Sample records for cycle climate change

  1. GLOBAL CARBON CYCLE AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The production of greenhouse gases due to anthropogenic activities may have begun to change the global climate. he global carbon cycle plays a significant role in projected climate change. owever, considerable uncertainty exists regarding pools and flux in the global cycle. iven ...

  2. Modelling the hydrological cycle in assessments of climate change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, D.; Rosenzweig, C.; Goldberg, R.

    1992-01-01

    The predictions of climate change studies depend crucially on the hydrological cycles embedded in the different models used. It is shown here that uncertainties in hydrological processes and inconsistencies in both climate and impact models limit confidence in current assessments of climate change. A future course of action to remedy this problem is suggested.

  3. Evolution of hydrological and carbon cycles under a changing climate

    E-print Network

    Montana, University of

    Evolution of hydrological and carbon cycles under a changing climate Qiaozhen Mu,* Maosheng Zhao, University of Montana, 32 Campus Drive, Missoula, MT, 59812, USA Abstract: Hydrological and carbon cycles cycling). In this article, we first reviewed the concepts of hydrological and carbon cycles

  4. Positive feedback between future climate change and the carbon cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pierre Friedlingstein; Laurent Bopp; Philippe Ciais; Jean-Louis Dufresne; Laurent Fairhead; Hervé LeTreut; Patrick Monfray; James Orr

    2001-01-01

    Future climate change due to increased atmospheric CO2 may affect land and ocean efficiency to absorb atmospheric CO2. Here, using climate and carbon three-dimensional models forced by a 1% per year increase in atmospheric CO2, we show that there is a positive feedback between the climate system and the carbon cycle. Climate change reduces land and ocean uptake of CO2,

  5. Microbial contributions to climate change through carbon cycle feedbacks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard D Bardgett; Chris Freeman; Nicholas J Ostle

    2008-01-01

    There is considerable interest in understanding the biological mechanisms that regulate carbon exchanges between the land and atmosphere, and how these exchanges respond to climate change. An understanding of soil microbial ecology is central to our ability to assess terrestrial carbon cycle–climate feedbacks, but the complexity of the soil microbial community and the many ways that it can be affected

  6. Climate change and the water cycle in newly irrigated areas.

    PubMed

    Abrahão, Raphael; García-Garizábal, Iker; Merchán, Daniel; Causapé, Jesús

    2015-02-01

    Climate change is affecting agriculture doubly: evapotranspiration is increasing due to increments in temperature while the availability of water resources is decreasing. Furthermore, irrigated areas are expanding worldwide. In this study, the dynamics of climate change impacts on the water cycle of a newly irrigated watershed are studied through the calculation of soil water balances. The study area was a 752-ha watershed located on the left side of the Ebro river valley, in Northeast Spain. The soil water balance procedures were carried out throughout 1827 consecutive days (5 years) of hydrological and agronomical monitoring in the study area. Daily data from two agroclimatic stations were used as well. Evaluation of the impact of climate change on the water cycle considered the creation of two future climate scenarios for comparison: 2070 decade with climate change and 2070 decade without climate change. The main indicators studied were precipitation, irrigation, reference evapotranspiration, actual evapotranspiration, drainage from the watershed, and irrigation losses. The aridity index was also applied. The results represent a baseline scenario in which adaptation measures may be included and tested to reduce the impacts of climate change in the studied area and other similar areas. PMID:25626569

  7. Complex response of the forest nitrogen cycle to climate change.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Susana; Hedin, Lars O; Likens, Gene E; Gerber, Stefan; Buso, Don C

    2012-02-28

    Climate exerts a powerful influence on biological processes, but the effects of climate change on ecosystem nutrient flux and cycling are poorly resolved. Although rare, long-term records offer a unique opportunity to disentangle effects of climate from other anthropogenic influences. Here, we examine the longest and most complete record of watershed nutrient and climate dynamics available worldwide, which was collected at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in the northeastern United States. We used empirical analyses and model calculations to distinguish between effects of climate change and past perturbations on the forest nitrogen (N) cycle. We find that climate alone cannot explain the occurrence of a dramatic >90% drop in watershed nitrate export over the past 46 y, despite longer growing seasons and higher soil temperatures. The strongest climate influence was an increase in soil temperature accompanied by a shift in paths of soil water flow within the watershed, but this effect explained, at best, only ?40% of the nitrate decline. In contrast, at least 50-60% of the observed change in the N export could be explained by the long-lasting effect of forest cutting in the early 1900s on the N cycle of the soil and vegetation pools. Our analysis shows that historic events can obscure the influence of modern day stresses on the N cycle, even when analyses have the advantage of being informed by 0.5-century-long datasets. These findings raise fundamental questions about interpretations of long-term trends as a baseline for understanding how climate change influences complex ecosystems. PMID:22331889

  8. Terrestrial water cycle and the impact of climate change.

    PubMed

    Tao, Fulu; Yokozawa, Masayuki; Hayashi, Yousay; Lin, Erda

    2003-06-01

    The terrestrial water cycle and the impact of climate change are critical for agricultural and natural ecosystems. In this paper, we assess both by running a macro-scale water balance model under a baseline condition and 2 General Circulation Model (GCM)-based climate change scenarios. The results show that in 2021-2030, water demand will increase worldwide due to climate change. Water shortage is expected to worsen in western Asia, the Arabian Peninsula, northern and southern Africa, northeastern Australia, southwestern North America, and central South America. A significant increase in surface runoff is expected in southern Asia and a significant decrease is expected in northern South America. These changes will have implications for regional environment and socioeconomics. PMID:12956596

  9. Global response of the terrestrial biosphere to CO2 and climate change using a coupled climate-carbon cycle model

    E-print Network

    Dufresne, Jean-Louis

    feedback in the climate-carbon cycle system. INDEX TERMS: 0315 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Impact phenomena; KEYWORDS: climate change impact, terrestrial carbon cycle Citation: Berthelot, M., P of the terrestrial biosphere to CO2 and climate change using a coupled climate-carbon cycle model, Global Biogeochem

  10. Climate change impact on the carbon cycle in Russian peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavalishin, N. N.

    2009-04-01

    Dynamic compartment model with annual time resolution of carbon cycle functioning with elements of nitrogen and water cycles for three basic types of peatlands (oligotrophic, mesotrophic, eutrophic) is designed and verified based on data for several peatland ecosystems from Russian European part and Western Siberia as well as on estimates of relative areas occupied by these types in each of wetland provinces marked by Kats (1970). Flows between three main reservoirs and input-output fluxes can have donor-, recipient-, Volterra-controlled forms or be saturation functions of storages in participating reservoirs. Possible steady states of combined cycles allow to distinguish forest, forest-swamp and swamp for each of three types of peatland ecosystems as stable equilibria. Stability and bifurcation analysis of the dynamic model, as well as numerical modeling of transient non-equilibrium dynamic regimes, is carried out in the space of three parameters corresponding to intensities of atmospheric carbon assimilation by vegetation, output runoff from soils and litter, decay of dead organic matter by animals and microorganisms. These parameters depend on climatic magnitudes - annual temperature and total precipitation, soil moisture, availability of nitrogen in the litterfall. Atmospheric CO2 concentration increase can lead to appearance of oscillations in system compartments or to transition into other steady states depending on two other parameter values. Numerical simulations and analytical findings allow establish stability boundaries of each peatland type as an equilibrium of the model, and to calculate critical values of external parameters for which stable functioning of matter cycles is provided. Change in climatic or human perturbation parameters initiates a shift in the model parameter space corresponding to the temporal evolution of carbon cycle capable to change the ecosystem state significantly. Estimations of relative areas occupied by peatland types in some regions of European Russia and Western Siberia help to make predictions on the contribution of large peatland regions to the carbon cycle dynamics at regional and global scales and clarify future biotic contribution into carbon emissions from peatland ecosystems to the atmosphere under several CO2 doubling climate change scenarios taken as an output of different climate models. Changes in areas occupied by oligotrophic, mesotrophic and eutrophic peatlands in wetland provinces under these scenarios are also studied. This work is supported by the program of the Earth Sciences Department of the Russian Academy of Sciences "Physical and chemical processes in atmosphere and on Earth surface determining climate change", projects 09-01-226a and 09-05-00153a of the Russian Foundation for Basic Research.

  11. On the magnitude of positive feedback between future climate change and the carbon cycle

    E-print Network

    Dufresne, Jean-Louis

    On the magnitude of positive feedback between future climate change and the carbon cycle J CO 2 will be 18% higher due to the climate change impact on the carbon cycle. Such a positive. They found a very large negative im- pact of climate change on land carbon cycle with a de- cline of tropical

  12. Change in Water Cycle- Important Issue on Climate Earth System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Pratik

    Change in Water Cycle- Important Issue on Climate Earth System PRATIK KUMAR SINGH1 1BALDEVRAM MIRDHA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY,JAIPUR (RAJASTHAN) ,INDIA Water is everywhere on Earth and is the only known substance that can naturally exist as a gas, liquid, and solid within the relatively small range of air temperatures and pressures found at the Earth's surface.Changes in the hydrological cycle as a consequence of climate and land use drivers are expected to play a central role in governing a vast range of environmental impacts.Earth's climate will undergo changes in response to natural variability, including solar variability, and to increasing concentrations of green house gases and aerosols.Further more, agreement is widespread that these changes may profoundly affect atmospheric water vapor concentrations, clouds and precipitation patterns.As we know that ,a warmer climate, directly leading to increased evaporation, may well accelerate the hydrological cycle, resulting in an increase in the amount of moisture circulating through the atmosphere.The Changing Water Cycle programmer will develop an integrated, quantitative understanding of the changes taking place in the global water cycle, involving all components of the earth system, improving predictions for the next few decades of regional precipitation, evapotranspiration, soil moisture, hydrological storage and fluxes.The hydrological cycle involves evaporation, transpiration, condensation, precipitation, and runoff. NASA's Aqua satellite will monitor many aspects of the role of water in the Earth's systems, and will do so at spatial and temporal scales appropriate to foster a more detailed understanding of each of the processes that contribute to the hydrological cycle. These data and the analyses of them will nurture the development and refinement of hydrological process models and a corresponding improvement in regional and global climate models, with a direct anticipated benefit of more accurate weather and climate forecasts. Aqua is a major mission of the Earth Observing System (EOS), an international program centered in NASA's Earth Science Enterprise to study the Earth in detail from the unique vantage point of space. Focused on key measurements identified by a consensus of U.S. and international scientists, EOS is further enabling studies of the complex interactions amongst the Earth's land, ocean, air, ice and biological systems. Aqua's contributions to monitoring water in the Earth's environment will involve all six of Aqua's instruments: the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), the Humidity Sounder for Brazil (HSB), the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer- Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES). Frozen water in the oceans, in the form of sea ice, will be examined with both AMSR-E and MODIS data, the former allowing routine monitoring of sea ice at a coarse resolution and the latter providing greater spatial resolution but only under cloud-free conditions. Sea ice can insulate the underlying liquid water against heat loss to the often frigid overlying polar atmosphere and also reflects sunlight that would otherwise be available to warm the ocean. AMSR-E measurements will allow the routine derivation of sea ice concentrations in both polar regions, through taking advantage of the marked contrast in microwave emissions of sea ice and liquid water. This will continue, with improved resolution and accuracy, a 22-year satellite record of changes in the extent of polar ice. MODIS, with its finer resolution, will permit the identification of individual ice flows, when unobscured by clouds. AMSR-E and MODIS will also provide monitoring, the AIRS/AMSU/HSB combination will provide more-accurate space-based measurements of atmospheric temperature and water vapor than have ever been obtained before, with the highest vertical resolution to date as well. Since water vapor is the Earth's primary greenhouse gas and co

  13. Climate and carbon cycle changes under the overshoot scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusbaumer, Jesse; Matsumoto, Katsumi

    2008-05-01

    The "overshoot scenario" is an emissions scenario in which CO 2 concentration in the atmosphere temporarily exceeds some pre-defined, "dangerous" threshold (before being reduced to non-dangerous levels). Support for this idea comes from its potential to achieve a balance between the burdens of current and future generations in dealing with global warming. Before it can be considered a viable policy, the overshoot scenario needs to be examined in terms of its impacts on the global climate and the environment. In, particular, it must be determined if climate change cause by the overshoot scenario is reversible or not, since crossing that "dangerous" CO 2 threshold could result in climate change from which we might not be able to recover. In this study, we quantify the change in several climatic and environmental variables under the overshoot scenario using a global climate model of intermediate complexity. Compared to earlier studies on the overshoot scenario, we have an explicit carbon cycle model that allows us to represent carbon-climate feedbacks and force the climate model more realistically with CO 2 emissions rates rather than with prescribed atmospheric pCO 2. Our standard CO 2 emissions rate is calculated on the basis of historical atmospheric pCO 2 data and the WRE S650 non-overshoot stabilization profile. It starts from the preindustrial year 1760, peaks in the year 2056, and ends in the year 2300. A variety of overshoot scenarios were constructed by increasing the amplitude of the control emissions peak but decreasing the peak duration so that the cumulative emissions remain essentially constant. Sensitivity simulations of various overshoot scenarios in our model show that many aspects of the global climate are largely reversible by year 2300. The significance of the reversibility, which takes roughly 200 years in our experiments, depends on the time horizon with which it is viewed or the number of future generations for whom equity is sought. At times when the overshoot scenario has emissions rates higher then the control scenario, the transient changes in atmospheric and oceanic temperatures and surface ocean pH can be significant, even for moderate overshoot scenarios that remain within IPCC SRES emissions scenarios. The large transient changes and the centennial timescale of climate reversibility suggest that the overshoot might not be the best mitigation approach, even if it technically follows the optimal economic path.

  14. Long-term changes of the diurnal temperature cycle: implications about mechanisms of global climate change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Hansen; M. Sato; R. Ruedy

    1995-01-01

    We use a global climate model to investigate the impact of a wide range of radiative forcing and feedback mechanisms on the diurnal cycle of surface air temperature. This allows us not only to rule out many potential explanations for observed diurnal changes, but to infer fundamental information concerning the nature and location of the principal global climate forcings of

  15. CHANGING CLIMATE AND PHOTOBIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Global biogeochemistry plays a critical role in controlling life processes, climate and their interactions, including effects on atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Recent evidence indicates that the light-driven part of aquatic biogeochemical cycles is being altered by in...

  16. A new feedback on climate change from the hydrological cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul D. Williams; Eric Guilyardi; Rowan Sutton; Jonathan Gregory; Gurvan Madec

    2007-01-01

    An intensification of the hydrological cycle is a likely consequence of global warming. But changes in the hydrological cycle could affect sea-surface temperature by modifying diffusive ocean heat transports. We investigate this mechanism by studying a coupled general circulation model sensitivity experiment in which the hydrological cycle is artificially amplified. We find that the amplified hydrological cycle depresses sea-surface temperature

  17. Complex Life Cycles and the Responses of Insects to Climate Change

    E-print Network

    change. Introduction Climate change is not simply global warming. General circulation models (GCMsSYMPOSIUM Complex Life Cycles and the Responses of Insects to Climate Change Joel G. Kingsolver,1 to the Response of Organisms to Climate Change: The Role of Thermal Adaptation'' presented at the annual meeting

  18. Decision-making in Electricity Generation Based on Global Warming Potential and Life-cycle Assessment for Climate Change

    E-print Network

    Horvath, Arpad

    2005-01-01

    Global Warming Potential and Life-cycle Assessment for Climate Change"Global Warming Potential and Life-cycle Assessment for Climate Changeglobal warming potential (GWP) method. GWP is a method to compare the global climate change

  19. Future climate change, the agricultural water cycle, and agricultural production in China

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fulu Tao; Masayuki Yokozawa; Yousay Hayashi; Erda Lina

    2003-01-01

    Climate change would have a major impact on the hydrological cycle and consequently on available water resources, the potential for flood and drought, and agricultural productivity. In this study, the impacts of climate change on the agricultural water cycle and their implications for agricultural production in the 2020s were assessed by water-balance calculations for Chinese croplands. Temporal and spatial changes

  20. Contaminant Cycling Under Climate Change: Evidences and Scenarios

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carlos Vale; João Canário; Miguel Caetano; Laurier Poissant; Ana Maria Ferreira

    \\u000a Marine ecosystems are influenced by many factors related with human activity, such as eutrophication, chemical contamination,\\u000a selective ­overfishing, ­bottom trawling and blast fishing. However, various regions have shown at least some changes that\\u000a were likely to be attributable to recent climate change. Although various works have pointed to repercussions of climate change\\u000a on ocean processes at physical and biological levels,

  1. Climate Climate change change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jonathan Davies; Michele Nori

    2008-01-01

    Mobile pastoralists are amongst those most at risk to climate change, yet they are amongst those with the greatest potential to adapt to climate change, and they may also of- fer one of the greatest hopes for mitigating climate change. The vulnerability that is associated with climate change in some pastoral environments has its roots in the restriction of tried

  2. Modeling changes in the global carbon cycle-climate system

    E-print Network

    Steinacher, Marco

    , predomi- nantly the emissions of CO2, is summarized and discussed with respect to ocean acidification presenting projections of ocean acidification with a special focus on the Arctic Ocean. The global coupled carbon cycle-climate model NCAR CSM1.4-carbon is applied to simulate ocean acidification

  3. Contribution of increasing CO2 and climate change to the carbon cycle in China's ecosystems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qiaozhen Mu; Maosheng Zhao; Steven W. Running; Mingliang Liu; Hanqin Tian

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 and China's climate have changed greatly during 1961–2000. The influence of increased CO2 and changing climate on the carbon cycle of the terrestrial ecosystems in China is still unclear. In this article we used a process-based ecosystem model, Biome-BGC, to assess the effects of changing climate and elevated atmospheric CO2 on terrestrial China's carbon cycle during two time

  4. Contribution of increasing CO2 and climate change to the carbon cycle in China's ecosystems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Qiaozhen Mu; Maosheng Zhao; Steven W. Running; Mingliang Liu; Hanqin Tian

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric CO2 and China's climate have changed greatly during 1961-2000. The influence of increased CO2 and changing climate on the carbon cycle of the terrestrial ecosystems in China is still unclear. In this article we used a process-based ecosystem model, Biome-BGC, to assess the effects of changing climate and elevated atmospheric CO2 on terrestrial China's carbon cycle during two time

  5. Climate and carbon cycle changes under the overshoot scenario Jesse Nusbaumer a

    E-print Network

    Matsumoto, Katsumi

    Climate and carbon cycle changes under the overshoot scenario Jesse Nusbaumer a , Katsumi Matsumoto scenario needs to be examined in terms of its impacts on the global climate and the environment. In, particular, it must be determined if climate change cause by the overshoot scenario is reversible or not

  6. Impacts of Climate Change on Carbon and Nitrogen Cycles

    E-print Network

    In Boreal Forest Ecosystems; Peter Eliasson

    Eliasson, P.E. 2007. Impacts of climate change on carbon and nitrogen cycles in boreal forest ecosystems. Doctor’s dissertation. ISSN: 1652-6880, ISBN: 978-91-576-7388-6 It is well known that soil carbon stocks decrease considerably in response to soil warming, but experimental data have shown that the loss of carbon declines within decades in apparent acclimation. An explanation to such findings is offered under the theoretical framework of ecosystem models in this thesis. Simulations of forest ecosystem responses to increased soil temperatures showed that the labile carbon in soil was reduced considerably within years after warming, although the structure and function of decomposer organisms remained intact. Simulations of increased CO 2 also confirmed positive growth response in the short term. The response of soil carbon was similar, however predicted to be less than the increase of biomass. Nitrogen availability and negative feedback mechanisms of the plant soil system were critical to the results, indicating that nitrogen progressively limited the growth response.

  7. Climate change or climate cycles? Snowpack trends in the Olympic and Cascade Mountains, Washington, USA.

    PubMed

    Barry, Dwight; McDonald, Shea

    2013-01-01

    Climate change could significantly influence seasonal streamflow and water availability in the snowpack-fed watersheds of Washington, USA. Descriptions of snowpack decline often use linear ordinary least squares (OLS) models to quantify this change. However, the region's precipitation is known to be related to climate cycles. If snowpack decline is more closely related to these cycles, an OLS model cannot account for this effect, and thus both descriptions of trends and estimates of decline could be inaccurate. We used intervention analysis to determine whether snow water equivalent (SWE) in 25 long-term snow courses within the Olympic and Cascade Mountains are more accurately described by OLS (to represent gradual change), stationary (to represent no change), or step-stationary (to represent climate cycling) models. We used Bayesian information-theoretic methods to determine these models' relative likelihood, and we found 90 models that could plausibly describe the statistical structure of the 25 snow courses' time series. Posterior model probabilities of the 29 "most plausible" models ranged from 0.33 to 0.91 (mean = 0.58, s = 0.15). The majority of these time series (55%) were best represented as step-stationary models with a single breakpoint at 1976/77, coinciding with a major shift in the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. However, estimates of SWE decline differed by as much as 35% between statistically plausible models of a single time series. This ambiguity is a critical problem for water management policy. Approaches such as intervention analysis should become part of the basic analytical toolkit for snowpack or other climatic time series data. PMID:22411029

  8. Incorporating climate-system and carbon-cycle uncertainties in integrated assessments of climate change. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogelj, J.; McCollum, D. L.; Reisinger, A.; Knutti, R.; Riahi, K.; Meinshausen, M.

    2013-12-01

    The field of integrated assessment draws from a large body of knowledge across a range of disciplines to gain robust insights about possible interactions, trade-offs, and synergies. Integrated assessment of climate change, for example, uses knowledge from the fields of energy system science, economics, geophysics, demography, climate change impacts, and many others. Each of these fields comes with its associated caveats and uncertainties, which should be taken into account when assessing any results. The geophysical system and its associated uncertainties are often represented by models of reduced complexity in integrated assessment modelling frameworks. Such models include simple representations of the carbon-cycle and climate system, and are often based on the global energy balance equation. A prominent example of such model is the 'Model for the Assessment of Greenhouse Gas Induced Climate Change', MAGICC. Here we show how a model like MAGICC can be used for the representation of geophysical uncertainties. Its strengths, weaknesses, and limitations are discussed and illustrated by means of an analysis which attempts to integrate socio-economic and geophysical uncertainties. These uncertainties in the geophysical response of the Earth system to greenhouse gases remains key for estimating the cost of greenhouse gas emission mitigation scenarios. We look at uncertainties in four dimensions: geophysical, technological, social and political. Our results indicate that while geophysical uncertainties are an important factor influencing projections of mitigation costs, political choices that delay mitigation by one or two decades a much more pronounced effect.

  9. How positive is the feedback between climate change and the carbon cycle?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. FRIEDLINGSTEIN; J.-L. DUFRESNE; P. M. COX; P. RAYNER

    2003-01-01

    Future climate change induced by atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases is believed to have a large impact on the global carbon cycle. Several offline studies focusing either on the marine or on the terrestrial carbon cycle highlighted such potential effects. Two recent online studies, using ocean-atmosphere general circulation models coupled to land and ocean carbon cycle models, in- vestigated in

  10. How does complex terrain influence responses of carbon and water cycle processes to climate variability and climate change?

    EPA Science Inventory

    We are pursuing the ambitious goal of understanding how complex terrain influences the responses of carbon and water cycle processes to climate variability and climate change. Our studies take place in H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest, an LTER (Long Term Ecological Research) site...

  11. INTERACTIVE EFFECTS OF SOLAR UV RADIATION AND CLIMATE CHANGE ON BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper assesses research on the interactions of UV radiation (280-400 nm) and global climate change with global biogeochemical cycles at the Earth's surface. The effects of UV-B (280-315 nm), which are dependent on the stratospheric ozone layer, on biogeochemical cycles are o...

  12. Effects of Solar UV Radiation and Climate Change on Biogeochemical Cycling: Interactions and Feedbacks

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solar UV radiation, climate and other drivers of global change are undergoing significant changes and models forecast that these changes will continue for the remainder of this century. Here we assess the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles and the interactions...

  13. Long-term climate change and the geochemical cycle of carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, Hal G.; Walker, James C. G.; Kuhn, William R.

    1988-01-01

    The response of the coupled climate-geochemical system to changes in paleography is examined in terms of the biogeochemical carbon cycle. The simple, zonally averaged energy balance climate model combined with a geochemical carbon cycle model, which was developed to study climate changes, is described. The effects of latitudinal distributions of the continents on the carbon cycle are investigated, and the global silicate weathering rate as a function of latitude is measured. It is observed that a concentration of land area at high altitudes results in a high CO2 partial pressure and a high global average temperature, and for land at low latitudes a cold globe and ice are detected. It is noted that the CO2 greenhouse feedback effect is potentially strong and has a stabilizing effect on the climate system.

  14. Trophic Interaction Cycles in Tundra Ecosystems and the Impact of Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    ROLF A. IMS and EVA FUGLEI (; )

    2005-04-01

    This peer-reviewed article from BioScience journal is about the impact of climate change on tundra. While population cycles are geographically widespread, it is on arctic tundra that such cycles appear to be most influential for the functioning of the whole ecosystem. We give an overview of tundra species that exhibit population cycles and describe what are currently believed to be the causal mechanisms. Population cycles most likely originate from trophic interactions within the plant-based tundra food web, where lemmings, either as prey for carnivores or as consumers of plants, play the key role. The predominance of trophic interaction cycles at northern latitudes is ultimately related to climate, and such cycles should therefore be vulnerable to climate change. Recent evidence indicates that changes have already taken place in the dynamics of some key herbivores and their predators, consistent with the expected impacts of climate change. There is a strong need for large-scale integrated monitoring and research efforts to further document such changes and their ecosystem consequences.

  15. Climate Change and Macro-Economic Cycles in Pre-Industrial Europe

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Qing; Zhang, David D.; Lee, Harry F.; Li, Guodong

    2014-01-01

    Climate change has been proven to be the ultimate cause of social crisis in pre-industrial Europe at a large scale. However, detailed analyses on climate change and macro-economic cycles in the pre-industrial era remain lacking, especially within different temporal scales. Therefore, fine-grained, paleo-climate, and economic data were employed with statistical methods to quantitatively assess the relations between climate change and agrarian economy in Europe during AD 1500 to 1800. In the study, the Butterworth filter was adopted to filter the data series into a long-term trend (low-frequency) and short-term fluctuations (high-frequency). Granger Causality Analysis was conducted to scrutinize the associations between climate change and macro-economic cycle at different frequency bands. Based on quantitative results, climate change can only show significant effects on the macro-economic cycle within the long-term. In terms of the short-term effects, society can relieve the influences from climate variations by social adaptation methods and self-adjustment mechanism. On a large spatial scale, temperature holds higher importance for the European agrarian economy than precipitation. By examining the supply-demand mechanism in the grain market, population during the study period acted as the producer in the long term, whereas as the consumer in the short term. These findings merely reflect the general interactions between climate change and macro-economic cycles at the large spatial region with a long-term study period. The findings neither illustrate individual incidents that can temporarily distort the agrarian economy nor explain some specific cases. In the study, the scale thinking in the analysis is raised as an essential methodological issue for the first time to interpret the associations between climatic impact and macro-economy in the past agrarian society within different temporal scales. PMID:24516601

  16. Human Impacts on the Hydrologic Cycle: Comparing Global Climate Change and Local Water Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, I. M.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is significantly altering the hydrologic cycle at global and regional scales, with potentially devastating impacts on water resources. Recent studies demonstrate that hydrologic response to climate change will depend on local-scale feedbacks between groundwater, surface water, and land surface processes. These studies suggest that local water management practices that alter the quantity and distribution of water in the terrestrial system—e.g., groundwater pumping and irrigation—may also feed back across the hydrologic cycle, with impacts on land-atmosphere fluxes and thus weather and climate. Here we use an integrated hydrologic model to compare the impacts of large-scale climate change and local water management practices on water and energy budgets at local and watershed scales. We consider three climate scenarios (hot, hot+wet, and hot+dry) and three management scenarios (pumping only, irrigation only, and pumping+irrigation). Results demonstrate that impacts of local water management on basin-integrated groundwater storage, evapotranspiration, and stream discharge are comparable to those of changing climate conditions. However, impacts of climate change are shown to have a smaller magnitude and greater spatial extent, while impacts of pumping and irrigation are shown to have a greater magnitude but are local to areas where pumping and irrigation occur. These results have important implications regarding the scales of human impacts on both water resources and climate and the sustainability of water resources.

  17. "Days of future passed" - climate change and carbon cycle history (Jean Baptiste Lamarck Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissert, Helmut

    2013-04-01

    With the beginning of the fossil fuel age in the 19th century mankind has become an important geological agent on a global scale. For the first time in human history action of man has an impact on global biogeochemical cycles. Increasing CO2 concentrations will result in a perturbation of global carbon cycling coupled with climate change. Investigations of past changes in carbon cycling and in climate will improve our predictions of future climate. Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations will drive climate into a mode of operation, which may resemble climate conditions in the deep geological past. Pliocene climate will give insight into 400ppm world with higher global sea level than today. Doubling of pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 levels will shift the climate system into a state resembling greenhouse climate in the Early Cenozoic or even in the Cretaceous. Carbon isotope geochemistry serves as tool for tracing the pathway of the carbon cycle through geological time. Globally registered negative C-isotope anomalies in the C-isotope record are interpreted as signatures of rapid addition (103 to a few 104 years) of CO2 to the ocean-atmosphere system. Positive C-isotope excursions following negative spikes record the slow post-perturbation recovery of the biosphere at time scales of 105 to 106 years. Duration of C-cycle perturbations in earth history cannot be directly compared with rapid perturbation characterizing the Anthropocene. However, the investigation of greenhouse pulses in the geological past provides insight into different climate states, it allows to identify tipping points in past climate systems and it offers the opportunity to learn about response reactions of the biosphere to rapid changes in global carbon cycling. Sudden injection of massive amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere is recorded in C-isotope record of the Early Cretaceous. The Aptian carbon cycle perturbation triggered changes in temperature and in global hydrological cycling. Changes in physical and chemical oceanography are reflected in widespread black shale deposition ("Oceanic Anoxic Event 1a"), in carbonate platform drowning and in biocalcification crises. "Days of future passed" (Moody Blues, 1967) reminds us that the past provides essential information needed for decisions to be made in the interest of mankind's future.

  18. Northern Iberian abrupt climate change dynamics during the last glacial cycle: A view from lacustrine sediments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ana Moreno; Penélope González-Sampériz; Mario Morellón; Blas L. Valero-Garcés; William J. Fletcher

    2010-01-01

    We present a palaeoclimatic reconstruction of the last glacial cycle in Iberia (ca. 120,000–11,600cal yrs BP) based on multi-proxy reconstructions from lake sediments with robust chronologies, and with a particular focus on abrupt climate changes. The selected lake sequences provide an integrated approach from northern Iberia exploring temperature conditions, humidity variations and land-sea comparisons during the most relevant climate transitions

  19. Climate Change

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in a place over a period of time. Climate change is major change in temperature, rainfall, snow, or ... by natural factors or by human activities. Today climate changes are occurring at an increasingly rapid rate. Climate ...

  20. Interactive Effects of Urban Land Use and Climate Change on Biogeochemical Cycles (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouyat, R. V.

    2009-12-01

    Urban land-use change can affect biogeochemical cycles through altered disturbance regimes, landscape management practices (e.g., irrigation and fertilization), built structures, and altered environments (heat island effect, pollution, introduction of non-native species, loss of native species). As a result, the conversion of native to urban ecological systems has been shown to significantly affect carbon, nitrogen, and water cycles at local, regional, and global scales. These changes have created novel habitats and ecosystems, which have no analogue in the history of life. Nonetheless, some of the environmental changes occurring in urban areas are analogous to the changes expected in climate by the end of the century, e.g. atmospheric increase in CO2 and an increase in air temperatures, which can be utilized as a “natural experiment” to investigate global change effects on large scale ecosystem processes. Moreover, as analogues of expected future environments, urban ecological systems may act as reservoirs of plant and animal species for adjoining landscapes that are expected to undergo relatively rapid climate changes in the next 100 years. Urban land-use change by itself may contribute to changes in regional weather patterns and long-term changes in global climate, which will depend on the net effect of converting native systems to urban systems and the comparison of per capita “footprints” between urban, suburban, and rural inhabitants. My objectives are to 1) assess the impact of changes in urban land-use on climate change and in turn how climate change may affect urban biogeochemical cycles and 2) discuss the potential for urban ecosystems to mitigate green house gas emissions.

  1. The Twilight Zone of the Marine Carbon Cycle and Climate Change Past and Future

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Paul Loubere

    This Ocean and Climate Change Institute article provides information regarding carbon cycling and the ocean. It discusses where and how carbon moves through the ocean system, focusing on carbon dioxide in the atmosphere as it relates to biota and sediment records.

  2. INTERACTIVE EFFECTS OF OZONE DEPLETION AND CLIMATE CHANGE ON BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of ozone depletion on global biogeochemical cycles, via increased UV-B radiation at the Earth's surface, have continued to be documented over the past 4 years. In this report we also document various effects of UV-B that interact with global climate change because the...

  3. Spatial modelling of mountainous basins; An integrated analysis of the hydrological cycle, climate change and agriculture

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. W. Immerzeel

    2008-01-01

    Water is the most essential substance on earth and a changing climate has an important impact on the temporal and spatial distribution of water availability. Mountain ranges provide an important “water tower' function and over 20% of the global population depends on fresh water resources provided by the Himalayan range in critical periods of the year. The hydrological cycle is

  4. Changing Climates

    E-print Network

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    and vegetation. Climate Change ? EPA?s Climate Change Site http://www.epa.gov/climatechange/ Comprehensive information on the issue of climate change, including science, U.S. climate policy, greenhouse emissions, health and environmental effects... on the comment section. L ong before climate change and global warming became such a popular topic, scientists were researching the different aspects of the world?s changing climate. In Texas alone, dozens of scientists from different universities...

  5. Winter climate change effects on soil C and N cycles in urban grasslands.

    PubMed

    Durán, Jorge; Rodríguez, Alexandra; Morse, Jennifer L; Groffman, Peter M

    2013-09-01

    Despite growing recognition of the role that cities have in global biogeochemical cycles, urban systems are among the least understood of all ecosystems. Urban grasslands are expanding rapidly along with urbanization, which is expected to increase at unprecedented rates in upcoming decades. The large and increasing area of urban grasslands and their impact on water and air quality justify the need for a better understanding of their biogeochemical cycles. There is also great uncertainty about the effect that climate change, especially changes in winter snow cover, will have on nutrient cycles in urban grasslands. We aimed to evaluate how reduced snow accumulation directly affects winter soil frost dynamics, and indirectly greenhouse gas fluxes and the processing of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) during the subsequent growing season in northern urban grasslands. Both artificial and natural snow reduction increased winter soil frost, affecting winter microbial C and N processing, accelerating C and N cycles and increasing soil : atmosphere greenhouse gas exchange during the subsequent growing season. With lower snow accumulations that are predicted with climate change, we found decreases in N retention in these ecosystems, and increases in N2 O and CO2 flux to the atmosphere, significantly increasing the global warming potential of urban grasslands. Our results suggest that the environmental impacts of these rapidly expanding ecosystems are likely to increase as climate change brings milder winters and more extensive soil frost. PMID:23630015

  6. Synchronized Northern Hemisphere climate change and solar magnetic cycles during the Maunder Minimum

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Yasuhiko T.; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Miyahara, Hiroko; Sho, Kenjiro; Nakatsuka, Takeshi

    2010-01-01

    The Maunder Minimum (A.D. 1645–1715) is a useful period to investigate possible sun–climate linkages as sunspots became exceedingly rare and the characteristics of solar cycles were different from those of today. Here, we report annual variations in the oxygen isotopic composition (?18O) of tree-ring cellulose in central Japan during the Maunder Minimum. We were able to explore possible sun–climate connections through high-temporal resolution solar activity (radiocarbon contents; ?14C) and climate (?18O) isotope records derived from annual tree rings. The tree-ring ?18O record in Japan shows distinct negative ?18O spikes (wetter rainy seasons) coinciding with rapid cooling in Greenland and with decreases in Northern Hemisphere mean temperature at around minima of decadal solar cycles. We have determined that the climate signals in all three records strongly correlate with changes in the polarity of solar dipole magnetic field, suggesting a causal link to galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). These findings are further supported by a comparison between the interannual patterns of tree-ring ?18O record and the GCR flux reconstructed by an ice-core 10Be record. Therefore, the variation of GCR flux associated with the multidecadal cycles of solar magnetic field seem to be causally related to the significant and widespread climate changes at least during the Maunder Minimum. PMID:21076031

  7. Research on Dualistic Water Cycle Simulation in the Reception Basin of South-to-North Water Diversion under Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Tian

    2010-05-01

    As social and economic activities is increasing day by day, interference to water cycle that made by human activities breaks principle and balance of original natural water cycle system, so that the existing water cycle system from dominated only by natural cycle to a new water cycle system dominated by combinational effect of natural and artificial system. The paper firstly developed the dualistic water cycle model in the reception basin of the Middle Route Project of South-to-North Water Diversion, which is developed under lots of problems such as inter-basin, large-scale, human activity, water cycle flux instability, and then parameter sensitivity analysis, parameter calibration, model validation are given. On the basis of dualistic water cycle model development, CMIP3 data is used to analysis temperature and precipitation, climate change scenario in the reception basin is scientifically given. Under the condition of climate change, the natural and artificial collateral water cycle effects by climate change are presented respectively.The results show that under climate change scenarios, runoff ratio changed greater in the water three geographical areas of Ziya River in Haihe River Basin, YongdingHe CeTian reservoir, and CeTian reservoir to Sanjiadian. Climate change impacts runoff in the reception basin as well as the quantity of water demand. From the view of result, climate change is not bringing large change to the water balance in the reception basin, and water supply could meet the 95% guarantee.

  8. Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2005-10-21

    This video segment adapted from NOVA explains the difference between weather and climate and features groundbreaking analysis revealing that Earth's climate has changed much faster than previously believed.

  9. A long marine history of carbon cycle modulation by?orbital-climatic?changes

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Timothy D.

    1997-01-01

    Pacing of the marine carbon cycle by orbital forcing during the Pliocene and Pleistocene Ice Ages [past 2.5 million years (Myr)] is well known. As older deep-sea sediment records are being studied at greater temporal resolution, it is becoming clear that similar fluctuations in the marine carbon system have occurred throughout the late Mesozoic and Tertiary, despite the absence of large continental ice sheets over much of this time. Variations in both the organic and the calcium carbonate components of the marine carbon system seem to have varied cyclically in response to climate forcing, and carbon and carbonate time series appear to accurately characterize the frequency spectrum of ancient climatic change. For the past 35 Myr, much of the variance in carbonate content carries the “polar” signal of obliquity [41,000 years (41 kyr)] forcing. Over the past 125 Myr, there is evidence from marine sediments of the continued role of precessional (?21 kyr) climatic cycles. Repeat patterns of sedimentation at about 100, 400, and 2,400 kyr, the modulation periods of precession, persistently enter into marine carbon cycle records as well. These patterns suggest a nonlinear response of climate and/or the sedimentation of organic carbon and carbonates to precessional orbital perturbations. Nonlinear responses of the carbon system may help to amplify relatively weak orbital insolation anomalies into more significant climatic perturbations through positive feedback effects. Nonlinearities in the carbon cycle may have transformed orbital-climatic cycles into long-wavelength features on time scales comparable to the residence times of carbon and nutrient elements in the ocean. PMID:11607746

  10. Responses of ecosystem carbon cycling to climate change treatments along an elevation gradient

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, Zhuoting; Koch, George W.; Dijkstra, Paul; Bowker, Matthew A.; Hungate, Bruce A.

    2011-01-01

    Global temperature increases and precipitation changes are both expected to alter ecosystem carbon (C) cycling. We tested responses of ecosystem C cycling to simulated climate change using field manipulations of temperature and precipitation across a range of grass-dominated ecosystems along an elevation gradient in northern Arizona. In 2002, we transplanted intact plant–soil mesocosms to simulate warming and used passive interceptors and collectors to manipulate precipitation. We measured daytime ecosystem respiration (ER) and net ecosystem C exchange throughout the growing season in 2008 and 2009. Warming generally stimulated ER and photosynthesis, but had variable effects on daytime net C exchange. Increased precipitation stimulated ecosystem C cycling only in the driest ecosystem at the lowest elevation, whereas decreased precipitation showed no effects on ecosystem C cycling across all ecosystems. No significant interaction between temperature and precipitation treatments was observed. Structural equation modeling revealed that in the wetter-than-average year of 2008, changes in ecosystem C cycling were more strongly affected by warming-induced reduction in soil moisture than by altered precipitation. In contrast, during the drier year of 2009, warming induced increase in soil temperature rather than changes in soil moisture determined ecosystem C cycling. Our findings suggest that warming exerted the strongest influence on ecosystem C cycling in both years, by modulating soil moisture in the wet year and soil temperature in the dry year.

  11. Interactive effects of solar UV radiation and climate change on biogeochemical cycling.

    PubMed

    Zepp, R G; Erickson, D J; Paul, N D; Sulzberger, B

    2007-03-01

    This report assesses research on the interactions of UV radiation (280-400 nm) and global climate change with global biogeochemical cycles at the Earth's surface. The effects of UV-B (280-315 nm), which are dependent on the stratospheric ozone layer, on biogeochemical cycles are often linked to concurrent exposure to UV-A radiation (315-400 nm), which is influenced by global climate change. These interactions involving UV radiation (the combination of UV-B and UV-A) are central to the prediction and evaluation of future Earth environmental conditions. There is increasing evidence that elevated UV-B radiation has significant effects on the terrestrial biosphere with implications for the cycling of carbon, nitrogen and other elements. The cycling of carbon and inorganic nutrients such as nitrogen can be affected by UV-B-mediated changes in communities of soil organisms, probably due to the effects of UV-B radiation on plant root exudation and/or the chemistry of dead plant material falling to the soil. In arid environments direct photodegradation can play a major role in the decay of plant litter, and UV-B radiation is responsible for a significant part of this photodegradation. UV-B radiation strongly influences aquatic carbon, nitrogen, sulfur and metals cycling that affect a wide range of life processes. UV-B radiation changes the biological availability of dissolved organic matter to microorganisms, and accelerates its transformation into dissolved inorganic carbon and nitrogen, including carbon dioxide and ammonium. The coloured part of dissolved organic matter (CDOM) controls the penetration of UV radiation into water bodies, but CDOM is also photodegraded by solar UV radiation. Changes in CDOM influence the penetration of UV radiation into water bodies with major consequences for aquatic biogeochemical processes. Changes in aquatic primary productivity and decomposition due to climate-related changes in circulation and nutrient supply occur concurrently with exposure to increased UV-B radiation, and have synergistic effects on the penetration of light into aquatic ecosystems. Future changes in climate will enhance stratification of lakes and the ocean, which will intensify photodegradation of CDOM by UV radiation. The resultant increase in the transparency of water bodies may increase UV-B effects on aquatic biogeochemistry in the surface layer. Changing solar UV radiation and climate also interact to influence exchanges of trace gases, such as halocarbons (e.g., methyl bromide) which influence ozone depletion, and sulfur gases (e.g., dimethylsulfide) that oxidize to produce sulfate aerosols that cool the marine atmosphere. UV radiation affects the biological availability of iron, copper and other trace metals in aquatic environments thus potentially affecting metal toxicity and the growth of phytoplankton and other microorganisms that are involved in carbon and nitrogen cycling. Future changes in ecosystem distribution due to alterations in the physical and chemical climate interact with ozone-modulated changes in UV-B radiation. These interactions between the effects of climate change and UV-B radiation on biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial and aquatic systems may partially offset the beneficial effects of an ozone recovery. PMID:17344963

  12. Sensitivity of carbon cycling in the European Alps to changes of climate and land cover

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bärbel Zierl; Harald Bugmann

    2007-01-01

    Assessments of the impacts of global change on carbon stocks in mountain regions have received little attention to date, in\\u000a spite of the considerable role of these areas for the global carbon cycle. We used the regional hydro-ecological simulation\\u000a system RHESSys in five case study catchments from different climatic zones in the European Alps to investigate the behavior\\u000a of the

  13. Climate Change Impacts on the Organic Carbon Cycle at the Land-Ocean Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canuel, E. A.; Cammer, S. S.; McIntosh, H.; Pondell, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Humans have modified estuaries across the globe by altering the delivery of water, sediments and elements such as carbon and nitrogen that play important roles in biogeochemical processes. These activities have caused declines in the health and quality of estuarine ecosystems globally and this trend will likely continue due to increasing population growth in coastal regions, expected changes associated with climate change, and their interaction with each other, leading to serious consequences for the ecological and societal services they provide. A key function of estuaries is the transfer and transformation of carbon and biogenic elements between land and ocean systems. The anticipated effects of climate change on biogeochemical processes in estuaries are likely to be both numerous and complex but are poorly understood. Climate change has the potential to influence the carbon cycle in estuaries through anticipated changes to organic matter production, transformation, burial and export. Estuarine biogeochemical processes will likely be altered by: 1) sea level rise and increased storm intensity which will amplify the erosion and transfer of terrigenous materials, 2) increases in water temperatures which will enhance the rates of biological and biogeochemical processes (e.g., enzyme kinetics, decomposition rates, and remineralization), while simultaneously decreasing the concentration of dissolved oxygen, 3) changes in particle (or sediment) loadings in response to altered patterns of precipitation and river runoff, and 4) altered inputs of nutrients and dissolved organic materials to coastal waters, also resulting from changing precipitation and runoff. In this presentation, we review the effects of climate change on the carbon cycle in estuaries, with a focus on the temperate estuaries of North America.

  14. Effects of global climate change and organic pollution on nutrient cycling in marine sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanz-Lázaro, C.; Valdemarsen, T.; Holmer, M.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing ocean temperature due to climate change is an important anthropogenic driver of ecological change in coastal systems, where sediments play a major role in nutrient cycling. Our ability to predict ecological consequences of climate change is enhanced by simulating real scenarios especially when the interactions among drivers may not be just additive. Based on predicted climate change scenarios, we tested the effect of temperature and organic pollution on nutrient release from coastal sediments to the water column in a mesocosm experiment. PO43- release rates from sediments followed the same trends as organic matter mineralization rates, and increased linearly with temperature and were significantly higher under organic pollution than under non-polluted conditions. NH4+ release only increased significantly when the temperature rise was above 6 °C, and was significantly higher in organic polluted compared to non-polluted sediments. Nutrient release to the water column was only a fraction from the mineralized organic matter, suggesting PO43- retention and NH4+ oxidation in the sediment. Bioturbation and bioirrigation appeared to be key processes responsible of this behaviour. Considering that the primary production of most marine basins is N-limited, the excess release of NH4+ at temperature rise >6 ° could enhance water column primary productivity, which may lead to the deterioration of the environmental quality. Climate change effects are expected to be accelerated in areas affected by organic pollution.

  15. USA National Phenology Network: Plant and Animal Life-Cycle Data Related to Climate Change

    DOE Data Explorer

    Phenology refers to recurring plant and animal life cycle stages, such as leafing and flowering, maturation of agricultural plants, emergence of insects, and migration of birds. It is also the study of these recurring plant and animal life cycle stages, especially their timing and relationships with weather and climate. Phenology affects nearly all aspects of the environment, including the abundance and diversity of organisms, their interactions with one another, their functions in food webs, and their seasonable behavior, and global-scale cycles of water, carbon, and other chemical elements. Phenology records can help us understand plant and animal responses to climate change; it is a key indicator. The USA-NPN brings together citizen scientists, government agencies, non-profit groups, educators, and students of all ages to monitor the impacts of climate change on plants and animals in the United States. The network harnesses the power of people and the Internet to collect and share information, providing researchers with far more data than they could collect alone.[Extracts copied from the USA-NPN home page and from http://www.usanpn.org/about].

  16. Insolation-driven 100 kyr glacial cycles and millennial climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe-Ouchi, A.; Saito, F.; Kawamura, K.; Raymo, M. E.; Okuno, J.; Takahashi, K.; Blatter, H.

    2013-12-01

    The waxing and waning of Northern Hemisphere ice sheets over the past one million years is dominated by an approximately 100-kyr periodicity and a sawtooth pattern (gradual growth and fast termination). Milankovitch theory proposes that summer insolation at high northern latitudes drives the glacial cycles, and statistical tests demonstrated that the glacial cycles are indeed linked to eccentricity, obliquity and precession cycles. However, insolation alone cannot explain the strong 100 kyr cycle which presumably arises through internal climatic feedbacks. Prior work with conceptual models, for example, showed that glacial terminations are associated with the build-up of Northern Hemisphere 'excess ice', but the physical mechanisms of 100-kyr cycle at work remain unclear. Here, using comprehensive climate and ice sheet models, we show that the ~100-kyr periodicity is explained by insolation and internal feedback amongst the climate, ice sheet and lithosphere/asthenosphere system (reference). We found that equilibrium states of ice sheets exhibit hysteresis responses to summer insolation, and that the shape and position of the hysteresis loop play a key role in determining the periodicities of glacial cycles. The hysteresis loop of the North American ice sheet is such that, after its inception, the ice sheet mass balance remains mostly positive or neutral through several precession cycles whose amplitude decreases towards an eccentricity minimum. The larger the ice sheet grows and extends towards lower latitudes, the smaller is the insolation required to turn the mass balance to negative. Therefore, once the large ice sheet is established, only a moderate increase in insolation can trigger a negative mass balance, leading to a complete retreat within several thousand years, due to the delayed isostatic rebound. The effect of ocean circulation and millennial scale climate change are not playing the dominant role for determing the 100kyr cycle, but are effective for modifying the speed and geographical pattern of the waxing and waning of the Northern Hemisphere ice sheets and their melt water. (reference of the basic results: Abe-Ouchi et al, 2013, Insolation-driven 100,000 year glacial cycles and hysteresis of ice-sheet volume, Nature, 500, 190-193.)

  17. Sustainable Development (20 credits) The carbon cycle, its impact on climate, and the need to change this by introducing

    E-print Network

    Miall, Chris

    Sustainable Development (20 credits) The carbon cycle, its impact on climate, and the need to change this by introducing hydrogen and fuel cell technologies will be covered. The influence activities such as cities. #12;

  18. Long-term climate change and the geochemical cycle of carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Hal G.; Walker, James C. G.; Kuhn, William R.

    1988-01-01

    We study the interactions between the geochemical cycles of carbon and long-term changes in climate. Climate change is studied with a simple, zonally averaged energy balance climate model that includes the greenhouse effect of carbon dioxide explicitly. The geochemical model balances the rate of consumption of carbon dioxide in silicate weathering against its release by volcanic and metamorphic processes. The silicate weathering rate is expressed locally as a function of temperature, carbon dioxide partial pressure, and runoff. The global weathering rate is calculated by integrating these quantities over the land area as a function of latitude. Carbon dioxide feedback stabilizes the climate system against a reduction in solar luminosity and may contribute to the preservation of equable climate on the early Earth, when solar luminosity was low. The system responds to reduced land area by increasing carbon dioxide partial pressure and warming the globe. Our model makes it possible to study the response of the system to changing latitudinal distribution of the continents. A concentration of land area at high latitudes leads to high carbon dioxide partial pressures and high global average temperature because weathering of high-latitude continents is slow. Conversely, concentration of the continents at low latitudes yields a cold globe and ice at low latitudes, a situation that appears to be representative of the late Precambrian glacial episode. This model is stable against ice albedo catastrophe even when the ice line occurs at low latitudes. In this it differs from energy balance models that lack the coupling to the geochemical cycle of carbon.

  19. A simple explanation for the sensitivity of the hydrologic cycle to global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleidon, Axel; Renner, Maik

    2014-05-01

    The global hydrologic cycle is likely to increase in strength with global warming, although some studies indicate that warming due to solar absorption may result in a different sensitivity than warming due to an elevated greenhouse effect. Here we show that these sensitivities of the hydrologic cycle can be derived analytically from an extremely simple surface energy balance model that is constrained by the assumption that vertical convective exchange within the atmosphere operates at the thermodynamic limit of maximum power. Using current climatic mean conditions, this model predicts a sensitivity of the hydrologic cycle of 2.2 % K-1 to greenhouse-induced surface warming which is the sensitivity reported from climate models. The sensitivity to solar-induced warming includes an additional term, which increases the total sensitivity to 3.2 % K-1. These sensitivities are explained by shifts in the turbulent fluxes in the case of greenhouse-induced warming, which is proportional to the change in slope of the saturation vapor pressure, and in terms of an additional increase in turbulent fluxes in the case of solar radiation-induced warming. We illustrate an implication of this explanation for geoengineering, which aims to undo surface temperature differences by solar radiation management. Our results show that when such an intervention compensates surface warming, it cannot simultaneously compensate the changes in hydrologic cycling because of the differences in sensitivities for solar vs. greenhouse-induced surface warming. We conclude that the sensitivity of the hydrologic cycle to surface temperature can be understood and predicted with very simple physical considerations but this needs to reflect on the different roles that solar and terrestrial radiation play in forcing the hydrologic cycle.

  20. The marine nitrogen cycle: recent discoveries, uncertainties and the potential relevance of climate change

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Maren; Bange, Hermann W.; Dippner, Joachim W.; Middelburg, Jack J.; Montoya, Joseph P.; Ward, Bess

    2013-01-01

    The ocean's nitrogen cycle is driven by complex microbial transformations, including nitrogen fixation, assimilation, nitrification, anammox and denitrification. Dinitrogen is the most abundant form of nitrogen in sea water but only accessible by nitrogen-fixing microbes. Denitrification and nitrification are both regulated by oxygen concentrations and potentially produce nitrous oxide (N2O), a climate-relevant atmospheric trace gas. The world's oceans, including the coastal areas and upwelling areas, contribute about 30 per cent to the atmospheric N2O budget and are, therefore, a major source of this gas to the atmosphere. Human activities now add more nitrogen to the environment than is naturally fixed. More than half of the nitrogen reaches the coastal ocean via river input and atmospheric deposition, of which the latter affects even remote oceanic regions. A nitrogen budget for the coastal and open ocean, where inputs and outputs match rather well, is presented. Furthermore, predicted climate change will impact the expansion of the oceans' oxygen minimum zones, the productivity of surface waters and presumably other microbial processes, with unpredictable consequences for the cycling of nitrogen. Nitrogen cycling is closely intertwined with that of carbon, phosphorous and other biologically important elements via biological stoichiometric requirements. This linkage implies that human alterations of nitrogen cycling are likely to have major consequences for other biogeochemical processes and ecosystem functions and services. PMID:23713119

  1. Life-cycle assessment of electricity generation systems and applications for climate change policy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Paul Joseph

    This research uses Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) to better understand the energy and environmental performance for two electricity generation systems, a 620 MW combined-cycle natural gas plant, and an 8kW building-integrated photovoltaic system. The results of the LCA are used to provide an effective and accurate means for evaluating greenhouse gas emission reduction strategies for U.S. electricity generation. The modern combined-cycle plant considered in this thesis is nominally 48% thermally efficient, but it is only 43% energy efficient when evaluated across its entire life-cycle, due primarily to energy losses during the natural gas fuel cycle. The emission rate for the combined-cycle natural gas plant life-cycle (469 tonnes CO2-equivalent per GWeh), was 23% higher than the emission rate from plant operation alone (382 tonnes CO2-equivalent per GWeh). Uncertainty in the rate of fuel-cycle methane releases results in a potential range of emission rates between 457 to 534 tonnes CO 2-equivalent per GWeh for the studied plant. The photovoltaic system modules have a sunlight to DC electricity conversion efficiency of 5.7%. However, the system's sunlight to AC electricity conversion efficiency is 4.3%, when accounting for life-cycle energy inputs, as well as losses due to system wiring, AC inversion, and module degradation. The LCA illustrates that the PV system has a low, but not zero, life-cycle greenhouse gas emission rate of 39 Tonnes CO2-equivalent per GWeh. A ternary method of evaluation is used to evaluate three greenhouse gas mitigation alternatives: (1) fuel-switching from coal to natural gas for Kyoto-based compliance, (2) fuel-switching from coal to nuclear/renewable for Kyoto based compliance, and (3) fuel-switching to meet the White House House's Global Climate Change Initiative. In a moderate growth scenario, fuel-switching from coal to natural gas fails to meet a Kyoto-based emission target, while fuel-switching to nuclear/renewable meets the emission objective by reducing coal generated electricity 32% below 2000 levels. The Global Climate Change Initiative allows annual greenhouse gas emissions to increase to levels that are 54% higher than the proposed U.S. commitment under the Kyoto Protocol.

  2. Macronutrient cycles and climate change: key science areas and an international perspective.

    PubMed

    Whitehead, P G; Crossman, J

    2012-09-15

    Human activities have doubled global cycles of Nitrogen (N) and Phosphorus (P) and elevated N and P have compromised ecosystem services through the degradation of natural resources of soils, freshwaters and marine waters with a subsequent loss of biodiversity. Elevated Carbon (C) levels in the atmosphere have been linked to global warming, with positive feedback mechanisms accelerating the warming process. In order to initiate nutrient control, both national and international mitigation measures have been implemented. However, many of these initiatives focus upon a single nutrient without considering cycle interactions. A sound understanding of processes and transformations involved in the interactions of macronutrient cycles is required to avoid inadvertently enhancing effects of one nutrient, during mitigation for impacts of another. Emerging research initiatives are addressing these research gaps, with programmes in the US (USGCRP) and the UK (Macronutrient Cycles) advocating integration between scientists and stakeholders, in order to deliver results directly to policy makers. Through these programmes the scales of nitrogen and phosphorus fluxes will be quantified, and a determination made of the nature of nutrient transformations in catchments under a changing climate and perturbed carbon cycle. The consideration of connectivity between multiple macronutrient cycles will help to minimise the threats to biodiversity, ecosystem dynamics, public water supplies and human health by improved management and better focused policy. PMID:21937085

  3. Three climate cycles of millennial-scale vegetation change in Africa (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupont, L. M.

    2010-12-01

    Marine sediments can deliver long well-dated continuous sequences of environmental change, not only of the ocean but also of the continents. Vegetation records from these archives are often the only land-cover records to encompass several climate cycles. Comparing vegetation development during several cycles uncovers the structural and systematic differences between glacial and interglacial vegetation. Such data may help with the validation of the current earth system models including dynamic vegetation modules. A number of marine pollen records from the East Atlantic (ODP658, GIK16415, GIK16776, GIK16867, GeoB1016) and a new one from the Indian Ocean (MD96-2048) register the vegetation development in West and South Africa over a period of more than 300 thousand years covering at least three full glacial-interglacial cycles. From these dataset typical patterns of vegetation change in Africa are inferred and differences between cycles are discussed. Both latitudinal and altitudinal shifts in the vegetation have been recorded by pollen of e.g. Chenopods, Asteraceae (daisies), Ericaceae (heath), Podocarpus (yellow wood), Poaceae (grass), and lowland forest. While latitudinal shifts in the area of desert and savannah are typical in West Africa, altitudinal changes of the belt with mountainous forest and mountainous shrubs are more common in Southern Africa. During glacial times, vegetation includes ericaceous shrubs in Southern Africa, while desert shrubs expand in West Africa, and the area of the lowland forests is strongly reduced on the whole continent.

  4. A simple explanation for the sensitivity of the hydrologic cycle to global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleidon, A.; Renner, M.

    2013-08-01

    The global hydrologic cycle is likely to increase its strength with global warming. Climate models generally predict an increase in strength of 2.2% K-1, which is much weaker than what would be expected from the increase in saturation vapor pressure of 6.5% K-1. Furthermore, it has been reported that the sensitivity of the hydrologic cycle to surface temperature differences caused by solar radiation is about 50% greater than by an equivalent difference induced by the greenhouse effect. Here we show that these sensitivities can be derived analytically from an extremely simple surface energy balance model that is constrained by the assumption that vertical convective transport within the atmosphere operates at maximum power. Using current climatic mean conditions, this model predicts a sensitivity of the hydrologic cycle of 2.2% K-1 to surface temperature induced by differences in the greenhouse effect, and a sensitivity of 3.2% K-1 for differences caused by absorbed solar radiation. These sensitivities can be explained by considering the changes in the surface energy balance in which the heating by solar radiation is partitioned equally into radiative and turbulent cooling at a state of maximum power of convective exchange. This explanation emphasizes the different roles that solar and terrestrial radiation play in the surface energy balance and hydrologic cycling that cannot be lumped together into a radiative forcing concept. We illustrate one implication of this explanation for the case of geoengineering, which aims to undo surface temperature differences by solar radiation management, but will nevertheless result in substantial differences in hydrologic cycling due to the difference in sensitivities. We conclude that the overall sensitivity of the hydrologic cycle to surface temperature can be understood and predicted by very simple physical considerations.

  5. Fingerprinting global climate change and forest management within rhizosphere carbon and nutrient cycling processes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhihong; Chen, Chengrong

    2006-09-01

    As one of the two Principal Subject Editors for ESPR Subject Area 1 'Terrestrial Ecology and Biology / Soil and Sediments: Toxicology-related Subjects' (see pp 287-293), the senior author and his colleague, Dr Chen, present an example of sub-category 4 'Environmental studies of pesticides, air pollution, and management strategies for forestry and plant ecosystems'. Thereby, they inform the ESPR community about the new Australian research project concerning the fingerprints of global climate change (GCC) and forest management on rhizosphere carbon and nutrient cycling and, subsequently, present an overview on the GCC and forest management fingerprints. PMID:17067023

  6. Nitrogen cycle and ecosystem services in the Brazilian La Plata Basin: anthropogenic influence and climate change.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Ortega, E; Bergier, I; Silva, J S V

    2012-08-01

    The increasing human demand for food, raw material and energy has radically modified both the landscape and biogeochemical cycles in many river basins in the world. The interference of human activities on the Biosphere is so significant that it has doubled the amount of reactive nitrogen due to industrial fertiliser production (Haber-Bosch), fossil fuel burning and land-use change over the last century. In this context, the Brazilian La Plata Basin contributes to the alteration of the nitrogen cycle in South America because of its huge agricultural and grazing area that meets the demands of its large urban centres - Sao Paulo, for instance - and also external markets abroad. In this paper, we estimate the current inputs and outputs of anthropogenic nitrogen (in kg N.km(-2).yr(-1)) in the basin. In the results, we observe that soybean plays a very important role in the Brazilian La Plata, since it contributes with an annual entrance of about 1.8 TgN due to biological nitrogen fixation. Moreover, our estimate indicates that the export of soybean products accounts for roughly 1.0 TgN which is greater than the annual nitrogen riverine exports from Brazilian Parana, Paraguay and Uruguay rivers together. Complimentarily, we built future scenarios representing changes in the nitrogen cycle profile considering two scenarios of climate change for 2070-2100 (based on IPCC's A2 and B2) that will affect land-use, nitrogen inputs, and loss of such nutrients in the basin. Finally, we discuss how both scenarios will affect human well-being since there is a connection between nitrogen cycle and ecosystem services that affect local and global populations, such as food and fibre production and climate regulation. PMID:23011299

  7. Effects of Past Climate Changes on Ecosystem Biogeochemical Cycles in Rocky Mountain Forests and Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuman, B.; Mechenich, M. F.; Stefanova, I.; Henderson, A.; Donnelly, J. P.

    2007-12-01

    Ongoing climate trends will likely alter how forest ecosystems produce important goods and services, in part, by changing ecosystem responses to disturbances, such as fires and land-use. Disturbances induce forest succession and thus dramatically change the flow of water and nutrients through a given ecosystem. However, long-term ecosystem responses to disturbance, especially regarding nutrient pools and cycling rates, are poorly documented, and less is known about the effects of century-scale climate trends on these responses especially with respect to moisture. Here, we show biogeochemical responses to repeated (>20) episodes of disturbance and succession in a single ecosystem under a range of climatic conditions over 2000 years. Our lake sediment record shows regular fluctuations in the flux of base cations and other macronutrients from lodgepole pine ( Pinus contorta) forests in northern Colorado following catastrophic stand-replacing fires. Post-fire elemental fluctuations are consistent with ecosystem theory regarding the re-equilibration of biomass and nutrient pools during succession, but show systematic variation that has been previously undocumented. The time span of post-fire re-equilibration correlates positively with measures of fire severity, which is consistent with hypotheses that seed dispersal and soil recovery likely slow re-growth after large or severe fires. Likewise, dry conditions during the Medieval Climatic Anomaly (MCA, 1200-500 yrs BP) altered elemental fluctuations and, thus, generated post-fire pulses of lake eutrophication that were not evident during other periods. The interaction of climate and disturbance, therefore, has important consequences for ecosystem function and services, including the quality of aquatic environments.

  8. Impact of climate change on the northwestern Mediterranean Sea pelagic planktonic ecosystem and associated carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Marine; Estournel, Claude; Adloff, Fanny; Diaz, Frédéric

    2014-09-01

    The northwestern Mediterranean Sea (NWMS) is biologically one of the most productive Mediterranean regions. NWMS pelagic planktonic ecosystem is strongly influenced by hydrodynamics, in particular by deep convection that could significantly weaken under the influence of climate change. Here we investigate the response of this ecosystem and associated carbon cycle to the long-term evolution of oceanic and atmospheric circulations. For that we developed a tridimensional coupled physical-biogeochemical model and performed two groups of annual simulations under the climate conditions of respectively the 20th and the end of 21st centuries. Our results suggest that the evolution of oceanic and atmospheric circulations does not modify the NWMS pelagic planktonic ecosystem and associated carbon cycle at a first order. However, differences mainly induced by the deep convection weakening and the surface warming are obtained at a second order. The spring bloom occurs 1 month earlier. Resulting from the decrease in nutrients availability, the bottom up control of phytoplankton development and bacteria growth by the nitrogen and phosphorus availability strengthens and the microbial loop intensifies as the small-sized plankton biomass increases. Carbon net fixation and deep export do not change significantly. The choice of the biogeochemical initial and boundary conditions does not change the representation of the ecosystem seasonal cycle, but the associated uncertainty range can be one order of magnitude larger than the predicted interannual and long-term variabilities. The uncertainty range of long-term trends associated with the physical forcing (hydrological, atmospheric, hydrodynamical, and socioeconomic) is much smaller (<10%).

  9. Life cycle assessment of biochar systems: estimating the energetic, economic, and climate change potential.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Kelli G; Gloy, Brent A; Joseph, Stephen; Scott, Norman R; Lehmann, Johannes

    2010-01-15

    Biomass pyrolysis with biochar returned to soil is a possible strategy for climate change mitigation and reducing fossil fuel consumption. Pyrolysis with biochar applied to soils results in four coproducts: long-term carbon (C) sequestration from stable C in the biochar, renewable energy generation, biochar as a soil amendment, and biomass waste management. Life cycle assessment was used to estimate the energy and climate change impacts and the economics of biochar systems. The feedstocks analyzed represent agricultural residues (corn stover), yard waste, and switchgrass energy crops. The net energy of the system is greatest with switchgrass (4899 MJ t(-1) dry feedstock). The net greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for both stover and yard waste are negative, at -864 and -885 kg CO(2) equivalent (CO(2)e) emissions reductions per tonne dry feedstock, respectively. Of these total reductions, 62-66% are realized from C sequestration in the biochar. The switchgrass biochar-pyrolysis system can be a net GHG emitter (+36 kg CO(2)e t(-1) dry feedstock), depending on the accounting method for indirect land-use change impacts. The economic viability of the pyrolysis-biochar system is largely dependent on the costs of feedstock production, pyrolysis, and the value of C offsets. Biomass sources that have a need for waste management such as yard waste have the highest potential for economic profitability (+$69 t(-1) dry feedstock when CO(2)e emission reductions are valued at $80 t(-1) CO(2)e). The transportation distance for feedstock creates a significant hurdle to the economic profitability of biochar-pyrolysis systems. Biochar may at present only deliver climate change mitigation benefits and be financially viable as a distributed system using waste biomass. PMID:20030368

  10. Climate change and sectors of the surface water cycle in CMIP5 projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirmeyer, P. A.; Fang, G.; Wang, Z.; Yadav, P.; Milton, A. D.

    2014-07-01

    Results from ten global climate change models are synthesized to investigate changes in extremes, defined as wettest and driest deciles in precipitation, soil moisture and runoff based on each model's historical twentieth century simulated climatology. Under a moderate warming scenario, regional increases in drought frequency are found with little increase in floods. For more severe warming, both drought and flood become much more prevalent, with nearly the entire globe significantly affected. Soil moisture changes tend toward drying while runoff trends toward flood. To determine how different sectors of society dependent the on various components of the surface water cycle may be affected, changes in monthly means and interannual variability are compared to data sets of crop distribution and river basin boundaries. For precipitation, changes in interannual variability can be important even when there is little change in the long-term mean. Over 20% of the globe is projected to experience a combination of reduced precipitation and increased variability under severe warming. There are large differences in the vulnerability of different types of crops, depending on their spatial distributions. Increases in soil moisture variability are again found to be a threat even where soil moisture is not projected to decrease. The combination of increased variability and greater annual discharge over many basins portends increased risk of river flooding, although a number of basins are projected to suffer surface water shortages.

  11. Climate change and sectors of the surface water cycle In CMIP5 projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirmeyer, P. A.; Fang, G.; Wang, Z.; Yadav, P.; Milton, A.

    2014-12-01

    Results from 10 global climate change models are synthesized to investigate changes in extremes, defined as wettest and driest deciles in precipitation, soil moisture and runoff based on each model's historical 20th century simulated climatology. Under a moderate warming scenario, regional increases in drought frequency are found with little increase in floods. For more severe warming, both drought and flood become much more prevalent, with nearly the entire globe significantly affected. Soil moisture changes tend toward drying, while runoff trends toward flood. To determine how different sectors of society dependent on various components of the surface water cycle may be affected, changes in monthly means and interannual variability are compared to data sets of crop distribution and river basin boundaries. For precipitation, changes in interannual variability can be important even when there is little change in the long-term mean. Over 20% of the globe is projected to experience a combination of reduced precipitation and increased variability under severe warming. There are large differences in the vulnerability of different types of crops, depending on their spatial distributions. Increases in soil moisture variability are again found to be a threat even where soil moisture is not projected to decrease. The combination of increased variability and greater annual discharge over many basins portends increased risk of river flooding, although a number of basins are projected to suffer surface water shortages.

  12. Life cycle ecophysiology of small pelagic fish and climate-driven changes in populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peck, Myron A.; Reglero, Patricia; Takahashi, Motomitsu; Catalán, Ignacio A.

    2013-09-01

    Due to their population characteristics and trophodynamic role, small pelagic fishes are excellent bio-indicators of climate-driven changes in marine systems world-wide. We argue that making robust projections of future changes in the productivity and distribution of small pelagics will require a cause-and-effect understanding of historical changes based upon physiological principles. Here, we reviewed the ecophysiology of small pelagic (clupeiform) fishes including a matrix of abiotic and biotic extrinsic factors (e.g., temperature, salinity, light, and prey characteristics) and stage-specific vital rates: (1) adult spawning, (2) survival and development of eggs and yolk sac larvae, and (3) feeding and growth of larvae, post-larvae and juveniles. Emphasis was placed on species inhabiting Northwest Pacific and Northeast Atlantic (European) waters for which summary papers are particularly scarce compared to anchovy and sardine in upwelling systems. Our review revealed that thermal niches (optimal and sub-optimal ranges in temperatures) were species- and stage-specific but that temperature effects only partly explained observed changes in the distribution and/or productivity of populations in the Northwest Pacific and Northeast Atlantic; changes in temperature may be necessary but not sufficient to induce population-level shifts. Prey availability during the late larval and early juvenile period was a common, density-dependent mechanism linked to fluctuations in populations but recruitment mechanisms were system-specific suggesting that generalizations of climate drivers across systems should be avoided. We identified gaps in knowledge regarding basic elements of the growth physiology of each life stage that will require additional field and laboratory study. Avenues of research are recommended that will aid the development of models that provide more robust, physiological-based projections of the population dynamics of these and other small pelagic fish. In our opinion, the continued development of biophysical models that close the life cycle (depict all life stages) offers the best chance of revealing processes causing historical fluctuations on the productivity and distribution of small pelagic fishes and to project future climate-driven impacts. Correctly representing physiological-based mechanisms will increase confidence in the outcomes of models simulating the potential impacts of bottom-up processes, a first step towards evaluating the mixture of factors and processes (e.g. intra-guild dynamics, predation, fisheries exploitation) which interact with climate to affect populations of small pelagic fishes. Understand the impacts of reduced growth rates during the juvenile stage on the process of maturation and spawning condition of small pelagic fishes. Examine the effects of changes in prey quality on the duration and magnitude of spawning by small pelagic fishes to capture how climate-driven changes in zooplankton species composition might act as a “bottom-up” regulator of fish productivity. Identify the drivers for spawning location and timing to better understand how spawning dynamics may be influenced by climate change (e.g. changes in water salinity or turbidity resulting from changes in river discharges or wind-driven turbulence, respectively).

  13. Impact of land use change on the diurnal cycle climate of the Canadian Prairies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, Alan K.; Desjardins, Raymond; Worth, Devon; Cerkowniak, Darrel

    2013-11-01

    paper uses hourly observations from 1953 to 2011 of temperature, relative humidity, and opaque cloud cover from 14 climate stations across the Canadian Prairies to analyze the impact of agricultural land use change on the diurnal cycle climate, represented by the mean temperature and relative humidity and their diurnal ranges. We show the difference between the years 1953-1991 and 1992-2011. The land use changes have been largest in Saskatchewan where 15-20% of the land area has been converted in the past four decades from summer fallow (where the land was left bare for 1 year) to annual cropping. During the growing season from 20 May to 28 August, relative humidity has increased by about 7%. During the first 2 months, 20 May to 19 July, maximum temperatures and the diurnal range of temperature have fallen by 1.2°C and 0.6°C, respectively, cloud cover has increased by about 4%, reducing surface net radiation by 6 W m-2, and precipitation has increased. We use the dry-downs after precipitation to separate the impact of cloud cover and show the coupling between evapotranspiration and relative humidity. We estimate, using reanalysis data from ERA-Interim, that increased transpiration from the larger area of cropland has reduced the surface Bowen ratio by 0.14-0.2. For the month on either side of the growing season, cloud cover has fallen slightly; maximum temperatures have increased, increasing the diurnal temperature range and the diurnal range of humidity.

  14. North atlantic deepwater temperature change during late pliocene and late quaternary climatic cycles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dwyer, G.S.; Cronin, T. M.; Baker, P.A.; Raymo, M.E.; Buzas, J.S.; Correge, T.

    1995-01-01

    Variations in the ratio of magnesium to calcium (Mg/Ca) in fossil ostracodes from Deep Sea Drilling Project Site 607 in the deep North Atlantic show that the change in bottom water temperature during late Pliocene 41,000-year obliquity cycles averaged 1.5??C between 3.2 and 2.8 million years ago (Ma) and increased to 2.3??C between 2.8 and 2.3 Ma, coincidentally with the intensification of Northern Hemisphere glaciation. During the last two 100,000-year glacial-to-interglacial climatic cycles of the Quaternary, bottom water temperatures changed by 4.5??C. These results show that glacial deepwater cooling has intensified since 3.2 Ma, most likely as the result of progressively diminished deep-water production in the North Atlantic and of the greater influence of Antarctic bottom water in the North Atlantic during glacial periods. The ostracode Mg/Ca data also allow the direct determination of the temperature component of the benthic foraminiferal oxygen isotope record from Site 607, as well as derivation of a hypothetical sea-level curve for the late Pliocene and late Quaternary. The effects of dissolution on the Mg/Ca ratios of ostracode shells appear to have been minimal.

  15. Late Quaternary glacial-interglacial cycle of climatic and environmental change on Mount Kenya, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olago, D. O.; Street-Perrott, F. A.; Perrott, R. A.; Ivanovich, M.; Harkness, D. D.

    1999-10-01

    Sediments from Sacred Lake and Lake Nkunga on the northeastern flank of Mount Kenya have a sequential palaeoclimatic and palæoenvironmental record covering most of the Late Quaternary period: from ca 115 to 0 ka. Most of the Late Quaternary period (110 to 14 ka - glacial period) was characterised by terrestrial C 4 vegetation types (grassland) at higher altitudes and mixed C 3-C 4 (grassland with scattered trees and shrubs) vegetation types at lower altitudes, while low, productivity-related 13C discrimination occurred in the aquatic environment. The last interglacial and Holocene vegetation consisted of C 3 forest-type elements, and high 13C discrimination occurred in the aquatic environment. The period 14 to 9 ka is transitional to Holocene climatic conditions, with progressive expansion of terrestrial C 3 vegetation, and increased 13C discrimination in the aquatic environment. These changes occurred in step with, and were primarily driven by, palaeo-atmospheric CO 2 changes. Thus, the estimates of temperature depression in the tropics during the last glaciation need to be revised as they are probably overestimated. Regionally, the changes on Mount Kenya are coherent with those observed at other high altitude sites across the tropics. Globally, they show a high coherency with Milankovitch periodicities, and are coupled to ocean circulation changes and ice sheet growth and disintegration cycles in the North Atlantic.

  16. Sulfate-Reducing Microorganisms in Wetlands – Fameless Actors in Carbon Cycling and Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Pester, Michael; Knorr, Klaus-Holger; Friedrich, Michael W.; Wagner, Michael; Loy, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater wetlands are a major source of the greenhouse gas methane but at the same time can function as carbon sink. Their response to global warming and environmental pollution is one of the largest unknowns in the upcoming decades to centuries. In this review, we highlight the role of sulfate-reducing microorganisms (SRM) in the intertwined element cycles of wetlands. Although regarded primarily as methanogenic environments, biogeochemical studies have revealed a previously hidden sulfur cycle in wetlands that can sustain rapid renewal of the small standing pools of sulfate. Thus, dissimilatory sulfate reduction, which frequently occurs at rates comparable to marine surface sediments, can contribute up to 36–50% to anaerobic carbon mineralization in these ecosystems. Since sulfate reduction is thermodynamically favored relative to fermentative processes and methanogenesis, it effectively decreases gross methane production thereby mitigating the flux of methane to the atmosphere. However, very little is known about wetland SRM. Molecular analyses using dsrAB [encoding subunit A and B of the dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase] as marker genes demonstrated that members of novel phylogenetic lineages, which are unrelated to recognized SRM, dominate dsrAB richness and, if tested, are also abundant among the dsrAB-containing wetland microbiota. These discoveries point toward the existence of so far unknown SRM that are an important part of the autochthonous wetland microbiota. In addition to these numerically dominant microorganisms, a recent stable isotope probing study of SRM in a German peatland indicated that rare biosphere members might be highly active in situ and have a considerable stake in wetland sulfate reduction. The hidden sulfur cycle in wetlands and the fact that wetland SRM are not well represented by described SRM species explains their so far neglected role as important actors in carbon cycling and climate change. PMID:22403575

  17. Using Elemental Budgets to Determine Effects of Simulated Climate Change on Phosphorus Cycling in a Grassland Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, S.; Paytan, A.; Mellett, T.

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of the Jasper Ridge Global Change Experiment is to find out the effects of climate change on a terrestrial grassland ecosystem. The different treatments include increased carbon dioxide, nitrogen deposition, temperature, and precipitation. A portion of the above ground biomass of each plot was harvested, and an abundant species chosen to analyze. The goal of this project was to investigate the effects of climate change on phosphorus cycling in the grassland vegetation. Total phosphorus content of each sample was determined by combustion and acid digestion along with optical emission spectrometry. Total nitrogen and carbon was determined via flash combustion in an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. This information was combined to evaluate the limitation of phosphorus in each treatment and better understand how climate change may affect phosphorus cycling in terrestrial grasslands.

  18. Mechanisms for Annual Cycle Changes in Monsoons in a Warming Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seth, Anji

    2014-05-01

    Analyses of phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) experiments show that the global monsoon is expected to increase in area, precipitation, and intensity as the climate system responds to anthropogenic forcing. Concurrently, detailed analyses for several individual monsoons indicate a re-distribution of rainfall from early to late in the rainy season. This presentation will further examine CMIP5 projected changes in the annual cycle of precipitation in monsoon regions, and use a moist static energy framework to evaluate competing mechanisms identified to be important in precipitation changes over land. In the presence of sufficient surface moisture, the local response to the increase in downwelling energy is characterized by increased evaporation, increased low-level moist static energy, and decreased stability with consequent increases in precipitation. A remote mechanism begins with warmer oceans and operates on land regions via a warmer tropical troposphere, increased stability, and decreased precipitation. The remote mechanism controls the projected changes during winter, and the local mechanism appears to control the switch to increased precipitation during summer in several monsoon regions. During the early summer transition, regions where boundary layer moisture availability is reduced due to decreases in evaporation and moisture convergence experience an enhanced convective barrier. This enhanced convective barrier leads to a redistribution of rainfall from early to late summer, and is robust in the American and African monsoons but not seen in Asia.

  19. Testing causes for long-term changes in carbon cycling and climate during the early Paleogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komar, N.; Zeebe, R. E.; Dickens, G. R.

    2013-12-01

    The late Paleocene to the early Eocene (˜58-52 Ma) was marked by significant changes in global climate and carbon cycling. Among the evidence for these changes, stable isotope records reveal a prominent decrease of ?13C and ?18O (in both surface and deep ocean), indicating a reorganization in the long-term global carbon cycle and a long-term warming trend (˜4°C), respectively. Concurrently, deep-sea carbonate records at several sites indicate a deepening of the calcite compensation depth (CCD). Here, we investigate possible causes (e.g., increased volcanic degassing, decreased net organic burial, and accelerated dissociation of gas hydrate) for these observations, but from a new perspective. The basic model employed is a modified version of GEOCARB III. However, we have coupled this well-known geochemical model to LOSCAR, a model that enables simulation of seawater carbonate chemistry, the CCD, and ocean ?13C. We have also added a gas hydrate capacitor that can account for the storage and release of methane from the seafloor over millions of years. We further consider accurate input data (e.g., ?13C of carbonate) on a currently accepted time scale that spans an interval much longer than the perturbation. Several different scenarios are investigated with the goal of consistency amongst inferred changes in temperature, the CCD, and surface ocean and deep ocean ?13C. The results strongly suggest that a decrease in net organic carbon burial drove carbon cycle changes during the late Paleocene and early Eocene, although an increase in volcanic activity might have contributed. Importantly, a drop in net organic carbon burial may represent increased oxidation of previously deposited organic carbon, such as stored in peat or gas hydrates. The model successfully recreates trends in Earth surface warming, as inferred from ?18O records, the CCD, and ?13C. At the moment, however, our coupled modeling effort cannot reproduce the magnitude of change in all these records collectively. Similar problems have arisen in simulations of short-term hyperthermal events during the early Paleogene (PETM), suggesting one or more basic issues with data interpretation or geochemical modeling remain.

  20. Climate Change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Hafemeister

    Weather can change many times a day. Climate.the sum of weather.changes slowly, over decades and centuries, but it can change\\u000a abruptly with large volcanic eruptions, instabilities in ocean currents, or meteorite crashes. The dramatic 1815 Tambora eruption\\u000a spewed 100 km3 of ash, causing “a year without a summer” to cool Earth by 4°C. Cooling from volcanic and anthropogenic aerosols must

  1. Bedrock displacements in Greenland manifest ice mass variations, climate cycles and climate change.

    PubMed

    Bevis, Michael; Wahr, John; Khan, Shfaqat A; Madsen, Finn Bo; Brown, Abel; Willis, Michael; Kendrick, Eric; Knudsen, Per; Box, Jason E; van Dam, Tonie; Caccamise, Dana J; Johns, Bjorn; Nylen, Thomas; Abbott, Robin; White, Seth; Miner, Jeremy; Forsberg, Rene; Zhou, Hao; Wang, Jian; Wilson, Terry; Bromwich, David; Francis, Olivier

    2012-07-24

    The Greenland GPS Network (GNET) uses the Global Positioning System (GPS) to measure the displacement of bedrock exposed near the margins of the Greenland ice sheet. The entire network is uplifting in response to past and present-day changes in ice mass. Crustal displacement is largely accounted for by an annual oscillation superimposed on a sustained trend. The oscillation is driven by earth's elastic response to seasonal variations in ice mass and air mass (i.e., atmospheric pressure). Observed vertical velocities are higher and often much higher than predicted rates of postglacial rebound (PGR), implying that uplift is usually dominated by the solid earth's instantaneous elastic response to contemporary losses in ice mass rather than PGR. Superimposed on longer-term trends, an anomalous 'pulse' of uplift accumulated at many GNET stations during an approximate six-month period in 2010. This anomalous uplift is spatially correlated with the 2010 melting day anomaly. PMID:22786931

  2. A numerical simulation of climate changes during the obliquity cycle on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francois, L. M.; Walker, J. C. G.; Kuhn, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    A one-dimensional seasonal energy balance climate model of the Martian surface is developed. The model shows the importance of using short-period diurnal and seasonal variations of solar irradiance instead of yearly-averaged quantities. The roles of meridional heat transport and greenhouse warming are shown to be important. The possible existence of hysteresis cycles in the formation and sublimation of permanent deposits during the course of the obliquity cycle is demonstrated.

  3. Effects of stratospheric ozone depletion, solar UV radiation, and climate change on biogeochemical cycling: interactions and feedbacks.

    PubMed

    Erickson, David J; Sulzberger, Barbara; Zepp, Richard G; Austin, Amy T

    2015-01-01

    Climate change modulates the effects of solar UV radiation on biogeochemical cycles in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, particularly for carbon cycling, resulting in UV-mediated positive or negative feedbacks on climate. Possible positive feedbacks discussed in this assessment include: (i) enhanced UV-induced mineralisation of above ground litter due to aridification; (ii) enhanced UV-induced mineralisation of photoreactive dissolved organic matter (DOM) in aquatic ecosystems due to changes in continental runoff and ice melting; (iii) reduced efficiency of the biological pump due to UV-induced bleaching of coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in stratified aquatic ecosystems, where CDOM protects phytoplankton from the damaging solar UV-B radiation. Mineralisation of organic matter results in the production and release of CO2, whereas the biological pump is the main biological process for CO2 removal by aquatic ecosystems. This paper also assesses the interactive effects of solar UV radiation and climate change on the biogeochemical cycling of aerosols and trace gases other than CO2, as well as of chemical and biological contaminants. Interacting effects of solar UV radiation and climate change on biogeochemical cycles are particularly pronounced at terrestrial-aquatic interfaces. PMID:25380348

  4. Environmental and climatic changes during Valanginian (Early Cretaceous) perturbations of the carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kujau, A.; Heimhofer, U.; Hochuli, P. A.; Schouten, S.; Thierry, A.; Morales, C.; Mutterlose, J.

    2011-12-01

    After a long-lasting period of relatively stable conditions during the late Jurassic to earliest Cretaceous, the Valanginian was a time of climatic and environmental perturbations. Proposed changes include fluctuations in atmospheric pCO2, an accelerated hydrologic cycling, a cooling phase, and changes in composition and abundances of the marine fauna. A prominent perturbation of the global carbon cycle is documented in a globally recorded positive ?13C shift. Widespread storage of Corg-rich sediments in ocean basins, probably accompanied by anoxic conditions has long been supposed to explain for the positive carbon isotope anomaly. However, no widespread deposition of black shales has been shown for the Valanginian. Research on the Valanginian carbon cycle has focused on marine environmental changes, while studies on continental archives are scarce. This study deals with stable isotope chemostratigraphy, spore-pollen assemblages, palynofacies, and organic geochemistry of two successions located in the northwestern Tethyan realm (Vocontian Basin, SE France) and the Carpathian seaway (Polish Trough, central Poland). For both sites no evidence for anoxic conditions in the form of the occurrence of specific biomarkers like isoreniratene are found. Spore-pollen assemblages from both localities show many similarities in terms of composition, diversity and abundances of taxa. Both are dominated by conifer pollen and fern spores. During the initial phase of the ?13C shift the palynological compositions of both sites are quite diverging. Here, the French site is characterized by a decrease in spore abundances not being observed for the Polish site. This is followed by a peak in fern spores for both sites. Bulk Corg and algal-derived pristane and phytane follow the positive isotope shift of Ccarb with a lead of ~200 kyrs. Land plant derived long chain C27 n-alkanes for the Vocontian Basin as well show this positive shift while for the site at the Carpathian seaway the coeval shift is negative. PCO2 reconstructions based on the ?? record point to an increase in atmospheric pCO2 for this time interval. Results are interpreted to reflect an increase in aridity at the French site, whereas conditions become more humid in the hinterland of the Carpathian seaway during the initiation of the carbon cycle perturbation. This would explain for diverging compositions of vegetation and the negative shift in C27 n-alkanes of the Polish site, since an increase in humidity enhances discrimination in land plants and therewith the amount of implemented 12C. The subsequent peak in fern spores may point to supra-regional hostile conditions favoring massive appearance of fern plants, coinciding with pCO2 drawdown, arid conditions, and the initiation of a cooling phase during the plateau-phase of the carbon isotope excursion. Results point to an important role of continental environments during the complex pattern of environmental and climatic changes accompanying and/or causing the Valanginian carbon isotope anomaly.

  5. The role of the hydrological cycle and the ocean`s thermohaline circulation in climate change: A multicomponent climate model study. Ph.D. Thesis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Huaxiao

    1993-01-01

    Global ocean-atmosphere and ocean-atmosphere-continental ice sheet models are developed to address the question of feedbacks between the hydrological cycle and the global thermohaline circulation capable of explaining the climate changes seen in paleoclimate records of the late Pleistocene and the last deglaciation. The ocean-atmosphere model climate system displays two distinct stable equilibria controlled by latitudinal water vapor transport and the

  6. Climatic change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Staffordshire County Council; Anthony J. Richardson; RICHARD MCCANN; HOWARD AYLESWORTH; MARY L. VIGILANTE

    1974-01-01

    But there are many reasons to question the wisdom of the Kyoto Protocol's approach to climate change policy, including questions about the scientific grounding of the protocol; questions about the feasibility of the proposed implementation mechanisms; questions about the efficacy of those measures; questions about the adverse consequences of diverting resources to address highly uncertain risks using tools with uncertain

  7. Climate-induced changes in carbon and nitrogen cycling in the rapidly warming Antarctic coastal ocean 

    E-print Network

    Henley, Sian Frances

    2013-07-01

    The western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) is a hotspot of climatic and oceanographic change, with a 6°C rise in winter atmospheric temperatures and >1°C warming of the surface ocean since the 1950s. These trends are having ...

  8. Modeling Potential Equilibrium States of Vegetation and Terrestrial Water Cycle of Mesoamerica under Climate Change Scenarios*

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    (Gentry 1982). Countries in the re- gion have developed national and regional policies for in- tegrating MAHE´ ,& RONALD NEILSON,**,&& LENIN CORRALES,11 MARKO SCHOLZE,## AND PHILIPPE CIAIS @@ 1 Climate Change

  9. Transient Climate Change Simulations with a Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean GCM Including the Tropospheric Sulfur Cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Roeckner; L. Bengtsson; J. Feichter; J. Lelieveld; H. Rodhe

    1999-01-01

    The time-dependent climate response to changing concentrations of greenhouse gases and sulfate aerosols is studied using a coupled general circulation model of the atmosphere and the ocean (ECHAM4\\/OPYC3). The concentrations of the well-mixed greenhouse gases like CO2, CH4, N2O, and CFCs are prescribed for the past (1860-1990) and projected into the future according to International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

  10. On the climate response of the low-latitude Pacific Ocean to changes in the global freshwater cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. D. Williams; E. Guilyardi; R. T. Sutton; J. M. Gregory; G. Madec

    2006-01-01

    Under global warming, the predicted intensification of the global freshwater cycle will modify the net freshwater flux at\\u000a the ocean surface. Since the freshwater flux maintains ocean salinity structures, changes to the density-driven ocean circulation\\u000a are likely. A modified ocean circulation could further alter the climate, potentially allowing rapid changes, as seen in the\\u000a past. The relevant feedback mechanisms and

  11. The Hydroclimate of East Africa: Seasonal cycle, Decadal Variability, and Human-induced Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenchang

    The hydroclimate of East Africa shows distinctive variabilities on seasonal to decadal time scales and poses a great challenge to climatologists attempting to project its response to anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs). Increased frequency and intensity of droughts over East Africa in recent decades raise the question of whether the drying trend will continue into the future. To address this question, we first examine the decadal variability of the East African rainfall during March--May (MAM, the major rainy season in East Africa) and assess how well a series of models simulate the observed features. Observational results show that the drying trend during MAM is associated with decadal natural variability of sea surface temperature (SST) variations over the Pacific Ocean. The multimodel mean of the SST-forced, Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) AMIP experiment models reproduces both the climatological annual cycle and the drying trend in recent decades. The fully coupled models from the CMIP5 historical experiment, however, have systematic errors in simulating the East African rainfall annual cycle by underestimating the MAM rainfall while overestimating the October--December (OND, the second rainy season in East Africa) rainfall. The multimodel mean of the historical coupled runs of the MAM rainfall anomalies, which is the best estimate of the radiatively-forced change, shows a weak wetting trend associated with anthropogenic forcing. However, the SST anomaly pattern associated with the MAM rainfall has large discrepancies with the observations. The errors in simulating the East African hydroclimate with coupled models raise questions about how reliable model projections of future East African climate are. This motivates a fundamental study of why East African climate is the way it is and why coupled models get it wrong. East African hydroclimate is characterized by a dry annual mean climatology compared to other deep tropical land areas and a bimodal annual cycle with the major rainy season during MAM (often called the ``long rains'' by local people) and the second during OND (the "short rains"). To explore these distinctive features, we use the ERA-Interim Re-Analysis data to analyze the associated annual cycles of atmospheric convective stability, circulation and moisture budget. The atmosphere over East Africa is found to be convectively stable, in general, year-round but with an annual cycle dominated by the surface moist static energy (MSE), which is in phase with the precipitation annual cycle. Throughout the year, the atmospheric circulation is dominated by a pattern of convergence near the surface, divergence in the lower troposphere and convergence again at upper levels. Consistently, the convergence of the vertically integrated moisture flux is mostly negative across the year, but becomes weakly positive in the two rainy seasons. It is suggested the semi-arid/arid climate in East Africa and its bimodal rainfall annual cycle can be explained by the ventilation mechanism, in which the atmospheric convective stability over East Africa is controlled by the import of low MSE air from the relatively cool Indian Ocean off the coast and the cold winter hemisphere. During the rainy seasons, however, the off-coast SST increases (and is warmest during the long rains season) and the northerly or southerly weakens, and consequently the air imported into East Africa becomes less stable. The MSE framework is then applied to study the coupling-induced bias of the East African rainfall annual cycle often found in CMIP3/5 coupled models that overestimates the OND rainfall and underestimates the MAM rainfall, by comparing the historical (coupled) and the AMIP runs (SST-forced) for each model. It is found that a warm north and cold south SST bias over the Indian Ocean induced in coupled models is responsible for the dry MAM rainfall bias over East Africa while the ocean dynamics induced warm west and cold east SST bias over the Indian Ocean contributes to the wet OND rainfall bias in

  12. Sedimentary cycles related to the late Palaeozoic cold-warm climate change, Talchir Formation, Talchir Basin, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Biplab

    2013-06-01

    Attributes of sedimentary facies within Permo-Carboniferous Talchir Formation (Gondwana Supergroup), Talchir Basin, India, attest to sedimentation under glaciomarine setting. Facies architecture reveals three sedimentary cycles of distinct orders. Cycle-1 sediments are 10s of m thick and are represented by repeated occurrences of glacigenic/reworked-glacigenic sediments followed by storm-reworked glacial outwash deposits. Juxtaposition of multiple Cycle-1 sequences indicate repeated ice-front advance-retreats related to climatic fluctuations, which led to accumulation of glacier-laden coarse-grained sediments, and subsequent flooding by marine storm surges. Cm-thin sandstone-mudstone interbeds of Cycle-2 belong within the Cycle-1 sequences and represent deposition from episodic storm surges. Mm-thin Cycle-3 sediments occur within the Cycle-2 sequences and attribute their genesis to semi-diurnal tidal fluctuations. Open marine storm surges have reworked these tidal sediments. In absence of major tectonic influences, the studied sedimentary cycles and associated palaeogeographic changes in the ice-marginal Talchir marine basin bear direct relation to late Palaeozoic cold-warm climatic transitions.

  13. Impact of Climate Change on the Water Cycle and Nutrient Losses in a Finnish Catchment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    F. Bouraoui; B. Grizzetti; K. Granlund; S. Rekolainen; G. Bidoglio

    2004-01-01

    Changes in climate, either long or short-term changes, can alter significantly the hydrological behavior of catchments. A statistical analysis of a thirty-four year time series of meteorological data collected in the Vantaanjoki watershed (Southern Finland) shows an increase in temperature and precipitation. The hydrological model SWAT was applied to the Vantaanjoki watershed in order to assess the impact of the

  14. Challenge of modelling the climate of the last glacial-interglacial cycle and millennial climate change as a background of evolution of modern Human

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe-Ouchi, Ayako; Chan, Wing-Le; O'ishi, Ryouta; Obrochta, Stephen; Yokoyama, Yusuke; Kondo, Yasuhisa; Yoneda, Minoru

    2014-05-01

    The environment of the evolution of Homo-Sapience is characterized by the climate change of glacial-interglacial cycle (about 125 thousand years in the past), which includes frequent occurrence of abrupt climate change (Dansgaard Oeschger events, = D-O events) of millenial time scale during the marine isotope stage 3. I We will have an overview on our work which we investigate the glacial-interglacial climate change and D-O events and its influence on vegetation of Africa through Eurasia (Europe and Asia). The numerical simulations are based on several model types, a coupled atmosphere-ocean-land GCM, MIROC, developed in Japan as well as ice sheet model IcIES, and a dynamical vegetation model LPJ. The condition that is given and changed for each time period is the following: orbital parameter (so called Milankovitch forcing) which influence the seasonal-latitudinal insolation, atmospheric content such as Carbon dioxide, ice sheet extent, and melt water from the ice sheet, which influence the ocean circulation and induce abrupt climate change. A transient ice sheet model behaviour is analyzed with the ice sheet model with climatic parameterization (Abe-Ouchi et al, 2013, Nature). Several snap shots of experimentsf are obtained both by slab ocean coupled GCM and AOGCM for the stadial - interstadial climate states and high resolution AGCM experiments are used to focus on the regional detail. The factors of climate change important for human evolution is examined and discussed, such as the change of climate, hydrology and vegetation associated with the abrupt climate change of D-O events is investigated.

  15. Millennial timescale carbon cycle and climate change in an efficient Earth system model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. M. Lenton; M. S. Williamson; N. R. Edwards; R. Marsh; A. R. Price; A. J. Ridgwell; J. G. Shepherd; S. J. Cox

    2006-01-01

    A new Earth system model, GENIE-1, is presented which comprises a 3-D frictional geostrophic ocean, phosphate-restoring marine biogeochemistry, dynamic and thermodynamic sea-ice, land surface physics and carbon cycling, and a seasonal 2-D energy-moisture balance atmosphere. Three sets of model climate parameters are used to explore the robustness of the results and for traceability to earlier work. The model versions have

  16. Millennial timescale carbon cycle and climate change in an efficient Earth system model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. M. Lenton; M. S. Williamson; N. R. Edwards; R. Marsh; A. R. Price; A. J. Ridgwell; J. G. Shepherd; S. J. Cox

    2006-01-01

    A new Earth system model, GENIE-1, is presented which comprises a 3-D frictional geostrophic ocean, phosphate-restoring marine\\u000a biogeochemistry, dynamic and thermodynamic sea-ice, land surface physics and carbon cycling, and a seasonal 2-D energy-moisture\\u000a balance atmosphere. Three sets of model climate parameters are used to explore the robustness of the results and for traceability\\u000a to earlier work. The model versions have

  17. Impact of climate change on forests, forest products and the carbon cycle in the Congo Basin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruijt, Bart; Jans, Wilma; Franssen, Wietse; Ludwig, Fulco

    2014-05-01

    Africa is widely seen as the continent most vulnerable to climate change. Current climate variability already has a large impact on the economies of developing countries. Large parts of African economies are highly climate sensitive, in particular agriculture, infrastructure and water sector. In this study we performed an analysis of climate change impacts in the Congo Basin on Forest ecosystem functioning and carbon storage. We emphasise the methodologies and validation involved in modelling the basin-wide carbon budgets. We also studied the potential shifts in broad classes of vegetation types, resulting from climate change. Finally, we compared annual productivity of the Congo forests with statistics of wood fuel and charcoal use for each of the countries in the region. The model simulations suggest that the region's forests will see increasing productivity under future climate, however, the effect of rising CO2 concentrations, stimulating growth, is highly uncertain. From these findings it follows that the potential in the region to implement UNFCCC-REDD+ projects is still very uncertain, but probably sustainable and feasible. The analysis shows that, averaged over 10 years, wood fuel and charcoal use amount to 50% and in some countries up to 100% or even more of the yearly vegetation carbon increase. These percentages generally increases with population density.

  18. The impacts of climate change and human activities on biogeochemical cycles on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huai; Zhu, Qiuan; Peng, Changhui; Wu, Ning; Wang, Yanfen; Fang, Xiuqing; Gao, Yongheng; Zhu, Dan; Yang, Gang; Tian, Jianqing; Kang, Xiaoming; Piao, Shilong; Ouyang, Hua; Xiang, Wenhua; Luo, Zhibin; Jiang, Hong; Song, Xingzhang; Zhang, Yao; Yu, Guirui; Zhao, Xinquan; Gong, Peng; Yao, Tandong; Wu, Jianghua

    2013-10-01

    With a pace of about twice the observed rate of global warming, the temperature on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (Earth's 'third pole') has increased by 0.2 °C per decade over the past 50 years, which results in significant permafrost thawing and glacier retreat. Our review suggested that warming enhanced net primary production and soil respiration, decreased methane (CH(4)) emissions from wetlands and increased CH(4) consumption of meadows, but might increase CH(4) emissions from lakes. Warming-induced permafrost thawing and glaciers melting would also result in substantial emission of old carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and CH(4). Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emission was not stimulated by warming itself, but might be slightly enhanced by wetting. However, there are many uncertainties in such biogeochemical cycles under climate change. Human activities (e.g. grazing, land cover changes) further modified the biogeochemical cycles and amplified such uncertainties on the plateau. If the projected warming and wetting continues, the future biogeochemical cycles will be more complicated. So facing research in this field is an ongoing challenge of integrating field observations with process-based ecosystem models to predict the impacts of future climate change and human activities at various temporal and spatial scales. To reduce the uncertainties and to improve the precision of the predictions of the impacts of climate change and human activities on biogeochemical cycles, efforts should focus on conducting more field observation studies, integrating data within improved models, and developing new knowledge about coupling among carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus biogeochemical cycles as well as about the role of microbes in these cycles. PMID:23744573

  19. Climate change, adaptive cycles, and the persistence of foraging economies during the late Pleistocene/Holocene transition in the Levant

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Arlene M.; Rivera-Collazo, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Climatic forcing during the Younger Dryas (?12.9–11.5 ky B.P.) event has become the theoretical basis to explain the origins of agricultural lifestyles in the Levant by suggesting a failure of foraging societies to adjust. This explanation however, does not fit the scarcity of data for predomestication cultivation in the Natufian Period. The resilience of Younger Dryas foragers is better illustrated by a concept of adaptive cycles within a theory of adaptive change (resilience theory). Such cycles consist of four phases: release/collapse (?); reorganization (?), when the system restructures itself after a catastrophic stimulus through innovation and social memory—a period of greater resilience and less vulnerability; exploitation (r); and conservation (K), representing an increasingly rigid system that loses flexibility to change. The Kebarans and Late Natufians had similar responses to cold and dry conditions vs. Early Natufians and the Pre-Pottery Neolithic A responses to warm and wet climates. Kebarans and Late Natufians (?-phase) shifted to a broader-based diet and increased their mobility. Early Natufian and Pre-Pottery Neolithic A populations (r- and K-phases) had a growing investment in more narrowly focused, high-yield plant resources, but they maintained the broad range of hunted animals because of increased sedentism. These human adaptive cycles interlocked with plant and animal cycles. Forest and grassland vegetation responded to late Pleistocene and early Holocene climatic fluctuations, but prey animal cycles reflected the impact of human hunting pressure. The combination of these three adaptive cycles results in a model of human adaptation, showing potential for great sustainability of Levantine foraging systems even under adverse climatic conditions. PMID:22371591

  20. GLOBAL CARBON CYCLE AND CLIMATE CHANGE: RESPONSES AND FEEDBACKS FROM BELOW-GROUND SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    According to most global climate models, a continued build-up of OC2 and other greenhouse gases will lead to significant changes in temperature and precipitation patterns over large parts of the Earth. elow-ground processes will strongly influence the response of the biosphere to...

  1. Predicting life-cycle adaptation of migratory birds to global climate change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    TIMOTHY COPPACK; C. Both

    2003-01-01

    Analyses of long-term data indicate that human-caused climatic changes are affecting bird phenology in directions consistent with theoretical predictions. Here, we report on recent trends in the timing of spring arrival and egg laying found within a western European Pied Flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca population. Mean egg laying date has advanced over the past 20 years in this population. The advancement

  2. Long-term cycles of Triassic climate change: a new ?18O record from conodont apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trotter, Julie A.; Williams, Ian S.; Nicora, Alda; Mazza, Michele; Rigo, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    A new oxygen isotope (?18O) record derived from conodont apatite reveals variable long-term climate trends throughout the Triassic period. This record shows several major, first order, negative shifts reflecting intense warming episodes, not only the well-known extreme PTB-Early Triassic event (? 5 ‰), but also two large cycles of similar magnitude (?1.5, ? 1.7 ‰) and duration (?7 Myrs) during the late Carnian and late Norian. Between the PTB-Early Triassic and Carnian major episodes, three rapid shorter-term warming events of decreasing magnitude punctuate the mid-late Anisian, early Ladinian, and latest Ladinian, with distinct cooler (i.e. favourable) intervals characterising the early Anisian and early Carnian, indicating a fluctuating but ameliorating Middle Triassic climate trend. Two long periods of sustained cooler conditions occurred during the Late Triassic, for much of the Norian and Rhaetian. The five humid events previously recognised from the geological record, including the Carnian Pluvial Episode, are associated with the low ?18O warming phases. The magnitudes of these first order warming cycles, together with widespread geological and palaeontological evidence, suggest they were at least Tethyan-wide events.

  3. Solar Cycle Variability, Ozone, and Climate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Drew Shindell; David Rind; Nambeth Balachandran; Judith Lean; Patrick Lonergan

    1999-01-01

    Results from a global climate model including an interactive parameterization of stratospheric chemistry show how upper stratospheric ozone changes may amplify observed, 11-year solar cycle irradiance changes to affect climate. In the model, circulation changes initially induced in the stratosphere subsequently penetrate into the troposphere, demonstrating the importance of the dynamical coupling between the stratosphere and troposphere. The model reproduces

  4. Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This new report from the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and the Marine Conservation Biology Institute argues that rising temperatures have impacted the world's oceans to a far greater extent than previously acknowledged. Addressing topics such as sea-level rise, ocean circulation, coral reefs, sea birds and invertebrates, as well as the increasing threats to Salmon, the report predicts a dangerous chain reaction in marine ecosystems if global warming continues unabated. On the positive side, it also argues that decisive actions now to reduce pollution can slow the warming and preserve the world's oceans. Accessible from the WWF Climate Change page, the full text of the report is available in .pdf, Word 6.0, and HTML versions. A summary is also provided.

  5. Vulnerability of Permafrost Carbon to Climate Change: Implications for the Global Carbon Cycle

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Edward A. G. Schuur (University of Florida; )

    2008-09-01

    Thawing permafrost and the resulting microbial decomposition of previously frozen organic carbon (C) is one of the most significant potential feedbacks from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere in a changing climate. In this article we present an overview of the global permafrost C pool and of the processes that might transfer this C into the atmosphere, as well as the associated ecosystem changes that occur with thawing. We show that accounting for C stored deep in the permafrost more than doubles previous high-latitude inventory estimates, with this new estimate equivalent to twice the atmospheric C pool. The thawing of permafrost with warming occurs both gradually and catastrophically, exposing organic C to microbial decomposition. Other aspects of ecosystem dynamics can be altered by climate change along with thawing permafrost, such as growing season length, plant growth rates and species composition, and ecosystem energy exchange. However, these processes do not appear to be able to compensate for C release from thawing permafrost, making it likely that the net effect of widespread permafrost thawing will be a positive feedback to a warming climate.

  6. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-print Network

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources BoardBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  7. Climate Change Scoping Plan

    E-print Network

    Climate Change Scoping Plan a amework for change as approved Prepared by the California AirBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  8. Emission scenario dependencies in climate change assessments of the hydrological cycle

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hideo Shiogama; Naota Hanasaki; Yuji Masutomi; Tatsuya Nagashima; Tomoo Ogura; Kiyoshi Takahashi; Yasuaki Hijioka; Toshihiko Takemura; Toru Nozawa; Seita Emori

    2010-01-01

    Anthropogenic global warming will lead to changes in the global hydrological cycle. The uncertainty in precipitation sensitivity\\u000a per 1 K of global warming across coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models (AOGCMs) has been actively examined.\\u000a On the other hand, the uncertainty in precipitation sensitivity in different emission scenarios of greenhouse gases (GHGs)\\u000a and aerosols has received little attention. Here we show a

  9. Global Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site provides a brief overview of processes and properties associated with global climate change and its rate of change, which is of current concern to scientists. The carbon cycle is discussed including its sources, sinks, and release agents along with the fact that it is critical to the biosphere and must continue cycling to support life on Earth. The information at this site should lead students to an understanding of carbon dioxide and the other major greenhouse gases, which is necessary to identify the current trends in atmospheric concentrations and climate change. Three other concepts addressed at this site include the profound effects living organisms in an ecosystem can have upon the local atmosphere, profound effects changes in vegetation can have upon wind speed, and the link of human activity to increased greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. This section serves as a reference for and includes links to seven classroom activities.

  10. Forests, climate change and tourism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Michael Hall; Daniel Scott; Stefan Gössling

    2011-01-01

    Forests are an important store of carbon within the global carbon cycle and increasingly play a role in climate change adaptation and mitigation. The review illustrates that the cultural, economic and environmental services of forests that are utilized for tourism and recreation are being affected by climate change. In addition to the changes to the distribution and composition of forests

  11. Hydrological Cycle in the Indonesian Archipelago and Rapid Climate Changes During Glacial Period at low Latitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caillon, N.; Levi, C.; Bassinot, F.; Waelbroeck, C.; Labeyrie, L.; Guichard, F.; Rebaubier, H.; Michel, E.

    2006-12-01

    An high resolution (0.2-0.6 ka) record of paired measurements of Mg/Ca and ?18Oc (calcite) were obtained on planktonic foraminifera Globigerinoides ruber (white) picked from core MD98-2165 (east tropical Indian Ocean ; 9°38'S, 118°20'E) over the 0-200 ka time interval (extending back in time PhD thesis's work of C. Levi on the LGM-Holocene transition). Cleaning procedure for Mg/Ca followed Barker et al., 2003's procedure and Mg/Ca ratios were performed at the LSCE on an ICP-OES following de Villiers et al, 2002's method. Mg/Ca precisions obtained on G. ruber samples are 4.2% (1?, pooled RSD). Using the Mg/Ca-SST estimates and coupled ?18Oc measurements, a record of water ?18O has been calculated; corrected for ice-volume global contribution using Waelbroeck et al., 2002 reconstruction. Our results suggest a narrow climatic coupling between low latitudes hydrological cycle and northern high latitude climate during the last glacial period, with a reconstructed surface water saltier (around 0.5 psu) and slightly warmer (0.2-1°C) associated with North Atlantic cold episodes. This coupling is in agreement with a weakening of the East Asian monsoon activity during cooling of the Europe-Asia continent that can be explained by a southward shift of the ITCZ as proposed by Labeyrie et al. (C.R. Geosciences, 2004).

  12. Environmental magnetism and climate change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Barbara A. Maher

    2007-01-01

    A major and pressing problem is to understand how, and how fast, the Earth's climate has changed in the past, with and without human influences on the global carbon cycle. Magnetic, remanence-acquiring, minerals, mostly iron oxides and sulphides, occur ubiquitously in sediments. They can act as sensitive recorders of past climates, because as climate has varied (from glacial to interglacial,

  13. CLIMATE VARIABILITY AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Climate change and climate variability has received considerable attention from the scientific community in recent decades and has led to a better understanding of various climate phenomena and driving mechanisms. This increased understanding of climate has prompted engineers and policy makers to as...

  14. Recent climate changes over the Tibetan Plateau and their impacts on energy and water cycle: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kun; Wu, Hui; Qin, Jun; Lin, Changgui; Tang, Wenjun; Chen, Yingying

    2014-01-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) exerts strong thermal forcing on the atmosphere over Asian monsoon region and supplies water resources to adjacent river basins. Recently, the Plateau experienced evident climate changes, which have changed atmospheric and hydrological cycles and thus reshaped the local environment. This study reviewed recent research progress in the climate changes and explored their impacts on the Plateau energy and water cycle, based on which a conceptual model to synthesize these changes was proposed and urgent issues to be explored were summarized. The TP has experienced an overall surface air warming and moistening, solar dimming, and wind stilling since the beginning of the 1980s. The surface warming depends on elevation and its horizontal pattern is consistent with the one of the glacier change. Accompanying the warming was air moistening, and both facilitated the trigger of more deep-clouds, which resulted in solar dimming. Surface wind speed declined from the 1970s, as a result of atmospheric circulation adjustment caused by the differential surface warming between the Asian high-latitude and low-latitude. The climate changes had weakened the thermal forcing over the TP. The warming and wind stilling lowered the Bowen ratio and led to less surface sensible heating. Atmospheric radiative cooling was enhanced, mainly by outgoing longwave emission from the warming planetary system and slightly by solar radiation reflection. Both processes contributed to the thermal forcing weakening over the Plateau. The water cycle was also altered by the climate changes. The wind stilling may have weakened water vapor exchange between the Asia monsoon region and the Plateau and thus led to less precipitation in the monsoon-impacted southern and eastern Plateau, but the warming enhanced land evaporation. Their overlap resulted in runoff reduction in the southern and eastern Plateau regions. By contrast, more convective precipitation over the central TP was triggered under the warmer and moister condition and yielded more runoff; meanwhile, the solar dimming weakened lake evaporation. The two together with enhanced glacier melts contributed to the lake expansion in the central TP.

  15. Climate change action plan

    E-print Network

    Delivery Climate change action plan 2009-2011 #12;2 | Climate change action plan ©istockphoto.com #12;Climate Change Action Plan Climate change action plan | 3 Contents Overview 4 Preface and Introduction 5 Climate change predictions for Scotland 6 The role of forestry 7 Protecting and managing

  16. Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Weather is notoriously unpredictable; however, climate descriptions, which identify average and normal temperatures and precipitation levels, tend to be perceived as stable, at least over time scales that humans can easily relate to. New evidence suggests that hasn't always been the case. This video segment describes climate data, obtained from ice cores drilled into the Greenland Ice Sheet, that suggest the Earth has undergone dramatic climate shifts in relatively short spans of time. The segment is five minutes forty-eight seconds in length. A background essay and discussion questions are included.

  17. Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2009-05-04

    This website is intended to describe the differences between weather and climate. It includes sections about sky, sea, ice, land, life, and people. Each section has a discussion of the human impact on that part of the environment.

  18. Each life stage matters: the importance of assessing the response to climate change over the complete life cycle in butterflies.

    PubMed

    Radchuk, Viktoriia; Turlure, Camille; Schtickzelle, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    As ectothermic organisms, butterflies have widely been used as models to explore the predicted impacts of climate change. However, most studies explore only one life stage; to our best knowledge, none have integrated the impact of temperature on the vital rates of all life stages for a species of conservation concern. Besides, most population viability analysis models for butterflies are based on yearly population growth rate, precluding the implementation and assessment of important climate change scenarios, where climate change occurs mainly, or differently, during some seasons. Here, we used a combination of laboratory and field experiments to quantify the impact of temperature on all life stages of a vulnerable glacial relict butterfly. Next, we integrated these impacts into an overall population response using a deterministic periodic matrix model and explored the impact of several climate change scenarios. Temperature positively affected egg, pre-diapause larva and pupal survival, and the number of eggs laid by a female; only the survival of overwintering larva was negatively affected by an increase in temperature. Despite the positive impact of warming on many life stages, population viability was reduced under all scenarios, with predictions of much shorter times to extinction than under the baseline (current temperature situation) scenario. Indeed, model predictions were the most sensitive to changes in survival of overwintering larva, the only stage negatively affected by warming. A proper consideration of every stage of the life cycle is important when designing conservation guidelines in the light of climate change. This is in line with the resource-based habitat view, which explicitly refers to the habitat as a collection of resources needed for all life stages of the species. We, therefore, encourage adopting a resource-based habitat view for population viability analysis and development of conservation guidelines for butterflies, and more generally, other organisms. Life stages that are cryptic or difficult to study should not be forsaken as they may be key determinants in the overall response to climate change, as we found with overwintering Boloria eunomia larvae. PMID:22924795

  19. Preliminary results of carbon cycling in southwestern ecosystems: Implications for climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Klopatek, C.C. [Forest Service, Tempe, AZ (United States). Rocky Mountain Station; [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Microbiology; Murphy, K.L.; Klopatek, J.M. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Botany

    1995-12-31

    By determining the C pool sizes, cycling and relative sequestering rates, the authors intend to estimate the effects of a vegetation change caused by a temperature increase and available moisture decrease. A predominant source of C for the soil compartment is the plant litter and its subsequent decomposition. The resulting effect of temperature and moisture on decomposition will vary according to the biome and litter quality of that biome. Litter quality, referring to the carbon and other nutrient fractions, strongly influences the potential rate of decomposition. The preliminary findings indicate that litter quality and moisture, not temperature, are the major controlling variables in decomposition.

  20. CONSIDERATIONS FOR CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-print Network

    Neff, Jason

    CONSIDERATIONS FOR CLIMATE CHANGE AND VARIABILITY ADAPTATION ON THE NAVAJO NATION March 2014 Julie Nania & Karen Cozzetto, et. al #12;Considerations for Climate Change and Variability Adaptation provided information for and authored the Framework Tribal Climate Change Adaptation Report

  1. Global Studies of the Sulfur Cycle Including the Influence of DMS and Fossil Fuel Sulfur on Climate and Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penner, Joyce E.

    1998-01-01

    The indirect effect of anthropogenic aerosols, wherein aerosol particles are thought to increase cloud droplet concentrations and cloud lifetime, is the most uncertain component of climate forcing over the past 100 years. Here, for the first time, we use a mechanistic treatment of droplet nucleation and a prognostic treatment of the number of cloud droplets to study the indirect aerosol effect from changes in carbonaceous and sulfate aerosols. Cloud droplet nucleation is parameterized as a function of total aerosol number concentration, updraft velocity and a shape parameter, which takes into account the mechanism, of sulfate aerosol formation, while cloud droplet number depends on the nucleation as well as on droplet sinks. Whereas previous treatments have predicted annual average indirect effects between -1 and -2 W/sq m, we obtain an indirect aerosol effect between -0.14 W/sq m and -0.42 W/sq m in the global mean.

  2. Climate change impairs processes of soil and plant N cycling in European beech forests on marginal soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejedor, Javier; Gasche, Rainer; Gschwendtner, Silvia; Leberecht, Martin; Bimüller, Carolin; Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid; Pole, Andrea; Schloter, Michael; Rennenberg, Heinz; Simon, Judy; Hanewinkel, Marc; Baltensweiler, Andri; Bilela, Silvija; Dannenmann, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Beech forests of Central Europe are covering large areas with marginal calcareous soils, but provide important ecological services and represent a significant economical value. The vulnerability of these ecosystems to projected climate conditions (higher temperatures, increase of extreme drought and precipitation events) is currently unclear. Here we present comprehensive data on the influence of climate change conditions on ecosystem performance, considering soil nitrogen biogeochemistry, soil microbiology, mycorrhiza ecology and plant physiology. We simultaneously quantified major plant and soil gross N turnover processes by homogenous triple 15N isotope labeling of intact beech natural regeneration-soil-microbe systems. This isotope approach was combined with a space for time climate change experiment, i.e. we transferred intact beech seedling-soil-microbe mesocosms from a slope with N-exposure (representing present day climate conditions) to a slope with S exposure (serving as a warmer and drier model climate for future conditions). Transfers within N slope served as controls. After an equilibration period of 1 year, three isotope labeling/harvest cycles were performed. Reduced soil water content resulted in a persistent decline of ammonia oxidizing bacteria in soil (AOB). Consequently, we found a massive five-fold reduction of gross nitrification in the climate change treatment and a subsequent strong decline in soil nitrate concentrations as well as nitrate uptake by microorganisms and beech. Because nitrate was the major nutrient for beech in this forest type with little importance of ammonium and amino acids, this resulted in a strongly reduced performance of beech natural regeneration with reduced N content, N metabolite concentrations and plant biomass. These findings provided an explanation for a large-scale decline of distribution of beech forests on calcareous soils in Europe by almost 80% until 2080 predicted by statistical modeling. Hence, we question the sustainability of such forests under projected climate change conditions, but also discuss potential mitigation and adaptation options. Important comment: The topic of this abstract is subject to a press embargo, because it is in review at a Nature Journal

  3. Climate change and avian influenza

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Gilbert; J. Slingenbergh; X. Xiao

    2008-01-01

    Summary This paper discusses impacts of climate change on the ecology of avian influenza viruses (AI viruses), which presumably co-evolved with migratory water birds, with virus also persisting outside the host in subarctic water bodies. Climate change would almost certainly alter bird migration, influence the AI virus transmission cycle and directly affect virus survival outside the host. The joint, net

  4. Current Climate Variability & Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diem, J.; Criswell, B.; Elliott, W. C.

    2013-12-01

    Current Climate Variability & Change is the ninth among a suite of ten interconnected, sequential labs that address all 39 climate-literacy concepts in the U.S. Global Change Research Program's Climate Literacy: The Essential Principles of Climate Sciences. The labs are as follows: Solar Radiation & Seasons, Stratospheric Ozone, The Troposphere, The Carbon Cycle, Global Surface Temperature, Glacial-Interglacial Cycles, Temperature Changes over the Past Millennium, Climates & Ecosystems, Current Climate Variability & Change, and Future Climate Change. All are inquiry-based, on-line products designed in a way that enables students to construct their own knowledge of a topic. Questions representative of various levels of Webb's depth of knowledge are embedded in each lab. In addition to the embedded questions, each lab has three or four essential questions related to the driving questions for the lab suite. These essential questions are presented as statements at the beginning of the material to represent the lab objectives, and then are asked at the end as questions to function as a summative assessment. For example, the Current Climate Variability & Change is built around these essential questions: (1) What has happened to the global temperature at the Earth's surface, in the middle troposphere, and in the lower stratosphere over the past several decades?; (2) What is the most likely cause of the changes in global temperature over the past several decades and what evidence is there that this is the cause?; and (3) What have been some of the clearly defined effects of the change in global temperature on the atmosphere and other spheres of the Earth system? An introductory Prezi allows the instructor to assess students' prior knowledge in relation to these questions, while also providing 'hooks' to pique their interest related to the topic. The lab begins by presenting examples of and key differences between climate variability (e.g., Mt. Pinatubo eruption) and climate change. The next section guides students through the exploration of temporal changes in global temperature from the surface to the lower stratosphere. Students discover that there has been global warming over the past several decades, and the subsequent section allows them to consider solar radiation and greenhouse gases as possible causes of this warming. Students then zoom in on different latitudinal zones to examine changes in temperature for each zone and hypothesize about why one zone may have warmed more than others. The final section, prior to the answering of the essential questions, is an examination of the following effects of the current change in temperatures: loss of sea ice; rise of sea level; loss of permafrost loss; and moistening of the atmosphere. The lab addresses 14 climate-literacy concepts and all seven climate-literacy principles through data and images that are mainly NASA products. It focuses on the satellite era of climate data; therefore, 1979 is the typical starting year for most datasets used by students. Additionally, all time-series analysis end with the latest year with full-year data availability; thus, the climate variability and trends truly are 'current.'

  5. Trophic Interaction Cycles in Tundra Ecosystems and the Impact of Climate Change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    ROLF A. IMS; EVA FUGLEI

    2005-01-01

    While population cycles are geographically widespread, it is on arctic tundra that such cycles appear to be most influential for the functioning of the whole ecosystem. We give an overview of tundra species that exhibit population cycles and describe what are currently believed to be the causal mechanisms. Population cycles most likely originate from trophic interactions within the plant-based tundra

  6. Climate Systems and Climate Change Is Climate Change Real?

    E-print Network

    Pan, Feifei

    Chapter 10 Climate Systems and Climate Change #12;Is Climate Change Real? 1980 1898 2005 2003 #12;Arctic Sea Ice Changes #12;Observed Global Surface Air Temperature #12;! Current climate: weather station data, remote sensing data, numerical modeling using General Circulation Models (GCM) ! Past climate

  7. Implications for the hydrologic cycle under climate change due to the expansion of bioenergy crops in the Midwestern United States

    PubMed Central

    Le, Phong V. V.; Kumar, Praveen; Drewry, Darren T.

    2011-01-01

    To meet emerging bioenergy demands, significant areas of the large-scale agricultural landscape of the Midwestern United States could be converted to second generation bioenergy crops such as miscanthus and switchgrass. The high biomass productivity of bioenergy crops in a longer growing season linked tightly to water use highlight the potential for significant impact on the hydrologic cycle in the region. This issue is further exacerbated by the uncertainty in the response of the vegetation under elevated CO2 and temperature. We use a mechanistic multilayer canopy-root-soil model to (i) capture the eco-physiological acclimations of bioenergy crops under climate change, and (ii) predict how hydrologic fluxes are likely to be altered from their current magnitudes. Observed data and Monte Carlo simulations of weather for recent past and future scenarios are used to characterize the variability range of the predictions. Under present weather conditions, miscanthus and switchgrass utilized more water than maize for total seasonal evapotranspiration by approximately 58% and 36%, respectively. Projected higher concentrations of atmospheric CO2 (550 ppm) is likely to decrease water used for evapotranspiration of miscanthus, switchgrass, and maize by 12%, 10%, and 11%, respectively. However, when climate change with projected increases in air temperature and reduced summer rainfall are also considered, there is a net increase in evapotranspiration for all crops, leading to significant reduction in soil-moisture storage and specific surface runoff. These results highlight the critical role of the warming climate in potentially altering the water cycle in the region under extensive conversion of existing maize cropping to support bioenergy demand. PMID:21876137

  8. Modeling the carbon cycle under altered ecosystem disturbance rates and the impacts on climate change mitigation strategies over the 21st century within an integrated assessment model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Page, Y.; Hurtt, G. C.; Thomson, A.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Wise, M.; Calvin, K. V.; Fisk, J. P.; Edmonds, J.; Janetos, A.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the interaction between the terrestrial carbon and human economic cycles is essential to explore climate change mitigation strategies. If ecosystem will store less carbon in the future, for example, then attaining a particular 21st-century climate forcing target becomes more difficult, implying a reduction in anthropogenic emissions. Coupling economic integrated assessment models (IAMs) to dynamic ecosystem models is thus fundamental to account for future changes in the carbon cycle, but IAMs carbon cycle modules often do not represent such important processes as disturbances or climate feedbacks. Here we outline an ongoing project to couple the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) to the Ecosystem Demography model (ED), with a focus on potential changes in disturbance rates (fires, hurricanes). As a first step, we evaluate the impacts of such changes with both models uncoupled. Our results suggest that a moderate increase in disturbances could significantly reduce the amount of carbon stored in forests. In GCAM, under a carbon emission constraint policy, this results in global economic changes - including energy generation shifts towards low polluting technologies - to compensate for increased disturbance emissions. Altered disturbance rates could thus be an important factor to account for in projecting the carbon cycle and exploring the efficiency of mitigation policies. A fully coupled model will provide more insights into the sensitivity of climate change mitigation pathways to the carbon cycle.

  9. Impact of climate change on the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea pelagic planktonic ecosystem and associated carbon cycle

    E-print Network

    and associated carbon cycle M. Herrmann, C. Estournel, F. Diaz, F. Adloff ; LEGOS, LA, MIO, CNRM The northwestern and associated carbon cycle to the long-term evolution of oceanic and atmospheric circulations. For that we planktonic ecosystem and associated carbon cycle at a first order. However, differences mainly induced

  10. Climate Change and Transportation

    E-print Network

    Minnesota, University of

    1 Climate Change and Transportation Addressing Climate Change in the Absence of Federal Guidelines;6 WSDOT Efforts · Climate Change Team · Project Level GHG Approach · Planning Level GHG Approach · Alternative Fuels Corridor · Recent legislation and research #12;7 WSDOT Efforts: Climate Change Team

  11. Climate Change Schools Project...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinzey, Krista

    2010-01-01

    This article features the award-winning Climate Change Schools Project which aims to: (1) help schools to embed climate change throughout the national curriculum; and (2) showcase schools as "beacons" for climate change teaching, learning, and positive action in their local communities. Operating since 2007, the Climate Change Schools Project…

  12. Using Multiple Approaches, including ?18O Signatures of Phosphate to Investigate Potential Phosphorus Limitation and Cycling under Changing Climate Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, K.; Paytan, A.; Field, C. B.; Honn, E.; Edwards, E.; Gottlieb, R.

    2012-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) is often a limiting or co-limiting nutrient in terrestrial systems. It has been proposed that it will play an even greater role in ecosystems experiencing some of the many predicted effects of climate change, in particular release from nitrogen limitation. Recent work in 2007 by Menge et al. suggests that this is indeed a possibility. To investigate the potential for P limitation, and P cycling under multiple controlled conditions we collected samples from the Jasper Ridge Global Change Experiment (JRGCE) in May 2011. For over a decade the JRGCE has been manipulating four key parameters predicted to change in the future in a native Californian grassland system. Elevated Nitrogen deposition, increased precipitation, increased pCO2, and increased temperature are applied and monitored in a split plot design at the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve in the eastern foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains, California. Work done previously at the site using a suite of indicators of the potential P limitation suggest P limitation in some of the manipulated plots in the JRGCE. In this study we replicate a subset of the prior analyses to compare inter-annual signals of P limitation, and further attempt to utilize the oxygen isotopes of phosphate to investigate P cycling in soils at JRGCE. A fractional soil extraction process for phosphate enables separation of several operationally defined P pools, and provides auxiliary information regarding the relative concentrations of bio-available P, and relevant minerals in this grassland system under the varied conditions.

  13. Assessment of climate change effects on water and carbon cycling and habitat change in the Yukon River Basin: Piloting a National Strategy (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdoch, P. S.; Striegl, R. G.

    2009-12-01

    Recent hydrologic investigations conducted in the Yukon River Basin indicate shifts in the timing and source of water and carbon exports by the Yukon River to the Bering Sea. Much of the observed change can be attributed to permafrost thaw and increased infiltration; factors that also affect surface water extent and chemistry, vegetation and habitat composition and condition, biogeochemical cycling, and energy balance. Consequently, USGS has initiated a comprehensive interdisciplinary investigation of processes controlling water and carbon cycling and export in the Yukon Flats region of interior Alaska, an important area for waterfowl and wildlife that is considered to be particularly prone to permafrost thaw and concomitant changes in water availability and distribution. The investigation integrates biological, chemical, geological, hydrological, meteorological, modeling and remote sensing studies by USGS, USFWS, universities and others, in collaboration with Alaska native volunteers, to determine climate change effects on water and carbon cycling of the region. Results of the intensive field and modeling studies will have transfer value to other similar regions of the Yukon Basin and other subarctic regions and will provide a foundation for scaling to a larger basin wide assessment. The Yukon River Basin initiative is the pilot of a national program for establishing climate related collaborative observation, research, and decision support strategies by the Department of Interior.

  14. Life-cycle assessment of electricity generation systems and applications for climate change policy analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Joseph Meier

    2002-01-01

    This research uses Life-Cycle Assessment (LCA) to better understand the energy and environmental performance for two electricity generation systems, a 620 MW combined-cycle natural gas plant, and an 8kW building-integrated photovoltaic system. The results of the LCA are used to provide an effective and accurate means for evaluating greenhouse gas emission reduction strategies for U.S. electricity generation. The modern combined-cycle

  15. Campus Conversations: CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-print Network

    Attari, Shahzeen Z.

    booklet is an adaptation and updating of Global Warming and Climate Change, a brochure developed in 1994 that will address climate change. Scientists tell us that the climate of the earth is warming, and that the warmingCampus Conversations: CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE CAMPUS Southwestern Pennsylvania Program

  16. programs in climate change

    E-print Network

    existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) project develops and maintains advanced numerical models of the ocean, sea ice, and ice sheets for use in global climate change

  17. Metrics for biogeophysical climate forcings from land use and land cover changes and their inclusion in life cycle assessment: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Bright, Ryan M

    2015-03-17

    The regulation by vegetation of heat, momentum, and moisture exchanges between the land surface and the atmosphere is a major component in Earth's climate system. By altering surface biogeophysics, anthropogenic land use activities often perturb these exchanges and thereby directly affect climate. Although long recognized scientifically as being important, biogeophysical climate forcings from land use and land cover changes (LULCC) are rarely included in life cycle assessment (LCA). Here, I review climate metrics for characterizing biogeophysical climate forcings from LULCC, focusing mostly on those that do not require coupled land-atmosphere climate models to compute. I discuss their merits, highlight their pros and cons in terms of their compatibility with the LCA framework, outline near-term practical guidelines and solutions for their integration, and point to areas of longer term research needs in both the climate science and LCA research communities. PMID:25719274

  18. Is the life cycle of high arctic aphids adapted to climate change?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maurice Hullé; Joël Bonhomme; Damien Maurice; Jean-Christophe Simon

    2008-01-01

    The high arctic aphid Acyrthosiphon svalbardicum Heikinheimo is endemic to Svalbard and has developed a shortened life cycle to cope with harsh environmental conditions prevailing\\u000a in this archipelago. Previous studies in the 1990s showed that contrarily to Sitobion calvulum, a species which is also restricted to Svalbard and displays a two-generation life cycle, A. svalbardicum can produce a third generation

  19. Designing Global Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffith, P. C.; ORyan, C.

    2012-12-01

    In a time when sensationalism rules the online world, it is best to keep things short. The people of the online world are not passing back and forth lengthy articles, but rather brief glimpses of complex information. This is the target audience we attempt to educate. Our challenge is then to attack not only ignorance, but also apathy toward global climate change, while conforming to popular modes of learning. When communicating our scientific material, it was difficult to determine what level of information was appropriate for our audience, especially with complex subject matter. Our unconventional approach for communicating the carbon crisis as it applies to global climate change caters to these 'recreational learners'. Using story-telling devices acquired from Carolyne's biomedical art background coupled with Peter's extensive knowledge of carbon cycle and ecosystems science, we developed a dynamic series of illustrations that capture the attention of a callous audience. Adapting complex carbon cycle and climate science into comic-book-style animations creates a channel between artist, scientist, and the general public. Brief scenes of information accompanied by text provide a perfect platform for visual learners, as well as fresh portrayals of stale material for the jaded. In this way art transcends the barriers of the cerebral and the abstract, paving the road to understanding.;

  20. Comprehensive Scenarios of Millennial Timescale Carbon Cycle and Climate

    E-print Network

    Williamson, Mark

    Comprehensive Scenarios of Millennial Timescale Carbon Cycle and Climate Change in a new Earth Model Efficient Numerical Terrestrial Scheme (ENTS) Millennial carbon cycle and climate change 6PacificGlobal #12;Carbon cycle and future emissions 1990s CO2 = 352ppmv (below observations) Ocean C sink = 3.2 Gt

  1. Kiavallakkikput Agviq (Into the Whaling Cycle): Cetaceousness and Climate Change Among the Iñupiat of Arctic Alaska

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chie Sakakibara

    2010-01-01

    The Iñupiat of Arctic Alaska identify themselves as the “People of the Whales.” The flesh of the bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus) is high in vitamins and other components that traditionally sustained human physiology in a climate that is unsuitable for agriculture. Not surprisingly, the People of the Whales depend on the bowhead for sustenance and cultural meaning. The bowhead remains

  2. "Managing Department Climate Change"

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    "Managing Department Climate Change" #12;Presenters · Ronda Callister Professor, Department Department Climate? · Assesment is essential for determining strategies for initiating change · In a research climate · Each panelist will describe an intervention designed to improve department climate ­ Ronda

  3. Effect of long-term snow climate change on C and N cycling in the Great Basin Desert, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loik, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Snowfall is the dominant hydrologic input for high elevations and latitudes of the arid- and semi-arid western United States. Sierra Nevada snowpack provides numerous important services for California, but is vulnerable to anthropogenic forcing of the coupled ocean-atmosphere system. Fundamental ecological models envision migrations of species to higher elevations under a warmer climate, altered water cycling patterns, changes in carbon fluxes, and impacts on nutrient cycling. How will future complex patterns of snow depth and melt timing affect ecosystem patterns and processes at seasonal and decadal scales? To address such questions, my experiments utilize large-scale, long-term roadside snow fences to manipulate snow depth and melt timing at the ecotone between the Great Basin Desert shrub and the Sierra Nevada conifer forest in eastern California, USA. Soil water, carbon, and nitrogen dynamics were compared across snow depth treatments (increased, decreased, and ambient snow depths) as well as across microhabitats (under the canopies of the two dominant shrub species and in open, intercanopy sites.) At this site, April 1 snow pack averages 1344 mm (1928-2008) with a CV of 48%. Snow was about 2-fold deeper on increased depth plots, and was about 20% reduced on decreased snow plots, compared to upwind, ambient-depth plots. Snow fences altered snow melt timing by up to 18 days in high-snowfall years, and affected short-term soil moisture pulses less in low- than medium- or high-snowfall years. Soil temperature was colder during the low-snowfall winter of 2006-2007, compared to the prior and subsequent winters when ambient snowfall was higher. Short-term turnover rates of NO3- and NH4+ were higher after winter compared to summer, but there was considerable variation across snow depth treatments and small-scale microhabitats. Wintertime fluxes of CO2 from soils were dependent on soil temperature, which was affected by snow depth. Snow depth and microhabitat (particularly under the canopies of a N-fixing shrub) interacted to affect long-term patterns of snow depth forcing on total C and NO3-. Results indicate that snow depth affects water, carbon, and nitrogen dynamics in both winter and the subsequent spring and summer, and that plant community composition will feedback on water cycling, carbon storage, and N availability over longer time scales. Interactions between species responses and ecosystem processes may help maintain resilience to snow climate change at this widespread shrub-conifer ecotone.

  4. Abrupt Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site serves as a broad introduction to the subject of abrupt climate change. It cites several historical examples of climate change and their impact on human civilization. In addition, some of the current questions about climate are presented including the drying of the Sahel since the 1960s and changes in the El Nino pattern. The site includes links to a question and answer feature, paleoclimate research that focuses on how and why abrupt climate change events occurred in the recent past, and an explanation of a joint observational and modeling approach to climate change. There is also a link to the Climate Kids Corner with on-line activities.

  5. Uncertainty in Predicting the Effect of Climatic Change on the Carbon Cycling of Canadian Peatlands

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. R. Moore; N. T. Roulet; J. M. Waddington

    1998-01-01

    Northern peatlands play an important role globally in the cycling of C, through the exchange of CO2 with the atmosphere, the emission of CH4, the production and export of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and the storage of C. Under 2 × CO2 GCM scenarios, most Canadian peatlands will be exposed to increases in mean annual temperature ranging between 2 and

  6. Relationships between solar activity and climate change. [sunspot cycle effects on lower atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, W. O.

    1974-01-01

    Recurrent droughts are related to the double sunspot cycle. It is suggested that high solar activity generally increases meridional circulations and blocking patterns at high and intermediate latitudes, especially in winter. This effect is related to the sudden formation of cirrus clouds during strong geomagnetic activity that originates in the solar corpuscular emission.

  7. The Carbon Cycle and its Role in Climate Change: Activity 1

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-05-29

    In this activity (on page 1), learners role play as atoms to explore how atoms can be rearranged to make different materials. Learners group together and link arms or hold hands to form chemical bonds and act out the processes of photosynthesis and respiration. Use this activity to introduce the carbon cycle and follow this activity with two associated activities from the same resource.

  8. Climate Change and Biodiverstiy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site describes climate change due to human activities and natural factors; future scenarios due to global warming; and how climate change will impact ecosystems and biodiversity. It includes information on political activity such as avoidance, mitigation and adaptation as a response to climate change. Current projects of the United Nations Environment Programme - World Conservation Monitoring Centre( UNEP-WCMC) involving involving climate change migration and adaptation and impact on the ecosystem services.

  9. Dampening prey cycle overrides the impact of climate change on predator population dynamics: a long-term demographic study on tawny owls.

    PubMed

    Millon, Alexandre; Petty, Steve J; Little, Brian; Gimenez, Olivier; Cornulier, Thomas; Lambin, Xavier

    2014-06-01

    Predicting the dynamics of animal populations with different life histories requires careful understanding of demographic responses to multifaceted aspects of global changes, such as climate and trophic interactions. Continent-scale dampening of vole population cycles, keystone herbivores in many ecosystems, has been recently documented across Europe. However, its impact on guilds of vole-eating predators remains unknown. To quantify this impact, we used a 27-year study of an avian predator (tawny owl) and its main prey (field vole) collected in Kielder Forest (UK) where vole dynamics shifted from a high- to a low-amplitude fluctuation regime in the mid-1990s. We measured the functional responses of four demographic rates to changes in prey dynamics and winter climate, characterized by wintertime North Atlantic Oscillation (wNAO). First-year and adult survival were positively affected by vole density in autumn but relatively insensitive to wNAO. The probability of breeding and number of fledglings were higher in years with high spring vole densities and negative wNAO (i.e. colder and drier winters). These functional responses were incorporated into a stochastic population model. The size of the predator population was projected under scenarios combining prey dynamics and winter climate to test whether climate buffers or alternatively magnifies the impact of changes in prey dynamics. We found the observed dampening vole cycles, characterized by low spring densities, drastically reduced the breeding probability of predators. Our results illustrate that (i) change in trophic interactions can override direct climate change effect; and (ii) the demographic resilience entailed by longevity and the occurrence of a floater stage may be insufficient to buffer hypothesized environmental changes. Ultimately, dampened prey cycles would drive our owl local population towards extinction, with winter climate regimes only altering persistence time. These results suggest that other vole-eating predators are likely to be threatened by dampening vole cycles throughout Europe. PMID:24634279

  10. Dampening prey cycle overrides the impact of climate change on predator population dynamics: a long-term demographic study on tawny owls

    PubMed Central

    Millon, Alexandre; Petty, Steve J; Little, Brian; Gimenez, Olivier; Cornulier, Thomas; Lambin, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Predicting the dynamics of animal populations with different life histories requires careful understanding of demographic responses to multifaceted aspects of global changes, such as climate and trophic interactions. Continent-scale dampening of vole population cycles, keystone herbivores in many ecosystems, has been recently documented across Europe. However, its impact on guilds of vole-eating predators remains unknown. To quantify this impact, we used a 27-year study of an avian predator (tawny owl) and its main prey (field vole) collected in Kielder Forest (UK) where vole dynamics shifted from a high- to a low-amplitude fluctuation regime in the mid-1990s. We measured the functional responses of four demographic rates to changes in prey dynamics and winter climate, characterized by wintertime North Atlantic Oscillation (wNAO). First-year and adult survival were positively affected by vole density in autumn but relatively insensitive to wNAO. The probability of breeding and number of fledglings were higher in years with high spring vole densities and negative wNAO (i.e. colder and drier winters). These functional responses were incorporated into a stochastic population model. The size of the predator population was projected under scenarios combining prey dynamics and winter climate to test whether climate buffers or alternatively magnifies the impact of changes in prey dynamics. We found the observed dampening vole cycles, characterized by low spring densities, drastically reduced the breeding probability of predators. Our results illustrate that (i) change in trophic interactions can override direct climate change effect; and (ii) the demographic resilience entailed by longevity and the occurrence of a floater stage may be insufficient to buffer hypothesized environmental changes. Ultimately, dampened prey cycles would drive our owl local population towards extinction, with winter climate regimes only altering persistence time. These results suggest that other vole-eating predators are likely to be threatened by dampening vole cycles throughout Europe. PMID:24634279

  11. Carbonate formation and water level changes in a paleo-lake and its implication for carbon cycle and climate change, arid China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu; Wang, Nai'ang; Li, Zhuolun; Zhou, Xuehua; Zhang, Chengqi; Wang, Yue

    2013-12-01

    Carbonate deposition is a main inorganic carbon sink in lakes, which varies depending on climate change and internal lake dynamics. Research on the relationship between lake carbonate and climate will help to understand mechanisms of carbon cycle in lacustrine systems. The approach of this study is to explicitly link carbonate formation with Holocene long-term climate change and lake evolution in a paleo-lake (Zhuye Lake), which is a terminal lake of a typical inland drainage basin in arid China. This paper presents analysis on grain-size, carbonate content and mineralogical composition of sediment samples from different locations of Zhuye Lake. The results show that calcite and aragonite are two main components for the lake carbonate, and the carbonate enrichment is associated with lake expansion during the Late Glacial and early to middle Holocene. Holocene lake expansion in arid regions of China is usually connected with high basin-wide precipitation that can strengthen the basin-wide surface carbonate accumulation in the terminal lake. For this reason, Zhuye Lake plays a role of carbon sinks during the wet periods of the Holocene.

  12. Earth's Orbit and Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-10-18

    In this self-paced tutorial, learners examine data to determine the relative contribution of what we call natural climate cycles and that of human-caused greenhouse gases to contemporary climate change. Changes in the Earth-Sun geometry over time are explored using interactive digital applets. A section supporting pedagogical techniques that begin with student prior conceptions and a list of common Earth science student misconceptions are included. Vocabulary terms are hot linked to a glossary. This is the sixth of ten self-paced professional development modules providing opportunities for teachers to learn about climate change through first-hand data exploration.

  13. Global Climate Change Exploratorium

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Exploratorium

    This site, funded by NSF, is the home page for the Global Climate Change research explorer. Multicolor tabs at the top of the page link to further information and visualizations (graphs, charts, pictures, etc.) for climate change resources in each of the Earth's spheres, including: atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, biosphere, and global effects of climate change.

  14. The Changing Climate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Stephen H.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the global change of climate. Presents the trend of climate change with graphs. Describes mathematical climate models including expressions for the interacting components of the ocean-atmosphere system and equations representing the basic physical laws governing their behavior. Provides three possible responses on the change. (YP)

  15. The Mathematics Climate Change

    E-print Network

    Zeeman, Mary Lou

    ;Evaluating global warming #12;The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) nds that human - inducedThe Mathematics of Climate Change Graciela Chichilnisky UNESCO Professor of Mathematics January 7 & 8, 2008 #12;Climate Change is a New Phenomenon Notoriously di cult to model mathematically

  16. Environment and Climate Change

    E-print Network

    Galles, David

    Migration, Environment and Climate Change: ASSESSING THE EVIDENCE #12;The opinions expressed;Migration, Environment and Climate Change: ASSESSING THE EVIDENCE Edited by Frank Laczko and Christine with with the financial support of #12;3 Migration, Environment and Climate Change: Assessing the Evidence Contents

  17. Forest Research: Climate Change

    E-print Network

    Forest Research: Climate Change projects Forest Research is part of the Forestry Commission of climate change-related research is wide-ranging, covering impact assessment and monitoring, adaptation around a quarter of its research budget with Forest Research on climate change and related programmes

  18. Abrupt Climate Change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. B. Alley; J. Marotzke; W. D. Nordhaus; J. T. Overpeck; D. M. Peteet; R. A. Pielke Jr; R. T. Pierrehumbert; P. B. Rhines; T. F. Stocker; L. D. Talley; J. M. Wallace

    2003-01-01

    Large, abrupt, and widespread climate changes with major impacts have occurred repeatedly in the past, when the Earth system was forced across thresholds. Although abrupt climate changes can occur for many reasons, it is conceivable that human forcing of climate change is increasing the probability of large, abrupt events. Were such an event to recur, the economic and ecological impacts

  19. Climate Change Workshop 2007

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    1 Climate Change Workshop 2007 Adaptive Management and Resilience Relevant for the Platte River, UNL Climate Change Workshop 2007 · Resilience ·Why it matters · Adaptive Management ·How it helps ·Adaptive Capacity · What it is Overview Climate Change Workshop 2007 "A public Domain, once a velvet carpet

  20. International Finance and Climate Change

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Junshan

    International Finance and Climate Change Thursday, October 17, 2013 Breakfast ­ 8:30 a Principal Climate Change Specialist, Climate Business Group at International Finance Corporation, World Bank Group Vladimir Stenek Senior Climate Change Specialist, Climate Business Department of the International

  1. The effects of global climate change on the cycling and processes of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Driscoll, K.; Mayer, B.; Su, J.; Mathis, M.

    2014-05-01

    The fate and cycling of two selected legacy persistent organic pollutants (POPs), PCB 153 and ?-HCH, in the North Sea in the 21st century have been modelled with combined hydrodynamic and fate and transport ocean models (HAMSOM and FANTOM, respectively). To investigate the impact of climate variability on POPs in the North Sea in the 21st century, future scenario model runs for three 10-year periods to the year 2100 using plausible levels of both in situ concentrations and atmospheric, river and open boundary inputs are performed. This slice mode under a moderate scenario (A1B) is sufficient to provide a basis for further analysis. For the HAMSOM and atmospheric forcing, results of the IPCC A1B (SRES) 21st century scenario are utilized, where surface forcing is provided by the REMO downscaling of the ECHAM5 global atmospheric model, and open boundary conditions are provided by the MPIOM global ocean model. Dry gas deposition and volatilization of ?-HCH increase in the future relative to the present by up to 20% (in the spring and summer months for deposition and in summer for volatilization). In the water column, total mass of ?-HCH and PCB 153 remain fairly steady in all three runs. In sediment, ?-HCH increases in the future runs, relative to the present, while PCB 153 in sediment decreases exponentially in all three runs, but even faster in the future, due to the increased number of storms, increased duration of gale wind conditions and increased water and air temperatures, all of which are the result of climate change. Annual net sinks exceed sources at the ends of all periods. Overall, the model results indicate that the climate change scenarios considered here generally have a negligible influence on the simulated fate and transport of the two POPs in the North Sea, although the increased number and magnitude of storms in the 21st century will result in POP resuspension and ensuing revolatilization events. Trends in emissions from primary and secondary sources will remain the key driver of levels of these contaminants over time.

  2. Climate change 2007 - mitigation of climate change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. Metz; O. Davidson; P. Bosch; R. Dave; L. Meyer

    2007-01-01

    This volume of the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) provides a comprehensive, state-of-the-art and worldwide overview of scientific knowledge related to the mitigation of climate change. It includes a detailed assessment of costs and potentials of mitigation technologies and practices, implementation barriers, and policy options for the sectors: energy supply, transport, buildings, industry,

  3. Is Climate Change Happening?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    King's Centre for Visualization in Science

    For this lesson, the guiding Concept Question is: What is climate change and how does climate relate to greenhouse gas concentrations over time? This activity is the second lesson in a nine-lesson module 'Visualizing and Understanding the Science of Climate Change' produced by the International Year of Chemistry project (2011).

  4. Atmospheric circulation climate changes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin E. Trenberth

    1995-01-01

    The role of the atmospheric circulation in climate change is examined. A review is given of the information available in the past record on the atmosheric circulation and its role in climate change, firstly at the surface via sea level pressure in both the northern and southern hemispheres and secondly for the free atmosphere. As with most climate information, the

  5. IISDnet: Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) provides this site to present its knowledge base for climate change and adaptation. The knowledge base includes links to global projects on climate change, policy documents and research reports. The e-newsletter, Climate Canada, is accessible from this site as well.

  6. Global Climatic Change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard A. Houghton; George M. Woodwell

    1989-01-01

    This paper reviews the climatic effects of trace gases such as carbon dioxide and methane. It discusses the expected changes from the increases in trace gases and the extent to which the expected changes can be found in the climate record and in the retreat of glaciers. The use of ice cores in correlating atmospheric composition and climate is discussed.

  7. Winds of change: How will windstorms and forest harvesting affect C cycling in northern MN under different climate scenarios?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucash, M. S.; Scheller, R. M.; Gustafson, E.; Sturtevant, B.

    2013-12-01

    Forest managers struggle to manage timber resources while integrating the complex interactions that exist among disturbances with the novel conditions produced by a changing climate. To help forest managers better integrate climate change and disturbance projections into their forest management plans, we are using a forest landscape disturbance and succession model (LANDIS-II, Century extension) to project carbon sequestration in northern Minnesota under multiple climate change, management and disturbance scenarios. The model was calibrated and validated using empirical estimates of aboveground productivity and net ecosystem exchange. Our simulations suggest that windstorms will decrease tree biomass and soil organic matter and will increase dead C, resulting in an overall decrease in total C and C sink strength under the GFDL A1FI climate scenario. However the direct effects of climate change on C via altered production and heterotrophic respiration were larger than the impacts of wind. In contrast, forest harvesting will remain the dominant determinant of C dynamics under A1FI, even under management scenarios of more selective logging and longer rotation periods. Recovery from historic (late 1800s and early 1900s) disturbance - clearcut logging and wildfire - remain an important, though declining, driver of long-term C dynamics. Our research results will inform regional planning efforts and help forest managers evaluate the relative importance of disturbances (e.g. wind) and forest harvesting under a changing climate.

  8. High regional climate sensitivity over continental China constrained by glacial-recent changes in temperature and the hydrological cycle

    PubMed Central

    Eagle, Robert A.; Risi, Camille; Mitchell, Jonathan L.; Eiler, John M.; Seibt, Ulrike; Neelin, J. David; Li, Gaojun; Tripati, Aradhna K.

    2013-01-01

    The East Asian monsoon is one of Earth’s most significant climatic phenomena, and numerous paleoclimate archives have revealed that it exhibits variations on orbital and suborbital time scales. Quantitative constraints on the climate changes associated with these past variations are limited, yet are needed to constrain sensitivity of the region to changes in greenhouse gas levels. Here, we show central China is a region that experienced a much larger temperature change since the Last Glacial Maximum than typically simulated by climate models. We applied clumped isotope thermometry to carbonates from the central Chinese Loess Plateau to reconstruct temperature and water isotope shifts from the Last Glacial Maximum to present. We find a summertime temperature change of 6–7 °C that is reproduced by climate model simulations presented here. Proxy data reveal evidence for a shift to lighter isotopic composition of meteoric waters in glacial times, which is also captured by our model. Analysis of model outputs suggests that glacial cooling over continental China is significantly amplified by the influence of stationary waves, which, in turn, are enhanced by continental ice sheets. These results not only support high regional climate sensitivity in Central China but highlight the fundamental role of planetary-scale atmospheric dynamics in the sensitivity of regional climates to continental glaciation, changing greenhouse gas levels, and insolation. PMID:23671087

  9. Messaging climate change uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooke, Roger M.

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is full of uncertainty and the messengers of climate science are not getting the uncertainty narrative right. To communicate uncertainty one must first understand it, and then avoid repeating the mistakes of the past.

  10. 11 CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-print Network

    unknown authors

    Information collected over many years at northern climate stations, suggests that the climate in the Mackenzie Delta and the Mackenzie Valley region might be changing. Communities and other stakeholders are concerned about the potential

  11. Climate change changing hazards?

    E-print Network

    Stoffelen, Ad

    , Brussels How does the climate system work? sun heats surface (land + ocean), mainly in tropics atmosphere = -15°C surface heats atmosphere warm atmosphere gives extra heating => Tglob = +15°C "Greenhouse effect" #12;21.03.2012 Andreas Sterl, Insurance Strategy, Brussels Greenhouse gases only 1

  12. Tropical forests and the global carbon cycle: impacts of atmospheric carbon dioxide, climate change and rate of deforestation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wolfgang Cramer; Alberte Bondeau; Sibyll Schaphoff; Wolfgang Lucht; B. Smith; S. Sitch

    2004-01-01

    The remaining carbon stocks in wet tropical forests are currently at risk because of anthropogenic defores- tation, but also because of the possibility of release driven by climate change. To identify the relative roles of CO2 increase, changing temperature and rainfall, and deforestation in the future, and the magnitude of their impact on atmospheric CO2 concentrations, we have applied a

  13. Global Climate Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Dorothy K.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses recent changes in the Earth's climate. Summarizes reports on changes related to carbon dioxide, temperature, rain, sea level, and glaciers in polar areas. Describes the present effort to measure the changes. Lists 16 references. (YP)

  14. Centennial-scale interactions between the carbon cycle and anthropogenic climate change using a dynamic Earth system model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Winguth; U. Mikolajewicz; M. Gröger; E. Maier-Reimer; G. Schurgers; M. Vizcaíno

    2005-01-01

    A complex Earth system model including atmosphere, ocean, ice sheets, marine carbon cycle and terrestrial vegetation was used to study the long-term response (100-1000 yrs) of the climate to different increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations. A 3.2 K global mean surface temperature increase is simulated for a 3xCO2 experiment. The freshwater input by melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet due to

  15. Centennial-scale interactions between the carbon cycle and anthropogenic climate change using a dynamic Earth system model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Winguth; U. Mikolajewicz; M. Gröger; E. Maier-Reimer; G. Schurgers; M. Vizcaíno

    2005-01-01

    A complex Earth system model including atmosphere, ocean, ice sheets, marine carbon cycle and terrestrial vegetation was used to study the long-term response (100–1000 yrs) of the climate to different increased atmospheric CO2 concentrations. A 3.2 K global mean surface temperature increase is simulated for a 3xCO2 experiment. The freshwater input by melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet due to

  16. Tropical forests and the global carbon cycle: impacts of atmospheric carbon dioxide, climate change and rate of deforestation.

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Wolfgang; Bondeau, Alberte; Schaphoff, Sibyll; Lucht, Wolfgang; Smith, Benjamin; Sitch, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    The remaining carbon stocks in wet tropical forests are currently at risk because of anthropogenic deforestation, but also because of the possibility of release driven by climate change. To identify the relative roles of CO2 increase, changing temperature and rainfall, and deforestation in the future, and the magnitude of their impact on atmospheric CO2 concentrations, we have applied a dynamic global vegetation model, using multiple scenarios of tropical deforestation (extrapolated from two estimates of current rates) and multiple scenarios of changing climate (derived from four independent offline general circulation model simulations). Results show that deforestation will probably produce large losses of carbon, despite the uncertainty about the deforestation rates. Some climate models produce additional large fluxes due to increased drought stress caused by rising temperature and decreasing rainfall. One climate model, however, produces an additional carbon sink. Taken together, our estimates of additional carbon emissions during the twenty-first century, for all climate and deforestation scenarios, range from 101 to 367 Gt C, resulting in CO2 concentration increases above background values between 29 and 129 p.p.m. An evaluation of the method indicates that better estimates of tropical carbon sources and sinks require improved assessments of current and future deforestation, and more consistent precipitation scenarios from climate models. Notwithstanding the uncertainties, continued tropical deforestation will most certainly play a very large role in the build-up of future greenhouse gas concentrations. PMID:15212088

  17. Responding to Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    King's Centre for Visualization in Science

    This is the ninth and final lesson in a series of lessons about climate change. This lesson focuses on the various activities that humans can do to mitigate the effects of climate change. This includes information on current and predicted CO2 emission scenarios across the globe, alternative energy sources, and how people are currently responding to climate change. Importantly, this lesson is motivating in showing students that they can make a difference.

  18. Climate Change Policy

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Experts Jason Shogren and Michael Toman wrote this discussion paper (00-22) on the economics of climate change policy, recently posted on the Resources for the Future (RFF) Website. The paper (.pdf format) examines the risks of climate change, the benefits of protection from climate change, and the costs of alternative protection policies. Also included is a summary of key policy lessons and knowledge gaps.

  19. North Pacific carbon cycle response to climate variability on seasonal to decadal timescales

    E-print Network

    2006-01-01

    et al. (2004b), Ocean Carbon and Climate Change (OCCC): Anof the ocean carbon cycle to climate change. Capturing theClimate-driven changes to the atmospheric CO 2 sink in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean,

  20. Our Changing Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newhouse, Kay Berglund

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how global warming makes the leap from the headlines to the classroom with thought-provoking science experiments. To teach her fifth-grade students about climate change, the author starts with a discussion of the United States' local climate. They extend this idea to contrast the local climate with others,…

  1. Communicating Urban Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, S.; Crowley, K.; Horton, R.; Bader, D.; Hoffstadt, R.; Labriole, M.; Shugart, E.; Steiner, M.; Climate; Urban Systems Partnership

    2011-12-01

    While cities cover only 2% of the Earth's surface, over 50% of the world's people live in urban environments. Precisely because of their population density, cities can play a large role in reducing or exacerbating the global impact of climate change. The actions of cities could hold the key to slowing down climate change. Urban dwellers are becoming more aware of the need to reduce their carbon usage and to implement adaptation strategies. However, messaging around these strategies has not been comprehensive and adaptation to climate change requires local knowledge, capacity and a high level of coordination. Unless urban populations understand climate change and its impacts it is unlikely that cities will be able to successfully implement policies that reduce anthropogenic climate change. Informal and formal educational institutions in urban environments can serve as catalysts when partnering with climate scientists, educational research groups, and public policy makers to disseminate information about climate change and its impacts on urban audiences. The Climate and Urban Systems Partnership (CUSP) is an interdisciplinary network designed to assess and meet the needs and challenges of educating urban audiences about climate change. CUSP brings together organizations in Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Queens, NY and Washington, DC to forge links with informal and formal education partners, city government, and policy makers. Together this network will create and disseminate learner-focused climate education programs and resources for urban audiences that, while distinct, are thematically and temporally coordinated, resulting in the communication of clear and consistent information and learning experiences about climate science to a wide public audience. Working at a community level CUSP will bring coordinated programming directly into neighborhoods presenting the issues of global climate change in a highly local context. The project is currently exploring a number of models for community programming and this session will present early results of these efforts while engaging participants in exploring approaches to connecting urban communities and their local concerns to the issues of global climate change.

  2. Climate change. Uncertainty and climate change assessments.

    PubMed

    Reilly, J; Stone, P H; Forest, C E; Webster, M D; Jacoby, H D; Prinn, R G

    2001-07-20

    Clear and quantitative discussion of uncertainties is critical for public policy making on climate change. The recently completed report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessed the uncertainty in its findings and forecasts. The uncertainty assessment process of the IPCC should be improved in the future by using a consistent approach to quantifying uncertainty, focusing the quantification on the few key results most important for policy making. The uncertainty quantification procedure should be fully documented, and if expert judgment is used, a specific list of the experts consulted should be included. PMID:11463897

  3. Rapid changes in temperature and hydrology in the western Mediterranean during the last climatic cycle from the high resolution record ODP Site 976 (Alboran Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combourieu-Nebout, Nathalie; Peyron, Odile; Bout-Roumazeille, Viviane

    2013-04-01

    High-resolution pollen record, pollen-inferred climate reconstructions and clay mineralogy records were performed over the last climatic cycle from the ODP Site 976 located in the Alboran Sea Continental paleoenvironment proxies were provided on the same samples to depict the short and long term variability of Mediterranean vegetation and climate during the two last terminations and the last two interglacials. Pollen record highlights the vegetation changes associated to climate variability while clay mineralogy informs about the terrigenous inputs related to wind and/or river transport. During the last cycle, both vegetation and clay minerals data have recorded the response of continental ecosystems to all the climate events which characterized the last 135000 years. The Dansgaard/Oeschger oscillations and the rapid cold events evidenced in the North Atlantic (Bond et al., 1993; McManus et al., 1994) are well evidenced in the ODP sequence. Thus, warm interstadials show a strong colonisation of temperate Mediterranean forest while cold events are particularly well expressed by correlative increases in dry steppic to semi-desert formation with enhanced input from African desert dust (Bout-Roumazeilles et al, 2007 and in progress). A special attention has been paid on the two last glacial/interglacial transitions 1 and 2 that occurred before the interglacial inception in order to better understand what happened during these key-periods in continental areas and also better understand how reacts the Mediterranean climate regime through these two periods. The two high resolution records from the Terminaison 2/ Stage 5 and Terminaison 1/ Holocene are compared especially with regards to the wind regime modifications through atmospheric supply, and to hydrological and temperature changes reconstructed from pollen data. Therefore for these two key-periods, we aim to produce a robust climate reconstruction pollen-inferred precipitation and temperature from the 0DP 976 marine Mediterranean core which also can be compared to climate estimates based on other marine cores (Peyron et al., in progress).

  4. Predicting Impacts of Increased CO2 and Climate Change on the Water Cycle and Water Quality in the Semiarid James River Basin of the Midwestern USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, Yiping; Liu, Shuguang; Gallant, Alisa L.

    2012-01-01

    Emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosols from human activities continue to alter the climate and likely will have significant impacts on the terrestrial hydrological cycle and water quality, especially in arid and semiarid regions. We applied an improved Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to evaluate impacts of increased atmospheric CO2 concentration and potential climate change on the water cycle and nitrogen loads in the semiarid James River Basin (JRB) in the Midwestern United States. We assessed responses of water yield, soil water content, groundwater recharge, and nitrate nitrogen (NO3–N) load under hypothetical climate-sensitivity scenarios in terms of CO2, precipitation, and air temperature. We extended our predictions of the dynamics of these hydrological variables into the mid-21st century with downscaled climate projections integrated across output from six General Circulation Models. Our simulation results compared against the baseline period 1980 to 2009 suggest the JRB hydrological system is highly responsive to rising levels of CO2 concentration and potential climate change. Under our scenarios, substantial decrease in precipitation and increase in air temperature by the mid-21st century could result in significant reduction in water yield, soil water content, and groundwater recharge. Our model also estimated decreased NO3–N load to streams, which could be beneficial, but a concomitant increase in NO3–N concentration due to a decrease in streamflow likely would degrade stream water and threaten aquatic ecosystems. These results highlight possible risks of drought, water supply shortage, and water quality degradation in this basin.

  5. Climate Change on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, R. M.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Today, Mars is cold and dry. With a 7 mbar mean surface pressure, its thin predominantly CO2 atmosphere is not capable of raising global mean surface temperatures significantly above its 217K effective radiating temperature, and the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere is equivalent to a global ocean only 10 microns deep. Has Mars always been in such a deep freeze? There are several lines of evidence that suggest it has not. First, there are the valley networks which are found throughout the heavily cratered terrains. These features are old (3.8 Gyr) and appear to require liquid water to form. A warm climate early in Mars' history has often been invoked to explain them, but the precise conditions required to achieve this have yet to be determined. Second, some of the features seen in orbiter images of the surface have been interpreted in terms of glacial activity associated with an active hydrological cycle some several billion years ago. This interpretation is controversial as it requires the release of enormous quantities of ground water and enough greenhouse warming to raise temperatures to the melting point. Finally, there are the layered terrains that characterize both polar regions. These terrains are geologically young (10 Myr) and are believed to have formed by the slow and steady deposition of dust and water ice from the atmosphere. The individual layers result from the modulation of the deposition rate which is driven by changes in Mars' orbital parameters. The ongoing research into each of these areas of Martian climate change will be reviewed, and similarities to the Earth's climate system will be noted.

  6. Climate change and avian influenza.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, M; Slingenbergh, J; Xiao, X

    2008-08-01

    This paper discusses impacts of climate change on the ecology of avian influenza viruses (AI viruses), which presumably co-evolved with migratory water birds, with virus also persisting outside the host in subarctic water bodies. Climate change would almost certainly alter bird migration, influence the AI virus transmission cycle and directly affect virus survival outside the host. The joint, net effects of these changes are rather unpredictable, but it is likely that AI virus circulation in water bird populations will continue with endless adaptation and evolution. In domestic poultry, too little is known about the direct effect of environmental factors on highly pathogenic avian influenza transmission and persistence to allow inference about the possible effect of climate change. However, possible indirect links through changes in the distribution of duck-crop farming are discussed. PMID:18819672

  7. Subalpine Forest Carbon Cycling Short and Long-Term Influence ofClimate and Species

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lara M. Kueppers; John Harte

    2005-01-01

    Ecosystem carbon cycle feedbacks to climate change comprise one of the largest remaining sources of uncertainty in global model predictions of future climate. Both direct climate effects on carbon cycling and indirect effects via climate-induced shifts in species composition may alter ecosystem carbon balance over the long term. In the short term, climate effects on carbon cycling may be mediated

  8. Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan

    E-print Network

    Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air ResourcesBackgroundBackgroundBackground ............................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4444 1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California1. Climate Change Policy in California

  9. Climate Change and Groundwater

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Catherine E. Hughes; Dioni I. Cendón; Mathew P. Johansen; Karina T. Meredith

    \\u000a Human civilisations have for millennia depended on the stability of groundwater resources to survive dry or unreliable climates.\\u000a While groundwater supplies are buffered against short-term effects of climate variability, they can be impacted over longer\\u000a time frames through changes in rainfall, temperature, snowfall, melting of glaciers and permafrost and vegetation and land-use\\u000a changes. Groundwater provides an archive of past climate

  10. Alleviating climate change Alleviating climate change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert Goodland; Simon Counsell

    2008-01-01

    Addressing climate change will require dramatic policy shifts in the fields of energy, livestock production and forest management. The following paper summarises where we are now and what we need to do, with an emphasis on how multilateral organisations like The World Bank can help to address the challenges ahead.

  11. Climate change 2007 - mitigation of climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, B.; Davidson, O.; Bosch, P.; Dave, R.; Meyer, L. (eds.)

    2007-07-01

    This volume of the Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) provides a comprehensive, state-of-the-art and worldwide overview of scientific knowledge related to the mitigation of climate change. It includes a detailed assessment of costs and potentials of mitigation technologies and practices, implementation barriers, and policy options for the sectors: energy supply, transport, buildings, industry, agriculture, forestry and waste management. It links sustainable development policies with climate change practices. This volume will again be the standard reference for all those concerned with climate change. Contents: Foreword; Preface; Summary for policymakers; Technical Summary; 1. Introduction; 2. Framing issues; 3. Issues related to mitigation in the long term context; 4. Energy supply; 5. Transport and its infrastructure; 6. Residential and commercial buildings; 7. Industry; 8. Agriculture; 9. Forestry; 10. Waste management; 11. Mitigation from a cross sectoral perspective; 12. Sustainable development and mitigation; 13. Policies, instruments and co-operative agreements. 300 figs., 50 tabs., 3 annexes.

  12. Climate Change Review of Muller's chapter on Climate Change from

    E-print Network

    Browder, Tom

    Climate Change · Review of Muller's chapter on Climate Change from Physics for Future Society) controversy on climate change (e.g. resignation of Hal Lewis, Ivar Giaever and other notable. #12;Some climate changes basics · IPCC = Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change · The IPCC

  13. Climate Change: Conflict, Security and Vulnerability Professor of Climate Change

    E-print Network

    Hulme, Mike

    Climate Change: Conflict, Security and Vulnerability Mike Hulme Professor of Climate Change Science, Society and Sustainability Group School of Environmental Sciences Rethinking Climate Change, Conflict security" "increase risk of conflicts among and within nations" #12;· from `climatic change' to `climate-change

  14. Global Biogeochemical Cycles and the Physical Climate System

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Fred Mackenzie

    1999-01-01

    This module focuses on the biogeochemical cycles of five of the major elements important to life - carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulfur, and oxygen - and their role in climatic change. The chapters include: Biogeochemical Processes, Biogeochemical Cycles and Climate, The Modern Coupled C-N-P-S-O System, Carbon Cycles, The Important Nutrient Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Sulfur, and The Water Cycle. Study questions and answers are also available.

  15. Responding to the Consequences of Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, Peter H.

    2011-01-01

    The talk addresses the scientific consensus concerning climate change, and outlines the many paths that are open to mitigate climate change and its effects on human activities. Diverse aspects of the changing water cycle on Earth are used to illustrate the reality climate change. These include melting snowpack, glaciers, and sea ice; changes in runoff; rising sea level; moving ecosystems, an more. Human forcing of climate change is then explained, including: greenhouse gasses, atmospheric aerosols, and changes in land use. Natural forcing effects are briefly discussed, including volcanoes and changes in the solar cycle. Returning to Earth's water cycle, the effects of climate-induced changes in water resources is presented. Examples include wildfires, floods and droughts, changes in the production and availability of food, and human social reactions to these effects. The lk then passes to a discussion of common human reactions to these forecasts of climate change effects, with a summary of recent research on the subject, plus several recent historical examples of large-scale changes in human behavior that affect the climate and ecosystems. Finally, in the face for needed action on climate, the many options for mitigation of climate change and adaptation to its effects are presented, with examples of the ability to take affordable, and profitable action at most all levels, from the local, through national.

  16. COMMITTE REPORT: Climate change and water resources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    1997-01-01

    Global climatic change—the greenhouse effect—is here to stay. Although uncertainties remain about the nature and extent of climatic changes that will occur, most among the scientific community believe changes in the hydrologic cycle and to water resource management systems will be significant. Water managers, policy-makers, and the public should begin to consider the implications of climatic change for long-term water

  17. Climate Change and Biodiversity in Europe

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hannah Reid

    Climate change is already affecting European biodiversity, as de m- onstrated by changes in species' ranges and ecosystem boundaries, shifts in reproductive cycles and growing seasons, and cha nges to the complex ways in which species interact (predation, pollination, competition and disease). These effects vary between regions and ecosystems. Strategies adopted to mitigate or adapt to climate change also impact

  18. Coastal Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-14

    As climate changes, dynamic coastal regions are experiencing a wide range of impacts. Sea levels, ocean acidification, sea surface temperatures, ocean heat, and ocean circulation have all been changing in ways unseen for thousands of years. Arctic sea ice melted significantly more during summers in the last 30 years, and storms are intensifying. Coastal ecosystems stand to be damaged, and coasts will likely erode from rising sea levels, intensified storm surges, and flooding that climate change may amplify. Coastal communities will need to prepare adaptation strategies to cope, and many who live or work in coastal regions are wondering what climate change might mean for them. This module provides an overview of the impacts coastal regions are experiencing and may continue to experience as a result of Earth’s changing climate. A video series within the module demonstrates effective strategies for communicating climate science.

  19. Surface Ozone and Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, K.; Barnes, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    Surface ozone pollution will continue to be a concern in the coming decades as the effects of climate change couple with changing emissions to influence air quality. We analyze modeled surface ozone's seasonal cycle variability, long-term variability, and its correlation to atmospheric circulation using output from the GFDL coupled chemistry climate model (CM3) from CMIP5. We analyze the relationship between the jet stream and both ozone variability and mean ozone over the North Pacific. We also determine if ozone's seasonal cycle will shift in the future on a worldwide scale. We focus on surface ozone and 500mb zonal winds in order to analyze the large-scale circulation effects from 2006 to 2100. CMIP5 contains varying representative concentration pathways (RCPs), and we use three-member RCPs 4.5 and 4.5*, which are identical save the fact that 4.5* have fixed amounts of aerosols and ozone precursors at 2005 levels. The use of both 4.5 and 4.5* allows us to see effects due to changing emissions of ozone precursors such as NOx and which are due to climate change. Jet speed is found to correlate well with the maximum amount of decadal mean ozone in both 4.5 and 4.5* in the Pacific region. In addition, ozone's seasonal cycle across the globe peaks earlier in the year due to climate change alone, while decreasing emissions of ozone precursors is found to alter the amplitude of the cycle over industrial continental areas, causing the day of maximum ozone to occur months earlier long-term. The seasonal cycle change in 4.5* appears to be connected to the jet stream over the Pacific.

  20. Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and

    E-print Network

    1 Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change Changes · Due to ­ Climate Change ­ Land Cover / Land Use Change ­ Interaction of Climate and Land Cover Change · Resolution ­ Space ­ Time Hydro-Climatic Change · Variability vs. Change (Trends) · Point data

  1. Modeling Global Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Vanessa Svihla

    Understanding global climate change is challenging, even for adults, yet having an understanding of this topic is consequential for the future. In this activity, middle school students learn about global climate change using models that allow them to make predictions, observations, and then explain mechanisms for climate change. Component ideas include change over time, deep time, and accumulation. Students are asked to act as advisers on how to lower energy use, and refine their understanding of how and why this is important, before testing their ideas and finally revising their advice.

  2. Modern global climate change.

    PubMed

    Karl, Thomas R; Trenberth, Kevin E

    2003-12-01

    Modern climate change is dominated by human influences, which are now large enough to exceed the bounds of natural variability. The main source of global climate change is human-induced changes in atmospheric composition. These perturbations primarily result from emissions associated with energy use, but on local and regional scales, urbanization and land use changes are also important. Although there has been progress in monitoring and understanding climate change, there remain many scientific, technical, and institutional impediments to precisely planning for, adapting to, and mitigating the effects of climate change. There is still considerable uncertainty about the rates of change that can be expected, but it is clear that these changes will be increasingly manifested in important and tangible ways, such as changes in extremes of temperature and precipitation, decreases in seasonal and perennial snow and ice extent, and sea level rise. Anthropogenic climate change is now likely to continue for many centuries. We are venturing into the unknown with climate, and its associated impacts could be quite disruptive. PMID:14657489

  3. The Biodiversity: Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    International Polar Foundation

    This step-by-step slide show animation, from the International Polar Foundation, deals with the topics of biodiversity and climate change. It lays out the main effects of climate change, i.e. the strengthening of the natural greenhouse effect phenomenon that has been caused by our way of life, and the unprecedented speeding up of rises in temperature compared with the natural periods of warming that have occurred in the past. It also looks at the main consequences of these changes.

  4. What Is Climate Change?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beswick, Adele

    2007-01-01

    Weather consists of those meteorological events, such as rain, wind and sunshine, which can change day-by-day or even hour-by-hour. Climate is the average of all these events, taken over a period of time. The climate varies over different parts of the world. Climate is usually defined as the average of the weather over a 30-year period. It is when…

  5. Climate change and skin.

    PubMed

    Balato, N; Ayala, F; Megna, M; Balato, A; Patruno, C

    2013-02-01

    Global climate appears to be changing at an unprecedented rate. Climate change can be caused by several factors that include variations in solar radiation received by earth, oceanic processes (such as oceanic circulation), plate tectonics, and volcanic eruptions, as well as human-induced alterations of the natural world. Many human activities, such as the use of fossil fuel and the consequent accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, land consumption, deforestation, industrial processes, as well as some agriculture practices are contributing to global climate change. Indeed, many authors have reported on the current trend towards global warming (average surface temperature has augmented by 0.6 °C over the past 100 years), decreased precipitation, atmospheric humidity changes, and global rise in extreme climatic events. The magnitude and cause of these changes and their impact on human activity have become important matters of debate worldwide, representing climate change as one of the greatest challenges of the modern age. Although many articles have been written based on observations and various predictive models of how climate change could affect social, economic and health systems, only few studies exist about the effects of this change on skin physiology and diseases. However, the skin is the most exposed organ to environment; therefore, cutaneous diseases are inclined to have a high sensitivity to climate. For example, global warming, deforestation and changes in precipitation have been linked to variations in the geographical distribution of vectors of some infectious diseases (leishmaniasis, lyme disease, etc) by changing their spread, whereas warm and humid environment can also encourage the colonization of the skin by bacteria and fungi. The present review focuses on the wide and complex relationship between climate change and dermatology, showing the numerous factors that are contributing to modify the incidence and the clinical pattern of many dermatoses. PMID:23407083

  6. Status of Climate Change

    E-print Network

    North, G.

    2013-01-01

    Status of Climate Change 2013 CaTee Conference San Antonio 2013 ESL-KT-13-12-56 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Menu for Today • IPCC 2013: Assessment Report #5 • Facts about Climate Change... Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Facts about Climate Change ESL-KT-13-12-56 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 ESL-KT-13-12-56 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency...

  7. Australian agriculture: coping with dangerous climate change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Will Steffen; John Sims; James Walcott; Greg Laughlin

    2011-01-01

    Australian agriculture has operated successfully in one of the world’s most hostile environments for two centuries. However,\\u000a climate change is posing serious challenges to its ongoing success. Determining what might constitute dangerous climate change\\u000a for Australian agriculture is not an easy task, as most climate-related risks are associated with changes in the highly uncertain\\u000a hydrological cycle rather than directly to

  8. Climate Change and the Oceans

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The King's Centre for Visualization in Science

    This activity covers the role that the oceans may play in climate change and how climate change may affect the oceans. It is lesson 8 in a nine-lesson module Visualizing and Understanding the Science of Climate Change.

  9. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-print Network

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION . THE COSTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE .INTRODUCTION The earth has entered a new period of significant climate change.introductions to the concepts of adaptation and adaptive capacity, including how the concepts are used in the climate change

  10. MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES,

    E-print Network

    MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION TO PUBLIC HEALTH RISKS's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012041 Prepared for: California Energy Commission of California. #12; ii ABSTRACT This study reviewed first available frameworks for climate change adaptation

  11. Abrupt Climate Change Inevitable Surprises

    E-print Network

    Abrupt Climate Change Inevitable Surprises Committee on Abrupt Climate Change Ocean Studies Board of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Abrupt climate change : inevitable surprises / Committee on Abrupt Climate Change, Ocean Studies Board, Polar Research Board, Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate

  12. Conservation and Global Climate Change

    E-print Network

    Landweber, Laura

    V.6 Conservation and Global Climate Change Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross OUTLINE 1. Introduction 2. How climate is changing 3. Environmental responses to climate change 4. Consequences of climate the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly

  13. Climate change and drought

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N. W. Arnell

    SUMMARY - Climate change is likely to increase drought risk during the 21st century in many parts of the world. Climate model projections, under a range of emissions scenarios, consistently show that seasonal rainfall is likely to decrease across large parts of southern Europe, north Africa, central Asia and southern Africa, and reductions are also possible in other dry parts

  14. Climate Change Made Simple

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shallcross, Dudley E.; Harrison, Tim G.

    2007-01-01

    The newly revised specifications for GCSE science involve greater consideration of climate change. This topic appears in either the chemistry or biology section, depending on the examination board, and is a good example of "How Science Works." It is therefore timely that students are given an opportunity to conduct some simple climate modelling.…

  15. Mitigating Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-03-16

    In this video segment adapted from Navajo Technical College, meet a chemistry professor who explains some of the core concepts connected to climate change: carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and emissions from energy use.

  16. Climate change and jobs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-05-01

    Development expert Barbara Harriss-White leads a team of specialists from agriculture to economics, environmental science and policy to investigate neglected aspects of the climate change response in India.

  17. Solar Changes and Climate Changes. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feynman, J.

    2009-12-01

    During the early decades of the Space Age there was general agreement in the scientific community on two facts: (1) sunspot cycles continued without interruption; (2) decadal timescale variations in the solar output has no effect on Earth’s climate. Then in 1976 Jack Eddy published a paper called ‘The Maunder Minimum” in Science magazine arguing that neither of these two established facts was true. He reviewed the observations from the 17th century that show the Sun did not appear to cycle for several decades and he related that to the cold winters in Northern Europe at that time. The paper has caused three decades of hot discussions. When Jack Eddy died on June 10th of this year the arguments were sill going on, and there were no sunspots that day. The Sun was in the longest and deepest solar minimum since 1900. In this talk I will describe the changes in the solar output that have taken place over the last few decades and put them in their historical context. I will also review recent work on the influence of decadal and century scale solar variations on the Earth’s climate. It is clear that this long, deep “solar minimum” is an opportunity to make fundamental progress on our understanding of the solar dynamo and to separate climate change due to the Sun from anthropogenic climate change.

  18. A simple explanation for the sensitivity of the hydrologic cycle to surface temperature and solar radiation and its implications for global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleidon, A.; Renner, M.

    2013-12-01

    The global hydrologic cycle is likely to increase in strength with global warming, although some studies indicate that warming due to solar absorption may result in a different sensitivity than warming due to an elevated greenhouse effect. Here we show that these sensitivities of the hydrologic cycle can be derived analytically from an extremely simple surface energy balance model that is constrained by the assumption that vertical convective exchange within the atmosphere operates at the thermodynamic limit of maximum power. Using current climatic mean conditions, this model predicts a sensitivity of the hydrologic cycle of 2.2% K-1 to greenhouse-induced surface warming which is the sensitivity reported from climate models. The sensitivity to solar-induced warming includes an additional term, which increases the total sensitivity to 3.2% K-1. These sensitivities are explained by shifts in the turbulent fluxes in the case of greenhouse-induced warming, which is proportional to the change in slope of the saturation vapor pressure, and in terms of an additional increase in turbulent fluxes in the case of solar radiation-induced warming. We illustrate an implication of this explanation for geoengineering, which aims to undo surface temperature differences by solar radiation management. Our results show that when such an intervention compensates surface warming, it cannot simultaneously compensate the changes in hydrologic cycling because of the differences in sensitivities for solar vs. greenhouse-induced surface warming. We conclude that the sensitivity of the hydrologic cycle to surface temperature can be understood and predicted with very simple physical considerations but this needs to reflect on the different roles that solar and terrestrial radiation play in forcing the hydrologic cycle.

  19. Responses of Terrestrial Water Cycles to Changes in Climate and Phenology over the Conterminous U.S. During 1983-2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Adam, J. C.; Zhu, Z.; Myneni, R.

    2012-12-01

    Evidence indicates that the global terrestrial water cycle has been altered by environmental change and human activities during the last century. However, knowledge gaps exist regarding the relative contributions from climate change, including temperature (T) and precipitation (P), and land cover change (human-caused and/or terrestrial ecosystem's response to environmental change) to the variations of terrestrial water cycles. Remotely sensed data and process-based models detected an earlier greenness of vegetation and a longer growing season in the Northern Hemisphere during the last several decades. Our objective is to investigate how these phenology changes, in combination of climate change, could affect the long-term and seasonal variations of evapotranspiration (ET) and runoff over the conterminous United States during the last 29 years. A macro-scale hydrological model - the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model - was applied in this study. To estimate effects of phenology on hydrological processes, we used the 15-day Leaf Area Index (LAI) product from a combination of AVHRR NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) and MODIS NDVI through Artificial Neural Network (ANN) method to drive VIC. To estimate relative contributions of climate change factors (T & P) and phenology change on variations of ET and runoff, a series of factor-controlled simulation experiments were conducted: base run (all factors are transient), FixT (fixed T but transient P and LAI), FixP, FixLAI, etc. Simulation results indicated that P is the dominant factor controlling the interannual fluctuations of ET and runoff over the conterminous US. However, LAI, T, and P all play similar roles in driving the long-term trends in water fluxes. A positive trend in LAI, which is associated with elevated terrestrial ecosystem primary productivity, accelerated ET and decreased runoff in the conterminous US during the last 29 years. This long-term increase in LAI has almost the same magnitude as T in driving the long-term effects on ET and runoff during the study period. We should emphasize that each factor's contributions to variations of long-term trends in ET and runoff vary in spatial and temporal domain. To make long-term projections on water resources in the context of climate change, our long-term directions involve consideration of the responses and feedbacks of terrestrial ecosystems to the regional climate system within a framework of coupled regional earth system model.

  20. Global climatic change

    SciTech Connect

    Houghton, R.A.; Woodwell, G.M.

    1989-04-01

    This paper reviews the climatic effects of trace gases such as carbon dioxide and methane. It discusses the expected changes from the increases in trace gases and the extent to which the expected changes can be found in the climate record and in the retreat of glaciers. The use of ice cores in correlating atmospheric composition and climate is discussed. The response of terrestrial ecosystems as a biotic feedback is discussed. Possible responses are discussed, including reduction in fossil-fuel use, controls on deforestation, and reforestation. International aspects, such as the implications for developing nations, are addressed.

  1. Global Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    At this site students can explore scientific data on climate change relating to the atmosphere, the oceans, the areas covered by ice and snow, and the living organisms in all these domains. They will get a sense of how scientists study natural phenomena, how researchers gather evidence, test theories, and come to conclusions. Though climate change is not new, the study of how human activity affects the earth's climate is. Links lead to five major sections: atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, biosphere, and global effects. Each section is a separate lesson consisting of visual thumbnails with supporting text. All sections are supported by a glossary.

  2. Climate Change Action Pack Climate & Habitats

    E-print Network

    Gunawardena, Arunika

    Climate Change Action Pack Climate & Habitats B A C K G R O U DN C H E C K ! Habitat, Food, Water Change on habitats,and in particular at the impacts that could result from the warming of global the potential to affect plants,animals and humans around the globe. #12;Climate Change Action Pack 158 Habitat

  3. Predicting impacts of increased CO? and climate change on the water cycle and water quality in the semiarid James River Basin of the Midwestern USA.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yiping; Liu, Shuguang; Gallant, Alisa L

    2012-07-15

    Emissions of greenhouse gases and aerosols from human activities continue to alter the climate and likely will have significant impacts on the terrestrial hydrological cycle and water quality, especially in arid and semiarid regions. We applied an improved Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to evaluate impacts of increased atmospheric CO(2) concentration and potential climate change on the water cycle and nitrogen loads in the semiarid James River Basin (JRB) in the Midwestern United States. We assessed responses of water yield, soil water content, groundwater recharge, and nitrate nitrogen (NO(3)-N) load under hypothetical climate-sensitivity scenarios in terms of CO(2), precipitation, and air temperature. We extended our predictions of the dynamics of these hydrological variables into the mid-21st century with downscaled climate projections integrated across output from six General Circulation Models. Our simulation results compared against the baseline period 1980 to 2009 suggest the JRB hydrological system is highly responsive to rising levels of CO(2) concentration and potential climate change. Under our scenarios, substantial decrease in precipitation and increase in air temperature by the mid-21st century could result in significant reduction in water yield, soil water content, and groundwater recharge. Our model also estimated decreased NO(3)-N load to streams, which could be beneficial, but a concomitant increase in NO(3)-N concentration due to a decrease in streamflow likely would degrade stream water and threaten aquatic ecosystems. These results highlight possible risks of drought, water supply shortage, and water quality degradation in this basin. PMID:22641243

  4. Consequence of altered nitrogen cycles in the coupled human and ecological system under changing climate: The need for long-term and site-based research.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Hideaki; Branquinho, Cristina; McDowell, William H; Mitchell, Myron J; Monteith, Don T; Tang, Jianwu; Arvola, Lauri; Cruz, Cristina; Cusack, Daniela F; Halada, Lubos; Kopá?ek, Ji?í; Máguas, Cristina; Sajidu, Samson; Schubert, Hendrik; Tokuchi, Naoko; Záhora, Jaroslav

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenically derived nitrogen (N) has a central role in global environmental changes, including climate change, biodiversity loss, air pollution, greenhouse gas emission, water pollution, as well as food production and human health. Current understanding of the biogeochemical processes that govern the N cycle in coupled human-ecological systems around the globe is drawn largely from the long-term ecological monitoring and experimental studies. Here, we review spatial and temporal patterns and trends in reactive N emissions, and the interactions between N and other important elements that dictate their delivery from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems, and the impacts of N on biodiversity and human society. Integrated international and long-term collaborative studies covering research gaps will reduce uncertainties and promote further understanding of the nitrogen cycle in various ecosystems. PMID:25037589

  5. Climate Change Impacts in the Amazon. Review of scientific literature

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    2006-04-15

    The Amazon's hydrological cycle is a key driver of global climate, and global climate is therefore sensitive to changes in the Amazon. Climate change threatens to substantially affect the Amazon region, which in turn is expected to alter global climate and increase the risk of biodiversity loss. In this literature review the following subjects can be distinguished: Observed Climatic Change and Variability, Predicted Climatic Change, Impacts, Forests, Freshwater, Agriculture, Health, and Sea Level Rise.

  6. Climate Change: Good for Us?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oblak, Jackie

    2000-01-01

    Presents an activity with the objective of encouraging students to think about the effects of climate change. Explains background information on dependence to climate and discuses whether climate change is important. Provides information for the activity, extensions, and evaluation. (YDS)

  7. Energy and climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-01

    Models that simulate present and past climatic behavior suggest that an increase in carbon dioxide concentration to double the preindustrial level would commit us to an increase in global average temperatures of up to a few degrees Celsius. This warming would be accompanied by many other related changes of climate. An increase in annual average temperature by such an amount, while not unprecedented on a local basis, would elevate global temperatures to levels not experienced in historical times. This climate change could occur before the carbon dioxide concentration doubled because of the similar radiative effects of other gases, necessitating coupled consideration of the climatic and chemical effects of carbon dioxide and other trace gases, including especially methane, chlorofluorocarbons, and nitrous oxide. Consideration of this issue in the development of the National Energy Strategy will require addressing a series of very difficult and interconnected questions concerning: projection of future energy use and the mix of technologies, estimation of the consequent level of chemical, climate, and environmental change, selection of the acceptable rate of chemical, climate, and environmental change, estimation of the probably rate of conservation and of technological and efficiency developments, and determination of the appropriate level of national and international commitment for addressing this global issue. This report attempts to summarize the technical basis for addressing these issues, even while recognizing the many complex societal aspects underlying each of them. 310 refs., 24 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. Avoiding dangerous climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Hans Joachim Schellnhuber; Wolfgang Cramer; Nebojsa Nakicenovic; Tom Wigley; Gary Yohe (eds.)

    2006-02-15

    In 2005 the UK Government hosted the Avoiding Dangerous Climate Change conference to take an in-depth look at the scientific issues associated with climate change. This volume presents the most recent findings from the leading international scientists that attended the conference. The topics addressed include critical thresholds and key vulnerabilities of the climate system, impacts on human and natural systems, socioeconomic costs and benefits of emissions pathways, and technological options for meeting different stabilisation levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Contents are: Foreword from Prime Minister Tony Blair; Introduction from Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the IPCC; followed by 41 papers arranged in seven sections entitled: Key Vulnerabilities of the Climate System and Critical Thresholds; General Perspectives on Dangerous Impacts; Key Vulnerabilities for Ecosystems and Biodiversity; Socio-Economic Effects; Regional Perspectives; Emission Pathways; and Technological Options. Four papers have been abstracted separately for the Coal Abstracts database.

  9. Global Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Integrated Teaching and Learning Program,

    Students learn how the greenhouse effect is related to global warming and how global warming impacts our planet, including global climate change. Extreme weather events, rising sea levels, and how we react to these changes are the main points of focus of this lesson.

  10. Solar Influence: Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    National Research Council

    This short video, the sixth in the National Academies Climate Change, Lines of Evidence series, explores the hypothesis that changes in solar energy output may be responsible for observed global surface temperature rise. Several lines of evidence, such as direct satellite observations, are reviewed.

  11. Climate change and marine plankton

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Graeme C. Hays; Anthony J. Richardson; Carol Robinson

    2005-01-01

    Understanding how climate change will affect the planet is a key issue worldwide. Questions concerning the pace and impacts of climate change are thus central to many ecological and biogeochemical studies, and addressing the consequences of climate change is now high on the list of priorities for funding agencies. Here, we review the interactions between climate change and plankton communities,

  12. Climate change and disaster management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Geoff O'Brien; Phil O'Keefe; Joanne Rose; Ben Wisner

    2006-01-01

    Climate change, although a natural phenomenon, is accelerated by human activities. Disaster policy response to climate change is dependent on a number of factors, such as readiness to accept the reality of climate change, institutions and capacity, as well as willingness to embed climate change risk assessment and management in development strategies. These conditions do not yet exist universally. A

  13. Potential Impacts of CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    . Climatic changes--Government policy--United States. 4. Global warming-- Environmental aspects. I. NationalPotential Impacts of CLIMATE CHANGE on U.S. Transportation Potential Impacts of CLIMATE CHANGE on U.S. Transportation TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH BOARD SPECIAL REPORT 290 #12;#12;Committee on Climate Change and U

  14. Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International

    E-print Network

    Ashkenazy, Yossi "Yosef"

    climate change in the Kalahari and Australian deserts Y. Ashkenazy & H. Yizhaq & Haim Tsoar Received: 241 23 Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International Journal Devoted to the Description, Causes and Implications of Climatic Change ISSN 0165-0009 Volume 112 Combined 3-4 Climatic Change (2012) 112:901-923 DOI

  15. Climate Change and Runoff Management

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Climate Change and Runoff Management in Wisconsin Fox-Wolf Watershed Alliance May 10, 2011 David S of Engineering #12;Overview · Understanding climate change · Wisconsin's changing climate · Expected impacts of a changing climate J. Magnuson Source: IPCC 2007 Potter, et al. A longer record is better! #12;What about

  16. Debating Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2009-11-01

    Debating Climate Change explores, both theoretically and empirically, how people argue about climate change and link to each other through various elements in their arguments. As science is a central issue in the debate, the arguments of scientists and the interpretations and responses of non-scientists are important aspects of the analysis. The book first assesses current thinking about the climate change debate and current participants in the debates surrounding the issue, as well as a brief history of various groups’ involvements. Chapters 2 and 3 distill and organize various ways of framing the climate change issue. Beginning in Chapter 4, a modified classical analysis of the elements carried in an argument is used to identify areas and degrees of disagreement and agreement. One hundred documents, drawn from a wide spectrum of sources, map the topic and debate space of the climate change issue. Five elements of each argument are distilled: the authority of the writer, the evidence presented, the formulation of the argument, the worldview presented, and the actions proposed. Then a social network analysis identifies elements of the arguments that point to potential agreements. Finally, the book suggests mechanisms by which participants in the debate can build more general agreements on elements of existing agreement.

  17. Climatic and topographic controls on soil organic carbon storage and dynamics in the Indian Himalaya: Potential carbon cycle and climate change feedbacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbottom, T. L.; Townsend-Small, A.; Owen, L. A.; Murari, M. K.

    2012-12-01

    Soil organic carbon affects soil fertility and agricultural production, and organic C storage can also mitigate increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations on decadal timescales or longer. Soil organic C storage is dependent on climatic conditions, and changes in temperature and precipitation associated with climate change can influence feedback mechanisms that contribute to controlling atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The storage of organic C in soils in high tropical and subtropical mountain regions, however, is poorly quantified. As a start to evaluate the importance of C storage in soils in high mountain regions, regional organic carbon abundance was examined across the Himalaya of northern India. As such soil organic carbon (SOC) would vary corresponding to these bioclimatic barriers, a result of this large precipitation and assumed vegetation discrepancy. Average annual C accumulation and C turnover time were estimated for selected soil down-core chronosequences, and results varied widely among the areas investigated (0.0019kg - 0.0332kg and ~66 years - 3,333 years, respectively). Soil organic C stocks in the Indian Himalaya are more sensitive to moisture availability than temperature, as average annual precipitation was a greater influence on SOC than altitude. C3 vegetation has been consistently dominant in the region up to ~6000 BP, and rates of C accumulation and turnover are influenced greatly by variations in climate, vegetation, and topography. Anthropogenically increased precipitation may lead to increased soil C storage in the region, unless soils are exposed to greater risk of erosion.

  18. Predicting climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, J.B.

    1995-12-31

    Few scientific topics evoke such general interests and public discussion as climate change. It is a subject that has been highly politicized. New results enter the environmental debate as evidence supporting a position. Usually the qualifiers, the background, and perspective needed to understand the result have been stripped away to form an appropriate sound bite. The attention is understandable given the importance of climate to agriculture and energy use. Fear of global warming and the greenhouse effect has been justification for reducing the use of fossil fuels and increasing use of nuclear energy and alternative energy sources. It has been suggested to avoid climate change, a return to a preindustrial level of emissions is necessary. The subject of this article is not the policy implications of greenhouse warming, or even the validity of the premise that global warming caused by the greenhouse effect is occurring. The subject is the current array of concepts and tools available to understand and predict the earth`s climate based on mathematical models of physical processes. These tools for climate simulations include some of the world`s most powerful computers, including the Intel Paragon XP/S 150 at ORNL. With these tools, the authors are attempting to predict the climate changes that may occur 100 years from now for different temperatures of the earth`s surface that will likely result from rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere.

  19. Soil vulnerability to future climate in the southwestern USA, with implications for vegetation change and water cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterman, W. L.; Bachelet, D. M.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding soil response to changes in precipitation/snow cover and increasing temperatures is essential to predicting changes in riparian, wetland, and aquatic as well as terrestrial communities in the coming decades. Changes in precipitation and snowmelt are affecting streamflow seasonality and magnitude, and rising air temperatures and declining precipitation affect aquatic habitats directly by causing increases in stream temperatures and evapo-transpiration causing lower streamflow. The water resources of the Colorado River system are projected to be strained due to runoff losses of 7 to 20% this century, and a reduction of approximately 5% of the annual average runoff is due to increased evapotranspiration from early exposure of vegetation and soils. We are developing a spatially-explicit soil vulnerability index of high, moderate and low sensitivity soils for the southwestern USA and comparing it to projections of vegetation dieback under future climate change scenarios to provide 1) a measure of uncertainty of the model skill and 2) a warning that vegetation shifts may increase soil vulnerability in areas where it is still protected by current plant cover, thus enabling a preliminary estimate of the future location of sources of aeolian dust.

  20. Climate change matters.

    PubMed

    Macpherson, Cheryl Cox

    2014-04-01

    One manifestation of climate change is the increasingly severe extreme weather that causes injury, illness and death through heat stress, air pollution, infectious disease and other means. Leading health organisations around the world are responding to the related water and food shortages and volatility of energy and agriculture prices that threaten health and health economics. Environmental and climate ethics highlight the associated challenges to human rights and distributive justice but rarely address health or encompass bioethical methods or analyses. Public health ethics and its broader umbrella, bioethics, remain relatively silent on climate change. Meanwhile global population growth creates more people who aspire to Western lifestyles and unrestrained socioeconomic growth. Fulfilling these aspirations generates more emissions; worsens climate change; and undermines virtues and values that engender appreciation of, and protections for, natural resources. Greater understanding of how virtues and values are evolving in different contexts, and the associated consequences, might nudge the individual and collective priorities that inform public policy toward embracing stewardship and responsibility for environmental resources necessary to health. Instead of neglecting climate change and related policy, public health ethics and bioethics should explore these issues; bring transparency to the tradeoffs that permit emissions to continue at current rates; and offer deeper understanding about what is at stake and what it means to live a good life in today's world. PMID:23665996

  1. EPA's Climate Change Site

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) provides this site in order to present or direct users to accurate and timely social, scientific, and logistic information on the very broad issue of climate change and global warming in a way that is accessible and meaningful to all parts of society. The subtopics covered are climate - which includes information on global warming or The Greenhouse Effect -, emissions - with information on the Greenhouse Gases -, impacts, and actions, including what you can do to help with the problem of global warming. Specific information is presented for Concerned Citizens, Kids and Educators, Small Business and Industry and how they can help with the issue of global warming, Public Decision makers, International, Coastal Residents, Health Professionals, Meteorologists, and Wildlife Advocates. Some features are News, Calendar, Publications, Presentations (slide shows), Online tools (including software, calculators, case studies, and document searches), Science Frequently Asked Questions, Uncertainties, Glossary, and Links. The United States has based its climate change policies on the conclusions of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which has provided an authoritative international consensus on the science of climate change.

  2. Climate-change scenarios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, F.H.; Stohlgren, T.J.; Baldwin, C.K.; Mearns, L.O.

    2003-01-01

    In 1991, the United States Congress passed the Global Change Research Act directing the Executive Branch of government to assess the potential effects of predicted climate change and variability on the nation. This congressional action followed formation of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in 1988 by the United Nations Environmental Program and World Meteorological Organization. Some 2,000 scientists from more than 150 nations contribute to the efforts of the IPCC. Under coordination of the U.S. Global Change Research Program, the congressionally ordered national assessment has divided the country into 19 regions and five socio-economic sectors that cut across the regions: agriculture, coastal and marine systems, forests, human health, and water. Potential climate-change effects are being assessed in each region and sector, and those efforts collectively make up the national assessment. This document reports the assessment of potential climate-change effects on the Rocky Mountain/Great Basin (RMGB) region which encompasses parts of nine western states. The assessment began February 16-18, 1998 with a workshop in Salt Lake City co-convened by Frederic H. Wagner of Utah State University and Jill Baron of the U.S. Geological Survey Biological Resources Division (BRD). Invitations were sent to some 300 scientists and stakeholders representing 18 socio-economic sectors in nine statesa?|

  3. Rapid shifts in South American montane climates driven by pCO2 and ice volume changes over the last two glacial cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groot, M. H. M.; Bogotá, R. G.; Lourens, L. J.; Hooghiemstra, H.; Vriend, M.; Berrio, J. C.; Tuenter, E.; van der Plicht, J.; van Geel, B.; Ziegler, M.; Weber, S. L.; Betancourt, A.; Contreras, L.; Gaviria, S.; Giraldo, C.; González, N.; Jansen, J. H. F.; Konert, M.; Ortega, D.; Rangel, O.; Sarmiento, G.; Vandenberghe, J.; van der Hammen, T.; van der Linden, M.; Westerhoff, W.

    2010-10-01

    Tropical montane biome migration patterns in the northern Andes are found to be coupled to glacial-induced mean annual temperature (MAT) changes; however, the accuracy and resolution of current records are insufficient to fully explore their magnitude and rates of change. Here we present a ~60-year resolution pollen record over the past 284 000 years from Lake Fúquene (5° N) in Colombia. This record shows rapid and extreme MAT changes at 2540 m elevation of up to 10 ± 2 °C within a few hundred of years that concur with the ~100 and 41-kyr (obliquity) paced glacial cycles and North Atlantic abrupt climatic events as documented in ice cores and marine sediments. Using transient climate modelling experiments we demonstrate that insolation-controlled ice volume and greenhouse gasses are the major forcing agents causing the orbital MAT changes, but that the model simulations significantly underestimate changes in lapse rates and local hydrology and vegetation feedbacks within the studied region due to its low spatial resolution.

  4. Climate driven changes in hydrology, nutrient cycling, and food web dynamics in surface waters of the Arctic Coastal Plain, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, J. C.; Wipfli, M.; Schmutz, J.; Gurney, K.

    2011-12-01

    Arctic ecosystems are changing rapidly as a result of a warming climate. While many areas of the arctic are expected to dry as a result of warming, the Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP) of Alaska, which extends from the Brooks Range north to the Beaufort Sea will likely become wetter, because subsurface hydrologic fluxes are constrained by thick, continuous permafrost. This landscape is characterized by large, oriented lakes and many smaller ponds that form in the low centers and troughs/edges of frost polygons. This region provides important breeding habitat for many migratory birds including loons, arctic terns, eiders, shorebirds, and white-fronted geese, among others. Increased hydrologic fluxes may provide a bottom-up control on the success of these species by altering the availability of food resources including invertebrates and fish. This work aimed to 1) characterize surface water fluxes and nutrient availability in the small streams and lake types of two study regions in the ACP, 2) predict how increased hydrological fluxes will affect the lakes, streams, and water chemistry, and 3) use nutrient additions to simulate likely changes in lake chemistry and invertebrate availability. Initial observations suggest that increasing wetland areas and availability of nutrients will result in increased invertebrate abundance, while the potential for drainage and terrestrialization of larger lakes may reduce fish abundance and overwintering habitat. These changes will likely have positive implications for insectivores and negative implications for piscivorous waterfowl.

  5. SIDS and Climate Change Indicators

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Soonil D. Rughooputh

    There is no doubt that the climate is changing. Climate change is also affecting our natural world, society and economy. Our climate has been evolving continuously since centuries. But the last two millennia have witnessed an unprecedented change in the climate. The clear message from the scientific community is that this warming is due, at least in part, to the

  6. Software research and climate change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steve M. Easterbrook; Michael Glenn; Jorge Aranda; Jon Pipitone

    2009-01-01

    This workshop explored the contributions that software research can make to the challenge of climate change. Climate change is likely to be the defining issue of the 21st Century. Recent studies indicate that climate change is accelerating, confirming the most pessimistic of scenarios identified by climate scientists. Our past use of fossil fuels commit the world to around 2°C average

  7. Understanding and Attributing Climate Change

    E-print Network

    Box, Jason E.

    9 Understanding and Attributing Climate Change Coordinating Lead Authors: Gabriele C. Hegerl (USA. Nicholls, J.E. Penner and P.A. Stott, 2007: Under- standing and Attributing Climate Change. In: Climate of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Solomon, S., D. Qin, M. Manning, Z. Chen, M. Marquis, K.B. Averyt, M

  8. Biological Impacts of Climate Change

    E-print Network

    McCarty, John P.

    Biological Impacts of Climate Change John P McCarty, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE and reproduction depend on how well adapted individuals are to local climate patterns. Climate change can disrupt subsequent impacts on populations or species' distributions across geographic regions. Climate change may

  9. Biological Effects of Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Juanita Constible

    2008-10-01

    How important is climate change--something that has occurred throughout Earth's history? Can ecosystems tolerate the magnitude and rate of future change? How will other conservation threats interact with climate change? How likely are widespread extinction

  10. Climate change and plant diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Raquel Ghini; Emília Hamada; Wagner Bettiol

    2008-01-01

    Human activities are altering greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere and causing global climate change. In the near future, there will certainly be changes in the Brazilian phytosanitary scenario attributed to global climate change. The impacts of climate change can be positive, negative or neutral, since these changes can decrease, increase or have no impact on diseases, depending on each

  11. Climate Change and Ground Water

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hugo A. Loáiciga

    2003-01-01

    This article summarizes the theory of climate change and the relationship of climate-change forcing to hydrologic and aquifer processes. It focuses on regional aquifer systems and on the methods to link large-scale climate-change processes to ground-water recharge and to simulate ground-water flow and solute transport in a warmer, 2xCO2 climate. The article reviews methods currently available to generate climate-change forcing

  12. CHANGING OUR WAYS SCOTLAND'S CLIMATE CHANGE PROGRAMME

    E-print Network

    ;Foreword Climate change is one of the most serious threats facing the world today. Scientific evidence in light of sound scientific evidence that Scotland's climate will change significantly over the comingCHANGING OUR WAYS SCOTLAND'S CLIMATE CHANGE PROGRAMME #12;Cover based on diagram below. Hadley

  13. What is Climate Change?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site is offered by Canada's Natural Resources Department. The main page describes the basics of the phenomenon, while the links tell about the impact of climate change on health and safety, communities, land resources, water resources, and coastal regions. Although specific to Canadian regions, the site will give visitors from all over a good introduction to the potential problems of global warming.

  14. Environmental Sustainability & Climate Change

    E-print Network

    s p Policies Climate Change Smart Growth Bay Restoration #12;Policies Facilitate the effective and working groups­ Statewide goals and working groups · Chesapeake Bay Restoration · Maryland Smart Growth· Coordination activities #12;Practices: System-widey · USM Strategic Plan ­ Greenhouse gas emissions

  15. Adapting to Climate Change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jon M. Conrad; Koji Kotani

    This paper examines the optimal time to adapt to climate change. We take the perspective of a farmer growing a crop in a stochastic environment. The farmer faces stochastic seasonal growth, which makes harvest at the end of any season a random variable. Within a season, crop biomass is assumed to grow according to a continuous- time Itô process. The

  16. Climate Change? When? Where?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boon, Helen

    2009-01-01

    Regional Australian students were surveyed to explore their understanding and knowledge of the greenhouse effect, ozone depletion and climate change. Results were compared with a parallel study undertaken in 1991 in a regional UK city. The comparison was conducted to investigate whether more awareness and understanding of these issues is…

  17. Confronting Climate Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, an African-American think tank based in Washington, D.C., convenes a commission to focus on the disparate impact of climate change on minority communities and help involve historically Black institutions in clean energy projects. Launched formally in July 2008, the Commission to Engage…

  18. MILANKOVITCH CYCLES AND THE EARTH'S CLIMATE

    E-print Network

    Baez, John

    MILANKOVITCH CYCLES AND THE EARTH'S CLIMATE John Baez Climate Science Seminar California State University Northridge April 26, 2013 #12;Understanding the Earth's climate poses different challenges at different time scales. The Earth has been cooling for at least 15 million years, with glaciers

  19. Volcanoes and Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Major volcanic eruptions alter the Earth's radiative balance, as volcanic ash and gas clouds absorb terrestrial radiation and scatter a significant amount of the incoming solar radiation, an effect known as "radiative forcing" that can last from two to three years following a volcanic eruption. This results in reduced temperatures in the troposphere, and changes in atmospheric circulation patterns. This site uses text, photographs, and links to related sites to describe volcano-induced climate change.

  20. Climate Kids: What is Global Climate Change?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2013-11-07

    A question and answer format is used to differentiate between weather and climate, and to provide a brief overview of global warming. This lesson is part of the Climate Kids website, a NASA education resource featuring articles, videos, images and games focused on the science of climate change.

  1. Effects of Temperature and Water Level Changes on Enzyme Activities in Two Typical Peatlands: Implications for the Responses of Carbon Cycling in Peatland to Global Climate Change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ling He; Wu Xiang; Xingting Sun

    2009-01-01

    As enzymes are involved in soil nutrient and carbon cycle in peatlands, they were expected to play a key role in regulating soil organic carbon decompose process in peatlands. In addition, temperature and water levels are both crucial factors affecting enzyme activities. Therefore, we investigated the effects of temperature and water level change on enzyme activities in two typical peatlands,

  2. Bayesian Climate Change Assessment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berliner, L. Mark; Levine, Richard A.; Shea, Dennis J.

    2000-11-01

    A Bayesian fingerprinting methodology for assessing anthropogenic impacts on climate was developed. This analysis considers the effect of increased CO2 on near-surface temperatures. A spatial CO2 fingerprint based on control and forced model output from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Climate System Model was developed. The Bayesian approach is distinguished by several new facets. First, the prior model for the amplitude of the fingerprint is a mixture of two distributions: one reflects prior uncertainty in the anticipated value of the amplitude under the hypothesis of `no climate change.' The second reflects behavior assuming`climate change forced by CO2.' Second, within the Bayesian framework, a new formulation of detection and attribution analyses based on practical significance of impacts rather than traditional statistical significance was presented. Third, since Bayesian analyses can be very sensitive to prior inputs, a robust Bayesian approach, which investigates the ranges of posterior inferences as prior inputs are varied, was used. Following presentation of numerical results that enforce the claim of changes in temperature patterns due to anthropogenic CO2 forcing, the article concludes with a comparative analysis for another CO2 fingerprint and selected discussion.

  3. The origin of climate changes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Delecluse

    2008-01-01

    Summary Investigation on climate change is coordinated by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which has the delicate task of collecting recent knowledge on climate change and the related impacts of the observed changes, and then developing a consensus statement from these findings. The IPCC's last review, published at the end of 2007, summarised major findings on the present

  4. Climate Change and Indiana Agriculture

    E-print Network

    Warming Climate Change: Any systematic change in the state of the atmosphere (temperature, humidity7/23/2009 1 Climate Change and Indiana Agriculture Dev Niyogi Indiana State Climatologist it l d f d i li tWebsite: landsurface.org and iclimate.org What is Climate Change? (and...... what

  5. Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan

    E-print Network

    Climate Change Proposed Scoping Plan a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources #12;CLIMATE CHANGE SCOPING PLAN State of California Air Resources Board Resolution 08-47 December 11 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that cause global warming; WHEREAS, the adverse impacts of climate change

  6. Climate change: Flawed science, or

    E-print Network

    Climate change: Fraud, Flawed science, or Fundamental dilemma? Prof Roy Thompson, FRSE #12;Fraud innovation Dilemma... Vicious Circle #12;1. Climate Change - Weather vs. climate - The greenhouse effect - Past climates 2. Impacts - Plants & animals - The seasons 3. Fundamental dilemma - Overpopulation

  7. Climate Change and Extinction

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2004-07-12

    A senior researcher discusses extinction due to global warming in this two-minute sound segment. He says that as climate warms, species will probably move upslope and towards the poles but in many cases, that may put species that are found on mountain tops at risk. Species with small ranges or lowland species that may not be able to get to mountain slopes and find equitable climate will die out. His study suggests that as many as one million species of plants and animals worldwide could be facing extinction as a result of climate change. This site is from an archive of a daily radio program called Pulse of the Planet, which provides its listeners with a portrait of Planet Earth, tracking the rhythms of nature, culture and science worldwide and blending interviews and extraordinary natural sound. The site also provides a written transcript of the broadcast.

  8. Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate EngineeringImplications for Climate Engineering

    E-print Network

    Polz, Martin

    Global Climate Change Impacts:Global Climate Change Impacts: Implications for Climate Engineering Center Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States October 29, 2009 #12;2Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States 2 Response Strategies to ClimateResponse Strategies to Climate ChangeChange

  9. Climate, climatic change, and water supply

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James R. Wallis

    1977-01-01

    The earth's climate is changing, and associated predictions of future floods and droughts reverberate throughout the news media. Coupled with forecasts of climatic change one can often find associated predictions of social unrest, wars, and famines, but these possible derivative issues have not been addressed. We considered only the simpler problems of water shortages, which may or may not be

  10. Climate Change and Human Health

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2011-05-02

    Learn how global climate change affects human health in this interactive activity adapted from A Human Health Perspective: On Climate Change by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

  11. Climate Change and Citizen Science

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Citizen Science Central, Cornell Lab of Ornithology

    This animation describes how citizen observations can document the impact of climate change on plants and animals. It introduces the topic of phenology and data collection, the impact of climate change on phenology, and how individuals can become citizen scientists.

  12. Health Effects of Climate Change

    MedlinePLUS

    ... over generations. TODAY It is now established that climate changes are occurring at an increasingly rapid rate. These ... are becoming alert to the dynamic relationship between climate change and human health. Some of these impacts are ...

  13. Perception of climate change.

    PubMed

    Hansen, James; Sato, Makiko; Ruedy, Reto

    2012-09-11

    "Climate dice," describing the chance of unusually warm or cool seasons, have become more and more "loaded" in the past 30 y, coincident with rapid global warming. The distribution of seasonal mean temperature anomalies has shifted toward higher temperatures and the range of anomalies has increased. An important change is the emergence of a category of summertime extremely hot outliers, more than three standard deviations (3?) warmer than the climatology of the 1951-1980 base period. This hot extreme, which covered much less than 1% of Earth's surface during the base period, now typically covers about 10% of the land area. It follows that we can state, with a high degree of confidence, that extreme anomalies such as those in Texas and Oklahoma in 2011 and Moscow in 2010 were a consequence of global warming because their likelihood in the absence of global warming was exceedingly small. We discuss practical implications of this substantial, growing, climate change. PMID:22869707

  14. Terrestrial ecosystems and climatic change

    SciTech Connect

    Emanuel, W.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Schimel, D.S. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (USA). Natural Resources Ecology Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    The structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems depend on climate, and in turn, ecosystems influence atmospheric composition and climate. A comprehensive, global model of terrestrial ecosystem dynamics is needed. A hierarchical approach appears advisable given currently available concepts, data, and formalisms. The organization of models can be based on the temporal scales involved. A rapidly responding model describes the processes associated with photosynthesis, including carbon, moisture, and heat exchange with the atmosphere. An intermediate model handles subannual variations that are closely associated with allocation and seasonal changes in productivity and decomposition. A slow response model describes plant growth and succession with associated element cycling over decades and centuries. These three levels of terrestrial models are linked through common specifications of environmental conditions and constrain each other. 58 refs.

  15. Outchasing climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Pygmy possums, monarch butterflies, spoon-billed sandpipers, and a number of trees and other plants could be among the species unable to migrate fast enough to new habitat in the face of potential global climate changes, according to an August 30 report by the Switzerland-based World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and the U.S. based Clean-Air-Cool Planet (CACP), two conservation organizations.

  16. Nitrogen regulation of climate-carbon cycle feedback: evidence from a long-term global change experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, S.; Luo, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Modeling study has showed that nitrogen (N) strongly regulates ecosystem responses and feedback to climate warming by presuming that the increased N mineralization is the key mechanism for stimulating plant C uptake. Here, we present long-term experimental evidence to test the modeling hypothesis. We have conducted a warming and clipping experiment since November 1999 in a tallgrass prairie of Great Plains, USA. Infrared heaters were used to elevate soil temperature by an average of 1.6oC from 2000 to 2008. Yearly biomass clipping was to mimic hay or biofuel feedstock harvest. We measured carbon (C) and N concentrations, estimated their contents and C:N ratio in plant, root, litter, and soil pools. Warming significantly stimulated C storage in aboveground plant, root, and litter pools by 17, 38 and 29%, respectively, over the 9 years (all P<0.05) but did not change soil C content or N content in any pool. Plant and litter C:N ratio increased in the warmed plots in comparison with that in the control plots, resulting primarily from increased dominance of C4 plants in the community. Clipping significantly decreased C and N storages in plant and litter pools (all P<0.05) but did not have interactive effects with warming on either C or N pools over the 9 years. Our results suggested that increased ecosystem nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) via shifted species composition toward C4 dominance rather than plant N uptake is a key mechanism underlying warming stimulation of plant biomass growth.

  17. Past and Current Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercedes Rodríguez Ruibal, Ma

    2014-05-01

    In 1837 the Swiss geologist and palaeontologist Louis Agassiz was the first scientist to propose the existence of an ice age in the Earth's past. Nearly two centuries after discussing global glacial periods... while the average global temperature is rising very quickly because of our economic and industrial model. In tribute to these pioneers, we have selected a major climate change of the past as the Snowball Earth and, through various activities in the classroom, compared to the current anthropogenic climate change. First, we include multiple geological processes that led to a global glaciation 750 million years ago as the decrease in the atmospheric concentration of greenhouse gases such as CO2 and CH4, the effect of climate variations in solar radiation due to emissions of volcanic dust and orbital changes (Milankovitch cycles), being an essential part of this model the feedback mechanism of the albedo of the ice on a geological scale. Moreover, from simple experiments and studies in the classroom this time we can compare the past with the current anthropogenic global warming we are experiencing and some of its consequences, highlighting that affect sea level rise, increased extreme and effects on health and the biosphere weather.

  18. Climate Variability and Change Lectures, July 2013

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    COMET

    2014-04-08

    This lesson presents 13 recorded presentations from the 29 July–2 August, 2013 offering of the Climate Variability and Change Virtual Course (CVCVC). This five-day live facilitated online course provided an extensive background on a range of climate variability and change topics with an emphasis on developing communication skills for challenging climate topics. The topics covered in this course, while aimed primarily at NOAA operational climate services delivery staff will also be helpful for others who already possess a basic level of understanding of climate science. Presentations include: Weather vs. Climate — Derek Arndt, National Climatic Data Center, NOAA Climate Variability — Matt Newman, NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory Climate Science Communication — Derek Arndt, National Climatic Data Center, NOAA The El Niño/ Southern Oscillation (ENSO) Cycle — Michelle L'Heureux, Climate Prediction Center, NOAA/National Weather Service NOAA's Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlooks — Gerry Bell, Climate Prediction Center, NOAA/National Weather Service The Madden-Julian Oscillation — Jon Gottschalk, Climate Prediction Center, NOAA/National Weather Service Drought: Science, Monitoring and Early Warning — Roger Pulwarty, National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS), Earth System Research Laboratory/NOAA Climate Prediction Center Outlooks — Mike Halpert, Climate Prediction Center, NOAA/National Weather Service Climate.gov: Information, Products, and Tools — David Herring, Climate Program Office, NOAA/National Weather Service Climate Communication Skills for Decision-support Audiences — Susan Buhr, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), University of Colorado Climate Change Science — Wayne Higgins, Climate Program Office, NOAA Climate Change Impacts — Peter Backlund, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Managing Marine and Coastal Resources in a Changing Climate — Kenric Osgood, Marine Ecosystems Division, NOAA, NMFS Please Note: There are no quizzes available on MetEd for these materials. However, National Weather Service users may complete a quiz for each lecture and receive credit in the NWS Learning Center. The quizzes may be found in the NWS Learning Center by searching for "Climate Variability and Change Lecture". Alternatively, a learning plan containing quizzes for all 13 lectures is available on the NWS Learning Center's COMET Page.

  19. CLIMATE CHANGE: A POLITICAL INTRODUCTION

    Microsoft Academic Search

    François Gemenne

    Syllabus Summary Climate change has now grown from a scientific concern to one of the most pressing issues of our time. This seminar aims to look at the topic from a political viewpoint, and analyze the different mechanisms of cooperation in the fight against climate change. The first part provides an appraisal of climate change as a political issue: it

  20. The Politics of Climate Change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Robert

    2010-01-01

    This article explains the ways in which climate change is a geopolitical problem. It discusses the potential ramifications of the impacts of climate change on security, and argues that predictions of international conflicts arising from climate change are premature. It explains the spatial politics of reducing greenhouse gas emissions through an overview of the positions of the main actors in

  1. 4, 28752899, 2007 Climate change

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    HESSD 4, 2875­2899, 2007 Climate change impact and model inaccuracy P. Droogers et al. Title Page are under open-access review for the journal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Climate change impact­2899, 2007 Climate change impact and model inaccuracy P. Droogers et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

  2. Climate Change Action Plan Report

    E-print Network

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    Climate Change Action Plan Report Intermountain Region 2013 National Park Service Resource Stewardship and Science Landscape Conservation and Climate Change Division #12;About this Report Each National Park Service is responding to the challenge of climate change; and (2) raise awareness among NPS

  3. CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS, VULNERABILITIES, AND

    E-print Network

    CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION IN THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA Commission's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012071 Prepared for: California Energy, as well as projections of future changes in climate based on modeling studies using various plausible

  4. Climate Variability and Change in a Eutrophic Great Lakes Freshwater Embayment: Shifting Hydrodynamics and the Potential for Indirect Impacts on Biogeochemical Processes, Carbon Cycling and Hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klump, J. V.; Waples, J. T.

    2008-12-01

    Future changes in the climatic regime of the Great Lakes region have the potential to induce a variety of both direct (e.g. thermal) and indirect (e.g. biogeochemical) alterations in ecosystem function. In the case of the later, we have identified a statistically significant shift in wind direction of the average wind field over the Great Lakes basin that is consistent with a southward migration of the dominant summer storm track. In Green Bay (NW Lake Michigan), we have shown that the new wind field has most likely resulted in periods of decreased thermal stratification and an overall decrease in water mass exchange with Lake Michigan. In subsequent studies, aimed at determining the impact of these shifts in the physical climate regime, time series measurements of currents, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, and the Be-7 activity of particulates in bottom sediments, sediment traps, and suspended particulates have been made over a 3 year period. A tracer of short term particle dynamics, Be-7 (half life 53 d) is useful in estimating particle residence times in the water column, along with episodic sediment deposition and erosion rates, and the average number of deposition/erosion cycles a particle experiences prior to permanent burial in the sediments. Be-7 derived estimates of the age of particulate organic carbon cycling between surface sediments and the overlying waters are on the order of months, and are dependent upon resuspension frequency. Remineralization of organic carbon within this actively resuspended pool of material results in estimated decomposition rates for POC ranging 0.08 to 0.04% per day, a rate intermediate between the rapid remineralization of fresh algal material and post-depositional diagenesis. Comparisons between 1989-90 and 2004-06 show a decrease in resuspension frequency, possibly in response to shifts in regional climatic scale dynamics. This appears to result in an increase in the efficiency of trapping of organic matter in the bay and a significant increase in the organic carbon content of suspended particulates within the resuspension reactor. Measured sedimentation rates determined via Pb-210 and Cs-137 also indicate increased sediment accumulation over this interval. Combined with the wind shift induced reduction in water mass exchange, these climatic changes have the potential to increase hypoxia via enhancing benthic oxygen demand - a common feature of lower Green Bay that recent evidence suggests may be exacerbated, triggering severe oxygen depletion and fish kills.

  5. Observed climate variability and change of relevance to the biosphere

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David R. Easterling; Thomas R. Karl; Kevin P. Gallo; David A. Robinson; Kevin E. Trenberth; Aiguo Dai

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we review the current instrumental evidence regarding climate variations and change during the 20th century emphasizing those changes that are likely to have direct interactions with the biosphere. Three basic questions are addressed: (1) Is the climate getting warmer, (2) is the hydrologic cycle changing, and (3) is the climate becoming more extreme. Based on global near-surface

  6. 2012 Climate Change Education Symposium February 23, 2012

    E-print Network

    are on "Carbon Cycling" and "Energy and Global Warming," which include a focus on climate change. Each module2012 Climate Change Education Symposium February 23, 2012 Michigan State University Union East Lansing, MI CLIMATE CHANGE EDUCATION RESOURCES AND RELEVANT MSU COURSES (This information was submitted

  7. [Keynote address: Climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Forrister, D. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Broadly speaking, the climate issue is moving from talk to action both in the United States and internationally. While few nations have adopted strict controls or stiff new taxes, a number of them are developing action plans that are making clear their intention to ramp up activity between now and the year 2000... and beyond. There are sensible, economically efficient strategies to be undertaken in the near term that offer the possibility, in many countries, to avoid more draconian measures. These strategies are by-and-large the same measures that the National Academy of Sciences recommended in a 1991 report called, Policy Implications of Greenhouse Warming. The author thinks the Academy`s most important policy contribution was how it recommended the nations act in the face of uncertain science and high risks--that cost effective measures are adopted as cheap insurance... just as nations insure against other high risk, low certainty possibilities, like catastrophic health insurance, auto insurance, and fire insurance. This insurance theme is still right. First, the author addresses how the international climate change negotiations are beginning to produce insurance measures. Next, the author will discuss some of the key issues to watch in those negotiations that relate to longer-term insurance. And finally, the author will report on progress in the United States on the climate insurance plan--The President`s Climate Action Plan.

  8. Earth's Climate Changes: Virtual Bookshelf

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jessica Fries-Gaither

    This list of carefully selected books for grades K-5 highlights nonfiction about climate proxies, those preserved physical characteristics, such as fossils, that scientists use to reconstruct past climates. Also highlighted are a few books that provide information about two past climatic events -- the last ice age and the Dust Bowl. In each issue of the free, online magazine Beyond Weather and the Water Cycle, the virtual bookshelf recommends books that accurately portray the theme drawn from the principles of climate sciences.

  9. Carbon cycling in a rapidly changing High Arctic: Results from long-term climate experiments and observations of interannual variability in NW Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czimczik, C. I.; Lupascu, M.; Csank, A. Z.; Seibt, U. H.; Maseyk, K. S.; Xu, X.; Welker, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    The High Arctic, a region dominated by polar semi-deserts underlain with continuous permafrost, is experiencing dramatic changes in climate associated with the loss of sea ice, including warming and shifts in precipitation regimes (i.e. wetting and changing snow cover). Here, we present findings from a set of studies that are addressing the sign and strength of the High Arctic's summertime carbon (C) cycle feedback. We explored magnitudes, patterns and sources of C losses through CO2 and CH4 fluxes and via leaching as dissolved organic C (DOC) and particulate organic C (POC) along with measurements of net ecosystem exchange and plant C uptake. From studying long-term summertime experimental warming and/or watering and interannual weather patterns we find that in polar semi-deserts: a) Summer precipitation regime is the key driver of current summertime C budgets. Warming plus wetting results in increased ecosystem C sequestration and reduced losses of older C as CO2, while warming alone decreases C uptake and increases losses of older soil C as CO2. The system is a sink for CH4, but the sink strength will decline with increasing soil moisture. Thus, the High Arctic has the potential to remain a strong summertime C sink even as the rest of the permafrost region transitions to a net C source to the atmosphere as climate continues to warm. b) Old C is diffusing out of the High Arctic landscape into the atmosphere. This C loss is especially evident in the spring before vegetation pumps fresh C into the soil system. Further, loss of older C from the deeper active layer is highly episodic and dominates C emissions during small precipitation events. c) Precipitation regime is also the key driver of that ancient C export from the land surface as DOC, higher precipitation in the later part of the growing season (July-August), when the active layer is deeper, results in a greater fraction of old C transported to the nearshore Arctic Ocean. Collectively these findings represent a comprehensive picture of C cycle-climate interactions in the High Arctic and provide benchmark datasets critically needed to assess simulations of a changing Arctic.

  10. Agriculture and climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Abelson, P.H.

    1992-07-03

    How will increases in levels of CO{sub 2} and changes in temperature affect food production A recently issued report analyzes prospects for US agriculture 1990 to 2030. The report, prepared by a distinguished Task Force, first projects the evolution of agriculture assuming increased levels of CO{sub 2} but no climate change. Then it deals with effects of climate change, followed by a discussion of how greenhouse emissions might be diminished by agriculture. Economic and policy matters are also covered. How the climate would respond to more greenhouse gases is uncertain. If temperatures were higher, there would be more evaporation and more precipitation. Where would the rain fall That is a good question. Weather in a particular locality is not determined by global averages. The Dust Bowl of the 1930s could be repeated at its former site or located in another region such as the present Corn Belt. But depending on the realities at a given place, farmers have demonstrated great flexibility in choosing what they may grow. Their flexibility has been increased by the numerous varieties of seeds of major crops that are now available, each having different characteristics such as drought resistance and temperature tolerance. In past, agriculture has contributed about 5% of US greenhouse gases. Two large components have involved emissions of CO{sub 2} from farm machinery and from oxidation of organic matter in soil due to tillage. Use of diesel fuel and more efficient machinery has reduced emissions from that source by 40%. In some areas changed tillage practices are now responsible for returning carbon to the soil. The report identifies an important potential for diminishing net US emissions of CO{sub 2} by growth and utilization of biomass. Large areas are already available that could be devoted to energy crops.

  11. Population and climate change.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joel E

    2010-06-01

    To review, the four broad dimensions of any complex human problem, including climate change, are the human population, economics, culture, and environment. These dimensions interact with one another in all directions and on many time-scales. From 2010 to 2050, the human population is likely to grow bigger, more slowly, older, and more urban. It is projected that by 2050 more than 2.6 billion people (almost 94% of global urban growth) will be added to the urban population in today's developing countries. That works out to 1.26 million additional urban people in today's developing countries every week from 2010 to 2050. Humans alter the climate by emitting greenhouse gases, by altering planetary albedo, and by altering atmospheric components. Between 1900 and 2000, humans' emissions of carbon into the atmosphere increased fifteenfold, while the numbers of people increased less than fourfold. Population growth alone, with constant rates of emissions per person, could not account for the increase in the carbon emissions to the atmosphere. The world economy grew sixteenfold in the twentieth century, accompanied by enormous increases in the burning of gas, oil, and coal. In the last quarter of the twentieth century, population grew much faster in developing countries than in high-income countries, and, compared with population growth, the growth of carbon emissions to the atmosphere was even faster in developing countries than in high-income countries. The ratio of emissions-to-population growth rates was 2.8 in developing countries compared with 1.6 in high-income countries. Emissions of CO2 and other greenhouse gases are influenced by the sizes and density of settlements, the sizes of households, and the ages of householders. Between 2010 and 2050, these demographic factors are anticipated to change substantially. Therefore demography will play a substantial role in the dynamics of climate changes. Climate changes affect many aspects of the living environment, including human settlements, food production, and diseases. These changes will affect poor people more severely than rich, and poor nations more severely than rich. Yet not enough is known to predict quantitatively many details that will matter enormously to future people and other species. Three kinds of responses are related to demographic issues that affect climate changes: universal secondary education, voluntary contraception and maternal health services, and smarter urban design and construction. These responses may prevent, reduce, or ameliorate the impacts of climate changes. They are as relevant to rich countries as to poor, though in ways that are as different as are rich countries and poor. They are desirable in their own right because they improve the lives of the people they affect directly; and they are desirable for their beneficial effects on the larger society and globe. They are effective responses to the twin challenges of reducing poverty and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. PMID:21553595

  12. Enviropedia: Introduction to Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This resource provides an overview of the concept of climate change and discusses past climate changes, as evidenced by sea sediments and sedimentary rock studied by paleoclimatologists. More recently, ice cores, tree rings, and historical records tell of changes such as interglacial periods and the little ice age. Other factors like volcanoes, changes in the Earth's orbit, comets, and meteorites that may alter the energy balance, change the greenhouse effect, or cause climate forcing are also explored in these pages.

  13. Climate Change and Extreme Weather

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2014-09-14

    This module discusses how a changing climate can also lead to changes in extreme weather events on the local scale. The role of natural variability is also explained. The module describes how climate change can have both positive and negative effects, depending on the situation, location, and the vulnerability of the population. While research on climate change and extreme events is still relatively new, the module discusses what changes scientists think are likely if greenhouse gas emissions continue to rise.

  14. World Bank Group: Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Located within the World Bank's Environment Department, the Climate Change team "provides resources and expertise for the World Bank's participation in international climate change negotiations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and provides technical advice to the World Bank's Global Environment Facility Program." Understandably, the site contains a brief explication of the key themes surrounding contemporary concerns about climate change, along with offering a detailed discussion of the various programs and research projects with which the Climate Change group is engaged directly or in tandem with other related organizations and institutions. From the main page, visitors can read about the nature of international climate change (and its disproportionate effects on the developing world), peruse a list of relevant online publications, and read press releases from the Climate Change team.

  15. The dating of dipterocarp tree rings: establishing a record of carbon cycling and climatic change in the tropics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Robertson; C. A. Froyd; R. P. D. Walsh; D. M. Newbery; S. Woodborne; R. C. Ong

    2004-01-01

    In a first step to obtain a proxy record of past climatic events (including the El Niño-Southern Oscillation) in the normally aseasonal tropical environment of Sabah, a radial segment from a recently fallen dipterocarp (Shorea superba) was radiocarbon dated and subjected to carbon isotope analysis. The high-precision radiocarbon results fell into the ambiguous modern plateau where several calibrated dates can

  16. Free Podcasts on Climate and Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Robert Payo

    In partnership with the National Science Digital Library and Apple, NCAR and UCAR offer podcasts that provide a brief and accessible overview on climate and climate change. These podcasts, short 5-8 minute videos you can download on your computer or iPod, are a part of the NSDL on iTunes U collection.

  17. Climate Change Economics and Policy

    E-print Network

    Romano, Daniela

    AFRICA COLLEGE Centre for Climate Change Economics and Policy Adapting to Climate Change 3 CLIMATE-SMART DEVELOPMENT 11 - 13 September 2013 #12;According to the International Energy Agency, greenhouse gas emissions.2 Agricultural land is also an important source of greenhouse gas emissions ­ the US Environmental

  18. Human Engineering and Climate Change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Matthew Liao; Anders Sandberg; Rebecca Roache

    2012-01-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is arguably one of the biggest problems that confront us today. There is ample evidence that climate change is likely to affect adversely many aspects of life for all people around the world, and that existing solutions such as geoengineering might be too risky and ordinary behavioural and market solutions might not be sufficient to mitigate climate

  19. Climate Change: Prospects for Nature

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Lovejoy

    2008-03-12

    Thomas Lovejoy, President of The H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics and the Environment, explores the impact of climate change on the natural world. He also discusses the implications of climate change for climate policy and natural resource management.

  20. Climate Change and Regional Impacts

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    COMET

    2012-08-14

    This short module is an overview of the different effects climate change produces in different regions of the United States. In addition to discussing impacts already being experienced, the module presents information on how climate scientists use specialized models and statistical techniques to estimate how regional climates are likely to change in the future.

  1. Climate Change Workshop Links

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Deb and Chad

    2007-11-20

    This page is a collection of useful Web links to climate change resources. Only a few resources here right now, but you get the idea... NIERRS Water quality monitoring data page NERRS - Water quality monitoring data This is a great site for water stuff. GOMOOS Site -- buoy monitoring data GOMOOS - Weather and water data (real-time) from Gulf of Maine buoys This is a great site for ocean temperatures and wind speed, etc. Coastal Ocean Observing Center Here\\'s another: The COOLroom ...

  2. Contrails and Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this problem-based learning unit, learners analyze the role of condensation trails from jets, or contrails, and their role in climate change. Contrails are thin ice clouds that form from the burning of jet fuel and release of water vapor. The issue with contrails is that narrow trails can spread and coalesce to form significant banks of cirrus-type clouds. Instructions to access NASA data are provided along with additional resources and activities. This module was developed to be used in the Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA) courses for middle and high school teachers and is also available to teachers to adapt for general classroom use.

  3. Climate Variability and Change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2007-01-01

    In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) developed a science strategy outlining the major natural science issues facing the Nation in the next decade. The science strategy consists of six science directions of critical importance, focusing on areas where natural science can make a substantial contribution to the well-being of the Nation and the world. This fact sheet focuses on climate variability and change and how USGS research can strengthen the Nation with information needed to meet the challenges of the 21st century.

  4. Climate change and ethics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayward, Tim

    2012-12-01

    What does it matter if the climate changes? This kind of question does not admit of a scientific answer. Natural science can tell us what some of its biophysical effects are likely to be; social scientists can estimate what consequences such effects could have for human lives and livelihoods. But how should we respond? The question is, at root, about how we think we should live--and different people have myriad different ideas about this. The distinctive task of ethics is to bring some clarity and order to these ideas.

  5. UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National

    E-print Network

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National Adaptation Programme Meg Patel Defra #12 change #12;Weather & climate impacts - economic, societal, environmental Water consumption per capita;Legislative Framework Climate Change Act 2008 Adaptation Reporting Power 2011 Climate Change Risk Assessment

  6. Ruminants, climate change and climate policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripple, William J.; Smith, Pete; Haberl, Helmut; Montzka, Stephen A.; McAlpine, Clive; Boucher, Douglas H.

    2014-01-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions from ruminant meat production are significant. Reductions in global ruminant numbers could make a substantial contribution to climate change mitigation goals and yield important social and environmental co-benefits.

  7. The dating of dipterocarp tree rings: establishing a record of carbon cycling and climatic change in the tropics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. Robertson; C. A. Froyd; R. P. D. Walsh; D. M. Newbery; S. Woodborne; R. C. Ong

    2004-01-01

    ABSTRACT: In a first step to obtain a proxy record of past climatic events (including the El Nin ˜o– Southern Oscillation) in the normally aseasonal tropical environment of Sabah, a radial segment from a recently fallen dipterocarp (Shorea superba) was radiocarbon,dated and subjected to carbon,isotope analysis. The high-precision radiocarbon,results fell into the ambiguous,modern,plateau where,sev- eral calibrated dates can exist for

  8. Emerging Legal and Policy Strategies for Climate Change Adaptation: Opportunities and Constraints for Action in Africa

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emmanuel Kasimbazi

    2012-01-01

    The climate of the Africa is changing. When the climate started changing and when it will end is subject to endless debate. Climate is important for development in Africa but natural climate fluctuations from autonomous climate cycles (such as those linked to the El Nino phenomenon) disrupt ecological, economic and social systems. The causes of climate of change include: continued

  9. California Climate Change Portal

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Global warming and climate change have been a top priority for a number of international organizations, and in recent years, a number of states have also become profoundly concerned about these transformations. Not surprisingly, the state of California has been interested in these subjects for some time, and this website is an initiative of the various agencies working in this area of research. On this site, visitors can learn about various initiatives sponsored by different agencies within the state and also peruse a list of FAQâ??s on the subject. First-time visitors will want to start at the â??Backgroundâ? section; they may then proceed to the â??Policy & Programâ? area, where they can learn what the state is doing to combat this situation. Some of these programs include a voluntary greenhouse gas emission registry for California companies and a research program to spur environmentally-friendly energy alternatives. Finally, the site also includes a very nice glossary of terms used in discussing global climate change.

  10. Communicating Climate Change (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mann, M. E.

    2009-12-01

    I will discuss the various challenges scientists must confront in efforts to communicate the science and implications of climate change to the public. Among these challenges is the stiff headwind we must fight of a concerted disinformation effort designed to confuse the public about the nature of our scientific understanding of the problem and the reality of the underlying societal threat. We also must fight the legacy of the public’s perception of the scientist. That is to say, we must strive to communicate in plainspoken language that neither insults the intelligence of our audience, nor hopelessly loses them in jargon and science-speak. And through all of this, we must maintain our composure and good humor even in the face of what we might consider the vilest of tactics by our opposition. When it comes to how best to get our message out to the broader public, I don’t pretend to have all of the answers. But I will share some insights and anecdotes that I have accumulated over the course of my own efforts to inform the public about the reality of climate change and the potential threat that it represents.

  11. Climate change and marine life

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Anthony J.; Brown, Christopher J.; Brander, Keith; Bruno, John F.; Buckley, Lauren; Burrows, Michael T.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Holding, Johnna; Kappel, Carrie V.; Kiessling, Wolfgang; Moore, Pippa J.; O'Connor, Mary I.; Pandolfi, John M.; Parmesan, Camille; Schoeman, David S.; Schwing, Frank; Sydeman, William J.; Poloczanska, Elvira S.

    2012-01-01

    A Marine Climate Impacts Workshop was held from 29 April to 3 May 2012 at the US National Center of Ecological Analysis and Synthesis in Santa Barbara. This workshop was the culmination of a series of six meetings over the past three years, which had brought together 25 experts in climate change ecology, analysis of large datasets, palaeontology, marine ecology and physical oceanography. Aims of these workshops were to produce a global synthesis of climate impacts on marine biota, to identify sensitive habitats and taxa, to inform the current Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) process, and to strengthen research into ecological impacts of climate change. PMID:22791706

  12. Climate change and marine life.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Anthony J; Brown, Christopher J; Brander, Keith; Bruno, John F; Buckley, Lauren; Burrows, Michael T; Duarte, Carlos M; Halpern, Benjamin S; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove; Holding, Johnna; Kappel, Carrie V; Kiessling, Wolfgang; Moore, Pippa J; O'Connor, Mary I; Pandolfi, John M; Parmesan, Camille; Schoeman, David S; Schwing, Frank; Sydeman, William J; Poloczanska, Elvira S

    2012-12-23

    A Marine Climate Impacts Workshop was held from 29 April to 3 May 2012 at the US National Center of Ecological Analysis and Synthesis in Santa Barbara. This workshop was the culmination of a series of six meetings over the past three years, which had brought together 25 experts in climate change ecology, analysis of large datasets, palaeontology, marine ecology and physical oceanography. Aims of these workshops were to produce a global synthesis of climate impacts on marine biota, to identify sensitive habitats and taxa, to inform the current Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) process, and to strengthen research into ecological impacts of climate change. PMID:22791706

  13. Vegetation and climate changes in the South Eastern Mediterranean during the Last Glacial-Interglacial cycle (86 ka): new marine pollen record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langgut, D.; Almogi-Labin, A.; Bar-Matthews, M.; Weinstein-Evron, M.

    2011-12-01

    The Eastern Mediterranean, located at the meeting between the Mediterranean vegetation of the Eurasian continent and the desert vegetation of the Saharan-Arabian desert belt, is ideal for tracking changes in regional vegetation as function of climate changes. Reconstruction of these changes in the South Eastern Mediterranean during the last 86 ka is based on a palynological record, from deep-sea core 9509, taken by R/V Marion Dufresne, off the southern Israeli coast. The chronological framework is based on the correlation of ? 18O records of planktonic foraminifera with the high resolution, well-dated U-Th speleothem record from the Soreq Cave, Israel and the occurrence of sapropel layers. Several cycles of humid/dry periods were documented during the last 86 ka. The record starts with the moderate humid and warm sapropel S3 marking the end of Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5. The climate during the Last Glacial period (75.5-16.2 ka) was cold and dry, with low Arboreal Pollen (AP) levels, and high values of semi-desert and desert vegetation (e.g. Artemisia - sagebrush). The driest and coldest period during the last 86 ka corresponds to MIS 2 (27.1-16.2 ka), characterized by the lowest tree cover along the sequence and the dominance of steppe vegetation. Some slightly more humid fluctuations were identified during the period of 56.3 and 43.5 ka with its peak between 56.0 and 54.4 ka. The most pronounced climate change started at the beginning of the Deglaciation (16.2-10 ka) and continued throughout the Holocene (last 10 ka), notwithstanding some short fluctuations. High AP levels were dominated by Quercus callipprinos (evergreen oak), suggesting that the Mediterranean forest was more extensive in the area and the climate was wet. Sapropels S3 and S1 were clearly recognized here by the high concentrations and good state of preservation of pollen because of the development of anoxia in the bottom water that may be related to more extensive Nile discharge coinciding with high insolation values at 65° N and enhanced westerlies activity. Another wet and warm event is the Bölling-Allerød (14.6-12.3 ka). Cold and dry spells identified by low AP and high steppe elements correspond with Heinrich Events H2-H6, the Last Glacial Maximum, Younger Dryas and the 8.2 ka event. Similar pattern of vegetation trends was observed also in Lake Zeribar Western Iran, Tenaghi Philippon North East Greece and the Alborán Sea. There is a clear general difference between the South East Mediterranean and western and central Mediterranean because of W-E climatic moisture gradient reflected in the dominance of Mediterranean maquis, lower tree population and higher steppe vegetation in the South East Mediterranean.

  14. Climate Change: Geophysical Puzzles and Some Answers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, S. F.

    2009-04-01

    Climate change is a complex subject, involving many disciplines of geophysics - from geodynamics and meteorology to solar-terrestrial relationships and solar-planetary dynamics. We will discuss a number of scientific puzzles, many still unanswered: · How much of climate change of the past century is anthropogenic and how much is caused by Nature? · How reliable are temperature data of the atmosphere and of the surface, including sea surface? · How reliable are climate models used to calculate future temperatures? · How good is the evidence for solar forcing of climate? · On a decadal time scale, is natural forcing mainly solar or due to internal oscillations? · Can the 1500-year cycle discovered in ice cores explain the Medieval Warming and Little Ice Age? · Why does sea level rise show no acceleration - and how to account for its observed magnitude? -------------------------------------------------------------------- Much of the presentation is based on the NIPCC report "Nature - Not Human Activity - Rules the Climate" http://www.sepp.org/publications/NIPCC_final.pdf

  15. Earth's Climate and Global Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2004-05-11

    With three levels to choose from on each page - beginner, intermediate or advanced - this site provides information on the way climate affects our world. Global climate, regional climate, and climate change are all explained. There is an important section on what controls climate change, like the sun, volcanic eruptions, greenhouse gases, snow, and ice. there is a module called Energy Choices and Climate Change that provides a new way to look at issues related to energy and climate change. In the scenarios within this module, you will be able to make decisions about the types and amount of energy used and see what effect your decisions have on the amount of greenhouse gases emitted to the atmosphere. Your goal is to reduce the amount of warming greenhouse gases added to the atmosphere from fossil fuel emissions while keeping costs within reason.

  16. Competitive Cities and Climate Change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lamia Kamal-Chaoui; Alexis Robert

    2009-01-01

    Cities are part of the climate change problem, but they are also a key part of the solution. This report offers a comprehensive analysis of how cities and metropolitan regions can change the way we think about responding to climate change. Cities consume the vast majority of global energy and are therefore major contributors of greenhouse gas emissions. At the

  17. Hurricanes-Climate Change Connection

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This page focuses on recent natural disasters and the latest climate change research to engage students with topical issues and help them understand the larger issue of climate change. Includes resources and visualizations of recent storms such as Katrina and changing coastlines worldwide.

  18. Cadastres and Climate Change1

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul VAN DER MOLEN

    This paper explores the role of land registers and cadastre in supporting measures that aim at adapting to and mitigating climate change. To that end, the paper provides a brief introduction to climate change in general. The paper then continues by analyzing the role of housing, land use, land-use change and forestry with respect to carbon storage and emission reduction.

  19. Climate Change and Arctic Ecosystems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Project Activities for Conceptualizing Climate and Climate Change

    In this activity, students learn about how climate change is affecting the Arctic ecosystem and then investigate how this change is impacting polar bear populations. Students analyze maps of Arctic sea ice, temperature graphs, and polar bear population data to answer questions about the impact of climate change on the Arctic ecosystem.

  20. Holocene climate-dynamics of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon-a record built by centennial paleoflood variations superimposed upon millennial cycles of grade change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pederson, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    How do climate variations build an alluvial stratigraphic record versus destroy it? How do we reconcile the paradigms of paleoflood hydrology versus cyclic aggradation and degradation? Intensive research in Grand Canyon reveals a record spanning the entire Holocene that addresses these and other issues of the dynamic response of continental-scale rivers to climate. The Colorado River integrates sediment from the rapidly eroding Colorado Plateau with a hydrology controlled by snowmelt in its Rocky Mountain headwaters. Thus geomorphic responses may be driven by climate in both regions, and the influence of both variable flooding and sediment supply must be resolved. Recent chronostratigraphic investigations at archaeological sites spanning the Colorado River corridor have involved scores of exposures constrained by 104 OSL and 14C dates. Results indicate a correlatable Holocene stratigraphy exists across the canyon, assigned to packages I-V based upon field observations of bounding unconformities and hiatuses in deposition. A sharp character distinction exists between the thinly interbedded, diverse canyon-bottom facies of millennial-scale packages I, II, and III, versus the thickly bedded, purer mainstem flood deposits of younger, century-scale packages IV and V. These distinct packages are borne out by peaks in the probability distribution of all stratigraphic ages. Packages I, II, and III are evenly spaced over the entire Holocene, suggesting a cyclical driver, and the last episode of aggradation from 3500-1500 yrs bp. Spikes of depositional ages within these reflect field evidence that century-scale oscillations built the millennial packages in pulses. Packages IV and V are likewise interpreted as peaks in flood magnitude, and their inset stratigraphic position is consistent with overall lowering of grade over the last several hundred years. This new stratigraphic model can be conceptualized as two sine curves, with a longer millennial wavelength dictating the background grade of the channel. The shorter, superimposed wavelength of flood variability builds terrace deposits while on the rising limb of millennial grade, but when on the falling limb, clusters of large floods tend to produce inset deposits with a low preservation potential. This implies that the paleoflood paradigm is pertinent at century timescales, whereas over millennia the shifting grade of the system should confound both preservation and estimates of paleoflood magnitude. In terms of climate drivers, other research suggests the river aggraded or incised over millennia in response to sediment production in canyon tributaries, perhaps related to variations in winter-frontal versus monsoonal precipitation. Yet millennial climate changes that can be linked to this response in Grand Canyon are elusive, suggesting sensitivity of the system to subtle shifts in regional climate. At shorter timescales, several studies have linked alluvial deposits of the plateau to ~200-500 yr wet-dry cycles, including the Little Ice Age and Medieval Climate Optimum as possibly linked to ENSO. Still, the pertinent driver is specifically annual snowmelt flooding from the headwaters, and tree-ring records of drought across the catchment and lake records of winter moisture in the Rockies more directly reflect such variations.

  1. Ecosystem services, resilience and our changing climate

    E-print Network

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Ecosystem services, resilience and our changing climate Craig R. Allen Nebraska Cooperative Fish ecosystems for critical services #12;What Do Species Do? · regulate biogeochemical cycles ­ e.g., moose.g., predation / herbivory · provide ecological services ­ e.g., pollination #12;Ecosystem Services - Supporting

  2. Climate change: Challenges for future crop adjustments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Climate change will affect all agricultural areas over the coming years; however, this effect will not be equally distributed spatially or temporally. Increasing temperatures of 2-3°C over the next 40 years will expose plants to higher temperatures throughout their life cycle and also increase the a...

  3. Cinematic climate change, a promising perspective on climate change communication.

    PubMed

    Sakellari, Maria

    2014-06-10

    Previous research findings display that after having seen popular climate change films, people became more concerned, more motivated and more aware of climate change, but changes in behaviors were short-term. This article performs a meta-analysis of three popular climate change films, The Day after Tomorrow (2005), An Inconvenient Truth (2006), and The Age of Stupid (2009), drawing on research in social psychology, human agency, and media effect theory in order to formulate a rationale about how mass media communication shapes our everyday life experience. This article highlights the factors with which science blends in the reception of the three climate change films and expands the range of options considered in order to encourage people to engage in climate change mitigation actions. PMID:24916195

  4. Global Climate Change: Atmosphere

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site explains how climate change affects everything from stratospheric temperatures to the golden toad of Costa Rica. Graphs, articles, and maps monitor humankind's impact on the planet. The site features five thumbnails including two maps showing Global Outgoing Longwave Heat Radiation, and Global Reflected Shortwave Solar Radiation and three graphs entitled Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Records from Mauna Loa, Hawaii (1958 - 2000), Global Average Near-Surface Temperatures - Monthly Anomalies (1961 - 2002), and Global Stratospheric and Tropospheric Temperature Anomalies (1979 - 2001). Each of these provides a link to a larger version of the visual and a detailed explanation. Each section has links to a glossary as well as links to questions about each section and additional references.

  5. BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation

    E-print Network

    Pedersen, Tom

    BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report executive summary #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

  6. BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation

    E-print Network

    Pedersen, Tom

    BC Agriculture Climate Change Adaptation Risk + Opportunity Assessment Provincial Report #12;published March 2012 by the British Columbia Agriculture & Food Climate Action Initiative www.BCAgClimateAction.ca project funding provided by Agriculture and Agri-food Canada BC Ministry of Agriculture BC Ministry

  7. Geomorphic responses to climatic change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. B. Bull

    1991-01-01

    The primary focus of this book is the response of landscapes to Pleistocene and Holocene climatic changes. During the past 40 ky the global climate has varied from full-glacial to interglacial. Global temperatures decreased between 40 and 20 ka culminating in full-glacial climatic conditions at 20 ka. This resulted in a sea level decline of 130 m. Only 8 to

  8. Preparing for climate change.

    PubMed

    Holdgate, M

    1989-01-01

    There is a distinct probability that humankind is changing the climate and at the same time raising the sea level of the world. The most plausible projections we have now suggest a rise in mean world temperature of between 1 degree Celsius and 2 degrees Celsius by 2030--just 40 years hence. This is a bigger change in a smaller period than we know of in the experience of the earth's ecosystems and human societies. It implies that by 2030 the earth will be warmer than at any time in the past 120,000 years. In the same period, we are likely to see a rise of 15-30 centimeters in sea level, partly due to the melting of mountain glaciers and partly to the expansion of the warmer seas. This may not seem much--but it comes on top of the 12-centimeter rise in the past century and we should recall that over 1/2 the world's population lives in zones on or near coasts. A quarter meter rise in sea level could have drastic consequences for countries like the Maldives or the Netherlands, where much of the land lies below the 2-meter contour. The cause of climate change is known as the 'greenhouse effect'. Greenhouse glass has the property that it is transparent to radiation coming in from the sun, but holds back radiation to space from the warmed surfaces inside the greenhouse. Certain gases affect the atmosphere in the same way. There are 5 'greenhouse gases' and we have been roofing ourselves with them all: carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere have increased 25% above preindustrial levels and are likely to double within a century, due to tropical forest clearance and especially to the burning of increasing quantities of coal and other fossil fuels; methane concentrations are now twice their preindustrial levels as a result of releases from agriculture; nitrous oxide has increased due to land clearance for agriculture, use of fertilizers, and fossil fuel combustion; ozone levels near the earth's surface have increased due mainly to pollution from motor vehicles; and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have been released in great quantities through their use in aerosol sprays, refrigerator fluids, and insulating foams. We can get rid of CFCs and curb the pollutants generating ozone, but it will be difficult to put the brake on either methane or nitrous oxide. And the reduction in carbon dioxide emissions will demand major changes in energy policy as well as action to slow deforestation. It appears that we are already committed to rising temperatures and sea levels. The question is by how much, in which areas? A number of things can be done to prepare for these changes: Governments must recognize that there is a problem; Better models must be worked out, especially to define where the greatest impacts from climate change and sea level rise will hit; Reference scenarios must be developed to see what the impacts are likely to be in ecological, agricultural, social and economic terms; Every country should develop "avoidance strategies" to minimize risk (for example, by not building on land likely to be flooded); We must cut down on the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere from human activities, by eliminating CFCs and adopting energy conservation programs and other measures to minimize CO2 release; Global agreements to protect the atmosphere are needed. PMID:12285901

  9. 1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate

    E-print Network

    1DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL Dangerous Climate A BrAzil-UK AnAlysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;3DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE IN BRAZIL April 2011Alysis of ClimAte ChAnge And deforestAtion impACts in the AmAzon Change in Brazil #12;4 DANGEROUS CLIMATE CHANGE

  10. Earth's Changing Energy and Water Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trenberth, K. E.

    2008-05-01

    A new assessment of the flows of energy through the climate system will be presented. It features an imbalance at the top-of-atmosphere owing to an enhanced greenhouse effect that produces global warming. Most of the surplus energy trapped increases ocean heat content. Large upwards surface thermal radiation is offset by back radiation from greenhouse gases and clouds in the atmosphere. At the surface, the net losses of energy are greatest through evapotranspiration, followed closely by net radiation, while sensible heat losses are much smaller. This highlights the vital role of the hydrological cycle and why direct changes in the water cycle are a consequence of climate change. Nonetheless, net changes in surface evaporation are fairly modest and a much larger percentage change occurs in the water-holding capacity as atmospheric temperatures increase (4% per °F). A consequence is increased water vapor in the atmosphere which feeds all storms and thus leads to more intense precipitation; increased water vapor, heavier rains and stronger storms are already observed to be happening. However, the disparity between modestly enhanced evaporation and heavier rains means decreases in frequency of precipitation and enhanced droughts. With more precipitation per unit of upward motion in the atmosphere, the atmospheric circulation weakens, causing monsoons to falter. Observed changes in Atlantic hurricanes will be used to illustrate some of these aspects. Understanding these profound consequences of climate change is especially important for water managers. In reality that includes everyone.

  11. Effects of soot-induced snow albedo change on snowpack and hydrological cycle in western United States based on Weather Research and Forecasting chemistry and regional climate simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Yun; Gustafson, William I.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ghan, Steven J.

    2009-02-14

    Radiative forcing induced by soot on snow is a major anthropogenic forcing affecting the global climate. However, it is uncertain how the soot-induced snow albedo perturbation affects regional snowpack and the hydrological cycle. In this study we simulated the deposition of soot aerosol on snow and investigated the resulting impact on snowpack and the surface water budget in the western United States. A yearlong simulation was performed using the chemistry version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF-Chem) to determine an annual budget of soot deposition, followed by two regional climate simulations using WRF in meteorology-only mode, with and without the soot-induced snow albedo perturbations. The chemistry simulation shows large spatial variability in soot deposition that reflects the localized emissions and the influence of the complex terrain. The soot-induced snow albedo perturbations increase the net solar radiation flux at the surface during late winter to early spring, increase the surface air temperature, reduce snow water equivalent amount, and lead to reduced snow accumulation and less spring snowmelt. These effects are stronger over the central Rockies and southern Alberta, where soot deposition and snowpack overlap the most. The indirect forcing of soot accelerates snowmelt and alters stream flows, including a trend toward earlier melt dates in the western United States. The soot-induced albedo reduction initiates a positive feedback process whereby dirty snow absorbs more solar radiation, heating the surface and warming the air. This warming causes reduced snow depth and fraction, which further reduces the regional surface albedo for the snow covered regions. Our simulations indicate that the change of maximum snow albedo induced by soot on snow contributes to 60% of the net albedo reduction over the central Rockies. Snowpack reduction accounts for the additional 40%.

  12. Climate Change and National Security

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2013-02-01

    Climate change is increasingly recognized as having national security implications, which has prompted dialogue between the climate change and national security communities – with resultant advantages and differences. Climate change research has proven useful to the national security community sponsors in several ways. It has opened security discussions to consider climate as well as political factors in studies of the future. It has encouraged factoring in the stresses placed on societies by climate changes (of any kind) to help assess the potential for state stability. And it has shown that, changes such as increased heat, more intense storms, longer periods without rain, and earlier spring onset call for building climate resilience as part of building stability. For the climate change research community, studies from a national security point of view have revealed research lacunae, for example, such as the lack of usable migration studies. This has also pushed the research community to consider second- and third-order impacts of climate change, such as migration and state stability, which broadens discussion of future impacts beyond temperature increases, severe storms, and sea level rise; and affirms the importance of governance in responding to these changes. The increasing emphasis in climate change science toward research in vulnerability, resilience, and adaptation also frames what the intelligence and defense communities need to know, including where there are dependencies and weaknesses that may allow climate change impacts to result in security threats and where social and economic interventions can prevent climate change impacts and other stressors from resulting in social and political instability or collapse.

  13. Climate change refugia as a tool for climate adaptation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate change refugia, areas relatively buffered from contemporary climate change so as to increase persistence of valued physical, ecological, and cultural resources, are considered as potential adaptation options in the face of anthropogenic climate change. In a collaboration ...

  14. Geomorphic responses to climatic change

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, W.B.

    1991-01-01

    The primary focus of this book is the response of landscapes to Pleistocene and Holocene climatic changes. During the past 40 ky the global climate has varied from full-glacial to interglacial. Global temperatures decreased between 40 and 20 ka culminating in full-glacial climatic conditions at 20 ka. This resulted in a sea level decline of 130 m. Only 8 to 14 ky later the global temperature had reversed itself and the climate was the warmest of the past 120 ky. These dramatic changes in climate imposed significant controls on fluvial systems and impacted land forms and whole landscapes worldwide. Chapter 1, Conceptual Models for Changing landscapes, presents numerous concepts related to erosional and depositional processes controlling landscape development. Each of the next four chapters of the book, 2, 3, 4, and 5, examine different aspects of climatic change on fluvial systems. The conceptual models are used to analyze landscape response in four different climatic and geologic settings. In each setting the present and past climatic conditions, the climatically induced changes in vegetation and soil development, and geochronology are considered in assessing the influence of climatic changes on geomorphic processes. Chapter 2, investigates the influence of climatic change on the geomorphic processes operating in desert watersheds in the southwestern US and northern Mexico. The study sites for Chapter 3, are small desert drainage basins in the southwestern US and near the Sinai Peninsula in the Middle East. Chapter 4, investigates fill terraces in several drainage basins of the San Gabrial Mountains of the central Transverse Ranges of coastal southern California. The study site for Chapter 5 is the Charwell River watershed in the Seaward Kaikoura Range of New Zealand. Chapter 6, Difference Responses of Arid and Humid Fluvial Systems, compares the effects of changing climates in basins that range from extremely arid to humid.

  15. Tropical Cyclones and Climate Change

    E-print Network

    Knutson, Thomas R.

    Whether the characteristics of tropical cyclones have changed or will change in a warming climate — and if so, how — has been the subject of considerable investigation, often with conflicting results. Large amplitude ...

  16. Urban Growth and Climate Change

    E-print Network

    Kahn, Matthew E.

    2008-01-01

    The best models of future temperature and rainfall indicatemodels yield county level predictions over average temperature and rainfallmodels of climate change’s predicted effects for future temperature and rainfall

  17. AAAS - Global Climate Change Video

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

    This video features residents of Shishmaref, Alaska, plus environmental journalist Elizabeth Kolbert and scientist John Holdren, exploring the human impacts of global climate change. The roles of teachers, scientists, policymakers, and concerned citizens in mitigating the changes are highlighted.

  18. Narratives of climate change: introduction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen Daniels; Georgina H. Endfield

    2009-01-01

    This paper introduces a special feature on narratives of climate change, containing papers by Richard Hamblyn, Sverker Sörlin, Michael Bravo and Diana Liverman. The feature reflects the rising cultural profile of climate change in the public sphere, as represented, for example, by Al Gore's documentary film, An Inconvenient Truth, and art exhibitions devoted to the subject.

  19. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    World Meteorological Organization, United Nations Environment Programme

    This organization was established by the World Meteorological Organization and the United Nations Environment Programme to assess scientific, technical and socio- economic information relevant for the understanding of climate change. The website contains reports, publications, technical papers, press releases, and official documents related to climate change.

  20. Idea Bank: Climate Change Inquiries

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ryan Bowman

    2010-02-01

    How can students engage in authentic inquiry on global climate change if they are not able to do the actual experiments? Many questions about climate change emerge over large areas and long periods of time. The good news is that much of the data from thes

  1. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel H. Cole

    2007-01-01

    Since the signing the Kyoto Protocol, the international community has focused a great deal of attention on measures designed to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. Much less attention has been paid to climate change adaption. This is unfortunate because, even if the Kyoto Protocol is fully implemented, climate change will generate substantial costs requiring substantial adaptation efforts, especially in the

  2. Historic and Projected Climate Change

    E-print Network

    Historic and Projected Climate Change F A C T S H E E T This evidence strongly indicates and Projected Climate Change PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Robert M. Roseen, Ph.D. P.E., D.WRE · Director, The UNH is largely the result of human activities such as the burning of fossil fuels. · A warming trend of about 1

  3. Take Aim At Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Polar Palooza.com

    This music video features a rap song about some of the causes and effects of climate change with the goal of increasing awareness of climate change and how it will impact nature and humans. The website also includes links to short fact sheets with lyrics to the song that are annotated with the sources of the information in the lyrics.

  4. Generating Arguments About Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Barry Golden

    In this article from the NSTA Press Journal, Science Scope, students participate in a unit on global climate change by engaging in the process of scientific argumentation. The lessons presented in this article were created using the generate-an-argument model to help students understand climate change science. The article is free to both NSTA members and nonmembers.

  5. Implications of Climate Change for

    E-print Network

    Implications of Climate Change for Northern Ireland: Informing Strategy Development #12;Further expressed in this document are not necessarily those of SNIFFER, any Northern Ireland Government Department and Northern Ireland Forum for Environmental Research (SNIFFER) to improve understanding of climate change

  6. Teaching about Global Climate Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffron, Susan Gallagher; Valmond, Kharra

    2011-01-01

    Students are exposed to many different media reports about global climate change. Movies such as "The Day After Tomorrow" and "Ice Age" are examples of instances when movie producers have sought to capture the attention of audiences by augmenting the challenges that climate change poses. Students may receive information from a wide range of media…

  7. Generating Arguments about Climate Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, Barry; Grooms, Jonathon; Sampson, Victor; Oliveri, Robin

    2012-01-01

    This unit is a different and fun way to engage students with an extremely important topic, climate change, which cuts across scientific and nonscientific disciplines. While climate change itself may not be listed in the curriculum of every science class, the authors contend that such a unit is appropriate for virtually any science curriculum.…

  8. Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International

    E-print Network

    Alvarez, Nadir

    1 23 Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary, International Journal Devoted to the Description, Causes that the most genetically diverse populations are the ones most at risk from climate change, so that global warming will erode the species' genetic variability faster than it curtails the species' geographic

  9. BIRD MIGRATION AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mecislovas ŽALAKEVI?IUS

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explain and forecast the dependency of different migratory processes: spring arrival dates, migratory take-off, transit autumnal and spring migrations, migration abruption, and their characteristics upon different climatic parameters. We tried to explain the change in migratory-resident state of birds, and defined the effect of climate change upon species specificity of bird migration, mechanisms

  10. Climate@Home: Crowdsourcing Climate Change Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C.; Yang, C.; Li, J.; Sun, M.; Bambacus, M.

    2011-12-01

    Climate change deeply impacts human wellbeing. Significant amounts of resources have been invested in building super-computers that are capable of running advanced climate models, which help scientists understand climate change mechanisms, and predict its trend. Although climate change influences all human beings, the general public is largely excluded from the research. On the other hand, scientists are eagerly seeking communication mediums for effectively enlightening the public on climate change and its consequences. The Climate@Home project is devoted to connect the two ends with an innovative solution: crowdsourcing climate computing to the general public by harvesting volunteered computing resources from the participants. A distributed web-based computing platform will be built to support climate computing, and the general public can 'plug-in' their personal computers to participate in the research. People contribute the spare computing power of their computers to run a computer model, which is used by scientists to predict climate change. Traditionally, only super-computers could handle such a large computing processing load. By orchestrating massive amounts of personal computers to perform atomized data processing tasks, investments on new super-computers, energy consumed by super-computers, and carbon release from super-computers are reduced. Meanwhile, the platform forms a social network of climate researchers and the general public, which may be leveraged to raise climate awareness among the participants. A portal is to be built as the gateway to the climate@home project. Three types of roles and the corresponding functionalities are designed and supported. The end users include the citizen participants, climate scientists, and project managers. Citizen participants connect their computing resources to the platform by downloading and installing a computing engine on their personal computers. Computer climate models are defined at the server side. Climate scientists configure computer model parameters through the portal user interface. After model configuration, scientists then launch the computing task. Next, data is atomized and distributed to computing engines that are running on citizen participants' computers. Scientists will receive notifications on the completion of computing tasks, and examine modeling results via visualization modules of the portal. Computing tasks, computing resources, and participants are managed by project managers via portal tools. A portal prototype has been built for proof of concept. Three forums have been setup for different groups of users to share information on science aspect, technology aspect, and educational outreach aspect. A facebook account has been setup to distribute messages via the most popular social networking platform. New treads are synchronized from the forums to facebook. A mapping tool displays geographic locations of the participants and the status of tasks on each client node. A group of users have been invited to test functions such as forums, blogs, and computing resource monitoring.

  11. Ground Water and Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Richard G.; Scanlon, Bridget; Doell, Petra; Rodell, Matt; van Beek, Rens; Wada, Yoshihide; Longuevergne, Laurent; Leblanc, Marc; Famiglietti, James S.; Edmunds, Mike; Konikow, Leonard; Green, Timothy R.; Chen, Jianyao; Taniguchi, Makoto; Bierkens, Marc F. P.; MacDonald, Alan; Fan, Ying; Maxwell, Reed M.; Yechieli, Yossi; Gurdak, Jason J.; Allen, Diana M.; Shamsudduha, Mohammad; Hiscock, Kevin; Yeh, Pat J. -F; Holman, Ian; Treidel, Holger

    2013-01-01

    As the world's largest distributed store of fresh water, ground water plays a central part in sustaining ecosystems and enabling human adaptation to climate variability and change. The strategic importance of ground water for global water and food security will probably intensify under climate change as more frequent and intense climate extremes (droughts and floods) increase variability in precipitation, soil moisture and surface water. Here we critically review recent research assessing the impacts of climate on ground water through natural and human-induced processes as well as through groundwater-driven feedbacks on the climate system. Furthermore, we examine the possible opportunities and challenges of using and sustaining groundwater resources in climate adaptation strategies, and highlight the lack of groundwater observations, which, at present, limits our understanding of the dynamic relationship between ground water and climate.

  12. Ground water and climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Richard G.; Scanlon, Bridget; Döll, Petra; Rodell, Matt; van Beek, Rens; Wada, Yoshihide; Longuevergne, Laurent; Leblanc, Marc; Famiglietti, James S.; Edmunds, Mike; Konikow, Leonard; Green, Timothy R.; Chen, Jianyao; Taniguchi, Makoto; Bierkens, Marc F.P.; MacDonald, Alan; Fan, Ying; Maxwell, Reed M.; Yechieli, Yossi; Gurdak, Jason J.; Allen, Diana M.; Shamsudduha, Mohammad; Hiscock, Kevin; Yeh, Pat J.-F.; Holman, Ian; Treidel, Holger

    2012-01-01

    As the world's largest distributed store of fresh water, ground water plays a central part in sustaining ecosystems and enabling human adaptation to climate variability and change. The strategic importance of ground water for global water and food security will probably intensify under climate change as more frequent and intense climate extremes (droughts and floods) increase variability in precipitation, soil moisture and surface water. Here we critically review recent research assessing the impacts of climate on ground water through natural and human-induced processes as well as through groundwater-driven feedbacks on the climate system. Furthermore, we examine the possible opportunities and challenges of using and sustaining groundwater resources in climate adaptation strategies, and highlight the lack of groundwater observations, which, at present, limits our understanding of the dynamic relationship between ground water and climate.

  13. CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION

    E-print Network

    CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION: PHYSIOLOGY, LIFE HISTORY, AND ECOSYSTEM CHANGE A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center of the uncertainties with climate change effects on terrestrial ecosystems is understanding where transitions

  14. CLIMATE CHANGE: Past, Present and Future: Introduction

    E-print Network

    Allan, Richard P.

    CLIMATE CHANGE: Past, Present and Future: Introduction Richard Allan, Department of Meteorology r.p.allan@reading.ac.uk #12;Text Books and References · Henson, B., Rough Guide to Climate Change http://www.amazon.co.uk/Climate-Change-Guides-Reference- Titles/dp/1858281059 · Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), Climate Change 2007, www

  15. Climate Change Adaptation for Local Government

    E-print Network

    Pedersen, Tom

    Climate Change Adaptation for Local Government A Resource Guide June 2011 Jenny Fraser, Adaptation to Climate Change Team, Simon Fraser University #12;Page 1 of 26 Climate Change Adaptation for Local: RESOURCES THAT SUPPORT CLIMATE CHANGE ASSESSMENT 3. Past and Future Climate Change and Its Impacts 4

  16. Global climate change: Policy implications for fisheries

    SciTech Connect

    Gucinski, H.; Lackey, R.T.; Spence, B.C.

    1990-01-01

    Several government agencies are evaluating policy options for addressing global climate change. These include planning for anticipated effects and developing mitigation options where feasible if climate does change as predicted. For fisheries resources, policy questions address effects on international, national, and regional scales. Climate change variables expected to affect inland and offshore fisheries include temperature rise, changes in the hydrologic cycle, alterations in nutrient fluxes, and reduction and relocation of spawning and nursery habitat. These variables will affect resources at all levels of biological organization, including the genetic, organism, population, and ecosystem levels. In this context, changes in primary productivity, species composition in the food-web, migration, invasions, synchrony in biological cycles, shifts in utilization of niches, and problems of larvae entrainment in estuaries have been identified. Maintaining ecosystem robustness (i.e., high biodiversity) is another component of the problem. Action requires establishing priorities for information needs, determining appropriate temporal and spatial scales at which to model effects, and accounting for interactive changes in physical and biological cycles. A policy response can be derived when these results are integrated with social needs and human population constraints.

  17. Paleoceanography and Climate Change

    E-print Network

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    ;IPCC 2007 #12;Paleoclimate Proxy Records · Historical Documents (~1000 years) · Tree Rings (~10) #12;Tree Rings · Temperature · Precipitation · Drought #12;IPCC 2007 #12;The Climate System #12;The in Earth's orbit around the sun · Climate and CO2 tightly coupled #12;

  18. Climate change and dead zones.

    PubMed

    Altieri, Andrew H; Gedan, Keryn B

    2015-04-01

    Estuaries and coastal seas provide valuable ecosystem services but are particularly vulnerable to the co-occurring threats of climate change and oxygen-depleted dead zones. We analyzed the severity of climate change predicted for existing dead zones, and found that 94% of dead zones are in regions that will experience at least a 2 °C temperature increase by the end of the century. We then reviewed how climate change will exacerbate hypoxic conditions through oceanographic, ecological, and physiological processes. We found evidence that suggests numerous climate variables including temperature, ocean acidification, sea-level rise, precipitation, wind, and storm patterns will affect dead zones, and that each of those factors has the potential to act through multiple pathways on both oxygen availability and ecological responses to hypoxia. Given the variety and strength of the mechanisms by which climate change exacerbates hypoxia, and the rates at which climate is changing, we posit that climate change variables are contributing to the dead zone epidemic by acting synergistically with one another and with recognized anthropogenic triggers of hypoxia including eutrophication. This suggests that a multidisciplinary, integrated approach that considers the full range of climate variables is needed to track and potentially reverse the spread of dead zones. PMID:25385668

  19. Adapting agriculture to climate change

    PubMed Central

    Howden, S. Mark; Soussana, Jean-François; Tubiello, Francesco N.; Chhetri, Netra; Dunlop, Michael; Meinke, Holger

    2007-01-01

    The strong trends in climate change already evident, the likelihood of further changes occurring, and the increasing scale of potential climate impacts give urgency to addressing agricultural adaptation more coherently. There are many potential adaptation options available for marginal change of existing agricultural systems, often variations of existing climate risk management. We show that implementation of these options is likely to have substantial benefits under moderate climate change for some cropping systems. However, there are limits to their effectiveness under more severe climate changes. Hence, more systemic changes in resource allocation need to be considered, such as targeted diversification of production systems and livelihoods. We argue that achieving increased adaptation action will necessitate integration of climate change-related issues with other risk factors, such as climate variability and market risk, and with other policy domains, such as sustainable development. Dealing with the many barriers to effective adaptation will require a comprehensive and dynamic policy approach covering a range of scales and issues, for example, from the understanding by farmers of change in risk profiles to the establishment of efficient markets that facilitate response strategies. Science, too, has to adapt. Multidisciplinary problems require multidisciplinary solutions, i.e., a focus on integrated rather than disciplinary science and a strengthening of the interface with decision makers. A crucial component of this approach is the implementation of adaptation assessment frameworks that are relevant, robust, and easily operated by all stakeholders, practitioners, policymakers, and scientists. PMID:18077402

  20. Climate, carbon cycling, and deep-ocean ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Smith, K. L.; Ruhl, H. A.; Bett, B. J.; Billett, D. S. M.; Lampitt, R. S.; Kaufmann, R. S.

    2009-01-01

    Climate variation affects surface ocean processes and the production of organic carbon, which ultimately comprises the primary food supply to the deep-sea ecosystems that occupy ?60% of the Earth's surface. Warming trends in atmospheric and upper ocean temperatures, attributed to anthropogenic influence, have occurred over the past four decades. Changes in upper ocean temperature influence stratification and can affect the availability of nutrients for phytoplankton production. Global warming has been predicted to intensify stratification and reduce vertical mixing. Research also suggests that such reduced mixing will enhance variability in primary production and carbon export flux to the deep sea. The dependence of deep-sea communities on surface water production has raised important questions about how climate change will affect carbon cycling and deep-ocean ecosystem function. Recently, unprecedented time-series studies conducted over the past two decades in the North Pacific and the North Atlantic at >4,000-m depth have revealed unexpectedly large changes in deep-ocean ecosystems significantly correlated to climate-driven changes in the surface ocean that can impact the global carbon cycle. Climate-driven variation affects oceanic communities from surface waters to the much-overlooked deep sea and will have impacts on the global carbon cycle. Data from these two widely separated areas of the deep ocean provide compelling evidence that changes in climate can readily influence deep-sea processes. However, the limited geographic coverage of these existing time-series studies stresses the importance of developing a more global effort to monitor deep-sea ecosystems under modern conditions of rapidly changing climate. PMID:19901326

  1. Deep solar minimum and global climate changes

    PubMed Central

    Hady, Ahmed A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the deep minimum of solar cycle 23 and its potential impact on climate change. In addition, a source region of the solar winds at solar activity minimum, especially in the solar cycle 23, the deepest during the last 500 years, has been studied. Solar activities have had notable effect on palaeoclimatic changes. Contemporary solar activity are so weak and hence expected to cause global cooling. Prevalent global warming, caused by building-up of green-house gases in the troposphere, seems to exceed this solar effect. This paper discusses this issue. PMID:25685420

  2. Solar Changes and Climate Changes. (Invited)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Feynman

    2009-01-01

    During the early decades of the Space Age there was general agreement in the scientific community on two facts: (1) sunspot cycles continued without interruption; (2) decadal timescale variations in the solar output has no effect on Earth's climate. Then in 1976 Jack Eddy published a paper called `The Maunder Minimum'' in Science magazine arguing that neither of these two

  3. Atmospheric Composition Change: Climate-Chemistry Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaksen, I.S.A.; Granier, C.; Myhre, G.; Bernsten, T. K.; Dalsoren, S. B.; Gauss, S.; Klimont, Z.; Benestad, R.; Bousquet, P.; Collins, W.; Cox, T.; Eyring, V.; Fowler, D.; Fuzzi, S.; Jockel, P.; Laj, P.; Lohmann, U.; Maione, M.; Monks, T.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Raes, F.; Richter, A.; Rognerud, B.; Schulz, M.; Shindell, D.; Stevenson, D. S.; Storelvmo, T.; Wang, W.-C.; vanWeele, M.; Wild, M.; Wuebbles, D.

    2011-01-01

    Chemically active climate compounds are either primary compounds such as methane (CH4), removed by oxidation in the atmosphere, or secondary compounds such as ozone (O3), sulfate and organic aerosols, formed and removed in the atmosphere. Man-induced climate-chemistry interaction is a two-way process: Emissions of pollutants change the atmospheric composition contributing to climate change through the aforementioned climate components, and climate change, through changes in temperature, dynamics, the hydrological cycle, atmospheric stability, and biosphere-atmosphere interactions, affects the atmospheric composition and oxidation processes in the troposphere. Here we present progress in our understanding of processes of importance for climate-chemistry interactions, and their contributions to changes in atmospheric composition and climate forcing. A key factor is the oxidation potential involving compounds such as O3 and the hydroxyl radical (OH). Reported studies represent both current and future changes. Reported results include new estimates of radiative forcing based on extensive model studies of chemically active climate compounds such as O3, and of particles inducing both direct and indirect effects. Through EU projects such as ACCENT, QUANTIFY, and the AEROCOM project, extensive studies on regional and sector-wise differences in the impact on atmospheric distribution are performed. Studies have shown that land-based emissions have a different effect on climate than ship and aircraft emissions, and different measures are needed to reduce the climate impact. Several areas where climate change can affect the tropospheric oxidation process and the chemical composition are identified. This can take place through enhanced stratospheric-tropospheric exchange of ozone, more frequent periods with stable conditions favouring pollution build up over industrial areas, enhanced temperature-induced biogenic emissions, methane releases from permafrost thawing, and enhanced concentration through reduced biospheric uptake. During the last 510 years, new observational data have been made available and used for model validation and the study of atmospheric processes. Although there are significant uncertainties in the modelling of composition changes, access to new observational data has improved modelling capability. Emission scenarios for the coming decades have a large uncertainty range, in particular with respect to regional trends, leading to a significant uncertainty range in estimated regional composition changes and climate impact.

  4. Atmospheric composition change: Climate-Chemistry interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaksen, I. S. A.; Granier, C.; Myhre, G.; Berntsen, T. K.; Dalsøren, S. B.; Gauss, M.; Klimont, Z.; Benestad, R.; Bousquet, P.; Collins, W.; Cox, T.; Eyring, V.; Fowler, D.; Fuzzi, S.; Jöckel, P.; Laj, P.; Lohmann, U.; Maione, M.; Monks, P.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Raes, F.; Richter, A.; Rognerud, B.; Schulz, M.; Shindell, D.; Stevenson, D. S.; Storelvmo, T.; Wang, W.-C.; van Weele, M.; Wild, M.; Wuebbles, D.

    Chemically active climate compounds are either primary compounds like methane (CH 4), removed by oxidation in the atmosphere, or secondary compounds like ozone (O 3), sulfate and organic aerosols, both formed and removed in the atmosphere. Man-induced climate-chemistry interaction is a two-way process: Emissions of pollutants change the atmospheric composition contributing to climate change through the aforementioned climate components, and climate change, through changes in temperature, dynamics, the hydrological cycle, atmospheric stability, and biosphere-atmosphere interactions, affects the atmospheric composition and oxidation processes in the troposphere. Here we present progress in our understanding of processes of importance for climate-chemistry interactions, and their contributions to changes in atmospheric composition and climate forcing. A key factor is the oxidation potential involving compounds like O 3 and the hydroxyl radical (OH). Reported studies represent both current and future changes. Reported results include new estimates of radiative forcing based on extensive model studies of chemically active climate compounds like O 3, and of particles inducing both direct and indirect effects. Through EU projects like ACCENT, QUANTIFY, and the AeroCom project, extensive studies on regional and sector-wise differences in the impact on atmospheric distribution are performed. Studies have shown that land-based emissions have a different effect on climate than ship and aircraft emissions, and different measures are needed to reduce the climate impact. Several areas where climate change can affect the tropospheric oxidation process and the chemical composition are identified. This can take place through enhanced stratospheric-tropospheric exchange of ozone, more frequent periods with stable conditions favoring pollution build up over industrial areas, enhanced temperature induced biogenic emissions, methane releases from permafrost thawing, and enhanced concentration through reduced biospheric uptake. During the last 5-10 years, new observational data have been made available and used for model validation and the study of atmospheric processes. Although there are significant uncertainties in the modeling of composition changes, access to new observational data has improved modeling capability. Emission scenarios for the coming decades have a large uncertainty range, in particular with respect to regional trends, leading to a significant uncertainty range in estimated regional composition changes and climate impact.

  5. Climate Change and Water Resources Management: A Federal Perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brekke, Levi D.; Kiang, Julie E.; Olsen, J. Rolf; Pulwarty, Roger S.; Raff, David A.; Turnipseed, D. Phil; Webb, Robert S.; White, Kathleen D.

    2009-01-01

    Many challenges, including climate change, face the Nation's water managers. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has provided estimates of how climate may change, but more understanding of the processes driving the changes, the sequences of the changes, and the manifestation of these global changes at different scales could be beneficial. Since the changes will likely affect fundamental drivers of the hydrological cycle, climate change may have a large impact on water resources and water resources managers. The purpose of this interagency report prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is to explore strategies to improve water management by tracking, anticipating, and responding to climate change. This report describes the existing and still needed underpinning science crucial to addressing the many impacts of climate change on water resources management.

  6. Earth's Changing Climate

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Juanita Constible

    2008-10-01

    In 1896, Svante Arrhenius published the first model of the effects of industrial carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) on Earth's climate. Since the days of Arrhenius, scientists have moved from pencils to supercomputers. Calculations take hours or days instead

  7. Dictionary of global climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Maunder, W.J. (ed.)

    1992-01-01

    This book represents a revision of the climate change lexicon that was prepared for the Second World Climate Conference in 1990. The conference had 1400 participants and consisted of a scientific component followed by a ministerial meeting. To foster communication among the different constituencies, a lexicon of climate and climate change was prepared for the participants. The dictionary includes definitions and descriptions of most of the scientific terms, organizations, and programs related to the physical aspects of climate change. Nearly 40% of the material describes organized projects, experiments, or programs, mostly international. Some information on biological topics, such as the difference between C3 and C4 plants, is also included. The length of definitions and descriptions ranges from one line to one or more pages, with the longer descriptions usually related to programs.

  8. Climate change, wine, and conservation

    PubMed Central

    Hannah, Lee; Roehrdanz, Patrick R.; Ikegami, Makihiko; Shepard, Anderson V.; Shaw, M. Rebecca; Tabor, Gary; Zhi, Lu; Marquet, Pablo A.; Hijmans, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Climate change is expected to impact ecosystems directly, such as through shifting climatic controls on species ranges, and indirectly, for example through changes in human land use that may result in habitat loss. Shifting patterns of agricultural production in response to climate change have received little attention as a potential impact pathway for ecosystems. Wine grape production provides a good test case for measuring indirect impacts mediated by changes in agriculture, because viticulture is sensitive to climate and is concentrated in Mediterranean climate regions that are global biodiversity hotspots. Here we demonstrate that, on a global scale, the impacts of climate change on viticultural suitability are substantial, leading to possible conservation conflicts in land use and freshwater ecosystems. Area suitable for viticulture decreases 25% to 73% in major wine producing regions by 2050 in the higher RCP 8.5 concentration pathway and 19% to 62% in the lower RCP 4.5. Climate change may cause establishment of vineyards at higher elevations that will increase impacts on upland ecosystems and may lead to conversion of natural vegetation as production shifts to higher latitudes in areas such as western North America. Attempts to maintain wine grape productivity and quality in the face of warming may be associated with increased water use for irrigation and to cool grapes through misting or sprinkling, creating potential for freshwater conservation impacts. Agricultural adaptation and conservation efforts are needed that anticipate these multiple possible indirect effects. PMID:23569231

  9. Ecological Networks in a Changing Climate

    E-print Network

    Benstead, Jon

    to the Components of Climate Change: Impacts of Warming on Aqueous Media and Surveys at Different Scales and Examples . . . . 78 III. Network Responses to Climate Change Components to the Components of Climate Change: Atmospheric Composition and Ecological Stoichiometry . . . . . . . . . . 100 VI

  10. GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE AND ITS IMPACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Outline of talk: A. What causes climate change B. Possible changes in the world's and the Pacific Northwest's climate C. Possible impacts of climate change I. The world and U.S. II. Oregon D. Possible solutions E. Discussion ...

  11. CLIMATE CHANGE EFFECTS ON THE HIGHELEVATION HYDROPOWER

    E-print Network

    CLIMATE CHANGE EFFECTS ON THE HIGHELEVATION HYDROPOWER SYSTEM Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012020 Prepared for: California consideration of climate change effects on highelevation hydropower supply and demand in California. Artificial

  12. The Arctic Tree Line and Climate Change

    E-print Network

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    quicker Overall Feedbacks to Climate Change Advance in Treeline . Global Warming Decrease in Albedo Models). Arctic climate change with a 2 C global warming: Timing, climate patterns and vegetation change. ClimaticThe Arctic Tree Line and Climate Change By Amanda Reinwald 1 IntroductionIntroduction · What

  13. Climate Change and Tourism Dr David Viner

    E-print Network

    Feigon, Brooke

    Climate Change and Tourism éCLAT Dr David Viner Climatic Research Unit University of East Anglia d.viner@uea.ac.uk Tourism has a strong international dimension and is sensitive to any changes of climate that alter to attract visitors are likely to be vulnerable to climate change and the implementation of climate change

  14. Ground water and climate change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the world’s largest distributed store of fresh water, ground water plays a central part in sustaining ecosystems and enabling human adaptation to climate variability and change. The strategic importance of ground water for global water and food secu¬rity will probably intensify under climate chan...

  15. Extinction risk from climate change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chris D. Thomas; Alison Cameron; Rhys E. Green; Michel Bakkenes; Linda J. Beaumont; Yvonne C. Collingham; Barend F. N. Erasmus; Marinez Ferreira de Siqueira; Alan Grainger; Lee Hannah; Lesley Hughes; Brian Huntley; Albert S. van Jaarsveld; Guy F. Midgley; Lera Miles; Miguel A. Ortega-Huerta; A. Townsend Peterson; Oliver L. Phillips; Stephen E. Williams

    2004-01-01

    Climate change over the past ~30 years has produced numerous shifts in the distributions and abundances of species and has been implicated in one species-level extinction. Using projections of species' distributions for future climate scenarios, we assess extinction risks for sample regions that cover some 20% of the Earth's terrestrial surface. Exploring three approaches in which the estimated probability of

  16. Global Changes of the Water Cycle Intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Walker, Gregory K.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we evaluate numerical simulations of the twentieth century climate, focusing on the changes in the intensity of the global water cycle. A new diagnostic of atmospheric water vapor cycling rate is developed and employed, that relies on constituent tracers predicted at the model time step. This diagnostic is compared to a simplified traditional calculation of cycling rate, based on monthly averages of precipitation and total water content. The mean sensitivity of both diagnostics to variations in climate forcing is comparable. However, the new diagnostic produces systematically larger values and more variability than the traditional average approach. Climate simulations were performed using SSTs of the early (1902-1921) and late (1979- 1998) twentieth century along with the appropriate C02 forcing. In general, the increase of global precipitation with the increases in SST that occurred between the early and late twentieth century is small. However, an increase of atmospheric temperature leads to a systematic increase in total precipitable water. As a result, the residence time of water in the atmosphere increased, indicating a reduction of the global cycling rate. This result was explored further using a number of 50-year climate simulations from different models forced with observed SST. The anomalies and trends in the cycling rate and hydrologic variables of different GCMs are remarkably similar. The global annual anomalies of precipitation show a significant upward trend related to the upward trend of surface temperature, during the latter half of the twentieth century. While this implies an increase in the hydrologic cycle intensity, a concomitant increase of total precipitable water again leads to a decrease in the calculated global cycling rate. An analysis of the land/sea differences shows that the simulated precipitation over land has a decreasing trend while the oceanic precipitation has an upward trend consistent with previous studies and the available observations. The decreasing continental trend in precipitation is located primarily over tropical land regions, with some other regions, such as North America experiencing an increasing trend. Precipitation trends are diagnosed further using the water tracers to delineate the precipitation that occurs because of continental evaporation, as opposed to oceanic evaporation. These diagnostics show that over global land areas, the recycling of continental moisture is decreasing in time. However, the recycling changes are not spatially uniform so that some regions, most notably over the United States, experience continental recycling of water that increases in time.

  17. The role of carbon in climate change: a lifecyclethinking approach to a complex issue

    E-print Network

    2, CH4, N2O, ... #12;The Carbon Cycle 5 UNESCO Chair in Life Cycle and Climate Change #12 carbonate rock forma>on (largely biogenic) The Carbon Cycle 6 UNESCO Chair in Life Cycle Anthropogenic carbon emissions #12;Fossil fuel burning 12 UNESCO Chair in Life Cycle and Climate

  18. Climate Carbon Cycle Feedback Analysis: Results from the C4MIP Model Intercomparison

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Friedlingstein; P. Cox; R. Betts; L. Bopp; W. von Bloh; V. Brovkin; P. Cadule; S. Doney; M. Eby; I. Fung; G. Bala; J. John; C. Jones; F. Joos; T. Kato; M. Kawamiya; W. Knorr; K. Lindsay; H. D. Matthews; T. Raddatz; P. Rayner; C. Reick; E. Roeckner; K.-G. Schnitzler; R. Schnur; K. Strassmann; A. J. Weaver; C. Yoshikawa; N. Zeng

    2006-01-01

    Eleven coupled climate-carbon cycle models used a common protocol to study the coupling between climate change and the carbon cycle. The models were forced by historical emissions and the Intergovern- mental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) A2 anthropogenic emissions of CO2 for the 1850-2100 time period. For each model, two simulations were performed in

  19. Estimating Groundwater Recharge in Response to Potential Future Climate Change: The Importance of Winter Temperatures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. I. Jyrkama; J. F. Sykes

    2005-01-01

    Changes in future climate will alter regional hydrologic cycles and subsequently impact the quantity and quality of regional water resources. While climate change affects surface water resources directly through changes in the major long-term climate variables such as air temperature, precipitation, and evapotranspiration, the relationship between the changing climate variables and groundwater is more complicated and poorly understood. Groundwater resources

  20. Is this climate porn? How does climate change communication

    E-print Network

    Watson, Andrew

    Is this climate porn? How does climate change communication affect our perceptions and behaviour;1 Is this climate porn? How does climate change communication affect our perceptions and behaviour? Thomas D. Lowe 1 these kinds of messages (which have recently been dubbed `climate porn' (Ereaut and Segnit, 2006)), can

  1. In both climate states the changing oceanic heat con-

    E-print Network

    of climate change. One driver of global weather patterns is the El Nino/La Nina cycle. El Nino refers warms. Dr. Curtis sees somewhat of a mixed signal using global satellite data sets. During both El NinoIn both climate states the changing oceanic heat con- tent affects the large scale atmospheric

  2. Global Climate Change Key Indicators

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website charts measurement of key indicators of global climate change. Simple explanations and "What Does This Mean?" sections accompany each area of sea level, carbon dioxide concentration, global surface temperature, Arctic sea ice and land ice.

  3. Taking Action on Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    At this Government of Canada website, visitors can "learn about the science, impacts and adaptation to climate change and how individuals, governments, businesses, industry and communities take action by reducing greenhouse gas emissions." Through maps, graphs, and clear text, users can learn the basics of climate change and the greenhouse gases. The website details many of the ecological, economic, and global impacts of climate change. Users can find out about the One-Tonne Challenge, which encourages everyone to reduce their emissions. Teachers can find questions and activities to educate their students about climate change. The website also offers a calculator to estimate a user's current emissions, a series of videos instructing individuals how to create an energy efficient home and car, as well as publications and media resources. This site is also reviewed in the March 18, 2005 _NSDL Physical Sciences Report_.

  4. Climate change & street trees project

    E-print Network

    Climate change & street trees project Social Research Report The social and cultural values, and governance, of street trees Norman Dandy March 2010 #12;Contents Summary .................................................................................................4 1.1 What is a `street tree

  5. Climate Change is About... Water

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Democracy Center

    Climate Change Is About...Water tells the story of climate change and impacts on water in Bolivia through a range of voices and multimedia materials. Case studies bring the explanatory analysis of vulnerability and the social, economic and cultural impacts of climate change vividly to life. A Teaching and Activities Guide is available to help educators and learners delve into this material, understand the realities of climate change for affected communities, apply this to their own experiences and encourage citizenship in responding to it. The resources are designed to be flexible and accessible for use with secondary-level students upwards, and can be adapted for self-led or teacher-led exploration in both formal and informal settings.

  6. NASA Climate Change Resource Reel

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    NASA

    This collection of resources from NASA includes animations and still shots covering a wide range of topics in climate, including the cryosphere, ocean sciences, changes on land, the atmosphere, and satellite images.

  7. LAY REPRESENTATIONS ON CLIMATE CHANGE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rosa Cabecinhas; Alexandra Lázaro; Anabela Carvalho

    ABSTRACT Lay representations on climate change were mapped via the free-word association method,in two pilot studies. Participants were asked to generate words associated to “the big problems faced by humankind nowadays” (1,study). Climate change was not spontaneously evoked by the participants in the first study: pollution was among the top 10 problems, but references to other environmental issues were very

  8. Climate Change, MFA on Ice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christy Roberts

    2011-01-01

    This MFA Thesis exhibition by Christy Roberts, entitled Climate Change, MFA on Ice consisted of a synthetic ice skating rink in the gallery, with a video-projected changing climate and a soundtrack comprised of music made from nature samples. Visitors were able to check out skates at the concession stand and skate for as long as they liked.\\u000aWithin the confines

  9. Global Climate Change Briefing Book

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Congressional Research Service

    This website presents general resources and legislative issues related to global climate change. The site includes greenhouse gas sources, trends and effects on the environment, the text of the Kyoto Protocol, and a glossary with acronyms. Other topics such as legal, economic and energy issues are also covered, and links to the latest updates on climate change from the White House and the National Academy of Sciences are found here.

  10. Risk analysis and climate change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nick Pidgeon; Catherine Butler

    2009-01-01

    There is an increasing emphasis on risk-based approaches in the scientific and economic assessment of climate change, exemplified by the Stern Report and IPPC 4th Assessment. In the United Kingdom, risk discourse also increasingly dominates environmental policy-making and governance. The use of risk assessment, management and communication practices in climate change governance and policy is critically examined, utilising an interpretation

  11. Understanding and Communicating Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-01-01

    This module is designed for a four week elective class on the local impacts of climate change. The lessons incorporate current data and information from a variety of sources, are designed to keep student engagement high, and include a variety of instructional approaches, from jigsaw readings to online interactives to hands-on simulated ice core analysis. The unit is themed around countering skeptics' statements, and the final product emphasizes clear written communication around climate change and its impacts.

  12. Climate Change, Energy and Health

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Physicians for Social Responsibility

    This site provides an overview of the causes of climate change and the repercussions it has on our environment and our health. Special focus topics include energy and health (with respect to fossil fuels and nuclear energy), national energy policy and health, how a warming climate affects weather and health, impacts of fuel economy (with respect to emissions of carbon dioxide and hydrocarbons on environmental and human health), and air quality and climate change. The site also features links to current news and related resources.

  13. Climate Change and Forest Disturbances

    E-print Network

    Dale, Virginia H.; Joyce, Linda A.; McNulty, Steve; Neilson, Ronald P.; Ayres, Matthew P.; Flannigan, Michael D.; Hanson, Paul J.; Irland, Lloyd C.; Lugo, Ariel E.; Peterson, Chris J.; Simberloff, Daniel; Swanson, Frederick J.; Stocks, Brian J.; Wotton, B. Michael; Peterson, A. Townsend

    2001-01-01

    is an assistant professor in the Department of Biological Sciences, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755. Michael D. Flannigan is a re- search scientist in Forest Fires and Climate Change, Canadian Forest Service, Edmonton, AB T6H 3S5, Canada. Lloyd C. Irland... points to a large anthropogenic component to current global climate changes (Houghton et al. 1996). Analyses of the last 100 years of climate data for the coterminous United States suggest that the average temperature has risen by 0.5°C...

  14. Climate Change: The Sun's Role

    E-print Network

    Gerald E. Marsh

    2007-06-23

    The sun's role in the earth's recent warming remains controversial even though there is a good deal of evidence to support the thesis that solar variations are a very significant factor in driving climate change both currently and in the past. This precis lays out the background and data needed to understand the basic scientific argument behind the contention that variations in solar output have a significant impact on current changes in climate. It also offers a simple, phenomenological approach for estimating the actual-as opposed to model dependent-magnitude of the sun's influence on climate.

  15. Global Climate Change Policy Book

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The White House

    This website summarizes the current administration's approach to global climate change, including the President's Program of Domestic and International Initiatives. These include a national goal to reduce emissions growth by 18 percent in the next ten years, substantially improve the emission reduction registry, protect and provide transferable credits for emissions reduction, increase funding for America's commitment to climate change, take action on the Science and Technology Review and a range of international climate initiatives. Descriptions of these programs, as well as their costs, are included.

  16. Climate Change: The Sun's Role

    E-print Network

    Marsh, Gerald E

    2007-01-01

    The sun's role in the earth's recent warming remains controversial even though there is a good deal of evidence to support the thesis that solar variations are a very significant factor in driving climate change both currently and in the past. This precis lays out the background and data needed to understand the basic scientific argument behind the contention that variations in solar output have a significant impact on current changes in climate. It also offers a simple, phenomenological approach for estimating the actual-as opposed to model dependent-magnitude of the sun's influence on climate.

  17. Climate Change: Basic Information

    MedlinePLUS

    ... change includes major changes in temperature, precipitation, or wind patterns, among other effects, that occur over several ... changes that can affect our water supplies, agriculture, power and transportation systems, the natural environment, and even ...

  18. Paleoceanography and Climate Change

    E-print Network

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    · Historical Documents (~1000 years) · Tree Rings (~10,000 years) · Corral Reefs (~100,000 years) · Ice Cores (~800,000 years) · Ocean Sediments (>3,000,000 years) Wednesday, April 13, 2011 #12;Tree Rings around the sun · Climate and CO2 tightly coupled Wednesday, April 13, 2011 #12;

  19. Climatic Change An Interdisciplinary,

    E-print Network

    Reale, Marco

    & Jennifer Brown #12;1 23 Your article is protected by copyright and all rights are held exclusively of a system has a temporal dependence on all past states. The alternative to these genuine long memory models will reverse in the near future. 1 Introduction Since the end of the last ice age the earth's climate has

  20. Classifying climate change adaptation frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Jennifer

    2014-05-01

    Complex socio-ecological demographics are factors that must be considered when addressing adaptation to the potential effects of climate change. As such, a suite of deployable climate change adaptation frameworks is necessary. Multiple frameworks that are required to communicate the risks of climate change and facilitate adaptation. Three principal adaptation frameworks have emerged from the literature; Scenario - Led (SL), Vulnerability - Led (VL) and Decision - Centric (DC). This study aims to identify to what extent these adaptation frameworks; either, planned or deployed are used in a neighbourhood vulnerable to climate change. This work presents a criterion that may be used as a tool for identifying the hallmarks of adaptation frameworks and thus enabling categorisation of projects. The study focussed on the coastal zone surrounding the Sizewell nuclear power plant in Suffolk in the UK. An online survey was conducted identifying climate change adaptation projects operating in the study area. This inventory was analysed to identify the hallmarks of each adaptation project; Levels of dependency on climate model information, Metrics/units of analysis utilised, Level of demographic knowledge, Level of stakeholder engagement, Adaptation implementation strategies and Scale of adaptation implementation. The study found that climate change adaptation projects could be categorised, based on the hallmarks identified, in accordance with the published literature. As such, the criterion may be used to establish the matrix of adaptation frameworks present in a given area. A comprehensive summary of the nature of adaptation frameworks in operation in a locality provides a platform for further comparative analysis. Such analysis, enabled by the criterion, may aid the selection of appropriate frameworks enhancing the efficacy of climate change adaptation.

  1. Simple indices of global climate variability and change Part II: attribution of climate change during the twentieth century

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Braganza; D. J. Karoly; A. C. Hirst; P. Stott; R. J. Stouffer; S. F. B. Tett

    2004-01-01

    Five simple indices of surface temperature are used to investigate the influence of anthropogenic and natural (solar irradiance and volcanic aerosol) forcing on observed climate change during the twentieth century. These indices are based on spatial fingerprints of climate change and include the global-mean surface temperature, the land-ocean temperature contrast, the magnitude of the annual cycle in surface temperature over

  2. Abrupt climate change: can society cope?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mike Hulme

    2003-01-01

    Consideration of abrupt climate change has generally been incorporated neither in analyses of climate-change impacts nor in the design of climate adaptation strategies. Yet the possibility of abrupt climate change triggered by human perturbation of the climate system is used to support the position of both those who urge stronger and earlier mitigative action than is currently being contemplated and

  3. IN THIS ISSUE Regional Climate Change..............1

    E-print Network

    Hamann, Andreas

    IN THIS ISSUE · Regional Climate Change..............1 · From the Executive Director...........2 release of new climate change scenarios from the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM) heralds of the fundamental questions remaining with respect to understanding climate change and even climate variability. And

  4. The effects of climate sensitivity and carbon cycle interactions on mitigation policy stringency

    EPA Science Inventory

    Climate sensitivity and climate-carbon cycle feedbacks interact to determine how global carbon and energy cycles will change in the future. While the science of these connections is well documented, their economic implications are not well understood. Here we examine the effect o...

  5. The role of solar absorption in climate and climate change

    E-print Network

    1 The role of solar absorption in climate and climate change William Collins UC Berkeley · Changes to surface and atmosphere by aerosols · Climate sensitivity to changes in aerosols and CO2 Research Boulder, Colorado, USA #12;2 Prior Research on Absorption and Climate Field Experiments: · Central

  6. Phenological changes reflect climate change in Wisconsin

    Microsoft Academic Search

    NINA L. BRADLEY; A. CARL LEOPOLD; J OHN ROSS; WELLINGTON HUFFAKER

    1999-01-01

    A phenological study of springtime events was made over a 61-year period at one site in southern Wisconsin. The records over this long period show that several phenological events have been increasing in earliness; we discuss evidence indicating that these changes ref lect climate change. The mean of regressions for the 55 phenophases studied was 20.12 day per year, an

  7. The EPA Climate Change Kids Site

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2003-01-29

    This interactive site features games, animations, and teachers' materials intended to introduce younger students to climate change. There is information about what climate change is, the difference between weather and climate, and the greenhouse effect. There are also materials on the climate system, ancient climates, and how scientists investigate climate. Other topics include discussions of whether people can actually change Earth's climate, what the potential effects might be, and what people can do to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases.

  8. Climate change and food security.

    PubMed

    Gregory, P J; Ingram, J S I; Brklacich, M

    2005-11-29

    Dynamic interactions between and within the biogeophysical and human environments lead to the production, processing, distribution, preparation and consumption of food, resulting in food systems that underpin food security. Food systems encompass food availability (production, distribution and exchange), food access (affordability, allocation and preference) and food utilization (nutritional and societal values and safety), so that food security is, therefore, diminished when food systems are stressed. Such stresses may be induced by a range of factors in addition to climate change and/or other agents of environmental change (e.g. conflict, HIV/AIDS) and may be particularly severe when these factors act in combination. Urbanization and globalization are causing rapid changes to food systems. Climate change may affect food systems in several ways ranging from direct effects on crop production (e.g. changes in rainfall leading to drought or flooding, or warmer or cooler temperatures leading to changes in the length of growing season), to changes in markets, food prices and supply chain infrastructure. The relative importance of climate change for food security differs between regions. For example, in southern Africa, climate is among the most frequently cited drivers of food insecurity because it acts both as an underlying, ongoing issue and as a short-lived shock. The low ability to cope with shocks and to mitigate long-term stresses means that coping strategies that might be available in other regions are unavailable or inappropriate. In other regions, though, such as parts of the Indo-Gangetic Plain of India, other drivers, such as labour issues and the availability and quality of ground water for irrigation, rank higher than the direct effects of climate change as factors influencing food security. Because of the multiple socio-economic and bio-physical factors affecting food systems and hence food security, the capacity to adapt food systems to reduce their vulnerability to climate change is not uniform. Improved systems of food production, food distribution and economic access may all contribute to food systems adapted to cope with climate change, but in adopting such changes it will be important to ensure that they contribute to sustainability. Agriculture is a major contributor of the greenhouse gases methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), so that regionally derived policies promoting adapted food systems need to mitigate further climate change. PMID:16433099

  9. Climate change and food security

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, P.J; Ingram, J.S.I; Brklacich, M

    2005-01-01

    Dynamic interactions between and within the biogeophysical and human environments lead to the production, processing, distribution, preparation and consumption of food, resulting in food systems that underpin food security. Food systems encompass food availability (production, distribution and exchange), food access (affordability, allocation and preference) and food utilization (nutritional and societal values and safety), so that food security is, therefore, diminished when food systems are stressed. Such stresses may be induced by a range of factors in addition to climate change and/or other agents of environmental change (e.g. conflict, HIV/AIDS) and may be particularly severe when these factors act in combination. Urbanization and globalization are causing rapid changes to food systems. Climate change may affect food systems in several ways ranging from direct effects on crop production (e.g. changes in rainfall leading to drought or flooding, or warmer or cooler temperatures leading to changes in the length of growing season), to changes in markets, food prices and supply chain infrastructure. The relative importance of climate change for food security differs between regions. For example, in southern Africa, climate is among the most frequently cited drivers of food insecurity because it acts both as an underlying, ongoing issue and as a short-lived shock. The low ability to cope with shocks and to mitigate long-term stresses means that coping strategies that might be available in other regions are unavailable or inappropriate. In other regions, though, such as parts of the Indo-Gangetic Plain of India, other drivers, such as labour issues and the availability and quality of ground water for irrigation, rank higher than the direct effects of climate change as factors influencing food security. Because of the multiple socio-economic and bio-physical factors affecting food systems and hence food security, the capacity to adapt food systems to reduce their vulnerability to climate change is not uniform. Improved systems of food production, food distribution and economic access may all contribute to food systems adapted to cope with climate change, but in adopting such changes it will be important to ensure that they contribute to sustainability. Agriculture is a major contributor of the greenhouse gases methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), so that regionally derived policies promoting adapted food systems need to mitigate further climate change. PMID:16433099

  10. Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice 10 November 2011

    E-print Network

    Hansen, James E.

    1 Climate Variability and Climate Change: The New Climate Dice 10 November 2011 J. Hansen, M. Sato, coincident with increased global warming. The most dramatic and important change of the climate dice change is the natural variability of climate. How can a person discern long-term climate change, given

  11. Inuit Observations on Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is an overview of the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) project at Sachs Harbour on Banks Island, Northwest Territories, Canada, an effort to document the problem of Arctic climate change as experienced by the Inuit living there. There is video commentary by Inuit in which they describe changes in daily life for animals and people at Sachs Harbour: banks caving from permafrost melt, seasonal changes and new types of animals appearing as the old familiar animals disappear, ice dangerously opening up, and most importantly, a new unpredictability added to the usual extreme weather conditions in the Arctic region. The video comes in an abbreviated version, 14 minutes in length, as well as the full version, which is 42 minutes in length. There are reports of IISD trips made during different seasons at Sachs Harbour, a teacher guide for the video, and a report on the climate observations discussed in the IISD: Inuit Observations on Climate Change workshop.

  12. Indigenous Health and Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Indigenous populations have been identified as vulnerable to climate change. This framing, however, is detached from the diverse geographies of how people experience, understand, and respond to climate-related health outcomes, and overlooks nonclimatic determinants. I reviewed research on indigenous health and climate change to capture place-based dimensions of vulnerability and broader determining factors. Studies focused primarily on Australia and the Arctic, and indicated significant adaptive capacity, with active responses to climate-related health risks. However, nonclimatic stresses including poverty, land dispossession, globalization, and associated sociocultural transitions challenge this adaptability. Addressing geographic gaps in existing studies alongside greater focus on indigenous conceptualizations on and approaches to health, examination of global–local interactions shaping local vulnerability, enhanced surveillance, and an evaluation of policy support opportunities are key foci for future research. PMID:22594718

  13. Invasive species and climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, Beth A.

    2006-01-01

    Invasive species challenge managers in their work of conserving and managing natural areas and are one of the most serious problems these managers face. Because invasive species are likely to spread in response to changes in climate, managers may need to change their approaches to invasive species management accordingly.

  14. Faces of Climate Change: Introduction

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Darcy Dugan

    This is the first of three short videos showcasing the dramatic changes in Alaska's marine ecosystems through interviews with scientists and Alaska Natives. This introduction to the impacts of climate change in Alaska includes interviews with Alaska Natives, commentary by scientists, and footage from Alaska's Arctic.

  15. EPA Region 10 Climate Change and TMDL Pilot - Project Research Plan

    EPA Science Inventory

    Global climate change affects the fundamental drivers of the hydrological cycle. Evidence is growing that climate change will have significant ramifications for the nation’s freshwater ecosystems, as deviations in atmospheric temperature and precipitation patterns are more ...

  16. Overview-Climate Change and Adaptation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard B. Aronson

    2009-01-01

    Climate change poses a grave threat to sustainability. The first section of Sustainability2009: The Next Horizon, therefore, is devoted to Climate Change and Adaptation. Contributions focus on the historical consequences of climate change for human societies, as well as the effects of current climate change on sea level, lightning intensity, fire, the El Nin~o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and hurricane intensity. Chapters

  17. Overview—Climate Change and Adaptation

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard B. Aronson

    2009-01-01

    Climate change poses a grave threat to sustainability. The first section of Sustainability2009: The Next Horizon, therefore, is devoted to Climate Change and Adaptation. Contributions focus on the historical consequences of climate change for human societies, as well as the effects of current climate change on sea level, lightning intensity, fire, the El Nin˜o—Southern Oscillation (ENSO), and hurricane intensity. Chapters

  18. Can Science Win Over Climate Change Skeptics?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Michael Dougherty (The American Society of Human Genetics; )

    2009-07-25

    Explaining global warming is complex, making it harder to argue against climate change skeptics. Teaching the nature of science may be a better way to help students and the public understand that climate change is real; highlight the benefits from climate change awareness; and provide concise, direct answers to critics of climate change theory.

  19. The Science and Politics of Climate Change

    E-print Network

    ;#12;#12;Climate Change Natural Vs. Anthropogenic #12;Is the global warming in the 20th century due to the increaseThe Science and Politics of Climate Change J.Srinivasan Divecha Centre for Climate Change Indian has been induced by human beings? What is the impact of aerosols on climate change? #12;U

  20. Plant Pathogens as Indicators of Climate Change

    E-print Network

    Garrett, Karen A.

    Chapter 25 Plant Pathogens as Indicators of Climate Change K.A. Garrett, M. Nita, E.D. De Wolf, L. Introduction 2. Climatic Variables and Plant Disease 3. Evidence that Simulated Climate Change Affects Plant Disease in Experiments 4. Evidence that Plant Disease Patterns have Changed due to Climate Change

  1. Climate Change and Trout in Wisconsin Streams

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Climate Change and Trout in Wisconsin Streams Photo Matt Mitro W John J. Magnuson Center Climate Change Fishes and Climate Change Adaptation Magnuson Photo #12;The Invisible Present The Invisible in Weather versus Climate Change Magnuson 2009 #12;Magnuson 2006 The Invisible Present The Invisible Place

  2. An iconic approach to representing climate change

    E-print Network

    Feigon, Brooke

    1 An iconic approach to representing climate change Saffron Jessica O'Neill A thesis submitted-experts to be meaningfully engaged with the issue of climate change. This thesis investigates the value of engaging non-experts with climate change at the individual level. Research demonstrates that individuals perceive climate change

  3. Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers

    E-print Network

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    1 Prospective Climate Change Impact on Large Rivers in the US and South Korea Pierre Y. Julien Dept. of Civil and Environ. Eng. Colorado State University Seoul, South Korea August 11, 2009 Climate Change and Large Rivers 1. Climatic changes have been on-going for some time; 2. Climate changes usually predict

  4. Linkages between climate change and sustainable development

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Noreen Beg; Jan Corfee Morlot; Ogunlade Davidson; Yaw Afrane-Okesse; Lwazikazi Tyani; Fatma Denton; Youba Sokona; Jean Philippe Thomas; Emilio Lèbre La Rovere; Jyoti K. Parikh; Kirit Parikh; A. Atiq Rahman

    2002-01-01

    Climate change does not yet feature prominently within the environmental or economic policy agendas of developing countries. Yet evidence shows that some of the most adverse effects of climate change will be in developing countries, where populations are most vulnerable and least likely to easily adapt to climate change, and that climate change will affect the potential for development in

  5. Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Feedback to Climate Warming: Experimental Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Y.; Zhou, X.; Sherry, R.

    2006-12-01

    Global climate modeling has demonstrated that climate warming would stimulate respiratory CO2 release from the terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere, which in turn leads to more warming in the climate system. This positive feedback between the climate change and the terrestrial carbon cycle can form a vicious cycle that potentially leads to a dangerous threat to ecosystem functioning and service. Some of the key processes underlying this feedback loop, however, have not been carefully examined by experimental studies. Those key processes include temperature sensitivity of ecosystem carbon influx; regulation of carbon processes by warming-induced changes in species composition, and nutrient and water availability; and phenology and timing of ecosystem processes under warming. We have conducted two warming experiments in a Southern Great Plains prairie to examine ecosystem responses to climate warming. We used infrared heaters to elevate soil temperature by approximately 2.0 and 4.0 oC, respectively, during the experimental period. Our results indicate that plant biomass growth increased by approximately 20% in the warmed plots in comparison to that in the control plots. The increased plant productivity likely resulted from extended length of growing seasons since warming advanced phenology of early-flowering species and delayed phenology of late-flowering species, leading to an extension of the growing season. Leaf photosynthesis, however, was not strongly affected by warming. Warming also considerably increased C4 plant biomass and caused slight decreases in growth of C3 plants. Increased C4 biomass and litter production resulted in decreases in quality and decomposition of bulk litter at the ecosystem scale, leading to an increase in litter mass at the soil surface. Soil respiration did not significantly increase in the first two years but increased by 8-10% in the last several years, largely due to increased root respiration and litter pool sizes. We did not observe much change in soil C content under warming, indicating that increased plant biomass counterbalanced the increased carbon loss via respiration. The increased biomass production was accompanied by increases in plant nitrogen uptake and use efficiency. Decreased litter quality and increased litter pools may trigger a negative nitrogen feedback to decrease nitrogen releases from litter and availability for plants over time. Overall, our data from the Great Plains prairie do not support the notion that warming stimulation of soil respiration is the major feedback process to climate change. A realistic prediction of the future carbon cycle and climate change may require more ecosystem processes other than the respiration to be incorporated into climate models.

  6. Accounting for Climate Change: Introduction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Lieberman; Matthias Jonas; Wilfried Winiwarter; Zbigniew Nahorski; Sten Nilsson

    \\u000a The assessment of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted to and removed from the atmosphere is high on both political and scientific\\u000a agendas internationally. As increasing international concern and cooperation aim at policy-oriented solutions to the climate\\u000a change problem, several issues have begun to arise regarding verification and compliance under both proposed and legislated\\u000a schemes meant to reduce the human-induced global climate

  7. Accounting for Climate Change: Introduction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel Lieberman; Matthias Jonas; Wilfried Winiwarter; Zbigniew Nahorski; Sten Nilsson

    2007-01-01

    The assessment of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted to and removed from the atmosphere is high on both political and scientific\\u000a agendas internationally. As increasing international concern and cooperation aim at policy-oriented solutions to the climate\\u000a change problem, several issues have begun to arise regarding verification and compliance under both proposed and legislated\\u000a schemes meant to reduce the human-induced global climate

  8. Soil Moisture-Ecosystem-Climate Interactions in a Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seneviratne, S. I.; Davin, E.; Hirschi, M.; Mueller, B.; Orlowsky, B.; Teuling, A.

    2011-12-01

    Soil moisture is a key variable of the climate system. It constrains plant transpiration and photosynthesis in several regions of the world, with consequent impacts on the water, energy and biogeochemical cycles (e.g. Seneviratne et al. 2010). Moreover it is a storage component for precipitation and radiation anomalies, inducing persistence in the climate system. Finally, it is involved in a number of feedbacks at the local, regional and global scales, and plays a major role in climate-change projections. This presentation will provide an overview on these interactions, based on several recent publications (e.g. Seneviratne et al. 2006, Orlowsky and Seneviratne 2010, Teuling et al. 2010, Hirschi et al. 2011). In particular, it will highlight possible impacts of soil moisture-ecosystem coupling for climate extremes such as heat waves and droughts, and the resulting interconnections between biophysical and biogeochemical feedbacks in the context of climate change. Finally, it will also address recent regional- to global-scale trends in land hydrology and ecosystem functioning, as well as issues and potential avenues for investigating these trends (e.g. Jung et al. 2010, Mueller et al. 2011). References Hirschi, M., S.I. Seneviratne, V. Alexandrov, F. Boberg, C. Boroneant, O.B. Christensen, H. Formayer, B. Orlowsky, and P. Stepanek, 2011: Observational evidence for soil-moisture impact on hot extremes in southeastern Europe. Nature Geoscience, 4, 17-21, doi:10.1038/ngeo1032. Jung, M., et al., 2010: Recent decline in the global land evapotranspiration trend due to limited moisture supply. Nature, 467, 951-954. doi:10.1038/nature09396 Mueller, B., S.I. Seneviratne, et al.: Evaluation of global observations-based evapotranspiration datasets and IPCC AR4 simulations, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L06402, doi:10.1029/2010GL046230 Orlowsky, B., and S.I. Seneviratne, 2010: Statistical analyses of land-atmosphere feedbacks and their possible pitfalls. J. Climate, 23(14), 3918-3932 Seneviratne, S.I., T. Corti, E.L. Davin, M. Hirschi, E.B. Jaeger, I. Lehner, B. Orlowsky, and A.J. Teuling, 2010: Investigating soil moisture-climate interactions in a changing climate: A review. Earth-Science Reviews, 99, 3-4, 125-161, doi:10.1016/j.earscirev.2010.02.004 Seneviratne, S.I., D. Lüthi, M. Litschi, and C. Schär, 2006: Land-atmosphere coupling and climate change in Europe. Nature, 443, 205-209. Teuling, A.J., S.I. Seneviratne, et al. 2010: Contrasting response of European forest and grassland energy exchange to heatwaves. Nature Geoscience, 3, 722-727, doi:10.1038/ngeo950.

  9. Experimenting with Climate Change

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Hilda Smith, biological technician with Canyonlands Research Station, monitors changes in biological soil crusts in response to experimental increases in temperature and altered precipitation patterns....

  10. Climate Wisconsin: Temperature Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Finn Ryan

    This interactive visualization allows users to compare future projections of Wisconsin's average annual temperature with the actual changes of the last five decades. Text on the web page encourages students to think about the challenges Wisconsin could face if these changes occur.

  11. Terrestrial ecosystem feedbacks to global climate change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel A. Lashof; Benjamin J. DeAngelo; Scott R. Saleska; John Harte

    1997-01-01

    Anthropogenic greenhouse gases are expected to induce changes in global climate that can alter ecosystems in ways that, in turn, may further affect climate. Such climate-ecosystem interactions can generate either positive or negative feedbacks to the climate system, thereby either enhancing or diminishing the magnitude of global climate change. Important terrestrial feedback mechanisms include COâ fertilization (negative feedbacks), carbon storage

  12. Climate Kids: How Do We Know the Climate Is Changing?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This question is addressed through a series of questions and answers, each providing related introductory information such as how climate change is studied, the history of Earth’s climate, and the effects of climate change on Earth’s geology and biology. The Climate Kids website is a NASA education resource featuring articles, videos, images and games focused on the science of climate change.

  13. ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' Team

    E-print Network

    ``Climate Modelling & Global Change'' scientific report 1 ``Climate Modelling & Global Change of the tropical climate : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 6 2.2 Short­term variability studies : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 8 2.3 Climate drift sensitivity studies

  14. Climate change in Central America and Mexico: regional climate model validation and climate change projections

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ambarish V. Karmalkar; Raymond S. Bradley; Henry F. Diaz

    2011-01-01

    Central America has high biodiversity, it harbors high-value ecosystems and it's important to provide regional climate change information to assist in adaptation and mitigation work in the region. Here we study climate change projections for Central America and Mexico using a regional climate model. The model evaluation shows its success in simulating spatial and temporal variability of temperature and precipitation

  15. Interactive Quizzes on Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website allows you to test your knowledge on 5 topics. Warm Up: Test your knowledge about global temperature change and its impact on Earth's climate; Freeze Frames: How much do you know about glaciers and ice caps?; Sea Change: Test your knowledge of sea level rise and its effect on global populations; It's A Gas: Test your knowledge of carbon dioxide and why it's so important to climate stability and our quality of life; Each test consists of 10 questions and are immediately scored. The final module, 10 Things You Never Knew About Earth: Discover some amazing and little-known facts about our home planet, allows you to learn facts about the Earth and Climate Change.

  16. Fisheries and Global Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Rosanne Fortner

    2002-07-31

    When populations of harvestable fish start to decline, managers look for explanations of the changes throughout the Earth system. In this activity, the impact of global climate change on marine and Great Lakes fish is considered. First, decline in the striped bass population of the North Atlantic, noted in the Downeaster Alexa song by Billy Joel, is examined with spreadsheet analysis and on-line searches of National Marine Fisheries Service databases. In a second investigation, ArcView generates a model of the Lake Erie depths that could be associated with global climate change (shallower water). Students identify fish species that use nearshore shallows for spawning and nursery areas, and speculate on the impact of the lower water. In both activities, the thermal niche of the species is considered as a factor in where fish populations may migrate with new climate regimes.

  17. Renewable Energy and Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Chum, H. L.

    2012-01-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change issued the Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation (SRREN) at http://srren.ipcc-wg3.de/ (May 2011 electronic version; printed form ISBN 978-1-107-60710-1, 2012). More than 130 scientists contributed to the report.* The SRREN assessed existing literature on the future potential of renewable energy for the mitigation of climate change within a portfolio of mitigation options including energy conservation and efficiency, fossil fuel switching, RE, nuclear and carbon capture and storage (CCS). It covers the six most important renewable energy technologies - bioenergy, direct solar, geothermal, hydropower, ocean and wind, as well as their integration into present and future energy systems. It also takes into consideration the environmental and social consequences associated with these technologies, the cost and strategies to overcome technical as well as non-technical obstacles to their application and diffusion.

  18. Preparing for climate change in Washington State

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lara C. Whitely Binder; Jennifer Krencicki Barcelos; Derek B. Booth; Meriel Darzen; Marketa McGuire Elsner; Richard Fenske; Thomas F. Graham; Alan F. Hamlet; John Hodges-Howell; J. Elizabeth Jackson; Catherine Karr; Patrick W. Keys; Jeremy S. Littell; Nathan Mantua; Jennifer Marlow; Don McKenzie; Michael Robinson-Dorn; Eric A. Rosenberg; Claudio O. Stöckle; Julie A. Vano

    2010-01-01

    Climate change is expected to bring potentially significant changes to Washington State’s natural, institutional, cultural,\\u000a and economic landscape. Addressing climate change impacts will require a sustained commitment to integrating climate information\\u000a into the day-to-day governance and management of infrastructure, programs, and services that may be affected by climate change.\\u000a This paper discusses fundamental concepts for planning for climate change and

  19. Climate Extremes, Uncertainty and Impacts Climate Change Challenge: The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

    E-print Network

    Climate Extremes, Uncertainty and Impacts Climate Change Challenge: The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, AR4) has resulted in a wider acceptance of global climate change climate extremes and change impacts. Uncertainties in process studies, climate models, and associated

  20. US Climate Change Science Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Web site offers a portal to the recently held Planning Workshop for Scientists and Stakeholders, convened by the Bush administration to set the research agenda for its US Climate Change Science Program (CCSP). Clicking on Library will call up the draft strategic plan for the CCSP, which may be downloaded in whole or in part. The Web site also provides an overview of the meetings and the program, along with various publications and white papers also available to download. Climate change researchers and other interested parties should find this site a useful resource for keeping tabs on the current administration's stance on the issue.

  1. On Some Challenges of Statistical Analysis in Climate Change Study

    E-print Network

    /curve-fitting, spectral analysis methods, sufficient in detecting trends/cycles in climate data? #12;C: To detect trend.g. linear and nonlinear regression/curve-fitting, spectral analysis methods, sufficient in detecting trendsOn Some Challenges of Statistical Analysis in Climate Change Study Jingfeng Wang School of Civil

  2. Plate Movements and Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Karen Bice

    In this activity students use maps of the positions of the continents over the past 180 million years, and, with some basic concepts about climate zones, hypothesize what climate changes may have occurred due to plate movements. They will discover that even though climate zones are oriented roughly parallel to lines of latitude about the Earth, according to the theory of plate tectonics, the continents "ride" on dynamic plates which make up the Earth's surface. Although the resulting movement of the continents is very slow, over millions of years it is enough to get a continent from one place to another, and that movement may take the landmass through several latitudes and climate zones.

  3. Changing the intellectual climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castree, Noel; Adams, William M.; Barry, John; Brockington, Daniel; Büscher, Bram; Corbera, Esteve; Demeritt, David; Duffy, Rosaleen; Felt, Ulrike; Neves, Katja; Newell, Peter; Pellizzoni, Luigi; Rigby, Kate; Robbins, Paul; Robin, Libby; Rose, Deborah Bird; Ross, Andrew; Schlosberg, David; Sörlin, Sverker; West, Paige; Whitehead, Mark; Wynne, Brian

    2014-09-01

    Calls for more broad-based, integrated, useful knowledge now abound in the world of global environmental change science. They evidence many scientists' desire to help humanity confront the momentous biophysical implications of its own actions. But they also reveal a limited conception of social science and virtually ignore the humanities. They thereby endorse a stunted conception of 'human dimensions' at a time when the challenges posed by global environmental change are increasing in magnitude, scale and scope. Here, we make the case for a richer conception predicated on broader intellectual engagement and identify some preconditions for its practical fulfilment. Interdisciplinary dialogue, we suggest, should engender plural representations of Earth's present and future that are reflective of divergent human values and aspirations. In turn, this might insure publics and decision-makers against overly narrow conceptions of what is possible and desirable as they consider the profound questions raised by global environmental change.

  4. Path Dependence of Regional Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrington, Tyler; Zickfeld, Kirsten

    2013-04-01

    Path dependence of the climate response to CO2 forcing has been investigated from a global mean perspective, with evidence suggesting that long-term global mean temperature and precipitation changes are proportional to cumulative CO2 emissions, and independent of emissions pathway. Little research, however, has been done on path dependence of regional climate changes, particularly in areas that could be affected by tipping points. Here, we utilize the UVic Earth System Climate Model version 2.9, an Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity. It consists of a 3-dimensional ocean general circulation model, coupled with a dynamic-thermodynamic sea ice model, and a thermodynamic energy-moisture balance model of the atmosphere. This is then coupled with a terrestrial carbon cycle model and an ocean carbon-cycle model containing an inorganic carbon and marine ecosystem component. Model coverage is global with a zonal resolution of 3.6 degrees and meridional resolution of 1.8 degrees. The model is forced with idealized emissions scenarios across five cumulative emission groups (1300 GtC, 2300 GtC, 3300 GtC, 4300 GtC, and 5300 GtC) to explore the path dependence of (and the possibility of hysteresis in) regional climate changes. Emission curves include both fossil carbon emissions and emissions from land use changes, and span a variety of peak and decline scenarios with varying emission rates, as well as overshoot and instantaneous pulse scenarios. Tipping points being explored include those responsible for the disappearance of summer Arctic sea-ice, the irreversible melt of the Greenland Ice Sheet, the collapse of the Atlantic Thermohaline Circulation, and the dieback of the Amazonian Rainforest. Preliminary results suggest that global mean climate change after cessation of CO2 emissions is independent of the emissions pathway, only varying with total cumulative emissions, in accordance with results from earlier studies. Forthcoming analysis will investigate path dependence of regional climate change. Some evidence exists to support the idea of hysteresis in the Greenland Ice Sheet, and since tipping points represent non-linear elements of the climate system, we suspect that the other tipping points might also show path dependence.

  5. Coal in a changing climate

    SciTech Connect

    Lashof, D.A.; Delano, D.; Devine, J. (and others)

    2007-02-15

    The NRDC analysis examines the changing climate for coal production and use in the United States and China, the world's two largest producers and consumers of coal. The authors say that the current coal fuel cycle is among the most destructive activities on earth, placing an unacceptable burden on public health and the environment. There is no such thing as 'clean coal.' Our highest priorities must be to avoid increased reliance on coal and to accelerate the transition to an energy future based on efficient use of renewable resources. Energy efficiency and renewable energy resources are technically capable of meeting the demands for energy services in countries that rely on coal. However, more than 500 conventional coal-fired power plants are expected in China in the next eight years alone, and more than 100 are under development in the United States. Because it is very likely that significant coal use will continue during the transition to renewables, it is important that we also take the necessary steps to minimize the destructive effects of coal use. That requires the U.S. and China to take steps now to end destructive mining practices and to apply state of the art pollution controls, including CO{sub 2} control systems, to sources that use coal. Contents of the report are: Introduction; Background (Coal Production; Coal Use); The Toll from Coal (Environmental Effects of Coal Production; Environmental Effects of Coal Transportation); Environmental Effects of Coal Use (Air Pollutants; Other Pollutants; Environmental Effects of Coal Use in China); What Is the Future for Coal? (Reducing Fossil Fuel Dependence; Reducing the Impacts of Coal Production; Reducing Damage From Coal Use; Global Warming and Coal); and Conclusion. 2 tabs.

  6. Appendix L: Climate Change and Power Planning

    E-print Network

    Page 1 Appendix L: Climate Change and Power Planning Power Committee Webinar June 3, 2009 June 3, 2009 2 Outline · Climate Change Data · Assessing impacts to the power system · Dealing with climate;Page 5 June 3, 2009 9 Outline · Climate Change Data · Assessing impacts to the power system · Dealing

  7. GUNNISON BASIN CLIMATE CHANGE VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT

    E-print Network

    Neff, Jason

    of climate change on land and water resources to help inform management and conservation activities Basin, Colorado, are likely to be most at risk to projected climatic changes and why they are likelyGUNNISON BASIN CLIMATE CHANGE VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT For the Gunnison Climate Working Group

  8. Stormwater, Climate Change and Wisconsin's Coastal Communities

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    source of risk from changing climate. City of Green Bay watershed - #12;Predicted climate includes climate change impacts on specific Wisconsin natural resources, ecosystems and regions. WICCI was createdStormwater, Climate Change and Wisconsin's Coastal Communities Johnson Foundation at Wingspread

  9. APPROACHES TO VULNERABILITY TO CLIMATE CHANGE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. Neil Adger

    Abstract Vulnerability to the impacts of future climate change remains a critical issue in the interaction of society with global environmental change. While adaptation to evolving climate patterns can and does occur, sections of society already vulnerable to present climate variability could find this vulnerability exacerbated by the changing incidence of extreme climate events such as droughts and floods. Present

  10. USACE JUNE 2014 Climate Change Adaptation Plan

    E-print Network

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    of Climate Change 5 2013-2014 Highlights 6 ADAPTATION POLICY STATEMENT 7 MAINSTREAM ADAPTATION 9 GOVERNANCE Science Working Group 19 National Climate Assessment 20 Climate Change and Water Working Group 20USACE JUNE 2014 Climate Change Adaptation Plan #12;2 INTRODUCTIONEXECUTIVE SUMMARY This USACE

  11. 4, 289308, 2008 Climate change and

    E-print Network

    Boyer, Edmond

    CPD 4, 289­308, 2008 Climate change and rainstorms in East China M. Domroes and D. Schaefer Title forum of Climate of the Past Recent climate change affecting rainstorm occurrences? A case study in East­308, 2008 Climate change and rainstorms in East China M. Domroes and D. Schaefer Title Page Abstract

  12. Global Climate Change Earth, 1972, Apollo 17,

    E-print Network

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    climate." December 1995. #12;Human-Induced Global Warming? Intergovernmental Panel on Climate ChangeGlobal Climate Change Earth, 1972, Apollo 17, 29,000 km into space. #12;Natural Variation of the earth. Global Change Impacts 2009. #12;Human Impacts on Climate Greenhouse effect easily tested

  13. Delayed Seasonal Cycle and African Monsoon in a Warmer Climate

    E-print Network

    Biasutti, Michela

    2009-01-01

    Increasing greenhouse gases will change many aspects of the Earth's climate, from its annual mean to the frequency of extremes such as heat waves and droughts. Here we report that the current generation of climate models predicts a delay in the seasonal cycle of global rainfall and ocean temperature in response to increasing greenhouse gases, with important implications for the regional monsoons. In particular, the rainy season of the semi-arid African Sahel is projected to start later and become shorter: an undesirable change for local rainfed agriculture and pastoralism. Previous work has highlighted the uncertainty in this region's response to anthropogenic global warming: summer rainfall is predicted either to decrease or increase by up to 30% depending which model is used. The robust agreement across models on the seasonal distribution of rainfall changes signifies that the onset date and length of the rainy season should be more predictable than annual mean anomalies.

  14. Mars Recent Climate Change Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberle, Robert M.; Owen, Sandra J.

    2012-11-01

    Mars Recent Climate Change Workshop NASA/Ames Research Center May 15-17, 2012 Climate change on Mars has been a subject of great interest to planetary scientists since the 1970's when orbiting spacecraft first discovered fluvial landforms on its ancient surfaces and layered terrains in its polar regions. By far most of the attention has been directed toward understanding how "Early Mars" (i.e., Mars >~3.5 Gya) could have produced environmental conditions favorable for the flow of liquid water on its surface. Unfortunately, in spite of the considerable body of work performed on this subject, no clear consensus has emerged on the nature of the early Martian climate system because of the difficulty in distinguishing between competing ideas given the ambiguities in the available geological, mineralogical, and isotopic records. For several reasons, however, the situation is more tractable for "Recent Mars" (i.e., Mars during past 20 My or so). First, the geologic record is better preserved and evidence for climate change on this time scale has been building since the rejuvenation of the Mars Exploration Program in the late 1990's. The increasing coverage of the planet from orbit and the surface, coupled with accurate measurements of surface topography, increasing spatial resolution of imaging cameras, improved spectral resolution of infrared sensors, and the ability to probe the subsurface with radar, gamma rays, and neutron spectroscopy, has not only improved the characterization of previously known climate features such as polar layered terrains and glacier-related landforms, but has also revealed the existence of many new features related to recent climate change such as polygons, gullies, concentric crater fill, and a latitude dependent mantle. Second, the likely cause of climate change - spin axis/orbital variations - is more pronounced on Mars compared to Earth. Spin axis/orbital variations alter the seasonal and latitudinal distribution of sunlight, which can mobilize and redistribute volatile reservoirs both on and below the surface. And for Mars, these variations are large. In the past 20 My, for example, the obliquity is believed to have varied from a low of 15° to a high of 45° with a regular oscillation time scale of ~10^5 years. These variations are typically less than two degrees on the Earth. Mars, therefore, offers a natural laboratory for the study of orbitally induced climate change on a terrestrial planet. Finally, general circulation models (GCMs) for Mars have reached a level of sophistication that justifies their application to the study of spin axis/orbitally forced climate change. With recent advances in computer technology the models can run at reasonable spatial resolution for many Mars years with physics packages that include cloud microphysics, radiative transfer in scattering/absorbing atmospheres, surface heat budgets, boundary layer schemes, and a host of other processes. To be sure, the models will undergo continual improvement, but with carefully designed experiments they can now provide insights into mechanisms of climate change in the recent past. Thus, the geologic record is better preserved, the forcing function is large, and GCMs have become useful tools. While research efforts in each of these areas have progressed considerably over the past several decades, they have proceeded mostly on independent paths occasionally leading to conflicting ideas. To remedy this situation and accelerate progress in the area, the NASA/Ames Research Center's Mars General Circulation Modeling Group hosted a 3-day workshop on May 15-17, 2012 that brought together the geological and atmospheric science communities to collectively discuss the evidence for recent climate change on Mars, the nature of the change required, and how that change could be brought about. Over 50 researchers, students, and post-docs from the US, Canada, Europe, and Japan attended the meeting. The program and abstracts from the workshop are presented in this NASA/CP and are available to the public at http://spa

  15. CLIMATIC CHANGE SINCE 1950

    Microsoft Academic Search

    RICHARD A. KALNICKY

    1974-01-01

    The mean temperature for the Northern Hemisphere had a warming trend from 1890 to 1950 and a cooling trend since 1950. The eastern and central United States had colder temperatures in 1961–1970 than in 1931–1960. The temperature changes were associated with an adjustment of hemispheric circulation from more frequent zonal flow between 1900 and 1950 to more frequent meridional flow

  16. About sponsorship Climate change

    E-print Network

    Bice, Karen L.

    -climatologist at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, is passionate about the alligators and palm trees he sees dotting was one of a panel of experts on emissions of ancient greenhouse gases that gathered at the American. The main body of this evidence is changes in the chemical properties of the fossilised remains of ancient

  17. AEROSOL, CLOUDS, AND CLIMATE CHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    SCHWARTZ, S.E.

    2005-09-01

    Earth's climate is thought to be quite sensitive to changes in radiative fluxes that are quite small in absolute magnitude, a few watts per square meter, and in relation to these fluxes in the natural climate. Atmospheric aerosol particles exert influence on climate directly, by scattering and absorbing radiation, and indirectly by modifying the microphysical properties of clouds and in turn their radiative effects and hydrology. The forcing of climate change by these indirect effects is thought to be quite substantial relative to forcing by incremental concentrations of greenhouse gases, but highly uncertain. Quantification of aerosol indirect forcing by satellite- or ground-based remote sensing has proved quite difficult in view of inherent large variation in the pertinent observables such as cloud optical depth, which is controlled mainly by liquid water path and only secondarily by aerosols. Limited work has shown instances of large magnitude of aerosol indirect forcing, with local instantaneous forcing upwards of 50 W m{sup 66}-2. Ultimately it will be necessary to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models to accurately identify the anthropogenic forcing at present and over secular time and to assess the influence of this forcing in the context of other forcings of climate change. While the elements of aerosol processes that must be represented in models describing the evolution and properties of aerosol particles that serve as cloud condensation particles are known, many important components of these processes remain to be understood and to be represented in models, and the models evaluated against observation, before such model-based representations can confidently be used to represent aerosol indirect effects in climate models.

  18. Stratospheric aerosols and climatic change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, B.; Pollack, J. B.; Summers, A.; Toon, O. B.; Sagan, C.; Van Camp, W.

    1976-01-01

    Generated primarily by volcanic explosions, a layer of submicron silicate particles and particles made of concentrated sulfuric acids solution is present in the stratosphere. Flights through the stratosphere may be a future source of stratospheric aerosols, since the effluent from supersonic transports contains sulfurous gases (which will be converted to H2SO4) while the exhaust from Space Shuttles contains tiny aluminum oxide particles. Global heat balance calculations have shown that the stratospheric aerosols have made important contributions to some climatic changes. In the present paper, accurate radiative transfer calculations of the globally-averaged surface temperature (T) are carried out to estimate the sensitivity of the climate to changes in the number of stratospheric aerosols. The results obtained for a specified model atmosphere, including a vertical profile of the aerosols, indicate that the climate is unlikely to be affected by supersonic transports and Space Shuttles, during the next decades.

  19. Bergen earth system model (BCM-C): model description and regional climate-carbon cycle feedbacks assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. F. Tjiputra; K. Assmann; M. Bentsen; I. Bethke; O. H. Otterâ; C. Sturm; C. Heinze

    2009-01-01

    A complex earth system model is developed by coupling terrestrial and oceanic carbon cycle models into the Bergen Climate Model. Two model simulations (one with climate change inclusions and the other without) are generated to study the large scale climate and carbon cycle variability as well as its feedback for the period 1850-2100. The simulations are performed based on historical

  20. Bergen Earth system model (BCM-C): model description and regional climate-carbon cycle feedbacks assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. F. Tjiputra; K. Assmann; M. Bentsen; I. Bethke; O. H. Otterâ; C. Sturm; C. Heinze

    2010-01-01

    We developed a complex Earth system model by coupling terrestrial and oceanic carbon cycle components into the Bergen Climate Model. For this study, we have generated two model simulations (one with climate change inclusions and the other without) to study the large scale climate and carbon cycle variability as well as its feedback for the period 1850-2100. The simulations are

  1. Climate change impacts of US reactive nitrogen

    PubMed Central

    Pinder, Robert W.; Davidson, Eric A.; Goodale, Christine L.; Greaver, Tara L.; Herrick, Jeffrey D.; Liu, Lingli

    2012-01-01

    Fossil fuel combustion and fertilizer application in the United States have substantially altered the nitrogen cycle, with serious effects on climate change. The climate effects can be short-lived, by impacting the chemistry of the atmosphere, or long-lived, by altering ecosystem greenhouse gas fluxes. Here we develop a coherent framework for assessing the climate change impacts of US reactive nitrogen emissions, including oxides of nitrogen, ammonia, and nitrous oxide (N2O). We use the global temperature potential (GTP), calculated at 20 and 100 y, in units of CO2 equivalents (CO2e), as a common metric. The largest cooling effects are due to combustion sources of oxides of nitrogen altering tropospheric ozone and methane concentrations and enhancing carbon sequestration in forests. The combined cooling effects are estimated at ?290 to ?510 Tg CO2e on a GTP20 basis. However, these effects are largely short-lived. On a GTP100 basis, combustion contributes just ?16 to ?95 Tg CO2e. Agriculture contributes to warming on both the 20-y and 100-y timescales, primarily through N2O emissions from soils. Under current conditions, these warming and cooling effects partially offset each other. However, recent trends show decreasing emissions from combustion sources. To prevent warming from US reactive nitrogen, reductions in agricultural N2O emissions are needed. Substantial progress toward this goal is possible using current technology. Without such actions, even greater CO2 emission reductions will be required to avoid dangerous climate change. PMID:22547815

  2. Mid Latitude Extreme Precipitation under future changed climate Mid Latitude Extreme Precipitation under future changed climate Mid Latitude Extreme Precipitation under future changed climate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Volodin; N. A. Diansky; U. Lall; C. Karamperidou; F. Cioffi; C. Transerici; R. Purini

    2010-01-01

    Precipitation patterns under global warming scenario are statistically analyzed for two mid-latitude regions: Mediterranean and North Europe, North America. Simulation data from INMCM.3 GCM are used. Changes in intensity, frequency, duration and amount of precipitation due to climate changes are investigated. Furthermore we analyze all the components of hydrologic cycle, including runoff, transpiration, as well as, plant productivity with focus

  3. Responding to Climate Change Debate

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Leigh Dawson

    2011-01-01

    Responding to Climate Change was the topic for the 2011 Big Issues Forum recently hosted by The University of Notre Dame Australia (UNDA). Panellists included Senator Scott Ludlam, Federal Greens Senator for WA; Melissa Parke MP, Federal Labor Member for Fremantle; Dr Dennis Jensen MP, Federal Liberal Member for Tangney and Dr Michael O’Leary, UNDA Lecturer in the School of

  4. Global Climate Change Interaction Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortner, Rosanne W.

    1998-01-01

    Students investigate the effects of global climate change on life in the Great Lakes region in this activity. Teams working together construct as many links as possible for such factors as rainfall, lake water, evaporation, skiing, zebra mussels, wetlands, shipping, walleye, toxic chemicals, coastal homes, and population. (PVD)

  5. Media power and climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, Julia B.

    2015-04-01

    Fingers are often pointed directly at the news media for their powerful influence and ineffective reporting of climate change. But is that the best place to point? And are there more effective ways to conceptualize the power of the media and to consider whom they serve?

  6. Climate change primer for respirologists.

    PubMed

    Takaro, Tim K; Henderson, Sarah B

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is already affecting the cardiorespiratory health of populations around the world, and these impacts are expected to increase. The present overview serves as a primer for respirologists who are concerned about how these profound environmental changes may affect their patients. The authors consider recent peer-reviewed literature with a focus on climate interactions with air pollution. They do not discuss in detail cardiorespiratory health effects for which the potential link to climate change is poorly understood. For example, pneumonia and influenza, which affect >500 million people per year, are not addressed, although clear seasonal variation suggests climate-related effects. Additionally, large global health impacts in low-resource countries, including migration precipitated by environmental change, are omitted. The major cardiorespiratory health impacts addressed are due to heat, air pollution and wildfires, shifts in allergens and infectious diseases along with respiratory impacts from flooding. Personal and societal choices about carbon use and fossil energy infrastructure should be informed by their impacts on health, and respirologists can play an important role in this discussion. PMID:25664458

  7. CLIMATE CHANGE AND N DEPOSITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project investigates the potential influence of climate change on wet deposition of reduced nitrogen across the U.S. The concentration of ammonium-nitrogen in precipitation is known to increase with temperature, owing to temperature dependent ammonia source strengths (natur...

  8. Climate Change: Science, Skepticism, Solutions

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kutscher, Charles F.

    The Advanced Technology Environmental and Energy Center (ATEEC) provides this presentation on climate change from Chuck Kutscher of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The presentation includes graphics and data. The document may be downloaded in PDF file format. Users must download this resource for viewing, which requires a free log-in. There is no cost to download the item.

  9. Climate change - creating watershed resilience

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Climate change is likely to intensify the circulation of water, which will shift spatial and temporal availability of snowmelt and runoff. In addition, drought and floods are likely to be more frequent, severe and widespread. Higher air temperatures will lead to higher ocean temperatures, elevating ...

  10. Climate Change: Evidence and Causes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The fundamentals of climate change are well established: greenhouse gases warm the planet; their concentrations in the atmosphere are increasing; Earth has warmed, and is going to continue warming with a range of impacts. This article summarises the contents of a recent publication issued by the UK's Royal Society and the US National Academy…

  11. Climate Change Wildlife and Wildlands

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

    This video focuses on the science of climate change and its impacts on wildlife on land and in the sea, and their habitats in the U.S. There are short sections on walruses, coral reefs, migrating birds and their breeding grounds, freshwater fish, bees, etc. Video concludes with some discussion about solutions, including reduce/recyle/reuse, energy conservation, backyard habitats, citizen scientists.

  12. Conservation, Development and Climate Change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Anthony Hall

    Deforestation in Latin America, especially in the A mazon Basin, is a major source of greenhouse gases such as CO 2 which contribute to global warming. Protected area s play a vital role in minimizing forest loss and in supplyi ng key environmental services, including carbon sequestration and rainfall regulat ion, which mitigate the adverse impacts of climate change amidst

  13. Leishmaniasis emergence and climate change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. D. Ready

    2008-01-01

    Summary Spatio-temporal modelling of the distributions of the leishmaniases and their sandfly vectors is reviewed in relation to climate change. Many leishmaniases are rural zoonoses, and so there is a foundation of descriptive ecology and qualitative risk assessment. Dogs are widespread reservoir hosts of veterinary importance. Recent statistical modelling has not always produced novel general conclusions, exemplifying the difficulty of

  14. Climate changes and food supply

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Pimentel

    2009-01-01

    Hotter and drier weather in North America, caused by the buildup of greenhouse gases and the thinning of the ozone layer, could cut crop production by as much as 27 percent, calculates David Pimentel of Cornell University. At the same time, however, climate changes in eastern and central Africa could be beneficial-increasing yields from 10 to 30 percent he says.

  15. Climatic Change and Human Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garratt, John R.

    1995-01-01

    Traces the history of the Earth over four billion years, and shows how climate has had an important role to play in the evolution of humans. Posits that the world's rapidly growing human population and its increasing use of energy is the cause of present-day changes in the concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. (Author/JRH)

  16. A Lesson on Climate Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Jim

    This cooperative learning activity, for grades 7-12, promotes critical thinking skills within the context of learning about the causes and effects of climate change. Objectives include: (1) understanding factors that reduce greenhouse gases; (2) understanding the role of trees in reducing greenhouse gases; (3) identifying foods that produce…

  17. Perturbations to the River Nitrogen Cycling from the Historical Land Use and Climate Changes: the Susquehanna River Case Study with GFDL Land Model LM3-N

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.; Malyshev, S.; Shevliakova, E.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2013-12-01

    We developed a regional version of the GFDL land model LM3-N to assess human influences on the nitrogen cycle in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The new features include integrated effects of point and non-point sources on river nitrogen loads, a denitrification module and stream microbial processes within the LM3's terrestrial and river component respectively. We have used the improved version to investigate the intertwined relationship between nitrogen dynamics and hydrological processes under different climate scenarios. We applied the modified model to the Susquehanna River basin, the largest of the watersheds in the northeastern U.S., draining an area of 71,220 square kilometers, at the resolution of 1/8 degree. Within the LM3's integrated modeling framework, we simulated stream NH4-N and DON loads in addition to NO3-N loads for the entire drainage network, which were verified using 20 year (1986-2005) river data from 6 long-term monitoring stations. Results suggest that mechanistic land-surface models like LM3, which are capable of capturing long-term hydrological cycles, allow for the simulation of inter-annual variations of stream nitrogen loadings caused by differences in weather patterns. Most of the non-point nitrogen inputs to the terrestrial ecosystem were stored in the vegetation and soil in the secondary land use, but they were removed by soil denitrification in the agricultural land, indicating that artificial nitrogen applications could drive substantial increase of N2O emission. Simulations using different idealized climate scenarios showed that after a series of dry years (e.g., 1961-1963) the median and upper 10 percent of the estimated river nitrogen loadings increase by 25 and 26 percent respectively, as compared to the loadings after a mean hydrological year (2005). This shows that prolonged drought periods could induce a significant increase of stream nutrient load in the post drought year due to the delayed release of the accumulated soil nitrogen during the drought periods. The above discussion points illustrate the critical role of historical climate patterns in addition to the increasing anthropogenic nutrient loads when assessing nutrient-related water quality problems and designing optimal nutrient loading controls.

  18. Inuit Observations of Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    WGBH/Boston

    This video features changes in the land, sea, and animals that are being observed by the residents of Sachs Harbour, Northwest Territories, Canada â many of whom hunt, trap, and fishâbecause of their long-standing and intimate connection with their ecosystem. Scientists interview the residents and record their observations in order to deepen our understanding of climate change in the polar region. Background essay and discussion questions are included.

  19. Climate Change and Intertidal Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Pauline M.; Adam, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Intertidal wetlands are recognised for the provision of a range of valued ecosystem services. The two major categories of intertidal wetlands discussed in this contribution are saltmarshes and mangrove forests. Intertidal wetlands are under threat from a range of anthropogenic causes, some site-specific, others acting globally. Globally acting factors include climate change and its driving cause—the increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. One direct consequence of climate change will be global sea level rise due to thermal expansion of the oceans, and, in the longer term, the melting of ice caps and glaciers. The relative sea level rise experienced at any one locality will be affected by a range of factors, as will the response of intertidal wetlands to the change in sea level. If relative sea level is rising and sedimentation within intertidal wetlands does not keep pace, then there will be loss of intertidal wetlands from the seaward edge, with survival of the ecosystems only possible if they can retreat inland. When retreat is not possible, the wetland area will decline in response to the “squeeze” experienced. Any changes to intertidal wetland vegetation, as a consequence of climate change, will have flow on effects to biota, while changes to biota will affect intertidal vegetation. Wetland biota may respond to climate change by shifting in distribution and abundance landward, evolving or becoming extinct. In addition, impacts from ocean acidification and warming are predicted to affect the fertilisation, larval development, growth and survival of intertidal wetland biota including macroinvertebrates, such as molluscs and crabs, and vertebrates such as fish and potentially birds. The capacity of organisms to move and adapt will depend on their life history characteristics, phenotypic plasticity, genetic variability, inheritability of adaptive characteristics, and the predicted rates of environmental change. PMID:24832670

  20. Climate change and intertidal wetlands.

    PubMed

    Ross, Pauline M; Adam, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Intertidal wetlands are recognised for the provision of a range of valued ecosystem services. The two major categories of intertidal wetlands discussed in this contribution are saltmarshes and mangrove forests. Intertidal wetlands are under threat from a range of anthropogenic causes, some site-specific, others acting globally. Globally acting factors include climate change and its driving cause-the increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. One direct consequence of climate change will be global sea level rise due to thermal expansion of the oceans, and, in the longer term, the melting of ice caps and glaciers. The relative sea level rise experienced at any one locality will be affected by a range of factors, as will the response of intertidal wetlands to the change in sea level. If relative sea level is rising and sedimentation within intertidal wetlands does not keep pace, then there will be loss of intertidal wetlands from the seaward edge, with survival of the ecosystems only possible if they can retreat inland. When retreat is not possible, the wetland area will decline in response to the "squeeze" experienced. Any changes to intertidal wetland vegetation, as a consequence of climate change, will have flow on effects to biota, while changes to biota will affect intertidal vegetation. Wetland biota may respond to climate change by shifting in distribution and abundance landward, evolving or becoming extinct. In addition, impacts from ocean acidification and warming are predicted to affect the fertilisation, larval development, growth and survival of intertidal wetland biota including macroinvertebrates, such as molluscs and crabs, and vertebrates such as fish and potentially birds. The capacity of organisms to move and adapt will depend on their life history characteristics, phenotypic plasticity, genetic variability, inheritability of adaptive characteristics, and the predicted rates of environmental change. PMID:24832670

  1. Environment and Global Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This module is intended to convey a broad understanding of the nature of climate change and its potential impacts. Students will come to understand the effects of radiation imbalance in the Arctic, fluctuations in albedo, and ecological consequences of decreasing albedo in the Arctic. Upon completion of the module, they will be able to explain: the consequences of decreasing stratospheric ozone, potential hazards of POP's entering Arctic food chains, and the possible impacts of environmental changes on traditional lifestyles in the Arctic.

  2. Thermohaline circulations and global climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, H.P.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research activities conducted during the period 15 January 1992--14 December 1992. Thermohaline Circulations and Global Climate Change is concerned with investigating the hypothesis that changes in surface thermal and hydrological forcing of the North Atlantic, changes that might be expected to accompany C0[sub 2]-induced global warming, could result in ocean-atmosphere interactions' exerting a positive feedback on the climate system. Because the North Atlantic is the source of much of the global ocean's reservoir of deep water, and because this deep water could sequester large amounts of anthropogenically produced C0[sub 2], changes in the rate of deep-water production are important to future climates. Since deep-water Production is controlled, in part, by the annual cycle of the atmospheric forcing of the North Atlantic, and since this forcing depends strongly on both hydrological and thermal processes as well as the windstress, there is the potential for feedback between the relatively short-term response of the atmosphere to changing radiative forcing and the longer-term processes in the oceans. Work over the past 11 months has proceeded according to the continuation discussion of last January and several new results have arisen.

  3. Earth's Changing Climate: Natural Variation and Human Impact

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kimberly Lightle

    This article looks at the content knowledge teachers will need to prepare young students for later introduction of the fourth essential principle of the climate sciences, which is "Climate varies over space and time through both natural and man-made processes." The author describes the concepts that underlie the principle, provides maps and visuals from the federal agencies that monitor weather and climate changes, and identifies online resources for the teacher. The free, online magazine Beyond Weather and the Water Cycle is structured on the seven essential principles of the climate sciences, which are required for climate literacy.

  4. Changing Climates @ Colorado State: 100 (Multidisciplinary) Views of Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, S.; Calderazzo, J.; Changing Climates, Cmmap Education; Diversity Team

    2011-12-01

    We would like to talk about a multidisciplinary education and outreach program we co-direct at Colorado State University, with support from an NSF-funded STC, CMMAP, the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes. We are working to raise public literacy about climate change by providing information that is high quality, up to date, thoroughly multidisciplinary, and easy for non-specialists to understand. Our primary audiences are college-level students, their teachers, and the general public. Our motto is Climate Change is Everybody's Business. To encourage and help our faculty infuse climate-change content into their courses, we have organized some 115 talks given by as many different speakers-speakers drawn from 28 academic departments, all 8 colleges at CSU, and numerous other entities from campus, the community, and farther afield. We began with a faculty-teaching-faculty series and then broadened our attentions to the whole campus and surrounding community. Some talks have been for narrowly focused audiences such as extension agents who work on energy, but most are for more eclectic groups of students, staff, faculty, and citizens. We count heads at most events, and our current total is roughly 6,000. We have created a website (http://changingclimates.colostate.edu) that includes videotapes of many of these talks, short videos we have created, and annotated sources that we judge to be accurate, interesting, clearly written, and aimed at non-specialists, including books, articles and essays, websites, and a few items specifically for college teachers (such as syllabi). Pages of the website focus on such topics as how the climate works / how it changes; what's happening / what might happen; natural ecosystems; agriculture; impacts on people; responses from ethics, art, literature; communication; daily life; policy; energy; and-pulling all the pieces together-the big picture. We have begun working on a new series of very short videos that can be combined in various ways to comprise focused, lively, accurate primers to what we all need to know about climate change. With college classrooms as our intended venue, we are looking at such topics as why the weather in your backyard tells you nothing about global climate change-but a good deal about climate; how tiny molecules warm the planet; how snowpack, drought, bark beetles, fire suppression, and wildfire interact as stress complexes; why (and where) women, children, and the poor are especially vulnerable to harm from climate change; what international policy negotiators argue about; what poets and artists can contribute to understanding and solving the climate problem; and why ecologists are worried about changes in the seasonal timing of natural events. We will describe what we have done and how we did it; offer a few tips to others who might wish to do something similar; and introduce our website.

  5. A history of the science and politics of climate change: the role of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

    SciTech Connect

    Bolin, B. [University of Stockholm, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-11-15

    In response to growing concern about human-induced global climate change, the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) was formed in 1988. Written by its first Chairman, this book is a unique overview of the history of the IPCC. It describes and evaluates the intricate interplay between key factors in the science and politics of climate change, the strategy that has been followed, and the regretfully slow pace in getting to grips with the uncertainties that have prevented earlier action being taken. The book also highlights the emerging conflict between establishing a sustainable global energy system and preventing a serious change in global climate. Contents are: Part I. The Early History of the Climate Change Issue: 1. Nineteenth century discoveries; 2. The natural carbon cycle and life on earth; 3. Global research initiatives in meteorology and climatology; 4. Early international assessments of climate change; Part II. The Climate Change Issue Becomes One of Global Concern: 5. Setting the stage; 6. The scientific basis for a climate convention; 7. Serving the Intergovernmental Negotiating Committee; 8. The Second IPP Assessment Report; 9. In the aftermath of the IPCC Second Assessment; 10. The Kyoto Protocol is agreed and a third assessment begun; 11. A decade of hesitance and slow progress; Part III. A Turning Point in Addressing Climate Change?: 12. Key scientific finding of prime political relevance; 13. Climate change and the future global energy supply system; Concluding remarks. 9 figs.

  6. Engaging the Public in Climate Change Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meymaris, K. K.; Henderson, S.; Alaback, P.; Havens, K.; Schwarz Ballard, J.

    2009-12-01

    Providing opportunities for individuals to contribute to a better understanding of climate change is the hallmark of Project BudBurst (www.budburst.org). This highly successful, national citizen science program, currently finishing its third year, is bringing climate change education outreach to thousands of individuals. Project BudBurst is a national citizen science initiative designed to engage the public in observations of phenological (life cycle) events that raise awareness of climate change, and create a cadre of informed citizen scientists. Citizen science programs such as Project BudBurst provide the opportunity for students and interested laypersons to actively participate in scientific research. Such programs are important not only from an educational perspective, but because they also enable scientists to broaden the geographic and temporal scale of their observations. The goals of Project BudBurst are to 1) increase awareness of phenology as an area of scientific study; 2) Increase awareness of the impacts of changing climates on plants; and 3) increase science literacy by engaging participants in the scientific process. In anticipation of the 2010 campaign, Project BudBurst has developed and released innovative and exciting projects with a special focus in the field of phenology and climate change. The collaborations between Project BudBurst and other organizations are producing unique campaigns for engaging the public in environmental research. The special project foci include on-the-spot and in-the-field data reporting via mobile phones, an emphasis on urban tree phenology data, as well as monitoring of native gardens across the US National Wildlife Refuge System. This presentation will provide an overview of Project Budburst and the new special projects, and share results from 2007-2009. Project BudBurst is managed by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, the Chicago Botanic Garden, and the University of Montana.

  7. Climate Change in the 20th and 21st Centuries

    SciTech Connect

    Washington, Warren (NCAR) [NCAR

    2006-04-19

    The NCAR Community Climate System Model and Parallel Climate Model have produced one the largest data sets for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and its fourth Assessment. There will be some discussion of what is in state-of-art climate models. As a result of this and other climate assessments, most of the climate research science community now believes that mankind is changing the earth's system and that global warming is taking place. The changes are not only reflected in terms of means but also extremes. The new IPCC research findings will be presented along with future computational challenges. It is expected that in the future there will be a need for both terascale and petascale computing, which will allow for higher resolution climate models that have embedded hurricanes and smaller scale weather features as well as viable biogeochemical cycles. Because of concerns of burning fossil fuels there will be special emphasis on better estimates of the Earth's carbon cycle, which is a special concern for the DOE. In order to perform future climate change simulations, the computational methods will necessarily undergo a reexamination. Finally, at the end of talk there will be a discussion of how climate model studies can aid in future policy options, some of which will address 'geoengineering' the climate system.

  8. Trees: Recorders of Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-03-30

    In this activity, learners are introduced to tree rings by examining a cross section of a tree, also known as a “tree cookie.” They discover how tree age can be determined by studying the rings and how ring thickness can be used to deduce times of optimal growing conditions. Next they investigate simulated tree rings by applying the scientific method to explore how climatic conditions varied during the Little Ice Age. Use this activity to begin discussions on global warming and climate change. This lesson guide includes background information and handouts. Note: cost of materials does not include cost of purchasing "tree cookies."

  9. A common-sense climate index: Is climate changing noticeably?

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, James; Sato, Makiko; Glascoe, Jay; Ruedy, Reto

    1998-01-01

    We propose an index of climate change based on practical climate indicators such as heating degree days and the frequency of intense precipitation. We find that in most regions the index is positive, the sense predicted to accompany global warming. In a few regions, especially in Asia and western North America, the index indicates that climate change should be apparent already, but in most places climate trends are too small to stand out above year-to-year variability. The climate index is strongly correlated with global surface temperature, which has increased as rapidly as projected by climate models in the 1980s. We argue that the global area with obvious climate change will increase notably in the next few years. But we show that the growth rate of greenhouse gas climate forcing has declined in recent years, and thus there is an opportunity to keep climate change in the 21st century less than “business-as-usual” scenarios. PMID:9539699

  10. A common-sense climate index: is climate changing noticeably?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, J.; Sato, M.; Glascoe, J.; Ruedy, R.

    1998-01-01

    We propose an index of climate change based on practical climate indicators such as heating degree days and the frequency of intense precipitation. We find that in most regions the index is positive, the sense predicted to accompany global warming. In a few regions, especially in Asia and western North America, the index indicates that climate change should be apparent already, but in most places climate trends are too small to stand out above year-to-year variability. The climate index is strongly correlated with global surface temperature, which has increased as rapidly as projected by climate models in the 1980s. We argue that the global area with obvious climate change will increase notably in the next few years. But we show that the growth rate of greenhouse gas climate forcing has declined in recent years, and thus there is an opportunity to keep climate change in the 21st century less than "business-as-usual" scenarios.

  11. Climate Science in a Nutshell: Climate Change Around the World?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Planet Nutshell

    This video is part of the Climate Science in a Nutshell video series. This short video looks at the effects of climate change happening right now around the globe, including: more extreme weather events, droughts, forest fires, land use changes, altered ranges of disease-carrying insects, and the loss of some agricultural products. It concludes with a discussion of the differences among weather, climate variability and climate change.

  12. Unit Plans: Earth's Climate Changes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jessica Fries-Gaither

    Unit plans for Grades K-2 and 3-5 are a regular feature of the magazine Beyond Weather and the Water Cycle. The plans draw on articles and resources in a themed issue and are aligned with national science and language arts standards. This unit is designed to provide elementary students with the opportunity to investigate how the annual rings in trees help scientists learn about past climates. It uses hands-on experiences and nonfiction text to answer the unit question: How do trees help scientists learn about the past?

  13. Terrestrial carbon cycle affected by non-uniform climate warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jianyang; Chen, Jiquan; Piao, Shilong; Ciais, Philippe; Luo, Yiqi; Wan, Shiqiang

    2014-03-01

    Feedbacks between the terrestrial carbon cycle and climate change could affect many ecosystem functions and services, such as food production, carbon sequestration and climate regulation. The rate of climate warming varies on diurnal and seasonal timescales. A synthesis of global air temperature data reveals a greater rate of warming in winter than in summer in northern mid and high latitudes, and the inverse pattern in some tropical regions. The data also reveal a decline in the diurnal temperature range over 51% of the global land area and an increase over only 13%, because night-time temperatures in most locations have risen faster than daytime temperatures. Analyses of satellite data, model simulations and in situ observations suggest that the impact of seasonal warming varies between regions. For example, spring warming has largely stimulated ecosystem productivity at latitudes between 30° and 90° N, but suppressed productivity in other regions. Contrasting impacts of day- and night-time warming on plant carbon gain and loss are apparent in many regions. We argue that ascertaining the effects of non-uniform climate warming on terrestrial ecosystems is a key challenge in carbon cycle research.

  14. Global Climate Change and Agriculture

    SciTech Connect

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.

    2009-01-01

    The Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change released in 2007 significantly increased our confidence about the role that humans play in forcing climate change. There is now a high degree of confidence that the (a) current atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) far exceed those of the pre-industrial era, (b) global increases in CO2 arise mainly from fossil fuel use and land use change while those of CH4 and N2O originate primarily from agricultural activities, and (c) the net effect of human activities since 1750 has led to a warming of the lower layers of the atmosphere, with an increased radiative forcing of 1.6 W m-2. Depending on the scenario of human population growth and global development, mean global temperatures could rise between 1.8 and 4.0 °C by the end of the 21st century.

  15. Ecological Restoration and Global Climate Change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James A. Harris; Richard J. Hobbs; Eric Higgs; James Aronson

    2006-01-01

    There is an increasing consensus that global climate change occurs and that potential changes in climate are likely to have important regional consequences for biota and ecosystems. Ecological restoration, including (re)- afforestation and rehabilitation of degraded land, is included in the array of potential human responses to cli- mate change. However, the implications of climate change for the broader practice

  16. Behavioral dimensions of climate change: drivers, responses,

    E-print Network

    Pedersen, Tom

    to cite this article: WIREs Clim Change 2011. doi: 10.1002/wcc.143 INTRODUCTION Climate changeOverview Behavioral dimensions of climate change: drivers, responses, barriers, and interventions of global climate change, reviews the behavioral and psychological responses to its impacts (including

  17. The greenhouse effect and climate change

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John F. B. Mitchell; J. F. B

    1989-01-01

    The physical basis of the projected changes in climate due to enhancement of the greenhouse effect is outlined. Gases important to the greenhouse effect are discussed as well as the expected changes in the concentration of greenhouse gases, potential climatic effects, and the ways of detecting changes in the climate. The potential warming due to man-made changes over the last

  18. TV Weathercasters as Climate Change Communicators

    E-print Network

    climate change "Early Adopter" Mike Nelson Chief Meteorologist, KMGH-TV Denver Global Warming and ColoradoTV Weathercasters as Climate Change Communicators Kris Wilson Ph.D. School of Journalism University Change: General Public Source: Leiserowitz, A., Maibach, E., & Roser-Renouf, C. (2010) Climate change

  19. Australian Government Department ofClimate Change

    E-print Network

    Hansen, James E.

    and carbon capture and storage, has been passed to the Minister for Climate Change and Water, Senator the Hon change one of its highest priorities. Australia's climate change policy is built on three pillarsAustralian Government Department ofClimate Change C08/7649 Mr James Hansen Columbia University 4405

  20. Climate Change: High Water Impacts and Adaptation

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Climate Change: High Water Impacts and Adaptation David S. Liebl and Kenneth W. Potter Co Development John Ramsden, Natural Resources Conservation Service Jon Schellpfeffer, Madison Metropolitan changes due to global climate change." ­ WICCI Stormwater Working Group #12;Future Climate Change What