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Sample records for cw resonance ionization

  1. Attogram measurement of rare isotopes by CW resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bushaw, B.A.

    1992-05-01

    Three-color double-resonance ionization mass spectrometry, using two single-frequency cw dye lasers and a cw carbon dioxide laser, has been applied to the detection of attogram quantities of rare radionuclides. {sup 210}Pb has been measured in human hair and brain tissue samples to assess indoor radon exposure. Measurements on {sup 90}Sr have shown overall isotopic selectivity of greater than 10{sup 9} despite unfavorable isotope shifts relative to the major stable isotope, {sup 88}Sr.

  2. Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) with Pulsed and CW-Lasers on Plutonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, P.; Huber, G.; Passler, G.; Trautmann, N.; Wendt, K.

    2005-04-01

    The detection of long-lived plutonium isotopes in ultra-trace amounts by resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is a well-established routine method. Detection limits of 106 to 107 atoms and precise measurements of the isotopic composition have been achieved. In this work multi-step resonance ionization of plutonium atoms has been performed with tunable lasers having very different output intensities and spectral properties. In order to compare different ways for the resonance ionization of plutonium broadband pulsed dye and titanium:sapphire lasers as well as narrow-band cw-diode and titanium:sapphire lasers have been applied for a number of efficient excitation schemes. It has been shown, that for identical excitation schemes the optical isotope selectivity can be improved by using cw-lasers (bandwidths < 10 MHz) instead of pulsed lasers (bandwidths > 2 GHz). Pulsed and cw-laser systems have been used simultaneously for resonance ionization enabling direct comparisons of pulsed and continuous ionization processes. So far, a three-step, three-color laser excitation scheme has been proven to be most practical in terms of efficiency, selectivity and laser wavelengths. Alternatively a newly discovered three-step, two-color excitation scheme which includes a strong two-photon transition from an excited state into a high-lying autoionizing state yields similar ionization efficiencies. This two-photon transition was characterized with respect to saturation behavior and line width.

  3. Resonance Ionization, Mass Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, J. P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Discussed is an analytical technique that uses photons from lasers to resonantly excite an electron from some initial state of a gaseous atom through various excited states of the atom or molecule. Described are the apparatus, some analytical applications, and the precision and accuracy of the technique. Lists 26 references. (CW)

  4. Resonance ionization for analytical spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Hurst, George S.; Payne, Marvin G.; Wagner, Edward B.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for the sensitive and selective analysis of an atomic or molecular component of a gas. According to this method, the desired neutral component is ionized by one or more resonance photon absorptions, and the resultant ions are measured in a sensitive counter. Numerous energy pathways are described for accomplishing the ionization including the use of one or two tunable pulsed dye lasers.

  5. Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Rolland P.

    2008-06-07

    Ionization Cooling using Parametric Resonances was an SBIR project begun in July 2004 and ended in January 2008 with Muons, Inc., (Dr. Rolland Johnson, PI), and Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) (Dr. Yaroslav Derbenev, Subcontract PI). The project was to develop the theory and simulations of Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) so that it could be used to provide the extra transverse cooling needed for muon colliders in order to relax the requirements on the proton driver, reduce the site boundary radiation, and provide a better environment for experiments. During the course of the project, the theoretical understanding of PIC was developed and a final exposition is ready for publication. Workshops were sponsored by Muons, Inc. in May and September of 2007 that were devoted to the PIC technique. One outcome of the workshops was the interesting and somewhat unexpected realization that the beam emittances using the PIC technique can get small enough that space charge forces can be important. A parallel effort to develop our G4beamline simulation program to include space charge effects was initiated to address this problem. A method of compensating for chromatic aberrations by employing synchrotron motion was developed and simulated. A method of compensating for spherical aberrations using beamline symmetry was also developed and simulated. Different optics designs have been developed using the OptiM program in preparation for applying our G4beamline simulation program, which contains all the power of the Geant4 toolkit. However, no PIC channel design that has been developed has had the desired cooling performance when subjected to the complete G4beamline simulation program. This is believed to be the consequence of the difficulties of correcting the aberrations associated with the naturally large beam angles and beam sizes of the PIC method that are exacerbated by the fringe fields of the rather complicated channel designs that have been

  6. CW YVO4:Er Laser with Resonant Pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachenya, K. N.; Kisel, V. E.; Yasukevich, A. S.; Matrosov, V. N.; Tolstik, N. A.; Kuleshov, N. V.

    2015-05-01

    The lasing characteristics of a YVO4:Er laser with resonant pumping in the 1.5-1.6 μm range are studied. Lasing is obtained at λ = 1603 nm with a differential efficiency of up to 61%. YVO4:Er crystals are found to offer promise for use in efficient resonantly (in-band) pumped lasers.

  7. Astatine and Yttrium Resonant Ionization Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teigelhoefer, Andrea

    Providing intense, contamination-free beams of rare isotopes to experiments is a challenging task. At isotope separator on-line facilities such as ISAC at TRIUMF, the choice of production target and ion source are key to the successful beam delivery. Due to their element-selectivity, high efficiency and versatility, resonant ionization laser ion sources (RILIS) gain increasingly in importance. The spectroscopic data available are typically incomplete in the region of excited- and autoionizing atomic states. In order to find the most efficient ionization scheme for a particular element, further spectroscopy is often required. The development of efficient laser resonant ionization schemes for yttrium and astatine is presented in this thesis. For yttrium, two ionization schemes with comparable relative intensities were found. Since for astatine, only two transitions were known, the focus was to provide data on atomic energy levels using resonance ionization spectroscopy. Altogether 41 previously unknown astatine energy levels were found.

  8. Isotopically selective RIMS of rare radionuclides by double-resonance excitation with cw lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bushaw, B.A.; Munley, J.T.

    1990-09-01

    Double-resonance, Resonance Ionization Mass Spectroscopy (RIMS) using two single-frequency dye lasers and a CO{sub 2} laser for photoionization has been shown to be both extremely sensitive and highly selective. Measurements on the radioisotope {sup 210}Pb have demonstrated optical selectivity in excess of 10{sup 9} and detection limits of less than 1 femtogram.

  9. Resonant 2-photon-ionization of Xe

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, M.; Lacoursiere, J.; Nahon, L.; Gisselbrecht, M.; Morin, P.; Larzilliere, M.

    1997-01-15

    The combination of laser and synchrotron radiation has been used to investigate in a pump-probe arrangement the ionization of Xe atoms via the resonant state Xe*5p{sup 5}5d[3/2]{sub 1}. In a first type of experiments the synchronization between the pulses of a mode-locked Ar{sup +} laser and the synchrotron radiation has been demonstrated by measuring the lifetime of the intermediate, resonantly excited states. In addition, a tuneable dye laser has been used to excite the Xe*5p{sup 5}4f[5/2]{sub 2} autoionization resonance.

  10. Selective isotope determination of lanthanum by diode-laser-initiated resonance-ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, J. P.; Shaw, R. W.

    1995-08-01

    A diode-laser step has been incorporated into a resonance-ionization mass spectrometry optical excitation process to enhance the isotopic selectivity of the technique. Lanthanum isotope ratio enhancements as high as 103 were achieved by use of a single-frequency cw diode laser tuned to excite the first step of a three-step excitation-ionization optical process; the subsequent steps were excited by use of a pulsed dye laser. Applying the same optical technique, we measured atomic hyperfine constants for the high-lying even-parity 4D5/2 state of lanthanum at 30354 cm-1 . The general utility of this spectral approach is discussed.

  11. Historical survey of resonance ionization spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, G.S.

    1984-04-01

    We have recently celebrated the 10th birthday of Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS), and this seems an appropriate time to review the history of its development. Basically, RIS is a photophysics process in which tunable light sources are used to remove a valence electron from an atom of selected atomic number, Z. If appropriate lasers are used as the light source, one electron can be removed from each atom of the selected Z in the laser pulse. This implies that RIS can be a very efficient, as well as selective, ionization process. In what we normally call RIS, laser schemes are employed which preserve both of these features. In contrast, multiphoton ionization (MPI) is more general, although not necessarily Z selective or very efficient because resonances are often not used. Early research completed in the USSR and described as selective two-step photoionization, employed resonances to ionize the rubidium atom and served to guide work on laser isotope separation. 29 references, 8 figures.

  12. Conceptual basis of resonance ionization spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, M.G.

    1984-04-01

    Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) can b defined as a state-selective detection process in which tunable lasers are used to promote transitions from the selected state of the atoms or molecules in question to higher states, one of which will be ionized by the absorption of another photon. At least one resonance step is used in the stepwise ionization process, and it has been shown that the ionization probability of the spectroscopically selected species can nearly always be made close to unity. Since measurements of the number of photoelectrons or ions can be made very precisely and even one electron (or under vacuum conditions, one ion) can be detected, the technique can be used to make quantitative measurements of very small populations of the state-selected species. Counting of individual atoms has special meaning for detection of rare events. The ability to make saturated RIS measurements opens up a wide variety of applications to both basic and applied research. We view RIS as a specific type of multi-photon ionization in which the goal is to make quantitative measurements of quantum-selected populations in atomic or molecular systems. 16 references.

  13. Explosive vaporization of metallic sodium microparticles by CW resonant laser radiation.

    PubMed

    Atutov, S N; Baldini, W; Biancalana, V; Calabrese, R; Guidi, V; Mai, B; Mariotti, E; Mazzocca, G; Moi, L; Pod'yachev, S P; Tomassetti, L

    2001-11-19

    Explosive vaporization of metallic Na microparticles stimulated by resonant cw laser radiation has been observed in a glass cell. Vaporization occurs at low laser-power density. The effect consists in the generation of optically thick and sharply localized Na vapor clouds propagating in the cell against the laser beam. The effect is explained by laser excitation of Na atoms, which collide onto the surface of the microparticles and transfer their internal energy. This causes other atoms to be vaporized and to continue the avalanche process. PMID:11736344

  14. Mode selection and resonator design studies of a 95 GHz, 100 kW, CW gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Vamshi Krishna, P.; Kartikeyan, M.V. E-mail: kartik@iitr.ernet.in; Thumm, M.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, the mode selection procedure leading to the design and the cavity resonator design studies of a 95 GHz, 100 kW, CW Gyrotron will be presented, such a gyrotron will be used for specific ECRH/ECRIS applications. In this course all the suitable modes with design constraints within the limits of design goals are considered and finally the TE{sub 10.4} mode is chosen as the operating mode which is suitable for the design. Design constraints are carefully investigated, and starting currents are computed. (author)

  15. Experimental test of hole-coupled FEL resonator designs using a CW-HeNe laser

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, W.P.; Wallace, E.W.; Xie, M.; Kim, K.J.

    1993-01-01

    We report on ongoing experiments and simulations which model the performance of hole-coupled resonators. We have previously studied a hole-coupled resonator which was well inside the stable region (stability parameter g = {minus}0.8). In the far field, good agreement between experiment and simulation was obtained for both the intracavity and outcoupled mode-profile. The present study involves a resonator with a stability parameter of {minus}0.987, identical to the stability parameter of the proposed Infrared Free Electron Laser (IRFEL) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The experiments were carried out with a frequency stabilized CW-HeNe laser beam at a wavelength of 632.8 nm. Both intracavity and outcoupled mode profiles and power levels were measured. The simulations were done using the code HOLD, which is based on the Fresnel approximation for the Huygens kernel. Within the experimental uncertainties, magnified due to the 1/(1+g) dependence of the mode characteristics on errors in measured resonator parameters, we have obtained fair agreement between experiment and simulation.

  16. Experimental test of hole-coupled FEL resonator designs using a CW-HeNe laser

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, W.P.; Wallace, E.W.; Xie, M.; Kim, K.J.

    1993-01-01

    We report on ongoing experiments and simulations which model the performance of hole-coupled resonators. We have previously studied a hole-coupled resonator which was well inside the stable region (stability parameter g = [minus]0.8). In the far field, good agreement between experiment and simulation was obtained for both the intracavity and outcoupled mode-profile. The present study involves a resonator with a stability parameter of [minus]0.987, identical to the stability parameter of the proposed Infrared Free Electron Laser (IRFEL) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The experiments were carried out with a frequency stabilized CW-HeNe laser beam at a wavelength of 632.8 nm. Both intracavity and outcoupled mode profiles and power levels were measured. The simulations were done using the code HOLD, which is based on the Fresnel approximation for the Huygens kernel. Within the experimental uncertainties, magnified due to the 1/(1+g) dependence of the mode characteristics on errors in measured resonator parameters, we have obtained fair agreement between experiment and simulation.

  17. (Resonance ionization spectroscopy and its applications)

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, M.G.

    1990-10-05

    The field of Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy grew out of work done in the Photophysics Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. As one of the original developers of this field the traveler has continued to attend this meeting on a regular basis. The traveler was originally asked to present an invited talk and to present part of a short course offered to graduate students attending the conference. Subsequently, the traveler was also asked to chair a session and to be a judge of the students papers entered in a contest for a $1000 first prize.

  18. Selective Ultratrace Analysis of Ca41 by Laser Resonance Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, K.; Blaum, K.; Diel, S.; Geppert, C.; Kuschnick, A.; Muller, P.; Trautmann, N.; Nortershauser, W.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2001-05-15

    A compact resonance ionization mass spectrometer is presented. It is presently applied for sensitive and highly selective ultratrace detemination of the long-lived radioisotope 41Ca for environmental, biological, and fundamental investigations. The development of coherent multistep resonance ionization enables the realization of experimental detection limits as low as 6 10 atoms per sample and very high isotopic selectivity above 12 10.

  19. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry for isotopic abundance measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is a relatively new laser-based technique for the determination of isotopic abundances. The resonance ionization process depends upon the stepwise absorption of photons from the laser, promoting atoms of the element of interest through progressively higher electronic states until an ion is formed. Sensitivity arises from the efficiency of the resonant absorption process when coupled with the power available from commercial laser sources. Selectivity derives naturally from the distinct electronic structure of different elements. This isobaric discrimination has provided the major impetus for development of the technique. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry was used for analysis of the isotopic abundances of the rare earth lutetium. Isobaric interferences from ytterbium severely effect the ability to measure small amounts of the neutron-deficient Lu isotopes by conventional mass spectrometric techniques. Resonance ionization for lutetium is performed using a continuous-wave laser operating at 452 nm, through a sequential two-photon process, with one photon exciting the intermediate resonance and the second photon causing ionization. Ion yields for microgram-sized quantities of lutetium lie between 10(6) and 10(7) ions per second, at overall ionization efficiencies approaching 10(-4). Discrimination factors against ytterbium greater than 10(6) have been measured. Resonance ionization for technetium is also being explored, again in response to an isobaric interference, molybdenum. Because of the relatively high ionization potential for Tc, three-photon, two-color RIMS processes are being developed.

  20. Epicyclic helical channels for parametric resonance ionization cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Johson, Rolland Paul; Derbenev, Yaroslav

    2015-08-23

    Proposed next-generation muon colliders will require major technical advances to achieve rapid muon beam cooling requirements. Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. In PIC, a half-integer parametric resonance causes strong focusing of a muon beam at appropriately placed energy absorbers while ionization cooling limits the beam’s angular spread. Combining muon ionization cooling with parametric resonant dynamics in this way should then allow much smaller final transverse muon beam sizes than conventional ionization cooling alone. One of the PIC challenges is compensation of beam aberrations over a sufficiently wide parameter range while maintaining the dynamical stability with correlated behavior of the horizontal and vertical betatron motion and dispersion. We explore use of a coupling resonance to reduce the dimensionality of the problem and to shift the dynamics away from non-linear resonances. PIC simulations are presented.

  1. Ion microprobe mass spectrometry using sputtering atomization and resonance ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Donohue, D.L.; Christie, W.H.; Goeringer, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) has recently been developed into a useful technique for isotope ratio measurements. Studies performed in our laboratory (1-6) have been reported for a variety of elements using thermal vaporization sources to produce the atom reservoir for laser-induced resonance ionization. A commercial ion microprobe mass analyzer (IMMA) has been interfaced with a tunable pulsed dye laser for carrying out resonance ionization mass spectrometry of sputtered atoms. The IMMA instrument has many advantages for this work, including a micro-focused primary ion beam (2 ..mu..m in diameter) of selected mass, complete sample manipulation and viewing capability, and a double-focusing mass spectrometer for separation and detection of the secondary or laser-generated ions. Data were obtained demonstrating the number and type of ions formed along with optical spectral information showing the wavelengths at which resonance ionization occurs. 7 refs.

  2. CW and pulsed electrically detected magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 263GHz/12T on operating amorphous silicon solar cells.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, W; Schnegg, A; Veber, S; Meier, C; Fehr, M; Lips, K

    2015-08-01

    Here we describe a new high frequency/high field continuous wave and pulsed electrically detected magnetic resonance (CW EDMR and pEDMR) setup, operating at 263GHz and resonance fields between 0 and 12T. Spin dependent transport in illuminated hydrogenated amorphous silicon p-i-n solar cells at 5K and 90K was studied by in operando 263GHz CW and pEDMR alongside complementary X-band CW EDMR. Benefiting from the superior resolution at 263GHz, we were able to better resolve EDMR signals originating from spin dependent hopping and recombination processes. 5K EDMR spectra were found to be dominated by conduction and valence band tail states involved in spin dependent hopping, with additional contributions from triplet exciton states. 90K EDMR spectra could be assigned to spin pair recombination involving conduction band tail states and dangling bonds as the dominating spin dependent transport process, with additional contributions from valence band tail and triplet exciton states. PMID:26112328

  3. Simultaneous resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization and electron avalanche ionization in gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Zhang Zhili; Miles, Richard B.

    2008-07-15

    Resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and electron avalanche ionization (EAI) are measured simultaneously in Ar:Xe mixtures at different partial pressures of mixture components. A simple theory for combined REMPI+EAI in gas mixture is developed. It is shown that the REMPI electrons seed the avalanche process, and thus the avalanche process amplifies the REMPI signal. Possible applications are discussed.

  4. Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source for Radioactive Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Beene, James R; Havener, Charles C; Vane, C Randy; Gottwald, T.; Wendt, K.; Mattolat, C.; Lassen, J.

    2009-01-01

    A resonant ionization laser ion source based on all-solid-state, tunable Ti:Sapphire lasers is being developed for the production of pure radioactive ion beams. It consists of a hot-cavity ion source and three pulsed Ti:Sapphire lasers operating at a 10 kHz pulse repetition rate. Spectroscopic studies are being conducted to develop ionization schemes that lead to ionizing an excited atom through an auto-ionization or a Rydberg state for numerous elements of interest. Three-photon resonant ionization of 12 elements has been recently demonstrated. The overall efficiency of the laser ion source measured for some of these elements ranges from 1 to 40%. The results indicate that Ti:Sapphire lasers could be well suited for laser ion source applications. The time structures of the ions produced by the pulsed lasers are investigated. The information may help to improve the laser ion source performance.

  5. Prediction and identification of multiple-photon resonant ionization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.H.; McKown, H.S.; Young, J.P.; Shaw, R.W.; Donohue, D.L.

    1988-08-01

    Many single-color, multiple-photon transitions leading to ionization are observed for lanthanide and actinide elements in experiments using resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS). It is desirable both to identify the energy levels involved in observed transitions and to be able to predict in advance their location. A computer code, ETRANS, has been written to perform these functions. Examples of both types of operation are given.

  6. A resonance ionization imaging detector based on cesium atomic vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temirov, J. P.; Chigarev, N. V.; Matveev, O. I.; Omenetto, N.; Smith, B. W.; Winefordner, J. D.

    2004-05-01

    A novel Cs resonance ionization imaging detector (RIID) has been developed and evaluated. The detector is capable of two-dimensional imaging with high spectral resolution, which is determined by the Doppler broadened atomic linewidth of Cs at given temperature. Ionization schemes of Cs have been investigated using dye and color center tunable lasers pumped by an excimer laser and by a Nd:YAG laser. It has been experimentally shown that the most efficient ionization scheme for Cs RIID should include a three-step excitation/ionization ladder, for example, with transitions at λ1=852.11 (852.113) nm, λ2=917.22 (917.2197) nm, and λ3=1064 nm. The imaging capabilities of the detector have been evaluated using a simpler two-step ionization scheme with wavelengths λ1=852.11 nm and λ2=508 nm.

  7. Microbeam titanium isotopic analysis by resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, D.R.; Davis, A.M.; Clayton, R.N. . Enrico Fermi Inst.); Pellin, M.J.; Calaway, W.F.; Burnett, J.W.; Coon, S.R.; Young, C.E.; Gruen, D.M. )

    1991-01-01

    The importance of isotopic anomalies in refractory inclusions in meteorites is well established. Measurements of the anomalies using conventional mass spectrometry are often rendered difficult, however, by isobarically interfering isotopes: for example, {sup 48}Ti and {sup 48}Ca. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) can substantially reduce isobaric interferences in a number of systems. We have employed RIMS for the in situ detection of Ti atoms sputtered from pure Ti metal and from several terrestrial oxides containing both Ti and Ca. Tunable lasers were employed to resonantly ionize neutral Ti atoms. We have chosen Ti specifically because of the importance of Ti isotopic anomalies in cosmochemistry.

  8. Resonance ionization detection of combustion radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Cool, T.A.

    1993-12-01

    Fundamental research on the combustion of halogenated organic compounds with emphasis on reaction pathways leading to the formation of chlorinated aromatic compounds and the development of continuous emission monitoring methods will assist in DOE efforts in the management and disposal of hazardous chemical wastes. Selective laser ionization techniques are used in this laboratory for the measurement of concentration profiles of radical intermediates in the combustion of chlorinated hydrocarbon flames. A new ultrasensitive detection technique, made possible with the advent of tunable VUV laser sources, enables the selective near-threshold photoionization of all radical intermediates in premixed hydrocarbon and chlorinated hydrocarbon flames.

  9. Determination of Ionization Potential of Calcium by High-Resolution Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyabe, Masabumi; Geppert, Christopher; Kato, Masaaki; Oba, Masaki; Wakaida, Ikuo; Watanabe, Kazuo; Wendt, Klaus D. A.

    2006-03-01

    High-resolution resonance ionization spectroscopy has been utilized to determine a precise ionization potential of Ca. Three-step resonance excitation with single-mode extended-cavity diode lasers populates long and unperturbed Rydberg series of 4snp (1P1) and 4snf (1F3) states in the range of n=20--150. Using an extended Ritz formula for quantum defects, the series convergence limit has been determined to be 49305.9240(20) cm-1 with the accuracy improved one order of magnitude higher than previously reported ones.

  10. Efficient second harmonic generation of a diode-laser-pumped CW Nd:YAG laser using monolithic MgO:LiNbO3 external resonant cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlovsky, William J.; Nabors, C. D.; Byer, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    56-percent efficient external-cavity-resonant second-harmonic generation of a diode-laser pumped, CW single-axial-mode Nd:YAG laser is reported. A theory of external doubling with a resonant fundamental is presented and compared to experimental results for three monolithic cavities of nonlinear MgO:LiNbO3. The best conversion efficiency was obtained with a 12.5-mm-long monolithic ring cavity doubler, which produced 29.7 mW of CW, single-axial model 532-nm radiation from an input of 52.5 mW.

  11. High resolution resonance ionization imaging detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Winefordner, James D.; Matveev, Oleg I.; Smith, Benjamin W.

    1999-01-01

    A resonance ionization imaging device (RIID) and method for imaging objects using the RIID are provided, the RIID system including a RIID cell containing an ionizable vapor including monoisotopic atoms or molecules, the cell being positioned to intercept scattered radiation of a resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1 from the object which is to be detected or imaged, a laser source disposed to illuminate the RIID cell with laser radiation having a wavelength .lambda..sub.2 or wavelengths .lambda..sub.2, .lambda..sub.3 selected to ionize atoms in the cell that are in an excited state by virtue of having absorbed the scattered resonance laser radiation, and a luminescent screen at the back surface of the RIID cell which presents an image of the number and position of charged particles present in the RIID cell as a result of the ionization of the excited state atoms. The method of the invention further includes the step of initially illuminating the object to be detected or imaged with a laser having a wavelength selected such that the object will scatter laser radiation having the resonance wavelength .lambda..sub.1.

  12. Experimental Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (REMPI) studies of small molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dehmer, J. L.; Dehmer, P. M.; Pratt, S. T.; Ohalloran, M. A.; Tomkins, F. S.

    1987-01-01

    Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) utilizes tunable dye lasers to ionize an atom or molecule by first preparing an excited state by multiphoton absorption and then ionizing that state before it can decay. This process is highly selective with respect to both the initial and resonant intermediate states of the target, and it can be extremely sensitive. In addition, the products of the REMPI process can be detected as needed by analyzing the resulting electrons, ions, fluorescence, or by additional REMPI. This points to a number of exciting opportunities for both basic and applied science. On the applied side, REMPI has great potential as an ultrasensitive, highly selective detector for trace, reactive, or transient species. On the basic side, REMPI affords an unprecedented means of exploring excited state physics and chemistry at the quantum-state-specific level. An overview of current studies of excited molecular states is given to illustrate the principles and prospects of REMPI.

  13. Anion formation by neutral resonant ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, John S.

    2015-10-01

    A collision-radiation model of the cesium plasma that forms within a pitted or recessed sample in a Middleton-type sputter ion source showed that excited states of Cs formed. These excited states of neutral Cs undergo resonant electron transfer with neutral sputtered atoms of AMS samples to produce the accelerated anions. Numerous reported effects from over 30 years are readily explained by this mechanism, including several that puzzled Middleton.

  14. Parametric-Resonance Ionization Cooling in Twin-Helix.

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Morozov, Ya.S. Derbenev, A. Afanasev, R.P. Johnson, Erdelyi. B., J.A. Maloney

    2011-09-01

    Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a highluminosity muon collider. For the implementation of PIC, we developed an epicyclic twin-helix channel with correlated optics. Wedge-shaped absorbers immediately followed by short rf cavities are placed into the twin-helix channel. Parametric resonances are induced in both planes using helical quadrupole harmonics. We demonstrate resonant dynamics and cooling with stochastic effects off using GEANT4/G4beamline. We illustrate compensation of spherical aberrations and benchmark COSY Infinity, a powerful tool for aberration analysis and compensation.

  15. Resonant three-photon ionization spectroscopy of atomic Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Gottwald, T.; Havener, C. C.; Mattolat, C.; Vane, C. R.; Wendt, K.

    2013-12-01

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential (IP) in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for the development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti: sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source, typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities, was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63 737.686 ± 0.068 cm-1 for the ionization potential of iron.

  16. Resonant three-Photon Ionization Spectroscopy of Atomic Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Gottwald, T.; Havener, Charles C; Mattolat, C.; Vane, C Randy; Wendt, K.

    2013-01-01

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti:Sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63737.686 0.068 cm-1 for the ionization potential of iron.

  17. Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy of Neutron-Deficient Francium Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, K. T.; Lynch, K. M.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Budinčević, I.; Cocolios, T. E.; de Groote, R. P.; De Schepper, S.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Franchoo, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Heylen, H.; Marsh, B. A.; Neyens, G.; Procter, T. J.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Strashnov, I.; Stroke, H. H.; Wendt, K. D. A.

    2013-11-01

    The magnetic moments and isotope shifts of the neutron-deficient francium isotopes Fr202-205 were measured at ISOLDE-CERN with use of collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy. A production-to-detection efficiency of 1% was measured for Fr202. The background from nonresonant and collisional ionization was maintained below one ion in 105 beam particles. Through a comparison of the measured charge radii with predictions from the spherical droplet model, it is concluded that the ground-state wave function remains spherical down to Fr205, with a departure observed in Fr203 (N=116).

  18. Collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy of neutron-deficient francium isotopes.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, K T; Lynch, K M; Billowes, J; Bissell, M L; Budinčević, I; Cocolios, T E; de Groote, R P; De Schepper, S; Fedosseev, V N; Franchoo, S; Garcia Ruiz, R F; Heylen, H; Marsh, B A; Neyens, G; Procter, T J; Rossel, R E; Rothe, S; Strashnov, I; Stroke, H H; Wendt, K D A

    2013-11-22

    The magnetic moments and isotope shifts of the neutron-deficient francium isotopes (202-205)Fr were measured at ISOLDE-CERN with use of collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy. A production-to-detection efficiency of 1% was measured for (202)Fr. The background from nonresonant and collisional ionization was maintained below one ion in 10(5) beam particles. Through a comparison of the measured charge radii with predictions from the spherical droplet model, it is concluded that the ground-state wave function remains spherical down to (205)Fr, with a departure observed in (203)Fr (N=116). PMID:24313482

  19. Resonance ionization mass spectroscopy for trace analysis of plutonium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdmann, N.; Albus, F.; Deiβenberger, R.; Eberhardt, K.; Funk, H.; Hasse, H.-U.; Herrmann, G.; Huber, G.; Kluge, H.-J.; Köhler, S.; Nunnemann, M.; Passler, G.; Trautmann, N.; Urban, F.-J.

    1995-04-01

    Trace amounts of plutonium are determined by means of resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS). Plutonium atoms evaporated from a heated filament are ionized via a three-step exciation leading to an autoionizing state. The ions are mass-selectively detected with a time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. Several types of filaments have been tested with respect to atomic yield after evaporation and reproducibility. The best results have been obtained using tantalum as backing and titanium as covering. An overall detection efficiency of 1ṡ10-5 could be determined with such filaments yielding a detection limit of 2ṡ106 atoms of 239Pu.

  20. Anion formation in sputter ion sources by neutral resonant ionization.

    PubMed

    Vogel, J S

    2016-02-01

    Focused Cs(+) beams in sputter ion sources create mm-diameter pits supporting small plasmas that control anionization efficiencies. Sputtering produces overwhelmingly neutral products that the plasma can ionize as in a charge-change vapor. Electron capture between neutral atoms rises as the inverse square of the difference between the ionization potential of the Cs state and the electron affinity of the sputtered atom, allowing resonant ionization at very low energies. A plasma collision-radiation model followed electronic excitation up to Cs(7d). High modeled Cs(7d) in a 0.5 mm recess explains the 80 μA/mm(2) C(-) current density compared to the 20 μA/mm(2) from a 1 mm recess. PMID:26931912

  1. Anion formation in sputter ion sources by neutral resonant ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    Focused Cs+ beams in sputter ion sources create mm-diameter pits supporting small plasmas that control anionization efficiencies. Sputtering produces overwhelmingly neutral products that the plasma can ionize as in a charge-change vapor. Electron capture between neutral atoms rises as the inverse square of the difference between the ionization potential of the Cs state and the electron affinity of the sputtered atom, allowing resonant ionization at very low energies. A plasma collision-radiation model followed electronic excitation up to Cs(7d). High modeled Cs(7d) in a 0.5 mm recess explains the 80 μA/mm2 C- current density compared to the 20 μA/mm2 from a 1 mm recess.

  2. Resonant Laser Ionization Mass Spectrometry: An Alternative to AMS?

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Klaus; Trautmann, N.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2001-02-15

    Resonant laser ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) has developed into a versatile experimental method particularly concerning applications for highly selective ultratrace analaysis. Apart from providing nearly complete isobaric suspression and high overall efficiency, the possibolility for combining optical isotpic selectivity with that of hte mass spectrometer leads to remarkable specifications. The widespread analytical potential and applicability of different techniques based on resonant laser ionization is demonstrated in investigations on stable and radioactive ultratrace isotopes with the focus on applications which require high selectivity, concerning, e.g., the noble gas isotopes, 81,85KR, PU isotopes, 89,90SR, 99Tc and 41Ca. Selective ultratrace determination of these radioisotopes proved access to a variety of fundamental research problems in environmental sciences, geo- and cosmochemistry, archaeology, and biomedicine, which previously were often an exclusive domain for accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS).

  3. A resonant ionization laser ion source at ORNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Stracener, D. W.

    2016-06-01

    Multi-step resonance laser ionization has become an essential tool for the production of isobarically pure radioactive ion beams at the isotope separator on-line (ISOL) facilities around the world. A resonant ionization laser ion source (RILIS) has been developed for the former Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The RILIS employs a hot-cavity ion source and a laser system featuring three grating-tuned and individually pumped Ti:Sapphire lasers, especially designed for stable and simple operation. The RILIS has been installed at the second ISOL production platform of former HRIBF and has successfully provided beams of exotic neutron-rich Ga isotopes for beta decay studies. This paper reports the features, advantages, limitations, and on-line and off-line performance of the RILIS.

  4. Experiments on statistical mechanics using resonance ionization spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Iturbe, J.; Allman, S.L.; Hurst, G.S.; Payne, M.G.

    1984-04-01

    Five different fluctuation phenomena at the atomic and molecular levels have been studied by resonance ionization spectroscopy techniques with one-atom detection sensitivity. The Poisson distribution described the observed frequency distributions suggesting random behavior. In addition, a gedanken experiment suggested by Einstein and Furth on the diffusion of atoms was performed in order to test the equality between time and ensemble averages. The obtained results confirmed the ergodicity of the studied system.

  5. Proposal on dynamic correction method for resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noto, Takuma; Tomita, Hideki; Richter, Sven; Schneider, Fabian; Wendt, Klaus; Iguchi, Tetsuo; Kawarabayashi, Jun

    2013-04-01

    For high precision and accuracy in isotopic ratio measurement of transuranic elements using laser ablation assisted resonance ionization mass spectrometry, a dynamic correction method based on correlation of ion signals with energy and timing of each laser pulse was proposed. The feasibility of this dynamic correction method was investigated through the use of a programmable electronics device for fast acquisition of the energy and timing of each laser pulse.

  6. Simulations of Parametric Resonance Ionization Cooling of Muon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    K. Beard; S.A. Bogacz; Y.S. Derbenev; R.P. Johnson; K. Paul; T.J. Roberts; K. Yonehara

    2005-05-16

    The technique of using a parametric resonance to allow better ionization cooling is being developed to create small beams so that high collider luminosity can be achieved with fewer muons. In the linear channel that is studied in this effort, a half integer resonance is induced such that the normal elliptical motion of particles in x-x' phase space becomes hyperbolic, with particles moving to smaller x and larger x' as they pass down the channel. Thin absorbers placed at the focal points of the channel then cool the angular divergence of the beam by the usual ionization cooling mechanism where each absorber is followed by RF cavities. Thus the phase space of the beam is compressed in transverse position by the dynamics of the resonance and its angular divergence is compressed by the ionization cooling mechanism. We report the first results of simulations of this process, including comparisons to theoretical cooling rates and studies of sensitivity to variations in absorber thickness and initial beam conditions.

  7. Photodissociation resonances of jet-cooled NO2 at the dissociation threshold by CW-CRDS.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    Around 398 nm, the jet-cooled-spectrum of NO2 exhibits a well identified dissociation threshold (D0). Combining the continuous-wave absorption-based cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique and laser induced fluorescence detection, an energy range of ∼25 cm(-1) is analyzed at high resolution around D0. In addition to the usual molecular transitions to long-lived energy levels, ∼115 wider resonances are observed. The position, amplitude, and width of these resonances are determined. The resonance width spreads from ∼0.006 cm(-1) (i.e., ∼450 ps) to ∼0.7 cm(-1) (∼4 ps) with large fluctuations. The identification of at least two ranges of resonance width versus the excess energy can be associated with the opening of the dissociation channels NO2→NO(X(2)Π1/2, v=0, J=1/2+O((3)P2) and NO2→NO(X(2)Π1/2, v=0, J=3/2)+O((3)P2). This analysis corroborates the existence of loose transition states close to the dissociation threshold as reported previously and in agreement with the phase space theory predictions as shown by Tsuchiya's group [Miyawaki et al., J. Chem. Phys. 99, 254-264 (1993)]. The data are analyzed in the light of previously reported frequency- and time-resolved data to provide a robust determination of averaged unimolecular dissociation rate coefficients. The density of reactant levels deduced (ρreac ∼ 11levels/cm(-1)) is discussed versus the density of transitions, the density of resonances, and the density of vibronic levels. PMID:25956098

  8. Calculating Relative Ionization Probabilities of Plutonium for Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry to Support Nuclear Forensic Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lensegrav, Craig; Smith, Craig; Isselhardt, Brett

    2015-03-01

    Ongoing work seeks to apply the technology of Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) to problems related to nuclear forensics and, in particular, to the analysis and quantification of debris from nuclear detonations. As part of this effort, modeling and simulation methods are being applied to analyze and predict the potential for ionization by laser excitation of isotopes of both uranium and plutonium. Early work focused on the ionization potential of isotopes of uranium, and the present effort has expanded and extended the previous work by identifying and integrating new data for plutonium isotopes. In addition to extending the effort to this important new element, we have implemented more accurate descriptions of the spatial distribution of the laser beams to improve the accuracy of model predictions compared with experiment results as well as an ability to readily incorporate new experimental data as they become available. The model is used to estimate ionization cross sections and to compare relative excitation on two isotopes as a function of wavelength. This allows the study of sensitivity of these measurements to fluctuations in laser wavelength, irradiance, and bandwidth. We also report on initial efforts to include predictions of americium ionization probabilities into our modeling package. I would like to thank my co-authors, Gamani Karunasiri and Fabio Alves. My success is a product of their support and guidance.

  9. Resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization studies of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dixit, S. N.; Levin, D.; Mckoy, V.

    1987-01-01

    In resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI), an atom absorbs several photons making a transition to a resonant intermediate state and subsequently ionizing out of it. With currently available tunable narrow-band lasers, the extreme sensitivity of REMPI to the specific arrangement of levels can be used to selectively probe minute amounts of a single species (atom) in a host of background material. Determination of the number density of atoms from the observed REMPI signal requires a knowledge of the multiphoton ionization cross sections. The REMPI of atomic oxygen was investigated through various excitation schemes that are feasible with available light sources. Using quantum defect theory (QDT) to estimate the various atomic parameters, the REMPI dynamics in atomic oxygen were studied incorporating the effects of saturation and a.c. Stark shifts. Results are presented for REMPI probabilities for excitation through various 2p(3) (4S sup o) np(3)P and 2p(3) (4S sup o) nf(3)F levels.

  10. Resonance ionization of holmium for ion implantation in microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, F.; Chrysalidis, K.; Dorrer, H.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.; Haas, R.; Kieck, T.; Mokry, C.; Naubereit, P.; Schmidt, S.; Wendt, K.

    2016-06-01

    The determination of the electron neutrino mass by calorimetric measurement of the 163 Ho electron capture spectrum requires ultra-pure samples. Several collaborations, like ECHo or HOLMES, intend to employ microcalorimeters into which 163 Ho is implanted as an ion beam. This makes a selective and additionally very efficient ion source for holmium mandatory. For this purpose, laser resonance ionization of stable holmium 165 Ho was studied, using a three step excitation scheme driven by pulsed Ti:sapphire lasers. Five measurements with sample sizes of 1014 and 1015 atoms were performed for the efficiency investigation. In average, an excellent ionization efficiency of 32(5) % could be shown, demonstrating the suitability for ion beam implantation.

  11. Progress of resonant ionization laser ion source development at GANIL

    SciTech Connect

    Henares, J. L. Huguet, Y.; Lecesne, N.; Leroy, R.; Osmond, B.; Sjödin, A. M.; Kron, T.; Schneider, F.; Wendt, K.

    2014-02-15

    SPIRAL2 (Système de Production d’Ions Radioactifs Accélérés en Ligne) is a research facility under construction at GANIL (Grand Accélérateur National d’Ions Lourds) for the production of radioactive ion beams by isotope separation on-line methods and low-energy in-flight techniques. A resonant ionization laser ion source will be one of the main techniques to produce the radioactive ion beams. GISELE (GANIL Ion Source using Electron Laser Excitation) is a test bench developed to study a fully operational laser ion source available for Day 1 operations at SPIRAL2 Phase 2. The aim of this project is to find the best technical solution which combines high selectivity and ionization efficiency with small ion beam emittance and stable long term operation. Latest results about the new ion source geometry will be presented.

  12. Ion cyclotron resonance heating systems upgrade toward high power and CW operations in WEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillairet, Julien; Mollard, Patrick; Zhao, Yanping; Bernard, Jean-Michel; Song, Yuntao; Argouarch, Arnaud; Berger-By, Gilles; Charabot, Nicolas; Chen, Gen; Chen, Zhaoxi; Colas, Laurent; Delaplanche, Jean-Marc; Dumortier, Pierre; Durodié, Frédéric; Ekedahl, Annika; Fedorczak, Nicolas; Ferlay, Fabien; Goniche, Marc; Hatchressian, Jean-Claude; Helou, Walid; Jacquot, Jonathan; Joffrin, Emmanuel; Litaudon, Xavier; Lombard, Gilles; Maggiora, Riccardo; Magne, Roland; Milanesio, Daniele; Patterlini, Jean-Claude; Prou, Marc; Verger, Jean-Marc; Volpe, Robert; Vulliez, Karl; Wang, Yongsheng; Winkler, Konstantin; Yang, Qingxi; Yuan, Shuai

    2015-12-01

    The design of the WEST (Tungsten-W Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) Ion cyclotron resonance heating antennas is based on a previously tested conjugate-T Resonant Double Loops prototype equipped with internal vacuum matching capacitors. The design and construction of three new WEST ICRH antennas are being carried out in close collaboration with ASIPP, within the framework of the Associated Laboratory in the fusion field between IRFM and ASIPP. The coupling performance to the plasma and the load-tolerance have been improved, while adding Continuous Wave operation capability by introducing water cooling in the entire antenna. On the generator side, the operation class of the high power tetrodes is changed from AB to B in order to allow high power operation (up to 3 MW per antenna) under higher VSWR (up to 2:1). Reliability of the generators is also improved by increasing the cavity breakdown voltage. The control and data acquisition system is also upgraded in order to resolve and react on fast events, such as ELMs. A new optical arc detection system comes in reinforcement of the Vr/Vf and SHAD systems.

  13. Ion cyclotron resonance heating systems upgrade toward high power and CW operations in WEST

    SciTech Connect

    Hillairet, Julien Mollard, Patrick; Bernard, Jean-Michel; Argouarch, Arnaud; Berger-By, Gilles; Charabot, Nicolas; Colas, Laurent; Delaplanche, Jean-Marc; Ekedahl, Annika; Fedorczak, Nicolas; Ferlay, Fabien; Goniche, Marc; Hatchressian, Jean-Claude; Helou, Walid; Jacquot, Jonathan; Joffrin, Emmanuel; Litaudon, Xavier; Lombard, Gilles; Magne, Roland; Patterlini, Jean-Claude; and others

    2015-12-10

    The design of the WEST (Tungsten-W Environment in Steady-state Tokamak) Ion cyclotron resonance heating antennas is based on a previously tested conjugate-T Resonant Double Loops prototype equipped with internal vacuum matching capacitors. The design and construction of three new WEST ICRH antennas are being carried out in close collaboration with ASIPP, within the framework of the Associated Laboratory in the fusion field between IRFM and ASIPP. The coupling performance to the plasma and the load-tolerance have been improved, while adding Continuous Wave operation capability by introducing water cooling in the entire antenna. On the generator side, the operation class of the high power tetrodes is changed from AB to B in order to allow high power operation (up to 3 MW per antenna) under higher VSWR (up to 2:1). Reliability of the generators is also improved by increasing the cavity breakdown voltage. The control and data acquisition system is also upgraded in order to resolve and react on fast events, such as ELMs. A new optical arc detection system comes in reinforcement of the V{sub r}/V{sub f} and SHAD systems.

  14. Search for Efficient Laser Resonance Ionization Schemes of Refractory Elements for KISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, M.; Hirayama, Y.; Imai, N.; Ishiyama, H.; Jeong, S. C.; Miyatake, H.; Oyaizu, M.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Kim, Y. H.; Kimura, S.

    Laser resonance ionization is employed for the element-selective ionization of multi-nucleon transfer reaction products which are stopped and neutralized in the gas cell filled with argon gas of 50 kPa. We searched for laser resonance ionization schemes of tantalum (Z = 73), tungsten (Z = 74), rhenium (Z = 75) and iridium (Z = 77) elements. We deduced the photon absorption cross section for each transition and the laser ionization efficiency in the gas cell.

  15. Progress on muon parametric-resonance ionization cooling channel development

    SciTech Connect

    V.S. Morozov, Ya.S. Derbenev, A. Afanasev, K.B. Beard, R.P. Johnson, B. Erdelyi, J.A. Maloney

    2012-07-01

    Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is intended as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. To implement PIC, a continuous-field twin-helix magnetic channel was developed. A 6D cooling with stochastic effects off is demonstrated in a GEANT4/G4beamline model of a system where wedge-shaped Be absorbers are placed at the appropriate dispersion points in the twin-helix channel and are followed by short rf cavities. To proceed to cooling simulations with stochastics on, compensation of the beam aberrations from one absorber to another is required. Initial results on aberration compensation using a set of various-order continuous multipole fields are presented. As another avenue to mitigate the aberration effect, we optimize the cooling channel's period length. We observe a parasitic parametric resonance naturally occurring in the channel's horizontal plane due to the periodic beam energy modulation caused by the absorbers and rf. We discuss options for compensating this resonance and/or properly combining it with the induced half-integer parametric resonance needed for PIC.

  16. Determination of a three-step excitation and ionization scheme for resonance ionization and ultratrace analysis of Np-237

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeder, S.; Stöbener, N.; Gottwald, T.; Passler, G.; Reich, T.; Trautmann, N.; Wendt, K.

    2011-03-01

    The long-lived radio isotope 237Np is generated within the nuclear fuel cycle and represents a major hazard in the final disposal of nuclear waste. Related geochemical research requires sensitive methods for the detection of ultratrace amounts of neptunium in environmental samples. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) has proven to be one of the most sensitive methods for the detection of plutonium. A precondition for the application of RIMS to ultratrace analysis of neptunium is the knowledge of an efficient and selective scheme for optical excitation and ionization. Therefore, a multitude of medium to high-lying atomic levels in neptunium was located by applying in-source resonance ionization spectroscopy. By using excitation via six previously known first excited, intermediate levels of odd parity, a set of twelve so far unknown high-lying levels of even parity were identified and studied further for their suitability in resonant excitation/ionization schemes. Autoionizing resonances for efficient ionization of neptunium atoms were subsequently accessed spectroscopically. Altogether five resonance ionization schemes were investigated and characterized concerning their saturation behavior and relative efficiency. Applying a calibrated sample, an overall efficiency of 0.3 % was determined.

  17. Resonance ionization mass spectrometric study of the promethium/samarium isobaric pair

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, R.W.; Young, J.P.; Smith, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    Samarium daughters are problematic in isotope ratio measurements of promethium because they are isobaric. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry was utilized to circumvent this problem. An ionization selectivity factor of at least 1000:1 has been measured for promethium over samarium at 584.6 nm. Resonance ionization spectra have been recorded for both elements over the 528-560 and 580-614 nm wavelength ranges.

  18. Laser resonance ionization scheme development for tellurium and germanium at the dual Ti:Sa-Dye ISOLDE RILIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day Goodacre, T.; Fedorov, D.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Forster, L.; Marsh, B. A.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Veinhard, M.

    2016-09-01

    The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) is the principal ion source of the ISOLDE radioactive beam facility based at CERN. Using the method of in-source laser resonance ionization spectroscopy, a transition to a new autoionizing state of tellurium was discovered and applied as part of a three-step, three-resonance, photo-ionization scheme. In a second study, a three-step, two-resonance, photo-ionization scheme for germanium was developed and the ionization efficiency was measured at ISOLDE. This work increases the range of ISOLDE RILIS ionized beams to 31 elements. Details of the spectroscopy studies are described and the new ionization schemes are summarized.

  19. A tunable general purpose Q-band resonator for CW and pulse EPR/ENDOR experiments with large sample access and optical excitation.

    PubMed

    Reijerse, Edward; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Isaacson, Roger; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    We describe a frequency tunable Q-band cavity (34 GHz) designed for CW and pulse Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) as well as Electron Nuclear Double Resonance (ENDOR) and Electron Electron Double Resonance (ELDOR) experiments. The TE(011) cylindrical resonator is machined either from brass or from graphite (which is subsequently gold plated), to improve the penetration of the 100 kHz field modulation signal. The (self-supporting) ENDOR coil consists of four 0.8mm silver posts at 2.67 mm distance from the cavity center axis, penetrating through the plunger heads. It is very robust and immune to mechanical vibrations. The coil is electrically shielded to enable CW ENDOR experiments with high RF power (500 W). The top plunger of the cavity is movable and allows a frequency tuning of ±2 GHz. In our setup the standard operation frequency is 34.0 GHz. The microwaves are coupled into the resonator through an iris in the cylinder wall and matching is accomplished by a sliding short in the coupling waveguide. Optical excitation of the sample is enabled through slits in the cavity wall (transmission ∼60%). The resonator accepts 3mm o.d. sample tubes. This leads to a favorable sensitivity especially for pulse EPR experiments of low concentration biological samples. The probehead dimensions are compatible with that of Bruker flexline Q-band resonators and it fits perfectly into an Oxford CF935 Helium flow cryostat (4-300 K). It is demonstrated that, due to the relatively large active sample volume (20-30 μl), the described resonator has superior concentration sensitivity as compared to commercial pulse Q-band resonators. The quality factor (Q(L)) of the resonator can be varied between 2600 (critical coupling) and 1300 (over-coupling). The shortest achieved π/2-pulse durations are 20 ns using a 3 W microwave amplifier. ENDOR (RF) π-pulses of 20 μs ((1)H @ 51 MHz) were obtained for a 300 W amplifier and 7 μs using a 2500 W amplifier. Selected applications of the

  20. A tunable general purpose Q-band resonator for CW and pulse EPR/ENDOR experiments with large sample access and optical excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reijerse, Edward; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Isaacson, Roger; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    We describe a frequency tunable Q-band cavity (34 GHz) designed for CW and pulse Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) as well as Electron Nuclear Double Resonance (ENDOR) and Electron Electron Double Resonance (ELDOR) experiments. The TE 011 cylindrical resonator is machined either from brass or from graphite (which is subsequently gold plated), to improve the penetration of the 100 kHz field modulation signal. The (self-supporting) ENDOR coil consists of four 0.8 mm silver posts at 2.67 mm distance from the cavity center axis, penetrating through the plunger heads. It is very robust and immune to mechanical vibrations. The coil is electrically shielded to enable CW ENDOR experiments with high RF power (500 W). The top plunger of the cavity is movable and allows a frequency tuning of ±2 GHz. In our setup the standard operation frequency is 34.0 GHz. The microwaves are coupled into the resonator through an iris in the cylinder wall and matching is accomplished by a sliding short in the coupling waveguide. Optical excitation of the sample is enabled through slits in the cavity wall (transmission ˜60%). The resonator accepts 3 mm o.d. sample tubes. This leads to a favorable sensitivity especially for pulse EPR experiments of low concentration biological samples. The probehead dimensions are compatible with that of Bruker flexline Q-band resonators and it fits perfectly into an Oxford CF935 Helium flow cryostat (4-300 K). It is demonstrated that, due to the relatively large active sample volume (20-30 μl), the described resonator has superior concentration sensitivity as compared to commercial pulse Q-band resonators. The quality factor ( Q L) of the resonator can be varied between 2600 (critical coupling) and 1300 (over-coupling). The shortest achieved π/2-pulse durations are 20 ns using a 3 W microwave amplifier. ENDOR (RF) π-pulses of 20 μs ( 1H @ 51 MHz) were obtained for a 300 W amplifier and 7 μs using a 2500 W amplifier. Selected applications of the

  1. In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of high lying energy levels in atomic uranium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeder, Sebastian; Fies, Silke; Gottwald, Tina; Mattolat, Christoph; Rothe, Sebastian; Wendt, Klaus

    2010-02-01

    In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy of uranium has been carried out as preparation for the analysis of low contaminations of nuclear material in environmental samples via laser mass spectrometry. Using three-step resonance ionization spectroscopy, 86 levels of odd parity in the energy range from 37,200-38,650 cm - 1 were studied, 51 of these levels were previously unknown. Suitable excitation schemes for analytic applications are discussed.

  2. G4BEAMLINE Simulations of Parametric Resonance Ionization Cooling of Muon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, Kevin; Bogacz, S. Alex; Derbenev, Yaroslav; Yonehara, Katsuya; Johnson, Rolland P.; Paul, Kevin; Roberts, Thomas J.

    2006-03-20

    The technique of using a parametric resonance to allow better ionization cooling is being developed to create small emittance beams so that high collider luminosity can be achieved with fewer muons. While parametric resonance ionization cooling (PIC) of muons has been shown to work in matrix-based simulations using OptiM when the system is properly tuned, doing the same using a much more detailed GEANT-based g4beamline simulation has been more difficult.

  3. Relativistic effects on giant resonances in electron-impact double ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Pindzola, M.S.

    1987-06-01

    The electron-impact double-ionization cross section for Fr/sup +/ is calculated in the distorted-wave Born approximation. A giant resonance in the 5d subshell ionization-autoionization contribution to the cross section is found to be quite sensitive to changes in the double-well potential caused by relativistic effects on bound-state wave functions.

  4. Detection of undistorted continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra with non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) of the magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Kittell, Aaron W.; Camenisch, Theodore G.; Ratke, Joseph J.; Sidabras, Jason W.; Hyde, James S.

    2011-01-01

    A continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum is typically displayed as the first harmonic response to the application of 100 kHz magnetic field modulation, which is used to enhance sensitivity by reducing the level of 1/f noise. However, magnetic field modulation of any amplitude causes spectral broadening and sacrifices EPR spectral intensity by at least a factor of two. In the work presented here, a CW rapid-scan spectroscopic technique that avoids these compromises and also provides a means of avoiding 1/f noise is developed. This technique, termed non-adiabatic rapid sweep (NARS) EPR, consists of repetitively sweeping the polarizing magnetic field in a linear manner over a spectral fragment with a small coil at a repetition rate that is sufficiently high that receiver noise, microwave phase noise, and environmental microphonics, each of which has 1/f characteristics, are overcome. Nevertheless, the rate of sweep is sufficiently slow that adiabatic responses are avoided and the spin system is always close to thermal equilibrium. The repetitively acquired spectra from the spectral fragment are averaged. Under these conditions, undistorted pure absorption spectra are obtained without broadening or loss of signal intensity. A digital filter such as a moving average is applied to remove high frequency noise, which is approximately equivalent in bandwidth to use of an integrating time constant in conventional field modulation with lock-in detection. Nitroxide spectra at L- and X-band are presented. PMID:21741868

  5. Resonance overlap criterion for H atom ionization by circularly polarized microwave fields

    SciTech Connect

    Sacha, K.; Zakrzewski, J.

    1997-01-01

    The threshold for H atom ionization by circularly polarized microwave fields is discussed within the classical mechanics framework for high microwave frequencies. The Chirikov resonance overlap criterion predictions are compared with estimates obtained adopting the renormalization method. It is shown that the ionization threshold is highly sensitive to the helicity of microwaves. Among all possible initial electronic orbits, those of medium eccentricity are the first to ionize. The results obtained indicate that collisions with the nucleus play a negligible role for the onset of ionization. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Resonant production of high-lying states in the microwave ionization of Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakelyan, A.; Gallagher, T. F.

    2016-01-01

    We report microwave ionization experiments with Rydberg states of Na using several microwave frequencies near 80 GHz. We observe substantial ionization of states as low as n =26 with microwave pulses of 170-V/cm amplitude. Unlike experiments at 38 and 17 GHz, microwave ionization is not always accompanied by the production of the extremely high-lying states just below the limit. It only occurs when the initial Rydberg state is in multiphoton resonance with the high-lying states. The resonance condition is apparent at 80 GHz because the ponderomotive energy shift of the limit, and of the high-lying states, is small compared to the microwave frequency, even at fields strong enough to produce ionization. At the lower microwave frequencies, the ponderomotive shift exceeds the microwave frequency, ensuring that the resonance condition is met and obscuring its importance. The same is true of many laser experiments.

  7. Muon Tracking Studies in a Skew Parametric Resonance Ionization Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Sy, Amy; Afanaciev, Andre; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Johnson, Rolland; Morozov, Vasiliy

    2015-09-01

    Skew Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (SPIC) is an extension of the Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) framework that has previously been explored as the final 6D cooling stage of a high-luminosity muon collider. The addition of skew quadrupoles to the PIC magnetic focusing channel induces coupled dynamic behavior of the beam that is radially periodic. The periodicity of the radial motion allows for the avoidance of unwanted resonances in the horizontal and vertical transverse planes, while still providing periodic locations at which ionization cooling components can be implemented. A first practical implementation of the magnetic field components required in the SPIC channel is modeled in MADX. Dynamic features of the coupled correlated optics with and without induced parametric resonance are presented and discussed.

  8. Quantifying Uranium Isotope Ratios Using Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry: The Influence of Laser Parameters on Relative Ionization Probability

    SciTech Connect

    Isselhardt, Brett H.

    2011-09-01

    Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) has been developed as a method to measure relative uranium isotope abundances. In this approach, RIMS is used as an element-selective ionization process to provide a distinction between uranium atoms and potential isobars without the aid of chemical purification and separation. We explore the laser parameters critical to the ionization process and their effects on the measured isotope ratio. Specifically, the use of broad bandwidth lasers with automated feedback control of wavelength was applied to the measurement of 235U/238U ratios to decrease laser-induced isotopic fractionation. By broadening the bandwidth of the first laser in a 3-color, 3-photon ionization process from a bandwidth of 1.8 GHz to about 10 GHz, the variation in sequential relative isotope abundance measurements decreased from >10% to less than 0.5%. This procedure was demonstrated for the direct interrogation of uranium oxide targets with essentially no sample preparation. A rate equation model for predicting the relative ionization probability has been developed to study the effect of variation in laser parameters on the measured isotope ratio. This work demonstrates that RIMS can be used for the robust measurement of uranium isotope ratios.

  9. Ionization Branching Ratio Control with a Resonance Attosecond Clock

    SciTech Connect

    Argenti, Luca; Lindroth, Eva

    2010-07-30

    We investigate the possibility to monitor the dynamics of autoionizing states in real-time and control the yields of different ionization channels in helium by simulating extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pump IR-probe experiments focused on the N=2 threshold. The XUV pulse creates a coherent superposition of doubly excited states which is found to decay by ejecting electrons in bursts. Prominent interference fringes in the photoelectron angular distribution of the 2s and 2p ionization channels are observed, along with significant out-of-phase quantum beats in the yields of the corresponding parent ions.

  10. Influence of resonant charge exchange on the viscosity of partially ionized plasma in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhdanov, V. M. Stepanenko, A. A.

    2013-12-15

    The influence of resonant charge exchange for ion-atom interaction on the viscosity of partially ionized plasma embedded in the magnetic field is investigated. The general system of equations used to derive the viscosity coefficients for an arbitrary plasma component in the 21-moment approximation of Grad’s method is presented. The expressions for the coefficients of total and partial viscosities of a multicomponent partially ionized plasma in the magnetic field are obtained. As an example, the coefficients of the parallel and transverse viscosities for the ionic and neutral components of the partially ionized hydrogen plasma are calculated. It is shown that the account for resonant charge exchange can lead to a substantial change of the parallel and transverse viscosity of the plasma components in the region of low degrees of ionization on the order of 0.1.

  11. Resonant and nonresonant multiphoton ionization processes in the mass spectrometry of explosives.

    PubMed

    Hamachi, Akifumi; Okuno, Tomoya; Imasaka, Tomoko; Kida, Yuichiro; Imasaka, Totaro

    2015-03-01

    Multiphoton ionization processes were studied for three types of explosives using a line-tunable ultraviolet femtosecond laser. When peroxides such as triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) were ionized through a nonresonant two-photon process, a molecular ion was dominantly observed by reducing the excess energy remaining in the ion. However, an aromatic nitro compound such as 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) produced large signals arising from molecular and fragment ions by resonant two-photon ionization. In addition, only fragment ions were produced from a nonaromatic nitro compound such as 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), even when a resonant two-photon ionization process was employed, suggesting that a further reduction in excess energy would be necessary if a molecular ion were to be observed. PMID:25622138

  12. In-source spectroscopy on astatine and radium for resonant laser ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeder, Sebastian; Lassen, Jens; Heggen, Henning; Teigelhöfer, Andrea

    2014-06-01

    At on-line isotope separator facilities, rare isotopes of radioactive elements such as astatine, radium or polonium are demanded for fundamental research on nuclear structure. These elements are generally suitable for a resonance ionization laser ion source, but more data on the atomic structure is necessary to develop efficient laser ionization schemes. Due to the missing stable reference isotopes spectroscopic investigation of the atomic structure can only be performed during on-line operation. At the Isotope Separator and ACcelerator (ISAC) facility at TRIUMF, the elements astatine and radium were investigated by in-source laser spectroscopy to optimize the laser ionization efficiency. For astatine, laser spectroscopy was performed to search for high lying bound states as well as for auto-ionizing resonances. This led to the identification of four new high lying bound states of odd parity, while no auto-ionizing resonances were observed in the investigated region. Furthermore, the feasibility and the impact of laser ionization on the yield of radium isotopes was investigated using an activated target after proton irradiation.

  13. Resonance-mediated atomic ionization dynamics induced by ultraintense x-ray pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Phay J.; Kanter, E. P.; Young, L.

    2015-12-01

    We describe the methodology of our recently developed Monte Carlo rate equation (MCRE) approach, which systematically incorporates bound-bound resonances to model multiphoton ionization dynamics induced by high-fluence, high-intensity x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses. These resonances are responsible for ionization far beyond that predicted by the sequential single photon absorption model and are central to a quantitative understanding of atomic ionization dynamics in XFEL pulses. We also present calculated multiphoton ionization dynamics for Kr and Xe atoms in XFEL pulses for a variety of conditions, to compare the effects of bandwidth, pulse duration, pulse fluence, and photon energy. This comprehensive computational investigation reveals areas in the photon energy-pulse fluence landscape where resonances are critically important. We also uncover a mechanism, preservation of inner-shell vacancies (PIVS), whereby radiation damage is enhanced at higher XFEL intensities and identify the sequence of core-outer-Rydberg, core-valence, and core-core resonances encountered during multiphoton x-ray ionization.

  14. Laser-induced resonance states as dynamic suppressors of ionization in high-frequency short pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Barash, Danny; Orel, Ann E.; Baer, Roi

    2000-01-01

    An adiabatic-Floquet formalism is used to study the suppression of ionization in short laser pulses. In the high-frequency limit the adiabatic equations involve only the pulse envelope where transitions are purely ramp effects. For a short-ranged potential having a single-bound state we show that ionization suppression is caused by the appearance of a laser-induced resonance state, which is coupled by the pulse ramp to the ground state and acts to trap ionizing flux. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  15. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: counting noble-gas atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, G.S.; Payne, M.G.; Chen, C.H.; Willis, R.D.; Lehmann, B.E.; Kramer, S.D.

    1981-06-01

    New work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions) is reported. When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. It is shown that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective.

  16. Photodissociation resonances of jet-cooled NO{sub 2} at the dissociation threshold by CW-CRDS

    SciTech Connect

    Dupré, Patrick

    2015-05-07

    Around 398 nm, the jet-cooled-spectrum of NO{sub 2} exhibits a well identified dissociation threshold (D{sub 0}). Combining the continuous-wave absorption-based cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique and laser induced fluorescence detection, an energy range of ∼25 cm{sup −1} is analyzed at high resolution around D{sub 0}. In addition to the usual molecular transitions to long-lived energy levels, ∼115 wider resonances are observed. The position, amplitude, and width of these resonances are determined. The resonance width spreads from ∼0.006 cm{sup −1} (i.e., ∼450 ps) to ∼0.7 cm{sup −1} (∼4 ps) with large fluctuations. The identification of at least two ranges of resonance width versus the excess energy can be associated with the opening of the dissociation channels NO{sub 2}→NO(X {sup 2}Π{sub 1/2}, v=0, J=1/2)+O({sup 3}P{sub 2}) and NO{sub 2}→NO(X {sup 2}Π{sub 1/2}, v=0, J=3/2)+O({sup 3}P{sub 2}). This analysis corroborates the existence of loose transition states close to the dissociation threshold as reported previously and in agreement with the phase space theory predictions as shown by Tsuchiya’s group [Miyawaki et al., J. Chem. Phys. 99, 254–264 (1993)]. The data are analyzed in the light of previously reported frequency- and time-resolved data to provide a robust determination of averaged unimolecular dissociation rate coefficients. The density of reactant levels deduced (ρ{sub reac} ∼ 11 levels/cm{sup −1}) is discussed versus the density of transitions, the density of resonances, and the density of vibronic levels.

  17. Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source Project at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lassen, J.; Bricault, P.; Dombsky, M.; Lavoie, J. P.; Geppert, Ch.; Wendt, K.

    2005-04-01

    Resonant laser excitation and ionisation is one of the most successful tools for the selective production of radioactive ion beams (RIB) at on-line mass separator facilities. TRIUMF plans to augment the current ion sources with a resonant ionisation laser ion source (RILIS), to use the high production yields from the target, as shown by the delivery of 3*104/s 11Li ions from a standard target ion source with surface ionisation. The development and installation of TRIUMF's RILIS (TRILIS) is necessary to provide beams of short lived isotopes that conventional ion sources could not produce in sufficient intensity and purity for nuclear-, and nuclear astrophysics- experiments. A laser system consisting of three tunable titanium sapphire (TiSa) lasers with frequency doubling and tripling was employed to demonstrate first off-line resonance ionisation of Ga, and is being installed for first on-line test and a run on 62Ga in December 2004.

  18. Epicyclic Helical Channels for Parametric Resonance Ionization Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Andrei Afanaciev, Alex Bogacz, Yaroslav Derbenev, Kevin Beard, Valentin Ivanov, Rolland Johnson, Guimei Wang, Katsuya Yonehara

    2009-05-01

    In order to achieve cooling of muons in addition to 6D helical cooling channel (HCC) [1], we develop a technique based on a parametric resonance. The use of parametric resonances requires alternating dispersion, minimized at locations of thin absorbers, but maximized in between in order to compensate for chromatic aberrations [2]. These solutions can be combined in an Epicyclic Helical Cooling Channel (EHCC) that meets requirements of alternating dispersion of beam periodic orbit with best conditions for maintenance of stable beam transport in a continuous solenoid-type field [3]. We discuss here basic features and new simulation results for EHCC.

  19. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation using resonance ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Comaskey, B.; Crane, J.; Erbert, G.; Haynam, C.; Johnson, M.; Morris, J.; Paisner, J.; Solarz, R.; Worden, E.

    1986-09-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power-reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985, the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for enriched uranium. Resonance photoionization is the heart of the AVLIS process. We discuss those fundamental atomic parameters that are necessary for describing isotope-selective resonant multistep photoionization along with the measurement techniques that we use. We illustrate the methodology adopted with examples of other elements that are under study in our program.

  20. 6D Ionization Cooling Channel with Resonant Dispersion Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.; Alexahin, Yuri I.; Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    For muons with preferable for ionization cooling momentum <300MeV/c the longitudinal motion is naturally undamped. In order to provide the longitudinal damping a correlation between muon momentum and transverse position--described in terms of the dispersion function--should be introduced. In the present report we consider the possibility of dispersion generation in a periodic sequence of alternating solenoids (FOFO channel) by choosing the tune in the second passband (i.e. above half-integer per cell) and tilting the solenoids in adjacent cells in the opposite direction. Analytical estimates for equilibrium emittances and cooling rates are presented.

  1. Resonant- and avalanche-ionization amplification of laser-induced plasma in air

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yue; Zhang, Zhili; Jiang, Naibo; Roy, Sukesh; Gord, James R.

    2014-10-14

    Amplification of laser-induced plasma in air is demonstrated utilizing resonant laser ionization and avalanche ionization. Molecular oxygen in air is ionized by a low-energy laser pulse employing (2 + 1) resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) to generate seed electrons. Subsequent avalanche ionization of molecular oxygen and nitrogen significantly amplifies the laser-induced plasma. In this plasma-amplification effect, three-body attachments to molecular oxygen dominate the electron-generation and -loss processes, while either nitrogen or argon acts as the third body with low electron affinity. Contour maps of the electron density within the plasma obtained in O₂/N₂ and O₂/Ar gas mixtures are provided to show relative degrees of plasma amplification with respect to gas pressure and to verify that the seed electrons generated by O₂ 2 + 1 REMPI are selectively amplified by avalanche ionization of molecular nitrogen in a relatively low-pressure condition (≤100 Torr). Such plasma amplification occurring in air could be useful in aerospace applications at high altitude.

  2. g4beamline Simulations of Parametric Resonance Ionization Cooling of Muon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Beard; Slawomir Bogacz; Yaroslav Derbenev; Katsuya Yonehara; Rolland P. Johnson; Kevin Paul; Thomas J. Roberts

    2005-09-19

    The technique of using a parametric resonance to allow better ionization cooling is being developed to create small beams so that high collider luminosity can be achieved with fewer muons. While parametric resonance ionization (PIC) cooling of muons has been shown to work in matrix-based simulations when the system is properly tuned, doing the same using a much more detailed GEANT-based g4beamline [1] simulation has proven more difficult. The starting point for this work is a the linear channel; a half integer resonance is induced such that the normal elliptical motion of particles in x-x' phase space becomes hyperbolic, with particles moving to smaller x and larger x' as they pass down the channel. Thin absorbers placed at the focal points of the channel then cool the angular divergence of the beam by the usual ionization cooling mechanism where each absorber is followed by RF cavities. Thus the phase space of the beam is compressed in transverse position by the dynamics of the resonance and its angular divergence is compressed by the ionization cooling mechanism. The g4beamline and OptiM [2] simulations show the importance of synchrotron motion as an averaging mechanism for chromatic detuning. Multiple scattering and energy straggling play a significant role that must be addressed via further optimizations and additional compensation solutions.

  3. A Combined Laser Ablation-Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometer for Planetary Surface Geochronology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardell, G.; Taylor, M. E.; Stewart, B. W.; Capo, R. C.; Crown, D. A.

    2002-01-01

    Progress in the development of an instrument for direct geochronologic measurements on rocks in situ will be described. The instrument integrates laser ablation sampling, resonance ionization, and mass spectrometry to directly measure concentrations of the Rb-Sr isotope system. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Modeling of the initiation and evolution of a laser-ionized column in the lower atmosphere - 314.5 nm wavelength resonant multiphoton ionization of naturally occurring argon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetzer, G. J.; Stockley, J. E.

    1992-01-01

    A 3+1 resonant multiphoton ionization process in naturally occurring argon is studied at 314.5 nm as a candidate for providing a long ionized channel through the atmosphere. Results are presented which indicate peak electron densities up to 10 exp 8/cu cm can be created using laser intensities on the order of 10 exp 8 W/sq cm.

  5. Skew-Quad Parametric-Resonance Ionization Cooling: Theory and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Afanaciev, Andre; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Morozov, Vasiliy; Sy, Amy; Johnson, Rolland P.

    2015-09-01

    Muon beam ionization cooling is a key component for the next generation of high-luminosity muon colliders. To reach adequately high luminosity without excessively large muon intensities, it was proposed previously to combine ionization cooling with techniques using a parametric resonance (PIC). Practical implementation of PIC proposal is a subject of this report. We show that an addition of skew quadrupoles to a planar PIC channel gives enough flexibility in the design to avoid unwanted resonances, while meeting the requirements of radially-periodic beam focusing at ionization-cooling plates, large dynamic aperture and an oscillating dispersion needed for aberration corrections. Theoretical arguments are corroborated with models and a detailed numerical analysis, providing step-by-step guidance for the design of Skew-quad PIC (SPIC) beamline.

  6. Optimization of a hot-cavity type resonant ionization laser ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henares, J. L.; Lecesne, N.; Hijazi, L.; Bastin, B.; Kron, T.; Lassen, J.; Le Blanc, F.; Leroy, R.; Naubereit, P.; Osmond, B.; Vignet, J. L.; Wendt, K.

    2016-02-01

    Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) is nowadays an important technique in many Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facilities for its reliability and ability to ionize efficiently and element selectively. Grand Accélérateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL) Ion Source using Electron Laser Excitation (GISELE) is an off-line test bench for RILIS developed to study a fully operational resonant laser ion source at GANIL facility. The ion source body has been designed as a modular system to investigate different experimental approaches by varying the design parameters, to develop the future on-line laser ion source. The aim of this project is to determine the best technical solution which combines high selectivity and ionization efficiency with small ion beam emittance and stable long term operation. Latest results concerning emittance and time profile development as a function of the temperature for different ion source versions will be presented.

  7. High-resolution, three-step resonance ionization mass spectrometry of gadolinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaum, K.; Bushaw, B. A.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Wendt, K.

    2001-08-01

    High-resolution resonance ionization mass spectrometry has been used to measure triple-resonance autoionization (AI) spectra of gadolinium. Al resonances as narrow as 10 MHz have been observed and isotope shifts and hyperfine structure have been measured in selected AI states. The strongest AI state observed at 49663.576 cm-1 with a photoionization cross section of >3.6×10-15 cm2 was found to have an overall detection efficiency of >3×10-5, allowing application to a number of ultratrace determination problems. Analytical measurements with a diode-laser-based system have been successfully performed on bio-medical tissue samples.

  8. Resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization under XUV FEL radiation: a case study of the role of harmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolopoulos, G. M.; Lambropoulos, P.

    2015-12-01

    We provide a detailed quantitative study of the possible role of a small admixture of harmonics on resonant two-photon ionization. The motivation comes from the occasional presence of 2nd and 3rd harmonics in FEL radiation. We obtain the dependence of ionic yields on the intensity of the fundamental, the percentage of 2nd harmonic and the detuning of the fundamental from resonance. Having examined the cases of one and two intermediate resonances, we arrive at results of general validity and global behaviour, showing that even a small amount of harmonic may seem deceptively innocuous.

  9. Doubly resonant three-photon double ionization of Ar atoms induced by an EUV free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Gryzlova, E. V.; Ma, Ri; Fukuzawa, H.; Motomura, K.; Yamada, A.; Ueda, K.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A. N.; Strakhova, S. I.; Kabachnik, N. M.; Rouzee, A.; Hundermark, A.; Vrakking, M. J. J.; Johnsson, P.; Nagaya, K.; Yase, S.; Mizoguchi, Y.; Yao, M.; Nagasono, M.; Tono, K.; Yabashi, M.; and others

    2011-12-15

    A mechanism for three-photon double ionization of atoms by extreme-ultraviolet free-electron laser pulses is revealed, where in a sequential process the second ionization step, proceeding via resonant two-photon ionization of ions, is strongly enhanced by the excitation of ionic autoionizing states. In contrast to the conventional model, the mechanism explains the observed relative intensities of photoelectron peaks and their angular dependence in three-photon double ionization of argon.

  10. Identification of four rotamers of m-methoxystyrene by resonant two-photon ionization and mass analyzed threshold ionization spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Yanqi; Tzeng, Sheng Yuan; Takahashi, Kaito; Shivatare, Vidya; Zhang, Bing; Tzeng, Wen Bih

    2015-03-28

    We report the vibronic and cation spectra of four rotamers of m-methoxystyrene, recorded by using the two-color resonant two-photon ionization and mass-analyzed threshold ionization techniques. The excitation energies of the S{sub 1}← S{sub 0} electronic transition are found to be 32 767, 32 907, 33 222, and 33 281 cm{sup −1}, and the corresponding adiabatic ionization energies are 65 391, 64 977, 65 114, and 64 525 cm{sup −1} for these isomeric species. Most of the observed active vibrations in the electronically excited S{sub 1} and cationic ground D{sub 0} states involve in-plane ring deformation and substituent-sensitive bending motions. It is found that the relative orientation of the methoxyl with respect to the vinyl group does not influence the vibrational frequencies of the ring-substituent bending modes. The two dimensional potential energy surface calculations support our experimental finding that the isomerization is restricted in the S{sub 1} and D{sub 0} states.

  11. Parametric Resonance Ionization Cooling and Reverse Emittance Exchange for Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Yaroslav Derbenev

    2005-09-18

    Two methods to cool muon beams deeply below the limit conventionally established for the ionization cooling are proposed. In Phase Ionization Cooling (PIC), the beam is focused at wedge absorber plates each half of particle oscillation period by imposing a weak parametric resonance along the beam path. The resonance growth of particle amplitude is surmounted by the ionization cooling. At optimum, such arrangement results in reduction of each of two transverse emittances by an order of value in addition to the preceding 6D ionization cooling. Next, resonance focusing and transverse cooling can be continued in the regime of a fast Reverse Emittance Exchange (REMEX). Here, the sign of the absorber wedge is opposite to PIC while the dispersion increased. REMEX to be accompanied by the bunch lengthening and acceleration in order to maintain the relative energy spread at an appropriate level. The limitations due to energy straggling in absorber will be evaluated, and possibilities of beam conditioning against aberrations and muon space charge will be illustrated for specific beam transports. Estimates of Muon Collider luminosity versus muon production rate will be presented.

  12. Resonance ionization laser ion sources for on-line isotope separators (invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. A.

    2014-02-01

    A Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) is today considered an essential component of the majority of Isotope Separator On Line (ISOL) facilities; there are seven laser ion sources currently operational at ISOL facilities worldwide and several more are under development. The ionization mechanism is a highly element selective multi-step resonance photo-absorption process that requires a specifically tailored laser configuration for each chemical element. For some isotopes, isomer selective ionization may even be achieved by exploiting the differences in hyperfine structures of an atomic transition for different nuclear spin states. For many radioactive ion beam experiments, laser resonance ionization is the only means of achieving an acceptable level of beam purity without compromising isotope yield. Furthermore, by performing element selection at the location of the ion source, the propagation of unwanted radioactivity downstream of the target assembly is reduced. Whilst advances in laser technology have improved the performance and reliability of laser ion sources and broadened the range of suitable commercially available laser systems, many recent developments have focused rather on the laser/atom interaction region in the quest for increased selectivity and/or improved spectral resolution. Much of the progress in this area has been achieved by decoupling the laser ionization from competing ionization processes through the use of a laser/atom interaction region that is physically separated from the target chamber. A new application of gas catcher laser ion source technology promises to expand the capabilities of projectile fragmentation facilities through the conversion of otherwise discarded reaction fragments into high-purity low-energy ion beams. A summary of recent RILIS developments and the current status of laser ion sources worldwide is presented.

  13. Resonance ionization laser ion sources for on-line isotope separators (invited).

    PubMed

    Marsh, B A

    2014-02-01

    A Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) is today considered an essential component of the majority of Isotope Separator On Line (ISOL) facilities; there are seven laser ion sources currently operational at ISOL facilities worldwide and several more are under development. The ionization mechanism is a highly element selective multi-step resonance photo-absorption process that requires a specifically tailored laser configuration for each chemical element. For some isotopes, isomer selective ionization may even be achieved by exploiting the differences in hyperfine structures of an atomic transition for different nuclear spin states. For many radioactive ion beam experiments, laser resonance ionization is the only means of achieving an acceptable level of beam purity without compromising isotope yield. Furthermore, by performing element selection at the location of the ion source, the propagation of unwanted radioactivity downstream of the target assembly is reduced. Whilst advances in laser technology have improved the performance and reliability of laser ion sources and broadened the range of suitable commercially available laser systems, many recent developments have focused rather on the laser/atom interaction region in the quest for increased selectivity and/or improved spectral resolution. Much of the progress in this area has been achieved by decoupling the laser ionization from competing ionization processes through the use of a laser/atom interaction region that is physically separated from the target chamber. A new application of gas catcher laser ion source technology promises to expand the capabilities of projectile fragmentation facilities through the conversion of otherwise discarded reaction fragments into high-purity low-energy ion beams. A summary of recent RILIS developments and the current status of laser ion sources worldwide is presented. PMID:24593628

  14. Resonance ionization laser ion sources for on-line isotope separators (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Marsh, B. A.

    2014-02-15

    A Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) is today considered an essential component of the majority of Isotope Separator On Line (ISOL) facilities; there are seven laser ion sources currently operational at ISOL facilities worldwide and several more are under development. The ionization mechanism is a highly element selective multi-step resonance photo-absorption process that requires a specifically tailored laser configuration for each chemical element. For some isotopes, isomer selective ionization may even be achieved by exploiting the differences in hyperfine structures of an atomic transition for different nuclear spin states. For many radioactive ion beam experiments, laser resonance ionization is the only means of achieving an acceptable level of beam purity without compromising isotope yield. Furthermore, by performing element selection at the location of the ion source, the propagation of unwanted radioactivity downstream of the target assembly is reduced. Whilst advances in laser technology have improved the performance and reliability of laser ion sources and broadened the range of suitable commercially available laser systems, many recent developments have focused rather on the laser/atom interaction region in the quest for increased selectivity and/or improved spectral resolution. Much of the progress in this area has been achieved by decoupling the laser ionization from competing ionization processes through the use of a laser/atom interaction region that is physically separated from the target chamber. A new application of gas catcher laser ion source technology promises to expand the capabilities of projectile fragmentation facilities through the conversion of otherwise discarded reaction fragments into high-purity low-energy ion beams. A summary of recent RILIS developments and the current status of laser ion sources worldwide is presented.

  15. PRODUCTION OF HIGH-POWER CW UV BY RESONANT FREQUENCY QUADRUPLING OF A ND:YLF LASER.

    SciTech Connect

    KUCZEWSKI,A.J.

    1999-01-28

    We have constructed a single ring to resonantly double an 18 watt Nd:YLF mode-locked laser and re-double the stored green to produce over 4 watts of power in the ultra-violet (UV). This laser is used to produce a beam of 470 MeV gamma-rays by Compton backscattering the laser beam from 2.8 GeV electrons stored in a synchrotron. Achieving high luminosity of the colliding beams requires very good mode quality and beam stability at the intersection point 22 meters from the laser. The ring consists of six mirrors, with two 25 cm radius of curvature mirrors enclosing each nonlinear crystal. The drive laser is a lamp pumped Nd:YLF with a 50 ps bunch length at 76 MHz. A pointing stabilizer servo has been constructed as part of the infrared (IR) mode matching telescope. The IR to green conversion is accomplished in a 15 mm long non-critically phased matched LB0 crystal located at a 40 micron waist, with an IR conversion efficiency of 70%. A stable, nearly diffraction limited W beam of up to 4.2 watts is generated in a BBO crystal in the green storage ring. The output power is relatively independent of the efficiency of the LB0 and BBO crystals. This fact makes it possible to reduce the amount of non-TEM{sub 00} modes created by walk-off of the UV by using relatively thin BBO crystals. At present, however, the lower bound on the BBO thickness is limited by the loss of conversion efficiency at high power.

  16. Production of high-power CW UV by resonant frequency quadrupling of a Nd:YLF laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kuczewski, A.J.; Thorn, C.E.; Matone, G.; Giordano, G.

    1999-06-01

    The authors have constructed a single ring to resonantly double an 18 watt Nd:YLF mode-locked laser and re-double the stored green to produce over 4 watts of power in the ultra-violet (UV). This laser is used to produce a beam of 470 MeV gamma-rays by Compton backscattering the laser beam from 2.8 GeV electrons stored in a synchrotron. Achieving high luminosity of the colliding beams requires very good mode quality and beam stability at the intersection point 22 meters from the laser. The ring consists of six mirrors, with two 25 cm radius of curvature mirrors enclosing each nonlinear crystal. The drive laser is a lamp-pumped Nd:YLF with a 50 ps bunch length at 76 MHz. A pointing stabilizer servo has been constructed as part of the infrared (IR) mode matching telescope. The IR to green conversion is accomplished in a 15 mm long non-critically phased matched LBO crystal located at a 40 micron waist, with an IR conversion efficiency of 70%. A stable, nearly diffraction limited UV beam of up to 4.2 watts is generated in a BBO crystal in the green storage ring. The output power is relatively independent of the efficiency of the LBO and BBO crystals. This fact makes it possible to reduce the amount of non-TEM{sub 00} modes created by walk-off of the UV by using relatively thin BBO crystals. At present, however, the lower bound on the BBO thickness is limited by the loss of conversion efficiency at high power.

  17. Atmospheric Pressure Ionization Permanent Magnet Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Vilkov, Andrey N.; Gamage, Chaminda M.; Misharin, Alexander S.; Doroshenko, Vladimir M.; Tolmachev, Dmitry A.; Tarasova, Irina A.; Kharybin, Oleg N.; Novoselov, Konstantin P.; Gorshkov, Michael V.

    2007-01-01

    A new Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance mass spectrometer based on a permanent magnet with an atmospheric pressure ionization source was designed and constructed. A mass resolving power (full-width-at-half-maximum) of up to 80,000 in the electron ionization mode and 25,000 in the electrospray mode was obtained. Also, a mass measurement accuracy at low-ppm level has been demonstrated for peptide mixtures in a mass range of up to 1,200 m/z in the isotopically resolved mass spectra. PMID:17587594

  18. [Identification of high-lying odd energy levels of uranium by resonant ionization mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Du, H; Shi, G; Huang, M; Jin, C

    2000-06-01

    Single-colour and two-colour multiphoton resonant ionization spectra of uranium atom were studied extensively with a Nd:YAG laser-pumped dye laser atomic beam apparatus time-of-flight mass spectrometer in our laboratory. The energy locations of high-lying odd-parity levels in the region 33,003-34,264 cm-1, measured by a two-colour three-step ionization technique, were reported here. The angular momentum quantum number J was uniquely assigned for these levels by using angular momentum selection rules. PMID:12958925

  19. [Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of even-parity autoionization states of cerium atom].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-ming; Zhu, Feng-rong; Zhang, Zi-bin; Ren, Xiang-jun; Deng, Hu; Zhai, Li-hua; Zhang, Li-xing

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes the investigation of even-parity autoionization states of cerium atoms by three-step three-color resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS). Twenty-seven odd-parity highly excited levels, whose transition probability is high, were used in this research. One hundred and forty-one autoionization states were found by these channels with the third-step laser scanning in the wavelength range of 634-670 nm. The ionization probabilities of different channels, which had higher cross sections, were compared. On the basis of this, eight optimal photoionization schemes of cerium atom have been given. PMID:15828309

  20. Improving precision in resonance ionization mass spectrometry : influence of laser bandwidth in uranium isotope ratio measurements.

    SciTech Connect

    Isselhardt, B. H.; Savina, M. R.; Knight, K. B.; Pellin, M. J.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Prussin, S. G.

    2011-03-01

    The use of broad bandwidth lasers with automated feedback control of wavelength was applied to the measurement of {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U ratios by resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) to decrease laser-induced isotopic fractionation. By broadening the bandwidth of the first laser in a three-color, three-photon ionization process from a bandwidth of 1.8 GHz to about 10 GHz, the variation in sequential relative isotope abundance measurements decreased from 10% to less than 0.5%. This procedure was demonstrated for the direct interrogation of uranium oxide targets with essentially no sample preparation.

  1. Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization Mass Spectrometry (REMPI-MS): Applications for Process Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streibel, Thorsten; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2014-06-01

    Process analysis is an emerging discipline in analytical sciences that poses special requirements on analytical techniques, especially when conducted in an online manner. Mass spectrometric methods seem exceedingly suitable for this task, particularly if a soft ionization method is applied. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) in combination with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) provides a selective and sensitive means for monitoring (poly)aromatic compounds in process flows. The properties of REMPI and various variations of the ionization process are presented. The potential of REMPI for process analysis is highlighted with several examples, and drawbacks of the method are also noted. Applications of REMPI-TOFMS for the detection and monitoring of aromatic species in a large variety of combustion processes comprising flames, vehicle exhaust, and incinerators are discussed. New trends in technical development and combination with other analytical methods are brought forward.

  2. Rydberg levels and ionization potential of francium measured by laser-resonance ionization in a hot cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, S.V.; Mishin, V.I.; Letokhov, V.S.

    1988-10-01

    A highly sensitive method of detecting atoms in samples has been used for spectral investigations of the rare radioactive element Fr. The method is based on laser-resonance photoionization of Fr atoms in a hot quasi-enclosed cavity. The investigations have been carried out with samples in which short-lived radioactive /sup 221/Fr atoms formed at a rate of approximately 10/sup 3/ atoms/sec. The data obtained, to our knowledge for the first time, on the energies of the high-lying Rydberg levels of the /sup 2/S/sub 1/2/ and /sup 2/D series have made it possible to determine the electron binding energy of the 7p /sup 2/P/sub 3/2/ state and to establish the ionization potential of Fr accurately.

  3. State selective detection of sputtered Al neutrals by resonant laser ionization SNMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, S.; Kubota, N.

    2008-12-01

    It is important to optimize the resonance ionization efficiency of the sputtered particle by evaluating the internal energy of it. And also the dependence of the change of the internal energy of it on primary ion species and accelerating voltages was investigated. For this study, we developed proto-type resonance laser ionization SNMS instrument, which is a quadrupole SIMS apparatus combined with a wavelength tunable laser. The internal energy of the sputtered aluminum atoms, which has lowly lying excited state (112 cm -1) on the ground state, was monitored. As the results, the internal energy of the sputtered aluminum atoms was not influenced by the change of the surface work function and primary ion beam energy at all. On the contrary, the density on lowly lying excited state drastically increased due to the existence of the oxygen on aluminum surface.

  4. Reliability evaluation for failed fuel identification using resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Yoshihiro; Ito, Chikara; Harano, Hideki

    2013-04-01

    In the fast reactors, rapid and accurate identification of a fuel failure event is essential for ensuring safety operation. Isotopic analysis of krypton (Kr) and xenon (Xe) using resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is an effective identification tool, in which Kr and Xe atoms are resonantly ionized by a pulsed laser at 216.7 nm and 249.6 nm, respectively, and then three isotopic ratios: 78Kr/80Kr, 82Kr/80Kr and 126Xe/129Xe are measured to detect the location of the failed fuel assembly. In this paper, we report on the required analytical precision of RIMS estimated from simulation studies as well as the analytical performance of our spectrometer to evaluate the availability of RIMS to the failed fuel identification technique in the fast reactors.

  5. Convoy electron emission following ionization of highly-charged ions excited by resonant coherent excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, S.; Nakano, Y.; Metoki, K.; Shindo, T.; Ohtsuki, S.; Azuma, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Komaki, K.; Nakai, Y.; Takada, E.; Murakami, T.

    2012-11-01

    Projectile ionization of highly-charged Ar and Fe ions in the excited states passing relativistically fast through a thin crystalline foil was experimentally studied. We selectively controlled the population of the excited states of the projectiles, and their alignment by choosing a specific m-state through three-dimensional resonant coherent excitation technique by periodical electric fields in a crystalline. We measured energy-differential spectra of electron emission released from projectiles at zero degree. Under the resonance condition, we found an evident enhancement of the convoy electron yield, which reflects the electron momentum distribution of the initial bound state of the excited ions.

  6. Neutral resonant ionization in a H- plasma source: Potential of doubly excited **H-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, J. S.

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen plasmas are optically dense to Lyman-α radiation, maintaining *H(n = 2) neutral atoms that may undergo neutral resonant ionization to **H-. One state, **H-(2p2 3Pe), is thought bound at 9.7 meV with a several nanosecond lifetime while all others are unbound resonances. Collision dynamics of two *H(2s) shows that an ionic pair of (p, **H-) resolves at least three long-standing collision experiments. The doubly excited anion also has a path to the unexcited ion pair whose only physical distinction is that both (p, H-) have energy of 3.7 eV.

  7. Near-threshold photoelectron spectrum in resonant two-photon ionization of atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Raczyn-acute-accentski, A.; Zaremba, J.

    1987-11-15

    The near-threshold photoelectron spectrum in a resonant two-photon ionization process is investigated using a nonperturbative method. The hydrogen atom is represented by a realistic model including an infinite number of Rydberg states converging at the threshold. When the threshold is crossed a typical two-peak structure of the spectrum is modified by cutting off part of the spectrum which may include one or even two peaks.

  8. Double-resonant photoionization efficiency spectroscopy: A precise determination of the adiabatic ionization potential of DCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foltynowicz, Robert J.; Robinson, Jason D.; Grant, Edward R.

    2001-03-01

    We report the first high-resolution measurement of the adiabatic ionization potential of DCO and the fundamental bending frequency of DCO+. Fixing a first-laser frequency on selected ultraviolet transitions to individual rotational levels in the (000) band of the 3pπ 2Π intermediate Rydberg state of DCO, we scan a second visible laser over the range from 20 000 to 20 300 cm-1 to record double resonance photoionization efficiency (DR/PIE) spectra. Intermediate resonance with this Rydberg state facilitates transitions to the threshold for producing ground-state cations by bridging the Franck-Condon gap between the bent neutral radical and linear cation. By selecting a single rotational state for ionization, double-resonant excitation eliminates thermal congestion. Spectroscopic features for first-photon resonance are identified by reference to a complete assignment of the 3pπ 2Π(000)-X 2A'(000) band system of DCO. Calibration with HCO, for which the adiabatic ionization threshold is accurately known, establishes an experimental instrument function that accounts for collisional effects on the shape of the photoionization efficiency spectrum near threshold. Analysis of the DR/PIE threshold for DCO yields an adiabatic ionization threshold of 65 616±3 cm-1. By extrapolation of vibrationally autoionizing Rydberg series accessed from the Σ+ component of the 3pπ 2Π(010) intermediate state, we determine an accurate rotationally state-resolved threshold for producing DCO+(010). This energy, together with the threshold determined for the vibrational ground state of the cation provides a first estimate of the bending frequency for DCO+ as 666±3 cm-1. Assignment of the (010) autoionization spectrum further yields a measurement of an energy of 4.83±0.01 cm-1 for the (2-1) rotational transition in the 1Σ+(0110) state of DCO+.

  9. Determination of iodine in oyster tissue by isotope dilution laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Fassett, J.D.; Murphy, T.J. )

    1990-02-15

    The technique of laser resonance ionization mass spectrometry has been combined with isotope dilution analysis to determine iodine in oyster tissue. The long-lived radioisotope, 129I, was used to spike the samples. Samples were equilibrated with the 129I, wet ashed under controlled conditions, and iodine separated by coprecipitation with silver chloride. The analyte was dried as silver ammonium iodide upon a tantalum filament from which iodine was thermally desorbed in the resonance ionization mass spectrometry instrument. A single-color, two-photon resonant plus one-photon ionization scheme was used to form positive iodine ions. Long-lived iodine signals were achieved from 100 ng of iodine. The precision of 127I/129I measurement has been evaluated by replicate determinations of the spike, the spike calibration samples, and the oyster tissue samples and was 1.0%. Measurement precision among samples was 1.9% for the spike calibration and 1.4% for the oyster tissue. The concentration of iodine determined in SRM 1566a, Oyster Tissue, was 4.44 micrograms/g with an estimate of the overall uncertainty for the analysis of +/- 0.12 microgram/g.

  10. Hot-cavity studies for the Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henares, J. L.; Lecesne, N.; Hijazi, L.; Bastin, B.; Kron, T.; Lassen, J.; Le Blanc, F.; Leroy, R.; Osmond, B.; Raeder, S.; Schneider, F.; Wendt, K.

    2016-09-01

    The Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS) has emerged as an important technique in many Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facilities for its reliability, and ability to ionize target elements efficiently and element selectively. GISELE is an off-line RILIS test bench to study the implementation of an on-line laser ion source at the GANIL separator facility. The aim of this project is to determine the best technical solution which combines high selectivity and ionization efficiency with small ion beam emittance and stable long term operation. The ion source geometry was tested in several configurations in order to find a solution with optimal ionization efficiency and beam emittance. Furthermore, a low work function material was tested to reduce the contaminants and molecular sidebands generated inside the ion source. First results with ZrC ionizer tubes will be presented. Furthermore, a method to measure the energy distribution of the ion beam as a function of the time of flight will be discussed.

  11. Studies of the Twin Helix Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling Channel with COSY INFINITY

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Maloney, K.B. Beard, R.P. Johnson, A. Afanasev, S.A. Bogacz, Y.S. Derbenev, V.S. Morozov, B. Erdelyi

    2012-07-01

    A primary technical challenge to the design of a high luminosity muon collider is an effective beam cooling system. An epicyclic twin-helix channel utilizing parametric-resonance ionization cooling has been proposed for the final 6D cooling stage. A proposed design of this twin-helix channel is presented that utilizes correlated optics between the horizontal and vertical betatron periods to simultaneously focus transverse motion of the beam in both planes. Parametric resonance is induced in both planes via a system of helical quadrupole harmonics. Ionization cooling is achieved via periodically placed wedges of absorbing material, with intermittent rf cavities restoring longitudinal momentum necessary to maintain stable orbit of the beam. COSY INFINITY is utilized to simulate the theory at first order. The motion of particles around a hyperbolic fixed point is tracked. Comparison is made between the EPIC cooling channel and standard ionization cooling effects. Cooling effects are measured, after including stochastic effects, for both a single particle and a distribution of particles.

  12. Dissociative ionization at high laser intensities: importance of resonances and relaxation for fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trushin, S. A.; Fuß, W.; Schmid, W. E.

    2004-10-01

    We investigated dissociative single and double ionization of the metal carbonyls Ni(CO)4, Fe(CO)5 and Cr(CO)6 in the gas phase by means of laser pulses of different durations (30-110 fs) and wavelengths (0.8 and 1.35 µm) at intensities of 2 × 1012-2 × 1014 W cm-2. The mass spectra show striking differences: for example, Fe(CO)5 strongly fragments at 0.8 µm but little at 1.35 µm, whereas for Ni(CO)4 fragmentation is higher at 1.35 µm than at 0.8 µm chromium carbonyl shows little fragmentation at both wavelengths. In other cases, fragmentation first decreases and then increases again with intensity. These and other phenomena, also published ones, can readily be understood from long-known principles, namely resonances in the parent ions, sometimes also in the neutral molecules, in particular if relaxations are also taken into account. We emphasize that fragmentation and ionization are two separate processes. We also point out that in the process of dissociative ionization in intense laser radiation, one should generally consider intermediate states, even if there is no one-photon resonance.

  13. A dielectric barrier discharge ionization based interface for online coupling surface plasmon resonance with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiding; Xu, Shuting; Wen, Luhong; Bai, Yu; Niu, Li; Song, Daqian; Liu, Huwei

    2016-05-23

    The online combination of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) with mass spectrometry (MS) could be beneficial for accurately acquiring molecular interaction data simultaneously with their structural information at high throughputs. In this work, a novel SPR-MS interface was developed using a dielectric barrier discharge ionization (DBDI) source. The DBDI source was placed in front of the MS inlet, generating an ionization plasma jet. A spray tip was set between the DBDI source outlet and the MS inlet, nebulizing the SPR sample solution. Using this interface, samples could first be studied by SPR, then sprayed and ionized, finally analyzed by MS. By analyzing model samples containing small-molecule drugs dissolved in salt containing solutions, the practicability of this SPR-DBDI-MS interface was proved, observing the consistent change of SPR and MS signals. Compared with our previously developed direct analysis in real time (DART) based SPR-MS interface, this new interface exhibited a higher and better tolerance to non-volatile salts, and different ionization capabilities for various samples. These results indicated that the interface could find further utilization in SPR-MS studies especially when physiological conditions were needed. PMID:27116712

  14. Resonance ionization spectroscopy measurement of the vapor pressure of several molecular species

    SciTech Connect

    Capelle, G.A.; Jessup, D.A.; Borella, H.M.; Franks, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    In recent years resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) has found increasing application to various problems involving detection of low levels of atomic, and more recently molecular, species. This work demonstrates the usefulness of RIS in measuring vapor pressure curves of molecular species at very low pressures. Specifically, the vapor pressures versus temperature relationship for rubidium iodide (RbI) and potassium iodide (KI) was measured by applying RIS to atomic Rb and K, using a two-laser system. A pulsed molecular nitrogen laser first dissociated the RbI to produce ground-state Rb atoms in the experimental cell. A flashlamp-pumped dye laser then ionized the Rb in a process wherein two photons of the same wavelength are absorbed, the first exciting Rb via an allowed transition to an upper state (5/sup 2/S/sub 1/2/ ..-->.. 6/sup 2//sub 1/2 or 3/2/) lying in energy slightly more than half the distance to the ionization limit, and the second photon ionizing the excited Rb. In the case of KI, an excimer-laser-pumped dye laser was used in a similar way. An applied dc electric field swept the photoelectrons to a proportional counter for subsequent amplification and detection. The photoelectron signal was then related back to RbI and KI concentrations.

  15. Resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization of ions by Lyman alpha radiation in gaseous nebulae.

    PubMed

    Johansson, S; Letokhov, V

    2001-01-26

    One of the mysteries of nebulae in the vicinity of bright stars is the appearance of bright emission spectral lines of ions, which imply fairly high excitation temperatures. We suggest that an ion formation mechanism, based on resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization (RETPI) by intense H Lyman alpha radiation (wavelength of 1215 angstroms) trapped inside optically thick nebulae, can produce these spectral lines. The rate of such an ionization process is high enough for rarefied gaseous media where the recombination rate of the ions formed can be 10(-6) to 10(-8) per second for an electron density of 10(3) to 10(5) per cubic centimeter in the nebula. Under such conditions, the photo-ions formed may subsequently undergo further RETPI, catalyzed by intense He i and He ii radiation, which also gets enhanced in optically thick nebulae that contain enough helium. PMID:11158669

  16. Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization (rempi) and Double Resonance Uv-Uv and Ir-Uv Spectroscopic Investigation Isocytosine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Min, Ahreum; Ahn, Ahreum; Moon, Cheol Joo; Choi, Myong Yong; Ishiuchi, Shun-Ichi; Miyazaki, Mitsuhiko; Fujii, Masaaki

    2013-06-01

    Isocytosine(iC), 2-aminouracil, is a non-natural nucleobase and its functional group's positions resemble those of guanine; therefore, its spectroscopic investigation is worthy of attention especially for the natural/unnatural base pairs with guanine and isoguanine. In this study, resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) and UV/IR-UV double resonance spectra of iC in the gas phase are presented. The collaboration work between Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan and Gyeongsang National University, Korea using laser ablation and thermal evaporation, respectively, for producing jet-cooled iC is presented and discussed. The REMPI spectrum of iC monomers is recorded in the spectral range of 35000 to 36400cm-1, showing very congested π-π* vibronic bands. UV-UV hole burning spectroscopy is further conducted to investigate the conformational landscapes of iC monomers. Moreover, the presence of free OH band from IR-UV double resonance spectroscopy in combination with quantum chemical calculations convinces that the iC monomer in free-jet expansion experiment is an enol tautomer. However, a possible presence of a keto tautomer of iC may be provided by employing a pico-second experiment on iC.

  17. New electronic states of NH and ND observed by resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Russell D., III; Hudgens, Jeffrey W.

    1990-01-01

    Resonance Enhanced MultiPhoton Ionization (REMPI) spectra of NH and ND, which reveal four new electronic states are presented. Transitions from NH a 1 delta to 3s and 3p Rydberg states in both NH and ND have been observed and rotationally analyzed. The transitions were observed in the wavelength range of 258 to 288 nm. The state assignments are: e 1 pi (3s sigma) at 82857/cm, f 1 pi (3p sigma) at 86378/cm, g 1 delta (3p pi) at 88141/cm and h 1 sigma (3p pi) at 89151/cm.

  18. The ionization instability and resonant acoustic modes suppression by charge space effects in a dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Conde, L.

    2006-03-15

    The large wavenumber suppression of unstable modes by space charge effects of the ionization instability in a weakly ionized and unmagnetized dusty plasma is investigated. The charge losses in the initial equilibrium state are balanced by electron impact ionizations originated by both the thermal electron populations and an additional monoenergetic electron beam. The multifluid dimensionless equations are deduced by using the time and length scales for elastic collisions between ions and neutral atoms and the Poisson equation relates the plasma potential fluctuations with charged particle densities instead of the quasineutral approximation. A general dimensionless dispersion relation is obtained from the linearized transport equations, where the ratios between the characteristic velocities, as the dust ion acoustic (IA), dust acoustic (DA), ion sound, and thermal speeds permits us to evaluate the weight of the different terms. In the long wavelength limit the results obtained using the quasineutral approximation are recovered. The differences found between roots of both dispersion equations are discussed, as well as those of previous models. The unstable mode of the linear ionization instability is originated by the imbalance between ion and electron densities in the rest state caused by the negative charging of dust grains. Contrary to dust free plasmas, the unstable mode exists, even in the absence of the ionizing electron beam. The numerical calculations of the roots of the full dispersion equation present a maximum unstable wavenumber not predicted by the quasineutral approximation, which is related with the minimum allowed length for space charge fluctuations within a fluid model. This upper limit of unstable wave numbers hinders the predicted resonant coupling in the long wavenumber regime between the DA and DIA waves.

  19. CW ultrasonic bolt tensioning monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A CW ultrasonic device is described for measuring frequency shifts of the peak of a mechanical resonance in a body. One application of the device is measuring the strain in a bolt, and other applications such as measuring the thickness of a body, measuring the depth of a flaw in a body, measuring the elongation of a body, and measuring changes in velocity of sound in a body. The body is connected, by means of a CW transducer, to electrical circuit means including a narrow band RF amplifier to form a closed loop feedback marginal oscillator that frequency locks the device to the peak of a mechanical resonance in the body. When the frequency of this peak changes, because of a physical change in the body, the frequency of the oscillator changes. The device includes an automatic frequency resonant peak tracker that produces a voltage that is related to a change in frequency of the oscillator. This voltage is applied to the RF amplifier to change the center of its frequency band to include the frequency of the peak and is a measure of the frequency shift.

  20. Resonance ionization of sputtered atoms: Quantitative analysis in the near-surface region of silicon wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calaway, W. F.; Spiegel, D. R.; Marshall, A. H.; Downey, S. W.; Pellin, M. J.

    1997-02-01

    The unambiguous identification and quantification of low levels of metallic impurities on Si wafers are difficult problems due to the rapidly changing chemical activity near the surface. Air-exposed Si surfaces typically possess a native oxide layer several atoms thick plus a top monolayer of various silicon-containing molecules. Resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) used for postionization in secondary neutral mass spectrometry (SNMS) is uniquely suited to this task. The high sensitivity of this technique allows detection of metals at parts per billion levels with monolayer sensitivity. The high selectivity of RIS allows unambiguous identification of elements, while the reduced matrix effects of SNMS allow quantification of the photoionized element. Characterization of Si surfaces using RIS/SNMS has been explored by measuring the concentration profiles of Ca in the near-surface region of Si wafers of varying degrees of cleanliness. Calcium detection can be problematic due to the isobaric interference with SiC, particularly in the near-surface region during fabrication of devices due to the use of organic photoresist. Three different resonance ionization schemes for Ca have been examined and compared for effectiveness by calculating detection limits for Ca in Si in the chemically active near-surface region.

  1. Time Profiles of Ions Produced in a Hot-Cavity Resonant Ionization Laser Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Baktash, Cyrus; Beene, James R; Havener, Charles C; Krause, Herbert F; Schultz, David Robert; Stracener, Daniel W; Vane, C Randy; Geppert, C.; Kessler, T.; Wies, K.; Wendt, K.

    2011-01-01

    The time profiles of Cu, Sn and Ni ions extracted from a hot-cavity resonant ionization laser ion source are investigated. The ions are produced in the ion source by three-photon resonant ionization with pulsed Ti:Sapphire lasers. Measurements show that the time spread of these ions generated within laser pulses of about 30 ns could be larger than 100 s when the ions are extracted from the ion source. A one-dimensional ion-transport model using the Monte Carlo method is developed to simulate the time dependence of the ion pulses. The observed ion temporal profiles agree reasonably well with the predictions of the model, which indicates that a substantial fraction of the extracted ions are generated in the vapor-transfer tube rather than the hot cavity and that ion-wall collisions are suppressed inside the ion source by an undetermined ion confinement mechanism. Three-dimensional modeling will be necessary to understand the strong reduction in losses expected from ion-wall collisions which we interpret as evidence for confinement.

  2. Cosmological constraints in the presence of ionizing and resonance radiation at recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, Rachel; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Silk, Joseph

    2007-03-15

    With the recent measurement of full sky cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization from WMAP, key cosmological degeneracies have been broken, allowing tighter constraints to be placed on cosmological parameters inferred assuming a standard recombination scenario. Here we consider the effect on cosmological constraints if additional ionizing and resonance radiation sources are present at recombination. We find that the new CMB data significantly improve the constraints on the additional radiation sources, with log{sub 10}[{epsilon}{sub {alpha}}]<-0.5 and log{sub 10}[{epsilon}{sub i}]<-2.4 at 95% c.l. for resonance and ionizing sources, respectively. Including the generalized recombination scenario, however, we find that the constraints on the scalar spectral index n{sub s} are weakened to n{sub s}=0.98{+-}0.03, with the n{sub s}=1 case now well inside the 95% c.l. The relaxation of constraints on tensor modes, scale invariance, dark energy and neutrino masses are also discussed.

  3. Suppression of ionization probability due to Rabi oscillations in the resonance two-photon ionization of He by EUV free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Sako, Tokuei; Adachi, Junichi; Yagishita, Akira; Yabashi, Makina; Tanaka, Takashi; Nagasono, Mitsuru; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2011-11-15

    The two-photon resonance ionization probability of atoms in strong extreme-ultraviolet free-electron laser (EUV FEL) pulses has been investigated by the model of time-dependent wave packet propagation of a light-coupled multilevel atom. Under the simulation within the model assuming single-mode FEL pulses, the ionization probability P{sub ion} has shown characteristic dependences on the scaled coupling parameter U{sub gi} between two levels of the ground (g) and intermediate (i) resonance states, namely, P{sub ion}{proportional_to}(U{sub gi}){sup n}, with n being equal to {approx}2, less than 1, and {approx}1 for the small, medium, and large U{sub gi} regimes, respectively. This power dependence of the ionization probability has been interpreted due to Rabi oscillations between g and i states. To compare with recent experimental results on the same condition, the multimode nature of self-amplitude spontaneous emission (SASE) FEL pulses has been managed in the simulation. Then, the recent experimental laser-power dependence of the two-photon resonance ionization of He [Sato et al., J. Phys. B 44, 161001 (2011)] has been well described by that for the large U{sub gi} regime of the simulation, i.e., n{approx} 1. Thus, the observed linear laser-power dependence has been rationalized as being caused by the strong Rabi oscillations between the (2p)-(1s) states.

  4. Laser induced avalanche ionization in gases or gas mixtures with resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization or femtosecond laser pulse pre-ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, Mikhail N.; Miles, Richard B.

    2012-08-15

    The paper discusses the requirements for avalanche ionization in gas or gas mixtures initiated by REMPI or femtosecond-laser pre-ionization. Numerical examples of dependencies on partial composition for Ar:Xe gas mixture with REMPI of argon and subsequent classic avalanche ionization of Xe are presented.

  5. Spectroscopy and Ionization Thresholds of Isoelectronic 1-PHENYLALLYL and Benzylallenyl Resonance Stabilized Radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebree, Joshua A.; Kidwell, Nathan; Buchanan, Evan; Zwier, Timothy S.; Zgierski, Marek

    2011-06-01

    In recent years it has been proposed that resonance-stabilized radicals (RSRs) may play an important role as intermediates in the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). RSRs gain extra stability by delocalizing the unpaired electron through a neighboring conjugated π-system. Because of this extra stability, RSRs are able to build up in concentration, allowing for the creation of larger, more complex systems through their recombination with other RSRs. Mass-selective two-color resonant two-photon ionization spectra of two RSRs, phenylallyl and benzylallenyl radicals, have been recorded under jet-cooled conditions. These two radicals, while sharing the same radical conjugation, have unique properties. The phenylallyl and benzylallenyl radicals were respectively produced via discharge of trans-β-methylstyrene and benzylallene in argon prior to supersonic expansion. The D0-D1 origin of the phenylallyl radical was found at 19204 wn and was found to have a strong vertical ionization energy of 6.905(2) eV. By comparison, the benzylallenyl radical has an origin at 19703 wn and, while showing similar Franck-Condon activity to phenylallyl, has an IP curve indicative of a large geometry change between the ground state and the ion 7.50(2) eV. Visible-visible holeburning was used to show that each radical exists in one conformeric form in the expansion. The CH stretch region of each radical was taken using D0-Resonant Ion Dip Infrared Spectroscopy in a novel four laser experiment. A combination of this and DFT calculations was used to show that each radical exists in a trans geometry.

  6. Parametric-Resonance Ionization Cooling and Reverse Emittance Exchange for Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, Yaroslav; Johnson, Rolland P.

    2006-03-20

    Two new ideas are being developed to reduce the transverse emittance of muon beams in order to increase the luminosity of muon colliders. The first idea involves driving a (1/2)-integer parametric resonance in a beam line or ring such that particle motion becomes hyperbolic, where xx'=constant. With the proper phase of the resonance driving term, particles move to larger and larger x' and smaller and smaller x at the position of a thin wedge absorber. The usual mechanism of ionization cooling reduces or constrains the excursion in x' while the dynamics of the resonance reduces the spread of x. The second idea takes advantage of the large reduction of relative momentum spread with increasing momentum in going from a few hundred MeV/c where the beam is cooled to a few TeV/c for an energy frontier collider. In this case we can use thin wedge absorbers to exchange the transverse and longitudinal emittances to make the transverse emittance smaller. These two ideas depend on careful control of the lattice functions and corrections for chromatic and spherical aberrations. We discuss these ideas and their potential luminosity implications considering the limitations of aberration corrections and of space charge effects.

  7. Ultra slow muon microscopy by laser resonant ionization at J-PARC, MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Y.; Ikedo, Y.; Shimomura, K.; Strasser, P.; Kawamura, N.; Nishiyama, K.; Koda, A.; Fujimori, H.; Makimura, S.; Nakamura, J.; Nagatomo, T.; Kadono, R.; Torikai, E.; Iwasaki, M.; Wada, S.; Saito, N.; Okamura, K.; Yokoyama, K.; Ito, T.; Higemoto, W.

    2013-04-01

    As one of the principal muon beam line at the J-PARC muon facility (MUSE), we are now constructing a Muon beam line (U-Line), which consists of a large acceptance solenoid made of mineral insulation cables (MIC), a superconducting curved transport solenoid and superconducting axial focusing magnets. There, we can extract 2 × 108/s surface muons towards a hot tungsten target. At the U-Line, we are now establishing a new type of muon microscopy; a new technique with use of the intense ultra-slow muon source generated by resonant ionization of thermal Muonium (designated as Mu; consisting of a μ + and an e - ) atoms generated from the surface of the tungsten target. In this contribution, the latest status of the Ultra Slow Muon Microscopy project, fully funded, is reported.

  8. Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of Al atoms and dimers solvated in helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnokutski, Serge A.; Huisken, Friedrich

    2015-02-28

    Resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectroscopy has been applied to investigate the solvation of Al atoms in helium droplets. The R2PI spectra reveal vibrational progressions that can be attributed to Al–He{sub n} vibrations. It is found that small helium droplets have very little chance to pick up an aluminum atom after collision. However, the pick-up probability increases with the size of the helium droplets. The absorption band that is measured by monitoring the ions on the mass of the Al dimer is found to be very little shifted with respect to the Al monomer band (∼400 cm{sup −1}). However, using the same laser wavelength, we were unable to detect any Al{sub n} photoion with n larger than two.

  9. High efficiency direct detection of ions from resonance ionization of sputtered atoms

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, D.M.; Pellin, M.J.; Young, C.E.

    1985-01-16

    A method and apparatus are provided for trace and other quantitative analysis with high efficiency of a component in a sample, with the analysis involving the removal by ion or other bombardment of a small quantity of ion and neutral atom groups from the sample, the conversion of selected neutral atom groups to photoions by laser initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy, the selective deflection of the photoions for separation from original ion group emanating from the sample, and the detection of the photoions as a measure of the quantity of the component. In some embodiments, the original ion group is accelerated prior to the RIS step for separation purposes. Noise and other interference are reduced by shielding the detector from primary and secondary ions and deflecting the photoions sufficiently to avoid the primary and secondary ions.

  10. High efficiency direct detection of ions from resonance ionization of sputtered atoms

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Pellin, Michael J.; Young, Charles E.

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for trace and other quantitative analysis with high efficiency of a component in a sample, with the analysis involving the removal by ion or other bombardment of a small quantity of ion and neutral atom groups from the sample, the conversion of selected neutral atom groups to photoions by laser initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy, the selective deflection of the photoions for separation from original ion group emanating from the sample, and the detection of the photoions as a measure of the quantity of the component. In some embodiments, the original ion group is accelerated prior to the RIS step for separation purposes. Noise and other interference are reduced by shielding the detector from primary and secondary ions and deflecting the photoions sufficiently to avoid the primary and secondary ions.

  11. Roles of resonances and recollisions in strong-field atomic phenomena: Above-threshold ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Wassaf, Joseph; Veniard, Valerie; Taieeb, Richard; Maquet, Alfred

    2003-05-01

    We present the results of a set of quantal and classical calculations designed for simulating the photoelectron spectra observed when atoms are submitted to an intense laser field. We have concentrated the discussion on the range of parameters where conspicuous enhancements are observed in the high-energy part of the above-threshold ionization (ATI) spectra. Our results confirm that these enhancements result from a resonant transfer of population into the Rydberg states. Subsequent multiple returns, with elastic or inelastic recollisions of the electrons with the nucleus, when they are released in the continuum, also play an essential part. Our analysis highlights also the similarities as well as the differences observed in simulations, depending on the choice of the model potential, i.e., if it is either long range (Coulomb-like) or short range (with an exponentially decreasing tail)

  12. Flame temperature measurements by radar resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of molecular oxygen.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Sawyer, Jordan; Zhang, Zhili; Adams, Steven F

    2012-10-01

    Here we report nonintrusive local rotational temperature measurements of molecular oxygen, based on coherent microwave scattering (radar) from resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) in room air and hydrogen/air flames. Analyses of the rotational line strengths of the two-photon molecular oxygen C(3)Π(v=2)←X(3)Σ(v'=0) transition have been used to determine the hyperfine rotational state distribution of the ground X(3)Σ(v'=0) state. Rotationally resolved 2+1 REMPI spectra of the molecular oxygen C(3)Π(v=2)←X(3)Σ(v'=0) transition at different temperatures were obtained experimentally by radar REMPI. Rotational temperatures have been determined from the resulting Boltzmann plots. The measurements in general had an accuracy of ~±60 K in the hydrogen/air flames at various equivalence ratios. Discussions about the decreased accuracy for the temperature measurement at elevated temperatures have been presented. PMID:23033104

  13. Impurity characterization of solar wind collectors for the genesis discovery mission by resonance ionization mass spectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    Calaway, W. F.

    1999-02-01

    NASA's Genesis Discovery Mission is designed to collect solar matter and return it to earth for analysis. The mission consists of launching a spacecraft that carries high purity collector materials, inserting the spacecraft into a halo orbit about the L1 sun-earth libration point, exposing the collectors to the solar wind for two years, and then returning the collectors to earth. The collectors will then be made available for analysis by various methods to determine the elemental and isotopic abundance of the solar wind. In preparation for this mission, potential collector materials are being characterized to determine baseline impurity levels and to assess detection limits for various analysis techniques. As part of the effort, potential solar wind collector materials have been analyzed using resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS). RIMS is a particularly sensitivity variation of secondary neutral mass spectrometry that employs resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) to selectively postionize an element of interest, and thus discriminates between low levels of that element and the bulk material. The high sensitivity and selectivity of RIMS allow detection of very low concentrations while consuming only small amounts of sample. Thus, RIMS is well suited for detection of many heavy elements in the solar wind, since metals heavier than Fe are expected to range in concentrations from 1 ppm to 0.2 ppt. In addition, RIMS will be able to determine concentration profiles as a function of depth for these implanted solar wind elements effectively separating them from terrestrial contaminants. RIMS analyses to determine Ti concentrations in Si and Ge samples have been measured. Results indicate that the detection limit for RIMS analysis of Ti is below 100 ppt for 10{sup 6} averages. Background analyses of the mass spectra indicate that detection limits for heavier elements will be similar. Furthermore, detection limits near 1 ppt are possible with higher

  14. Developments for resonance ionization laser spectroscopy of the heaviest elements at SHIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lautenschläger, F.; Chhetri, P.; Ackermann, D.; Backe, H.; Block, M.; Cheal, B.; Clark, A.; Droese, C.; Ferrer, R.; Giacoppo, F.; Götz, S.; Heßberger, F. P.; Kaleja, O.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kunz, P.; Mistry, A. K.; Laatiaoui, M.; Lauth, W.; Raeder, S.; Walther, Th.; Wraith, C.

    2016-09-01

    The experimental determination of atomic levels and the first ionization potential of the heaviest elements (Z ⩾ 100) is key to challenge theoretical predictions and to reveal changes in the atomic shell structure. These elements are only artificially produced in complete-fusion evaporation reactions at on-line facilities such as the GSI in Darmstadt at a rate of, at most, a few atoms per second. Hence, highly sensitive spectroscopic methods are required. Laser spectroscopy is one of the most powerful and valuable tools to investigate atomic properties. In combination with a buffer-gas filled stopping cell, the Radiation Detected Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RADRIS) technique provides the highest sensitivity for laser spectroscopy on the heaviest elements. The RADRIS setup, as well as the measurement procedure, have been optimized and characterized using the α -emitter 155 Yb in on-line conditions, resulting in an overall efficiency well above 1%. This paves the way for a successful search of excited atomic levels in nobelium and heavier elements.

  15. Resonantly Enhanced Betatron Hard X-rays from Ionization Injected Electrons in a Laser Plasma Accelerator

    PubMed Central

    Huang, K.; Li, Y. F.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, L. M.; Tao, M. Z.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Li, M. H.; Chen, M.; Mirzaie, M.; Hafz, N.; Sokollik, T.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast betatron x-ray emission from electron oscillations in laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been widely investigated as a promising source. Betatron x-rays are usually produced via self-injected electron beams, which are not controllable and are not optimized for x-ray yields. Here, we present a new method for bright hard x-ray emission via ionization injection from the K-shell electrons of nitrogen into the accelerating bucket. A total photon yield of 8 × 108/shot and 108 photons with energy greater than 110 keV is obtained. The yield is 10 times higher than that achieved with self-injection mode in helium under similar laser parameters. The simulation suggests that ionization-injected electrons are quickly accelerated to the driving laser region and are subsequently driven into betatron resonance. The present scheme enables the single-stage betatron radiation from LWFA to be extended to bright γ-ray radiation, which is beyond the capability of 3rd generation synchrotrons. PMID:27273170

  16. Resonantly Enhanced Betatron Hard X-rays from Ionization Injected Electrons in a Laser Plasma Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Huang, K; Li, Y F; Li, D Z; Chen, L M; Tao, M Z; Ma, Y; Zhao, J R; Li, M H; Chen, M; Mirzaie, M; Hafz, N; Sokollik, T; Sheng, Z M; Zhang, J

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast betatron x-ray emission from electron oscillations in laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been widely investigated as a promising source. Betatron x-rays are usually produced via self-injected electron beams, which are not controllable and are not optimized for x-ray yields. Here, we present a new method for bright hard x-ray emission via ionization injection from the K-shell electrons of nitrogen into the accelerating bucket. A total photon yield of 8 × 10(8)/shot and 10(8 )photons with energy greater than 110 keV is obtained. The yield is 10 times higher than that achieved with self-injection mode in helium under similar laser parameters. The simulation suggests that ionization-injected electrons are quickly accelerated to the driving laser region and are subsequently driven into betatron resonance. The present scheme enables the single-stage betatron radiation from LWFA to be extended to bright γ-ray radiation, which is beyond the capability of 3(rd) generation synchrotrons. PMID:27273170

  17. Resonantly Enhanced Betatron Hard X-rays from Ionization Injected Electrons in a Laser Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, K.; Li, Y. F.; Li, D. Z.; Chen, L. M.; Tao, M. Z.; Ma, Y.; Zhao, J. R.; Li, M. H.; Chen, M.; Mirzaie, M.; Hafz, N.; Sokollik, T.; Sheng, Z. M.; Zhang, J.

    2016-06-01

    Ultrafast betatron x-ray emission from electron oscillations in laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) has been widely investigated as a promising source. Betatron x-rays are usually produced via self-injected electron beams, which are not controllable and are not optimized for x-ray yields. Here, we present a new method for bright hard x-ray emission via ionization injection from the K-shell electrons of nitrogen into the accelerating bucket. A total photon yield of 8 × 108/shot and 108 photons with energy greater than 110 keV is obtained. The yield is 10 times higher than that achieved with self-injection mode in helium under similar laser parameters. The simulation suggests that ionization-injected electrons are quickly accelerated to the driving laser region and are subsequently driven into betatron resonance. The present scheme enables the single-stage betatron radiation from LWFA to be extended to bright γ-ray radiation, which is beyond the capability of 3rd generation synchrotrons.

  18. Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of jet-cooled NiPt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Scott; Spain, Eileen M.; Morse, Michael D.

    1990-03-01

    Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of jet-cooled NiPt has been used to investigate the possibility of d-electron contributions to the bonding in this species. Based on an abrupt onset of predissociation, the bond strength of NiPt is assigned as D0(NiPt)=2.798±0.003 eV. Comparisons of scans using ArF (6.42 eV) or F2 (7.87 eV) radiation as the ionization laser yield IP(NiPt)=8.02±0.15 eV, from which we derive D0(Ni+-Pt)=2.41±0.15 eV and D0(Ni-Pt+) =3.58±0.35 eV. High resolution studies of the 6-0 and 8-0 bands of one of the three identifiable progressions demonstrate an Ω'=0←Ω`=0 transition with r'e =2.3396±0.0039Å and r″0 =2.2078±0.0023Å. The short bond length and large bond strength of NiPt, as compared to the corresponding values (re=2.330±0.003Å and D0=2.34±0.10 eV) for the coinage metal analog, CuAu, demonstrate significant d-orbital contributions to the bonding in NiPt.

  19. Rotational temperature analysis of N2 by resonant enhanced multi-photon ionization with fluorescence detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Steven F.; Williamson, James M.; Fisher, Dustin M.

    2011-10-01

    A non-invasive, optical technique to determine the rotational temperature of molecular nitrogen at atmospheric pressure by direct probing of the N2(X1Σg+,v =0) ground state with subsequent analysis of the rotational state distribution is presented. A tunable probe laser was scanned over resonant-enhanced, multi-photon ionization transitions initiating from various N2(X1Σg+,v =0,J″) states. At atmospheric pressure, the laser photo-ionization also induced N2+ fluorescence bands. Analysis of the relative fluorescence as a function of laser wavelength produced a calculated N2(X1Σg+,v =0,J″) rotational state distribution and determined the rotational temperature. The analysis also resulted in the assignment and tabulation of 11 previously unreported term energies for N2(b1Πu+,v =6) and N2(b1Πu-,v =6) for J' > 22, based on the experimental data. The method resulted in temperature determinations for two experimental trials in atmospheric N2 gas flows at room temperature and 600 K that were in good agreement with thermocouple measurements in the vicinity of the laser probe region.

  20. Resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization of pyrrole, N-methyl pyrrole, and furan

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, C.D.; Williamson, A.D.; Miller, J.C.; Compton, R.N.

    1980-08-15

    The resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra of pyrrole (C/sub 4/H/sub 5/N), N-methyl pyrrole (C/sub 5/H/sub 7/N), and furan (C/sub 4/H/sub 4/O) have been measured in the wavelength region from 365 to 680 nm. New and previously observed Rydberg states are reported for pyrrole and furan. Vibrational constants are presented for most of the Rydberg series. Accurate ionization potentials are derived for pyrrole (8.207 +- 0.003 eV) and N-methyl pyrrole (7.94 +- 0.02 eV). A strong two photon allowed transition is observed in N-methyl pyrrole at 41 193 cm/sup -1/ (0,0) and is attributed to an /sup 1/A/sub 2/ state. The corresponding state is not seen in pyrrole; however, it may be obscured by overlapping Rydberg series. Mass spectra following REMPI for benzene, pyrrole, and furan are reported. The degree of ionic fragmentation depends upon laser power density and wavelength.

  1. Competition between two-photon-resonant three-photon ionization and four-wave mixing in Xe

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, Hidekazu; Nakanaga, Taisuke

    2011-12-15

    Competitive inhibition of a resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization process by a resonant four-wave mixing has been observed in Xe atoms. When an intense IR (1064 nm) laser was applied to a sample of Xe which was also being irradiated by a UV laser tuned to the two-photon absorption line of Xe, the two-photon-resonant three-photon ionization signals decreased with increasing IR laser power. This phenomenon is dependent on the resonant states of Xe and the polarization of the two laser beams. Three 6s excited states [5/2]{sub 2}, [3/2]{sub 2}, and [1/2]{sub 0} were examined. At the [1/2]{sub 0} resonant state, the ion signals were not decreased but slightly increased with the increase of the IR laser power. No suppression of the ion signal was observed at the [5/2]{sub 2} resonant state, when the polarization directions of the lasers were perpendicular to each other. The result of the polarization dependence reflects the selection rules of four-wave mixing. A simple rate equation analysis including the contribution of two-photon ionization from the [1/2]{sub 0} state by the IR laser well represents the IR laser-power dependence of the ion signal.

  2. Verification Results of Jet Resonance-enhanced Multiphoton Ionization as a Real-time PCDD/F Emission Monitor

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Jet REMPI (Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization) monitor was tested on a hazardous waste firing boiler for its ability to determine concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDDs/Fs). Jet REMPI is a real time instrument capable of highly selec...

  3. Competition of Resonant and Nonresonant Paths in Resonance-Enhanced Two-Photon Single Ionization of He by an Ultrashort Extreme-Ultraviolet Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Kenichi L.; Ueda, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically study the pulse-width dependence of the photoelectron angular distribution (PAD) from the resonance-enhanced two-photon single ionization of He by femtosecond (≲20fs) extreme-ultraviolet pulses, based on the time-dependent perturbation theory and simulations with the full time-dependent Schrödinger equation. In particular, we focus on the competition between resonant and nonresonant ionization paths, which leads to the relative phase δ between the S and D wave packets distinct from the corresponding scattering phase shift difference. When the spectrally broadened pulse is resonant with an excited level, the competition varies with pulse width, and, therefore, δ and the PAD also change with it. On the other hand, when the Rydberg manifold is excited, δ and the PAD do not much vary with the pulse width, except for the very short-pulse regime.

  4. Nonadiabatic dynamics and multiphoton resonances in strong-field molecular ionization with few-cycle laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliamonti, Vincent; Sándor, Péter; Zhao, Arthur; Rozgonyi, Tamás; Marquetand, Philipp; Weinacht, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We study strong-field molecular ionization using few- (four to ten) cycle laser pulses. Employing a supercontinuum light source, we are able to tune the optical laser wavelength (photon energy) over a range of ˜200 nm (500 meV). We measure the photoelectron spectrum for a series of different molecules as a function of laser intensity, frequency, and bandwidth and illustrate how the ionization dynamics vary with these parameters. We find that multiphoton resonances and nonadiabatic dynamics (internal conversion) play an important role and result in ionization to different ionic continua. Interestingly, while nuclear dynamics can be "frozen" for sufficiently short laser pulses, we find that resonances strongly influence the photoelectron spectrum and final cationic state of the molecule regardless of pulse duration—even for pulses that are less than four cycles in duration.

  5. Low-frequency resonances of the refractive index in weakly ionized plasma with an admixture of dust

    SciTech Connect

    Prudskikh, V. V.

    2013-12-15

    The propagation of low-frequency electromagnetic waves along the magnetic field in weakly ionized plasma with an admixture of dust is studied in the framework of the Hall magnetohydrodynamics. Explicit expressions for the coefficients of magnetic field diffusion in plasma are derived. The resonance of the refractive index is found to occur for either right- or left-hand polarized waves. A quantitative criterion is obtained that allows one to determine the polarization of waves that experience resonance at given plasma parameters. The physical mechanism of the resonance is discussed, and the obtained results are compared with the available literature data.

  6. Three-step resonant photoionization spectroscopy of Ni and Ge: ionization potential and odd-parity Rydberg levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, T.; Brück, K.; Baktash, C.; Beene, J. R.; Geppert, Ch; Havener, C. C.; Krause, H. F.; Liu, Y.; Schultz, D. R.; Stracener, D. W.; Vane, C. R.; Wendt, K.

    2007-12-01

    In preparation of a laser ion source, we have investigated multi-step laser ionization via Rydberg and autoionizing states for atomic Ni and Ge using a mass separator with an ion beam energy of 20 keV. For both elements resonant three-step excitation schemes suitable for modern Ti:sapphire laser systems were developed. Rydberg series in the range of principal quantum numbers 20 <= n <= 80 were localized, assigned and quantum numbers were allocated to the individual resonances. Ionization potentials (IP) were extracted from fits of the individual series and quantum defects of individual levels were analysed for confirmation of series assignment. For Ni the ionization potential could be extracted with significantly increased precision compared to literature with a value of EIP (Ni) = 61 619.77(14) cm-1. Also, at least one notable autoionizing state above the first IP was discovered for both elements, and the different ionization schemes via Rydberg or autoionizing states were compared with respect to line shape, ionization efficiency and selectivity.

  7. Effects of laser pulse duration and intensity on Coulomb explosion of CO2: Signatures of charge-resonance enhanced ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinyuk, Igor V.; Bocharova, Irina; Sanderson, Joseph; Kieffer, Jean-Claude; Légaré, François

    2009-11-01

    We studied laser-induced Coulomb explosion of CO2 by full triple-coincidence momentum resolved detection of resulting ion fragments. From the coincidence momentum data we can reconstruct molecular geometry immediately before explosion. We observe the dynamics of Coulomb explosion by comparing reconstructed CO2 geometries for different Ti:Sapphire laser pulse durations (at the same intensity) ranging from few cycles (7 fs) to 200 fs. We conclude that for longer pulse durations (>=100 fs) Coulomb explosion proceeds through the enhanced ionization mechanism taking place at the critical O-O distance of 8 a.u., similarly to well known charge-resonance enhanced ionization (CREI) in H2.

  8. Search for efficient laser resonance ionization schemes of tantalum using a newly developed time-of-flight mass-spectrometer in KISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, M.; Hirayama, Y.; Ishiyama, H.; Jung, H. S.; Miyatake, H.; Oyaizu, M.; Watanabe, Y. X.; Kimura, S.; Ozawa, A.; Jeong, S. C.; Sonoda, T.

    2016-06-01

    The technique of laser resonance ionization is employed for an element-selective ionization of multi-nucleon transfer reaction products which are stopped and neutralized in a gas cell filled with argon gas at 50 kPa. We have been searching for efficient laser ionization schemes for refractory elements of Z = 73-78 using a time-of-flight mass-spectrometer (TOF-MS) chamber. To evaluate the isotope shift and ionization efficiency for each candidate of the ionization scheme, isotope separation using the TOF-MS was devised. The TOF-MS was designed to separate the isotopes using two-stage linear acceleration with a mass resolving power M / ΔM of >350. A mass resolving power of 250 was experimentally confirmed by measuring the TOF of laser-ionized tantalum (Z = 73) ions with mass number 181. We searched for a laser resonance ionization scheme of tantalum using the TOF-MS.

  9. Photoionization Dynamics and Ion State Distributions in Single-Photon and Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization of Molecules.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braunstein, Matthew

    This thesis presents results of theoretical studies of single-photon ionization and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) of several small molecules. The first part of the thesis examines shape resonances in the photoionization of O_2. Studies reported here include investigations of branching ratios of electronic multiplet states in the 3sigma _{g} and 1pi_ {u} photoionization of O_2 and a comparison of photoionization of the singlet states, a ^1Delta_{g} and d ^1prod_{g } (3ssigma_{g} 1pi_{g}), with that of the ground state of O_2. These studies show that the electronic exchange interaction between the ion core and the photoelectron in shape resonant energy regions profoundly affects the electronic state distributions of the molecular ion. We also report vibrational branching ratios in the single-photon ionization of O_2 , and in REMPI of O_2 via the G^3prod_{g} Rydberg state. In these studies, we find that a shape resonance causes a dependence of the electronic transition moment on the molecular geometry leading to non-Franck -Condon ion vibrational distributions and a dependence of the rotational branch intensity on the ion vibrational state. The second part of this thesis examines shape resonances in other molecules, focusing on the more general aspects of the photoionization dynamics. Here we present studies of the vibrational state distributions in the 7 sigma photoionization of the polyatomic N_2O, where a shape resonance causes non-Franck-Condon vibrational state distributions, the degree of which depends on the nuclear displacements involved and whether the shape resonance is localized on a particular bond. We also study the photoionization dynamics of the valence shell of Cl_2, where a shape resonance is also seen. Finally, we present studies of the K-shell ionization of CO. Studies in this energy region have assumed a new importance with the development of tunable X-ray synchrotron sources. Here, electronic relaxation in the production of a K

  10. Spatially resolved measurement of singlet delta oxygen by radar resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Zhang, Zhili; Ombrello, Timothy M

    2013-07-01

    Coherent microwave Rayleigh scattering (Radar) from resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) was demonstrated to directly and nonintrusively measure singlet delta oxygen, O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)), with high spatial resolution. Two different approaches, photodissociation of ozone and microwave discharge plasma in an argon and oxygen flow, were utilized for O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)) generation. The d(1)Π(g)←a(1)Δ(g) (3-0) and d(1)Π(g)←a(1)Δ(g) (1-0) bands of O(2)(a(1)Δ(g)) were detected by Radar REMPI for two different flow conditions. Quantitative absorption measurements using sensitive off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (ICOS) was used simultaneously to evaluate the accuracy and sensitivity of the Radar REMPI technique. The detection limit of Radar REMPI was found to be comparable to the ICOS technique with a detection threshold of approximately 10(14) molecules/cm(3) but with a spatial resolution that was 8 orders of magnitude smaller than the ICOS technique. PMID:23811904

  11. Controlled-Resonant Surface Tapping-Mode Scanning Probe Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenz, Matthias; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on the advancement of a controlled-resonance surface tapping-mode single capillary liquid junction extraction/ESI emitter for mass spectrometry imaging. The basic instrumental setup and the general operation of the system were discussed and optimized performance metrics were presented. The ability to spot sample, lane scan and chemically image in an automated and controlled fashion were demonstrated. Rapid, automated spot sampling was demonstrated for a variety of compound types including the cationic dye basic blue 7, the oligosaccharide cellopentaose, and the protein equine heart cytochrome c. The system was used for lane scanning and chemical imaging of the cationic dye crystal violet in inked lines on glass and for lipid distributions in mouse brain thin tissue sections. Imaging of the lipids in mouse brain tissue under optimized conditions provided a spatial resolution of approximately 35 m based on the ability to distinguish between features observed both in the optical and mass spectral chemical images. The sampling spatial resolution of this system was comparable to the best resolution that has been reported for other types of atmospheric pressure liquid extraction-based surface sampling/ionization techniques used for mass spectrometry imaging.

  12. Development of High Resolution Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Neutron Dosimetry Technique with93Nb(n,n')93mNb Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomita, Hideki; Takatsuka, Takaaki; Takamatsu, Takahide; Adachi, Yoshitaka; Furuta, Yujin; Noto, Takuma; Iguchi, Tetsuo; Sonnenschein, Volker; Wendt, Klaus; Ito, Chikara; Maeda, Shigetaka

    2016-02-01

    We have proposed an advanced technique to measure the 93mNb yield precisely by Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry, instead of conventional characteristic X-ray spectroscopy. 93mNb-selective resonance ionization is achievable by distinguishing the hyperfine splitting of the atomic energy levels between 93Nb and 93mNb at high resolution. In advance of 93mNb detection, we could successfully demonstrate high resolution resonant ionization spectroscopy of stable 93Nb using an all solid-state, narrow-band and tunable Ti:Sapphire laser system operated at 1 kHz repetition rate.

  13. CW-pulsed laser

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, J. C.

    1981-09-01

    An apparatus for generating a spatially coherent laser beam having both CW and pulsed modes is disclosed. The modes are generated in differing volumetric regions of a single gain medium excited by a continuous energy pump. The CW portion of the output beam passes from the gain medium through a partially transmissive output coupling. The pulsed modes in the output beam are created in the respective region of the gain medium when transition materials from a selected group are stimulated to undergo an abrupt change between their reflective and transmissive states. Either cavity dumped or Q-switched configurations can be created by selective and patterned location of the transition materials at the ends of the gain medium. Symmetric organization of the volumetric regions within the gain medium allows temporal superposition of the two modes while maintaining spatial distinctiveness within the laser beam generated.

  14. A proposal for a novel H ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance heating and surface ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Tarvainen, Ollie A; Kurennoy, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    A design for a novel H{sup -} ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance plasma heating and surface ionization is presented. The plasma chamber of the source is an rf-cavity designed for TE{sub 111} eigenmode at 2.45 GHz. The desired mode is excited with a loop antenna. The ionization process takes place on a cesiated surface of a biased converter electrode. The H{sup -} ion beam is further 'self-extracted' through the plasma region. The magnetic field of the source is optimized for plasma generation by electron cyclotron resonance heating, and beam extraction. The design features of the source are discussed in detail and the attainable H{sup -} ion current, beam emittance and duty factor of the novel source are estimated.

  15. Use of a Continuous Wave Laser and Pockels Cell for Sensitive High-Resolution Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groote, R. P.; Budinčević, I.; Billowes, J.; Bissell, M. L.; Cocolios, T. E.; Farooq-Smith, G. J.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Flanagan, K. T.; Franchoo, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Heylen, H.; Li, R.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Neyens, G.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Stroke, H. H.; Wendt, K. D. A.; Wilkins, S. G.; Yang, X.

    2015-09-01

    New technical developments have led to a 2 orders of magnitude improvement of the resolution of the collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at ISOLDE, CERN, without sacrificing the high efficiency of the CRIS technique. Experimental linewidths of 20(1) MHz were obtained on radioactive beams of francium, allowing us for the first time to determine the electric quadrupole moment of the short lived [t1 /2=22.0 (5 ) ms ] 219Fr Qs=-1.21 (2 ) eb , which would not have been possible without the advantages offered by the new method. This method relies on a continuous-wave laser and an external Pockels cell to produce narrow-band light pulses, required to reach the high resolution in two-step resonance ionization. Exotic nuclei produced at rates of a few hundred ions/s can now be studied with high resolution, allowing detailed studies of the anchor points for nuclear theories.

  16. Use of a Continuous Wave Laser and Pockels Cell for Sensitive High-Resolution Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    de Groote, R P; Budinčević, I; Billowes, J; Bissell, M L; Cocolios, T E; Farooq-Smith, G J; Fedosseev, V N; Flanagan, K T; Franchoo, S; Garcia Ruiz, R F; Heylen, H; Li, R; Lynch, K M; Marsh, B A; Neyens, G; Rossel, R E; Rothe, S; Stroke, H H; Wendt, K D A; Wilkins, S G; Yang, X

    2015-09-25

    New technical developments have led to a 2 orders of magnitude improvement of the resolution of the collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) experiment at ISOLDE, CERN, without sacrificing the high efficiency of the CRIS technique. Experimental linewidths of 20(1) MHz were obtained on radioactive beams of francium, allowing us for the first time to determine the electric quadrupole moment of the short lived [t_{1/2}=22.0(5) ms] ^{219}Fr Q_{s}=-1.21(2) eb, which would not have been possible without the advantages offered by the new method. This method relies on a continuous-wave laser and an external Pockels cell to produce narrow-band light pulses, required to reach the high resolution in two-step resonance ionization. Exotic nuclei produced at rates of a few hundred ions/s can now be studied with high resolution, allowing detailed studies of the anchor points for nuclear theories. PMID:26451548

  17. (2 + 1) resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization of H2 via the E,F 1Sigma(+)g state

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, H.; Lynch, D. L.; Dixit, S. N.; Mckoy, V.; Huo, Winifred M.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper, the results of ab initio calculations of photoelectron angular distributions and vibrational branching ratios for the (2 + 1) resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) of H2 via the E,F 1Sigma(+)g state are reported, and these are compared with the experimental data of Anderson et al. (1984). These results show that the observed non-Franck-Condon behavior is predominantly due to the R dependence of the transition matrix elements, and to a lesser degree to the energy dependence. This work presents the first molecular REMPI study employing a correlated wave function to describe the Rydberg-valence mixing in the resonant intermediate state.

  18. Photofragmentation, state interaction, and energetics of Rydberg and ion-pair states: Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of HI

    SciTech Connect

    Hróðmarsson, Helgi Rafn; Wang, Huasheng; Kvaran, Ágúst

    2014-06-28

    Mass resolved resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization data for hydrogen iodide (HI), for two-photon resonance excitation to Rydberg and ion-pair states in the 69 600–72 400 cm{sup −1} region were recorded and analyzed. Spectral perturbations due to homogeneous and heterogeneous interactions between Rydberg and ion-pair states, showing as deformations in line-positions, line-intensities, and line-widths, were focused on. Parameters relevant to photodissociation processes, state interaction strengths and spectroscopic parameters for deperturbed states were derived. Overall interaction and dynamical schemes to describe the observations are proposed.

  19. Mechanism of Resonance-enhanced X-ray Multiple Ionization of Argon Atom in an XFEL Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Linda; Ho, Phay

    2014-05-01

    We present a new Monte Carlo rate equation (MCRE) approach to examine the inner-shell ionization dynamics of atoms in an intense x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulse. In addition to photoionization, Auger decay and fluorescence processes, we include bound-to-bound transitions in the rate equation calculations. This computational tool allows us to account for ``hidden resonances'' unveiled in high charge states of atom in XFEL pulse. Using our MCRE approach, we investigated the ionization dynamics of Argon atom exposed to an 480-eV XFEL pulse. At this photon energy, it is not energetically allowed to produce Ar ions with charge 10 + and higher via direct one-photon L-shell ionization. Rather, we found that the resonance-enhanced x-ray multiple ionization (REXMI) pathways play a dominant role in producing these highly charged ions. Our calculated results agree with the measured Ar ion yield data. More importantly, we account for the pulse-duration dependence of experimental ion yield data and identify the responsible REXMI pathways where excitation of multiple electrons into outer valence and Rydberg orbitals are followed by autoionization. Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Di- vision, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, US Dept of Energy, Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  20. The in-gas-jet laser ion source: Resonance ionization spectroscopy of radioactive atoms in supersonic gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryavtsev, Yu.; Ferrer, R.; Huyse, M.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.

    2013-02-01

    New approaches to perform efficient and selective step-wise resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) of radioactive atoms in different types of supersonic gas jets are proposed. This novel application results in a major expansion of the in-gas laser ionization and spectroscopy (IGLIS) method developed at KU Leuven. Implementation of resonance ionization in the supersonic gas jet allows to increase the spectral resolution by one order of magnitude in comparison with the currently performed in-gas-cell ionization spectroscopy. Properties of supersonic beams, obtained from the de Laval-, the spike-, and the free jet nozzles that are important for the reduction of the spectral line broadening mechanisms in cold and low density environments are discussed. Requirements for the laser radiation and for the vacuum pumping system are also examined. Finally, first results of high-resolution spectroscopy in the supersonic free jet are presented for the 327.4 nm 3d104s 2S1/2→ 3d104p 2P1/2 transition in the stable 63Cu isotope using an amplified single mode laser radiation.

  1. Upgrade of the Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometer for Precise Identification of Failed Fuel in a Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Iwata, Yoshihiro; Ito, Chikara; Harano, Hideki; Aoyama, Takafumi

    2011-12-13

    Isotopic analysis of krypton (Kr) and xenon (Xe) by resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is an effective tool for identification of failed fuel in fast reactors to achieve their safety operation and high plant availability. Reliability of the failed fuel detection and location (FFDL) system depends on the precise determination of {sup 78}Kr/{sup 80}Kr, {sup 82}Kr/{sup 80}Kr and {sup 126}Xe/{sup 129}Xe isotopic ratios, which is mainly hampered by statistical errors for detection of the corresponding isotopes except {sup 82}Kr generated in large amounts during operation of fast reactors. In this paper, we report on improvements of the laser optical system of our spectrometer to increase the resonance ionization efficiency of Kr and Xe atoms, focusing on (i) utilization of the uniform YAG laser beam to improve the wavelength conversion efficiency of sum frequency generation and (ii) reflection of the ultraviolet light by a concave mirror to increase the photon density. The results indicate that our upgraded resonance ionization mass spectrometer has enough performance for isotopic analysis of Kr and Xe required in the Monju FFDL system.

  2. Upgrade of the Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometer for Precise Identification of Failed Fuel in a Fast Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, Yoshihiro; Harano, Hideki; Ito, Chikara; Aoyama, Takafumi

    2011-12-01

    Isotopic analysis of krypton (Kr) and xenon (Xe) by resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) is an effective tool for identification of failed fuel in fast reactors to achieve their safety operation and high plant availability. Reliability of the failed fuel detection and location (FFDL) system depends on the precise determination of 78Kr/80Kr, 82Kr/80Kr and 126Xe/129Xe isotopic ratios, which is mainly hampered by statistical errors for detection of the corresponding isotopes except 82Kr generated in large amounts during operation of fast reactors. In this paper, we report on improvements of the laser optical system of our spectrometer to increase the resonance ionization efficiency of Kr and Xe atoms, focusing on (i) utilization of the uniform YAG laser beam to improve the wavelength conversion efficiency of sum frequency generation and (ii) reflection of the ultraviolet light by a concave mirror to increase the photon density. The results indicate that our upgraded resonance ionization mass spectrometer has enough performance for isotopic analysis of Kr and Xe required in the Monju FFDL system.

  3. Automated ambient desorption-ionization platform for surface imaging integrated with a commercial Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Pól, Jaroslav; Vidová, Veronika; Kruppa, Gary; Kobliha, Václav; Novák, Petr; Lemr, Karel; Kotiaho, Tapio; Kostiainen, Risto; Havlícek, Vladimír; Volný, Michael

    2009-10-15

    A fully automated atmospheric pressure ionization platform has been built and coupled with a commercial high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FTICR-MS) instrument. The outstanding performance of this instrument allowed screening on the basis of exact masses in imaging mode. The main novel aspect was in the integration of the atmospheric pressure ionization imaging into the current software for matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) imaging, which allows the user of this commercial dual-source mass spectrometer to perform MALDI-MS and different ambient MS imaging from the same user interface and to utilize the same software tools. Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) and desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI) were chosen to test the ambient surface imaging capabilities of this new ionization platform. Results of DESI imaging experiments performed on brain tissue sections are in agreement with previous MS imaging reports obtained by DESI imaging, but due to the high resolution and mass accuracy of the FTICR instrument it was possible to resolve several ions at the same nominal mass in the DESI-MS spectra of brain tissue. These isobaric interferences at low resolution are due to the overlap of ions from different lipid classes with different biological relevance. It was demonstrated that with the use of high-resolution MS fast imaging screening of lipids can be achieved without any preseparation steps. DAPPI, which is a relatively new and less developed ambient ionization technique compared to DESI, was used in imaging mode for the first time ever. It showed promise in imaging of phytocompounds from plant leaves, and selective ionization of a sterol lipid was achieved by DAPPI from a brain tissue sample. PMID:19761221

  4. Experimental preparation of the initial state of Xe+-N laser-induced collisional charge transfer system: Multi-photon resonant ionization of xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongying; Lu, Zhenzhong; Fan, Rongwei; Chen, Deying

    2009-05-01

    A novel one-color Xe+-N laser induced collisional charge transfer system is proposed, and preparation of the initial state of the system, i.e., Xe+ is experimentally implemented through resonance enhanced multi-photon ionization (REMPI) by ˜440 nm dye laser. The REMPI of Xe is experimentally investigated through time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry and the intensity dependence of Xe+ is obtained, aiming at the preparation of Xe+. The resonant ionization spectra of Xe at ˜440 nm under several different conditions are measured, showing the impacts of mode purification and source pressure on the resonant ionization spectrum. The results indicate the feasibility of preparing the initial state of the Xe+-N system by ˜440 nm multi-photon resonant ionization, which prepares for a further experiment of laser-induced collisional charge transfer.

  5. Surface-Induced Dissociation of Ions Produced by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization in a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, Julia; Beck, Kenneth M.; Hache, John J.; Futrell, Jean H.

    2004-01-15

    Intermediate pressure matrix assisted laser ionization (MALDI) source was constructed and interfaced with a 6T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) specially configured for surface-induced dissociation (SID) studies.

  6. Measurement of88Sr K-shell ionization probability across the nuclear elastic-scattering resonance at 5060 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemin, J. F.; Anholt, R.; Stoller, Ch.; Meyerhot, W. E.; Amundsen, P. A.

    1981-09-01

    We have measured the dependence of the Sr K-shell-ionization probability on the projectile energy in the vicinity of the d-wave iosobaric analog resonance at 5060 keV in the reaction 88Sr(p,p)88Sr. The variation of the ionization probability with projectile enegy is interpreted in terms of a phase shift between the incoming and outgoing atomic ionization amplitudes due to the nuclear time delay.

  7. Observation of orbiting resonances in He({sup 3}S{sub 1}) + NH{sub 3} Penning ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Jankunas, Justin; Osterwalder, Andreas; Jachymski, Krzysztof; Hapka, Michał

    2015-04-28

    Resonances are among the clearest quantum mechanical signatures of scattering processes. Previously, shape resonances and Feshbach resonances have been observed in inelastic and reactive collisions involving atoms or diatomic molecules. Structure in the integral cross section has been observed in a handful of elastic collisions involving polyatomic molecules. The present paper presents the observation of shape resonances in the reactive scattering of a polyatomic molecule, NH{sub 3}. A merged-beam study of the gas phase He({sup 3}S{sub 1}) + NH{sub 3} Penning ionization reaction dynamics is described in the collision energy range 3.3 μeV < E{sub coll} < 10 meV. In this energy range, the reaction rate is governed by long-range attraction. Peaks in the integral cross section are observed at collision energies of 1.8 meV and 7.3 meV and are assigned to ℓ = 15,16 and ℓ = 20,21 partial wave resonances, respectively. The experimental results are well reproduced by theoretical calculations with the short-range reaction probability P{sub sr} = 0.035. No clear signature of the orbiting resonances is visible in the branching ratio between NH{sub 3}{sup +} and NH{sub 2}{sup +} formation.

  8. Rate equation model of laser induced bias in uranium isotope ratios measured by resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Isselhardt, B. H.; Prussin, S. G.; Savina, M. R.; Willingham, D. G.; Knight, K. B.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2015-12-07

    Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) has been developed as a method to measure uranium isotope abundances. In this approach, RIMS is used as an element-selective ionization process between uranium atoms and potential isobars without the aid of chemical purification and separation. The use of broad bandwidth lasers with automated feedback control of wavelength was applied to the measurement of the 235U/238U ratio to decrease laser-induced isotopic fractionation. In application, isotope standards are used to identify and correct bias in measured isotope ratios, but understanding laser-induced bias from first-principles can improve the precision and accuracy of experimental measurements. A rate equation model for predicting the relative ionization probability has been developed to study the effect of variations in laser parameters on the measured isotope ratio. The model uses atomic data and empirical descriptions of laser performance to estimate the laser-induced bias expected in experimental measurements of the 235U/238U ratio. Empirical corrections are also included to account for ionization processes that are difficult to calculate from first principles with the available atomic data. As a result, development of this model has highlighted several important considerations for properly interpreting experimental results.

  9. Rate equation model of laser induced bias in uranium isotope ratios measured by resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Isselhardt, B. H.; Prussin, S. G.; Savina, M. R.; Willingham, D. G.; Knight, K. B.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2015-12-07

    Resonance Ionization Mass Spectrometry (RIMS) has been developed as a method to measure uranium isotope abundances. In this approach, RIMS is used as an element-selective ionization process between uranium atoms and potential isobars without the aid of chemical purification and separation. The use of broad bandwidth lasers with automated feedback control of wavelength was applied to the measurement of the 235U/238U ratio to decrease laser-induced isotopic fractionation. In application, isotope standards are used to identify and correct bias in measured isotope ratios, but understanding laser-induced bias from first-principles can improve the precision and accuracy of experimental measurements. A rate equationmore » model for predicting the relative ionization probability has been developed to study the effect of variations in laser parameters on the measured isotope ratio. The model uses atomic data and empirical descriptions of laser performance to estimate the laser-induced bias expected in experimental measurements of the 235U/238U ratio. Empirical corrections are also included to account for ionization processes that are difficult to calculate from first principles with the available atomic data. As a result, development of this model has highlighted several important considerations for properly interpreting experimental results.« less

  10. Investigation of the photoionization properties of pharmaceutically relevant substances by resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy and single-photon ionization spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Kleeblatt, Juliane; Ehlert, Sven; Hölzer, Jasper; Sklorz, Martin; Rittgen, Jan; Baumgärtel, Peter; Schubert, Jochen K; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2013-08-01

    The photoionization properties of the pharmaceutically relevant substances amantadine, diazepam, dimethyltryptamine, etomidate, ketamine, mescaline, methadone, and propofol were determined. At beamline U125/2-10m-NIM of the BESSY II synchrotron facility (Berlin, Germany) vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization spectra were recorded in the energy range 7.1 to 11.9 eV (174.6 to 104.2 nm), showing the hitherto unknown ionization energies and fragmentation appearance energies of the compounds under investigation. Furthermore, (1+1)-resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra of selected compounds (amantadine, diazepam, etomidate, ketamine, and propofol) were recorded by a continuous scan in the energy range between 3.6 and 5.7 eV (345 to 218 nm) using a tunable optical parametric oscillator (spectral resolution: 0.1 nm) laser system. The resulting REMPI wavelength spectra of these compounds are discussed and put into context with already known UV absorption data. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used for ion detection in both experiments. Finally, the implications of the obtained physical-chemical results for potential analytical applications are discussed. In this context, fast detection approaches for the considered compounds from breath gas using photoionization mass spectrometry and a rapid pre-concentration step (e.g., needle trap device) are of interest. PMID:23876725

  11. Rotationally Resolved Vacuum Ultraviolet Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization (VUV REMPI) of Acetylene via the G̃ Rydberg State.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-May, Alice F; Grütter, Monika; Neugebohren, Jannis; Kitsopoulos, T N; Wodtke, Alec M; Harding, Dan J

    2016-07-14

    We present a 1 + 1' resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) scheme for acetylene via the linear G̃ 4sσ (1)Πu Rydberg state, offering partial rotational resolution and the possibility to detect excitation in both the cis- and trans-bending modes. The resonant transition to the G̃ state is driven by a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photon, generated by resonant four-wave mixing (FWM) in krypton. Ionization from the short-lived G̃ state then occurs quickly, driven by the high intensity of the residual light from the FWM process. We have observed nine bands in the region between 79 200 cm(-1) and 80 500 cm(-1) in C2H2 and C2D2. We compare our results with published spectra in this region and suggest alternative assignments for some of the Renner-Teller split bands. Similar REMPI schemes should be applicable to other small molecules with picosecond lifetime Rydberg states. PMID:27073931

  12. Laser Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy of the Lanthanides Tb, Dy and Ho as Homologues to Actinides and Super Heavy Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Gottwald, T.; Lassen, J.; Liu, Yuan; Mattolat, C.; Raeder, S.; Wendt, K.

    2009-03-01

    At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) spectroscopic investigations of the rare earth elements Tb, Dy and Ho were carried out using laser resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS). Detailed spectroscopic studies are necessary to develop highly efficient and selective excitation and ionization schemes. Those schemes, carefully worked out under off-line conditions are mandatory for employment at laser ion sources at on-line facilities for studies of exotic radioactive nuclei e.g. 146Tb, as well as for laser-based ultra trace isotope analysis. Additionally, this work serves as preparatory step for related investigations on actinide elements and in preparation of the heaviest elements, where spectroscopic data so far are scarce or not existing at all.

  13. Interfering one-photon and two-photon ionization by femtosecond VUV pulses in the region of an intermediate resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grum-Grzhimailo, Alexei N.; Gryzlova, Elena V.; Staroselskaya, Ekaterina I.; Venzke, Joel; Bartschat, Klaus

    2015-06-01

    The electron angular distribution after atomic photoionization by the fundamental frequency and its second harmonic is analyzed for a case when the frequency of the fundamental scans the region of an intermediate atomic state. The angular distribution and its left-right asymmetry, due to the two-pathway interference between nonresonant one-photon and resonant two-photon ionization, sharply change as a function of the photon energy. The phenomenon is exemplified by both solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation on a numerical space-time grid and by applying perturbation theory for ionization of the hydrogen atom in the region of the 1 s -2 p transition for femtosecond pulses as well as an infinitely long exposure to the radiation. Parametrizations for the asymmetry and the anisotropy coefficients, obtained within perturbation theory, reveal general characteristics of observable quantities as functions of the parameters of the radiation beam.

  14. Uptake of Cu{sup 2+} by the calcium carbonates vaterite and calcite as studied by continuous wave (CW) and pulse electron paramagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Schosseler, P.M.; Schweiger, A.; Wehrli, B.

    1999-07-01

    The investigation of the Cu{sup 2+} uptake by the calcium carbonate minerals vaterite and calcite with continuous wave and pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) yields information on a molecular scale about the relevant complexation reactions at the mineral-water interface. The structural assignment is based on changes in the coordination geometry of the copper complexes. Magnetic interactions of the unpaired Cu{sup 2+} electron with nuclei of {sup 13}C-labeled carbonate ligands and protons from water or hydroxyl ligands in the first and second coordination spheres of the cation are detected by pulse EPR techniques. Results show that the Cu{sup 2+} ions are rapidly dehydrated upon adsorption on the mineral surface. The strong surface binding is due to monodentate coordination to three or four carbonate surface ions, comparable to chelate complexation in solution. The formation of square-planar or square-pyramidal copper complexes at exposed surface sites like kinks and steps yields a convincing explanation for the inhibition of calcium carbonate growth and dissolution. Upon recrystallization the Cu{sup 2+} ions are integrated into the calcite lattice where they exhibit a dynamic Jahn-Teller effect. The resulting local lattice distortions are expected to destabilize the Cu{sub x}-Ca{sub (1{minus}x)}CO{sub 3}(s) solid solution. Results support the concept of a dynamic calcium carbonate surface, covered by a thin, structured surface layer. The detailed structural information obtained for Cu{sup 2+} provides a better understanding of the interaction of other metal ions with calcium carbonate minerals.

  15. CW laser light condensation.

    PubMed

    Zhurahov, Michael; Bekker, Alexander; Levit, Boris; Weill, Rafi; Fischer, Baruch

    2016-03-21

    We present a first experimental demonstration of classical CW laser light condensation (LC) in the frequency (mode) domain that verifies its prediction (Fischer and Weill, Opt. Express20, 26704 (2012)). LC is based on weighting the modes in a noisy environment in a loss-gain measure compared to an energy (frequency) scale in Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC). It is characterized by a sharp transition from multi- to single-mode oscillation, occurring when the spectral-filtering (loss-trap) has near the lowest-loss mode ("ground-state") a power-law dependence with an exponent smaller than 1. An important meaning of the many-mode LC system stems from its relation to lasing and photon-BEC. PMID:27136845

  16. Aging effects on macadamia nut oil studied by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Proschogo, Nicholas W; Albertson, Peter L; Bursle, Johanna; McConchie, Cameron A; Turner, Athol G; Willett, Gary D

    2012-02-29

    High-resolution electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry is successfully used in the detailed molecular analysis of aged macadamia nut oils. The results are consistent with peroxide values, the current industry measure for rancidity, and provide detailed molecular information on the oxidative and hydrolytic degeneration of such oils. Mass analysis of macadamia oil samples stored for extended periods at 6 °C revealed that oils obtained by the cold press method are more susceptible to aging than those obtained using modified Soxhlet or accelerated solvent extraction methods. PMID:22268609

  17. Ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and ionic radii of element Uus (Z = 117) and astatine.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhiwei; Li, Jiguang; Dong, Chenzhong

    2010-12-30

    Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) method was employed to calculate the first five ionization potentials, electron affinities, resonance excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and radii for the element Uus and its homologue At. Main valence correlation effects were taken into account. The Breit interaction and QED effects were also estimated. The uncertainties of calculated IPs, EAs, and IR for Uus and At were reduced through an extrapolation procedure. The good consistency with available experimental and other theoretical values demonstrates the validity of the present results. These theoretical data therefore can be used to predict some unknown physicochemical properties of element Uus, Astatine, and their compounds. PMID:21141866

  18. Ion microscopy with resonant ionization mass spectrometry : time-of-flight depth profiling with improved isotopic precision.

    SciTech Connect

    Pellin, M. J.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Levine, J.; Zinovev, A.; Davis, A. M.; Stephan, T.; Tripa, C. E.; King, B. V.; Savina, M. R.

    2010-01-01

    There are four generally mutually exclusive requirements that plague many mass spectrometric measurements of trace constituents: (1) the small size (limited by the depth probed) of many interesting materials requires high useful yields to simply detect some trace elements, (2) the low concentrations of interesting elements require efficient discrimination from isobaric interferences, (3) it is often necessary to measure the depth distribution of elements with high surface and low bulk contributions, and (4) many applications require precise isotopic analysis. Resonant ionization mass spectrometry has made dramatic progress in addressing these difficulties over the past five years.

  19. Resonant coupling of ionization waves and acoustic gravity waves in the presence of a magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eun, H.; Gross, S. H.

    1976-01-01

    The nature of the two resonant directions that occur for a single frequency in the presence of a magnetic field is demonstrated, along with the manner in which the resonances change with the dip angle and the angle of propagation from the meridian plane. The conditions under which acoustic branch resonances may occur are outlined. It is found that the calculated frequencies and directions for resonance are in the range of observed values for TID's obtained from ground and satellite measurements. This result is indicative of a possible connection between TID's and the resonance phenomenon. It is shown that a strong resonance type of response may be possible in the F region at a particular frequency from a region that can be as great as 100 km in altitude.

  20. The design of double electrostatic-lens optics for resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization and photoelectron imaging experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Zehua; Li, Chunsheng; Qin, Zhengbo E-mail: xfzheng@mail.ahnu.edu.cn; Zheng, Xianfeng E-mail: xfzheng@mail.ahnu.edu.cn; Yao, Guanxin; Zhang, Xianyi; Cui, Zhifeng

    2015-06-15

    Compared to single ion/electron-optics for velocity-map imaging, a double-focusing lens assembly designed not only allows for mapping velocity imaging of photoelectrons but also allows for investigating the vibrational structure of the intermediate states of neutral species in resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra. In this presentation, in order to record REMPI and photoelectron spectra separately, we have constructed a compact photoelectron velocity-map imaging (VMI) apparatus combined with an opposite linear Wiley-Mclaren time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS). A mass resolution (m/Δm) of ∼1300 for TOFMS and electron energy resolution (ΔE/E) of 2.4% for VMI have been achieved upon three-photon ionization of Xe atom at 258.00 nm laser wavelength. As a benchmark, in combination of one-color (1 + 1) REMPI and photoelectron imaging of benzene via 6{sup 1} and 6{sup 1}1{sup 1} vibronic levels in the S{sub 1} state, the vibrational structures of the cation and photoelectron angular anisotropy are unraveled. In addition, two-color (1 + 1′) REMPI and photoelectron imaging of aniline was used to complete the accurate measurement of ionization potential (62 271 ± 3 cm{sup −1}). The results suggest that the apparatus is a powerful tool for studying photoionization dynamics in the photoelectron imaging using vibrational-state selected excitation to the intermediate states of neutrals based on REMPI technique.

  1. The design of double electrostatic-lens optics for resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization and photoelectron imaging experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zehua; Li, Chunsheng; Qin, Zhengbo; Zheng, Xianfeng; Yao, Guanxin; Zhang, Xianyi; Cui, Zhifeng

    2015-06-01

    Compared to single ion/electron-optics for velocity-map imaging, a double-focusing lens assembly designed not only allows for mapping velocity imaging of photoelectrons but also allows for investigating the vibrational structure of the intermediate states of neutral species in resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra. In this presentation, in order to record REMPI and photoelectron spectra separately, we have constructed a compact photoelectron velocity-map imaging (VMI) apparatus combined with an opposite linear Wiley-Mclaren time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS). A mass resolution (m/Δm) of ˜1300 for TOFMS and electron energy resolution (ΔE/E) of 2.4% for VMI have been achieved upon three-photon ionization of Xe atom at 258.00 nm laser wavelength. As a benchmark, in combination of one-color (1 + 1) REMPI and photoelectron imaging of benzene via 61 and 6111 vibronic levels in the S1 state, the vibrational structures of the cation and photoelectron angular anisotropy are unraveled. In addition, two-color (1 + 1') REMPI and photoelectron imaging of aniline was used to complete the accurate measurement of ionization potential (62 271 ± 3 cm-1). The results suggest that the apparatus is a powerful tool for studying photoionization dynamics in the photoelectron imaging using vibrational-state selected excitation to the intermediate states of neutrals based on REMPI technique.

  2. The design of double electrostatic-lens optics for resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization and photoelectron imaging experiments.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zehua; Li, Chunsheng; Qin, Zhengbo; Zheng, Xianfeng; Yao, Guanxin; Zhang, Xianyi; Cui, Zhifeng

    2015-06-01

    Compared to single ion/electron-optics for velocity-map imaging, a double-focusing lens assembly designed not only allows for mapping velocity imaging of photoelectrons but also allows for investigating the vibrational structure of the intermediate states of neutral species in resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra. In this presentation, in order to record REMPI and photoelectron spectra separately, we have constructed a compact photoelectron velocity-map imaging (VMI) apparatus combined with an opposite linear Wiley-Mclaren time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS). A mass resolution (m/Δm) of ∼1300 for TOFMS and electron energy resolution (ΔE/E) of 2.4% for VMI have been achieved upon three-photon ionization of Xe atom at 258.00 nm laser wavelength. As a benchmark, in combination of one-color (1 + 1) REMPI and photoelectron imaging of benzene via 6(1) and 6(1)1(1) vibronic levels in the S1 state, the vibrational structures of the cation and photoelectron angular anisotropy are unraveled. In addition, two-color (1 + 1') REMPI and photoelectron imaging of aniline was used to complete the accurate measurement of ionization potential (62,271 ± 3 cm(-1)). The results suggest that the apparatus is a powerful tool for studying photoionization dynamics in the photoelectron imaging using vibrational-state selected excitation to the intermediate states of neutrals based on REMPI technique. PMID:26133827

  3. Athabasca oil sands process water: characterization by atmospheric pressure photoionization and electrospray ionization fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Barrow, Mark P; Witt, Matthias; Headley, John V; Peru, Kerry M

    2010-05-01

    The Athabasca oil sands in Canada are a less conventional source of oil which have seen rapid development. There are concerns about the environmental impact, with particular respect to components in oil sands process water which may enter the aquatic ecosystem. Naphthenic acids have been previously targeted for study, due to their implications in toxicity toward aquatic wildlife, but it is believed that other components, too, contribute toward the potential toxicity of the oil sands process water. When mass spectrometry is used, it is necessary to use instrumentation with a high resolving power and mass accuracy when studying complex mixtures, but the technique has previously been hindered by the range of compounds that have been accessible via common ionization techniques, such as electrospray ionization. The research described here applied Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry in conjunction with electrospray ionization and atmospheric pressure photoionization, in both positive-ion and negative-ion modes, to the characterization of oil sands process water for the first time. The results highlight the need for broader characterization when investigating toxic components within oil sands process water. PMID:20359201

  4. Efficient three-step, two-color ionization of plutonium using a resonance enhanced 2-photon transition into an autoionizing state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, P.; Huber, G.; Passler, G.; Trautmann, N.

    2004-05-01

    Resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) has proven to be a powerful method for isotope selective ultra-trace analysis of long-lived radioisotopes. For plutonium detection limits of 106 to 107 atoms have been achieved for various types of samples. So far a three-step, three-color laser excitation scheme was applied for efficient ionization. In this work, a two-photon transition from an excited state into a high-lying autoionizing state, will be presented, yielding a similar overall efficiency as the three-step, three-color ionization scheme. In this way, only two tunable lasers are needed, while the advantages of a three-step, three-color excitation (high selectivity, good efficiency and low non-resonant background) are preserved. The two-photon transition has been characterized with respect to saturation behavior and line width. The three-step, two-color ionization is a possibility for an improved RIMS procedure.

  5. Electron angular distribution in resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization of H{sub 2}{sup +} by ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Selstoe, S.; Palacios, A.; Fernandez, J.; Martin, F.

    2007-03-15

    We present a theoretical study of the electron angular distribution produced in resonance enhanced two-photon ionization of the H{sub 2}{sup +} molecular ion using ultrashort laser pulses. The method consists in solving the time dependent Schroedinger equation and includes all electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. Differential (in proton energy and electron emission solid angle) ionization probabilities have been evaluated for various photon energies, laser intensities, and pulse durations. We show that (1+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) leads to angular distributions significantly different from those produced in direct two-photon ionization. The REMPI process is observed even at photon energies not matching the energy difference between two electronic states in a perfect vertical transition. Interestingly, there is no trace of REMPI effects in the electron angular distribution when the fully differential probabilities are integrated over proton energy.

  6. Molecular photoelectron angular distribution rotations in multi-photon resonant ionization of H{sub 2}{sup +} by circularly polarized ultraviolet laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Kai-Jun Chelkowski, Szczepan; Bandrauk, André D.

    2015-04-14

    We study effects of pulse durations on molecular photoelectron angular distributions (MPADs) in ultrafast circular polarization ultraviolet resonant ionization processes. Simulations performed on aligned H{sub 2}{sup +} by numerically solving time dependent Schrödinger equations show rotations of MPADs with respect to the molecular symmetry axes. It is found that in multi-photon resonant ionization processes, rotation angles are sensitive to pulse durations, which we attribute to the coherent resonant excitation between the ground state and the intermediate excited electronic state induced by Rabi oscillations. Multi-photon nonresonant and single photon ionization processes are simulated and compared which exhibit a constant rotation angle. An asymmetry parameter is introduced to describe the pulse duration sensitivity by perturbation theory models. Influence of pulse frequency detunings on MPADs is also investigated where oscillations of rotations are absent at long pulse durations due to nonresonance excitation.

  7. Resonance ionization spectroscopy of sodium Rydberg levels using difference frequency generation of high-repetition-rate pulsed Ti:sapphire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naubereit, P.; Marín-Sáez, J.; Schneider, F.; Hakimi, A.; Franzmann, M.; Kron, T.; Richter, S.; Wendt, K.

    2016-05-01

    The generation of tunable laser light in the green to orange spectral range has generally been a deficiency of solid-state lasers. Hence, the formalisms of difference frequency generation (DFG) and optical parametric processes are well known, but the DFG of pulsed solid-state lasers was rarely efficient enough for its use in resonance ionization spectroscopy. Difference frequency generation of high-repetition-rate Ti:sapphire lasers was demonstrated for resonance ionization of sodium by efficiently exciting the well-known D1 and D2 lines in the orange spectral range (both ≈589 nm). In order to prove the applicability of the laser system for its use at resonance ionization laser ion sources of radioactive ion beam facilities, the first ionization potential of Na was remeasured by three-step resonance ionization into Rydberg levels and investigating Rydberg convergences. A result of EIP=41449.455 (6) stat(7) syscm-1 was obtained, which is in perfect agreement with the literature value of EIPlit =41449.451(2)cm-1 . A total of 41 level positions for the odd-parity Rydberg series n f 2F5/2,7/2o for principal quantum numbers of 10 ≤n ≤60 were determined experimentally.

  8. Trace determination of gadolinium in biomedical samples by diode laser-based multi-step resonance ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Blaum, K; Geppert, C; Schreiber, W G; Hengstler, J G; Müller, P; Nörtershäuser, W; Wendt, K; Bushaw, B A

    2002-04-01

    The application of high-resolution multi-step resonance ionization mass spectrometry (RIMS) to the trace determination of the rare earth element gadolinium is described. Utilizing three-step resonant excitation into an autoionizing level, both isobaric and isotopic selectivity of >10(7) were attained. An overall detection efficiency of approximately 10(-7) and an isotope specific detection limit of 1.5 x 10(9) atoms have been demonstrated. When targeting the major isotope (158)Gd, this corresponds to a total Gd detection limit of 1.6 pg. Additionally, linear response has been demonstrated over a dynamic range of six orders of magnitude. The method has been used to determine the Gd content in various normal and tumor tissue samples, taken from a laboratory mouse shortly after injection of gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA), which is used as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The RIMS results show Gd concentrations that vary by more than two orders of magnitude (0.07-11.5 microg mL(-1)) depending on the tissue type. This variability is similar to that observed in MRI scans that depict Gd-DTPA content in the mouse prior to dissection, and illustrates the potential for quantitative trace analysis in microsamples of biomedical materials. PMID:12012186

  9. Phonological and Phonetic Asymmetries of Cw Combinations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Yunju

    2009-01-01

    This thesis investigates the relationship between the phonological distribution of Cw combinations, and the acoustic/perceptual distinctiveness between syllables with plain C onsets and with Cw combination onsets. Distributional asymmetries of Cw combinations discussed in this thesis include the avoidance of Cw combinations in the labial consonant…

  10. The Collinear Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (CRIS) experimental setup at CERN-ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocolios, T. E.; Al Suradi, H. H.; Billowes, J.; Budinčević, I.; de Groote, R. P.; De Schepper, S.; Fedosseev, V. N.; Flanagan, K. T.; Franchoo, S.; Garcia Ruiz, R. F.; Heylen, H.; Le Blanc, F.; Lynch, K. M.; Marsh, B. A.; Mason, P. J. R.; Neyens, G.; Papuga, J.; Procter, T. J.; Rajabali, M. M.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Simpson, G. S.; Smith, A. J.; Strashnov, I.; Stroke, H. H.; Verney, D.; Walker, P. M.; Wendt, K. D. A.; Wood, R. T.

    2013-12-01

    The CRIS setup at CERN-ISOLDE is a laser spectroscopy experiment dedicated to the high-resolution study of the spin, hyperfine structure and isotope shift of radioactive nuclei with low production rates (a few per second). It combines the Doppler-free resolution of the in-flight collinear geometry with the high detection efficiency of resonant ionisation. A recent commissioning campaign has demonstrated a 1% experimental efficiency, and as low as a 0.001% non-resonant ionisation. The current status of the experiment and its recent achievements with beams of francium isotopes are reported. The first identified systematic effects are discussed.

  11. New perspectives in laser analytics: Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization in a Paul ion trap combined with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisling, Peter; Heger, Hans Jörg; Michaelis, Walfried; Weitkamp, Claus; Zobel, Harald

    1995-04-01

    A new laser analytical device has been developed that is based on resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization in the very center of a radio-frequency quadrupole ion trap. Applications in speciation anlaysis of biological and enviromental samples and in materials science will all benefit from laser-optical selectivity in the resonance excitation process, combined with mass-spectropic sensivity which is further enhanced by the ion accumulation and storage capability.

  12. Structural characterization of phospholipids by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marto, J A; White, F M; Seldomridge, S; Marshall, A G

    1995-11-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry provides for structural analysis of the principal biological phospholipids: glycerophosphatidylcholine, -ethanolamine, -serine, and -inositol. Both positive and negative molecular or quasimolecular ions are generated in high abundance. Isolated molecular ions may be collisionally activated in the source side of a dual trap mass analyzer, yielding fragments serving to identify the polar head group (positive ion mode) and fatty acid side chains (negative ion mode). Azimuthal quadrupolar excitation following collisionally activated dissociation refocuses productions close to the solenoid axis; subsequent transfer of product ions to the analyzer ion trap allows for high-resolution mass analysis. Cyro-cooling of the sample probe with liquid nitrogen greatly reduces matrix adduction encountered in the negative ion mode. PMID:8633761

  13. An All-Solid-State High Repetiton Rate Titanium:Sapphire Laser System For Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattolat, C.; Rothe, S.; Schwellnus, F.; Gottwald, T.; Raeder, S.; Wendt, K.

    2009-03-01

    On-line production facilities for radioactive isotopes nowadays heavily rely on resonance ionization laser ion sources due to their demonstrated unsurpassed efficiency and elemental selectivity. Powerful high repetition rate tunable pulsed dye or Ti:sapphire lasers can be used for this purpose. To counteract limitations of short pulse pump lasers, as needed for dye laser pumping, i.e. copper vapor lasers, which include high maintenance and nevertheless often only imperfect reliability, an all-solid-state Nd:YAG pumped Ti:sapphire laser system has been constructed. This could complement or even replace dye laser systems, eliminating their disadvantages but on the other hand introduce shortcomings on the side of the available wavelength range. Pros and cons of these developments will be discussed.

  14. Detection of Ultracold Ground-State Molecules by One- and Two-Color Resonance-Enhanced Two-Photon Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhonghao; Ji, Zhonghua; Zhang, Xiang; Yuan, Jinpeng; Zhao, Yanting; Xiao, Liantuan; Jia, Suotang

    2016-08-01

    One- and two-color resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization (RETPI) is used to detect ultracold ground-state RbCs molecules which are formed via short-range photoassociation from laser-cooled atoms. The transition from the X1Σ+(v = 0) state to the 21Π(v = 10) state of ultracold RbCs molecules shows the consistence of one- and two-color RETPI. A multi-photon photoionization rate model is introduced to interpret the dependence of molecular ion intensity on photoionized laser energy, and can be used to verify the photoionization scheme. This photoionization rate model can be expanded to multi-color photoionization for all kinds of atoms and molecules, which is a powerful method of determining the photoionization scheme.

  15. Measurement and calculation of the Stark-broadening parameters for the resonance lines of singly ionized calcium and magnesium.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. W.; Sanchez, A.; Greig, J. R.; Griem, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    The electron-impact-broadened profiles of the resonance lines of singly ionized calcium and magnesium have been measured using an electromagnetically driven shock tube and a rapid-scanning Fabry-Perot spectrometer. For an electron density of 10 to the 17th power per cu cm and a temperature of 19,000 K, we found the Lorentzian half-width of the Ca+ line to be 0.086 A plus or minus 10% and of the Mg+ line to be 0.044 A plus or minus 10%. Using the quantum-mechanical theory of Barnes and Peach and our semiclassical calculation for the calcium lines, we found that the temperature dependence of the theoretical curves is close to that measured, although both theories predict actual values which are somewhat large.

  16. Excited state spectroscopy of para di-substituted benzenes in a supersonic beam using resonant two photon ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tembreull, R.; Dunn, T. M.; Lubman, D. M.

    Excited state vibronic spectra of p-aminophenol, p-cresol, p-fluoroaniline, p-fluorophenol, hydroquinone and p-toluidine have been obtained using resonant two photon ionization supersonic beam mass spectrometry. Despite marked similarities in the spectra, notable differences exist and different para polyatomic substituents in the same molecule show vibronic evidence of their real molecular symmetry of C2ν. Expansion of the ring is also noted upon excitation in all cases. Further, it is now evident that the assignment of some vibronic bands historically interpreted as sequence structure must be reconsidered since molecules like hydroquinone are mixtures of cis and trans and others have a vibronic structure arising from the polyatomic nature of the substituents ( cƒ. CH 3).

  17. Identification of Two Allylbenzene Conformers by One- and Two-Photon Resonant Multiphoton Ionization Spectroscopy in a Supersonic Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philis, John G.; Kosmidis, Constantine

    1997-02-01

    Two allylbenzene conformers have been identified using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy (REMPI) in a supersonic jet expansion. Their existence has been confirmed by the vibrational analysis of theS1← S0ππ* transition, recorded under (1 + 1) and (2 + 2) REMPI schemes and by the intensity variation of their spectra under various expansion conditions. The conformer with higher excitation energy shows strong dependence on the terminal beam temperature, which is consistent with a shallow potential energy well as predicted by theory. The relative abundance of the two conformers and the frequency values of several vibrational modes in their lower excited singlet electronic stateS1have been determined.

  18. Population inversion of molecular nitrogen in an Ar: N2 mixture by selective resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, M. N.; Baltuška, A.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2011-10-01

    Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) is shown to offer an attractive strategy for population inversion of molecular nitrogen in an Ar: N2 gas mixture. We present a detailed analysis of the key processes leading to a population inversion of molecular nitrogen in a REMPI-pumped Ar: N2 gas mixture, including a (3 + 1) REMPI of argon atoms, conversion of the REMPI-generated atomic argon ions into molecular ions, and generation of long-lived metastable excited-state argon atoms through dissociative recombination, populating the C3πu states of molecular nitrogen. Population inversion achieved for the second-positive-band laser transitions of molecular nitrogen enables stimulated emission of ultraviolet radiation at 337 nm. A high selectivity of the REMPI process helps to radically reduce the depletion of the working medium through the ionization of N2, providing a pump mechanism that is ideally suited for the creation of a new type of a highly efficient nitrogen laser.

  19. Kinetic modeling of evolution of 3 + 1:Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization plasma in argon at low pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Tholeti, Siva Sashank; Alexeenko, Alina A.; Shneider, Mikhail N.

    2014-06-15

    We present numerical kinetic modeling of generation and evolution of the plasma produced as a result of resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) in Argon gas. The particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision (PIC/MCC) simulations capture non-equilibrium effects in REMPI plasma expansion by considering the major collisional processes at the microscopic level: elastic scattering, electron impact ionization, ion charge exchange, and recombination and quenching for metastable excited atoms. The conditions in one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) formulations correspond to known experiments in Argon at a pressure of 5 Torr. The 1D PIC/MCC calculations are compared with the published results of local drift-diffusion model, obtained for the same conditions. It is shown that the PIC/MCC and diffusion-drift models are in qualitative and in reasonable quantitative agreement during the ambipolar expansion stage, whereas significant non-equilibrium exists during the first few 10 s of nanoseconds. 2D effects are important in the REMPI plasma expansion. The 2D PIC/MCC calculations produce significantly lower peak electron densities as compared to 1D and show a better agreement with experimentally measured microwave radiation scattering.

  20. Ultra-slow muon generation by laser resonant ionization towards the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Y.; Shimomura, K.; Makimura, S.; Matsuda, Y.; Bakule, P.; Scheuermann, R. J.; Nagamine, K.

    2001-01-01

    At KEK-MSL we have been pursuing the Ultra-Slow Muon Project, in which thermal muonium atoms (designated as Mu; consisting of a μ+ and an e -) are generated from the surface of a hot tungsten foil, placed at the primary 500 MeV proton beam line, and ionized by intense lasers synchronized with the emission of Mu. In the 21st century, it will be extended to the intense slow-muon facility of M-arena at the JOINT PROJECT of KEK and JAERI, where 3 GeV, 333 μA of proton beam is available, for the surface science, atomic physics, etc.

  1. Resonance ionization mass spectrometry of ion beam sputtered neutrals for element- and isotope-selective analysis of plutonium in micro-particles.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, N; Kratz, J-V; Trautmann, N; Passler, G

    2009-11-01

    Micro-particles containing actinides are of interest for risk assessments of contaminated areas, nuclear forensic analyses, and IAEA as well as Euratom safeguards programs. For their analysis, secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been established as the state-of-the-art standard technique. In the case of actinide mixtures within the particles, however, SIMS suffers from isobaric interferences (e.g., (238)U/(238)Pu, (241)Am/(241)Pu). This can be eliminated by applying resonance ionization mass spectrometry which is based on stepwise resonant excitation and ionization of atoms with laser light, followed by mass spectrometric detection of the produced ions, combining high elemental selectivity with the analysis of isotopic compositions. This paper describes the instrumental modifications for coupling a commercial time-of-flight (TOF)-SIMS apparatus with three-step resonant post-ionization of the sputtered neutrals using a high-repetition-rate (kHz) Nd:YAG laser pumped tunable titanium:sapphire laser system. Spatially resolved ion images obtained from actinide-containing particles in TOF-SIMS mode demonstrate the capability for isotopic and spatial resolution. Results from three-step resonant post-ionization of bulk Gd and Pu samples successfully demonstrate the high elemental selectivity of this process. PMID:19557397

  2. REAL TIME, ON-LINE CHARACTERIZATION OF DIESEL GENERATOR AIR TOXIC EMISSIONS BY RESONANCE ENHANCED MULTI-PHOTON IONIZATION TIME OF FLIGHT MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The laser based resonance, enhanced multi-photon ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (REMPI-TOFMS) technique has been applied to the exhaust gas stream of a diesel generator to measure, in real time, concentration levels of aromatic air toxics. Volatile organic compounds ...

  3. Polarization Measurements of the Resonant Multiphoton Ionization Spectrum of the 3 s Rydberg States of Monomethylpyridines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmidis, C.; Bolovinos, A.; Tsekeris, P.

    1993-07-01

    The circular to linear polarization ratio for the two-photon excitation of the 3 s Rydberg states of monomethylpyridines has been measured by 2 + 1 resonant MPI spectroscopy in a static cell. The symmetry of the Rydberg vibrational bands is deduced and the results from the 0-0 transition suggest that the highest occupied MO of 4-methylpyridine is an n MO, while that for 2- and 3-methylpyridines is a π-type one.

  4. High-lying bound Rydberg states of excited Hg(6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 1}) atoms from two-color resonance ionization mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bisling, Peter; Dederichs, Jan; Neidhart, Bernd; Weitkamp, Claus

    1998-12-16

    Mercury isotopes are investigated with two-color resonance ionization mass spectroscopy (RIMS). Isotope shifts, hyperfine structure splittings, and the lifetime of the intermediate 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 1} state are determined by RIMS. Ion yields at the threshold region in various static electric fields are measured in order to determine an extrapolated ionization energy value at zero field strength. New energy values for high-lying bound 6s nd {sup 3}D (21ionization. To the author's knowledge this is the first time that isotopic effects on the ionization energy are deduced from the convergence limit of the Rydberg series.

  5. Ionizing Radiation Detectors Based on Ge-Doped Optical Fibers Inserted in Resonant Cavities

    PubMed Central

    Avino, Saverio; D’Avino, Vittoria; Giorgini, Antonio; Pacelli, Roberto; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Cella, Laura; De Natale, Paolo; Gagliardi, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of ionizing radiation (IR) is a crucial issue in different areas of interest, from environmental safety and industrial monitoring to aerospace and medicine. Optical fiber sensors have recently proven good candidates as radiation dosimeters. Here we investigate the effect of IR on germanosilicate optical fibers. A piece of Ge-doped fiber enclosed between two fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) is irradiated with gamma radiation generated by a 6 MV medical linear accelerator. With respect to other FBG-based IR dosimeters, here the sensor is only the bare fiber without any special internal structure. A near infrared laser is frequency locked to the cavity modes for high resolution measurement of radiation induced effects on the fiber optical parameters. In particular, we observe a variation of the fiber thermo-optic response with the radiation dose delivered, as expected from the interaction with Ge defect centers, and demonstrate a detection limit of 360 mGy. This method can have an impact in those contexts where low radiation doses have to be measured both in small volumes or over large areas, such as radiation therapy and radiation protection, while bare optical fibers are cheap and disposable. PMID:25686311

  6. Ionizing radiation detectors based on Ge-doped optical fibers inserted in resonant cavities.

    PubMed

    Avino, Saverio; D'Avino, Vittoria; Giorgini, Antonio; Pacelli, Roberto; Liuzzi, Raffaele; Cella, Laura; De Natale, Paolo; Gagliardi, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of ionizing radiation (IR) is a crucial issue in different areas of interest, from environmental safety and industrial monitoring to aerospace and medicine. Optical fiber sensors have recently proven good candidates as radiation dosimeters. Here we investigate the effect of IR on germanosilicate optical fibers. A piece of Ge-doped fiber enclosed between two fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) is irradiated with gamma radiation generated by a 6 MV medical linear accelerator. With respect to other FBG-based IR dosimeters, here the sensor is only the bare fiber without any special internal structure. A near infrared laser is frequency locked to the cavity modes for high resolution measurement of radiation induced effects on the fiber optical parameters. In particular, we observe a variation of the fiber thermo-optic response with the radiation dose delivered, as expected from the interaction with Ge defect centers, and demonstrate a detection limit of 360 mGy. This method can have an impact in those contexts where low radiation doses have to be measured both in small volumes or over large areas, such as radiation therapy and radiation protection, while bare optical fibers are cheap and disposable. PMID:25686311

  7. Oil spill source identification by principal component analysis of electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectra.

    PubMed

    Corilo, Yuri E; Podgorski, David C; McKenna, Amy M; Lemkau, Karin L; Reddy, Christopher M; Marshall, Alan G; Rodgers, Ryan P

    2013-10-01

    One fundamental challenge with either acute or chronic oil spills is to identify the source, especially in highly polluted areas, near natural oil seeps, when the source contains more than one petroleum product or when extensive weathering has occurred. Here we focus on heavy fuel oil that spilled (~200,000 L) from two suspected fuel tanks that were ruptured on the motor vessel (M/V) Cosco Busan when it struck the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge in November 2007. We highlight the utility of principal component analysis (PCA) of elemental composition data obtained by high resolution FT-ICR mass spectrometry to correctly identify the source of environmental contamination caused by the unintended release of heavy fuel oil (HFO). Using ultrahigh resolution electrospray ionization (ESI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, we uniquely assigned thousands of elemental compositions of heteroatom-containing species in neat samples from both tanks and then applied principal component analysis. The components were based on double bond equivalents for constituents of elemental composition, CcHhN1S1. To determine if the fidelity of our source identification was affected by weathering, field samples were collected at various intervals up to two years after the spill. We are able to identify a suite of polar petroleum markers that are environmentally persistent, enabling us to confidently identify that only one tank was the source of the spilled oil: in fact, a single principal component could account for 98% of the variance. Although identification is unaffected by the presence of higher polarity, petrogenic oxidation (weathering) products, future studies may require removal of such species by anion exchange chromatography prior to mass spectral analysis due to their preferential ionization by ESI. PMID:24033143

  8. Rotationally resolved photoelectron spectra in resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of HCl via the F 1Δ2 Rydberg state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kwanghsi; McKoy, V.

    1991-12-01

    Results of studies of rotational ion distributions in the X 2Π3/2 and X 2Π1/2 spin-orbit states of HCl+ resulting from (2+1') resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) via the S(0) branch of the F 1Δ2 Rydberg state are reported and compared with measured threshold-field-ionization zero-kinetic-energy spectra reported recently [K. S. Haber, Y. Jiang, G. Bryant, H. Lefebvre-Brion, and E. R. Grant, Phys. Rev. A (in press)]. These results show comparable intensities for J+=3/2 of the X 2Π3/2 ion and J+=1/2 of the X 2Π1/2 ion. Both transitions require an angular momentum change of ΔN=-1 upon photoionization. To provide further insight into the near-threshold dynamics of this process, we also show rotationally resolved photoelectron angular distributions, alignment of the ion rotational levels, and rotational distributions for the parity components of the ion rotational levels. About 18% population is predicted to occur in the (+) parity component, which would arise from odd partial-wave contributions to the photoelectron matrix element. This behavior is similar to that in (2+1) REMPI via the S(2) branch of the F 1Δ2 state of HBr and was shown to arise from significant l mixing in the electronic continuum due to the nonspherical molecular ion potential. Rotational ion distributions resulting from (2+1) REMPI via the S(10) branch of the F 1Δ2 state are also shown.

  9. High-resolution accurate mass measurements of biomolecules using a new electrospray ionization ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Winger, B E; Hofstadler, S A; Bruce, J E; Udseth, H R; Smith, R D

    1993-07-01

    A novel electrospray ionization/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer based on a 7-T superconducting magnet was developed for high-resolution accurate mass measurements of large biomolecules. Ions formed at atmospheric pressure using electrospray ionization (ESI) were transmitted (through six differential pumping stages) to the trapped ion cell maintained below 10(-9) torr. The increased pumping speed attainable with cryopumping (> 10(5) L/s) allowed brief pressure excursions to above 10(-4) torr, with greatly enhanced trapping efficiencies and subsequent short pumpdown times, facilitating high-resolution mass measurements. A set of electromechanical shutters were also used to minimize the effect of the directed molecular beam produced by the ES1 source and were open only during ion injection. Coupled with the use of the pulsed-valve gas inlet, the trapped ion cell was generally filled to the space charge limit within 100 ms. The use of 10-25 ms ion injection times allowed mass spectra to be obtained from 4 fmol of bovine insulin (Mr 5734) and ubiquitin (Mr 8565, with resolution sufficient to easily resolve the isotopic envelopes and determine the charge states. The microheterogeneity of the glycoprotein ribonuclease B was examined, giving a measured mass of 14,898.74 Da for the most abundant peak in the isotopic envelope of the normally glycosylated protein (i.e., with five mannose and two N-acetylglucosamine residues (an error of approximately 2 ppm) and an average error of approximately 1 ppm for the higher glycosylated and various H3PO4 adducted forms of the protein. Time-domain signals lasting in excess of 80 s were obtained for smaller proteins, producing, for example, a mass resolution of more than 700,000 for the 4(+) charge state (m/z 1434) of insulin. PMID:24227643

  10. Microwave reflectometer ionization sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seals, Joseph; Fordham, Jeffrey A.; Pauley, Robert G.; Simonutti, Mario D.

    1993-01-01

    The development of the Microwave Reflectometer Ionization Sensor (MRIS) Instrument for use on the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) spacecraft is described. The instrument contract was terminated, due to cancellation of the AFE program, subsequent to testing of an engineering development model. The MRIS, a four-frequency reflectometer, was designed for the detection and location of critical electron density levels in spacecraft reentry plasmas. The instrument would sample the relative magnitude and phase of reflected signals at discrete frequency steps across 4 GHz bandwidths centered at four frequencies: 20, 44, 95, and 140 GHz. The sampled data would be stored for later processing to calculate the distance from the spacecraft surface to the critical electron densities versus time. Four stepped PM CW transmitter receivers were located behind the thermal protection system of the spacecraft with horn antennas radiating and receiving through an insulating tile. Techniques were developed to deal with interference, including multiple reflections and resonance effects, resulting from the antenna configuration and operating environment.

  11. K-shell ionization probability in elastic proton scattering on /sup 138/Ba through an f/sub 7/2/ isobaric-analog resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Dost, M.; Lorek, R.; Roehl, S.; Seidel, J.; Koenig, W.

    1985-10-01

    The bombarding energy dependence of the K-shell ionization probability P/sub K/ was measured in elastic proton scattering on /sup 138/Ba at energies near the 69-keV-wide f/sub 7/2/ isobaric-analog resonance at 9.965 MeV. The best simultaneous fit to P/sub K/ in the scattering angle intervals 45/sup 0/--80/sup 0/ and 100/sup 0/--135/sup 0/ yields R/sub 0/ = -0.30 +- 0.30 for the tangent of the phase angle of the semiclassical monopole ionization amplitude.

  12. Excitation of the {sup 229m}Th nuclear isomer via resonance conversion in ionized atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Karpeshin, F. F.; Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.

    2015-09-15

    Pressing problems concerning the optical pumping of the 7.6-eV {sup 229m}Th nuclear isomer, which is a candidate for a new nuclear optical reference point for frequencies, are examined. Physics behind the mechanism of the two-photon optical pumping of the isomer is considered. It is shown that, irrespective of the pumping scheme, a dominant contribution comes, in accord with what was proven earlier for the 3.5-eV isomer, from the resonance 8s–7s transition. Details of an optimum experimental scheme are discussed. It is shown that, after isomer excitation, the atom involved remains with a high probability in an excited state at an energy of about 0.5 eV rather than in the ground state, the required energy of the two photons being equal to the energy of the nuclear level plus the energy of the lowest 7s state of the atom. The estimated pumping time is about 1.5 s in the case where the field strength of each laser is 1 V/cm.

  13. Modeling of cw OIL energy performance based on similarity criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezhenin, Andrey V.; Pichugin, Sergey Y.; Azyazov, Valeriy N.

    2012-01-01

    A simplified two-level generation model predicts that power extraction from an cw oxygen-iodine laser (OIL) with stable resonator depends on three similarity criteria. Criterion τd is the ratio of the residence time of active medium in the resonator to the O2(1Δ) reduction time at the infinitely large intraresonator intensity. Criterion Π is small-signal gain to the threshold ratio. Criterion Λ is the relaxation to excitation rate ratio for the electronically excited iodine atoms I(2P1/2). Effective power extraction from a cw OIL is achieved when the values of the similarity criteria are located in the intervals: τd=5-8, Π=3-8 and Λ<=0.01.

  14. Evaluation of Hyperpolarized [1-13C]-Pyruvate by Magnetic Resonance to Detect Ionizing Radiation Effects in Real Time

    PubMed Central

    Sandulache, Vlad C.; Chen, Yunyun; Lee, Jaehyuk; Rubinstein, Ashley; Ramirez, Marc S.; Skinner, Heath D.; Walker, Christopher M.; Williams, Michelle D.; Tailor, Ramesh; Court, Laurence E.; Bankson, James A.; Lai, Stephen Y.

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) cytotoxicity is primarily mediated through reactive oxygen species (ROS). Since tumor cells neutralize ROS by utilizing reducing equivalents, we hypothesized that measurements of reducing potential using real-time hyperpolarized (HP) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) can serve as a surrogate marker of IR induced ROS. This hypothesis was tested in a pre-clinical model of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC), an aggressive head and neck malignancy. Human ATC cell lines were utilized to test IR effects on ROS and reducing potential in vitro and [1-13C] pyruvate HP-MRS/MRSI imaging of ATC orthotopic xenografts was used to study in vivo effects of IR. IR increased ATC intra-cellular ROS levels resulting in a corresponding decrease in reducing equivalent levels. Exogenous manipulation of cellular ROS and reducing equivalent levels altered ATC radiosensitivity in a predictable manner. Irradiation of ATC xenografts resulted in an acute drop in reducing potential measured using HP-MRS, reflecting the shunting of reducing equivalents towards ROS neutralization. Residual tumor tissue post irradiation demonstrated heterogeneous viability. We have adapted HP-MRS/MRSI to non-invasively measure IR mediated changes in tumor reducing potential in real time. Continued development of this technology could facilitate the development of an adaptive clinical algorithm based on real-time adjustments in IR dose and dose mapping. PMID:24475215

  15. Characterization of a dual-etalon Ti:sapphire laser via resonance ionization spectroscopy of stable copper isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenschein, V.; Moore, I. D.; Khan, H.; Pohjalainen, I.; Reponen, M.

    2014-06-01

    Resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS) inside a buffer gas-filled ion guide is a very sensitive tool for a first determination of nuclear moments and charge radii of radioactive isotopes produced using the IGISOL technique. Currently employed pulsed Ti:sapphire laser systems have a typical laser linewidth of 5 GHz in the fundamental, which in many cases is the dominant line broadening effect. We present results of RIS on stable 63,65Cu using a dual-etalon Ti:sapphire laser with a reduced linewidth of 1 GHz. Determination of hyperfine parameters of 63Cu revealed discrepancies when compared to existing higher resolution data. A study of systematic uncertainties is underway using a homemade scanning Fabry-Pérot interferometer (FPI). A real-time recording of the mode structure of the multi-longitudinal mode Ti:sapphire laser during a scan of the 244.238 nm atomic ground state transition in parallel with the readout from the commercial wavemeter has identified sources of uncertainty.

  16. Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization/secondary neutral mass spectrometry and cesium attachment secondary ion mass spectrometry of bronze : a comparison.

    SciTech Connect

    McCann, M. P.; Calaway, W. F.; Pellin, M. J.; Veryovkin, I. V.; Constantinides, I.; Adriaens, A.; Adams, F.; Materials Science Division; Sam Houston State Univ.; Univ. of Antwerp

    2002-05-01

    Archaeologists have considerable interests in ancient bronzes. They want to know how these alloys were produced and how they corroded with time. Modern bronzes, with compositions very close to that of some ancient bronzes, have been produced and two methods were examined to characterize one of these modern bronzes. Analysis of this modern bronze using resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization/secondary neutral mass spectrometry (REMPI/SNMS) is examined in detail and compared to cesium attachment secondary ion mass spectrometry (CsAMS) results. Both REMPI/SNMS and CsAMS were used to quantify the composition of Fe, Ni and Mn in a modern quaternary bronze designed to serve as a certified reference material for an ancient bronze. Both methods exhibit reduced matrix effects when compared to secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and thus quantification should be simplified. It was found that when relative sensitivity factors obtained from a standard bronze material are used to calibrate the instruments, the REMPI/SNMS measurements yield results that were more sensitive and more accurate.

  17. Vacuum compatible sample positioning device for matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging

    PubMed Central

    Aizikov, Konstantin; Smith, Donald F.; Chargin, David A.; Ivanov, Sergei; Lin, Tzu-Yung; Heeren, Ron M. A.; O’Connor, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    The high mass accuracy and resolving power of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers (FT-ICR MS) make them ideal mass detectors for mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), promising to provide unmatched molecular resolution capabilities. The intrinsic low tolerance of FT-ICR MS to RF interference, however, along with typically vertical positioning of the sample, and MSI acquisition speed requirements present numerous engineering challenges in creating robotics capable of achieving the spatial resolution to match. This work discusses a two-dimensional positioning stage designed to address these issues. The stage is capable of operating in ∼1 × 10–8 mbar vacuum. The range of motion is set to 100 mm × 100 mm to accommodate large samples, while the positioning accuracy is demonstrated to be less than 0.4 micron in both directions under vertical load over the entire range. This device was integrated into three different matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) FT-ICR instruments and showed no detectable RF noise. The “oversampling” MALDI-MSI experiments, under which the sample is completely ablated at each position, followed by the target movement of the distance smaller than the laser beam, conducted on the custom-built 7T FT-ICR MS demonstrate the stability and positional accuracy of the stage robotics which delivers high spatial resolution mass spectral images at a fraction of the laser spot diameter. PMID:21639522

  18. Evaluating the Aging of Multiple Emulsions Using Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Yukihiro; Uchimura, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry was applied to measurements of multiple emulsions with no pretreatment; a method for the quantitative evaluation of aging was proposed. We prepared water-in-oil-in-water (W/O/W) multiple emulsions containing toluene and m-phenylenediamine. The samples were measured immediately following both preparation and after having been stirred for 24 h. Time profiles of the peak areas for each analyte species were obtained, and several intense spikes for toluene could be detected from each sample after stirring, which suggests that the concentration of toluene in the middle phase had increased during stirring. On the other hand, in the case of a W/O/W multiple emulsion containing phenol and m-phenylenediamine, spikes for m-phenylenediamine, rather than phenol, were detected after stirring. In the present study, the time-profile data were converted into a scatter plot in order to quantitatively evaluate the aging. As a result, the ratio of the plots where strong signal intensities of toluene were detected increased from 8.4% before stirring to 33.2% after stirring for 24 h. The present method could be a powerful tool for evaluating multiple emulsions, such as studies on the kinetics of the encapsulation and release of active ingredients. PMID:27396662

  19. Vacuum compatible sample positioning device for matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Aizikov, Konstantin; Lin, Tzu-Yung; Smith, Donald F.; Heeren, Ron M. A.; Chargin, David A.; Ivanov, Sergei; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2011-05-15

    The high mass accuracy and resolving power of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometers (FT-ICR MS) make them ideal mass detectors for mass spectrometry imaging (MSI), promising to provide unmatched molecular resolution capabilities. The intrinsic low tolerance of FT-ICR MS to RF interference, however, along with typically vertical positioning of the sample, and MSI acquisition speed requirements present numerous engineering challenges in creating robotics capable of achieving the spatial resolution to match. This work discusses a two-dimensional positioning stage designed to address these issues. The stage is capable of operating in {approx}1 x 10{sup -8} mbar vacuum. The range of motion is set to 100 mm x 100 mm to accommodate large samples, while the positioning accuracy is demonstrated to be less than 0.4 micron in both directions under vertical load over the entire range. This device was integrated into three different matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) FT-ICR instruments and showed no detectable RF noise. The ''oversampling'' MALDI-MSI experiments, under which the sample is completely ablated at each position, followed by the target movement of the distance smaller than the laser beam, conducted on the custom-built 7T FT-ICR MS demonstrate the stability and positional accuracy of the stage robotics which delivers high spatial resolution mass spectral images at a fraction of the laser spot diameter.

  20. New even-parity high-lying levels of Sm I and measurement of isotope shifts by two-color resonance ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seema, A. U.; Mandal, P. K.; Rath, Asawari D.; Dev, Vas

    2014-09-01

    In this work, we investigate the even-parity high-lying levels of Sm I in the energy region 33136-33960 cm-1 by performing two-color three-photon resonance ionization spectroscopy in an atomic beam coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer using two tunable pulsed dye lasers. We observe twenty-one new and confirm eight previously reported even-parity energy levels of Sm I in this spectral region. Absolute energies of these levels are determined with an accuracy of ±0.3 cm-1. Using electric dipole selection rule, total angular momentum (J-value) of the most newly observed levels is assigned uniquely. Further, employing two-color three-step resonance ionization mass spectrometry, we measure the isotope shift between 154Sm and 144Sm of sixteen high-lying levels with a moderate accuracy of ±30 mK.

  1. Vibrations of the S{sub 1} state of fluorobenzene-h{sub 5} and fluorobenzene-d{sub 5} via resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Joe P.; Andrejeva, Anna; Tuttle, William D.; Wright, Timothy G.; Pugliesi, Igor; Schriever, Christian

    2014-12-28

    We report resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra of the isotopologues fluorobenzene-h{sub 5} and fluorobenzene-d{sub 5}. By making use of quantum chemical calculations, the changes in the wavenumber of the vibrational modes upon deuteration are examined. Additionally, the mixing of vibrational modes both between isotopologues and also between the two electronic states is discussed. The isotopic shifts lead to dramatic changes in the appearance of the spectrum as vibrations shift in and out of Fermi resonance. Assignments of the majority of the fluorobenzene-d{sub 5} observed bands are provided, aided by previous results on fluorobenzene-h{sub 5}.

  2. Vibrations of the S1 state of fluorobenzene-h5 and fluorobenzene-d5 via resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Harris, Joe P; Andrejeva, Anna; Tuttle, William D; Pugliesi, Igor; Schriever, Christian; Wright, Timothy G

    2014-12-28

    We report resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra of the isotopologues fluorobenzene-h5 and fluorobenzene-d5. By making use of quantum chemical calculations, the changes in the wavenumber of the vibrational modes upon deuteration are examined. Additionally, the mixing of vibrational modes both between isotopologues and also between the two electronic states is discussed. The isotopic shifts lead to dramatic changes in the appearance of the spectrum as vibrations shift in and out of Fermi resonance. Assignments of the majority of the fluorobenzene-d5 observed bands are provided, aided by previous results on fluorobenzene-h5. PMID:25554159

  3. Status of the Project-X CW Linac Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ostiguy, J-F.; Solyak, N.; Berrutti, P.; Carneiro, J.P.; Lebedev, V.; Nagaitsev, S.; Saini, A.; Stheynas, B.; Yakovlev, V.P.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    Project-X is a proposed proton accelerator complex at Fermilab that would provide particle beams to support a diversified experimental program at the intensity frontier. As currently envisioned, the complex would employ a CW superconducting linac to accelerate a 1 mA average, 5 mA peak H{sup -} beam from 2.1 MeV to 3 GeV. A second superconducting linac, operating in pulsed mode would ultimately accelerate a small fraction of this beam up to 8 GeV. The CW linac is based on five families of resonators operating at three frequencies: half-wave (1 family at 162.5 MHz), spoke (2 families at 325 MHz) and elliptical (2 families at 650 MHz). Accelerating and focusing elements are assembled in cryomodules separated by short warm sections. A long open region ({approx} 15 m) allows beam extraction at 1 GeV in support of a nuclear experimental program. In this paper, we present the latest iteration of the CW linac baseline lattice. We also briefly compare it to an alternative where the 162.5 half-wave resonators are replaced with 325 MHz spoke resonators.

  4. CW laser pumped emerald laser

    SciTech Connect

    Shand, M.L.; Lai, S.T.

    1984-02-01

    A CW laser-pumped emerald laser is reported. A 34 percent output power slope efficiency is observed with longitudinal pumping by a krypton laser in a nearly concentric cavity. The laser has been tuned from 728.8 to 809.0 nm. Losses in emerald are larger than those of alexandrite determined in a similar cavity. The present data also indicate that the excited state absorption minimum is shifted from that of alexandrite. 13 references.

  5. Three-photon resonance ionization of atomic Mn in a hot-cavity laser ion source using Ti:sapphire lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Gottwald, T.; Mattolat, C.; Wendt, K.

    2015-06-01

    Three-photon resonance ionization of atomic manganese (Mn) in a hot-cavity ion source using Ti:sapphire lasers has been demonstrated. Three-step ionization schemes employing different intermediate levels and Rydberg or autoionizing (AI) states in the final ionization step are established. Strong AI resonances were observed via the 3d54s5s f 6S5/2 level at 49 415.35 cm-1, while Rydberg transitions were reached from the 3d54s4d e 6D9/2,7/2,5/2 levels at around 47 210 cm-1. Analyses of the strong Rydberg transitions associated with the 3d54s4d e 6D7/2 lower level indicate that they belong to the dipole-allowed 4d → nf 6F°9/2,7/2,5/2 series converging to the 3d54s 7S3 ground state of Mn II. From this series, an ionization potential of 59 959.56 ± 0.01 cm-1 is obtained for Mn. At high ion source temperatures the semi-forbidden 4d → nf 8F°9/2,7/2,5/2 series was also observed. The overall ionization efficiency for Mn has been measured to be about 0.9% when using the strong AI transition in the third excitation step and 0.3% when employing an intense Rydberg transition. Experimental data indicate that the ionization efficiency was limited by the interaction of Mn atoms with ion source materials at high temperatures.

  6. Three-photon resonance ionization of atomic Mn in a hot-cavity laser ion source using Ti:sapphire lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Gottwald, T.; Mattolat, C.; Wendt, K.

    2015-05-08

    We have demonstrated three-photon resonance ionization of atomic manganese (Mn) in a hot-cavity ion source using Ti: sapphire lasers. Three-step ionization schemes employing different intermediate levels and Rydberg or autoionizing (AI) states in the final ionization step are established. Strong AI resonances were observed via the 3d54s5s f6S5/2 level at 49 415.35 cm-1, while Rydberg transitions were reached from the 3d54s4d e 6D9/2,7/2,5/2) levels at around 47 210 cm-1. Analyses of the strong Rydberg transitions associated with the 3d54s4d e 6D7/2 lower level indicate that they belong to the dipole-allowed 4d → nf69/2,7/2,5/2 series converging to the 3d54s 7S3 ground state of Mn II. From this series, an ionization potential of 59 959.56 ± 0.01 cm-1 is obtained for Mn. At high ion source temperatures the semi-forbidden 4d → nf8F°9/2,7/2,5/2 series was also observed. The overall ionization efficiency for Mn has been measured to be about 0.9% when using the strong AI transition in the third excitation step and 0.3% when employing an intense Rydberg transition. Experimental data indicate that the ionization efficiency was limited by the interaction of Mn atoms with ion source materials at high temperatures.

  7. Three-photon resonance ionization of atomic Mn in a hot-cavity laser ion source using Ti:sapphire lasers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Liu, Y.; Gottwald, T.; Mattolat, C.; Wendt, K.

    2015-05-08

    We have demonstrated three-photon resonance ionization of atomic manganese (Mn) in a hot-cavity ion source using Ti: sapphire lasers. Three-step ionization schemes employing different intermediate levels and Rydberg or autoionizing (AI) states in the final ionization step are established. Strong AI resonances were observed via the 3d54s5s f6S5/2 level at 49 415.35 cm-1, while Rydberg transitions were reached from the 3d54s4d e 6D9/2,7/2,5/2) levels at around 47 210 cm-1. Analyses of the strong Rydberg transitions associated with the 3d54s4d e 6D7/2 lower level indicate that they belong to the dipole-allowed 4d → nf6F°9/2,7/2,5/2 series converging to the 3d54s 7S3 groundmore » state of Mn II. From this series, an ionization potential of 59 959.56 ± 0.01 cm-1 is obtained for Mn. At high ion source temperatures the semi-forbidden 4d → nf8F°9/2,7/2,5/2 series was also observed. The overall ionization efficiency for Mn has been measured to be about 0.9% when using the strong AI transition in the third excitation step and 0.3% when employing an intense Rydberg transition. Experimental data indicate that the ionization efficiency was limited by the interaction of Mn atoms with ion source materials at high temperatures.« less

  8. Laser ablation with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry for determining aromatic lignin volatilization products from biomass.

    PubMed

    Mukarakate, Calvin; Scheer, Adam M; Robichaud, David J; Jarvis, Mark W; David, Donald E; Ellison, G Barney; Nimlos, Mark R; Davis, Mark F

    2011-03-01

    We have designed and developed a laser ablation∕pulsed sample introduction∕mass spectrometry platform that integrates pyrolysis (py) and∕or laser ablation (LA) with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS). Using this apparatus, we measured lignin volatilization products of untreated biomass materials. Biomass vapors are produced by either a custom-built hot stage pyrolysis reactor or laser ablation using the third harmonic of an Nd:YAG laser (355 nm). The resulting vapors are entrained in a free jet expansion of He, then skimmed and introduced into an ionization region. One color resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (1+1 REMPI) is used, resulting in highly selective detection of lignin subunits from complex vapors of biomass materials. The spectra obtained by py-REMPI-TOFMS and LA-REMPI-TOFMS display high selectivity and decreased fragmentation compared to spectra recorded by an electron impact ionization molecular beam mass spectrometer (EI-MBMS). The laser ablation method demonstrates the ability to selectively isolate and volatilize specific tissues within the same plant material and then detect lignin-based products from the vapors with enhanced sensitivity. The identification of select products observed in the LA-REMPI-TOFMS experiment is confirmed by comparing their REMPI wavelength scans with that of known standards. PMID:21456715

  9. CW operation of an intracavity pumped molecular submillimeter-wave laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepf, G. A.

    1977-01-01

    The 373-micron line of CH3CN was operated in a CW mode in an arrangement where the submillimeter (SMM)-wave laser is placed inside the resonator of the CO2 pump laser. 1 mW of CW output power was obtained; this is five times the power of a comparable SMM-wave laser in the common extracavity arrangement. In a pulsed mode, a peak power of 46 mW was measured.

  10. Gyrotron FU CW VII for 300 MHz and 600 MHz DNP-NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idehara, Toshitaka; Kosuga, Kosuke; Agusu, La; Ogawa, Isamu; Takahashi, Hiroki; Smith, Mark E.; Dupree, Ray

    2010-07-01

    Gyrotron FU CW VII, one of the FU CW Series Gyrotrons, has been designed, constructed and completed operational tests successfully in the Research Center for Development of Far Infrared Region, University of Fukui (FIR FU). The gyrotron operates at around 200 GHz for the fundamental cyclotron resonances and at around 400 GHz for the second harmonics. These radiation frequencies will be applied to 300 MHz and 600 MHz DNP enhanced NMR spectroscopy.

  11. Resonance ionization spectroscopy of thorium isotopes-towards a laser spectroscopic identification of the low-lying 7.6 eV isomer of 229Th

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeder, S.; Sonnenschein, V.; Gottwald, T.; Moore, I. D.; Reponen, M.; Rothe, S.; Trautmann, N.; Wendt, K.

    2011-08-01

    In-source resonance ionization spectroscopy was used to identify an efficient and selective three-step excitation/ionization scheme of thorium, suitable for titanium:sapphire (Ti:sa) lasers. The measurements were carried out in the preparation of laser spectroscopic investigations for an identification of the low-lying 229mTh isomer predicted at 7.6 ± 0.5 eV above the nuclear ground state. Using a sample of 232Th, a multitude of optical transitions leading to over 20 previously unknown intermediate states of even parity as well as numerous high-lying odd parity auto-ionizing (AI) states were identified. Level energies were determined with an accuracy of 0.06 cm-1 for intermediate and 0.15 cm-1 for AI states. Using different excitation pathways, an assignment of total angular momenta for several energy levels was possible. One particularly efficient ionization scheme of thorium, exhibiting saturation in all three optical transitions, was studied in detail. For all three levels in this scheme, the isotope shifts of the isotopes 228Th, 229Th and 230Th relative to 232Th were measured. An overall efficiency including ionization, transport and detection of 0.6% was determined, which was predominantly limited by the transmission of the mass spectrometer ion optics.

  12. Molecular characterization of inhibiting biochar water-extractable substances using electrospray ionization fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smith, Cameron R; Sleighter, Rachel L; Hatcher, Patrick G; Lee, James W

    2013-01-01

    Biochar has gained significant interest worldwide for its potential use as both a carbon sequestration technique and soil amendment. Recently, research has shown that pinewood-derived biochar water extracts inhibited the growth of aquatic photosynthetic microorganisms, both prokaryotic and eukaryotic algae, while chicken litter- and peanut shell-derived biochar water extracts showed no growth inhibition. With the use of electrodialysis, the pinewood-derived biochar water extract is separated into 3 fractions (anode-isolated, center chamber retained, and cathode-isolated substances) all with varying toxic effects. Because of its ultrahigh resolution and mass precision, electrospray ionization (ESI) coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) is utilized in this study to analyze biochar water extracts at a molecular level to enhance our understanding of the toxic nature of pinewood-derived biochar water extracts as compared to benign peanut shell-derived biochar water extracts. The molecular composition of pinewood-derived biochar water extracts shows unique carbohydrate ligneous components and sulfur containing condensed ligneous components that are both absent from the peanut shell water extracts and more prevalent in the anode-isolated substances. Using Kendrick mass defect analysis, we also determine that the most likely inhibitor species contain carboxyl and hydroxyl homologous series, both of which are characteristic functional groups hypothesized in our previous research for the inhibitor species. We have suggested that inhibition of aquatic photosynthetic microorganism growth is most likely due to degraded lignin-like species rich in oxygen containing functionalities. From the study conducted here, we show the potential of ultrahigh resolution FTICR-MS as a valuable analytical technique for determining whether certain biochars are safe and benign for use as carbon sequestration and soil amendment. PMID:24180747

  13. Molecular formulae of marine and terrigenous dissolved organic matter detected by electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Boris P.; Witt, Matthias; Engbrodt, Ralph; Dittmar, Thorsten; Kattner, Gerhard

    2005-07-01

    The chemical structure of refractory marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is still largely unknown. Electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR-MS) was used to resolve the complex mixtures of DOM and provide valuable information on elemental compositions on a molecular scale. We characterized and compared DOM from two sharply contrasting aquatic environments, algal-derived DOM from the Weddell Sea (Antarctica) and terrigenous DOM from pore water of a tropical mangrove area in northern Brazil. Several thousand molecular formulas in the mass range of 300-600 Da were identified and reproduced in element ratio plots. On the basis of molecular elemental composition and double-bond equivalents (DBE) we calculated an average composition for marine DOM. O/C ratios in the marine samples were lower (0.36 ± 0.01) than in the mangrove pore-water sample (0.42). A small proportion of chemical formulas with higher molecular mass in the marine samples were characterized by very low O/C and H/C ratios probably reflecting amphiphilic properties. The average number of unsaturations in the marine samples was surprisingly high (DBE = 9.9; mangrove pore water: DBE = 9.4) most likely due to a significant contribution of carbonyl carbon. There was no significant difference in elemental composition between surface and deep-water DOM in the Weddell Sea. Although there were some molecules with unique marine elemental composition, there was a conspicuous degree of similarity between the terrigenous and algal-derived end members. Approximately one third of the molecular formulas were present in all marine as well as in the mangrove samples. We infer that different forms of microbial degradation ultimately lead to similar structural features that are intrinsically refractory, independent of the source of the organic matter and the environmental conditions where degradation took place.

  14. Resonance Ionization of Heavy Noble Gases: The Potential of KR and Xe Measurements from Single Pre-Solar Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thonnard, N.

    1995-09-01

    measure noble gases from fourteen individual "X" SiC grains, previously identified by ion microprobe analysis, was unsuccessful with the 2,000 132Xe atom detection limit of the mass spectrometer [12,13]. From the Kr concentration measurements of SiC particles KJF by Lewis et al. [6], a 2 micrometer diameter particle will on average contain 134 Kr atoms. If only 4% of the SiC grains contain the majority of the noble gas atoms, then a single gas rich grain will contain 3,350 Kr atoms, or 12, 75, 385, 398, 1910, and 580 atoms for 78Kr through 86Kr, respectively. The Xe single-grain abundances would be similar. Resonance ionization, an emerging laser-based element analysis technique, is being harnessed to a wide variety of problems in which minute quantities of a particular element need to be measured efficiently in the presence of an overwhelmingly larger background of other materials [14]. By utilizing lasers tuned to specific atomic energy levels of the analyte element, ions are produced selectively in a mass spectrometer with much higher efficiency than possible using conventional methods, such as electron bombardment, thermal ionization, or ion sputtering. In a static resonance ionization system for noble gases, the combination of high ionization efficiency and sample concentrator results in an extremely fast (~3 min. detection half-life vs. ~60 min. for conventional systems) analyzer with a detection limit of ~100 85Kr atoms [15]. In addition to the almost complete absence of interferences, the short analysis time significantly reduces the background contribution of outgassing in the mass spectrometer. Although using a less efficient laser scheme resulting in slightly slower analyses, a similar system has recently been completed and dedicated to extraterrestrial Xe measurements [16]. At the newly formed Institute for Rare Isotope Measurements [17], the noble gas equipment that had previously been at Atom Sciences [14,15] is being re-installed and upgraded to provide

  15. Absorption line CW EPR using an amplitude modulated longitudinal field.

    PubMed

    Fedin, Matvey; Gromov, Igor; Schweiger, Arthur

    2004-11-01

    In standard continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) experiments, the first derivative of absorption lines is detected. This type of a line shape is caused by the magnetic field modulation and is usually an undesired feature, since the sensitivity of CW-EPR drastically decreases with increasing linewidth. A new approach is introduced, which allows for the measurement of absorption line EPR spectra in systems with broad inhomogeneous lines. The method makes use of multiple-photon transitions that are induced in spin systems when a transverse microwave and a longitudinal radio frequency field are simultaneously applied. The absorption lines are obtained by using amplitude modulation of the radio frequency field and slight saturation of the spectral lines. The basics of the new approach are discussed and experimental examples are given. PMID:15504685

  16. Ionization Potentials for Isoelectronic Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agmon, Noam

    1988-01-01

    Presents a quantitative treatment of ionization potentials of isoelectronic atoms. By looking at the single-electron view of calculating the total energy of an atom, trends in the screening and effective quantum number parameters are examined. Approaches the question of determining electron affinities. (CW)

  17. Comparing Laser Desorption Ionization and Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization Coupled to Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry To Characterize Shale Oils at the Molecular Level

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cho, Yunjo; Jin, Jang Mi; Witt, Matthias; Birdwell, Justin E.; Na, Jeong-Geol; Roh, Nam-Sun; Kim, Sunghwan

    2013-01-01

    Laser desorption ionization (LDI) coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) was used to analyze shale oils. Previous work showed that LDI is a sensitive ionization technique for assessing aromatic nitrogen compounds, and oils generated from Green River Formation oil shales are well-documented as being rich in nitrogen. The data presented here demonstrate that LDI is effective in ionizing high-double-bond-equivalent (DBE) compounds and, therefore, is a suitable method for characterizing compounds with condensed structures. Additionally, LDI generates radical cations and protonated ions concurrently, the distribution of which depends upon the molecular structures and elemental compositions, and the basicity of compounds is closely related to the generation of protonated ions. This study demonstrates that LDI FT-ICR MS is an effective ionization technique for use in the study of shale oils at the molecular level. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that LDI FT-ICR MS has been applied to shale oils.

  18. Fine- and hyperfine-structure effects in molecular photoionization. II. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization and hyperfine-selective generation of molecular cations.

    PubMed

    Germann, Matthias; Willitsch, Stefan

    2016-07-28

    Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) is a widely used technique for studying molecular photoionization and producing molecular cations for spectroscopy and dynamics studies. Here, we present a model for describing hyperfine-structure effects in the REMPI process and for predicting hyperfine populations in molecular ions produced by this method. This model is a generalization of our model for fine- and hyperfine-structure effects in one-photon ionization of molecules presented in Paper I [M. Germann and S. Willitsch, J. Chem. Phys. 145, 044314 (2016)]. This generalization is achieved by covering two main aspects: (1) treatment of the neutral bound-bound transition including the hyperfine structure that makes up the first step of the REMPI process and (2) modification of our ionization model to account for anisotropic populations resulting from this first excitation step. Our findings may be used for analyzing results from experiments with molecular ions produced by REMPI and may serve as a theoretical background for hyperfine-selective ionization experiments. PMID:27475369

  19. Fine- and hyperfine-structure effects in molecular photoionization. II. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization and hyperfine-selective generation of molecular cations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germann, Matthias; Willitsch, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) is a widely used technique for studying molecular photoionization and producing molecular cations for spectroscopy and dynamics studies. Here, we present a model for describing hyperfine-structure effects in the REMPI process and for predicting hyperfine populations in molecular ions produced by this method. This model is a generalization of our model for fine- and hyperfine-structure effects in one-photon ionization of molecules presented in Paper I [M. Germann and S. Willitsch, J. Chem. Phys. 145, 044314 (2016)]. This generalization is achieved by covering two main aspects: (1) treatment of the neutral bound-bound transition including the hyperfine structure that makes up the first step of the REMPI process and (2) modification of our ionization model to account for anisotropic populations resulting from this first excitation step. Our findings may be used for analyzing results from experiments with molecular ions produced by REMPI and may serve as a theoretical background for hyperfine-selective ionization experiments.

  20. Ultratrace detection of chemical warfare agent simulants using supersonic-molecular-beam, resonance-enhanced multiphoton-ionization, time-of-flight mass spectroscopy. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Syage, J.A.; Pollard, J.E.; Cohen, R.B.

    1988-02-15

    An ultratrace detection method that offers exceptional selectivity has been developed based on the technique of supersonic molecular beam, resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization, time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (MB/REMPI/TOFMS). Single ion detection capability has given detection limits as low as 300 ppt (dimethyl sulfide). Single vibronic level REMPI of the supercooled molecules in conjunction with TOFMS provides selectivity of 10,000 against chemically similar compounds. Studies were carried out using moist air expansions for a variety of organophosphonate and sulfide chemical warfare agent (CWA) simulant molecules. The preparation of molecules in single vibronic levels by laser excitation in supersonic molecular beams has enabled us to record high resolution spectra of higher excited electronic states showing fully resolved vibrational structure for diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS). VUV absorption spectra have also been recorded for several CWA molecules at ambient temperature, revealing several new electronic states extending up to the ionization threshold.

  1. Upgrade of the resonance ionization laser ion source at ISOLDE on-line isotope separation facility: new lasers and new ion beams.

    PubMed

    Fedosseev, V N; Berg, L-E; Fedorov, D V; Fink, D; Launila, O J; Losito, R; Marsh, B A; Rossel, R E; Rothe, S; Seliverstov, M D; Sjödin, A M; Wendt, K D A

    2012-02-01

    The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) produces beams for the majority of experiments at the ISOLDE on-line isotope separator. A substantial improvement in RILIS performance has been achieved through a series of upgrade steps: replacement of the copper vapor lasers by a Nd:YAG laser; replacement of the old homemade dye lasers by new commercial dye lasers; installation of a complementary Ti:Sapphire laser system. The combined dye and Ti:Sapphire laser system with harmonics is capable of generating beams at any wavelength in the range of 210-950 nm. In total, isotopes of 31 different elements have been selectively laser-ionized and separated at ISOLDE, including recently developed beams of samarium, praseodymium, polonium, and astatine. PMID:22380244

  2. Upgrade of the resonance ionization laser ion source at ISOLDE on-line isotope separation facility: New lasers and new ion beamsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedosseev, V. N.; Berg, L.-E.; Fedorov, D. V.; Fink, D.; Launila, O. J.; Losito, R.; Marsh, B. A.; Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Seliverstov, M. D.; Sjödin, A. M.; Wendt, K. D. A.

    2012-02-01

    The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) produces beams for the majority of experiments at the ISOLDE on-line isotope separator. A substantial improvement in RILIS performance has been achieved through a series of upgrade steps: replacement of the copper vapor lasers by a Nd:YAG laser; replacement of the old homemade dye lasers by new commercial dye lasers; installation of a complementary Ti:Sapphire laser system. The combined dye and Ti:Sapphire laser system with harmonics is capable of generating beams at any wavelength in the range of 210-950 nm. In total, isotopes of 31 different elements have been selectively laser-ionized and separated at ISOLDE, including recently developed beams of samarium, praseodymium, polonium, and astatine.

  3. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry of Pyrolysis Oil from German Brown Coal.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Jan; Kroll, Marius M; Rathsack, Philipp; Otto, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil from the slow pyrolysis of German brown coal from Schöningen, obtained at a temperature of 500°C, was separated and analyzed using hyphenation of gas chromatography with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source operated in negative ion mode and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS). Development of this ultrahigh-resolving analysis method is described, that is, optimization of specific GC and APCI parameters and performed data processing. The advantages of GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS hyphenation, for example, soft ionization, ultrahigh-resolving detection, and most important isomer separation, were demonstrated for the sample liquid. For instance, it was possible to separate and identify nine different propylphenol, ethylmethylphenol, and trimethylphenol isomers. Furthermore, homologous series of different acids, for example, alkyl and alkylene carboxylic acids, were verified, as well as homologous series of alkyl phenols, alkyl dihydroxy benzenes, and alkoxy alkyl phenols. PMID:27066076

  4. Gas Chromatography/Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry of Pyrolysis Oil from German Brown Coal

    PubMed Central

    Zuber, Jan; Kroll, Marius M.; Rathsack, Philipp; Otto, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Pyrolysis oil from the slow pyrolysis of German brown coal from Schöningen, obtained at a temperature of 500°C, was separated and analyzed using hyphenation of gas chromatography with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization source operated in negative ion mode and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS). Development of this ultrahigh-resolving analysis method is described, that is, optimization of specific GC and APCI parameters and performed data processing. The advantages of GC-APCI-FT-ICR-MS hyphenation, for example, soft ionization, ultrahigh-resolving detection, and most important isomer separation, were demonstrated for the sample liquid. For instance, it was possible to separate and identify nine different propylphenol, ethylmethylphenol, and trimethylphenol isomers. Furthermore, homologous series of different acids, for example, alkyl and alkylene carboxylic acids, were verified, as well as homologous series of alkyl phenols, alkyl dihydroxy benzenes, and alkoxy alkyl phenols. PMID:27066076

  5. Resonant two-photon ionization of LiNa. Observation and preliminary characterization of five new singlet states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappes, Manfred M.; Marti, Kurt O.; Radi, Peter; Schär, Martin; Schumacher, Ernst

    1984-05-01

    Supersonic molecular beams containing rotationally and vibrationally cold LiNa were probed by one- and multi-photon ionization. Results include determination of a vertical ionization potential (5.05 ± 0.04 eV) as well as first observation of five new singlet states. Preliminary spectroscopic constants ( Te, we and wexe) and term symbols are reported for these five states (A 1Σ +, C 1 Σ +, D 1Π, E 1 Σ + and F 1 E +).

  6. Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization and Uv-Uv Hole-Burning Spectroscopic Studies of Jet-Cooled Acetanilide Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Ceol Joo; Min, Ahreum; Ahn, Ahreum; Lee, Seung Jun; Choi, Myong Yong; Kim, Seong Keun

    2013-06-01

    Conformational investigations and photochemistry of jet-cooled methacetine (MA) and phenacetine (PA) using one color resonant two-photon ionization (REMPI), UV-UV hole-burning and IR-dip spectroscopy are presented. MA and PA are derivatives of acetanilide, substituted by methoxyl, ethoxyl group in the para position of acetanilide, respectively. Moreover, we have investigated conformational information of the acetanilide derivatives (AAP, MA and PA)-water. In this work, we will present and discuss the solvent effects of the hydroxyl group of acetanilide derivatives in the excited state.

  7. Fraunhofer-like diffracted lateral photoelectron momentum distributions of H2+ in charge-resonance-enhanced ionization in strong laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Lin; Qin, Han-Cheng; Wu, Wan-Yang; He, Feng

    2015-12-01

    For H2+ at the critical internuclear distance where the charge-resonance-enhanced ionization is most prominent, the lateral photoelectron momentum distribution presents the Fraunhofer-like diffraction pattern: a central disk surrounded by one or more rings. We study this phenomenon by simulating the time-dependent Schrödinger equation and unveil the mechanism: the stretched molecule constructs an interatomic Coulomb potential, which works as a circular aperture and diffracts the electron when it travels between two nuclei. This distinct lateral photoelectron momentum distribution offers another perspective to look into molecular structures.

  8. State interactions and illumination of hidden states through perturbations and observations of new states: High energy resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of HI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hróçmarsson, Helgi Rafn; Wang, Huasheng; Kvaran, Ágúst

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogen iodide, a Hund's case (c) molecule, serves as a benchmark compound for studying rich molecular state interactions between Rydberg and valence states as well as between Rydberg states at high energies (72 300-74 600 cm-1) by mass resolved resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). Perturbations in the spectra appearing as deformations in line-positions, line-intensities, and linewidths are found to be either due to near-degenerate or non-degenerate interactions, both homogeneous and heterogeneous in nature. Perturbation analyses allow indirect observation as well as characterization of "hidden states" to some extent. Furthermore, new observable spectral features are assigned and characterized.

  9. State interactions and illumination of hidden states through perturbations and observations of new states: High energy resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of HI.

    PubMed

    Hróðmarsson, Helgi Rafn; Wang, Huasheng; Kvaran, Ágúst

    2015-06-28

    Hydrogen iodide, a Hund's case (c) molecule, serves as a benchmark compound for studying rich molecular state interactions between Rydberg and valence states as well as between Rydberg states at high energies (72,300-74,600 cm(-1)) by mass resolved resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI). Perturbations in the spectra appearing as deformations in line-positions, line-intensities, and linewidths are found to be either due to near-degenerate or non-degenerate interactions, both homogeneous and heterogeneous in nature. Perturbation analyses allow indirect observation as well as characterization of "hidden states" to some extent. Furthermore, new observable spectral features are assigned and characterized. PMID:26133433

  10. Dynamics of C-Br bond dissociation in methyl 2-bromopropionate at 235 nm: A resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Ankur; Kumar, Awadhesh; Naik, Prakash D.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of the C-Br bond dissociation on UV excitation of methyl 2-bromopropionate mainly to the 1(nσ*) state, repulsive in the C-Br bond, has been investigated, employing resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization. Both the ground state and spin-orbits excited bromine atoms were detected, with the former being the major channel. Bromine fragments show bimodal translational energy distributions, with slow and fast (major) bromine atoms arising mainly from the ground and excited electronic states, respectively. The measured recoil anisotropy suggests isotropic angular distributions of bromine atoms. Molecular orbital calculations reveal an important role of avoided curve crossing on C-Br bond dissociation dynamics.

  11. NBS-LASL cw microtron

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, S.; Cutler, R.I.; Debenham, D.H.

    1980-01-01

    The NBS-LASL racetrack microtron (RIM) is a joint research project of the National Bureau of Standards and the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The project goals are to determine the feasibility of, and develop the necessary technology for building high-energy, high-current, continuous-beam (cw) electron accelerators using beam recirculation and room-temperature rf accelerating structures. To achieve these goals, a demonstration accelerator will be designed, constructed, and tested. Parameters of the demonstration RIM are: injection energy - 5 MEV; energy gain per pass -12 MeV; number of passes - 15; final beam energy - 185 MeV; maximum current 550 ..mu..A. One 450 kW cw klystron operating at 2380 MHz will supply rf power to both the injector linac and the main accelerating section of the RTM. The disk and washer standing wave rf structure being developed at LASL will be used. SUPERFISH calculations indicate that an effective shunt impedance (ZT) of about 100 M..cap omega../m can be obtained. Thus, rf power dissipation of 25 kW/m results in an energy gain of more than 1.5 MeV/m. Accelerators of this type should be attractive for many applications. At beam energies above about 50 MeV, an RTM should be considerably cheaper to build and operate than a conventional pulsed rf linac of the same maximum energy and time-average beam power. In addition, the RTM provides superior beam quality and a continuous beam which is essential for nuclear physics experiments requiring time-coincidence measurements between emitted particles.

  12. The coupling of direct analysis in real time ionization to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry for ultrahigh-resolution mass analysis.

    PubMed

    Rummel, Julia L; McKenna, Amy M; Marshall, Alan G; Eyler, John R; Powell, David H

    2010-03-01

    Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART) is an ambient ionization technique for mass spectrometry that provides rapid and sensitive analyses with little or no sample preparation. DART has been reported primarily for mass analyzers of low to moderate resolving power such as quadrupole ion traps and time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometers. In the current work, a custom-built DART source has been successfully coupled to two different Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometers for the first time. Comparison of spectra of the isobaric compounds, diisopropyl methylphosphonate and theophylline, acquired by 4.7 T FT-ICR MS and TOF MS, demonstrates that the TOF resolving power can be insufficient for compositionally complex samples. 9.4 T FT-ICR MS yielded the highest mass resolving power yet reported with DART ionization for 1,2-benzanthracene and 9,10-diphenylanthracene. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons exhibit a spatial dependence in ionization mechanisms between the DART source and the mass spectrometer. The feasibility of analyzing a variety of samples was established with the introduction and analysis of food products and crude oil samples. DART FT-ICR MS provides complex sample analysis that is rapid, highly selective and information-rich, but limited to relatively low-mass analytes. PMID:20187081

  13. Angular and internal state distributions of H2 (+) generated by (2 + 1) resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of H2 using time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Perreault, William E; Mukherjee, Nandini; Zare, Richard N

    2016-06-01

    We report direct measurement of the anisotropy parameter β for the angular distribution of the photoelectron and photoion in (2 + 1) resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization process of H2 X (1)Σg (+) (v = 0, J = 0) molecules through the intermediate H2 E,F (1)Σg (+) (v' = 0, J' = 0) level (λ = 201.684 nm) using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The time-of-flight spectra were recorded as the direction of polarization of the ionizing laser was varied with respect to the flight axis of the H2 molecular beam and were fitted to an angular distribution in an appropriately rotated coordinate system with the z-axis oriented along the time-of-flight axis. The anisotropy parameter β was found to be 1.72 ± 0.13 by fitting the time-of-flight spectra and agreed with previous measurements. Using secondary ionization with a delayed laser pulse of different wavelength, we also determined the vibrational energy distribution of the ions, showing that 98% ± 4% of the ions are generated in their ground vibrational state, in agreement with the calculated Franck-Condon factors between the H2 E,F (1)Σg (+) (v' = 0) and H2 (+) X (1)Σg (+) (v″) vibrational levels. PMID:27276949

  14. Angular and internal state distributions of H2+ generated by (2 + 1) resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization of H2 using time-of-flight mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perreault, William E.; Mukherjee, Nandini; Zare, Richard N.

    2016-06-01

    We report direct measurement of the anisotropy parameter β for the angular distribution of the photoelectron and photoion in (2 + 1) resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization process of H2 X 1 Σg + (v = 0, J = 0) molecules through the intermediate H2 E,F 1 Σg + (v' = 0, J' = 0) level (λ = 201.684 nm) using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The time-of-flight spectra were recorded as the direction of polarization of the ionizing laser was varied with respect to the flight axis of the H2 molecular beam and were fitted to an angular distribution in an appropriately rotated coordinate system with the z-axis oriented along the time-of-flight axis. The anisotropy parameter β was found to be 1.72 ± 0.13 by fitting the time-of-flight spectra and agreed with previous measurements. Using secondary ionization with a delayed laser pulse of different wavelength, we also determined the vibrational energy distribution of the ions, showing that 98% ± 4% of the ions are generated in their ground vibrational state, in agreement with the calculated Franck-Condon factors between the H2 E,F 1 Σg + (v' = 0) and H 2+ X 1 Σg + (v″) vibrational levels.

  15. Evaluation of combined matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry experiments for peptide mass fingerprinting analysis.

    PubMed

    da Silva, David; Wasselin, Thierry; Carré, Vincent; Chaimbault, Patrick; Bezdetnaya, Lina; Maunit, Benoît; Muller, Jean-François

    2011-07-15

    Peptide Mass Fingerprinting (PMF) is still of significant interest in proteomics because it allows a large number of complex samples to be rapidly screened and characterized. The main part of post-translational modifications is generally preserved. In some specific cases, PMF suffers from ambiguous or unsuccessful identification. In order to improve its reliability, a combined approach using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTICRMS) was evaluated. The study was carried out on bovine serum albumin (BSA) digest. The influence of several important parameters (the matrix, the sample preparation method, the amount of the analyte) on the MOWSE score and the protein sequence coverage were evaluated to allow the identification of specific effects. A careful investigation of the sequence coverage obtained by each kind of experiment ensured the detection of specific peptides for each experimental condition. Results highlighted that DHB-FTICRMS and DHB- or CHCA-TOFMS are the most suited combinations of experimental conditions to achieve PMF analysis. The association (convolution) of the data obtained by each of these techniques ensured a significant increase in the MOWSE score and the protein sequence coverage. PMID:21638364

  16. New High Power CW Test Facilities For ITER ICRH Components Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, J. M.; Lombard, G.; Argouarch, A.; Chaix, J. P.; Fejoz, P.; Garibaldi, P.; Hatchressian, J. C.; Lebourg, P.; Martinez, A.; Mollard, P.; Mouyon, D.; Mougeolle, G.; Pagano, M.; Thouvenin, D.; Volpe, D.; Volpe, R.; Vulliez, K.

    2011-12-01

    First CW test bed, devoted for Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH), has been built at CEA Cadarache. It has been designed for testing the ICRH antenna sub assemblies under ITER relevant conditions (vacuum, cooling and RF). This paper presents a technical overview of these facilities and discusses their future operations in the framework of the ITER ICRH European R&D program.

  17. Design for a compact CW atom laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Erik; Raithel, Georg

    2011-05-01

    We present a design for a compact continuous-wave atom laser on a chip. A 2D spiral-shaped quadrupole guide is formed by two 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm wires carrying 5 A each embedded in a Si wafer; a 1.5 mm × 0.5 mm wire on the bottom layer carries -10 A, producing a horizontal B-field that pushes the guiding channel center above the chip surface. The center-to-center separation between the top wires is varied from 1.6 mm at the start of the guide to 1 mm at the end, decreasing the guide height from ~ 500 μm to ~ 25 μm above the surface as the atoms travel the 70 cm-long guide. The magnetic gradient of the guiding channel gradually increases from ~ 100 G /cm to ~ 930 G /cm . These features result in continuous surface adsorption evaporative cooling and progressive magnetic compression. Spin flip losses are mitigated by a solenoid sewn around the guide to produce a longitudinal B-field. 87Rb atoms are gravitationally loaded into the guide. A far off-resonant light shift barrier at the end of the guide traps the atoms and allows formation of a BEC. Tuning the barrier height to create a non-zero tunneling rate equal to the loading rate completes the implementation of a CW atom laser. Two options for atom interferometry are implemented on the first-generation chip (matter-wave Fabry-Perot interferometer and guide-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer). Current construction status and challenges will be discussed, along with preliminary results.

  18. 93.7 W 1112 nm diode-side-pumped CW Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. Y.; Wang, Z. C.; Xu, Y. T.; Yang, F.; Wang, B. S.; Gao, H. W.; Bo, Y.; Peng, Q. J.; Cui, D. F.; Xu, Z. Y.

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate a high power continuous wave (CW) infrared laser operated at 1112 nm from a diode side-pumped Nd:YAG crystal with a plano-plano symmetrical resonator. By inserting an etalon, an output power of as high as 93.7 W at 1112 nm was obtained at the pump power of 570 W with conversion efficiency of 16.4%. The beam quality factor of M2 was measured to be about 17. The wavelength tunable performance of the etalon was also analyzed. To the best of our knowledge, it is the highest output power at 1112 nm CW laser based on Nd:YAG crystal.

  19. Nanoglassified, optically-active monolayer films of gold nanoparticles for in situ orthogonal detection by localized surface plasmon resonance and surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization-MS.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Yuan; Hinman, Samuel S; Duan, Jicheng; Cheng, Quan

    2014-12-16

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) represents a sensitive and versatile method for detection of biomolecules in a label-free fashion, but identification of bound analytes can be challenging with LSPR alone, especially for samples in a complex medium. We report the fabrication of an optically active, plasmonic film of gold nanoparticles by using a self-assembly and calcination process, which offers orthogonal measurements enabling multifaceted characterization on the same surface with LSPR and surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. This proof-of-concept study involves plasmonic characterization of the fabricated nanofilm, real-time monitoring of vesicle-surface interactions toward formation of fluid lipid bilayer, and mass spectrometric analysis of peptides and cytochrome c digest. This multifunction-enabling surface material can yield complementary analytical information, providing new tools for comprehensive analysis of biomolecular samples. PMID:25417963

  20. Nanoglassified, Optically-Active Monolayer Films of Gold Nanoparticles for in Situ Orthogonal Detection by Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance and Surface-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-MS

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) represents a sensitive and versatile method for detection of biomolecules in a label-free fashion, but identification of bound analytes can be challenging with LSPR alone, especially for samples in a complex medium. We report the fabrication of an optically active, plasmonic film of gold nanoparticles by using a self-assembly and calcination process, which offers orthogonal measurements enabling multifaceted characterization on the same surface with LSPR and surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. This proof-of-concept study involves plasmonic characterization of the fabricated nanofilm, real-time monitoring of vesicle–surface interactions toward formation of fluid lipid bilayer, and mass spectrometric analysis of peptides and cytochrome c digest. This multifunction-enabling surface material can yield complementary analytical information, providing new tools for comprehensive analysis of biomolecular samples. PMID:25417963

  1. Resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization of helium using an Ar{sup +} mode-locked laser synchronized with VUV synchrotron radiation pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Lacoursiere, Jean; Meyer, Michael; Nahon, Laurent; Morin, Paul; Larzilliere, Michel

    1995-04-01

    We report a new experimental set-up consisting in the synchronization of 74.9094 MHz pulses from a mode-locked Ar{sup +} laser with 8.32 MHz pulses of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation from the Super-ACO storage ring of the Laboratorie pour l'Utilisation du Rayonnement Electromagnetique (LURE). The capabilities of the set-up are demonstrated in a time-resolved pump-probe (VUV+visible) experiment in which free helium atoms are resonantly ionized via the short-lived 1s3p ({sup 1}P) state. This experiment allowed us to show the relevance of this technique for the investigation of nanosecond dynamics on gas phase species.

  2. Resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization of helium using an Ar+ mode-locked laser synchronized with VUV synchrotron radiation pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoursière, Jean; Meyer, Michael; Nahon, Laurent; Morin, Paul; Larzillière, Michel

    1995-04-01

    We report a new experimental set-up consisting in the synchronization of 74.9094 MHz pulses from a mode-locked Ar+ laser with 8.32 MHz pulses of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) synchrotron radiation from the Super-ACO storage ring of the Laboratorie pour l'Utilisation du Rayonnement Electromagnetique (LURE). The capabilities of the set-up are demonstrated in a time-resolved pump-probe (VUV+visible) experiment in which free helium atoms are resonantly ionized via the short-lived 1s3p (1P) state. This experiment allowed us to show the relevance of this technique for the investigation of nanosecond dynamics on gas phase species.

  3. Resonantly-enhanced, four-photon ionization of krypton at laser intensities exceeding 10/sup 13/ W/cm/sup 2/

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, M.D.; Landen, O.L.; Campbell, E.M.

    1987-12-01

    The yield of singly- and multiply- charged ions of krypton and xenon is presented as a function of laser intensity and frequency. The measurements were performed using the second harmonic output of a well-characterized, tunable picosecond dye laser in the range 285 to 310 nm at laser intensities from 1 x 10/sup 12/ to 10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/. Enhancement of the Kr/sup +/ yield by two orders of magnitude by three-photon resonant, four-photon ionization is observed in the vicinity of the 4d'(5/2)/sub 3/ and the 4d(3/2)/sub 1/ intermediate states. A model incorporating line shifts and widths scaling linearly with intensity is in good agreement with the experimental results.

  4. Characterization of antibody-antigen interactions: comparison between surface plasmon resonance measurements and high-mass matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bich, Claudia; Scott, Mike; Panagiotidis, Andreas; Wenzel, Ryan J; Nazabal, Alexis; Zenobi, Renato

    2008-04-01

    The interaction between the bovine prion protein (bPrP) and a monoclonal antibody, 1E5, was studied with high-mass matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). In the case of MS a cross-linking stabilization was used prior to the analysis, whereas for SPR the antibody was immobilized and bPrP was injected. We compared the determination of parameters such as the epitope, the kinetics and binding strength, and the capacity of the antigen to bind two different antibodies. The two methods are highly complementary. SPR measurements require a lower amount of sample but are more time-consuming due to all of the necessary side steps (e.g., immobilization, regeneration). High-mass MALDI MS needs a higher overall amount of sample and cannot give direct access to the kinetic constants, but the analysis is faster and easier compared with SPR. PMID:18078803

  5. Quantitative determination of H2, HD, and D2 internal-state distributions by (2+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinnen, Klaus-Dieter; Buntine, Mark A.; Kliner, Dahv A. V.; Zare, Richard N.; Huo, Winifred M.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of an experimental study of (2+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) detection of H2, HD, and D2 via the E,F two-photon transition, in which the relationship between ion signals and quantum-state populations was determined by calibration against a thermal effusive source. Vibrational and rotational correction factors were obtained for 102 rovibrational levels for v-double-prime = 0, 1, and 2 and for J-double-prime ranging from 0 to 17. These correction factors make it possible to convert ion signals into relative quantum-state populations without relying on a theoretical description of the (2+1) REMPI process.

  6. (1 + 1) resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization via the A2Sigma(+) state of NO - Ionic rotational branching ratios and their intensity dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, H.; Mckoy, V.; Dixit, S. N.; Huo, W. M.

    1988-01-01

    Rotational branching ratios resulting from the (1 + 1) resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy of NO via the 0-0 transition of the A-X band for the four possible branches that can be assigned as R(21.5) are explored using calculation performed in the frozen-core approximation at the Hartree-Fock level. The four different branches, of which three are distinctly different in the perturbative limit, have rather different branching ratios. The mixed R12 + Q22(21.5) branch, which is not intense and has the lowest transition energy, appears to give the best agreement with experimental branching ratio for parallel detection. The agreement is less satisfactory for perpendicular detection. Neither the effect of finite-acceptance angle of the photoelectron detector nor high intensities can explain the discrepancy.

  7. Dating the Martian meteorite Zagami by the 87Rb-87Sr isochron method with a prototype in situ resonance ionization mass spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Scott Anderson, F; Levine, Jonathan; Whitaker, Tom J

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE The geologic history of the Solar System builds on an extensive record of impact flux models, crater counts, and ∼270 kg of lunar samples analyzed in terrestrial laboratories. However, estimates of impactor flux may be biased by the fact that most of the dated Apollo samples were only tenuously connected to an assumed geologic context. Moreover, uncertainties in the modeled cratering rates are significant enough to lead to estimated errors for dates on Mars and the Moon of ∼1 Ga. Given the great cost of sample return missions, combined with the need to sample multiple terrains on multiple planets, we have developed a prototype instrument that can be used for in situ dating to better constrain the age of planetary samples. METHODS We demonstrate the first use of laser ablation resonance ionization mass spectrometry for 87Rb-87Sr isochron dating of geological specimens. The demands of accuracy and precision have required us to meet challenges including regulation of the ambient temperature, measurement of appropriate backgrounds, sufficient ablation laser intensity, avoidance of the defocusing effect of the plasma created by ablation pulses, and shielding of our detector from atoms and ions of other elements. RESULTS To test whether we could meaningfully date planetary materials, we have analyzed a piece of the Martian meteorite Zagami. In each of four separate measurements we obtained 87Rb-87Sr isochron ages for Zagami consistent with its published age, and, in both of two measurements that reached completion, we obtained better than 200 Ma precision. Combining all our data into a single isochron with 581 spot analyses gives an 87Rb-87Sr age for this specimen of 360 ±90 Ma. CONCLUSIONS Our analyses of the Zagami meteorite represent the first successful application of resonance ionization mass spectrometry to isochron geochronology. Furthermore, the technique is miniaturizable for spaceflight and in situ dating on other planetary bodies. © 2014 The

  8. Exploring Biosignatures Associated with Thenardite by Geomatrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (GALDI-FTICR-MS)

    SciTech Connect

    C. Doc Richardson; Nancy W. Hinman; Timothy R. McJunkin; J. Michelle Kotler; Jill R. Scott

    2008-10-01

    Geomatrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (GALDI) in conjunction with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FTICR-MS) has been employed to determine how effectively bio/organic molecules associated with the mineral thenardite (Na2SO4) can be detected. GALDI is based on the ability of the mineral host to assist desorption and ionization of bio/organic molecules without additional sample preparation. When glycine was mixed with thenardite, glycine was deprotonated to produce C2H4NO-2 at m/z 74.025. The combination of stearic acid with thenardite produced a complex cluster ion at m/z 390.258 in the negative mode, which was assigned a composition ofC18H39O7Na-. Anatural sample of thenardite from Searles Lake in California also produced a peak at m/z 390.260. The bio/organic signatures in both the laboratory-based and natural samples were heterogeneously dispersed as revealed by chemical imaging. The detection limits for the stearic acid and thenardite combination were estimated to be 3 parts per trillion or~7 zeptomoles (10-21) per laser spot. Attempts to improve the signal-to-noise ratio by co-adding FTICR-MS data predetermined to contain the biosignatures of interest revealed problems due to a lack of phase coherence between data sets.

  9. Resonant Raman scattering contribution to attenuation of x rays at energies in lower vicinity of the K-shell ionization threshold of some elements

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Sharma, Veena; Kumar, Sunil; Alrakabi, Muhanad; Mehta, D.; Singh, Nirmal

    2009-05-15

    Attenuation of the x rays and gamma rays in the {sub 22}Ti, {sub 41}Nb, {sub 69}Tm, {sub 70}Yb, and {sub 71}Lu elements have been measured with special emphasis for the x ray energies (E{sub in}) in lower vicinity of the K shell ionization threshold (B{sub K}) of the element. The incident photon beam is obtained from decay of the {sup 55}Fe, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 57}Co radioisotopes, and fluorescence of the {sub 23}V, {sub 70}Yb, {sub 71}Lu, {sub 74}W, {sub 76}Os, and {sub 90}Th targets excited by the x rays and gamma rays from the radioisotopes. The measurements were performed using energy dispersive setups involving Ge detectors. The measured attenuation coefficients agree with the available theoretical values except at the photon energies with (B{sub K}-E{sub in}) less than or nearly equal to the K-shell width (GAMMA{sub K}), where significant positive deviations as large as factor of 2 have been observed. In view of reliability of the available theoretical cross sections for the photoionization and the photon scattering processes, the magnitude of positive alteration at the photon energy in lower vicinity of the ionization threshold is attributed to the K shell resonant Raman scattering (RRS) process and the corresponding cross sections have been deduced. Possible matrix effects in the energy dispersive x ray spectrometry due to RRS are also discussed.

  10. Observations of magnetospheric ionization enhancements using upper-hybrid resonance noise band data from the RAE-1 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosier, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    Noise bands associated with the upper-hybrid resonance were used to provide direct evidence for the existence of regions of enhanced density in the equatorial magnetosphere near L = 2. Density enhancements ranging from several percent to as high as 45 percent are observed with radial dimensions of several hundred kilometers. The enhancement characteristics strongly suggest their identification as magnetospheric whistler ducts.

  11. Application of pyrolysis-mass spectrometry and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with electron-ionization or resonance-enhanced-multi-photon ionization for characterization of crude oils.

    PubMed

    Otto, Stefan; Streibel, Thorsten; Erdmann, Sabrina; Sklorz, Martin; Schulz-Bull, Detlef; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-01-15

    A novel analytical system for gas-chromatographic investigation of complex samples has been developed, that combines the advantages of several analytical principles to enhance the analytical information. Decomposition of high molecular weight structures is achieved by pyrolysis and a high separation capacity due to the chromatographic step provides both an universal as well as a selective and sensitive substance detection. The latter is achieved by simultaneously applying electron ionization quadrupole mass spectrometry (EI-QMS) for structural elucidation and [1+1]-resonance-enhanced-multi-photon ionization (REMPI) combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ToFMS). The system has been evaluated and tested with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) standards. It was applied to crude oil samples for the first time. In such highly complex samples several thousands of compounds are present and the identification especially of low concentrated chemical species such as PAH or their polycyclic aromatic sulfur containing heterocyclic (PASH) derivatives is often difficult. Detection of unalkylated and alkylated PAH together with PASH is considerably enhanced by REMPI-ToFMS, at times revealing aromatic structures which are not observable by EI-QMS due to their low abundance. On the other hand, the databased structure proposals of the EI-QMS analysis are needed to confirm structural information and isomers distinction. The technique allows a complex structure analysis as well as selective assessment of aromatic substances in one measurement. Information about the content of sulfur containing compounds plays a significant role for the increase of efficiency in the processing of petroleum. PMID:25542090

  12. 20 °C, 9 GHz CW-EPR saturation measurements of five selected Alberta coals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudynska, J.; Buckmaster, H. A.; Duczmal, T.

    1991-12-01

    This paper reports the first determination of the spin-lattice (T_1) and spin-spin (T_2) relaxation times at 20 °C for two subbituminous and three hv bituminous selected Alberta coals using 9 GHz CW-EPR saturation measurements. Argand diagrammatic techniques were used to verify that the lineshapes were Lorentzian since the deviation was less than 4%. Consequently, it was assumed that the CW-EPR spectral resonances could be approximated to homogeneously broadened lineshapes and saturation techniques could be used to determine these relaxation times. The T_1 and T_2 relaxation times are in good agreement with values reported in the literature using saturation measurements, but two orders of magnitude shorter than those obtained using ESE because coal EPR spectral resonances are the unresolved superposition of comparatively narrow homogeneous resonances.

  13. Design of 57.5 MHz CW RFQ for medium energy heavy ion superconducting linac.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Kolomiets, A. A.; Kashinsky, D. A.; Minaev, S. A.; Pershin, V. I.; Tretyakova, T. E.; Yaramishev, S. G.; Physics; Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics

    2002-06-01

    The nuclear science community considers the construction of the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility as a top priority. The RIA includes a 1.4 GV superconducting linac for production of 400 kW cw heavy ion beams. The initial acceleration of heavy ions delivered from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source can be effectively performed by a 57.5 MHz 4-m long room temperature RFQ. The principal specifications of the RFQ are (i) formation of extremely low longitudinal emittance, (ii) stable operation over a wide range of voltage for acceleration of various ion species needed for RIA operation, and (iii) simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states of uranium ions. cw operation of an accelerating structure leads to a number of requirements for the resonators such as high shunt impedance, efficient water cooling of all parts of the resonant cavity, mechanical stability together with precise alignment, reliable rf contacts, a stable operating mode, and fine tuning of the resonant frequency during operation. To satisfy these requirements a new resonant structure has been developed. This paper discusses the beam dynamics and electrodynamics design of the RFQ cavity, as well as some aspects of the mechanical design of the low-frequency cw RFQ.

  14. Resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perozzi, E.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A resonance in CELESTIAL MECHANICS occurs when some of the quantities characterizing the motion of two or more celestial bodies can be considered as commensurable, i.e. their ratio is close to an integer fraction. In a simplified form, this can be expressed as ...

  15. CW CO2 Laser Induced Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pola, Joseph

    1989-05-01

    CW CO2 laser driven reactions between sulfur hexafluoride and carbon oxide, carbon suboxide, carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide proceed at subatmospheric pressures and yield fluorinated carbon compounds and sulfur tetrafluoride. CW CO2 laser driven reactions of organic compounds in the presence of energy-conveying sulfur hexafluoride show reaction course different from that normally observed due to elimination of reactor hot surface effects. The examples concern the decomposition of polychlorohydrocarbons, 2-nitropropane, tert.-butylamine, allyl chloride, spirohexane, isobornyl acetate and the oxidation of haloolefins. CW CO2 laser induced fragmentation of 1-methyl-l-silacyclobutanes and 4-silaspiro(3.4)octane in the presence of sulfur hexafluoride is an effective way for preparation and deposition of stable organosilicon polymers.

  16. An Acoustic Demonstration Model for CW and Pulsed Spectrosocopy Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starck, Torben; Mäder, Heinrich; Trueman, Trevor; Jäger, Wolfgang

    2009-06-01

    High school and undergraduate students have often difficulties if new concepts are introduced in their physics or chemistry lectures. Lecture demonstrations and references to more familiar analogues can be of great help to the students in such situations. We have developed an experimental setup to demonstrate the principles of cw absorption and pulsed excitation - emission spectroscopies, using acoustical analogues. Our radiation source is a speaker and the detector is a microphone, both controlled by a computer sound card. The acoustical setup is housed in a plexiglas box, which serves as a resonator. It turns out that beer glasses are suitable samples; this also helps to keep the students interested! The instrument is controlled by a LabView program. In a cw experiment, the sound frequency is swept through a certain frequency range and the microphone response is recorded simultaneously as function of frequency. A background signal without sample is recorded, and background subtraction yields the beer glass spectrum. In a pulsed experiment, a short sound pulse is generated and the microphone is used to record the resulting emission signal of the beer glass. A Fourier transformation of the time domain signal gives then the spectrum. We will discuss the experimental setup and show videos of the experiments.

  17. Optimizing Frequency-Modulated CW EDMR in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lihuang; van Schooten, Kipp; Ramanathan, Chandrasekhar

    Electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) is a powerful method of probing dopant and defect spin states in semiconductor devices. Moreover, at the single dopant level, these spin states are heavily investigated as potential qubit systems, though facile electronic access to single dopants is exceedingly difficult. We therefore characterize detection sensitivities of frequency-modulated CW-EDMR of phosphorus donors in silicon Si:P using a home-built 2.5 GHz system (~80 mT) at 5 K. An arbitrary waveform generator controls the frequency modulation, allowing us to optimize the signal to noise ratio (SNR) of both the dangling bond and phosphorus donor signals against multiple experimental parameters, such as modulation amplitude and modulation frequency. The optimal range of frequency modulation parameters is constrained by the relaxation time of the phosphorous electron at 5 K, resulting in the same sensitivity limit as field modulated CW-EDMR, but offers some technical advantages; e.g. reducing the relative contribution of magnetic field induced currents and eliminating the need for field modulation coils. We further characterize the EDMR SNR in Si:P as a function of optical excitation energy by using a narrow line laser, tunable across donor exciton and band gap states.

  18. A combined ¹H nuclear magnetic resonance and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry analysis to understand the basal metabolism of plant-pathogenic Fusarium spp.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Rohan G T; Allwood, J William; Galster, Aimee M; Urban, Martin; Daudi, Arsalan; Canning, Gail; Ward, Jane L; Beale, Michael H; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E

    2010-12-01

    Many ascomycete Fusarium spp. are plant pathogens that cause disease on both cereal and noncereal hosts. Infection of wheat ears by Fusarium graminearum and F. culmorum typically results in bleaching and a subsequent reduction in grain yield. Also, a large proportion of the harvested grain can be spoiled when the colonizing Fusarium mycelia produce trichothecene mycotoxins, such as deoxynivalenol (DON). In this study, we have explored the intracellular polar metabolome of Fusarium spp. in both toxin-producing and nonproducing conditions in vitro. Four Fusarium spp., including nine well-characterized wild-type field isolates now used routinely in laboratory experimentation, were explored. A metabolic "triple-fingerprint" was recorded using (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance and direct-injection electrospray ionization-mass spectroscopy in both positive- and negative-ionization modes. These combined metabolomic analyses revealed that this technique is sufficient to resolve different wild-type isolates and different growth conditions. Principal components analysis was able to resolve the four species explored-F. graminearum, F. culmorum, F. pseudograminearum, and F. venenatum-as well as individual isolate differences from the same species. The external nutritional environment was found to have a far greater influence on the metabolome than the genotype of the organism. Conserved responses to DON-inducing medium were evident and included increased abundance of key compatible solutes, such as glycerol and mannitol. In addition, the concentration of γ-aminobutyric acid was elevated, indicating that the cellular nitrogen status may be affected by growth on DON-inducing medium. PMID:20718668

  19. Cw operation of the FMIT RFQ accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelius, W.D.

    1985-01-01

    Recently, we have achieved reliable cw operation of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator. In addition to the operational experiences in achieving this status, some of the modifications of the vacuum system, cooling system, and rf structure are discussed. Preliminary beam-characterization results are presented. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  20. CW arc-lamp-pumped alexandrite lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Samelson, H.; Walling, J.C.; Wernikowski, T.; Harter, D.J.

    1988-06-01

    The performance characteristics of arc-lamp- (Xe and Hg) pumped, CW alexandrite lasers are described in detail. The modes of operation considered are free running, tuned, and repetitively Q-switched. The experimental arrangement and apparatus are also outlined. The experimental results are discussed in terms of a steady-state model, and the areas of agreement and difficulty are pointed out.

  1. A CW Gunn Diode Switching Element.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurtado, Marco; Rosenbaum, Fred J.

    As part of a study of the application of communication satellites to educational development, certain technical aspects of such a system were examined. A current controlled bistable switching element using a CW Gunn diode is reported on here. With modest circuits switching rates of the order of 10 MHz have been obtained. Switching is initiated by…

  2. 2 MW CW RF load for gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Ives, R.; Marsden, David; Mizuhara, Max; Collins, George; Neilson, Jeff; Borchard, Philipp

    2011-07-01

    Final design and assembly are in progress for a 2MW CW RF load for gyrotrons. Such loads are required for testing high power gyrotrons for electron cyclotron heating of fusion plasmas. The research is building on experience with a 1 MW load to increase the power capability, reduce backscattered RF power, and improve the mechanical design. (author)

  3. Design of 57.5 MHz cw RFQ structure for the rare isotope accelerator facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Ostroumov, P. N.; Kolomiets, A. A.; Kashinsky, D. A.; Minaev, S. A.; Pershin, V. I.; Yaramishev, S. G.; Tretyakova, T. E.

    2002-01-29

    The Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility includes a driver linac for production of 400 kW CW heavy-ion beams. The initial acceleration of heavy-ions delivered from an ECR ion source can be effectively performed by a 57.5 MHz four-meter long RFQ. The principal specifications of the RFQ are: (1) formation of extremely low longitudinal emittance; (2) stable operation over a wide range of voltage for acceleration of various ion species needed for RIA operation; (3) simultaneous acceleration of two-charge states of uranium ions. CW operation of an accelerating structure leads to a number of requirements for the resonators such as high shunt impedance, efficient water cooling of all parts of the resonant cavity, mechanical stability together with precise alignment, reliable rf contacts, a stable operating mode and fine tuning of the resonant frequency during operation. To satisfy these requirements a new resonant structure has been developed. This paper discusses beam dynamics and electrodynamics design of the RFQ cavity, as well as, some aspects of the mechanical design of this low-frequency CW RFQ.

  4. The 1.083 micron tunable CW semiconductor laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, C. S.; Chen, Jan-Shin; Lu, Ken-Gen; Ouyang, Keng

    1991-01-01

    A tunable CW laser is desired to produce light equivalent to the helium spectral line at 1.08 microns. This laser will serve as an optical pumping source for He-3 and He-4 atoms used in space magnetometers. This light source can be fabricated either as a semiconductor laser diode or a pumped solid state laser. Continuous output power of greater than 10 mW is desired. Semiconductor lasers can be thermally tuned, but must be capable of locking onto the helium resonance lines. Solid state lasers must have efficient pumping sources suitable for space configuration. Additional requirements are as follows: space magnetometer applications will include low mass (less than 0.5 kg), low power consumption (less than 0.75 W), and high stability/reliability for long missions (5-10 years).

  5. Parametric four-wave mixing using a single cw laser.

    PubMed

    Brekke, E; Alderson, L

    2013-06-15

    Four-wave mixing can be used to generate coherent output beams, with frequencies difficult to acquire in commercial lasers. Here, a single narrow external cavity diode laser locked to the two photon 5s-5d transition in rubidium is combined with a tapered amplifier system to produce a high power cw beam at 778 nm and used to generate coherent light at 420 nm through parametric four-wave mixing. This process is analyzed in terms of the intensity and frequency of the incoming beam as well as the atomic density of the sample. The efficiency of the process is currently limited when on resonance due to the absorption of the 420 nm beam, and modifications should allow a significant increase in output power. PMID:23939005

  6. The SERS spectra of alizarin and its ionized species: The contribution of the molecular resonance to the spectral enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lofrumento, Cristiana; Platania, Elena; Ricci, Marilena; Mulana, Carla; Becucci, Maurizio; Castellucci, Emilio M.

    2015-06-01

    Quantum chemical calculations are today extensively used to model the SERS spectra of molecular systems as the interpretation of the experimental data is facilitated by progress in the efficiency of programs for computing derivative properties, such as normal-mode frequencies and spectral intensities. After that quantum chemical calculations furnish an invaluable aid to spectroscopists in the analysis and assignment of experimental vibrational spectra for complex poliatomics. The analysis of the vibrational properties of alizarin and its anions is presented. The experimental results obtained by Raman and SERS spectroscopy are discussed in comparison with the results of DFT calculations carried out at the B3LYP/6-31g(d) level of theory. The surface selection rules for adsorbed molecule to metal nanoparticles are also applied for the explanation of the SERS experimental results. From the calculated spectra a hint to the contribution of molecular resonances to the SERS spectra can be obtained. The general spectral features of the SERS experimental data obtained with 514, 632, 785 and 1064 nm laser excitation wavelengths are satisfactorily reproduced.

  7. Dithranol as a Matrix for Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Imaging on a Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    Le, Cuong H.; Han, Jun; Borchers, Christoph H.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) determines the spatial localization and distribution patterns of compounds on the surface of a tissue section, mainly using MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization)-based analytical techniques. New matrices for small-molecule MSI, which can improve the analysis of low-molecular weight (MW) compounds, are needed. These matrices should provide increased analyte signals while decreasing MALDI background signals. In addition, the use of ultrahigh-resolution instruments, such as Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometers, has the ability to resolve analyte signals from matrix signals, and this can partially overcome many problems associated with the background originating from the MALDI matrix. The reduction in the intensities of the metastable matrix clusters by FTICR MS can also help to overcome some of the interferences associated with matrix peaks on other instruments. High-resolution instruments such as the FTICR mass spectrometers are advantageous as they can produce distribution patterns of many compounds simultaneously while still providing confidence in chemical identifications. Dithranol (DT; 1,8-dihydroxy-9,10-dihydroanthracen-9-one) has previously been reported as a MALDI matrix for tissue imaging. In this work, a protocol for the use of DT for MALDI imaging of endogenous lipids from the surfaces of mammalian tissue sections, by positive-ion MALDI-MS, on an ultrahigh-resolution hybrid quadrupole FTICR instrument has been provided. PMID:24300588

  8. Dithranol as a matrix for matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging on a fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Le, Cuong H; Han, Jun; Borchers, Christoph H

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) determines the spatial localization and distribution patterns of compounds on the surface of a tissue section, mainly using MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization)-based analytical techniques. New matrices for small-molecule MSI, which can improve the analysis of low-molecular weight (MW) compounds, are needed. These matrices should provide increased analyte signals while decreasing MALDI background signals. In addition, the use of ultrahigh-resolution instruments, such as Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometers, has the ability to resolve analyte signals from matrix signals, and this can partially overcome many problems associated with the background originating from the MALDI matrix. The reduction in the intensities of the metastable matrix clusters by FTICR MS can also help to overcome some of the interferences associated with matrix peaks on other instruments. High-resolution instruments such as the FTICR mass spectrometers are advantageous as they can produce distribution patterns of many compounds simultaneously while still providing confidence in chemical identifications. Dithranol (DT; 1,8-dihydroxy-9,10-dihydroanthracen-9-one) has previously been reported as a MALDI matrix for tissue imaging. In this work, a protocol for the use of DT for MALDI imaging of endogenous lipids from the surfaces of mammalian tissue sections, by positive-ion MALDI-MS, on an ultrahigh-resolution hybrid quadrupole FTICR instrument has been provided. PMID:24300588

  9. Novel glutathione conjugates of phenyl isocyanate identified by ultra-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Johansson Mali'n, Tove; Lindberg, Sandra; Åstot, Crister

    2014-01-01

    Phenyl isocyanate is a highly reactive compound that is used as a reagent in organic synthesis and in the production of polyurethanes. The potential for extensive occupational exposure to this compound makes it important to elucidate its reactivity towards different nucleophiles and potential targets in the body. In vitro reactions between glutathione and phenyl isocyanate were studied. Three adducts of glutathione with phenyl isocyanate were identified using ultra-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Mass spectrometric data for these adducts have not previously been reported. Nucleophilic attack on phenyl isocyanate occurred via either the cysteinyl thiol group or the glutamic acid α-amino group of glutathione. In addition, a double adduct was formed by the reaction of both these moieties. NMR analysis confirmed the proposed structure of the double adduct, which has not previously been described. These results suggest that phenyl isocyanate may react with free cysteines, the α-amino group and also with lysine residues whose side chain contains a primary amine. PMID:24446265

  10. Biomarkers probed in saliva by surface plasmon resonance imaging coupled to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry in array format.

    PubMed

    Musso, Johana; Buchmann, William; Gonnet, Florence; Jarroux, Nathalie; Bellon, Sophie; Frydman, Chiraz; Brunet, Didier-Luc; Daniel, Regis

    2015-02-01

    Detection of protein biomarkers is of major interest in proteomics. This work reports the analysis of protein biomarkers directly from a biological fluid, human saliva, by surface plasmon resonance imaging coupled to mass spectrometry (SPRi-MS), using a functionalized biochip in an array format enabling multiplex SPR-MS analysis. The SPR biochip presented a gold surface functionalized by a self-assembled monolayer of short poly(ethylene oxide) chains carrying an N-hydroxysuccinimide end-group for the immobilization of antibodies. The experiments were accomplished without any sample pre-purification or spiking with the targeted biomarkers. SPRi monitoring of the interactions, immune capture from the biochip surface, and finally on-chip matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-MS structural identification of two protein biomarkers, salivary α-amylase and lysozyme, were successively achieved directly from saliva at the femtomole level. For lysozyme, the on-chip MS identification was completed by a proteomic analysis based on an on-chip proteolysis procedure and a peptide mass fingerprint. PMID:25524230

  11. Ionic rotational branching ratios in resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization of NO via the A2Sigma(+)(3s sigma) and D2Sigma(+)(3p sigma) states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, H.; Mckoy, V.; Dixit, S. N.; Huo, W. M.

    1988-01-01

    Results are presented for the rotationally resolved photoelectron spectra resulting from a (2 + 1) one-color resonant enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) of NO via the rotationally clean S21(11.5) and mixed S11(15.5) + R21(15.5) branches of the 0-0 transition in the D-X band. The calculations were done in the fixed-nuclei frozen core approximation. The resulting photoionization spectra, convoluted with a Lorentzian detection function, agree qualitatively with experimental results of Viswanathan et al. (1986) and support their conclusion that the nonspherical nature of the molecular potential creates a substantial l-mixing in the continuum, which in turn leads to the intense Delta N = 0 peak. The rather strong photoelectron energy dependence of the rotational branching ratios of the D 2Sigma(+) S21(11.5) line was investigated and compared to the weak energy dependence of the A 2Sigma(+) R22(21.5) line.

  12. A 100 MV cryomodule for CW operation

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Reece

    2005-07-10

    A cryomodule designed for high-gradient CW operation has been built at Jefferson Lab. The Renascence cryomodule is the final prototype of a design for use in the 12 GeV CEBAF upgrade. The module uses eight 7-cell 1497 MHz cavities to be individually powered by 13 kW klystrons. Specifications call for providing >109 MV CW with < 250 W of dynamic heat at 2.07 K. The module incorporates a new generation of tuners and higher power input waveguides. A mixture of the new HG and LL cavity shapes are used. A new high thermal conductivity RF feedthrough has been developed and used on the 32 HOM coupler probes of Renascence. The cryomodule assembly is complete. Testing is to begin late June. Design features and initial test data will be presented.

  13. A 1 + 1' resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization scheme for rotationally state-selective detection of formaldehyde via the à (1)A2 ← X[combining tilde] (1)A1 transition.

    PubMed

    Park, G Barratt; Krüger, Bastian C; Meyer, Sven; Wodtke, Alec M; Schäfer, Tim

    2016-08-10

    The formaldehyde molecule is an important model system for understanding dynamical processes in small polyatomic molecules. However, prior to this work, there have been no reports of a resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) detection scheme for formaldehyde suitable for rovibrationally state-selective detection in molecular beam scattering experiments. Previously reported tunable REMPI schemes are either non-rotationally resolved, involve multiple resonant steps, or involve many-photon ionization steps. In the current work, we present a new 1 + 1' REMPI scheme for formaldehyde. The first photon is tunable and provides rotational resolution via the vibronically allowed à (1)A2 ← X[combining tilde] (1)A1 transition. Molecules are then directly ionized from the à state by one photon of 157 nm. The results indicate that the ionization cross section from the 4(1) vibrational level of the à state is independent of the rotational level used as intermediate, to within experimental uncertainty. The 1 + 1' REMPI intensities are therefore directly proportional to the à ← X[combining tilde] absorption intensities and can be used for quantitative measurement of X[combining tilde]-state population distributions. PMID:27461406

  14. Application of resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (REMPI-TOFMS) for on-line trace analysis of combustion and pyrolysis products in technical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmermann, Ralf; Heger, H. J.; Dorfner, R.; Kettrup, A. A.; Boesl, Ulrich

    1997-05-01

    We present first applications of resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (REMPI-TOFMS) for on-line monitoring of technical water incinerator flue gases and coffee roasting process off- gases. The results were obtained with a newly developed, mobile REMPI-TOFMS device. The combination of laser induced resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization and time-of-flight mass spectrometry represents a highly selective as well as sensitive analytical technique, well suited for species selective real-time on-line monitoring of trace-products in of-gases from thermal processes or technical incinerators. The achievable sensitivities are in the ppb-range or better for aromatic compounds. The high selectivity is due to the combination of mass- and optical selectivity, the high sensitivity is caused by the high cross sections of resonance-enhanced two photon ionization with lasers. On- line monitoring of trace chemicals, formed during combustion- or pyrolysis-processes, is useful e.g. for feed back steering of combustion processes in order to minimize the formation of hazardous byproducts or for optimization of the economic efficiency of thermal production processes.

  15. Energy saver prototype accelerating resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, Q.; May, M.; Miller, H.W.; Reid, J.; Turkot, F.; Webber, R.; Wildman, D.

    1981-06-01

    A fixed frequency rf accelerating resonator has been built and tested for the Fermilab Energy Saver. The design parameters and prototype resonator test results are given. The resonator features a high permeability nickel alloy resistor which damps unwanted modes and corona rolls designed with the aid of the computer code SUPERFISH. In bench measurements, the prototype resonator has achieved peak accelerating voltages of 500 kV for a 1% duty cycle and cw operation at 360 kV. 4 refs.

  16. Characterization of IRDye 800CW chlorotoxin as a targeting agent for brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Kovar, Joy L; Curtis, Evan; Othman, Shadi F; Simpson, Melanie A; Olive, D Michael

    2013-09-15

    Primary brain tumors present significant challenges for surgical resection because of their location and the frequent occurrence of malignant projections extending beyond the primary tumor. Visualization of the tumor margins during surgery is critical for a favorable outcome. We report the use of IRDye 800CW chlorotoxin (CLTX) as a targeted imaging agent for brain tumors in a spontaneous mouse model of medulloblastoma, ND2:SmoA1. Specificity and functionality of the targeted agent were confirmed in cell-based assays. Tumors were detected by magnetic resonance imaging and IRDye 800CW CLTX administered to individual animals for optical imaging at 1-month increments. The integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) was measured by Evan's Blue perfusion prior to sacrifice. Results show that IRDye 800CW CLTX specifically targeted tumor tissue. The extravasation of Evan's Blue was observed in all tumors, suggesting that the presence of the tumors can introduce alterations in the permeability of the BBB. Because increased vascular permeability was observed early in the disease model, larger dye-labeled imaging agents that exceed current BBB size restrictions may warrant renewed consideration as candidates for tumor detection and surgical resection. Our study provides data characterizing in vitro and in vivo use of IRDye 800CW CLTX as a broadly applicable tumor imaging agent. PMID:23711726

  17. Performance of three-crystal 1800 watt CW Nd:YAG laser

    SciTech Connect

    Jellison, J.L.; Keicher, D.M.; Fuerschbach, P.W.

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a laser system that would combine some of the favorable characteristics of the two most commonly used lasers for seam welding of heat sensitive assemblies. A multirod (3) symmetrical resonator CW Nd:YAG laser has been developed that is rated at 1800 watts output power. By utilizing the symmetrical resonator design, beam characteristics are not significantly compromised compared to that of single rod systems. The laser is capable of producing acceptable welds in aluminum and copper alloys and also has sufficient power to produce welds in steels and nickel base alloys at high welding speeds. 4 refs., 5 figs. 1 tab.

  18. Similarity criteria in calculations of the energy characteristics of a cw oxygen - iodine laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezhenin, A. V.; Azyazov, V. N.

    2012-12-01

    The calculated and experimental data on the energy efficiency of a cw oxygen - iodine laser (OIL) are analysed based on two similarity criteria, namely, on the ratio of the residence time of the gas mixture in the resonator to the characteristic time of extraction of the energy stored in singlet oxygen td and on the gain-to-loss ratio Π. It is shown that the simplified two-level laser model satisfactorily predicts the output characteristics of OILs with a stable resonator at τd <= 7. Efficient energy extraction from the OIL active medium is achieved in the case of τd = 5 - 7, Π = 4 - 8.

  19. Similarity criteria in calculations of the energy characteristics of a cw oxygen - iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Mezhenin, A V; Azyazov, V N

    2012-12-31

    The calculated and experimental data on the energy efficiency of a cw oxygen - iodine laser (OIL) are analysed based on two similarity criteria, namely, on the ratio of the residence time of the gas mixture in the resonator to the characteristic time of extraction of the energy stored in singlet oxygen td and on the gain-to-loss ratio {Pi}. It is shown that the simplified two-level laser model satisfactorily predicts the output characteristics of OILs with a stable resonator at {tau}{sub d} {<=} 7. Efficient energy extraction from the OIL active medium is achieved in the case of {tau}{sub d} = 5 - 7, {Pi} = 4 - 8. (lasers)

  20. Double-arm three-dimensional ion imaging apparatus for the study of ion pair channels in resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poretskiy, M. S.; Chichinin, A. I.; Maul, C.; Gericke, K.-H.

    2016-02-01

    We present a novel experimental configuration for the full quantitative characterization of the multichannel resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) of small molecules in cases when the ion-pair dissociation channel is important. For this purpose, a double-arm time-of-flight mass spectrometer with three-dimensional (3D) ion imaging detectors at both arms is constructed. The REMPI of HCl molecules is used to examine the constructed setup. The apparatus allows us to perform simultaneous measurements of the 3D velocity vector distributions of positive (H+, HCl+, and Cl+) and negative (Cl-) photoions. The characterization consists of the determination of "two-photon absorption cross sections" for the process HCl(X)+2hν → HCl∗, one-photon absorption cross sections for subsequent processes HCl∗ + hν → HCl∗∗, and the probability of the subsequent non-adiabatic transition HCl∗∗ → HCl(B) → H+ + Cl-, which leads to ionic pairs. All these data should be obtained from the analysis of the dependencies of the number of ions on the laser energy. The full characterization of the laser beam and the knowledge of the ion detection probability are necessary parts of the analysis. Detailed knowledge of losses of produced ions in the mass spectrometer before detection requires understanding and characterization of such processes like electron emission from metallic grids under ion bombardment or charge transfer between positive ions and the metal surface of the grids, like Cl+ + (grid) → Cl-. These important phenomena from surface science are rarely discussed in the imaging literature, and here, we try to compensate for this shortcoming.

  1. Double-arm three-dimensional ion imaging apparatus for the study of ion pair channels in resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization.

    PubMed

    Poretskiy, M S; Chichinin, A I; Maul, C; Gericke, K-H

    2016-02-01

    We present a novel experimental configuration for the full quantitative characterization of the multichannel resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) of small molecules in cases when the ion-pair dissociation channel is important. For this purpose, a double-arm time-of-flight mass spectrometer with three-dimensional (3D) ion imaging detectors at both arms is constructed. The REMPI of HCl molecules is used to examine the constructed setup. The apparatus allows us to perform simultaneous measurements of the 3D velocity vector distributions of positive (H(+), HCl(+), and Cl(+)) and negative (Cl(-)) photoions. The characterization consists of the determination of "two-photon absorption cross sections" for the process HCl(X)+2hν → HCl*, one-photon absorption cross sections for subsequent processes HCl* + hν → HCl*, and the probability of the subsequent non-adiabatic transition HCl* → HCl(B) → H(+) + Cl(-), which leads to ionic pairs. All these data should be obtained from the analysis of the dependencies of the number of ions on the laser energy. The full characterization of the laser beam and the knowledge of the ion detection probability are necessary parts of the analysis. Detailed knowledge of losses of produced ions in the mass spectrometer before detection requires understanding and characterization of such processes like electron emission from metallic grids under ion bombardment or charge transfer between positive ions and the metal surface of the grids, like Cl(+) + (grid) → Cl(-). These important phenomena from surface science are rarely discussed in the imaging literature, and here, we try to compensate for this shortcoming. PMID:26931834

  2. Calculation of multiphoton ionization processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, T. N.; Poe, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    We propose an accurate and efficient procedure in the calculation of multiphoton ionization processes. In addition to the calculational advantage, this procedure also enables us to study the relative contributions of the resonant and nonresonant intermediate states.

  3. Analysis of the (1)A' S1 ← (1)A' S0 and (2)A' D0 ← (1)A' S1 band systems in 1,2-dichloro-4-fluorobenzene by means of resonance-enhanced-multi-photon-ionization (REMPI) and mass-analyzed-threshold-ionization (MATI) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Sascha; Grotemeyer, Jürgen

    2016-03-14

    Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) and mass analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy have been applied in order to investigate the vibrational structure of 1,2-dichloro-4-fluorobenzene (1,2,4-DCFB) in its first excited state (S1) and the cationic ground state (D0). The selection of the state prior to ionization resulted in MATI spectra with different intensity distributions thus giving access to many vibrational levels. To support the experimental findings, geometry optimizations and frequency analyses at DFT (density functional) and TDDFT (time-dependent density functional) levels of theory have been applied. Additionally, a multidimensional Franck-Condon approach has been used to calculate the vibrational intensities from the DFT calculations. An excellent agreement between simulated and measured REMPI and MATI spectra allowed for a confident assignment of vibrational levels and mechanisms active during excitation and ionization. In order to avoid any ambiguity regarding the assignment of the vibrational bands to normal modes, Duschinsky normal mode analysis has been performed to correlate the ground state (S0) normal modes of 1,2,4-DCFB with the benzene derived Wilson nomenclature. From the REMPI spectra the electronic excitation energy (EE) of 1,2-dichloro-4-fluorobenzene could be determined to be 35 714 ± 2 cm(-1) while the MATI spectra yielded the adiabatic ionization energy (IE) of 1,2-dichloro-4-fluorobenzene which could be determined to be 73 332 ± 7 cm(-1). PMID:26884269

  4. Diode-pumped CW molecular lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellegehausen, B.; Luhs, W.

    2016-05-01

    First continuous laser oscillation on many lines in the range of 533-635 nm on different transitions of Na2 and Te2 molecules has been obtained, optically pumped with common cw blue emitting InGaN diode lasers operating around 445 and 460 nm. Spectral narrowing of the diode laser is achieved with a beamsplitter and grating setup, allowing use of more than 50 % of the diode power. Operation conditions and properties of the laser systems are presented, and perspectives for the realization of compact low cost molecular lasers are discussed.

  5. Two-photon excitation in living cells induced by low-power cw laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Liu, Yagang; Berns, Michael W.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1996-05-01

    We demonstrate multi-photon excitation in optically-trapped living cells. Intracellular non- resonant two-photon excitation of endogenous and exogenous chromophores was induced by CW near infrared (NIR) trapping beams of 105 mW power. In the case of fluorescent chromophores, detection of NIR-excited visible fluorescence was achieved by imaging and spectroscopy methods. Trap-induced, two-photon excited fluorescence was employed as a novel diagnostic method to monitor intracellular redox state and cell vitality of single motile spermatozoa and Chinese hamster ovary cells. We found, that nonlinear absorption of NIR photons < 800 nm may lead to oxidative stress and severe cell damage. Biological response was amplified in multimode CW lasers due to longitudinal mode-beating and partial mode- locking. As a result, we recommend the use of longwavelength-NIR, single-frequency traps (`optical tweezers') for micromanipulation of vital cells.

  6. CW single transverse mode all-fiber Tm3+-doped silica fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, E. Z.; Li, W. H.; You, L.

    2012-04-01

    The CW 25.6 W output power with a slope efficiency of 30.6% respected to the pump power from a CW single transverse mode all-fiber Tm3+-doped Silica Fiber Laser is reported. The all-fiber laser is made up by progressively splicing the pigtail fiber, matched FBG fiber and Tm fiber. The reflective FBG and Tm3+-doped fiber end Fresnel reflection build up the laser resonance cavity. Due to the multi-mode FBG as the reflective mirror, the output laser spectrum is multi-peaks at high output power, but the spectrum width is less than 2 nm at 1.94 μm. We estimate the beam quality to be M 2 = 2.39, clearly indicating nearly diffraction-limited beam propagation.

  7. Calcium - ionized

    MedlinePlus

    ... at both ionized calcium and calcium attached to proteins. You may need to have a separate ionized calcium test if you have factors that increase or decrease total calcium levels. These may include abnormal blood levels ...

  8. Comparison of the resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectra of pyrrole and 2,5-dimethylpyrrole: Building toward an understanding of the electronic structure and photochemistry of porphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beames, Joseph M.; Nix, Michael G. D.; Hudson, Andrew J.

    2009-11-01

    The photophysical properties of porphyrins have relevance for their use as light-activated drugs in cancer treatment and sensitizers in solid-state solar cells. However, the appearance of their UV-visible spectra is usually explained inadequately by qualitative molecular-orbital theories. We intend to gain a better insight into the intense absorption bands, and excited-state dynamics, that make porphyrins appropriate for both of these applications by gradually building toward an understanding of the macrocyclic structure, starting with studies of smaller pyrrolic subunits. We have recorded the (1+1) and (2+1) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra of pyrrole and 2,5-dimethylpyrrole between 25 600 cm-1 (390 nm) and 48 500 cm-1 (206 nm). We did not observe a (1+1) REMPI signal through the optically bright B12 (ππ ∗) and A11 (ππ ∗) states in pyrrole due to ultrafast deactivation via conical intersections with the dissociative A12 (πσ ∗) and B11 (πσ ∗) states. However, we did observe (2+1) REMPI through Rydberg states with a dominant feature at 27 432 cm-1 (two-photon energy, 54 864 cm-1) assigned to a 3d←π transition. In contrast, 2,5-dimethylpyrrole has a broad and structured (1+1) REMPI spectrum between 36 000 and 42 500 cm-1 as a result of vibronic transitions to the B12 (ππ ∗) state, and it does not show the 3d←π Rydberg transition via (2+1) REMPI. We have complemented the experimental studies by a theoretical treatment of the excited states of both molecules using time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) and accounted for the contrasting features in the spectra. TD-DFT modeled the photochemical activity of both the optically dark π1σ∗ states (dissociative) and optically bright π1π∗ states well, predicting the barrierless deactivation of the B12 (ππ ∗) state of pyrrole and the bound minimum of the B12 (ππ ∗) state in 2,5-dimethylpyrrole. However, the quantitative agreement between vibronic

  9. Rapid Profiling of Bovine and Human Milk Gangliosides by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyeyoung; An, Hyun Joo; Lerno, Larry A.; German, J. Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2010-01-01

    Gangliosides are anionic glycosphingolipids widely distributed in vertebrate tissues and fluids. Their structural and quantitative expression patterns depend on phylogeny and are distinct down to the species level. In milk, gangliosides are exclusively associated with the milk fat globule membrane. They may participate in diverse biological processes but more specifically to host-pathogen interactions. However, due to the molecular complexities, the analysis needs extensive sample preparation, chromatographic separation, and even chemical reaction, which makes the process very complex and time-consuming. Here, we describe a rapid profiling method for bovine and human milk gangliosides employing matrix-assisted desorption/ionization (MALDI) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry (MS). Prior to the analyses of biological samples, milk ganglioside standards GM3 and GD3 fractions were first analyzed in order to validate this method. High mass accuracy and high resolution obtained from MALDI FTICR MS allow for the confident assignment of chain length and degree of unsaturation of the ceramide. For the structural elucidation, tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), specifically as collision-induced dissociation (CID) and infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) were employed. Complex ganglioside mixtures from bovine and human milk were further analyzed with this method. The samples were prepared by two consecutive chloroform/methanol extraction and solid phase extraction. We observed a number of differences between bovine milk and human milk. The common gangliosides in bovine and human milk are NeuAc-NeuAc-Hex-Hex-Cer (GD3) and NeuAc-Hex-Hex-Cer (GM3); whereas, the ion intensities of ganglioside species are different between two milk samples. Kendrick mass defect plot yields grouping of ganglioside peaks according to their structural similarities. Gangliosides were further probed by tandem MS to confirm the compositional and structural assignments

  10. The Vibronic Spectroscopy of Some P-Alkylphenols and Catechols as Examined by Means of Supersonic Jet Resonant Two-Photon Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grace, Louis Immanuel

    I present a set of ground-state assignments, based on infrared and Raman data, for p-ethylphenol, p-isopropylphenol, tyramine, tyrosine, 4-methylcatechol and 3-methoxytyramine. I present supersonic jet resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectra and the corresponding vibronic assignments for all of these molecules and for catechol. Tyramine and tyrosine require a laser-desorption technique, which is described in detail. The ground-state spectra for the four p-alkylphenols studied are quite similar to each other. Thus, analogy to the p-cresol ground state is quite useful for making the assignments. The ground-state data for 4-methylcatechol and 3-methoxytyramine seem to be interpretable by analogy to the spectra of other tri-substituted benzenes. The R2PI spectra for the p-alkylphenols are also similar to each other, despite the fact that the nature of the substituent chain varies considerably among these molecules. The observed (lowest-energy) origins (v ^{''} = 0 to v^' = 0) are: For tyrosine, p-isopropylphenol, p-ethylphenol and tyramine, respectively, 35620, 35587, 35516 and 35492cm^{-1 }, and for 4-methylcatechol, 4-ethylcatechol, 3-methoxytyramine and catechol, respectively, 34781, 34877(?), 35325 and 35655cm^{-1}. Two bands previously assigned as origins in the fluorescence spectrum of tyramine are absent in the R2PI spectrum. Most of these molecules are stable in several geometries. To aid the ground-state assignments for the p-alkyl-phenols, and to examine the issue of multiple conformers, particularly of the catechols, I performed Hartree-Fock calculations at the 3-21G level via the GAUSSIAN program. Results of these are presented. I also attempted to obtain an R2PI spectrum for dopamine. Despite the fact that I tried many experiments with a variety of entrainment conditions, I was unable to do so. Some of the catechols exhibit unusual behavior in that they yield R2PI spectra only for a certain range of jet stagnation pressures. I present the results of

  11. Detection of Biosignatures using Geomatrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry: Implications for the Search for Life in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, C. D.; Kotler, J. M.; Hinman, N. W.; Scott, J. R.

    2008-12-01

    Detection of bio/organic signatures, defined as an organic structure produced by living organisms or derived from other biogenic organic compounds, is essential to investigating the origin and distribution of extant or extinct life in the solar system. In conjunction with mineralogical, inorganic, and isotopic data, the detection and identification of bio/organic signatures can assist in linking biochemical and geochemical processes. Geomatrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (GALDI) in conjunction with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) is a proven method of obtaining bio/organic signatures from a range of geological materials. Sulfate salts were studied because they are found on Mars and Jovian satellites. The goal here was to determine (1) which combinations of bio/organic compounds and sulfate salts produced distinctive spectral signatures, and (2) the detection limit of the method. In these experiments, thenardite (Na2SO4) was mixed with stearic acid to determine the detection limit of GALDI-FTICR-MS, previously estimated to be 3 ppt, which corresponds to approximately 7 zeptomoles (10-21) per laser shot. All spectra were collected with little to no sample preparation and were acquired using a single laser shot. Unlike conventional analytical practices, the signal-to-noise ratio increased as the concentration of bio/organic compounds decreased relative to the mineral host. In combination with thenardite, aromatic amino acids were observed to undergo simple cation attachment ([M+Na]+) due to the π-bonded aromatic ring. Subsequent cation substitution of the carboxyl group led to formation of peaks representing double cation attachment ([M-H+Na]Na+). Spectra from naturally occurring thenardite and jarosite (XFe3(OH)6(SO4)2) revealed the presence of high mass cluster ions; analysis of their isotopic distribution suggested the presence of bio/organic compounds. High mass cluster ions, both organic and inorganic, readily

  12. Ring-Down Spectroscopy for Characterizing a CW Raman Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Maleki, Lute

    2007-01-01

    .A relatively simple technique for characterizing an all-resonant intracavity continuous-wave (CW) solid-state Raman laser involves the use of ring-down spectroscopy. As used here, characterizing signifies determining such parameters as threshold pump power, Raman gain, conversion efficiency, and quality factors (Q values) of the pump and Stokes cavity modes. Heretofore, in order to characterize resonant-cavity-based Raman lasers, it has usually been necessary to manipulate the frequencies and power levels of pump lasers and, in each case, to take several sets of measurements. In cases involving ultra-high-Q resonators, it also has been desirable to lock pump lasers to resonator modes to ensure the quality of measurement data. Simpler techniques could be useful. In the present ring-down spectroscopic technique, one infers the parameters of interest from the decay of the laser out of its steady state. This technique does not require changing the power or frequency of the pump laser or locking the pump laser to the resonator mode. The technique is based on a theoretical analysis of what happens when the pump laser is abruptly switched off after the Raman generation reaches the steady state. The analysis starts with differential equations for the evolution of the amplitudes of the pump and Stokes electric fields, leading to solutions for the power levels of the pump and Stokes fields as functions of time and of the aforementioned parameters. Among other things, these solutions show how the ring-down time depends, to some extent, on the electromagnetic energy accumulated in the cavity. The solutions are readily converted to relatively simple equations for the parameters as functions of quantities that can be determined from measurements of the time-dependent power levels. For example, the steady-state intracavity conversion efficiency is given by G1/G2 1 and the threshold power is given by Pin(G2/G1)2, where Pin is the steady-state input pump power immediately prior to

  13. Stationary Inverted Balmer and Lyman populations for a CW HI water-plasma laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Randell L.

    2002-10-01

    Stationary inverted H Balmer and Lyman populations were observed from a low pressure water-vapor microwave discharge plasma. The ionization and population of excited atomic hydrogen levels was attributed to energy provided by a catalytic resonance energy transfer between hydrogen atoms and molecular oxygen formed in the water plasma. The catalysis mechanism was supported by the observation of O^2+ and H Balmer line broadening of 55 eV compared to 1 eV for hydrogen alone. The high hydrogen atom temperature with a relatively low electron temperature, Te = 2 eV, exhibited characteristics of cold recombining plasmas. These conditions of a water plasma favored an inverted population in the lower levels. Thus, the catalysis of atomic hydrogen may pump a cw HI laser. From our results, laser oscillations are may be possible from (i) n = 3, n = 4, n = 5, n = 6, n = 7, and n = 8 to n = 2, (ii) n = 4, n = 5, n = 6, and n = 7 to n = 3 and (iii) n = 5 and n = 6 to n = 4. Lines of the Balmer series of n = 5, and n = 6 to n = 2 and the Paschen series of n = 5 to n = 3 were of particular importance because of the potential to design blue and 1.3 micron infrared lasers, respectively, which are ideal for many communications and microelectronics applications. At a microwave input power of 9W/cm^3, a collisional radiative model showed that the hydrogen excited state population distribution was consistent with an n = 1arrow5,6 pumping power of an unprecedented 200W/cm^3. High power hydrogen gas lasers are anticipated at wavelengths, over a broad spectral range from far infrared to violet which may be miniaturized to micron dimensions. Such a hydrogen laser represents the first new atomic gas laser in over a decade, and it may prove to be the most efficient, versatile, and useful of all. A further application is the direct generation of electrical power using photovoltaic conversion of the spontaneous or stimulated water vapor plasma emission.

  14. CW silver ion laser with electron beam excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernsman, B.; Prabhuram, T.; Lewis, K.; Gonzalez, F.; Villagran, M.

    1988-08-01

    A CW laser power of 140 mW was obtained in the 840.39-nm transition of Ag II by electron-beam excitation. The electron-beam excited metal-vapor ion laser is capable of operating using metals with high vaporization temperatures, and is of interest for generation of CW coherent radiation in the 220-260-nm spectral region.

  15. Resonance multiphoton ionization and dissociation of dimethyl ether via the {\\skew1\\tilde{\\rm C}^{\\prime}}, {\\skew1\\tilde{\\rm C}} and \\tilde{\\rm B} states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia-Ospino, E.; García, G.; Guerrero, A.; Alvarez, I.; Cisneros, C.

    2005-01-01

    The three-photon resonance four-photon ionization and dissociation spectra of dimethyl ether (DME) are presented in the wavelength range 450-550 nm at 1 nm intervals. The (3+1) REMPI spectra show three prominent bands corresponding to the \\tildeB \\leftarrow \\skew1\\tildeX, {\\skew1\\tildeC} \\leftarrow \\skew1\\tildeX and {\\skew1\\tildeC^{\\prime}} \\leftarrow \\skew1\\tildeX transitions with origins at 61 457 cm-1 (7.615 eV), 59 055 cm-1 (7.322 eV) and 58 010 cm-1 (7.194 eV), respectively. Several ionized species, CH3+, CHnO+ (n = 1-3) and CH3OCH3+, are observed in the region of wavelengths studied here. In order to compare the results, a shorter wavelength multiphoton dissociation and ionization of DME at 355 nm is also presented. At this wavelength, DME undergoes neutral dissociation to CH3 and CH3O and each fragment is then ionized by multiphoton absorption. The fragmentation at 355 nm is very intense and only small fragments such as CH3+, CHO+, CH2+, CH+ and C+ ions are observed. The measurement of photoelectron energy allows us to establish that the DME ionization potential is at least 9.55 ± 0.15 eV. The experiments were performed using a Nd:YAG-OPO (optical parametric oscillator) tunable laser system coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer and a hemispherical electron energy analyser.

  16. Moderate-power cw fibre lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kurkov, Andrei S; Dianov, Evgenii M

    2004-10-31

    A review of the development and investigation of moderate-power (10{sup -1}-10{sup 2} W) cw fibre lasers is presented. The properties of optical fibres doped with rare-earth ions and methods for fabricating double-clad fibres are considered. The methods for fabrication of fibre Bragg gratings used as selective reflectors are discussed and the grating properties are analysed. The main pump schemes for double-clad fibre lasers are described. The properties of fibre lasers doped with neodymium, ytterbium, erbium, thulium, and holmium ions are also considered. The principles of fabrication of Raman converters of laser radiation based on optical fibres of different compositions are discussed and the main results of their studies are presented. It is concluded that fibre lasers described in the review can produce moderate-power radiation at any wavelength in the spectral range from 0.9 to 2 {mu}m. (review)

  17. Ionization of polarized hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Alessi, J.G.

    1983-01-01

    Methods are discussed for the production of polarized H/sup -/ ions from polarized atoms produced in ground state atomic beam sources. Present day sources use ionizers of two basic types - electron ionizers for H/sup +/ Vector production followed by double charge exchange in a vapor, or direct H/sup -/ Vector production by charge exchange of H/sup 0/ with Cs/sup 0/. Both methods have ionization efficiencies of less than 0.5%. Ionization efficiencies in excess of 10% may be obtained in the future by the use of a plasma ionizer plus charge exchange in Cs or Sr vapor, or ionization by resonant charge exchange with a self-extracted D/sup -/ beam from a ring magnetron or HCD source. 36 references, 4 figures.

  18. Hyphenation of Thermal Analysis to Ultrahigh-Resolution Mass Spectrometry (Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry) Using Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Ionization For Studying Composition and Thermal Degradation of Complex Materials.

    PubMed

    Rüger, Christopher P; Miersch, Toni; Schwemer, Theo; Sklorz, Martin; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the hyphenation of a thermobalance to an ultrahigh-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (UHR FTICR MS) is presented. Atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) is used for efficient ionization. The evolved gas analysis (EGA), using high-resolution mass spectrometry allows the time-resolved molecular characterization of thermally induced processes in complex materials or mixtures, such as biomass or crude oil. The most crucial part of the setup is the hyphenation between the thermobalance and the APCI source. Evolved gases are forced to enter the atmospheric pressure ionization interface of the MS by applying a slight overpressure at the thermobalance side of the hyphenation. Using the FTICR exact mass data, detailed chemical information is gained by calculation of elemental compositions from the organic species, enabling a time and temperature resolved, highly selective detection of the evolved species. An additional selectivity is gained by the APCI ionization, which is particularly sensitive toward polar compounds. This selectivity on the one hand misses bulk components of petroleum samples such as alkanes and does not deliver a comprehensive view but on the other hand focuses particularly on typical evolved components from biomass samples. As proof of principle, the thermal behavior of different fossil fuels: heavy fuel oil, light fuel oil, and a crude oil, and different lignocellulosic biomass, namely, beech, birch, spruce, ash, oak, and pine as well as commercial available softwood and birch-bark pellets were investigated. The results clearly show the capability to distinguish between certain wood types through their molecular patterns and compound classes. Additionally, typical literature known pyrolysis biomass marker were confirmed by their elemental composition, such as coniferyl aldehyde (C10H10O3), sinapyl aldehyde (C11H12O4), retene (C18H18), and abietic acid (C20H30O2). PMID:26024433

  19. Ionizing radiation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter gives a comprehensive review on ionizing irradiation of fresh fruits and vegetables. Topics include principles of ionizing radiation, its effects on pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms, shelf-life, sensory quality, nutritional and phytochemical composition, as well as physiologic and...

  20. Detection of cw-related species in complex aerosol particles deposited on surfaces with an ion trap-based aerosol mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, William A; Reilly, Pete; Whitten, William B

    2007-01-01

    A new type of aerosol mass spectrometer was developed by minimal modification of an existing commercial ion trap to analyze the semivolatile components of aerosols in real time. An aerodynamic lens-based inlet system created a well-collimated particle beam that impacted into the heated ionization volume of the commercial ion trap mass spectrometer. The semivolatile components of the aerosols were thermally vaporized and ionized by electron impact or chemical ionization in the source. The nascent ions were extracted and injected into the ion trap for mass analysis. The utility of this instrument was demonstrated by identifying semivolatile analytes in complex aerosols. This study is part of an ongoing effort to develop methods for identifying chemical species related to CW agent exposure. Our efforts focused on detection of CW-related species doped on omnipresent aerosols such as house dust particles vacuumed from various surfaces found in any office building. The doped aerosols were sampled directly into the inlet of our mass spectrometer from the vacuumed particle stream. The semivolatile analytes were deposited on house dust and identified by positive ion chemical ionization mass spectrometry up to 2.5 h after deposition. Our results suggest that the observed semivolatile species may have been chemisorbed on some of the particle surfaces in submonolayer concentrations and may remain hours after deposition. This research suggests that identification of trace CW agent-related species should be feasible by this technique.

  1. Chemical Principles Revisited. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuarrie, Donald A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses how to interpret nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra and how to use them to determine molecular structures. This discussion is limited to spectra that are a result of observation of only the protons in a molecule. This type is called proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectra. (CW)

  2. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Optical strength of mirrors on fluorite substrates subjected to cw radiation from a chemical CO laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkin, V. A.; Rukhin, V. B.

    1994-02-01

    Optimisation of the energy characteristics of a chemical CO laser revealed damage to the optical resonator mirrors. Estimates indicated that when the power density of the incident cw laser radiation was 2-2.5 kW cm-2 the induced thermoelastic stresses could reach the damage threshold of mirrors on fluorite substrates.

  3. High efficiency cw laser-pumped tunable alexandrite laser

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, S.T.; Shand, M.L.

    1983-10-01

    High efficiency cw alexandrite laser operation has been achieved. With longitudinal pumping by a krypton laser in a nearly concentric cavity, a 51% output power slope efficiency has been measured. Including the transmission at the input coupler mirror, a quantum yield of 85% has been attained above threshold. Tunability from 726 to 802 nm has also been demonstrated. The low loss and good thermal properties make alexandrite ideal for cw laser operation.

  4. Epicyclic Twin-Helix Ionization Cooling Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliy Morozov, Yaroslav Derbenev, A. Afanaciev, R.P. Johnson

    2011-04-01

    Parametric-resonance Ionization Cooling (PIC) is proposed as the final 6D cooling stage of a highluminosity muon collider. For the implementation of PIC, we earlier developed an epicyclic twin-helix channel with correlated behavior of the horizontal and vertical betatron motions and dispersion. We now insert absorber plates with short energy-recovering units located next to them at the appropriate locations in the twin-helix channel. We first demonstrate conventional ionization cooling in such a system with the optics uncorrelated. We then adjust the correlated optics state and induce a parametric resonance to study ionization cooling under the resonant condition.

  5. 3 μm CW lasers for myringotomy and microsurgery.

    PubMed

    Linden, Kurt J; Pfeffer, Christian P; Sousa, John Gary; D'Alleva, Nicholas; Aslani, Arash; Gorski, Grzegorz; Kenna, Margaret; Poe, Dennis S

    2013-03-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of 3 μm lasers for myringotomy and microsurgery. Two different lasers were investigated. The first, an Er-doped, CW zirconate glass fiber laser optically pumped by a 970 nm diode laser, emitted > 1 W of CW power at 2.76 μm with concomitant green incoherent emission that served as a convenient visible illumination beam. The second, a 1 W CW Er:YAG solid-state laser also optically pumped by a 970 nm diode laser, emitted > 1 W of CW power at 2.94 μm, coincident with the strongest infrared water absorption peak. Running CW, both lasers are expected to avoid the loud acoustical shocks associated with pulsed lasers. Myringotomies were carried out with the Er:YAG laser on anaesthetized guinea pigs and the effects of the laser were documented. Laser ablated samples of tympanic membrane, soft tissue and bone were histologically examined. Histology results indicated that the CW Er:YAG laser is a potential candidate for a new myringotomy tool and possibly for otologic microsurgery, but deliverable power levels need to be increased to the 2 W (or higher) level. This work was funded under NIH SBIR Grant No. 5R44DC004899. PMID:24382990

  6. Homogeneity and EPR metrics for assessment of regular grids used in CW EPR powder simulations.

    PubMed

    Crăciun, Cora

    2014-08-01

    CW EPR powder spectra may be approximated numerically using a spherical grid and a Voronoi tessellation-based cubature. For a given spin system, the quality of simulated EPR spectra depends on the grid type, size, and orientation in the molecular frame. In previous work, the grids used in CW EPR powder simulations have been compared mainly from geometric perspective. However, some grids with similar homogeneity degree generate different quality simulated spectra. This paper evaluates the grids from EPR perspective, by defining two metrics depending on the spin system characteristics and the grid Voronoi tessellation. The first metric determines if the grid points are EPR-centred in their Voronoi cells, based on the resonance magnetic field variations inside these cells. The second metric verifies if the adjacent Voronoi cells of the tessellation are EPR-overlapping, by computing the common range of their resonance magnetic field intervals. Beside a series of well known regular grids, the paper investigates a modified ZCW grid and a Fibonacci spherical code, which are new in the context of EPR simulations. For the investigated grids, the EPR metrics bring more information than the homogeneity quantities and are better related to the grids' EPR behaviour, for different spin system symmetries. The metrics' efficiency and limits are finally verified for grids generated from the initial ones, by using the original or magnetic field-constraint variants of the Spherical Centroidal Voronoi Tessellation method. PMID:24968092

  7. Ultraviolet femtosecond laser ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Imasaka, Totaro

    2008-01-01

    For this study, multiphoton ionization/mass spectrometry using an ultraviolet (UV) femtosecond laser was employed for the trace analysis of organic compounds. Some of the molecules, such as dioxins, contain several chlorine atoms and have short excited-state lifetimes due to a "heavy atom" effect. A UV femtosecond laser is, then, useful for efficient resonance excitation and subsequent ionization. A technique of multiphoton ionization using an extremely short laser pulse (e.g., <10 fs), referred to as "impulsive ionization," may have a potential for use in fragmentation-free ionization, thus providing information on molecular weight in mass spectrometry. PMID:18302290

  8. Non-volatile analysis in fruits by laser resonant ionization spectrometry: application to resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene) in grapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, C.; Orea, J. M.; Soledad Muñoz, M.; Lobo, R. F. M.; González Ureña, A.

    A laser desorption (LD) coupled with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionisation (REMPI) and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOFMS) technique for non-volatile trace analysis compounds is presented. Essential features are: (a) an enhanced desorption yield due to the mixing of metal powder with the analyte in the sample preparation, (b) a high resolution, great sensitivity and low detection limit due to laser resonant ionisation and mass spectrometry detection. Application to resveratrol content in grapes demonstrated the capability of the analytical method with a sensitivity of 0.2 pg per single laser shot and a detection limit of 5 ppb.

  9. Characterization by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry of the major photoproducts of temoporfin (m-THPC) and bacteriochlorin (m-THPBC).

    PubMed

    Angotti, M; Maunit, B; Muller, J F; Bezdetnaya, L; Guillemin, F

    2001-07-01

    The photobleaching of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(m-hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (temoporfin, m-THPC) and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(m-hydroxyphenyl)bacteriochlorin (bacteriochlorin, m-THPBC) was studied in ethanol-water (1 : 99, v/v) and in physiological medium (phosphate-buffered saline, PBS) with or without fetal calf serum (FCS). m-THPC solution was irradiated with the laser radiation of 650 nm, whereas m-THPBC solution underwent two consecutive irradiations at 532 and 650 nm. The photoproducts were characterized by UV-visible absorption spectrophotometry and by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) coupled with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICRMS). Independent of the solvent used, the phototransformation of either photosensitizer yielded the formation of 5,10,15,20-tetrakis (m-hydroxyphenyl)porphyrin (m-THPP) through a major dehydrogenation process. PMID:11473406

  10. Ionization Scheme Development at the ISOLDE RILIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedosseev, V. N.; Marsh, B. A.; Fedorov, D. V.; Köster, U.; Tengborn, E.

    2005-04-01

    The resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) of the ISOLDE on-line isotope separation facility is based on the method of laser step-wise resonance ionization of atoms in a hot metal cavity. The atomic selectivity of the RILIS complements the mass selection process of the ISOLDE separator magnets to provide beams of a chosen isotope with greatly reduced isobaric contamination. Using a system of dye lasers pumped by copper vapour lasers, ion beams of 24 elements have been generated at ISOLDE with ionization efficiencies in the range of 0.5-15%. As part of the ongoing RILIS development off-line resonance ionization spectroscopy studies carried out in 2003 and 2004 have determined the optimal three-step ionization schemes for scandium, antimony, dysprosium and yttrium.

  11. Single electron impact ionization of the methane molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouamoud, Mammar; Sahlaoui, Mohammed; Benmansour, Nour El Houda; Atomic and Molecular Collisions Team

    2014-10-01

    Triply differential cross sections (TDCS) results of electron-impact ionization of the inner 2a1 molecular orbital of CH4 are presented in the framework of the Second Born Approximation and compared with the experimental data performed in coplanar asymmetric geometry. The cross sections are averaged on the random orientations of the molecular target for accurate comparison with experiments and are compared also with the theoretical calculations of the Three Coulomb wave (3CW) model. Our results are in good agreement with experiments and 3CW results in the binary peak. In contrast the Second Born Approximation yields a significant higher values compared to the 3CW results for the recoil peak and seems to describe suitably the recoil region where higher order effects can occur with the participation of the recoiling ion in the collision process.

  12. A portable CW/FM-CW Doppler radar for local investigation of severe storms

    SciTech Connect

    Unruh, W.P.; Wolf, M.A.; Bluestein, H.B.

    1988-01-01

    During the 1987 spring storm season we used a portable 1-W X-band CW Doppler radar to probe a tornado, a funnel cloud, and a wall cloud in Oklahoma and Texas. This same device was used during the spring storm season in 1988 to probe a wall cloud in Texas. The radar was battery powered and highly portable, and thus convenient to deploy from our chase vehicle. The device separated the receding and approaching Doppler velocities in real time and, while the radar was being used, it allowed convenient stereo data recording for later spectral analysis and operator monitoring of the Doppler signals in stereo headphones. This aural monitoring, coupled with the ease with which an operator can be trained to recognize the nature of the signals heard, made the radar very easy to operate reliably and significantly enhanced the quality of the data being recorded. At the end of the 1988 spring season, the radar was modified to include FM-CW ranging and processing. These modifications were based on a unique combination of video recording and FM chirp generation, which incorporated a video camera and recorder as an integral part of the radar. After modification, the radar retains its convenient portability and the operational advantage of being able to listen to the Doppler signals directly. The original mechanical design was unaffected by these additions. During the summer of 1988, this modified device was used at the Langmuir Laboratory at Socorro, New Mexico in an attempt to measure vertical convective flow in a thunderstorm. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  13. A portable CW/FM-CW Doppler radar for local investigation of severe storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unruh, Wesley P.; Wolf, Michael A.; Bluestein, Howard B.

    During the 1987 spring storm season we used a portable 1-W X-band CW Doppler radar to probe a tornado, a funnel cloud, and a wall cloud in Oklahoma and Texas. This same device was used during the spring storm season in 1988 to probe a wall cloud in Texas. The radar was battery powered and highly portable, and thus convenient to deploy from our chase vehicle. The device separated the receding and approaching Doppler velocities in real time and, while the radar was being used, it allowed convenient stereo data recording for later spectral analysis and operator monitoring of the Doppler signals in stereo headphones. This aural monitoring, coupled with the ease with which an operator can be trained to recognize the nature of the signals heard, made the radar very easy to operate reliably and significantly enhanced the quality of the data being recorded. At the end of the 1988 spring season, the radar was modified to include FM-CW ranging and processing. These modifications were based on a unique combination of video recording and FM chirp generation, which incorporated a video camera and recorder as an integral part of the radar. After modification, the radar retains its convenient portability and the operational advantage of being able to listen to the Doppler signals directly. The original mechanical design was unaffected by these additions. During the summer of 1988, this modified device was used at the Langmuir Laboratory at Socorro, New Mexico in an attempt to measure vertical convective flow in a thunderstorm.

  14. On the measurement of wind speeds in tornadoes with a portable CW/FM-CW Doppler radar

    SciTech Connect

    Bluestein, H.B. . School of Meteorology); Unruh, W.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Both the formation mechanism and structure of tornadoes are not yet well understood. The Doppler radar is probably the best remote-sensing instrument at present for determining the wind field in tornadoes. Although much has been learned about the non-supercell tornado from relatively close range using Doppler radars at fixed sites, close-range measurements in supercell tornadoes are relatively few. Doppler radar can increase significantly the number of high-resolution, sub-cloud base measurements of both the tornado vortex and its parent vortex in supercells, with simultaneous visual documentation. The design details and operation of the CW/FM-CW Doppler radar developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and used by storm-intercept teams at the Univ. of Oklahoma are described elsewhere. The radar transmits 1 W at 3 cm, and can be switched back and forth between CW and FM-CW modes. In the FM-CW mode the sweep repetition frequency is 15.575 kHz and the sweep width 1.9 MHz; the corresponding maximum unambiguous range and velocity, and range resolution are 5 km, {plus minus} 115 m s{sup {minus}1}, and 78 m respectively. The bistatic antennas, which have half-power beamwidths of 5{degree}, are easily pointed wit the aid of a boresighted VCR. FM-CW Data are recorded on the VCR, while voice documentation is recorded on the audio tape; video is recorded on another VCR. The radar and antennas are easily mounted on a tripod, and can be set up by three people in a minute or two. The purpose of this paper is to describe the signal processing techniques used to determine the Doppler spectrum in the FM-CW mode and a method of its interpretation in real time, and to present data gathered in a tornadic storm in 1990. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Simple laboratory methods for quantitative IR measurements of CW agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puckrin, Eldon; Thériault, Jean-Marc; Lavoie, Hugo; Dubé, Denis; Lepage, Carmela J.; Petryk, Michael

    2005-11-01

    A simple method is presented for quantitatively measuring the absorbance of chemical warfare (CW) agents and their simulants in the vapour phase. The technique is based on a standard lab-bench FTIR spectrometer, 10-cm gas cell, a high accuracy Baratron pressure manometer, vacuum pump and simple stainless-steel hardware components. The results of this measurement technique are demonstrated for sarin (GB) and soman (GD). A second technique is also introduced for the passive IR detection of CW agents in an open- air path located in a fumehood. Using a modified open-cell with a pathlength of 45 cm, open-air passive infrared measurements have been obtained for simulants and several classical CW agents. Detection, identification and quantification results based on passive infrared measurements are presented for GB and the CW agent simulant, DMMP, using the CATSI sensor which has been developed by DRDC Valcartier. The open-cell technique represents a relatively simple and feasible method for examining the detection capability of passive sensors, such as CATSI, for CW agents.

  16. First experiments with gasdynamic ion source in CW mode.

    PubMed

    Skalyga, V; Izotov, I; Golubev, S; Vodopyanov, A; Tarvainen, O

    2016-02-01

    A new type of ECR ion source-a gasdynamic ECR ion source-has been recently developed at the Institute of Applied Physics. The main advantages of such device are extremely high ion beam current with a current density up to 600-700 emA/cm(2) in combination with low emittance, i.e., normalized RMS emittance below 0.1 π mm mrad. Previous investigations were carried out in pulsed operation with 37.5 or 75 GHz gyrotron radiation with power up to 100 kW at SMIS 37 experimental facility. The present work demonstrates the first experience of operating the gasdynamic ECR ion source in CW mode. A test bench of SMIS 24 facility has been developed at IAP RAS. 24 GHz radiation of CW gyrotron was used for plasma heating in a magnetic trap with simple mirror configuration. Initial studies of plasma parameters were performed. Ion beams with pulsed and CW high voltage were successfully extracted from the CW discharge. Obtained experimental results demonstrate that all advantages of the gasdynamic source can be realized also in CW operation. PMID:26931933

  17. First experiments with gasdynamic ion source in CW mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalyga, V.; Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Vodopyanov, A.; Tarvainen, O.

    2016-02-01

    A new type of ECR ion source—a gasdynamic ECR ion source—has been recently developed at the Institute of Applied Physics. The main advantages of such device are extremely high ion beam current with a current density up to 600-700 emA/cm2 in combination with low emittance, i.e., normalized RMS emittance below 0.1 π mm mrad. Previous investigations were carried out in pulsed operation with 37.5 or 75 GHz gyrotron radiation with power up to 100 kW at SMIS 37 experimental facility. The present work demonstrates the first experience of operating the gasdynamic ECR ion source in CW mode. A test bench of SMIS 24 facility has been developed at IAP RAS. 24 GHz radiation of CW gyrotron was used for plasma heating in a magnetic trap with simple mirror configuration. Initial studies of plasma parameters were performed. Ion beams with pulsed and CW high voltage were successfully extracted from the CW discharge. Obtained experimental results demonstrate that all advantages of the gasdynamic source can be realized also in CW operation.

  18. CW- and pulsed-EPR of carbonaceous matter in primitive meteorites: solving a lineshape paradox.

    PubMed

    Delpoux, Olivier; Gourier, Didier; Binet, Laurent; Vezin, Hervé; Derenne, Sylvie; Robert, François

    2008-05-01

    Insoluble organic matter (IOM) of Orgueil and Tagish Lake meteorites are studied by CW-EPR and pulsed-EPR spectroscopies. The EPR line is due to polycyclic paramagnetic moieties concentrated in defect-rich regions of the IOM, with concentrations of the order of 4x10(19) spin/g. CW-EPR reveals two types of paramagnetic defects: centres with S=1/2, and centres with S=0 ground state and thermally accessible triple state S=1. In spite of the Lorentzian shape of the EPR and its narrowing upon increasing the spin concentration, the EPR line is not in the exchange narrowing regime as previously deduced from multi-frequency CW-EPR [L. Binet, D. Gourier, Appl. Magn. Reson. 30 (2006) 207-231]. It is inhomogeneously broadened as demonstrated by the presence of nuclear modulations in the spin-echo decay. The line narrowing, similar to an exchange narrowing effect, is the result of an increasing contribution of the narrow line of the triplet state centres in addition to the broader line of doublet states. Hyperfine sublevel correlation spectroscopy (HYSCORE) of hydrogen and (13)C nuclei indicates that IOM* centres are small polycyclic moieties that are moderately branched with aliphatic chains, as shown by the presence of aromatic hydrogen atoms. On the contrary the lack of such aromatic hydrogen in triplet states suggests that these radicals are most probably highly branched. Paramagnetic centres are considerably enriched in deuterium, with D/H approximately 1.5+/-0.5x10(-2) of the order of values existing in interstellar medium. PMID:18024197

  19. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  20. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, A.H.

    An ionization chamber is described which has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionizes the gas.

  1. Saturation by Noise and CW Signals in SIS Mixers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, A. R.

    2002-03-01

    In ALMA Memo 321, Plambeck points out that saturation (gain compression) is likely to be a significant factor limiting the calibration accuracy of ALMA observations. In this paper, saturation by broadband noise and CW signals is analyzed for representative SIS receivers operating at different frequencies. Many SIS mixers in current use are expected to exhibit a significant degree of gain compression when connected to a room-temperature source. Previous analyses of saturation in SIS mixers have applied only to CW signals. To analyze saturation by noise, the statistics of the output voltage are derived from those of the input signal. A single constant, applicable to all SIS mixers, is determined experimentally by fitting the predicted CW gain compression curve to measured data.

  2. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  3. Time Shifted PN Codes for CW Lidar, Radar, and Sonar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F. (Inventor); Prasad, Narasimha S. (Inventor); Harrison, Fenton W. (Inventor); Flood, Michael A. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A continuous wave Light Detection and Ranging (CW LiDAR) system utilizes two or more laser frequencies and time or range shifted pseudorandom noise (PN) codes to discriminate between the laser frequencies. The performance of these codes can be improved by subtracting out the bias before processing. The CW LiDAR system may be mounted to an artificial satellite orbiting the earth, and the relative strength of the return signal for each frequency can be utilized to determine the concentration of selected gases or other substances in the atmosphere.

  4. SRF cavities for CW option of Project X Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Solyak, N.; Gonin, I.; Khabiboulline, T.; Lunin, A.; Perunov, N.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    Alternative option of Project X is based on the CW SC 2GeV Linac with the average current 1mA. Possible option of the CW Linac considered in the paper includes low energy part consisted of a few families SC Spoke cavities (from 2.5 MeV to 466 MeV) and high energy part consisted of 2 types of elliptical cavities (v/c=0.81 and v/c=1). Requirements and designed parameters of cavities are considered.

  5. cw passive mode locking of a Ti:sapphire laser

    SciTech Connect

    Sarukura, N.; Ishida, Y.; Nakano, H.; Yamamoto, Y. )

    1990-02-26

    cw passive mode locking of a Ti:sapphire laser is achieved with 1,1{prime}-dietyl-2,2{prime}-dicarbocyanine iodide as the saturable absorber dye, using a 5 {mu}m thin dye jet flow. The pulse width is 4.0 ps, which is almost the transform-limited pulse for the observed spectrum width. The output power is {similar to}50 mW, when it is pumped by a 5 W cw Ar laser, while the tuning range is 745--755 nm.

  6. CW RF system of the Project-X accelerator front end

    SciTech Connect

    Khabiboulline, T.; Barbanotti, S.; Gonin, I.; Solyak, N.; Terechkine, I.; Yakovlev, V.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Front end of a CW linac of the Project X contains an H{sup -} source, an RFQ, a medium energy transport line with the beam chopper, and a SC low-beta linac that accelerates H{sup -} from 2.5 MeV to 160 MeV. SC Single Spoke Resonators (SSR) will be used in the linac, because Fermilab already successfully developed and tested a SSR for beta = 0.21. Two manufactured cavities achieve 2.5 times more than design accelerating gradients. One of these cavities completely dressed, e.g. welded to helium vessel with integrated slow and fast tuners, and tested in CW regime. Successful tests of beta = 0.21 SSR give us a confidence to use this type of cavity for low beta (0.117) and for high-beta (0.4) as well. Both types of these cavities are under development. In present report the basic constrains, parameters, electromagnetic and mechanical design for all the three SSR cavities, and first test results of beta = 0.21 SSR are presented.

  7. Ionization probes of molecular structure and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    Various photoionization processes provide very sensitive probes for the detection and understanding of the spectra of molecules relevant to combustion processes. The detection of ionization can be selective by using resonant multiphoton ionization or by exploiting the fact that different molecules have different sets of ionization potentials. Therefore, the structure and dynamics of individual molecules can be studied even in a mixed sample. The authors are continuing to develop methods for the selective spectroscopic detection of molecules by ionization, and to use these methods for the study of some molecules of combustion interest.

  8. Possibility of retrospective dosimetry for persons accidentally exposed to ionizing radiation using electron spin resonance of sugar and mother-of-pearl.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, T

    1989-02-01

    An electron spin resonance (ESR) dosemeter was used to measure ESR absorption spectra of sugar and shell buttons made of mother-of-pearl, for the purpose of evaluating the external dose to exposed inhibitants in the vicinity of a radiation accident. The ESR absorption intensity of sugar was proportional to dose in the range from about 30 mGy to 6 x 10(4) Gy. The lifetime of the free radical created in both sugar and shell buttons by radiation was stable for at least 6 months after irradiation. If sugar and shell goods left in or around houses since the occurrence of the Chernobyl reactor and the Brazilian accidents were obtained, it would be possible to estimate from them the integrated external dose to exposed people. PMID:2538196

  9. Nonlinear optical properties of methyl red under CW irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yu; Ye, Qing; Wang, Chen; Wang, Jin; Deng, Zhichao; Mei, Jianchun; Zhou, Wenyuan; Zhang, Chunping; Tian, Jianguo

    2015-12-01

    Organic materials have wide potential application in nonlinear optical devices. The nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of methyl red (MR) doped polymethyl methacrylate (MR-PMMA) are investigated under CW laser irradiation at 473 nm, 532 nm and 632.8 nm, respectively. By combining Kramers-Kronig (K-K) relation and CW Z-scan technique, the effective refractive index n2 and the change of refractive index Δn are obtained under different scanning speed at 473 nm and 532 nm. Δn is positive at 473 nm, while Δn is negative at 532 nm. The experimental result is consistent with that of K-K relation. With the scanning speed decreasing, the NLO properties of MR-PMMA are enhanced. With different laser powers at 632.8 nm, MR-PMMA has only nonlinear absorption rather than nonlinear refraction. Meanwhile, the sample is investigated under pulse laser irradiation at 532 nm. Through the comparison of results of CW Z-scan and pulse Z-scan, the influence of the cumulative thermal effect on NLO properties of material is investigated. The results indicate that, under CW irradiation near the absorption peak wavelength, the cumulative thermal effect has great influence to the NLO properties of MR-PMMA.

  10. Investigations of atmospheric dynamics using a CW Doppler sounder array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    A three-dimensional CW Doppler sounding system currently under operation at the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama is described. The properties of the neutral atmosphere are discussed along with the theory of Doppler sounding technique. Methods of data analyses used to investigate the dynamical phenomena at the ionospheric heights are presented and suggestions for future investigations provided.

  11. Applications of KHZ-CW Lidar in Ecological Entomology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmqvist, Elin; Brydegaard, Mikkel

    2016-06-01

    The benefits of kHz lidar in ecological entomology are explained. Results from kHz-measurements on insects, carried out with a CW-lidar system, employing the Scheimpflug principle to obtain range resolution, are presented. A method to extract insect events and analyze the large amount of lidar data is also described.

  12. CW-FIT: Group Contingency Effects across the Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wills, Howard P.; Iwaszuk, Wendy M.; Kamps, Debra; Shumate, Emily

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the effects of a group-contingency intervention on student behavior across academic instructional periods. Research suggests group contingencies are evidence-based practices, yet calls for investigation to determine the best conditions and groups suited for this type of intervention. CW-FIT (Class-Wide Function-related…

  13. Cascaded combiners for a high power CW fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Qirui; Ge, Tingwu; Zhang, Xuexia; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-02-01

    We report cascaded combiners for a high power continuous wave (CW) fiber laser in this paper. The cascaded combiners are fabricated with an improved lateral splicing process. During the fusing process, there is no stress or tension between the pump fiber and the double-cladding fiber. Thus, the parameters of the combiner are better than those that have been reported. The coupling efficiency is 98.5%, and the signal insertion loss is 1%. The coupling efficiency of the cascaded combiners is 97.5%. The pump lights are individually coupled into the double-cladding fiber via five combiners. The thermal effects cannot cause damage to the combiners and the cascaded combiners can operate stably in high power CW fiber lasers. We also develop a high power CW fiber laser that generates a maximum 780 W of CW signal power at 1080 nm with 71% optical-to-optical conversion efficiency. The fiber laser is pumped via five intra-cavity cascaded combiners and five extra-cavity cascaded combiners with a maximum pump power of 1096 W and a pump wavelength of 975 nm.

  14. Diffusion, convection, and solidification in cw-mode free electron laser nitrided titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeche, Daniel; Mueller, Sven; Shinn, Michelle; Schaaf, Peter

    2009-04-15

    Titanium sheets were irradiated by free electron laser radiation in cw mode in pure nitrogen. Due to the interaction, nitrogen diffusion occurs and titanium nitride was synthesized in the tracks. Overlapping tracks have been utilized to create coatings in order to improve the tribological properties of the sheets. Caused by the local heating and the spatial dimension of the melt pool, convection effects were observed and related to the track properties. Stress, hardness, and nitrogen content were investigated with x-ray diffraction, nanoindention, and resonant nuclear reaction analysis. The measured results were correlated with the scan parameters, especially to the lateral track shift. Cross section micrographs were prepared and investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy. They show the solidification behavior, phase formation, and the nitrogen distribution. The experiments give an insight into the possibilities of materials processing using such a unique heat source.

  15. Development of a powerful continuously tunable mid-infrared cw PPLN OPO for trace gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Herpen, Maarten; te Lintel Hekkert, Sacco; Bisson, Scott E.; Harren, Frans J. M.

    2002-08-01

    A new Optical Parametric Oscillator for the mid infrared wavelength region of 3-3.8 micrometer is developed with an idler output power of more than 1 Watt. The OPO is pumped with a 10 Watt, cw, Nd:YAG Laser and consists of a bowtie ring cavity (FSR 320 MHz) resonating at the signal wavelength. The wavelength is controlled with a fan-out PPLN crystal and a low finesse intracavity Fabry-Perot. The idler output could be tuned over more than 24 Ghz modehop-free, by tuning the pump laser and keep the OPO cavity fixed. Mode hop tuning over 100 Ghz could be obtained changing the length of the intracavity Fabry-Perot. This high power OPO is combined with photoacoustic spectroscopy in order to develop a sensitive trace gas detector for LifeScience applications.

  16. Stable 1.25 watts CW far infrared laser radiation at the 119 micron methanol line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhoomand, Jam; Pickett, Herbert M.

    1987-01-01

    Far-infrared CW radiation of 1.25 watts has been obtained at the 119 micron methanol line with a CO2 pump power of 125 watts, and the maximum frequency fluctuation of the free running laser is measured to be less than + or - 100 kHz per hour. Reflecting optics have been used, when possible, to minimize CO2 degradation, and the frequency stability is ensured by cooling the input and output couplers. The input and output assemblies within the lasing medium are enclosed to minimize the external effects on the cavity length and to eliminate the mechanical instabilities associated with the use of bellows. The vibrational bottle-neck is broken by cooling the resonator wall to 5 deg and adding He as the buffer gas.

  17. Combining Two-Dimensional Diffusion-Ordered Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Imaging Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry, and Direct Analysis in Real-Time Mass Spectrometry for the Integral Investigation of Counterfeit Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Nyadong, Leonard; Harris, Glenn A.; Balayssac, Stéphane; Galhena, Asiri S.; Malet-Martino, Myriam; Martino, Robert; Parry, R. Mitchell; Wang, May Dongmei; Fernández, Facundo M.; Gilard, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, there has been a marked increase in the number of reported cases involving counterfeit medicines in developing and developed countries. Particularly, artesunate-based antimalarial drugs have been targeted, because of their high demand and cost. Counterfeit antimalarials can cause death and can contribute to the growing problem of drug resistance, particularly in southeast Asia. In this study, the complementarity of two-dimensional diffusion-ordered 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (2D DOSY 1H NMR) with direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry (DART MS) and desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI MS) was assessed for pharmaceutical forensic purposes. Fourteen different artesunate tablets, representative of what can be purchased from informal sources in southeast Asia, were investigated with these techniques. The expected active pharmaceutical ingredient was detected in only five formulations via both nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) methods. Common organic excipients such as sucrose, lactose, stearate, dextrin, and starch were also detected. The graphical representation of DOSY 1H NMR results proved very useful for establishing similarities among groups of samples, enabling counterfeit drug “chemotyping”. In addition to bulk- and surface-average analyses, spatially resolved information on the surface composition of counterfeit and genuine antimalarial formulations was obtained using DESI MS that was performed in the imaging mode, which enabled one to visualize the homogeneity of both genuine and counterfeit drug samples. Overall, this study suggests that 2D DOSY 1H NMR, combined with ambient MS, comprises a powerful suite of instrumental analysis methodologies for the integral characterization of counterfeit antimalarials. PMID:19453162

  18. Experimental atomic scale investigation of irradiation effects in CW 316SS and UFG-CW 316SS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareige, P.; Etienne, A.; Radiguet, B.

    2009-06-01

    Materials of the core internals of pressurized water reactor (austenitic stainless steels) are subject to neutron irradiation. To understand the ageing mechanisms associated with irradiation and propose life predictions of components or develop new materials, irradiation damage needs to be experimentally investigated. Atomic scale investigation of a neutron-irradiated CW316 SS with the laser pulsed atom probe gives a detailed description of the solute segregation in the austenitic grains. In order to understand the mechanism of solute segregation detected in the neutron-irradiated materials, ion irradiations were performed. These latest irradiations were realized on a CW 316SS as well as on a nanostructured CW 316SS. The study of irradiation effects in a nanograin material allows first, to easily analyse grain boundary segregation and second, to test the behaviour under irradiation of a new nanostructured material. The three aspects of this atomic scale investigation (neutron irradiation effect, model ion irradiation, new nanostructured CW 316 SS) are tackled in this paper.

  19. The Fourier Transform in Chemistry. Part 1. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Roy W.; Williams, Kathryn R.

    1989-01-01

    Using fourier transformation methods in nuclear magnetic resonance has made possible increased sensitivity in chemical analysis. This article describes these methods as they relate to magnetization, the RF magnetic field, nuclear relaxation, the RF pulse, and free induction decay. (CW)

  20. Experimental Investigation of Continuous-Wave Laser Ionization of Krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, Bret D.; Shannon, Robert F.

    2001-10-30

    This report describes experimental investigations of a method that uses continuous-wave (CW) lasers to ionize selected isotopes of krypton with high isotopic selectivity. The experiments show that the ionization rate is at least a factor of 100 lower than calculated with our model that has been described in a previous report. This discrepancy may be due to a much smaller excitation cross section that expected based on previous work and/or the aberrations in the ultraviolet beam used for the first step in the excitation. Additional problems with damage to mirrors, alignment instabilities, and manufacturers halting production of key products make this approach not worth further development at this time

  1. Decomposition Products of RDX and TNT after Resonant Laser Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monat, Jeremy; Gump, Jared

    2009-06-01

    This presentation describes research on the gas-phase products of decomposition of explosives after resonant laser excitation. We studied RDX, TNT, and formulations containing them after excitation by lasers in the infrared (10.6 4μm continuous-wave [CW]; resonant with ring vibrational modes) and ultraviolet (266 nm CW and pulsed [ca. 5 ns pulsewidth]; resonant with delocalized ring electronic absorptions). The decomposition products in air were identified by infrared spectroscopy and will be described as a function of laser wavelength and energy deposition timescale. Our results will be compared to decomposition pathways in the literature derived from resistive heating techniques.

  2. Molecular Characterization and Reactivity of Dissolved Organic Matter by High Resolution Nanospray Ionization Fourier Transform-Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FTICR-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sleighter, R. L.; Hatcher, S. A.; Hatcher, P. G.

    2006-12-01

    The ultrahigh resolving power of FTICR-MS allows for the intense characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM). DOM is the largest reactive component of the global carbon cycle, and an improved understanding of its composition is necessary to determine the transport and eventual fate of pollutants. The seasonal and spatial variations in DOM composition are investigated by taking surface water samples from five different sampling sites, four times a year. Water sampling begins at the Dismal Swamp in North Carolina, continues north up the Elizabeth River to the Chesapeake Bay, and concludes approximately ten miles off the coast in the Atlantic Ocean. DOM was extracted from the water samples using C18 extraction disks and were prepared in 50:50 methanol:water. Ammonium hydroxide was added prior to nanospray in order to solubilize the DOM as well as to increase the ionization efficiency. The samples were continuously infused into the Apollo II ion source with an Advion TriVersa NanoMate system of a Bruker 12 Tesla Apex QE FTICR-MS with resolving powers exceeding 400,000. All samples were analyzed in negative ion mode and were externally and internally calibrated prior to data analysis. Our DOM mass spectra consist of a multitude of peaks spanning the range of 200-850 m/z. Complexity is apparent from the detection of up to 20 peaks per nominal mass at nearly every mass throughout that range. A molecular formula calculator generated molecular formula matches from which van Krevelen plots were constructed for characterization purposes. A wide range of molecules were observed each containing oxygen, sulfur and nitrogen functional groups. We utilize the van Krevelen diagram to assist in clustering the molecules according to their functional group compositions. To test the hypothesis that formation of adducts to DOM serve to protect peptides from bacterial degradation, microcosm experiments were performed with a small isotopically enriched peptide, GGGR. This peptide

  3. Temporal compression of cw diode-laser output into short pulses with cesium-vapor group-velocity dispersion.

    PubMed

    Choi, K; Menders, J; Ross, D; Korevaar, E

    1993-11-15

    Using a technique similar to chirped pulse compression, we have compressed the 50-mW cw output of a diode laser into pulses of greater than 500-mW peak power and less than 400-ps duration. By applying a small current modulation to the diode, we induced a small wavelength modulation in the vicinity of the 6s(1/2)-to-6p(3/2) cesium resonance transition at 852 nm. Group-velocity dispersion on propagation through a cesium vapor cell then led to pulse compression. We developed a simple model to make predictions of output pulse shapes by using different modulation waveforms. PMID:19829441

  4. External-cavity-controlled 32-MHz narrow-band cw GaA1As-diode lasers.

    PubMed

    Voumard, C

    1977-08-01

    By coupling a cw GaA1As-diode laser to an external resonator with Fabry-Perot etalons as dispersive elements, emission was reduced to a single-axial mode of 32-MHz width. The wavelength could be coarsely tuned over a spectral range of over 10 nm. Fine tuning over about 500 MHz was achieved by varying the external cavity length by less than lambda/3. At single-axial-mode operation, the commonly observed high- and low-frequency self-pulsing of the light output was found to disappear almost completely. PMID:19680331

  5. DANCING WITH THE ELECTRONS: TIME-DOMAIN AND CW IN VIVO EPR IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Sankaran; Krishna, Murali C.

    2009-01-01

    The progress in the development of imaging the distribution of unpaired electrons in living systems and the functional and the potential diagnostic dimensions of such an imaging process, using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Imaging (EPRI), is traced from its origins with emphasis on our own work. The importance of EPR imaging stems from the fact that many paramagnetic probes show oxygen dependent spectral broadening. Assessment of in vivo oxygen concentration is an important factor in radiation oncology in treatment-planning and monitoring treatment-outcome. The emergence of narrow-line trairylmethyl based, bio-compatible spin probes has enabled the development of radiofrequency time-domain EPRI. Spectral information in time-domain EPRI can be achieved by generating a time sequence of T2* or T2 weighted images. Progress in CW imaging has led to the use of rotating gradients, more recently rapid scan with direct detection, and a combination of all the three. Very low field MRI employing Dynamic Nuclear polarization (Overhauser effect) is also employed for monitoring tumor hypoxia, and re-oxygenation in vivo. We have also been working on the co-registration of MRI and time domain EPRI on mouse tumor models at 300 MHz using a specially designed resonator assembly. The mapping of the unpaired electron distribution and unraveling the spectral characteristics by using magnetic resonance in presence of stationary and rotating gradients in indeed ‘dancing with the (unpaired) electrons’, metaphorically speaking. PMID:22025900

  6. Resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization and zero electron kinetic energy spectroscopy of the DABCO-N2 van der Waals complex: Divergent energy level spacings as evidence for an offset parallel structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Mark J.; Cockett, Martin C. R.

    2003-12-01

    The DABCO-N2 van der Waals complex has been investigated using a combination of (1+1') resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization and zero electron kinetic energy spectroscopy, supported by ab initio molecular orbital calculations. The observation of extended vibrational progressions of low wave number with diverging vibrational spacings supports an assignment to an offset parallel structure analogous to the 45° canted parallel structures proposed for the nitrogen dimer. The active vibrational mode is assigned to a mixed van der Waals stretch/rocking mode in which the nitrogen solvent undergoes a hindered rotational motion against the DABCO framework in the plane containing the C3 axis in DABCO and the intermolecular axis in N2. The results of counterpoise corrected ab initio calculations support this assignment to the extent that they suggest that a parallel structure is the most stable with a cross structure identified as a transition state. No experimental evidence is found for the existence of other stable structures.

  7. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectroscopy of bromobenzene and its perdeuterated isotopologue: Assignment of the vibrations of the S(0), S(1), and D(0)(+) states of bromobenzene and the S(0) and D(0)(+) states of iodobenzene.

    PubMed

    Andrejeva, Anna; Tuttle, William D; Harris, Joe P; Wright, Timothy G

    2015-12-28

    We report vibrationally resolved spectra of the S1←S0 transition of bromobenzene using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy. We study bromobenzene-h5 as well as its perdeuterated isotopologue, bromobenzene-d5. The form of the vibrational modes between the isotopologues and also between the S0 and S1 electronic states is discussed for each species, allowing assignment of the bands to be achieved and the activity between states and isotopologues to be established. Vibrational bands are assigned utilizing quantum chemical calculations, previous experimental results, and isotopic shifts. Previous work and assignments of the S1 spectra are discussed. Additionally, the vibrations in the ground state cation, D0 (+), are considered, since these have also been used by previous workers in assigning the excited neutral state spectra. We also examine the vibrations of iodobenzene in the S0 and D0 (+) states and comment on the previous assignments of these. In summary, we have been able to assign the corresponding vibrations across the whole monohalobenzene series of molecules, in the S0, S1, and D0 (+) states, gaining insight into vibrational activity and vibrational couplings. PMID:26723684

  8. New Vanadium Compounds in Venezuela Heavy Crude Oil Detected by Positive-ion Electrospray Ionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xu; Shi, Quan; Gray, Murray R.; Xu, Chunming

    2014-01-01

    Metalloporphyrins are ubiquitous in nature, particularly iron porphyrins (hemes) and magnesium dihydroporphyrins or chlorophylls. Oxovanadium (IV) complexes of alkyl porphyrins are widely distributed in petroleum, oil shales and maturing sedimentary bitumen. Here we identify new vanadium compounds in Venezuela Orinoco heavy crude oil detected by Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). These compounds likely have the main structure of porphyrin, with the addition of more aromatic rings, thiophene and amino functional groups, corresponding to molecular series of CnH2n-40N4V1O1 (36 ≤ n ≤ 58),CnH2n-42N4V1O1 (37 ≤ n ≤ 57),CnH2n-44N4V1O1 (38 ≤ n ≤ 59),CnH2n-46N4V1O1 (43 ≤ n ≤ 54),CnH2n-48N4V1O1 (45 ≤ n ≤ 55),CnH2n-38N4V1S1O1 (36 ≤ n ≤ 41),CnH2n-40N4V1S1O1 (35 ≤ n ≤ 51),CnH2n-42N4V1S1O1 (36 ≤ n ≤ 54),CnH2n-44N4V1S1O1 (41 ≤ n ≤ 55),CnH2n-46N4V1S1O1 (39 ≤ n ≤ 55),CnH2n-27N5V1O1 (29 ≤ n ≤ 40),CnH2n-29N5V1O1 (34 ≤ n ≤ 42),CnH2n-33N5V1O1 (31 ≤ n ≤ 38),CnH2n-35N5V1O1 (32 ≤ n ≤ 41),CnH2n-27N5V1O2 (32 ≤ n ≤ 41) and CnH2n-29N5V1O2 (33 ≤ n ≤ 42). These findings are significant for the understanding of the existing form of vanadium species in nature, and are helpful for enhancing the amount of information on palaeoenvironments and improving the level of applied basic theory for the processing technologies of heavy oils. PMID:24948028

  9. New Vanadium Compounds in Venezuela Heavy Crude Oil Detected by Positive-ion Electrospray Ionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xu; Shi, Quan; Gray, Murray R.; Xu, Chunming

    2014-06-01

    Metalloporphyrins are ubiquitous in nature, particularly iron porphyrins (hemes) and magnesium dihydroporphyrins or chlorophylls. Oxovanadium (IV) complexes of alkyl porphyrins are widely distributed in petroleum, oil shales and maturing sedimentary bitumen. Here we identify new vanadium compounds in Venezuela Orinoco heavy crude oil detected by Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). These compounds likely have the main structure of porphyrin, with the addition of more aromatic rings, thiophene and amino functional groups, corresponding to molecular series of CnH2n-40N4V1O1 (36 <= n <= 58),CnH2n-42N4V1O1 (37 <= n <= 57),CnH2n-44N4V1O1 (38 <= n <= 59),CnH2n-46N4V1O1 (43 <= n <= 54),CnH2n-48N4V1O1 (45 <= n <= 55),CnH2n-38N4V1S1O1 (36 <= n <= 41),CnH2n-40N4V1S1O1 (35 <= n <= 51),CnH2n-42N4V1S1O1 (36 <= n <= 54),CnH2n-44N4V1S1O1 (41 <= n <= 55),CnH2n-46N4V1S1O1 (39 <= n <= 55),CnH2n-27N5V1O1 (29 <= n <= 40),CnH2n-29N5V1O1 (34 <= n <= 42),CnH2n-33N5V1O1 (31 <= n <= 38),CnH2n-35N5V1O1 (32 <= n <= 41),CnH2n-27N5V1O2 (32 <= n <= 41) and CnH2n-29N5V1O2 (33 <= n <= 42). These findings are significant for the understanding of the existing form of vanadium species in nature, and are helpful for enhancing the amount of information on palaeoenvironments and improving the level of applied basic theory for the processing technologies of heavy oils.

  10. New vanadium compounds in Venezuela heavy crude oil detected by positive-ion electrospray ionization fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xu; Shi, Quan; Gray, Murray R; Xu, Chunming

    2014-01-01

    Metalloporphyrins are ubiquitous in nature, particularly iron porphyrins (hemes) and magnesium dihydroporphyrins or chlorophylls. Oxovanadium (IV) complexes of alkyl porphyrins are widely distributed in petroleum, oil shales and maturing sedimentary bitumen. Here we identify new vanadium compounds in Venezuela Orinoco heavy crude oil detected by Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS). These compounds likely have the main structure of porphyrin, with the addition of more aromatic rings, thiophene and amino functional groups, corresponding to molecular series of C(n)H(2n-40)N(4)V(1)O(1) (36 ≤ n ≤ 58),C(n)H(2n-42)N(4)V(1)O(1) (37 ≤ n ≤ 57),C(n)H(2n-44)N(4)V(1)O(1) (38 ≤ n ≤ 59),C(n)H(2n-46)N(4)V(1)O(1) (43 ≤ n ≤ 54),C(n)H(2n-48)N(4)V(1)O(1) (45 ≤ n ≤ 55),C(n)H(2n-38)N(4)V(1)S(1)O(1) (36 ≤ n ≤ 41),C(n)H(2n-40)N(4)V(1)S(1)O(1) (35 ≤ n ≤ 51),C(n)H(2n-42)N(4)V(1)S(1)O(1) (36 ≤ n ≤ 54),C(n)H(2n-44)N(4)V(1)S(1)O(1) (41 ≤ n ≤ 55),C(n)H(2n-46)N(4)V(1)S(1)O(1) (39 ≤ n ≤ 55),C(n)H(2n-27)N(5)V(1)O(1) (29 ≤ n ≤ 40),C(n)H(2n-29)N(5)V(1)O(1) (34 ≤ n ≤ 42),C(n)H(2n-33)N(5)V(1)O(1) (31 ≤ n ≤ 38),C(n)H(2n-35)N(5)V(1)O(1) (32 ≤ n ≤ 41),C(n)H(2n-27)N(5)V(1)O(2) (32 ≤ n ≤ 41) and C(n)H(2n-29)N(5)V(1)O(2) (33 ≤ n ≤ 42). These findings are significant for the understanding of the existing form of vanadium species in nature, and are helpful for enhancing the amount of information on palaeoenvironments and improving the level of applied basic theory for the processing technologies of heavy oils. PMID:24948028

  11. PROSPECTS FOR A VERY HIGH POWER CW SRF LINAC

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Rimmer

    2010-06-01

    Steady development in SRF accelerator technology combined with the success of large scale installations such as CEBAF at Jefferson Laboratory and the SNS Linac at ORNL gives credibility to the concept of very high average power CW machines for light sources or Proton drivers. Such machines would be powerful tools for discovery science in themselves but could also pave the way to reliable cost effective drivers for such applications as neutrino factories, an energy-frontier muon collider, nuclear waste transmutation or accelerator driven subcritical reactors for energy production. In contrast to machines such as ILC that need maximum accelerating gradient, the challenges in these machines are mainly in efficiency, reliability, beam stability, beam loss and of course cost. In this paper the present state of the art is briefly reviewed and options for a multi-GeV, multi-MW CW linac are discussed.

  12. Computationally efficient, rotational nonequilibrium CW chemical laser model

    SciTech Connect

    Sentman, L.H.; Rushmore, W.

    1981-10-01

    The essential fluid dynamic and kinetic phenomena required for a quantitative, computationally efficient, rotational nonequilibrium model of a CW HF chemical laser are identified. It is shown that, in addition to the pumping, collisional deactivation, and rotational relaxation reactions, F-atom wall recombination, the hot pumping reaction, and multiquantum deactivation reactions play a significant role in determining laser performance. Several problems with the HF kinetics package are identified. The effect of various parameters on run time is discussed.

  13. The eclipsing binary CW Eridani. [three-color photoelectric observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K.-Y.

    1975-01-01

    Results of three-color photoelectric observations of CW Eridani are presented which were made with a 30-inch telescope over the three-year period from 1970 to 1973. The times of minima are computed, solutions of the light curves are obtained, and theoretical light curves are computed from the solutions. The period is determined to be 2.72837 days, and the orbital and photoelectric elements are derived from solutions based on the idealized Russell model.

  14. Low threshold CW Nc laser oscillator at 1060 nm study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birnbaum, M.; Deshazer, L. G.

    1976-01-01

    A broad range of characteristics of neodymium/yag lasers were investigated. With Nd:YVO4 crystals, CW 1.06 mu lasers were operated with thresholds a factor of 2 lower than Nd:YAG and with greater slope efficiencies. Thus, the first step in the development of new oscillators suitable for application in high data rate laser communication systems which surpass the present performance of the Nd:YAG laser has been successfully demonstrated.

  15. Laser Photon Force Measurements using a CW Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Perry; Edwards, David L.; Carruth, M. Ralph, Jr.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The photon force resulting from the non-damaging impact of laser derived photons on a metallic target was measured using a vacuum compatible microbalance. This experiment quantitatively verified that the force resulting from laser photons impacting a reflective surface is measurable and predictable. The photon wavelength is 1064 mn and the laser is a multi-mode 30OW Nd YAG continuous wave (CW) laser.

  16. Fundamental studies of molecular multiphoton ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.C.; Compton, R.N.

    1984-04-01

    For several years the authors have performed fundamental studies of molecular multiphoton ionization (MPI). We will present a potpourri of techniques and results chosen to illustrate the interesting complexities of molecular MPI. Techniques used include time-of-flight mass spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, supersonic expansion cooling of molecular beams, harmonic generation, two-color laser MPI, and polarization spectroscopy. Whenever possible the relevance of these results to resonance ionization spectroscopy schemes will be delineated. 23 references, 10 figures.

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Long Chain Fatty Acids Present in a Type I Kerogen Using Electrospray Ionization Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry: Compared with BF3/MeOH Methylation/GC-FID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamga, Albert W.; Behar, Fancoise; Hatcher, Patrick G.

    2014-05-01

    Long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) are present in various natural samples and are easily detectable using electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI-FT-ICR-MS) in negative ion mode. The capability of the ESI-FT-ICR-MS for quantifying LCFAs was evaluated by performing a standard addition followed by an internal standard methodology to several kerogen extracts using n-C20 fatty acid as standard. As the concentration of the standard increased, the magnitude of its peak ( m/z 311.29525) increased linearly but with two separate slopes, leaving the entire mass spectra relatively unchanged, which shows evidence of reproducibility. Response factors of other LCFAs are obtained using a standard addition approach. We employed five LCFA standards ( n-C15, n-C19, n-C24, n-C26, and n-C30) with different carbon numbers. This allowed us to determine the response factor of all fatty acids (with carbon number between 15 and 30) by plotting the slope of each standard versus its carbon number. With the observed response factors and use of the internal standard, the concentrations of LCFAs in four kerogen extracts were measured by ESI-FT-ICR-MS and compared with those from GC-FID. The carbon number distribution obtained by ESI-FT-ICR-MS matched well the GC-FID distribution (5%-50%) with the exception of C16 and C18, considering that ESI-FT-ICR-MS does not differentiate between normal and branched LCFAs, whereas GC-FID does. This allows one to quantitatively compare samples with a relatively similar matrix for specific compounds such as LCFAs with no need of time-consuming derivatization procedures. Moreover, the calibration can be extended to higher carbon numbers with ESI-FT-ICR-MS, beyond the capabilities of GC/MS.

  18. A high-resolution scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization ion source for imaging analysis on an ion trap/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Koestler, Martin; Kirsch, Dieter; Hester, Alfons; Leisner, Arne; Guenther, Sabine; Spengler, Bernhard

    2008-10-01

    A new scanning microprobe matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SMALDI) ion source for high spatial resolution has been developed for linear ion trap and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS). The source is fully compatible with commercial ion trap flanges (such as the LTQ series, Thermo Fisher Scientific). The source is designed for atmospheric pressure (AP) operation but is also suitable for mid-pressure operation. The AP mode is especially useful for investigating volatile compounds. The source can be interchanged with other ion sources within a minute when operated in the AP mode. Combining high-lateral resolution MALDI imaging with high mass resolution and high mass accuracy mass spectrometry, available in the FT-ICR mode, provides a new quality of analytical information, e.g. from biological samples. First results obtained with the new ion source demonstrate a maximum lateral resolution of 0.6 by 0.5 microm. Depending on the limit of detection of the chosen mass analyzer, however, the size of the focus had to be enlarged to a diameter of up to 8 microm in the FT-ICR mode, in order to create enough ions for detection. Mass spectra acquired for analytical imaging were obtained from single laser pulses per pixel in all the experiments. This mode allows us to investigate biological thin sections with desorption focus diameters in the micrometer range, known to cause complete evaporation of material under the laser focus with a very limited number of laser pulses. As a first example, peptide samples deposited in microstructures were investigated with the new setup. A high quality and validity of the acquired images were obtained in the ion trap mode due to the low limit of detection. High mass resolution and accuracy but poorer image quality were obtained in the ICR mode due to the lower detection sensitivity of the ICR detector. PMID:18819119

  19. Identification of unsaturated N-acylhomoserine lactones in bacterial isolates of Rhodobacter sphaeroides by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization-hybrid linear ion trap-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cataldi, Tommaso R I; Bianco, Giuliana; Abate, Salvatore; Losito, Ilario

    2011-07-15

    The identification of two unsaturated N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) produced by Rhodobacter sphaeroides bacteria, based on liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to a hybrid quadrupole linear ion trap (LTQ)-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer upon electrospray ionization (ESI), is presented. Besides the confirmation of the signaling molecule already described in the literature, i.e. (Z)-N-tetradec-7-enoyl-homoserine lactone (C(14:1)-HSL), we have discovered the occurrence, at low, yet significant levels, of another monounsaturated compound, C(12:1) -HSL, which may extend the number of small diffusible chemical signals known for R. sphaeroides. Both unsaturated AHLs were identified by high-resolution FTICR mass spectrometry in extracts of bacterial culture media and the occurrence of a C=C bond was assessed upon their conversion into bromohydrins. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra were then collected on the LTQ mass analyzer. A careful comparison of tandem MS spectra of monounsaturated (i.e., C(12:1)-HSL and C(14:1)-HSL) and saturated AHLs (i.e. C(12)-HSL and C(14)-HSL) led to the emphasis of two series of product ions, exhibiting 14 Da spaced m/z ratios. Both series were referred to progressive fragmentations at the aliphatic end of the AHL acyl chains, followed by neutral losses of terminal alkenes (i.e. CH(2)=CH(CH(2))(n)H). In particular, the series located at the higher end of the explored m/z range (>200 Da), observed only for monounsaturated species, enabled the location of the C=C bond between carbons 7 and 8 of the acyl chain. PMID:21638357

  20. Self-consistent modeling for estimation of the reduced electric field in a DC excited diffusion controlled CW CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Manoj; Bhagat, M. S.; Biswas, A. K.; Rana, L. B.; Pakhare, Jagdish; Rawat, B. S.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2016-07-01

    The results of a numerical simulation method that estimate various discharge parameters in the positive column of a DC glow discharge controlled by ambipolar diffusion are presented. The parameters like reduced electric field (E/N), electron temperature, ionization rates, ambipolar diffusion losses and the average gas temperature were numerically evaluated for several mixtures of CO2, N2 and He in low pressure regime. The estimated E/N value which is a primary governing parameter of positive column was verified experimentally using a double probe in diffusion controlled CW CO2 laser for a variety of CO2, N2 and He mixtures. The role of auxiliary ionization source like pulser used for pre-ionization and its effect on the steady state E/N value was also studied. A reasonably good agreement was found between the theoretical and the experimental results. Based on the results of this simulation a zigzag folded, diffusion-cooled, 500 W CW CO2 laser has been designed and developed for research in gas phase nanoparticle synthesis.

  1. Stepped-frequency CW radar for concealed weapon detection and through-the-wall surveillance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Allen R.; Hogg, R. Douglas

    2002-08-01

    Both concealed weapons detection and through the wall surveillance are significant problems for both law enforcement and military personnel. While on the surface it would appear that these two problems are unrelated technologically, they do, in fact, share some common ground. A concealed weapon acts as resonant object, exhibiting electromagnetic resonance peaks at frequencies characteristic of the weapon's major dimensions. For handguns the frequency range of interest lies approximately between 450 MHz and 2 GHz. As it turns out, this is also a region over which many common building materials are largely transparent. As part of grant 97-IJ-CX-K013 from the National Institute of Justice, AKELA, Inc. has developed a stepped-frequency, CW radar that covers this frequency range. The radar is digitally synthesized and controlled and has a range resolution of approximately 4'. Digital waveform control gives the radar the ability to avoid interference with other electronic devices, to tailor data collection for signal processing requirements, and to change its sweep time in response to operational requirements. AKELA has developed a brassboard concealed weapons detector that uses this radar. A through the wall imaging system that uses the radar is currently in development under AFRL Contract F30602-00-C-0205.

  2. Production of High Intracavity UV Power From a CW Laser Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    David, R. T.; Chyba, T. H.; Keppel, C. E.; Gaskell, D.; Ent, R.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this research project is to create a prototype high power CW source of ultraviolet (UV) photons for photon-electron scattering at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Hall B. The facility will use optical resonant cavities to produce a high photon flux. The technical approach will be to frequency-double the 514.5 mn light from an Argon-Ion Laser to create 0.1 to 1.0 watt in the UV. The produced UV power will be stored in a resonant cavity to generate an high intracavity UV power of 102 to 103 watts. The specific aim of this project is to first design and construct the low-Q doubling cavity and lock it to the Argon-Ion wavelength. Secondly, the existing 514.5 nm high-Q build-up cavity and its locking electronics will be modified to create high intracavity UV power. The entire system will then be characterized and evaluated for possible beam line use.

  3. Bimodal loop-gap resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecki, W.; Froncisz, W.; Hyde, James S.

    1996-05-01

    A bimodal loop-gap resonator for use in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy at S band is described. It consists of two identical one-loop-one-gap resonators in coaxial juxtaposition. In one mode, the currents in the two loops are parallel and in the other antiparallel. By introducing additional capacitors between the loops, the frequencies of the two modes can be made to coincide. Details are given concerning variable coupling to each mode, tuning of the resonant frequency of one mode to that of the other, and adjustment of the isolation between modes. An equivalent circuit is given and network analysis carried out both experimentally and theoretically. EPR applications are described including (a) probing of the field distributions with DPPH, (b) continuous wave (cw) EPR with a spin-label line sample, (c) cw electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR), (d) modulation of saturation, and (e) saturation-recovery (SR) EPR. Bloch induction experiments can be performed when the sample extends half way through the structure, but microwave signals induced by Mx and My components of magnetization cancel when it extends completely through. This latter situation is particularly favorable for SR, modulation of saturation, and ELDOR experiments, which depend on observing Mz indirectly using a second weak observing microwave source.

  4. How Suitable is Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time-of-Flight for Metabolite Imaging from Clinical Formalin-Fixed and Paraffin-Embedded Tissue Samples in Comparison to Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry?

    PubMed

    Buck, Achim; Balluff, Benjamin; Voss, Andreas; Langer, Rupert; Zitzelsberger, Horst; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel

    2016-05-17

    In research and clinical settings, formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue specimens are collected routinely and therefore this material constitutes a highly valuable source to gather insight in metabolic changes of diseases. Among mass spectrometry techniques to examine the molecular content of FFPE tissue, mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is the most appropriate when morphological and histological features are to be related to metabolic information. Currently, high-resolution mass spectrometers are widely used for metabolomics studies. However, with regards to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MSI, no study has so far addressed the necessity of instrumental mass resolving power in terms of clinical diagnosis and prognosis using archived FFPE tissue. For this matter we performed for the first time a comprehensive comparison between a high mass resolution Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer and a time-of-flight (TOF) instrument with lower mass resolving power. Spectra analysis revealed that about one-third of the detected peaks remained unresolved by MALDI-TOF, which led to a 3-5 times lower number of m/z features compared to FTICR measurements. Overlaid peak information and background noise in TOF images made a precise assignment of molecular attributes to morphological features more difficult and limited classification approaches. This clearly demonstrates the need for high-mass resolution capabilities for metabolite imaging. Nevertheless, MALDI-TOF allowed reproducing and verifying individual markers identified previously by MALDI-FTICR MSI. The systematic comparison gives rise to a synergistic combination of the different MSI platforms for high-throughput discovery and validation of biomarkers. PMID:27065343

  5. Multiphoton ionization of ions, neutrals, and clusters. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Wessel, J.

    1991-06-28

    Scientific results are summarized from a three year research program on multiphoton ionization in aromatic molecules, clusters, and their ions. As originally proposed, the studies elucidated a new cluster ionization mechanism, characterized properties of long range intermolecular interactions, and investigated electronic transitions of aromatic cations cooled in a supersonic beam. The studies indicate that the new cluster ionization mechanism is highly efficient and dominates conventional 1 + 1 resonant ionization. In the case of the dimer of the large aromatic molecule fluorene, the results suggest that excimer formation competes with a direct ionization process. Highly selective excitonic spectra have been identified for several cluster species.

  6. JLab CW Cryomodules for 4th Generation Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Rimmer, Robert; Bundy, Richard; Cheng, Guangfeng; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Clemens, William; Daly, Edward; Henry, James; Hicks, William; Kneisel, Peter; Manning, Stephen; Manus, Robert; Marhauser, Frank; Preble, Joseph; Reece, Charles; Smith, Karl; Stirbet, Mircea; Turlington, Larry; Wang, Haipeng; Wilson, Katherine

    2008-01-23

    Fourth generation light sources hold the prospect of unprecedented brightness and optical beam quality for a wide range of scientific applications. Many of the proposed new facilities will rely on large superconducting radio frequency (SRF) based linacs to provide high energy, low emittance CW electron beams. For high average power applications there is a growing acceptance of energy recovery linac (ERL) technology as the way to support large recirculating currents with modest RF power requirements. CW SRF and high current ERLs are two core competencies at Jefferson Lab. JLab has designed and built a number of CW cryomodules of several different types starting with the original CEBAF design, with variations for higher current in the two generations of JLab’s free-electron laser (FEL), through two intermediate prototypes to the final high-performance module for the 12 GeV upgrade. Each of these represent fully engineered and tested configurations with a variety of specifications that could be considered for possible use in fourth generation light sources. Furthermore JLab has been actively pursuing advanced concepts for highcurrent high-efficiency cryomodules for next generation ERL based FEL’s. These existing and proposed designs span the range from about 1mA single-pass to over 100 mA energy recovered current capability. Specialized configurations also exist for high-current non-energy recovered sections such as the injector region where very high RF power is required. We discuss the performance parameters of these existing and proposed designs and their suitability to different classes of fourth generation light sources.

  7. Quasi-CW Laser Diode Bar Life Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark A.; Krainak, Michael A.; Dallas, Joseph L.

    1997-01-01

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center is developing technology for satellite-based, high peak power, LIDAR transmitters requiring 3-5 years of reliable operation. Semi-conductor laser diodes provide high efficiency pumping of solid state lasers with the promise of long-lived, reliable operation. 100-watt quasi- CW laser diode bars have been baselined for the next generation laser altimeters. Multi-billion shot lifetimes are required. The authors have monitored the performance of several diodes for billions of shots and investigated operational modes for improving diode lifetime.

  8. Design of 250-MW CW RF system for APT

    SciTech Connect

    Rees, D.

    1997-09-01

    The design for the RF systems for the APT (Accelerator Production of Tritium) proton linac will be presented. The linac produces a continuous beam power of 130 MW at 1300 MeV with the installed capability to produce up to a 170 MW beam at 1700 MeV. The linac is comprised of a 350 MHz RFQ to 7 MeV followed in sequence by a 700 MHz coupled-cavity drift tube linac, coupled-cavity linac, and superconducting (SC) linac to 1700 MeV. At the 1700 MeV, 100 mA level the linac requires 213 MW of continuous-wave (CW) RF power. This power will be supplied by klystrons with a nominal output power of 1.0 MW. 237 kystrons are required with all but three of these klystrons operating at 700 MHz. The klystron count includes redundancy provisions that will be described which allow the RF systems to meet an operational availability in excess of 95 percent. The approach to achieve this redundancy will be presented for both the normal conducting (NC) and SC accelerators. Because of the large amount of CW RF power required for the APT linac, efficiency is very important to minimize operating cost. Operation and the RF system design, including in-progress advanced technology developments which improve efficiency, will be discussed. RF system performance will also be predicted. Because of the simultaneous pressures to increase RF system reliability, reduce tunnel envelope, and minimize RF system cost, the design of the RF vacuum windows has become an important issue. The power from a klystron will be divided into four equal parts to minimize the stress on the RF vacuum windows. Even with this reduction, the RF power level at the window is at the upper boundary of the power levels employed at other CW accelerator facilities. The design of a 350 MHz, coaxial vacuum window will be presented as well as test results and high power conditioning profiles. The transmission of 950 kW, CW, power through this window has been demonstrated with only minimal high power conditioning.

  9. High efficiency CW green-pumped alexandrite lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuper, J. W.; Brown, D. C.

    2006-02-01

    High power, CW and pulsed alexandrite lasers were produced by pumping the laser rod with a high quality diode pumped 532 nm laser sources. This pumping architecture provides stable performance with output power > 1.4 W at 767nm in the free running mode and 0.78W at 1000 Hz. An output of 80 mW at 375.5 nm was achieved at 500 Hz. This approach holds promise for the production of a scalable diode-pumped, tunable alexandrite laser systems operating in the near infrared (750 nm), and the ultraviolet (375 and 250 nm) spectral regions.

  10. Cavitation induced by CW lasers in absorbing liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-San-Juan, J. C.; Rodriguez-Aboytes, E.; Martínez-Canton, A. E.; Baldovino-Pantaleon, O.; Torres-Hurtado, S.; Robledo-Martinez, A.; Korneev, N.; Ramos-Garcia, R.

    2010-02-01

    Novel results are presented on thermocavitation in highly absorbing solutions using CW low power laser (λ=975 nm). Due to the large absorption coefficient (135 cm-1) at the laser wavelength, penetration length is only ~74μm inside the liquid and asymmetric bubbles are generated near the beam's entrance wall. We report the temporal dynamic of the cavitation bubble, which is much shorter than previously reported. We found that the amplitude of the shock wave decreases exponentially with the beam power. As shown in this work, thermocavitation is a phenomenon that has a great application potential in areas such as ultrasonic waves generation and controlled tissue ablation for use in lithotripsy.

  11. Ultraviolet photometry of the eclipsing variable CW Cephei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobieski, S.

    1972-01-01

    An extended series of photometric observations were made of the eclipsing variable CW Cephei using the Wisconsin instrument on OAO-2. Approximate elements which were derived based solely on the eclipse depths and shape of the secondary are in satisfactory agreement with those found using ground based observations. However, persistent asymmetries and anomalous light variations, all larger than the expected experimental error, were also found; subsequent ground-based observations show H sub alpha entirely in emission indicating the presence of an extended gaseous system surrounding one or both of the components. Consistent solutions utilizing all data at all wavelengths were not found.

  12. GEM: ANL 4-GeV CW electron microtron design

    SciTech Connect

    Kustom, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    A six-sided hexagonal microtron has been chosen as the accelerator to generate the beams required to pursue a national research program at a CW 4 GeV electron laboratory. This option has the advantage of superior beam quality, low capital and operating cost, and promise of furnishing beams of several electron energies simultaneously. Only moderate rf power is required because of the basic feature of all microtron designs, recirculation of the electron beam through the same rf accelerating section many times. The hexatron design has the additional feature of compatibility with an existing accelerator complex at Argonne which is currently unoccupied and available.

  13. Weakly ionized cosmic gas: Ionization and characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, M.; Mendis, D. A.; Chow, V. W.

    1994-01-01

    Since collective plasma behavior may determine important transport processes (e.g., plasma diffusion across a magnetic field) in certain cosmic environments, it is important to delineate the parameter space in which weakly ionized cosmic gases may be characterized as plasmas. In this short note, we do so. First, we use values for the ionization fraction given in the literature, wherein the ionization is generally assumed to be due primarily to ionization by cosmic rays. We also discuss an additional mechanism for ionization in such environments, namely, the photoelectric emission of electrons from cosmic dust grains in an interstellar Far Ultra Violet (FUV) radiation field. Simple estimates suggest that under certain conditions this mechanism may dominate cosmic ray ionization, and possibly also the photoionization of metal atoms by the interstellar FUV field, and thereby lead to an enhanced ionization level.

  14. Continuously Frequency Tunable High Power Sub-THz Radiation Source—Gyrotron FU CW VI for 600 MHz DNP-NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idehara, Toshitaka; Kosuga, Kosuke; Agusu, La; Ikeda, Ryosuke; Ogawa, Isamu; Saito, Teruo; Matsuki, Yoh; Ueda, Keisuke; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2010-07-01

    A high frequency gyrotron with a 15 T superconducting magnet named Gyrotron FU CW VI has achieved continuous frequency tuning through the relatively wide range of 1.5 GHz near 400 GHz. The operation is at the fundamental cyclotron resonance of the TE06 cavity mode with many higher order axial modes. The output power measured at the end of the circular waveguide system ranges from 10 to 50 watts at the low acceleration voltage of 12 kV for beam electrons. The beam current is also low. It is around 250 mA. This gyrotron is designed as a demountable radiation source for the 600 MHz DNP-NMR spectroscopy. The design and operation results of the gyrotron FU CW VI are presented.

  15. Photometric analysis of the overcontact binary CW Cas

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. J.; Qian, S. B.; He, J. J.; Li, L. J.; Zhao, E. G.

    2014-11-01

    New CCD photometric observations of overcontact binary CW Cas were carried out in 2004 and 2011. In particular, the light curve obtained in 2004 shows a remarkable O'Connell effect. Compared with light curves in different observing seasons, variations were found. These variations can be explained by dark spot activities on the surface of at least one component. Using the Wilson-Devinney code with a spot model, we find that the photometric solutions confirm CW Cas is a shallow W-subtype overcontact binary with a spotted massive component. Our new determined times of minimum light together with the others published in the literature were analyzed to find a change of orbital period. From the O – C curves, the period of the system shows a cyclic period change (P {sub 3} = 69.9 yr, A {sub 3} = 0.03196 days) superposed on the linear increase. The cyclic variation, if explained as the light-travel time effect, reveals the presence of a tertiary companion.

  16. Photometric Analysis of the Overcontact Binary CW Cas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. J.; Qian, S. B.; He, J. J.; Li, L. J.; Zhao, E. G.

    2014-11-01

    New CCD photometric observations of overcontact binary CW Cas were carried out in 2004 and 2011. In particular, the light curve obtained in 2004 shows a remarkable O'Connell effect. Compared with light curves in different observing seasons, variations were found. These variations can be explained by dark spot activities on the surface of at least one component. Using the Wilson-Devinney code with a spot model, we find that the photometric solutions confirm CW Cas is a shallow W-subtype overcontact binary with a spotted massive component. Our new determined times of minimum light together with the others published in the literature were analyzed to find a change of orbital period. From the O - C curves, the period of the system shows a cyclic period change (P 3 = 69.9 yr, A 3 = 0.03196 days) superposed on the linear increase. The cyclic variation, if explained as the light-travel time effect, reveals the presence of a tertiary companion.

  17. Optimal Signal Processing of Frequency-Stepped CW Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ybarra, Gary A.; Wu, Shawkang M.; Bilbro, Griff L.; Ardalan, Sasan H.; Hearn, Chase P.; Neece, Robert T.

    1995-01-01

    An optimal signal processing algorithm is derived for estimating the time delay and amplitude of each scatterer reflection using a frequency-stepped CW system. The channel is assumed to be composed of abrupt changes in the reflection coefficient profile. The optimization technique is intended to maximize the target range resolution achievable from any set of frequency-stepped CW radar measurements made in such an environment. The algorithm is composed of an iterative two-step procedure. First, the amplitudes of the echoes are optimized by solving an overdetermined least squares set of equations. Then, a nonlinear objective function is scanned in an organized fashion to find its global minimum. The result is a set of echo strengths and time delay estimates. Although this paper addresses the specific problem of resolving the time delay between the two echoes, the derivation is general in the number of echoes. Performance of the optimization approach is illustrated using measured data obtained from an HP-851O network analyzer. It is demonstrated that the optimization approach offers a significant resolution enhancement over the standard processing approach that employs an IFFT. Degradation in the performance of the algorithm due to suboptimal model order selection and the effects of additive white Gaussion noise are addressed.

  18. Optimal Signal Processing of Frequency-Stepped CW Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ybarra, Gary A.; Wu, Shawkang M.; Bilbro, Griff L.; Ardalan, Sasan H.; Hearn, Chase P.; Neece, Robert T.

    1995-01-01

    An optimal signal processing algorithm is derived for estimating the time delay and amplitude of each scatterer reflection using a frequency-stepped CW system. The channel is assumed to be composed of abrupt changes in the reflection coefficient profile. The optimization technique is intended to maximize the target range resolution achievable from any set of frequency-stepped CW radar measurements made in such an environment. The algorithm is composed of an iterative two-step procedure. First, the amplitudes of the echoes are optimized by solving an overdetermined least squares set of equations. Then, a nonlinear objective function is scanned in an organized fashion to find its global minimum. The result is a set of echo strengths and time delay estimates. Although this paper addresses the specific problem of resolving the time delay between the first two echoes, the derivation is general in the number of echoes. Performance of the optimization approach is illustrated using measured data obtained from an HP-X510 network analyzer. It is demonstrated that the optimization approach offers a significant resolution enhancement over the standard processing approach that employs an IFFT. Degradation in the performance of the algorithm due to suboptimal model order selection and the effects of additive white Gaussion noise are addressed.

  19. Locations of radical species in black pepper seeds investigated by CW EPR and 9 GHz EPR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Kouichi; Epel, Boris

    2014-10-01

    In this study, noninvasive 9 GHz electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-imaging and continuous wave (CW) EPR were used to investigate the locations of paramagnetic species in black pepper seeds without further irradiation. First, lithium phthalocyanine (LiPC) phantom was used to examine 9 GHz EPR imaging capabilities. The 9 GHz EPR-imager easily resolved the LiPC samples at a distance of ∼2 mm. Then, commercially available black pepper seeds were measured. We observed signatures from three different radical species, which were assigned to stable organic radicals, Fe3+, and Mn2+ complexes. In addition, no EPR spectral change in the seed was observed after it was submerged in distilled H2O for 1 h. The EPR and spectral-spatial EPR imaging results suggested that the three paramagnetic species were mostly located at the seed surface. Fewer radicals were found inside the seed. We demonstrated that the CW EPR and 9 GHz EPR imaging were useful for the determination of the spatial distribution of paramagnetic species in various seeds.

  20. Microwave ionization of Rydberg atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, T.F.

    1996-12-31

    An atom can be ionized by a static field if the field depresses the potential below the binding energy W, leading to the requirement E = W{sup 2}/4 in atomic units. The atomic units of field and energy are 5.14 {times} 10{sup 9} V/cm and 27.2 eV. The ionization field is often expressed in terms of the principal quantum number n of the state in question as E = 1/16n{sup 4}. In a microwave field with frequency far less than the separation {Delta}W = 1/n{sup 3} between adjacent n states, atoms other than H ionize at the much lower microwave field amplitude of E = 1/3n{sup 5}. This field corresponds to the Inglis-Teller limit, where it is impossible to resolve spectrally adjacent n states due to Stark broadening in a plasma. In H ionization occurs as it does in a static field. The difference exists because the finite sized ionic core of a non hydrogenic atom breaks one of the symmetries found in H. In non hydrogenic atoms the microwave field drives a series of transitions through successively higher n states culminating in ionization. These transitions can be understood in terms of a Landau-Zener picture based on the variation of the energies of the atoms produced by the time varying field or as the resonant multiphoton absorption of the microwave photons. In either case, the atoms make transitions through real intermediate states en route to ionization. With short, four cycle, microwave pulses complete ionization does not occur with fields of E = 1/3n{sup 5}, and population is left in intermediate states. The transition from ionization at fields near E = 1/3n{sup 5} to fields of E = 1/16n{sup 4} occurs when the frequency becomes low enough that the energies of the states vary adiabatically in the temporally varying field.

  1. Control of soliton train transmission, storage, and clock recovery by cw light injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wabnitz, S.

    1996-12-01

    The Gordon-Haus time jitter and the soliton-soliton interactions in a soliton fiber loop memory or in a transmission link may be suppressed by the periodic injection of a weak cw control beam. In the case of a fiber ring cavity cw injection may also permit clock regeneration from a randomly modulated soliton train. .

  2. Concepts for the JLab Ampere-Class CW Cryomodule

    SciTech Connect

    R. Rimmer; E.F. Daly; W.R. Hicks; J. Henry; J. Preble; M. Stirbet; H. Wang; K.M. Wilson; G. Wu

    2005-05-01

    We describe the concepts and developments underway at JLab as part of the program to develop a new CW cryomodule capable of transporting ampere-level beam currents in a compact FEL. Requirements include real-estate gradient of at least 10 MV/m and very strong HOM damping to push BBU thresholds up by two or more orders of magnitude compared to existing designs. Cavity shape, HOM damping, power couplers, tuners etc. are being designed and optimized for this application. Cavity considerations include a large iris for beam halo, low-RF losses, HOM frequencies and Q's, low peak surface fields, field flatness and microphonics. Module considerations include high packing factor, low static heat leak, image current heating of beam-line components, cost and maintainability. This module is being developed for the next generation ERL based high power FELs but may be useful for other applications such as electron cooling, electron-ion colliders, industrial processing etc.

  3. CW laser generated ultrasound techniques for microstructure material properties evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thursby, Graham; Culshaw, Brian; Pierce, Gareth; Cleary, Alison; McKee, Campbell; Veres, Istvan

    2009-03-01

    Mechanical properties of materials may be obtained from the inversion of ultrasonic Lamb wave dispersion curves. In order to do this broadband excitation and detection of ultrasound is required. As sample size and, in particular, thickness, are reduced to those of microstructures, ultrasound frequencies in the range of the gigahertz region will be required. We look at two possible cw laser excitation techniques which, having far lower peak powers than the more frequently used Q-switched lasers, therefore give a negligible risk of damaging the sample through ablation. In the first method the modulation frequency of a sinusoidally modulated laser is swept over the required range. In the second, the laser is modulated with a series of square pulses whose timing is given by a PRBS (pseudo random binary sequence) in the form of a modified m-sequence.

  4. Low power cw-laser signatures on human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Lihachev, A; Lesinsh, J; Jakovels, D; Spigulis, J

    2011-01-24

    Impact of cw laser radiation on autofluorescence features of human skin is studied. Two methods of autofluorescence detection are applied: the spectral method with the use of a fibreoptic probe and spectrometer for determining the autofluorescence recovery kinetics at a fixed skin area of {approx}12 mm{sup 2}, and the multispectral visualisation method with the use of a multispectral imaging camera for visualising long-term autofluorescence changes in a skin area of {approx}4 cm{sup 2}. The autofluorescence recovery kinetics after preliminary laser irradiation is determined. Skin autofluorescence images with visible long-term changes - 'signatures' of low power laser treatment are acquired. (application of lasers and laser-optical methods in life sciences)

  5. Operational experience with CW high gradient and high QL cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Hovater, J. Curt; Allison, Trent L.; Bachimanchi, Ramakrishna; Daly, Edward F.; Drury, Michael A.; Lahti, George E.; Mounts, Clyde I.; Nelson, Richard M.; Plawski, Tomasz E.

    2014-12-01

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12 GeV includes the installation of ten new 100 MV cryomodules (80 cavities). The superconducting RF cavities are designed to operate CW at an accelerating gradient of 19.3 MV/m with a QL of 3×107. The RF system employs single cavity control using new digital LLRF controls and 13 kW klystrons. Recently, all of the new cryomodules and associated RF hardware and software have been commissioned and operated in the CEBAF accelerator. Electrons at linac currents up to 10 ?A have been successfully accelerated and used for nuclear physics experiments. This paper reports on the commissioning and operation of the cryomodules and RF system.

  6. The reliability of /AlGa/As CW laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettenberg, M.; Kressel, H.

    1980-02-01

    Major factors bearing on the reliability of (AlGa)As CW laser diodes are reviewed with attention given to the degradation modes of facet mirror damage, contact degradation, and internal damage. Detailed results are provided for the oxide-defined stripe-contact double-heterojunction lasers operated for more than 40,000 h with extrapolations indicating a median time to failure between 100,000 and 1,000,000. Facet damage and contact degradation appear to be under control, and internal damage remains the dominant failure mechanism. Most of the data deals with threshold current increase; however, shifts in far-field pattern and changes in laser modulation characteristics, including self-sustained oscillations, may affect laser performance in real systems.

  7. Characterization of a THz CW spectrometer pumped at 1550 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Woon-Gi; Nahar, Niru K.

    2015-07-01

    We present an evaluation of a cost-effective THz CW spectrometer pumped at 1550 nm wavelengths with a fixed delay line. To study the spectral competence of the spectrometer, transmission data is obtained for various organic and inorganic samples. Spectral comparisons of the samples are presented by using THz time domain spectroscopy and vector network analyzer (VNA). Despite the capability of highly resolved transmission spectroscopy, our current system reveals the uncertainty in interferometric output data for phase analysis. Here, we identify the effect of fringing space of raw output data toward frequency resolution, phase analysis, and data acquisition time. We also propose the proper delay line setup for phase analysis for this type of spectrometers.

  8. Quasi-cw tissue transillumination at 1064 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernini, Umberto; Ramaglia, Antonio; Russo, Paolo

    1997-08-01

    An extended series of transillumination experiments has been performed in vitro on animal samples (bovine muscle, up to 30- mm-thick; chicken wing and quail femur, 12-mm-thick) and in vivo on the human hand (thickness, about 20 mm), using a pulsed light source (7 ns, about 10-4 J/pulse, 10 Hz rep rate) from a collimated (1.2 m) Nd:YAG laser beam (1064 nm). A PIN photodiode connected to a digital oscilloscope was used to measure the maximum intensity of the beam pulse transmitted through the sample (i.e., no temporal discrimination of the output signal was attempted) while it was scanned across the source/detector assembly. One dimensional scans were performed on bovine muscle samples in which thin metallic test objects were embedded, in order to study the spatial resolution of the technique (for bovine muscle at 1064 nm, absorption and reduced scattering coefficients are reported to be about 1 cm-1 and 3 cm-1, respectively). The measured spatial resolution was as good as 3.6 mm in 30 mm of tissue thickness. In the two-dimensional scans of the chicken and quail sample, fat and bone tissues can be easily seen with good resolution, whereas imaging of the middle finger of a human hand shows cartilaginoid and bone tissue with 1 - 2 mm resolution. Hence, this simple collimated quasi-cw technique gives significantly better results for tissue imaging than pure cw transillumination. Use of (pulsed) light above 1000 nm and a high energy content per pulse are supposed to explain the positive experimental findings.

  9. The 700-1500 cm{sup −1} region of the S{sub 1} (A{sup ~1}B{sub 2}) state of toluene studied with resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI), zero-kinetic-energy (ZEKE) spectroscopy, and time-resolved slow-electron velocity-map imaging (tr-SEVI) spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Adrian M.; Green, Alistair M.; Tamé-Reyes, Victor M.; Reid, Katharine L.; Davies, Julia A.; Parkes, Victoria H. K.; Wright, Timothy G.

    2014-03-21

    We report (nanosecond) resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI), (nanosecond) zero-kinetic-energy (ZEKE) and (picosecond) time-resolved slow-electron velocity map imaging (tr-SEVI) spectra of fully hydrogenated toluene (Tol-h{sub 8}) and the deuterated-methyl group isotopologue (α{sub 3}-Tol-d{sub 3}). Vibrational assignments are made making use of the activity observed in the ZEKE and tr-SEVI spectra, together with the results from quantum chemical and previous experimental results. Here, we examine the 700–1500 cm{sup −1} region of the REMPI spectrum, extending our previous work on the region ≤700 cm{sup −1}. We provide assignments for the majority of the S{sub 1} and cation bands observed, and in particular we gain insight regarding a number of regions where vibrations are coupled via Fermi resonance. We also gain insight into intramolecular vibrational redistribution in this molecule.

  10. An intra-cavity device with a discharge-drived CW DF chemical laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Baozhu; Liu, Wenguang; Zhou, Qiong; Yuan, Shengfu; Lu, Qisheng

    2015-05-01

    The performance parameters of reflecting mirrors such as absorption coefficient or thermal distortion determine the beam quality of the output laser, so the quality of mirrors is one of the most important factors affecting the capability of the whole laser system. At the present time, there was obviously insufficient in test methods for the mirrors performance. The reflection coefficient, absorption coefficient and scattering coefficient of mirrors could be measured by a lot of test methods such as cavity ring-down method, photothermal deflection method, surface thermal lens method and laser calorimetry. But these methods could not test under high power density radiation. So the test data and results could not indicate the real performance in a real laser system exactly. Testing in a real laser system would be expensive and time consuming. Therefore, the test sequence and data would not be sufficient to analyze and realize the performance of mirrors. To examine the performance of mirrors under high power density radiation, the working principle of intra-cavity was introduced in this paper. Utilizing an output mirror with a low output coupling ratio, an intra-cavity could produce high-power density laser in the resonant cavity on the basis of a relatively small scale of gain medium, and the consumption and cost were very low relatively. Based on a discharge-drived CW DF chemical laser, an intra-cavity device was established. A laser beam of 3kw/cm2 was achieved in the resonant cavity. Two pieces of 22.5 degree mirrors and two pieces of 45 degree mirrors could be tested simultaneously. Absorption coefficient and thermal distortion were measured by calorimetry and Hartmann wavefront sensor respectively. This device was simple, convenient, low-maintenance, and could work for a long time. The test results would provide support for process improvement of mirrors.

  11. Determination of the first ionization potential of actinium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roßnagel, J.; Raeder, S.; Hakimi, A.; Ferrer, R.; Trautmann, N.; Wendt, K.

    2012-01-01

    Using resonance ionization spectroscopy the first-ionization potential of actinium has been determined by analyzing different Rydberg series in two-color resonant laser excitation. Three individual Rydberg series were investigated, converging toward the ionic ground state and toward the first- and second-excited state of the actinium ion, respectively. A combined analysis of the convergence limits leads to a consistent value for the first-ionization potential of Ac of 43394.45(19)cm-1, equivalent to 5.380226(24) eV.

  12. OPERATIONS OF THE LEDA RESONANTLY COUPLED RFQ

    SciTech Connect

    L. M. YOUNG

    2001-04-01

    The LEDA RFQ is a 350-MHz continuous-wave (CW) radio-frequency quadrupole linac. LEDA is the low energy demonstration accelerator, a full power front-end prototype for the accelerator production of tritium (APT) linac. This machine has accelerated a 100-mA CW proton beam from 75 keV to 6.7 MeV. The 8-m-long RFQ accepts a dc, 75-keV, {approximately}110-mA H{sup +} beam from the LEDA injector, bunches the beam, and accelerates it to full energy with {approximately}94% transmission. Output beam power is 670 kW. This RFQ consists of four 2-meter-long RFQs joined with resonant coupling to form an 8-meter-long RFQ. The resonant coupling improves the stability of both the longitudinal and transverse RF-field distribution in this long RFQ.

  13. Two-Photon Ionization of Metastable Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czechanski, James Poremba

    There have been relatively few investigations of multiphoton ionization from metastable helium. Of particular interest has been the work of Haberland et al. 1987 and Haberland and Oschwald 1988. In both the 1987 and 1988 papers they have described the two photon ionization of metastable helium. In each of these studies they have reported the occurrence of unexplained structure along the wings of their resonance profiles. Upon the performance of similar measurements by this study, the unexplained structure is not seen and the agreement of the experiment's measurements with the theoretical shape of the resonance curves has been good. To experimentally verify these resonance effects, we have used a tunable dye laser in conjunction with a time of flight mass spectrometer to create and detect ions from metastable helium by two-photon absorption. The use of a metastable state instead of the ground state is advantageous because of its proximity to the ionization continuum and its extended lifetime. Using a metastable state as a starting point for multiphoton absorption requires fewer photons to reach the ionization threshold. The extended lifetime of the state also makes it easy to access experimentally. For helium the singlet metastable state 2^1 S lies at 20.61 eV above the ground level with a natural lifetime of close to a millisecond. Two photons of 501.7 nm and 504.35 nm are required for the ionization processes in resonance with the 3^1P and the 3^1D states. This thesis is the accounting of the experimental process involved in the measurement of the dipole and quadrupole resonances of two photon ionization from singlet metastable helium. The study includes the description of the laser, electron gun assembly for metastable helium creation, and the time of flight mass spectrometer. A discussion of the theory of multiphoton processes is included along with the discussion of the data, its reduction and analysis, and a comparison with theoretical prediction. This study

  14. CW EPR and 9 GHz EPR imaging investigation of stable paramagnetic species and their antioxidant activities in dry shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes).

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kouichi; Hara, Hideyuki

    2016-05-01

    We investigated the antioxidant activities and locations of stable paramagnetic species in dry (or drying) shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes) using continuous wave (CW) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and 9 GHz EPR imaging. CW 9 GHz EPR detected paramagnetic species (peak-to-peak linewidth (ΔHpp) = 0.57 mT) in the mushroom. Two-dimensional imaging of the sharp line using a 9 GHz EPR imager showed that the species were located in the cap and shortened stem portions of the mushroom. No other location of the species was found in the mushroom. However, radical locations and concentrations varied along the cap of the mushroom. The 9 GHz EPR imaging determined the exact location of stable paramagnetic species in the shiitake mushroom. Distilled water extracts of the pigmented cap surface and the inner cap of the mushroom showed similar antioxidant activities that reduced an aqueous solution of 0.1 mM 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl. The present results suggest that the antioxidant activities of the edible mushroom extracts are much weaker than those of ascorbic acid. Thus, CW EPR and EPR imaging revealed the location and distribution of stable paramagnetic species and the antioxidant activities in the shiitake mushroom for the first time. PMID:26846304

  15. Ionization potentials of seaborgium

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.; Pershina, V.; Fricke, B.

    1999-10-21

    Multiconfiguration relativistic Dirac-Fock values were calculated for the first six ionization potentials of seaborgium and of the other group 6 elements. No experimental ionization potentials are available for seaborgium. Accurate experimental values are not available for all of the other ionization potentials. Ionic radii for the 4+ through 6+ ions of seaborgium are also presented. The ionization potentials and ionic radii obtained will be used to predict some physiochemical properties of seaborgium and its compounds.

  16. Martian Meteor Ionization Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebowsky, J. M.; Pesnell, W. D.

    1999-01-01

    Small interplanetary grains bombard Mars, like all the solar system planets, and, like all the planets with atmospheres, meteoric ion and atom layers form in the upper atmosphere. We have developed a comprehensive one-dimensional model of the Martian meteoric ionization layer including a full chemical scheme. A persistent layer of magnesium ions should exist around an altitude of 70 km. Unlike the terrestrial case, where the metallic ions are formed via charge-exchange with the ambient ions, Mg(+) in the Martian atmosphere is produced by photoionization. Nevertheless, the predicted metal layer peak densities for Earth and Mars are similar. Diffusion solutions, such as those presented here, should be a good approximation of the metallic ions in regions where the magnetic field is negligible and may provide a significant contribution to the nightside ionosphere. The low ultraviolet absorption of the Martian atmosphere may make Mars an excellent laboratory in which to study meteoric ablation. Resonance lines not seen in the spectra of terrestrial meteors may be visible to a surface observatory in the Martian highlands.

  17. Strong field ionization rates simulated with time-dependent configuration interaction and an absorbing potential

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Pascal; Sonk, Jason A.; Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    2014-05-07

    Ionization rates of molecules have been modeled with time-dependent configuration interaction simulations using atom centered basis sets and a complex absorbing potential. The simulations agree with accurate grid-based calculations for the ionization of hydrogen atom as a function of field strength and for charge resonance enhanced ionization of H{sub 2}{sup +} as the bond is elongated. Unlike grid-based methods, the present approach can be applied to simulate electron dynamics and ionization in multi-electron polyatomic molecules. Calculations on HCl{sup +} and HCO{sup +} demonstrate that these systems also show charge resonance enhanced ionization as the bonds are stretched.

  18. Ionization Energies of Lanthanides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Peter F.; Smith, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how data are used to analyze the pattern of ionization energies of the lanthanide elements. Different observed pathways of ionization between different ground states are discussed, and the effects of pairing, exchange, and orbital interactions on ionization energies of the lanthanides are evaluated. When all the above…

  19. Picosecond Measurements with Mode-Locked CW Lasers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosaad, Neamat Roushdy M.

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. The characteristics of output pulses from a synchronously and hybridly mode-locked CW Rhodamine 6G dye laser were studied in detail by both spectral and temporal measurements. In a synchronous system, the observed spectrum was found to change from deeply channelled to nearly smooth according to the position of the birefringent filter. The output pulses were nearly transform-limited and believed to have a single-sided exponential shape. Hybridly CW mode-locked dye laser was a more reliable source for generating broadly tunable subpicosecond pulses, compared to a synchronously mode-locked laser. With carefull adjustment of the dye laser and the saturable absorber concentration (DQOCI) mixed with R6G in a single dye jet stream, pulses as short as 0.21 ps have been obtained with a compression factor of 5. The observed spectrum showed asymmetric broadening at the long-wavelength side alone. The SHG autocorrelation traces showed broad wings with exponential-like shape. The time-bandwidth product for these pulses were about three to seven times larger than that for the transform-limited pulse with single-sided exponential shape. This suggest that the pulse is largely frequency-chirped which can consistently be explained by taking into account the nonlinear process of self-phase modulation due to optical Kerr effect in a mixed dye jet stream. The timing pulse jitter was reduced by a factor of 2.4 due to mode-locking stabilization. Optical pulse compression utilizing nonlinear propagation in single-mode fibres was studied. The propagation in the fibre broadens and chirps the pulse due to the combined action of group velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation. The channelled spectrum disappeared completely and a smooth Gaussian shape was observed with the same overall width. The pulse can then be compressed by passage through a suitable dispersive delay line. Short pulses were obtained with a

  20. Studies of narrow autoionizing resonances in gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Bushaw, Bruce A.; Nortershauser, W.; Blaum, K.; Wendt, Klaus

    2003-06-30

    The autoionization (AI) spectrum of gadolinium between the first and second limits has been investigated by triple-resonance excitation with high-resolution cw lasers. A large number of narrow AI resonances have been observed and assigned total angular momentum J values. The resonances are further divided into members of AI Rydberg series converging to the second limit or other ''interloping'' levels. Fine structure in the Rydberg series has been identified and interpreted in terms of Jc j coupling. A number of detailed studies have been performed on the interloping resonances: These include lifetime determination by lineshape analysis, isotope shifts, hyperfine structure, and photoionization saturation parameters. The electronic structure of the interloping levels is discussed in terms of these studies. Linewidths generally decrease with increasing total angular momentum and the J = 7 resonances are extremely narrow with Lorentzian widths ranging from < 1 MHz up to 157 MHz. The strongest resonances are found to have cross-sections of {approx}10-12 cm{sup 2} and photoionization can be saturated with powers available from cw diode lasers.

  1. Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Min-Zong; Yuan, Cheng-Hui; Cheng, Sy-Chyi; Cho, Yi-Tzu; Shiea, Jentaie

    2010-07-01

    Mass spectrometric ionization methods that operate under ambient conditions and require minimal or no sample pretreatment have attracted much attention in such fields as biomedicine, food safety, antiterrorism, pharmaceuticals, and environmental pollution. These technologies usually involve separate ionization and sample-introduction events, allowing independent control over each set of conditions. Ionization is typically performed under ambient conditions through use of existing electrospray ionization (ESI) or atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) techniques. Rapid analyses of gas, liquid, and solid samples are possible with the adoption of various sample-introduction methods. This review sorts different ambient ionization techniques into two main subcategories, primarily on the basis of the ionization processes, that are further differentiated in terms of the approach used for sampling.

  2. Physics of Partially Ionized Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishan, Vinod

    2016-05-01

    Figures; Preface; 1. Partially ionized plasmas here and everywhere; 2. Multifluid description of partially ionized plasmas; 3. Equilibrium of partially ionized plasmas; 4. Waves in partially ionized plasmas; 5. Advanced topics in partially ionized plasmas; 6. Research problems in partially ionized plasmas; Supplementary matter; Index.

  3. Effect of a weak CW trigger on optical rogue waves in the femtosecond supercontinuum generation.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Duan, Xiaoqi

    2015-06-15

    We numerically study the characteristics of optical rogue waves in the femtosecond supercontinuum (SC) generation and use the CW triggering mechanism to control the SC generation. Detailed simulation results show for the first time that a weak CW trigger can manipulate the behaviors of optical rogue waves in the femtosecond SC regime. For the proposed CW triggering technique which requires only wavelength tuning and is a handy approach for the active control of SC, the resultant spectrum can be greatly broadened, and the noise properties of the SC can be significantly improved in terms of both of the coherence and intensity stability. PMID:26193609

  4. Adapting TESLA technology for future cw light sources using HoBiCaT.

    PubMed

    Kugeler, O; Neumann, A; Anders, W; Knobloch, J

    2010-07-01

    The HoBiCaT facility has been set up and operated at the Helmholtz-Zentrum-Berlin and BESSY since 2005. Its purpose is testing superconducting cavities in cw mode of operation and it was successfully demonstrated that TESLA pulsed technology can be used for cw mode of operation with only minor changes. Issues that were addressed comprise of elevated dynamic thermal losses in the cavity walls, necessary modifications in the cryogenics and the cavity processing, the optimum choice of operational parameters such as cavity temperature or bandwidth, the characterization of higher order modes in the cavity, and the usability of existing tuners and couplers for cw. PMID:20687747

  5. Adapting TESLA technology for future cw light sources using HoBiCaT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kugeler, O.; Neumann, A.; Anders, W.; Knobloch, J.

    2010-07-01

    The HoBiCaT facility has been set up and operated at the Helmholtz-Zentrum-Berlin and BESSY since 2005. Its purpose is testing superconducting cavities in cw mode of operation and it was successfully demonstrated that TESLA pulsed technology can be used for cw mode of operation with only minor changes. Issues that were addressed comprise of elevated dynamic thermal losses in the cavity walls, necessary modifications in the cryogenics and the cavity processing, the optimum choice of operational parameters such as cavity temperature or bandwidth, the characterization of higher order modes in the cavity, and the usability of existing tuners and couplers for cw.

  6. Resonances and resonance widths

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1986-05-01

    Two-dimensional betatron resonances are much more important than their simple one-dimensional counterparts and exhibit a strong dependence on the betatron phase advance per cell. A practical definition of ''width'' is expanded upon in order to display these relations in tables. A primarily pedagogical introduction is given to explain the tables, and also to encourage a wider capability for deriving resonance behavior and wider use of ''designer'' resonances.

  7. Quantitative cw Overhauser Dynamic Nuclear Polarization for the Analysis of Local Water Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Franck, John M.; Pavlova, Anna; Scott, John A.; Han, Songi

    2013-01-01

    Liquid state Overhauser Effect Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (ODNP) has experienced a recent resurgence of interest. The ODNP technique described here relies on the double resonance of electron spin resonance (ESR) at the most common, i.e. X-band (~ 10 GHz), frequency and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) at ~ 15 MHz. It requires only a standard continuous wave (cw) ESR spectrometer with an NMR probe inserted or built into an X-band cavity. Our focus lies on reviewing a new and powerful manifestation of ODNP as a high frequency NMR relaxometry tool that probes dipolar cross relaxation between the electron spins and the 1H nuclear spins at X-band frequencies. This technique selectively measures the translational mobility of water within a volume extending 0.5–1.5 nm outward from a nitroxide radical spin probe that is attached to a targeted site of a macromolecule. This method has been applied to study the dynamics of water that hydrates or permeates the surface or interior of proteins, polymers, and lipid membrane vesicles. We begin by reviewing the recent advances that have helped develop ODNP into a tool for mapping the dynamic landscape of hydration water with sub-nanometer locality. In order to bind this work coherently together, and to place it in the context of the extensive body of research in the field of NMR relaxometry, we then rephrase the analytical model and extend the description of the ODNP-derived NMR signal enhancements. This extended model highlights several aspects of ODNP data analysis, including the importance of considering all possible effects of microwave sample heating, the need to consider the error associated with various relaxation rates, and the unique ability of ODNP to probe the electron–1H cross-relaxation process, which is uniquely sensitive to fast (tens of ps) dynamical processes. By implementing the relevant corrections in a stepwise fashion, this paper draws a consensus result from previous ODNP procedures, and then shows

  8. Multielectron ionization of CdSe quantum dots in intense femtosecond ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Son, D.H.; Wittenberg, Joshua S.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2004-03-26

    Multielectron ionization of colloidal CdSe quantum dots under intense femtosecond UV excitation has been studied. By directly probing the absorption from the ionized electron, quantitative measurements of the yield and dynamics of the ionization have been made as a function of excitation fluence and variations of size and potential structure of quantum dots. The results have been explained by an ionization mechanism involving resonant two-photon absorption.

  9. Investigation of RF excited CW CO2 waveguide lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochuli, U.

    1984-01-01

    The RF excited 2 to 3W CW CO2 waveguide lasers with lifetimes of the order of 10(4) to 2.10(4) hours were produced. This was achieved with CO and N2 bearing gas mixtures and with internal as well as external discharge electrodes. It is noted that these tests were conducted with unstabilized lasers which drift around in their signatures. The average power output was reduced to about one half of the highest peak power output in the signature. One of the lasers, no. 1.1, still shows 60% of its original output power after it was cycled on and off every 10 minutes for more than 50,000 times. The starting voltage and driving point impedance of the RF excited gas discharge structure for different gas pressures and mixtures were measured. These data will serve as a basis for the matching and starting network optimization. The second laser body was frit and indium sealed. To our a vacuum leak between the bore and electrode holes was noted. The leak seems to be due to a defect or crack in the BeO body.

  10. CW high intensity non-scaling FFAG proton drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnstone, C.; Berz, M.; Makino, K.; Snopok, P.; /IIT, Chicago

    2011-04-01

    Accelerators are playing increasingly important roles in basic science, technology, and medicine including nuclear power, industrial irradiation, material science, and neutrino production. Proton and light-ion accelerators in particular have many research, energy and medical applications, providing one of the most effective treatments for many types of cancer. Ultra high-intensity and high-energy (GeV) proton drivers are a critical technology for accelerator-driven sub-critical reactors (ADS) and many HEP programs (Muon Collider). These high-intensity GeV-range proton drivers are particularly challenging, encountering duty cycle and space-charge limits in the synchrotron and machine size concerns in the weaker-focusing cyclotrons; a 10-20 MW proton driver is not presently considered technically achievable with conventional re-circulating accelerators. One, as-yet, unexplored re-circulating accelerator, the Fixed-field Alternating Gradient, or FFAG, is an attractive alternative to the cyclotron. Its strong focusing optics are expected to mitigate space charge effects, and a recent innovation in design has coupled stable tunes with isochronous orbits, making the FFAG capable of fixed-frequency, CW acceleration, as in the classical cyclotron. This paper reports on these new advances in FFAG accelerator technology and references advanced modeling tools for fixed-field accelerators developed for and unique to the code COSY INFINITY.

  11. Proton Injector for CW-Mode Linear Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Joseph D.; Swenson, Donald; Guy, Frank; Love, Cody; Starling, Joel; Willis, Carl

    2009-03-01

    Numerous applications exist for CW linear accelerators with final energies in the 0.5 to 4.0 MeV proton energy range. Typical proton current at the linac output energy is 20 mA. An important subsystem for the accelerator facility is a reliable dc mode proton injector. We present here design and laboratory results for a dc, 25-keV, 30-mA proton injector. The proton source is a 2.45-GHz microwave hydrogen ion source which operates with an 875-G axial magnetic field. Low emittance, high proton fraction (>85%), beams have been demonstrated from this source. The injector uses a novel dual-solenoid magnet for matching the injector beam into a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linear accelerator. Recently, a dc ion-source development program has given up to 30 mA beam current. The dual solenoid is a compact and simple design utilizing tape-wound, edge-cooled coils. The low-energy beam transport design as well as 25-keV beam matching calculations to an RFQ will also be presented.

  12. Observation of nonsequential ionization of helium and its impact on intensity monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Fittinghoff, D.N. |; Bolton, P.R.; Chang, B.; Kulander, K.C.

    1993-03-19

    The authors have measured the ion yields for helium and neon ionized by 120 femtosecond, 614 nanometer laser pulses with intensities up to 10{sup 16} watts per square centimeter. They have found that the He II and Ne II data exhibit features incompatible with standard nonresonant sequential ionization. These features reduce the usefulness of optical field ionization for monitoring laser intensity. For the experiment, they expect dynamic resonances to have little effect on the ionization, and they attribute the features to nonsequential ionization based on the simultaneous saturation of the features and the singly ionized charge states.

  13. The ionization energy of C2.

    PubMed

    Krechkivska, O; Bacskay, G B; Welsh, B A; Nauta, K; Kable, S H; Stanton, J F; Schmidt, T W

    2016-04-14

    Resonant two-photon threshold ionization spectroscopy is employed to determine the ionization energy of C2 to 5 meV precision, about two orders of magnitude more precise than the previously accepted value. Through exploration of the ionization threshold after pumping the 0-3 band of the newly discovered 4(3)Πg←a(3)Πu band system of C2, the ionization energy of the lowest rovibronic level of the a(3)Πu state was determined to be 11.791(5) eV. Accounting for spin-orbit and rotational effects, we calculate that the ionization energy of the forbidden origin of the a(3)Πu state is 11.790(5) eV, in excellent agreement with quantum thermochemical calculations which give 11.788(10) eV. The experimentally derived ionization energy of X(1)Σg (+) state C2 is 11.866(5) eV. PMID:27083719

  14. The ionization energy of C2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krechkivska, O.; Bacskay, G. B.; Welsh, B. A.; Nauta, K.; Kable, S. H.; Stanton, J. F.; Schmidt, T. W.

    2016-04-01

    Resonant two-photon threshold ionization spectroscopy is employed to determine the ionization energy of C2 to 5 meV precision, about two orders of magnitude more precise than the previously accepted value. Through exploration of the ionization threshold after pumping the 0-3 band of the newly discovered 43Πg←a3Πu band system of C2, the ionization energy of the lowest rovibronic level of the a3Πu state was determined to be 11.791(5) eV. Accounting for spin-orbit and rotational effects, we calculate that the ionization energy of the forbidden origin of the a3Πu state is 11.790(5) eV, in excellent agreement with quantum thermochemical calculations which give 11.788(10) eV. The experimentally derived ionization energy of X1Σg+ state C2 is 11.866(5) eV.

  15. Resonant-tunnelling diodes for THz applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiginov, Michael; Sydlo, Cezary; Cojocari, Oleg; Meissner, Peter

    2012-10-01

    We investigate experimentally resonant-tunnelling-diode (RTD) oscillators, which are based on RTDs with heavily doped collector. We demonstrate that such RTD oscillators can work at frequencies, which are far beyond the limitations imposed by resonant-state lifetime and relaxation time. Exploiting further such RTDs, we have achieved the record operating frequency of 1.1 THz and show that substantially higher frequencies should be also achievable with RTD oscillators. RTD oscillators are extremely compact (less than a square millimeter) room-temperature sources of coherent cw THz radiation. Such sources should enable plenty of real-world THz applications.

  16. Transpupillary CW YAG laser coagulation. A comparison with argon green and krypton red lasers.

    PubMed

    Peyman, G A; Conway, M D; House, B

    1983-08-01

    The authors have developed a CW YAG laser for transpupillary coagulation. The effects of CW YAG coagulation on the retina, retinal vessels, and fovea were compared with those produced by the krypton red and argon green lasers. To produce threshold coagulative lesions in monkeys and rabbits, we needed five to ten times more energy with the CW YAG than with the krypton red or argon green lasers. Nerve fiber damage was observed only when coagulating retinal vessels with the argon green laser. At the parameters used, none of the lasers damaged the sensory retina of the fovea. The CW YAG may be used as a new mode of laser coagulation in the treatment of retinal diseases. PMID:6688868

  17. Draft Genome Sequences of Ralstonia pickettii Strains SSH4 and CW2, Isolated from Space Equipment.

    PubMed

    Monsieurs, Pieter; Mijnendonckx, Kristel; Provoost, Ann; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Ott, C Mark; Leys, Natalie; Van Houdt, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Ralstonia pickettii SSH4 and CW2 were isolated from space equipment. Here, we report their draft genome sequences with the aim of gaining insight into their potential to adapt to these environments. PMID:25189592

  18. Draft Genome Sequences of Ralstonia pickettii Strains SSH4 and CW2, Isolated from Space Equipment

    PubMed Central

    Monsieurs, Pieter; Mijnendonckx, Kristel; Provoost, Ann; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Ott, C. Mark; Leys, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Ralstonia pickettii SSH4 and CW2 were isolated from space equipment. Here, we report their draft genome sequences with the aim of gaining insight into their potential to adapt to these environments. PMID:25189592

  19. CW 20 kW SAGE CO[sub 2] laser for industrial use. [Silent-discharge Assisted Glow discharge Excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Nagai, Haruhiko ); Hishii, Masao ); Tanaka, Masaaki; Myoi, Yasuhito; Yagi, Toshinori . Manufacturing Development Lab.); Wakata, Hitoshi . Central Research Lab.); Tabata, Norikazu . Industrial Electronics and Systems Lab.)

    1993-12-01

    A new type of high-power CW CO[sub 2] laser with power output of more than 20 kW is described. The laser consists of a discharge excitation system named SAGE (Silent-discharge (SD) Assisted Glow discharge Excitation) and a ZnSe or a KCl transmissive window to extract high quality beams with axisymmetric intensity profile from a confocal positive-branch unstable resonator. The SAGE is effective to form a uniformly distributed and stable discharge in a large-volume and high-pressure gas excitation medium. Together with appropriate high-pressure gas conditions leading to low dissociation rate of CO[sub 2] and with using the properly selected zeolite to adsorb water vapor in the laser chamber, the transmissive windows have enabled gas-sealed operations. Prior to the design of the 20-kW SAGE laser, small-scaled experiments of the SAGE and stress analyses of the window were studied. The structure of the 20-kW SAGE laser and its performance characteristics such as SD power, magnification factor of the unstable resonator and gas pressure dependences of the power output, long-term gas-sealed operation, and beam quality are described in detail. The maximum CW power of 26.5 kW with an efficiency of 16.5 percent is attained through the ZnSe window, and a 20.3 kW power output is extracted through the KCl window. A long-term gas-sealed operation at a CW power level of 20 kW is demonstrated during a period of 65 hours.

  20. Natural gas leaks detection by spatial-resolvable-CW-laser-based remote monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Agishev, R.R.; Bajazitov, R.A.; Galeyev, M.M.; Ismagilow, Z.B.

    1996-12-31

    The opportunities of spatial-resolvable atmosphere monitoring and atmospheric pollutions remote chemical analysis based on the CW-laser radiants are investigated. A frequency-responsive processing peculiarities of atmosphere remote sensing signals are described. Application of the mentioned approach for the limited hydrocarbons remote detection and sensing is discussed. The requirements to the CW-LIDAR receiving and radiating systems parameters are formulated. The evaluations of the system sensitivity limit, measurement accuracy and accuracy increase ways are presented.

  1. Passively stabilized 215-W monolithic CW LMA-fiber laser with innovative transversal mode filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutzki, Fabian; Jauregui, Cesar; Voigtländer, Christian; Thomas, Jens U.; Limpert, Jens; Nolte, Stefan; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2010-02-01

    We report on the development of a high power monolithic CW fiber oscillator with an output power of 215 W in a 20μm core diameter few-mode Large Mode Area fiber (LMA). The key parameters for stable operation are reviewed. With these optimizations the root mean square of the output power fluctuations can be reduced to less than 0.5 % on a timescale of 20 s, which represents an improvement of more than a factor 5 over a non-optimized fiber laser. With a real-time measurement of the mode content of the fiber laser it can be shown that the few-mode nature of LMA fibers is the main factor for the residual instability of our optimized fiber laser. The root of the problem is that Fiber Bragg Gratings (FBGs) written in multimode fibers exhibit a multi-peak reflexion spectrum in which each resonance corresponds to a different transversal mode. This reflectivity spectrum stimulates multimode laser operation, which results in power and pointing instabilities due to gain competition between the different transversal modes . To stabilize the temporal and spatial behavior of the laser output, we propose an innovative passive in-fiber transversal mode filter based on modified FBG-Fabry Perot structure. This structure provides different reflectivities to the different transversal modes according to the transversal distribution of their intensity profile. Furthermore, this structure can be completely written into the active fiber using fs-laser pulses. Moreover, this concept scales very well with the fiber core diameter, which implies that there is no performance loss in fibers with even larger cores. In consequence this structure is inherently power scalable and can, therefore, be used in kW-level fiber laser systems.

  2. Analytical instruments, ionization sources, and ionization methods

    DOEpatents

    Atkinson, David A.; Mottishaw, Paul

    2006-04-11

    Methods and apparatus for simultaneous vaporization and ionization of a sample in a spectrometer prior to introducing the sample into the drift tube of the analyzer are disclosed. The apparatus includes a vaporization/ionization source having an electrically conductive conduit configured to receive sample particulate which is conveyed to a discharge end of the conduit. Positioned proximate to the discharge end of the conduit is an electrically conductive reference device. The conduit and the reference device act as electrodes and have an electrical potential maintained between them sufficient to cause a corona effect, which will cause at least partial simultaneous ionization and vaporization of the sample particulate. The electrical potential can be maintained to establish a continuous corona, or can be held slightly below the breakdown potential such that arrival of particulate at the point of proximity of the electrodes disrupts the potential, causing arcing and the corona effect. The electrical potential can also be varied to cause periodic arcing between the electrodes such that particulate passing through the arc is simultaneously vaporized and ionized. The invention further includes a spectrometer containing the source. The invention is particularly useful for ion mobility spectrometers and atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometers.

  3. Forensic Application of FM-CW and Pulse Radar

    SciTech Connect

    S. K. Koppenjan; R. S. Freeland; M. L. Miller; R. E. Yoder

    2003-01-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) technology has supplied vital assistance in criminal investigations. However, law enforcement personnel desire further developments such that the technology is rapidly deployable, and that it provides both a simple user interface and sophisticated target identification. To assist in the development of target identification algorithms, our efforts involve gathering background GPR data for the various site conditions and circumstances that often typify clandestine burials. For this study, forensic anthropologists established shallow-grave plots at The University of Tennessee Anthropological Research Facility (ARF) that are specific to GPR research. These plots contain donated human cadavers lying in various configurations and depths, surrounded by assorted construction material and backfill debris. We scanned the plots using two GPR technologies: (1) a multi-frequency synthetic-aperture FM-CW radar (200-700 MHz) (GPR-X) developed by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Special Technologies Laboratory (STL), Bechtel Nevada (Koppenjan et al., 2000), and (2) a commercial pulse radar (SIR-20) manufactured by Geophysical Survey Systems, Inc. (400 and 900 MHz)(GSSI). The sweep-frequency data show the large biological mass decomposing within the torso as encircled ''hot spots.'' The 400-MHz pulse radar exhibit major horizontal reflectors above the body, with shadow reflectors (horizontal multiples) occurring beneath the body at 60 cm depth. The 400-MHz antenna was able to discern the grave walls and folded tarp covering the lower body. Under these moist, clay-rich conditions, the 900-MHz antenna was able to penetrate slightly beyond 30 cm beneath the concrete layer. However, neither system was able to penetrate beyond a one meter depth in the moist, clay-rich soil (fine, mixed, thermic Typic Paleudalf). Example scans from each system are provided, along with a discussion of the survey protocol and general performance.

  4. Further Characterization of 394-GHz Gyrotron FU CW GII with Additional PID Control System for 600-MHz DNP-SSNMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Keisuke; Matsuki, Yoh; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Tatematsu, Yoshinori; Ogawa, Isamu; Idehara, Toshitaka

    2016-09-01

    A 394-GHz gyrotron, FU CW GII, has been designed at the University of Fukui, Japan, for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) experiments at 600-MHz 1H resonant frequency. After installation at the Institute for Protein Research (IPR), Osaka University, Japan, a PID feedback control system was equipped to regulate the electron gun heater current for stabilization of the electron beam current, which ultimately achieved stabilization of output power when operating in continuous wave (CW) mode. During exploration to further optimize operating conditions, a continuous tuning bandwidth of approximately 1 GHz was observed by varying the operating voltage at a fixed magnetic field. In the frequency range required for positive DNP enhancement, the output power was improved by increasing the magnetic field and the operating voltage from their initial operational settings. In addition, fine tuning of output frequency by varying the cavity cooling water temperature was demonstrated. These operating conditions and ancillary enhancements are expected to contribute to further enhancement of SSNMR signal.

  5. Further Characterization of 394-GHz Gyrotron FU CW GII with Additional PID Control System for 600-MHz DNP-SSNMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Keisuke; Matsuki, Yoh; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Tatematsu, Yoshinori; Ogawa, Isamu; Idehara, Toshitaka

    2016-04-01

    A 394-GHz gyrotron, FU CW GII, has been designed at the University of Fukui, Japan, for dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP)-enhanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (SSNMR) experiments at 600-MHz 1H resonant frequency. After installation at the Institute for Protein Research (IPR), Osaka University, Japan, a PID feedback control system was equipped to regulate the electron gun heater current for stabilization of the electron beam current, which ultimately achieved stabilization of output power when operating in continuous wave (CW) mode. During exploration to further optimize operating conditions, a continuous tuning bandwidth of approximately 1 GHz was observed by varying the operating voltage at a fixed magnetic field. In the frequency range required for positive DNP enhancement, the output power was improved by increasing the magnetic field and the operating voltage from their initial operational settings. In addition, fine tuning of output frequency by varying the cavity cooling water temperature was demonstrated. These operating conditions and ancillary enhancements are expected to contribute to further enhancement of SSNMR signal.

  6. High-power CW and long-pulse lasers in the green wavelength regime for copper welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pricking, Sebastian; Huber, Rudolf; Klausmann, Konrad; Kaiser, Elke; Stolzenburg, Christian; Killi, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    We report on industrial high-power lasers in the green wavelength regime. By means of a thin disk oscillator and a resonator-internal nonlinear crystal for second harmonic generation we are able to extract up to 8 kW pulse power in the few-millisecond range at a wavelength of 515 nm with a duty cycle of 10%. Careful shaping and stabilization of the polarization and spectral properties leads to a high optical-to-optical efficiency larger than 55%. The beam parameter product is designed and measured to be below 5 mm·mrad which allows the transport by a fiber with a 100 μm core diameter. The fiber and beam guidance optics are adapted to the green wavelength, enabling low transmission losses and stable operation. Application tests show that this laser is perfectly suited for copper welding due to the superior absorption of the green wavelength compared to IR, which allows us to produce weld spots with an unprecedented reproducibility in diameter and welding depth. With an optimized set of parameters we could achieve a splatter-free welding process of copper, which is crucial for welding electronic components. Furthermore, the surface condition does not influence the welding process when the green wavelength is used, which allows to skip any expensive preprocessing steps like tin-coating. With minor changes we could operate the laser in cw mode and achieved up to 1.7 kW of cw power at 515 nm with a beam parameter product of 2.5 mm·mrad. These parameters make the laser perfectly suitable for additional applications such as selective laser melting of copper.

  7. Discrimination of radiation quality through second harmonic out-of-phase cw-ESR detection.

    PubMed

    Marrale, Maurizio; Longo, Anna; Brai, Maria; Barbon, Antonio; Brustolon, Marina

    2014-02-01

    The ability to discriminate the quality of ionizing radiation is important because the biological effects produced in tissue strongly depends on both absorbed dose and linear energy transfer (LET) of ionizing particles. Here we present an experimental electron spin resonance (ESR) analysis aimed at discriminating the effective LETs of various radiation beams (e.g., 19.3 MeV protons, (60)Co photons and thermal neutrons). The measurement of the intensities of the continuous wave spectrometer signal channel first harmonic in-phase and the second harmonic out-of-phase components are used to distinguish the radiation quality. A computational analysis, was carried out to evaluate the dependence of the first harmonic in-phase and second harmonic out-of-phase components on microwave power, modulation amplitude and relaxation times, and highlights that these components could be used to point out differences in the relaxation times. On the basis of this numerical analysis the experimental results are discussed. The methodology described in this study has the potential to provide information on radiation quality. PMID:24524346

  8. The Rhodotron, a new 10 MeV, 100 kW, cw metric wave electron accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jongen, Y.; Abs, M.; Genin, F.; Nguyen, A.; Capdevila, J. M.; Defrise, D.

    1993-06-01

    New applications for high energy, high current electron beam processing are continually expanding. Today, however, 10 MeV rf electron linacs are frequently limited to an average beam power of only 20 or 30 kW. To achieve higher beam power, CW operation and the use of lower frequencies are necessary. In the last years, the principle for a new kind of electron accelerator was developed by the Atomic Energy Agency (CEA) in France. This accelerator is based on the principle of recirculating a beam throughout a single coaxial cavity resonating in metric waves. A 3.3 MeV, 4 mA prototype has been built and successfully tested. The industrial accelerator developed by IBA in collaboration with the CEA is a 10 MeV, 100 kW beam power unit with an additional beam exit at 5 MeV. The cavity, made of copper-plated steel, will resonate at 107.5 MHz. A rf power of 100 kW is needed to produce an electric field allowing an energy gain of 1 MeV per crossing. In addition, 100 kW of power is needed for acceleration. The 200 kW output amplifier uses a 100 kW plate dissipation tetrode (TH 681 from Thomson-CSF) in a grounded grid configuration. In this paper, the design of the new model as well as the prototype manufacturing schedule are presented in more detail.

  9. Magnetic resonance angiographic evaluation of circle of Willis: A morphologic study in a tertiary hospital set up

    PubMed Central

    Naveen, Shankar Rao; Bhat, Venkatraman; Karthik, Gadabanahalli Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anatomy of circle of Willis (CW) shows wide variation in different individuals, population groups, and has vital clinical significance in causation and presentation of clinical disease. This study evaluates the anatomical variations, incidence of various common anomalies of CW in south Indian tertiary hospital set up, using three-dimensional time-of-flight (3D-TOF) magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). Materials and Methods: A total of 300 patients referred for neuroimaging study over a period of 2-year were included in the analysis. In this prospective and retrospective study, 198 men and 102 women; mean age, 55 years) underwent 3D-TOF MR angiograms of the CW using a 1.5-tesla MR scanner. Images were reviewed for anatomical configuration of the CW using maximum intensity projection (MIP) and 3D volume rendered images. Results: On analysis, a complete CW was seen in 50 (16.6%) of 300 subjects. An incomplete anterior and posterior CW was found in 66 (22%) The remaining 184 (61.3%) subjects had partially complete CW configuration. The most common type of CW in a single subject was anterior variant type A and posterior type variant E. Conclusion: We observed wide variation in CW configuration in our patients. The prevalence of complete configuration of the circle is 16.6%; slightly higher in females and younger subjects. Complete anterior circle was present in 77.3%. Most common anterior variant is type A (normal anterior configuration) with a prevalence of 66%. The most common posterior circle variant is type E (hypoplasia or absence of both PcomA) with 32.6%. Overall, CW variants are slightly more common among the women in comparison to men. Incidence of associated anomalies like aneurysm or arteriovenous malformation (AVM) was comparable to that described in literature. PMID:26713008

  10. Unstable resonators with excited converging wave

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, N. ); Weber, H. )

    1990-04-01

    This paper reports the properties of unstable resonators with an additional mirror inside or outside the resonator investigated, both experimentally and theoretically. The additional mirror excites the converging wave, and by this, output coupling is decreased without affecting beam quality. Experiments were performed with a pulsed Nd:YAG system. The theoretical model was based on the coupled Kirchhoff integrals and solved numerically. Agreement between theory and experiments indicates that this kind of resonator provides high focusability and maximum extraction efficiency simultaneously, even with low-gain media. This enables one to apply unstable resonators to solid-state lasers with low small-signal gain, like alexandrite or CW-pumped Nd:YAG.

  11. Multiphoton ionization of large water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Apicella, B.; Li, X.; Passaro, M.; Spinelli, N.; Wang, X.

    2014-05-28

    Water clusters are multimers of water molecules held together by hydrogen bonds. In the present work, multiphoton ionization in the UV range coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry has been applied to water clusters with up to 160 molecules in order to obtain information on the electronic states of clusters of different sizes up to dimensions that can approximate the bulk phase. The dependence of ion intensities of water clusters and their metastable fragments produced by laser ionization at 355 nm on laser power density indicates a (3+1)-photon resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization process. It also explains the large increase of ionization efficiency at 355 nm compared to that at 266 nm. Indeed, it was found, by applying both nanosecond and picosecond laser ionization with the two different UV wavelengths, that no water cluster sequences after n = 9 could be observed at 266 nm, whereas water clusters up to m/z 2000 Th in reflectron mode and m/z 3000 Th in linear mode were detected at 355 nm. The agreement between our findings on clusters of water, especially true in the range with n > 10, and reported data for liquid water supports the hypothesis that clusters above a critical dimension can approximate the liquid phase. It should thus be possible to study clusters just above 10 water molecules, for getting information on the bulk phase structure.

  12. Argonne CW Linac (ACWL) -- Legacy from SDI and opportunities for the future

    SciTech Connect

    McMichael, G.E.; Yule, T.J.

    1994-08-01

    The former Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) invested significant resources over a 6-year period to develop and build an accelerator to demonstrate the launching of a cw beam with characteristics suitable for a space-based Neutral Particle Beam (NPD) system. This accelerator, the CWDD (Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator) accelerator, was designed to accelerate 80 mA cw of D{sup {minus}} to 7.5 MeV. A considerable amount of hardware was constructed and installed in the Argonne-based facility, and major performance milestones were achieved before program funding from the Department of Defense ended in October 1993. Existing assets have been turned over to Argonne. Assets include a fully functional 200 kV cw D{sup {minus}} injector, a cw RFQ that has been tuned, leak checked and aligned, beam lines and a high-power beam stop, all installed in a shielded vault with appropriate safety and interlock systems. In addition, there are two high power (1 MW) cw rf amplifiers and all the ancillary power, cooling and control systems required for a high-power accelerator system. The SDI mission required that the CWDD accelerator structures operate at cryogenic temperatures (26 K), a requirement that placed severe limitations on operating period (CWDD would have provided 20 seconds of cw beam every 90 minutes). However, the accelerator structures were designed for full-power rf operation with water cooling and ACWL (Argonne Continuous Wave Linac), the new name for CWDD in its water-cooled, positive-ion configuration, will be able to operate continuously. Project status and achievements will be reviewed. Preliminary design of a proton conversion for the RFQ, and other proposals for turning ACWL into a testbed for cw-linac engineering, will be discussed.

  13. Argonne CW Linac (ACWL)—legacy from SDI and opportunities for the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMichael, G. E.; Yule, T. J.

    1995-09-01

    The former Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) invested significant resources over a 6-year period to develop and build an accelerator to demonstrate the launching of a cw beam with characteristics suitable for a space-based Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) system. This accelerator, the CWDD (Continuous Wave Deuterium Demonstrator) accelerator, was designed to accelerate 80 mA cw of D- to 7.5 MeV. A considerable amount of hardware was constructed and installed in the Argonne-based facility, and major performance milestones were achieved before program funding from the Department of Defense ended in October 1993. Existing assets have been turned over to Argonne. Assets include a fully functional 200 kV cw D- injector, a cw RFQ that has been tuned, leak checked and aligned, beam lines and a high-power beam stop, all installed in a shielded vault with appropriate safety and interlock systems. In addition, there are two high power (1 MW) cw rf amplifiers and all the ancillary power, cooling and control systems required for a high-power accelerator system. The SDI mission required that the CWDD accelerator structures operate at cryogenic temperatures (26K), a requirement that placed severe limitations on operating period (CWDD would have provided 20 seconds of cw beam every 90 minutes). However, the accelerator structures were designed for full-power rf operation with water cooling and ACWL (Argonne Continuous Wave Linac), the new name for CWDD in its water-cooled, positive-ion configuration, will be able to operate continuously. Project status and achievements will be reviewed. Preliminary design of a proton conversion for the RFQ, and other proposals for turning ACWL into a testbed for cw-linac engineering, will be discussed.

  14. Ionization of EPA Contaminants in Direct and Dopant-Assisted Atmospheric Pressure Photoionization and Atmospheric Pressure Laser Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauppila, Tiina J.; Kersten, Hendrik; Benter, Thorsten

    2015-06-01

    Seventy-seven EPA priority environmental pollutants were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) equipped with an optimized atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and an atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI) interface with and without dopants. The analyzed compounds included e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro compounds, halogenated compounds, aromatic compounds with phenolic, acidic, alcohol, and amino groups, phthalate and adipatic esters, and aliphatic ethers. Toluene, anisole, chlorobenzene, and acetone were tested as dopants. The widest range of analytes was ionized using direct APPI (66/77 compounds). The introduction of dopants decreased the amount of compounds ionized in APPI (e.g., 54/77 with toluene), but in many cases the ionization efficiency increased. While in direct APPI the formation of molecular ions via photoionization was the main ionization reaction, dopant-assisted (DA) APPI promoted ionization reactions, such as charge exchange and proton transfer. Direct APLI ionized a much smaller amount of compounds than APPI (41/77 compounds), showing selectivity towards compounds with low ionization energies (IEs) and long-lived resonantly excited intermediate states. DA-APLI, however, was able to ionize a higher amount of compounds (e.g. 51/77 with toluene), as the ionization took place entirely through dopant-assisted ion/molecule reactions similar to those in DA-APPI. Best ionization efficiency in APPI and APLI (both direct and DA) was obtained for PAHs and aromatics with O- and N-functionalities, whereas nitro compounds and aliphatic ethers were the most difficult to ionize. Halogenated aromatics and esters were (mainly) ionized in APPI, but not in APLI.

  15. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  16. Ionization sources and mass analyzers in MS imaging.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Hsuan; Menger, Robert F; Drexler, Dieter M; Yost, Richard A; Garrett, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicology study is one important step in drug discovery and development. MS imaging has become one of the popular methods in this field. Here, selected ionization methods such as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization, secondary ion MS and desorption electrospray ionization have been briefly discussed. To differentiate drug and drug metabolites from endogenous compounds present in the biological system, exact mass and/or tandem MS is necessary. As a result, mass analyzers such as time-of-flight, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance or Orbitrap are often the method of choice and are briefly introduced. PMID:26511148

  17. Multiphoton excitation of organic chromophores in microbubble resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohoon, Gregory A.; Kieu, Khanh; Norwood, Robert A.

    2014-03-01

    We report the observation of multiphoton excitation of organic chromophores in microbubble whispering gallery mode resonators. High-Q microbubble resonators are a formed by heating a pressurized fused silica capillary to form a hollow bubble which can be filled with liquid. In this case, the microbubble is filled with a solution of Rhodamine 6G dye. The resonator and dye are excited by evanescently coupling CW light from a 980nm laser diode using a tapered optical fiber. The two-photon fluorescence of the dye can be seen with pump powers as low as 1 mW.

  18. Single dose toxicity study of IRDye 800CW in Sprague-Dawley rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Milton V.; Draney, Daniel; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Olive, D. Michael

    2010-02-01

    Fluorophore-labeled contrast imaging agents are moving toward clinical use as aids in nodal staging and intraoperative resection of tumors. Near-infrared fluorophores with defined toxicity properties will be needed before these agents can be translated to the clinic. The near-infrared dye IRDye 800CW is frequently used in its N-hydroxysuccinamide (NHS) ester form for labeling these agents. Following conjugation or breakdown of a labeled ligand, excess NHS ester is converted to the carboxylate form. We report here the results of a preliminary toxicity study on IRDye 800CW carboxylate in preparation for its use as a labeling moiety for targeted contrast agents. Male and female Sprague Dawley rats were given a single intravenous or intradermal administration of IRDye 800CW carboxylate; indocyanine green was used as a comparative control. Following administration of varying doses of either the dyes or saline, animals were observed for up to fourteen days during which time, hematological, clinical chemistry, enzymological, and histological testing was performed on animal subgroups. Under the conditions tested, a single administration of IRDye 800CW carboxylate intravenously at dose levels of 1, 5 and 20 mg/kg or 20 mg/kg intradermally produced no pathological evidence of toxicity. A dose of 20 mg/kg was identified as the NOAEL (no observed adverse effect level) following IV or ID routes of administration of IRDye 800CW.

  19. Multiphoton ionization of uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, D. P.; Harkins, D. A.; Compton, R. N.; Ding, D.

    1994-01-01

    Multiphoton ionization (MPI) time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (TOFMS) and photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) studies of UF6 are reported using focused light from the Nd:YAG laser fundamental (λ=1064 nm) and its harmonics (λ=532, 355, or 266 nm), as well as other wavelengths provided by a tunable dye laser. The MPI mass spectra are dominated by the singly and multiply charged uranium ions rather than by the UF+x fragment ions, even at the lowest laser power densities at which signal could be detected. In general, the doubly charged uranium ion (U2+) intensity is much greater than that of the singly charged uranium ion (U+). For the case of the tunable dye laser experiments, the Un+ (n=1-4) wavelength dependence is relatively unstructured and does not show observable resonance enhancement at known atomic uranium excitation wavelengths. The MPI-PES studies reveal only very slow electrons (≤0.5 eV) for all wavelengths investigated. The dominance of the U2+ ion, the absence or very small intensities of UF+x (x=1-3) fragments, the unstructured wavelength dependence, and the preponderance of slow electrons all indicate that mechanisms may exist other than ionization of bare U atoms following the stepwise photodissociation of F atoms from the parent molecule. The data also argue against stepwise photodissociation of UF+x (x=5,6) ions. Neither of the traditional MPI mechanisms (``neutral ladder'' or the ``ionic ladder'') are believed to adequately describe the ionization phenomena observed. We propose that the multiphoton excitation of UF6 under these experimental conditions results in a highly excited molecule, superexcited UF6**. The excitation of highly excited UF6** is proposed to be facilitated by the well known ``giant resonance,'' whose energy level lies in the range of 12-14 eV above that of ground state UF6. The highly excited molecule then primarily dissociates, via multiple channels, into Un+, UF+x, fluorine atoms, and ``slow'' electrons, although dissociation

  20. Design considerations in achieving 1 MW CW operation with a whispering-gallery-mode gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Felch, K.; Feinstein, J.; Hess, C.; Huey, H.; Jongewaard, E.; Jory, H.; Neilson, J.; Pendleton, R.; Pirkle, D.; Zitelli, L. )

    1989-09-01

    Varian is developing high-power, CW gyrotrons at frequencies in the range 100 GHz to 150 GHz, for use in electron cyclotron heating applications. Early test vehicles have utilized a TE{sub 15,2,1} interaction cavity, have achieved short-pulse power levels of 820 kW and average power levels of 80 kW at 140 GHz. Present tests are aimed at reaching 400 kW under CW operating conditions and up to 1 MW for short pulse durations. Work is also underway on modifications to the present design that will enable power levels of up to 1 MW CW to be achieved. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  1. CW-THz image contrast enhancement using wavelet transform and Retinex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Zhang, Min; Hu, Qi-fan; Huang, Ying-Xue; Liang, Hua-Wei

    2015-10-01

    To enhance continuous wave terahertz (CW-THz) scanning images contrast and denoising, a method based on wavelet transform and Retinex theory was proposed. In this paper, the factors affecting the quality of CW-THz images were analysed. Second, an approach of combination of the discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and a designed nonlinear function in wavelet domain for the purpose of contrast enhancing was applied. Then, we combine the Retinex algorithm for further contrast enhancement. To evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed method in qualitative and quantitative, it was compared with the adaptive histogram equalization method, the homomorphic filtering method and the SSR(Single-Scale-Retinex) method. Experimental results demonstrated that the presented algorithm can effectively enhance the contrast of CW-THZ image and obtain better visual effect.

  2. The experimental study of a CW 1080 nm multi-point pump fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuexia; Ge, Tingwu; Ding, Xing; Tan, Qirui; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we report on a CW 1080 nm fiber laser cascaded-pumped by a CW 975 nm diode laser. The fiber used in the experiment has a core diameter of 20 μm (NA  =  0.06), inner clad of 400 μm (NA  =  0.46), and an absorption coefficient of about 1.26 dB m‑1 at 975 nm. An output power of 780 W with an optical conversion efficiency of 71% has been achieved at a pump light of 1.1 kW. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that a 1080 nm CW fiber laser has used a cascaded-pump coupler.

  3. Development of voids in pulsed and CW- driven reactive plasmas with large nanoparticle density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanović, I.; Sikimić, B.; Aschinger, A.; Berndt, J.; Kovačević, E.; Winter, J.

    2015-09-01

    This contribution deals with the nanoparticle distribution inside of plasma with large nanoparticle density. In particular, the formation of voids i.e. dust-free regions in pulsed and CW discharge regime is analyzed. The discharge was ignited in a mixture of argon and acetylene in the conditions favorable for nanoparticles’ formation and growth. The temporal evolution of the spatial distribution of nanoparticles during their growth is studied experimentally by means of a laser light scattering technique. The experimental results show that the void expands much faster in the case of pulsed plasma than in the CW plasma operated for the same gas mixture and at the same (average) input power. In the CW plasma, we observed a rapid expansion of the void after some tens of minutes, whereas the corresponding process in the pulsed plasma occurred after some tens of seconds.

  4. Installation of a cw radiofrequency quadrupole accelerator at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.D.; Bolme, J.; Brown, V.

    1994-09-01

    Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) has had a long history of cw proton beam development for production of intense neutron sources and fissile fuel breeders. In 1986 CRL and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) entered into a collaborative effort to establish a base technologies program for the development of a cw radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ). The initial cw RFQ design had 50-keV proton injection energy with 600-keV output energy. The 75-mA design current at 600-keV beam energy was obtained in 1990. Subsequently, the RFQ output energy was increased to 1250 keV by replacing the RFQ vanes, still maintaining the 75-m A design current. A new 250-kW cw klystrode rf power source at 267-MHz was installed at CRL. By April of 1993, 55-mA proton beams had been accelerated to 1250 keV. Concurrent developments were taking place on proton source development and on 50-keV low-energy beam transport (LEBT) systems. Development of a dc, high-proton fraction ({ge} 70%) microwave ion source led to utilization of a single-solenoid RFQ direct injection scheme. It was decided to continue this cw RFQ demonstration project at Los Alamos when the CRL project was terminated in April 1993. The LANL goals are to find the current limit of the 1250-keV RFQ, better understand the beam transport properties through the single-solenoid focusing LEBT, continue the application of the cw klystrode tube technology to accelerators, and develop a two-solenoid LEBT which could be the front end of an Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies (ADTT) linear accelerator.

  5. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The "magic" that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers.

  6. "Magic" Ionization Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The systematic study of the temperature and pressure dependence of matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) led us to the discovery of the seemingly impossible, initially explained by some reviewers as either sleight of hand or the misinterpretation by an overzealous young scientist of results reported many years before and having little utility. The “magic” that we were attempting to report was that with matrix assistance, molecules, at least as large as bovine serum albumin (66 kDa), are lifted into the gas phase as multiply charged ions simply by exposure of the matrix:analyte sample to the vacuum of a mass spectrometer. Applied heat, a laser, or voltages are not necessary to achieve charge states and ion abundances only previously observed with electrospray ionization (ESI). The fundamentals of how solid phase volatile or nonvolatile compounds are converted to gas-phase ions without added energy currently involves speculation providing a great opportunity to rethink mechanistic understanding of ionization processes used in mass spectrometry. Improved understanding of the mechanism(s) of these processes and their connection to ESI and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization may provide opportunities to further develop new ionization strategies for traditional and yet unforeseen applications of mass spectrometry. This Critical Insights article covers developments leading to the discovery of a seemingly magic ionization process that is simple to use, fast, sensitive, robust, and can be directly applied to surface characterization using portable or high performance mass spectrometers. PMID:26486514

  7. Alkali metal ionization detector

    DOEpatents

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  8. Theoretical study of cw to short pulse conversion in an active cw-injected ring cavity with a Yb3+:YAG amplifier.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhiyun; Bourdet, Gilbert L

    2007-05-10

    The short laser pulse generated from an active cw-injected ring cavity with Yb3+:YAG crystal, which is treated as the homogeneously broadened amplifier, is studied theoretically. Based on the derived results, the impacts of the amplifier length, the seeding laser intensity and frequency, the pump intensity, the efficiency of the acousto-optic modulator (AOM), and the frequency shift generated by the AOM on the performance of the laser pulse are analyzed. PMID:17446920

  9. Admittance Test and Conceptual Study of a CW Positron Source for CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Golge, Serkan; Hyde, Charles E.; Freyberger, Arne

    2009-09-02

    A conceptual study of a Continuous Wave (CW) positron production is presented in this paper. The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab (JLAB) operates with a CW electron beam with a well-defined emittance, time structure and energy spread. Positrons created via bremsstrahlung photons in a high-Z target emerge with a large emittance compared to incoming electron beam. An admittance study has been performed at CEBAF to estimate the maximum beam phase space area that can be transported in the LINAC and in the Arcs. A positron source is described utilizing the CEBAF injector electron beam, and directly injecting the positrons into the CEBAF LINAC.

  10. Design of a Ka Band 35 kW CW Low-Voltage Harmonic Gyrotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Pu-Kun; Su, Yi Nong; Xu, Shou Xi; Xue, Qian Zhong

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a continuous wave (CW) low-voltage second harmonic gyrotron with the conventional cavity has been preliminarily designed and evaluated with self-consistent nonlinear simulation code and the particle-in-cell code CHIPIC. The simulation results of the two codes are shown to be in agreement basically. The 35 kW CW output power of the designed harmonic gyrotron driven by a 25 kV 5.0A electron beam from a magnetron injection gun (MIG) is obtained. The maximum output power and the electronic efficiency of the gyrotron is about 35 kW and 30% respectively.

  11. Passively cooled diode lasers in the cw power range of 120 to 200W

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzen, Dirk; Meusel, Jens; Schröder, Dominic; Hennig, Petra

    2008-02-01

    Improvements of laser diode bar efficiency and mounting technology have boosted output powers of passively cooled diode lasers beyond the 100W cw limit. After an introduction about reliablity statements and reliability assessment, the performance increase by technology improvements is documented in current-step failure discrimination tests. Electro-optical parameters of improved diode lasers are subsequently presented in detail as well as the results of lifetime tests at different powers and in different operation modes - steady-state and repetitive/intermittent ("hard pulse") cw operation.

  12. Effect of CW YAG and argon green lasers on experimentally detached retinas.

    PubMed

    Peyman, G A; Conway, M D; House, B J

    1984-06-01

    We evaluated the effects of argon-green (514.5 nm) and CW neodymium YAG (1060 nm) wavelengths on experimentally detached retinas of primates. Neither laser produced damage to the sensory retina of the fovea. The argon green wavelength, which was absorbed by haemoglobin in the vessel or by extravasated red blood cells, created vasospasm and nerve fiber layer damage. The beam of the CW YAG was not absorbed by haemoglobin; therefore, no vasospasm could be produced on experimentally detached retinas. PMID:6547800

  13. Modulated Sine Waves for Differential Absorption Measurements Using a CW Laser System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F. (Inventor); Lin, Bing (Inventor); Nehrir, Amin R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A continuous wave Light Detection and Ranging (CW LiDAR) system utilizes two or more laser frequencies and time or range shifted pseudorandom noise (PN) codes to discriminate between the laser frequencies. The performance of these codes can be improved by subtracting out the bias before processing. The CW LiDAR system may be mounted to an artificial satellite orbiting the earth, and the relative strength of the return signal for each frequency can be utilized to determine the concentration of selected gases or other substances in the atmosphere.

  14. Effect of scanned quasi-cw CO2 laser irradiation on tissue thermal damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domankevitz, Yacov; Bua, Dominic; Chung, Jina; Hanel, Edward; Silver, Geoffrey; Nishioka, Norman S.

    1994-08-01

    Residual thermal damage produced by a scanned quasi cw CO2 laser was measured in pig skin. The effects of scan speed on thermal damage distribution for laser dwell times ranging between 1 and 150 msec were examined. Significantly larger thermal damage zones were produced along the crater wall for laser dwell times longer than 50 msec. Thermal damage along the crater base was constant independent of dwell time. The preliminary experimental results suggest that quasi cw CO2 can consistently produce less than 200 micrometers zones of thermal damage if laser parameters are carefully chosen.

  15. Diode pumped CW and passively Q-switched Nd:LGGG laser at 1062 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, H.; Jia, Z. T.; Zhang, B. T.; He, J. L.; Liu, S. D.; Yang, Y.; Tao, X. T.

    2012-05-01

    We report a Nd:LGGG laser at 1062 nm in the operations of the continuous-wave (CW) and passively Q-switching. The maximum CW output power of 5.62 W was obtained, corresponding to an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 49.0% and slope efficiency of 55.9%. By using Cr4+:YAG with initial transmission of 94% as the saturable absorber, for the first time, we got the maximum passively Q-switched output power of 1.21 W, accompanied with a highest pulse repetition rate of 27.1 kHz and a shortest pulse width of 9.1 ns.

  16. 219.3 W CW diode-side-pumped 1123 nm Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. Y.; Bo, Y.; Xu, Y. T.; Yang, F.; Wang, Z. C.; Wang, B. S.; Xu, J. L.; Gao, H. W.; Peng, Q. J.; Cui, D. F.; Xu, Z. Y.

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate a high power continuous wave (CW) diode-side-pumped Nd:YAG laser operating at 1123 nm with a plano-plano configuration. By means of precise coating, a single 1123 nm wavelength is achieved. Under the pump power of 1080 W, an output power of 219.3 W is obtained, which corresponds to an optical-optical conversion efficiency of 20.3%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest output power for CW 1123 nm laser based on Nd:YAG crystal.

  17. DNA strand breaks are not induced in human cells exposed to 2.1425 GHz band CW and W-CDMA modulated radiofrequency fields allocated to mobile radio base stations.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, N; Komatsubara, Y; Takeda, H; Hirose, H; Sekijima, M; Nojima, T; Miyakoshi, J

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a large-scale in vitro study focused on the effects of low level radiofrequency (RF) fields from mobile radio base stations employing the International Mobile Telecommunication 2000 (IMT-2000) cellular system in order to test the hypothesis that modulated RF fields may act as a DNA damaging agent. First, we evaluated the responses of human cells to microwave exposure at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 80 mW/kg, which corresponds to the limit of the average whole body SAR for general public exposure defined as a basic restriction in the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines. Second, we investigated whether continuous wave (CW) and Wideband Code Division Multiple Access (W-CDMA) modulated signal RF fields at 2.1425 GHz induced different levels of DNA damage. Human glioblastoma A172 cells and normal human IMR-90 fibroblasts from fetal lungs were exposed to mobile communication frequency radiation to investigate whether such exposure produced DNA strand breaks in cell culture. A172 cells were exposed to W-CDMA radiation at SARs of 80, 250, and 800 mW/kg and CW radiation at 80 mW/kg for 2 and 24 h, while IMR-90 cells were exposed to both W-CDMA and CW radiations at a SAR of 80 mW/kg for the same time periods. Under the same RF field exposure conditions, no significant differences in the DNA strand breaks were observed between the test groups exposed to W-CDMA or CW radiation and the sham exposed negative controls, as evaluated immediately after the exposure periods by alkaline comet assays. Our results confirm that low level exposures do not act as a genotoxicant up to a SAR of 800 mW/kg. PMID:16283663

  18. Efficient upconversion of subterahertz radiation in a high-Q whispering gallery resonator.

    PubMed

    Strekalov, D V; Savchenkov, A A; Matsko, A B; Yu, N

    2009-03-15

    We demonstrate efficient upconversion of subterahertz radiation into the optical domain in a high-Q whispering gallery mode resonator with quadratic optical nonlinearity. The 5x10(-3) power conversion efficiency of a cw 100 GHz signal is achieved with only 16 mW of optical pump. PMID:19282908

  19. Fuel cell with ionization membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartley, Frank T. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A fuel cell is disclosed comprising an ionization membrane having at least one area through which gas is passed, and which ionizes the gas passing therethrough, and a cathode for receiving the ions generated by the ionization membrane. The ionization membrane may include one or more openings in the membrane with electrodes that are located closer than a mean free path of molecules within the gas to be ionized. Methods of manufacture are also provided.

  20. Identification, Composition, and Asymmetric Formation Mechanism of Glycidyl Methacrylate/Butyl Methacrylate Copolymers up to 7000 Da from Electrospray Ionization Ultrahigh-Resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shi, S D; Hendrickson, C L; Marshall, A G; Simonsick, W J; Aaserud, D J

    1998-08-01

    Glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) and butyl methacrylate (BMA) have the same nominal mass (142 Da) but differ in exact mass by 0.036 Da (CH(4) vs O). Therefore, copolymers formed from the two isobaric monomers exhibit a characteristic isobaric distribution due to different monomer compositions. Here, we show that electrospray ionization FT-ICR mass spectrometry at 9.4 T resolves the isobaric components of copolymers as large as 7000 Da with a resolving power (m/Δm(50%)) of ∼500 000 in a gel permeation chromatography fractionated polymer sample. That resolution provides for complete and unequivocal component analysis of such copolymers of the size used for high solid content automobile coatings. All five possible copolymer products predicted by the polymerization mechanism are resolved and identified in the mass spectrum. Two of those polymer series (each with saturated end group) were previously unresolved by mass spectrometry because they differ in mass from the two other unsaturated products by only 0.0089 Da. Finally, analysis of the asymmetrical isobaric distribution for the copolymer n-mers, (GMA)(m)(BMA)(n)(-)(m), 0≤ m ≤ n, in which species with adjacent values of m differ from each other in mass by 36 mDa (i.e., the mass difference, CH(4) vs O, between GMA and BMA) proves that GMA is less reactive than BMA in the polymerization process. PMID:21644659

  1. Surface ionization of terpene hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Zandberg, E.Y.; Nezdyurov, A.L.; Paleev, V.I.; Ponomarev, D.A.

    1986-09-01

    By means of a surface ionization indicator for traces of materials in the atmosphere it has been established that many natural materials containing terpenes and their derivatives are ionized on the surface of heated molybdenum oxide at atmospheric air pressure. A mass-spectrometer method has been used to explain the mechanism of ionization of individual terpene hydrocarbons and to establish its principles. The ionization of ..cap alpha..-pinene, alloocimene, camphene, and also adamantane on oxidized tungsten under vacuum conditions has been investigated. The ..cap alpha..-pinene and alloocimene are ionized by surface ionization but camphene and adamantane are not ionized under vacuum conditions. The surface ionization mass spectra of ..cap alpha..-pinene and alloocimene are of low line brightness in comparison with electron ionization mass spectra and differ between themselves. The temperature relations for currents of the same compositions of ions during ionization of ..cap alpha..-pinene and alloocimene are also different, which leads to the possibility of surface ionization analysis of mixtures of terpenes being ionized. The ionization coefficients of alloocimene and ..cap alpha..-pinene on oxidized tungsten under temperatures optimum for ionization and the ionization potentials of alloocimene molecules and of radicals (M-H) of both compounds have been evaluated.

  2. Nanoslit cavity plasmonic modes and built-in fields enhance the CW THz radiation in an unbiased antennaless photomixers array.

    PubMed

    Mohammad-Zamani, Mohammad Javad; Neshat, Mohammad; Moravvej-Farshi, Mohammad Kazem

    2016-01-15

    A new generation unbiased antennaless CW terahertz (THz) photomixer emitters array made of asymmetric metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) gratings with a subwavelength pitch, operating in the optical near-field regime, is proposed. We take advantage of size effects in near-field optics and electrostatics to demonstrate the possibility of enhancing the THz power by 4 orders of magnitude, compared to a similar unbiased antennaless array of the same size that operates in the far-field regime. We show that, with the appropriate choice of grating parameters in such THz sources, the first plasmonic resonant cavity mode in the nanoslit between two adjacent MSMs can enhance the optical near-field absorption and, hence, the generation of photocarriers under the slit in the active medium. These photocarriers, on the other hand, are accelerated by the large built-in electric field sustained under the nanoslits by two dissimilar Schottky barriers to create the desired large THz power that is mainly radiated downward. The proposed structure can be tuned in a broadband frequency range of 0.1-3 THz, with output power increasing with frequency. PMID:26766729

  3. Development and testing of a CW-EPR apparatus for imaging of short-lifetime nitroxyl radicals in mouse head

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato-Akaba, Hideo; Fujii, Hirotada; Hirata, Hiroshi

    2008-08-01

    This article describes a method for reducing the acquisition time in three-dimensional (3D) continuous-wave electron paramagnetic resonance (CW-EPR) imaging. To visualize nitroxyl spin probes, which have a short lifetime in living organisms, the acquisition time for a data set of spectral projections should be shorter than the lifetime of the spin probes. To decrease the total time required for data acquisition, the duration of magnetic field scanning was reduced to 0.5 s. Moreover, the number of projections was decreased by using the concept of a uniform distribution. To demonstrate this faster data acquisition, two kinds of nitroxyl radicals with different decay rates were measured in mice. 3D EPR imaging of 4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-d 17-1- 15N-1-oxyl in mouse head was successfully carried out. 3D EPR imaging of nitroxyl spin probes with a half-life of a few minutes was achieved for the first time in live animals.

  4. CFD assisted simulation of temperature distribution and laser power in pulsed and CW pumped static gas DPALs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waichman, Karol; Barmashenko, Boris D.; Rosenwaks, Salman

    2015-10-01

    An analysis of radiation, kinetic and fluid dynamic processes in diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs) is reported. The analysis is based on a three-dimensional, time-dependent computational fluid dynamics (3D CFD) model. The CFD code which solves the gas conservation equations includes effects of natural convection and temperature diffusion of the species in the DPAL mixture. The gas flow conservation equations are coupled to the equations for DPAL kinetics and to the Beer-Lambert equations for pump and laser beams propagation. The DPAL kinetic processes in the Cs/CH4 (K/He) gas mixtures considered involve the three low energy levels, (1) n2S1/2, (2) n2P3/2 and (3) n2P1/2 (where n=4,6 for K and Cs, respectively), three excited alkali states and two alkali ionic states. Using the CFD model, the gas flow pattern and spatial distributions of the pump and laser intensities in the resonator were calculated for end-pumped CW and pulsed Cs and K DPALs. The DPAL power and medium temperature were calculated as a function of pump power and pump pulse duration. The CFD model results were compared to experimental results of Cs and K DPALs.

  5. A capacitive probe for Electron Spin Resonance detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloisi, Giovanni; Dolci, David; Carlà, Marcello; Mannini, Matteo; Piuzzi, Barbara; Caneschi, Andrea

    2016-02-01

    The use of the magnetic field associated with Maxwell displacement current in a capacitor is proposed for the detection of Electron Spin Resonance. A probe based on this concept is realized and successfully tested with CW radio-frequency in the band going from 200 MHz to 1 GHz with a DPPH sample. A significant increase of Signal to Noise Ratio is observed while increasing the frequency.

  6. Atmospheric Ionization Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slack, Thomas; Mayes, Riley

    2015-04-01

    The measurement of atmospheric ionization is a largely unexplored science that potentially holds the key to better understanding many different geophysical phenomena through this new and valuable source of data. Through the LaACES program, which is funded by NASA through the Louisiana Space Consortium, students at Loyola University New Orleans have pursued the goal of measuring high altitude ionization for nearly three years, and were the first to successfully collect ionization data at altitudes over 30,000 feet using a scientific weather balloon flown from the NASA Columbia Scientific Ballooning Facility in Palestine, TX. In order to measure atmospheric ionization, the science team uses a lightweight and highly customized sensor known as a Gerdien condenser. Among other branches of science the data is already being used for, such as the study of aerosol pollution levels in the atmosphere, the data may also be useful in meteorology and seismology. Ionization data might provide another variable with which to predict weather or seismic activity more accurately and further in advance. Thomas Slack and Riley Mayes have served as project managers for the experiment, and have extensive knowledge of the experiment from the ground up. LaSPACE Louisiana Space Consortium.

  7. Laser-Induced Ionization Efficiency Enhancement On A Filament For Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Siegfried, M.

    2015-10-14

    The evaluation of trace Uranium and Plutonium isotope ratios for nanogram to femtogram material quantities is a vital tool for nuclear counter-proliferation and safeguard activities. Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) is generally accepted as the state of the art technology for highly accurate and ultra-trace measurements of these actinide ratios. However, the very low TIMS ionization yield (typically less than 1%) leaves much room for improvement. Enhanced ionization of Nd and Sm from a TIMS filament was demonstrated using wavelength resonance with a nanosecond (pulse width) laser operating at 10 Hz when light was directed toward the filament.1 For this study, femtosecond and picosecond laser capabilities were to be employed to study the dissociation and ionization mechanisms of actinides/lanthanides and measure the enhanced ionization of the metal of interest. Since the underlying chemistry of the actinide/lanthanide carbides produced and dissociated on a TIMS filament is not well understood, the experimental parameters affecting the photodissociation and photoionization with one and two laser beams were to be investigated.

  8. Upper Hybrid Effects in Artificial Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, K.; Eliasson, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    A most fascinating result of recent ionospheric experiments has been the discovery of artificial ionization by Pedersen et al. (GRL, 37, L02106, 2010). The Artificial Ionospheric Layers (AIL) were the result of F-region O-mode HF irradiation using the HAARP ionospheric heater operating at 3.6 MW power. As demonstrated by Eliasson et al. (JGR, 117, A10321, 2012) the physics controlling the observed phenomenon and its threshold can be summarized as: " Collisional ionization due to high energy (~ 20 eV) electron tails generated by the interaction of strong Langmuir turbulence with plasma heated at the upper hybrid resonance and transported at the reflection height". The objective of the current presentation is to explore the role of the upper hybrid heating in the formation of AIL and its implications to future experiments involving HF heaters operating in middle and equatorial latitudes.

  9. EXPOSURE OF RATS TO 425-MHZ (CW) RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION: EFFECTS ON LYMPHOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four experiments were performed in which six pregnant rats were exposed from day 12 of pregnancy to parturition, for 4 hours a day in a temperature-controlled environment, to 425-MHz (CW) radiation, using a multimode rectangular strip transmission line. Four male pups born to eac...

  10. Proton beam studies with a 1.25 MeV, cw radio frequency quadrupole linac

    SciTech Connect

    Bolme, G.O.; Hardek, T.W.; Hansborough, L.D.

    1998-12-31

    A high-current, cw linear accelerator has been proposed as a spallation neutron source driver for tritium production. Key features of this accelerator are high current (100 mA), low emittance-growth beam propagation, cw operation, high efficiency, and minimal maintenance downtime. A 268 MHz, cw radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) LINAC section and klystrode based rf system were obtained from the Chalk River Laboratories and were previously installed at LANL to support systems development and advanced studies in support of cw, proton accelerators. A variation of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA) proton injector, modified to operate at 50 keV, was mated to the RFQ and was operated to support advance developments for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program. High current, proton beam studies were completed which focused on the details of injector-RFQ integration, development of beam diagnostics, development of operations procedures, and personnel and equipment safety systems integration. This development led to acceleration of up to 100 mA proton beam.

  11. CHRONIC EXPOSURE OF RATS TO 100-MHZ (CW) RADIOFREQUENCY RADIATION: ASSESSMENT OF BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multidisciplinary approach was employed to assess the possible biological effects of chronic exposure of rats to 100-MHz continuous wave (CW) radiofrequency (RF) radiation. A group of 20 time-bred rats were exposed in a transverse electronmagnetic mode (TEM) transmission line t...

  12. The CW domain, a new histone recognition module in chromatin proteins.

    PubMed

    Hoppmann, Verena; Thorstensen, Tage; Kristiansen, Per Eugen; Veiseth, Silje Veie; Rahman, Mohummad Aminur; Finne, Kenneth; Aalen, Reidunn B; Aasland, Rein

    2011-05-18

    Post-translational modifications of the N-terminal histone tails, including lysine methylation, have key roles in regulation of chromatin and gene expression. A number of protein modules have been identified that recognize differentially modified histone tails and provide their proteins with the capacity to sense such modifications. Here, we identify the CW domain of plant and animal chromatin-related proteins as a novel module that recognizes different methylated states of lysine 4 on histone H3 (H3K4me). The solution structure of the CW domain of the Arabidopsis ASH1 HOMOLOG2 (ASHH2) histone methyltransferase provides insight into how different CW domains can distinguish different methylated histone tails. We provide evidence that ASHH2 is acting on H3K4me-marked genes, allowing for ASHH2-dependent H3K36 tri-methylation, which contributes to sustained expression of tissue-specific and developmentally regulated genes. This suggests that ASHH2 is a combined 'reader' and 'writer' of the histone code. We propose that different CW domains, dependent on their specificity for different H3K4 methylations, are important for epigenetic memory or participate in switching between permissive and repressive chromatin states. PMID:21522130

  13. Development of a high average power, CW, MM-wave FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Ramian, G.

    1995-12-31

    Important operational attributes of FELs remain to be demonstrated including high average power and single-frequency, extremely narrow-linewidth lasing. An FEL specifically designed to achieve these goals for scientific research applications is currently under construction. Its most salient feature is operation in a continuous-wave (CW) mode with an electrostatically generated, high-current, recirculating, DC electron beam.

  14. Red-light-emitting laser diodes operating CW at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kressel, H.; Hawrylo, F. Z.

    1976-01-01

    Heterojunction laser diodes of AlGaAs have been prepared with threshold current densities substantially below those previously achieved at room temperature in the 7200-8000-A spectral range. These devices operate continuously with simple oxide-isolated stripe contacts to 7400 A, which extends CW operation into the visible (red) portion of the spectrum.

  15. Topological Invariants and CW Complexes of Cartesian Product and Hexagonal Tiling Paces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, Juan García

    2011-09-01

    The cohomology of a class of cartesian product tiling spaces in N dimensions when the inflation factor is a Pisot-Vijayaraghavan unit is analyzed. A CW complex for an hexagonal tiling space is defined in terms of collared tiles for the study of its topological invariants.

  16. Characterization of High-power Quasi-cw Laser Diode Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark A.; Vasilyev, Aleksey; Troupaki, Elisavet; Allan, Graham R.; Kashem, Nasir B.

    2005-01-01

    NASA s requirements for high reliability, high performance satellite laser instruments have driven the investigation of many critical components; specifically, 808 nm laser diode array (LDA) pump devices. Performance and comprehensive characterization data of Quasi-CW, High-power, laser diode arrays is presented.

  17. Method for generating high-energy and high repetition rate laser pulses from CW amplifiers

    DOEpatents

    Zhang, Shukui

    2013-06-18

    A method for obtaining high-energy, high repetition rate laser pulses simultaneously using continuous wave (CW) amplifiers is described. The method provides for generating micro-joule level energy in pico-second laser pulses at Mega-hertz repetition rates.

  18. Use of Self-Management with the CW-FIT Group Contingency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamps, Debra; Conklin, Carl; Wills, Howard

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of self-management as a tier two enhancement to the group contingency intervention, Class-Wide Function-related Intervention Teams Program (CW-FIT). Two classrooms, first and fourth grade, and two students in each of the classrooms participated in the intervention. The group contingency…

  19. Class-Wide Function-Related Intervention Teams "CW-FIT" Efficacy Trial Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamps, Debra; Wills, Howard; Dawson-Bannister, Harriett; Heitzman-Powell, Linda; Kottwitz, Esther; Hansen, Blake; Fleming, Kandace

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the efficacy of the Class-Wide Function-Related Intervention Teams (CW-FIT) program for improving students' on-task behavior, and increasing teacher recognition of appropriate behavior. The intervention is a group contingency classroom management program consisting of teaching and reinforcing appropriate…

  20. Harmonic generation in the free-electron laser. II. cw calculation for the linearly polarized wiggler

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Abawi, H.; Moore, G.T.; Scully, M.O.

    1982-01-01

    Harmonic generation in the free-electron laser offers a possible means to extend the wavelength range of the device towards high frequency. Numerical solutions to the basic equations describing this process are shown for cw operation using a linearly polarized wiggler. Higher harmonic emission becomes enhanced as the magnetic field is increased and as the energy spread in the electron beam is reduced.