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Sample records for cyanide plant foundations

  1. OVERVIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS, ZINC BOXES, TANKS, AND TAILINGS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS, ZINC BOXES, TANKS, AND TAILINGS PILES, LOOKING NORTHEAST. THE LOWER TRAM TERMINAL AND MILL SITE IS AT TOP CENTER IN THE DISTANCE. THE DARK SPOT JUST BELOW THE TRAM TERMINAL ARE REMAINS OF THE DEWATERING BUILDING. THE MAIN ACCESS ROAD IS AT UPPER LEFT. THE FOUNDATIONS AT CENTER SUPPORTED SIX 25 FT. OR GREATER DIAMETER SETTLING TANKS WHERE TAILINGS FROM THE MILL SETTLED IN A CYANIDE SOLUTION IN ORDER TO RECLAIM ANY GOLD CONTENT. THE PREGNANT SOLUTION WAS THEN RUN THROUGH THE ZINC BOXES ON THE GROUND AT CENTER RIGHT, WHERE ZINC SHAVINGS WERE INTRODUCED, CAUSING THE GOLD TO PRECIPITATE OUT OF THE CYANIDE SOLUTION, WHICH COULD BE USED AGAIN. THE FLAT AREA IN THE FOREGROUND WITH THE TANK AND TANK HOOPS IS THE FOOTPRINT OF A LARGE BUILDING WHERE THE PRECIPITATION AND FURTHER FILTERING AND FINAL CASTING TOOK PLACE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  2. TOP VIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS. ZINC BOXES, TANKS, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOP VIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS. ZINC BOXES, TANKS, AND TAILINGS PILES, LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM MAIN ACCESS ROAD. THE FOUNDATIONS AT CENTER SUPPORTED SIX 25 FT. OR GREATER DIAMETER SETTLING TANKS. IN THE FOREGROUND ARE REMAINS OF TWO PREPARATION TANKS AT LEFT NEXT TO A BUILDING FOOTPRINT AT RIGHT. ZINC BOXES ARE JUST ABOVE THE PREPARATION TANKS ON LEFT. THE WATER TANK AT CENTER IS NEARBY A SHAFT. THE COLLAPSED TANK JUST IN FRONT OF THE WATER TANK IS ANOTHER WATER HOLDING TANK THAT CONNECTS DIRECTLY TO THE PIPELINE THAT CARRIED WATER FROM A NEARBY SPRING A QUARTER MILE OFF TO THE RIGHT (SEE CA-291-41 FOR DETAIL). THE LEFT OF THE CENTER WATER TANK IS A LARGE TAILINGS PILE. DEATH VALLEY IS IN THE DISTANCE. SEE CA-291-40 FOR IDENTICAL B&W NEGATIVE. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  3. TOP VIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS, ZINC BOXES, TANKS, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TOP VIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS, ZINC BOXES, TANKS, AND TAILINGS PILES, LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM MAIN ACCESS ROAD. THE FOUNDATIONS AT CENTER SUPPORTED SIX 25 FT. OR GREATER DIAMETER SETTLING TANKS. IN THE FOREGROUND ARE REMAINS OF TWO PREPARATION TANKS AT LEFT NEXT TO A BUILDING FOOTPRINT AT RIGHT. ZINC BOXES ARE JUST ABOVE THE PREPARATION TANKS ON LEFT. THE WATER TANK AT CENTER IS NEARBY A SHAFT. THE COLLAPSED TANK JUST IN FRONT OF THE WATER TANK IS ANOTHER WATER HOLDING TANK THAT CONNECTS DIRECTLY TO THE PIPELINE THAT CARRIED WATER FROM A NEARBY SPRING A QUARTER MILE OFF TO THE RIGHT (SEE CA-291-41 FOR DETAIL). THE LEFT OF THE CENTER WATER TANK IS A LARGE TAILINGS PILE. DEATH VALLEY IS IN THE DISTANCE. SEE CA-291-53 (CT) FOR IDENTICAL COLOR TRANSPARENCY. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  4. OVERVIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT REMAINS, TAILINGS PILES, PARKING LOT, AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF CYANIDE PLANT REMAINS, TAILINGS PILES, PARKING LOT, AND MINE MANAGER'S HOME, LOOKING SOUTH SOUTHEAST. RIGHT, TAILINGS PILES ARE AT CENTER WITH CYANIDE PLANT FOUNDATIONS TO THE LEFT OF THE PILES. PARKING LOT IS AT UPPER LEFT. THE AREA BETWEEN THE COLLAPSED TANK AT CENTER LEFT AND THE REMAINS OF THE MANAGER'S HOUSE AT LOWER RIGHT IS A TAILINGS HOLDING AREA. TAILINGS FROM THE MILL WERE HELD HERE. THE LARGE SETTLING TANKS WERE CHARGED FROM THIS HOLDING AREA BY A TRAM ON RAILS AND BY A SLUICEWAY SEEN AS THE DARK SPOT ON THE CENTER LEFT EDGE OF THE FRAME. AFTER THE TAILINGS WERE LEACHED, THEY WERE DEPOSITED ON THE LARGE WASTE PILE AT CENTER RIGHT. THE TANK AT CENTER RIGHT EDGE IS WHERE THE WATER PIPELINE ENTERED THE WORKS. A STRAIGHT LINE OF POSTS IN THE GROUND GO ACROSS THE CENTER FROM LEFT TO RIGHT, WHICH ORIGINALLY SUSPENDED THE WATER PIPELINE GOING FROM THE WATER HOLDING TANK AT RIGHT UP TO THE SECONDARY WATER TANKS ABOVE THE MILL. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  5. Physiologically available cyanide (PAC) in manufactured gas plant waste and soil samples

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, B.; Taft, A.; Ratliff, W.; Kelley, J.; Sullivan, J.; Pancorbo, O.

    1995-12-31

    Iron-complexed cyanide compounds, such as ferri-ferrocyanide (Prussian Blue), are wastes associated with former manufactured gas plant (MGP) facilities. When tested for total cyanide, these wastes often show a high total cyanide content. Because simple cyanide salts are acutely toxic, cyanide compounds can be the subject of concern. However, Prussian Blue and related species are known to have a low order of human and animal toxicity. Toxicology data on complexed cyanides will be presented. Another issue regarding Prussian Blue and related species is that the total cyanide method does not accurately represent the amount of free cyanide released from these cyanide species. The method involves boiling the sample in an acidic solution under vacuum to force the formation of HCN gas. Thus, Prussian Blue, which is known to be low in toxicity, cannot be properly evaluated with current methods. The Massachusetts Natural Gas Council initiated a program with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection to develop a method that would define the amount of cyanide that is able to be converted into hydrogen cyanide under the pH conditions of the stomach. It is demonstrated that less than 1% of the cyanide present in Prussian Blue samples and soils from MGP sites can be converted to HCN under the conditions of the human stomach. The physiologically available cyanide method has been designed to be executed at a higher temperature for one hour. It is shown that physiologically available cyanide in MGP samples is < 5--15% of total cyanide.

  6. Remediation of manufactured gas plant soils contaminated with free and complex cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Maka, A.; Aronstein, B.N.; Srivastava, V.J.; Theis, T.L.; Young, T.C.

    1992-12-31

    Cyanide is one of the main contaminants present in soil from manufactured gas plants (MGP) . Several treatment methods including thermal treatment, chemical treatment, ultraviolet irradiation, and biological treatment were evaluated for their ability to degrade the cyanide present in these soils. In the thermal treatment, raising the temperature of the purified waste to 2000--3000C resulted in complete removal of complex cyanide from the soil; however, the cyanide emitted was in a the toxic gaseous HCN form. Chemical treatment, using the oxidant Fenton`s reagent in a 10% soil slurry, resulted in the destruction of 80% of the free cyanide but little, if any, complex cyanide. Ultraviolet irradiation of the basic leachate from MGP wastes in the presence of the chelating agent EDTA yielded 90% degradation of the complex cyanide. For biological treatment, using an aerobic mixed culture, almost 60% of the free cyanide disappeared from the system with minimal degradation of the complex cyanide. Each treatment has its limitations. Thus, a combined physical-chemical-biological treatment in which the complex cyanide is degraded to free cyanide by photodegradation under alkaline conditions, the free cyanide then chemically (by Fenton`s reagent) or biologically converted to NH{sub 3} and CO{sub 2}, is proposed for the removal of cyanide from MGP sites.

  7. Role of algae and higher aquatic plants in decontamination of cyanide-containing waters

    SciTech Connect

    Timofeeva, S.S.; Kraeva, V.Z.; Men'shikova, O.A.

    1986-09-01

    Cyanide compounds and especially free cyanides stand out among components of wastewaters of hydrometallurgy, electroforming, and other such enterprises with respect to toxicity and danger for man and fauna of water bodies. In this article data on a study of the regularities of decontamination of cyanide-containing wastewaters by hydrophytes are given, the mechanisms of this process are examined, and the results of testing the hydrobotanical method of treating wastewaters of a goldrecovery plant are examined. The experiments were carried out with hydrophytes from the Angara River, Lake Baikal, and small lakes and ponds in the vicinity of Irkutsk and Tashkent. The series of experiments established that algae and higher aquatic plants are resistant to cyanides. A table shows the kinetic parameters of the removal of cyanide by algae and higher aquatic plants collected in Baikal. Of the multitude of species investigated for detoxifying ability, the most resistant were detected in the experimental basins and the most suitable were charophytes.

  8. Vertical movement of iron-cyanide complexes in soils of a former Manufactured Gas Plant site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sut, Magdalena; Repmann, Frank; Raab, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In Germany, soil and groundwater at more than a thousand sites are contaminated with iron-cyanide complexes. These contaminations originate from the gas purification process that was conducted in Manufactured Gas Plants (MGP). The phenomenon of iron-cyanide complexes mobility in soil, according to the literature, is mainly governed by the dissolution and precipitation of ferric ferrocyanide, which is only slightly soluble (< 1 mg L-1) under acidic conditions. This study suggests vertical transport of a colloidal ferric ferrocyanide, in the excess of iron and circum-neutral pH conditions, as an alternative process that influences the retardation of the pollutant movement through the soil profile. Preliminary in situ investigations of the two boreholes implied transport of ferric ferricyanide from the initial deposition in the wastes layer towards the sandy loam material (secondary accumulation), which possibly retarded the mobility of cyanide (CN). The acidic character of the wastes and the accumulation of the blue patches suggested the potential filter function of a sandy loam material due to colloidal transport of the ferric ferricyanide. Series of batch and column experiments, using sandy loam soil, revealed reduction of CN concentration due to mechanical filtration of precipitated solid iron-cyanide complexes and due to the formation of potassium manganese iron-cyanide (K2Mn[Fe(CN)6]).

  9. A gene horizontally transferred from bacteria protects arthropods from host plant cyanide poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Wybouw, Nicky; Dermauw, Wannes; Tirry, Luc; Stevens, Christian; Grbi?, Miodrag; Feyereisen, René; Van Leeuwen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Cyanogenic glucosides are among the most widespread defense chemicals of plants. Upon plant tissue disruption, these glucosides are hydrolyzed to a reactive hydroxynitrile that releases toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN). Yet many mite and lepidopteran species can thrive on plants defended by cyanogenic glucosides. The nature of the enzyme known to detoxify HCN to ?-cyanoalanine in arthropods has remained enigmatic. Here we identify this enzyme by transcriptome analysis and functional expression. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the gene is a member of the cysteine synthase family horizontally transferred from bacteria to phytophagous mites and Lepidoptera. The recombinant mite enzyme had both ?-cyanoalanine synthase and cysteine synthase activity but enzyme kinetics showed that cyanide detoxification activity was strongly favored. Our results therefore suggest that an ancient horizontal transfer of a gene originally involved in sulfur amino acid biosynthesis in bacteria was co-opted by herbivorous arthropods to detoxify plant produced cyanide. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02365.001 PMID:24843024

  10. A Role for Ethylene in the Metabolism of Cyanide by Higher Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Goudey, J. Stephen; Tittle, Forrest L.; Spencer, Mary S.

    1989-01-01

    The action of ethylene on the capacity of plant tissues to metabolize cyanide to ?-cyanoalanine was examined. Beta-cyanoalanine synthase (EC 4.4.1.9) catalyzes the reaction between cyanide and cysteine to form ?-cyanoalanine and hydrogen sulfide. Levels of ?-cyanoalanine synthase activity in tissues of 6 day old etiolated pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings were enhanced severalfold by 1 microliter per liter ethylene. The promotive effect of ethylene increased with increasing ethylene concentrations from 0.01 to 100 microliters per liter and with the period of exposure from 3 to 24 hours. Ethylene enhanced ?-cyanoalanine synthase activity in all regions of the seedling (shoots and roots, internodal regions, cotyledons). The promotive effect was eliminated by norbornadiene, a competitive inhibitor of ethylene action. Levels of ?-cyanoalanine synthase in seedlings of four other dicots (Phaseolus aureas, Glycine max, Lactuca sativa, Sinapis arvensis) and two monocots (Hordeum vulgares, Triticum aestivum) were also increased in response to ethylene. Our results suggest an important regulatory role for ethylene in the metabolism of cyanide by higher plants. PMID:16666701

  11. Cyanide-resistant respiration in photosynthetic organs of freshwater aquatic plants. [Myriophyllum spicatum

    SciTech Connect

    Azcon-Bieto, J.; Murillo, J.; Penuelas, J.

    1987-07-01

    The rate and sensitivity to inhibitors (KCN and salicylhydroxamic acid(SHAM)) of respiratory oxygen uptake has been investigated in photosynthetic organs of several freshwater aquatic plant species. The oxygen uptake rates on a dry weigh basis of angiosperm leaves were generally higher than those of the corresponding stems. Leaves also had a higher chlorophyll content than stems. Respiration of leaves and stems of aquatic angiosperms was generally cyanide-resistant. The cyanide resistance of respiration of whole shoots of two aquatic bryophytes and an alga was lower. These results suggested that the photosynthetic tissues of aquatic plants have a considerable alternative pathway capacity. The angiosperm leaves generally showed the largest alternative path capacity. In all cases, the respiration rate of the aquatic plants studied was inhibited by SHAM alone by about 13 to 31%. These results were used for calculating the actual activities of the cytochrome and alternative pathways. These activities were generally higher in the leaves of angiosperms. The basal oxygen uptake rate of Myriophyllum spicatum leaves was greatly increased by CCCP, either in the presence or in the absence of substrates. These results suggest that respiration was limited by the adenylate system, and not by substrate availability. The increase in the respiratory rate by CCCP was due to a large increase in the activities of both the cytochrome and alternative pathways. The respiration rate of M. spicatum leaves in the presence of substrates was little inhibited by SHAM alone, but the SHAM-resistant rate (that is, the cytochrome path) was greatly stimulated by the further addition of CCCP. Similarly, the cyanide-resistant rate of O/sub 2/ uptake was also increased by the uncoupler.

  12. A role for ethylene in the metabolism of cyanide by higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Goudey, J.S.; Tittle, F.L.; Spencer, M.S. )

    1989-04-01

    The action of ethylene on the capacity of plant tissues to metabolize cyanice to {beta}-cyanoalanine was examined. Beta-cyanoalanine synthase catalyzes the reaction between cyanide and cysteine to form {beta}-cyanoalanine and hydrogen sulfide. Levels of {beta}-cyanoalanine synthase activity in tissues of 6 day old etiolated pea (Pisum sativum) seedlings were enhanced severalfold by 1 microliter per liter ethylene. The promotive effect of ethylene increased with increasing ethylene concentrations from 0.01 to 100 microliters per liter and with the period of exposure from 3 to 24 hours. Ethylene enhanced {beta}-cyanoalanine synthase activity in all regions of the seedling (shoots and roots, internodal regions, cotyledons). The promotive effect was eliminated by norbornadiene, a competitive inhibitor of ethylene action. Levels of {beta}-cyanoalanine synthase in seedlings of four other dicots (Phaseolus aureas, Glycine max, Lactuca sativa, Sinapis arvensis) and two monocots (Hordeum vulgares, Triticum aestivum) were also increased in response to ethylene. Our results suggest an important regulatory role for ethylene in the metabolism of cyanide by higher plants.

  13. The role of alternative cyanide-insensitive respiration in plants. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Raskin, Ilya

    1997-09-29

    This DOE funded research concentrated on the investigation of the role of respiration and oxidative stress in plant biology. Initially the authors concentrated on the possible role of cyanide-insensitive respiration in counteracting the deleterious effects of chilling stress. Although plants are considered to be poikilotherms, there are a few examples of thermogenesis, in which the tissue temperature increases well above ambient. They suggested that differences between thermogenic and non-thermogenic plants may be quantitative rather than qualitative, and that heat from increased respiration may have a local protective effect on the mitochondria, slowing or reducing the effects of chilling. They proposed that this is accomplished by a large increase in respiration, predominantly via the alternative pathway. They measured the increases in respiration, particularly via the alternative pathway, in response to chilling. They have also quantified the associated increases in heat evolution in response to chilling in a number of plant species using a microcalorimeter. For example, after 8 h exposure to 8 C, heat evolution in chilling-sensitive species increased 47--98%, compared to 7--22% for the chilling-resistant species. No increase in heat evolution was observed in the extremely chilling-sensitive ornamental Episcka cupreata (Hook). Increases in heat evolution were observed when plants were chilled in constant light or in the dark, but not when plants were chilled at high humidity. Heat evolution by mitochondria isolated from potato tuber slices were also measured. These values, together with measurements of the heat capacity of isolated mitochondria and counting of the mitochondria by flow cytometry, allow calculation of theoretical maximal rates of heating and the heat produced per mitochondrion. The obtained data was consistent with the protective role of respiratory heat production in cold-stressed plants.

  14. Structure of soybean [beta]-cyanoalanine synthase and the molecular basis for cyanide detoxification in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Hankuil; Juergens, Matthew; Jez, Joseph M.

    2012-09-07

    Plants produce cyanide (CN{sup -}) during ethylene biosynthesis in the mitochondria and require {beta}-cyanoalanine synthase (CAS) for CN{sup -} detoxification. Recent studies show that CAS is a member of the {beta}-substituted alanine synthase (BSAS) family, which also includes the Cys biosynthesis enzyme O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase (OASS), but how the BSAS evolved distinct metabolic functions is not understood. Here we show that soybean (Glycine max) CAS and OASS form {alpha}-aminoacrylate reaction intermediates from Cys and O-acetylserine, respectively. To understand the molecular evolution of CAS and OASS in the BSAS enzyme family, the crystal structures of Gm-CAS and the Gm-CAS K95A mutant with a linked pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-Cys molecule in the active site were determined. These structures establish a common fold for the plant BSAS family and reveal a substrate-induced conformational change that encloses the active site for catalysis. Comparison of CAS and OASS identified residues that covary in the PLP binding site. The Gm-OASS T81M, S181M, and T185S mutants altered the ratio of OASS:CAS activity but did not convert substrate preference to that of a CAS. Generation of a triple mutant Gm-OASS successfully switched reaction chemistry to that of a CAS. This study provides new molecular insight into the evolution of diverse enzyme functions across the BSAS family in plants.

  15. Investigations on the mechanism of oxygen-dependent plant processes: ethylene biosynthesis and cyanide-resistant respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Stegink, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    Two oxygen-dependent plant processes were investigated. A cell-free preparation from pea (Pisum sativum L., cv. Alaska) was used to study ethylene biosynthesis from 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid. Mitochondrial cyanide-resistant respiration was investigated in studies with /sup 14/C-butyl gallate and other respiratory effectors. Ethylene biosynthesis was not due to a specific enzyme, or oxygen radicals. Rather, hydrogen peroxide, generated at low levels, coupled with endogenous manganese produced ethylene. /sup 14/C-butyl gallate bound specifically to mitochondria from cyanide-sensitive and -resistant higher plants and Neurospora crassa mitochondria. The amount of gallate bound was similar for all higher plant mitochondria. Rat liver mitochondria bound very little /sup 14/C-butyl gallate. Plant mitochondria in which cyanide-resistance was induced bound as much /sup 14/C-butyl gallate as before induction. However mitochondria from recently harvested white potato tubers did not bind the gallate. The observations suggest that an engaging factor couples with a gallate binding site in the mitochondrial membrane. With skunk cabbage spadix mitochondria the I/sub 5//sup 0/ for antimycin A inhibition of oxygen uptake was decreased by salicylhydroxamic acid pretreatment; this was also true for reverse order additions. No shift was observed with mung bean hypocotyl or Jerusalem artichoke tuber mitochondria.

  16. Transient Transcriptional Regulation of the CYS-C1 Gene and Cyanide Accumulation upon Pathogen Infection in the Plant Immune Response1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    García, Irene; Rosas, Tábata; Bejarano, Eduardo R.; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C.

    2013-01-01

    Cyanide is produced concomitantly with ethylene biosynthesis. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) detoxifies cyanide primarily through the enzyme ?-cyanoalanine synthase, mainly by the mitochondrial CYS-C1. CYS-C1 loss of function is not toxic for the plant and leads to an increased level of cyanide in cys-c1 mutants as well as a root hairless phenotype. The classification of genes differentially expressed in cys-c1 and wild-type plants reveals that the high endogenous cyanide content of the cys-c1 mutant is correlated with the biotic stress response. Cyanide accumulation and CYS-C1 gene expression are negatively correlated during compatible and incompatible plant-bacteria interactions. In addition, cys-c1 plants present an increased susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea and an increased tolerance to the biotrophic Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 bacterium and Beet curly top virus. The cys-c1 mutation produces a reduction in respiration rate in leaves, an accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and an induction of the alternative oxidase AOX1a and pathogenesis-related PR1 expression. We hypothesize that cyanide, which is transiently accumulated during avirulent bacterial infection and constitutively accumulated in the cys-c1 mutant, uncouples the respiratory electron chain dependent on the cytochrome c oxidase, and this uncoupling induces the alternative oxidase activity and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, which act by stimulating the salicylic acid-dependent signaling pathway of the plant immune system. PMID:23784464

  17. Transient transcriptional regulation of the CYS-C1 gene and cyanide accumulation upon pathogen infection in the plant immune response.

    PubMed

    García, Irene; Rosas, Tábata; Bejarano, Eduardo R; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C

    2013-08-01

    Cyanide is produced concomitantly with ethylene biosynthesis. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) detoxifies cyanide primarily through the enzyme ?-cyanoalanine synthase, mainly by the mitochondrial CYS-C1. CYS-C1 loss of function is not toxic for the plant and leads to an increased level of cyanide in cys-c1 mutants as well as a root hairless phenotype. The classification of genes differentially expressed in cys-c1 and wild-type plants reveals that the high endogenous cyanide content of the cys-c1 mutant is correlated with the biotic stress response. Cyanide accumulation and CYS-C1 gene expression are negatively correlated during compatible and incompatible plant-bacteria interactions. In addition, cys-c1 plants present an increased susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea and an increased tolerance to the biotrophic Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato DC3000 bacterium and Beet curly top virus. The cys-c1 mutation produces a reduction in respiration rate in leaves, an accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and an induction of the alternative oxidase AOX1a and pathogenesis-related PR1 expression. We hypothesize that cyanide, which is transiently accumulated during avirulent bacterial infection and constitutively accumulated in the cys-c1 mutant, uncouples the respiratory electron chain dependent on the cytochrome c oxidase, and this uncoupling induces the alternative oxidase activity and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, which act by stimulating the salicylic acid-dependent signaling pathway of the plant immune system. PMID:23784464

  18. Elimination of phenols, ammonia and cyanide in wash water from biomass gasification, and nitrogen recycling using planted trickling filters.

    PubMed

    Graber, Andreas; Skvarc, Robert; Junge-Berberovi?, Ranka

    2009-01-01

    Trickling filters were used to treat wash water from a wood gasifier. This wash water contained toxic substances such as ammonium, cyanide, phenols, and PAH. The goal was to develop a system that degraded toxic substances, and achieved full nitrification of ammonia. A 1 kW model wood gasifier plant delivered wash water for the experiments, which was standardised to a conductivity of 3 mS/cm by dilution. Toxicity was assessed by bacterial luminescence detection, germination test with cress (Lepidium sativum), and pot plants cultivated in a hydroponic setup irrigated continuously with the wastewater. Treatment experiments were done in both planted and unplanted trickling filters. Plant yield was similar to conventional hydroponic production systems. The trickling filters achieved complete detoxification of phenol, PAH and cyanide as well as full nitrification. The specific elimination rates were 100 g m(-3) Leca d(-1) for phenols and 90 g m(-3) Leca d(-1) for ammonium in planted systems. In unplanted trickling filters circulated for 63 h, phenol concentration decreased from 83.5 mg/L to 2.5 mg/L and cyanide concentration from 0.32 mg/L to 0.02 mg/L. PAH concentrations were reduced from 3,050 microg/L to 0.89 microg/L within 68 days. The assays demonstrated the feasibility of using the technique to construct a treatment system in a partially closed circulation for gasifier wash water. The principal advantage is to convert toxic effluents from biomass gasifiers into a non-toxic, nitrogen-rich fertiliser water, enabling subsequent use in plant production and thus income generation. However, the questions of long-term performance and possible accumulation of phenols and heavy metals in the produce still have to be studied. PMID:19955650

  19. 33. CONSTRUCTION OF FOUNDATION FOR ORIGINAL CROSSCUT DIESEL PLANT BUILDING, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. CONSTRUCTION OF FOUNDATION FOR ORIGINAL CROSSCUT DIESEL PLANT BUILDING, LATER ENLARGED TO HOUSE STEAM GENERATING EQUIPMENT. November 23, 1937 - Crosscut Steam Plant, North side Salt River near Mill Avenue & Washington Street, Tempe, Maricopa County, AZ

  20. Hydrogen Cyanide and Cyanide Salts

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 08 / 016 F www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF HYDROGEN CYANIDE AND CYANIDE SALTS ( CAS No . various ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) September 2010 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC DISCLAIMER This docu

  1. Release of iron-cyanide complexes form contaminated soils - Batch and column experiments on substrates from Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sut, Magdalena; Repmann, Frank; Raab, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Soils of former Manufactured Gas Plants (MGPs) are often contaminated with iron-cyanide (Fe-CN) complexes that originate from gas purification process. Cyanide is a potentially toxic substance and its presence in soil and groundwater may cause risk for human health as well as for the environment. MGPs were commonly built on the city suburban areas, which have spread ever since. Nowadays, these sites are typically located in inner cities, causing environmental thread, due to the leaching of pollutants. More recently, columns and batch experiments have been used to study fate and mobility of contaminants is soil. The release of iron-cyanide complexes under unsaturated flow conditions was evaluated with eight columns of 30 cm length and a diameter of 5,4 cm. Cyanide concentrations in the collected leachates were measured with Flow Injection Analysis (FIA). Additionally pH, electrical conductivity (EC) and various ion concentrations were determined. In order to compare the release of Fe-CN complexes in saturated conditions a batch experiment was conducted, where in defined time intervals, 1 ml of the extract water phase was analyzed for CN concentration. Study revealed an analogous trend of cyanide release in both experiments indicating primarily the release of formerly dissolved phase (hexacyanoferrates) followed by continual dissolution of ferric ferrocyanide. We conclude that batch experiments, conducted prior to column analysis, can serve as preliminary prediction of the water soluble cyanide fraction under unsaturated conditions.

  2. 95. View of foundation plant looking east showing one of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    95. View of foundation plant looking east showing one of the four cylinders completed in the midstream tower known as Pier 3. - Carquinez Bridge, Spanning Carquinez Strait at Interstate 80, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  3. Chlorine cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Chlorine cyanide ; CASRN 506 - 77 - 4 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic

  4. Copper cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Copper cyanide ; CASRN 544 - 92 - 3 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  5. Zinc cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Zinc cyanide ; CASRN 557 - 21 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effe

  6. Silver cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Silver cyanide ; CASRN 506 - 64 - 9 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  7. Calcium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for calcium cyanide is included in th

  8. Potassium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for potassium cyanide is included in

  9. Sodium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for sodium cyanide is included in the

  10. Barium cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Barium cyanide ; CASRN 542 - 62 - 1 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Ef

  11. Beyond toxicity: a regulatory role for mitochondrial cyanide.

    PubMed

    García, Irene; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C

    2014-01-01

    In non-cyanogenic plants, cyanide is a co-product of ethylene and camalexin biosynthesis. To maintain cyanide at non-toxic levels, Arabidopsis plants express the mitochondrial ?-cyanoalanine synthase CYS-C1. CYS-C1 knockout leads to an increased level of cyanide in the roots and leaves and a severe defect in root hair morphogenesis, suggesting that cyanide acts as a signaling factor in root development. During compatible and incompatible plant-bacteria interactions, cyanide accumulation and CYS-C1 gene expression are negatively correlated. Moreover, CYS-C1 mutation increases both plant tolerance to biotrophic pathogens and their susceptibility to necrotrophic fungi, indicating that cyanide could stimulate the salicylic acid-dependent signaling pathway of the plant immune system. We hypothesize that CYS-C1 is essential for maintaining non-toxic concentrations of cyanide in the mitochondria to facilitate cyanide's role in signaling. PMID:24398435

  12. Drought increases forage nitrate and cyanide.

    PubMed

    Pickrell, J A; Oehme, F W; Hickman, S R

    1991-06-01

    To investigate drought-associated increases in concentrations of nitrate and cyanide in animal forage, we compared forage nitrate and cyanide in 1986-87 (annual rainfall 33 in) to nitrate and cyanide in a drought (1988 and 1989; annual rainfall 20 and 27 in, respectively). Fifteen to 20% of the nitrate and cyanide samples from 1986-1987 had sufficiently high concentrations to be of concern (3000 ppm nitrate, 20 ppm cyanide as submitted). Only 4-6% of the 1986-1987 samples had concentrations sufficiently high to produce acute respiratory distress (13,000 ppm nitrate, 50 ppm cyanide as submitted). During 1988 sample numbers had more than doubled, suggesting increased concern for the possibility of nitrate or cyanide intoxication and yielding parallel increases in the number of samples with elevated nitrates or cyanides. By 1989, 25-33% of the samples had concentrations of health concern with respect to either nitrate or cyanide, while 14-19% had concentrations sufficiently high to produce acute respiratory signs. Shortages of forage caused by a 2-y drought were further exacerbated by nitrate and cyanide increases in that feed. Future efforts should concentrate on controlling groundwater nitrate and delivery of nitrate to the plant root-systems. PMID:1858304

  13. Cyanide in the chemical arsenal of garlic mustard, Alliaria petiolata.

    PubMed

    Cipollini, Don; Gruner, Bill

    2007-01-01

    Cyanide production has been reported from over 2500 plant species, including some members of the Brassicaceae. We report that the important invasive plant, Alliaria petiolata, produces levels of cyanide in its tissues that can reach 100 ppm fresh weight (FW), a level considered toxic to many vertebrates. In a comparative study, levels of cyanide in leaves of young first-year plants were 25 times higher than in leaves of young Arabidopsis thaliana plants and over 150 times higher than in leaves of young Brassica kaber, B. rapa, and B. napus. In first-year plants, cyanide levels were highest in young leaves of seedlings and declined with leaf age on individual plants. Leaves of young plants infested with green peach aphids (Myzus persicae) produced just over half as much cyanide as leaves of healthy plants, suggesting that aphid feeding led to loss of cyanide from intact tissues before analysis, or that aphid feeding inhibited cyanide precursor production. In a developmental study, levels of cyanide in the youngest and oldest leaf of young garlic mustard plants were four times lower than in the youngest and oldest leaf of young Sorghum sudanense (cv. Cadan 97) plants, but cyanide levels did not decline in these leaves with plant age as in S. sudanense. Different populations of garlic mustard varied moderately in the constitutive and inducible expression of cyanide in leaves, but no populations studied were acyanogenic. Although cyanide production could result from breakdown products of glucosinolates, no cyanide was detected in vitro from decomposition of sinigrin, the major glucosinolate of garlic mustard. These studies indicate that cyanide produced from an as yet unidentified cyanogenic compound is a part of the battery of chemical defenses expressed by garlic mustard. PMID:17146719

  14. Two-Photon Sensing and Imaging of Endogenous Biological Cyanide in Plant Tissues Using Graphene Quantum Dot/Gold Nanoparticle Conjugate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lili; Zheng, Jing; Yang, Sheng; Wu, Cuichen; Liu, Changhui; Xiao, Yue; Li, Yinhui; Qing, Zhihe; Yang, Ronghua

    2015-09-01

    One main source of cyanide (CN(-)) exposure for mammals is through the plant consumption, and thus, sensitive and selective CN(-) detection in plants tissue is a significant and urgent work. Although various fluorescence probes have been reported for CN(-) in water and mammalian cells, the detection of endogenous biological CN(-) in plant tissue remains to be explored due to the high background signal and large thickness of plant tissue that hamper the effective application of traditional one-photo excitation. To address these issues, we developed a new two-photo excitation (TPE) nanosensor using graphene quantum dots (GQDs)/gold nanoparticle (AuNPs) conjugate for sensing and imaging endogenous biological CN(-). With the benefit of the high quenching efficiency of AuNPs and excellent two-photon properties of GQDs, our sensing system can achieve a low detection limit of 0.52 ?M and deeper penetration depth (about 400 ?m) without interference from background signals of a complex biological environment, thus realizing sensing and imaging of CN(-) in different types of plant tissues and even monitoring CN(-) removal in food processing. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time for fluorescent sensing and imaging of CN(-) in plant tissues. Moreover, our design also provides a new model scheme for the development of two-photon fluorescent nanomaterial, which is expected to hold great potential for food processing and safety testing. PMID:26264405

  15. Dynamics of Metal Cyanides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidinger, Daniel; Brown, Douglas J.; Houchins, Cassidy; Owrutsky, Jeffrey C.

    2010-06-01

    Time resolved IR spectroscopy was used to characterize the vibrational energy relaxation (VER) dynamics of the CN stretching bands of aqueous molecular metal cyanides and networked metal cyanides, such as Prussain Blue, in reverse micelles. The vibrational and rotational relaxation dynamics of the CN stretching bands near 2000 cm-1 for aqueous molecular cyanides Au(CN)2-, Ni(CN)42-, Pt(CN)42-, Co(CN)63-, Mn(CN)42-, and Ru(CN)64- have been investigated using ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy. While the spectra and dynamics of Ru(CN)64- are similar to those previously reported for ferrocyanide, VER times are significantly longer (>30 ps) in the other molecules. Mn(CN)63- represents an intermediate case with a relaxation time of about 15 ps in water. The VER dynamics extend and reinforce the established trends of metal cyanide CN band frequencies and intensities. Prussian Blue and its ruthenium analog were also studied using visible pump-IR probe and IR pump-IR probe spectroscopy. The VER dynamics are similar to the monometal cyanides and there is evidence for CN band excitation following back electron transfer based on the comparison of visible and infrared pump results.

  16. Electroplating and Cyanide Waste.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torpy, Michael F.; Runke, Henry M.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastes from electroplating industry, covering publications of 1977. This review covers studies such as: (1) ion exchange treatment process; (2) use of reverse osmosis; and (3) cyanide removal and detection. A list of 75 references is also presented. (HM)

  17. Potassium silver cyanide

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Jump to main content . Integrated Risk Information System Recent Additions | Contact Us Search : All EPA IRIS • You are here : EPA Home • Research • Environmental Assessment • IRIS • IRIS Summaries Redirect Page As of September 28 , 2010 , the assessment summary for potassium silver cyanide is inclu

  18. History, Development, and Modern Applications of the Cyanide Process

    E-print Network

    Cone, Victor M.

    1906-06-01

    . This system did not prove to be as.efficient as zinc, owing to the great number of filters required. A peculiar fact here is that, the­ oretically, carbon cannot precipiatte gold, because it is electro­ negative to the latter in a KCn solution. That it is a... Cyanide Treatment 49 use of cyanide solutions — -50 Precipitation 51 use of filter presses 51 high percentage of extraction 51 Refining of Precipitates 52 b CONTENTS (continued) PAGES Plan and section of the Homostake cyanide plant —54 Home stake...

  19. 50. OBLIQUE VIEW OF CYANIDE TANKS, LOOKING EAST SOUTHEAST, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. OBLIQUE VIEW OF CYANIDE TANKS, LOOKING EAST SOUTHEAST, SHOWING TANK SUPPORTS AND MASONRY FOUNDATIONS. THE SUPPORTING TIMBERS WERE ADDED DURING THE MILL STABILIZATION EFFORT IN THE 1990'S. THE TANKS ARE HANGING OVER THE FOUNDATIONS TO GIVE ACCESS TO THE TRAP DOOR IN THEIR BOTTOMS FOR EMPTYING THE SANDS AFTER PROCESSING (SEE CA-290-37). SEE CA-290-36 FOR IDENTICAL B&W NEGATIVE. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  20. 36. OBLIQUE VIEW OF CYANIDE TANKS, LOOKING EAST SOUTHEAST, SHOWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. OBLIQUE VIEW OF CYANIDE TANKS, LOOKING EAST SOUTHEAST, SHOWING TANK SUPPORTS AND MASONRY FOUNDATIONS. THE SUPPORTING TIMBERS WERE ADDED DURING THE MILL STABILIZATION EFFORT IN THE 1990'S THE TANKS ARE HANGING OVER THE FOUNDATIONS TO GIVE ACCESS TO THE TRAP DOOR IN THEIR BOTTOMS FOR EMPTYING THE SANDS AFTER PROCESSING (SEE CA-290-37). SEE CA-290-50 (CT) FOR IDENTICAL COLOR TRANSPARENCY. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  1. Cyanide hydratases and cyanide dihydratases: emerging tools in the biodegradation and biodetection of cyanide.

    PubMed

    Martínková, Ludmila; Veselá, Alicja Barbara; Rinágelová, Anna; Chmátal, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to summarize the current knowledge of the enzymes which are involved in the hydrolysis of cyanide, i.e., cyanide hydratases (CHTs; EC 4.2.1.66) and cyanide dihydratases (CynD; EC 3.5.5.1). CHTs are probably exclusively produced by filamentous fungi and widely occur in these organisms; in contrast, CynDs were only found in a few bacterial genera. CHTs differ from CynDs in their reaction products (formamide vs. formic acid and ammonia, respectively). Several CHTs were also found to transform nitriles but with lower relative activities compared to HCN. Mutants of CynDs and CHTs were constructed to study the structure-activity relationships in these enzymes or to improve their catalytic properties. The effect of the C-terminal part of the protein on the enzyme activity was determined by constructing the corresponding deletion mutants. CynDs are less active at alkaline pH than CHTs. To improve its bioremediation potential, CynD from Bacillus pumilus was engineered by directed evolution combined with site-directed mutagenesis, and its operation at pH 10 was thus enabled. Some of the enzymes have been tested for their potential to eliminate cyanide from cyanide-containing wastewaters. CynDs were also used to construct cyanide biosensors. PMID:26329848

  2. Acute oral toxicity of sodium cyanide in birds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Hill, E.F.; Carpenter, J.W.; Krynitsky, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    Sensitivities of six avian species, black vulture (Coragyps atratus), American kestrel (Falco sparverius), Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), domestic chicken (Gallus domesticus), eastern screech-owl (Otus asio), and European starling (Sturnus vulgaris), to acute poisoning by sodium cyanide (NaCN) were compared by single dose LD50's. Three species, domestic chickens, black vultures, and turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), were dosed with NaCN to determine cyanide residues in those that died and also in survivors, in addition to postmortem fate. Three flesh-eating species (black vulture, American kestrel, and eastern screech-owl; LD50's 4.0-8.6 mg/kg) were more sensitive to NaCN than three species (Japanese quail, domestic chicken, and European starling; LD50's 9.4-21 mg/kg) that fed predominantly on plant material. Elevated concentrations of cyanide were found in the blood of birds that died of cyanide poisoning; however, concentrations in birds that died overlapped those in survivors. Blood was superior to liver as the tissue of choice for detecting cyanide exposure. No gross pathological changes related to dosing were observed at necropsy.

  3. Acute oral toxicity of sodium cyanide in birds.

    PubMed

    Wiemeyer, S N; Hill, E F; Carpenter, J W; Krynitsky, A J

    1986-10-01

    Sensitivities of six avian species, black vulture (Coragyps atratus), American kestrel (Falco sparverius), Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica), domestic chicken (Gallus domesticus), eastern screech-owl (Otus asio), and European starling (Sturnus vulgaris), to acute poisoning by sodium cyanide (NaCN) were compared by single dose LD50's. Three species, domestic chickens, black vultures, and turkey vultures (Cathartes aura), were dosed with NaCN to determine cyanide residues in those that died and also in survivors, in addition to postmortem fate. Three flesh-eating species (black vulture, American kestrel, and eastern screech-owl; LD50's 4.0-8.6 mg/kg) were more sensitive to NaCN than three species (Japanese quail, domestic chicken, and European starling; LD50's 9.4-21 mg/kg) that fed predominantly on plant material. Elevated concentrations of cyanide were found in the blood of birds that died of cyanide poisoning; however, concentrations in birds that died overlapped those in survivors. Blood was superior to liver as the tissue of choice for detecting cyanide exposure. No gross pathological changes related to dosing were observed at necropsy. PMID:3503141

  4. CYANIDE HEAP BILOGICAL DETOXIFICATION - PHASE II

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many active mine sites, mines in closure stage and some abandoned mines are and have utilized cyanidation to remove and recover precious metals. Discharges from these sites normally contain significant amounts of metal cyanide complexes and concentrations of thiocyanate, soluble...

  5. Solar-Assisted Oxidation of Toxic Cyanide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byvik, C. E.; Miles, A.

    1985-01-01

    In solar-assisted oxidation technique, oxygen-bearing air bubbled through cyanide solution in which platinized powdered TiO2 is suspended. Light from either artifical source or natural Sunlight irradiates. Experiments demonstrated this technique effective in reducing concentration of cyanide to levels well below those achieved by other methods. Results suggest effective and inexpensive method for oxidizing cyanide in industrial wastewaters.

  6. ALTERNATIVES FOR SODIUM CYANIDE FOR FLOTATION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyanide has long been looked upon as the classical poison and has been listed by EPA as a priority pollutant. The mineral dressing industry has long used cyanide in its concentration and extractive metallurgy operations. Cyanide plays a role of varying importance in the metallurg...

  7. Biodegradation of cyanide by a new isolated strain under alkaline conditions and optimization by response surface methodology (RSM)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Biodegradation of free cyanide from industrial wastewaters has been proven as a viable and robust method for treatment of wastewaters containing cyanide. Results Cyanide degrading bacteria were isolated from a wastewater treatment plant for coke-oven-gas condensate by enrichment culture technique. Five strains were able to use cyanide as the sole nitrogen source under alkaline conditions and among them; one strain (C2) was selected for further studies on the basis of the higher efficiency of cyanide degradation. The bacterium was able to tolerate free cyanide at concentrations of up to 500 ppm which makes it a good potentially candidate for the biological treatment of cyanide contaminated residues. Cyanide degradation corresponded with growth and reached a maximum level 96% during the exponential phase. The highest growth rate (1.23?×?108) was obtained on day 4 of the incubation time. Both glucose and fructose were suitable carbon sources for cyanotrophic growth. No growth was detected in media with cyanide as the sole carbon source. Four control factors including, pH, temperature, agitation speed and glucose concentration were optimized according to central composite design in response surface method. Cyanide degradation was optimum at 34.2°C, pH 10.3 and glucose concentration 0.44 (g/l). Conclusions Bacterial species degrade cyanide into less toxic products as they are able to use the cyanide as a nitrogen source, forming ammonia and carbon dioxide as end products. Alkaliphilic bacterial strains screened in this study evidentially showed the potential to possess degradative activities that can be harnessed to remediate cyanide wastes. PMID:24921051

  8. A Disposable Blood Cyanide Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Yong; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.; Mahon, Sari B.; Ma, Jian; Brenner, Matthew; Wang, Jian-Hua; Boss, Gerry R.

    2013-01-01

    Deaths due to smoke inhalation in fires are often due to poisoning by HCN. Rapid administration of antidotes can result in complete resuscitation of the patient but judicious dosing requires the knowledge of the level of cyanide exposure. Rapid sensitive means for blood cyanide quantitation are needed. Hydroxocyanocobinamide (OH(CN)Cbi) reacts with cyanide rapidly; this is accompanied by a large spectral change. The disposable device consists of a pair of nested petri dish bottoms and a single top that fits the outer bottom dish. The top cover has a diametrically strung porous polypropylene membrane tube filled with aqueous OH(CN)Cbi. One end of the tube terminates in an amber (583 nm) light emitting diode; the other end in a photodiode via an acrylic optical fiber. An aliquot of the blood sample is put in the inner dish, the assembly covered and acid is added through a port in the cover. Evolved HCN diffuses into the OH(CN)Cbi solution and the absorbance in the long path porous membrane tube cell is measured within 160s. The LOD was 0.047, 1.0, 0.15, 5.0 and 2.2 ?M, respectively, for water (1 mL), bovine blood (100 ?L, 1 mL), and rabbit blood (20?L, 50 ?L). RSDs were < 10% in all cases and the linear range extended from 0.5 to 200 ?M. The method was validated against a microdiffusion approach and applied to the measurement of cyanide in rabbit and human blood. The disposable device permits field measurement of blood cyanide in < 4 min. PMID:23473259

  9. Effect of Cyanide in Dark and Light on the Membrane Potential and the ATP Level of Young and Mature Green Tissues of Higher Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich-Eberius, Cornelia I.; Novacky, Anton; Ball, Erika

    1983-01-01

    The effect of CN? and N2 on the electrical membrane potential (Em) was compared with that of CN? on the ATP levels in cotyledons of Gossypium hirsutum and in Lemna gibba L. In mature cotton tissue, CN? depolarized Em to the energy-independent diffusion potential (ED) in the dark. In the light Em recovered transiently. The same was observed in leaves of Nicotiana, Avena, Impatiens, Kalanchoë, and in Lemna. In contrast, in young cotton cotyledons and tobacco leaves and, to a large extent, in +sucrose-grown Lemna, Em was depolarized to ED also in the light in a similar way as in the dark. In Lemna grown without sucrose, the energy-dependent component of Em was only partially depolarized by CN? in dark or light. Cyanide plus salicylhydroxamic acid completely reduced Em to ED, abolished respiration and photosynthesis, and severely diminished the ATP level. This suggests the operation of a CN?-insensitive respiration in uninjured Lemna. The initial CN?-induced decay of the ATP level in cotton and Lemna was more rapid than the decay of Em. CN?-induced oscillations of the ATP level were followed by similar but slower oscillations of Em. This supports the view of a general dependence of Em on ATP. Discrepancies between inhibitor-induced changes of Em and ATP levels are suggested to result from additional regulation of Em by the cytoplasmatic pH value. A comparison of ED in young and mature cotton cotyledons in the dark and in the light suggests that in growing young cotyledons the different effect of CN? in the light is due to a less effective photosynthesis together with high mitochondrial respiration. In Lemna and in mature cotton tissue, Em in the light is maintained by noncyclic photophosphorylation and photosystem II, which is only partly inhibited by CN?, thus resulting in an incomplete depolarization and recovery of Em. Complete inhibition of photosynthetic O2 evolution and membrane depolarization by CN? plus salicylhydroxamic acid are suggested to result from photooxidation. PMID:16662984

  10. Aposematism in Archips cerasivoranus not linked to the sequestration of host-derived cyanide.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, T D; Stevens, M A; Miller, S; Jeffers, P

    2008-10-01

    This study addressed the question of how caterpillars of Archips cerasivoranus feeding upon Prunus virginiana cope with the cyanogenic compounds of their food. Analysis by ion chromatography showed that young and aged leaves of P. virginiana consumed by the caterpillars during spring have hydrogen cyanide potentials (HCN-ps) of 2,473 +/- 130 ppm and 1,058 +/- 98 ppm, respectively. Although less than 3% of the cyanide released as the caterpillars feed escapes into the atmosphere, the larva's bright-yellow aposematic coloration and conspicuous activity can not be attributed to the sequestration of cyanide. Only six of 25 samples of the caterpillars' defensive regurgitants collected from 12 field colonies contained cyanide (17.6 +/- 6.54 ppm), less than 5% of the quantity previously reported to occur in the regurgitant of the tent caterpillar M. americanum. Only seven of 13 caterpillars assayed had detectable quantities of cyanide in their bodies (3.9 +/- 0.9 ppm). The fecal pellets that encase the cocoon contained no cyanide, nor did the frass that litters the leaf shelters. The small quantities of cyanide that occur in the caterpillar compared to the HCN-p of ingested plant material appear attributable to paced bouts of feeding and the maintenance of a highly alkaline foregut that inhibits cyanogenesis. PMID:18810551

  11. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hydrogen Cyanide and Cyanide Salts (2010 Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyanide compounds are used in a number of industrial processes including mining, electroplating, metallurgy, chemical manufacturing, and photography because these compounds can form stable complexes with a range of metals. Hydrogen cyanide is also a component of tobacco smoke, v...

  12. Iodine cyanide as volumetric oxidant.

    PubMed

    Paul, R C; Chauhan, R K; Sharma, N C; Parkash, R

    1971-11-01

    Iodine cyanide has been developed as an oxidant for the determination of iodide, sulphite, thiosulphate, thiocyanate, arsenic (III), antimony(III), tin(II), mercury(I), iron(II), ascorbic acid and beta-naphthol in dilute aqueous mineral acids, glacial acetic acid and 1:1 acetic acid-acetic anhydride mixture, with visual and potentiometric methods of end-point detection. PMID:18960997

  13. 40 CFR 180.130 - Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues... Specific Tolerances § 180.130 Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues...tolerance for residues of the insecticide hydrogen cyanide from postharvest...

  14. 40 CFR 180.130 - Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues... Specific Tolerances § 180.130 Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues...tolerance for residues of the insecticide hydrogen cyanide from postharvest...

  15. 40 CFR 180.130 - Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues... Specific Tolerances § 180.130 Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues...tolerance for residues of the insecticide hydrogen cyanide from postharvest...

  16. 40 CFR 180.130 - Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues... Specific Tolerances § 180.130 Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues...tolerance for residues of the insecticide hydrogen cyanide from postharvest...

  17. 40 CFR 180.130 - Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues... Specific Tolerances § 180.130 Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues...tolerance for residues of the insecticide hydrogen cyanide from postharvest...

  18. CYANIDE HEAP BIOLOGICAL DETOXIFICATION - PHASE II

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many active mine sites, mines in the closure stage and some abandoned mines are and have utilized cyanidation to remove and recover precious metals. Discharges from these sites normally contain significant amounts of metal cyanide complexes and concentrations of thiocyanate, solu...

  19. Nonperipheral chemoreceptor stimulation of ventilation by cyanide.

    PubMed

    Levine, S

    1975-08-01

    To assess the ventilatory responses elicited by changes of tissue hypoxia, sodium cyanide (0.12 mg/kg-min for 10 min) was infused into the upper abdominal aorta of anesthetized dogs. These infusions produced decreases in oxygen consumption, increases in arterial lactate concentration, and increases in arterial lactate/pyruvate ratio. Coincident with these metabolic changes of hypoxia, minute ventilation (VE) increased 228 +/- SE 36% and arterial PCO2 decreased 21 +/- SE 2 mmHg; therefore, pH increased both in arterial blood in and cisternal cerebrospinal fluid. Following infusion of cyanide into the abdominal aorta, small quantities of cyanide (48 +/- SE 14 mumol/liter) appeared in carotid arterial blood. To evaluate the possibility that the observed increases in VE were due to stimulation of peripheral arterial chemoreceptors by the recirculating cyanide, the carotid and aortic chemoreceptors were denervated in four dogs. Nonetheless, after intra-aortic infusion of sodium cyanide (1.2 mg/kg), ventilation in these chemodenervated animals again increased considerably (154 +/- SE 36%). In order to explore the possibility that cyanide infusion can stimulate ventilation by an extracranial mechanism, heads of vagotomized dogs (including the carotid bodies) were perfused entirely by donor dogs. The intra-aortic infusion of sodium cyanide (0.9 mg/kg) into these head-perfused animals still caused large increases in VE (163 +/- SE 19%). It is concluded that intra-aortic cyanide infusions stimulate VE by an extracranial mechanism other than the carotid and aortic chemoreceptors. PMID:240795

  20. Determination of cyanide using a microbial sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi, Keijiro; Ikebukuro, Kazunori; Karube, Isao

    1996-08-01

    A microbial cyanide sensor was prepared, consisting of immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae and an oxygen electrode. When the electrode was inserted into a solution containing glucose, the respiration activity of the microorganisms increased. The change in the respiration activity is monitored with the oxygen electrode. When cyanide is added to the sample solution, the electron transport chain reaction of the respiration system in the mitochondria is inhibited, resulting in a decrease in respiration. The inhibition is caused by cyanide binding with respiration enzymes such as the cytochrome oxidase complex in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Therefore, the cyanide concentration can be measured from the change in the respiration rate. When the sensor was applied to a batch system at pH 8.0 and 30{degrees}C, the cyanide calibration curve showed linearity in the concentration range between 0.3 pM and 150 {mu}m CN{sup -}. 13 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Fiber optic sensing of cyanides in solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Park, S.S.; Mackenzie, J.D.; Li, C.Y.; Guerreiro, P.; Peyghambarian, N.

    1996-12-31

    A novel sol-gel technique was used to immobilize malachite green ions (MG{sup +}) in stable, optically transparent, porous silica gel films. A simple and sensitive method was developed for the detection of cyanides in solutions using spectrophotometry to measure changes caused by cyanide ions (CN{sup {minus}}) in the absorption spectra of the green-colored silica gel films. After reaction with cyanide ions, the absorption spectra of the films changed with a typical decrease in absorbance at 620 nm. On the basis of the absorption spectra of the films, a portable and easy to use fiber optic cyanide film sensor was fabricated. Decolorization undergone by the green-colored gel films, as they were exposed to cyanide ions, was detected through a fiber. Preliminary results indicate concentrations on the order of a few ppm are detected using the fiber optic sensor.

  2. Anaerobic biodegradation of cyanide under methanogenic conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Fallon, R D; Cooper, D A; Speece, R; Henson, M

    1991-01-01

    Upflow, anaerobic, fixed-bed, activated charcoal biotreatment columns capable of operating at free cyanide concentrations of greater than 100 mg liter-1 with a hydraulic retention time of less than 48 h were developed. Methanogenesis was maintained under a variety of feed medium conditions which included ethanol, phenol, or methanol as the primary reduced carbon source. Under optimal conditions, greater than 70% of the inflow free cyanide was removed in the first 30% of the column height. Strongly complexed cyanides were resistant to removal. Ammonia was the nitrogen end product of cyanide transformation. In cell material removed from the charcoal columns, [14C]bicarbonate was the major carbon end product of [14C]cyanide transformation. PMID:1872600

  3. Advances in f-element cyanide chemistry.

    PubMed

    Berthet, Jean-Claude; Thuéry, Pierre; Ephritikhine, Michel

    2015-05-01

    This Dalton perspective gives an overview of the development of cyanide chemistry of 4f- and 5f-elements, a field which was poorly explored in contrast to the attention paid to the cyanide complexes of the d transition metals. The use of the cyanide ligand led to the discovery of mono- and polycyanide complexes which exhibit unprecedented and unexpected coordination geometries. A new type of linear metallocenes including [U(Cp*)2(CN)5](3-) (Cp* = C5Me5) and the first bent actinocenes [An(Cot)2(CN)](-) (An = Th, U; Cot = C8H8) were isolated. Thorocene was found to be much more reactive than uranocene since a series of sterically crowded cyanide complexes have been obtained only from [Th(Cot)2]. A series of cyanido-bridged dinuclear compounds and mononuclear mono-, bis- and tris(cyanide) complexes were prepared by addition of cyanide salts to [MN*3] (M = Ce, U) and [UN*3](+) [N* = N(SiMe3)2]. The Ce(III), U(III) and U(IV) ions were clearly differentiated in these reactions by cyanide linkage isomerism, as shown for example by the structures of the cyanide complex [U(III)N*3(CN)2](2-) and of the isocyanide derivatives [Ce(III)N*3(NC)2](2-) and [U(IV)N*3(NC)](-). While the U-CN/NC coordination preference towards the U(III)/U(IV) pair is related to the subtle balance between steric, covalent and ionic factors, DFT computations and in particular the calculated total bonding energies between the metal and the cyanide ligand allowed the observed coordination mode to be predicted. The ability of the cyanide ligand to stabilize the high oxidation states was assessed with the synthesis of U(V) and U(VI) complexes in the inorganic and organometallic series. PMID:25811407

  4. Raman spectroscopic analysis of cyanogenic glucosides in plants: development of a flow injection surface-enhanced Raman scatter (FI-SERS) method for determination of cyanide.

    PubMed

    Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; Jørgensen, Kirsten; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Engelsen, Søren Balling

    2004-02-01

    Cyanogenic glucosides were studied using Raman spectroscopy. Spectra of the crystal forms of linamarin, linustatin, neolinustatin, amygdalin, sambunigrin, and dhurrin were obtained using a Raman spectrograph microscope equipped with a 532 nm laser. The position of the signal from the C identical with N triple bond of the cyanohydrin group was influenced by the nature of the side group and was above 2240 cm(-1) for the three cyanogenic glucosides that contain a neighboring aromatic ring, and below or partially below 2240 cm(-1) for the non-aromatic cyanoglucosides. Signals from the CN bond of linamarin/lotaustralin in leaves and roots from a medium cyanogenic cassava variety were obtained in situ using a Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) Raman interferometer with a 1064 nm laser, but the signal was very weak and difficult to obtain. A spectrum containing a signal from the CN bond of dhurrin in a freeze-dried sorghum leaf was also obtained using this instrument. Surface-enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) was demonstrated to be a more sensitive method that enabled determination of the cyanogenic potential of plant tissue. The SERS method was optimized by flow injection (FI) using a colloidal gold dispersion as effluent. Potential problems and pitfalls of the method are discussed. PMID:15000716

  5. 40 CFR 180.130 - Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for... § 180.130 Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance for residues of the insecticide hydrogen cyanide from postharvest fumigation as a result of application of sodium cyanide...

  6. 40 CFR 180.130 - Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for... § 180.130 Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance for residues of the insecticide hydrogen cyanide from postharvest fumigation as a result of application of sodium cyanide...

  7. 40 CFR 180.130 - Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for... § 180.130 Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance for residues of the insecticide hydrogen cyanide from postharvest fumigation as a result of application of sodium cyanide...

  8. 40 CFR 180.130 - Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for... § 180.130 Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance for residues of the insecticide hydrogen cyanide from postharvest fumigation as a result of application of sodium cyanide...

  9. 40 CFR 180.130 - Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for... § 180.130 Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance for residues of the insecticide hydrogen cyanide from postharvest fumigation as a result of application of sodium cyanide...

  10. Biosynthetic Pathway for the Cyanide-Free Production of Phenylacetonitrile in Escherichia coli by Utilizing Plant Cytochrome P450 79A2 and Bacterial Aldoxime Dehydratase

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Yuta

    2014-01-01

    The biosynthetic pathway for the production of phenylacetonitrile (PAN), which has a wide variety of uses in chemical and pharmaceutical industries, was constructed in Escherichia coli utilizing enzymes from the plant glucosinolate-biosynthetic and bacterial aldoxime-nitrile pathways. First, the single-step reaction to produce E,Z-phenylacetaldoxime (PAOx) from l-Phe was constructed in E. coli by introducing the genes encoding cytochrome P450 (CYP) 79A2 and CYP reductase from Arabidopsis thaliana, yielding the E,Z-PAOx-producing transformant. Second, this step was expanded to the production of PAN by further introducing the aldoxime dehydratase (Oxd) gene from Bacillus sp. strain OxB-1, yielding the PAN-producing transformant. The E,Z-PAOx-producing transformant also produced phenethyl alcohol and PAN as by-products, which were suggested to be the metabolites of E,Z-PAOx produced by E. coli enzymes, while the PAN-producing transformant accumulated only PAN in the culture broth, which suggested that the CYP79A2 reaction (the conversion of l-Phe to E,Z-PAOx) was a potential bottleneck in the PAN production pathway. Expression of active CYP79A2 and concentration of biomass were improved by the combination of the autoinduction method, coexpression of groE, encoding the heat shock protein GroEL/GroES, N-terminal truncation of CYP79A2, and optimization of the culture conditions, yielding a >60-fold concentration of E,Z-PAOx (up to 2.9 mM). The concentration of PAN was 4.9 mM under the optimized conditions. These achievements show the potential of this bioprocess to produce nitriles and nitrile derivatives in the absence of toxic chemicals. PMID:25172862

  11. Cyanide

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Training Surveillance Preparation & Planning First Responders Lab Info Chemical Emergencies A–Z Abrin Adamsite Ammonia Arsenic Arsine Barium ... chemical. For more information on evacuation during a chemical emergency, see Facts About Evacuation . For more information on ...

  12. Cyanide-degrading enzymes for bioremediation 

    E-print Network

    Basile, Lacy Jamel

    2008-10-10

    to degrade cyanide in the presence of high concentrations of copper and silver. iv Although all four were relatively similar, the N. crassa cyanide hydratase (CHT) has the greatest thermal stability and widest pH range where activity remained above 50... stream_source_info Basile.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 71651 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Basile.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 CYANIDE-DEGRADING ENZYMES...

  13. Foundation technologies in synthetic biology: tools for use in understanding plant immunity 

    E-print Network

    Moore, John Wallace

    2012-06-25

    The plant hormone salicylic acid (SA) is an essential activator of plant immune responses directed against biotrophic pathogens. The transcription cofactor NPR1 (Nonexpressor of pathogenesis- related (PR) genes 1) functions ...

  14. 40 CFR 415.420 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. 415...MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production Subcategory § 415.420 Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production...

  15. 40 CFR 415.420 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. 415...MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production Subcategory § 415.420 Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production...

  16. 40 CFR 415.420 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. 415...MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production Subcategory § 415.420 Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production...

  17. 40 CFR 415.420 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. 415...MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production Subcategory § 415.420 Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production...

  18. 40 CFR 415.420 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. 415...MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production Subcategory § 415.420 Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production...

  19. Process for the displacement of cyanide ions from metal-cyanide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Barbara F. (Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Thomas W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to water-soluble polymers and the use of such water-soluble polymers in a process for the displacement of the cyanide ions from the metal ions within metal-cyanide complexes. The process waste streams can include metal-cyanide containing electroplating waste streams, mining leach waste streams, mineral processing waste streams, and related metal-cyanide containing waste streams. The metal ions of interest are metals that give very strong complexes with cyanide, mostly iron, nickel, and copper. The physical separation of the water-soluble polymer-metal complex from the cyanide ions can be accomplished through the use of ultrafiltration. Once the metal-cyanide complex is disrupted, the freed cyanide ions can be recovered for reuse or destroyed using available oxidative processes rendering the cyanide nonhazardous. The metal ions are released from the polymer, using dilute acid, metal ion oxidation state adjustment, or competing chelating agents, and collected and recovered or disposed of by appropriate waste management techniques. The water-soluble polymer can then be recycled. Preferred water-soluble polymers include polyethyleneimine and polyethyleneimine having a catechol or hydroxamate group.

  20. Incident, accident, catastrophe: cyanide on the Danube.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Solveig Argeseanu

    2005-06-01

    It has been described as the worst disaster since Chernobyl. In January 2000, a retaining wall failed at the Aurul gold processing plant in Romania, releasing a wave of cyanide and heavy metals that moved quickly from one river to the next through Romania, Hungary, the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and Bulgaria, killing tens of thousands of fish and other forms of wildlife and poisoning drinking-water supplies. This paper examines how and why the chemical spill at Baia Mare occurred and how responses to it emerged from circumstances at the global, local and immediate levels. The spill demonstrates the importance of the flow of information in framing and interpreting disasters, suggesting that such an event can go unnoticed or be viewed as catastrophic, depending on the political, historical and personal struggles that lead to its publicity. The paper offers a framework for understanding why the spill was alternately perceived as an incident, an accident and a catastrophe based on changing perceptions of culpability. PMID:15910645

  1. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hydrogen Cyanide and Cyanide Salts (Interagency Science Discussion Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is releasing the draft report, Toxicological Review of Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) and Cyanide Salts, that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the IRIS As...

  2. C-11 cyanide production system

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Dohyun; Alexoff, David; Kim, Sung Won; Hooker, Jacob; Ferrieri, Richard A

    2015-01-13

    A method for providing .sup.11C-labeled cyanides from .sup.11C labeled oxides in a target gas stream retrieved from an irradiated high pressure gaseous target containing O.sub.2 is provided, wherein .sup.11C labeled oxides are reduced with H.sub.2 in the presence of a nickel catalyst under a pressure and a temperature sufficient to form a product stream comprising at least about 95% .sup.11CH.sup.4 , the .sup.11CH.sub.4 is then combined with an excess of NH.sub.3 in a carrier/reaction stream flowing at an accelerated velocity and the combined .sup.11CH4 carrier/reaction stream is then contacted with a platinum (Pt) catalyst particulate supported on a substantially-chemically-nonreactive heat-stable support at a temperature of at least about 900 .degree. C., whereby a product stream comprising at least about 60%H.sup.11CN is provided in less than 10 minutes from retrieval of the .sup.11C labeled oxide.

  3. Foundation improvement techniques for heavy power plant structures at the Gilberton Power Project

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.W. ); Lewis, M.R. ); Whitcraft, J.S. ); Pernisi, R.E. )

    1989-01-01

    In recent years, a number of small cogeneration projects have been developed in various parts of the country to make use of the economic advantages afforded by the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act. The viability of these projects depends upon the ability of the developer, engineer and constructor to assemble a cost effective program that has the capability to produce electricity profitably. To assure success, the projects are, in many cases, constructed under lump sum contracts with relatively short schedules. For many of these projects, the site conditions are not ideal. It is usually necessary to construct the facilities n parcels of land not readily suitable for other purposes. Because of cost and schedule constraints, as well as potentially adverse soil conditions, there is a continuing need for development of innovative solutions to difficult foundation situations. This paper discusses an approach to one such problem.

  4. Recent developments in cyanide detection: a review.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2010-07-19

    The extreme toxicity of cyanide and environmental concerns from its continued industrial use continue to generate interest in facile and sensitive methods for cyanide detection. In recent years, there is also additional recognition of HCN toxicity from smoke inhalation and potential use of cyanide as a weapon of terrorism. This review summarizes the literature since 2005 on cyanide measurement in different matrices ranging from drinking water and wastewater, to cigarette smoke and exhaled breath to biological fluids like blood, urine and saliva. The dramatic increase in the number of publications on cyanide measurement is indicative of the great interest in this field not only from analytical chemists, but also researchers from diverse environmental, medical, forensic and clinical arena. The recent methods cover both established and emerging analytical disciplines and include naked eye visual detection, spectrophotometry/colorimetry, capillary electrophoresis with optical absorbance detection, fluorometry, chemiluminescence, near-infrared cavity ring down spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry, electrochemical methods (potentiometry/amperometry/ion chromatography-pulsed amperometry), mass spectrometry (selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry), gas chromatography (nitrogen phosphorus detector, electron capture detector) and quartz crystal mass monitors. PMID:20599024

  5. Recent developments in cyanide detection: A review

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jian; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.

    2010-01-01

    The extreme toxicity of cyanide and environmental concerns from its continued industrial use continue to generate interest in facile and sensitive methods for cyanide detection. In recent years there is also additional recognition of HCN toxicity from smoke inhalation and potential use of cyanide as a weapon of terrorism. This review summarizes the literature since 2005 on cyanide measurement in different matrices ranging from drinking water and wastewater, to cigarette smoke and exhaled breath to biological fluids like blood, urine and saliva. The dramatic increase in the number of publications on cyanide measurement is indicative of the great interest in this field not only from analytical chemists, but also researchers from diverse environmental, medical, forensic and clinical arena. The recent methods cover both established and emerging analytical disciplines and include naked eye visual detection, spectrophotometry/colorimetry, capillary electrophoresis with optical absorbance detection, fluorometry, chemiluminescence, near-infrared cavity ring down spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry, electrochemical methods (potentiometry/amperometry/ion chromatography-pulsed amperometry), mass spectrometry (selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry), gas chromatography (nitrogen phosphorus detector, electron capture detector) and quartz crystal mass monitors. PMID:20599024

  6. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hydrogen Cyanide (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of hydrogen cyanide and cyanide salts that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  7. Influence of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus (AMF) on degradation of iron-cyanide complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sut, Magdalena; Boldt-Burisch, Katja; Raab, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Soil contamination in the vicinities of former Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) sites is a worldwide known environmental issue. The pollutants, in form of iron-cyanide complexes, originating from the gas purification process, create a risk for human health due to potential release of toxic free cyanide, CN(aq) and HCN(g), (aq).The management and remediation of cyanide contaminated soil can be very challenging due to the complex chemistry and toxicity of CN compounds. The employment of phytoremediation to remove or stabilize contaminants at a former MGP site is an inexpensive process, but can be limited through shallow rotting, decreased biomass, poor growing and the risk of secondary accumulation. However, this adaptation may be enhanced via arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) activity, which may cooperate on the degradation, transformation or uptake of the contaminants. We would like to present our preliminary results from the ongoing project concerning toxic substrate-AMF-plant relation, based on studying the site of a former MGP site. In situ experiments contributed to identifying those fungi that are likely to persist in extremely acidic and toxic conditions. Subsequently, commercially available Rhizophagus irregularis was grown in sterilized, un-spiked soil with the roots of the host plant Calamagrostis epigejos. Extracted roots and AMF hyphae were used in the batch experiment, were the potential of this association on degradation of iron-cyanide complexes, in form of potassium ferrocyanide solution, was assessed.

  8. Evaluation of computer-aided foundation design techniques for fossil fuel power plants. Final report. [Includes list of firms involved, equipment, software, etc

    SciTech Connect

    Kulhawy, F.H.; Dill, J.C.; Trautmann, C.H.

    1984-11-01

    The use of an integrated computer-aided drafting and design system for fossil fuel power plant foundations would offer utilities considerable savings in engineering costs and design time. The technology is available, but research is needed to develop software, a common data base, and data management procedures. An integrated CADD system suitable for designing power plant foundations should include the ability to input, display, and evaluate geologic, geophysical, geotechnical, and survey field data; methods for designing piles, mats, footings, drilled shafts, and other foundation types; and the capability of evaluating various load configurations, soil-structure interactions, and other construction factors that influence design. Although no such integrated system exists, the survey of CADD techniques showed that the technology is available to computerize the whole foundation design process, from single-foundation analysis under single loads to three-dimensional analysis under earthquake loads. The practices of design firms using CADD technology in nonutility applications vary widely. Although all the firms surveyed used computer-aided drafting, only two used computer graphics in routine design procedures, and none had an integrated approach to using CADD for geotechnical engineering. All the firms had developed corporate policies related to system security, supervision, overhead allocation, training, and personnel compensation. A related EPRI project RP2514, is developing guidelines for applying CADD systems to entire generating-plant construction projects. 4 references, 6 figures, 6 tables.

  9. REVIEWS OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS OF POLLUTANTS: V. CYANIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a review of the scientific literature on the biological and environmental effects of cyanide. Included in the review are a general summary and a comprehensive discussion of the following topics as related to cyanide and specific cyanide compounds: physical and chemical pr...

  10. Seed sprout production: Consumables and a foundation for higher plant growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Day, Michelle; Thomas, Terri; Johnson, Steve; Luttges, Marvin

    1990-01-01

    Seed sprouts can be produced as a source of fresh vegetable materials and as higher plant seedlings in space. Sprout production was undertaken to evaluate the mass accumulations possible, the technologies needed, and the reliability of the overall process. Baseline experiments corroborated the utility of sprout production protocols for a variety of seed types. The automated delivery of saturated humidity effectively supplants labor intensive manual soaking techniques. Automated humidification also lend itself to modest centrifugal sprout growth environments. A small amount of ultraviolet radiation effectively suppressed bacterial and fungal contamination, and the sprouts were suitable for consumption.

  11. TREATMENT OF CYANIDE SOLUTIONS AND SLURRIES USING AIR-SPARGED HYDROCYCLONE (ASH) TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    Jan D. Miller; Terrence Chatwin; Jan Hupka; Doug Halbe; Tao Jiang; Bartosz Dabrowski; Lukasz Hupka

    2003-03-31

    The two-year Department of Energy (DOE) project ''Treatment of Cyanide Solutions and Slurries Using Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone (ASH) Technology'' (ASH/CN) has been completed. This project was also sponsored by industrial partners, ZPM Inc., Elbow Creek Engineering, Solvay Minerals, EIMCO-Baker Process, Newmont Mining Corporation, Cherokee Chemical Co., Placer Dome Inc., Earthworks Technology, Dawson Laboratories and Kennecott Minerals. Development of a new technology using the air-sparged hydrocyclone (ASH) as a reactor for either cyanide recovery or destruction was the research objective. It was expected that the ASH could potentially replace the conventional stripping tower presently used for HCN stripping and absorption with reduced power costs. The project was carried out in two phases. The first phase included calculation of basic processing parameters for ASH technology, development of the flowsheet, and design/adaptation of the ASH mobile system for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) recovery from cyanide solutions. This was necessary because the ASH was previously used for volatile organics removal from contaminated water. The design and modification of the ASH were performed with the help from ZPM Inc. personnel. Among the modifications, the system was adapted for operation under negative pressure to assure safe operating conditions. The research staff was trained in the safe use of cyanide and in hazardous material regulations. Cyanide chemistry was reviewed resulting in identification of proper chemical dosages for cyanide destruction, after completion of each pilot plant run. The second phase of the research consisted of three field tests that were performed at the Newmont Mining Corporation gold cyanidation plant near Midas, Nevada. The first field test was run between July 26 and August 2, 2002, and the objective was to demonstrate continuous operation of the modified ASH mobile system. ASH units were applied for both stripping and absorption, to recover cyanide, using the acidification-volatilization-reabsorption chemistry. Plant barren cyanide solution was used during the field tests. The original ASH system used for the field tests had been designed and fabricated by ZPM Inc. to remove volatile organic compounds from ground water. The system, even with a number of modifications, could not operate at optimum conditions for cyanide recovery. Reactors and pumps installed in the mobile system only allowed for the treatment of clear solutions, not slurries. Also the original mobile system was limited with respect to Q, the relative air flow rate, and the extent of recovery in a single stage. Due to the lack of automatic controls, the system required constant supervision of the University of Utah (U/U) team. In spite of these difficulties, application of the ASH mobile system was particularly attractive due to compactness of the apparatus and less than 1 second residence time of the aqueous phase in the cyclones. The performance of the ASH system was evaluated by comparison with theoretical predictions.

  12. Cyanide poisoning from metal cleaning solutions.

    PubMed

    Krieg, A; Saxena, K

    1987-05-01

    We report two cases of cyanide poisoning from accidental ingestion of an imported metal cleaning solution used by some Southeast Asians for shining coins. Both patients received specific therapy and recovered completely after a dramatic sequence of sudden collapse and severe cardiovascular compromise. PMID:2882711

  13. Aerobic cyanide degradation by bacterial isolates from cassava factory wastewater.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Sujatha; Dananjeyan, Balachandar; Krishnamurthy, Kumar; Benckiser, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains that utilize cyanide (CN) as a nitrogen source were isolated from cassava factory wastewater after enrichment in a liquid media containing sodium cyanide (1 mM) and glucose (0.2% w/v). The strains could tolerate and grow in cyanide concentrations of up to 5 mM. Increased cyanide levels in the media caused an extension of lag phase in the bacterial growth indicating that they need some period of acclimatisation. The rate of cyanide removal by the strains depends on the initial cyanide and glucose concentrations. When initial cyanide and glucose concentrations were increased up to 5 mM, cyanide removal rate increased up to 63 and 61 per cent by Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas putida. Metabolic products such as ammonia and formate were detected in culture supernatants, suggesting a direct hydrolytic pathway without an intermediate formamide. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of aerobic treatment with cyanide degrading bacteria for cyanide removal in cassava factory wastewaters. PMID:26413045

  14. Aerobic cyanide degradation by bacterial isolates from cassava factory wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Kandasamy, Sujatha; Dananjeyan, Balachandar; Krishnamurthy, Kumar; Benckiser, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains that utilize cyanide (CN) as a nitrogen source were isolated from cassava factory wastewater after enrichment in a liquid media containing sodium cyanide (1 mM) and glucose (0.2% w/v). The strains could tolerate and grow in cyanide concentrations of up to 5 mM. Increased cyanide levels in the media caused an extension of lag phase in the bacterial growth indicating that they need some period of acclimatisation. The rate of cyanide removal by the strains depends on the initial cyanide and glucose concentrations. When initial cyanide and glucose concentrations were increased up to 5 mM, cyanide removal rate increased up to 63 and 61 per cent by Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas putida. Metabolic products such as ammonia and formate were detected in culture supernatants, suggesting a direct hydrolytic pathway without an intermediate formamide. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of aerobic treatment with cyanide degrading bacteria for cyanide removal in cassava factory wastewaters. PMID:26413045

  15. Uptake of wetting method in Africa to reduce cyanide poisoning and konzo from cassava

    E-print Network

    Uptake of wetting method in Africa to reduce cyanide poisoning and konzo from cassava J. Howard Keywords: Konzo Cyanide poisoning Cyanogenic glucosides Cassava Wetting method a b s t r a c t Cassava breakdown to toxic cyanide. Cyanide ingestion from bitter cassava can cause cyanide poisoning sometimes

  16. Relationship Between Levels of Cyanide in Sudangrass Hybrids Incorporated into Soil and Suppression of Meloidogyne hapla

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, T. L.; Abawi, G. S.

    2002-01-01

    Sudangrass cv. Trudan 8 has been demonstrated to suppress infection of vegetables by Meloidogyne hapla (Mh). Hydrogen cyanide, released from the degradation of the cyanogenic glucoside (dhurrin) during decomposition of Trudan 8, was the primary factor involved in suppression of Mh on vegetables. The cyanide ion level in leaf tissue of 14 hybrids of sudangrass varied between 0.04 (cv. SX-8) to 1.84 parts per million (cv. 840F). The suppressive activity of the sudangrass hybrids against Mh was assessed in greenhouse tests by incorporating various amounts of leaf tissue into organic soil. After 1 week, eggs of Mh were added to the soil (8 eggs/cm[sup3] soil), which was then planted with lettuce as a bioassay plant. After 8 weeks, the lettuce roots were washed and rated for root-gall severity (RGS). Incorporation of sudangrass tissue resulted in a reduction of RGS up to 54%. There was a correlation between the amount of free cyanide incorporated into the soil and the reduction in RGS. Other green manures of cyanogenic plants tested were white clover, which resulted in a 45% reduction in RGS, and flax, which resulted in a 53% reduction in Mh penetration of lettuce roots. These results suggest that cyanogenic plants have potential as nematicidal green manures. PMID:19265902

  17. Collisional excitation of interstellar methyl cyanide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Sheldon

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical calculations are used to determine the collisional excitation rates of methyl cyanide under interstellar molecular cloud conditions. The required Q(L,M) as a function of kinetic temperature were determined by averaging fixed energy IOS (infinite order sudden) results over appropriate Boltzmann distributions of collision energies. At a kinetic temperature of 40 K, rates within a K ladder were found to be accurate to generally better than about 30 percent.

  18. Hydroxyapatite nanoarray-based cyanide biosensor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Suiping; Lei, Yong; Zhang, Yun; Tang, Jian; Shen, Guoli; Yu, Ruqin

    2010-03-15

    Here we report a simple, biomolecular-friendly protocol for the fabrication of a hydroxyapatite nanowires array (HANWA) biosensor of spatial positioning, large surface area, and abundant adsorbing sites and its application to cyanide sensing. The fabrication of HANWA is performed by template-assisted electrodeposition. The well-aligned hydroxyapatite nanoarray is composed of vertical nanowires with a diameter of approximately 200 nm and an average length of 1 microm. The electrochemical biosensor for the determination of cyanide through its inhibitory effect on horseradish peroxidase (HRP) encapsulated by chitosan (CHIT) on the platform of HANWA is demonstrated. The current organic-inorganic hybrid nanostructure provides excellent enzyme-substrate contact with enzyme activity well maintained. The densely distributed HANWA with large surface area and abundant adsorbing sites can provide a favorable electrochemical interface for the construction of electrochemical biosensor. A sensitive detection limit of 0.6 ng ml(-1) was obtained for cyanide. The proposed CHIT-HRP/HANWA biosensor has the advantages of spatial resolution, high sensitivity, rapid regeneration, and fast response associated with individual nanowires. It broadens the possible applications of chemosensors and biosensors, and it offers an alternative method for toxic substance determination. The new device holds great promise for environmental and food industrial monitoring of toxins. PMID:19944059

  19. Analysis of cyanide in whole blood of dosed cathartids

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krynitsky, A.J.; Wiemeyer, Stanley N.; Hill, E.F.; Carpenter, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    A gas-liquid chromatographic method was modified to quantify both unmetabolized ('free') and metabolized ('bound', i.e., thiocyanates) cyanides. The methods for both are efficient and sensitive to 0.05 ppm. Repeated freezing and thawing of whole blood from treated cathartids caused an initial increase in free cyanide concentrations, followed by a gradual decline to a plateau. Bound cyanide concentrations declined after repeated freezing and thawing.

  20. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic...Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized,...

  1. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic...Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized,...

  2. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic...Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized,...

  3. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic...Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized,...

  4. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic...Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized,...

  5. Continuous real-time measurement of aqueous cyanide

    DOEpatents

    Rosentreter, Jeffrey J.; Gering, Kevin L.

    2007-03-06

    This invention provides a method and system capable of the continuous, real-time measurement of low concentrations of aqueous free cyanide (CN) using an on-line, flow through system. The system is based on the selective reactivity of cyanide anions and the characteristically nonreactive nature of metallic gold films, wherein this selective reactivity is exploited as an indirect measurement for aqueous cyanide. In the present invention the dissolution of gold, due to the solubilization reaction with the analyte cyanide anion, is monitored using a piezoelectric microbalance contained within a flow cell.

  6. CARES Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a walk in your area. For more information, contact Dina@CaresFoundation.org Support Our Mission Research, education ... Meeting. Beaver County, PA, 2:00pm More events>>> Contact Us CARES Foundation is a nonprofit organization committed ...

  7. Dysautonomia Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of the Dysautonomia Foundation, Inc. Disclaimer Privacy Policy Website Disclaimer The information provided in the Dysautonomia Foundation ... address, email address) that you submit through this website with any third party organization without your explicit ...

  8. SODIUM CYANIDE AS A FISH POISON Marine Biological Laboratory

    E-print Network

    SODIUM CYANIDE AS A FISH POISON Marine Biological Laboratory APR 2 '^ 1958 WOODS HOLE, MASS of the Interior, Fred A. Seaton, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Arnie J. Suomela, Commissioner SODIUM 1958 #12;ABSTRACT Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of sodium cyanide

  9. 38. DETAIL OF RUINS OF CYANIDE MIXING AND EXTRACTION SHED, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. DETAIL OF RUINS OF CYANIDE MIXING AND EXTRACTION SHED, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. CYANIDE SOLUTION WAS PREPARED HERE AND PUMPED UP INTO THE PROCESSING TANKS, AND THE PREGNANT SOLUTION WAS ALSO EXTRACTED HERE AFTER THE LEACHING PROCESS WAS COMPLETE - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  10. Hydroxocobalamin: improved public health readiness for cyanide disasters.

    PubMed

    Sauer, S W; Keim, M E

    2001-06-01

    The United States is under the constant threat of a mass casualty cyanide disaster from industrial accidents, hazardous material transportation incidents, and deliberate terrorist attacks. The current readiness for cyanide disaster by the emergency medical system in the United States is abysmal. We, as a nation, are simply not prepared for a significant cyanide-related event. The standard of care for cyanide intoxication is the cyanide antidote kit, which is based on the use of nitrites to induce methemoglobinemia. This kit is both expensive and ill suited for out-of-hospital use. It also has its own inherent toxicity that prevents rapid administration. Furthermore, our hospitals frequently fail to stock this life-saving antidote or decline to stock more than one. Hydroxocobalamin is well recognized as an efficacious, safe, and easily administered cyanide antidote. Because of its extremely low adverse effect profile, it is ideal for out-of-hospital use in suspected cyanide intoxication. To effectively prepare for a cyanide disaster, the United States must investigate, adopt, manufacture, and stockpile hydroxocobalamin to prevent needless morbidity and mortality. PMID:11385334

  11. DRINKING WATER CRITERIA DOCUMENT FOR CYANIDES (FINAL DRAFT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Office of Drinking Water (ODW), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has prepared a Drinking Water Criteria Document on cyanide. This Criteria Document is an extensive review of the following topics: Physical and chemical properties of cyanides; Toxicokinetics and human expos...

  12. DEMONSTRATION OF ZINC CYANIDE RECOVERY USING REVERSE OSMOSIS AND EVAPORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field test was conducted to demonstrate closed-loop recovery of zinc cyanide at a job plating facility. Since the zinc cyanide bath operates at room temperature with very little evaporation from the bath, reverse osmosis (RO) treatment of the rinsewater must be supplemented by ...

  13. Enhancing public health preparedness for a terrorist attack involving cyanide.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Marc

    2008-07-01

    The US government considers cyanide to be among the most likely agents of chemical terrorism. Cyanide differs from many other biological or chemical agents for which little or no defense is available because its individual and public health effects are largely remediable through appropriate preparedness and response. Because the toxicity of the cyanide antidote currently available in the United States renders it ill-suited for use in terrorist incidents and other situations requiring rapid out-of-hospital treatment, hydroxocobalamin--an effective and safe cyanide antidote being used in other countries--has been introduced in the United States. Unlike the other available cyanide antidote, hydroxocobalamin can be administered at the scene of a cyanide disaster, and it need not be reserved for cases of confirmed cyanide poisoning but can be administered in cases of suspected poisoning. Both of these attributes facilitate the rapid intervention necessary for saving lives. To realize the potential benefits of hydroxocobalamin, progress also needs to be realized in other aspects of readiness, including but not limited to developing plans for ensuring local and regional availability of antidote, educating emergency responders and health care professionals in the recognition and management of cyanide poisoning, and raising public awareness of the potential for a chemical weapons attack and of how to respond. PMID:17976798

  14. Inhibition of aerobic respiration and dissimilatory perchlorate reduction using cyanide

    E-print Network

    Inhibition of aerobic respiration and dissimilatory perchlorate reduction using cyanide Yanguang reduction and aerobic respiration was examined using pure cultures of Azospira sp. KJ. Cyanide reduction; Respiration pathway 1. Introduction Perchlorate (ClOÀ 4 ) has been detected in impacted ground

  15. CYANIDE REMOVAL FROM COKE MAKING AND BLAST FURNACE WASTE WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study to determine the feasibility of removing cyanide from coke making and blast furnace waste waters by ion flotation or column precipitate flotation of iron ferrocyanides. Ion flotation was reasonably effective on ferricyanide, but not on cyanide ...

  16. HYDROGEN CYANIDE IN THE MURCHISON METEORITE

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzarello, Sandra

    2012-08-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites are meteorites that may contain abundant organic materials, including soluble compounds as diverse as amino acids and hydrocarbons. We report here the finding of hydrogen cyanide in the Murchison meteorite in amounts {<=} 10 ppm. HCN was never searched for in meteorites and its detection in sizeable amount is surprising in view of the extensive water phase that is recorded by the petrology of this type of meteorites and could have exhausted their HCN content through multiple reactions. The finding adds to the inventory of simple volatile molecules found in both comets and meteorites.

  17. Competing hydrostatic compression mechanisms in nickel cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, J.; Lucas, T. C.; Cairns, A. B.; Funnell, N. P.; Tucker, M. G.; Kleppe, A. K.; Hriljac, J. A.; Goodwin, A. L.

    2015-12-01

    We use variable-pressure neutron and X-ray diffraction measurements to determine the uniaxial and bulk compressibilities of nickel(II) cyanide, Ni(CN)2. Whereas other layered molecular framework materials are known to exhibit negative area compressibility, we find that Ni(CN)2 does not. We attribute this difference to the existence of low-energy in-plane tilt modes that provide a pressure-activated mechanism for layer contraction. The experimental bulk modulus we measure is about four times lower than that reported elsewhere on the basis of density functional theory methods [Phys. Rev. B 83 (2011) 024301].

  18. DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF AN EXPERIMENT FOR ASSESSING CYANIDE IN GOLD MINING WASTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gold mining wastes treated by heap leaching cyanidization typically contain several metallo-cyanide species. Accurate measurement of total cyanide by the most common methods in such a case may be hampered by the inadequate recoveries that occur for certain cyanide compounds (e.g....

  19. Differential Mitochondrial Electron Transport through the Cyanide-Sensitive and Cyanide-Insensitive Pathways in Isonuclear Lines of Cytoplasmic Male Sterile, Male Fertile, and Restored Petunia1

    PubMed Central

    Connett, Marie B.; Hanson, Maureen R.

    1990-01-01

    Three pairs of isonuclear lines of cytoplasmic male sterile (CMS) and fertile Petunia cells (Petunia hybrida [Hook] Vilm. and Petunia parodii L.S.M.) grown in suspension culture were examined for sensitivity to inhibitors of respiratory electron transport at time-points after transfer into fresh media. Cells from CMS lines differed from cells of fertile lines in their utilization of the cyanide-insensitive oxidase pathway. Under our culture regime, after approximately 3 days of culture cells from the CMS lines exhibited much lower cyanide-insensitive, salicylhydroxamic acid-sensitive respiration than cells from the fertile lines. This respiratory difference was shown to be specific to the mitochondrial alternative oxidase pathway by using other characteristic inhibitors of mitochondrial electron transport in experiments with isolated mitochondria. Immature anthers from CMS plants also showed lower alternative oxidase activity relative to anthers from male fertile plants, but no such difference was detected in leaf tissue, ovary or perianth tissue, or anthers collected just prior to anthesis. A cell line from a fertile plant carrying a nuclear fertility restorer gene and the CMS cytoplasm exhibited increased activity of the alternative pathway compared with the CMS lines. PMID:16667667

  20. Cobinamide chemistries for photometric cyanide determination. A merging zone liquid core waveguide cyanide analyzer using cyanoaquacobinamide

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jian; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.; Zelder, Felix H.; Boss, Gerry R.

    2012-01-01

    Diaquacobinamide (H2O)2Cbi2+ or its conjugate base hydroxyaquacobinamide (OH(H2O)Cbi+)) can bind up to two cyanide ions, making dicyanocobinamide. This transition is accompanied by a significant change in color, previously exploited for cyanide determination. The reagent OH(H2O)Cbi+ is used in excess; when trace amounts of cyanide are added, CN(H2O)Cbi+ should be formed. But the spectral absorption of CN(H2O)Cbi+ is virtually the same as that of OH(H2O)Cbi+. It has been inexplicable how trace amounts of cyanide are sensitively measured by this reaction. It is shown here that even with excess OH(H2O)Cbi+, (CN)2Cbi is formed first due to kinetic reasons; this only slowly forms CN(H2O)Cbi+. This understanding implies that CN(H2O)Cbi+ will itself be a better reagent. We describe a single valve merging zone flow analyzer that allows both sample and reagent economy. With a 50 cm liquid core waveguide (LCW) flow cell and an inexpensive fiber optic - charge coupled device array spectrometer, a S/N=3 limit of detection of 8 nM, a linear dynamic range to 6 ?M, and excellent precision (RSD 0.49% and 1.07% at 50 and 100 nM, respectively, n=5 each) are formed. At 1% carryover, sample throughput is 40 h?1. The setup is readily used to measure thiocyanate with different reagents. We demonstrate applicability to real samples by analyzing human saliva samples and hydrolyzed extracts of apple seeds, peach pits, and almonds. PMID:22769008

  1. Cobinamide chemistries for photometric cyanide determination. A merging zone liquid core waveguide cyanide analyzer using cyanoaquacobinamide.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Zelder, Felix H; Boss, Gerry R

    2012-07-29

    Diaquacobinamide (H(2)O)(2)Cbi(2+) or its conjugate base hydroxyaquacobinamide (OH(H(2)O)Cbi(+))) can bind up to two cyanide ions, making dicyanocobinamide. This transition is accompanied by a significant change in color, previously exploited for cyanide determination. The reagent OH(H(2)O)Cbi(+) is used in excess; when trace amounts of cyanide are added, CN(H(2)O)Cbi(+) should be formed. But the spectral absorption of CN(H(2)O)Cbi(+) is virtually the same as that of OH(H(2)O)Cbi(+). It has been inexplicable how trace amounts of cyanide are sensitively measured by this reaction. It is shown here that even with excess OH(H(2)O)Cbi(+), (CN)(2)Cbi is formed first due to kinetic reasons; this only slowly forms CN(H(2)O)Cbi(+). This understanding implies that CN(H(2)O)Cbi(+) will itself be a better reagent. We describe a single valve merging zone flow analyzer that allows both sample and reagent economy. With a 50 cm liquid core waveguide (LCW) flow cell and an inexpensive fiber optic-charge coupled device array spectrometer, a S/N=3 limit of detection of 8 nM, a linear dynamic range to 6 ?M, and excellent precision (RSD 0.49% and 1.07% at 50 and 100 nM, respectively, n=5 each) are formed. At 1% carryover, sample throughput is 40 h(-1). The setup is readily used to measure thiocyanate with different reagents. We demonstrate applicability to real samples by analyzing human saliva samples and hydrolyzed extracts of apple seeds, peach pits, and almonds. PMID:22769008

  2. A proton nuclear magnetic resonance study of sulfmyoglobin cyanide.

    PubMed

    Magliozzo, R S; Peisach, J

    1986-07-25

    The proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of sulfmyoglobin cyanide was studied at 400 MHz. The position of a methyl-group resonance at low field is consistent with a chlorin-like structure for the prosthetic group. The proton NMR spectrum of the cyanide derivative of the purified prosthetic group which decomposes upon extraction from the protein was found to be the same as that of the cyanide derivative of the prosthetic group extracted from myoglobin and a sample prepared from hemin-Cl. PMID:3730393

  3. Bromine cyanide as titrimetric oxidant in non-aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Chand Paul, R; Kumar Chauman, R; Parkash, R

    1974-06-01

    Bromine cyanide has been used for the potentiometric determination of sulphide, sulphite, thiocyanate, iodide, tin(II), arsenic(III),hydrazine hydrate, phenylhydrazine, 1,1-methylphenyldrazine and chloralhydrazine in glacial acetic acid and 1 : 1 acetic acid-acetic anhydride mixture, of thiourea, ethylthiourea, isopropylthiourea, benzylthiourea, alpha-phenylthiourea and o-tolythiourea in methanol, and of sodium methyl-, ethyl-,dimethyl-, diehtyl- and isopropyldithiocarbamates in ehtanol and acetonitrile media. The behaviour of bromine cyanide in these non- aqueous solvents has been compared with its behaviour in aqueous medium and with that of iodine cyanide in these non-aqueous solvents. PMID:18961514

  4. Chemical evolution. XXIX - Pyrimidines from hydrogen cyanide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferris, J. P.; Joshi, P. C.; Lawless, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    Compounds obtained by hydrolysis of HCN oligomers formed by allowing pH 9.2, 0.1 M cyanide to stand at room temperature for 4 to 12 months were analyzed. Hydrolysis of HCN oligomers yielded 4,5-dihydroxypyrimidine and 5-hydroxyuracil; orotic acid was detected after hydrolysis at pH 8.5. A unified pathway from diaminofumaronitrile to the pyrimidines observed is suggested. As purines, pyrimidines and amino acids are released by hydrolysis of HCN oligomers in either acidic or mildly basic aqueous solutions, they could have been formed on the primitive earth in spite of fluctuations in pH. 4,5-dihydroxypyrimidines appear to be likely candidates for incorporation into primitive nucleic acids, as they should undergo Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding with adenine.

  5. AN ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PERFORMANCE TESTING OF THE INDUSTRIAL TEST SYSTEM, INC. CYANIDE REAGENTSTRIP™ TEST KIT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyanide can be present in various forms in water. The cyanide test kit evaluated in this verification study (Industrial Test System, Inc. Cyanide Regent Strip ™ Test Kit) was designed to detect free cyanide in water. This is done by converting cyanide in water to cyanogen...

  6. SUBSTITUTING CADMIUM CYANIDE ELECTROPLATING WITH ZINC CHLORIDE ELECTROPLATING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The environmental and economic implications of substituting zinc chloride electroplating for cadmium cyanide electroplating were evaluated. he process substitution was successful in achieving product quality to satisfy the customer requirements for corrosion resistance. orrosion ...

  7. Management of cyanide toxicity in patients with burns.

    PubMed

    MacLennan, Louise; Moiemen, Naiem

    2015-02-01

    The importance of cyanide toxicity as a component of inhalational injury in patients with burns is increasingly being recognised, and its prompt recognition and management is vital for optimising burns survival. The evidence base for the use of cyanide antidotes is limited by a lack of randomised controlled trials in humans, and in addition consideration must be given to the concomitant pathophysiological processes in patients with burns when interpreting the literature. We present a literature review of the evidence base for cyanide antidotes with interpretation in the context of patients with burns. We conclude that hydroxycobalamin should be utilised as the first-line antidote of choice in patients with burns with inhalational injury where features consistent with cyanide toxicity are present. PMID:24994676

  8. ABIM Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... own voices A video compilation of real-world success stories in which physicians describe activities that have ... care. Join our community . Facebook Twitter Youtube Wordpress Google+ Sitemap | Privacy Policy © 2015 ABIM Foundation | 510 Walnut ...

  9. Epilepsy Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... with epilepsy See More Join Us for National Epilepsy Awareness Month #DareTo Go the Distance in finding ... receiving the best possible seizure care See More Epilepsy Foundation Pipeline Conference and Community Day Join is ...

  10. Kodak: MotorMaster+ Is the Foundation for Energy Efficiency at a Chemical and Imaging Technologies Plant (Revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2007-02-01

    This DOE Industrial Technologies Program spotlight describes how Kodak is saving 5.8 million kWh and $664,000 annually after upgrading or replacing inefficient motors in its Rochester, New York, plant.

  11. Temperature dependence of Henry's law constant for hydrogen cyanide. Generation of trace standard gaseous hydrogen cyanide.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Blackledge, William; Boss, Gerry R

    2010-04-15

    Primary data for the temperature dependent solubility of HCN in water do not presently exist for low concentrations of HCN at environmentally or physiologically relevant temperatures. Henry's Law constant (K(H), M/atm) for the vapor-solution equilibrium of HCN was determined in 0.1 M sodium phosphate buffer (adjusted to pH 9.00 +/- 0.03 at 296.6 +/- 0.1 K) from 287-311 K. Stable gas phase concentrations of HCN are generated by established techniques, via air equilibration of aqueous cyanide partitioned by a microporous membrane. The effluent gaseous HCN, in equilibrium with the constant temperature aqueous cyanide, was collected in dilute NaOH and determined by a spectrophotometrically using cobinamide. The K(H) of HCN may be expressed as ln K(H) (M/atm) = (8205.7 +/- 341.9)/T - (25.323 +/- 1.144); r(2) = 0.9914) where T is the absolute temperature in K. This corresponds to 9.02 and 3.00 M/atm at 25 and 37.4 degrees C, respectively, compared to actual measurements of 9.86 and 3.22 at 25.0 and 37.8 degrees C, respectively. The technique also allows for convenient generation of trace levels of HCN at ppbv-ppmv levels that can be further diluted. PMID:20302333

  12. Precious metal recovery from waste printed circuit boards using cyanide and non-cyanide lixiviants - A review.

    PubMed

    Akcil, Ata; Erust, Ceren; Gahan, Chandra Sekhar; Ozgun, Mehmet; Sahin, Merve; Tuncuk, Aysenur

    2015-11-01

    Waste generated by the electrical and electronic devices is huge concern worldwide. With decreasing life cycle of most electronic devices and unavailability of the suitable recycling technologies it is expected to have huge electronic and electrical wastes to be generated in the coming years. The environmental threats caused by the disposal and incineration of electronic waste starting from the atmosphere to the aquatic and terrestrial living system have raised high alerts and concerns on the gases produced (dioxins, furans, polybrominated organic pollutants, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) by thermal treatments and can cause serious health problems if the flue gas cleaning systems are not developed and implemented. Apart from that there can be also dissolution of heavy metals released to the ground water from the landfill sites. As all these electronic and electrical waste do posses richness in the metal values it would be worth recovering the metal content and protect the environmental from the pollution. Cyanide leaching has been a successful technology worldwide for the recovery of precious metals (especially Au and Ag) from ores/concentrates/waste materials. Nevertheless, cyanide is always preferred over others because of its potential to deliver high recovery with a cheaper cost. Cyanidation process also increases the additional work of effluent treatment prior to disposal. Several non-cyanide leaching processes have been developed considering toxic nature and handling problems of cyanide with non-toxic lixiviants such as thiourea, thiosulphate, aqua regia and iodine. Therefore, several recycling technologies have been developed using cyanide or non-cyanide leaching methods to recover precious and valuable metals. PMID:25704926

  13. HSC Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 2015 The HSC Foundation, all rights reserved. 2013 H Street NW, Suite 300 Washington, DC 20006 Phone: (202) 454-1220 info@hscfoundation.org Some pages of this website include PDF files, please download Adobe Reader to view them. Accessibility | The HSC Health Care System Code of Conduct

  14. Mathematics Foundations

    E-print Network

    Emshwiller, Eve

    Environmental Economics Envir St 367 Renewable Energy Systems Envir St 410 Minerals as a Public Problem Envir St Physics Foundations I Fall Math 221 Calc I 5 Liberal Studies 3 II Spring Math 222 Calc II 4 (Math 221) V Materials 3 (O Chem) Physics II Phys 202, 208 or 248 5 (Phys I) Physics I Phys 201, 207 or 247 5 (Math 221

  15. Disulfiram inhibition of cyanide formation after acetonitrile poisoning.

    PubMed

    De Paepe, Peter; Colin, Pieter; Depuydt, Pieter; Decavele, An-Sofie; De Smet, Julie; Boussery, Koen; Stove, Christophe; Benoit, Dominique; Verstraete, Alain; Van Bocxlaer, Jan; Buylaert, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Context Cyanide poisoning may be caused by acetonitrile, a common industrial organic solvent and laboratory agent. Objective To describe the potential use of disulfiram in treating acetonitrile poisoning in a human clinical case and to further study its effect in human liver microsomes in vitro. Case details A 30-year-old man initially presented with a cholinergic toxic syndrome following ingestion of aldicarb. Toxicological analysis revealed coingestion of ethanol. He subsequently developed severe metabolic acidosis caused by the cyanogenic compound acetonitrile which was erroneously interpreted as acetone in the chromatogram. After three treatments with hydroxocobalamin (5 g i.v.) and sodium thiosulfate (12.5 g i.v.) on days 2, 3, and 5, he had transient improvement but recurrent lactic acidosis. Treatment with disulfiram was associated on day 7 with resolution of metabolic acidosis and slowing of the decrease in acetonitrile concentration. He recovered from acetonitrile toxicity completely. The time course of acetonitrile, thiocyanate, and cyanide concentrations suggested that disulfiram inhibited cyanide formation. Results In vitro experiments with human liver microsomes showed the cyanide concentration was significantly lower after incubation with acetonitrile and disulfiram than acetonitrile alone (a mean 60% reduction in cyanide level). Discussion Although disulfiram was given late in the course of the poisoning it is possible that it contributed to the recovery. PMID:26623950

  16. Sources and geochemical evolution of cyanide and formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrhenius, G.

    1991-01-01

    The major source of cyanide has, in current paleoatmospheric models, been assumed to be the reaction of photodissociated thermospheric nitrogen with a limiting supply of stratospheric methane. Formaldehyde may be produced with more ease from an atmosphere of carbon dioxide as the dominant carbon species, and from carbonate in solution or sorbed in double layer hydroxide minerals. Potentially more important sources for cyanide and other carbon containing molecules are the partially photoprotected northern and southern auroral ovals where continuous currents reaching several mega-amperes induce ion-molecule reactions, extending into the lower stratosphere. In simulated environments of this kind, the cyanide ion is known to be produced from oxidized carbon species potentially more abundant than methane. Rainout of cyanide and formaldehyde place them in two different geochemical reaction reservoirs. In the anoxic Archean hydrosphere, about 1mM in Fe2(+), the cyanide ion would have been efficiently converted to the stable ferrocyanide complex Fe(CN) sub 6(4-), protecting it from the commonly considered fate of decomposition by hydrolysis, and eventually incorporating it in pyroaurite type minerals, most efficiently in green rust where it converts to insoluble ferriferrocyanide, prussian blue.

  17. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of sodium and potassium cyanide as a forensic signature.

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, Helen W; Horita, Juske; Moran, James J; Tomkins, Bruce A; Janszen, Derek B; Carman, April

    2012-01-01

    Sodium and potassium cyanide are highly toxic, produced in large amounts by the chemical industry, and linked to numerous high-profile crimes. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified cyanide as one of the most probable agents to be used in a chemical terrorism event. We investigated whether stable C and N isotopic content of sodium and potassium cyanide could serve as a forensic signature for sample matching, using a collection of 65 cyanide samples. Upon analysis, a few of the cyanide samples displayed nonhomogeneous isotopic content associated with degradation to a carbonate salt and loss of hydrogen cyanide. Most samples had highly reproducible isotope content. Of the 65 cyanide samples, >95% could be properly matched based on C and N isotope ratios, with a false match rate <3%. These results suggest that stable C and N isotope ratios are a useful forensic signature for matching cyanide samples. PMID:22040310

  18. Intramuscular Cobinamide Sulfite in a Rabbit Model of Sub-Lethal Cyanide Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Matthew; Kim, Jae G.; Mahon, Sari B.; Lee, Jangwoen; Kreuter, Kelly A.; Blackledge, William; Mukai, David; Patterson, Steve; Mohammad, Othman; Sharma, Vijay S.; Boss, Gerry R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the ability of an intramuscular cobinamide sulfite injection to rapidly reverse the physiologic effects of cyanide toxicity. Background Exposure to cyanide in fires and industrial exposures and intentional cyanide poisoning by terrorists leading to mass casualties is an ongoing threat. Current treatments for cyanide poisoning must be administered intravenously, and no rapid treatment methods are available for mass casualty cyanide exposures. Cobinamide is a cobalamin (vitamin B12) analog with an extraordinarily high affinity for cyanide that is more water-soluble than cobalamin. We investigated the use of intramuscular cobinamide sulfite to reverse cyanide toxicity induced physiologic changes in a sublethal cyanide exposure animal model. Methods New Zealand white rabbits were given 10 mg sodium cyanide intravenously over 60 minutes. Quantitative diffuse optical spectroscopy and continuous wave near infrared spectroscopy monitoring of tissue oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations were performed concurrently with blood cyanide level measurements and cobinamide levels. Immediately after completion of the cyanide infusion, the rabbits were injected intramuscularly with cobinamide sulfite (n=6) or inactive vehicle (controls, n=5). Results Intramuscular administration led to rapid mobilization of cobinamide and was extremely effective at reversing the physiologic effects of cyanide on oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin extraction. Recovery time to 63% of their baseline values in the central nervous system was in a mean of 1032 minutes in the control group and 9 minutes in the cobinamide group with a difference of 1023 minutes (95% confidence interval [CI] 116, 1874 minutes). In muscle tissue, recovery times were 76 and 24 minutes with a difference of 52 minutes (95% CI 7, 98min). Red blood cell cyanide levels returned towards normal significantly faster in cobinamide sulfite-treated animals than in control animals. Conclusions Intramuscular cobinamide sulfite rapidly and effectively reverses the physiologic effects of cyanide poisoning, suggesting that a compact cyanide antidote kit can be developed for mass casualty cyanide exposures. PMID:20045579

  19. Acute Cyanide Poisoning: Hydroxocobalamin and Sodium Thiosulfate Treatments with Two Outcomes following One Exposure Event

    PubMed Central

    Meillier, Andrew; Heller, Cara

    2015-01-01

    Cyanide is rapidly reacting and causes arrest of aerobic metabolism. The symptoms are diffuse and lethal and require high clinical suspicion. Remediation of symptoms and mortality is highly dependent on quick treatment with a cyanide antidote. Presently, there are two widely accepted antidotes: sodium thiosulfate and hydroxocobalamin. These treatments act on different components of cyanide's metabolism. Here, we present two cases resulting from the same source of cyanide poisoning and the use of both antidotes separately used with differing outcomes. PMID:26543483

  20. Encapsulation of thiosulfate: cyanide sulfurtransferase by mouse erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, P.; Ray, L.E.; Sander, C.; Way, J.L.; Sylvester, D.M.; Way, J.L.

    1986-03-30

    Murine carrier erythrocytes, prepared by hypotonic dialysis, were employed in the encapsulation of several compounds including (14C)sucrose, (3H)inulin, and bovine thiosulfate:cyanide sulfurtransferase (rhodanese), a mitochondrial enzyme which converts cyanide to thiocyanate. Approximately 30% of the added (14C)sucrose, (3H)inulin, and rhodanese was encapsulated by predialyzed erythrocytes, and a decrease in the mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin was observed. In the encapsulation of rhodanese a recovery of 95% of the erythrocytes was achieved and an 85% equilibrium was established. The addition of potassium cyanide (50 mM) to intact, rhodanese-loaded erythrocytes containing sodium thiosulfate resulted in its metabolism to thiocyanate. These results establish the potential use of erythrocytes as biodegradable drug carrier in drug antagonism.

  1. New Ground-State Measurements of Ethyl Cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauer, Carolyn S.; Pearson, John C.; Drouin, Brian J.; Yu, Shanshan

    2009-09-01

    The spectrum of ethyl cyanide, or propionitrile (CH3CH2CN), has been repeatedly observed in the interstellar medium with large column densities and surprisingly high temperatures in hot core sources. The construction of new, more sensitive, observatories accessing higher frequencies such as Herschel, ALMA, and SOFIA have made it important to extend the laboratory data for ethyl cyanide to coincide with the capabilities of the new instruments. We report extensions of the laboratory measurements of the rotational spectrum of ethyl cyanide in its ground vibrational state to 1.6 THz. A global analysis of the ground state, which includes all of the previous data and 3356 newly assigned transitions, has been fitted to within experimental error to J = 132, K = 36, using both Watson A-reduced and Watson S-reduced Hamiltonians.

  2. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed...

  3. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed...

  4. 40 CFR 415.420 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. 415.420 Section 415.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production Subcategory § 415.420 Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  5. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed...

  6. 40 CFR 415.420 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. 415.420 Section 415.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production Subcategory § 415.420 Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  7. 40 CFR 415.420 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. 415.420 Section 415.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production Subcategory § 415.420 Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  8. 40 CFR 415.420 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. 415.420 Section 415.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production Subcategory § 415.420 Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  9. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed...

  10. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed...

  11. 40 CFR 415.420 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. 415.420 Section 415.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production Subcategory § 415.420 Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United...

  12. Cleavage of Carbon-Carbon Bonds in Alkyl Cyanides Using Nickel(0)

    E-print Network

    Jones, William D.

    Cleavage of Carbon-Carbon Bonds in Alkyl Cyanides Using Nickel(0) Juventino J. Garci´a,*, Alma Are of alkyl cyanides afforded nickel(0) compounds of the type [(dippe)Ni(2 -RCN)], where R ) Me, Et, Pr, i Pr cyanides using [(dippe)NiH]2, leading to the formation of an 2- nitrile complex of nickel(0), which

  13. INTEGRATED BIOREACTOR SYSTEM FOR THE TREATMENT OF CYANIDE, METALS AND NITRATES IN MINE PROCESS WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    An innovative biological process is described for the tratment of cyanide-, metals- and nitrate-contaminated mine process water. The technology was tested for its ability to detoxify cyanide and nitrate and to immobilize metals in wastewater from agitation cyanide leaching. A pil...

  14. Kinetics of Alkaline Decomposition and Cyaniding of Argentian Rubidium Jarosite in NaOH Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, Eleazar Salinas; Sáenz, Eduardo Cerecedo; Ramírez, Marius; Cardona, Francisco Patiño; Labra, Miguel Pérez

    2012-10-01

    The alkaline decomposition of Argentian rubidium jarosite in NaOH media is characterized by an induction period and a progressive conversion period in which the sulfate and rubidium ions pass to the solution, leaving an amorphous iron hydroxide residue. The process is chemically controlled and the order of reaction with respect to hydroxide concentration in the range of 1.75 and 20.4 mol OH- m-3 is 0.94, while activation energy in the range of temperatures of 298 K to 328 K (25 °C to 55 °C) is 91.3 kJ mol-1. Cyaniding of Argentian rubidium jarosite in NaOH media presents a reaction order of 0 with respect to NaCN concentration (in the range of 5 to 41 mol m-3) and an order of reaction of 0.62 with respect to hydroxide concentration, in the range of 1.1 and 30 mol [OH-] m-3. In this case, the cyaniding process can be described, as in other jarosites, as the following two-step process: (1) a step (slow) of alkaline decomposition that controls the overall process followed by (2) a fast step of silver complexation. The activation energy during cyaniding in the range of temperatures of 298 K to 333 K (25 °C to 60 °C) is 43.5 kJ mol-1, which is characteristic of a process controlled by chemical reaction. These results are quite similar to that observed for several synthetic jarosites and that precipitated in a zinc hydrometallurgical plant (Industrial Minera México, San Luis Potosi).

  15. On OMC-1 temperatures determined from methyl cyanide observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    An analysis is performed on the J(k) = 12(k)-11(k) and 13(k)-12(k) transitions of methyl cyanide detected by other investigators in the direction of OMC-1. The original interpretation of those observations argues for the presence of two distinct temperature regions or possibly a temperature gradient within the cloud. The analysis presented here demonstrates that the observations of these particular molecular transitions are consistent with a single methyl cyanide emission region with a source kinetic temperature of 121.2 + or - 8.2 K and a molecular rotational temperature of 16.6 + or - 1.8 K.

  16. 37. DETAIL OF CYANIDE LEACHING TANK DRAIN DOOR AND PIPING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. DETAIL OF CYANIDE LEACHING TANK DRAIN DOOR AND PIPING SYSTEM. NOTE SPIGOT UNDER BOARD AT UPPER LEFT INSERTS INTO HOLE IN PIPE AT BOTTOM OF FRAME. CYANIDE SOLUTION WAS PUMPED INTO THE TANKS AND THE PREGNANT SOLUTION DRAINED OUT OF THE TANKS THROUGH THIS PIPE, AND BACK INTO A SEPARATE HOLDING TANK ON THE EAST SIDE OF THE MILL. TAILINGS WERE REMOVED FROM THE TANKS THROUGH THE ROUND DRAIN DOOR IN THE BOTTOM OF THE TANK (MISSING) SEEN AT TOP CENTER. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  17. Design of a Prototype of Water Purification by Plasma Technology as the Foundation for an Industrial Wastewater Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barillas, L.

    2015-03-01

    In order to mitigate the contamination of water sources due to the spill of sewage without any kind of treatment, mainly generated by the industrial sector; a prototype of water purification by plasma technology has been designed. The prototype will transform liquid water into plasma to eliminate the pathogens from the water, due to their exposure to ultraviolet radiation, electric fields and shock waves, which aid in the destruction of pollutants. The sewage will be accelerated at high speed to convert it into a liquid-gas mixture in order to transform it into plasma, which is achieved when the electrical discharge (of the type dielectric barrier discharge or DBD) is applied to the water by means of high voltage electrodes, from a source of alternating current (AC). Subsequently, the mixture slows down to be return into liquid phase and obtain clean water, all of these without a significantly rise of temperature. The device also has an automatic power control system. Finally, a short feasibility study was conducted in order to use this type of water cleaner in the future as a basis for a treatment plant of industrial waste water, so it comes to replace the current secondary and tertiary treatments used among the industry. It is intended that this new system will be more efficient and cheaper than the current waste water treatments.

  18. Turning the 'mustard oil bomb' into a 'cyanide bomb': aromatic glucosinolate metabolism in a specialist insect herbivore.

    PubMed

    Stauber, Einar J; Kuczka, Petrissa; van Ohlen, Maike; Vogt, Birgit; Janowitz, Tim; Piotrowski, Markus; Beuerle, Till; Wittstock, Ute

    2012-01-01

    Plants have evolved a variety of mechanisms for dealing with insect herbivory among which chemical defense through secondary metabolites plays a prominent role. Physiological, behavioural and sensorical adaptations to these chemicals provide herbivores with selective advantages allowing them to diversify within the newly occupied ecological niche. In turn, this may influence the evolution of plant metabolism giving rise to e.g. new chemical defenses. The association of Pierid butterflies and plants of the Brassicales has been cited as an illustrative example of this adaptive process known as 'coevolutionary armsrace'. All plants of the Brassicales are defended by the glucosinolate-myrosinase system to which larvae of cabbage white butterflies and related species are biochemically adapted through a gut nitrile-specifier protein. Here, we provide evidence by metabolite profiling and enzyme assays that metabolism of benzylglucosinolate in Pieris rapae results in release of equimolar amounts of cyanide, a potent inhibitor of cellular respiration. We further demonstrate that P. rapae larvae develop on transgenic Arabidopsis plants with ectopic production of the cyanogenic glucoside dhurrin without ill effects. Metabolite analyses and fumigation experiments indicate that cyanide is detoxified by ?-cyanoalanine synthase and rhodanese in the larvae. Based on these results as well as on the facts that benzylglucosinolate was one of the predominant glucosinolates in ancient Brassicales and that ancient Brassicales lack nitrilases involved in alternative pathways, we propose that the ability of Pierid species to safely handle cyanide contributed to the primary host shift from Fabales to Brassicales that occured about 75 million years ago and was followed by Pierid species diversification. PMID:22536404

  19. Cyanide Degradation under Alkaline Conditions by a Strain of Fusarium solani Isolated from Contaminated Soils

    PubMed Central

    Dumestre, A.; Chone, T.; Portal, J.; Gerard, M.; Berthelin, J.

    1997-01-01

    Several cyanide-tolerant microorganisms have been selected from alkaline wastes and soils contaminated with cyanide. Among them, a fungus identified as Fusarium solani IHEM 8026 shows a good potential for cyanide biodegradation under alkaline conditions (pH 9.2 to 10.7). Results of K(sup14)CN biodegradation studies show that fungal metabolism seems to proceed by a two-step hydrolytic mechanism: (i) the first reaction involves the conversion of cyanide to formamide by a cyanide-hydrolyzing enzyme, cyanide hydratase (EC 4.2.1.66); and (ii) the second reaction consists of the conversion of formamide to formate, which is associated with fungal growth. No growth occurred during the first step of cyanide degradation, suggesting that cyanide is toxic to some degree even in cyanide-degrading microorganisms, such as F. solani. The presence of organic nutrients in the medium has a major influence on the occurrence of the second step. Addition of small amounts of yeast extract led to fungal growth, whereas no growth was observed in media containing cyanide as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen. The simple hydrolytic detoxification pathway identified in the present study could be used for the treatment of many industrial alkaline effluents and wastes containing free cyanide without a prior acidification step, thus limiting the risk of cyanhydric acid volatilization; this should be of great interest from an environmental and health point of view. PMID:16535647

  20. Process for making boron nitride using sodium cyanide and boron

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1990-01-01

    This a very simple process for making boron nitride by mixing sodium cyanide and boron phosphate and heating the mixture in an inert atmosphere until a reaction takes place. The product is a white powder of boron nitride that can be used in applications that require compounds that are stable at high temperatures and that exhibit high electrical resistance.

  1. Integrated self-powered microchip biosensor for endogenous biological cyanide.

    PubMed

    Deng, Liu; Chen, Chaogui; Zhou, Ming; Guo, Shaojun; Wang, Erkang; Dong, Shaojun

    2010-05-15

    In this work we developed a fully integrated biofuel cell on a microchip, which consisted of glucose dehydrogenase supported (carbon nanotubes/thionine/gold nanoparticles)(8) multilayer as the anode, and the (carbon nanotubes/polylysine/laccase)(15) multilayer as the cathode. The as-obtained biofuel cell produced open circuit potential 620 mV and power density 302 microW cm(-2), showing great potential as a small power resource of portable electronics. Most importantly, for the first time we demonstrated the feasibility of developing a self-powered biosensor based on the inhibitive effect on microchip enzyme biofuel cell. With cyanide employed as the model analyte, this method showed a linear range of 3.0 x 10(-7) to 5.0 x 10(-4) M and a detection limit with 1.0 x 10(-7) M under the optimal conditions. The detection limit was lower than the acceptable cyanide concentration in drinking water (1.9 x 10(-6) M) according to the World Health Organization (WHO). This self-powered sensor was successfully used to detect the cyanide concentration in a real sample, cassava, which is the main carbohydrate resource in South America and Africa. This presented biosensor combined with a resistor and a multimeter demonstrated the general applicability as a fast and simple detection method in the determination of endogenous biological cyanide. PMID:20402491

  2. 169. PORTLAND FILTER FLOOR FROM SOUTHEAST. CYANIDE FEED TOWER TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    169. PORTLAND FILTER FLOOR FROM SOUTHEAST. CYANIDE FEED TOWER TO SUMP, LOWER RIGHT QUADRANT. DIAGONAL PIPE IN UPPER RIGHT IS AIR LINE TO AGITATORS. LAUNDER PARALLEL TO LEFT EDGE (FILLED WITH DEBRIS) RUNS FROM PRIMARY THICKENER No. 2 TO GOLD TANK No. 2 - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  3. Intoxication by Cyanide in Pregnant Sows: Prenatal and Postnatal Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Gotardo, André T.; Hueza, Isis M.; Manzano, Helena; Maruo, Viviane M.; Maiorka, Paulo C.; Górniak, Silvana L.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanide is a ubiquitous chemical in the environment and has been associated with many intoxication episodes; however, little is known about its potentially toxic effects on development. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of maternal exposure to potassium cyanide (KCN) during pregnancy on both sows and their offspring. Twenty-four pregnant sows were allocated into four groups that orally received different doses of KCN (0.0, 2.0, 4.0, and 6.0?mg/kg of body weight) from day 21 of pregnancy to term. The KCN-treated sows showed histological lesions in the CNS, thyroid follicle enlargement, thyroid epithelial thickening, colloid reabsorption changes, and vacuolar degeneration of the renal tubular epithelium. Sows treated with 4.0?mg/kg KCN showed an increase in the number of dead piglets at birth. Weaned piglets from all KCN-treated groups showed histological lesions in the thyroid glands with features similar to those found in their mothers. The exposure of pregnant sows to cyanide thus caused toxic effects in both mothers and piglets. We suggest that swine can serve as a useful animal model to assess the neurological, goitrogenic, and reproductive effects of cyanide toxicosis. PMID:26101526

  4. CYANIDE REMOVAL FROM REFINERY WASTEWATER USING POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the removal of low level cyanide in petroleum refinery wastewater by the addition of powdered activated carbon and cupric chloride to an activated sludge unit. The activated carbon and cupric chloride act as a catalyst in the oxidatio...

  5. 90. PORTLAND FILTER FLOOR FROM SOUTHEAST. CYANIDE FEED TOWER TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    90. PORTLAND FILTER FLOOR FROM SOUTHEAST. CYANIDE FEED TOWER TO SUMP, LOWER RIGHT QUADRANT. DIAGONAL PIPE IN UPPER RIGHT IS AIR LINE TO AGITATORS. LAUNDER PARALLEL TO LEFT EDGE (FILLED WITH DEBRIS) RUNS FROM PRIMARY THICKENER No. 2 TO GOLD TANK No. 2. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  6. Room-temperature synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles in different media and their application in cyanide photodegradation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cyanide is an extreme hazard and extensively found in the wastes of refinery, coke plant, and metal plating industries. A simple, fast, cost-effective, room-temperature wet chemical route, based on cyclohexylamine, for synthesizing zinc oxide nanoparticles in aqueous and enthanolic media was established and tested for the photodegradation of cyanide ions. Particles of polyhedra morphology were obtained for zinc oxide, prepared in ethanol (ZnOE), while spherical and some chunky particles were observed for zinc oxide, prepared in water (ZnOW). The morphology was crucial in enhancing the cyanide ion photocatalytic degradation efficiency of ZnOE by a factor of 1.5 in comparison to the efficiency of ZnOW at an equivalent concentration of 0.02 wt.% ZnO. Increasing the concentration wt.% of ZnOE from 0.01 to 0.09 led to an increase in the photocatalytic degradation efficiency from 85% to almost 100% after 180 min and a doubling of the first-order rate constant (k). PMID:24314056

  7. Room-temperature synthesis of zinc oxide nanoparticles in different media and their application in cyanide photodegradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagabas, Abdulaziz; Alshammari, Ahmad; Aboud, Mohamed FA; Kosslick, Hendrik

    2013-12-01

    Cyanide is an extreme hazard and extensively found in the wastes of refinery, coke plant, and metal plating industries. A simple, fast, cost-effective, room-temperature wet chemical route, based on cyclohexylamine, for synthesizing zinc oxide nanoparticles in aqueous and enthanolic media was established and tested for the photodegradation of cyanide ions. Particles of polyhedra morphology were obtained for zinc oxide, prepared in ethanol (ZnOE), while spherical and some chunky particles were observed for zinc oxide, prepared in water (ZnOW). The morphology was crucial in enhancing the cyanide ion photocatalytic degradation efficiency of ZnOE by a factor of 1.5 in comparison to the efficiency of ZnOW at an equivalent concentration of 0.02 wt.% ZnO. Increasing the concentration wt.% of ZnOE from 0.01 to 0.09 led to an increase in the photocatalytic degradation efficiency from 85% to almost 100% after 180 min and a doubling of the first-order rate constant ( k).

  8. Volatile-Mediated Killing of Arabidopsis thaliana by Bacteria Is Mainly Due to Hydrogen Cyanide? †

    PubMed Central

    Blom, Dirk; Fabbri, Carlotta; Eberl, Leo; Weisskopf, Laure

    2011-01-01

    The volatile-mediated impact of bacteria on plant growth is well documented, and contrasting effects have been reported ranging from 6-fold plant promotion to plant killing. However, very little is known about the identity of the compounds responsible for these effects or the mechanisms involved in plant growth alteration. We hypothesized that hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is a major factor accounting for the observed volatile-mediated toxicity of some strains. Using a collection of environmental and clinical strains differing in cyanogenesis, as well as a defined HCN-negative mutant, we demonstrate that bacterial HCN accounts to a significant extent for the deleterious effects observed when growing Arabidopsis thaliana in the presence of certain bacterial volatiles. The environmental strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PUPa3 was less cyanogenic and less plant growth inhibiting than the clinical strain P. aeruginosa PAO1. Quorum-sensing deficient mutants of C. violaceum CV0, P. aeruginosa PAO1, and P. aeruginosa PUPa3 showed not only diminished HCN production but also strongly reduced volatile-mediated phytotoxicity. The double treatment of providing plants with reactive oxygen species scavenging compounds and overexpressing the alternative oxidase AOX1a led to a significant reduction of volatile-mediated toxicity. This indicates that oxidative stress is a key process in the physiological changes leading to plant death upon exposure to toxic bacterial volatiles. PMID:21115704

  9. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF PROCEDURES FOR THE ANALYSIS OF SIMPLE CYANIDES, TOTAL CYANIDE, AND THIOCYANATE IN WATER AND WASTEWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seven methods for the analysis of simple cyanides have been investigated. Included are (1) an ion-exchange procedure, (2) a continuous-flow distillation, (3) and EDTA electrode method, (4) the American Iron and Steel Institute aeration method, (5) an EDTA aeration method, (6) the...

  10. Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Sodium and Potassium Cyanide as a Forensic Signature

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer, Helen W.; Horita, Juske; Moran, James J.; Tomkins, Bruce; Janszen, Derek B.; Carman, April J.

    2012-01-03

    Sodium and potassium cyanide are highly toxic, produced in large amounts by the chemical industry, and linked to numerous high-profile crimes. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified cyanide as one of the most probable agents to be used in a future chemical terrorism event. We investigated whether stable C and N isotopic content of sodium and potassium cyanide could serve as a forensic signature for sample matching, using a collection of 65 cyanide samples. A few of these samples displayed non-homogeneous isotopic content associated with degradation to a carbonate salt and loss of hydrogen cyanide. Most samples had highly reproducible isotope content. Of these, >95% could be properly matched based on C and N isotope ratios, with a false match rate <3%. These results suggest that stable C and N isotope ratios are a useful forensic signature for matching cyanide samples.

  11. Stable Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Ratios of Sodium and Potassium Cyanide as a Forensic Signature

    SciTech Connect

    Kruzer, Helen W; Horita, Juske; Moran, James J; Tomkins, Bruce A; Janszen, Derek B; Carman, April

    2012-01-01

    Sodium and potassium cyanide are highly toxic, produced in large amounts by the chemical industry, and linked to numerous high-profile crimes. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified cyanide as one of the most probable agents to be used in a future chemical terrorism event. We investigated whether stable C and N isotopic content of sodium and potassium cyanide could serve as a forensic signature for sample matching, using a collection of 65 cyanide samples. A few of these samples displayed non-homogeneous isotopic content associated with degradation to a carbonate salt and loss of hydrogen cyanide. Most samples had highly reproducible isotope content. Of these, >95% could be properly matched based on C and N isotope ratios, with a false match rate <3%. These results suggest that stable C and N isotope ratios are a useful forensic signature for matching cyanide samples.

  12. Calcium antagonists. A role in the management of cyanide poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Maduh, E.U.; Porter, D.W.; Baskin, S.I.

    1993-12-31

    The physiological role of calcium was demonstrated by Ringer (1883) when he linked the omission of calcium (Ca++) from the bathing medium to the induction of cardiac arrest in the isolated frog heart. This observation established that Ca++ controlled muscle contraction but it was not until the autumn of 1963 that the specific pharmacological significance of this contribution was realised by Fleckenstein (1964), leading to the development of Ca++ antagonism as a concept in drug action (Fleckenstein 1977). Identifying the precise role of Ca++ ions in toxic cell injury and tissue death attributable to drug and chemical intoxication has lagged behind developments in Ca++ physiology and pharmacology and to date, much remains to be learned, although studies aimed at characterising the role of Ca++ in cytotoxic cell injury are receiving intense attention (Bondy Komulainen 1988; Maduh et al. l988a, l99Oa,b; Orrenius et al. 1989; Trump et al. 1989). On the other hand, the importance of cyanide as a poison has been known from antiquity (for references to earlier literature see Baskin Fricke 1992; Solomonson 1981). In experimental cyanide poisoning, recent studies have examined alterations in cell Ca++ and the influence of Ca++ antagonists in the management of this chemical toxicological emergency. These efforts have principally focused on the cellular Ca++ homeostasis system, its interrelationship with cellular components, and its susceptibility to cyanide action.

  13. Cyanide-induced hyperthyroidism in male Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Adeniyi Temadiyo; Adekilekun, Tijani Ahmad; Adewale, Musa Adbus-Semiu; Adekemi, Abayomi Taiwo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cyanide is one of the major environmental pollutants termed thyroid disruptor. Regardless of its origin, it is a primary toxic agent. This study was designed to understand the impact of prolonged low dose cyanide exposure on the structure and function of the thyroid gland. Materials and Methods: Twelve F1 male Wistar rats were used for this study. They were divided into two groups of six animals each. The first group served as the control group and received 0.25M sucrose while the second group being the treated group received 2 mg/kg body weight (BW) potassium hexacyanoferrate III solution. The treatment duration was 56 days following which the animals were sacrificed by cervical dislocation. Blood samples were drawn to determine serum FT3, FT4 and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels. The thyroid gland was also excised and processed for light microscopic studies. Result: An increase in serum FT3 and FT4 with decrease serum TSH was obtained in the treated group. Application of one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) statistical analysis showed that there were highly significant differences (P < 0.05) in the activities of FT3, FT4 and TSH when compared with those of the control group. Light microscopic examination of thyroid gland from the treated group revealed marked epithelial hyperplasia with cellular degeneration and scanty cytoplasm while the control group revealed normal thyroid architecture. Conclusion: Results obtained revealed that hyperthyroidism was induced by cyanide. PMID:25013258

  14. Isolation of Cyanide Hydratase Mutants from Gloeocerospora Sorghi at alkaline pH 

    E-print Network

    Lessen, Henry Joseph

    2013-02-04

    sodium and potassium. This type of cyanide is referred to as simple, soluble cyanide, which is often the basis for industrial mixtures (Needham 2003, MERG 2001). Cyanide can also form complexes with members of the transition metals; however.... The antidote kit is comprised of three medications, amyl nitrite, sodium nitrite, and sodium thiosulfate (Hamel 2011). The amyl nitrite is inhaled, while the sodium nitrite and sodium thiosulfate are administered intravenously. The nitrites form...

  15. Total cyanide mass measurement with micro-ion selective electrode for determination of specific activity of carbon-11 cyanide.

    PubMed

    Shea, Colleen; Alexoff, David L; Kim, Dohyun; Hoque, Ruma; Schueller, Michael J; Fowler, Joanna S; Qu, Wenchao

    2015-08-01

    In this research, we aim to directly measure the specific activity (SA) of the carbon-11 cyanide ([(11)C]CN¯) produced by our in-house built automated [(11)C]HCN production system and to identify the major sources of (12)C-cyanide ((12)CN¯). The [(11)C]CN¯ is produced from [(11)C]CO2, which is generated by the (14)N(p,?)(11)C nuclear reaction using a cyclotron. Direct measurement of cyanide concentrations was accomplished using a relatively inexpensive, and easy to use ion selective electrode (ISE) which offered an appropriate range of sensitivity for detecting mass. Multiple components of the [(11)C]HCN production system were isolated in order to determine their relative contributions to (12)CN¯ mass. It was determined that the system gases were responsible for approximately 30% of the mass, and that the molecular sieve/nickel furnace unit contributed approximately 70% of the mass. Beam on target (33µA for 1 and 10min) did not contribute significantly to the mass. Additionally, we compared the SA of our [(11)C]HCN precursor determined using the ISE to the SA of our current [(11)C]CN¯ derived radiotracers determined by HPLC to assure there was no significant difference between the two methods. These results are the first reported use of an ion selective electrode to determine the SA of no-carrier-added cyanide ion, and clearly show that it is a valuable, inexpensive and readily available tool suitable for this purpose. PMID:25980658

  16. Total cyanide mass measurement with micro-ion selective electrode for determination of specific activity of carbon-11 cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, Colleen; Alexoff, David L.; Kim, Dohyun; Hoque, Ruma; Schueller, Michael J.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Qu, Wenchao

    2015-04-25

    In this study, we aim to directly measure the specific activity (SA) of the carbon-11 cyanide ([11C]CN¯) produced by our in-house built automated [11C]HCN production system and to identify the major sources of 12C-cyanide (12CN¯). The [11C]CN¯ is produced from [11C]CO2, which is generated by the 14N(p,?)11C nuclear reaction using a cyclotron. Direct measurement of cyanide concentrations was accomplished using a relatively inexpensive, and easy to use ion selective electrode (ISE) which offered an appropriate range of sensitivity for detecting mass. Multiple components of the [11C]HCN production system were isolated in order to determine their relative contributions to 12CN¯ mass. It was determined that the system gases were responsible for approximately 30% of the mass, and that the molecular sieve/nickel furnace unit contributed approximately 70% of the mass. Beam on target (33 µA for 1 and 10 min) did not contribute significantly to the mass. Additionally, we compared the SA of our [11C]HCN precursor determined using the ISE to the SA of our current [11C]CN¯ derived radiotracers determined by HPLC to assure there was no significant difference between the two methods. These results are the first reported use of an ion selective electrode to determine the SA of no-carrier-added cyanide ion, and clearly show that it is a valuable, inexpensive and readily available tool suitable for this purpose.

  17. Total cyanide mass measurement with micro-ion selective electrode for determination of specific activity of carbon-11 cyanide

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shea, Colleen; Alexoff, David L.; Kim, Dohyun; Hoque, Ruma; Schueller, Michael J.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Qu, Wenchao

    2015-04-25

    In this study, we aim to directly measure the specific activity (SA) of the carbon-11 cyanide ([11C]CN¯) produced by our in-house built automated [11C]HCN production system and to identify the major sources of 12C-cyanide (12CN¯). The [11C]CN¯ is produced from [11C]CO2, which is generated by the 14N(p,?)11C nuclear reaction using a cyclotron. Direct measurement of cyanide concentrations was accomplished using a relatively inexpensive, and easy to use ion selective electrode (ISE) which offered an appropriate range of sensitivity for detecting mass. Multiple components of the [11C]HCN production system were isolated in order to determine their relative contributions to 12CN¯ mass.more »It was determined that the system gases were responsible for approximately 30% of the mass, and that the molecular sieve/nickel furnace unit contributed approximately 70% of the mass. Beam on target (33 µA for 1 and 10 min) did not contribute significantly to the mass. Additionally, we compared the SA of our [11C]HCN precursor determined using the ISE to the SA of our current [11C]CN¯ derived radiotracers determined by HPLC to assure there was no significant difference between the two methods. These results are the first reported use of an ion selective electrode to determine the SA of no-carrier-added cyanide ion, and clearly show that it is a valuable, inexpensive and readily available tool suitable for this purpose.« less

  18. Sulfanegen sodium treatment in a rabbit model of sub-lethal cyanide toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Brenner, Matthew; Kim, Jae G.; Lee, Jangwoen; Mahon, Sari B.; Lemor, Daniel; Ahdout, Rebecca; Boss, Gerry R.; Blackledge, William; Jann, Lauren; Nagasawa, Herbert T.; Patterson, Steven E.

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the ability of intramuscular and intravenous sulfanegen sodium treatment to reverse cyanide effects in a rabbit model as a potential treatment for mass casualty resulting from cyanide exposure. Cyanide poisoning is a serious chemical threat from accidental or intentional exposures. Current cyanide exposure treatments, including direct binding agents, methemoglobin donors, and sulfur donors, have several limitations. Non-rhodanese mediated sulfur transferase pathways, including 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MPST) catalyze the transfer of sulfur from 3-MP to cyanide, forming pyruvate and less toxic thiocyanate. We developed a water-soluble 3-MP prodrug, 3-mercaptopyruvatedithiane (sulfanegen sodium), with the potential to provide a continuous supply of substrate for CN detoxification. In addition to developing a mass casualty cyanide reversal agent, methods are needed to rapidly and reliably diagnose and monitor cyanide poisoning and reversal. We use non-invasive technology, diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and continuous wave near infrared spectroscopy (CWNIRS) to monitor physiologic changes associated with cyanide exposure and reversal. A total of 35 animals were studied. Sulfanegen sodium was shown to reverse the effects of cyanide exposure on oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin rapidly, significantly faster than control animals when administered by intravenous or intramuscular routes. RBC cyanide levels also returned to normal faster following both intramuscular and intravenous sulfanegen sodium treatment than controls. These studies demonstrate the clinical potential for the novel approach of supplying substrate for non-rhodanese mediated sulfur transferase pathways for cyanide detoxification. DOS and CWNIRS demonstrated their usefulness in optimizing the dose of sulfanegen sodium treatment.

  19. Sulfanegen Sodium Treatment in a Rabbit Model of Sub-Lethal Cyanide Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Matthew; Kim, Jae G.; Lee, Jangwoen; Mahon, Sari B.; Lemor, Daniel; Ahdout, Rebecca; Boss, Gerry R.; Blackledge, William; Jann, Lauren; Nagasawa, Herbert T.; Patterson, Steven E.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the ability of intramuscular and intravenous sulfanegen sodium treatment to reverse cyanide effects in a rabbit model as a potential treatment for mass casualty resulting from cyanide exposure. Cyanide poisoning is a serious chemical threat from accidental or intentional exposures. Current cyanide exposure treatments, including direct binding agents, methemoglobin donors, and sulfur donors, have several limitations. Non-rhodanese mediated sulfur transferase pathways, including 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MPST) catalyze the transfer of sulfur from 3-MP to cyanide, forming pyruvate and less toxic thiocyanate. We developed a water soluble 3-MP prodrug, 3-mercaptopyruvatedithiane (sulfanegen sodium), with the potential to provide a continuous supply of substrate for CN detoxification. In addition to developing a mass casualty cyanide reversal agent, methods are needed to rapidly and reliably diagnose and monitor cyanide poisoning and reversal. We use non-invasive technology, diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and continuous wave near infrared spectroscopy (CWNIRS) to monitor physiologic changes associated with cyanide exposure and reversal. A total of 35 animals were studied. Sulfanegen sodium was shown to reverse the effects of cyanide exposure on oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin rapidly, significantly faster than control animals when administered by intravenous or intramuscular routes. RBC cyanide levels also returned to normal faster following both intramuscular and intravenous sulfanegen sodium treatment than controls. These studies demonstrate the clinical potential for the novel approach of supplying substrate for non-rhodanese mediated sulfur transferase pathways for cyanide detoxification. DOS and CWNIRS demonstrated their usefulness in optimizing the dose of sulfanegen sodium treatment. PMID:20705081

  20. Konzo and continuing cyanide intoxication from cassava in Mozambique J. Cliff a,*, H. Muquingue b

    E-print Network

    Konzo and continuing cyanide intoxication from cassava in Mozambique J. Cliff a,*, H. Muquingue b: Available online 21 July 2010 Keywords: Konzo Cyanide Cassava Mozambique a b s t r a c t In Mozambique, epidemics of the cassava-associated paralytic disease, konzo, have been reported in asso- ciation

  1. Development of biochemical and transformation cyanide antidotes. Final report, 13 January 1993-12 January 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Isom, G.E.

    1996-02-01

    Work for this contract involved both cyanide (Part 1) and sulfur mustard vesicants (Part 2). Part (1) To develop an in vitro screen for cyanide antidotes, compounds were tested empirically for ability to block the biochemical effects of cyanide in isolated rat pheochromocytoma (PC 12) cells. Effects in vitro were then compared to ability to block cyanide toxicity in mice. Of the five biochemical actions of cyanide tested, blockade of catalase activity was the one most correlated with in vivo protection. Overall, significant correlations were found between catalase protection in vitro and cyanide antidotal effects in vivo. Data involving 40 different chemical compounds showed that approximately 75% of the time, the in vitro assay was predictive of effectiveness in vivo. The results indicate that the ability of a compound to protect catalase in cultured PC 12 cells against cyanide is a useful screen for cyanide antidotal action in mice. Part (2) To develop an in vitro screen for antivesicant compounds. Mechanisms by which sulfur mustards cause cell death were studied in differentiated PC 12 cells. Both the `Apotag` method and electron microscopy indicated that apoptosis occurred after sulfur mustard exposure. A necrotic mechanism was also evident at higher concentrations (>10-4M). It may be possible to identify sulfur mustard antidotes by their ability to block each of these mechanisms in differentiated PC12 cells.

  2. Reactive photonic film for label-free and selective sensing of cyanide.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuesong; Peng, Lihua; Cui, Jiecheng; Li, Weina; Lin, Changxu; Xu, Dan; Tian, Tian; Zhang, Guanxin; Zhang, Deqing; Li, Guangtao

    2012-02-20

    Three-dimensional ordered inverse-opal films bearing a reactive trifluoroacetyl group are successfully constructed. Through the specific reaction between cyanide and trifluoroacetyl, the photonic films can selectively detect sub-micromolar levels of cyanide by distinct structural color change. Labeled molecules are not necessary for the sensing mechanism. PMID:22282395

  3. PEPTIDE FORMATION MEDIATED BY HYDROGEN CYANIDE TETRAMER: A POSSIBLE PREBIOTIC PROCESS

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sherwood; Flores, Jose; Ponnamperuma, Cyril

    1969-01-01

    Chemical evolution on the primitive earth must have involved condensation of ?-amino acids to peptides. Under aqueous conditions consistent with current conceptions of primordial waters, heating glycerine with the hydrogen cyanide tetramer, diaminomaleonitrile, yields dipeptide. If nitrogen was cycled through primordial waters as cyanide, peptide synthesis by stepwise tetramer-mediated condensation of ?-amino acids would have been a plausible process. PMID:5264133

  4. Gold-cyanide biosorption with L-cysteine Hui Niu and Bohumil Volesky*

    E-print Network

    Volesky, Bohumil

    Gold-cyanide biosorption with L-cysteine Hui Niu and Bohumil Volesky* Department of Chemical gold-cyanide biosorption by protonated Bacillus subtilis, Penicillium chrysogenum and Sargassum ¯uitans a positive charge when protonated [(biomass±cysteine±H )±(AuCN2 À )]. Deposited gold could be eluted from Au

  5. Development of a site-specific marine water quality standard for cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Arredondo, L.A.; Brix, K.V.; Cardwell, R.D.; Marsden, A.

    1995-12-31

    A study was conducted to develop a site-specific marine standard for cyanide. The generic cyanide standard of 1 {micro}g/L is ``driven`` by toxicity data for eastern rock crab (Cancer irroratus) zoeae. The reported LC50 for C. irroratus is 4.9 {micro}g/L cyanide and is six times more sensitive that any other marine species tested. In order to develop a site-specific standard for Washington state, cyanide toxicity tests were conducted using the first stage zoeae of Cancer magister and Cancer oregonensis, two Cancer resident to Puget Sound, in accordance with standard ASTM test methods. Testing with C. magister and C. oregonensis resulted in Species Mean Acute Values (SMAVS) of 68 and 131 {micro}g/L cyanide based on measured test concentrations. This is considerably higher than that reported for C. irroratus, is more consistent with cyanide toxicity values for other species tested, and results in a water quality criterion of 9.85 {micro}g/L cyanide with inclusion of these values in the data set. This paper presents the test methods used and the potential effects the test results may have on the marine water quality criterion for cyanide.

  6. OVERVIEW OF REMAINS OF DEWATERING BUILDING, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD CYANIDE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    OVERVIEW OF REMAINS OF DEWATERING BUILDING, LOOKING SOUTH TOWARD CYANIDE PROCESSING AREA. WATER USED IN PROCESSING AT THE STAMP MILL WAS CIRCULATED HERE FOR RECLAMATION. SANDS WERE SETTLED OUT AND DEPOSITED IN ONE OF TWO TAILINGS HOLDING AREAS. CLEARED WATER WAS PUMPED BACK TO THE MILL FOR REUSE. THIS PROCESS WAS ACCOMPLISHED BY THE USE OF SETTLING CONES, EIGHT FEET IN DIAMETER AND SIX FEET HIGH. THE REMAINS OF FOUR CONES ARE AT CENTER, BEHIND THE TANK IN THE FOREGROUND. TO THE LEFT IS THE MAIN ACCESS ROAD BETWEEN THE MILL AND THE PARKING LOT. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  7. DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER CYANIDE PROCESSING WORKS, LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF LOWER CYANIDE PROCESSING WORKS, LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM LARGE TAILINGS PILE. THE REMAINS OF THREE TEN FOOT DIAMETER SETTLING TANKS ARE AT CENTER. THE SCATTER IN THE CENTER FOREGROUND IS THE REMAINS OF A LARGE RECTANGULAR HOLDING TANK POSSIBLY A SETTLING TANK. THIS AREA WAS MOST LIKELY CONSTRUCTED LATER IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY AFTER MINING HAD CEASED AND ONLY TAILINGS WERE BEING RECLAIMED. AN EXACT DATE CANNOT BE DETERMINED HOWEVER THESE WORKS ARE DISTINCTLY DIFFERENT THAN THE ORIGINAL LAYOUT. THE SANDY AREA THAT OCCUPIES THE FOREGROUND AND THE CENTER ARE TAILINGS. - Keane Wonder Mine, Park Route 4 (Daylight Pass Cutoff), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  8. Cyanide and amygdalin as indicators of the presence of bitter almonds in imported raw almonds.

    PubMed

    Toomey, Valerie M; Nickum, Elisa A; Flurer, Cheryl L

    2012-09-01

    Consumer complaints received by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in August 2010 about raw organic almonds tasting "bitter" opened an investigation into the presence of bitter almonds in the imported product. Bitter almonds (Prunus amygdalus) contain the cyanogenic glucoside amygdalin, which hydrolyzes to produce cyanide. Ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry was used to detect and quantitate cyanide, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was utilized to detect amygdalin in the submitted samples. Control bitter almonds were found to contain 1.4 mg cyanide/g and an estimated level of 20-25 mg amygdalin/g. The questioned samples contained between 14 and 42 ?g cyanide/g and were positive for the presence of amygdalin. Sweet almonds were found to be negative for both compounds, at levels of detection of 4 ?g cyanide/g and 200 ?g amygdalin/g. PMID:22564183

  9. Nitrocobinamide, a New Cyanide Antidote That Can Be Administered by Intramuscular Injection

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Adriano; Jiang, Jingjing; Fridman, Alla; Guo, Ling T.; Shelton, G. Diane; Liu, Ming-Tao; Green, Carol; Haushalter, Kristofer J.; Patel, Hemal H.; Lee, Jangwoen; Yoon, David; Burney, Tanya; Mukai, David; Mahon, Sari B.; Brenner, Matthew; Pilz, Renate B.; Boss, Gerry R.

    2015-01-01

    Currently available cyanide antidotes must be given by intravenous injection over 5–10 min, making them illsuited for treating many people in the field, as could occur in a major fire, an industrial accident, or a terrorist attack. These scenarios call for a drug that can be given quickly, e.g., by intramuscular injection. We have shown that aquohydroxocobinamide is a potent cyanide antidote in animal models of cyanide poisoning, but it is unstable in solution and poorly absorbed after intramuscular injection. Here we show that adding sodium nitrite to cobinamide yields a stable derivative (referred to as nitrocobinamide) that rescues cyanide-poisoned mice and rabbits when given by intramuscular injection. We also show that the efficacy of nitrocobinamide is markedly enhanced by coadministering sodium thiosulfate (reducing the total injected volume), and we calculate that ?1.4 mL each of nitrocobinamide and sodium thiosulfate should rescue a human from a lethal cyanide exposure. PMID:25650735

  10. Photobiomodulation partially rescues visual cortical neurons from cyanide-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, H L; Whelan, H T; Eells, J T; Meng, H; Buchmann, E; Lerch-Gaggl, A; Wong-Riley, M

    2006-05-12

    Near-infrared light via light-emitting diode treatment has documented therapeutic effects on neurons functionally inactivated by tetrodotoxin or methanol intoxication. Light-emitting diode pretreatment also reduced potassium cyanide-induced cell death, but the mode of death via the apoptotic or necrotic pathway was unclear. The current study tested our hypothesis that light-emitting diode rescues neurons from apoptotic cell death. Primary neuronal cultures from postnatal rat visual cortex were pretreated with light-emitting diode for 10 min at a total energy density of 30 J/cm2 before exposing to potassium cyanide for 28 h. With 100 or 300 microM potassium cyanide, neurons died mainly via the apoptotic pathway, as confirmed by electron microscopy, Hoechst 33258, single-stranded DNA, Bax, and active caspase-3. In the presence of caspase inhibitor I, the percentage of apoptotic cells in 300microM potassium cyanide was significantly decreased. Light-emitting diode pretreatment reduced apoptosis from 36% to 17.9% (100 microM potassium cyanide) and from 58.9% to 39.6% (300 microM potassium cyanide), representing a 50.3% and 32.8% reduction, respectively. Light-emitting diode pretreatment significantly decreased the expression of caspase-3 elicited by potassium cyanide. It also reversed the potassium cyanide-induced increased expression of Bax and decreased expression of Bcl-2 to control levels. Moreover, light-emitting diode decreased the intensity of 5-(and -6) chloromethy-2', 7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate acetyl ester, a marker of reactive oxygen species, in neurons exposed to 300 microM potassium cyanide. These results indicate that light-emitting diode pretreatment partially protects neurons against cyanide-induced caspase-mediated apoptosis, most likely by decreasing reactive oxygen species production, down-regulating pro-apoptotic proteins and activating anti-apoptotic proteins, as well as increasing energy metabolism in neurons as reported previously. PMID:16464535

  11. Protection from cyanide-induced brain injury by the Nrf2 transcriptional activator carnosic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongxian; Lee, Brian; Nutter, Anthony; Song, Paul; Dolatabadi, Nima; Parker, James; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Newmeyer, Traci; Ambasudhan, Rajesh; McKercher, Scott R; Masliah, Eliezer; Lipton, Stuart A

    2015-06-01

    Cyanide is a life-threatening, bioterrorist agent, preventing cellular respiration by inhibiting cytochrome c oxidase, resulting in cardiopulmonary failure, hypoxic brain injury, and death within minutes. However, even after treatment with various antidotes to protect cytochrome oxidase, cyanide intoxication in humans can induce a delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Additional mechanisms are thought to underlie cyanide-induced neuronal damage, including generation of reactive oxygen species. This may account for the fact that antioxidants prevent some aspects of cyanide-induced neuronal damage. Here, as a potential preemptive countermeasure against a bioterrorist attack with cyanide, we tested the CNS protective effect of carnosic acid (CA), a pro-electrophilic compound found in the herb rosemary. CA crosses the blood-brain barrier to up-regulate endogenous antioxidant enzymes via activation of the Nrf2 transcriptional pathway. We demonstrate that CA exerts neuroprotective effects on cyanide-induced brain damage in cultured rodent and human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons in vitro, and in vivo in various brain areas of a non-Swiss albino mouse model of cyanide poisoning that simulates damage observed in the human brain. Cyanide, a potential bioterrorist agent, can produce a chronic delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Here, cyanide poisoning treated with the proelectrophillic compound carnosic acid, results in reduced neuronal cell death in both in vitro and in vivo models through activation of the Nrf2/ARE transcriptional pathway. Carnosic acid is therefore a potential treatment for the toxic central nervous system (CNS) effects of cyanide poisoning. ARE, antioxidant responsive element; Nrf2 (NFE2L2, Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2). PMID:25692407

  12. Biotic and abiotic processes contribute to successful anaerobic degradation of cyanide by UASB reactor biomass treating brewery waste water.

    PubMed

    Novak, Domen; Franke-Whittle, Ingrid H; Pirc, Elizabeta Tratar; Jerman, Vesna; Insam, Heribert; Logar, Romana Marinšek; Stres, Blaž

    2013-07-01

    In contrast to the general aerobic detoxification of industrial effluents containing cyanide, anaerobic cyanide degradation is not well understood, including the microbial communities involved. To address this knowledge gap, this study measured anaerobic cyanide degradation and the rearrangements in bacterial and archaeal microbial communities in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor biomass treating brewery waste water using bio-methane potential assays, molecular profiling, sequencing and microarray approaches. Successful biogas formation and cyanide removal without inhibition were observed at cyanide concentrations up to 5 mg l(-1). At 8.5 mg l(-1) cyanide, there was a 22 day lag phase in microbial activity, but subsequent methane production rates were equivalent to when 5 mg l(-1) was used. The higher cumulative methane production in cyanide-amended samples indicated that part of the biogas was derived from cyanide degradation. Anaerobic degradation of cyanide using autoclaved UASB biomass proceeded at a rate more than two times lower than when UASB biomass was not autoclaved, indicating that anaerobic cyanide degradation was in fact a combination of simultaneous abiotic and biotic processes. Phylogenetic analyses of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA genes for the first time identified and linked the bacterial phylum Firmicutes and the archaeal genus Methanosarcina sp. as important microbial groups involved in cyanide degradation. Methanogenic activity of unadapted granulated biomass was detected at higher cyanide concentrations than reported previously for the unadapted suspended biomass, making the aggregated structure and predominantly hydrogenotrophic nature of methanogenic community important features in cyanide degradation. The combination of brewery waste water and cyanide substrate was thus shown to be of high interest for industrial level anaerobic cyanide degradation. PMID:23726700

  13. Cyanide detection using a benzimidazole derivative in aqueous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-Bin; Hu, Jing-Han; Chen, Juan-Juan; Qi, Jing

    2014-12-01

    A novel cyanide selective fluorescent chemosensor S1 based on benzimidazole group and naphthalene group as the fluorescence signal group had been designed and synthesized. The receptor could instantly detect CN- anion over other anions such as F-, Cl-, Br-, I-, AcO-, H2PO4-, HSO4-, SCN- and ClO4- by fluorescence spectroscopy changes in aqueous solution (H2O/DMSO, 8:2, v/v) with specific selectivity and high sensitivity. The fluorescence color of the solution containing sensor S1 induced a remarkable color change from pale blue to mazarine only after the addition of CN- in aqueous solution while other anions did not cause obvious color change. Moreover, further study demonstrates the detection limit on fluorescence response of the sensor to CN- is down to 8.8 × 10-8 M, which is far lower than the WHO guideline of 1.9 × 10-6 M. Test strips based on S1 were fabricated, which could act as a convenient and efficient CN- test kit to detect CN- in pure water for “in-the-field” measurement. Thus, the probe should be potential applications in an aqueous environment for the monitoring of cyanide.

  14. 1. OIL HOUSE FOUNDATIONS, DIKE, AND PORTION OF SOUTH FRONT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. OIL HOUSE FOUNDATIONS, DIKE, AND PORTION OF SOUTH FRONT OF MAIN ASSEMBLY PLANT. VIEW TO WEST. - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Oil House, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Search How We Work Our Topics About RWJF Search Menu How We Work Areas of Focus Discovering ... winners For Grantees and Grantseekers The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation supports research and programs throughout the nation ...

  16. Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... National Conference at the Walt Disney World Swan & Dolphin Hotel in Orlando, Florida. The conference will consist ... 24, 2016 at Walt Disney World's Swan and Dolphin Hotel in Orlando, FL! Watch the OI Foundation’s ...

  17. Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... most current news and updates from the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation. Life with PF Education & Support About PF ... LEARN MORE We Imagine a World Without Pulmonary Fibrosis The mission of the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation (PFF) ...

  18. Cooley's Anemia Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    Cooley's Anemia Foundation Leading the Fight against Thalassemia About Us Mission/Purpose History Medical Research Board/Staff Contact the Foundation U.S. Patients: Register for Information Learn about Thalassemia About Thalassemia Clinical ...

  19. National Pancreas Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Pancreas Foundation Donate to NPF Contact Us Social Networking Button – Medium Search: Main menu Skip to primary ... 20814 1.866.726.2737 | Contact Us Social Networking Button – Medium © 2014 The National Pancreas Foundation | Health ...

  20. Temperature Dependence of Henry’s Law Constant for Hydrogen Cyanide. Generation of Trace Standard Gaseous Hydrogen Cyanide

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jian; Blackledge, William; Boss, Gerry R.

    2010-01-01

    Primary data for the temperature dependent solubility of HCN in water do not presently exist for low concentrations of HCN at environmentally or physiologically relevant temperatures. Henry’s Law constant (KH, M/atm) for the vapor-solution equilibrium of HCN was determined in 0.1 M sodium phosphate buffer (adjusted to pH 9.00±0.03 at 296.6±0.1 K) from 287–311 K. Stable gas phase concentrations of HCN are generated by established techniques, via air equilibration of aqueous cyanide partitioned by a microporous membrane. The effluent gaseous HCN, in equilibrium with the constant temperature aqueous cyanide, was collected in dilute NaOH and determined by a spectrophotometrically using cobinamide. The KH of HCN may be expressed as ln KH (M/atm) = (8205.7±341.9)/T ? (25.323±1.144); r2 = 0.9914) where T is the absolute temperature in K. This corresponds to 9.02 and 3.00 M/atm at 25 and 37.4 °C, respectively, compared to actual measurements of 9.86 and 3.22 at 25.0 and 37.8 °C, respectively. The technique also allows for convenient generation of trace levels of HCN at ppbv-ppmv levels that can be further diluted. PMID:20302333

  1. Effect of harvesting frequency, variety and leaf maturity on nutrient composition, hydrogen cyanide content and cassava foliage yield.

    PubMed

    Hue, Khuc Thi; Thanh Van, Do Thi; Ledin, Inger; Wredle, Ewa; Spörndly, Eva

    2012-12-01

    The experiment studied the effect of harvesting frequencies and varieties on yield, chemical composition and hydrogen cyanide content in cassava foliage. Foliage from three cassava varieties, K94 (very bitter), K98-7 (medium bitter) and a local (sweet), were harvested in three different cutting cycles, at 3, 6 and 9 months; 6 and 9 months and 9 months after planting, in a 2-yr experiment carried out in Hanoi, Vietnam. Increasing the harvesting frequency increased dry matter (DM) and crude protein (CP) production in cassava foliage. The K94 variety produced higher foliage yields than the other two varieties. Dry matter, neutral detergent fibre (NDF), acid detergent fibre (ADF) and total tannin content increased with months to the first harvest, whereas CP content decreased. Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) content was lower at the first harvest than at later harvests for all cutting cycles. At subsequent harvests the content of total tannins tended to decline, while HCN content increased (p<0.05). Chemical composition differed somewhat across varieties except for total tannins and ash. Dry matter, NDF, ADF and total tannins were higher in fully matured leaves, while CP and HCN were lower in developing leaves. PMID:25049534

  2. Prostate Cancer Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... as we Grow, Give and MOVE to raise awareness and critical funds for prostate cancer research. 10.01.2015 Foundation News 6 New ... 20 th Annual Home Run Challenge to Raise Awareness and Fund Research for Prostate Cancer 06.18.2015 Foundation News Prostate Cancer Foundation ...

  3. Potential water-quality effects from iron cyanide anticaking agents in road salt

    SciTech Connect

    Paschka, M.G.; Ghosh, R.S.; Dzombak, D.A.

    1999-10-01

    Water-soluble iron cyanide compounds are widely used as anticaking agents in road salt, which creates potential contamination of surface and groundwater with these compounds when the salt dissolves and is washed off roads in runoff. This paper presents a summary of available information on iron cyanide use in road salt and its potential effects on water quality. Also, estimates of total cyanide concentrations in snow-melt runoff from roadways are presented as simple mass-balance calculations. Although available information does not indicate a widespread problem, it also is clear that the water-quality effects of cyanide in road salt have not been examined much. Considering the large, and increasing, volume of road salt used for deicing, studies are needed to determine levels of total and free cyanide in surface and groundwater adjacent to salt storage facilities and along roads with open drainage ditches. Results could be combined with current knowledge of the fate and transport of cyanide to assess water-quality effects of iron cyanide anticaking agents used in road salt.

  4. Archean geochemistry of formaldehyde and cyanide and the oligomerization of cyanohydrin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrhenius, T.; Arrhenius, G.; Paplawsky, W.

    1994-01-01

    The sources and speciation of reduced carbon and nitrogen inferred for the early Archean are reviewed in terms of current observations and models, and known chemical reactions. Within this framework hydrogen cyanide and cyanide ion in significant concentration would have been eliminated by reaction with excess formaldehyde to form cyanohydrin (glycolonitrile), and with ferrous ion to formferrocyanide. Natural reactions of these molecules would under such conditions deserve special consideration in modeling of primordial organochemical processes. As a step in this direction, transformation reactions have been investigated involving glycolonitrile in the presence of water. We find that glycolonitrile, formed from formaldehyde and hydrogen cyanide or cyanide ion, spontaneously cyclodimerizes to 4-amino-2-hydroxymethyloxazole. The crystalline dimer is the major product at low temperatue (approximately 0 C); the yield diminishes with increasing temperature at the expense of polymerization and hydrolysis products. Hydrolysis of glycolamide and of oxazole yields a number of simpler organic molecules, including ammonia and glycolamide. The spontaneous polymerization of glycolonitrile and its dimer gives rise to soluble, cationic oligomers of as yet unknown structure, and, unless arrested, to a viscous liquid, insoluble in water. A loss of cyanide by reaction with formaldehyde, inferred for the early terrestrial hydrosphere and cryosphere would present a dilemma for hypotheses invoking cyanide and related compounds as concentrated reactants capable of forming biomolecular precursor species. Attempts to escape from its horns may take advantage of the efficient concentration and separation of cyanide as solid ferriferrocyanide, and most directly of reactions of glycolonitrile and its derivatives.

  5. Effect of organic matter on cyanide removal by illuminated titanium dioxide or zinc oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Effect of different type of organic compounds (humic acid, oxalate, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, nitrilotriacetic acid, phenol) on the photocatalytic removal of cyanide with TiO2 or ZnO was studied in this work with variation of the solution pH, contact time, initial cyanide concentration and type of organic compounds. Photocatalytic oxidation efficiency of cyanide with TiO2 was greatly affected by the solution pH. It increased as the solution pH decreased. Also maximum removal of cyanide by ZnO was observed near at neutral pH because of the reduced photocatalytic activity of ZnO at exceedingly low and high pH values originated from either acidic/photochemical corrosion of the catalyst and/or surface passivation with Zn(OH)2. Removal efficiency of cyanide greatly decreased in the presence of humic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, nitrilotriacetic acid compared to that without presence of organic compound because of the competitive oxidation as well as surface blocking by relatively large organic compounds. The oxidation pattern of cyanide was better described by first-order kinetic model. Finally photocatalytic reaction with TiO2 or ZnO can be effectively applied to treat synthetic wastewater contaminated with cyanide. PMID:24499704

  6. Depletion of host-derived cyanide in the gut of the eastern tent caterpillar, Malacosoma americanum.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, T D; Jeffers, P M; Mantella, D

    2002-02-01

    Using a colorimetric procedure, we assessed the HCN-p of black cherry leaves (Prunus serotina) ingested by the eastern tent caterpillar, Malacosoma americanum, and the cyanide content of the bolus as it passed thorough the caterpillar's digestive tract and into the detritus pool. The mean HCN-p of leaves in our study area was 1902 +/- 174 (SE) ppm. Young leaves found at the tips of growing branches, which the caterpillars preferred, had a significantly higher HCN-p (3032 +/- 258 ppm) than older leaves found at the middle (1542 +/- 243 ppm) or base of the shoot (1131 +/- 159 ppm). Following a bout of overnight feeding on young leaves, the cyanide content of the foregut and midgut boluses of early sixth-instar caterpillars averaged 631 +/- 161 ppm, and 14 +/- 3 ppm, respectively, indicating that host-derived cyanide is rapidly depleted as the bolus transits the gut. Some cyanide, however, remains. In three studies, the mean cyanide content of fresh fecal pellets ranged from approximately 20 to 38 ppm, while the dried, compacted pellets ranged from 63 to 85 ppm. Food in the foreguts of mature caterpillars dispersing over the ground in search of pupation sites had 417 +/- 99 ppm cyanide. The potential impact of this egested and caterpillar-transported cyanide on the consumer and detritivore communities is discussed. PMID:11925066

  7. Effects of elevated partial pressure of carbon dioxide and season of the year on forage quality and cyanide concentration of Trifolium repens L. from a FACE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frehner, Marco; Lüscher, Andreas; Hebeisen, Thomas; Zanetti, Silvia; Schubiger, Franz; Scalet, Mario

    Differently managed (cutting frequency and N fertilization) Trifolium repens monocultures were grown at 60 Pa and 35 Pa of pCO 2 (partial pressure of CO 2) in a Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (FACE) array. The concentrations of cyanide, digestible organic matter, crude protein and net energy for lactation were measured at different harvests throughout the growing season. The average cyanide concentrations differed significantly in the years and the seasons within the year; however, the concentrations were not affected by CO 2. Digestible organic matter, crude protein and net energy for lactation differed significantly with the seasons of the year and cutting frequencies. While digestible organic matter and net energy for lactation were not affected by elevated pCO 2, the concentration of crude protein decreased from 288 g kg -1 at ambient to 251 g kg -1 at elevated pCO 2. Since the crude protein concentration in herbage from Trifolium monocultures was very high even at elevated CO 2, it is suggested that this decrease in crude protein concentration does not negatively affect forage quality. We conclude that, in Trifolium herbage, the seasons of the year and management practices are more decisive for forage quality than changes in pCO 2. We shall discuss how forage quality and cyanide intake by ruminants may, however, be affected by CO 2-induced shifts in the proportion of species in mixed plant communities.

  8. Nickel-specific, slow-binding inhibition of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Rhodospirillum rubrum by cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Ensign, S.A.; Hyman, M.R.; Ludden, P.W. )

    1989-06-13

    The inhibition of purified carbon monoxide dehydrogenase from Rhodospirillum rubrum by cyanide was investigated in both the presence and absence of CO and electron acceptor. The inhibition was a time-dependent process exhibiting pseudo-first-order kinetics under both sets of conditions. The true second-order rate constants for inhibition were 72.2 M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} with both substrates present and 48.9 and 79.5 M{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively, for the reduced and oxidized enzymes incubated with cyanide. CO partially protected the enzyme against inhibition after 25-min incubation with 100 {mu}M KCN. Dissociation constants of 8.46 {mu}M (KCN) and 4.70 {mu}M (CO) were calculated for the binding of cyanide and CO to the enzyme. Cyanide inhibition was fully reversible under an atmosphere of CO after removal of unbound cyanide. N{sub 2} was unable to reverse the inhibition. The competence of nickel-deficient (apo) CO dehydrogenase to undergo activation by NiCl{sub 2} was unaffected by prior incubation with cyanide. Cyanide inhibition of holo-CO dehydrogenase was not reversed by addition of NiCl{sub 2}. {sup 14}CN{sup {minus}} remained associated with holoenzyme but not with apoenzyme through gel filtration chromatography. These findings suggest that cyanide is a slow-binding, active-site-directed, nickel-specific, reversible inhibitor of CO dehydrogenase. The authors propose that cyanide inhibits CO dehydrogenase by being a analogue of CO and by binding through enzyme-bound nickel.

  9. Cryptography Foundations RSA Sebastian Pauli

    E-print Network

    Pauli, Sebastian

    Cryptography Foundations RSA RSA Sebastian Pauli Sebastian Pauli RSA #12;Cryptography Foundations RSA Overview Public Key Cryptography Mathematical Foundations of RSA The Cryptosystem RSA Sebastian Pauli RSA #12;Cryptography Foundations RSA with private keys with public key Realization Cryptography

  10. A ferromagnetically coupled Fe42 cyanide-bridged nanocage

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Soonchul; Zheng, Hui; Liu, Tao; Hamachi, Kohei; Kanegawa, Shinji; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Shiota, Yoshihito; Hayami, Shinya; Mito, Masaki; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Nakano, Motohiro; Baker, Michael L.; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Duan, Chunying; Sato, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of artificial nanoscale units into superstructures is a prevalent topic in science. In biomimicry, scientists attempt to develop artificial self-assembled nanoarchitectures. However, despite extensive efforts, the preparation of nanoarchitectures with superior physical properties remains a challenge. For example, one of the major topics in the field of molecular magnetism is the development of high-spin (HS) molecules. Here, we report a cyanide-bridged magnetic nanocage composed of 18 HS iron(III) ions and 24 low-spin iron(II) ions. The magnetic iron(III) centres are ferromagnetically coupled, yielding the highest ground-state spin number (S=45) of any molecule reported to date. PMID:25562786

  11. A ferromagnetically coupled Fe42 cyanide-bridged nanocage.

    PubMed

    Kang, Soonchul; Zheng, Hui; Liu, Tao; Hamachi, Kohei; Kanegawa, Shinji; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Shiota, Yoshihito; Hayami, Shinya; Mito, Masaki; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Nakano, Motohiro; Baker, Michael L; Nojiri, Hiroyuki; Yoshizawa, Kazunari; Duan, Chunying; Sato, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Self-assembly of artificial nanoscale units into superstructures is a prevalent topic in science. In biomimicry, scientists attempt to develop artificial self-assembled nanoarchitectures. However, despite extensive efforts, the preparation of nanoarchitectures with superior physical properties remains a challenge. For example, one of the major topics in the field of molecular magnetism is the development of high-spin (HS) molecules. Here, we report a cyanide-bridged magnetic nanocage composed of 18 HS iron(III) ions and 24 low-spin iron(II) ions. The magnetic iron(III) centres are ferromagnetically coupled, yielding the highest ground-state spin number (S = 45) of any molecule reported to date. PMID:25562786

  12. The Submillimeter Wave Spectrum of Isotopic Methyl Cyanide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, J. C.; Mueller, H. S. P.

    1996-01-01

    The laboratory submillimeter wave rotational spectrum of the 13CH3CN, CH3C13CN, and CH3C15N isotopomers of methyl cyanide has been observed in natural abundance in the 294 to 607 GHz region. The maximum J and K values are 34 and 14, respectively. Fifteen additional CH3CN transitions up to K = 21 were also measured. The transitions of all four species are fitted to a symmetric top Hamiltonian, and the rotation and distortion constants are determined. The 14N quadrupole and spin rotation coupling constants are also calculated and presented. Suggested values for many other parameters, which could not be directly determined from the isotope spectra, are calculated from the normal species values and isotope relationships. The determined and calculated constants should predict the spectrum of the three isotopomers to well over 1 THz accurately enough for astronomical assignments.

  13. Torsional barrier and equilibrium structure of ethyl cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaison, J.; Margulès, L.; Mäder, H.; Sheng, M.; Rudolph, H. D.

    2008-12-01

    The quadratic, cubic and semi-diagonal quartic force field of ethyl cyanide has been calculated at the B3LYP level of theory employing a basis set of triple-? quality. A semi-experimental equilibrium structure has been derived from experimental ground state rotational constants and rovibrational interaction parameters calculated from the ab initio force field. This structure is in excellent agreement with the ab initio structure calculated at the CCSD(T) level of theory using a basis set of quadruple-? quality and a core correlation correction. The empirical structures are also determined and their accuracy is discussed. The potential barrier V3 hindering internal rotation of the methyl group has been calculated from 23 rotational transitions of CH 3CH 2C 15N which were found split into doublets, giving V3 = 3074(27) cal mol -1.

  14. Comparison of cobinamide to hydroxocobalamin in reversing cyanide physiologic effects in rabbits using diffuse optical spectroscopy monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Matthew; Mahon, Sari B.; Lee, Jangwoen; Kim, Jae; Mukai, David; Goodman, Seth; Kreuter, Kelly A.; Ahdout, Rebecca; Mohammad, Othman; Sharma, Vijay S.; Blackledge, William; Boss, Gerry R.

    2010-01-01

    Our purpose is to compare cobinamide to hydroxocobalamin in reversing cyanide (CN)–induced physiologic effects in an animal model using diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS). Cyanide poisoning is a major threat worldwide. Cobinamide is a novel molecule that can bind two molecules of cyanide, has a much higher binding affinity than hydroxocobalamin, and is more water soluble. We investigated the ability of equimolar doses of cobinamide and hydroxocobalamin to reverse the effects of cyanide exposure in an animal model monitored continuously by DOS. Cyanide toxicity was induced in 16 New Zealand white rabbits by intravenous infusion. Animals were divided into three groups: controls (n=5) received saline following cyanide, hydroxocobalamin (N=6) following cyanide, and cobinamide (N=5) following cyanide. Cobinamide caused significantly faster and more complete recovery of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations in cyanide-exposed animals than hydroxocobalamin- or saline-treated animals, with a recovery time constant of 13.8±7.1 min compared to 75.4±25.1 and 76.4±42.7 min, for hydroxocobalamin- and saline-treated animals, respectively (p<0.0001). This study indicates that cobinamide more rapidly and completely reverses the physiologic effects of cyanide than equimolar doses of cobalamin at the dose used in this study, and CN effects and response can be followed noninvasively using DOS. PMID:20210475

  15. Comparison of cobinamide to hydroxocobalamin in reversing cyanide physiologic effects in rabbits using diffuse optical spectroscopy monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenner, Matthew; Mahon, Sari B.; Lee, Jangwoen; Kim, Jae; Mukai, David; Goodman, Seth; Kreuter, Kelly A.; Ahdout, Rebecca; Mohammad, Othman; Sharma, Vijay S.; Blackledge, William; Boss, Gerry R.

    2010-01-01

    Our purpose is to compare cobinamide to hydroxocobalamin in reversing cyanide (CN)-induced physiologic effects in an animal model using diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS). Cyanide poisoning is a major threat worldwide. Cobinamide is a novel molecule that can bind two molecules of cyanide, has a much higher binding affinity than hydroxocobalamin, and is more water soluble. We investigated the ability of equimolar doses of cobinamide and hydroxocobalamin to reverse the effects of cyanide exposure in an animal model monitored continuously by DOS. Cyanide toxicity was induced in 16 New Zealand white rabbits by intravenous infusion. Animals were divided into three groups: controls (n=5) received saline following cyanide, hydroxocobalamin (N=6) following cyanide, and cobinamide (N=5) following cyanide. Cobinamide caused significantly faster and more complete recovery of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations in cyanide-exposed animals than hydroxocobalamin- or saline-treated animals, with a recovery time constant of 13.8+/-7.1 min compared to 75.4+/-25.1 and 76.4+/-42.7 min, for hydroxocobalamin- and saline-treated animals, respectively (p<0.0001). This study indicates that cobinamide more rapidly and completely reverses the physiologic effects of cyanide than equimolar doses of cobalamin at the dose used in this study, and CN effects and response can be followed noninvasively using DOS.

  16. Fluorescence excitation spectroscopic study of the jet-cooled acetyl cyanide

    E-print Network

    Kim, Sang Kyu

    Fluorescence excitation spectroscopic study of the jet-cooled acetyl cyanide Min-Chul Yoon, Young S. Choi, and Sang Kyu Kima) Department of Chemistry, Inha University, Inchon (402-751), Republic of Korea

  17. Regions Involved in the Oligomerization and Activity of the Spiral Forming Nitrilase Cyanide Dihydratase 

    E-print Network

    Park, Jason M

    2014-05-22

    , mutagenic, carcinogenic, and corrosive. Their toxicity can stem from the liberation of the cyano group as cyanide, or from actions of the larger nitrile itself (Pollak et al. 2000). As such, nitrilases are being investigated for the degradation of nitrile...

  18. MOVEMENT OF SELECTED METALS, ASBESTOS, AND CYANIDE IN SOIL: APPLICATIONS TO WASTE DISPOSAL PROBLEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents information on movement of selected hazardous substances in soil which can be applied to problems of selecting and operating land disposal sites for wastes containing arsenic, asbestos, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, cyanide, iron, lead, mercury, selen...

  19. Determination of total cyanide in Hanford Site high-level wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.I.; Pool, K.H.

    1994-05-01

    Nickel ferrocyanide compounds (Na{sub 2-x}Cs{sub x}NiFe (CN){sub 6}) were produced in a scavenging process to remove {sup 137}Cs from Hanford Site single-shell tank waste supernates. Methods for determining total cyanide in Hanford Site high-level wastes are needed for the evaluation of potential exothermic reactions between cyanide and oxidizers such as nitrate and for safe storage, processing, and management of the wastes in compliance with regulatory requirements. Hanford Site laboratory experience in determining cyanide in high-level wastes is summarized. Modifications were made to standard cyanide methods to permit improved handling of high-level waste samples and to eliminate interferences found in Hanford Site waste matrices. Interferences and associated procedure modifications caused by high nitrates/nitrite concentrations, insoluble nickel ferrocyanides, and organic complexants are described.

  20. APPLICATION AND EVALUATION OF ANALYTICAL PROCEDURES FOR TRACE METALS, TOTAL CYANIDES AND PHENOLICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical procedures for the determination of trace metals, total cyanides and phenolics were systematically evaluated for their applicability industry-wide. Matrix interferences, methods equivalency, and analytical precision were investigated through a series of duplicate and s...

  1. Measurement of the methyl cyanide E/A ratio in TMC-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minh, Y. C.; Irvine, W. M.; Ohishi, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Saito, S.; Kaifu, N.

    1993-01-01

    We have observed the methyl cyanide (CH3CN) J = 2-1 K = 0 and 1 transitions toward the cyanopolyyne peak of TMC-1 and have derived an E/A (ortho/para)abundance ratio N(E)/N(A) = 0.75 +/- 0.10. The total methyl cyanide column density is N(total) = 5 x 10 exp 12/sq cm toward TMC-1, in agreement with earlier results from the J = 1-0 lines.

  2. Foundation Design Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Carmody, John; Mosiman, Garrett; Handeen, Daniel; Huelman, Patrick; Christian, Jeffery

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to provide information that will enable designers, builders, and homeowners to understand foundation design problems and solutions. The foundation of a house is a somewhat invisible and sometimes ignored component of the building. It is increasingly evident, however, that attention to good foundation design and construction has significant benefits to the homeowner and the builder, and can avoid some serious future problems. Good foundation design and construction practice means not only insulating to save energy, but also providing effective structural design as well as moisture, termite, and radon control techniques where appropriate.

  3. Heritage Foundation: Court Philosophers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Constance

    1981-01-01

    Describes the Heritage Foundation, a nonprofit organization with considerable influence on policy formation in the Reagan administration. Recommendations from this group regarding science policy are discussed. (CS)

  4. Fate of process solution cyanide and nitrate at three nevada gold mines inferred from stable carbon and nitrogen isotope measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.A.; Grimes, D.J.; Rye, R.O.

    2000-01-01

    Stable isotope methods have been used to identify the mechanisms responsible for cyanide consumption at three heap-leach operations that process Carlin-type gold ores in Nevada, U.S.A. The reagent cyanide had ??15N values ranging from -5 to -2??? and ??13C values from -60 to -35???. The wide ??13C range reflects the use by different suppliers of isotopically distinct natural-gas feedstocks and indicates that isotopes may be useful in environmental studies where there is a need to trace cyanide sources. In heap-leach circuits displaying from 5 to 98% consumption of cyanide, barren-solution and pregnant-solution cyanide were isotopically indistinguishable. The similarity is inconsistent with cyanide loss predominantly by HCN offgassing (a process that in laboratory experiments caused substantial isotopic changes), but it is consistent with cyanide retention within the heaps as solids, a process that caused minimal isotopic changes in laboratory simulations, or with cyanide oxidation, which also appears to cause minimal changes. In many pregnant solutions cyanide was carried entirely as metal complexes, which is consistent with ferrocyanides having precipitated or cyanocomplexes having been adsorbed within the heaps. It is inferred that gaseous cyanide emissions from operations of this type are less important than has generally been thought and that the dissolution or desorption kinetics of solid species is an important control on cyanide elution when the spent heaps undergo rinsing. Nitrate, nitrite and ammonium had ??15N values of 1-16???. The data reflect isotopic fractionation during ammonia offgassing or denitrification of nitrate - particularly in reclaim ponds - but do not indicate the extent to which nitrate is derived from cyanide or from explosive residues. ?? The Institution of Mining and Metallurgy 2000.

  5. Cyanide binding to human plasma heme-hemopexin: A comparative study

    SciTech Connect

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Istituto Nazionale di Biostrutture e Biosistemi, Roma ; Leboffe, Loris; Polticelli, Fabio

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyanide binding to ferric HHPX-heme-Fe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyanide binding to ferrous HHPX-heme-Fe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dithionite-mediated reduction of ferric HHPX-heme-Fe-cyanide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyanide binding to HHPX-heme-Fe is limited by ligand deprotonation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyanide dissociation from HHPX-heme-Fe-cyanide is limited by ligand protonation. -- Abstract: Hemopexin (HPX) displays a pivotal role in heme scavenging and delivery to the liver. In turn, heme-Fe-hemopexin (HPX-heme-Fe) displays heme-based spectroscopic and reactivity properties. Here, kinetics and thermodynamics of cyanide binding to ferric and ferrous hexa-coordinate human plasma HPX-heme-Fe (HHPX-heme-Fe(III) and HHPX-heme-Fe(II), respectively), and for the dithionite-mediated reduction of the HHPX-heme-Fe(III)-cyanide complex, at pH 7.4 and 20.0 Degree-Sign C, are reported. Values of thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for cyanide binding to HHPX-heme-Fe(III) and HHPX-heme-Fe(II) are K = (4.1 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} M, k{sub on} = (6.9 {+-} 0.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 1} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, and k{sub off} = 2.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}; and H = (6 {+-} 1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -1} M, h{sub on} = 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -1} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}, and h{sub off} = (7.1 {+-} 0.8) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -2} s{sup -1}, respectively. The value of the rate constant for the dithionite-mediated reduction of the HHPX-heme-Fe(III)-cyanide complex is l = 8.9 {+-} 0.8 M{sup -1/2} s{sup -1}. HHPX-heme-Fe reactivity is modulated by proton acceptor/donor amino acid residue(s) (e.g., His236) assisting the deprotonation and protonation of the incoming and outgoing ligand, respectively.

  6. Acute electrocardiographic ST segment elevation may predict hypotension in a swine model of severe cyanide toxicity.

    PubMed

    Muncy, Tylan A; Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Varney, Shawn M; Pitotti, Rebecca; Boudreau, Susan

    2012-09-01

    Cyanide causes severe cardiac toxicity resulting in tachycardia, hypotension, and cardiac arrest; however, the clinical diagnosis can be difficult to make. A clinical finding that may precede or predict cyanide-induced hypotension may be a trigger to provide treatment earlier and improve outcomes in cyanide toxicity. Our primary objective was to determine if there is a clinically significant change in ST segment deviation measured on ECG during intravenous cyanide infusion that may predict cyanide-induced hypotension. As part of a larger study comparing antidotes for cyanide-induced shock, 30 swine were anesthetized and monitored and then intoxicated with a continuous cyanide infusion until severe hypotension (50 % of baseline mean arterial pressure) occurred. ECGs were obtained at baseline, every 5 min during infusion, and at the development of hypotension. Repeated measures of analysis of variance were used to determine significance. The mean weight for the 30 swine at baseline was 48 kg (range 45-52), pulse rate 86 beats/min (range 55-121), and systolic blood pressure 109 mmHg (range 90-121). The mean time to hypotension was 31 min (range 16-39). The mean amount of cyanide infused was 5 mg/kg (range 2.5-6.3 mg/kg). All animals (30/30) had ECG changes in repolarization or depolarization during cyanide infusion. Significant rhythm, repolarization, and conduction changes from baseline were observed prior to severe hypotension (p?cyanide-induced hypotension in our swine model. Leads V3 and V4 had the most pronounced with ST elevation, but we also detected electrocardiographic ST elevation inferiorly. Shortening of the QTc and lengthening of the PR interval were also detected before hypotension. PMID:22528590

  7. Foundations for Critical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bers, Trudy; Chun, Marc; Daly, William T.; Harrington, Christine; Tobolowsky, Barbara F.

    2015-01-01

    "Foundations for Critical Thinking" explores the landscape of critical-thinking skill development and pedagogy through foundational chapters and institutional case studies involving a range of students in diverse settings. By establishing a link between active learning and improved critical thinking, this resource encourages all higher…

  8. Establishing a School Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Juanita; Stewart, G. Kent

    2002-01-01

    A school foundation is a nonprofit, tax-exempt organization that finances school projects not covered by the district budget. Legal requirements and accounting procedures; the board of trustees and fund manager; use of volunteers; capitalization and sources of capital (gifts, bequests, fundraising activities); marketing the foundation; examples of…

  9. Foundations for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albanese, Andrew Richard

    2002-01-01

    Discusses private fundraising initiatives for public libraries, often through special foundations with full-time fundraisers. Highlights include experiences at the Public Library of Des Moines Foundation; metropolitan, suburban, and small public library initiatives; fundraising on the Web; effects on public support; outreach programs; bequests;…

  10. Cultivating Foundation Support for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Mary Kay, Ed.

    The process of acquiring financial support from private foundations is discussed in 26 essays, divided into five categories (Targeting the Foundation Market; Getting Started: Tools of the Trade; The Process of Foundation Fund Raising; The Grant Maker's Perspective; and Focused Programs and Foundation Support). A prologue, "Ethics and Foundation

  11. Ethyl Cyanide On Titan: Spectroscopic Detection and Mapping Using Alma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordiner, M. A.; Palmer, M. Y.; Nixon, C. A.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Teanby, N. A.; Charnley, S. B.; Mumma, M. J.; Kisiel, Z.; Serigano, J.; Kuan, Y.-J.; Chuang, Y.-L.; Wang, K.-S.

    2015-02-01

    We report the first spectroscopic detection of ethyl cyanide (C2H5CN) in Titan’s atmosphere, obtained using spectrally and spatially resolved observations of multiple emission lines with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The presence of C2H5CN in Titan’s ionosphere was previously inferred from Cassini ion mass spectrometry measurements of C2H5CNH+. Here we report the detection of 27 rotational lines from C2H5CN (in 19 separate emission features detected at \\gt 3? confidence) in the frequency range 222-241 GHz. Simultaneous detections of multiple emission lines from HC3N, CH3CN, and CH3CCH were also obtained. In contrast to HC3N, CH3CN, and CH3CCH, which peak in Titan’s northern (spring) hemisphere, the emission from C2H5CN is found to be concentrated in the southern (autumn) hemisphere, suggesting a distinctly different chemistry for this species, consistent with a relatively short chemical lifetime for C2H5CN. Radiative transfer models show that C2H5CN is most concentrated at altitudes ? 200 km, suggesting production predominantly in the stratosphere and above. Vertical column densities are found to be in the range (1-5) × 1014 cm-2.

  12. EXPENDITURE OBJECT CODES Foundation FOUNDATION EXPENDITURE OBJECT CODES are used primarily by Accounting Services for Foundation

    E-print Network

    Harms, Kyle E.

    object codes to book fixed assets. 8050 Transfers to LSU: Programmatic cost support provided by the LSU 6945 Foundation Campaign Media 7995 Foundation - Capital Assets Offset: Offset total of 7000 expense Foundation to the University. 8060 Grants to LSU Property Foundation 8065 Asset Proceeds to LSU Foundation

  13. Forward Genetics by Genome Sequencing Reveals That Rapid Cyanide Release Deters Insect Herbivory of Sorghum bicolor

    PubMed Central

    Krothapalli, Kartikeya; Buescher, Elizabeth M.; Li, Xu; Brown, Elliot; Chapple, Clint; Dilkes, Brian P.; Tuinstra, Mitchell R.

    2013-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing has allowed rapid progress in the application of forward genetics in model species. In this study, we demonstrated an application of next-generation sequencing for forward genetics in a complex crop genome. We sequenced an ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutant of Sorghum bicolor defective in hydrogen cyanide release and identified the causal mutation. A workflow identified the causal polymorphism relative to the reference BTx623 genome by integrating data from single nucleotide polymorphism identification, prior information about candidate gene(s) implicated in cyanogenesis, mutation spectra, and polymorphisms likely to affect phenotypic changes. A point mutation resulting in a premature stop codon in the coding sequence of dhurrinase2, which encodes a protein involved in the dhurrin catabolic pathway, was responsible for the acyanogenic phenotype. Cyanogenic glucosides are not cyanogenic compounds but their cyanohydrins derivatives do release cyanide. The mutant accumulated the glucoside, dhurrin, but failed to efficiently release cyanide upon tissue disruption. Thus, we tested the effects of cyanide release on insect herbivory in a genetic background in which accumulation of cyanogenic glucoside is unchanged. Insect preference choice experiments and herbivory measurements demonstrate a deterrent effect of cyanide release capacity, even in the presence of wild-type levels of cyanogenic glucoside accumulation. Our gene cloning method substantiates the value of (1) a sequenced genome, (2) a strongly penetrant and easily measurable phenotype, and (3) a workflow to pinpoint a causal mutation in crop genomes and accelerate in the discovery of gene function in the postgenomic era. PMID:23893483

  14. Poisoning and suicide by cyanide jewelry cleaner in the US Hmong community: a case series.

    PubMed

    Garlich, Fiona M; Alsop, Judith Ann; Anderson, Deborah L; Geller, Richard J; Kalugdan, Theresa Thao; Roberts, David J; Thomas, Lindsey C

    2012-02-01

    Over 200?000 persons of Hmong ethnicity live in the United States. The majority of this Southeast Asian ethnic group live in California, Minnesota and Wisconsin. Tradition plays a strong role in the Hmong population, and difficulty in assimilation into "Western ways" has been reported to result in depression and suicide attempts. Some products sold at Southeast Asian ethnic markets are well-known within the Hmong community to be lethal but are essentially unknown to the outside community. We describe eight cases in which cyanide-containing products were ingested by Hmong patients. Seven cases were suicide attempts involving the ingestion of a locally-purchased substance intended for cleaning metal, coins, or jewelry. One case involved the fatal ingestion of a cyanide-containing "herbal" cure. In the majority of the cases, cyanide was not initially suspected, and treatment was delayed due to lack of information regarding the product ingested. In the two patients who survived, the cyanide antidote kit (sodium nitrite, amyl nitrite, and sodium thiosulfate) was administered early. Clinicians should be aware that unusual and potentially lethal products are easily available at ethnic markets. Cyanide toxicity should be suspected, and empiric antidote therapy initiated early, in patients of Hmong or Southeast Asian descent who present with sudden and unexplained cardiovascular collapse and metabolic acidosis, especially in the setting of a suspected suicidal ingestion. PMID:22292976

  15. Histopathological alterations in spleen of freshwater fish Cyprinus carpio exposed to sublethal concentration of sodium cyanide

    PubMed Central

    David, M.; Kartheek, R.M.

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic ecosystems in areas with intense mining activity are often subject to cyanide contamination; the present study was aimed to evaluate the harmful effects of sodium cyanide on histoarchitechtural aspect of spleen of freshwater fish Cyprinus carpio using an in vivo approach. The fishes were exposed to a sublethal concentration of 0.2 mg/L of sodium cyanide for duration of 10 and 20 days and were further allowed to undergo recovery for 14 days in a toxicant free medium. From the present investigation findings like occurrence of haemosiderin pigment, melanomacrophage centers, vacuolation and necrotic eosinophils were evident in all the fishes exposed to sodium cyanide. However, changes were more pronounced in fish subjected to 10 days of exposure, which was followed by 20 days of exposure and 14 days of recovery. The study revealed that there seemed to be the presence of homeostatic mechanism in fish that allows them to stabilize and overcome stress, which in present case is caused by sublethal concentration of sodium cyanide. Since the recovery phenomenon may be adaptive and even strategic, the present investigation also throws a light on adaptive behaviour of fish under stressful environments. PMID:26623354

  16. Foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Can Help Contact Us The Foundation for Peripheral Neuropathy works to educate the public and healthcare professionals, ... of-the-art treatment for patients with peripheral neuropathy, and will be the catalyst for advancing innovative ...

  17. Children's Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... CBTF Justin's Hope Fund Grant Recipients Grants Children’s Brain Tumor Foundation, A non-profit organization, was founded ... and the long term outlook for children with brain and spinal cord tumors through research, support, education, ...

  18. National Fragile X Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... NFXF with happenings, events and more. Sign Up Contact Online Contact Form 2100 M St., NW Ste.170 Box ... Center of Missouri. Sitemap Disclaimer Intellectual Property Use Contact Copyright © 1998 - 2015 National Fragile X Foundation. All ...

  19. Hepatitis Foundation International

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nutrients in the food you eat into muscles, energy, hormones, blood clotting factors and immune factors. ImageT4 ... GIVES Amazon will donate 0.5% of the price of your eligible AmazonSmile purchases to Hepatitis Foundation ...

  20. Foundation Fighting Blindness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Campaign to End Blindness Other Ways to Fight Blindness Corporate Support Volunteer Take Action Honor a Loved ... taking place nationwide. Join Us We Are Ending Blindness The urgent mission of the Foundation Fighting Blindness ...

  1. American Vitiligo Research Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is required to use GTranslate multilingual website and translation delivery network Select Language English Afrikaans Albanian Arabic ... testing. Please Visit Our Donations Page American Vitiligo Research Foundation "We Walk By Faith, Not By Sight" ...

  2. Australian Mineral Foundation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowe, D. S.

    1980-01-01

    Provides details on the philosophy and operation of the Australian Mineral Foundation, established in 1970 to update professionals in the mining and petroleum industries. Services in continuing education courses and to secondary school teachers and students are described. (CS)

  3. A Foundation for Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, William A.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the funding of scientific research by the National Science Foundation (NSF) during the past 25 years. Reviews in general terms the types of broad research accomplished through NSF funds in various fields of science. (MLH)

  4. Cystic Fibrosis Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Learn about the status of CF drugs in development. Clinical Trials Help test new treatments for CF. Find ... Analysis Program Our Research Our Research Approach Drug Development Pipeline Clinical Trials CF Patient Registry Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics ( ...

  5. Cleft Palate Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... now available in English , Spanish , and Mandarin ! Student Scholarships The Cleft Palate Foundation awarded over $11,000 in college scholarships to full-time students with craniofacial differences. Apply ...

  6. Sarcoma Foundation of America

    MedlinePLUS

    ... season, don't forget that you can support sarcoma research by shopping through these links. App Now ... Join Donate Our Mission The mission of the Sarcoma Foundation of America (SFA) is to advocate for ...

  7. United Leukodystrophy Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... caregivers for support. Home About Us: The United Leukodystrophy Foundation (ULF), incorporated in 1982, is a non- ... research into causes, treatments, and prevention of the leukodystrophies. Leukodystrophies make up a group of genetic nervous ...

  8. National Reye's Syndrome Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Packages - Free! Talking to Tweens and Teens About Aspirin and Other Medications Join the Effort to Eradicate ... Foundation's LinkedIn profile Spread Awareness with the Kids & Aspirin Don't Mix car magnet ribbon. Get News & ...

  9. 9. May 20, 1963 SEED BUILDING FOUNDATION WALLS Under Construction. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. May 20, 1963 SEED BUILDING FOUNDATION WALLS Under Construction. Looking southeast showing north and west walls of Machinery Shed - Tucson Plant Material Center, Machinery Shed, 3241 North Romero Road, Tucson, Pima County, AZ

  10. Building foundation design handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Labs, K.; Carmody, J.; Sterling, R.; Shen, L.; Huang, Yu Joe; Parker, D.

    1988-05-01

    This design handbook contains a concise set of typical residential foundation construction details and recommends cost-effective insulation levels for a variety of basements, crawl spaces, and slab-on-grade foundations for most US regions. The construction details are accompanied by the critical design information needed for specifying structural integrity; thermal and vapor controls; subsurface drainage; waterproofing; backfilling and compaction; and decay, termite, and radon control measures. 402 refs., 122 figs., 97 tabs.

  11. Synthesis of hydrogen cyanide under simulated hydrothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinedo-González, Paulina

    Nitrogen is a fundamental element for life, where is present in structural (e.g., proteins), catalytic (e.g., enzymes and ribozymes), energy transfer (e.g., ATP) and information storage (RNA and DNA) biomolecules. Atmospheric and planetary models suggest that nitrogen was abundant in the early atmospheres of Earth as dinitrogen (N2 ), an inert gas under normal atmospheric conditions. To be available for prebiotic synthesis it must be converted into hydrogen cyanide (HCN), ammonia (NH3 ) and/or nitric oxide (NO), in a process referred to as nitrogen fixation. Due to the strength of the triple bond in N2 , nitrogen fixation, while thermodynamically favored is kinetically restricted. In a reducing atmosphere dominated by CH4 -N2 , thunderstorm lightning efficiently produces HCN and NH3 (Stribling and Miller, 1987). Nevertheless, photochemical and geochemical constraints strongly suggest that the early atmosphere was weakly reducing, dominated by CO2 and N2 with traces of CH4 , CO, and H2 (Kasting, 1993). Under these conditions, HCN is no longer synthesized in the lightning channel and instead NO is formed (Navarro-Gon?lez, et al., 2001). In volcanic plumes, where magmatic gases a were more reducing than in the atmosphere, NO can also be formed by the lava heat (Mather et al., 2004) or volcanic lightning (Navarro-Gon?lez et al., 1998). Surprisingly, dinitrogen can be a reduced to NH3 in hydrothermal systems (Brandes et al., 1998), but the formation of HCN and its derivates were not investigated. The present work explores the possibility of the formation of HCN as well as other nitrile derivatives catalyzed by mineral surfaces in hydrothermal vents. To simulate a hydrothermal atmosphere, the experiments were carried out in a stainless steel Parr R minireactor with a 0.1 M NH4 HCO3 solution (200 ml) with or without a mineral surface exposed at 1 bar at temperatures ranging from 100 to 375° C. Different mineral matrices are been investigated. Our preliminary results have been conducted with pyrite and quantified by headspace-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. These results indicate that catalysis induced by the mineral surface under hydrothermal conditions does not stop with the production of HCN, but the reaction continues leading to more complex nitriles. The experiments also reveal a clear trend between time and the production of more complex molecules, which are measurable by the chromatographic method. Brandes, J.A., Boctor, N.Z., Cody, G.D., Cooper, B. A., Hazen, R. M. and Yoder Jr, H.S. (1998). Abiotic nitrogen reduction on the early Earth. Nature 395, 365-367. Kasting J.F. (1993) Earth's early atmosphere. Science 259, 920-926. Mather, T.A., Pyle, D.M., and Allen, A.G. (2004) Volcanic source of fixed nitrogen in the early Earth's atmosphere. Geology 32, 905-908. Navarro-Gon?lez, R., Molina, M.J. and. Molina, L.T. (1998) Nitrogen fixation by volcanic a lightning in the early Earth. Geophys. Res. Lett. 25, 3123-3126. Navarro-Gon?lez, R., McKay, C.P. and Nna Mvondo, D. ( 2001) A possible nitrogen crisis for a Archean life due to reduced nitrogen fixation by lightning. Nature 412, 61-64. Stribling, R., and Miller, S.L. (1987) Energy yields for the hydrogen cyanide and formaldehyde synthesis: the HCN and amino acid concentrations in the primitive ocean. Origins Life 17, 261-273.

  12. The iPlant collaborative: cyberinfrastructure for plant biology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The iPlant Collaborative (iPlant) is a United States National Science Foundation (NSF)funded project that aims to create an innovative, comprehensive, and foundational cyberinfrastructure in support of plant biology research (PSCIC, 2006). iPlant is developing cyberinfrastructure that uniquely enabl...

  13. ETHYL CYANIDE ON TITAN: SPECTROSCOPIC DETECTION AND MAPPING USING ALMA

    SciTech Connect

    Cordiner, M. A.; Palmer, M. Y.; Nixon, C. A.; Charnley, S. B.; Mumma, M. J.; Serigano, J.; Irwin, P. G. J.; Teanby, N. A.; Kisiel, Z.; Wang, K.-S.

    2015-02-10

    We report the first spectroscopic detection of ethyl cyanide (C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN) in Titan’s atmosphere, obtained using spectrally and spatially resolved observations of multiple emission lines with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The presence of C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN in Titan’s ionosphere was previously inferred from Cassini ion mass spectrometry measurements of C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CNH{sup +}. Here we report the detection of 27 rotational lines from C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN (in 19 separate emission features detected at >3? confidence) in the frequency range 222–241 GHz. Simultaneous detections of multiple emission lines from HC{sub 3}N, CH{sub 3}CN, and CH{sub 3}CCH were also obtained. In contrast to HC{sub 3}N, CH{sub 3}CN, and CH{sub 3}CCH, which peak in Titan’s northern (spring) hemisphere, the emission from C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN is found to be concentrated in the southern (autumn) hemisphere, suggesting a distinctly different chemistry for this species, consistent with a relatively short chemical lifetime for C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN. Radiative transfer models show that C{sub 2}H{sub 5}CN is most concentrated at altitudes ?200 km, suggesting production predominantly in the stratosphere and above. Vertical column densities are found to be in the range (1–5) × 10{sup 14} cm{sup ?2}.

  14. Turn-off-on chemiluminescence determination of cyanide.

    PubMed

    Han, Suqin; Wang, Jianbo; Jia, Shize

    2015-02-01

    A flow injection chemiluminescence (FI-CL) method was developed for the determination of cyanide (CN(-) ) based on the recovered CL signal by Cu(2+) inhibiting a glutathione (GSH)-capped CdTe quantum dot (QD) and hydrogen peroxide system. In an alkaline medium, strong CL signals were observed from the reaction of CdTe QDs and H2O2 , and addition of Cu(2+) could cause significant CL inhibition of the CdTe QDs-H2O2 system. In the presence of CN(-) , Cu(2+) can be removed from the surface of CdTe QDs via the formation of particularly stable [Cu(CN)n ]((n-1)-) species, and the CL signal of the CdTe QDs-H2O2 system was efficiently recovered. Thus, the CL signals of CdTe QDs-H2O2 system were turned off and turned on by the addition of Cu(2+) and CN(-) , respectively. Further, the results showed that among the tested ions, only CN(-) could recover the CL signal, which suggested that the CdTe QDs-H2O2 -Cu(2+) CL system had highly selectivity for CN(-) . Under optimum conditions, the CL intensity and the concentration of CN(-) show a good linear relationship in the range 0.0-650.0?ng/mL (R(2) ?=?0.9996). The limit of detection for CN(-) was 6.0?ng/mL (3?). This method has been applied to detect CN(-) in river water and industrial wastewater with satisfactory results. PMID:24804930

  15. Past, present and future of cyanide antagonism research: From the early remedies to the current therapies

    PubMed Central

    Petrikovics, Ilona; Budai, Marianna; Kovacs, Kristof; Thompson, David E

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews milestones in antidotal therapies for cyanide (CN) spanning early remedies, current antidotal systems and research towards next generation therapies. CN has been a part of plant defense mechanisms for millions of years. It became industrially important in the nineteenth century with the advent of CN assisted gold mining and the use of CN as a pest control agent. The biochemical basis of CN poisoning was actively studied and key mechanisms were understood as early as 1929. These fundamental studies led to a variety of antidotes, including indirect CN binders that generate methemoglobin, direct CN binders such as hydroxocobalamin, and sulfur donors that convert CN to the less toxic thiocyanate. Research on blood gases at the end of the twentieth century shed new light on the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the body. The discovery of NO’s ability to compete with CN for enzymatic binding sites provided a previously missed explanation for the rapid efficacy of NO generating antidotes such as the nitrites. Presently used CN therapies include: methemoglobin/NO generators (e.g., sodium nitrite, amyl nitrite, and dimethyl aminophenol), sulfur donors (e.g., sodium thiosulfate and glutathione), and direct binding agents [(e.g., hydroxocobalamin and dicobalt salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (dicobalt edetate)]. A strong effort is being made to explore novel antidotal systems and to formulate them for rapid administration at the point of intoxication in mass casualty scenarios. New antidotes, formulations, and delivery systems are enhancing bioavailability and efficacy and hold promise for a new generation of improved CN countermeasures. PMID:26140275

  16. Rational design, synthesis of reaction-based dual-channel cyanide sensor in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun-Jian; Wei, Wei; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Xu, Xiao; Liu, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Qiu-Han; Dong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A new dual-channel sensor for the detection of cyanide was developed based on the conjugated of naphthalene and malononitrile. Upon the addition of CN(-), the sensor displayed very large blue-shift in both fluorescence (80nm) and absorption (120nm) spectra. The sensor of cyanide was performed via the nucleophilic attack of cyanide anion to vinylic groups of the sensor with a 1:1 binding stoichiometry and the color changed of the sensor is mainly due to the intramolecular charge transfer process improvement. The intramolecular charge transfer progress was blocked with color changed and fluorescence blue-shift. The mechanism of sensor reaction with CN(-) ion was studied using (1)H NMR and mass spectrometry. PMID:26231779

  17. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Parashar, Abhinav; Venkatachalam, Avanthika; Gideon, Daniel Andrew; Manoj, Kelath Murali

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Cyanide (CN) is a well-studied toxic principle, known to inhibit heme-enzymes. • Inhibition is supposed to result from CN binding at the active site as a ligand. • Diverse heme enzymes’ CN inhibition profiles challenge prevailing mechanism. • Poor binding efficiency of CN at low enzyme concentrations and ligand pressures. • CN-based diffusible radicals cause ‘non-productive electron transfers’ (inhibition). - Abstract: The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins’ active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes.

  18. Rational design, synthesis of reaction-based dual-channel cyanide sensor in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun-Jian; Wei, Wei; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Xu, Xiao; Liu, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Qiu-Han; Dong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A new dual-channel sensor for the detection of cyanide was developed based on the conjugated of naphthalene and malononitrile. Upon the addition of CN-, the sensor displayed very large blue-shift in both fluorescence (80 nm) and absorption (120 nm) spectra. The sensor of cyanide was performed via the nucleophilic attack of cyanide anion to vinylic groups of the sensor with a 1:1 binding stoichiometry and the color changed of the sensor is mainly due to the intramolecular charge transfer process improvement. The intramolecular charge transfer progress was blocked with color changed and fluorescence blue-shift. The mechanism of sensor reaction with CN- ion was studied using 1H NMR and mass spectrometry.

  19. Corrin-based chemosensors for the ASSURED detection of endogenous cyanide.

    PubMed

    Zelder, Felix; Tivana, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a staple food for more than 500 million people, especially in Africa and South America. However, its consumption bears risks as it contains cyanogenic glycosides that convert enzymatically to toxic cyanide during cell damage. To avoid serious health problems by unintentional cyanide intake, this dangerous product of decomposition must be removed before consumption. For monitoring such food processing procedures and for controlling the quality and safety of cassava products on the market, a convenient and reliable analytical method for routine applications without laboratory equipment is required. This Perspective summarizes the authors' work on corrin-based chemosensors for the ('naked-eye') detection of endogenous cyanide in cassava samples. Considering selectivity, sensitivity, handling and speed of detection, these systems are superior to currently applied methods. Based on these properties, the development of a test kit for application by rural farmers in remote locations is proposed. PMID:25317920

  20. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling of hydrogen cyanide levels in human breath.

    PubMed

    Stamyr, Kristin; Mörk, Anna-Karin; Johanson, Gunnar

    2015-08-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is a potent and fast-acting toxin increasingly recognized as an important cause of death in fire victims. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of cyanide poisoning are essential to avoid fatalities. Unfortunately, there are at present few rapid diagnostic methods. A noninvasive methodology would be to use HCN in exhaled air as a marker for systemic exposure. To explore this possibility, we developed a preliminary physiologically based pharmacokinetic model. The model suggests that breath HCN levels following inhalation exposure at near-lethal and lethal conditions are 0.1-1 ppm, i.e., one to two orders of magnitude higher than the background breath level of about 0.01 ppm in unexposed subjects. Hence, our results imply that breath analysis may be used as a rapid diagnostic method for cyanide poisoning. PMID:25069802

  1. Thermoelectric Mechanism and Interface Characteristics of Cyanide-Free Nanogold-Coated Silver Wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Yi-Wei; Hung, Fei-Yi; Lui, Truan-Sheng

    2015-11-01

    Traditional bath-plated gold contains a cyanide complex, which is an environmental hazard. In response, our study used a green plating process to produce cyanide-free gold-coated silver (cyanide-free ACA) bonding wire that has been proven to be a feasible alternative to gold bonding wire in semiconductor packaging. In this work, ACA wire annealed at 550°C was found to have stable microstructure and superior mechanical properties. Intermetallic compounds Ag2Al and AuAl2 grew from Ag-Au balls and Al pads after aging at 175°C for 500 h. After current testing, ACA wire was found to have improved electrical properties due to equiaxed grain growth. The gold nanolayer on the Ag surface increased the oxidation resistance. These results provide insights regarding the reliability of ACA wire in advanced bonding processes.

  2. Cyanide and Aflatoxin Loads of Processed Cassava (Manihot esculenta) Tubers (Garri) in Njaba, Imo State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Chikezie, Paul Chidoka; Ojiako, Okey A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The present study sought to investigate the role of palm oil, in conjunction with the duration of fermentation, on cyanide and aflatoxin (AFT) loads of processed cassava tubers (Garri). Materials and Methods: Matured cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) tubers were harvested from three different locations (Akunna, Mkporo-Oji and Durungwu) in Njaba Local Government Area, Imo State, Nigeria. The cassava tubers were processed into Garri according to standard schemes with required modifications and measured for cyanide content using titrimetric methods. Samples of Garri for determination of AFT levels were stored for 30 days before the commencement of spectrophotometric analysis. Results: Cyanide content of peeled cassava tubers was within the range of 4.07 ± 0.16-5.20 ± 0.19 mg hydrocyanic acid (HCN) equivalent/100 g wet weight, whereas the various processed cassava tubers was within the range of 1.44 ± 0.34-3.95 ± 0.23 mg HCN equivalents/100 g. For the 48 h fermentation scheme, Garri treated with palm oil exhibited marginal reduction in cyanide contents by 0.96%, 3.52% and 3.69%, whereas 4 h fermentation scheme is in concurrence with palm oil treatment caused 4.42%, 7.47% and 5.15% elimination of cyanide contents compared with corresponding untreated Garri samples (P > 0.05). Levels of AFT of the various Garri samples ranged between 0.26 ± 0.07 and 0.55 ± 0.04 ppb/100 g. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in AFT levels among the various samples in relation to their corresponding sources. Conclusion: The present study showed that the 48 h fermentation scheme for Garri production caused significant (P < 0.05) reduction, but did not obliterate the cyanide content of cassava tubers. Conversely, the 48 h fermentation scheme promoted the elevation of AFT levels, but was relatively reduced in Garri samples treated with palm oil. PMID:24403736

  3. Total cyanide analysis of tank core samples: Analytical results and supporting investigations. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Pool, K.H.

    1994-03-01

    The potential for a ferrocyanide explosion in Hanford site single-shelled waste storage tanks (SSTS) poses a serious safety concern. This potential danger developed in the 1950s when {sup 137}Cs was scavenged during the reprocessing of uranium recovery process waste by co-precipitating it along with sodium in nickel ferrocyanide salt. Sodium or potassium ferrocyanide and nickel sulfate were added to the liquid waste stored in SSTs. The tank storage space resulting from the scavenging process was subsequently used to store other waste types. Ferrocyanide salts in combinations with oxidizing agents, such as nitrate and nitrite, are known to explode when key parameters (temperature, water content, oxidant concentration, and fuel [cyanide]) are in place. Therefore, reliable total cyanide analysis data for actual SST materials are required to address the safety issue. Accepted cyanide analysis procedures do not yield reliable results for samples containing nickel ferrocyanide materials because the compounds are insoluble in acidic media. Analytical chemists at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) have developed a modified microdistillation procedure (see below) for analyzing total cyanide in waste tank matrices containing nickel ferrocyanide materials. Pacific Northwest Laboratory analyzed samples from Hanford Waste Tank 241-C-112 cores 34, 35, and 36 for total cyanide content using technical procedure PNL-ALO-285 {open_quotes}Total Cyanide by Remote Microdistillation and Agrentometric Titration,{close_quotes} Rev. 0. This report summarizes the results of these analyses along with supporting quality control data, and, in addition, summarizes the results of the test to check the efficacy of sodium nickel ferrocyanide solubilization from an actual core sample by aqueous EDTA/en to verify that nickel ferrocyanide compounds were quantitatively solubilized before actual distillation.

  4. Release of hydrogen cyanide via a post-secretion Schotten-Baumann reaction in defensive fluids of polydesmoid millipedes.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Yasumasa; Shimizu, Nobuhiro; Tanabe, Tsutomu

    2011-03-01

    Mandelonitrile benzoate, a minor defense component produced by polydesmoid millipedes, is produced in large amounts together with hydrogen cyanide following shake-disturbances administered to individuals of Nedyopus tambanus tambanus, Parafontaria tonominea, Epanerchodus sp., and Epanerchodus fulvus. These species commonly produce mandelonitrile and benzoyl cyanide (the oxidized product after discharge). The newly generated mandelonitrile benzoate was identified as a product of post secretion Schotten-Baumann reaction under basic conditions of bled bodily fluids (pH ca. 9.0), and was not an enzymatic reaction product. The reaction occurred in vitro even under less basic conditions [1M Tris-HCl buffer (pH 8.0)], and could be defined as a new mechanism of hydrogen cyanide release occurring in roughly half of polydesmoid millipedes. Species possessing no benzoyl cyanide, such as Oxidus gracilis and Cryptocorypha sp., could also produce mandelonitrile benzoate under conditions in which benzoyl cyanide was exogenously provided. PMID:21344179

  5. Different reactivity of hydroxylamine with carbamoyl azides and carbamoyl cyanides: synthesis of hydroxyureas and carbamoyl amidoximes.

    PubMed

    Paz, Jairo; Pérez-Balado, Carlos; Iglesias, Beatriz; Muñoz, Luis

    2010-12-01

    The carbamoylating agents carbamoyl azides and carbamoyl cyanides (aka cyanoformamides) react with hydroxylamine in different ways, leading in the first case to N-hydroxyureas and, in the case of carbamoyl cyanides, to carbamoyl amidoxime derivatives. The synthetic procedure developed for the latter type of compound, which represents an interesting precursor for heterocyclic structures, allowed the highly efficient preparation of a wide selection of examples. The Z configuration of the double bond in the amidoxime moiety was proposed on the basis of comparison between experimental and calculated (13)C and (15)N NMR chemical shift values for the isopropyl and benzyl derivatives. PMID:21049914

  6. Mantakassa: an epidemic of spastic paraparesis associated with chronic cyanide intoxication in a cassava staple area of Mozambique. 2. Nutritional factors and hydrocyanic acid content of cassava products*

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    An outbreak of spastic paraparesis which mostly affected women and children occurred in a northern province of Mozambique in 1981. The epidemic was related to chronic cyanide intoxication associated with a diet consisting almost exclusively of cassava. A prolonged drought in the area had exhausted all food resources except cassava, especially the bitter varieties. A nutritional, toxicological and botanical investigation was carried out in two of the five districts affected. The main findings were that cyanide levels were unusually high in the cassava plant as a consequence of the drought with daily intakes estimated at 15-31.5 mg HCN. Detoxification of the bitter varieties by sun-drying was inadequate because of the general food shortage, and metabolic detoxification was probably reduced owing to the absence of sulfur-containing amino acids in the diet. The raw and dried uncooked cassava was eaten mostly by women and children. The nutritional status of the population, however, was not very poor and symptoms of advanced under-nutrition were rarely seen. PMID:6088100

  7. Modelling potential ß-carotene intake and cyanide exposure from consumption of biofortified cassava

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Vitamin A (VA) deficiency causes disability and mortality. Cassava, a staple crop in Africa, can be crossbred to improve its pro-vitamin A (PVA) content and used as an alternative to capsule supplementation. However it contains cyanide and its continued consumption may lead to chronic...

  8. GENETIC OPTIMIZATION FOR ALKALINE pH OF A CYANIDE DIHYDRATASE FROM PSEUDOMONAS STUTZERI 

    E-print Network

    Rodriguez Mendoza, Alvaro

    2011-08-08

    is the cyanide dihydratase (CynDstut) found in Pseudomonas stutzeri AK61. The enzyme operates optimally around pH 7-8, but most polluted waters have much higher alkaline pH. The aim of this research project is to construct genetic mutants for this enzyme...

  9. Moisture-pressure combination treatments for cyanide reduction in grated cassava.

    PubMed

    Harris, Mark Anglin; Koomson, Charles Kofi

    2011-01-01

    Several cyanide-associated health disorders have been linked with frequent consumption of mildly toxic cassava (Manihot esculenta crantz) products in individuals on a low-protein diet. Production of bread from cassava often involves application of prolonged physical pressure (pressing) to the freshly grated root for several hours. This study aimed to determine effects of pressure and wetting on grated cassava. Six treatments were applied: confining pressure for 12 h, wetting for 4 h at 25 °C, 2 h at 25 °C, 2 h at 40 °C, and 2 h at 50 °C, or each of the above followed by pressure for 12 h. Treatments released cyanide from samples in the order: 2-h wet at 50 °C + pressing >4-h wet at 25 °C + pressing = 2-h wet at 40 °C + pressing >2-h wet at 25 °C + pressing = 4-h wet at 25 °C >12-h pressing. Wetting for 2 h at 50 °C followed by pressure for 12 h reduced cyanide levels by at least 20% more than that of any other treatment. The combination of moisture and pressure enhanced the contact time between linamarin and linamarase to increase the release of hydrogen cyanide. PMID:21535726

  10. PREVENTION REFERENCE MANUAL: CHEMICAL SPECIFIC. VOLUME 10. CONTROL OF ACCIDENTAL RELEASES OF HYDROGEN CYANIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the control of accidental releases of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) to the atmosphere. HCN has an IDLH (immediately dangerous to life and health) concentration of 50 ppm, making it an acute toxic hazard. Reducing the risk associated with an accidental release of HCN...

  11. TECHNICAL RESOURCE DOCUMENT: TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES FOR METAL/CYANIDE-CONTAINING WASTES. VOLUME 3

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Technical Resource Document provides information that can be used by environmental regulatory agencies and others as a source of technical information for waste management options for hazardous liquid wastes containing heavy metals and/or cyanide compounds. These options incl...

  12. Comparative effects of prolonged administration of cyanide, thiocyanate and chokecherry (Prunus virginiana) to goats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of the present study was to determine and compare the clinical, hematological, biochemical, and histopathological changes induced by cyanide, thiocyanate, and chokecherry (Prunus virginiana) in goats. Sixteen Boer-Spanish cross-bred female goats were divided into 4 treatment groups: 1) contr...

  13. 35. DETAIL OF TRAMWAY/WALKWAY OVER CYANIDE TANKS, LOOKING EAST. CLASSIFIED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. DETAIL OF TRAMWAY/WALKWAY OVER CYANIDE TANKS, LOOKING EAST. CLASSIFIED SANDS WERE LOADED INTO SMALL TRAM CARS FROM THE SPOUT OF THE CLASSIFIER IN THE DISTANCE AT CENTER AND CONVEYED BY HAND TO BE DUMPED INTO THE TANKS BELOW. - Skidoo Mine, Park Route 38 (Skidoo Road), Death Valley Junction, Inyo County, CA

  14. Clinical and Pathological Effects of Short-term Cyanide Repeated Dosing to Goats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this work is to determine and describe the effects of subacute cyanide toxicity to goats. Eight female goats were divided into two groups. The first group of five animals was treated with 8.0mg KCN kg-1 body weight day -1 for seven consecutive days. The second group of three animal...

  15. Anomalously slow cyanide binding to Glycera dibranchiata monomer methemoglobin component II: Implication for the equilibrium constant

    SciTech Connect

    Mintorovitch, J.; Satterlee, J.D. )

    1988-10-18

    In comparison to sperm whale metmyoglobin, metleghemoglobin {alpha}, methemoglobins, and heme peroxidases, the purified Glycera dibranchiata monomer methemoglobin component II exhibits anomalously slow cyanide ligation kinetics. For the component II monomer methemoglobin this reaction has been studied under pseudo-first-order conditions at pH 6.0, 7.0, 8.0, and 9.0, employing 100-250-fold mole excesses of potassium cyanide at each pH. The analysis shows that the concentration-independent bimolecular rate constant is small in comparison to those of the other heme proteins. Furthermore, the results show that the dissociation rate is extremely slow. Separation of the bimolecular rate constant into contributions from k{sub CN{sup {minus}}} (the rate constant for CN{sup {minus}} binding) and from k{sub HCN} (the rate constant for HCN binding) shows that the former is approximately 90 times greater. These results indicate that cyanide ligation reactions are not instantaneous for this protein, which is important for those attempting to study the ligand-binding equilibria. From the results presented here the authors estimate that the actual equilibrium dissociation constant (K{sub D}) for cyanide binding to this G. dibranchiata monomer methemoglobin has a numerical upper limit that is at least 2 orders of magnitude smaller than the value reported before the kinetic results were known.

  16. Feasibility of recovering high valency metal cyanide complexes with a fluidized bed of resin

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, A.B.; Petersen, F.W.

    1995-09-01

    A commercially available strong base ion-exchange resin IRA 958 was used to recover polyvalent metal cyanide complexes in a fluidized-bed application. A method for modeling the expansion of a fluidized bed of resin is proposed. The method takes into account the difficulties associated with the hydrodynamic characteristics of a macroporous resin of this nature.

  17. Analysis of a MULE-cyanide hydratase gene fusion in Verticillium dahliae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genome of the phytopathogenic fungus Verticillium dahliae encodes numerous Class II “cut-and-paste” transposable elements, including those of a small group of MULE transposons. We have previously identified a fusion event between a MULE transposon sequence and sequence encoding a cyanide hydrata...

  18. A catalytic chemodosimetric approach for detection of nanomolar cyanide ions in water, blood serum and live cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rahul; Sandhu, Sana; Hundal, Geeta; Singh, Prabhpreet; Walia, Amandeep; Vanita, Vanita; Kumar, Subodh

    2015-12-01

    Naphthimidazolium based monocationic chemodosimeters CD-1 and CD-2 undergo cyanide mediated catalytic transformation in the presence of cyanide ions (0.01% to 1% of CD-1/CD-2 concentrations) with a turnover number from 70 to 360. These chemodosimeters can detect as low as 0.5 nM and 1 nM cyanide ions under nearly physiological conditions (HEPES buffer-DMSO (5%), pH 7.4). The structures of CD-1 and its cyanide induced hydrolyzed product 4 have been confirmed by single crystal X-ray crystallography. CD-1 can also be used for the determination of 2 nM cyanide in the presence of blood serum. CD-1 and CD-2 also find applications in live cell imaging of 10 nM cyanide ions in rat brain C6 glioma cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report where high sensitivity towards cyanide ions has been achieved through catalytic hydrolysis of the fluorescent chemodosimeter. PMID:26403695

  19. Foundation at Visitor Center

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    This photo shows workers creating the foundation for the new Visitor Center at Audubon NWR. The new facility, funded by the Recovery Act, will replace a building that has developed and exposed some serious health and safety problems, including asbestos, extensive rodent encroachment, water leakage, ...

  20. Foundations of logic programming

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    The author provides an account of the mathematical foundations of logic programming. The reader should have a strong background in mathematics and be familiar with a logic programming language such as PROLOG. Includes chapter problems, references for further study, and a subject index. Contents: Declarative semantics. Procedural semantics. Negation. Perpetual processes. Index.

  1. Childhood Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... related fundraising projects go to the Childhood Brain… Amazon Smile When you shop at AmazonSmile, Amazon donates 0.5% of the purchase price to ... Brain Tumor Foundation. Bookmark the link http://smile.amazon.com/ch/52-2122976 and support us every ...

  2. Foundations/History/Philosophy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelin, John R.

    Patterns that emerged from reviewing 20 syllabi for courses on educational foundations, history, and philosophy are discussed, and five sample syllabi are presented. These courses are offered as part of graduate level studies in the field of higher education administration. The review revealed the following profile: the history of higher education…

  3. Brain Aneurysm Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... September 22, 2014 Read More Introducing our new mobile app for Android or iPhone! January 30, 2014 Read More Prev Next 1 of 1 ©2015 Brain Aneurysm Foundation Footer menu Site Map Disclaimer Contact: office @bafound.org (888) 272-4602 Website Design: Communication via Design, Ltd.

  4. Foundation for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Directorate for Education and Human Resources.

    This document describes some of the many programs sponsored by the National Science Foundation in its efforts to continue to promote systemic science and mathematics education reform. Brief descriptions of the following programs are included: (1) Interactive Math Program Restructures 9-12 Math Education; (2) Algebra I Project Sparks Citywide…

  5. The Broad Foundations, 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broad Foundation, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The mission of the Broad Foundations is to transform K-12 urban public education through better governance, management, labor relations and competition; make significant contributions to advance major scientific and medical research; foster public appreciation of contemporary art by increasing access for audiences worldwide; and lead and…

  6. The Broad Foundations, 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broad Foundation, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This 2008 foundation report provides an opportunity to look back and ahead as the organization reviews what has been accomplished and identifies challenges to be tackled in the future in the areas of education, scientific and medical research, and the arts. Grant making from the perspective of grantees is presented in each area. [This document was…

  7. NPR FOUNDATION FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

    E-print Network

    Napp, Nils

    . In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity of the entity's internal control. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes evaluating on the Financial Statements We have audited the accompanying financial statements of NPR Foundation, which comprise

  8. Progeria Research Foundation, Inc.

    MedlinePLUS

    ... more than ever, your contribution makes a difference. December 01, 2015 #GIVINGTUESDAY - DECEMBER 1, 2015 Join PRF as we participate in Giving Tuesday, ... the CURE! This site was last updated on December 01, 2015 Quick Links Join The Progeria Research Foundation's global ...

  9. Rapid point of care analyzer for the measurement of cyanide in blood.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Mishra, Santosh K; Puanngam, Mahitti; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Mahon, Sari B; Brenner, Matthew; Blackledge, William; Boss, Gerry R

    2011-06-01

    A simple, sensitive optical analyzer for the rapid determination of cyanide in blood in point of care applications is described. HCN is liberated by the addition of 20% H(3)PO(4) and is absorbed by a paper filter impregnated with borate-buffered (pH 9.0) hydroxoaquocobinamide (hereinafter called cobinamide). Cobinamide on the filter changes color from orange (?(max) = 510 nm) to violet (?(max) = 583 nm) upon reaction with cyanide. This color change is monitored in the transmission mode by a light emitting diode (LED) with a 583 nm emission maximum and a photodiode detector. The observed rate of color change increases 10 times when the cobinamide solution for filter impregnation is prepared in borate-buffer rather than in water. The use of a second LED emitting at 653 nm and alternate pulsing of the LEDs improves the limit of detection by 4 times to ~0.5 ?M for a 1 mL blood sample. Blood cyanide levels of imminent concern (?10 ?M) can be accurately measured in ~2 min. The response is proportional to the mass of cyanide in the sample: smaller sample volumes can be successfully used with proportionate change in the concentration LODs. Bubbling air through the blood-acid mixture was found effective for mixing of the acid with the sample and the liberation of HCN. A small amount of ethanol added to the top of the blood was found to be the most effective means to prevent frothing during aeration. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for repetitive determination of blood samples containing 9 ?M CN was 1.09% (n = 5). The technique was compared blind with a standard microdiffusion-spectrophotometric method used for the determination of cyanide in rabbit blood. The results showed good correlation (slope 1.05, r(2) 0.9257); independent calibration standards were used. PMID:21553921

  10. Rapid Point of Care Analyzer for the Measurement of Cyanide in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jian; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Mishra, Santosh K.; Puanngam, Mahitti; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.; Mahon, Sari B.; Brenner, Matthew; Blackledge, William; Boss, Gerry R.

    2011-01-01

    A simple, sensitive optical analyzer for the rapid determination of cyanide in blood in point of care applications is described. HCN is liberated by the addition of 20% H3PO4 and is absorbed by a paper filter impregnated with borate-buffered (pH 9.0) hydroxoaquocobinamide Hereinafter called cobinamide). Cobinamide on the filter changes color from orange (?max = 510 nm) to violet (?max = 583 nm) upon reaction with cyanide. This color change is monitored in the transmission mode by a light emitting diode (LED) with a 583 nm emission maximum and a photodiode detector. The observed rate of color change increases 10x when the cobinamide solution for filter impregnation is prepared in borate-buffer rather than in water. The use of a second LED emitting at 653 nm and alternate pulsing of the LEDs improve the limit of detection by 4x to ~ 0.5 ?M for a 1 mL blood sample. Blood cyanide levels of imminent concern (? 10 ?M) can be accurately measured in ~ 2 min. The response is proportional to the mass of cyanide in the sample – smaller sample volumes can be successfully used with proportionate change in the concentration LODs. Bubbling air through the blood-acid mixture was found effective for mixing of the acid with the sample and the liberation of HCN. A small amount of ethanol added to the top of the blood was found to be the most effective means to prevent frothing during aeration. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for repetitive determination of blood samples containing 9 ?M CN was 1.09% (n=5). The technique was compared blind with a standard microdiffusion-spectrophotometric method used for the determination of cyanide in rabbit blood. The results showed good correlation (slope 1.05, r2 0.9257); independent calibration standards were used. PMID:21553921

  11. A rapid conductometric sensor for the analysis of cyanide using imidazole based receptor.

    PubMed

    Paul, Anirban; Perween, Mosarrat; Saha, Sukdeb; Srivastava, Divesh N; Das, Amitava

    2015-10-01

    A specific and efficient hydrogen bonding interaction between cyanide and the HN-H [imidazole] in an aqueous medium has been utilized for the selective recognition of cyanide under physiological conditions. The possibility of utilizing such an interaction for developing any practical device for the specific detection of cyanide in an aqueous environment has not been explored to date. We now report a simple dip and read conductometric sensor for cyanide ions using a tailored electrode in aqueous media. The purpose built reagent, 2-phenyl-1H-anthra-[2,3-d]-immidazole-5,10 dione was immobilized in a polyaniline matrix to fabricate this conductometric device. The homogeneous immobilization of the receptor in polyaniline was confirmed by FT-IR mapping. The proposed transduction mechanism is charge neutralization on the polyaniline moiety, which ultimately inhibits the protonation resulting in a decrease in the conductance of polyaniline. The sensor response was measured in three ranges of cyanide concentration (10(-10) M to 10(-8) M; 10(-8) M to 10(-6) M and 10(-6) M to 10(-3) M). Whereas the device is found insensitive in the first range, it acts as a detector in the second range and as a proportional sensor in the third range. The minimum detection limit of this device was found to be 10 nmol L(-1) (2.6 ppt), which is significantly less than the WHO guideline values. The responses have been investigated under various conditions such as different pH and the electrochemical state of the polymer. The current device has been found to be better close to neutral pH and at a 400 mV vs. Ag/AgCl potential. The reproducibility and repeatability of the sensor was investigated and interference studies were performed. PMID:26394898

  12. FOUNDATION PAPER FOR THE PLANT OIL FLAGSHIP

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the last century we have become dependent on fossil fuels not just as an energy source for transportation and heating but also for the provision of industrial feedstocks for a multitude of products that we use in every aspect of our daily lives. Fossil fuels are a finite resource and as this re...

  13. Optical chemosensor for the detection of cyanide in water based on ethyl(hydroxyethyl)cellulose functionalized with Brooker's merocyanine.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Leandro G; Nicoleti, Celso R; Bellettini, Ismael C; Machado, Vanderlei G

    2014-05-20

    Ethyl(hydroxyethyl)cellulose was functionalized with Brooker's merocyanine. The modified polymer was easily transformed in a film, which could be used as a highly selective chromogenic and fluorogenic chemosensor for the detection of cyanide in water, with detection limits of 1.9 × 10(-5) and 1.0 × 10(-7) mol L(-1). The film was successfully applied to the detection of cyanide in cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) roots, which are a well-known source of endogenous biological cyanide. PMID:24805864

  14. Effects of acetylcholine and sodium cyanide on cat carotid baroreceptors

    PubMed Central

    McQueen, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    1 The effects of intracarotid (i.a.) injections of acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium cyanide (NaCN) on baroreceptor activity recorded from the sinus nerve have been investigated in cats anaesthetized with pentobarbitone. 2 Two types of baroreceptor unit were recorded. The predominant type discharged at least 3 to 4 spikes per pulse wave at normal BP; they are referred to as `polyspike' units and may have been associated with A fibres. The other type discharged a maximum of 1 to 3 spikes per pulse wave, even at high BP; they are referred to as `few-spike' units and may have been from C fibres. 3 NaCN had no direct effect on either type of baroreceptor unit, even when injected in high doses (2.04 to 5.1 ?mol i.a.) which cause maximal chemoreceptor stimulation, and it is concluded that as far as the cat's carotid baroreceptors and chemoreceptors are concerned, NaCN is a specific chemoreceptor stimulant. 4 ACh had no direct effect on polyspike baroreceptor units unless very high doses (1.83 ?mol i.a.) were injected, when there was occasionally a transient slight increase in discharge. This effect appeared to be secondary to muscle contraction caused by ACh since it was not seen when an adequate neuromuscular-blocking dose of gallamine had been administered. 5 ACh stimulated the few-spike type of baroreceptor unit, an effect which was dose-related and lasted for up to 3 s; the threshold dose for baroreceptor stimulation was higher than that needed to excite chemoreceptor units. The increased discharge also occurred during experiments in which gallamine had been administered. Only five of these units were recorded during the investigation, despite an intensive search for them. 6 There was a delayed increase in baroreceptor sensitivity following the administration of ACh in doses (37 to 366 nmol i.a.) which had no immediate direct effect on polyspike baroreceptor discharge. The effect was evidently not secondary to changes in sympathetic nerve activity to the sinus region since it was observed during an experiment in which the ganglioglomerular nerves had been cut. Whether the increased sensitivity resulted from direct or indirect actions of ACh remains to be determined. 7 It is concluded that low doses of ACh or other drugs with nicotinic properties are unlikely to evoke baroreceptor reflexes on intracarotid injection, although they may cause delayed changes in baroreceptor sensitivity. Higher doses of ACh do not directly affect baroreceptor polyspike (A fibre) units, but transient baroreflex changes might result from stimulation of baroreceptor few-spike (C fibre) units. It is most unlikely that NaCN has any direct effect on baroreceptor reflex activity when injected into the carotid artery in doses used to elicit chemoreceptor reflexes. PMID:7397453

  15. 75 FR 18240 - Comment Request: National Science Foundation-Applicant Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ...Clearance Officer, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Blvd...type of object to be taken (plant, native mammal, or native...the native mammals, birds, plants, and invertebrates of Antarctica...as amended by the Antarctic Science, Tourism, and...

  16. CONVEYOR FOUNDATIONS CALCULATION

    SciTech Connect

    S. Romanos

    1995-03-10

    The purpose of these calculations is to design foundations for all conveyor supports for the surface conveyors that transport the muck resulting from the TBM operation, from the belt storage to the muck stockpile. These conveyors consist of: (1) Conveyor W-TO3, from the belt storage, at the starter tunnel, to the transfer tower. (2) Conveyor W-SO1, from the transfer tower to the material stacker, at the muck stockpile.

  17. Fractal Topology Foundations

    E-print Network

    Helene Porchon

    2012-01-25

    In this paper, we introduce the foundation of a fractal topological space constructed via a family of nested topological spaces endowed with subspace topologies, where the number of topological spaces involved in this family is related to the appearance of new structures on it. The greater the number of topological spaces we use, the stronger the subspace topologies we obtain. The fractal manifold model is brought up as an illustration of space that is locally homeomorphic to the fractal topological space.

  18. Mathematical foundations of neurocomputing

    SciTech Connect

    Amari, S. . Faculty of Engineering)

    1990-09-01

    Neurocomputing makes use of parallel dynamical interactions of modifiable neuron-like elements. It is important to show, by mathematical treatments, the capabilities and limitations of information processing by various architectures of neural networks. This paper, gives mathematical foundations to neurocomputing. It considers the capabilities of transformations by layered networks, statistical neurodynamics, the dynamical characteristics of associative memory, a general theory of neural learning, and self-organization of neural networks.

  19. Foundation Accounting 2010 Levy Avenue

    E-print Network

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Foundation Accounting 2010 Levy Avenue Building B, Suite 300 Tallahassee, FL 32310 PH: (850) 644 to the Foundation Accounting Department. Upon receipt of the Designation of Restricted Gift form by the Foundation Accounting Department, the necessary paperwork will be sent to the Department and must be returned before

  20. Foundation Accounting PO Box 3062739

    E-print Network

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Foundation Accounting PO Box 3062739 Tallahassee, FL 32306-2739 PH: (850) 644-6000 Revised 1 required): Date: Foundation Approval(s): Date: FOUNDATION ACCOUNTING USE ONLY Check Invoice Invoice Date Account Code Fund Project Amount Requisition Total Review Disb Supr. Signature Approvals for Payment

  1. Farm Foundation Annual Report, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farm Foundation, Oak Brook, IL.

    The Farm Foundation was established in 1933 as a private agency to help coordinate the work of other public and private groups and agencies to improve agriculture and rural life without taking political positions or supporting specific legislation. An operating rather than a grant-making foundation, the foundation develops national and regional…

  2. Volume 79, number 2 FEBS LETTERS July 1977 A COMPUTER ANALYSIS OF CYANIDE STIMULATED OXYGEN UPTAKE IN

    E-print Network

    Clore, G. Marius

    at the branch point of the linear respiratory chain plus catalase to decompose the hydrogen peroxide back in the presence of cyanide is summarized in fig. 1. It provides for a hydrogen peroxide generating leak

  3. Assay techniques for detection of exposure to sulfur mustard, cholinesterase inhibitors, sarin, soman, GF, and cyanide. Technical bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    This technical bulletin provides analytical techniques to identify toxic chemical agents in urine or blood samples. It is intended to provide the clinician with laboratory tests to detect exposure to sulfur mustard, cholinesterase inhibitors, sarin, soman, GF, and cyanide.

  4. Colorimetric Cyanide Chemosensor Based on 1?,3,3?,4-Tetrahydrospiro[chromene-2,2?-indole

    PubMed Central

    Dagilien?, Migl?; Martynaitis, Vytas; Kriš?i?nien?, Vilija; Krikštolaityt?, Sonata; Ša?kus, Algirdas

    2015-01-01

    A new class of chemosensors based on the 1?,3,3?,4-tetrahydrospiro[chromene-2,2?-indole] ring system, which detects cyanide with high specificity, is described. These chemosensors show a distinct color change when treated with cyanide in acetonitrile solution buffered with sodium phosphate, and this procedure is not affected by the presence of other common anions. The chemisensors exhibit high sensitivity to low concentrations of cyanide, meeting the European Union water quality control criterion of sensitivity below 0.05?mg?L?1, and show a very fast response within tens of seconds. The mechanism for detection is rationalized by the nucleophilic substitution of the phenolic oxygen atom at the indoline C-2 atom by the cyanide anion to form a stable indolylnitrile adduct and to generate the colored 4-nitrophenolate chromophore. These chemosensors can be synthesized by a simple procedure from commercially available starting materials. PMID:26246998

  5. Preparation and Characterization of Cyanide-Bridged Molecular Clusters and Extended Networks Using the Building-Block Approach 

    E-print Network

    Karadas, Ferdi

    2011-02-22

    The cyanide ligand has frequently been used to prepare clusters with novel magnetic properties due to its ability to provide an efficient pathway for superexchange between metal centers that are bound in an end-to-end ...

  6. Rotational spectroscopy of 3d transition-metal cyanides: Millimeter-wave studies of ZnCN ,,X 2

    E-print Network

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    -shaped structure is generated with a highly ionic bonding scheme. The alkaline earth metals tend to form linear Copper cyanide, for instance, is widely used in the creation of carbon­carbon bonds. Such varied use has

  7. Acute effects of road salts and associated cyanide compounds on the early life stages of the unionid mussel Villosa iris.

    PubMed

    Pandolfo, Tamara J; Cope, W Gregory; Young, George B; Jones, Jess W; Hua, Dan; Lingenfelser, Susan F

    2012-08-01

    The toxicity of cyanide to the early life stages of freshwater mussels (order Unionida) has remained unexplored. Cyanide is known to be acutely toxic to other aquatic organisms. Cyanide-containing compounds, such as sodium ferrocyanide and ferric ferrocyanide, are commonly added to road deicing salts as anticaking agents. The purpose of the present study was to assess the acute toxicity of three cyanide compounds (sodium cyanide, sodium ferrocyanide, and ferric ferrocyanide), two road salts containing cyanide anticaking agents (Morton and Cargill brands), a brine deicing solution (Liquidow brand), and a reference salt (sodium chloride) on glochidia (larvae) and juveniles of the freshwater mussel Villosa iris. Sodium ferrocyanide and ferric ferrocyanide were not acutely toxic to glochidia and juvenile mussels at concentrations up to 1,000 mg/L and 100 mg/L, respectively. Lowest observed effect concentrations (LOECs) for these two chemicals ranged from 10 to >1,000 mg/L. Sodium cyanide was acutely toxic to juvenile mussels, with a 96-h median effective concentration (EC50) of 1.10 mg/L, although glochidia tolerated concentrations up to 10 mg/L. The EC50s for sodium chloride, Liquidow brine, Morton road salt, and Cargill road salt were not significantly different for tests within the same life stage and test duration (range, 1.66-4.92 g/L). These results indicate that cyanide-containing anticaking agents do not exacerbate the toxicity of road salts, but that the use of road salts and brine solutions for deicing or dust control on roads may warrant further investigation. PMID:22573519

  8. DNA microarray analysis of the cyanotroph Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 in response to nitrogen starvation, cyanide and a jewelry wastewater.

    PubMed

    Luque-Almagro, V M; Escribano, M P; Manso, I; Sáez, L P; Cabello, P; Moreno-Vivián, C; Roldán, M D

    2015-11-20

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 is an alkaliphilic bacterium that can use cyanide as nitrogen source for growth, becoming a suitable candidate to be applied in biological treatment of cyanide-containing wastewaters. The assessment of the whole genome sequence of the strain CECT5344 has allowed the generation of DNA microarrays to analyze the response to different nitrogen sources. The mRNA of P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 cells grown under nitrogen limiting conditions showed considerable changes when compared against the transcripts from cells grown with ammonium; up-regulated genes were, among others, the glnK gene encoding the nitrogen regulatory protein PII, the two-component ntrBC system involved in global nitrogen regulation, and the ammonium transporter-encoding amtB gene. The protein coding transcripts of P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 cells grown with sodium cyanide or an industrial jewelry wastewater that contains high concentration of cyanide and metals like iron, copper and zinc, were also compared against the transcripts of cells grown with ammonium as nitrogen source. This analysis revealed the induction by cyanide and the cyanide-rich wastewater of four nitrilase-encoding genes, including the nitC gene that is essential for cyanide assimilation, the cyanase cynS gene involved in cyanate assimilation, the cioAB genes required for the cyanide-insensitive respiration, and the ahpC gene coding for an alkyl-hydroperoxide reductase that could be related with iron homeostasis and oxidative stress. The nitC and cynS genes were also induced in cells grown under nitrogen starvation conditions. In cells grown with the jewelry wastewater, a malate quinone:oxidoreductase mqoB gene and several genes coding for metal extrusion systems were specifically induced. PMID:26432339

  9. Dithizone as novel and efficient chromogenic probe for cyanide detection in aqueous media through nucleophilic addition into diazenylthione moiety.

    PubMed

    Tavallali, Hossein; Deilamy-Rad, Gohar; Parhami, Abolfath; Kiyani, Sajede

    2014-01-01

    A new selective chemodosimeter probe was developed by the introduction of dithizone (DTZ) as a simple and available dye for detection of cyanide in aqueous media which enables recognition of cyanide over other competing anions such as acetate, dihydrogen phosphate, fluoride and benzoate through covalent bonding. The sensing properties of DTZ were investigated in DMSO/H2O (1:9) and have demonstrated a very high selectivity toward the cyanide anions. A reasonable recognition mechanism was suggested using UV-Vis, (1)H NMR and FTIR spectroscopy techniques. Time dependent density function theory (TDDFT) computations of UV-Vis excitation for DTZ2-CN adduct agreed well with our experimental findings. The detection limit of the new chromogenic probe was measured to be 0.48 ?mol L(-1) which is much lower than most recently reported chromogenic probes for cyanide determination. The analytical utility of the method for the analysis of cyanide ions in electroplating wastewater (EPWW), human serum, tap and mineral water samples was demonstrated and the results were compared successfully with the conventional reference method. The short time response and the detection by the naked eye make the method available for the detection and quantitative determination of cyanide in a variety of real samples. PMID:24231750

  10. Detection of a branched alkyl molecule in the interstellar medium: iso-propyl cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belloche, Arnaud; Garrod, Robin T.; Müller, Holger S. P.; Menten, Karl M.

    2014-09-01

    The largest noncyclic molecules detected in the interstellar medium (ISM) are organic with a straight-chain carbon backbone. We report an interstellar detection of a branched alkyl molecule, iso-propyl cyanide (i-C3H7CN), with an abundance 0.4 times that of its straight-chain structural isomer. This detection suggests that branched carbon-chain molecules may be generally abundant in the ISM. Our astrochemical model indicates that both isomers are produced within or upon dust grain ice mantles through the addition of molecular radicals, albeit via differing reaction pathways. The production of iso-propyl cyanide appears to require the addition of a functional group to a nonterminal carbon in the chain. Its detection therefore bodes well for the presence in the ISM of amino acids, for which such side-chain structure is a key characteristic.

  11. Removal of Lead Hydroxides Complexes from Solutions Formed in Silver/Gold: Cyanidation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parga, José R.; Martinez, Raul Flores; Moreno, Hector; Gomes, Andrew Jewel; Cocke, David L.

    2014-04-01

    The presence of lead hydroxides in "pregnant cyanide solution" decreases the quality of the Dore obtained in the recovery processes of gold and silver, so it is convenient to remove them. The adsorbent capacity of the low cost cow bone powder was investigated for the removal of lead ions from a solution of lead hydroxide complexes at different initial metal ion concentrations (10 to 50 mg/L), and reaction time. Experiments were carried out in batches. The maximum sorption capacity of lead determined by the Langmuir model was found to be 126.58 mg/g, and the separation factor R L was between 0 and 1, indicating a significant affinity of bone for lead. Experimental data follow pseudo-second order kinetics suggesting chemisorption. It is concluded that cow bone powder can be successfully used for the removal of lead ions, and improves the quality of the silver-gold cyanides precipitate.

  12. Ferrocyanide safety project: Task 3.5 cyanide species analytical methods development. FY 1992 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, S.A.; Pool, K.H.; Burger, L.L.; Carlson, C.D.; Hess, N.J.; Matheson, J.D.; Ryan, J.L.; Scheele, R.D.; Tingey, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of studies conducted in FY 1992 to develop methods for the identification and quantification of cyanide species in ferrocyanide tank waste. Currently there are 24 high-level waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site that have been placed on a Ferrocyanide Tank Watchlist because they contain an estimated 1,000 g-moles or greater amount of precipitated ferrocyanide. This amount of ferrocyanide is of concern because the consequences of a potential explosion may exceed those reported previously in safety analyses. The threshold concentration of total cyanide within the tank waste matrix that is expected to be a safety concern is estimated at approximately 1 to 3 wt%. Methods for detection and speciation of ferrocyanide complexes in actual waste are needed to definitively measure and quantitate the amount of ferrocyanides present within actual waste tanks to a lower limit of at least 0.1 wt% in order to bound the safety concern.

  13. Ferrocyanide safety project: Task 3. 5 cyanide species analytical methods development

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, S.A.; Pool, K.H.; Burger, L.L.; Carlson, C.D.; Hess, N.J.; Matheson, J.D.; Ryan, J.L.; Scheele, R.D.; Tingey, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of studies conducted in FY 1992 to develop methods for the identification and quantification of cyanide species in ferrocyanide tank waste. Currently there are 24 high-level waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site that have been placed on a Ferrocyanide Tank Watchlist because they contain an estimated 1,000 g-moles or greater amount of precipitated ferrocyanide. This amount of ferrocyanide is of concern because the consequences of a potential explosion may exceed those reported previously in safety analyses. The threshold concentration of total cyanide within the tank waste matrix that is expected to be a safety concern is estimated at approximately 1 to 3 wt%. Methods for detection and speciation of ferrocyanide complexes in actual waste are needed to definitively measure and quantitate the amount of ferrocyanides present within actual waste tanks to a lower limit of at least 0.1 wt% in order to bound the safety concern.

  14. Method for aqueous gold thiosulfate extraction using copper-cyanide pretreated carbon adsorption

    DOEpatents

    Young, Courtney; Melashvili, Mariam; Gow, Nicholas V

    2013-08-06

    A gold thiosulfate leaching process uses carbon to remove gold from the leach liquor. The activated carbon is pretreated with copper cyanide. A copper (on the carbon) to gold (in solution) ratio of at least 1.5 optimizes gold recovery from solution. To recover the gold from the carbon, conventional elution technology works but is dependent on the copper to gold ratio on the carbon.

  15. Cobinamide-based cyanide analysis by multiwavelength spectrometry in a liquid core waveguide.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jian; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Blackledge, William; Boss, Gerry R

    2010-07-15

    A novel cyanide analyzer based on sensitive cobinamide chemistry relies on simultaneous reagent and sample injection and detection in a 50 cm liquid core waveguide (LCW) flow cell illuminated by a white light emitting diode. The transmitted light is read by a fiber-optic charge coupled device (CCD) spectrometer. Alkaline cobinamide (orange, lambda(max) = 510 nm) changes to violet (lambda(max) = 583 nm) upon reaction with cyanide. Multiwavelength detection permits built-in correction for artifact responses intrinsic to a single-line flow injection system and corrects for drift. With optimum choice of the reaction medium, flow rate, and mixing coil length, the limit of detection (LOD, S/N = 3) is 30 nM and the linear dynamic range extends to 10 microM. The response base width for 1% carryover is <95 s, permitting a throughput of 38 samples/h. The relative standard deviations (rsd) for repetitive determinations at 0.15, 0.5, and 1 microM were 7.6% (n = 5), 3.2% (n = 7), and 1.7% (n = 6), respectively. Common ions at 250-80,000x concentrations do not interfere except for sulfide. For the determination of 2 microM CN(-), the presence of 2, 5, 10, 20, 100, and 1000 microM HS(-) results in 22, 27, 48, 58, 88, and 154% overestimation of cyanide. The sulfide product actually has a different characteristic absorption, and in those samples where significant presence is likely, this can be corrected for. We demonstrate applicability by analyzing the hydrolytic cyanide extract of apple and pear seeds with orange seeds as control and also measure HCN in breath air samples. Spike recoveries in these sample extracts ranged from 91 to 108%. PMID:20560532

  16. Cobinamide-Based Cyanide Analysis by Multiwavelength Spectrometry in a Liquid Core Waveguide

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jian; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.; Blackledge, William; Boss, Gerry R.

    2010-01-01

    A novel cyanide analyzer based on sensitive cobinamide chemistry relies on simultaneous reagent and sample injection and detection in a 50 cm liquid core waveguide (LCW) flow cell illuminated by a white light emitting diode. The transmitted light is read by a fiber-optic charge coupled device (CCD) spectrometer. Alkaline cobinamide (orange, ?max = 510 nm) changes to violet (?max = 583 nm) upon reaction with cyanide. Multiwavelength detection permits built-in correction for artifact responses intrinsic to a single-line flow injection system and corrects for drift. With optimum choice of the reaction medium, flow rate, and mixing coil length, the limit of detection (LOD, S/N = 3) is 30 nM and the linear dynamic range extends to 10 ?M. The response base width for 1% carryover is <95 s, permitting a throughput of 38 samples/h. The relative standard deviations (rsd) for repetitive determinations at 0.15, 0.5, and 1 ?M were 7.6% (n = 5), 3.2% (n = 7), and 1.7% (n = 6), respectively. Common ions at 250–80 000× concentrations do not interfere except for sulfide. For the determination of 2 ?M CN?, the presence of 2, 5, 10, 20, 100, and 1000 ?M HS? results in 22, 27, 48, 58, 88, and 154% overestimation of cyanide. The sulfide product actually has a different characteristic absorption, and in those samples where significant presence is likely, this can be corrected for. We demonstrate applicability by analyzing the hydrolytic cyanide extract of apple and pear seeds with orange seeds as control and also measure HCN in breath air samples. Spike recoveries in these sample extracts ranged from 91 to 108%. PMID:20560532

  17. The comet-like composition of a protoplanetary disk as revealed by complex cyanides.

    PubMed

    Öberg, Karin I; Guzmán, Viviana V; Furuya, Kenji; Qi, Chunhua; Aikawa, Yuri; Andrews, Sean M; Loomis, Ryan; Wilner, David J

    2015-04-01

    Observations of comets and asteroids show that the solar nebula that spawned our planetary system was rich in water and organic molecules. Bombardment brought these organics to the young Earth's surface. Unlike asteroids, comets preserve a nearly pristine record of the solar nebula composition. The presence of cyanides in comets, including 0.01 per cent of methyl cyanide (CH3CN) with respect to water, is of special interest because of the importance of C-N bonds for abiotic amino acid synthesis. Comet-like compositions of simple and complex volatiles are found in protostars, and can readily be explained by a combination of gas-phase chemistry (to form, for example, HCN) and an active ice-phase chemistry on grain surfaces that advances complexity. Simple volatiles, including water and HCN, have been detected previously in solar nebula analogues, indicating that they survive disk formation or are re-formed in situ. It has hitherto been unclear whether the same holds for more complex organic molecules outside the solar nebula, given that recent observations show a marked change in the chemistry at the boundary between nascent envelopes and young disks due to accretion shocks. Here we report the detection of the complex cyanides CH3CN and HC3N (and HCN) in the protoplanetary disk around the young star MWC 480. We find that the abundance ratios of these nitrogen-bearing organics in the gas phase are similar to those in comets, which suggests an even higher relative abundance of complex cyanides in the disk ice. This implies that complex organics accompany simpler volatiles in protoplanetary disks, and that the rich organic chemistry of our solar nebula was not unique. PMID:25855455

  18. Formation of titanium nitride whiskers by reaction of sodium titanium bronze with molten sodium cyanide

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, C.E.; Angelini, P.; Nolan, T.A. )

    1990-04-01

    The production of titanium nitride, TiN, whiskers by reaction of sodium titanium bronze, Na{sub x}TiO{sub 2}(STB), with excess sodium cyanide, NaCN, at 1000{degrees}C is reported. The solubility of Ti from a STB in molten NaCN has been estimated experimentally. The TiN whiskers obtained under different experimental conditions have been examined by scanning electron microscopy and analyzed by analytical electron microscopy.

  19. The comet-like composition of a protoplanetary disk as revealed by complex cyanides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öberg, Karin I.; Guzmán, Viviana V.; Furuya, Kenji; Qi, Chunhua; Aikawa, Yuri; Andrews, Sean M.; Loomis, Ryan; Wilner, David J.

    2015-04-01

    Observations of comets and asteroids show that the solar nebula that spawned our planetary system was rich in water and organic molecules. Bombardment brought these organics to the young Earth's surface. Unlike asteroids, comets preserve a nearly pristine record of the solar nebula composition. The presence of cyanides in comets, including 0.01 per cent of methyl cyanide (CH3CN) with respect to water, is of special interest because of the importance of C-N bonds for abiotic amino acid synthesis. Comet-like compositions of simple and complex volatiles are found in protostars, and can readily be explained by a combination of gas-phase chemistry (to form, for example, HCN) and an active ice-phase chemistry on grain surfaces that advances complexity. Simple volatiles, including water and HCN, have been detected previously in solar nebula analogues, indicating that they survive disk formation or are re-formed in situ. It has hitherto been unclear whether the same holds for more complex organic molecules outside the solar nebula, given that recent observations show a marked change in the chemistry at the boundary between nascent envelopes and young disks due to accretion shocks. Here we report the detection of the complex cyanides CH3CN and HC3N (and HCN) in the protoplanetary disk around the young star MWC 480. We find that the abundance ratios of these nitrogen-bearing organics in the gas phase are similar to those in comets, which suggests an even higher relative abundance of complex cyanides in the disk ice. This implies that complex organics accompany simpler volatiles in protoplanetary disks, and that the rich organic chemistry of our solar nebula was not unique.

  20. Laboratory Characterization and Astrophysical Detection in Orion KL of Higher Excited Vibrational States of Vinyl Cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Alicia; Tercero, Belén; Cernicharo, Jose; Kisiel, Zbigniew; Pszczó?kowski, Lech; Bermúdez, Celina; Alonso, José L.; Medvedev, Ivan; Neese, Christopher F.; Drouin, Brian; Daly, Adam M.; Marcelino, Nuria; Viti, Serena; Calcutt, Hannah

    2014-06-01

    Vinyl cyanide (acrylonitrile, H_2C=CHC?N) is an interstellar molecule that was classified as a 'weed' since transitions in its isotopic species and vibrationally excited states have already been detected and need to be accounted for in searches for complex organic molecules. Presently we extend the systematic analysis of the laboratory rotational spectrum of vinyl cyanide to 9 new excited vibrational states with vibrational energies above 550 cm-1 (785K). The spectroscopic analysis is based on the broadband 50-1900 GHz spectrum combined from results from the participating spectroscopic laboratories and covering a total of 1235 GHz. The studied states come in the form of polyads of perturbing vibrational states, and such perturbations also affect the strong, low-K_a transitions used for astrophysical detection. It is therefore crucial to account for such effects in order to produce reliable linelists. The experimental data for three new polyads were fitted to experimental accuracy using Coriolis and Fermi perturbation models. Multiple transitions in the lowest of these polyads (and in other excited vibrational states and isotopic species of vinyl cyanide) were detected in the millimetre survey of the Orion-KL Nebula made with the IRAM 30-m radiotelescope.

  1. Spectroscopic Confirmation of Ethyl Cyanide in Titan’s Atmosphere using ALMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Maureen Y.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Nixon, Conor A.; Kisiel, Zbigniew; Charnley, Steven B.; Teanby, Nick; Kuan, Yi-Jehng; Mumma, Michael J.

    2014-11-01

    In the last few decades, many molecular species have been detected in the atmosphere of Titan. The first detection of a new molecule on Titan using high-resolution microwave spectroscopy was by Bézard et al. (1993), who observed multiple emission lines from methyl cyanide (CH3CN) near 221 GHz. The presence of ethyl cyanide (CH3CH2CN) has long been predicted by photochemical models, and the protonated form (CH3CH2CNH+) was previously inferred from Cassini INMS measurements (Vuitton et al. 2006). Here, we present the first spectroscopic detection of ethyl cyanide in Titan's atmosphere, obtained using high spectral/spatial-resolution observations carried out with the Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA). We have detected over 30 rotational emission lines from CH3CH2CN in the frequency range 220-350 GHz, and will present a preliminary model for the column density, as well as maps of the CH3CH2CN distribution in Titan's daylight hemisphere.References: Vuitton, Yelle, & Anicich 2006, ApJ, 647, L175.; Bézard, B., Marten, A., & Paubert, G. (1993). Detection of Acetonitrile on Titan. In AAS/Division for Planetary Sciences Meeting Abstracts #25.09, vol. 25 of Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society, (p. 1100).

  2. Pretreatment of cyanided tailings by catalytic ozonation with Mn2+/O3.

    PubMed

    Li, Yulong; Li, Dengxin; Li, Jiebing; wang, Jin; Hussain, Asif; Ji, Hao; Zhai, Yijie

    2015-02-01

    The increasing amount of cyanided tailings produced as a by-product has gained significant attention in recent years because of the rapid development of the gold industry and extensive exploitation of gold mineral resources. The effective use of these secondary resources is becoming an important and urgent problem for all environmental protection staff. Manganese-catalyzed ozonation for the pre-oxidation of cyanided tailings was studied and the effects of Mn2+ dosage, initial sulfuric acid concentration, ozone volume flow, temperature and agitation speed on pretreatment were examined. The optimum reaction conditions were observed to be: ore pulp density 2.5%, agitation speed 700 r/min, temperature 60°C, Mn2+ dosage 40 g/L, ozone volume flow 80 L/hr, initial sulfuric acid concentration 1 mol/L, and reaction time 6 hr. Under these conditions, the leaching rate of Fe and weight loss could reach 94.85% and 48.89% respectively. The leaching process of cyanided tailings by Mn2+/O3 was analyzed, and it was found that the leaching of pyrite depends on synergetic oxidation by high-valent manganese and O3, in which the former played an important part. PMID:25662233

  3. VUV photoionization and dissociative photoionization of the prebiotic molecule acetyl cyanide: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Bellili, A; Schwell, M; Bénilan, Y; Fray, N; Gazeau, M-C; Mogren Al-Mogren, M; Guillemin, J-C; Poisson, L; Hochlaf, M

    2014-10-01

    The present combined theoretical and experimental investigation concerns the single photoionization of gas-phase acetyl cyanide and the fragmentation pathways of the resulting cation. Acetyl cyanide (AC) is inspired from both the chemistry of cyanoacetylene and the Strecker reaction which are thought to be at the origin of medium sized prebiotic molecules in the interstellar medium. AC can be formed by reaction from cyanoacetylene and water but also from acetaldehyde and HCN or the corresponding radicals. In view of the interpretation of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) experimental data obtained using synchrotron radiation, we explored the ground potential energy surface (PES) of acetyl cyanide and of its cation using standard and recently implemented explicitly correlated methodologies. Our PES covers the regions of tautomerism (between keto and enol forms) and of the lowest fragmentation channels. This allowed us to deduce accurate thermochemical data for this astrobiologically relevant molecule. Unimolecular decomposition of the AC cation turns out to be very complex. The implications for the evolution of prebiotic molecules under VUV irradiation are discussed. PMID:25296810

  4. 1D cyanide complexes with 2-pyridinemethanol: Synthesis, crystal structures and spectroscopic properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Say?n, Elvan; Kürkçüo?lu, Güne? Süheyla; Ye?ilel, Okan Zafer; Hökelek, Tuncer

    2015-12-01

    Two new one-dimensional coordination polymers, [Cu(hmpH)2Pd(?-CN)2(CN)2]n (1) and [Cu(hmpH)2Pt(?-CN)2(CN)2]n (2), (hmpH = 2-pyridinemethanol), have been synthesized and characterized by vibrational (FT-IR and Raman) spectroscopy, single crystal X-ray diffraction, thermal and elemental analyses techniques. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that complexes 1 and 2 are isomorphous and isostructural, and crystallize in the triclinic system and P-1 space group. The Pd(II) or Pt(II) ions are four coordinated with four cyanide-carbon atoms in a square planar geometry. Cu(II) ion displays a distorted octahedral coordination by two N-atoms and two O-atoms of hmpH ligands, two bridging cyanide groups. In one dimensional structure of the complexes, [M(CN)4]2- (M = Pd(II) or Pt(II)) anions and [Cu(hmpH)2]2+ cations are linked via bridging cyanide ligands. In the complexes, the presence of intramolecular C-H⋯M (M = Pd(II) or Pt(II)) interactions with distance values of 3.00-2.95 Å are established, respectively.

  5. Pediatric cyanide intoxication and death from an acetonitrile-containing cosmetic

    SciTech Connect

    Caravati, E.M.; Litovitz, T.L. )

    1988-12-16

    Two cases of pediatric accidental ingestion of an acetonitrile-containing cosmetic are reported. One of the children, a 16-month-old boy, was found dead in bed the morning after ingesting the product. No therapy had been undertaken, as the product was mistakenly assumed to be an acetone-containing nail polish remover. The second child, a 2-year-old boy, experienced signs of severe cyanide poisoning, but survived with vigorous supportive care. Both children had blood cyanide levels in the potentially lethal range. The observed delayed onset of severe toxic reactions supports the proposed mechanism of acetonitrile conversion to inorganic cyanide via hepatic microsomal enzymes. Physicians and poison centers should be alerted to the existence of this highly toxic product, sold for removal of sculptured nails and likely to be confused with the less toxic acetone-containing nail polish removers. The authors urge regulatory agencies to reconsider the wisdom of marketing a cosmetic that poses such an extreme health hazard.

  6. Granular activated carbons from palm nut shells for gold di-cyanide adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buah, William K.; Williams, Paul T.

    2013-02-01

    Granular activated carbons were produced from palm nut shells by physical activation with steam. The proximate analysis of palm nut shells was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis, and the adsorption capacity of the activated carbons, produced as a result of shell pyrolysis at 600°C followed by steam activation at 900°C in varying activation times, was evaluated using nitrogen adsorption at 77 K. Applicability of the activated carbons for gold dicyanide adsorption was also investigated. Increasing the activation hold time with the attendant increase in the degree of carbon burn-off results in a progressive increase in the surface area of the activated carbons, reaching a value of 903.1 m2/g after activation for 6 h. The volumes of total pores, micropores, and mesopores in the activated carbons also increase progressively with the increasing degree of carbon burn-off, resulting from increasing the activation hold time. The gold di-cyanide adsorption of the activated carbons increases with the rise of pore volume of the activated carbons. The gold di-cyanide adsorption of palm nut shell activated carbon obtained after 6-h activation at 900°C is superior to that of a commercial activated carbon used for gold di-cyanide adsorption.

  7. Evaluation of cyanide exposure and its effect on thyroid function of workers in a cable industry.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, K K; Bishayee, A; Marimuthu, P

    1997-03-01

    A thyroid-hormone evaluation of workers dealing with cyanide compounds in an electroplating process of a cable industry was carried out. Serum thiocyanate (SCN) levels of 35 nonsmoking copper-ply employees were assayed by a ferric-chloride color test. The mean SCN concentration of these employees was 316 +/- 15 mumol/L, which was significantly (P < 0.01) higher than that of control subjects (90.8 +/- 9.02 mumol/L). Serum thyroxine (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations of exposed workers were compared with those of 35 control subjects. Cyanide exposure resulted in a decrease in T4 and T3 concentrations (P < 0.05) and an increase in TSH concentration (P < 0.05), compared with the control subjects. The serum T4 level was found to be negatively correlated (r = -0.363, P < 0.05), whereas the TSH level was positively correlated (r = 0.354, P < 0.05), with SCN concentration in the exposed group. The study suggests that occupational cyanide exposure in the industry impairs thyroid function. PMID:9093978

  8. Freshwater availability and coastal wetland foundation species: ecological transitions along a rainfall gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osland, Michael; Enwright, Nicholas; Stagg, Camille La Fosse

    2014-01-01

    Climate gradient-focused ecological research can provide a foundation for better understanding critical ecological transition points and nonlinear climate-ecological relationships, which is information that can be used to better understand, predict, and manage ecological responses to climate change. In this study, we examined the influence of freshwater availability upon the coverage of foundation plant species in coastal wetlands along a northwestern Gulf of Mexico rainfall gradient. Our research addresses the following three questions: (1) what are the region-scale relationships between measures of freshwater availability (e.g., rainfall, aridity, freshwater inflow, salinity) and the relative abundance of foundation plant species in tidal wetlands; (2) How vulnerable are foundation plant species in tidal wetlands to future changes in freshwater availability; and (3) What is the potential future relative abundance of tidal wetland foundation plant species under alternative climate change scenarios? We developed simple freshwater availability-based models to predict the relative abundance (i.e., coverage) of tidal wetland foundation plant species using climate data (1970-2000), estuarine freshwater inflow-focused data, and coastal wetland habitat data. Our results identify regional ecological thresholds and nonlinear relationships between measures of freshwater availability and the relative abundance of foundation plant species in tidal wetlands. In drier coastal zones, relatively small changes in rainfall could produce comparatively large landscape-scale changes in foundation plant species abundance which would affect some ecosystem good and services. Whereas a drier future would result in a decrease in the coverage of foundation plant species, a wetter future would result in an increase in foundation plant species coverage. In many ways, the freshwater-dependent coastal wetland ecological transitions we observed are analogous to those present in dryland terrestrial ecosystems.

  9. Accounting for cyanide and its degradation products at three Nevada gold mines; constraints from stable C- and N-isotopes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.A.; Grimes, D.J.; Rye, R.O.

    1998-01-01

    An understanding of the fate of cyanide (CN-) in mine process waters is important for addressing environmental concerns and for taking steps to minimize reagent costs. The utility of stable isotope methods in identifying cyanide loss pathways has been investigated in case studies at three Nevada gold mines. Freshly prepared barren solutions at the mines have cyanide d15N and d13C values averaging -4 ? and -36 ?, respectively, reflecting the nitrogen and carbon sources used by commercial manufacturers, air and natural gas methane. Pregnant solutions returning from ore heaps display small isotopic shifts to lower d15N and d13C values. The shifts are similar to those observed in laboratory experiments where cyanide was progressively precipitated as a cyanometallic compound, and are opposite in sign and much smaller in magnitude than the shifts observed in experiments where HCN was offgassed. Offgassing is inferred to be a minor cyanide loss mechanism in the heap leach operations at the three mines, and precipitation as cyanometallic compounds, and possibly coprecipitation with ferric oxides, is inferred to be an important loss mechanism. Isotopic analysis of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) shows that uptake of high d13C air CO2 has been important in many barren and pregnant solutions. However, DIC in reclaim pond waters at all three mines has low d13C values of -28 to -34 ? indicating cyanide breakdown either by hydrolysis or by other chemical pathways that break the C-N bond. Isotope mass balance calculations indicate that about 40 % of the DIC load in the ponds, at a minimum, was derived from cyanide breakdown. This level of cyanide hydrolysis accounts for 14-100 % of the dissolved inorganic nitrogen species present in the ponds. Overall, isotope data provide quantitative evidence that only minor amounts of cyanide are lost via offgassing and that significant amounts are destroyed via hydrolysis and related pathways. The data also highlight the possibility that significant cyanide may be either retained in the ore heaps or destroyed via other chemical pathways.

  10. Effect of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid on Endogenous Cyanide, ?-Cyanoalanine Synthase Activity, and Ethylene Evolution in Seedlings of Soybean and Barley 1

    PubMed Central

    Tittle, Forrest L.; Goudey, J. Stephen; Spencer, Mary S.

    1990-01-01

    Treatment of etiolated seedlings of barley (Hordeum vulgare) and soybean (Glycine max) with 1 millimolar 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) resulted in a 14-fold and greater than 100-fold increase in ethylene production, respectively. Simultaneous monitoring of endogenous cyanide and ?-cyanoalanine synthase (?-CAS) (EC 4.4. 1.9) activity was also performed. Endogenous levels of cyanide did not change in barley. In soybean, endogenous cyanide increased within 3 hours, increased again 6 hours after exposure to 2,4-D, and continued to increase throughout the experimental period. The activity of ?-CAS increased in both barley and soybean 9 hours after herbicide treatment. The increase in cyanide preceded the increase in ?-CAS activity by 3 to 6 hours in soybean. The steady-state concentration of endogenous cyanide in soybean was 1 micromolar, based on rates of ethylene production and cyanide metabolism by ?-CAS. This agreed with the determination of endogenous cyanide by both distillation and isotope dilution. Given the apparent compartmentalization of ?-CAS in mitochondria and the localization of ethylene/HCN production at the plasmalemma and/or tonoplast, our results suggest that extra-mitochondrial accumulation of cyanide in the cytoplasm may occur. If so, the activity of cyanide-sensitive cytoplasmic enzymes could be adversely affected, thus possibly contributing to the toxicity of 2,4-D. PMID:16667809

  11. Biodegradation of free cyanide and subsequent utilisation of biodegradation by-products by Bacillus consortia: optimisation using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Mekuto, Lukhanyo; Ntwampe, Seteno Karabo Obed; Jackson, Vanessa Angela

    2015-07-01

    A mesophilic alkali-tolerant bacterial consortium belonging to the Bacillus genus was evaluated for its ability to biodegrade high free cyanide (CN(-)) concentration (up to 500 mg CN(-)/L), subsequent to the oxidation of the formed ammonium and nitrates in a continuous bioreactor system solely supplemented with whey waste. Furthermore, an optimisation study for successful cyanide biodegradation by this consortium was evaluated in batch bioreactors (BBs) using response surface methodology (RSM). The input variables, that is, pH, temperature and whey-waste concentration, were optimised using a numerical optimisation technique where the optimum conditions were found to be as follows: pH 9.88, temperature 33.60 °C and whey-waste concentration of 14.27 g/L, under which 206.53 mg CN(-)/L in 96 h can be biodegraded by the microbial species from an initial cyanide concentration of 500 mg CN(-)/L. Furthermore, using the optimised data, cyanide biodegradation in a continuous mode was evaluated in a dual-stage packed-bed bioreactor (PBB) connected in series to a pneumatic bioreactor system (PBS) used for simultaneous nitrification, including aerobic denitrification. The whey-supported Bacillus sp. culture was not inhibited by the free cyanide concentration of up to 500 mg CN(-)/L, with an overall degradation efficiency of ? 99 % with subsequent nitrification and aerobic denitrification of the formed ammonium and nitrates over a period of 80 days. This is the first study to report free cyanide biodegradation at concentrations of up to 500 mg CN(-)/L in a continuous system using whey waste as a microbial feedstock. The results showed that the process has the potential for the bioremediation of cyanide-containing wastewaters. PMID:25721526

  12. Determination of cyanogenic compounds in edible plants by ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hye-Jeon; Do, Byung-Kyung; Shim, Soon-Mi; Kwon, Hoonjeong; Lee, Dong-Ha; Nah, Ahn-Hee; Choi, Youn-Ju; Lee, Sook-Yeon

    2013-06-01

    Cyanogenic glycosides are HCN-producing phytotoxins; HCN is a powerful and a rapidly acting poison. It is not difficult to find plants containing these compounds in the food supply and/or in medicinal herb collections. The objective of this study was to investigate the distribution of total cyanide in nine genera (Dolichos, Ginkgo, Hordeum, Linum, Phaseolus, Prunus, Phyllostachys, Phytolacca, and Portulaca) of edible plants and the effect of the processing on cyanide concentration. Total cyanide content was measured by ion chromatography following acid hydrolysis and distillation. Kernels of Prunus genus are used medicinally, but they possess the highest level of total cyanide of up to 2259.81 CN(-)/g dry weight. Trace amounts of cyanogenic compounds were detected in foodstuffs such as mungbeans and bamboo shoots. Currently, except for the WHO guideline for cassava, there is no global standard for the allowed amount of cyanogenic compounds in foodstuffs. However, our data emphasize the need for the guidelines if plants containing cyanogenic glycosidesare to be developed as dietary supplements. PMID:24278641

  13. Determination of Cyanogenic Compounds in Edible Plants by Ion Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hye-Jeon; Do, Byung-Kyung; Shim, Soon-Mi; Lee, Dong-Ha; Nah, Ahn-Hee; Choi, Youn-Ju; Lee, Sook-Yeon

    2013-01-01

    Cyanogenic glycosides are HCN-producing phytotoxins; HCN is a powerful and a rapidly acting poison. It is not difficult to find plants containing these compounds in the food supply and/or in medicinal herb collections. The objective of this study was to investigate the distribution of total cyanide in nine genera (Dolichos, Ginkgo, Hordeum, Linum, Phaseolus, Prunus, Phyllostachys, Phytolacca, and Portulaca) of edible plants and the effect of the processing on cyanide concentration. Total cyanide content was measured by ion chromatography following acid hydrolysis and distillation. Kernels of Prunus genus are used medicinally, but they possess the highest level of total cyanide of up to 2259.81 CN?/g dry weight. Trace amounts of cyanogenic compounds were detected in foodstuffs such as mungbeans and bamboo shoots. Currently, except for the WHO guideline for cassava, there is no global standard for the allowed amount of cyanogenic compounds in foodstuffs. However, our data emphasize the need for the guidelines if plants containing cyanogenic glycosidesare to be developed as dietary supplements. PMID:24278641

  14. Foundations of Geomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Andy

    The study of the magnetic field of the Earth, or geomagnetism, is one of the oldest lines of scientific enquiry. Indeed, it has often been said that William Gilbert's De Magnete, published in 1600 and predating Isaac Newton's Principia by 87 years, can claim to be the first true scientific textbook; his study was essentially the first of academic rather than practical interest.What then, we may ask, has been accomplished in the nearly 400 intervening years up to the publication of Foundations of Geomagnetism? In short, a wealth of observational evidence, considerable physical understanding, and a great deal of mathematical apparatus have accrued, placing the subject on a much surer footing.The latter two categories are described in considerable detail, and with attendant rigor, in this book. The sphericity of the Earth means that a frequent theme in the book is the solution of the partial differential equations of electrodynamics in a spherical geometry.

  15. Creating a Successful Affiliated Foundation. Foundation Relations. Board Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedgepeth, Royster C.

    1999-01-01

    This booklet for trustees of institutions of higher education offers guidelines for the creation of effective affiliated foundations. An introductory section notes the increased use of such foundations by public colleges and universities for institutional fund-raising and management of property and endowments. The booklet finds that successful…

  16. The Complete, Temperature-resolved Experimental Spectrum of Vinyl Cyanide (H2CCHCN) between 210 and 270 GHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortman, Sarah M.; Medvedev, Ivan R.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.

    2011-08-01

    The results of an experimental approach to the identification and characterization of the astrophysical weed vinyl cyanide in the 210-270 GHz region are reported. This approach is based on spectrally complete, intensity-calibrated spectra taken at more than 400 different temperatures in the 210-270 GHz region and is used to produce catalogs in the usual astrophysical format: line frequency, line strength, and lower state energy. As in our earlier study of ethyl cyanide, we also include the results of a frequency point-by-point analysis, which is especially well suited for characterizing weak lines and blended lines in crowded spectra. This study shows substantial incompleteness in the quantum-mechanical (QM) models used to calculate astrophysical catalogs, primarily due to their omission of many low-lying vibrational states of vinyl cyanide, but also due to the exclusion of perturbed rotational transitions. Unlike ethyl cyanide, the QM catalogs for vinyl cyanide include analyses of perturbed excited vibrational states, whose modeling is more challenging. Accordingly, we include an empirical study of the frequency accuracy of these QM models. We observe modest frequency differences for some vibrationally excited lines.

  17. THE COMPLETE, TEMPERATURE-RESOLVED EXPERIMENTAL SPECTRUM OF VINYL CYANIDE (H{sub 2}CCHCN) BETWEEN 210 AND 270 GHz

    SciTech Connect

    Fortman, Sarah M.; Neese, Christopher F.; De Lucia, Frank C.; Medvedev, Ivan R.

    2011-08-10

    The results of an experimental approach to the identification and characterization of the astrophysical weed vinyl cyanide in the 210-270 GHz region are reported. This approach is based on spectrally complete, intensity-calibrated spectra taken at more than 400 different temperatures in the 210-270 GHz region and is used to produce catalogs in the usual astrophysical format: line frequency, line strength, and lower state energy. As in our earlier study of ethyl cyanide, we also include the results of a frequency point-by-point analysis, which is especially well suited for characterizing weak lines and blended lines in crowded spectra. This study shows substantial incompleteness in the quantum-mechanical (QM) models used to calculate astrophysical catalogs, primarily due to their omission of many low-lying vibrational states of vinyl cyanide, but also due to the exclusion of perturbed rotational transitions. Unlike ethyl cyanide, the QM catalogs for vinyl cyanide include analyses of perturbed excited vibrational states, whose modeling is more challenging. Accordingly, we include an empirical study of the frequency accuracy of these QM models. We observe modest frequency differences for some vibrationally excited lines.

  18. Infrared study of matrix-isolated ethyl cyanide: simulation of the photochemistry in the atmosphere of Titan.

    PubMed

    Toumi, A; Piétri, N; Couturier-Tamburelli, I

    2015-11-11

    Low-temperature Ar matrix isolation has been carried out to investigate the infrared spectrum of ethyl cyanide (CH3CH2CN), a molecule present in the atmosphere of Titan. The ? > 120 nm and ? > 230 nm photolysis reactions of ethyl cyanide in an Ar matrix were also performed in order to compare the behaviour of this compound when it is submitted to high and low energetic radiations. These different wavelengths have been used with the aim to reproduce the radiation reaching the various parts of the atmosphere. Several photoproducts have been identified during photolysis such as vinyl cyanide (CH2[double bond, length as m-dash]CHCN), cyanoacetylene (HC3N), and ethylene/hydrogen cyanide (C2H4/HCN), ethylene/hydrogen isocyanide (C2H4/HNC), acetylene/hydrogen cyanide (C2H2/HCN), acetylene/hydrogen isocyanide (C2H2/HNC), and acetylene:methylenimine (C2H2:HNCH2) complexes. Ethyl isocyanide (CH3CH2NC) and a ketenimine form (CH3CH[double bond, length as m-dash]C[double bond, length as m-dash]NH) have been identified as well. Photoproduct identification and spectral assignments were done using previous studies and density functional theory (DFT) calculations with the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ basis set. PMID:26507585

  19. Hydrogen cyanide production due to mid-size impacts in a redox-neutral N2-rich atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Kosuke; Sugita, Seiji; Ishibashi, Ko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Sekine, Yasuhito; Ogawa, Nanako O; Kadono, Toshihiko; Ohno, Sohsuke; Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Nagaoka, Yoichi; Matsui, Takafumi

    2013-06-01

    Cyanide compounds are amongst the most important molecules of the origin of life. Here, we demonstrate the importance of mid-size (0.1-1 km in diameter) hence frequent meteoritic impacts to the cyanide inventory on the early Earth. Subsequent aerodynamic ablation and chemical reactions with the ambient atmosphere after oblique impacts were investigated by both impact and laser experiments. A polycarbonate projectile and graphite were used as laboratory analogs of meteoritic organic matter. Spectroscopic observations of impact-generated ablation vapors show that laser irradiation to graphite within an N2-rich gas can produce a thermodynamic environment similar to that produced by oblique impacts. Thus, laser ablation was used to investigate the final chemical products after this aerodynamic process. We found that a significant fraction (>0.1 mol%) of the vaporized carbon is converted to HCN and cyanide condensates, even when the ambient gas contains as much as a few hundred mbar of CO2. As such, the column density of cyanides after carbon-rich meteoritic impacts with diameters of 600 m would reach ~10 mol/m(2) over ~10(2) km(2) under early Earth conditions. Such a temporally and spatially concentrated supply of cyanides may have played an important role in the origin of life. PMID:23877440

  20. Wetland-based passive treatment systems for gold ore processing effluents containing residual cyanide, metals and nitrogen species.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, R; Ordóñez, A; Loredo, J; Younger, P L

    2013-10-01

    Gold extraction operations generate a variety of wastes requiring responsible disposal in compliance with current environmental regulations. During recent decades, increased emphasis has been placed on effluent control and treatment, in order to avoid the threat to the environment posed by toxic constituents. In many modern gold mining and ore processing operations, cyanide species are of most immediate concern. Given that natural degradation processes are known to reduce the toxicity of cyanide over time, trials have been made at laboratory and field scales into the feasibility of using wetland-based passive systems as low-cost and environmentally friendly methods for long-term treatment of leachates from closed gold mine tailing disposal facilities. Laboratory experiments on discrete aerobic and anaerobic treatment units supported the development of design parameters for the construction of a field-scale passive system at a gold mine site in northern Spain. An in situ pilot-scale wetland treatment system was designed, constructed and monitored over a nine-month period. Overall, the results suggest that compost-based constructed wetlands are capable of detoxifying cyanidation effluents, removing about 21.6% of dissolved cyanide and 98% of Cu, as well as nitrite and nitrate. Wetland-based passive systems can therefore be considered as a viable technology for removal of residual concentrations of cyanide from leachates emanating from closed gold mine tailing disposal facilities. PMID:24089077

  1. Foundation Accounting 2010 Levy Avenue

    E-print Network

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Foundation Accounting 2010 Levy Avenue Building B, Suite 300 Tallahassee, FL 32310 PH: (850) 644 of all information on this form. Name Signature Date FOR FOUNDATION ACCOUNTING USE ONLY-DO NOT WRITE BELOW THIS LINE Accounting Authorization: Date: JE created by Acct. Staff: Date: FE fund closed by Acct

  2. WILD CHIMPANZEE FOUNDATION Volunteer Position

    E-print Network

    WILD CHIMPANZEE FOUNDATION Volunteer Position GIS specialist and Assistant field coordinator: The Wild Chimpanzee Foundation (WCF), is an international NGO established in several countries such as Côte in Zwedru, Grand Gedeh County, Liberia, the volunteer will be required to assist the Field Coordinator

  3. Quantum Computation Models Foundational Problems

    E-print Network

    Rowell, Eric C.

    Quantum Computation Models Foundational Problems Qualitative Questions Conjectural Answer to All Questions Locality in Quantum Computation, II Eric Rowell1 with Z. Wang2, C. Galindo3, S.-M. Hong4 1:Texas A Computation, II #12;Quantum Computation Models Foundational Problems Qualitative Questions Conjectural Answer

  4. Role of cyanide-resistant respiration in the response of two pea hybrids to CO/sub 2/ enrichment. [Pisum sativum

    SciTech Connect

    Musgrave, M.E.; Strain, B.R.; Siedow, J.N.

    1986-04-01

    Two cultivars of pea (Pisum sativum L., cvs. Alaska and Progress No. 9) were reciprocally crossed to yield hybrids differing in the presence or absence of the cyanide-resistant (alternative) pathway of respiration. The growth of this material in greenhouses maintained at either 350 or 650 ppm CO/sub 2/ was compared. The objective was to assess the significance of the alternative pathway to whole plant carbon budgets and further to use CO/sub 2/ enrichment as a means of testing the hypothesis that the alternative pathway might be important in oxidizing excess carbohydrates. More structural and storage carbohydrates were available in the cross lacking the pathway than in the reciprocal cross as shown by greater plant height, leaf area, specific leaf weight, branching, total dry matter and seed production. Specific leaf weight increased strongly under CO/sub 2/ enrichment in the hybrid lacking the pathway while it was the same at 350 and 650 ppm in the reciprocal cross. These results suggest that respiration via the alternative pathway may be energetically wasteful in terms of whole plant carbon budgets.

  5. Foundations of resilience thinking.

    PubMed

    Curtin, Charles G; Parker, Jessica P

    2014-08-01

    Through 3 broad and interconnected streams of thought, resilience thinking has influenced the science of ecology and natural resource management by generating new multidisciplinary approaches to environmental problem solving. Resilience science, adaptive management (AM), and ecological policy design (EPD) contributed to an internationally unified paradigm built around the realization that change is inevitable and that science and management must approach the world with this assumption, rather than one of stability. Resilience thinking treats actions as experiments to be learned from, rather than intellectual propositions to be defended or mistakes to be ignored. It asks what is novel and innovative and strives to capture the overall behavior of a system, rather than seeking static, precise outcomes from discrete action steps. Understanding the foundations of resilience thinking is an important building block for developing more holistic and adaptive approaches to conservation. We conducted a comprehensive review of the history of resilience thinking because resilience thinking provides a working context upon which more effective, synergistic, and systems-based conservation action can be taken in light of rapid and unpredictable change. Together, resilience science, AM, and EPD bridge the gaps between systems analysis, ecology, and resource management to provide an interdisciplinary approach to solving wicked problems. PMID:24975863

  6. Photodissociation of vinyl cyanide at 193 nm: Nascent product distributions of the molecular elimination channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Michael J.; Nikow, Matthew; Letendre, Laura; Dai, Hai-Lung

    2009-01-01

    The photodissociation dynamics of vinyl cyanide (H2CCHCN, acrylonitrile) and deuterated vinyl cyanide (D2CCDCN) at 193 nm are examined using time-resolved Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy. Prior photofragment translational spectroscopy studies [D. A. Blank et al., J. Chem. Phys. 108, 5784 (1998)] of the dissociation have observed the presence of four main dissociation channels; two molecular and two radical in nature. However, with the exception of a <0.01 quantum yield determined for the CN radical loss channel, the branching ratios of the remaining three elimination channels were not measured. The time-resolved emission spectra, including those from the deuterated samples, revealed the presence of acetylene, hydrogen cyanide (HCN), as well as the energetically less stable isomer hydrogen isocyanide (HNC). Acetylene is found in two distinct energetic distributions, suggesting that both three- and four-centered elimination reactions are occurring significantly in the dissociation. In contrast to prior ab initio studies that have suggested the dominant nature of the three-center elimination of molecular hydrogen (H2) and cyanovinylidene (:C?CHCN), we find this reaction channel to be of little importance as there is no evidence to support any significant presence of rovibrationally excited cyanoacetylene. Spectral modeling of the product distributions allows for the first experimental determination of the relative occurrence of the three-centered (resulting in HCN+vinylidene) versus four-centered (HNC+acetylene) elimination channels as 3.34 to 1.00, in contrast to the previously calculated value of 126:1. Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus analysis depicts that the transition state energy of the four-centered reaction should be about 10 kcal mole-1 lower than the three-centered reaction.

  7. Evaluation of a non-cyanide gold plating process for switch tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Norwood, D.P.; Martinez, F.E.

    1996-01-01

    Switch tubes are used in nuclear weapon firing sets and are required to be reliable and impervious to gas permeation for many years. To accomplish this, a gold plated coating of approximately 25 microns is required over all metal surfaces on the tube exterior. The gold has historically been plated using gold cyanide plating chemistry. In this work we proposed to replace the cyanide plating bath with an environmentally friendlier sulfite gold plating bath. Low and high pH sulfite plating chemistries were investigated as possible replacements for the cyanide gold plating chemistry. The low pH plating chemistry demonstrated a gold plated coating which met the high purity, grain size, and hardness requirements for switch tubes. The high pH chemistry was rejected primarily because the hardness of the gold plated coatings was too high and exceeded switch tube coating requirements. A problem with nodule formation on the gold plated surface using the low pH chemistry had to be resolved during this evaluation. The nodule formation was postulated to be produced by generation of SO{sub 2} in the low pH bath causing gold to be precipitated out when the sulfite concentration falls below a minimum level. The problem was resolved by maintaining a higher sulfite concentration and providing an active filtration system during plating. In this initial study, there were no major obstacles found when using a sulfite gold bath for switch tube plating, however, further work is needed on bath control and bath life before adopting it as the primary plating chemistry.

  8. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 414 - Non-Complexed Metal-Bearing Waste Streams and Cyanide-Bearing Waste Streams

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 false Non-Complexed Metal-Bearing Waste Streams and Cyanide-Bearing...Appendix A to Part 414—Non-Complexed Metal-Bearing Waste Streams and Cyanide-Bearing...of ethylene Dialkyldithiocarbamates, metal salts/Dialkylamines + carbon...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 414 - Non-Complexed Metal-Bearing Waste Streams and Cyanide-Bearing Waste Streams

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 true Non-Complexed Metal-Bearing Waste Streams and Cyanide-Bearing...Appendix A to Part 414—Non-Complexed Metal-Bearing Waste Streams and Cyanide-Bearing...of ethylene Dialkyldithiocarbamates, metal salts/Dialkylamines + carbon...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 414 - Non-Complexed Metal-Bearing Waste Streams and Cyanide-Bearing Waste Streams

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2009-07-01 true Non-Complexed Metal-Bearing Waste Streams and Cyanide-Bearing...Appendix A to Part 414—Non-Complexed Metal-Bearing Waste Streams and Cyanide-Bearing...of ethylene Dialkyldithiocarbamates, metal salts/Dialkylamines + carbon...

  11. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 414 - Non-Complexed Metal-Bearing Waste Streams and Cyanide-Bearing Waste Streams

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 true Non-Complexed Metal-Bearing Waste Streams and Cyanide-Bearing...Appendix A to Part 414—Non-Complexed Metal-Bearing Waste Streams and Cyanide-Bearing...of ethylene Dialkyldithiocarbamates, metal salts/Dialkylamines + carbon...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix A to Part 414 - Non-Complexed Metal-Bearing Waste Streams and Cyanide-Bearing Waste Streams

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 true Non-Complexed Metal-Bearing Waste Streams and Cyanide-Bearing...Appendix A to Part 414—Non-Complexed Metal-Bearing Waste Streams and Cyanide-Bearing...of ethylene Dialkyldithiocarbamates, metal salts/Dialkylamines + carbon...

  13. Non-cancer health risk assessment from exposure to cyanide by resident adults from the mining operations of Bogoso Gold Limited in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Obiri, S; Dodoo, D K; Okai-Sam, F; Essumang, D K

    2006-07-01

    Cyanide is a very toxic chemical that is used to extract gold from its ores. Wastewaters from gold mining companies such as Bogoso Gold Limited (BGL) contain cyanide and other potentially toxic chemicals that have adverse effects on human beings and aquatic organisms. This study was conducted to evaluate the human health risk assessment from exposure to free cyanide via oral and dermal contact of surface/underground water by resident adults within the concession of Bogoso Gold Limited. The chronic non-cancer health risk from exposure to cyanide in River Bogo Upstream is 230 and 43 (by Central Tendency Exposure (CTE) parameters respectively). This means that approximately 230 and 43 resident adults are likely to suffer diseases related to cyanide intoxication via oral and dermal contact respectively. For chronic exposure to River Bogo Downstream by resident adults, the non-cancer health risks are: 0.031 and 0.57 via oral and dermal contact for CTE parameters respectively, which also means that, the non-cancer health risks associated with cyanide intoxication is negligible as the hazard index is less than 1.0 via oral and dermal contacts respectively. The results showed that health risk for acute exposure to cyanide by the resident adults is very high. Hence the residents attribute most of the unexplained deaths in the communities to accidental ingestion and dermal contact of cyanide water. PMID:16897533

  14. High catalytic activity of heteropolynuclear cyanide complexes containing cobalt and platinum ions: visible-light driven water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yusuke; Oyama, Kohei; Gates, Rachel; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-05-01

    A near-stoichiometric amount of O2 was evolved as observed in the visible-light irradiation of an aqueous buffer (pH?8) containing [Ru(II) (2,2'-bipyridine)3 ] as a photosensitizer, Na2 S2 O8 as a sacrificial electron acceptor, and a heteropolynuclear cyanide complex as a water-oxidation catalyst. The heteropolynuclear cyanide complexes exhibited higher catalytic activity than a polynuclear cyanide complex containing only Co(III) or Pt(IV) ions as C-bound metal ions. The origin of the synergistic effect between Co and Pt ions is discussed in relation to electronic and local atomic structures of the complexes. PMID:25866203

  15. Development of an enzyme membrane reactor for treatment of cyanide-containing wastewaters from the food industry

    SciTech Connect

    Basheer, S.; Kut, O.M.; Prenosil, J.E.; Bourne, J.R. )

    1993-02-20

    Cyanidase, an immobilized enzyme preparation for hydrolyzing cyanide to ammonia and formate, was applied for the treatment of cyanide-containing waste-waters from the food industry. Apricot seed extract was chosen as a model effluent. The enzymatic hydrolysis of pure amygdalin, the main cyanogenic glycoside in the extract, and the degradation of the cyanide formed was investigated and compared with the behavior of the real extract in a batch slurry reactor. A diffusional-type, flat-membrane reactor with immobilized cyanidase was developed, where the enzyme is effectively protected from adverse effects of high molecular components contained in the extract. For monitoring continuous-membrane reactor operation, a new unsegmented ammonia measurement system was developed and applied. In continuous operation the cyanidase retained its original activity for more than 400 hours on stream.

  16. Cyanide and antimony thermodynamic database for the aqueous species and solids for the EPA-MINTEQ geochemical code

    SciTech Connect

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1989-05-01

    Thermodynamic data for aqueous species and solids that contain cyanide and antimony were tabulated from several commonly accepted, published sources of thermodynamic data and recent journal article. The review does not include gases or organic complexes of either antimony or cyanide, nor does the review include the sulfur compounds of cyanide. The basic thermodynamic data, ..delta..G/sub f,298//sup o/, ..delta..H/sub f,298//sup o/, and S/sub f//sup o/ values, were chosen to represent each solid phase and aqueous species for which data were available in the appropriate standard state. From these data the equilibrium constants (log K/sub r,298//sup o/) and enthalpies of reaction (..delta..H/sub r,298//sup o/) at 298 K (25/degree/C) were calculated for reactions involving the formation of these aqueous species and solids from the basic components. 34 refs., 14 tabs.

  17. Sublethal toxicity of cyanide to the tropical marine fish Dascyllus aruanus

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, L.; Hanawa, M.; Farrell, A.P.; Bendell-Young, L.I.; Graham, M.

    1995-12-31

    The use of NACN in collecting tropical marine fish for the hobby trade results in high mortality rates of the captured fish, plus the destruction of the associated coral reef. Despite its widespread use, little is known of sublethal effects of cyanide to tropical marine fish. The objectives were two-fold: (1) determine the concentration/time exposure regime that results in exposed fish being anesthetized but surviving long enough for export and (2) through the measurement of several physiological endpoints, identify a biomarker indicative of sublethal cyanide exposure. Hand caught Dascyllus aruanus were exposed to 25 and 50 ppm cyanide solutions for periods of 10-, 60- and 120-s. Two weeks following exposure, hemoglobin concentration, blood [O{sub 2}], and liver O{sub 2} consumption rate were determined. Only the 120-s exposure at 25 and 50 ppm proved lethal (42% and 0% survival respectively). Liver O{sub 2} consumption rate was significantly lower (P < 0.05) for the 50 ppm, 10- and 60-s exposed versus control fish (2.0 {+-} 0.4 and 2.56 {+-} 0.1 versus 5.4 {+-} 2.0 ml/mg/min, respectively: values = mean {+-} 1.S.D.). O{sub 2} consumption rate for the 25 ppm, 10-s exposed fish was also significantly lower (P < 0.05) versus control fish (0.9 {+-} 0.5 versus 2.3 {+-} 0.7 respectively). In contrast, no difference in O{sub 2} consumption rate between the 25 ppm, 60-s exposed versus control fish was noted (2.4 {+-} 0.8 versus 2.3 {+-} 0.7 respectively). Hemoglobin concentration tended to be lower in fish exposed to 50 ppm, 10- and 60-s exposed fish versus that of controls. Hemoglobin concentration results were inconclusive for the 25 ppm exposed versus the control fish. Blood [O{sub 2}] was highly variable with no apparent trends between exposed versus control fish. Sublethal exposure to cyanide clearly results in impaired liver function indicated by depressed O{sub 2} consumption rate.

  18. The effects of the pollutant, sodium cyanide, on the morphology and physiology of oedogonium cardiacum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, E.

    1977-01-01

    OEDOGONIUM cardiacum exposed to varying concentrations of sodium cyanide for 15 day periods exhibited both morphological and physiological alterations. Organisms were exposed to the pollutant in concentrations of 1, 10, 25, 50, and 100 parts per million. Exposure period for organisms in each concentration was 15 days. As the concentration of the pollutant increased fragmentation also increased. Exposure also caused organisms to lose chlorophyll. The third morphological alteration was the incidence of rupture. Physiological effects altered by exposure included: reduced oxygen evolution, retardation of starch production and death. Death occurs when organisms are exposed to high concentrations over the total 15 day period.

  19. Reusable and specific proton transfer signalling by inorganic cyanide in solution and solid phase.

    PubMed

    Kaloo, Masood Ayoub; Sankar, Jeyaraman

    2015-10-01

    A highly specific cyanide mediated proton transfer signalling (PTS) is exhibited by a simple diaminomalenonitrile (DAMN) derivative 1. By virtue of the functional groups on it, the chromophore offered a rigid anchoring on a silica surface via a simple dip method, while retaining the recognition behaviour. The PTS triggered a prompt dual-modal display i.e., chromogenic and fluorogenic. The signal readout can be visualized even in micromolar concentrations. It is noteworthy that PTS can be reversed in both solution and solid phases. The remarkable sensitivity of 1 to detect CN(-) from the solution and solid phase envisages a pivotal step towards field-usable sensing. PMID:26285689

  20. A new channel for the formation of hydrogen cyanide in CH2-N2 systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laufer, A. H.; Bass, A. M.

    1978-01-01

    The reaction between N2 and either the singlet or the triplet electronic state of CH2 is investigated in order to shed light on the formation of NO in fuel-rich hydrocarbon flames. For the reaction of N2 and the triplet CH2, a rate constant less than or equal to 10 to the minus 16th power cu cm/molecule-sec is obtained. The time history of hydrogen cyanide production from the CH2-N2 systems is discussed as a basis for understanding the possible reaction routes from HCN to NO.

  1. Simulation of the cubic to orthorhombic phase transition in potassium cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Impey, Roger W.; Sprik, Michiel; Klein, Michael L.

    1985-10-01

    Constant pressure (NPH) ensemble molecular dynamics calculations have been used to study the cubic to orthorhombic phase transition that occurs upon cooling potassium cyanide at low pressures. A rigid ion model consisting of interionic electrostatic terms plus nonbonded atom-atom interactions has been found to yield an almost quantitative account of the transition. In particular, the extreme softening of the shear elastic constant C44 and the anomalous dispersion of the transverse acoustic phonons propagating along the crystal [100] direction in the cubic phase are well reproduced.

  2. Private Foundations: Quiet Partners in Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Sanctis, Vincent

    1982-01-01

    Reviewing evidence of private foundation support of adult education, the author finds that the number of contributing foundations is increasing, the range of grant recipients is broadening, and that foundations have an impact on legislation. (SK)

  3. A behaviorological thanatology: Foundations and implications

    PubMed Central

    Fraley, Lawrence E.

    1998-01-01

    Foundation principles supporting a behaviorological thanatology are reviewed, including concepts of life, person, death, value, right, ethic, and body/person distinctions. These natural science foundations are contrasted with traditional foundations, and their respective implications are speculatively explored. PMID:22478293

  4. Electrokinetic improvement of offshore foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micic, Silvana

    Offshore and near-shore structures for energy exploration and production, harbour work and other facilities are often situated on very soft marine clay deposits that have shear strengths of a few kilopascals. The design of foundations embedded in these soft deposits often poses a challenge for geotechnical engineers, i.e., to satisfy the bearing capacity requirement, while at the same time minimizing the embedment depth and dimensions of the foundation due to cost considerations. The present study investigates the possibility of using electrokinetics to strengthen the soil adjacent to skirted foundations embedded in soft marine deposits and, thus, to improve the load carrying capacity of the foundations. The innovative feature of this approach as compared to soil improvement methods commonly adopted in practice is that the focus of strengthening is on the interface between the soil and embedded foundation, in terms of enhancement of adhesion and cementation. The thesis presents a summary of the method and results of a series of electrokinetic tests conducted on natural and simulated marine clays in small-scale and large-scale laboratory testing facilities. Steel plates and steel cylinders are used to simulate skirted foundations. A low dc voltage is applied via steel electrodes installed around the foundation models. The effects of electrokinetics are evaluated through changes in the geotechnical properties of the soil and load carrying capacities of the foundation model after treatment. The results demonstrate that the load carrying capacity of the skirted foundation model and the undrained shear strength of the adjacent soil increase by a factor of three after electrokinetic treatment. The clay adheres strongly to the inside and outside walls of the foundation model, indicating bonding occurs between the soil and steel after treatment. The treatment increases the soil undrained modulus and also induces a preconsolidation pressure of the remoulded clay, thereby reducing potential settlement of the foundation. The new technology described in this thesis has potential application in offshore engineering for increasing the load carrying capacity of skirted foundations installed in soft clayey sediments, as well as for rehabilitation of existing offshore structures.

  5. Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Ehlers-Danlos National Foundation Facebook Twitter Linkedin Youtube Google Donate Today Search Home About Us Contact Us ... 300, McLean VA 22102 Facebook Twitter Linkedin Youtube Google Donate Today Search Facebook Twitter Linkedin Google Donate ...

  6. Hydration free energies of cyanide and hydroxide ions from molecular dynamics simulations with accurate force fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, M.W.; Meuwly, M.

    2013-01-01

    The evaluation of hydration free energies is a sensitive test to assess force fields used in atomistic simulations. We showed recently that the vibrational relaxation times, 1D- and 2D-infrared spectroscopies for CN(-) in water can be quantitatively described from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with multipolar force fields and slightly enlarged van der Waals radii for the C- and N-atoms. To validate such an approach, the present work investigates the solvation free energy of cyanide in water using MD simulations with accurate multipolar electrostatics. It is found that larger van der Waals radii are indeed necessary to obtain results close to the experimental values when a multipolar force field is used. For CN(-), the van der Waals ranges refined in our previous work yield hydration free energy between -72.0 and -77.2 kcal mol(-1), which is in excellent agreement with the experimental data. In addition to the cyanide ion, we also study the hydroxide ion to show that the method used here is readily applicable to similar systems. Hydration free energies are found to sensitively depend on the intermolecular interactions, while bonded interactions are less important, as expected. We also investigate in the present work the possibility of applying the multipolar force field in scoring trajectories generated using computationally inexpensive methods, which should be useful in broader parametrization studies with reduced computational resources, as scoring is much faster than the generation of the trajectories.

  7. ALMA Spectroscopy of Titan's Atmosphere: First Detections of Vinyl Cyanide and Acetonitrile Isotopologues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordiner, Martin; Y Palmer, Maureen; Nixon, Conor A.; Charnley, Steven B.; Mumma, Michael J.; Irwin, Pat G. J.; Teanby, Nick A.; Kisiel, Zbigniew; Serigano, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Studies of Titan's atmospheric chemistry provide a unique opportunity to explore the origin and evolution of complex organic matter in primitive planetary atmospheres. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is a powerful new telescope, well suited to the study of molecular emission from Titan's stratosphere and mesosphere. Here we present early results from our ongoing study to exploit the large volume of Titan data taken using ALMA in Early Science Mode (during the period 2012-2014). Combining data from multiple ALMA Band 6 observations, we obtained high-resolution mm-wave spectra with unprecedented sensitivity, enabling the first detection of vinyl cyanide (C2H3CN) in Titan's atmosphere. Initial estimates indicate a mesospheric abundance ratio with respect to ethyl cyanide (C2H5CN) of [C2H3CN]/[C2H5CN] = 0.31. In addition, we report the first detections on Titan of the 13C and 15N-substituted isotopologues of acetonitrile (13CH3CN and CH3C15N). Radiative transfer models and possible chemical formation pathways for these molecules will be discussed.

  8. An electrogenerative process for the recovery of gold from cyanide solutions.

    PubMed

    Yap, C Y; Mohamed, N

    2007-04-01

    Traditional methods for the recovery of gold from electronic scrap by hydrometallurgy were cyanidation followed by adsorption on activated carbon or cementation onto zinc dust and by electrowinning. In our studies, a static batch electrochemical reactor operating in an electrogenerative mode was used in gold recovery from cyanide solutions. A spontaneous chemical reaction will take place in the reactor and generate an external flow of current. In this present work, a static batch cell with an improved design using three-dimensional cathodes namely porous graphite and reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) and two-dimensional cathode materials, copper and stainless steel plates were coupled with a zinc anode. The electrogenerative system was demonstrated and the performance of the system using various cathode materials for gold recovery was evaluated. The system resulted in more than 90% gold being recovered within 3h of operation. Activated RVC serves as a superior cathode material having the highest recovery rate with more than 99% of gold being recovered in 1h of operation. The morphology of gold deposits on various cathode materials was also investigated. PMID:17296217

  9. Formation of highly toxic hydrogen cyanide upon ruby laser irradiation of the tattoo pigment phthalocyanine blue

    PubMed Central

    Schreiver, Ines; Hutzler, Christoph; Laux, Peter; Berlien, Hans-Peter; Luch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Since laser treatment of tattoos is the favored method for the removing of no longer wanted permanent skin paintings, analytical, biokinetics and toxicological data on the fragmentation pattern of commonly used pigments are urgently required for health safety reasons. Applying dynamic headspace—gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (DHS—GC/MS) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC—ToF-MS), we identified 1,2-benzene dicarbonitrile, benzonitrile, benzene, and the poisonous gas hydrogen cyanide (HCN) as main fragmentation products emerging dose-dependently upon ruby laser irradiation of the popular blue pigment copper phthalocyanine in suspension. Skin cell viability was found to be significantly compromised at cyanide levels of ?1?mM liberated during ruby laser irradiation of >1.5?mg/ml phthalocyanine blue. Further, for the first time we introduce pyrolysis-GC/MS as method suitable to simulate pigment fragmentation that may occur spontaneously or during laser removal of organic pigments in the living skin of tattooed people. According to the literature such regular tattoos hold up to 9?mg pigment/cm2 skin. PMID:26243473

  10. Formation of highly toxic hydrogen cyanide upon ruby laser irradiation of the tattoo pigment phthalocyanine blue.

    PubMed

    Schreiver, Ines; Hutzler, Christoph; Laux, Peter; Berlien, Hans-Peter; Luch, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Since laser treatment of tattoos is the favored method for the removing of no longer wanted permanent skin paintings, analytical, biokinetics and toxicological data on the fragmentation pattern of commonly used pigments are urgently required for health safety reasons. Applying dynamic headspace-gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (DHS-GC/MS) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-ToF-MS), we identified 1,2-benzene dicarbonitrile, benzonitrile, benzene, and the poisonous gas hydrogen cyanide (HCN) as main fragmentation products emerging dose-dependently upon ruby laser irradiation of the popular blue pigment copper phthalocyanine in suspension. Skin cell viability was found to be significantly compromised at cyanide levels of ?1?mM liberated during ruby laser irradiation of >1.5?mg/ml phthalocyanine blue. Further, for the first time we introduce pyrolysis-GC/MS as method suitable to simulate pigment fragmentation that may occur spontaneously or during laser removal of organic pigments in the living skin of tattooed people. According to the literature such regular tattoos hold up to 9?mg pigment/cm(2) skin. PMID:26243473

  11. Removal of cyanide compounds from coking wastewater by ferrous sulfate: Improvement of biodegradability.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xubiao; Xu, Ronghua; Wei, Chaohai; Wu, Haizhen

    2016-01-25

    The effect of ferrous sulfate (FeSO4) treatment on the removal of cyanide compounds and the improvement of biodegradability of coking wastewater were investigated by varying Fe:TCN molar ratios. Results suggested that the reaction between FeSO4 and coking wastewater was a two-step process. At the first step, i.e., 0?Fe:TCN?1.0, the reaction mechanisms were dominated by the precipitation of FeS, the complexation of CN(-), and the coagulation of organic compounds. The COD of coking wastewater decreased from 3748.1mg/L to 3450.2mg/L, but BOD5:COD (B/C) was improved from 0.30 to 0.51. At the second step, i.e., 1.0cyanide compounds by ferrous ions was the dominating mechanism. The COD showed a continuous increase to 3542.2mg/L (Fe:TCN=3.2) due to the accumulated ferrous ions in coking wastewater. Moreover, B/C decreased progressively to 0.35, which was attributed to the negative effects of excess ferrous ions on biodegradability. To improve coking wastewater's biodegradability, a minimum ferrous dosage is required to complete the first step reaction. However, the optimum ferrous dosage should be determined to control a safe residual TCN in coking wastewater for the further biological treatment. PMID:26547041

  12. LABORATORY CHARACTERIZATION AND ASTROPHYSICAL DETECTION OF VIBRATIONALLY EXCITED STATES OF ETHYL CYANIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, A. M.; Bermudez, C.; Alonso, J. L.; Lopez, A.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Pearson, J. C.; Marcelino, N. E-mail: cbermu@qf.uva.es E-mail: lopezja@cab.inta-csic.es E-mail: jcernicharo@cab.inta-csic.es E-mail: nmarceli@nrao.edu

    2013-05-01

    Ethyl cyanide, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CN, is an important interstellar molecule with a very dense rotational-vibrational spectrum. On the basis of new laboratory data in the range of 17-605 GHz and ab initio calculations, two new vibrational states, {nu}{sub 12} and {nu}{sub 20}, have been detected in molecular clouds of Orion. Laboratory data consist of Stark spectroscopy (17-110 GHz) and frequency-modulated spectrometers (GEM laboratory in Valladolid: 17-170, 270-360 GHz; Toyama: 26-200 GHz; Emory: 200-240 GHz; Ohio State: 258-368 GHz; and JPL: 270-318, 395-605 GHz). More than 700 distinct lines of each species were measured in J up to 71 and in K{sub a} up to 25. The states were fitted with Watson's S-reduction Hamiltonian. The two new states have been identified in the interstellar medium toward the Orion Nebula (Orion KL). The ground state, the isotopologues of CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CN, and the vibrationally excited states have been fitted to obtain column densities and to derive vibrational temperatures. All together, ethyl cyanide is responsible for more than 2000 lines in the observed frequency range of 80-280 GHz.

  13. More Metal Cyanide Species: Detection of AlNC (X 1?+) toward IRC +10216

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziurys, L. M.; Savage, C.; Highberger, J. L.; Apponi, A. J.; Guélin, M.; Cernicharo, J.

    2002-01-01

    A new metal-containing species, AlNC, has been detected toward the circumstellar envelope of the late-type carbon star IRC +10216, using the IRAM 30 m telescope. The J=11-->10, 12-->11, and 13-->12 rotational transitions at 2 mm and the J=18-->17 and J=21-->20 transitions at 1.2 mm of this linear, closed-shell molecule were observed in this object. The line profiles appear U-shaped, indicating a source >~20", and the horn-to-center ratios suggest a shell-like distribution. In contrast, the other two Al-bearing molecules previously detected, AlF and AlCl, exist exclusively near the stellar photosphere. Modeling of the detected transitions, assuming a spherical-shell distribution, indicates a column density of Ntot~9×1011 cm-2 and a fractional abundance relative to H2 of ~3×10-10 for AlNC. A rotational temperature of Trot~60 K was also derived for this molecule, suggesting that shock waves may be synthesizing AlNC in the outer envelope. This species is the fourth metal cyanide/isocyanide compound discovered in this object, along with MgNC, MgCN, and NaCN. These data suggest that cyanide/isocyanide species are the major molecular carriers of metals in circumstellar gas.

  14. Hydration of the cyanide ion: an ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Moin, Syed Tarique; Hofer, Thomas S

    2014-12-21

    This paper presents an ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics simulation study of the cyanide anion (CN(-)) in aqueous solution where hydrogen bond formation plays a dominant role in the hydration process. Preferential orientation of water hydrogens compared to oxygen atoms was quantified in terms of radial, angular as well as coordination number distributions. All structural results indicate that the water hydrogens are attracted towards CN(-) atoms, thus contributing to the formation of the hydration layer. Moreover, a clear picture of the local arrangement of water molecules around the ellipsoidal CN(-) ion is provided via angular-radial distribution and spatial distribution functions. Apart from the structural analysis, the evaluation of water dynamics in terms of ligand mean residence times and H-bond correlation functions indicates the weak structure making capacity of the CN(-) ion. The similar values of H-bond lifetimes obtained for the NHwat and CHwat bonds indicate an isokinetic behaviour of these H-bonds, since there is a very small difference in the magnitude of the lifetimes. On the other hand, the H-bond lifetimes between water molecules of the hydration shell, and between solute and solvent evidence the slightly stable hydration of the CN(-). Overall, the H-bonding dominates in the hydration process of the cyanide anion enabling it to become soluble in the aqueous environment associated to chemical and biological processes. PMID:25360541

  15. A ratiometric chemodosimeter for highly selective naked-eye and fluorogenic detection of cyanide.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wei-Chi; Hu, Jiun-Wei; Chen, Kew-Yu

    2015-09-17

    A simple indole-based chemosensor (1) with a very low molecular weight of 207 g mol(-1) has been synthesized for the highly reactive and selective detection of CN(-) in aqueous media, even in the presence of other anions, such as F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), AcO(-), [Formula: see text] , SCN(-), [Formula: see text] , [Formula: see text] , [Formula: see text] , BzO(-), [Formula: see text] , and [Formula: see text] . The sensor achieves rapid detection of cyanide anion in 2 min, and the pseudo-first-order rate constant is estimated as 1.576 min(-1). The colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescent response of the sensor to CN(-) is attributable to the addition of CN(-) to the electron-deficient dicyanovinyl group of 1, which prevents intramolecular charge transfer. The sensing mechanism is supported by density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory calculations. Moreover, sensor 1 exhibits both high accuracy in determining the concentration of CN(-) in real samples and 1-based test strips can conveniently detect CN(-) without any additional equipment. The detection limit of the sensor 1 (1.1 ?M) for cyanide is lower than the maximum permissible level of CN(-) (1.9 ?M) in drinking water. PMID:26398427

  16. The cometary composition of a protoplanetary disk as revealed by complex cyanides

    E-print Network

    Oberg, Karin I; Furuya, Kenji; Qi, Chunhua; Aikawa, Yuri; Andrews, Sean M; Loomis, Ryan; Wilner, David J

    2015-01-01

    Observations of comets and asteroids show that the Solar Nebula that spawned our planetary system was rich in water and organic molecules. Bombardment brought these organics to the young Earth's surface, seeding its early chemistry. Unlike asteroids, comets preserve a nearly pristine record of the Solar Nebula composition. The presence of cyanides in comets, including 0.01% of methyl cyanide (CH3CN) with respect to water, is of special interest because of the importance of C-N bonds for abiotic amino acid synthesis. Comet-like compositions of simple and complex volatiles are found in protostars, and can be readily explained by a combination of gas-phase chemistry to form e.g. HCN and an active ice-phase chemistry on grain surfaces that advances complexity[3]. Simple volatiles, including water and HCN, have been detected previously in Solar Nebula analogues - protoplanetary disks around young stars - indicating that they survive disk formation or are reformed in situ. It has been hitherto unclear whether the s...

  17. Formation of highly toxic hydrogen cyanide upon ruby laser irradiation of the tattoo pigment phthalocyanine blue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiver, Ines; Hutzler, Christoph; Laux, Peter; Berlien, Hans-Peter; Luch, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Since laser treatment of tattoos is the favored method for the removing of no longer wanted permanent skin paintings, analytical, biokinetics and toxicological data on the fragmentation pattern of commonly used pigments are urgently required for health safety reasons. Applying dynamic headspace—gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (DHS—GC/MS) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC—ToF-MS), we identified 1,2-benzene dicarbonitrile, benzonitrile, benzene, and the poisonous gas hydrogen cyanide (HCN) as main fragmentation products emerging dose-dependently upon ruby laser irradiation of the popular blue pigment copper phthalocyanine in suspension. Skin cell viability was found to be significantly compromised at cyanide levels of ?1?mM liberated during ruby laser irradiation of >1.5?mg/ml phthalocyanine blue. Further, for the first time we introduce pyrolysis-GC/MS as method suitable to simulate pigment fragmentation that may occur spontaneously or during laser removal of organic pigments in the living skin of tattooed people. According to the literature such regular tattoos hold up to 9?mg pigment/cm2 skin.

  18. Aqueous Phase Non Enzymatic Chemistry of Cyanide, Formaldehyde and RNH2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, Narcinda R.; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    It is postulated that amino acids were produced on the early earth from dilute aqueous solution of cyanide, carbonyls and ammonia (the Strecker synthesis RNH2 + R"R""C=O + KCN yields H-N(R)-C(R")(R"")-CO2H. We have studied the products obtained from dilute aqueous solutions of cyanide, formaldehyde (R"=R""=H), ammonia (R=H) and amino acids. Solutions in the pH range from 8 to 10. at room temperature and at reactant concentrations from 0.001 M to 0.3 M have been studied. With R= H product yields were low (less than 3%). Only with R"=R""=H and R represented by the following: CH2CO2H (glycine); CH(CH3)CO2H (alanine); CH(CH2CH3)CO2H (a-amino n=butyric acids); C(CH3)2(CO2H) (a-aminoisobutyric acid); CH(CH(CH3)2)CO2H (valine); and CH(CH2CO2H)CO2H (aspartic acid), were product yields high (greater than 10%). The yields of glycine were larger with R not equal to H. The prebiotic implications of these findings will be discussed.

  19. NEWS: Solid foundations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-07-01

    Among the initiatives to be found at UK universities is a vocational award with the title `University Foundation Degree' at Nottingham Trent University. This qualification will be offered in 14 different subjects including four in the Faculty of Science and Mathematics, in the areas of applied biology, applied sciences, chemistry and physics. The courses will be available on a two-year full-time, three-year sandwich or a part-time basis. Set at a higher standard and specification than the Higher National Diplomas which it replaces, the UFD has been devised in consultation with industry and will cover the technical and specialist areas demanded by employers to combat skills shortages. The UFD in applied sciences concentrates on practical applications through laboratory, IT and project work, supported by lectures and seminars. At the end students can enter the employment market or transfer onto the second year of a degree course. Science-based careers including research and development would be the aim of those taking the UFD in physics. The first year develops the fundamentals of modern physics supported by studies in mathematics, IT and computer programming, whilst year 2 is vocational in nature with industrial problem solving and work experience as well as an academic theme associated with environmental aspects of the subject. Those who complete the UFD will be allowed automatic progression to a specified honours degree course and would normally be expected to study for a further two years for this award. However, those demonstrating an outstanding academic performance can transfer to the linked degree programme at the end of the first year via fast-track modules. Back in May the UK's Quality Assurance Agency (QAA) announced new standard benchmarks for degrees. These will be introduced into higher education institutions from 2002 to outline the knowledge, understanding and skills a student should gain from a particular higher education course. These benchmark statements should help students to make informed choices about their degree and subsequent employability, as well as informing employers about the skills and knowledge of the graduates they propose to employ. Academics from each discipline have agreed the statements for their areas of expertise to a common framework.

  20. Plant uptake and transport of /sup 241/Am

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, A.; Romney, E.M.; Mueller, R.T. Sr.; soufi, S.M.

    1981-07-01

    We conducted several experiments with /sup 241/Am to obtain a more complete understanding of how this transuranium element is absorbed and transported in plants. In a plant species (Tamarix pentandra Pall.) that has salt glands in the leaves excreting NaCl and other ions, /sup 241/Am was not pumped through these glands. Cyanide, which forms complexes with any metals, when applied to a calcareous soil, greatly increased the transport of /sup 241/Am into stems and leaves of bush bean plants. Radioactive cyanide (/sup 14/C) was also transported to leaves and stems. When radish was grown in both calcareous and noncalcareous soils, /sup 241/Am appeared to be fixed on the peel so firmly that it was resistant to removal by HNO/sub 3/ washing. The chelating agent DTPA induced increased transport of /sup 241/Am to leaves and into the fleshy roots of the radish.

  1. Diversified glucosinolate metabolism: biosynthesis of hydrogen cyanide and of the hydroxynitrile glucoside alliarinoside in relation to sinigrin metabolism in Alliaria petiolata

    PubMed Central

    Frisch, Tina; Motawia, Mohammed S.; Olsen, Carl E.; Agerbirk, Niels; Møller, Birger L.; Bjarnholt, Nanna

    2015-01-01

    Alliaria petiolata (garlic mustard, Brassicaceae) contains the glucosinolate sinigrin as well as alliarinoside, a ?-hydroxynitrile glucoside structurally related to cyanogenic glucosides. Sinigrin may defend this plant against a broad range of enemies, while alliarinoside confers resistance to specialized (glucosinolate-adapted) herbivores. Hydroxynitrile glucosides and glucosinolates are two classes of specialized metabolites, which generally do not occur in the same plant species. Administration of [UL-14C]-methionine to excised leaves of A. petiolata showed that both alliarinoside and sinigrin were biosynthesized from methionine. The biosynthesis of alliarinoside was shown not to bifurcate from sinigrin biosynthesis at the oxime level in contrast to the general scheme for hydroxynitrile glucoside biosynthesis. Instead, the aglucon of alliarinoside was formed from metabolism of sinigrin in experiments with crude extracts, suggesting a possible biosynthetic pathway in intact cells. Hence, the alliarinoside pathway may represent a route to hydroxynitrile glucoside biosynthesis resulting from convergent evolution. Metabolite profiling by LC-MS showed no evidence of the presence of cyanogenic glucosides in A. petiolata. However, we detected hydrogen cyanide (HCN) release from sinigrin and added thiocyanate ion and benzyl thiocyanate in A. petiolata indicating an enzymatic pathway from glucosinolates via allyl thiocyanate and indole glucosinolate derived thiocyanate ion to HCN. Alliarinoside biosynthesis and HCN release from glucosinolate-derived metabolites expand the range of glucosinolate-related defenses and can be viewed as a third line of defense, with glucosinolates and thiocyanate forming protein being the first and second lines, respectively. PMID:26583022

  2. A Multifunctional Bimetallic Molecular Device for Ultrasensitive Detection, Naked-Eye Recognition, and Elimination of Cyanide Ions.

    PubMed

    Chow, Cheuk-Fai; Ho, Pui-Yu; Wong, Wing-Leung; Gong, Cheng-Bin

    2015-09-01

    A new bimetallic Fe(II) -Cu(II) complex was synthesized, characterized, and applied as a selective and sensitive sensor for cyanide detection in water. This complex is the first multifunctional device that can simultaneously detect cyanide ions in real water samples, amplify the colorimetric signal upon detection for naked-eye recognition at the parts-per-million (ppb) level, and convert the toxic cyanide ion into the much safer cyanate ion in situ. The mechanism of the bimetallic complex for high-selectivity recognition and signaling toward cyanide ions was investigated through a series of binding kinetics of the complex with different analytes, including CN(-) , SO4 (2-) , HCO3 (-) , HPO4 (2-) , N3 (-) , CH3 COO(-) , NCS(-) , NO3 (-) , and Cl(-) ions. In addition, the use of the indicator/catalyst displacement assay (ICDA) is demonstrated in the present system in which one metal center acts as a receptor and inhibitor and is bridged to another metal center that is responsible for signal transduction and catalysis, thus showing a versatile approach to the design of new multifunctional devices. PMID:26198787

  3. Visual & reversible sensing of cyanide in real samples by an effective ratiometric colorimetric probe & logic gate application.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Shubhrajyotsna; Singh, Ashok Kumar

    2015-10-15

    A novel anion probe 3 (2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-((2(2,4-dinitrophenyl) hydrazono) methyl) phenol) has been unveiled as an effective ratiometric and colorimetric sensor for selective and rapid detection of cyanide. The sensing behavior was demonstrated by UV-vis experiments and NMR studies. This sensory system exhibited prominent visual color change toward cyanide ion over other testing anions in DMSO (90%) solvent, with a 1:1 binding stoichiometry and a detection limit down to 3.6×10(-8) mol L(-1). Sensor reveals specific anti-jamming activity and reversible in the presence of Cu(2+) ions. This concept has been applied to design a logic gate circuit at the molecular level. Further we developed coated graphite electrode using probe 3 as ionophore and studied the performance characteristics of electrode. The sensitivity of ratiometric-based colorimetric assay is below the 1.9 ?M, accepted by the World Health Organization as the highest permissible cyanide concentration in drinking water. So it can be applied for both quantitative determination and qualitative supervising of cyanide concentrations in real samples. PMID:25913671

  4. Synthesis of Nanoporous Ni-Co Mixed Oxides by Thermal Decomposition of Metal-Cyanide Coordination Polymers.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Mohamed B; Hu, Ming; Pramanik, Malay; Li, Cuiling; Tang, Jing; Aldalbahi, Ali; Alshehri, Saad M; Malgras, Victor; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2015-07-01

    A straightforward strategy to prepare nanoporous metal oxides with well-defined shapes is highly desirable. Through thermal treatment and a proper selection of metal-cyanide coordination polymers, nanoporous nickel-cobalt mixed oxides with different shapes (i.e., flakes and cubes) can be easily prepared. Our nanoporous materials demonstrate high electrocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution reaction. PMID:25968597

  5. Treatment of phenolics, aromatic hydrocarbons, and cyanide-bearing wastewater in individual and combined anaerobic, aerobic, and anoxic bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Naresh K; Philip, Ligy

    2015-01-01

    Studies were conducted on a mixture of pollutants commonly found in coke oven wastewater (CWW) to evaluate the biodegradation of various pollutants under anaerobic, aerobic, and anoxic conditions. The removal of the pollutants was monitored during individual bioreactor operation and using a combination of bioreactors operating in anaerobic-aerobic-anoxic sequence. While studying the performance of individual reactors, it was observed that cyanide removal (83.3 %) was predominant in the aerobic bioreactor, while much of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) (69 %) was consumed in the anoxic bioreactor. With the addition of cyanide, the COD removal efficiency was affected in all the bioreactors, and several intermediates were detected. While treating synthetic CWW using the combined bioreactor system, the overall COD removal efficiency was 86.79 % at an OLR of 2.4 g COD/L/day and an HRT of 96 h. The removal efficiency of 3,5-xylenol and cyanide, with inlet concentration of 150 and 10 mg/L, was found to be 91.8 and 93.6 % respectively. It was found that the impact of xylenol on the performance of the bioreactors was less than cyanide toxicity. Molecular analysis using T-RFLP revealed the dominance of strictly aerobic, mesophilic proteobacterium, Bosea minatitlanensis, in the aerobic bioreactor. The anoxic bioreactor was dominant with Rhodococcus pyridinivorans, known for its remarkable aromatic decomposing activity, while an unclassified Myxococcales bacterium was identified as the predominant bacterial species in the anaerobic bioreactor. PMID:25267355

  6. Simultaneous high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS-MS) analysis of cyanide and thiocyanate from swine plasma.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Raj K; Manandhar, Erica; Oda, Robert P; Rockwood, Gary A; Logue, Brian A

    2014-01-01

    An analytical procedure for the simultaneous determination of cyanide and thiocyanate in swine plasma was developed and validated. Cyanide and thiocyanate were simultaneously analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry in negative ionization mode after rapid and simple sample preparation. Isotopically labeled internal standards, Na(13)C(15)N and NaS(13)C(15)N, were mixed with swine plasma (spiked and nonspiked), proteins were precipitated with acetone, the samples were centrifuged, and the supernatant was removed and dried. The dried samples were reconstituted in 10 mM ammonium formate. Cyanide was reacted with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde and taurine to form N-substituted 1-cyano[f]benzoisoindole, while thiocyanate was chemically modified with monobromobimane to form an SCN-bimane product. The method produced dynamic ranges of 0.1-50 and 0.2-50 ?M for cyanide and thiocyanate, respectively, with limits of detection of 10 nM for cyanide and 50 nM for thiocyanate. For quality control standards, the precision, as measured by percent relative standard deviation, was below 8 %, and the accuracy was within ±10 % of the nominal concentration. Following validation, the analytical procedure successfully detected cyanide and thiocyanate simultaneously from the plasma of cyanide-exposed swine. PMID:24327078

  7. But…What about My Epistemological Foundations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curin, Raquel Isabel Barrera

    2015-01-01

    At one time or another, all researchers in mathematics education must face the rather complex question of their epistemological foundations. Discussing epistemological foundations naturally leads to a conversation about theories. Theories and epistemological foundations work in a circular fashion: theories can have epistemological foundations and…

  8. COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

    E-print Network

    .................................................................................................................11 NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ­ FASTLANE SYSTEM REGISTRATION...................................................11 Required Information for FastLane Registration

  9. Cyanide-induced death of dopaminergic cells is mediated by uncoupling protein-2 up-regulation and reduced Bcl-2 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Li, L.; Zhang, L.; Borowitz, J.L.; Isom, G.E.

    2009-07-01

    Cyanide is a potent inhibitor of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and produces mitochondria-mediated death of dopaminergic neurons and sublethal intoxications that are associated with a Parkinson-like syndrome. Cyanide toxicity is enhanced when mitochondrial uncoupling is stimulated following up-regulation of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2). In this study, the role of a pro-survival protein, Bcl-2, in cyanide-mediated cell death was determined in a rat dopaminergic immortalized mesencephalic cell line (N27 cells). Following pharmacological up-regulation of UCP-2 by treatment with Wy14,643, cyanide reduced cellular Bcl-2 expression by increasing proteasomal degradation of the protein. The increased turnover of Bcl-2 was mediated by an increase of oxidative stress following UCP-2 up-regulation. The oxidative stress involved depletion of mitochondrial glutathione (mtGSH) and increased H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generation. Repletion of mtGSH by loading cells with glutathione ethyl ester reduced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generation and in turn blocked the cyanide-induced decrease of Bcl-2. To determine if UCP-2 mediated the response, RNAi knock down was conducted. The RNAi decreased cyanide-induced depletion of mtGSH, reduced H{sub 2}O{sub 2} accumulation, and inhibited down-regulation of Bcl-2, thus blocking cell death. To confirm the role of Bcl-2 down-regulation in the cell death, it was shown that over-expression of Bcl-2 by cDNA transfection attenuated the enhancement of cyanide toxicity after UCP-2 up-regulation. It was concluded that UCP-2 up-regulation sensitizes cells to cyanide by increasing cellular oxidative stress, leading to an increase of Bcl-2 degradation. Then the reduced Bcl-2 levels sensitize the cells to cyanide-mediated cell death.

  10. Uncoupling protein-2 up-regulation and enhanced cyanide toxicity are mediated by PPAR{alpha} activation and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Li, L.; Prabhakaran, K.; Zhang, L.; Leavesley, H.B.; Borowitz, J.L.; Isom, G.E.

    2007-08-15

    Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP-2) is an inner mitochondrial membrane proton carrier that modulates mitochondrial membrane potential ({delta}{psi}{sub m}) and uncouples oxidative phosphorylation. We have shown that up-regulation of UCP-2 by Wy14,643, a selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) agonist, enhances cyanide cytotoxicity. The pathway by which Wy14,643 up-regulates UCP-2 was determined in a dopaminergic cell line (N27 cells). Since dopaminergic mesencephalic cells are a primary brain target of cyanide, the N27 immortalized mesencephalic cell was used in this study. Wy14,643 produced a concentration- and time-dependent up-regulation of UCP-2 that was linked to enhanced cyanide-induced cell death. MK886 (PPAR{alpha} antagonist) or PPAR{alpha} knock-down by RNA interference (RNAi) inhibited PPAR{alpha} activity as shown by the peroxisome proliferator response element-luciferase reporter assay, but only partially decreased up-regulation of UCP-2. The role of oxidative stress as an alternative pathway to UCP-2 up-regulation was determined. Wy14,643 induced a rapid surge of ROS generation and loading cells with glutathione ethyl ester (GSH-EE) or pre-treatment with vitamin E attenuated up-regulation of UCP-2. On the other hand, RNAi knockdown of PPAR{alpha} did not alter ROS generation, suggesting a PPAR{alpha}-independent component to the response. Co-treatment with PPAR{alpha}-RNAi and GSH-EE blocked both the up-regulation of UCP-2 by Wy14,643 and the cyanide-induced cell death. It was concluded that a PPAR{alpha}-mediated pathway and an oxidative stress pathway independent of PPAR{alpha} mediate the up-regulation of UCP-2 and subsequent increased vulnerability to cyanide-induced cytotoxicity.

  11. Foundations of Forensic Meteoritics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treiman, A. H.

    1992-07-01

    It may be useful to know if a meteorite was found at the site where it fell. For instance, the polymict ureilites North Haig and Nilpena were found 1100 km apart, yet are petrologically identical [1]. Could this distance represent transport from a single strewn field, or does it represent distinct fall sites? A meteorite may contain sufficient clues to suggest some characteristics of its fall site. If these inferences are inconsistent with the find site, one may infer that the meteorite has been transported. It will likely be impossible to determine the exact fall site of a transported meteorite. Data relevant to a meteorite's fall site may be intrinsic to the meteorite, or acquired at the site. For instance, an intrinsic property is terrestrial residence age (from abundances of cosmogenic radioisotopes and their decay products); a meteorite's terrestrial residence age must be the same or less than that of the surface on which it fell. After falling, a meteorite may acquire characteristic telltales of terrestrial geological, geochemical, and biological processes. These telltale clues may include products of chemical weathering, adhering geological materials, biological organisms living (or once living) on the meteorite, and biological materials adhering to (but never living on) the meteorite. The effects of chemical weathering, present in all but the freshest finds, range from slight rusting to extensive decomposition and veining The ages of weathering materials and veins, as with terrestrial residence ages above, must be less than the age of the fall surface. The mineralogy and chemistry, elemental and isotopic, of weathering materials will differ according to the mineralogy and composition of the meteorite, and the mineralogy, geochemistry, hydrology, and climate of the fall site. Weathering materials may also vary as climate changes and may vary among the microenvironments associated with a meteorite on the Earth's surface. Geological materials (rock, sediment, soil) adhering to a meteorite are samples of the actual physical environment in which the meteorite rested. Adhesion may derive from chemical cementation (incl. rust from the meteorite), biologic activity (incl. desert varnish?), or impact processes [2]. Given the wide diversity of geological materials and processes on the Earth, adhering geological materials may be useful forensic tools. For instance, fall in a volcanic terrane may be inconsistent with adhering sediments of clean quartz sand. Biologic matter on meteorites includes animal and vegetable matter mixed with the adhering geological materials, lichens and other plants growing in place, and purposefully attached animal matter (e.g. insect eggs). The most useful biological data may be provided by pollen, which can often be referred unambiguously to genera and species of plants. For example, sediments adhering to meteorites from the central Nullabor Plain (W. Australia) are different from sediments from the Plain's margin in S. Australia. Sediment on meteorites from the central Nullabor (e.g. Mundrabilla) lacks quartz sand and consists almost entirely of clay-sized particles, consistent with derivation from the local saprolitic soil. Sediment on meteorites from the eastern Nullabor (e.g. Hughes and Cook, S.A.) contains a significant fraction of quartz sand, 1/4- to 1/2-mm grains, probably blown from the Great Victoria Desert to the north and northwest. However, sedimentologic data alone may be misleading. For instance, sediments adhering to Nuevo Mercurio stones (H5; Zacatecas, Mexico) are clay-sized and lack coarser material. But sediment on Nuevo Mercurio (b), a ureilite found in the Nuevo Mercurio strewn field, consists of quartz sand and clay pellets, 1/4 to 1/2 mm diameter. Clearly, local environments may affect the character of sediment adhering to a meteorite, and careful detailed study may be required to determine whether a meteorite has been transported. I am grateful to R. Farrell and D. New for availability of samples. References: 1. Prinz et al. (1986) Lunar Planet. Sci. XVII, 681. [2] Koebe

  12. Electrodeposition of CuZn Alloys from the Non-Cyanide Alkaline Baths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Minggang; Wei, Guoying; Hu, Shuangshuang; Xu, Shuhan; Yang, Yejiong; Miao, Qinfang

    2015-10-01

    Effect of copper sulfate on CuZn alloys electroplating from non-cyanide baths are investigated by different electrochemical methods. Cyclic voltammetry and current transient measurements are used to characterize the CuZn alloys electroplating system in order to analyze the nucleation and growth mechanism. The reduction of Cu and CuZn alloy on sheet iron substrates shows an instantaneous nucleation process. However, the reduction of Zn on sheet iron substrates shows a progressive nucleation process. The structure and surface morphology of CuZn alloys are analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The morphology of CuZn alloys obtained with 50 g L-1 copper sulfate presents a smooth and compact deposit and the size of crystal particle is uniform.

  13. Enhanced electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction based on pattering of platinum surfaces with cyanide.

    SciTech Connect

    Strmcnik, D.; Escudero-Escribano, M.; Kodama, K.; Stamenkovic, V. R.; Cuesta, A.; Markovic, N. M.; Materials Science Division; Inst. de Quimica Fisica; Toyota Central R&D Labs., Inc.

    2010-08-15

    The slow rate of the oxygen reduction reaction in the phosphoric acid fuel cell is the main factor limiting its wide application. Here, we present an approach that can be used for the rational design of cathode catalysts with potential use in phosphoric acid fuel cells, or in any environments containing strongly adsorbing tetrahedral anions. This approach is based on molecular patterning of platinum surfaces with cyanide adsorbates that can efficiently block the sites for adsorption of spectator anions while the oxygen reduction reaction proceeds unhindered. We also demonstrate that, depending on the supporting electrolyte anions and cations, on the same CN-covered Pt(111) surface, the oxygen reduction reaction activities can range from a 25-fold increase to a 50-fold decrease. This behaviour is discussed in the light of the role of covalent and non-covalent interactions in controlling the ensemble of platinum active sites required for high turn over rates of the oxygen reduction reaction.

  14. Enhanced electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction based on patterning of platinum surfaces with cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strmcnik, Dusan; Escudero-Escribano, María; Kodama, Kensaku; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R.; Cuesta, Angel; Markovi?, Nenad M.

    2010-10-01

    The slow rate of the oxygen reduction reaction in the phosphoric acid fuel cell is the main factor limiting its wide application. Here, we present an approach that can be used for the rational design of cathode catalysts with potential use in phosphoric acid fuel cells, or in any environments containing strongly adsorbing tetrahedral anions. This approach is based on molecular patterning of platinum surfaces with cyanide adsorbates that can efficiently block the sites for adsorption of spectator anions while the oxygen reduction reaction proceeds unhindered. We also demonstrate that, depending on the supporting electrolyte anions and cations, on the same CN-covered Pt(111) surface, the oxygen reduction reaction activities can range from a 25-fold increase to a 50-fold decrease. This behaviour is discussed in the light of the role of covalent and non-covalent interactions in controlling the ensemble of platinum active sites required for high turn over rates of the oxygen reduction reaction.

  15. Development of Technology for Effective Removal of Arsenic and Cyanides from Drinking Water and Wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Jo, Jae

    2008-02-09

    The purpose of the project was to perform a joint research and development effort focused upon the development of methods and the prototype facility for effective removal of arsenic and cyanides from drinking water and wastewater, based on the UPEC patented technology. The goals of this project were to validate UPEC technology, to manufacture a prototype facility meeting the market requirements, and to introduce it to both industry and municipalities which deal with the water quality. The project involved design and fabrication of one experimental unit and one prototypical industrial unit, and tests at industrial and mining sites. The project used sodium ferrate (Na2FeO4) as the media to remove arsenic in drinking water and convert arsenic into non-hazardous form. The work consisted of distinct phases ending with specific deliverables in development, design, fabrication and testing of prototype systems and eventually producing validation data to support commercial introduction of technology and its successful implementation.

  16. Formation of amino acids by cobalt-60 irradiation of hydrogen cyanide solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweeney, M. A.; Toste, A. P.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the pathway for the prebiotic origin of amino acids from hydrogen cyanide (HCN) under the action of ionizing radiation considered as an effective source of energy on the primitive earth. The irradiations were performed in a cobalt-60 source with a dose rate of 200,000 rad/hr. Seven naturally occurring amino acids are identified among the products formed by the hydrolysis of gamma-irradiated solutions of HCN: glycine, alanine, valine, serine, threonine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid. The identity of these amino acids is established by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Control experiments provided evidence that the amino acids are not the result of contamination.

  17. Foundation + Collaboration + Inspiration. The Joyce Foundation 2009 Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce Foundation, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Among the great strengths of a policy-oriented foundation like Joyce is the willingness to take a long view, to be patient investors in ideas that take time to have impact, and to take chances on projects that may not work out. But in times of crisis, Joyce team and partners also have an obligation to be responsive to immediate challenges in their…

  18. IDENTIFICATION OF KCN IN IRC+10216: EVIDENCE FOR SELECTIVE CYANIDE CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Pulliam, R. L.; Ziurys, L. M.; Savage, C.; Agundez, M.; Cernicharo, J.; Guelin, M.

    2010-12-20

    A new interstellar molecule, KCN, has been identified toward the circumstellar envelope of the carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch star, IRC+10216-the fifth metal cyanide species to be detected in space. Fourteen rotational transitions of this T-shaped, asymmetric top were searched for in the frequency range of 83-250 GHz using the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) 12 m Kitt Peak antenna, the IRAM 30 m telescope, and the ARO Submillimeter Telescope. Distinct lines were measured for 10 of these transitions, including the K{sub a} = 1 and 2 asymmetry components of the J = 11 {yields} 10 and J = 10 {yields} 9 transitions, i.e., the K-ladder structure distinct to an asymmetric top. These data are some of the most sensitive astronomical spectra at {lambda} {approx} 1 and 3 mm obtained to date, with 3{sigma} noise levels {approx}0.3 mK, made possible by new ALMA technology. The line profiles from the ARO and IRAM telescopes are consistent with a shell-like distribution for KCN with r{sub outer} {approx} 15'', but with an inner shell radius that extends into warmer gas. The column density for KCN in IRC+10216 was found to be N{sub tot} {approx} 1.0 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} with a rotational temperature of T{sub rot} {approx} 53 K. The fractional abundance was calculated to be f(KCN/H{sub 2}) {approx} 6 x 10{sup -10}, comparable to that of KCl. The presence of KCN in IRC+10216, along with MgNC, MgCN, NaCN, and AlNC, suggests that cyanide/isocyanide species are the most common metal-containing molecules in carbon-rich circumstellar gas.

  19. Identification of iron-cyanide complexes in contaminated soils and wastes by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rennert, Thilo; Kaufhold, Stephan; Mansfeldt, Tim

    2007-08-01

    Persistent cyanide species in soil are mainly iron-cyanide (Fe-CN) complexes. They originate from anthropogenic inputs of compounds such as Fe4[Fe(II)(CN)6]3 in deposited gas-purifier wastes (GPW) or K2Zn3[Fe(II)(CN)6]2 in deposited blast-furnace sludge (BFSI). Fe-CN species in de-inking sludge (DIS) and sewage farm soils (SF) are still unknown. We investigated 35 soil and waste samples from 15 European sites and five synthesized Fe-CN-containing compounds by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, we determined the contents of total and adsorbed CN and pH. In all samples (pH 2.2-9.5), adsorbed Fe-CN complexes were negligible. In GPW and DIS samples, Fe4[Fe(II)(CN)6]3 and KFe[FeII(CN)6] were the only Fe-CN compounds (total CN contents 0.4-449 g kg(-1)). Several BFSI samples were free of CN. The spectra of other BFSI samples partially indicated dissolution of the characteristic compound K2Zn3[Fe(II)(CN)6]2, resulting in a loss of CN (contents < 12.3 g kg(-1)). Distinctive changes in BFSI with respect to CN speciation occurred within relatively short periods, <20 years. Dissolution of K2Zn3[Fe(II)(CN)6]2 was followed by dissociation of free CN from [Fe(CN)6](3-/4-) and adsorption of [Fe(II)(CN)6](4-) on organic surfaces. In DIS and SF samples, Fe4[Fe(11)(CN)6]3 and K2Zn3[Fe(II)(CN)6]2 (SF only) were identified. PMID:17822089

  20. Exploring the structure of a hydrogen cyanide polymer by electron spin resonance and scanning force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Eastman, M P; Helfrich, F S E; Umantsev, A; Porter, T L; Weber, R

    2003-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of potassium cyanide and ammonium hydroxide are known to yield a heterogeneous cyanide polymer, containing paramagnetic sites and biologically significant substructures including polypeptides. Here, such solutions were used to prepare various samples of polymer for study by X-band and W-band electron spin resonance (ESR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and scanning force microscopy (SFM). Elemental composition of a typical sample of the polymer was C-35.2%, N-38.47%, 0-14.51%, and H-4.13%, exposing the polymer to 6M HCl hydrolyzed portions of the polymer and released glycine and traces of other amino acids. The X-band ESR spectra consist of a single slightly asymmetric line centered at g = 2.003; spin concentration measurements made at X-band using a nitroxide radical standard yield approximate radical concentrations of 10(18) spins/gm. W-band ESR indicates the presence of a single rhombic paramagnetic site with g(x) = 2.0025, g(y) = 2.0030, and g(z) = 2.0048 and the possibility of small 14N hyperfine splittings. The ESR spin echo studies yield a longitudinal relaxation time, Tl of 75 microS and a short-phase memory relaxation time, Tm, of about 300 nS. Scanning electron microscopy studies of the polymer show that it is made of ellipsoidal particles about one micron in size. The particles tend to clump together when suspended in aqueous solution. The particles disperse and dissolve in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO); when these solutions dry on microscope slides, optical microscopy shows a branched island morphology for the polymer. This morphology is reminiscent of snowflakes and is identified as dendritic. Phase contrast SFM of the dendritic arms show a striking segregation and ordering of various components of the polymer. Paramagnetic sites are conserved in the series of steps leading to dendritic structures. PMID:12627894

  1. Extended warm gas in Orion KL as probed by methyl cyanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, T. A.; Cernicharo, J.; Viti, S.; Marcelino, N.; Palau, Aina; Esplugues, G. B.; Tercero, B.

    2014-04-01

    In order to study the temperature distribution of the extended gas within the Orion Kleinmann-Low nebula, we have mapped the emission by methyl cyanide (CH3CN) in its J = 6K-5K, J = 12K-11K, J = 13K-12K, and J = 14K-13K transitions at an average angular resolution of ~10 arcsec (22 arcsec for the 6K-5K lines), as part of a new 2D line survey of this region using the IRAM 30 m telescope. These fully sampled maps show extended emission from warm gas to the northeast of IRc2 and the distinct kinematic signatures of the hot core and compact ridge source components. We have constructed population diagrams for the four sets of K-ladder emission lines at each position in the maps and have derived rotational excitation temperatures and total beam-averaged column densities from the fitted slopes. In addition, we have fitted LVG model spectra to the observations to determine best-fit physical parameters at each map position, yielding the distribution of kinetic temperatures across the region. The resulting temperature maps reveal a region of hot (T> 350 K) material surrounding the north-eastern edge of the hot core, whereas the column density distribution is more uniform and peaks near the position of IRc2. We attribute this region of hot gas to shock heating caused by the impact of outflowing material from active star formation in the region, as indicated by the presence of broad CH3CN lines. This scenario is consistent with predictions from C-shock chemical models that suggest that gas-phase methyl cyanide survives in the post-shock gas and can be somewhat enhanced due to sputtering of grain mantles in the passing shock front. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain).

  2. Chelsea Dvorak Specht Associate Professor and Plant Organismal Biologist

    E-print Network

    evolution with specific focus on Cycads, carnivorous plants, monocots, and within monocots the order Foundation DDIG: Dissertation Research: Chitinase Subfunctionalization in Carnivorous PlantsChelsea Dvorak Specht Associate Professor and Plant Organismal Biologist Curator, University

  3. 45 CFR 670.21 - Designation of native plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Designation of native plants. 670.21 Section 670.21 Public Welfare...FOUNDATION CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Native Mammals, Birds, Plants, and Invertebrates § 670.21...

  4. 45 CFR 670.21 - Designation of native plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Designation of native plants. 670.21 Section 670.21 Public Welfare...FOUNDATION CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Native Mammals, Birds, Plants, and Invertebrates § 670.21...

  5. 45 CFR 670.21 - Designation of native plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Designation of native plants. 670.21 Section 670.21 Public Welfare...FOUNDATION CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Native Mammals, Birds, Plants, and Invertebrates § 670.21...

  6. 45 CFR 670.21 - Designation of native plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Designation of native plants. 670.21 Section 670.21 Public Welfare...FOUNDATION CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Native Mammals, Birds, Plants, and Invertebrates § 670.21...

  7. 7 CFR 1726.125 - Generating plant facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) Fossil generating stations. Engineering services, steam generator, turbine generator, flue gas... installation (including turbine installation and plant piping), power plant building (foundation and... towers, and dams or reservoirs. (2) Diesel and combustion turbine plants. Engineering services,...

  8. 7 CFR 1726.125 - Generating plant facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) Fossil generating stations. Engineering services, steam generator, turbine generator, flue gas... installation (including turbine installation and plant piping), power plant building (foundation and... towers, and dams or reservoirs. (2) Diesel and combustion turbine plants. Engineering services,...

  9. 7 CFR 1726.125 - Generating plant facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) Fossil generating stations. Engineering services, steam generator, turbine generator, flue gas... installation (including turbine installation and plant piping), power plant building (foundation and... towers, and dams or reservoirs. (2) Diesel and combustion turbine plants. Engineering services,...

  10. 7 CFR 1726.125 - Generating plant facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) Fossil generating stations. Engineering services, steam generator, turbine generator, flue gas... installation (including turbine installation and plant piping), power plant building (foundation and... towers, and dams or reservoirs. (2) Diesel and combustion turbine plants. Engineering services,...

  11. Principles for Foundations of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britt, John

    The significance of the foundations of education approach to teaching is apparent in the ideas of John Henry Newman, Karl Jaspers, Jose Ortega y Gasset, and Mortimer Adler. Newman maintained that there is a circle of knowledge and once this unity is ignored the result is distortion in the learners and in the knowledge. To retain the whole, the…

  12. Foundations of Artificial Intelligence Introduction

    E-print Network

    Qu, Rong

    Foundations of Artificial Intelligence Introduction to the Course Module G64FAI #12;General in Artificial Intelligence (AI) · Provide an understanding of the theory of a range of those techniques · Introduce the students to a number of Artificial Intelligence applications · Show how these systems can

  13. Student Alumni Associations and Foundations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberger, Patricia L., Ed.

    Papers from a conference on student alumni programs and foundations are presented. Contents are as follows: "How Student Alumni Programs Can Serve Your Institution," by Larry Weiss; "How to Start a Student Alumni Organization," by William Harlan; "Getting the Right Students: How, When, and Where" (Harlan); "Building Your Budget From Scratch," by…

  14. Foundation Accounting 2010 Levy Avenue

    E-print Network

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Foundation Accounting 2010 Levy Avenue Building B, Suite 300 Tallahassee, FL 32310 to this form. Date Payee Purpose Amount Fund Account Total Reimbursement Requested Part II authorized to be held in a bank account, you must include a copy of the bank statement balance. Cash on Hand

  15. Introduction to College Intellectual Foundations

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    University Common Core ENGR XYZ Engineering Preparation Color Code: ME CORE Course ME Major Course Note to Engineering CHEM 111L General Chemistry Lab I CHEM 111 General Chemistry I MATH 170 Calculus I ENGL 102 Intro Lab PHYS 211 Physics I with Calculus MATH 175 Calculus II UF 200 Civil and Ethical Foundations ENGR

  16. Foundations of Distinctive Feature Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltaxe, Christiane A. M.

    This treatise on the theoretical and historical foundations of distinctive feature theory traces the evolution of the distinctive features concept in the context of related notions current in linguistic theory, discusses the evolution of individual distinctive features, and criticizes certain acoustic and perceptual correlates attributed to these…

  17. Building Trades. Block II. Foundations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    Twelve informational lessons and eleven manipulative lessons are provided on foundations as applied to the building trades. Informational lessons cover land measurements; blueprint reading; level instruments; building and site planning; building site preparation; laying out building lines; soil preparation and special evacuation; concrete forms;…

  18. 2013-14 catalog FOUNDATIONS

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    Technical Communication 3 CE 350 or ME 350 Engineering Mechanics of Materials 3 ENGR 210 Engineering Statics Composition English Composition Technical Communication Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering UF Introduction to Engineering 3 PHYS 211 Physics I with Calculus 4 our web site. UF 100 Intellectual Foundations

  19. 2014-15 catalog FOUNDATIONS

    E-print Network

    Barrash, Warren

    Engineering Methods 2 ENGL 202 Technical Communication 3 ENGR 210 Engineering Statics 3 CE or ME 350 Introduction to Engineering 3 PHYS 211 Physics I with Calculus 4 our web site. UF 100 Intellectual Foundations 3 PHYS 211L Physics I with Calculus Lab 1 17 16 CE 210 # Engineering Surveying 2 CE 280 Civil

  20. Soils and Foundations: A Syllabus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Melvin J.

    The teaching guide and course outline for a 12-week course in soils and foundations is designed to help student technicians in a two-year associate degree civil engineering technology program to obtain entry level employment as highway engineering aides, soil testing technicians, soil mappers, or construction inspectors. The seven teaching units…

  1. FOUNDATION IN CRYPTOLOGY ASSIGNMENT 4

    E-print Network

    Babinkostova, Liljana

    FOUNDATION IN CRYPTOLOGY ASSIGNMENT 4 Problem 1 (a) Write a procedure in Sage that will convert the following utility functions available in Sage.1 sage: from sage.crypto.util import ascii to bin ascii integer, ascii to bin, bin to ascii (b) Write a procedure in Sage that will convert a binary number

  2. The University of Connecticut Foundation,

    E-print Network

    Chandy, John A.

    statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, we consider internal control of The University of Connecticut Foundation, Incorporated: We have audited the accompanying consolidated financial States of America; this includes the design, implementation, and maintenance of internal control relevant

  3. Foundations of Cryptography Class Notes

    E-print Network

    Goldreich, Oded

    Foundations of Cryptography Class Notes Spring 1989 Oded Goldreich Abstract Recent developments and unforgeable signatures were placed on sound grounds. These notes report an attempt to present the basic and unforgeable signatures were placed on sound grounds. These notes report an attempt to present the basic

  4. Sociolinguistic Foundations of Language Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ornstein-Galicia, Jacob L.

    An answer to the question of what sociolinguistics has to offer to the art of language assessment is sought in exploration of the following topics: (1) a history of the development of sociolinguistics and an outline of the research on dialectology; (2) a review of basic sociolinguistic foundations and theories about language, society, domains of…

  5. A novel reaction-based colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescent sensor for cyanide anion with a large emission shift and high selectivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaodan; Fei, Xiaoliang; Guo, Jing; Yang, Qingbiao; Li, Yaoxian; Song, Yan

    2016-02-01

    A hybrid carbazole-hemicyanine dye (Cac) has been developed as a novel colorimetric and ratiometric fluorescent sensor for cyanide detection. Upon treatment with cyanide, Cac displayed a remarkable fluorescence ratiometric response, with the emission wavelength displaying a very large emission shift (214nm). The detection of cyanide was performed via the nucleophilic addition of cyanide anion to the indolium group of the sensor, which resulted in the blocking of the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) process in the sensor, inducing a ratiometric fluorescence change and simultaneously an obvious color change. Furthermore, competitive anions did not showed any significant changes both in color and emission intensity ratio (I381/I595), indicating the high selectivity of the sensor to CN(-). PMID:26653444

  6. Ammonia from Iron(II) Reduction of Nitrite and the Strecker Synthesis: Do Iron(II) and Cyanide Interfere with Each Other?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, David P.; Lerner, Narcinda; Chang, Sherwood (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The question of whether the production of ammonia, from the reduction of nitrite by iron(II), is compatible with its use in the Strecker synthesis of amino acids, or whether the iron and the cyanide needed for the Strecker synthesis interfere with each other, is addressed. Results show that the presence of iron(II) appears to have little, or no, affect on the Strecker synthesis. The presence of cyanide does interfere with reduction of nitrite, but the reduction proceeds at cyanide/iron ratios of less than 4:1. At ratios of about 2:1 and less there is only a small effect. The two reactions can be combined to proceed in each other's presence, forming glycine from nitrite, Fe(+2), formaldehyde, and cyanide.

  7. A crossed beams study of the reaction of carbon atoms, C(3 vinyl cyanide, C2H3CN(X 1

    E-print Network

    Kaiser, Ralf I.

    of the carbon atom to the carbon­carbon double bond of the vinyl cyanide molecule yielding a cyano molecular clouds, circumstellar envelopes of carbon stars) which could lead to the formation of cyano

  8. Ammonia from iron(II) reduction of nitrite and the Strecker synthesis: do iron(II) and cyanide interfere with each other?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summers, D. P.; Lerner, N.

    1998-01-01

    The question of whether the production of ammonia, from the reduction of nitrite by iron(II), is compatible with its use in the Strecker synthesis of amino acids, or whether the iron and the cyanide needed for the Strecker synthesis interfere with each other, is addressed. Results show that the presence of iron(II) appears to have little, or no, effect on the Strecker synthesis. The presence of cyanide does interfere with reduction of nitrite, but the reduction proceeds at cyanide/iron ratios of less than 4:1. At ratios of about 2:1 and less there is only a small effect. The reduction of nitrite and the Strecker can be combined to proceed in each other's presence, to yield glycine from a mixture of nitrite, Fe+2, formaldehyde, and cyanide.

  9. Cystic Fibrosis Foundation: Find a Chapter

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Infant Care Our Research Our Research Approach Drug Development Pipeline Clinical Trials CF Patient Registry Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics ( ... Analysis Program Our Research Our Research Approach Drug Development ... Trials CF Patient Registry Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Therapeutics ( ...

  10. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundation parameter study

    SciTech Connect

    Lodde, P.F.

    1980-07-01

    The dynamic failure criterion governing the dimensions of prototype Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Foundations is treated as a variable parameter. The resulting change in foundation dimensions and costs is examined.

  11. Measurements of stratospheric hydrogen cyanide at McMurdo Station, Antarctica - Further evidence of winter stratospheric subsidence?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaramillo, M.; De Zafra, R. L.; Barrett, J.; Emmons, L. K.; Solomon, P. M.

    1989-01-01

    Measurements of hydrogen cyanide in the springtime Antarctic stratosphere were made using ground-based millimeter wave spectroscopy. A steeper decrease in volume mixing ratio with altitude was found, than that found at tropical latitudes, from an assumed value of about 160 pptv in the troposphere to a value of 65 + or - 30 pptv at 40 km, which may be further evidence of substantial vertical subsidence of the Antarctic winter stratosphere.

  12. A dual role of the transcriptional regulator TstR provides insights into cyanide detoxification in Lactobacillus brevis

    PubMed Central

    Pagliai, Fernando A.; Murdoch, Caitlin C.; Brown, Sara M.; Gonzalez, Claudio F.; Lorca, Graciela L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In this study we uncover two genes in Lactobacillus brevis ATCC367, tstT and tstR, encoding for a rhodanese and a transcriptional regulator involved in cyanide detoxification. TstT (LVIS_0852) belongs to a new class of thiosulfate:cyanide sulfurtransferases. We found that TstR (LVIS_0853) modulates both the expression and the activity of the downstream-encoded tstT. The TstR binding site was identified at ?1 to +33, from tstR transcriptional start site. EMSA revealed that sulfite, a product of the reaction catalyzed by TstT, improved the interaction between TstR:PtstR, while Fe(III) disrupted this interaction. Site-directed mutagenesis in TstR identified M64 as a key residue in sulfite recognition, while residues H136-H139-C167-M171 formed a pocket for ferric iron coordination. In addition to its role as a transcriptional repressor, TstR is also involved in regulating the thiosulfate:cyanide sulfurtransferase activity of TstT. A 3-fold increase in TstT activity was observed in the presence of TstR, which was enhanced by the addition of Fe(III). Overexpression of the tstRT operon was found to increase the cyanide tolerance of L. brevis and Escherichia coli. The protein-protein interaction between TstR and TstT described herein represents a novel mechanism for regulation of enzymatic activity by a transcriptional regulator. PMID:24684290

  13. Cyanide inhibits the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger in isolated cardiac pacemaker cells of the cane toad.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yue-kun; Allen, David G

    2005-02-01

    The effects of the metabolic inhibition on the activity of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX) were studied in single isolated pacemaker cells from the cane toad. Ca2+ influx on NCX (reverse mode) was estimated by measuring the increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in response to extracellular Na+-free solution. After application of 2 mM sodium cyanide for 3-5 min, the peak [Ca2+]i in Na+-free solution was significantly decreased from 377+/-42 nM to 260+/-46 nM, suggesting inhibition of NCX. To study Ca2+ efflux on NCX (forward mode), we recorded the tail currents on repolarization which were abolished by Ni2+ and by Na+-free solution. Cyanide decreased the amplitude of tail currents by 36+/-3%. To investigate the intrinsic properties of NCX during the metabolic inhibition, we used rapid application of caffeine to trigger sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release, which then stimulates NCX current (I(NCX) ). Both the caffeine-induced peak [Ca2+]i and the peak I(NCX) were reduced by cyanide exposure. When I(NCX) was plotted against [Ca2+], the slope of the decay phase was decreased in the presence of CN- to 44+/-8% of control, indicating that for a given [Ca2+]i there was less I(NCX) produced. These results show that cyanide (CN-) inhibits NCX activity at least partly through changes in the intrinsic properties of NCX. The inhibition of NCX probably contributes to the slower firing rate of pacemaker cells in CN-. PMID:15688245

  14. Cognitive Foundations for Visual Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Noonan, Christine F.; Franklin, Lyndsey

    2011-02-25

    In this report, we provide an overview of scientific/technical literature on information visualization and VA. Topics discussed include an update and overview of the extensive literature search conducted for this study, the nature and purpose of the field, major research thrusts, and scientific foundations. We review methodologies for evaluating and measuring the impact of VA technologies as well as taxonomies that have been proposed for various purposes to support the VA community. A cognitive science perspective underlies each of these discussions.

  15. Analysis of hemoglobin derivatives by capillary isoelectric focusing and its application in the antidotal research of cyanide poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, M.L.; Korte, W.D.

    1996-07-01

    Cyanide toxicity can be reduced by the use of methemoglobin (MetHb) formers, and antidotal dosage is based on the extent of MetHb formation. Hemoglobin and ferrihemoglobin (MetHb, hemimethemoglobins {alpha}{sup 3+}{beta}{sup 2+} and {alpha}{sup 2-}{beta}{sup 3-}, tetracyanmethemoglobin, and dicyanmethemoglobin) concentrations in human, pig, and mouse blood were determined after separation by isoelectric focusing with an octyl-bonded capillary. The predominant species formed in blood when MetHb formers, such as potassium ferricyanide, hydroxylamine, sodium nitrite, and 4-dimethylaminophenol (DMAP), added at molar ratios ranging from 1:10 to 1:1 to hemoglobin, are the valency hybrid intermediates {alpha}{sup 3+}{beta}{sup 2+} and {alpha}{sup 2+}{beta}{sup 3+}. In the detoxication of cyanide with methemoglobin, an intermediate dicyanhemimethemoglobin was demonstrated to be the predominant species in the formation of tetracyanmethemoglobin. Complex mixtures of hemoglobin derivatives were observed with DMAP at 1:1 or greater molar ratio to hemoglobin. Comparison of the MetHb values obtained with a hemoxometer indicated that the valency hybrids were measured as MetHb and the values of oxidized hemoglobin were overestimated. In cyanide poisoning, incorrect dosages of MetHb formers could be calculated, and misinterpretation of MetHb data would results from methods that fail to discriminate among the various species of MetHb. 24 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Data Mining: Foundation, Techniques and Applications

    E-print Network

    Tung, Anthony Kum Hoe

    Data Mining: Foundation, Techniques and Applications Anthony Tung() School of Computing National #12;11/30/2007 Data Mining: Foundation, Techniques and Applications 2 Main objectives of this course: · Data mining is a diverse field which draw its foundation from many research areas like databases

  17. Philanthropy and Private Foundations: Expanding Revenue Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummer, Carlee; Marshburn, Roxann

    2014-01-01

    As community colleges seek new revenue streams, philanthropic organizations, including college foundations and private funders, have already begun to influence both revenues and college programming. This chapter discusses the current role of philanthropy, especially private foundations such as the Lumina Foundation for Education and the Bill and…

  18. Beyond Dependency: Strategies for Saving Foundations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutz, Aaron; Butin, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The foundations field cannot sustain itself in its present condition. A range of complex forces have combined to marginalize foundations over the past few decades. The decline of this field as a separate discipline in schools of education has been abetted by the fact that foundations is generally a "service provider" to other programs.…

  19. Foundations of Cryptography (Volume 2 --Basic Applications)

    E-print Network

    Goldreich, Oded

    Foundations of Cryptography (Volume 2 -- Basic Applications) Oded Goldreich Department of Computer from a working draft of Goldreich's FOUNDATIONS OF CRYPTOGRAPHY. See copyright notice. #12; I to Dana c OF CRYPTOGRAPHY. See copyright notice. #12; II Extracted from a working draft of Goldreich's FOUNDATIONS

  20. On the Foundations of Modern Cryptography

    E-print Network

    Goldreich, Oded

    Appendix C On the Foundations of Modern Cryptography It is possible to build a cabin with no foundations, but not a lasting building. Eng. Isidor Goldreich (1906--1995) Summary: Cryptography is concerned. This appendix is aimed at presenting the foundations of cryptography, which are the paradigms, approaches

  1. Foundations of Cryptography (Volume 2 { Basic Applications)

    E-print Network

    Goldreich, Oded

    Foundations of Cryptography (Volume 2 { Basic Applications) Oded Goldreich Department of Computer from a working draft of Goldreich's FOUNDATIONS OF CRYPTOGRAPHY. See copyright notice. #12;I to Dana c with credit is permitted. Extracted from a working draft of Goldreich's FOUNDATIONS OF CRYPTOGRAPHY. See

  2. Monocyclometalated Gold(III) Complexes Bearing ?-Accepting Cyanide Ligands: Syntheses, Structural, Photophysical, and Electrochemical Investigations.

    PubMed

    Szentkuti, Alexander; Garg, Jai Anand; Blacque, Olivier; Venkatesan, Koushik

    2015-11-16

    The synthesis, structural, photophysical, and electrochemical investigations of a series of gold(III) monocyclometalated complexes bearing ancillary ligands with ?-accepting properties is reported. Complexes of the type [(C(?)N)Au(C?N)2] [C(?)N = 2-phenylpyridine (ppy) (1), 2-(p-tolyl)pyridine (tpy) (2), 2-(2-thienyl)-pyridine (thpy) (3), 2-(5-methyl-2-thienyl)pyridine (5m-thpy) (4), 1-phenylisoquinoline (piq) (5)], and [(N(?)N)Au(C?N)2] [N(?)N = 3,5-bis(phenyl)-2-(2'-pyridyl)pyrrole (pyrpy) (6)] were prepared, and the influence of both the cyanide as an ancillary ligand as well as the different electronic properties of the cyclometalating ligands (1-5) and the chelating bidentate (6) on the triplet emission properties were studied. The physicochemical properties were evaluated by a variety of physical methods, and the structure of selected complexes was further confirmed by X-ray diffraction studies. Complexes 1-5 display long-lived emission in solution, neat solid, spin coated PMMA films, and at 77 K in 2-MeTHF. The emission energies were strongly dictated by the cyclometalating ligands independent of the cyanide ligand, which is in quite a contrast to the previously reported dicyano complexes of iridium(III) and the isoelectronic platinum(II) complexes. The nonemissive behavior of complex 6 in any medium further highlights the importance that the good ?-donating properties of the cyclometalating ligand alone is not decisive in rendering the gold complexes emissive, but also the appropriate placement of the energy level of the ligand orbitals is also important. Detailed photophysical studies in conjunction with density functional theory and time-dependent density functional theory calculations support the origin of the emission to be a metal perturbed intra ligand (3)IL (?-?*) delocalized over the cyclometalating ligand. The stability of the complexes combined with good emission quantum yields and tunability of the emission energies makes these complexes suitable alternatives to the relatively less stable monocyclometalated gold(III) diaryl or dialkyne complexes for organic light emitting device applications. PMID:26517297

  3. Function and glycosylation of plant-derived antiviral monoclonal antibody

    E-print Network

    30333 Contributed by Hilary Koprowski, April 24, 2003 Plant genetic engineering led to the production Rupprecht , Bernhard Dietzschold*, Maxim Golovkin*, and Hilary Koprowski*§ *Biotechnology Foundation

  4. Excreted thiocyanate detects live reef fishes illegally collected using cyanide--a non-invasive and non-destructive testing approach.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Marcela C M; Rocha-Santos, Teresa A P; Rocha, Rui J M; Lopes, Isabel; Pereira, Ruth; Duarte, Armando C; Rubec, Peter J; Calado, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Cyanide fishing is a method employed to capture marine fish alive on coral reefs. They are shipped to markets for human consumption in Southeast Asia, as well as to supply the marine aquarium trade worldwide. Although several techniques can be used to detect cyanide in reef fish, there is still no testing method that can be used to survey the whole supply chain. Most methods for cyanide detection are time-consuming and require the sacrifice of the sampled fish. Thiocyanate anion (SCN(-)) is a metabolite produced by the main metabolic pathway for cyanide anion (CN(-)) detoxification. Our study employed an optical fiber (OF) methodology (analytical time <6 min) to detect SCN(-) in a non-invasive and non-destructive manner. Our OF methodology is able to detect trace levels (>3.16 µg L(-1)) of SCN(-) in seawater. Given that marine fish exposed to cyanide excrete SCN(-) in the urine, elevated levels of SCN(-) present in the seawater holding live reef fish indicate that the surveyed specimens were likely exposed to cyanide. In our study, captive-bred clownfish (Amphiprion clarkii) pulse exposed for 60 s to either 12.5 or 25 mg L(-1) of CN(-) excreted up to 6.96±0.03 and 9.84±0.03 µg L(-1) of SCN(-), respectively, during the 28 days following exposure. No detectable levels of SCN(-) were recorded in the water holding control organisms not exposed to CN(-), or in synthetic seawater lacking fish. While further research is necessary, our methodology can allow a rapid detection of SCN(-) in the holding water and can be used as a screening tool to indicate if live reef fish were collected with cyanide. PMID:22536375

  5. Excreted Thiocyanate Detects Live Reef Fishes Illegally Collected Using Cyanide—A Non-Invasive and Non-Destructive Testing Approach

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Marcela C. M.; Rocha-Santos, Teresa A. P.; Rocha, Rui J. M.; Lopes, Isabel; Pereira, Ruth; Duarte, Armando C.; Rubec, Peter J.; Calado, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Cyanide fishing is a method employed to capture marine fish alive on coral reefs. They are shipped to markets for human consumption in Southeast Asia, as well as to supply the marine aquarium trade worldwide. Although several techniques can be used to detect cyanide in reef fish, there is still no testing method that can be used to survey the whole supply chain. Most methods for cyanide detection are time-consuming and require the sacrifice of the sampled fish. Thiocyanate anion (SCN?) is a metabolite produced by the main metabolic pathway for cyanide anion (CN?) detoxification. Our study employed an optical fiber (OF) methodology (analytical time <6 min) to detect SCN? in a non-invasive and non-destructive manner. Our OF methodology is able to detect trace levels (>3.16 µg L?1) of SCN? in seawater. Given that marine fish exposed to cyanide excrete SCN? in the urine, elevated levels of SCN? present in the seawater holding live reef fish indicate that the surveyed specimens were likely exposed to cyanide. In our study, captive-bred clownfish (Amphiprion clarkii) pulse exposed for 60 s to either 12.5 or 25 mg L?1 of CN? excreted up to 6.96±0.03 and 9.84±0.03 µg L?1 of SCN?, respectively, during the 28 days following exposure. No detectable levels of SCN? were recorded in the water holding control organisms not exposed to CN?, or in synthetic seawater lacking fish. While further research is necessary, our methodology can allow a rapid detection of SCN? in the holding water and can be used as a screening tool to indicate if live reef fish were collected with cyanide. PMID:22536375

  6. Synthesis, characterization, and structural analyses of two cyanide-bridged bimetallic complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kautz, J. A.; Mullica, D. F.; Cunningham, B. P.; Combs, R. A.; Farmer, J. M.

    2000-05-01

    The crystal structures of two bimetallic cyanide-bridged lanthanide (Ln) complexes were obtained by means of three-dimensional single-crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The isostructural complexes (DMF) 4(H 2O) 3LaFe(CN) 6·H 2O ( I) and (DMF) 4(H 2O) 3CeFe(CN) 6·H 2O ( II) crystallize in the monoclinic system with Z=4 having respective lattice constants of a=17.660(2), 17.633(4); b=8.952(1), 8.920(2); c=20.017(2), 19.950(4) Å; and ?=95.68(1), 95.72(3). In each complex, the coordination about the central lanthanide ion is eight in a square antiprism arrangement while the coordination about the iron(III) ion is six, oriented octahedrally. Molecules in the crystal lattice of each complex are held together by normal van der Waals forces and a network of hydrogen bonding. Characterization includes physical property determinations, conoscopic studies, thermal gravimetric analyses (TGA), and IR spectrometric identifications. Select geometric parameters are tabulated and a synthesis of these compounds is presented.

  7. Vibrational spectra, powder X-ray diffractions and physical properties of cyanide complexes with 1-ethylimidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürkçüo?lu, Güne? Süheyla; Kiraz, Fulya Çetinkaya; Say?n, Elvan

    2015-10-01

    The heteronuclear tetracyanonickelate(II) complexes of the type [M(etim)Ni(CN)4]n (hereafter, abbreviated as M-Ni-etim, M = Mn(II), Fe(II) or Co(II); etim = 1-ethylimidazole, C5H8N2) were prepared in powder form and characterized by FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), thermal (TG; DTG and DTA), and elemental analysis techniques. The structures of these complexes were elucidated using vibrational spectra and powder X-ray diffraction patterns with the peak assignment to provide a better understanding of the structures. It is shown that the spectra are consistent with a proposed crystal structure for these compounds derived from powder X-ray diffraction measurements. Vibrational spectra of the complexes were presented and discussed with respect to the internal modes of both the etim and the cyanide ligands. The C, H and N analyses were carried out for all the complexes. Thermal behaviors of these complexes were followed using TG, DTG and DTA curves in the temperature range 30-700 °C in the static air atmosphere. The FT-IR, Raman spectra, thermal and powder X-ray analyses revealed no significant differences between the single crystal and powder forms. Additionally, electrical and magnetic properties of the complexes were investigated. The FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, PXRD, thermal and elemental analyses results propose that these complexes are similar in structure to the Hofmann-type complexes.

  8. Adsorption of gold cyanide complexes by activated carbon on non-coconut shell origin

    SciTech Connect

    Yalcin, M.; Arol, A.I.

    1995-12-31

    Coconut shells are the most widely used raw material for the production of activated carbon used in the gold production by cyanide leaching. There have been efforts to find alternatives to coconut shells. Shells and stones of certain fruits, have been tested. Although promising results to some extent were obtained, coconut shells remain the main source of activated carbon. Turkey has become a country of interest in terms of gold deposits of epithermal origin. Four deposits have already been discovered and, mining and milling operations are expected to start in the near future. Explorations are underway in many other areas of high expectations. Turkey is also rich in fruits which can be a valuable source of raw material for activated carbon production. In this study, hazelnut shells, peach and apricot stones, abundantly available locally, have been tested to determine whether they are suitable for the gold metallurgy. Parameters of carbonization and activation have been optimized. Gold loading capacity and adsorption kinetics have been studied.

  9. Electrochemical adsorption of cyanide on Ag(1 1 1) in the presence of cetylpyridinium chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzini, Benedetto; Mele, Claudio; Tadjeddine, Abderrahmane

    2004-10-01

    The behaviour of an Ag(1 1 1) electrode in contact with a neutral perchlorate solution containing cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) and potassium cyanide was studied as a function of potential. The understanding of the interaction of organic additives relevant to metal plating processes with specific crystal faces can provide guidelines for the design of advanced and environmentally friendly electrodeposition processes. CPC acts as a cathodic depolariser and an efficient hydrogen scavenger in precious metal and alloy electrodeposition baths containing cyanocomplexes. In situ spectroelectrochemical FT-IR measurements were carried out using both p- and s-polarised radiation. FT-IR data were complemented by SERS measurements on electrochemically roughened polycrystalline Ag in order to clarify the potential-dependent orientational behaviour of CPC. Cyclic voltammetry and differential capacitance measurements were employed to asses the electroactivity and adsorption ability of the relevant species. The results obtained evidenced a reorientation of the heteroaromatic ring from flat to vertical on shifting the electrode potential from anodic to cathodic. Surface CN - stretching bands were observed with and without CPC in the solution. As a function of potential, the presence of CPC shifts the CN - peak position to higher wavenumbers, suggesting the existence of an interaction between adsorbates, and increases in the peak intensities, possibly denoting coadsorption on interacting adsorption sites.

  10. Anionic Forensic Signatures for Sample Matching of Potassium Cyanide Using High Performance Ion Chromatography and Chemometrics

    SciTech Connect

    Fraga, Carlos G.; Farmer, Orville T.; Carman, April J.

    2011-01-30

    Potassium cyanide, a known poison, was used a model compound to determine the feasibility of using anionic impurities as a forensic signature for matching KCN samples back to their source. In this study, portions of eight KCN stocks originating from four countries were separately dissolved in water and analyzed by high performance ion chromatography (HPIC) using an anion exchange column and conductivity detection. Sixty KCN aqueous samples were produced from the eight stocks and analyzed for 11anionic impurities. Hierarchal cluster analysis and principal component analysis were used to demonstrate that KCN samples cluster according to source based on the concentrations of their anionic impurities. The F-ratio method and degree-of-class separation (DCS) were used for feature selection on a training set of KCN samples in order to optimize sample clustering. The optimal subset of anions needed for sample classification was determined to be sulfate, oxalate, phosphate, and an unknown anion named unk5. Using K-nearest neighbors (KNN) and the optimal subset of anions, KCN test samples from different KCN stocks were correctly determined to be manufactured in the United States. In addition, KCN samples from stocks manufactured in Belgium, Germany, and the Czech Republic were all correctly matched back to their original stocks because each stock had a unique anionic impurity profile. The application of the F-ratio method and DCS for feature selection improved the accuracy and confidence of sample classification by KNN.

  11. Theoretical study on monometallic cyanide cluster fullerenes MCN@C74 (M=Y, Tb).

    PubMed

    Gao, Xu; Zhao, Li-Juan; Wang, Dong-Lai

    2015-11-01

    New monometallic cyanide cluster endohedral fullerenes MCN@C74 (M=Y, Tb) have been investigated using density functional theory. Four isomers of MCN@C74 are considered based on four lowest energy C74 (2-) isomers, namely one cage with isolated pentagons and three isomers with a pentagon-pentagon junction. The results show that the variation of the cluster size has slight influence on the structures and relative stabilities of MCN@C74. The MCN@D3h(14246)-C74 derived from the only C74 cage with the isolated pentagons are predicted to possess the lowest energy. More importantly, in MCN@D3h(14246)-C74, the encapsulated YCN or TbCN cluster is triangular, similar to the results reported on YCN@Cs(6)-C82 and TbCN@C2(5)-C82. Furthermore, IR spectra and (13)C NMR spectra have also been explored to assist future experimental characterization. PMID:26518687

  12. Inhibition of Photosynthesis by Azide and Cyanide and the Role of Oxygen in Photosynthesis 1

    PubMed Central

    Forti, Giorgio; Gerola, Paolo

    1977-01-01

    Cyanide and azide inhibit photosynthesis and catalase activity of isolated, intact spinach (Spinacia oleracea) chloroplasts. When chloroplasts are illuminated in the presence of CN? or N3?, accumulation of H2O2 is observed, parallel to inhibition of photosynthesis. Photosynthetic O2 evolution is inhibited to the same extent, under saturating light, whether CO2 or phosphoglycerate is present as electron acceptor. The illumination of chloroplasts with CN? or N3? inactivates the NADPH- and ATP-dependent phosphoglycerate reduction. This enzyme system can be reactivated by dithiothreitol. In reconstituted, envelope-less chloroplasts, the phosphoglycerate-dependent and the ribose 5-phosphate-dependent O2 evolution are inhibited to the same extent, while electron transport to NADP is unaffected. It is concluded that the inhibition of photosynthesis by CN? and N3? is due to H2O2 accumulation, which is a consequence of catalase inhibition. The inhibition of phosphoglycerate reduction, but not of CO2 reduction, is abolished under conditions where ATP is available in excess of NADPH (low light, supply of ATP). This is taken as an indication that electron flow from photosystem I is diverted to O2 (Mehler reaction, which produces H2O2) when the unavailability of ATP is limiting the rate of reoxidation of NADPH. The Mehler reaction is considered a physiological process supplying ATP for photosynthesis. PMID:16659956

  13. Energy efficient--advanced oxidation process for treatment of cyanide containing automobile industry wastewater.

    PubMed

    Mudliar, R; Umare, S S; Ramteke, D S; Wate, S R

    2009-05-30

    Destruction of cyanide (CN) from an automobile industry wastewater by advance oxidation process (AOP) has been evaluated. The operating conditions (in an indigenously designed photoreactor) for three different treatment strategies have been optimized. The treatment strategies involved use of, ultra violet light (UV), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and ozone (O(3)) in various combinations. Treatment of automobile industry wastewater (250 mg/L CN) showed fastest CN destruction, which was significantly (P<0.05) faster than that observed with synthetic wastewater (with similar CN concentration). A combined application of H(2)O(2)/O(3) was found to be the best option for maximum CN destruction. This treatment allows CN to reach the regional/international limit (of 0.02 mg/L) for safe industrial wastewater discharges to the receiving water bodies. The specific energy consumption by the photoreactor following this treatment was comparable to that obtained by conventional treatments, which use photocatalyst. Since the present treatment does not use catalyst, it provides an excellent energy efficient and economical option for treatment and safe disposal of CN containing industrial wastewater. PMID:19022578

  14. Vibrational spectra, powder X-ray diffractions and physical properties of cyanide complexes with 1-ethylimidazole.

    PubMed

    Kürkçüo?lu, Güne? Süheyla; Kiraz, Fulya Çetinkaya; Say?n, Elvan

    2015-10-01

    The heteronuclear tetracyanonickelate(II) complexes of the type [M(etim)Ni(CN)4]n (hereafter, abbreviated as M-Ni-etim, M=Mn(II), Fe(II) or Co(II); etim=1-ethylimidazole, C5H8N2) were prepared in powder form and characterized by FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), thermal (TG; DTG and DTA), and elemental analysis techniques. The structures of these complexes were elucidated using vibrational spectra and powder X-ray diffraction patterns with the peak assignment to provide a better understanding of the structures. It is shown that the spectra are consistent with a proposed crystal structure for these compounds derived from powder X-ray diffraction measurements. Vibrational spectra of the complexes were presented and discussed with respect to the internal modes of both the etim and the cyanide ligands. The C, H and N analyses were carried out for all the complexes. Thermal behaviors of these complexes were followed using TG, DTG and DTA curves in the temperature range 30-700 °C in the static air atmosphere. The FT-IR, Raman spectra, thermal and powder X-ray analyses revealed no significant differences between the single crystal and powder forms. Additionally, electrical and magnetic properties of the complexes were investigated. The FT-IR and Raman spectroscopy, PXRD, thermal and elemental analyses results propose that these complexes are similar in structure to the Hofmann-type complexes. PMID:25919408

  15. The Community College Foundation Today: A. History, Characteristics, and Assets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angel, Dan; Gares, Dale

    1989-01-01

    Offers a historical perspective on the community college foundation, reviews 1987 research findings concerning foundation assets, lists 10 steps to establishing a foundation, and identifies key factors in organizational success. Describes the revitalization of the Citrus College Foundation. (DMM)

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of a Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium, Serratia fonticola Strain AU-P3(3)

    PubMed Central

    Devi, Usha; Khatri, Indu; Kumar, Navinder; Kumar, Lalit; Sharma, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR), found in the rhizospheric region of plants, not only suppress plant disease, but also directly improve plant health by improving the availability of nutrients and by providing phytostimulants. Herein, we report the high-quality genome sequence of Serratia fonticola strain AU-P3(3), a PGPR of the pea plant, which confers phosphate solubilization, indole-3-acetic acid production, ammonia production, hydrogen cyanide (HCN) production, and siderophore production and also confers activity against Rhizoctonia species. The 5.02-Mb genome sequence contains genes related to plant growth promotion and biocontrol activities. PMID:24233592

  17. Practitioner Perspectives on Foundational Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Leider, Jonathon P.; Juliano, Chrissie; Castrucci, Brian C.; Beitsch, Leslie M.; Dilley, Abby; Nelson, Rachel; Kaiman, Sherry; Sprague, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Context: National efforts are underway to classify a minimum set of public health services that all jurisdictions throughout the United States should provide regardless of location. Such a set of basic programs would be supported by crosscutting services, known as the “foundational capabilities” (FCs). These FCs are assessment services, preparedness and disaster response, policy development, communications, community partnership, and organizational support activities. Objective: To ascertain familiarity with the term and concept of FCs and gather related perspectives from state and local public health practitioners. Design: In fall 2013, we interviewed 50 leaders from state and local health departments. We asked about familiarity with the term “foundational capabilities,” as well as the broader concept of FCs. We attempted to triangulate the utility of the FC concept by asking respondents about priority programs and services, about perceived unique contributions made by public health, and about prevalence and funding for the FCs. Setting: Telephone-based interviews. Participants: Fifty leaders of state and local health departments. Main Outcome Measures: Practitioner familiarity with and perspectives on the FCs, information about current funding streams for public health, and the likelihood of creating nationwide FCs that would be recognized and accepted by all jurisdictions. Results: Slightly more than half of the leaders interviewed said that they were familiar with the concept of FCs. In most cases, health departments had all of the capabilities to some degree, although operationalization varied. Few indicated that current funding levels were sufficient to support implementing a minimum level of FCs nationally. Conclusions: Respondents were not able to articulate the current or optimal levels of services for the various capabilities, nor the costs associated with them. Further research is needed to understand the role of FCs as part of the foundational public health services. PMID:25486134

  18. Deontological foundations for medical ethics?

    PubMed

    Gillon, R

    1985-05-01

    Gillon outlines the principles of the deontological, or duty-based, group of moral theories in one of a series of British Medical Journal articles on the philosophical foundations of medical ethics. He differentiates between monistic theories, such as Immanuel Kant's, which rely on a single moral principle, and pluralistic theories, such as that of W.D. Ross, which rely on several principles that potentially could conflict. He summarizes the contributions of Kant and Ross to the development of deontological thought, then concludes his essay with brief paragraphs on other deontological approaches to the resolution of conflicting moral principles. PMID:3922480

  19. Foundations for offshore wind turbines.

    PubMed

    Byrne, B W; Houlsby, G T

    2003-12-15

    An important engineering challenge of today, and a vital one for the future, is to develop and harvest alternative sources of energy. This is a firm priority in the UK, with the government setting a target of 10% of electricity from renewable sources by 2010. A component central to this commitment will be to harvest electrical power from the vast energy reserves offshore, through wind turbines or current or wave power generators. The most mature of these technologies is that of wind, as much technology transfer can be gained from onshore experience. Onshore wind farms, although supplying 'green energy', tend to provoke some objections on aesthetic grounds. These objections can be countered by locating the turbines offshore, where it will also be possible to install larger capacity turbines, thus maximizing the potential of each wind farm location. This paper explores some civil-engineering problems encountered for offshore wind turbines. A critical component is the connection of the structure to the ground, and in particular how the load applied to the structure is transferred safely to the surrounding soil. We review previous work on the design of offshore foundations, and then present some simple design calculations for sizing foundations and structures appropriate to the wind-turbine problem. We examine the deficiencies in the current design approaches, and the research currently under way to overcome these deficiencies. Designs must be improved so that these alternative energy sources can compete economically with traditional energy suppliers. PMID:14667305

  20. Monitoring of TiO2-catalytic UV-LED photo-oxidation of cyanide contained in mine wastewater and leachate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong Hee; Lee, Sang Woo; Lee, Gye Min; Lee, Byung-Tae; Yun, Seong-Taek; Kim, Soon-Oh

    2016-01-01

    A photo-oxidation process using UV-LEDs and TiO2 was studied for removal of cyanide contained in mine wastewater and leachates. This study focused on monitoring of a TiO2-catalyzed LED photo-oxidation process, particularly emphasizing the effects of TiO2 form and light source on the efficiency of cyanide removal. The generation of hydroxyl radicals was also examined during the process to evaluate the mechanism of the photo-catalytic process. The apparent removal efficiency of UV-LEDs was lower than that achieved using a UV-lamp, but cyanide removal in response to irradiation as well as consumption of electrical energy was observed to be higher for UV-LEDs than for UV-lamps. The Degussa P25 TiO2 showed the highest performance of the TiO2 photo-catalysts tested. The experimental results indicate that hydroxyl radicals oxidize cyanide to OCN(-), NO2(-), NO3(-), HCO3(-), and CO3(2-), which have lower toxicity than cyanide. In addition, the overall efficacy of the process appeared to be significantly affected by diverse operational parameters, such as the mixing ratio of anatase and rutile, the type of gas injected, and the number of UV-LEDs used. PMID:26195431

  1. Speciation and characterization of arsenic in gold ores and cyanidation tailings using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paktunc, D.; Foster, A.; Heald, S.; Laflamme, G.

    2004-01-01

    The knowledge of mineralogy and molecular structure of As is needed to better understand the stability of As in wastes resulting from processing of gold ores. In this study, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe, X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy (including both XANES and EXAFS regimes) were employed to determine the mineralogical composition and local coordination environment of As in gold ores and process tailings from bench-scale tests designed to mimic a common plant practice. Arsenic-bearing minerals identified in the ores and tailings include iron (III) oxyhydroxides, scorodite (FeAsO4??2H2O), ferric arsenates, arseniosiderite (Ca2Fe3 (AsO4)3O2??3H2O), Ca-Fe arsenates, pharmacosiderite (KFe4 (AsO4)3(OH)4??6-7H2O), jarosite (K2Fe6(SO4)4 (OH)12) and arsenopyrite (FeAsS). Iron (III) oxyhydroxides contain variable levels of As from trace to about 22 wt% and Ca up to approximately 9 wt%. Finely ground ore and tailings samples were examined by bulk XAFS and selected mineral grains were analyzed by microfocused XAFS (micro-EXAFS) spectroscopy to reconcile the ambiguities of multiple As sources in the complex bulk EXAFS spectra. XANES spectra indicated that As occurs as As5+in all the samples. Micro-EXAFS spectra of individual iron (III) oxyhydroxide grains with varying As concentrations point to inner-sphere bidentate-binuclear arsenate complexes as the predominant form of As. There are indications for the presence of a second Fe shell corresponding to bidentate-mononuclear arrangement. Iron (III) oxyhydroxides with high As concentrations corresponding to maximum adsorption densities probably occur as nanoparticles. The discovery of Ca atoms around As in iron (III) oxyhydroxides at interatomic distances of 4.14-4.17 A?? and the coordination numbers suggest the formation of arseniosiderite-like nanoclusters by coprecipitation rather than simple adsorption of Ca onto iron (III) oxyhydroxides. Correlation of Ca with As in iron (III) oxyhydroxides as determined by electron microprobe analysis supports the coprecipitate origin for the presence of Ca in iron (III) oxyhydroxides. The samples containing higher abundances of ferric arsenates released higher As concentrations during the cyanidation tests. The presence of highly soluble ferric arsenates and Ca-Fe arsenates, and relatively unstable iron (III) oxyhydroxides with Fe/As molar ratios of less than 4 in the ore and process tailings suggests that not only the tailings in the impoundment will continue to release As, but also there is the potential for mobilization of As from the natural sources such as the unmined ore. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Energy yields in the prebiotic synthesis of hydrogen cyanide and formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stribling, R.; Miller, S. L.

    1986-01-01

    Prebiotic experiments are usually reported in terms of carbon yields, i.e., the yield of product based on the total carbon in the system. These experiments usually involve a large input of energy and are designed to maximize the yields of product. However, large inputs of energy result in multiple activation of the reactants and products. A more realistic prebiotic experiment is to remove the products of the activation step so they are not exposed a second time to the energy source. This is equivalent to transporting the products synthesized in the primitive atmosphere to the ocean, and thereby protecting them from destruction by atmospheric energy sources. Experiments of this type, using lower inputs of energy, give energy yields (moles of products/joule) which can be used to estimate the relative importance of the different energy sources on the primitive earth. Simulated prebiotic atmospheres containing either CH4, CO or CO2 with N2, H2O and variable amounts of H2 were subjected to a high frequency Tesla coil. Samples of the aqueous phase were taken at various time intervals from 1 hr to 7 days, and the energy yields were obtained by extrapolation to zero time. The samples were analyzed for HCN with the cyanide electrode and for H2CO by chromotropic acid. The spark energy was estimated by calorimetry. The temperature rise in an insulated discharge flask was compared with the temperature rise from a resistance heater in the same flask. These results will be compared with calculated production rates of HCN and H2CO from lightning and a number of photochemical processes on the primitive Earth.

  3. Removal of aqueous cyanide with strongly basic ion-exchange resin.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Halis; Kobya, Mehmet; Khan, Eakalak; Bezbaruah, Achintya N

    2015-01-01

    The removal of cyanide (CN-) from aqueous solutions using a strongly basic ion-exchange resin, Purolite A-250, was investigated. The effects of contact time, initial CN- concentration, pH, temperature, resin dosage, agitation speed, and particle size distribution on the removal of CN- were examined. The adsorption equilibrium data fitted the Langmuir isotherm very well. The maximum CN- adsorption capacity of Purolite A-250 was found to be 44?mg?CN-?g(-1) resin. More than 90% CN- adsorption was achieved for most CN- solutions (50, 100, and 200?mg?CN-?L(-1)) with a resin dose of 2?g?L(-1). The equilibrium time was ?20?min, optimum pH was 10.0-10.5, and optimum agitation speed was 150?rpm. An increase in adsorption of CN- with increasing resin dosage was observed. Adsorption of CN- by the resin was marginally affected (maximum 4% variation) within an environmentally relevant temperature range of 20-50?°C. Fixed-bed column (20.5?mm internal diameters) experiments were performed to investigate the effects of resin bed depth and influent flow rate on breakthrough behaviour. Breakthrough occurred in 5?min for 0.60?cm bed depth while it was 340?min for 5.40?cm bed depth. Adsorption capacity was 25.5?mg?CN-?g(-1) for 5?mL?min(-1) flow rate and 3.9?mg?CN-?g(-1) for 20?mL?min(-1) flow rate. The research has established that the resin can be effectively used for CN- removal from aqueous solutions. PMID:25558868

  4. A Unique Cyanide Adduct in Human Serum Albumin – Potential as a Surrogate Exposure Marker

    PubMed Central

    Fasco, Michael J.; Stack, Robert F.; Lu, Shijun; Hauer, Charles R.; Schneider, Erasmus; Dailey, Michael; Aldous, Kenneth M.

    2011-01-01

    Cyanide (CN = HCN + CN?) is a renowned poison and neurotoxicant that is prevalent throughout the environment. Despite a plethora of studies conducted over the last half century, relatively little is known of its potential to cause adverse health outcomes at sublethal exposures. CN exposure is normally determined from blood, but because CN is rapidly metabolized and cleared from this compartment (t1/2 < 1 h), it is common for several half-lives to have passed before blood samples are drawn for analysis. This variable, coupled with a very narrow toxic index and metabolic diversity within the human population, have rendered accurate assessment of CN exposure, and consequently any predictions of possible adverse health outcomes, highly problematic. Prior studies by us showed the potential of Cys-SCN adducts within human serum albumin (HSA) to act as retrospective surrogates of CN exposure. Here we report the discovery of a stable, SCN adduct at Cys567 formed by reaction of CN with the C-terminal Cys558Cys567 disulfide bond of HSA. Treatment of HSA purified from human serum with base in guanidine hydrochloride releases a readily detectable, uniquely modified, C-terminal-19 mer peptide from Cys567-SCN moieties in all the samples examined thus far. Inclusion of a HSA-Cys567-S13C15N labeled internal standard permits quantitation of the Cys567- SCN adduct by LC-MS/MS in Selective Reaction Monitoring (SRM) of the surrogate peptide with high sensitivity and good precision. Reaction of CN in vitro with the Cys558Cys567 disulfide bond in HSA is specific, rapid, and concentration dependent within a putative, physiologically-relevant range. Data from various human sera demonstrate the potential usefulness of this adduct as a biomarker of CN exposure. PMID:21366342

  5. 1D to 3D heterobimetallic complexes tuned by cyanide precursors: synthesis, crystal structures, and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Daopeng; Si, Weijiang; Wang, Ping; Chen, Xia; Jiang, Jianzhuang

    2014-04-01

    Five new heterobimetallic complexes, namely, {[Ni(L)][Fe(bpb)(CN)2]}ClO4 (L = 2,12-dimethyl-3,7,11,17-tetraazabicyclo[11.3.1]heptadeca-1(17),13,15-triene, bpb(2-) = 1,2-bis(pyridine-2-carboxamido)benzenate) (1), {[Ni(L)]3[M(CN)6]2}·7H2O (M = Fe (2), Cr (3)), {[Ni(L)]2[Mo(CN)8]}·CH3CN·13H2O (4), and {[Ni(L)]2[W(CN)8]}·16H2O (5), were assembled from the polyaza macrocycle nickel(II) compound and five cyanidometalate precursors containing different numbers of cyanide groups. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals their different structure ranging from a cyanide-bridged cationic polymeric single chain for 1, a two-dimensional network for 2 and 3, and a three-dimensional network for 4 and 5. In addition, a systematic investigation over the magnetic properties of 1-3 indicates the ferromagnetic magnetic coupling between neighboring Fe(III)/Cr(III) and Ni(II) ions through the bridging cyanide group. For complex 1, the magnetic susceptibility has been simulated by the Seiden model using the Hamiltonian H = -J?i=0(N)SiSi+1, leading to the magnetic coupling constant of J = 3.67 cm(-1). The two-dimensional magnetic complexes exhibit three-dimensional magnetic ordering behavior with a magnetic phase transition temperature of TC = 4.0 K for 2 and TN = 6.0 K for 3, respectively. PMID:24655013

  6. The Laboratory Rotational Spectrum of Iso-Propyl Cyanide and AN Astronomical Search in Sagittarius B2(N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Holger S. P.; Coutens, A.; Walters, A.; Grabow, J.-U.; Belloche, A.; Menten, K. M.; Schlemmer, S.

    2009-06-01

    We have carried out a molecular line survey of Sagittarius B2(N) in the 3 mm region with selected recordings at 2 and 1.3 mm to probe the chemical complexity in massive star-forming regions. Noteworthy results include the detection of aminoacetonitrile, a possible precursor of the aminoacid glycine, the detection of ^{13}C isotopologs of vinyl cyanide, and the detection of ethyl formate as well as normal-propyl cyanide. The heavy atoms in the latter molecule form a chain. An isomer with a branched structure, iso-propyl cyanide, also exists, but its rotational spectrum has only been recorded in few transitions up to 40 GHz. Therefore, laboratory measurements were extended. The molecule is rather asymmetric (? = -0.5766) with a strong a-dipole moment component of 4.05 (2) D and a still sizable c-component of 1.4 (2) D.^e Measurements in Köln were carried out in selected regions between 40 and 600 GHz. Since the c-type transitions appeared to be weaker than predicted additional Stark (and also zero-field) measurements have been carried out in Hannover between 6 and 20 GHz. We will present results of these laboratory spectroscopic investigations as well as the outcome of a search for the molecule in our Sgr B2(N) line survey. A. Belloche, K. M. Menten, C. Comito, H. S. P. Müller, P. Schilke, J. Ott, S. Thorwirth, C. Hieret, Astron. Astrophys. 482 (2008) 179; Erratum 492 (2008) 796. H. S. P. Müller, A. Belloche, K. M. Menten, C. Comito, P. Schilke, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 251 (2008) 319. A. Belloche, R. T. Garrod, H. S. P. Müller, K. M. Menten, C. Comito, P. Schilke, Astron. Astrophys. (2009), accepted. G. E. Herberich, Z. Naturforsch. 22a (1967) 543. J. R. Durig, Y. S. Li, J. Mol. Struct. 21 (1974) 289.

  7. Improved gas chromatography with electron-capture detection using a reaction pre-column for the determination of blood cyanide: a higher content in the left ventricle of fire victims.

    PubMed

    Maseda, C; Matsubara, K; Shiono, H

    1989-05-30

    We developed a head-space method for the determination of blood cyanide by gas chromatography with electron-capture detection. In this technique, a reaction pre-column, packed with chloramine-T, was used for the conversion of hydrogen cyanide into cyanogen chloride. Since the reaction pre-column eliminated the necessity for trapping hydrogen cyanide from the biological samples, blood cyanide was quickly analysed by acidification only. The reaction pre-column was durable for at least several months. The calibration curve gave good linearity when dichloromethane was used as the internal standard, and the lower detection limit taken from this plot was ca. 0.05 micrograms/ml. The relative standard deviation of spiked blood samples was in the range 0.6-3.9%. We determined blood cyanide levels at autopsy in victims who had died from fire using this method. A significantly higher cyanide content was detected in the left ventricular blood than in the right. There was a positive correlation between blood cyanide and carboxylhaemoglobin contents. This simple and sensitive technique could be very useful for the determination of cyanide in various samples. PMID:2768405

  8. Partnering: The foundation for performance

    SciTech Connect

    Edelman, L.

    1994-12-31

    Over the past several decades, the US has experienced an unprecedented increase in the number of disputes in litigation. The environmental area, particularly contracts involving remediation projects, have not been immune from this situation. The adverse impact of this litigation mindset on the financial and personnel resources of the contracting parties has escalated and the detrimental effect on contractual relationships has become more apparent. Both owners and contractors are confronted with unrealized contract expectations, hostility on the jobsite and disappointment in the traditional dispute resolution processes. Relying exclusively on litigation when negotiations fail to settle contract disputes is time consuming, costly and frustrating. Now in the 1990s, the Corps along with the construction industry are moving to establish a new relationship beneficial to all contracting parties that focus on disputes avoidance. This new relationship is fostered by a process called Partnering. In undertaking environmental remediation work, Partnering can lay the foundation for a successful relationship among all involved parties.

  9. Emotional foundations of cognitive control

    PubMed Central

    Inzlicht, Michael; Bartholow, Bruce D.; Hirsh, Jacob B.

    2015-01-01

    Often seen as the paragon of higher cognition, here we suggest that cognitive control is dependent on emotion. Rather than asking whether control is influenced by emotion, we ask whether control itself can be understood as an emotional process. Reviewing converging evidence from cybernetics, animal research, cognitive neuroscience, and social and personality psychology, we suggest that cognitive control is initiated when goal conflicts evoke phasic changes to emotional primitives that both focus attention on the presence of goal conflicts and energize conflict resolution to support goal-directed behavior. Critically, we propose that emotion is not an inert byproduct of conflict but is instrumental in recruiting control. Appreciating the emotional foundations of control leads to testable predictions that can spur future research. PMID:25659515

  10. The foundation of kinship: households.

    PubMed

    Leonetti, Donna L; Chabot-Hanowell, Benjamin

    2011-07-01

    Men's hunting has dominated the discourse on energy capture and flow in the past decade or so. We turn to women's roles as critical to household formation, pair-bonding, and intergenerational bonds. Their pivotal contributions in food processing and distribution likely promoted kinship, both genetic and affinal, and appear to be the foundation from which households evolved. With conscious recognition of household social units, variable cultural constructions of human kinship systems that were sensitive to environmental and technological conditions could emerge. Kinship dramatically altered the organization of resource access for our species, creating what we term "kinship ecologies." We present simple mathematical models to show how hunting leads to dependence on women's contributions, bonds men to women, and bonds generations together. Kinship, as it organized transfers of food and labor energy centered on women, also became integrated with the biological evolution of human reproduction and life history. PMID:21799658

  11. Microgravity investigations of foundation conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Yule, D.E.; Sharp, M.K.; Butler, D.K.

    1998-01-01

    A microgravity investigation was conducted in the upstream and downstream switchyards of the Wilson Dam powerplant, Florence, Alabama. The objective of the survey was the detection in the switchyard foundations of subsurface cavities or other anomalous conditions that could threaten the stability of the switchyard structures. The survey consisted of 288 gravity stations in the downstream switchyard and 347 stations in the upstream switchyard. Significant anomalous areas in the switchyards were selected on the basis of residual gravity anomaly maps. These results were prioritized and used to guide an exploratory drilling program to investigate the cause of the anomalies. Highest-priority boring location recommendations were in negative gravity anomaly areas, since negative anomalies could be caused by actual cavities or low-density zones that might represent incipient cavity formation. Remaining boring locations were in positive anomaly areas for verification purposes. The results of the borings confirm the presence of cavities and soft zones indicative of cavity formation.

  12. Noninvasive monitoring of treatment response in a rabbit cyanide toxicity model reveals differences in brain and muscle metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae G.; Lee, Jangwoen; Mahon, Sari B.; Mukai, David; Patterson, Steven E.; Boss, Gerry R.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Brenner, Matthew

    2012-10-01

    Noninvasive near infrared spectroscopy measurements were performed to monitor cyanide (CN) poisoning and recovery in the brain region and in foreleg muscle simultaneously, and the effects of a novel CN antidote, sulfanegen sodium, on tissue hemoglobin oxygenation changes were compared using a sub-lethal rabbit model. The results demonstrated that the brain region is more susceptible to CN poisoning and slower in endogenous CN detoxification following exposure than peripheral muscles. However, sulfanegen sodium rapidly reversed CN toxicity, with brain region effects reversing more quickly than muscle. In vivo monitoring of multiple organs may provide important clinical information regarding the extent of CN toxicity and subsequent recovery, and facilitate antidote drug development.

  13. Cyanide-bridged single-molecule magnet constructed by an octacoordinated [W(CN)6(bpy)]- anion.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jung Hee; Lim, Jeong Hak; Kim, Hyoung Chan; Hong, Chang Seop

    2006-11-27

    Two cyanide-bridged WV-M [M = Mn(II) (1), Co(II) (2)] bimetallic clusters were prepared by self-assembling a new molecular precursor [W(CN)6(bpy)]- and the corresponding metal complexes. Compound 1 shows a tetranuclear W2Mn2 entity, consisting of a Jahn-Teller ion, Mn(III), which serves as an anisotropic source, while compound 2 exhibits a trimeric W2Co structure. Among them, compound 1 displays slow relaxation of the magnetization, which is typical of a single-molecule magnet behavior. PMID:17112248

  14. A colorimetric and fluorescent cyanide chemosensor based on dicyanovinyl derivatives: Utilization of the mechanism of intramolecular charge transfer blocking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiao; Cai, Yi; Yao, Hong; Lin, Qi; Zhu, Yuan-Rong; Li, Hui; Zhang, You-Ming; Wei, Tai-Bao

    2015-02-01

    Chemosensor (CS1) was designed and synthesized by simple green chemistry procedure. CS1 exhibited both colorimetric and fluorescence turn-off responses for cyanide (CN-) ion in aqueous solution. The probe showed an immediate visible color changes from yellow to colorless and green fluorescence disappearance when CN- was added. The mechanism of chemosensor reaction with CN- was studied using 1HH NMR and 13C NMR spectroscopies and mass spectrometry. Moreover, test strips based on the sensor were fabricated, which served as convenient and efficient CN- test kits.

  15. ESP IMPROVEMENTS AT POWER PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An on-going ORD and OIA collaborative project in the Newly Independent States (NIS) is designed to upgrade ESPs used in NIS power plants and has laid the foundation for implementing cost-effective ESP modernization efforts at power plants. Thus far, state-of-the-art ESP performan...

  16. 7 CFR 1726.125 - Generating plant facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...types of projects not shown, such as nuclear and alternate energy projects, RUS will...turbine installation and plant piping), power plant building (foundation and superstructure), site preparation, coal unloading and handling facilities,...

  17. 7 CFR 1726.125 - Generating plant facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...types of projects not shown, such as nuclear and alternate energy projects, RUS will...turbine installation and plant piping), power plant building (foundation and superstructure), site preparation, coal unloading and handling facilities,...

  18. 7 CFR 1726.125 - Generating plant facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...types of projects not shown, such as nuclear and alternate energy projects, RUS will...turbine installation and plant piping), power plant building (foundation and superstructure), site preparation, coal unloading and handling facilities,...

  19. 10. SOUTHEAST CORNER OF PLANT, LOOKING NORTH ALONG DIKE. NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. SOUTHEAST CORNER OF PLANT, LOOKING NORTH ALONG DIKE. NOTE OIL HOUSE FOUNDATIONS AT LOWER LEFT. - Ford Motor Company Long Beach Assembly Plant, Assembly Building, 700 Henry Ford Avenue, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  20. The Foundation-Institution Partnership: The Role of Institutionally Related Foundations in Public Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, David

    2010-01-01

    Institutionally related foundations have played a vital role in raising and managing private resources in support of public institutions of higher education. Unlike private grant-making foundations, college and university foundations are typically incorporated as public charities under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Although they…

  1. 45 CFR 670.25 - Designation of specially protected species of native mammals, birds, and plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...native mammals, birds, and plants. 670.25 Section 670...Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Specially Protected Species of Mammals, Birds, and Plants § 670.25...

  2. 45 CFR 670.25 - Designation of specially protected species of native mammals, birds, and plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...native mammals, birds, and plants. 670.25 Section 670...Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Specially Protected Species of Mammals, Birds, and Plants § 670.25...

  3. On the Need to Live Educational Foundations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, William H.

    2013-01-01

    William H. Schubert, retired faculty member at the University of Illinois, Chicago, reflects on his teaching career and the loss of "educational foundations." Schubert states that "Foundations of Education" are being pushed toward the precipice of extinction. He describes a loss of "back-to-basics" education with a…

  4. UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT FOUNDATION DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE

    E-print Network

    Bermingham, Laura Hill

    of the Development Committee of The University of Vermont and State Agricultural College Foundation, Inc. ("UVM to order at 3:05 p.m. Welcome Remarks Karen Meyer welcomed everyone and reflected on the terrific news we by gift officers to go anywhere to see anyone, connections with foundation board and FLC members, and more

  5. UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT FOUNDATION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

    E-print Network

    Bermingham, Laura Hill

    of the Executive Committee of The University of Vermont and State Agricultural College Foundation, Inc. ("UVM:06 a.m. Opening Remarks Chair John Hilton welcomed everyone and thanked Committee and staff members,000 donors gave gifts. John felt that the Foundation has come a long way in a short time and has longer to go

  6. Foundations and Trends R Machine Learning

    E-print Network

    Linial, Nathan "Nati"

    Foundations and Trends R in Machine Learning Vol. 4, No. 2 (2011) 107­194 c 2012 S. Shalev.1 Bibliographic Remarks 190 Acknowledgments 191 References 192 #12;Foundations and Trends R in Machine Learning research fields including game theory, information theory, and machine learning. It also became of great

  7. Liberating Foundations of Art and Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lerner, Fern

    2012-01-01

    Research concerning the basic course known as Foundations of Art and Design strengthens the pedagogical approach for K-16 art and design education. The version of Foundations introduced to America by Josef Albers, although hardly changed, is shown to have continued, timeless relevance. Next, a sequential, implicit logic is revealed in linking the…

  8. Inter-American Foundation Annual Report 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inter-American Foundation, Rosslyn, VA.

    This annual report from the Inter-American Foundation (IAF), a federal development agency, includes letters from foundation officials describing the IAF-funded work in poverty areas of Latin America and the Caribbean. The report describes IAF's In-Country Support System (ICS), staffed by local professionals who assist grantees and report their…

  9. Foundations and Higher Education: Whose Agenda?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Grant programs that had been relatively open-ended were now tightly drawn, grounded in the foundations' own carefully articulated take on issues and receptive only to proposals that responded appropriately. Initiative and creativity had shifted heavily from prospective grantee to grantor. As foundations embraced this funding-by-agenda, it burdened…

  10. WILD CHIMPANZEE FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 2012

    E-print Network

    WILD CHIMPANZEE FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 2012 Activities of the Wild Chimpanzee Foundation for improved conservation of chimpanzees and their habitat in West Africa Prepared by the WCF team Siège ........................................................................................................ 12 1.8. Celebrating 33 years of research and conservation of chimpanzees in the Taï National Park

  11. UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT FOUNDATION AUDIT COMMITTEE

    E-print Network

    Bermingham, Laura Hill

    UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT FOUNDATION AUDIT COMMITTEE MEETING MINUTES OCTOBER 13, 2011 A meeting of the Audit Committee of The University of Vermont and State Agricultural College Foundation, Inc. ("UVM at 1:38 PM. Chair's Welcome Max Ansbacher welcomed members of the Audit Committee. Each Committee

  12. UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT FOUNDATION AUDIT COMMITTEE

    E-print Network

    Bermingham, Laura Hill

    UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT FOUNDATION AUDIT COMMITTEE MEETING MINUTES NOVEMBER 18, 2011 A meeting of the Audit Committee of The University of Vermont and State Agricultural College Foundation, Inc. ("UVM's Welcome Max Ansbacher called the meeting to order and explained the importance of choosing an audit firm

  13. UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT FOUNDATION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

    E-print Network

    Bermingham, Laura Hill

    Committee unanimously voted to approve the minutes. Dashboard Report Rich Bundy, President and CEO of the Foundation, distributed copies of the Dashboard Report showing Foundation progress as of September 30, 2012 of the board. The dashboard report focuses solely on quantitative measures of our activity to date. Rich

  14. UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT FOUNDATION AUDIT & STEWARDSHIP COMMITTEE

    E-print Network

    Bermingham, Laura Hill

    principles and government auditing standards. KPMG's audit approach and methodology is risk based. KPMG uses to fraud is that every audit has the requirement to address the risk of fraud. #12;UVM Foundation AuditUNIVERSITY OF VERMONT FOUNDATION AUDIT & STEWARDSHIP COMMITTEE DRAFT MEETING MINUTES APRIL 30, 2015

  15. UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT FOUNDATION AUDIT & STEWARDSHIP COMMITTEE

    E-print Network

    Bermingham, Laura Hill

    year to end June 30. Renee reviewed the control environment as well as fraud risks, noting there wereUNIVERSITY OF VERMONT FOUNDATION AUDIT & STEWARDSHIP COMMITTEE MEETING MINUTES OCTOBER 9, 2014 A meeting of the Audit Committee of The University of Vermont and State Agricultural College Foundation, Inc

  16. Accurate structural and spectroscopic characterization of prebiotic molecules: The neutral and cationic acetyl cyanide and their related species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellili, A.; Linguerri, R.; Hochlaf, M.; Puzzarini, C.

    2015-11-01

    In an effort to provide an accurate structural and spectroscopic characterization of acetyl cyanide, its two enolic isomers and the corresponding cationic species, state-of-the-art computational methods, and approaches have been employed. The coupled-cluster theory including single and double excitations together with a perturbative treatment of triples has been used as starting point in composite schemes accounting for extrapolation to the complete basis-set limit as well as core-valence correlation effects to determine highly accurate molecular structures, fundamental vibrational frequencies, and rotational parameters. The available experimental data for acetyl cyanide allowed us to assess the reliability of our computations: structural, energetic, and spectroscopic properties have been obtained with an overall accuracy of about, or better than, 0.001 Å, 2 kcal/mol, 1-10 MHz, and 11 cm-1 for bond distances, adiabatic ionization potentials, rotational constants, and fundamental vibrational frequencies, respectively. We are therefore confident that the highly accurate spectroscopic data provided herein can be useful for guiding future experimental investigations and/or astronomical observations.

  17. Assessment of carboxyhemoglobin, hydrogen cyanide and methemoglobin in fire victims: a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Luis A; Giannuzzi, Leda

    2015-11-01

    To establish the cause of death, carboxyhemoglobin (COHb), total hemoglobin (tHb), methemoglobin (MetHb), and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) were quantified in the blood of fire victims. We analyzed 32 out of 33 blood samples from forensic autopsy cases in a disastrous polyurethane mattress fire, which caused the deaths of 33 inmates at a prison in Argentina in 2006. The cadaveric blood samples were collected by femoral vein puncture. These samples were analyzed using the IL80 CO-oximeter system for tHb, MetHb, and COHb levels and by microdiffusion for HCN and COHb levels. Blood alcohol (ethanol) and drugs were examined by headspace gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (HS-GC-FID) and GC-mass spectrometry (MS), respectively. Polyurethane mattress samples were analyzed according to the California 117 protocol. The saturation of COHb ranged from 10% to 43%, tHb from 2% to 19.7%, MetHb from 0.10% to 35.7%, and HCN from 0.24 to 15mg/L. These HCN values are higher than the lethal levels reported in the literature. Other toxic components routinely measured (ethanol, methanol, aldehydes, and other volatile compounds) gave negative results in the 32 cases. Neither drugs of abuse nor psychotropic drugs were detected. The results indicate that death in the 32 fire victims was probably caused in part by HCN, generated during the extensive polyurethane decomposition stimulated by a rapid increase in temperature. We also considered the influence of oxygen depletion and the formation of other volatile compounds such as NOx in this disaster, as well as pathological evidence demonstrating that heat was not the cause of death in all victims. Furthermore, statistical analysis showed that the percentage values of COHb and MetHb in the blood were not independent variables, with ?(2)=11.12 (theoretical ?(2)=4.09, degrees of freedom=12, and ?=0.05). However, no correlation was found between HCN and MetHb in the blood of the victims. This is the first report to assess the relationship between COHb and MetHb in forensic blood samples. We further discuss other factors that could lead to a lethal atmosphere generated by the fire and compare the data from this disaster with that of other published fire episodes. PMID:26426954

  18. Hydrogen Activation by Biomimetic [NiFe]-Hydrogenase Model Containing Protected Cyanide Cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Manor, Brian C.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Described are experiments that allow incorporation of cyanide cofactors and hydride substrate into active site models [NiFe]-hydrogenases (H2ases). Complexes of the type (CO)2(CN)2Fe(pdt)Ni(dxpe), (dxpe = dppe, 1; dxpe = dcpe, 2) bind the Lewis acid B(C6F5)3 (BArF3) to give the adducts (CO)2(CNBArF3)2Fe(pdt)Ni(dxpe), (1(BArF3)2, 2(BArF3)2). Upon decarbonylation using amine oxides, these adducts react with H2 to give hydrido derivatives Et4N[(CO)(CNBArF3)2Fe(H)(pdt)Ni(dxpe)], (dxpe = dppe, Et4N[H3(BArF3)2]; dxpe = dcpe, Et4N[H4(BArF3)2]). Crystallographic analysis shows that Et4N[H3(BArF3)2] generally resembles the active site of the enzyme in the reduced, hydride-containing states (Ni-C/R). The Fe-H…Ni center is unsymmetrical with rFe-H = 1.51(3) and rNi-H = 1.71(3) Å. Both crystallographic and 19F NMR analysis show that the CNBArF3? ligands occupy basal and apical sites. Unlike cationic Ni-Fe hydrides, [H3(BArF3)2]? and [H4(BArF3)2]? oxidize at mild potentials, near the Fc+/0 couple. Electrochemical measurements indicate that in the presence of base, [H3(BArF3)2]? catalyzes the oxidation of H2. NMR evidence indicates dihydrogen bonding between these anionic hydrides and ammonium salts, which is relevant to the mechanism of hydrogenogenesis. In the case of Et4N[H3(BArF3)2], strong acids such as HCl induce H2 release to give the chloride Et4N[(CO)(CNBArF3)2Fe(pdt)(Cl)Ni(dppe)]. PMID:23899049

  19. Mathematical foundation of quantum annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Satoshi; Nishimori, Hidetoshi

    2008-12-15

    Quantum annealing is a generic name of quantum algorithms that use quantum-mechanical fluctuations to search for the solution of an optimization problem. It shares the basic idea with quantum adiabatic evolution studied actively in quantum computation. The present paper reviews the mathematical and theoretical foundations of quantum annealing. In particular, theorems are presented for convergence conditions of quantum annealing to the target optimal state after an infinite-time evolution following the Schroedinger or stochastic (Monte Carlo) dynamics. It is proved that the same asymptotic behavior of the control parameter guarantees convergence for both the Schroedinger dynamics and the stochastic dynamics in spite of the essential difference of these two types of dynamics. Also described are the prescriptions to reduce errors in the final approximate solution obtained after a long but finite dynamical evolution of quantum annealing. It is shown there that we can reduce errors significantly by an ingenious choice of annealing schedule (time dependence of the control parameter) without compromising computational complexity qualitatively. A review is given on the derivation of the convergence condition for classical simulated annealing from the view point of quantum adiabaticity using a classical-quantum mapping.

  20. Foundations of support constraint machines.

    PubMed

    Gnecco, Giorgio; Gori, Marco; Melacci, Stefano; Sanguineti, Marcello

    2015-02-01

    The mathematical foundations of a new theory for the design of intelligent agents are presented. The proposed learning paradigm is centered around the concept of constraint, representing the interactions with the environment, and the parsimony principle. The classical regularization framework of kernel machines is naturally extended to the case in which the agents interact with a richer environment, where abstract granules of knowledge, compactly described by different linguistic formalisms, can be translated into the unified notion of constraint for defining the hypothesis set. Constrained variational calculus is exploited to derive general representation theorems that provide a description of the optimal body of the agent (i.e., the functional structure of the optimal solution to the learning problem), which is the basis for devising new learning algorithms. We show that regardless of the kind of constraints, the optimal body of the agent is a support constraint machine (SCM) based on representer theorems that extend classical results for kernel machines and provide new representations. In a sense, the expressiveness of constraints yields a semantic-based regularization theory, which strongly restricts the hypothesis set of classical regularization. Some guidelines to unify continuous and discrete computational mechanisms are given so as to accommodate in the same framework various kinds of stimuli, for example, supervised examples and logic predicates. The proposed view of learning from constraints incorporates classical learning from examples and extends naturally to the case in which the examples are subsets of the input space, which is related to learning propositional logic clauses. PMID:25380338