from both UTSI and MSU line reversal systems.

  10. Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama. Technical progress report, Run 243 with Illinois 6 coal

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    This report presents the operating results for Run 243 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R and D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. This run was made in an Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (ITSL) mode using Illinois 6 coal from the Burning Star mine. The primary objective was to demonstrate the effect of a dissolver on the ITSL product slate, especially on the net C/sub 1/-C/sub 5/ gas production and hydrogen consumption. Run 243 began on 3 February 1983 and continued through 28 June 1983. During this period, 349.8 tons of coal was fed in 2947 hours of operation. Thirteen special product workup material balances were defined, and the results are presented herein. 29 figures, 19 tables.

  11. Technical progress report for the magnetohydrodynamics Coal-Fired Flow Facility for the period April 1, 1993--June 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    In this quarterly technical progress report, UTSI reports on progress on a multitask contract to develop the necessary technology for the steam bottoming plant of the MHD Steam Combined Cycle power plant. A Proof-Of-Concept (POC) test was conducted during the quarter and the results are reported. This POC test was terminated after 88 hours of operation due to the failure of the coal pulverizer main shaft. Preparations for the test and post-test activities are summarized. Modifications made to the dry electrostatic precipitator (ESP) are described and measurements of its performance are reported. The baghouse performance is summarized, together with actions being taken to improve bag cleaning using reverse air. Data on the wet ESP performance is included at two operating conditions, including verification that it met State of Tennessee permit conditions for opacity with all the flow through it. The results of experiments to determine the effect of potassium seed on NO{sub x} emissions and secondary combustion are reported. The status of efforts to quantify the detailed mass balance for all POC testing is summarized. The work to develop a predictive ash deposition model is discussed and results compared with deposition actually encountered during the test. Plans to measure the kinetics of potassium and sulfur on flames like the secondary combustor, are included. Advanced diagnostic work by both UTSI and MSU is reported. Efforts to develop the technology for a high temperature air heater using ceramic tubes are summarized.

  12. Critical experiments at Sandia National Laboratories : technical meeting on low-power critical facilities and small reactors.

    SciTech Connect

    Harms, Gary A.; Ford, John T.; Barber, Allison Delo

    2010-11-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has conducted radiation effects testing for the Department of Energy (DOE) and other contractors supporting the DOE since the 1960's. Over this period, the research reactor facilities at Sandia have had a primary mission to provide appropriate nuclear radiation environments for radiation testing and qualification of electronic components and other devices. The current generation of reactors includes the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR), a water-moderated pool-type reactor, fueled by elements constructed from UO2-BeO ceramic fuel pellets, and the Sandia Pulse Reactor III (SPR-III), a bare metal fast burst reactor utilizing a uranium-molybdenum alloy fuel. The SPR-III is currently defueled. The SPR Facility (SPRF) has hosted a series of critical experiments. A purpose-built critical experiment was first operated at the SPRF in the late 1980's. This experiment, called the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Critical Experiment (CX), was designed to explore the reactor physics of a nuclear thermal rocket motor. This experiment was fueled with highly-enriched uranium carbide fuel in annular water-moderated fuel elements. The experiment program was completed and the fuel for the experiment was moved off-site. A second critical experiment, the Burnup Credit Critical Experiment (BUCCX) was operated at Sandia in 2002. The critical assembly for this experiment was based on the assembly used in the CX modified to accommodate low-enriched pin-type fuel in water moderator. This experiment was designed as a platform in which the reactivity effects of specific fission product poisons could be measured. Experiments were carried out on rhodium, an important fission product poison. The fuel and assembly hardware for the BUCCX remains at Sandia and is available for future experimentation. The critical experiment currently in operation at the SPRF is the Seven Percent Critical Experiment (7uPCX). This experiment is designed to provide benchmark

  13. Chiral electron transport in CVD bilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyunghoon; Eo, Yun Suk; Kurdak, Cagliyan; Zhong, Zhaohui

    2014-03-01

    Charge carriers in bilayer graphene have a parabolic energy spectrum. Due to this band structure they are massive quasiparticles having a finite density of state at zero energy like other non-relativistic charge carriers in conventional two dimensional materials. However, they are massive Dirac fermions which have a chiral nature similar to the case of massless Dirac fermions in single layer graphene. Coupling of pseudospin and motion of charge carrier via chirality can result in dramatic consequence for transport in bipolar regime like Klein tunneling, Fabry-Perot interference, collimation of charge carrier, Veslago lens, etc. However, little attention has been paid to chiral dependent electron transport in bilayer graphene. Here we study these properties by probing phase coherent transport behavior in CVD bilayer graphene devices with sub-200nm channel length. Complex Fabry-Perot interference patterns are observed in resonant cavities defined by local gating. By applying Fourier analysis technique, we successfully analyze and identify the origin of each individual interference pattern in bipolar and monopolar regime. Our initial results also hint at the observation of cloaking of electronic states against chiral electrons in bilayer graphene.

  14. Photo-electronic properties of CVD amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salau, Akinola Muritala

    1983-12-01

    D.c. conductivity, thermoelectric power and photoconductivity of amorphous silicon films prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have been measured as functions of operating and annealing temperatures. Several interpretations of the results obtained have been suggested.

  15. The development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities: Phase 1 final report. Volume 1: Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.G.; Morrison, J.L.; Pisupati, S.V.

    1997-01-31

    The first phase of a three-phase project investigating the development of coal-based technologies for Department of Defense facilities has been completed. The objectives of the project are to: decrease DOD`s dependence on foreign oil and increase its use of coal; promote public and private sector deployment of technologies for utilizing coal-based fuels in oil-designed combustion equipment; and provide a continuing environment for research and development of coal-based fuel technologies for small-scale applications at a time when market conditions in the US are not favorable for the introduction of coal-fired equipment in the commercial and industrial capacity ranges. The Phase 1 activities were focused on developing clean, coal-based combustion technologies for the utilization of both micronized coal-water mixtures (MCWMs) and dry, micronized coal (DMC) in fuel oil-designed industrial boilers. The specific objective in Phase 1 was to deliver fully engineered retrofit options for a fuel oil-designed watertube boiler located on a DOD installation to fire either MCWM or DMC. This was achieved through a project consisting of fundamental, pilot-sale, and demonstration-scale activities investigating coal beneficiation and preparation, and MCWM and DMC combustion performance. In addition, detailed engineering designs and an economic analysis were conducted for a boiler located at the Naval Surface Warfare Center, near Crane, Indiana. Results are reported on MCWM and DMC combustion performance evaluation; engineering design; and cost/economic analysis.

  16. Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama. Run 262 with Black Thunder subbituminous coal: Technical progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    This report presents the results of Run 262 performed at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R&D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The run started on July 10, 1991 and continued until September 30, 1991, operating in the Close-Coupled Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction mode processing Black Thunder Mine subbituminous coal (Wyodak-Anderson seam from Wyoming Powder River Basin). A dispersed molybdenum catalyst was evaluated for its performance. The effect of the dispersed catalyst on eliminating solids buildup was also evaluated. Half volume reactors were used with supported Criterion 324 1/16`` catalyst in the second stage at a catalyst replacement rate of 3 lb/ton of MF coal. The hybrid dispersed plus supported catalyst system was tested for the effect of space velocity, second stage temperature, and molybdenum concentration. The supported catalyst was removed from the second stage for one test period to see the performance of slurry reactors. Iron oxide was used as slurry catalyst at a rate of 2 wt % MF coal throughout the run (dimethyl disulfide (DMDS) was used as the sulfiding agent). The close-coupled reactor unit was on-stream for 1271.2 hours for an on-stream factor of 89.8% and the ROSE-SR unit was on-feed for 1101.6 hours for an on-stream factor of 90.3% for the entire run.

  17. Grout disposal facility vault exhauster: Technical background document on demonstration of best available control technology for toxics

    SciTech Connect

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Glantz, C.S.; Rittman, P.D.

    1994-09-01

    The Grout Disposal Facility (GDF) is currently operated on the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. The GDF is located near the east end of the Hanford Site`s 200 East operations area, and is used for the treatment and disposal of low-level radioactive liquid wastes. In the grout treatment process, selected radioactive wastes from double-shell tanks are mixed with grout-forming solids; the resulting grout slurry is pumped to near-surface concrete vaults for solidification and permanent disposal. As part of this treatment process, small amounts of toxic particles and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) may be released to the atmosphere through the GDF`s exhaust system. This analysis constitutes a Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (T-BACT) study, as required in the Washington Administrative Code (WAC 173-460) to support a Notice of Construction for the operation of the GDF exhaust system at a modified flow rate that exceeds the previously permitted value. This report accomplishes the following: assesses the potential emissions from the GDF; estimates air quality impacts to the public from toxic air pollutants; identifies control technologies that could reduce GDF emissions; evaluates impacts of the control technologies; and recommends appropriate emissions controls.

  18. Ion beam figuring of CVD silicon carbide mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailly, P.; Collette, J.-P.; Frenette, K. Fleury; Jamar, C.

    2004-06-01

    Optical and structural elements made of silicon carbide are increasingly found in space instruments. Chemical vapor deposited silicon carbide (CVD-SiC) is used as a reflective coating on SiC optics in reason of its good behavior under polishing. The advantage of applying ion beam figuring (IBF) to CVD-SiC over other surface figure-improving techniques is discussed herein. The results of an IBF sequence performed at the Centre Spatial de Liège on a 100 mm CVD-SiC mirror are reported. The process allowed to reduce the mirror surface errors from 243 nm to 13 nm rms. Beside the surface figure, roughness is another critical feature to consider in order to preserve the optical quality of CVD-SiC. Thus, experiments focusing on the evolution of roughness were performed in various ion beam etching conditions. The roughness of samples etched at different depths down to 3 μm was determined with an optical profilometer. These measurements emphasize the importance of selecting the right combination of gas and beam energy to keep roughness at a low level. Kaufman-type ion sources are generally used to perform IBF but the performance of an end-Hall ion source in figuring CVD-SiC mirrors was also evaluated in this study. In order to do so, ion beam etching profiles obtained with the end-Hall source on CVD-SiC were measured and used as a basis for IBF simulations.

  19. Class 1 Permit Modification Notification Addition of Structures within Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11, Dome 375 Los Alamos National Laboratory Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, July 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R.; Lechel, Robert A.

    2012-08-31

    The purpose of this letter is to notify the New Mexico Environment Department-Hazardous Waste Bureau (NMED-HWB) of a Class 1 Permit Modification to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit issued to the Department of Energy (DOE) and Los Alamos National Security, LLC (LANS) in November 2010. The modification adds structures to the container storage unit at Technical Area (TA) 54 Area G, Pad 11. Permit Section 3.1(3) requires that changes to the location of a structure that does not manage hazardous waste shall be changed within the Permit as a Class 1 modification without prior approval in accordance with Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 (40 CFR), {section}270.42(a)(1). Structures have been added within Dome 375 located at TA-54, Area G, Pad 11 that will be used in support of waste management operations within Dome 375 and the modular panel containment structure located within Dome 375, but will not be used as waste management structures. The Class 1 Permit Modification revises Figure 36 in Attachment N, Figures; and Figure G.12-1 in Attachment G.12, Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11 Outdoor Container Storage Unit Closure Plan. Descriptions of the structures have also been added to Section A.4.2.9 in Attachment A, TA - Unit Descriptions; and Section 2.0 in Attachment G.12, Technical Area 54, Area G, Pad 11 Outdoor Container Storage Unit Closure Plan. Full description of the permit modification and the necessary changes are included in Enclosure 1. The modification has been prepared in accordance with 40 CFR {section}270.42(a)(l). This package includes this letter and an enclosure containing a description of the permit modification, text edits of the Permit sections, and the revised figures (collectively LA-UR-12-22808). Accordingly, a signed certification page is also enclosed. Three hard copies and one electronic copy of this submittal will be delivered to the NMED-HWB.

  20. Evaluation of Low-Level Waste Disposal Receipt Data for Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011

    SciTech Connect

    French, Sean B.; Shuman, Robert

    2012-04-17

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) generates radioactive waste as a result of various activities. Operational or institutional waste is generated from a wide variety of research and development activities including nuclear weapons development, energy production, and medical research. Environmental restoration (ER), and decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) waste is generated as contaminated sites and facilities at LANL undergo cleanup or remediation. The majority of this waste is low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and is disposed of at the Technical Area 54 (TA-54), Area G disposal facility. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 (DOE, 2001) requires that radioactive waste be managed in a manner that protects public health and safety, and the environment. To comply with this order, DOE field sites must prepare and maintain site-specific radiological performance assessments for LLW disposal facilities that accept waste after September 26, 1988. Furthermore, sites are required to conduct composite analyses that account for the cumulative impacts of all waste that has been (or will be) disposed of at the facilities and other sources of radioactive material that may interact with the facilities. Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis was issued in 2008 (LANL, 2008). These analyses estimate rates of radionuclide release from the waste disposed of at the facility, simulate the movement of radionuclides through the environment, and project potential radiation doses to humans for several on-site and off-site exposure scenarios. The assessments are based on existing site and disposal facility data and on assumptions about future rates and methods of waste disposal. The accuracy of the performance assessment and composite analysis depends upon the validity of the data used and assumptions made in conducting the analyses. If changes in these data and assumptions are significant, they may invalidate or call

  1. Material removal characteristics of orthogonal velocity polishing tool for efficient fabrication of CVD SiC mirror surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Hyunju; Han, Jeong-Yeol; Kim, Sug-Whan; Seong, Sehyun; Yoon, Siyoung; Lee, Kyungmook; Lee, Haengbok

    2015-09-01

    Today, CVD SiC mirrors are readily available in the market. However, it is well known to the community that the key surface fabrication processes and, in particular, the material removal characteristics of the CVD SiC mirror surface varies sensitively depending on the shop floor polishing and figuring variables. We investigated the material removal characteristics of CVD SiC mirror surfaces using a new and patented polishing tool called orthogonal velocity tool (OVT) that employs two orthogonal velocity fields generated simultaneously during polishing and figuring machine runs. We built an in-house OVT machine and its operating principle allows for generation of pseudo Gaussian shapes of material removal from the target surface. The shapes are very similar to the tool influence functions (TIFs) of other polishing machine such as IRP series polishing machines from Zeeko. Using two CVD SiC mirrors of 150 mm in diameter and flat surface, we ran trial material removal experiments over the machine run parameter ranges from 12.901 to 25.867 psi in pressure, 0.086 m/sec to 0.147 m/sec in tool linear velocity, and 5 to 15 sec in dwell time. An in-house developed data analysis program was used to obtain a number of Gaussian shaped TIFs and the resulting material removal coefficient varies from 3.35 to 9.46 um/psi hour m/sec with the mean value to 5.90 ± 1.26(standard deviation). We report the technical details of the new OVT machine, of the data analysis program, of the experiments and the results together with the implications to the future development of the OVT machine and process for large CVD SiC mirror surfaces.

  2. C(1) metabolism and CVD outcomes in older adults.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Helene; Strain, J J; Pentieva, Kristina; Ward, Mary

    2012-05-01

    CVD is the most common cause of death in people over 65 years. This review considers the latest evidence for a potential protective effect of C(1) donors (folate and the metabolically related B-vitamins) in CVD. Such an effect may or may not be mediated via the role of these nutrients in maintaining plasma homocysteine concentrations within a desirable range. Despite predictions from epidemiological studies that lowering plasma homocysteine would reduce cardiovascular risk, several secondary prevention trials in at-risk patients published since 2004 have failed to demonstrate a benefit of homocysteine-lowering therapy with B-vitamins on CVD events generally. All these trials were performed in CVD patients with advanced disease; thus current evidence suggests that intervention with high-dose folic acid is of no benefit in preventing another event, at least in the case of heart disease. The evidence at this time, however, is stronger for stroke, with meta-analyses of randomised trials showing that folic acid reduces the risk of stroke, particularly in people with no history of stroke. Genetic studies provide convincing evidence to support a causal relationship between sub-optimal B-vitamin status and CVD. People homozygous for the common C677T variant in the gene encoding the folate-metabolising enzyme, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), typically have a 14-21% higher risk of CVD. Apart from folate, riboflavin is required as a co-factor for MTHFR. New evidence shows that riboflavin intervention results in marked lowering of blood pressure, specifically in patients with the MTHFR 677TT genotype. This novel gene-nutrient interaction may provide insights as to the mechanism that links C(1) metabolism with CVD outcomes. PMID:22152927

  3. Incorporation of small BN domains in graphene during CVD using methane, boric acid and nitrogen gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bepete, George; Voiry, Damien; Chhowalla, Manish; Chiguvare, Zivayi; Coville, Neil J.

    2013-06-01

    Chemical doping of graphene with small boron nitride (BN) domains has been shown to be an effective way of permanently modulating the electronic properties in graphene. Herein we show a facile method of growing large area graphene doped with small BN domains on copper foils using a single step CVD route with methane, boric acid powder and nitrogen gas as the carbon, boron and nitrogen sources respectively. This facile and safe process avoids the use of boranes and ammonia. Optical microscopy confirmed that continuous films were grown and Raman spectroscopy confirmed changes in the electronic structure of the grown BN doped graphene. Using XPS studies we find that both B and N can be substituted into the graphene structure in the form of small BN domains to give a B-N-C system. A novel structure for the BN doped graphene is proposed.

  4. Incorporation of small BN domains in graphene during CVD using methane, boric acid and nitrogen gas.

    PubMed

    Bepete, George; Voiry, Damien; Chhowalla, Manish; Chiguvare, Zivayi; Coville, Neil J

    2013-07-21

    Chemical doping of graphene with small boron nitride (BN) domains has been shown to be an effective way of permanently modulating the electronic properties in graphene. Herein we show a facile method of growing large area graphene doped with small BN domains on copper foils using a single step CVD route with methane, boric acid powder and nitrogen gas as the carbon, boron and nitrogen sources respectively. This facile and safe process avoids the use of boranes and ammonia. Optical microscopy confirmed that continuous films were grown and Raman spectroscopy confirmed changes in the electronic structure of the grown BN doped graphene. Using XPS studies we find that both B and N can be substituted into the graphene structure in the form of small BN domains to give a B-N-C system. A novel structure for the BN doped graphene is proposed. PMID:23759928

  5. Technical Approach for Determining Key Parameters Needed for Modeling the Performance of Cast Stone for the Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Yabusaki, Steven B.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Rockhold, Mark L.; Wang, Guohui; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2015-03-30

    Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) and its contractors at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are conducting a development program to develop / refine the cementitious waste form for the wastes treated at the ETF and to provide the data needed to support the IDF PA. This technical approach document is intended to provide guidance to the cementitious waste form development program with respect to the waste form characterization and testing information needed to support the IDF PA. At the time of the preparation of this technical approach document, the IDF PA effort is just getting started and the approach to analyze the performance of the cementitious waste form has not been determined. Therefore, this document looks at a number of different approaches for evaluating the waste form performance and describes the testing needed to provide data for each approach. Though the approach addresses a cementitious secondary aqueous waste form, it is applicable to other waste forms such as Cast Stone for supplemental immobilization of Hanford LAW. The performance of Cast Stone as a physical and chemical barrier to the release of contaminants of concern (COCs) from solidification of Hanford liquid low activity waste (LAW) and secondary wastes processed through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) is of critical importance to the Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) total system performance assessment (TSPA). The effectiveness of cementitious waste forms as a barrier to COC release is expected to evolve with time. PA modeling must therefore anticipate and address processes, properties, and conditions that alter the physical and chemical controls on COC transport in the cementitious waste forms over time. Most organizations responsible for disposal facility operation and their regulators support an iterative hierarchical safety/performance assessment approach with a general philosophy that modeling provides

  6. Understanding and optimising the packing density of perylene bisimide layers on CVD-grown graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berner, Nina C.; Winters, Sinéad; Backes, Claudia; Yim, Chanyoung; Dümbgen, Kim C.; Kaminska, Izabela; Mackowski, Sebastian; Cafolla, Attilio A.; Hirsch, Andreas; Duesberg, Georg S.

    2015-10-01

    The non-covalent functionalisation of graphene is an attractive strategy to alter the surface chemistry of graphene without damaging its superior electrical and mechanical properties. Using the facile method of aqueous-phase functionalisation on large-scale CVD-grown graphene, we investigated the formation of different packing densities in self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of perylene bisimide derivatives and related this to the amount of substrate contamination. We were able to directly observe wet-chemically deposited SAMs in scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) on transferred CVD graphene and revealed that the densely packed perylene ad-layers adsorb with the conjugated π-system of the core perpendicular to the graphene substrate. This elucidation of the non-covalent functionalisation of graphene has major implications on controlling its surface chemistry and opens new pathways for adaptable functionalisation in ambient conditions and on the large scale.The non-covalent functionalisation of graphene is an attractive strategy to alter the surface chemistry of graphene without damaging its superior electrical and mechanical properties. Using the facile method of aqueous-phase functionalisation on large-scale CVD-grown graphene, we investigated the formation of different packing densities in self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of perylene bisimide derivatives and related this to the amount of substrate contamination. We were able to directly observe wet-chemically deposited SAMs in scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) on transferred CVD graphene and revealed that the densely packed perylene ad-layers adsorb with the conjugated π-system of the core perpendicular to the graphene substrate. This elucidation of the non-covalent functionalisation of graphene has major implications on controlling its surface chemistry and opens new pathways for adaptable functionalisation in ambient conditions and on the large scale. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  7. Evaluation of CVD silicon carbide for synchrotron radiation mirrors

    SciTech Connect

    Takacs, P.Z.

    1981-07-01

    Chemical vapor deposited silicon carbide (CVD SiC) is a recent addition to the list of materials suitable for use in the harsh environment of synchrotron radiation (SR) beam lines. SR mirrors for use at normal incidence must be ultrahigh vacuum compatible, must withstand intense x-ray irradiation without surface damage, must be capable of being polished to an extremely smooth surface finish, and must maintain surface figure under thermal loading. CVD SiC exceeds the performance of conventional optical materials in all these areas. It is, however, a relatively new optical material. Few manufacturers have experience in producing optical quality material, and few opticians have experience in figuring and polishing the material. The CVD material occurs in a variety of forms, sensitively dependent upon reaction chamber production conditions. We are evaluating samples of CVD SiC obtained commercially from various manufacturers, representing a range of deposition conditions, to determine which types of CVD material are most suitable for superpolishing. At the time of this writing, samples are being polished by several commercial vendors and surface finish characteristics are being evaluated by various analytical methods.

  8. Electron diffraction studies on CVD grown bi-layered graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingam, Kiran; Karakaya, Mehmet; Podila, Ramakrishna; Quin, Haijun; Rao, Apparao; Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC USA 29634. Team; Advanced Materials Research Laboratories, Clemson University, Anderson, SC USA 29625 Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    Graphene has generated enormous interest in the scientific community due to its peculiar properties like electron mobility, thermal conductivity etc. Several recent reports on exfoliated graphene emphasized the role of layer stacking on the electronic and optical properties of graphene in case of bi-layered and few layered graphene and several synthesis techniques like chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on Copper foils are employed to prepare graphene for applications at a large scale. However, a correlated study pertinent to the stacking order in CVD grown graphene is still unclear. In this work, using a combination of Raman spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction analysis we analyzed the preferred misorientation angles in a CVD grown bi-layered graphene and also the role of Cu crystal facets on the graphene stacking order will be presented.

  9. Characterization of interfaces in mosaic CVD diamond crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muchnikov, Anatoly B.; Radishev, Dmitry B.; Vikharev, Anatoly L.; Gorbachev, Alexei M.; Mitenkin, Anatoly V.; Drozdov, Mikhail N.; Drozdov, Yuri N.; Yunin, Pavel A.

    2016-05-01

    Detailed description of a way to accrete diamond single crystals in one plate using the CVD method is presented. It was found that each region of the mosaic CVD diamond crystal grown over a certain seed substrate "inherits" the crystallographic orientation of its substrate. No correlation was found between the value of misorientation of the accreted crystals and entrance of hydrogen to the boundary. It is shown that successful accretion of single crystal diamond plates in a single mosaic crystal occurs even in the case of great misorientation of crystals. The mechanical stresses appear during the fabrication of the mosaic CVD diamond crystal. Stresses accumulate during accretion of the regions, which grow over substrates with different orientations, in a common structure.

  10. Characteristics of CVD ternary refractory nitride diffusion barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, J.G.; Smith, P.M.; Custer, J.S.

    1996-11-01

    A range of different ternary refractory nitride compositions have been deposited by CVD (chemical vapor deposition) for the systems TiSiN, WBN, and WSiN. The precursors used are readily available. The structure, electrical, and barrier properties of the films produced by CVD are similar to those observed for films with similar compositions deposited by PVD (physical vapor deposition). The step coverage of the CVD processes developed is good and in some cases, exceptional. A combination of desirable resistivity, step coverage, and barrier properties exists simultaneously over a reasonable range of compositions for each system. Initial attempts to integrate WSiN films into a standard 0.5 micrometer CMOS process flow in place of a sputtered Ti/TiN stack were successful.

  11. The relationship between periodontal disease (pd) and cardiovascular disease (cvd).

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Maurizio; Dorn, Joan

    2010-01-01

    The recent focus on the potential link between periodontal and cardiovascular disease (PD and CVD) is part of the larger renewed interest on the role of infection and inflammation in the etiology of atherosclerosis and its clinical manifestations. Periodontal Disease is an inflammatory process affecting the periodontium, the tissue that surrounds and supports the teeth. The process usually starts with an inflammatory process of the gum (gingivitis) but it may progress with an extensive involvement of the gum, as well as the periodontal ligament and the bone surrounding the teeth resulting in substantial bone loss. Periodontal disease is a common oral pathological condition in the adult age and represents the leading cause of tooth loss. PD prevalence increases with age and there are estimates that up to 49,000,000 Americans may suffer from some form of gum disease. The gingival plaque associated with PD is colonized by a number of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria that have been shown to affect the initiation and development of PD and have been associated with the potential etiological role of PD in CVD and other chronic conditions. A potential etiological link between PD and CVD may have important public health implications as both the exposure (PD) and the outcomes (CVD) are highly prevalent in industrialized societies. In situations in which both the exposure and the outcome are highly prevalent even modest associations, like those observed in the studies reporting on the link between PD and CVD outcomes, may have relevance. There are not definite data on the effect of periodontal treatment on CVD clinical outcomes (either in primary or secondary prevention) however it should be pointed out that the limited (both in terms of numbers and study design) experimental evidence in humans suggests a possible beneficial effect of periodontal treatment of indices of functional and structural vascular health. PMID:21415980

  12. The extended growth of graphene oxide flakes using ethanol CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingfeng; Larisika, Melanie; Fam, W. H. Derrick; He, Qiyuan; Nimmo, Myra A.; Nowak, Christoph; Tok, I. Y. Alfred

    2013-03-01

    We report the extended growth of Graphene Oxide (GO) flakes using atmospheric pressure ethanol Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). GO was used to catalyze the deposition of carbon on a substrate in the ethanol CVD with Ar and H2 as carrier gases. Raman, SEM, XPS and AFM characterized the growth to be a reduced GO (RGO) of <5 layers. This newly grown RGO possesses lower defect density with larger and increased distribution of sp2 domains than chemically reduced RGO. Furthermore this method without optimization reduces the relative standard deviation of electrical conductivity between chips, from 80.5% to 16.5%, enabling RGO to be used in practical electronic devices.We report the extended growth of Graphene Oxide (GO) flakes using atmospheric pressure ethanol Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). GO was used to catalyze the deposition of carbon on a substrate in the ethanol CVD with Ar and H2 as carrier gases. Raman, SEM, XPS and AFM characterized the growth to be a reduced GO (RGO) of <5 layers. This newly grown RGO possesses lower defect density with larger and increased distribution of sp2 domains than chemically reduced RGO. Furthermore this method without optimization reduces the relative standard deviation of electrical conductivity between chips, from 80.5% to 16.5%, enabling RGO to be used in practical electronic devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: The ethanol CVD setup, TEM of CVD treated RGO, graphite 2D Raman spectra, GO synthesis, transfer and reduction methods and details of characterization techniques are described in the document. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr33704a

  13. Origin of residual particles on transferred graphene grown by CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasunishi, Tomohiro; Takabayashi, Yuya; Kishimoto, Shigeru; Kitaura, Ryo; Shinohara, Hisanori; Ohno, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    Large-area single-layer graphene can be grown on Cu foil by CVD, but for device applications, the layer must to be transferred onto an insulating substrate. As residual particles are often observed on transferred graphene, we investigated their origin using scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX). The results show that these residual particles are composed either of silicon or an alloy of a few metals, and hence, likely originate from the quartz tube of the CVD furnace and the impurities contained in the Cu foil.

  14. Tractable Chemical Models for CVD of Silicon and Carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanquet, E.; Gokoglu, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    Tractable chemical models are validated for the CVD of silicon and carbon. Dilute silane (SiH4) and methane (CH4) in hydrogen are chosen as gaseous precursors. The chemical mechanism for each systems Si and C is deliberately reduced to three reactions in the models: one in the gas phase and two at the surface. The axial-flow CVD reactor utilized in this study has well-characterized flow and thermal fields and provides variable deposition rates in the axial direction. Comparisons between the experimental and calculated deposition rates are made at different pressures and temperatures.

  15. Schottky barrier solar cells of weakly hydrogenated CVD amorphous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashita, T.; Hirose, M.; Osaka, Y.

    1981-01-01

    Electronic properties of CVD a-Si were remarkably improved by hydrogen plasma annealing. As a result, the Schottky-barrier solar cells without an antireflection coating have provided a conversion efficiency of 2.7% at 100 mW/sq cm, and no Staebler-Wronski effect has been observed in the hydrogenated CVD a-Si cell. It is also found that the fill factor is dependent on incident light intensity, because of changes in its series and parallel resistances by light illumination.

  16. CVD Growth of Carbon Nanotubes: Structure, Catalyst, and Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit extraordinary mechanical and unique electronic properties and hence have been receiving much attention in recent years for their potential in nanoelectronics, field emission devices, scanning probes, high strength composites and many more applications. Catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbon feedstock with the aid of supported transition metal catalysts - also known as chemical vapor deposition (CVD) - has become popular to produce single-walled and multi-walled nanotubes (SWNTs, MWNTs) and multiwalled nanofibers (MWNFs). The ability to grow CNTs on patterned substrates and in vertically aligned arrays, and the simplicity of the process, has made CVD growth of CNTs an attractive approach.

  17. SCFA lead lab technical assistance at Oak Ridge Y-12 nationalsecurity complex: Evaluation of treatment and characterizationalternatives of mixed waste soil and debris at disposal area remedialaction DARA solids storage facility (SSF)

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, Terry

    2002-08-26

    On July 17-18, 2002, a technical assistance team from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) met with the Bechtel Jacobs Company Disposal Area Remedial Action (DARA) environmental project leader to review treatment and characterization options for the baseline for the DARA Solids Storage Facility (SSF). The technical assistance request sought suggestions from SCFA's team of technical experts with experience and expertise in soil treatment and characterization to identify and evaluate (1) alternative treatment technologies for DARA soils and debris, and (2) options for analysis of organic constituents in soil with matrix interference. Based on the recommendations, the site may also require assistance in identifying and evaluating appropriate commercial vendors.

  18. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR DOE STANDARD 3013 EQUIVALENCY SUPPORTING REDUCED TEMPERATURE STABILIZATION OF OXALATE-DERIVED PLUTONIUM OXIDE PRODUCED BY THE HB-LINE FACILITY AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Duffey, J.; Livingston, R.; Berg, J.; Veirs, D.

    2012-07-02

    The HB-Line (HBL) facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is designed to produce high-purity plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) which is suitable for future use in production of Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel. The MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) requires PuO{sub 2} feed to be packaged per the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Standard 3013 (DOE-STD-3013) to comply with the facility's safety basis. The stabilization conditions imposed by DOE-STD-3013 for PuO{sub 2} (i.e., 950 C for 2 hours) preclude use of the HBL PuO{sub 2} in direct fuel fabrication and reduce the value of the HBL product as MFFF feedstock. Consequently, HBL initiated a technical evaluation to define acceptable operating conditions for production of high-purity PuO{sub 2} that fulfills the DOE-STD-3013 criteria for safe storage. The purpose of this document is to demonstrate that within the defined operating conditions, the HBL process will be equivalent for meeting the requirements of the DOE-STD-3013 stabilization process for plutonium-bearing materials from the DOE complex. The proposed 3013 equivalency reduces the prescribed stabilization temperature for high-purity PuO{sub 2} from oxalate precipitation processes from 950 C to 640 C and places a limit of 60% on the relative humidity (RH) at the lowest material temperature. The equivalency is limited to material produced using the HBL established flow sheet, for example, nitric acid anion exchange and Pu(IV) direct strike oxalate precipitation with stabilization at a minimum temperature of 640 C for four hours (h). The product purity must meet the MFFF acceptance criteria of 23,600 {micro}g/g Pu (i.e., 2.1 wt %) total impurities and chloride content less than 250 {micro}g/g of Pu. All other stabilization and packaging criteria identified by DOE-STD-3013-2012 or earlier revisions of the standard apply. Based on the evaluation of test data discussed in this document, the expert judgment of the authors supports packaging the HBL product under a 3013

  19. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN OZONE-INDUCED LUNG INJURY, ANTIOXIDANT COMPENSATION AND UNDERLYING CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE (CVD).

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased levels of oxidants and compromised compensatory response are associated with CVD susceptibility. We hypothesized that rat strains demonstrating genetic CVD will have lower levels of antioxidants and greater ozone-induced pulmonary injury relative to healthy strains. Mal...

  20. COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF RISK FACTORS FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE (CVD) IN GENETICALLY PREDISPOSED RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rodent CVD models are increasingly used for understanding individual differences in susceptibility to environmental stressors such as air pollution. We characterized pathologies and a number of known human risk factors of CVD in genetically predisposed, male young adult Spontaneo...

  1. Enhancing the mechanical properties of single-crystal CVD diamond.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qi; Yan, Chih-Shiue; Meng, Yufei; Lai, Joseph; Krasnicki, Szczesny; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Hemley, Russell J

    2009-09-01

    Approaches for enhancing the strength and toughness of single-crystal diamond produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) at high growth rates are described. CVD processes used to grow single-crystal diamond in high density plasmas were modified to incorporate boron and nitrogen. Semi-quantitative studies of mechanical properties were carried out using Vickers indentation techniques. The introduction of boron in single-crystal CVD diamond can significantly enhance the fracture toughness of this material without sacrificing its high hardness (∼78 GPa). Growth conditions were varied to investigate its effect on boron incorporation and optical properties by means of photoluminescence, infrared, and ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy. Boron can be readily incorporated into single-crystal diamond by the methods used, but with nitrogen addition, the incorporation of boron was hindered. The spectroscopic measurements indicate that nitrogen and boron coexist in the diamond structure, which helps explain the origin of the enhanced fracture toughness of this material. Further, low pressure/high temperature annealing can enhance the intrinsic hardness of single-crystal CVD diamond by a factor of two without appreciable loss in fracture toughness. This doping and post-growth treatment of diamond may lead to new technological applications that require enhanced mechanical properties of diamond. PMID:21832321

  2. Cold vacuum drying facility 90% design review

    SciTech Connect

    O`Neill, C.T.

    1997-05-02

    This document contains review comment records for the CVDF 90% design review. Spent fuels retrieved from the K Basins will be dried at the CVDF. It has also been recommended that the Multi-Conister Overpacks be welded, inspected, and repaired at the CVD Facility before transport to dry storage.

  3. Morphological Engineering of CVD-Grown Transition Metal Dichalcogenides for Efficient Electrochemical Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Ji, Qingqing; Zhang, Yu; Shi, Jianping; Sun, Jingyu; Zhang, Yanfeng; Liu, Zhongfan

    2016-08-01

    2D layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) have emerged as new possibilites beyond conventional particulate catalysts in facilitating efficient electrochemical hydrogen evolution. This is mainly mediated by the ultrahigh surface-to-volume ratio and the effective coupling of all active sites with supporting electrodes. Especially, the facile chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method has enabled morphological engineering of monolayer TMDC catalysts toward development of abundant active edge sites within the 2D plane. Here, two pathways to achieve such purpose are highlighted, either by non-equilibrium growth of MoS2 dendrites or throughout high-density nucleation of MoS2 nanoflakes directly on the electrode materials. Furthermore, future research directions have also been proposed and discussed to further enhance the efficiency of such unique catalysts. PMID:26848711

  4. 9 CFR 351.10 - Facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF TECHNICAL ANIMAL FATS FOR EXPORT Facilities and Operations § 351.10 Facilities. (a) Facilities for the preparation, identification, and storage of the technical animal fat to be... maintain the identity of certified technical animal fats and materials used in their preparation,...

  5. 9 CFR 351.10 - Facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF TECHNICAL ANIMAL FATS FOR EXPORT Facilities and Operations § 351.10 Facilities. (a) Facilities for the preparation, identification, and storage of the technical animal fat to be... maintain the identity of certified technical animal fats and materials used in their preparation,...

  6. 9 CFR 351.10 - Facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF TECHNICAL ANIMAL FATS FOR EXPORT Facilities and Operations § 351.10 Facilities. (a) Facilities for the preparation, identification, and storage of the technical animal fat to be... maintain the identity of certified technical animal fats and materials used in their preparation,...

  7. 9 CFR 351.10 - Facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF TECHNICAL ANIMAL FATS FOR EXPORT Facilities and Operations § 351.10 Facilities. (a) Facilities for the preparation, identification, and storage of the technical animal fat to be... maintain the identity of certified technical animal fats and materials used in their preparation,...

  8. 9 CFR 351.10 - Facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION CERTIFICATION OF TECHNICAL ANIMAL FATS FOR EXPORT Facilities and Operations § 351.10 Facilities. (a) Facilities for the preparation, identification, and storage of the technical animal fat to be... maintain the identity of certified technical animal fats and materials used in their preparation,...

  9. Multiwalled carbon nanotube CVD synthesis, modification, and composite applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Dali

    Well-aligned carbon multiwall nanotube (MWNT) arrays have been continuously synthesized by a floating catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method involving the pyrolysis of xylene-ferrocene mixtures. The CVD parameters have been studied to selectively synthesize nanotubes with required dimensions. A mixed tip-root growth model has been proposed for the floating catalytic CVD synthesis. Coarsening of the catalyst particle at the root end promoted MWNT wall coarsening (addition of new concentric graphene shells), while the smaller catalyst particle at the tip contributed to MWNT elongation. A two-step process in which ferrocene was fed for only five minutes to nucleate the DTs was developed to understand if a continuous supply of catalyst was necessary for continued growth. The results show that the ferrocene was only necessary for initial nucleation. To simplify the CVD process further, another two-step synthesis method was developed in which the ferrocene was pre-decomposed so that the nanotube nucleation could be isolated from the growth, enabling quantification of growth mechanisms and kinetics. Mass spectra and hydrocarbon analyses of the CVD reactor tail gas were performed to understand the pyrolysis chemistry. Well-aligned N-doped and Ru-doped MWNT arrays have been produced by pyrolysis of pyridine ferrocene mixtures and xylene-ferrocene-ruthenocene mixtures, respectively. Various material characterization techniques were used to measure the dopant distributions and correlate the catalyst phase with the novel nanotube structures. High-temperature annealing has been shown to be a viable means to remove both the catalyst particles and certain microstructural defects within the CVD-derived DTs. The phase transformation of catalyst during annealing has also been studied. Homogeneous distribution of MWNTs in polystyrene matrices was achieved by an ultrasonic assisted solution-evaporation method. Addition of only 1 wt % DTs to polystyrene increased the polymer

  10. Large-scale quantification of CVD graphene surface coverage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Bonanni, Alessandra; Sofer, Zdeněk; Pumera, Martin

    2013-02-01

    The extraordinary properties demonstrated for graphene and graphene-related materials can be fully exploited when a large-scale fabrication procedure is made available. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene on Cu and Ni substrates is one of the most promising procedures to synthesize large-area and good quality graphene films. Parallel to the fabrication process, a large-scale quality monitoring technique is equally crucial. We demonstrate here a rapid and simple methodology that is able to probe the effectiveness of the growth process over a large substrate area for both Ni and Cu substrates. This method is based on inherent electrochemical signals generated by the underlying metal catalysts when fractures or discontinuities of the graphene film are present. The method can be applied immediately after the CVD growth process without the need for any graphene transfer step and represents a powerful quality monitoring technique for the assessment of large-scale fabrication of graphene by the CVD process.The extraordinary properties demonstrated for graphene and graphene-related materials can be fully exploited when a large-scale fabrication procedure is made available. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene on Cu and Ni substrates is one of the most promising procedures to synthesize large-area and good quality graphene films. Parallel to the fabrication process, a large-scale quality monitoring technique is equally crucial. We demonstrate here a rapid and simple methodology that is able to probe the effectiveness of the growth process over a large substrate area for both Ni and Cu substrates. This method is based on inherent electrochemical signals generated by the underlying metal catalysts when fractures or discontinuities of the graphene film are present. The method can be applied immediately after the CVD growth process without the need for any graphene transfer step and represents a powerful quality monitoring technique for the assessment of large

  11. Development of CVD mullite coatings for Si-based ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, Michael Lawrence

    1999-09-01

    To raise fuel efficiencies, the next generation of engines and fuel systems must be lighter and operate at higher temperatures. Ceramic-based materials, which are considerably lighter than metals and can withstand working temperatures of up to 1400sp°C, have been targeted to replace traditional metal-based components. The materials used in combustion environments must also be capable of withstanding erosion and corrosion caused by combustion gases, particulates, and deposit-forming corrodants. With these demanding criteria, silicon-based ceramics are the leading candidate materials for high temperature engine and heat exchanger structural components. However, these materials are limited in gaseous environments and in the presence of molten salts since they form liquid silicates on exposed surfaces at temperatures as low as 800sp°C. Protective coatings that can withstand higher operating temperatures and corrosive atmospheres must be developed for silicon-based ceramics. Mullite (3Alsb2Osb3{*}2SiOsb2) was targeted as a potential coating material due to its unique ability to resist corrosion, retain its strength, resist creep, and avoid thermal shock failure at elevated temperatures. Several attempts to deposit mullite coatings by various processing methods have met with limited success and usually resulted in coatings that have had pores, cracks, poor adherence, and required thermal post-treatments. To overcome these deficiencies, the direct formation of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) mullite coatings has been developed. CVD is a high temperature atomistic deposition technique that results in dense, adherent crystalline coatings. The object of this dissertation was to further the understanding of the CVD mullite deposition process and resultant coating. The kinetics of CVD mullite deposition were investigated as a function of the following process parameters: temperature, pressure, and the deposition reactor system. An empirical kinetic model was developed

  12. Carbon fiber CVD coating by carbon nanostructured for space materials protection against atomic oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Roberto; Bueno Morles, Ramon; Micheli, Davide

    2016-07-01

    , by the purpose to integrate the carbon nanostructures in the carbon fibers by means of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, in order to develop the basic substrate of advanced carbon-based nanocomposite for atomic oxygen protection. The nanostructures grown onto the carbon fibers can be used to create multiscale hybrid carbon nanotube/carbon fiber composites where individual carbon fibers, which are several microns in diameter, are surrounded by nanotubes. The present objective is the setting-up of the CVD parameters for a reliable growth of carbon nanostructures on carbon fiber surface; after that, the results of a preliminary characterization related to atomic oxygen effects testing by means of a ground LEO simulation facility are reported and discussed.

  13. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) OCRWM Loop Error Determination

    SciTech Connect

    PHILIPP, B.L.

    2000-07-26

    Characterization is specifically identified by the Richland Operations Office (RL) for the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) of the US Department of Energy (DOE), as requiring application of the requirements in the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) (RW-0333P DOE 1997a). Those analyses that provide information that is necessary for repository acceptance require application of the QARD. The cold vacuum drying (CVD) project identified the loops that measure, display, and record multi-canister overpack (MCO) vacuum pressure and Tempered Water (TW) temperature data as providing OCRWM data per Application of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Quality Assurance Requirements to the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project HNF-SD-SNF-RPT-007. Vacuum pressure transmitters (PT 1*08, 1*10) and TW temperature transmitters (TIT-3*05, 3*12) are used to verify drying and to determine the water content within the MCO after CVD.

  14. Characterisation of scCVD diamond detectors with γ sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caiffi, B.; Amapane, N.; Argirò, S.; Battaglieri, M.; Beolé, S.; De Vita, R.; Masera, M.; Mila, G.; Osipenko, M.; Ripani, M.; Taiuti, M.

    2014-08-01

    A single-crystal CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) diamond detector was used to measure γ rays in order to assess its performance in terms of energy resolution and linearity. For this purpose, 57Co, 133Ba, 22Na, 207Bi and 137Cs γ sources were used. Electrons scattered by the backward Compton process were detected in the diamond, in coincidence with (backscattered) γs measured in a NaI detector, placed at 180° from the CVD diamond detector with respect to the source. The resulting calibration shows a linear dependence of the charge deposited in the diamond and a resolution of about 24 keV FWHM for the energy of the incident γs between 40 keV (57Co) and 477 keV (137Cs), comparable with the resolution of our electronic chain.

  15. THERMAL DIFFUSIVITY/CONDUCTIVITY OF IRRADIATED MONOLITHIC CVD-SIC

    SciTech Connect

    Youngblood, Gerald E.; Senor, David J.; Jones, Russell H.

    2003-03-31

    Several thermal diffusivity disc samples of high purity CVD-SiC were neutron-irradiated to equivalent doses of about 5-8 dpa-SiC at temperatures from 252 up to 800 C. For this temperature range, the degradation in the thermal diffusivity ranged from about 95 percent down to 89 percent, respectively. The reciprocal thermal diffusivity method was used to estimate the phonon mean free paths and defect concentrations before and after the irradiations for these materials. Even though the CVD-SiC material is an excellent monitor of certain neutron irradiation effects, the degradation in the thermal diffusivity (conductivity) appears to be more than a factor of two greater than predicted by recent theoretical model simulations.

  16. Single crystal and polycrystalline CVD diamond for demanding optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodson, J. M.; Brandon, J. R.; Dhillon, H. K.; Friel, I.; Geoghegan, S. L.; Mollart, T. P.; Santini, P.; Scarsbrook, G. A.; Twitchen, D. J.; Whitehead, A. J.; Wilman, J. J.; de Wit, H.

    2011-06-01

    Diamond's extremely wide transparency, combined with its other exceptional properties including hardness, strength and thermal conductivity make it a desirable material for optical windows. Polycrystalline diamond grown by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) has become the preferred window material for high power CO2 laser systems since its development in the 1990s. The range and availability of diamond materials is expanding, and in recent years has been extended to include CVD single crystal diamond. This paper reviews the quality of these materials, looking at optical scatter and absorption around 1 and 10 microns, along with their thermal and mechanical properties. We also discuss selection of appropriate grades and how they may best be integrated into demanding optical applications.

  17. Designed CVD growth of graphene via process engineering.

    PubMed

    Yan, Kai; Fu, Lei; Peng, Hailin; Liu, Zhongfan

    2013-10-15

    Graphene, the atomic thin carbon film with honeycomb lattice, holds great promise in a wide range of applications, due to its unique band structure and excellent electronic, optical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Scientists are researching this star material because of the development of various emerging preparation techniques, among which chemical vapor deposition (CVD) has received the fastest advances in the past few years. For the CVD growth of graphene, the ultimate goal is to achieve the highest quality in the largest scale and lowest cost with a precise control of layer thickness, stacking order, and crystallinity. To meet this goal, researchers need a comprehensive understanding and effective controlling of the growth process, especially to its elementary steps. In this Account, we focus on our recent progresses toward the controlled surface growth of graphene and its two-dimensional (2D) hybrids via rational designs of CVD elementary processes, namely, process engineering. A typical CVD process consists of four main elementary steps: (A) adsorption and catalytic decomposition of precursor gas, (B) diffusion and dissolution of decomposed carbon species into bulk metal, (C) segregation of dissolved carbon atoms onto the metal surface, and finally, (D) surface nucleation and growth of graphene. Absence or enhancement of each elementary step would lead to significant changes in the whole growth process. Metals with certain carbon solubility, such as nickel and cobalt, involve all four elementary steps in a typical CVD process, thus providing us an ideal system for process engineering. The elementary segregation process can be completely blocked if molybdenum is introduced into the system as an alloy catalyst, yielding perfect monolayer graphene almost independent of growth parameters. On the other hand, the segregation-only process of predissolved solid carbons is also capable of high-quality graphene growth. By using a synergetic Cu-Ni alloy, we are

  18. Electronic properties of CVD graphene grown on copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Helin; Yu, Qingkai; Jauregui, Luis A.; Tian, Jifa; Wu, Wei; Liu, Zhihong; Jalilian, Romaneh; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Jiang, Zhigang; Bao, Jiming; Pei, Steven S.; Chen, Yong P.

    2010-03-01

    We report the electronic properties of graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on copper foils at ambient pressure. Large size graphene films (4 inch*4 inch) are synthesized and transferred to SiO2/Si substrate. Raman mapping demonstrates that the films consist primarily of monolayer graphene (up to ˜90% area coverage). Low temperature transport measurements are performed on devices made from such CVD graphene. The ``half-integer'' quantum Hall effect, which is the hall-mark of mono-layer graphene, has been observed in these devices. We also observe the ambipolar field effect and weak localization, which allow us to extract carrier mobility ˜3000cm^2/Vs and phase coherence length ˜300nm at 1.5K.

  19. CVD diamond screens for photon beam imaging at PETRA III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degenhardt, M.; Aprigliano, G.; Schulte-Schrepping, H.; Hahn, U.; Grabosch, H.-J.; Wörner, E.

    2013-03-01

    PETRA III, the most brilliant storage-ring-based synchrotron radiation source in the world, started its operation in 2009. It features 14 undulator beamlines and will be extended by further 10 beamlines in the PETRA III extension project. During the startup phase of the 14 PETRA III beamlines, fluorescence monitors based on CVD diamond screens have proven to be a very powerful tool for the monitoring of the attenuated undulator beams and for the commissioning of the optical components, e.g. slit systems and monochromators. They served as the essential instrument for the initial setup of the positron beam orbit to align the undulator photon beam along the beamline. The application of CVD diamond screens for the beam imaging at PETRA III beamlines is presented. Images taken during the beam adjustment and the beamline commissioning are shown.

  20. Argan oil improves surrogate markers of CVD in humans.

    PubMed

    Sour, Souad; Belarbi, Meriem; Khaldi, Darine; Benmansour, Nassima; Sari, Nassima; Nani, Abdelhafid; Chemat, Farid; Visioli, Francesco

    2012-06-01

    Limited - though increasing - evidence suggests that argan oil might be endowed with potential healthful properties, mostly in the areas of CVD and prostate cancer. We sought to comprehensively determine the effects of argan oil supplementation on the plasma lipid profile and antioxidant status of a group of healthy Algerian subjects, compared with matched controls. A total of twenty healthy subjects consumed 15 g/d of argan oil - with toasted bread - for breakfast, during 4 weeks (intervention group), whereas twenty matched controls followed their habitual diet, but did not consume argan oil. The study lasted 30 d. At the end of the study, argan oil-supplemented subjects exhibited higher plasma vitamin E concentrations, lower total and LDL-cholesterol, lower TAG and improved plasma and cellular antioxidant profile, when compared with controls. In conclusion, we showed that Algerian argan oil is able to positively modulate some surrogate markers of CVD, through mechanisms which warrant further investigation. PMID:22082585

  1. Infrared absorption of fs-laser textured CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvani, P.; Bellucci, A.; Girolami, M.; Orlando, S.; Valentini, V.; Polini, R.; Mezzetti, A.; Di Fonzo, F.; Trucchi, D. M.

    2016-03-01

    Nanoscale periodic texturing on polycrystalline CVD diamond surface was performed to obtain a significant increase in optical absorptance to visible and near-infrared radiation. Surface texturing, obtained by the use of fs-laser ultrashort pulses, has been demonstrated to induce a controlled periodicity of ripples of about 170 nm and length of several µm, able to drastically increase the diamond capability of interacting with solar radiation from its intrinsic visible blindness. Ultraviolet and visible Raman spectroscopy has been used to confirm the absence of non-diamond phases resulting from the process for the fs-laser-textured sample. Moreover, here we investigate the optical properties in the range 200 nm-25 µm. Absorbance of fs-laser-textured CVD diamond is considerably higher than the untreated one at every wavelength, resulting in a remarkable increase in the emittance: It points out the need for an optimization of process parameters to enhance the selective absorption capability.

  2. Electroluminescent and photosensitive films prepared by DTC-CVD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavyalova, Ludmila V.; Svechnikov, George S.

    1997-08-01

    The original chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method used in fabrication A2B6 films, photodetectors and electro- luminescent emitters based on these films have been reported. The basic idea behind this method is thermal decomposition of dithiocarbamates (DTC). The proposed method does not require expensive materials and vacuum equipment. Moreover, the DTC-CVD method differs from the known CVD methods in source material delivery method, a low deposition temperature and a non-sealed reactor geometry. Both CdS and CdS1-xSex were obtained at temperature of 240- 280 degrees C and were activated directly in the grown process by Cu and In, or by annealing in mixture CdS: Cu, Cl. Photodetectors with absorption maxima at 500-750 nm have dark conductivity (sigma) D EQ 10-9 divided by 10-8 (Omega) -1 cm-1 and photoconductivity (sigma) ph equals 10-2 divided by 10-1 (Omega) -1 cm-1 at 200 lux. CdS films with thickness of 6 divided by 12 micrometers have been used as sandwich-type photoconductor detectors. Electroluminescence ZnS:Mn films prepared by DTC-CVD method at the substrate temperature of 200 DIV 300 degrees C without additional annealing have high luminance and luminous efficiency. Deposition at a law temperature makes it possible to use flexible polymer films or low cost glasses as substrates. Because the technique is rather simple and can be applied to obtain all types of thin film electroluminescence structure layers, we expect a low price of light sources based on these films.

  3. Underestimating risk in women delays diagnosis of CVD.

    PubMed

    Keteepe-Arachi, Tracey; Sharma, Sanjay

    2016-03-01

    CVD remains the most common cause of mortality in women. In 2007, the annual mortality in women secondary to CAD was 4.7 times that of breast cancer. Around 2.8 million women are living with CVD in the UK. There has been an increase in the prevalence of MI in women aged 35 to 54, while a decline in prevalence was observed in age-matched men. Difficulty in evaluating symptoms of ischaemic heart disease in women is well documented and remains challenging because of their atypical nature. The main gender difference is that women tend to present less frequently with exertional symptoms of chest pain before an AMI. Although men and women share classic cardiovascular risk factors the relative importance of each risk factor may be gender specific. The impact of smoking is greater in women than men, especially in those under 50. Diabetes is a more potent risk factor for fatal CHD in women than men. Risk factors specific to women include postmenopausal status, hysterectomy and complications during pregnancy. Women who develop gestational diabetes mellitus or pre-eclampsia more than double their risk of CVD later in life. Transition to the menopause is associated with a worsening CHD risk profile. After the menopause women may experience an increase in weight, alteration in fat distribution and an increase in other CVD risk factors such as diabetes and a more adverse lipid profile. Pharmacological stress testing is preferred for diagnosing CAD in females with lower exercise capacity. Stress cardiomyopathy is triggered by intense, unexpected emotional or physical stress and is characterised by transient apical systolic dysfunction or ballooning of the left ventricle. The syndrome predominantly affects postmenopausal women. Women presenting with STEMI have worse outcomes compared with men. However, in those presenting with NSTEMI there were no differences in outcomes. PMID:27214974

  4. Electrochromic behavior in CVD grown tungsten oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogova, D.; Iossifova, A.; Ivanova, T.; Dimitrova, Zl; Gesheva, K.

    1999-03-01

    Solid state electrochemical devices (ECDs) for smart windows, large area displays and automobile rearview mirrors are of considerable technological and commercial interest. In this paper, we studied the electrochromic properties of amorphous and polycrystalline CVD carbonyl tungsten oxide films and the possibility for sol-gel thin TiO 2 film to play the role of passive electrode in an electrochromic window with solid polymer electrolyte.

  5. Ultra-high Burst Strength of CVD Graphene Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Luda; Boutilier, Michael; Kidambi, Piran; Karnik, Rohit; Microfluidics; Nanofluidics Research Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    Porous graphene membranes have significant potential in gas separation, water desalination and nanofiltration. Understanding the mechanical strength of porous graphene is crucial because membrane separations can involve high pressures. We studied the burst strength of CVD graphene membrane placed on porous support at applied pressures up to 100 bar by monitoring the gas flow rate across the membrane as a function of pressure. Increase of gas flow rate with pressure allowed for extraction of the burst fraction of graphene as it failed under increasing pressure. We also studied the effect of sub-nanometer pores on the ability of graphene to withstand pressure. The results showed that porous graphene membranes can withstand pressures comparable to or even higher than the >50 bar pressures encountered in water desalination, with non-porous CVD graphene exhibiting even higher mechanical strength. Our study shows that porous polycrystalline CVD graphene has ultra-high burst strength under applied pressure, suggesting the possibility for its use in high-pressure membrane separations. Principal Investigator

  6. CVD silicon carbide characterization. Final report, August 1992-October 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Graves, G.A.; Iden, D.

    1994-08-01

    Chemically vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide is a candidate material for high quality ground and space-based mirror substrates and high quality reflective optics. Statistically valid material property data has not been available, however, to make durability and lifetime predictions for such optics. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the Weibull and slow crack growth parameters for CVD silicon carbide. Specimens were cut from various locations in a 25 mm thick, 50 cm diameter piece of SiC to analyze bulk material property homogeneity. Flexural strength was measured using a four-point bend technique. In addition to mechanical testing for strength, hardness, and fracture toughness, the material crystallography and microstructure were studied. Thermal expansion, thermal diffusivity, specific heat, optical absorption, and infrared reflectivity measurements were also conducted. Raman spectroscopy was used to check for any residual stress. Test results show this CVD silicon carbide is a high-purity, homogeneous, fine-grained substrate material with very good mechanical, optical, and thermal properties.

  7. Large-scale quantification of CVD graphene surface coverage.

    PubMed

    Ambrosi, Adriano; Bonanni, Alessandra; Sofer, Zdeněk; Pumera, Martin

    2013-03-21

    The extraordinary properties demonstrated for graphene and graphene-related materials can be fully exploited when a large-scale fabrication procedure is made available. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of graphene on Cu and Ni substrates is one of the most promising procedures to synthesize large-area and good quality graphene films. Parallel to the fabrication process, a large-scale quality monitoring technique is equally crucial. We demonstrate here a rapid and simple methodology that is able to probe the effectiveness of the growth process over a large substrate area for both Ni and Cu substrates. This method is based on inherent electrochemical signals generated by the underlying metal catalysts when fractures or discontinuities of the graphene film are present. The method can be applied immediately after the CVD growth process without the need for any graphene transfer step and represents a powerful quality monitoring technique for the assessment of large-scale fabrication of graphene by the CVD process. PMID:23396554

  8. Deposition of moisture barrier films by catalytic CVD using hexamethyldisilazane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohdaira, Keisuke; Matsumura, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) is utilized to deposit moisture barrier films by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (Cat-CVD). An increase in the thickness of silicon oxynitride (SiOxNy) films leads to a better water-vapor transmission rate (WVTR), indicating that Cat-CVD SiOxNy films deposited using HMDS do not severely suffer from cracking. A WVTR on the order of 10-3 g m-2 day-1 can be realized by a Cat-CVD SiOxNy film formed using HMDS on a poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrate without any stacking structures at a substrate temperature of as low as 60 °C. X-ray reflectivity (XRR) measurement reveals that a film density of >2.0 g/cm3 is necessary for SiOxNy films to demonstrate an effective moisture barrier ability. The use of HMDS will give us safer production of moisture barrier films because of its non-explosive and non-toxic nature.

  9. Controlled CVD growth of Cu-Sb alloy nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing; Yin, Zongyou; Sim, Daohao; Tay, Yee Yan; Zhang, Hua; Ma, Jan; Hng, Huey Hoon; Yan, Qingyu

    2011-08-01

    Sb based alloy nanostructures have attracted much attention due to their many promising applications, e.g. as battery electrodes, thermoelectric materials and magnetic semiconductors. In many cases, these applications require controlled growth of Sb based alloys with desired sizes and shapes to achieve enhanced performance. Here, we report a flexible catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process to prepare Cu-Sb nanostructures with tunable shapes (e.g. nanowires and nanoparticles) by transporting Sb vapor to react with copper foils, which also serve as the substrate. By simply controlling the substrate temperature and distance, various Sb-Cu alloy nanostructures, e.g. Cu11Sb3 nanowires (NWs), Cu2Sb nanoparticles (NPs), or pure Sb nanoplates, were obtained. We also found that the growth of Cu11Sb3 NWs in such a catalyst-free CVD process was dependent on the substrate surface roughness. For example, smooth Cu foils could not lead to the growth of Cu11Sb3 nanowires while roughening these smooth Cu foils with rough sand papers could result in the growth of Cu11Sb3 nanowires. The effects of gas flow rate on the size and morphology of the Cu-Sb alloy nanostructures were also investigated. Such a flexible growth strategy could be of practical interest as the growth of some Sb based alloy nanostructures by CVD may not be easy due to the large difference between the condensation temperature of Sb and the other element, e.g. Cu or Co.

  10. Laser velocimetry measurements in non-isothermal CVD systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, E. J.; Hyer, P. V.; Culotta, P. W.; Clark, I. O.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers at the NASA Langley Research Center are applying laser velocimetry (LV) techniques to characterize the fluid dynamics of non-isothermal flows inside fused silica chambers designed for chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Experimental issues involved in the application of LV techniques to this task include thermophoretic effects on the LV seed particles, seeding the hazardous gases, index of refraction gradients in the flow field and surrounding media, optical access, relatively low flow velocities, and analysis and presentation of sparse data. An overview of the practical difficulties these issues represent to the use of laser velocimetry instrumentation for CVD applications is given. A fundamental limitation on the application of LV techniques in non-isothermal systems is addressed which involves a measurement bias due to the presence of thermal gradients. This bias results from thermophoretic effects which cause seed particle trajectories to deviate from gas streamlines. Data from a research CVD reactor are presented which indicate that current models for the interaction of forces such as Stokes drag, inertia, gravity, and thermophoresis are not adequate to predict thermophoretic effects on particle-based velocimetry measurements in arbitrary flow configurations.

  11. Engineered CVD Diamond Coatings for Machining and Tribological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumpala, Ravikumar; Chandran, Maneesh; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.

    2015-07-01

    Diamond is an allotropes of carbon and is unique because of its extreme hardness (~100 GPa), low friction coefficient (<0.05), high thermal conductivity (~2000 Wm-1 K-1), and high chemical inertness. Diamond is being synthesized artificially in bulk form as well as in the form of surface coatings for various engineering applications. The mechanical characteristics of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond coatings such as hardness, adhesion, friction coefficient, and fracture toughness can be tuned by controlling the grain size of the coatings from a few microns to a few nanometers. In this review, characteristics and performance of the CVD diamond coatings deposited on cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) substrates were discussed with an emphasis on WC-Co grade selection, substrate pretreatment, nanocrystallinity and microcrystallinity of the coating, mechanical and tribological characteristics, coating architecture, and interfacial adhesion integrity. Engineered coating substrate architecture is essential for CVD diamond coatings to perform well under harsh and highly abrasive machining and tribological conditions.

  12. Technical/commercial feasibility study of the production of fuel-grade ethanol from corn: 100-million-gallon-per-year production facility in Myrtle Grove, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-05-01

    The management and execution plan for phase 2 construction of an ethyl alcohol production facility is given. Socioeconomic, environmental, health and safety issues are discussed. An economic analysis and a feasibility analysis are given.

  13. Effects of Light Intensity Activity on CVD Risk Factors: A Systematic Review of Intervention Studies

    PubMed Central

    Batacan, Romeo B.; Duncan, Mitch J.; Dalbo, Vincent J.; Tucker, Patrick S.; Fenning, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of light intensity physical activity (LIPA) on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors remain to be established. This review summarizes the effects of LIPA on CVD risk factors and CVD-related markers in adults. A systematic search of four electronic databases (PubMed, Academic Search Complete, SPORTDiscus, and CINAHL) examining LIPA and CVD risk factors (body composition, blood pressure, glucose, insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin, and lipid profile) and CVD-related markers (maximal oxygen uptake, heart rate, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2) published between 1970 and 2015 was performed on 15 March 2015. A total of 33 intervention studies examining the effect of LIPA on CVD risk factors and markers were included in this review. Results indicated that LIPA did not improve CVD risk factors and CVD-related markers in healthy individuals. LIPA was found to improve systolic and diastolic blood pressure in physically inactive populations with a medical condition. Reviewed studies show little support for the role of LIPA to reduce CVD risk factors. Many of the included studies were of low to fair study quality and used low doses of LIPA. Further studies are needed to establish the value of LIPA in reducing CVD risk. PMID:26543862

  14. Effects of Light Intensity Activity on CVD Risk Factors: A Systematic Review of Intervention Studies.

    PubMed

    Batacan, Romeo B; Duncan, Mitch J; Dalbo, Vincent J; Tucker, Patrick S; Fenning, Andrew S

    2015-01-01

    The effects of light intensity physical activity (LIPA) on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors remain to be established. This review summarizes the effects of LIPA on CVD risk factors and CVD-related markers in adults. A systematic search of four electronic databases (PubMed, Academic Search Complete, SPORTDiscus, and CINAHL) examining LIPA and CVD risk factors (body composition, blood pressure, glucose, insulin, glycosylated hemoglobin, and lipid profile) and CVD-related markers (maximal oxygen uptake, heart rate, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and tumor necrosis factor receptors 1 and 2) published between 1970 and 2015 was performed on 15 March 2015. A total of 33 intervention studies examining the effect of LIPA on CVD risk factors and markers were included in this review. Results indicated that LIPA did not improve CVD risk factors and CVD-related markers in healthy individuals. LIPA was found to improve systolic and diastolic blood pressure in physically inactive populations with a medical condition. Reviewed studies show little support for the role of LIPA to reduce CVD risk factors. Many of the included studies were of low to fair study quality and used low doses of LIPA. Further studies are needed to establish the value of LIPA in reducing CVD risk. PMID:26543862

  15. Fleet servicing facilities for servicing, maintaining, and testing rail and truck radioactive waste transport systems: functional requirements, technical design concepts and options cost estimates and comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, C.D.; Hudson, B.J.; Keith, D.A.; Preston, M.K. Jr.; McCreery, P.N.; Knox, W.; Easterling, E.M.; Lamprey, A.S.; Wiedemann, G.

    1980-05-01

    This is a resource document which examines feasibility design concepts and feasibility studies of a Fleet Servicing Facility (FSF). Such a facility is intended to be used for routine servicing, preventive maintenance, and for performing requalification license compliance tests and inspections, minor repairs, and decontamination of both the transportation casks and their associated rail cars or tractor-trailers. None of the United States' waste handling plants presently receiving radioactive wastes have an on-site FSF, nor is there an existing third party facility providing these services. This situation has caused the General Accounting Office to express concern regarding the quality of waste transport system maintenance once the system is placed into service. Thus, a need is indicated for FSF's, or their equivalent, at various radioactive materials receiving sites. In this report, three forms of FSF's solely for spent fuel transport systems were examined: independent, integrated, and colocated. The independent concept was already the subject of a detailed report and is extensively referenced in this document so that capital cost comparisons of the three concepts could be made. These facilities probably could service high-level, intermediate-level, low-level, or other waste transportation systems with minor modification, but this study did not include any system other than spent fuel. Both the Integrated and Colocated concepts were assumed to be associated with some radioactive materials handling facility such as an AFR repository.

  16. 25th anniversary article: CVD polymers: a new paradigm for surface modification and device fabrication.

    PubMed

    Coclite, Anna Maria; Howden, Rachel M; Borrelli, David C; Petruczok, Christy D; Yang, Rong; Yagüe, Jose Luis; Ugur, Asli; Chen, Nan; Lee, Sunghwan; Jo, Won Jun; Liu, Andong; Wang, Xiaoxue; Gleason, Karen K

    2013-10-11

    Well-adhered, conformal, thin (<100 nm) coatings can easily be obtained by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) for a variety of technological applications. Room temperature modification with functional polymers can be achieved on virtually any substrate: organic, inorganic, rigid, flexible, planar, three-dimensional, dense, or porous. In CVD polymerization, the monomer(s) are delivered to the surface through the vapor phase and then undergo simultaneous polymerization and thin film formation. By eliminating the need to dissolve macromolecules, CVD enables insoluble polymers to be coated and prevents solvent damage to the substrate. CVD film growth proceeds from the substrate up, allowing for interfacial engineering, real-time monitoring, and thickness control. Initiated-CVD shows successful results in terms of rationally designed micro- and nanoengineered materials to control molecular interactions at material surfaces. The success of oxidative-CVD is mainly demonstrated for the deposition of organic conducting and semiconducting polymers. PMID:24115244

  17. CONTROL TECHNOLOGY APPENDICES FOR POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNICAL MANUALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document is one of six technical handbooks prepared by EPA to help government officials granting permits to build synfuels facilities, synfuels process developers, and other interested parties. They provide technical data on waste streams from synfuels facilities and technolo...

  18. Controlled CVD growth of Cu-Sb alloy nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Yin, Zongyou; Sim, Daohao; Tay, Yee Yan; Zhang, Hua; Ma, Jan; Hng, Huey Hoon; Yan, Qingyu

    2011-08-12

    Sb based alloy nanostructures have attracted much attention due to their many promising applications, e.g. as battery electrodes, thermoelectric materials and magnetic semiconductors. In many cases, these applications require controlled growth of Sb based alloys with desired sizes and shapes to achieve enhanced performance. Here, we report a flexible catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process to prepare Cu-Sb nanostructures with tunable shapes (e.g. nanowires and nanoparticles) by transporting Sb vapor to react with copper foils, which also serve as the substrate. By simply controlling the substrate temperature and distance, various Sb-Cu alloy nanostructures, e.g. Cu(11)Sb(3) nanowires (NWs), Cu(2)Sb nanoparticles (NPs), or pure Sb nanoplates, were obtained. We also found that the growth of Cu(11)Sb(3) NWs in such a catalyst-free CVD process was dependent on the substrate surface roughness. For example, smooth Cu foils could not lead to the growth of Cu(11)Sb(3) nanowires while roughening these smooth Cu foils with rough sand papers could result in the growth of Cu(11)Sb(3) nanowires. The effects of gas flow rate on the size and morphology of the Cu-Sb alloy nanostructures were also investigated. Such a flexible growth strategy could be of practical interest as the growth of some Sb based alloy nanostructures by CVD may not be easy due to the large difference between the condensation temperature of Sb and the other element, e.g. Cu or Co. PMID:21757793

  19. Spray CVD for Making Solar-Cell Absorber Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banger, Kulbinder K.; Harris, Jerry; Jin, Michael H.; Hepp, Aloysius

    2007-01-01

    Spray chemical vapor deposition (spray CVD) processes of a special type have been investigated for use in making CuInS2 absorber layers of thin-film solar photovoltaic cells from either of two subclasses of precursor compounds: [(PBu3) 2Cu(SEt)2In(SEt)2] or [(PPh3)2Cu(SEt)2 In(SEt)2]. The CuInS2 films produced in the experiments have been characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and four-point-probe electrical tests.

  20. Gravitational and thermal effects in CVD flow and deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, I. O.; Black, L. R.; Johnson, E. J.; Hyer, P. V.; Gerdes, W. K.; Culotta, P. W.; Jesser, W. A.; Kui, J.

    1992-01-01

    A three-phased approach is used to investigate the transport phenomena occurring in horizontal CVD reactors. The three phases are made up of laser velocimetry experimental investigations, numerical CFD modeling, and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition experimental studies. Laser velocimetry measurements of flow in a horizontal reactor with a cylindrical flow channel and tilted susceptor demonstrate velocity components arising from thermal expansion and buoyancy effects that significantly exceed the velocity components due to the external applied flow. MOCVD of InP and GaAs thin films in a horizontal reactor channel with a rectangular cross section and a tilted susceptor has also been examined.

  1. Selective, pulsed CVD of platinum on microfilament gas sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Manginell, R.P.; Smith, J.H.; Ricco, A.J.; Moreno, D.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Huber, R.J.; Senturia, S.D.

    1996-05-01

    A post-processing, selective micro-chemical vapor deposition (``micro-CVD``) technology for the deposition of catalytic films on surface-micromachined, nitride-passivated polysilicon filaments has been investigated. Atmospheric pressure deposition of Pt on microfilaments was accomplished by thermal decomposition of Pt acetylacetonate; deposition occurs selectively only on those filaments which are electrically heated. Catalyst morphology, characterized by SEM, can be controlled by altering deposition time, filament temperature, and through the use of pulsed heating of the filament during deposition. Morphology plays an important role in determining the sensitivity of these devices when used as combustible gas sensors.

  2. Development of CVD Mullite Coatings for SiC Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Sarin, V.K.; Varadarajan, S.

    2000-03-15

    A process for depositing CVD mullite coatings on SiC fibers for enhanced oxidation and corrosion, and/or act as an interfacial protective barrier has been developed. Process optimization via systematic investigation of system parameters yielded uniform crystalline mullite coatings on SiC fibers. Structural characterization has allowed for tailoring of coating structure and therefore properties. High temperature oxidation/corrosion testing of the optimized coatings has shown that the coatings remain adherent and protective for extended periods. However, preliminary tests of coated fibers showed considerable degradation in tensile strength.

  3. Ultratough CVD single crystal diamond and three dimensional growth thereof

    DOEpatents

    Hemley, Russell J.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Yan, Chih-shiue

    2009-09-29

    The invention relates to a single-crystal diamond grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition that has a toughness of at least about 30 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention also relates to a method of producing a single-crystal diamond with a toughness of at least about 30 MPa m.sup.1/2. The invention further relates to a process for producing a single crystal CVD diamond in three dimensions on a single crystal diamond substrate.

  4. CVD Of Thin Films From Single Organometallic Precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Barron, Andrew R.; Power, Michael B.; Macinnes, Andrew N.; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1996-01-01

    Method of forming thin inorganic films involves chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from single organometallic precursors. No toxic constituents, minimizes impurities, and yields films having substantially uniform crystal structure and composition. Especially suitable for depositing high-quality passivating or buffer layers of GaS on GaAs semiconductor substrates. Also applicable to formation of high-quality films for purposes other than buffering or passivation, and to different materials in which another element from same group in periodic table of elements substituted for all or portion of each element in GaS/GaAs system.

  5. Healing defective CVD-graphene through vapor phase treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Lam, Do; Kim, Sang-Min; Cho, Youngji; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Yang, Jun-Mo; Lee, Seung-Mo

    2014-05-01

    Structural defects present on chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-graphene have usually originated from the growth stage and transfer process. They limit the electronic transport properties of graphene and degrade performance of related devices. Here we report that these inherent atomic defects could be selectively healed by a simple vapor phase treatment performed in equipment conventionally used for atomic layer deposition (ALD). The unique chemistry of Al2O3 ALD facilitated selective depositions of AlxOy compounds on the defects, which could be readily probed and visualized using AFM imaging. The healing agent, AlxOy, was observed to bind tightly to the defects and lead to doping of the CVD-graphene, which was reflected in the noticeable improvement in electrical sheet resistance. In contrast with the chemically doped graphene, the ALD-treated graphenes revealed notable long-term stability under environmental conditions. Our approach promises selective healing of defects present in most materials and possibly ensures considerable improvement in electrical and mechanical properties. ALD with a broad spectrum of material selection could be a versatile tool for upgrading properties of materials.Structural defects present on chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-graphene have usually originated from the growth stage and transfer process. They limit the electronic transport properties of graphene and degrade performance of related devices. Here we report that these inherent atomic defects could be selectively healed by a simple vapor phase treatment performed in equipment conventionally used for atomic layer deposition (ALD). The unique chemistry of Al2O3 ALD facilitated selective depositions of AlxOy compounds on the defects, which could be readily probed and visualized using AFM imaging. The healing agent, AlxOy, was observed to bind tightly to the defects and lead to doping of the CVD-graphene, which was reflected in the noticeable improvement in electrical sheet resistance

  6. The Oxidation of CVD Silicon Carbide in Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Nguyen, QuynchGiao N.

    1997-01-01

    Chemically-vapor-deposited silicon carbide (CVD SiC) was oxidized in carbon dioxide (CO2) at temperatures of 1200-1400 C for times between 100 and 500 hours at several gas flow rates. Oxidation weight gains were monitored by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and were found to be very small and independent of temperature. Possible rate limiting kinetic laws are discussed. Oxidation of SiC by CO2 is negligible compared to the rates measured for other oxidants typically found in combustion environments: oxygen and water vapor.

  7. Paralinear Oxidation of CVD SiC in Water Vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth J.; Hann, Raiford E., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of CVD SiC were monitored by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) in a 50% H2O/50% O2 gas mixture flowing at 4.4 cm/s for temperatures between 1200 and 1400 C. Paralinear weight change kinetics were observed as the water vapor oxidized the SiC and simultaneously volatilized the silica scale. The long-term degradation rate of SiC is determined by the volatility of the silica scale. Rapid SiC surface recession rates were estimated from these data for actual aircraft engine combustor conditions.

  8. ECR Plasma CVD in Different Magnetic Field Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Masayoshi; Uchida, Satoshi; Kishimoto, Kengo; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Komori, Akio; Kawai, Yoshinobu

    1992-05-01

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma is produced with a slotted Lisitano coil, and the axial distribution of the plasma parameters is measured in detail for different magnetic field configurations. It is found that the plasma density in uniform magnetic fields axially decreases more slowly than that in divergent magnetic fields. Furthermore, carbon films are formed by ECR plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and the deposition rate obtained in the uniform magnetic fields is found to be larger than that obtained in the divergent magnetic fields.

  9. Language Laboratory Facilities: Technical Guide for the Selection, Purchase, Use, and Maintenance. New Media for Instruction, 4. Bulletin, 1963, No. 37. OE-21024

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, Alfred S.

    1963-01-01

    During the past fifteen years, educators and electronics specialists have been experimenting with language facilities, usually by modifying equipment components which were originally designed for other purposes. The rapid growth, wide diversity, and newness of these electronic aids to language learning have created the need for a study of the most…

  10. NEW MATERIALS DEVELOPED TO MEET REGULATORY AND TECHNICAL REQUIREMENTS ASSOCIATED WITH IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING OF NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Blankenship, J.; Langton, C.; Musall, J.; Griffin, W.

    2012-01-18

    For the 2010 ANS Embedded Topical Meeting on Decommissioning, Decontamination and Reutilization and Technology, Savannah River National Laboratory's Mike Serrato reported initial information on the newly developed specialty grout materials necessary to satisfy all requirements associated with in-situ decommissioning of P-Reactor and R-Reactor at the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site. Since that report, both projects have been successfully completed and extensive test data on both fresh properties and cured properties has been gathered and analyzed for a total of almost 191,150 m{sup 3} (250,000 yd{sup 3}) of new materials placed. The focus of this paper is to describe the (1) special grout mix for filling the P-Reactor vessel (RV) and (2) the new flowable structural fill materials used to fill the below grade portions of the facilities. With a wealth of data now in hand, this paper also captures the test results and reports on the performance of these new materials. Both reactors were constructed and entered service in the early 1950s, producing weapons grade materials for the nation's defense nuclear program. R-Reactor was shut down in 1964 and the P-Reactor in 1991. In-situ decommissioning (ISD) was selected for both facilities and performed as Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensations and Liability Act actions (an early action for P-Reactor and a removal action for R-Reactor), beginning in October 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy concept for ISD is to physically stabilize and isolate intact, structurally robust facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of producing (reactor facilities), processing (isotope separation facilities), or storing radioactive materials. Funding for accelerated decommissioning was provided under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Decommissioning of both facilities was completed in September 2011. ISD objectives for these CERCLA actions included: (1) Prevent industrial worker

  11. Transfer of CVD-grown monolayer graphene onto arbitrary substrates.

    PubMed

    Suk, Ji Won; Kitt, Alexander; Magnuson, Carl W; Hao, Yufeng; Ahmed, Samir; An, Jinho; Swan, Anna K; Goldberg, Bennett B; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2011-09-27

    Reproducible dry and wet transfer techniques were developed to improve the transfer of large-area monolayer graphene grown on copper foils by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The techniques reported here allow transfer onto three different classes of substrates: substrates covered with shallow depressions, perforated substrates, and flat substrates. A novel dry transfer technique was used to make graphene-sealed microchambers without trapping liquid inside. The dry transfer technique utilizes a polydimethylsiloxane frame that attaches to the poly(methyl methacrylate) spun over the graphene film, and the monolayer graphene was transferred onto shallow depressions with 300 nm depth. The improved wet transfer onto perforated substrates with 2.7 μm diameter holes yields 98% coverage of holes covered with continuous films, allowing the ready use of Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy to study the intrinsic properties of CVD-grown monolayer graphene. Additionally, monolayer graphene transferred onto flat substrates has fewer cracks and tears, as well as lower sheet resistance than previous transfer techniques. Monolayer graphene films transferred onto glass had a sheet resistance of ∼980 Ω/sq and a transmittance of 97.6%. These transfer techniques open up possibilities for the fabrication of various graphene devices with unique configurations and enhanced performance. PMID:21894965

  12. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of cubic silicon carbide. Patent Application

    SciTech Connect

    Addamiano, A.

    1985-07-02

    This invention relates to the growth of cubic silicon carbide crystals. More specifically, this invention relates to the growth of cubic silicon carbide by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). One object of the present invention is to provide a novel method for the production of cubic SiC for high temperature electronic devices. Another object of the present invention is to provide a novel method for the production of highly pure, single crystal cubic SiC that is duplicable. Another object of the present invention is to provide a novel method for the production of large-area single-crystal wafers of cubic SiC. These and other objects of the present invention can be achieved by a method for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of cubic Silicon Carbide (SiC) comprising the steps of etching silicon substrated having one mechanically polished face; depositing a thin buffer layer of cubic SiC formed by reaction between a heated Si substrate and a H2-C3H8 gas mixuture; and depositing SiC on the buffer layer at high temperature using H2+C3HY+SiH4 mixture.

  13. Predicted Variations in Flow Patterns in a Horizontal CVD Reactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    1999-01-01

    Expressions in terms of common reactor operating parameters were derived for the ratio of the Grashof number to the Reynolds number, Gr/Re, the ratio of the Grashof to the square of 2 the Reynolds number, Gr/Re(exp 2), and the Rayleigh number, Ra. Values for these numbers were computed for an example horizontal CVD reactor and compared to numerical simulations to gauge their effectiveness as predictors of the presence or absence of transverse and longitudinal rolls in the reactor. Comparisons were made for both argon and hydrogen carrier gases over the pressure range 2- 101 kPa. Reasonable agreement was achieved in most cases when using Gr/Re to predict the presence of transverse rolls and Ra to predict the presence of longitudinal rolls. The ratio Gr/Re(exp 2) did not yield useful predictions regarding the presence of transverse rolls. This comparison showed that the ratio of the Grashof number to the Reynolds number, as well as the Rayleigh number, can be used to predict the presence or absence of transverse and longitudinal rolls in a horizontal CVD reactor for a given set of reactor conditions. These predictions are approximate, and care must be exercised when making predictions near transition regions.

  14. CVD of silicon carbide on structural fibers - Microstructure and composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veitch, Lisa C.; Terepka, Francis M.; Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1992-01-01

    Structural fibers are currently being considered as reinforcements for intermetallic and ceramic materials. Some of these fibers, however, are easily degraded in a high temperature oxidative environment. Therefore, coatings are needed to protect the fibers from environmental attack. Silicon carbide (SiC) was chemically vapor deposited (CVD) on Textron's SCS6 fibers. Fiber temperatures ranging from 1350 to 1500 C were studied. Silane (SiH4) and propane (C2H8) were used for the source gases and different concentrations of these source gases were studied. Deposition rates were determined for each group of fibers at different temperatures. Less variation in deposition rates were observed for the dilute source gas experiments than the concentrated source gas experiments. A careful analysis was performed on the stoichiometry of the CVD SiC coating using electron microprobe. Microstructures for the different conditions were compared. At 1350 C, the microstructures were similar; however, at higher temperatures, the microstructure for the more concentrated source gas group were porous and columnar in comparison to the cross sections taken from the same area for the dilute source gas group.

  15. Thermoluminescence in CVD diamond films: application to actinometric dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Barboza-Flores, M; Meléndrez, R; Chernov, V; Castañeda, B; Pedroza-Montero, M; Gan, B; Ahn, J; Zhang, Q; Yoon, S F

    2002-01-01

    Diamond is considered a tissue-equivalent material since its atomic number (Z =6) is close to the effective atomic number of biological tissue (Z =7.42). Such a situation makes it suitable for radiation detection purposes in medical applications. In the present work the analysis is reported of the thermoluminescence (TL) and dosimetric features of chemically vapour deposited (CVD) diamond film samples subjected to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation in the actinometric region. The TL glow curve shows peaks at 120, 220), 320 and 370 degrees C. The 120 and 370 degrees C peaks are too weak and the first one fades away in a few seconds after exposure. The overall room temperature fading shows a 50% TL decay 30 min after exposure. The 320 degrees C glow peak is considered to be the most adequate for dosimetric applications due to its low fading and linear TL behaviour as a function of UV dose in the 180-260 nm range. The TL excitation spectrum presents a broad band with at least two overlapped components around 205 and 220 nm. The results indicate that the TL behaviour of CVD diamond film can be a good alternative to the currently available dosemeter and detector in the actinometric region as well as in clinical and medical applications. PMID:12382917

  16. Native NIR-emitting single colour centres in CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatto Monticone, D.; Traina, P.; Moreva, E.; Forneris, J.; Olivero, P.; Degiovanni, I. P.; Taccetti, F.; Giuntini, L.; Brida, G.; Amato, G.; Genovese, M.

    2014-05-01

    Single-photon sources are a fundamental element for developing quantum technologies, and sources based on colour centres in diamonds are among the most promising candidates. The well-known nitrogen vacancy centres are characterized by several limitations, and thus few other defects have recently been considered. In the present work, we characterize, in detail, native efficient single colour centres emitting in the near infra-red (λ = 740-780 nm) in both standard IIa single-crystal and electronic-grade polycrystalline commercial chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond samples. In the former case, a high-temperature (T > 1000 °C) annealing process in vacuum is necessary to induce the formation/activation of luminescent centres with good emission properties, while in the latter case the annealing process has marginally beneficial effects on the number and performance of native centres in commercially available samples. Although displaying significant variability in several photo-physical properties (emission wavelength, emission rate instabilities, saturation behaviours), these centres generally display appealing photophysical properties for applications as single photon sources: short lifetimes (0.7-3 ns), high emission rates (˜50-500 × 103 photons s-1) and strongly (>95%) polarized light. The native centres are tentatively attributed to impurities incorporated in the diamond crystal during the CVD growth of high-quality type-IIa samples, and offer promising perspectives in diamond-based photonics.

  17. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Iron Aluminide by CVD Coated Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Asit Biswas Andrew J. Sherman

    2006-09-25

    This I &I Category2 program developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron, aluminum and aluminum oxide coated iron powders and the availability of high temperature oxidation, corrosion and erosion resistant coating for future power generation equipment and can be used for retrofitting existing fossil-fired power plant equipment. This coating will provide enhanced life and performance of Coal-Fired Boilers components such as fire side corrosion on the outer diameter (OD) of the water wall and superheater tubing as well as on the inner diameter (ID) and OD of larger diameter headers. The program also developed a manufacturing route for readily available thermal spray powders for iron aluminide coating and fabrication of net shape component by powder metallurgy route using this CVD coated powders. This coating can also be applid on jet engine compressor blade and housing, industrial heat treating furnace fixtures, magnetic electronic parts, heating element, piping and tubing for fossil energy application and automotive application, chemical processing equipment , heat exchanger, and structural member of aircraft. The program also resulted in developing a new fabrication route of thermal spray coating and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide composites enabling more precise control over material microstructures.

  18. Healing defective CVD-graphene through vapor phase treatment.

    PubMed

    Van Lam, Do; Kim, Sang-Min; Cho, Youngji; Kim, Jae-Hyun; Lee, Hak-Joo; Yang, Jun-Mo; Lee, Seung-Mo

    2014-06-01

    Structural defects present on chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-graphene have usually originated from the growth stage and transfer process. They limit the electronic transport properties of graphene and degrade performance of related devices. Here we report that these inherent atomic defects could be selectively healed by a simple vapor phase treatment performed in equipment conventionally used for atomic layer deposition (ALD). The unique chemistry of Al2O3 ALD facilitated selective depositions of AlxOy compounds on the defects, which could be readily probed and visualized using AFM imaging. The healing agent, AlxOy, was observed to bind tightly to the defects and lead to doping of the CVD-graphene, which was reflected in the noticeable improvement in electrical sheet resistance. In contrast with the chemically doped graphene, the ALD-treated graphenes revealed notable long-term stability under environmental conditions. Our approach promises selective healing of defects present in most materials and possibly ensures considerable improvement in electrical and mechanical properties. ALD with a broad spectrum of material selection could be a versatile tool for upgrading properties of materials. PMID:24756318

  19. CVD of silicon carbide on structural fibers: Microstructure and composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veitch, Lisa C.; Terepka, Francis M.; Gokoglu, Suleyman A.

    1992-01-01

    Structural fibers are currently being considered as reinforcements for intermetallic and ceramic materials. Some of these fibers, however, are easily degraded in a high temperature oxidative environment. Therefore, coatings are needed to protect the fibers from environmental attack. Silicon carbide (SiC) was chemically vapor deposited (CVD) on Textron's SCS6 fibers. Fiber temperatures ranging from 1350 to 1500 C were studied. Silane (SiH4) and propane (C2H8) were used for the source gases and different concentrations of these source gases were studied. Deposition rates were determined for each group of fibers at different temperatures. Less variation in deposition rates were observed for the dilute source gas experiments than the concentrated source gas experiments. A careful analysis was performed on the stoichiometry of the CVD SiC coating using electron microprobe. Microstructures for the different conditions were compared. At 1350 C, the microstructures were similar; however, at higher temperatures, the microstructure for the more concentrated source gas group were porous and columnar in comparison to the cross sections taken from the same area for the dilute source gas group.

  20. Dopant Incorporation Efficiency in CVD Silicon Carbide Epilayers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larkin, D. J.

    1996-01-01

    In order to ensure reproducible and reliable SiC semiconductor device characteristics, controlled dopant incorporation must be accomplished. Some of the many factors which greatly influence dopant incorporation are the site-competition effect, SiC(0001) substrate polarity, substrate temperature, and the dopant-source reactor concentration. In this paper, dopant incorporation is considered and compared for various dopants in the context of dopant incorporation efficiency. By using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), the relative dopant incorporation efficiencies were calculated by dividing the SIMS determined dopant concentration in the resulting epitaxial layer by the intentional gas phase dopant concentration used during the SiC CVD. Specifically, the relative magnitudes of dopant incorporation efficiencies for nitrogen, phosphorus, and boron in 6H-SiC (0001) Si-face epitaxial layers are compared as a function of the site-competition effect and the dopant-source reactor concentrations. This serves as a first approximation for comparison of the relative 'doping potencies' of some common dopants used in SiC CVD epitaxial growth.

  1. CVD Rhenium Engines for Solar-Thermal Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian E.; Fortini, Arthur J.; Tuffias, Robert H.; Duffy, Andrew J.; Tucker, Stephen P.

    1999-01-01

    Solar-thermal upper-stage propulsion systems have the potential to provide specific impulse approaching 900 seconds, with 760 seconds already demonstrated in ground testing. Such performance levels offer a 100% increase in payload capability compared to state-of-the-art chemical upper-stage systems, at lower cost. Although alternatives such as electric propulsion offer even greater performance, the 6- to 18- month orbital transfer time is a far greater deviation from the state of the art than the one to two months required for solar propulsion. Rhenium metal is the only material that is capable of withstanding the predicted thermal, mechanical, and chemical environment of a solar-thermal propulsion device. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is the most well-established and cost-effective process for the fabrication of complex rhenium structures. CVD rhenium engines have been successfully constructed for the Air Force ISUS program (bimodal thrust/electricity) and the NASA Shooting Star program (thrust only), as well as under an Air Force SBIR project (thrust only). The bimodal engine represents a more long-term and versatile approach to solar-thermal propulsion, while the thrust-only engines provide a potentially lower weight/lower cost and more near-term replacement for current upper-stage propulsion systems.

  2. Crystallographic anisotropy of growth and etch rates of CVD diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfer, M; Biener, J; El-dasher, B S; Biener, M M; Hamza, A V; Kriele, A; Wild, C

    2008-08-05

    The investigation of orientation dependent crystal growth and etch processes can provide deep insights into the underlying mechanisms and thus helps to validate theoretical models. Here, we report on homoepitaxial diamond growth and oxygen etch experiments on polished, polycrystalline CVD diamond wafers by use of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and white-light interferometry (WLI). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was applied to provide additional atomic scale surface morphology information. The main advantage of using polycrystalline diamond substrates with almost random grain orientation is that it allows determining the orientation dependent growth (etch) rate for different orientations within one experiment. Specifically, we studied the effect of methane concentration on the diamond growth rate, using a microwave plasma CVD process. At 1 % methane concentration a maximum of the growth rate near <100> and a minimum near <111> is detected. Increasing the methane concentration up to 5 % shifts the maximum towards <110> while the minimum stays at <111>. Etch rate measurements in a microwave powered oxygen plasma reveal a pronounced maximum at <111>. We also made a first attempt to interpret our experimental data in terms of local micro-faceting of high-indexed planes.

  3. 32 CFR 2001.51 - Technical security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Surveillance Countermeasures and TEMPEST necessary to detect or deter exploitation of classified information..., TEMPEST Countermeasures for Facilities, and SPB Issuance 6-97, National Policy on Technical...

  4. 32 CFR 2001.51 - Technical security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Surveillance Countermeasures and TEMPEST necessary to detect or deter exploitation of classified information..., TEMPEST Countermeasures for Facilities, and SPB Issuance 6-97, National Policy on Technical...

  5. 32 CFR 2001.51 - Technical security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Surveillance Countermeasures and TEMPEST necessary to detect or deter exploitation of classified information..., TEMPEST Countermeasures for Facilities, and SPB Issuance 6-97, National Policy on Technical...

  6. 32 CFR 2001.51 - Technical security.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Surveillance Countermeasures and TEMPEST necessary to detect or deter exploitation of classified information..., TEMPEST Countermeasures for Facilities, and SPB Issuance 6-97, National Policy on Technical...

  7. Novel orthogonal velocity polishing tool and its material removal characteristics from CVD SiC mirror surfaces.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hyunju; Han, Jeong-Yeol; Kim, Sug-Whan; Seong, Sehyun; Yoon, Siyoung; Lee, Kyoungmuk; Hong, Jinsuk; Lee, Haengbok; Bok, Mingab

    2016-05-30

    A new and patented polishing tool called Orthogonal Velocity field Tool (OVT) was built and its material removal characteristics from Chemical Vapor Deposition Silicon Carbide (CVD SiC) mirror surfaces were investigated in this study. The velocity field of OVT is produced by rotating the bicycle type tool in the two orthogonal axes, and this concept is capable of producing a material removal foot print of pseudo Gaussian shapes. First for the OVT characterization, we derived a theoretical material removal model using distributions of pressure exerted onto the workpiece surface, relative speed between the tool and workpiece surface, and dwell time inside the tool- workpiece contact area. Second, using two flat CVD SiC mirrors that are 150 mm in diameter, we ran material removal experiments over machine run parameter ranging from 12.901 to 25.867 psi in pressure, from 0.086 m/sec to 0.147 m/sec tool in the relative speed, and 5 to 15 sec in dwell time. Material removal coefficients are obtained by using the in-house developed data analysis program. The resulting material removal coefficient varies from 3.35 to 9.46 um/psi hour m/sec with a mean value of 5.90 ± 1.26(standard deviation). We describe the technical details of the new OVT machine, the data analysis program, the experiments, and the results together with the implications to the future development of the machine. PMID:27410150

  8. Technical/commercial feasibility study of the production of fuel-grade ethanol from corn: 100-million-gallon-per-year production facility in Myrtle Grove, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-05-31

    The technical and economic feasibility of producing motor fuel alcohol from corn in a 100 million gallon per year plant to be constructed in Myrtle Grove, Louisiana is evaluated. The evaluation includes a detailed process design using proven technology, a capital cost estimate for the plant, a detailed analysis of the annual operating cost, a market study, a socioeconomic, environmental, health and safety analysis, and a complete financial analysis. Several other considerations for production of ethanol were evaluated including: cogeneration and fuel to be used in firing the boilers; single by-products vs. multiple by-products; and use of boiler flue gas for by-product drying.

  9. Technical/commercial feasibility study of the production of fuel-grade ethanol from corn: 100-million-gallon-per-year production facility in Myrtle Grove, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-05-01

    The technical and economic feasibility of producing motor fuel alcohol from corn in a 100 million gallon per year plant to be constructed in Myrtle Grove, Louisiana is evaluated. The evaluation includes a detailed process design using proven technology, a capital cost estimate for the plant, a detailed analysis of the annual operating cost, a market study, a socioeconomic, environmental, health and safety analysis, and a complete financial analysis. Several other considerations for production of ethanol were evaluated including: cogeneration and fuel to be used in firing the boilers; single by-products vs. multiple by-products; and use of boiler flue gas for by-product drying.

  10. Combined single-crystalline and polycrystalline CVD diamond substrates for diamond electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Vikharev, A. L. Gorbachev, A. M.; Dukhnovsky, M. P.; Muchnikov, A. B.; Ratnikova, A. K.; Fedorov, Yu. Yu.

    2012-02-15

    The fabrication of diamond substrates in which single-crystalline and polycrystalline CVD diamond form a single wafer, and the epitaxial growth of diamond films on such combined substrates containing polycrystalline and (100) single-crystalline CVD diamond regions are studied.

  11. Development of X-ray facilities for materials research at the Advanced Photon Source. Final technical report for period AUGUST 15, 1996 - AUGUST 14, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Bedzyk, Michael J.

    2000-09-01

    The P.I. and his research team successfully used the funds from the DOE Instrumentation grant entitled, 'Development of X-Ray Facilities for Materials Research at the Advanced Photon Source,' to design, build, test, and commission a customized surface science x-ray scattering spectroscopy chamber. This instrumentation, which is presently in use at an APS x-ray undulator beam line operated by the DuPont-Northwestern-Dow Collaborative Access Team, is used for x-ray measurements of surface, interface, thin film and nano-structures.

  12. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act ( ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance, U.S. General Services Administration - Project 194 U.S. Custom Cargo Inspection Facility, Detroit, MI

    SciTech Connect

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-05-31

    This report documents the findings of an on-site audit of the U.S. Customs Cargo Inspection Facility (CIF) in Detroit, Michigan. The federal landlord for this building is the General Services Administration (GSA). The focus of the audit was to identify various no-cost or low-cost energy-efficiency opportunities that, once implemented, would reduce electrical and gas consumption and increase the operational efficiency of the building. This audit also provided an opportunity to identify potential capital cost projects that should be considered in the future to acquire additional energy (electric and gas) and water savings to further increase the operational efficiency of the building.

  13. Oxidation behavior of CVD and single crystal SiC at 1100 C

    SciTech Connect

    Ramberg, C.E.; Spear, K.E.; Tressler, R.E.; Chinone, Yoshiharu

    1995-11-01

    High purity chemical vapor deposition (CVD) silicon carbide fabricated by a commercial process was examined and oxidized at 1,100 C along with high purity single crystal silicon carbide. The freestanding CVD thick films had a highly textured polycrystalline microstructure, with the <111> directions of the crystals parallel to the growth direction. This texturing maintained the polarity of the 43m crystal structure, implying that either the [111] or the [1{und 1}1] direction grew significantly faster during the CVD process. The (111) face of the cubic, CVD-SiC oxidized at the same rate as the (0001) face of the single crystal SiC. The (111) face of the CVD-SiC oxidized at nominally the same rat as the (0001) face of the single crystal SiC.

  14. Study of magnetotransport across the neutrality point in CVD graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Ramesh G.

    Hall effect compensation and a residual resistivity ρxx ~ h / 4e2 are experimentally examined over the p <-->n transition about the nominal Dirac point in CVD graphene. The observed characteristics are reproduced in a model with a parabolic distribution f (VN) of neutrality potentials, VN, and simultaneous electron- and hole- conduction. The results suggest that, broadly about the gate-induced n <--> p transition, charge transport is characterized by domain confined ambipolar currents, which leads to compensation in the global Hall effect and the observed residual resistivity. DOE-BES, Mat'l. Sci. & Eng. Div., DE-SC0001762; ARO W911NF-14-2-0076; ARO W911NF-15-1-0433.

  15. Thermal stability of CVD-SiC lightweight optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goela, Jitendra S.; Desai, Hemant D.; Taylor, Raymond L.; Olson, Steven E.

    1995-10-01

    The lightweight SiC mirrors that are fabricated by the CVD process at Morton Advanced Materials contain graphite core enclosed in the SiC backstructure. A finite element analysis of a lightweight SiC model mirror was performed to assess the effect of the graphite core on the thermal stability of the SiC mirror in the temperature range of 77 - 1623 K. The results indicate that for both no-slip (SiC deposit adhered to graphite core) and slip cases, the maximum stresses in the SiC mirror structure are significantly less than the flexural strength of SiC. Further, the maximum stress in graphite core is close to the tensile strength of graphite indicating that graphite core will probably fracture. Finally, the SiC faceplate figure distortion due to the presence of the graphite core is quite small, on the order of a few tens of nanometers.

  16. Tip-based patterning of HOPG and CVD graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, Bryan T.; Yoshimizu, Norimasa; O'Connell, Christopher; Lal, Amit; Pollock, Clifford R.

    2011-06-01

    Nanometer-scale patterning of graphite and graphene has been accomplished through local anodic oxidation using an AFM tip. The underlying mechanism is explained. To date, protrusions, holes, trenches, and even words have been patterned in HOPG over scales ranging from 1nm2 to 1mm2 and depths ranging from sub nm to as deep as 200nm with less than 5 nm variation on the feature size and placement. This same method has also been applied to CVD-grown graphene providing a resist-free process for patterning graphene at the single nanometer scale. This capability could provide a method to rival e-beam lithography resolution but without any pre- or post-processing.

  17. Electronic and Atomic-Scale Properties of Ultraflat CVD Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Christopher; Rosenthal, Ethan; Dadgar, Ali; Brown, Lola; Lochocki, Edward; Shen, Kyle; Park, Jiwoong; Pasupathy, Abhay

    2014-03-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth on copper foils has proven to be a reliable and cost-effective method for the production of graphene. However, most films grown by this method suffer from misoriented graphene grains as well as topographic roughness due to the polycrystallinity of the underlying copper foil substrate. Recent methods of copper foil treatment have allowed for the growth of graphene predominantly on large single crystal Cu(111) facets. In this talk we discuss scanning tunneling microscope (STM) measurements on such samples that reveal large terraces and atomically-resolved images that allow us to analyze the graphene-copper interaction during the growth. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) measurements and mapping are further employed to probe the electronic interaction between the graphene and copper substrate.

  18. Dimensionless Numbers Expressed in Terms of Common CVD Process Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuczmarski, Maria A.

    1999-01-01

    A variety of dimensionless numbers related to momentum and heat transfer are useful in Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) analysis. These numbers are not traditionally calculated by directly using reactor operating parameters, such as temperature and pressure. In this paper, these numbers have been expressed in a form that explicitly shows their dependence upon the carrier gas, reactor geometry, and reactor operation conditions. These expressions were derived for both monatomic and diatomic gases using estimation techniques for viscosity, thermal conductivity, and heat capacity. Values calculated from these expressions compared well to previously published values. These expressions provide a relatively quick method for predicting changes in the flow patterns resulting from changes in the reactor operating conditions.

  19. Hydrogen and hydrogen-related defects in CVD diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, K.M.M.

    1998-12-31

    Hydrogen is a detrimental impurity in many chemical vapor deposited (CVD) materials, particularly those involved in electronic or optical applications. For example, active hydrogen defects have been observed in materials such as silicon, Si, gallium arsenide, GaAs, and diamond, C, thin films. Hydrogen and its related defects can be identified, quantified, and observed using magnetic resonance techniques. These techniques allow a unique quantitative, non-destructive view of hydrogen in the solid-state. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used to study hydrogenated defects directly, while electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is used to observe hydrogen associated with paramagnetic defects. These observations can enhance understanding of the effects of hydrogen incorporation on the properties of such materials.

  20. Interfaces in nano-/microcrystalline multigrade CVD diamond coatings.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Flávia A; Salgueiredo, Ermelinda; Oliveira, Filipe J; Silva, Rui F; Baptista, Daniel L; Peripolli, Suzana B; Achete, Carlos A

    2013-11-27

    The interfaces of multilayered CVD diamond films grown by the hot-filament technique were characterized with high detail using HRTEM, STEM-EDX, and EELS. The results show that at the transition from micro- (MCD) to nanocrystalline diamond (NCD), a thin precursor graphitic film is formed, irrespectively of the NCD gas chemistry used (with or without argon). On the contrary, the transition of the NCD to MCD grade is free of carbon structures other than diamond, the result of a higher substrate temperature and more abundant atomic H in the gas chemistry. At those transitions WC nanoparticles could be found due to contamination from the filament, being also present at the first interface of the MCD layer with the silicon nitride substrate. PMID:24164667

  1. Tests of Hercules/Ultramet CVD coatings in hot hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Vanier, P.E.; Barletta, R.E.; Svandrlik, J.; Adams, J.

    1992-12-31

    The effort by Hercules and Ultramet to produce CVD NbC coatings, which protect carbon-carbon substrates from hot hydrogen, has had some success but with some limitations. The coatings increase the survival time at atmospheric pressure and low flow rate of hydrogen by about a factor of 40 over uncoated graphite at 3000 K. However, the grain structure is not stable at these temperatures, and after about 10--20 minutes, the coating is subject to rapid degradation by spalling in visible chunks. Further experiments would have to be performed to determine the effects of higher pressures and flow rates, for it is not clear how these factors would affect the survival time, considering that one of the main failure mechanisms is independent of the atmosphere.

  2. Tests of Hercules/Ultramet CVD coatings in hot hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Vanier, P.E.; Barletta, R.E.; Svandrlik, J.; Adams, J.

    1992-01-01

    The effort by Hercules and Ultramet to produce CVD NbC coatings, which protect carbon-carbon substrates from hot hydrogen, has had some success but with some limitations. The coatings increase the survival time at atmospheric pressure and low flow rate of hydrogen by about a factor of 40 over uncoated graphite at 3000 K. However, the grain structure is not stable at these temperatures, and after about 10--20 minutes, the coating is subject to rapid degradation by spalling in visible chunks. Further experiments would have to be performed to determine the effects of higher pressures and flow rates, for it is not clear how these factors would affect the survival time, considering that one of the main failure mechanisms is independent of the atmosphere.

  3. ECR Plasma CVD Using a Slotted Lisitano Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Yoshinobu; Komori, Akio; Ikeda, Hidehiko; Kishimoto, Kengo; Murata, Masayoshi; Uchida, Satoshi

    1990-11-01

    An ECR plasma is produced at relatively high pressures up to 25 mTorr with a slotted Lisitano coil 140 mm in diameter, and the radial distributions of plasma parameters are measured. It is found that the plasma is almost radially uniform even at pressures higher than 10 mTorr. Carbon films are formed on silicon wafers by introducing methane gas into the ECR plasma and the deposition rate is examined as a function of concentration of methane gas and substrate temperature. Furthermore, the physical properties of the films are analyzed by X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering. These results show that a slotted Lisitano coil is very useful for the ECR plasma CVD.

  4. Leakage current measurements of a pixelated polycrystalline CVD diamond detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zain, R. M.; Maneuski, D.; O'Shea, V.; Bates, R.; Blue, A.; Cunnigham, L.; Stehl, C.; Berderman, E.; Rahim, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    Diamond has several desirable features when used as a material for radiation detection. With the invention of synthetic growth techniques, it has become feasible to look at developing diamond radiation detectors with reasonable surface areas. Polycrystalline diamond has been grown using a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique by the University of Augsburg and detector structures fabricated at the James Watt Nanofabrication Centre (JWNC) in the University of Glasgow in order to produce pixelated detector arrays. The anode and cathode contacts are realised by depositing gold to produce ohmic contacts. Measurements of I-V characteristics were performed to study the material uniformity. The bias voltage is stepped from -1000V to 1000V to investigate the variation of leakage current from pixel to pixel. Bulk leakage current is measured to be less than 1nA.

  5. Textures and morphologies of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Clausing, R.E.; Heatherly, L.; Horton, L.L.; Specht, E.D.; Begun, G.M. ); Wang, Z.L. )

    1991-01-01

    The textures, surface morphologies, structural perfection, and properties of diamond films grown by activated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) vary greatly with the growth conditions. The evolution of two commonly observed polycrystalline morphologies, which give rise to <110> textures, will be described as well as the development of four films grown to produce <100>, <111>, and near <100>'' textures with various combinations of growth facets. These films were grown to test models of texture development. Films free of twins, microtwins, and stacking faults are deposited when only (100) facets are permitted to grow. In polycrystalline materials, special conditions must be met to avoid the formation of planar defects at the peripheries of individual crystallites. The planar defects grow from (111) or mixed microfaceted surfaces. Twinning plays an important role in growth of (111) faceted surfaces. The films have been characterized with Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and optical methods. 13 refs., 7 figs.

  6. Low temperature CVD of TaB/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Randich, E.

    1980-01-01

    Crystalline TaB/sub 2/ has been deposited using the CVD reaction of TaCl/sub 5/ and B/sub 2/H/sub 6/ in the temperature range of 773-1200/sup 0/K. Thermodynamic calculations have been made which compare the use of both B/sub 2/H/sub 6/ and BCl/sub 3/ as B source gases. The deposits obtained with B/sub 2/H/sub 6/ exhibited extremely small crystal size and contained amorphous B when the deposition temperature was below approx. 873/sup 0/K but were substoichiometric in B above this temperature. Carbon analysis indicated that C may substitute for B and thereby stabilize the diboride structure at high deposition temperatures. Microhardness of the coatings decreased with increasing B/Ta ratio and decreasing crystal size.

  7. A controlled atmosphere tube furnace was designed for thermal CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, M.; Bhatti, J. A.; Hussain, F.; Imran, M.; Khawaja, I. U.; Chaudhary, K. A.; Ahmad, S. A.

    2013-06-01

    High quality materials were used for the fabrication of hi-tech tube furnace. The furnace was especially suitable for thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD). High density alumina tube was used for the fabrication of furnace. The tube furnace was found to have three different temperature zones with maximum temperature at central zone was found to be 650°C. The flexible heating tape with capacity of 760°C was wrapped on the tube. To minimize the heat losses, asbestos and glass wool were used on heating tape. The temperature of the tube furnace was controlled by a digital temperature controller had accuracy of ±1°C. Methanol was taken as the representative of hydrocarbon sources, to give thin film of carbon. The a-C: H structure was investigated by conventional techniques using optical microscopy, FT-IR and SEM.

  8. Transfer printing of CVD graphene FETs on patterned substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abhilash, T. S.; de Alba, R.; Zhelev, N.; Craighead, H. G.; Parpia, J. M.

    2015-08-01

    We describe a simple and scalable method for the transfer of CVD graphene for the fabrication of field effect transistors. This is a dry process that uses a modified RCA-cleaning step to improve the surface quality. In contrast to conventional fabrication routes where lithographic steps are performed after the transfer, here graphene is transferred to a pre-patterned substrate. The resulting FET devices display nearly zero Dirac voltage, and the contact resistance between the graphene and metal contacts is on the order of 910 +/- 340 Ω μm. This approach enables formation of conducting graphene channel lengths up to one millimeter. The resist-free transfer process provides a clean graphene surface that is promising for use in high sensitivity graphene FET biosensors.We describe a simple and scalable method for the transfer of CVD graphene for the fabrication of field effect transistors. This is a dry process that uses a modified RCA-cleaning step to improve the surface quality. In contrast to conventional fabrication routes where lithographic steps are performed after the transfer, here graphene is transferred to a pre-patterned substrate. The resulting FET devices display nearly zero Dirac voltage, and the contact resistance between the graphene and metal contacts is on the order of 910 +/- 340 Ω μm. This approach enables formation of conducting graphene channel lengths up to one millimeter. The resist-free transfer process provides a clean graphene surface that is promising for use in high sensitivity graphene FET biosensors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03501e

  9. Type A Accident Investigation Board report on the January 17, 1996, electrical accident with injury in Technical Area 21 Tritium Science and Fabrication Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    An electrical accident was investigated in which a crafts person received serious injuries as a result of coming into contact with a 13.2 kilovolt (kV) electrical cable in the basement of Building 209 in Technical Area 21 (TA-21-209) in the Tritium Science and Fabrication Facility (TSFF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In conducting its investigation, the Accident Investigation Board used various analytical techniques, including events and causal factor analysis, barrier analysis, change analysis, fault tree analysis, materials analysis, and root cause analysis. The board inspected the accident site, reviewed events surrounding the accident, conducted extensive interviews and document reviews, and performed causation analyses to determine the factors that contributed to the accident, including any management system deficiencies. Relevant management systems and factors that could have contributed to the accident were evaluated in accordance with the guiding principles of safety management identified by the Secretary of Energy in an October 1994 letter to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board and subsequently to Congress.

  10. Progress report and technical evaluation of the ISCR pilot test conducted at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-01-14

    In October, 2007, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) presented the document Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007a) to the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Bureau of Environmental Remediation (KDHE/BER), for a proposed non-emergency Interim Measure (IM) at the site of the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Centralia, Kansas (Figure 1.1). The IM was recommended to mitigate existing levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the vadose zone soils beneath the former facility and in the groundwater beneath and in the vicinity of the former facility, as well as to moderate or decrease the potential future concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in the groundwater. The Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007a) was developed in accordance with the KDHE/BER Policy No.BERRS-029, Policy and Scope of Work: Interim Measures (KDHE 1996). The hydrogeologic, geochemical, and contaminant distribution characteristics of the Centralia site, as identified by the CCC/USDA, factored into the development of the nonemergency IM proposal. These characteristics were summarized in the Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007a) and were discussed in detail in previous Argonne reports (Argonne 2002a, 2003, 2004, 2005a,b,c, 2006a,b, 2007b). The identified remedial goals of the proposed IM were as follows: (1) To reduce the existing concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater in three 'hot spot' areas identified at the site (at SB01, SB05, and SB12-MW02; Figure 1.2) to levels acceptable to the KDHE. (2) To reduce carbon tetrachloride concentrations in the soils near the location of former soil boring SB12 and existing monitoring well MW02 (Figure 1.2) to levels below the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level (RBSL) of 200 {micro}g/kg for this contaminant. To address these goals, the potential application of an in situ chemical reduction (ISCR) treatment technology, employing the

  11. CVD growth of single-crystal monolayer graphene on H-terminated germanium surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whang, Dongmok

    2015-03-01

    Large-area graphene has been grown by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on various metal substrates. However, the uniform growth of single-crystal graphene over wafer-scale areas remains a challenge toward the commercial realization of various electronic, photonic, mechanical, and other devices based upon the outstanding properties of graphene. In this talk, we present the growth of single-crystal monolayer graphene on hydrogen-terminated germanium (Ge) surface. A single-crystal Ge substrate is a promising candidate for the growth of single-crystal graphene, because of (i) its catalytic activity for the catalytic decomposition of the formation of graphitic carbon on the surface; (ii) the extremely low solubility of carbon in Ge even at its melting temperature, enabling growth of complete monolayer graphene; (iii) the anisotropic atomic arrangement of single crystal Ge surface, enabling aligned growth of multiple seeds; (iv) the availability of a large area single-crystal surface via epitaxial Ge growth on Si wafers. We observed that well-defined atomic arrangement on the single crystal Ge surface enabled aligned growth of multiple seeds which can merge to single crystal graphene. Furthermore very weak van der Waals interaction between graphene and underlying Ge surface enabled facile dry transfer of graphene and recycling the Ge/Si wafer for continuing growth.

  12. Technical support to environmental restoration division for groundwater level monitoring effort at entombed Hallam Nuclear Power Facility. Final report, August 1, 1993--July 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    1994-03-15

    This report provides an interim summary of information from a water-level monitoring program. The information was collected by the US Geological Survey (USGS) over a 6-month period. The monitoring program between the US DOE and the USGS was set up to measure water levels in 16 observation wells at the Hallam Nuclear Facility in Hallam, Nebraska. The summary of USGS data includes: (1) a description of the USGS monitoring program; (2) a description of the collection of continuous water-level data; (3) a description of the collection of monthly water-level data; (4) table of observation well number, latitude, longitude, and depth; (5) table of monthly ground-water levels data; (6) table of recorder wells, rainfall, and barometric pressure values; (7) table of recorder well, rainfall, and barometric pressure daily values; and (8) hydrographs of selected wells. 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Unreviewed Safety Question Determination for TOPAZ II uranium fuel pellet production at the Plutonium Handling Facility (PF-4), Technical Area 55, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, D.J.P.

    1993-09-29

    Enriched uranium oxide, nitride, and carbide fuel pellets have been produced at PF-4 since the facility became operational in the late 1970s. The TOPAZ II reactors require fuel enriched to 97% uranium-235. Approximately 75 kilograms (kgs) of uranium will be processed per year in support of this program. The amount of fuel processed per year at PF-4 will not be increased for these programs, but the batch size will be increased to approximately 3 kgs of uranium. The current DOE-approved Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) calls for batches containing 45 grams (gms) of plutonium-239 and 172 gms of uranium-235. The impact of increasing the uranium batch size on the facility authorization basis is analyzed in the attached Safety Evaluation Worksheet. In addition, the structural modification for the transformer and vacuum pump installation, required to support the operation, is evaluated. Based on the attached Safety Evaluation, it has been determined that the change in uranium batch size does not constitute an Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ), the increase in uranium batch size does not increase the probability or consequences of any accidents previously analyzed and does not create the possibility for a new type of accident or reduce the margin of safety in the Operational Safety Requirements (OSRs). Similarly, the structural modifications required for the transformer and vacuum pump installation do not increase the probability or consequence of any accident previously analyzed and do not create the possibility for a new type of accident or reduce any margin of safety in the OSRS.

  14. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Electrical System Captor and Dapper Study

    SciTech Connect

    SINGH, G.

    2000-11-20

    The objective of this report is to Validate and as-build the Load and Fault hand calculations performed by Meier Associates. Perform a protective device coordination study, not performed by Meier's, and furnish any recommendations, including recommended device settings. Perform Transient Motor Starting (TMS) analysis for the chillers and also the motors on the standby generator system. Indicate any design problems or NEC Code Violations, if found.

  15. Cold Vacuum Drying facility effluent drains system design description (SYS 18)

    SciTech Connect

    TRAN, Y.S.

    2000-05-11

    The Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility provides required process systems, supporting equipment, and facilities needed for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) mission. This system design description (SDD) addresses the effluent drain system (EFS), which supports removal of water from the process bay floors. The discussion that follows is limited to piping, valves, components, and the process bay floor drain retention basin.

  16. The benzyl ligand in materials chemistry: Synthetic, structural, and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remington, Michael Perry, Jr.

    A series of new organometallic precursors and/or reactions have been investigated for the facile production of main group compound semiconductors at relatively low temperature. The common feature among the organometallic compounds used in this study is that they all contain the benzyl ligand, Bn = CH2C6H5. Novel dual source reactions between benzylated organometallic compounds, and elemental sulfur or selenium produce the underrepresented Group 14/16 and Group 15/16 solid-state binary semiconductors as well as the corresponding Sn(SxSe1-x) and (Bi xSb1-x)2S3 solid solutions. In addition, new single-source precursors that produce germanium sulfide, selenide, tin telluride, and bismuth sulfide under mild conditions have been synthesized. By judicious choice of the precursor and the reaction conditions, synthetic control over the size and microstructure of Bi2S3 particles is achieved. Decomposition of (BnS)3Bi at mild temperatures forms small (˜1 mum) aggregates of nearly spherical botryoidal particles or 6 mum diameter spherical particles composed of radiating acicular crystallites. The reaction of Bn3Bi with sulfur produces small spherical crystallites 200--300 nm in size; rod-like crystallites 500--700 nm in width and 4--5 mum in length; or dense, prismatic rods ˜1 mum in length and 500 nm wide. Two new chemical vapor deposition (CVD) sources of the technologically important elements antimony and bismuth have been identified. Bn3Sb and Bn3Bi were shown to grow films of these elements under low-pressure conditions (LPCVD). Depositions on glass and Si(100) substrates were performed. Resulting films are of high purity, good adherence, and highly crystalline as determined by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). The films also exhibit a high degree of texture. The texture of Sb films could be controlled by varying the distance of the deposition substrate to that of the precursor. Bi films were highly oriented in the (012) crystallographic direction, where most deposition

  17. Technical writing versus technical writing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillingham, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Two terms, two job categories, 'technical writer' and 'technical author' are discussed in terms of industrial and business requirements and standards. A distinction between 'technical writing' and technical 'writing' is made. The term 'technical editor' is also considered. Problems inherent in the design of programs to prepare and train students for these jobs are discussed. A closer alliance between industry and academia is suggested as a means of preparing students with competent technical communication skills (especially writing and editing skills) and good technical skills.

  18. 13C(n,α0)10Be cross section measurement with sCVD diamond detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavrigin, P.; Griesmayer, E.; Belloni, F.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Weiss, C.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents 13C(n, α0)10Be cross section measurements performed at the Van de Graaff facility of the Joint Research Centre Geel. The 13C(n, α0)10Be cross section was measured relative to the 12C(n, α0)9Be cross section at 14.3 MeV and 17.0 MeV neutron energies. The measurements were performed with an sCVD (single-crystal chemical vapor deposition) diamond detector which acted as sample and as sensor simultaneously. A novel analysis technique was applied, which is based on the pulse-shape analysis of the detector's ionization current. This technique resulted in an efficient separation of background events and consequently in a well-determined selection of the nuclear reaction channels 12C(n, α0)9Be and 13C(n, α0)10Be.

  19. Characterisation of CVD diamond detectors used for fast neutron flux monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulon, F.; Bergonzo, P.; Amosov, V. N.; Kaschuck, Yu.; Frunze, V.; Tromson, D.; Brambilla, A.

    2002-01-01

    Natural diamond detectors (NDD) have been successfully used for fast neutron spectrometry on various fusion installations in plasma diagnostics. These detectors can work at high temperature, are radiation hard and exhibit a high energy resolution. However, the use of NDD is limited by the availability of IIa type diamonds exhibiting high electronic properties. With the recent advance in the growth of high quality chemically vapour deposited (CVD) diamond at LETI, CVD diamond appears to be a very promising material for plasma diagnostics. We present here for the first time results of the use of CVD diamond detectors for fast neutron flux monitoring on a neutron generator. The characteristics of CVD diamond detectors are compared with that of high quality NDD made by TRINITI. Pulse height spectra have been measured with CVD detectors and NDD under both 5.5 MeV alpha particles and 14.1 MeV neutrons. The quality of CVD diamond enables the recording of structured spectra allowing the distinction between the different neutron reactions on carbon. The efficiency of CVD diamond monitors and their actual limitations are analysed and discussed.

  20. Evaluation of trench subsidence and stabilization at Sheffield low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. Technical report (final) 15 Oct 80-30 Mar 81

    SciTech Connect

    Kahle, R.; Rowlands, J.

    1981-05-01

    This report presents the results of the evaluation of trench subsidence and possible future stabilization techniques at the Sheffield Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility, Sheffield, Illinois. The investigation was based on a review, analysis and summary of available surface maintenance records on the site, and other data obtained from the site operator, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the U.S. Geological Survey, and the Illinois Department of Nuclear Safety. Analyses were performed to determine subsidence trends and project future subsidence for 21 trenches into which the wastes were placed. The types of subsidence, potholes, sudden slumps, and long term area settlement were evaluated to develop future projections. The mechanisms evaluated as causing subsidence and settlement were: piping and settlement of the trench backfill soil into voids, consolidation of the trench backfill soil, and deterioration of the waste containers and wastes by corrosion and biodegradation. The engineering feasibility and costs of potential trench stabilization techniques were developed. Recommendations were made for stabilization, final capping, and future monitoring of each trench.

  1. Development of Micro and Nano Crystalline CVD Diamond TL/OSL Radiation Detectors for Clinical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza-Flores, Marcelino

    2015-03-01

    Modern radiotherapy methods requires the use of high photon radiation doses delivered in a fraction to small volumes of cancer tumors. An accurate dose assessment for highly energetic small x-ray beams in small areas, as in stereotactic radiotherapy, is necessary to avoid damage to healthy tissue surrounding the tumor. Recent advances on the controlled synthesis of CVD diamond have demonstrated the possibility of using high quality micro and nano crystalline CVD as an efficient detector and dosimeter suitable for high energy photons and energetic particle beams. CVD diamond is a very attractive material for applications in ionizing radiation dosimetry, particularly in the biomedical field since the radiation absorption by a CVD diamond is very close to that of soft tissue. Furthermore, diamond is stable, non-toxic and radiation hard. In the present work we discuss the CVD diamond properties and dosimeter performance and discuss its relevance and advantages of various dosimetry methods, including thermally stimulated luminescence (TL) as well as optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). The recent CVD improved method of growth allows introducing precisely controlled impurities into diamond to provide it with high dosimetry sensitivity. For clinical dosimetry applications, high accuracy of dose measurements, low fading, high sensitivity, good reproducibility and linear dose response characteristics are very important parameters which all are found in CVD diamonds specimens. In some cases, dose linearity and reproducibility in CVD diamond have been found to be higher than standard commercial TLD materials like LiF. In the present work, we discuss the state-of-the art developments in dosimetry applications using CVD diamond. The financial support from Conacyt (Mexico) is greatly acknowledged

  2. Rolling-contact fatigue and wear of CVD-SiC with residual surface compression

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, L.Y.; Lakshminarayanan, R.; Shetty, D.K.; Cutler, R.A.

    1995-09-01

    The rolling-contact fatigue life and wear of CVD-SiC coatings with surface compression were studied using a three-ball-on-rod rolling-contact fatigue (RCF) tester. Two levels of surface compression in the coatings, approximately 190 {micro}m thick, were introduced by using substrates of a liquid-phase sintered SiC and a SiC-30 vol% TiC to obtain desired thermal-expansion mismatches with the CVD-SiC. Residual surface compressions of 250 and 680 MPa were measured in the CVD-SiC coatings on SiC and SiC-30 vol% TiC substrates, respectively, by a strain-gage technique. In the RCF test, the fatigue life of the CVD-SiC coating with the moderate surface compression was limited by severe wear by a brittle fracture mechanism at a Hertzian contact stress of 5.5 GPa. The CVD-SiC coating on the SiC-30 vol% TiC composite, on the other hand, did not show measurable wear. A majority of the tests (11 out of 16) were suspended at 100 h or stopped due to failure of the steel balls. Five tests stopped due to spalling of the CVD-SiC coating at weak interfaces 10 to 15 {micro}m below the contact surface. Examination of the microstructure of the CVD-SiC coating in cross sections revealed that the weak interfaces that led to the spalling were related to discontinuous growth of the CVD-SiC in the form of nodules or growth regions. Elimination of these defective structures is likely to enhance the tribological performance of surface-toughened CVD-SiC.

  3. Characterization of CVD micrometer-size diamond (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsumi, K.; Hagiya, K.; Miyamoto, M.; Matsuda, J.; Ohmasa, M.

    1989-07-01

    formed from carbonaceous materials by impact shock or directly formed from vapor. Recent discovery of vapor-growth diamonds in carbonaceous chondrites has generated a renewed interest in the origin of ureilite diamonds. Two types of micrometer-size diamonds were prepared. One of them was grown under low pressure by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from gaseous mixtures of H2 and CH4, and another was synthesized by shock effect (kindly offered by Nippon Oil & Fats Co., Ltd.) The micro-Laue method was applied to them in order to get information about their microstructures. Two characteristics are recognized in profiles of reflections themselves and in whole patterns of the Laue photographs. The reflections of CVD diamonds are elongated but symmetric in their profiles and are distributed regularly as they are indexed by the diamond lattice, while those of shock effect are also elongated and asymmetric, and are distributed at random as they cannot be indexed. The characteristics observed by the method may be useful to ascribe the origin to CVD or shock effect.

  4. A Novel Al/TiN/CVD-W Structure to Eliminate Resistance Anomaly in Deep Submicron Al/CVD-W Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Mitsuru; Fujii, Toyokazu; Yamanaka, Michinari; Fukumoto, Masanori

    1995-02-01

    The sheet resistance increase of Al/chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-W interconnects after low-temperature annealing has been investigated. Anomalous sheet resistance increase depending on the linewidth in sub-half-micron Al-Si-Cu/CVD-W lines after 450° C annealing is found for the first time. The sheet resistance increase of the Al/CVD-W lines becomes larger for narrower linewidth after annealing. It is considered that this anomalous sheet resistance increase is due to more nonuniform high-resistivity WAl12 formation in the narrower lines. Using a TiN interlayer to eliminate WAl12 formation, sub-half-micron lines of a new Al-Si-Cu/TiN/CVD-W structure have demonstrated sufficiently low line resistance even after 450° C annealing for 300 min and exhibited 6 times longer electromigration (EM) lifetime compared with the previous Al-Si-Cu/CVD-W structure. This longer EM lifetime is also attributed to the suppression of WAl12 formation. This structure is one of the most promising interconnect structures for realizing sub-half-micron interconnects in future ULSIs.

  5. Preventing CVD in resource-poor areas: perspectives from the 'real-world'.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Simon; Sliwa, Karen

    2009-07-01

    An evolving epidemic of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is having a profound effect on the health of vulnerable populations in low-to-middle income countries with limited resources. Despite some encouraging signs (particularly initiatives from the WHO), global and regional apathy towards noncommunicable forms of CVD adds to the complexity of issues to consider when establishing cost-effective prevention programs. We present our perspective on overcoming the myriad of barriers to providing cost-effective measures for CVD prevention in a resource-poor environment through the 'prism' of our experiences in establishing the Heart of Soweto Study in South Africa. PMID:19554008

  6. Controlled incorporation of mid-to-high Z transition metals in CVD diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, M M; Biener, J; Kucheyev, S O; Wang, Y M; El-Dasher, B; Teslich, N E; Hamza, A V; Obloh, H; Mueller-Sebert, W; Wolfer, M; Fuchs, T; Grimm, M; Kriele, A; Wild, C

    2010-01-08

    We report on a general method to fabricate transition metal related defects in diamond. Controlled incorporation of Mo and W in synthetic CVD diamond was achieved by adding volatile metal precursors to the diamond chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth process. Effects of deposition temperature, grain structure and precursor exposure on the doping level were systematically studied, and doping levels of up to 0.25 at.% have been achieved. The metal atoms are uniformly distributed throughout the diamond grains without any indication of inclusion formation. These results are discussed in context of the kinetically controlled growth process of CVD diamond.

  7. Radiation monitoring with CVD Diamonds and PIN Diodes at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Bruinsma, M.; Burchat, P.; Curry, S.; Edwards, A.J.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Kirkby, D.; Majewski, S.; Petersen, B.A.; /UC, Irvine /SLAC /Ohio State U.

    2008-02-13

    The BaBar experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center has been using two polycrystalline chemical vapor deposition (pCVD) diamonds and 12 silicon PIN diodes for radiation monitoring and protection of the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT). We have used the pCVD diamonds for more than 3 years, and the PIN diodes for 7 years. We will describe the SVT and SVT radiation monitoring system as well as the operational difficulties and radiation damage effects on the PIN diodes and pCVD diamonds in a high-energy physics environment.

  8. Technical Shibboleths.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, John S.

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technical sub-languages to reveal sociological functions of language that transcend mere transfer of substantive information. Finds one sociological feature, the shibboleth, acting widely throughout technical fields. (PA)

  9. Recovery of CVD Diamond Detectors using Laser Double Pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Dauffy, L S; Lerche, R A; Schmid, G J; Koch, J A; Silbenagel, C

    2005-09-27

    A 5 x 0.25 mm Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) diamond detector, with a voltage bias of + 250V, was excited by a 400 nm laser (3.1 eV photons) in order to study the saturation of the wafer and its associated electronics. In a first experiment, the laser beam energy was increased from a few tens of a pJ to about 100 {micro}J, and the signal from the diamond was recorded until full saturation of the detection system was achieved. Clear saturation of the detection system was observed at about 40 V, which corresponds with the expected saturation at 10% of the applied bias (250V). The results indicate that the interaction mechanism of the 3.1 eV photons in the diamond (E{sub bandgap} = 5.45 eV) is not a multi-photon process but is linked to the impurities and defects of the crystal. In a second experiment, the detector was irradiated by a saturating first laser pulse and then by a delayed laser pulse of equal or smaller amplitude with delays of 5, 10, and 20 ns. The results suggest that the diamond and associated electronics recover within 10 to 20 ns after a strong saturating pulse.

  10. The evaluation of radiation damage parameter for CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilj, V.; Skukan, N.; Jakšić, M.; Pomorski, M.; Kada, W.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T.

    2016-04-01

    There are a few different phenomenological approaches that aim to track the dependence of signal height in irradiated solid state detectors on the fluence of damaging particles. However, none of them are capable to provide a unique radiation hardness parameter that would reflect solely the material capability to withstand high radiation environment. To extract such a parameter for chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, two different diamond detectors were irradiated with proton beams in MeV energy range and subjected afterwards to ion beam induced charge (IBIC) analysis. The change in charge collection efficiency (CCE) due to defects produced was investigated in context of a theoretical model that was developed on the basis of the adjoint method for linearization of the continuity equations of electrons and holes. Detailed modeling of measured data resulted with the first known value of the kσ product for diamond, where k represents the number of charge carriers' traps created per one simulated primary lattice vacancy and σ represents the charge carriers' capture cross section. As discussed in the text, this product could be considered as a true radiation damage parameter.

  11. Quantum Hall effect in polycrystalline CVD graphene: grain boundaries impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro-Palau, Rebeca; Lafont, Fabien; Schopfer, Felicien; Poirier, Wilfrid; Bouchiat, Vincent; Han, Zhen; Cresti, Alessandro; Cummings, Aron; Roche, Stephan

    2014-03-01

    It was demonstrated by Janssen et al. (New J. Phys. 2011) that graphene could surpass GaAs for quantum Hall resistance standards with an accuracy better than 10-10. Graphene should render possible the realization of a standard operating at T > 4 K and B < 4 T, easing its dissemination towards industry. To materialize this goal scalable graphene with outstanding electronic transport properties is required. We present measurements performed in large area Hall bars made of polycrystalline CVD graphene on Si/SiO2, with a carrier mobility of 0.6 T-1. Even at 20.2 T and 300 mK, the Hall resistance plateaus are insufficiently quantized at ν = +/- 2 and +/- 6 . This is due to a high dissipation manifested by a longitudinal resistance which does not drop to zero. We pointed out unusual power-law temperature dependencies of Rxx and an exponential magnetic field dependence. We do not observe the common thermally activated or VRH behaviors. This can be attributed to the grain boundaries in the sample that short-circuit the edge states, as supported by our numerical simulations. This reveals new and peculiar aspects of the quantum Hall effect in polycrystalline systems. Another unexpected feature is the observation of the ν = 0 and 1 states in such low mobility systems.

  12. High Efficiency CVD Graphene-lead (Pb) Cooper Pair Splitter.

    PubMed

    Borzenets, I V; Shimazaki, Y; Jones, G F; Craciun, M F; Russo, S; Yamamoto, M; Tarucha, S

    2016-01-01

    Generation and manipulation of quantum entangled electrons is an important concept in quantum mechanics, and necessary for advances in quantum information processing; but not yet established in solid state systems. A promising device is a superconductor-two quantum dots Cooper pair splitter. Early nanowire based devices, while efficient, are limited in scalability and further electron manipulation. We demonstrate an optimized, high efficiency, CVD grown graphene-based Cooper pair splitter. Our device is designed to induce superconductivity in graphene via the proximity effect, resulting in both a large superconducting gap Δ = 0.5 meV, and coherence length ξ = 200 nm. The flat nature of the device lowers parasitic capacitance, increasing charging energy EC. Our design also eases geometric restrictions and minimizes output channel separation. As a result we measure a visibility of up to 86% and a splitting efficiency of up to 62%. This will pave the way towards near unity efficiencies, long distance splitting, and post-splitting electron manipulation. PMID:26971450

  13. High Efficiency CVD Graphene-lead (Pb) Cooper Pair Splitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzenets, I. V.; Shimazaki, Y.; Jones, G. F.; Craciun, M. F.; Russo, S.; Yamamoto, M.; Tarucha, S.

    2016-03-01

    Generation and manipulation of quantum entangled electrons is an important concept in quantum mechanics, and necessary for advances in quantum information processing; but not yet established in solid state systems. A promising device is a superconductor-two quantum dots Cooper pair splitter. Early nanowire based devices, while efficient, are limited in scalability and further electron manipulation. We demonstrate an optimized, high efficiency, CVD grown graphene-based Cooper pair splitter. Our device is designed to induce superconductivity in graphene via the proximity effect, resulting in both a large superconducting gap Δ = 0.5 meV, and coherence length ξ = 200 nm. The flat nature of the device lowers parasitic capacitance, increasing charging energy EC. Our design also eases geometric restrictions and minimizes output channel separation. As a result we measure a visibility of up to 86% and a splitting efficiency of up to 62%. This will pave the way towards near unity efficiencies, long distance splitting, and post-splitting electron manipulation.

  14. Experimental Study of the Flow in a Rotating CVD Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Sun; Meng, Jiandong; Jaluria, Yogesh

    2013-11-01

    An experimental model is developed to study the rotating, vertical, impinging chemical vapor deposition reactor. Deposition occurs only when the system has enough thermal energy. Therefore, understanding the fluid flow and thermal characteristics of the system would provide a good basis to model the thin film deposition process. The growth rate and the uniformity of the film are the two most important factors in the CVD process and these depend strongly on the flow and the thermal transport within the system. Operating parameters, such as inflow velocity, susceptor temperature and rotational speed, are used to create different design simulations. Fluid velocities and temperature distributions are recorded to obtain the effects of different operating parameters. Velocities are recorded by using a rotameter and a hot wire anemometer. The temperatures are recorded by using thermocouples and an infrared thermometer. The effects of buoyancy and rotation are examined. The expermental study is also coupled with a numerical study for validation of the numerical model and to expand the domain. Comparisons between the two models are presented, indicating fair agreement. The numerical model also includes simulation of Gallium Nitride (GaN) thin film deposition. This simulation thus includes mass transport and gas kinetics, along with the flow and heat transfer within the system. A three dimensional simulation is needed due to the rotation of the susceptor. The results obtained as well as the underlying fluid flow phenomena are discussed.

  15. Excimer Laser Beam Analyzer Based on CVD Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girolami, Marco; Salvatori, Stefano; Conte, Gennaro

    2010-11-01

    1-D and 2-D detector arrays have been realized on CVD-diamond. The relatively high resistivity of diamond in the dark allowed the fabrication of photoconductive "sandwich" strip (1D) or pixel (2D) detectors: a semitransparent light-receiving back-side contact was used for detector biasing. Cross-talk between pixels was limited by using intermediate guard contacts connected at the same ground potential of the pixels. Each pixel photocurrent was conditioned by a read-out electronics composed by a high sensitive integrator and a Σ-Δ ADC converter. The overall 500 μs conversion time allowed a data acquisition rate up to 2 kSPS. The measured fast photoresponse of the samples in the ns time regime suggests to use the proposed devices for fine tuning feedback of high-power pulsed-laser cavities, whereas solar-blindness guarantees high performance in UV beam diagnostics also under high intensity background illumination. Offering unique properties in terms of thermal conductivity and visible-light transparency, diamond represents one of the most suitable candidate for the detection of high-power UV laser emission. The technology of laser beam profiling is evolving with the increase of excimer lasers applications that span from laser-cutting to VLSI and MEMS technologies. Indeed, to improve emission performances, fine tuning of the laser cavity is required. In such a view, the development of a beam-profiler, able to work in real-time between each laser pulse, is mandatory.

  16. Atomistic modelling of CVD synthesis of carbon nanotubes and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, James A.; Shibuta, Yasushi; Amara, Hakim; Bichara, Christophe; Neyts, Erik C.

    2013-07-01

    We discuss the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene by catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CCVD) and plasma-enhanced CVD (PECVD), summarising the state-of-the-art understanding of mechanisms controlling their growth rate, chiral angle, number of layers (walls), diameter, length and quality (defects), before presenting a new model for 2D nucleation of a graphene sheet from amorphous carbon on a nickel surface. Although many groups have modelled this process using a variety of techniques, we ask whether there are any complementary ideas emerging from the different proposed growth mechanisms, and whether different modelling techniques can give the same answers for a given mechanism. Subsequently, by comparing the results of tight-binding, semi-empirical molecular orbital theory and reactive bond order force field calculations, we demonstrate that graphene on crystalline Ni(111) is thermodynamically stable with respect to the corresponding amorphous metal and carbon structures. Finally, we show in principle how a complementary heterogeneous nucleation step may play a key role in the transformation from amorphous carbon to graphene on the metal surface. We conclude that achieving the conditions under which this complementary crystallisation process can occur may be a promising method to gain better control over the growth processes of both graphene from flat metal surfaces and CNTs from catalyst nanoparticles.

  17. Fabrication of graphene-based films using remote plasma CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiramatsu, Mineo; Tsukada, Ryosuke; Kashima, Yohei; Naito, Masateru; Kondo, Hiroki; Hori, Masaru

    2012-10-01

    Plasma-enhanced CVD (PECVD) employing methane/hydrogen gases has been used to grow diamond, diamond-like carbon, and carbon nanotubes. In the case of microwave PECVD with methane/hydrogen system without catalyst nanoparticles at temperatures of 700--850 ^oC, where the substrate is exposed to the plasma, vertical nano-graphenes and carbon nanoflakes have been easily grown even on Cu substrate due to the ion bombardment and local electric field forces. In this work, we demonstrate the synthesis of planar few-layer graphene-based film using PECVD with remote plasma configuration. In the case using microwave plasma of cylindrical resonant cavity type, by simply installing grounded grid over the substrate plate for obtaining remote plasma configuration, we have successfully fabricated graphene-based films on Cu substrate, which was confirmed by the Raman spectrum and SEM image of deposit. Similar method will be applied to other plasmas such as low-pressure inductively coupled plasma, in order to verify the effectiveness of remote plasma configuration for the growth of planar graphene using PECVD technique. We will discuss the planar graphene growth mechanism in terms of precursors and their surface reaction.

  18. Atomistic modelling of CVD synthesis of carbon nanotubes and graphene.

    PubMed

    Elliott, James A; Shibuta, Yasushi; Amara, Hakim; Bichara, Christophe; Neyts, Erik C

    2013-08-01

    We discuss the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene by catalytic chemical vapour deposition (CCVD) and plasma-enhanced CVD (PECVD), summarising the state-of-the-art understanding of mechanisms controlling their growth rate, chiral angle, number of layers (walls), diameter, length and quality (defects), before presenting a new model for 2D nucleation of a graphene sheet from amorphous carbon on a nickel surface. Although many groups have modelled this process using a variety of techniques, we ask whether there are any complementary ideas emerging from the different proposed growth mechanisms, and whether different modelling techniques can give the same answers for a given mechanism. Subsequently, by comparing the results of tight-binding, semi-empirical molecular orbital theory and reactive bond order force field calculations, we demonstrate that graphene on crystalline Ni(111) is thermodynamically stable with respect to the corresponding amorphous metal and carbon structures. Finally, we show in principle how a complementary heterogeneous nucleation step may play a key role in the transformation from amorphous carbon to graphene on the metal surface. We conclude that achieving the conditions under which this complementary crystallisation process can occur may be a promising method to gain better control over the growth processes of both graphene from flat metal surfaces and CNTs from catalyst nanoparticles. PMID:23774798

  19. High Efficiency CVD Graphene-lead (Pb) Cooper Pair Splitter

    PubMed Central

    Borzenets, I. V.; Shimazaki, Y.; Jones, G. F.; Craciun, M. F.; Russo, S.; Yamamoto, M.; Tarucha, S.

    2016-01-01

    Generation and manipulation of quantum entangled electrons is an important concept in quantum mechanics, and necessary for advances in quantum information processing; but not yet established in solid state systems. A promising device is a superconductor-two quantum dots Cooper pair splitter. Early nanowire based devices, while efficient, are limited in scalability and further electron manipulation. We demonstrate an optimized, high efficiency, CVD grown graphene-based Cooper pair splitter. Our device is designed to induce superconductivity in graphene via the proximity effect, resulting in both a large superconducting gap Δ = 0.5 meV, and coherence length ξ = 200 nm. The flat nature of the device lowers parasitic capacitance, increasing charging energy EC. Our design also eases geometric restrictions and minimizes output channel separation. As a result we measure a visibility of up to 86% and a splitting efficiency of up to 62%. This will pave the way towards near unity efficiencies, long distance splitting, and post-splitting electron manipulation. PMID:26971450

  20. Carbon Nanotubes Grown By CVD in Various Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, S.; Su, C.; Cochrane, J. C.; Lehoczky. S. L.; Muntele, I.; Ila, D.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the superior properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) could be used in numerous devices such as electronics and sensors, many efforts have been engaged in synthesizing particular structural or dimensional MWCNT. This presentation will illustrate MWCNT synthesized on silicon substrates by thermal CVD. On the substrate, an array of catalysts is coated using sputtering deposition. A thin Ti buffer layer is also coated on some Si substrates prior to depositing catalyst particles. Nickel, cobalt or iron transition metals are used as catalysts for the MWCNT growth. Since the diameter of MWCNT depends on the size of catalyst particles, the catalyst particle size is investigated after annealed at various temperatures. MWCNT are grown on the substrate in the temperature range of 700 to 1000 C and the pressure range of 100 torr to one atmosphere. Methane and hydrogen gases with methane content of 10% to 100% are used for the MWCNT synthesis. Morphology, length and diameter of these MWCNT are determined by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The detailed results of syntheses and characterizations will be discussed in the presentation.

  1. Carbon Nanotubes Growth by CVD on Graphite Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Shen; Su, Ching-Hua; Cochrane, J. C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Muntele, I.; Ila, D.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Due to the superior electrical and mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT), synthesizing CNT on various substances for electronics devices and reinforced composites have been engaged in many efforts for applications. This presentation will illustrate CNT synthesized on graphite fibers by thermal CVD. On the fiber surface, iron nanoparticles as catalysts for CNT growth are coated. The growth temperature ranges from 600 to 1000 C and the pressure ranges from 100 Torr to one atmosphere. Methane and hydrogen gases with methane content of 10% to 100% are used for the CNT synthesis. At high growth temperatures (greater than or equal to 900 C), the rapid inter-diffusion of the transition metal iron on the graphite surface results in the rough fiber surface without any CNT grown on it. When the growth temperature is relative low (650-800 C), CNT with catalytic particles on the nanotube top ends are fabricated on the graphite surface. (Methane and hydrogen gases with methane content of 10% to 100% are used for the CNT synthesis.) (By measuring the samples) Using micro Raman spectroscopy in the breath mode region, single-walled or multi-walled CNT (MWCNT), depending on growth concentrations, are found. Morphology, length and diameter of these MWCNT are determined by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The detailed results of syntheses and characterizations will be discussed in the presentation.

  2. Carbon Nanotubes Growth by CVD in Various Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, S.; Su, C. H.; Cochrane, J. C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Gorti, S.; Muntele, I.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Since the superior properties of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT could be used in numerous devices such as electronics and sensors, many efforts have been engaged in synthesizing particular structural or dimensional MWCNT. This presentation will illustrate MWCNT synthesized on silicon substrates by thermal CVD. On the substrate, an array of catalysts is coated using sputtering deposition. A thin Ti buffer layer is also coated on some Si substrates prior to depositing catalyst particles. Nickel, cobalt or iron transition metals are used as catalysts for the MWCNT growth. Since the diameter of MWCNT depends on the size of catalyst particles, the catalyst particle size is investigated after annealed at various temperatures. MWCNT are grown on the substrate in the temperature range of 700 to 1000 C and the pressure range of 100 torr to one atmosphere. Methane and hydrogen gases with methane content of 10% to 100% are used for the MWCNT synthesis. Morphology, length and diameter of these MWCNT are determined by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The detailed results of syntheses and characterizations will be discussed in the presentation.

  3. KSC Technical Capabilities Website

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nufer, Brian; Bursian, Henry; Brown, Laurette L.

    2010-01-01

    This document is the website pages that review the technical capabilities that the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has for partnership opportunities. The purpose of this information is to make prospective customers aware of the capabilities and provide an opportunity to form relationships with the experts at KSC. The technical capabilities fall into these areas: (1) Ground Operations and Processing Services, (2) Design and Analysis Solutions, (3) Command and Control Systems / Services, (4) Materials and Processes, (5) Research and Technology Development and (6) Laboratories, Shops and Test Facilities.

  4. Enhanced thermal conductivity of CVD SiC via beryllium and boron dopings

    SciTech Connect

    Kowbel, W.; Gao, F.; Withers, J.C.

    1995-10-01

    SiC-SiC composites exhibit excellent mechanical and corrosion properties, which are desired for a variety of advanced applications including fusion reactors, heat exchangers and advanced turbine engines. However, SiC-SiC composites fabricated by the CVI methods have unacceptably low through-the-thickness thermal conductivity, which limits their use in these applications. CVD SiC co-deposition with either beryllium or boron compounds significantly enhanced the thermal conductivity of CVD SiC at temperatures up to 1,000 C. Results pertinent to the doping processes and the measured thermal conductivity of doped CVD SiC are reported. Mechanisms for the enhanced thermal conductivity of the CVD SiC are discussed based on the microstructural characteristics of the doped specimens.

  5. Is the risk and nature of CVD the same in type 1 and type 2 diabetes?

    PubMed

    Duca, Lindsey; Sippl, Rachel; Snell-Bergeon, Janet K

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes is increasing globally, most likely explained by environmental changes, such as changing exposures to foods, viruses, and toxins, and by increasing obesity. While cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality has been declining recently, this global epidemic of diabetes threatens to stall this trend. CVD is the leading cause of death in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with at least a two- to fourfold increased risk in patients with diabetes. In this review, the risk factors for CVD are discussed in the context of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. While traditional risk factors such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, and obesity are greater in type 2 patients than in type 1 diabetes, they explain only about half of the increased CVD risk. The role for diabetes-specific risk factors, including hyperglycemia and kidney complications, is discussed in the context of new study findings. PMID:23519720

  6. Lipid-Lowering Drug Therapy for CVD Prevention: Looking into the Future.

    PubMed

    Stein, Evan A; Raal, Frederick J

    2015-11-01

    Over the past three decades, statins have become first-line treatment for reducing LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). They have provided a clear, robust, and reproducible relationship between the absolute LDL-C reduction and the decrease in CVD; every 1 mmol/L (~40 mg/dL) in LDL-C reduction results in a 22 % decrease in CVD events. This relationship has recently been extended to reduction in LDL-C with a non-statin, ezetimibe, on top of statin therapy, further consolidating LDL-C as the cornerstone in CVD risk reduction. Despite these two effective and safe LDL-C-lowering drugs, there remains a need for additional drugs to reduce LDL-C, the focus of this review which covers agents which produce sufficient LDL-C reduction to potentially help address this unmet need and are either recently approved or currently in clinical trials. PMID:26385394

  7. A platform for large-scale graphene electronics--CVD growth of single-layer graphene on CVD-grown hexagonal boron nitride.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min; Jang, Sung Kyu; Jang, Won-Jun; Kim, Minwoo; Park, Seong-Yong; Kim, Sang-Woo; Kahng, Se-Jong; Choi, Jae-Young; Ruoff, Rodney S; Song, Young Jae; Lee, Sungjoo

    2013-05-21

    Direct chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of single-layer graphene on CVD-grown hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) film can suggest a large-scale and high-quality graphene/h-BN film hybrid structure with a defect-free interface. This sequentially grown graphene/h-BN film shows better electronic properties than that of graphene/SiO2 or graphene transferred on h-BN film, and suggests a new promising template for graphene device fabrication. PMID:23576235

  8. Facilities Assessment Update Study, 1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunther, William H., Jr.; Collum, John M., Jr.

    This document addresses the physical state of the more than 170 buildings at 28 technical schools administered by the Georgia Department of Technical and Adult Education, concluding that although some progress has been made in reversing the deteriorating condition of the state's school facilities, funding at the current level is not keeping up…

  9. CVD Diamond, DLC, and c-BN Coatings for Solid Film Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    When the main criteria for judging coating performance were coefficient of friction and wear rate, which had to be less than 0.1 and 10(exp -6) mm(exp 3)/N-m, respectively, carbon- and nitrogen-ion-implanted, fine-grain CVD diamond and DLC ion beam deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond met the requirements regardless of environment (vacuum, nitrogen, and air).

  10. CVD Diamond, DLC, and c-BN Coatings for Solid Film Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Murakawa, Masao; Watanabe, Shuichi; Takeuchi, Sadao; Miyake, Shojiro; Wu, Richard L. C.

    1998-01-01

    The main criteria for judging coating performance were coefficient of friction and wear rate, which had to be less than 0.1 and 10(exp -6) cubic MM /(N*m), respectively. Carbon- and nitrogen-ion-implanted, fine-grain, chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond and diamondlike carbon (DLC) ion beam deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond met the criteria regardless of environment (vacuum, nitrogen, and air).

  11. Tribological Characteristics and Applications of Superhard Coatings: CVD Diamond, DLC, and c-BN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Murakawa, Masao; Watanabe, Shuichi; Takeuchi, Sadao; Wu, Richard L. C.

    1999-01-01

    Results of fundamental research on the tribological properties of chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond, diamondlike carbon, and cubic boron nitride films in sliding contact with CVD diamond in ultrahigh vacuum, dry nitrogen, humid air, and water are discussed. Furthermore, the actual and potential applications of the three different superhard coatings in the field of tribology technology, particularly for wear parts and tools, are reviewed.

  12. Book Processing Facility Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheahan (Drake)-Stewart Dougall, Marketing and Physical Distribution Consultants, New York, NY.

    The Association of New York Libraries for Technical Services (ANYLTS) is established to develop and run a centralized book processing facility for the public library systems in New York State. ANYLTS plans to receive book orders from the 22 library systems, transmit orders to publishers, receive the volumes from the publishers, print and attach…

  13. Linkage Mapping of CVD Risk Traits in the Isolated Norfolk Island Population

    PubMed Central

    Bellis, C.; Cox, H.C; Dyer, T. D.; Charlesworth, J. C.; Begley, K.N; Quinlan, S.; Lea, R.A; Heath, S.C; Blangero, J.; Griffiths, L.R

    2009-01-01

    To understand the underlying genetic architecture of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk traits, we undertook a genome-wide linkage scan to identify CVD quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in 377 individuals from the Norfolk Island population. The central aim of this research focused on the utilization of a genetically and geographically isolated population of individuals from Norfolk Island for the purposes of variance component linkage analysis to identify QTLs involved in CVD risk traits. Substantial evidence supports the involvement of traits such as systolic and diastolic blood pressures (SBP and DBP), high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), body mass index (BMI) and triglycerides (TG) as important risk factors for CVD pathogenesis. In addition to the environmental influences of poor diet, reduced physical activity, increasing age, cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption, many studies have illustrated a strong involvement of genetic components in the CVD phenotype through family and twin studies. We undertook a genome scan using 400 markers spaced approximately 10cM in 600 individuals from Norfolk Island. Genotype data was analyzed using the variance components methods of SOLAR. Our results gave a peak LOD score of 2.01 localizing to chromosome 1p36 for systolic blood pressure and replicated previously implicated loci for other CVD relevant QTLs. PMID:18975005

  14. 233-S plutonium concentration facility hazards assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Broz, R.E.

    1994-12-19

    This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning activities for the 233-S Plutonium Concentration Facility on the Hanford Site. The document represents an acceptable interpretation of the implementing guidance document for DOE ORDER 5500.3A. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific Emergency Action Levels and the Emergency Planning Zone is demonstrated.

  15. 340 Facility emergency preparedness hazards assessment

    SciTech Connect

    CAMPBELL, L.R.

    1998-11-25

    This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning activities for the 340 Facility on the Hanford Site. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific Emergency Action Levels and Emergency Planning Zone, is demonstrated.

  16. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Crane and Hoist System Design Description (SYS 14)

    SciTech Connect

    TRAN, Y.S.

    2000-06-07

    This system design description (SDD) is for the Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility overhead crane and hoist system. The overhead crane and hoist system is a general service system. It is located in the process bays of the CVD Facility, supports the processes required to drain the water and dry the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) contained in the multi-canister overpacks (MCOs) after they have been removed from the K-Basins. The location of the system in the process bay is shown.

  17. CVD diamond for optics applications in high heat flux environments

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, C.A.

    1996-12-31

    Diamond has a cubic lattice structure and a very wide bandgap, which suggests that this material should exhibit excellent optical properties at wavelengths ranging from the far infrared to the near ultraviolet. Since diamond also exhibits unusually favorable properties in terms of mechanical strength, chemical stability, and thermal conductivity, there is considerable interest in using diamond for optics applications that involve adverse environmental conditions. The purpose of this paper is to provide an updated assessment of some of the issues that arise in connection with the use of chemically vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond for applications such as missile system windows or domes, and for designing components that must function in the high photon flux of high-power lasers. Specifically, since the flight velocities of future air-intercept missiles are projected to far exceed those of contemporary systems, this raises the issue of how to assess the capability of window/dome material candidates in an aero-thermal shock environment. In this context, it can be demonstrated that, compared to other candidate materials, diamond windows promise to deliver superior performances and should be able to meet any foreseeable requirement. Operation at high speeds, however, imposes limits on the tolerable window emittance to prevent blinding the seeker, and this issue leads to the conclusion that diamond is intrinsically unsuitable for operation in the 3- to 5-{micro}m spectral band. Concerning high-energy lasers, note that operational systems always include an optical train consisting of mirrors and windows, which must be capable of transporting and directing the beam without seriously degrading the nominal performance of the laser. In this regard, mirror-faceplate material candidates can be ranked on the basis of appropriate figures of merit, which demonstrate that diamond is of particular promise for high-heat-load applications that require efficient cooling.

  18. Life Sciences Centrifuge Facility assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Robert H.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides an assessment of the status of the Centrifuge Facility being developed by ARC for flight on the International Space Station Alpha. The assessment includes technical status, schedules, budgets, project management, performance of facility relative to science requirements, and identifies risks and issues that need to be considered in future development activities.

  19. The Rationale and Design of the Pharmacist Intervention for Low Literacy in Cardiovascular Disease (PILL-CVD) Study

    PubMed Central

    Schnipper, Jeffrey L.; Roumie, Christianne L.; Cawthon, Courtney; Businger, Alexandra; Dalal, Anuj K.; Mugalla, Ileko; Eden, Svetlana; Jacobson, Terry A.; Rask, Kimberly J.; Vaccarino, Viola; Gandhi, Tejal K.; Bates, David W.; Johnson, Daniel C.; Labonville, Stephanie; Gregory, David; Kripalani, Sunil

    2010-01-01

    Background Medication errors and adverse drug events are common after hospital discharge, due to changes in medication regimens, suboptimal discharge instructions, and prolonged time to follow-up. Pharmacist-based interventions may be effective in promoting the safe and effective use of medications, especially among high risk patients such as those with low health literacy. Methods and Results The Pharmacist Intervention for Low Literacy in Cardiovascular Disease (PILL-CVD) study is a randomized controlled trial conducted at 2 academic centers – Vanderbilt University Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome or acute decompensated heart failure were randomized to usual care or intervention. The intervention consisted of pharmacist-assisted medication reconciliation, inpatient pharmacist counseling, low-literacy adherence aids, and tailored telephone follow-up after discharge. The primary outcome is the occurrence of serious medication errors in the first 30 days after hospital discharge. Secondary outcomes are health care utilization, disease-specific quality of life, and cost effectiveness. Enrollment was completed September 2009. A total of 862 patients were enrolled, and 430 patients were randomized to receive the intervention. Analyses will determine whether the intervention was effective in reducing serious medication errors, particularly in patients with low health literacy. Conclusions The PILL-CVD study was designed to reduce serious medication errors after hospitalization through a pharmacist-based intervention. The intervention, if effective, will inform health care facilities on the use of pharmacist-assisted medication reconciliation, inpatient counseling, low-literacy adherence aids, and patient follow-up after discharge. Clinical Trial Registration http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00632021, NCT00632021 PMID:20233982

  20. The Effect of Annealing at 1500 C on Migration and Release of Ion Implanted Silver in CVD Silicon Carbide

    SciTech Connect

    HJ MacLean; RG Ballinger; LE Kolaya; SA Simonson; N Lewis; M Hanson

    2004-10-07

    The transport of silver in CVD {beta}-SiC has been studied using ion implantation. Silver ions were implanted in {beta}-SiC using the ATLAS accelerator facility at the Argonne National Laboratory. Ion beams with energies of 93 and 161 MeV were used to achieve deposition with peak concentrations at depths of approximately 9 and 13 {micro}m, respectively. As-implanted samples were then annealed at 1500 C for 210 or 480 hours. XPS, SEM, TEM, STEM, and optical methods were used to analyze the material before and after annealing. Silver concentration profiles were determined using XPS before and after annealing. STEM and SEM equipped with quantitative chemical analysis capability were used to more fully characterize the location and morphology of the silver before and after annealing. The results show that, within the uncertainty of measurement techniques, there is no silver migration, via either inter- or intragrannular paths, for the times and temperature studied. Additionally, the silver was observed to phase separate within the SiC after annealing. The irradiation damage from the implantation process resulted in a three-layer morphology in the as-implanted condition: (1) a layer of unaltered SiC, followed by (2) a layer of crystallized SiC, followed by (3) an amorphized layer which contained essentially all of the implanted silver. After annealing the layer structure changed. Layer 1 was unaltered. The grains in layer 2 recrystallized to form an epitaxial (columnar) layer. Layer 3 recrystallized to form a fine grain equiaxed layer. The results of this work do not support the long held assumption that silver release from CVD SiC, used for gas-reactor coated particle fuel, is dominated by grain boundary diffusion.

  1. POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNICAL MANUAL FOR KOPPERS-TOTZEK BASED INDIRECT COAL LIQUEFACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document is one of six technical handbooks prepared by EPA to help government officials granting permits to build synfuels facilities, synfuels process developers, and other interested parties. They provide technical data on waste streams from synfuels facilities and technolo...

  2. Surface morphology and resistivity of aluminum oxide films prepared by plasma CVD combined with ion beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, H.; Shinohara, J.; Sassa, T.; Ikegami, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Plasma CVD combined with simultaneous ion beams has been developed in order to prepare ceramic insulating films which have strong force of adhesion and higher electric resistivity at high temperatures. Aluminum oxide (Al 2O 3) films were deposited on nickel based superalloy (Inconel 718) by thermal CVD, plasma CVD and ion beam assisted plasma CVD at the several substrate temperatures. The surface morphology of these films was analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was confirmed that, by ion beam irradiation, the extent of crystallization was enhanced at lower substrate temperature and grain size became smaller. The electric resistivity was measured in the temperature range of RT to 800°C. The film, deposited by ion beam assisted plasma CVD at 800°C, had higher electric resistivity than the films by conventional CVD.

  3. CVD mullite coatings in high-temperature, high-pressure air-H{sub 2}O[Chemical Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, J.A.; Lance, M.J.; Cooley, K.M.; Ferber, M.K.; Lowden, R.A.; Stinton, D.P.

    2000-03-01

    Crystalline mullite was deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) onto SiC/SiC composites overlaid with CVD SiC. Specimens were exposed to isothermal oxidation tests in high-pressure air +H{sub 2}O at 1,200 C. Unprotected CVD SiC formed silica scales with a dense amorphous inner layer and a thick, porous, outer layer of cristobalite. Thin coatings ({approximately}2{mu}m) of dense CVD mullite effectively suppressed the rapid oxidation of CVD SiC. No microstructural evidence of mullite volatility was observed under these temperature, pressure, and low-flow-rate conditions. Results of this preliminary study indicate that dense, crystalline, high-purity CVD mullite is stable and protective in low-velocity, high-pressure, moisture-containing environments.

  4. Performance specifications for proton medical facility

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, W.T.; Staples, J.W.; Ludewigt, B.A.; Renner, T.R.; Singh, R.P.; Nyman, M.A.; Collier, J.M.; Daftari, I.K.; Petti, P.L.; Alonso, J.R.; Kubo, H.; Verhey, L.J. |; Castro, J.R. ||

    1993-03-01

    Performance specifications of technical components of a modern proton radiotherapy facility are presented. The technical items specified include: the accelerator; the beam transport system including rotating gantry; the treatment beamline systems including beam scattering, beam scanning, and dosimetric instrumentation; and an integrated treatment and accelerator control system. Also included are treatment ancillary facilities such as diagnostic tools, patient positioning and alignment devices, and treatment planning systems. The facility specified will accommodate beam scanning enabling the three-dimensional conformal therapy deliver .

  5. Movers and stayers: The geography of residential mobility and CVD hospitalisations in Auckland, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Exeter, Daniel J; Sabel, Clive E; Hanham, Grant; Lee, Arier C; Wells, Susan

    2015-05-01

    The association between area-level disadvantage and health and social outcomes is unequivocal. However, less is known about the health impact of residential mobility, particularly at intra-urban scales. We used an encrypted National Health Index (eNHI) number to link individual-level data recorded in routine national health databases to construct a cohort of 641,532 participants aged 30+ years to investigate the association between moving and CVD hospitalisations in Auckland, New Zealand. Residential mobility was measured for participants according to changes in the census Meshblock of usual residence, obtained from the Primary Health Organisation (PHO) database for every calendar quarter between 1/1/2006 and 31/12/2012. The NZDep2006 area deprivation score at the start and end of a participant's inclusion in the study was used to measure deprivation mobility. We investigated the relative risk of movers being hospitalised for CVD relative to stayers using multi-variable binomial regression models, controlling for age, gender, deprivation and ethnicity. Considered together, movers were 1.22 (1.19-1.26) times more likely than stayers to be hospitalised for CVD. Using the 5×5 deprivation origin-destination matrix to model a patient's risk of CVD based on upward, downward or sideways deprivation mobility, movers within the least deprived (NZDep2006 Quintile 1) areas were 10% less likely than stayers to be hospitalised for CVD, while movers within the most deprived (NZDep2006 Q5) areas were 45% more likely than stayers to have had their first CVD hospitalisation in 2006-2012 (RR: 1.45 [1.35-1.55]). Participants who moved upward also had higher relative risks of having a CVD event, although their risk was less than those observed for participants experiencing downward deprivation mobility. This research suggests that residential mobility is an important determinant of CVD in Auckland. Further investigation is required to determine the impact moving has on the risk of

  6. Metal oxide growth, spin precession measurements and Raman spectroscopy of CVD graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsubayashi, Akitomo

    The focus of this dissertation is to explore the possibility of wafer scale graphene-based spintronics. Graphene is a single atomic layer of sp 2 bonded carbon atoms that has attracted much attention as a new type of electronic material due to its high carrier mobilities, superior mechanical properties and extremely high thermal conductivity. In addition, it has become an attractive material for use in spintronic devices owing to its long electron spin relaxation time at room temperature. This arises in part from its low spin-orbit coupling and negligible nuclear hyperfine interaction. In order to realize wafer scale graphene spintronics, utilization of CVD grown graphene is crytical due to its scalability. In this thesis, a unique fabrication method of the metal oxide layers on CVD graphene is presented. This is motivated by theoretical work showing that an ultra thin metal oxide film used as a tunnel barrier improves the spin injection efficiency. Introducing a titanium seed layer prior to the aluminum oxide growth showed improved surface and film uniformity and resulted in a completely oxidized film. Utilizing this unique metal oxide film growth process, lateral spin valve devices using CVD graphene as a channel are successfully fabricated. Hanle spin precession measurements are demonstrated on these CVD graphene spin devices. A non-local Hanle voltage model based upon the diffusive spin transport in a solid is utilized to find the spin diffusion length and spin relaxation time of CVD graphene. The measured spin relaxation times in CVD graphene were compatible with the values found in the literature. However, they are an order of magnitude shorter than the theoretical values expected in graphene. To investigate possible origins of this order of magnitude shorter spin relaxation time in graphene, crystal and electrical modifications in CVD graphene are studied throughout the entire device fabrication process. Raman spectroscopy is utilized to track CVD graphene

  7. Application of CVD diamonds as dosimeters of soft X-ray emission from plasma sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krása, J.; Juha, L.; Vorlíček, V.; Cejnarová, A.

    2004-05-01

    The thermoluminescent properties of polycrystalline chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond, as free-standing CVD cutting tool material, type CVDITE-CDM (De Beers Company), were studied with respect to its use in the dosimetry of soft X-ray emission from laser-produced plasma. The range of linearity for 5.9-keV radiation was measured to be only two orders of magnitude, ranging from a sensitivity threshold of ˜0.01 to ˜2 Gy. In this linearity range, the sensitivity of CVD diamonds is about 65 times lower than the sensitivity of TLD-100 dosimeters. The unpolished (grained) face of CVD diamonds shows ˜1.5-times higher thermoluminescence (TL) response after irradiation than the polished face, in the high-temperature range, but the polished face shows slightly higher TL response in the low-temperature range. A strong TL sensitivity to the blue portion of the visible light spectrum was measured. Simultaneous irradiation of TLD-100 dosimeters and CVD diamonds by soft X-rays emitted from a laser-produced plasma showed that CVDITE-CDM diamonds can be applied as detectors of intense soft X-ray radiation.

  8. CVD2014-A Database for Evaluating No-Reference Video Quality Assessment Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Nuutinen, Mikko; Virtanen, Toni; Vaahteranoksa, Mikko; Vuori, Tero; Oittinen, Pirkko; Hakkinen, Jukka

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present a new video database: CVD2014-Camera Video Database. In contrast to previous video databases, this database uses real cameras rather than introducing distortions via post-processing, which results in a complex distortion space in regard to the video acquisition process. CVD2014 contains a total of 234 videos that are recorded using 78 different cameras. Moreover, this database contains the observer-specific quality evaluation scores rather than only providing mean opinion scores. We have also collected open-ended quality descriptions that are provided by the observers. These descriptions were used to define the quality dimensions for the videos in CVD2014. The dimensions included sharpness, graininess, color balance, darkness, and jerkiness. At the end of this paper, a performance study of image and video quality algorithms for predicting the subjective video quality is reported. For this performance study, we proposed a new performance measure that accounts for observer variance. The performance study revealed that there is room for improvement regarding the video quality assessment algorithms. The CVD2014 video database has been made publicly available for the research community. All video sequences and corresponding subjective ratings can be obtained from the CVD2014 project page (http://www.helsinki.fi/psychology/groups/visualcognition/). PMID:27164589

  9. Applicability of the Existing CVD Risk Assessment Tools to Type II Diabetics in Oman: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Al-Rawahi, Abdulhakeem; Lee, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Patients with type II diabetes (T2DM) have an elevated risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and it is considered to be a leading cause of morbidity and premature mortality in these patients. Many traditional risk factors such as age, male sex, hypertension, dyslipidemia, glycemic control, diabetes duration, renal dysfunction, obesity, and smoking have been studied and identified as independent factors for CVD. Quantifying the risk of CVD among diabetics using the common risk factors in order to plan the treatment and preventive measures is important in the management of these patients as recommended by many clinical guidelines. Therefore, several risk assessment tools have been developed in different parts of the world for this purpose. These include the tools that have been developed for general populations and considered T2DM as a risk factor, and the tools that have been developed for T2DM populations specifically. However, due to the differences in sociodemographic factors and lifestyle patterns, as well as the differences in the distribution of various CVD risk factors in different diabetic populations, the external applicability of these tools on different populations is questionable. This review aims to address the applicability of the existing CVD risk models to the Omani diabetic population. PMID:26421110

  10. High prevalence of aspirin resistance in elderly patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and hyperhomocysteinaemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huaxin; Chen, Xiuying; Liu, Lin; Fan, Li; Cao, Jian; Li, Xiaoli; Hu, Guoliang; Hu, Yixin; Zhu, Bingpo; Liu, Xianfeng; Gao, Yan; Ma, Cong; Leng, Wenxiu

    2014-01-01

    Although aspirin resistance is well reported in CVD, little is known about aspirin response in elderly patients with hyperhomocysteinaemia. The aim of the present study was to explore the prevalence of aspirin resistance in elderly patients with CVD and hyperhomocysteinaemia. A total of 370 elderly patients with CVD were recruited. The study included 216 patients with hyperhomocysteinaemia and 154 patients with normohomocysteinaemia receiving daily aspirin therapy (≥ 75 mg) over 1 month. The effect of aspirin was assessed using by light transmission aggregometry (LTA). Aspirin resistance was defined as ≥ 20% arachidonic acid induced aggregation according to LTA. Aspirin resistance was defined in 48 (13.0%) of 370 patients. The prevalence of aspirin resistance was higher in hyperhomocysteinaemic patients than normohomocysteinaemic patients (16.7% vs. 7.8%, odds ratio (OR)=2.367; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.188-4.715, p=0.012). In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, hyperhomocysteinaemia (OR=2.406, 95% CI=1.201-4.820, p=0.013) was a significant risk factor for aspirin resistance. A significant number of CVD patients with hyperhomocysteinemia are resistant to aspirin therapy. Hyperhomocysteinemia is a significant risk factor for aspirin resistance in elderly patients with CVD. PMID:24880196

  11. Enhanced cold wall CVD reactor growth of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Wei; Kwak, Eun-Hye; Chen, Bingan; Huang, Shirong; Edwards, Michael; Fu, Yifeng; Jeppson, Kjell; Teo, Kenneth; Jeong, Goo-Hwan; Liu, Johan

    2016-05-01

    HASynthesis of horizontally-aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (HA-SWCNTs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) directly on quartz seems very promising for the fabrication of future nanoelectronic devices. In comparison to hot-wall CVD, synthesis of HA-SWCNTs in a cold-wall CVD chamber not only means shorter heating, cooling and growth periods, but also prevents contamination of the chamber. However, since most synthesis of HA-SWCNTs is performed in hot-wall reactors, adapting this well-established process to a cold-wall chamber becomes extremely crucial. Here, in order to transfer the CVD growth technology from a hot-wall to a cold-wall chamber, a systematic investigation has been conducted to determine the influence of process parameters on the HA-SWCNT's growth. For two reasons, the cold-wall CVD chamber was upgraded with a top heater to complement the bottom substrate heater; the first reason to maintain a more uniform temperature profile during HA-SWCNTs growth, and the second reason to preheat the precursor gas flow before projecting it onto the catalyst. Our results show that the addition of a top heater had a significant effect on the synthesis. Characterization of the CNTs shows that the average density of HA-SWCNTs is around 1 - 2 tubes/ μm with high growth quality as shown by Raman analysis. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  12. Facility Modernization Report

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, D; Ackley, R

    2007-05-10

    Modern and technologically up-to-date facilities and systems infrastructure are necessary to accommodate today's research environment. In response, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has a continuing commitment to develop and apply effective management models and processes to maintain, modernize, and upgrade its facilities to meet the science and technology mission. The Facility Modernization Pilot Study identifies major subsystems of facilities that are either technically or functionally obsolete, lack adequate capacity and/or capability, or need to be modernized or upgraded to sustain current operations and program mission. This study highlights areas that need improvement, system interdependencies, and how these systems/subsystems operate and function as a total productive unit. Although buildings are 'grandfathered' in and are not required to meet current codes unless there are major upgrades, this study also evaluates compliance with 'current' building, electrical, and other codes. This study also provides an evaluation of the condition and overall general appearance of the structure.

  13. Technical planning activity: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    In April 1985, the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Fusion Energy commissioned the Technical Planning Activity (TPA). The purpose of this activity was to develop a technical planning methodology and prepare technical plans in support of the strategic and policy framework of the Magnetic Fusion Program Plan issued by DOE in February 1985. Although this report represents the views of only the US magnetic fusion community, it is international in scope in the sense that the technical plans contained herein describe the full scope of the tasks that are prerequisites for the commercialization of fusion energy. The TPA has developed a well-structured methodology that includes detailed definitions of technical issues, definitions of program areas and elements, statements of research and development objectives, identification of key decision points and milestones, and descriptions of facility requirements.

  14. Effect of current stress during thermal CVD of multilayer graphene on cobalt catalytic layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Kazuyoshi; Ichikawa, Hiroyasu; Uchida, Takaki

    2016-04-01

    To improve the crystallinity of multilayer graphene (MLG) by CVD at a low temperature, the effect of current stress during thermal CVD on a cobalt (Co) catalytic layer was investigated. The crystallinity of MLG obtained by CVD with current was higher than that without current at the same temperature. This indicates that current has effects besides the Joule heating effect. The current effects on the Co catalytic layer and the MLG growth reaction were investigated, and it was found that current had small effects on the grain size and crystal structure of the Co catalyst and large effects on the MLG growth reaction such as large grain growth and a low activation energy of 0.49 eV, which is close to the value reported for carbon surface diffusion on Co. It is considered that the enhancement of MLG growth reaction by current leads to the improved crystallinity of MLG at a relatively low temperature.

  15. Polymer Adsorption on Graphite and CVD Graphene Surfaces Studied by Surface-Specific Vibrational Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Su, Yudan; Han, Hui-Ling; Cai, Qun; Wu, Qiong; Xie, Mingxiu; Chen, Daoyong; Geng, Baisong; Zhang, Yuanbo; Wang, Feng; Shen, Y R; Tian, Chuanshan

    2015-10-14

    Sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy was employed to probe polymer contaminants on chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene and to study alkane and polyethylene (PE) adsorption on graphite. In comparing the spectra from the two surfaces, it was found that the contaminants on CVD graphene must be long-chain alkane or PE-like molecules. PE adsorption from solution on the honeycomb surface results in a self-assembled ordered monolayer with the C-C skeleton plane perpendicular to the surface and an adsorption free energy of ∼42 kJ/mol for PE(H(CH2CH2)nH) with n ≈ 60. Such large adsorption energy is responsible for the easy contamination of CVD graphene by impurity in the polymer during standard transfer processes. Contamination can be minimized with the use of purified polymers free of PE-like impurities. PMID:26367247

  16. iCVD Cyclic Polysiloxane and Polysilazane as Nanoscale Thin-Film Electrolyte: Synthesis and Properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nan; Reeja-Jayan, B; Liu, Andong; Lau, Jonathan; Dunn, Bruce; Gleason, Karen K

    2016-03-01

    A group of crosslinked cyclic siloxane (SiO) and silazane (SiN) polymers are synthesized via solvent-free initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD). Notably, this is the first report of cyclic polysilazanes synthesized via the gas-phase iCVD method. The deposited nanoscale thin films are thermally stable and chemically inert. By iCVD, they can uniformly and conformally cover nonplanar surfaces having complex geometry. Although polysiloxanes are traditionally utilized as dielectric materials and insulators, our research shows these cyclic organosilicon polymers can conduct lithium ions (Li(+) ) at room temperature. The conformal coating and the room temperature ionic conductivity make these cyclic organosilicon polymers attractive for use as thin-film electrolytes in solid-state batteries. Also, their synthesis process and properties have been systemically studied and discussed. PMID:26785633

  17. Microbiota and the nitrogen cycle: Implications in the development and progression of CVD and CKD.

    PubMed

    Briskey, David; Tucker, Patrick S; Johnson, David W; Coombes, Jeff S

    2016-07-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with an increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease (CVD). One factor involved in CVD development is nitric oxide (NO), which acts as a powerful vasodilator. NO is produced via the nitrogen cycle, through the reduction of nitrate to nitrite with the process mainly occurring in the mouth by commensal microbiota. People with CKD have compromised microbiota (dysbiosis) with an increased abundance of potentially pathogenic and pro-inflammatory bacteria capable of producing uremic toxins that contribute to CKD development and reduce enzymatic NO production. However, to date, few studies have comprehensively documented the gut or saliva microbiota in the CKD population or investigated the role of NO in people with CKD. This review will discuss NO pathways that are linked to the progression of CKD and CVD and therapeutic options for targeting these pathways. PMID:27164294

  18. Onset conditions for gas phase reaction and nucleation in the CVD of transition metal oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J.; Rosner, D. E.; Castillo, J.

    1992-01-01

    A combined experimental/theoretical study is presented of the onset conditions for gas phase reaction and particle nucleation in hot substrate/cold gas CVD of transition metal oxides. Homogeneous reaction onset conditions are predicted using a simple high activation energy reacting gas film theory. Experimental tests of the basic theory are underway using an axisymmetric impinging jet CVD reactor. No vapor phase ignition has yet been observed in the TiCl4/O2 system under accessible operating conditions (below substrate temperature Tw = 1700 K). The goal of this research is to provide CVD reactor design and operation guidelines for achieving acceptable deposit microstructures at the maximum deposition rate while simultaneously avoiding homogeneous reaction/nucleation and diffusional limitations.

  19. Epitaxial thin film GaAs solar cells using OM-CVD techniques. [Organometallics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, R. J.; Wang, K. L.; Yeh, Y. C. M.

    1981-01-01

    A new approach has been initiated at JPL to fabricate thin-film, high efficiency GaAs solar cells on low-cost, single-crystal Si substrates having a thin CVD interlayer of Ge to minimize the lattice and thermal expansion mismatch. For initial experiments, n(+)/p GaAs cells were grown by OM-CVD on single-crystal GaAs and Ge wafers. Details of the growths and performance results will be presented. Subsequently, a combined epitaxial structure of OM-CVD GaAs on a strongly adherent Ge interlayer on (100) Si was grown. This is the first report of the successful growth of this composite structure. Low module costs projected by JPL SAMICS methodology calculations and the potential for 400-600W/kg space solar arrays will be discussed.

  20. A direct comparison of CVD-grown and exfoliated MoS2 using optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plechinger, G.; Mann, J.; Preciado, E.; Barroso, D.; Nguyen, A.; Eroms, J.; Schüller, C.; Bartels, L.; Korn, T.

    2014-06-01

    MoS2 is a highly interesting material, which exhibits a crossover from an indirect band gap in the bulk crystal to a direct gap for single layers. Here, we perform a direct comparison between large-area MoS2 films grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and MoS2 flakes prepared by mechanical exfoliation from mineral bulk crystal. Raman spectroscopy measurements show differences between the in-plane and out-of-plane phonon mode positions in CVD-grown and exfoliated MoS2. Photoluminescence (PL) mapping reveals large regions in the CVD-grown films that emit strong PL at room-temperature, and low-temperature PL scans demonstrate a large spectral shift of the A exciton emission as a function of position. Polarization-resolved PL measurements under near-resonant excitation conditions show a strong circular polarization of the PL, corresponding to a valley polarization.

  1. Injection doping of ultrathin microcrystalline silicon films prepared by CC-CVD

    SciTech Connect

    Koynov, S.; Grebner, S.; Schwarz, R.; Vassilev, L.; Sieber, I.; Schmidt, M.; Fuhs, W.

    1997-07-01

    Recently, the authors have proposed a cyclic method, referred to as Closed Chamber CVD (CC-CVD), for the preparation of {micro}c-Si films of high crystalline fraction at increased deposition rates. In this work, they first report new process conditions of CC-CVD, which result in growth of highly crystalline films with a sharp interface on a foreign substrate. Then these conditions are further used together with a pulsed injection of B{sub 2}H{sub 6} in an appropriate moment of each cycle, so that the disturbance of the crystallization process is prevented. A series of ultrathin {micro}c-Si films, doped by this technique, is characterized by conductivity measurements, SEM, Raman Scattering, optical transmission and UV reflection. A strong reduction of the transient interface layer is achieved and conductivity as high as 2 S/cm with an activation energy of 27 meV is reached.

  2. Dietary flavonoid intakes and CVD incidence in the Framingham Offspring Cohort.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Paul F; Cassidy, Aedin; Rogers, Gail; Peterson, Julia J; Dwyer, Johanna T

    2015-11-14

    This study examines the relationship between long-term intake of six flavonoid classes and incidence of CVD and CHD, using a comprehensive flavonoid database and repeated measures of intake, while accounting for possible confounding by components of a healthy dietary pattern. Flavonoid intakes were assessed using a FFQ among the Framingham Offspring Cohort at baseline and three times during follow-up. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to characterise prospective associations between the natural logarithms of flavonoid intakes and CVD incidence using a time-dependent approach, in which intake data were updated at each examination to represent average intakes from previous examinations. Mean baseline age was 54 years, and 45 % of the population was male. Over an average 14·9 years of follow-up among 2880 participants, there were 518 CVD events and 261 CHD events. After multivariable adjustment, only flavonol intake was significantly associated with lower risk of CVD incidence (hazard ratios (HR) per 2·5-fold flavonol increase=0·86, P trend=0·05). Additional adjustment for total fruit and vegetable intake and overall diet quality attenuated this observation (HR=0·89, P trend=0·20 and HR=0·92, P trend=0·33, respectively). There were no significant associations between flavonoids and CHD incidence after multivariable adjustment. Our findings suggest that the observed association between flavonol intake and CVD risk may be a consequence of better overall diet. However, the strength of this non-significant association was also consistent with relative risks observed in previous meta-analyses, and therefore a modest benefit of flavonol intake on CVD risk cannot be ruled out. PMID:26334117

  3. Construction, genotypic and phenotypic characterization, and immunogenicity of attenuated DeltaguaBA Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strain CVD 915.

    PubMed

    Wang, J Y; Pasetti, M F; Noriega, F R; Anderson, R J; Wasserman, S S; Galen, J E; Sztein, M B; Levine, M M

    2001-08-01

    A promising live attenuated typhoid vaccine candidate strain for mucosal immunization was developed by introducing a deletion in the guaBA locus of pathogenic Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi strain Ty2. The resultant DeltaguaBA mutant, serovar Typhi CVD 915, has a gene encoding resistance to arsenite replacing the deleted sequence within guaBA, thereby providing a marker to readily identify the vaccine strain. CVD 915 was compared in in vitro and in vivo assays with wild-type strain Ty2, licensed live oral typhoid vaccine strain Ty21a, or attenuated serovar Typhi vaccine strain CVD 908-htrA (harboring mutations in aroC, aroD, and htrA). CVD 915 was less invasive than CVD 908-htrA in tissue culture and was more crippled in its ability to proliferate after invasion. In mice inoculated intraperitoneally with serovar Typhi and hog gastric mucin (to estimate the relative degree of attenuation), the 50% lethal dose of CVD 915 (7.7 x 10(7) CFU) was significantly higher than that of wild-type Ty2 (1.4 x 10(2) CFU) and was only slightly lower than that of Ty21a (1.9 x 10(8) CFU). Strong serum O and H antibody responses were recorded in mice inoculated intranasally with CVD 915, which were higher than those elicited by Ty21a and similar to those stimulated by CVD 908-htrA. CVD 915 also elicited potent proliferative responses in splenocytes from immunized mice stimulated with serovar Typhi antigens. Used as a live vector, CVD 915(pTETlpp) elicited high titers of serum immunoglobulin G anti-fragment C. These encouraging preclinical data pave the way for phase 1 clinical trials with CVD 915. PMID:11447145

  4. AB006. Erectile dysfunction (ED) as a marker for cardiovascular diseases (CVD)

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Luiz Otavio

    2015-01-01

    In 1973 V. Michal, a vascular surgeon said “Erectile dysfunction (ED) is related to diseases of the vascular bed”. And this makes sense since ED and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) share many risk factors like aging, obesity, inactivity, smoking, depression, dyslipidemia, hypertension, diabetes/insuline resistance. These conditions may lead to an oxidative stress which ultimately can promote vasoconstriction, thrombosis, atherosclerosis and finally ED and CVD. One of the most accepted Idea is that small vessels plug earlier, it means, small arteries when have for example 50% of obstruction will probably have a clinical manifestation before bigger arteries!

  5. System for the growth of bulk SiC crystals by modified CVD techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steckl, Andrew J.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of this program was the development of a SiC CVD growth of films thick enough to be useful as pseudo-substrates. The cold-walled CVD system was designed, assembled, and tested. Extrapolating from preliminary evaluation of SiC films grown in the system at relatively low temperatures indicates that the growth rate at the final temperatures will be high enough to make our approach practical. Modifications of the system to allow high temperature growth and cleaner growth conditions are in progress. This program was jointly funded by Wright Laboratory, Materials Directorate and NASA LeRC and monitored by NASA.

  6. Effects of Operating Conditions on the Deposition of GaAs in a Vertical Cvd Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Jae-Sang; Boo, Jin-Hyo; Kim, Youn-Jea

    A numerical study is needed to gain insight into the growth mechanism and improve the reactor design or optimize the deposition condition in chemical vapor deposition (CVD). In this study, we have performed a numerical analysis of the deposition of gallium arsenide (GaAs) from trimethyl gallium (TMG) and arsine in a vertical CVD reactor. The effects of operating parameters, such as the rotation velocity of susceptor, inlet velocity, and inlet TMG fraction, are investigated and presented. The three-dimensional model which is used in this investigation includes complete coupling between the thermal-fluid transport and species transport with chemical reaction.

  7. Physics and applications of novel structures with CVD graphene: edges, grain boundaries, twisted bilayers, and hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong P.

    2014-03-01

    In this talk, I will discuss experimental studies (including electronic transport, optical/Raman, and STM) of physical properties of various novel synthetic graphene structures formed in CVD graphene grown on Cu, including edges of graphene single crystals, grain boundaries between such single crystals, and twisted bilayer graphene. Such synthetic graphene structures could be used as playground to explore novel physics and engineer new functionalities in graphene based electronic devices. Furthermore, I will discuss graphene based ``hybrid'' materials combining CVD graphene with semiconductor and metallic nanostructures for potential optoelectronic and plasmonics applications.

  8. A numerical and experimental analysis of reactor performance and deposition rates for CVD on monofilaments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Kuczmarski, M.; Veitch, L.; Tsui, P.; Chait, A.

    1990-01-01

    The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT is adopted to simulate a cylindrical upflow reactor designed for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on monofilaments. Equilibrium temperature profiles along the fiber and quartz reactor wall are experimentally measured and used as boundary conditions in numerical simulations. Two-dimensional axisymmetric flow and temperature fields are calculated for hydrogen and argon; the effect of free convection is assessed. The gas and surface chemistry is included for predicting silicon deposition from silane. The model predictions are compared with experimentally measured silicon CVD rates. Inferences are made for optimum conditions to obtain uniformity.

  9. Raman spectroscopic investigation of polycrystalline structures of CVD-grown graphene by isotope labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shengnan; Suzuki, Satoru; Hibino, Hiroki

    2014-10-01

    Topological defects, such as point defects, dislocations and grain boundaries, have a dramatic influence on the chemical and physical properties of large-scale graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Here we demonstrate the Raman visualization of polycrystalline structures in an isotopically modified CVD graphene. By means of the reversible reaction of methane on a copper catalyst, the etching of 12C-lattice and surface deposition of 13C-atoms occur in CVD graphene by sequentially introducing hydrogen and isotopic methane after standard growth of graphene with full monolayer coverage. Spatial Raman spectroscopic mapping on labeled graphene reveals pronounced network-like 13C-rich regions, which are further identified to exist along the grain boundaries of graphene by low-energy electron microscopy. The structural defects inside the graphene grains are also targeted in the isotope labeling process. Our work opens a new way to investigate multiple grain structures in CVD graphene with a simple spectroscopic technique.Topological defects, such as point defects, dislocations and grain boundaries, have a dramatic influence on the chemical and physical properties of large-scale graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Here we demonstrate the Raman visualization of polycrystalline structures in an isotopically modified CVD graphene. By means of the reversible reaction of methane on a copper catalyst, the etching of 12C-lattice and surface deposition of 13C-atoms occur in CVD graphene by sequentially introducing hydrogen and isotopic methane after standard growth of graphene with full monolayer coverage. Spatial Raman spectroscopic mapping on labeled graphene reveals pronounced network-like 13C-rich regions, which are further identified to exist along the grain boundaries of graphene by low-energy electron microscopy. The structural defects inside the graphene grains are also targeted in the isotope labeling process. Our work opens a new

  10. Hot-Wire CVD Amorphous Si Materials for Solar Cell Application

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films and their application to solar cells fabricated using the hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) or (CAT)-CVD will be reviewed. This review will focus on the comparison to the standard plasma enhance (PE) CVD in the terms of deposition technique, film properties, and solar cell performance. The advantages of using HWCVD for a-Si:H solar cell research as well as the criteria for industry's adaptation of this technique for mass production will be addressed.

  11. Temperature threshold and water role in CVD growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Junfeng; Motta, Marcelo; Angels, Volker; Luo, Jikui; Johnson, Brian

    2016-02-01

    An in-depth understanding of the growth process of single walled carbon nanotubes is of vital importance to the control of the yield of the material and its carbon structure. Using a nickel/silica (Ni/SiOx) catalyst we have conducted a series of growth experiments with a chemical vapour deposition (CVD) system. We find that there is a temperature threshold in the CVD process, and if the reaction temperature sets above this threshold there will be no growth of the nanotubes. In association with this temperature effect, water plays an important role in the promotion or termination of the growth of single walled carbon nanotubes.

  12. Technical Guid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanasescu, F. T.; Stanciu, V.; Nitu, V.; Nitu, C.

    The book contains the most important informations from Physics,Mechanics,Heat,Electromagnetism, Nuclear Physics as well as tables with values for physical and technical Quantities. The book is designed especially for engineers, but could be useful for physicists

  13. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    drucker, jeff

    2014-08-18

    This project investigated the fundamental science of nanowire epitaxy using vapor-liquid-solid growth in the silicon-germanium material system. Ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHV CVD) was the primary deposition method. Nanowires grown using UHV CVD were characterized ex situ using scanning electron microscopy and a variety of transmission electron microscopy techniques. In situ transmission electron microscopy was also employed to monitor growth in real time and was instrumental in elucidating growth mechanisms.

  14. 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (TEDF) Hazards Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    CAMPBELL, L.R.

    1999-01-15

    This document establishes the technical basis in support of emergency planning activities for the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The technical basis for project-specific Emergency Action Levels and Emergency Planning Zone is demonstrated.

  15. Proton beam therapy facility

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-09

    It is proposed to build a regional outpatient medical clinic at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), Batavia, Illinois, to exploit the unique therapeutic characteristics of high energy proton beams. The Fermilab location for a proton therapy facility (PTF) is being chosen for reasons ranging from lower total construction and operating costs and the availability of sophisticated technical support to a location with good access to patients from the Chicago area and from the entire nation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 26 tabs.

  16. Evaluation of tubular ceramic heat exchanger materials in acidic coal ash from coal-oil-mixture combustion. [Sialon; alumina; CVD, sintered, and siliconized SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Ferber, M.K.; Tennery, V.J.

    1981-12-01

    Tubes of five ceramic materials were exposed to the hot combustion gases from a coal-oil-mixture (COM) fuel in the Ceramic Recuperator Analysis Facility (CRAF) at about 1200/sup 0/C for about 500 h. Siliconized SiC, sintered ..cap alpha..-SiC, and chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC survived the long-term exposure with no major visible degradation. The alumina and sialon tubes were cracked extensively. Acidic coal slag deposited extensively on the upstream surface of all tubes. During cooldown, the slag did not strongly bond to any of the silicon carbide tubes, but a strong bond was developed with the alumina and sialon tubes. The silicon carbides corroded by a micropitting oxidation at the carbide-slag interface. The SiC and Si phases of siliconized SiC corroded at essentially the same rate. Exposure to hot coal slag increased the room-temperature helium permeability of all the SiC-based tubes. For KT and CVD SiC, both upstream and downstream sides exhibited expansion increases up to about 17% at 1000/sup 0/C. Sintered ..cap alpha..-SiC had much smaller increases. Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ had an expansion increase of about 14% on the upstream side at 1000/sup 0/C but the downstream side was unchanged. 65 figures, 22 tables.

  17. Independent technical review, handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    Purpose Provide an independent engineering review of the major projects being funded by the Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. The independent engineering review will address questions of whether the engineering practice is sufficiently developed to a point where a major project can be executed without significant technical problems. The independent review will focus on questions related to: (1) Adequacy of development of the technical base of understanding; (2) Status of development and availability of technology among the various alternatives; (3) Status and availability of the industrial infrastructure to support project design, equipment fabrication, facility construction, and process and program/project operation; (4) Adequacy of the design effort to provide a sound foundation to support execution of project; (5) Ability of the organization to fully integrate the system, and direct, manage, and control the execution of a complex major project.

  18. Writer's Guide for technical procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    A primary objective throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex is that operations be conducted in a deliberate and controlled manner with emphasis upon recognition and maintenance of the facility-specific safety envelope. One critical element of maintaining the safety envelope is procedures. DOE is providing guidance through this and other writer's guides to assist procedure writers across the DOE complex in producing accurate, complete, and usable procedures that promote safe and efficient operations in keeping with such DOE Orders as 5480.19, Conduct of Operations for DOE Facilities'', 5480.5, Safety of Nuclear facilities'', and 5480.6, Safety of Department of Energy-Owned Nuclear Reactors''. This Writer's Guide addresses the content, format, and style of technical procedures (procedures that prescribe production, operation of equipment and facilities, and maintenance activities) and is intended to be applied in a manner appropriate to the individual facility, 15 refs.

  19. A beam radiation monitor based on CVD diamonds for SuperB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardarelli, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.

    2013-08-01

    Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond particle detectors are in use in the CERN experiments at LHC and at particle accelerator laboratories in Europe, USA and Japan mainly as beam monitors. Nowadays it is considered a proven technology with a very fast signal read-out and a very high radiation tolerance suitable for measurements in high radiation environment zones i.e. near the accelerators beam pipes. The specific properties of CVD diamonds make them a prime candidate for measuring single particles as well as high-intensity particle cascades, for timing measurements on the sub-nanosecond scale and for beam protection systems in hostile environments. A single-crystalline CVD (scCVD) diamond sensor, read out with a new generation of fast and high transition frequency SiGe bipolar transistor amplifiers, has been tested for an application as radiation monitor to safeguard the silicon vertex tracker in the SuperB detector from excessive radiation damage, cumulative dose and instantaneous dose rates. Test results with 5.5 MeV alpha particles from a 241Am radioactive source and from electrons from a 90Sr radioactive source are presented in this paper.

  20. Recent Advances in High-Growth Rate Single-Crystal CVD Diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Q.; Yan, C; Meng, Y; Lai, J; Krasnicki, S; Mao, H; Hemley, R

    2009-01-01

    There have been important advances in microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) of large single-crystal CVD diamond at high growth rates and applications of this diamond. The types of gas chemistry and growth conditions, including microwave power, pressure, and substrate surface temperatures, have been varied to optimize diamond quality and growth rates. The diamond has been characterized by a variety of spectroscopic and diffraction techniques. We have grown single-crystal CVD diamond over ten carats and above 1 cm in thickness at growth rates of 50-100 {micro}m/h. Colorless and near colorless single crystals up to two carats have been produced by further optimizing the process. The nominal Vickers fracture toughness of this high-growth rate diamond can be tuned to exceed 20 MPa m{sup 1/2} in comparison to 5-10 MPa m{sup 1/2} for conventional natural and CVD diamond. Post-growth high-pressure/high-temperature (HPHT) and low-pressure/high-temperature (LPHT) annealing have been carried out to alter the optical, mechanical, and electronic properties. Most recently, single-crystal CVD diamond has been successfully annealed by LPHT methods without graphitization up to 2200 C and < 300 Torr for periods of time ranging from a fraction of minute to a few hours. Significant changes observed in UV, visible, infrared, and photoluminescence spectra are attributed to changes in various vacancy centers and extended defects.

  1. Control of Reaction Surface in Low Temperature CVD to Enhance Nucleation and Conformal Coverage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Navneet

    2009-01-01

    The Holy Grail in CVD community is to find precursors that can afford the following: good nucleation on a desired substrate and conformal deposition in high AR features. Good nucleation is not only necessary for getting ultra-thin films at low thicknesses; it also offers films that are smooth at higher thickness values. On the other hand,…

  2. Hexagonal Boron Nitride assisted transfer and encapsulation of large area CVD graphene.

    PubMed

    Shautsova, Viktoryia; Gilbertson, Adam M; Black, Nicola C G; Maier, Stefan A; Cohen, Lesley F

    2016-01-01

    We report a CVD hexagonal boron nitride (hBN-) assisted transfer method that enables a polymer-impurity free transfer process and subsequent top encapsulation of large-area CVD-grown graphene. We demonstrate that the CVD hBN layer that is utilized in this transfer technique acts as a buffer layer between the graphene film and supporting polymer layer. We show that the resulting graphene layers possess lower doping concentration, and improved carrier mobilities compared to graphene films produced by conventional transfer methods onto untreated SiO2/Si, SAM-modified and hBN covered SiO2/Si substrates. Moreover, we show that the top hBN layer used in the transfer process acts as an effective top encapsulation resulting in improved stability to ambient exposure. The transfer method is applicable to other CVD-grown 2D materials on copper foils, thereby facilitating the preparation of van der Waals heterostructures with controlled doping. PMID:27443219

  3. Far-ultraviolet and visible light scatter measurements for CVD SiC mirrors for SOHO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leviton, Douglas B.; Saha, Timo T.; Gardner, Larry D.

    1998-12-01

    Chemically-vapor-deposited (CVD) silicon carbide (SiC) has become a popular mirror material for spaceborne solar instrumentation for the vacuum ultraviolet wavelength range due to its appreciable broadband reflectance and favorable thermal and opto-mechanical properties. Scatter from surfaces of mirrors operating in this wavelength range can destroy otherwise good image contrast especially for extended targets such as the sun. While valid far ultraviolet (FUV) scatter measurements are entirely non-trivial to conduct and so are rarely performed, visible light scatter measurements are comparatively easy. Unfortunately, it is not straightforward to predict FUV scatter performance based on visible light scatter measurements for mirrors made of CVD SiC. It is hoped that by carrying out scatter measurements in both wavelength regimes for the same CVD SiC mirror, that the ability to make such predictions may be enhanced. Visible light (633 nm) scatter measurements were performed at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) by two different means on CVD SiC telescope mirrors (from the same process and same vendor) for two instruments on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) - - the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) and Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER). Additionally, extensive FUV scatter measurements were made for SUMER telescope mirrors. In this paper, we correlate the results for those FUV and visible light scatter measurements for this important material.

  4. Evidence for CVD 103-HgR as an effective single-dose oral cholera vaccine.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Sarah S; Chen, Wilbur H

    2015-01-01

    We propose the ideal oral cholera vaccine (OCV) should be an inexpensive, single, oral dose that rapidly confers immunity for a long duration, and is well tolerated by individuals vulnerable to cholera. Vaccine trials in industrialized countries of a single oral dose of 5 × 10(8) colony forming units (CFU) of the live, attenuated cholera strain CVD 103-HgR have shown 88-97% serum vibriocidal antibody seroconversion rates, a correlate of protection and documented vaccine efficacy of ≥80% using volunteer challenge studies with wild-type cholera. For individuals of developing countries, a 5 × 10(9) CFU dose of CVD 103-HgR is necessary to elicit similar antibody responses. Presently, a reformulation of CVD 103-HgR is in late-stage clinical development for prospective US FDA licensure; making a cholera vaccine for US travelers potentially accessible in 2016. The availability of CVD 103-HgR should be a welcome addition to the currently available OCVs. PMID:26228388

  5. Effect of N2O on high-rate homoepitaxial growth of CVD single crystal diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.; Li, H. D.; Cheng, S. H.; Zhang, Q.; Wang, Q. L.; Lv, X. Y.; Zou, G. T.; Pei, X. Q.; Xie, J. G.

    2012-07-01

    Various gases such as N2, O2, and CO2 have been introduced in the typical reaction atmosphere of CH4/H2 and proposed to improve the growth of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) single-crystal diamonds (SCDs). In this paper, we study the influence of a new adding gas nitrous oxide (N2O) on the growth rate, morphology, and optical properties of homoepitaxy (100) CVD SCDs. The reaction pressure (H2/CH4 flow rates) was fixed at 300 Torr (750/90 in sccm) with the addition of a small amount of N2O gas varied at flow rates of 0, 2, 5, 8 and 10 sccm. With the appropriate addition of N2O, the growth rate was increased up to 135 μm/h and the surface roughness was decreased to around 2 nm. Furthermore, adding N2O is favorable for inhibiting the generation of large anti-pyramidal pits on the top surface of SCDs, which generally appeared in the products synthesized in CH4/H2 ambient. The combined effect of the nitrogen- and oxygen-related radicals decomposed from N2O on the growth and properties of the CVD SCDs is discussed. As a result, the addition of N2O provides a new route to realize high-rate growth CVD SCDs instead of the traditional nitrogen.

  6. Highly Crystalline CVD-grown Multilayer MoSe2 Thin Film Transistor for Fast Photodetector

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Chulseung; Kim, Seung Min; Moon, Hyunseong; Han, Gyuchull; Kwon, Junyeon; Hong, Young Ki; Omkaram, Inturu; Yoon, Youngki; Kim, Sunkook; Park, Jozeph

    2015-01-01

    Hexagonal molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2) multilayers were grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A relatively high pressure (>760 Torr) was used during the CVD growth to achieve multilayers by creating multiple nuclei based on the two-dimensional crystal growth model. Our CVD-grown multilayer MoSe2 thin-film transistors (TFTs) show p-type-dominant ambipolar behaviors, which are attributed to the formation of Se vacancies generated at the decomposition temperature (650 °C) after the CVD growth for 10 min. Our MoSe2 TFT with a reasonably high field-effect mobility (10 cm2/V · s) exhibits a high photoresponsivity (93.7 A/W) and a fast photoresponse time (τrise ~ 0.4 s) under the illumination of light, which demonstrates the practical feasibility of multilayer MoSe2 TFTs for photodetector applications. PMID:26477744

  7. Raman spectroscopic investigation of polycrystalline structures of CVD-grown graphene by isotope labeling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shengnan; Suzuki, Satoru; Hibino, Hiroki

    2014-11-21

    Topological defects, such as point defects, dislocations and grain boundaries, have a dramatic influence on the chemical and physical properties of large-scale graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Here we demonstrate the Raman visualization of polycrystalline structures in an isotopically modified CVD graphene. By means of the reversible reaction of methane on a copper catalyst, the etching of (12)C-lattice and surface deposition of (13)C-atoms occur in CVD graphene by sequentially introducing hydrogen and isotopic methane after standard growth of graphene with full monolayer coverage. Spatial Raman spectroscopic mapping on labeled graphene reveals pronounced network-like (13)C-rich regions, which are further identified to exist along the grain boundaries of graphene by low-energy electron microscopy. The structural defects inside the graphene grains are also targeted in the isotope labeling process. Our work opens a new way to investigate multiple grain structures in CVD graphene with a simple spectroscopic technique. PMID:25303722

  8. Hexagonal Boron Nitride assisted transfer and encapsulation of large area CVD graphene

    PubMed Central

    Shautsova, Viktoryia; Gilbertson, Adam M.; Black, Nicola C. G.; Maier, Stefan A.; Cohen, Lesley F.

    2016-01-01

    We report a CVD hexagonal boron nitride (hBN-) assisted transfer method that enables a polymer-impurity free transfer process and subsequent top encapsulation of large-area CVD-grown graphene. We demonstrate that the CVD hBN layer that is utilized in this transfer technique acts as a buffer layer between the graphene film and supporting polymer layer. We show that the resulting graphene layers possess lower doping concentration, and improved carrier mobilities compared to graphene films produced by conventional transfer methods onto untreated SiO2/Si, SAM-modified and hBN covered SiO2/Si substrates. Moreover, we show that the top hBN layer used in the transfer process acts as an effective top encapsulation resulting in improved stability to ambient exposure. The transfer method is applicable to other CVD-grown 2D materials on copper foils, thereby facilitating the preparation of van der Waals heterostructures with controlled doping. PMID:27443219

  9. Towards a general growth model for graphene CVD on transition metal catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Weatherup, Robert S.; Braeuninger-Weimer, Philipp; Caneva, Sabina; Hofmann, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of graphene on three polycrystalline transition metal catalysts, Co, Ni and Cu, is systematically compared and a first-order growth model is proposed which can serve as a reference to optimize graphene growth on any elemental or alloy catalyst system. Simple thermodynamic considerations of carbon solubility are insufficient to capture even basic growth behaviour on these most commonly used catalyst materials, and it is shown that kinetic aspects such as carbon permeation have to be taken into account. Key CVD process parameters are discussed in this context and the results are anticipated to be highly useful for the design of future strategies for integrated graphene manufacture.The chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of graphene on three polycrystalline transition metal catalysts, Co, Ni and Cu, is systematically compared and a first-order growth model is proposed which can serve as a reference to optimize graphene growth on any elemental or alloy catalyst system. Simple thermodynamic considerations of carbon solubility are insufficient to capture even basic growth behaviour on these most commonly used catalyst materials, and it is shown that kinetic aspects such as carbon permeation have to be taken into account. Key CVD process parameters are discussed in this context and the results are anticipated to be highly useful for the design of future strategies for integrated graphene manufacture. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. S1. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06873h

  10. Hexagonal Boron Nitride assisted transfer and encapsulation of large area CVD graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shautsova, Viktoryia; Gilbertson, Adam M.; Black, Nicola C. G.; Maier, Stefan A.; Cohen, Lesley F.

    2016-07-01

    We report a CVD hexagonal boron nitride (hBN-) assisted transfer method that enables a polymer-impurity free transfer process and subsequent top encapsulation of large-area CVD-grown graphene. We demonstrate that the CVD hBN layer that is utilized in this transfer technique acts as a buffer layer between the graphene film and supporting polymer layer. We show that the resulting graphene layers possess lower doping concentration, and improved carrier mobilities compared to graphene films produced by conventional transfer methods onto untreated SiO2/Si, SAM-modified and hBN covered SiO2/Si substrates. Moreover, we show that the top hBN layer used in the transfer process acts as an effective top encapsulation resulting in improved stability to ambient exposure. The transfer method is applicable to other CVD-grown 2D materials on copper foils, thereby facilitating the preparation of van der Waals heterostructures with controlled doping.

  11. Antioxidant Status before and after Dietary Intervention in Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Patients.

    PubMed

    Karajibani, M; Hashemi, M; Montazerifar, F; Dikshit, M

    2010-12-01

    There is some evidence showing an inverse correlation between dietary sources including natural antioxidant vitamins and the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of dietary antioxidants on oxidative stress in CVD patients. This study was carried out on 31 CVD patients and 63 healthy individuals. Nutritional status and dietary antioxidant vitamins were assessed by 48-hour recall. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities as well as the levels of vitamins A, E, C, total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were determined before and after serving fresh fruits and vegetables for 3 months. Before intervention intake, levels of vitamins A, E and C were significantly lower in patients than in normal individuals (P<0.001). The serum levels of vitamins A, E and C were significantly lower in the cases than in the control subjects. After intervention, the serum levels of vitamins A, E and C were increased significantly (P<0.0001). Similarly, the levels of TAC as well as the activities of SOD and GPx were found to increase by end of 3 months. In addition, a significant increase of TAC and a decrease in MDA levels were observed. In conclusion, the findings show that dietary supplementation improves the antioxidant defense system in CVD patients. PMID:22691986

  12. CVD of SiC and AlN using cyclic organometallic precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Interrante, L. V.; Larkin, D. J.; Amato, C.

    1992-01-01

    The use of cyclic organometallic molecules as single-source MOCVD precursors is illustrated by means of examples taken from our recent work on AlN and SiC deposition, with particular focus on SiC. Molecules containing (AlN)3 and (SiC)2 rings as the 'core structure' were employed as the source materials for these studies. The organoaluminum amide, (Me2AlNH2)3, was used as the AlN source and has been studied in a molecular beam sampling apparatus in order to determine the gas phase species present in a hot-wall CVD reactor environment. In the case of SiC CVD, a series of disilacyclobutanes (Si(XX')CH2)2 (with X and X' = H, CH3, and CH2SiH2CH3), were examined in a cold-wall, hot-stage CVD reactor in order to compare their relative reactivities and prospective utility as single-source CVD precursors. The parent compound, disilacyclobutane, (SiH2CH2)2, was found to exhibit the lowest deposition temperature (ca. 670 C) and to yield the highest purity SiC films. This precursor gave a highly textured, polycrystalline film on the Si(100) substrates.

  13. Advanced Synthesis of Spinnable MWCNT Forests by RF-Induction Heating Enhanced CVD Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhidov, Anvar; Holmes, William; UTD Solarno Team; Solarno UTD Team

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate here an advanced method to effectively grow tall multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) vertically oriented forests which are highly spinnable. Heating of the Fe catalyst is achieved extremely fast by RF induction heating using coils outside the quartz tube. This method and the new apparatus designed and presented in this paper allow separate control over the temperature of the substrate and the temperature of the incoming gases. In addition to temperature control, the fast T-ramping of the substrate preserves the catalyst nanoclusters from Ostwald ripening and other growth quenching effects such as carbon overgrowth of the catalyst. We show that the parametric sweet spot or bell curve of substrate spinnability can be increased significantly with this improved RF-CVD method. The catalyst nanoclusters also show a wide band of density arrangements that very positively effect spinnability and the drawing ratio. Drawing ratios can vary from 2 meters to 12 meters of sheets drawn from only 1cm of forest. RF-CVD method allows to grow fast (in several minuts) higher CNT forests at higher temperature of synthesis up to 800 K, and obtain dry-spinable CNTs, Characterization results of the samples created in the newRF-CVD system will be presented and compared to previous CNT sheet samples by conventional three-zone resistive heating CVD to measure the extent of property improvements of the CNT sheets and forests. Specifics of the experimental system will be addressed in detail and future property improvements and applications explored.

  14. The relationship between Lp(a) and CVD outcomes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Carol A; Quek, Ruben G W; Deshpande, Sohan; Worthy, Gill; Wolff, Robert; Stirk, Lisa; Kleijnen, Jos; Gandra, Shravanthi R; Djedjos, Stephen; Wong, Nathan D

    2016-01-01

    Robust associations between lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] and CVD outcomes among general populations have been published in previous studies. However, associations in high risk primary prevention and secondary prevention populations are less well defined. In order to investigate this further, a systematic review was performed including prospective studies, which assessed the relationship between Lp(a) and CVD outcomes using multivariable analyses. Additional information was gathered on Lp(a) assays, multivariable modelling and population characteristics. Literature searches from inception up to December 2015 retrieved 2850 records. From these 60 studies were included. Across 39 primary prevention studies in the general population (hazard ratios ranged from 1.16 to 2.97) and seven high risk primary prevention studies (hazard ratios ranged from 1.01 to 3.7), there was evidence of a statistically significant relationship between increased Lp(a) and an increased risk of future CVD. Results in 14 studies of secondary prevention populations were also suggestive of a modest statistically significant relationship (hazard ratios ranged from 0.75 to 3.7).Therefore current evidence would suggest that increased Lp(a) levels are associated with modest increases in the risk of future CVD events in both general and higher risk populations. However, further studies are required to confirm these findings. PMID:27184891

  15. Low temperature CVD growth of ultrathin carbon films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao; Wu, Peng; Gan, Wei; Habib, Muhammad; Xu, Weiyu; Fang, Qi; Song, Li

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate the low temperature, large area growth of ultrathin carbon films by chemical vapor deposition under atmospheric pressure on various substrates. In particularly, uniform and continuous carbon films with the thickness of 2-5 nm were successfully grown at a temperature as low as 500 oC on copper foils, as well as glass substrates coated with a 100 nm thick copper layer. The characterizations revealed that the low-temperature-grown carbon films consist on few short, curved graphene layers and thin amorphous carbon films. Particularly, the low-temperature grown samples exhibited over 90% transmittance at a wavelength range of 400-750 nm and comparable sheet resistance in contrast with the 1000oC-grown one. This low-temperature growth method may offer a facile way to directly prepare visible ultrathin carbon films on various substrate surfaces that are compatible with temperatures (500-600oC) used in several device processing technologies.

  16. 44. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. CAPE COD AIR STATION PAVE PAWS FACILITY - BUILDING ELEVATION WITH BUILDING METAL SIDING BEING APPLIED ON "B" FACE. - Cape Cod Air Station, Technical Facility-Scanner Building & Power Plant, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  17. RETROFITTING CONTROL FACILITIES FOR WET-WEATHER FLOW TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Available technologies were evaluated to demonstrate the technical feasibility and cost effectiveness of retrofitting existing facilities to handle wet-weather flow. Cost/benefit relationships were also compared to construction of new conventional control and treatment facilities...

  18. Health Facilities

    MedlinePlus

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, ... psychiatric care centers. When you choose a health facility, you might want to consider How close it ...

  19. Why simulations of colour for CVD observers might not be what they seem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Phil

    2015-01-01

    A common task in universal design is to create a 'simulation' of the appearance of a colour image as it appears to a CVD observer. Although such simulations are useful in illustrating the particular problems that a CVD observer has in discriminating between colours in an image, it may not be reasonable to assume that such a simulation accurately conveys the experience of the CVD observer to an observer with normal vision. Two problems with this assumption are discussed here. First, it risks confusing appearance with sensation. A colour appearance model can more or less accurately predict the change in appearance of a colour when it is viewed under different conditions, but does not define the actual sensation. Such a sensation cannot be directly communicated but merely located on a scale with other related sensations. In practice we avoid this epistemological problem by asking observers to judge colour matches, relations and differences, none of which requires examination of the sensation itself. Since we do not truly know what sensation a normal observer experiences, it seems unscientific to suppose that we can do so for CVD observers. Secondly, and following from the above, the relation between stimulus and corresponding sensation is established as part of neural development during infancy, and while we can determine the stimulus we cannot readily determine what sensation the stimulus is mapped to, or what the available range of sensations is for a given observer. It is suggested that a similar range of sensations could be available to CVD observers as to normal observers.

  20. Blood glucose may be an alternative to cholesterol in CVD risk prediction charts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Established risk models for the prediction of cardiovascular disease (CVD) include blood pressure, smoking and cholesterol parameters. The use of total cholesterol for CVD risk prediction has been questioned, particularly for primary prevention. We evaluated whether glucose could be used instead of total cholesterol for prediction of fatal CVD using data with long follow-up. Methods We followed-up 6,095 men and women aged ≥16 years who participated 1977-79 in a community based health study and were anonymously linked with the Swiss National Cohort until the end of 2008. During follow-up, 727 participants died of CVD. Based on the ESC SCORE methodology (Weibull regression), we used age, sex, blood pressure, smoking, and fasting glucose or total cholesterol. The mean Brier score (BS), area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) were used for model comparison. We validated our models internally using cross-validation and externally using another data set. Results In our models, the p-value of total cholesterol was 0.046, that of glucose was p < 0.001. The model with glucose had a slightly better predictive capacity (BS: 2216x10-5 vs. 2232x10-5; AUC: 0.9181 vs. 0.9169, IDI: 0.009 with p-value 0.026) and could well discriminate the overall risk of persons with high and low concentrations. The external validation confirmed these findings. Conclusions Our study suggests that instead of total cholesterol glucose can be used in models predicting overall CVD mortality risk. PMID:23351551

  1. Cold Vacuum Drying facility deionized water system design description (SYS 25)

    SciTech Connect

    PITKOFF, C.C.

    1999-07-02

    This document describes the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) de-ionized water system. The de-ionized water system is used to provide clean, conditioned water, free from contaminants, chlorides and iron for the CVD Facility. Potable water is supplied to the deionized water system, isolated by a backflow prevention device. After the de-ionization process is complete, via a packaged de-ionization unit, de-ionized water is supplied to the process deionization unit.

  2. Technical Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Carol A.

    This manuscript provides information and problems for teaching mathematics to vocational education students. Problems reflect applications of mathematical concepts to specific technical areas. The materials are organized into six chapters. Chapter 1 covers basic arithmetic, including fractions, decimals, ratio and proportions, percentages, and…

  3. Chlordane (Technical)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chlordane ( Technical ) ; CASRN 12789 - 03 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarc

  4. A TRAINING INSTITUTE FOR TEACHERS OF TECHNICAL PROGRAMS IN AGRICULTURE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Cobleskill. Agricultural and Technical Coll.

    A TRAINING INSTITUTE WAS HELD FOR TEACHERS OF TECHNICAL PROGRAMS IN AGRICULTURE IN WHICH SPEAKERS AND DISCUSSION GROUPS EXPLORED AND EXPLAINED (1) THE NEED FOR TECHNICAL EDUCATION IN AGRICULTURE, (2) FACILITIES NECESSARY FOR SUCH INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS, (3) FACULTY REQUIREMENTS FOR TEACHING COURSES IN THE TECHNICAL FIELDS OF AGRICULTURE, (4)…

  5. A facile process to achieve hysteresis-free and fully stabilized graphene field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Ji; Lee, Young Gon; Jung, Ukjin; Lee, Sangchul; Lee, Sang Kyung; Lee, Byoung Hun

    2015-03-01

    The operation of chemical vapor-deposited (CVD) graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs) is highly sensitive to environmental factors such as the substrate, polymer residues, ambient condition, and other species adsorbed on the graphene surface due to their high defect density. As a result, CVD GFETs often exhibit a large hysteresis and time-dependent instability. These problems become a major roadblock in the systematic study of graphene devices. We report a facile process to alleviate these problems, which can be used to fabricate stable high performance CVD GFETs with symmetrical current-voltage (I-V) characteristics and an effective carrier mobility over 6000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). This process combined a few steps of processes in sequence including pre-annealing in a vacuum, depositing a passivation layer, and the final annealing in a vacuum, and eliminated ∼50% of charging sources primarily originating from water reduction reactions. PMID:25672592

  6. Vocational and Technical Education: Development of Curricula, Instructional Materials, Physical Facilities and Teacher Training with Focus on Electrical and Electronic Subjects. Asian Programme of Educational Innovation for Development. Report of a Technical Working Group Meeting (Adelaide, Australia, October 6-18, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and the Pacific.

    This report contains summaries and syntheses of materials from the Technical Working Group Meeting for curriculum planning and instructional materials design for vocational and technical education. Chapter 1 gives an overview of the objectives and procedures of the meeting and lists the participants. In chapter 2 are presented summaries of the…

  7. Technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Fugazzotto, P A

    1999-01-01

    Appropriately applied, guided tissue regeneration (GTR) therapy is an important addition to the clinician's treatment armamentarium. However, GTR therapy is highly technique-sensitive, and failure to understand and manage the subtleties of treatment will significantly diminish therapeutic results. This article discusses the technical prerequisites for successful application of GTR therapy to infrabony defects and periodontally involved furcations for maximization of treatment results. PMID:11360324

  8. Life Sciences Centrifuge Facility review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Laurence R.

    1994-01-01

    The Centrifuge Facility Project at ARC was reviewed by a code U team to determine appropriateness adequacy for the ISSA. This report represents the findings of one consultant to this team and concentrates on scientific and technical risks. This report supports continuation of the project to the next phase of development.

  9. Enhancement of the Electrical Properties of CVD-Grown Graphene with Ascorbic Acid Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Chunmiao; Chen, Zhiying; Zhang, Haoran; Zhang, Yaqian; Zhang, Yanhui; Sui, Yanping; Yu, Guanghui; Cao, Yijiang

    2016-02-01

    Ascorbic acid was used to modify to chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-grown graphene films transferred onto SiO2 substrate. Residual polymer (polymethyl methacrylate), Fe3+, Cl-, H2O, and O2 affected the electrical and thermal properties on graphene during the transfer or device fabrication processes. Exposure of transferred graphene to ascorbic acid resulted in significantly enhanced electrical properties with increased charge carrier mobility. All devices exhibited more than 30% improvement in room temperature carrier mobility in air. The carrier mobility of the treated graphene did not significantly decrease in 21 days. This result can be attributed to electron donation to graphene through the -OH functional group in ascorbic acid that is absorbed in graphene. This work provides a method to enhance the electrical properties of CVD-grown graphene.

  10. Photo-oxidation of Polymers Synthesized by Plasma and Initiated CVD

    SciTech Connect

    Baxamusa, Salmaan H.; Suresh, Aravind; Ehrmann, Paul; Laurence, Ted; Hanania, Jiries; Hayes, Jeff; Harley, Stephen; Burkey, Daniel D.

    2015-11-09

    Plasma polymers are often limited by their susceptibility to spontaneous and photo-oxidation. We show that the unusual photoluminescence (PL) behavior of a plasma polymer of trans-2-butene is correlated with its photoluminescence strength. These photo-processes occur under blue light illumination (λ=405 nm), distinguishing them from traditional ultraviolet degradation of polymers. These photo-active defects are likely formed during the plasma deposition process and we show that a polymer synthesized using initiated (i)CVD, non-plasma method, has 1000× lower PL signal and enhanced photo-stability. In conclusion, non-plasma methods such as iCVD may therefore be a route to overcoming material aging issues that limit the adoption of plasma polymers.

  11. Pulse-shape analysis for gamma background rejection in thermal neutron radiation using CVD diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavrigin, P.; Finocchiaro, P.; Griesmayer, E.; Jericha, E.; Pappalardo, A.; Weiss, C.

    2015-09-01

    A novel technique for the rejection of gamma background from charged-particle spectra was demonstrated using a CVD diamond detector with a 6Li neutron converter installed at a thermal neutron beamline of the TRIGA research reactor at the Atominstitut (Vienna University of Technology). Spectra of the alpha particles and tritons of 6Li(n,T)4He thermal neutron capture reaction were separated from the gamma background by a new algorithm based on pulse-shape analysis. The thermal neutron capture in 6Li is already used for neutron flux monitoring, but the ability to remove gamma background allows using a CVD diamond detector for thermal neutron counting. The pulse-shape analysis can equally be applied to all cases where the charged products of an interaction are absorbed in the diamond and to other background particles that fully traverse the detector.

  12. Development of Health Parameter Model for Risk Prediction of CVD Using SVM

    PubMed Central

    Unnikrishnan, P.; Kumar, H.; Mitchell, P.; Kawasaki, R.

    2016-01-01

    Current methods of cardiovascular risk assessment are performed using health factors which are often based on the Framingham study. However, these methods have significant limitations due to their poor sensitivity and specificity. We have compared the parameters from the Framingham equation with linear regression analysis to establish the effect of training of the model for the local database. Support vector machine was used to determine the effectiveness of machine learning approach with the Framingham health parameters for risk assessment of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The result shows that while linear model trained using local database was an improvement on Framingham model, SVM based risk assessment model had high sensitivity and specificity of prediction of CVD. This indicates that using the health parameters identified using Framingham study, machine learning approach overcomes the low sensitivity and specificity of Framingham model. PMID:27594895

  13. Hard Coat Layers by PE-CVD Process for the Top Surface of Touch Panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okunishi, T.; Sato, N.; Yazawa, K.

    2013-06-01

    In order to protect surface from damages, the high pencil hardness and the high abrasion resistance are required for the hard coat layers on polyethylene telephthalate (PET) films for the application of touch panel surface. We have already found that the UV-curing-hard-coat-polymer (UHP) coated PET films show the poor abrasion resistance, while they have the high pencil hardness. It reveals that the abrasion resistance of hard coat layers of the UHP is not simply dependent on the pencil hardness. In this work, we have studied to improve the abrasion resistance of SiOC films as hard coat layers, which were formed by PE-CVD process on UHP coated PET. The abrasion resistance was evaluated by Taber abrasion test. PE-CVD hard coat layers which formed on UHP coater PET films have showed the better abrasion resistance and have the possibility of substitution to the thin glass sheets for touch panel application.

  14. Synthesis of Few-Layer Graphene Using DC PE-CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong Hyuk; Castro, Edward Joseph D.; Hwang, Yong Gyoo; Lee, Choong Hun

    2011-12-01

    Few layer graphene (FLG) had been successfully grown on polycrystalline Ni films or foils on a large scale using DC Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (DC PE-CVD) as a result of the Raman spectra drawn out of the sample. The size of graphene films is dependent on the area of the Ni film as well as the DC PE-CVD chamber size. Synthesis time has an effect on the quality of graphene produced. However, further analysis and experiments must be pursued to further identify the optimum settings and conditions of producing better quality graphene. Applied plasma voltage on the other hand, had an influence on the minimization of defects in the graphene grown. It has also presented a method of producing a free standing PMMA/graphene membrane on a FeCl3(aq) solution which could then be transferred to a desired substrate.

  15. Tailored CVD graphene coating as a transparent and flexible gas barrier

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Tae Hoon; Lee, Seula; Cho, Hyunjin; Chandramohan, S.; Suh, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Heon Sang; Bae, Su Kang; Kim, Soo Min; Park, Min; Lee, Jae Kwan; Kim, Myung Jong

    2016-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method to obtain tailored graphene as a transparent and flexible gas barrier has been developed. By separating nucleation step from growth, we could reduce early graphene nucleation density and thus induce better stitching between domain boundaries in the second growth step. Furthermore, two step growth in conjunction with electrochemical polishing of Cu foils achieved large graphene domains and improved graphene quality with minimized defects. The performance of resulting graphene as a gas barrier was superior to the graphene obtained by one-step growth on polished or unpolished Cu foils. The CVD graphene reported here could open up the possibility for exploring graphene-based gas barrier due to the minimized density of defect area. PMID:27063180

  16. Aligned carbon nanotubes catalytically grown on iron-based nanoparticles obtained by laser-induced CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Normand, F.; Cojocaru, C. S.; Ersen, O.; Legagneux, P.; Gangloff, L.; Fleaca, C.; Alexandrescu, R.; Dumitrache, F.; Morjan, I.

    2007-12-01

    Iron-based nanoparticles are prepared by a laser-induced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. They are characterized as body-centered Fe and Fe 2O 3 (maghemite/magnetite) particles with sizes ≤5 and 10 nm, respectively. The Fe particles are embedded in a protective carbon matrix. Both kind of particles are dispersed by spin-coating on SiO 2/Si(1 0 0) flat substrates. They are used as catalyst to grow carbon nanotubes by a plasma- and filaments-assisted catalytic CVD process (PE-HF-CCVD). Vertically oriented and thin carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown with few differences between the two samples, except the diameter in relation to the initial size of the iron particles, and the density. The electron field emission of these samples exhibit quite interesting behavior with a low turn-on voltage at around 1 V/μm.

  17. CVD graphene growth and transfer techniques for the fabrication of micromechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losowyj, Daniel; Storch, Isaac; McCune, Thomas; McEuen, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Graphene's superlative mechanical strength, electrical mobility, low mass, and large surface area make it a prime candidate for use in micromechanical resonators, which have potential applications in mass and force sensing, radio frequency signal processing, and optomechanics. Our resonators use graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and have excellent mechanical performance, but their electrical performance is comparatively worse than that of exfoliated graphene devices. We attribute these limitations to contamination from copper oxidation during the growth and solvents used in the transfer process. To remedy this, we have performed CVD growths on copper foils with long anneal times, confirming with Raman spectroscopy and SEM that the graphene is single layer and high quality. We have also found that graphene suspended on a substrate can survive high temperature air annealing, provided that the temperature ramp is gradual. Improving the electrical performance of these novel devices will facilitate their use in a variety of new experiments and applications.

  18. Development of Health Parameter Model for Risk Prediction of CVD Using SVM.

    PubMed

    Unnikrishnan, P; Kumar, D K; Poosapadi Arjunan, S; Kumar, H; Mitchell, P; Kawasaki, R

    2016-01-01

    Current methods of cardiovascular risk assessment are performed using health factors which are often based on the Framingham study. However, these methods have significant limitations due to their poor sensitivity and specificity. We have compared the parameters from the Framingham equation with linear regression analysis to establish the effect of training of the model for the local database. Support vector machine was used to determine the effectiveness of machine learning approach with the Framingham health parameters for risk assessment of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The result shows that while linear model trained using local database was an improvement on Framingham model, SVM based risk assessment model had high sensitivity and specificity of prediction of CVD. This indicates that using the health parameters identified using Framingham study, machine learning approach overcomes the low sensitivity and specificity of Framingham model. PMID:27594895

  19. Effect of dry oxidation on the energy gap and chemical composition of CVD graphene on nickel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aria, Adrianus I.; Gani, Adi W.; Gharib, Morteza

    2014-02-01

    The findings presented herein show that the electronic properties of CVD graphene on nickel can be altered from metallic to semiconducting by introducing oxygen adsorbates via UV/ozone or oxygen plasma treatment. These properties can be partially recovered by removing the oxygen adsorbates via vacuum annealing treatment. The effect of oxidation is studied by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). As probed by STM/STS, an energy gap opening of 0.11-0.15 eV is obtainable as the oxygen/carbon atomic ratio reaches 13-16%. The corresponding XPS spectra show a significant monotonic increase in the concentration of oxygenated functional groups due to the oxidation treatments. This study demonstrates that the opening of energy gap in CVD graphene can be reasonably controlled by a combination of UV/ozone or oxygen plasma treatment and vacuum annealing treatment.

  20. Photo-oxidation of Polymers Synthesized by Plasma and Initiated CVD

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Baxamusa, Salmaan H.; Suresh, Aravind; Ehrmann, Paul; Laurence, Ted; Hanania, Jiries; Hayes, Jeff; Harley, Stephen; Burkey, Daniel D.

    2015-11-09

    Plasma polymers are often limited by their susceptibility to spontaneous and photo-oxidation. We show that the unusual photoluminescence (PL) behavior of a plasma polymer of trans-2-butene is correlated with its photoluminescence strength. These photo-processes occur under blue light illumination (λ=405 nm), distinguishing them from traditional ultraviolet degradation of polymers. These photo-active defects are likely formed during the plasma deposition process and we show that a polymer synthesized using initiated (i)CVD, non-plasma method, has 1000× lower PL signal and enhanced photo-stability. In conclusion, non-plasma methods such as iCVD may therefore be a route to overcoming material aging issues that limit themore » adoption of plasma polymers.« less

  1. Electronic properties and strain sensitivity of CVD-grown graphene with acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Meng; Sasaki, Shinichirou; Ohnishi, Masato; Suzuki, Ken; Miura, Hideo

    2016-04-01

    Although many studies have shown that large-area monolayer graphene can be formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using methane gas, the growth of monolayer graphene using highly reactive acetylene gas remains a big challenge. In this study, we synthesized a uniform monolayer graphene film by low-pressure CVD (LPCVD) with acetylene gas. On the base of Raman spectroscopy measurements, it was found that up to 95% of the as-grown graphene is monolayer. The electronic properties and strain sensitivity of the LPCVD-grown graphene with acetylene were also evaluated by testing the fabricated field-effect transistors (FETs) and strain sensors. The derived carrier mobility and gauge factor are 862-1150 cm2/(V·s) and 3.4, respectively, revealing the potential for high-speed FETs and strain sensor applications. We also investigated the relationship between the electronic properties and the graphene domain size.

  2. CVD diamond wafers as large-area thermoluminescence detectors for measuring the spatial distribution of dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marczewska, B.; Bilski, P.; Olko, P.; Olko, P.; Nesládek, M.; Bergonzo, P.; Rbisz, M.; Waligórski, M. P. R.

    2003-09-01

    The applicability of large-area CVD diamond wafers (diameter about 5 cm, thickness about 0.1 mm), read out as thermoluminescence (TL) detectors, for assessing two-dimensional (2-D) dose distribution over their area, was investigated. To obtain 2-D TL images, a special TL reader equipped with large-area planchet and a CCD camera instead of the usual PM tube was developed. Several 2-D TL images: of an alpha source (Am-241), a Ra-226 needle source and a Ru-106 ophthalmic applicator, were measured and high-resolution digital images obtained. Our preliminary results demonstrate the potential capability of large-area CVD diamond wafers, read out as TL detectors, in 2-D dosimetry for medical applications. (

  3. Exploring the relative bending of a CVD graphene monolayer with gap-plasmons.

    PubMed

    Min, Young Hwan; Park, Won-Hwa

    2014-08-21

    We report a spectroscopic indicator showing the bending of a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene monolayer on Cu foil or an arbitrary substrate after transfer. Using a Au nanoparticle (NP)-graphene monolayer-Au thin film (TF) junction system, the Radial Breathing-Like Mode (RBLM) Raman signal from the sandwiched graphene monolayer is evidently observed by employing a local z-polarized incident field formed at the Au NP-Au TF junction. We also utilized the RBLM intensity as a quantitative tool with a wide dynamic range (∼300%) compared to the 2D peak width (∼35%) for determining the relative degree of bending on the Au TF substrate. The RBLM signal from the CVD graphene monolayer is anticipated to be used as a valuable marker in exploring out-of-plane directional properties. PMID:25006796

  4. Application of N- and B-doped CVD diamond layers for cyclic voltammetry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torz-Piotrowska, R.; Wrzyszczyński, A.; Paprocki, K.; Staryga, E.

    2009-10-01

    Conductive polycrystalline diamond layers prepared by the CVD process have received attention from electrochemists owing to such superior electrochemical properties as the wide potential window, the very low background current, the stability of chemical and physical properties. In this paper, the cyclic voltammetry application using N- and B-doped diamond electrodes was studied. Diamond layers, doped with boron and nitrogen, were synthesized on a silicon substrate in a hot-filament CVD reactor. The obtained diamond layers were characterized using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The electrochemical properties of diamond layers were measured in KCl and NaCl basic solutions to gain knowledge about their potential application as an electrode material. It was found that boron doped diamond electrodes showed potential windows up to about 7 V which were almost twice wider than those observed for conventional Pt electrodes.

  5. Electrochemical delamination of CVD-grown graphene film: toward the recyclable use of copper catalyst.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Zheng, Yi; Xu, Xiangfan; Dubuisson, Emilie; Bao, Qiaoliang; Lu, Jiong; Loh, Kian Ping

    2011-12-27

    The separation of chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene from the metallic catalyst it is grown on, followed by a subsequent transfer to a dielectric substrate, is currently the adopted method for device fabrication. Most transfer techniques use a chemical etching method to dissolve the metal catalysts, thus imposing high material cost in large-scale fabrication. Here, we demonstrate a highly efficient, nondestructive electrochemical route for the delamination of CVD graphene film from metal surfaces. The electrochemically delaminated graphene films are continuous over 95% of the surface and exhibit increasingly better electronic quality after several growth cycles on the reused copper catalyst, due to the suppression of quasi-periodical nanoripples induced by copper step edges. The electrochemical delamination process affords the advantages of high efficiency, low-cost recyclability, and minimal use of etching chemicals. PMID:22034835

  6. Modeling the optimum conditions for the formation of defect-free CVD graphene on copper melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, N. I.

    2014-09-01

    The nucleation and growth of nuclei of graphene (graphene islets) on the surfaces of copper melts during catalytic CVD, i.e., the catalytic decomposition of a gas-phase carbon support, is considered. It is shown that on a copper melt the optimum combination of conditions for the preservation of islets with almost perfect hexagonal shape and the necessary conditions of the CVD-process are reached at the same time. The average distance between the islets and the dimensionless parameter that determines changes in the shape of islets is calculated. The maximum rate of decomposition of the carbon support at which this parameter simultaneously promotes the growth of defect-free islets and the maximum possible rate of growth of the graphene monolayer is determined.

  7. Reinforcement of CVD grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes by high temperature annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elumeeva, K. V.; Kuznetsov, V. L.; Ischenko, A. V.; Smajda, R.; Spina, M.; Forró, L.; Magrez, A.

    2013-11-01

    We report on the increase of the Young's modulus (E) of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) upon high temperature heat treatment. The post heat-treatment at 2200-2800°C in a controlled atmosphere results in a considerable improvement of the microstructure, chemical stability and electro-physical properties of the nanotubes. The Young's modulus of MWNTs of different diameters was measured by the deflection of a single tube suspended across the hole of silicon nitride membrane and loaded by an atomic force microscope tip. Contrary to previous reports, a strong increase of E was feasible due to the improved growth conditions of pristine carbon nanotubes and to the improved heat treatment conditions. However, the elastic modulus of CVD grown MWNTs still shows strong diameter dependence resulting from the remaining structural inhomogeneities in large diameter nanotubes.

  8. Antenna-integrated 0.6 THz FET direct detectors based on CVD graphene.

    PubMed

    Zak, Audrey; Andersson, Michael A; Bauer, Maris; Matukas, Jonas; Lisauskas, Alvydas; Roskos, Hartmut G; Stake, Jan

    2014-10-01

    We present terahertz (THz) detectors based on top-gated graphene field effect transistors (GFETs) with integrated split bow-tie antennas. The GFETs were fabricated using graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The THz detectors are capable of room-temperature rectification of a 0.6 THz signal and achieve a maximum optical responsivity better than 14 V/W and minimum optical noise-equivalent power (NEP) of 515 pW/Hz(0.5). Our results are a significant improvement over previous work on graphene direct detectors and are comparable to other established direct detector technologies. This is the first time room-temperature direct detection has been demonstrated using CVD graphene, which introduces the potential for scalable, wafer-level production of graphene detectors. PMID:25203787

  9. Towards a general growth model for graphene CVD on transition metal catalysts.

    PubMed

    Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Weatherup, Robert S; Braeuninger-Weimer, Philipp; Caneva, Sabina; Hofmann, Stephan

    2016-01-28

    The chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of graphene on three polycrystalline transition metal catalysts, Co, Ni and Cu, is systematically compared and a first-order growth model is proposed which can serve as a reference to optimize graphene growth on any elemental or alloy catalyst system. Simple thermodynamic considerations of carbon solubility are insufficient to capture even basic growth behaviour on these most commonly used catalyst materials, and it is shown that kinetic aspects such as carbon permeation have to be taken into account. Key CVD process parameters are discussed in this context and the results are anticipated to be highly useful for the design of future strategies for integrated graphene manufacture. PMID:26730836

  10. Chemical Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Prepared Using Camphoric Carbon by Thermal-CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azira, A. A.; Rusop, M.

    2010-03-01

    Chemical properties and surface study on the influence of starting carbon materials by using thermal chemical vapor deposition (Thermal-CVD) to produced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is investigated. The CNTs derived from camphor were synthesized as the precursor material due to low sublimation temperature. The major parameters are also evaluated in order to obtain high-yield and high-quality CNTs. The prepared CNTs are examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) to determine the microstructure of nanocarbons. The FESEM investigation of the CNTs formed on the support catalysts provides evidence that camphor is suitable as a precursor material for nanotubes formation. The chemical properties of the CNTs were conducted using FTIR spectroscopy and PXRD analysis. The high-temperature graphitization process induced by the Thermal-CVD enables the hydrocarbons to act as carbon sources and changes the aromatic species into the layered graphite structure of CNTs.

  11. Tailored CVD graphene coating as a transparent and flexible gas barrier.

    PubMed

    Seo, Tae Hoon; Lee, Seula; Cho, Hyunjin; Chandramohan, S; Suh, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Heon Sang; Bae, Su Kang; Kim, Soo Min; Park, Min; Lee, Jae Kwan; Kim, Myung Jong

    2016-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method to obtain tailored graphene as a transparent and flexible gas barrier has been developed. By separating nucleation step from growth, we could reduce early graphene nucleation density and thus induce better stitching between domain boundaries in the second growth step. Furthermore, two step growth in conjunction with electrochemical polishing of Cu foils achieved large graphene domains and improved graphene quality with minimized defects. The performance of resulting graphene as a gas barrier was superior to the graphene obtained by one-step growth on polished or unpolished Cu foils. The CVD graphene reported here could open up the possibility for exploring graphene-based gas barrier due to the minimized density of defect area. PMID:27063180

  12. Tailored CVD graphene coating as a transparent and flexible gas barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Tae Hoon; Lee, Seula; Cho, Hyunjin; Chandramohan, S.; Suh, Eun-Kyung; Lee, Heon Sang; Bae, Su Kang; Kim, Soo Min; Park, Min; Lee, Jae Kwan; Kim, Myung Jong

    2016-04-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method to obtain tailored graphene as a transparent and flexible gas barrier has been developed. By separating nucleation step from growth, we could reduce early graphene nucleation density and thus induce better stitching between domain boundaries in the second growth step. Furthermore, two step growth in conjunction with electrochemical polishing of Cu foils achieved large graphene domains and improved graphene quality with minimized defects. The performance of resulting graphene as a gas barrier was superior to the graphene obtained by one-step growth on polished or unpolished Cu foils. The CVD graphene reported here could open up the possibility for exploring graphene-based gas barrier due to the minimized density of defect area.

  13. Chemical Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Prepared Using Camphoric Carbon by Thermal-CVD

    SciTech Connect

    Azira, A. A.; Rusop, M.

    2010-03-11

    Chemical properties and surface study on the influence of starting carbon materials by using thermal chemical vapor deposition (Thermal-CVD) to produced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is investigated. The CNTs derived from camphor were synthesized as the precursor material due to low sublimation temperature. The major parameters are also evaluated in order to obtain high-yield and high-quality CNTs. The prepared CNTs are examined using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) to determine the microstructure of nanocarbons. The FESEM investigation of the CNTs formed on the support catalysts provides evidence that camphor is suitable as a precursor material for nanotubes formation. The chemical properties of the CNTs were conducted using FTIR spectroscopy and PXRD analysis. The high-temperature graphitization process induced by the Thermal-CVD enables the hydrocarbons to act as carbon sources and changes the aromatic species into the layered graphite structure of CNTs.

  14. Vitamin D and risk of CVD: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Fry, Catherine M; Sanders, Thomas A B

    2015-08-01

    This review summarises evidence for an association between vitamin D status and CVD and the mechanisms involved. Vitamin D3 is predominantly provided by the action of UVB from sunlight on skin. Average UK diets supply 2-3 μg/d vitamin D but diets containing at least one portion of oily fish per week supply about 7 μg/d. Pharmacological doses of vitamin D2 (bolus injection of 7500 μg or intakes >50 μg/d) result in a smaller increase in plasma 25(OH)D than those of D3 but physiological doses 5-25 μg/d seem equivalent. Plasma 25(OH)D concentrations are also influenced by clothing, obesity and skin pigmentation. Up to 40 % of the population have plasma 25(OH)D concentrations <25 nmol/l in the winter compared with <10 % in the summer. The relative risk of CVD death is 1·41 (95 % CI 1·18, 1·68) greater in the lowest quintile of plasma 25(OH)D according to meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Acute deficiency may inhibit insulin secretion and promote inflammation thus increasing the risk of plaque rupture and arterial thrombosis. Chronic insufficiency may increase arterial stiffness. There is no evidence to support claims of reduced CVD from existing trials with bone-related health outcomes where vitamin D was usually co-administered with calcium. Although several trials with cardiovascular endpoints are in progress, these are using pharmacological doses. In view of the potential toxicity of pharmacological doses, there remains a need for long-term trials of physiological doses of D2 and D3 with CVD incidence as the primary outcome. PMID:25697289

  15. Effects of disorder on the optical properties of CVD grown polycrystalline graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podila, Ramakrishna; Anand, Benoy; Spear, John T.; Puneet, P.; Philip, Reji; Siva Sankara Sai, S.; Rao, Apparao M.

    2012-02-01

    We explore the effects of crystallite size (La) on the linear and non-linear optical properties of chemical vapor deposition grown polycrystalline graphene. The π-plasmon resonance present at ~4.75 eV (~260 nm) in the optical absorption spectrum of graphene follows the empirical relationship λπ = 250.5 nm + 89.5 nm2/La, where λπ represents the π-plasmon wavelength. Furthermore, our Z-scan studies reveal that the crystallite size significantly changes the saturation intensity in CVD grown graphene. Notably, in comparison to epitaxial graphene layers grown on SiC wafers which exhibit a photogenerated carrier lifetime of few picoseconds, we find that the photogenerated carriers in our CVD grown graphene can exhibit lifetimes as long as nanoseconds.We explore the effects of crystallite size (La) on the linear and non-linear optical properties of chemical vapor deposition grown polycrystalline graphene. The π-plasmon resonance present at ~4.75 eV (~260 nm) in the optical absorption spectrum of graphene follows the empirical relationship λπ = 250.5 nm + 89.5 nm2/La, where λπ represents the π-plasmon wavelength. Furthermore, our Z-scan studies reveal that the crystallite size significantly changes the saturation intensity in CVD grown graphene. Notably, in comparison to epitaxial graphene layers grown on SiC wafers which exhibit a photogenerated carrier lifetime of few picoseconds, we find that the photogenerated carriers in our CVD grown graphene can exhibit lifetimes as long as nanoseconds. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr11206j

  16. Modeling and simulation of silicon epitaxial growth in Siemens CVD reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Haoyin; Lu, Shijie; Chen, Caixia

    2014-10-01

    Siemens CVD reactor is an important chemical device for the production of polysilicon. The chemical and physical phenomenon involved in the reactor is very complex. Understanding the multispecies thermal fluid transport and its interaction with the gas/surface reactions is crucial for an optimal design and operation of the reactor. In the present paper, a mathematical model was constructed to describe the fluid dynamics, the heat and mass transfer and the reaction kinetics of the epitaxial growth process in industrial CVD reactors. A modified reaction kinetics model was used to represent the gas phase and surface reactions. The kinetics model was validated using the published experimental data obtained in a temperature range similar to the industrial CVD processes of silicon productions. The epitaxial growth of silicon in a Siemens reactor was simulated using commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software ANSYS FLUENT. The distributions of gas velocity, temperature and species concentrations in the reactor were predicted numerically. Based on the numerical simulation results, a sensitivity analysis was carried out to determine the key factors influencing the growth rate in industrial CVD reactors. Under the conditions of fixed heating power applied to three different rod diameters of 50 mm, 80 mm and 100 mm, the simulated results show, when the rods' diameter is 50 mm, the surface temperature is high and the gas temperature is low, the growth rate of silicon is determined by the transport of gas species. When the rods' diameter increases to 80 mm, the averaged surface temperature decreases to 1361 K, the surface reaction rate and transport of gas species control the growth rate of Si together. When the rods' diameter is 100 mm, the surface temperature decreases further, the rates of surface reactions become the control factor of deposition rate of Si.

  17. Fabricating Large-Area Sheets of Single-Layer Graphene by CVD

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronikowski, Michael; Manohara, Harish

    2008-01-01

    This innovation consists of a set of methodologies for preparing large area (greater than 1 cm(exp 2)) domains of single-atomic-layer graphite, also called graphene, in single (two-dimensional) crystal form. To fabricate a single graphene layer using chemical vapor deposition (CVD), the process begins with an atomically flat surface of an appropriate substrate and an appropriate precursor molecule containing carbon atoms attached to substituent atoms or groups. These molecules will be brought into contact with the substrate surface by being flowed over, or sprayed onto, the substrate, under CVD conditions of low pressure and elevated temperature. Upon contact with the surface, the precursor molecules will decompose. The substituent groups detach from the carbon atoms and form gas-phase species, leaving the unfunctionalized carbon atoms attached to the substrate surface. These carbon atoms will diffuse upon this surface and encounter and bond to other carbon atoms. If conditions are chosen carefully, the surface carbon atoms will arrange to form the lowest energy single-layer structure available, which is the graphene lattice that is sought. Another method for creating the graphene lattice includes metal-catalyzed CVD, in which the decomposition of the precursor molecules is initiated by the catalytic action of a catalytic metal upon the substrate surface. Another type of metal-catalyzed CVD has the entire substrate composed of catalytic metal, or other material, either as a bulk crystal or as a think layer of catalyst deposited upon another surface. In this case, the precursor molecules decompose directly upon contact with the substrate, releasing their atoms and forming the graphene sheet. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) can also be used. In this method, a substrate surface at low temperature is covered with exactly one monolayer of precursor molecules (which may be of more than one type). This is heated up so that the precursor molecules decompose and form one

  18. Exploring the relative bending of a CVD graphene monolayer with gap-plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Young Hwan; Park, Won-Hwa

    2014-07-01

    We report a spectroscopic indicator showing the bending of a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene monolayer on Cu foil or an arbitrary substrate after transfer. Using a Au nanoparticle (NP)-graphene monolayer-Au thin film (TF) junction system, the Radial Breathing-Like Mode (RBLM) Raman signal from the sandwiched graphene monolayer is evidently observed by employing a local z-polarized incident field formed at the Au NP-Au TF junction. We also utilized the RBLM intensity as a quantitative tool with a wide dynamic range (~300%) compared to the 2D peak width (~35%) for determining the relative degree of bending on the Au TF substrate. The RBLM signal from the CVD graphene monolayer is anticipated to be used as a valuable marker in exploring out-of-plane directional properties.We report a spectroscopic indicator showing the bending of a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene monolayer on Cu foil or an arbitrary substrate after transfer. Using a Au nanoparticle (NP)-graphene monolayer-Au thin film (TF) junction system, the Radial Breathing-Like Mode (RBLM) Raman signal from the sandwiched graphene monolayer is evidently observed by employing a local z-polarized incident field formed at the Au NP-Au TF junction. We also utilized the RBLM intensity as a quantitative tool with a wide dynamic range (~300%) compared to the 2D peak width (~35%) for determining the relative degree of bending on the Au TF substrate. The RBLM signal from the CVD graphene monolayer is anticipated to be used as a valuable marker in exploring out-of-plane directional properties. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr01586j

  19. Performance study of polycrystalline CVD diamond detectors for fast neutron monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Arvind Kumar, Amit Topkar, Anita

    2014-04-24

    Diamond detectors using polycrystalline CVD diamond substrates of thickness 300μm and 100μm were fabricated for fast neutron monitoring application.. The characterization of detectors was carried out using various tests such as leakage current, capacitance and alpha particle response. The performance of detectors was evaluated for fast neutrons at different neutron yields. The results presented in this work demonstrate that the diamond detectors will be suitable for monitoring fast neutrons.

  20. Correlation of experimental performance data for a CVD tungsten-niobium, planar thermionic converter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sockol, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    Approximate expressions are presented which correlate experimental performance data from a CVD tungsten-niobium, planar thermionic converter. The current voltage characteristics are given as functions of emitter and collector temperatures and cesium pressure for currents below the knee in the ignited mode. The correlation covers the temperature ranges of 1700 to 1950 K for the emitter, 900 to 1050 K for the collector, and 580 to 645 K for the cesium reservoir.