Science.gov

Sample records for cycle alternative mechanisms

  1. Cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, two alternative mechanisms for PMKT2 killer activity.

    PubMed

    Santos, Antonio; Alonso, Alejandro; Belda, Ignacio; Marquina, Domingo

    2013-01-01

    Pichia membranifaciens CYC 1086 secretes a unique 30kDa killer toxin (PMKT2) that inhibits a variety of spoilage yeasts and fungi of agronomical interest. The cytocidal effect of PMKT2 on Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells was studied. Metabolic events associated with the loss of S. cerevisiae viability caused by PMKT2 were qualitatively identical to those reported for K28 killer toxin activity, but different to those reported for PMKT. At higher doses, none of the cellular events accounting for the action of PMKT, the killer toxin secreted by P. membranifaciens CYC 1106, was observed for PMKT2. Potassium leakage, sodium influx and the decrease of intracellular pH were not among the primary effects of PMKT2. We report here that this protein is unable to form ion-permeable channels in liposome membranes, suggesting that channel formation is not the mechanism of cytotoxic action of PMKT2. Nevertheless, flow cytometry studies have revealed a cell cycle arrest at an early S-phase with an immature bud and pre-replicated 1n DNA content. By testing the sensitivity of cells arrested at different stages in the cell cycle, we hoped to identify the execution point for lethality more precisely. Cells arrested at the G1-phase by α-factor or arrested at G2-phase by the spindle poison methyl benzimidazol-2-yl-carbamate (MBC) were protected against the toxin. Cells released from the arrest in both cases were killed by PMKT2 at a similar rate. Nevertheless, cells released from MBC-arrest were able to grow for a short time, and then viability dropped rapidly. These findings suggest that cells released from G2-phase are initially able to divide, but die in the presence of PMKT2 after initiating the S-phase in a new cycle, adopting a terminal phenotype within that cycle. By contrast, low doses of PMKT and PMKT2 were able to generate the same cellular response. The evidence presented here shows that treating yeast with low doses of PMKT2 leads to the typical membranous, cytoplasmic

  2. Separations Needs for the Alternate Chemical Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Frederick F. Stewart

    2007-05-01

    The bulk of the efforts for the development of a hydrogen production plant supported by the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) have been directed towards the sulfur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical cycle. However, it was judged prudent to re-investigate alternate chemical cycles in light of new developments and technical accomplishments derived from the current S-I work. This work analyzes the available data for the promising alternate chemical cycles to provide an understanding of their inherent chemical separations needs. None of the cycles analyzed have separations that are potential “show stoppers”; although some of the indicated separations will be challenging to perform. The majority of the separations involve processes that are either more achievable or more developed

  3. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF ELECTRICITY GENERATION ALTERNATIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation summarizes various electricity and electricity/steam cogeneration alternatives. Among these alternatives, are fossil fuel and biomass power generation plants. These plants have different designs due to the need in fossil fuel (coal) plants to include process u...

  4. Alternative growth mechanisms in the natural diamonds

    SciTech Connect

    Gafitullina, D.S.; Ashurov, M.Kh.; Oksengendler, B.L.

    1995-12-31

    On the base of autoradiography method including digital treatment it was investigated the impurity distribution in natural diamonds. It was established the alternation of zonal and fibruilar distribution of several impurities. This phenomenon treatment may be realized on the base of combaing of Cahn-Routburd-Shklowskii growth theory with Prigogine` like synergetic idea. According to the type of crystallization mechanisms depends on relation between crystallization moviting force and value of combaine parameter, depending of boundary wide A lot of regimes of crystallization including the alternation of normal and tangential mechanisms are discussed.

  5. The modulated annual cycle: an alternative reference frame for climate anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhaohua; Schneider, Edwin K.; Kirtman, Ben P.; Sarachik, E. S.; Huang, Norden E.; Tucker, Compton J.

    2008-12-01

    In climate science, an anomaly is the deviation of a quantity from its annual cycle. There are many ways to define annual cycle. Traditionally, this annual cycle is taken to be an exact repeat of itself year after year. This stationary annual cycle may not reflect well the intrinsic nonlinearity of the climate system, especially under external forcing. In this paper, we re-examine the reference frame for anomalies by re-examining the annual cycle. We propose an alternative reference frame for climate anomalies, the modulated annual cycle (MAC) that allows the annual cycle to change from year to year, for defining anomalies. In order for this alternative reference frame to be useful, we need to be able to define the instantaneous annual cycle: we therefore also introduce a new method to extract the MAC from climatic data. In the presence of a MAC, modulated in both amplitude and frequency, we can then define an alternative version of an anomaly, this time with respect to the instantaneous MAC rather than a permanent and unchanging AC. Based on this alternative definition of anomalies, we re-examine some familiar physical processes: in particular SST re-emergence and ENSO phase locking to the annual cycle. We find that the re-emergence mechanism may be alternatively interpreted as an explanation of the change of the annual cycle instead of an explanation of the interannual to interdecadal persistence of SST anomalies. We also find that the ENSO phase locking can largely be attributed to the residual annual cycle (the difference of the MAC and the corresponding traditional annual cycle) contained in the traditional anomaly, and, therefore, can be alternatively interpreted as a part of the annual cycle phase locked to the annual cycle itself. In addition to the examples of reinterpretation of physics of well known climate phenomena, we also present an example of the implications of using a MAC against which to define anomalies. We show that using MAC as a reference

  6. Relationship between cycling mechanics and core stability.

    PubMed

    Abt, John P; Smoliga, James M; Brick, Matthew J; Jolly, John T; Lephart, Scott M; Fu, Freddie H

    2007-11-01

    Core stability has received considerable attention with regards to functional training in sports. Core stability provides the foundation from which power is generated in cycling. No research has described the relationship between core stability and cycling mechanics of the lower extremity. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between cycling mechanics and core stability. Hip, knee, and ankle joint kinematic and pedal force data were collected on 15 competitive cyclists while cycling untethered on a high-speed treadmill. The exhaustive cycling protocol consisted of cycling at 25.8 km x h(-1) while the grade was increased 1% every 3 minutes. A core fatigue workout was performed before the second treadmill test. Total frontal plane knee motion (test 1: 15.1 +/- 6.0 degrees ; test 2: 23.3 +/- 12.5 degrees), sagittal plane knee motion (test 1: 69.9 +/- 4.9 degrees ; test 2: 79.3 +/- 10.1 degrees), and sagittal plane ankle motion (test 1: 29.0 +/- 8.5 degrees ; test 2: 43.0 +/- 22.9 degrees) increased after the core fatigue protocol. No significant differences were demonstrated for pedaling forces. Core fatigue resulted in altered cycling mechanics that might increase the risk of injury because the knee joint is potentially exposed to greater stress. Improved core stability and endurance could promote greater alignment of the lower extremity when riding for extended durations as the core is more resistant to fatigue. PMID:18076271

  7. Elucidating the mechanisms of double ionization using intense half-cycle, single-cycle, and double half-cycle pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Kamta, G. Lagmago; Starace, Anthony F.

    2003-10-01

    We investigate the interaction of a two-active electron system (Li{sup -}) with intense single-cycle and double half-cycle pulses. The 'intensity' and 'frequency' considered correspond to the 'multiphoton above-barrier regime'. For the single-cycle pulse (SCP), the electric field changes sign once, allowing electron wave packets created during the first half cycle to recollide with the parent ion when driven back by the field. For the double half-cycle pulse (DHP), however, the electric field does not change sign, and electron wave packets created during the first half cycle are not driven back to the parent ion. We find that both single and double ionization are significantly larger for the SCP than for the DHP, thereby elucidating the role of the rescattering mechanism. On the other hand, doubly ionized electrons produced by a half-cycle pulse and a DHP are found to have angular distributions in which one electron is ejected in the direction of the pulse field, and the other in the opposite direction. This clear signature of electron correlations suggests that 'shake-off', 'knockout', and, possibly, 'multiphoton-sharing' processes are alternative contributing mechanisms for double ionization in this regime.

  8. An Alternative Mechanism for Accelerated Carbon Sequestration in Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Haselbach, Liv M.; Thomle, Jonathan N.

    2014-07-01

    The increased rate of carbon dioxide sequestration (carbonation) is desired in many primary and secondary life applications of concrete in order to make the life cycle of concrete structures more carbon neutral. Most carbonation rate studies have focused on concrete exposed to air under various conditions. An alternative mechanism for accelerated carbon sequestration in concrete was investigated in this research based on the pH change of waters in contact with pervious concrete which have been submerged in carbonate laden waters. The results indicate that the concrete exposed to high levels of carbonate species in water may carbonate faster than when exposed to ambient air, and that the rate is higher with higher concentrations. Validation of increased carbon dioxide sequestration was also performed via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). It is theorized that the proposed alternative mechanism reduces a limiting rate effect of carbon dioxide dissolution in water in the micro pores of the concrete.

  9. Life cycle models of conventional and alternative-fueled automobiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maclean, Heather Louise

    This thesis reports life cycle inventories of internal combustion engine automobiles with feasible near term fuel/engine combinations. These combinations include unleaded gasoline, California Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, alcohol and gasoline blends (85 percent methanol or ethanol combined with 15 percent gasoline), and compressed natural gas in spark ignition direct and indirect injection engines. Additionally, I consider neat methanol and neat ethanol in spark ignition direct injection engines and diesel fuel in compression ignition direct and indirect injection engines. I investigate the potential of the above options to have a lower environmental impact than conventional gasoline-fueled automobiles, while still retaining comparable pricing and consumer benefits. More broadly, the objective is to assess whether the use of any of the alternative systems will help to lead to the goal of a more sustainable personal transportation system. The principal tool is the Economic Input-Output Life Cycle Analysis model which includes inventories of economic data, environmental discharges, and resource use. I develop a life cycle assessment framework to assemble the array of data generated by the model into three aggregate assessment parameters; economics, externalities, and vehicle attributes. The first step is to develop a set of 'comparable cars' with the alternative fuel/engine combinations, based on characteristics of a conventional 1998 gasoline-fueled Ford Taurus sedan, the baseline vehicle for the analyses. I calculate the assessment parameters assuming that these comparable cars can attain the potential thermal efficiencies estimated by experts for each fuel/engine combination. To a first approximation, there are no significant differences in the assessment parameters for the vehicle manufacture, service, fixed costs, and the end-of-life for any of the options. However, there are differences in the vehicle operation life cycle components and the state of technology

  10. Advanced Electrochemical Technologies for Hydrogen Production by Alternative Thermochemical Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Lvov, Serguei; Chung, Mike; Fedkin, Mark; Lewis, Michele; Balashov, Victor; Chalkova, Elena; Akinfiev, Nikolay; Stork, Carol; Davis, Thomas; Gadala-Maria, Francis; Stanford, Thomas; Weidner, John; Law, Victor; Prindle, John

    2011-01-06

    Hydrogen fuel is a potentially major solution to the problem of climate change, as well as addressing urban air pollution issues. But a key future challenge for hydrogen as a clean energy carrier is a sustainable, low-cost method of producing it in large capacities. Most of the world's hydrogen is currently derived from fossil fuels through some type of reforming processes. Nuclear hydrogen production is an emerging and promising alternative to the reforming processes for carbon-free hydrogen production in the future. This report presents the main results of a research program carried out by a NERI Consortium, which consisted of Penn State University (PSU) (lead), University of South Carolina (USC), Tulane University (TU), and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Thermochemical water decomposition is an emerging technology for large-scale production of hydrogen. Typically using two or more intermediate compounds, a sequence of chemical and physical processes split water into hydrogen and oxygen, without releasing any pollutants externally to the atmosphere. These intermediate compounds are recycled internally within a closed loop. While previous studies have identified over 200 possible thermochemical cycles, only a few have progressed beyond theoretical calculations to working experimental demonstrations that establish scientific and practical feasibility of the thermochemical processes. The Cu-Cl cycle has a significant advantage over other cycles due to lower temperature requirements – around 530 °C and below. As a result, it can be eventually linked with the Generation IV thermal power stations. Advantages of the Cu-Cl cycle over others include lower operating temperatures, ability to utilize low-grade waste heat to improve energy efficiency, and potentially lower cost materials. Another significant advantage is a relatively low voltage required for the electrochemical step (thus low electricity input). Other advantages include common chemical agents and

  11. Alternative Mechanisms of Immune Receptor Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Litman, Gary W.; Dishaw, Larry J.; Cannon, John P.; Haire, Robert N.; Rast, Jonathan P.

    2007-01-01

    Our views of both innate and adaptive immunity have been significantly modified by recent studies of immune receptors and immunity in protostomes, invertebrate deuterostomes and jawless vertebrates. Extraordinary variation in the means whereby organisms recognize pathogens has been revealed by a series of recent findings, including: novel forms of familiar immune receptors, high genetic polymorphism for new receptor types, germline rearrangement for non-Ig domain receptors, somatic variation of germline-encoded receptors and unusually complex alternative splicing of genes with both immune and non-immune roles. Collectively, these observations underscore pathways in the evolution of immune recognition and suggest universal processes by which immune systems co-opt and integrate existing cellular mechanisms to effect diverse recognition functions. PMID:17703932

  12. A life-cycle comparison of alternative automobile fuels.

    PubMed

    MacLean, H L; Lave, L B; Lankey, R; Joshi, S

    2000-10-01

    We examine the life cycles of gasoline, diesel, compressed natural gas (CNG), and ethanol (C2H5OH)-fueled internal combustion engine (ICE) automobiles. Port and direct injection and spark and compression ignition engines are examined. We investigate diesel fuel from both petroleum and biosources as well as C2H5OH from corn, herbaceous bio-mass, and woody biomass. The baseline vehicle is a gasoline-fueled 1998 Ford Taurus. We optimize the other fuel/powertrain combinations for each specific fuel as a part of making the vehicles comparable to the baseline in terms of range, emissions level, and vehicle lifetime. Life-cycle calculations are done using the economic input-output life-cycle analysis (EIO-LCA) software; fuel cycles and vehicle end-of-life stages are based on published model results. We find that recent advances in gasoline vehicles, the low petroleum price, and the extensive gasoline infrastructure make it difficult for any alternative fuel to become commercially viable. The most attractive alternative fuel is compressed natural gas because it is less expensive than gasoline, has lower regulated pollutant and toxics emissions, produces less greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, and is available in North America in large quantities. However, the bulk and weight of gas storage cylinders required for the vehicle to attain a range comparable to that of gasoline vehicles necessitates a redesign of the engine and chassis. Additional natural gas transportation and distribution infrastructure is required for large-scale use of natural gas for transportation. Diesel engines are extremely attractive in terms of energy efficiency, but expert judgment is divided on whether these engines will be able to meet strict emissions standards, even with reformulated fuel. The attractiveness of direct injection engines depends on their being able to meet strict emissions standards without losing their greater efficiency. Biofuels offer lower GHG emissions, are sustainable, and

  13. ALTERNATIVE FLOWSHEETS FOR THE SULFUR-IODINE THERMOCHEMICAL HYDROGEN CYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    BROWN,LC; LENTSCH,RD; BESENBRUCH,GE; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JE

    2003-02-01

    OAK-B135 A hydrogen economy will need significant new sources of hydrogen. Unless large-scale carbon sequestration can be economically implemented, use of hydrogen reduces greenhouse gases only if the hydrogen is produced with non-fossil energy sources. Nuclear energy is one of the limited options available. One of the promising approaches to produce large quantities of hydrogen from nuclear energy efficiently is the Sulfur-Iodine (S-I) thermochemical water-splitting cycle, driven by high temperature heat from a helium Gas-Cooled Reactor. They have completed a study of nuclear-driven thermochemical water-splitting processes. The final task of this study was the development of a flowsheet for a prototype S-I production plant. An important element of this effort was the evaluation of alternative flowsheets and selection of the reference design.

  14. Life-Cycle Analysis of Alternative Aviation Fuels in GREET

    SciTech Connect

    Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Carter, N.; Stratton, R.; Hileman, J.; Malwitz, A.; Balasubramanian, S.

    2012-06-01

    The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, has been expanded to include well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis of aviation fuels and aircraft. This report documents the key WTWa stages and assumptions for fuels that represent alternatives to petroleum jet fuel. The aviation module in GREET consists of three spreadsheets that present detailed characterizations of well-to-pump and pump-to-wake parameters and WTWa results. By using the expanded GREET version (GREET1_2011), we estimate WTWa results for energy use (total, fossil, and petroleum energy) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide) for (1) each unit of energy (lower heating value) consumed by the aircraft or(2) each unit of distance traveled/ payload carried by the aircraft. The fuel pathways considered in this analysis include petroleum-based jet fuel from conventional and unconventional sources (i.e., oil sands); Fisher-Tropsch (FT) jet fuel from natural gas, coal, and biomass; bio-jet fuel from fast pyrolysis of cellulosic biomass; and bio-jet fuel from vegetable and algal oils, which falls under the American Society for Testing and Materials category of hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids. For aircraft operation, we considered six passenger aircraft classes and four freight aircraft classes in this analysis. Our analysis revealed that, depending on the feedstock source, the fuel conversion technology, and the allocation or displacement credit methodology applied to co-products, alternative bio-jet fuel pathways have the potential to reduce life-cycle GHG emissions by 55–85 percent compared with conventional (petroleum-based) jet fuel. Although producing FT jet fuel from fossil feedstock sources — such as natural gas and coal — could greatly reduce dependence on crude oil, production from such sources (especially coal) produces greater WTWa GHG emissions compared with petroleum jet

  15. Life-cycle analysis of alternative aviation fuels in GREET

    SciTech Connect

    Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Carter, N.; Stratton, R.; Hileman, J.; Malwitz, A.; Balasubramanian, S.

    2012-07-23

    The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, has been expanded to include well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis of aviation fuels and aircraft. This report documents the key WTWa stages and assumptions for fuels that represent alternatives to petroleum jet fuel. The aviation module in GREET consists of three spreadsheets that present detailed characterizations of well-to-pump and pump-to-wake parameters and WTWa results. By using the expanded GREET version (GREET1{_}2011), we estimate WTWa results for energy use (total, fossil, and petroleum energy) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide) for (1) each unit of energy (lower heating value) consumed by the aircraft or (2) each unit of distance traveled/ payload carried by the aircraft. The fuel pathways considered in this analysis include petroleum-based jet fuel from conventional and unconventional sources (i.e., oil sands); Fisher-Tropsch (FT) jet fuel from natural gas, coal, and biomass; bio-jet fuel from fast pyrolysis of cellulosic biomass; and bio-jet fuel from vegetable and algal oils, which falls under the American Society for Testing and Materials category of hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids. For aircraft operation, we considered six passenger aircraft classes and four freight aircraft classes in this analysis. Our analysis revealed that, depending on the feedstock source, the fuel conversion technology, and the allocation or displacement credit methodology applied to co-products, alternative bio-jet fuel pathways have the potential to reduce life-cycle GHG emissions by 55-85 percent compared with conventional (petroleum-based) jet fuel. Although producing FT jet fuel from fossil feedstock sources - such as natural gas and coal - could greatly reduce dependence on crude oil, production from such sources (especially coal) produces greater WTWa GHG emissions compared with petroleum jet

  16. Prospectives on the risks of alternative fuel cycles.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, D H; Kastenberg, W E; Griesmeyer, J M

    1981-01-01

    A commentary is provided on the uncertainties in the data and in qualifying the phenomena relating to the risks imposed by the various steps involved in the use of coal, oil, natural gas, hydropower, and nuclear fuels for the generation of electricity. Uncertainties appear to be extremely large for hydropower which exhibits both large scale ecological impacts and the potential for high consequence, moderate frequency events at specific sites. Major risk-related uncertainties with the use of nuclear fuels include those surrounding nuclear weapons proliferation and reactor accident frequencies and consequences. Uncertainties for coal and oil include specification of the damage function of air transported sulfates and the effects of atmospheric CO2 buildup, acid rain, and groundwater contamination from mine water runoff. Compounding these problems is the potential impact of the growing global competition for a diminishing supply of oil. In the studies reviewed herein, the assessed risks of the nuclear fuel cycle are no greater than those of the primary alternatives. Prudence suggests that we do not totally reject any particular option at this time on the basis of health effects alone; similarly, no option is an undisputed choice. PMID:7270773

  17. Prospectives on the risks of alternative fuel cycles.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D H; Kastenberg, W E; Griesmeyer, J M

    1981-09-01

    A commentary is provided on the uncertainties in the data and in qualifying the phenomena relating to the risks imposed by the various steps involved in the use of coal, oil, natural gas, hydropower, and nuclear fuels for the generation of electricity. Uncertainties appear to be extremely large for hydropower which exhibits both large scale ecological impacts and the potential for high consequence, moderate frequency events at specific sites. Major risk-related uncertainties with the use of nuclear fuels include those surrounding nuclear weapons proliferation and reactor accident frequencies and consequences. Uncertainties for coal and oil include specification of the damage function of air transported sulfates and the effects of atmospheric CO2 buildup, acid rain, and groundwater contamination from mine water runoff. Compounding these problems is the potential impact of the growing global competition for a diminishing supply of oil. In the studies reviewed herein, the assessed risks of the nuclear fuel cycle are no greater than those of the primary alternatives. Prudence suggests that we do not totally reject any particular option at this time on the basis of health effects alone; similarly, no option is an undisputed choice. PMID:7270773

  18. Mechanisms and Regulation of Alternative Pre-mRNA Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) splicing is a critical step in the posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, providing significant expansion of the functional proteome of eukaryotic organisms with limited gene numbers. Split eukaryotic genes contain intervening sequences or introns disrupting protein-coding exons, and intron removal occurs by repeated assembly of a large and highly dynamic ribonucleoprotein complex termed the spliceosome, which is composed of five small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles, U1, U2, U4/U6, and U5. Biochemical studies over the past 10 years have allowed the isolation as well as compositional, functional, and structural analysis of splicing complexes at distinct stages along the spliceosome cycle. The average human gene contains eight exons and seven introns, producing an average of three or more alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms. Recent high-throughput sequencing studies indicate that 100% of human genes produce at least two alternative mRNA isoforms. Mechanisms of alternative splicing include RNA–protein interactions of splicing factors with regulatory sites termed silencers or enhancers, RNA–RNA base-pairing interactions, or chromatin-based effects that can change or determine splicing patterns. Disease-causing mutations can often occur in splice sites near intron borders or in exonic or intronic RNA regulatory silencer or enhancer elements, as well as in genes that encode splicing factors. Together, these studies provide mechanistic insights into how spliceosome assembly, dynamics, and catalysis occur; how alternative splicing is regulated and evolves; and how splicing can be disrupted by cis- and trans-acting mutations leading to disease states. These findings make the spliceosome an attractive new target for small-molecule, antisense, and genome-editing therapeutic interventions. PMID:25784052

  19. A Comparison Study of Various Nuclear Fuel Cycle Alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Eun-ha; Ko, Won-il

    2007-07-01

    As a nation develops its nuclear strategies, it must consider various aspects of nuclear energy such as sustainability, environmental-friendliness, proliferation-resistance, economics, technologies, and so on. Like all the policy decision, however, a nuclear fuel cycle option can not be superior in all aspects; the nation must identify its top priority and accordingly evaluate all the possible nuclear fuel cycle options. For such a purpose, this paper takes four different fuel cycle options that are likely adopted by the Korean government, considering the current status of nuclear power generation and the 3. Comprehensive Nuclear Energy Promotion Plan (CNEPP) - Once-through Cycle, DUPIC Recycle, Thermal Recycle and GEN-IV Recycle. The paper then evaluates each option in terms of resource utilization and waste generation. The analysis shows that the GEN-IV Recycle appears to be most competitive from these aspects. (authors)

  20. Representing and constructing liquefaction cycle alternatives for FLNG FEED using system entity structure concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Sol; Lee, Kyu-Yeul

    2014-09-01

    To support the procedure for determining an optimal liquefaction cycle for FLNG FEED, an ontological modeling method which can automatically generate various alternative liquefaction cycles were carried out in this paper. General rules in combining equipment are extracted from existing onshore liquefaction cycles like C3MR and DMR cycle. A generic relational model which represents whole relations of the plant elements has all these rules, and it is expressed by using the system entity structure (SES), an ontological framework that hierarchically represents the elements of a system and their relationships. By using a process called pruning which reduces the SES to a candidate, various alternative relational models of the liquefaction cycles can be automatically generated. These alternatives were provided by XML-based formats, and they can be used for choosing an optimal liquefaction cycle on the basis of the assessments such as process simulation and reliability analysis

  1. Empirical Research of College Students' Alternative Frameworks of Particle Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Hongmei

    2010-01-01

    Based on the constructive theory, about 300 college students of grade 05 of the electronic information specialty of Dezhou University are surveyed for their alternative frameworks of particle mechanics in college physics in this article. In the survey, the questionnaires are used to find out college students' alternative frameworks, and the…

  2. 40 CFR 1033.520 - Alternative ramped modal cycles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... warm it up. Then follow the provisions of 40 CFR part 1065, subpart F for general pre-test procedures... specified mode sequence (without repeating the normal idle mode). (e) Start the test according to 40 CFR... sampling procedures specified in 40 CFR 1065.530. (f) Calculate your cycle-weighted brake-specific...

  3. 40 CFR 1033.520 - Alternative ramped modal cycles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... warm it up. Then follow the provisions of 40 CFR part 1065, subpart F for general pre-test procedures... specified mode sequence (without repeating the normal idle mode). (e) Start the test according to 40 CFR... sampling procedures specified in 40 CFR 1065.530. (f) Calculate your cycle-weighted brake-specific...

  4. 40 CFR 1033.520 - Alternative ramped modal cycles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... warm it up. Then follow the provisions of 40 CFR part 1065, subpart F for general pre-test procedures... specified mode sequence (without repeating the normal idle mode). (e) Start the test according to 40 CFR... sampling procedures specified in 40 CFR 1065.530. (f) Calculate your cycle-weighted brake-specific...

  5. 40 CFR 1033.520 - Alternative ramped modal cycles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... warm it up. Then follow the provisions of 40 CFR part 1065, subpart F for general pre-test procedures... specified mode sequence (without repeating the normal idle mode). (e) Start the test according to 40 CFR... sampling procedures specified in 40 CFR 1065.530. (f) Calculate your cycle-weighted brake-specific...

  6. 40 CFR 1033.520 - Alternative ramped modal cycles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... warm it up. Then follow the provisions of 40 CFR part 1065, subpart F for general pre-test procedures... specified mode sequence (without repeating the normal idle mode). (e) Start the test according to 40 CFR... sampling procedures specified in 40 CFR 1065.530. (f) Calculate your cycle-weighted brake-specific...

  7. Alternative refrigerants and refrigeration cycles for domestic refrigerators

    SciTech Connect

    Sand, J.R.; Rice, C.L.; Vineyard, E.A.

    1992-12-01

    This project initially focused on using nonazeotropic refrigerant mixtures (NARMs) in a two-evaporator refrigerator-freezer design using two stages of liquid refrigerant subcooling. This concept was proposed and tested in 1975. The work suggested that the concept was 20% more efficient than the conventional one-evaporator refrigerator-freezer (RF) design. After considerable planning and system modeling based on using a NARM in a Lorenz-Meutzner (L-M) RF, the program scope was broadened to include investigation of a ``dual-loop`` concept where energy savings result from exploiting the less stringent operating conditions needed to satisfy cooling, of the fresh food section. A steady-state computer model (CYCLE-Z) capable of simulating conventional, dual loop, and L-M refrigeration cycles was developed. This model was used to rank the performance of 20 ozone-safe NARMs in the L-M refrigeration cycle while key system parameters were systematically varied. The results indicated that the steady-state efficiency of the L-M design was up to 25% greater than that of a conventional cycle. This model was also used to calculate the performance of other pure refrigerants relative to that of dichlorodifluoromethane, R-12, in conventional and dual-loop RF designs. Projected efficiency gains for these cycles were more modest, ranging from 0 to 10%. Individual compressor calorimeter tests of nine combinations of evaporator and condenser temperatures usually used to map RF compressor performance were carried out with R-12 and two candidate L-M NARMs in several compressors. Several models of a commercially produced two-evaporator RF were obtained as test units. Two dual-loop RF designs were built and tested as part of this project.

  8. Tests of alternative reductants in the second uranium purification cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, M.C.

    1980-05-01

    Miniature mixer-settler tests of the second uranium purification cycle show that plutonium cannot be removed by hydroxylamine-hydrazine (NH/sub 2/OH-N/sub 2/H/sub 4/) because the acidity is too high, or by 2,5-di-t-pentylhydroquinone because HNO/sub 3/ oxidizes the hydroquinone. Plutonium can be removed satisfactorily when U(IV)-hydrazine is used as the reductant.

  9. Alternative bacteriophage life cycles: the carrier state of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Siringan, Patcharin; Connerton, Phillippa L; Cummings, Nicola J; Connerton, Ian F

    2014-01-01

    Members of the genus Campylobacter are frequently responsible for human enteric disease, often through consumption of contaminated poultry products. Bacteriophages are viruses that have the potential to control pathogenic bacteria, but understanding their complex life cycles is key to their successful exploitation. Treatment of Campylobacter jejuni biofilms with bacteriophages led to the discovery that phages had established a relationship with their hosts typical of the carrier state life cycle (CSLC), where bacteria and bacteriophages remain associated in equilibrium. Significant phenotypic changes include improved aerotolerance under nutrient-limited conditions that would confer an advantage to survive in extra-intestinal environments, but a lack in motility eliminated their ability to colonize chickens. Under these circumstances, phages can remain associated with a compatible host and continue to produce free virions to prospect for new hosts. Moreover, we demonstrate that CSLC host bacteria can act as expendable vehicles for the delivery of bacteriophages to new host bacteria within pre-colonized chickens. The CSLC represents an important phase in the ecology of Campylobacter bacteriophage. PMID:24671947

  10. Comprehensive life cycle inventories of alternative wastewater treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Foley, Jeffrey; de Haas, David; Hartley, Ken; Lant, Paul

    2010-03-01

    Over recent decades, the environmental regulations on wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) have trended towards increasingly stringent nutrient removal requirements for the protection of local waterways. However, such regulations typically ignore other environmental impacts that might accompany apparent improvements to the WWTP. This paper quantitatively defines the life cycle inventory of resources consumed and emissions produced in ten different wastewater treatment scenarios (covering six process configurations and nine treatment standards). The inventory results indicate that infrastructure resources, operational energy, direct greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and chemical consumption generally increase with increasing nitrogen removal, especially at discharge standards of total nitrogen <5 mgN L(-1). Similarly, infrastructure resources and chemical consumption increase sharply with increasing phosphorus removal, but operational energy and direct GHG emissions are largely unaffected. These trends represent a trade-off of negative environmental impacts against improved local receiving water quality. However, increased phosphorus removal in WWTPs also represents an opportunity for increased resource recovery and reuse via biosolids applied to agricultural land. This study highlights that where biosolids displace synthetic fertilisers, a negative environmental trade-off may also occur by increasing the heavy metals discharged to soil. Proper analysis of these positive and negative environmental trade-offs requires further life cycle impact assessment and an inherently subjective weighting of competing environmental costs and benefits. PMID:20022351

  11. THERMODYNAMIC EVALUATION OF FIVE ALTERNATIVE REFRIGERANTS IN VAPOR-COMPRESSION CYCLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives results of a thermodynamic evaluation of five alternative refrigerants in a vapor-compression refrigeration cycle, utilizing throttling, super-heating, and combined throttling and superheating. ive alternative refrigerants (R32, R125, R134a, R143a, and R152a) were...

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF GASOLINE ALTERNATIVES: MTBE AND ETHANOL ADDITIVES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently, the U.S. is considering options for additives to reformulated gasoline. To inform this debate the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development is conducting a screening life cycle assessment (LCA) of three gasoline alternatives. These alternatives include gasoline w...

  13. Exactly Solvable Quantum Mechanical Potentials: An Alternative Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pronchik, Jeremy N.; Williams, Brian W.

    2003-01-01

    Describes an alternative approach to finding exactly solvable, one-dimensional quantum mechanical potentials. Differs from the usual approach in that instead of starting with a particular potential and seeking solutions to the related Schrodinger equations, it begins with known solutions to second-order ordinary differential equations and seeks to…

  14. Subversion of cell cycle regulatory mechanisms by HIV

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Andrew P.; Kimata, Jason T.

    2015-01-01

    To establish a productive infection, HIV-1 must counteract cellular innate immune mechanisms and redirect cellular process towards viral replication. Recent studies have discovered that HIV-1 and other primate immunodeficiency viruses subvert cell cycle regulatory mechanisms to achieve these ends. The viral Vpr and Vpx proteins target cell cycle controls to counter innate immunity. The cell cycle-related protein Cyclin L2 is also utilized to counter innate immunity. The viral Tat protein utilizes Cyclin T1 to activated proviral transcription, and regulation of Cyclin T1 levels in CD4+ T cells has important consequences for viral replication and latency. This review will summarize this emerging evidence that primate immunodeficiency viruses subvert cell cycle regulatory mechanisms to enhance replication. PMID:26067601

  15. An alternative mechanism for guanidinoacetic acid to affect methylation cycle.

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Sergej M

    2014-12-01

    Guanidinoacetic acid (also known as glycocyamine; GAA) is an endogenous substance which occurs in humans and plays a central role in the biosynthesis of creatine. The formation of creatine from GAA consumes methyl groups, and increases production of homocysteine. GAA may have the potential to stimulate insulin secretion. Insulin reduces plasma homocysteine and raises methyl group supply. It is possible that the ability of GAA to trigger the insulin secretion modulates methyl group metabolism, and comparatively counterbalance for the direct effect of GAA on increased methylation demand. Possible insulinotropic effect of GAA may contribute to total in vivo methylation demand during biotransformation. PMID:25468046

  16. Survey of alternative gas turbine engine and cycle design. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lukas, H.

    1986-02-01

    In the period of the 1940's to 1960's much experimentation was performed in the areas of intercooling, reheat, and recuperation, as well as the use of low-grade fuels in gas turbines. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in an effort to document past experience which can be used as the basis for current design activities, commissioned a study to document alternate cycles and components used in gas turbine design. The study was performed by obtaining the important technical and operational criteria of the cycles through a literature search of published documents, articles, and papers. Where possible the information was augmented through dialogue with persons associated with those cycles and with the manufacturers. The survey indicated that many different variations of the simple open-cycle gas turbine plant were used. Many of these changes resulted in increases in efficiency over the low simple-cycle efficiency of that period. Metallurgy, as well as compressor and turbine design, limited the simple-cycle efficiency to the upper teens. The cycle modifications increased those efficiencies to the twenties and thirties. Advances in metallurgy as well as compressor and turbine design, coupled with the decrease in flue cost, stopped the development of these complex cycles. Many of the plants operated successfully for many years, and only because newer simple-cycle gas turbine plants and large steam plants had better heat rates were these units shutdown or put into stand-by service. 24 refs., 25 figs., 114 tabs.

  17. Spacetime alternatives in the quantum mechanics of a relativistic particle

    SciTech Connect

    Whelan, J.T. Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences, 20 Clarkson Road, Cambridge, CB3 0EH )

    1994-11-15

    Hartle's generalized quantum mechanics formalism is used to examine spacetime coarse grainings, i.e., sets of alternatives defined with respect to a region extended in time as well as space, in the quantum mechanics of a free relativistic particle. For a simple coarse graining and suitable initial conditions, tractable formulas are found for branch wave functions. Despite the nonlocality of the positive-definite version of the Klein-Gordon inner product, which means that nonoverlapping branches are not sufficient to imply decoherence, some initial conditions are found to give decoherence and allow the consistent assignment of probabilities.

  18. Dynamic performance of dissipative dielectric elastomers under alternating mechanical load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Junshi; Chen, Hualing; Sheng, Junjie; Liu, Lei; Wang, Yongquan; Jia, Shuhai

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a theoretical study about the effect of dissipation on the dynamic performance of a dielectric elastomer membrane subject to a combination of mechanical load and voltage. The thermodynamic dissipative model is given and the equation of motion is deduced by a free energy method. It is found that when the applied mechanical load and voltage are static, the membrane may reach a state of equilibrium after the viscoelastic relaxation. When the voltage is static but the mechanical load is sinusoidal, the membrane will resonate at multiple frequencies. The study result indicates that the viscoelasticity can reduce the natural frequency and increase the mean stretch of the dielectric elastomer. After the power source is cut off, the effect of current leakage on dynamic performance under alternating mechanical load is that the natural frequency increases and the mean stretch reduces.

  19. An extensive program of periodic alternative splicing linked to cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez, Daniel; Tsai, Yi-Hsuan; Weatheritt, Robert; Wang, Yang; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Wang, Zefeng

    2016-01-01

    Progression through the mitotic cell cycle requires periodic regulation of gene function at the levels of transcription, translation, protein-protein interactions, post-translational modification and degradation. However, the role of alternative splicing (AS) in the temporal control of cell cycle is not well understood. By sequencing the human transcriptome through two continuous cell cycles, we identify ~1300 genes with cell cycle-dependent AS changes. These genes are significantly enriched in functions linked to cell cycle control, yet they do not significantly overlap genes subject to periodic changes in steady-state transcript levels. Many of the periodically spliced genes are controlled by the SR protein kinase CLK1, whose level undergoes cell cycle-dependent fluctuations via an auto-inhibitory circuit. Disruption of CLK1 causes pleiotropic cell cycle defects and loss of proliferation, whereas CLK1 over-expression is associated with various cancers. These results thus reveal a large program of CLK1-regulated periodic AS intimately associated with cell cycle control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10288.001 PMID:27015110

  20. Cell cycle control, checkpoint mechanisms, and genotoxic stress.

    PubMed Central

    Shackelford, R E; Kaufmann, W K; Paules, R S

    1999-01-01

    The ability of cells to maintain genomic integrity is vital for cell survival and proliferation. Lack of fidelity in DNA replication and maintenance can result in deleterious mutations leading to cell death or, in multicellular organisms, cancer. The purpose of this review is to discuss the known signal transduction pathways that regulate cell cycle progression and the mechanisms cells employ to insure DNA stability in the face of genotoxic stress. In particular, we focus on mammalian cell cycle checkpoint functions, their role in maintaining DNA stability during the cell cycle following exposure to genotoxic agents, and the gene products that act in checkpoint function signal transduction cascades. Key transitions in the cell cycle are regulated by the activities of various protein kinase complexes composed of cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) molecules. Surveillance control mechanisms that check to ensure proper completion of early events and cellular integrity before initiation of subsequent events in cell cycle progression are referred to as cell cycle checkpoints and can generate a transient delay that provides the cell more time to repair damage before progressing to the next phase of the cycle. A variety of cellular responses are elicited that function in checkpoint signaling to inhibit cyclin/Cdk activities. These responses include the p53-dependent and p53-independent induction of Cdk inhibitors and the p53-independent inhibitory phosphorylation of Cdk molecules themselves. Eliciting proper G1, S, and G2 checkpoint responses to double-strand DNA breaks requires the function of the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated gene product. Several human heritable cancer-prone syndromes known to alter DNA stability have been found to have defects in checkpoint surveillance pathways. Exposures to several common sources of genotoxic stress, including oxidative stress, ionizing radiation, UV radiation, and the genotoxic compound benzo[a]pyrene, elicit cell cycle

  1. An evaluation of alternative household solid waste treatment practices using life cycle inventory assessment mode.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Nguyen Phuc; Matsui, Yasuhiro

    2012-06-01

    Waste disposal is an important part of the life cycle of a product and is associated with environmental burdens like any other life-cycle stages. In this study, an integrated assessment for solid waste treatment practices, especially household solid waste, was undertaken to evaluate the impact contribution of household solid waste treatment alternatives towards the sustainable development by using Life Cycle Inventory Assessment method. A case study has been investigated under various possible scenarios, such as (1) landfill without landfill gas recovery, (2) landfill with landfill gas recovery and flaring, (3) landfill with landfill gas recovery and electric generation, (4) composting, and (5) incineration. The evaluation utilized the Life Cycle Inventory Assessment method for multiple assessments based on various aspects, such as greenhouse gas emission/reduction, energy generation/consumption, economic benefit, investment and operating cost, and land use burden. The results showed that incineration was the most efficient alternative for greenhouse gas emission reduction, economic benefit, energy recovery, and land use reduction, although it was identified as the most expensive for investment and operating cost, while composting scenario was also an efficient alternative with quite economic benefit, low investment and operating cost, and high reduction of land use, although it was identified as existing greenhouse gas emission and no energy generation. Furthermore, the aim of this study was also to establish localized assessment methods that waste management agencies, environmental engineers, and environmental policy decision makers can use to quantify and compare the contribution to the impacts from different waste treatment options. PMID:21773866

  2. Quantitative Financial Analysis of Alternative Energy Efficiency Shareholder Incentive Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Chait, Michele; Edgar, George; Schlegel, Jeff; Shirley, Wayne

    2008-08-03

    Rising energy prices and climate change are central issues in the debate about our nation's energy policy. Many are demanding increased energy efficiency as a way to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and lower the total cost of electricity and energy services for consumers and businesses. Yet, as the National Action Plan on Energy Efficiency (NAPEE) pointed out, many utilities continue to shy away from seriously expanding their energy efficiency program offerings because they claim there is insufficient profit-motivation, or even a financial disincentive, when compared to supply-side investments. With the recent introduction of Duke Energy's Save-a-Watt incentive mechanism and ongoing discussions about decoupling, regulators and policymakers are now faced with an expanded and diverse landscape of financial incentive mechanisms, Determining the 'right' way forward to promote deep and sustainable demand side resource programs is challenging. Due to the renaissance that energy efficiency is currently experiencing, many want to better understand the tradeoffs in stakeholder benefits between these alternative incentive structures before aggressively embarking on a path for which course corrections can be time-consuming and costly. Using a prototypical Southwest utility and a publicly available financial model, we show how various stakeholders (e.g. shareholders, ratepayers, etc.) are affected by these different types of shareholder incentive mechanisms under varying assumptions about program portfolios. This quantitative analysis compares the financial consequences associated with a wide range of alternative incentive structures. The results will help regulators and policymakers better understand the financial implications of DSR program incentive regulation.

  3. Emerging regulatory mechanisms in ubiquitin-dependent cell cycle control

    PubMed Central

    Mocciaro, Annamaria; Rape, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The covalent modification of proteins with ubiquitin is required for accurate cell division in all eukaryotes. Ubiquitylation depends on an enzymatic cascade, in which E3 enzymes recruit specific substrates for modification. Among ~600 human E3s, the SCF (Skp1–cullin1–F-box) and the APC/C (anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome) are known for driving the degradation of cell cycle regulators to accomplish irreversible cell cycle transitions. The cell cycle machinery reciprocally regulates the SCF and APC/C through various mechanisms, including the modification of these E3s or the binding of specific inhibitors. Recent studies have provided new insight into the intricate relationship between ubiquitylation and the cell division apparatus as they revealed roles for atypical ubiquitin chains, new mechanisms of substrate and E3 regulation, as well as extensive crosstalk between ubiquitylation enzymes. Here, we review these emerging regulatory mechanisms of ubiquitin-dependent cell cycle control and discuss how their manipulation might provide therapeutic benefits in the future. PMID:22357967

  4. Millimeter wave detection of nuclear radiation - an alternative detection mechanism.

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Chien, H. T.; Heifetz, A.; Koehl, E. R.; Raptis, A. C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-08-01

    We present a nuclear radiation detection mechanism using millimeter waves as an alternative to conventional detection. It is based on the concept that nuclear radiation causes ionization of air and that if we place a dielectric material near the radiation source, it acts as a charge accumulator of the air ions. We have found that millimeter waves can interrogate the charge cloud on the dielectric material remotely. This concept was tested with a standoff millimeter wave system by monitoring the charge levels on a cardboard tube placed in an x-ray beam.

  5. Millimeter wave detection of nuclear radiation: An alternative detection mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Gopalsami, N.; Chien, H. T.; Heifetz, A.; Koehl, E. R.; Raptis, A. C.

    2009-08-15

    We present a nuclear radiation detection mechanism using millimeter waves as an alternative to conventional detection. It is based on the concept that nuclear radiation causes ionization of air and that if we place a dielectric material near the radiation source, it acts as a charge accumulator of the air ions. We have found that millimeter waves can interrogate the charge cloud on the dielectric material remotely. This concept was tested with a standoff millimeter wave system by monitoring the charge levels on a cardboard tube placed in an x-ray beam.

  6. Millimeter wave detection of nuclear radiation: an alternative detection mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gopalsami, N; Chien, H T; Heifetz, A; Koehl, E R; Raptis, A C

    2009-08-01

    We present a nuclear radiation detection mechanism using millimeter waves as an alternative to conventional detection. It is based on the concept that nuclear radiation causes ionization of air and that if we place a dielectric material near the radiation source, it acts as a charge accumulator of the air ions. We have found that millimeter waves can interrogate the charge cloud on the dielectric material remotely. This concept was tested with a standoff millimeter wave system by monitoring the charge levels on a cardboard tube placed in an x-ray beam. PMID:19725673

  7. Millimeter wave detection of nuclear radiation: An alternative detection mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalsami, N.; Chien, H. T.; Heifetz, A.; Koehl, E. R.; Raptis, A. C.

    2009-08-01

    We present a nuclear radiation detection mechanism using millimeter waves as an alternative to conventional detection. It is based on the concept that nuclear radiation causes ionization of air and that if we place a dielectric material near the radiation source, it acts as a charge accumulator of the air ions. We have found that millimeter waves can interrogate the charge cloud on the dielectric material remotely. This concept was tested with a standoff millimeter wave system by monitoring the charge levels on a cardboard tube placed in an x-ray beam.

  8. Comparative evaluation of three alternative power cycles for waste heat recovery from the exhaust of adiabatic diesel engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, M. M.

    1985-01-01

    Three alternative power cycles were compared in application as an exhaust-gas heat-recovery system for use with advanced adiabatic diesel engines. The power cycle alternatives considered were steam Rankine, organic Rankine with RC-1 as the working fluid, and variations of an air Brayton cycle. The comparison was made in terms of fuel economy and economic payback potential for heavy-duty trucks operating in line-haul service. The results indicate that, in terms of engine rated specific fuel consumption, a diesel/alternative-power-cycle engine offers a significant improvement over the turbocompound diesel used as the baseline for comparison. The maximum imporvement resulted from the use of a Rankine cycle heat-recovery system in series with turbocompounding. The air Brayton cycle alternatives studied, which included both simple-cycle and compression-intercooled configurations, were less effective and provided about half the fuel consumption improvement of the Rankine cycle alternatives under the same conditions. Capital and maintenance cost estimates were also developed for each of the heat-recovery power cycle systems. These costs were integrated with the fuel savings to identify the time required for net annual savings to pay back the initial capital investment. The sensitivity of capital payback time to arbitrary increases in fuel price, not accompanied by corresponding hardware cost inflation, was also examined. The results indicate that a fuel price increase is required for the alternative power cycles to pay back capital within an acceptable time period.

  9. Alternative Mechanisms to Initiate Translation in Eukaryotic mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Salas, Encarnación; Piñeiro, David; Fernández, Noemí

    2012-01-01

    The composition of the cellular proteome is under the control of multiple processes, one of the most important being translation initiation. The majority of eukaryotic cellular mRNAs initiates translation by the cap-dependent or scanning mode of translation initiation, a mechanism that depends on the recognition of the m7G(5′)ppp(5′)N, known as the cap. However, mRNAs encoding proteins required for cell survival under stress bypass conditions inhibitory to cap-dependent translation; these mRNAs often harbor internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements in their 5′UTRs that mediate internal initiation of translation. This mechanism is also exploited by mRNAs expressed from the genome of viruses infecting eukaryotic cells. In this paper we discuss recent advances in understanding alternative ways to initiate translation across eukaryotic organisms. PMID:22536116

  10. Transcranial Alternating Current and Random Noise Stimulation: Possible Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Antal, Andrea; Herrmann, Christoph S.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) is a relatively recent method suited to noninvasively modulate brain oscillations. Technically the method is similar but not identical to transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). While decades of research in animals and humans has revealed the main physiological mechanisms of tDCS, less is known about the physiological mechanisms of tACS. Method. Here, we review recent interdisciplinary research that has furthered our understanding of how tACS affects brain oscillations and by what means transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) that is a special form of tACS can modulate cortical functions. Results. Animal experiments have demonstrated in what way neurons react to invasively and transcranially applied alternating currents. Such findings are further supported by neural network simulations and knowledge from physics on entraining physical oscillators in the human brain. As a result, fine-grained models of the human skull and brain allow the prediction of the exact pattern of current flow during tDCS and tACS. Finally, recent studies on human physiology and behavior complete the picture of noninvasive modulation of brain oscillations. Conclusion. In future, the methods may be applicable in therapy of neurological and psychiatric disorders that are due to malfunctioning brain oscillations. PMID:27242932

  11. The life cycle assessment of alternative fuel chains for urban buses and trolleybuses.

    PubMed

    Kliucininkas, L; Matulevicius, J; Martuzevicius, D

    2012-05-30

    This paper describes a comparative analysis of public transport alternatives in the city of Kaunas, Lithuania. An LCA (Life Cycle Assessment) inventory analysis of fuel chains was undertaken using the midi urban bus and a similar type of trolleybus. The inventory analysis of fuel chains followed the guidelines provided by the ISO 14040 and ISO 14044 standards. The ReCiPe Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) methodology was used to quantify weighted damage originating from five alternative fuel chains. The compressed biogas fuel chain had the lowest weighted damage value, namely 45.7 mPt/km, whereas weighted damage values of the fuel chains based on electricity generation for trolleybuses were 60.6 mPt/km (for natural gas) and 78.9 mPt/km (for heavy fuel oil). The diesel and compressed natural gas fuel chains exhibited considerably higher damage values of 114.2 mPt/km and 132.6 mPt/km, respectively. The comparative life cycle assessment of fuel chains suggested that biogas-powered buses and electric trolleybuses can be considered as the best alternatives to use when modernizing the public transport fleet in Kaunas. PMID:22326758

  12. Management of radioactive waste gases from the nuclear fuel cycle. Volume I. Comparison of alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, A.G.; Prout, W.E.; Buckner, J.T.; Buckner, M.R.

    1980-12-01

    Alternatives were compared for collection and fixation of radioactive waste gases released during normal operation of the nuclear fuel cycle, and for transportation and storage/disposal of the resulting waste forms. The study used a numerical rating scheme to evaluate and compare the alternatives for krypton-85, iodine-129, and carbon-14; whereas a subjective evaluation, based on published reports and engineering judgement, was made for transportation and storage/disposal options. Based on these evaluations, certain alternatives are recommended for an integrated scheme for waste management of each of the subject waste gases. Phase II of this project, which is concerned with the development of performance criteria for the waste forms associated with the subject gases, will be completed by the end of 1980. This work will be documented as Volume II of this report.

  13. Alternative mechanisms of initiating translation of mammalian mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Jackson, R J

    2005-12-01

    Of all the steps in mRNA translation, initiation is the one that differs most radically between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Not only is there no equivalent of the prokaryotic Shine-Dalgarno rRNA-mRNA interaction, but also what requires only three initiation factor proteins (aggregate size approximately 125 kDa) in eubacteria needs at least 28 different polypeptides (aggregate >1600 kDa) in mammalian cells, which is actually larger than the size of the 40 S ribosomal subunit. Translation of the overwhelming majority of mammalian mRNAs occurs by a scanning mechanism, in which the 40 S ribosomal subunit, primed for initiation by the binding of several initiation factors including the eIF2 (eukaryotic initiation factor 2)-GTP-MettRNA(i) complex, is loaded on the mRNA immediately downstream of the 5'-cap, and then scans the RNA in the 5'-->3' direction. On recognition of (usually) the first AUG triplet via base-pairing with the Met-tRNA(i) anticodon, scanning ceases, triggering GTP hydrolysis and release of eIF2-GDP. Finally, ribosomal subunit joining and the release of the other initiation factors completes the initiation process. This sketchy outline conceals the fact that the exact mechanism of scanning and the precise roles of the initiation factors remain enigmatic. However, the factor requirements for initiation site selection on some viral IRESs (internal ribosome entry sites/segments) are simpler, and investigations into these IRES-dependent mechanisms (particularly picornavirus, hepatitis C virus and insect dicistrovirus IRESs) have significantly enhanced our understanding of the standard scanning mechanism. This article surveys the various alternative mechanisms of initiation site selection on mammalian (and other eukaryotic) cellular and viral mRNAs, starting from the simplest (in terms of initiation factor requirements) and working towards the most complex, which paradoxically happens to be the reverse order of their discovery. PMID:16246087

  14. Fuel-cycle greenhouse gas emissions impacts of alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M. Q.

    1998-12-16

    At an international conference on global warming, held in Kyoto, Japan, in December 1997, the United States committed to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 7% over its 1990 level by the year 2012. To help achieve that goal, transportation GHG emissions need to be reduced. Using Argonne's fuel-cycle model, I estimated GHG emissions reduction potentials of various near- and long-term transportation technologies. The estimated per-mile GHG emissions results show that alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies can help significantly reduce transportation GHG emissions. Of the near-term technologies evaluated in this study, electric vehicles; hybrid electric vehicles; compression-ignition, direct-injection vehicles; and E85 flexible fuel vehicles can reduce fuel-cycle GHG emissions by more than 25%, on the fuel-cycle basis. Electric vehicles powered by electricity generated primarily from nuclear and renewable sources can reduce GHG emissions by 80%. Other alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas, offer limited, but positive, GHG emission reduction benefits. Among the long-term technologies evaluated in this study, conventional spark ignition and compression ignition engines powered by alternative fuels and gasoline- and diesel-powered advanced vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by 10% to 30%. Ethanol dedicated vehicles, electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, and fuel-cell vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by over 40%. Spark ignition engines and fuel-cell vehicles powered by cellulosic ethanol and solar hydrogen (for fuel-cell vehicles only) can reduce GHG emissions by over 80%. In conclusion, both near- and long-term alternative fuels and advanced transportation technologies can play a role in reducing the United States GHG emissions.

  15. A new alternative mechanism in glioblastoma vascularization: tubular vasculogenic mimicry

    PubMed Central

    Boisselier, Blandine; Peglion, Florent; Rousseau, Audrey; Colin, Carole; Idbaih, Ahmed; Marie, Yannick; Mokhtari, Karima; Thomas, Jean-Léon; Eichmann, Anne; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Maniotis, Andrew J.; Sanson, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma is one of the most angiogenic human tumours and endothelial proliferation is a hallmark of the disease. A better understanding of glioblastoma vasculature is needed to optimize anti-angiogenic therapy that has shown a high but transient efficacy. We analysed human glioblastoma tissues and found non-endothelial cell-lined blood vessels that were formed by tumour cells (vasculogenic mimicry of the tubular type). We hypothesized that CD133+ glioblastoma cells presenting stem-cell properties may express pro-vascular molecules allowing them to form blood vessels de novo. We demonstrated in vitro that glioblastoma stem-like cells were capable of vasculogenesis and endothelium-associated genes expression. Moreover, a fraction of these glioblastoma stem-like cells could transdifferentiate into vascular smooth muscle-like cells. We describe here a new mechanism of alternative glioblastoma vascularization and open a new perspective for the antivascular treatment strategy. PMID:20375132

  16. Assessment of Alternative Funding Mechanisms for the IAEA

    SciTech Connect

    Toomey, Christopher; Wyse, Evan T.; Kurzrok, Andrew J.; Ford, Benjamin E.

    2012-06-15

    While the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has enjoyed substantial success and prestige in the international community, there is growing concern that global demographic trends, advances in technology and the trend towards austerity in Member State budgets will stretch the Agency’s resources to a point where it may no longer be possible to execute its multifaceted mission in its entirety. As part of an ongoing effort by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative to evaluate the IAEA’s long-term budgetary concerns , this paper proposes a series of alternate funding mechanisms that have the potential to sustain the IAEA in the long-term, including endowment, charity, and fee-for-service funding models.

  17. Alternative Mechanical Structure for LARP Nb3Sn Quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Anerella, M.; Cozzolino, J.; Ambrosio, G.; Caspi, S.; Felice, H.; Kovach, P.; Lamm, M.; Sabbi, G.; Schmalzle, J.; Wanderer, P.

    2010-08-01

    An alternative structure for the 120 mm Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupole magnet presently under development for use in the upgrade for LHC at CERN is presented. The goals of this structure are to build on the existing technology developed in LARP with the LQ and HQ series magnets and to further optimize the features required for operation in the accelerator. These features include mechanical alignment needed for field quality and provisions for cold mass cooling with 1.9 K helium in a helium pressure vessel. The structure will also optimize coil azimuthal and axial pre-load for high gradient operation, and will incorporate features intended to improve manufacturability, thereby improving reliability and reducing cost.

  18. Investigation of Thermal High Cycle and Low Cycle Fatigue Mechanisms of Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic thermal barrier coatings have attracted increased attention for diesel engine applications. The advantages of using the ceramic coatings include a potential increase in efficiency and power density and a decrease in maintenance cost. Zirconia-based ceramics are the most important coating materials for such applications because of their low thermal conductivity, relatively high thermal expansivity and excellent mechanical properties. However, durability of thick thermal barrier coatings (TBCS) under severe temperature cycling encountered in engine conditions, remains a major question. The thermal transients associated with the start/stop and no-load/full-load engine cycle, and with the in-cylinder combustion process, generate thermal low cycle fatigue (LCF) and thermal high cycle fatigue (HCF) in the coating system. Therefore, the failure mechanisms of thick TBCs are expected to be quite different from those of thin TBCs under these temperature transients. The coating failure is related not only to thermal expansion mismatch and oxidation of the bond coats and substrates, but also to the steep thermal stress gradients induced in the coating systems. Although it has been reported that stresses generated by thermal transients can initiate surface and interface cracks in a coating system, the mechanisms of the crack propagation and of coating failure under the complex LCF and HCF conditions are still not understood. In this paper, the thermal fatigue behavior of an yttria partially stabilized zirconia coating system under simulated LCF and HCF engine conditions is investigated. The effects of LCF and HCF on surface crack initiation and propagation are also discussed.

  19. Statistical mechanics of self-driven Carnot cycles.

    PubMed

    Smith, E

    1999-10-01

    The spontaneous generation and finite-amplitude saturation of sound, in a traveling-wave thermoacoustic engine, are derived as properties of a second-order phase transition. It has previously been argued that this dynamical phase transition, called "onset," has an equivalent equilibrium representation, but the saturation mechanism and scaling were not computed. In this work, the sound modes implementing the engine cycle are coarse-grained and statistically averaged, in a partition function derived from microscopic dynamics on criteria of scale invariance. Self-amplification performed by the engine cycle is introduced through higher-order modal interactions. Stationary points and fluctuations of the resulting phenomenological Lagrangian are analyzed and related to background dynamical currents. The scaling of the stable sound amplitude near the critical point is derived and shown to arise universally from the interaction of finite-temperature disorder, with the order induced by self-amplification. PMID:11970197

  20. Moving toward multilateral mechanisms for the fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Panasyuk,A.; Rosenthal,M.; Efremov, G. V.

    2009-04-17

    Multilateral mechanisms for the fuel cycle are seen as a potentially important way to create an industrial infrastructure that will support a renaissance and at the same time not contribute to the risk of nuclear proliferation. In this way, international nuclear fuel cycle centers for enrichment can help to provide an assurance of supply of nuclear fuel that will reduce the likelihood that individual states will pursue this sensitive technology, which can be used to produce nuclear material directly usable nuclear weapons. Multinational participation in such mechanisms can also potentially promote transparency, build confidence, and make the implementation of IAEA safeguards more effective or more efficient. At the same time, it is important to ensure that there is no dissemination of sensitive technology. The Russian Federation has taken a lead role in this area by establishing an International Uranium Enrichment Center (IUEC) for the provision of enrichment services at its uranium enrichment plant located at the Angarsk Electrolysis Chemical Complex (AECC). This paper describes how the IUEe is organized, who its members are, and the steps that it has taken both to provide an assured supply of nuclear fuel and to ensure protection of sensitive technology. It also describes the relationship between the IUEC and the IAEA and steps that remain to be taken to enhance its assurance of supply. Using the IUEC as a starting point for discussion, the paper also explores more generally the ways in which features of such fuel cycle centers with multinational participation can have an impact on safeguards arrangements, transparency, and confidence-building. Issues include possible lAEA safeguards arrangements or other links to the IAEA that might be established at such fuel cycle centers, impact of location in a nuclear weapon state, and the transition by the IAEA to State Level safeguards approaches.

  1. Study on capacitance evolving mechanism of polypyrrole during prolonged cycling.

    PubMed

    Wang, JingPing; Xu, Youlong; Wang, Jie; Zhu, Jianbo; Bai, Yang; Xiong, Lilong

    2014-02-01

    A simple model on the evolution mechanism of PPy capacitance during prolonged cycling offers a reasonably description on the rapid increase and decay of PPy capacitance in 1 M 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate/propylene carbonate (EtMeImBF4/PC). The capacitance of PPy films reached a very high specific capacitance of 420 F·g(-1) after 15 cycles when they worked in 1 M MeEt3ImBF4/PC. However, the capacitance rapidly decreased to 5% after only 400 cycles. The electronic conductivity and protonation level on the nitrogen site of PPy films rapidly decreased with the increase of cyclic number. The salt of EtMeImBF4 was monitored in PPy matrix by FTIR spectra after 400 cycles. The EQCM results indicated that a lot of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium cations (EtMeIm(+)) were inserted during reduction process and retained in PPy matrix. The detained EtMeIm(+) cations bonded with doped p-toluenesulfonate anions (PTS(-)) in PPy matrix or BF4(-) anions from electrolyte and formed salts. Small amount of salts in PPy matrix can open more channels of ion insertion and resulted in a very high capacitance after 15 cycles. The continuous combination of detained EtMeIm(+) cations with doping anions of PTS(-) resulted in the rapid decrease of PPy protonation level on the nitrogen site and formation of compensate semiconductor state in PPy matrix. This should be responsible for the rapid decay of PPy conductivity and capacitance. The continuous accumulation of salts resulted in the great increase of PPy internal resistance. PMID:24428582

  2. Investigation of Thermal High Cycle and Low Cycle Fatigue Mechanisms of Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Thick thermal barrier coating systems in a diesel engine experience severe thermal low cycle fatigue (LCF) and high cycle fatigue (HCF) during engine operation. In this paper, the mechanisms of fatigue crack initiation and propagation in a ZrO2-8wt% Y2O3 thermal barrier coating, under simulated engine thermal LCF and HCF conditions, are investigated using a high power CO2 laser. Experiments showed that the combined LCF-HCF tests induced more severe coating surface cracking, microspallation and accelerated crack growth, as compared to the pure LCF test. Lateral crack branching and the ceramic/bond coat interface delaminations were also facilitated by HCF thermal loads, even in the absence of severe interfacial oxidation. Fatigue damage at crack wake surfaces, due to such phenomena as asperity/debris contact induced cracking and splat pull-out bending during cycling, was observed especially for the combined LCF-HCF tests. It is found that the failure associated with LCF is closely related to coating sintering and creep at high temperatures, which induce tensile stresses in the coating after cooling. The failure associated with HCF process, however, is mainly associated with a surface wedging mechanism. The interaction between the LCF, HCF and ceramic coating creep, and the relative importance of LCF and HCF in crack propagation are also discussed based on the experimental evidence.

  3. Investigation of Thermal High Cycle and Low Cycle Fatigue Mechanisms of Thick Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    Thick thermal barrier coating systems in a diesel engine experience severe thermal low cycle fatigue (LCF) and high cycle fatigue (HCF) during engine operation. In this paper, the mechanisms of fatigue crack initiation and propagation in a ZrO2-8wt.% Y2O3 thermal barrier coating, under simulated engine thermal LCF and HCF conditions, are investigated using a high power CO2 laser. Experiments showed that the combined LCF/HCF tests induced more severe coating surface cracking, microspallation and accelerated crack growth, as compared to the pure LCF test. Lateral crack branching and the ceramic/bond coat interface delaminations were also facilitated by HCF thermal loads, even in the absence of severe interfacial oxidation. Fatigue damages at crack wake surfaces, due to such phenomena as asperity/debris contact induced cracking and splat pull-out bending during cycling, were observed especially for the combined LCF/HCF tests. It is found that the failure associated with LCF is closely related to coating sintering and creep at high temperatures, which induce tensile stresses in the coating after cooling. The failure associated with HCF process, however, is mainly associated with a surface wedging mechanism. The interaction between the LCF, HCF and ceramic coating creep, and the relative importance of LCF and HCF in crack propagation are also discussed based on the experimental evidence.

  4. Alternative splicing: An important mechanism in stem cell biology

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kenian; Dai, Xiaojing; Wu, Jiaqian

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is an essential mechanism in post-transcriptional regulation and leads to protein diversity. It has been shown that AS is prevalent in metazoan genomes, and the splicing pattern is dynamically regulated in different tissues and cell types, including embryonic stem cells. These observations suggest that AS may play critical roles in stem cell biology. Since embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells have the ability to give rise to all types of cells and tissues, they hold the promise of future cell-based therapy. Many efforts have been devoted to understanding the mechanisms underlying stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. However, most of the studies focused on the expression of a core set of transcription factors and regulatory RNAs. The role of AS in stem cell differentiation was not clear. Recent advances in high-throughput technologies have allowed the profiling of dynamic splicing patterns and cis-motifs that are responsible for AS at a genome-wide scale, and provided novel insights in a number of studies. In this review, we discuss some recent findings involving AS and stem cells. An emerging picture from these findings is that AS is integrated in the transcriptional and post-transcriptional networks and together they control pluripotency maintenance and differentiation of stem cells. PMID:25621101

  5. Alternative Kondo breakdown mechanism: Orbital-selective orthogonal metal transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yin; Liu, Ke; Wang, Yong-Qiang; Luo, Hong-Gang

    2012-09-01

    In a recent paper of Nandkishore, Metlitski, and Senthil [Phys. Rev. B1098-012110.1103/PhysRevB.86.045128 86, 045128 (2012)], a concept of orthogonal metal has been introduced to reinterpret the disordered state of slave-spin representation in the Hubbard model as an exotic gapped metallic state. We extend this concept to study the corresponding quantum phase transition in the extended Anderson lattice model. It is found that the disordered state of slave spins in this model is an orbital-selective orthogonal metal, a generalization of the concept of the orthogonal metal in the Hubbard model. The quantum critical behaviors are multiscale and dominated by a z=3 and z=2 critical modes in the high- and low-temperature regime, respectively. Such behaviors are obviously in contrast to the naive expectation in the Hubbard model. The result provides alternative Kondo breakdown mechanism for heavy fermion compounds underlying the physics of the orbital-selective orthogonal metal in the disordered state, which is different from the conventional Kondo breakdown mechanism with the fractionalized Fermi-liquid picture. This work is expected to be useful in understanding the quantum criticality happening in some heavy fermion materials and other related strongly correlated systems.

  6. The Dynamical Mechanisms of the Cell Cycle Size Checkpoint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shi-Fu; Yan, Jie; Liu, Zeng-Rong; Yang, Ling

    2012-10-01

    Cell division must be tightly coupled to cell growth in order to maintain cell size, whereas the mechanisms of how initialization of mitosis is regulated by cell size remain to be elucidated. We develop a mathematical model of the cell cycle, which incorporates cell growth to investigate the dynamical properties of the size checkpoint in embryos of Xenopus laevis. We show that the size checkpoint is naturally raised from a saddle-node bifurcation, and in a mutant case, the cell loses its size control ability due to the loss of this saddle-node point.

  7. Constraints on reactive chlorine cycling mechanisms in remote marine air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, M. J.; Saltzman, E. S.; Sander, R.

    2010-12-01

    Reaction with chlorine atoms derived from marine aerosols may be a significant sink for climate-relevant trace gases, including methane, ozone, volatile organic compounds, and dimethyl sulfide. However, Cl atom levels and the mechanisms that control them are poorly constrained by observations. Here we examine the rates and possible mechanisms of reactive Cl cycling in the eastern tropical Atlantic using observations of HOCl and Cl2 at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory. Enhanced Cl cycling was observed in pollutant-impacted marine air, with typical daytime HOCl levels of 60-100 ppt and nighttime Cl2 maxima of 13-35 ppt. Two aspects of the observations are not well replicated by a multiphase photochemical box model with halogen chemistry. First, the model cannot reproduce the high HOCl levels observed given reasonable input parameters. Second, if an additional source of HOCl is imposed, Cl2 levels are overpredicted due to efficient conversion of HOCl to Cl2 in model aerosols. We propose that 1) there must be an additional photochemical source of HOCl (possibly a photosensitized or surface-enhanced reaction), and 2) that aerosol conversion of HOCl to Cl2 is inhibited, due either to a lower-than-expected aerosol uptake rate of HOCl or an aqueous phase reactive chlorine loss. Cl atom levels are inferred from various model assumptions and the impacts of chlorine chemistry at Cape Verde are estimated.

  8. Treatment of sewage sludge in a thermophilic membrane reactor (TMR) with alternate aeration cycles.

    PubMed

    Collivignarelli, Maria Cristina; Castagnola, Federico; Sordi, Marco; Bertanza, Giorgio

    2015-10-01

    The management of sewage sludge is becoming a more and more important issue, both at national and international level, in particular due to the uncertain recovery/disposal future options. Therefore, it is clear that the development of new technologies that can mitigate the problem at the source by reducing sludge production is necessary, such as the European Directive 2008/98/EC prescribes. This work shows the results obtained with a thermophilic membrane reactor, for processing a biological sludge derived from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) that treats urban and industrial wastewater. Sewage sludge was treated in a thermophilic membrane reactor (TMR), at pilot-scale (1 m(3) volume), with alternate aeration cycles. The experimentation was divided into two phases: a "startup phase" during which, starting with a psychrophilic/mesophilic biomass, thermophilic conditions were progressively reached, while feeding a highly biodegradable substrate; the obtained thermophilic biomass was then used, in the "regime phase", to digest biological sludge which was fed to the plant. Good removal yields were observed: 64% and 57% for volatile solids (VS) and total COD (CODtot), respectively, with an average hydraulic retention time (HRT) equal to 20 d, an organic loading rate (OLR) of about 1.4-1.8 kg COD m(-3) d(-1) and aeration/non aeration cycles alternated every 4 h. PMID:26233586

  9. Comparative life-cycle cost analysis for low-level mixed waste remediation alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.A.; White, T.P.; Kloeber, J.M.; Toland, R.J.; Cain, J.P.; Buitrago, D.Y.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this study is two-fold: (1) to develop a generic, life-cycle cost model for evaluating low-level, mixed waste remediation alternatives, and (2) to apply the model specifically, to estimate remediation costs for a site similar to the Fernald Environmental Management Project near Cincinnati, OH. Life-cycle costs for vitrification, cementation, and dry removal process technologies are estimated. Since vitrification is in a conceptual phase, computer simulation is used to help characterize the support infrastructure of a large scale vitrification plant. Cost estimating relationships obtained from the simulation data, previous cost estimates, available process data, engineering judgment, and expert opinion all provide input to an Excel based spreadsheet for generating cash flow streams. Crystal Ball, an Excel add-on, was used for discounting cash flows for net present value analysis. The resulting LCC data was then analyzed using multi-attribute decision analysis techniques with cost and remediation time as criteria. The analytical framework presented allows alternatives to be evaluated in the context of budgetary, social, and political considerations. In general, the longer the remediation takes, the lower the net present value of the process. This is true because of the time value of money and large percentage of the costs attributed to storage or disposal.

  10. Life-cycle cost and impacts: alternatives for managing KE basin sludge

    SciTech Connect

    Alderman, C.J.

    1997-06-27

    This document presents the results of a life-cycle cost and impacts evaluation of alternatives for managing sludge that will be removed from the K Basins. The two basins are located in the 100-K Area of the Hanford Site. This evaluation was conducted by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. (FDH) and its subcontractors to support decisions regarding the ultimate disposition of the sludge. The long-range plan for the Hanford Site calls for spent nuclear fuel (SNF), sludge, debris, and water to be removed from the K East (KE) and K West (KW) Basins. This activity will be conducted as a removal action under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The scope of the CERCLA action will be limited to removing the SNF, sludge, debris, and water from the basins and transferring them to authorized facilities for interim storage and/or treatment and disposal. The scope includes treating the sludge and water in the 100-K Area prior to the transfer. Alternatives for the removal action are evaluated in a CERCLA engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) and include different methods for managing sludge from the KE Basins. The scope of the removal action does not include storing, treating, or disposing of the sludge once it is transferred to the receiving facility and the EE/CA does not evaluate those downstream activities. This life-cycle evaluation goes beyond the EE/CA and considers the full life-cycle costs and impacts of dispositioning sludge.

  11. Phototoxicity: Its Mechanism and Animal Alternative Test Methods.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyuri; Park, Hyeonji; Lim, Kyung-Min

    2015-06-01

    The skin exposure to solar irradiation and photoreactive xenobiotics may produce abnormal skin reaction, phototoxicity. Phototoxicity is an acute light-induced response, which occurs when photoreacive chemicals are activated by solar lights and transformed into products cytotoxic against the skin cells. Multifarious symptoms of phototoxicity are identified, skin irritation, erythema, pruritis, and edema that are similar to those of the exaggerated sunburn. Diverse organic chemicals, especially drugs, are known to induce phototoxicity, which is probably from the common possession of UV-absorbing benzene or heterocyclic rings in their molecular structures. Both UVB (290~320 nm) and UVA (320~400 nm) are responsible for the manifestation of phototoxicity. Absorption of photons and absorbed energy (hv) by photoactive chemicals results in molecular changes or generates reactive oxygen species and depending on the way how endogenous molecules are affected by phototoxicants, mechanisms of phototoxcity is categorized into two modes of action: Direct when unstable species from excited state directly react with the endogenous molecules, and indirect when endogeneous molecules react with secondary photoproducts. In order to identify phototoxic potential of a chemical, various test methods have been introduced. Focus is given to animal alternative test methods, i.e., in vitro, and in chemico assays as well as in vivo. 3T3 neutral red uptake assay, erythrocyte photohemolysis test, and phototoxicity test using human 3-dimensional (3D) epidermis model are examples of in vitro assays. In chemico methods evaluate the generation of reactive oxygen species or DNA strand break activity employing plasmid for chemicals, or drugs with phototoxic potential. PMID:26191378

  12. Phototoxicity: Its Mechanism and Animal Alternative Test Methods

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyeonji; Lim, Kyung-Min

    2015-01-01

    The skin exposure to solar irradiation and photoreactive xenobiotics may produce abnormal skin reaction, phototoxicity. Phototoxicity is an acute light-induced response, which occurs when photoreacive chemicals are activated by solar lights and transformed into products cytotoxic against the skin cells. Multifarious symptoms of phototoxicity are identified, skin irritation, erythema, pruritis, and edema that are similar to those of the exaggerated sunburn. Diverse organic chemicals, especially drugs, are known to induce phototoxicity, which is probably from the common possession of UV-absorbing benzene or heterocyclic rings in their molecular structures. Both UVB (290~320 nm) and UVA (320~400 nm) are responsible for the manifestation of phototoxicity. Absorption of photons and absorbed energy (hv) by photoactive chemicals results in molecular changes or generates reactive oxygen species and depending on the way how endogenous molecules are affected by phototoxicants, mechanisms of phototoxcity is categorized into two modes of action: Direct when unstable species from excited state directly react with the endogenous molecules, and indirect when endogeneous molecules react with secondary photoproducts. In order to identify phototoxic potential of a chemical, various test methods have been introduced. Focus is given to animal alternative test methods, i.e., in vitro, and in chemico assays as well as in vivo. 3T3 neutral red uptake assay, erythrocyte photohemolysis test, and phototoxicity test using human 3-dimensional (3D) epidermis model are examples of in vitro assays. In chemico methods evaluate the generation of reactive oxygen species or DNA strand break activity employing plasmid for chemicals, or drugs with phototoxic potential. PMID:26191378

  13. Mathematical model of alternative mechanism of telomere length maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollár, Richard; Bod'ová, Katarína; Nosek, Jozef; Tomáška, L'ubomír

    2014-03-01

    Biopolymer length regulation is a complex process that involves a large number of biological, chemical, and physical subprocesses acting simultaneously across multiple spatial and temporal scales. An illustrative example important for genomic stability is the length regulation of telomeres—nucleoprotein structures at the ends of linear chromosomes consisting of tandemly repeated DNA sequences and a specialized set of proteins. Maintenance of telomeres is often facilitated by the enzyme telomerase but, particularly in telomerase-free systems, the maintenance of chromosomal termini depends on alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) mechanisms mediated by recombination. Various linear and circular DNA structures were identified to participate in ALT, however, dynamics of the whole process is still poorly understood. We propose a chemical kinetics model of ALT with kinetic rates systematically derived from the biophysics of DNA diffusion and looping. The reaction system is reduced to a coagulation-fragmentation system by quasi-steady-state approximation. The detailed treatment of kinetic rates yields explicit formulas for expected size distributions of telomeres that demonstrate the key role played by the J factor, a quantitative measure of bending of polymers. The results are in agreement with experimental data and point out interesting phenomena: an appearance of very long telomeric circles if the total telomere density exceeds a critical value (excess mass) and a nonlinear response of the telomere size distributions to the amount of telomeric DNA in the system. The results can be of general importance for understanding dynamics of telomeres in telomerase-independent systems as this mode of telomere maintenance is similar to the situation in tumor cells lacking telomerase activity. Furthermore, due to its universality, the model may also serve as a prototype of an interaction between linear and circular DNA structures in various settings.

  14. Mechanisms of the noxious inflammatory cycle in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Rottner, Mathilde; Freyssinet, Jean-Marie; Martínez, M Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Multiple evidences indicate that inflammation is an event occurring prior to infection in patients with cystic fibrosis. The self-perpetuating inflammatory cycle may play a pathogenic part in this disease. The role of the NF-κB pathway in enhanced production of inflammatory mediators is well documented. The pathophysiologic mechanisms through which the intrinsic inflammatory response develops remain unclear. The unfolded mutated protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTRΔF508), accounting for this pathology, is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), induces a stress, and modifies calcium homeostasis. Furthermore, CFTR is implicated in the transport of glutathione, the major antioxidant element in cells. CFTR mutations can alter redox homeostasis and induce an oxidative stress. The disturbance of the redox balance may evoke NF-κB activation and, in addition, promote apoptosis. In this review, we examine the hypotheses of the integrated pathogenic processes leading to the intrinsic inflammatory response in cystic fibrosis. PMID:19284656

  15. Life cycle comparison of waste-to-energy alternatives for municipal waste treatment in Chilean Patagonia.

    PubMed

    Bezama, Alberto; Douglas, Carla; Méndez, Jacqueline; Szarka, Nóra; Muñoz, Edmundo; Navia, Rodrigo; Schock, Steffen; Konrad, Odorico; Ulloa, Claudia

    2013-10-01

    The energy system in the Region of Aysén, Chile, is characterized by a strong dependence on fossil fuels, which account for up to 51% of the installed capacity. Although the implementation of waste-to-energy concepts in municipal waste management systems could support the establishment of a more fossil-independent energy system for the region, previous studies have concluded that energy recovery systems are not suitable from an economic perspective in Chile. Therefore, this work intends to evaluate these technical options from an environmental perspective, using life cycle assessment as a tool for a comparative analysis, considering Coyhaique city as a case study. Three technical alternatives were evaluated: (i) landfill gas recovery and flaring without energy recovery; (ii) landfill gas recovery and energy use; and (iii) the implementation of an anaerobic digestion system for the organic waste fraction coupled with energy recovery from the biogas produced. Mass and energy balances of the three analyzed alternatives have been modeled. The comparative LCA considered global warming potential, abiotic depletion and ozone layer depletion as impact categories, as well as required raw energy and produced energy as comparative regional-specific indicators. According to the results, the use of the recovered landfill gas as an energy source can be identified as the most environmentally appropriate solution for Coyhaique, especially when taking into consideration the global impact categories. PMID:23988463

  16. Assessment of Alternate Delivery Mechanisms for Asynchronous Adult Distance Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usrey, Michael W.

    Within a course at the University of Colorado addressing the management of research and development, a comparison of alternate asynchronous delivery media was conducted. For the course session on the management of intellectual property, asynchronous students were given access to the VHS tapes traditionally utilized, plus World Wide Web-based and…

  17. Mechanisms for synchrony and alternation in song interactions of the bushcricket Mecopoda elongata (Tettigoniidae: Orthoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Hartbauer, Manfred; Kratzer, Silvia; Steiner, Klaus; Römer, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    Males of the bushcricket Mecopoda elongata synchronise or alternate their chirps with their neighbours in an aggregation. Since synchrony is imperfect, leader and follower chirps are established in song interactions; females prefer leader chirps in phonotactic trials. Using playback experiments and simulations of song oscillator interactions, we investigate the mechanisms that result in synchrony and alternation, and the probability for the leader role in synchrony. A major predictor for the leader role of a male is its intrinsic chirp period, which varies in a population from 1.6 to 2.3 s. Faster singing males establish the leader role more often than males with longer chirp periods. The phase-response curve (PRC) of the song oscillators differs to other rhythmically calling or flashing insects, in that only the disturbed cycle is influenced in duration by a stimulus. This results in sustained leader or follower chirps of one male, when the intrinsic chirp periods of two males differ by 150 ms or more. By contrast, the individual shape of the male’s PRC has only little influence on the outcome of chirp interactions. The consequences of these findings for the evolution of synchrony in this species are discussed. PMID:15614532

  18. Mechanical cycling effects at Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni SMAs obtained by powder metallurgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pricop, B.; Söyler, U.; Comčneci, R. I.; Özkal, B.; Bujoreanu, L. G.

    Specimens from Fe-Mn-Si-Cr-Ni SMA, obtained by powder metallurgy and compacted through hot rolling, were subjected to tensile loading-unloading cycles. The pseudoelastic parameters were determined based on recorded stress-strain curves, and their variation tendency with increasing the number of mechanical cycles was discussed. The gauges of tensile specimens were cut after mechanical cycling and were subjected to structural and dilatometric analysis. The structure was analyzed by XRD and SEM, aiming to reveal mechanical cycling effects. The thermomechanical response on heating, of mechanically cycled specimens, was recorded by dilatometry and revealed a tendency to enhance thermal expansion as an effect of increasing the number of cycles. The microstructural changes, induced by mechanical cycling, consisted in the stress induced formation of α' martensite.

  19. Chemisorption On Nanoparticles: An Alternative Mechanism For Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, A; Reboredo, F; Galli, G

    2004-04-09

    We present first principles, computational predictions of a porous, nano-structured semiconductor material that will reversibly store hydrogen for fuel cell applications. The material is competitive with current metal hydride storage materials, but contains only carbon and silicon, reducing both its cost and environmental impact. Additionally, unlike metal hydrides, the core skeleton structure of this material is unaltered when cycling from full hydrogen storage to full hydrogen depletion, removing engineering complications associated with expansion/contraction of the material.

  20. Fundamental study of failure mechanisms of pressure vessels under thermo-mechanical cycling in multiphase environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penso Mula, Jorge Antonio

    Cracking and bulging in welded and internally lined pressure vessels that work in thermal-mechanical cycling services have been well known problems in the petrochemical, power and nuclear industries. Published literature and industry surveys show that similar problems have been occurring during the last 50 years. Understanding the causes of cracking and bulging would lead to improvements in the reliability of these pressure vessels. This study attempts to add information required for improving the knowledge and fundamental understanding of these problems. Cracking and bulging, most often in the weld areas, commonly experienced in delayed coking units (e.g. coke drums) in oil refineries are typical examples. The coke drum was selected for this study because of the existing field experience and past industrial investigation results that were available to serve as the baseline references for the analytical studies performed for this dissertation. Another reason for selecting the delayed coking units for this study was due to their high economical yields. Shutting down these units would cause a high negative economic impact on the refinery operations. Several failure mechanisms were hypothesized. The finite element method was used to analyze these significant variables and to verify the hypotheses. In conclusion, a fundamental explanation of the occurrence of bulging and cracking in pressure vessels in multiphase environments has been developed. Several important factors have been identified, including the high convection coefficient of the boiling layer during filling and quenching, the mismatch in physical, thermal and mechanical properties in the dissimilar weld of the clad plates and process conditions such as heating and quenching rate and warming time. Material selection for coke drums should consider not only fatigue strength but also corrosion resistance at high temperatures and low temperatures. Cracking occurs due to low cycle fatigue and corrosion. The FEA

  1. Investigation of alternative layouts for the supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle for a sodium-cooled fast reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.

    2009-07-01

    Analyses of supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle performance have largely settled on the recompression supercritical cycle (or Feher cycle) incorporating a flow split between the main compressor downstream of heat rejection, a recompressing compressor providing direct compression without heat rejection, and high and low temperature recuperators to raise the effectiveness of recuperation and the cycle efficiency. Alternative cycle layouts have been previously examined by Angelino (Politecnico, Milan), by MIT (Dostal, Hejzlar, and Driscoll), and possibly others but not for sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) operating at relatively low core outlet temperature. Thus, the present authors could not be sure that the recompression cycle is an optimal arrangement for application to the SFR. To ensure that an advantageous alternative layout has not been overlooked, several alternative cycle layouts have been investigated for a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle coupled to the Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) SFR preconceptual design having a 510 C core outlet temperature and a 470 C turbine inlet temperature to determine if they provide any benefit in cycle performance (e.g., enhanced cycle efficiency). No such benefits were identified, consistent with the previous examinations, such that attention was devoted to optimizing the recompression supercritical cycle. The effects of optimizing the cycle minimum temperature and pressure are investigated including minimum temperatures and/or pressures below the critical values. It is found that improvements in the cycle efficiency of 1% or greater relative to previous analyses which arbitrarily fixed the minimum temperature and pressure can be realized through an optimal choice of the combination of the minimum cycle temperature and pressure (e.g., for a fixed minimum temperature there is an optimal minimum pressure). However, this leads to a requirement for a larger cooler for heat rejection which may impact the

  2. Life Cycle Assessment of a Parabolic Trough Concentrating Solar Power Plant and Impacts of Key Design Alternatives: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.; Turchi, C. S.

    2011-09-01

    Climate change and water scarcity are important issues for today's power sector. To inform capacity expansion decisions, hybrid life cycle assessment is used to evaluate a reference design of a parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) facility located in Daggett, California, along four sustainability metrics: life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, cumulative energy demand (CED), and energy payback time (EPBT). This wet-cooled, 103 MW plant utilizes mined nitrate salts in its two-tank, thermal energy storage (TES) system. Design alternatives of dry-cooling, a thermocline TES, and synthetically-derived nitrate salt are evaluated. During its life cycle, the reference CSP plant is estimated to emit 26 g CO2eq per kWh, consume 4.7 L/kWh of water, and demand 0.40 MJeq/kWh of energy, resulting in an EPBT of approximately 1 year. The dry-cooled alternative is estimated to reduce life cycle water consumption by 77% but increase life cycle GHG emissions and CED by 8%. Synthetic nitrate salts may increase life cycle GHG emissions by 52% compared to mined. Switching from two-tank to thermocline TES configuration reduces life cycle GHG emissions, most significantly for plants using synthetically-derived nitrate salts. CSP can significantly reduce GHG emissions compared to fossil-fueled generation; however, dry-cooling may be required in many locations to minimize water consumption.

  3. Life-cycle costs of non-PCB distribution transformer alternatives. Final report, January-December 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Pulle, C.

    1990-05-01

    The U.S. Navy is investigating transformer alternatives to replace PCB transformers. Currently, NCEL is making a technical evaluation of various non PCB transformer replacement alternatives and determining the Life Cycle Costs (LCC) of these transformers. These include mineral oil, silicon oil, RTemp, amorphous core, vapor-cooled, ventilated dry, sealed dry, and cast coil at kVA ratings of 25, 75, 150, 300, 350, 500, 750, 1000, and 1500. Life cycle savings of amorphous core transformers over conventional silicon steel are also analyzed and show substantial savings. A 1500 kVA amorphous core transformer that is loaded at 90 percent and with a 15 percent price differential over a similar silicon steel transformer can produce life cycle savings of nearly $75,000 with a payback of 2 to 3 years. For the purpose of transformer cost comparison, life cycle costs are composed of the purchase price, load and no-load costs. Life cycle costs are computed for the entire life cycle of 30 years. Energy costs of 0.06/k Wh is used throughout this report with a compound growth rate of 5 percent over the assumed life cycle of 30 years for each transformer.

  4. Fuel-cycle greenhouse gas emissions from alternative fuels in Australian heavy vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beer, Tom; Grant, Tim; Williams, David; Watson, Harry

    This paper quantifies the expected pre-combustion and combustion emissions of greenhouse gases from Australian heavy vehicles using alternative fuels. We use the term exbodied emissions for these full fuel-cycle emissions. The fuels examined are low sulfur diesel (LSD), ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULS), compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied natural gas (LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), ethanol (from lignocellulose), biodiesel and waste oil. Biodiesel and ethanol have the lowest exbodied greenhouse gas emissions (in grams greenhouse gases per kilometre travelled). Biodiesel reduces exbodied greenhouse gas emissions from 41% to 51% whereas ethanol reduces emissions by 49-55%. In fact, both emit larger quantities of CO 2 than conventional fuels, but as most of the CO 2 is from renewable carbon stocks that fraction is not counted towards the greenhouse gas emissions from the fuel. The gaseous fuels (LPG, CNG) come next with emissions that range from 88% to 92% of diesel. The emissions of greenhouse gases from diesel are reduced if waste oil is used as a diesel extender, but the processing energy required to generate LSD and ULS in Australia increase their greenhouse gas emissions compared to diesel fuel. The extra energy required liquefy and cool LNG means that it has the highest exbodied greenhouse gas emissions of the fuels that were considered.

  5. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    Capillary endothelial cells can be switched between growth and differentiation by altering cell-extracellular matrix interactions and thereby, modulating cell shape. Studies were carried out to determine when cell shape exerts its growth-regulatory influence during cell cycle progression and to explore the role of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in this control mechanism. When G0-synchronized cells were cultured in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-containing defined medium on dishes coated with increasing densities of fibronectin or a synthetic integrin ligand (RGD-containing peptide), cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis all increased in parallel. To determine the minimum time cells must be adherent and spread on extracellular matrix (ECM) to gain entry into S phase, cells were removed with trypsin or induced to retract using cytochalasin D at different times after plating. Both approaches revealed that cells must remain extended for approximately 12-15 h and hence, most of G1, in order to enter S phase. After this restriction point was passed, normally 'anchorage-dependent' endothelial cells turned on DNA synthesis even when round and in suspension. The importance of actin-containing microfilaments in shape-dependent growth control was confirmed by culturing cells in the presence of cytochalasin D (25-1000 ng ml-1): dose-dependent inhibition of cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis resulted. In contrast, induction of microtubule disassembly using nocodazole had little effect on cell or nuclear spreading and only partially inhibited DNA synthesis. Interestingly, combination of nocodazole with a suboptimal dose of cytochalasin D (100 ng ml-1) resulted in potent inhibition of both spreading and growth, suggesting that microtubules are redundant structural elements which can provide critical load-bearing functions when microfilaments are partially compromised. Similar synergism between nocodazole and cytochalasin D was observed

  6. Student Absences During Learning Cycle Phases: A Technological Alternative for Make-Up Work in Laboratory Based High School Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marek, Edmund A.; Askey, David M.; Abraham, Michael R.

    2000-01-01

    Absences from school present a major obstacle to students gaining understanding of concepts developed in class. Investigates an alternative procedure for making up missed class work: viewing a quasi-interactive videotaped presentation of missed portions of a learning cycle in chemistry. (Author/SAH)

  7. OVERVIEW OF RESEARCH TO CONDUCT LIFE-CYCLE STUDY TO EVALUATE ALTERNATIVE STRATEGIES FOR INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper gives an overview of, the schedule for outputs from, and the potential applications of research to use life-cycle assessment (LCA) principles to evaluate upstream and downstream environmental impacts to evaluate alternative municipal solid waste (MSW) management options...

  8. Coalescence kinetics under the action of alternative grain growth mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Gubanov, P. Yu. Maksimov, I. L.

    2008-01-15

    The coalescence process is considered for the case where the prevailing grain growth mechanism is block-to-block diffusion, during which the motion of atoms in a solution occurs in the form of diffusion flux along the block boundaries. Numerical and analytical investigation of the coalescence kinetics in a homogeneous supersaturated solution is performed with allowance for the finite maximum grain size, and the time evolution of the size distribution function of new-phase grains is theoretically described. Possible transition regimes arising during coalescence at a change in the dominant grain growth mechanism are considered.

  9. ASSESSING NITROGEN CYCLING MECHANISMS TO EVALUATE RIPARIAN ZONE RESTORATION EFFECTIVENESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Agricultural and forestry practices, point source pollution, and urban development have had considerable impacts on nitrogen cycling and water quality in many developed and agricultural regions of the world. Among these impacts are eutrophication due to nutrient loading and oxyge...

  10. Small molecules reveal an alternative mechanism of Bax activation

    PubMed Central

    Brahmbhatt, Hetal; Uehling, David; Al-awar, Rima; Leber, Brian; Andrews, David

    2016-01-01

    The pro-apoptotic protein Bax commits a cell to death by permeabilizing the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). To obtain small-molecule probes for elucidating the molecular mechanism(s) of Bax activation, we screened for compounds that induced Bax-mediated liposome permeabilization. We identified five structurally different small molecules that promoted both Bax targeting to and oligomerization at membranes. All five compounds initiated Bax oligomerization in the absence of membranes by a mechanism unlike Bax activation by Bcl-2 homology 3 domain (BH3) proteins. Some of the compounds induced Bax/Bak-dependent apoptosis in cells. Activation of Bax by the most active compound was poorly inhibited by the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-XL and requires a cysteine residue at position 126 of Bax that is not required for activation by BH3 proteins. Our results reveal a novel pathway for Bax activation independent of pro-apoptotic BH3 proteins that may have important implications for the regulation of Bax activity in cells. PMID:26916338

  11. Small molecules reveal an alternative mechanism of Bax activation.

    PubMed

    Brahmbhatt, Hetal; Uehling, David; Al-Awar, Rima; Leber, Brian; Andrews, David

    2016-04-15

    The pro-apoptotic protein Bax commits a cell to death by permeabilizing the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). To obtain small-molecule probes for elucidating the molecular mechanism(s) of Bax activation, we screened for compounds that induced Bax-mediated liposome permeabilization. We identified five structurally different small molecules that promoted both Bax targeting to and oligomerization at membranes. All five compounds initiated Bax oligomerization in the absence of membranes by a mechanism unlike Bax activation by Bcl-2 homology 3 domain (BH3) proteins. Some of the compounds induced Bax/Bak-dependent apoptosis in cells. Activation of Bax by the most active compound was poorly inhibited by the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-XL and requires a cysteine residue at position 126 of Bax that is not required for activation by BH3 proteins. Our results reveal a novel pathway for Bax activation independent of pro-apoptotic BH3 proteins that may have important implications for the regulation of Bax activity in cells. PMID:26916338

  12. Species-driven changes in nitrogen cycling can provide a mechanism for plant invasions.

    PubMed

    Laungani, Ramesh; Knops, Johannes M H

    2009-07-28

    Traits that permit successful invasions have often seemed idiosyncratic, and the key biological traits identified vary widely among species. This fundamentally limits our ability to determine the invasion potential of a species. However, ultimately, successful invaders must have positive growth rates that longer term result in higher biomass accumulation than competing established species. In many terrestrial ecosystems nitrogen limits plant growth, and is a key factor determining productivity and the outcome of competition among species. Plant nitrogen use may provide a powerful framework to evaluate the invasive potential of a species in nitrogen-limiting ecosystems. Six mechanisms influence plant nitrogen use or acquisition: photosynthetic tissue allocation, photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency, nitrogen fixation, nitrogen-leaching losses, gross nitrogen mineralization, and plant nitrogen residence time. Here we show that among these alternatives, the key mechanism allowing invasion for Pinus strobus into nitrogen limited grasslands was its higher nitrogen residence time. This higher nitrogen residence time created a positive feedback that redistributed nitrogen from the soil into the plant. This positive feedback allowed P. strobus to accumulate twice as much nitrogen in its tissues and four times as much nitrogen to photosynthetic tissues, as compared with other plant species. In turn, this larger leaf nitrogen pool increased total plant carbon gain of P. strobus two- to sevenfold as compared with other plant species. Thus our data illustrate that plant species can change internal ecosystem nitrogen cycling feedbacks and this mechanism can allow them to gain a competitive advantage over other plant species. PMID:19592506

  13. Alternative Mechanism for White Adipose Tissue Lipolysis after Thermal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Li; Patsouris, David; Sadri, Ali-Reza; Dai, Xiaojing; Amini-Nik, Saeid; Jeschke, Marc G

    2015-01-01

    Extensively burned patients often suffer from sepsis, a complication that enhances postburn hypermetabolism and contributes to increased incidence of multiple organ failure, morbidity and mortality. Despite the clinical importance of burn sepsis, the molecular and cellular mechanisms of such infection-related metabolic derangements and organ dysfunction are still largely unknown. We recently found that upon endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, the white adipose tissue (WAT) interacts with the liver via inflammatory and metabolic signals leading to profound hepatic alterations, including hepatocyte apoptosis and hepatic fatty infiltration. We therefore hypothesized that burn plus infection causes an increase in lipolysis of WAT after major burn, partially through induction of ER stress, contributing to hyperlipidemia and profound hepatic lipid infiltration. We used a two-hit rat model of 60% total body surface area scald burn, followed by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) 3 d postburn. One day later, animals were euthanized and liver and epididymal WAT (EWAT) samples were collected for gene expression, protein analysis and histological study of inflammasome activation, ER stress, apoptosis and lipid metabolism. Our results showed that burn plus LPS profoundly increased lipolysis in WAT associated with significantly increased hepatic lipid infiltration. Burn plus LPS augmented ER stress by upregulating CHOP and activating ATF6, inducing NLRP3 inflammasome activation and leading to increased apoptosis and lipolysis in WAT with a distinct enzymatic mechanism related to inhibition of AMPK signaling. In conclusion, burn sepsis causes profound alterations in WAT and liver that are associated with changes in organ function and structure. PMID:26736177

  14. Alternative Approaches to the Family Life Cycle in the Analysis of Housing Consumption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, P. B.; Ellis, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    Used loan-approval data to analyze the effects of life-cycle stage on housing consumption. The detailed typologies were not generally superior to the more simplified approaches, except for per capita consumption. For per capita consumption, price, and quality, clear evidence is found for structural nonhomogeneity across life-cycle stages. (JAC)

  15. Alternative Physical Therapy Protocol Using a Cycle Ergometer During Hospital Rehabilitation of Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: a Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Trevisan, Margarete Diprat; Lopes, Diene Gomes Colvara; de Mello, Renato Gorga Bandeira; Macagnan, Fabrício Edler; Kessler, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the efficacy of a cycle ergometer-based exercise program to a standard protocol on the increment of the maximum distance walked during the six-minute walk test in the postoperative rehabilitation of patients submitted to coronary artery bypass grafting. METHODS A controlled clinical trial pilot, blinded to the outcome, enrolled subjects who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting in a hospital from Southern Brazil. Subjects were designated for the standard physical rehabilitation protocol or to an alternative cycle ergometer-based protocol through simple random sampling. The primary outcome was the difference in the maximum distance walked in the six-minute walk test before and after the allocated intervention. RESULTS Twenty-four patients were included in the analysis, 10 in the standard protocol and 14 in the alternative protocol group. There was an increment in the maximum distance walked in both groups, and borderline superiority in the intervention group comparing to the control group (312.2 vs. 249.7; P=0.06). CONCLUSION There was an increase in the maximum distance walked in the alternative protocol compared to the standard protocol. Thus, it is postulated that the use of a cycle ergometer can be included in physical rehabilitation in the hospital phase of postoperative coronary artery bypass grafting. However, randomized studies with larger sample size should be conducted to assess the significance of these findings. PMID:26934400

  16. Accelerated Thermal Cycling and Failure Mechanisms for BGA and CSP Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    2000-01-01

    This paper reviews the accelerated thermal cycling test methods that are currently used by industry to characterize the interconnect reliability of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) ball grid array (BGA) and chip scale package (CSP) assemblies. Acceleration induced failure mechanisms varied from conventional surface mount (SM) failures for CSPs. Examples of unrealistic life projections for other CSPs are also presented. The cumulative cycles to failure for ceramic BGA assemblies performed under different conditions, including plots of their two Weibull parameters, are presented. The results are for cycles in the range of -30 C to 100 C, -55 C to 100 C, and -55 C to 125 C. Failure mechanisms as well as cycles to failure for thermal shock and thermal cycling conditions in the range of -55 C to 125 C were compared. Projection to other temperature cycling ranges using a modified Coffin-Manson relationship is also presented.

  17. Simulations of heart mechanics over the cardiac cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavoularis, Stavros; Doyle, Matthew; Bourgault, Yves

    2009-11-01

    This study is concerned with the numerical simulation of blood flow and myocardium motion with fluid-structure interaction of the left ventricle (LV) of a canine heart over the entire cardiac cycle. The LV geometry is modeled as a series of nested prolate ellipsoids and is capped with cylindrical tubes representing the inflow and outflow tracts. The myocardium is modeled as a multi-layered, slightly compressible, transversely isotropic, hyperelastic material, with each layer having different principal directions to approximate the fibrous structure. Blood is modeled as a slightly compressible Newtonian fluid. Blood flow into and out of the LV is driven by left atrial and aortic pressures applied at the distal ends of the inflow and outflow tracts, respectively, along with changes in the stresses in the myocardium caused by time-dependent changes in its material properties, which simulate the cyclic contraction and relaxation of the muscle fibers. Numerical solutions are obtained with the use of a finite element code. The computed temporal and spatial variations of pressure and velocity in the blood and stresses and strains in the myocardium will be discussed and compared to physiological data. The variation of the LV cavity volume over the cardiac cycle will also be discussed.

  18. Alternation of generations - unravelling the underlying molecular mechanism of a 165-year-old botanical observation.

    PubMed

    Horst, N A; Reski, R

    2016-07-01

    Characteristically, land plants exhibit a life cycle with an 'alternation of generations' and thus alternate between a haploid gametophyte and a diploid sporophyte. At meiosis and fertilisation the transitions between these two ontogenies take place in distinct single stem cells. The evolutionary invention of an embryo, and thus an upright multicellular sporophyte, in the ancestor of land plants formed the basis for the evolution of increasingly complex plant morphologies shaping Earth's ecosystems. Recent research employing the moss Physcomitrella patens revealed the homeotic gene BELL1 as a master regulator of the gametophyte-to-sporophyte transition. Here, we discuss these findings in the context of classical botanical observations. PMID:27094475

  19. Alternative functions of core cell cycle regulators in neuronal migration, neuronal maturation, and synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Christopher L.; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that boundaries separating a cycling cell from a post-mitotic neuron are not as concrete as expected. Novel and unique physiological functions in neurons have been ascribed for proteins fundamentally required for cell cycle progression and control. These “core” cell cycle regulators serve diverse post-mitotic functions that span various developmental stages of a neuron, including neuronal migration, axonal elongation, axon pruning, dendrite morphogenesis, and synaptic maturation and plasticity. In this review, we detail the non-proliferative post-mitotic roles that these cell cycle proteins have recently been reported to play, the significance of their expression in neurons, mechanistic insight when available, and future prospects. PMID:19447088

  20. Progress of Stirling cycle analysis and loss mechanism characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tew, R. C., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    An assessment of Stirling engine thermodynamic modeling and design codes shows a general deficiency; this deficiency is due to poor understanding of the fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena that occur in the oscillating flow and pressure level environment within the engines. Stirling engine thermodynamic loss mechanisms are listed. Several experimental and computational research efforts now underway to characterize various loss mechanisms are reviewed. The need for additional experimental rigs and rig upgrades is discussed. Recent developments and current efforts in Stirling engine thermodynamic modeling are also reviewed.

  1. The Parasexual Cycle in Candida albicans Provides an Alternative Pathway to Meiosis for the Formation of Recombinant Strains

    PubMed Central

    Forche, Anja; Alby, Kevin; Schaefer, Dana; Johnson, Alexander D; Berman, Judith; Bennett, Richard J

    2008-01-01

    Candida albicans has an elaborate, yet efficient, mating system that promotes conjugation between diploid a and α strains. The product of mating is a tetraploid a/α cell that must undergo a reductional division to return to the diploid state. Despite the presence of several “meiosis-specific” genes in the C. albicans genome, a meiotic program has not been observed. Instead, tetraploid products of mating can be induced to undergo efficient, random chromosome loss, often producing strains that are diploid, or close to diploid, in ploidy. Using SNP and comparative genome hybridization arrays we have now analyzed the genotypes of products from the C. albicans parasexual cycle. We show that the parasexual cycle generates progeny strains with shuffled combinations of the eight C. albicans chromosomes. In addition, several isolates had undergone extensive genetic recombination between homologous chromosomes, including multiple gene conversion events. Progeny strains exhibited altered colony morphologies on laboratory media, demonstrating that the parasexual cycle generates phenotypic variants of C. albicans. In several fungi, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the conserved Spo11 protein is integral to meiotic recombination, where it is required for the formation of DNA double-strand breaks. We show that deletion of SPO11 prevented genetic recombination between homologous chromosomes during the C. albicans parasexual cycle. These findings suggest that at least one meiosis-specific gene has been re-programmed to mediate genetic recombination during the alternative parasexual life cycle of C. albicans. We discuss, in light of the long association of C. albicans with warm-blooded animals, the potential advantages of a parasexual cycle over a conventional sexual cycle. PMID:18462019

  2. The evaluation of alternative thermochemical cycles-Part II the down selection process.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M. A.; Masin, J. G.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2009-01-01

    The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy Science and Technology is supporting an effort to reevaluate thermochemical cycles reported in the literature as having both promising efficiencies and proof-of-concept results. Nine cycles were identified. A group of universities was tasked with the evaluation of these cycles using the NHI consistent methodology for calculating efficiency and for recommending and conducting critical research needed to help in the down-selection process. Argonne National Laboratory coordinated these activities. This paper provides an overview of the program and summarizes the results of the down-selection process. Individual papers that contain the details of the research are provided by the universities.

  3. Alternative reactions at the interface of glycolysis and citric acid cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    van Rossum, Harmen M; Kozak, Barbara U; Niemeijer, Matthijs S; Duine, Hendrik J; Luttik, Marijke A H; Boer, Viktor M; Kötter, Peter; Daran, Jean-Marc G; van Maris, Antonius J A; Pronk, Jack T

    2016-05-01

    Pyruvate and acetyl-coenzyme A, located at the interface between glycolysis and TCA cycle, are important intermediates in yeast metabolism and key precursors for industrially relevant products. Rational engineering of their supply requires knowledge of compensatory reactions that replace predominant pathways when these are inactivated. This study investigates effects of individual and combined mutations that inactivate the mitochondrial pyruvate-dehydrogenase (PDH) complex, extramitochondrial citrate synthase (Cit2) and mitochondrial CoA-transferase (Ach1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Additionally, strains with a constitutively expressed carnitine shuttle were constructed and analyzed. A predominant role of the PDH complex in linking glycolysis and TCA cycle in glucose-grown batch cultures could be functionally replaced by the combined activity of the cytosolic PDH bypass and Cit2. Strongly impaired growth and a high incidence of respiratory deficiency in pda1Δ ach1Δ strains showed that synthesis of intramitochondrial acetyl-CoA as a metabolic precursor requires activity of either the PDH complex or Ach1. Constitutive overexpression of AGP2, HNM1, YAT2, YAT1, CRC1 and CAT2 enabled the carnitine shuttle to efficiently link glycolysis and TCA cycle in l-carnitine-supplemented, glucose-grown batch cultures. Strains in which all known reactions at the glycolysis-TCA cycle interface were inactivated still grew slowly on glucose, indicating additional flexibility at this key metabolic junction. PMID:26895788

  4. Life-cycle assessment of municipal solid waste management alternatives with consideration of uncertainty: SIWMS development and application

    SciTech Connect

    El Hanandeh, Ali; El-Zein, Abbas

    2010-05-15

    This paper describes the development and application of the Stochastic Integrated Waste Management Simulator (SIWMS) model. SIWMS provides a detailed view of the environmental impacts and associated costs of municipal solid waste (MSW) management alternatives under conditions of uncertainty. The model follows a life-cycle inventory approach extended with compensatory systems to provide more equitable bases for comparing different alternatives. Economic performance is measured by the net present value. The model is verified against four publicly available models under deterministic conditions and then used to study the impact of uncertainty on Sydney's MSW management 'best practices'. Uncertainty has a significant effect on all impact categories. The greatest effect is observed in the global warming category where a reversal of impact direction is predicted. The reliability of the system is most sensitive to uncertainties in the waste processing and disposal. The results highlight the importance of incorporating uncertainty at all stages to better understand the behaviour of the MSW system.

  5. Assessment of potential impacts of municipal solid waste treatment alternatives by using life cycle approach: a case study in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Thanh, Nguyen Phuc; Matsui, Yasuhiro

    2013-10-01

    In Vietnam, most of municipal solid waste (MSW) is disposed of at open dumping and landfill sites, and the methane gas from waste is the un-ignorable source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emission. It is indispensable to explore the possibility for GHG mitigation in MSW management. The objective of this study was to estimate alternative waste treatment practices towards the GHG emission mitigation, energy consumption and generation, reduction of landfill volume, and various benefits for proposing the appropriate selection by scenario analyses for representative Vietnam's cities. Impacts were calculated by utilizing life cycle assessment (LCA) method. A literature review survey on the current applicability of LCA database for assessing impacts from waste sector in developing countries, especially for Vietnam, was carried out. This study assessed the contribution of alternative solid waste treatment practices. The result showed that, except investment and operation costs, incineration with energy recovery seems the suitable alternative for treating waste from representative cities of Vietnam according to reduction of GHG emission and waste burden to landfill sites and energy recovery and generation. Besides, MSW composition was identified as an important factor directly influencing to impacts as well as other products and benefits of waste treatment alternatives. Reliable data on waste composition are indispensable for assessing to choose, improve, or plan the waste treatment practices towards sustainable development. PMID:23475528

  6. Benefits and risks of emerging technologies: integrating life cycle assessment and decision analysis to assess lumber treatment alternatives.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Michael P; Bates, Matthew E; Madison, Marcus; Linkov, Igor

    2014-10-01

    Assessing the best options among emerging technologies (e.g., new chemicals, nanotechnologies) is complicated because of trade-offs across benefits and risks that are difficult to quantify given limited and fragmented availability of information. This study demonstrates the integration of multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA) and life cycle assessment (LCA) to address technology alternative selection decisions. As a case study, prioritization of six lumber treatment alternatives [micronized copper quaternary (MCQ); alkaline copper quaternary (ACQ); water-borne copper naphthenate (CN); oil-borne copper naphthenate (CNo); water-borne copper quinolate (CQ); and water-borne zinc naphthenate (ZN)] for military use are considered. Multiattribute value theory (MAVT) is used to derive risk and benefit scores. Risk scores are calculated using a cradle-to-gate LCA. Benefit scores are calculated by scoring of cost, durability, and corrosiveness criteria. Three weighting schemes are used, representing Environmental, Military and Balanced stakeholder perspectives. Aggregated scores from all three perspectives show CQ to be the least favorable alterative. MCQ is identified as the most favorable alternative from the Environmental stakeholder perspective. From the Military stakeholder perspective, ZN is determined to be the most favorable alternative, followed closely by MCQ. This type of scoring and ranking of multiple heterogeneous criteria in a systematic and transparent way facilitates better justification of technology selection and regulation. PMID:25209330

  7. Shallow-water marl-limestone alternations in the Late Jurassic of western France: Cycles, storm event deposits or both?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombié, Claude; Schnyder, Johann; Carcel, Damien

    2012-10-01

    The contribution of event deposits to various basin fills can be very significant, higher than 90% in some cases. Events may lead to the formation of marl-limestone alternations, which can also result from cyclic changes in sea level or climate, for example. The marl-limestone alternations of the Late Jurassic of western France contain abundant coarse-grained accumulations that resemble storm deposits described in other western European successions. The detailed analysis of facies evolution and hierarchical, high-frequency stacking pattern of depositional sequences of the Phare de Chassiron section (Ile d'Oléron, western France) allows the controls on marl-limestone formation to be defined. This section contains nearshore and shallow-marine mud deposits that were exposed to high-energy events. Elementary, small-, and medium-scale depositional sequences are defined. The stacking-pattern and the duration of these sequences suggest an orbital control on sedimentation. Precession (20 ka) cycles notably controlled the formation of elementary sequences that correspond to marl-limestone alternations. The deposition of marly or carbonate mud occurred in this storm-dominated system because of muddy sea beds, the gentle slope of the shelf, and the great amount of particles in suspension, which reduced water energy resulting from storms. Sediment supply was also sufficient to limit bioturbation and favour the preservation of numerous storm deposits. The production of carbonate mud was localised on positive structures and partly controlled by Milankovitch-scale sea-level cycles. Transport by storms of carbonate mud to the adjacent marly depressions during high carbonate production periods led to the formation of calcareous beds. Marl-limestone alternations in the Late Jurassic of western France therefore result from the combined effects of cyclic changes in carbonate production and high-energy, episodic events.

  8. 45 CFR 148.128 - State flexibility in individual market reforms-alternative mechanisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false State flexibility in individual market reforms-alternative mechanisms. 148.128 Section 148.128 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDIVIDUAL HEALTH INSURANCE MARKET Requirements Relating to Access and...

  9. Coupling of remote alternating-access transport mechanisms for protons and substrates in the multidrug efflux pump AcrB

    PubMed Central

    Eicher, Thomas; Seeger, Markus A; Anselmi, Claudio; Zhou, Wenchang; Brandstätter, Lorenz; Verrey, François; Diederichs, Kay; Faraldo-Gómez, José D; Pos, Klaas M

    2014-01-01

    Membrane transporters of the RND superfamily confer multidrug resistance to pathogenic bacteria, and are essential for cholesterol metabolism and embryonic development in humans. We use high-resolution X-ray crystallography and computational methods to delineate the mechanism of the homotrimeric RND-type proton/drug antiporter AcrB, the active component of the major efflux system AcrAB-TolC in Escherichia coli, and one most complex and intriguing membrane transporters known to date. Analysis of wildtype AcrB and four functionally-inactive variants reveals an unprecedented mechanism that involves two remote alternating-access conformational cycles within each protomer, namely one for protons in the transmembrane region and another for drugs in the periplasmic domain, 50 Å apart. Each of these cycles entails two distinct types of collective motions of two structural repeats, coupled by flanking α-helices that project from the membrane. Moreover, we rationalize how the cross-talk among protomers across the trimerization interface might lead to a more kinetically efficient efflux system. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03145.001 PMID:25248080

  10. Effect of root canal preparation, type of endodontic post and mechanical cycling on root fracture strength

    PubMed Central

    RIPPE, Marília Pivetta; SANTINI, Manuela Favarin; BIER, Carlos Alexandre Souza; BALDISSARA, Paolo; VALANDRO, Luiz Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of the type of root canal preparation, intraradicular post and mechanical cycling on the fracture strength of roots. Material and Methods eighty human single rooted teeth were divided into 8 groups according to the instruments used for root canal preparation (manual or rotary instruments), the type of intraradicular post (fiber posts- FRC and cast post and core- CPC) and the use of mechanical cycling (MC) as follows: Manual and FRC; Manual, FRC and MC; Manual and CPC; Manual, CPC and MC; Rotary and FRC; Rotary, FRC and MC; Rotary and CPC; Rotary, CPC and MC. The filling was performed by lateral compactation. All root canals were prepared for a post with a 10 mm length, using the custom #2 bur of the glass fiber post system. For mechanical cycling, the protocol was applied as follows: an angle of incidence of 45°, 37°C, 88 N, 4 Hz, 2 million pulses. All groups were submitted to fracture strength test in a 45° device with 1 mm/ min cross-head speed until failure occurred. Results The 3-way ANOVA showed that the root canal preparation strategy (p<0.03) and post type (p<0.0001) affected the fracture strength results, while mechanical cycling (p=0.29) did not. Conclusion The root canal preparation strategy only influenced the root fracture strength when restoring with a fiber post and mechanical cycling, so it does not seem to be an important factor in this scenario. PMID:25025556

  11. The life cycle of Ceratomyxa shasta, a myxosporean parasite of salmonids, requires a freshwater polychaete as an alternate host.

    PubMed

    Bartholomew, J L; Whipple, M J; Stevens, D G; Fryer, J L

    1997-10-01

    The actinosporean life stage of Ceratomyxa shasta, a myxozoan parasite of salmonids, and the annelid worm that serves as its alternate host were identified in laboratory transmission experiments and their roles were confirmed using molecular techniques. Infection by the parasite occurred in susceptible fish that were either exposed to or force fed the freshwater polychaete, Manayunkia speciosa, infected with the actinosporean. These observations were confirmed using the polymerase chain reaction with primers designed from the C. shasta 18S rDNA sequence. DNA was amplified from polychaetes harboring the actinosporean that caused infection in the fish but not from uninfected polychaetes. Amplified DNA from an infected polychaete was sequenced and its homology with the 18S rDNA sequence of C. shasta spores verified the proposed life cycle. Ultrastructural examination of the actinosporean in the polychaete showed developmental stages in the epidermis rather than within the intestinal epithelium as described for other myxozoans. The methods described will be useful in identifying alternate hosts and morphologically diverse life stages in the complex life cycles of other myxosporea and in understanding the relationships between these parasites and their hosts. PMID:9379291

  12. Toxic emissions from mobile sources: a total fuel-cycle analysis for conventional and alternative fuel vehicles.

    PubMed

    Winebrake, J J; Wang, M Q; He, D

    2001-07-01

    Mobile sources are among the largest contributors of four hazardous air pollutants--benzene, 1,3-butadiene, acetaldehyde, and formaldehyde--in urban areas. At the same time, federal and state governments are promoting the use of alternative fuel vehicles as a means to curb local air pollution. As yet, the impact of this movement toward alternative fuels with respect to toxic emissions has not been well studied. The purpose of this paper is to compare toxic emissions from vehicles operating on a variety of fuels, including reformulated gasoline (RFG), natural gas, ethanol, methanol, liquid petroleum gas (LPG), and electricity. This study uses a version of Argonne National Laboratory's Greenhouse Gas, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model, appropriately modified to estimate toxic emissions. The GREET model conducts a total fuel-cycle analysis that calculates emissions from both downstream (e.g., operation of the vehicle) and upstream (e.g., fuel production and distribution) stages of the fuel cycle. We find that almost all of the fuels studied reduce 1,3-butadiene emissions compared with conventional gasoline (CG). However, the use of ethanol in E85 (fuel made with 85% ethanol) or RFG leads to increased acetaldehyde emissions, and the use of methanol, ethanol, and compressed natural gas (CNG) may result in increased formaldehyde emissions. When the modeling results for the four air toxics are considered together with their cancer risk factors, all the fuels and vehicle technologies show air toxic emission reduction benefits. PMID:15658225

  13. Life cycle assessment of a parabolic trough concentrating solar power plant and the impacts of key design alternatives.

    PubMed

    Burkhardt, John J; Heath, Garvin A; Turchi, Craig S

    2011-03-15

    Climate change and water scarcity are important issues for today's power sector. To inform capacity expansion decisions, hybrid life cycle assessment is used to evaluate a reference design of a parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) facility located in Daggett, CA, along four sustainability metrics: life cycle (LC) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, cumulative energy demand (CED), and energy payback time (EPBT). This wet-cooled, 103 MW plant utilizes mined nitrates salts in its two-tank, thermal energy storage (TES) system. Design alternatives of dry-cooling, a thermocline TES, and synthetically derived nitrate salt are evaluated. During its LC, the reference CSP plant is estimated to emit 26 g of CO(2eq) per kWh, consume 4.7 L/kWh of water, and demand 0.40 MJ(eq)/kWh of energy, resulting in an EPBT of approximately 1 year. The dry-cooled alternative is estimated to reduce LC water consumption by 77% but increase LC GHG emissions and CED by 8%. Synthetic nitrate salts may increase LC GHG emissions by 52% compared to mined. Switching from two-tank to thermocline TES configuration reduces LC GHG emissions, most significantly for plants using synthetically derived nitrate salts. CSP can significantly reduce GHG emissions compared to fossil-fueled generation; however, dry-cooling may be required in many locations to minimize water consumption. PMID:21391722

  14. Impact of Wetting/Oven-Drying Cycles on the Mechanical and Physical Properties of Birch Plywood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sooru, M.; Kasepuu, K.; Kask, R.; Lille, H.

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study was to explore some physical and mechanical properties and the dimensional stability of birch (Betula sp.) nine-ply veneers glued with phenol-formaldehyde (PF) after 10 cycles of soaking/oven-drying. The properties to be determined were bending strength (BS), modulus of elasticity in bending (MOE), Janka hardness (JH) and thickness swelling (TS), which were tested according to the European Standards (EN). An analytical equation was used for approximation of the change in the physical and mechanical properties of the samples depending on the number of cycles. It was shown that the values of the studied properties were affected most by the first soaking and drying cycles after which BS and MOE decreased continuously while the values of JH and TS stabilized. After 10 cycles the final values of BS, MOE, JH and TS accounted for 75-81%, 95%, 82% and 98.5% of the initial values, respectively.

  15. Effect of thermal cycling treatment on the mechanical properties of low-alloy chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Rakitskii, A.N.; Bega, N.D.; Brodnikovskii, N.P.; Khutorskii, A.L.; Turtsevich, E.V.

    1985-10-01

    The authors report the results of a study of the effect of structural changes occurring during thermal cycling treatment in low-alloy chromium on mechanical properties. Low-alloy chromium containing 0.5 wt.% lanthanum and 0.25 wt.% tantalum was selected as test material, as well as unalloyed chromium. It is concluded that thermal cycling treatment of chromium and low-alloy chromium leads to an increase in flow stresses as the result of forming a strengthened nitrogen-containing surface layer. Alloying of chromium with lanthanum and tantalum, apart from increasing the low-temperature ductility, increases its resistance to thermal cycling. In alloy specimens subjected to prior impregnation with nitrogen, the effect ot thermal cycling strengthening and embrittlement is more clearly defined. In unalloyed chromium under the action of thermal cycling treatment, the region of strain aging shifts in the direction of lower temperature.

  16. A deep-seated mechanism for cycle-dependent sunspot group tilt angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isik, Emre

    2016-07-01

    The cycle-averaged tilt angle of sunspot groups is an important quantity in determining the magnetic flux diffusing across the equator, which is highly correlated with the strength of the next cycle. This quantity has recently been reported to be anti-correlated with the strength of the solar cycle. I suggest that a deep-seated thermodynamic cycle can be responsible for the observed correlation. Motivated by helioseismic indications, I calculate the effect of cooling of the convective overshoot region on the stability and dynamics of thin, unstable flux tubes. I find that only 5-20 K of cooling in the layer can explain the observed range of tilt angle fluctuations among different cycles. This mechanism can play a role in the nonlinear saturation and amplitude fluctuations of the solar dynamo.

  17. Environmental impacts of remediation of a trichloroethene-contaminated site: life cycle assessment of remediation alternatives.

    PubMed

    Lemming, Gitte; Hauschild, Michael Z; Chambon, Julie; Binning, Philip J; Bulle, Cécile; Margni, Manuele; Bjerg, Poul L

    2010-12-01

    The environmental impacts of remediation of a chloroethene-contaminated site were evaluated using life cycle assessment (LCA). The compared remediation options are (i) in situ bioremediation by enhanced reductive dechlorination (ERD), (ii) in situ thermal desorption (ISTD), and (iii) excavation of the contaminated soil followed by off-site treatment and disposal. The results showed that choosing the ERD option will reduce the life-cycle impacts of remediation remarkably compared to choosing either ISTD or excavation, which are more energy-demanding. In addition to the secondary impacts of remediation, this study includes assessment of local toxic impacts (the primary impact) related to the on-site contaminant leaching to groundwater and subsequent human exposure via drinking water. The primary human toxic impacts were high for ERD due to the formation and leaching of chlorinated degradation products, especially vinyl chloride during remediation. However, the secondary human toxic impacts of ISTD and excavation are likely to be even higher, particularly due to upstream impacts from steel production. The newly launched model, USEtox, was applied for characterization of primary and secondary toxic impacts and combined with a site-dependent fate model of the leaching of chlorinated ethenes from the fractured clay till site. PMID:21053954

  18. Life cycle assessment of a power tower concentrating solar plant and the impacts of key design alternatives.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, Michael B; Heath, Garvin A; Burkhardt, John J; Turchi, Craig S

    2013-06-01

    A hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) is used to evaluate four sustainability metrics over the life cycle of a power tower concentrating solar power (CSP) facility: greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, cumulative energy demand (CED), and energy payback time (EPBT). The reference design is for a dry-cooled, 106 MW(net) power tower facility located near Tucson, AZ that uses a mixture of mined nitrate salts as the heat transfer fluid and storage medium, a two-tank thermal energy storage system designed for six hours of full load-equivalent storage, and receives auxiliary power from the local electric grid. A thermocline-based storage system, synthetically derived salts, and natural gas auxiliary power are evaluated as design alternatives. Over its life cycle, the reference plant is estimated to have GHG emissions of 37 g CO2eq/kWh, consume 1.4 L/kWh of water and 0.49 MJ/kWh of energy, and have an EPBT of 15 months. Using synthetic salts is estimated to increase GHG emissions by 12%, CED by 7%, and water consumption by 4% compared to mined salts. Natural gas auxiliary power results in greater than 10% decreases in GHG emissions, water consumption, and CED. The thermocline design is most advantageous when coupled with the use of synthetic salts. PMID:23663111

  19. CYCLE pilot: a protocol for a pilot randomised study of early cycle ergometry versus routine physiotherapy in mechanically ventilated patients

    PubMed Central

    Molloy, Alexander J; Clarke, France; Herridge, Margaret S; Koo, Karen K Y; Rudkowski, Jill; Seely, Andrew J E; Pellizzari, Joseph R; Tarride, Jean-Eric; Mourtzakis, Marina; Karachi, Timothy; Cook, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Early exercise with in-bed cycling as part of an intensive care unit (ICU) rehabilitation programme has the potential to improve physical and functional outcomes following critical illness. The objective of this study is to determine the feasibility of enrolling adults in a multicentre pilot randomised clinical trial (RCT) of early in-bed cycling versus routine physiotherapy to inform a larger RCT. Methods and analysis 60-patient parallel group pilot RCT in 7 Canadian medical-surgical ICUs. We will include all previously ambulatory adult patients within the first 0–4 days of mechanical ventilation, without exclusion criteria. After informed consent, patients will be randomised using a web-based, centralised electronic system, to 30 min of in-bed leg cycling in addition to routine physiotherapy, 5 days per week, for the duration of their ICU stay (28 days maximum) or routine physiotherapy alone. We will measure patients' muscle strength (Medical Research Council Sum Score, quadriceps force) and function (Physical Function in ICU Test (scored), 30 s sit-to-stand, 2 min walk test) at ICU awakening, ICU discharge and hospital discharge. Our 4 feasibility outcomes are: (1) patient accrual of 1–2 patients per month per centre, (2) protocol violation rate <20%, (3) outcome measure ascertainment >80% at the 3 time points and (4) blinded outcomes ascertainment >80% at hospital discharge. Hospital outcome assessors are blinded to group assignment, whereas participants, ICU physiotherapists, ICU caregivers, research coordinators and ICU outcome assessors are not blinded to group assignment. We will analyse feasibility outcomes with descriptive statistics. Ethics and dissemination Each participating centre will obtain local ethics approval, and results of the study will be published to inform the design and conduct of a future multicentre RCT of in-bed cycling to improve physical outcomes in ICU survivors. Trial registration number NCT02377830; Pre

  20. Experimental evolution of an alternating uni- and multicellular life cycle in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliff, William C.; Herron, Matthew D.; Howell, Kathryn; Pentz, Jennifer T.; Rosenzweig, Frank; Travisano, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The transition to multicellularity enabled the evolution of large, complex organisms, but early steps in this transition remain poorly understood. Here we show that multicellular complexity, including development from a single cell, can evolve rapidly in a unicellular organism that has never had a multicellular ancestor. We subject the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to conditions that favour multicellularity, resulting in the evolution of a multicellular life cycle in which clusters reproduce via motile unicellular propagules. While a single-cell genetic bottleneck during ontogeny is widely regarded as an adaptation to limit among-cell conflict, its appearance very early in this transition suggests that it did not evolve for this purpose. Instead, we find that unicellular propagules are adaptive even in the absence of intercellular conflict, maximizing cluster-level fecundity. These results demonstrate that the unicellular bottleneck, a trait essential for evolving multicellular complexity, can arise rapidly via co-option of the ancestral unicellular form. PMID:24193369

  1. Essential and alternative prey in a ponerine ant: variations according to the colony life cycle.

    PubMed

    Suzzoni, J P; Schatz, B; Dejean, A

    2000-11-01

    We studied the prey specialization of Plectroctena minor, a ponerine ant known to capture mostly millipedes. We compared the prey spectrum of the hunting workers from large colonies with that of the founding queens. The hunting workers captured all kinds of tested prey, but hunted mostly millipedes. Founding queens, which avoided relatively large prey, including the millipedes tested, captured mostly isopods under experimental conditions. We also verified that the presence of millipedes in the diet of the larvae of large colonies was necessary for the production of winged females and strongly enhanced the production of workers, permitting us to assert that P. minor is a predatory species specialized in the capture of millipedes. In contrast, the presence of millipedes had no impact on the production of males. We thus assert that millipedes constitute the 'essential prey' of P. minor, while other arthropod taxa are therefore 'alternative prey'. PMID:11144023

  2. Sleep and alertness during alternating monophasic and polyphasic rest-activity cycles.

    PubMed

    Porcú, S; Casagrande, M; Ferrara, M; Bellatreccia, A

    1998-07-01

    People involved in shift work often have to face altered patterns of sleep and wakefulness. This is particularly true for schedules involving night shifts and/or fragmentation of duty periods throughout the 24-hr day. In such conditions, it can be difficult to obtain satisfactory periods of sleep, and sleepiness on duty is a frequent and dangerous occurrence. The aim of this study was to evaluate sleep and wakefulness periods of subjects whose work schedule was characterized by an alternation of 2 hours of activity and 4 hours of rest (sleep allowed), repeated 4 times throughout the 24-hr day. This schedule was alternated with 24 hours off duty. Nine healthy male volunteers were monitored by means of ambulatory polysomnography while attending their 24-hr rest-activity schedule. Sleep periods were visually scored according to standard criteria. Wake periods were visually scored using both 30 s and 5 s epochs in order to reveal episodes of drowsiness and/or microsleep. Results showed that total sleep time was substantially reduced as compared to the usual 7-8 hour monophasic nocturnal sleep. Subjects did not sleep during the first rest period (11.00-15.00). Time in sleep linearly increased in the course of the 3 remaining rest periods. Normal sleep stage distribution was substantially spared only in the last rest period (3.00-7.00 a.m.). With regard to duty periods, only a few microsleeps were detected and their number did not significantly vary across the four 2-hr activity periods. In conclusion, this rest-activity schedule, despite the considerable sleep reduction, allowed maintaining good levels of vigilance as shown by the virtual absence of EEG microsleeps. Whether future research will prove that this regimen does not cause an impairment of performance, it should be a suitable strategy for the management of continuous operations. PMID:9845015

  3. Generation of spatially periodic patterns by a mechanical instability: a mechanical alternative to the Turing model.

    PubMed

    Harris, A K; Stopak, D; Warner, P

    1984-04-01

    We have studied the generation of spatial patterns created by mechanical (rather than chemical) instabilities. When dissociated fibroblasts are suspended in a gel of reprecipitated collagen, and the contraction of the gel as a whole is physically restrained by attachment of its margin to a glass fibre meshwork, then the effect of the fibroblasts' traction is to break up the cell-matrix mixture into a series of clumps or aggregations of cells and compressed matrix. These aggregations are interconnected by linear tracts of collagen fibres aligned under the tensile stress exerted by fibroblast traction. The patterns generated by this mechanical instability vary depending upon cell population density and other factors. Over a certain range of cell concentrations, this mechanical instability yields geometric patterns which resemble but are usually much less regular than the patterns which develop normally in the dermis of developing bird skin. We propose that an equivalent mechanical instability, occurring during the embryonic development of this skin, could be the cause not only of the clumping of dermal fibroblasts to form the feather papillae, but also of the alignment of collagen fibres into the characteristic polygonal network of fibre bundles - which interconnect these papillae and which presage the subsequent pattern of the dermal muscles serving to control feather movements. More generally, we suggest that this type of mechanical instability can serve the morphogenetic functions for which Turing's chemical instability and other reaction-diffusion systems have been proposed. Mechanical instabilities can create physical structures directly, in one step, in contrast to the two or more steps which would be required if positional information first had to be specified by chemical gradients and then only secondarily implemented in physical form. In addition, physical forces can act more quickly and at much longer range than can diffusing chemicals and can generate a

  4. Evaluation of different end-of-life management alternatives for used natural cork stoppers through life cycle assessment.

    PubMed

    Demertzi, Martha; Dias, Ana Cláudia; Matos, Arlindo; Arroja, Luís Manuel

    2015-12-01

    An important aspect of sustainable development is the implementation of effective and sustainable waste management strategies. The present study focuses on a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach to different waste management strategies for natural cork stoppers, namely incineration at a municipal solid waste incinerator, landfilling in a sanitary landfill, and recycling. In the literature, there are no LCA studies analyzing in detail the end-of-life stage of natural cork stoppers as well as other cork products. In addition, cork is usually treated as wood at the end-of-life stage. Thus, the outcome of this study can provide an important insight into this matter. The results showed that different management alternatives, namely incineration and recycling, could be chosen depending on the impact category considered. The former alternative presented the best environmental results in the impact categories of climate change, ozone depletion and acidification, while the latter for photochemical ozone formation and mineral and fossil resource depletion. The landfilling alternative did not present the best environmental performance in any of the impact categories. However, when the biogenic carbon dioxide emission was assessed for the climate change category, the landfilling alternative was found to be the most effective since most of the biogenic carbon would be permanently stored in the cork products and not emitted into the atmosphere. A sensitivity analysis was performed and the results showed that there are various parameters that can significantly influence the results (e.g., carbon content in cork and decay rate of cork in the landfill). Thus, LCA studies should include a detailed description concerning their assumptions when the end-of-life stage is included in the boundaries since they can influence the results, and furthermore, to facilitate the comparison of different end-of-life scenarios. The present study and the obtained results could be useful for the

  5. Ceramic Inlays: Effect of Mechanical Cycling and Ceramic Type on Restoration-dentin Bond Strength.

    PubMed

    Trindade, F Z; Kleverlaan, C J; da Silva, L H; Feilzer, A J; Cesar, P F; Bottino, M A; Valandro, L F

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the bond strength between dentin and five different ceramic inlays in permanent maxillary premolars, with and without mechanical cycling. One hundred permanent maxillary premolars were prepared and divided into 10 groups (n=10) according to the ceramic system (IPS e.Max Press; IPS e.Max CAD; Vita PM9; Vita Mark II; and Vita VM7) and the mechanical cycling factor (with and without [100 N, 2 Hz, 1.2×10(6) cycles]). The inlays were adhesively cemented, and all of the specimens were cut into microbars (1×1 mm, nontrimming method), which were tested under microtensile loading. The failure mode was classified and contact angle, roughness, and microtopographic analyses were performed on each ceramic surface. The mechanical cycling had a significant effect (p=0.0087) on the bond strength between dentin and IPS e.max Press. The Vita Mark II group had the highest bond strength values under both conditions, with mechanical cycling (9.7±1.8 MPa) and without (8.2±1.9 MPa), while IPS e.Max CAD had the lowest values (2.6±1.6 and 2.2±1.4, respectively). The adhesive failure mode at the ceramic/cement interface was the most frequent. Vita Mark II showed the highest value of average roughness. IPS e.max Press and Vita Mark II ceramics presented the lowest contact angles. In conclusion, the composition and manufacturing process of ceramics seem to have an influence on the ceramic surface and resin cement bond strength. Mechanical cycling did not cause significant degradation on the dentin and ceramic bond strength under the configuration used. PMID:27455117

  6. Alternative "global warming" metrics in life cycle assessment: a case study with existing transportation data.

    PubMed

    Peters, Glen P; Aamaas, Borgar; T Lund, Marianne; Solli, Christian; Fuglestvedt, Jan S

    2011-10-15

    The Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) impact category "global warming" compares emissions of long-lived greenhouse gases (LLGHGs) using Global Warming Potential (GWP) with a 100-year time-horizon as specified in the Kyoto Protocol. Two weaknesses of this approach are (1) the exclusion of short-lived climate forcers (SLCFs) and biophysical factors despite their established importance, and (2) the use of a particular emission metric (GWP) with a choice of specific time-horizons (20, 100, and 500 years). The GWP and the three time-horizons were based on an illustrative example with value judgments and vague interpretations. Here we illustrate, using LCA data of the transportation sector, the importance of SLCFs relative to LLGHGs, different emission metrics, and different treatments of time. We find that both the inclusion of SLCFs and the choice of emission metric can alter results and thereby change mitigation priorities. The explicit inclusion of time, both for emissions and impacts, can remove value-laden assumptions and provide additional information for impact assessments. We believe that our results show that a debate is needed in the LCA community on the impact category "global warming" covering which emissions to include, the emission metric(s) to use, and the treatment of time. PMID:21936535

  7. The Primary and Secondary Production of Germanium: A Life-Cycle Assessment of Different Process Alternatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertz, Benedicte; Verhelle, Jensen; Schurmans, Maarten

    2015-02-01

    Germanium is a semiconducting metalloid element used in optical fibers, catalysis, infrared optics, solar cells, and light-emitting diodes. The need for Ge in these markets is considered to increase by a steady ~1% on a yearly basis. Its economic importance, coupled with the identified supply risks, has led to the classification of germanium as a critical raw material within Europe. Since the early 1950s, Umicore Electro-Optic Materials has supplied germanium-based materials solutions to its markets around the world. Umicore extracts germanium from a wide range of refining and recycling feeds. The main objectives of this study were to quantify the potential environmental impacts of the production of germanium from production scraps from the photovoltaic industry and to compare them with the potential impacts of the primary production of germanium from coal. The data related to the secondary production are Umicore-specific data. Environmental impact scores have been calculated for the impact categories recommended by the International reference life cycle data system. The comparison of the primary and secondary production highlights the benefit linked to the recycling of metals.

  8. Alternative splicing mechanisms orchestrating post-transcriptional gene expression: intron retention and the intron-rich genome of apicomplexan parasites.

    PubMed

    Lunghi, Matteo; Spano, Furio; Magini, Alessandro; Emiliani, Carla; Carruthers, Vern B; Di Cristina, Manlio

    2016-02-01

    Apicomplexan parasites including Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium species have complex life cycles that include multiple hosts and differentiation through several morphologically distinct stages requiring marked changes in gene expression. This review highlights emerging evidence implicating regulation of mRNA splicing as a mechanism to prime these parasites for rapid gene expression upon differentiation. We summarize the most important insights in alternative splicing including its role in regulating gene expression by decreasing mRNA abundance via 'Regulated Unproductive Splicing and Translation'. As a related but less well-understood mechanism, we discuss also our recent work suggesting a role for intron retention for precluding translation of stage specific isoforms of T. gondii glycolytic enzymes. We additionally provide new evidence that intron retention might be a widespread mechanism during parasite differentiation. Supporting this notion, recent genome-wide analysis of Toxoplasma and Plasmodium suggests intron retention is more pervasive than heretofore thought. These findings parallel recent emergence of intron retention being more prevalent in mammals than previously believed, thereby adding to the established roles in plants, fungi and unicellular eukaryotes. Deeper mechanistic studies of intron retention will provide important insight into its role in regulating gene expression in apicomplexan parasites and more general in eukaryotic organisms. PMID:26194054

  9. Role of mechanical loads in inducing in-cycle tensile stress in thermally grown oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, R.; Jansz, M.; Mossaddad, M.; Raghavan, S.; Okasinski, J.S.; Almer, J.D.; Perez, H.P.; Imbrie, P.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction results tracking the strain behavior of the various layers during a cycle, under thermo-mechanical conditions are presented in this work. The quantitative strain measurements here show that the thermally grown oxide briefly experiences in-plane tensile stress ({sigma}{sub 22} = +36.4 MPa) with increased mechanical loading during ramp-up in the thermal cycle. These findings are the first in situ experimental observations of these strains under thermo-mechanical conditions, envisaged to serve as a catalyst for crack initiation. The depth resolved measurements of strain taken during applied thermal and mechanical load in this work are a significant step towards achieving realistic testing conditions.

  10. Cycling stability and degradation mechanism of LiMnPO4 based electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskon, J.; Pivko, M.; Jerman, I.; Tchernychova, E.; Logar, N. Zabukovec; Zorko, M.; Selih, V. S.; Dominko, R.; Gaberscek, M.

    2016-01-01

    Long term stability of LiMnPO4 particles with a crystallite size between ˜20 and 50 nm covered with a dense native carbon coating (14 wt.%) is demonstrated. More than 500 cycles at a rate of C/20, in the potential window of 2.7-4.5 V and a temperature of 55 °C were achieved. During most of the cycling the average capacity decay was less than 0.06% per cycle. After about 500 cycles a sudden capacity drop was observed. Degradation processes in various stages of cycling were thoroughly examined using a range of techniques. Severe surface film formation, manganese dissolution and degradation of LixMnPO4 accompanied by formation of Li4P2O7 were clearly identified. The good long term stability seems to be due to dense, protective carbon coating. Decomposition is most likely initiated at local defects in the microstructure of pyrolytic carbon coating around LiMnPO4 particles. In addition to known degradation mechanisms of LiMnPO4 we observed pronounced gradual amorphization of the olivine crystallites during long-term cycling at 55 °C. Finally, changes in morphology of the carbon black additive after prolonged cycling are reported and commented.

  11. Study of an alternate glyoxylate cycle for acetate assimilation by Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Alber, Birgit E; Spanheimer, Regina; Ebenau-Jehle, Christa; Fuchs, Georg

    2006-07-01

    Organisms, which grow on organic substrates that are metabolized via acetyl-CoA, are faced with the problem to form all cell constituents from this C(2)-unit. The problem was solved by the seminal work of Kornberg and is known as the glyoxylate cycle. However, many bacteria are known to not contain isocitrate lyase, the key enzyme of this pathway. This problem was addressed in acetate-grown Rhodobacter sphaeroides. An acetate-minus mutant identified by transposon mutagenesis was affected in the gene for beta-ketothiolase forming acetoacetyl-CoA from two molecules of acetyl-CoA. This enzyme activity was missing in this mutant, which grew on acetoacetate and on acetate plus glyoxylate. A second acetate/acetoacetate-minus mutant was affected in the gene for a putative mesaconyl-CoA hydratase, an enzyme which catalyses the hydration of mesaconyl-CoA to beta-methylmalyl-CoA. Beta-methylmalyl-CoA is further cleaved into glyoxylate and propionyl-CoA. These results as well as identification of acetate-upregulated proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis lead to the proposal of a new pathway for acetate assimilation. In a first part, affected by the mutations, two molecules of acetyl-CoA and one molecule CO(2) are converted via acetoacetyl-CoA and mesaconyl-CoA to glyoxylate and propionyl-CoA. In a second part glyoxylate and propionyl-CoA are converted with another molecule of acetyl-CoA and CO(2) to l-malyl-CoA and succinyl-CoA. PMID:16856937

  12. Reduction of the excess sludge production by biological alternating process: real application results and metabolic uncoupling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Eusebi, Anna Laura; Battistoni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The biological solution proposed to reduce the wasted sludge production is based on a process of alternating phases realized in a specific reactor (alternate cycles in sludge line (ACSL)) where a quote of the recycle sludge is treated and sent back to the main activated sludge process. The ACSL process was applied in two urban wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). The reduction was tested by changing the hydraulic retention time and the conditions of oxidation reduction potential. The main mechanism of the process is recognized in the metabolic uncoupling. In fact, an increase in the specific oxygen uptake rate in the biological reactors was recorded (up to 20 mg/g VSS/h), which was stimulated by the fasting condition in the ACSL. The process is able to reduce the observed sludge yield on average of 25-30% with final average values reaching 0.179 kg VSS/kg chemical oxygen demand (COD) for WWTP1 and 0.117 kg VSS/kg COD for WWTP2. PMID:25413108

  13. Parametric Studies Of Failure Mechanisms In Thermal Barrier Coatings During Thermal Cycling Using FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivathsa, B.; Das, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are widely used on different hot components of gas turbine engines such as blades and vanes. Although, several mechanisms for the failure of the TBCs have been suggested, it is largely accepted that the durability of these coatings is primarily determined by the residual stresses that are developed during the thermal cycling. In the present study, the residual stress build-up in an electron beam physical vapour deposition (EB-PVD) based TBCs on a coupon during thermal cycling has been studied by varying three parameters such as the cooling rate, TBC thickness and substrate thickness. A two-dimensional thermomechanical generalized plane strain finite element simulations have been performed for thousand cycles. It was observed that these variations change the stress profile significantly and the stress severity factor increases non-linearly. Overall, the predictions of the model agree with reported experimental results and help in predicting the failure mechanisms.

  14. Effect of surface treatment of brackets and mechanical cycling on adhesion to enamel.

    PubMed

    Arrais, Fabiola Rossato; Degrazia, Felipe; Peres, Bernardo Urbanetto; Ferrazzo, Vilmar Antonio; Grehs, Renesio Armindo; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2014-01-01

    This in vitro study sought to evaluate how surface conditioning from bracket and mechanical cycling aging affected the bond strength between metallic brackets and bovine enamel, and to determine the adhesive remnant index. Eighty bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin using polyvinyl chloride rings and divided into 4 groups based on surface treatment (n = 20). Group 1 (control) received no surface treatment, Group 2 specimens were sandblasted with aluminum oxide particles, Group 3 specimens were sandblasted with silicon oxide and treated with a tribochemichemical silica coupling agent, and Group 4 specimens were primed with a multidomain protein-based agent. Half of the specimens were submitted to shear bond testing, while the others were subjected to mechanical cycling. ANOVA showed that mechanical cycling did not have a significant influence on bond strength (P = 0.9244), while surface conditioning of the brackets did (P = 0.0001). Tukey's test results were similar for mechanical cycling, and indicated that only Group 3 significantly improved the resin bond to the brackets; however, this group also demonstrated the highest percentage of enamel failure. PMID:24784526

  15. Learning the Cardiac Cycle: Simultaneous Observations of Electrical and Mechanical Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Richard Alec; Frey, Mary Anne Bassett

    1980-01-01

    Described is a method for integrating electrical and mechanical events of the cardiac cycle by measuring systolic time intervals, which involves simultaneous recording of the ECG, a phonocardiogram, and the contour of the carotid pulse. Both resting and stress change data are provided as bases for class discussion. (CS)

  16. DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A NATURAL BIO-DEFENSE MECHANISM

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA DAMAGE REPAIR AND CELL CYCLE CONTROL: A natural bio-defense mechanism
    Anuradha Mudipalli.

    Maintenance of genetic information, including the correct sequence of nucleotides in DNA, is essential for replication, gene expression, and protein synthesis. DNA lesions onto...

  17. Comparative alternative materials assessment to screen toxicity hazards in the life cycle of CIGS thin film photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, Daniel A; Yu, Mengjing; Lam, Carl W; Ogunseitan, Oladele A; Schoenung, Julie M

    2013-09-15

    Copper-indium-gallium-selenium-sulfide (CIGS) thin film photovoltaics are increasingly penetrating the market supply for consumer solar panels. Although CIGS is attractive for producing less greenhouse gas emissions than fossil-fuel based energy sources, CIGS manufacturing processes and solar cell devices use hazardous materials that should be carefully considered in evaluating and comparing net environmental benefits of energy products. Through this research, we present a case study on the toxicity hazards associated with alternative materials selection for CIGS manufacturing. We applied two numeric models, The Green Screen for Safer Chemicals and the Toxic Potential Indicator. To improve the sensitivity of the model outputs, we developed a novel, life cycle thinking based hazard assessment method that facilitates the projection of hazards throughout material life cycles. Our results show that the least hazardous CIGS solar cell device and manufacturing protocol consist of a titanium substrate, molybdenum metal back electrode, CuInS₂ p-type absorber deposited by spray pyrolysis, ZnS buffer deposited by spray ion layer gas reduction, ZnO:Ga transparent conducting oxide (TCO) deposited by sputtering, and the encapsulant polydimethylsiloxane. PMID:23811631

  18. Emissions tradeoffs among alternative marine fuels: total fuel cycle analysis of residual oil, marine gas oil, and marine diesel oil.

    PubMed

    Corbett, James J; Winebrake, James J

    2008-04-01

    Worldwide concerns about sulfur oxide (SOx) emissions from ships are motivating the replacement of marine residual oil (RO) with cleaner, lower-sulfur fuels, such as marine gas oil (MGO) and marine diesel oil (MDO). Vessel operators can use MGO and MDO directly or blended with RO to achieve environmental and economic objectives. Although expected to be much cleaner in terms of criteria pollutants, these fuels require additional energy in the upstream stages of the fuel cycle (i.e., fuel processing and refining), and thus raise questions about the net impacts on greenhouse gas emissions (primarily carbon dioxide [CO2]) because of production and use. This paper applies the Total Energy and Environmental Analysis for Marine Systems (TEAMS) model to conduct a total fuel cycle analysis of RO, MGO, MDO, and associated blends for a typical container ship. MGO and MDO blends achieve significant (70-85%) SOx emissions reductions compared with RO across a range of fuel quality and refining efficiency assumptions. We estimate CO2 increases of less than 1% using best estimates of fuel quality and refinery efficiency parameters and demonstrate how these results vary based on parameter assumptions. Our analysis suggests that product refining efficiency influences the CO2 tradeoff more than differences in the physical and energy parameters of the alternative fuels, suggesting that modest increases in CO2 could be offset by efficiency improvements at some refineries. Our results help resolve conflicting estimates of greenhouse gas tradeoffs associated with fuel switching and other emissions control policies. PMID:18422040

  19. Hybrid life-cycle assessment (LCA) of CO2 emission with management alternatives for household food wastes in Japan.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Rokuta; Nansai, Keisuke; Fujii, Minoru; Hashimoto, Seiji

    2010-06-01

    In this study, we conducted a hybrid life-cycle assessment (LCA) to evaluate reductions in CO(2) emissions by food waste biogasification of household food wastes in Japan. Two alternative scenarios were examined. In one alternative (Ref), all combustible municipal solid wastes (MSWs), including food waste, are incinerated. In the other (Bio), food waste is biogasified, while the other combustible wastes are incinerated. An inventory analysis of energy and material flow in the MSW management system was conducted. Subsequently, the inventory data were summarized into an input-output format, and a make-use input-output framework was applied. Furthermore, a production equilibrium model was established using a matrix representing the input- output relationship of energy and materials among the processes and sectors. Several levels of power generation efficiency from incineration were applied as a sensitivity analysis. The hybrid LCA indicated that the difference between the Bio and Ref scenarios, from the perspective of CO( 2) emissions, is relatively small. However, a 13-14% reduction of CO(2) emissions of the total waste management sector in Japan may be achieved by improving the efficiency of power generation from incineration from 10% to 25%. PMID:19942648

  20. Strategic Grassland Bird Conservation throughout the annual cycle: Linking policy alternatives, landowner decisions, and biological population outcomes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drum, Ryan G.; Ribic, Christine; Koch, Katie; Lonsdorf, Eric V.; Grant, Edward C.; Ahlering, Marissa; Barnhill, Laurel; Dailey, Thomas; Lor, Socheata; Mueller, Connie; Pavlacky, D.C., Jr.; Rideout, Catherine; Sample, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Grassland bird habitat has declined substantially in the United States. Remaining grasslands are increasingly fragmented, mostly privately owned, and vary greatly in terms of habitat quality and protection status. A coordinated strategic response for grassland bird conservation is difficult, largely due to the scope and complexity of the problem, further compounded by biological, sociological, and economic uncertainties. We describe the results from a collaborative Structured Decision Making (SDM) workshop focused on linking social and economic drivers of landscape change to grassland bird population outcomes. We identified and evaluated alternative strategies for grassland bird conservation using a series of rapid prototype models. We modeled change in grassland and agriculture cover in hypothetical landscapes resulting from different landowner decisions in response to alternative socio-economic conservation policy decisions. Resulting changes in land cover at all three stages of the annual cycle (breeding, wintering, and migration) were used to estimate changes in grassland bird populations. Our results suggest that successful grassland bird conservation may depend upon linkages with ecosystem services on working agricultural lands and grassland-based marketing campaigns to engage the public. With further development, spatial models that link landowner decisions with biological outcomes can be essential tools for making conservation policy decisions. A coordinated non-traditional partnership will likely be necessary to clearly understand and systematically respond to the many conservation challenges facing grassland birds.

  1. Strategic Grassland Bird Conservation throughout the Annual Cycle: Linking Policy Alternatives, Landowner Decisions, and Biological Population Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Drum, Ryan G.; Ribic, Christine A.; Koch, Katie; Lonsdorf, Eric; Grant, Evan; Ahlering, Marissa; Barnhill, Laurel; Dailey, Thomas; Lor, Socheata; Mueller, Connie; Pavlacky, David C.; Rideout, Catherine; Sample, David

    2015-01-01

    Grassland bird habitat has declined substantially in the United States. Remaining grasslands are increasingly fragmented, mostly privately owned, and vary greatly in terms of habitat quality and protection status. A coordinated strategic response for grassland bird conservation is difficult, largely due to the scope and complexity of the problem, further compounded by biological, sociological, and economic uncertainties. We describe the results from a collaborative Structured Decision Making (SDM) workshop focused on linking social and economic drivers of landscape change to grassland bird population outcomes. We identified and evaluated alternative strategies for grassland bird conservation using a series of rapid prototype models. We modeled change in grassland and agriculture cover in hypothetical landscapes resulting from different landowner decisions in response to alternative socio-economic conservation policy decisions. Resulting changes in land cover at all three stages of the annual cycle (breeding, wintering, and migration) were used to estimate changes in grassland bird populations. Our results suggest that successful grassland bird conservation may depend upon linkages with ecosystem services on working agricultural lands and grassland-based marketing campaigns to engage the public. With further development, spatial models that link landowner decisions with biological outcomes can be essential tools for making conservation policy decisions. A coordinated non-traditional partnership will likely be necessary to clearly understand and systematically respond to the many conservation challenges facing grassland birds. PMID:26569108

  2. Strategic Grassland Bird Conservation throughout the Annual Cycle: Linking Policy Alternatives, Landowner Decisions, and Biological Population Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Drum, Ryan G; Ribic, Christine A; Koch, Katie; Lonsdorf, Eric; Grant, Evan; Ahlering, Marissa; Barnhill, Laurel; Dailey, Thomas; Lor, Socheata; Mueller, Connie; Pavlacky, David C; Rideout, Catherine; Sample, David

    2015-01-01

    Grassland bird habitat has declined substantially in the United States. Remaining grasslands are increasingly fragmented, mostly privately owned, and vary greatly in terms of habitat quality and protection status. A coordinated strategic response for grassland bird conservation is difficult, largely due to the scope and complexity of the problem, further compounded by biological, sociological, and economic uncertainties. We describe the results from a collaborative Structured Decision Making (SDM) workshop focused on linking social and economic drivers of landscape change to grassland bird population outcomes. We identified and evaluated alternative strategies for grassland bird conservation using a series of rapid prototype models. We modeled change in grassland and agriculture cover in hypothetical landscapes resulting from different landowner decisions in response to alternative socio-economic conservation policy decisions. Resulting changes in land cover at all three stages of the annual cycle (breeding, wintering, and migration) were used to estimate changes in grassland bird populations. Our results suggest that successful grassland bird conservation may depend upon linkages with ecosystem services on working agricultural lands and grassland-based marketing campaigns to engage the public. With further development, spatial models that link landowner decisions with biological outcomes can be essential tools for making conservation policy decisions. A coordinated non-traditional partnership will likely be necessary to clearly understand and systematically respond to the many conservation challenges facing grassland birds. PMID:26569108

  3. Physical and biogeochemical mechanisms of internal carbon cycling in Lake Michigan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilcher, Darren J.; McKinley, Galen A.; Bootsma, Harvey A.; Bennington, Val

    2015-03-01

    The lakewide seasonal carbon cycle of Lake Michigan is poorly quantified and lacks the mechanistic links necessary to determine impacts upon it from eutrophication, invasive species, and climate change. A first step toward a full appreciation of Lake Michigan's carbon cycle is to quantify the dominant mechanisms of its internal carbon cycle. To achieve this, we use the MIT general circulation model configured to the bathymetry of Lake Michigan and coupled to an ecosystem model to simulate the seasonal cycle of productivity, temperature, circulation, and the partial pressure of CO2 in water (pCO2). This biogeochemistry is designed to be appropriate for the prequagga mussel state of the lake. The primary mechanism behind the seasonal cycle of primary productivity is lake physics. The offshore spring phytoplankton bloom begins following a reduction in deep vertical mixing and ends with the depletion of nutrients via thermal stratification. The exception is the western shoreline, where summer winds drive coastal upwelling, providing hypolimnetic nutrients and generating significant productivity. Surface pCO2 is controlled by the net effect from temperature on solubility, and is modulated by biological uptake of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and isothermal mixing of DIC-rich water in winter. Temperature tends to have the greatest seasonal impact in nearshore regions, while local DIC has the greatest impact in offshore regions. Lakewide, the model suggests that carbon is absorbed from the atmosphere during the spring bloom and released to the atmosphere during winter mixing and when summer surface temperatures are at their maximum.

  4. MECHANICAL STRAIN AND PIEZOELECTRIC PROPERTIES OF PZT STACKS RELATED TO SEMI-BIPOLAR ELECTRIC CYCLING FATIGUE

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong; Lin, Hua-Tay; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Cooper, Thomas A

    2009-01-01

    PZT stacks that had an inter-digital internal electrode configuration and consisted of a specific number of multilayer actuators were tested to more than 108 cycles by using a 100-Hz semi-bipolar sine wave with a field range of +4.5/-0.9 kV/mm and a 20-MPa mechanical preload. Significant reductions in mechanical strain and piezoelectric coefficients were observed during the fatigue cycling, depending on the measuring condition. Extensive surface discharges and arcs were also observed. These surface events as well as related dielectric breakdown resulted in the erosion of external electrode and outcrop of internal electrode, and that partially accounts for the reduction observed above. The data obtained in this study demonstrated the feasibility of using a semi-bipolar mode to drive a PZT stack with a designed mechanical preload applied and illustrated the potential fatigue of stack~{!/~}s performance during its service.

  5. A Mechanism for the Loading-Unloading Substorm Cycle Missing in MHD Global Magnetospheric Simulation Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimas, A. J.; Uritsky, V.; Vassiliadis, D.; Baker, D. N.

    2005-01-01

    Loading and consequent unloading of magnetic flux is an essential element of the substorm cycle in Earth's magnetotail. We are unaware of an available global MHD magnetospheric simulation model that includes a loading- unloading cycle in its behavior. Given the central role that MHD models presently play in the development of our understanding of magnetospheric dynamics, and given the present plans for the central role that these models will play in ongoing space weather prediction programs, it is clear that this failure must be corrected. A 2-dimensional numerical driven current-sheet model has been developed that incorporates an idealized current- driven instability with a resistive MHD system. Under steady loading, the model exhibits a global loading- unloading cycle. The specific mechanism for producing the loading-unloading cycle will be discussed. It will be shown that scale-free avalanching of electromagnetic energy through the model, from loading to unloading, is carried by repetitive bursts of localized reconnection. Each burst leads, somewhat later, to a field configuration that is capable of exciting a reconnection burst again. This process repeats itself in an intermittent manner while the total field energy in the system falls. At the end of an unloading interval, the total field energy is reduced to well below that necessary to initiate the next unloading event and, thus, a loading-unloading cycle results. It will be shown that, in this model, it is the topology of bursty localized reconnection that is responsible for the appearance of the loading-unloading cycle.

  6. Cell Cycle Phase-Specific Drug Resistance as an Escape Mechanism of Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Kimberley A; Hill, David S; Daignault, Sheena M; Lui, Goldie Y L; Sharp, Danae M; Gabrielli, Brian; Weninger, Wolfgang; Haass, Nikolas K

    2016-07-01

    The tumor microenvironment is characterized by cancer cell subpopulations with heterogeneous cell cycle profiles. For example, hypoxic tumor zones contain clusters of cancer cells that arrest in G1 phase. It is conceivable that neoplastic cells exhibit differential drug sensitivity based on their residence in specific cell cycle phases. In this study, we used two-dimensional and organotypic melanoma culture models in combination with fluorescent cell cycle indicators to investigate the effects of cell cycle phases on clinically used drugs. We demonstrate that G1-arrested melanoma cells, irrespective of the underlying cause mediating G1 arrest, are resistant to apoptosis induced by the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib or the alkylating agent temozolomide. In contrast, G1-arrested cells were more sensitive to mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway inhibitor-induced cell death. Of clinical relevance, pretreatment of melanoma cells with a mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway inhibitor, which induced G1 arrest, resulted in resistance to temozolomide or bortezomib. On the other hand, pretreatment with temozolomide, which induced G2 arrest, did not result in resistance to mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway inhibitors. In summary, we established a model to study the effects of the cell cycle on drug sensitivity. Cell cycle phase-specific drug resistance is an escape mechanism of melanoma cells that has implications on the choice and timing of drug combination therapies. PMID:26970356

  7. Mechanism of Silicon Electrode Aging upon Cycling in Full Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Delpuech, Nathalie; Dupre, Nicolas; Moreau, Philippe; Bridel, Jean-Sebastian; Gaubicher, Joel; Lestriez, Bernard; Guyomard, Dominique

    2016-04-21

    Understanding the aging mechanism of silicon-based negative electrodes for lithium-ion batteries upon cycling is essential to solve the problem of low coulombic efficiency and capacity fading and further to implement this new high-capacity material in commercial cells. Nevertheless, such studies have so far focused on half cells in which silicon is cycled versus an infinite reservoir of lithium. In the present work, the aging mechanism of silicon-based electrodes is studied upon cycling in a full Li-ion cell configuration with LiCoO2 as the positive electrode. Postmortem analyses of both electrodes clearly indicate that neither one of them contains lithium and that no discernible degradation results from the cycling. The aging mechanism can be explained by the reduction of solvent molecules. Electrons extracted from the positive electrode are responsible for an internal imbalance in the cell, which results in progressive slippage of the electrodes and reduces the compositional range of cyclable lithium ions for both electrodes. PMID:26915951

  8. A NEW MECHANISM FOR DISSIPATION OF ALTERNATING FIELDS IN POYNTING-DOMINATED OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2010-12-20

    Reconnection of alternating magnetic fields is an important energy transformation mechanism in Poynting-dominated outflows. We show that the reconnection is facilitated by the Kruskal-Schwarzschild instability of current sheets separating the oppositely directed fields. This instability, which is a magnetic counterpart of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, develops if the flow is accelerated. Then the plasma drips out of the current sheet, providing conditions for rapid reconnection. Since the magnetic dissipation leads to the flow acceleration, the process is self-sustaining. In pulsar winds, this process could barely compete with the earlier proposed dissipation mechanisms. However, the novel mechanism turns out to be very efficient at active galactic nucleus and gamma-ray burst conditions.

  9. The floodplain large-wood cycle hypothesis: A mechanism for the physical and biotic structuring of temperate forested alluvial valleys in the North Pacific coastal ecoregion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Brian D.; Montgomery, David R.; Fetherston, Kevin L.; Abbe, Tim B.

    2012-02-01

    A 'floodplain large-wood cycle' is hypothesized as a mechanism for generating landforms and influencing river dynamics in ways that structure and maintain riparian and aquatic ecosystems of forested alluvial river valleys of the Pacific coastal temperate rainforest of North America. In the cycle, pieces of wood large enough to resist fluvial transport and remain in river channels initiate and stabilize wood jams, which in turn create alluvial patches and protect them from erosion. These stable patches provide sites for trees to mature over hundreds of years in river valleys where the average cycle of floodplain turnover is much briefer, thus providing a future source of large wood and reinforcing the cycle. Different tree species can function in the floodplain large-wood cycle in different ecological regions, in different river valleys within regions, and within individual river valleys in which forest composition changes through time. The cycle promotes a physically complex, biodiverse, and self-reinforcing state. Conversely, loss of large trees from the system drives landforms and ecosystems toward an alternate stable state of diminished biogeomorphic complexity. Reestablishing large trees is thus necessary to restore such rivers. Although interactions and mechanisms may differ between biomes and in larger or smaller rivers, available evidence suggests that large riparian trees may have similarly fundamental roles in the physical and biotic structuring of river valleys elsewhere in the temperate zone.

  10. Mechanism of electron transfer in the cytochrome b/f complex of algae: evidence for a semiquinone cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Joliot, P; Joliot, A

    1994-01-01

    The most widely accepted mechanism of electron and proton transfer within the cytochrome (Cyt) b/f complex derives from the Q-cycle hypothesis originally proposed for the mitochondrial Cyt b/c1 complex by Mitchell [Mitchell, P. (1975) FEBS Lett. 57, 135-137]. In chloroplasts, the Cyt b/f complex catalyzes the oxidation of a plastoquinol at a site, Qo (the plastoquinol binding site), close to the inner aqueous phase and the reduction of a quinone at a site, Qi (the plastoquinone binding site), close to the stromal side of the membrane. In an alternative model, the semiquinone cycle [Wikström, M. & Krab, K. (1986) J. Bioenerg. Biomembr. 18, 181-193], a charged semiquinone formed at site Qo is transferred to site Qi where it is reduced into quinol. Flash-induced kinetics of the redox changes of Cyt b and of the formation of a transmembrane potential have been measured in Chlorella sorokiniana cells incubated in reducing conditions that induce a full reduction of the plastoquinone pool. The experiments were performed in the presence of an uncoupler that collapses the permanent electrochemical proton gradient and thus accelerates the rate of the electrogenic processes. The results show that the electrogenic reaction driven by the Cyt b/f complex precedes the processes of reduction or oxidation of the b-hemes. This electrogenic process is probably due to a transmembrane movement of a charged semiquinone, in agreement with the semiquinone-cycle hypothesis. This mechanism may represent an adaptation to reducing conditions when no oxidized quinone is available at the Qi site. PMID:11607457

  11. Mammalian Glutaminase Gls2 Gene Encodes Two Functional Alternative Transcripts by a Surrogate Promoter Usage Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Sandoval, José A.; Manzanares, Elisa; Lobo, Carolina; Segura, J. A.; Alonso, Francisco J.; Matés, José M.; Márquez, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Background Glutaminase is expressed in most mammalian tissues and cancer cells, but the regulation of its expression is poorly understood. An essential step to accomplish this goal is the characterization of its species- and cell-specific isoenzyme pattern of expression. Our aim was to identify and characterize transcript variants of the mammalian glutaminase Gls2 gene. Methodology/Principal Findings We demonstrate for the first time simultaneous expression of two transcript variants from the Gls2 gene in human, rat and mouse. A combination of RT-PCR, primer-extension analysis, bioinformatics, real-time PCR, in vitro transcription and translation and immunoblot analysis was applied to investigate GLS2 transcripts in mammalian tissues. Short (LGA) and long (GAB) transcript forms were isolated in brain and liver tissue of human, rat and mouse. The short LGA transcript arises by a combination of two mechanisms of transcriptional modulation: alternative transcription initiation and alternative promoter. The LGA variant contains both the transcription start site (TSS) and the alternative promoter in the first intron of the Gls2 gene. The full human LGA transcript has two in-frame ATGs in the first exon, which are missing in orthologous rat and mouse transcripts. In vitro transcription and translation of human LGA yielded two polypeptides of the predicted size, but only the canonical full-length protein displayed catalytic activity. Relative abundance of GAB and LGA transcripts showed marked variations depending on species and tissues analyzed. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report demonstrating expression of alternative transcripts of the mammalian Gls2 gene. Transcriptional mechanisms giving rise to GLS2 variants and isolation of novel GLS2 transcripts in human, rat and mouse are presented. Results were also confirmed at the protein level, where catalytic activity was demonstrated for the human LGA protein. Relative abundance of GAB and LGA transcripts was

  12. Strain Interactions as a Mechanism for Dominant Strain Alternation and Incidence Oscillation in Infectious Diseases: Seasonal Influenza as a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Background Many human infectious diseases are caused by pathogens that have multiple strains and show oscillation in infection incidence and alternation of dominant strains which together are referred to as epidemic cycling. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of epidemic cycling is essential for forecasting outbreaks of epidemics and therefore important for public health planning. Current theoretical effort is mainly focused on the factors that are extrinsic to the pathogens themselves (“extrinsic factors”) such as environmental variation and seasonal change in human behaviours and susceptibility. Nevertheless, co-circulation of different strains of a pathogen was usually observed and thus strains interact with one another within concurrent infection and during sequential infection. The existence of these intrinsic factors is common and may be involved in the generation of epidemic cycling of multi-strain pathogens. Methods and Findings To explore the mechanisms that are intrinsic to the pathogens themselves (“intrinsic factors”) for epidemic cycling, we consider a multi-strain SIRS model including cross-immunity and infectivity enhancement and use seasonal influenza as an example to parameterize the model. The Kullback-Leibler information distance was calculated to measure the match between the model outputs and the typical features of seasonal flu (an outbreak duration of 11 weeks and an annual attack rate of 15%). Results show that interactions among strains can generate seasonal influenza with these characteristic features, provided that: the infectivity of a single strain within concurrent infection is enhanced 2−7 times that within a single infection; cross-immunity as a result of past infection is 0.5–0.8 and lasts 2–9 years; while other parameters are within their widely accepted ranges (such as a 2–3 day infectious period and the basic reproductive number of 1.8–3.0). Moreover, the observed alternation of the dominant strain among

  13. Life-Cycle Cost and Risk Analysis of Alternative Configurations for Shipping Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Daling, Philip M.; Ross, Steven B.; Biwer, Bruce

    1999-12-17

    This study evaluates alternative transportation system configurations for NTS approved and potential generators based on complex-wide LLW load information. Technical judgments relative to the availability of DOE LLW generators to ship from their sites by rail were developed. Public and worker risk and life-cycle cost components are quantified. The study identifies and evaluates alternative scenarios that increase the use of rail (intermodal where needed) to transport LLW from generator sites to NTS.

  14. Marginal adaptation of class V composite restorations submitted to thermal and mechanical cycling

    PubMed Central

    CASSELLI, Denise Sá Maia; FARIA-E-SILVA, André Luis; CASSELLI, Henrique; MARTINS, Luis Roberto Marcondes

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the effect of the margin location and an adhesive system on the marginal adaptation of composite restorations. Material and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared in bovine teeth with the gingival margin on the dentin and the incisal margin on the enamel. The cavities were restored with a micro-hybrid composite resin using an etch-and-rinse [Single Bond 2 (SB)] or a self-etching adhesive [Clearfil SE Bond (CL)]. After finishing and polishing the restorations, epoxy replicas were prepared. The marginal adaptation was analyzed using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM, 500 x magnification). The higher gap width in each margin was recorded (T0). After the first evaluation, the samples were submitted to thermal cycling (2,000 cycles of 5ºC±2ºC followed by 55ºC±2ºC - T1) and mechanical cycling (100,000 cycles of 50 kN and 2 Hz - T2). Replicas of samples were rebuilt after each cycling and analyzed under SEM. The data were submitted to Mann-Whitney, Wilcoxon and Friedman testing (a=0.05). Results: The SB presented higher gaps in the dentin than the enamel, while there was no difference between the substrate for the CL. In the dentin, the CL showed better marginal sealing than the SB. The opposite occurred in the enamel. There were no significant differences between the baseline, thermal and mechanical cycling for any experimental condition. Conclusions: The outcomes of the present study showed that the adhesive system and margin location have an important effect on the marginal adaptation of composite restorations. PMID:23559115

  15. An alternative bactericidal mechanism of action for lantibiotic peptides that target lipid II.

    PubMed

    Hasper, Hester E; Kramer, Naomi E; Smith, James L; Hillman, J D; Zachariah, Cherian; Kuipers, Oscar P; de Kruijff, Ben; Breukink, Eefjan

    2006-09-15

    Lantibiotics are polycyclic peptides containing unusual amino acids, which have binding specificity for bacterial cells, targeting the bacterial cell wall component lipid II to form pores and thereby lyse the cells. Yet several members of these lipid II-targeted lantibiotics are too short to be able to span the lipid bilayer and cannot form pores, but somehow they maintain their antibacterial efficacy. We describe an alternative mechanism by which members of the lantibiotic family kill Gram-positive bacteria by removing lipid II from the cell division site (or septum) and thus block cell wall synthesis. PMID:16973881

  16. Coordination of DNA damage tolerance mechanisms with cell cycle progression in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Callegari, A. John; Kelly, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA damage tolerance (DDT) mechanisms allow cells to synthesize a new DNA strand when the template is damaged. Many mutations resulting from DNA damage in eukaryotes are generated during DDT when cells use the mutagenic translesion polymerases, Rev1 and Polζ, rather than mechanisms with higher fidelity. The coordination among DDT mechanisms is not well understood. We used live-cell imaging to study the function of DDT mechanisms throughout the cell cycle of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We report that checkpoint-dependent mitotic delay provides a cellular mechanism to ensure the completion of high fidelity DDT, largely by homology-directed repair (HDR). DDT by mutagenic polymerases is suppressed during the checkpoint delay by a mechanism dependent on Rad51 recombinase. When cells pass the G2/M checkpoint and can no longer delay mitosis, they completely lose the capacity for HDR and simultaneously exhibit a requirement for Rev1 and Polζ. Thus, DDT is coordinated with the checkpoint response so that the activity of mutagenic polymerases is confined to a vulnerable period of the cell cycle when checkpoint delay and HDR are not possible. PMID:26652183

  17. The Interplay between Cell Wall Mechanical Properties and the Cell Cycle in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Richard G.; Turner, Robert D.; Mullin, Nic; Clarke, Nigel; Foster, Simon J.; Hobbs, Jamie K.

    2014-01-01

    The nanoscale mechanical properties of live Staphylococcus aureus cells during different phases of growth were studied by atomic force microscopy. Indentation to different depths provided access to both local cell wall mechanical properties and whole-cell properties, including a component related to cell turgor pressure. Local cell wall properties were found to change in a characteristic manner throughout the division cycle. Splitting of the cell into two daughter cells followed a local softening of the cell wall along the division circumference, with the cell wall on either side of the division circumference becoming stiffer. Once exposed, the newly formed septum was found to be stiffer than the surrounding, older cell wall. Deeper indentations, which were affected by cell turgor pressure, did not show a change in stiffness throughout the division cycle, implying that enzymatic cell wall remodeling and local variations in wall properties are responsible for the evolution of cell shape through division. PMID:25468333

  18. Comparison of mechanism of break up and cycle length in defibrillation success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melkus, Natalya; Puwal, Steffan

    2012-10-01

    Heart fibrillation is an often fatal condition which can be modeled by chaotic electrical activity; spiral waves of electrical activity rotate, break-up, and meander on tissue. As they do, they produce a chaotic distribution of electrical activity, negatively affecting physical contraction (blood pumping). Fenton, et al. studied several mechanisms of this wave breakup, including ``far from tip'' and ``Doppler shift.'' We used Fenton et al.'s mathematical model and the different modes of breakup proposed by Fenton to simulate fibrillation and to determine if the cycle length of the activity or the type of mechanism was more significant in defibrillation. Our data supports the conclusion that the cycle length is the more important factor in defibrillation.

  19. Effect of thermal cycling on the mechanical properties of 350-grade maraging steel

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, U.K.; Kishore, R.; Asundi, M.K.

    1996-03-01

    The effects of retained austenite produced by thermal cycling on the mechanical properties of a precipitation-hardened 350-grade commercial maraging steel were examined. The presence of retained austenite caused decreases in the yield strength (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and effected a significant increase in the tensile ductility. Increased impact toughness was also produced by this treatment. The mechanical stability of retained austenite was evaluated by tension and impact tests at subambient temperatures. A deformation-induced transformation of the austenite was manifested as load drops on the load-elongation plots at subzero temperatures. This transformation imparts excellent low-temperature ductility to the material. A wide range of strength, ductility, and toughness can be obtained by subjecting the steel to thermal cycling before the precipitation-hardening treatment.

  20. Influence of creep damage on the low cycle thermal-mechanical fatigue behavior of two tantalum base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, K. D.; Doble, G. S.

    1972-01-01

    Low cycle fatigue tests have been performed on the tantalum base alloys T-111 and ASTAR 811C with synchronized, independently programmed temperature and strain cycling. The thermal-mechanical cycles applied fell into three basic categories: these were isothermal cycling, in-phase thermal cycling, and out-of-phase thermal cycling. In-phase cycling was defined as tensile deformation associated with high temperature and compressive deformation with low temperature, while out-of-phase thermal cycling was defined as the reverse case. The in-phase thermal cycling had a pronounced detrimental influence on the fatigue life of both alloys, with the life reduction being greater in the solid solution strengthened T-111 alloy than in the carbide strengthened ASTAR 811C alloy. The out-of-phase tests also showed pronounced effects on the fatigue life of both alloys, although not as dramatic.

  1. Mechanisms of dissolved organic carbon cycling in an ocean margin. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Benner, R.

    1997-11-24

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is the largest reservoir of organic carbon in the ocean, and the objectives of this project were to investigate the mechanisms and pathways of DOC formation and consumption in seawater. Carbohydrates are the most abundant form of DOC, and this project included measurements of dissolved carbohydrates as well as DOC to help delineate the cycling of DOC. Many of the methods and approaches for investigating DOC production were developed as part of this project.

  2. Mycobacterial escape from macrophage phagosomes to the cytoplasm represents an alternate adaptation mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Jamwal, Shilpa V.; Mehrotra, Parul; Singh, Archana; Siddiqui, Zaved; Basu, Atanu; Rao, Kanury V.S.

    2016-01-01

    Survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) within the host macrophage is mediated through pathogen-dependent inhibition of phagosome-lysosome fusion, which enables bacteria to persist within the immature phagosomal compartment. By employing ultrastructural examination of different field isolates supported by biochemical analysis, we found that some of the Mtb strains were in fact poorly adapted for subsistence within endocytic vesicles of infected macrophages. Instead, through a mechanism involving activation of host cytosolic phospholipase A2, these bacteria rapidly escaped from phagosomes, and established residence in the cytoplasm of the host cell. Interestingly, by facilitating an enhanced suppression of host cellular autophagy, this translocation served as an alternate virulence acquisition mechanism. Thus, our studies reveal plasticity in the adaptation strategies employed by Mtb, for survival in the host macrophage. PMID:26980157

  3. Towards nanomedicines of the future: Remote magneto-mechanical actuation of nanomedicines by alternating magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Golovin, Yuri I; Gribanovsky, Sergey L; Golovin, Dmitry Y; Klyachko, Natalia L; Majouga, Alexander G; Master, Аlyssa M; Sokolsky, Marina; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2015-12-10

    The paper describes the concept of magneto-mechanical actuation of single-domain magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in super-low and low frequency alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) and its possible use for remote control of nanomedicines and drug delivery systems. The applications of this approach for remote actuation of drug release as well as effects on biomacromolecules, biomembranes, subcellular structures and cells are discussed in comparison to conventional strategies employing magnetic hyperthermia in a radio frequency (RF) AMF. Several quantitative models describing interaction of functionalized MNPs with single macromolecules, lipid membranes, and proteins (e.g. cell membrane receptors, ion channels) are presented. The optimal characteristics of the MNPs and an AMF for effective magneto-mechanical actuation of single molecule responses in biological and bio-inspired systems are discussed. Altogether, the described studies and phenomena offer opportunities for the development of novel therapeutics both alone and in combination with magnetic hyperthermia. PMID:26407671

  4. Similarity between quantum mechanics and thermodynamics: entropy, temperature, and Carnot cycle.

    PubMed

    Abe, Sumiyoshi; Okuyama, Shinji

    2011-02-01

    The similarity between quantum mechanics and thermodynamics is discussed. It is found that if the Clausius equality is imposed on the Shannon entropy and the analog of the quantity of heat, then the value of the Shannon entropy comes to formally coincide with that of the von Neumann entropy of the canonical density matrix, and pure-state quantum mechanics apparently transmutes into quantum thermodynamics. The corresponding quantum Carnot cycle of a simple two-state model of a particle confined in a one-dimensional infinite potential well is studied, and its efficiency is shown to be identical to the classical one. PMID:21405832

  5. Life cycle air quality impacts of conventional and alternative light-duty transportation in the United States

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tessum, Christopher W.; Hill, Jason D.; Marshall, Julian D.

    2014-12-30

    Commonly considered strategies for reducing the environmental impact of light-duty transportation include using alternative fuels and improving vehicle fuel economy. We evaluate the air quality-related human health impacts of 10 such options, including the use of liquid biofuels, diesel, and compressed natural gas (CNG) in internal combustion engines; the use of electricity from a range of conventional and renewable sources to power electric vehicles (EVs); and the use of hybrid EV technology. Our approach combines spatially, temporally, and chemically detailed life cycle emission inventories; comprehensive, fine-scale state-of-the-science chemical transport modeling; and exposure, concentration–response, and economic health impact modeling for ozonemore » (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5). We find that powering vehicles with corn ethanol or with coal-based or “grid average” electricity increases monetized environmental health impacts by 80% or more relative to using conventional gasoline. Conversely, EVs powered by low-emitting electricity from natural gas, wind, water, or solar power reduce environmental health impacts by 50% or more. Consideration of potential climate change impacts alongside the human health outcomes described here further reinforces the environmental preferability of EVs powered by low-emitting electricity relative to gasoline vehicles.« less

  6. Life cycle air quality impacts of conventional and alternative light-duty transportation in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Jason D.; Marshall, Julian D.

    2014-01-01

    Commonly considered strategies for reducing the environmental impact of light-duty transportation include using alternative fuels and improving vehicle fuel economy. We evaluate the air quality-related human health impacts of 10 such options, including the use of liquid biofuels, diesel, and compressed natural gas (CNG) in internal combustion engines; the use of electricity from a range of conventional and renewable sources to power electric vehicles (EVs); and the use of hybrid EV technology. Our approach combines spatially, temporally, and chemically detailed life cycle emission inventories; comprehensive, fine-scale state-of-the-science chemical transport modeling; and exposure, concentration–response, and economic health impact modeling for ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5). We find that powering vehicles with corn ethanol or with coal-based or “grid average” electricity increases monetized environmental health impacts by 80% or more relative to using conventional gasoline. Conversely, EVs powered by low-emitting electricity from natural gas, wind, water, or solar power reduce environmental health impacts by 50% or more. Consideration of potential climate change impacts alongside the human health outcomes described here further reinforces the environmental preferability of EVs powered by low-emitting electricity relative to gasoline vehicles. PMID:25512510

  7. Life cycle air quality impacts of conventional and alternative light-duty transportation in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Tessum, Christopher W.; Hill, Jason D.; Marshall, Julian D.

    2014-12-30

    Commonly considered strategies for reducing the environmental impact of light-duty transportation include using alternative fuels and improving vehicle fuel economy. We evaluate the air quality-related human health impacts of 10 such options, including the use of liquid biofuels, diesel, and compressed natural gas (CNG) in internal combustion engines; the use of electricity from a range of conventional and renewable sources to power electric vehicles (EVs); and the use of hybrid EV technology. Our approach combines spatially, temporally, and chemically detailed life cycle emission inventories; comprehensive, fine-scale state-of-the-science chemical transport modeling; and exposure, concentration–response, and economic health impact modeling for ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5). We find that powering vehicles with corn ethanol or with coal-based or “grid average” electricity increases monetized environmental health impacts by 80% or more relative to using conventional gasoline. Conversely, EVs powered by low-emitting electricity from natural gas, wind, water, or solar power reduce environmental health impacts by 50% or more. Consideration of potential climate change impacts alongside the human health outcomes described here further reinforces the environmental preferability of EVs powered by low-emitting electricity relative to gasoline vehicles.

  8. Life cycle air quality impacts of conventional and alternative light-duty transportation in the United States.

    PubMed

    Tessum, Christopher W; Hill, Jason D; Marshall, Julian D

    2014-12-30

    Commonly considered strategies for reducing the environmental impact of light-duty transportation include using alternative fuels and improving vehicle fuel economy. We evaluate the air quality-related human health impacts of 10 such options, including the use of liquid biofuels, diesel, and compressed natural gas (CNG) in internal combustion engines; the use of electricity from a range of conventional and renewable sources to power electric vehicles (EVs); and the use of hybrid EV technology. Our approach combines spatially, temporally, and chemically detailed life cycle emission inventories; comprehensive, fine-scale state-of-the-science chemical transport modeling; and exposure, concentration-response, and economic health impact modeling for ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5). We find that powering vehicles with corn ethanol or with coal-based or "grid average" electricity increases monetized environmental health impacts by 80% or more relative to using conventional gasoline. Conversely, EVs powered by low-emitting electricity from natural gas, wind, water, or solar power reduce environmental health impacts by 50% or more. Consideration of potential climate change impacts alongside the human health outcomes described here further reinforces the environmental preferability of EVs powered by low-emitting electricity relative to gasoline vehicles. PMID:25512510

  9. Total fuel-cycle analysis of heavy-duty vehicles using biofuels and natural gas-based alternative fuels.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Patrick E; Green, Erin H; Corbett, James J; Mas, Carl; Winebrake, James J

    2011-03-01

    Heavy-duty vehicles (HDVs) present a growing energy and environmental concern worldwide. These vehicles rely almost entirely on diesel fuel for propulsion and create problems associated with local pollution, climate change, and energy security. Given these problems and the expected global expansion of HDVs in transportation sectors, industry and governments are pursuing biofuels and natural gas as potential alternative fuels for HDVs. Using recent lifecycle datasets, this paper evaluates the energy and emissions impacts of these fuels in the HDV sector by conducting a total fuel-cycle (TFC) analysis for Class 8 HDVs for six fuel pathways: (1) petroleum to ultra low sulfur diesel; (2) petroleum and soyoil to biodiesel (methyl soy ester); (3) petroleum, ethanol, and oxygenate to e-diesel; (4) petroleum and natural gas to Fischer-Tropsch diesel; (5) natural gas to compressed natural gas; and (6) natural gas to liquefied natural gas. TFC emissions are evaluated for three greenhouse gases (GHGs) (carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane) and five other pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter, and sulfur oxides), along with estimates of total energy and petroleum consumption associated with each of the six fuel pathways. Results show definite advantages with biodiesel and compressed natural gas for most pollutants, negligible benefits for e-diesel, and increased GHG emissions for liquefied natural gas and Fischer-Tropsch diesel (from natural gas). PMID:21416755

  10. Evaluating environmental impacts of alternative construction waste management approaches using supply-chain-linked life-cycle analysis.

    PubMed

    Kucukvar, Murat; Egilmez, Gokhan; Tatari, Omer

    2014-05-22

    Waste management in construction is critical for the sustainable treatment of building-related construction and demolition (C&D) waste materials, and recycling of these wastes has been considered as one of the best strategies in minimization of C&D debris. However, recycling of C&D materials may not always be a feasible strategy for every waste type and therefore recycling and other waste treatment strategies should be supported by robust decision-making models. With the aim of assessing the net carbon, energy, and water footprints of C&D recycling and other waste management alternatives, a comprehensive economic input-output-based hybrid life-cycle assessment model is developed by tracing all of the economy-wide supply-chain impacts of three waste management strategies: recycling, landfilling, and incineration. Analysis results showed that only the recycling of construction materials provided positive environmental footprint savings in terms of carbon, energy, and water footprints. Incineration is a better option as a secondary strategy after recycling for water and energy footprint categories, whereas landfilling is found to be as slightly better strategy when carbon footprint is considered as the main focus of comparison. In terms of construction materials' environmental footprint, nonferrous metals are found to have a significant environmental footprint reduction potential if recycled. PMID:24855225

  11. Separation Mechanism of Primary Silicon from Hypereutectic Al-Si Melts Under Alternating Electromagnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Haiyang; Lv, Guoqiang; Ma, Wenhui; Chen, Daotong; Yu, Jie

    2015-07-01

    Solar grade silicon (SOG-Si) and hypereutectic Al-Si alloys with low silicon (silicon composition below 25 pct) can be successfully obtained by separation of hypereutectic Al-Si alloy with high silicon (silicon composition above 30 pct) under an alternating electromagnetic field after post-processing. To explore the separation mechanism in detail, experiments were conducted in this study using a high-frequency induction furnace with different pulling conditions of the crucible which is loaded with Al-45 wt pct Si melt. Results demonstrate that the separation of hypereutectic Al-Si alloy is feasible through either a pull-up or drop-down process. The height of each separation interface between the compact and sparse parts of the primary silicon decrease as the pull-up distance rose. When the pulling rate is very low, resultant morphologies of compact primary silicon are rounded and polygonal, allowing for more effective separation of the primary silicon. A novel physical model is presented here based on the experimental results and simulation. The model can be used to effectively describe the separation mechanism of primary silicon from hypereutectic Al-Si melts under alternating electromagnetic fields.

  12. Photosystem II cycle activity and alternative electron transport in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum under dynamic light conditions and nitrogen limitation.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Heiko; Jakob, Torsten; Lavaud, Johann; Wilhelm, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Alternative electron sinks are an important regulatory mechanism to dissipate excessively absorbed light energy particularly under fast changing dynamic light conditions. In diatoms, the cyclic electron transport (CET) around Photosystem II (PS II) is an alternative electron transport pathway (AET) that contributes to avoidance of overexcitation under high light illumination. The combination of nitrogen limitation and high-intensity irradiance regularly occurs under natural conditions and is expected to force the imbalance between light absorption and the metabolic use of light energy. The present study demonstrates that under N limitation, the amount of AET and the activity of CETPSII in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum were increased. Thereby, the activity of CETPSII was linearly correlated with the amount of AET rates. It is concluded that CETPSII significantly contributes to AET in P. tricornutum. Surprisingly, CETPSII was found to be activated already at the end of the dark period under N-limited conditions. This coincided with a significantly increased degree of reduction of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool. The analysis of the macromolecular composition of cells of P. tricornutum under N-limited conditions revealed a carbon allocation in favor of carbohydrates during the light period and their degradation during the dark phase. A possible linkage between the activity of CETPSII and degree of reduction of the PQ pool on the one side and the macromolecular changes on the other is discussed. PMID:26650230

  13. Attentional Biases toward Attractive Alternatives and Rivals: Mechanisms Involved in Relationship Maintenance among Chinese Women

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yidan; Zhao, Guang; Tu, Shen; Zheng, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A long-term romantic relationship can offer many benefits to committed individuals. Thus, humans possess relationship maintenance mechanisms to protect against threats from those who serve as attractive alternatives or intrasexual rivals. Many studies have indicated that romantic love can act as a commitment device to activate these mechanisms. To examine the attentional bias associated with relationship maintenance among 108 college students (49 single and 59 committed females) in China, we used a semantic priming procedure to activate mental representations associated with romantic love and then asked participants to complete a dot-probe task for the purpose of making a distinction between the engage and disengage components of attention. No significant engaging effects toward attractive faces were observed among committed females, but the following significant disengaging effects were found: when primed with romantic love, single females showed increased attention toward and difficulty in disengaging from attractive male faces, whereas females already in a committed relationship did not alter their attention, remaining as inattentive to attractive alternatives as they were in the baseline condition. In addition, committed females responded to love priming by exhibiting difficulty in disengaging from attractive rivals. The present findings provide evidence in the Chinese cultural context for the existence of early-stage attentional processes in the domain of relationship maintenance that committed Chinese females protected an ongoing relationship by not only being inattentive to attractive males who could serve as attractive alternatives, but also being more attentive to attractive females who could be potential rivals when mental representations associated with romantic love were primed. PMID:26309232

  14. Attentional Biases toward Attractive Alternatives and Rivals: Mechanisms Involved in Relationship Maintenance among Chinese Women.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yidan; Zhao, Guang; Tu, Shen; Zheng, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A long-term romantic relationship can offer many benefits to committed individuals. Thus, humans possess relationship maintenance mechanisms to protect against threats from those who serve as attractive alternatives or intrasexual rivals. Many studies have indicated that romantic love can act as a commitment device to activate these mechanisms. To examine the attentional bias associated with relationship maintenance among 108 college students (49 single and 59 committed females) in China, we used a semantic priming procedure to activate mental representations associated with romantic love and then asked participants to complete a dot-probe task for the purpose of making a distinction between the engage and disengage components of attention. No significant engaging effects toward attractive faces were observed among committed females, but the following significant disengaging effects were found: when primed with romantic love, single females showed increased attention toward and difficulty in disengaging from attractive male faces, whereas females already in a committed relationship did not alter their attention, remaining as inattentive to attractive alternatives as they were in the baseline condition. In addition, committed females responded to love priming by exhibiting difficulty in disengaging from attractive rivals. The present findings provide evidence in the Chinese cultural context for the existence of early-stage attentional processes in the domain of relationship maintenance that committed Chinese females protected an ongoing relationship by not only being inattentive to attractive males who could serve as attractive alternatives, but also being more attentive to attractive females who could be potential rivals when mental representations associated with romantic love were primed. PMID:26309232

  15. Mechanisms for alternative treatments in Parkinson's disease: acupuncture, tai chi, and other treatments.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Bijan D; Kluger, Benzi

    2014-06-01

    At least 40% of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) use one or more forms of alternative therapy (AT) to complement standard treatments. This article reviews the commonest forms of AT for PD, including acupuncture, tai chi, yoga, mindfulness, massage, herbal medicine, and cannabis. We discuss the current evidence for the clinical efficacy of each AT and discuss potential mechanisms, including those suggested by animal and human studies. With a few notable exceptions, none of the treatments examined were investigated rigorously enough to draw definitive conclusions about efficacy or mechanism. Tai chi, acupuncture, Mucuna pruriens, cannabinoids, and music therapy have all been proposed to work through specific mechanisms, although current evidence is insufficient to support or refute these claims, with the possible exception of Mucuna pruriens (which contains levodopa). It is likely that most ATs predominantly treat PD patients through general mechanisms, including placebo effects, stress reduction, and improved mood and sleep, and AT may provide patients with a greater locus of control regarding their illness. PMID:24760476

  16. Effects of mechanical and thermal load cycling on micro tensile bond strength of clearfil SE bond to superficial dentin

    PubMed Central

    Daneshkazemi, Ali Reza; Davari, Abdol Rahim; Ataei, Ebrahim; Dastjerdi, Fariba; Hajighasemi, Ehsan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Certain studies have been conducted on the effects of mechanical and thermal load cycling on the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of composites to dentin, but the results were different. The authors therefore decided to evaluate these effects on the bonding of Clearfil SE bond to superficial dentin. Materials and Methods: Flat dentinal surface of 42 molar teeth were bonded to Filtek-Z250 resin composite by Clearfil SE bond. The teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups and exposed to different mechanical and thermal load cycling. Thermocycling was at 5-55°C and mechanical load cycling was created with a force of 125 N and 0.5 Hz. Then, the teeth were sectioned and shaped to hour glass form and subjected to microTBS testing at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results were statistically analyzed by computer with three-way analysis of variance and T-test at P < 0.05 significant. To evaluate the location and mode of failure, the specimens were observed under the stereomicroscope. Then, one of the specimens in each group was evaluated under Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) for mode of failure. Results: All of the study groups had a significantly lower microTBS as compared to the control group (P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference between mechanical cycling with 50K (kilo = 1000) cycles, and 50K mechanical cycles plus 1K thermal cycles. Most of the fractures in the control group were of adhesive type and this type of fracture increased after exposure to mechanical and thermal load cycling. Conclusion: Thermal and mechanical load cycling had significant negative effects on microTBS and the significant effects of mechanical load cycling started to be significant at 100K cycles. PMID:23946737

  17. Fatigue Response of a PZT Multilayer Actuator under High-Field Electric Cycling with Mechanical Preload

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong; Wereszczak, Andrew A; Lin, Hua-Tay

    2009-01-01

    An electric fatigue test system has been developed for piezoelectric actuator with a mechanical loading capability. Fatigue responses of a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) multilayer actuator (MLA) with a plate-through electrode configuration have been studied under an electric field (1.7 times that of a coercive field of PZT material) and a concurrent mechanical preload (30.0 MPa). A total of 1.0x10^9 cycles were carried out. Variations in charge density and mechanical strain under a high electric field and constant mechanical loads were observed during the fatigue test. The dc and the first harmonic (at 10 Hz) dielectric and piezoelectric coefficients were subsequently characterized by using FFT (Fast Fourier Transformation). It has been observed that both the dielectric and the piezoelectric coefficients underwent a monotonic decrease prior to 2.86x10^8 cycles under the relevant preload, and then fluctuated to a certain extent. Both the dielectric loss tangent and the piezoelectric loss tangent also exhibited the fluctuations after a certain amount of drop but at different levels relative to the pre-fatigue. And finally, the results were discussed with respect to domain wall mobility, microcracking, and other pre-existing anomalies.

  18. Effect of fast freeze-thaw cycles on mechanical properties of ordinary-air-entrained concrete.

    PubMed

    Shang, Huai-shuai; Cao, Wei-qun; Wang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Freezing-thawing resistance is a very significant characteristic for concrete in severe environment (such as cold region with the lowest temperature below 0°C). In this study, ordinary-air-entrained (O-A-E) concrete was produced in a laboratory environment; the compressive strength, cubic compressive strength of C50, C40, C30, C25, and C20 ordinary-air-entrained concrete, tensile strength, and cleavage strength of C30 ordinary-air-entrained concrete were measured after fast freeze-thaw cycles. The effects of fast freeze-thaw cycles on the mechanical properties (compressive strength and cleavage strength) of ordinary-air-entrained concrete materials are investigated on the basis of the experimental results. And the concise mathematical formula between mechanical behavior and number of fast freeze-thaw cycles was established. The experiment results can be used as a reference in design, maintenance, and life prediction of ordinary-air-entrained concrete structure (such as dam, offshore platform, etc.) in cold regions. PMID:24895671

  19. Effect of Fast Freeze-Thaw Cycles on Mechanical Properties of Ordinary-Air-Entrained Concrete

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Huai-shuai; Cao, Wei-qun; Wang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Freezing-thawing resistance is a very significant characteristic for concrete in severe environment (such as cold region with the lowest temperature below 0°C). In this study, ordinary-air-entrained (O-A-E) concrete was produced in a laboratory environment; the compressive strength, cubic compressive strength of C50, C40, C30, C25, and C20 ordinary-air-entrained concrete, tensile strength, and cleavage strength of C30 ordinary-air-entrained concrete were measured after fast freeze-thaw cycles. The effects of fast freeze-thaw cycles on the mechanical properties (compressive strength and cleavage strength) of ordinary-air-entrained concrete materials are investigated on the basis of the experimental results. And the concise mathematical formula between mechanical behavior and number of fast freeze-thaw cycles was established. The experiment results can be used as a reference in design, maintenance, and life prediction of ordinary-air-entrained concrete structure (such as dam, offshore platform, etc.) in cold regions. PMID:24895671

  20. A novel DAG-dependent mechanism links PKCa and Cyclin B1 regulating cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Alessandro; Ramazzotti, Giulia; Matteucci, Alessandro; Manzoli, Lucia; Lonetti, Annalisa; Suh, Pann-Ghill; McCubrey, James A.; Cocco, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    Through the years, different studies showed the involvement of Protein Kinase C (PKC) in cell cycle control, in particular during G1/S transition. Little is known about their role at G2/M checkpoint. In this study, using K562 human erythroleukemia cell line, we found a novel and specific mechanism through which the conventional isoform PKC⍺ positively affects Cyclin B1 modulating G2/M progression of cell cycle. Since the kinase activity of this PKC isoform was not necessary in this process, we demonstrated that PKC⍺, physically interacting with Cyclin B1, avoided its degradation and stimulated its nuclear import at mitosis. Moreover, the process resulted to be strictly connected with the increase in nuclear diacylglycerol levels (DAG) at G2/M checkpoint, due to the activity of nuclear Phospholipase C β1 (PLCβ1), the only PLC isoform mainly localized in the nucleus of K562 cells. Taken together, our findings indicated a novel DAG dependent mechanism able to regulate the G2/M progression of the cell cycle. PMID:25362646

  1. Mechanical Properties of Anisotropic Conductive Adhesive Film Under Hygrothermal Aging and Thermal Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li-Lan; Chen, Xu; Gao, Hong

    2012-07-01

    Mechanical properties of anisotropic conductive adhesive film (ACF) were investigated experimentally under various environmental conditions. The temperature sweep test was conducted to investigate the effects of temperature on dynamical mechanical properties of the ACF. The ACF exhibited transitions to the glass state, viscoelastic state, and rubber state with increasing temperature, and its glass-transition temperature ( T g) was determined to be 149°C. The creep-recovery behaviors of the ACF were investigated, and it was found that the initial strains, instantaneous strains, and creep or recovery rates increased with increasing temperature. No obvious creep phenomenon was observed at low temperatures (≤0°C). The creep strain and creep rates at any time decreased with increasing hygrothermal aging time. The uniaxial tensile behaviors of the ACF were also investigated under hygrothermal aging and thermal cycling. The results show that the Young's modulus and tensile strength of the ACF decrease with increasing hygrothermal aging time; however, they increase at first and then decrease with increasing thermal cycling time. T g decreases slightly for the ACF after hygrothermal aging; however, it increases after thermal cycling.

  2. Fatigue responses of PZT stacks under semi-bipolar electric cycling with mechanical preload

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong; Cooper, Thomas A; Lin, Hua-Tay; Wereszczak, Andrew A

    2010-01-01

    PZT stacks that had an inter-digital internal electrode configuration were tested to more than 10^8 cycles. A 100-Hz semi-bipolar sine wave with a field range of +4.5/-0.9 kV/mm was used in cycling with a concurrently-applied 20 MPa preload. Significant reductions in piezoelectric and dielectric responses were observed during the cycling depending on the measuring condition. Extensive surface discharges were also observed. These surface events resulted in the erosion of external electrode and the outcrop of internal electrode. Sections prepared by sequential polishing technique revealed a variety of damage mechanisms including delaminations, pores, and etch grooves. The scale of damage was correlated to the degree of fatigue-induced reduction in piezoelectric and dielectric responses. The results from this study demonstrate the feasibility of using a semi-bipolar mode to drive a PZT stack under a mechanical preload and illustrate the potential fatigue and damages of the stack in service.

  3. Static mechanical strain induces capillary endothelial cell cycle re-entry and sprouting.

    PubMed

    Zeiger, A S; Liu, F D; Durham, J T; Jagielska, A; Mahmoodian, R; Van Vliet, K J; Herman, I M

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cells are known to respond to a range of biochemical and time-varying mechanical cues that can promote blood vessel sprouting termed angiogenesis. It is less understood how these cells respond to sustained (i.e., static) mechanical cues such as the deformation generated by other contractile vascular cells, cues which can change with age and disease state. Here we demonstrate that static tensile strain of 10%, consistent with that exerted by contractile microvascular pericytes, can directly and rapidly induce cell cycle re-entry in growth-arrested microvascular endothelial cell monolayers. S-phase entry in response to this strain correlates with absence of nuclear p27, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor. Furthermore, this modest strain promotes sprouting of endothelial cells, suggesting a novel mechanical 'angiogenic switch'. These findings suggest that static tensile strain can directly stimulate pathological angiogenesis, implying that pericyte absence or death is not necessarily required of endothelial cell re-activation. PMID:27526677

  4. Probabilistic Material Strength Degradation Model for Inconel 718 Components Subjected to High Temperature, High-Cycle and Low-Cycle Mechanical Fatigue, Creep and Thermal Fatigue Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bast, Callie C.; Boyce, Lola

    1995-01-01

    The development of methodology for a probabilistic material strength degradation is described. The probabilistic model, in the form of a postulated randomized multifactor equation, provides for quantification of uncertainty in the lifetime material strength of aerospace propulsion system components subjected to a number of diverse random effects. This model is embodied in the computer program entitled PROMISS, which can include up to eighteen different effects. Presently, the model includes five effects that typically reduce lifetime strength: high temperature, high-cycle mechanical fatigue, low-cycle mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue. Results, in the form of cumulative distribution functions, illustrated the sensitivity of lifetime strength to any current value of an effect. In addition, verification studies comparing predictions of high-cycle mechanical fatigue and high temperature effects with experiments are presented. Results from this limited verification study strongly supported that material degradation can be represented by randomized multifactor interaction models.

  5. Alternative splicing modulates Kv channel clustering through a molecular ball and chain mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandany, Nitzan; Marciano, Shir; Magidovich, Elhanan; Frimerman, Teddy; Yehezkel, Rinat; Shem-Ad, Tzilhav; Lewin, Limor; Abdu, Uri; Orr, Irit; Yifrach, Ofer

    2015-03-01

    Ion channel clustering at the post-synaptic density serves a fundamental role in action potential generation and transmission. Here, we show that interaction between the Shaker Kv channel and the PSD-95 scaffold protein underlying channel clustering is modulated by the length of the intrinsically disordered C terminal channel tail. We further show that this tail functions as an entropic clock that times PSD-95 binding. We thus propose a ‘ball and chain’ mechanism to explain Kv channel binding to scaffold proteins, analogous to the mechanism describing channel fast inactivation. The physiological relevance of this mechanism is demonstrated in that alternative splicing of the Shaker channel gene to produce variants of distinct tail lengths resulted in differential channel cell surface expression levels and clustering metrics that correlate with differences in affinity of the variants for PSD-95. We suggest that modulating channel clustering by specific spatial-temporal spliced variant targeting serves a fundamental role in nervous system development and tuning.

  6. The effects of thermal cycling on the physical and mechanical properties of [NZP] ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, T.B.; Limaye, S.Y.; Porter, W.D.

    1994-12-31

    The [NZP] ceramics, sodium zirconium phosphate and its crystal structure analogs, are noted for their very low thermal expansion characteristics. What has not been widely studied is the effect of thermal cycling on physical and mechanical properties. Two [NZP] compositional series were selected (Ba{sub 1+x}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6{minus}2x}Si{sub 2x}O{sub 24} and Ca{sub 1{minus}x}Sr{sub x}Zr{sub 4}P{sub 6}O{sub 24}) that exhibit varying bulk thermal expansion from positive to negative and varying degrees of thermal expansion anisotropy. The effect of thermal cycling, to 1,250 C, on the bulk thermal expansion and flexural strength of these ceramics is discussed in relationship to changes in density, thermal expansion anisotropy and microstructure.

  7. A preclinical mouse model of glioma with an alternative mechanism of telomere maintenance (ALT).

    PubMed

    Jeitany, Maya; Pineda, Jose Ramon; Liu, Qingyuan; Porreca, Rosa Maria; Hoffschir, Françoise; Desmaze, Chantal; Silvestre, David C; Mailliet, Patrick; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo; Ségal-Bendirdjian, Evelyne; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Boussin, François D

    2015-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most aggressive primary tumor of the central nervous system. Glioma stem cells (GSCs), a small population of tumor cells with stem-like properties, are supposedly responsible for glioblastoma multiforme relapse after current therapies. In approximately thirty percent of glioblastoma multiforme tumors, telomeres are not maintained by telomerase but through an alternative mechanism, termed alternative lengthening of telomere (ALT), suggesting potential interest in developing specific therapeutic strategies. However, no preclinical model of ALT glioma was available until the isolation of TG20 cells from a human ALT glioma. Herein, we show that TG20 cells exhibit a high level of telomeric recombination but a stable karyotype, indicating that their telomeres retain their protective function against chromosomal instability. TG20 cells possess all of the characteristic features of GSCs: the expression of neural stem cell markers, the generation of intracerebral tumors in NOD-SCID-IL2Rγ (NSG) mice as well as in nude mice, and the ability to sustain serial intracerebral transplantations without expressing telomerase, demonstrating the stability of the ALT phenotype in vivo. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that 360B, a G-quadruplex ligand of the pyridine derivative series that impairs telomere replication and mitotic progression in cancer cells, prevents the development of TG20 tumors. Together, our results show that intracerebral grafts of TG20 cells in immunodeficient mice constitute an efficient preclinical model of ALT glioblastoma multiforme and that G-quadruplex ligands are a potential therapy for this specific type of tumor. PMID:25175359

  8. Sun-dried raisins are a cost-effective alternative to Sports Jelly Beans in prolonged cycling.

    PubMed

    Rietschier, Helena L; Henagan, Tara M; Earnest, Conrad P; Baker, Birgitta L; Cortez, Cory C; Stewart, Laura K

    2011-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a natural carbohydrate (CHO) source in the form of sun-dried raisins (SDRs) vs. Sports Jelly Beans™ (SJBs) on endurance performance in trained cyclists and triathletes. Ten healthy men (18-33 years) completed 1 water-only acclimatization exercise trial and 2 randomized exercise trials administered in a crossover fashion. Each trial consisted of a 120-minute constant-intensity glycogen depletion period followed by a 10-km time trial (TT). During each experimental trial, participants consumed isocaloric amounts of SDRs or SJBs in 20-minute intervals. Measurements included time to complete 10-km TT, power output during 10-km TT, blood glucose levels and respiratory exchange ratio during glycogen depletion period, rate of perceived exertion (RPE), 'flow' questionnaire responses, and a hedonic (i.e., pleasantness) sensory acceptance test. There were no significant differences in endurance performance for TT time (SDRs vs. SJBs, 17.3 ± 0.4 vs. 17.3 ± 0.4 seconds) or power (229.3 ± 13.0 vs. 232.0 ± 13.6 W), resting blood glucose levels (5.8 ± 04 mmol·L(-1) for SDRs and 5.4 ± 0.2 mmol·L(-1) for SJBs), RPE, or flow experiences between SDR and SJB trials. However, the mean sensory acceptance scores were significantly higher for the SDRs compared to the SJBs (50.7 ± 1.7 vs. 44.3 ± 2.7). Consuming SDRs or SJBs during 120 minutes of intense cycling results in similar subsequent TT performances and are equally effective in maintaining blood glucose levels during exercise. Therefore, SDRs are a natural, pleasant, cost-effective CHO alternative to commercial SJBs that can be used during moderate- to high-intensity endurance exercise. PMID:21881533

  9. The life cycle of rice: LCA of alternative agri-food chain management systems in Vercelli (Italy).

    PubMed

    Blengini, Gian Andrea; Busto, Mirko

    2009-03-01

    The Vercelli rice district in northern Italy plays a key role in the agri-food industry in a country which accounts for more than 50% of the EU rice production and exports roughly 70%. However, although wealth and jobs are created, the sector is said to be responsible for environmental impacts that are increasingly being perceived as topical. As a complex and comprehensive environmental evaluation is necessary to understand and manage the environmental impact of the agri-food chain, the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology has been applied to the rice production system: from the paddy field to the supermarket. The LCA has pointed out the magnitude of impact per kg of delivered white milled rice: a CO2eq emission of 2.9 kg, a primary energy consumption of 17.8 MJ and the use of 4.9 m3 of water for irrigation purposes. Improvement scenarios have been analysed considering alternative rice farming and food processing methods, such as organic and upland farming, as well as parboiling. The research has shown that organic and upland farming have the potential to decrease the impact per unit of cultivated area. However, due to the lower grain yields, the environmental benefits per kg of the final products are greatly reduced in the case of upland rice production and almost cancelled for organic rice. LCA has proved to be an effective tool for understanding the eco-profile of Italian rice and should be used for transparent and credible communication between suppliers and their customers. PMID:19046619

  10. The Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Endometriosis: A Review of Utilization and Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Sai; Zhang, Yue-Hui; Liu, Chen-Fang; Tsui, Ilene; Guo, Ying; Ai, Bei-Bei; Han, Feng-Juan

    2014-01-01

    Endometriosis (EM) is one of the common gynecological conditions causing menstrual and pelvic pain and affects 10%–15% of women of reproductive age. In recent years, the complementary and alternative medical (CAM) treatment for EM has become popular due to the few adverse reactions reported. The CAM therapy for EM includes several different treatments such as herbs (herbal prescription, extract, and patent), acupuncture, microwave physiotherapy, and Chinese herb medicine enema (CHM enema). These CAM therapies are effective at relieving dysmenorrhoea, shrinking adnexal masses, and promoting pregnancy, with less unpleasant side effects when compared to hormonal and surgical treatments. In this review, we focus on the status quo of CAM on EM and try to identify therapeutic efficacy and mechanisms based on some clinical and experimental studies. We hope to provide some instructive suggestions for clinical treatment and experimental research in the future. PMID:24701237

  11. Candida Infections, Causes, Targets, and Resistance Mechanisms: Traditional and Alternative Antifungal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Spampinato, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    The genus Candida includes about 200 different species, but only a few species are human opportunistic pathogens and cause infections when the host becomes debilitated or immunocompromised. Candida infections can be superficial or invasive. Superficial infections often affect the skin or mucous membranes and can be treated successfully with topical antifungal drugs. However, invasive fungal infections are often life-threatening, probably due to inefficient diagnostic methods and inappropriate initial antifungal therapies. Here, we briefly review our current knowledge of pathogenic species of the genus Candida and yeast infection causes and then focus on current antifungal drugs and resistance mechanisms. An overview of new therapeutic alternatives for the treatment of Candida infections is also provided. PMID:23878798

  12. A possible role of actin in the mechanical control of the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, S C

    1989-01-01

    Sail-sheet Cultures (SSC) are those in which the cells are i) grown within the meshes of inert grids ii) exposed to nutrients from most sides iii) attached to one another only at the edges like sail of a yacht (hence, the name 'sail-sheet') and iv) have the advantage of three-dimensional structure similar to an in vivo situation. We grew fibroblasts from chicken heart explants as SSC and studied the effect of mechanical stretching on the F-actin content of these cells. This study was designed to investigate the hypothesis that the effect of tension on the cell cycle may be channeled through the microfilaments. Data from this preliminary study suggested that short-term mechanical stretching of sail-sheets, using low frequency tension (1.0 Hz), diminishes F-actin. Thus, it may be possible to relate the decrease in the F-actin content of these cells to the slowing down of their locomotory activity, possible rounding up, and division. This study might contribute to the understanding of the mechanical control of the cell cycle and be of relevance in the phenomena such as healing of wounds and control of the cell division in tumors. PMID:2620166

  13. Measuring the distribution of equity in terms of energy, environmental, and economic costs in the fuel cycles of alternative fuel vehicles with hydrogen pathway scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Patrick E.

    Numerous analyses exist which examine the energy, environmental, and economic tradeoffs between conventional gasoline vehicles and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles powered by hydrogen produced from a variety of sources. These analyses are commonly referred to as "E3" analyses because of their inclusion of Energy, Environmental, and Economic indicators. Recent research as sought a means to incorporate social Equity into E3 analyses, thus producing an "E4" analysis. However, E4 analyses in the realm of energy policy are uncommon, and in the realm of alternative transportation fuels, E4 analyses are extremely rare. This dissertation discusses the creation of a novel E4 simulation tool usable to weigh energy, environmental, economic, and equity trade-offs between conventional gasoline vehicles and alternative fuel vehicles, with specific application to hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. The model, dubbed the F uel Life-cycle Analysis of Solar Hydrogen -- Energy, Environment, Economic & Equity model, or FLASH-E4, is a total fuel-cycle model that combines energy, environmental, and economic analysis methodologies with the addition of an equity analysis component. The model is capable of providing results regarding total fuel-cycle energy consumption, emissions production, energy and environmental cost, and level of social equity within a population in which low-income drivers use CGV technology and high-income drivers use a number of advanced hydrogen FCV technologies. Using theories of equity and social indicators conceptually embodied in the Lorenz Curve and Gini Index, the equity of the distribution of societal energy and environmental costs are measured for a population in which some drivers use CGVs and other drivers use FCVs. It is found, based on baseline input data representative of the United States (US), that the distribution of energy and environmental costs in a population in which some drivers use CGVs and other drivers use natural gas-based hydrogen FCVs can be

  14. Efficiency at Maximum Power Output of a Quantum-Mechanical Brayton Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yuan; He, Ji-Zhou; Gao, Yong; Wang, Jian-Hui

    2014-03-01

    The performance in finite time of a quantum-mechanical Brayton engine cycle is discussed, without introduction of temperature. The engine model consists of two quantum isoenergetic and two quantum isobaric processes, and works with a single particle in a harmonic trap. Directly employing the finite-time thermodynamics, the efficiency at maximum power output is determined. Extending the harmonic trap to a power-law trap, we find that the efficiency at maximum power is independent of any parameter involved in the model, but depends on the confinement of the trapping potential.

  15. Reply to "Comment on 'Similarity between quantum mechanics and thermodynamics: Entropy, temperature, and Carnot cycle' ''.

    PubMed

    Abe, Sumiyoshi

    2015-05-01

    In their Comment on the paper [Abe and Okuyama, Phys. Rev. E 83, 021121 (2011)], González-Díaz and Díaz-Solórzano discuss that the initial state of the quantum-mechanical analog of the Carnot cycle should be not in a pure state but in a mixed state due to a projective measurement of the system energy. Here, first the Comment is shown to miss the point. Then, second, multiple projective measurements are discussed as a generalization of the Comment, although they are not relevant to the work commented. PMID:26066283

  16. Validity and reliability of an alternative method for measuring power output during six-second all-out cycling.

    PubMed

    Watson, Martin; Bibbo, Daniele; Duffy, Charles R; Riches, Philip E; Conforto, Silvia; Macaluso, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    In a laboratory setting where both a mechanically-braked cycling ergometer and a motion analysis (MA) system are available, flywheel angular displacement can be estimated by using MA. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the validity and reliability of a MA method for measuring maximal power output (Pmax) in comparison with a force transducer (FT) method. Eight males and eight females undertook three identical sessions, separated by 4 to 6 days; the first being a familiarization session. Individuals performed three 6-second sprints against 50% of the maximal resistance to complete two pedal revolutions with a 3-minute rest between trials. Power was determined independently using both MA and FT analyses. Validity: MA recorded significantly higher Pmax than FT (P < .05). Bland-Altman plots showed that there was a systematic bias in the difference between the measures of the two systems. This difference increased as power increased. Repeatability: Intraclass correlation coefficients were on average 0.90 ± 0.05 in males and 0.85 ± 0.08 in females. Measuring Pmax by MA, therefore, is as appropriate for use in exercise physiology research as Pmax measured by FT, provided that a bias between these measurements methods is allowed for. PMID:24977624

  17. Hemp Thermal Insulation Concrete with Alternative Binders, Analysis of their Thermal and Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinka, M.; Sahmenko, G.; Korjakins, A.; Radina, L.; Bajare, D.

    2015-11-01

    One of the main challenges that construction industry faces today is how to address the demands for more sustainable, environmentally friendly and carbon neutral construction materials and building upkeep processes. One of the answers to these demands is lime-hemp concrete (LHC) building materials - carbon negative materials that have sufficient thermal insulation capabilities to be used as thermal insulation materials for new as well as for existing buildings. But one problem needs to be overcome before these materials can be used on a large scale - current manufacturing technology allows these materials to be used only as self-bearing thermal insulation material with large labour intensity in the manufacturing process. In order to lower the labour intensity and allow the material to be used in wider applications, a LHC block and board production is necessary, which in turn calls for the binders different from the classically used ones, as they show insufficient mechanical strength for this new use. The particular study focuses on alternative binders produced using gypsum-cement compositions ensuring they are usable in outdoor applications together with hemp shives. Physical, mechanical, thermal and water absorption properties of hemp concrete with various binders are addressed in the current study.

  18. Action mechanisms of complementary and alternative medicine therapies for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Keisuke, Imada; Bian, Bao-lin; Li, Xiang-dong; Takashi, Sato; Akira, Ito

    2011-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized as a chronic inflammatory disease in joints and concomitant destruction of cartilage and bone. Cartilage extracellular matrix components, such as type II collagen and aggrecan are enzymatically degraded by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and aggrecanases in RA. Currently, treatments targeting cytokines, including anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α antibodies, soluble TNF receptor, anti-interleukin (IL)-6 receptor antibody, and IL-1 receptor antagonist, are widely used for treating RA in addition to antiantiinflammatory agents and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), such as inflmethotrexate, but these treatments have some problems, especially in terms of cost and the increased susceptibility of patients to infection in addition to the existence of low-responders to these treatments. Therefore, therapeutics that can be safely used for an extended period of time would be preferable. Complementary and alternative medicines including traditional Chinese medicines (TCM) have been used for the arthritic diseases through the ages. Recently, there are many reports concerning the anti-arthritic action mechanisms of TCM-based herbal formulas and crude herbal extracts or isolated ingredients. These natural herbal medicines are thought to moderately improve RA, but they exert various actions for the treatment of RA. In this review, the current status of the mechanism exploration of natural compounds and TCM-based herbal formulas are summarized, focusing on the protection of cartilage destruction in arthritic diseases including RA and osteoarthritis. PMID:22101694

  19. Alternative substrates reveal catalytic cycle and key binding events in the reaction catalysed by anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cookson, Tammie V M; Castell, Alina; Bulloch, Esther M M; Evans, Genevieve L; Short, Francesca L; Baker, Edward N; Lott, J Shaun; Parker, Emily J

    2014-07-01

    AnPRT (anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase), required for the biosynthesis of tryptophan, is essential for the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). AnPRT catalyses the Mg2+-dependent transfer of a phosphoribosyl group from PRPP (5'-phosphoribosyl-1'-pyrophosphate) to anthranilate to form PRA (5'-phosphoribosyl anthranilate). Mtb-AnPRT was shown to catalyse a sequential reaction and significant substrate inhibition by anthranilate was observed. Antimycobacterial fluoroanthranilates and methyl-substituted analogues were shown to act as alternative substrates for Mtb-AnPRT, producing the corresponding substituted PRA products. Structures of the enzyme complexed with anthranilate analogues reveal two distinct binding sites for anthranilate. One site is located over 8 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) from PRPP at the entrance to a tunnel leading to the active site, whereas in the second, inner, site anthranilate is adjacent to PRPP, in a catalytically relevant position. Soaking the analogues for variable periods of time provides evidence for anthranilate located at transient positions during transfer from the outer site to the inner catalytic site. PRPP and Mg2+ binding have been shown to be associated with the rearrangement of two flexible loops, which is required to complete the inner anthranilate-binding site. It is proposed that anthranilate first binds to the outer site, providing an unusual mechanism for substrate capture and efficient transfer to the catalytic site following the binding of PRPP. PMID:24712732

  20. A new view on the driving mechanism of Milankovitch glaciation cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Han-Shou

    1995-03-01

    Dynamical instabilities in the glaciation and deglaciation of the ice sheets can be triggered by pulsations of the rate of change of the orbital and rotational parameters. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that the Milankovitch glaciation cycles are extremely sensitive to the rate of change of the obliquity frequency. The first of our three contributions is a pedagogic principle of dynamical instability which provides a scientific basis for the driving mechanism of the glaciation cycles. The second contribution is a clarification of the origin and climate significance of the obliquity related 100 kyr cycle in terms of nonlinear coupling between various orbital and rotational parameters. Finally, the fluctuations in the size of the ice sheets are computed using the Weertman-Birchfield-Watts model of ice sheets. It is demonstrated that the growth and decay of the width of the ice sheets are in good agreement with the variations in the continental ice volume as seen in the late Pleistocene δ 18O record.

  1. Global patterns and substrate-based mechanisms of the terrestrial nitrogen cycle.

    PubMed

    Niu, Shuli; Classen, Aimée T; Dukes, Jeffrey S; Kardol, Paul; Liu, Lingli; Luo, Yiqi; Rustad, Lindsey; Sun, Jian; Tang, Jianwu; Templer, Pamela H; Thomas, R Quinn; Tian, Dashuan; Vicca, Sara; Wang, Ying-Ping; Xia, Jianyang; Zaehle, Sönke

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition is impacting the services that ecosystems provide to humanity. However, the mechanisms determining impacts on the N cycle are not fully understood. To explore the mechanistic underpinnings of N impacts on N cycle processes, we reviewed and synthesised recent progress in ecosystem N research through empirical studies, conceptual analysis and model simulations. Experimental and observational studies have revealed that the stimulation of plant N uptake and soil retention generally diminishes as N loading increases, while dissolved and gaseous losses of N occur at low N availability but increase exponentially and become the dominant fate of N at high loading rates. The original N saturation hypothesis emphasises sequential N saturation from plant uptake to soil retention before N losses occur. However, biogeochemical models that simulate simultaneous competition for soil N substrates by multiple processes match the observed patterns of N losses better than models based on sequential competition. To enable better prediction of terrestrial N cycle responses to N loading, we recommend that future research identifies the response functions of different N processes to substrate availability using manipulative experiments, and incorporates the measured N saturation response functions into conceptual, theoretical and quantitative analyses. PMID:26932540

  2. From cycling between coupled reactions to the cross-bridge cycle: mechanical power output as an integral part of energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Diederichs, Frank

    2012-01-01

    ATP delivery and its usage are achieved by cycling of respective intermediates through interconnected coupled reactions. At steady state, cycling between coupled reactions always occurs at zero resistance of the whole cycle without dissipation of free energy. The cross-bridge cycle can also be described by a system of coupled reactions: one energising reaction, which energises myosin heads by coupled ATP splitting, and one de-energising reaction, which transduces free energy from myosin heads to coupled actin movement. The whole cycle of myosin heads via cross-bridge formation and dissociation proceeds at zero resistance. Dissipation of free energy from coupled reactions occurs whenever the input potential overcomes the counteracting output potential. In addition, dissipation is produced by uncoupling. This is brought about by a load dependent shortening of the cross-bridge stroke to zero, which allows isometric force generation without mechanical power output. The occurrence of maximal efficiency is caused by uncoupling. Under coupled conditions, Hill's equation (velocity as a function of load) is fulfilled. In addition, force and shortening velocity both depend on [Ca2+]. Muscular fatigue is triggered when ATP consumption overcomes ATP delivery. As a result, the substrate of the cycle, [MgATP2-], is reduced. This leads to a switch off of cycling and ATP consumption, so that a recovery of [ATP] is possible. In this way a potentially harmful, persistent low energy state of the cell can be avoided. PMID:24957757

  3. Effects of Hygrothermal Cycling on the Chemical, Thermal, and Mechanical Properties of 862/W Epoxy Resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Roberts, Gary D.; Copa, Christine C.; Bail, Justin L.; Kohlman, Lee W.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.

    2011-01-01

    The hygrothermal aging characteristics of an epoxy resin were characterized over 1 year, which included 908 temperature and humidity cycles. The epoxy resin quickly showed evidence of aging through color change and increased brittleness. The influence of aging on the material s glass transition temperature (Tg) was evaluated by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA). The Tg remained relatively constant throughout the year long cyclic aging profile. The chemical composition was monitored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) where evidence of chemical aging and advancement of cure was noted. The tensile strength of the resin was tested as it aged. This property was severely affected by the aging process in the form of reduced ductility and embrittlement. Detailed chemical evaluation suggests many aging mechanisms are taking place during exposure to hygrothermal conditions. This paper details the influence of processes such as: advancement of cure, chemical degradation, and physical aging on the chemical and physical properties of the epoxy resin.

  4. Understanding Low-cycle Fatigue Life Improvement Mechanisms in a Pre-twinned Magnesium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Wei; An, Ke

    2015-10-03

    The mechanisms of fatigue life improvement by pre-twinning process in a commercial rolled magnesium (Mg) alloy have been investigated using real-time in situ neutron diffraction under a continuous-loading condition. It is found that by introducing the excess twinned grains through pre-compression along the rolling direction the fatigue life was enhanced approximately 50%, mainly resulting from the prolonged detwinning process and inhibited dislocation slip during reverse tension. Moreover, after pre-twinning process, the removal of the rapid strain hardening during reverse tension leads to a compressive mean stress value and more symmetric shape of stress-strain hysteresis loop. The pre-twinning has significant impacts on the twinning-detwinning characteristics and deformation modes during cyclic loading and greatly facilitates the twinning-detwinning activities in plastic deformation. The cyclic straining leads to the increase of contribution of tensile twinning deformation in overall plastic deformation in both the as-received and pre-deformed sample. The mechanisms of load partitioning in different groups of grains are closely related to the deformation modes in each deformation stage, while the fatigue cycling has little influence on the load sharing. The pre-twinning process provides an easy and cost-effective route to improve the low-cycle fatigue life through manufacturing and processing, which would advance the wide application of light-weight wrought Mg alloys as structural materials.

  5. Life Cycle Assessment of mechanical biological pre-treatment of Municipal Solid Waste: a case study.

    PubMed

    Beylot, Antoine; Vaxelaire, Stéphane; Zdanevitch, Isabelle; Auvinet, Nicolas; Villeneuve, Jacques

    2015-05-01

    The environmental performance of mechanical biological pre-treatment (MBT) of Municipal Solid Waste is quantified using Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), considering one of the 57 French plants currently in operation as a case study. The inventory is mostly based on plant-specific data, extrapolated from on-site measurements regarding mechanical and biological operations (including anaerobic digestion and composting of digestate). The combined treatment of 46,929 tonnes of residual Municipal Solid Waste and 12,158 tonnes of source-sorted biowaste (as treated in 2010 at the plant) generates 24,550 tonnes CO2-eq as an impact on climate change, 69,943kg SO2-eq on terrestrial acidification and 19,929kg NMVOC-eq on photochemical oxidant formation, in a life-cycle perspective. On the contrary MBT induces environmental benefits in terms of fossil resource depletion, human toxicity (carcinogenic) and ecotoxicity. The results firstly highlight the relatively large contribution of some pollutants, such as CH4, emitted at the plant and yet sometimes neglected in the LCA of waste MBT. Moreover this study identifies 4 plant-specific operation conditions which drive the environmental impact potentials induced by MBT: the conditions of degradation of the fermentable fraction, the collection of gaseous flows emitted from biological operations, the abatement of collected pollutants and NOx emissions from biogas combustion. Finally the results underline the relatively large influence of the operations downstream the plant (in particular residuals incineration) on the environmental performance of waste MBT. PMID:25708404

  6. Understanding Low-cycle Fatigue Life Improvement Mechanisms in a Pre-twinned Magnesium Alloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Wei; An, Ke

    2015-10-03

    The mechanisms of fatigue life improvement by pre-twinning process in a commercial rolled magnesium (Mg) alloy have been investigated using real-time in situ neutron diffraction under a continuous-loading condition. It is found that by introducing the excess twinned grains through pre-compression along the rolling direction the fatigue life was enhanced approximately 50%, mainly resulting from the prolonged detwinning process and inhibited dislocation slip during reverse tension. Moreover, after pre-twinning process, the removal of the rapid strain hardening during reverse tension leads to a compressive mean stress value and more symmetric shape of stress-strain hysteresis loop. The pre-twinning has significant impactsmore » on the twinning-detwinning characteristics and deformation modes during cyclic loading and greatly facilitates the twinning-detwinning activities in plastic deformation. The cyclic straining leads to the increase of contribution of tensile twinning deformation in overall plastic deformation in both the as-received and pre-deformed sample. The mechanisms of load partitioning in different groups of grains are closely related to the deformation modes in each deformation stage, while the fatigue cycling has little influence on the load sharing. The pre-twinning process provides an easy and cost-effective route to improve the low-cycle fatigue life through manufacturing and processing, which would advance the wide application of light-weight wrought Mg alloys as structural materials.« less

  7. Cancer cell(s) cycle sequencing reveals universal mechanisms of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Marretta, R M Ardito; Ales, F

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, cell cycle in higher eukaryotes and their molecular networks signals both in G1/S and G2/M transitions are replicated in silico. Biochemical kinetics, converted into a set of differential equations, and system control theory are employed to design multi-nested digital layers to simulate protein-to-protein activation and inhibition for cell cycle dynamics in the presence of damaged genomes. Sequencing and controlling the digital process of four micro-scale species networks (p53/Mdm2/DNA damage, p21mRNA/cyclin-CDK complex, CDK/CDC25/weel/SKP2/APC/CKI and apoptosis target genes system) not only allows the comprehension of the mechanisms of these molecule interactions but paves the way for unraveling the participants and their by-products, until now quite unclear, which have the task of carrying out (or not) cell death. Whatever the running simulations (e.g., different species signals, mutant cells and different DNA damage levels), the results of the proposed cell digital multi-layers give reason to believe in the existence of a universal apoptotic mechanism. As a consequence, we identified and selected cell check points, sizers, timers and specific target genes dynamic both for influencing mitotic process and avoiding cancer proliferation as much as for leading the cancer cell(s) to collapse into a steady stable apoptosis phase. PMID:21141676

  8. Microbial mechanisms coupling carbon and phosphorus cycles in phosphorus-limited northern Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Malfatti, F; Turk, V; Tinta, T; Mozetič, P; Manganelli, M; Samo, T J; Ugalde, J A; Kovač, N; Stefanelli, M; Antonioli, M; Fonda-Umani, S; Del Negro, P; Cataletto, B; Hozić, A; Ivošević Denardis, N; Zutić, V; Svetličić, V; Mišić Radić, T; Radić, T; Fuks, D; Azam, F

    2014-02-01

    The coastal northern Adriatic Sea receives pulsed inputs of riverine nutrients, causing phytoplankton blooms and seasonally sustained dissolved organic carbon (DOC) accumulation-hypothesized to cause episodes of massive mucilage. The underlying mechanisms regulating P and C cycles and their coupling are unclear. Extensive biogeochemical parameters, processes and community composition were measured in a 64-day mesocosms deployed off Piran, Slovenia. We followed the temporal trends of C and P fluxes in P-enriched (P+) and unenriched (P-) mesocosms. An intense diatom bloom developed then crashed; however, substantial primary production was maintained throughout, supported by tightly coupled P regeneration by bacteria and phytoplankton. Results provide novel insights on post-bloom C and P dynamics and mechanisms. 1) Post-bloom DOC accumulation to 186 μM remained elevated despite high bacterial carbon demand. Presumably, a large part of DOC accumulated due to the bacterial ectohydrolytic processing of primary productivity that adventitiously generated slow-to-degrade DOC; 2) bacteria heavily colonized post-bloom diatom aggregates, rendering them microscale hotspots of P regeneration due to locally intense bacterial ectohydrolase activities; 3) Pi turnover was rapid thus suggesting high P flux through the DOP pool (dissolved organic phosphorus) turnover; 4) Alpha- and Gamma-proteobacteria dominated the bacterial communities despite great differences of C and P pools and fluxes in both mesocosms. However, minor taxa showed dramatic changes in community compositions. Major OTUs were presumably generalists adapted to diverse productivity regimes.We suggest that variation in bacterial ectohydrolase activities on aggregates, regulating the rates of POM→DOM transition as well as dissolved polymer hydrolysis, could become a bottleneck in P regeneration. This could be another regulatory step, in addition to APase, in the microbial regulation of P cycle and the coupling

  9. Thermal Cycling Reliability of Sn-Ag-Cu Solder Interconnections—Part 2: Failure Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokka, Jussi; Mattila, Toni T.; Xu, Hongbo; Paulasto-Kröckel, Mervi

    2013-06-01

    Part 1 of this study focused on identifying the effects of (i) temperature difference (Δ T), (ii) lower dwell temperature and shorter dwell time, (iii) mean temperature, (iv) dwell time, and (v) ramp rate on the lifetime of ball grid array (with 144 solder balls) component boards. Based on the characteristic lifetime, the studied thermal cycling profiles were categorized into three groups: (i) highly accelerated conditions, (ii) moderately accelerated conditions, and (iii) mildly/nonaccelerated conditions. In this work, the observed differences in component board lifetime are explained by studying the failure mechanisms and microstructural changes that take place in the three groups of loading conditions. It was observed that, under the standardized thermal cycling conditions (highly accelerated conditions), the networks of grain boundaries formed by recrystallization provided favorable paths for cracks to propagate intergranularly. It is noteworthy that the coarsening of intermetallic particles was strong in the recrystallized regions (the cellular structure had disappeared completely in the crack region). However, under real-use conditions (mildly/nonaccelerated conditions), recrystallization was not observed in the solder interconnections and cracks had propagated transgranularly in the bulk solder or between the intermetallic compound (IMC) layer and the bulk solder. The real-use conditions showed slight coarsening of the microstructure close to the crack region, but the solder bulk still included finer IMC particles and β-Sn cells characteristic of the as-solidified microstructures. These findings suggest that standardized thermal cycling tests used to assess the solder interconnection reliability of BGA144 component boards create failure mechanisms that differ from those seen in conditions representing real-use operation.

  10. A comparative study of commercial lithium ion battery cycle life in electrical vehicle: Aging mechanism identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xuebing; Ouyang, Minggao; Lu, Languang; Li, Jianqiu; Zheng, Yuejiu; Li, Zhe

    2014-04-01

    When lithium-ion batteries age with cycling, the battery capacity decreases and the resistance increases. The aging mechanism of different types of lithium-ion batteries differs. The loss of lithium inventory, loss of active material, and the increase in resistance may result in battery aging. Generally, analysis of the battery aging mechanism requires dismantling of batteries and using methods such as X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. These methods may permanently damage the battery. Therefore, the methods are inappropriate for the battery management system (BMS) in an electric vehicle. The constant current charging curves while charging the battery could be used to get the incremental capacity and differential voltage curves for identifying the aging mechanism; the battery state-of-health can then be estimated. This method can be potentially used in the BMS for online diagnostic and prognostic services. The genetic algorithm could be used to quantitatively analyze the battery aging offline. And the membership function could be used for onboard aging mechanism identification.

  11. Compensatory mechanisms in Great Lakes sea lamprey populations: implications for alternative control strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Michael L.; Bergstedt, R.A.; Twohey, Michael B.; Fodale, Michael F.; Cuddy, Douglas W.; Slade, Jeffrey W.

    2003-01-01

    Compensatory mechanisms are demographic processes that tend to increase population growth rates at lower population density. These processes will tend to reduce the effectiveness of actions that use controls on reproductive success to suppress sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus), an economically important pest in the Great Lakes. Historical evidence for compensatory mechanisms in sea lamprey populations was reviewed, and revealed: (1) strong evidence for shifts in sex ratios as sea lamprey abundance was reduced in the early years of the control program; (2) weak and equivocal evidence for increased growth rates of sea lamprey cohorts re-colonizing streams following a lampricide treatment; and (3) suggestions of other compensatory processes, such as earlier ages at metamorphosis, but with little empirical evidence. Larval size distribution data for cohorts in the first and second years following a lampricide treatment (26 pairs of cohorts in 20 streams) was analyzed and did not indicate a consistent pattern of more rapid growth of the first colonizing cohort (only 11 of 33 cases). To test for compensation between spawning and age-1 in sea lamprey populations, data were analyzed for 49 stream-years for which spawning female abundance was known and age-1 abundance was estimated in the following year. A fit of these data to a Ricker stock-recruitment function showed evidence for compensation, measured as reduced survival to age 1 at higher abundance of spawning females. More obvious, however, was a large amount of density-independent variation in survival, which tends to mask evidence for compensatory survival. The results were applied to a simple model that simulates sea lamprey populations and their control in a hypothetical lake. Control strategies that targeted reproductive success performed far less well than comparable strategies that targeted larval populations, because density-independent recruitment variation leads to occasional strong year classes even when

  12. Probabilistic material strength degradation model for Inconel 718 components subjected to high temperature, high-cycle and low-cycle mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bast, Callie C.; Boyce, Lola

    1995-01-01

    This report presents the results of both the fifth and sixth year effort of a research program conducted for NASA-LeRC by The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA). The research included on-going development of methodology for a probabilistic material strength degradation model. The probabilistic model, in the form of a postulated randomized multifactor equation, provides for quantification of uncertainty in the lifetime material strength of aerospace propulsion system components subjected to a number of diverse random effects. This model is embodied in the computer program entitled PROMISS, which can include up to eighteen different effects. Presently, the model includes five effects that typically reduce lifetime strength: high temperature, high-cycle mechanical fatigue, low-cycle mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue. Statistical analysis was conducted on experimental Inconel 718 data obtained from the open literature. This analysis provided regression parameters for use as the model's empirical material constants, thus calibrating the model specifically for Inconel 718. Model calibration was carried out for five variables, namely, high temperature, high-cycle and low-cycle mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue. Methodology to estimate standard deviations of these material constants for input into the probabilistic material strength model was developed. Using an updated version of PROMISS, entitled PROMISS93, a sensitivity study for the combined effects of high-cycle mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue was performed. Then using the current version of PROMISS, entitled PROMISS94, a second sensitivity study including the effect of low-cycle mechanical fatigue, as well as, the three previous effects was performed. Results, in the form of cumulative distribution functions, illustrated the sensitivity of lifetime strength to any current value of an effect. In addition, verification studies comparing a combination of high-cycle mechanical

  13. Two independent mechanical events in the interaction cycle of skeletal muscle myosin with actin.

    PubMed

    Capitanio, M; Canepari, M; Cacciafesta, P; Lombardi, V; Cicchi, R; Maffei, M; Pavone, F S; Bottinelli, R

    2006-01-01

    During skeletal muscle contraction, regular arrays of actin and myosin filaments slide past each other driven by the cyclic ATP-dependent interaction of the motor protein myosin II (the cross-bridge) with actin. The rate of the cross-bridge cycle and its load-dependence, defining shortening velocity and energy consumption at the molecular level, vary widely among different isoforms of myosin II. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We have addressed this question by applying a single-molecule approach to rapidly ( approximately 300 mus) and precisely ( approximately 0.1 nm) detect acto-myosin interactions of two myosin isoforms having large differences in shortening velocity. We show that skeletal myosin propels actin filaments, performing its conformational change (working stroke) in two steps. The first step ( approximately 3.4-5.2 nm) occurs immediately after myosin binding and is followed by a smaller step ( approximately 1.0-1.3 nm), which occurs much faster in the fast myosin isoform than in the slow one, independently of ATP concentration. On the other hand, the rate of the second phase of the working stroke, from development of the latter step to dissociation of the acto-myosin complex, is very similar in the two isoforms and depends linearly on ATP concentration. The finding of a second mechanical event in the working stroke of skeletal muscle myosin provides the molecular basis for a simple model of actomyosin interaction. This model can account for the variation, in different fiber types, of the rate of the cross-bridge cycle and provides a common scheme for the chemo-mechanical transduction within the myosin family. PMID:16371472

  14. Heliox breathing equally influences respiratory mechanics and cycling performance in trained males and females

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, Sabrina S.; Dominelli, Paolo B.; Sporer, Benjamin C.; Koehle, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    In this study we tested the hypothesis that inspiring a low-density gas mixture (helium-oxygen; HeO2) would minimize mechanical ventilatory constraints and preferentially increase exercise performance in females relative to males. Trained male (n = 11, 31 yr) and female (n = 10, 26 yr) cyclists performed an incremental cycle test to exhaustion to determine maximal aerobic capacity (V̇o2max; male = 61, female = 56 ml·kg−1·min−1). A randomized, single-blinded crossover design was used for two experimental days where subjects completed a 5-km cycling time trial breathing humidified compressed room air or HeO2 (21% O2:balance He). Subjects were instrumented with an esophageal balloon for the assessment of respiratory mechanics. During the time trial, we assessed the ability of HeO2 to alleviate mechanical ventilatory constraints in three ways: 1) expiratory flow limitation, 2) utilization of ventilatory capacity, and 3) the work of breathing. We found that HeO2 significantly reduced the work of breathing, increased the size of the maximal flow-volume envelope, and reduced the fractional utilization of the maximal ventilatory capacity equally between men and women. The primary finding of this study was that inspiring HeO2 was associated with a statistically significant performance improvement of 0.7% (3.2 s) for males and 1.5% (8.1 s) for females (P < 0.05); however, there were no sex differences with respect to improvement in time trial performance (P > 0.05). Our results suggest that the extent of sex-based differences in airway anatomy, work of breathing, and expiratory flow limitation is not great enough to differentially affect whole body exercise performance. PMID:25429095

  15. Dunaliella tertiolecta (Chlorophyta) Avoids Cell Death Under Ultraviolet Radiation By Triggering Alternative Photoprotective Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Segovia, María; Mata, Teresa; Palma, Armando; García-Gómez, Candela; Lorenzo, Rosario; Rivera, Alicia; Figueroa, Félix L

    2015-11-01

    The effect of different ultraviolet radiation (UVR) treatments combining PAR (P), UVA (A) and UVB (B) on the molecular physiology of Dunaliella tertiolecta was studied during 6 days to assess the response to chronic UVR exposure. UVR reduced cell growth but did not cause cell death, as shown by the absence of SYTOX Green labeling and cellular morphology. However, caspase-like enzymatic activities (CLs), (regarded as cell death proteases), were active even though the cells were not dying. Maximal quantum yield of fluorescence (Fv /Fm ) and photosynthetic electron transport rate (ETR) dropped. Decreased nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) paralleled a drop in xanthophyll cycle de-epoxidation under UVB. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and D1 protein accumulation were inversely correlated. PAB exhibited elevated ROS production at earlier times. Once ROS decayed, D1 protein recovered two-fold compared with P and PA at later stages. Therefore, PsbA gene was still transcribed, suggesting ROS involvement in D1 recovery by its direct effect on mRNA-translation. We add evidence of an UVB-induced positive effect on the cells when P is present, providing photoprotection and resilience, by means of D1 repair. This allowed cells to survive. The photoprotective mechanisms described here (which are counterintuitive in principle) conform to an important ecophysiological response regarding light stress acclimation. PMID:26224653

  16. Simulation, Model Verification and Controls Development of Brayton Cycle PM Alternator: Testing and Simulation of 2 KW PM Generator with Diode Bridge Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankovic, Ana V.

    2003-01-01

    Professor Stankovic will be developing and refining Simulink based models of the PM alternator and comparing the simulation results with experimental measurements taken from the unit. Her first task is to validate the models using the experimental data. Her next task is to develop alternative control techniques for the application of the Brayton Cycle PM Alternator in a nuclear electric propulsion vehicle. The control techniques will be first simulated using the validated models then tried experimentally with hardware available at NASA. Testing and simulation of a 2KW PM synchronous generator with diode bridge output is described. The parameters of a synchronous PM generator have been measured and used in simulation. Test procedures have been developed to verify the PM generator model with diode bridge output. Experimental and simulation results are in excellent agreement.

  17. [Enoximone as an alternative to mechanical circulatory support prior to heart transplantation].

    PubMed

    Schmid, E R; Zollinger, A; Turina, M; Dieterich, H A

    1989-09-01

    Enoximone, a relatively new type III phosphodiesterase (PDE III) inhibitor with combined positive inotropic and vasodilating properties, was used as a pharmacological bridge to heart transplantation in a patient with severe dilatative cardiomyopathy (ejection fraction 11-13%), who developed cardiogenic shock refractory to conventional therapy with catecholamines and vasodilators. Enoximone led to an 88% increase in cardiac index (from 1.6 to 3.0 l/min.m2). Despite a noticeable rise in heart rate, stroke index increased by 57%. Systemic vascular resistance decreased by 48% without any relevant change in mean arterial pressure. Cardiac filling pressures remained high. Oxygen transport doubled and oxygen extraction ratio decreased by 10%. Apart from a decrease in arterial oxygen tension (from 15.8 to 12.8 kPa [119 to 96 mm Hg]), no other side effects were noted. Withdrawal of catecholamine therapy did not cause any relevant haemodynamic changes. Although complications arose from an uncontrolled septic state, orthotopic heart transplantation was performed with success 74 hours after initiation of enoximone therapy. As the PDE III inhibitor enoximone exerts its potent inotropic and vasodilating effects without requiring adrenergic receptor activation, it may be used as an alternative to mechanical support in patients who develop cardiogenic shock resistant to catecholamines while awaiting heart transplantation. PMID:2529633

  18. An alternative mechanism for international health aid: evaluating a Global Social Protection Fund.

    PubMed

    Basu, Sanjay; Stuckler, David; McKee, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Several public health groups have called for the creation of a global fund for 'social protection'-a fund that produces the international equivalent of domestic tax collection and safety net systems to finance care for the ill and disabled and related health costs. All participating countries would pay into a global fund based on a metric of their ability to pay and withdraw from the common pool based on a metric of their need for funds. We assessed how alternative strategies and metrics by which to operate such a fund would affect its size and impact on health system financing. Using a mathematical model, we found that common targets for health funding in low-income countries require higher levels of aid expenditures than presently distributed. Some mechanisms exist that may incentivize reduction of domestic health inequalities, and direct most funds towards the poorest populations. Payments from high-income countries are also likely to decrease over time as middle-income countries' economies grow. PMID:23335466

  19. Climate change and shrinking salamanders: alternative mechanisms for changes in plethodontid salamander body size.

    PubMed

    Connette, Grant M; Crawford, John A; Peterman, William E

    2015-08-01

    An increasing number of studies have demonstrated relationships between climate trends and body size change of organisms. In many cases, climate might be expected to influence body size by altering thermoregulation, energetics or food availability. However, observed body size change can result from a variety of ecological processes (e.g. growth, selection, population dynamics) or imperfect observation of biological systems. We used two extensive datasets to evaluate alternative mechanisms for recently reported changes in the observed body size of plethodontid salamanders. We found that mean adult body size of salamanders can be highly sensitive to survey conditions, particularly rainfall. This systematic bias in the detection of larger or smaller individuals could result in a signature of body size change in relation to reported climate trends when it is simply observation error. We also identify considerable variability in body size distributions among years and find that individual growth rates can be strongly influenced by weather. Finally, our study demonstrates that measures of mean adult body size can be highly variable among surveys and that large sample sizes may be required to make reliable inferences. Identifying the effects of climate change is a critical area of research in ecology and conservation. Researchers should be aware that observed changes in certain organisms can result from multiple ecological processes or systematic bias due to nonrandom sampling of populations. PMID:25641384

  20. The long-term seismic cycle in collisional margins: insights from Seismo-Thermo-Mechanical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dal Zilio, L.; van Dinther, Y.; Gerya, T.

    2015-12-01

    The April 25, 2015, Mw 7.8 Gorkha earthquake is the largest one in the Nepal Himalaya since 1934. Since the foreland part of it is densely populated, these events represent a considerable seismic hazard. The restricted direct observations in time and space in combination with tectonic and rheological complexities, however, pose a difficult problem for both seismic hazard assessment and modeling efforts. In this study we for the first time simulate cycles of spontaneous earthquake-like ruptures on non a-priori defined faults within a generic continental collision zone. We use the Seismo-Thermo-Mechanical (STM) numerical modeling approach, which is based on a continuum, viscoelastoplastic code I2ELVIS and is validated for seismic cycle applications against a laboratory model and natural observations (van Dinther et al., 2013a, b). The 2-D model setup consists of two continental plates separated by an oceanic plate, in which the incipient subduction phase is followed by continent-continent collision. In different collisional stages, we evaluate a non-associative Drucker-Prager plasticity yield criterion with pressure dependent yield strength and a strongly rate-dependent friction formulation. Our results show physically consistent emergence of complex rupture paths, both on- and off-main frontal thrust. Assuming different physical properties of tectonic nappes, we find that ruptures propagate following rheological or tectonic discontinuities. Our findings suggest that the interseismic coupling of the main-thrust affects the seismic cycle of the entire orogenic belt. While thrust-faulting events mainly occur on the main frontal thrust, normal-faulting events spread throughout the orogenic belt as a consequence of gravitational extension. Results from an event detection algorithm shows events in the deeper portions of the orogenic belt, both within the oceanic slab and near the bottom of the wedge where material is squeezed between stiff lithospheric mantle portions.

  1. Complete catalytic cycle of cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase involves a spring-loaded mechanism.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, Amlan; Kundu, Anirban; Bose, Madhuparna; Gujar, Akanksha; Mukherjee, Somnath; Das, Amit Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Cofactor-independent phosphoglycerate mutase (iPGM), an important enzyme in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, catalyses the isomerization of 2- and 3-phosphoglycerates by an Mn(2+)-dependent phospho-transfer mechanism via a phospho-enzyme intermediate. Crystal structures of bi-domain iPGM from Staphylococcus aureus, together with substrate-bound forms, have revealed a new conformation of the enzyme, representing an intermediate state of domain movement. The substrate-binding site and the catalytic site are present in two distinct domains in the intermediate form. X-ray crystallography complemented by simulated dynamics has enabled delineation of the complete catalytic cycle, which includes binding of the substrate, followed by its positioning into the catalytic site, phospho-transfer and finally product release. The present work describes a novel mechanism of domain movement controlled by a hydrophobic patch that is exposed on domain closure and acts like a spring to keep the protein in open conformation. Domain closing occurs after substrate binding, and is essential for phospho-transfer, whereas the open conformation is a prerequisite for efficient substrate binding and product dissociation. A new model of catalysis has been proposed by correlating the hinge-bending motion with the phospho-transfer mechanism. PMID:25611430

  2. Samples of HDR Soultz Injection Microearthquakes: Mechanism Using Alternative Source Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jechumtalova, Z.; Sileny, J.

    2011-12-01

    offered by the seismicity induced during the massive fluid injection experiments at the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) site Soultz-sous-Forêts. The site is located in Alsace (France) within the hottest geothermal surface anomaly of the Upper Rhine Graben. From the bulk of the seismicity recorded, we have processed several microearthquakes with magnitudes between M = 1.4 and 1.5 which occurred during the first phase of 2003 fluid injection, when only the borehole GPK3 was stimulated. Mechanisms resulting from the alternative approaches offer the clue to estimate the reliability of the shear vs. non-shear source components, thus indicating the type of the fracturing.

  3. A Mechanism for Cell Cycle Regulation of MAP Kinase Signaling in a Yeast Differentiation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Strickfaden, Shelly C.; Winters, Matthew J.; Ben-Ari, Giora; Lamson, Rachel E.; Tyers, Mike; Pryciak, Peter M.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Yeast cells arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle upon exposure to mating pheromones. As cells commit to a new cycle, G1 CDK activity (Cln/CDK) inhibits signaling through the mating MAPK cascade. Here, we show that the target of this inhibition is Ste5, the MAPK cascade scaffold protein. Cln/CDK phosphorylates a cluster of sites flanking a small, basic membrane-binding motif in Ste5, thereby disrupting Ste5 membrane localization. Effective inhibition of Ste5 signaling requires multiple phosphorylation sites and a substantial accumulation of negative charge, suggesting that Ste5 acts as a sensor for high G1 CDK activity. Thus, Ste5 is an integration point for both external and internal signals. When Ste5 cannot be phosphorylated, pheromone triggers an aberrant arrest of cells outside G1, either in the presence or absence of the CDK inhibitor protein Far1. These findings define a mechanism and physiological benefit of restricting antiproliferative signaling to G1. PMID:17289571

  4. Using optical tweezers to relate the chemical and mechanical cross-bridge cycles.

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Walter; Sleep, John

    2004-01-01

    In most current models of muscle contraction there are two translational steps, the working stroke, whereby an attached myosin cross-bridge moves relative to the actin filament, and the repriming step, in which the cross-bridge returns to its original orientation. The development of single molecule methods has allowed a more detailed investigation of the relationship of these mechanical steps to the underlying biochemistry. In the normal adenosine triphosphate cycle, myosin.adenosine diphosphate.phosphate (M.ADP.Pi) binds to actin and moves it by ca. 5 nm on average before the formation of the end product, the rigor actomyosin state. All the other product-like intermediate states tested were found to give no net movement indicating that M.ADP.Pi alone binds in a pre-force state.Myosin states with bound, unhydrolysed nucleoside triphosphates also give no net movement, indicating that these must also bind in a post-force conformation and that the repriming, post- to pre-transition during the forward cycle must take place while the myosin is dissociated from actin. These observations fit in well with the structural model in which the working stroke is aligned to the opening of the switch 2 element of the ATPase site. PMID:15647161

  5. 78 FR 60275 - Alternative Method for Calculating Off-Cycle Credits for Mercedes-Benz Vehicles Under the Light...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... that may be used beginning in MY 2014.\\2\\ \\1\\ 75 FR 25438-25440, May 7, 2010. \\2\\ 77 FR 62832-62839... established a program to allow automobile manufacturers to generate ``off-cycle'' carbon dioxide (CO...

  6. [Alternative Splicing Detection as a Biomarker for Cancer Diagnosis: A Novel Progressive Mechanism of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia with Alternative Splicing as a Biomarker Candidate].

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Kouichi; Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Kobayashi, Souhei; Ishige, Takayuki; Semba, Toshihisa; Kimura, Asako; Kazami, Takahiro; Ohyama, Masayuki; Itoga, Sakae; Beppu, Minako; Nishimura, Motoi; Satoh, Mamoru; Nomura, Fumio

    2015-09-01

    Alternative splicing is an important mechanism that links to transcription and contributes to protein diversity. Disturbed alternative splicing is frequently observed in cancers, but its precise mechanism remains largely unknown. FUSE-binding protein (FBP) -interacting repressor (FIR) is a transcriptional repressor of the c-myc gene. Previous studies indicated that a splice variant of FIR, FIRΔexon2, that lacks exon2 in the transcriptional repressor domain, was increased in colorectal cancers, hepatocellular carcinomas, and leukemia cells. Furthermore, FIRΔexon2 activated c-myc transcription by disabling wild-type FIR as a dominant-negative form of FIR. Recently, somatic mutations of the SF3B1 (SAP155) gene, a subunit of the SF3B spliceosome complex, were found in myelodysplastic leukemia. In this study, FIR heterozygous knockout (FIR(+/-)) was established as a dominant-negative model of FIR in the C57BL/6 mouse. FIR(+/-) mice showed an increased c-myc mRNA expression level, particularly in peripheral blood, although FIR(+/-) mice had no apparent pathogenic phenotype. Therefore, an increased c-myc mRNA expression level alone is not enough for leukemogenesis. Nevertheless, FIR(+/-)TP53(-/-) mice generated acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) with increased organ and/or bone marrow invasion. In conclusion, alternative splicing of FIR, generating FIRΔexon2, contributes to not only colorectal carcinogenesis but also leukemogenesis independent of the c-Myc activation pathway. Finally, we will discuss our hypothesis that FIRΔexon2 interferes with FBW7, that FIRΔexon2 inhibits PP1 in the EGFR pathway, and that FIR haploinsufficiency is potentially associated with protein expression through transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. PMID:26731899

  7. Feedback of mechanical effectiveness induces adaptations in motor modules during cycling.

    PubMed

    De Marchis, Cristiano; Schmid, Maurizio; Bibbo, Daniele; Castronovo, Anna Margherita; D'Alessio, Tommaso; Conforto, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have reported evidence that the motor system may rely on a modular organization, even if this behavior has yet to be confirmed during motor adaptation. The aim of the present study is to investigate the modular motor control mechanisms underlying the execution of pedaling by untrained subjects in different biomechanical conditions. We use the muscle synergies framework to characterize the muscle coordination of 11 subjects pedaling under two different conditions. The first one consists of a pedaling exercise with a strategy freely chosen by the subjects (Preferred Pedaling Technique, PPT), while the second condition constrains the gesture by means of a real time visual feedback of mechanical effectiveness (Effective Pedaling Technique, EPT). Pedal forces, recorded using a pair of instrumented pedals, were used to calculate the Index of Effectiveness (IE). EMG signals were recorded from eight muscles of the dominant leg and Non-negative Matrix Factorization (NMF) was applied for the extraction of muscle synergies. All the synergy vectors, extracted cycle by cycle for each subject, were pooled across subjects and conditions and underwent a 2-dimensional Sammon's non-linear mapping. Seven representative clusters were identified on the Sammon's projection, and the corresponding eight-dimensional synergy vectors were used to reconstruct the repertoire of muscle activation for all subjects and all pedaling conditions (VAF > 0.8 for each individual muscle pattern). Only 5 out of the 7 identified modules were used by the subjects during the PPT pedaling condition, while 2 additional modules were found specific for the pedaling condition EPT. The temporal recruitment of three identified modules was highly correlated with IE. The structure of the identified modules was found similar to that extracted in other studies of human walking, partly confirming the existence of shared and task specific muscle synergies, and providing further evidence on the modularity

  8. Feedback of mechanical effectiveness induces adaptations in motor modules during cycling

    PubMed Central

    De Marchis, Cristiano; Schmid, Maurizio; Bibbo, Daniele; Castronovo, Anna Margherita; D'Alessio, Tommaso; Conforto, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have reported evidence that the motor system may rely on a modular organization, even if this behavior has yet to be confirmed during motor adaptation. The aim of the present study is to investigate the modular motor control mechanisms underlying the execution of pedaling by untrained subjects in different biomechanical conditions. We use the muscle synergies framework to characterize the muscle coordination of 11 subjects pedaling under two different conditions. The first one consists of a pedaling exercise with a strategy freely chosen by the subjects (Preferred Pedaling Technique, PPT), while the second condition constrains the gesture by means of a real time visual feedback of mechanical effectiveness (Effective Pedaling Technique, EPT). Pedal forces, recorded using a pair of instrumented pedals, were used to calculate the Index of Effectiveness (IE). EMG signals were recorded from eight muscles of the dominant leg and Non-negative Matrix Factorization (NMF) was applied for the extraction of muscle synergies. All the synergy vectors, extracted cycle by cycle for each subject, were pooled across subjects and conditions and underwent a 2-dimensional Sammon's non-linear mapping. Seven representative clusters were identified on the Sammon's projection, and the corresponding eight-dimensional synergy vectors were used to reconstruct the repertoire of muscle activation for all subjects and all pedaling conditions (VAF > 0.8 for each individual muscle pattern). Only 5 out of the 7 identified modules were used by the subjects during the PPT pedaling condition, while 2 additional modules were found specific for the pedaling condition EPT. The temporal recruitment of three identified modules was highly correlated with IE. The structure of the identified modules was found similar to that extracted in other studies of human walking, partly confirming the existence of shared and task specific muscle synergies, and providing further evidence on the modularity

  9. Effect of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties of Cu/SS joints after single and multiple HIP cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tähtinen, S.; Singh, B. N.; Toft, P.

    2000-12-01

    The present design of the ITER plasma facing components consists of a copper alloy heat sink layer between plasma facing materials and stainless steel structure. The main option for manufacturing these components is hot isostatic pressing (HIP) method and several HIP thermal cycles are foreseen for manufacturing of the complete blanket module. Mechanical characterisation of HIP joints between dissimilar metals is a complicated issue, where information on mechanical properties of base alloys, metallurgy of the HIP joints and mechanical testing methods will be required. The tensile and three point bend tests produced different fracture modes, depending on test temperature, applied HIP thermal cycles and neutron irradiation. The fracture mode was either ductile fracture of copper alloy or joint interface fracture. The mechanical properties of the HIP joint specimens were dominated by strength mismatch of the base alloys which was affected by HIP thermal cycles and neutron irradiation.

  10. CuCrZr alloy microstructure and mechanical properties after hot isostatic pressing bonding cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frayssines, P.-E.; Gentzbittel, J.-M.; Guilloud, A.; Bucci, P.; Soreau, T.; Francois, N.; Primaux, F.; Heikkinen, S.; Zacchia, F.; Eaton, R.; Barabash, V.; Mitteau, R.

    2014-04-01

    ITER first wall (FW) panels are a layered structure made of the three following materials: 316L(N) austenitic stainless steel, CuCrZr alloy and beryllium. Two hot isostatic pressing (HIP) cycles are included in the reference fabrication route to bond these materials together for the normal heat flux design supplied by the European Union (EU). This reference fabrication route ensures sufficiently good mechanical properties for the materials and joints, which fulfil the ITER mechanical specifications, but often results in a coarse grain size for the CuCrZr alloy, which is not favourable, especially, for the thermal creep properties of the FW panels. To limit the abnormal grain growth of CuCrZr and make the ITER FW fabrication route more reliable, a study began in 2010 in the EU in the frame of an ITER task agreement. Two material fabrication approaches have been investigated. The first one was dedicated to the fabrication of solid CuCrZr alloy in close collaboration with an industrial copper alloys manufacturer. The second approach investigated was the manufacturing of CuCrZr alloy using the powder metallurgy (PM) route and HIP consolidation. This paper presents the main mechanical and microstructural results associated with the two CuCrZr approaches mentioned above. The mechanical properties of solid CuCrZr, PM CuCrZr and joints (solid CuCrZr/solid CuCrZr and solid CuCrZr/316L(N) and PM CuCrZr/316L(N)) are also presented.

  11. Confidence versus Performance as an Indicator of the Presence of Alternative Conceptions and Inadequate Problem-Solving Skills in Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potgieter, Marietjie; Malatje, Esther; Gaigher, Estelle; Venter, Elsie

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the use of performance-confidence relationships to signal the presence of alternative conceptions and inadequate problem-solving skills in mechanics. A group of 33 students entering physics at a South African university participated in the project. The test instrument consisted of 20 items derived from existing standardised…

  12. Structural basis of the alternating-access mechanism in a bile acid transporter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaoming; Levin, Elena J.; Pan, Yaping; McCoy, Jason G.; Sharma, Ruchika; Kloss, Brian; Bruni, Renato; Quick, Matthias; Zhou, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Bile acids are synthesized from cholesterol in hepatocytes and secreted through the biliary tract into the small intestine, where they aid in absorption of lipids and fat-soluble vitamins. Through a process known as enterohepatic recirculation, more than 90% of secreted bile acids are then retrieved from the intestine and returned to the liver for resecretion. In humans, there are two Na+-dependent bile acid transporters involved in enterohepatic recirculation, the Na+-taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP; also known as SLC10A1) expressed in hepatocytes, and the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT; also known as SLC10A2) expressed on enterocytes in the terminal ileum. In recent years, ASBT has attracted much interest as a potential drug target for treatment of hypercholesterolaemia, because inhibition of ASBT reduces reabsorption of bile acids, thus increasing bile acid synthesis and consequently cholesterol consumption. However, a lack of three-dimensional structures of bile acid transporters hampers our ability to understand the molecular mechanisms of substrate selectivity and transport, and to interpret the wealth of existing functional data. The crystal structure of an ASBT homologue from Neisseria meningitidis (ASBTNM) in detergent was reported recently, showing the protein in an inward-open conformation bound to two Na+ and a taurocholic acid. However, the structural changes that bring bile acid and Na+ across the membrane are difficult to infer from a single structure. To understand the structural changes associated with the coupled transport of Na+ and bile acids, here we solved two structures of an ASBT homologue from Yersinia frederiksenii (ASBTYf) in a lipid environment, which reveal that a large rigid-body rotation of a substrate-binding domain gives the conserved `crossover' region, where two discontinuous helices cross each other, alternating accessibility from either side of the cell membrane. This result has implications

  13. Supercharged two-cycle engines employing novel single element reciprocating shuttle inlet valve mechanisms and with a variable compression ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesen, Bernard (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    This invention relates to novel reciprocating shuttle inlet valves, effective with every type of two-cycle engine, from small high-speed single cylinder model engines, to large low-speed multiple cylinder engines, employing spark or compression ignition. Also permitting the elimination of out-of-phase piston arrangements to control scavenging and supercharging of opposed-piston engines. The reciprocating shuttle inlet valve (32) and its operating mechanism (34) is constructed as a single and simple uncomplicated member, in combination with the lost-motion abutments, (46) and (48), formed in a piston skirt, obviating the need for any complex mechanisms or auxiliary drives, unaffected by heat, friction, wear or inertial forces. The reciprocating shuttle inlet valve retains the simplicity and advantages of two-cycle engines, while permitting an increase in volumetric efficiency and performance, thereby increasing the range of usefulness of two-cycle engines into many areas that are now dominated by the four-cycle engine.

  14. Application of fracture mechanics and half-cycle theory to the prediction of fatigue life of aerospace structural components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    1989-01-01

    The service life of aircraft structural components undergoing random stress cycling was analyzed by the application of fracture mechanics. The initial crack sizes at the critical stress points for the fatigue crack growth analysis were established through proof load tests. The fatigue crack growth rates for random stress cycles were calculated using the half-cycle method. A new equation was developed for calculating the number of remaining flights for the structural components. The number of remaining flights predicted by the new equation is much lower than that predicted by the conventional equation. This report describes the application of fracture mechanics and the half-cycle method to calculate the number of remaining flights for aircraft structural components.

  15. Cycling excitation process: An ultra efficient and quiet signal amplification mechanism in semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yu-Hsin; Yan, Lujiang; Zhang, Alex Ce; Hall, David; Niaz, Iftikhar Ahmad; Zhou, Yuchun; Sham, L. J.; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2015-08-03

    Signal amplification, performed by transistor amplifiers with its merit rated by the efficiency and noise characteristics, is ubiquitous in all electronic systems. Because of transistor thermal noise, an intrinsic signal amplification mechanism, impact ionization was sought after to complement the limits of transistor amplifiers. However, due to the high operation voltage (30-200 V typically), low power efficiency, limited scalability, and, above all, rapidly increasing excess noise with amplification factor, impact ionization has been out of favor for most electronic systems except for a few applications such as avalanche photodetectors and single-photon Geiger detectors. Here, we report an internal signal amplification mechanism based on the principle of the phonon-assisted cycling excitation process (CEP). Si devices using this concept show ultrahigh gain, low operation voltage, CMOS compatibility, and, above all, quantum limit noise performance that is 30 times lower than devices using impact ionization. Established on a unique physical effect of attractive properties, CEP-based devices can potentially revolutionize the fields of semiconductor electronics.

  16. Cycling excitation process: An ultra efficient and quiet signal amplification mechanism in semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Hsin; Yan, Lujiang; Zhang, Alex Ce; Hall, David; Niaz, Iftikhar Ahmad; Zhou, Yuchun; Sham, L. J.; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2015-08-01

    Signal amplification, performed by transistor amplifiers with its merit rated by the efficiency and noise characteristics, is ubiquitous in all electronic systems. Because of transistor thermal noise, an intrinsic signal amplification mechanism, impact ionization was sought after to complement the limits of transistor amplifiers. However, due to the high operation voltage (30-200 V typically), low power efficiency, limited scalability, and, above all, rapidly increasing excess noise with amplification factor, impact ionization has been out of favor for most electronic systems except for a few applications such as avalanche photodetectors and single-photon Geiger detectors. Here, we report an internal signal amplification mechanism based on the principle of the phonon-assisted cycling excitation process (CEP). Si devices using this concept show ultrahigh gain, low operation voltage, CMOS compatibility, and, above all, quantum limit noise performance that is 30 times lower than devices using impact ionization. Established on a unique physical effect of attractive properties, CEP-based devices can potentially revolutionize the fields of semiconductor electronics.

  17. Mechanism for differential sensitivity of the chromosome and growth cycles of mammalian cells to the rate of protein synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, R S; Bonner, W M

    1985-01-01

    It has been documented widely that when the generation times of eucaryotic cells are lengthened by slowing the rate of protein synthesis, the duration of the chromosome cycle (S, G2, and M phases) remains relatively invariant. Paradoxically, when the growth of exponentially growing cultures of CHO cells is partially inhibited with inhibitors of protein synthesis, the immediate effect is a proportionate reduction in the rate of total protein, histone protein, and DNA synthesis. However, on further investigation it was found that over the next 2 h the rates of histone protein and DNA synthesis recover, in some cases completely to the uninhibited rate, while the synthesis rates of other proteins do not recover. We called this process chromosome cycle compensation. The amount of compensation seen in CHO cell cultures can account quantitatively for the relative invariance in the length of the chromosome cycle (S, G2, and M phases) reported for these cells. The mechanism for this compensation involves a specific increase in the levels of histone mRNAs. An invariant chromosome cycle coupled with a lengthening growth cycle must result in a disproportionate lengthening of the G1 phase. Thus, these results suggest that chromosome cycle invariance may be due more to specific cellular compensation mechanisms rather than to the more usual interpretation involving a rate-limiting step for cell cycle progression in the G1 phase. Images PMID:3837839

  18. Adaptation of muscle coordination to altered task mechanics during steady-state cycling.

    PubMed

    Neptune, R R; Herzog, W

    2000-02-01

    The objective of this work was to increase our understanding of how motor patterns are produced during movement tasks by quantifying adaptations in muscle coordination in response to altered task mechanics. We used pedaling as our movement paradigm because it is a constrained cyclical movement that allows for a controlled investigation of test conditions such as movement speed and effort. Altered task mechanics were introduced using an elliptical chainring. The kinematics of the crank were changed from a relatively constant angular velocity using a circular chainring to a widely varying angular velocity using an elliptical chainring. Kinetic, kinematic and muscle activity data were collected from eight competitive cyclists using three different chainrings--one circular and two different orientations of an elliptical chainring. We tested the hypotheses that muscle coordination patterns (EMG timing and magnitude), specifically the regions of active muscle force production, would shift towards regions in the crank cycle in which the crank angular velocity, and hence muscle contraction speeds, were favorable to produce muscle power as defined by the skeletal muscle power-velocity relationship. The results showed that our hypothesis with regards to timing was not supported. Although there were statistically significant shifts in muscle timing, the shifts were minor in absolute terms and appeared to be the result of the muscles accounting for the activation dynamics associated with muscle force development (i.e. the delay in muscle force rise and decay). But, significant changes in the magnitude of muscle EMG during regions of slow crank angular velocity for the tibialis anterior and rectus femoris were observed. Thus, the nervous system used adaptations to the muscle EMG magnitude, rather than the timing, to adapt to the altered task mechanics. The results also suggested that cyclists might work on the descending limb of the power-velocity relationship when pedaling at

  19. Pericyte contractility controls endothelial cell cycle progression and sprouting: insights into angiogenic switch mechanics.

    PubMed

    Durham, Jennifer T; Surks, Howard K; Dulmovits, Brian M; Herman, Ira M

    2014-11-01

    Microvascular stability and regulation of capillary tonus are regulated by pericytes and their interactions with endothelial cells (EC). While the RhoA/Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway has been implicated in modulation of pericyte contractility, in part via regulation of the myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP), the mechanisms linking Rho GTPase activity with actomyosin-based contraction and the cytoskeleton are equivocal. Recently, the myosin phosphatase-RhoA-interacting protein (MRIP) was shown to mediate the RhoA/ROCK-directed MLCP inactivation in vascular smooth muscle. Here we report that MRIP directly interacts with the β-actin-specific capping protein βcap73. Furthermore, manipulation of MRIP expression influences pericyte contractility, with MRIP silencing inducing cytoskeletal remodeling and cellular hypertrophy. MRIP knockdown induces a repositioning of βcap73 from the leading edge to stress fibers; thus MRIP-silenced pericytes increase F-actin-driven cell spreading twofold. These hypertrophied and cytoskeleton-enriched pericytes demonstrate a 2.2-fold increase in contractility upon MRIP knockdown when cells are plated on a deformable substrate. In turn, silencing pericyte MRIP significantly affects EC cycle progression and angiogenic activation. When MRIP-silenced pericytes are cocultured with capillary EC, there is a 2.0-fold increase in EC cycle entry. Furthermore, in three-dimensional models of injury and repair, silencing pericyte MRIP results in a 1.6-fold elevation of total tube area due to EC network formation and increased angiogenic sprouting. The pivotal role of MRIP expression in governing pericyte contractile phenotype and endothelial growth should lend important new insights into how chemomechanical signaling pathways control the "angiogenic switch" and pathological angiogenic induction. PMID:25143350

  20. Cell Cycle-Dependent Mechanisms Underlie Vincristine-Induced Death of Primary Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Kothari, Anisha; Hittelman, Walter N; Chambers, Timothy C

    2016-06-15

    Microtubule-targeting agents (MTA), such as the taxanes and vinca alkaloids, are used to treat a variety of cancers due to their ability to perturb microtubule dynamics. In cell culture, MTAs exert their anticancer effects primarily by causing mitotic arrest and cell death. However, accumulating indirect evidence suggests that MTAs may exert their cytotoxicity in human tumors by interfering with interphase microtubules. In this study, we sought to develop and characterize an experimental system in which to test the hypothesis that MTAs induce cell death during interphase. Primary adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells treated with vincristine only weakly exhibited colocalization between mitotic and apoptotic markers and major characteristics of mitotic death, such as an increase in cells with 4N DNA content before the appearance of cells with <2N DNA content, suggesting a mixed response. Therefore, we separated ALL cells into distinct phases of the cell cycle by centrifugal elutriation, labeled cells with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU), and then treated each population with vincristine. Cells isolated during G1 underwent cell death without evidence of EdU uptake, indicating that the cytotoxic effects of vincristine took place during G1 Conversely, cells isolated during S or G2-M phases underwent death following mitotic arrest. Thus, vincristine induces distinct death programs in primary ALL cells depending on cell-cycle phase, and cells in G1 are particularly susceptible to perturbation of interphase microtubules. Primary ALL cells may therefore provide a powerful model system in which to study the multimodal mechanisms underlying MTA-induced cell death. Cancer Res; 76(12); 3553-61. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197148

  1. 6-Shogaol induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human hepatoma cells through pleiotropic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jung-Ju; Omar, Hany A; Lee, Ying-Ray; Teng, Yen-Ni; Chen, Pin-Shern; Chen, Yu-Chung; Huang, Hsiao-Shan; Lee, Kuan-Han; Hung, Jui-Hsiang

    2015-09-01

    Shogaols are a group of the active constituents of ginger that have been identified to have various biological activities. The aim of the current study was to investigate the antitumor activity of 6-shogaol in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and the possible involvement of reactive oxygen species as a putative mechanism of action. HCC cell lines, HepG2 and Huh-7, were used to study the in vitro anti-cancer activity of 6-shogaol via the application of various molecular biology techniques. Results showed that 6-shogaol effectively inhibited the cell viability, caused cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase and induced apoptosis in HCC cells as indicated by MTT assay, DAPI nuclear staining, annexin V assay, cell cycle analysis, and activation of caspase-3. Western blot analysis revealed the ability of 6-shogaol to target cancer survival signaling pathways mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Akt. In addition, 6-Shogaol induced alteration of cyclin proteins expression and caused cleavage of protein kinase C delta. Furthermore, 6-Shogaol was able to induce the production of reactive oxygen species and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-associated proteins and the consequent activation of autophagy in HepG2 cells. Taken together, the current study highlights evidences that 6-shogaol induces apoptosis, modulates cyclins expression and targets cancer survival signaling pathways in HCC cell lines, at least in part, via the production of reactive oxygen species. These findings support 6-shogaol's clinical promise as a potential candidate for HCC therapy. PMID:26101062

  2. Instrumentation to study myofibril mechanics from static to artificial simulations of cardiac cycle

    PubMed Central

    Vikhorev, Petr G.; Ferenczi, Michael A.; Marston, Steven B.

    2016-01-01

    Many causes of heart muscle diseases and skeletal muscle diseases are inherited and caused by mutations in genes of sarcomere proteins which play either a structural or contractile role in the muscle cell. Tissue samples from human hearts with mutations can be obtained but often samples are only a few milligrams and it is necessary to freeze them for storage and transportation. Myofibrils are the fundamental contractile components of the muscle cell and retain all structural elements and contractile proteins performing in contractile event; moreover viable myofibrils can be obtained from frozen tissue.•We are describing a versatile technique for measuring the contractility and its Ca2+ regulation in single myofibrils. The control of myofibril length, incubation medium and data acquisition is carried out using a digital acquisition board via computer software. Using computer control it is possible not only to measure contractile and mechanical parameters but also simulate complex protocols such as a cardiac cycle to vary length and medium independently.•This single myofibril force assay is well suited for physiological measurements. The system can be adapted to measure tension amplitude, rates of contraction and relaxation, Ca2+ dependence of these parameters in dose-response measurements, length-dependent activation, stretch response, myofibril elasticity and response to simulated cardiac cycle length changes. Our approach provides an all-round quantitative way to measure myofibrils performance and to observe the effect of mutations or posttranslational modifications. The technique has been demonstrated by the study of contraction in heart with hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy mutations in sarcomere proteins. PMID:27047763

  3. Experimental opto-mechanics with levitated nanoparticles: towards quantum control and thermodynamic cycles (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiesel, Nikolai; Blaser, Florian; Delic, Uros; Grass, David; Dechant, Andreas; Lutz, Eric; Bathaee, Marzieh; Aspelmeyer, Markus

    2015-08-01

    Combining optical levitation and cavity optomechanics constitutes a promising approach to prepare and control the motional quantum state of massive objects (>10^9 amu). This, in turn, would represent a completely new type of light-matter interface and has, for example, been predicted to enable experimental tests of macrorealistic models or of non-Newtonian gravity at small length scales. Such ideas have triggered significant experimental efforts to realizing such novel systems. To this end, we have recently successfully demonstrated cavity-cooling of a levitated sub-micron silica particle in a classical regime at a pressure of approximately 1mbar. Access to higher vacuum of approx. 10^-6 mbar has been demonstrated using 3D-feedback cooling in optical tweezers without cavity-coupling. Here we will illustrate our strategy towards trapping, 3D-cooling and quantum control of nanoparticles in ultra-high vacuum using cavity-based feedback cooling methods and clean particle loading with hollow-core photonic crystal fibers. We will also discuss the current experimental progress both in 3D-cavity cooling and HCPCF-based transport of nanoparticles. As yet another application of cavity-controlled levitated nanoparticles we will show how to implement a thermodynamic Sterling cycle operating in the underdamped regime. We present optimized protocols with respect to efficiency at maximum power in this little explored regime. We also show that the excellent level of control in our system will allow reproducing all relevant features of such optimized protocols. In a next step, this will enable studies of thermodynamics cycles in a regime where the quantization of the mechanical motion becomes relevant.

  4. Effect of Alternate Supply of Shielding Gases of Tungsten Inert Gas Welding on Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Neelam Vilas; Telsang, Martand Tamanacharya

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, an attempt is made to study the effect of alternate supply of the shielding gas in comparison with the conventional method of TIG welding with pure argon gas. The two sets of combination are used as 10-10 and 40-20 s for alternate supply of the Argon and Helium shielding gas respectively. The effect of alternate supply of shielding gas is studied on the mechanical properties like bend test, tensile test and impact test. The full factorial experimental design is applied for three set of combinations. The ANOVA is used to find significant parameters for the process and regression analysis used to develop the mathematical model. The result shows that the alternate supply of the shielding gas for 10-10 s provides better result for the bend, tensile and impact test as compared with the conventional argon gas and the alternate supply of 40-20 s argon and helium gas respectively. Welding speed can be increased for alternate supply of the shielding gas that can reduce the total welding cost.

  5. Effect of Alternate Supply of Shielding Gases of Tungsten Inert Gas Welding on Mechanical Properties of Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Neelam Vilas; Telsang, Martand Tamanacharya

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, an attempt is made to study the effect of alternate supply of the shielding gas in comparison with the conventional method of TIG welding with pure argon gas. The two sets of combination are used as 10-10 and 40-20 s for alternate supply of the Argon and Helium shielding gas respectively. The effect of alternate supply of shielding gas is studied on the mechanical properties like bend test, tensile test and impact test. The full factorial experimental design is applied for three set of combinations. The ANOVA is used to find significant parameters for the process and regression analysis used to develop the mathematical model. The result shows that the alternate supply of the shielding gas for 10-10 s provides better result for the bend, tensile and impact test as compared with the conventional argon gas and the alternate supply of 40-20 s argon and helium gas respectively. Welding speed can be increased for alternate supply of the shielding gas that can reduce the total welding cost.

  6. A Modified Wilson Cycle Scenario Based on Thermo-Mechanical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baes, M.; Sobolev, S. V.

    2014-12-01

    The major problem of classical Wilson Cycle concept is the suggested conversion of the passive continental margin to the active subduction zone. Previous modeling studies assumed either unusually thick felsic continental crust at the margin (over 40 km) or unusually low lithospheric thickness (less than 70 km) to simulate this process. Here we propose a new triggering factor in subduction initiation process that is mantle suction force. Based on this proposal we suggest a modification of Wilson Cycle concept. Sometime after opening and extension of oceanic basin, continental passive margin moves over the slab remnants of the former active subduction zones in deep mantle. Such slab remnants or deep slabs of neighboring active subduction zones produce a suction mantle flow introducing additional compression at the passive margin. It results in the initiation of a new subduction zone, hence starting the closing phase of Wilson Cycle. In this scenario the weakness of continental crust near the passive margin which is inherited from the rifting phase and horizontal push force induced from far-field topographic gradient within the continent facilitate and speed up subduction initiation process. Our thermo-mechanical modeling shows that after a few tens of million years a shear zone may indeed develop along the passive margin that has typical two-layered 35 km thick continental crust and thermal lithosphere thicker than 100 km if there is a broad mantle down-welling flow below the margin. Soon after formation of this shear zone oceanic plate descends into mantle and subduction initiates. Subduction initiation occurs following over-thrusting of continental crust and retreating of future trench. In models without far-field topographic gradient within the continent subduction initiation requires weaker passive margin. Our results also indicate that subduction initiation depends on several parameters such as magnitude, domain size and location of suction mantle flow

  7. Mechanical ventilatory constraints during incremental cycle exercise in human pregnancy: implications for respiratory sensation

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Dennis; Webb, Katherine A; Davies, Gregory A L; O'Donnell, Denis E

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the physiological mechanisms of exertional respiratory discomfort (breathlessness) in pregnancy by comparing ventilatory (breathing pattern, airway function, operating lung volumes, oesophageal pressure (Poes)-derived indices of respiratory mechanics) and perceptual (breathlessness intensity) responses to incremental cycle exercise in 15 young, healthy women in the third trimester (TM3; between 34 and 38 weeks gestation) and again 4–5 months postpartum (PP). During pregnancy, resting inspiratory capacity (IC) increased (P < 0.01) and end-expiratory lung volume decreased (P < 0.001), with no associated change in total lung capacity (TLC) or static respiratory muscle strength. This permitted greater tidal volume (VT) expansion throughout exercise in TM3, while preserving the relationship between contractile respiratory muscle effort (tidal Poes swing expressed as a percentage of maximum inspiratory pressure (PImax)) and thoracic volume displacement (VT expressed as a percentage of vital capacity) and between breathlessness and ventilation (V̇E). At the highest equivalent work rate (HEWR = 128 ± 5 W) in TM3 compared with PP: V̇E, tidal Poes/PImax and breathlessness intensity ratings increased by 10.2 l min−1 (P < 0.001), 8.8%PImax (P < 0.05) and 0.9 Borg units (P < 0.05), respectively. Pulmonary resistance was not increased at rest or during exercise at the HEWR in TM3, despite marked increases in mean tidal inspiratory and expiratory flow rates, suggesting increased bronchodilatation. Dynamic mechanical constraints on VT expansion (P < 0.05) with associated increased breathlessness intensity ratings (P < 0.05) were observed near peak exercise in TM3 compared with PP. In conclusion: (1) pregnancy-induced increases in exertional breathlessness reflected the normal awareness of increased V̇E and contractile respiratory muscle effort; (2) mechanical adaptations of the respiratory system, including recruitment of resting IC

  8. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), General Electric Phase 1. Volume 2: Advanced energy conversion systems. Part 1: Open-cycle gas turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. H.; Corman, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Ten energy conversion systems are defined and analyzed in terms of efficiency. These include: open-cycle gas turbine recuperative; open-cycle gas turbine; closed-cycle gas turbine; supercritical CO2 cycle; advanced steam cycle; liquid metal topping cycle; open-cycle MHD; closed-cycle inert gas MHD; closed-cycle liquid metal MHD; and fuel cells. Results are presented.

  9. Use of Guided Acoustic Waves to Assess the Effects of Thermal-Mechanical Cycling on Composite Stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seale, Michael D.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2000-01-01

    The introduction of new, advanced composite materials into aviation systems requires it thorough understanding of the long-term effects of combined thermal and mechanical loading. As part of a study to evaluate the effects of thermal-mechanical cycling, it guided acoustic (Lamb) wave measurement system was used to measure the bending and out-of-plane stiffness coefficients of composite laminates undergoing thermal-mechanical loading. The system uses a pulse/receive technique that excites an antisymmetric Lamb mode and measures the time-of-flight over a wide frequency range. Given the material density and plate thickness, the bending and out-of-plane shear stiffnesses are calculated from a reconstruction of the velocity dispersion curve. A series of 16 and 32-ply composite laminates were subjected to it thermal-mechanical loading profile in load frames equipped with special environmental chambers. The composite systems studied were it graphite fiber reinforced amorphous thermoplastic polyimide and it graphite fiber reinforced bismaleimide thermoset. The samples were exposed to both high and low temperature extremes its well as high and low strain profiles. The bending and out-of-plane stiffnesses for composite sample that have undergone over 6,000 cycles of thermal-mechanical loading are reported. The Lamb wave generated elastic stiffness results have shown decreases of up to 20% at 4,936 loading cycles for the graphite/thermoplastic samples and up to 64% at 4,706 loading cycles for the graphite/thermoset samples.

  10. Mechanical regulation of cardiac muscle by coupling calcium kinetics with cross-bridge cycling: a dynamic model.

    PubMed

    Landesberg, A; Sideman, S

    1994-08-01

    This study describes the regulation of mechanical activity in the intact cardiac muscle, the effects of the free calcium transients and the mechanical constraints, and emphasizes the central role of the troponin complex in regulating muscle activity. A "loose coupling" between calcium binding to troponin and cross-bridge cycling is stipulated, allowing the existence of cross bridges in the strong conformation without having bound calcium on the neighboring troponin. The model includes two feedback mechanisms: 1) a positive feedback, or cooperativity, in which the cycling cross bridges affect the affinity of troponin for calcium, and 2) a negative mechanical feedback, where the filament-sliding velocity affects cross-bridge cycling. The model simulates the reported experimental force-length and force-velocity relationships at different levels of activation. The dependence of the shortening velocity on calcium concentration, sarcomere length, internal load, and rate of cross-bridge cycling is described analytically in agreement with reported data. Furthermore, the model provides an analytic solution for Hill's equation of the force-velocity relationship and for the phenomena of unloaded shortening velocity and force deficit. The model-calculated changes in free calcium in various mechanical conditions are in good agreement with the available experimental results. PMID:8067434

  11. Use of alternative fuels and oxidants (hydrogen and methane) in diesel engines operating in the gas-diesel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Kartashev, N.N. )

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses how alternative fuels such as hydrogen and methane, carried in liquefied form, have applications in all types of transport. An important property of hydrogen and methane is that they can be transported over great distances without loss and that they can be stored in industrial quantities in underground tanks near manufacturing areas or cities. In addition, they are ecologically cleaner than the customary fuels, and their use causes no significant environmental pollution.

  12. Computational study on the behaviors of granular materials under mechanical cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Ye, Minyou; Chen, Hongli

    2015-11-01

    Considering that fusion pebble beds are probably subjected to the cyclic compression excitation in their future applications, we presented a computational study to report the effect of mechanical cycling on the behaviors of granular matter. The correctness of our numerical experiments was confirmed by a comparison with the effective medium theory. Under the cyclic loads, the fast granular compaction was observed to evolve in a stretched exponential law. Besides, the increasing stiffening in packing structure, especially the decreasing moduli pressure dependence due to granular consolidation, was also observed. For the force chains inside the pebble beds, both the internal force distribution and the spatial distribution of force chains would become increasingly uniform as the external force perturbation proceeded and therefore produced the stress relief on grains. In this case, the originally proposed 3-parameter Mueth function was found to fail to describe the internal force distribution. Thereby, its improved functional form with 4 parameters was proposed here and proved to better fit the data. These findings will provide more detailed information on the pebble beds for the relevant fusion design and analysis.

  13. Fiber-reinforced composite analysis using optical coherence tomography after mechanical and thermal cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyotoku, B. B. C.; Braz, A. K. S.; Braz, R.; Gomes, A. S. L.

    2007-02-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are new materials which have been used for a variety of dental applications, including tooth splinting, replacement of missing teeth, treatment of dental emergencies, reinforcement of resin provisional fixed prosthodontic restorations, orthodontic retention, and other clinical applications. Different fiber types are available, but little clinical information has been disseminated. The traditional microscopy investigation, most commonly used to study this material, is a destructive technique, which requires specimen sectioning and are essentially surface measurements. On the basis of these considerations, the aim of this research is to analyze the interior of a dental sample reinforced with fiber after a mechanical and thermal cycling to emulate oral conditions using optical coherence tomography (OCT). The device we are using is a home built Fourier domain OCT working at 800 nm with 6 μm resolution. The results are compared with microscopy images to validate OCT as a working method. In long term, fractures allow bacterial invasion provoking plaque and calculus formation that can cause caries and periodontal disease. Therefore, non invasive imaging of the bridge fiber enables the possibility of periodic clinical evaluation to ensure the patient health. Furthermore, OCT images can provide a powerful method for quantitative analysis of crack propagation, and can potentially be used for in vivo assessment.

  14. Methyl Jasmonate: Putative Mechanisms of Action on Cancer Cells Cycle, Metabolism, and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Cesari, Italo Mario; Figueiredo Rodrigues, Mariana; Mendonça, Bruna dos Santos; Amôedo, Nivea Dias; Rumjanek, Franklin David

    2014-01-01

    Methyl jasmonate (MJ), an oxylipid that induces defense-related mechanisms in plants, has been shown to be active against cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, without affecting normal cells. Here we review most of the described MJ activities in an attempt to get an integrated view and better understanding of its multifaceted modes of action. MJ (1) arrests cell cycle, inhibiting cell growth and proliferation, (2) causes cell death through the intrinsic/extrinsic proapoptotic, p53-independent apoptotic, and nonapoptotic (necrosis) pathways, (3) detaches hexokinase from the voltage-dependent anion channel, dissociating glycolytic and mitochondrial functions, decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential, favoring cytochrome c release and ATP depletion, activating pro-apoptotic, and inactivating antiapoptotic proteins, (4) induces reactive oxygen species mediated responses, (5) stimulates MAPK-stress signaling and redifferentiation in leukemia cells, (6) inhibits overexpressed proinflammatory enzymes in cancer cells such as aldo-keto reductase 1 and 5-lipoxygenase, and (7) inhibits cell migration and shows antiangiogenic and antimetastatic activities. Finally, MJ may act as a chemosensitizer to some chemotherapics helping to overcome drug resistant. The complete lack of toxicity to normal cells and the rapidity by which MJ causes damage to cancer cells turn MJ into a promising anticancer agent that can be used alone or in combination with other agents. PMID:24648844

  15. Computational study on the behaviors of granular materials under mechanical cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Ye, Minyou; Chen, Hongli

    2015-11-07

    Considering that fusion pebble beds are probably subjected to the cyclic compression excitation in their future applications, we presented a computational study to report the effect of mechanical cycling on the behaviors of granular matter. The correctness of our numerical experiments was confirmed by a comparison with the effective medium theory. Under the cyclic loads, the fast granular compaction was observed to evolve in a stretched exponential law. Besides, the increasing stiffening in packing structure, especially the decreasing moduli pressure dependence due to granular consolidation, was also observed. For the force chains inside the pebble beds, both the internal force distribution and the spatial distribution of force chains would become increasingly uniform as the external force perturbation proceeded and therefore produced the stress relief on grains. In this case, the originally proposed 3-parameter Mueth function was found to fail to describe the internal force distribution. Thereby, its improved functional form with 4 parameters was proposed here and proved to better fit the data. These findings will provide more detailed information on the pebble beds for the relevant fusion design and analysis.

  16. Chicken collagen hydrolysate cryoprotection of natural actomyosin: Mechanism studies during freeze-thaw cycles and simulated digestion.

    PubMed

    Du, Lihui; Betti, Mirko

    2016-11-15

    The cryoprotective effect of chicken collagen hydrolysate (CCH) obtained from chicken skin was investigated at 0%, 4%, 8% and 12% (w/w) on natural actomyosin (NAM) model system to elucidate the possible mechanism. Ice dimensions in the NAM dispersions were measured after 7 thermal cycles (stabilized at -20°C and cycled between -16°C to -12°C) using a polarized microscope, demonstrating a significant reduction of ice crystal size induced by CCH. To determine the ice-controlling effect of CCH on protein freeze-denaturation, NAM samples were subjected to 7 freeze-thaw cycles between -20°C and 4°C. The results suggest that the presence of CCH can inhibit the ice crystals growth in NAM to reduce protein freeze-denaturation and oxidation similarly to the commercial cryoprotectants, resulting in higher protein solubility and a better gel structure with higher digestibility after freeze-thaw cycles. PMID:27283698

  17. Mechanical Unloading of Mouse Bone in Microgravity Significantly Alters Cell Cycle Gene Set Expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaber, Elizabeth; Dvorochkin, Natalya; Almeida, Eduardo; Kaplan, Warren; Burns, Brnedan

    2012-07-01

    Spaceflight factors, including microgravity and space radiation, have many detrimental short-term effects on human physiology, including muscle and bone degradation, and immune system dysfunction. The long-term progression of these physiological effects is still poorly understood, and a serious concern for long duration spaceflight missions. We hypothesized that some of the degenerative effects of spaceflight may be caused in part by an inability of stem cells to proliferate and differentiate normally resulting in an impairment of tissue regenerative processes. Furthermore, we hypothesized that long-term bone tissue degeneration in space may be mediated by activation of the p53 signaling network resulting in cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis in osteoprogenitors. In our analyses we found that spaceflight caused significant bone loss in the weight-bearing bones of mice with a 6.3% reduction in bone volume and 11.9% decrease in bone thickness associated with increased osteoclastic activity. Along with this rapid bone loss we also observed alterations in the cell cycle characterized by an increase in the Cdkn1a/p21 cell cycle arrest molecule independent of Trp53. Overexpression of Cdkn1a/p21 was localized to osteoblasts lining the periosteal surface of the femur and chondrocytes in the head of the femur, suggesting an inhibition of proliferation in two key regenerative cell types of the femur in response to spaceflight. Additionally we found overexpression of several matrix degradation molecules including MMP-1a, 3 and 10, of which MMP-10 was localized to osteocytes within the shaft of the femur. This, in conjunction with 40 nm resolution synchrotron nano-Computed Tomography (nano-CT) observations of an increase in osteocyte lacunae cross-sectional area, perimeter and a decrease in circularity indicates a potential role for osteocytic osteolysis in the observed bone degeneration in spaceflight. To further investigate the genetic response of bone to mechanical

  18. Mechanisms governing the eyewall replacement cycle in numerical simulations of tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhenduo

    Eyewall replacement cycle (ERC) is frequently observed during the evolution of intensifying Tropical Cyclones (TCs). Although intensely studied in recent years, the underlying mechanisms of ERC are still poorly understood, and the forecast of ERC remains a great challenge. To advance our understanding of ERC and provide insights in improvement of numerical forecast of ERC, a series of numerical simulations is performed to investigate ERCs in TC-like vortices on a f-plane. The simulated ERCs possess key features similar to those observed in real TCs including the formation of a secondary tangential wind maximum associated with the outer eyewall. The Sawyer-Eliassen equation and tangential momentum budget analyses are performed to diagnose the mechanisms underlying the secondary eyewall formation (SEF) and ERC. Our diagnoses reveal crucial roles of outer rainband heating in governing the formation and development of the secondary tangential wind maximum and demonstrate that the outer rainband convection must reach a critical strength relative to the eyewall before SEF and the subsequent ERC can occur. A positive feedback among low-level convection, acceleration of tangential winds in the boundary layer, and surface evaporation that leads to the development of ERC and a mechanism for the demise of inner eyewall that involves interaction between the transverse circulations induced by eyewall and outer rainband convection are proposed. The tangential momentum budget indicates that the net tendency of tangential wind is a small residual resultant from a large cancellation between tendencies induced by the resolved and sub-grid scale (SGS) processes. The large SGS contribution to the tangential wind budget explains different characteristics of ERC shown in previous numerical studies and poses a great challenge for a timely correct forecast of ERC. The sensitivity experiments show that ERCs are strongly subjected to model physics, vortex radial structure and background

  19. A physical mechanism for the prediction of the sunspot number during solar cycle 21. [graphs (charts)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schatten, K. H.; Scherrer, P. H.; Svalgaard, L.; Wilcox, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    On physical grounds it is suggested that the sun's polar field strength near a solar minimum is closely related to the following cycle's solar activity. Four methods of estimating the sun's polar magnetic field strength near solar minimum are employed to provide an estimate of cycle 21's yearly mean sunspot number at solar maximum of 140 plus or minus 20. This estimate is considered to be a first order attempt to predict the cycle's activity using one parameter of physical importance.

  20. High temperature low cycle fatigue mechanisms for nickel base and a copper base alloy. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shih, C. I.

    1982-01-01

    Damage mechanisms were studied in Rene' 95 and NARloy Z, using optical, scanning and transmission in microscopy. In necklace Rene' 95, crack initiation was mainly associated with cracking of surface MC carbides, except for hold time tests at higher strain ranges where initiation was associated more with a grain boundary mechanism. A mixed mode of propagation with a faceted fracture morphology was typical for all cycle characters. The dependence of life on maximum tensile stress can be demonstrated by the data falling onto three lines corresponding to the three tensile hold times, in the life against maximum tensile stress plot. In NARloy Z, crack initiation was always at the grain boundaries. The mode of crack propagation depended on the cycle character. The life decreased with decreasing strain rate and with tensile holds. In terms of damage mode, different life prediction laws may be applicable to different cycle characters.

  1. Mechanisms of Cell Cycle Control Revealed by a Systematic and Quantitative Overexpression Screen in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Wei; Li, Zhihua; Zhan, Wenjing; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of cell cycle progression is fundamental to cell health and reproduction, and failures in this process are associated with many human diseases. Much of our knowledge of cell cycle regulators derives from loss-of-function studies. To reveal new cell cycle regulatory genes that are difficult to identify in loss-of-function studies, we performed a near-genome-wide flow cytometry assay of yeast gene overexpression-induced cell cycle delay phenotypes. We identified 108 genes whose overexpression significantly delayed the progression of the yeast cell cycle at a specific stage. Many of the genes are newly implicated in cell cycle progression, for example SKO1, RFA1, and YPR015C. The overexpression of RFA1 or YPR015C delayed the cell cycle at G2/M phases by disrupting spindle attachment to chromosomes and activating the DNA damage checkpoint, respectively. In contrast, overexpression of the transcription factor SKO1 arrests cells at G1 phase by activating the pheromone response pathway, revealing new cross-talk between osmotic sensing and mating. More generally, 92%–94% of the genes exhibit distinct phenotypes when overexpressed as compared to their corresponding deletion mutants, supporting the notion that many genes may gain functions upon overexpression. This work thus implicates new genes in cell cycle progression, complements previous screens, and lays the foundation for future experiments to define more precisely roles for these genes in cell cycle progression. PMID:18617996

  2. Mechanisms behind primary production distribution during the last glacial-interglacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Mézo, Priscilla; Kageyama, Masa; Bopp, Laurent; Beaufort, Luc

    2015-04-01

    Reconstructions of past climates are possible through the analysis of organisms contained in marine and terrestrial sediments. Most of the paleorecords depend on biological processes, e.g. production of shells for coccolithophorids in the ocean, and these processes are sensitive to climate fluctuations from seasonal to orbital timescales. Consequently, depending on where and when the organisms that record climate conditions lived in the past, different factors may have influenced their abundance, their functioning, and thus it may bias interpretations of paleodata. In this context, it is necessary to evaluate the response of paleorecorders to climate variability at different timescales. In order to do so, we are using the coupled Earth System Model IPSLCM5A, which has a biogeochemical component PISCES that simulates primary production. We use 9 climate simulations of the IPSL-CM5A model, from -80kyr BP climate conditions to a preindustrial state. Thanks to different forcing conditions of these simulations we are able to disentangle the effects of precession changes from those of obliquity, sea level or gases concentrations. The objectives are to characterize the mechanisms behind the observed changes in primary production between the different time periods. The results of this modeling study will also be compared to reconstructed productions in the Indian, West and East Tropical Pacific Oceans obtained from core sediments with the method described in Beaufort et al. 1997. The early results on seasonal cycles show that, in the Indian Ocean, precession is not the main driver of changes in primary production. Indeed, we observe a grouping between simulations having the same sea level, which suggests that changes in primary production are more sensitive to parameters that define glacial-interglacial conditions such as ice sheets which affect oceanic circulation.

  3. Energy and emission benefits of alternative transportation liquid fuels derived from switchgrass: a fuel life cycle assessment.

    PubMed

    Wu, May; Wu, Ye; Wang, Michael

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a mobility chains, or well-to-wheels (WTW), analysis to assess the energy and emission benefits of cellulosic biomass for the U.S. transportation sector in the years 2015-2030. We estimated the life-cycle energy consumption and emissions associated with biofuel production and use in light-duty vehicle (LDV) technologies by using the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model. Analysis of biofuel production was based on ASPEN Plus model simulation of an advanced fermentation process to produce fuel ethanol/protein, a thermochemical process to produce Fischer-Tropsch diesel (FTD) and dimethyl ether (DME), and a combined heat and power plant to co-produce steam and electricity. Our study revealed that cellulosic biofuels as E85 (mixture of 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline by volume), FTD, and DME offer substantial savings in petroleum (66-93%) and fossil energy (65-88%) consumption on a per-mile basis. Decreased fossil fuel use translates to 82-87% reductions in greenhouse gas emissions across all unblended cellulosic biofuels. In urban areas, our study shows net reductions for almost all criteria pollutants, with the exception of carbon monoxide (unchanged), for each of the biofuel production option examined. Conventional and hybrid electric vehicles, when fueled with E85, could reduce total sulfur oxide (SO(x)) emissions to 39-43% of those generated by vehicles fueled with gasoline. By using bio-FTD and bio-DME in place of diesel, SO(x) emissions are reduced to 46-58% of those generated by diesel-fueled vehicles. Six different fuel production options were compared. This study strongly suggests that integrated heat and power co-generation by means of gas turbine combined cycle is a crucial factor in the energy savings and emission reductions. PMID:16889378

  4. Low cycle fatigue and strengthening mechanism of cold extruded large diameter internal thread of Q460 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Hong; Mei, Qing; Yuan, Jingyun; Zheng, Zaixiang; Jin, Yifu; Zuo, Dunwen

    2016-04-01

    large diameter internal thread of high-strength steel(LDITHSS) manufactured by traditional methods always has the problems of low accuracy and short life. Compared with traditional methods, the cold extrusion process is an effective means to realize higher accuracy and longer life. The low-cycle fatigue properties of LDITHSS are obtained by experiments, and the initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks are observed by scanning electron microscope(SEM). Based on the mechanical properties, surface microstructure and residual stress, the strengthening mechanism of cold extruded large diameter internal thread(LDIT) is discussed. The results show that new grains or sub-grains can be formed on the surface of LDIT due to grain segmentation and grain refinement during cold extrusion. The fibrous structures appear as elongated and streamlined along the normal direction of the tooth surface which leads to residual compressive stress on the extruded surface. The maximum tension stress of LDIT after cold extrusion is found to be 192.55 kN. Under low stress cycling, the yield stress on thread increases, the propagation rate of crack reduces, the fatigue life is thus improved significantly with decreasing surface grain diameter and the average fatigue life increases to 45.539×103 cycle when the maximum applied load decreases to 120 kN. The low cycle fatigue and strengthening mechanism of cold extruded LDIT revealed by this research has significant importance to promote application of internal thread by cold extrusion processing.

  5. Low cycle fatigue and strengthening mechanism of cold extruded large diameter internal thread of Q460 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Hong; Mei, Qing; Yuan, Jingyun; Zheng, Zaixiang; Jin, Yifu; Zuo, Dunwen

    2016-05-01

    large diameter internal thread of high-strength steel(LDITHSS) manufactured by traditional methods always has the problems of low accuracy and short life. Compared with traditional methods, the cold extrusion process is an effective means to realize higher accuracy and longer life. The low-cycle fatigue properties of LDITHSS are obtained by experiments, and the initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks are observed by scanning electron microscope(SEM). Based on the mechanical properties, surface microstructure and residual stress, the strengthening mechanism of cold extruded large diameter internal thread(LDIT) is discussed. The results show that new grains or sub-grains can be formed on the surface of LDIT due to grain segmentation and grain refinement during cold extrusion. The fibrous structures appear as elongated and streamlined along the normal direction of the tooth surface which leads to residual compressive stress on the extruded surface. The maximum tension stress of LDIT after cold extrusion is found to be 192.55 kN. Under low stress cycling, the yield stress on thread increases, the propagation rate of crack reduces, the fatigue life is thus improved significantly with decreasing surface grain diameter and the average fatigue life increases to 45.539×103 cycle when the maximum applied load decreases to 120 kN. The low cycle fatigue and strengthening mechanism of cold extruded LDIT revealed by this research has significant importance to promote application of internal thread by cold extrusion processing.

  6. Comment on "Similarity between quantum mechanics and thermodynamics: Entropy, temperature, and Carnot cycle"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Díaz, L. A.; Díaz-Solórzano, S.

    2015-05-01

    In the paper by Abe and Okuyama [Phys. Rev. E 83, 021121 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevE.83.021121], the quantum Carnot cycle of a simple two-state model of a particle confined in a one-dimensional infinite potential well is discussed. It is claimed that the state at the beginning of the quantum Carnot cycle is pure. After that, it is apparently transmuted to a mixed state if Clausius equality is imposed. We prove that this statement is incorrect. In particular, we prove that the state at the beginning of the cycle is mixed due to the process of measuring energy.

  7. Comment on "Similarity between quantum mechanics and thermodynamics: Entropy, temperature, and Carnot cycle".

    PubMed

    González-Díaz, L A; Díaz-Solórzano, S

    2015-05-01

    In the paper by Abe and Okuyama [Phys. Rev. E 83, 021121 (2011)], the quantum Carnot cycle of a simple two-state model of a particle confined in a one-dimensional infinite potential well is discussed. It is claimed that the state at the beginning of the quantum Carnot cycle is pure. After that, it is apparently transmuted to a mixed state if Clausius equality is imposed. We prove that this statement is incorrect. In particular, we prove that the state at the beginning of the cycle is mixed due to the process of measuring energy. PMID:26066282

  8. Life cycle assessment of integrated waste management systems for alternative legacy scenarios of the London Olympic Park.

    PubMed

    Parkes, Olga; Lettieri, Paola; Bogle, I David L

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the results of the life cycle assessment (LCA) of 10 integrated waste management systems (IWMSs) for 3 potential post-event site design scenarios of the London Olympic Park. The aim of the LCA study is to evaluate direct and indirect emissions resulting from various treatment options of municipal solid waste (MSW) annually generated on site together with avoided emissions resulting from energy, materials and nutrients recovery. IWMSs are modelled using GaBi v6.0 Product Sustainability software and results are presented based on the CML (v.Nov-10) characterisation method. The results show that IWMSs with advanced thermal treatment (ATT) and incineration with energy recovery have the lowest Global Warming Potential (GWP) than IWMSs where landfill is the primary waste treatment process. This is due to higher direct emissions and lower avoided emissions from the landfill process compared to the emissions from the thermal treatment processes. LCA results demonstrate that significant environmental savings are achieved through substitution of virgin materials with recycled ones. The results of the sensitivity analysis carried out for IWMS 1 shows that increasing recycling rate by 5%, 10% and 15% compared to the baseline scenario can reduce GWP by 8%, 17% and 25% respectively. Sensitivity analysis also shows how changes in waste composition affect the overall result of the system. The outcomes of such assessments provide decision-makers with fundamental information regarding the environmental impacts of different waste treatment options necessary for sustainable waste management planning. PMID:25837786

  9. Molecular mechanisms of activity and derepression of alternative lengthening of telomeres.

    PubMed

    Pickett, Hilda A; Reddel, Roger R

    2015-11-01

    Alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) involves homology-directed telomere synthesis. This multistep process is facilitated by loss of the ATRX or DAXX chromatin-remodeling factors and by abnormalities of the telomere nucleoprotein architecture, including altered DNA sequence and decreased TRF2 saturation. Induction of telomere-specific DNA damage triggers homology-directed searches, and NuRD-ZNF827 protein-protein interactions provide a platform for the telomeric recruitment of homologous recombination (HR) proteins. Telomere lengthening proceeds by strand exchange and template-driven DNA synthesis, which culminates in dissolution of HR intermediates. PMID:26581522

  10. Alternative Activation Mechanisms of Protein Kinase B Trigger Distinct Downstream Signaling Responses.

    PubMed

    Balzano, Deborah; Fawal, Mohamad-Ali; Velázquez, Jose V; Santiveri, Clara M; Yang, Joshua; Pastor, Joaquín; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; Djouder, Nabil; Lietha, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) is an important mediator of signals that control various cellular processes including cell survival, growth, proliferation, and metabolism. PKB promotes these processes by phosphorylating many cellular targets, which trigger distinct downstream signaling events. However, how PKB is able to selectively target its substrates to induce specific cellular functions remains elusive. Here we perform a systematic study to dissect mechanisms that regulate intrinsic kinase activity versus mechanisms that specifically regulate activity toward specific substrates. We demonstrate that activation loop phosphorylation and the C-terminal hydrophobic motif are essential for high PKB activity in general. On the other hand, we identify membrane targeting, which for decades has been regarded as an essential step in PKB activation, as a mechanism mainly affecting substrate selectivity. Further, we show that PKB activity in cells can be triggered independently of PI3K by initial hydrophobic motif phosphorylation, presumably through a mechanism analogous to other AGC kinases. Importantly, different modes of PKB activation result in phosphorylation of distinct downstream targets. Our data indicate that specific mechanisms have evolved for signaling nodes, like PKB, to select between various downstream events. Targeting such mechanisms selectively could facilitate the development of therapeutics that might limit toxic side effects. PMID:26286748

  11. Mechanical and piezoelectric properties of zinc oxide nanorods grown on conductive textile fabric as an alternative substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Azam; Hussain, Mushtaque; Nur, Omer; Willander, Magnus

    2014-08-01

    The present research is devoted to understanding the mechanism and causes of variation in the piezoelectric potential generated from vertically aligned zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs), which were grown on a conductive textile fabric as an alternative substrate by using the aqueous chemical growth method. The piezoelectric voltage was harvested from vertically aligned ZnO NRs having different physical parameters by using atomic force microscopy in contact mode and the variation in the generated piezoelectricity was investigated. The generated output potential indicates that different physical parameters such aspect ratio, crystal size and lattice internal crystal strain have a strong influence on the piezoelectric properties of vertically aligned ZnO NRs, which were grown on a textile fabric. Presented results indicate that textiles can be used as an alternative substrate just like the other conventional substrates, because our results are similar/better than many reported works on conventional substrates.

  12. The effect of cadence on timing of muscle activation and mechanical output in cycling: on the activation dynamics hypothesis.

    PubMed

    McGhie, David; Ettema, Gertjan

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the activation dynamics hypothesis, which states that, in cycling, the pattern between muscle activity and crank position shifts in regard to its angle in the crank cycle with increasing cadence to maintain invariant positioning of the mechanical output. We measured surface EMG of six muscles, and by means of force measurements at the crank and inverse dynamics calculated hip, knee, and ankle joint dynamics during cycling at five cadences (60-100 rpm) at 75% of maximal power in trained cyclists. The joint dynamics (net muscle moment and power) showed a consistent positive phase shift with increasing cadence. The phase shift in muscle activation patterns was highly variable amongst subjects and was, on average, close to zero. Our results are in contradiction with the activation dynamics hypothesis. PMID:20594872

  13. Development and validation of an alternative disturbed skin model by mechanical abrasion to study drug penetration

    PubMed Central

    Schlupp, P.; Weber, M.; Schmidts, T.; Geiger, K.; Runkel, F.

    2014-01-01

    Pharmaceuticals and cosmetics for dermal application are usually tested on healthy skin, although the primary permeation barrier, the stratum corneum, is often impaired by skin diseases or small skin lesions, especially on the hands. These skin conditions can considerably influence the permeation of chemicals and drugs. Furthermore, risk assessment for example of nanoparticles should be performed under various skin conditions to reflect the true circumstances. Therefore, an alternative and reproducible method for a high throughput of skin samples with impaired skin barrier was developed and verified by skin permeation studies (25 h) of caffeine, sorbic acid and testosterone compared to healthy (untreated) and tape-stripped skin. Skin barrier disruption was controlled by TEWL measurement. Skin permeation of the three substances was increased in tape-stripped and abraded skin compared to untreated skin due to the reduced barrier integrity. Enhancement of drug uptake was highest for the most hydrophilic substance, caffeine, followed by sorbic acid and lipophilic testosterone. No significant difference in drug uptake studies was observed between the new abrasion method with an aluminum-coated sponge and the tape-stripping method. The obtained results demonstrate that this abrasion method is an alternative way to achieve a disturbed skin barrier for drug and chemical uptake studies. PMID:25756004

  14. A novel mechanism of myostatin regulation by its alternative splicing variant during myogenesis in avian species.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sangsu; Song, Yan; Ahn, Jinsoo; Kim, Eunsoo; Chen, Paula; Yang, Shujin; Suh, Yeunsu; Lee, Kichoon

    2015-11-15

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a key negative regulator of muscle growth and development, and an increase of muscle mass is achieved by inhibiting MSTN signaling. In the current study, five alternative splicing isoforms of MSTN mRNAs in avian species were identified in various tissues. Among these five, three truncated forms of myostatin, MSTN-B, -C, and -E created premature stop codons and produced partial MSTN prodomains encoded from exon 1. MSTN-B is the second dominant isoform following full-length MSTN-A, and their expression was dynamically regulated during muscle development of chicken, turkey, and quail in vivo and in vitro. To clarify the function of MSTN-B, two stable cell lines of quail myoblasts (QM7) were generated to overexpress MSTN-A or MSTN-B. Interestingly, MSTN-B promoted both cell proliferation and differentiation similar to the function of the MSTN prodomain to counteract the negative role of MSTN on myogenesis. The coimmunoprecipitation assay revealed that MSTN-B binds to MSTN-A and reduces the generation of mature MSTN. Furthermore, the current study demonstrated that the partial prodomain encoded from exon 1 is critical for binding of MSTN-B to MSTN-A. Altogether, these data imply that alternative splicing isoforms of MSTN could negatively regulate pro-myostatin processing in muscle cells and prevent MSTN-mediated inhibition of myogenesis in avian species. PMID:26354750

  15. Alternative ways of using field-based estimates to calibrate ecosystem models and their implications for carbon cycle studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    He, Yujie; Zhuang, Qianlai; McGuire, David; Liu, Yaling; Chen, Min

    2013-01-01

    Model-data fusion is a process in which field observations are used to constrain model parameters. How observations are used to constrain parameters has a direct impact on the carbon cycle dynamics simulated by ecosystem models. In this study, we present an evaluation of several options for the use of observations in modeling regional carbon dynamics and explore the implications of those options. We calibrated the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model on a hierarchy of three vegetation classification levels for the Alaskan boreal forest: species level, plant-functional-type level (PFT level), and biome level, and we examined the differences in simulated carbon dynamics. Species-specific field-based estimates were directly used to parameterize the model for species-level simulations, while weighted averages based on species percent cover were used to generate estimates for PFT- and biome-level model parameterization. We found that calibrated key ecosystem process parameters differed substantially among species and overlapped for species that are categorized into different PFTs. Our analysis of parameter sets suggests that the PFT-level parameterizations primarily reflected the dominant species and that functional information of some species were lost from the PFT-level parameterizations. The biome-level parameterization was primarily representative of the needleleaf PFT and lost information on broadleaf species or PFT function. Our results indicate that PFT-level simulations may be potentially representative of the performance of species-level simulations while biome-level simulations may result in biased estimates. Improved theoretical and empirical justifications for grouping species into PFTs or biomes are needed to adequately represent the dynamics of ecosystem functioning and structure.

  16. Life cycle assessment of integrated waste management systems for alternative legacy scenarios of the London Olympic Park

    SciTech Connect

    Parkes, Olga Lettieri, Paola Bogle, I. David L.

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Application of LCA in planning integrated waste management systems. • Environmental valuation of 3 legacy scenarios for the Olympic Park. • Hot-spot analysis highlights the importance of energy and materials recovery. • Most environmental savings are achieved through materials recycling. • Sensitivity analysis shows importance of waste composition and recycling rates. - Abstract: This paper presents the results of the life cycle assessment (LCA) of 10 integrated waste management systems (IWMSs) for 3 potential post-event site design scenarios of the London Olympic Park. The aim of the LCA study is to evaluate direct and indirect emissions resulting from various treatment options of municipal solid waste (MSW) annually generated on site together with avoided emissions resulting from energy, materials and nutrients recovery. IWMSs are modelled using GaBi v6.0 Product Sustainability software and results are presented based on the CML (v.Nov-10) characterisation method. The results show that IWMSs with advanced thermal treatment (ATT) and incineration with energy recovery have the lowest Global Warming Potential (GWP) than IWMSs where landfill is the primary waste treatment process. This is due to higher direct emissions and lower avoided emissions from the landfill process compared to the emissions from the thermal treatment processes. LCA results demonstrate that significant environmental savings are achieved through substitution of virgin materials with recycled ones. The results of the sensitivity analysis carried out for IWMS 1 shows that increasing recycling rate by 5%, 10% and 15% compared to the baseline scenario can reduce GWP by 8%, 17% and 25% respectively. Sensitivity analysis also shows how changes in waste composition affect the overall result of the system. The outcomes of such assessments provide decision-makers with fundamental information regarding the environmental impacts of different waste treatment options necessary for

  17. Ignition assist systems for direct-injected, diesel cycle, medium-duty alternative fuel engines: Final report phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, A.K.

    2000-02-23

    This report is a summary of the results of Phase 1 of this contract. The objective was to evaluate the potential of assist technologies for direct-injected alternative fuel engines vs. glow plug ignition assist. The goal was to demonstrate the feasibility of an ignition system life of 10,000 hours and a system cost of less than 50% of the glow plug system, while meeting or exceeding the engine thermal efficiency obtained with the glow plug system. There were three tasks in Phase 1. Under Task 1, a comprehensive review of feasible ignition options for DING engines was completed. The most promising options are: (1) AC and the ''SmartFire'' spark, which are both long-duration, low-power (LDLP) spark systems; (2) the short-duration, high-power (SDHP) spark system; (3) the micropilot injection ignition; and (4) the stratified charge plasma ignition. Efforts concentrated on investigating the AC spark, SmartFire spark, and short-duration/high-power spark systems. Using proprietary pricing information, the authors predicted that the commercial costs for the AC spark, the short-duration/high-power spark and SmartFire spark systems will be comparable (if not less) to the glow plug system. Task 2 involved designing and performing bench tests to determine the criteria for the ignition system and the prototype spark plug for Task 3. The two most important design criteria are the high voltage output requirement of the ignition system and the minimum electrical insulation requirement for the spark plug. Under Task 3, all the necessary hardware for the one-cylinder engine test was designed. The hardware includes modified 3126 cylinder heads, specially designed prototype spark plugs, ignition system electronics, and parts for the system installation. Two 3126 cylinder heads and the SmartFire ignition system were procured, and testing will begin in Phase 2 of this subcontract.

  18. Life cycle assessment of water supply alternatives in water-receiving areas of the South-to-North Water Diversion Project in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Xiong, Wei; Zhang, Wenlong; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang

    2016-02-01

    To alleviate the water shortage in northern China, the Chinese government launched the world's largest water diversion project, the South-to-North Water Diversion Project (SNWDP), which delivers water from water-sufficient southern China to water-deficient northern China. However, an up-to-date study has not been conducted to determine whether the project is a favorable option to augment the water supply from an environmental perspective. The life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology integrated with a freshwater withdrawal category (FWI) was adopted to compare water supply alternatives in the water-receiving areas of the SNWDP, i.e., water diversion, wastewater reclamation and seawater desalination. Beijing, Tianjin, Jinan and Qingdao were studied as representative cities because they are the primary water-receiving areas of the SNWDP. The results revealed that the operation phase played the dominant role in all but one of the life cycle impact categories considered and contributed to more than 70% of their scores. For Beijing and Tianjin, receiving water through the SNWDP is the most sustainable option to augment the water supply. The result can be drawn in all of the water-receiving areas of the middle route of the SNWDP. For Jinan and Qingdao, the most sustainable option is the wastewater reclamation system. The seawater desalination system obtains the highest score of the standard impact indicators in all of the study areas, whereas it is the most favorable water supply option when considering the freshwater withdrawal impact. Although the most sustainable water supply alternative was recommended through an LCA analysis, multi-water resources should be integrated into the region's water supply from the perspective of water sustainability. The results of this study provide a useful recommendation on the management of water resources for China. PMID:26619399

  19. The impact of altered task mechanics on timing and duration of eccentric bi-articular muscle contractions during cycling.

    PubMed

    Connick, Mark J; Li, François-Xavier

    2013-02-01

    In order to understand muscle adaptations to altered task mechanics during cycling, this study investigated the impact of altered seat height and cadence on timing and duration of gastrocnemius (GAST), biceps femoris (BF) and vastus lateralis (VL) eccentric contractions and muscle activation patterns, and cycling economy. Ten male cyclists completed 9 × 5 min of cycling at 3 seat heights and 3 cadences. Three-dimensional leg kinematics and muscle activation patterns were recorded to estimate timing of eccentric muscle contractions. Onset, offset and duration of eccentric contractions and, onset, offset and duration of muscle activation were calculated, along with cycling economy. Duration of GAST and VL eccentric contractions decreased with increasing seat height due to earlier offset of eccentric muscle contractions. Duration of BF eccentric contractions significantly increased with seat height due to a later eccentric contraction offset. Offset of GAST and BF muscle activation occurred earlier with increasing cadence. Cycling economy was significantly affected by cadence but not seat height. The results suggest that as a consequence of altered seat height, proprioceptive feedback is used to fine-tune the timing of bi-articular eccentric muscle contractions. These results may have implications for seat height self-selection. PMID:23010605

  20. Evaluation of new alternatives in wastewater treatment plants based on dynamic modelling and life cycle assessment (DM-LCA).

    PubMed

    Bisinella de Faria, A B; Spérandio, M; Ahmadi, A; Tiruta-Barna, L

    2015-11-01

    With a view to quantifying the energy and environmental advantages of Urine Source-Separation (USS) combined with different treatment processes, five wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) scenarios were compared to a reference scenario using Dynamic Modelling (DM) and Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), and an integrated DM-LCA framework was thus developed. Dynamic simulations were carried out in BioWin(®) in order to obtain a realistic evaluation of the dynamic behaviour and performance of plants under perturbation. LCA calculations were performed within Umberto(®) using the Ecoinvent database. A Python™ interface was used to integrate and convert simulation data and to introduce them into Umberto(®) to achieve a complete LCA evaluation comprising foreground and background processes. Comparisons between steady-state and dynamic simulations revealed the importance of considering dynamic aspects such as nutrient and flow peaks. The results of the evaluation highlighted the potential of the USS scenario for nutrient recovery whereas the Enhanced Primary Clarification (EPC) scenario gave increased biogas production and also notably decreased aeration consumption, leading to a positive energy balance. Both USS and EPC scenarios also showed increased stability of plant operation, with smaller daily averages of total nitrogen and phosphorus. In this context, USS and EPC results demonstrated that the coupled USS + EPC scenario and its combinations with agricultural spreading of N-rich effluent and nitritation/anaerobic deammonification could present an energy-positive balance with respectively 27% and 33% lower energy requirements and an increase in biogas production of 23%, compared to the reference scenario. The coupled scenarios also presented lesser environmental impacts (reduction of 31% and 39% in total endpoint impacts) along with effluent quality well within the specified limits. The marked environmental performance (reduction of global warming) when nitrogen is used

  1. Bifurcation analysis of a menstrual cycle model reveals multiple mechanisms linking testosterone and classical PCOS.

    PubMed

    Hendrix, Angelean O; Selgrade, James F

    2014-11-21

    A system of 16 differential equations is described which models hormonal regulation of the menstrual cycle focusing on the effects of the androgen testosterone (T) on follicular development and on the synthesis of luteinizing hormone (LH) in the pituitary. Model simulations indicate two stable menstrual cycles - one cycle fitting data in the literature for normal women and the other cycle being anovulatory because of no LH surge. Bifurcations with respect to sensitive model parameters illustrate various characteristics of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), a leading cause of female infertility. For example, varying one parameter retards the growth of preantral follicles and produces a "stockpiling" of these small follicles as observed in the literature for some PCOS women. Modifying another parameter increases the stimulatory effect of T on LH synthesis resulting in reduced follicular development and anovulation. In addition, the model illustrates how anovulatory and hyperandrogenic cycles which are characteristic of PCOS can be reproduced by perturbing both pituitary sensitivity to T and the follicular production of T. Thus, this model suggests that for some women androgenic activity at the levels of both the pituitary and the ovaries may contribute to the etiology of PCOS. PMID:25079709

  2. Nonfunctional tricarboxylic acid cycle and the mechanism of glutamate biosynthesis in Acetobacter suboxydans.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, S; Claus, G W

    1972-12-01

    Acetobacter suboxydans does not contain an active tricarboxylic acid cycle, yet two pathways have been suggested for glutamate synthesis from acetate catalyzed by cell extracts: a partial tricarboxylic acid cycle following an initial condensation of oxalacetate and acetyl coenzyme A. and the citramalate-mesaconate pathway following an initial condensation of pyruvate and acetyl coenzyme A. To determine which pathway functions in growing cells, acetate-1-(14)C was added to a culture growing in minimal medium. After growth had ceased, cells were recovered and fractionated. Radioactive glutamate was isolated from the cellular protein fraction, and the position of the radioactive label was determined. Decarboxylation of the C5 carbon removed 100% of the radioactivity found in the purified glutamate fraction. These experiments establish that growing cells synthesize glutamate via a partial tricarboxylic acid cycle. Aspartate isolated from these hydrolysates was not radioactive, thus providing further evidence for the lack of a complete tricarboxylic acid cycle. When cell extracts were analyzed, activity of all tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes, except succinate dehydrogenase, was demonstrated. PMID:4640504

  3. 45 CFR 148.128 - State flexibility in individual market reforms-alternative mechanisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... benefits for the coverage consistent with standards included in the NAIC Model Health Plan for Uninsurable... Requirements Relating to Access and Renewability of Coverage § 148.128 State flexibility in individual market... mechanism meets the following conditions: (i) Offers health insurance coverage to all eligible...

  4. 45 CFR 148.128 - State flexibility in individual market reforms-alternative mechanisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... benefits for the coverage consistent with standards included in the NAIC Model Health Plan for Uninsurable... Requirements Relating to Access and Renewability of Coverage § 148.128 State flexibility in individual market... mechanism meets the following conditions: (i) Offers health insurance coverage to all eligible...

  5. 45 CFR 148.128 - State flexibility in individual market reforms-alternative mechanisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... benefits for the coverage consistent with standards included in the NAIC Model Health Plan for Uninsurable... Requirements Relating to Access and Renewability of Coverage § 148.128 State flexibility in individual market... mechanism meets the following conditions: (i) Offers health insurance coverage to all eligible...

  6. 45 CFR 148.128 - State flexibility in individual market reforms-alternative mechanisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... benefits for the coverage consistent with standards included in the NAIC Model Health Plan for Uninsurable... Requirements Relating to Access and Renewability of Coverage § 148.128 State flexibility in individual market... mechanism meets the following conditions: (i) Offers health insurance coverage to all eligible...

  7. Structural differences within the loop E motif imply alternative mechanisms of viroid processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viroids replicate via a rolling circle mechanism, and cleavage/ligation requires extensive rearrangement of the highly base-paired native structure. For Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd), the switch from cleavage to ligation is driven by the change from a multi-branched tetraloop structure to a l...

  8. Alternative Mechanisms to Encourage Individual Contributions to Vocational Education and Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haukka, Sandra; Keating, Jack; Lamb, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    Financing vocational education and training, as part of Australia's commitment to lifelong learning, will become a greater challenge as increased spending on other public services, such as health and welfare caused by an aging population, constrains government education expenditure. This report examines a range of mechanisms to encourage…

  9. Linguistic Alternatives to Quantitative Research Strategies. Part One: How Linguistic Mechanisms Advance Research Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeager, Joseph; Sommer, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Combining psycholinguistic technologies and systems analysis created advances in motivational profiling and numerous new behavioral engineering applications. These advances leapfrog many mainstream statistical research methods, producing superior research results via cause-effect language mechanisms. Entire industries explore motives ranging from…

  10. CCDs in the Mechanics Lab--A Competitive Alternative? (Part I).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Fabrizio

    1995-01-01

    Reports on the implementation of a relatively low-cost, versatile, and intuitive system to teach basic mechanics based on the use of a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera and inexpensive image-processing and analysis software. Discusses strengths and limitations of CCD imaging technologies. (JRH)

  11. Influence of Different Thermo-mechanical Cycling Routes on Recovery Stresses of Annealed NiTi Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X. J.; Ge, Y. L.; Van Humbeeck, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the influence of different thermo-mechanical cycling routes on recovery stresses of annealed NiTi wires has been investigated by using a dynamic mechanical analyzer. The as-received wire was annealed in Argon atmosphere in the temperature range of 350 to 900 °C. Differential scanning calorimeter was used to study the martensite transformation. In route I, the sample is deformed to 2% pre-strain and recovery stress is measured after unloading. In route II, the sample undergoes 3% deformation followed by a free shape recovery and then is reloaded to 2% pre-strain and recovery stress is measured after unloading. In route III, the sample undergoes a constrained thermal cycling at 3% pre-strain followed by a free shape recovery and then recovery stress is measured at 2% pre-strain. The results show that both route II and III can improve the recovery stresses. Route III has higher recovery stresses than route II for samples annealed at 550-700 °C. The improvements of recovery stresses under route II and III are partly attributed to the decrease of A s temperatures after thermo-mechanical cycling. Such information is essential for the proper use of NiTi alloys in smart structures, intelligent controllers, and memory devices.

  12. Weaning from mechanical ventilation: why are we still looking for alternative methods?

    PubMed

    Frutos-Vivar, F; Esteban, A

    2013-12-01

    Most patients who require mechanical ventilation for longer than 24 hours, and who improve the condition leading to the indication of ventilatory support, can be weaned after passing a first spontaneous breathing test. The challenge is to improve the weaning of patients who fail that first test. We have methods that can be referred to as traditional, such as the T-tube, pressure support or synchronized intermittent mandatory ventilation (SIMV). In recent years, however, new applications of usual techniques as noninvasive ventilation, new ventilation methods such as automatic tube compensation (ATC), mandatory minute ventilation (MMV), adaptive support ventilation or automatic weaning systems based on pressure support have been described. Their possible role in weaning from mechanical ventilation among patients with difficult or prolonged weaning remains to be established. PMID:23084120

  13. Upright position mechanical ventilation: an alternative strategy for ALI/ARDS patients?

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Jia-Ning; Yan, Hua; Li, Yang-Kai; Ai, Bo; Fu, Sheng-Lin; Fu, Xiang-Ning

    2009-11-01

    Use of body positioning to improve oxygenation in mechanically ventilated patients with acute lung injury (ALI) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has been well documented. However, neither prone position ventilation nor side lying ventilation has been reported to improve the survival. Whether there is a body position superior to routine supine position or other positions as therapeutic adjunct for ventilated patients with ALI and ARDS? We propose the hypothesis that upright position ventilation may be helpful to improve oxygenation and benefit patients with ALI/ARDS. According to the existing physiologic and pathophysiologic data of upright position investigation, we suppose that improvement of V/Q matching, increased functional residual capacity, alveolar recruitment, accelerated diaphragm recovery, early gastric emptying and enteric feeding may be a potential protect mechanism of upright position ventilation. Whether this can be translated into improvement in patient outcome should be further tested in clinical trial. PMID:19683402

  14. An alternative mechanism for production of emission features in some infrared objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apruzese, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    Two dust-envelope models of the M supergiant VX Sgr, which exhibits a prominent emission feature at 10 microns, are presented. The models indicate that, for certain envelope sizes, the presence of the observed emission feature does not necessarily indicate that the emitting grains possess a similar feature in their emissivity profile. The mechanism which may in some cases be producing the observed emission feature is discussed.

  15. Reconciling two alternative mechanisms behind bi-decadal variability in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega, Pablo; Mignot, Juliette; Swingedouw, Didier; Sévellec, Florian; Guilyardi, Eric

    2015-09-01

    Understanding the preferential timescales of variability in the North Atlantic, usually associated with the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), is essential for the prospects for decadal prediction. However, the wide variety of mechanisms proposed from the analysis of climate simulations, potentially dependent on the models themselves, has stimulated the debate of which processes take place in reality. One mechanism receiving increasing attention, identified both in idealized models and observations, is a westward propagation of subsurface buoyancy anomalies that impact the AMOC through a basin-scale intensification of the zonal density gradient, enhancing the northward transport via thermal wind balance. In this study, we revisit a control simulation from the Institut Pierre-Simon Laplace Coupled Model 5A (IPSL-CM5A), characterized by a strong AMOC periodicity at 20 years, previously explained by an upper ocean-atmosphere-sea ice coupled mode driving convection activity south of Iceland. Our study shows that this mechanism interacts constructively with the basin-wide propagation in the subsurface. This constructive feedback may explain why bi-decadal variability is so intense in this coupled model as compared to others.

  16. Alternative mechanisms of increased eggshell hardness of avian brood parasites relative to host species

    PubMed Central

    Igic, Branislav; Braganza, Kim; Hyland, Margaret M.; Silyn-Roberts, Heather; Cassey, Phillip; Grim, Tomas; Rutila, Jarkko; Moskát, Csaba; Hauber, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Obligate brood parasitic birds lay their eggs in nests of other species and parasite eggs typically have evolved greater structural strength relative to host eggs. Increased mechanical strength of the parasite eggshell is an adaptation that can interfere with puncture ejection behaviours of discriminating hosts. We investigated whether hardness of eggshells is related to differences between physical and chemical traits from three different races of the parasitic common cuckoo Cuculus canorus, and their respective hosts. Using tools developed for materials science, we discovered a novel correlate of increased strength of parasite eggs: the common cuckoo's egg exhibits a greater microhardness, especially in the inner region of the shell matrix, relative to its host and sympatric non-host species. We then tested predictions of four potential mechanisms of shell strength: (i) increased relative thickness overall, (ii) greater proportion of the structurally harder shell layers, (iii) higher concentration of inorganic components in the shell matrix, and (iv) elevated deposition of a high density compound, MgCO3, in the shell matrix. We confirmed support only for hypothesis (i). Eggshell characteristics did not differ between parasite eggs sampled from different host nests in distant geographical sites, suggesting an evolutionarily shared microstructural mechanism of stronger parasite eggshells across diverse host-races of brood parasitic cuckoos. PMID:21561966

  17. Alternative mechanisms of increased eggshell hardness of avian brood parasites relative to host species.

    PubMed

    Igic, Branislav; Braganza, Kim; Hyland, Margaret M; Silyn-Roberts, Heather; Cassey, Phillip; Grim, Tomas; Rutila, Jarkko; Moskát, Csaba; Hauber, Mark E

    2011-11-01

    Obligate brood parasitic birds lay their eggs in nests of other species and parasite eggs typically have evolved greater structural strength relative to host eggs. Increased mechanical strength of the parasite eggshell is an adaptation that can interfere with puncture ejection behaviours of discriminating hosts. We investigated whether hardness of eggshells is related to differences between physical and chemical traits from three different races of the parasitic common cuckoo Cuculus canorus, and their respective hosts. Using tools developed for materials science, we discovered a novel correlate of increased strength of parasite eggs: the common cuckoo's egg exhibits a greater microhardness, especially in the inner region of the shell matrix, relative to its host and sympatric non-host species. We then tested predictions of four potential mechanisms of shell strength: (i) increased relative thickness overall, (ii) greater proportion of the structurally harder shell layers, (iii) higher concentration of inorganic components in the shell matrix, and (iv) elevated deposition of a high density compound, MgCO(3), in the shell matrix. We confirmed support only for hypothesis (i). Eggshell characteristics did not differ between parasite eggs sampled from different host nests in distant geographical sites, suggesting an evolutionarily shared microstructural mechanism of stronger parasite eggshells across diverse host-races of brood parasitic cuckoos. PMID:21561966

  18. Soil organic carbon enrichment of dust emissions: Magnitude, mechanisms and its implications for the carbon cycle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil erosion is an important component of the global carbon cycle. However, little attention has been given to the role of aeolian processes in influencing soil organic carbon (SOC) flux and the release of greenhouse gasses, such as carbon-dioxide (CO2), to the atmosphere. Understanding the magnitu...

  19. Thermal Cycling and Degradation Mechanisms of Compressive Mica-based Seals for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung ); Stevenson, Jeffry W. )

    2002-11-14

    Thermal cycling was conducted on the compressive mica seals at 800 degrees C in air. Thin ({approx}0-1 mm) Muscovite mica was pressed between a metal pipe and an alumina substrate and tested for leak rates at a stress of 100 psi in the plain (mica only) and the hybrid design.

  20. Nonribosomal peptide synthetase with a unique iterative-alternative-optional mechanism catalyzes amonabactin synthesis in Aeromonas.

    PubMed

    Esmaeel, Qassim; Chevalier, Mickael; Chataigné, Gabrielle; Subashkumar, Rathinasamy; Jacques, Philippe; Leclère, Valérie

    2016-10-01

    Based on the exploration of data generated by genome sequencing, a bioinformatics approach has been chosen to identify the biosynthetic pathway of the siderophores produced by Aeromonas species. The amonabactins, considered as a virulence factor, represent a family of four variants of catechol peptidic siderophores containing Dhb, Lys, Gly, and an aromatic residue either Trp or Phe in a D-configuration. The synthesis operon is constituted of seven genes named amoCEBFAGH and is iron-regulated. The cluster includes genes encoding proteins involved in the synthesis and incorporation of the Dhb monomer, and genes encoding specific nonribosomal peptide synthetases, which are responsible for the building of the peptidic moiety. The amonabactin assembly line displays a still so far not described atypical mode of synthesis that is iterative, alternative, and optional. A disruption mutant in the adenylation domain of AmoG was unable to synthesize any amonabactin and to grow in iron stress conditions while a deletion of amoH resulted in the production of only two over the four forms. The amo cluster is widespread among most of the Aeromonas species, only few species produces the enterobactin siderophore. PMID:27531515

  1. Using Unconstrained Tongue Motion as an Alternative Control Mechanism for Wheeled Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Xueliang; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2015-01-01

    Tongue drive system (TDS) is a tongue-operated, minimally invasive, unobtrusive, noncontact, and wireless assistive technology that infers users’ intentions by detecting and classifying their voluntary tongue motions, and translating them to user-defined commands. We have developed customized interface circuitry between an external TDS (eTDS) prototype and a commercial powered wheelchair (PWC) as well as three control strategies to evaluate the tongue motion as an alternative control input for wheeled mobility. We tested the eTDS performance in driving PWCs on 12 able-bodied human subjects, of which 11 were novice. The results showed that all subjects could complete navigation tasks by operating the PWC using their tongue motions. Despite little prior experience, the average time using the eTDS and the tongue was only approximately three times longer than using a joystick and the fingers. Navigation time was strongly dependant on the number of issued commands, which reduced by gaining experience. Particularly, the unintended issued commands (the Midas touch problem) were rare, demonstrating the effectiveness of the tongue tracking and external magnetic field cancellation algorithms as well as the safety of the TDS for wheeled mobility. PMID:19362901

  2. Alternative mating tactics in the yellow dung fly: resolving mechanisms of small-male advantage off pasture.

    PubMed

    Gress, Brian E; Waltzer, Ryan J; Lüpold, Stefan; Droge-Young, Elizabeth M; Manier, Mollie K; Pitnick, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Recent work suggests that the yellow dung fly mating system may include alternative patroller-competitor mating tactics in which large males compete for gravid females on dung, whereas small, non-competitive males search for females at foraging sites. Small males obtain most matings off pasture, yet the behavioural mechanism(s) giving rise to this pattern are unknown. We investigated the male and female behaviours that determine mating success in this environment by conducting field mating experiments and found small males to benefit from several attributes specific to the off-pasture mating environment. First, small males from foraging sites exhibited higher mating propensity, indicating that large males away from dung may be depleted of energy and/or sperm. Second, small males were more discriminating, being significantly less likely to attempt with non-gravid females, which are absent on dung but common off pasture. Third, non-gravid females were generally more likely to actively struggle and reject mating attempts; however, such behaviours occurred disproportionately more often with large males. Female Scathophaga stercoraria thus appear to preferentially mate with small males when off pasture. These findings challenge assumptions about male-female interactions in systems with alternative mating tactics and reveal hidden processes that may influence selection patterns in the field. PMID:24225455

  3. Alternative mating tactics in the yellow dung fly: resolving mechanisms of small-male advantage off pasture

    PubMed Central

    Gress, Brian E.; Waltzer, Ryan J.; Lüpold, Stefan; Droge-Young, Elizabeth M.; Manier, Mollie K.; Pitnick, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Recent work suggests that the yellow dung fly mating system may include alternative patroller–competitor mating tactics in which large males compete for gravid females on dung, whereas small, non-competitive males search for females at foraging sites. Small males obtain most matings off pasture, yet the behavioural mechanism(s) giving rise to this pattern are unknown. We investigated the male and female behaviours that determine mating success in this environment by conducting field mating experiments and found small males to benefit from several attributes specific to the off-pasture mating environment. First, small males from foraging sites exhibited higher mating propensity, indicating that large males away from dung may be depleted of energy and/or sperm. Second, small males were more discriminating, being significantly less likely to attempt with non-gravid females, which are absent on dung but common off pasture. Third, non-gravid females were generally more likely to actively struggle and reject mating attempts; however, such behaviours occurred disproportionately more often with large males. Female Scathophaga stercoraria thus appear to preferentially mate with small males when off pasture. These findings challenge assumptions about male–female interactions in systems with alternative mating tactics and reveal hidden processes that may influence selection patterns in the field. PMID:24225455

  4. Structure of the voltage-gated K⁺ channel Eag1 reveals an alternative voltage sensing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Whicher, Jonathan R; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2016-08-12

    Voltage-gated potassium (K(v)) channels are gated by the movement of the transmembrane voltage sensor, which is coupled, through the helical S4-S5 linker, to the potassium pore. We determined the single-particle cryo-electron microscopy structure of mammalian K(v)10.1, or Eag1, bound to the channel inhibitor calmodulin, at 3.78 angstrom resolution. Unlike previous K(v) structures, the S4-S5 linker of Eag1 is a five-residue loop and the transmembrane segments are not domain swapped, which suggest an alternative mechanism of voltage-dependent gating. Additionally, the structure and position of the S4-S5 linker allow calmodulin to bind to the intracellular domains and to close the potassium pore, independent of voltage-sensor position. The structure reveals an alternative gating mechanism for K(v) channels and provides a template to further understand the gating properties of Eag1 and related channels. PMID:27516594

  5. Mechanisms of G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in myeloma cells induced by hybrid-compound histone deacetylase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Seiko; Okinaga, Toshinori; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Takahashi, Osamu; Iwanaga, Kenjiro; Nishino, Norikazu; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Novel histone deacetylase inhibitor Ky-2, remarkably inhibits myeloma cell growth. •Ky-2 demonstrates no cytotoxicity against normal lymphocytic cells. •Ky-2 induces cell cycle arrest through the cell cycle-associated proteins. •Ky-2 induces Bcl-2-inhibitable apoptosis through a caspase-dependent cascade. -- Abstract: Objectives: Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are new therapeutic agents, used to treat various types of malignant cancers. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Ky-2, a hybrid-compound HDAC inhibitor, on the growth of mouse myeloma cells. Materials and methods: Myeloma cells, HS-72, P3U1, and mouse normal cells were used in this study. Effect of HDAC inhibitors on cell viability was determined by WST-assay and trypan blue assay. Cell cycle was analyzed using flow cytometer. The expression of cell cycle regulatory and the apoptosis associated proteins were examined by Western blot analysis. Hoechst’s staining was used to detect apoptotic cells. Results: Our findings showed that Ky-2 decreased the levels of HDACs, while it enhanced acetylation of histone H3. Myeloma cell proliferation was inhibited by Ky-2 treatment. Interestingly, Ky-2 had no cytotoxic effects on mouse normal cells. Ky-2 treatment induced G1-phase cell cycle arrest and accumulation of a sub-G1 phase population, while Western blotting analysis revealed that expressions of the cell cycle-associated proteins were up-regulated. Also, Ky-2 enhanced the cleavage of caspase-9 and -3 in myeloma cells, followed by DNA fragmentation. In addition, Ky-2 was not found to induce apoptosis in bcl-2 overexpressing myeloma cells. Conclusion: These findings suggest that Ky-2 induces apoptosis via a caspase-dependent cascade and Bcl-2-inhibitable mechanism in myeloma cells.

  6. Exploration of alternate catalytic mechanisms and optimization strategies for retroaldolase design.

    PubMed

    Bjelic, Sinisa; Kipnis, Yakov; Wang, Ling; Pianowski, Zbigniew; Vorobiev, Sergey; Su, Min; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Xiao, Rong; Kornhaber, Gregory; Hunt, John F; Tong, Liang; Hilvert, Donald; Baker, David

    2014-01-01

    Designed retroaldolases have utilized a nucleophilic lysine to promote carbon-carbon bond cleavage of β-hydroxy-ketones via a covalent Schiff base intermediate. Previous computational designs have incorporated a water molecule to facilitate formation and breakdown of the carbinolamine intermediate to give the Schiff base and to function as a general acid/base. Here we investigate an alternative active-site design in which the catalytic water molecule was replaced by the side chain of a glutamic acid. Five out of seven designs expressed solubly and exhibited catalytic efficiencies similar to previously designed retroaldolases for the conversion of 4-hydroxy-4-(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)-2-butanone to 6-methoxy-2-naphthaldehyde and acetone. After one round of site-directed saturation mutagenesis, improved variants of the two best designs, RA114 and RA117, exhibited among the highest kcat (>10(-3)s(-1)) and kcat/KM (11-25M(-1)s(-1)) values observed for retroaldolase designs prior to comprehensive directed evolution. In both cases, the >10(5)-fold rate accelerations that were achieved are within 1-3 orders of magnitude of the rate enhancements reported for the best catalysts for related reactions, including catalytic antibodies (kcat/kuncat=10(6) to 10(8)) and an extensively evolved computational design (kcat/kuncat>10(7)). The catalytic sites, revealed by X-ray structures of optimized versions of the two active designs, are in close agreement with the design models except for the catalytic lysine in RA114. We further improved the variants by computational remodeling of the loops and yeast display selection for reactivity of the catalytic lysine with a diketone probe, obtaining an additional order of magnitude enhancement in activity with both approaches. PMID:24161950

  7. Exploration of Alternate Catalytic Mechanisms and Optimization Strategies for Retroaldolase Design

    PubMed Central

    Bjelic, Sinisa; Kipnis, Yakov; Wang, Ling; Pianowski, Zbigniew; Vorobiev, Sergey; Su, Min; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Xiao, Rong; Kornhaber, Gregory; Hunt, John F.; Tong, Liang; Hilvert, Donald; Baker, David

    2014-01-01

    Designed retroaldolases have utilized a nucleophilic lysine to promote carbon–carbon bond cleavage of β-hydroxy-ketones via a covalent Schiff base intermediate. Previous computational designs have incorporated a water molecule to facilitate formation and breakdown of the carbinolamine intermediate to give the Schiff base and to function as a general acid/base. Here we investigate an alternative active-site design in which the catalytic water molecule was replaced by the side chain of a glutamic acid. Five out of seven designs expressed solubly and exhibited catalytic efficiencies similar to previously designed retroaldolases for the conversion of 4-hydro-xy-4-(6-methoxy-2-naphthyl)-2-butanone to 6-methoxy-2-naphthaldehyde and acetone. After one round of site-directed saturation mutagenesis, improved variants of the two best designs, RA114 and RA117, exhibited among the highest kcat (>10−3 s−1) and kcat/KM (11–25 M−1 s−1) values observed for retroaldolase designs prior to comprehensive directed evolution. In both cases, the >105-fold rate accelerations that were achieved are within 1–3 orders of magnitude of the rate enhancements reported for the best catalysts for related reactions, including catalytic antibodies (kcat/kuncat = 106 to 108) and an extensively evolved computational design (kcat/kuncat > 107). The catalytic sites, revealed by X-ray structures of optimized versions of the two active designs, are in close agreement with the design models except for the catalytic lysine in RA114. We further improved the variants by computational remodeling of the loops and yeast display selection for reactivity of the catalytic lysine with a diketone probe, obtaining an additional order of magnitude enhancement in activity with both approaches. PMID:24161950

  8. Mindfulness-Based Exposure Strategies as a Transdiagnostic Mechanism of Change: An Exploratory Alternating Treatment Design.

    PubMed

    Brake, C Alex; Sauer-Zavala, Shannon; Boswell, James F; Gallagher, Matthew W; Farchione, Todd J; Barlow, David H

    2016-03-01

    The present study explored whether distress reduction in response to strong negative emotions, a putative transdiagnostic mechanism of action, is facilitated by mindfulness strategies. Seven patients (mean age=31.14years, SD=12.28, range 19-48 years, 43% female, 86% Caucasian) with heterogeneous anxiety disorders (i.e., panic disorder with or without agoraphobia, social anxiety, generalized anxiety) were assigned a randomized order of weeklong blocks utilizing either mindfulness- or avoidance-based strategies while ascending a 6-week emotion exposure hierarchy. Participants completed three exposures per block and provided distress and avoidance use ratings following each exposure. Anxiety severity, distress aversion, and distraction/suppression tendencies were also assessed at baseline and the conclusion of each block. Visual, descriptive, and effect size results showing exposures utilizing mindfulness were associated with higher overall distress levels, compared with those utilizing avoidance. Within blocks, the majority of participants exhibited declining distress levels when employing mindfulness strategies, as opposed to more static distress levels in the avoidance condition. Systematic changes in anxiety severity, distress aversion, and distraction/suppression were not observed. These results suggest mindfulness strategies may be effective in facilitating emotion exposure; however, a minimum dosage may be necessary to overcome initial distress elevation. Potential transdiagnostic change mechanisms and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:26956654

  9. Crystal structure of A. aeolicus LpxC with bound product suggests alternate deacetylation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew D; Gao, Ning; Ross, Philip L; Olivier, Nelson B

    2015-09-01

    UDP-3-O-acyl-N-acetylglucosamine deacetylase (LpxC) is the first committed step to form lipid A, an essential component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. As it is essential for the survival of many pathogens, LpxC is an attractive target for antibacterial therapeutics. Herein, we report the product-bound co-crystal structure of LpxC from the acheal Aquifex aeolicus solved to 1.6 Å resolution. We identified interactions by hydroxyl and hydroxymethyl substituents of the product glucosamine ring that may enable new insights to exploit waters in the active site for structure-based design of LpxC inhibitors with novel scaffolds. By using this product structure, we have performed quantum mechanical modeling on the substrate in the active site. Based on our results and published experimental data, we propose a new mechanism that may lead to a better understanding of LpxC catalysis and inhibition. PMID:26177919

  10. Neurotoxin localization to ectodermal gland cells uncovers an alternative mechanism of venom delivery in sea anemones.

    PubMed

    Moran, Yehu; Genikhovich, Grigory; Gordon, Dalia; Wienkoop, Stefanie; Zenkert, Claudia; Ozbek, Suat; Technau, Ulrich; Gurevitz, Michael

    2012-04-01

    Jellyfish, hydras, corals and sea anemones (phylum Cnidaria) are known for their venomous stinging cells, nematocytes, used for prey and defence. Here we show, however, that the potent Type I neurotoxin of the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, Nv1, is confined to ectodermal gland cells rather than nematocytes. We demonstrate massive Nv1 secretion upon encounter with a crustacean prey. Concomitant discharge of nematocysts probably pierces the prey, expediting toxin penetration. Toxin efficiency in sea water is further demonstrated by the rapid paralysis of fish or crustacean larvae upon application of recombinant Nv1 into their medium. Analysis of other anemone species reveals that in Anthopleura elegantissima, Type I neurotoxins also appear in gland cells, whereas in the common species Anemonia viridis, Type I toxins are localized to both nematocytes and ectodermal gland cells. The nematocyte-based and gland cell-based envenomation mechanisms may reflect substantial differences in the ecology and feeding habits of sea anemone species. Overall, the immunolocalization of neurotoxins to gland cells changes the common view in the literature that sea anemone neurotoxins are produced and delivered only by stinging nematocytes, and raises the possibility that this toxin-secretion mechanism is an ancestral evolutionary state of the venom delivery machinery in sea anemones. PMID:22048953

  11. Candidate mechanisms underlying atypical progesterone profiles as deduced from parameter perturbations in a mathematical model of the bovine estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Boer, H M T; Apri, M; Molenaar, J; Stötzel, C; Veerkamp, R; Woelders, H

    2012-07-01

    The complex interplay of physiological factors that underlies fertility in dairy cows was investigated using a mechanistic mathematical model of the dynamics of the bovine estrous cycle. The model simulates the processes of follicle and corpus luteum development and its relations with key hormones that interact to control these processes. Several factors may perturb the regular oscillatory behavior of a normal estrous cycle, and such perturbations are likely the effect of simultaneous changes in multiple parameters. The objective of this paper was to investigate how multiple parameter perturbation changes the behavior of the estrous cycle model, so as to identify biological mechanisms that could play a role in the development of cystic ovaries. Cystic ovaries are a common reason for reproductive failure in dairy cows, but much about the causes of this disorder remains unknown. We investigated in which region of the parameter space the model predicts a normal cycle, and when a progesterone pattern occurred with delayed ovulation (indicating a cystic follicle) or delayed luteolysis (indicating a persistent corpus luteum). Perturbation of the initial values for all parameters simultaneously showed 2 specific parameter configurations leading to delayed ovulation or delayed luteolysis immediately. The most important parameter changes in these 2 configurations involve the regulation of corpus luteum functioning, luteolytic signals, and GnRH synthesis, suggesting that these mechanisms are likely involved in the development of cystic ovaries. In the multidimensional parameter space, areas exist in which the parameter configurations resulted in normal cycles. These areas may be separated by areas in which irregular cycle patterns occurred. These irregular patterns thus mark the transition from one stable (normal) situation to another. Interestingly, within a series, there were some cycles with delayed ovulation and some with delayed luteolysis in these patterns. This could

  12. Al-Li alloy AA2198's very high cycle fatigue crack initiation mechanism and its fatigue thermal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Luopeng; Cao, Xiaojian; Chen, Yu; Wang, Qingyuan

    2015-10-01

    AA2198 alloy is one of the third generation Al-Li alloys which have low density, high elastic modulus, high specific strength and specific stiffness. Compared With the previous two generation Al-Li alloys, the third generation alloys have much improved in alloys strength, corrosion resistance and weldable characteristic. For these advantages, the third generation Al-Li alloys are used as aircraft structures, such as C919 aviation airplane manufactured by China and Russia next generation aviation airplane--MS-21. As we know, the aircraft structures are usually subjected to more than 108 cycles fatigue life during 20-30 years of service, however, there is few reported paper about the third generation Al-Li alloys' very high cycle fatigue(VHCF) which is more than 108 cycles fatigue. The VHCF experiment of AA2198 have been carried out. The two different initiation mechanisms of fatigue fracture have been found in VHCF. The cracks can initiate from the interior of the testing material with lower stress amplitude and more than 108 cycles fatigue life, or from the surface or subsurface of material which is the dominant reason of fatigue failures. During the experiment, the infrared technology is used to monitor the VHCF thermal effect. With the increase of the stress, the temperature of sample is also rising up, increasing about 15 °C for every 10Mpa. The theoretical thermal analysis is also carried out.

  13. The Forkhead Transcription Factor FOXM1 Controls Cell Cycle-Dependent Gene Expression through an Atypical Chromatin Binding Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi; Müller, Gerd A.; Quaas, Marianne; Fischer, Martin; Han, Namshik; Stutchbury, Benjamin; Engeland, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    There are nearly 50 forkhead (FOX) transcription factors encoded in the human genome and, due to sharing a common DNA binding domain, they are all thought to bind to similar DNA sequences. It is therefore unclear how these transcription factors are targeted to specific chromatin regions to elicit specific biological effects. Here, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) to investigate the genome-wide chromatin binding mechanisms used by the forkhead transcription factor FOXM1. In keeping with its previous association with cell cycle control, we demonstrate that FOXM1 binds and regulates a group of genes which are mainly involved in controlling late cell cycle events in the G2 and M phases. However, rather than being recruited through canonical RYAAAYA forkhead binding motifs, FOXM1 binding is directed via CHR (cell cycle genes homology region) elements. FOXM1 binds these elements through protein-protein interactions with the MMB transcriptional activator complex. Thus, we have uncovered a novel and unexpected mode of chromatin binding of a FOX transcription factor that allows it to specifically control cell cycle-dependent gene expression. PMID:23109430

  14. Influence of High- G Mechanical Shock and Thermal Cycling on Localized Recrystallization in Sn-Ag-Cu Solder Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tae-Kyu; Kim, Choong-Un; Bieler, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of isothermal aging and recrystallized grain structure distribution on mechanical shock and thermal cycling performance of solder joints with 1% and 3% silver content Sn-Ag-Cu interconnects were investigated. Localized recrystallized grain structure distributions were analyzed to identify correlations between the microstructure evolution and shock performance. The results reveal that the shock tolerance depends on the amount of shock energy that can be absorbed during each shock cycle, which depends on microstructural features. Based on the recrystallized grain distribution, additional isothermal aging in 1% silver Sn-Ag-Cu interconnects shows improved shock performance, whereas degraded shock performance was observed in 3% Sn-Ag-Cu interconnects. Using the same grain boundary distribution analysis on thermally cycled samples, relationships between the particle size distribution, localized recrystallized grain structure development, shock, and thermomechanical performance were identified: finer particle spacing is beneficial for thermal cycling as it resists grain boundary generation, while conversely, wider particle spacing facilitates recrystallization and grain boundary mobility that allows Sn to absorb shock energy.

  15. Coding Psychological Constructs in Text Using Mechanical Turk: A Reliable, Accurate, and Efficient Alternative

    PubMed Central

    Tosti-Kharas, Jennifer; Conley, Caryn

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate how to effectively use the crowdsourcing service, Amazon's Mechanical Turk (MTurk), to content analyze textual data for use in psychological research. MTurk is a marketplace for discrete tasks completed by workers, typically for small amounts of money. MTurk has been used to aid psychological research in general, and content analysis in particular. In the current study, MTurk workers content analyzed personally-written textual data using coding categories previously developed and validated in psychological research. These codes were evaluated for reliability, accuracy, completion time, and cost. Results indicate that MTurk workers categorized textual data with comparable reliability and accuracy to both previously published studies and expert raters. Further, the coding tasks were performed quickly and cheaply. These data suggest that crowdsourced content analysis can help advance psychological research. PMID:27303321

  16. Pathological display of affect in patients with depression and right frontal brain damage. An alternative mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ross, E D; Stewart, R S

    1987-03-01

    Two patients are reported with the acute onset of pathological crying following right inferior frontal brain damage. Both had severe endogenous depression and neither had pseudobulbar palsy. These and other cases argue that two organic brain diseases--one structural and the other "physiopharmacological"--may interact to produce pathological display of affect that cannot be accounted for by traditional neurological explanations. A pharmacological mechanism for the rapid amelioration of pathological affect by tricyclic medications and its possible relationship to the newly discovered descending motor systems of the brain that use norepinephrine and serotonin as neurotransmitters is offered. These cases also suggest that pathological affect is a valuable clinical indicator of an underlying major depression in some brain-injured patients. PMID:3819712

  17. Coding Psychological Constructs in Text Using Mechanical Turk: A Reliable, Accurate, and Efficient Alternative.

    PubMed

    Tosti-Kharas, Jennifer; Conley, Caryn

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we evaluate how to effectively use the crowdsourcing service, Amazon's Mechanical Turk (MTurk), to content analyze textual data for use in psychological research. MTurk is a marketplace for discrete tasks completed by workers, typically for small amounts of money. MTurk has been used to aid psychological research in general, and content analysis in particular. In the current study, MTurk workers content analyzed personally-written textual data using coding categories previously developed and validated in psychological research. These codes were evaluated for reliability, accuracy, completion time, and cost. Results indicate that MTurk workers categorized textual data with comparable reliability and accuracy to both previously published studies and expert raters. Further, the coding tasks were performed quickly and cheaply. These data suggest that crowdsourced content analysis can help advance psychological research. PMID:27303321

  18. Alternate mechanism for amino acid entry into Neurospora crassa: extracellular deamination and subsequent keto acid transport.

    PubMed Central

    DeBusk, R M; Brown, D T; DeBusk, A G; Penderghast, R D

    1981-01-01

    The growth of the pm nbg mutant strain of Neurospora crassa was inhibited by the amino acid analog para-fluorophenylalanine despite the fact that none of the three constitutive amino acid permeases is functional in this strain. This observation led to the detection of both a deaminase which was released into the growth medium in response to para-fluorophenylalanine and a keto acid transport system which allowed entry of the resulting keto acid into the cell. The transported keto acid was recovered in cellular protein, suggesting its regeneration as the amino acid. The cooperative activity of these two systems represents an additional mechanism for the intracellular accumulation of amino acids, which is distinct from the known amino acid permeases. Images PMID:6452443

  19. Failure of the Volume Function in Granular Statistical Mechanics and an Alternative Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenfeld, Raphael; Amitai, Shahar; Jordan, Joe F.; Hihinashvili, Rebecca

    2016-04-01

    We first show that the currently accepted statistical mechanics for granular matter is flawed. The reason is that it is based on the volume function, which depends only on a minute fraction of all the structural degrees of freedom and is unaffected by most of the configurational microstates. Consequently, the commonly used partition function underestimates the entropy severely. We then propose a new formulation, replacing the volume function with a connectivity function that depends on all the structural degrees of freedom and accounts correctly for the entire entropy. We discuss the advantages of the new formalism and derive explicit results for two- and three-dimensional systems. We test the formalism by calculating the entropy of an experimental two-dimensional system, as a function of system size, and showing that it is an extensive variable.

  20. The Miller׳s knot as an alternative to the surgical knotting? Characterization of the mechanical behavior.

    PubMed

    Ortillés, A; Rodríguez, J; Calvo, B

    2014-10-01

    Several types of materials and surgical suture patterns are used in conventional surgery. Their combination with an appropriate knot is the basis for correct tissue apposition and healing. Knot security is essential to prevent loosening or slipping before the suture line is completely closed. Nevertheless, the knot itself is the weakest link in any surgical handling. The aim of this study is to determine and compare the mechanical behavior of four surgical knot types (square knot, surgeon׳s knot, square slipknot and Miller׳s knot) performed with three different suture materials (absorbable monofilament glyconate, non-absorbable monofilament polyamide and absorbable braided polyglycolic acid) in a non-biological experimental in vitro model (a tube of synthetic material with non-linear mechanical behavior). The mechanical properties of each suture material are also compared. Ten samples were mechanically tested for each suture and knot using a uniaxial tensile test until complete sample rupture. The failure Cauchy stress and stretch were calculated. The Cauchy stress at 5%, 10% and 15% strain and standard deviation were compared for each suture and knot type. The results demonstrated that all the suture materials had statistically significant differences in their non-linear mechanical behavior. Absorbable monofilament glyconate was the most compliant suture with the greatest tensile strength, while absorbable braided polyglycolic acid was the stiffest. Regardless of the suture type used, the Miller׳s knot had the greatest failure Cauchy stress and stretch, while the square, surgeon׳s and square slipknot had the lowest. In all cases, the Miller׳s knot was more compliant and had greater tensile strength than the other knots. The square knot, surgeon׳s knot, and square slipknot had statistically significant similarities in their mechanical behavior. Therefore, the Miller׳s knot could be classified as the gold standard and an alternative to the surgical knotting

  1. Numerical evaluation of mechanisms driving Early Jurassic changes in global carbon cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Beerling, D.J.; Brentnall, S.J.

    2007-03-15

    The Early Jurassic (early Toarcian, ca. 183 Ma) carbon cycle perturbation is characterized by aabout -5 parts per thousand {delta} {sup 13}C excursion in the exogenic carbon reservoirs, a 1000 ppm rise in atmospheric CO{sub 2}, and a 6-7 degrees warming. Two proposed explanations for this presumed global carbon cycle perturbation are the liberation of massive amounts of isotopically light CH4 from (1) Gondwanan coals by heating during the intrusive eruption of the Karoo-Ferrar large igneous province (LIP) or (2) the thermal dissociation of gas hydrates. Carbon cycle modeling indicates that the release of CH4 from Gondwanan coals synchronous with the eruption of the Karoo-Ferrar LIP fails to reproduce the magnitude or timing of the CO{sub 2} and {delta} {sup 13}C excursions. However, sensitivity analyses constrained by a marine cyclostratigraphically dated {delta}{sup 13}C record indicate that both features of geologic record can be explained with the huge input of about 15,340-24,750 Gt C over about 220 k.y., a result possibly pointing to the involvement of hydrothermal vent complexes in the Karoo Basin. The simulated release of > 6000 Gt C from gas hydrates also reproduces aspects of the early Toarcian rock record, but the large mass involved raises fundamental questions about its formation, storage, and release.

  2. Designing instruction to support mechanical reasoning: Three alternatives in the simple machines learning environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKenna, Ann Frances

    2001-07-01

    Creating a classroom environment that fosters a productive learning experience and engages students in the learning process is a complex endeavor. A classroom environment is dynamic and requires a unique synergy among students, teacher, classroom artifacts and events to achieve robust understanding and knowledge integration. This dissertation addresses this complex issue by developing, implementing, and investigating the simple machines learning environment (SIMALE) to support students' mechanical reasoning and understanding. SIMALE was designed to support reflection, collaborative learning, and to engage students in generative learning through multiple representations of concepts and successive experimentation and design activities. Two key components of SIMALE are an original web-based software tool and hands-on Lego activities. A research study consisting of three treatment groups was created to investigate the benefits of hands-on and web-based computer activities on students' analytic problem solving ability, drawing/modeling ability, and conceptual understanding. The study was conducted with two populations of students that represent a diverse group with respect to gender, ethnicity, academic achievement and social/economic status. One population of students in this dissertation study participated from the Mathematics, Engineering, and Science Achievement (MESA) program that serves minorities and under-represented groups in science and mathematics. The second group was recruited from the Academic Talent Development Program (ATDP) that is an academically competitive outreach program offered through the University of California at Berkeley. Results from this dissertation show success of the SIMALE along several dimensions. First, students in both populations achieved significant gains in analytic problem solving ability, drawing/modeling ability, and conceptual understanding. Second, significant differences that were found on pre-test measures were eliminated

  3. Home composting as an alternative treatment option for organic household waste in Denmark: An environmental assessment using life cycle assessment-modelling.

    PubMed

    Andersen, J K; Boldrin, A; Christensen, T H; Scheutz, C

    2012-01-01

    An environmental assessment of the management of organic household waste (OHW) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the waste-life cycle assessment (LCA) model EASEWASTE. The focus was on home composting of OHW in Denmark and six different home composting units (with different input and different mixing frequencies) were modelled. In addition, incineration and landfilling was modelled as alternatives to home composting. The most important processes contributing to the environmental impact of home composting were identified as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (load) and the avoided emissions in relation to the substitution of fertiliser and peat when compost was used in hobby gardening (saving). The replacement of fertiliser and peat was also identified as one of the most sensible parameters, which could potentially have a significant environmental benefit. Many of the impact categories (especially human toxicity via water (HTw) and soil (HTs)) were affected by the heavy metal contents of the incoming OHW. The concentrations of heavy metals in the compost were below the threshold values for compost used on land and were thus not considered to constitute a problem. The GHG emissions were, on the other hand, dependent on the management of the composting units. The frequently mixed composting units had the highest GHG emissions. The environmental profiles of the home composting scenarios were in the order of -2 to 16 milli person equivalents (mPE) Mg(-1) wet waste (ww) for the non-toxic categories and -0.9 to 28mPEMg(-1) ww for the toxic categories. Home composting performed better than or as good as incineration and landfilling in several of the potential impact categories. One exception was the global warming (GW) category, in which incineration performed better due to the substitution of heat and electricity based on fossil fuels. PMID:21975300

  4. Home composting as an alternative treatment option for organic household waste in Denmark: An environmental assessment using life cycle assessment-modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Andersen, J.K.; Boldrin, A.; Christensen, T.H.; Scheutz, C.

    2012-01-15

    An environmental assessment of the management of organic household waste (OHW) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the waste-life cycle assessment (LCA) model EASEWASTE. The focus was on home composting of OHW in Denmark and six different home composting units (with different input and different mixing frequencies) were modelled. In addition, incineration and landfilling was modelled as alternatives to home composting. The most important processes contributing to the environmental impact of home composting were identified as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (load) and the avoided emissions in relation to the substitution of fertiliser and peat when compost was used in hobby gardening (saving). The replacement of fertiliser and peat was also identified as one of the most sensible parameters, which could potentially have a significant environmental benefit. Many of the impact categories (especially human toxicity via water (HTw) and soil (HTs)) were affected by the heavy metal contents of the incoming OHW. The concentrations of heavy metals in the compost were below the threshold values for compost used on land and were thus not considered to constitute a problem. The GHG emissions were, on the other hand, dependent on the management of the composting units. The frequently mixed composting units had the highest GHG emissions. The environmental profiles of the home composting scenarios were in the order of -2 to 16 milli person equivalents (mPE) Mg{sup -1} wet waste (ww) for the non-toxic categories and -0.9 to 28 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the toxic categories. Home composting performed better than or as good as incineration and landfilling in several of the potential impact categories. One exception was the global warming (GW) category, in which incineration performed better due to the substitution of heat and electricity based on fossil fuels.

  5. Nanobacteria: an alternative mechanism for pathogenic intra- and extracellular calcification and stone formation.

    PubMed

    Kajander, E O; Ciftçioglu, N

    1998-07-01

    Calcium phosphate is deposited in many diseases, but formation mechanisms remain speculative. Nanobacteria are the smallest cell-walled bacteria, only recently discovered in human and cow blood and commercial cell culture serum. In this study, we identified with energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis and chemical analysis that all growth phases of nanobacteria produce biogenic apatite on their cell envelope. Fourier transform IR spectroscopy revealed the mineral as carbonate apatite. The biomineralization in cell culture media resulted in biofilms and mineral aggregates closely resembling those found in tissue calcification and kidney stones. In nanobacteria-infected fibroblasts, electron microscopy revealed intra- and extracellular acicular crystal deposits, stainable with von Kossa staining and resembling calcospherules found in pathological calcification. Previous models for stone formation have led to an hypothesis that elevated pH due to urease and/or alkaline phosphatase activity is a lithogenic factor. Our results indicate that carbonate apatite can be formed without these factors at pH 7.4, at physiological phosphate and calcium concentrations. Nanobacteria can produce apatite in media mimicking tissue fluids and glomerular filtrate and provide a unique model for in vitro studies on calcification. PMID:9653177

  6. Photofunctionalization of Titanium: An Alternative Explanation of Its Chemical-Physical Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Pompella, Alfonso; Kubacki, Jerzy; Szade, Jacek; Roy, Robert A.; Hedzelek, Wieslaw

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To demonstrate that titanium implant surfaces as little as 4 weeks from production are contaminated by atmospheric hydrocarbons. This phenomenon, also known as biological ageing can be reversed by UVC irradiation technically known as photofunctionalization. To propose a new model from our experimental evidence to explain how the changes in chemical structure of the surface will affect the adsorption of amino acids on the titanium surface enhancing osteointegration. Methods In our study XPS and AES were used to analyze the effects of UVC irradiation (photofunctionalization) in reversing biological ageing of titanium. SEM was used to analyze any possible effects on the topography of the surface. Results UVC irradiation was able to reverse biological ageing of titanium by greatly reducing the amount of carbon contamination present on the implant surface by up to 4 times, while the topography of the surface was not affected. UVC photon energy reduces surface H2O and increases TiOH with many –OH groups being produced. These groups explain the super-hydrophilic effect from photofunctionalization when these groups come into contact with water. Significance Photofunctionalization has proven to be a valid method to reduce the amount of hydrocarbon contamination on titanium dental implants and improve biological results. The chemisorption mechanisms of amino acids, in our study, are dictated by the chemical structure and electric state present on the surface, but only in the presence of an also favourable geometrical composition at the atomical level. PMID:27309723

  7. A Homemade Snare: An Alternative Method for Mechanical Removal of Dirofilaria immitis in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Fiarresga, António; Landum, Miguel; Lima, Clara; Gamboa, Óscar; Meireles, José; Sales Luís, José; Madeira de Carvalho, Luís

    2016-01-01

    Canine dirofilariosis is a life-threatening parasitic disease that is increasingly reported worldwide. Once diagnosed the main treatment goals are to improve the animal's clinical condition and to eliminate all life stages of the parasite with minimal posttreatment side effects. This can be achieved through mechanical, surgical, or chemotherapeutical approaches. Currently, manual extraction is the preferred method to remove adult heartworms due to its diminished invasiveness, reduced damage to the vascular endothelium, and shortened anaesthesia duration. However, it remains an expensive technique that can be highly traumatic. To address this issue, a nontraumatic homemade catheter-guided snare was developed for heartworm removal by adapting and folding a 0.014-inch coronary wire (BMW, Abbott Vascular). Transvenous heartworm extraction was performed on a dog severely infected with adult heartworms by inserting the modified snare into a 6-F Judkins right coronary guiding catheter BMW (Cordis) and advancing it into the right ventricle under fluoroscopic guidance. Fifteen adult specimens of Dirofilaria immitis were successfully extracted from the pulmonary artery and right ventricle without complications. To assure the death of both larvae and adults, postoperative treatment was successfully managed using ivermectin, doxycycline, and melarsomine, with no recurrence after surgery. PMID:26981316

  8. A Homemade Snare: An Alternative Method for Mechanical Removal of Dirofilaria immitis in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Alho, Ana Margarida; Fiarresga, António; Landum, Miguel; Lima, Clara; Gamboa, Óscar; Meireles, José; Sales Luís, José; Madeira de Carvalho, Luís

    2016-01-01

    Canine dirofilariosis is a life-threatening parasitic disease that is increasingly reported worldwide. Once diagnosed the main treatment goals are to improve the animal's clinical condition and to eliminate all life stages of the parasite with minimal posttreatment side effects. This can be achieved through mechanical, surgical, or chemotherapeutical approaches. Currently, manual extraction is the preferred method to remove adult heartworms due to its diminished invasiveness, reduced damage to the vascular endothelium, and shortened anaesthesia duration. However, it remains an expensive technique that can be highly traumatic. To address this issue, a nontraumatic homemade catheter-guided snare was developed for heartworm removal by adapting and folding a 0.014-inch coronary wire (BMW, Abbott Vascular). Transvenous heartworm extraction was performed on a dog severely infected with adult heartworms by inserting the modified snare into a 6-F Judkins right coronary guiding catheter BMW (Cordis) and advancing it into the right ventricle under fluoroscopic guidance. Fifteen adult specimens of Dirofilaria immitis were successfully extracted from the pulmonary artery and right ventricle without complications. To assure the death of both larvae and adults, postoperative treatment was successfully managed using ivermectin, doxycycline, and melarsomine, with no recurrence after surgery. PMID:26981316

  9. Life-Cycle Cost and Risk Analysis of Alternative Configurations for Shipping Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    PM Daling; SB Ross; BM Biwer

    1999-12-17

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is a major receiver of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) for disposal. Currently, all LLW received at NTS is shipped by truck. The trucks use highway routes to NTS that pass through the Las Vegas Valley and over Hoover Dam, which is a concern of local stakeholder groups in the State of Nevada. Rail service offers the opportunity to reduce transportation risks and costs, according to the Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM-PEIS). However, NTS and some DOE LLW generator sites are not served with direct rail service so intermodal transport is under consideration. Intermodal transport involves transport via two modes, in this case truck and rail, from the generator sites to NTS. LLW shipping containers would be transferred between trucks and railcars at intermodal transfer points near the LLW generator sites, NTS, or both. An Environmental Assessment (EA)for Intermodal Transportation of Low-Level Radioactive Waste to the Nevada Test Site (referred to as the NTSIntermodal -M) has been prepared to determine whether there are environmental impacts to alterations to the current truck routing or use of intermodal facilities within the State of Nevada. However, an analysis of the potential impacts outside the State of Nevada are not addressed in the NTS Intermodal EA. This study examines the rest of the transportation network between LLW generator sites and the NTS and evaluates the costs, risks, and feasibility of integrating intermodal shipments into the LLW transportation system. This study evaluates alternative transportation system configurations for NTS approved and potential generators based on complex-wide LLW load information. Technical judgments relative to the availability of DOE LLW generators to ship from their sites by rail were developed. Public and worker risk and life-cycle cost components are quantified. The study identifies and evaluates alternative scenarios that increase the use of rail (intermodal

  10. Fatigue failure kinetics and structural changes in lead-free interconnects due to mechanical and thermal cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedler, Brent Alan

    Environmental and human health concerns drove European parliament to mandate the Reduction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) for electronics. This was enacted in July 2006 and has practically eliminated lead in solder interconnects. There is concern in the electronics packaging community because modern lead-free solder is rich in tin. Presently, near-eutectic tin-silver-copper solders are favored by industry. These solders are stiffer than the lead-tin near-eutectic alloys, have a higher melting temperature, fewer slip systems, and form intermetallic compounds (IMC) with Cu, Ni and Ag, each of which tend to have a negative effect on lifetime. In order to design more reliable interconnects, the experimental observation of cracking mechanisms is necessary for the correct application of existing theories. The goal of this research is to observe the failure modes resulting from mode II strain and to determine the damage mechanisms which describe fatigue failures in 95.5 Sn- 4.0 Ag - 0.5 Cu wt% (SAC405) lead-free solder interconnects. In this work the initiation sites and crack paths were characterized for SAC405 ball-grid array (BGA) interconnects with electroless-nickel immersion-gold (ENIG) pad-finish. The interconnects were arranged in a perimeter array and tested in fully assembled packages. Evaluation methods included monotonic and displacement controlled mechanical shear fatigue tests, and temperature cycling. The specimens were characterized using metallogaphy, including optical and electron microscopy as well as energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and precise real-time electrical resistance structural health monitoring (SHM). In mechanical shear fatigue tests, strain was applied by the substrates, simulating dissimilar coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) between the board and chip-carrier. This type of strain caused cracks to initiate in the soft Sn-rich solder and grow near the interface between the solder and intermetallic compounds (IMC). The growth near

  11. Do-or-die life cycles and diverse post-infection resistance mechanisms limit the evolution of parasite host ranges.

    PubMed

    Sieber, Michael; Gudelj, Ivana

    2014-04-01

    In light of the dynamic nature of parasite host ranges and documented potential for rapid host shifts, the observed high host specificity of most parasites remains an ecological paradox. Different variants of host-use trade-offs have become a mainstay of theoretical explanations of the prevalence of host specialism, but empirical evidence for such trade-offs is rare. We propose an alternative theory based on basic features of the parasite life cycle: host selection and subsequent intrahost replication. We introduce a new concept of effective burst size that accounts for the fact that successful host selection does not guarantee intrahost replication. Our theory makes a general prediction that a parasite will expand its host range if its effective burst size is positive. An in silico model of bacteria-phage coevolution verifies our predictions and demonstrates that the tendency for relatively narrow host ranges in parasites can be explained even in the absence of trade-offs. PMID:24495077

  12. Structural Insight into Archaic and Alternative Chaperone-Usher Pathways Reveals a Novel Mechanism of Pilus Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Pakharukova, Natalia; Garnett, James A.; Tuittila, Minna; Paavilainen, Sari; Diallo, Mamou; Xu, Yingqi; Matthews, Steve J.; Zavialov, Anton V.

    2015-01-01

    Gram-negative pathogens express fibrous adhesive organelles that mediate targeting to sites of infection. The major class of these organelles is assembled via the classical, alternative and archaic chaperone-usher pathways. Although non-classical systems share a wider phylogenetic distribution and are associated with a range of diseases, little is known about their assembly mechanisms. Here we report atomic-resolution insight into the structure and biogenesis of Acinetobacter baumannii Csu and Escherichia coli ECP biofilm-mediating pili. We show that the two non-classical systems are structurally related, but their assembly mechanism is strikingly different from the classical assembly pathway. Non-classical chaperones, unlike their classical counterparts, maintain subunits in a substantially disordered conformational state, akin to a molten globule. This is achieved by a unique binding mechanism involving the register-shifted donor strand complementation and a different subunit carboxylate anchor. The subunit lacks the classical pre-folded initiation site for donor strand exchange, suggesting that recognition of its exposed hydrophobic core starts the assembly process and provides fresh inspiration for the design of inhibitors targeting chaperone-usher systems. PMID:26587649

  13. Structural Insight into Archaic and Alternative Chaperone-Usher Pathways Reveals a Novel Mechanism of Pilus Biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pakharukova, Natalia; Garnett, James A; Tuittila, Minna; Paavilainen, Sari; Diallo, Mamou; Xu, Yingqi; Matthews, Steve J; Zavialov, Anton V

    2015-11-01

    Gram-negative pathogens express fibrous adhesive organelles that mediate targeting to sites of infection. The major class of these organelles is assembled via the classical, alternative and archaic chaperone-usher pathways. Although non-classical systems share a wider phylogenetic distribution and are associated with a range of diseases, little is known about their assembly mechanisms. Here we report atomic-resolution insight into the structure and biogenesis of Acinetobacter baumannii Csu and Escherichia coli ECP biofilm-mediating pili. We show that the two non-classical systems are structurally related, but their assembly mechanism is strikingly different from the classical assembly pathway. Non-classical chaperones, unlike their classical counterparts, maintain subunits in a substantially disordered conformational state, akin to a molten globule. This is achieved by a unique binding mechanism involving the register-shifted donor strand complementation and a different subunit carboxylate anchor. The subunit lacks the classical pre-folded initiation site for donor strand exchange, suggesting that recognition of its exposed hydrophobic core starts the assembly process and provides fresh inspiration for the design of inhibitors targeting chaperone-usher systems. PMID:26587649

  14. Mechanical, hormonal, and hypertrophic adaptations to 10 weeks of eccentric and stretch-shortening cycle exercise training in old males.

    PubMed

    Váczi, Márk; Nagy, Szilvia A; Kőszegi, Tamás; Ambrus, Míra; Bogner, Péter; Perlaki, Gábor; Orsi, Gergely; Tóth, Katalin; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2014-10-01

    The growth promoting effects of eccentric (ECC) contractions are well documented but it is unknown if the rate of stretch per se plays a role in such muscular responses in healthy aging human skeletal muscle. We tested the hypothesis that exercise training of the quadriceps muscle with low rate ECC and high rate ECC contractions in the form of stretch-shortening cycles (SSCs) but at equal total mechanical work would produce rate-specific adaptations in healthy old males age 60-70. Both training programs produced similar improvements in maximal voluntary isometric (6%) and ECC torque (23%) and stretch-shortening cycle function (reduced contraction duration [24%] and enhanced elastic energy storage [12%]) (p<0.05). The rate of torque development increased 30% only after SSC exercise (p<0.05). Resting testosterone and cortisol levels were unchanged but after each program the acute exercise-induced cortisol levels were 12-15% lower (p<0.05). Both programs increased quadriceps size 2.5% (p<0.05). It is concluded that both ECC and SSC exercise training produces favorable adaptations in healthy old males' quadriceps muscle. Although the rate of muscle tension during the SSC vs. ECC contractions was about 4-fold greater, the total mechanical work seems to regulate the hypetrophic, hormonal, and most of the mechanical adaptations. However, SSC exercise was uniquely effective in improving a key deficiency of aging muscle, i.e., its ability to produce force rapidly. PMID:25064038

  15. Control of cell cycle by metabolites of prostaglandin D2 through a non-cAMP mediated mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Fukushima, M.

    1993-01-01

    The dehydration products of PGD2, 9-deoxy-9 prostaglandin D2(PGJ2), 9-deoxy-delta 9, delta 12, delta 13 dehydroprostaglandin D2 (delta 12 PGJ2), and PGA2 all contain an unsaturated cyclopentenone structure which is characteristic of prostaglandins which effectively inhibit cell growth. It has been suggested that the action of the inhibitory prostaglandins may be through a cAMP mechanism. In this study, we use S49 wild type (WT) and adenylate cyclase variant (cyc-) cells to show that PGD2 and PGJ2 are not acting via a cyclic AMP mechanism. First, the increase in cyclic AMP in wild type S-49 cells is not proportional to its effects on DNA synthesis. More importantly, when S-49 cyc- cells were exposed to PGJ2, the adenylate cyclase (cyc-) mutant had decreased DNA synthesis with no change in its nominal cAMP content. Short-term (2 hours or less) exposure of the cyc- cells to prostaglandin J2 caused an inhibition of DNA synthesis. PGJ2 caused cytolysis at high concentrations. Long-term exposure (>14 hrs) of the cells to PGJ2, delta 12PGJ2 or delta 12, delta 14PGJ2 caused a cell cycle arrest in G1 demonstrating a cell cycle specific mechanism of action for growth inhibition by naturally occurring biological products independent of cAMP.

  16. Mechanism of a high-Tc superconducting flux pump: Using alternating magnetic field to trigger flux flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Jianzhao; Coombs, T. A.

    2015-10-01

    High-Tc Superconducting (HTS) magnets operating in persistent current mode suffer a current decay due to flux creep of superconductor and joint resistance. Flux pumps are able to inject direct current into superconducting circuit to compensate the current decay, without the thermal loss caused by current leads. In this work, we proposed a flux pumping mechanism for HTS coils, with an experimental verification and an analytical model. The basic principle we have used is that flux flow can be triggered when the superconductor carrying a direct current is subjected to a perpendicular AC magnetic field. Low frequency alternating current is induced in a loop of YBCO tape using an AC field. A portion of the tape which we refer to as the "bridge" shorts a superconducting coil. A high frequency AC field is applied perpendicular to the bridge tape when alternating current in the tape reaches one polarity. This triggers a net flux flow and results in a current increase in the coil. The proposed flux pump has clear physics and is easily controllable, which may make it promising in practical use.

  17. Life cycle assessment of cellulose nanofibrils production by mechanical treatment and two different pretreatment processes.

    PubMed

    Arvidsson, Rickard; Nguyen, Duong; Svanström, Magdalena

    2015-06-01

    Nanocellulose is a bionanomaterial with many promising applications, but high energy use in production has been described as a potential obstacle for future use. In fact, life cycle assessment studies have indicated high life cycle energy use for nanocellulose. In this study, we assess the cradle-to-gate environmental impacts of three production routes for a particular type of nanocellulose called cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) made from wood pulp. The three production routes are (1) the enzymatic production route, which includes an enzymatic pretreatment, (2) the carboxymethylation route, which includes a carboxymethylation pretreatment, and (3) one route without pretreatment, here called the no pretreatment route. The results show that CNF produced via the carboxymethylation route clearly has the highest environmental impacts due to large use of solvents made from crude oil. The enzymatic and no pretreatment routes both have lower environmental impacts, of similar magnitude. A sensitivity analysis showed that the no pretreatment route was sensitive to the electricity mix, and the carboxymethylation route to solvent recovery. When comparing the results to those of other carbon nanomaterials, it was shown that in particular CNF produced via the enzymatic and no pretreatment routes had comparatively low environmental impacts. PMID:25938258

  18. Cell Cycle Regulation by Checkpoints

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, Kevin J.; O’Connell, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoints are surveillance mechanisms that monitor the order, integrity, and fidelity of the major events of the cell cycle. These include growth to the appropriate cell size, the replication and integrity of the chromosomes, and their accurate segregation at mitosis. Many of these mechanisms are ancient in origin and highly conserved, and hence have been heavily informed by studies in simple organisms such as the yeasts. Others have evolved in higher organisms, and control alternative cell fates with significant impact on tumor suppression. Here, we consider these different checkpoint pathways and the consequences of their dysfunction on cell fate. PMID:24906307

  19. Mechanism of uncoupling in mitochondria: uncouplers as ionophores for cycling cations and protons.

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, R J; Tyson, C A; Green, D E

    1976-01-01

    Classical uncouplers such as 2,4-dinitrophenol have been shown to be ionophores with the capability for transporting monovalent or divalent cations with equal efficiency. The conditions appropriate for the maximal expression of this ionophoric capability have been explored. Two critical factors are the polarity of the organic phase and the pH of the aqueous phase that is equilibrated with the organic phase. The demonstrated cationic ionophoric capability of uncouplers, taken in conjunction with the known ability of uncouplers to cycle protons across a membrane phase, provides the experimental basis for the thesis that uncoupling of electron flow from ATP synthesis via classical uncouplers involves the substitution of one coupled process by another. Uncoupling thus reduces to the replacement of one driven reaction (ATP synthesis) by the driven reaction (cyclical transport) mediated by the uncoupler. PMID:9641

  20. Simulating left ventricular fluid-solid mechanics through the cardiac cycle under LVAD support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCormick, M.; Nordsletten, D. A.; Kay, D.; Smith, N. P.

    2013-07-01

    In this study we have integrated novel modifications of the standard Newton-Raphson/line search algorithm and optimisation of the interpolation scheme at the fluid-solid boundary to enable the simulation of fluid-solid interaction within the cardiac left ventricle under the support of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD). The line search modification combined with Jacobian reuse produced close to an order of magnitude improvement in computational time across both test and whole heart simulations. Optimisation of element interpolation schemes on the fluid-solid boundary highlights the impact this choice can have on problem stability and demonstrates that, in contrast to linear fluid elements, higher order interpolation produces improved error reduction per degree of freedom. Incorporating these modifications enabled a full heart cycle under LVAD support to be modelled. Results from these simulations show that there is slower clearance of blood entering the chamber during early compared to late diastole under conditions of constant LVAD flow.

  1. Canard explosion of limit cycles in templator models of self-replication mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brøns, Morten

    2011-04-01

    Templators are differential equation models for self-replicating chemical systems. Beutel and Peacock-López [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 125104 (2007)], 10.1063/1.2716396 have numerically analyzed a model for a cross-catalytic self-replicating system and found two cases of canard explosion, that is, a substantial change of amplitude of a limit cycle over a very short parameter interval. We show how the model can be reduced to a two-dimensional system and how canard theory for slow-fast equations can be applied to yield analytic information about the canard explosion. In particular, simple expressions for the parameter value where the canard explosion occurs are obtained. The connection to mixed-mode oscillations also observed in the model is briefly discussed.

  2. Mechanisms Controlling the Annual Cycle of Precipitation in the Tropical Atlantic Sector in an Atmospheric GCM(.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biasutti, M.; Battisti, D. S.; Sarachik, E. S.

    2004-12-01

    A set of AGCM experiments is used to study the annual cycle of precipitation in the region surrounding the tropical Atlantic Ocean. The experiments are designed to reveal the relative importance of insolation over land and the (uncoupled) SST on the annual cycle of precipitation over the tropical Atlantic Ocean, Africa, and the tropical Americas.SST variations impact the position of the maritime ITCZ by forcing the hydrostatic adjustment of the atmospheric boundary layer and changes in surface pressure and low-level convergence. The condensation heating released in the ITCZ contributes substantially to the surface circulation and the maintenance of the SST-induced ITCZ anomalies.The remote influence of SST is felt in equatorial coastal areas and the Sahel. The circulation driven by condensation heating in the maritime ITCZ extends to the coastal regions, thus communicating the SST signal onshore. Conversely, the Sahel responds to variations in SST through boundary layer processes that do not involve the maritime ITCZ. The atmospheric response to changes in subtropical SST is advected inland and forces changes in sea level pressure and low-level convergence across a large part of tropical Africa.The impact of local insolation on continental precipitation can be explained by balancing net energy input at the top of the atmospheric column with the export of energy by the divergent circulation that accompanies convection. Increased insolation reduces the stability of the atmosphere in the main continental convection centers, but not in monsoon regions.Insolation over land impacts the intensity of the maritime ITCZ via its influence on precipitation in Africa and South America. Reduced land precipitation induces the cooling of the Atlantic upper troposphere and the enhancement of convective available potential energy in the maritime ITCZ.


  3. Stimulation of microbial nitrogen cycling in aquatic ecosystems by benthic macrofauna: mechanisms and environmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stief, P.

    2013-12-01

    Invertebrate animals that live at the bottom of aquatic ecosystems (i.e., benthic macrofauna) are important mediators between nutrients in the water column and microbes in the benthos. The presence of benthic macrofauna stimulates microbial nutrient dynamics through different types of animal-microbe interactions, which potentially affect the trophic status of aquatic ecosystems. This review contrasts three types of animal-microbe interactions in the benthos of aquatic ecosystems: (i) ecosystem engineering, (ii) grazing, and (iii) symbiosis. Their specific contributions to the turnover of fixed nitrogen (mainly nitrate and ammonium) and the emission of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide are evaluated. Published data indicate that ecosystem engineering by sediment-burrowing macrofauna stimulates benthic nitrification and denitrification, which together allows fixed nitrogen removal. However, the release of ammonium from sediments is enhanced more strongly than the sedimentary uptake of nitrate. Ecosystem engineering by reef-building macrofauna increases nitrogen retention and ammonium concentrations in shallow aquatic ecosystems, but allows organic nitrogen removal through harvesting. Grazing by macrofauna on benthic microbes apparently has small or neutral effects on nitrogen cycling. Animal-microbe symbioses provide abundant and distinct benthic compartments for a multitude of nitrogen-cycle pathways. Recent studies reveal that ecosystem engineering, grazing, and symbioses of benthic macrofauna significantly enhance nitrous oxide emission from shallow aquatic ecosystems. The beneficial effect of benthic macrofauna on fixed nitrogen removal through coupled nitrification-denitrification can thus be offset by the concurrent release of (i) ammonium that stimulates aquatic primary production and (ii) nitrous oxide that contributes to global warming. Overall, benthic macrofauna intensifies the coupling between benthos, pelagial, and atmosphere through enhanced turnover and

  4. Stimulation of microbial nitrogen cycling in aquatic ecosystems by benthic macrofauna: mechanisms and environmental implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stief, P.

    2013-07-01

    Invertebrate animals that live at the bottom of aquatic ecosystems (i.e., benthic macrofauna) are important mediators between nutrients in the water column and microbes in the benthos. The presence of benthic macrofauna stimulates microbial nutrient dynamics through different types of animal-microbe interactions, which potentially affect the trophic status of aquatic ecosystems. This review contrasts three types of animal-microbe interactions in the benthos of aquatic ecosystems: (i) ecosystem engineering, (ii) grazing, and (iii) symbiosis. Their specific contributions to the turnover of fixed nitrogen (mainly nitrate and ammonium) and the emission of the greenhouse gas nitrous oxide are evaluated. Published data indicate that ecosystem engineering by sediment-burrowing macrofauna stimulates benthic nitrification and denitrification, which together allows fixed nitrogen removal. However, the release of ammonium from sediments often is enhanced even more than the sedimentary uptake of nitrate. Ecosystem engineering by reef-building macrofauna increases nitrogen retention and ammonium concentrations in shallow aquatic ecosystems, but allows organic nitrogen removal through harvesting. Grazing by macrofauna on benthic microbes apparently has small or neutral effects on nitrogen cycling. Animal-microbe symbioses provide abundant and distinct benthic compartments for a multitude of nitrogen-cycle pathways. Recent studies revealed that ecosystem engineering, grazing, and symbioses of benthic macrofauna significantly enhance nitrous oxide emission from shallow aquatic ecosystems. The beneficial effect of benthic macrofauna on fixed nitrogen removal through coupled nitrification-denitrification can thus be offset by the concurrent release of (i) ammonium that stimulates aquatic primary production and (ii) nitrous oxide that contributes to global warming. Overall, benthic macrofauna intensifies the coupling between benthos, pelagial, and atmosphere through enhanced turnover

  5. Mechanisms for capacity fading in the NiH2 cell and its effects on cycle life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Albert H.

    1993-01-01

    During recent years there have been a number of instances where the capacity of nickel hydrogen battery cells has proven to be unstable during storage. The capacity losses seen after periods of cell or battery storage have typically varied from only a small amount of fading, up to about 30 percent of the total cell capacity. Detailed studies into the root causes for such fading have been carried out in a number of instances. This report provides an overview of the different mechanisms that have been found to be responsible for such capacity fading in nickel hydrogen cells, and summarizes the presently available data on how each responsible mechanism affects ultimate cell cycle life.

  6. Effect of thermo-mechanical cycling on zirconium hydride reorientation studied in situ with synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, Kimberly B.; Motta, Arthur T.; Daymond, Mark R.; Almer, Jonathan D.

    2013-09-01

    The circumferential hydrides normally present in nuclear reactor fuel cladding after reactor exposure may dissolve during drying for dry storage and re-precipitate when cooled under load into a more radial orientation, which could embrittle the fuel cladding. It is necessary to study the rates and conditions under which hydride reorientation may happen in order to assess fuel integrity in dry storage. The objective of this work is to study the effect of applied stress and thermal cycling on the hydride morphology in cold-worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 by combining conventional metallography and in situ X-ray diffraction techniques. Metallography is used to study the evolution of hydride morphology after several thermo-mechanical cycles. In situ X-ray diffraction performed at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron provides real-time information on the process of hydride dissolution and precipitation under stress during several thermal cycles. The detailed study of diffracted intensity, peak position and full-width at half-maximum provides information on precipitation kinetics, elastic strains and other characteristics of the hydride precipitation process. The results show that thermo-mechanical cycling significantly increases the radial hydride fraction as well as the hydride length and connectivity. The radial hydrides are observed to precipitate at a lower temperature than circumferential hydrides. Variations in the magnitude and range of hydride strains due to reorientation and cycling have also been observed. These results are discussed in light of existing models and experiments on hydride reorientation. The study of hydride elastic strains during precipitation shows marked differences between circumferential and radial hydrides, which can be used to investigate the reorientation process. Cycling under stress above the threshold stress for reorientation drastically increases both the reoriented hydride fraction and the hydride size. The reoriented hydride

  7. Maternal effects mechanism of population cycling: a formidable competitor to the traditional predator–prey view

    PubMed Central

    Inchausti, Pablo; Ginzburg, Lev R.

    2009-01-01

    In the language of mathematics, one needs minimally two interacting variables (two dimensions) to describe repeatable periodic behaviour, and in the language of density dependence, one needs delayed, not immediate, density dependence to produce cyclicity. Neither language specifies the causal mechanism. There are two major potential mechanisms: exogenous mechanisms involving species interactions as in predator–prey or host–parasite, and endogenous mechanisms such as maternal effects where population growth results from the cross-generational transmission of individual quality. The species interactions view stemming from a major observation of Elton and a simultaneous independent theory by Lotka and Volterra is currently dominant. Most ecologists, when faced with cyclic phenomena, automatically look for an interacting species one step below or above in a food chain in order to find an explanation. Maternal effects hypothesis, verbally suggested in the 1950s, had only found its theoretical implementation in the 1990s. In a relatively short time, the degree of acceptance of this view grew to the level of a ‘minority opinion’ as evidenced by the widely used textbook of Begon et al. This short review attempts to describe the arguments for and against this internal two-dimensional approach. PMID:19324616

  8. Glucocorticoid receptor-mediated cell cycle arrest is achieved through distinct cell-specific transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Rogatsky, I; Trowbridge, J M; Garabedian, M J

    1997-01-01

    Glucocorticoids inhibit proliferation of many cell types, but the events leading from the activated glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to growth arrest are not understood. Ectopic expression and activation of GR in human osteosarcoma cell lines U2OS and SAOS2, which lack endogenous receptors, result in a G1 cell cycle arrest. GR activation in U2OS cells represses expression of the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) CDK4 and CDK6 as well as their regulatory partner, cyclin D3, leading to hypophosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb). We also demonstrate a ligand-dependent reduction in the expression of E2F-1 and c-Myc, transcription factors involved in the G1-to-S-phase transition. Mitogen-activated protein kinase, CDK2, cyclin E, and the CDK inhibitors (CDIs) p27 and p21 are unaffected by receptor activation in U2OS cells. The receptor's N-terminal transcriptional activation domain is not required for growth arrest in U2OS cells. In Rb-deficient SAOS2 cells, however, the expression of p27 and p21 is induced upon receptor activation. Remarkably, in SAOS2 cells that express a GR deletion derivative lacking the N-terminal transcriptional activation domain, induction of CDI expression is abolished and the cells fail to undergo ligand-dependent cell cycle arrest. Similarly, murine S49 lymphoma cells, which, like SAOS2 cells, lack Rb, require the N-terminal activation domain for growth arrest and induce CDI expression upon GR activation. These cell-type-specific differences in receptor domains and cellular targets linking GR activation to cell cycle machinery suggest two distinct regulatory mechanisms of GR-mediated cell cycle arrest: one involving transcriptional repression of G1 cyclins and CDKs and the other involving enhanced transcription of CDIs by the activated receptor. PMID:9154817

  9. Influence of thermal and mechanical load cycling on microtensile bond strengths of total and self-etching adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Fabio Hiroyuki Ogata; Peris, Alessandra Rezende; Cavalcanti, Andrea Nóbrega; Marchi, Giselle Maria; Pimenta, Luiz André Freire

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different thermal (TC) and mechanical (MC) cycling protocols on microtensile bond strength (muTBS) to cervical dentin margins of Class II restorations using two total-etch (TE) adhesives and one self-etching (SE) primer. Class II slot cavities were prepared on the mesial surfaces of 168 bovine incisors and were divided into three groups according to the bonding system used: Single Bond, OptiBond Solo Plus and Clearfil SE Bond. All cavities were restored with Filtek Z250 composite. Following restorative procedures, the restored teeth were allocated to seven subgroups (n = 8) according to the thermal/mechanical protocol performed: G1-control (no cycling), G2-100,000 MC, G3-200,000 MC, G4-500,000 MC, G5-100,000 MC+1,000 TC, G6-200,000 MC+1,000 TC, G7-500,000 MC+1,000 TC. TC was performed using 5 +/- 2 degrees C and 55 +/- 2 degrees C baths, with a dwell time of 60 seconds in each bath. MC was achieved with an axial force of 80 N at 2 cycles/second. The restorations were sectioned perpendicular to the cervical bonded interface into two 0.8-1-mm thick slabs. The slabs were trimmed at the interface to obtain a cross-sectional surface area of 0.8-1 mm2. All specimens were then subjected to muTBS (v = 0.5 mm/minute). Fracture mode analysis was performed using SEM. Bond strength mean values (MPa) were analyzed with ANOVA 3-way and Tukey's test (alpha = 5%). Dunnett's test was used to compare tested groups against Control groups of each adhesive system (alpha = 56%). SE primer presented lower mean bond strength values when compared to TE adhesives (p = 0.05). In addition, specimens restored with the SE primer did not resist to the 200,000 and 500,000 MC associated with TC. The application of 100,000 MC did not present a significant decrease in bond strength when compared to the control. Mixed failures were predominant for all groups. The higher the amount of thermal/mechanical cycles, the greater the number of mixed failures and the

  10. Design and performance of a punch mechanism based pellet injector for alternative injection in the large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, J. S.; Sakamoto, R.; Motojima, G.; Matsuyama, A.; Yamada, H.

    2011-02-15

    A low speed single barrel pellet injector, using a mechanical punch device has been developed for alternative injection in the large helical device. A pellet is injected by the combined operation of a mechanical punch and a pneumatic propellant system. The pellet shape is cylindrical, 3 mm in diameter and 3 mm in length. Using this technique the speed of the pellet can be controlled flexibly in the range of 100-450 m/s, and a higher speed can be feasible for a higher gas pressure. The injector is equipped with a guide tube selector to direct the pellet to different injection locations. Pellets are exposed to several curved parts with the curvature radii R{sub c}= 0.8 and 0.3 m when they are transferred in guided tubes to the respective injection locations. Pellet speed variation with pressure at different pellet formation temperatures has been observed. Pellet intactness tests through these guide tubes show a variation in the intact speed limit over a range of pellet formation temperatures from 6.5 to 9.8 K. Pellet speed reduction of less than 6% has been observed after the pellet moves through the curved guide tubes.

  11. Design and performance of a punch mechanism based pellet injector for alternative injection in the large helical device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, J. S.; Sakamoto, R.; Motojima, G.; Matsuyama, A.; Yamada, H.

    2011-02-01

    A low speed single barrel pellet injector, using a mechanical punch device has been developed for alternative injection in the large helical device. A pellet is injected by the combined operation of a mechanical punch and a pneumatic propellant system. The pellet shape is cylindrical, 3 mm in diameter and 3 mm in length. Using this technique the speed of the pellet can be controlled flexibly in the range of 100-450 m/s, and a higher speed can be feasible for a higher gas pressure. The injector is equipped with a guide tube selector to direct the pellet to different injection locations. Pellets are exposed to several curved parts with the curvature radii Rc = 0.8 and 0.3 m when they are transferred in guided tubes to the respective injection locations. Pellet speed variation with pressure at different pellet formation temperatures has been observed. Pellet intactness tests through these guide tubes show a variation in the intact speed limit over a range of pellet formation temperatures from 6.5 to 9.8 K. Pellet speed reduction of less than 6% has been observed after the pellet moves through the curved guide tubes.

  12. Effects of weak transcranial alternating current stimulation on brain activity-a review of known mechanisms from animal studies.

    PubMed

    Reato, Davide; Rahman, Asif; Bikson, Marom; Parra, Lucas C

    2013-01-01

    Rhythmic neuronal activity is ubiquitous in the human brain. These rhythms originate from a variety of different network mechanisms, which give rise to a wide-ranging spectrum of oscillation frequencies. In the last few years an increasing number of clinical research studies have explored transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) with weak current as a tool for affecting brain function. The premise of these interventions is that tACS will interact with ongoing brain oscillations. However, the exact mechanisms by which weak currents could affect neuronal oscillations at different frequency bands are not well known and this, in turn, limits the rational optimization of human experiments. Here we review the available in vitro and in vivo animal studies that attempt to provide mechanistic explanations. The findings can be summarized into a few generic principles, such as periodic modulation of excitability, shifts in spike timing, modulation of firing rate, and shifts in the balance of excitation and inhibition. These effects result from weak but simultaneous polarization of a large number of neurons. Whether this can lead to an entrainment or a modulation of brain oscillations, or whether AC currents have no effect at all, depends entirely on the specific dynamic that gives rise to the different brain rhythms, as discussed here for slow wave oscillations (∼1 Hz) and gamma oscillations (∼30 Hz). We conclude with suggestions for further experiments to investigate the role of AC stimulation for other physiologically relevant brain rhythms. PMID:24167483

  13. Defining the mechanism(s) of protection by cytolytic CD8 T cells against a cryptic epitope derived from a retroviral alternative reading frame

    PubMed Central

    Rutkowski, Melanie R.; Ho, On; Green, William R.

    2009-01-01

    The biological significance of protective CD8 T-cell-mediated responses against non-traditional alternative reading frame epitopes remains relatively unknown. Cytolytic CD8 T cells (CTL) specific for a non-traditional cryptic MHC class I epitope, SYNTGRFPPL, are critically involved in the protection of mice during infection with the LP-BM5 murine retrovirus. The goal of this study was to determine the functional properties of the protective SYNTGRFPPL-specific CTL during LP-BM5 infection of susceptible BALB/c CD8−/− mice. Direct infection experiments and adoptive transfer of CD8 T cells derived from perforin (pfp)−/−, IFNγ−/−, FasL−/− and, as a positive control, wild-type BALB/c mice, were utilized to assess the effector mechanisms responsible for protection. Our results indicate that SYNTGRFPPL-specific effector CTL preferentially utilize perforin-mediated cytolysis to provide protection against LP-BM5-induced pathogenesis, whereas CTL production of IFNγ is not required. Our results also suggest a minimal contribution of FasL/Fas-mediated lysis during the effector response. Collectively, these results provide insight into effector mechanisms utilized by protective CTL directed against non-traditional cryptic epitopes during disease protection. PMID:19539970

  14. Effects of Thermal and Mechanical Load Cycling on the Dentin Microtensile Bond Strength of Single Bond-2

    PubMed Central

    Daneshkazemi, Alireza; Davari, Abdolrahim; Akbari, Mohammad Javad; Davoudi, Amin; Badrian, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Different studies have shown the uncertain effects of thermal cycling (TC) and mechanical load cycling (MC) on the dentin microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of composites. This study designed to investigate the effects of TC and MC on the dentin µTBS of single bond-2. Materials and Methods: Flat dentinal surface was prepared on 48 sound extracted human third molar teeth, and were bonded by single bond-2 adhesive and Z250 resin composite. The teeth were randomly divided into eight equal groups, according to the thermal/mechanical protocol. TC and MC were proceeded at 5-55°C and 90 N with 0.5 Hz. Then restorations were sectioned to shape the hour-glass form and subjected to µTBS testing at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. To evaluate the bonding failure, the specimens were observed under the scanning electron microscope. The results were statistically analyzed with analysis of variance, t-test, Tukey HSD and post-hoc by using SPSS software version 17 at a significant level of 0.05. Results: µTBS of all groups were significantly lower than the control group (P < 0.001). Adhesive failure was predominant in all groups and increased with TC and MC. Conclusions: TC and MC had an adverse effect on µTBS of the tested adhesive resin to dentin. PMID:26464532

  15. Mechanical pain sensitivity and the severity of chronic neck pain and disability are not modulated across the menstrual cycle

    PubMed Central

    Balter, JE; Molner, JL; Kohrt, WM; Maluf, KS

    2013-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of neck pain among women, menstrual effects on regional pain outcomes have not been investigated in this clinical population. This study evaluated menstrual effects on mechanical pain sensitivity (Pressure Pain Threshold; PPT), neck pain intensity (Numeric Pain Rating Scale; NPRS) and neck-related disability (Neck Disability Index; NDI) in 22 normally menstruating (NM) and 17 hormonal contraceptive (HC) users with chronic neck pain. Sex hormones, PPT, and NDI were measured during the early follicular (F1), late follicular (F2), and luteal (L) menstrual phases. Daily NPRS scores were recorded in an online symptom diary and averaged within each phase. Estradiol and progesterone increased only for NM women in F2 and L, respectively. Phase effects on PPT (η2=0.003), NDI (η2=0.003), and NPRS (η2=0.016) for NM women were small, and did not differ from the HC group (p≥0.386). Averaged across the menstrual cycle, PPT scores explained 29% of the variance in NPRS scores for NM women, but were not associated with NDI scores in either group. Results indicate that that magnitude of menstrual effects on mechanical pain sensitivity, and the severity of neck pain and disability do not exceed thresholds of clinically detectable change in women with chronic neck pain. PERSPECTIVE Fluctuations in evoked and clinical pain outcomes across the menstrual cycle do not appear to be of sufficient magnitude to impact clinical decision-making for women with chronic neck pain. PMID:24021578

  16. Targeting and functional mechanisms of the cytokinesis-related F-BAR protein Hof1 during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Oh, Younghoon; Schreiter, Jennifer; Nishihama, Ryuichi; Wloka, Carsten; Bi, Erfei

    2013-05-01

    F-BAR proteins are membrane-associated proteins believed to link the plasma membrane to the actin cytoskeleton in cellular processes such as cytokinesis and endocytosis. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the F-BAR protein Hof1 localizes to the division site in a complex pattern during the cell cycle and plays an important role in cytokinesis. However, the mechanisms underlying its localization and function are poorly understood. Here we show that Hof1 contains three distinct targeting domains that contribute to cytokinesis differentially. The N-terminal half of Hof1 localizes to the bud neck and the sites of polarized growth during the cell cycle. The neck localization is mediated mainly by an interaction between the second coiled-coil region in the N-terminus and the septin Cdc10, whereas the localization to the sites of polarized growth is mediated entirely by the F-BAR domain. In contrast, the C-terminal half of Hof1 interacts with Myo1, the sole myosin-II heavy chain in budding yeast, and localizes to the bud neck in a Myo1-dependent manner from the onset to the completion of cytokinesis. We also show that the SH3 domain in the C-terminus plays an important role in maintaining the symmetry of Myo1 ring constriction during cytokinesis and that Hof1 interacts with Chs2, a chitin synthase that is required for primary septum formation. Together these data define a mechanism that accounts for the localization of Hof1 during the cell cycle and suggest that Hof1 may function in cytokinesis by coupling actomyosin ring constriction to primary septum formation through interactions with Myo1 and Chs2. PMID:23468521

  17. Heteromeric amino acid transporters. In search of the molecular bases of transport cycle mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Palacín, Manuel; Errasti-Murugarren, Ekaitz; Rosell, Albert

    2016-06-15

    Heteromeric amino acid transporters (HATs) are relevant targets for structural studies. On the one hand, HATs are involved in inherited and acquired human pathologies. On the other hand, these molecules are the only known examples of solute transporters composed of two subunits (heavy and light) linked by a disulfide bridge. Unfortunately, structural knowledge of HATs is scarce and limited to the atomic structure of the ectodomain of a heavy subunit (human 4F2hc-ED) and distant prokaryotic homologues of the light subunits that share a LeuT-fold. Recent data on human 4F2hc/LAT2 at nanometer resolution revealed 4F2hc-ED positioned on top of the external loops of the light subunit LAT2. Improved resolution of the structure of HATs, combined with conformational studies, is essential to establish the structural bases for light subunit recognition and to evaluate the functional relevance of heavy and light subunit interactions for the amino acid transport cycle. PMID:27284037

  18. Oceanic mechanisms for amplification of the 23,000-year ice-volume cycle.

    PubMed

    Ruddiman, W F; McIntyre, A

    1981-05-01

    Situated adjacent to the largest Northern Hemispher ice sheets of the ice ages, the mid-latitude North Atlantic Ocean has an important role in the earth's climate history. It provides a significant local source of moisture for the atmosphere and adjacent continents, forms a corridor that guides moisture-bearing storms northward from low latitudes, and at times makes direct contact along its shorelines with continental ice masses. Evidence of major ice-ocean-air interactions involving the North Atlantic during the last 250,000 years is summarized. Outflow of icebergs and meltwater initially driven by summer insolation over the ice sheets affects midlatitude ocean temperatures, summer heat storage, winter sea-ice extent, and global sea level. These oceanic responses in turn influence the winter moisture flux back to the ice sheets, as well as ablation of land ice by calving. Spectral data indicate that the oceanic moisture and sea-level feedbacks, in part controlled by glacial melt products, amplify Milankovitch (insolation) forcing of the volumetrically dominant mid-latitude ice sheets at the 23,000-year precessional cycle. PMID:17739384

  19. Process screening study of alternative gas treating and sulfur removal systems for IGCC (Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle) power plant applications: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Biasca, F.E.; Korens, N.; Schulman, B.L.; Simbeck, D.R.

    1987-12-01

    One of the inherent advantages of the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle plant (IGCC) over other coal-based electric generation technologies is that the sulfur in the coal is converted into a form which can be removed and recovered. Extremely low sulfur oxide emissions can result. Gas treating and sulfur recovery processes for the control of sulfur emissions are an integral part of the overall IGCC plant design. There is a wide range of commercially proven technologies which are highly efficient for sulfur control. In addition, there are many developing technologies and new concepts for applying established technologies which offer potential improvements in both technical and economic performance. SFA Pacific, Inc. has completed a screening study to compare several alternative methods of removing sulfur from the gas streams generated by the Texaco coal gasification process for use in an IGCC plant. The study considered cleaning the gas made from high and low sulfur coals to produce a low sulfur fuel gas and a severely desulfurized synthesis gas (suitable for methanol synthesis), while maintaining a range of low levels of total sulfur emissions. The general approach was to compare the technical performance of the various processes in meeting the desulfurization specifications laid out in EPRI's design basis for the study. The processing scheme being tested at the Cool Water IGCC facility incorporates the Selexol acid gas removal process which is used in combination with a Claus sulfur plant and a SCOT tailgas treating unit. The study has identified several commercial systems, as well as some unusual applications, which can provide efficient removal of sulfur from the fuel gas and also produce extremely low sulfur emissions - so as to meet very stringent sulfur emissions standards. 29 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. Left bundle branch block and mechanical events of the cardiac cycle.

    PubMed

    Hultgren, H N; Craige, E; Fujii, J; Nakamura, T; Bilisoly, J

    1983-10-01

    Left bundle branch block (LBBB) is associated with a prolongation of the interval from the QRS onset to the onset of left ventricular (LV) ejection. The locus and prevalence of specific sites of delay were examined in 56 patients with complete LBBB using echocardiography, phonocardiography and external pulse recordings. The results were compared with those in 52 control subjects without LBBB. The onset of the QRS complex was used as the initial reference point of measurement of time intervals. The following abnormalities were found in patients with LBBB: (1) delayed mitral valve closure (Q-MC greater than 0.08 second) was the major site of delay in 23% of patients; (2) prolongation of the LV isovolumetric contraction time (greater than 0.06 second) was the major site of delay in 41%; (3) both Q-MC and LV isovolumetric contraction time were prolonged in 18%; and (4) in 26% of patients the onset of ventricular contraction determined by the onset of the increase of the apex impulse was delayed (Q-VC greater than 0.07 second). The most common cause of delayed ejection was a prolonged LV isovolumetric contraction time, which occurred in 59% of patients. A control group of 20 patients with abnormal LV function but without LBBB had a low incidence of the 3 types of delay in LV ejection (0 to 15%). Thus, the major abnormalities in the cardiac cycle in LBBB are due to the conduction defect and not to LV dysfunction. The results of this study suggest the presence of variable abnormalities of conduction in complete LBBB. PMID:6624668

  1. Effects of bonding bakeout thermal cycles on pre- and post irradiation microstructures, physical, and mechanical properties of copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, B.N.; Eldrup, M.; Toft, P.; Edwards, D.J.

    1996-10-01

    At present, dispersion strengthened (DS) copper is being considered as the primary candidate material for the ITER first wall and divertor components. Recently, it was agreed among the ITER parties that a backup alloy should be selected from the two well known precipitation hardened copper alloys, CuCrZr and CuNiBe. It was therefore decided to carry out screening experiments to simulate the effect of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on microstructure, mechanical properties, and electrical resistivity of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys. On the basis of the results of these experiments, one of the two alloys will be selected as a backup material. Tensile specimens of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys were given various heat treatments corresponding to solution anneal, prime ageing, and bonding thermal cycle followed by reageing and the reactor bakeout treatment at 623K for 100 hours. Tensile specimens of the DS copper were also given the heat treatment corresponding to the bonding thermal cycle. A number of these heat treated specimens of CuCrZr, CuNiBe, and DS copper were neutron irradiated at 523K to a dose level of {approx}0.3 dpa (NRT) in the DR-3 reactor at Riso. Both unirradiated and irradiated specimens with the various heat treatments were tensile tested at 532K. The dislocation, precipitate and void microstructures and electrical resistivity of these specimens were also determined. Results of these investigations will be reported and discussed in terms of thermal and irradiation stability of precipitates and irradiation-induced precipitation and recovery of dislocation microstructure. Results show that the bonding and bakeout thermal cycles are not likely to have any serious deleterious effects on the performance of these alloys. The CuNiBe alloys were found to be susceptible to radiation-induced embrittlement, however, the exact mechanism is not yet known. It is thought that radiation-induced precipitation and segregation of the beryllium may be responsible.

  2. Prevention of cardiolipin oxidation and fatty acid cycling as two antioxidant mechanisms of cationic derivatives of plastoquinone (SkQs).

    PubMed

    Skulachev, Vladimir P; Antonenko, Yury N; Cherepanov, Dmitry A; Chernyak, Boris V; Izyumov, Denis S; Khailova, Ludmila S; Klishin, Sergey S; Korshunova, Galina A; Lyamzaev, Konstantin G; Pletjushkina, Olga Yu; Roginsky, Vitaly A; Rokitskaya, Tatiana I; Severin, Fedor F; Severina, Inna I; Simonyan, Ruben A; Skulachev, Maxim V; Sumbatyan, Natalia V; Sukhanova, Evgeniya I; Tashlitsky, Vadim N; Trendeleva, Tatyana A; Vyssokikh, Mikhail Yu; Zvyagilskaya, Renata A

    2010-01-01

    The present state of the art in studies on the mechanisms of antioxidant activities of mitochondria-targeted cationic plastoquinone derivatives (SkQs) is reviewed. Our experiments showed that these compounds can operate as antioxidants in two quite different ways, i.e. (i) by preventing peroxidation of cardiolipin [Antonenko et al., Biochemistry (Moscow) 73 (2008) 1273-1287] and (ii) by fatty acid cycling resulting in mild uncoupling that inhibits the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondrial State 4 [Severin et al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 107 (2009), 663-668]. The quinol and cationic moieties of SkQ are involved in cases (i) and (ii), respectively. In case (i) SkQH2 interrupts propagation of chain reactions involved in peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acid residues in cardiolipin, the formed SkQ- being reduced back to SkQH2 by heme bH of complex III in an antimycin-sensitive way. Molecular dynamics simulation showed that there are two stable conformations of SkQ1 with the quinol residue localized near peroxyl radicals at C9 or C13 of the linoleate residue in cardiolipin. In mechanism (ii), fatty acid cycling mediated by the cationic SkQ moiety is involved. It consists of (a) transmembrane movement of the fatty acid anion/SkQ cation pair and (b) back flows of free SkQ cation and protonated fatty acid. The cycling results in a protonophorous effect that was demonstrated in planar phospholipid membranes and liposomes. In mitochondria, the cycling gives rise to mild uncoupling, thereby decreasing membrane potential and ROS generation coupled to reverse electron transport in the respiratory chain. In yeast cells, dodecyltriphenylphosphonium (capital ES, Cyrillic12TPP), the cationic part of SkQ1, induces uncoupling that is mitochondria-targeted since capital ES, Cyrillic12TPP is specifically accumulated in mitochondria and increases the H+ conductance of their inner membrane. The conductance of the outer cell membrane is not affected by capital ES

  3. Discovery of causal mechanisms: Oxidative phosphorylation and the Calvin-Benson cycle.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Raphael; Nickelsen, Kärin

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the context of discovery of two significant achievements of twentieth century biochemistry: the chemiosmotic mechanism of oxidative phosphorylation (proposed in 1961 by Peter Mitchell) and the dark reaction of photosynthesis (elucidated from 1946 to 1954 by Melvin Calvin and Andrew A. Benson). The pursuit of these problems involved discovery strategies such as the transfer, recombination and reversal of previous causal and mechanistic knowledge in biochemistry. We study the operation and scope of these strategies by careful historical analysis, reaching a number of systematic conclusions: (1) even basic strategies can illuminate "hard cases" of scientific discovery that go far beyond simple extrapolation or analogy; (2) the causal-mechanistic approach to discovery permits a middle course between the extremes of a completely substrate-neutral and a completely domain-specific view of scientific discovery; (3) the existing literature on mechanism discovery underemphasizes the role of combinatorial approaches in defining and exploring search spaces of possible problem solutions; (4) there is a subtle interplay between a fine-grained mechanistic and a more coarse-grained causal level of analysis, and both are needed to make discovery processes intelligible. PMID:26013645

  4. Leaching of biocides from polymer renders under wet/dry cycles--Rates and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Styszko, Katarzyna; Bollmann, Ulla E; Bester, Kai

    2015-11-01

    In this study it was tested, which mechanism for the transport of biocides in polymeric renders is more relevant: (1) evaporative transports (meaning there is a flow of water through the material due to evaporation on the surface), which transports also the biocides to the surface, (2) transport through the polymer and (3) transport through water filled pores. It turned out that under the experimental conditions evaporative transport was not relevant, while transport through soaked (constantly wetted) renders was considerably faster than by other means. Additionally it turned out that also the equilibria were influenced by the water content. Differences in equilibria can be up to factor 10 between constantly wetted (soaked) and un-wetted materials. The two tested materials (one silicone and one acrylate render) had significantly different leaching behavior concerning equilibria and dynamics of mass flows, but for both the pre-wetted materials leached most. PMID:26210026

  5. Tumor cells chronically treated with a trastuzumab-maytansinoid antibody-drug conjugate develop varied resistance mechanisms but respond to alternate treatments.

    PubMed

    Loganzo, Frank; Tan, Xingzhi; Sung, Matthew; Jin, Guixian; Myers, Jeremy S; Melamud, Eugene; Wang, Fang; Diesl, Veronica; Follettie, Maximillian T; Musto, Sylvia; Lam, My-Hanh; Hu, William; Charati, Manoj B; Khandke, Kiran; Kim, Kenny Sung Kyoo; Cinque, Mike; Lucas, Judy; Graziani, Edmund; Maderna, Andreas; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Arndt, Kim T; Gerber, Hans-Peter

    2015-04-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADC) are emerging as clinically effective therapy. We hypothesized that cancers treated with ADCs would acquire resistance mechanisms unique to immunoconjugate therapy and that changing ADC components may overcome resistance. Breast cancer cell lines were exposed to multiple cycles of anti-Her2 trastuzumab-maytansinoid ADC (TM-ADC) at IC80 concentrations followed by recovery. The resistant cells, 361-TM and JIMT1-TM, were characterized by cytotoxicity, proteomic, transcriptional, and other profiling. Approximately 250-fold resistance to TM-ADC developed in 361-TM cells, and cross-resistance was observed to other non-cleavable-linked ADCs. Strikingly, these 361-TM cells retained sensitivity to ADCs containing cleavable mcValCitPABC-linked auristatins. In JIMT1-TM cells, 16-fold resistance to TM-ADC developed, with cross-resistance to other trastuzumab-ADCs. Both 361-TM and JIMT1-TM cells showed minimal resistance to unconjugated mertansine (DM1) and other chemotherapeutics. Proteomics and immunoblots detected increased ABCC1 (MRP1) drug efflux protein in 361-TM cells, and decreased Her2 (ErbB2) in JIMT1-TM cells. Proteomics also showed alterations in various pathways upon chronic exposure to the drug in both cell models. Tumors derived from 361-TM cells grew in mice and were refractory to TM-ADC compared with parental cells. Hence, acquired resistance to trastuzumab-maytansinoid ADC was generated in cultured cancer cells by chronic drug treatment, and either increased ABCC1 protein or reduced Her2 antigen were primary mediators of resistance. These ADC-resistant cell models retain sensitivity to other ADCs or standard-of-care chemotherapeutics, suggesting that alternate therapies may overcome acquired ADC resistance. Mol Cancer Ther; 14(4); 952-63. ©2015 AACR. PMID:25646013

  6. Linking Self-Incompatibility, Dichogamy, and Flowering Synchrony in Two Euphorbia Species: Alternative Mechanisms for Avoiding Self-Fertilization?

    PubMed Central

    Narbona, Eduardo; Ortiz, Pedro L.; Arista, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Background Plant species have several mechanisms to avoid selfing such as dichogamy or a self-incompatibility response. Dichogamy in a single flower may reduce autogamy but, to avoid geitonogamy, plants must show flowering synchronization among all their flowers (i.e. synchronous dichogamy). It is hypothesized that one species would not simultaneously show synchronous dichogamy and self-incompatibility because they are redundant mechanisms to reduce selfing; however, this has not been accurately assessed. Methodology/Principal Findings This expectation was tested over two years in two natural populations of the closely related Mediterranean spurges Euphorbia boetica and E. nicaeensis, which completely avoid autogamy by protogyny at the cyathia level. Both spurges showed a high population synchrony (Z<79), and their inflorescences flower synchronously. In E. nicaeensis, there was no overlap among the cyathia in anthesis of successive inflorescence levels and the overlap between sexual phases of cyathia of the same inflorescence level was uncommon (4–16%). In contrast, E. boetica showed a high overlap among consecutive inflorescence levels (74–93%) and between sexual phases of cyathia of the same inflorescence level (48–80%). The flowering pattern of both spurges was consistent in the two populations and over the two successive years. A hand-pollination experiment demonstrated that E. nicaeensis was strictly self-compatible whereas E. boetica was partially self-incompatible. Conclusions/Significance We propose that the complex pattern of synchronized protogyny in E. nicaeensis prevents geitonogamous crosses and, consequently, avoids selfing and inbreeding depression. In E. boetica, a high probability of geitonogamous crosses may occur but, alternatively, this plant escapes selfing through a self-incompatibility response. We posit that synchronous dichogamy and physiological self-incompatibility do not co-occur in the same species because each process is

  7. Stretch shortening cycle fatigue: interactions among joint stiffness, reflex, and muscle mechanical performance in the drop jump [corrected].

    PubMed

    Horita, T; Komi, P V; Nicol, C; Kyröläinen, H

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of strenuous stretch-shortening cycle exercise on the relationship between reflex and stiffness regulation during the drop jump. Ten healthy male subjects performed submaximal stretch-shortening cycle exercise on a special sledge apparatus. Exhaustion occurred on average within 3 min. A drop jump test from a 50-cm height was performed immediately before and after the sledge exercise, as well as 2 h, 2 days and 4 days later. The fatigue exercise showed relatively high blood lactate concentrations 12.5 (SD 2.6) mmol.l-1 and a 2-day delayed increase of serum cretaine kinase concentration. In drop jumps, the short latency M1 component of the vastus lateralis muscle electromyogram (EMG) response showed a continuous decline throughout the entire follow-up period after fatigue (NS), whereas the medium latency EMG component increased 2 days after the postfatigue sessions (P < 0.05). Immediately after the fatigue exercise a positive correlation (P < 0.05) was found between the changes in the short latency EMG response and in the amount of knee joint stiffness during the early postlanding phase of the drop jump. This suggests that the M1 response was closely related to the stiffness changes during the initial braking phase of the drop jump. Increase of creatine kinase concentration on the 2nd day correlated negatively with the changes in the drop jump performance (P < 0.05). Since the short latency EMG component has almost recovered on the 2nd day, impairment of the mechanical function of the muscle might have taken place. In conclusion, exhausting stretch-shortening cycle exercise induced local muscle impairment, which resulted in modulation of the reflex and stiffness interaction in the drop jump as well as compensation by central motor command. PMID:8803498

  8. Investigation of anticancer mechanism of oleuropein via cell cycle and apoptotic pathways in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Seçme, Mücahit; Eroğlu, Canan; Dodurga, Yavuz; Bağcı, Gülseren

    2016-07-01

    Neuroblastoma is one of the most common types of pediatric tumors that can spread quickly in neuronal tissues. Oleuropein which is active compound of olive leaves, belongs to polyphenols group and has antioxidant, anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, anti-hypertensive and anti-carcinogenic effects. The aim of the study is to determine the therapeutic effects of oleuropein on cell proliferation, invasion, colony formation, cell cycle and apoptotic mechanisms in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line under in vitro conditions. The effect of oleuropein on cell viability was determined by XTT method. 84 cell cycle control and 84 apoptosis related genes were evaluated by RT-PCR. Effects of oleuropein on apoptosis were researched by TUNEL assay. Protein expressions were determined by western blot analysis. Effects of oleuropein on cell invasion, colony formation and migration were detected by matrigel-chamber, colony formation assay and wound-healing assay, respectively. IC50 value of oleuropein in SH-SY5Y cells was detected as 350μM at 48th hours. It is determined that oleuropein causes cell cycle arrest by down-regulating of CylinD1,CylinD2,CyclinD3,CDK4,CDK6 and up-regulating of p53 and CDKN2A, CDKN2B, CDKN1A gene expressions. Oleuropein also induces apoptosis by inhibiting of Bcl-2 and activating of Bax,caspase-9 and caspase-3 gene expressions. Apoptotic cell ratio was found 36.4±3.27% in oleuropein dose group. Oleuropein decreased invasion in SH-SY5Y cells and suppressed colony numbers in ratio of 53.6±4.71%.Our results demonstrated that oleuropein can be a therapeutic agent in the treatment of neuroblastoma. PMID:27032461

  9. Molecular Mechanisms by Which a Fucus vesiculosus Extract Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Geisen, Ulf; Zenthoefer, Marion; Peipp, Matthias; Kerber, Jannik; Plenge, Johannes; Managò, Antonella; Fuhrmann, Markus; Geyer, Roland; Hennig, Steffen; Adam, Dieter; Piker, Levent; Rimbach, Gerald; Kalthoff, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer entities, with an extremely poor 5-year survival rate. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents with specific modes of action are urgently needed. Marine organisms represent a promising source to identify new pharmacologically active substances. Secondary metabolites derived from marine algae are of particular interest. The present work describes cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by an HPLC-fractionated, hydrophilic extract derived from the Baltic brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fv1). Treatment with Fv1 resulted in a strong inhibition of viability in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. This extract inhibited the cell cycle of proliferating cells due to the up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, shown on the mRNA (microarray data) and protein level. As a result, cells were dying in a caspase-independent manner. Experiments with non-dividing cells showed that proliferation is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of Fv1. Importantly, Fv1 showed low cytotoxic activity against non-malignant resting T cells and terminally differentiated cells like erythrocytes. Interestingly, accelerated killing effects were observed in combination with inhibitors of autophagy. Our in vitro data suggest that Fv1 may represent a promising new agent that deserves further development towards clinical application. PMID:26204945

  10. Highly Dynamic Interactions Maintain Kinetic Stability of the ClpXP Protease During the ATP-Fueled Mechanical Cycle.

    PubMed

    Amor, Alvaro J; Schmitz, Karl R; Sello, Jason K; Baker, Tania A; Sauer, Robert T

    2016-06-17

    The ClpXP protease assembles in a reaction in which an ATP-bound ring hexamer of ClpX binds to one or both heptameric rings of the ClpP peptidase. Contacts between ClpX IGF-loops and clefts on a ClpP ring stabilize the complex. How ClpXP stability is maintained during the ATP-hydrolysis cycle that powers mechanical unfolding and translocation of protein substrates is poorly understood. Here, we use a real-time kinetic assay to monitor the effects of nucleotides on the assembly and disassembly of ClpXP. When ATP is present, complexes containing single-chain ClpX assemble via an intermediate and remain intact until transferred into buffers containing ADP or no nucleotides. ATP binding to high-affinity subunits of the ClpX hexamer prevents rapid dissociation, but additional subunits must be occupied to promote assembly. Small-molecule acyldepsipeptides, which compete with the IGF loops of ClpX for ClpP-cleft binding, cause exceptionally rapid dissociation of otherwise stable ClpXP complexes, suggesting that the IGF-loop interactions with ClpP must be highly dynamic. Our results indicate that the ClpX hexamer spends almost no time in an ATP-free state during the ATPase cycle, allowing highly processive degradation of protein substrates. PMID:27003103

  11. Molecular Mechanisms by Which a Fucus vesiculosus Extract Mediates Cell Cycle Inhibition and Cell Death in Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Geisen, Ulf; Zenthoefer, Marion; Peipp, Matthias; Kerber, Jannik; Plenge, Johannes; Managò, Antonella; Fuhrmann, Markus; Geyer, Roland; Hennig, Steffen; Adam, Dieter; Piker, Levent; Rimbach, Gerald; Kalthoff, Holger

    2015-07-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive cancer entities, with an extremely poor 5-year survival rate. Therefore, novel therapeutic agents with specific modes of action are urgently needed. Marine organisms represent a promising source to identify new pharmacologically active substances. Secondary metabolites derived from marine algae are of particular interest. The present work describes cellular and molecular mechanisms induced by an HPLC-fractionated, hydrophilic extract derived from the Baltic brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus (Fv1). Treatment with Fv1 resulted in a strong inhibition of viability in various pancreatic cancer cell lines. This extract inhibited the cell cycle of proliferating cells due to the up-regulation of cell cycle inhibitors, shown on the mRNA (microarray data) and protein level. As a result, cells were dying in a caspase-independent manner. Experiments with non-dividing cells showed that proliferation is a prerequisite for the effectiveness of Fv1. Importantly, Fv1 showed low cytotoxic activity against non-malignant resting T cells and terminally differentiated cells like erythrocytes. Interestingly, accelerated killing effects were observed in combination with inhibitors of autophagy. Our in vitro data suggest that Fv1 may represent a promising new agent that deserves further development towards clinical application. PMID:26204945

  12. In Situ Method for Measuring the Mechanical Properties of Nafion Thin Films during Hydration Cycles.

    PubMed

    Page, Kirt A; Shin, Jae Wook; Eastman, Scott A; Rowe, Brandon W; Kim, Sangcheol; Kusoglu, Ahmet; Yager, Kevin G; Stafford, Gery R

    2015-08-19

    Perfluorinated ionomers, in particular Nafion, are an essential component in hydrogen fuel cells, as both the proton exchange membrane and the binder within the catalyst layer. During normal operation of a hydrogen fuel cell, the ionomer will progressively swell and deswell in response to the changes in hydration, resulting in mechanical fatigue and ultimately failure over time. In this study, we have developed and implemented a cantilever bending technique in order to investigate the swelling-induced stresses in biaxially constrained Nafion thin films. When the deflection of a cantilever beam coated with a polymer film is monitored as it is exposed to varying humidity environments, the swelling induced stress-thickness product of the polymer film is measured. By combining the stress-thickness results with a measurement of the swelling strain as a function of humidity, as measured by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and X-ray reflectivity (XR), the swelling stress can be determined. An estimate of the Young's modulus of thin Nafion films as a function of relative humidity is obtained. The Young's modulus values indicate orientation of the ionic domains within the polymer films, which were confirmed by grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS). This study represents a measurement platform that can be expanded to incorporate novel ionomer systems and fuel cell components to mimic the stress state of a working hydrogen fuel cell. PMID:26258630

  13. A mechanism for bacterial transformation of dimethylsulfide to dimethylsulfoxide: a missing link in the marine organic sulfur cycle.

    PubMed

    Lidbury, Ian; Kröber, Eileen; Zhang, Zhidong; Zhu, Yijun; Murrell, J Colin; Chen, Yin; Schäfer, Hendrik

    2016-09-01

    The volatile organosulfur compound, dimethylsulfide (DMS), plays an important role in climate regulation and global sulfur biogeochemical cycles. Microbial oxidation of DMS to dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) represents a major sink of DMS in surface seawater, yet the underlying molecular mechanisms and key microbial taxa involved are not known. Here, we reveal that Ruegeria pomeroyi, a model marine heterotrophic bacterium, can oxidize DMS to DMSO using trimethylamine monooxygenase (Tmm). Purified Tmm oxidizes DMS to DMSO at a 1:1 ratio. Mutagenesis of the tmm gene in R. pomeroyi completely abolished DMS oxidation and subsequent DMSO formation. Expression of Tmm and DMS oxidation in R. pomeroyi is methylamine-dependent and regulated at the post-transcriptional level. Considering that Tmm is present in approximately 20% of bacterial cells inhabiting marine surface waters, particularly the marine Roseobacter clade and the SAR11 clade, our observations contribute to a mechanistic understanding of biological DMSO production in surface seawater. PMID:27114231

  14. Entropy production in mesoscopic stochastic thermodynamics: nonequilibrium kinetic cycles driven by chemical potentials, temperatures, and mechanical forces.

    PubMed

    Qian, Hong; Kjelstrup, Signe; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B; Bedeaux, Dick

    2016-04-20

    Nonequilibrium thermodynamics (NET) investigates processes in systems out of global equilibrium. On a mesoscopic level, it provides a statistical dynamic description of various complex phenomena such as chemical reactions, ion transport, diffusion, thermochemical, thermomechanical and mechanochemical fluxes. In the present review, we introduce a mesoscopic stochastic formulation of NET by analyzing entropy production in several simple examples. The fundamental role of nonequilibrium steady-state cycle kinetics is emphasized. The statistical mechanics of Onsager's reciprocal relations in this context is elucidated. Chemomechanical, thermomechanical, and enzyme-catalyzed thermochemical energy transduction processes are discussed. It is argued that mesoscopic stochastic NET in phase space provides a rigorous mathematical basis of fundamental concepts needed for understanding complex processes in chemistry, physics and biology. This theory is also relevant for nanoscale technological advances. PMID:26986039

  15. Investigation on the microstructure and mechanical properties of CuCrZr after manufacturing thermal cycle for plasma facing component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jeong-Yong; Jung, Yang-Il; Choi, Byung-Kwon; Lee, Jung-Suk; Jeong, Yong Hwan; Hong, Bong Guen

    2011-10-01

    The effects of manufacturing thermal cycle on the various mechanical properties of CuCrZr were investigated. Vickers hardness was changed with an aging temperature in an identical manner with the strength change in a wide range of heat treatment. The change of Charpy impact energy with an aging temperature exhibited an opposite trend to the changes of the strength and hardness. At least in terms of the impact energy of CuCrZr, aging at a higher temperate would be preferable if the strength of CuCrZr could be maintained higher than the limitation value after the completion of the fabrication of ITER first wall. The fatigue life of CuCrZr was influenced to a certain extent by the cooling rate and the aging temperature. Especially in the higher strain amplitude, the contribution of the elastic and plastic components to the fatigue response was dependent on the yield strength which is determined by the aging temperature.

  16. Mechanisms and Concepts Paving the Way towards a Complete Transport Cycle of Plant Vacuolar Sorting Receptors[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    De Marcos Lousa, Carine; Gershlick, David C.; Denecke, Jurgen

    2012-01-01

    Delivery of proteins to the lytic vacuole in plants is a complex cascade of selective interactions that specifically excludes residents of the endoplasmic reticulum and secreted proteins. Vacuolar transport must be highly efficient to avoid mistargeting of hydrolytic enzymes to locations where they could be harmful. While plant vacuolar sorting signals have been well described for two decades, it is only during the last 5 years that a critical mass of data was gathered that begins to reveal how vacuolar sorting receptors (VSRs) may complete a full transport cycle. Yet, the field is far from reaching a consensus regarding the organelles that could be involved in vacuolar sorting, their potential biogenesis, and the ultimate recycling of membranes and protein machinery that maintain this pathway. This review will highlight the important landmarks in our understanding of VSR function and compare recent transport models that have been proposed so that an emerging picture of plant vacuolar sorting mechanisms can be drawn. PMID:22570446

  17. Entropy production in mesoscopic stochastic thermodynamics: nonequilibrium kinetic cycles driven by chemical potentials, temperatures, and mechanical forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Hong; Kjelstrup, Signe; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Bedeaux, Dick

    2016-04-01

    Nonequilibrium thermodynamics (NET) investigates processes in systems out of global equilibrium. On a mesoscopic level, it provides a statistical dynamic description of various complex phenomena such as chemical reactions, ion transport, diffusion, thermochemical, thermomechanical and mechanochemical fluxes. In the present review, we introduce a mesoscopic stochastic formulation of NET by analyzing entropy production in several simple examples. The fundamental role of nonequilibrium steady-state cycle kinetics is emphasized. The statistical mechanics of Onsager’s reciprocal relations in this context is elucidated. Chemomechanical, thermomechanical, and enzyme-catalyzed thermochemical energy transduction processes are discussed. It is argued that mesoscopic stochastic NET in phase space provides a rigorous mathematical basis of fundamental concepts needed for understanding complex processes in chemistry, physics and biology. This theory is also relevant for nanoscale technological advances.

  18. High temperature low-cycle fatigue mechanisms in single crystals of nickel-based superalloy Mar-M 200

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milligan, W. W.; Jayaraman, N.

    1984-01-01

    Twenty three high temperature low-cycle fatigue tests were conducted on single crystals of the nickel-based superalloy Mar-M 200. Tests were conducted at 760 and 870 C. SEM fractography and transmission electron microscopy were used to determine mechanisms responsible for the observed orientation dependent fatigue behavior. It has been concluded that the plastic characteristics of the alloy lead to orientation-dependent strain hardening and fatigue lives at 760 C. At 870 C, the elastic characteristics of the alloy dominated the behavior, even though the plastic strain ranges were about the same as they were at 760 C. This led to orientation-dependent fatigue lives, but the trends were not the same as they were at 760 C.

  19. Mechanisms involved in resveratrol-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in prostate cancer-derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Dixan A; Pozo-Guisado, Eulalia; Alvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Fernandez-Salguero, Pedro M; Castellón, Enrique A

    2007-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol found at high concentrations in grapes and red wine with reported anticarcinogenic effects. We studied the molecular mechanism of resveratrol-induced apoptosis and proliferation arrest in prostate derived cells PZ-HPV-7 (nontumorigenic line), LNCaP (androgen-sensitive cancer line), and PC-3 (androgen-insensitive cancer line). Apoptosis and cell cycle distribution were evaluated by flow cytometry and proliferation by MTT assay and direct cell counting. Caspases, bax, bcl-2, cyclins, Cdks, p53, p21, and p27 were measured by Western blot and kinase activities of cyclin/Cdk complexes by immunoprecipitation followed by kinase assays with appropriate substrates. Resveratrol induced a decrease in proliferation rates and an increase in apoptosis in cancer cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. These effects were coincident with cell accumulation at the G0/G1 phase. In LNCaP and PC-3, the apoptosis induced by resveratrol was mediated by activation of caspases 9 and 3 and a change in the ratio of bax/bcl-2. Expressions of cyclin D1, E, and Cdk4 as well as cyclin D1/Cdk4 kinase activity were reduced by resveratrol only in LNCaP cells. In contrast, cyclin B and Cdk1 expression and cyclin B/Cdk1 kinase activity were decreased in both cell lines in the presence of resveratrol. However, modulator proteins p53, p21, and p27 were increased by resveratrol only in LNCaP cells. These effects probably result in the observed proliferation arrest and disruption of cell cycle control. In addition, the specific differences found between LNCaP and PC-3 suggest that resveratrol acts through different mechanisms upon the androgen or estrogen receptor cell status. PMID:17050787

  20. Transverse cable stiffness and mechanical losses associated with load cycles in ITER Nb3Sn and NbTi CICCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijhuis, A.; Ilyin, Y.

    2009-05-01

    The flexible nature of the cable bundles in the sizeable cable-in-conduit-conductors for ITER containing more than a thousand strands, in combination with a void fraction of around 30%, gives scope for significant cable compression and strand deflection. In particular, the transverse stiffness of the Nb3Sn type of cabled superconductors, being subjected to large electromagnetic forces, is critical for their long-term performance considering the impact of the strain variation on the transport properties. What is more, the compression of the cable bundle under load and the permanent deformation and relaxation in time or that associated with quenches, have an effect on the cooling and pressure drop along the turns of the windings and are valuable to account for in large magnets such as for ITER. The electromagnetic AC losses of ITER Nb3Sn and NbTi CICCs, related to changing magnetic field and in this manner important for their stability, were broadly studied and reported but the associated mechanical losses have received less attention so far. The lifetime characteristics in terms of cable compression, changes in transverse stiffness and mechanical losses are experimentally determined on several prototype ITER NbTi and Nb3Sn conductors in the Twente press and a summary of the results is given. The nonlinear stress-strain characteristics of the cable bundle and its moderate time-dependent nature can be considered as a viscoelastic-plastic phenomenon. The evolution of the stiffness and the mechanical loss depends on the peak load, void fraction, strand type and strand coating and changes with the number of load cycles. The dissipated heat from mechanical energy is not a critical issue for ITER magnet operation but is not negligible, in particular in the case of NbTi conductors.

  1. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), General Electric Phase 1. Volume 3: Energy conversion subsystems and components. Part 1: Bottoming cycles and materials of construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, R. P.; Solomon, H. D.

    1976-01-01

    Energy conversion subsystems and components were evaluated in terms of advanced energy conversion systems. Results of the bottoming cycles and materials of construction studies are presented and discussed.

  2. Strike-slip fault Kinematics and mechanics at the seismic cycle time-scale : Results from new analogue model experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caniven, Yannick; Dominguez, Stéphane; Soliva, Roger; Cattin, Rodolphe; Peyret, Michel; Chéry, Jean; Romano, Christian

    2013-04-01

    The average seismic cycle duration extends from hundred to a few thousands years but geodetic measurements, including trilateration, GPS, Insar and seismological data extend over less than one century. This short time observation scale renders difficult, then, to constrain the role of key parameters such as fault friction and geometry, crust rheology, stress and strain rate that control the kinematics and mechanics of active faults. To solve this time scale issue, we have developed a new experimental set-up that reproduces scaled micro-earthquakes and several hundreds of seismic cycles along a strike-slip fault. The model is constituted by two polyurethane foam plates laterally in contact, lying on a basal silicone layer, which simulate the mechanical behaviour of an elastoplastic upper crust over a ductile lower crust, respectively. To simulate the boundary conditions of a strike-slip fault, a computerized motoreductor system moves the two compartments on an opposite sens and at a constant very low velocity (a few µm/s). The model spatial and temporal scaling, deduces from analog material physical and mechanical parameters, implies that 1 cm in the model represents 2-3 km in the nature and 1 s is equivalent to 5-15 years. Surface-horizontal strain field is quantified by sub-pixel correlation of digital camera pictures recorded every 16 µm of displacement. For each experience about 2000 horizontal-velocity field measurements are recorded. The analysis of model-interseismic and coseismic surface displacements and their comparison to seismogenic natural faults demonstrate that our analog model reproduces correctly both near and far-field surface strains. To compare the experiences, we have developed several algorithms that allow studying the main spatial and temporal evolution of the physical parameters and surface deformation processes that characterise the seismic cycle (magnitudes, stress, strain, friction coefficients, interseismic locking depth, recurrence

  3. Alternative Mechanisms for the Interaction of the Cell-Penetrating Peptides Penetratin and the TAT Peptide with Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Yesylevskyy, Semen; Marrink, Siewert-Jan; Mark, Alan E.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have recently attracted much interest due to their apparent ability to penetrate cell membranes in an energy-independent manner. Here molecular-dynamics simulation techniques were used to study the interaction of two CPPs: penetratin and the TAT peptide with 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) phospolipid bilayers shed light on alternative mechanisms by which these peptides might cross biological membranes. In contrast to previous simulation studies of charged peptides interacting with lipid bilayers, no spontaneous formation of transmembrane pores was observed. Instead, the simulations suggest that the peptides may enter the cell by micropinocytosis, whereby the peptides induce curvature in the membrane, ultimately leading to the formation of small vesicles within the cell that encapsulate the peptides. Specifically, multiple peptides were observed to induce large deformations in the lipid bilayer that persisted throughout the timescale of the simulations (hundreds of nanoseconds). Pore formation could be induced in simulations in which an external potential was used to pull a single penetratin or TAT peptide into the membrane. With the use of umbrella-sampling techniques, the free energy of inserting a single penetratin peptide into a DPPC bilayer was estimated to be ∼75 kJmol−1, which suggests that the spontaneous penetration of single peptides would require a timescale of at least seconds to minutes. This work also illustrates the extent to which the results of such simulations can depend on the initial conditions, the extent of equilibration, the size of the system, and the conditions under which the simulations are performed. The implications of this with respect to the current systems and to simulations of membrane-peptide interactions in general are discussed. PMID:19580742

  4. Competing Mechanisms of Gamma and Beta Oscillations in the Olfactory Bulb Based on Multimodal Inhibition of Mitral Cells Over a Respiratory Cycle123

    PubMed Central

    Courtiol, Emmanuelle; Buonviso, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Gamma (∼40-90 Hz) and beta (∼15-40 Hz) oscillations and their associated neuronal assemblies are key features of neuronal sensory processing. However, the mechanisms involved in either their interaction and/or the switch between these different regimes in most sensory systems remain misunderstood. Based on in vivo recordings and biophysical modeling of the mammalian olfactory bulb (OB), we propose a general scheme where OB internal dynamics can sustain two distinct dynamic states, each dominated by either a gamma or a beta regime. The occurrence of each regime depends on the excitability level of granule cells, the main OB interneurons. Using this model framework, we demonstrate how the balance between sensory and centrifugal input can control the switch between the two oscillatory dynamic states. In parallel, we experimentally observed that sensory and centrifugal inputs to the rat OB could both be modulated by the respiration of the animal (2-12 Hz) and each one phase shifted with the other. Implementing this phase shift in our model resulted in the appearance of the alternation between gamma and beta rhythms within a single respiratory cycle, as in our experimental results under urethane anesthesia. Our theoretical framework can also account for the oscillatory frequency response, depending on the odor intensity, the odor valence, and the animal sniffing strategy observed under various conditions including animal freely-moving. Importantly, the results of the present model can form a basis to understand how fast rhythms could be controlled by the slower sensory and centrifugal modulations linked to the respiration. Visual Abstract: See Abstract PMID:26665163

  5. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 4: Open recuperated and bottomed gas turbine cycles. [performance prediction and energy conversion efficiency of gas turbines in electric power plants (thermodynamic cycles)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amos, D. J.; Grube, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    Open-cycle recuperated gas turbine plant with inlet temperatures of 1255 to 1644 K (1800 to 2500 F) and recuperators with effectiveness values of 0, 70, 80 and 90% are considered. A 1644 K (2500 F) gas turbine would have a 33.5% plant efficiency in a simple cycle, 37.6% in a recuperated cycle and 47.6% when combined with a sulfur dioxide bottomer. The distillate burning recuperated plant was calculated to produce electricity at a cost of 8.19 mills/MJ (29.5 mills/kWh). Due to their low capital cost $170 to 200 $/kW, the open cycle gas turbine plant should see duty for peaking and intermediate load duty.

  6. Parity splitting and E1/E2 branching in the alternating parity band of {sup 240}Pu from two-center octupole wave functions using supersymmetric quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Jolos, R. V.; Brentano, P. von

    2011-08-15

    An interpretation is suggested of the recently published experimental data on the alternating parity bands in {sup 240}Pu. The interpretation is based on the assumption that the main role in the description of the properties of the alternating parity bands plays the octupole mode which preserves the axial symmetry. The mathematical technique of the supersymmetric quantum mechanics is used for the realization of the model with the two-center octupole wave functions. A good description of the parity splitting and of the ratio of the dipole and quadrupole transitional moments is obtained for the first two bands.

  7. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 5: Combined gas-steam turbine cycles. [energy conversion efficiency in electric power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amos, D. J.; Foster-Pegg, R. W.; Lee, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    The energy conversion efficiency of gas-steam turbine cycles was investigated for selected combined cycle power plants. Results indicate that it is possible for combined cycle gas-steam turbine power plants to have efficiencies several point higher than conventional steam plants. Induction of low pressure steam into the steam turbine is shown to improve the plant efficiency. Post firing of the boiler of a high temperature combined cycle plant is found to increase net power but to worsen efficiency. A gas turbine pressure ratio of 12 to 1 was found to be close to optimum at all gas turbine inlet temperatures that were studied. The coal using combined cycle plant with an integrated low-Btu gasifier was calculated to have a plant efficiency of 43.6%, a capitalization of $497/kW, and a cost of electricity of 6.75 mills/MJ (24.3 mills/kwh). This combined cycle plant should be considered for base load power generation.

  8. The cytotoxicity of polycationic iron oxide nanoparticles: Common endpoint assays and alternative approaches for improved understanding of cellular response mechanism

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNP's) have an increasing number of biomedical applications. As such in vitro characterisation is essential to ensure the bio-safety of these particles. Little is known on the cellular interaction or effect on membrane integrity upon exposure to these MNPs. Here we synthesised Fe3O4 and surface coated with poly(ethylenimine) (PEI) and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) to achieve particles of varying surface positive charges and used them as model MNP's to evaluate the relative utility and limitations of cellular assays commonly applied for nanotoxicity assessment. An alternative approach, atomic force microscopy (AFM), was explored for the analysis of membrane structure and cell morphology upon interacting with the MNPs. The particles were tested in vitro on human SH-SY5Y, MCF-7 and U937 cell lines for reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and lipid peroxidation (LPO), LDH leakage and their overall cytotoxic effect. These results were compared with AFM topography imaging carried out on fixed cell lines. Results Successful particle synthesis and coating were characterised using FTIR, PCS, TEM and ICP. The particle size from TEM was 30 nm (−16.9 mV) which increased to 40 nm (+55.6 mV) upon coating with PEI and subsequently 50 nm (+31.2 mV) with PEG coating. Both particles showed excellent stability not only at neutral pH but also in acidic environment of pH 4.6 in the presence of sodium citrate. The higher surface charge MNP-PEI resulted in increased cytotoxic effect and ROS production on all cell lines compared with the MNP-PEI-PEG. In general the effect on the cell membrane integrity was observed only in SH-SY5Y and MCF-7 cells by MNP-PEI determined by LDH leakage and LPO production. AFM topography images showed consistently that both the highly charged MNP-PEI and the less charged MNP-PEI-PEG caused cell morphology changes possibly due to membrane disruption and cytoskeleton remodelling. Conclusions Our findings

  9. Quantum mechanically derived AMBER-compatible heme parameters for various states of the cytochrome P450 catalytic cycle

    PubMed Central

    Shahrokh, Kumars; Orendt, Anita; Yost, Garold; Cheatham, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Molecular mechanics (MM) methods are computationally affordable tools for screening chemical libraries of novel compounds for sites of P450 metabolism. One challenge for MM methods has been the absence of a consistent and transferable set of parameters for the heme within the P450 active-site. Experimental data indicates that mammalian P450 enzymes vary greatly in the size, architecture, and plasticity of their active sites. Thus, obtaining x-ray based geometries for the development of accurate MM parameters for the major classes of hepatic P450 remains a daunting task. Our previous work with preliminary gas-phase quantum mechanics (QM) derived atomic partial charges, greatly improved the accuracy of docking studies of raloxifene to CYP3A4. We have therefore developed and tested a consistent set of transferable MM parameters based on gas-phase QM calculations of two model systems of the heme—a truncated (T-HM) and a full (F-HM) for four states of the P450 catalytic cycle. Our results indicate that the use of the atomic partial charges from the F-HM model further improves the accuracy of docked predictions for raloxifene to CYP3A4. Different patterns for substrate docking are also observed depending on the choice of heme model and state. Newly parameterized heme models are tested in implicit and explicitly solvated MD simulations in the absence and presence of enzyme structures, for CYP3A4, and appear to be stable on the nanosecond simulation timescale. The new force field for the various heme states may aid the community for simulations of P450 enzymes and other heme containing enzymes. PMID:21997754

  10. [Mechanisms of smooth endoplasmic reticulum aggregates creation in oocyte's cytoplasm in IVF cycles and its clinical relevance (literature review)].

    PubMed

    Kovalskaya, E V; Makarova, N P; Syrkasheva, A G; Dolgushina, N V; Kurilo, L F

    2015-01-01

    A large proportion of human oocytes received from exogenous gonadotropin-stimulated cycles have different morphological attributes, or dysmorphisms. The presence of dysmorphism can affect the fertilization rate, the embryo quality and subsequently the frequency of occurrence of implantation and pregnancy. Special attention is paid to oocytes with cytoplasmic attributes such as alteration of cytoplasmic granularity, the appearance of vacuoles, lipofuscin bodies and visible (large) aggregates of smooth endoplasmic reticulum. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a type of the organelle forming an interconnected network of flattened, membrane-enclosed sacs or tubes. One of the main functions of ER in the oocyte is storage and redistribution of calcium, which provides cell activation during fertilization. Furthermore, complex of ER and mitochondria is necessary for accumulation of energy, synthesis of lipids and triglycerides, as well as synthesis of cytosolic and nuclear membranes during the early stages of cleavage. The appearance of anomalously large aggregates of ER in oocytes correlates with a low fertilization rate, low embryo quality, and pregnancy rate. The aim of the manuscript is to summarize current understanding of the mechanism of formation of such pathology of oocytes, together with special aspects of their fertilization and embryo quality. PMID:26035970

  11. Flow mechanism of self-induced reversed limit-cycle wing rock for a chined forebody configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Deng, Xueying; Wang, Yankui; Li, Qian

    2015-11-01

    The wing rock phenomenon reduces the maneuverability and affects the flight safety of modern advanced fighters, such as the F-35, which have chined forebodies. Understanding the flow mechanism is critical to suppressing this phenomenon. In this study, experiments were conducted to reveal the motion and flow behavior over a chined forebody configuration. The tests were performed in a wind tunnel at an angle of attack of 50∘ with a Reynolds number of 1.87 × 105. Reversed limit-cycle oscillation was discovered in the free-to-roll tests. The unstable rolling moment around zero roll angle in the static case suggests that the model tends to be driven away from zero roll angle. Thus, the model cannot maintain its equilibrium at zero roll angle during free-to-roll motion. The unstable rolling moment is generated by the wing vortex structure above the upward wing, which is induced by the forebody asymmetric vortices. During wing rock, the wing vortex structure appears above the upward wing at a large roll angle after crossing zero roll angle owing to a time lag in the forebody vortex position, which is conducive to the motion. The forebody asymmetric vortices are thus the key to induce and maintain the motion.

  12. Benefits of clean development mechanism application on the life cycle assessment perspective: a case study in the palm oil industry.

    PubMed

    Chuen, Onn Chiu; Yusoff, Sumiani

    2012-03-01

    This study performed an assessment on the beneficial of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) application on waste treatment system in a local palm oil industry in Malaysia. Life cycle assessment (LCA) was conducted to assess the environmental impacts of the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction from the CDM application. Calculations on the emission reduction used the methodology based on AM002 (Avoided Wastewater and On-site Energy Use Emissions in the Industrial Sector) Version 4 published by United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCC). The results from the studies showed that the introduction of CDM in the palm oil mill through conversion of the captured biogas from palm oil mill effluent (POME) treatment into power generation were able to reduce approximate 0.12 tonnes CO2 equivalent concentration (tCO2e) emission and 30 kW x hr power generation per 1 tonne of fresh fruit bunch processed. Thus, the application of CDM methodology on palm oil mill wastewater treatment was able to reduce up to 1/4 of the overall environment impact generated in palm oil mill. PMID:22482288

  13. Algal evolution in relation to atmospheric CO2: carboxylases, carbon-concentrating mechanisms and carbon oxidation cycles

    PubMed Central

    Raven, John A.; Giordano, Mario; Beardall, John; Maberly, Stephen C.

    2012-01-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis evolved at least 2.4 Ga; all oxygenic organisms use the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco)–photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle (PCRC) rather than one of the five other known pathways of autotrophic CO2 assimilation. The high CO2 and (initially) O2-free conditions permitted the use of a Rubisco with a high maximum specific reaction rate. As CO2 decreased and O2 increased, Rubisco oxygenase activity increased and 2-phosphoglycolate was produced, with the evolution of pathways recycling this inhibitory product to sugar phosphates. Changed atmospheric composition also selected for Rubiscos with higher CO2 affinity and CO2/O2 selectivity correlated with decreased CO2-saturated catalytic capacity and/or for CO2-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). These changes increase the energy, nitrogen, phosphorus, iron, zinc and manganese cost of producing and operating Rubisco–PCRC, while biosphere oxygenation decreased the availability of nitrogen, phosphorus and iron. The majority of algae today have CCMs; the timing of their origins is unclear. If CCMs evolved in a low-CO2 episode followed by one or more lengthy high-CO2 episodes, CCM retention could involve a combination of environmental factors known to favour CCM retention in extant organisms that also occur in a warmer high-CO2 ocean. More investigations, including studies of genetic adaptation, are needed. PMID:22232762

  14. A methodology to incorporate life cycle analysis and the triple bottom line mechanism for sustainable management of industrial enterprises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Lin, Li

    2004-02-01

    Since 1970"s, the environmental protection movement has challenged industries to increase their investment in Environmentally Conscious Manufacturing (ECM) techniques and management tools. Social considerations for global citizens and their descendants also motivated the examination on the complex issues of sustainable development beyond the immediate economic impact. Consequently, industrial enterprises have started to understand sustainable development in considering the Triple Bottom Line (TBL): economic prosperity, environmental quality and social justice. For the management, however, a lack of systematic ECM methodologies hinders their effort in planning, evaluating, reporting and auditing of sustainability. To address this critical need, this research develops a framework of a sustainable management system by incorporating a Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of industrial operations with the TBL mechanism. A TBL metric system with seven sets of indices for the TBL elements and their complex relations is identified for the comprehensive evaluation of a company"s sustainability performance. Utilities of the TBL indices are estimated to represent the views of various stakeholders, including the company, investors, employees and the society at large. Costs of these indices are also captured to reflect the company"s effort in meeting the utilities. An optimization model is formulated to maximize the economic, environmental and social benefits by the company"s effort in developing sustainable strategies. To promote environmental and social consciousness, the methodology can significantly facilitate management decisions by its capabilities of including "non-business" values and external costs that the company has not contemplated before.

  15. Algal evolution in relation to atmospheric CO2: carboxylases, carbon-concentrating mechanisms and carbon oxidation cycles.

    PubMed

    Raven, John A; Giordano, Mario; Beardall, John; Maberly, Stephen C

    2012-02-19

    Oxygenic photosynthesis evolved at least 2.4 Ga; all oxygenic organisms use the ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-oxygenase (Rubisco)-photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle (PCRC) rather than one of the five other known pathways of autotrophic CO(2) assimilation. The high CO(2) and (initially) O(2)-free conditions permitted the use of a Rubisco with a high maximum specific reaction rate. As CO(2) decreased and O(2) increased, Rubisco oxygenase activity increased and 2-phosphoglycolate was produced, with the evolution of pathways recycling this inhibitory product to sugar phosphates. Changed atmospheric composition also selected for Rubiscos with higher CO(2) affinity and CO(2)/O(2) selectivity correlated with decreased CO(2)-saturated catalytic capacity and/or for CO(2)-concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). These changes increase the energy, nitrogen, phosphorus, iron, zinc and manganese cost of producing and operating Rubisco-PCRC, while biosphere oxygenation decreased the availability of nitrogen, phosphorus and iron. The majority of algae today have CCMs; the timing of their origins is unclear. If CCMs evolved in a low-CO(2) episode followed by one or more lengthy high-CO(2) episodes, CCM retention could involve a combination of environmental factors known to favour CCM retention in extant organisms that also occur in a warmer high-CO(2) ocean. More investigations, including studies of genetic adaptation, are needed. PMID:22232762

  16. Molecular mechanisms underlying mangiferin-induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in A549 human lung carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    SHI, WEI; DENG, JIAGANG; TONG, RONGSHENG; YANG, YONG; HE, XIA; LV, JIANZHEN; WANG, HAILIAN; DENG, SHAOPING; QI, PING; ZHANG, DINGDING; WANG, YI

    2016-01-01

    Mangiferin, which is a C-glucosylxanthone (1,3,6,7-tetrahydroxyxanthone-C2-β-D-glucoside) purified from plant sources, has recently gained attention due to its various biological activities. The present study aimed to determine the apoptotic effects of mangiferin on A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. In vitro studies demonstrated that mangiferin exerted growth-inhibitory and apoptosis-inducing effects against A549 cells. In addition, mangiferin exhibited anti-tumor properties in A549 xenograft mice in vivo. Mangiferin triggered G2/M phase cell cycle arrest via down-regulating the cyclin-dependent kinase 1-cyclin B1 signaling pathway, and induced apoptotic cell death by inhibiting the protein kinase C-nuclear factor-κB pathway. In addition, mangiferin was able to enhance the antiproliferative effects of cisplatin on A549 cells, thus indicating the potential for a combined therapy. Notably, mangiferin exerted anticancer effects in vivo, where it was able to markedly decrease the volume and weight of subcutaneous tumor mass, and expand the lifespan of xenograft mice. The present study clarified the molecular mechanisms underlying mangiferin-induced antitumor activities, and suggested that mangiferin may be considered a potential antineoplastic drug for the future treatment of cancer. PMID:26935347

  17. Seismo-mechanical modelling of megathrust earthquake cycles: influence of rate-and state-dependent friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrendörfer, Robert; van Dinther, Ylona; Gerya, Taras

    2015-04-01

    Our long-term goal is to explore the cause-and-effect relationships between subduction dynamics and the megathrust earthquake potential. Therefore we are developing a 2D continuum mechanics-based numerical seismic cycle model that bridges the gap between processes on geodynamic and earthquake time scales. The initial step towards this goal was the implementation of a purely slip rate-dependent friction (Van Dinther et al. 2013) into the visco-elasto-plastic, finite difference code I2ELVIS, which uses a marker-in-cell technique. This seismo-mechanical modelling approach was validated for seismic cycle applications through a comparison against scaled analogue subduction experiments (Corbi et al. 2013). However, this comparison revealed large differences in terms of the slip behaviour in the periods between fast slip events. While diminishing interseismic creep occurs within the seismogenic zone in our numerical models, large aseismic slip was present in the analogue experiments. Here we want to overcome this mismatch by implementing the laboratory-based rate-and state dependent friction (RSF) formulation into our modelling approach. We choose the RSF formulation because, in contrast to our previous friction formulation, it takes the dependency of frictional strength on a state variable into account. The evolution of the state variable as a function of time or slip allows aseismic slip during the interseismic period within the seismogenic zone. In addition, RSF can potentially explain the transition from stick-slip behaviour to stable sliding with increasing loading velocity, which is observed in related friction experiments (Corbi et al. 2011). Here we implement the regularised version of RSF into our seismo-mechanical modelling approach by calculating and storing the analytical solution of the state evolution on each marker. In contrast to the conventional RSF formulation, we relate slip velocities to strain rates and use an invariant formulation. Thus we do not

  18. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 9: Closed-cycle MHD. [energy conversion efficiency of electric power plants using magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsu, T. C.

    1976-01-01

    A closed-cycle MHD system for an electric power plant was studied. It consists of 3 interlocking loops, an external heating loop, a closed-cycle cesium seeded argon nonequilibrium ionization MHD loop, and a steam bottomer. A MHD duct maximum temperature of 2366 K (3800 F), a pressure of 0.939 MPa (9.27 atm) and a Mach number of 0.9 are found to give a topping cycle efficiency of 59.3%; however when combined with an integrated gasifier and optimistic steam bottomer the coal to bus bar efficiency drops to 45.5%. A 1978 K (3100 F) cycle has an efficiency of 55.1% and a power plant efficiency of 42.2%. The high cost of the external heating loop components results in a cost of electricity of 21.41 mills/MJ (77.07 mills/kWh) for the high temperature system and 19.0 mills/MJ (68.5 mills/kWh) for the lower temperature system. It is, therefore, thought that this cycle may be more applicable to internally heated systems such as some futuristic high temperature gas cooled reactor.

  19. Effect of thermal cycling on the mechanical properties of Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Shao, Yang; Gong, Pan; Yao, KeFu

    2012-12-01

    The effect of thermal cycling treatment on mechanical properties and thermal stability of a Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 bulk metallic glass is investigated. The metallic glassy samples are sealed into quartz tubes under high vacuum condition, and liquid nitrogen together with electric furnace are used to control a periodical temperature variation between -196°C and 150°C. The structure and properties of the tested samples for different thermal cycles have been examined by X-ray diffraction analysis, mechanical properties measurement and thermal analysis. It has been found that the structure and properties of the samples do not show a significant change even after 200 cycles, which suggests Zr41Ti14Cu12.5Ni10Be22.5 alloy as having potential in aerospace environment.

  20. High temperature, low cycle fatigue of copper-base alloys in argon. Part 3: Zirconium-copper; thermal-mechanical strain cycling, hold-time and notch fatigue results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conway, J. B.; Stentz, R. H.; Berling, J. T.

    1973-01-01

    The low-cycle fatigue characteristics of smooth bar and notched bar specimens (hourglass shape) of zirconium-copper, 1/2 Hard, material (R-2 Series) were evaluated at room temperature in axial strain control. Over the fatigue life range from about 300 to 3000 cycles the ratio of fatigue life for smooth bar to fatigue life for notched bar remained constant at a value of about 6.0. Some additional hold-time data for the R-2 alloy tested in argon at 538 C are reported. An analysis of the relaxation data obtained in these hold-time tests is also reported and it is shown that these data yield a fairly consistent correlation in terms of instantaneous stress rate divided by instantaneous stress. Two thermal-mechanical strain cycling tests were also performed using a cyclic frequency of 4.5 cycles per hour and a temperature cycling interval from 260 to 538 C. The fatigue life values in these tests were noticeably lower than that observed in isothermal tests at 538 C.

  1. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 7: Metal vapor Rankine topping-steam bottoming cycles. [energy conversion efficiency in electric power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deegan, P. B.

    1976-01-01

    Adding a metal vapor Rankine topper to a steam cycle was studied as a way to increase the mean temperature at which heat is added to the cycle to raise the efficiency of an electric power plant. Potassium and cesium topping fluids were considered. Pressurized fluidized bed or pressurized (with an integrated low-Btu gasifier) boilers were assumed. Included in the cycles was a pressurizing gas turbine with its associated recuperator, and a gas economizer and feedwater heater. One of the ternary systems studied shows plant efficiency of 42.3% with a plant capitalization of $66.7/kW and a cost of electricity of 8.19 mills/MJ (29.5 mills/kWh).

  2. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IX. Reactor and fuel cycle description

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    The Nonproliferation Alterntive Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) has characterized and assessed various reactor/fuel-cycle systems. Volume IX provides, in summary form, the technical descriptions of the reactor/fuel-cycle systems studied. This includes the status of the system technology, as well as a discussion of the safety, environmental, and licensing needs from a technical perspective. This information was then used in developing the research, development, and demonstration (RD and D) program, including its cost and time frame, to advance the existing technology to the level needed for commercial use. Wherever possible, the cost data are given as ranges to reflect the uncertainties in the estimates.

  3. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 6: Closed-cycle gas turbine systems. [energy conversion efficiency in electric power plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amos, D. J.; Fentress, W. K.; Stahl, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    Both recuperated and bottomed closed cycle gas turbine systems in electric power plants were studied. All systems used a pressurizing gas turbine coupled with a pressurized furnace to heat the helium for the closed cycle gas turbine. Steam and organic vapors are used as Rankine bottoming fluids. Although plant efficiencies of over 40% are calculated for some plants, the resultant cost of electricity was found to be 8.75 mills/MJ (31.5 mills/kWh). These plants do not appear practical for coal or oil fired plants.

  4. An Alternative to Farmer Age as an Indicator of Life-Cycle Stage: The Case for a Farm Family Age Index

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Rob J. F.

    2006-01-01

    In studies of farming, the age of the principal decision-maker (PDM) has been associated with numerous farm structural and managerial features and has been widely accepted as a good indicator of the influence of life-cycle factors on decision-making. As such, it has become an important aspect of many quantitative studies of agricultural change.…

  5. Depleted uranium management alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report evaluates two management alternatives for Department of Energy depleted uranium: continued storage as uranium hexafluoride, and conversion to uranium metal and fabrication to shielding for spent nuclear fuel containers. The results will be used to compare the costs with other alternatives, such as disposal. Cost estimates for the continued storage alternative are based on a life-cycle of 27 years through the year 2020. Cost estimates for the recycle alternative are based on existing conversion process costs and Capital costs for fabricating the containers. Additionally, the recycle alternative accounts for costs associated with intermediate product resale and secondary waste disposal for materials generated during the conversion process.

  6. Alternative Automobile Engines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David Gordon

    1978-01-01

    Requirements for cleaner and more efficient engines have stimulated a search for alternatives to the conventional spark-ignition engine. So far, the defects of the alternative engines are clearer than the virtues. The following engines are compared: spark ignition, diesel, vapor-cycle, Stirling, and gas turbine. (Author/MA)

  7. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), Westinghouse phase 1. Volume 8: Open-cycle MHD. [energy conversion efficiency and design analysis of electric power plants employing magnetohydrodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, D. Q.

    1976-01-01

    Electric power plant costs and efficiencies are presented for three basic open-cycle MHD systems: (1) direct coal fired system, (2) a system with a separately fired air heater, and (3) a system burning low-Btu gas from an integrated gasifier. Power plant designs were developed corresponding to the basic cases with variation of major parameters for which major system components were sized and costed. Flow diagrams describing each design are presented. A discussion of the limitations of each design is made within the framework of the assumptions made.

  8. Developmental plasticity and the evolution of animal complex life cycles

    PubMed Central

    Minelli, Alessandro; Fusco, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Metazoan life cycles can be complex in different ways. A number of diverse phenotypes and reproductive events can sequentially occur along the cycle, and at certain stages a variety of developmental and reproductive options can be available to the animal, the choice among which depends on a combination of organismal and environmental conditions. We hypothesize that a diversity of phenotypes arranged in developmental sequence throughout an animal's life cycle may have evolved by genetic assimilation of alternative phenotypes originally triggered by environmental cues. This is supported by similarities between the developmental mechanisms mediating phenotype change and alternative phenotype determination during ontogeny and the common ecological condition that favour both forms of phenotypic variation. The comparison of transcription profiles from different developmental stages throughout a complex life cycle with those from alternative phenotypes in closely related polyphenic animals is expected to offer critical evidence upon which to evaluate our hypothesis. PMID:20083638

  9. Cell output, cell cycle duration and neuronal specification: a model of integrated mechanisms of the neocortical proliferative process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caviness, V. S. Jr; Goto, T.; Tarui, T.; Takahashi, T.; Bhide, P. G.; Nowakowski, R. S.

    2003-01-01

    The neurons of the neocortex are generated over a 6 day neuronogenetic interval that comprises 11 cell cycles. During these 11 cell cycles, the length of cell cycle increases and the proportion of cells that exits (Q) versus re-enters (P) the cell cycle changes systematically. At the same time, the fate of the neurons produced at each of the 11 cell cycles appears to be specified at least in terms of their laminar destination. As a first step towards determining the causal interrelationships of the proliferative process with the process of laminar specification, we present a two-pronged approach. This consists of (i) a mathematical model that integrates the output of the proliferative process with the laminar fate of the output and predicts the effects of induced changes in Q and P during the neuronogenetic interval on the developing and mature cortex and (ii) an experimental system that allows the manipulation of Q and P in vivo. Here we show that the predictions of the model and the results of the experiments agree. The results indicate that events affecting the output of the proliferative population affect both the number of neurons produced and their specification with regard to their laminar fate.

  10. Impact of Cooling Rate-Induced Recrystallization on High G Mechanical Shock and Thermal Cycling in Sn-Ag-Cu Solder Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tae-Kyu; Bieler, Thomas R.; Kim, Choong-Un

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical stability and thermo-mechanical fatigue performance of solder joints with low silver content Sn-1.0Ag-0.5Cu (wt.%) (SAC105) alloy based on different cooling rates are investigated in high G level shock environment and thermal cycling conditions. The cooling rate-controlled samples ranging from 1°C/min to 75°C/min cooling rate, not only show differences in microstructure, where a fine poly-granular microstructure develops in the case of fast cooling versus normal cooling, but also show various shock performances based on the microstructure changes. The fast cooling rate improves the high G shock performance by over 90% compared to the normal cooled SAC105 alloy air-cooling environment commonly used after assembly reflow. The microstructure effect on thermal cycling performance is also discussed, which is analyzed based on the Sn grain orientation, interconnect stability, and solder joint bulk microstructure.

  11. On the interaction of water-soluble binders and nano silicon particles: alternative binder towards increased cycling stability at elevated temperatures.

    PubMed

    Klamor, S; Schröder, M; Brunklaus, G; Niehoff, P; Berkemeier, F; Schappacher, F M; Winter, M

    2015-02-28

    Silicon based composites are among the most promising negative electrodes for lithium ion battery applications due to their high theoretical capacities. One major drawback of silicon based anodes are their large volume changes during lithiation and delithiation. Although many efforts have been made in view of new binder materials and improved electrolytes, the resulting battery cell suffers from severe capacity fading at ambient or elevated temperatures, respectively. The strong reactivity with the electrolyte is considered to be responsible for the reduced cycle life at elevated temperatures. In this work we introduce silicon composite anodes with a novel composition based on a gellan gum binder material that show an improved cycling performance at ambient temperature and at 60 °C. To elucidate the influence of the binder material, we investigated the structure of the silicon based composite anodes in order to understand the nature of the interaction of the gellan gum based binder polymers with the silicon particles in comparison with a common CMC binder. Also the influence of the choice of binder on the interactions at the interface between electrode surface and electrolyte were studied. A combination of powerful techniques including solid state NMR, TEM and EELS, XPS as well as FTIR were applied. PMID:25623421

  12. Segmental Duplications Arise from Pol32-Dependent Repair of Broken Forks through Two Alternative Replication-Based Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Dujon, Bernard; Fischer, Gilles

    2008-01-01

    The propensity of segmental duplications (SDs) to promote genomic instability is of increasing interest since their involvement in numerous human genomic diseases and cancers was revealed. However, the mechanism(s) responsible for their appearance remain mostly speculative. Here, we show that in budding yeast, replication accidents, which are most likely transformed into broken forks, play a causal role in the formation of SDs. The Pol32 subunit of the major replicative polymerase Polδ is required for all SD formation, demonstrating that SDs result from untimely DNA synthesis rather than from unequal crossing-over. Although Pol32 is known to be required for classical (Rad52-dependant) break-induced replication, only half of the SDs can be attributed to this mechanism. The remaining SDs are generated through a Rad52-independent mechanism of template switching between microsatellites or microhomologous sequences. This new mechanism, named microhomology/microsatellite-induced replication (MMIR), differs from all known DNA double-strand break repair pathways, as MMIR-mediated duplications still occur in the combined absence of homologous recombination, microhomology-mediated, and nonhomologous end joining machineries. The interplay between these two replication-based pathways explains important features of higher eukaryotic genomes, such as the strong, but not strict, association between SDs and transposable elements, as well as the frequent formation of oncogenic fusion genes generating protein innovations at SD junctions. PMID:18773114

  13. Alternative Toxicity Testing: Analyses on Skin Sensitization, ToxCast Phases I and II, and Carcinogenicity Provide Indications on How to Model Mechanisms Linked to Adverse Outcome Pathways.

    PubMed

    Benigni, Romualdo; Battistelli, Chiara Laura; Bossa, Cecilia; Giuliani, Alessandro; Tcheremenskaia, Olga

    2015-01-01

    This article studies alternative toxicological approaches, with new (skin sensitization, ToxCast) and previous (carcinogenicity) analyses. Quantitative modeling of rate-limiting steps in skin sensitization and carcinogenicity predicts the majority of toxicants. Similarly, successful (Quantitative) Structure-Activity Relationships models exploit the quantification of only one, or few rate-limiting steps. High-throughput assays within ToxCast point to promising associations with endocrine disruption, whereas markers for pathways intermediate events have limited correlation with most endpoints. Since the pathways may be very different (often not simple linear chains of events), quantitative analysis is necessary to identify the type of mechanism and build the appropriate model. PMID:26398111

  14. Ambient particulate matter induces IL-8 expression through an alternative NF-kB mechanism in human airway epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND: Exposure to ambient air particulate matter (PM) has been shown to increase rates of cardio-pulmonary morbidity and mortality, but the underlying mechanisms are still not well understood. OBJECTIVE: To examine signaling events involved in the expression of the inflamma...

  15. Thermal-Fatigue Crack-Growth Characteristics and Mechanical Strain Cycling Behavior of A-286 Discaloy, and 16-25-6 Austenitic Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert W.; Smith, Gordon T.

    1960-01-01

    Thermal-fatigue crack-growth characteristics of notched- and unnotched-disk specimens of A-286, Discaloy, hot-cold worked 16-25-6, and overaged 16-25-6 were experimentally studied. Separately controlled variables were total strain range (0.0043 to 0.0079 in./in.), maximum cycle temperature (1300 and 1100 F), and hold time at maximum temperature (O and 5 min). A limited number of mechanical, push-pull, constant-strain cycle tests at room temperature were made using notched and un-notched bars of the same materials. In these tests the number of cycles to failure as well as the variation of load change with accumulated cycles was measured, and the effects of mean stress were observed. Constant-strain-range mechanical-fatigue tests at room temperature revealed notched-bar fatigue life to be strongly influenced by mean stress. For a specific strain range, the longest fatigue life was always found to be associated with the least-tensile (or most compressive) mean stress. By defining thermal-fatigue life as the number of cycles required to produce a crack area of 6000 square mils, the relative thermal-fatigue resistances of the test materials were established. Notched-disk specimens of A-286 and Discaloy steels exhibited longer fatigue lives than either hot-cold worked or overaged 16-25-6. On the other hand, unnotched-disk specimens of Discaloy and hot-cold worked 16-25-6 had longer lives than A-286 and overaged 16-25-6. Separation of the crack-growth data into microstage and macrostage periods revealed that the macrostage period accounted for the greatest part of the difference among materials when tested in the notched configuration, while the microstage was largely responsible for the differences encountered in unnotched disks.

  16. Mechanical Stimulation (Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields "PEMF" and Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy "ESWT") and Tendon Regeneration: A Possible Alternative.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Federica; Bonasia, Davide E; Marmotti, Antonio; Cottino, Umberto; Rossi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of tendon degeneration and tendinopathy is still partially unclear. However, an active role of metalloproteinases (MMP), growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and a crucial role of inflammatory elements and cytokines was demonstrated. Mechanical stimulation may play a role in regulation of inflammation. In vitro studies demonstrated that both pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) and extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) increased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine such as interleukin (IL-6 and IL-10). Moreover, ESWT increases the expression of growth factors, such as transforming growth factor β(TGF-β), (VEGF), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), as well as the synthesis of collagen I fibers. These pre-clinical results, in association with several clinical studies, suggest a potential effectiveness of ESWT for tendinopathy treatment. Recently PEMF gained popularity as adjuvant for fracture healing and bone regeneration. Similarly to ESWT, the mechanical stimulation obtained using PEMFs may play a role for treatment of tendinopathy and for tendon regeneration, increasing in vitro TGF-β production, as well as scleraxis and collagen I gene expression. In this manuscript the rational of mechanical stimulations and the clinical studies on the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave (ESW) and PEMF will be discussed. However, no clear evidence of a clinical value of ESW and PEMF has been found in literature with regards to the treatment of tendinopathy in human, so further clinical trials are needed to confirm the promising hypotheses concerning the effectiveness of ESWT and PEMF mechanical stimulation. PMID:26617513

  17. Alternative security

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, B.H. )

    1990-01-01

    This book contains the following chapters: The Military and Alternative Security: New Missions for Stable Conventional Security; Technology and Alternative Security: A Cherished Myth Expires; Law and Alternative Security: Toward a Just World Peace; Politics and Alternative Security: Toward a More Democratic, Therefore More Peaceful, World; Economics and Alternative Security: Toward a Peacekeeping International Economy; Psychology and Alternative Security: Needs, Perceptions, and Misperceptions; Religion and Alternative Security: A Prophetic Vision; and Toward Post-Nuclear Global Security: An Overview.

  18. More about neutron Majorana mass from exotic instantons: An alternative mechanism in low-scale string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addazi, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    We discuss an alternative for baryon-violating six quarks transition in the context of low scale string theory. In particular, with MS = 10-103 TeV, such a transition can be mediated by two color-triplets through a quartic coupling with down-quarks, generated by exotic instantons, in a calculable and controllable way. We show how flavor-changing neutral currents (FCNCs) limits on color-triplet mass are well compatible with n ‑n¯ oscillation ones. If an n ‑n¯ transition was found, this would be an indirect hint for our model. This would strongly motivate searches for direct channels in proton-proton colliders. In fact, our model can be directly tested in an experimentally challenging 100-1000 TeV proton-proton collider, searching for our desired color-triplet states and an evidence for exotic instantons resonances, in addition to stringy Regge resonances, anomalous Z‧-bosons and gauged megaxion. In particular, our scenario can be related to the 750 GeV diphoton hint identifying it with the gauged megaxion dual to the B-field. On the other hand, this scenario is compatible with TeV-ish color triplets visible at large hadron collider (LHC) and with 1-10 TeV string scale, i.e. stringy resonances at LHC.

  19. Single-Cell Analyses of ESCs Reveal Alternative Pluripotent Cell States and Molecular Mechanisms that Control Self-Renewal

    PubMed Central

    Papatsenko, Dmitri; Darr, Henia; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.; Waghray, Avinash; Makeev, Vsevolod J.; MacArthur, Ben D.; Lemischka, Ihor R.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Analyses of gene expression in single mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) cultured in serum and LIF revealed the presence of two distinct cell subpopulations with individual gene expression signatures. Comparisons with published data revealed that cells in the first subpopulation are phenotypically similar to cells isolated from the inner cell mass (ICM). In contrast, cells in the second subpopulation appear to be more mature. Pluripotency Gene Regulatory Network (PGRN) reconstruction based on single-cell data and published data suggested antagonistic roles for Oct4 and Nanog in the maintenance of pluripotency states. Integrated analyses of published genomic binding (ChIP) data strongly supported this observation. Certain target genes alternatively regulated by OCT4 and NANOG, such as Sall4 and Zscan10, feed back into the top hierarchical regulator Oct4. Analyses of such incoherent feedforward loops with feedback (iFFL-FB) suggest a dynamic model for the maintenance of mESC pluripotency and self-renewal. PMID:26267829

  20. Disposal of post-consumer polyethylene terephthalate (PET) bottles: comparison of five disposal alternatives in the small island state of Mauritius using a life cycle assessment tool.

    PubMed

    Foolmaun, Rajendra Kumar; Ramjeeawon, Toolseeram

    2012-01-01

    Used polyethylene terephthalate bottles (PET) dumped indiscriminately onto bare lands and water bodies constitute an eyesore. This problem is viewed as a serious impediment to the flourishing tourism industry in Mauritius. Currently, over 100 million PET bottles are generated annually and the only fully operational disposal route is through the sole sanitary landfill. There is no formal segregation of waste and therefore used PET bottles are disposed of commingled with domestic waste. Despite a satisfactory waste collection system, a considerable amount of used PET bottles unfortunately end up in water bodies and on bare lands. An appreciable amount of PET bottles is now being collected separately for flake production prior to export to South Africa. This paper investigated the environmental impact of five waste management scenarios (100% landfill; 100% incineration with energy recovery; 50% incineration and 50% landfill; 34% flake production and 66% landfill; 100% flake production) for used PET bottles in Mauritius. Comparison of the five scenarios was based on the life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology described in ISO 14040 and ISO 14044. SimaPro 7.1 software was used to analyse the data. Comparison of the five scenarios showed that the highest environmental impacts occurred when 100% of used PET bottles were sent to the landfill. The comparison also indicated that there were least impacts on the environment when all used PET bottles were incinerated with energy recovery. PMID:22629630

  1. Energy balances in the production and end use of alcohols derived from biomass. A fuels-specific comparative analysis of alternate ethanol production cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    Considerable public interest and debate have been focused on the so-called energy balance issue involved in the conversion of biomass materials into ethanol for fuel use. This report addresses questions of net gains in premium fuels that can be derived from the production and use of ethanol from biomass, and shows that for the US alcohol fuel program, energy balance need not be a concern. Three categories of fuel gain are discussed in the report: (1) Net petroleum gain; (2) Net premium fuel gain (petroleum and natural gas); and (3) Net energy gain (for all fuels). In this study the investment of energy (in the form of premium fuels) in alcohol production includes all investment from cultivating, harvesting, or gathering the feedstock and raw materials, through conversion of the feedstock to alcohol, to the delivery to the end-user. To determine the fuel gains in ethanol production, six cases, encompassing three feedstocks, five process fuels, and three process variations, have been examined. For each case, two end-uses (automotive fuel use and replacement of petrochemical feedstocks) were scrutinized. The end-uses were further divided into three variations in fuel economy and two different routes for production of ethanol from petrochemicals. Energy requirements calculated for the six process cycles accounted for fuels used directly and indirectly in all stages of alcohol production, from agriculture through distribution of product to the end-user. Energy credits were computed for byproducts according to the most appropriate current use.

  2. [The mechanism of acetate assimilation in purple nonsulfur bacteria lacking the glyoxylate pathway: enzymes of the citramalate cycle in Rhodobacter sphaeroides].

    PubMed

    Filatova, L V; Berg, I A; Krasil'nikova, E N; Ivanovskiĭ, R N

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism of acetate assimilation by the purple nonsulfur bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, which lacks the glyoxylate shortcut, has been studied. In a previous work, proceeding from data on acetate assimilation by Rba. sphaeroides cell suspensions, a suggestion was made regarding the operation, in this bacterium, of the citramalate cycle. This cycle was earlier found in Rhodospirillum rubrum in the form of an anaplerotic reaction sequence that operates during growth on acetate instead of the glyoxylate shortcut, which is not present in the latter bacterium. The present work considers the enzymes responsible for acetate assimilation in Rba. sphaeroides. It is shown that this bacterium possesses the key enzymes of the citramalate cycle: citramalate synthase, which catalyzes condensation of acetyl-CoA and pyruvate and, as a result, forms citramalate, and 3-methylmalyl-CoA lyase, which catalyzes the cleavage of 3-methylmalyl-CoA to glyoxylate and propionyl-CoA. The regeneration of pyruvate, which is the acetyl-CoA acceptor in the citramalate cycle, involves propionyl-CoA and occurs via the following reaction sequence: propionyl-CoA (+ CO2) --> methylmalonyl-CoA --> succinyl-CoA --> succinate --> fumarate --> malate --> oxalacetate (- CO2) --> phosphoenolpyruvate --> pyruvate. The independence of the cell growth and the acetate assimilation of CO2 is due to the accumulation of CO2/HCO3- (released during acetate assimilation) in cells to a level sufficient for the effective operation of propionyl-CoA carboxylase. PMID:16119844

  3. Expression of cell cycle regulator cdk2ap1 suppresses tumor cell phenotype by non-cell autonomous mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zolochevska, Olga; Figueiredo, Marxa L.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of expressing the cell cycle regulator cdk2ap1 in epithelial or stromal cell compartments to reduce SCC growth in vitro and in vivo. Cell autonomous and/or non-cell autonomous expression of cdk2ap1 reduced tumor growth and invasion and altered cell cycle, adhesion, invasion, angiogenesis, and apoptotic gene expression, as assessed by several in vitro phenotype assays, quantitative real time PCR, and in vivo molecular imaging using a novel three-way xenograft animal model. Our findings suggest that the interactions between cancer cells and fibroblasts that promote abnormal growth can be minimized by expressing cdk2ap1, supporting a novel concept by which tumor/growth suppressor genes can impact tumorigenesis phenotypes from non-cell autonomous interactions within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:19515604

  4. Disturbance and recovery of trunk mechanical and neuromuscular behaviors following repeated static trunk flexion: influences of duration and duty cycle on creep-induced effects.

    PubMed

    Muslim, Khoirul; Bazrgari, Babak; Hendershot, Brad; Toosizadeh, Nima; Nussbaum, Maury A; Madigan, Michael L

    2013-07-01

    Occupations involving frequent trunk flexion are associated with a higher incidence of low back pain. To investigate the effects of repeated static flexion on trunk behaviors, 12 participants completed six combinations of three static flexion durations (1, 2, and 4 min), and two flexion duty cycles (33% and 50%). Trunk mechanical and neuromuscular behaviors were obtained pre- and post-exposure and during recovery using sudden perturbations. A longer duration of static flexion and a higher duty cycle increased the magnitude of decrements in intrinsic stiffness. Increasing duty cycle caused larger decreases in reflexive muscle responses, and females had substantially larger decreases in reflexive responses following exposure. Patterns of recovery for intrinsic trunk stiffness and reflexive responses were consistent across conditions and genders, and none of these measures returned to pre-exposure values after 20 min of recovery. Reflexive responses may not provide a compensatory mechanism to offset decreases in intrinsic trunk stiffness following repetitive static trunk flexion. A prolonged recovery duration may lead to trunk instability and a higher risk of low back injury. PMID:23332771

  5. AGEs-Induced IL-6 Synthesis Precedes RAGE Up-Regulation in HEK 293 Cells: An Alternative Inflammatory Mechanism?

    PubMed

    Serban, Andreea Iren; Stanca, Loredana; Geicu, Ovidiu Ionut; Dinischiotu, Anca

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) can activate the inflammatory pathways involved in diabetic nephropathy. Understanding these molecular pathways could contribute to therapeutic strategies for diabetes complications. We evaluated the modulation of inflammatory and oxidative markers, as well as the protective mechanisms employed by human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293) upon exposure to 200 μg/mL bovine serum albumine (BSA) or AGEs-BSA for 12, 24 and 48 h. The mRNA and protein expression levels of AGEs receptor (RAGE) and heat shock proteins (HSPs) 27, 60 and 70, the activity of antioxidant enzymes and the expression levels of eight cytokines were analysed. Cell damage via oxidative mechanisms was evaluated by glutathione and malondialdehyde levels. The data revealed two different time scale responses. First, the up-regulation of interleukin-6 (IL-6), HSP 27 and high catalase activity were detected as early as 12 h after exposure to AGEs-BSA, while the second response, after 24 h, consisted of NF-κB p65, RAGE, HSP 70 and inflammatory cytokine up-regulation, glutathione depletion, malondialdehyde increase and the activation of antioxidant enzymes. IL-6 might be important in the early ignition of inflammatory responses, while the cellular redox imbalance, RAGE activation and NF-κB p65 increased expression further enhance inflammatory signals in HEK 293 cells. PMID:26307981

  6. AGEs-Induced IL-6 Synthesis Precedes RAGE Up-Regulation in HEK 293 Cells: An Alternative Inflammatory Mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Serban, Andreea Iren; Stanca, Loredana; Geicu, Ovidiu Ionut; Dinischiotu, Anca

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) can activate the inflammatory pathways involved in diabetic nephropathy. Understanding these molecular pathways could contribute to therapeutic strategies for diabetes complications. We evaluated the modulation of inflammatory and oxidative markers, as well as the protective mechanisms employed by human embryonic kidney cells (HEK 293) upon exposure to 200 μg/mL bovine serum albumine (BSA) or AGEs–BSA for 12, 24 and 48 h. The mRNA and protein expression levels of AGEs receptor (RAGE) and heat shock proteins (HSPs) 27, 60 and 70, the activity of antioxidant enzymes and the expression levels of eight cytokines were analysed. Cell damage via oxidative mechanisms was evaluated by glutathione and malondialdehyde levels. The data revealed two different time scale responses. First, the up-regulation of interleukin-6 (IL-6), HSP 27 and high catalase activity were detected as early as 12 h after exposure to AGEs–BSA, while the second response, after 24 h, consisted of NF-κB p65, RAGE, HSP 70 and inflammatory cytokine up-regulation, glutathione depletion, malondialdehyde increase and the activation of antioxidant enzymes. IL-6 might be important in the early ignition of inflammatory responses, while the cellular redox imbalance, RAGE activation and NF-κB p65 increased expression further enhance inflammatory signals in HEK 293 cells. PMID:26307981

  7. Thermochemical cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, J. E.; Soliman, M. A.; Carty, R. H.; Conger, W. L.; Cox, K. E.; Lawson, D.

    1975-01-01

    The thermochemical production of hydrogen is described along with the HYDRGN computer program which attempts to rate the various thermochemical cycles. Specific thermochemical cycles discussed include: iron sulfur cycle; iron chloride cycle; and hybrid sulfuric acid cycle.

  8. Dependence of the mechanical behavior of alloys on their electron work function—An alternative parameter for materials design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Hao; Hua, Guomin; Li, Dongyang

    2013-12-01

    In this article, we demonstrate that the electron work function (EWF) as an intrinsic parameter can provide information or clues in a simple or straightforward way for material design, modification, and development. A higher work function of a material represents a more stable electronic state, which consequently generates a higher resistance to any attempt of changing the electronic state and other corresponding states, e.g., changes in structure or microstructure caused by mechanical and electrochemical actions. Using Cu-Ni alloy as an example, we demonstrate the correlation between the EWF and Young's modulus of the material as well as its hardness. The properties of a material can be modified using elements with appropriate work functions. This is also applicable for tailoring inter-phase boundaries or interfaces.

  9. Alternative Interpretation of Low-Energy Nuclear Reaction Processes with Deuterated Metals Based on the Bose-Einstein Condensation Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeong E.; Passell, Thomas O.

    2006-02-01

    Recently, a generalization of the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) mechanism has been made to a ground-state mixture of two different species of positively charged bosons in harmonic traps. The theory has been used to describe (D + Li) reactions in the low energy nuclear reaction (LENR) processes in condensed matter and predicts that the (D + Li) reaction rates can be larger than (D + D) reaction rates by as much as a factor of ~50, implying that (D + Li) reactions may be occuring in addition to the (D + D) reactions. A survey of the existing data from LENR experiments is carried out to check the validity of the theoretical prediction. We conclude that there is compelling experimental evidence which support the theoretical prediction. New experimental tests of the theoretical prediction are suggested.

  10. Fractional order models of viscoelasticity as an alternative in the analysis of red blood cell (RBC) membrane mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Craiem, Damian; Magin, Richard L

    2011-01-01

    New lumped-element models of red blood cell mechanics can be constructed using fractional order generalizations of springs and dashpots. Such ‘spring-pots’ exhibit a fractional order viscoelastic behavior that captures a wide spectrum of experimental results through power-law expressions in both the time and frequency domains. The system dynamics is fully described by linear fractional order differential equations derived from first order stress–strain relationships using the tools of fractional calculus. Changes in the composition or structure of the membrane are conveniently expressed in the fractional order of the model system. This approach provides a concise way to describe and quantify the biomechanical behavior of membranes, cells and tissues. PMID:20090192

  11. Dependence of the mechanical behavior of alloys on their electron work function—An alternative parameter for materials design

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Hao; Hua, Guomin; Li, Dongyang

    2013-12-23

    In this article, we demonstrate that the electron work function (EWF) as an intrinsic parameter can provide information or clues in a simple or straightforward way for material design, modification, and development. A higher work function of a material represents a more stable electronic state, which consequently generates a higher resistance to any attempt of changing the electronic state and other corresponding states, e.g., changes in structure or microstructure caused by mechanical and electrochemical actions. Using Cu-Ni alloy as an example, we demonstrate the correlation between the EWF and Young's modulus of the material as well as its hardness. The properties of a material can be modified using elements with appropriate work functions. This is also applicable for tailoring inter-phase boundaries or interfaces.

  12. NiW and NiRu Bimetallic Catalysts for Ethylene Steam Reforming: Alternative Mechanisms for Sulfur Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Rangan, M.; Yung, M. M.; Medlin, J. W.

    2012-06-01

    Previous investigations of Ni-based catalysts for the steam reforming of hydrocarbons have indicated that the addition of a second metal can reduce the effects of sulfur poisoning. Two systems that have previously shown promise for such applications, NiW and NiRu, are considered here for the steam reforming of ethylene, a key component of biomass derived tars. Monometallic and bimetallic Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported Ni and W catalysts were employed for ethylene steam reforming in the presence and absence of sulfur. The NiW catalysts were less active than Ni in the absence of sulfur, but were more active in the presence of 50 ppm H{sub 2}S. The mechanism for the W-induced improvements in sulfur resistance appears to be different from that for Ru in NiRu. To probe reasons for the sulfur resistance of NiRu, the adsorption of S and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} on several bimetallic NiRu alloy surfaces ranging from 11 to 33 % Ru was studied using density functional theory (DFT). The DFT studies reveal that sulfur adsorption is generally favored on hollow sites containing Ru. Ethylene preferentially adsorbs atop the Ru atom in all the NiRu (111) alloys investigated. By comparing trends across the various bimetallic models considered, sulfur adsorption was observed to be correlated with the density of occupied states near the Fermi level while C{sub 2}H{sub 4} adsorption was correlated with the number of unoccupied states in the d-band. The diverging mechanisms for S and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} adsorption allow for bimetallic surfaces such as NiRu that enhance ethylene binding without accompanying increases in sulfur binding energy. In contrast, bimetallics such as NiSn and NiW appear to decrease the affinity of the surface for both the reagent and the poison.

  13. The two active sites in human branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase operate independently without an obligatory alternating-site mechanism.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Machius, Mischa; Chuang, Jacinta L; Wynn, R Max; Chuang, David T

    2007-04-20

    A long standing controversy is whether an alternating activesite mechanism occurs during catalysis in thiamine diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzymes. We address this question by investigating the ThDP-dependent decarboxylase/dehydrogenase (E1b) component of the mitochondrial branched-chain alpha-keto acid dehydrogenase complex (BCKDC). Our crystal structure reveals that conformations of the two active sites in the human E1b heterotetramer harboring the reaction intermediate are identical. Acidic residues in the core of the E1b heterotetramer, which align with the proton-wire residues proposed to participate in active-site communication in the related pyruvate dehydrogenase from Bacillus stearothermophilus, are mutated. Enzyme kinetic data show that, except in a few cases because of protein misfolding, these alterations are largely without effect on overall activity of BCKDC, ruling out the requirement of a proton-relay mechanism in E1b. BCKDC overall activity is nullified at 50% phosphorylation of E1b, but it is restored to nearly half of the pre-phosphorylation level after dissociation and reconstitution of BCKDC with the same phosphorylated E1b. The results suggest that the abolition of overall activity likely results from the specific geometry of the half-phosphorylated E1b in the BCKDC assembly and not due to a disruption of the alternating active-site mechanism. Finally, we show that a mutant E1b containing only one functional active site exhibits half of the wild-type BCKDC activity, which directly argues against the obligatory communication between active sites. The above results provide evidence that the two active sites in the E1b heterotetramer operate independently during the ThDP-dependent decarboxylation reaction. PMID:17329260

  14. Mechanisms underlying enhancements in muscle force and power output during maximal cycle ergometer exercise induced by chronic β2-adrenergic stimulation in men.

    PubMed

    Hostrup, Morten; Kalsen, Anders; Onslev, Johan; Jessen, Søren; Haase, Christoffer; Habib, Sajad; Ørtenblad, Niels; Backer, Vibeke; Bangsbo, Jens

    2015-09-01

    The study was a randomized placebo-controlled trial investigating mechanisms by which chronic β2-adrenergic stimulation enhances muscle force and power output during maximal cycle ergometer exercise in young men. Eighteen trained men were assigned to an experimental group [oral terbutaline 5 mg/30 kg body weight (bw) twice daily (TER); n = 9] or a control group [placebo (PLA); n = 9] for a 4-wk intervention. No changes were observed with the intervention in PLA. Isometric muscle force of the quadriceps increased (P ≤ 0.01) by 97 ± 29 N (means ± SE) with the intervention in TER compared with PLA. Peak and mean power output during 30 s of maximal cycling increased (P ≤ 0.01) by 32 ± 8 and 25 ± 9 W, respectively, with the intervention in TER compared with PLA. Maximal oxygen consumption (V̇o2max) and time to fatigue during incremental cycling did not change with the intervention. Lean body mass increased by 1.95 ± 0.8 kg (P ≤ 0.05) with the intervention in TER compared with PLA. Change in single fiber cross-sectional area of myosin heavy chain (MHC) I (1,205 ± 558 μm(2); P ≤ 0.01) and MHC II fibers (1,277 ± 595 μm(2); P ≤ 0.05) of the vastus lateralis muscle was higher for TER than PLA with the intervention, whereas no changes were observed in MHC isoform distribution. Expression of muscle proteins involved in growth, ion handling, lactate production, and clearance increased (P ≤ 0.05) with the intervention in TER compared with PLA, with no change in oxidative enzymes. Our observations suggest that muscle hypertrophy is the primary mechanism underlying enhancements in muscle force and peak power during maximal cycling induced by chronic β2-adrenergic stimulation in humans. PMID:26159759

  15. Metabolic cycle, cell cycle, and the finishing kick to Start

    PubMed Central

    Futcher, Bruce

    2006-01-01

    Slowly growing budding yeast store carbohydrate, then liquidate it in late G1 phase of the cell cycle, superimposing a metabolic cycle on the cell cycle. This metabolic cycle may separate biochemically incompatible processes. Alternatively it may provide a burst of energy and material for commitment to the cell cycle. Stored carbohydrate could explain the size requirement for cells passing the Start point. PMID:16677426

  16. Performance Characteristics of Seven Bilevel Mechanical Ventilators in Pressure-Support Mode with Different Cycling Criteria: A Comparative Bench Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuqing; Cheng, Kewen; Zhou, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Background Pressure support ventilation from a bilevel device is a standard technique for non-invasive home ventilation. A bench study was designed to compare the performance and patient-ventilator synchronization of 7 bilevel ventilators, in the presence of system leaks. Material/Methods Ventilators were connected to a Hans Rudolph Series 1101 lung simulator (compliance, 50 mL/cmH2O; expiratory resistance, 20 cmH2O/L/s; respiratory rate, 15 breaths/min; inspiratory time, 1.0 s). All ventilators were set at 15 cmH2O pressure support and 5 cmH2O positive end-expiratory pressure. Tests were conducted at 2 system leaks (12–15 and 25–28 L/min). The performance characteristics and patient-ventilator asynchrony were assessed, including flow, airway pressure, time, and workload. Results The Breas Vivo30 could not synchronize with the simulator (frequent auto-triggering) at a leak of 25–28 L/min, but provided stable assisted ventilation when the leak was 12–15 L/min. Missed efforts and back-up ventilation occurred for the Weinmann VENTImotion and Airox Smartair Plus, requiring adjustment of trigger effort. All ventilators had a short trigger delay time (<200 ms), but significant differences between devices were found in triggering workload, pressurization appearance, tidal volume, and peak inspiratory flow. Premature cycling was frequent when the inspiratory termination criteria were at the highest sensitivity. Cycling synchronization was considerably improved by modifying expiratory triggering sensitivity settings, when available. Conclusions Performance and triggering workload varied significantly between bilevel ventilators, possibly due to software algorithm differences. Adjusting the cycling criteria settings can alter the shape of the inspiratory phase and peak expiratory flow, and improve patient-ventilator synchrony. PMID:25619202

  17. The study of crack resistance of TiAlN coatings under mechanical loading and thermal cycle testing

    SciTech Connect

    Akulinkin, Alexandr Shugurov, Artur Sergeev, Viktor; Panin, Alexey; Cheng, C.-H.

    2015-10-27

    The effect of preliminary ion bombardment of 321 stainless steel substrate on crack resistance of TiAlN coatings at uniaxial tension and thermal cycling is studied. The ion-beam treatment of the substrate is shown to substantially improve the adhesion strength of the coatings that prevents their delamination and spalling under uniaxial tension. The resistance to crack propagation and spalling by the thermal shock is higher in the TiAlN coating deposited onto the substrate subjected to Ti ion bombardment as compared to that in the TiAlN coating deposited onto the initial substrate.

  18. The study of crack resistance of TiAlN coatings under mechanical loading and thermal cycle testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akulinkin, Alexandr; Shugurov, Artur; Panin, Alexey; Sergeev, Viktor; Cheng, C.-H.

    2015-10-01

    The effect of preliminary ion bombardment of 321 stainless steel substrate on crack resistance of TiAlN coatings at uniaxial tension and thermal cycling is studied. The ion-beam treatment of the substrate is shown to substantially improve the adhesion strength of the coatings that prevents their delamination and spalling under uniaxial tension. The resistance to crack propagation and spalling by the thermal shock is higher in the TiAlN coating deposited onto the substrate subjected to Ti ion bombardment as compared to that in the TiAlN coating deposited onto the initial substrate.

  19. Systemic Low-Dose UVB Inhibits CD8 T Cells and Skin Inflammation by Alternative and Novel Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Sabita; Rogers, Linda Joanne; Halliday, Gary Mark

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to UVB radiation before antigen delivery at an unirradiated site inhibits functional immunological responses. Mice treated dorsally with suberythemal low-dose UVB and immunized with ova in abdominal skin generated ova-specific CD8 T cells with a significantly decreased activation, expansion, and cytotoxic activity compared with unirradiated mice. UVB also impaired the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction to ova. Transfer of CD4+CD25+ cells from UVB-exposed mice did not suppress the ova-specific CD8 T-cell response or DTH reaction in unexposed mice, confirming that systemic low-dose UVB does not induce long-lived functional regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells. Repairing cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer–type DNA damage and blocking aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling also did not reverse the immunosuppressive effect of UVB on ova-specific CD8 T cells and DTH, suggesting that cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor are not required in systemic low-dose UVB-induced immunosuppression. The known UVB chromophore, cis-urocanic acid, and reactive oxygen species triggered the inhibition of DTH caused by UVB, but they were not involved in the modulation of CD8 T cells. These findings indicate that systemic low-dose UVB impedes the primary response of antigen-specific CD8 T cells by a novel mechanism that is independent of pathways known to be involved in systemic suppression of DTH. PMID:21641400

  20. Novel Nitrobenzazolo[3,2-a]quinolinium Salts Induce Cell Death through a Mechanism Involving DNA Damage, Cell Cycle Changes, and Mitochondrial Permeabilization

    PubMed Central

    Vélez, Christian; Cox, Osvaldo; Rosado-Berrios, Carlos A.; Molina, Dennise; Arroyo, Luz; Carro, Sujey; Filikov, Anton; Kumar, Vineet; Malhotra, Sanjay V.; Cordero, Marisol; Zayas, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the capacity of three nitro substituted benzazolo[3,2-a]quinolinium salts NBQs: NBQ 95 (NSC-763304), NBQ 38 (NSC 763305), and NBQ 97 (NSC-763306) as potential antitumor agents. NBQ’s are unnatural alkaloids possessing a positive charge that could facilitate interaction with cell organelles. The anticancer activities of these compounds were evaluated through the National Cancer Institute (NCI) 60 cell line screening which represents diverse histologies. The screening was performed at 10 µM on all cell lines. Results from the NCI screening indicated cytotoxicity activity on six cell lines. In order to explore a possible mechanism of action, a detailed biological activity study of NBQ 95 and NBQ 38 was performed on A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells to determine an apoptotic pathway involving, cell cycle changes, DNA fragmentation, mutations, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and caspases activation. DNA fragmentation, cell cycle effects, mutagenesis, mitochondrial permeabilization and activation of caspases were determined by fluorimetry and differential imaging. Our data showed that A431 growth was inhibited with an average IC50 of 30 µM. In terms of the mechanism, these compounds interacted with DNA causing fragmentation and cell cycle arrest at sub G0/G1 stage. Mutagenesis was higher for NBQ 38 and moderate for NBQ 95 Mitochon-drial permeabilization was observed with NBQ 38 and slightly for NBQ 95. Both compounds caused activation of Caspases 3 and 7 suggesting an apoptotic cell death pathway through an intrinsic mechanism. This study reports evidence of the toxicity of these novel compounds with overlapping structural and mechanistic similarities to ellipticine, a known anti-tumor compound. PMID:25243104

  1. [Effect of Elodea nuttallii-immobilized Nitrogen Cycling Bacteria on Nitrogen Removal Mechanism in an Inflow River, Gonghu Bay].

    PubMed

    Han, Hua-yang; Li, Zheng-kui; Wang, Hao; Zhu, Qian

    2016-04-15

    Undisturbed sediment cores and surface water from Qinshui River in Gonghu Bay were collected to carry out a simulation experiment in our laboratory. The remediation effect of Elodea nuttallii-Immobilized Nitrogen Cycling Bacteria (INCB) was applied in the polluted inflow river. The denitrification rate, ANAMMOX rate and nitrogen microorganism diversity were measured by ¹⁵N isotope pairing technology and high-throughput sequencing technology based on 16S rRNA. The TN, NH₄⁺-N, NO₃⁻-N concentrations were reduced by 72.03%, 46.67% and 76.65% in the treatment with addition of Elodea nuttallii and INCB in our laboratory experiment. Meanwhile, denitrification bacteria and ANAMMOX bacteria had synergistic effect with each other. The denitrification and ANAMMOX rates were increased by 165 µmol (m² · h)⁻¹ and 269.7 µmol · (m² · h)⁻¹, respectively. The diversities of denitrification and ANAMMOX bacteria also increased in our experiment. From the level of major phylum, Proteobacteria, Planctomycetes, Acidobbacteria and Bacteroidetes all increased significantly. The results showed that the Elodea nuttallii-INCB assemblage technology could increase the bio-diversity of nitrogen cycling bacteria and promote the ability of nitrogen removal in Qinshui River. PMID:27548961

  2. Biology of the cell cycle inhibitor p21(CDKN1A): molecular mechanisms and relevance in chemical toxicology.

    PubMed

    Dutto, Ilaria; Tillhon, Micol; Cazzalini, Ornella; Stivala, Lucia A; Prosperi, Ennio

    2015-02-01

    The cell cycle inhibitor p21(CDKN1A) is a protein playing multiple roles not only in the DNA damage response, but also in many cellular processes during unperturbed cell growth. The main, well-known function of p21 is to arrest cell cycle progression by inhibiting the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases. In addition, p21 is involved in the regulation of transcription, apoptosis, DNA repair, as well as cell motility. However, p21 appears to a have a dual-face behavior because, in addition to its tumor suppressor functions, it may act as an oncogene, depending on the cell type and on the cellular localization. As a biomarker of the cell response to different toxic stimuli, p21 expression and functions have been analyzed in an impressive number of studies investigating the activity of several types of chemicals, in order to determine their possible harmful effects on human cells. Here, we review these studies in order to highlight the different roles p21 may play in the cell response to chemical exposure and to better evaluate the information provided by this biomarker. PMID:25514883

  3. Bithermal fatigue: A simplified alternative to thermomechanical fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.

    1988-01-01

    A bithermal fatigue test technique was proposed as a simplified alternative to the thermomechanical fatigue test. Both the thermomechanical cycle and the bithermal technique can be used to study nonisothermal fatigue behavior. The difference between the two cycles is that in a conventional thermomechanical fatigue cycle the temperature is continuously varied concurrently with the applied mechanical strains, but in the bithermal fatigue cycle the specimen is held at zero load during the temperature excursions and all the loads are applied at the two extreme temperatures of the cycle. Experimentally, the bithermal fatigue test technique offers advantages such as ease in synchronizing the temperature and mechanical strain waveforms, in minimizing temperature gradients in the specimen gauge length, and in reducing and interpreting thermal fatigue such as the influence of alternate high and low temperatures on the cyclic stress-strain response characteristics, the effects of thermal state, and the possibility of introducing high- and low-temperature deformation mechanisms within the same cycle. The bithermal technique was used to study nonisothermal fatigue behavior of alloys such as single-crystal PWA 1480, single-crystal Rene N4, cast B1900+Hf, and wrought Haynes 188.

  4. Autocrine IL-10 induces hallmarks of alternative activation in macrophages and suppresses anti-tuberculosis effector mechanisms without compromising T cell immunity1

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Tanja; Ehlers, Stefan; Heitmann, Lisa; Rausch, Alexandra; Mages, Jörg; Murray, Peter J.; Lang, Roland; Hölscher, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Elevated IL-10 has been implicated in reactivation tuberculosis (TB). Since macrophages rather than T cells were reported to be the major source of IL-10 in TB, we analyzed the consequences of a macrophage-specific overexpression of IL-10 in transgenic mice (macIL-10-transgenic) after aerosol infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). MacIL-10-transgenic mice were more susceptible to chronic Mtb infection than non-transgenic littermates, exhibiting higher bacterial loads in the lung after 12 weeks of infection and dying significantly earlier than controls. The differentiation, recruitment and activation of TH1 cells as well as the induction of IFN-gamma-dependent effector genes against Mtb were not affected by macrophage-derived IL-10. However, microarray analysis of pulmonary gene expression revealed patterns characteristic of alternative macrophage activation that were overrepresented in Mtb-infected macIL-10-transgenic mice. Importantly, arginase-1 gene expression and activity were strikingly enhanced in transgenic mice accompanied by a reduced production of reactive nitrogen intermediates. Moreover, IL-10-dependent arginase-1 induction diminished anti-mycobacterial effector mechanisms in macrophages. Together, macrophage-derived IL-10 triggers aspects of alternative macrophage activation and promotes Mtb recrudescence independent of overt effects on anti-TB T cell immunity. PMID:19561100

  5. Effect of short-time external short circuiting on the capacity fading mechanism during long-term cycling of LiCoO2/mesocarbon microbeads battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lingling; Cheng, Xinqun; Ma, Yulin; Guan, Ting; Sun, Shun; Cui, Yingzhi; Du, Chunyu; Zuo, Pengjian; Gao, Yunzhi; Yin, Geping

    2016-06-01

    Commercial LiCoO2/mesocarbon microbeads (MCMB) batteries (CP475148AR) are short circuited by different contact resistances (0.6 mΩ and 5.0 mΩ) for short times. The short circuited battery is cycled for 1000 times, and the effect of the short-time external short circuiting on the capacity fading mechanism during long-term cycling of LiCoO2/MCMB battery is studied by analyzing the morphology, structure, and electrochemical performance. The results of SEM indicates that the morphology of LiCoO2 material is almost unchanged, except that the particle surface becomes smooth, and the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) film on the surface of MCMB electrode becomes nonuniform due to the high temperature caused by short circuiting. The lithium ions are more difficult to de-intercalate from the anode and the lattice structure of LiCoO2 degrades according to the results of X-ray diffraction (XRD). The high discharge current caused by short circuiting can damage electrodes, leaving vacancies in structure. The damage of electrode structure can lead to a decrease of diffusion coefficient of lithium (D), so polarization increases and mainly caused by the LiCoO2 electrode. The capacity deterioration of short circuited battery during long-term cycling is mainly caused by the increase of polarization and capacity loss of electrodes.

  6. Mechanisms of deformation and fracture in high temperature low cycle fatigue of Rene 80 and IN 100

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanoski, G. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Specimens tested for the AGARD strain range partitioning program were investigated. Rene 80 and IN 100 were tested in air and in vacuum; at 871 C, 925 C, and 1000 C; and in the coated and uncoated condition. The specimens exhibited a multiplicity of high-temperature low-cycle fatigue damage. Observations of the various forms of damage were consistent with material and testing conditions and were generally in agreement with previous studies. In every case observations support a contention that failure occurs at a particular combination of crack length and maximum stress. A failure criterion which is applicable in the regime of testing studied is presented. The predictive capabilities of this criterion are straight forward.

  7. Experimental study of a gas clearance phase regulation mechanism for a pneumatically-driven split-Stirling-cycle cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cun-quan; Zhong, Cheng

    2015-03-01

    A concept for a new type of pneumatically-driven split-Stirling-cycle cryocooler with clearance-phase-adjustor has recently been described, along with a theoretical model for simulating its operation and performance (Zhang, in preparation, 2003). This paper describes experiments that have been carried out to systematically validate the model, and to characterize the performance of the cryocooler in several key areas. These include: oscillatory flow within the cooler, correlation between the compression piston and the free displacer, the impact of the cold-tip temperature and phase-adjusting clearance gaps on cooler performance. The minimum cold-tip temperature is used as primary gauge of refrigeration performance. Real-time measurements of gas pressures in different chambers, displacements of the compression piston and the free displacer have been performed to reveal the internal physical processes. The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with the simulated ones.

  8. Effects of 17-AAG on the cell cycle and apoptosis of H446 cells and the associated mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xuerong; Wang, Jianping; Xiao, Lijun; Xu, Qian; Zhao, Enhong; Zheng, Xin; Zheng, Huachuan; Zhao, Shuang; Ding, Shi

    2016-01-01

    As a heat shock protein 90 inhibitor, 17-allyl-amino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) has been studied in numerous types of cancer, however the effects of 17-AAG on apoptosis and the cell cycle of H446 cells remain unclear. In the current study, the MTT method was used to evaluate the inhibitory effects of different durations and doses of 17-AAG treatment on the proliferation of H446 cells. The cells were stained with Annexin-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide and measured by flow cytometry, and the gene and protein expression levels of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), survivin, cyclin D1, cyt-C, caspase 9 and caspase 3 were determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The results indicated that with treatment with 1.25–20 mg/l 17-AAG for 24 and 48 h, significant inhibition of H446 cell proliferation was observed in a time- and dose-dependent manner. With treatment of 3.125, 6.25 and 12.5 mg/l 17-AAG for 48 h, significant apoptosis and cell cycle arrest was observed. The results indicated that the gene and protein expression levels of STAT3, survivin and cyclin D1 were downregulated, and cyt-C, caspase 9 and caspase 3 were upregulated by 17-AAG in a dose-dependent manner when the cells were treated with 3.125 and 6.25 mg/l 17-AAG for 48 h. The results indicated that 17-AAG is able to inhibit the cell proliferation, induce apoptosis and G2/M arrest and downregulate the gene and protein expression levels of STAT3, survivin and cyclin D1, and upregulate gene and protein expression of cyt-C, caspase 9, caspase 3. PMID:27279418

  9. Investigation of failure mechanisms in silicon based half cells during the first cycle by micro X-ray tomography and radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fu; Markötter, Henning; Dong, Kang; Manke, Ingo; Hilger, Andre; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Banhart, John

    2016-07-01

    Two proof-of-concept batteries were designed and prepared for X-ray microtomography and radiography characterizations to investigate the degradation mechanisms of silicon (Si) based half cells during the first cycle. It is highlighted here for the first time that, apart from the significant volume expansion-induced pulverization, the electrochemical "deactivation" mechanism contributes significantly to the capacity loss during the first charge process. In addition, the unexpected electrochemically inactive Si particles are also believed to substantially decrease the energy density due to the inefficient utilization of loaded active material. These unexpected findings, which cannot be deduced from macroscopic electrochemical characterizations, expand the inherent explanations for performance deterioration of Si-anode material based lithium ion batteries (LIBs) and emphasize the vital value of microscopic techniques in revealing the correlation between macroscopic electrode structure and the overall electrochemical performance.

  10. Cell cycle alterations induced by urban PM2.5 in bronchial epithelial cells: characterization of the process and possible mechanisms involved

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study explores and characterizes cell cycle alterations induced by urban PM2.5 in the human epithelial cell line BEAS-2B, and elucidates possible mechanisms involved. Methods The cells were exposed to a low dose (7.5 μg/cm2) of Milan winter PM2.5 for different time points, and the cell cycle progression was analyzed by fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. Activation of proteins involved in cell cycle control was investigated by Western blotting and DNA damage by 32P-postlabelling, immunostaining and comet assay. The formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was quantified by flow cytometry. The role of PM organic fraction versus washed PM on the cell cycle alterations was also examined. Finally, the molecular pathways activated were further examined using specific inhibitors. Results Winter PM2.5 induced marked cell cycle alteration already after 3 h of exposure, represented by an increased number of cells (transient arrest) in G2. This effect was associated with an increased phosphorylation of Chk2, while no changes in p53 phosphorylation were observed at this time point. The increase in G2 was followed by a transient arrest in the metaphase/anaphase transition point (10 h), which was associated with the presence of severe mitotic spindle aberrations. The metaphase/anaphase delay was apparently followed by mitotic slippage at 24 h, resulting in an increased number of tetraploid G1 cells and cells with micronuclei (MN), and by apoptosis at 40 h. Winter PM2.5 increased the level of ROS at 2 h and DNA damage (8-oxodG, single- and double stand breaks) was detected after 3 h of exposure. The PM organic fraction caused a similar G2/M arrest and augmented ROS formation, while washed PM had no such effects. DNA adducts were detected after 24 h. Both PM-induced DNA damage and G2 arrest were inhibited by the addition of antioxidants and α-naphthoflavone, suggesting the involvement of ROS and reactive electrophilic metabolites formed via a P

  11. The capacity fading mechanism and improvement of cycling stability in MoS2-based anode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Shu, Haibo; Li, Feng; Hu, Chenli; Liang, Pei; Cao, Dan; Chen, Xiaoshuang

    2016-02-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered MoS2 nanosheets possess great potential as anode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs), but they still suffer from poor cycling performance. Improving the cycling stability of electrode materials depends on a deep understanding of their dynamic structural evolution and reaction kinetics in the lithiation process. Herein, thermodynamic phase diagrams and the lithiation dynamics of MoS2-based nanostructures with the intercalation of lithium ions are studied by using first-principles calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Our results demonstrate that the continuous intercalation of Li ions induces structural destruction of 2H phase MoS2 nanosheets in the discharge process that follows a layer-by-layer dissociation mechanism. Meanwhile, the intercalation of Li ions leads to a structural transition of MoS2 nanosheets from the 2H to the 1T phase due to the ultralow transition barriers (∼0.1 eV). We find that the phase transition can slow down the dissociation of MoS2 nanosheets during lithiation. The result can be applied to explain extensive experimental observation of the fast capacity fading of MoS2-based anode materials between the first and the subsequent discharges. To suppress the dissociation of MoS2 nanosheets in the lithiation process, we propose a strategy by constructing a sandwich-like graphene/MoS2/graphene structure that indicates high chemical stability, superior conductivity, and high Li-ion mobility in the charge/discharge process, implying the possibility to induce an improvement in the anode cycling performance. This work opens a new route to rational design layered transition-metal disulfide (TMD) anode materials for LIBs with superior cycling stability and electrochemical performance. PMID:26780964

  12. Effects of Thermal Cycling on Thermal Expansion and Mechanical Properties of Sic Fiber-reinforced Reaction-bonded Si3n4 Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Palczer, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal expansion curves for SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded Si3N4 matrix composites (SiC/RBSN) and unreinforced RBSN were measured from 25 to 1400 C in nitrogen and in oxygen. The effects of fiber/matrix bonding and cycling on the thermal expansion curves and room-temperature tensile properties of unidirectional composites were determined. The measured thermal expansion curves were compared with those predicted from composite theory. Predicted thermal expansion curves parallel to the fiber direction for both bonding cases were similar to that of the weakly bonded composites, but those normal to the fiber direction for both bonding cases resulted in no net dimensional changes at room temperature, and no loss in tensile properties from the as-fabricated condition. In contrast, thermal cycling in oxygen for both composites caused volume expansion primarily due to internal oxidation of RBSN. Cyclic oxidation affected the mechanical properties of the weakly bonded SiC/RBSN composites the most, resulting in loss of strain capability beyond matrix fracture and catastrophic, brittle fracture. Increased bonding between the SiC fiber and RBSN matrix due to oxidation of the carbon-rich fiber surface coating and an altered residual stress pattern in the composite due to internal oxidation of the matrix are the main reasons for the poor mechanical performance of these composites.

  13. Methanol to olefin Conversion on HSAPO-34 zeolite from periodic density functional theory calculations: a complete cycle of side chain hydrocarbon pool mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.M.; Wang, Y.D.; Xie, Z.K.; Liu, Z.P.

    2009-03-15

    For its unique position in the coal chemical industry, the methanol to olefin (MTO) reaction has been a hot topic in zeolite catalysis. Due to the complexities of catalyst structure and reaction networks, many questions such as how the olefin chain is built from methanol remain elusive. On the basis of periodic density functional theory calculations, this work establishes the first complete catalytic cycle for MTO reaction via hexamethylbenzene (HMB) trapped in HSAPO-34 zeolite based on the so-called side chain hydrocarbon pool mechanism. The cycle starts from the methylation of HMB that leads to heptamethylbenzenium ion (heptaMB{sup +}) intermediate. This is then followed by the growth of side chain via repeated deprotonation of benzenium ions and methylation of the exocyclic double bond. Ethene and propene can finally be released from the side ethyl and isopropyl groups of benzenium ions by deprotonation and subsequent protonation steps. We demonstrate that (i) HMB/HSAPO-34 only yields propene as the primary product based on the side chain hydrocarbon pool mechanism and (ii) an indirect proton-shift step mediated by water that is always available in the system is energetically more favorable than the traditionally regarded internal hydrogen-shift step. Finally, the implications of our results toward understanding the effect of acidity of zeolite on MTO activity are also discussed.

  14. Studies on the mechanisms of mammalian cell killing by a freeze-thaw cycle: conditions that prevent cell killing using nucleated freezing

    SciTech Connect

    Shier, W.T.

    1988-04-01

    Normally a freeze-thaw cycle is a very efficient method of killing mammalian cells. However, this report describes conditions that prevent killing of cultured mammalian cells by nucleated freezing at -24 degrees C. Optimal protection from cell killing at -24 degrees C was obtained in isotonic solutions containing an organic cryoprotectant such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO; 10%, v/v), a saccharide such as sucrose over a broad concentration range from 50 to 150 mM, and glucose. Glycerol was also an effective cryoprotectant but other organic solvents were ineffective, although in some cases they appeared to protect cell membranes, while not protecting other vital components. A wide variety of saccharide structures were effective at protecting cells from freeze-thaw killing, with trehalose being particularly effective. The degree of resistance to killing by a freeze-thaw cycle under these conditions varied widely among different cell lines. If toxicity of DMSO was responsible for this variability of cryoprotection, it must have been due to short-term, not longer term, toxicity of DMSO. Studies on the mechanism by which cells are protected from killing under these conditions indicated that neither vitrification of the medium nor the concentrating of components during freezing were involved. One model not eliminated by the mechanistic studies proposes that the organic solvent cryoprotectant component acts by fluidizing membranes under the thawing conditions, so that any holes produced by ice crystals propagating through membranes can reseal during the thawing process. In this model one of the mechanisms by which the saccharide component could act is by entering the cells and stabilizing vital intracellular components. Consistent with this, a freeze-thaw cycle promoted the uptake of labeled sucrose into cultured cells.

  15. Nuclear fuel cycle costs

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Rainey, R.H.

    1982-02-01

    The costs for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which were developed as part of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), are presented. Total fuel cycle costs are given for the pressurized water reactor once-through and fuel recycle systems, and for the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor system. These calculations show that fuel cycle costs are a small part of the total power costs. For breeder reactors, fuel cycle costs are about half that of the present once-through system. The total power cost of the breeder reactor system is greater than that of light-water reactor at today's prices for uranium and enrichment.

  16. Investigation of the mechanical behaviour of the plantar soft tissue during gait cycle: Experimental and numerical activities.

    PubMed

    Fontanella, Chiara G; Forestiero, Antonella; Carniel, Emanuele L; Natali, Arturo N

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the mechanical response of the plantar soft tissue from the heel strike to the midstance, developing both experimental and numerical activities. Using force plates and motion tracking system, the dynamic and kinematic data of 10 subjects are evaluated. The average kinematics data obtained from the experimental tests are assumed as boundary and loading conditions for the computational analyses. A three-dimensional virtual solid model of the foot is developed from the analysis of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine images from computed tomography and magnetic resonance. Constitutive formulations that interpret the mechanical response of the biological tissues are defined. Because of the major role of plantar soft tissue in the proposed analysis, a specific visco-hyperelastic constitutive formulation is provided considering the typical features of the tissue mechanics. The three-dimensional numerical model permits to evaluate the capability of the plantar soft tissue to redistribute the deformations, especially during the midstance, and to define quantitative aspects related to the energy absorption. The numerical results highlight the stress distribution from the heel strike to the midstance. The values of stress and strain reached are more intensive during the midstance, when there is a single support of the foot. PMID:26405096

  17. Droughts may increase susceptibility of prairie dogs to fleas: Incongruity with hypothesized mechanisms of plague cycles in rodents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eads, David; Biggins, Dean E.; Long, Dustin H.; Gage, Kenneth L.; Antolin, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Plague is a reemerging, rodent-associated zoonosis caused by the flea-borne bacterium Yersinia pestis. As a vector-borne disease, rates of plague transmission may increase when fleas are abundant. Fleas are highly susceptible to desiccation under hot-dry conditions; we posited that their densities decline during droughts. We evaluated this hypothesis with black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) in New Mexico, June–August 2010–2012. Precipitation was relatively plentiful during 2010 and 2012 but scarce during 2011, the driest spring–summer on record for the northeastern grasslands of New Mexico. Unexpectedly, fleas were 200% more abundant in 2011 than in 2010 and 2012. Prairie dogs were in 27% better condition during 2010 and 2012, and they devoted 287% more time to grooming in 2012 than in 2011. During 2012, prairie dogs provided with supplemental food and water were in 23% better condition and carried 40% fewer fleas. Collectively, these results suggest that during dry years, prairie dogs are limited by food and water, and they exhibit weakened defenses against fleas. Long-term data are needed to evaluate the generality of whether droughts increase flea densities and how changes in flea abundance during sequences of dry and wet years might affect plague cycles in mammalian hosts.

  18. Theoretical modeling of a gas clearance phase regulation mechanism for a pneumatically-driven split-Stirling-cycle cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cun-quan; Zhong, Cheng

    2015-03-01

    The concept of a new type of pneumatically-driven split-Stirling-cycle cryocooler with clearance-phase-adjustor is proposed. In this implementation, the gap between the phase-adjusting part and the cylinder of the spring chamber is used, instead of dry friction acting on the pneumatically-driven rod to control motion damping of the displacer and to adjust the phase difference between the compression piston and displacer. It has the advantages of easy damping adjustment, low cost, and simplified manufacturing and assembly. A theoretical model has been established to simulate its dynamic performance. The linear compressor is modeled under adiabatic conditions, and the displacement of the compression piston is experimentally rectified. The working characteristics of the compressor motor and the principal losses of cooling, including regenerator inefficiency loss, solid conduction loss, shuttle loss, pump loss and radiation loss, are taken into account. The displacer motion was modeled as a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) forced system. A set of governing equations can be solved numerically to simulate the cooler's performance. The simulation is useful for understanding the physical processes occurring in the cooler and for predicting the cooler's performance.

  19. Verification of a 2 kWe Closed-Brayton-Cycle Power Conversion System Mechanical Dynamics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwiczak, Damian R.; Le, Dzu K.; McNelis, Anne M.; Yu, Albert C.; Samorezov, Sergey; Hervol, Dave S.

    2005-01-01

    Vibration test data from an operating 2 kWe closed-Brayton-cycle (CBC) power conversion system (PCS) located at the NASA Glenn Research Center was used for a comparison with a dynamic disturbance model of the same unit. This effort was performed to show that a dynamic disturbance model of a CBC PCS can be developed that can accurately predict the torque and vibration disturbance fields of such class of rotating machinery. The ability to accurately predict these disturbance fields is required before such hardware can be confidently integrated onto a spacecraft mission. Accurate predictions of CBC disturbance fields will be used for spacecraft control/structure interaction analyses and for understanding the vibration disturbances affecting the scientific instrumentation onboard. This paper discusses how test cell data measurements for the 2 kWe CBC PCS were obtained, the development of a dynamic disturbance model used to predict the transient torque and steady state vibration fields of the same unit, and a comparison of the two sets of data.

  20. Electric currents from thunderstorms to the ionosphere during a solar cycle: Quasi-static modeling of the coupling mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velinov, P. I. Y.; Tonev, P. T.

    2008-11-01

    Conduction and displacement currents, and their sum the Maxwell current, generated over a thunderstorm (TS) with recurrent lightning discharges are investigated theoretically. The aim is to study better the influence of different factors on these currents, which form the link between thunderstorms and the ionosphere in the global atmospheric electrical circuit. The factors studied concern the thunderstorm characteristics (the charge separation current, and the lightning discharge parameters), as well as the atmospheric and cloud conductivity. Some of these factors may show long-term changes with the 11-year solar cycle, possibly realized through an inverse dependence of the cosmic ray flux on solar activity. Earlier investigations have suggested that the lightning-related charge redistribution and subsequent relaxation, rather than the high intensity current, is mainly the source of the energy coupled to the ionosphere. With respect to this, a quasi-electrostatic analytical model is proposed, based on Maxwell’s equations. The currents are generated by a TS modeled as a positive vertical dipole with charges which are first accumulated and then destroyed by lightning. Our computations show that the mean and peak values of the conduction and total Maxwell currents to the ionosphere depend significantly on the charge moment change. The mean currents are also sensitive to the reduction of the conductivity in thunderclouds. Small variations of the stratospheric conductivity (˜20% at geomagnetic latitude 40° and ˜40 50% at 55°) with the solar activity do not influence the currents to the ionosphere very much.

  1. The differential expression of alternatively polyadenylated transcripts is a common stress-induced response mechanism that modulates mammalian mRNA expression in a quantitative and qualitative fashion

    PubMed Central

    Hollerer, Ina; Curk, Tomaz; Haase, Bettina; Benes, Vladimir; Hauer, Christian; Neu-Yilik, Gabriele; Bhuvanagiri, Madhuri; Hentze, Matthias W.; Kulozik, Andreas E.

    2016-01-01

    Stress adaptation plays a pivotal role in biological processes and requires tight regulation of gene expression. In this study, we explored the effect of cellular stress on mRNA polyadenylation and investigated the implications of regulated polyadenylation site usage on mammalian gene expression. High-confidence polyadenylation site mapping combined with global pre-mRNA and mRNA expression profiling revealed that stress induces an accumulation of genes with differentially expressed polyadenylated mRNA isoforms in human cells. Specifically, stress provokes a global trend in polyadenylation site usage toward decreased utilization of promoter-proximal poly(A) sites in introns or ORFs and increased utilization of promoter-distal polyadenylation sites in intergenic regions. This extensively affects gene expression beyond regulating mRNA abundance by changing mRNA length and by altering the configuration of open reading frames. Our study highlights the impact of post-transcriptional mechanisms on stress-dependent gene regulation and reveals the differential expression of alternatively polyadenylated transcripts as a common stress-induced mechanism in mammalian cells. PMID:27407180

  2. Alternative current conduction mechanisms of organic-inorganic compound [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}CuCl{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Bechir, M. Karoui, K.; Guidara, K.; Ben Rhaiem, A.; Tabellout, M.

    2014-05-28

    The [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}CuCl{sub 4} single crystal has been analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction patterns, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and electrical impedance spectroscopy. [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}CuCl{sub 4} crystallizes at room temperature in the monoclinic system with P2{sub 1}/{sub C} space group. Three phase transitions at T{sub 1} = 226 K, T{sub 2} = 264 K, and T{sub 3} = 297 K have been evidenced by DSC measurements. The electrical technique was measured in the 10{sup −1}–10{sup 7} Hz frequency range and 203–313 K temperature intervals. The frequency dependence of alternative current (AC) conductivity is interpreted in terms of Jonscher's law (developed). The AC electrical conduction in [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}CuCl{sub 4} compound is studied by two processes which can be attributed to a hopping transport mechanism: the correlated barrier hopping model in phases I, II, and III, the non-overlapping small polaron tunneling model in phase IV. The conduction mechanism is interpreted with the help of Elliot's theory, and the Elliot's parameters are found.

  3. The differential expression of alternatively polyadenylated transcripts is a common stress-induced response mechanism that modulates mammalian mRNA expression in a quantitative and qualitative fashion.

    PubMed

    Hollerer, Ina; Curk, Tomaz; Haase, Bettina; Benes, Vladimir; Hauer, Christian; Neu-Yilik, Gabriele; Bhuvanagiri, Madhuri; Hentze, Matthias W; Kulozik, Andreas E

    2016-09-01

    Stress adaptation plays a pivotal role in biological processes and requires tight regulation of gene expression. In this study, we explored the effect of cellular stress on mRNA polyadenylation and investigated the implications of regulated polyadenylation site usage on mammalian gene expression. High-confidence polyadenylation site mapping combined with global pre-mRNA and mRNA expression profiling revealed that stress induces an accumulation of genes with differentially expressed polyadenylated mRNA isoforms in human cells. Specifically, stress provokes a global trend in polyadenylation site usage toward decreased utilization of promoter-proximal poly(A) sites in introns or ORFs and increased utilization of promoter-distal polyadenylation sites in intergenic regions. This extensively affects gene expression beyond regulating mRNA abundance by changing mRNA length and by altering the configuration of open reading frames. Our study highlights the impact of post-transcriptional mechanisms on stress-dependent gene regulation and reveals the differential expression of alternatively polyadenylated transcripts as a common stress-induced mechanism in mammalian cells. PMID:27407180

  4. Alternate Alternates: A Medley of Alternate Assessments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdette, Paula J.; Olsen, Ken

    This paper highlights eight states that have implemented alternate assessments for children with disabilities who cannot participate in their state and district-wide assessment programs. The alternate assessment systems in Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Minnesota, North Dakota, Utah, and West Virginia are briefly described, along with their…

  5. Rugby-Specific Small-Sided Games Training Is an Effective Alternative to Stationary Cycling at Reducing Clinical Risk Factors Associated with the Development of Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mendham, Amy E.; Duffield, Rob; Coutts, Aaron J.; Marino, Frank; Boyko, Andriy; Bishop, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The present study investigated whether rugby small-sided games (SSG) could be an effective alternative to continuous stationary cycling (CYC) training at reducing clinical risk factors associated with the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods Thirty-three middle-aged (48.6±6.6y), inactive men were randomized into a CYC (n=11), SSG (n=11), or control (CON, n=11) group. Participants trained 3d.wk-1 for 8 weeks, while control participants maintained normal activity and dietary patterns. Exercise duration was matched between groups, which involved CYC or SSG (four quarters, interspersed with 2-min passive recovery). Both training programs were designed to induce similar internal loads of maximal heart rate (~80-85%HRmax) and rating of perceived exertion. Pre- and post-intervention testing included dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan, graded exercise test, fasting 2h oral glucose tolerance test and resting muscle biopsy. Western blotting was used to assess the content of skeletal muscle proteins associated with mitochondrial biogenesis and glucose regulation. Results Both CYC and SSG increased VO2 at 80%HRmax, and reduced glycated haemoglobin, glucose area under the curve (AUC; SSG, -2.3±2.4; CYC -2.2±1.6 mmol.L1(120min)1; p<0.05), and total body fat-mass (SSG -2.6±0.9%; CYC -2.9±1.1%), compared to no change in CON (p<0.05). SSG reduced insulin AUC (-30.4±40.7 µlU.mL1(120min)1; p<0.05) and increased total body fat-free mass (1.1±1.2kg; p<0.05), with no change in CYC or CON (P>0.05). There were no differences within or between conditions for protein content of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α, sirtuin-1, p53, glucose transporter-4, protein kinase AKT/PKB, myocyte enhancer factor 2A, mitochondrial transcription factor, nuclear respiratory factor (NRF)-1, NRF-2 or mitochondrial complexes I-V (p>0.05). Conclusion Rugby small-sided games is an effective alternative to continuous cycling for improving

  6. An Interpretation of a Possible Mechanism for the First Ground-Level Enhancement of Solar Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firoz, K. A.; Gan, W. Q.; Li, Y. P.; Rodríguez-Pacheco, J.

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that solar flares and shocks driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are high-energy particle acceleration processes that might cause a high-energy particle event known as a ground-level enhancement (GLE). In this context, we have attempted to understand the processes responsible for the first GLE event (GLE71 17 May 2012 01:50 UT) of Solar Cycle 24. We studied the spatial and spectral data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) the Culgoora radio-heliograph, and Wind/WAVES instrument, and analyzed the temporal data of the solar-flare components, the solar radio-flux density, and the electron fluxes from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI), the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), and Wind spacecraft. The flare had two ribbons separated by the neutral line between negative and positive magnetic polarity. Their structure was also almost consistent with the contours of some flare components, which were almost saturated during the flare-peak time. As indicated by the metric-kilometric Type-II burst, and because it extended over a wide heliolongitude (> ≈ 41∘) range, the CME-driven shock was fast enough to cause high-energy particle acceleration at a high altitude in the solar corona. Moreover, the CME and flare-flash phases were aligned along the same direction, which implies that if the CME-driven shock played the leading role in causing the GLE, preceding flare components may have contributed to the shock.

  7. Sex-Related Differences in Self-Paced All Out High-Intensity Intermittent Cycling: Mechanical and Physiological Responses.

    PubMed

    Panissa, Valéria L G; Julio, Ursula F; França, Vanessa; Lira, Fabio S; Hofmann, Peter; Takito, Monica Y; Franchini, Emerson

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare sex-related responses to a self-paced all out high-intensity intermittent exercise (HIIE). 9 women and 10 men were submitted to a maximal incremental test (to determine maximum aerobic power - MAP and VO2peak), and an HIIE cycling (60x8s:12s, effort:pause). During the protocol the mean value of V̇O2 and heart rate for the entire exercise (VO2total and HRtotal) as well as the values only in the effort or pause (V̇O2effort, VO2pause and HReffort and HRpause) relative to VO2peak were measured. Anaerobic power reserve (APR), blood lactate [La] and the respiratory exchange ratio (RER) were also measured. These variables were compared between men and women using the unpaired t test. Men used greater APR (109 ± 12%MAP vs 92 ± 6%MAP) with similar V̇O2total (74 ± 7 vs 78 ± 8% VO2peak), however, when effort and pause were analysed separately, V̇O2effort (80 ± 9 vs 80 ± 5%VO2peak) was similar between sexes, while V̇O2pause was lower in men (69 ± 6% vs 77 ± 11% VO2peak, respectively). Women presented lower power decrement (30 ± 11 vs 11 ± 3%), RER (1.04 ± 0.03 vs 1.00 ± 0.02) and [La]peak (8.6 ± 0.9 vs 5.9 ± 2.3 mmol.L(-1)). Thus, we can conclude that men self-paced HIIE at higher APR but with the same cardiovascular/aerobic solicitation as women. Key pointsMen self-paced high-intensity intermittent exercise at higher intensities than women.Men utilized greater anaerobic power reserve than women.Men and women had same cardiovascular solicitation. PMID:27274678

  8. Sex-Related Differences in Self-Paced All Out High-Intensity Intermittent Cycling: Mechanical and Physiological Responses

    PubMed Central

    Panissa, Valéria L. G.; Julio, Ursula F.; França, Vanessa; Lira, Fabio S.; Hofmann, Peter; Takito, Monica Y.; Franchini, Emerson

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare sex-related responses to a self-paced all out high-intensity intermittent exercise (HIIE). 9 women and 10 men were submitted to a maximal incremental test (to determine maximum aerobic power - MAP and VO2peak), and an HIIE cycling (60x8s:12s, effort:pause). During the protocol the mean value of V̇O2 and heart rate for the entire exercise (VO2total and HRtotal) as well as the values only in the effort or pause (V̇O2effort, VO2pause and HReffort and HRpause) relative to VO2peak were measured. Anaerobic power reserve (APR), blood lactate [La] and the respiratory exchange ratio (RER) were also measured. These variables were compared between men and women using the unpaired t test. Men used greater APR (109 ± 12%MAP vs 92 ± 6%MAP) with similar V̇O2total (74 ± 7 vs 78 ± 8% VO2peak), however, when effort and pause were analysed separately, V̇O2effort (80 ± 9 vs 80 ± 5%VO2peak) was similar between sexes, while V̇O2pause was lower in men (69 ± 6% vs 77 ± 11% VO2peak, respectively). Women presented lower power decrement (30 ± 11 vs 11 ± 3%), RER (1.04 ± 0.03 vs 1.00 ± 0.02) and [La]peak (8.6 ± 0.9 vs 5.9 ± 2.3 mmol.L-1). Thus, we can conclude that men self-paced HIIE at higher APR but with the same cardiovascular/aerobic solicitation as women. Key points Men self-paced high-intensity intermittent exercise at higher intensities than women. Men utilized greater anaerobic power reserve than women. Men and women had same cardiovascular solicitation. PMID:27274678

  9. Alternative Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Physicians and Survivors © Alternative Therapies Alternative therapies, also called complementary, can support ... of motion, pain, and fatigue are often reported. Energy work includes acupuncture and acupressure, traditional Chinese medicine ...

  10. In-Situ Measurement of Power Loss for Crystalline Silicon Modules Undergoing Thermal Cycling and Mechanical Loading Stress Testing: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Spataru, Sergiu; Hacke, Pater; Sera, Dezso

    2015-09-15

    We analyze the degradation of multi-crystalline silicon photovoltaic modules undergoing simultaneous thermal, mechanical, and humidity stress testing to develop a dark environmental chamber in-situ measurement procedure for determining module power loss. From the analysis we determine three main categories of failure modes associated with the module degradation consisting of: shunting, recombination losses, increased series resistance losses, and current mismatch losses associated with a decrease in photo-current generation by removal of some cell areas due to cell fractures. Based on the analysis, we propose an in-situ module power loss monitoring procedure that relies on dark current-voltage measurements taken during the stress test, and initial and final module flash testing, to determine the power degradation characteristic of the module.

  11. On the recovery of the physical and mechanical properties of a CuCrZr alloy subjected to heat treatments simulating the thermal cycle of hot isostatic pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzwarth, U.; Pisoni, M.; Scholz, R.; Stamm, H.; Volcan, A.

    2000-03-01

    Due to their high mechanical strength and thermal conductivity precipitation hardened CuCrZr alloys are being considered as potential heat sink material for the ITER divertor vertical target. The fabrication of the divertor component involves a joining procedure by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The impact of this method on the degradation of the physical and mechanical properties of the CuCrZr alloy and their possible subsequent recovery by (re-)aging heat treatments have been investigated by hardness measurements, tensile testing and measurements of thermal diffusivity and electrical resistivity. The thermal cycle of hot isostatic pressing has been simulated by solution annealing finished by cooling rates between 0.03 and 1.5 K s-1. The experiments revealed that a successful recovery of the desired mechanical strength is only achievable if cooling rates of about 1 K s-1 or higher can be realized after HIP. Otherwise the alloy becomes already over-aged during slow cooling after the joining procedure.

  12. Limit cycle stability analysis and adaptive control of a multi-compartment model for a pressure-limited respirator and lung mechanics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chellaboina, VijaySekhar; Haddad, Wassim M.; Li, Hancao; Bailey, James M.

    2010-05-01

    Acute respiratory failure due to infection, trauma or major surgery is one of the most common problems encountered in intensive care units, and mechanical ventilation is the mainstay of supportive therapy for such patients. In this article, we develop a general mathematical model for the dynamic behaviour of a multi-compartment respiratory system in response to an arbitrary applied inspiratory pressure. Specifically, we use compartmental dynamical system theory and Poincaré maps to model and analyse the dynamics of a pressure-limited respirator and lung mechanics system, and show that the periodic orbit generated by this system is globally asymptotically stable. Furthermore, we show that the individual compartmental volumes, and hence the total lung volume, converge to steady-state end-inspiratory and end-expiratory values. Finally, we develop a model reference direct adaptive controller framework for the multi-compartmental model of a pressure-limited respirator and lung mechanics system where the plant and reference model involve switching and time-varying dynamics. We then apply the proposed adaptive feedback controller framework to stabilise a given limit cycle corresponding to a clinically plausible respiratory pattern.

  13. Evolution of a developmental mechanism: species-specific regulation of the cell cycle and the timing of events during craniofacial osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Jane; Jheon, Andrew H.; Ealba, Erin L.; Eames, B. Frank; Butcher, Kristin D.; Mak, Siu-Shan; Ladher, Raj; Alliston, Tamara; Schneider, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Neural crest mesenchyme (NCM) controls species-specific pattern in the craniofacial skeleton but how this cell population accomplishes such a complex task remains unclear. To elucidate mechanisms through which NCM directs skeletal development and evolution, we made chimeras from quail and duck embryos, which differ markedly in their craniofacial morphology and maturation rates. We show that quail NCM, when transplanted into duck, maintains its faster timetable for development and autonomously executes molecular and cellular programs for the induction, differentiation, and mineralization of bone, including premature expression of osteogenic genes such as Runx2 and Col1a1. In contrast, the duck host systemic environment appears to be relatively permissive and supports osteogenesis independently by providing circulating minerals and a vascular network. Further experiments reveal that NCM establishes the timing of osteogenesis by regulating cell cycle progression in a stage- and species-specific manner. Altering the time-course of D-type cyclin expression mimics chimeras by accelerating expression of Runx2 and Col1a1. We also discover higher endogenous expression of Runx2 in quail coincident with their smaller craniofacial skeletons, and by prematurely over-expressing Runx2 in chick embryos we reduce the overall size of the craniofacial skeleton. Thus, our work suggests that NCM establishes species-specific size in the craniofacial skeleton by controlling cell cycle, Runx2 expression, and the timing of key events during osteogenesis. PMID:24262986

  14. Proposing interactions between maternal phospholipids and the one carbon cycle: A novel mechanism influencing the risk for cardiovascular diseases in the offspring in later life.

    PubMed

    Khot, Vinita; Chavan-Gautam, Preeti; Joshi, Sadhana

    2015-05-15

    Studies have adequately demonstrated the importance of maternal nutrition, particularly, micronutrients (folic acid, vitamin B12) and long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFAs) in determining pregnancy outcome. Reports indicate that children born preterm or to mothers with preeclampsia are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in later life although mechanisms are unclear. Our earlier studies have established that micronutrients (folic acid, vitamin B12) and LCPUFAs are interlinked in the one carbon cycle and influence methylation reactions. Here, we propose a novel hypothesis that altered phospholipid metabolism and dysregulation in the one carbon cycle will result in altered epigenetic programming of placental genes leading to an adverse pregnancy outcome with increased risk of adult diseases in the offspring. Folic acid and vitamin B12 are involved in S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) synthesis, the major methyl donor for most methyl acceptors. Inadequacy of LCPUFA containing phospholipids, one of the major methyl group acceptors in the one carbon metabolic pathway, may cause diversion of methyl groups toward deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) eventually resulting in aberrant DNA methylation patterns. These modified DNA methylation patterns lead to alterations in the expression of vital genes e.g. angiogenic factor genes thereby contributing to the dysregulation of angiogenesis/vasculogenesis further affecting placental development. This consequently would adversely "program" the fetus for increased risk of CVD in later life. PMID:25283080

  15. Effects of cryogenic thermal cycle and immersion on the mechanical characteristics of phenol-resin bonded plywood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Hyeon; Park, Doo-Hwan; Lee, Chi-Seung; Park, Kwang-Jun; Lee, Jae-Myung

    2015-12-01

    The main objective of the present study is to investigate the performance degradation of the plywood used in a liquefied natural gas (LNG) cargo containment system (CCS). A plywood sheet features an odd number of thinly layered wooden plies bonded perpendicularly to the previous layer to give it a very strong and durable structure. Owing to this strong point, plywood is applied to a variety of interior and exterior applications. Above all, it is widely adopted as insulation panels in an LNG CCS owing to a high stiffness with low density and its superior mechanical capabilities. As an insulation material of an LNG CCS, plywood is constantly exposed to repeated wave-induced thermal variations caused by the loading (-163 °C) and unloading (20 °C) of LNG during general operating periods of 25 years on average. Therefore, the effects of cryogenic-level thermal loads on the material characteristics of plywood must be analyzed with respect to the design and safety aspects of LNG CCSs. In the present study, the influences of the estimated thermal load, testing temperature, and grain orientation on plywood adopted in an LNG CCS are investigated. In terms of safety and design, the repeated thermal loads in a LNG CCS must be considered because the modulus of elasticity (MOE), tensile strength (TS), and modulus of rupture (MOR) are degraded by thermal treatments, such as cyclic thermal-shock and cryogenic immersion.

  16. Application of fracture mechanics and half-cycle method to the prediction of fatigue life of B-52 aircraft pylon components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, W. L.; Carter, A. L.; Totton, W. W.; Ficke, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Stress intensity levels at various parts of the NASA B-52 carrier aircraft pylon were examined for the case when the pylon store was the space shuttle solid rocket booster drop test vehicle. Eight critical stress points were selected for the pylon fatigue analysis. Using fracture mechanics and the half-cycle theory (directly or indirectly) for the calculations of fatigue-crack growth ,the remaining fatigue life (number of flights left) was estimated for each critical part. It was found that the two rear hooks had relatively short fatigue life and that the front hook had the shortest fatigue life of all the parts analyzed. The rest of the pylon parts were found to be noncritical because of their extremely long fatigue life associated with the low operational stress levels.

  17. GNAS mutation as an alternative mechanism of activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in gastric adenocarcinoma of the fundic gland type.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Ryosuke; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Mitomi, Hiroyuki; Hidaka, Yasuhiro; Lee, Se-yong; Watanabe, Sumio; Yao, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma of the fundic gland type (GAFG) is a rare variant of gastric tumor. We have recently reported the frequent accumulation of β-catenin in GAFGs and showed that approximately half of the cases studied harbored at least 1 mutation in CTNNB1/AXINs/APC, leading to the constitutive activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. However, the mechanisms of Wnt signaling activation in the remaining cases are unknown. Accumulating evidence showed that the activating mutation in GNAS promotes tumorigenesis via the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway or the ERK1/2 MAPK pathway. Therefore, we analyzed the mutations in GNAS (exons 8 and 9) and in KRAS (exon 2) in 26 GAFGs. Immunohistochemistry revealed nuclear β-catenin expression in 22 of 26 GAFGs, and 10 (38.5%) of 26 cases harbored at least 1 mutation in CTNNB1/AXINs/APC. Activating mutations in GNAS were found in 5 (19.2%) of 26 GAFGs, all of which harbored R201C mutations. Activating mutations in KRAS were found in 2 (7.7%) of 26 GAFGs, and both of these also contained GNAS activating mutations. Four of 5 cases with GNAS mutation showed nuclear β-catenin expression, and presence of GNAS mutation was associated with β-catenin nuclear expression (P = .01). Furthermore, 3 of these 4 cases did not harbor mutations in CTNNB1, APC, or AXINs, suggesting that mutations in the Wnt component genes and those in GNAS occur almost exclusively. These results suggest that GNAS mutation might occur in a small subset of GAFG as an alternative mechanism of activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:25288233

  18. Alternative current conduction mechanisms of organic-inorganic compound [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}ZnCl{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Bechir, M. Karoui, K.; Guidara, K.; Ben Rhaiem, A.; Tabellout, M.

    2014-04-21

    [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}ZnCl{sub 4} has been studied by X-ray powder diffraction patterns, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and impedance spectroscopy. The [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}ZnCl{sub 4} hybrid compound is crystallized at room temperature (T ≈ 300 K) in the orthorhombic system with Pnma space group. Five phase transitions (T{sub 1} = 255 K, T{sub 2} = 282 K, T{sub 3} = 302 K, T{sub 4} = 320 K, and T{sub 5} = 346 K) have been proved by DSC measurements. The electrical technique was measured in the 10{sup −1}-10{sup 7} Hz frequency range and 233–363 K temperature interval. The frequency dependence of alternative current (AC) conductivity is interpreted in terms of Jonscher's law. The AC electrical conduction in [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}ZnCl{sub 4} is analyzed by different processes, which can be attributed to several models: the correlated barrier hopping model in phase I, the overlapping large polaron tunneling model in phase II, the quantum mechanical tunneling model in phase IV, and the non-overlapping small polaron tunneling model in phases III, V, and VI. The conduction mechanism is studied with the help of Elliot's theory, and the Elliot's parameters are determined.

  19. Surface topography, nano-mechanics and secondary structure of wheat gluten pretreated by alternate dual-frequency ultrasound and the correlation to enzymolysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanyan; Wang, Bei; Zhou, Cunshan; Atungulu, Griffiths G; Xu, Kangkang; Ma, Haile; Ye, Xiaofei; Abdualrahman, Mohammed A Y

    2016-07-01

    The effects of alternate dual-frequency ultrasound (ADFU) pretreatment on the degree of hydrolysis (DH) of wheat gluten (WG) and angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity were investigated in this research. The surface topography, nano-mechanics and secondary structure of WG were also determined using atomic force microscope (AFM) and circular dichroism (CD). The correlations of ACE inhibitory activity and DH with surface topography, nano-mechanics and secondary structure of WG were determined using Pearson's correlation analysis. The results showed that with an increase in either pretreatment duration or power, the ACE inhibitory activity of the hydrolysate also increases, reaching maximum at 10 min and 150 W/L, respectively, and then decreases thereafter. Similarly, AFM analysis showed that as the pretreatment duration or power increases, the surface roughness also increase and again a decrease occurs thereafter. As the pretreatment duration or power increased, the Young's modulus and adhesion of WG also increased and then declined. Young's modulus and adhesions average values were compared with ACE inhibitory activity reversely. The result of the CD spectra analysis exhibited losses in the relative percentage of α-helix of WG. Pearson's correlation analysis showed that the average values of Young's modulus and the relative percentage of α-helix correlated with ACE inhibitory activity of the hydrolysates linearly and significantly (P<0.05); the relative percentage of β-sheet correlated linearly with DH of WG significantly (P<0.05). In conclusion, ADFU pretreatment is an efficient method in proteolysis due to its physical and chemical effect on the Young's modulus, α-helix and β-sheet of WG. PMID:26964949

  20. Small Scale Earthquake Mechanisms Induced by Fluid Injection at the Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoir Soultz (Alsace) in 2003 using Alternative Source Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šílený, Jan; Jechumtálová, Zuzana; Dorbath, Catherine

    2014-10-01

    The geothermal reservoir at Soultz-sous-Forêts is a valuable natural laboratory for understanding the mechanisms of microearthquakes generated during stimulations and circulation tests. An ongoing effort currently exists regarding the retrieval of mechanisms aimed to indicate the type of fracturing of the rock massif. As a default, a moment tensor description has been applied. Nevertheless, the retrieval of the mode of fracturing still remains ambiguous. Recent studies indicate a prevailing shear slip but, rarely, a non-shear pattern has also been observed. The moment tensor, used today as a universal tool for descriptions of the mechanism, captures general balanced dipole sources. However, in the case of small-scale earthquakes, the moment tensor need not always be reliably determined. In an effort to fit the data, there may be notable non-shear components caused by the low quality of input data. Constraining the source model to directly determine a simpler one is convenient for describing the physical phenomena expected for a particular focus. An opening of new fractures can be described, to a first approximation, by a tensile crack, optionally combined with a shear slip. Such an alternative model is called a shear-tensile crack (STC) source model. The combination is practical, and can be used to both identify events that reflect purely mode-I (tensile) failure and to determine the dilation angle of the fracture undergoing shear. The latter is particularly important in enhanced geothermal system reservoirs such as Soultz, where shear-related dilation is believed to be the primary mechanism underpinning permeability creation during stimulation injections. We performed a synthetic case study by simulating seismic data as recorded by the actual seismic array installed at Soultz-sous-Forêts. Synthetic P and S amplitudes for several shear-tensile source models were inverted for several types of station coverage. The analysis explored how results were influenced by

  1. A Mechanism Regulating G Protein-coupled Receptor Signaling That Requires Cycles of Protein Palmitoylation and Depalmitoylation* ♦

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Lixia; Chisari, Mariangela; Maktabi, Mohammad H.; Sobieski, Courtney; Zhou, Hao; Konopko, Aaron M.; Martin, Brent R.; Mennerick, Steven J.; Blumer, Kendall J.

    2014-01-01

    Reversible attachment and removal of palmitate or other long-chain fatty acids on proteins has been hypothesized, like phosphorylation, to control diverse biological processes. Indeed, palmitate turnover regulates Ras trafficking and signaling. Beyond this example, however, the functions of palmitate turnover on specific proteins remain poorly understood. Here, we show that a mechanism regulating G protein-coupled receptor signaling in neuronal cells requires palmitate turnover. We used hexadecyl fluorophosphonate or palmostatin B to inhibit enzymes in the serine hydrolase family that depalmitoylate proteins, and we studied R7 regulator of G protein signaling (RGS)-binding protein (R7BP), a palmitoylated allosteric modulator of R7 RGS proteins that accelerate deactivation of Gi/o class G proteins. Depalmitoylation inhibition caused R7BP to redistribute from the plasma membrane to endomembrane compartments, dissociated R7BP-bound R7 RGS complexes from Gi/o-gated G protein-regulated inwardly rectifying K+ (GIRK) channels and delayed GIRK channel closure. In contrast, targeting R7BP to the plasma membrane with a polybasic domain and an irreversibly attached lipid instead of palmitate rendered GIRK channel closure insensitive to depalmitoylation inhibitors. Palmitate turnover therefore is required for localizing R7BP to the plasma membrane and facilitating Gi/o deactivation by R7 RGS proteins on GIRK channels. Our findings broaden the scope of biological processes regulated by palmitate turnover on specific target proteins. Inhibiting R7BP depalmitoylation may provide a means of enhancing GIRK activity in neurological disorders. PMID:24385443

  2. Alternative backing up pump for turbomolecular pumps

    DOEpatents

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    2003-04-22

    As an alternative to the use of a mechanical backing pump in the application of wide range turbomolecular pumps in ultra-high and extra high vacuum applications, palladium oxide is used to convert hydrogen present in the evacuation stream and related volumes to water with the water then being cryo-pumped to a low pressure of below about 1.e.sup.-3 Torr at 150.degree. K. Cryo-pumping is achieved using a low cost Kleemenco cycle cryocooler, a somewhat more expensive thermoelectric cooler, a Venturi cooler or a similar device to achieve the required minimization of hydrogen partial pressure.

  3. Consequences of the ban of by-products from terrestrial animals in livestock feeding in Germany and the European Union: alternatives, nutrient and energy cycles, plant production, and economic aspects.

    PubMed

    Rodehutscord, M; Abel, H J; Friedt, W; Wenk, C; Flachowsky, G; Ahlgrimm, H J; Johnke, B; Kühl, R; Breves, G

    2002-04-01

    Consequences of the ban of meat and bone meal (MBM) and animal fat with regard to livestock feeding, cropping, ecology and economy where investigated with an inter-disciplinary approach for Germany and the European Union. Calculations were made for different production systems with pigs and poultry on the basis of statistical data for the production and for the feed markets as well as from requirement data for the respective species and production system. (1.) The ban of MBM from feeding caused a need for alternative protein sources. If all the amount of protein from MBM is to be replaced by soybean meal, in Germany and the EU about 0.30 and 2.30 x 10(6) t would be needed each year (supplementary amino acids not considered). Alternatively, doubling the grain legume acreage in Germany to about 420,000 ha would supply a similar amount of protein. A wider application of phase feeding with adjusted dietary amino acid concentrations, however, would allow for saving protein to an extent which is similar to the amount of protein that was contributed by MBM in recent years. Thus, the ban is a minor problem in terms of ensuring amino acid supply. (2.) However, alternative plant ingredients cannot compensate for the gap in P supply that is caused by the ban. An additional demand for inorganic feed phosphates of about 14,000 and 110,000 t per year is given in Germany and the EU, respectively. So far, this gap is filled almost completely by increased mining of rock phosphates. Alternatively, a general application of microbial phytase to all diets would largely fill this gap. Until the ban, MBM contributed to 57% of the supplementation of P that was needed for pigs and poultry. The ban of MBM makes large amounts of P irreversibly disappearing from the food chain. (3.) Energy from slaughter offal and cadavers can be utilized in different technologies, in the course of which the efficiency of energy utilisation depends on the technology applied. It is efficient in the cement work

  4. The capacity fading mechanism and improvement of cycling stability in MoS2-based anode materials for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Haibo; Li, Feng; Hu, Chenli; Liang, Pei; Cao, Dan; Chen, Xiaoshuang

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered MoS2 nanosheets possess great potential as anode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs), but they still suffer from poor cycling performance. Improving the cycling stability of electrode materials depends on a deep understanding of their dynamic structural evolution and reaction kinetics in the lithiation process. Herein, thermodynamic phase diagrams and the lithiation dynamics of MoS2-based nanostructures with the intercalation of lithium ions are studied by using first-principles calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Our results demonstrate that the continuous intercalation of Li ions induces structural destruction of 2H phase MoS2 nanosheets in the discharge process that follows a layer-by-layer dissociation mechanism. Meanwhile, the intercalation of Li ions leads to a structural transition of MoS2 nanosheets from the 2H to the 1T phase due to the ultralow transition barriers (~0.1 eV). We find that the phase transition can slow down the dissociation of MoS2 nanosheets during lithiation. The result can be applied to explain extensive experimental observation of the fast capacity fading of MoS2-based anode materials between the first and the subsequent discharges. To suppress the dissociation of MoS2 nanosheets in the lithiation process, we propose a strategy by constructing a sandwich-like graphene/MoS2/graphene structure that indicates high chemical stability, superior conductivity, and high Li-ion mobility in the charge/discharge process, implying the possibility to induce an improvement in the anode cycling performance. This work opens a new route to rational design layered transition-metal disulfide (TMD) anode materials for LIBs with superior cycling stability and electrochemical performance.Two-dimensional (2D) layered MoS2 nanosheets possess great potential as anode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs), but they still suffer from poor cycling performance. Improving the cycling stability of

  5. Mechanics on Myocardium Deficient in the N2B Region of Titin: The Cardiac-Unique Spring Element Improves Efficiency of the Cardiac Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Nedrud, Joshua; Labeit, Siegfried; Gotthardt, Michael; Granzier, Henk

    2011-01-01

    Titin (also known as connectin) is an intrasarcomeric muscle protein that functions as a molecular spring and generates passive tension upon muscle stretch. The N2B element is a cardiac-specific spring element within titin's extensible region. Our goal was to study the contribution of the N2B element to the mechanical properties of titin, particularly its hypothesized role in limiting energy loss during repeated stretch (diastole)-shortening (systole) cycles of the heart. We studied energy loss by measuring hysteresis from the area between the stretch and release passive force-sarcomere length curves and used both wild-type (WT) mice and N2B knockout (KO) mice in which the N2B element has been deleted. A range of protocols was used, including those that mimic physiological loading conditions. KO mice showed significant increases in hysteresis. Most prominently, in tissue that had been preconditioned with a physiological stretch-release protocol, hysteresis increased significantly from 320 ± 46 pJ/mm2/sarcomere in WT to 650 ± 94 pJ/mm2/sarcomere in N2B KO myocardium. These results are supported by experiments in which oxidative stress was used to mechanically inactivate portions of the N2B-Us of WT titin through cysteine cross-linking. Studies on muscle from which the thin filaments had been extracted (using the actin severing protein gelsolin) showed that the difference in hysteresis between WT and KO tissue cannot be explained by filament sliding-based viscosity. Instead the results suggest that hysteresis arises from within titin and most likely involves unfolding of immunoglobulin-like domains. These studies support that the mechanical function of the N2B element of titin includes reducing hysteresis and increasing the efficiency of the heart. PMID:21943419

  6. Measuring Cycling Effort.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jahnke, Thomas; Hamson, Mike

    1999-01-01

    Investigates the basic mechanics of cycling with a simple reckoning of how much effort is needed from the cyclist. The work done by the cyclist is quantified when the ride is on the flat and also when pedaling uphill. Proves that by making use of the available gears on a mountain bike, cycling uphill can be accomplished without pain. (Author/ASK)

  7. Scaled Quantum Mechanical scale factors for vibrational calculations using alternate polarized and augmented basis sets with the B3LYP density functional calculation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legler, C. R.; Brown, N. R.; Dunbar, R. A.; Harness, M. D.; Nguyen, K.; Oyewole, O.; Collier, W. B.

    2015-06-01

    The Scaled Quantum Mechanical (SQM) method of scaling calculated force constants to predict theoretically calculated vibrational frequencies is expanded to include a broad array of polarized and augmented basis sets based on the split valence 6-31G and 6-311G basis sets with the B3LYP density functional. Pulay's original choice of a single polarized 6-31G(d) basis coupled with a B3LYP functional remains the most computationally economical choice for scaled frequency calculations. But it can be improved upon with additional polarization functions and added diffuse functions for complex molecular systems. The new scale factors for the B3LYP density functional and the 6-31G, 6-31G(d), 6-31G(d,p), 6-31G+(d,p), 6-31G++(d,p), 6-311G, 6-311G(d), 6-311G(d,p), 6-311G+(d,p), 6-311G++(d,p), 6-311G(2d,p), 6-311G++(2d,p), 6-311G++(df,p) basis sets are shown. The double d polarized models did not perform as well and the source of the decreased accuracy was investigated. An alternate system of generating internal coordinates that uses the out-of plane wagging coordinate whenever it is possible; makes vibrational assignments via potential energy distributions more meaningful. Automated software to produce SQM scaled vibrational calculations from different molecular orbital packages is presented.

  8. Effects of a high mean stress on the high cycle fatigue life of PWA 1480 and correlation of data by linear elastic fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Majumdar, S.; Kwasny, R.

    1985-01-01

    High-cycle fatigue tests using 5-mm-diameter smooth specimens were performed on the single crystal alloy PWA 1480 (001 axis) at 70F (room temperature) in air and at 100F (538C) in vacuum (10 to the -6 power torr). Tests were conducted at zero mean stress as well as at high tensile mean stress. The results indicate that, although a tensile mean stress, in general, reduces life, the reduction in fatigue strength, for a given mean stress at a life of one million cycles, is much less than what is predicted by the usual linear Goodman plot. Further, the material appears to be significantly more resistant to mean stress effects at 1000F than at 70F. Metallographic examinations of failed specimens indicate that failures in all cases are initiated from micropores of sizes of the order of 30 to 40 microns. Since the macroscopic stress-strain response in all cases was observed to be linear elastic, linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) analyses were carried out to determine the crack growth curves of the material assuming that crack initiation from a micropore (a sub o = 40 microns) occurs very early in life. The results indicate that the calculated crack growth rates at an R (defined as the ratio between minimum stress to maximum stress) value of zero are approximately the same at 70F as at 1000F. However, the calculated crack growth rates at other R ratios, both positive and negative, tend to be higher at 70F than at 1000F. Calculated threshold effects at large R values tend to be independent of temperature in the temperature regime studied. They are relatively constant with increasing R ratio up to a value of about 0.6, beyond which the calculated threshold stress intensity factor range decreases rapidly with increasing R ratios.

  9. The Study of Carbamoyl Phosphate Synthetase 1 Deficiency Sheds Light on the Mechanism for Switching On/Off the Urea Cycle.

    PubMed

    Díez-Fernández, Carmen; Gallego, José; Häberle, Johannes; Cervera, Javier; Rubio, Vicente

    2015-05-20

    Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase 1 (CPS1) deficiency (CPS1D) is an inborn error of the urea cycle having autosomal (2q34) recessive inheritance that can cause hyperammonemia and neonatal death or mental retardation. We analyzed the effects on CPS1 activity, kinetic parameters and enzyme stability of missense mutations reported in patients with CPS1 deficiency that map in the 20-kDa C-terminal domain of the enzyme. This domain turns on or off the enzyme depending on whether the essential allosteric activator of CPS1, N-acetyl-L-glutamate (NAG), is bound or is not bound to it. To carry out the present studies, we exploited a novel system that allows the expression in vitro and the purification of human CPS1, thus permitting site-directed mutagenesis. These studies have clarified disease causation by individual mutations, identifying functionally important residues, and revealing that a number of mutations decrease the affinity of the enzyme for NAG. Patients with NAG affinity-decreasing mutations might benefit from NAG site saturation therapy with N-carbamyl-L-glutamate (a registered drug, the analog of NAG). Our results, together with additional present and prior site-directed mutagenesis data for other residues mapping in this domain, suggest an NAG-triggered conformational change in the β4-α4 loop of the C-terminal domain of this enzyme. This change might be an early event in the NAG activation process. Molecular dynamics simulations that were restrained according to the observed effects of the mutations are consistent with this hypothesis, providing further backing for this structurally plausible signaling mechanism by which NAG could trigger urea cycle activation via CPS1. PMID:26059772

  10. A combined experimental and DFT study of active structures and self-cycle mechanisms of mononuclear tungsten peroxo complexes in oxidation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Peng; Wei, Donghui; Wen, Yiqiang; Luo, Mengfei; Wang, Xiangyu; Tang, Mingsheng

    2011-04-01

    Tungsten peroxo complexes have been widely used in olefin epoxidation, alcohol oxidation, Baeyer-Villiger oxidation and other oxidation reactions, however, there is still not a unanimous viewpoint for the active structure of mononuclear tungsten peroxo complex by now. In this paper, the catalysis of mononuclear tungsten peroxo complexes 0- 5 with or without acidic ligands for the green oxidation of cyclohexene to adipic acid in the absence of organic solvent and phase-transfer catalyst has been researched in experiment. Then we have suggested two possible kinds of active structures of mononuclear tungsten peroxo complexes including peroxo ring ( nA, n = 0-1) and hydroperoxo ( nB, n = 0-1) structures, which have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). Moreover, the calculations on self-cycle mechanisms involving the two types of active structures of tungsten peroxo complexes with and without oxalic acid ligand have also been carried out at the B3LYP/[LANL2DZ/6-31G(d, p)] level. The highest energy barrier are 26.17 kcal/mol ( 0A, peroxo ring structure without oxalic acid ligand), 23.91 kcal/mol ( 1A, peroxo ring structure with oxalic acid ligand), 18.19 kcal/mol ( 0B, hydroperoxo structure without oxalic acid ligand) and 13.10 kcal/mol ( 1B, hydroperoxo structure with oxalic acid ligand) in the four potential energy profiles, respectively. The results indicate that both the energy barriers of active structure self-cycle processes with oxalic acid ligands are lower than those without oxalic acid ligands, so the active structures with oxalic acid ligands should be easier to recycle, which is in good agreement with our experimental results. However, due to the higher energy of product than that of the reactant, the energy profile of the self-cycle process of 1B shows that the recycle of 1B could not occur at all in theory. Moreover, the crystal data of peroxo ring structure with oxalic acid ligand could be found in some experimental references. Thus

  11. The Q-cycle reviewed: how well does a monomeric mechanism of the bc1 complex account for the function of a dimeric complex?

    PubMed Central

    Crofts, Antony R.; Holland, J. Todd; Victoria, Doreen; Kolling, Derrick R.J.; Dikanov, Sergei A.; Gilbreth, Ryan; Lhee, Sangmoon; Kuras, Richard; Kuras, Mariana Guergova

    2008-01-01

    Recent progress in understanding the Q-cycle mechanism of the bc1 complex is reviewed. The data strongly support a mechanism in which the Qo-site operates through a reaction in which the first electron transfer from ubiquinol to the oxidized iron-sulfur protein is the rate determining step for the overall process. The reaction involves a proton-coupled electron transfer down a hydrogen bond between the ubiquinol and a histidine ligand of the [2Fe-2S] cluster, in which the unfavorable protonic configuration contributes a substantial part of the activation barrier. The reaction is endergonic, and the products are an unstable ubisemiquinone at the Qo-site, and the reduced iron-sulfur protein, the extrinsic mobile domain of which is now free to dissociate and move away from the site to deliver an electron to cyt c1 and liberate the H+. When oxidation of the semiquinone is prevented, it participates in bypass reactions, including superoxide generation if O2 is available. When the b-heme chain is available as acceptor, the semiquinone is oxidized in a process in which the proton is passed to the glutamate of the conserved –PEWY- sequence, and the semiquinone anion passes its electron to heme bL to form the product ubiquinone. The rate is rapid compared to the limiting reaction, and would require movement of the semiquinone closer to heme bL to enhance the rate constant. The acceptor reactions at the Qi-site are still controversial, but likely involve a “two-electron gate” in which a stable semiquinone stores an electron. Possible mechanisms to explain the cytb150 phenomenon are discussed, and the information from pulsed EPR studies about the structure of the intermediate state is reviewed. The mechanism discussed is applicable to a monomeric bc1 complex. We discuss evidence in the literature that has been interpreted as shown that the dimeric structure participates in a more complicated mechanism involving electron transfer across the dimer interface. We show from

  12. Erythroleukemia cells acquire an alternative mitophagy capability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian; Fang, Yixuan; Yan, Lili; Yuan, Na; Zhang, Suping; Xu, Li; Nie, Meilan; Zhang, Xiaoying; Wang, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia cells are superior to hematopoietic cells with a normal differentiation potential in buffering cellular stresses, but the underlying mechanisms for this leukemic advantage are not fully understood. Using CRISPR/Cas9 deletion of the canonical autophagy-essential gene Atg7, we found that erythroleukemia K562 cells are armed with two sets of autophagic machinery. Alternative mitophagy is functional regardless of whether the canonical autophagic mechanism is intact or disrupted. Although canonical autophagy defects attenuated cell cycling, proliferation and differentiation potential, the leukemia cells retained their abilities for mitochondrial clearance and for maintaining low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis. Treatment with a specific inducer of mitophagy revealed that the canonical autophagy-defective erythroleukemia cells preserved a mitophagic response. Selective induction of mitophagy was associated with the upregulation and localization of RAB9A on the mitochondrial membrane in both wild-type and Atg7−/− leukemia cells. When the leukemia cells were treated with the alternative autophagy inhibitor brefeldin A or when the RAB9A was knocked down, this mitophagy was prohibited. This was accompanied by elevated ROS levels and apoptosis as well as reduced DNA damage repair. Therefore, the results suggest that erythroleukemia K562 cells possess an ATG7-independent alternative mitophagic mechanism that functions even when the canonical autophagic process is impaired, thereby maintaining the ability to respond to stresses such as excessive ROS and DNA damage. PMID:27091640

  13. Fragile cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonatti, Ch.; Díaz, L. J.

    We study diffeomorphisms f with heterodimensional cycles, that is, heteroclinic cycles associated to saddles p and q with different indices. Such a cycle is called fragile if there is no diffeomorphism close to f with a robust cycle associated to hyperbolic sets containing the continuations of p and q. We construct a codimension one submanifold of Diff(S×S) that consists of diffeomorphisms with fragile heterodimensional cycles. Our construction holds for any manifold of dimension ⩾4.

  14. The mitochondrial calcium uniporter is involved in mitochondrial calcium cycle dysfunction: Underlying mechanism of hypertension associated with mitochondrial tRNA(Ile) A4263G mutation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Zhang, Yu; Xu, Bin; Cai, Zhongqi; Wang, Lin; Tian, Jinwen; Liu, Yuqi; Li, Yang

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies have shown that the mitochondrial DNA mutations are involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Our previous study identified mitochondrial tRNA(Ile) A4263G mutation in a large Chinese Han family with maternally-inherited hypertension. This mutation may contribute to mitochondrial Ca(2+) cycling dysfuntion, but the mechanism is unclear. Lymphoblastoid cell lines were derived from hypertensive and normotensive individuals, either with or without tRNA(Ile) A4263G mutation. The mitochondrial calcium ([Ca(2+)]m) in cells from hypertensive subjects with the tRNA(Ile) A4263G mutation, was lower than in cells from normotension or hypertension without mutation, or normotension with mutation (P<0.05). Meanwhile, cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)]c) in hypertensive with mutation cells was higher than another three groups. After exposure to caffeine, which could increase the [Ca(2+)]c by activating ryanodine receptor on endoplasmic reticulum, [Ca(2+)]c/[Ca(2+)]m increased higher than in hypertensive with mutation cells from another three groups. Moreover, MCU expression was decreased in hypertensive with mutation cells compared with in another three groups (P<0.05). [Ca(2+)]c increased and [Ca(2+)]m decreased after treatment with Ru360 (an inhibitor of MCU) or an siRNA against MCU. In this study we found decreased MCU expression in hypertensive with mutation cells contributed to dysregulated Ca(2+) uptake into the mitochondria, and cytoplasmic Ca(2+) overload. This abnormality might be involved in the underlying mechanisms of maternally inherited hypertension in subjects carrying the mitochondrial tRNA(Ile) A4263G mutation. PMID:27471128

  15. Experimental and life cycle assessment analysis of gas emission from mechanically-biologically pretreated waste in a landfill with energy recovery.

    PubMed

    Di Maria, Francesco; Sordi, Alessio; Micale, Caterina

    2013-11-01

    The global gaseous emissions produced by landfilling the Mechanically Sorted Organic Fraction (MSOF) with different weeks of Mechanical Biological Treatment (MBT) was evaluated for an existing waste management system. One MBT facility and a landfill with internal combustion engines fuelled by the landfill gas for electrical energy production operate in the waste management system considered. An experimental apparatus was used to simulate 0, 4, 8 and 16weeks of aerobic stabilization and the consequent biogas potential (Nl/kg) of a large sample of MSOF withdrawn from the full-scale MBT. Stabilization achieved by the waste was evaluated by dynamic oxygen uptake and fermentation tests. Good correlation coefficients (R(2)), ranging from 0.7668 to 0.9772, were found between oxygen uptake, fermentation and anaerobic test values. On the basis of the results of several anaerobic tests, the methane production rate k (year(-1)) was evaluated. k ranged from 0.436 to 0.308year(-1) and the bio-methane potential from 37 to 12Nm(3)/tonne, respectively, for the MSOF with 0 and 16weeks of treatment. Energy recovery from landfill gas ranged from about 11 to 90kWh per tonne of disposed MSOF depending on the different scenario investigated. Life cycle analysis showed that the scenario with 0weeks of pre-treatment has the highest weighted global impact even if opposite results were obtained with respect to the single impact criteria. MSOF pre-treatment periods longer than 4weeks showed rather negligible variation in the global impact of system emissions. PMID:23910244

  16. Alternative Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchett, Stanley; Kimsey, Steve

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design of the DeKalb Alternative School in Atlanta, Georgia, located in a renovated shopping center. Purchasing commercial land and renovating the existing building saved the school system time and money. (EV)