Science.gov

Sample records for cyano-bridged trimers mn2miii-m-iiicn6

  1. Cyano-bridged bimetallic complexes based on nitroprusside [Fe(CN) 5(NO)] 2- and [Cu(TAAB-macrocycle)] 2+: Synthesis, structure and thermal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Sheng-Wen; Li, Ming-Xing; Shao, Min; Liu, Hong-Jiang

    2007-09-01

    Two new cyano-bridged bimetallic complexes, [Cu(TAAB)Fe(CN) 5(NO)]·2H 2O ( 1) and [Mn(bpy) 2(H 2O)Fe(CN) 5(NO)]·H 2O ( 2) (where TAAB = tetrabenzo[ b, f, j, n][1,5,9,l3]tetraaza-cyclohexadecine and bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine), have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR spectra and TG-DSC analyses. Single crystal X-ray structure analyses revealed that the complex 1 has a cyano-bridged binuclear structure in which Cu(II) center is coordinated by tetraazacyclic TAAB ligand to form an intriguing saddle-shaped structure, and Fe(II) center is in an octahedral coordination environment with nitrosyl group trans to the cyano-bridge. In complex 2, Mn(II) center is cis six-coordinated and linked to nitroprusside though a bridging cyanide group to form a binuclear structure, while the nitrosyl group is cis to the cyano-bridge. The thermal stabilities of both complexes were investigated, which shows the nitrosyl and cyanide groups of nitroprusside released by two-steps in the temperature range of 200-380 °C.

  2. Magnetic anisotropy of [Mo(CN)7]4- anions and fragments of cyano-bridged magnetic networks.

    PubMed

    Chibotaru, Liviu F; Hendrickx, Marc F A; Clima, Sergiu; Larionova, Joulia; Ceulemans, Arnout

    2005-08-18

    Quantum chemistry calculations of CASSCF/CASPT2 level together with ligand field analysis are used for the investigation of magnetic anisotropy of [Mo(CN)7]4- complexes. We have considered three types of heptacyano environments: two ideal geometries, a pentagonal bipyramid and a capped trigonal prism, and the heptacyanomolybdate fragment of the cyano-bridged magnetic network K2[Mn(H2O)2]3[Mo(CN)7]2.6H2O. At all geometries the first excited Kramers doublet is found remarkably close to the ground one due to a small orbital energy gap in the ligand field spectrum, which ranges between a maximal value in the capped trigonal prism (800 cm(-1)) and zero in the pentagonal bipyramid. The small value of this gap explains (i) the axial form of the g tensor and (ii) the strong magnetic anisotropy even in strongly distorted complexes. Comparison with available experimental data for the g tensor of the mononuclear precursors reveals good agreement with the present calculations for the capped trigonal prismatic complex and a significant discrepancy for the pentagonal bipyramidal one. The calculations for the heptacyanomolybdate fragment of K2[Mn(H2O)2]3[Mo(CN)7]2.6H2O give g(perpendicular)/g(parallel) approximately 0.5 and the orientation of the local anisotropy axis close to the symmetry axis of an idealized pentagonal bipyramid. These findings are expected to be important for the understanding of the magnetism of anisotropic Mo(III)-Mn(II) cyano-bridged networks based on the [Mo(CN)7]4- building block. PMID:16834090

  3. Tuning the Origin of Magnetic Relaxation by Substituting the 3d or Rare-Earth Ions into Three Isostructural Cyano-Bridged 3d-4f Heterodinuclear Compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Guo, Zhen; Xie, Shuang; Li, Hui-Li; Zhu, Wen-Hua; Liu, Li; Dong, Xun-Qing; He, Wei-Xun; Ren, Jin-Chao; Liu, Ling-Zhi; Powell, Annie K

    2015-11-01

    Three isostructural cyano-bridged 3d-4f compounds, [YFe(CN)6(hep)2(H2O)4] (1), [DyFe(CN)6(hep)2(H2O)4] (2), and [DyCo(CN)6(hep)2(H2O)4] (3), were successfully assembled by site-targeted substitution of the 3d or rare-earth ions. All compounds have been structurally characterized to display slightly distorted pentagonal-bipyramidal local coordination geometry around the rare-earth ions. Magnetic analyses revealed negligible magnetic coupling in compound 1, antiferromagnetic intradimer interaction in 2, and weak ferromagnetic coupling through dipolar-dipolar interaction in 3. Under an applied direct-current (dc) field, 1 (Hdc = 2.5 kOe, τ0 = 1.3 × 10(-7) s, and Ueff/kB = 23 K) and 3 (Hdc = 2.0 kOe, τ0 = 7.1 × 10(-11) s, and Ueff/kB = 63 K) respectively indicated magnetic relaxation behavior based on a single [Fe(III)]LS ion and a Dy(III) ion; nevertheless, 2 (Hdc = 2.0 kOe, τ0 = 9.7 × 10(-8) s, and Ueff/kB = 23 K) appeared to be a single-molecule magnet based on a cyano-bridged DyFe dimer. Compound 1, which can be regarded as a single-ion magnet of the [Fe(III)]LS ion linked to a diamagnetic Y(III) ion in a cyano-bridged heterodimer, represents one of the rarely investigated examples based on a single Fe(III) ion explored in magnetic relaxation behavior. It demonstrated that the introduction of intradimer magnetic interaction of 2 through a cyano bridge between Dy(III) and [Fe(III)]LS ions negatively affects the energy barrier and χ″(T) peak temperature compared to 3. PMID:26473654

  4. Two dimensional cyano-bridged hetero-metallic coordination polymers containing metal⋅⋅⋅π interactions.

    PubMed

    Karaağaç, Dursun; Kürkçüoğlu, Güneş Süheyla; Yeşilel, Okan Zafer; Hökelek, Tuncer

    2014-01-01

    Three cyano bridged hetero-metallic complexes of general formula, [Cu(NH3)2(μ-ampy)M(μ-CN)2(CN)2]n [ampy=4-aminomethylpyridine, M=Ni(II) (1), Pd(II) (2) and Pt(II) (3)] have been synthesized and characterized by vibrational (FT-IR and Raman) spectroscopy, single crystal X-ray diffraction, thermal analyses and elemental analyses. The complexes crystallize in triclinic system with space group P-1. In all complexes, M(II) ions are coordinated by four cyano ligands, and four N atoms in the equatorial plane around the Cu atom form a slightly distorted square-planar arrangement, while the slightly distorted octahedral coordination is completed by the cyanide N atoms in the axial positions. In one-dimensional structures of all the complexes, [Cu(ampy)](2+) cations and [M(CN)4](2-) anions are linked via bridging cyano ligands. The adjacent one-dimensional structures form a 2D network to connect by the μ-ampy bridging ligands. The 2D layers are further linked by metal⋯π and hydrogen bonding interactions to generate a three dimensional network. PMID:24239763

  5. Towards Acid-Tolerated Ethanol Dehydration: Chitosan-Based Mixed Matrix Membranes Containing Cyano-Bridged Coordination Polymer Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Wu, C-W; Kang, Chao-Hsiang; Lin, Yi-Feng; Tung, Kuo-Lun; Deng, Yu-Heng; Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M; Suzuki, Norihiro; Yamauchi, Yusuke

    2016-04-01

    Prussian blue (PB) nanoparticles, one of many cyano-bridged coordination polymers, are successfully incorporated into chitosan (CS) polymer to prepare PB/CS mixed matrix membranes (MMMs). The PB nanoparticles are uniformly distributed in the MMMs without the collapse of the original PB structure. As-prepared PB/CS MMMs are used for ethanol dehydration at 25 °C in the pervaporation process. The effect of loading PB in CS matrix on pervaporation performance is carefully investigated. The PB/CS membrane with 30 wt% PB loading shows the best performance with a permeate flux of 614 g. m-2 . h-1 and a separation factor of 1472. The pervaporation using our PB/CS membranes exhibits outstanding performance in comparison with the previously reported CS-based membranes and MMMs. Furthermore, the addition of PB allows PB/CS MMMs to be tolerant of acidic environment. The present work demonstrates good pervaporation performance of PB/CS MMMs for the separation of an ethanol/water (90:10 in wt%) solution. Our new system provides an opportunity for dehydration of bioethanol in the future. PMID:27451778

  6. Investigation of cyano-bridged coordination nanoparticles Gd(3+)/[Fe(CN)6](3-)/D-mannitol as T1-weighted MRI contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Perrier, M; Gallud, A; Ayadi, A; Kennouche, S; Porredon, C; Gary-Bobo, M; Larionova, J; Goze-Bac, Ch; Zanca, M; Garcia, M; Basile, I; Long, J; de Lapuente, J; Borras, M; Guari, Y

    2015-07-28

    Cyano-bridged Gd(3+)/[Fe(CN)6](3-) coordination polymer nanoparticles of 3-4 nm stabilized with D-mannitol presenting a high r1 relaxivity value of 11.4 mM(-1) s(-1) were investigated in vivo as contrast agents (CA) for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). They allow an increase of the MR image contrast and can act as an efficient intravascular T1 CA with a relatively long blood-circulation lifetime (60 min) without specific toxicity. PMID:25967733

  7. Investigation of cyano-bridged coordination nanoparticles Gd3+/[Fe(CN)6]3-/d-mannitol as T1-weighted MRI contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrier, M.; Gallud, A.; Ayadi, A.; Kennouche, S.; Porredon, C.; Gary-Bobo, M.; Larionova, J.; Goze-Bac, Ch.; Zanca, M.; Garcia, M.; Basile, I.; Long, J.; de Lapuente, J.; Borras, M.; Guari, Y.

    2015-07-01

    Cyano-bridged Gd3+/[Fe(CN)6]3- coordination polymer nanoparticles of 3-4 nm stabilized with d-mannitol presenting a high r1 relaxivity value of 11.4 mM-1 s-1 were investigated in vivo as contrast agents (CA) for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). They allow an increase of the MR image contrast and can act as an efficient intravascular T1 CA with a relatively long blood-circulation lifetime (60 min) without specific toxicity.Cyano-bridged Gd3+/[Fe(CN)6]3- coordination polymer nanoparticles of 3-4 nm stabilized with d-mannitol presenting a high r1 relaxivity value of 11.4 mM-1 s-1 were investigated in vivo as contrast agents (CA) for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). They allow an increase of the MR image contrast and can act as an efficient intravascular T1 CA with a relatively long blood-circulation lifetime (60 min) without specific toxicity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and procedures, toxicological data, physical characterization. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr01557j

  8. A theoretical study on the molecular structure and vibrational (FT-IR and Raman) spectra of cyano-bridged heteronuclear polymeric complex of triethylenetetramine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kürkçüoğlu, Güneş Süheyla; Çetinkaya, Fulya; Arslan, Taner

    The cyano bridged complex of triethylenetetramine was characterized by FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray single crystal diffraction analysis. The molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies of the complex in the ground state have been calculated by using B3LYP density functional method with LANL2DZ basis set. A good correlation was found via comparison of the experimental and theoretical vibrational frequencies of complex. The complex of the type [Zn(teta)Ni(μ-CN)2(CN)2]n has been studied in the 4000-250 cm-1 region and assignment of all the observed bands were made. The analysis of the FT-IR and Raman spectra indicates that there are some structure spectra correlations.

  9. Photocatalytic Hydroxylation of Benzene by Dioxygen to Phenol with a Cyano-Bridged Complex Containing Fe(II) and Ru(II) Incorporated in Mesoporous Silica-Alumina.

    PubMed

    Aratani, Yusuke; Oyama, Kohei; Suenobu, Tomoyoshi; Yamada, Yusuke; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2016-06-20

    Photocatalytic hydroxylation of benzene to phenol was achieved by using O2 as an oxidant as well as an oxygen source with a cyano-bridged polynuclear metal complex containing Fe(II) and Ru(II) incorporated in mesoporous silica-alumina ([Fe(H2O)3]2[Ru(CN)6]@sAl-MCM-41). An apparent turnover number (TON) of phenol production per the monomer unit of [Fe(H2O)3]2[Ru(CN)6] was 41 for 59 h. The cyano-bridged polynuclear metal complex, [Fe(H2O)3]2[Ru(CN)6], exhibited catalytic activity for thermal hydroxylation of benzene by H2O2 in acetonitrile (MeCN), where the apparent TON of phenol production reached 393 for 60 h. The apparent TON increased to 2500 for 114 h by incorporating [Fe(H2O)3]2[Ru(CN)6] in sAl-MCM-41. Additionally, [Fe(H2O)3]2[Ru(CN)6] acts as a water oxidation catalyst by using [Ru(bpy)3](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) and Na2S2O8 as a photosensitizer and a sacrificial electron acceptor as evidenced by (18)O-isotope labeling experiments. Photoirradiation of an O2-saturated MeCN solution containing [Fe(H2O)3]2[Ru(CN)6]@sAl-MCM-41 and scandium ion provided H2O2 formation, where photoexcited [Ru(CN)6](4-) moiety reduces O2 as indicated by laser flash photolysis measurements. Thus, hydroxylation of benzene to phenol using molecular oxygen photocatalyzed by [Fe(H2O)3]2[Ru(CN)6] occurred via a two-step route; (1) molecular oxygen was photocatalytically reduced to peroxide by using water as an electron donor, and then (2) peroxide thus formed is used as an oxidant for hydroxylation of benzene. PMID:27265780

  10. A cyano-bridged single-molecule magnet: slow magnetic relaxation in a trigonal prismatic MnMo(6)(CN)(18) cluster.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Jennifer J; Hee, Allan G; Long, Jeffrey R

    2002-07-01

    We report the synthesis of the first well-documented example of a cyano-bridged single-molecule magnet. An assembly reaction parallel to that employed in producing the trigonal prismatic [(Me(3)tacn)(6)MnCr(6)(CN)(18)](2+) (Me(3)tacn = N,N',N"-trimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane) cluster affords K[(Me(3)tacn)(6)MnMo(6)(CN)(18)](ClO(4))(3) (1), containing an analogous molybdenum(III)-substituted cluster. Fits to the DC magnetic susceptibility and magnetization data for 1 show that the MnMo(6) cluster possesses weak antiferromagnetic coupling (J = -6.7 cm(-1)), leading to an S = (13)/(2) ground state with significantly enhanced magnetic anisotropy (D = -0.33 cm(-1) and E = -0.018 cm(-1)). Consistent with these results, AC magnetic susceptibility measurements show the molecule to exhibit slow magnetic relaxation indicative of a single-molecule magnet with an energy barrier of 10 cm(-1) for spin reversal. PMID:12083909

  11. Assembly of azido- or cyano-bridged binuclear complexes containing the bulky [Mn(phen)2]2+ building block: syntheses, crystal structures, and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Ni, Zhong-Hai; Kou, Hui-Zhong; Zheng, Lei; Zhao, Yi-Hua; Zhang, Li-Fang; Wang, Ru-Ji; Cui, Ai-Li; Sato, Osamu

    2005-06-27

    Two new cyano-bridged heterobinuclear complexes, [Mn(II)(phen)2Cl][Fe(III)(bpb)(CN)2] x 0.5CH3CH2OH x 1.5H2O (1) and [Mn(II)(phen)2Cl][Cr(III)(bpb)(CN)2] x 2H2O (2) [phen = 1,10-phenanthroline; bpb(2-) = 1,2-bis(pyridine-2-carboxamido)benzenate], and four novel azido-bridged Mn(II) dimeric complexes, [Mn2(phen)4(mu(1,1)-N3)2][M(III)(bpb)(CN)2]2 x H2O [M = Fe (3), Cr (4), Co (5)] and [Mn2(phen)4(mu(1,3)-N3)(N3)2]BPh4 x 0.5H2O (6), have been synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and magnetic studies. Complexes 1 and 2 comprise [Mn(phen)2Cl]+ and [M(bpb)(CN)2]- units connected by one cyano ligand of [M(bpb)(CN)2]-. Complexes 3-5 are doubly end-on (EO) azido-bridged Mn(II) binuclear complexes with two [M(bpb)(CN)2]- molecules acting as charge-compensating anions. However, the Mn(II) ions in complex 6 are linked by a single end-to-end (EE) azido bridging ligand with one large free BPh4(-) group as the charge-balancing anion. The magnetic coupling between Mn(II) and Fe(III) or Cr(III) in complexes 1 and 2 was found to be antiferromagnetic with J(MnFe) = -2.68(3) cm(-1) and J(MnCr) = -4.55(1) cm(-1) on the basis of the Hamiltonian H = -JS(Mn)S(M) (M = Fe or Cr). The magnetic interactions between two Mn(II) ions in 3-5 are ferromagnetic in nature with the magnetic coupling constants of 1.15(3), 1.05(2), and 1.27(2) cm(-1) (H = -JS(Mn1)S(Mn2)), respectively. The single EE azido-bridged dimeric complex 6 manifests antiferromagnetic interaction with J = -2.29(4) cm(-1) (H = -JS(Mn1)S(Mn2)). Magneto-structural correlationship on the EO azido-bridged Mn(II) dimers has been investigated. PMID:15962981

  12. Cyano-bridged coordination polymer hydrogel-derived Sn-Fe binary oxide nanohybrids with structural diversity: from 3D, 2D, to 2D/1D and enhanced lithium-storage performance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weiyu; Zhu, Xiaoshu; Chen, Xuguang; Zhou, Yiming; Tang, Yawen; Ding, Liangxin; Wu, Ping

    2016-05-14

    Metal oxide nanohybrids with uniform dimensions and controlled architectures possess unique compositional and structural superiorities, and thus harbor promising potential for a series of applications in energy, catalysis, and sensing systems. Herein, we propose a facile, general, and scalable cyano-bridged coordination polymer hydrogel-derived thermal-oxidation route for the construction of main-group metal and transition-metal heterometallic oxide nanohybrids with controlled constituents and architectures. The formation of Sn-Fe binary oxide nanohybrids has been demonstrated as an example by using cyano-bridged Sn(iv)-Fe(ii) bimetallic coordination polymer hydrogels (i.e., SnCl4-K4Fe(CN)6 cyanogels, Sn-Fe cyanogels) as precursors. The physicochemical properties of Sn-Fe cyanogels with different Sn/Fe ratios have been systematically examined, and it is found that perfect Sn-Fe cyanogels without unbridged Sn(iv) or Fe(ii) can be formed with Sn/Fe ratios from 2 : 1 to 1 : 2. More importantly, the simple adjustment of Sn/Fe ratios in the Sn-Fe cyanogel precursors can realize flexible dimensional control of the Sn-Fe binary oxide nanohybrids, and 2D/1D SnO2-Fe2O3 hierarchitectures, 2D SnO2-Fe2O3 nanosheets, and 3D SnO2-Fe2O3 networks have been synthesized using the Sn-Fe 1 : 2, Sn-Fe 1 : 1, and Sn-Fe 2 : 1 cyanogels as precursors, respectively. To demonstrate their compositional/structural superiorities and potential applications, the lithium-storage utilization of the Sn-Fe binary oxide nanohybrids has been selected as an objective application, and the nanohybrids exhibit Sn/Fe ratio-dependent lithium-storage performance. As a representative example, the 2D/1D SnO2-Fe2O3 hierarchitectures manifest markedly enhanced Li-storage performance in terms of reversible capacities and cycling stability in comparison with their constituent units, i.e., bare SnO2 nanosheets and Fe2O3 nanorods. The proposed cyanogel-derived thermal-oxidation strategy could

  13. Cyano-bridged coordination polymer hydrogel-derived Sn-Fe binary oxide nanohybrids with structural diversity: from 3D, 2D, to 2D/1D and enhanced lithium-storage performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiyu; Zhu, Xiaoshu; Chen, Xuguang; Zhou, Yiming; Tang, Yawen; Ding, Liangxin; Wu, Ping

    2016-05-01

    Metal oxide nanohybrids with uniform dimensions and controlled architectures possess unique compositional and structural superiorities, and thus harbor promising potential for a series of applications in energy, catalysis, and sensing systems. Herein, we propose a facile, general, and scalable cyano-bridged coordination polymer hydrogel-derived thermal-oxidation route for the construction of main-group metal and transition-metal heterometallic oxide nanohybrids with controlled constituents and architectures. The formation of Sn-Fe binary oxide nanohybrids has been demonstrated as an example by using cyano-bridged Sn(iv)-Fe(ii) bimetallic coordination polymer hydrogels (i.e., SnCl4-K4Fe(CN)6 cyanogels, Sn-Fe cyanogels) as precursors. The physicochemical properties of Sn-Fe cyanogels with different Sn/Fe ratios have been systematically examined, and it is found that perfect Sn-Fe cyanogels without unbridged Sn(iv) or Fe(ii) can be formed with Sn/Fe ratios from 2 : 1 to 1 : 2. More importantly, the simple adjustment of Sn/Fe ratios in the Sn-Fe cyanogel precursors can realize flexible dimensional control of the Sn-Fe binary oxide nanohybrids, and 2D/1D SnO2-Fe2O3 hierarchitectures, 2D SnO2-Fe2O3 nanosheets, and 3D SnO2-Fe2O3 networks have been synthesized using the Sn-Fe 1 : 2, Sn-Fe 1 : 1, and Sn-Fe 2 : 1 cyanogels as precursors, respectively. To demonstrate their compositional/structural superiorities and potential applications, the lithium-storage utilization of the Sn-Fe binary oxide nanohybrids has been selected as an objective application, and the nanohybrids exhibit Sn/Fe ratio-dependent lithium-storage performance. As a representative example, the 2D/1D SnO2-Fe2O3 hierarchitectures manifest markedly enhanced Li-storage performance in terms of reversible capacities and cycling stability in comparison with their constituent units, i.e., bare SnO2 nanosheets and Fe2O3 nanorods. The proposed cyanogel-derived thermal-oxidation strategy could open up new

  14. Synthesis, spectroscopic, thermal and structural properties of [M(3-aminopyridine)2Ni(μ-CN)2(CN)2]n (M(II) = Co and Cu) heteropolynuclear cyano-bridged complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartal, Zeki

    2016-01-01

    Two novel cyano-bridged heteropolynuclear complexes, [Co(3-aminopyridine)2Ni(μ-CN)2(CN)2]n and [Cu(3-aminopyridine)2Ni(μ-CN)2(CN)2]n have been synthesized and characterized by elemental, thermal, FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopies. The structures of complexes have been determined by X-ray powder diffraction. The FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of complexes have been recorded in the region of 3500-400 cm-1 and 3500-100 cm-1, respectively. General information was acquired about structural properties of these complexes from FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra by considering changes at characteristic peaks of the cyano group and 3AP. The splitting of the ν(Ctbnd N) stretching bands in the FT-IR spectra for complexes indicates the presence of terminal and bridging cyanides. The thermal behaviors of these complexes have been also investigated in the range of 25-950 °C using TG and DTG methods. Magnetic susceptibility measurements were made at room temperature using Gouy-balance.

  15. Trimerization of aromatic nitriles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, L. C. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Triazine compounds and cross-linked polymer compositions were made by heating aromatic nitriles to a temperature in the range of about 100 C to about 700 C, in the presence of a catalyst or mixture of catalysts. Aromatic nitrile-modified (terminated and/or appended) imide, benzimidazole, imidazopyrrolone, quinoxaline, and other condensation type prepolymers or their precopolymers were made which were trimerized with or without a filler by the aforementioned catalytic trimerization process.

  16. Metalloporphines: Dimers and Trimers.

    PubMed

    Jentzen, Walter; Shelnutt, John A; Scheidt, W Robert

    2016-06-20

    Procedures for the purification and subsequent crystallization of the slightly soluble four-coordinate metallporphines, the simplest possible porphyrin derivatives, are described. Crystals of the porphine derivatives of cobalt(II), copper(II), platinum(II), and two polymorphs of zinc(II) were obtained. Analysis of the crystal and molecular structures shows that all except the platinum(II) derivative form an unusual trimeric species in the solid state. The isomorphous cobalt(II), copper(II), and one zinc(II) polymorph pack in the unit cell to form dimers as well as the trimers. Interplanar spacings between porphine rings are similar in both the dimers and trimers and range between 3.24 and 3.37 Å. Porphine rings are strongly overlapped with lateral shifts between ring centers in both the dimers and trimers with values between 1.52 and 1.70 Å or in Category S as originally defined by Scheidt and Lee. Periodic trends in the M-Np bond distances parallel those observed previously for tetraphenyl- and octaethylporphyrin derivatives. PMID:27276239

  17. Trimerization of Phenyl Cyanate Ester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallaka, Madhusudhan Reddy; Simon, Sindee L.

    2015-03-01

    The kinetics of phenyl cyanate ester trimerization is studied in the bulk using differential scanning calorimetry. Dynamic experiments for different heating rates are analyzed for the activation energy using the model-free Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose(KAS) isoconversion method. The activation energy and other kinetic parameters are also obtained by fitting the dynamic data to a first order autocatalytic reaction model, which well describes the experimental data. The activation energy obtained from the KAS isoconversion method (70.1 kJ/mol) is in good agreement with that obtained from the kinetic model (73.2 kJ/mol) and is much lower than the more bulky cyanate esters studied in our laboratory, which have activation energies of approximately 95 kJ/mol. In addition, the rate constant for the phenyl cyanate ester is one to two orders higher than the bulkier cyanate esters in the temperature range of 200 to 300°C. Further elucidation of the dynamic experiments revealed a strong dependence of the reaction kinetics on the sample weight. Future work aims to understand this finding.

  18. Trimeric Autotransporters Require Trimerization of the Passenger Domain for Stability and Adhesive Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cotter, Shane E.; Surana, Neeraj K.; Grass, Susan; St. Geme, Joseph W.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, structural studies have identified a number of bacterial, viral, and eukaryotic adhesive proteins that have a trimeric architecture. The prototype examples in bacteria are the Haemophilus influenzae Hia adhesin and the Yersinia enterocolitica YadA adhesin. Both Hia and YadA are members of the trimeric-autotransporter subfamily and are characterized by an internal passenger domain that harbors adhesive activity and a short C-terminal translocator domain that inserts into the outer membrane and facilitates delivery of the passenger domain to the bacterial surface. In this study, we examined the relationship between trimerization of the Hia and YadA passenger domains and the capacity for adhesive activity. We found that subunit-subunit interactions and stable trimerization are essential for native folding and stability and ultimately for full-level adhesive activity. These results raise the possibility that disruption of the trimeric architecture of trimeric autotransporters, and possibly other trimeric adhesins, may be an effective strategy to eliminate adhesive activity. PMID:16855229

  19. A New Approach to Produce HIV-1 Envelope Trimers

    PubMed Central

    AlSalmi, Wadad; Mahalingam, Marthandan; Ananthaswamy, Neeti; Hamlin, Christopher; Flores, Dalia; Gao, Guofen; Rao, Venigalla B.

    2015-01-01

    The trimeric envelope spike of HIV-1 mediates virus entry into human cells. The exposed part of the trimer, gp140, consists of two noncovalently associated subunits, gp120 and gp41 ectodomain. A recombinant vaccine that mimics the native trimer might elicit entry-blocking antibodies and prevent virus infection. However, preparation of authentic HIV-1 trimers has been challenging. Recently, an affinity column containing the broadly neutralizing antibody 2G12 has been used to capture recombinant gp140 and prepare trimers from clade A BG505 that naturally produces stable trimers. However, this antibody-based approach may not be as effective for the diverse HIV-1 strains with different epitope signatures. Here, we report a new and simple approach to produce HIV-1 envelope trimers. The C terminus of gp140 was attached to Strep-tag II with a long linker separating the tag from the massive trimer base and glycan shield. This allowed capture of nearly homogeneous gp140 directly from the culture medium. Cleaved, uncleaved, and fully or partially glycosylated trimers from different clade viruses were produced. Extensive biochemical characterizations showed that cleavage of gp140 was not essential for trimerization, but it triggered a conformational change that channels trimers into correct glycosylation pathways, generating compact three-blade propeller-shaped trimers. Uncleaved trimers entered aberrant pathways, resulting in hyperglycosylation, nonspecific cross-linking, and conformational heterogeneity. Even the cleaved trimers showed microheterogeneity in gp41 glycosylation. These studies established a broadly applicable HIV-1 trimer production system as well as generating new insights into their assembly and maturation that collectively bear on the HIV-1 vaccine design. PMID:26088135

  20. Immunosilencing a Highly Immunogenic Protein Trimerization Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Sliepen, Kwinten; van Montfort, Thijs; Melchers, Mark; Isik, Gözde; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic proteins and protein subunit vaccines contain heterologous trimerization domains, such as the widely used GCN4-based isoleucine zipper (IZ) and the T4 bacteriophage fibritin foldon (Fd) trimerization domains. We found that these domains induced potent anti-IZ or anti-Fd antibody responses in animals when fused to an HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) immunogen. To dampen IZ-induced responses, we constructed an IZ domain containing four N-linked glycans (IZN4) to shield the underlying protein surface. When fused to two different vaccine antigens, HIV-1 Env and influenza hemagglutinin (HA), IZN4 strongly reduced the antibody responses against the IZ, but did not affect the antibody titers against Env or HA. Silencing of immunogenic multimerization domains with glycans might be relevant for therapeutic proteins and protein vaccines. PMID:25635058

  1. Creation of Hybrid Nanorods From Sequences of Natural Trimeric Fibrous Proteins Using the Fibritin Trimerization Motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanikolopoulou, Katerina; van Raaij, Mark J.; Mitraki, Anna

    Stable, artificial fibrous proteins that can be functionalized open new avenues in fields such as bionanomaterials design and fiber engineering. An important source of inspiration for the creation of such proteins are natural fibrous proteins such as collagen, elastin, insect silks, and fibers from phages and viruses. The fibrous parts of this last class of proteins usually adopt trimeric, β-stranded structural folds and are appended to globular, receptor-binding domains. It has been recently shown that the globular domains are essential for correct folding and trimerization and can be successfully substituted by a very small (27-amino acid) trimerization motif from phage T4 fibritin. The hybrid proteins are correctly folded nanorods that can withstand extreme conditions. When the fibrous part derives from the adenovirus fiber shaft, different tissue-targeting specificities can be engineered into the hybrid proteins, which therefore can be used as gene therapy vectors. The integration of such stable nanorods in devices is also a big challenge in the field of biomechanical design. The fibritin foldon domain is a versatile trimerization motif and can be combined with a variety of fibrous motifs, such as coiled-coil, collagenous, and triple β-stranded motifs, provided the appropriate linkers are used. The combination of different motifs within the same fibrous molecule to create stable rods with multiple functions can even be envisioned. We provide a comprehensive overview of the experimental procedures used for designing, creating, and characterizing hybrid fibrous nanorods using the fibritin trimerization motif.

  2. Quantum gases in trimerized kagome lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Damski, B.; Fehrmann, H.; Everts, H.-U.; Baranov, M.; Santos, L.; Lewenstein, M.

    2005-11-15

    We study low-temperature properties of atomic gases in trimerized optical kagome lattices. The laser arrangements that can be used to create these lattices are briefly described. We also present explicit results for the coupling constants of the generalized Hubbard models that can be realized in such lattices. In the case of a single-component Bose gas the existence of a Mott insulator phase with fractional numbers of particles per trimer is verified in a mean-field approach. The main emphasis of the paper is on an atomic spinless interacting Fermi gas in the trimerized kagome lattice with two fermions per site. This system is shown to be described by a quantum spin-1/2 model on the triangular lattice with couplings that depend on the bond directions. We investigate this model by means of exact diagonalization. Our key finding is that the system exhibits nonstandard properties of a quantum spin-liquid crystal: it combines planar antiferromagnetic order in the ground state with an exceptionally large number of low-energy excitations. The possibilities of experimental verification of our theoretical results are critically discussed.

  3. Crystal structure of a soluble cleaved HIV-1 envelope trimer.

    PubMed

    Julien, Jean-Philippe; Cupo, Albert; Sok, Devin; Stanfield, Robyn L; Lyumkis, Dmitry; Deller, Marc C; Klasse, Per-Johan; Burton, Dennis R; Sanders, Rogier W; Moore, John P; Ward, Andrew B; Wilson, Ian A

    2013-12-20

    HIV-1 entry into CD4(+) target cells is mediated by cleaved envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimers that have been challenging to characterize structurally. Here, we describe the crystal structure at 4.7 angstroms of a soluble, cleaved Env trimer that is stabilized and antigenically near-native (termed the BG505 SOSIP.664 gp140 trimer) in complex with a potent broadly neutralizing antibody, PGT122. The structure shows a prefusion state of gp41, the interaction between the component gp120 and gp41 subunits, and how a close association between the gp120 V1/V2/V3 loops stabilizes the trimer apex around the threefold axis. The complete epitope of PGT122 on the trimer involves gp120 V1, V3, and several surrounding glycans. This trimer structure advances our understanding of how Env functions and is presented to the immune system, and provides a blueprint for structure-based vaccine design. PMID:24179159

  4. Functional Characterization of Burkholderia pseudomallei Trimeric Autotransporters

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Cristine G.; Byrd, Matthew S.

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a tier 1 select agent and the causative agent of melioidosis, a severe and often fatal disease with symptoms ranging from acute pneumonia and septic shock to a chronic infection characterized by abscess formation in the lungs, liver, and spleen. Autotransporters (ATs) are exoproteins belonging to the type V secretion system family, with many playing roles in pathogenesis. The genome of B. pseudomallei strain 1026b encodes nine putative trimeric AT proteins, of which only four have been described. Using a bioinformatic approach, we annotated putative domains within each trimeric AT protein, excluding the well-studied BimA protein, and found short repeated sequences unique to Burkholderia species, as well as an unexpectedly large proportion of ATs with extended signal peptide regions (ESPRs). To characterize the role of trimeric ATs in pathogenesis, we constructed disruption or deletion mutations in each of eight AT-encoding genes and evaluated the resulting strains for adherence to, invasion of, and plaque formation in A549 cells. The majority of the ATs (and/or the proteins encoded downstream) contributed to adherence to and efficient invasion of A549 cells. Using a BALB/c mouse model of infection, we determined the contributions of each AT to bacterial burdens in the lungs, liver, and spleen. At 48 h postinoculation, only one strain, Bp340::pDbpaC, demonstrated a defect in dissemination and/or survival in the liver, indicating that BpaC is required for wild-type virulence in this model. PMID:23716608

  5. What is the shape of the helium trimer? A comparison with the neon and argon trimers.

    PubMed

    Bressanini, Dario; Morosi, Gabriele

    2011-10-13

    Despite its apparent simplicity and extensive theoretical investigations, the issue of what is the shape of the helium trimer is still debated in the literature. After reviewing previous conflicting interpretations of computational studies, we introduce the angle-angle distribution function as a tool to discuss in a simple way the shape of any trimer. We compute this function along with many different geometrical distributions using variational and diffusion Monte Carlo methods. We compare them with the corresponding ones for the neon and argon trimers. Our analysis shows that while Ne(3) and Ar(3) fluctuate around an equilibrium structure that is an equilateral triangle, (4)He(3) shows an extremely broad angle-angle distribution function, and all kinds of three-atom configurations must be taken into account in its description. Classifying (4)He(3) as either equilateral or linear or any other particular shape, as was done in the past, is not sensible, because in this case the intuitive notion of equilibrium structure is ill defined. Our results could help the interpretation of future experiments aimed at measuring the geometrical properties of the helium trimer. PMID:21894924

  6. Random sequential adsorption of trimers and hexamers.

    PubMed

    Cieśla, Michał; Barbasz, Jakub

    2013-12-01

    Adsorption of trimers and hexamers built of identical spheres was studied numerically using the random sequential adsorption (RSA) algorithm. Particles were adsorbed on a two-dimensional, flat and homogeneous surface. Numerical simulations allowed us to determine the maximal random coverage ratio, RSA kinetics as well as the available surface function (ASF), which is crucial for determining the kinetics of the adsorption process obtained experimentally. Additionally, the density autocorrelation function was measured. All the results were compared with previous results obtained for spheres, dimers and tetramers. PMID:24193213

  7. Action Spectroscopy and Dissociation Energy of Ammonia Trimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heid, Cornelia G.; Case, Amanda S.; Western, Colin M.; Crim, F. Fleming

    2012-06-01

    We have investigated the energy dependence for the vibrational predissociation of ammonia trimer, (NH_3)_3 → (NH_3)_2 + NH_3, using infrared-action spectroscopy. The action spectra come from detecting specific rovibrational states of the monomer fragment via (2+1) resonance enhanced multiphoton excitation (REMPI) while scanning the IR excitation laser over the NH stretch transitions of the trimer as well as the dimer. The relative intensities of the dimer and trimer features in the action spectra depend on the amount of energy available for breaking the hydrogen bonds in the clusters. For example, the action spectra of ammonia fragments with large amounts of internal energy (v_2=3) show almost no trimer contribution since there is not enough energy available to break two bonds in the cyclic trimer. The action spectra for fragments with low internal energies (v_2=1), on the other hand, exhibit a substantial trimer component as more energy remains available to dissociate the cluster. Using the threshold at which the trimer feature becomes apparent in our spectra as an upper limit (Edissmax = hνvib-Eint(NH_3)), we determine the dissociation energy of ammonia trimer to be in the range between 1700-1800 cm-1. This range agrees well with theoretical predictions.

  8. Trimerization of monocyanate ester in nanopores.

    PubMed

    Koh, Yung P; Simon, Sindee L

    2010-06-17

    The effects of nanoconfinement on the reaction kinetics and properties of a monocyanate ester and the resulting cyanurate trimer are studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). On the basis of both dynamic heating scans and isothermal reaction studies, the reaction rate is found to increase with decreasing nanopore size without a change in reaction mechanism. Both the monocyanate ester reactant and cyanurate product show reduced glass transition temperatures (T(g)s) as compared to the bulk; the T(g) depression increases with conversion and is more pronounced for the fully reacted product, suggesting that molecular stiffness influences the magnitude of nanoconfinement effects. Our results are consistent with the accelerated reaction and the T(g) depression found previously for the nanoconfined difunctional cyanate ester, supporting the supposition that intracyclization is not the origin of these effects. PMID:20496921

  9. Recombinant HIV envelope trimer selects for quaternary-dependent antibodies targeting the trimer apex

    PubMed Central

    Sok, Devin; van Gils, Marit J.; Pauthner, Matthias; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Saye-Francisco, Karen L.; Hsueh, Jessica; Briney, Bryan; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Le, Khoa M.; Lee, Peter S.; Hua, Yuanzi; Seaman, Michael S.; Moore, John P.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Burton, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) targeting the trimer apex of HIV envelope are favored candidates for vaccine design and immunotherapy because of their great neutralization breadth and potency. However, methods of isolating bnAbs against this site have been limited by the quaternary nature of the epitope region. Here we report the use of a recombinant HIV envelope trimer, BG505 SOSIP.664 gp140, as an affinity reagent to isolate quaternary-dependent bnAbs from the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of a chronically infected donor. The newly isolated bnAbs, named “PGDM1400–1412,” show a wide range of neutralization breadth and potency. One of these variants, PGDM1400, is exceptionally broad and potent with cross-clade neutralization coverage of 83% at a median IC50 of 0.003 µg/mL. Overall, our results highlight the utility of BG505 SOSIP.664 gp140 as a tool for the isolation of quaternary-dependent antibodies and reveal a mosaic of antibody responses against the trimer apex within a clonal family. PMID:25422458

  10. HIV Neutralizing Antibodies Induced by Native-like Envelope Trimers

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Rogier W.; van Gils, Marit J.; Derking, Ronald; Sok, Devin; Ketas, Thomas J.; Burger, Judith A.; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Cupo, Albert; Simonich, Cassandra; Goo, Leslie; Arendt, Heather; Kim, Helen J.; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Pugach, Pavel; Williams, Melissa; Debnath, Gargi; Moldt, Brian; van Breemen, Mariëlle J.; Isik, Gözde; Medina-Ramírez, Max; Back, Jaap Willem; Koff, Wayne; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Rakasz, Eva G.; Seaman, Michael S.; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly K.; Klasse, Per Johan; LaBranche, Celia; Schief, William R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Overbaugh, Julie; Burton, Dennis R.; Ward, Andrew B.; Montefiori, David C.; Dean, Hansi; Moore, John P.

    2015-01-01

    A challenge for HIV-1 immunogen design is inducing neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against neutralization-resistant (Tier-2) viruses that dominate human transmissions. We show that a soluble recombinant HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimer that adopts a native conformation (BG505 SOSIP.664) induced NAbs potently against the sequence-matched Tier-2 virus in rabbits and similar but weaker responses in macaques. The trimer also consistently induced cross-reactive NAbs against more sensitive (Tier-1) viruses. Tier-2 NAbs recognized conformational epitopes that differed between animals and in some cases overlapped with those recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), whereas Tier-1 responses targeted linear V3 epitopes. A second trimer, B41 SOSIP.664, also induced a strong autologous Tier-2 NAb response in rabbits. Thus, native-like trimers represent a promising starting point for developing HIV-1 vaccines aimed at inducing bNAbs. PMID:26089353

  11. Analytic representation of the Efimov effect in the helium trimer

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, Lawrence L.; Blinder, S.M.

    2004-06-01

    Exact solutions for the low-temperature helium dimer and trimer, {sup 4}He{sub 2} and {sup 4}He{sub 3}, are derived, based on our {delta} function model for the interatomic potential. For the trimer, the Faddeev equations are shown to be separable in hyperspherical coordinates, with the S-wave alone giving an exact solution. The parameters {lambda}{sub 0} and r{sub 0} are fitted to accurate computations on the dimer and trimer. Excited states of the trimer are shown to exhibit the Efimov effect, whereby artificially reducing the strength of the two-body potential causes an infinite number of weakly-bound levels to condense out of the continuum. All the features anticipated by Efimov are quantitatively reproduced within our model. Since short-range details of the intermolecular forces are not relevant, our results can be considered to be universally applicable.

  12. Porcine parvovirus removal using trimer and biased hexamer peptides

    PubMed Central

    Heldt, Caryn L.; Gurgel, Patrick V.; Jaykus, Lee-Ann; Carbonell, Ruben G.

    2014-01-01

    Assuring the microbiological safety of biological therapeutics remains an important concern. Our group has recently reported small trimeric peptides that have the ability to bind and remove a model non-enveloped virus, porcine parvovirus (PPV), from complex solutions containing human blood plasma. In an effort to improve the removal efficiency of these small peptides, we created a biased library of hexamer peptides that contain two previously reported trimeric peptides designated WRW and KYY. This library was screened and several hexamer peptides were discovered that also removed PPV from solution, but there was no marked improvement in removal efficiency when compared to the trimeric peptides. Based on simulated docking experiments, it appeared that hexamer peptide binding is dictated more by secondary structure, whereas the binding of trimeric peptides is dominated by charge and hydrophobicity. This study demonstrates that trimeric and hexameric peptides may have different, matrix-specific roles to play in virus removal applications. In general, the hexamer ligand may perform better for binding of specific viruses, whereas the trimer ligand may have more broadly reactive virus-binding properties. PMID:21751387

  13. Biosynthesis of fluorescent cyanobacterial allophycocyanin trimer in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaofang; Chen, Yingjie; Lu, Yandu; Chen, Huaxin; Li, Fuchao; Qin, Song

    2010-08-01

    Allophycocyanin (APC), a cyanobacterial photosynthetic phycobiliprotein, functions in energy transfer as a light-harvesting protein. One of the prominent spectroscopic characteristics of APC is a strong red-shift in the absorption and emission maxima when monomers are assembled into a trimer. Previously, holo-APC alpha and beta subunits (holo-ApcA and ApcB) were successfully synthesized in Escherichia coli. In this study, both holo-subunits from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 were co-expressed in E. coli, and found to self-assemble into trimers. The recombinant APC trimer was purified by metal affinity and size-exclusion chromatography, and had a native structure identical to native APC, as determined by characteristic spectroscopic measurements, fluorescence quantum yield, tryptic digestion analysis, and molecular weight measurements. Combined with results from a study in which only the monomer was formed, our results indicate that bilin synthesis and the subsequent attachment to apo-subunits are important for the successful assembly of APC trimers. This is the first study to report on the assembly of recombinant ApcA and ApcB into a trimer with native structure. Our study provides a promising method for producing better fluorescent tags, as well as a method to facilitate the genetic analysis of APC trimer assembly and biological function. PMID:20607408

  14. Role of trimer-trimer interaction of bacteriorhodopsin studied by optical spectroscopy and high-speed atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hayato; Inoue, Keiichi; Shibata, Mikihiro; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Sasaki, Jun; Kandori, Hideki; Ando, Toshio

    2013-10-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) trimers form a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice in the purple membrane of Halobacterium salinarum. However, the physiological significance of forming the lattice has long been elusive. Here, we study this issue by comparing properties of assembled and non-assembled bR trimers using directed mutagenesis, high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM), optical spectroscopy, and a proton pumping assay. First, we show that the bonds formed between W12 and F135 amino acid residues are responsible for trimer-trimer association that leads to lattice assembly; the lattice is completely disrupted in both W12I and F135I mutants. HS-AFM imaging reveals that both crystallized D96N and non-crystallized D96N/W12I mutants undergo a large conformational change (i.e., outward E-F loop displacement) upon light-activation. However, lattice disruption significantly reduces the rate of conformational change under continuous light illumination. Nevertheless, the quantum yield of M-state formation, measured by low-temperature UV-visible spectroscopy, and proton pumping efficiency are unaffected by lattice disruption. From these results, we conclude that trimer-trimer association plays essential roles in providing bound retinal with an appropriate environment to maintain its full photo-reactivity and in maintaining the natural photo-reaction pathway. PMID:23462099

  15. Predicted 3D Model of the Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Trimer.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Bastida-González; Yersin, Celaya-Trejo; José, Correa-Basurto; Paola, Zárate-Segura

    2016-01-01

    The RABVG ectodomain is a homotrimer, and trimers are often called spikes. They are responsible for the attachment of the virus through the interaction with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). This makes them relevant in viral pathogenesis. The antigenic structure differs significantly between the trimers and monomers. Surfaces rich in hydrophobic amino acids are important for trimer stabilization in which the C-terminal of the ectodomain plays an important role; to understand these interactions between the G proteins, a mechanistic study of their functions was performed with a molecular model of G protein in its trimeric form. This verified its 3D conformation. The molecular modeling of G protein was performed by a I-TASSER server and was evaluated via a Rachamandran plot and ERRAT program obtained 84.64% and 89.9% of the residues in the favorable regions and overall quality factor, respectively. The molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on RABVG trimer at 310 K. From these theoretical studies, we retrieved the RMSD values from Cα atoms to assess stability. Preliminary model of G protein of rabies virus stable at 12 ns with molecular dynamics was obtained. PMID:27294109

  16. Predicted 3D Model of the Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Trimer

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Bastida-González; Yersin, Celaya-Trejo; José, Correa-Basurto; Paola, Zárate-Segura

    2016-01-01

    The RABVG ectodomain is a homotrimer, and trimers are often called spikes. They are responsible for the attachment of the virus through the interaction with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). This makes them relevant in viral pathogenesis. The antigenic structure differs significantly between the trimers and monomers. Surfaces rich in hydrophobic amino acids are important for trimer stabilization in which the C-terminal of the ectodomain plays an important role; to understand these interactions between the G proteins, a mechanistic study of their functions was performed with a molecular model of G protein in its trimeric form. This verified its 3D conformation. The molecular modeling of G protein was performed by a I-TASSER server and was evaluated via a Rachamandran plot and ERRAT program obtained 84.64% and 89.9% of the residues in the favorable regions and overall quality factor, respectively. The molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on RABVG trimer at 310 K. From these theoretical studies, we retrieved the RMSD values from Cα atoms to assess stability. Preliminary model of G protein of rabies virus stable at 12 ns with molecular dynamics was obtained. PMID:27294109

  17. Achiral flexible liquid crystal trimers exhibiting chiral conglomerates.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Haruna; Takanishi, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Jun; Yoshizawa, Atsushi

    2016-04-14

    Chiral conglomerates of domains with opposite handedness have attracted much attention from researchers. We prepared a homologous series of achiral liquid crystal trimers in which two phenylpyrimidine units and one biphenyl unit were connected via flexible methylene spacers. We investigated their phase transition behaviour. Some trimers possessing odd-numbered spacers were found to exhibit a nematic phase and a dark chiral conglomerate phase possessing a layered structure. The chiral characteristics were confirmed by uncrossing the polarizers in opposite directions. The layer spacing detected using X-ray diffraction was about 80% of the molecular length. The structure-property relations indicate that intermolecular interactions cause a conformational change in the trimers possessing flexible odd-numbered methylene spacers to form helical conformers with axial chirality, which might induce chiral segregation and layer deformation to drive the chiral conglomerates. PMID:26947890

  18. New Infrared Spectra of the Nitrous Oxide Trimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghany, M.; Afshari, Mahin; Oliaee, J. N.; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.; McKellar, A. R. W.

    2009-06-01

    Infrared spectra of N_{2}O trimers are studied using a tunable diode laser to probe a pulsed supersonic slit-jet expansion. A previous observation by R.E. Miller and L. Pedersen [J. Chem. Phys. 108, 436 (1998)] in the N_{2}O νb{1}+νb{3} combination band region ( 3480 cm^{-1}) showed the trimer structure to be noncyclic, with three inequivalent N_{2}O monomer units which could be thought of as an N_{2}O dimer (slipped antiparallel configuration) plus a third monomer unit lying above the dimer plane. The present observations cover the N_{2}O fundamental band regions νb{3} ( 1280 cm^{-1}) and νb{1} ( 2230 cm^{-1}). In the νb{3} region, two trimer bands are assigned with vibrational shifts and other characteristics similar to those in the νb{1}+νb{3} region, but in the νb{1} region all three possible trimer bands are observed. Relationships among the various bands such as rotational intensity patterns, vibrational shifts, and the properties of the related N_{2}O dimer, generally support the conclusions of Miller and Pedersen. Three trimer bands are also observed for the fully ^{15}N-substituted species in the νb{1} region, and these results should aid in detection of the as-yet-unobserved pure rotational microwave spectrum of the trimer. Finally, three combination bands involving the intermolecular van der Waals modes at 2253.7, 2255.5, and 2269.4 cm^{-1} have been measured. The analyses of these bands and the identification of the nature of the intermolecular modes involved are currently underway.

  19. Nonadditive effects in the mixed trimers of HCl and methanethiol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Mine; Boylu, Özgün; Uras-Aytemiz, Nevin

    2007-06-01

    Ab initio and density functional theory calculations with aug-cc-pVDZ and aug-cc-pVTZ basis sets have been performed on the HCl -CH3SH dimer and HCl -(CH3SH)2 and (HCl)2-CH3SH trimers. Structures, energetics, and infrared frequencies are calculated. The results are discussed in terms of the cooperativity effect which is a characteristic of H-bonded systems and compared to oxygen-containing analogs of the same trimers, HCl -(CH3OH)2 and (HCl)2-CH3OH, which have been published recently.

  20. Synthesis and reactions of the oxides of hexafluoropropylene trimers

    SciTech Connect

    Zapevalov, A.Ya.; Filyakova, T.I.; Peschanskii, N.V.; Kodess, M.I.; Kolenko, I.P.

    1986-03-10

    By the oxidation of the hexafluoropropylene trimers with an aqueous solution of sodium hypochlorite in the presence of acetonitrile the following ..cap alpha..-oxides were obtained: 2,3-Epoxyperfluoro-3-isopropyl-4-methylpentane and 2,3-epoxyperfluoro-3-ethyl-2,4-dimethylpentane. According to the /sup 19/F NMR data, the epoxidation takes place stereoselectively with the formation of only one conformer of the ..cap alpha..-oxide in each case. The determining effect of the steric factors on the reactivity of the oxides of hexafluoropropylene trimers in reaction with nucleophiles was demonstrated.

  1. Enhanced Immunogenicity of Stabilized Trimeric Soluble Influenza Hemagglutinin

    PubMed Central

    Weldon, William C.; Wang, Bao-Zhong; Martin, Maria P.; Koutsonanos, Dimitrios G.; Skountzou, Ioanna; Compans, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    Background The recent swine-origin H1N1 pandemic illustrates the need to develop improved procedures for rapid production of influenza vaccines. One alternative to the current egg-based manufacture of influenza vaccine is to produce a hemagglutinin (HA) subunit vaccine using a recombinant expression system with the potential for high protein yields, ease of cloning new antigenic variants, and an established safety record in humans. Methodology/Principal Findings We generated a soluble HA (sHA), derived from the H3N2 virus A/Aichi/2/68, modified at the C-terminus with a GCN4pII trimerization repeat to stabilize the native trimeric structure of HA. When expressed in the baculovirus system, the modified sHA formed native trimers. In contrast, the unmodified sHA was found to present epitopes recognized by a low-pH conformation specific monoclonal antibody. We found that mice primed and boosted with 3 µg of trimeric sHA in the absence of adjuvants had significantly higher IgG and HAI titers than mice that received the unmodified sHA. This correlated with an increased survival and reduced body weight loss following lethal challenge with mouse-adapted A/Aichi/2/68 virus. In addition, mice receiving a single vaccination of the trimeric sHA in the absence of adjuvants had improved survival and body weight loss compared to mice vaccinated with the unmodified sHA. Conclusions/Significance Our data indicate that the recombinant trimeric sHA presents native trimeric epitopes while the unmodified sHA presents epitopes not exposed in the native HA molecule. The epitopes presented in the unmodified sHA constitute a “silent face” which may skew the antibody response to epitopes not accessible in live virus at neutral pH. The results demonstrate that the trimeric sHA is a more effective influenza vaccine candidate and emphasize the importance of structure-based antigen design in improving recombinant HA vaccines. PMID:20824188

  2. Uncleaved prefusion-optimized gp140 trimers derived from analysis of HIV-1 envelope metastability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Leopold; He, Linling; de Val, Natalia; Vora, Nemil; Morris, Charles D.; Azadnia, Parisa; Sok, Devin; Zhou, Bin; Burton, Dennis R.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Zhu, Jiang

    2016-06-01

    The trimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) is critical for host immune recognition and neutralization. Despite advances in trimer design, the roots of Env trimer metastability remain elusive. Here we investigate the contribution of two Env regions to metastability. First, we computationally redesign a largely disordered bend in heptad region 1 (HR1) of SOSIP trimers that connects the long, central HR1 helix to the fusion peptide, substantially improving the yield of soluble, well-folded trimers. Structural and antigenic analyses of two distinct HR1 redesigns confirm that redesigned Env closely mimics the native, prefusion trimer with a more stable gp41. Next, we replace the cleavage site between gp120 and gp41 with various linkers in the context of an HR1 redesign. Electron microscopy reveals a potential fusion intermediate state for uncleaved trimers containing short but not long linkers. Together, these results outline a general approach for stabilization of Env trimers from diverse HIV-1 strains.

  3. Uncleaved prefusion-optimized gp140 trimers derived from analysis of HIV-1 envelope metastability

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Leopold; He, Linling; de Val, Natalia; Vora, Nemil; Morris, Charles D.; Azadnia, Parisa; Sok, Devin; Zhou, Bin; Burton, Dennis R.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Zhu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The trimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) is critical for host immune recognition and neutralization. Despite advances in trimer design, the roots of Env trimer metastability remain elusive. Here we investigate the contribution of two Env regions to metastability. First, we computationally redesign a largely disordered bend in heptad region 1 (HR1) of SOSIP trimers that connects the long, central HR1 helix to the fusion peptide, substantially improving the yield of soluble, well-folded trimers. Structural and antigenic analyses of two distinct HR1 redesigns confirm that redesigned Env closely mimics the native, prefusion trimer with a more stable gp41. Next, we replace the cleavage site between gp120 and gp41 with various linkers in the context of an HR1 redesign. Electron microscopy reveals a potential fusion intermediate state for uncleaved trimers containing short but not long linkers. Together, these results outline a general approach for stabilization of Env trimers from diverse HIV-1 strains. PMID:27349805

  4. Uncleaved prefusion-optimized gp140 trimers derived from analysis of HIV-1 envelope metastability.

    PubMed

    Kong, Leopold; He, Linling; de Val, Natalia; Vora, Nemil; Morris, Charles D; Azadnia, Parisa; Sok, Devin; Zhou, Bin; Burton, Dennis R; Ward, Andrew B; Wilson, Ian A; Zhu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The trimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) is critical for host immune recognition and neutralization. Despite advances in trimer design, the roots of Env trimer metastability remain elusive. Here we investigate the contribution of two Env regions to metastability. First, we computationally redesign a largely disordered bend in heptad region 1 (HR1) of SOSIP trimers that connects the long, central HR1 helix to the fusion peptide, substantially improving the yield of soluble, well-folded trimers. Structural and antigenic analyses of two distinct HR1 redesigns confirm that redesigned Env closely mimics the native, prefusion trimer with a more stable gp41. Next, we replace the cleavage site between gp120 and gp41 with various linkers in the context of an HR1 redesign. Electron microscopy reveals a potential fusion intermediate state for uncleaved trimers containing short but not long linkers. Together, these results outline a general approach for stabilization of Env trimers from diverse HIV-1 strains. PMID:27349805

  5. Catalytic trimerization of aromatic nitriles for synthesis of polyimide matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, L. C.

    1974-01-01

    Aromatic nitriles may be trimerized at moderate temperature and pressure with p-toluenesulfonic acid as catalyst. Studies were conducted to establish the effect of the reaction temperature, pressure, time, and catalyst concentration on yield of the trimerized product. Trimerization studies were also conducted to establish the effect of substituting electron donating or withdrawing groups on benzonitrile. Preliminary results of using the catalytic trimerization approach to prepare s-triazine cross-linked polyimide/graphite fiber composites are presented.

  6. Rotation assisted diffusion of water trimers on Pd{111}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranea, Víctor A.; de Andres, P. L.

    2016-06-01

    Diffusion barriers for a cluster of three water molecules on Pd{111} have been estimated from ab-initio Density Functional Theory. A model for the diffusion of a cluster of three water molecules (trimer) based in rotations yields a simple explanation of why the cluster can diffuse faster than a single water molecule by a factor ≈ 102 [1]. This model is based on the differences between the adsorption geometry for the three molecules forming the trimer. One member interacts strongly with the surface and sits closer to the surface (d) while the other two interact weakly and stay at a larger separation from the surface (u). The trimer rotates nearly freely around the axis determined by the d-like monomer. Translations of the whole trimer imply breaking the strong interaction of the d-like molecule with the surface with a high energy cost. Alternatively, thermal fluctuations can exchange the position of the molecule sitting closer to the surface with a lower energetic cost. Rotations around different axis yield a diffusion mechanism where the strong interaction is maintained along the diffusion path, therefore lowering the effective activation barrier.

  7. Soluble Mimetics of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Viral Spikes Produced by Replacement of the Native Trimerization Domain with a Heterologous Trimerization Motif: Characterization and Ligand Binding Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pancera, Marie; Lebowitz, Jacob; Schön, Arne; Zhu, Ping; Freire, Ernesto; Kwong, Peter D.; Roux, Kenneth H.; Sodroski, Joseph; Wyatt, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120, mediates binding to the viral receptors and, along with the transmembrane glycoprotein gp41, is a major target for neutralizing antibodies. We asked whether replacing the gp41 fusion/trimerization domain with a stable trimerization motif might lead to a more stable gp120 trimer that would be amenable to structural and immunologic analysis. To obtain stable gp120 trimers, a heterologous trimerization motif, GCN4, was appended to the C terminus of YU2gp120. Biochemical analysis indicated that the gp120-GCN4 trimers were superior to gp140 molecules in their initial homogeneity, and trilobed structures were observable by electron microscopy. Biophysical analysis of gp120-GCN4 trimers by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and ultracentrifugation analyses indicated that most likely two molecules of soluble CD4 could bind to one gp120-GCN4 trimer. To further examine restricted CD4 stoichiometric binding to the gp120-GCN4 trimers, we generated a low-affinity CD4 binding trimer by introducing a D457V change in the CD4 binding site of each gp120 monomeric subunit. The mutant trimers could definitively bind only one soluble CD4 molecule, as determined by ITC and sedimentation equilibrium centrifugation. These data indicate that there are weak interactions between the gp120 monomeric subunits of the GCN4-stabilized trimers that can be detected by low-affinity ligand sensing. By similar analysis, we also determined that removal of the variable loops V1, V2, and V3 in the context of the gp120-GCN4 proteins allowed the binding of three CD4 molecules per trimer. Interestingly, both the gp120-GCN4 variants displayed a restricted stoichiometry for the CD4-induced antibody 17b of one antibody molecule binding per trimer. This restriction was not evident upon removal of the variable loops V1 and V2 loops, consistent with conformational constraints in the wild-type gp120 trimers and similar to

  8. Immunogenicity of stabilized HIV-1 envelope trimers with reduced exposure of non-neutralizing epitopes

    PubMed Central

    de Taeye, Steven W.; Ozorowski, Gabriel; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Guttman, Miklos; Julien, Jean-Philippe; van den Kerkhof, Tom L.G.M.; Burger, Judith A.; Pritchard, Laura K.; Pugach, Pavel; Yasmeen, Anila; Crampton, Jordan; Hu, Joyce; Bontjer, Ilja; Torres, Jonathan L.; Arendt, Heather; DeStefano, Joanne; Koff, Wayne C.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Eggink, Dirk; Berkhout, Ben; Dean, Hansi; LaBranche, Celia; Crotty, Shane; Crispin, Max; Montefiori, David C.; Klasse, P. J.; Lee, Kelly K.; Moore, John P.; Wilson, Ian A.; Ward, Andrew B.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The envelope glycoprotein trimer mediates HIV-1 entry into cells. The trimer is flexible, fluctuating between closed and more open conformations and sometimes sampling the fully open, CD4-bound form. We hypothesized that conformational flexibility could hinder the induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). We therefore modified soluble Env trimers to stabilize their closed, ground states. The trimer variants were indeed stabilized in the closed conformation, with a reduced ability to undergo receptor-induced conformational changes and a decreased exposure of non-neutralizing V3-directed antibody epitopes. In rabbits, the stabilized trimers induced similar autologous Tier-1B or Tier-2 NAb titers to those elicited by the corresponding wild-type trimers, but lower levels of V3-directed Tier-1A NAbs. Stabilized, closed trimers might therefore be useful components of vaccines aimed at inducing bNAbs. PMID:26687358

  9. Immunogenicity of Stabilized HIV-1 Envelope Trimers with Reduced Exposure of Non-neutralizing Epitopes.

    PubMed

    de Taeye, Steven W; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; Guttman, Miklos; Julien, Jean-Philippe; van den Kerkhof, Tom L G M; Burger, Judith A; Pritchard, Laura K; Pugach, Pavel; Yasmeen, Anila; Crampton, Jordan; Hu, Joyce; Bontjer, Ilja; Torres, Jonathan L; Arendt, Heather; DeStefano, Joanne; Koff, Wayne C; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Eggink, Dirk; Berkhout, Ben; Dean, Hansi; LaBranche, Celia; Crotty, Shane; Crispin, Max; Montefiori, David C; Klasse, P J; Lee, Kelly K; Moore, John P; Wilson, Ian A; Ward, Andrew B; Sanders, Rogier W

    2015-12-17

    The envelope glycoprotein trimer mediates HIV-1 entry into cells. The trimer is flexible, fluctuating between closed and more open conformations and sometimes sampling the fully open, CD4-bound form. We hypothesized that conformational flexibility and transient exposure of non-neutralizing, immunodominant epitopes could hinder the induction of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). We therefore modified soluble Env trimers to stabilize their closed, ground states. The trimer variants were indeed stabilized in the closed conformation, with a reduced ability to undergo receptor-induced conformational changes and a decreased exposure of non-neutralizing V3-directed antibody epitopes. In rabbits, the stabilized trimers induced similar autologous Tier-1B or Tier-2 NAb titers to those elicited by the corresponding wild-type trimers but lower levels of V3-directed Tier-1A NAbs. Stabilized, closed trimers might therefore be useful components of vaccines aimed at inducing bNAbs. PMID:26687358

  10. Cerebrosides and tocopherol trimers from the seeds of Euryale ferox.

    PubMed

    Row, Lie-Ching; Ho, Jiau-Ching; Chen, Chiu-Ming

    2007-07-01

    Two new cerebrosides, ferocerebrosides A (1) [(2S,3R,4E,8E,2'R)-1-O-(beta-glucopyranosyl)-N-(2'-hydroxydocosanoyl)-4,8-sphingadienine] and B (2) [(2S,3R,4E,8E,2'R)-1-O-(beta-glucopyranosyl)-N-(2'-hydroxytetracosanoyl)-4,8-sphingadienine], two new tocopherol trimers, ferotocotrimers C (5) and D (6), and two known tocopherol trimers, IVb (3) and IVa (4), were isolated from the seeds of Euryale ferox. Their structures were determined on the basis of spectroscopic data, especially 1D and 2D NMR experiments. Compounds 1 and 2 showed cytotoxicity in the brine shrimp lethality bioassay, with LC50 values of 0.17 and 0.20 mM, respectively. PMID:17567070

  11. Formation of unique trimer of nitric oxide on Cu(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Shiotari, A.; Hatta, S.; Okuyama, H. Aruga, T.

    2014-10-07

    We report that NO molecules unexpectedly prefer a trimeric configuration on Cu(111). We used scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) at 6 K, and confirmed that the NO molecule is bonded to the face-centered-cubic hollow site in an upright configuration. The individual NO molecule is imaged as a ring protrusion, which is characteristic of the doubly degenerate 2π{sup *} orbital. A triangular trimer is thermodynamically more favorable than the monomer and dimer, and its bonding structure was characterized by STM manipulation. This unique behavior of NO on Cu(111) is ascribed to the threefold symmetry of the surface, facilitating effective mixing of the 2π{sup *} orbitals in a triangular configuration.

  12. The Trimeric Model: A New Model of Periodontal Treatment Planning

    PubMed Central

    Tarakji, Bassel

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of periodontal disease is a complex and multidisciplinary procedure, requiring periodontal, surgical, restorative, and orthodontic treatment modalities. Several authors attempted to formulate models for periodontal treatment that orders the treatment steps in a logical and easy to remember manner. In this article, we discuss two models of periodontal treatment planning from two of the most well-known textbook in the specialty of periodontics internationally. Then modify them to arrive at a new model of periodontal treatment planning, The Trimeric Model. Adding restorative and orthodontic interrelationships with periodontal treatment allows us to expand this model into the Extended Trimeric Model of periodontal treatment planning. These models will provide a logical framework and a clear order of the treatment of periodontal disease for general practitioners and periodontists alike. PMID:25177662

  13. Interatomic Coulombic decay widths of helium trimer: Ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kolorenč, Přemysl; Sisourat, Nicolas

    2015-12-14

    We report on an extensive study of interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) widths in helium trimer computed using a fully ab initio method based on the Fano theory of resonances. Algebraic diagrammatic construction for one-particle Green’s function is utilized for the solution of the many-electron problem. An advanced and universal approach to partitioning of the configuration space into discrete states and continuum subspaces is described and employed. Total decay widths are presented for all ICD-active states of the trimer characterized by one-site ionization and additional excitation of an electron into the second shell. Selected partial decay widths are analyzed in detail, showing how three-body effects can qualitatively change the character of certain relaxation transitions. Previously unreported type of three-electron decay processes is identified in one class of the metastable states.

  14. Interatomic Coulombic decay widths of helium trimer: Ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Kolorenč, Přemysl; Sisourat, Nicolas

    2015-12-14

    We report on an extensive study of interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) widths in helium trimer computed using a fully ab initio method based on the Fano theory of resonances. Algebraic diagrammatic construction for one-particle Green's function is utilized for the solution of the many-electron problem. An advanced and universal approach to partitioning of the configuration space into discrete states and continuum subspaces is described and employed. Total decay widths are presented for all ICD-active states of the trimer characterized by one-site ionization and additional excitation of an electron into the second shell. Selected partial decay widths are analyzed in detail, showing how three-body effects can qualitatively change the character of certain relaxation transitions. Previously unreported type of three-electron decay processes is identified in one class of the metastable states. PMID:26671378

  15. Quadrupole response of a weakly bound bosonic trimer.

    PubMed

    Liverts, Evgeny; Bazak, Betzalel; Barnea, Nir

    2012-03-16

    The inelastic response of a bosonic trimer is explored in the confines of the Borromean region. To this end we model the interaction between the external field and the bosonic system as a photoabsorptionlike process and study the response of the trimer in the quadrupole approximation. We utilize the hyperspherical-harmonics expansion to solve the Schrödinger equation and the Lorentz integral transform method to calculate the reaction. It is found that the magnitude of the response function and corresponding sum rules increase exponentially when approaching the 3-body threshold. It is also found that this increase is governed by unnatural exponents. The connection between our results and radio-frequency experiments in ultracold atom systems is made. PMID:22540468

  16. Fluorescence spectroscopy, exciton dynamics, and photochemistry of single allophycocyanin trimers

    SciTech Connect

    Ying, L.; Sie, X.S.

    1998-12-10

    The authors report a study of the allophycocyanin trimer (APC), a light-harvesting protein complex from cyanobacteria, by room-temperature single-molecule measurements of fluorescence spectra, lifetimes, intensity trajectories, and polarization modulation. Emission spectra of individual APC trimers are found to be homogeneous on the time scale of seconds. In contrast, their emission lifetimes are found to be widely distributed because of generation of long-lived exciton traps during the course of measurements. The intensity trajectories and polarization modulation experiments indicate reversible exciton trap formation within the three quasi-independent pairs of strong interacting {alpha}84 and {beta}84 chromophores in APC, as well as photobleaching of individual chromophores. Comparison experiments under continuous-wave and pulsed excitation reveal a two-photon mechanism for generating exciton traps and/or photobleaching, which involves exciton-exciton annihilation. These single-molecule experiments provide new insights into the spectroscopy, exciton dynamics, and photochemistry of light-harvesting complexes.

  17. Dynamics of water trimer in femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiping; Zhang, Fengshou; Xu, Xuefeng; Wang, Yanbiao; Qian, Chaoyi

    2016-07-01

    With the help of the time-dependent local-density approximation (TDLDA) coupled non-adiabatically to molecular dynamics (MD), we studied both the static properties and irradiation dynamics of water trimer subject to the short and intense femtosecond laser field. It is shown that the optimized geometry and the optical absorption strength of the water trimer accord well with results in literature. Three typical possible irradiated scenarios of water trimer which are “normal oscillation”, “dissociation and formation” and “pure OH dissociation” are exhibited by investigating the ionization and the level depletion related to electrons as well as the OH bonds, proton-transfer, the intermolecular distance and the kinetic energy connected with ions. In three scenarios, the behaviors of water trimer can be attributed to the sequential combination of responses of the electrons emission, the proton-transfer, OH vibration and rotation, OH dissociation and hydroxyl formation, respectively. The relevant time scales of the first proton-transfer and OH dissociation are identified as 13 fs and 10-20 fs, respectively. The study of kinetic energies of ions show that the kinetic energies of the remaining ions are all below 4.5 eV and outgoing hydrogen ions carry a kinetic energy about 5-12 eV. Furthermore, it is found that in the tunneling ionization situations the depletion is fairly shared between the various levels except the most deep occupied electronic level while in the multiphotonic ionization case the electron loss comes from all single-electron levels and the HOMO level contributes the most.

  18. Exact models for trimerization and tetramerization in spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachel, Stephan; Greiter, Martin

    2008-10-01

    We present exact models for an antiferromagnetic S=1 spin chain describing trimerization as well as for an antiferromagnetic S=3/2 spin chain describing tetramerization. These models can be seen as generalizations of the Majumdar-Ghosh model. For both models, we provide a local Hamiltonian and its exact threefold or fourfold degenerate ground state wave functions, respectively. We numerically confirm the validity of both models using exact diagonalization and discuss the low-lying excitations.

  19. Quantum gases in trimerized kagomé lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damski, B.; Fehrmann, H.; Everts, H.-U.; Baranov, M.; Santos, L.; Lewenstein, M.

    2005-11-01

    We study low-temperature properties of atomic gases in trimerized optical kagomé lattices. The laser arrangements that can be used to create these lattices are briefly described. We also present explicit results for the coupling constants of the generalized Hubbard models that can be realized in such lattices. In the case of a single-component Bose gas the existence of a Mott insulator phase with fractional numbers of particles per trimer is verified in a mean-field approach. The main emphasis of the paper is on an atomic spinless interacting Fermi gas in the trimerized kagomé lattice with two fermions per site. This system is shown to be described by a quantum spin- 1/2 model on the triangular lattice with couplings that depend on the bond directions. We investigate this model by means of exact diagonalization. Our key finding is that the system exhibits nonstandard properties of a quantum spin-liquid crystal: it combines planar antiferromagnetic order in the ground state with an exceptionally large number of low-energy excitations. The possibilities of experimental verification of our theoretical results are critically discussed.

  20. Biochemical evidence of a role for matrix trimerization in HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein incorporation.

    PubMed

    Tedbury, Philip R; Novikova, Mariia; Ablan, Sherimay D; Freed, Eric O

    2016-01-12

    The matrix (MA) domain of HIV Gag has important functions in directing the trafficking of Gag to sites of assembly and mediating the incorporation of the envelope glycoprotein (Env) into assembling particles. HIV-1 MA has been shown to form trimers in vitro; however, neither the presence nor the role of MA trimers has been documented in HIV-1 virions. We developed a cross-linking strategy to reveal MA trimers in virions of replication-competent HIV-1. By mutagenesis of trimer interface residues, we demonstrated a correlation between loss of MA trimerization and loss of Env incorporation. Additionally, we found that truncating the long cytoplasmic tail of Env restores incorporation of Env into MA trimer-defective particles, thus rescuing infectivity. We therefore propose a model whereby MA trimerization is required to form a lattice capable of accommodating the long cytoplasmic tail of HIV-1 Env; in the absence of MA trimerization, Env is sterically excluded from the assembling particle. These findings establish MA trimerization as an obligatory step in the assembly of infectious HIV-1 virions. As such, the MA trimer interface may represent a novel drug target for the development of antiretrovirals. PMID:26711999

  1. Hybridization and the origin of Fano resonances in symmetric nanoparticle trimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, Ben; Filonov, Dmitry S.; Glybovski, Stanislav B.; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.

    2015-07-01

    We study the light scattering by plasmonic and dielectric symmetric trimers to investigate the existence of polarization-independent Fano resonances. Plasmonic hybridization theory is revealed to hide simple physics, and we instead provide a simplified model for hybridization to derive a plasmonic trimer's eigenmodes analytically. This approach is demonstrated to accurately recreate full wave simulations of plasmonic trimers and their Fano resonances. We are subsequently able to deduce the grounds for modal interference in plasmonic trimers and the related formation of Fano resonances. However, by generalizing our simplified hybridization approach, we are also able to investigate the eigenmodes of all-dielectric trimers. We show that bianisotropic coupling channels between high-index dielectric nanoparticles are able to increase the capacity for Fano resonances, even at normal incidence. We finally provide the first experimental measurements of sharp, polarization-independent Fano resonances from a symmetric all-dielectric trimer, with very good agreement with the predicted response from our simplified hybridization theory.

  2. Imaging of the structure of the argon and neon dimer, trimer, and tetramer.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, B; Vredenborg, A; Malakzadeh, A; Schmidt, L Ph H; Havermeier, T; Meckel, M; Cole, K; Smolarski, M; Chang, Z; Jahnke, T; Dörner, R

    2011-06-30

    We Coulomb explode argon and neon dimers, trimers, and tetramers by multiple ionization in an ultrashort 800 nm laser pulse. By measuring all momentum vectors of the singly charged ions in coincidence, we determine the ground state nuclear wave function of the dimer, trimer, and tetramer. Furthermore we retrieve the bond angles of the trimer in position space by applying a classical numerical simulation. For the argon and neon trimer, we find a structure close to the equilateral triangle. The width of the distribution around the equilateral triangle is considerably wider for neon than for argon. PMID:21413773

  3. Direct visualization of the trimeric structure of the ASIC1a channel, using AFM imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carnally, Stewart M.; Dev, Harveer S.; Stewart, Andrew P.; Barrera, Nelson P.; Van Bemmelen, Miguel X.; Schild, Laurent; Henderson, Robert M.; Edwardson, J.Michael

    2008-08-08

    There has been confusion about the subunit stoichiometry of the degenerin family of ion channels. Recently, a crystal structure of acid-sensing ion channel (ASIC) 1a revealed that it assembles as a trimer. Here, we used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to image unprocessed ASIC1a bound to mica. We detected a mixture of subunit monomers, dimers and trimers. In some cases, triple-subunit clusters were clearly visible, confirming the trimeric structure of the channel, and indicating that the trimer sometimes disaggregated after adhesion to the mica surface. This AFM-based technique will now enable us to determine the subunit arrangement within heteromeric ASICs.

  4. Identification of Ata, a Multifunctional Trimeric Autotransporter of Acinetobacter baumannii

    PubMed Central

    Bentancor, Leticia V.; Camacho-Peiro, Ana; Bozkurt-Guzel, Cagla; Pier, Gerald B.

    2012-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii has recently emerged as a highly troublesome nosocomial pathogen, especially in patients in intensive care units and in those undergoing mechanical ventilation. We have identified a surface protein adhesin of A. baumannii, designated the Acinetobacter trimeric autotransporter (Ata), that contains all of the typical features of trimeric autotransporters (TA), including a long signal peptide followed by an N-terminal, surface-exposed passenger domain and a C-terminal domain encoding 4 β-strands. To demonstrate that Ata encoded a TA, we created a fusion protein in which we replaced the entire passenger domain of Ata with the epitope tag V5, which can be tracked with specific monoclonal antibodies, and demonstrated that the C-terminal 101 amino acids of Ata were capable of exporting the heterologous V5 tag to the surface of A. baumannii in a trimeric form. We found that Ata played a role in biofilm formation and bound to various extracellular matrix/basal membrane (ECM/BM) components, including collagen types I, III, IV, and V and laminin. Moreover, Ata mediated the adhesion of whole A. baumannii cells to immobilized collagen type IV and played a role in the survival of A. baumannii in a lethal model of systemic infection in immunocompetent mice. Taken together, these results reveal that Ata is a TA of A. baumannii involved in virulence, including biofilm formation, binding to ECM/BM proteins, mediating the adhesion of A. baumannii cells to collagen type IV, and contributing to the survival of A. baumannii in a mouse model of lethal infection. PMID:22609912

  5. Photoemission Electron Microscopy of a Plasmonic Silver Nanoparticle Trimer

    SciTech Connect

    Peppernick, Samuel J.; Joly, Alan G.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Hess, Wayne P.; Wang, Jinyong; Wang, Yi-Chung; Wei, Wei

    2013-07-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study to investigate the spatial distribution of photoelectrons emitted from core-shell silver (Ag) nanoparticles. We use two-photon photoemission microscopy (2P-PEEM) to spatially resolve electron emission from a trimeric core-shell aggregate of triangular symmetry. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations are performed to model the intensity distributions of the electromagnetic near-fields resulting from femtosecond (fs) laser excitation of localized surface plasmon oscillations in the triangular core-shell structure. We demonstrate that the predicted FDTD near-field intensity distribution reproduces the 2P-PEEM photoemission pattern.

  6. A monomer-trimer model supports intermittent glucagon fibril growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košmrlj, Andrej; Cordsen, Pia; Kyrsting, Anders; Otzen, Daniel E.; Oddershede, Lene B.; Jensen, Mogens H.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate in vitro fibrillation kinetics of the hormone peptide glucagon at various concentrations using confocal microscopy and determine the glucagon fibril persistence length 60μm. At all concentrations we observe that periods of individual fibril growth are interrupted by periods of stasis. The growth probability is large at high and low concentrations and is reduced for intermediate glucagon concentrations. To explain this behavior we propose a simple model, where fibrils come in two forms, one built entirely from glucagon monomers and one entirely from glucagon trimers. The opposite building blocks act as fibril growth blockers, and this generic model reproduces experimental behavior well.

  7. A Native-Like SOSIP.664 Trimer Based on an HIV-1 Subtype B env Gene

    PubMed Central

    Pugach, Pavel; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Cupo, Albert; Ringe, Rajesh; Yasmeen, Anila; de Val, Natalia; Derking, Ronald; Kim, Helen J.; Korzun, Jacob; Golabek, Michael; de los Reyes, Kevin; Ketas, Thomas J.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Klasse, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recombinant trimeric mimics of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) spike should expose as many epitopes as possible for broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) but few, if any, for nonneutralizing antibodies (non-NAbs). Soluble, cleaved SOSIP.664 gp140 trimers based on the subtype A strain BG505 approach this ideal and are therefore plausible vaccine candidates. Here, we report on the production and in vitro properties of a new SOSIP.664 trimer derived from a subtype B env gene, B41, including how to make this protein in low-serum media without proteolytic damage (clipping) to the V3 region. We also show that nonclipped trimers can be purified successfully via a positive-selection affinity column using the bNAb PGT145, which recognizes a quaternary structure-dependent epitope at the trimer apex. Negative-stain electron microscopy imaging shows that the purified, nonclipped, native-like B41 SOSIP.664 trimers contain two subpopulations, which we propose represent an equilibrium between the fully closed and a more open conformation. The latter is different from the fully open, CD4 receptor-bound conformation and may represent an intermediate state of the trimer. This new subtype B trimer adds to the repertoire of native-like Env proteins that are suitable for immunogenicity and structural studies. IMPORTANCE The cleaved, trimeric envelope protein complex is the only neutralizing antibody target on the HIV-1 surface. Many vaccine strategies are based on inducing neutralizing antibodies. For HIV-1, one approach involves using recombinant, soluble protein mimics of the native trimer. At present, the only reliable way to make native-like, soluble trimers in practical amounts is via the introduction of specific sequence changes that confer stability on the cleaved form of Env. The resulting proteins are known as SOSIP.664 gp140 trimers, and the current paradigm is based on the BG505 subtype A env gene. Here, we describe the

  8. Trimerization Dictates Solution Opalescence of a Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Yang, Teng-Chieh; Langford, Alex Jacob; Kumar, Sandeep; Ruesch, John Carl; Wang, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Opalescence, sometimes observed in antibody solutions, is thought to be mediated by light scattering of soluble oligomers or insoluble particulates. However, mechanistic features, such as stoichiometry and self-association affinity of oligomeric species related to opalescence, are poorly understood. Here, opalescence behavior of a monoclonal antibody (mAb-1) solution was studied over a wide range of solution conditions including different protein concentrations, pH, and in the presence or absence of salt. Hydrodynamic and thermodynamic properties of mAb-1 solutions were studied by analytical ultracentrifugation and dynamic light scattering. Opalescence in mAb-1 solutions is pH and concentration dependent. The degree of opalescence correlates with reversible monomer-trimer equilibrium detected by analytical ultracentrifugation. Increased trimer formation corresponds to increased opalescence in mAb-1 solutions at higher pH and protein concentrations. Addition of NaCl shifts this equilibrium toward monomer and reduces solution opalescence. This study demonstrates that opalescence in mAb-1 solutions does not arise from the light scattering of monomer or random molecular self-associations but is strongly correlated with a specific self-association stoichiometry and affinity. Importantly, at pH 5.5 (far below isoelectric point of mAb-1), the solution is not opalescent and with nonideal behavior. This study also dissects several parameters to describe the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic nonideality. PMID:27373839

  9. Structure of a Burkholderia pseudomallei Trimeric Autotransporter Adhesin Head

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Thomas E.; Phan, Isabelle; Abendroth, Jan; Dieterich, Shellie H.; Masoudi, Amir; Guo, Wenjin; Hewitt, Stephen N.; Kelley, Angela; Leibly, David; Brittnacher, Mitch J.; Staker, Bart L.; Miller, Samuel I.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Myler, Peter J.; Stewart, Lance J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Pathogenic bacteria adhere to the host cell surface using a family of outer membrane proteins called Trimeric Autotransporter Adhesins (TAAs). Although TAAs are highly divergent in sequence and domain structure, they are all conceptually comprised of a C-terminal membrane anchoring domain and an N-terminal passenger domain. Passenger domains consist of a secretion sequence, a head region that facilitates binding to the host cell surface, and a stalk region. Methodology/Principal Findings Pathogenic species of Burkholderia contain an overabundance of TAAs, some of which have been shown to elicit an immune response in the host. To understand the structural basis for host cell adhesion, we solved a 1.35 Å resolution crystal structure of a BpaA TAA head domain from Burkholderia pseudomallei, the pathogen that causes melioidosis. The structure reveals a novel fold of an intricately intertwined trimer. The BpaA head is composed of structural elements that have been observed in other TAA head structures as well as several elements of previously unknown structure predicted from low sequence homology between TAAs. These elements are typically up to 40 amino acids long and are not domains, but rather modular structural elements that may be duplicated or omitted through evolution, creating molecular diversity among TAAs. Conclusions/Significance The modular nature of BpaA, as demonstrated by its head domain crystal structure, and of TAAs in general provides insights into evolution of pathogen-host adhesion and may provide an avenue for diagnostics. PMID:20862217

  10. Nonlinear trimer resonators for compact ultra-fast switching.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kenzo; Fujii, Masamitsu; Haraguchi, Masanobu; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Fukui, Masuo

    2009-12-01

    We propose and numerically verify a scheme for compact optical modulation which can enable complex directional switching of signals in integrated micro-optical circuits within hundreds of femtoseconds. The scheme is based on a trimer comprised of two identical silica whispering gallery mode (WGM) microresonators spaced by a central non-linear WGM resonator. The non-linear resonator is in the form of a silica cylinder with a thin coating of an ultrafast Kerr nonlinear material (a J-aggregate of cyanine dye). Using a two-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method and realistic material and structural parameters, we investigated the near-field coupling from a waveguide to the trimer and the subsequent switching process. In our scheme the sandwiched central control resonator has a resonant frequency that is mismatched to that of the input and output resonators. Therefore the optical energy is coupled from the waveguide into only the primary resonator in linear operation. However, for control light intensities of more than approximately 10(-2) W/microm the effective index and hence eigenfrequency of the central resonator can be shifted to match that of its neighbors and hence the optical energy can be redirected. PMID:20052247

  11. Accurate calculations of bound rovibrational states for argon trimer

    SciTech Connect

    Brandon, Drew; Poirier, Bill

    2014-07-21

    This work presents a comprehensive quantum dynamics calculation of the bound rovibrational eigenstates of argon trimer (Ar{sub 3}), using the ScalIT suite of parallel codes. The Ar{sub 3} rovibrational energy levels are computed to a very high level of accuracy (10{sup −3} cm{sup −1} or better), and up to the highest rotational and vibrational excitations for which bound states exist. For many of these rovibrational states, wavefunctions are also computed. Rare gas clusters such as Ar{sub 3} are interesting because the interatomic interactions manifest through long-range van der Waals forces, rather than through covalent chemical bonding. As a consequence, they exhibit strong Coriolis coupling between the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom, as well as highly delocalized states, all of which renders accurate quantum dynamical calculation difficult. Moreover, with its (comparatively) deep potential well and heavy masses, Ar{sub 3} is an especially challenging rare gas trimer case. There are a great many rovibrational eigenstates to compute, and a very high density of states. Consequently, very few previous rovibrational state calculations for Ar{sub 3} may be found in the current literature—and only for the lowest-lying rotational excitations.

  12. Accurate calculations of bound rovibrational states for argon trimer.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Drew; Poirier, Bill

    2014-07-21

    This work presents a comprehensive quantum dynamics calculation of the bound rovibrational eigenstates of argon trimer (Ar3), using the ScalIT suite of parallel codes. The Ar3 rovibrational energy levels are computed to a very high level of accuracy (10(-3) cm(-1) or better), and up to the highest rotational and vibrational excitations for which bound states exist. For many of these rovibrational states, wavefunctions are also computed. Rare gas clusters such as Ar3 are interesting because the interatomic interactions manifest through long-range van der Waals forces, rather than through covalent chemical bonding. As a consequence, they exhibit strong Coriolis coupling between the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom, as well as highly delocalized states, all of which renders accurate quantum dynamical calculation difficult. Moreover, with its (comparatively) deep potential well and heavy masses, Ar3 is an especially challenging rare gas trimer case. There are a great many rovibrational eigenstates to compute, and a very high density of states. Consequently, very few previous rovibrational state calculations for Ar3 may be found in the current literature-and only for the lowest-lying rotational excitations. PMID:25053315

  13. Local moment formation and Kondo screening in impurity trimers.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Andrew K; Jarrold, Thomas F; Galpin, Martin R; Logan, David E

    2013-10-24

    We study theoretically a triangular cluster of three magnetic impurities, hybridizing locally with conduction electrons of a metallic host. Such a cluster is the simplest to exhibit frustration, an important generic feature of many complex molecular systems in which different interactions compete. Here, low-energy doublet states of the trimer are favored by effective exchange interactions produced by strong electronic repulsion in localized impurity orbitals. Parity symmetry protects a level crossing of such states on tuning microscopic parameters, while an avoided crossing arises in the general distorted case. Upon coupling to a metallic host, the behavior is shown to be immensely rich because collective quantum many-body effects now also compete. In particular, impurity degrees of freedom are totally screened at low temperatures in a Kondo-screened Fermi liquid phase, while degenerate ground states persist in a local moment phase. Local frustration drives the quantum phase transition between the two, which may be first order or of Kosterlitz-Thouless type, depending on symmetries. Unusual mechanisms for local moment formation and Kondo screening are found due to the orbital structure of the impurity trimer. Our results are of relevance for triple quantum dot devices. The problem is studied by a combination of analytical arguments and the numerical renormalization group. PMID:23527540

  14. Trimerization and crystallization of reconstituted light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b complex.

    PubMed Central

    Hobe, S; Prytulla, S; Kühlbrandt, W; Paulsen, H

    1994-01-01

    The major light-harvesting complex (LHCII) of photosystem II, the most abundant chlorophyll-containing complex in higher plants, is organized in trimers. In this paper we show that the trimerization of LHCII occurs spontaneously and is dependent on the presence of lipids. LHCII monomers were reconstituted from the purified apoprotein (LHCP), overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and pigments, purified from chloroplast membranes. These synthetic LHCII monomers trimerize in vitro in the presence of a lipid fraction isolated from pea thylakoids. The reconstituted LHCII trimers are very similar to native LHCII trimers in that they are stable in the presence of mild detergents and can be isolated by partially denaturing gel electrophoresis or by centrifugation in sucrose density gradients. Moreover, both native and reconstituted LHCII trimers exhibit signals in circular dichroism in the visible range that are not seen in native or reconstituted LHCII monomers, indicating that trimer formation either establishes additional pigment-pigment interactions or alters pre-existing interactions. Reconstituted LHCII trimers readily form two-dimensional crystals that appear to be identical to crystals of the native complex. Images PMID:8062818

  15. Understanding Magnetic Trimer Interactions in (Cr,Mn)-Substituted Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haraldsen, Jason T.; Crook, Charles B.; Houchins, Gregory; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Constantin, Costel; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    We investigate the magnetic interactions within a graphene superlattice produced by three directly substituted transition-metal atoms (specifically chromium and manganese). Using a first principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for this system assuming an equilateral trimer configuration with varying atomic separations. Through an examination of the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, we find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, where the interactions are dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic atoms and the carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, we use magnetization mapping to show that the substituted atoms induce an overall magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, which may help guide the discussion on spintronic graphene. JTH, CBC, GH, and AVB acknowledge support from the Institute for Materials Science via the United States Basic Energy Sciences (E304).

  16. Femtosecond Spectroscopy of Alkali Trimers on Helium Nanodroplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, C.; Grüner, B.; Fechner, L.; Mudrich, M.; Stienkemeier, F.; Hauser, A. W.; Ernst, W. E.

    2010-06-01

    Superfluid helium nanodroplets offer the opportunity to study dopant molecules in the sub-Kelvin range with only weak matrix perturbations. Femtosecond wave packet spectroscopy has been shown to be well suited to obtain high resolution vibrational spectra of cold alkali molecules in weakly bound high-spin states. In a pump-probe scheme a first laser pulse excites a vibrational wave packet that evolves on the molecular potential and is probed by a second ionizing pulse. We present spectroscopic data on Rb_3 and K_3 showing different vibronic progressions. These are assigned with the help of high level ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of the bare trimers. M. Mudrich, P. Heister, T. Hippler, C. Giese, O. Dulieu and F. Stienkemeier, Phys. Rev. A 80, 042512 (2009) J. Nagl, G. Auböck, A.W. Hauser, O. Allard, C. Callegari and W.E. Ernst, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 063001 (2008)

  17. Crystal Structure and Molecular Imaging of the Nav Channel β3 Subunit Indicates a Trimeric Assembly*

    PubMed Central

    Namadurai, Sivakumar; Balasuriya, Dilshan; Rajappa, Rajit; Wiemhöfer, Martin; Stott, Katherine; Klingauf, Jurgen; Edwardson, J. Michael; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y.; Jackson, Antony P.

    2014-01-01

    The vertebrate sodium (Nav) channel is composed of an ion-conducting α subunit and associated β subunits. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human β3 subunit immunoglobulin (Ig) domain, a functionally important component of Nav channels in neurons and cardiomyocytes. Surprisingly, we found that the β3 subunit Ig domain assembles as a trimer in the crystal asymmetric unit. Analytical ultracentrifugation confirmed the presence of Ig domain monomers, dimers, and trimers in free solution, and atomic force microscopy imaging also detected full-length β3 subunit monomers, dimers, and trimers. Mutation of a cysteine residue critical for maintaining the trimer interface destabilized both dimers and trimers. Using fluorescence photoactivated localization microscopy, we detected full-length β3 subunit trimers on the plasma membrane of transfected HEK293 cells. We further show that β3 subunits can bind to more than one site on the Nav 1.5 α subunit and induce the formation of α subunit oligomers, including trimers. Our results suggest a new and unexpected role for the β3 subunits in Nav channel cross-linking and provide new structural insights into some pathological Nav channel mutations. PMID:24567321

  18. A theoretical study of five water/ammonia/formaldehyde cyclic trimers: Influence of cooperative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masella, Michel; Flament, Jean-Pierre

    1999-04-01

    Ab initio computations at the MP2 level on five dimers and five cyclic trimers, drawn from water, ammonia, and formaldehyde are presented. Trimers have been drawn to present cyclic X-H---Y patterns. Particular attentions have been devoted in analyzing the energetic contributions resulting from cooperative effects in the trimer binding energies (BEs) and in analyzing the trends of several parameters from monomers to dimers and from dimers to trimers [in particular, the trends of the R(X-H) bond lengths, of the R(X---Y) distances, of the δvXH shifts in the vXH stretch vibrational frequencies, and of the electronic density ρc value at the XH---Y axis critical point when it exists]. The results have exhibited that cooperative effects represent from 10% to 16% of the trimer BEs and that they reinforce, from dimers to trimers, the trends observed for the above parameters from monomers to dimers. In particular, for "typical" X-H---Y HB (i.e., where X and Y atoms correspond to oxygen or nitrogen atoms), R(X-H) bond lengths are increased within 0.01 Å from monomers to dimers and from dimers to trimers, R(X---Y) distances shortened within 0.18 Å, ρc values increased by about 17% and vXH red-shifted from 18 to 164 cm-1 from dimers to trimers. As contrasted to those HBs the R(X-H) and δvXH parameters corresponding to C-H---Y interaction (with Y=O or N) follows an opposite trend from monomers to dimers and from dimers to trimers (i.e., they are respectively smoothly shortened and blue-shifted). All of these results therefore exhibit the great incidence of cooperative effects on the properties of X-H---Y interactions (corresponding to typical HBs or not), which are of importance to understand the properties of biochemical systems.

  19. Gas field ion source current stability for trimer and single atom terminated W(111) tips

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Radovan; Wolkow, Robert A.; Pitters, Jason L.

    2012-06-25

    Tungsten W(111) oriented trimer-terminated tips as well as single atom tips, fabricated by a gas and field assisted etching and evaporation process, were investigated with a view to scanning ion microscopy and ion beam writing applications. In particular, ion current stability was studied for helium and neon imaging gases. Large ion current fluctuations from individual atomic sites were observed when a trimer-terminated tip was used for the creation of neon ion beam. However, neon ion current was stable when a single atom tip was employed. No such current oscillations were observed for either a trimer or a single atom tip when imaged with helium.

  20. Experimental investigations of trimer ion contributions in the low resolution mass spectrometry of hydrogen isotope mixtures.

    PubMed

    Bidica, Nicolae

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on some preliminary experimental results of a work in progress regarding a problem involving the quantitative analysis of hydrogen isotopes by mass spectrometry of low resolution: the triatomic (trimer) ions interferences with the isotopic hydrogen species having the same mass/charge. These results indicate that, in complex mixtures of hydrogen isotopes, trimer ions are strongly affected by the presence of other species, and a new approach that takes into account the destruction mechanism of trimer ions is necessary for a proper determination of their contributions. PMID:23149602

  1. Trimeric forms of the photosystem I reaction center complex pre-exist in the membranes of the cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis.

    PubMed

    Shubin, V V; Tsuprun, V L; Bezsmertnaya, I N; Karapetyan, N V

    1993-11-01

    Oligomeric and monomeric forms of chlorophyll-protein complexes of photosystem I (PSI) have been isolated from the mesophilic cyanobacterium Spirulina [(1992) FEBS Lett. 309, 340-342]. Electron microscopic analysis of the complexes showed that the oligomeric form is a trimer of the shape and dimensions similar to those of the trimer from thermophilic cyanobacteria. The chlorophyl ratio in the isolated trimer and monomer was found to be 7:3. The trimeric form of PSI complex in contrast to the monomeric one contains the chlorophyll emitting at 760 nm (77K), which is also found in Spirulina membranes and therefore could be used as an intrinsic probe for the trimeric complex. The 77K circular dichroism spectrum of the trimeric form is much more similar to that of Spirulina membranes than the spectrum of the monomer. Thus, the trimeric PSI complexes exist and dominate in the Spirulina membranes. PMID:8224233

  2. Sequential and Simultaneous Immunization of Rabbits with HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein SOSIP.664 Trimers from Clades A, B and C.

    PubMed

    Klasse, P J; LaBranche, Celia C; Ketas, Thomas J; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Cupo, Albert; Pugach, Pavel; Ringe, Rajesh P; Golabek, Michael; van Gils, Marit J; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly K; Wilson, Ian A; Butera, Salvatore T; Ward, Andrew B; Montefiori, David C; Sanders, Rogier W; Moore, John P

    2016-09-01

    We have investigated the immunogenicity in rabbits of native-like, soluble, recombinant SOSIP.664 trimers based on the env genes of four isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1); specifically BG505 (clade A), B41 (clade B), CZA97 (clade C) and DU422 (clade C). The various trimers were delivered either simultaneously (as a mixture of clade A + B trimers) or sequentially over a 73-week period. Autologous, Tier-2 neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses were generated to the clade A and clade B trimers in the bivalent mixture. When delivered as boosting immunogens to rabbits immunized with the clade A and/or clade B trimers, the clade C trimers also generated autologous Tier-2 NAb responses, the CZA97 trimers doing so more strongly and consistently than the DU422 trimers. The clade C trimers also cross-boosted the pre-existing NAb responses to clade A and B trimers. We observed heterologous Tier-2 NAb responses albeit inconsistently, and with limited overall breath. However, cross-neutralization of the clade A BG505.T332N virus was consistently observed in rabbits immunized only with clade B trimers and then boosted with clade C trimers. The autologous NAbs induced by the BG505, B41 and CZA97 trimers predominantly recognized specific holes in the glycan shields of the cognate virus. The shared location of some of these holes may account for the observed cross-boosting effects and the heterologous neutralization of the BG505.T332N virus. These findings will guide the design of further experiments to determine whether and how multiple Env trimers can together induce more broadly neutralizing antibody responses. PMID:27627672

  3. Signal transmission within the P2X2 trimeric receptor.

    PubMed

    Keceli, Batu; Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2014-06-01

    P2X2 receptor channel, a homotrimer activated by the binding of extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to three intersubunit ATP-binding sites (each located ∼50 Å from the ion permeation pore), also shows voltage-dependent activation upon hyperpolarization. Here, we used tandem trimeric constructs (TTCs) harboring critical mutations at the ATP-binding, linker, and pore regions to investigate how the ATP activation signal is transmitted within the trimer and how signals generated by ATP and hyperpolarization converge. Analysis of voltage- and [ATP]-dependent gating in these TTCs showed that: (a) Voltage- and [ATP]-dependent gating of P2X2 requires binding of at least two ATP molecules. (b) D315A mutation in the β-14 strand of the linker region connecting the ATP-binding domains to the pore-forming helices induces two different gating modes; this requires the presence of the D315A mutation in at least two subunits. (c) The T339S mutation in the pore domains of all three subunits abolishes the voltage dependence of P2X2 gating in saturating [ATP], making P2X2 equally active at all membrane potentials. Increasing the number of T339S mutations in the TTC results in gradual changes in the voltage dependence of gating from that of the wild-type channel, suggesting equal and independent contributions of the subunits at the pore level. (d) Voltage- and [ATP]-dependent gating in TTCs differs depending on the location of one D315A relative to one K308A that blocks the ATP binding and downstream signal transmission. (e) Voltage- and [ATP]-dependent gating does not depend on where one T339S is located relative to K308A (or D315A). Our results suggest that each intersubunit ATP-binding signal is directly transmitted on the same subunit to the level of D315 via the domain that contributes K308 to the β-14 strand. The signal subsequently spreads equally to all three subunits at the level of the pore, resulting in symmetric and independent contributions of the three

  4. Signal transmission within the P2X2 trimeric receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    P2X2 receptor channel, a homotrimer activated by the binding of extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to three intersubunit ATP-binding sites (each located ∼50 Å from the ion permeation pore), also shows voltage-dependent activation upon hyperpolarization. Here, we used tandem trimeric constructs (TTCs) harboring critical mutations at the ATP-binding, linker, and pore regions to investigate how the ATP activation signal is transmitted within the trimer and how signals generated by ATP and hyperpolarization converge. Analysis of voltage- and [ATP]-dependent gating in these TTCs showed that: (a) Voltage- and [ATP]-dependent gating of P2X2 requires binding of at least two ATP molecules. (b) D315A mutation in the β-14 strand of the linker region connecting the ATP-binding domains to the pore-forming helices induces two different gating modes; this requires the presence of the D315A mutation in at least two subunits. (c) The T339S mutation in the pore domains of all three subunits abolishes the voltage dependence of P2X2 gating in saturating [ATP], making P2X2 equally active at all membrane potentials. Increasing the number of T339S mutations in the TTC results in gradual changes in the voltage dependence of gating from that of the wild-type channel, suggesting equal and independent contributions of the subunits at the pore level. (d) Voltage- and [ATP]-dependent gating in TTCs differs depending on the location of one D315A relative to one K308A that blocks the ATP binding and downstream signal transmission. (e) Voltage- and [ATP]-dependent gating does not depend on where one T339S is located relative to K308A (or D315A). Our results suggest that each intersubunit ATP-binding signal is directly transmitted on the same subunit to the level of D315 via the domain that contributes K308 to the β-14 strand. The signal subsequently spreads equally to all three subunits at the level of the pore, resulting in symmetric and independent contributions of the three

  5. HIV-1 VACCINES. HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies induced by native-like envelope trimers.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Rogier W; van Gils, Marit J; Derking, Ronald; Sok, Devin; Ketas, Thomas J; Burger, Judith A; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Cupo, Albert; Simonich, Cassandra; Goo, Leslie; Arendt, Heather; Kim, Helen J; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Pugach, Pavel; Williams, Melissa; Debnath, Gargi; Moldt, Brian; van Breemen, Mariëlle J; Isik, Gözde; Medina-Ramírez, Max; Back, Jaap Willem; Koff, Wayne C; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Rakasz, Eva G; Seaman, Michael S; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly K; Klasse, Per Johan; LaBranche, Celia; Schief, William R; Wilson, Ian A; Overbaugh, Julie; Burton, Dennis R; Ward, Andrew B; Montefiori, David C; Dean, Hansi; Moore, John P

    2015-07-10

    A challenge for HIV-1 immunogen design is the difficulty of inducing neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) against neutralization-resistant (tier 2) viruses that dominate human transmissions. We show that a soluble recombinant HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimer that adopts a native conformation, BG505 SOSIP.664, induced NAbs potently against the sequence-matched tier 2 virus in rabbits and similar but weaker responses in macaques. The trimer also consistently induced cross-reactive NAbs against more sensitive (tier 1) viruses. Tier 2 NAbs recognized conformational epitopes that differed between animals and in some cases overlapped with those recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), whereas tier 1 responses targeted linear V3 epitopes. A second trimer, B41 SOSIP.664, also induced a strong autologous tier 2 NAb response in rabbits. Thus, native-like trimers represent a promising starting point for the development of HIV-1 vaccines aimed at inducing bNAbs. PMID:26089353

  6. Monte Carlo and Exact Diagonalization of Copper (II) Trimer Spin Frustrated Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egido-Betancourt, Hailey X.; Ter Haar, Leonard W.; Varney, Christopher N.

    We discuss the use and importance of trimer-based systems because of the spin frustration that may arise within extended lattices comprised of trimers. The possible intra- and inter-trimer exchange pathways they posses due to interconnections are evaluated using density functional theory (DFT) to identify the optimal structures that may be used in designing extended lattices. As example, trinuclear Cu36+ cores with each pair of copper atoms bridged by carboxylate ligands have three-fold symmetry. As trimers these structures have the potential to be modeled as a frustrated quantum spin-1/2 system. To analyze the magnetic ground state and topological properties, we utilize exact diagonalization on small clusters and compare with Monte Carlo simulations for a range of system sizes. Research reported in this abstract was supported by UWF NIH MARC U-STAR 1T34GM110517-01.

  7. Kondo state for a compact Cr trimer on a metallic surface.

    PubMed

    Kudasov, Yu B; Uzdin, V M

    2002-12-30

    The ground state of a Cr trimer supported on the Au(111) surface is investigated by means of a variational approach to the Coqblin-Schrieffer Hamiltonian. The temperature of Kondo-resonance formation (T(K)) for equilateral trimers increases drastically as compared to T(K) for a single Cr adatom. The Kondo state of a Cr trimer proves to be very sensitive to geometry and a small shift of any atom from the symmetrical position leads to a rapid decrease in T(K). These results are in good agreement with recent observations of the Kondo response of a single antiferromagnetic chromium trimer [T. Jamneala, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 256804 (2001)

  8. Self-assembly of trimer colloids: effect of shape and interaction range.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Harold W; Yang, Seung-Yeob; Mittal, Jeetain; Shen, Vincent K

    2016-05-14

    Trimers with one attractive bead and two repulsive beads, similar to recently synthesized trimer patchy colloids, were simulated with flat-histogram Monte Carlo methods to obtain the stable self-assembled structures for different shapes and interaction potentials. Extended corresponding states principle was successfully applied to self-assembling systems in order to approximately collapse the results for models with the same shape, but different interaction range. This helps us directly compare simulation results with previous experiment, and good agreement was found between the two. In addition, a variety of self-assembled structures were observed by varying the trimer geometry, including spherical clusters, elongated clusters, monolayers, and spherical shells. In conclusion, our results help to compare simulations and experiments, via extended corresponding states, and we predict the formation of self-assembled structures for trimer shapes that have not been experimentally synthesized. PMID:27087490

  9. Design of Lipid Nanocapsule Delivery Vehicles for Multivalent Display of Recombinant Env Trimers in HIV Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Immunization strategies that elicit antibodies capable of neutralizing diverse virus strains will likely be an important part of a successful vaccine against HIV. However, strategies to promote robust humoral responses against the native intact HIV envelope trimer structure are lacking. We recently developed chemically cross-linked lipid nanocapsules as carriers of molecular adjuvants and encapsulated or surface-displayed antigens, which promoted follicular helper T-cell responses and elicited high-avidity, durable antibody responses to a candidate malaria antigen. To apply this system to the delivery of HIV antigens, Env gp140 trimers with terminal his-tags (gp140T-his) were anchored to the surface of lipid nanocapsules via Ni-NTA-functionalized lipids. Initial experiments revealed that the large (409 kDa), heavily glycosylated trimers were capable of extracting fluid phase lipids from the membranes of nanocapsules. Thus, liquid-ordered and/or gel-phase lipid compositions were required to stably anchor trimers to the particle membranes. Trimer-loaded nanocapsules combined with the clinically relevant adjuvant monophosphoryl lipid A primed high-titer antibody responses in mice at antigen doses ranging from 5 μg to as low as 100 ng, whereas titers dropped more than 50-fold over the same dose range when soluble trimer was mixed with a strong oil-in-water adjuvant comparator. Nanocapsule immunization also broadened the number of distinct epitopes on the HIV trimer recognized by the antibody response. These results suggest that nanocapsules displaying HIV trimers in an oriented, multivalent presentation can promote key aspects of the humoral response against Env immunogens. PMID:25020048

  10. Presenting native-like trimeric HIV-1 antigens with self-assembling nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    He, Linling; de Val, Natalia; Morris, Charles D.; Vora, Nemil; Thinnes, Therese C.; Kong, Leopold; Azadnia, Parisa; Sok, Devin; Zhou, Bin; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A; Nemazee, David; Ward, Andrew B.; Zhu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Structures of BG505 SOSIP.664 trimer in complex with broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) have revealed the critical role of trimeric context for immune recognition of HIV-1. Presentation of trimeric HIV-1 antigens on nanoparticles may thus provide promising vaccine candidates. Here we report the rational design, structural analysis and antigenic evaluation of HIV-1 trimer-presenting nanoparticles. We first demonstrate that both V1V2 and gp120 can be presented in native-like trimeric conformations on nanoparticles. We then design nanoparticles presenting various forms of stabilized gp140 trimer based on ferritin and a large, 60-meric E2p that displays 20 spikes mimicking virus-like particles (VLPs). Particle assembly is confirmed by electron microscopy (EM), while antigenic profiles are generated using representative bNAbs and non-NAbs. Lastly, we demonstrate high-yield gp140 nanoparticle production and robust stimulation of B cells carrying cognate VRC01 receptors by gp120 and gp140 nanoparticles. Together, our study provides an arsenal of multivalent immunogens for HIV-1 vaccine development. PMID:27349934

  11. Presenting native-like trimeric HIV-1 antigens with self-assembling nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    He, Linling; de Val, Natalia; Morris, Charles D; Vora, Nemil; Thinnes, Therese C; Kong, Leopold; Azadnia, Parisa; Sok, Devin; Zhou, Bin; Burton, Dennis R; Wilson, Ian A; Nemazee, David; Ward, Andrew B; Zhu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Structures of BG505 SOSIP.664 trimer in complex with broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) have revealed the critical role of trimeric context for immune recognition of HIV-1. Presentation of trimeric HIV-1 antigens on nanoparticles may thus provide promising vaccine candidates. Here we report the rational design, structural analysis and antigenic evaluation of HIV-1 trimer-presenting nanoparticles. We first demonstrate that both V1V2 and gp120 can be presented in native-like trimeric conformations on nanoparticles. We then design nanoparticles presenting various forms of stabilized gp140 trimer based on ferritin and a large, 60-meric E2p that displays 20 spikes mimicking virus-like particles (VLPs). Particle assembly is confirmed by electron microscopy (EM), while antigenic profiles are generated using representative bNAbs and non-NAbs. Lastly, we demonstrate high-yield gp140 nanoparticle production and robust stimulation of B cells carrying cognate VRC01 receptors by gp120 and gp140 nanoparticles. Together, our study provides an arsenal of multivalent immunogens for HIV-1 vaccine development. PMID:27349934

  12. Different Infectivity of HIV-1 Strains Is Linked to Number of Envelope Trimers Required for Entry

    PubMed Central

    Brandenberg, Oliver F.; Magnus, Carsten; Rusert, Peter; Regoes, Roland R.; Trkola, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 enters target cells by virtue of envelope glycoprotein trimers that are incorporated at low density in the viral membrane. How many trimers are required to interact with target cell receptors to mediate virus entry, the HIV entry stoichiometry, still awaits clarification. Here, we provide estimates of the HIV entry stoichiometry utilizing a combined approach of experimental analyses and mathematical modeling. We demonstrate that divergent HIV strains differ in their stoichiometry of entry and require between 1 to 7 trimers, with most strains depending on 2 to 3 trimers to complete infection. Envelope modifications that perturb trimer structure lead to an increase in the entry stoichiometry, as did naturally occurring antibody or entry inhibitor escape mutations. Highlighting the physiological relevance of our findings, a high entry stoichiometry correlated with low virus infectivity and slow virus entry kinetics. The entry stoichiometry therefore directly influences HIV transmission, as trimer number requirements will dictate the infectivity of virus populations and efficacy of neutralizing antibodies. Thereby our results render consideration of stoichiometric concepts relevant for developing antibody-based vaccines and therapeutics against HIV. PMID:25569556

  13. Structure and immune recognition of trimeric prefusion HIV-1 Env

    PubMed Central

    Pancera, Marie; Zhou, Tongqing; Druz, Aliaksandr; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Soto, Cinque; Gorman, Jason; Huang, Jinghe; Acharya, Priyamvada; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Ofek, Gilad; Stewart-Jones, Guillaume B. E.; Stuckey, Jonathan; Bailer, Robert T.; Joyce, M. Gordon; Louder, Mark K.; Tumba, Nancy; Yang, Yongping; Zhang, Baoshan; Cohen, Myron S.; Haynes, Barton F.; Mascola, John R.; Morris, Lynn; Munro, James B.; Blanchard, Scott C.; Mothes, Walther; Connors, Mark; Kwong, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    The HIV-1-envelope (Env) spike, comprising three gp120 and three gp41 subunits, is a conformational machine that facilitates HIV-1 entry by rearranging from a mature unliganded state, through receptor-bound intermediates, to a postfusion state. As the sole viral antigen on the HIV-1-virion surface, Env is both the target of neutralizing antibodies and a focus of vaccine efforts. Here we report the structure at 3.5-Å resolution for an HIV-1-Env trimer captured in a mature closed state by antibodies PGT122 and 35O22. This structure reveals the prefusion conformation of gp41, indicates rearrangements needed for fusion activation, and defines parameters of immune evasion and immune recognition. Prefusion gp41 encircles N- and C-terminal strands of gp120 with four helices that form a membrane-proximal collar, fastened by insertion of a fusion peptide-proximal methionine into a gp41-tryptophan clasp. Spike rearrangements required for entry likely involve opening the clasp and expelling the termini. N-linked glycosylation and sequence-variable regions cover the prefusion closed spike: we used chronic cohorts to map the prevalence and location of effective HIV-1-neutralizing responses, which were distinguished by their recognition of N-linked glycan and tolerance for epitope-sequence variation. PMID:25296255

  14. Optimal efficiency of quantum transport in a disordered trimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusteri, Giulio G.; Celardo, G. Luca; Borgonovi, Fausto

    2016-03-01

    Disordered quantum networks, such as those describing light-harvesting complexes, are often characterized by the presence of peripheral ringlike structures, where the excitation is initialized, and inner structures and reaction centers (RCs), where the excitation is trapped and transferred. The peripheral rings often display distinguished coherent features: Their eigenstates can be separated, with respect to the transfer of excitation, into two classes of superradiant and subradiant states. Both are important to optimize transfer efficiency. In the absence of disorder, superradiant states have an enhanced coupling strength to the RC, while the subradiant ones are basically decoupled from it. Static on-site disorder induces a coupling between subradiant and superradiant states, thus creating an indirect coupling to the RC. The problem of finding the optimal transfer conditions, as a function of both the RC energy and the disorder strength, is very complex even in the simplest network, namely, a three-level system. In this paper we analyze such trimeric structure, choosing as the initial condition an excitation on a subradiant state, rather than the more common choice of an excitation localized on a single site. We show that, while the optimal disorder is of the order of the superradiant coupling, the optimal detuning between the initial state and the RC energy strongly depends on system parameters: When the superradiant coupling is much larger than the energy gap between the superradiant and the subradiant levels, optimal transfer occurs if the RC energy is at resonance with the subradiant initial state, whereas we find an optimal RC energy at resonance with a virtual dressed state when the superradiant coupling is smaller than or comparable to the gap. The presence of dynamical noise, which induces dephasing and decoherence, affects the resonance structure of energy transfer producing an additional incoherent resonance peak, which corresponds to the RC energy being

  15. PBX and MEIS as Non-DNA-Binding Partners in Trimeric Complexes with HOX Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Kandavel; Green, Nancy C.; Rambaldi, Isabel; Saragovi, H. Uri; Featherstone, Mark S.

    1999-01-01

    HOX, PBX, and MEIS transcription factors bind DNA through a homeodomain. PBX proteins bind DNA cooperatively as heterodimers with MEIS family members and also with HOX proteins from paralog groups 1 to 10. MEIS proteins cooperatively bind DNA with ABD-B class HOX proteins of groups 9 and 10. Here, we examine aspects of dimeric and higher-order interactions between these three homeodomain classes. The most significant results can be summarized as follows. (i) Most of PBX N terminal to the homeodomain is required for efficient cooperative binding with HOXD4 and HOXD9. (ii) MEIS and PBX proteins form higher-order complexes on a heterodimeric binding site. (iii) Although MEIS does not cooperatively bind DNA with ANTP class HOX proteins, it does form a trimer as a non-DNA-binding partner with DNA-bound PBX-HOXD4. (iv) The N terminus of HOXD4 negatively regulates trimer formation. (v) MEIS forms a similar trimer with DNA-bound PBX-HOXD9. (vi) A related trimer (where MEIS is a non-DNA-binding partner) is formed on a transcriptional promoter within the cell. (vii) We observe an additional trimer class involving non-DNA-bound PBX and DNA-bound MEIS-HOXD9 or MEIS-HOXD10 heterodimers that is enhanced by mutation of the PBX homeodomain. (viii) In this latter trimer, PBX is likely to contact both MEIS and HOXD9/D10. (ix) The stability of DNA binding by all trimers is enhanced relative to the heterodimers. These findings suggest novel functions for PBX and MEIS in modulating the function of DNA-bound MEIS-HOX and PBX-HOX heterodimers, respectively. PMID:10523646

  16. Comprehensive Antigenic Map of a Cleaved Soluble HIV-1 Envelope Trimer

    PubMed Central

    Derking, Ronald; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Sliepen, Kwinten; Yasmeen, Anila; Cupo, Albert; Torres, Jonathan L.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Lee, Jeong Hyun; van Montfort, Thijs; de Taeye, Steven W.; Connors, Mark; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Klasse, Per-Johan; Ward, Andrew B.; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2015-01-01

    The trimeric envelope (Env) spike is the focus of vaccine design efforts aimed at generating broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) to protect against HIV-1 infection. Three recent developments have facilitated a thorough investigation of the antigenic structure of the Env trimer: 1) the isolation of many bNAbs against multiple different epitopes; 2) the generation of a soluble trimer mimic, BG505 SOSIP.664 gp140, that expresses most bNAb epitopes; 3) facile binding assays involving the oriented immobilization of tagged trimers. Using these tools, we generated an antigenic map of the trimer by antibody cross-competition. Our analysis delineates three well-defined epitope clusters (CD4 binding site, quaternary V1V2 and Asn332-centered oligomannose patch) and new epitopes at the gp120-gp41 interface. It also identifies the relationships among these clusters. In addition to epitope overlap, we defined three more ways in which antibodies can cross-compete: steric competition from binding to proximal but non-overlapping epitopes (e.g., PGT151 inhibition of 8ANC195 binding); allosteric inhibition (e.g., PGT145 inhibition of 1NC9, 8ANC195, PGT151 and CD4 binding); and competition by reorientation of glycans (e.g., PGT135 inhibition of CD4bs bNAbs, and CD4bs bNAb inhibition of 8ANC195). We further demonstrate that bNAb binding can be complex, often affecting several other areas of the trimer surface beyond the epitope. This extensive analysis of the antigenic structure and the epitope interrelationships of the Env trimer should aid in design of both bNAb-based therapies and vaccines intended to induce bNAbs. PMID:25807248

  17. Perinatal Toxicity and Carcinogenicity Studies of Styrene –Acrylonitrile Trimer, A Ground Water Contaminant

    PubMed Central

    Behl, Mamta; Elmore, Susan A.; Malarkey, David E.; Hejtmancik, Milton R.; Gerken, Diane K.; Chhabra, Rajendra S.

    2015-01-01

    Styrene Acrylonitrile (SAN) Trimer is a by-product in the production of acrylonitrile styrene plastics. Following a report of a childhood cancer cluster in the Toms River section of Dover Township, New Jersey, SAN Trimer was identified as one of the groundwater contaminants at Reich Farm Superfund site in the township. The contaminants from the Reich Farm site’s ground water plume impacted two wells at the Parkway well field. The National Toxicology Program (NTP) studied the toxicity and carcinogenicity of SAN Trimer in rats exposed during their perinatal developmental period and adulthood. The chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity studies in F344/N rats were preceded by 7- and 18-week perinatal toxicity studies to determine the exposure concentrations for the 2-year studies. Subsequently, Fisher 344 pregnant dams were exposed to SAN Trimer containing diet at 400, 800, or 1600 ppm concentrations during gestation, nursing and weaning periods of offspring followed by two year of adult exposures to both male and female pups. There was no statistically significant evidence of carcinogenic activity following SAN-Trimer exposure; however, rare neoplasms in the brain and spinal cord were observed in males and to lesser extent in female rats. These incidences were considered within the range of historical background in the animal model used in the current studies. Therefore, the presence of a few rarely occurring CNS tumors in the treated groups were not judged to be associated with the SAN Trimer exposure. The major finding was a dose-related peripheral neuropathy associated with the sciatic nerves in females and spinal nerve roots in males and females thereby suggesting that SAN trimer is potentially a nervous system toxicant. PMID:24060431

  18. Asymmetric recognition of the HIV-1 trimer by broadly neutralizing antibody PG9.

    PubMed

    Julien, Jean-Philippe; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Cupo, Albert; Murin, Charles D; Derking, Ronald; Hoffenberg, Simon; Caulfield, Michael J; King, C Richter; Marozsan, Andre J; Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W; Moore, John P; Wilson, Ian A; Ward, Andrew B

    2013-03-12

    PG9 is the founder member of an expanding family of glycan-dependent human antibodies that preferentially bind the HIV (HIV-1) envelope (Env) glycoprotein (gp) trimer and broadly neutralize the virus. Here, we show that a soluble SOSIP.664 gp140 trimer constructed from the Clade A BG505 sequence binds PG9 with high affinity (∼11 nM), enabling structural and biophysical characterizations of the PG9:Env trimer complex. The BG505 SOSIP.664 gp140 trimer is remarkably stable as assessed by electron microscopy (EM) and differential scanning calorimetry. EM, small angle X-ray scattering, size exclusion chromatography with inline multiangle light scattering and isothermal titration calorimetry all indicate that only a single PG9 fragment antigen-binding (Fab) binds to the Env trimer. An ∼18 Å EM reconstruction demonstrates that PG9 recognizes the trimer asymmetrically at its apex via contact with two of the three gp120 protomers, possibly contributing to its reported preference for a quaternary epitope. Molecular modeling and isothermal titration calorimetry binding experiments with an engineered PG9 mutant suggest that, in addition to the N156 and N160 glycan interactions observed in crystal structures of PG9 with a scaffolded V1/V2 domain, PG9 makes secondary interactions with an N160 glycan from an adjacent gp120 protomer in the antibody-trimer complex. Together, these structural and biophysical findings should facilitate the design of HIV-1 immunogens that possess all elements of the quaternary PG9 epitope required to induce broadly neutralizing antibodies against this region. PMID:23426631

  19. A Multivalent Clade C HIV-1 Env Trimer Cocktail Elicits a Higher Magnitude of Neutralizing Antibodies than Any Individual Component

    PubMed Central

    Bricault, Christine A.; Kovacs, James M.; Nkolola, Joseph P.; Yusim, Karina; Giorgi, Elena E.; Shields, Jennifer L.; Perry, James; Lavine, Christy L.; Cheung, Ann; Ellingson-Strouss, Katharine; Rademeyer, Cecelia; Gray, Glenda E.; Williamson, Carolyn; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Seaman, Michael S.; Korber, Bette T.; Chen, Bing

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The sequence diversity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) presents a formidable challenge to the generation of an HIV-1 vaccine. One strategy to address such sequence diversity and to improve the magnitude of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is to utilize multivalent mixtures of HIV-1 envelope (Env) immunogens. Here we report the generation and characterization of three novel, acute clade C HIV-1 Env gp140 trimers (459C, 405C, and 939C), each with unique antigenic properties. Among the single trimers tested, 459C elicited the most potent NAb responses in vaccinated guinea pigs. We evaluated the immunogenicity of various mixtures of clade C Env trimers and found that a quadrivalent cocktail of clade C trimers elicited a greater magnitude of NAbs against a panel of tier 1A and 1B viruses than any single clade C trimer alone, demonstrating that the mixture had an advantage over all individual components of the cocktail. These data suggest that vaccination with a mixture of clade C Env trimers represents a promising strategy to augment vaccine-elicited NAb responses. IMPORTANCE It is currently not known how to generate potent NAbs to the diverse circulating HIV-1 Envs by vaccination. One strategy to address this diversity is to utilize mixtures of different soluble HIV-1 envelope proteins. In this study, we generated and characterized three distinct, novel, acute clade C soluble trimers. We vaccinated guinea pigs with single trimers as well as mixtures of trimers, and we found that a mixture of four trimers elicited a greater magnitude of NAbs than any single trimer within the mixture. The results of this study suggest that further development of Env trimer cocktails is warranted. PMID:25540368

  20. Murine Antibody Responses to Cleaved Soluble HIV-1 Envelope Trimers Are Highly Restricted in Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Joyce K.; Crampton, Jordan C.; Cupo, Albert; Ketas, Thomas; van Gils, Marit J.; Sliepen, Kwinten; de Taeye, Steven W.; Sok, Devin; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Deresa, Isaiah; Stanfield, Robyn; Ward, Andrew B.; Burton, Dennis R.; Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W.; Moore, John P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Generating neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) is a major goal of many current HIV-1 vaccine efforts. To be of practical value, these nAbs must be both potent and cross-reactive in order to be capable of preventing the transmission of the highly diverse and generally neutralization resistant (Tier-2) HIV-1 strains that are in circulation. The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) spike is the only target for nAbs. To explore whether Tier-2 nAbs can be induced by Env proteins, we immunized conventional mice with soluble BG505 SOSIP.664 trimers that mimic the native Env spike. Here, we report that it is extremely difficult for murine B cells to recognize the Env epitopes necessary for inducing Tier-2 nAbs. Thus, while trimer-immunized mice raised Env-binding IgG Abs and had high-quality T follicular helper (Tfh) cell and germinal center (GC) responses, they did not make BG505.T332N nAbs. Epitope mapping studies showed that Ab responses in mice were specific to areas near the base of the soluble trimer. These areas are not well shielded by glycans and likely are occluded on virions, which is consistent with the lack of BG505.T332N nAbs. These data inform immunogen design and suggest that it is useful to obscure nonneutralizing epitopes presented on the base of soluble Env trimers and that the glycan shield of well-formed HIV Env trimers is virtually impenetrable for murine B cell receptors (BCRs). IMPORTANCE Human HIV vaccine efficacy trials have not generated meaningful neutralizing antibodies to circulating HIV strains. One possible hindrance has been the lack of immunogens that properly mimic the native conformation of the HIV envelope trimer protein. Here, we tested the first generation of soluble, native-like envelope trimer immunogens in a conventional mouse model. We attempted to generate neutralizing antibodies to neutralization-resistant circulating HIV strains. Various vaccine strategies failed to induce neutralizing antibodies to a neutralization

  1. Chemical Cross-Linking Stabilizes Native-Like HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trimer Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Schiffner, Torben; de Val, Natalia; Russell, Rebecca A.; de Taeye, Steven W.; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Kim, Helen J.; Nieusma, Travis; Brod, Florian; Cupo, Albert; Sanders, Rogier W.; Moore, John P.; Ward, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Major neutralizing antibody immune evasion strategies of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer include conformational and structural instability. Stabilized soluble trimers such as BG505 SOSIP.664 mimic the structure of virion-associated Env but nevertheless sample different conformational states. Here we demonstrate that treating BG505 SOSIP.664 trimers with glutaraldehyde or a heterobifunctional cross-linker introduces additional stability with relatively modest effects on antigenicity. Thus, most broadly neutralizing antibody (bNAb) epitopes were preserved after cross-linking, whereas the binding of most weakly or nonneutralizing antibodies (non-NAb) was reduced. Cross-linking stabilized all Env conformers present within a mixed population, and individual conformers could be isolated by bNAb affinity chromatography. Both positive selection of cross-linked conformers using the quaternary epitope-specific bNAbs PGT145, PGT151, and 3BC315 and negative selection with non-NAbs against the V3 region enriched for trimer populations with improved antigenicity for bNAbs. Similar results were obtained using the clade B B41 SOSIP.664 trimer. The cross-linking method may, therefore, be useful for countering the natural conformational heterogeneity of some HIV-1 Env proteins and, by extrapolation, also vaccine immunogens from other pathogens. IMPORTANCE The development of a vaccine to induce protective antibodies against HIV-1 is of primary public health importance. Recent advances in immunogen design have provided soluble recombinant envelope glycoprotein trimers with near-native morphology and antigenicity. However, these trimers are conformationally flexible, potentially reducing B-cell recognition of neutralizing antibody epitopes. Here we show that chemical cross-linking increases trimer stability, reducing binding of nonneutralizing antibodies while largely maintaining neutralizing antibody binding. Cross-linking followed by positive or negative

  2. Tunable trimers: Using temperature and pressure to control luminescent emission in gold(I) pyrazolate-based trimers

    SciTech Connect

    Woodall, Christopher H.; Fuertes, Sara; Beavers, Christine M.; Hatcher, Lauren E.; Parlett, Andrew; Shepherd, Helena J.; Christensen, Jeppe; Teat, Simon J.; Intissar, Mourad; Rodrigue-Witchel, Alexandre; Suffren, Yan; Reber, Christian; Hendon, Christopher H.; Tiana, Davide; Walsh, Aron; Raithby, Paul R.

    2014-10-21

    A systematic investigation into the relationship between the solid-state luminescence and the intermolecular Au∙∙∙Au interactions in a series of pyrazolate-based gold(I) trimers; tris(μ2-pyrazolato-N,N')-tri-gold(I) (1), tris(μ2-3,4,5-trimethylpyrazolato-N,N')-tri-gold(I) (2), tris(μ2-3-methyl-5-phenylpyrazolato-N,N')-tri-gold(I) (3) and tris(μ2-3,5-diphenylpyrazolato-N,N')-tri-gold(I) (4) has been carried out using variable temperature and high pressure X-ray crystallography, solid-state emission spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and computational techniques. Single-crystal X-ray studies show that there is a significant reduction in the intertrimer Au∙∙∙Au distances both with decreasing temperature and increasing pressure. In the four complexes, the reduction in temperature from 293 to 100 K is accompanied by a reduction in the shortest intermolecular Au∙∙∙Au contacts of between 0.04 and 0.08 Å. The solid-state luminescent emission spectra of 1 and 2 display a red shift with decreasing temperature or increasing pressure. Compound 3 does not emit under ambient conditions but displays increasingly red-shifted luminescence upon cooling or compression. Compound 4 remains emissionless, consistent with the absence of intermolecular Au∙∙∙Au interactions. The largest pressure induced shift in emission is observed in 2 with a red shift of approximately 630 cm-1 per GPa between ambient and 3.80 GPa. The shifts in all the complexes can be correlated with changes in Au∙∙∙Au distance observed by diffraction.

  3. Tunable trimers: Using temperature and pressure to control luminescent emission in gold(I) pyrazolate-based trimers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Woodall, Christopher H.; Fuertes, Sara; Beavers, Christine M.; Hatcher, Lauren E.; Parlett, Andrew; Shepherd, Helena J.; Christensen, Jeppe; Teat, Simon J.; Intissar, Mourad; Rodrigue-Witchel, Alexandre; et al

    2014-10-21

    A systematic investigation into the relationship between the solid-state luminescence and the intermolecular Au∙∙∙Au interactions in a series of pyrazolate-based gold(I) trimers; tris(μ2-pyrazolato-N,N')-tri-gold(I) (1), tris(μ2-3,4,5-trimethylpyrazolato-N,N')-tri-gold(I) (2), tris(μ2-3-methyl-5-phenylpyrazolato-N,N')-tri-gold(I) (3) and tris(μ2-3,5-diphenylpyrazolato-N,N')-tri-gold(I) (4) has been carried out using variable temperature and high pressure X-ray crystallography, solid-state emission spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and computational techniques. Single-crystal X-ray studies show that there is a significant reduction in the intertrimer Au∙∙∙Au distances both with decreasing temperature and increasing pressure. In the four complexes, the reduction in temperature from 293 to 100 K is accompanied by a reduction in the shortest intermolecular Au∙∙∙Au contacts of between 0.04more » and 0.08 Å. The solid-state luminescent emission spectra of 1 and 2 display a red shift with decreasing temperature or increasing pressure. Compound 3 does not emit under ambient conditions but displays increasingly red-shifted luminescence upon cooling or compression. Compound 4 remains emissionless, consistent with the absence of intermolecular Au∙∙∙Au interactions. The largest pressure induced shift in emission is observed in 2 with a red shift of approximately 630 cm-1 per GPa between ambient and 3.80 GPa. The shifts in all the complexes can be correlated with changes in Au∙∙∙Au distance observed by diffraction.« less

  4. Tunable Trimers: Using Temperature and Pressure to Control Luminescent Emission in Gold(I) Pyrazolate-Based Trimers

    PubMed Central

    Woodall, Christopher H; Fuertes, Sara; Beavers, Christine M; Hatcher, Lauren E; Parlett, Andrew; Shepherd, Helena J; Christensen, Jeppe; Teat, Simon J; Intissar, Mourad; Rodrigue-Witchel, Alexandre; Suffren, Yan; Reber, Christian; Hendon, Christopher H; Tiana, Davide; Walsh, Aron; Raithby, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    A systematic investigation into the relationship between the solid-state luminescence and the intermolecular Au⋅⋅⋅Au interactions in a series of pyrazolate-based gold(I) trimers; tris(μ2-pyrazolato-N,N′)-tri-gold(I) (1), tris(μ2-3,4,5- trimethylpyrazolato-N,N′)-tri-gold(I) (2), tris(μ2-3-methyl-5-phenylpyrazolato-N,N′)-tri-gold(I) (3) and tris(μ2-3,5-diphenylpyrazolato-N,N′)-tri-gold(I) (4) has been carried out using variable temperature and high pressure X-ray crystallography, solid-state emission spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and computational techniques. Single-crystal X-ray studies show that there is a significant reduction in the intertrimer Au⋅⋅⋅Au distances both with decreasing temperature and increasing pressure. In the four complexes, the reduction in temperature from 293 to 100 K is accompanied by a reduction in the shortest intermolecular Au⋅⋅⋅Au contacts of between 0.04 and 0.08 Å. The solid-state luminescent emission spectra of 1 and 2 display a red shift with decreasing temperature or increasing pressure. Compound 3 does not emit under ambient conditions but displays increasingly red-shifted luminescence upon cooling or compression. Compound 4 remains emissionless, consistent with the absence of intermolecular Au⋅⋅⋅Au interactions. The largest pressure induced shift in emission is observed in 2 with a red shift of approximately 630 cm−1 per GPa between ambient and 3.80 GPa. The shifts in all the complexes can be correlated with changes in Au⋅⋅⋅Au distance observed by diffraction. PMID:25331304

  5. Unexpected Trimerization of Pyrazine in the Coordination Sphere of Low-Valent Titanocene Fragments.

    PubMed

    Jung, Thomas; Beckhaus, Rüdiger; Klüner, Thorsten; Höfener, Sebastian; Klopper, Wim

    2009-08-11

    The titanium mediated trimerization of pyrazine leads to the formation of a tris-chelate complex employing a 4a,4b,8a,8b,12a,12b-hexahydrodiyprazino[2,3-f:2',3'-h]quinoxaline ligand (HATH6, 3). The driving force in the formation of the (Cp*2Ti)3(HATH6) complex 2 is attributed to the formation of six Ti-N bonds. We show that density functional theory (DFT) fails to predict quantitatively correct results. Therefore, post-Hartree-Fock methods, such as second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2), in combination with coupled-cluster (CC) methods must be used. Both MP2 and CCSD(T) levels of theory provide endothermic trimerization energies, showing that the plain pyrazine trimer is not stable with respect to decomposition into its monomers. Complete basis set (CBS) results for the MP2 level of theory were computed using explicitly correlated wave functions. With these, we estimate the CCSD(T) CBS limit of the hypothetical trimerization energy to be +0.78 eV. Thus, the trimerization is facilitated by the formation of six Ti-N bonds with a calculated formation energy of -1.32 eV per bond. PMID:26613146

  6. Is It Beneficial for the Major Photosynthetic Antenna Complex of Plants To Form Trimers?

    PubMed

    Janik, Ewa; Bednarska, Joanna; Zubik, Monika; Sowinski, Karol; Luchowski, Rafal; Grudzinski, Wojciech; Gruszecki, Wieslaw I

    2015-07-01

    The process of primary electric charge separation in photosynthesis takes place in the reaction centers, but photosynthesis can operate efficiently and fluently due to the activity of several pigment-protein complexes called antenna, which absorb light quanta and transfer electronic excitations toward the reaction centers. LHCII is the major photosynthetic pigment-protein antenna complex of plants and appears in the trimeric form. Several recent reports point to trimeric organization of LHCII as a key factor responsible for the chloroplast architecture via stabilization of granal organization of the thylakoid membranes. In the present work, we address the question of whether such an organization could also directly influence the antenna properties of this pigment-protein complex. Chlorophyll fluorescence analysis reveals that excitation energy transfer in LHCII is substantially more efficient in trimers and dissipative energy losses are higher in monomers. It could be concluded that trimers are exceptionally well suited to perform the antenna function. Possibility of fine regulation of the photosynthetic antenna function via the LHCII trimer-monomer transition is also discussed, based on the fluorescence lifetime analysis in a single chloroplast. PMID:26085037

  7. Infrared Spectra and Calculated Binding Energies of γ-BUTYROLACTONE Dimers and Trimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Eric; Baumann, Chris

    2014-06-01

    Infrared spectra for matrix-isolated γ-butyrolactone and γ-butyrolactone-d_6 were obtained. The carbonyl stretching mode occurs at 1803 cm-1 for the monomer species, 1786 cm-1 for the dimer species, and 1774 cm-1 for the trimer species (1797, 1789 and 1770 cm-1 for the deuterated isotopomer.) Vibrational frequencies calculated using density functional theory are in agreement with the experimental values. Density functional theory was used to calculate the structures and binding energies of γ-butyrolactone dimers and trimers. Binding energies of 55-58 kJ mol-1 are predicted for the dimer structures. Optimized geometries for stacked and ring trimer structures have been calculated, with predicted binding energies of up to 68 kJ mol-1.

  8. Temperature influences epimerization and composition of flavanol monomers, dimers and trimers during cocoa bean roasting.

    PubMed

    Kothe, Lisa; Zimmermann, Benno F; Galensa, Rudolf

    2013-12-15

    Cocoa consumption is suggested to promote many health benefits, since cocoa is a rich source of flavanols; but amounts and profiles of flavanols depend strongly on the bean type, origin and manufacturing process. Roasting is known as a crucial step in technical treatment of cocoa, which leads to flavanol losses and modifications, especially the epimerization of (-)-epicatechin to (-)-catechin. This study monitors the influence of cocoa bean roasting on the composition of flavanol monomers to trimers, with special focus on epimerization, which was quantified for procyanidin dimers, and also observed for trimers for the first time. Five dimeric and two trimeric potential epimerization products were detected and the extent of epimerization during cocoa roasting was shown to be a function of temperature. The data also showed remarkable variations in the change of flavanol content. The quantified flavanols decreased about 50% in Java beans and increased about 30% in Ivory Coast beans, despite being roasted under equal conditions. PMID:23993533

  9. Correlation between AcrB trimer association affinity and efflux activity.

    PubMed

    Ye, Cui; Wang, Zhaoshuai; Lu, Wei; Zhong, Meng; Chai, Qian; Wei, Yinan

    2014-06-17

    The majority of membrane proteins function as oligomers. However, it remains largely unclear how the oligomer stability of protein complexes correlates with their function. Understanding the relationship between oligomer stability and activity is essential to protein research and to virtually all cellular processes that depend on the function of protein complexes. Proteins make lasting or transient interactions as they perform their functions. Obligate oligomeric proteins exist and function exclusively at a specific oligomeric state. Although oligomerization is clearly critical for such proteins to function, a direct correlation between oligomer affinity and biological activity has not yet been reported. Here, we used an obligate trimeric membrane transporter protein, AcrB, as a model to investigate the correlation between its relative trimer affinity and efflux activity. AcrB is a component of the major multidrug efflux system in Escherichia coli. We created six AcrB constructs with mutations at the transmembrane intersubunit interface, and we determined their activities using both a drug susceptibility assay and an ethidium bromide accumulation assay. The relative trimer affinities of these mutants in detergent micelles were obtained using blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. A correlation between the relative trimer affinity and substrate efflux activity was observed, in which a threshold trimer stability was required to maintain efflux activity. The trimer affinity of the wild-type protein was approximately 3 kcal/mol more stable than the threshold value. Once the threshold was reached, an additional increase of stability in the range observed had no observable effect on protein activity. PMID:24854514

  10. Why are the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes so large? Generation of an active trimeric complex.

    PubMed

    Marrott, Nia L; Marshall, Jacqueline J T; Svergun, Dmitri I; Crennell, Susan J; Hough, David W; van den Elsen, Jean M H; Danson, Michael J

    2014-11-01

    The four-component polypeptides of the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complex from the thermophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum assemble to give an active multienzyme complex possessing activity with the branched-chain 2-oxoacids derived from leucine, isoleucine and valine, and with pyruvate. The dihydrolipoyl acyl-transferase (E2) core of the complex is composed of identical trimer-forming units that assemble into a novel 42-mer structure comprising octahedral and icosahedral geometric aspects. From our previously determined structure of this catalytic core, the inter-trimer interactions involve a tyrosine residue near the C-terminus secured in a hydrophobic pocket of an adjacent trimer like a ball-and-socket joint. In the present study, we have deleted the five C-terminal amino acids of the E2 polypeptide (IIYEI) and shown by equilibrium centrifugation that it now only assembles into a trimeric enzyme. This was confirmed by SAXS analysis, although this technique showed the presence of approximately 20% hexamers. The crystal structure of the trimeric truncated E2 core has been determined and shown to be virtually identical with the ones observed in the 42-mer, demonstrating that removal of the C-terminal anchor does not significantly affect the individual monomer or trimer structures. The truncated E2 is still able to bind both 2-oxoacid decarboxylase (E1) and dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (E3) components to give an active complex with catalytic activity similar to the native multienzyme complex. This is the first report of an active mini-complex for this enzyme, and raises the question of why all 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complexes assemble into such large structures. PMID:25088564

  11. Potential Prepore Trimer Formation by the Bacillus thuringiensis Mosquito-specific Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Sriwimol, Wilaiwan; Aroonkesorn, Aratee; Sakdee, Somsri; Kanchanawarin, Chalermpol; Uchihashi, Takayuki; Ando, Toshio; Angsuthanasombat, Chanan

    2015-01-01

    The insecticidal feature of the three-domain Cry δ-endotoxins from Bacillus thuringiensis is generally attributed to their capability to form oligomeric pores, causing lysis of target larval midgut cells. However, the molecular description of their oligomerization process has not been clearly defined. Here a stable prepore of the 65-kDa trypsin-activated Cry4Ba mosquito-specific toxin was established through membrane-mimetic environments by forming an ∼200-kDa octyl-β-d-glucoside micelle-induced trimer. The SDS-resistant trimer caused cytolysis to Sf9 insect cells expressing Aedes-mALP (a Cry4Ba receptor) and was more effective than a toxin monomer in membrane perturbation of calcein-loaded liposomes. A three-dimensional model of toxin trimer obtained by negative-stain EM in combination with single-particle reconstruction at ∼5 nm resolution showed a propeller-shaped structure with 3-fold symmetry. Fitting the three-dimensional reconstructed EM map with a 100-ns molecular dynamics-simulated Cry4Ba structure interacting with an octyl-β-d-glucoside micelle showed relative positioning of individual domains in the context of the trimeric complex with a major protrusion from the pore-forming domain. Moreover, high-speed atomic force microscopy imaging at nanometer resolution and a subsecond frame rate demonstrated conformational transitions from a propeller-like to a globularly shaped trimer upon lipid membrane interactions, implying prepore-to-pore conversion. Real-time trimeric arrangement of monomers associated with l-α-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine/3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-2-hydroxy-1-propanesulfonic acid bicelle membranes was also envisaged by successive high-speed atomic force microscopy imaging, depicting interactions among three individual subunits toward trimer formation. Together, our data provide the first pivotal insights into the structural requirement of membrane-induced conformational changes of Cry4Ba toxin monomers for the

  12. Non-Hermitian trimers: PT-symmetry versus pseudo-Hermiticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchkov, Sergey V.; Fotsa-Ngaffo, Fernande; Kenfack-Jiotsa, Aurelien; Tikeng, Arnaud D.; Kofane, Timoleon C.; Kivshar, Yuri S.; Sukhorukov, Andrey A.

    2016-06-01

    We study a structure composed of three coupled waveguides with gain and loss, a non-Hermitian trimer. We demonstrate that the mode spectrum can be entirely real if the waveguides are placed in a special order and at certain distances between each other. Such structures generally lack a spatial symmetry, in contrast to parity-time symmetric trimers which are known to feature a real spectrum. We also determine a threshold for wave amplification and analyse the scattering properties of such non-conservative systems embedded into a chain of conservative waveguides.

  13. A theoretical study of the rovibrational levels of the bosonic van der Waals neon trimer.

    PubMed

    Salci, Moses; Levin, Sergey B; Elander, Nils; Yarevsky, Evgeny

    2008-10-01

    The eigenenergies and root mean square radii of the rovibrational levels (J = 0-3) of the weakly bound bosonic van der Waals neon trimer were calculated using a full angular momentum three-dimensional finite element method. The differing results of three previous studies for zero angular momentum are discussed, explained, and compared with the results presented here. PMID:19045087

  14. Cleavage-independent HIV-1 Env trimers engineered as soluble native spike mimetics for vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shailendra Kumar; de Val, Natalia; Bale, Shridhar; Guenaga, Javier; Tran, Karen; Feng, Yu; Dubrovskaya, Viktoriya; Ward, Andrew B.; Wyatt, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Viral glycoproteins mediate entry by pH-activated or receptor-engaged activation and exist in metastable pre-fusogenic states that may be stabilized by directed rational design. As recently reported, the conformationally fixed HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimers in the pre-fusion state (SOSIP) display molecular homogeneity and structural integrity at relatively high levels of resolution. However, the SOSIPs necessitate full Env precursor cleavage, which requires endogenous furin over-expression. Here, we developed an alternative strategy using flexible peptide covalent linkage of Env subdomains to produce soluble, homogeneous and cleavage-independent Env mimics, called native flexibly linked (NFL) trimers, as vaccine candidates. This simplified design avoids the need for furin co-expression and, in one case, antibody affinity purification to accelerate trimer scale-up for preclinical and clinical applications. We have successfully translated the NFL design to multiple HIV-1 subtypes, establishing the potential to become a general method of producing native-like, well-ordered Env trimers for HIV-1 or other viruses. PMID:25892233

  15. Formation of 4-aminopyrimidines via the trimerization of nitriles using focused microwave heating.

    PubMed

    Baxendale, Ian R; Ley, Steven V

    2005-01-01

    A series of substituted aliphatic nitriles have been trimerized to their corresponding pyrimidine structures under solvent-free conditions in the presence of catalytic quantities of potassium tert-butoxide using a focused microwave reactor. Multigram quantities of the corresponding 4-aminopyrimidines have been prepared in high yields and purity following a simple and scaleable protocol. PMID:15877477

  16. Green's function Monte Carlo calculation for the ground state of helium trimers

    SciTech Connect

    Cabral, F.; Kalos, M.H.

    1981-02-01

    The ground state energy of weakly bound boson trimers interacting via Lennard-Jones (12,6) pair potentials is calculated using a Monte Carlo Green's Function Method. Threshold coupling constants for self binding are obtained by extrapolation to zero binding.

  17. Theory vs. experiment for molecular clusters: Spectra of OCS trimers and tetramers

    SciTech Connect

    Evangelisti, Luca; Perez, Cristobal; Seifert, Nathan A.; Pate, Brooks H.; Dehghany, M.; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.; McKellar, A. R. W.

    2015-03-14

    All singly substituted {sup 13}C, {sup 18}O, and {sup 34}S isotopomers of the previously known OCS trimer are observed in natural abundance in a broad-band spectrum measured with a chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. The complete substitution structure thus obtained critically tests (and confirms) the common assumption that monomers tend to retain their free structure in a weakly bound cluster. A new OCS trimer isomer is also observed, and its structure is determined to be barrel-shaped but with the monomers all approximately aligned, in contrast to the original trimer which is barrel-shaped with two monomers aligned and one anti-aligned. An OCS tetramer spectrum is assigned for the first time, and the tetramer structure resembles an original trimer with an OCS monomer added at the end with two sulfur atoms. Infrared spectra observed in the region of the OCS ν{sub 1} fundamental (≈2060 cm{sup −1}) are assigned to the same OCS tetramer, and another infrared band is tentatively assigned to a different tetramer isomer. The experimental results are compared and contrasted with theoretical predictions from the literature and from new cluster calculations which use an accurate OCS pair potential and assume pairwise additivity.

  18. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Klaus B.; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M.; Wilbek, Theis S.; Nielsen, Line S.; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S.; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins. PMID:25658767

  19. Geometrically frustrated Fe2P-like systems: beyond the Fe-trimer approximation.

    PubMed

    Florez, J M; Negrete, O A; Vargas, P; Ross, C A

    2015-07-22

    Fe(2)P-like structures can be strongly frustrated magnets due to their Kagome/triangular intercalated-layer structure. A complete magnetic solution of the complex spin architecture, and hence the full potential of the magnetic phenomena in Fe(2)P-like material prototypes, is yet to be found. A previous magnetic model for a representative FeCrAs-like system used a mean-field effective-spin to describe the 3g-Wyckoff located Fe-triangles. Such an approach demonstrated the outstanding magnetocaloric properties of the material but left the question of whether the intra-trimer interaction could lead to new physical phenomena and therefore more potentially useful properties. In this work Monte Carlo simulations are employed in order to understand both the influence of the additional degrees of freedom introduced by the Fe-trimers and the changes caused by all the possible exchange couplings between them. Complex scenarios arise, in which FM coupling in the trimers gives rise to both in-plane and out-of-plane inter-layer AFM states; whereas AFM exchange in the trimers gives rise to three distinct states, i.e. AFM-canted layers, a non-collinear superposition of ferromagnetic Kagome/triangular orderings, and tilted inter-planar AFM order. These last three configurations generate a double bifurcated magnetic phase diagram while the first one mimics the behavior seen in a model that treats the trimer as an effective-spin under an applied magnetic field. PMID:26125529

  20. A Structural Study of CESA1 Catalytic Domain of Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthesis Complex: Evidence for CESA Trimers

    SciTech Connect

    Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Putnam, Daniel K.; Zhang, Qiu; Petridis, Loukas; Heller, William T.; Nixon, B. Tracy; Haigler, Candace H.; Kalluri, Udaya; Coates, Leighton; Langan, Paul; Smith, Jeremy C.; Meiler, Jens; O’Neill, Hugh

    2015-11-10

    In a cellulose synthesis complex a "rosette" shape is responsible for the synthesis of cellulose chains and their assembly into microfibrils within the cell walls of land plants and their charophyte algal progenitors. The number of cellulose synthase proteins in this large multisubunit transmembrane protein complex and the number of cellulose chains in a microfibril have been debated for many years. Our work reports a low resolution structure of the catalytic domain of CESA1 from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; AtCESA1CatD) determined by small-angle scattering techniques and provides the first experimental evidence for the self-assembly of CESA into a stable trimer in solution. The catalytic domain was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and using a two-step procedure, it was possible to isolate monomeric and trimeric forms of AtCESA1CatD. Moreover, the conformation of monomeric and trimeric AtCESA1CatD proteins were studied using small-angle neutron scattering and small-angle x-ray scattering. A series of AtCESA1CatD trimer computational models were compared with the small-angle x-ray scattering trimer profile to explore the possible arrangement of the monomers in the trimers. Several candidate trimers were identified with monomers oriented such that the newly synthesized cellulose chains project toward the cell membrane. In these models, the class-specific region is found at the periphery of the complex, and the plant-conserved region forms the base of the trimer. Finally, this study strongly supports the "hexamer of trimers" model for the rosette cellulose synthesis complex that synthesizes an 18-chain cellulose microfibril as its fundamental product.

  1. A Structural Study of CESA1 Catalytic Domain of Arabidopsis Cellulose Synthesis Complex: Evidence for CESA Trimers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vandavasi, Venu Gopal; Putnam, Daniel K.; Zhang, Qiu; Petridis, Loukas; Heller, William T.; Nixon, B. Tracy; Haigler, Candace H.; Kalluri, Udaya; Coates, Leighton; Langan, Paul; et al

    2015-11-10

    In a cellulose synthesis complex a "rosette" shape is responsible for the synthesis of cellulose chains and their assembly into microfibrils within the cell walls of land plants and their charophyte algal progenitors. The number of cellulose synthase proteins in this large multisubunit transmembrane protein complex and the number of cellulose chains in a microfibril have been debated for many years. Our work reports a low resolution structure of the catalytic domain of CESA1 from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; AtCESA1CatD) determined by small-angle scattering techniques and provides the first experimental evidence for the self-assembly of CESA into a stable trimer inmore » solution. The catalytic domain was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and using a two-step procedure, it was possible to isolate monomeric and trimeric forms of AtCESA1CatD. Moreover, the conformation of monomeric and trimeric AtCESA1CatD proteins were studied using small-angle neutron scattering and small-angle x-ray scattering. A series of AtCESA1CatD trimer computational models were compared with the small-angle x-ray scattering trimer profile to explore the possible arrangement of the monomers in the trimers. Several candidate trimers were identified with monomers oriented such that the newly synthesized cellulose chains project toward the cell membrane. In these models, the class-specific region is found at the periphery of the complex, and the plant-conserved region forms the base of the trimer. Finally, this study strongly supports the "hexamer of trimers" model for the rosette cellulose synthesis complex that synthesizes an 18-chain cellulose microfibril as its fundamental product.« less

  2. Comparative evaluation of trimeric envelope glycoproteins derived from subtype C and B HIV-1 R5 isolates

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, Indresh K. Kan, Elaine; Sun Yide; Sharma, Victoria A.; Cisto, Jimna; Burke, Brian; Lian Ying; Hilt, Susan; Biron, Zohar; Hartog, Karin; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Cheng, R. Holland; Ulmer, Jeffrey B.; Barnett, Susan W.

    2008-03-15

    We previously reported that an envelope (Env) glycoprotein immunogen (o-gp140{delta}V2SF162) containing a partial deletion in the second variable loop (V2) derived from the R5-tropic HIV-1 isolate SF162 partially protected vaccinated rhesus macaques against pathogenic SHIV{sub SF162P4} virus. Extending our studies to subtype C isolate TV1, we have purified o-gp140{delta}V2TV1 (subtype C {delta}V2 trimer) to homogeneity, performed glycosylation analysis, and determined its ability to bind CD4, as well as a panel of well-characterized neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAb). In general, critical epitopes are preserved on the subtype C {delta}V2 trimer; however, we did not observe significant binding for the b12 mAb. The molecular mass of subtype C {delta}V2 trimer was found to be 450 kDa, and the hydrodynamic radius was found to be 10.87 nm. Our data suggest that subtype C {delta}V2 trimer binds to CD4 with an affinity comparable to o-gp140{delta}V2SF162 (subtype B {delta}V2 trimer). Using isothermal titration calorimetric (ITC) analysis, we demonstrated that all three CD4 binding sites (CD4-BS) in both subtype C and B trimers are exposed and accessible. However, compared to subtype B trimer, the three CD4-BS in subtype C trimer have different affinities for CD4, suggesting a cooperativity of CD4 binding in subtype C trimer but not in subtype B trimer. Negative staining electron microscopy of the subtype C {delta}V2 trimer has demonstrated that it is in fact a trimer. These results highlight the importance of studying subtype C Env, and also of developing appropriate subtype C-specific reagents that may be used for better immunological characterization of subtype C Env for developing an AIDS vaccine.

  3. Binding of inferred germline precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies to native-like envelope trimers

    PubMed Central

    Sliepen, Kwinten; Medina-Ramírez, Max; Yasmeen, Anila; Moore, John P.; Klasse, Per Johan; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env) and Env-based immunogens usually do not interact efficiently with the inferred germline precursors of known broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). This deficiency may be one reason why Env and Env-based immunogens are not efficient at inducing bNAbs. We evaluated the binding of 15 inferred germline precursors of bNAbs directed to different epitope clusters to three soluble native-like SOSIP.664 Env trimers. We found that native-like SOSIP.664 trimers bind to some inferred germline precursors of bNAbs, particularly ones involving the V1/V2 loops at the apex of the trimer. The data imply that native-like SOSIP.664 trimers will be an appropriate platform for structure-guided design improvements intended to create immunogens able to target the germline precursors of bNAbs. PMID:26433050

  4. Use of correlated potential harmonic basis functions for the description of the {sup 4}He trimer and small clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Tapan Kumar; Chakrabarti, Barnali; Canuto, Sylvio

    2011-04-28

    A correlated many-body basis function is used to describe the {sup 4}He trimer and small helium clusters ({sup 4}He{sub N}) with N= 4 - 9. A realistic helium dimer potential is adopted. The ground state results of the {sup 4}He dimer and trimer are in close agreement with earlier findings. But no evidence is found for the existence of Efimov state in the trimer for the actual {sup 4}He-{sup 4}He interaction. However, decreasing the potential strength we calculate several excited states of the trimer which exhibit Efimov character. We also solve for excited state energies of these clusters which are in good agreement with Monte Carlo hyperspherical description.

  5. Dynamics of Spatially Confined Bisphenol A Trimers in a Unimolecular Network on Ag(111).

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Julian A; Papageorgiou, Anthoula C; Fischer, Sybille; Oh, Seung Cheol; Saǧlam, Özge; Diller, Katharina; Duncan, David A; Allegretti, Francesco; Klappenberger, Florian; Stöhr, Martin; Maurer, Reinhard J; Reuter, Karsten; Reichert, Joachim; Barth, Johannes V

    2016-03-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) aggregates on Ag(111) shows a polymorphism between two supramolecular motifs leading to formation of distinct networks depending on thermal energy. With rising temperature a dimeric pairing scheme reversibly converts into a trimeric motif, which forms a hexagonal superstructure with complex dynamic characteristics. The trimeric arrangements notably organize spontaneously into a self-assembled one-component array with supramolecular BPA rotors embedded in a two-dimensional stator sublattice. By varying the temperature, the speed of the rotors can be controlled as monitored by direct visualization. A combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and dispersion-corrected density-functional tight-binding (DFTB-vdW(surf)) based molecular modeling reveals the exact atomistic position of each molecule within the assembly as well as the driving force for the formation of the supramolecular rotors. PMID:26849384

  6. Cryo-EM structure of a native, fully glycosylated, cleaved HIV-1 envelope trimer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Hyun; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Ward, Andrew B

    2016-03-01

    The envelope glycoprotein trimer (Env) on the surface of HIV-1 recognizes CD4(+) T cells and mediates viral entry. During this process, Env undergoes substantial conformational rearrangements, making it difficult to study in its native state. Soluble stabilized trimers have provided valuable insights into the Env structure, but they lack the hydrophobic membrane proximal external region (MPER, an important target of broadly neutralizing antibodies), the transmembrane domain, and the cytoplasmic tail. Here we present (i) a cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of a clade B virus Env, which lacks only the cytoplasmic tail and is stabilized by the broadly neutralizing antibody PGT151, at a resolution of 4.2 angstroms and (ii) a reconstruction of this form of Env in complex with PGT151 and MPER-targeting antibody 10E8 at a resolution of 8.8 angstroms. These structures provide new insights into the wild-type Env structure. PMID:26941313

  7. Computational study of trimer self-assembly and fluid phase behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, Harold W. Shen, Vincent K.; Mittal, Jeetain

    2015-04-28

    The fluid phase diagram of trimer particles composed of one central attractive bead and two repulsive beads was determined as a function of simple geometric parameters using flat-histogram Monte Carlo methods. A variety of self-assembled structures were obtained including spherical micelle-like clusters, elongated clusters, and densely packed cylinders, depending on both the state conditions and shape of the trimer. Advanced simulation techniques were employed to determine transitions between self-assembled structures and macroscopic phases using thermodynamic and structural definitions. Simple changes in particle geometry yield dramatic changes in phase behavior, ranging from macroscopic fluid phase separation to molecular-scale self-assembly. In special cases, both self-assembled, elongated clusters and bulk fluid phase separation occur simultaneously. Our work suggests that tuning particle shape and interactions can yield superstructures with controlled architecture.

  8. Trimers, Molecules, and Polarons in Mass-Imbalanced Atomic Fermi Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Mathy, Charles J. M.; Parish, Meera M.; Huse, David A.

    2011-04-22

    We consider the ground state of a single ''spin-down'' impurity atom interacting attractively with a ''spin-up'' atomic Fermi gas. By constructing variational wave functions for polarons, molecules, and trimers, we perform a detailed study of the transitions between these dressed bound states as a function of mass ratio r=m{sub {up_arrow}}/m{sub {down_arrow}} and interaction strength. Crucially, we find that the presence of a Fermi sea enhances the stability of the p-wave trimer, which can be viewed as a Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov molecule that has bound an additional majority atom. For sufficiently large r, we find that the transitions lie outside the region of phase separation of the imbalanced Fermi gas and should thus be observable in experiment, unlike the well-studied equal-mass case.

  9. Hepatitis C Virus Envelope Glycoprotein E1 Forms Trimers at the Surface of the Virion

    PubMed Central

    Falson, Pierre; Bartosch, Birke; Alsaleh, Khaled; Tews, Birke Andrea; Loquet, Antoine; Ciczora, Yann; Riva, Laura; Montigny, Cédric; Montpellier, Claire; Duverlie, Gilles; Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle; le Maire, Marc; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected cells, the envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 assemble as a heterodimer. To investigate potential changes in the oligomerization of virion-associated envelope proteins, we performed SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions but without thermal denaturation. This revealed the presence of SDS-resistant trimers of E1 in the context of cell-cultured HCV (HCVcc) as well as in the context of HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpp). The formation of E1 trimers was found to depend on the coexpression of E2. To further understand the origin of E1 trimer formation, we coexpressed in bacteria the transmembrane (TM) domains of E1 (TME1) and E2 (TME2) fused to reporter proteins and analyzed the fusion proteins by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. As expected for strongly interacting TM domains, TME1–TME2 heterodimers resistant to SDS were observed. These analyses also revealed homodimers and homotrimers of TME1, indicating that such complexes are stable species. The N-terminal segment of TME1 exhibits a highly conserved GxxxG sequence, a motif that is well documented to be involved in intramembrane protein-protein interactions. Single or double mutations of the glycine residues (Gly354 and Gly358) in this motif markedly decreased or abrogated the formation of TME1 homotrimers in bacteria, as well as homotrimers of E1 in both HCVpp and HCVcc systems. A concomitant loss of infectivity was observed, indicating that the trimeric form of E1 is essential for virus infectivity. Taken together, these results indicate that E1E2 heterodimers form trimers on HCV particles, and they support the hypothesis that E1 could be a fusion protein. IMPORTANCE HCV glycoproteins E1 and E2 play an essential role in virus entry into liver cells as well as in virion morphogenesis. In infected cells, these two proteins form a complex in which E2 interacts with cellular receptors, whereas the function of E1 remains poorly understood. However, recent structural data suggest that E1

  10. Two-dimensional vibronic spectroscopy of molecular aggregates: Trimers, dimers, and monomers.

    PubMed

    Keß, M; Worth, G; Engel, V

    2016-08-28

    The two-dimensional (2D) vibronic spectroscopy of molecular trimers is studied theoretically. The solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is carried out with the multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) method which allows for an efficient propagation of the multi-component wave functions. 2D-spectra are calculated for H- and J-type aggregates incorporating one or two vibrational modes for each monomer. In performing calculations for monomer, dimer, and trimer systems, it is documented how the vibronic structure of the 2D-spectrum changes upon aggregation. This is of importance for the characterization of aggregation behavior being influenced by experimental conditions such as temperature or concentration. PMID:27586920

  11. Chiral conglomerates observed for a binary mixture of a nematic liquid crystal trimer and 6OCB.

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Atsushi; Kato, Yusuke; Sasaki, Haruna; Takanishi, Yoichi; Yamamoto, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Dark conglomerates of domains with opposite handedness, which are designated as dark conglomerate phases (DC phases), have attracted much attention. After designing an achiral liquid crystal trimer, 4,4′-bis{7-[4-(5-octyloxypyrimidin-2-yl)phenyloxy]heptyloxy}biphenyl (1), which exhibits only a nematic phase, we prepared binary mixtures with some typical rod-like nematic liquid crystals, i.e., 4′-hexyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl (6OCB), 2-(4-hexyloxyphenyl)-5-pentyloxypyrimidine (PPY), or 4-methyloxyphenyl 4-hexyloxycyclohexanecarboxylate (PCA), and investigated their phase transition behaviour. The binary mixtures containing 55–90 mol% of 6OCB were found to exhibit a nematic phase and a DC phase of chiral domains with opposite handedness. However, neither PPY nor PCA induced such a chiral conglomerate phase in the mixture with trimer 1. We discuss how core–core interactions contribute to produce such a chiral conglomerate phase. PMID:26395546

  12. Universal Trimers Induced by Spin-Orbit Coupling in Ultracold Fermi Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhe-Yu; Cui, Xiaoling; Zhai, Hui

    2014-01-01

    In this Letter we address the issue of how synthetic spin-orbit (SO) coupling can strongly affect three-body physics in ultracold atomic gases. We consider a system which consists of three fermionic atoms, including two spinless heavy atoms and one spin-1/2 light atom subjected to an isotropic SO coupling. We find that SO coupling can induce universal three-body bound states with a negative s-wave scattering length at a smaller mass ratio, where no trimer bound state can exist if in the absence of SO coupling. The energies of these trimers are independent of the high-energy cutoff, and therefore they are universal ones. Moreover, the resulting atom-dimer resonance can be effectively controlled by SO coupling strength. Our results can be applied to systems like a Li6 and K40 mixture.

  13. Carbon atom, dimer and trimer chemistry on diamond surfaces from molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Valone, S.M.

    1995-07-01

    Spectroscopic studies of various atmospheres appearing in diamond film synthesis suggest evidence for carbon atoms, dimers, or trimers. Molecular dynamics simulations with the Brenner hydrocarbon potential are being used to investigate the elementary reactions of these species on a hydrogen-terminated diamond (111) surface. In principle these types of simulations can be extended to simulations of growth morphologies, in the 1-2 monolayer regime presently.

  14. Manzamenone O, new trimeric fatty acid derivative from a marine sponge Plakortis sp.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naonobu; Asai, Miki; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Gonoi, Tohru; Fromont, Jane; Kobayashi, Jun'ichi

    2013-05-17

    A new structurally unique trimeric fatty acid derivative, manzamenone O (1), was isolated from a marine sponge Plakortis sp. Manzamenone O (1) has a novel skeleton consisting of C-C bonded octahydroindenone and dioxabicyclo[3.3.0]octane moieties and three long aliphatic chains. The structure of 1 was elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data and conformational analysis. Manzamenone O (1) exhibited antimicrobial activity against Micrococcus luteus, Aspergillis niger, and Trichophyton mentagrophytes. PMID:23651077

  15. Robust Neutralizing Antibodies Elicited by HIV-1 JRFL Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yu; Sharma, Shailendra Kumar; McKee, Krisha; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Montefiori, David C.; Mascola, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Host cell-mediated proteolytic cleavage of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp160 precursor glycoprotein into gp120 and gp41 subunits is required to generate fusion-competent envelope glycoprotein (Env) spikes. The gp120-directed broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bNabs) isolated from HIV-infected individuals efficiently recognize fully cleaved JRFL Env spikes; however, nonneutralizing gp120-directed monoclonal antibodies isolated from infected or vaccinated subjects recognize only uncleaved JRFL spikes. Therefore, as an immunogen, cleaved spikes that selectively present desired neutralizing epitopes to B cells may elicit cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies. Accordingly, we inoculated nonhuman primates (NHPs) with plasmid DNA encoding transmembrane-anchored, cleaved JRFL Env or by electroporation (EP). Priming with DNA expressing soluble, uncleaved gp140 trimers was included as a comparative experimental group of NHPs. DNA inoculation was followed by boosts with soluble JRFL gp140 trimers, and control NHPs were inoculated with soluble JRFL protein trimers without DNA priming. In the TZM-bl assay, elicitation of neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 tier 1 isolates was robust following the protein boost. Neutralization of tier 2 isolates was detected, but only in animals primed with plasmid DNA and boosted with trimeric protein. Using the more sensitive A3R5 assay, consistent neutralization of both clade B and C tier 2 isolates was detected from all regimens assessed in the current study, exceeding levels achieved by our previous vaccine regimens in primates. Together, these data suggest a potential advantage of B cell priming followed by a rest interval and protein boosting to present JRFL Env spikes to the immune system to better generate HIV-1 cross-clade neutralizing antibodies. PMID:24067980

  16. Cryo-electron microscopy structure of a coronavirus spike glycoprotein trimer

    PubMed Central

    Frenz, Brandon; Rottier, Peter J.M.; DiMaio, Frank; Rey, Félix A.; Veesler, David

    2016-01-01

    The tremendous pandemic potential of coronaviruses was demonstrated twice in the last decades by two global outbreaks of deadly pneumonia. Entry of coronaviruses into cells is mediated by the transmembrane spike glycoprotein S, which forms a trimer carrying receptor-binding and membrane fusion functions1. S also contains the principal antigenic determinants and is the target of neutralizing antibodies. Here we present the structure of a murine coronavirus S trimer ectodomain determined at 4.0 Å resolution by single particle cryo-electron microscopy. It reveals the metastable pre-fusion architecture of S and highlights key interactions stabilizing it. The structure shares a common core with paramyxovirus F proteins2,3, implicating mechanistic similarities and an evolutionary connection between these viral fusion proteins. The accessibility of the highly conserved fusion peptide at the periphery of the trimer indicates potential vaccinology strategies to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies against coronaviruses. Finally, comparison with crystal structures of human coronavirus S domains allows rationalization of the molecular basis for species specificity based on the use of spatially contiguous but distinct domains. PMID:26855426

  17. Electron stimulated desorption of anions from native and brominated single stranded oligonucleotide trimers

    SciTech Connect

    Polska, Katarzyna; Rak, Janusz; Bass, Andrew D.; Cloutier, Pierre; Sanche, Leon

    2012-02-21

    We measured the low energy electron stimulated desorption (ESD) of anions from thin films of native (TXT) and bromine monosubstituted (TBrXT) oligonucleotide trimers deposited on a gold surface (T = thymidine, X = T, deoxycytidine (C), deoxyadenosine (A) or deoxyguanosine (G), Br = bromine). The desorption of H{sup -}, CH{sub 3}{sup -}/NH{sup -}, O{sup -}/NH{sub 2}{sup -}, OH{sup -}, CN{sup -}, and Br{sup -} was induced by 0 to 20 eV electrons. Dissociative electron attachment, below 12 eV, and dipolar dissociation, above 12 eV, are responsible for the formation of these anions. The comparison of the results obtained for the native and brominated trimers suggests that the main pathways of TBrXT degradation correspond to the release of the hydride and bromide anions. Significantly, the presence of bromine in oligonucleotide trimers blocks the electron-induced degradation of nuclobases as evidenced by a dramatic decrease in CN{sup -} desorption. An increase in the yields of OH{sup -} is also observed. The debromination yield of particular oligonucleotides diminishes in the following order: BrdU > BrdA > BrdG > BrdC. Based on these results, 5-bromo-2{sup '}-deoxyuridine appears to be the best radiosensitizer among the studied bromonucleosides.

  18. Cryo-electron microscopy structure of a coronavirus spike glycoprotein trimer.

    PubMed

    Walls, Alexandra C; Tortorici, M Alejandra; Bosch, Berend-Jan; Frenz, Brandon; Rottier, Peter J M; DiMaio, Frank; Rey, Félix A; Veesler, David

    2016-03-01

    The tremendous pandemic potential of coronaviruses was demonstrated twice in the past few decades by two global outbreaks of deadly pneumonia. Entry of coronaviruses into cells is mediated by the transmembrane spike glycoprotein S, which forms a trimer carrying receptor-binding and membrane fusion functions. S also contains the principal antigenic determinants and is the target of neutralizing antibodies. Here we present the structure of a mouse coronavirus S trimer ectodomain determined at 4.0 Å resolution by single particle cryo-electron microscopy. It reveals the metastable pre-fusion architecture of S and highlights key interactions stabilizing it. The structure shares a common core with paramyxovirus F proteins, implicating mechanistic similarities and an evolutionary connection between these viral fusion proteins. The accessibility of the highly conserved fusion peptide at the periphery of the trimer indicates potential vaccinology strategies to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies against coronaviruses. Finally, comparison with crystal structures of human coronavirus S domains allows rationalization of the molecular basis for species specificity based on the use of spatially contiguous but distinct domains. PMID:26855426

  19. Electron stimulated desorption of anions from native and brominated single stranded oligonucleotide trimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polska, Katarzyna; Rak, Janusz; Bass, Andrew D.; Cloutier, Pierre; Sanche, Léon

    2012-02-01

    We measured the low energy electron stimulated desorption (ESD) of anions from thin films of native (TXT) and bromine monosubstituted (TBrXT) oligonucleotide trimers deposited on a gold surface (T = thymidine, X = T, deoxycytidine (C), deoxyadenosine (A) or deoxyguanosine (G), Br = bromine). The desorption of H-, CH3-/NH-, O-/NH2-, OH-, CN-, and Br- was induced by 0 to 20 eV electrons. Dissociative electron attachment, below 12 eV, and dipolar dissociation, above 12 eV, are responsible for the formation of these anions. The comparison of the results obtained for the native and brominated trimers suggests that the main pathways of TBrXT degradation correspond to the release of the hydride and bromide anions. Significantly, the presence of bromine in oligonucleotide trimers blocks the electron-induced degradation of nuclobases as evidenced by a dramatic decrease in CN- desorption. An increase in the yields of OH- is also observed. The debromination yield of particular oligonucleotides diminishes in the following order: BrdU > BrdA > BrdG > BrdC. Based on these results, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine appears to be the best radiosensitizer among the studied bromonucleosides.

  20. Gram-negative trimeric porins have specific LPS binding sites that are essential for porin biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Arunmanee, Wanatchaporn; Pathania, Monisha; Solovyova, Alexandra S; Le Brun, Anton P; Ridley, Helen; Baslé, Arnaud; van den Berg, Bert; Lakey, Jeremy H

    2016-08-23

    The outer membrane (OM) of gram-negative bacteria is an unusual asymmetric bilayer with an external monolayer of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and an inner layer of phospholipids. The LPS layer is rigid and stabilized by divalent cation cross-links between phosphate groups on the core oligosaccharide regions. This means that the OM is robust and highly impermeable to toxins and antibiotics. During their biogenesis, OM proteins (OMPs), which function as transporters and receptors, must integrate into this ordered monolayer while preserving its impermeability. Here we reveal the specific interactions between the trimeric porins of Enterobacteriaceae and LPS. Isolated porins form complexes with variable numbers of LPS molecules, which are stabilized by calcium ions. In earlier studies, two high-affinity sites were predicted to contain groups of positively charged side chains. Mutation of these residues led to the loss of LPS binding and, in one site, also prevented trimerization of the porin, explaining the previously observed effect of LPS mutants on porin folding. The high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of a trimeric porin-LPS complex not only helps to explain the mutagenesis results but also reveals more complex, subtle porin-LPS interactions and a bridging calcium ion. PMID:27493217

  1. Simulation of electron transfer in trimer nanocluster embedded in unstructured nondissipative matrix in external electromagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaltychenko, O. V.; Kanarovskii, E. Y.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper it is offered the simplest microscopic model for the description of the nanocomposite material, which is found under action of external electromagnetic (electric) field. At that, the trimer nanocluster embedded in the weakly structured non-dissipative matrix (for example, the polymeric, organic or amorphous types) is modeled as three- center molecular complex with one "excess" tunneling electron and all its centers are considered together with account of theirs ligand environment. The proposed model description is suitable to the trimer nanoclusters of bridge type, and to the nanotrimers such type in which the ions of 3d-metals and theirs oxides have the various oxidation degrees, and also to other three-center molecular complexes of similar types. For posed problem a description of external and internal factors and analysis of their interconnections are performed. Herewith, the given model is also characterized by fact that in addition to the explicit connections of its basic factors they, furthermore, are implicitly interconnected. Then, the mathematical model is formulated so that to contain an optimal number of model parameters for a detailed description of considered factors and its interconnections. In the result of numerical simulation can to identify the electron localization regimes in the trimer nanocluster and the values of controlling model parameters responsible for switching between the obtained regimes.

  2. Composition and Antigenic Effects of Individual Glycan Sites of a Trimeric HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Anna-Janina; Vasiljevic, Snezana; Pritchard, Laura K.; Harvey, David J.; Andev, Rajinder S.; Krumm, Stefanie A.; Struwe, Weston B.; Cupo, Albert; Kumar, Abhinav; Zitzmann, Nicole; Seabright, Gemma E.; Kramer, Holger B.; Spencer, Daniel I.R.; Royle, Louise; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Klasse, Per J.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Ward, Andrew B.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Moore, John P.; Doores, Katie J.; Crispin, Max

    2016-01-01

    Summary The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimer is covered by an array of N-linked glycans that shield it from immune surveillance. The high density of glycans on the trimer surface imposes steric constraints limiting the actions of glycan-processing enzymes, so that multiple under-processed structures remain on specific areas. These oligomannose glycans are recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) that are not thwarted by the glycan shield but, paradoxically, target it. Our site-specific glycosylation analysis of a soluble, recombinant trimer (BG505 SOSIP.664) maps the extremes of simplicity and diversity of glycan processing at individual sites and reveals a mosaic of dense clusters of oligomannose glycans on the outer domain. Although individual sites usually minimally affect the global integrity of the glycan shield, we identify examples of how deleting some glycans can subtly influence neutralization by bNAbs that bind at distant sites. The network of bNAb-targeted glycans should be preserved on vaccine antigens. PMID:26972002

  3. Crystal Structure of the Pre-fusion Nipah Virus Fusion Glycoprotein Reveals a Novel Hexamer-of-Trimers Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Somnath; Yan, Lianying; Feng, YanRu; Wang, Lin-Fa; Skiniotis, Georgios; Lee, Benhur; Zhou, Z. Hong; Broder, Christopher C.; Aguilar, Hector C.; Nikolov, Dimitar B.

    2015-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a paramyxovirus that infects host cells through the coordinated efforts of two envelope glycoproteins. The G glycoprotein attaches to cell receptors, triggering the fusion (F) glycoprotein to execute membrane fusion. Here we report the first crystal structure of the pre-fusion form of the NiV-F glycoprotein ectodomain. Interestingly this structure also revealed a hexamer-of-trimers encircling a central axis. Electron tomography of Nipah virus-like particles supported the hexameric pre-fusion model, and biochemical analyses supported the hexamer-of-trimers F assembly in solution. Importantly, structure-assisted site-directed mutagenesis of the interfaces between F trimers highlighted the functional relevance of the hexameric assembly. Shown here, in both cell-cell fusion and virus-cell fusion systems, our results suggested that this hexamer-of-trimers assembly was important during fusion pore formation. We propose that this assembly would stabilize the pre-fusion F conformation prior to cell attachment and facilitate the coordinated transition to a post-fusion conformation of all six F trimers upon triggering of a single trimer. Together, our data reveal a novel and functional pre-fusion architecture of a paramyxoviral fusion glycoprotein. PMID:26646856

  4. Tyrosine 114 is essential for the trimeric structure and the functional activities of human proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Jónsson, Z O; Podust, V N; Podust, L M; Hübscher, U

    1995-01-01

    In order to study the effect of trimerization of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) on its interaction with DNA polymerase (pol) delta and its loading onto DNA by replication factor C (RF-C) we have mutated a single tyrosine residue located at the subunit interface (Tyr114) to alanine. This mutation (Y114A) had a profound effect on PCNA, since it completely abolished trimer formation as seen by glycerol gradient sedimentation and native gel electrophoresis. Furthermore, the mutant protein was unable to stimulate DNA synthesis by pol delta and did not compete effectively with wild-type PCNA for pol delta, although it was able to oligomerize and could to some extent interact with subunits of functionally active PCNA. We thus conclude that PCNA molecules that are not part of a circular trimeric complex cannot interact with the pol delta core. furthermore, the mutant protein could not be loaded onto DNA by RF-C and did not compete with wild-type PCNA for loading onto DNA, indicating that PCNA trimerization may also be a prerequisite for its recognition by RF-C. The adverse effects caused by this single mutation suggest that trimerization of PCNA is essential for the monomers to keep their overall structure and that the structural changes imposed by trimerization are important for interaction with other proteins. Images PMID:8521831

  5. Effect of trimerization motifs on quaternary structure, antigenicity, and immunogenicity of a noncleavable HIV-1 gp140 envelope glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Sean X.; Idiart, Rebecca J.; Mariano, Ellaine B.; Chen, Helen; Jiang Peifeng; Xu Li; Ostrow, Kristin M.; Wrin, Terri; Phung, Pham; Binley, James M.; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Ballantyne, John A.; Whalen, Robert G.

    2009-12-05

    The external domains of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (gp120 and the gp41 ectodomain, collectively known as gp140) contain all known viral neutralization epitopes. Various strategies have been used to create soluble trimers of the envelope to mimic the structure of the native viral protein, including mutation of the gp120-gp41 cleavage site, introduction of disulfide bonds, and fusion to heterologous trimerization motifs. We compared the effects on quaternary structure, antigenicity, and immunogenicity of three such motifs: T4 fibritin, a GCN4 variant, and the Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamoylase catalytic subunit. Fusion of each motif to the C-terminus of a noncleavable JRCSF gp140(-) envelope protein led to enhanced trimerization but had limited effects on the antigenic profile and CD4-binding ability of the trimers. Immunization of rabbits provided no evidence that the trimerized gp140(-) constructs induced significantly improved neutralizing antibodies to several HIV-1 pseudoviruses, compared to gp140 lacking a trimerization motif. However, modest differences in both binding specificity and neutralizing antibody responses were observed among the various immunogens.

  6. A trimer of dimers is the basic building block for human immunodeficiency virus-1 capsid assembly.

    PubMed

    Tsiang, Manuel; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Hung, Magdeleine; Jin, Debi; Hu, Eric; Yant, Stephen; Samuel, Dharmaraj; Liu, Xiaohong; Sakowicz, Roman

    2012-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) capsid protein (CA) has become a target of antiviral drug design in recent years. The recognition that binding of small molecules to the CA protein can result in the perturbation of capsid assembly or disassembly has led to mathematical modeling of the process. Although a number of capsid assembly models have been developed using biophysical parameters of the CA protein obtained experimentally, there is currently no model of CA polymerization that can be practically used to analyze in vitro CA polymerization data to facilitate drug discovery. Herein, we describe an equilibrium model of CA polymerization for the kinetic analysis of in vitro assembly of CA into polymer tubes. This new mathematical model has been used to assess whether a triangular trimer of dimers rather than a hexagonal hexamer can be the basic capsomere building block of CA polymer. The model allowed us to quantify for the first time the affinity for each of the four crucial interfaces involved in the polymerization process and indicated that the trimerization of CA dimers is a relatively slow step in CA polymerization in vitro. For wild-type CA, these four interfaces include the interface between two monomers of a CA dimer (K(D) = 6.6 μM), the interface between any two dimers within a CA trimer of dimers (K(D) = 32 nM), and two types of interfaces between neighboring trimers of dimers, either within the same ring around the perimeter of the polymer tube (K(D) = 438 nM) or from two adjacent rings (K(D) = 147 nM). A comparative analysis of the interface dissociation constants between wild-type and two mutant CA proteins, cross-linked hexamer (A14C/E45C/W184A/M185A) and A14C/E45C, yielded results that are consistent with the trimer of dimers with a triangular geometry being the capsomere building block involved in CA polymer growth. This work provides additional insights into the mechanism of HIV-1 CA assembly and may prove useful in elucidating how small

  7. Preformed Soluble Chemoreceptor Trimers That Mimic Cellular Assembly States and Activate CheA Autophosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial chemoreceptors associate with the histidine kinase CheA and coupling protein CheW to form extended membrane arrays that receive and transduce environmental signals. A receptor trimers-of-dimers resides at each vertex of the hexagonal protein lattice. CheA is fully activated and regulated when it is integrated into the receptor assembly. To mimic these states in solution, we have engineered chemoreceptor cytoplasmic kinase-control modules (KCMs) based on the Escherichia coli aspartate receptor Tar that are covalently fused and trimerized by a foldon domain (TarFO). Small-angle X-ray scattering, multi-angle light scattering, and pulsed-dipolar electron spin resonance spectroscopy of spin-labeled proteins indicate that the TarFO modules assemble into homogeneous trimers wherein the protein interaction regions closely associate at the end opposite to the foldon domains. The TarFO variants greatly increase the saturation levels of phosphorylated CheA (CheA-P), indicating that the association with a trimer of receptor dimers changes the fraction of active kinase. However, the rate constants for CheA-P formation with the Tar variants are low compared to those for autophosphorylation by free CheA, and net phosphotransfer from CheA to CheY does not increase commensurately with CheA autophosphorylation. Thus, the Tar variants facilitate slow conversion to an active form of CheA that then undergoes stable autophosphorylation and is capable of subsequent phosphotransfer to CheY. Free CheA is largely incapable of phosphorylation but contains a small active fraction. Addition of TarFO to CheA promotes a planar conformation of the regulatory domains consistent with array models for the assembly state of the ternary complex and different from that observed with a single inhibitory receptor. Introduction of TarFO into E. coli cells activates endogenous CheA to produce increased clockwise flagellar rotation, with the effects increasing in the presence of the chemotaxis

  8. Spin and orbital magnetism of coinage metal trimers (Cu{sub 3}, Ag{sub 3}, Au{sub 3}): A relativistic density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect

    Afshar, Mahdi; Sargolzaei, Mohsen

    2013-11-15

    We have demonstrated electronic structure and magnetic properties of Cu{sub 3}, Ag{sub 3} and Au{sub 3} trimers using a full potential local orbital method in the framework of relativistic density functional theory. We have also shown that the non-relativistic generalized gradient approximation for the exchange-correlation energy functional gives reliable magnetic properties in coinage metal trimers compared to experiment. In addition we have indicated that the spin-orbit coupling changes the structure and magnetic properties of gold trimer while the structure and magnetic properties of copper and silver trimers are marginally affected. A significant orbital moment of 0.21μ{sub B} was found for most stable geometry of the gold trimer whereas orbital magnetism is almost quenched in the copper and silver trimers.

  9. Influences on the Design and Purification of Soluble, Recombinant Native-Like HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers

    PubMed Central

    Ringe, Rajesh P.; Yasmeen, Anila; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Go, Eden P.; Pritchard, Laura K.; Guttman, Miklos; Ketas, Thomas A.; Cottrell, Christopher A.; Wilson, Ian A.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Cupo, Albert; Crispin, Max; Lee, Kelly K.; Desaire, Heather; Ward, Andrew B.; Klasse, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have investigated factors that influence the production of native-like soluble, recombinant trimers based on the env genes of two isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), specifically 92UG037.8 (clade A) and CZA97.012 (clade C). When the recombinant trimers based on the env genes of isolates 92UG037.8 and CZA97.012 were made according to the SOSIP.664 design and purified by affinity chromatography using broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) against quaternary epitopes (PGT145 and PGT151, respectively), the resulting trimers are highly stable and they are fully native-like when visualized by negative-stain electron microscopy. They also have a native-like (i.e., abundant) oligomannose glycan composition and display multiple bNAb epitopes while occluding those for nonneutralizing antibodies. In contrast, uncleaved, histidine-tagged Foldon (Fd) domain-containing gp140 proteins (gp140UNC-Fd-His), based on the same env genes, very rarely form native-like trimers, a finding that is consistent with their antigenic and biophysical properties and glycan composition. The addition of a 20-residue flexible linker (FL20) between the gp120 and gp41 ectodomain (gp41ECTO) subunits to make the uncleaved 92UG037.8 gp140-FL20 construct is not sufficient to create a native-like trimer, but a small percentage of native-like trimers were produced when an I559P substitution in gp41ECTO was also present. The further addition of a disulfide bond (SOS) to link the gp120 and gp41 subunits in the uncleaved gp140-FL20-SOSIP protein increases native-like trimer formation to ∼20 to 30%. Analysis of the disulfide bond content shows that misfolded gp120 subunits are abundant in uncleaved CZA97.012 gp140UNC-Fd-His proteins but very rare in native-like trimer populations. The design and stabilization method and the purification strategy are, therefore, all important influences on the quality of trimeric Env proteins and hence their suitability as vaccine components

  10. Trimeric transmembrane domain interactions in paramyxovirus fusion proteins: roles in protein folding, stability, and function.

    PubMed

    Smith, Everett Clinton; Smith, Stacy E; Carter, James R; Webb, Stacy R; Gibson, Kathleen M; Hellman, Lance M; Fried, Michael G; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2013-12-13

    Paramyxovirus fusion (F) proteins promote membrane fusion between the viral envelope and host cell membranes, a critical early step in viral infection. Although mutational analyses have indicated that transmembrane (TM) domain residues can affect folding or function of viral fusion proteins, direct analysis of TM-TM interactions has proved challenging. To directly assess TM interactions, the oligomeric state of purified chimeric proteins containing the Staphylococcal nuclease (SN) protein linked to the TM segments from three paramyxovirus F proteins was analyzed by sedimentation equilibrium analysis in detergent and buffer conditions that allowed density matching. A monomer-trimer equilibrium best fit was found for all three SN-TM constructs tested, and similar fits were obtained with peptides corresponding to just the TM region of two different paramyxovirus F proteins. These findings demonstrate for the first time that class I viral fusion protein TM domains can self-associate as trimeric complexes in the absence of the rest of the protein. Glycine residues have been implicated in TM helix interactions, so the effect of mutations at Hendra F Gly-508 was assessed in the context of the whole F protein. Mutations G508I or G508L resulted in decreased cell surface expression of the fusogenic form, consistent with decreased stability of the prefusion form of the protein. Sedimentation equilibrium analysis of TM domains containing these mutations gave higher relative association constants, suggesting altered TM-TM interactions. Overall, these results suggest that trimeric TM interactions are important driving forces for protein folding, stability and membrane fusion promotion. PMID:24178297

  11. Techniques and tactics used in determining the structure of the trimeric ebolavirus glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jeffrey E.; Fusco, Marnie L.; Abelson, Dafna M.; Hessell, Ann J.; Burton, Dennis R.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2009-11-01

    Here, the techniques, tactics and strategies used to overcome a series of technical roadblocks in crystallization and phasing of the trimeric ebolavirus glycoprotein are described. The trimeric membrane-anchored ebolavirus envelope glycoprotein (GP) is responsible for viral attachment, fusion and entry. Knowledge of its structure is important both for understanding ebolavirus entry and for the development of medical interventions. Crystal structures of viral glycoproteins, especially those in their metastable prefusion oligomeric states, can be difficult to achieve given the challenges in production, purification, crystallization and diffraction that are inherent in the heavily glycosylated flexible nature of these types of proteins. The crystal structure of ebolavirus GP in its trimeric prefusion conformation in complex with a human antibody derived from a survivor of the 1995 Kikwit outbreak has now been determined [Lee et al. (2008 ▶), Nature (London), 454, 177–182]. Here, the techniques, tactics and strategies used to overcome a series of technical roadblocks in crystallization and phasing are described. Glycoproteins were produced in human embryonic kidney 293T cells, which allowed rapid screening of constructs and expression of protein in milligram quantities. Complexes of GP with an antibody fragment (Fab) promoted crystallization and a series of deglycosylation strategies, including sugar mutants, enzymatic deglycosylation, insect-cell expression and glycan anabolic pathway inhibitors, were attempted to improve the weakly diffracting glycoprotein crystals. The signal-to-noise ratio of the search model for molecular replacement was improved by determining the structure of the uncomplexed Fab. Phase combination with Fab model phases and a selenium anomalous signal, followed by NCS-averaged density modification, resulted in a clear interpretable electron-density map. Model building was assisted by the use of B-value-sharpened electron-density maps and the

  12. An Improved Chirped Pulse Ftmw Analysis of the Structures of Phenol Dimer and Trimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, Nathan A.; Perez, Cristobal; Steber, Amanda L.; Zaleski, Daniel P.; Neill, Justin L.; Pate, Brooks H.; Lesarri, Alberto

    2013-06-01

    With the recent improvements for chirped pulse FTMW (CP-FTMW) spectroscopy between 2-18 GHz, substitution structures of molecules and clusters with more than 10 heavy atoms are becoming routine. While previous CP-FTMW results for phenol dimer reported at this conference by Steber et al. necessitated reduced-band measurements in order to achieve the sensitivity to detect the carbon isotopologues, the latest improvements for the 2-8 GHz arrangement have enabled full band detection of all 12 ^{13}C and 2 ^{18}O isotopologues of phenol dimer in natural abundance, with improved fits for all detected species. In addition, the added sensitivity of this new 2-8 GHz configuration has enabled a full carbon substitution structure of phenol trimer. The experimental structure of phenol trimer, in agreement with the M06-2X/6-311++g(d,p) ab initio structure, is a C_{3} oblate symmetric top with 21 heavy atoms; however, all possible isotopic substitutions are off-symmetry axis, so the resulting detected isotopologues have been fit as c-type prolate asymmetric tops. Use of Kraitchman's equations for structural determination of a symmetric top molecule require some assumptions from the ab initio structure for the complete r_{s} structure of the trimer. A detailed summary of these methods, as well as the microwave results for both species, will be presented. A. L. Steber, J. L. Neill, D. P. Zaleski, B. H. Pate, A. Lesarri. 67th OSU Int. Symp. On Mol. Spectrosc., Columbus, OH, 2012, MH13.

  13. Identification of a Novel Trimeric Autotransporter Adhesin in the Cryptic Genospecies of Haemophilus▿

    PubMed Central

    Sheets, Amanda J.; Grass, Susan A.; Miller, Sara E.; St. Geme, Joseph W.

    2008-01-01

    Haemophilus biotype IV strains belonging to the recently recognized Haemophilus cryptic genospecies are an important cause of maternal genital tract and neonatal systemic infections and initiate infection by colonizing the genital or respiratory epithelium. To gain insight into the mechanism of Haemophilus cryptic genospecies colonization, we began by examining prototype strain 1595 and three other strains for adherence to genital and respiratory epithelial cell lines. Strain 1595 and two of the three other strains demonstrated efficient adherence to all of the cell lines tested. With a stably adherent variant of strain 1595, we generated a Mariner transposon library and identified 16 nonadherent mutants. All of these mutants lacked surface fibers and contained an insertion in the same open reading frame, which encodes a 157-kDa protein designated Cha for cryptic haemophilus adhesin. Analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence of Cha revealed the presence of an N-terminal signal peptide and a C-terminal domain bearing homology to YadA-like and Hia-like trimeric autotransporters. Examination of the C-terminal 120 amino acids of Cha demonstrated mobility as a trimer on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and the capacity to present the passenger domain of the Hia trimeric autotransporter on the bacterial surface. Southern analysis revealed that the gene that encodes Cha is conserved among clinical isolates of the Haemophilus cryptic genospecies and is absent from the closely related species Haemophilus influenzae. We speculate that Cha is important in the pathogenesis of disease due to the Haemophilus cryptic genospecies and is in part responsible for the apparent tissue tropism of this organism. PMID:18424521

  14. Synthesis of Cyclic Porphyrin Trimers through Alkyne Metathesis Cyclooligomerization and Their Host-Guest Binding Study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chao; Long, Hai; Jin, Yinghua; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-17

    Cyclic porphyrin trimers were synthesized through one-step cyclooligomerization via alkyne metathesis from diyne monomers. These macrocycles show interesting host-guest binding interactions with fullerenes, selectively binding C70 (6 × 10(3) M(-1)) over C60 and C84 (no binding observed). The fullerene-encapsulated host-guest complex can undergo guest or host exchange in the presence of another guest (2,4,6-tri(4-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine) or host (cage COP5) molecule with higher binding affinity. PMID:27267936

  15. In vitro trimerization of OmpF porin secreted by spheroplasts of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Sen, K; Nikaido, H

    1990-01-01

    It is not yet clear how bacterial outer membrane proteins reach their correct destination after they are secreted across the cytoplasmic membrane. We show here that porin OmpF is secreted into the medium as a water-soluble monomeric protein by spheroplasts of Escherichia coli. Furthermore, this monomeric porin is taken up by cell envelope preparations or purified lipopolysaccharides in the presence of 0.03% Triton X-100 and is converted correctly into the mature trimeric conformation. These results appear to reproduce a part of the physiological export and targeting steps of this protein. Images PMID:1689050

  16. Effects of aggregation on trimeric light-harvesting complex II of green plants: A hole-burning study

    SciTech Connect

    Pieper, J. ||; Irrgang, K.D.; Renger, G.; Raetsep, M.; Jankowiak, R.; Small, G.J. |; Schroetter, T.; Voigt, J.

    1999-04-08

    Low-temperature absorption, fluorescence, and persistent hole-burned spectra are reported for aggregates of the trimeric light-harvesting antenna complex of photosystem II (LHC II). The lowest energy Q{sub y}-state was found to lie at 681.5 nm on the basis of hole spectra, which corresponds to a 2 nm red shift relative to the isolated LHC II trimer. The electron phonon coupling of the 681.5 nm state is characterized by S {approximately} 0.8 and coupling to phonons with a mean frequency of {approximately} 20 cm{sup {minus}1} which is very similar to that of the isolated trimer. This coupling is consistent with the 4.2 K Stokes shift of the fluorescence originating from the 681.5 nm state. An adjacent state at 680.0 nm is assigned. On the basis of the results of Pieper et al. for the isolated trimer, a state at {approximately} 678.5 nm is inferred. These three lowest energy Q{sub y}-states are associated with the lowest energy chlorophyll a state of the subunit of the isolated LHC II trimer. Their degeneracy is removed because of structural heterogeneity. The hole-burning results indicate that, aside from a quite uniform and small red shifting, aggregation has little effect on the excitonic level structure and intrinsic dynamics of the isolated trimer. Take together, the results presented here and in Pieper et al. lead to a model that qualitatively accounts for the strong temperature dependence of aggregation-induced fluorescence quenching between 4.2 and 80 K.

  17. Managing light polarization via plasmon-molecule interactions within an asymmetric metal nanoparticle trimer

    SciTech Connect

    Shegai, Timur; Li, Zhipeng; Zhang, Zhenyu; Xu, Hongxing; Haran, Gilad

    2008-01-01

    The interaction of light with metal nanoparticles leads to novel phenomena mediated by surface plasmon excitations. In this paper we use single molecules to characterize the interaction of surface plasmons with light, and show that such interaction can strongly modulate the polarization of the emitted light. The simplest nanostructures that enable such polarization modulation are asymmetric silver nanocrystal trimers, where individual Raman scattering molecules are located in the gap between two of the nanoparticles. The third particle breaks the dipolar symmetry of the two-particle junction, generating a wavelength-dependent polarization pattern. Indeed, the scattered light becomes elliptically polarized and its intensity pattern is rotated in the presence of the third particle. We use a combination of spectroscopic observations on single molecules, scanning electron microscope imaging, and generalized Mie theory calculations to provide a full picture of the effect of particles on the polarization of the emitted light. Furthermore, our theoretical analysis allows us to show that the observed phenomenon is very sensitive to the size of the trimer particles and their relative position, suggesting future means for precise control of light polarization on the nanoscale.

  18. Structure of a trimeric variant of the Epstein-Barr virus glycoprotein B

    SciTech Connect

    Backovic, Marija; Longnecker, Richard; Jardetzky, Theodore S

    2009-03-16

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a herpesvirus that is associated with development of malignancies of lymphoid tissue. EBV infections are life-long and occur in >90% of the population. Herpesviruses enter host cells in a process that involves fusion of viral and cellular membranes. The fusion apparatus is comprised of envelope glycoprotein B (gB) and a heterodimeric complex made of glycoproteins H and L. Glycoprotein B is the most conserved envelope glycoprotein in human herpesviruses, and the structure of gB from Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is available. Here, we report the crystal structure of the secreted EBV gB ectodomain, which forms 16-nm long spike-like trimers, structurally homologous to the postfusion trimers of the fusion protein G of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). Comparative structural analyses of EBV gB and VSV G, which has been solved in its pre and postfusion states, shed light on gB residues that may be involved in conformational changes and membrane fusion. Also, the EBV gB structure reveals that, despite the high sequence conservation of gB in herpesviruses, the relative orientations of individual domains, the surface charge distributions, and the structural details of EBV gB differ from the HSV-1 protein, indicating regions and residues that may have important roles in virus-specific entry.

  19. Evidences of monomer, dimer and trimer of recombinant human cyclophilin A.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin-Chao; Wang, Wei-Dong; Wang, Jin-Song; Pan, Ji-Cheng; Zou, Guo-Lin

    2011-12-01

    Cyclophilin A (CyPA) is a cytosolic receptor of immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A (CsA) which possesses peptidyl-prodyl cis/trans isomerase (PPIase) activity. The recombinant human CyPA (rhCyPA) gene has been expressed in E. coli M15. Purification was performed using salting-out, as well as Sephacryl S-100 and DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B column chromatography. The molecular weight is about 18 kDa, confirmed by SDS-PAGE and mass spectrum. The results of Native-PAGE and immunoblotting showed the existence of three bands, which agreed well with the gel filtration results. The molecular mass of the three bands determined via CTAB gel electrophoresis and SDS-PAGE (rhCyPA cross-linked with glutaraldehyde) was 18 kDa, 36 kDa and 54 kDa respectively. Further more, the native rhCyPA and the cross-linked rhCyPA had the similar chromatographic behavior in gel filtration. All of the evidences above suggest that rhCyPA exists in forms of monomer, dimer and trimer. Moreover, we observed that even at low protein concentrations CyPA largely occurs as a dimer in solution, and enzyme kinetic parameters showed that activity of dimer was much higher than monomer or trimer, which probably have some biological significances. PMID:21728990

  20. Synthesis of Trimeric Organozinc Compounds and their Subsequent Reaction with Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Manzi, Joe A; Knapp, Caroline E; Parkin, Ivan P; Carmalt, Claire J

    2016-08-01

    A conventional solution-based route to a cyclic trimeric organozinc compound [{Zn(Et)(β-diketonate)}3] (β-diketonate=OC(OMe)CHC(Me)O, 1) is described, with 1 structurally characterized for the first time. The ligand selection of bidentate β-diketonates is shown to be key to isolating a cyclic trimer. Additional reaction of β-diketonates with diethyl zinc were spectroscopically characterized as compounds of the type [{Zn(Et)(β-diketonate)} n ] (β-diketonate=OC(Me)CHC(Me)O, 2, OC(OtBu)CHC(Me)O, 3). Further studies have shown that selective oxidation of these species produces cubanes of the general formula [{Zn(OC(R)CHC(Me)O)2Zn(Et)OEt}2] (R=OMe, 4; Me, 5; OtBu, 6), allowing a high oxygen content whilst remaining structurally suitable for use as precursors. The successful deposition of thin films of zinc oxide through aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD), using a novel precursor, is described and fully characterized. PMID:27547637

  1. Small molecule inhibitors of HIVgp41 N-heptad repeat trimer formation.

    PubMed

    Allen, William J; Yi, Hyun Ah; Gochin, Miriam; Jacobs, Amy; Rizzo, Robert C

    2015-07-15

    Identification of mechanistically novel anti-HIV fusion inhibitors was accomplished using a computer-aided structure-based design approach with the goal of blocking the formation of the N-heptad repeat (NHR) trimer of the viral protein gp41. A virtual screening strategy that included per-residue interaction patterns (footprints) was employed to identify small molecules compatible with putative binding pockets at the internal interface of the NHR helices at the core native viral six-helix bundle. From a screen of ∼2.8 million compounds using the DOCK program, 120 with favorable energetic and footprint overlap characteristics were purchased and experimentally tested leading to two compounds with favorable cell-cell fusion (IC50) and cytotoxicity profiles. Importantly, both hits were identified on the basis of scores containing footprint overlap terms and would not have been identified using the standard DOCK energy function alone. To our knowledge, these compounds represent the first reported small molecules that inhibit viral entry via the proposed NHR-trimer obstruction mechanism. PMID:26013847

  2. Characterization and structural analysis of an active particulate methane monooxygenase trimer from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Kitmitto, Ashraf; Myronova, Natalia; Basu, Piku; Dalton, Howard

    2005-08-23

    The oxidation of methane to methanol in methanotrophs is catalyzed by the enzyme methane monooxygenase (MMO). Two distinct forms of this enzyme exist, a soluble cytoplasmic MMO (sMMO) and a membrane-bound particulate form (pMMO). We describe here the biochemical characterization of a stable and active purified pMMO hydroxylase (pMMO-H) and report a three-dimensional (3D) structure, determined by electron microscopy and single-particle analysis at 23 A resolution. Both biochemical and structural data indicate that pMMO hydroxylase is trimeric, with each monomer unit comprised of three polypeptides of 47, 26, and 23 kDa. Comparison of the recent crystal structure [Lieberman, R. L., and Rosenzweig, A. C. (2005) Nature 434, 177] of an uncharacterized pMMO-H complex with the three-dimensional (3D) structure determined here yielded a good match between the principal features and the organization of the enzyme monomers into trimers. The data presented here advance our current understanding of particulate methane monooxygenase function by the characterization of an active form of the enzyme and the corresponding 3D structure. PMID:16101279

  3. Trimeric cluster of lithium amidoborane-the smallest unit for the modeling of hydrogen release mechanism.

    PubMed

    Pomogaeva, Anna V; Morokuma, Keiji; Timoshkin, Alexey Y

    2016-05-30

    A detailed first-principle DFT M06/6-311++G(d.p) study of dehydrogenation mechanism of trimeric cluster of lithium amidoborane is presented. The first step of the reaction is association of two LiNH2 BH3 molecules in the cluster. The dominant feature of the subsequent reaction pathway is activation of H atom of BH3 group by three Li atoms with formation of unique Li3 H moiety. This Li3 H moiety is destroyed prior to dehydrogenation in favor of formation of a triangular Li2 H moiety, which interacts with protic H atom of NH2 group. As a result of this interaction, Li2 H2 moiety is produced. It features N(-) H(+) H(-) group suited near the middle plane between two Li(+) in the transition state that leads to H2 release. The transition states of association and hydrogen release steps are similar in energy. It is concluded that the trimer, (LiNH2 BH3 )3 , is the smallest cluster that captures the essence of the hydrogen release reaction. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26854644

  4. An N-terminal glycine-rich sequence contributes to retrovirus trimer of hairpins stability

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Kirilee A.; Maerz, Anne L.; Baer, Severine; Drummer, Heidi E.; Poumbourios, Pantelis . E-mail: apoumbourios@burnet.edu.au

    2007-08-10

    Retroviral transmembrane proteins (TMs) contain a glycine-rich segment linking the N-terminal fusion peptide and coiled coil core. Previously, we reported that the glycine-rich segment (Met-326-Ser-337) of the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) TM, gp21, is a determinant of membrane fusion function [K.A. Wilson, S. Baer, A.L. Maerz, M. Alizon, P. Poumbourios, The conserved glycine-rich segment linking the N-terminal fusion peptide to the coiled coil of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 transmembrane glycoprotein gp21 is a determinant of membrane fusion function, J. Virol. 79 (2005) 4533-4539]. Here we show that the reduced fusion activity of an I334A mutant correlated with a decrease in stability of the gp21 trimer of hairpins conformation, in the context of a maltose-binding protein-gp21 chimera. The stabilizing influence of Ile-334 required the C-terminal membrane-proximal sequence Trp-431-Ser-436. Proline substitution of four of five Gly residues altered gp21 trimer of hairpins stability. Our data indicate that flexibility within and hydrophobic interactions mediated by this region are determinants of gp21 stability and membrane fusion function.

  5. Rate Constant Change of Photo Reaction of Bacteriorhodopsin Observed in Trimeric Molecular System.

    PubMed

    Tsujiuchi, Yutaka; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Goto, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    To elucidate the time evolution of photo reaction of bacteriorhodopsin in glycerol mixed purple membrane at around 196 K under irradiation by red light, a kinetic model was constructed. The change of absorption with irradiation at times of 560 nm and 412 nm was analyzed for the purpose of determining reaction rates of photo reaction of bacteriorhodopsin and its product M intermediate. In this study it is shown that reaction rates of conversion from bacteriorhodopsin to the M intermediate can be explained by a set of linear differential equations. This model analysis concludes that bacteriorhodopsin in which constitutes a trimer unit with other two bacteriorhodopsin molecules changes into M intermediates in the 1.73 of reaction rate, in the initial step, and according to the number of M intermediate in a trimer unit, from three to one, the reaction rate of bacteriorhodopsin into M intermediates smaller as 1.73, 0.80, 0.19 which caused by influence of inter-molecular interaction between bacteriorhodopsin. PMID:27451646

  6. Crystal Structure of Trimeric Carbohydrate Recognition and Neck Domains of Surfactant Protein A

    SciTech Connect

    Head,J.; Mealy, T.; McCormack, F.; Seaton, B.

    2003-01-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A), one of four proteins associated with pulmonary surfactant, binds with high affinity to alveolar phospholipid membranes, positioning the protein at the first line of defense against inhaled pathogens. SP-A exhibits both calcium-dependent carbohydrate binding, a characteristic of the collectin family, and specific interactions with lipid membrane components. The crystal structure of the trimeric carbohydrate recognition domain and neck domain of SP-A was solved to 2.1-{angstrom} resolution with multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing from samarium. Two metalbinding sites were identified, one in the highly conserved lectin site and the other 8.5 {angstrom} away. The interdomain carbohydrate recognition domain-neck angle is significantly less in SP-A than in the homologous collectins, surfactant protein D, and mannose-binding protein. This conformational difference may endow the SP-A trimer with a more extensive hydrophobic surface capable of binding lipophilic membrane components. The appearance of this surface suggests a putative binding region for membrane-derived SP-A ligands such as phosphatidylcholine and lipid A, the endotoxic lipid component of bacterial lipopolysaccharide that mediates the potentially lethal effects of Gram-negative bacterial infection.

  7. Influence of process parameters on the reaction kinetics of the chromium-catalyzed trimerization of ethylene.

    PubMed

    Wöhl, Anina; Müller, Wolfgang; Peitz, Stephan; Peulecke, Normen; Aluri, Bhaskar R; Müller, Bernd H; Heller, Detlef; Rosenthal, Uwe; Al-Hazmi, Mohammed H; Mosa, Fuad M

    2010-07-12

    In this paper we report the results of an extensive experimental kinetic study carried out on the novel ethylene trimerization catalyst system, comprising the chromium source [CrCl(3)(thf)(3)] (thf=tetrahydrofuran), a Ph(2)P-N(iPr)-P(Ph)-N(iPr)H (PNPNH) ligand (Ph=phenyl, iPr=isopropyl), and triethylaluminum (AlEt(3)) as activator. It could be shown that the initial activity shows a first-order dependency on the ethylene concentration. Also, a first-order dependency was found for the catalyst concentration. The initial activity follows a typical Arrhenius behavior with an experimentally determined activation energy of 52.6 kJ mol(-1). At elevated temperatures (ca. 80 degrees C), a significant deactivation was observed, which can be tentatively traced back to a ligand rearrangement in the presence of AlEt(3). After a fast initial phase, a pronounced 'kink' in the ethylene-uptake curve is observed, followed by a slow, almost linear, further increase of the total ethylene consumption. The catalyst composition, in particular the ligand/chromium and the cocatalyst/chromium molar ratio, has a strong impact on the catalytic performance of the trimerization of ethylene. PMID:20512824

  8. Conformational Evaluation of HIV-1 Trimeric Envelope Glycoproteins Using a Cell-based ELISA Assay

    PubMed Central

    Veillette, Maxime; Désormeaux, Anik; Roger, Michel; Finzi, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env) mediate viral entry into target cells and are essential to the infectious cycle. Understanding how those glycoproteins are able to fuel the fusion process through their conformational changes could lead to the design of better, more effective immunogens for vaccine strategies. Here we describe a cell-based ELISA assay that allows studying the recognition of trimeric HIV-1 Env by monoclonal antibodies. Following expression of HIV-1 trimeric Env at the surface of transfected cells, conformation specific anti-Env antibodies are incubated with the cells. A horseradish peroxidase-conjugated secondary antibody and a simple chemiluminescence reaction are then used to detect bound antibodies. This system is highly flexible and can detect Env conformational changes induced by soluble CD4 or cellular proteins. It requires minimal amount of material and no highly-specialized equipment or know-how. Thus, this technique can be established for medium to high throughput screening of antigens and antibodies, such as newly-isolated antibodies. PMID:25286159

  9. AAFreqCoil: a new classifier to distinguish parallel dimeric and trimeric coiled coils.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Yuan; Yan, Renxiang

    2015-07-01

    Coiled coils are characteristic rope-like protein structures, constituted by one or more heptad repeats. Native coiled-coil structures play important roles in various biological processes, while the designed ones are widely employed in medicine and industry. To date, two major oligomeric states (i.e. dimeric and trimeric states) of a coiled-coil structure have been observed, plausibly exerting different biological functions. Therefore, exploration of the relationship between heptad repeat sequences and coiled coil structures is highly important. In this paper, we develop a new method named AAFreqCoil to classify parallel dimeric and trimeric coiled coils. Our method demonstrated its competitive performance when benchmarked based on 10-fold cross validation and jackknife cross validation. Meanwhile, the rules that can explicitly explain the prediction results of the test coiled coil can be extracted from the AAFreqCoil model for a better explanation of user predictions. A web server and stand-alone program implementing the AAFreqCoil algorithm are freely available at . PMID:25918905

  10. Acetylene trimerization on Ag, Pd and Rh atoms deposited on MgO thin films.

    PubMed

    Judai, Ken; Wörz, Anke S; Abbet, Stéphane; Antonietti, Jean-Marie; Heiz, Ueli; Del Vitto, Annalisa; Giordano, Livia; Pacchioni, Gianfranco

    2005-03-01

    The acetylene trimerization on the group VIII transition metal atoms, Rh and Pd, as well as on Ag atoms supported on MgO thin films has been studied experimentally and theoretically. The three metal atoms with the atomic configurations 4d(8)5s1 (Rh), 4d10s0 (Pd) and 4d(10)5s1 (Ag) behave distinctly differently. The coinage metal atom silver is basically inert for this reaction, whereas Pd is active at 220 and 320 K, and Rh produces benzene in a rather broad temperature range from 350 to ca. 430 K. The origins of these differences are not only the different electronic configurations, leading to a weak interaction of acetylene with silver due to strong Pauli repulsion with the 5s electron but also the different stability and dynamics of the three atoms on the MgO surface. In particular, Rh and Pd atoms interact differently with surface defects like the oxygen vacancies (F centers) and the step edges. Pd atoms migrate already at low temperature exclusively to F centers where the cyclotrimerization is efficiently promoted. The Rh atoms on the other hand are not only trapped on F centers but also at step edges up to about 300 K. Interestingly, only Rh atoms on F centers catalyze the trimerization reaction whereas they are turned inert on the step edges due to strong steric effects. PMID:19791385

  11. Therapeutic TNF Inhibitors can Differentially Stabilize Trimeric TNF by Inhibiting Monomer Exchange.

    PubMed

    van Schie, Karin A; Ooijevaar-de Heer, Pleuni; Dijk, Lisanne; Kruithof, Simone; Wolbink, Gertjan; Rispens, Theo

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a homotrimeric cytokine that is a key mediator of inflammation. It is unstable at physiological concentrations and slowly converts into an inactive form. Here, we investigated the mechanism of this process by using a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay that allowed monitoring of monomeric subunit exchange in time. We observed continuous exchange of monomeric subunits even at concentrations of TNF high enough to maintain its bioactivity. The kinetics of this process closely corresponds with the appearance of monomeric subunits and disappearance of trimeric TNF in time at ng/ml concentrations as monitored by high-performance size-exclusion chromatography (HP-SEC). Furthermore, of the five therapeutic TNF inhibitors that are currently used in the clinic, three (adalimumab, infliximab, etanercept) were found to completely inhibit the monomer exchange reaction and stabilize TNF trimers, whereas golimumab and certolizumab could not prevent monomer exchange, but did slow down the exchange process. These differences were not correlated with the affinities of the TNF inhibitors, measured with both surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and in fluid phase using fluorescence-assisted HP-SEC. The stabilizing effect of these TNF inhibitors might result in prolonged residual TNF bioactivity under conditions of incomplete blocking, as observed in vitro for adalimumab. PMID:27605058

  12. Sequence Analysis of Trimer Isomers Formed by Montmorillonite Catalysis in the Reaction of Binary Monomer Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ertem, Gözen; Hazen, Robert M.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2007-10-01

    Oligonucleotides are structurally similar to short RNA strands. Therefore, their formation via non-enzymatic reactions is highly relevant to Gilbert's RNA world scenario (1986) and the origin of life. In laboratory synthesis of oligonucleotides from monomers, it is necessary to remove the water molecules from the reaction medium to shift the equilibrium in favor of oligonucleotide formation, which would have been impossible for reactions that took place in dilute solutions on the early Earth. Model studies designed to address this problem demonstrate that montmorillonite, a phyllosilicate common on Earth and identified on Mars, efficiently catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between activated mononucleotides in dilute solutions and produces RNA-like oligomers. The purpose of this study was to examine the sequences and regiospecificity of trimer isomers formed in the reaction of 5'-phosphorimidazolides of adenosine and uridine. Results demonstrated that regiospecificity and sequence specificity observed in the dimer fractions are conserved in their elongation products. With regard to regiospecificity, 61% of the linkages were found to be RNA-like 3',5'-phosphodiester bonds. With regard to sequence specificity, we found that 88% of the linear trimers were hetero-isomers with 61% A-monomer and 39% U-monomer incorporation. These results lend support to Bernal's hypothesis that minerals may have played a significant role in the chemical processes that led to the origin of life by catalyzing the formation of phosphodiester bonds in RNA-like oligomers.

  13. Therapeutic TNF Inhibitors can Differentially Stabilize Trimeric TNF by Inhibiting Monomer Exchange

    PubMed Central

    van Schie, Karin A.; Ooijevaar-de Heer, Pleuni; Dijk, Lisanne; Kruithof, Simone; Wolbink, Gertjan; Rispens, Theo

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a homotrimeric cytokine that is a key mediator of inflammation. It is unstable at physiological concentrations and slowly converts into an inactive form. Here, we investigated the mechanism of this process by using a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay that allowed monitoring of monomeric subunit exchange in time. We observed continuous exchange of monomeric subunits even at concentrations of TNF high enough to maintain its bioactivity. The kinetics of this process closely corresponds with the appearance of monomeric subunits and disappearance of trimeric TNF in time at ng/ml concentrations as monitored by high-performance size-exclusion chromatography (HP-SEC). Furthermore, of the five therapeutic TNF inhibitors that are currently used in the clinic, three (adalimumab, infliximab, etanercept) were found to completely inhibit the monomer exchange reaction and stabilize TNF trimers, whereas golimumab and certolizumab could not prevent monomer exchange, but did slow down the exchange process. These differences were not correlated with the affinities of the TNF inhibitors, measured with both surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and in fluid phase using fluorescence-assisted HP-SEC. The stabilizing effect of these TNF inhibitors might result in prolonged residual TNF bioactivity under conditions of incomplete blocking, as observed in vitro for adalimumab. PMID:27605058

  14. Indole trimers with antibacterial activity against Gram-positive organisms produced using combinatorial biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    McClay, Kevin; Mehboob, Shahila; Yu, Jerry; Santarsiero, Bernard D; Deng, Jiangping; Cook, James L; Jeong, Hyunyoung; Johnson, Michael E; Steffan, Robert J

    2015-12-01

    The I100V isoform of toluene-4-monooxygenase was used to catalyze the oxidative polymerization of anthranil and various indoles under mildly acidic conditions, favoring the production of trimers. Compounds produced in sufficient yield were purified and tested for their ability to inhibit the growth of B. anthracis, E. faecalis, L. monocytogenes, S. aureus, and in some cases, F. tularensis. 15 of the compounds displayed promising antibacterial activity (MIC < 5 µg/ml) against one or more of the strains tested, with the best MIC values being <0.8 µg/ml. All of these compounds had good selectivity, showing minimal cytotoxicity towards HepG2 cells. The structure was solved for six of the compounds that could be crystallized, revealing that minimally two classes of indole based trimers were produced. One compound class produced was a group of substituted derivatives of the natural product 2,2-bis(3-indolyl) indoxyl. The other group of compounds identified was classified as tryptanthrin-like compounds, all having multi-ring pendant groups attached at position 11 of tryptanthrin. One compound of particular interest, SAB-J85, had a structure that suggests that any compound, with a ring structure that can be activated by an oxygenase, might serve as a substrate for combinatorial biocatalysis. PMID:26112315

  15. An N-terminal glycine-rich sequence contributes to retrovirus trimer of hairpins stability.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Kirilee A; Maerz, Anne L; Bär, Séverine; Drummer, Heidi E; Poumbourios, Pantelis

    2007-08-10

    Retroviral transmembrane proteins (TMs) contain a glycine-rich segment linking the N-terminal fusion peptide and coiled coil core. Previously, we reported that the glycine-rich segment (Met-326-Ser-337) of the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) TM, gp21, is a determinant of membrane fusion function [K.A. Wilson, S. Bär, A.L. Maerz, M. Alizon, P. Poumbourios, The conserved glycine-rich segment linking the N-terminal fusion peptide to the coiled coil of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 transmembrane glycoprotein gp21 is a determinant of membrane fusion function, J. Virol. 79 (2005) 4533-4539]. Here we show that the reduced fusion activity of an I334A mutant correlated with a decrease in stability of the gp21 trimer of hairpins conformation, in the context of a maltose-binding protein-gp21 chimera. The stabilizing influence of Ile-334 required the C-terminal membrane-proximal sequence Trp-431-Ser-436. Proline substitution of four of five Gly residues altered gp21 trimer of hairpins stability. Our data indicate that flexibility within and hydrophobic interactions mediated by this region are determinants of gp21 stability and membrane fusion function. PMID:17577584

  16. Synthesis of Trimeric Organozinc Compounds and their Subsequent Reaction with Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Manzi, Joe A.; Knapp, Caroline E.; Parkin, Ivan P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A conventional solution‐based route to a cyclic trimeric organozinc compound [{Zn(Et)(β‐diketonate)}3] (β‐diketonate=OC(OMe)CHC(Me)O, 1) is described, with 1 structurally characterized for the first time. The ligand selection of bidentate β‐diketonates is shown to be key to isolating a cyclic trimer. Additional reaction of β‐diketonates with diethyl zinc were spectroscopically characterized as compounds of the type [{Zn(Et)(β‐diketonate)}n] (β‐diketonate=OC(Me)CHC(Me)O, 2, OC(OtBu)CHC(Me)O, 3). Further studies have shown that selective oxidation of these species produces cubanes of the general formula [{Zn(OC(R)CHC(Me)O)2Zn(Et)OEt}2] (R=OMe, 4; Me, 5; OtBu, 6), allowing a high oxygen content whilst remaining structurally suitable for use as precursors. The successful deposition of thin films of zinc oxide through aerosol‐assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD), using a novel precursor, is described and fully characterized. PMID:27547637

  17. Trimeric Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored HCDR3 of Broadly Neutralizing Antibody PG16 Is a Potent HIV-1 Entry Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lihong; Wang, Weiming; Yang, Lifei; Ren, Huanhuan; Kimata, Jason T.

    2013-01-01

    PG9 and PG16 are two quaternary-structure-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies with unique HCDR3 subdomains. Previously, we showed that glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored HCDR3 subdomains (GPI-HCDR3) can be targeted to lipid rafts of the plasma membrane, bind to the epitope recognized by HCDR3 of PG16, and neutralize diverse HIV-1 isolates. In this study, we further developed trimeric GPI-HCDR3s and demonstrated that trimeric GPI-HCDR3 (PG16) dramatically improves anti-HIV-1 neutralization, suggesting that a stoichiometry of recognition of 3 or 2 HCDR3 molecules (PG16) to 1 viral spike is possible. PMID:23152526

  18. On the trimerization of cyanoacetylene: mechanism of formation of tricyanobenzene isomers and laboratory detection of their radio spectra.

    PubMed

    Hopf, Henning; Mlynek, Cornelia; McMahon, Robert J; Menke, Jessica L; Lesarri, Alberto; Rosemeyer, Michael; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2010-12-17

    In support of a deeper understanding of the chemistry of cyanoacetylene--a known constituent of planetary atmospheres and interstellar space--theoretical and experimental studies address the chemical mechanism of dimerization and trimerization, and provide high-resolution rotational spectra of two of the trimeric products, 1,2,3- and 1,2,4-tricyanobenzene. Analysis of the rotational spectra is particularly challenging because of quadrupolar coupling from three (14)N nuclei. The laboratory rotational spectra provide the basis for future searches for these polar aromatic compounds in interstellar space by radio astronomy. PMID:20967903

  19. A procyanidin type A trimer from cinnamon extract attenuates glial cell swelling and the reduction in glutamate uptake following ischemic injury in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dietary polyphenols exert neuroprotective effects in ischemic injury. The protective effects of a procyanidin type A trimer (trimer 1) isolated from a water soluble cinnamon extract (CE) were investigated on key features of ischemic injury including cell swelling, increased free radical production, ...

  20. Triphenylene discotic liquid crystal trimers synthesized by Co2(CO)8-catalyzed terminal alkyne [2 + 2 + 2] cycloaddition

    PubMed Central

    Han, Bin; Hu, Ping; Wang, Bi-Qin; Redshaw, Carl

    2013-01-01

    Summary The synthesis of star-shaped discotic liquid crystal trimers using Co2(CO)8-catalyzed terminal alkyne [2 + 2 + 2] cycloaddition reaction is reported. The trimers consist of three triphenylene discotic units linked to a central 1,2,4-trisubstituted benzene ring via flexible spacers. The trimers were synthesized in the yields up to 70% by mixing the monomers with 10 mol % of Co2(CO)8 as the catalyst in refluxing 1,4-dioxane. The liquid crystalline properties were investigated by using polarizing optical microscopy (POM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Trimer 4 with an ester connecting group and a longer spacer exhibited a rectangular columnar mesophase, while 5b and 5c possessing an ether linkage and a shorter spacer display a hexagonal columnar mesophase. The connecting functional group and the length of the flexible spacer between the central benzene ring and the triphenylene units have pivotal influence on the mesomorphism. PMID:24367450

  1. The interplay of hydrogen bonding and dispersion in phenol dimer and trimer: structures from broadband rotational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Nathan A; Steber, Amanda L; Neill, Justin L; Pérez, Cristóbal; Zaleski, Daniel P; Pate, Brooks H; Lesarri, Alberto

    2013-07-21

    The structures of the phenol dimer and phenol trimer complexes in the gas phase have been determined using chirped-pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy in the 2-8 GHz band. All fourteen (13)C and (18)O phenol dimer isotopologues were assigned in natural abundance. A full heavy atom experimental substitution structure was determined, and a least-squares fit ground state r0 structure was determined by proper constraint of the M06-2X/6-311++g(d,p) ab initio structure. The structure of phenol dimer features a water dimer-like hydrogen bond, as well as a cooperative contribution from inter-ring dispersion. Comparisons between the experimental structure and previously determined experimental structures, as well as ab initio structures from various levels of theory, are discussed. For phenol trimer, a C3 symmetric barrel-like structure is found, and an experimental substitution structure was determined via measurement of the six unique (13)C isotopologues. The least-squares fit rm((1)) structure reveals a similar interplay between hydrogen bonding and dispersion in the trimer, with water trimer-like hydrogen bonding and C-H···π interactions. PMID:23749053

  2. Conformational divergence in the HA-33/HA-17 trimer of serotype C and D botulinum toxin complex.

    PubMed

    Sagane, Yoshimasa; Hayashi, Shintaro; Akiyama, Tomonori; Matsumoto, Takashi; Hasegawa, Kimiko; Yamano, Akihito; Suzuki, Tomonori; Niwa, Koichi; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Yajima, Shunsuke

    2016-08-01

    Clostridium botulinum produces a large toxin complex (L-TC) comprising botulinum neurotoxin associated with auxiliary nontoxic proteins. A complex of 33- and 17-kDa hemagglutinins (an HA-33/HA-17 trimer) enhances L-TC transport across the intestinal epithelial cell layer via binding HA-33 to a sugar on the cell surface. At least two subtypes of serotype C/D HA-33 exhibit differing preferences for the sugars sialic acid and galactose. Here, we compared the three-dimensional structures of the galactose-binding HA-33 and HA-33/HA-17 trimers produced by the C-Yoichi strain. Comparisons of serotype C/D HA-33 sequences reveal a variable region with relatively low sequence similarity across the C. botulinum strains; the variability of this region may influence the manner of sugar-recognition by HA-33. Crystal structures of sialic acid- and galactose-binding HA-33 are broadly similar in appearance. However, small-angle X-ray scattering revealed distinct solution structures for HA-33/HA-17 trimers. A structural change in the C-terminal variable region of HA-33 might cause a dramatic shift in the conformation and sugar-recognition mode of HA-33/HA-17 trimer. PMID:27237978

  3. Antigenic and 3D structural characterization of soluble X4 and hybrid X4-R5 HIV-1 Env trimers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV-1 is decorated with trimeric glycoprotein spikes that enable infection by engaging CD4 and a chemokine coreceptor, either CCR5 or CXCR4. The variable loop 3 (V3) of the HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) is the main determinant for coreceptor usage. The predominant CCR5 using (R5) HIV-1 Env has been intensively studied in function and structure, whereas the trimeric architecture of the less frequent, but more cytopathic CXCR4 using (X4) HIV-1 Env is largely unknown, as are the consequences of sequence changes in and near V3 on antigenicity and trimeric Env structure. Results Soluble trimeric gp140 Env constructs were used as immunogenic mimics of the native spikes to analyze their antigenic properties in the context of their overall 3D structure. We generated soluble, uncleaved, gp140 trimers from a prototypic T-cell line-adapted (TCLA) X4 HIV-1 strain (NL4-3) and a hybrid (NL4-3/ADA), in which the V3 spanning region was substituted with that from the primary R5 isolate ADA. Compared to an ADA (R5) gp140, the NL4-3 (X4) construct revealed an overall higher antibody accessibility, which was most pronounced for the CD4 binding site (CD4bs), but also observed for mAbs against CD4 induced (CD4i) epitopes and gp41 mAbs. V3 mAbs showed significant binding differences to the three constructs, which were refined by SPR analysis. Of interest, the NL4-3/ADA construct with the hybrid NL4-3/ADA CD4bs showed impaired CD4 and CD4bs mAb reactivity despite the presence of the essential elements of the CD4bs epitope. We obtained 3D reconstructions of the NL4-3 and the NL4-3/ADA gp140 trimers via electron microscopy and single particle analysis, which indicates that both constructs inherit a propeller-like architecture. The first 3D reconstruction of an Env construct from an X4 TCLA HIV-1 strain reveals an open conformation, in contrast to recently published more closed structures from R5 Env. Exchanging the X4 V3 spanning region for that of R5 ADA did not alter the open

  4. Hetero-modification of TRAIL trimer for improved drug delivery and in vivo antitumor activities

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li-Qiang; Zhao, Wen-Bin; Lai, Jun; Ding, Ding; Wei, Xiao-Yue; Li, Yang-Yang; Liu, Wen-Hui; Yang, Xiao-Yue; Xu, Ying-Chun; Chen, Shu-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Poor pharmacokinetics and resistance within some tumor cell lines have been the major obstacles during the preclinical or clinical application of TRAIL (tumor-necrosis-factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand). The half-life of TRAIL114-281 (114 to 281 amino acids) was revealed to be no more than 30 minutes across species. Therefore maleimido activated PEG (polyethylene glycol) and MMAE (Monomethyl Auristatin E) were applied to site-specifically conjugate with the mutated cysteines from different monomers of TRAIL successively, taking advantage of steric effects involved within TRAIL mutant conjugations. As a result, TRAIL trimer was hetero-modified for different purposes. And the resulting PEG-TRAIL-vcMMAE conjugate exhibited dramatically improved half-life (11.54 h), favourable in vivo targeting capability and antitumor activities while no sign of toxicity in xenograft models, suggesting it’s a viable therapeutic and drug delivery strategy. PMID:26445897

  5. Heteroleptic Tetrapyrrole-Fused Dimeric and Trimeric Skeletons with Unusual Non-Frustrated Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuehong; Oh, Juwon; Wang, Kang; Chen, Chao; Cao, Wei; Park, Kyu Hyung; Kim, Dongho; Jiang, Jianzhuang

    2016-03-18

    Phthalocyanine (Pc) and porphyrin (Por) chromophores have been fused through the benzo[α]pyrazine moiety, resulting in unprecedented heteroleptic tetrapyrrole-fused dimers and trimers. The heteroleptic tetrapyrrole nature has been clearly revealed based on single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis of the zinc dimer. Electrochemical analysis, theoretical calculations, and time-resolved spectroscopic results disclose that the two/three-tetrapyrrole-fused skeletons behave as one totally π-conjugated system as a result of the strong conjugative interaction between/among the tetrapyrrole chromophores. In particular, the effectively extended π-electron system through the fused-bridge induced strong electronic communication between the Pc and Por moieties and large transition dipole moments in the Pc-Por-fused systems, providing high fluorescence quantum yields (>0.13) and relatively long excited state lifetimes (>1.3 ns) in comparison with their homo-tetrapyrrole-fused analogues. PMID:26879243

  6. Prism-C2n carbon dimer, trimer, and nano-sheets: A quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Koichi; Satoh, Hiroko; Iwamoto, Takeaki

    2015-07-01

    Quantum chemical calculations have predicted the existence of a new carbon family with double-layered structures formed by arranging prism-C2n (n = 6, 8, and 12) units. Theoretical explorations of potential energy surfaces suggest the lowest barriers of the reaction channels to be ca. 30 kJ mol-1 for a D2h prism-C16 dimer and a D3h prism-C24 trimer. Geometry optimizations under periodic boundary conditions yield some prism-C2n sheets composed of CC single bonds of ca. 0.15-0.16 nm. The relative energies per one atom with respect to graphene are 90-160 kJ mol-1. Van der Waals thickness is estimated to be ca. 0.5 nm.

  7. Theoretical research program to study transition metal trimers and embedded clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    Small transition metal clusters at a high level of approximation i.e. including all the valence electrons in the calculation and also including extensive electron correlation were studied. Perhaps the most useful end result of these studies is the qualitative information about the electronic structure of these small metal clusters, including the nature of the bonding. The electronic structure studies of the small clusters are directly applicable to problems in catalysis. From comparison of dimers, trimers and possibly higher clusters, it is possible to extrapolate the information obtained to provide insights into the electronic structure of bulk transition metals and their interaction with other atoms and molecules at both surface and interior locations.

  8. Theoretical research program to study transition metal trimers and embedded clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walch, S. P.

    1984-01-01

    Small transition metal clusters were studied at a high level of approximation, including all the valence electrons in the calculation and extensive electron correlation, in order to understand the electronic structure of these small metal clusters. By comparison of dimers, trimers, and possibly higher clusters, the information obtained was used to provide insights into the electronic structure of bulk transition metals. Small metal clusters are currently of considerable experimental interest and some information is becomming available both from matrix electron spin resonance studies and from gas phase spectroscopy. Collaboration between theorists and experimentalists is thus expected to be especially profitable at this time since there is some experimental information which can serve to guide the theoretical work.

  9. Characterization of a trimeric MPER containing HIV-1 gp41 antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Hinz, Andreas; Schoehn, Guy; Quendler, Heribert; Hulsik, David Lutje; Stiegler, Gabi; Katinger, Hermann; Seaman, Michael S.; Montefiori, David; Weissenhorn, Winfried

    2009-08-01

    The membrane-proximal external region (MPER) of gp41 is considered as a prime target for the induction of neutralizing antibodies, since it contains the epitopes for three broadly neutralizing antibodies (2F5, 4E10 and Z13). Here we present a novel gp41 construct (HA-gp41) comprising gp41 HR2 and MPER fused to two triple-stranded coiled-coil domains at both ends. HA-gp41 is trimeric, has a high helical content in solution and forms rod-like structures as revealed by negative staining electron microscopy. Immunization of rabbits with HA-gp41 induced antibodies directed against MPER, which failed to exert significant neutralization capacity against envelopes from primary isolates. Thus trimerisation of MPER regions does not suffice to induce a potent neutralizing antibody response specific for conserved regions within gp41.

  10. Geometrical structure of helium triatomic systems: comparison with the neon trimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suno, Hiroya

    2016-01-01

    The structural properties of helium triatomic systems are studied using hyperspherical coordinates. A slow variable discretization approach is adopted to solve the three-body Schrödinger equation, in which the Schrödinger equation in hyperangular coordinates is solved using basis splines at a series of fixed FEM-DVR (finite-element methods–discrete variable representation) hyperradii. We focus on studying the geometrical structure of the 4He3 and 3He4He2 triatomic systems. Using the bound state wave functions obtained, we calculate and analyze the one-dimensional pair distribution and angle distribution functions as well as the two-dimensional angle–angle distributions. All these bound states are found to exhibit such a floppy nature that classifying them into particular geometrical shapes does not appear to be sensible. A comparison will be made with some bound states of the neon trimer, which are expected to be more tightly bound.

  11. Postionization fragmentation of rare-gas trimers revisited with new theoretical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janeček, Ivan; Cintavá, Silvie; Hrivňák, Daniel; Kalus, René; Fárník, Michal; Gadea, Florent Xavier

    2009-09-01

    A new theoretical approach is presented for the general treatment of nonadiabatic hybrid dynamics (mixing classical and quantum approach) and applied to the postionization of rare-gas trimers. There was an important disagreement between trajectory surface hopping (TSH) or mean field (MF) approaches and the experimental results; noteworthy, with the new method qualitative and almost quantitative agreement is found for the fragmentation ratios of ionic monomers and dimers. For the first time in the theory as in the experiment, the dimers prevail for argon while monomers strongly dominate for the heavier rare gases, krypton and xenon. A new compromise between MF and TSH approaches is proposed and the new method is found quite robust with results not too sensitive to various possible implementations.

  12. LINC Complexes Form by Binding of Three KASH Peptides to Domain Interfaces of Trimeric SUN Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sosa, Brian A.; Rothballer, Andrea; Kutay, Ulrike; Schwartz, Thomas U.

    2012-08-31

    Linker of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complexes span the nuclear envelope and are composed of KASH and SUN proteins residing in the outer and inner nuclear membrane, respectively. LINC formation relies on direct binding of KASH and SUN in the perinuclear space. Thereby, molecular tethers are formed that can transmit forces for chromosome movements, nuclear migration, and anchorage. We present crystal structures of the human SUN2-KASH1/2 complex, the core of the LINC complex. The SUN2 domain is rigidly attached to a trimeric coiled coil that prepositions it to bind three KASH peptides. The peptides bind in three deep and expansive grooves formed between adjacent SUN domains, effectively acting as molecular glue. In addition, a disulfide between conserved cysteines on SUN and KASH covalently links both proteins. The structure provides the basis of LINC complex formation and suggests a model for how LINC complexes might arrange into higher-order clusters to enhance force-coupling.

  13. Biochemical, conformational, and immunogenic analysis of soluble trimeric forms of henipavirus fusion glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yee-Peng; Lu, Min; Dutta, Somnath; Yan, Lianying; Barr, Jennifer; Flora, Michael; Feng, Yan-Ru; Xu, Kai; Nikolov, Dimitar B; Wang, Lin-Fa; Skiniotis, Georgios; Broder, Christopher C

    2012-11-01

    The henipaviruses, Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV), are paramyxoviruses discovered in the mid- to late 1990s that possess a broad host tropism and are known to cause severe and often fatal disease in both humans and animals. HeV and NiV infect cells by a pH-independent membrane fusion mechanism facilitated by their attachment (G) and fusion (F) glycoproteins. Here, several soluble forms of henipavirus F (sF) were engineered and characterized. Recombinant sF was produced by deleting the transmembrane (TM) and cytoplasmic tail (CT) domains and appending a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor signal sequence followed by GPI-phospholipase D digestion, appending a trimeric coiled-coil (GCNt) domain (sF(GCNt)), or deleting the TM, CT, and fusion peptide domain. These sF glycoproteins were produced as F(0) precursors, and all were apparent stable trimers recognized by NiV-specific antisera. Surprisingly, however, only the GCNt-appended constructs (sF(GCNt)) could elicit cross-reactive henipavirus-neutralizing antibody in mice. In addition, sF(GCNt) constructs could be triggered in vitro by protease cleavage and heat to transition from an apparent prefusion to postfusion conformation, transitioning through an intermediate that could be captured by a peptide corresponding to the C-terminal heptad repeat domain of F. The pre- and postfusion structures of sF(GCNt) and non-GCNt-appended sF could be revealed by electron microscopy and were distinguishable by F-specific monoclonal antibodies. These data suggest that only certain sF constructs could serve as potential subunit vaccine immunogens against henipaviruses and also establish important tools for further structural, functional, and diagnostic studies on these important emerging viruses. PMID:22915804

  14. Ubiquitination of p27 is regulated by Cdk-dependent phosphorylation and trimeric complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Montagnoli, Alessia; Fiore, Francesca; Eytan, Esther; Carrano, Andrea C.; Draetta, Giulio F.; Hershko, Avram; Pagano, Michele

    1999-01-01

    The cellular abundance of the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p27 is regulated by the ubiquitin–proteasome system. Activation of p27 degradation is seen in proliferating cells and in many types of aggressive human carcinomas. p27 can be phosphorylated on threonine 187 by Cdks, and cyclin E/Cdk2 overexpression can stimulate the degradation of wild-type p27, but not of a threonine 187-to-alanine p27 mutant [p27(T187A)]. However, whether threonine 187 phosphorylation stimulates p27 degradation through the ubiquitin–proteasome system or an alternative pathway is still not known. Here, we demonstrate that p27 ubiquitination (as assayed in vivo and in an in vitro reconstituted system) is cell-cycle regulated and that Cdk activity is required for the in vitro ubiquitination of p27. Furthermore, ubiquitination of wild-type p27, but not of p27(T187A), can occur in G1-enriched extracts only upon addition of cyclin E/Cdk2 or cyclin A/Cdk2. Using a phosphothreonine 187 site-specific antibody for p27, we show that threonine 187 phosphorylation of p27 is also cell-cycle dependent, being present in proliferating cells but undetectable in G1 cells. Finally, we show that in addition to threonine 187 phosphorylation, efficient p27 ubiquitination requires formation of a trimeric complex with the cyclin and Cdk subunits. In fact, cyclin B/Cdk1 which can phosphorylate p27 efficiently, but cannot form a stable complex with it, is unable to stimulate p27 ubiquitination by G1 extracts. Furthermore, another p27 mutant [p27(CK−)] that can be phosphorylated by cyclin E/Cdk2 but cannot bind this kinase complex, is refractory to ubiquitination. Thus throughout the cell cycle, both phosphorylation and trimeric complex formation act as signals for the ubiquitination of a Cdk inhibitor. PMID:10323868

  15. Trimeric intracellular cation channels and sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xinyu; Lin, Peihui; Yamazaki, Daiju; Park, Ki Ho; Komazaki, Shinji; Chen, S R Wayne; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Ma, Jianjie

    2014-02-14

    Trimeric intracellular cation channels (TRIC) represents a novel class of trimeric intracellular cation channels. Two TRIC isoforms have been identified in both the human and the mouse genomes: TRIC-A, a subtype predominantly expressed in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) of muscle cells, and TRIC-B, a ubiquitous subtype expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of all tissues. Genetic ablation of either TRIC-A or TRIC-B leads to compromised K(+) permeation and Ca(2+) release across the SR/ER membrane, supporting the hypothesis that TRIC channels provide a counter balancing K(+) flux that reduces SR/ER membrane depolarization for maintenance of the electrochemical gradient that drives SR/ER Ca(2+) release. TRIC-A and TRIC-B seem to have differential functions in Ca(2+) signaling in excitable and nonexcitable cells. Tric-a(-/-) mice display defective Ca(2+) sparks and spontaneous transient outward currents in arterial smooth muscle and develop hypertension, in addition to skeletal muscle dysfunction. Knockout of TRIC-B results in abnormal IP3 receptor-mediated Ca(2+) release in airway epithelial cells, respiratory defects, and neonatal lethality. Double knockout mice lacking both TRIC-A and TRIC-B show embryonic lethality as a result of cardiac arrest. Such an aggravated lethality indicates that TRIC-A and TRIC-B share complementary physiological functions in Ca(2+) signaling in embryonic cardiomyocytes. Tric-a(-/-) and Tric-b(+/-) mice are viable and susceptible to stress-induced heart failure. Recent evidence suggests that TRIC-A directly modulates the function of the cardiac ryanodine receptor 2 Ca(2+) release channel, which in turn controls store-overload-induced Ca(2+) release from the SR. Thus, the TRIC channels, in addition to providing a countercurrent for SR/ER Ca(2+) release, may also function as accessory proteins that directly modulate the ryanodine receptor/IP3 receptor channel functions. PMID:24526676

  16. A plant-produced H1N1 trimeric hemagglutinin protects mice from a lethal influenza virus challenge

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Yoko; Jones, R. Mark; Mett, Vadim; Chichester, Jessica A.; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Sun, Xiangjie; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Green, Brian J.; Shamloul, Moneim; Norikane, Joey; Bi, Hong; Hartman, Caitlin E.; Bottone, Cory; Stewart, Michelle; Streatfield, Stephen J.; Yusibov, Vidadi

    2013-01-01

    The increased worldwide awareness of seasonal and pandemic influenza, including pandemic H1N1 virus, has stimulated interest in the development of economic platforms for rapid, large-scale production of safe and effective subunit vaccines. In recent years, plants have demonstrated their utility as such a platform and have been used to produce vaccine antigens against various infectious diseases. Previously, we have produced in our transient plant expression system a recombinant monomeric hemagglutinin (HA) protein (HAC1) derived from A/California/04/09 (H1N1) strain of influenza virus and demonstrated its immunogenicity and safety in animal models and human volunteers. In the current study, to mimic the authentic HA structure presented on the virus surface and to improve stability and immunogenicity of the HA antigen, we generated trimeric HA by introducing a trimerization motif from a heterologous protein into the HA sequence. Here, we describe the engineering, production in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, and characterization of the highly purified recombinant trimeric HA protein (tHA-BC) from A/California/04/09 (H1N1) strain of influenza virus. The results demonstrate the induction of serum hemagglutination inhibition antibodies by tHA-BC and its protective efficacy in mice against a lethal viral challenge. In addition, the immunogenic and protective doses of tHA-BC were much lower compared with monomeric HAC1. Further investigation into the optimum vaccine dose and/or regimen as well as the stability of trimerized HA is necessary to determine whether trimeric HA is a more potent vaccine antigen than monomeric HA. PMID:23296194

  17. Elevated growth temperature can enhance photosystem I trimer formation and affects xanthophyll biosynthesis in Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 cells.

    PubMed

    Kłodawska, Kinga; Kovács, László; Várkonyi, Zsuzsanna; Kis, Mihály; Sozer, Özge; Laczkó-Dobos, Hajnalka; Kóbori, Ottilia; Domonkos, Ildikó; Strzałka, Kazimierz; Gombos, Zoltán; Malec, Przemysław

    2015-03-01

    In the thylakoid membranes of the mesophilic cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803, PSI reaction centers (RCs) are organized as monomers and trimers. PsaL, a 16 kDa hydrophobic protein, a subunit of the PSI RC, was previously identified as crucial for the formation of PSI trimers. In this work, the physiological effects accompanied by PSI oligomerization were studied using a PsaL-deficient mutant (ΔpsaL), not able to form PSI trimers, grown at various temperatures. We demonstrate that in wild-type Synechocystis, the monomer to trimer ratio depends on the growth temperature. The inactivation of the psaL gene in Synechocystis grown phototropically at 30°C induces profound morphological changes, including the accumulation of glycogen granules localized in the cytoplasm, resulting in the separation of particular thylakoid layers. The carotenoid composition in ΔpsaL shows that PSI monomerization leads to an increased accumulation of myxoxantophyll, zeaxanthin and echinenone irrespective of the temperature conditions. These xanthophylls are formed at the expense of β-carotene. The measured H2O→CO2 oxygen evolution rates in the ΔpsaL mutant are higher than those observed in the wild type, irrespective of the growth temperature. Moreover, circular dichroism spectroscopy in the visible range reveals that a peak attributable to long-wavelength-absorbing carotenoids is apparently enhanced in the trimer-accumulating wild-type cells. These results suggest that specific carotenoids are accompanied by the accumulation of PSI oligomers and play a role in the formation of PSI oligomer structure. PMID:25520404

  18. Well-ordered trimeric HIV-1 subtype B and C soluble spike mimetics generated by negative selection display native-like properties.

    PubMed

    Guenaga, Javier; de Val, Natalia; Tran, Karen; Feng, Yu; Satchwell, Karen; Ward, Andrew B; Wyatt, Richard T

    2015-01-01

    The structure of BG505 gp140 SOSIP, a soluble mimic of the native HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env), marks the beginning of new era in Env structure-based immunogen design. Displaying a well-ordered quaternary structure, these subtype A-derived trimers display an excellent antigenic profile, discriminating recognition by broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) from non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (non-bNAbs), and provide a solid Env-based immunogenic platform starting point. Even with this important advance, obtaining homogeneous well-ordered soluble SOSIP trimers derived from other subtypes remains challenging. Here, we report the "rescue" of homogeneous well-ordered subtype B and C SOSIP trimers from a heterogeneous Env mixture using CD4 binding site-directed (CD4bs) non-bNAbs in a negative-selection purification process. These non-bNAbs recognize the primary receptor CD4bs only on disordered trimers but not on the native Env spike or well-ordered soluble trimers due to steric hindrance. Following negative selection to remove disordered oligomers, we demonstrated recovery of well-ordered, homogeneous trimers by electron microscopy (EM). We obtained 3D EM reconstructions of unliganded trimers, as well as in complex with sCD4, a panel of CD4bs-directed bNAbs, and the cleavage-dependent, trimer-specific bNAb, PGT151. Using bio-layer light interferometry (BLI) we demonstrated that the well-ordered trimers were efficiently recognized by bNAbs and poorly recognized by non-bNAbs, representing soluble mimics of the native viral spike. Biophysical characterization was consistent with the thermostability of a homogeneous species that could be further stabilized by specific bNAbs. This study revealed that Env trimers generate different frequencies of well-ordered versus disordered aberrant trimers even when they are genetically identical. By negatively selecting the native-like well-ordered trimers, we establish a new means to obtain soluble Env mimetics derived from

  19. Well-Ordered Trimeric HIV-1 Subtype B and C Soluble Spike Mimetics Generated by Negative Selection Display Native-like Properties

    PubMed Central

    Guenaga, Javier; de Val, Natalia; Tran, Karen; Feng, Yu; Satchwell, Karen; Ward, Andrew B.; Wyatt, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    The structure of BG505 gp140 SOSIP, a soluble mimic of the native HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env), marks the beginning of new era in Env structure-based immunogen design. Displaying a well-ordered quaternary structure, these subtype A-derived trimers display an excellent antigenic profile, discriminating recognition by broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) from non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (non-bNAbs), and provide a solid Env-based immunogenic platform starting point. Even with this important advance, obtaining homogeneous well-ordered soluble SOSIP trimers derived from other subtypes remains challenging. Here, we report the “rescue” of homogeneous well-ordered subtype B and C SOSIP trimers from a heterogeneous Env mixture using CD4 binding site-directed (CD4bs) non-bNAbs in a negative-selection purification process. These non-bNAbs recognize the primary receptor CD4bs only on disordered trimers but not on the native Env spike or well-ordered soluble trimers due to steric hindrance. Following negative selection to remove disordered oligomers, we demonstrated recovery of well-ordered, homogeneous trimers by electron microscopy (EM). We obtained 3D EM reconstructions of unliganded trimers, as well as in complex with sCD4, a panel of CD4bs-directed bNAbs, and the cleavage-dependent, trimer-specific bNAb, PGT151. Using bio-layer light interferometry (BLI) we demonstrated that the well-ordered trimers were efficiently recognized by bNAbs and poorly recognized by non-bNAbs, representing soluble mimics of the native viral spike. Biophysical characterization was consistent with the thermostability of a homogeneous species that could be further stabilized by specific bNAbs. This study revealed that Env trimers generate different frequencies of well-ordered versus disordered aberrant trimers even when they are genetically identical. By negatively selecting the native-like well-ordered trimers, we establish a new means to obtain soluble Env mimetics derived

  20. pp-GalNAc-T13 induces high metastatic potential of murine Lewis lung cancer by generating trimeric Tn antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Yasuyuki; Zhang, Qing; Akita, Kaoru; Nakada, Hiroshi; Hamamura, Kazunori; Tokuda, Noriyo; Tsuchida, Akiko; Matsubara, Takeshi; Hori, Tomoko; Okajima, Tetsuya; Furukawa, Keiko; Urano, Takeshi; Furukawa, Koichi

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ppGalNAc-T13 was up-regulated in high metastatic sublines of Lewis lung cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ppGalNAc-T13 expression enhanced cell invasion activity in low metastatic sublines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Trimeric Tn antigen was induced in the transfectant cells of ppGalNAc-T13 cDNA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A major protein carrying trimeric Tn structure was identified as Syndecan-1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing of ppGalNAc-T13 resulted in the reduction of invasion and of metastasis.. -- Abstract: In order to analyze the mechanisms for cancer metastasis, high metastatic sublines (H7-A, H7-Lu, H7-O, C4-sc, and C4-ly) were obtained by repeated injection of mouse Lewis lung cancer sublines H7 and C4 into C57BL/6 mice. These sublines exhibited increased proliferation and invasion activity in vitro. Ganglioside profiles exhibited lower expression of GM1 in high metastatic sublines than the parent lines. Then, we established GM1-Si-1 and GM1-Si-2 by stable silencing of GM1 synthase in H7 cells. These GM1-knockdown clones exhibited increased proliferation and invasion. Then, we explored genes that markedly altered in the expression levels by DNA microarray in the combination of C4 vs. C4-ly or H7 vs. H7 (GM1-Si). Consequently, pp-GalNAc-T13 gene was identified as up-regulated genes in the high metastatic sublines. Stable transfection of pp-GalNAc-T13 cDNA into C4 (T13-TF) resulted in increased invasion and motility. Then, immunoblotting and flow cytometry using various antibodies and lectins were performed. Only anti-trimeric Tn antibody (mAb MLS128), showed increased expression levels of trimeric Tn antigen in T13-TF clones. Moreover, immunoprecipitation/immunoblotting was performed by mAb MLS128, leading to the identification of an 80 kDa band carrying trimeric Tn antigen, i.e. Syndecan-1. Stable silencing of endogenous pp-GalNAc-T13 in C4-sc (T13-KD) revealed that primary tumors generated by

  1. Room-temperature thermally induced relaxation effect in a two-dimensional cyano-bridged Cu-Mo bimetal assembly and thermodynamic analysis of the relaxation process

    SciTech Connect

    Umeta, Yoshikazu; Ozaki, Noriaki; Tokoro, Hiroko; Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi

    2013-04-15

    We observed a photo-switching effect in [Cu{sup II}(1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclodecane)]{sub 2}[Mo{sup IV}(CN){sub 8}]{center_dot}10H{sub 2}O by irradiation with 410-nm light around room temperature using infrared spectroscopy. This photo-switching is caused by the photo-induced charge transfer from Mo{sup IV} to Cu{sup II}. The photo-induced phase thermally relaxed to the initial phase with a half-life time of 2.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 1}, 6.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 1}, and 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 2} s at 293, 283, and 273 K, respectively. The relaxation process was analyzed using Hauser's equation, k=k{sub 0}exp[-(E{sub a}+E{sub a}{sup *}{gamma}) /k{sub B}T], where k is the rate constant of relaxation, k{sub 0} is the frequency factor, E{sub a} is the activation energy, E{sub a}{sup *} is the additional activation energy due to the cooperativity, and {gamma} is the fraction of the photo-induced phase. k{sub 0}, E{sub a}, and E{sub a}{sup *} were evaluated as 1.28 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7}{+-} 2.6 s{sup -1}, 4002 {+-} 188 cm{sup -1}, and 546 {+-} 318 cm{sup -1}, respectively. The value of E{sub a} is much larger than that of the relaxation process for the typical light-induced spin crossover effect (E{sub a} Almost-Equal-To 1000 cm{sup -1}). Room-temperature photo-switching is an important issue in the field of optical functional materials. The present system is useful for the demonstration of high-temperature photo-switching material.

  2. Electronic transitions of guanine tautomers, their stacked dimers, trimers and sodium complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, P. S.; Kumar, Anil; Mishra, P. C.

    2004-02-01

    Planar and nonplanar geometries of the keto-N9H and keto-N7H tautomers of the guanine base of DNA as well as the hydrogen bonded complexes of these species with three water molecules each were optimized using the density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31G ∗ ∗ level. Geometries of the isolated bases were also optimized using the ab initio approach at the MP2/6-31G ∗ ∗ level. The isolated keto-N9H and keto-N7H tautomers as well as their hydrogen bonded complexes with three water molecules each were solvated in bulk water employing the polarized continuum model (PCM) of the self-consistent reaction field theory (SCRF). Stacked dimers and trimers of both the tautomers of guanine were generated by placing the planar forms of the species at a fixed distance of 3.5 Å from the neighboring one and rotating one molecule with respect to the other by 110° for the keto-N9H form and 90° for the keto-N7H form which corresponded to total energy minima at the B3LYP/6-31G ∗ ∗ level. Geometry optimization for the cation of the monomer of guanine was performed at the same level of theory, and its solvation in bulk water was treated using the PCM model of the SCRF theory. The geometries of complexes of the two tautomers of guanine with a Na + ion each were optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G ∗ ∗ level, and the Na + ion is predicted to bind with the keto-N9H tautomer preferentially. While the complex of the keto-N7H form of guanine with three water molecules in gas phase is slightly more stable than the corresponding complex of the keto-N9H form of guanine, the reverse is true in bulk water. Stacking interactions enhance the relative stability of the keto-N9H tautomer over that of the keto-N7H tautomer, suggesting that in bulk solutions, the former would be dominant. Electronic spectra of the isolated tautomers of guanine, those of their complexes with three water molecules each, the (keto-n9h and keto-n7h) cation of guanine, the complexes of the tautomers with a Na + ion

  3. Hydrolyzable tannins of tamaricaceous plants. V. Structures of monomeric-trimeric tannins and cytotoxicity of macrocyclic-type tannins isolated from Tamarix nilotica (1).

    PubMed

    Orabi, Mohamed A A; Taniguchi, Shoko; Sakagami, Hiroshi; Yoshimura, Morio; Yoshida, Takashi; Hatano, Tsutomu

    2013-05-24

    Three new ellagitannin monomers, nilotinins M5-M7 (1-3), a dimer, nilotinin D10 (4), and a trimer, nilotinin T1 (5), together with three known dimers, hirtellin D (7) and tamarixinins B (8) and C (9), and a trimer, hirtellin T2 (6), were isolated from Tamarix nilotica dried leaves. The structures of the tannins were elucidated by intensive spectroscopic methods and chemical conversions into known tannins. The new trimer (5) is a unique macrocyclic type whose monomeric units are linked together by an isodehydrodigalloyl and two dehydrodigalloyl moieties. Additionally, dimeric and trimeric macrocyclic-type tannins isolated from T. nilotica in this study were assessed for possible cytotoxic activity against four human tumor cell lines. Tumor-selective cytotoxicities of the tested compounds were higher than those of synthetic and natural potent cytotoxic compounds, including polyphenols, and comparable with those of 5-fluorouracil and melphalan. PMID:23675651

  4. Direct measurement of excitation transfer dynamics between two trimers in C-phycocyanin hexamer from cyanobacterium Anabaena variabilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingmin; Zhao, Fuli; Zheng, Xiguang; Wang, Hezhou

    1999-05-01

    We provide the first experimental evidence for the excitation transfers between two trimers of an isolated C-phycocyanin hexamer (αβ) 6PCL RC27, at the end of the rod proximal to the core of PBS in cyanobacterium of Anabaena variabilis, with picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Our results strongly suggest that the observed fluorescence decay constants around 20 and 10 ps time scales, shown in anisotropy decay, not in isotropic decay experiments arose from the excitation transfers between two trimers via two types of transfer pathways such as 1β 155↔6β 155 (2β 155↔5β 155 and 3β 155↔4β 155) and 2α 84↔5α 84 (3α 84↔6α 84 and 1α 84↔4α 84) channels and these could be described by Föster dipole-dipole resonance mechanism.

  5. A procyanidin type A trimer from cinnamon extract attenuates glial cell swelling and the reduction in glutamate uptake following ischemia-like injury in vitro.

    PubMed

    Panickar, K S; Polansky, M M; Graves, D J; Urban, J F; Anderson, R A

    2012-01-27

    Dietary polyphenols exert neuroprotective effects in ischemic injury. The protective effects of a procyanidin type A trimer (trimer 1) isolated from a water soluble cinnamon extract (CE) were investigated on key features of ischemic injury, including cell swelling, increased free radical production, increased intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)), mitochondrial dysfunction, and the reduction in glutamate uptake. Astrocyte (glial) swelling is a major component of cytotoxic brain edema in ischemia and, along with vasogenic edema, may contribute to increased intracranial pressure, brain herniation, and additional ischemic injuries. C6 glial cultures were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) for 5 h, and cell swelling was determined at 90 min after the end of OGD. OGD-induced increases in glial swelling were significantly blocked by trimer 1, but not by the major nonpolyphenol fractions of CE including cinnamaldehyde and coumarin. Increased free radical production, a contributing factor in cell swelling following ischemic injury, was also significantly reduced by trimer 1. Mitochondrial dysfunction, another key feature of ischemic injury, is hypothesized to contribute to glial swelling. Depolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)) was assessed using a fluorescent dye (tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester [TMRE]), and was significantly attenuated by trimer 1 as was OGD-induced increased [Ca(2+)](i). Taken together with our previous observation that blockers of [Ca(2+)](i) reduce cell swelling, our results indicate that trimer 1 may attenuate cell swelling by regulating [Ca(2+)](i). Trimer 1 also significantly attenuated the OGD-induced decrease in glutamate uptake. In addition, cyclosporin A, a blocker of the mitochondrial permeability pore (mPT), but not FK506 (that does not block the mPT), reduced the OGD-induced decline in glutamate uptake indicating a role of the mPT in such effects. Thus, the effects of trimer 1 in attenuating the

  6. Design and structure of two HIV-1 clade C SOSIP.664 trimers that increase the arsenal of native-like Env immunogens

    PubMed Central

    Julien, Jean-Philippe; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Hua, Yuanzi; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; de Taeye, Steven W.; Nieusma, Travis; Cupo, Albert; Yasmeen, Anila; Golabek, Michael; Pugach, Pavel; Klasse, P. J.; Moore, John P.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    A key challenge in the quest toward an HIV-1 vaccine is design of immunogens that can generate a broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb) response against the enormous sequence diversity of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env). We previously demonstrated that a recombinant, soluble, fully cleaved SOSIP.664 trimer based on the clade A BG505 sequence is a faithful antigenic and structural mimic of the native trimer in its prefusion conformation. Here, we sought clade C native-like trimers with comparable properties. We identified DU422 and ZM197M SOSIP.664 trimers as being appropriately thermostable (Tm of 63.4 °C and 62.7 °C, respectively) and predominantly native-like, as determined by negative-stain electron microscopy (EM). Size exclusion chromatography, ELISA, and surface plasmon resonance further showed that these trimers properly display epitopes for all of the major bnAb classes, including quaternary-dependent, trimer-apex (e.g., PGT145) and gp120/gp41 interface (e.g., PGT151) epitopes. A cryo-EM reconstruction of the ZM197M SOSIP.664 trimer complexed with VRC01 Fab against the CD4 binding site at subnanometer resolution revealed a striking overall similarity to its BG505 counterpart with expected local conformational differences in the gp120 V1, V2, and V4 loops. These stable clade C trimers contribute additional diversity to the pool of native-like Env immunogens as key components of strategies to induce bnAbs to HIV-1. PMID:26372963

  7. Design and structure of two HIV-1 clade C SOSIP.664 trimers that increase the arsenal of native-like Env immunogens.

    PubMed

    Julien, Jean-Philippe; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Hua, Yuanzi; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; de Taeye, Steven W; Nieusma, Travis; Cupo, Albert; Yasmeen, Anila; Golabek, Michael; Pugach, Pavel; Klasse, P J; Moore, John P; Sanders, Rogier W; Ward, Andrew B; Wilson, Ian A

    2015-09-22

    A key challenge in the quest toward an HIV-1 vaccine is design of immunogens that can generate a broadly neutralizing antibody (bnAb) response against the enormous sequence diversity of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env). We previously demonstrated that a recombinant, soluble, fully cleaved SOSIP.664 trimer based on the clade A BG505 sequence is a faithful antigenic and structural mimic of the native trimer in its prefusion conformation. Here, we sought clade C native-like trimers with comparable properties. We identified DU422 and ZM197M SOSIP.664 trimers as being appropriately thermostable (Tm of 63.4 °C and 62.7 °C, respectively) and predominantly native-like, as determined by negative-stain electron microscopy (EM). Size exclusion chromatography, ELISA, and surface plasmon resonance further showed that these trimers properly display epitopes for all of the major bnAb classes, including quaternary-dependent, trimer-apex (e.g., PGT145) and gp120/gp41 interface (e.g., PGT151) epitopes. A cryo-EM reconstruction of the ZM197M SOSIP.664 trimer complexed with VRC01 Fab against the CD4 binding site at subnanometer resolution revealed a striking overall similarity to its BG505 counterpart with expected local conformational differences in the gp120 V1, V2, and V4 loops. These stable clade C trimers contribute additional diversity to the pool of native-like Env immunogens as key components of strategies to induce bnAbs to HIV-1. PMID:26372963

  8. A Next-Generation Cleaved, Soluble HIV-1 Env Trimer, BG505 SOSIP.664 gp140, Expresses Multiple Epitopes for Broadly Neutralizing but Not Non-Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Rogier W.; Derking, Ronald; Cupo, Albert; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Yasmeen, Anila; de Val, Natalia; Kim, Helen J.; Blattner, Claudia; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Korzun, Jacob; Golabek, Michael; de los Reyes, Kevin; Ketas, Thomas J.; van Gils, Marit J.; King, C. Richter; Wilson, Ian A.; Ward, Andrew B.; Klasse, P. J.; Moore, John P.

    2013-01-01

    A desirable but as yet unachieved property of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine candidate is the ability to induce broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). One approach to the problem is to create trimeric mimics of the native envelope glycoprotein (Env) spike that expose as many bNAb epitopes as possible, while occluding those for non-neutralizing antibodies (non-NAbs). Here, we describe the design and properties of soluble, cleaved SOSIP.664 gp140 trimers based on the subtype A transmitted/founder strain, BG505. These trimers are highly stable, more so even than the corresponding gp120 monomer, as judged by differential scanning calorimetry. They are also homogenous and closely resemble native virus spikes when visualized by negative stain electron microscopy (EM). We used several techniques, including ELISA and surface plasmon resonance (SPR), to determine the relationship between the ability of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to bind the soluble trimers and neutralize the corresponding virus. In general, the concordance was excellent, in that virtually all bNAbs against multiple neutralizing epitopes on HIV-1 Env were highly reactive with the BG505 SOSIP.664 gp140 trimers, including quaternary epitopes (CH01, PG9, PG16 and PGT145). Conversely, non-NAbs to the CD4-binding site, CD4-induced epitopes or gp41ECTO did not react with the trimers, even when their epitopes were present on simpler forms of Env (e.g. gp120 monomers or dissociated gp41 subunits). Three non-neutralizing MAbs to V3 epitopes did, however, react strongly with the trimers but only by ELISA, and not at all by SPR and to only a limited extent by EM. These new soluble trimers are useful for structural studies and are being assessed for their performance as immunogens. PMID:24068931

  9. Energy transfer dynamics in trimers and aggregates of light-harvesting complex II probed by 2D electronic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Enriquez, Miriam M.; Zhang, Cheng; Tan, Howe-Siang; Akhtar, Parveen; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H.

    2015-06-07

    The pathways and dynamics of excitation energy transfer between the chlorophyll (Chl) domains in solubilized trimeric and aggregated light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) are examined using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). The LHCII trimers and aggregates exhibit the unquenched and quenched excitonic states of Chl a, respectively. 2DES allows direct correlation of excitation and emission energies of coupled states over population time delays, hence enabling mapping of the energy flow between Chls. By the excitation of the entire Chl b Q{sub y} band, energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a states is monitored in the LHCII trimers and aggregates. Global analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) spectra reveals that energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a occurs on fast and slow time scales of 240–270 fs and 2.8 ps for both forms of LHCII. 2D decay-associated spectra resulting from the global analysis identify the correlation between Chl states involved in the energy transfer and decay at a given lifetime. The contribution of singlet–singlet annihilation on the kinetics of Chl energy transfer and decay is also modelled and discussed. The results show a marked change in the energy transfer kinetics in the time range of a few picoseconds. Owing to slow energy equilibration processes, long-lived intermediate Chl a states are present in solubilized trimers, while in aggregates, the population decay of these excited states is significantly accelerated, suggesting that, overall, the energy transfer within the LHCII complexes is faster in the aggregated state.

  10. Refined structure-based simulation of plant light-harvesting complex II: linear optical spectra of trimers and aggregates.

    PubMed

    Müh, Frank; Renger, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Linear optical spectra of solubilized trimers and small lamellar aggregates of the major light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) of higher plants are simulated employing excitonic couplings and site energies of chlorophylls (Chls) computed on the basis of the two crystal structures by a combined quantum chemical/electrostatic approach. A good agreement between simulation and experiment is achieved (except for the circular dichroism in the Chl b region), if vibronic transitions of Chls are taken into account. Site energies are further optimized by refinement fits of optical spectra. The differences between refined and directly calculated values are not significant enough to decide, whether the crystal structures are closer to trimers or aggregates. Changes in the linear dichroism spectrum upon aggregation are related to site energy shifts of Chls b601, b607, a603, a610, and a613, and are interpreted in terms of conformational changes of violaxanthin and the two luteins involving their ionone rings. Chl a610 is the energy sink at 77K in both conformations. An analysis of absorption spectra of trimers perpendicular and parallel to the C(3)-axis (van Amerongen et al. Biophys. J. 67 (1994) 837-847) shows that only Chl a604 close to neoxanthin is significantly reoriented in trimers compared to the crystal structures. Whether this pigment is orientated in aggregates as in the crystal structures, can presently not be determined faithfully. To finally decide about pigment reorientations that could be of relevance for non-photochemical quenching, further polarized absorption and fluorescence measurements of aggregates or detergent-depleted LHCII would be helpful. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability: from Natural to Artificial. PMID:22387396

  11. Fractional Mott insulator-to-superfluid transition of Bose–Hubbard model in a trimerized Kagomé optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qi-Hui; Li, Peng; Su, Haibin

    2016-06-01

    By generalizing the traditional single-site strong coupling expansion approach to a cluster one, we study the zero-temperature phase diagram of bosonic atoms in a trimerized Kagomé optical lattice. Some new features are present in this system. Due to the strong intra-trimer hopping interaction, there will be a new Mott insulator (MI), which is by definition incompressible but with a fractional filling per trimer. This is different from the traditional MI, which has an integral filling and originates only from the repulsive interaction between particles. We investigate the MI-to-superfluid transition and the nature of the fractional MI by calculating the critical exponents of phase transitions and the low-lying energy excitation spectra of quasiparticles (quasihole). We will show how the low-energy properties of this system can be understood qualitatively as a Bose–Hubbard model in triangular lattice from the point of view of the cluster strong coupling expansion. We also discuss how our results are related to experiment by studying the Bragg spectroscopy.

  12. Structural basis for substrate recognition and processive cleavage mechanisms of the trimeric exonuclease PhoExo I

    PubMed Central

    Miyazono, Ken-ichi; Ishino, Sonoko; Tsutsumi, Kanae; Ito, Tomoko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Tanokura, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Nucleases play important roles in nucleic acid processes, such as replication, repair and recombination. Recently, we identified a novel single-strand specific 3′-5′ exonuclease, PfuExo I, from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, which may be involved in the Thermococcales-specific DNA repair system. PfuExo I forms a trimer and cleaves single-stranded DNA at every two nucleotides. Here, we report the structural basis for the cleavage mechanism of this novel exonuclease family. A structural analysis of PhoExo I, the homologous enzyme from P. horikoshii OT3, showed that PhoExo I utilizes an RNase H-like active site and possesses a 3′-OH recognition site ∼9 Å away from the active site, which enables cleavage at every two nucleotides. Analyses of the heterotrimeric and monomeric PhoExo I activities showed that trimerization is indispensable for its processive cleavage mechanism, but only one active site of the trimer is required. PMID:26138487

  13. Quantifying Dimer and Trimer Formation by Tri-n-butyl Phosphates in n-Dodecane: Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Vo, Quynh N; Dang, Liem X; Nilsson, Mikael; Nguyen, Hung D

    2016-07-21

    Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), a representative of neutral organophosphorous ligands, is an important extractant used in the solvent extraction process for the recovery of uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel. Microscopic pictures of TBP isomerism and its behavior in n-dodecane diluent were investigated utilizing MD simulations with previously optimized force field parameters for TBP and n-dodecane. Potential mean force (PMF) calculations on a single TBP molecule show seven probable TBP isomers. Radial distribution functions (RDFs) of TBP suggest the existence of TBP trimers at high TBP concentrations in addition to dimers. 2D PMF calculations were performed to determine the angle and distance criteria for TBP trimers. The dimerization and trimerization constants of TBP in n-dodecane were obtained and match our own experimental values using the FTIR technique. The new insights into the conformational behaviors of the TBP molecule as a monomer and as part of an aggregate could greatly aid in the understanding of the complexation between TBP and metal ions in a solvent extraction system. PMID:27398866

  14. Fractional Mott insulator-to-superfluid transition of Bose-Hubbard model in a trimerized Kagomé optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi-Hui; Li, Peng; Su, Haibin

    2016-06-29

    By generalizing the traditional single-site strong coupling expansion approach to a cluster one, we study the zero-temperature phase diagram of bosonic atoms in a trimerized Kagomé optical lattice. Some new features are present in this system. Due to the strong intra-trimer hopping interaction, there will be a new Mott insulator (MI), which is by definition incompressible but with a fractional filling per trimer. This is different from the traditional MI, which has an integral filling and originates only from the repulsive interaction between particles. We investigate the MI-to-superfluid transition and the nature of the fractional MI by calculating the critical exponents of phase transitions and the low-lying energy excitation spectra of quasiparticles (quasihole). We will show how the low-energy properties of this system can be understood qualitatively as a Bose-Hubbard model in triangular lattice from the point of view of the cluster strong coupling expansion. We also discuss how our results are related to experiment by studying the Bragg spectroscopy. PMID:27165440

  15. Transformation of a fragment of beta-structural bacteriophage T4 adhesin to stable alpha-helical trimer.

    PubMed

    Miroshnikov, K A; Sernova, N V; Shneider, M M; Mesyanzhinov, V V

    2000-12-01

    Gene product 12 of bacteriophage T4, adhesin, serves to adhere the virus to host cells. Adhesin is a fibrous homotrimer, and a novel tertiary structure element, a beta-helix, is supposed to be a major structural feature of this protein. We have constructed two truncated gp12 mutants, 12N1 and 12N2, containing 221 and 135 N-terminal residues, respectively. When expressed in E. coli cells, these gp12 fragments formed labile beta-structural trimers. Another hybrid protein, 12FN, containing 179 N-terminal amino acid residues of gp12 fused to the C-terminal domain (31 amino acids) of T4 fibritin, was shown to have a trimeric proteolytically resistant alpha-helical structure. This structure is probably similar to that of fibritin, which has a triple alpha-helical coiled-coil structure. Hence, we have demonstrated the possibility of global transformation of fibrous protein structure using fusion with a C-terminal domain that initiates trimerization. PMID:11173503

  16. Rhesus Macaque B-Cell Responses to an HIV-1 Trimer Vaccine Revealed by Unbiased Longitudinal Repertoire Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Kaifan; He, Linling; Khan, Salar N.; O’Dell, Sijy; McKee, Krisha; Tran, Karen; Li, Yuxing; Sundling, Christopher; Morris, Charles D.; Mascola, John R.; Hedestam, Gunilla B. Karlsson

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has been used to investigate the diversity and maturation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) in HIV-1-infected individuals. However, the application of NGS to the preclinical assessment of human vaccines, particularly the monitoring of vaccine-induced B-cell responses in a nonhuman primate (NHP) model, has not been reported. Here, we present a longitudinal NGS analysis of memory B-cell responses to an HIV-1 trimer vaccine in a macaque that has been extensively studied by single B-cell sorting and antibody characterization. We first established an NHP antibodyomics pipeline using the available 454 pyrosequencing data from this macaque and developed a protocol to sequence the NHP antibody repertoire in an unbiased manner. Using these methods, we then analyzed memory B-cell repertoires at four time points of NHP immunization and traced the lineages of seven CD4-binding site (CD4bs)-directed monoclonal antibodies previously isolated from this macaque. Longitudinal analysis revealed distinct patterns of B-cell lineage development in response to an HIV-1 trimer vaccine. While the temporal B-cell repertoire profiles and lineage patterns provide a baseline for comparison with forthcoming HIV-1 trimer vaccines, the newly developed NHP antibody NGS technologies and antibodyomics tools will facilitate future evaluation of human vaccine candidates. PMID:26530382

  17. Quantifying Dimer and Trimer Formation of Tri-n-butyl Phosphates in Different Alkane Diluents: FTIR Study.

    PubMed

    Vo, Quynh N; Unangst, Jaclynn L; Nguyen, Hung D; Nilsson, Mikael

    2016-07-21

    Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), a representative of neutral organophosphorous metal-ion-extracting reagents, is an important ligand used in solvent extraction processes for the recovery of uranium and plutonium from spent nuclear fuel, as well as other non-nuclear applications. Ligand-ligand and organic solvent-ligand interactions play an important role in these processes. The self-association behavior of TBP in various alkane diluents of different chain lengths (8, 12, and 16 carbons) and a branched alkane (iso-octane) was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic measurements. By careful deconvolution of the spectra into multiple peaks, our results indicate that TBP self-associates to form not only dimers, as previous studies showed, but also trimers in the practical concentration range. Using a mathematical fitting procedure, the dimerization and trimerization constants were determined. As expected, these equilibrium constants are dependent on the solvent used. As the alkane chain for linear hydrocarbon solvents becomes longer, dimerization decreases whereas trimerization increases. For the more branched hydrocarbon, we observe a significantly higher dimerization constant. These effects are most likely due to the intermolecular van der Waals interactions between the butyl tails of each TBP molecule and the diluent hydrocarbon chain as all solvents in this study are relatively nonpolar. PMID:27399338

  18. Semiconductor quantum dots affect fluidity of purple membrane from Halobacterium salinarum through disruption of bacteriorhodopsin trimer organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchonville, Nicolas; Molinari, Michael; Le Cigne, Anthony; Troyon, Michel; Sukhanova, Alyona; Nabiev, Igor R.

    2012-10-01

    Bacteriorhodopsin (bR) is a unique protein of purple membranes (PMs) of the bacterium Halobacterium salinarum. Tight trimers of this integral photochromic protein form a highly ordered 2D hexagonal crystalline lattice within the PMs. Due to strong excitonic interactions between the bR chromophores (retinals) in the protein trimers, PMs exhibit a strong circular dichroism (CD) activity in the region of the retinal absorption band, which allows monitoring the regularity and stability of the bR trimer organization within the membrane. In this study, the effects of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) on the bR intramembrane organization and the time course of bR monomerization caused by detergents have been analyzed. The results show that the interaction with QDs does not influence the bR structural organization but considerably accelerates the monomerization of the protein by detergents. These data have been confirmed by the results of atomic force microscopy (AFM) followed by Fourier transform analysis, which have shown that interactions with QDs cause an eightfold acceleration of bR monomerization with Triton. The data show that interactions of nanoparticles with biological membranes may modulate the membrane fluidity and the structural organization and function of integral proteins embedded in these membranes.

  19. Traveling waves in trimer granular lattice I: Bifurcation structure of traveling waves in the unit-cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaprakash, K. R.; Shiffer, A.; Starosvetsky, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Present paper is the first one in the series devoted to the dynamics of traveling waves emerging in the uncompressed, tri-atomic granular crystals. This work is primarily concerned with the dynamics of one-dimensional periodic granular trimer (tri-atomic) chains in the state of acoustic vacuum. Each unit cell consists of three spherical particles of different masses subject to periodic boundary conditions. Hertzian interaction law governs the mutual interaction of these particles. Under the assumption of zero pre-compression, this interaction is modeled as purely nonlinear, which means the absence of linear force component. The dynamics of such chains is governed by the two system parameters that scale the mass ratios between the particles of the unit cell. Such a system supports two different classes of periodic solutions namely the traveling and standing waves. The primary objective of the present study is the numerical analysis of the bifurcation structure of these solutions with emphasis on the dynamics of traveling waves. In fact, understanding of the bifurcation structure of the traveling wave solutions emerging in the unit-cell granular trimer is rather important and can shed light on the more complex nonlinear wave phenomena emerging in semi-infinite trimer chains.

  20. Site-specific Isopeptide Bridge Tethering of Chimeric gp41 N-terminal Heptad Repeat Helical Trimers for the Treatment of HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Li, Xue; Yu, Fei; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Xifeng; Xu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Huixin; Lai, Wenqing; Zhang, Tianhong; Zhang, Zhenqing; Ye, Ling; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Keliang

    2016-01-01

    Peptides derived from the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) of HIV-1 gp41 can be potent inhibitors against viral entry when presented in a nonaggregating trimeric coiled-coil conformation via the introduction of exogenous trimerization motifs and intermolecular disulfide bonds. We recently discovered that crosslinking isopeptide bridges within the de novo helical trimers added exceptional resistance to unfolding. Herein, we attempted to optimize (CCIZN17)3, a representative disulfide bond-stabilized chimeric NHR-trimer, by incorporating site-specific interhelical isopeptide bonds as the redox-sensitive disulfide surrogate. In this process, we systematically examined the effect of isopeptide bond position and molecular sizes of auxiliary trimeric coiled-coil motif and NHR fragments on the antiviral potency of these NHR-trimers. Pleasingly, (IZ14N24N)3 possessed promising inhibitory activity against HIV-1 infection and markedly increased proteolytic stability relative to its disulfide-tethered counterpart, suggesting good potential for further development as an effective antiviral agent for treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27562370

  1. Site-specific Isopeptide Bridge Tethering of Chimeric gp41 N-terminal Heptad Repeat Helical Trimers for the Treatment of HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Li, Xue; Yu, Fei; Lu, Lu; Jiang, Xifeng; Xu, Xiaoyu; Wang, Huixin; Lai, Wenqing; Zhang, Tianhong; Zhang, Zhenqing; Ye, Ling; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Keliang

    2016-01-01

    Peptides derived from the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) of HIV-1 gp41 can be potent inhibitors against viral entry when presented in a nonaggregating trimeric coiled-coil conformation via the introduction of exogenous trimerization motifs and intermolecular disulfide bonds. We recently discovered that crosslinking isopeptide bridges within the de novo helical trimers added exceptional resistance to unfolding. Herein, we attempted to optimize (CCIZN17)3, a representative disulfide bond-stabilized chimeric NHR-trimer, by incorporating site-specific interhelical isopeptide bonds as the redox-sensitive disulfide surrogate. In this process, we systematically examined the effect of isopeptide bond position and molecular sizes of auxiliary trimeric coiled-coil motif and NHR fragments on the antiviral potency of these NHR-trimers. Pleasingly, (IZ14N24N)3 possessed promising inhibitory activity against HIV-1 infection and markedly increased proteolytic stability relative to its disulfide-tethered counterpart, suggesting good potential for further development as an effective antiviral agent for treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27562370

  2. Relation between cooperative effects in cyclic water, methanol/water, and methanol trimers and hydrogen bonds in methanol/water, ethanol/water, and dimethylether/water heterodimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masella, Michel; Flament, Jean Pierre

    1998-05-01

    Ab initio calculations at the MP2 level have been performed on water, methanol/water, ethanol/water, and dimethylether/water dimers and on water, methanol/water, and methanol cyclic trimers. Several properties of their hydrogen bonds have been investigated, such as interoxygen distances, O-H bond lengths, binding energies, electronic densities at hydrogen bond (HB) critical points and OH stretch vibrational frequencies. Results exhibit HB enhancements for dimers where the acceptor molecule corresponds to water (HDA dimers) as compared to dimers where the donor is water (HDD dimers). In particular, HB reinforcement depends on the number of alkyl groups bonded to the donor oxygen. For trimers, a comparison among their HB properties and those of dimers shows that HB reinforcements (as compared to isolated dimers) occurring in trimers correlate with HB reinforcements observed in (HDA dimers (as compared to (HDDs). In particular, HB properties of the cyclic water trimer are close to those of alcohol/water HDA dimers, and for the methanol cyclic trimer to that of the dimethylether/water HDA dimer. All of these results agree with an orbital interpretation of hydrogen bonding in terms of charge transfer from donor lone pairs to acceptor antibond σOH*, even if all of the HB properties in cyclic trimers may not be explained from this approach.

  3. Rovibrational bound states of neon trimer: quantum dynamical calculation of all eigenstate energy levels and wavefunctions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Benhui; Chen, Wenwu; Poirier, Bill

    2011-09-01

    Exact quantum dynamics calculations of the eigenstate energy levels and wavefunctions for all bound rovibrational states of the Ne(3) trimer (J = 0-18) have been performed using the ScalIT suite of parallel codes. These codes employ a combination of highly efficient methods, including phase-space optimized discrete variable representation, optimal separable basis, and preconditioned inexact spectral transform methods, together with an effective massive parallelization scheme. The Ne(3) energy levels and wavefunctions were computed using a pair-wise Lennard-Jones potential. Jacobi coordinates were used for the calculations, but to identify just those states belonging to the totally symmetric irreducible representation of the G(12) complete nuclear permutation-inversion group, wavefunctions were plotted in hyperspherical coordinates. "Horseshoe" states were observed above the isomerization barrier, but the horseshoe localization effect is weaker than in Ar(3). The rigid rotor model is found to be applicable for only the ground and first excited vibrational states at low J; fitted rotational constant values are presented. PMID:21913762

  4. Molecular conformation-controlled vesicle/micelle transition of cationic trimeric surfactants in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunxian; Hou, Yanbo; Deng, Manli; Huang, Xu; Yu, Defeng; Xiang, Junfeng; Liu, Yu; Li, Zhibo; Wang, Yilin

    2010-06-01

    Two star-like trimeric cationic surfactants with amide groups in spacers, tri(dodecyldimethylammonioacetoxy)diethyltriamine trichloride (DTAD) and tri(dodecyldimethylammonioacetoxy)tris(2-aminoethyl)amine trichloride (DDAD), have been synthesized, and the aggregation behavior of the surfactants in aqueous solution has been investigated by surface tension, electrical conductivity, isothermal titration microcalorimetry, dynamic light scattering, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy, and NMR techniques. Typically, both the surfactants form vesicles just above critical aggregation concentration (CAC), and then the vesicles transfer to micelles gradually with an increase of the surfactant concentration. It is approved that the conformation of the surfactant molecules changes in this transition process. Just above the CAC, the hydrophobic chains of the surfactant molecules pack more loosely because of the rigid spacer and intramolecular electrostatic repulsion in the three-charged headgroup. With the increase of the surfactant concentration, hydrophobic interaction becomes strong enough to pack the hydrophobic tails tightly and turn the molecular conformation into a pyramid-like shape, thus leading to the vesicle to micelle transition. PMID:20426428

  5. Bioinformatic Characterization of the Trimeric Intracellular Cation-Specific Channel Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Silverio, Abe L. F.

    2014-01-01

    Trimeric intracellular cation-specific (TRIC) channels are integral to muscle excitation–contraction coupling. TRIC channels provide counter-ionic flux when calcium is rapidly transported from intracellular stores to the cell cytoplasm. Until recently, knowledge of the presence of these proteins was limited to animals. We analyzed the TRIC family and identified a profusion of prokaryotic family members with topologies and motifs similar to those of their eukaryotic counterparts. Prokaryotic members far outnumber eukaryotic members, and although none has been functionally characterized, the evidence suggests that they function as secondary carriers. The presence of fused N- or C-terminal domains of known biochemical functions as well as genomic context analyses provide clues about the functions of these prokaryotic homologs. They are proposed to function in metabolite (e.g., amino acid/ nucleotide) efflux. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that TRIC channel homologs diverged relatively early during evolutionary history and that horizontal gene transfer was frequent in prokaryotes but not in eukaryotes. Topological analyses of TRIC channels revealed that these proteins possess seven putative transmembrane segments (TMSs), which arose by intragenic duplication of a three-TMS polypeptide-encoding genetic element followed by addition of a seventh TMS at the C terminus to give the precursor of all current TRIC family homologs. We propose that this family arose in prokaryotes. PMID:21519847

  6. Ultrafast spectroscopy of trimeric light-harvesting complex II from higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Connelly, J.P.; Mueller, G.M.; Hucke, M.; Gatzen, G.; Holzwarth, A.R.; Mullineaux, C.W.; Ruban, A.V.; Horton, P.

    1997-03-06

    Time-resolved femtosecond transient absorption measurements have been carried out at room temperature on light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein complex of photosystem II (LHC II) trimers prepared from spinach. Exciting in the chlorophyll (Chl) b region at 650 nm with very low intensity, virtually annihilation-free two-color transient absorption measurement of the kinetics over 100 ps, between 645 and 690 nm, yield global lifetimes of 175 fs, 625 fs, and 5 ps and a long component (>=790 ps) where the three fastest lifetimes reflect Chl b to Chl a energy transfer. On the basis of these results and recent electron diffraction structural data, a preliminary three-pool Ch a, three-pool Chl b kinetic model is proposed. The possible influence of variable xanthophyll composition on quenching in LHC II preparations isolated from light- and dark-adapted leaves has been investigated using time-resolved picosecond fluorescence at room temperature. Global lifetimes of 5 ps and 3.6 ns, the lifetimes of the terminal LHC II excited state, were obtained. No discernable quenching effect due to the presence of zeaxanthin was observed. 38 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Super stretchable electroactive elastomer formation driven by aniline trimer self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Guo, Baolin; Eyster, Thomas W.; Ma, Peter X.

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical electroactive elastomers with a modulus similar to that of soft tissues are highly desirable for muscle, nerve, and other soft tissue replacement or regeneration, but have rarely been reported. In this work, superiorly stretchable electroactive polyurethane-urea elastomers were designed based on poly(lactide), poly(ethylene glycol), and aniline trimer (AT). A strain at break higher than 1600% and a modulus close to soft tissues was achieved from these copolymers. The mechanisms of super stretchability of the copolymer were systematically investigated. Crystallinity, chemical cross-linking, ionic cross-linking and hard domain formation were examined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The sphere-like hard domains self-assembled from AT segments were found to provide the crucial physical interactions needed for the novel super elastic material formation. These super stretchable copolymers were blended with conductive fillers such as polyaniline nanofibers and nanosized carbon black to achieve a high electric conductivity of 0.1 S/cm while maintaining an excellent stretchability and a modulus similar to that of soft tissues (lower than 10 MPa). PMID:26692638

  8. The mechanism study in the interactions of sorghum procyanidins trimer with porcine pancreatic α-amylase.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xin; Yu, Jianan; Xu, Liman; Liu, Rui; Yang, Jun

    2015-05-01

    To examine the mechanisms in the interaction of sorghum procyanidins trimer (SPT) with porcine pancreatic α-amylase (PPA), fluorescence quenching, circular dichroism, and UV spectra methods were adopted. The procyanidins binding mode, binding constant and effect of procyanidins on protein stability and conformation were determined. The fluorescence spectroscopy results showed that the Stern-Volmer quenching constant K(SV) of SPT on PPA, bimolecular quenching constant k(q), and apparent static quenching constant K were 2639.5 M(-1), 2.6395 × 10(11) M(-1) s(-1), and 495.19 M(-1), respectively. In addition, binding constant KA and number of binding sites were 872.971 M(-1) and 1, respectively. Circular dichroism study revealed that PPA conformation was altered by SPT with a major reduction of β-sheet, increase of β-turn, minor change of random coil. UV spectra indicated that SPT influenced the micro-environment of aromatic amino acid residues in PPA. These findings directly elucidate the mechanisms of high molecular weight SPT in interaction with PPA. PMID:25529683

  9. Time-Periodic Solutions of Driven-Damped Trimer Granular Crystals

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Charalampidis, E. G.; Li, F.; Chong, C.; Yang, J.; Kevrekidis, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    We consider time-periodic structures of granular crystals consisting of alternate chrome steel (S) and tungsten carbide (W) spherical particles where each unit cell follows the pattern of a 2 : 1 trimer: S-W-S. The configuration at the left boundary is driven by a harmonic in-time actuation with given amplitude and frequency while the right one is a fixed wall. Similar to the case of a dimer chain, the combination of dissipation, driving of the boundary, and intrinsic nonlinearity leads to complex dynamics. For fixed driving frequencies in each of the spectral gaps, we find that the nonlinear surface modes and the statesmore » dictated by the linear drive collide in a saddle-node bifurcation as the driving amplitude is increased, beyond which the dynamics of the system becomes chaotic. While the bifurcation structure is similar for solutions within the first and second gap, those in the first gap appear to be less robust. We also conduct a continuation in driving frequency, where it is apparent that the nonlinearity of the system results in a complex bifurcation diagram, involving an intricate set of loops of branches, especially within the spectral gap. The theoretical findings are qualitatively corroborated by the experimental full-field visualization of the time-periodic structures.« less

  10. Unconventional N-Linked Glycosylation Promotes Trimeric Autotransporter Function in Kingella kingae and Aggregatibacter aphrophilus

    PubMed Central

    Rempe, Katherine A.; Spruce, Lynn A.; Porsch, Eric A.; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glycosylation is a widespread mechanism employed by both eukaryotes and bacteria to increase the functional diversity of their proteomes. The nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae glycosyltransferase HMW1C mediates unconventional N-linked glycosylation of the adhesive protein HMW1, which is encoded in a two-partner secretion system gene cluster that also encodes HMW1C. In this system, HMW1 is modified in the cytoplasm by sequential transfer of hexose residues. In the present study, we examined Kingella kingae and Aggregatibacter aphrophilus homologues of HMW1C that are not encoded near a gene encoding an obvious acceptor protein. We found both homologues to be functional glycosyltransferases and identified their substrates as the K. kingae Knh and the A. aphrophilus EmaA trimeric autotransporter proteins. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis revealed multiple sites of N-linked glycosylation on Knh and EmaA. Without glycosylation, Knh and EmaA failed to facilitate wild-type levels of bacterial autoaggregation or adherence to human epithelial cells, establishing that glycosylation is essential for proper protein function. PMID:26307167

  11. The resveratrol trimer miyabenol C inhibits β-secretase activity and β-amyloid generation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jin; Lin, Ting; Gao, Yuehong; Xu, Junyue; Jiang, Chao; Wang, Guanghui; Bu, Guojun; Xu, Huaxi; Chen, Haifeng; Zhang, Yun-wu

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation and deposition of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in the brain is a primary cause of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ is generated from amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) through sequential cleavages first by β-secretase and then by γ-secretase. Inhibiting β-secretase activity is believed to be one of the most promising strategies for AD treatment. In the present study, we found that a resveratrol trimer, miyabenol C, isolated from stems and leaves of the small-leaf grape (Vitisthunbergii var. taiwaniana), can markedly reduce Aβ and sAPPβ levels in both cell cultures and the brain of AD model mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that miyabenol C affects neither protein levels of APP, the two major α-secretases ADAM10 and TACE, and the γ-secretase component Presenilin 1, nor γ-secretase-mediated Notch processing and TACE activity. In contrast, although miyabenol C has no effect on altering protein levels of the β-secretase BACE1, it can inhibit both in vitro and in vivo β-secretase activity. Together, our results indicate that miyabenol C is a prominent β-secretase inhibitor and lead compound for AD drug development. PMID:25629409

  12. Gas-chromatographic determination of 1,3-butadiene trimers in the atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Drugov, Yu.S.; Murav`eva, G.V.; Shlyakhov, A.F.

    1992-02-10

    In the catalytic polymerization of 1,3-butadiene during the manufacture of SKD-1 rubber (with titanium and aluminum compounds as catalysts) the toxic oligomers (1,3-butadiene trimers) t,t,t-1, 5,9-cyclododecatriene (I), t,t,c-1, 5,9-cyclododecatriene (II), n-2,4,6,10-dodecatetraene (III), n-1,3,6,10-dodecatertraine (IV), and others end up in the atmosphere and the manufacture of cyclododecane. In the content of the oligomers in the air used for drying the rubber was determined by passing it through active carbon and desorbing the trapped substances with water vapor. However, aspects of the concentration of the microimpurities during their determination in the atmosphere were not considered. The aim of the present work was to develop a gas-chromatographic procedure for the determination of small amounts of compounds in the atmosphere. The tentative safe level amounts to 0.008 mg/m{sup 3} for (I) and 0.01 mg/m{sup 3} for (II, III). In air these oligomers are present in the form of vapor and aerosols. 7 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Magnetic properties of linear trimers in fluoride analogs of tetragonal tungsten bronze

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yaw-Shun; Boo, William O.J.; Mattern, Daniell L.

    2010-08-15

    The compounds KZnTiF{sub 6}, KZnVF{sub 6}, KVScF{sub 6}, KCrScF{sub 6}, and KMnScF{sub 6} are fluoride analogs of Tetragonal Tungsten Bronze. M{sup 2+}-M{sup 3+} ionic ordering in these fluorides provided systems which contained linear trinuclear complexes of their respective paramagnetic ions. Magnetic coupling within these linear trimers occurred below 100 K in each of the five systems. Derived magnetic susceptibility equations were fitted to observed magnetic susceptibilities for each of the possible spin systems: KZnTiF{sub 6} (S=1/2), J/k=-114 K; KZnVF{sub 6} (S=1), J/k=-39 K; KVScF{sub 6} (S=3/2), J/k=-16 K; KCrScF{sub 6} (S=2), J/k=-4 K; and KMnScF{sub 6} (S=5/2), J/k=-7.5 K. - Graphical abstract: Five fluoride analogs of Tetragonal Tungsten Bronze (KZnTiF{sub 6}, KZnVF{sub 6}, KVScF{sub 6}, KCrScF{sub 6}, and KMnScF{sub 6}) underwent M{sup 2+}-M{sup 3+} ionic ordering below 100 K, providing linear trinuclear complexes of their respective paramagnetic ions.

  14. Bacillus cereus Response to a Proanthocyanidin Trimer, a Transcriptional and Functional Analysis.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Tomoko; Ozawa, Megumi; Tanaka, Naoto; Arai, Soichi; Mura, Kiyoshi

    2016-07-01

    Proanthocyanidins are abundant in peanut skin, and in this study, the antibacterial effects of a peanut skin extract (PSE) against food-borne bacteria were investigated to find its minimum inhibitory concentration. Food-borne gram-positive bacteria, and in particular Bacillus cereus, was more sensitive to PSE. In particular, the inhibitory activity of epicatechin-(4β → 6)-epicatechin-(2β → O→7, 4β → 8)-catechin (EEC), a proanthocyanidin trimer from peanut skin, against B. cereus was stronger than that of procyanidin A1, a proanthocyanidin dimer. DNA microarray analysis of B. cereus treated with EEC was carried out, with a finding that 597 genes were significantly up-regulated. Analysis of the up-regulated genes suggested that EEC disrupted the normal condition of the cell membrane and wall of B. cereus and alter its usual nutritional metabolism. Moreover, treatment of B. cereus with EEC inhibited glucose uptake, suggesting that EEC affects the cell-surface adsorption. PMID:27061585

  15. X-ray crystal structure of the trimeric N-terminal domain of gephyrin.

    PubMed

    Sola, M; Kneussel, M; Heck, I S; Betz, H; Weissenhorn, W

    2001-07-01

    Gephyrin is a ubiquitously expressed protein that, in the central nervous system, forms a submembraneous scaffold for anchoring inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the postsynaptic membrane. The N- and C-terminal domains of gephyrin are homologous to the Escherichia coli enzymes MogA and MoeA, respectively, both of which are involved in molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis. This enzymatic pathway is highly conserved from bacteria to mammals, as underlined by the ability of gephyrin to rescue molybdenum cofactor deficiencies in different organisms. Here we report the x-ray crystal structure of the N-terminal domain (amino acids 2-188) of rat gephyrin at 1.9-A resolution. Gephyrin-(2-188) forms trimers in solution, and a sequence motif thought to be involved in molybdopterin binding is highly conserved between gephyrin and the E. coli protein. The atomic structure of gephyrin-(2-188) resembles MogA, albeit with two major differences. The path of the C-terminal ends of gephyrin-(2-188) indicates that the central and C-terminal domains, absent in this structure, should follow a similar 3-fold arrangement as the N-terminal region. In addition, a central beta-hairpin loop found in MogA is lacking in gephyrin-(2-188). Despite these differences, both structures show a high degree of surface charge conservation, which is consistent with their common catalytic function. PMID:11325967

  16. Clustering of OB-fold domains of the partner protease complexed with trimeric stomatin from Thermococcales.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Hideshi; Matsui, Eriko; Hiramoto, Kana; Forterre, Patrick; Matsui, Ikuo

    2013-07-01

    The C-terminal soluble domain of stomatin operon partner protein (STOPP) of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus horikoshii has an oligonucleotide binding-fold (OB-fold). STOPP lacks the conserved surface residues necessary for binding to DNA/RNA. A tryptophan (W) residue is conserved instead at the molecular surface. Solvent-accessible W residues are often found at interfaces of protein-protein complexes, which suggested the possibility of self-assembling of STOPP. Protein-protein interactions among the C-terminal soluble domains of STOPP PH1510 (1510-C) were then analyzed by chemical linking and blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE) methods. These results suggest that the soluble domains of STOPP could assemble into homo-oligomers. Since hexameric subcomplex I from archaeal proteasome consists of coiled-coil segments and OB-fold domains, molecular modeling of 1510-C was performed using hexameric subcomplex I as a template. Although 1510-C is a comparatively small polypeptide consisting of approximately 60 residues, numerous salt bridges and hydrophobic interactions were observed in the predicted hexamer of 1510-C, suggesting the stability of the homo-oligomeric structure. This oligomeric property of STOPP may be favorable for triplicate proteolysis of the trimer of prokaryotic stomatin. PMID:23587725

  17. The Resveratrol Trimer Miyabenol C Inhibits β-Secretase Activity and β-Amyloid Generation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jin; Lin, Ting; Gao, Yuehong; Xu, Junyue; Jiang, Chao; Wang, Guanghui; Bu, Guojun; Xu, Huaxi; Chen, Haifeng; Zhang, Yun-wu

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation and deposition of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ) in the brain is a primary cause of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Aβ is generated from amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) through sequential cleavages first by β-secretase and then by γ-secretase. Inhibiting β-secretase activity is believed to be one of the most promising strategies for AD treatment. In the present study, we found that a resveratrol trimer, miyabenol C, isolated from stems and leaves of the small-leaf grape (Vitisthunbergii var. taiwaniana), can markedly reduce Aβ and sAPPβ levels in both cell cultures and the brain of AD model mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that miyabenol C affects neither protein levels of APP, the two major α-secretases ADAM10 and TACE, and the γ-secretase component Presenilin 1, nor γ-secretase-mediated Notch processing and TACE activity. In contrast, although miyabenol C has no effect on altering protein levels of the β-secretase BACE1, it can inhibit both in vitro and in vivo β-secretase activity. Together, our results indicate that miyabenol C is a prominent β-secretase inhibitor and lead compound for AD drug development. PMID:25629409

  18. The halogen atom/metal trimer CW laser-engineering concept overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanuel, G.; Jacobs, T. A.

    1992-07-01

    A halogen atom/metal vapor laser is discussed in terms of CW power and performance. Fluorine and sodium represent surrogates for the halogen and metal species; other combinations are possible. Since lasing may occur from a variety of excited electronic states, operation is expected to be broadly dispersed over the visible and near UV wavelength regions. The device is a low pressure, supersonic mixing laser that resembles the HF/DF CW laser, e.g., separate plenums are utilized for the fluorine and sodium vapors, and each plenum feeds a nozzle array. Sodium trimer formation begins in the nozzle and continues inside the laser cavity. The design of this nozzle is particularly important; the concept of controlled condensation is introduced. Downstream of the nozzle bank, the two vapor streams mix and the F-Na3 reaction pumps several electronically excited states that have gain in the blue-green region. Estimates are given for power per unit mass flow rate and power per unit nozzle bank cross-sectional area.

  19. Integrins activate trimeric G proteins via the nonreceptor protein GIV/Girdin

    PubMed Central

    Leyme, Anthony; Marivin, Arthur; Perez-Gutierrez, Lorena; Nguyen, Lien T.

    2015-01-01

    Signal transduction via integrins and G protein–coupled receptors is critical to control cell behavior. These two receptor classes have been traditionally believed to trigger distinct and independent signaling cascades in response to extracellular cues. Here, we report a novel mechanism of integrin signaling that requires activation of the trimeric G protein Gαi by the nonreceptor guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) GIV (also known as Girdin), a metastasis-associated protein. We demonstrate that GIV enhances integrin-dependent cell responses upon extracellular matrix stimulation and makes tumor cells more invasive. These responses include remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton and PI3K-dependent signaling, resulting in enhanced haptotaxis and invasion. We show that both GIV and its substrate Gαi3 are recruited to active integrin complexes and that tumor cells engineered to express GEF-deficient GIV fail to transduce integrin signals into proinvasive responses via a Gβγ-PI3K axis. Our discoveries delineate a novel mechanism by which integrin signaling is rewired during metastasis to result in increased tumor invasiveness. PMID:26391662

  20. Quantum Dynamics through Conical Intersections in Heteronuclear Alkali-Metal Trimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Alexander; Makrides, Constantinos; Kotochigova, Svetlana

    2016-05-01

    Multi-particle potential surfaces have a number of characteristics that are absent from the more familiar two-body potentials of their constituents. Specifically in the case of triatomic alkali systems, the lowest two doublet surfaces are degenerate at specific locations commonly known as conical intersections. The collection of these points of intersection form a ``seam'' that trace out a line in nuclear space. As the complex propagates along the reaction path, the degeneracy at the seam allows for a radiationless transition between the surfaces. Here we analyze the lower two doublet states of the KRbK trimer. First, we map out the seam of intersections throughout the nuclear space and determine branching vectors that provide an accurate description of spatial derivative couplings in the vicinity of conical intersections and characterize the subsequent dynamics in the immediate region. We also revisit classical simulations of the nuclear motion on multiple surfaces and investigate how chaotic motion on the complex surfaces affect the reaction in the ultracold domain. This work is supported by the ARO-MURI and NSF grants.

  1. Renaturation of Recombinant Treponema pallidum Rare Outer Membrane Protein 1 into a Trimeric, Hydrophobic, and Porin-Active Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongwei H.; Blanco, David R.; Exner, Maurice M.; Shang, Ellen S.; Champion, Cheryl I.; Phillips, Martin L.; Miller, James N.; Lovett, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    We have previously observed that while native Treponema pallidum rare outer membrane protein 1 (Tromp1) is hydrophobic and has porin activity, recombinant forms of Tromp1 do not possess these properties. In this study we show that these properties are determined by conformation and can be replicated by proper renaturation of recombinant Tromp1. Native Tromp1, but not the 47-kDa lipoprotein, extracted from whole organisms by using Triton X-114, was found to lose hydrophobicity after treatment in 8 M urea, indicating that Tromp1’s hydrophobicity is conformation dependent. Native Tromp1 was purified from 0.1% Triton X-100 extracts of whole organisms by fast-performance liquid chromatography (FPLC) and shown to have porin activity in planar lipid bilayers. Cross-linking studies of purified native Tromp1 with an 11 Å cross-linking agent showed oligomeric forms consistent with dimers and trimers. For renaturation studies of recombinant Tromp1 (rTromp1), a 31,109-Da signal-less construct was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by FPLC. FPLC-purified rTromp1 was denatured in 8 M urea and then renatured in the presence of 0.5% Zwittergent 3,14 during dialysis to remove the urea. Renatured rTromp1 was passed through a Sephacryl S-300 gel exclusion column previously calibrated with known molecular weight standards. While all nonrenatured rTromp1 eluted from the column at approximately the position of the carbonic anhydrase protein standard (29 kDa), all renatured rTromp1 eluted at the position of the phosphorylase b protein standard (97 kDa), suggesting a trimeric conformation. Trimerization was confirmed by using an 11 Å cross-linking agent which showed both dimers and trimers similar to that of native Tromp1. Triton X-114 phase separations showed that all of renatured rTromp1, but none of nonrenatured rTromp1, phase separated exclusively into the hydrophobic detergent phase, similar to native Tromp1. Circular dichroism of nonrenatured and renatured rTromp1

  2. Interactions of cationic trimeric, gemini and monomeric surfactants with trianionic curcumin in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meina; Wu, Chunxian; Tang, Yongqiang; Fan, Yaxun; Han, Yuchun; Wang, Yilin

    2014-05-21

    Interactions of trianionic curcumin (Cur(3-)) with a series of cationic surfactants, monomeric surfactant dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), dimeric surfactant hexamethylene-1,6-bis(dodecyldimethylammonium bromide) (12-6-12) and trimeric surfactant tri(dodecyldimethylammonioacetoxy)diethyltriamine trichloride (DTAD), have been investigated in aqueous solution of pH 13.0. Surface tension and spectral measurements indicate that the cationic surfactants display a similar surfactant concentration dependent interaction process with Cur(3-), involving three interaction stages. At first the three cationic surfactants electrostatically bind on Cur(3-) to form the surfactant-Cur(3-) complex. Then the bound and unbound cationic surfactants with Cur(3-) aggregate into surfactant-Cur(3-) mixed micelles through hydrophobic interactions above the critical micelle concentration of the surfactants (CMCC) in the presence of Cur(3-). Finally excess unbound surfactants self-assemble into micelles like those without Cur(3-). For all the three surfactants, the addition of Cur(3-) only decreases the critical micelle concentration of 12-6-12 but does not affect the critical micelle concentration of DTAB and DTAD. As the oligomeric degree of surfactants increases, the intermolecular interaction of the cationic surfactants with Cur(3-) increases and the surfactant amount needed for Cur(3-) encapsulation decreases. Compared with 12-6-12, either the weaker interaction of DTAB with Cur(3-) or stronger interaction of DTAD with Cur(3-) limits the stability or solubility of Cur(3-) in surfactant micelles. Therefore, gemini surfactant 12-6-12 is the best choice to effectively suppress Cur(3-) degradation at very low concentrations. Isothermal titration microcalorimetry, surface tension and (1)H NMR results reveal that 12-6-12 and Cur(3-) form a (12-6-12)2-Cur(3-) complex and start to form micelles at extremely decreased concentrations, where either 12-6-12 or Cur(3-) works as a bridge

  3. Structure of a eukaryotic SWEET transporter in a homo-trimeric complex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuo; Eom, Joon-Seob; Chen, Li-Qing; Xu, Yan; Perry, Kay; Frommer, Wolf B.; Feng, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotes rely on efficient distribution of energy and carbon skeletons between organs in the form of sugars. Glucose in animals and sucrose in plants serve as dominant distribution forms. Cellular sugar uptake and release require vesicular and/or plasma membrane transport proteins. Humans and plants use related proteins from three superfamilies for sugar translocation: the major facilitator superfamily (MFS), the sodium solute symporter Family (SSF; only animal kingdom), and SWEETs1-5. SWEETs carry mono- and disaccharides6 across vacuolar or plasma membranes. Plant SWEETs play key roles in sugar translocation between compartments, cells, and organs, notably in nectar secretion7, phloem loading for long distance translocation8, pollen nutrition9, and seed filling10. Plant SWEETs cause pathogen susceptibility by sugar leakage from infected cells3,11,12. The vacuolar AtSWEET2 sequesters sugars in root vacuoles; loss-of-function increases susceptibility to Pythium infection13. Here we show that its orthologue, the vacuolar glucose transporter OsSWEET2b from rice, consists of an asymmetrical pair of triple-helix-bundles (THBs), connected by an inversion linker helix (TM4) to create the translocation pathway. Structural and biochemical analyses show OsSWEET2b in an apparent inward (cytosolic) open state forming homomeric trimers. TM4 tightly interacts with the first THB within a protomer and mediates key contacts among protomers. Structure-guided mutagenesis of the close paralogue SWEET1 from Arabidopsis identified key residues in substrate translocation and protomer crosstalk. Insights into the structure-function relationship of SWEETs is valuable for understanding the transport mechanism of eukaryotic SWEETs and may be useful for engineering sugar flux. PMID:26479032

  4. Evolutionary Conservation of a GPCR-Independent Mechanism of Trimeric G Protein Activation

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Brantley D.; Marivin, Arthur; Parag-Sharma, Kshitij; DiGiacomo, Vincent; Kim, Seongseop; Pepper, Judy S.; Casler, Jason; Nguyen, Lien T.; Koelle, Michael R.; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    Trimeric G protein signaling is a fundamental mechanism of cellular communication in eukaryotes. The core of this mechanism consists of activation of G proteins by the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity of G protein coupled receptors. However, the duration and amplitude of G protein-mediated signaling are controlled by a complex network of accessory proteins that appeared and diversified during evolution. Among them, nonreceptor proteins with GEF activity are the least characterized. We recently found that proteins of the ccdc88 family possess a Gα-binding and activating (GBA) motif that confers GEF activity and regulates mammalian cell behavior. A sequence similarity-based search revealed that ccdc88 genes are highly conserved across metazoa but the GBA motif is absent in most invertebrates. This prompted us to investigate whether the GBA motif is present in other nonreceptor proteins in invertebrates. An unbiased bioinformatics search in Caenorhabditis elegans identified GBAS-1 (GBA and SPK domain containing-1) as a GBA motif-containing protein with homologs only in closely related worm species. We demonstrate that GBAS-1 has GEF activity for the nematode G protein GOA-1 and that the two proteins are coexpressed in many cells of living worms. Furthermore, we show that GBAS-1 can activate mammalian Gα-subunits and provide structural insights into the evolutionarily conserved determinants of the GBA–G protein interface. These results demonstrate that the GBA motif is a functional GEF module conserved among highly divergent proteins across evolution, indicating that the GBA-Gα binding mode is strongly constrained under selective pressure to mediate receptor-independent G protein activation in metazoans. PMID:26659249

  5. Trimeric Association of Hox and TALE Homeodomain Proteins Mediates Hoxb2 Hindbrain Enhancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Yakop; Schnabel, Catherine A.; Cleary, Michael L.

    1999-01-01

    Pbx/exd proteins modulate the DNA binding affinities and specificities of Hox proteins and contribute to the execution of Hox-dependent developmental programs in arthropods and vertebrates. Pbx proteins also stably heterodimerize and bind DNA with Meis and Pknox1-Prep1, additional members of the TALE (three-amino-acid loop extension) superclass of homeodomain proteins that function on common genetic pathways with a subset of Hox proteins. In this study, we demonstrated that Pbx and Meis bind DNA as heterotrimeric complexes with Hoxb1 on a genetically defined Hoxb2 enhancer, r4, that mediates the cross-regulatory transcriptional effects of Hoxb1 in vivo. The DNA binding specificity of the heterotrimeric complex for r4 is mediated by a Pbx-Hox site in conjunction with a distal Meis site, which we showed to be required for ternary complex formation and Meis-enhanced transcription. Formation of heterotrimeric complexes in which all three homeodomains bind their cognate DNA sites is topologically facilitated by the ability of Pbx and Meis to interact through their amino termini and bind DNA without stringent half-site orientation and spacing requirements. Furthermore, Meis site mutation in the Hoxb2 enhancer phenocopies Pbx-Hox site mutation to abrogate enhancer-directed expression of a reporter transgene in the murine embryonic hindbrain, demonstrating that DNA binding by all three proteins is required for trimer function in vivo. Our data provide in vitro and in vivo evidence for the combinatorial regulation of Hox and TALE protein functions that are mediated, in part, by their interdependent DNA binding activities as ternary complexes. As a consequence, Hoxb1 employs Pbx and Meis-related proteins, as a pair of essential cofactors in a higher-order molecular complex, to mediate its transcriptional effects on an endogenous Hox response element. PMID:10373562

  6. Identification of a Predicted Trimeric Autotransporter Adhesin Required for Biofilm Formation of Burkholderia pseudomallei

    PubMed Central

    Lazar Adler, Natalie R.; Dean, Rachel E.; Saint, Richard J.; Stevens, Mark P.; Prior, Joann L.; Atkins, Timothy P.; Galyov, Edouard E.

    2013-01-01

    The autotransporters are a large and diverse family of bacterial secreted and outer membrane proteins, which are present in many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens and play a role in numerous environmental and virulence-associated interactions. As part of a larger systematic study on the autotransporters of Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of the severe tropical disease melioidosis, we have constructed an insertion mutant in the bpss1439 gene encoding an unstudied predicted trimeric autotransporter adhesin. The bpss1439 mutant demonstrated a significant reduction in biofilm formation at 48 hours in comparison to its parent 10276 wild-type strain. This phenotype was complemented to wild-type levels by the introduction of a full-length copy of the bpss1439 gene in trans. Examination of the wild-type and bpss1439 mutant strains under biofilm-inducing conditions by microscopy after 48 hours confirmed that the bpss1439 mutant produced less biofilm compared to wild-type. Additionally, it was observed that this phenotype was due to low levels of bacterial adhesion to the abiotic surface as well as reduced microcolony formation. In a murine melioidosis model, the bpss1439 mutant strain demonstrated a moderate attenuation for virulence compared to the wild-type strain. This attenuation was abrogated by in trans complementation, suggesting that bpss1439 plays a subtle role in the pathogenesis of B. pseudomallei. Taken together, these studies indicate that BPSS1439 is a novel predicted autotransporter involved in biofilm formation of B. pseudomallei; hence, this factor was named BbfA, Burkholderia biofilm factor A. PMID:24223950

  7. Trimeric association of Hox and TALE homeodomain proteins mediates Hoxb2 hindbrain enhancer activity.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Y; Schnabel, C A; Cleary, M L

    1999-07-01

    Pbx/exd proteins modulate the DNA binding affinities and specificities of Hox proteins and contribute to the execution of Hox-dependent developmental programs in arthropods and vertebrates. Pbx proteins also stably heterodimerize and bind DNA with Meis and Pknox1-Prep1, additional members of the TALE (three-amino-acid loop extension) superclass of homeodomain proteins that function on common genetic pathways with a subset of Hox proteins. In this study, we demonstrated that Pbx and Meis bind DNA as heterotrimeric complexes with Hoxb1 on a genetically defined Hoxb2 enhancer, r4, that mediates the cross-regulatory transcriptional effects of Hoxb1 in vivo. The DNA binding specificity of the heterotrimeric complex for r4 is mediated by a Pbx-Hox site in conjunction with a distal Meis site, which we showed to be required for ternary complex formation and Meis-enhanced transcription. Formation of heterotrimeric complexes in which all three homeodomains bind their cognate DNA sites is topologically facilitated by the ability of Pbx and Meis to interact through their amino termini and bind DNA without stringent half-site orientation and spacing requirements. Furthermore, Meis site mutation in the Hoxb2 enhancer phenocopies Pbx-Hox site mutation to abrogate enhancer-directed expression of a reporter transgene in the murine embryonic hindbrain, demonstrating that DNA binding by all three proteins is required for trimer function in vivo. Our data provide in vitro and in vivo evidence for the combinatorial regulation of Hox and TALE protein functions that are mediated, in part, by their interdependent DNA binding activities as ternary complexes. As a consequence, Hoxb1 employs Pbx and Meis-related proteins, as a pair of essential cofactors in a higher-order molecular complex, to mediate its transcriptional effects on an endogenous Hox response element. PMID:10373562

  8. Trimeric Form of Intracellular ATP Synthase Subunit β of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Binds Human Interleukin-1β

    PubMed Central

    Paino, Annamari; Tuominen, Heidi; Jääskeläinen, Mari; Alanko, Jonna; Nuutila, Jari; Asikainen, Sirkka E.; Pelliniemi, Lauri J.; Pöllänen, Marja T.; Chen, Casey; Ihalin, Riikka

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms resist host defenses and antibiotics partly because of their decreased metabolism. Some bacteria use proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1β, as cues to promote biofilm formation and to alter virulence. Although one potential bacterial IL-1β receptor has been identified, current knowledge of the bacterial IL-1β sensing mechanism is limited. In chronic biofilm infection, periodontitis, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans requires tight adherence (tad)-locus to form biofilms, and tissue destroying active lesions contain more IL-1β than inactive ones. The effect of IL-1β on the metabolic activity of A. actinomycetemcomitans biofilm was tested using alamarBlue™. The binding of IL-1β to A. actinomycetemcomitans cells was investigated using transmission electron microscopy and flow cytometry. To identify the proteins which interacted with IL-1β, different protein fractions from A. actinomycetemcomitans were run in native-PAGE and blotted using biotinylated IL-1β and avidin-HRP, and identified using mass spectroscopy. We show that although IL-1β slightly increases the biofilm formation of A. actinomycetemcomitans, it reduces the metabolic activity of the biofilm. A similar reduction was observed with all tad-locus mutants except the secretin mutant, although all tested mutant strains as well as wild type strains bound IL-1β. Our results suggest that IL-1β might be transported into the A. actinomycetemcomitans cells, and the trimeric form of intracellular ATP synthase subunit β interacted with IL-1β, possibly explaining the decreased metabolic activity. Because ATP synthase is highly conserved, it might universally enhance biofilm resistance to host defense by binding IL-1β during inflammation. PMID:21533109

  9. Comparative Immunogenicity of Evolved V1V2-Deleted HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Trimers

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Tommy; van Montfort, Thijs; Eggink, Dirk; Montefiori, David; Olson, William C.; Moore, John P.; Binley, James M.; Berkhout, Ben; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2013-01-01

    Despite almost 30 years of research, no effective vaccine has yet been developed against HIV-1. Probably such a vaccine would need to induce both an effective T cell and antibody response. Any vaccine component focused on inducing humoral immunity requires the HIV-1 envelope (Env) glycoprotein complex as it is the only viral protein exposed on the virion surface. HIV-1 has evolved several mechanisms to evade broadly reactive neutralizing antibodies. One such a mechanism involves variable loop domains, which are highly flexible structures that shield the underlying conserved epitopes. We hypothesized that removal of such loops would increase the exposure and immunogenicity of these conserved regions. Env variable loop deletion however often leads to protein misfolding and aggregation because hydrophobic patches becoming solvent accessible. We have therefore previously used virus evolution to acquire functional Env proteins lacking the V1V2 loop. We then expressed them in soluble (uncleaved) gp140 forms. Three mutants were found to perform optimally in terms of protein expression, stability, trimerization and folding. In this study, we characterized the immune responses to these antigens in rabbits. The V1V2 deletion mutant ΔV1V2.9.VK induced a prominent response directed to epitopes that are not fully available on the other Env proteins tested but that effectively bound and neutralized the ΔV1V2 Env virus. This Env variant also induced more efficient neutralization of the tier 1 virus SF162. The immune refocusing effect was lost after booster immunization with a full-length gp140 protein with intact V1V2 loops. Collectively, this result suggests that deletion of variable domains could alter the specificity of the humoral immune response, but did not result in broad neutralization of neutralization-resistant virus isolates. PMID:23840716

  10. Evolutionary Conservation of a GPCR-Independent Mechanism of Trimeric G Protein Activation.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Brantley D; Marivin, Arthur; Parag-Sharma, Kshitij; DiGiacomo, Vincent; Kim, Seongseop; Pepper, Judy S; Casler, Jason; Nguyen, Lien T; Koelle, Michael R; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2016-03-01

    Trimeric G protein signaling is a fundamental mechanism of cellular communication in eukaryotes. The core of this mechanism consists of activation of G proteins by the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity of G protein coupled receptors. However, the duration and amplitude of G protein-mediated signaling are controlled by a complex network of accessory proteins that appeared and diversified during evolution. Among them, nonreceptor proteins with GEF activity are the least characterized. We recently found that proteins of the ccdc88 family possess a Gα-binding and activating (GBA) motif that confers GEF activity and regulates mammalian cell behavior. A sequence similarity-based search revealed that ccdc88 genes are highly conserved across metazoa but the GBA motif is absent in most invertebrates. This prompted us to investigate whether the GBA motif is present in other nonreceptor proteins in invertebrates. An unbiased bioinformatics search in Caenorhabditis elegans identified GBAS-1 (GBA and SPK domain containing-1) as a GBA motif-containing protein with homologs only in closely related worm species. We demonstrate that GBAS-1 has GEF activity for the nematode G protein GOA-1 and that the two proteins are coexpressed in many cells of living worms. Furthermore, we show that GBAS-1 can activate mammalian Gα-subunits and provide structural insights into the evolutionarily conserved determinants of the GBA-G protein interface. These results demonstrate that the GBA motif is a functional GEF module conserved among highly divergent proteins across evolution, indicating that the GBA-Gα binding mode is strongly constrained under selective pressure to mediate receptor-independent G protein activation in metazoans. PMID:26659249