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Sample records for cyclin d1 transcription

  1. Cyclin D1 transcriptional activation in MCL.

    PubMed

    Beà, Sílvia

    2014-03-27

    In this issue of Blood, Allinne et al propose the nucleolin-dependent activation of the translocated CCND1 allele in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) because of its relocalization to a transcriptionally favorable area in the perinucleolar region. PMID:24677400

  2. Cyclin D1 stimulation of estrogen receptor transcriptional activity independent of cdk4.

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, E; Ladha, M H; Lin, N; Upton, T M; Miller, S J; DiRenzo, J; Pestell, R G; Hinds, P W; Dowdy, S F; Brown, M; Ewen, M E

    1997-01-01

    Cyclin D1 plays an important role in the development of breast cancer and is required for normal breast cell proliferation and differentiation associated with pregnancy. We show that ectopic expression of cyclin D1 can stimulate the transcriptional activity of the estrogen receptor in the absence of estradiol and that this activity can be inhibited by 4-hydroxytamoxifen and ICI 182,780. Cyclin D1 can form a specific complex with the estrogen receptor. Stimulation of the estrogen receptor by cyclin D1 is independent of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 activation. Cyclin D1 may manifest its oncogenic potential in breast cancer in part through binding to the estrogen receptor and activation of the transcriptional activity of the receptor. PMID:9271411

  3. NF-{kappa}B p65 represses {beta}-catenin-activated transcription of cyclin D1

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, Injoo; Choi, Yong Seok; Jeon, Mi-Ya; Jeong, Sunjoo

    2010-12-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Cyclin D1 transcription is directly activated by {beta}-catenin; however, {beta}-catenin-induced cyclin D1 transcription is reduced by NF-{kappa}B p65. {yields} Protein-protein interaction between NF-{kappa}B p65 and {beta}-catenin might be responsible for p65-mediated repression of cyclin D1. {yields} One of five putative binding sites, located further upstream of other sites, is the major {beta}-catenin binding site in the cyclin D1 promoter. {yields} NF-{kappa}B binding site in cyclin D1 is occupied not only by p65 but also by {beta}-catenin, which is dynamically regulated by the signal. -- Abstract: Signaling crosstalk between the {beta}-catenin and NF-{kappa}B pathways represents a functional network. To test whether the crosstalk also occurs on their common target genes, the cyclin D1 promoter was used as a model because it contains binding sites for both proteins. {beta}-catenin activated transcription from the cyclin D1 promoter, while co-expression of NF-{kappa}B p65 reduced {beta}-catenin-induced transcription. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed lithium chloride-induced binding of {beta}-catenin on one of the T-cell activating factor binding sites. More interestingly, {beta}-catenin binding was greatly reduced by NF-{kappa}B p65, possibly by the protein-protein interaction between the two proteins. Such a dynamic and complex binding of {beta}-catenin and NF-{kappa}B on promoters might contribute to the regulated expression of their target genes.

  4. Telomerase activates transcription of cyclin D1 gene through an interaction with NOL1.

    PubMed

    Hong, Juyeong; Lee, Ji Hoon; Chung, In Kwon

    2016-04-15

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that is required for the maintenance of telomere repeats. Although overexpression of telomerase in normal human somatic cells is sufficient to overcome replicative senescence, the ability of telomerase to promote tumorigenesis requires additional activities that are independent of its role in telomere extension. Here, we identify proliferation-associated nucleolar antigen 120 (NOL1, also known as NOP2) as a telomerase RNA component (TERC)-binding protein that is found in association with catalytically active telomerase. Although NOL1 is highly expressed in the majority of human tumor cells, the molecular mechanism by which NOL1 contributes to tumorigenesis remained unclear. We show that NOL1 binds to the T-cell factor (TCF)-binding element of the cyclin D1 promoter and activates its transcription. Interestingly, telomerase is also recruited to the cyclin D1 promoter in a TERC-dependent manner through the interaction with NOL1, further enhancing transcription of the cyclin D1 gene. Depletion of NOL1 suppresses cyclin D1 promoter activity, thereby leading to induction of growth arrest and altered cell cycle distributions. Collectively, our findings suggest that NOL1 represents a new route by which telomerase activates transcription of cyclin D1 gene, thus maintaining cell proliferation capacity. PMID:26906424

  5. Synergistic cooperation of Sall4 and Cyclin D1 in transcriptional repression

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Johann; Kaiser, Frank J.; Borozdin, Wiktor; Depping, Reinhard; Kohlhase, Juergen . E-mail: jkohlhase@humangenetik-freiburg.de

    2007-05-11

    Loss of function mutations in SALL4 cause Okihiro syndrome, an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by radial ray malformations associated with Duane anomaly. In zebrafish and mouse Sall4 interacts with TBX5 during limb and heart development and plays a crucial role for embryonic stem (ES) cell pluripotency. Here we report the nuclear interaction of murine Sall4 with Cyclin D1, one of the main regulators of G{sub 1} to S phase transition in cell cycle, verified by yeast two-hybrid assay, co-immunoprecipitation and intracellular co-localisation. Furthermore, using luciferase reporter gene assays we demonstrate that Sall4 operates as a transcriptional repressor located to heterochromatin and that this activity is modulated by Cyclin D1.

  6. Arsenic trioxide-mediated growth inhibition in gallbladder carcinoma cells via down-regulation of Cyclin D1 transcription mediated by Sp1 transcription factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ai, Zhilong; Lu, Weiqi; Ton, Saixiong; Liu, Houbao; Sou, Tao; Shen, Zhenbin; Qin, Xinyu . E-mail: smc_jjh@yahoo.com.cn

    2007-08-31

    Gallbladder carcinoma (GBC), an aggressive and mostly lethal malignancy, is known to be resistant to a number of drug stimuli. Here, we demonstrated that arsenic trioxide inhibited the proliferation of gallbladder carcinoma in vivo and in vitro as well as the transcription of cell cycle-related protein Cyclin D1. And, Cyclin D1 overexpression inhibited the negative role of arsenic trioxide in cell cycle progression. We further explored the mechanisms by which arsenic trioxide affected Cyclin D1 transcription and found that the Sp1 transcription factor was down-regulated by arsenic trioxide, with a corresponding decrease in Cyclin D1 promoter activity. Taken together, these results suggested that arsenic trioxide inhibited gallbladder carcinoma cell proliferation via down-regulation of Cyclin D1 transcription in a Sp1-dependent manner, which provided a new mechanism of arsenic trioxide-involved cell proliferation and may have important therapeutic implications in gallbladder carcinoma patients.

  7. Cyclin D1 Is Transcriptionally Down-Regulated by ZO-2 via an E Box and the Transcription Factor c-Myc

    PubMed Central

    Huerta, Miriam; Muñoz, Rodrigo; Tapia, Rocío; Soto-Reyes, Ernesto; Ramírez, Leticia; Recillas-Targa, Félix; González-Mariscal, Lorenza

    2007-01-01

    Recent reports have indicated the participation of tight junction (TJ) proteins in the regulation of gene expression and cell proliferation. Here, we have studied the role of zona occludens (ZO)-2, a TJ peripheral protein, in the regulation of cyclin D1 transcription. We found that ZO-2 down-regulates cyclin D1 transcription in a dose-dependent manner. To understand how ZO-2 represses cyclin D1 promoter activity, we used deletion analyses and found that ZO-2 negatively regulates cyclin D1 transcription via an E box and that it diminishes cell proliferation. Because ZO-2 does not associate directly with DNA, electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay were used to identify the transcription factors mediating the ZO-2–repressive effect. c-Myc was found to bind the E box present in the cyclin D1 promoter, and the overexpression of c-Myc augmented the inhibition generated by ZO-2 transfection. The presence of ZO-2 and c-Myc in the same complex was further demonstrated by immunoprecipitation. ChIP and reporter gene assays using histone deacetylases (HDACs) inhibitors demonstrated that HDACs are necessary for ZO-2 repression and that HDAC1 is recruited to the E box. We conclude that ZO-2 down-regulates cyclin D1 transcription by interacting with the c-Myc/E box element and by recruiting HDAC1. PMID:17881732

  8. EF Hand Protein IBA2 Promotes Cell Proliferation in Breast Cancers via Transcriptional Control of Cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Shuling; Li, Lingsong

    2016-08-01

    EF hand (EFh) domain-containing proteins have been implicated in malignant progression, but their precise functional contributions are uncertain. Here, we report evidence that the EFh protein IBA2 promotes the proliferation of breast cancer cells by facilitating their transit through the G1-S cell-cycle transition. Mechanistic investigations revealed that IBA2 acted at the transcriptional level to promote the expression of the critical cell-cycle regulator cyclin D1. Clinically, we found that levels of IBA2 were significantly upregulated in breast cancer specimens, where its expression correlated positively with histologic grade. Our results suggest a key role for IBA2 in mammary tumorigenesis. Cancer Res; 76(15); 4535-45. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27262171

  9. Cyclin K and cyclin D1b are oncogenic in myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Aberrant expression of cyclin D1 is a common feature in multiple myeloma (MM) and always associated with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). CCND1 gene is alternatively spliced to produce two cyclin D1 mRNA isoforms which are translated in two proteins: cyclin D1a and cyclin D1b. Both isoforms are present in MM cell lines and primary cells but their relative role in the tumorigenic process is still elusive. Results To test the tumorigenic potential of cyclin D1b in vivo, we generated cell clones derived from the non-CCND1 expressing MM LP-1 cell line, synthesizing either cyclin D1b or cyclin K, a structural homolog and viral oncogenic form of cyclin D1a. Immunocompromised mice injected s.c. with LP-1K or LP-1D1b cells develop tumors at the site of injection. Genome-wide analysis of LP-1-derived cells indicated that several cellular processes were altered by cyclin D1b and/or cyclin K expression such as cell metabolism, signal transduction, regulation of transcription and translation. Importantly, cyclin K and cyclin D1b have no major action on cell cycle or apoptosis regulatory genes. Moreover, they impact differently cell functions. Cyclin K-expressing cells have lost their migration properties and display enhanced clonogenic capacities. Cyclin D1b promotes tumorigenesis through the stimulation of angiogenesis. Conclusions Our study indicates that cyclin D1b participates into MM pathogenesis via previously unrevealed actions. PMID:20459741

  10. Cyclin D1 expression in prostate carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, R.A.; Ravinal, R.C.; Costa, R.S.; Lima, M.S.; Tucci, S.; Muglia, V.F.; Reis, R.B. Dos; Silva, G.E.B.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cyclin D1 expression and clinicopathological parameters in patients with prostate carcinoma. We assessed cyclin D1 expression by conventional immunohistochemistry in 85 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy for prostate carcinoma and 10 normal prostate tissue samples retrieved from autopsies. We measured nuclear immunostaining in the entire tumor area and based the results on the percentage of positive tumor cells. The preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 8.68±5.16 ng/mL (mean±SD). Cyclin D1 staining was positive (cyclin D1 expression in >5% of tumor cells) in 64 cases (75.4%) and negative (cyclin D1 expression in ≤5% of tumor cells) in 21 cases (including 15 cases with no immunostaining). Normal prostate tissues were negative for cyclin D1. Among patients with a high-grade Gleason score (≥7), 86% of patients demonstrated cyclin D1 immunostaining of >5% (P<0.05). In the crude analysis of cyclin D1 expression, the high-grade Gleason score group showed a mean expression of 39.6%, compared to 26.9% in the low-grade Gleason score group (P<0.05). Perineural invasion tended to be associated with cyclin D1 expression (P=0.07), whereas cyclin D1 expression was not associated with PSA levels or other parameters. Our results suggest that high cyclin D1 expression could be a potential marker for tumor aggressiveness. PMID:24820071

  11. Consequence of the tumor-associated conversion to cyclin D1b

    PubMed Central

    Augello, Michael A; Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Carr, Richard; Yoshida, Akihiro; Dean, Jeffry L; Schiewer, Matthew J; Feng, Felix Y; Tomlins, Scott A; Gao, Erhe; Koch, Walter J; Benovic, Jeffrey L; Diehl, John Alan; Knudsen, Karen E

    2015-01-01

    Clinical evidence suggests that cyclin D1b, a variant of cyclin D1, is associated with tumor progression and poor outcome. However, the underlying molecular basis was unknown. Here, novel models were created to generate a genetic switch from cyclin D1 to cyclin D1b. Extensive analyses uncovered overlapping but non-redundant functions of cyclin D1b compared to cyclin D1 on developmental phenotypes, and illustrated the importance of the transcriptional regulatory functions of cyclin D1b in vivo. Data obtained identify cyclin D1b as an oncogene, wherein cyclin D1b expression under the endogenous promoter induced cellular transformation and further cooperated with known oncogenes to promote tumor growth in vivo. Further molecular interrogation uncovered unexpected links between cyclin D1b and the DNA damage/PARP1 regulatory networks, which could be exploited to suppress cyclin D1b-driven tumors. Collectively, these data are the first to define the consequence of cyclin D1b expression on normal cellular function, present evidence for cyclin D1b as an oncogene, and provide pre-clinical evidence of effective methods to thwart growth of cells dependent upon this oncogenic variant. PMID:25787974

  12. Post-transcriptional regulation of cyclins D1, D3 and G1 and proliferation of human cancer cells depend on IMP-3 nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Rivera Vargas, T; Boudoukha, S; Simon, A; Souidi, M; Cuvellier, S; Pinna, G; Polesskaya, A

    2014-05-29

    RNA-binding proteins of the IMP family (insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) mRNA-binding proteins 1-3) are important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Multiple studies have linked high expression of IMP proteins, and especially of IMP-3, to an unfavorable prognosis in numerous types of cancer. The specific importance of IMP-3 for cancer transformation remains poorly understood. We here show that all three IMPs can directly bind the mRNAs of cyclins D1, D3 and G1 (CCND1, D3 and G1) in vivo and in vitro, and yet only IMP-3 regulates the expression of these cyclins in a significant manner in six human cancer cell lines of different origins. In the absence of IMP-3, the levels of CCND1, D3 and G1 proteins fall dramatically, and the cells accumulate in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, leading to almost complete proliferation arrest. Our results show that, compared with IMP-1 and IMP-2, IMP-3 is enriched in the nucleus, where it binds the transcripts of CCND1, D3 and G1. The nuclear localization of IMP-3 depends on its protein partner HNRNPM and is indispensable for the post-transcriptional regulation of expression of the cyclins. Cytoplasmic retention of IMP-3 and HNRNPM in human cancer cells leads to significant drop in proliferation. In conclusion, a nuclear IMP-3-HNRNPM complex is important for the efficient synthesis of CCND1, D3 and G1 and for the proliferation of human cancer cells. PMID:23812426

  13. Hepatitis B Virus X Protein Stabilizes Cyclin D1 and Increases Cyclin D1 Nuclear Accumulation through ERK-Mediated Inactivation of GSK-3β.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiangmei; Zhang, Ling; Zheng, Sujun; Zhang, Ting; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xiaolei; Zeng, Zhenzhen; McCrae, Malcolm A; Zhao, Jingmin; Zhuang, Hui; Lu, Fengmin

    2015-05-01

    The Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) contributes centrally to the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It has been suggested that the transcriptional activation of cyclin D1 by HBx is implicated in the development of HCC. However, numerous studies have shown that overexpression of cyclin D1 alone is not sufficient to drive oncogenic transformation. Herein, we investigated whether HBx can stabilize cyclin D1 and induce cyclin D1 protein nuclear accumulation, and thereby accelerate hepatocarcinogenesis. The effects of HBx on cyclin D1 stabilization were assessed in cell-based transfection, Western blot, immunoprecipitation, immunocytofluorescence staining, and flow-cytometric assays. The results demonstrated that ectopic expression of HBx in HCC cells could extend the half-life of cyclin D1 protein from 40-60 minutes to 80-110 minutes. HBx stabilized cyclin D1 primarily in the S phase of the cell cycle, in a manner dependent on the inactivation of GSK-3β, which was mediated by ERK activation. HBx also prompted the nuclear accumulation of cyclin D1, and cotransfection of the constitutively active mutant of GSK-3β along with HBx could reverse the nuclear accumulation and subsequent cell proliferation induced by HBx. Further, a positive correlation between HBx and nuclear cyclin D1 level was established in HCC specimens detected by an immunohistochemical assay. Taken together, our results indicated that HBx could stabilize and increase cyclin D1 nuclear accumulation through ERK-mediated inactivation of GSK-3β. This HBx-induced cyclin D1 upregulation might play an important role in HCC development and progression. PMID:25712050

  14. Oncoprotein ZNF322A transcriptionally deregulates alpha-adducin, cyclin D1 and p53 to promote tumor growth and metastasis in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jen, J; Lin, L-L; Chen, H-T; Liao, S-Y; Lo, F-Y; Tang, Y-A; Su, W-C; Salgia, R; Hsu, C-L; Huang, H-C; Juan, H-F; Wang, Y-C

    2016-01-01

    ZNF322A encoding a classical Cys2His2 zinc finger transcription factor was previously revealed as a potential oncogene in lung cancer patients. However, the oncogenic role of ZNF322A and its underlying mechanism in lung tumorigenesis remain elusive. Here we show ZNF322A protein overexpression in 123 Asian and 74 Caucasian lung cancer patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that ZNF322A was an independent risk factor for a poor outcome in lung cancer, corroborating the Kaplan–Meier results that patients with ZNF322A protein overexpression had significantly poorer overall survival than other patients. Overexpression of ZNF322A promoted cell proliferation and soft agar growth by prolonging cell cycle in S phase in multiple lung cell lines, including the immortalized lung cell BEAS-2B. In addition, ZNF322A overexpression enhanced cell migration and invasion, whereas knockdown of ZNF322A reduced cell growth, invasion and metastasis abilities in vitro and in vivo. Quantitative proteomic analysis revealed potential ZNF322A-regulated downstream targets, including alpha-adducin (ADD1), cyclin D1 (CCND1), and p53. Using luciferase promoter activity assay combined with site-directed mutagenesis and sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR assay, we found that ZNF322A could form a complex with c-Jun and cooperatively activate ADD1 and CCND1 but repress p53 gene transcription by recruiting differential chromatin modifiers, such as histone deacetylase 3, in an AP-1 element dependent manner. Reconstitution experiments indicated that CCND1 and p53 were important to ZNF322A-mediated promotion of cell proliferation, whereas ADD1 was necessary for ZNF322A-mediated cell migration and invasion. Our results provide compelling evidence that ZNF322A overexpression transcriptionally dysregulates genes involved in cell growth and motility therefore contributes to lung tumorigenesis and poor prognosis. PMID:26279304

  15. Oncoprotein ZNF322A transcriptionally deregulates alpha-adducin, cyclin D1 and p53 to promote tumor growth and metastasis in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Jen, J; Lin, L-L; Chen, H-T; Liao, S-Y; Lo, F-Y; Tang, Y-A; Su, W-C; Salgia, R; Hsu, C-L; Huang, H-C; Juan, H-F; Wang, Y-C

    2016-05-01

    ZNF322A encoding a classical Cys2His2 zinc finger transcription factor was previously revealed as a potential oncogene in lung cancer patients. However, the oncogenic role of ZNF322A and its underlying mechanism in lung tumorigenesis remain elusive. Here we show ZNF322A protein overexpression in 123 Asian and 74 Caucasian lung cancer patients. Multivariate Cox regression analysis indicated that ZNF322A was an independent risk factor for a poor outcome in lung cancer, corroborating the Kaplan-Meier results that patients with ZNF322A protein overexpression had significantly poorer overall survival than other patients. Overexpression of ZNF322A promoted cell proliferation and soft agar growth by prolonging cell cycle in S phase in multiple lung cell lines, including the immortalized lung cell BEAS-2B. In addition, ZNF322A overexpression enhanced cell migration and invasion, whereas knockdown of ZNF322A reduced cell growth, invasion and metastasis abilities in vitro and in vivo. Quantitative proteomic analysis revealed potential ZNF322A-regulated downstream targets, including alpha-adducin (ADD1), cyclin D1 (CCND1), and p53. Using luciferase promoter activity assay combined with site-directed mutagenesis and sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR assay, we found that ZNF322A could form a complex with c-Jun and cooperatively activate ADD1 and CCND1 but repress p53 gene transcription by recruiting differential chromatin modifiers, such as histone deacetylase 3, in an AP-1 element dependent manner. Reconstitution experiments indicated that CCND1 and p53 were important to ZNF322A-mediated promotion of cell proliferation, whereas ADD1 was necessary for ZNF322A-mediated cell migration and invasion. Our results provide compelling evidence that ZNF322A overexpression transcriptionally dysregulates genes involved in cell growth and motility therefore contributes to lung tumorigenesis and poor prognosis. PMID:26279304

  16. Phosphorylation-dependent regulation of cyclin D1 nuclear export and cyclin D1–dependent cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Alt, Jodi R.; Cleveland, John L.; Hannink, Mark; Diehl, J. Alan

    2000-01-01

    GSK-3β-dependent phosphorylation of cyclin D1 at Thr-286 promotes the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic redistribution of cyclin D1 during S phase of the cell cycle, but how phosphorylation regulates redistribution has not been resolved. For example, phosphorylation of nuclear cyclin D1 could increase its rate of nuclear export relative to nuclear import; alternatively, phosphorylation of cytoplasmic cyclin D1 by GSK-3β could inhibit nuclear import. Here, we report that GSK-3β-dependent phosphorylation promotes cyclin D1 nuclear export by facilitating the association of cyclin D1 with the nuclear exportin CRM1. D1-T286A, a cyclin D1 mutant that cannot be phosphorylated by GSK-3β, remains nuclear throughout the cell cycle, a consequence of its reduced binding to CRM1. Constitutive overexpression of the nuclear cyclin D1-T286A in murine fibroblasts results in cellular transformation and promotes tumor growth in immune compromised mice. Thus, removal of cyclin D1 from the nucleus during S phase appears essential for regulated cell division. PMID:11124803

  17. Cyclin D1 splice variants: polymorphism, risk, and isoform specific regulation in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Comstock, Clay E.S.; Augello, Michael A.; Benito, Ruth Pe; Karch, Jason; Tran, Thai H.; Utama, Fransiscus E.; Tindall, Elizabeth A.; Wang, Ying; Burd, Craig J.; Groh, Eric M.; Hoang, Hoa N.; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Hayes, Vanessa M.; Henderson, Brian E.; Marchand, Loic Le; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Baffa, Raffaele; Gomella, Leonard G.; Knudsen, Erik S.; Rui, Hallgeir; Henshall, Susan M.; Sutherland, Robert L.; Knudsen, Karen E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Alternative CCND1 splicing results in cyclin D1b, which has specialized, pro-tumorigenic functions in prostate not shared by the cyclin D1a (full-length) isoform. Here, the frequency, tumor relevance, and mechanisms controlling cyclin D1b were challenged. Experimental Design First, relative expression of both cyclin D1 isoforms was determined in prostate adenocarcinomas. Second, relevance of the androgen axis was determined. Third, minigenes were created to interrogate the role of the G/A870 polymorphism (within the splice site), and findings validated in primary tissue. Fourth, impact of G/A870 on cancer risk was assessed in two large case-control studies. Results Cyclin D1b is induced in tumors, and a significant subset expressed this isoform in the absence of detectable cyclin D1a. Accordingly, the isoforms showed non-correlated expression patterns, and hormone status did not alter splicing. While G/A870 was not independently predictive of cancer risk, A870 predisposed for transcript-b production in cells and in normal prostate. The influence of A870 on overall transcript-b levels was relieved in tumors, indicating that aberrations in tumorigenesis likely alter the influence of the polymorphism. Conclusions These studies reveal that cyclin D1b is specifically elevated in prostate tumorigenesis. Cyclin D1b expression patterns are distinct from that observed with cyclin D1a. The A870 allele predisposes for transcript-b production in a context-specific manner. While A870 does not independently predict cancer risk, tumor cells can bypass the influence of the polymorphism. These findings have major implications for the analyses of D-cyclin function in the prostate, and provide the foundation for future studies directed at identifying potential modifiers of the G/A870 polymorphism. PMID:19706803

  18. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibits EGF-induced cell transformation via reduction of cyclin D1 mRNA stability

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jingjie; Ouyang, Weiming; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Dongyun; Yu, Yonghui; Wang, York; Li, Xuejun; Huang, Chuanshu

    2012-09-01

    Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) inhibiting cancer cell growth has been associated with its downregulation of cyclin D1 protein expression at transcription level or translation level. Here, we have demonstrated that SAHA inhibited EGF-induced Cl41 cell transformation via the decrease of cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. We found that SAHA treatment resulted in the dramatic inhibition of EGF-induced cell transformation, cyclin D1 protein expression and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest. Further studies showed that SAHA downregulation of cyclin D1 was only observed with endogenous cyclin D1, but not with reconstitutionally expressed cyclin D1 in the same cells, excluding the possibility of SAHA regulating cyclin D1 at level of protein degradation. Moreover, SAHA inhibited EGF-induced cyclin d1 mRNA level, whereas it did not show any inhibitory effect on cyclin D1 promoter-driven luciferase reporter activity under the same experimental conditions, suggesting that SAHA may decrease cyclin D1 mRNA stability. This notion was supported by the results that treatment of cells with SAHA decreased the half-life of cyclin D1 mRNA from 6.95 h to 2.57 h. Consistent with downregulation of cyclin D1 mRNA stability, SAHA treatment also attenuated HuR expression, which has been well-characterized as a positive regulator of cyclin D1 mRNA stability. Thus, our study identifies a novel mechanism responsible for SAHA inhibiting cell transformation via decreasing cyclin D1 mRNA stability and induction of G0/G1 growth arrest in Cl41 cells. -- Highlights: ► SAHA inhibits cell transformation in Cl41 cells. ► SAHA suppresses Cyclin D1 protein expression. ► SAHA decreases cyclin D1 mRNA stability.

  19. Paradoxical roles of cyclin D1 in DNA stability.

    PubMed

    Jirawatnotai, Siwanon; Sittithumcharee, Gunya

    2016-06-01

    Maintenance of DNA integrity is vital for all of the living organisms. Consequence of DNA damaging ranges from, introducing harmless synonymous mutations, to causing disease-associated mutations, genome instability, and cell death. A cell cycle protein cyclin D1 is an established cancer-driving protein. However, contribution of cyclin D1 to cancer formation and cancer survival is not entirely known. In cancer tissues, overexpression of cyclin D1 is associated with both cancer genome instability, and resistance to DNA-damaging cancer drugs. Emerging evidence indicated that cyclin D1 may play novel direct roles in regulating DNA repair. Here we provide an insight how cyclin D1 expression may contribute to DNA repair and chromosome instability, and how these functions may facilitate cancer formation, and drug resistance. PMID:27155130

  20. Cyclin D1 blocks the anti-proliferative function of RUNX3 by interfering with RUNX3-p300 interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Iwatani, Kazunori; Fujimoto, Tetsuhiro; Ito, Takaaki

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Cyclin D1 interacts with RUNX3 and inhibits the interaction and collaboration of RUNX3 with coactivator p300. {yields} Cyclin D1 blocks the ability of RUNX3 to induce the expression of cdk inhibitor p21. {yields} Cyclin D1 releases cancer cells from the inhibition of proliferation induced by RUNX3. -- Abstract: Transcriptional function of cyclin D1, whose deregulation is frequently observed in human cancers, has been suggested to contribute to cancer formation. In the present study, we show that cyclin D1 protein inhibits RUNX3 activity by directly binding to it and interfering with its interaction with p300 interaction in lung cancer cells. Cyclin D1 inhibits p300-dependent RUNX3 acetylation and negatively regulates cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) inhibitor p21 expression. These transcriptional effects of cyclin D1 do not require cdk4/6 kinase activation. We propose that cyclin D1 provides a transcriptional switch that allows the tumor suppressor activity of RUNX3 to be repressed in cancer cells. Since RUNX3 plays tumor suppressive roles in a wide range of cancers, a non-canonical cyclin D1 function may be critical for neoplastic transformation of the epithelial cells in which RUNX3 regulates proliferation.

  1. Expression of cyclin D1 correlates with malignancy in human ovarian tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, F.; Cagnoli, M.; Ragni, N.; Pedullà, F.; Foglia, G.; Alama, A.

    1997-01-01

    Cyclin D1 is a cell cycle regulator of G1 progression that has been suggested to play a relevant role in the pathogenesis of several human cancer types. In the current study, the expression of cyclin D1 has been investigated in a series of 33 patients, with benign (10 patients), borderline (five patients) and malignant (18 patients) ovarian disease. Cyclin D1 protein and mRNA content were analysed by Western blotting and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction respectively. The levels of cyclin D1 protein were undetectable in patients with benign disease, detectable in the majority of patients with borderline disease and elevated in those with ovarian carcinomas, being significantly related to the degree of malignancy (carcinoma vs benign, P = 0.0001; benign vs borderline, P = 0.0238). A significant relationship between cyclin D1 expression and tumour proliferative activity was also found (P = 0.000001). Moreover, eight benign lesions, two borderline tumours and 11 carcinomas proved to be suitable for the analysis of cyclin D1 transcript, and emerging data demonstrated significant agreement between protein abundance and mRNA expression. Results from the current study suggest that cyclin D1 expression is associated with the degree of transformation and most probably plays a role in the early development of ovarian malignancy. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9155044

  2. Identification of the cyclin D1b mRNA variant in mouse

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jack; Wu, Si-hung; Bollig, Aliccia; Thakur, Archana

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin D1 plays a key regulatory role during the G1 phase of the cell cycle and its gene is amplified and over-expressed in many cancers. The cyclin D1b mRNA variant was established in human cells and recent functional analyses revealed that its protein product harbors unique activities in human cancer cells. By performing reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) experiments, we identified the cyclin D1b mRNA variant in mouse. Similar to its human counterpart, the mouse cyclin D1b transcript consists of exon 1, 2, 3, 4 and part of intron 4, and contains a long open reading frame (ORF). The predicted peptide from this ORF is 34-amino acid longer than the human cyclin D1b. The expression of this mouse mRNA variant was investigated. It appears to be expressed ubiquitously and differentially in various mouse cell lines and tissues and its level might be proportional to that of the canonical endogenous cyclin D1a mRNA. PMID:18446443

  3. Cyclin D1-Cdk4 controls glucose metabolism independently of cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoonjin; Dominy, John E; Choi, Yoon Jong; Jurczak, Michael; Tolliday, Nicola; Camporez, Joao Paulo; Chim, Helen; Lim, Ji-Hong; Ruan, Hai-Bin; Yang, Xiaoyong; Vazquez, Francisca; Sicinski, Piotr; Shulman, Gerald I; Puigserver, Pere

    2014-06-26

    Insulin constitutes a principal evolutionarily conserved hormonal axis for maintaining glucose homeostasis; dysregulation of this axis causes diabetes. PGC-1α (peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α) links insulin signalling to the expression of glucose and lipid metabolic genes. The histone acetyltransferase GCN5 (general control non-repressed protein 5) acetylates PGC-1α and suppresses its transcriptional activity, whereas sirtuin 1 deacetylates and activates PGC-1α. Although insulin is a mitogenic signal in proliferative cells, whether components of the cell cycle machinery contribute to its metabolic action is poorly understood. Here we report that in mice insulin activates cyclin D1-cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4), which, in turn, increases GCN5 acetyltransferase activity and suppresses hepatic glucose production independently of cell cycle progression. Through a cell-based high-throughput chemical screen, we identify a Cdk4 inhibitor that potently decreases PGC-1α acetylation. Insulin/GSK-3β (glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta) signalling induces cyclin D1 protein stability by sequestering cyclin D1 in the nucleus. In parallel, dietary amino acids increase hepatic cyclin D1 messenger RNA transcripts. Activated cyclin D1-Cdk4 kinase phosphorylates and activates GCN5, which then acetylates and inhibits PGC-1α activity on gluconeogenic genes. Loss of hepatic cyclin D1 results in increased gluconeogenesis and hyperglycaemia. In diabetic models, cyclin D1-Cdk4 is chronically elevated and refractory to fasting/feeding transitions; nevertheless further activation of this kinase normalizes glycaemia. Our findings show that insulin uses components of the cell cycle machinery in post-mitotic cells to control glucose homeostasis independently of cell division. PMID:24870244

  4. Opposing action of estrogen receptors alpha and beta on cyclin D1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng-Min; Albanese, Chris; Anderson, Carol M; Hilty, Kristin; Webb, Paul; Uht, Rosalie M; Price, Richard H; Pestell, Richard G; Kushner, Peter J

    2002-07-01

    Induction of cyclin D1 gene transcription by estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) plays an important role in estrogen-mediated proliferation. There is no classical estrogen response element in the cyclin D1 promoter, and induction by ERalpha has been mapped to an alternative response element, a cyclic AMP-response element at -57, with possible participation of an activating protein-1 site at -954. The action of ERbeta at the cyclin D1 promoter is unknown, although evidence suggests that ERbeta may inhibit the proliferative action of ERalpha. We examined the response of cyclin D1 promoter constructs by luciferase assay and the response of the endogenous protein by Western blot in HeLa cells transiently expressing ERalpha, ERalphaK206A (a derivative that is superactive at alternative response elements), or ERbeta. In each case, ER activation at the cyclin D1 promoter is mediated by both the cyclic AMP-response element and the activating protein-1 site, which play partly redundant roles. The activation by ERbeta occurs only with antiestrogens. Estrogens, which activate cyclin D1 gene expression with ERalpha, inhibit expression with ERbeta. Strikingly, the presence of ERbeta completely inhibits cyclin D1 gene activation by estrogen and ERalpha or even by estrogen and the superactive ERalphaK206A. The observation of the opposing action and dominance of ERbeta over ERalpha in activation of cyclin D1 gene expression has implications for the postulated role of ERbeta as a modulator of the proliferative effects of estrogen. PMID:11986316

  5. Cyclin D1-CDK4 Controls Glucose Metabolism Independently of Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoonjin; Dominy, John E.; Choi, Yoon Jong; Jurczak, Michael; Tolliday, Nicola; Camporez, Joao Paulo; Chim, Helen; Lim, Ji-Hong; Ruan, Hai-Bin; Yang, Xiaoyong; Vazquez, Francisca; Sicinski, Piotr; Shulman, Gerald I.; Puigserver, Pere

    2014-01-01

    Insulin constitutes a major evolutionarily conserved hormonal axis for maintaining glucose homeostasis1-3; dysregulation of this axis causes diabetes2,4. PGC-1α links insulin signaling to the expression of glucose and lipid metabolic genes5-7. GCN5 acetylates PGC-1α and suppresses its transcriptional activity, whereas SIRT1 deacetylates and activates PGC-1α8,9. Although insulin is a mitogenic signal in proliferative cells10,11, whether components of the cell cycle machinery contribute to insulin’s metabolic action is poorly understood. Herein, we report that insulin activates cyclin D1-CDK4, which, in turn, increases GCN5 acetyltransferase activity and suppresses hepatic glucose production independently of cell cycle progression. Through a cell-based high throughput chemical screen, we identified a CDK4 inhibitor that potently decreases PGC-1α acetylation. Insulin/GSK3β signaling induces cyclin D1 protein stability via sequestering cyclin D1 in the nucleus. In parallel, dietary amino acids increase hepatic cyclin D1 mRNA transcripts. Activated cyclin D1-CDK4 kinase phosphorylates and activates GCN5, which then acetylates and inhibits PGC-1α activity on gluconeogenic genes. Loss of hepatic cyclin D1 results in increased gluconeogenesis and hyperglycemia. In diabetic models, cyclin D1-CDK4 is chronically elevated and refractory to fasting/feeding transitions; nevertheless further activation of this kinase normalizes glycemia. Our findings show that insulin uses components of the cell cycle machinery in post-mitotic cells to control glucose homeostasis independently of cell division. PMID:24870244

  6. Arsenic trioxide suppressed mantle cell lymphoma by downregulation of cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Lo, Rico K H; Kwong, Yok-Lam

    2014-02-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is aggressive with poor prognosis. Due to t(11;14)(q13;q32), cyclin D1 is overexpressed. The in vitro activities of arsenic trioxide (As2O3) in MCL were investigated. In MCL lines Jeko-1 and Granta-519, As2O3 induced dose-dependent and time-dependent increases in apoptosis accompanied by cyclin D1 suppression. Downregulation of cyclin D1 resulted in decreased retinoblastoma protein phosphorylation, which led to repressed G1 progression to S/G2 phases. As2O3 did not affect cyclin D1 gene transcription. Instead, As2O3 activated glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (by tyrosine-216 phosphorylation) and IkappaB kinase alpha/beta (by serine-176/180 phosphorylation), both of which phosphorylated cyclin D1 at threonine-286, leading to its poly-ubiquitination and degradation in the proteasome. These observations were recapitulated partly in primary MCL samples obtained from patients refractory to conventional treatment. Our findings suggested that As2O3 might be clinically useful in MCL. PMID:23949314

  7. Ral GTPases Contribute to Regulation of Cyclin D1 through Activation of NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Dale O.; Moskalenko, Serge A.; Kaur, Kiran J.; Fu, Maofu; Pestell, Richard G.; Camonis, Jacques H.; White, Michael A.

    2000-01-01

    Ral GTPases have been implicated as mediators of Ras-induced signal transduction from observations that Ral-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors associate with Ras and are activated by Ras. The cellular role of Ral family proteins is unclear, as is the contribution that Ral may make to Ras-dependent signaling. Here we show that expression of activated Ral in quiescent rodent fibroblasts is sufficient to induce activation of NF-κB-dependent gene expression and cyclin D1 transcription, two key convergence points for mitogenic and survival signaling. The regulation of cyclin D1 transcription by Ral is dependent on NF-κB activation and is mediated through an NF-κB binding site in the cyclin D1 promoter. Ral activation of these responses is likely through an as yet uncharacterized effector pathway, as we find activation of NF-κB and the cyclin D1 promoter by Ral is independent of association of Ral with active phospholipase D1 or Ral-binding protein 1, two proteins proposed to mediate Ral function in cells. PMID:11027278

  8. ATM is required for rapid degradation of cyclin D1 in response to {gamma}-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, Dong Wan; Baek, Hye Jung; Motoyama, Noboru; Cho, Kwan Ho; Kim, Hye Sun; Kim, Sang Soo

    2009-01-23

    The cellular response to DNA damage induced by {gamma}-irradiation activates cell-cycle arrest to permit DNA repair and to prevent replication. Cyclin D1 is the key molecule for transition between the G1 and S phases of the cell-cycle, and amplification or overexpression of cyclin D1 plays pivotal roles in the development of several human cancers. To study the regulation of cyclin D1 in the DNA-damaged condition, we analyzed the proteolytic regulation of cyclin D1 expression upon {gamma}-irradiation. Upon {gamma}-irradiation, a rapid reduction in cyclin D1 levels was observed prior to p53 stabilization, indicating that the stability of cyclin D1 is controlled in a p53-independent manner. Further analysis revealed that irradiation facilitated ubiquitination of cyclin D1 and that a proteasome inhibitor blocked cyclin D1 degradation under the same conditions. Interestingly, after mutation of threonine residue 286 of cyclin D1, which is reported to be the GSK-3{beta} phosphorylation site, the mutant protein showed resistance to irradiation-induced proteolysis although inhibitors of GSK-3{beta} failed to prevent cyclin D1 degradation. Rather, ATM inhibition markedly prevented cyclin D1 degradation induced by {gamma}-irradiation. Our data indicate that communication between ATM and cyclin D1 may be required for maintenance of genomic integrity achieved by rapid arrest of the cell-cycle, and that disruption of this crosstalk may increase susceptibility to cancer.

  9. Cyclin D1 promotes BRCA2-Rad51 interaction by restricting cyclin A/B-dependent BRCA2 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Chalermrujinanant, C; Michowski, W; Sittithumcharee, G; Esashi, F; Jirawatnotai, S

    2016-06-01

    BRCA2 has an important role in the maintenance of genome stability by interacting with RAD51 recombinase through its C-terminal domain. This interaction is abrogated by cyclin A-CDK2-mediated phosphorylation of BRCA2 at serine 3291 (Ser3291). Recently, we showed that cyclin D1 facilitates RAD51 recruitment to BRCA2-containing DNA repair foci, and that downregulation of cyclin D1 leads to inefficient homologous-mediated DNA repair. Here, we demonstrate that cyclin D1, via amino acids 20-90, interacts with the C-terminal domain of BRCA2, and that this interaction is increased in response to DNA damage. Interestingly, CDK4-cyclin D1 does not phosphorylate Ser3291. Instead, cyclin D1 bars cyclin A from the C-terminus of BRCA2, prevents cyclin A-CDK2-dependent Ser3291 phosphorylation and facilitates RAD51 binding to the C-terminal domain of BRCA2. These findings indicate that the interplay between cyclin D1 and other cyclins such as cyclin A regulates DNA integrity through RAD51 interaction with the BRCA2 C-terminal domain. PMID:26387543

  10. Osmotic stress regulates the stability of cyclin D1 in a p38SAPK2-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Casanovas, O; Miró, F; Estanyol, J M; Itarte, E; Agell, N; Bachs, O

    2000-11-10

    We report here that different cell stresses regulate the stability of cyclin D1 protein. Exposition of Granta 519 cells to osmotic shock, oxidative stress, and arsenite induced the post-transcriptional down-regulation of cyclin D1. In the case of osmotic shock, this effect was completely reversed by the addition of p38(SAPK2)-specific inhibitors (SB203580 or SB220025), indicating that this effect is dependent on p38(SAPK2) activity. Moreover, the use of proteasome inhibitors prevented this down-regulation. Thus, osmotic shock induces proteasomal degradation of cyclin D1 protein by a p38(SAPK2)-dependent pathway. The effect of p38(SAPK2) on cyclin D1 stability might be mediated by direct phosphorylation at specific sites. We found that p38(SAPK2) phosphorylates cyclin D1 in vitro at Thr(286) and that this phosphorylation triggers the ubiquitination of cyclin D1. These results link for the first time a stress-induced MAP kinase pathway to cyclin D1 protein stability, and they will help to understand the molecular mechanisms by which stress transduction pathways regulate the cell cycle machinery and take control over cell proliferation. PMID:10952989

  11. Direct Repression of Cyclin D1 by SIP1 Attenuates Cell Cycle Progression in Cells Undergoing an Epithelial Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Mejlvang, Jakob; Kriajevska, Marina; Vandewalle, Cindy; Chernova, Tatyana; Sayan, A. Emre; Berx, Geert; Mellon, J. Kilian

    2007-01-01

    Zinc finger transcription factors of the Snail/Slug and ZEB-1/SIP1 families control epithelial-mesenchymal transitions in development in cancer. Here, we studied SIP1-regulated mesenchymal conversion of epidermoid A431 cells. We found that concomitant with inducing invasive phenotype, SIP1 inhibited expression of cyclin D1 and induced hypophosphorylation of the Rb tumor suppressor protein. Repression of cyclin D1 was caused by direct binding of SIP1 to three sequence elements in the cyclin D1 gene promoter. By expressing exogenous cyclin D1 in A431/SIP1 cells and using RNA interference, we demonstrated that the repression of cyclin D1 gene by SIP1 was necessary and sufficient for Rb hypophosphorylation and accumulation of cells in G1 phase. A431 cells expressing SIP1 along with exogenous cyclin D1 were highly invasive, indicating that SIP1-regulated invasion is independent of attenuation of G1/S progression. However, in another epithelial-mesenchymal transition model, gradual mesenchymal conversion of A431 cells induced by a dominant negative mutant of E-cadherin produced no effect on the cell cycle. We suggest that impaired G1/S phase progression is a general feature of cells that have undergone EMT induced by transcription factors of the Snail/Slug and ZEB-1/SIP1 families. PMID:17855508

  12. Protocatechualdehyde possesses anti-cancer activity through downregulating cyclin D1 and HDAC2 in human colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Lee, Seong-Ho

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA enhanced transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA suppressed HDAC2 expression and activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These findings suggest that anti-cancer activity of PCA may be mediated by reducing HDAC2-derived cyclin D1 expression. -- Abstract: Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) is a naturally occurring polyphenol found in barley, green cavendish bananas, and grapevine leaves. Although a few studies reported growth-inhibitory activity of PCA in breast and leukemia cancer cells, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Thus, we performed in vitro study to investigate if treatment of PCA affects cell proliferation and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells and define potential mechanisms by which PCA mediates growth arrest and apoptosis of cancer cells. Exposure of PCA to human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116 and SW480 cells) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis in dose-dependent manner. PCA decreased cyclin D1 expression in protein and mRNA level and suppressed luciferase activity of cyclin D1 promoter, indicating transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene by PCA. We also observed that PCA treatment attenuated enzyme activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and reduced expression of HDAC2, but not HDAC1. These findings suggest that cell growth inhibition and apoptosis by PCA may be a result of HDAC2-mediated cyclin D1 suppression.

  13. Down-regulation of hTERT and Cyclin D1 transcription via PI3K/Akt and TGF-β pathways in MCF-7 Cancer cells with PX-866 and Raloxifene.

    PubMed

    Peek, Gregory W; Tollefsbol, Trygve O

    2016-05-15

    Human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is the catalytic and limiting component of telomerase and also a transcription factor. It is critical to the integrity of the ends of linear chromosomes and to the regulation, extent and rate of cell cycle progression in multicellular eukaryotes. The level of hTERT expression is essential to a wide range of bodily functions and to avoidance of disease conditions, such as cancer, that are mediated in part by aberrant level and regulation of cell cycle proliferation. Value of a gene in regulation depends on its ability to both receive input from multiple sources and transmit signals to multiple effectors. The expression of hTERT and the progression of the cell cycle have been shown to be regulated by an extensive network of gene products and signaling pathways, including the PI3K/Akt and TGF-β pathways. The PI3K inhibitor PX-866 and the competitive estrogen receptor ligand raloxifene have been shown to modify progression of those pathways and, in combination, to decrease proliferation of estrogen receptor positive (ER+) MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We found that combinations of modulators of those pathways decreased not only hTERT transcription but also transcription of additional essential cell cycle regulators such as Cyclin D1. By evaluating known expression profile signatures for TGF-β pathway diversions, we confirmed additional genes such as heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB EGF) by which those pathways and their perturbations may also modify cell cycle progression. PMID:27017931

  14. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibition by the KLF6 tumor suppressor protein through interaction with cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Benzeno, Sharon; Narla, Goutham; Allina, Jorge; Cheng, George Z; Reeves, Helen L; Banck, Michaela S; Odin, Joseph A; Diehl, J Alan; Germain, Doris; Friedman, Scott L

    2004-06-01

    Kruppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) is a tumor suppressor gene inactivated in prostate and colon cancers, as well as in astrocytic gliomas. Here, we establish that KLF6 mediates growth inhibition through an interaction with cyclin D1, leading to reduced phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) at Ser(795). Furthermore, introduction of KLF6 disrupts cyclin D1-cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) 4 complexes and forces the redistribution of p21(Cip/Kip) onto cdk2, which promotes G(1) cell cycle arrest. Our data suggest that KLF6 converges with the Rb pathway to inhibit cyclin D1/cdk4 activity, resulting in growth suppression. PMID:15172998

  15. Cyclin D1 and Ewing's sarcoma/PNET: A microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Fagone, Paolo; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Salvatorelli, Lucia; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Magro, Gaetano

    2015-10-01

    Recent immunohistochemical analyses have showed that cyclin D1 is expressed in soft tissue Ewing's sarcoma/peripheral neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) of childhood and adolescents, while it is undetectable in both embryonal and alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. In the present paper, microarray analysis provided evidence of a significant upregulation of cyclin D1 in Ewing's sarcoma as compared to normal tissues. In addition, we confirmed our previous findings of a significant over-expression of cyclin D1 in Ewing sarcoma as compared to rhabdomyosarcoma. Bioinformatic analysis also allowed to identify some other genes, strongly correlated to cyclin D1, which, although not previously studied in pediatric tumors, could represent novel markers for the diagnosis and prognosis of Ewing's sarcoma/PNET. The data herein provided support not only the use of cyclin D1 as a diagnostic marker of Ewing sarcoma/PNET but also the possibility of using drugs targeting cyclin D1 as potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:26363896

  16. Immunohistological recognition of cyclin D1 expression by non-lymphoid cells among lymphoid neoplastic cells.

    PubMed

    Abdulla, Zainalabideen; Turley, Helen; Gatter, Kevin; Pezzella, Francesco

    2014-03-01

    Cyclin D1 immunostaining of non-neoplastic cells has been a source of diagnostic confusion especially in lymphoproliferative lesions. This study has reviewed these in two hundred and thirty-one haematopathological samples stained for cyclin D1. Most cases were formalin-fixed except for a few bone marrow trephines, which were B-5 fixed, and EDTA decalcified. Overall, 94% (216/231) of cases showed one or more types of non-neoplastic cells expressing Cyclin D1 of variable intensity. Endothelial cells and histiocytes were the most commonly identified Cyclin D1 positive cells being positive in 92% (214/231) of cases. Other normal cell types identified included fat cells, stromal fibroblasts, glial cells, spermatocytes, smooth muscle cells, osteoblasts and where present epithelial cells. Many normal cell types can express cyclinD1. Knowledge of these is useful to prevent misinterpretation of cyclin D1 positive tumours. PMID:23758159

  17. Cyclin D1b overexpression inhibits cell proliferation and induces cell apoptosis in cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ning; Wei, Heng; Yin, Duo; Lu, Yanming; Zhang, Yao; Jiang, Di; Jiang, Yan; Zhang, Shulan

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin D1b is one of two proteins translated from cyclin D1 transcripts (isoforms a and b) that are generated due to gene polymorphism. Our previous study has reported low cyclin D1b expression in cervical cancer tissue, with an expression level in moderately or poorly differentiated tissues that was significantly lower than that in well-differentiated tissues. However, the functional role of cyclin D1b in cervical cancer remains to be elucidated. In this study, using a cervical cancer cell line with stable expression of cyclin D1b, we found that upregulation of cyclin D1b initiated cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and induced apoptosis, thereby inhibiting cell proliferation and colony formation. Furthermore, xenograft transplantation experiments in nude mice demonstrated that cyclin D1b upregulation inhibited cancer growth and induce apoptosis in vivo. In conclusion, the present study indicates anti-tumor effects of cyclin D1b in cervical cancer, suggesting that cyclin D1b may represent a potential therapeutic target for cervical cancer. PMID:25120779

  18. The regulation of cyclin D1 degradation: roles in cancer development and the potential for therapeutic invention

    PubMed Central

    Alao, John P

    2007-01-01

    Cyclin D1 is an important regulator of cell cycle progression and can function as a transcriptionl co-regulator. The overexpression of cyclin D1 has been linked to the development and progression of cancer. Deregulated cyclin D1 degradation appears to be responsible for the increased levels of cyclin D1 in several cancers. Recent findings have identified novel mechanisms involved in the regulation of cyclin D1 stability. A number of therapeutic agents have been shown to induce cyclin D1 degradation. The therapeutic ablation of cyclin D1 may be useful for the prevention and treatment of cancer. In this review, current knowledge on the regulation of cyclin D1 degradation is discussed. Novel insights into cyclin D1 degradation are also discussed in the context of ablative therapy. A number of unresolved questions regarding the regulation of cellular cyclin D1 levels are also addressed. PMID:17407548

  19. [Pronostic value of the immunohistochemical expression of cyclin D1 (DCS6) in epidermoid larynx carcinoma].

    PubMed

    García Lozano, M C; Orradre Romero, J L; Sánchez Carrión, S; Caro Garcia, M; Lasso Luis, O; Piris Pinilla, M A

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we carried out an immunohistochemical study of cyclin D1 (DCS6 ) expression in a series of 195 patients with laryngeal carcinoma that were diagnosticated, treated and followed at the Department of Otolaryngology at "Virgen de la Salud" Hospital (Toledo, Spain) for a time of 5 years. In the cases with lymph node metastasis we also studied cyclin D1 expression at this level. Furthermore we have analysed the value of cyclin D1 expression as a prognostic factor (tumor recurrence, deads due to cancer and survival) and we evaluate the relationship between cyclin D1 expression and other clinic and pathologic parameters. PMID:16881553

  20. Schizophrenia susceptibility gene product dysbindin-1 regulates the homeostasis of cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hidenori; Morishita, Rika; Nagata, Koh-Ichi

    2016-08-01

    Dysbindin-1 (dystrobrevin binding protein-1, DTNBP1) is now widely accepted as a potential schizophrenia susceptibility gene and accumulating evidence indicates its functions in the neural development. In this study, we tried to identify new binding partners for dysbindin-1 to clarify the novel function of this molecule. When consulted with BioGRID protein interaction database, cyclin D3 was found to be a possible binding partner for dysbindin-1. We then examined the interaction between various dysbindin-1 isoforms (dysbindin-1A, -1B and -1C) and all three D-type cyclins (cyclin D1, D2, and D3) by immunoprecipitation with the COS7 cell expression system, and found that dysbindin-1A preferentially interacts with cyclin D1. The mode of interaction between these molecules was considered as direct binding since recombinant dysbindin-1A and cyclin D1 formed a complex in vitro. Mapping analyses revealed that the C-terminal region of dysbindin-1A binds to the C-terminal of cyclin D1. Consistent with the results of the biochemical analyses, endogenous dysbindin-1was partially colocalized with cyclin D1 in NIH3T3 fibroblast cells and in neuronal stem and/or progenitor cells in embryonic mouse brain. While co-expression of dysbindin-1A with cyclin D1 changed the localization of the latter from the nucleus to cytosol, cyclin D1-binding partner CDK4 inhibited the dysbindin-cyclin D1 interaction. Meanwhile, depletion of endogenous dysbindin-1A increased cyclin D1 expression. These results indicate that dysbindin-1A may control the cyclin D1 function spatiotemporally and might contribute to better understanding of the pathophysiology of dysbindin-1-associated disorders. PMID:27130439

  1. Cytoplasmic sequestration of cyclin D1 associated with cell cycle withdrawal of neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sumrejkanchanakij, Piyamas; Eto, Kazuhiro; Ikeda, Masa-Aki . E-mail: mikeda.emb@tmd.ac.jp

    2006-02-03

    The regulation of D-type cyclin-dependent kinase activity is critical for neuronal differentiation and apoptosis. We recently showed that cyclin D1 is sequestered in the cytoplasm and that its nuclear localization induces apoptosis in postmitotic primary neurons. Here, we further investigated the role of the subcellular localization of cyclin D1 in cell cycle withdrawal during the differentiation of N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells. We show that cyclin D1 became predominantly cytoplasmic after differentiation. Targeting cyclin D1 expression to the nucleus induced phosphorylation of Rb and cdk2 kinase activity. Furthermore, cyclin D1 nuclear localization promoted differentiated N1E-115 cells to reenter the cell cycle, a process that was inhibited by p16{sup INK4a}, a specific inhibitor of D-type cyclin activity. These results indicate that cytoplasmic sequestration of cyclin D1 plays a role in neuronal cell cycle withdrawal, and suggests that the abrogation of machinery involved in monitoring aberrant nuclear cyclin D1 activity contributes to neuronal tumorigenesis.

  2. Cyclin D1 as a universally expressed mantle cell lymphoma-associated tumor antigen for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, M; Sun, L; Qian, J; Han, X; Zhang, L; Lin, P; Cai, Z; Yi, Q

    2009-07-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) accounts for 5-10% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas and has the worst prognosis among all lymphomas. The hallmark of MCL is a t(11;14) translocation that results in overexpression of cyclin D1 by tumor cells of virtually all patients. In this study, we examined whether cyclin D1 could be an effective tumor-associated antigen for immunotherapy. We identified cyclin D1 peptides for HLA-A(*)0201 and generated peptide-specific CD8(+) T-cell lines from HLA-A(*)0201(+) blood donors and MCL patients. These cell lines proliferated in response to cyclin D1 peptide-pulsed stimulatory cells. Moreover, the T cells efficiently lysed peptide-pulsed but not unpulsed T2 cells and autologous dendritic cells; cyclin D1(+) and HLA-A(*)0201(+) human MCL lines MINO, SP53, Jeko-1 and Granta 519; and more importantly, HLA-A(*)0201(+) primary lymphoma cells from MCL patients. No killing was observed with HLA-A(*)0201(-) primary lymphoma cells or HLA-A(*)0201(+) normal blood cells, including B cells. These results indicate that these T cells are potent cytotoxic T cells and recognize cyclin D1 peptides naturally presented by patient lymphoma cells in the context of HLA-A(*)0201 molecules. Taken together, our work identifies cyclin D1 as a potentially important antigen for immunotherapy of MCL. PMID:19225534

  3. Cooperation between Dmp1 Loss and Cyclin D1 Overexpression in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Sinan; Mott, Ryan T.; Fry, Elizabeth A.; Taneja, Pankaj; Kulik, George; Sui, Guangchao; Inoue, Kazushi

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin D1 is a component of the core cell-cycle machinery and is frequently overexpressed in breast cancer. It physically interacts with the tumor suppressor Dmp1 that attenuates the oncogenic signals from Ras and HER2 by inducing Arf/p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest. Currently, the biological significance of Dmp1–cyclin D1 interplay in breast cancer has not been determined. Here, we show that cyclin D1 bound to Dmp1 to activate both Arf and Ink4a promoters and, consequently, induced apoptosis or G2/M cell-cycle delay in normal cells to protect them from neoplastic transformation. The cyclin D1–induced Ink4a/Arf gene expression was dependent on Dmp1 because the induction was not detected in Dmp1-deficient or DMP1-depleted cells. Arf/Ink4a expression was increased in pre-malignant mammary glands from Dmp1+/+;MMTV-cyclin D1 and Dmp1+/+;MMTV-D1T286A mice but significantly down-regulated in those from Dmp1-deficient mice. Selective Dmp1 deletion was found in 21% of the MMTV-D1 and D1T286A mammary carcinomas, and the Dmp1 heterozygous status significantly accelerated mouse mammary tumorigenesis with reduced apoptosis and increased metastasis. Overall, our study reveals a pivotal role of combined Dmp1 loss and cyclin D1 overexpression in breast cancer. PMID:23938323

  4. Structural Basis for the Modulation of CDK-Dependent/Independent Activity of Cyclin D1

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Dupuy, Jérôme; Borel, Franck; Jacquamet, Lilian; Noel, Joseph P.; Dulic, Vjekoslav

    2010-01-01

    D-type cyclins are key regulators of the cell division cycle. In association with Cyclin Dependent Kinases (CDK) 2/4/6, they control the G1/S-phase transition in part by phosphorylation and inactivation of tumor suppressor of retinoblastoma family. Defective regulation of the G1/S transition is a well-known cause of cancer, making the cyclin D1-CDK4/6 complex a promising therapeutic target. Our objective is to develop inhibitors that would block the formation or the activation of the cyclin D1-CDK4/6 complex, using in silico docking experiments on a structural homology model of the cyclin D1-CDK4/6 complex. To this end we focused on the cyclin subunit in three different ways: (1) targeting the part of the cyclin D1 facing the N-terminal domain of CDK4/6, in order to prevent the dimer formation; (2) targeting the part of the cyclin D1 facing the C-terminal domain of CDK4/6, in order to prevent the activation of CDK4/6 by blocking the T-loop in an inactive conformation, and also to destabilize the dimer; (3) targeting the groove of cyclin D1 where p21 binds, in order to mimic its inhibition mode by preventing binding of cyclin D1-CDK4/6 complex to its targets. Our strategy, and the tools we developed, will provide a computational basis to design lead compounds for novel cancer therapeutics, targeting a broad range of proteins involved in the regulation of the cell cycle. PMID:17172845

  5. Silymarin induces cyclin D1 proteasomal degradation via its phosphorylation of threonine-286 in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Eo, Hyun Ji; Park, Gwang Hun; Song, Hun Min; Lee, Jin Wook; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Lee, Man Hyo; Lee, Jeong Rak; Koo, Jin Suk; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2015-01-01

    Silymarin from milk thistle (Silybum marianum) plant has been reported to show anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and hepatoprotective effects. For anti-cancer activity, silymarin is known to regulate cell cycle progression through cyclin D1 downregulation. However, the mechanism of silymarin-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation still remains unanswered. The current study was performed to elucidate the molecular mechanism of cyclin D1 downregulation by silymarin in human colorectal cancer cells. The treatment of silymarin suppressed the cell proliferation in HCT116 and SW480 cells and decreased cellular accumulation of exogenously-induced cyclin D1 protein. However, silymarin did not change the level of cyclin D1 mRNA. Inhibition of proteasomal degradation by MG132 attenuated silymarin-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation and the half-life of cyclin D1 was decreased in the cells treated with silymarin. In addition, silymarin increased phosphorylation of cyclin D1 at threonine-286 and a point mutation of threonine-286 to alanine attenuated silymarin-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation. Inhibition of NF-κB by a selective inhibitor, BAY 11-7082 suppressed cyclin D1 phosphorylation and downregulation by silymarin. From these results, we suggest that silymarin-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation may result from proteasomal degradation through its threonine-286 phosphorylation via NF-κB activation. The current study provides new mechanistic link between silymarin, cyclin D1 downregulation and cell growth in human colorectal cancer cells. PMID:25479723

  6. RNA Inhibition Highlights Cyclin D1 as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Shiri; Emmanuel, Rafi; Jacobi, Ashley M.; Abraham, Avigdor; Behlke, Mark A.; Sprague, Andrew G.; Novobrantseva, Tatiana I.; Nagler, Arnon; Peer, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is characterized by a genetic translocation results in aberrant overexpression of the CCND1 gene, which encodes cyclin D1. This protein functions as a regulator of the cell cycle progression, hence is considered to play an important role in the pathogenesis of the disease. In this study, we used RNA interference strategies to examine whether cyclin D1 might serve as a therapeutic target for mantle cell lymphoma. Knocking down cyclin D1 resulted in significant growth retardation, cell cycle arrest, and most importantly, induction of apoptosis. These results mark cyclin D1 as a target for mantle cell lymphoma and emphasize the therapeutic potential hidden in its silencing. PMID:22905260

  7. HIV-1 expression induces cyclin D1 expression and pRb phosphorylation in infected podocytes: cell-cycle mechanisms contributing to the proliferative phenotype in HIV-associated nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Peter J; Sunamoto, Masaaki; Husain, Mohammad; Gelman, Irwin H

    2002-01-01

    Background The aberrant cell-cycle progression of HIV-1-infected kidney cells plays a major role in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated nephropathy, however the mechanisms whereby HIV-1 induces infected glomerular podocytes or infected tubular epithelium to exit quiescence are largely unknown. Here, we ask whether the expression of HIV-1 genes in infected podocytes induces cyclin D1 and phospho-pRb (Ser780) expression, hallmarks of cyclin D1-mediated G1 → S phase progression. Results We assessed cyclin D1 and phospho-pRb (Ser780) expression in two well-characterized models of HIV-associated nephropathy pathogenesis: HIV-1 infection of cultured podocytes and HIV-1 transgenic mice (Tg26). Compared to controls, cultured podocytes expressing HIV-1 genes, and podocytes and tubular epithelium from hyperplastic nephrons in Tg26 kidneys, had increased levels of phospho-pRb (Ser780), a target of active cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase-4/6 known to promote G1 → S phase progression. HIV-1-infected podocytes showed markedly elevated cyclin D1 mRNA and cyclin D1 protein, the latter of which did not down-regulate during cell-cell contact or differentiation, suggesting post-transcriptional stabilization of cyclin D1 protein levels by HIV-1. The selective suppression of HIV-1 transcription by the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, flavopiridol, abrogated cyclin D1 expression, underlying the requirement for HIV-1 encoded products to induce cyclin D1. Indeed, HIV-1 virus deleted of nef failed to induce cyclin D1 mRNA to the level of other single gene mutant viruses. Conclusions HIV-1 expression induces cyclin D1 and phospho-pRb (Ser780) expression in infected podocytes, suggesting that HIV-1 activates cyclin D1-dependent cell-cycle mechanisms to promote proliferation of infected renal epithelium. PMID:12241561

  8. Oct-1 Potentiates CREB-Driven Cyclin D1 Promoter Activation via a Phospho-CREB- and CREB Binding Protein-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Boulon, Séverine; Dantonel, Jean-Christophe; Binet, Virginie; Vié, Annick; Blanchard, Jean-Marie; Hipskind, Robert A.; Philips, Alexandre

    2002-01-01

    Cyclin D1, the regulatory subunit for mid-G1 cyclin-dependent kinases, controls the expression of numerous cell cycle genes. A cyclic AMP-responsive element (CRE), located upstream of the cyclin D1 mRNA start site, integrates mitogenic signals that target the CRE-binding factor CREB, which can recruit the transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP). We describe an alternative mechanism for CREB-driven cyclin D1 induction that involves the ubiquitous POU domain protein Oct-1. In the breast cancer cell line MCF-7, overexpression of Oct-1 or its POU domain strongly increases transcriptional activation of cyclin D1 and GAL4 reporter genes that is specifically dependent upon CREB but independent of Oct-1 DNA binding. Gel retardation and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirm that POU forms a complex with CREB bound to the cyclin D1 CRE. In solution, CREB interaction with POU requires the CREB Q2 domain and, notably, occurs with CREB that is not phosphorylated on Ser 133. Accordingly, Oct-1 also potently enhances transcriptional activation mediated by a Ser133Ala CREB mutant. Oct-1/CREB synergy is not diminished by the adenovirus E1A 12S protein, a repressor of CBP coactivator function. In contrast, E1A strongly represses CBP-enhanced transactivation by CREB phosphorylated on Ser 133. Our observation that Oct-1 potentiates CREB-dependent cyclin D1 transcriptional activity independently of Ser 133 phosphorylation and E1A-sensitive coactivator function offers a new paradigm for the regulation of cyclin D1 induction by proliferative signals. PMID:12391146

  9. Expression of Cyclin D1 and P16 in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Biswajit; Raphael, Vandana; Khonglah, Yookarin; GiriLynrah, Kyrshanlang

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the lethal cancers with a high incidence rate in Asia. Many genes including cyclin D1 and p16 play important role in its carcinogenesis. We aimed to analyze the expressions of cyclin D1 and p16 with the various clinicopathological characteristics of ESCC. METHODS We examined 30 biopsy samples of ESCC for cyclin D1 and p16 protein expressions using immunohistochemistry. Immunointensity was classified as no immunostaining (-), weakly immunostaining (+), weak immunostaining (++) and strongly positive immunostaining (+++). RESULTS Out of the 30 cases, positive expression of cyclin D1 was detected in 26 cases (86.7%). The percentage of tumors with invasion to the adventitia (88.2%), lymph node metastasis (87.5%), and tumors which were poorly differentiated (92.9%) were higher in cyclin D1 positive tumors than in the cyclin D1 negative tumors. However no significant association was found between cyclin D1 expression and the different clinicopathological parameters.There were 22 cases of ESCC (73.3 %) which showed negativity for p16. The percentage of tumors with invasion to the adventitia (82.4%) and poorly differentiated tumors (92.9%) were higher in the p16 negative tumors than in the p16 positive tumors. There was significant association between the histological grade and p16 expression (p=0.012). However, there were no significant association with regard to site, size and lymph node status of the tumors and p16 expression. CONCLUSION The study shows that alterations of cyclin D1 and p16 play an important role in ESCC. Loss of p16 expression was associated with poor differentiation. PMID:26609350

  10. Coexpression of cyclin D1 and alpha-internexin in oligodendroglial tumors.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Nozomi; Nobusawa, Sumihito; Ikota, Hayato; Hirato, Junko; Hirose, Takanori; Yokoo, Hideaki; Nakazato, Yoichi

    2015-10-01

    Oligodendroglial tumors with neuronal differentiation cases have been reported in recent studies. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) give rise to both oligodendrocytes and neurons; however, little is known about the association between OPCs and oligodendroglial tumors with neuronal differentiation. Previously, we observed the coexpression of cyclin D1, one of the OPC markers, and alpha-internexin (INA) in oligodendroglial tumor cells. INA is a neuronal marker, and has been indicated as an immunohistochemical surrogate of chromosome 1p/19q co-deletion in oligodendroglial tumors. In this study, we investigated the expression status in 83 gliomas immunohistochemically, and found that cyclin D1-positive cells were commonly detected in gliomas. There was no correlation between the cyclin D1 and Ki-67 labeling indices, suggesting an unrecognized role of cyclin D1 other than a cell cycle regulator in gliomas. Cyclin D1/INA double-positive cells were consistently observed in oligodendroglial tumors regardless of histological grade. In 2 cases of oligodendroglioma with neuronal differentiation, the tumor cells of neuronal morphology showed higher expression of INA, suggesting INA expression may be associated with a bona fide neuronal phenotype. The prevalence of cyclin D1/INA double-positive cells is a distinct feature of oligodendroglial tumors. This new characteristic finding may have practical utility in glioma classification. PMID:26233522

  11. Expression of the retinoblastoma protein in low-grade B-cell lymphoma: relationship to cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Zukerberg, L R; Benedict, W F; Arnold, A; Dyson, N; Harlow, E; Harris, N L

    1996-07-01

    The product of the retinoblastoma tumor-suppressor gene (pRB), a nuclear phosphoprotein that regulates transcription factors such as E2F, is involved in cell cycle control and differentiation. Its activity is regulated by phosphorylation; the underphosphorylated form inhibits transcription whereas the highly phosphorylated form is inactive. Cyclin D1 and its associated kinase (CDK 4/6) phosphorylate pRB in vitro, and therefore are thought to contribute to the regulation of pRB function. To examine the effect of cyclin D1 overexpression on pRB in primary tumor tissue, we studied pRB expression in low-grade B-cell neoplasms, with particular regard to mantle cell lymphoma, which is characterized by cyclin D1 (bcl-1) overexpression. pRB expression was studied by immunostaining with a well-characterized anti-pRB antibody; the phosphorylation status of pRB was examined by immunoblots; and the functional binding capacity of pRB was examined by in vitro binding to adenovirus E1A protein. We studied 3 reactive lymph nodes, 28 low grade B-cell lymphomas, 4 cases of hairy cell leukemia (HCL) and 3 plasmacytomas. Reactive lymph nodes showed intense pRB staining of germinal centers, with strongest (2+) staining in the large cells (centroblasts) of the proliferating (dark) zone and weak or no staining of small lymphocytes, including those of the mantle zone. In B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) (4 cases), follicular lymphoma (3 cases) and mucosa-associated (MALT) lymphoma (3 cases) strong (2+) pRB staining was limited to centroblasts in reactive and neoplastic follicles and occasional proliferation centers, with only faint staining of small lymphoid cells. In contrast, 15 of 16 cases of mantle cell lymphoma showed strong (1-2+) staining of most cells; one blastoid mantle cell lymphoma showed only faint pRB staining. All cases of (HCL) and plasmacytoma showed strong pRB staining. Although most lymphomas with strong pRB expression were cyclin D1(+), three cyclin D1(+) cases

  12. Detection of cyclin D1 in B cell lymphoproliferative disorders by flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Jain, P; Giustolisi, G M; Atkinson, S; Elnenaei, M O; Morilla, R; Owusu-Ankomah, K; Rafiq-Mohammed, F; Matutes, E; Wotherspoon, A; Catovsky, D

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To describe and revise a flow cytometric assay for evaluating cyclin D1 overexpression in B cell lymphoproliferative disorders (B-LPDs). Methods: Cyclin D1 expression was evaluated in 11 healthy controls and 51 patients with B-LPD by flow cytometry using the 5D4 monoclonal antibody. In 25 cases, experiments were repeated up to four times with mononuclear cells (MNC) fixed in ethanol for 1–120 days to evaluate the consistency of cyclin D1 expression. Flow cytometry results were compared with fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) for the t(11;14) translocation in 19 patients and with immunohistochemistry (IHC) using the DCS-6 monoclonal antibody in nine patients. Results: A mean fluorescence intensity ratio (MFIR) of 4.8 was defined as the cut off point for positivity based on cyclin D1 expression in healthy controls (mean + 3 SD). Ten patients overexpressed cyclin D1 by flow cytometry. These included five of eight patients with mantle cell lymphoma, four of 19 with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, and one with follicular lymphoma. MFIR in the repeat experiments differed less than 25% in 20 of 25 patients and in no cases did it cross the cut off point. There was a good correlation between cyclin D1 expression by flow cytometry and FISH for t(11;14) in 15 of 19 patients and six of nine had concordant results with flow cytometry, FISH, and IHC. Conclusion: Cyclin D1 expression remains fairly stable once MNC are fixed in ethanol and the flow cytometric assay can be used for the routine screening of B-LPD. Further comparisons between flow cytometry, IHC, and FISH may be needed to ascertain the diagnostic value of the flow cytometric assay. PMID:12461064

  13. BRCA1-IRIS regulates cyclin D1 expression in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakuci, Enkeleda; Mahner, Sven; DiRenzo, James; ElShamy, Wael M. . E-mail: wael_elshamy@dfci.harvard.edu

    2006-10-01

    The regulator of cell cycle progression, cyclin D1, is up-regulated in breast cancer cells; its expression is, in part, dependent on ER{alpha} signaling. However, many ER{alpha}-negative tumors and tumor cell lines (e.g., SKBR3) also show over-expression of cyclin D1. This suggests that, in addition to ER{alpha} signaling, cyclin D1 expression is under the control of other signaling pathways; these pathways may even be over-expressed in the ER{alpha}-negative cells. We previously noticed that both ER{alpha}-positive and -negative cell lines over-express BRCA1-IRIS mRNA and protein. Furthermore, the level of over-expression of BRCA1-IRIS in ER{alpha}-negative cell lines even exceeded its over-expression level in ER{alpha}-positive cell lines. In this study, we show that: (1) BRCA1-IRIS forms complex with two of the nuclear receptor co-activators, namely, SRC1 and SRC3 (AIB1) in an ER{alpha}-independent manner. (2) BRCA1-IRIS alone, or in connection with co-activators, is recruited to the cyclin D1 promoter through its binding to c-Jun/AP1 complex; this binding activates the cyclin D1 expression. (3) Over-expression of BRCA1-IRIS in breast cells over-activates JNK/c-Jun; this leads to the induction of cyclin D1 expression and cellular proliferation. (4) BRCA1-IRIS activation of JNK/c-Jun/AP1 appears to account for this, because in cells that were depleted from BRCA1-IRIS, JNK remained inactive. However, depletion of SRC1 or SRC3 instead reduced c-Jun expression. Our data suggest that this novel signaling pathway links BRCA1-IRIS to cellular proliferation through c-Jun/AP1 nuclear pathway; finally, this culminates in the increased expression of the cyclin D1 gene.

  14. Alternative splicing variants of human Fbx4 disturb cyclin D1 proteolysis in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xiufeng; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Jie; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xiaolei; Tu, Jing; Sun, Shiqin; Chen, Xiangmei; Lu, Fengmin

    2014-04-25

    Fbx4 is a specific substrate recognition component of SCF ubiquitin ligases that catalyzes the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of cyclin D1 and Trx1. Two isoforms of human Fbx4 protein, the full length Fbx4α and the C-terminal truncated Fbx4β have been identified, but their functions remain elusive. In this study, we demonstrated that the mRNA level of Fbx4 was significantly lower in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues than that in the corresponding non-tumor tissues. More importantly, we identified three novel splicing variants of Fbx4: Fbx4γ (missing 168-245 nt of exon1), Fbx4δ (missing exon6) and a N-terminal reading frame shift variant (missing exon2). Using cloning sequencing and RT-PCR, we demonstrated these novel splice variants are much more abundant in human cancer tissues and cell lines than that in normal tissues. When expressed in Sk-Hep1 and NIH3T3 cell lines, Fbx4β, Fbx4γ and Fbx4δ could promote cell proliferation and migration in vitro. Concordantly, these isoforms could disrupt cyclin D1 degradation and therefore increase cyclin D1 expression. Moreover, unlike the full-length isoform Fbx4α that mainly exists in cytoplasm, Fbx4β, Fbx4γ, and Fbx4δ locate in both cytoplasm and nucleus. Since cyclin D1 degradation takes place in cytoplasm, the nuclear distribution of these Fbx4 isoforms may not be involved in the down-regulation of cytoplasmic cyclin D1. These results define the impact of alternative splicing on Fbx4 function, and suggest that the attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by these novel Fbx4 isoforms provides a new insight for aberrant cyclin D1 expression in human cancers. PMID:24704453

  15. Arctiin induces cell growth inhibition through the down-regulation of cyclin D1 expression.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Youichirou; Koyama, Makoto; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Yokota, Tomoya; Kawanaka, Mayumi; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Germain, Doris; Sakai, Toshiyuki

    2008-03-01

    Arctiin is a major lignan constituent of Arctium lappa and has anti-cancer properties in animal models. It was recently reported that arctiin induces growth inhibition in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells. However, the growth inhibitory mechanism of arctiin remains unknown. Herein we report that arctiin induces growth inhibition and dephosphorylates the tumor-suppressor retinoblastoma protein in human immortalized keratinocyte HaCaT cells. We also show that the growth inhibition caused by arctiin is associated with the down-regulation of cyclin D1 protein expression. Furthermore, the arctiin-induced suppression of cyclin D1 protein expression occurs in various types of human tumor cells, including osteosarcoma, lung, colorectal, cervical and breast cancer, melanoma, transformed renal cells and prostate cancer. Depletion of the cyclin D1 protein using small interfering RNA-rendered human breast cancer MCF-7 cells insensitive to the growth inhibitory effects of arctiin, implicates cyclin D1 as an important target of arctiin. Taken together, these results suggest that arctiin down-regulates cyclin D1 protein expression and that this at least partially contributes to the anti-proliferative effect of arctiin. PMID:18288407

  16. Cyclin D1 and Ki-67 expression in normal, hyperplastic and neoplastic endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Shevra, CR; Ghosh, A; Kumar, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Proliferation and differentiation of cancer cells are regulated by various cell cycle promoting and inhibiting factors. Our knowledge about these proteins and mechanisms regulating cell cycle progression has increased dramatically in recent years. Aim: The present study was undertaken to examine the expression profile of cell cycle regulatory proteins in normal proliferative endometrium, hyperplasias (simple, complex and atypical) and endometrial carcinoma in a quantitative approach as also to assess correlations of Cyclin D1 expression with Ki-67 a proliferation marker. Settings and Design: A retrospective case control study in a tertiary referral centre. Materials and Methods: We evaluated and compared the expression profile of Cyclin D1 and Ki-67 expressions in 61 endometrial samples submitted as either endometrial curetting or hysterectomy specimens, which were diagnosed as simple hyperplasia (n =11), complex hyperplasia (n = 13), atypical hyperplasia (n = 7), and endometrial carcinoma (n = 20). Results: There was increased expression of Cyclin D1 and Ki-67 in patients with endometrial carcinoma relative to proliferative endometrium and simple hyperplasia, but there was no such difference between cases of atypical hyperplasia and endometrial carcinoma. Cyclin D1 expression had a positive correlation with Ki-67 expression. Cyclin D1 together with Ki-67 may be a marker for endometrial carcinogenesis and tumor cell proliferation. PMID:25511212

  17. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 suppresses gene expression of cyclin D1 in tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yasmin, Tania; Takahashi-Yanaga, Fumi . E-mail: yanaga@clipharm.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Mori, Jun; Miwa, Yoshikazu; Hirata, Masato; Watanabe, Yutaka; Morimoto, Sachio; Sasaguri, Toshiyuki

    2005-12-16

    To determine the mechanism by which differentiation-inducing factor-1 (DIF-1), a morphogen of Dictyostelium discoideum, inhibits tumor cell proliferation, we examined the effect of DIF-1 on the gene expression of cyclin D1. DIF-1 strongly reduced the expression of cyclin D1 mRNA and correspondingly decreased the amount of {beta}-catenin in HeLa cells and squamous cell carcinoma cells. DIF-1 activated glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) and inhibition of GSK-3{beta} attenuated the DIF-1-induced {beta}-catenin degradation, indicating the involvement of GSK-3{beta} in this effect. Moreover, DIF-1 reduced the activities of T-cell factor (TCF)/lymphoid enhancer factor (LEF) reporter plasmid and a reporter gene driven by the human cyclin D1 promoter. Eliminating the TCF/LEF consensus site from the cyclin D1 promoter diminished the effect of DIF-1. These results suggest that DIF-1 inhibits Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling, resulting in the suppression of cyclin D1 promoter activity.

  18. Salusin-β induces smooth muscle cell proliferation by regulating cyclins D1 and E expression through MAPKs signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao-Le; Zeng, Yi; Zhao, Cheng; He, Meng-Zi; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Despite the clear mitogenic effect of salusin-β on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), which contributes to its proatherosclerotic effects, additional studies are needed to explore its underlying mechanisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of salusin-β's effects on VSMCs cell cycle regulation and the possible signal pathways. Salusin-β accelerated the G1/S phase transition in VSMCs and increased the expression levels of cyclins D1 and E. Silencing either cyclin D1 or cyclin E gene inhibited salusin-β-induced VSMCs proliferation, cell cycle progression, phosphorylation of the Rb protein, and dissociation of the E2F-Rb complex. Importantly, expression of cyclin E was also induced by cyclin D1. Next, we found that salusin-β increased the protein expressions of activator protein-1 (AP-1) subunits c-Jun and c-Fos, and enhanced binding of AP-1 to the promoter region of cyclin D1. In addition, inhibition of AP-1 activity could lead to significant suppression of salusin-β-induced cyclin D1 expression. Furthermore, MPAKs pathways were found to mediate salusin-β-induced VSMCs proliferation, cyclin D1, cyclin E, c-Jun, and c-Fos expression. These results suggest that salusin-β promotes cell cycle progression of VSMCs by upregulating the cyclin D1 and cyclin E, in an AP-1-dependent manner through mitogen-activated protein kinases signaling pathways. PMID:25551321

  19. Downregulation of cyclin D1-CDK4 protein in human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HELF) induced by silica is mediated through the ERK and JNK pathway.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fuhai; Fan, Xueyun; Liu, Bingci; Jia, Xiaowei; Gao, Ai; Du, Hongju; Ye, Meng; You, Baorong; Huang, Chuanshu; Shi, Xianglin

    2008-10-01

    Silica is a factor in the induction of acute injury and chronic pulmonary fibrosis. In 1996, silica was also listed as a human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). However, the molecular mechanisms involved in its pathologic effects are not well understood. We found that exposure of human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HELF) to crystalline silica for 2h decreased cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) expression levels. Extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERKs), c-Jun NH2-terminal amino kinase (JNKs), and p38 kinase, as well as their downstream transcription factor, AP-1, had different effects on the regulation of expression levels of cyclin D1 and CDK4 alterations induced by silica. Silica activates multiple signal transduction pathways involved in coordinating cellular responses to stress. We established the requirements for ERK and JNK, members of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, in mediating G1 phase arrest of HELF induced by silica. Silica treatment activated ERK in a dose-dependent manner. AG126 (a chemical inhibitor of the ERK signaling pathway) and the dominant negative mutant of ERK2 (a molecular inhibitor of ERK2) prevented decreases in cyclin D1 and CDK4 expression levels. A chemical inhibitor of JNK, SP600125, prevented the decreased expression of both cyclin D1 and CDK4, whereas SB203580, a chemical inhibitor of p38, did not. Interestingly, curcumin prevented the decrease in DK4 expression, but not in cyclin D1. These results demonstrate that ERKs and JNKs are responsible for the decrease of cyclin D1 and CDK4 expression levels in HELF induced by silica. Activator protein-1 (AP-1) was responsible for the decrease of CDK4 expression level, but not that of cyclin D1. The findings help to explain the mechanisms of diseases induced by silica. PMID:18703151

  20. Alternative splicing variants of human Fbx4 disturb cyclin D1 proteolysis in human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Xiufeng; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Jie; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xiaolei; Tu, Jing; Sun, Shiqin; Chen, Xiangmei; Lu, Fengmin

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • The expression of Fbx4 was significantly lower in HCC tissues. • Novel splicing variants of Fbx4 were identified. • These novel variants are much more abundant in human cancer tissues and cells. • The novel Fbx4 isoforms could promote cell proliferation and migration in vitro. • These isoforms showed less capability for cyclin D1 binding and degradation. - Abstract: Fbx4 is a specific substrate recognition component of SCF ubiquitin ligases that catalyzes the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of cyclin D1 and Trx1. Two isoforms of human Fbx4 protein, the full length Fbx4α and the C-terminal truncated Fbx4β have been identified, but their functions remain elusive. In this study, we demonstrated that the mRNA level of Fbx4 was significantly lower in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues than that in the corresponding non-tumor tissues. More importantly, we identified three novel splicing variants of Fbx4: Fbx4γ (missing 168–245nt of exon1), Fbx4δ (missing exon6) and a N-terminal reading frame shift variant (missing exon2). Using cloning sequencing and RT-PCR, we demonstrated these novel splice variants are much more abundant in human cancer tissues and cell lines than that in normal tissues. When expressed in Sk-Hep1 and NIH3T3 cell lines, Fbx4β, Fbx4γ and Fbx4δ could promote cell proliferation and migration in vitro. Concordantly, these isoforms could disrupt cyclin D1 degradation and therefore increase cyclin D1 expression. Moreover, unlike the full-length isoform Fbx4α that mainly exists in cytoplasm, Fbx4β, Fbx4γ, and Fbx4δ locate in both cytoplasm and nucleus. Since cyclin D1 degradation takes place in cytoplasm, the nuclear distribution of these Fbx4 isoforms may not be involved in the down-regulation of cytoplasmic cyclin D1. These results define the impact of alternative splicing on Fbx4 function, and suggest that the attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by these novel Fbx4 isoforms provides a new insight for aberrant

  1. Antisense inhibition of cyclin D1 expression is equivalent to flavopiridol for radiosensitization of zebrafish embryos

    SciTech Connect

    McAleer, Mary Frances; Duffy, Kevin T.; Davidson, William R.; Kari, Gabor; Dicker, Adam P.; Rodeck, Ulrich; Wickstrom, Eric . E-mail: eric@tesla.jci.tju.edu

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: Flavopiridol, a small molecule pan-cyclin inhibitor, has been shown to enhance Radiation response of tumor cells both in vitro and in vivo. The clinical utility of flavopiridol, however, is limited by toxicity, previously attributed to pleiotropic inhibitory effects on several targets affecting multiple signal transduction pathways. Here we used zebrafish embryos to investigate radiosensitizing effects of flavopiridol in normal tissues. Methods and Materials: Zebrafish embryos at the 1- to 4-cell stage were treated with 500 nM flavopiridol or injected with 0.5 pmol antisense hydroxylprolyl-phosphono nucleic acid oligomers to reduce cyclin D1 expression, then subjected to ionizing radiation (IR) or no radiation. Results: Flavopiridol-treated embryos demonstrated a twofold increase in mortality after exposure to 40 Gy by 96 hpf and developed distinct radiation-induced defects in midline development (designated as the 'curly up' phenotype) at higher rates when compared with embryos receiving IR only. Cyclin D1-deficient embryos had virtually identical IR sensitivity profiles when compared with embryos treated with flavopiridol. This was particularly evident for the IR-induced curly up phenotype, which was greatly exacerbated by both flavopriridol and cyclin D1 downregulation. Conclusions: Treatment of zebrafish embryos with flavopiridol enhanced radiation sensitivity of zebrafish embryos to a degree that was very similar to that associated with downregulation of cyclin D1 expression. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that inhibition of cyclin D1 is sufficient to account for the radiosensitizing action of flavopiridol in the zebrafish embryo vertebrate model.

  2. Anti-Proliferative Effect of Naringenin through p38-Dependent Downregulation of Cyclin D1 in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hun Min; Park, Gwang Hun; Eo, Hyun Ji; Lee, Jin Wook; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Lee, Jeong Rak; Lee, Man Hyo; Koo, Jin Suk; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2015-01-01

    Naringenin (NAR) as one of the flavonoids observed in grapefruit has been reported to exhibit an anti-cancer activity. However, more detailed mechanism by which NAR exerts anti-cancer properties still remains unanswered. Thus, in this study, we have shown that NAR down-regulates the level of cyclin D1 in human colorectal cancer cell lines, HCT116 and SW480. NAR inhibited the cell proliferation in HCT116 and SW480 cells and decreased the level of cyclin D1 protein. Inhibition of proteasomal degradation by MG132 blocked NAR-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation and the half-life of cyclin D1 was decreased in the cells treated with NAR. In addition, NAR increased the phosphorylation of cyclin D1 at threonine-286 and a point mutation of threonine-286 to alanine blocked cyclin D1 downregulation by NAR. p38 inactivation attenuated cyclin D1 downregulation by NAR. From these results, we suggest that NAR-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation may result from proteasomal degradation through p38 activation. The current study provides new mechanistic link between NAR, cyclin D1 downregulation and cell growth in human colorectal cancer cells. PMID:26157550

  3. A dominant-negative cyclin D1 mutant prevents nuclear import of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and its phosphorylation by CDK-activating kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, J A; Sherr, C J

    1997-01-01

    Cyclins contain two characteristic cyclin folds, each consisting of five alpha-helical bundles, which are connected to one another by a short linker peptide. The first repeat makes direct contact with cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) subunits in assembled holoenzyme complexes, whereas the second does not contribute directly to the CDK interface. Although threonine 156 in mouse cyclin D1 is predicted to lie at the carboxyl terminus of the linker peptide that separates the two cyclin folds and is buried within the cyclin subunit, mutation of this residue to alanine has profound effects on the behavior of the derived cyclin D1-CDK4 complexes. CDK4 in complexes with mutant cyclin D1 (T156A or T156E but not T156S) is not phosphorylated by recombinant CDK-activating kinase (CAK) in vitro, fails to undergo activating T-loop phosphorylation in vivo, and remains catalytically inactive and unable to phosphorylate the retinoblastoma protein. Moreover, when it is ectopically overexpressed in mammalian cells, cyclin D1 (T156A) assembles with CDK4 in the cytoplasm but is not imported into the cell nucleus. CAK phosphorylation is not required for nuclear transport of cyclin D1-CDK4 complexes, because complexes containing wild-type cyclin D1 and a CDK4 (T172A) mutant lacking the CAK phosphorylation site are efficiently imported. In contrast, enforced overexpression of the CDK inhibitor p21Cip1 together with mutant cyclin D1 (T156A)-CDK4 complexes enhanced their nuclear localization. These results suggest that cyclin D1 (T156A or T156E) forms abortive complexes with CDK4 that prevent recognition by CAK and by other cellular factors that are required for their nuclear localization. These properties enable ectopically overexpressed cyclin D1 (T156A), or a more stable T156A/T286A double mutant that is resistant to ubiquitination, to compete with endogenous cyclin D1 in mammalian cells, thereby mobilizing CDK4 into cytoplasmic, catalytically inactive complexes and dominantly inhibiting

  4. Placental Estrogen Suppresses Cyclin D1 Expression in the Nonhuman Primate Fetal Adrenal Cortex*

    PubMed Central

    Dumitrescu, Adina; Aberdeen, Graham W.; Pepe, Gerald J.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that estrogen selectively suppresses growth of the fetal zone of the baboon fetal adrenal cortex, which produces the C19-steroid precursors, eg, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, which are aromatized to estrogen within the placenta. In the present study, we determined whether fetal adrenal expression of cell cycle regulators are altered by estrogen and thus provide a mechanism by which estrogen regulates fetal adrenocortical development. Cyclin D1 mRNA levels in the whole fetal adrenal were increased 50% (P < .05), and the number of cells in the fetal adrenal definitive zone expressing cyclin D1 protein was increased 2.5-fold (P < .05), whereas the total number of cells in the fetal zone and fetal serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels were elevated 2-fold (P < .05) near term in baboons in which fetal serum estradiol levels were decreased by 95% (P < .05) after maternal administration of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and restored to normal by concomitant administration of letrozole plus estradiol throughout second half of gestation. However, fetal adrenocortical expression of cyclin D2, the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-2, Cdk4, and Cdk6, and Cdk regulatory proteins p27Kip1 and p57Kip2 were not changed by letrozole or letrozole plus estradiol administration. We suggest that estrogen controls the growth of the fetal zone of the fetal adrenal by down-regulating cyclin D1 expression and thus proliferation of progenitor cells within the definitive zone that migrate to the fetal zone. We propose that estrogen restrains growth and function of the fetal zone via cyclin D1 to maintain estrogen levels in a physiological range during primate pregnancy. PMID:25247468

  5. Lefty inhibits in vitro decidualization by regulating P57 and cyclin D1 expressions.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Li, Hui; Bai, Liang; Yu, Hua

    2014-12-01

    Endometrial decidualization is highly important for successful construction and maintenance of embryo implantation and pregnancy. Lefty gene at different menstrual cycle phases has different expressions, indicating its regulatory significance. To study the mechanism of Lefty in decidualization, human endometrial stromal cells (hESCs) were cultured and induced with medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) and 8-bromoadenosine-cAMP (8-Br-cAMP) in vitro as a research model. Our results showed that Lefty1 overexpression inhibited MPA- and 8-Br-cAMP-induced hESC decidualization and significantly reduced the secretion of prolactin (PRL) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 (IGFBP-1). With the inhibition of Lefty1 expression, hESC decidualization induced by MPA and 8-Br-cAMP became more remarkable, and the secretions of PRL and IGFBP-1 were higher too. Further tests indicated that during the process of decidualization, P57 expression increased, whereas cyclin D1 expression decreased. Although Lefty1 overexpression did not significantly change the expressions of P57 and cyclin D1, inhibition of Lefty1 expression resulted in more evident changes in P57 and cyclin D1 expressions. Meanwhile, cell cycle examination showed that Lefty1 overexpression reduced the cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase in the in vitro hESC decidualization model. Therefore, Lefty1 could regulate the cell cycle via modulating the expressions of P57 and cyclin D1 and then inhibit the decidualization in vitro. PMID:25339094

  6. Epigenetically altered miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kaukoniemi, Kirsi M; Rauhala, Hanna E; Scaravilli, Mauro; Latonen, Leena; Annala, Matti; Vessella, Robert L; Nykter, Matti; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Visakorpi, Tapio

    2015-09-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRNA) are important regulators of gene expression and often differentially expressed in cancer and other diseases. We have previously shown that miR-193b is hypermethylated in prostate cancer (PC) and suppresses cell growth. It has been suggested that miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in several malignancies. Here, our aim was to determine if miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in prostate cancer. Our data show that miR-193b is commonly methylated in PC samples compared to benign prostate hyperplasia. We found reduced miR-193b expression (P < 0.05) in stage pT3 tumors compared to pT2 tumors in a cohort of prostatectomy specimens. In 22Rv1 PC cells with low endogenous miR-193b expression, the overexpression of miR-193b reduced CCND1 mRNA levels and cyclin D1 protein levels. In addition, the exogenous expression of miR-193b decreased the phosphorylation level of RB, a target of the cyclin D1-CDK4/6 pathway. Moreover, according to a reporter assay, miR-193b targeted the 3'UTR of CCND1 in PC cells and the CCND1 activity was rescued by expressing CCND1 lacking its 3'UTR. Immunohistochemical analysis of cyclin D1 showed that castration-resistant prostate cancers have significantly (P = 0.0237) higher expression of cyclin D1 compared to hormone-naïve cases. Furthermore, the PC cell lines 22Rv1 and VCaP, which express low levels of miR-193b and high levels of CCND1, showed significant growth retardation when treated with a CDK4/6 inhibitor. In contrast, the inhibitor had no effect on the growth of PC-3 and DU145 cells with high miR-193b and low CCND1 expression. Taken together, our data demonstrate that miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in prostate cancer. PMID:26129688

  7. Epigenetically altered miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kaukoniemi, Kirsi M; Rauhala, Hanna E; Scaravilli, Mauro; Latonen, Leena; Annala, Matti; Vessella, Robert L; Nykter, Matti; Tammela, Teuvo L J; Visakorpi, Tapio

    2015-01-01

    Micro-RNAs (miRNA) are important regulators of gene expression and often differentially expressed in cancer and other diseases. We have previously shown that miR-193b is hypermethylated in prostate cancer (PC) and suppresses cell growth. It has been suggested that miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in several malignancies. Here, our aim was to determine if miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in prostate cancer. Our data show that miR-193b is commonly methylated in PC samples compared to benign prostate hyperplasia. We found reduced miR-193b expression (P < 0.05) in stage pT3 tumors compared to pT2 tumors in a cohort of prostatectomy specimens. In 22Rv1 PC cells with low endogenous miR-193b expression, the overexpression of miR-193b reduced CCND1mRNA levels and cyclin D1 protein levels. In addition, the exogenous expression of miR-193b decreased the phosphorylation level of RB, a target of the cyclin D1-CDK4/6 pathway. Moreover, according to a reporter assay, miR-193b targeted the 3’UTR of CCND1 in PC cells and the CCND1 activity was rescued by expressing CCND1 lacking its 3’UTR. Immunohistochemical analysis of cyclin D1 showed that castration-resistant prostate cancers have significantly (P = 0.0237) higher expression of cyclin D1 compared to hormone-naïve cases. Furthermore, the PC cell lines 22Rv1 and VCaP, which express low levels of miR-193b and high levels of CCND1, showed significant growth retardation when treated with a CDK4/6 inhibitor. In contrast, the inhibitor had no effect on the growth of PC-3 and DU145 cells with high miR-193b and low CCND1 expression. Taken together, our data demonstrate that miR-193b targets cyclin D1 in prostate cancer. PMID:26129688

  8. Retroviral Cyclin Controls Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 8-Mediated Transcription Elongation and Reinitiation

    PubMed Central

    Birkenheuer, Claire H.; Brewster, Connie D.; Quackenbush, Sandra L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Walleye dermal sarcoma virus (WDSV) infection is associated with the seasonal development and regression of walleye dermal sarcoma. Previous work showed that the retroviral cyclin (RV-cyclin), encoded by WDSV, has separable cyclin box and transcription activation domains. It binds to cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) and enhances its kinase activity. CDK8 is evolutionarily conserved and is frequently overexpressed in human cancers. It is normally activated by cyclin C and is required for transcription elongation of the serum response genes (immediate early genes [IEGs]) FOS, EGR1, and cJUN. The IEGs drive cell proliferation, and their expression is brief and highly regulated. Here we show that constitutive expression of RV-cyclin in the HCT116 colon cancer cell line significantly increases the level of IEG expression in response to serum stimulation. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and nuclear run-on assays provide evidence that RV-cyclin does not alter the initiation of IEG transcription but does enhance the overall rate of transcription elongation and maintains transcription reinitiation. RV-cyclin does not increase activating phosphorylation events in the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and does not inhibit decay of IEG mRNAs. At the EGR1 gene locus, RV-cyclin increases and maintains RNA polymerase II (Pol II) occupancy after serum stimulation, in conjunction with increased and extended EGR1 gene expression. The RV-cyclin increases CDK8 occupancy at the EGR1 gene locus before and after serum stimulation. Both of RV-cyclin's functional domains, i.e., the cyclin box and the activation domain, are necessary for the overall enhancement of IEG expression. RV-cyclin presents a novel and ancient mechanism of retrovirus-induced oncogenesis. IMPORTANCE The data reported here are important to both virology and cancer biology. The novel mechanism pinpoints CDK8 in the development of walleye dermal sarcoma and sheds light on CDK8's role in

  9. Cytoplasmic cyclin D1 regulates cell invasion and metastasis through the phosphorylation of paxillin

    PubMed Central

    Fusté, Noel P.; Fernández-Hernández, Rita; Cemeli, Tània; Mirantes, Cristina; Pedraza, Neus; Rafel, Marta; Torres-Rosell, Jordi; Colomina, Neus; Ferrezuelo, Francisco; Dolcet, Xavier; Garí, Eloi

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin D1 (Ccnd1) together with its binding partner Cdk4 act as a transcriptional regulator to control cell proliferation and migration, and abnormal Ccnd1·Cdk4 expression promotes tumour growth and metastasis. While different nuclear Ccnd1·Cdk4 targets participating in cell proliferation and tissue development have been identified, little is known about how Ccnd1·Cdk4 controls cell adherence and invasion. Here, we show that the focal adhesion component paxillin is a cytoplasmic substrate of Ccnd1·Cdk4. This complex phosphorylates a fraction of paxillin specifically associated to the cell membrane, and promotes Rac1 activation, thereby triggering membrane ruffling and cell invasion in both normal fibroblasts and tumour cells. Our results demonstrate that localization of Ccnd1·Cdk4 to the cytoplasm does not simply act to restrain cell proliferation, but constitutes a functionally relevant mechanism operating under normal and pathological conditions to control cell adhesion, migration and metastasis through activation of a Ccnd1·Cdk4-paxillin-Rac1 axis. PMID:27181366

  10. Cytoplasmic cyclin D1 regulates cell invasion and metastasis through the phosphorylation of paxillin.

    PubMed

    Fusté, Noel P; Fernández-Hernández, Rita; Cemeli, Tània; Mirantes, Cristina; Pedraza, Neus; Rafel, Marta; Torres-Rosell, Jordi; Colomina, Neus; Ferrezuelo, Francisco; Dolcet, Xavier; Garí, Eloi

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin D1 (Ccnd1) together with its binding partner Cdk4 act as a transcriptional regulator to control cell proliferation and migration, and abnormal Ccnd1·Cdk4 expression promotes tumour growth and metastasis. While different nuclear Ccnd1·Cdk4 targets participating in cell proliferation and tissue development have been identified, little is known about how Ccnd1·Cdk4 controls cell adherence and invasion. Here, we show that the focal adhesion component paxillin is a cytoplasmic substrate of Ccnd1·Cdk4. This complex phosphorylates a fraction of paxillin specifically associated to the cell membrane, and promotes Rac1 activation, thereby triggering membrane ruffling and cell invasion in both normal fibroblasts and tumour cells. Our results demonstrate that localization of Ccnd1·Cdk4 to the cytoplasm does not simply act to restrain cell proliferation, but constitutes a functionally relevant mechanism operating under normal and pathological conditions to control cell adhesion, migration and metastasis through activation of a Ccnd1·Cdk4-paxillin-Rac1 axis. PMID:27181366

  11. Cyclin D1 and Ki-67 expression correlates to tumor staging in tongue squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    de Carli, Marina-Lara; Sperandio, Felipe-Fornias; Hanemann, João-Adolfo-Costa; Pereira, Alessandro-Antônio-Costa

    2015-01-01

    Background The immunohistochemical expression of Cyclin D1 and Ki-67 were analyzed in tongue squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), relating them to the clinical and morphological exhibition of these tumors. Material and Methods Twenty-nine patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria; clinical data included gender, age, ethnicity and use of licit drugs such as alcohol and tobacco. The TNM staging and histopathological differentiation grading was assessed for each case. In addition, T1 patients were gathered with T2 patients; and T3 patients were gathered with T4 patients to assemble two distinct groups: (T1/T2) and (T3/T4). Results The mean follow-up time was 24 months and 30% of the patients died as a consequence of the disease, while 23.3% lived with the disease and 46.7% lived lesion-free. T1 and T2 tumors showed statistically lesser Ki-67 and Cyclin D1 staining when compared to T3 and T4 tumors. Conclusions Ki-67 and Cyclin D1 pose as auxiliary tools when determining the progression of tongue SCC at the time of diagnosis. Key words:Carcinoma, squamous cell, cyclin D, immunohistochemistry, Ki-67 antigen, prognosis. PMID:26449430

  12. Cyclin D1 interacts and collaborates with Ral GTPases enhancing cell detachment and motility.

    PubMed

    Fernández, R M H; Ruiz-Miró, M; Dolcet, X; Aldea, M; Garí, E

    2011-04-21

    Alterations in the levels of adhesion and motility of cells are critical events in the development of metastasis. Cyclin D1 (CycD1) is one of the most frequently amplified oncogenes in many types of cancers and it is also associated with the development of metastasis. Despite this, we still do not know which are all the relevant pathways by which CycD1 induces oncogenic processes. CycD1 functions can be either dependent or independent of the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk4, and they affect several cellular aspects such as proliferation, cell attachment and migration. In this work, we reveal a novel function of CycD1 that fosters our understanding of the oncogenic potential of CycD1. We show that CycD1 binds to the small GTPases Ral A and B, which are involved, through exocyst regulation, in the progression of metastatic cancers, inducing anchorage-independent growth and cell survival of transformed cells. We show that CycD1 binds active Ral complexes and the exocyst protein Sec6, and co-localizes with Ral GTPases in trans-Golgi and exocyst-rich regions. We have also observed that CycD1-Cdk4 phosphorylates the Ral GEF Rgl2 'in vitro' and that CycD1-Cdk4 activity stimulates accumulation of the Ral GTP active forms. In accordance with this, our data suggest that CycD1-Cdk4 enhances cell detachment and motility in collaboration with Ral GTPases. This new function may help explain the contribution of CycD1 to tumor spreading. PMID:21242975

  13. Mantle cell lymphoma in cyclin D1 transgenic mice with Bim-deficient B cells

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Samuel G.; LaBelle, James L.; Meng, Hailong; Valeriano, Regina P.; Fisher, Jill K.; Sun, Heather; Rodig, Scott J.; Kleinstein, Steven H.

    2014-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a highly aggressive B-cell lymphoma resistant to conventional chemotherapy. Although defined by the characteristic t(11;14) translocation, MCL has not been recapitulated in transgenic mouse models of cyclin D1 overexpression alone. Indeed, several genetic aberrations have been identified in MCL that may contribute to its pathogenesis and chemoresistance. Of particular interest is the frequent biallelic deletion of the proapoptotic BCL-2 family protein BIM. BIM exerts its pro-death function via its α-helical BH3 death domain that has the dual capacity to inhibit antiapoptotic proteins such as BCL-2 and MCL-1 and directly trigger proapoptotic proteins such as the mitochondrial executioner protein BAX. To evaluate a functional role for Bim deletion in the pathogenesis of MCL, we generated cyclin D1–transgenic mice harboring Bim-deficient B cells. In response to immunization, EμCycD1CD19CREBimfl/fl mice manifested selective expansion of their splenic mantle zone compartment. Three distinct immune stimulation regimens induced lymphomas with histopathologic and molecular features of human MCL in a subset of mice. Thus, deletion of Bim in B cells, in the context of cyclin D1 overexpression, disrupts a critical control point in lymphoid maturation and predisposes to the development of MCL. This genetic proof of concept for MCL pathogenesis suggests an opportunity to reactivate the death pathway by pharmacologic mimicry of proapoptotic BIM. PMID:24352880

  14. Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma with Cyclin D1 overexpression: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas not otherwise specified are generally considered aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas, because of poor natural outcome and response to therapy. They show a complex karyotype without any specific genetic hallmark. We report a case of peripheral T-cell lymphoma not otherwise specified with heterogeneous nuclear Cyclin D1 immunohistochemical overexpression, due to gene copy gain, a phenomenon similar to that observed in Mantle Cell Lymphoma characterized by t(11;14)(q13;q32). In this case report we underline the diagnostic pitfall rapresented by Cyclin D1 immunoistochemical overexpression in a T-cell lymphoma. Several pitfalls could lead to misinterpretation of diagnosis, therefore, we underlined the need to integrate the classical histology and immunohistochemistry with molecular tests as clonality or Fluorescence in situ hybridization. Virtual slide The virtual slides for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1117747619703769 PMID:22770229

  15. Positive expression of cyclin D1 is an indicator for the evaluation of the prognosis of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liying; Liu, Sha; Jakulin, Adina; Yilamu, Dilimina; Wang, Bowei; Yan, Jinghong

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The present study is to detect the expression of cyclin D1 in different clinical molecular subtypes in breast cancer, and to analyze its relationship to the expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (Her-2), tumor size, clinical stages, histological grades, age of menarche, and prognosis. Methods: In the present study, we retrospectively reviewed the clinical information of 226 patients with breast cancer who were hospitalized at The First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University between January 2000 and December 2012. Immunohistochemical method was used to detect the expression of cyclin D1 in breast cancer tissues. Pearson’s Chi-square test was performed to compare the expression of cyclin D1 under different clinical indicators, and under different immune indexes and subtypes. Spearman rank correlation method was used to analyze the correlation between cyclin D1 expression and ER, PR, Her-2, tumor size, clinical stages, histological grades and age of menarche. Kaplan-Meier was employed to calculate the survival time of tumor-free survival time. Log-rank method was used to analyze the survival curves. Results: The expression of cyclin D1 was not significantly correlated to tumor size, clinical stages, histological grades, age of menarche, or PR, but was correlated to ER. Higher cyclin D1 positive rate corresponded to higher ER positive rate. The expression of cyclin D1 was negatively correlated to Her-2 expression (P < 0.05). Higher cyclin D1 positive rate corresponded to lower Her-2 positive rate. In cyclin D1 positive group, the percentage of Luminal A type was the highest. In cyclin D1 negative group, the percentage of Luminal B type was the highest. Higher cyclin D1 positive rate led to longer tumor-free survival time. Conclusions: The expression of cyclinD1 is significantly correlated to ER and Her-2. Positive expression of cyclin D1 suggests good prognosis, and can be used as

  16. Cyclin D1 is dispensable for G1 control in retinoblastoma gene-deficient cells independently of cdk4 activity.

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, J; Bartkova, J; Rohde, M; Strauss, M; Bartek, J

    1995-01-01

    To elucidate the regulator-versus-target relationship in the cyclin D1/cdk4/retinoblastoma protein (pRB) pathway, we examined fibroblasts from RB-1 gene-deficient and RB-1 wild-type littermate mouse embryos (ME) and in human tumor cell lines that differed in the status of the RB-1 gene. The RB+/+ and RB-/- ME fibroblasts expressed similar protein levels of D-type cyclins, cdk4, and cdk6, showed analogous spectra and abundance of cellular proteins complexed with cdk4 and/or cyclins D1 and D2, and exhibited comparable associated kinase activities. Of the two human cell lines established from the same sarcoma biopsy, the RB-positive SKUT1B cells contained cdk4 that was mainly associated with D-type cyclins, contrary to a predominant cdk4-p16INK4 complex in the RB-deficient SKUT1A cells. Antibody-mediated neutralization of cyclin D1 arrested the RB-positive ME and SKUT1B cells in G1, whereas this cyclin appeared dispensable in the RB-deficient ME and SKUT1A cells. Lack of requirement for cyclin D1 therefore correlated with absence of functional pRB, regardless of whether active cyclin D1/cdk4 holoenzyme was present in the cells under study. Consistent with a potential role of cyclin D/cdk4 in phosphorylation of pRB, monoclonal anti-cyclin D1 antibodies supporting the associated kinase activity failed to significantly affect proliferation of RB-positive cells, whereas the antibody DCS-6, unable to coprecipitate cdk4, efficiently inhibited G1 progression and prevented pRB phosphorylation in vivo. These data provide evidence for an upstream control function of cyclin D1/cdk4, and a downstream role for pRB, in the order of events regulating transition through late G1 phase of the mammalian cell division cycle. PMID:7739541

  17. miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation by suppressing CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xuesong; Gong, Xuhai; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Jinghui; Sun, Jiahang; Guo, Mian

    2015-05-08

    Glioblastoma development is often associated with alteration in the activity and expression of cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin-dependent kinases (CKDs) and cyclins, resulting in aberrant cell proliferation. Recent studies have highlighted the pivotal roles of miRNAs in controlling the development and growth of glioblastoma. Here, we provide evidence for a function of miR-340 in the inhibition of glioblastoma cell proliferation. We found that miR-340 is downregulated in human glioblastoma tissue samples and several established glioblastoma cell lines. Proliferation and neurosphere formation assays revealed that miR-340 plays an oncosuppressive role in glioblastoma, and that its ectopic expression causes significant defect in glioblastoma cell growth. Further, using bioinformatics, luciferase assay and western blot, we found that miR-340 specifically targets the 3′UTRs of CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2, leading to the arrest of glioblastoma cells in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase. Confirming these results, we found that re-introducing CDK6, cyclin-D1 or cyclin-D2 expression partially, but significantly, rescues cells from the suppression of cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest mediated by miR-340. Collectively, our results demonstrate that miR-340 plays a tumor-suppressive role in glioblastoma and may be useful as a diagnostic biomarker and/or a therapeutic avenue for glioblastoma. - Highlights: • miR-340 is downregulated in glioblastoma samples and cell lines. • miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation. • miR-340 directly targets CDK6, cyclin-D1, and cyclin-D2. • miR-340 regulates glioblastoma cell proliferation via CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2.

  18. Functional, chemical genomic, and super-enhancer screening identify sensitivity to cyclin D1/CDK4 pathway inhibition in Ewing sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Crompton, Brian; Cowley, Glenn; Vazquez, Francisca; Weir, Barbara A.; Tsherniak, Aviad; Parasuraman, Sudha; Kim, Sunkyu; Alexe, Gabriela; Stegmaier, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma is an aggressive bone and soft tissue tumor in children and adolescents, with treatment remaining a clinical challenge. This disease is mediated by somatic chromosomal translocations of the EWS gene and a gene encoding an ETS transcription factor, most commonly, FLI1. While direct targeting of aberrant transcription factors remains a pharmacological challenge, identification of dependencies incurred by EWS/FLI1 expression would offer a new therapeutic avenue. We used a combination of super-enhancer profiling, near-whole genome shRNA-based and small-molecule screening to identify cyclin D1 and CDK4 as Ewing sarcoma-selective dependencies. We revealed that super-enhancers mark Ewing sarcoma specific expression signatures and EWS/FLI1 target genes in human Ewing sarcoma cell lines. Particularly, a super-enhancer regulates cyclin D1 and promotes its expression in Ewing sarcoma. We demonstrated that Ewing sarcoma cells require CDK4 and cyclin D1 for survival and anchorage-independent growth. Additionally, pharmacologic inhibition of CDK4 with selective CDK4/6 inhibitors led to cytostasis and cell death of Ewing sarcoma cell lines in vitro and growth delay in an in vivo Ewing sarcoma xenograft model. These results demonstrated a dependency in Ewing sarcoma on CDK4 and cyclin D1 and support exploration of CDK4/6 inhibitors as a therapeutic approach for patients with this disease. PMID:26337082

  19. CCND2 rearrangements are the most frequent genetic events in cyclin D1− mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Salaverria, Itziar; Royo, Cristina; Carvajal-Cuenca, Alejandra; Clot, Guillem; Navarro, Alba; Valera, Alejandra; Song, Joo Y.; Woroniecka, Renata; Rymkiewicz, Grzegorz; Klapper, Wolfram; Hartmann, Elena M.; Sujobert, Pierre; Wlodarska, Iwona; Ferry, Judith A.; Gaulard, Philippe; Ott, German; Rosenwald, Andreas; Lopez-Guillermo, Armando; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Harris, Nancy L.; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Siebert, Reiner; Campo, Elias

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin D1− mantle cell lymphomas (MCLs) are not well characterized, in part because of the difficulties in their recognition. SOX11 has been identified recently as a reliable biomarker of MCL that is also expressed in the cyclin D1− variant. We investigated 40 lymphomas with MCL morphology and immunophenotype that were negative for cyclin D1 expression/t(11;14)(q13;q32) but positive for SOX11. These tumors presented clinically with generalized lymphadenopathy, advanced stage, and poor outcome (5-year overall survival, 48%). Chromosomal rearrangements of the CCND2 locus were detected in 55% of the cases, with an IG gene as partner in 18 of 22, in particular with light chains (10 IGK@ and 5 IGL@). No mutations in the phosphorylation motifs of CCND1, CCND2, or CCND3 were detected. The global genomic profile and the high complexity of the 32 cyclin D1− SOX11+ MCL patients analyzed by copy number arrays were similar to the conventional cyclin D1+/SOX11+ MCL. 17p deletions and high Ki67 expression conferred a significantly worse outcome for the patients. This comprehensive characterization of a large series of cyclin D1− MCL patients indicates that these tumors are clinically and biologically similar to the conventional cyclin D1+ MCL and provides a basis for the proper identification and clinical management of these patients. PMID:23255553

  20. Cyclin D1 amplification and expression in human breast carcinoma: correlation with histological prognostic markers and oestrogen receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Worsley, S D; Jennings, B A; Khalil, K H; Mole, M; Girling, A C

    1996-01-01

    Aims—To study the amplification of the Cyclin D1 gene (CCND1) in human breast carcinoma; to relate this to Cyclin D1 protein expression; to relate these parameters to recognised pathological prognostic factors, including oestrogen receptor (ER) status. Methods—DNA extracted from frozen sections of breast tumours (n = 36) was used for Southern blotting. Probes for CCND1, c-myc and the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus (IgH) were hybridised to tumour DNA. Immunocytochemical expression of Cyclin D1 protein and ER was studied in paraffin wax sections from the same tumours. Results—Amplification of CCND1 was observed in 11% (four of 36) of tumours studied. Over expression of Cyclin D1 protein was observed in 73% (30/41) of tumours. There was no correlation between recognised histological prognostic markers and either gene amplification or expression. However, a weak association was seen between Cyclin D1 expression and ER status. Conclusions—A disparity exists between locus amplification and over expression of Cyclin D1, suggesting the existence of another mechanism for raised protein expression. No significant correlation was detected between either Cyclin D1 amplification or over expression and established prognostic markers. Images PMID:16696045

  1. Competitive Nuclear Export of Cyclin D1 and Hic-5 Regulates Anchorage Dependence of Cell Growth and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Kazunori; Hirao, Etsuko; Toya, Yosuke; Oshima, Yukiko; Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Nose, Kiyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Anchorage dependence of cell growth and survival is a critical trait that distinguishes nontransformed cells from transformed cells. We demonstrate that anchorage dependence is determined by anchorage-dependent nuclear retention of cyclin D1, which is regulated by the focal adhesion protein, Hic-5, whose CRM1-dependent nuclear export counteracts that of cyclin D1. An adaptor protein, PINCH, interacts with cyclin D1 and Hic-5 and potentially serves as an interface for the competition between cyclin D1 and Hic-5 for CRM1. In nonadherent cells, the nuclear export of Hic-5, which is redox-sensitive, was interrupted due to elevated production of reactive oxygen species, and cyclin D1 was exported from the nucleus. When an Hic-5 mutant that was continuously exported in a reactive oxygen species-insensitive manner was introduced into the cells, cyclin D1 was retained in the nucleus under nonadherent conditions, and a significant population of cells escaped from growth arrest or apoptosis. Interestingly, activated ras achieved predominant cyclin D1 nuclear localization and thus, growth in nonadherent cells. We report a failsafe system for anchorage dependence of cell growth and survival. PMID:18946086

  2. Regulation of Glioblastoma Progression by Cord Blood Stem Cells Is Mediated by Downregulation of Cyclin D1

    PubMed Central

    Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Dasari, Venkata Ramesh; Tsung, Andrew J.; Gondi, Christopher S.; Klopfenstein, Jeffrey D.; Mohanam, Sanjeeva; Rao, Jasti S.

    2011-01-01

    Background The normal progression of the cell cycle requires sequential expression of cyclins. Rapid induction of cyclin D1 and its associated binding with cyclin-dependent kinases, in the presence or absence of mitogenic signals, often is considered a rate-limiting step during cell cycle progression through the G1 phase. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study, human umbilical cord blood stem cells (hUCBSC) in co-cultures with glioblastoma cells (U251 and 5310) not only induced G0-G1 phase arrest, but also reduced the number of cells at S and G2-M phases of cell cycle. Cell cycle regulatory proteins showed decreased expression levels upon treatment with hUCBSC as revealed by Western and FACS analyses. Inhibition of cyclin D1 activity by hUCBSC treatment is sufficient to abolish the expression levels of Cdk 4, Cdk 6, cyclin B1, β-Catenin levels. Our immuno precipitation experiments present evidence that, treatment of glioma cells with hUCBSC leads to the arrest of cell-cycle progression through inactivation of both cyclin D1/Cdk 4 and cyclin D1/Cdk 6 complexes. It is observed that hUCBSC, when co-cultured with glioma cells, caused an increased G0-G1 phase despite the reduction of G0-G1 regulatory proteins cyclin D1 and Cdk 4. We found that this reduction of G0-G1 regulatory proteins, cyclin D1 and Cdk 4 may be in part compensated by the expression of cyclin E1, when co-cultured with hUCBSC. Co-localization experiments under in vivo conditions in nude mice brain xenografts with cyclin D1 and CD81 antibodies demonstrated, decreased expression of cyclin D1 in the presence of hUCBSC. Conclusions/Significance This paper elucidates a model to regulate glioma cell cycle progression in which hUCBSC acts to control cyclin D1 induction and in concert its partner kinases, Cdk 4 and Cdk 6 by mediating cell cycle arrest at G0-G1 phase. PMID:21455311

  3. Selective repression of the oncogene cyclin D1 by the tumor suppressor miR-206 in cancers.

    PubMed

    Elliman, S J; Howley, B V; Mehta, D S; Fearnhead, H O; Kemp, D M; Barkley, L R

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are deregulated in cancer and have been shown to exhibit both oncogenic and tumor suppressive functions. Although the functional effects of several miRNAs have been elucidated, those of many remain to be discovered. In silico analysis identified microRNA-206 (miR-206) binding sites in the 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTR) of both the mouse and human CCND1 gene. Cyclin D1 is a recognized oncogene involved in direct phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein and promoting cell cycle transition from G1 to S. miR-206 specifically binds to the CCND1 3'-UTR and mediates reduction of both cyclin D1 protein and mRNA. Expression of miR-206 induced a G1 arrest and a decrease in cell proliferation in breast cancer cells. Ectopic expression of miRNA-resistant cyclin D1 was able to reverse the miR-206-induced decrease in cell proliferation. Therefore, we identified miR-206 as an activator of cell cycle arrest resulting in a decrease in cell proliferation that is dependent on the inhibition of cyclin D1. Interestingly, prostatic cancer (PCa) cells express low levels of miR-206 resulting in deregulated cyclin D1 expression compared with non-transformed primary prostatic epithelial cells (PrEC). Finally, we demonstrate that cyclin D1 is regulated by miR-206 in PrEC but not in PCa cells and this is due to the absence of a CCND1 3'-UTR in these cells. This suggests that miR-206-based anti-cyclin D1 targeted therapy would be beneficial in cancers where cyclin D1 is overexpressed and contains a 3'-UTR. PMID:25111862

  4. Sesamin, a lignan of sesame, down-regulates cyclin D1 protein expression in human tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Tomoya; Matsuzaki, Youichirou; Koyama, Makoto; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Kawanaka, Mayumi; Enoki-Konishi, Masako; Okuyama, Yusuke; Takayasu, Junko; Nishino, Hoyoku; Nishikawa, Akiyoshi; Osawa, Toshihiko; Sakai, Toshiyuki

    2007-09-01

    Sesamin is a major lignan constituent of sesame and possesses multiple functions such as antihypertensive, cholesterol-lowering, lipid-lowering and anticancer activities. Several groups have previously reported that sesamin induces growth inhibition in human cancer cells. However, the nature of this growth inhibitory mechanism remains unknown. The authors here report that sesamin induces growth arrest at the G1 phase in cell cycle progression in the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Furthermore, sesamin dephosphorylates tumor-suppressor retinoblastoma protein (RB). It is also shown that inhibition of MCF-7 cell proliferation by sesamin is correlated with down-regulated cyclin D1 protein expression, a proto-oncogene that is overexpressed in many human cancer cells. It was found that sesamin-induced down-regulation of cyclin D1 was inhibited by proteasome inhibitors, suggesting that sesamin suppresses cyclin D1 protein expression by promoting proteasome degradation of cyclin D1 protein. Sesamin down-regulates cyclin D1 protein expression in various kinds of human tumor cells, including lung cancer, transformed renal cells, immortalized keratinocyte, melanoma and osteosarcoma. Furthermore, depletion of cyclin D1 protein using small interfering RNA rendered MCF-7 cells insensitive to the growth inhibitory effects of sesamin, implicating that cyclin D1 is at least partially related to the antiproliferative effects of sesamin. Taken together, these results suggest that the ability of sesamin to down-regulate cyclin D1 protein expression through the activation of proteasome degradation could be one of the mechanisms of the antiproliferative activity of this agent. PMID:17640297

  5. Tumor suppressor SMAR1 mediates cyclin D1 repression by recruitment of the SIN3/histone deacetylase 1 complex.

    PubMed

    Rampalli, Shravanti; Pavithra, L; Bhatt, Altaf; Kundu, Tapas K; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2005-10-01

    Matrix attachment region binding proteins have been shown to play an important role in gene regulation by altering chromatin in a stage- and tissue-specific manner. Our previous studies report that SMAR1, a matrix-associated protein, regresses B16-F1-induced tumors in mice. Here we show SMAR1 targets the cyclin D1 promoter, a gene product whose dysregulation is attributed to breast malignancies. Our studies reveal that SMAR1 represses cyclin D1 gene expression, which can be reversed by small interfering RNA specific to SMAR1. We demonstrate that SMAR1 interacts with histone deacetylation complex 1, SIN3, and pocket retinoblastomas to form a multiprotein repressor complex. This interaction is mediated by the SMAR1(160-350) domain. Our data suggest SMAR1 recruits a repressor complex to the cyclin D1 promoter that results in deacetylation of chromatin at that locus, which spreads to a distance of at least the 5 kb studied upstream of the cyclin D1 promoter. Interestingly, we find that the high induction of cyclin D1 in breast cancer cell lines can be correlated to the decreased levels of SMAR1 in these lines. Our results establish the molecular mechanism exhibited by SMAR1 to regulate cyclin D1 by modification of chromatin. PMID:16166625

  6. Prognostic significance of CCND1 (cyclin D1) overexpression in primary resected non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Betticher, D. C.; Heighway, J.; Hasleton, P. S.; Altermatt, H. J.; Ryder, W. D.; Cerny, T.; Thatcher, N.

    1996-01-01

    Amplification of the CCDN1 gene encoding cyclin D1 was examined by Southern blotting and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and occurred in 8 of 53 patients (15%) with primary resected non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). These tumours and 17 additional tumours with a normal gene copy number showed overexpression of cyclin D1 (25/53, 47%), as assessed by immunostaining using a monoclonal antibody. In 22/25 cases, cyclin D1 was localised in the cytoplasm, but some (7/25) had simultaneous nuclear staining. This result is in marked contrast to that reported in breast, hepatocellular and colorectal carcinoma studies where immunostaining was invariably nuclear. Examination of a restriction fragment length polymorphic (RFLP) site within the 3'untranslated region of the cDNA following reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR (29/53 informative cases) showed a strong association between cytoplasmic staining and imbalance in allele-specific message levels. Cyclin D1 overexpression was associated with a poorly differentiated histology (P = 0.04), less lymphocytic infiltration of the tumour (P = 0.02) and a reduction in local relapse rate (P = 0.01). The relative risk of local relapse was 9.1 in tumours without cyclin D1 overexpression (P = 0.01, Cox regression analysis). We conclude that genetic alteration of cyclin D1 is a key abnormality in lung carcinogenesis and may have diagnostic and prognostic importance in the treatment of resectable NSCLC. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8562333

  7. The Wnt pathway destabilizes adherens junctions and promotes cell migration via β-catenin and its target gene cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Vlad-Fiegen, Annica; Langerak, Anette; Eberth, Sonja; Müller, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The Wnt pathway regulates cell proliferation, mobility and differentiation. Among the many Wnt target genes is CCND1 which codes for cyclin D1. Cyclin D1, in complex with cdk4 and cdk6, regulates G1/S phase transition during cell cycle. Independently of CDK, cyclin D1 also regulates the migration of macrophages. Here we analyzed the effects of cyclin D1 on the migration of cancer cell lines using the transwell migration and scratch assays. We also tested the effect of cyclin D1 and β-catenin on E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts. Our results show that the Wnt pathway promotes cellular migration via its target gene cyclin D1. Moreover we show that cyclin D1 influences the actin cytoskeleton and destabilizes adherens junctions. PMID:23650577

  8. The Wnt pathway destabilizes adherens junctions and promotes cell migration via β-catenin and its target gene cyclin D1

    PubMed Central

    Vlad-Fiegen, Annica; Langerak, Anette; Eberth, Sonja; Müller, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The Wnt pathway regulates cell proliferation, mobility and differentiation. Among the many Wnt target genes is CCND1 which codes for cyclin D1. Cyclin D1, in complex with cdk4 and cdk6, regulates G1/S phase transition during cell cycle. Independently of CDK, cyclin D1 also regulates the migration of macrophages. Here we analyzed the effects of cyclin D1 on the migration of cancer cell lines using the transwell migration and scratch assays. We also tested the effect of cyclin D1 and β-catenin on E-cadherin-mediated cell–cell contacts. Our results show that the Wnt pathway promotes cellular migration via its target gene cyclin D1. Moreover we show that cyclin D1 influences the actin cytoskeleton and destabilizes adherens junctions. PMID:23650577

  9. Overexpression of cyclin D1-CDK4 in silica-induced transformed cells is due to activation of ERKs, JNKs/AP-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Shen, Fuhai; Fan, Xueyun; Liu, Bingci; Jia, Xiaowei; Du, Hongju; You, Baorong; Ye, Meng; Huang, Chuanshu; Shi, Xianglin

    2006-01-25

    Silica has been known to be a factor inducing acute injury and chronic pulmonary fibrosis. Silica has also been listed as a human carcinogen in 1996 by International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). However, the molecular mechanisms involved its pathologic effects are not well understood. In these studies, we found that exposure of human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HELF) to crystalline silica could cause increases in activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs), p38K, and c-Jun NH2-terminal amino kinases (JNKs), and HELF transformation. Interestingly, silica-induced transformation of HELF (S-HELF) led to increases in activated levels of ERKs and p46 of JNKs, and decrease in p38K activation, and no effect on activation of p54 of JNKs, as compared with those in parental HELF. Further studies showed that there are differential effects of ERKs, JNKs and p38K, as well as their downstream transcription factor AP-1, in regulation of expression of cyclin D1 and CDK4 and cell cycle alternations induced by silica. Cyclin D1 and CDK4 were increased in S-HELF as compared with those in HELF. Inhibition of ERKs activation by AG126, JNK by SP600125, and AP-1 by curcumin could reduced the induction of cyclin D1 and CDK4. There is no significant difference for cell cycle distribution between groups. These results demonstrate that ERKs and JNKs, but not p38K is responsible for induction of cyclin D1 and CDK4 in S-HELF, suggesting that overexpression of cyclin D1 and CDK4 caused by silica is mediated by ERK, JNK/AP-1signaling pathway. PMID:16125882

  10. The expression status of TRX, AR, and cyclin D1 correlates with clinicopathological characteristics and ER status in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weisun; Nie, Weiwei; Zhang, Wenwen; Wang, Yanru; Zhu, Aiyu; Guan, Xiaoxiang

    2016-01-01

    Background The ER signaling pathway plays a critical role in breast cancer. ER signaling pathway-related proteins, such as TRX, AR, and cyclin D1, may have an important function in breast cancer. However, the ways that they influence breast cancer development and progression are still unclear. Patients and methods A total of 101 Chinese female patients diagnosed with invasive ductal breast adenocarcinoma were retrospectively enrolled in the study. The expression levels of TRX, AR, and cyclin D1 were detected by immunohistochemistry and analyzed via correlation with clinicopathological characteristics and the expression status of ER, PR, and HER2. Results The expression status of TRX, AR, and cyclin D1 was not associated with the patient’s age, menopausal status, tumor size, or histological differentiation (P>0.05), but was positively correlated with ER and PR (P<0.001, respectively). Most (66/76, 86.8) TRX-positive patients were also HER2-positive (P=0.003). Of AR- or cyclin D1-positive patients, most had relatively earlier I–II tumor stage (P=0.005 and P=0.047, respectively) and no metastatic lymph node involvement (P=0.008 and P=0.005, respectively). Conclusion TRX was found to be positively correlated with ER and PR expression, whereas it was negatively correlated with HER2 expression. In addition, we found that the positive expression of AR and cyclin D1 was correlated with lower TNM stage and fewer metastatic lymph nodes, and it was more common in ER-positive breast cancer than in the basal-like subtype. This may indicate that AR and cyclin D1 are good predictive and prognostic factors and closely interact with ER signaling pathway. Further studies will be necessary to investigate the response and clinical outcomes of treatment targeting TRX, AR, and cyclin D1. PMID:27499632

  11. Nuclear association of cyclin D1 in human fibroblasts: tight binding to nuclear structures and modulation by protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Scovassi, A I; Stivala, L A; Rossi, L; Bianchi, L; Prosperi, E

    1997-11-25

    The association of cyclin D1 with nuclear structures was investigated in normal human fibroblasts by using hypotonic detergent extraction procedures, immunofluorescence quantitation with flow cytometry, and Western blot analysis. About 20% of the total cellular levels of cyclin D1 was found to be tightly bound to nuclear structures, being the complex formation resistant to DNase I treatment and to high salt extraction. Maximal levels of the insoluble form of the protein were found in the middle to late G1 phase of the cell cycle. Cell fractionation and immunoprecipitation techniques after in vivo 32P-labeling showed that both soluble and nuclear-bound forms of cyclin D1 were phosphorylated. Both fractions were reactive to an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody, while only the latter was detectable with an anti-phosphoserine antibody. Treatment with the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine, which induces a cell cycle arrest in early G1 phase, strongly reduced cyclin D1 phosphorylation. Concomitantly, the ratio of nuclear-bound/total cyclin D1 levels was reduced by about 60%, compared with the control value. The protein kinase A specific inhibitor isoquinoline-sulfonamide (H-89) induced a similar reduction in the ratio, with no significant modification in the total amount of protein. In contrast, both calphostin C and bisindolylmaleimide, specific inhibitors of protein kinase C, consistently increased by 30-50% the ratio of nuclear-bound/total amount of the cyclin protein. These results suggest that, during the G1 phase, formation of an insoluble complex of cyclin D1 occurs at nuclear matrix structures and that this association is mediated by a protein kinase A-dependent pathway. PMID:9417875

  12. Tylophorine Analog DCB-3503 Inhibited Cyclin D1 Translation through Allosteric Regulation of Heat Shock Cognate Protein 70

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Lam, Wing; Chen, Shao-Ru; Guan, Fu-Lan; Dutchman, Ginger E.; Francis, Samson; Baker, David C.; Cheng, Yung-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Tylophorine analog DCB-3503 is a potential anticancer and immunosuppressive agent that suppresses the translation of cellular regulatory proteins, including cyclin D1, at the elongation step. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon remains unknown. This study demonstrates that DCB-3503 preferentially binds to heat shock cognate protein 70 (HSC70), which is a determinant for cyclin D1 translation by binding to the 3′-untranslated region (3′ UTR) of its mRNA. DCB-3503 allosterically regulates the ATPase and chaperone activities of HSC70 by promoting ATP hydrolysis in the presence of specific RNA binding motifs (AUUUA) of cyclin D1 mRNA. The suppression of cyclin D1 translation by DCB-3503 is not solely caused by perturbation of the homeostasis of microRNAs, although the microRNA processing complex is dissociated with DCB-3503 treatment. This study highlights a novel regulatory mechanism of protein translation with AUUUA motifs in the 3′ UTR of mRNA by HSC70, and its activity can be allosterically modulated by DCB-3503. DCB-3503 may be used to treat malignancies, such as hepatocellular carcinoma or breast cancer with elevated expression of cyclin D1. PMID:27596272

  13. Tylophorine Analog DCB-3503 Inhibited Cyclin D1 Translation through Allosteric Regulation of Heat Shock Cognate Protein 70.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Lam, Wing; Chen, Shao-Ru; Guan, Fu-Lan; Dutchman, Ginger E; Francis, Samson; Baker, David C; Cheng, Yung-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Tylophorine analog DCB-3503 is a potential anticancer and immunosuppressive agent that suppresses the translation of cellular regulatory proteins, including cyclin D1, at the elongation step. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon remains unknown. This study demonstrates that DCB-3503 preferentially binds to heat shock cognate protein 70 (HSC70), which is a determinant for cyclin D1 translation by binding to the 3'-untranslated region (3' UTR) of its mRNA. DCB-3503 allosterically regulates the ATPase and chaperone activities of HSC70 by promoting ATP hydrolysis in the presence of specific RNA binding motifs (AUUUA) of cyclin D1 mRNA. The suppression of cyclin D1 translation by DCB-3503 is not solely caused by perturbation of the homeostasis of microRNAs, although the microRNA processing complex is dissociated with DCB-3503 treatment. This study highlights a novel regulatory mechanism of protein translation with AUUUA motifs in the 3' UTR of mRNA by HSC70, and its activity can be allosterically modulated by DCB-3503. DCB-3503 may be used to treat malignancies, such as hepatocellular carcinoma or breast cancer with elevated expression of cyclin D1. PMID:27596272

  14. Hyper sensitive protein detection by Tandem-HTRF reveals Cyclin D1 dynamics in adult mouse

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Alexandre; Champagne, Julien; Auzemery, Baptiste; Fuentes, Ivanna; Maurel, Benjamin; Bienvenu, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    We present here a novel method for the semi-quantitative detection of low abundance proteins in solution that is both fast and simple. It is based on Homogenous Time Resolved Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (HTRF), between a lanthanide labeled donor antibody and a d2 or XL665 labeled acceptor antibody that are both raised against different epitopes of the same target. This novel approach we termed “Tandem-HTRF”, can specifically reveal rare polypeptides from only a few microliters of cellular lysate within one hour in a 384-well plate format. Using this sensitive approach, we observed surprisingly that the core cell cycle regulator Cyclin D1 is sustained in fully developed adult organs and harbors an unexpected expression pattern affected by environmental challenge. Thus our method, Tandem-HTRF offers a promising way to investigate subtle variations in the dynamics of sparse proteins from limited biological material. PMID:26503526

  15. Differential expression of Cyclin D1 in keratin-producing odontogenic cysts

    PubMed Central

    Vera-Sirera, Beatriz; Forner-Navarro, Leopoldo

    2015-01-01

    Objetives: The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression levels of Cyclin D1 (CCD1), a nuclear protein that plays a crucial role in cell cycle progression, in a series of keratin-producing odontogenic cysts. Study Design: A total of 58 keratin-producing odontogenic cysts, diagnosed over ten years and classified according to the WHO 2005 criteria, were immunohistochemically analyzed in terms of CCD1 expression, which was quantified in the basal, suprabasal and intermediate/superficial epithelial compartments. The extent of immunostaining was measured as a proportion of total epithelial thickness. Quantified immunohistochemical data were correlated with clinicopathological features and clinical recurrence. Results: Keratin-producing odontogenic cysts were classified as 6 syndromic keratocystic odontogenic tumors (S-KCOT), 40 sporadic or non-syndromic KCOT (NS-KCOT) and 12 orthokeratinized odontogenic cysts (OOC). Immunohistochemically, CCD1 staining was evident predominantly in the parabasal region of all cystic lesions, but among-lesion differences were apparent, showing a clear expansion of parabasal compartment especially in the S-KCOT, followed to a lesser extent in the NS-KCOT, and being much more reduced in the OOC, which had the greatest average epithelial thickness. Conclusions: The differential expression of CCD1 noted in the present study suggests that dysregulation of cell cycle progression from G1 to the S phase contributes to the different aggressiveness of these lesions. However, CCD1 expression levels did not predict NS-KCOT recurrence, which is likely influenced by factors unrelated to lesion biology. Key words:Keratin-producing odontogenic cyst, keratocyst, keratocystic odontogenic tumor, nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, orthokeratinized odontogenic cyst, cyclin D1, immunohistochemistry. PMID:25475773

  16. Prognostic value of MET, cyclin D1 and MET gene copy number in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Wenze; Song, Liping; Ai, Ting; Zhang, Yingbing; Gao, Ying; Cui, Jie

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation of the expression of MET and cyclin D1 and MET gene copy number in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tissues and patient clinicopathologic characteristics and survival. Sixty-one NSCLC tissue specimens were included in the study. The expression of MET and cyclin D1 was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and MET gene copy number was assessed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR). Positive expression of MET and cyclin D1 protein and increased MET gene copy number occurred in 59.0%, 59.0% and 18.0% of 61 NSCLC tissues, respectively. MET-positivity correlated with poor differentiation (P = 0.009). Increased MET gene copy number was significantly associated with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.004) and advanced tumor stage (P = 0.048), while the expression of cyclin D1 was not associated with any clinicopathologic parameters. There was a significant correlation between the expression of MET and MET gene copy number (P = 0.002). Additionally, the expression of cyclin D1 had a significant association with the expression of MET as well as MET gene copy number (P = 0.002 and P = 0.017, respectively). MET-positivity and increased MET gene copy number were significantly associated with poor overall survival (P = 0.003 and P < 0.001, respectively) in univariate analysis. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard analysis confirmed that the expression of MET and MET gene copy number were prognostic indicators of NSCLC (P = 0.003 and P = 0.001, respectively). The overexpression of MET and the increased MET gene copy number might be adverse prognostic factors for NSCLC patients. The activation of the MET/cyclin D1 signaling pathway may contribute to carcinogenesis and the development of NSCLC, and may represent a target for therapy. PMID:23720678

  17. Diagnostic utility of Ki-67 and Cyclin D1 immunostaining in differentiation of psoriasis vs. other psoriasiform dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Engin; Böer-Auer, Almut; Cetin, Emel; Tokat, Fatma; Durmaz, Emel; Sahin, Sedef; Ince, Umit

    2015-01-01

    Background: Differentiation of psoriasis from non-psoriasis psoriasiform dermatitis (NPPD) may be difficult for dermatopathologists, as lack of distinctive histopathological features in a subset of cases may cause confusion in diagnosis. Objective: As the prototype of psoriasiform dermatitis, psoriasis is a hyperproliferative skin disorder with increased epidermal turnover compared with NPPD, we investigated the role of proliferation markers, Ki-67 and Cyclin D1 as diagnostic tools to differentiate psoriasis from other psoriasiform dermatitis. Methods: Histopathological specimens of psoriasis (n = 35) and NPPD (n = 36, 14 pityriasis rubra pilaris, 12 pityriasis rosea and 10 lichen simplex) cases were reviewed and immunohistochemically stained for Ki-67 and Cyclin D1. Ki-67 and Cyclin D1 positive cells were counted for suprabasal, and total epidermal immunostaining per mm2. Results: Suprabasal and total epidermal cell counts for Ki-67 were found to be significantly higher in the psoriasis group compared with the NPPD group (p < 0.05). An important and interesting feature was the presence of a cut-off value for the suprabasal/total epidermal cell count ratio of 75% for Ki-67 immunostaining, which was higher in all patients having psoriasis (range, 77.1% – 92.4%) and lower in all NPPD cases (range, 21.0% – 73.3%). However, suprabasal Cyclin D1 cell counts were higher in the psoriasis group compared with the NPPD group (p < 0.05), total epidermal Cyclin D1 cell counts were not statistically significant in either group (p = 0.167), and a cut-off value for suprabasal/total epidermal cell count ratio to distinguish these two entities was not detected using this immunostain. Conclusions: We suggest that Ki-67 is a more sensitive marker than Cyclin D1 in terms of having a cutoff value of 75% for the suprabasal/total epidermal immunoreactive cell count ratio, which we believe could be useful for dermatopathologists in differentiating psoriasis from other psoriasiform

  18. Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 3C Facilitates G1-S Transition by Stabilizing and Enhancing the Function of Cyclin D1

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Abhik; Halder, Sabyasachi; Upadhyay, Santosh K.; Lu, Jie; Kumar, Pankaj; Murakami, Masanao; Cai, Qiliang; Robertson, Erle S.

    2011-01-01

    EBNA3C, one of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded latent antigens, is essential for primary B-cell transformation. Cyclin D1, a key regulator of G1 to S phase progression, is tightly associated and aberrantly expressed in numerous human cancers. Previously, EBNA3C was shown to bind to Cyclin D1 in vitro along with Cyclin A and Cyclin E. In the present study, we provide evidence which demonstrates that EBNA3C forms a complex with Cyclin D1 in human cells. Detailed mapping experiments show that a small N-terminal region which lies between amino acids 130–160 of EBNA3C binds to two different sites of Cyclin D1- the N-terminal pRb binding domain (residues 1–50), and C-terminal domain (residues 171–240), known to regulate Cyclin D1 stability. Cyclin D1 is short-lived and ubiquitin-mediated proteasomal degradation has been targeted as a means of therapeutic intervention. Here, we show that EBNA3C stabilizes Cyclin D1 through inhibition of its poly-ubiquitination, and also increases its nuclear localization by blocking GSK3β activity. We further show that EBNA3C enhances the kinase activity of Cyclin D1/CDK6 which enables subsequent ubiquitination and degradation of pRb. EBNA3C together with Cyclin D1-CDK6 complex also efficiently nullifies the inhibitory effect of pRb on cell growth. Moreover, an sh-RNA based strategy for knock-down of both cyclin D1 and EBNA3C genes in EBV transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) shows a significant reduction in cell-growth. Based on these results, we propose that EBNA3C can stabilize as well as enhance the functional activity of Cyclin D1 thereby facilitating the G1-S transition in EBV transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. PMID:21347341

  19. Genomic profiling of acquired resistance to apoptosis in cells derived from human atherosclerotic lesions: potential role of STATs, cyclinD1, BAD, and Bcl-XL.

    PubMed

    Gagarin, Dmitry; Yang, Zhaoqing; Butler, Jason; Wimmer, Monika; Du, Baoheng; Cahan, Patrick; McCaffrey, Timothy A

    2005-09-01

    Current theories suggest that atherosclerosis, plaque rupture, stroke, and restenosis after angioplasty may involve defective apoptotic mechanisms in vascular cells. Prior work has demonstrated that cells from human atherosclerotic lesions, and cells from the aorta of aged rats, exhibit functional resistance to apoptosis induced by TGF-beta and glucocorticoids. The present studies demonstrate that human lesion-derived cells (LDC) are also resistant to apoptosis induced by fas ligation compared to cells derived from the adjacent media, and that in vitro expansion of LDC causes acquired resistance to apoptosis. Microarray profiling of fas-resistant versus sensitive cells identified a set of genes including STATs, caspase 1, cyclin D1, Bcl-xL, VDAC2, and BAD. The STAT proteins have been implicated in resistance to apoptosis, potentially via their ability to modulate caspase 1 (ICE), Bcl-xL, and cyclin D1 expression. Western blot analysis of sensitive and resistant LDC clonal lines confirmed increases in cyclin D1, STAT6, Bcl-xL, and BAD, with decreased expression of caspase 1. Thus, transcript profiling has identified a potential pathway of apoptotic regulation in subsets of lesion cells. The resistant phenotype may contribute to plaque stability and excessive vascular repair, while sensitive cells may be involved in plaque rupture and infarction. The data suggests both genetic interventions and novel small-molecule inhibitors that may be effective modulators of apoptosis in atherosclerosis, angina, and in-stent restenosis. PMID:16005468

  20. Chenodeoxycholic acid through a TGR5-dependent CREB signaling activation enhances cyclin D1 expression and promotes human endometrial cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Casaburi, Ivan; Avena, Paola; Lanzino, Marilena; Sisci, Diego; Giordano, Francesca; Maris, Pamela; Catalano, Stefania; Morelli, Catia; Andò, Sebastiano

    2012-07-15

    Endometrial cancer exhibits a strong incidence in western developed countries mainly due to fat-rich diet and obesity. Processing of dietary lipids is triggered by bile acids, amphipathic detergents that are synthesized in the liver and stored in the gallbladder. In addition to their well-recognized role in dietary lipid absorption and cholesterol homeostasis, bile acids can also act as signaling molecules with systemic endocrine functions. In the present study we investigated the biological effects of the primary bile chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) on a human endometrial cancer cell line, Ishikawa. Low concentrations of CDCA are able to stimulate Ishikawa cell growth by inducing a significant increase in Cyclin D1 protein and mRNA expression through the activation of the membrane G protein-coupled receptor (TGR5)-dependent pathway. Dissecting the molecular mechanism underlying this effect by mutagenesis, EMSA and ChIP analysis revealed that CDCA-induced Cyclin D1 expression requires the enhanced recruitment of the transcription factor CREB on the cyclic AMP-responsive element motif within the Cyclin D1 gene proximal promoter. Our results suggest a novel molecular mechanism explaining the potential contribution of high-fat diet and obesity to endometrial cancer growth and progression opening the rationale for strategies to prevent the risk of this obesity-related cancer in women. PMID:22751440

  1. Prognostic Significance of Cyclin D1 Expression in Colorectal Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Wei, Jun; Xu, Chuanhui; Zhao, Zhongxin; You, Tiangeng

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cyclin D1 plays a vital role in cancer cell cycle progression and is overexpressed in many human cancers, including colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the prognostic value of cyclin D1 overexpression in colorectal cancer is conflicting and heterogeneous. We conducted a meta-analysis to more precisely evaluate its prognostic significance. Methods A comprehensive literature search for relevant studies published up to January 2014 was performed using PubMed, EMBASE, and ISI Web of Science. The pooled hazard ratio (HR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) was used to estimate the effects. Results 22 studies with 4150 CRC patients were selected to evaluate the association between cyclin D1 and overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS) and clinicopathological parameters. In a random-effects model, the results showed that cyclin D1 overexpression in CRC was significantly associated with both poor OS (HR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.63–0.85, P<0.001) and DFS (HR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.44–0.82, P = 0.001). Additionally, cyclin D1 overexpression was significantly associated with more relative older patients (≥60 years) (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.44–0.89, P = 0.009), T3,4 tumor invasion (OR 0.70, 95% CI 0.57–0.85, P<0.001), N positive (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.60–0.95, P = 0.016) and distant metastasis (OR 0.60, 95% CI 0.36–0.99, P = 0.047) of CRC. Conclusion The meta-analysis results indicated that cyclin D1 is an unfavorable prognostic factor for CRC. Cyclin D1 overexpression might be associated with poor clinical outcome and some clinicopathological factors such as age, T category, N category and distant metastasis in CRC patients. PMID:24728073

  2. Transcriptional Activation of the Cyclin A Gene by the Architectural Transcription Factor HMGA2

    PubMed Central

    Tessari, Michela A.; Gostissa, Monica; Altamura, Sandro; Sgarra, Riccardo; Rustighi, Alessandra; Salvagno, Clio; Caretti, Giuseppina; Imbriano, Carol; Mantovani, Roberto; Del Sal, Giannino; Giancotti, Vincenzo; Manfioletti, Guidalberto

    2003-01-01

    The HMGA2 protein belongs to the HMGA family of architectural transcription factors, which play an important role in chromatin organization. HMGA proteins are overexpressed in several experimental and human tumors and have been implicated in the process of neoplastic transformation. Hmga2 knockout results in the pygmy phenotype in mice and in a decreased growth rate of embryonic fibroblasts, thus indicating a role for HMGA2 in cell proliferation. Here we show that HMGA2 associates with the E1A-regulated transcriptional repressor p120E4F, interfering with p120E4F binding to the cyclin A promoter. Ectopic expression of HMGA2 results in the activation of the cyclin A promoter and induction of the endogenous cyclin A gene. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that HMGA2 associates with the cyclin A promoter only when the gene is transcriptionally activated. These data identify the cyclin A gene as a cellular target for HMGA2 and, for the first time, suggest a mechanism for HMGA2-dependent cell cycle regulation. PMID:14645522

  3. MicroRNA-520b affects the proliferation of human glioblastoma cells by directly targeting cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuchang; Wang, Fachen; Tian, Lin; Wang, Tongxin; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ben; Bai, Yun-An

    2016-06-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) represents one of most common tumors in humans. However, the biological processes and molecular mechanisms of GBM are still unclear. It is known that microRNA-520b (miR-520b) participates in the development of various tumor progressions. The present study was to evaluate the level of miR-520b in GBM tissues and cells. We further investigated the molecular mechanisms of miR-520b in U87 and U251 cell lines. Here, our data showed that the expression levels of miR-520b were significantly reduced in clinical GBM tissues and cell lines. Accordingly, the expression levels of cyclin D1 were significantly increased in clinical GBM tissues and cell lines. Ectopic expression of miR-520b in U87 and U251 cells resulted in decreased cell proliferation and enhanced cell apoptosis. Further study characterized the 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR) of cyclin D1 gene as a direct target of miR-520b in U87 and U251 cells as determined by luciferase reporter assays. In addition, ectopic expression of miR-520b led to the down-regulation of phosphorylated retinoblastoma (p-Rb, a downstream effector of cyclin D1), while the overexpression of cyclin D1 reversed the miR-520b-induced inhibition of p-Rb expression. In conclusion, this study highlights the importance of miR-520b in regulating the proliferation and apoptosis of GBM by directly targeting cyclin D1, and miR-520b may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for GBM. PMID:26700671

  4. The Role of EGFR/PI3K/Akt/cyclinD1 Signaling Pathway in Acquired Middle Ear Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Ren, Hongmiao; Ren, Jihao; Yin, Tuanfang; Hu, Bing; Xie, Shumin; Dai, Yinghuan; Wu, Weijing; Xiao, Zian; Yang, Xinming; Xie, Dinghua

    2013-01-01

    Cholesteatoma is a benign keratinizing and hyper proliferative squamous epithelial lesion of the temporal bone. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is one of the most important cytokines which has been shown to play a critical role in cholesteatoma. In this investigation, we studied the effects of EGF on the proliferation of keratinocytes and EGF-mediated signaling pathways underlying the pathogenesis of cholesteatoma. We examined the expressions of phosphorylated EGF receptor (p-EGFR), phosphorylated Akt (p-Akt), cyclinD1, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in 40 cholesteatoma samples and 20 samples of normal external auditory canal (EAC) epithelium by immunohistochemical method. Furthermore, in vitro studies were performed to investigate EGF-induced downstream signaling pathways in primary external auditory canal keratinocytes (EACKs). The expressions of p-EGFR, p-Akt, cyclinD1, and PCNA in cholesteatoma epithelium were significantly increased when compared with those of control subjects. We also demonstrated that EGF led to the activation of the EGFR/PI3K/Akt/cyclinD1 signaling pathway, which played a critical role in EGF-induced cell proliferation and cell cycle progression of EACKs. Both EGFR inhibitor AG1478 and PI3K inhibitor wortmannin inhibited the EGF-induced EGFR/PI3K/Akt/cyclinD1 signaling pathway concomitantly with inhibition of cell proliferation and cell cycle progression of EACKs. Taken together, our data suggest that the EGFR/PI3K/Akt/cyclinD1 signaling pathway is active in cholesteatoma and may play a crucial role in cholesteatoma epithelial hyper-proliferation. This study will facilitate the development of potential therapeutic targets for intratympanic drug therapy for cholesteatoma. PMID:24311896

  5. Novel RNA-binding activity of MYF5 enhances Ccnd1/Cyclin D1 mRNA translation during myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Amaresh C.; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Martindale, Jennifer L.; Di Germanio, Clara; Yang, Xiaoling; Grammatikakis, Ioannis; Noh, Ji Heon; Zhang, Yongqing; Lehrmann, Elin; Dudekula, Dawood B.; De, Supriyo; Becker, Kevin G.; White, Elizabeth J.; Wilson, Gerald M.; de Cabo, Rafael; Gorospe, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contains long multinucleated and contractile structures known as muscle fibers, which arise from the fusion of myoblasts into multinucleated myotubes during myogenesis. The myogenic regulatory factor (MRF) MYF5 is the earliest to be expressed during myogenesis and functions as a transcription factor in muscle progenitor cells (satellite cells) and myocytes. In mouse C2C12 myocytes, MYF5 is implicated in the initial steps of myoblast differentiation into myotubes. Here, using ribonucleoprotein immunoprecipitation (RIP) analysis, we discovered a novel function for MYF5 as an RNA-binding protein which associated with a subset of myoblast mRNAs. One prominent MYF5 target was Ccnd1 mRNA, which encodes the key cell cycle regulator CCND1 (Cyclin D1). Biotin-RNA pulldown, UV-crosslinking and gel shift experiments indicated that MYF5 was capable of binding the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) and the coding region (CR) of Ccnd1 mRNA. Silencing MYF5 expression in proliferating myoblasts revealed that MYF5 promoted CCND1 translation and modestly increased transcription of Ccnd1 mRNA. Accordingly, overexpressing MYF5 in C2C12 cells upregulated CCND1 expression while silencing MYF5 reduced myoblast proliferation as well as differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes. Moreover, MYF5 silencing reduced myogenesis, while ectopically restoring CCND1 abundance partially rescued the decrease in myogenesis seen after MYF5 silencing. We propose that MYF5 enhances early myogenesis in part by coordinately elevating Ccnd1 transcription and Ccnd1 mRNA translation. PMID:26819411

  6. Expression patterns of cyclin D1 and related proteins regulating G1-S phase transition in uveal melanoma and retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Coupland, S; Bechrakis, N; Schuler, A; Anagnostopoulos, I; Hummel, M; Bornfeld, N; Stein, H

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—A checkpoint mechanism in late G1, whose regulation via loss of retinoblastoma protein (pRB) or p16, or overexpression of cyclin D1 or cyclin dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), has been proposed to constitute a common pathway to malignancy. The aims of this study were (a) to compare markers of cell cycle G1-S phase transition in an intraocular tumour with known pRB deficiency (retinoblastoma) and compare it with one with an apparently functional pRB (uveal melanoma); (b) to determine if one of these markers may have a role in the pathogenesis of uveal melanoma; and (c) to determine if there is a difference in cell cycle marker expression following treatment of uveal melanoma and retinoblastoma.
METHODS—90 eyes were enucleated from 89 patients for retinoblastoma (n=24) or for choroidal or ciliary body melanoma (n=66). Conventional paraffin sections were assessed for cell type and degree of differentiation. Additional slides were investigated applying standard immunohistochemical methods with antibodies specific for cyclin D1 protein, pRB, p53, p21, p16, BCL-2, and MIB-1.
RESULTS—Cyclin D1 protein and pRB were negative in retinoblastoma using the applied antibodies. In contrast, cyclin D1 protein expression was observed in 65% of uveal melanomas; a positive correlation between cyclin D1 cell positivity and tumour cell type, location, growth fraction, as well as with pRB positivity was observed. p53, p21, and p16 could be demonstrated in both tumours. An inverse relation between p53 and p21 expression was demonstrated in most choroidal melanomas and in some retinoblastomas. Apart from a decrease in the growth fractions of the tumours as determined by MIB-1, a significant difference in the expression of G1-S phase transition markers in vital areas of uveal melanoma and retinoblastoma following treatment with radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy was not observed.
CONCLUSION—Retinoblastomas and uveal melanomas, two tumours of differing pRB status

  7. Cyclin D1 down-regulation is essential for DBC2's tumor suppressor function

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshihara, Takashi; Collado, Denise; Hamaguchi, Masaaki . E-mail: hamaguchi@fordham.edu

    2007-07-13

    The expression of tumor suppressor gene DBC2 causes certain breast cancer cells to stop growing [M. Hamaguchi, J.L. Meth, C. Von Klitzing, W. Wei, D. Esposito, L. Rodgers, T. Walsh, P. Welcsh, M.C. King, M.H. Wigler, DBC2, a candidate for a tumor suppressor gene involved in breast cancer, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99 (2002) 13647-13652]. Recently, DBC2 was found to participate in diverse cellular functions such as protein transport, cytoskeleton regulation, apoptosis, and cell cycle control [V. Siripurapu, J.L. Meth, N. Kobayashi, M. Hamaguchi, DBC2 significantly influences cell cycle, apoptosis, cytoskeleton, and membrane trafficking pathways. J. Mol. Biol. 346 (2005) 83-89]. Its tumor suppression mechanism, however, remains unclear. In this paper, we demonstrate that DBC2 suppresses breast cancer proliferation through down-regulation of Cyclin D1 (CCND1). Additionally, the constitutional overexpression of CCND1 prevented the negative impact of DBC2 expression on their growth. Under a CCND1 promoter, the expression of CCNE1 exhibited the same protective effect. Our results indicate that the down-regulation of CCND1 is an essential step for DBC2's growth suppression of cancer cells. We believe that this discovery contributes to a better understanding of DBC2's tumor suppressor function.

  8. Cyclin D1 localizes in the cytoplasm of keratinocytes during skin differentiation and regulates cell-matrix adhesion.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Hernández, Rita; Rafel, Marta; Fusté, Noel P; Aguayo, Rafael S; Casanova, Josep M; Egea, Joaquim; Ferrezuelo, Francisco; Garí, Eloi

    2013-08-01

    The function of Cyclin D1 (CycD1) has been widely studied in the cell nucleus as a regulatory subunit of the cyclin-dependent kinases Cdk4/6 involved in the control of proliferation and development in mammals. CycD1 has been also localized in the cytoplasm, where its function nevertheless is poorly characterized. In this work we have observed that in normal skin as well as in primary cultures of human keratinocytes, cytoplasmic localization of CycD1 correlated with the degree of differentiation of the keratinocyte. In these conditions, CycD1 co-localized in cytoplasmic foci with exocyst components (Sec6) and regulators (RalA), and with β1 integrin, suggesting a role for CycD1 in the regulation of keratinocyte adhesion during differentiation. Consistent with this hypothesis, CycD1 overexpression increased β1 integrin recycling and drastically reduced the ability of keratinocytes to adhere to the extracellular matrix. We propose that localization of CycD1 in the cytoplasm during skin differentiation could be related to the changes in detachment ability of keratinocytes committed to differentiation. PMID:23839032

  9. p18Ink4c and p53 Act as tumor suppressors in cyclin D1-driven primitive neuroectodermal tumor.

    PubMed

    Saab, Raya; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Matmati, Kelly; Rehg, Jerold E; Baumer, Shannon H; Khoury, Joseph D; Billups, Catherine; Neale, Geoffrey; Helton, Kathleen J; Skapek, Stephen X

    2009-01-15

    The retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor pathway is likely important in primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) of the brain. In fact, 10% to 15% of children born with RB mutations develop brain PNETs, commonly in the pineal gland. Cyclin D1, which in association with cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) 4 and Cdk6 phosphorylates and inactivates the RB protein, is expressed in 40% of sporadic medulloblastoma, a PNET of the cerebellum. To understand tumorigenic events cooperating with RB pathway disruption in brain PNET, we generated a transgenic mouse where cyclin D1 was expressed in pineal cells. Cyclin D1 enhanced pinealocyte proliferation, causing pineal gland enlargement. However, proliferation ceased beyond 2 weeks of age with reversal of Cdk4-mediated Rb phosphorylation despite continued expression of the transgene, and the pineal cells showed heterochromatin foci suggestive of a senescent-like state. In the absence of the p53 tumor suppressor, cell proliferation continued, resulting in pineal PNET that limited mouse survival to approximately 4 months. Interestingly, the Cdk inhibitor p18(Ink4c) was induced in the transgenic pineal glands independently of p53, and transgenic mice that lacked Ink4c developed invasive PNET, although at an older age than those lacking p53. Analogous to our mouse model, we found that children with heritable RB often had asymptomatic pineal gland enlargement that only rarely progressed to PNET. Our finding that the Cdk4 inhibitor p18(Ink4c) is a tumor suppressor in cyclin D1-driven PNET suggests that pharmacologic interventions to inhibit Cdk4 activity may be a useful chemoprevention or therapeutic strategy in cancer driven by primary RB pathway disruption. PMID:19147556

  10. Enhanced tumor formation in cyclin D1 x transforming growth factor beta1 double transgenic mice with characterization by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Deane, Natasha G; Lee, Haakil; Hamaamen, Jalal; Ruley, Anna; Washington, M Kay; LaFleur, Bonnie; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S; Price, Ronald; Beauchamp, R Daniel

    2004-02-15

    Transgenic mice that overexpress cyclin D1 protein in the liver develop liver carcinomas with high penetrance. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) serves as either an epithelial cell growth inhibitor or a tumor promoter, depending on the cellular context. We interbred LFABP-cyclin D1 and Alb-TGF-beta1 transgenic mice to produce cyclin D1/TGF-beta1 double transgenic mice and followed the development of liver tumors over time, characterizing cellular and molecular changes, tumor incidence, tumor burden, and tumor physiology noninvasively by magnetic resonance imaging. Compared with age-matched LFABP-cyclin D1 single transgenic littermates, cyclin D1/TGF-beta1 mice exhibited a significant increase in tumor incidence. Tumor multiplicity, tumor burden, and tumor heterogeneity were higher in cyclin D1/TGF-beta1 mice compared with single transgenic littermates. Characteristics of cyclin D1/TGF-beta1 livers correlated with a marked induction of the peripheral periductal oval cell/stem cell compartment of the liver. A number of cancerous lesions from cyclin D1/TGF-beta1 mice exhibited unique features such as ductal plate malformations and hemorrhagic nodules. Some lesions were contiguous with the severely diseased background liver and, in some cases, replaced the normal architecture of the entire organ. Cyclin D1/TGF-beta1 lesions, in particular, were associated with malignant features such as areas of vascular invasion by hepatocytes and heterogeneous hyperintensity of signal on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. These findings demonstrate that TGF-beta1 promotes stem cell activation and tumor progression in the context of cyclin D1 overexpression in the liver. PMID:14973059

  11. MicroRNA-193b Represses Cell Proliferation and Regulates Cyclin D1 in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiamin; Feilotter, Harriet E.; Paré, Geneviève C.; Zhang, Xiao; Pemberton, Joshua G.W.; Garady, Cherif; Lai, Dulcie; Yang, Xiaolong; Tron, Victor A.

    2010-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma is an aggressive form of human skin cancer characterized by high metastatic potential and poor prognosis. To better understand the role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in melanoma, the expression of 470 miRNAs was profiled in tissue samples from benign nevi and metastatic melanomas. We identified 31 miRNAs that were differentially expressed (13 up-regulated and 18 down-regulated) in metastatic melanomas relative to benign nevi. Notably, miR-193b was significantly down-regulated in the melanoma tissues examined. To understand the role of miR-193b in melanoma, functional studies were undertaken. Overexpression of miR-193b in melanoma cell lines repressed cell proliferation. Gene expression profiling identified 314 genes down-regulated by overexpression of miR-193b in Malme-3M cells. Eighteen of these down-regulated genes, including cyclin D1 (CCND1), were also identified as putative miR-193b targets by TargetScan. Overexpression of miR-193b in Malme-3M cells down-regulated CCND1 mRNA and protein by ≥50%. A luciferase reporter assay confirmed that miR-193b directly regulates CCND1 by binding to the 3′untranslated region of CCND1 mRNA. These studies indicate that miR-193b represses cell proliferation and regulates CCND1 expression and suggest that dysregulation of miR-193b may play an important role in melanoma development. PMID:20304954

  12. PAC exhibits potent anti-colon cancer properties through targeting cyclin D1 and suppressing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Al-Qasem, Abeer; Al-Howail, Huda A; Al-Swailem, Mashael; Al-Mazrou, Amer; Al-Otaibi, Basem; Al-Jammaz, Ibrahim; Al-Khalaf, Huda H; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although response rates and overall survival have been improved in recent years, resistance to multiple drug combinations is inevitable. Therefore, the development of more efficient drugs, with fewer side effects is urgently needed. To this end, we have investigated in the present report the effect of PAC, a novel cucumin analogue, on CRC cells both in vitro and in vivo. We have shown that PAC induces apoptosis, mainly via the internal mitochondrial route, and inhibits cell proliferation through delaying the cell cycle at G2/M phase. Interestingly, the pro-apoptotic effect was mediated through STAT3-dependent down-regulation of cyclin D1 and its downstream target survivin. Indeed, change in the expression level of cyclin D1 modulated the expression of survivin and the response of CRC cells to PAC. Furthermore, using the ChIP assay, we have shown PAC-dependent reduction in the binding of STAT3 to the cyclin D1 promoter in vivo. Additionally, PAC suppressed the epithelial-to-mesenchymal process through down-regulating the mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin, vimentin and Twist1) and inhibiting the invasion/migration abilities of the CRC cells via repressing the pro-migration/invasion protein kinases AKT and ERK1/2. In addition, PAC inhibited tumor growth and repressed the JAK2/STAT3, AKT/mTOR and MEK/ERK pathways as well as their common downstream effectors cyclin D1 and survivin in humanized CRC xenografts. Collectively, these results indicate that PAC has potent anti-CRC effects, and therefore could constitute an effective alternative chemotherapeutic agent, which may consolidate the adjuvant treatment of colon cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25641341

  13. CARMA3 is overexpressed in colon cancer and regulates NF-{kappa}B activity and cyclin D1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Zhifeng; Zhao, Tingting; Wang, Zhenning; Xu, Yingying; Song, Yongxi; Wu, Jianhua; Xu, Huimian

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CARMA3 expression is elevated in colon cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CARMA3 promotes proliferation and cell cycle progression in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CARMA3 upregulates cyclinD1 through NF-{kappa}B activation. -- Abstract: CARMA3 was recently reported to be overexpressed in cancers and associated with the malignant behavior of cancer cells. However, the expression of CARMA3 and its biological roles in colon cancer have not been reported. In the present study, we analyzed the expression pattern of CARMA3 in colon cancer tissues and found that CARMA3 was overexpressed in 30.8% of colon cancer specimens. There was a significant association between CARMA3 overexpression and TNM stage (p = 0.0383), lymph node metastasis (p = 0.0091) and Ki67 proliferation index (p = 0.0035). Furthermore, knockdown of CARMA3 expression in HT29 and HCT116 cells with high endogenous expression decreased cell proliferation and cell cycle progression while overexpression of CARMA3 in LoVo cell line promoted cell proliferation and facilitated cell cycle transition. Further analysis showed that CARMA3 knockdown downregulated and its overexpression upregulated cyclin D1 expression and phospho-Rb levels. In addition, we found that CARMA3 depletion inhibited p-I{kappa}B levels and NF-{kappa}B activity and its overexpression increased p-I{kappa}B expression and NF-{kappa}B activity. NF-{kappa}B inhibitor BAY 11-7082 reversed the role of CARMA3 on cyclin D1 upregulation. In conclusion, our study found that CARMA3 is overexpressed in colon cancers and contributes to malignant cell growth by facilitating cell cycle progression through NF-{kappa}B mediated upregulation of cyclin D1.

  14. Small interfering RNAs targeting cyclin D1 and cyclin D2 enhance the cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic agents in mantle cell lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tiemann, Katrin; Alluin, Jessica V; Honegger, Anja; Chomchan, Pritsana; Gaur, Shikha; Yun, Yen; Forman, Stephen J; Rossi, John J; Chen, Robert W

    2011-11-01

    Cyclin D1 (CCND1) is a known cell cycle regulator whose overexpression is a hallmark of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Although molecular techniques have unified the diagnostic approach to MCL, no therapeutic advances have been made to target this particular pathway. The significance of CCND1 in the pathogenesis and treatment of MCL has yet to be defined. We have taken advantage of RNA interference (RNAi) to down-regulate CCND1 expression in two MCL cell lines (Granta-519 and Jeko-1) to investigate the cytotoxic effect of combining RNAi with conventional chemotherapeutic agents. We designed four small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) specific to CCND1, one specific to CCND2, and one dual-targeting siRNA that simultaneously down-regulates CCND1 and CCND2. Etoposide and doxorubicin were used as chemotherapeutics in combination with the siRNAs. The transfected siRNAs in MCL cell lines triggered 40-60% reduction in target mRNA and protein levels. Importantly, the siRNA-mediated reduction in cyclins resulted in decreased IC(50) (50% inhibitory concentration) values for both doxorubicin and etoposide. The combination of siRNA-mediated inhibition of the cyclins along with chemotherapeutic agents could potentially be used to lower the effective doses of the chemotherapeutic agents and reduce drug-related toxicities. PMID:21745168

  15. Expression and purification of a human anti-cyclin D1 single-chain variable fragment antibody AD5 and its characterization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan; Zou, Desheng; Cao, Yuhua; Yao, Nannan; Wang, Junye; Wang, Wenhan; Jiang, Hongyu; Li, Guiying

    2013-12-01

    Cyclin D1 plays an important role in cell cycle progression. Increasing evidence indicates that cyclin D1 is overexpressed in the majority of tumor cells and has become a potential target for tumor therapy. However, little research has been done on the specific inhibition of cyclin D1 for cancer therapy. With the rapid development of the phage display antibody library technique, single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies have emerged, which have tremendous application prospects in cancer therapy and diagonosis. In this study, a human scFv binding specifically to cyclin D1 (AD5) that was derived from a human semi-synthetic scFv phage library was expressed in the soluble form in Escherichia coli (E. coli) HB2151 cells. To characterize AD5, soluble AD5 was purified successfully through ammonium sulfate precipitation and affinity chromatography from the culture supernatant of AD5/HB2151. ELISA assay revealed that purified soluble AD5 could specifically bind to human recombinant cyclin D1 with approximately (1.19±0.056) x 107 M-1 affinity constant and showed approximately 52% competitive inhibition with the anti-cyclin D1 polyclonal antibody for binding to cyclin D1 in vitro. These results suggest that the scFv antibody against cyclin D1 may be a novel potential tool for targeting cyclin D1 in cancer therapy and diagnosis. PMID:24127128

  16. Targeting the AKT/GSK3{beta}/Cyclin D1/Cdk4 Survival Signaling Pathway for Eradication of Tumor Radioresistance Acquired by Fractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Kakuda, Satoshi; Ochiai, Yasushi; Kuwahara, Yoshikazu; Takai, Yoshihiro; Fukumoto, Manabu

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: Radioresistance is a major cause of treatment failure of radiotherapy (RT) in human cancer. We have recently revealed that acquired radioresistance of tumor cells induced by fractionated radiation is attributable to cyclin D1 overexpression as a consequence of the downregulation of GSK3{beta}-dependent cyclin D1 proteolysis mediated by a constitutively activated serine-threonine kinase, AKT. This prompted us to hypothesize that targeting the AKT/GSK3{beta}/cyclin D1 pathway may improve fractionated RT by suppressing acquired radioresistance of tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Two human tumor cell lines with acquired radioresistance were exposed to X-rays after incubation with either an AKT inhibitor, AKT/PKB signaling inhibitor-2 (API-2), or a Cdk4 inhibitor (Cdk4-I). Cells were then subjected to immunoblotting, clonogenic survival assay, cell growth analysis, and cell death analysis with TUNEL and annexin V staining. In vivo radiosensitivity was assessed by growth of human tumors xenografted into nude mice. Results: Treatment with API-2 resulted in downregulation of cyclin D1 expression in cells with acquired radioresistance. Cellular radioresistance disappeared completely both in vitro and in vivo with accompanying apoptosis when treated with API-2. Furthermore, inhibition of cyclin D1/Cdk4 by Cdk4-I was sufficient for abolishing radioresistance. Treatment with either API-2 or Cdk4-I was also effective in suppressing resistance to cis-platinum (II)-diamine-dichloride in the cells with acquired radioresistance. Interestingly, the radiosensitizing effect of API-2 was canceled by overexpression of cyclin D1 whereas Cdk4-I was still able to sensitize cells with cyclin D1 overexpression. Conclusion: Cyclin D1/Cdk4 is a critical target of the AKT survival signaling pathway responsible for tumor radioresistance. Targeting the AKT/GSK3{beta}/cyclin D1/Cdk4 pathway would provide a novel approach to improve fractionated RT and would have an impact on tumor

  17. Quercetin reduces cyclin D1 activity and induces G1 phase arrest in HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, JIN; LI, LU; FANG, LI; XIE, HUA; YAO, WENXIU; ZHOU, XIANG; XIONG, ZHUJUAN; WANG, LI; LI, ZHIXI; LUO, FENG

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin is able to inhibit proliferation of malignant tumor cells; however, the exact mechanism involved in this biological process remains unclear. The current study utilized a quantitative proteomic analysis to explore the antitumor mechanisms of quercetin. The leucine of HepG2 cells treated with quercetin was labeled as d3 by stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). The isotope peaks of control HepG2 cells were compared with the d3-labeled HepG2 cells by mass spectrometry (MS) to identify significantly altered proteins. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analyses were subsequently employed to verify the results of the MS analysis. A flow cytometry assay was designed to observe the influence of various quercetin treatment concentrations on the cell cycle distribution of HepG2 cells. The results indicated that quercetin is able to substantially inhibit proliferation of HepG2 cells and induce an obvious morphological alteration of cells. According to the MS results, the 70 credibly-changed proteins that were identified may play important roles in multiple cellular processes, including protein synthesis, signaling, cytoskeletal processes and metabolism. Among these functional proteins, the expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1) was found to be significantly decreased. RT-PCR and western blot analyses verified the SILAC-MS results of decreased CCND1 expression. In summary, flow cytometry revealed that quercetin is able to induce G1 phase arrest in HepG2 cells. Based on the aforementioned observations, it is suggested that quercetin exerts antitumor activity in HepG2 cells through multiple pathways, including interfering with CCND1 gene expression to disrupt the cell cycle and proliferation of HepG2 cells. In the future, we aim to explore this effect in vivo. PMID:27347174

  18. Functional Variants at the 11q13 Risk Locus for Breast Cancer Regulate Cyclin D1 Expression through Long-Range Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    French, Juliet D.; Ghoussaini, Maya; Edwards, Stacey L.; Meyer, Kerstin B.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Ahmed, Shahana; Khan, Sofia; Maranian, Mel J.; O’Reilly, Martin; Hillman, Kristine M.; Betts, Joshua A.; Carroll, Thomas; Bailey, Peter J.; Dicks, Ed; Beesley, Jonathan; Tyrer, Jonathan; Maia, Ana-Teresa; Beck, Andrew; Knoblauch, Nicholas W.; Chen, Constance; Kraft, Peter; Barnes, Daniel; González-Neira, Anna; Alonso, M. Rosario; Herrero, Daniel; Tessier, Daniel C.; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Conroy, Don; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Cornelissen, Sten; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Fasching, Peter A.; Loehberg, Christian R.; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Johnson, Nichola; Aitken, Zoe; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Menegaux, Florence; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Benitez, Javier; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Lichtner, Peter; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Engel, Christoph; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Justenhoven, Christina; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Heikkilä, Päivi; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Sueta, Aiko; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Antonenkova, Natalia N.; Dörk, Thilo; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Lambrechts, Diether; Peeters, Stephanie; Smeets, Ann; Floris, Giuseppe; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Sardella, Domenico; Couch, Fergus J.; Wang, Xianshu; Pankratz, Vernon S.; Lee, Adam; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Ng, Char-Hong; Vithana, Eranga Nishanthie; Kristensen, Vessela; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Klevebring, Daniel; Schoof, Nils; Hooning, Maartje J.; Martens, John W.M.; Collée, J. Margriet; Tilanus-Linthorst, Madeleine; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Healey, Catherine S.; Shah, Mitul; Pooley, Karen A.; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Sim, Xueling; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; McKay, James; Toland, Amanda E.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Godwin, Andrew K.; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Chen, Shou-Tung; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Ponder, Bruce A.J.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Brown, Melissa A.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Dunning, Alison M.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of 4,405 variants in 89,050 European subjects from 41 case-control studies identified three independent association signals for estrogen-receptor-positive tumors at 11q13. The strongest signal maps to a transcriptional enhancer element in which the G allele of the best candidate causative variant rs554219 increases risk of breast cancer, reduces both binding of ELK4 transcription factor and luciferase activity in reporter assays, and may be associated with low cyclin D1 protein levels in tumors. Another candidate variant, rs78540526, lies in the same enhancer element. Risk association signal 2, rs75915166, creates a GATA3 binding site within a silencer element. Chromatin conformation studies demonstrate that these enhancer and silencer elements interact with each other and with their likely target gene, CCND1. PMID:23540573

  19. Cyclin D1 expression in colorectal cancer is a favorable prognostic factor in men but not in women in a prospective, population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Although colorectal cancer (CRC) is generally not considered to be a hormone-dependent malignancy, several sex-related differences in incidence, molecular characteristics and survival have been reported. Epidemiological studies have consistently shown that increased exposure to female sex hormones is associated with a lower risk of CRC in women, and cyclin D1, an important downstream effector in estrogen-mediated signaling, is commonly activated in CRC. In this study, we analyzed the prognostic significance of cyclin D1 expression in CRC, with particular reference to sex-related differences, in tumors from a large, prospective, population-based cohort. Methods Using tissue microarrays and immunohistochemistry, the fraction and intensity of cyclin D1 expression was evaluated in 527 incident CRC cases from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. The χ2 and Spearman's rho (ρ) tests were used for comparison of cyclin D1 expression and relevant clinicopathological characteristics. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards modeling were used to assess the effect of cyclin D1 expression on cancer-specific survival (CSS) in univariate and multivariate analysis, adjusted for established prognostic factors. Results Cyclin D1 intensity was significantly lower in male compared with female CRC (P = 0.018). In the full cohort, cyclin D1 expression was associated with a significantly prolonged CSS (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.69; 95% CI 0.49 to 0.96, P = 0.026) but subgroup analysis according to gender revealed a strongly accentuated prognostic effect of cyclin D1 in male CRC (HR = 0.48; 95% CI 0.31 to 0.74, P < 0.001), which was in contrast to female CRC, where cyclin D1 was not prognostic (HR = 1.05; 95% CI 0.62 to 1.78, P = 0.864) (Pinteraction = 0.024). The prognostic value of cyclin D1 was not retained in multivariate analysis, either in the full cohort or in male CRC. Conclusions Cyclin D1 expression is strongly associated with prolonged survival in male CRC

  20. DNA damage signaling guards against perturbation of cyclin D1 expression triggered by low-dose long-term fractionated radiation

    PubMed Central

    Shimura, T; Kobayashi, J; Komatsu, K; Kunugita, N

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin D1 expression is precisely controlled during cell-cycle progression. However, repeated exposure to low-dose fractionated radiation (FR) abrogates cell cycle-dependent cyclin D1 degradation by constitutive activation of AKT survival signaling in normal human fibroblasts. The resulting abnormal nuclear cyclin D1 accumulation induces defects in DNA replication and resulting DNA double-strand breaks, and is associated with induction of genomic instability in low-dose irradiated cells. Here, we investigated the role of DNA damage signaling against such perturbed cell-cycle control of cyclin D1 expression. Nuclear cyclin D1 accumulation was induced within 7 days after low-dose FR (0.01 Gy or 0.05 Gy per fraction) in ATM-deficient cells (AT5BIVA), but appeared later in AT5BIVA cells harboring human ATM cDNA. Thus, ATM prevents abnormal nuclear cyclin D1 accumulation at early time points after low-dose FR. We further demonstrated that ATM-mediated downregulation of protein phosphatase 2A activity caused activation of the AKT/cyclin D1 pathway after long-term FR. Perturbation of cyclin D1 expression induced Rad51 foci that indicate homologous recombination repair (HRR) in control cells, while ATM- and NBS1-deficient cells (GM7166) failed to induce Rad51 foci after long-term low-dose FR. After 21 days of FR, NBS1- and ATM-deficient cells showed a decrease in nuclear cyclin D1-positive cells, and an increase in apoptotic cells. Similarly, inhibition of ATM with KU55933 abrogated nuclear cyclin D1 accumulation by induction of apoptosis in ATM-complemented cells exposed to low-dose FR. In conclusion, we here demonstrate that ATM is involved in controlling cyclin D1 levels after low-dose FR. DNA damage signaling mitigates the harmful effects of low-dose long-term FR by suppression of cell death induced by perturbation of cyclin D1 expression. PMID:25486524

  1. LPLUNC1 Inhibits Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cell Growth via Down-Regulation of the MAP Kinase and Cyclin D1/E2F Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoling; Zhang, Wenling; Fan, Songqing; Shi, Lei; Li, Xiayu; Gong, Zhaojian; Ma, Jian; Zhou, Ming; Xiang, Juanjuan; Peng, Shuping; Xiang, Bo; Deng, Hao; Yang, Yunbo; Li, Yong; Xiong, Wei; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Li, Guiyuan

    2013-01-01

    Long-palate, lung and nasal epithelium clone 1 (LPLUNC1) gene expression is relatively tissue specific. It is highly expressed in nontumor nasopharyngeal epithelial tissues, but its expression is reduced in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), indicating that LPLUNC1 may be associated with the tumorigenesis of NPC. To study the effects of LPLUNC1 on NPC tumorigenesis, a full-length LPLUNC1 expression plasmid was stably transfected into the NPC cell line, 5-8F. Our data indicated that LPLUNC1 inhibited NPC cell proliferation in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. LPLUNC1 also delayed cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase and inhibited the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and phosphorylated Rb. To further investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the suppressive effects of LPLUNC1 on NPC tumorigenesis, cDNA microarray was performed. These studies revealed that LPLUNC1 inhibited the expression of certain mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases (MAPK) kinases and cell cycle-related molecules. Western blotting confirmed that the expression of MEK1, phosphorylated ERK1/2, phosphorylated JNK1/2, c-Myc and c-Jun were inhibited by LPLUNC1. Furthermore, the transcriptional activity of AP-1 was down-regulated by LPLUNC1, suggesting that the MAPK signaling pathway is regulated by LPLUNC1. Taken together, the present study indicates that LPLUNC1 delays NPC cell growth by inhibiting the MAPK and cyclin D1/E2F pathways and suggests that LPLUNC1 may represent a promising candidate tumor suppressor gene associated with NPC. PMID:23650533

  2. The p-ERK–p-c-Jun–cyclinD1 pathway is involved in proliferation of smooth muscle cells after exposure to cigarette smoke extract

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tianjia; Song, Ting; Ni, Leng; Yang, Genhuan; Song, Xitao; Wu, Lifei; Liu, Bao; Liu, Changwei

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • Smooth muscle cells proliferated after exposure to cigarette smoke extract. • The p-ERK, p-c-Jun, and cyclinD1 expressions increased in the process. • The p-ERK inhibitor, U0126, can reverse these effects. • The p-ERK → p-c-Jun → cyclinD1 pathway is involved in the process. - Abstract: An epidemiological survey has shown that smoking is closely related to atherosclerosis, in which excessive proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) plays a key role. To investigate the mechanism underlying this unusual smoking-induced proliferation, cigarette smoke extract (CSE), prepared as smoke-bubbled phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), was used to induce effects mimicking those exerted by smoking on SMCs. As assessed by Cell Counting Kit-8 detection (an improved MTT assay), SMC viability increased significantly after exposure to CSE. Western blot analysis demonstrated that p-ERK, p-c-Jun, and cyclinD1 expression increased. When p-ERK was inhibited using U0126 (inhibitor of p-ERK), cell viability decreased and the expression of p-c-Jun and cyclinD1 was reduced accordingly, suggesting that p-ERK functions upstream of p-c-Jun and cyclinD1. When a c-Jun over-expression plasmid was transfected into SMCs, the level of cyclinD1 in these cells increased. Moreover, when c-Jun was knocked down by siRNA, cyclinD1 levels decreased. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the p-ERK–p-c-Jun–cyclinD1 pathway is involved in the excessive proliferation of SMCs exposed to CSE.

  3. Endoglin inhibits ERK-induced c-Myc and cyclin D1 expression to impede endothelial cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Christopher C.; Bloodworth, Jeffrey C.; Mythreye, Karthikeyan; Lee, Nam Y.

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endoglin inhibits ERK activation in endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endoglin is a regulator of c-Myc and cyclin D1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {beta}-arrestin2 interaction with endoglin is required for ERK/c-Myc repression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endoglin impedes cellular proliferation by targeting ERK-induced mitogenic signaling. -- Abstract: Endoglin is an endothelial-specific transforming growth factor beta (TGF-{beta}) co-receptor essential for angiogenesis and vascular remodeling. Endoglin regulates a wide range of cellular processes, including cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation, through TGF-{beta} signaling to canonical Smad and Smad-independent pathways. Despite its overall pro-angiogenic role in the vasculature, the underlying mechanism of endoglin action is poorly characterized. We previously identified {beta}-arrestin2 as a binding partner that causes endoglin internalization from the plasma membrane and inhibits ERK signaling towards endothelial migration. In the present study, we examined the mechanistic role of endoglin and {beta}-arrestin2 in endothelial cell proliferation. We show that endoglin impedes cell growth through sustained inhibition of ERK-induced c-Myc and cyclin D1 expression in a TGF-{beta}-independent manner. The down-regulation of c-Myc and cyclin D1, along with growth-inhibition, are reversed when the endoglin/{beta}-arrestin2 interaction is disrupted. Given that TGF-{beta}-induced Smad signaling potently represses c-Myc in most cell types, our findings here show a novel mechanism by which endoglin augments growth-inhibition by targeting ERK and key downstream mitogenic substrates.

  4. Monoterpenes inhibit cell growth, cell cycle progression, and cyclin D1 gene expression in human breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bardon, S; Picard, K; Martel, P

    1998-01-01

    Monoterpenes are found in the essential oils of many commonly consumed fruits and vegetables. These compounds have been shown to exert chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities in mammary tumor models and represent a new class of breast cancer therapeutic agents. In this study, we investigated the effects of limonene and limonene-related monoterpenes, perillyl alcohol and perillic acid, on cell growth, cell cycle progression, and expression of cyclin D1 cell cycle-regulatory gene in T-47D, MCF-7, and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Our results revealed that limonene-related monoterpenes caused a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. Of the three monoterpenes tested, perillyl alcohol was the most potent and limonene was the least potent inhibitor of cell growth. The enantiomeric composition of limonene and perillyl alcohol did not interfere with their effect on cell growth. Sensitivity of breast cancer cell lines to monoterpenes was in the following order: T-47D > MCF-7 > MDA-MB-231. Growth inhibition induced by perillyl alcohol and perillic acid was associated with a fall in the proportion of cells in the S phase and an accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Finally, we showed that the effects of limonene-related monoterpenes on cell proliferation and cell cycle progression were preceded by a decrease in cyclin D1 mRNA levels. PMID:9824849

  5. PIK3CA mutation uncouples tumor growth and Cyclin D1 regulation from MEK/ERK and mutant KRAS signaling

    PubMed Central

    Halilovic, Ensar; She, Qing-Bai; Ye, Qing; Pagliarini, Raymond; Sellers, William R.; Solit, David B.; Rosen, Neal

    2010-01-01

    Mutational activation of KRAS is a common event in human tumors. Identification of the key signaling pathways downstream of mutant KRAS is essential for our understanding of how to pharmacologically target these cancers in patients. We show that PD0325901, a small molecule MEK inhibitor, decreases MEK/ERK pathway signaling, and destabilizes Cyclin D1, resulting in significant anti-cancer activity in a subset of KRAS mutant tumors in vitro and in vivo. Mutational activation of PIK3CA, which commonly co-occurs with KRAS mutation, provides resistance to MEK inhibition through reactivation of AKT signaling. Genetic ablation of the mutant PIK3CA allele in MEK inhibitor-resistant cells restores MEK pathway sensitivity, and re-expression of mutant PIK3CA reinstates the resistance, highlighting the importance of this mutation in resistance to therapy in human cancers. In KRAS mutant tumors, PIK3CA mutation restores Cyclin D1 expression and G1/S cell cycle progression so that they are no longer dependent on KRAS and MEK/ERK signaling. Furthermore, the growth of KRAS mutant tumors with coexistent PIK3CA mutations in vivo is profoundly inhibited with combined pharmacologic inhibition of MEK and AKT. These data suggest that tumors with both KRAS and PI3K mutations are unlikely to respond to inhibition of the MEK pathway alone but will require effective inhibition of both MEK and PI3K/AKT pathway signaling. PMID:20699365

  6. Coffee Polyphenols Change the Expression of STAT5B and ATF-2 Modifying Cyclin D1 Levels in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oleaga, Carlota; Ciudad, Carlos J.; Noé, Véronique; Izquierdo-Pulido, Maria

    2012-01-01

    Background. Epidemiological studies suggest that coffee consumption reduces the risk of cancer, but the molecular mechanisms of its chemopreventive effects remain unknown. Objective. To identify differentially expressed genes upon incubation of HT29 colon cancer cells with instant caffeinated coffee (ICC) or caffeic acid (CA) using whole-genome microarrays. Results. ICC incubation of HT29 cells caused the overexpression of 57 genes and the underexpression of 161, while CA incubation induced the overexpression of 12 genes and the underexpression of 32. Using Venn-Diagrams, we built a list of five overexpressed genes and twelve underexpressed genes in common between the two experimental conditions. This list was used to generate a biological association network in which STAT5B and ATF-2 appeared as highly interconnected nodes. STAT5B overexpression was confirmed at the mRNA and protein levels. For ATF-2, the changes in mRNA levels were confirmed for both ICC and CA, whereas the decrease in protein levels was only observed in CA-treated cells. The levels of cyclin D1, a target gene for both STAT5B and ATF-2, were downregulated by CA in colon cancer cells and by ICC and CA in breast cancer cells. Conclusions. Coffee polyphenols are able to affect cyclin D1 expression in cancer cells through the modulation of STAT5B and ATF-2. PMID:22919439

  7. Cyclin D1 silencing suppresses tumorigenicity, impairs DNA double strand break repair and thus radiosensitizes androgen-independent prostate cancer cells to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Xiaoming; Vetuschi, Antonella; Sferra, Roberta; Casimiro, Mathew C.; Pompili, Simona; Festuccia, Claudio; Colapietro, Alessandro; Gaudio, Eugenio; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Pestell, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with hormone-resistant prostate cancer (PCa) have higher biochemical failure rates following radiation therapy (RT). Cyclin D1 deregulated expression in PCa is associated with a more aggressive disease: however its role in radioresistance has not been determined. Cyclin D1 levels in the androgen-independent PC3 and 22Rv1 PCa cells were stably inhibited by infecting with cyclin D1-shRNA. Tumorigenicity and radiosensitivity were investigated using in vitro and in vivo experimental assays. Cyclin D1 silencing interfered with PCa oncogenic phenotype by inducing growth arrest in the G1 phase of cell cycle and reducing soft agar colony formation, migration, invasion in vitro and tumor formation and neo-angiogenesis in vivo. Depletion of cyclin D1 significantly radiosensitizes PCa cells by increasing the RT-induced DNA damages by affecting the NHEJ and HR pathways responsible of the DNA double-strand break repair. Following treatment of cells with RT the abundance of a biomarker of DNA damage, γ-H2AX, was dramatically increased in sh-cyclin D1 treated cells compared to shRNA control. Concordant with these observations DNA-PKcs-activation and RAD51-accumulation, part of the DNA double-strand break repair machinery, were reduced in shRNA-cyclin D1 treated cells compared to shRNA control. We further demonstrate the physical interaction between CCND1 with activated-ATM, -DNA-PKcs and RAD51 is enhanced by RT. Finally, siRNA-mediated silencing experiments indicated DNA-PKcs and RAD51 are downstream targets of CCND1-mediated PCa cells radioresistance. In summary, these observations suggest that CCND1 is a key mediator of PCa radioresistance and could represent a potential target for radioresistant hormone-resistant PCa. PMID:26689991

  8. Role of cyclin D1 immunoreactivity and AgNOR staining in the evaluation of benign and malignant lesions of the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Veena; Garg, Monika; Chaudhry, Manish; Singh, Sunita; Sen, Rajeev; Gill, Meenu; Sangwaiya, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Prostatic carcinoma is a common and growing public health problem. Histological evaluation is fairly adequate for assessing tumor differentiation, but tumor proliferative activity is difficult to measure. Increasing evidence suggests that the factors controlling cell cycle progression also modulate the rate of ribosome biogenesis. Despite the influence of cyclin D1 and argyrophilic nuclear organizer region (AgNOR) on prostate cancer proliferation, few studies have evaluated the diagnostic importance of these markers. Therefore, the present study was carried out to analyze the diagnostic value of the proliferative markers cyclin D1 and AgNOR in various prostatic lesions and to determine whether any association or relation between these markers and different Gleason grades exists. Methods: A total 50 cases of various prostatic lesions were studied. Tumor grade, AgNOR staining, and cyclin D1 expression were evaluated in all cases. Correlations between the intensity and differential localization of these markers and Gleason grades were evaluated. Results: The mean AgNOR count in cases of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia was high compared with cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) but lower than that of carcinoma cases. The intensity of cyclin D1 expression was high in carcinoma. A total of 14 cases (46.67%) showed strong positivity. No significant correlation was found between the intensity of cyclin D1 expression, AgNOR count, and histologic grades of prostatic carcinoma, whereas a significant correlation was observed between intensity and percentage expression of cyclin D1 in BPH and carcinoma (P<0.01). Nuclear as well as cytoplasmic positivity was seen among various grades of carcinoma. Conclusions: AgNOR count and cyclin D1 may be helpful in distinguishing between BPH and carcinoma of the prostate but may not be used as reliable indicators of the grade of prostatic adenocarcinoma because of overlapping values in various grades. However, further

  9. Growth inhibition of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells by sgRNA targeting the cyclin D1 mRNA based on TRUE gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Satoshi; Oridate, Nobuhiko; Nashimoto, Masayuki; Fukuda, Satoshi; Tamura, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) exhibits increased expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1). Previous studies have shown a correlation between poor prognosis of HNSCC and cyclin D1 overexpression. tRNase ZL-utilizing efficacious gene silencing (TRUE gene silencing) is one of the RNA-mediated gene expression control technologies that have therapeutic potential. This technology is based on a unique enzymatic property of mammalian tRNase ZL, which is that it can cleave any target RNA at any desired site by recognizing a pre-tRNA-like complex formed between the target RNA and an artificial small guide RNA (sgRNA). In this study, we designed several sgRNAs targeting human cyclin D1 mRNA to examine growth inhibition of HNSCC cells. Transfection of certain sgRNAs decreased levels of cyclin D1 mRNA and protein in HSC-2 and HSC-3 cells, and also inhibited their proliferation. The combination of these sgRNAs and cisplatin showed more than additive inhibition of cancer cell growth. These findings demonstrate that TRUE gene silencing of cyclin D1 leads to inhibition of the growth of HNSCC cells and suggest that these sgRNAs alone or combined with cisplatin may be a useful new therapy for HNSCCs. PMID:25437003

  10. Retinoblastoma Protein and MyoD Function Together to Effect the Repression of Fra-1 and in Turn Cyclin D1 during Terminal Cell Cycle Arrest Associated with Myogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Hasan N.; Takahashi, Chiaki; Ewen, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    The acquisition of skeletal muscle-specific function and terminal cell cycle arrest represent two important features of the myogenic differentiation program. These cellular processes are distinct and can be separated genetically. The lineage-specific transcription factor MyoD and the retinoblastoma protein pRb participate in both of these cellular events. Whether and how MyoD and pRb work together to effect terminal cell cycle arrest is uncertain. To address this question, we focused on cyclin D1, whose stable repression is required for terminal cell cycle arrest and execution of myogenesis. MyoD and pRb are both required for the repression of cyclin D1; their actions, however, were found not to be direct. Rather, they operate to regulate the immediate early gene Fra-1, a critical player in mitogen-dependent induction of cyclin D1. Two conserved MyoD-binding sites were identified in an intronic enhancer of Fra-1 and shown to be required for the stable repression of Fra-1 and, in turn, cyclin D1. Localization of MyoD alone to the intronic enhancer of Fra-1 in the absence of pRb was not sufficient to elicit a block to Fra-1 induction; pRb was also recruited to the intronic enhancer in a MyoD-dependent manner. These observations suggest that MyoD and pRb work together cooperatively at the level of the intronic enhancer of Fra-1 during terminal cell cycle arrest. This work reveals a previously unappreciated link between a lineage-specific transcription factor, a tumor suppressor, and a proto-oncogene in the control of an important facet of myogenic differentiation. PMID:25006242

  11. Overexpression of PIN1 Enhances Cancer Growth and Aggressiveness with Cyclin D1 Induction in EBV-Associated Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Meng; Cheung, Chartia Ching-Mei; Chow, Chit; Lun, Samantha Wei-Man; Cheung, Siu-Tim; Lo, Kwok-Wai

    2016-01-01

    Background Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a peculiar Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-associated malignancy that is prevalent in South-East Asia. Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase NIMA-interacting 1 (PIN1) isomerizes specific phosphorylated amino acid residues, which makes it an important regulator in cell survival and apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the contribution made by PIN1 in NPC tumorigenesis and PIN1’s potential role as a therapeutic target. Methods The expression of PIN1 was examined in a panel of NPC cell lines, xenografts and primary tumors. The functional roles of PIN1 in NPC cells were elucidated by the knockdown and overexpression of PIN1 in in vitro and in vivo nude mice models by siRNA and lenti-viral transfection, respectively. The antitumor effects of the PIN1 inhibitor Juglone in NPC cells were also evaluated. Results We revealed the consistent overexpression of PIN1 in almost all EBV-associated NPC cell lines, xenografts and primary tumors. PIN1 suppression was capable of inhibiting cyclin D1 expression and activating caspase-3 in NPC cells. It positively regulated NPC cell proliferation, colony formation and anchorage-independent growth. The inhibition of PIN1 suppressed tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions This study demonstrates the oncogenic role of PIN1 in NPC tumorigenesis, and shows that its overexpression can enhance tumor cell growth via the upregulation of cyclinD1. Our findings inform the development of novel treatments targeting PIN1 for NPC patients. PMID:27258148

  12. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 induces cyclin D1 degradation through the phosphorylation of Thr{sup 286} in squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Jun; Takahashi-Yanaga, Fumi . E-mail: yanaga@clipharm.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Miwa, Yoshikazu; Watanabe, Yutaka; Hirata, Masato; Morimoto, Sachio; Shirasuna, Kanemitsu; Sasaguri, Toshiyuki

    2005-11-01

    Differentiation-inducing factors (DIFs) are morphogens which induce cell differentiation in Dictyostelium. We reported that DIF-1 and DIF-3 inhibit proliferation and induce differentiation in mammalian cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of DIF-1 on oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines NA and SAS, well differentiated and poorly differentiated cell lines, respectively. Although DIF-1 did not induce the expression of cell differentiation makers in these cell lines, it inhibited the proliferation of NA and SAS in a dose-dependent manner by restricting the cell cycle in the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase. DIF-1 induced cyclin D1 degradation, but this effect was prevented by treatment with lithium chloride and SB216763, the inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase-3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}). Depletion of endogenous GSK-3{beta} by RNA interference also attenuated the effect of DIF-1 on cyclin D1 degradation. Therefore, we investigated the effect of DIF-1 on GSK-3{beta} and found that DIF-1 dephosphorylated GSK-3{beta} on Ser{sup 9} and induced the nuclear translocation of GSK-3{beta}, suggesting that DIF-1 activated GSK-3{beta}. Then, we examined the effect of DIF-1 on cyclin D1 mutants (Thr286Ala, Thr288Ala, and Thr286/288Ala). We revealed that Thr286Ala and Thr286/288Ala mutants were highly resistant to DIF-1-induced degradation compared with wild-type cyclin D1, indicating that the phosphorylation of Thr{sup 286} was critical for cyclin D1 degradation induced by DIF-1. These results suggest that DIF-1 induces degradation of cyclin D1 through the GSK-3{beta}-mediated phosphorylation of Thr{sup 286}.

  13. DSG3 Facilitates Cancer Cell Growth and Invasion through the DSG3-Plakoglobin-TCF/LEF-Myc/Cyclin D1/MMP Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yin-Ju; Lee, Li-Yu; Chao, Yin-Ka; Chang, Joseph T.; Lu, Ya-Ching; Li, Hsiao-Fang; Chiu, Ching-Chi; Li, Yi-Chen; Li, Yan-Liang; Chiou, Jeng-Fong; Cheng, Ann-Joy

    2013-01-01

    Desmoglein 3 (DSG3) is a component of the desmosome, which confers strong cell-cell adhesion. Previously, an oncogenic function of DSG3 has been found in head neck cancer (HNC). Here, we investigated how this molecule contributes to the malignant phenotype. Because DSG3 is associated with plakoglobin, we examined whether these phenotypic alterations were mediated through the plakoglobin molecule. Immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence staining revealed that DSG3 silencing disrupted its interaction with plakoglobin and induced plakoglobin translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Knockdown of DSG3 significantly increased the interaction of plakoglobin with the transcriptional factor TCF and suppressed the TCF/LEF transcriptional activity. These effects further conferred to reduced expression of the TCF/LEF downstream target genes, including c-myc, cyclin D1, and MMP-7. Functional analyses showed that DSG3 silencing reduced cell growth and arrested cells at G0/G1 phase. Besides, cell migration and invasion abilities were also decreased. These cellular results were confirmed using tumor xenografts in mice, as DSG3 silencing led to the suppressed tumor growth, plakoglobin translocation and reduced expression of TCF/LEF target genes in tumors. Therefore, our study shows that the desmosomal protein DSG3 additionally functions to regulate malignant phenotypes via nuclear signaling. In conclusion, we found that DSG3 functions as an oncogene and facilitates cancer growth and invasion in HNC cells through the DSG3-plakoglobin-TCF/LEF pathway. PMID:23737966

  14. Possible prognostic significance of p53, cyclin D1 and Ki-67 in the second primary malignancy of patients with double primary malignancies.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ming; Wei, Hui; Hou, Jun-Ming; Gao, Shan; Yang, De-Zhen; Lin, Zhen-Hua; Jia, Yong; Ren, Xiao-Peng; Gao, Mei-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Patients with two types of primary cancers are rare. In this study, we investigated the expression of p53, cyclin D1, and Ki-67 in the second primary malignancy. Tissue samples were obtained from the second primary cancer site of 43 patients who met the diagnostic criteria for double primary cancer. p53, cyclin D1 and Ki-67 were determined using immunohistochemistry. Categorical variables were compared using the Chi-squared test; correlation between data scores and histology was calculated using the Spearman's rank-order correlation. The expression rates of p53, cyclin D1 and Ki-67 in the second primary malignancy site were 60.5%, 30.2% and 65.1% respectively. p53 expression showed statistically significant association with tumor occurrence interval, pathological grading and nodal metastasis (p < 0.05). Positive correlation was detected between the expression of cyclin D1 and Ki-67 and the expression of p53 (r = 0.313, p = 0.041; r = 0.319, p = 0.037, respectively). High-expressing p53 or cyclin D second primary malignancies were associated with decreased overall survival (p = 0.040 and p = 0.043, respectively). Ki-67 expression levels did not exhibit statistically significant differences in survival. In conclusion, elevated protein expression of p53, cyclin D1 and Ki-67 in the second primary malignancy is an indicator of more aggressive malignant behavior of the secondary tumor. These markers may have prognostic value in the clinical setting. PMID:25120774

  15. The coffee diterpene kahweol suppresses the cell proliferation by inducing cyclin D1 proteasomal degradation via ERK1/2, JNK and GKS3β-dependent threonine-286 phosphorylation in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Gwang Hun; Song, Hun Min; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2016-09-01

    Kahweol as a coffee-specific diterpene has been reported to exert anti-cancer properties. However, the mechanism responsible for the anti-cancer effects of kahweol is not fully understood. The main aim of this investigation was to determine the effect of kahweol on cell proliferation and the possible mechanisms in human colorectal cancer cells. Kahweol inhibited markedly the proliferation of human colorectal cancer cell lines such as HCT116, SW480. Kahweol decreased cyclin D1 protein level in HCT116 and SW480 cells. Contrast to protein levels, cyclin D1 mRNA level and promoter activity did not be changed by kahweol treatment. MG132 treatment attenuated kahweol-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation and the half-life of cyclin D1 was decreased in kahweol-treated cells. Kahweol increased phosphorylation of cyclin D1 at threonine-286 and a point mutation of threonine-286 to alanine attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by kahweol. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by PD98059, JNK by SP600125 or GSK3β by LiCl suppressed cyclin D1 phosphorylation and downregulation by kahweol. Furthermore, the inhibition of nuclear export by LMB attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by kahweol. In conclusion, kahweol-mediated cyclin D1 degradation may contribute to the inhibition of the proliferation in human colorectal cancer cells. PMID:27424123

  16. Activation of the p38 MAPK/Akt/ERK1/2 signal pathways is required for the protein stabilization of CDC6 and cyclin D1 in low-dose arsenite-induced cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Youhong; Hock, Janet M; Sullivan, Con; Fang, Geying; Cox, Allison J; Davis, Kathleen T; Davis, Bruce H; Li, Xiong

    2010-12-15

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is a first-line anti-cancer agent for acute promyelocytic leukemia, and induces apoptosis in other solid cancer cell lines including breast cancer cells. However, as with arsenites found in drinking water and used as raw materials for wood preservatives, insecticides, and herbicides, low doses of ATO can induce carcinogenesis after long-term exposure. At 24 h after exposure, ATO (0.01-1 µM) significantly increased cell proliferation and promoted cell cycle progression from the G1 to S/G2 phases in the non-tumorigenic MCF10A breast epithelial cell line. The expression of 14 out of 96 cell-cycle-associated genes significantly increased, and seven of these genes including cell division cycle 6 (CDC6) and cyclin D1 (CCND1) were closely related to cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase. Low-dose ATO steadily increased gene transcript and protein levels of both CDC6 and cyclin D1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Low-dose ATO produced reactive oxygen species (ROS), and activated the p38 MAPK, Akt, and ERK1/2 pathways at different time points within 60 min. Small molecular inhibitors and siRNAs inhibiting the activation of p38 MAPK, Akt, and ERK1/2 decreased the ATO-increased expression of CDC6 protein. Inhibiting the activation of Akt and ERK1/2, but not p38 MAPK, decreased the ATO-induced expression of cyclin D1 protein. This study reports for the first time that p38 MAPK/Akt/ERK1/2 activation is required for the protein stabilization of CDC6 in addition to cyclin D1 in ATO-induced cell proliferation and cell cycle modulation from G1 to S phase. PMID:20862710

  17. The role of KLF4 in UVB-induced murine skin tumor development and its correlation with cyclin D1, p53, and p21(Waf1/Cip1) in epithelial tumors of the human skin.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo Jin; Youn, Sung Hwan; Back, Jung Ho; Park, Saebomi; Park, Eun Joo; Kim, Kwang Joong; Park, Hye Rim; Kim, Arianna L; Kim, Kwang Ho

    2011-04-01

    The zinc-finger-type transcriptional factor KLF4 is expressed in a variety of tissues including skin. KLF4 can function as either a tumor suppressor or an oncogene, depending on the type of tissue in which it is expressed, by modulating the expression of various factors. To understand the role of KLF4 in human skin cancer and also to evaluate the expression of cyclin D1, p53, and p21(Waf1/Cip1) in relation to the expression of KLF4, we evaluated the pattern of KLF4 expression during UVB-induced skin tumor development in SKH-1 hairless mice and in human skin cancer. We also determined whether there are correlations between the expression of KLF4, cyclin D1, p53, and p21 and non-melanoma skin tumors. KLF4 expression was found in the basal layer of non-irradiated control murine skin. Chronic UVB irradiation caused a progressive decrease in KLF4 expression, which was substantially decreased in UVB-induced murine skin tumors. In human precancerous lesions, KLF4 expression was maintained in 64.3% of Bowen's disease samples and 90.0% of AK samples. In contrast, KLF4 expression was significantly reduced in human cancer lesions (p = 0.004). A positive correlation was found between the expression of KLF4 and p21(Waf1/Cip1) in AK, whereas there was a negative correlation between the expression of cyclin D1 and p21(Waf1/Cip1) in Bowen's disease. Thus, our results suggest that KLF4 may function as a tumor suppressor in the skin and that the deregulated expression of KLF4 in the context of p21(Waf1/Cip1) and cyclin D1 expression may be involved in skin tumorigenesis. PMID:21132436

  18. Gankyrin facilitates follicle-stimulating hormone-driven ovarian cancer cell proliferation through the PI3K/AKT/HIF-1α/cyclin D1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, J; Bai, M; Ning, C; Xie, B; Zhang, J; Liao, H; Xiong, J; Tao, X; Yan, D; Xi, X; Chen, X; Yu, Y; Bast, R C; Zhang, Z; Feng, Y; Zheng, W

    2016-05-12

    Gankyrin is a regulatory subunit of the 26kD proteasome complex. As a novel oncoprotein, gankyrin is expressed aberrantly in cancers from several different sites and has been shown to contribute to oncogenesis in endometrial and cervical carcinomas. Neither gankyrin's contribution to the development of epithelial ovarian cancer nor its interaction with follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-driven proliferation in ovarian cancer has been studied. Here we have found that gankyrin is overexpressed in ovarian cancers compared with benign ovarian cystadenomas and that gankyrin regulates FSH upregulation of cyclin D1. Importantly, gankyrin regulates PI3K/AKT signaling by downregulating PTEN. Prolonged AKT activation by FSH stimulation of the FSH receptor (FSHR) promotes gankyrin expression, which, in turn, enhances AKT activation by inhibiting PTEN. Overexpression of gankyrin decreases hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein levels, but has little effect on HIF-1α mRNA levels, which could be attributed to gankyrin mediating HIF-1α protein stability via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Reduction in HIF-1α protein stability led to attenuation of the binding with cyclin D1 promoter, resulted in abolishment of the negative regulation of cyclin D1 by HIF-1α, which promotes proliferation of ovarian cancer cells. Our results document that gankyrin regulates HIF-1α protein stability and cyclin D1 expression, ultimately mediating FSH-driven ovarian cancer cell proliferation. PMID:26364616

  19. Baicalein induces G1 arrest in oral cancer cells by enhancing the degradation of cyclin D1 and activating AhR to decrease Rb phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Ya-Hsin; Li, Lih-Ann; Lin, Pinpin; Cheng, Li-Chuan; Hung, Chein-Hui; Chang, Nai Wen; Lin, Chingju

    2012-09-15

    Baicalein is a flavonoid, known to have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. As an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand, baicalein at high concentrations blocks AhR-mediated dioxin toxicity. Because AhR had been reported to play a role in regulating the cell cycle, we suspected that the anti-cancer effect of baicalein is associated with AhR. This study investigated the molecular mechanism involved in the anti-cancer effect of baicalein in oral cancer cells HSC-3, including whether such effect would be AhR-mediated. Results revealed that baicalein inhibited cell proliferation and increased AhR activity in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle was arrested at the G1 phase and the expression of CDK4, cyclin D1, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma (pRb) was decreased. When the AhR was suppressed by siRNA, the reduction of pRb was partially reversed, accompanied by a decrease of cell population at G1 phase and an increase at S phase, while the reduction of cyclin D1 and CDK4 did not change. This finding suggests that the baicalein activation of AhR is indeed associated with the reduction of pRb, but is independent of the reduction of cyclin D1 and CDK4. When cells were pre-treated with LiCl, the inhibitor of GSK-3β, the decrease of cyclin D1 was blocked and the reduction of pRb was recovered. The data indicates that in HSC-3 the reduction of pRb is both mediated by baicalein through activation of AhR and facilitation of cyclin D1 degradation, which causes cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, and results in the inhibition of cell proliferation. -- Highlights: ► Baicalein causes the G1 phase arrest by decreasing Rb phosphorylation. ► Baicalein modulates AhR-mediated cell proliferation. ► Both AhR activation and cyclin D1 degradation results in hypophosphorylation of Rb. ► Baicalein facilitates cyclin D1 degradation by signalling the GSK-3β pathway.

  20. Immunohistochemical evaluation of oral epithelial dysplasia using cyclin-D1, p27 and p63 expression as predictors of malignant transformation

    PubMed Central

    Ramasubramanian, Abilasha; Ramani, Pratibha; Sherlin, Herald J.; Premkumar, Priya; Natesan, Anuja; Thiruvengadam, Chandrasekar

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the degree of expression of cyclin-D1, p27 and p63 in mild, moderate and severe dysplasia using immunohistochemical evaluation in order to illustrate their prognostic value and attempt to propose a molecular grading system for oral epithelial dysplasia. Materials and Methods: The analysis included thirty cases of mild, moderate and severe dysplasia from Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, Saveetha Dental College, Chennai after a critical review of the Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E) stained sections. They were subjected to immunohistochemical evaluation using the markers cyclin-D1, p27 and p63. The assessment of the expression based on staining intensity and distribution of immunohistochemical staining of the various markers was analyzed followed by statistical analysis. Results: A highly significant increase in the expression of cyclin-D1 (P < 0.000) and p63 (P < 0.001) and a moderately significant decrease in the expression of p27 (P < 0.012) with the increasing severity of dysplasia was observed in our study. Conclusions: The result of our research affirms the fact that the increase in the expression of markers of cell cycle regulators such as cyclin D1, decrease in the expression of cell cycle inhibitors like p27 and increased expression of p63 in parallel with the increasing severity of dysplasia, emphasizes the use of immunohistochemical markers cyclin D1, p27 and p63 as prognostic markers for better understanding the behaviour of these potentially malignant disorders aiming towards proposing a molecular grading system for oral epithelial dysplasia to enable timely management prior to their possible malignant transformation. PMID:24082731

  1. Hog1 Targets Whi5 and Msa1 Transcription Factors To Downregulate Cyclin Expression upon Stress

    PubMed Central

    González-Novo, Alberto; Jiménez, Javier; Clotet, Josep; Nadal-Ribelles, Mariona; Cavero, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Yeast cells have developed complex mechanisms to cope with extracellular insults. An increase in external osmolarity leads to activation of the stress-activated protein kinase Hog1, which is the main regulator of adaptive responses, such as gene expression and cell cycle progression, that are essential for cellular survival. Upon osmostress, the G1-to-S transition is regulated by Hog1 through stabilization of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor Sic1 and the downregulation of G1 cyclin expression by an unclear mechanism. Here, we show that Hog1 interacts with and phosphorylates components of the core cell cycle transcriptional machinery such as Whi5 and the coregulator Msa1. Phosphorylation of these two transcriptional regulators by Hog1 is essential for inhibition of G1 cyclin expression, for control of cell morphogenesis, and for maximal cell survival upon stress. The control of both Whi5 and Msa1 by Hog1 also revealed the necessity for proper coordination of budding and DNA replication. Thus, Hog1 regulates G1 cyclin transcription upon osmostress to ensure coherent passage through Start. PMID:25733686

  2. Nonlinear ionizing radiation-induced changes in eye lens cell proliferation, cyclin D1 expression and lens shape

    PubMed Central

    Markiewicz, Ewa; Barnard, Stephen; Haines, Jackie; Coster, Margaret; van Geel, Orry; Wu, Weiju; Richards, Shane; Ainsbury, Elizabeth; Rothkamm, Kai; Bouffler, Simon; Quinlan, Roy A.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated cataract risk after radiation exposure was established soon after the discovery of X-rays in 1895. Today, increased cataract incidence among medical imaging practitioners and after nuclear incidents has highlighted how little is still understood about the biological responses of the lens to low-dose ionizing radiation (IR). Here, we show for the first time that in mice, lens epithelial cells (LECs) in the peripheral region repair DNA double strand breaks (DSB) after exposure to 20 and 100 mGy more slowly compared with circulating blood lymphocytes, as demonstrated by counts of γH2AX foci in cell nuclei. LECs in the central region repaired DSBs faster than either LECs in the lens periphery or lymphocytes. Although DSB markers (γH2AX, 53BP1 and RAD51) in both lens regions showed linear dose responses at the 1 h timepoint, nonlinear responses were observed in lenses for EdU (5-ethynyl-2′-deoxy-uridine) incorporation, cyclin D1 staining and cell density after 24 h at 100 and 250 mGy. After 10 months, the lens aspect ratio was also altered, an indicator of the consequences of the altered cell proliferation and cell density changes. A best-fit model demonstrated a dose-response peak at 500 mGy. These data identify specific nonlinear biological responses to low (less than 1000 mGy) dose IR-induced DNA damage in the lens epithelium. PMID:25924630

  3. Nonlinear ionizing radiation-induced changes in eye lens cell proliferation, cyclin D1 expression and lens shape.

    PubMed

    Markiewicz, Ewa; Barnard, Stephen; Haines, Jackie; Coster, Margaret; van Geel, Orry; Wu, Weiju; Richards, Shane; Ainsbury, Elizabeth; Rothkamm, Kai; Bouffler, Simon; Quinlan, Roy A

    2015-04-01

    Elevated cataract risk after radiation exposure was established soon after the discovery of X-rays in 1895. Today, increased cataract incidence among medical imaging practitioners and after nuclear incidents has highlighted how little is still understood about the biological responses of the lens to low-dose ionizing radiation (IR). Here, we show for the first time that in mice, lens epithelial cells (LECs) in the peripheral region repair DNA double strand breaks (DSB) after exposure to 20 and 100 mGy more slowly compared with circulating blood lymphocytes, as demonstrated by counts of γH2AX foci in cell nuclei. LECs in the central region repaired DSBs faster than either LECs in the lens periphery or lymphocytes. Although DSB markers (γH2AX, 53BP1 and RAD51) in both lens regions showed linear dose responses at the 1 h timepoint, nonlinear responses were observed in lenses for EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxy-uridine) incorporation, cyclin D1 staining and cell density after 24 h at 100 and 250 mGy. After 10 months, the lens aspect ratio was also altered, an indicator of the consequences of the altered cell proliferation and cell density changes. A best-fit model demonstrated a dose-response peak at 500 mGy. These data identify specific nonlinear biological responses to low (less than 1000 mGy) dose IR-induced DNA damage in the lens epithelium. PMID:25924630

  4. Prolyl hydroxylase-2 inhibits liver tumor cell proliferation and cyclin D1 expression in a hydroxylase-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yifeng; Lin, Feng; Li, Ruidong; Shen, Jie; Wang, Zhengxin

    2016-08-01

    Prolyl hydroxylase 2 is a key regulator of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha protein, and has previously been implicated as a tumor suppressor in various cancers. However, the function of prolyl hydroxylase 2 in liver cancer has yet to be elucidated. Characterization of prolyl hydroxylase 2 function and related mechanisms in liver cancer may enable the development of targeted therapy. Here we found that prolyl hydroxylase 2 overexpression in human hepatocellular carcinoma cancer cell lines inhibited cell proliferation, while prolyl hydroxylase 2 knockdown enhanced cell proliferation. Further analyses revealed that the prolyl hydroxylase 2-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation was due to a cell cycle arrest at the G1/S transition. Moreover, the block in cell cycle was facilitated by negative regulation of cyclin D1, a process dependent on the hydroxylase activity of prolyl hydroxylase 2. Using an in vivo xenograft mouse model, we found that the overexpression of prolyl hydroxylase 2 led to a reduction in tumor size. Evaluation of paired human liver cancer patient samples revealed that prolyl hydroxylase 2 protein levels were significantly reduced in 6 of the 10 cancer tissues as compared to their respective normal tissue controls. Furthermore, elevated expression of prolyl hydroxylase 2 was associated with significantly prolonged survival in patients with liver cancer. These results suggest that prolyl hydroxylase 2 plays an important tumor suppressive role in liver cancer and may prove to be of prognostic and therapeutic value. PMID:27307407

  5. Tagging of Genomic STAT3 and STAT1 with Fluorescent Proteins and Insertion of a Luciferase Reporter in the Cyclin D1 Gene Provides a Modified A549 Cell Line to Screen for Selective STAT3 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Samsonov, Andrey; Zenser, Nathan; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Hongyi; Fetter, John; Malkov, Dmitry

    2013-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is an oncogenic protein that is constitutively activated in numerous cancer cell lines and human cancers. Another STAT family member, STAT1, possesses cancer-inhibitory properties and can promote apoptosis in tumor cells upon activation. To better characterize these important cancer related genes, we tagged STAT3 and STAT1 loci with fluorescent protein (FP) sequences (RFP and GFP respectively) by targeted integration via zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) - mediated homologous recombination in A549 cells that express aberrantly activated STAT3. We inserted the FP transgenes at the N-terminus of the STAT3 locus and at the C-terminus of the STAT1 locus. The integration resulted in endogenous expression of fluorescent STAT3 and STAT1 chimeric fusion proteins. When stimulated with IL-6 or IFN-γ, the cells showed robust nuclear translocation of RFP-STAT3 or STAT1-GFP, respectively. Pre-incubation of cells with a known specific STAT3 inhibitor showed that IFN-γ-induced translocation of STAT1-GFP was not impaired. STAT3 activates multiple downstream targets such as genes involved in cell cycle progression - e.g. cyclin D1. To detect changes in expression of endogenous cyclin D1, we used ZFN technology to insert a secreted luciferase reporter behind the cyclin D1 promoter and separated the luciferase and cyclin D1 coding regions by a 2A sequence to induce a translational skip. The luciferase insertion was made in the RFP-STAT3/STAT1-GFP cell line to have all three reporters in a single cell line. Addition of a STAT3 inhibitor led to suppression of cyclin D1 promoter activity and cell growth arrest. The triple-modified cell line provides a simple and convenient method for high-content screening and pre-clinical testing of potential STAT3 inhibitors in live cells while ensuring that the STAT1 pathway is not affected. This approach of reporting endogenous gene activities using ZFN technology could be applied to other cancer

  6. Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor 5 Increases Lung Cancer Cell Tumorigenesis via MMP-2 and Cyclin D1 Upregulation.

    PubMed

    He, Ping; Wu, Wei; Yang, Kang; Tan, Deli; Tang, Meng; Liu, Hongxiang; Wu, Tao; Zhang, Shixin; Wang, Haidong

    2015-07-01

    We sought to elucidate the role of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor 5 (ARHGEF5) in tumorigenesis of lung adenocarcinoma cells. ARHGEF5 protein levels were assessed in 91 human lung adenocarcinoma specimens, and A549 and NCI-H1650 cells, by IHC and Western blotting. In addition, ARHGEF5 mRNA expression was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR. Furthermore, ARHGEF5 long and short isoform coexpression was detected by immunofluorescence. Finally, flow cytometry; CCK8 and wound-healing assays; cell invasion, migration and adhesion; and xenografts were used to evaluate the biologic significance of ARHGEF5. ARHGEF5 was significantly increased in lung adenocarcinoma tissues and cell lines. Interestingly, ARHGEF5 levels were significantly associated with tumor grade and pathologic stage, but not age, gender, T stage, or lymph node metastasis status. ARHGEF5 knockdown by RNAi resulted in dramatically reduced proliferation, adhesion, invasion, and migratory capability of A549 and NCI-H1650 cells. Likewise, protein levels of p-Src, p-Akt, and NF-κB were significantly decreased after ARHGEF5 knockdown. In parallel, increased S-phase population and MMP-2/cyclin D1 expression were observed in the cancer cells, which were not apoptotic. In addition, ARHGEF5 knockdown A549 and NCI-H1650 cells injected s.c. and i.v. into nude mice exhibited decreased xenograft volume and overtly reduced metastasis. Conversely, ARHGEF5 overexpression in A549 and NCI-H1650 cells increased their tumorigenicity in vitro. ARHGEF5 acts as a proto-oncogene in human lung adenocarcinoma cell tumorigenesis. PMID:25777963

  7. Cyclin D1 (PRAD1, CCND1) and glutathione-S-transferase pi gene expression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gaffey, M J; Iezzoni, J C; Meredith, S D; Boyd, J C; Stoler, M H; Weiss, L M; Zukerberg, L R; Levine, P A; Arnold, A; Williams, M E

    1995-11-01

    Chromosome 11q13 amplification has been identified in a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (H&N SCCs). This region contains several putative oncogenes, including cyclin D1 (PRAD1, CCND1), which encodes for an important cell cycle regulatory protein, and the locus encoding for the drug-detoxifying enzyme glutathione-S-transferase-pi (GST-pi). To determine the relationship of cyclin D1 and GST-pi gene amplification to expression of the encoded proteins, the authors examined 64 H&N SCCs by both Southern blot hybridization and immunohistochemistry, using a recently described, affinity-purified, anticyclin D1 polyclonal antibody no. 19 as well as a polyclonal antibody against GST-pi. Anticyclin D1 antibody no. 19 labeled the tumor cell nuclei in 28 (44%) of the H&N SCCs, whereas cytoplasmic immunoreactivity for GST-pi was noted in 55 (86%) neoplasms. By Southern blot 24 tumors (37.5%) showed twofold to tenfold amplification of 11q13 loci; only two of these were coamplified for GST-pi. Immunopositivity with anticyclin D1 antibody no. 19 but not anti-GST-pi significantly correlated with 11q13 amplification (P < .0001). Of the 28 tumors positive with anticyclin D1 antibody no. 19, however, only 18 (64%) were amplified for 11q13, and six amplified tumors did not react with the no. 19 antibody. A strong trend was noted between anticyclin D1 antibody no. 19 reactivity and a hypopharyngeal primary site (P = .053), but no correlations were observed between immunoreactivity and cytological grade, architectural pattern, pathological stage, and disease-free or overall survival. The inconsistent association of cyclin D1 immunoreactivity with 11q13 amplification indicates that other mechanisms may exist for protein overexpression. Immunoreactivity for the GST-pi protein is prevalent in H&N SCC but is clearly unassociated with amplification. In this series, the presence or extent of cyclin D1 and GST-pi immunoreactivity was of no proven prognostic benefit in H&N SCC

  8. Cigarette smoke extract alters the cell cycle via the phospholipid transfer protein/transforming growth factor-β1/CyclinD1/CDK4 pathway.

    PubMed

    Chai, Xue-Min; Li, You-Lun; Chen, Hong; Guo, Shu-Liang; Shui, Li-Li; Chen, Ya-Juan

    2016-09-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effect of phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) on cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced alteration of the cell cycle and the possible mechanism. Male Wistar rats and the rat alveolar epithelial cell line (RLE-6TN) were exposed to normal air or different concentrations of CSE. Then PLTP siRNA was transfected into cells and an inhibitor of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) was administered prior to CSE exposure. Histological changes and cell cycle stage were recorded, as were the expression levels of PLTP, TGF-β1, CyclinD1 and CDK4. Resulting morphological changes included diffuse interstitial substance incrassation and elevated alveolar rupturing. Flow cytometry analysis revealed an increase in the number of cells in the G1 phase in a time- and dose-related manner. Both PLTP and TGF-β1 were up-regulated at protein and mRNA levels, whereas CyclinD1 and CDK4 expression was down-regulated after CSE exposure. Furthermore, PLTP siRNA significantly suppressed CSE-induced TGF-β1 expression, resulting in up-regulation of CyclinD1 and CDK4, but the TGF-β1 inhibitor was not able to abrogate CSE-induced PLTP over-expression. In conclusion, PLTP may operate upstream of the TGF-β1/CyclinD1/CDK4 pathway and may mediate the CSE-induced G1 arrest in RLE-6TN cells. Our work provides some new insight into the relation between PLTP and cell cycle progression. PMID:27260126

  9. MiR-34a Promotes Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells via the RBP2/NOTCH1/CYCLIN D1 Coregulatory Network.

    PubMed

    Fan, Cong; Jia, Lingfei; Zheng, Yunfei; Jin, Chanyuan; Liu, Yunsong; Liu, Hao; Zhou, Yongsheng

    2016-08-01

    MiR-34a was demonstrated to be upregulated during the osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs). Overexpression of miR-34a significantly increased alkaline phosphatase activity, mineralization capacity, and the expression of osteogenesis-associated genes in hASCs in vitro. Enhanced heterotopic bone formation in vivo was also observed upon overexpression of miR-34a in hASCs. Mechanistic investigations revealed that miR-34a inhibited the expression of retinoblastoma binding protein 2 (RBP2) and reduced the luciferase activity of reporter gene construct comprising putative miR-34a binding sites in the 3' UTR of RBP2. Moreover, miR-34a downregulated the expression of NOTCH1 and CYCLIN D1 and upregulated the expression of RUNX2 by targeting RBP2, NOTCH1, and CYCLIN D1. Taken together, our results suggested that miR-34a promotes the osteogenic differentiation of hASCs via the RBP2/NOTCH1/CYCLIN D1 coregulatory network, indicating that miR-34a-targeted therapy could be a valuable approach to promote bone regeneration. PMID:27453008

  10. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species perturb AKT/cyclin D1 cell cycle signaling via oxidative inactivation of PP2A in lowdose irradiated human fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Sasatani, Megumi; Kamiya, Kenji; Kawai, Hidehiko; Inaba, Yohei; Kunugita, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Here we investigated the cellular response of normal human fibroblasts to repeated exposure to low-dose radiation. In contrast to acute single radiation, low-dose fractionated radiation (FR) with 0.01 Gy/fraction or 0.05 Gy/fraction for 31 days increased in mitochondrial mass, decreased cellular levels of the antioxidant glutathione and caused persistent accumulation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). Excess ROS promoted oxidative inactivation of protein phosphatase PP2A which in turn led to disruption of normal negative feed-back control of AKT/cyclin D1 signaling in cells treated with long-term FR. The resulting abnormal nuclear accumulation of cyclin D1 causes growth retardation, cellular senescence and genome instability in low-dose irradiated cells. Thus, loss of redox control and subsequently elevated levels of ROS perturb signal transduction as a result of oxidative stress. Our study highlights a specific role of mitochondrial ROS in perturbation of AKT/cyclin D1 cell cycle signaling after low-dose long-term FR. The antioxidants N-acetyl-L-cysteine, TEMPO and mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant Mito-TEMPO provided protection against the harmful cell cycle perturbations induced by low-dose long-term FR. PMID:26657292

  11. c-Jun/AP-1 pathway-mediated cyclin D1 expression participates in low dose arsenite-induced transformation in mouse epidermal JB6 Cl41 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Dongyun; Li Jingxia; Gao Jimin; Huang Chuanshu

    2009-02-15

    Arsenic is a well-documented human carcinogen associated with skin carcinogenesis. Our previous work reveals that arsenite exposure is able to induce cell transformation in mouse epidermal cell JB6 Cl41 through the activation of ERK, rather than JNK pathway. Our current studies further evaluate downstream pathway in low dose arsenite-induced cell transformation in JB6 Cl41 cells. Our results showed that treatment of cells with low dose arsenite induced activation of c-Jun/AP-1 pathway, and ectopic expression of dominant negative mutant of c-Jun (TAM67) blocked arsenite-induced transformation. Furthermore, our data indicated that cyclin D1 was an important downstream molecule involved in c-Jun/AP-1-mediated cell transformation upon low dose arsenite exposure, because inhibition of cyclin D1 expression by its specific siRNA in the JB6 Cl41 cells resulted in impairment of anchorage-independent growth of cells induced by low dose arsenite. Collectively, our results demonstrate that c-Jun/AP-1-mediated cyclin D1 expression is at least one of the key events implicated in cell transformation upon low dose arsenite exposure.

  12. Ophiobolin O isolated from Aspergillus ustus induces G1 arrest of MCF-7 cells through interaction with AKT/GSK3β/cyclin D1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Lv, Cuiting; Qin, Wenxing; Zhu, Tonghan; Wei, Shanjian; Hong, Kui; Zhu, Weiming; Chen, Ruohua; Huang, Caiguo

    2015-01-01

    Ophiobolin O is a member of ophiobolin family, which has been proved to be a potent anti-tumor drug candidate for human breast cancer. However, the anti-tumor effect and the mechanism of ophiobolin O remain unclear. In this study, we further verified ophiobolin O-induced G1 phase arrest in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, and found that ophiobolin O reduced the phosphorylation level of AKT and GSK3β, and induced down-regulation of cyclin D1. The inverse docking (INVDOCK) analysis indicated that ophiobolin O could bind to GSK3β, and GSK3β knockdown abolished cyclin D1 degradation and G1 phase arrest. Pre-treatment with phosphatase inhibitor sodium or thovanadate halted dephosphorylation of AKT and GSK3β, and blocked ophiobolin O-induced G1 phase arrest. These data suggest that ophiobolin O may induce G1 arrest in MCF-7 cells through interaction with AKT/GSK3β/cyclin D1 signaling. In vivo, ophiobolin O suppressed tumor growth and showed little toxicity in mouse xenograft models. Overall, these findings provide theoretical basis for the therapeutic use of ophiobolin O. PMID:25603341

  13. Association between cyclin D1 G870A polymorphism and hepatocellular carcinoma risk: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Tao; Chen, Jie; Liu, Jun-Jie; Li, Hang; You, Xue-Mei; Wang, Hong-Liang; Zhu, Shao-Liang; Li, Le-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Background Cyclin D1 (CCND1) G870A polymorphism may be associated with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk, but the results of previous studies were inconsistent. Available evidence was meta-analyzed to assess their potential association. Methods Databases PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Chinese Biomedical Literature database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Google Scholar were systematically searched. Meta-analyses were performed to investigate the association of G870A polymorphism with HCC risk by calculating odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) from the data of relevant case–control studies. Results Results of this meta-analysis of six case–control studies involving 1,030 cases and 1,683 controls indicate that G870A polymorphism was not associated with HCC risk in any of the five genetic models tested (recessive model: AA vs GG + AG: OR =1.38, 95% CI =0.95–2.00, P=0.09; dominant model: AG + AA vs GG: OR =1.38, 95% CI =0.87–2.20, P=0.17; homozygous model: AA vs GG: OR =1.60, 95% CI =0.87–2.94, P=0.13; heterozygous model: AG vs GG: OR =1.24, 95% CI =0.86–1.79, P=0.25; allelic model: A vs G: OR =1.30, 95% CI =0.95–1.80, P=0.10). Subgroup analyses according to ethnicity showing marginally significant association between this single nucleotide polymorphism and HCC risk indicate that G870A may be significantly associated with HCC risk in Caucasian populations (recessive model: AA vs GG + AG: OR =2.34, 95% CI =1.60–3.42, P<0.0001; dominant model: AG + AA vs GG: OR =2.44, 95% CI =1.19–4.97, P=0.01; homozygous model: AA vs GG: OR =3.42, 95% CI =1.80–6.50, P=0.0002; allelic model: A vs G: OR =2.06, 95% CI =1.31–3.24, P=0.002), but not in Asian populations. Conclusion Available evidence suggests that no significant association between G870A polymorphism and HCC risk was found in either total populations or Asian populations. However, significant association was found in Caucasian populations. These

  14. Distinction between Asymptomatic Monoclonal B-cell Lymphocytosis with Cyclin D1 Overexpression and Mantle Cell Lymphoma: From Molecular Profiling to Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Espinet, Blanca; Ferrer, Ana; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Nonell, Lara; Salar, Antonio; Fernández-Rodríguez, Concepción; Puigdecanet, Eulàlia; Gimeno, Javier; Garcia-Garcia, Mar; Carmen Vela, Maria; Luño, Elisa; Collado, Rosa; Navarro, José Tomás; de la Banda, Esmeralda; Abrisqueta, Pau; Arenillas, Leonor; Serrano, Cristina; Lloreta, Josep; Miñana, Belén; Cerutti, Andrea; Florensa, Lourdes; Orfao, Alberto; Sanz, Ferran; Solé, Francesc; Dominguez-Sola, David; Serrano, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose According to current diagnostic criteria, mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) encompasses the usual, aggressive variants and rare, nonnodal cases with monoclonal asymptomatic lymphocytosis, cyclin D1–positive (MALD1). We aimed to understand the biology behind this clinical heterogeneity and to identify markers for adequate identification of MALD1 cases. Experimental Design We compared 17 typical MCL cases with a homogeneous group of 13 untreated MALD1 cases (median follow-up, 71 months). We conducted gene expression profiling with functional analysis in five MCL and five MALD1. Results were validated in 12 MCL and 8 MALD1 additional cases by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and in 24 MCL and 13 MALD1 cases by flow cytometry. Classification and regression trees strategy was used to generate an algorithm based on CD38 and CD200 expression by flow cytometry. Results We found 171 differentially expressed genes with enrichment of neoplastic behavior and cell proliferation signatures in MCL. Conversely, MALD1 was enriched in gene sets related to immune activation and inflammatory responses. CD38 and CD200 were differentially expressed between MCL and MALD1 and confirmed by flow cytometry (median CD38, 89% vs. 14%; median CD200, 0% vs. 24%, respectively). Assessment of both proteins allowed classifying 85% (11 of 13) of MALD1 cases whereas 15% remained unclassified. SOX11 expression by qRT-PCR was significantly different between MCL and MALD1 groups but did not improve the classification. Conclusion We show for the first time that MALD1, in contrast to MCL, is characterized by immune activation and driven by inflammatory cues. Assessment of CD38/CD200 by flow cytometry is useful to distinguish most cases of MALD1 from MCL in the clinical setting. MALD1 should be identified and segregated from the current MCL category to avoid overdiagnosis and unnecessary treatment. PMID:24352646

  15. Role of the mTORC1 Complex in Satellite Cell Activation by RNA-Induced Mitochondrial Restoration: Dual Control of Cyclin D1 through MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Jash, Sukanta; Dhar, Gunjan; Ghosh, Utpalendu

    2014-01-01

    During myogenesis, satellite stem cells (SCs) are induced to proliferate and differentiate to myogenic precursors. The role of energy sensors such as the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and the mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) in SC activation is unclear. We previously observed that upregulation of ATP through RNA-mediated mitochondrial restoration (MR) accelerates SC activation following skeletal muscle injury. We show here that during regeneration, the AMPK-CRTC2-CREB and Raptor-mTORC-4EBP1 pathways were rapidly activated. The phosho-CRTC2-CREB complex was essential for myogenesis and activated transcription of the critical cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 (Ccnd1). Knockdown (KD) of either mTORC or its subunit Raptor delayed SC activation without influencing the differentiation program. KD of 4EBP1 had no effect on SC activation but enhanced myofiber size. mTORC1 positively regulated Ccnd1 translation but destabilized Ccnd1 mRNA. These antithetical effects of mTORC1 were mediated by two microRNAs (miRs) targeted to the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of Ccnd1 mRNA: miR-1 was downregulated in mTORC-KD muscle, and depletion of miR-1 resulted in increased levels of mRNA without any effect on Ccnd1 protein. In contrast, miR-26a was upregulated upon mTORC depletion, while anti-miR-26a oligonucleotide specifically stimulated Ccnd1 protein expression. Thus, mTORC may act as a timer of satellite cell proliferation during myogenesis. PMID:25047835

  16. Expression of URG4/URGCP, Cyclin D1, Bcl-2, and Bax genes in retinoic acid treated SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Gundogdu, Gulsah; Koc, Tugba; Yonguc, G. Nilufer; Kucukatay, Vural; Satiroglu-Tufan, N. Lale

    2013-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) plays important roles in development, growth, and differentiation by regulating the expression of its target genes. The pro-apoptotic Bax gene may form channels through oligomerization in the mitochondrial membrane and facilitate the cytosolic release of cytochrome c. The anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene can inhibit this process. Up-regulated gene 4/Upregulator of cell proliferation (URG4/URGCP) is a novel gene located on 7p13. URG4/URGCP also stimulates cyclin D1 (CCND1) mRNA expression, and RNAi-mediated URG4/URGCP silencing diminishes CCND1 mRNA expression in HepG2 cells. In this study, the effects of RA treatment on URG4/URGCP, CCND1, Bcl-2 and Bax gene expression changes in undifferentiated and differentiated SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells was analyzed. SHSY5Y cells were cultured in the appropriate conditions. To induce differentiation, the cells were treated with 10 micromolar RA in the dark for 3-10 days. SHSY5Y cells possess small processes in an undifferentiated state, and after treatment with RA, the cells developed long neurites, resembling a neuronal phenotype. Total RNA was isolated with Tri-Reagent. Expression profiles of the target genes were determined by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. According to the results, Bcl-2 and CCND1 gene expression levels were increased, while URG4/URGCP and Bax gene expression was decreased in RA treated cells compared to the control cells. Our preliminary results suggest that RA may induce cell proliferation and escape apoptosis using a novel pathway by the URG4/URGCP gene. Further investigations are needed to clarify more direct transcriptional targets of RA signaling and the interaction of RA pathways with other pro-regenerative signals. PMID:24592121

  17. NeuroD1/beta2 contributes to cell-specific transcription of the proopiomelanocortin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Poulin, G; Turgeon, B; Drouin, J

    1997-01-01

    NeuroD1/beta2 is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) factor expressed in the endocrine cells of the pancreas and in a subset of neurons as they undergo terminal differentiation. We now show that NeuroD1 is expressed in corticotroph cells of the pituitary gland and that it is involved in cell-specific transcription of the proopiomelanocortin (POMC) gene. It was previously shown that corticotroph-specific POMC transcription depends in part on the action of cell-restricted bHLH factors that were characterized as the CUTE (corticotroph upstream transcription element) (M. Therrien and J. Drouin, Mol. Cell. Biol. 13:2342-2353, 1993) complexes. We now demonstrate that these complexes contain NeuroD1 in association with various ubiquitous bHLH dimerization partners. The NeuroD1-containing heterodimers specifically recognize and activate transcription from the POMC promoter E box that confers transcriptional specificity. Interestingly, the NeuroD1 heterodimers activate transcription in synergy with Ptx1, a Bicoid-related homeodomain protein, which also contributes to corticotroph specificity of POMC transcription. In the adult pituitary gland, NeuroD1 transcripts are detected in POMC-expressing corticotroph cells. Taken together with the restricted pattern of Ptx1 expression, these results suggest that these two factors establish the basis of a combinatorial code for the program of corticotroph-specific gene expression. PMID:9343431

  18. EGFR-mediated Akt and MAPKs signal pathways play a crucial role in patulin-induced cell proliferation in primary murine keratinocytes via modulation of Cyclin D1 and COX-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Alam, Shamshad; Pal, Anu; Kumar, Rahul; Dwivedi, Premendra D; Das, Mukul; Ansari, Kausar M

    2014-12-01

    Patulin (PAT), a present day major contaminant of commercial apple and apple products is reported to be carcinogenic, embryotoxic, and immunotoxic. While oral and inhalation are considered to be the most prevalent routes of exposure to this toxin, exposure through skin is now being extensively investigated. Our previous study showed that short-term dermal exposure to PAT resulted in toxicological injury to the skin, while long-term exposure induced skin tumorigenesis. In this study, we explore the mechanism involve in proliferation of mouse keratinocytes by PAT. Our study revealed that PAT rapidly induces phosphorylation of EGFR, activation of the Ras/MAPKs, and Akt pathways. This in-turn leads to the activation of NF-κB/AP-1 transcription factors which then binds to the promoter region of the cell growth regulatory genes Cyclin D1 and COX-2 inducing their expression leading ultimately to PMKs proliferation. Inhibition of EGFR or the Ras/MAPKs, PI3/Akt pathways with different pharmacological inhibitors or knockdown of NF-κB, c-jun, c-fos, Cyclin D1, and COX-2 with siRNA inhibited PAT-induced PMKs proliferation. PMID:23813870

  19. Garcinone D, a natural xanthone promotes C17.2 neural stem cell proliferation: Possible involvement of STAT3/Cyclin D1 pathway and Nrf2/HO-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaohong; Wang, Shengnan; Ouyang, Ying; Tu, Yaling; Liu, Anmin; Tian, Yinghong; He, Mingliang; Pi, Rongbiao

    2016-07-28

    Garcinia mangostana L. (Mangosteen) has been used to treat various pathological conditions, including inflammation and urinary tract infections. Here, we observed that garcinone D, a natural xanthone from mangosteen, promoted the proliferation of C17.2 neural progenitor cells and also resulted in a larger percentage of cells in S phase compared with the control group. Moreover, garcinone D increased the protein levels of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (p-STAT3) and Cyclin D1 in concentration- and time- dependent manners. Garcinone D also increased the protein levels of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in concentration- and time- dependent manners, and inhibiting Nrf2 activation by brusatol could partly reverse garcinone D-induced C17.2 cell proliferation. Taken together, it is the first time to show that garcinone D promotes the proliferation of C17.2 neural stem cells, which may involve the STAT3/Cyclin D1 pathway and Nrf2/HO-1 pathway. It would provide new inspiration to develop garcinone D as a lead compound to promote the proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells (NSCs). PMID:27177723

  20. NPAT links cyclin E-Cdk2 to the regulation of replication-dependent histone gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J; Kennedy, B K; Lawrence, B D; Barbie, D A; Matera, A G; Fletcher, J A; Harlow, E

    2000-09-15

    In eukaryotic cells, histone gene expression is one of the major events that mark entry into S phase. While this process is tightly linked to cell cycle position, how it is regulated by the cell cycle machinery is not known. Here we show that NPAT, a substrate of the cyclin E-Cdk2 complex, is associated with human replication-dependent histone gene clusters on both chromosomes 1 and 6 in S phase. We demonstrate that NPAT activates histone gene transcription and that this activation is dependent on the promoter elements (SSCSs) previously proposed to mediate cell cycle-dependent transcription. Cyclin E is also associated with the histone gene loci, and cyclin E-Cdk2 stimulates the NPAT-mediated activation of histone gene transcription. Thus, our results both show that NPAT is involved in a key S phase event and provide a link between the cell cycle machinery and activation of histone gene transcription. PMID:10995386

  1. Adenosine induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via cyclinD1/Cdk4 and Bcl-2/Bax pathways in human ovarian cancer cell line OVCAR-3.

    PubMed

    Shirali, Saeid; Aghaei, Mahmoud; Shabani, Mahdi; Fathi, Mojtaba; Sohrabi, Majid; Moeinifard, Marzieh

    2013-04-01

    Adenosine is a regulatory molecule with widespread physiological effects in almost every cells and acts as a potent regulator of cell growth. Adenosine has been shown to inhibit cell growth and induce apoptosis in the several cancer cells via caspase activation and Bcl-2/Bax pathway. The present study was designed to understand the mechanism underlying adenosine-induced apoptosis in the OVCAR-3 human ovarian cancer cells. MTT viability, BrdU and cell counting assays were used to study the cell proliferation effect of adenosine in presence of adenosine deaminase inhibitor and the nucleoside transporter inhibitor. Cell cycle analysis, propidium iodide and annexin V staining, caspase-3 activity assay, cyclinD1, Cdk4, Bcl-2 and Bax protein expressions were assessed to detect apoptosis. Adenosine significantly inhibited cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner in OVCAR-3 cell line. Adenosine induced cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase via Cdk4/cyclinD1-mediated pathway. Adenosine induced apoptosis, which was determined by Annexin V-FITC staining and increased sub-G1 population. Moreover, down-regulation of Bcl-2 protein expression, up-regulation of Bax protein expression and activation of caspase-3 were observed in response to adenosine treatment. The results of this study suggest that extracellular adenosine induced G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells via cyclinD1/ Cdk4 and Bcl-2/Bax pathways and caspase-3 activation. These data might suggest that adenosine could be used as an agent for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:23345014

  2. Rsf-1 is overexpressed in non-small cell lung cancers and regulates cyclinD1 expression and ERK activity

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qingchang; Dong, Qianze; Wang, Enhua

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rsf-1 expression is elevated in non-small cell lung cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rsf-1 depletion inhibits proliferation and increased apoptosis in lung cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rsf-1 depletion decreases the level of cyclinD1 and phosphor-ERK expression. -- Abstract: Rsf-1 (HBXAP) was recently reported to be overexpressed in various cancers and associated with the malignant behavior of cancer cells. However, the expression of Rsf-1 in primary lung cancer and its biological roles in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have not been reported. The molecular mechanism of Rsf-1 in cancer aggressiveness remains ambiguous. In the present study, we analyzed the expression pattern of Rsf-1 in NSCLC tissues and found that Rsf-1 was overexpressed at both the mRNA and protein levels. There was a significant association between Rsf-1 overexpression and TNM stage (p = 0.0220) and poor differentiation (p = 0.0013). Furthermore, knockdown of Rsf-1 expression in H1299 and H460 cells with high endogenous Rsf-1 expression resulted in a decrease of colony formation ability and inhibition of cell cycle progression. Rsf-1 knockdown also induced apoptosis in these cell lines. Further analysis showed that Rsf-1 knockdown decreased cyclin D1 expression and phospho-ERK levels. In conclusion, Rsf-1 is overexpressed in NSCLC and contributes to malignant cell growth by cyclin D1 and ERK modulation, which makes Rsf-1 a candidate therapeutic target in lung cancer.

  3. piR-651 promotes tumor formation in non-small cell lung carcinoma through the upregulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Luo, Yingquan; Gao, Yawen; Yang, Yue; Wang, Yina; Xu, Yan; Tan, Shengyu; Zhang, Yuwei; Duan, Juan; Yang, Yu

    2016-09-01

    Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs or piRs) are a novel class of non-coding RNAs that participate in germline development by silencing transposable elements and regulating gene expression. To date, the association between piRNAs and non‑small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) has not yet been elucidated. In the present study, we have demonstrated that a significant increase in piR-651 expression occurs in NSCLC. Furthermore, the abnormal expression of piR-651 was associated with cancer progression in the patients with NSCLC. The upregulation of piR-651 in A549 cells caused a significant increase in cell viability and metastasis. The percentage of arrested cells in the G0/G1 phase was lower after piR-651 overexpression compared with the controls. We also examined the expression of oncogenes and cancer suppressor genes following piR-651 overexpression in NSCLC cells. Only the expression levels of cyclin D1 and CDK4 significantly correlated with piR-651 expression both in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, by injecting nude mice with A549 cells transfected with piR-651 plasmids to establish a xenograft model, we demonstrated that there was a correlation between piR-651 overexpression and tumor growth, which was mediated by cyclin D1 and CDK4. These findings strongly support the notion that piR-651 induces NSCLC progression through the cyclin D1 and CDK4 pathway and it may have applications as a potential diagnostic indicator and therapeutic target in the management of NSCLC. PMID:27431575

  4. Selective activation of p38alpha and p38gamma by hypoxia. Role in regulation of cyclin D1 by hypoxia in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Conrad, P W; Rust, R T; Han, J; Millhorn, D E; Beitner-Johnson, D

    1999-08-13

    Hypoxic/ischemic trauma is a primary factor in the pathology of a multitude of disease states. The effects of hypoxia on the stress- and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways were studied in PC12 cells. Exposure to moderate hypoxia (5% O(2)) progressively stimulated phosphorylation and activation of p38gamma in particular, and also p38alpha, two stress-activated protein kinases. In contrast, hypoxia had no effect on enzyme activity of p38beta, p38beta(2), p38delta, or on c-Jun N-terminal kinase, another stress-activated protein kinase. Prolonged hypoxia also induced phosphorylation and activation of p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase, although this activation was modest compared with nerve growth factor- and ultraviolet light-induced activation. Hypoxia also dramatically down-regulated immunoreactivity of cyclin D1, a gene that is known to be regulated negatively by p38 at the level of gene expression (Lavoie, J. N., L'Allemain, G., Brunet, A., Muller, R., and Pouyssegur, J. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 20608-20616). This effect was partially blocked by SB203580, an inhibitor of p38alpha but not p38gamma. Overexpression of a kinase-inactive form of p38gamma was also able to reverse in part the effect of hypoxia on cyclin D1 levels, suggesting that p38alpha and p38gamma converge to regulate cyclin D1 during hypoxia. These studies demonstrate that an extremely typical physiological stress (hypoxia) causes selective activation of specific p38 signaling elements; and they also identify a downstream target of these pathways. PMID:10438538

  5. Immunohistochemical Expression of Cyclin D1, Cytokeratin 20, and Uroplakin III in Proliferative Urinary Bladder Lesions Induced by o-Nitroanisole in Fischer 344/N Rats.

    PubMed

    Willson, C J; Flake, G P; Sills, R C; Kissling, G E; Cesta, M F

    2016-05-01

    o-Nitroanisole is an intermediate in the manufacture of azo dyes. In a National Toxicology Program stop-exposure study,o-nitroanisole induced hyperplasia, papillomas, and papillary carcinomas in the urinary bladder of Fischer 344/N rats.o-Nitroanisole was investigated since occupational or environmental exposure to aniline and azo dyes is a risk factor for urinary bladder cancer in humans. The current study describes the morphology of urinary bladder neoplasms seen in rats with respect to those observed in humans. This study also evaluated immunohistochemical expression of the cell cycle-related proteins cyclin D1 and p53 and the differentiation markers cytokeratin 20 and uroplakin III in hyperplastic (n= 11) and neoplastic (n= 6 papillomas,n= 11 carcinomas) lesions of the urinary bladder epithelium from rats treated witho-nitroanisole and in normal (n= 6) urinary bladders from untreated rats. The tumors observed were more similar to the papillary type rather than the muscle-invasive type of urinary bladder cancer in humans. The preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions observed suggest progression from hyperplasia to papilloma to papillary carcinoma. With neoplastic progression (hyperplasia to papilloma to carcinoma), cyclin D1 immunoreactivity progressively increased in intensity, percentage of cells staining, and distribution. Overexpression of p53 was not found. Cytokeratin 20 staining decreased in superficial cells, while uroplakin III staining increased in intermediate and basal cells with progression from hyperplasia to carcinoma. The results are consistent with increased cell cycle dysregulation or proliferation (cyclin D1), decreased differentiation (cytokeratin 20), and abnormal differentiation (uroplakin III) as lesions progress toward malignancy. PMID:26319780

  6. Dixdc1 targets CyclinD1 and p21 via PI3K pathway activation to promote Schwann cell proliferation after sciatic nerve crush.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weijie; Liu, Qingqing; Liu, Yuxi; Yu, Zhaohui; Wang, Youhua

    2016-09-16

    Dixdc1 (DIX domain containing-1), the mammalian homolog of Ccd1 (Coiled-coil-Dishevelled-Axin1), is a protein containing a coiled-coil domain and a Dishevelled-Axin (DIX) domain. As a novel component of the Wnt pathway, Dixdc1 has been reported to be able to promote neural progenitor proliferation and neuronal differentiation via Wnt/β-catenin signaling. But there still remains something unknown about Dixdc1 distribution and functions in the lesion and regeneration of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), so we tried to investigate dynamic changes of Dixdc1 expression in a rat sciatic nerve crush (SNC) model in this study. First of all, we detected SNC-induced increased levels of Dixdc1 in Schwann cells and interestingly identified parallel expression of PCNA (proliferation cell nuclear antigen) with Dixdc1. Besides, we observed up-regulated Dixdc1 during the process of TNF-α-induced Schwann cell proliferation. Also, we discovered that Dixdc1 could promote G1-S phase transition accompanied with the up-regulation of CyclinD1 and down-regulation of p21. More importantly, enhanced effects of Dixdc1 on cell proliferation were confirmed to be associated with PI3K activation. Not only blocking of the PI3K but Dixdc1 knockdown led to significantly decreased ability for proliferation, as well as down-regulation of CyclinD1 and up-regulation of p21. In summary, these data demonstrated that Dixdc1 might participate in Schwann cell proliferation by targeting CyclinD1 and p21 at least partially through the PI3K/AKT activation. PMID:27521891

  7. NeuroD1 reprograms chromatin and transcription factor landscapes to induce the neuronal program.

    PubMed

    Pataskar, Abhijeet; Jung, Johannes; Smialowski, Pawel; Noack, Florian; Calegari, Federico; Straub, Tobias; Tiwari, Vijay K

    2016-01-01

    Cell fate specification relies on the action of critical transcription factors that become available at distinct stages of embryonic development. One such factor is NeuroD1, which is essential for eliciting the neuronal development program and possesses the ability to reprogram other cell types into neurons. Given this capacity, it is important to understand its targets and the mechanism underlying neuronal specification. Here, we show that NeuroD1 directly binds regulatory elements of neuronal genes that are developmentally silenced by epigenetic mechanisms. This targeting is sufficient to initiate events that confer transcriptional competence, including reprogramming of transcription factor landscape, conversion of heterochromatin to euchromatin, and increased chromatin accessibility, indicating potential pioneer factor ability of NeuroD1. The transcriptional induction of neuronal fate genes is maintained via epigenetic memory despite a transient NeuroD1 induction during neurogenesis. NeuroD1 also induces genes involved in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, thereby promoting neuronal migration. Our study not only reveals the NeuroD1-dependent gene regulatory program driving neurogenesis but also increases our understanding of how cell fate specification during development involves a concerted action of transcription factors and epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:26516211

  8. The ts13 mutation in the TAF(II)250 subunit (CCG1) of TFIID directly affects transcription of D-type cyclin genes in cells arrested in G1 at the nonpermissive temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki-Yagawa, Y; Guermah, M; Roeder, R G

    1997-01-01

    The general transcription initiation factor TFIID contains the TATA-binding protein (TBP) and TBP-associated factors (TAFs) implicated in the function of gene-specific activators. Previous studies have indicated that a hamster cell line (ts13) with a point mutation in the TAF(II)250/CCG1 (TAF(II)250) gene shows temperature-sensitive expression of a subset of genes and arrests in late G1 at 39.5 degrees C. Here, we report the identification of cell cycle-specific (G1-specific) genes that appear to be regulated directly through TAF(II)250 both in vivo and in vitro. Transcription rates of several cell cycle-regulatory genes were determined by run-on assays in nuclei from ts13 cells grown at permissive (33 degrees C) and nonpermissive (39.5 degrees C) temperatures. Temperature-dependent differences in transcription rates were observed for cyclin A, D1, and D3 genes. In transient-transfection assays, the human cyclin D1 promoter fused to a luciferase reporter showed a temperature-dependent reduction in activity in ts13 cells but not in parental BHK cells. In in vitro assays, upstream sequence-dependent transcription from the human cyclin D1 promoter was significantly reduced in ts13 nuclear extracts preincubated at 30 degrees C but not in similarly treated BHK nuclear extracts, and transcription in the ts13 extract was restored by addition of an affinity-purified human TFIID. Preincubation of the ts13 nuclear extracts did not affect the function of several GAL4-activation domain fusion proteins (GAL4-VP16, GAL4-p65, and GAL4-p53) on either the adenovirus major late or cyclin D1 core promoter bearing GAL4 sites, further indicating that the effect of the TAF(II)250 mutation is both core promoter and activator specific. PMID:9154827

  9. Potential role for concurrent abnormalities of the cyclin D1, p16CDKN2 and p15CDKN2B genes in certain B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Functional studies in a cell line (Granta 519).

    PubMed

    Jadayel, D M; Lukas, J; Nacheva, E; Bartkova, J; Stranks, G; De Schouwer, P J; Lens, D; Bartek, J; Dyer, M J; Kruger, A R; Catovsky, D

    1997-01-01

    Abnormalities of several cell-cycle regulatory genes including cyclin D1, p16CDKN2 and p15CDKN2B have been described in B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL). We describe a new B-NHL cell line (Granta 519), with concurrent abnormalities of the cyclin D1, pl6CDKN2 and pl5CDKN2B genes. An independent clinical case of mantle cell NHL (Mc-NHL) with concomitant overexpression of cyclin D1, and deletion of the p16CDKN2 gene was also identified, suggesting that this combination of oncogenic aberration is a pathophysiologic contribution to a subset of NHL cases. More in-depth functional studies of this concept were facilitated by the availability of the cell line Granta 519 which was derived from a case of high-grade NHL and has a mature B cell immunophenotype. Cytogenetic analysis identified translocation t(11;14)(q13;q32) and complex rearrangements involving chromosomes 9p22, 13p21, 17pl1, and 18q21. Molecular analysis identified overexpression of cyclin D1 mRNA and biallelic deletion of the p16CDKN2 and p15CDKN2B genes. To elucidate the effect of these genetic abnormalities on the G1 control of Granta 519 cells, the level and function of the major components of the cyclinD/retinoblastoma (RB) pathway were investigated. Cyclin D1 was dominant among the D-type cyclins, formed abundant complexes with cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) Cdk4 rather than Cdk6, and the immunoprecipitated cyclin D1/Cdk4 holoenzyme was active as a pRB kinase. Electroporation of wild-type pl6CDKN2 arrested the Granta 519 cells in G1, consistent with the p16CDKN2 loss as a biologically relevant event during multistep evolution of the tumor, and with the expression of functional pRB. Direct cooperation of these distinct abnormalities to cell-cycle, deregulation in NHL cells was suggested by G1 acceleration upon inducible overexpression of cyclin D1 in a control breast cancer cell line lacking p16CDKN2, an effect which could be prevented by ectopic expression of p16CDKN2. Taken together, these data

  10. Cyclin D1 expression in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck and in oral mucosa in relation to proliferation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kotelnikov, V M; Coon, J S; Mundle, S; Kelanic, S; LaFollette, S; Taylor S, I V; Hutchinson, J; Panje, W; Caldarelli, D D; Preisler, H D

    1997-01-01

    Deregulation of expression of the cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 (cD1) may be responsible for rapid proliferation of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). We have studied the expression of cD1 in 46 SCCHNs using immunohistochemistry. Before biopsy, the patients received an in vivo infusion of iododeoxyuridine (IdUrd) for cell proliferation assessment. Additionally, the level of apoptosis was estimated using in situ end labeling (ISEL). Among 33 tumors, the proportion of cD1(+) cells varied from 0.5 to 51.3% (19.9 +/- 2.2%). Thirteen tumors did not express cD1. The fraction of S-phase (IdUrd-positive) cells was 26.3 +/- 1.8% in cD1(+) versus 20.0 +/- 2.4% in cD1(-) tumors (P = 0.06). The percentages of cD1(+) cells and of S-phase cells were not correlated (P = 0.37). Apoptosis was detected by ISEL in 15 of 33 tumors studied. ISEL-positive tumors contained a significantly higher proportion of cD1(+) cells (14.9 +/- 2.6%) than cD1(-) ones (7.9 +/- 2.8%; P = 0.03). There was a positive correlation between the percentage of cD1(+) cells and the degree of ISEL (r = 0.54; P < 0.001). In noninvolved oral mucosa, cD1(+) cells were located primarily in the suprabasal layers (29.3 +/- 3.8% versus 1.2 +/- 0. 2% in the basal layer). Only 23 of 44 mucosal specimens contained cD1(+) cells. All cD1(-) samples were proliferatively active and contained IdUrd-labeled cells. The percentage of cD1(+) cells in the oral epithelium from nontumor controls (uvula samples) was significantly higher than in the SCCHN group in both basal (2.4 +/- 0.4%; P = 0.008) and suprabasal (42.7 +/- 3.3%; P = 0.005) layers. Additionally, whereas in uvuli, cD1(+) cells were distributed evenly along the epithelial lining, in SCCHN samples the regions showing cD1 expression alternated with areas in which cD1 expression was undetectable. These data indicate that cD1 expression in SCCHN varies among tumors and is not correlated with cell proliferation. In noninvolved oral mucosa, cD1 expression

  11. Modulations of benzo[a]pyrene-induced DNA adduct, cyclin D1 and PCNA in oral tissue by 1,4-phenylenebis(methylene)selenocyanate

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Kun-Ming; Sacks, Peter G.; Spratt, Thomas E.; Lin, Jyh-Ming; Boyiri, Telih; Schwartz, Joel; Richie, John P.; Calcagnotto, Ana; Das, Arunangshu; Bortner, James; Zhao, Zonglin; Amin, Shantu; Guttenplan, Joseph; El-Bayoumy, Karam

    2009-05-22

    Tobacco smoking is an important cause of human oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Tobacco smoke contains multiple carcinogens include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons typified by benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P). Surgery is the conventional treatment approach for SCC, but it remains imperfect. However, chemoprevention is a plausible strategy and we had previously demonstrated that 1,4-phenylenebis(methylene)selenocyanate (p-XSC) significantly inhibited tongue tumors-induced by the synthetic 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (not present in tobacco smoke). In this study, we demonstrated that p-XSC is capable of inhibiting B[a]P-DNA adduct formation, cell proliferation, cyclin D1 expression in human oral cells in vitro. In addition, we showed that dietary p-XSC inhibits B[a]P-DNA adduct formation, cell proliferation and cyclin D1 protein expression in the mouse tongue in vivo. The results of this study are encouraging to further evaluate the chemopreventive efficacy of p-XSC initially against B[a]P-induced tongue tumors in mice and ultimately in the clinic.

  12. p16, Cyclin D1, and HIF-1α Predict Outcomes of Patients with Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated with Definitive Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Asal S.; Wilson, David D.; Saylor, Drew K.; Stelow, Edward B.; Thomas, Christopher Y.; Reibel, James F.; Levine, Paul A.; Shonka, David C.; Jameson, Mark J.; Read, Paul W.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated a panel of 8 immunohistochemical biomarkers as predictors of clinical response to definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). 106 patients with OPSCC were treated to a total dose of 66–70 Gy and retrospectively analyzed for locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS). All tumors had p16 immunohistochemical staining, and 101 tumors also had epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) staining. 53% of the patients had sufficient archived pathologic specimens for incorporation into a tissue microarray for immunohistochemical analysis for cyclophilin B, cyclin D1, p21, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), carbonic anhydrase, and major vault protein. Median followup was 27.2 months. 66% of the tumors were p16 positive, and 34% were p16 negative. On univariate analysis, the following correlations were statistically significant: p16 positive staining with higher LRC (P = 0.005) and longer DFS (P < 0.001); cyclin D1 positive staining with lower LRC (P = 0.033) and shorter DFS (P = 0.002); HIF-1α positive staining with shorter DFS (P = 0.039). On multivariate analysis, p16 was the only significant independent predictor of DFS (P = 0.023). After immunohistochemical examination of a panel of 8 biomarkers, our study could only verify p16 as an independent prognostic factor in OPSCC. PMID:22888357

  13. p16, Cyclin D1, and HIF-1α Predict Outcomes of Patients with Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated with Definitive Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Asal S; Wilson, David D; Saylor, Drew K; Stelow, Edward B; Thomas, Christopher Y; Reibel, James F; Levine, Paul A; Shonka, David C; Jameson, Mark J; Read, Paul W

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated a panel of 8 immunohistochemical biomarkers as predictors of clinical response to definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy in patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). 106 patients with OPSCC were treated to a total dose of 66-70 Gy and retrospectively analyzed for locoregional control (LRC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS). All tumors had p16 immunohistochemical staining, and 101 tumors also had epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) staining. 53% of the patients had sufficient archived pathologic specimens for incorporation into a tissue microarray for immunohistochemical analysis for cyclophilin B, cyclin D1, p21, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), carbonic anhydrase, and major vault protein. Median followup was 27.2 months. 66% of the tumors were p16 positive, and 34% were p16 negative. On univariate analysis, the following correlations were statistically significant: p16 positive staining with higher LRC (P = 0.005) and longer DFS (P < 0.001); cyclin D1 positive staining with lower LRC (P = 0.033) and shorter DFS (P = 0.002); HIF-1α positive staining with shorter DFS (P = 0.039). On multivariate analysis, p16 was the only significant independent predictor of DFS (P = 0.023). After immunohistochemical examination of a panel of 8 biomarkers, our study could only verify p16 as an independent prognostic factor in OPSCC. PMID:22888357

  14. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species-mediated genomic instability in low-dose irradiated human cells through nuclear retention of cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Tsutomu; Kunugita, Naoki

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria are associated with various radiation responses, including adaptive responses, mitophagy, the bystander effect, genomic instability, and apoptosis. We recently identified a unique radiation response in the mitochondria of human cells exposed to low-dose long-term fractionated radiation (FR). Such repeated radiation exposure inflicts chronic oxidative stresses on irradiated cells via the continuous release of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decrease in cellular levels of the antioxidant glutathione. ROS-induced oxidative mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage generates mutations upon DNA replication. Therefore, mtDNA mutation and dysfunction can be used as markers to assess the effects of low-dose radiation. In this study, we present an overview of the link between mitochondrial ROS and cell cycle perturbation associated with the genomic instability of low-dose irradiated cells. Excess mitochondrial ROS perturb AKT/cyclin D1 cell cycle signaling via oxidative inactivation of protein phosphatase 2A after low-dose long-term FR. The resulting abnormal nuclear accumulation of cyclin D1 induces genomic instability in low-dose irradiated cells. PMID:27078622

  15. Marine steroids as potential anticancer drug candidates: In silico investigation in search of inhibitors of Bcl-2 and CDK-4/Cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Saikia, Surovi; Kolita, Bhaskor; Dutta, Partha P; Dutta, Deep J; Neipihoi; Nath, Shyamalendu; Bordoloi, Manobjyoti; Quan, Pham Minh; Thuy, Tran Thu; Phuong, Doan Lan; Long, Pham Quoc

    2015-10-01

    Star fishes (Asteroidea) are rich in polar steroids with diverse structural characteristics. The structural modifications of star fish steroids occur at 3β, 4β, 5α, 6α (or β), 7α (or β), 8, 15α (or β) and 16β positions of the steroidal nucleus and in the side chain. Widely found polar steroids in starfishes include polyhydroxysteroids, steroidal sulfates, glycosides, steroid oligoglycosides etc. Bioactivity of these steroids is less studied; only a few reports like antibacterial, cytotoxic activity etc. are available. In continuation of our search for bioactive molecules from natural sources, we undertook in silico screening of steroids from star fishes against Bcl-2 and CDK-4/Cyclin D1 - two important targets of progression and proliferation of cancer cells. We have screened 182 natural steroids from star fishes occurring in different parts of the world and their 282 soft-derivatives by in silico methods. Their physico-chemical properties, drug-likeliness, binding potential with the selected targets, ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, toxicity) were predicted. Further, the results were compared with those of existing steroidal and non steroidal drugs and inhibitors of Bcl-2 and CDK-4/Cyclin D1. The results are promising and unveil that some of these steroids can be potent leads for cancer treatments. PMID:26111591

  16. Fangchinoline inhibits cell proliferation via Akt/GSK-3beta/ cyclin D1 signaling and induces apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang-Dong; Yuan, Cheng-Fu; Bu, You-Quan; Wu, Xiang-Mei; Wan, Jin-Yuan; Zhang, Li; Hu, Ning; Liu, Xian-Jun; Zu, Yong; Liu, Ge-Li; Song, Fang-Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Fangchinoline (Fan) inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in several cancer cell lines. The effects of Fan on cell growth and proliferation in breast cancer cells remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that Fan inhibited cell proliferation in the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line through suppression of the AKT/Gsk- 3beta/cyclin D1 signaling pathway. Furthermore, Fan induced apoptosis by increasing the expression of Bax (relative to Bcl-2), active caspase 3 and cytochrome-c. Fan significantly inhibited cell proliferation of MDA- MB-231 cells in a concentration and time dependent manner as determined by MTT assay. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that Fan treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells resulted in cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, which correlated with apparent downregulation of both mRNA and protein levels of both PCNA and cyclin D1. Further analysis demonstrated that Fan decreased the phosphorylation of AKT and GSK-3beta. In addition, Fan up-regulated active caspase3, cytochrome-c protein levels and the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, accompanied by apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that Fan is a potential natural product for the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:24568493

  17. Dihydroartemisinin inhibits cell proliferation via AKT/GSK3β/cyclinD1 pathway and induces apoptosis in A549 lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kui; Li, Juan; Wang, Zhiling

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death in the world. The main types of lung cancer are small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) and non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC); non small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) includes squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), adenocarcinoma and large cell carcinoma, Non small cell lung carcinoma accounts for about 80% of the total lung cancer cases. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in several cancer cell lines. The effects of DHA on cell growth and proliferation in lung cancer cells remain to be elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that DHA inhibited cell proliferation in the A549 lung cancer cell line through suppression of the AKT/Gsk-3β/cyclin D1 signaling pathway. DHA significantly inhibited cell proliferation of A549 cells in a concentration and time dependent manner as determined by MTS assay. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that DHA treatment of A549 cells resulted in cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, which correlated with apparent downregulation of both mRNA and protein levels of both PCNA and cyclin D1. These results suggest that DHA is a potential natural product for the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:25674233

  18. The prognostic significance of β-catenin, cyclin D1 and PIN1 in minor salivary gland carcinoma: β-catenin predicts overall survival.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Sven; Thurnher, Dietmar; Seemann, Rudolf; Brunner, Markus; Kadletz, Lorenz; Ghanim, Bahil; Aumayr, Klaus; Heiduschka, Gregor; Lill, Claudia

    2016-05-01

    Minor salivary gland carcinoma is a rare and heterogeneous type of cancer. Molecular prognostic and predictive markers are sparse. The aim of this study was to identify new prognostic and predictive markers in minor salivary gland carcinoma. 50 tissue samples of carcinomas of the minor salivary glands (adenoid cystic carcinoma n = 23, mucoepidermoid carcinoma n = 12, adenocarcinoma n = 10, carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma n = 2, salivary duct carcinoma n = 1, clear cell carcinoma n = 1, basal cell carcinoma n = 1) were immunohistochemically stained for β-catenin, cyclin D1 and PIN1. Expression patterns were analyzed and correlated to clinical outcome of 37 patients with complete clinical data. High expression of membranous β-catenin was linked to significantly better overall survival in patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma (log rank test, χ (2) = 13.3, p = .00397, Bonferroni corrected p = .024). PIN1 and cyclin D1 did not show any significant correlation to patients' clinical outcome. Expression of β-catenin in adenoid cystic carcinoma of the minor salivary glands significantly correlates with better overall survival. Hence, evaluation of β-catenin might serve as a clinical prognostic marker. PMID:25801951

  19. Notch-1 signaling promotes the cyclinD1-dependent generation of mammary tumor-initiating cells which can revert to bi-potential progenitors from which they arise

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Hua; Jolicoeur, Paul

    2016-01-01

    In a previous work, we reported that young transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the intracellular domain of Notch1 (N1IC) showed expansion of lin− CD24+ CD29high mammary cells enriched for stem cells and later developed mammary tumors. Mammary tumor formation was abolished or greatly reduced in cyclin D1−/− or cyclin D1+/− N1IC Tg mice, respectively. Here, we studied the epithelial cell subsets present in N1IC-induced tumors. CD24− CD29int and CD24+ CD29high cells were found to be present at low numbers in tumors. The latter had the same properties as those expanded in young Tg females, and neither cell population showed tumor-initiating potential, nor were they required for maintenance of tumors after transplantation. CD24int CD29int cells were identified as tumor-initiating and mammosphere-forming cells and represent a large percentage tumor cells in this model. Their number was significantly lower in tumors from cyclin D1+/− N1IC Tg mice. Using cyclin D1 shRNA knockdown, we also show that N1IC-induced tumor cells remain addicted to cyclin D1 for growth and survival. Interestingly, at lower levels of cyclin D1 or after transplantion in the presence of normal mammary cells, these N1IC-expressing tumor cells reverted to a state of low malignancy and differentiate into duct-like structures. They seem to adopt the fate of bi-potential stem/progenitor cells similar to that of the expanded CD24+ CD29high stem/progenitor cells from which they are likely to be derived. Our data indicate that decreasing cyclin D1 levels would be an efficient treatment for tumors induced by N1 signaling. PMID:22907433

  20. Immortalization of Fetal Bovine Colon Epithelial Cells by Expression of Human Cyclin D1, Mutant Cyclin Dependent Kinase 4, and Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase: An In Vitro Model for Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Kengo; Kiyono, Tohru; Isogai, Emiko; Masuda, Mizuki; Narita, Moe; Okuno, Katsuya; Koyanagi, Yukako; Fukuda, Tomokazu

    2015-01-01

    Cattle are the economically important animals in human society. They are essential for the production of livestock products such as milk and meats. The production efficiency of livestock products is negatively impacted by infection with zoonotic pathogens. To prevent and control infectious diseases, it is important to understand the interaction between cattle tissue and pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we established an in vitro infection model of an immortalized bovine colon-derived epithelial cell line by transducing the cells with lentiviral vectors containing genes encoding cell cycle regulators cyclin D1, mutant cyclin dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). The established cell line showed continuous cell proliferation, expression of epithelial markers, and an intact karyotype, indicating that the cells maintained their original nature as colon-derived epithelium. Furthermore, we exposed the established cell line to two strains of Salmonella enterica and EHEC. Interestingly, S. Typhimurium showed higher affinity for the established cell line and invaded the cytoplasm than S. Enteritidis. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that gene expression of Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1), TLR 2 and TLR 3, whereas TLR 4, 5 and 6 were not detectable in established cells. Our established immortalized colon-derived epithelial cell should be a useful tool for studies evaluating the molecular mechanisms underlying bacterial infection. PMID:26624883

  1. Immortalization of Fetal Bovine Colon Epithelial Cells by Expression of Human Cyclin D1, Mutant Cyclin Dependent Kinase 4, and Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase: An In Vitro Model for Bacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kengo; Kiyono, Tohru; Isogai, Emiko; Masuda, Mizuki; Narita, Moe; Okuno, Katsuya; Koyanagi, Yukako; Fukuda, Tomokazu

    2015-01-01

    Cattle are the economically important animals in human society. They are essential for the production of livestock products such as milk and meats. The production efficiency of livestock products is negatively impacted by infection with zoonotic pathogens. To prevent and control infectious diseases, it is important to understand the interaction between cattle tissue and pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we established an in vitro infection model of an immortalized bovine colon-derived epithelial cell line by transducing the cells with lentiviral vectors containing genes encoding cell cycle regulators cyclin D1, mutant cyclin dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). The established cell line showed continuous cell proliferation, expression of epithelial markers, and an intact karyotype, indicating that the cells maintained their original nature as colon-derived epithelium. Furthermore, we exposed the established cell line to two strains of Salmonella enterica and EHEC. Interestingly, S. Typhimurium showed higher affinity for the established cell line and invaded the cytoplasm than S. Enteritidis. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that gene expression of Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1), TLR 2 and TLR 3, whereas TLR 4, 5 and 6 were not detectable in established cells. Our established immortalized colon-derived epithelial cell should be a useful tool for studies evaluating the molecular mechanisms underlying bacterial infection. PMID:26624883

  2. Euphol arrests breast cancer cells at the G1 phase through the modulation of cyclin D1, p21 and p27 expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Wang, Guiying; Yang, Dandan; Guo, Xudong; Xu, Yanxin; Feng, Bo; Kang, Jiuhong

    2013-10-01

    Euphorbia tirucalli is a long‑established treatment for a wide variety of cancers. However, the mechanism of its anticancer effect is yet to be elucidated. In the present study, we examined the anticancer effect of euphol, a tetracyclic triterpene alcohol isolated from the sap of Euphorbia tirucalli, in T47D human breast cancer cells. Following the treatment of cells with different doses of euphol for 24, 48 and 72 h, the cell proliferation, cell cycle, and mRNA and protein levels of cell cycle regulatory molecules were analyzed, respectively. Treatment of the cells with euphol resulted in decreased cell viability, which was accompanied by an accumulation of cells in the G1 phase. Further studies demonstrated that euphol treatment downregulated cyclin D1 expression and the hypophosphorylation of Rb. Furthermore, this effect was correlated with the downregulation of cyclin‑dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) expression and the upregulation of the CDK inhibitors p21 and p27. Reduced expression levels of cyclin A and B1 were also observed, corresponding to the decreased distribution of cells in the S and G2/M phases, respectively. These findings indicated that euphol is an active agent in Euphorbia tirucalli that exerts anticancer activity by arresting the cell cycle of cancer cells. PMID:23969579

  3. Transcriptional regulation of cyclin D2 by the PKA pathway and inducible cAMP early repressor in granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Muñiz, Luis C; Yehia, Ghassan; Mémin, Elisabeth; Ratnakar, Pillarisetty V A L; Molina, Carlos A

    2006-08-01

    Cyclin D2 (Ccnd2) is an essential gene for folliculogenesis, as null mutation in mice impairs granulosa cell proliferation in response to FSH. Ccnd2 mRNA is induced during the estrus cycle by FSH and is rapidly inhibited by LH. Yet, the responsive elements and transcription factors accounting for the gene expression of cyclin D2 in the ovary have not been fully characterized. Using primary cultures of rat granulosa cells and immortalized mouse granulosa cells, we demonstrate a mechanism for the regulation of cyclin D2 at the level of transcription via a PKA-dependent signaling mechanism. The promoter activity of cyclin D2 was shown to be induced by FSH and the catalytic alpha subunit of PKA (PRKACA), and this activity was repressible by inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER), a cAMP response element (CRE) modulator isoform. In silico analysis of the mouse, rat, and human cyclin D2 promoters identified two CRE-binding protein sites, a conserved proximal element and a less conserved distal element relative to the translation start site. The mutation on the proximal element drastically decreases the effects of PRKACA and ICER on the promoter activity, whereas the mutation on the distal element did not contribute to the decrease in the promoter activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and deoxyribonuclease footprint analysis confirmed ICER binding to the proximal element, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated the occurrence of this binding in vivo. These results showed a CRE within the upstream region of Ccnd2 that is (at least partly) implicated in the stimulation and repression of cyclin D2 transcription. Finally, our data suggest that ICER involvement in the regulation of granulosa cell proliferation as overexpression of ICER results in the inhibition of PRKACA-induced DNA synthesis. PMID:16625003

  4. Abrogation of p53 by its antisense in MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells increases cyclin D1 via activation of Akt and promotion of cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Kumari, Ratna; Upadhyay, Ankur Kumar; Bhat, Manoj Kumar

    2007-11-15

    The p53 protein has been a subject of intense research interest since its discovery as about 50% of human cancers carry p53 mutations. Mutations in the p53 gene are the most frequent genetic lesions in breast cancers suggesting a critical role of p53 in breast cancer development, growth and chemosensitivity. This report describes the derivation and characterization of MCF-7As53, an isogenic cell line derived from MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells in which p53 was abrogated by antisense p53 cDNA. Similar to MCF-7 and simultaneously selected hygromycin resistant MCF-7H cells, MCF-7As53 cells have consistent basal epithelial phenotype, morphology, and estrogen receptor expression levels at normal growth conditions. Present work documents investigation of molecular variations, growth kinetics, and cell cycle related studies in relation to absence of wild-type p53 protein and its transactivation potential as well. Even though wild-type tumor suppressor p53 is an activator of cell growth arrest and apoptosis-mediator genes such as p21, Bax, and GADD45 in MCF-7As53 cells, no alterations in expression levels of these genes were detected. The doubling time of these cells decreased due to depletion of G0/G1 cell phase because of constitutive activation of Akt and increase in cyclin D1 protein levels. This proliferative property was abrogated by wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI3-K/Akt signaling pathway. Therefore this p53 null cell line indicates that p53 is an indispensable component of cellular signaling system which is regulated by caveolin-1 expression, involving Akt activation and increase in cyclin D1, thereby promoting proliferation of breast cancer cells.

  5. Opposing roles for DNA replication initiator proteins ORC1 and CDC6 in control of Cyclin E gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Manzar; Stillman, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Newly born cells either continue to proliferate or exit the cell division cycle. This decision involves delaying expression of Cyclin E that promotes DNA replication. ORC1, the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) large subunit, is inherited into newly born cells after it binds to condensing chromosomes during the preceding mitosis. We demonstrate that ORC1 represses Cyclin E gene (CCNE1) transcription, an E2F1 activated gene that is also repressed by the Retinoblastoma (RB) protein. ORC1 binds to RB, the histone methyltransferase SUV39H1 and to its repressive histone H3K9me3 mark. ORC1 cooperates with SUV39H1 and RB protein to repress E2F1-dependent CCNE1 transcription. In contrast, the ORC1-related replication protein CDC6 binds Cyclin E-CDK2 kinase and in a feedback loop removes RB from ORC1, thereby hyper-activating CCNE1 transcription. The opposing effects of ORC1 and CDC6 in controlling the level of Cyclin E ensures genome stability and a mechanism for linking directly DNA replication and cell division commitment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12785.001 PMID:27458800

  6. Opposing roles for DNA replication initiator proteins ORC1 and CDC6 in control of Cyclin E gene transcription.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Manzar; Stillman, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Newly born cells either continue to proliferate or exit the cell division cycle. This decision involves delaying expression of Cyclin E that promotes DNA replication. ORC1, the Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) large subunit, is inherited into newly born cells after it binds to condensing chromosomes during the preceding mitosis. We demonstrate that ORC1 represses Cyclin E gene (CCNE1) transcription, an E2F1 activated gene that is also repressed by the Retinoblastoma (RB) protein. ORC1 binds to RB, the histone methyltransferase SUV39H1 and to its repressive histone H3K9me3 mark. ORC1 cooperates with SUV39H1 and RB protein to repress E2F1-dependent CCNE1 transcription. In contrast, the ORC1-related replication protein CDC6 binds Cyclin E-CDK2 kinase and in a feedback loop removes RB from ORC1, thereby hyper-activating CCNE1 transcription. The opposing effects of ORC1 and CDC6 in controlling the level of Cyclin E ensures genome stability and a mechanism for linking directly DNA replication and cell division commitment. PMID:27458800

  7. Toll-Like Receptor 1/2 and 5 Ligands Enhance the Expression of Cyclin D1 and D3 and Induce Proliferation in Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mastorci, Katy; Muraro, Elena; Pasini, Elisa; Furlan, Chiara; Sigalotti, Luca; Cinco, Marina; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Fratta, Elisabetta

    2016-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma with a still undefined etiology. Several lines of evidence are consistent with the possible involvement of peculiar microenvironmental stimuli sustaining tumor cell growth and survival, as the activation of Toll-like receptors (TLR) 4 and 9. However, little is known about the contribution of other TLRs of pathogenic relevance in the development of MCL. This study reports evidence that MCL cell lines and primary MCL cells express different levels of TLR2 and TLR5, and that their triggering is able to further activate the Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB signaling cascades, known to be altered in MCL cells. This leads to the enhancement of cyclin D1 and D3 over-expression, occurring at post-translational level through a mechanism that likely involves the Akt/GSK-3α/β pathway. Interestingly, in primary B cells, TLR1/2 or TLR5 ligands increase protein level of cyclin D1, which is not usually expressed in normal B cells, and cyclin D3 when associated with CD40 ligand (CD40L), IL-4, and anti-human-IgM co-stimulus. Finally, the activation of TLR1/2 and TLR5 results in an increased proliferation of MCL cell lines and, in the presence of co-stimulation with CD40L, IL-4, and anti-human-IgM also of primary MCL cells and normal B lymphocytes. These effects befall together with an enhanced IL-6 production in primary cultures. Overall, our findings suggest that ligands for TLR1/2 or TLR5 may provide critical stimuli able to sustain the growth and the malignant phenotype of MCL cells. Further studies aimed at identifying the natural source of these TLR ligands and their possible pathogenic association with MCL are warranted in order to better understand MCL development, but also to define new therapeutic targets for counteracting the tumor promoting effects of lymphoma microenvironment. PMID:27123851

  8. Methanol extract of wheatgrass induces G1 cell cycle arrest in a p53-dependent manner and down regulates the expression of cyclin D1 in human laryngeal cancer cells-an in vitro and in silico approach

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Garima; Balasubramanian, Sangeetha; Rajagopalan, Rukkumani

    2015-01-01

    Background: Deregs been implicated in the malignancy of cancer. Since many years investigation on the traditional herbs has been the focus to develop novel and effective drug for cancer remedies. Wheatgrass is a medicinal plant, used in folk medicine to cure various diseases. The present study was undertaken to gain insights into antiproliferative effect of methanol extract of wheatgrass. Materials Methods: Cell viability was assessed via 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and Lactate Dehydrogenase assays. Cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. Western blot was performed to determine the p53 and cyclin D1 levels. In silico docking interaction of the 14 active components (identified by high-performance liquid chromatography/gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy) of the methanol extract was tested with cyclin D1 (Protein Data Bank ID: 2W96) and compared with the reference cyclin D1/Cdk4 inhibitor. Results: Methanol extract of wheatgrass effectively reduced the cell viability. The cell cycle analysis showed that the extract treatment caused G1 arrest. The level of cyclin D1 was decreased, whereas p53 level was increased. Molecular docking studies revealed interaction of seven active compounds of the extract with the vital residues (Lys112/Glu141) of cyclin D1. Conclusion: These findings indicate that the methanol extract of wheatgrass inhibits human laryngeal cancer cell proliferation via cell cycle G1 arrest and p53 induction. The seven active compounds of the extract were also found to be directly involved in the inhibition of cyclin D1/Cdk4 binding, thus inhibiting the cell proliferation. PMID:26109759

  9. The effect of sulforaphane on the cell cycle, apoptosis and expression of cyclin D1 and p21 in the A549 non-small cell lung cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Żuryń, Agnieszka; Litwiniec, Anna; Safiejko-Mroczka, Barbara; Klimaszewska-Wiśniewska, Anna; Gagat, Maciej; Krajewski, Adrian; Gackowska, Lidia; Grzanka, Dariusz

    2016-06-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is present in plants belonging to Cruciferae family and was first isolated from broccoli sprouts. Chemotherapeutic and anticarcinogenic properties of sulforaphane were demonstrated, however, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study we evaluated the expression of cyclin D1 and p21 protein in SFN-treated A549 cells and correlated these results with the extent of cell death and/or cell cycle alterations, as well as determined a potential contribution of cyclin D1 to cell death. A549 cells were treated with increasing concentrations of SFN (30, 60 and 90 µM) for 24 h. Morphological and ultrastructural changes were observed using light, transmission electron microscope and videomicroscopy. Image-based cytometry was applied to evaluate the effect of SFN on apoptosis and the cell cycle. Cyclin D1 and p21 expression was determined by flow cytometry, RT-qPCR and immunofluorescence. siRNA was used to evaluate the role of cyclin D1 in the process of suforaphane-induced cell death. We found that the percentage of cyclin D1-positive cells decreased after the treatment with SFN, but at the same time mean fluorescence intensity reflecting cyclin D1 content was increased at 30 µM SFN and decreased at 60 and 90 µM SFN. Percentage of p21-positive cells increased following the treatment, with the highest increase at 60 µM SFN, at which concentration mean fluorescence intensity of this protein was also significantly increased. The 30-µM dose of SFN induced an increased G2/M phase population along with a decreased polyploid fraction of cells, which implies a functional G2/M arrest. The major mode of cell death induced by SFN was necrosis and, to a lower degree apoptosis. Transfection with cyclin D1-siRNA resulted in significantly compromised fraction of apoptotic and necrotic cells, which suggests that cyclin D1 is an important determinant of the therapeutic efficiency of SFN in the A549 cells. PMID:27035641

  10. Involvement of cyclin D1/CDK4 and pRb mediated by PI3K/AKT pathway activation in Pb{sup 2+}-induced neuronal death in cultured hippocampal neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Li Chenchen Xing Tairan Tang Mingliang Yong Wu Yan Dan Deng Hongmin Wang Huili Wang Ming Chen Jutao Ruan Diyun

    2008-06-15

    Lead (Pb) is widely recognized as a neurotoxicant. One of the suggested mechanisms of lead neurotoxicity is apoptotic cell death. And the mechanism by which Pb{sup 2+} causes neuronal death is not well understood. The present study sought to examine the obligate nature of cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), phosphorylation of its substrate retinoblastoma protein (pRb) and its select upstream signal phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway in the death of primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons evoked by Pb{sup 2+}. Our data showed that lead treatment of primary hippocampal cultures results in dose-dependent cell death. Inhibition of CDK4 prevented Pb{sup 2+}-induced neuronal death significantly but was incomplete. In addition, we demonstrated that the levels of cyclin D1 and pRb/p107 were increased during Pb{sup 2+} treatment. These elevated expression persisted up to 48 h, returning to control levels after 72 h. We also presented pharmacological and morphological evidences that cyclin D1/CDK4 and pRb/p107 were required for such kind of neuronal death. Addition of the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 (30 {mu}M) or wortmannin (100 nM) significantly rescued the cultured hippocampal neurons from death caused by Pb{sup 2+}. And that Pb{sup 2+}-elicited phospho-AKT (Ser473) participated in the induction of cyclin D1 and partial pRb/p107 expression. These results provide evidences that cell cycle elements play a required role in the death of neurons evoked by Pb{sup 2+} and suggest that certain signaling elements upstream of cyclin D1/CDK4 are modified and/or required for this form of neuronal death.

  11. microRNA-365-targeted nuclear factor I/B transcriptionally represses cyclin-dependent kinase 6 and 4 to inhibit the progression of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; Wang, Yinghui; Ou, Chengshan; Lin, Zhixiang; Wang, Jianyu; Liu, Hongxia; Zhou, Meijuan; Ding, Zhenhua

    2015-08-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases are either post-transcriptionally regulated by interacting with cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors or are transcriptionally regulated by transcription factors, but the latter mechanism has not been extensively investigated. Dysregulated transcription factors resulting from aberrantly expressed microRNAs play critical roles in tumor development and progression. Our previous work identified miR-365 as an oncogenic microRNA that promotes the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma via repression of cyclin-dependent kinase 6, while miR-365 also targets nuclear factor I/B. However, the underlying mechanism(s) of the interaction between nuclear factor I/B and cyclin-dependent kinase 6 are unclear. In this work, we demonstrate that miR-365-regulated nuclear factor I/B transcriptionally inhibits cyclin-dependent kinases 6 and 4 by binding to their promoter regions. In vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrate that the loss of nuclear factor I/B after miR-365 expression or treatment with small interfering RNAs results in the upregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases 6 and 4. This upregulation, in turn, enhances the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein and tumor progression. Characterizing this transcriptional repression of cyclin-dependent kinases 6 and 4 by nuclear factor I/B contributes to the understanding of the transcriptional regulation of cyclin-dependent kinases by transcription factors and also facilitates the development of new therapeutic regimens to improve the clinical treatment of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26072217

  12. Transcriptional regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (p21) gene by NFI in proliferating human cells

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Stéphane; Vigneault, François; Lessard, Maryse; Leclerc, Steeve; Drouin, Régen; Guérin, Sylvain L.

    2006-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A), also known as p21 (WAF1/CIP1) modulates cell cycle, apoptosis, senescence and differentiation via specific protein–protein interactions with the cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk), and many others. Expression of the p21 gene is mainly regulated at the transcriptional level. By conducting both ligation-mediated PCR (LMPCR) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in vivo, we identified a functional target site for the transcription factor, nuclear factor I (NFI), in the basal promoter from the p21 gene. Transfection of recombinant constructs bearing mutations in the p21 NFI site demonstrated that NFI acts as a repressor of p21 gene expression in various types of cultured cells. Inhibition of NFI in human skin fibroblasts through RNAi considerably increased p21 promoter activity suggesting that NFI is a key repressor of p21 transcription. Over-expression of each of the four NFI isoforms in HCT116 cells established that each of them contribute to various extend to the repression of the p21 gene. Most of all, over-expression of NFI-B in doxorubicin, growth-arrested HCT116 increased the proportion of cells in the S-phase of the cell cycle whereas NFI-A and NFI-X reduced it, thereby establishing a role for NFI in the cell cycle dependent expression of p21. PMID:17130157

  13. Association Between Polymorphism rs678653 in Human Cyclin D1 Gene (CCND1) and Susceptibility to Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xichao; Zhang, Xizhi; Wang, Buhai; Wang, Chaomin; Jiang, Jingting; Wu, Changping

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND To assess the association between polymorphism rs678653 in human Cyclin D1 gene (CCND1) and the risk of cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS Multiple biomedical databases were systematically searched. Pooled odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were calculated in the appropriate model. RESULTS In total, 17 case-control studies from 14 articles were included. When combing all available data, no significant association of rs678653 with cancer risk was observed under different genetic models. Stratification by ethnicity also indicated that rs678653 was not correlated with cancer risk in Taiwanese or Indian populations. When stratified by cancer type, no significant association was found between polymorphism rs678653 and digestive tract cancer, head and neck cancer, and gynecological cancer risk. CONCLUSIONS Our comprehensive meta-analysis suggests that the polymorphism rs678653 in CCND1 has no association with cancer risk in different population and disease contexts, indicating that CCND1 rs678653 does not serve a significant biological function in predicting cancer risk. PMID:26979757

  14. The cytoskeletal protein ezrin regulates EC proliferation and angiogenesis via TNF-α–induced transcriptional repression of cyclin A

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Raj; Qin, Gangjian; Luedemann, Corinne; Bord, Evelyn; Hanley, Allison; Silver, Marcy; Gavin, Mary; Goukassain, David; Losordo, Douglas W.

    2005-01-01

    TNF-α modulates EC proliferation and thereby plays a central role in new blood vessel formation in physiologic and pathologic circumstances. TNF-α is known to downregulate cyclin A, a key cell cycle regulatory protein, but little else is known about how TNF-α modulates EC cell cycle and angiogenesis. Using primary ECs, we show that ezrin, previously considered to act primarily as a cytoskeletal protein and in cytoplasmic signaling, is a TNF-α–induced transcriptional repressor. TNF-α exposure leads to Rho kinase–mediated phosphorylation of ezrin, which translocates to the nucleus and binds to cell cycle homology region repressor elements within the cyclin A promoter. Overexpression of dominant-negative ezrin blocks TNF-α–induced modulation of ezrin function and rescues cyclin A expression and EC proliferation. In vivo, blockade of ezrin leads to enhanced transplanted EC proliferation and angiogenesis in a mouse hind limb ischemia model. These observations suggest that TNF-α regulates angiogenesis via Rho kinase induction of a transcriptional repressor function of the cytoskeletal protein ezrin and that ezrin may represent a suitable therapeutic target for processes dependent on EC proliferation. PMID:15965500

  15. miR-1 suppresses the growth of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in vivo and in vitro through the downregulation of MET, cyclin D1 and CDK4 expression

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, SEN; ZHAO, CHAO; YANG, XIAODI; LI, XIANGYANG; PAN, QING; HUANG, HAIJIN; WEN, XUYANG; SHAN, HUSHENG; LI, QIANWEN; DU, YUNXIANG; ZHAO, YAPING

    2016-01-01

    Several aberrant microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) have been implicated in esophageal cancer (EC), which is widely prevalent in China. However, their role in EC tumorigenesis has not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we determined that miR-1 was downregulated in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissues compared with adjacent non-neoplastic tissues using RT-qPCR, and confirmed this using an ESCC cell line. Using a nude mouse xenograft model, we confirmed that the re-expression of miR-1 significantly inhibited ESCC tumor growth. A tetrazolium assay and a trypan blue exclusion assay revealed that miR-1 suppressed ESCC cell proliferation and increased apoptosis, whereas the silencing of miR-1 promoted cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis, suggesting that miR-1 is a novel tumor suppressor. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of action of miR-1 in ESCC, we investigated putative targets using bioinformatics tools. MET, cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), which are involved in the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/MET signaling pathway, were found to be targets of miR-1. miR-1 expression inversely correlated with MET, cyclin D1 and CDK4 expression in ESCC cells. miR-1 directly targeted MET, cyclin D1 and CDK4, suppressing ESCC cell growth. The newly identified miR-1/MET/cyclin D1/CDK4 axis provides new insight into the molecular mechanisms of ESCC pathogenesis and indicates a novel strategy for the diagnosis and treatment of ESCC. PMID:27247259

  16. miR-1 suppresses the growth of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in vivo and in vitro through the downregulation of MET, cyclin D1 and CDK4 expression.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Sen; Zhao, Chao; Yang, Xiaodi; Li, Xiangyang; Pan, Qing; Huang, Haijin; Wen, Xuyang; Shan, Husheng; Li, Qianwen; Du, Yunxiang; Zhao, Yaping

    2016-07-01

    Several aberrant microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) have been implicated in esophageal cancer (EC), which is widely prevalent in China. However, their role in EC tumorigenesis has not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we determined that miR‑1 was downregulated in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissues compared with adjacent non-neoplastic tissues using RT-qPCR, and confirmed this using an ESCC cell line. Using a nude mouse xenograft model, we confirmed that the re-expression of miR‑1 significantly inhibited ESCC tumor growth. A tetrazolium assay and a trypan blue exclusion assay revealed that miR‑1 suppressed ESCC cell proliferation and increased apoptosis, whereas the silencing of miR‑1 promoted cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis, suggesting that miR‑1 is a novel tumor suppressor. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of action of miR‑1 in ESCC, we investigated putative targets using bioinformatics tools. MET, cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), which are involved in the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/MET signaling pathway, were found to be targets of miR‑1. miR‑1 expression inversely correlated with MET, cyclin D1 and CDK4 expression in ESCC cells. miR‑1 directly targeted MET, cyclin D1 and CDK4, suppressing ESCC cell growth. The newly identified miR‑1/MET/cyclin D1/CDK4 axis provides new insight into the molecular mechanisms of ESCC pathogenesis and indicates a novel strategy for the diagnosis and treatment of ESCC. PMID:27247259

  17. Cell cycle arrest in Metformin treated breast cancer cells involves activation of AMPK, downregulation of cyclin D1, and requires p27Kip1 or p21Cip1

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yongxian; Miskimins, W Keith

    2008-01-01

    Background The antihyperglycemic drug metformin may have beneficial effects on the prevention and treatment of cancer. Metformin is known to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). It has also been shown to inhibit cyclin D1 expression and proliferation of some cultured cancer cells. However, the mechanisms of action by which metformin mediates cell cycle arrest are not completely understood. Results In this study, metformin was found to inhibit proliferation of most cultured breast cancer cell lines. This was independent of estrogen receptor, HER2, or p53 status. Inhibition of cell proliferation was associated with arrest within G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. As in previous studies, metformin treatment led to activation of (AMPK) and downregulation of cyclin D1. However, these events were not sufficient for cell cycle arrest because they were also observed in the MDA-MB-231 cell line, which is not sensitive to growth arrest by metformin. In sensitive breast cancer lines, the reduction in cyclin D1 led to release of sequestered CDK inhibitors, p27Kip1 and p21Cip1, and association of these inhibitors with cyclin E/CDK2 complexes. The metformin-resistant cell line MDA-MB-231 expresses significantly lower levels of p27Kip1 and p21Cip1 than the metformin-sensitive cell line, MCF7. When p27Kip1 or p21Cip1 were overexpressed in MDA-MB-231, the cells became sensitive to cell cycle arrest in response to metformin. Conclusion Cell cycle arrest in response to metformin requires CDK inhibitors in addition to AMPK activation and cyclin D1 downregulation. This is of interest because many cancers are associated with loss or downregulation of CDK inhibitors and the results may be relevant to the development of anti-tumor reagents that target the AMPK pathway. PMID:19046439

  18. Epac1 knockdown inhibits the proliferation of ovarian cancer cells by inactivating AKT/Cyclin D1/CDK4 pathway in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gao, Meng; Ma, Yanyan; Bast, Robert C; Li, Yue; Wan, Lu; Liu, Yanping; Sun, Yingshuo; Fang, Zhenghui; Zhang, Lining; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wei, Zengtao

    2016-07-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death among gynecological malignancies, and high grade serous ovarian carcinoma is the most common and most aggressive subtype. Recently, it was demonstrated that cAMP mediates protein kinase A-independent effects through Epac (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP) proteins. Epac proteins, including Epac1 and Epac2, are implicated in several diverse cellular responses, such as insulin secretion, exocytosis, cellular calcium handling and formation of cell-cell junctions. Several reports document that Epac1 could play vital roles in promoting proliferation, invasion and migration of some cancer cells. However, the expression levels and roles of Epac1 in ovarian cancer have not been investigated. In the present study, we detected the expression levels of Epac1 mRNA and protein in three kinds of ovarian cancer cells SKOV3, OVCAR3 and CAOV3. Furthermore, the effect of Epac1 knockdown on the proliferation and apoptosis of SKOV3 and OVCAR3 cells was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. The results showed that there was higher expression of Epac1 mRNA and protein in SKOV3 and OVCAR3 cells. Epac1 knockdown inhibited the proliferation of SKOV3 and OVCAR3 cells in vitro and in vivo. Decreased proliferation may be due to downregulation of Epac1-induced G1 phase arrest by inactivating the AKT/Cyclin D1/CDK4 pathway, but not to alterations in the MAPK pathway or to apoptosis. Taken together, our data provide new insight into the essential role of Epac1 in regulating growth of ovarian cancer cells and suggest that Epac1 might represent an attractive therapeutic target for treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:27277757

  19. An apolar extract of Critonia morifolia inhibits c-Myc, cyclin D1, Cdc25A, Cdc25B, Cdc25C and Akt and induces apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Unger, Christine; Popescu, Ruxandra; Giessrigl, Benedikt; Rarova, Lucie; Herbacek, Irene; Seelinger, Mareike; Diaz, Rene; Wallnöfer, Bruno; Fritzer-Szekeres, Monika; Szekeres, Thomas; Frisch, Richard; Doležal, Karel; Strnad, Miroslav; De Martin, Rainer; Grusch, Michael; Kopp, Brigitte; Krupitza, Georg

    2012-06-01

    Investigating the bioactivity of traditional medical remedies under the controlled conditions of a laboratory is an option to find additional applications, novel formulations or lead structures for the development of new drugs. The present work analysed the anti‑neoplastic activity of increasing polar extracts of the rainforest plant Critonia morifolia (Asteraceae) that has been successfully used as traditional remedy to treat various inflammatory conditions in the long-lasting medical tradition of the Central American Maya, which was here also confirmed in vitro. The apolar petroleum ether extract exhibited the most potent anti‑proliferative and pro‑apoptotic effects in HL‑60 cells and triggered down-regulation of Cdc25C and cyclin D1 within 30 min followed by the inhibition of c-Myc expression and the onset of caspase-3 activation within 2 h. Subsequent to these very rapid molecular responses Chk2 and H2AX became phosphorylated (γ‑H2AX) after 4 h. Analysis of the cell cycle distribution showed an accumulation of cells in the G2-M phase within 8 h and after 24 h in S-phase. This was temporally paralleled by the down-regulation of Cdc25A, Cdc25B, Wee1 and Akt. Therefore, the attenuation of cell cycle progression in the G2-M phase was consistent with the known role of Chk2 for G2-M arrest and with the role of Cdc25B in S-phase progression. These findings suggest the presence of two distinct active principles in the petroleum ether extract of C. moriflia. These facilitated the strong apoptotic response evidenced by the rapid activation of caspase-3 that was later enforced by the inhibition of the survival kinase Akt. Importantly, the efficient down-regulation of Akt, which is successfully tested in current clinical trials, is a unique property of C. morifolia. PMID:22446629

  20. The Down syndrome-related protein kinase DYRK1A phosphorylates p27Kip1 and Cyclin D1 and induces cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Soppa, Ulf; Schumacher, Julian; Florencio Ortiz, Victoria; Pasqualon, Tobias; Tejedor, Francisco J; Becker, Walter

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental question in neurobiology is how the balance between proliferation and differentiation of neuronal precursors is maintained to ensure that the proper number of brain neurons is generated. Substantial evidence implicates DYRK1A (dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A) as a candidate gene responsible for altered neuronal development and brain abnormalities in Down syndrome. Recent findings support the hypothesis that DYRK1A is involved in cell cycle control. Nonetheless, how DYRK1A contributes to neuronal cell cycle regulation and thereby affects neurogenesis remains poorly understood. In the present study we have investigated the mechanisms by which DYRK1A affects cell cycle regulation and neuronal differentiation in a human cell model, mouse neurons, and mouse brain. Dependent on its kinase activity and correlated with the dosage of overexpression, DYRK1A blocked proliferation of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells within 24 h and arrested the cells in G1 phase. Sustained overexpression of DYRK1A induced G0 cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that DYRK1A modulated protein stability of cell cycle-regulatory proteins. DYRK1A reduced cellular Cyclin D1 levels by phosphorylation on Thr286, which is known to induce proteasomal degradation. In addition, DYRK1A phosphorylated p27Kip1 on Ser10, resulting in protein stabilization. Inhibition of DYRK1A kinase activity reduced p27Kip1 Ser10 phosphorylation in cultured hippocampal neurons and in embryonic mouse brain. In aggregate, these results suggest a novel mechanism by which overexpression of DYRK1A may promote premature neuronal differentiation and contribute to altered brain development in Down syndrome. PMID:24806449

  1. WT1 Promotes Cell Proliferation in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines through Up-Regulating Cyclin D1 and p-pRb In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yang; Zhong, Zhaopeng; Liu, Xiang; Xu, Jing; Cui, Fei; Chen, Bin; Røe, Oluf Dimitri; Li, Aihong; Chen, Yijiang

    2013-01-01

    The Wilms’ tumor suppressor gene (WT1) has been identified as an oncogene in many malignant diseases such as leukaemia, breast cancer, mesothelioma and lung cancer. However, the role of WT1 in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) carcinogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we compared WT1 mRNA levels in NSCLC tissues with paired corresponding adjacent tissues and identified significantly higher expression in NSCLC specimens. Cell proliferation of three NSCLC cell lines positively correlated with WT1 expression; moreover, these associations were identified in both cell lines and a xenograft mouse model. Furthermore, we demonstrated that up-regulation of Cyclin D1 and the phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (p-pRb) was mechanistically related to WT1 accelerating cells to S-phase. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated that WT1 is an oncogene and promotes NSCLC cell proliferation by up-regulating Cyclin D1 and p-pRb expression. PMID:23936312

  2. MEK2 controls the activation of MKK3/MKK6-p38 axis involved in the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell survival: Correlation with cyclin D1 expression.

    PubMed

    Huth, Hugo W; Albarnaz, Jonas D; Torres, Alice A; Bonjardim, Claudio A; Ropert, Catherine

    2016-09-01

    The Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK1/2 signaling pathway regulates fundamental processes in malignant cells. However, the exact contributions of MEK1 and MEK2 to the development of cancer remain to be established. We studied the effects of MEK small-molecule inhibitors (PD98059 and U0126) and MEK1 and MEK2 knock-down on cell proliferation, apoptosis and MAPK activation. We showed a diminution of cell viability that was associated with a downregulation of cyclin D1 expression and an increase of apoptosis marker in MEK2 silenced cells; by contrast, a slight increase of cell survival was observed in the absence of MEK1 that correlated with an augment of cyclin D1 expression. These data indicate that MEK2 but not MEK1 is essential for MDA-MB-231 cell survival. Importantly, the role of MEK2 in cell survival appeared independent on ERK1/2 phosphorylation since its absence did not alter the level of activated ERK1/2. Indeed, we have reported an unrevealed link between MEK2 and MKK3/MKK6-p38 MAPK axis where MEK2 was essential for the phosphorylation of MKK3/MKK6 and p38 MAPK that directly impacted on cyclin D1 expression. Importantly, the MEK1 inhibitor PD98059, like MEK1 silencing, induced an augment of cyclin D1 expression that correlated with an increase of MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation suggesting that MEK1 may play a regulatory role in these cells. In sum, the crucial role of MEK2 in MDA-MB-231 cell viability and the unknown relationship between MEK2 and MKK3/MKK6-p38 axis here revealed may open new therapeutic strategies for aggressive breast cancer. PMID:27181679

  3. The Ability of Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b To Transactivate Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transcription Depends on a Functional Kinase Domain, Cyclin T1, and Tat

    PubMed Central

    Fujinaga, Koh; Cujec, Thomas P.; Peng, Junmin; Garriga, Judit; Price, David H.; Graña, Xavier; Peterlin, B. Matija

    1998-01-01

    By binding to the transactivation response element (TAR) RNA, the transcriptional transactivator (Tat) from the human immunodeficiency virus increases rates of elongation rather than initiation of viral transcription. Two cyclin-dependent serine/threonine kinases, CDK7 and CDK9, which phosphorylate the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, have been implicated in Tat transactivation in vivo and in vitro. In this report, we demonstrate that CDK9, which is the kinase component of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) complex, can activate viral transcription when tethered to the heterologous Rev response element RNA via the regulator of expression of virion proteins (Rev). The kinase activity of CDK9 and cyclin T1 is essential for these effects. Moreover, P-TEFb binds to TAR only in the presence of Tat. We conclude that Tat–P-TEFb complexes bind to TAR, where CDK9 modifies RNA polymerase II for the efficient copying of the viral genome. PMID:9696809

  4. Combinatorial PX-866 and Raloxifene Decrease Rb Phosphorylation, Cyclin E2 Transcription, and Proliferation of MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Peek, Gregory W; Tollefsbol, Trygve O

    2016-07-01

    As a potential means to reduce proliferation of breast cancer cells, a multiple-pathway approach with no effect on control cells was explored. The human interactome being constructed by the Center for Cancer Systems Biology will prove indispensable to understanding composite effects of multiple pathways, but its discovered protein-protein interactions require characterization. Accordingly, we explored the effects of regulators of one protein on downstream targets of the other protein. MCF-7 estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer cells were treated with raloxifene to upregulate the TGF-β pathway and PX-866 to down-regulate the PI3K/Akt pathway. This resulted in highly significant downstream reduction of cell cycle proliferation in breast cancer cells with no significant proliferation reduction following similar treatment of noncancerous MCF10A breast epithelial cells. Reduced phosphorylation of p107 and substantial reduction of Rb phosphorylation were observed in response. The effects of reduced Rb and p107 phosphorylation were reflected in significant decline in E2F-1 transcriptional activity, which is dependent on pocket protein phosphorylation status. The reduced proliferation was related to decreased expression of cyclins, including E2F-1-regulated Cyclin E2, which was also in response to raloxifene and PX-866. All combinations of raloxifene and PX-866 produced significant or highly significant results for reduced MCF-7 cell proliferation, reduced Cyclin E2 transcription, and reduced Rb phosphorylation. These studies demonstrated that uncontrolled proliferation of ER+ breast cancer cells can be significantly reduced by combinational targeting of two relevant pathways. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1688-1696, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26660119

  5. Association between the Cyclin D1 G870A polymorphism and the susceptibility to and prognosis of upper aerodigestive tract squamous cell carcinomas: an updated meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yichen; Zhang, Chenglin; Zhou, Xuhui

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Several publications have investigated the association between the Cyclin D1 G to A substitution at nucleotide 870 (CCND1 G870A) polymorphism and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT), but their conclusions still remain controversial. We conducted a meta-analysis to precisely evaluate this association. Patients and methods We electronically searched the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, PubMed, and Embase (up to January 2015) databases for case–control studies on the association between the CCND1 G870A polymorphism and SCC of the UADT, and 23 studies were included in total. Results The meta-analysis results showed that there was a significant association between the CCND1 G870A polymorphism and the risk of SCC of the UADT (AA vs GG: odds ratio [OR] =1.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.01–1.74, P<0.001 for heterogeneity; GA/AA vs GG: OR =1.24, 95% CI =1.01–1.51, P<0.001 for heterogeneity; AA vs GA/GG: OR =1.16, 95% CI =0.97–1.39, P<0.001 for heterogeneity; allele A vs allele G: OR =1.14, 95% CI =1.00–1.30, P<0.001 for heterogeneity; GA vs GG: OR =1.18, 95% CI =0.98–1.42, P<0.001 for heterogeneity). However, when analyzing prognosis, allele G was a potential risk factor for poor tumor differentiation (AA vs GA/GG: OR =2.60, 95% CI =1.15–5.86, P=0.836 for heterogeneity) and reduced disease-free intervals (OR =2.08, 95% CI =1.17–3.69, P=0.134 for heterogeneity). In the subgroup analysis, the cancer susceptibility of Asian groups, population-based control groups, nasopharyngeal cancer groups, and esophageal SCC groups were more likely to be affected by the CCND1 G870A polymorphism. No significant publication bias was found in our analysis (P=0.961 for Egger’s test and P=0.245 for Begg’s test). Conclusion The results of the present meta-analysis suggest that the variant CCND1 870A allele might confer an elevated risk of SCC of the UADT, particularly among Asians and individuals who have esophageal or

  6. Cdk5-mediated inhibition of APC/C-Cdh1 switches on the cyclin D1-Cdk4-pRb pathway causing aberrant S-phase entry of postmitotic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Veas-Pérez de Tudela, Miguel; Maestre, Carolina; Delgado-Esteban, María; Bolaños, Juan P.; Almeida, Angeles

    2015-01-01

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that regulates cell cycle progression in proliferating cells. To enter the S-phase, APC/C must be inactivated by phosphorylation of its cofactor, Cdh1. In post-mitotic cells such as neurons APC/C-Cdh1 complex is highly active and responsible for the continuous degradation of mitotic cyclins. However, the specific molecular pathway that determines neuronal cell cycle blockade in post-mitotic neurons is unknown. Here, we show that activation of glutamatergic receptors in rat cortical primary neurons endogenously triggers cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (Cdk5)-mediated phosphorylation of Cdh1 leading to its cytoplasmic accumulation and disassembly from the APC3 core protein, causing APC/C inactivation. Conversely, pharmacological or genetic inhibition of Cdk5 promotes Cdh1 ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Furthermore, we show that Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation and inactivation of Cdh1 leads to p27 depletion, which switches on the cyclin D1-cyclin-dependent kinase-4 (Cdk4)-retinoblastoma protein (pRb) pathway to allow the S-phase entry of neurons. However, neurons do not proceed through the cell cycle and die by apoptosis. These results indicate that APC/C-Cdh1 actively suppresses an aberrant cell cycle entry and death of neurons, highlighting its critical function in neuroprotection. PMID:26658992

  7. Expression and cellular localization of the transcription factor NeuroD1 in the developing and adult rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Castro, Analía E; Benitez, Sergio G; Farias Altamirano, Luz E; Savastano, Luis E; Patterson, Sean I; Muñoz, Estela M

    2015-05-01

    Circadian rhythms govern many aspects of mammalian physiology. The daily pattern of melatonin synthesis and secretion is one of the classic examples of circadian oscillations. It is mediated by a class of neuroendocrine cells known as pinealocytes which are not yet fully defined. An established method to evaluate functional and cytological characters is through the expression of lineage-specific transcriptional regulators. NeuroD1 is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor involved in the specification and maintenance of both endocrine and neuronal phenotypes. We have previously described developmental and adult regulation of NeuroD1 mRNA in the rodent pineal gland. However, the transcript levels were not influenced by the elimination of sympathetic input, suggesting that any rhythmicity of NeuroD1 might be found downstream of transcription. Here, we describe NeuroD1 protein expression and cellular localization in the rat pineal gland during development and the daily cycle. In embryonic and perinatal stages, protein expression follows the mRNA pattern and is predominantly nuclear. Thereafter, NeuroD1 is mostly found in pinealocyte nuclei in the early part of the night and in cytoplasm during the day, a rhythm maintained into adulthood. Additionally, nocturnal nuclear NeuroD1 levels are reduced after sympathetic disruption, an effect mimicked by the in vivo administration of α- and β-adrenoceptor blockers. NeuroD1 phosphorylation at two sites, Ser(274) and Ser(336) , associates with nuclear localization in pinealocytes. These data suggest that NeuroD1 influences pineal phenotype both during development and adulthood, in an autonomic and phosphorylation-dependent manner. PMID:25752781

  8. ClC-3 Chloride Channel Proteins Regulate the Cell Cycle by Up-regulating cyclin D1-CDK4/6 through Suppressing p21/p27 Expression in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Dong; Luo, Hai; Lai, Zhouyi; Zou, Lili; Zhu, Linyan; Mao, Jianwen; Jacob, Tim; Ye, Wencai; Wang, Liwei; Chen, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    It was shown in this study that knockdown of ClC-3 expression by ClC-3 siRNA prevented the activation of hypotonicity-induced chloride currents, and arrested cells at the G0/G1 phase in nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE-2Z cells. Reconstitution of ClC-3 expression with ClC-3 expression plasmids could rescue the cells from the cell cycle arrest caused by ClC-3 siRNA treatments. Transfection of cells with ClC-3 siRNA decreased the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin dependent kinase 4 and 6, and increased the expression of cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs), p21 and p27. Pretreatments of cells with p21 and p27 siRNAs depleted the inhibitory effects of ClC-3 siRNA on the expression of CDK4 and CDK6, but not on that of cyclin D1, indicating the requirement of p21 and p27 for the inhibitory effects of ClC-3 siRNA on CDK4 and CDK6 expression. ClC-3 siRNA inhibited cells to progress from the G1 phase to the S phase, but pretreatments of cells with p21 and p27 siRNAs abolished the inhibitory effects of ClC-3 siRNA on the cell cycle progress. Our data suggest that ClC-3 may regulate cell cycle transition between G0/G1 and S phases by up-regulation of the expression of CDK4 and CDK6 through suppression of p21 and p27 expression. PMID:27451945

  9. Expression of epidermal growth factor receptor, p53, Bcl2, vascular endothelial growth factor, cyclooxygenase-2, cyclin D1, human epidermal receptor-2 and Ki-67: Association with clinicopathological profiles and outcomes in gallbladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Doval, Dinesh Chandra; Azam, Saud; Sinha, Rupal; Batra, Ullas; Mehta, Anurag

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present study observed the expression levels of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), p53, Bcl2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), cyclooxygenase-2 (cox-2), cyclin D1, human epidermal receptor-2 (HER-2) and Ki-67 in gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) and their association with clinicopathological profiles and disease outcomes. Materials and Methods: Fifty consecutive samples of cholecystectomy/biopsies from GB bed (archived formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue blocks of different stages of GBC) were included, and patient details related to their demographic profile, investigations, tumor profile, treatment, and follow-up were recorded. Immunohistochemistry was performed to study the expression levels. Results: Overexpression of EGFR, p53, Bcl2, VEGF, cox-2, cyclin D1 and HER-2 was observed as 74%, 44%, 8%, 34%, 66%, 64%, and 4%, respectively. Association of Bcl2 overexpression in mucinous morphology (40%, P = 0.045), cox-2 overexpression in early stage (I/II) tumors (87.5%, P = 0.028) and VEGF overexpression in alive patients (47.1%, P = 0.044) was observed. Co-expression of EGFR and p53 were statistically significant (P = 0.033). Ki-67 labeling index was significantly higher in patients in age group <40 years (P = 0.027), and poorly differentiated tumors (P = 0.023). Advanced disease and poorly differentiated tumors showed a significantly poor median survival (P < 0.05). Conclusion: EGFR, cox-2 and cyclin D1 were largely overexpressed. Advanced tumor stages and poorly differentiated tumors are predictors of poor survival. PMID:25225463

  10. Functional Interactions between BM88/Cend1, Ran-Binding Protein M and Dyrk1B Kinase Affect Cyclin D1 Levels and Cell Cycle Progression/Exit in Mouse Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tsioras, Konstantinos; Papastefanaki, Florentia; Politis, Panagiotis K.; Matsas, Rebecca; Gaitanou, Maria

    2013-01-01

    BM88/Cend1 is a neuronal-lineage specific modulator with a pivotal role in coordination of cell cycle exit and differentiation of neuronal precursors. In the current study we identified the signal transduction scaffolding protein Ran-binding protein M (RanBPM) as a BM88/Cend1 binding partner and showed that BM88/Cend1, RanBPM and the dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation regulated kinase 1B (Dyrk1B) are expressed in mouse brain as well as in cultured embryonic cortical neurons while RanBPM can form complexes with either of the two other proteins. To elucidate a potential mechanism involving BM88/Cend1, RanBPM and Dyrk1B in cell cycle progression/exit, we transiently co-expressed these proteins in mouse neuroblastoma Neuro 2a cells. We found that the BM88/Cend1-dependent or Dyrk1B-dependent down-regulation of cyclin D1 is reversed following their functional interaction with RanBPM. More specifically, functional interaction of RanBPM with either BM88/Cend1 or Dyrk1B stabilizes cyclin D1 in the nucleus and promotes 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation as a measure of enhanced cell proliferation. However, the RanBPM-dependent Dyrk1B cytosolic retention and degradation is reverted in the presence of Cend1 resulting in cyclin D1 destabilization. Co-expression of RanBPM with either BM88/Cend1 or Dyrk1B also had a negative effect on Neuro 2a cell differentiation. Our results suggest that functional interactions between BM88/Cend1, RanBPM and Dyrk1B affect the balance between cellular proliferation and differentiation in Neuro 2a cells and indicate that a potentially similar mechanism may influence cell cycle progression/exit and differentiation of neuronal precursors. PMID:24312406

  11. DOG1, cyclin D1, CK7, CD117 and vimentin are useful immunohistochemical markers in distinguishing chromophobe renal cell carcinoma from clear cell renal cell carcinoma and renal oncocytoma.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Tian, Bo; Wu, Chao; Peng, Yan; Wang, Hui; Gu, Wen-Li; Gao, Feng-Hou

    2015-04-01

    The distinction between chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (ChRCC), clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CRCC) and renal oncocytoma may cause a diagnostic dilemma. The usefulness of DOG1, cyclin D1, CK7, CD117 and vimentin in the differential diagnosis of these renal epithelial tumors was investigated. DOG1 was positive in ChRCC (32 of 32, 100%) and in renal oncocytoma (21 of 21, 100%). In contrast, DOG1 was absent in all CRCC (0 of 30). Cyclin D1 was positive in renal oncocytomas (17 of 21, 81%) but negative in the ChRCC (0/23) and CRCC (0 of 30). CK7 was positive in ChRCC (30 of 32, 94%), but was negative in oncocytoma (only scattered single positive cells), and was only focal positive in two cases of CRCC. CD117 was expressed in 88% of ChRCC (28 of 32), 86% of renal oncocytoma (18 of 21), and was negative in all CRCC (0 of 30). Twenty-six of the 30 cases of CRCC were positive (87%) for vimentin with prominent membrane staining patterns. All 23 chromophobe carcinomas were negative for vimentin and 15 of 21 oncocytomas demonstrated focal vimentin positivity, but less than 10%. The above results demonstrate that: (1) DOG1 was very sensitive and specific marker for distinguish ChRCC from CRCC; (2) Cyclin D1 was a useful marker to discriminate between ChRCC and renal oncocytoma; (3) CK7 and CD117 were useful markers to distinguish ChRCC from renal oncocytoma and CRCC. (4) Vimentin was helpful for distinguishing clear cell RCC from chromophobe and oncocytoma (87% of clear cell RCC positive, negative in chromophobe, only focally positive in oncocytoma). (5) CK8/18, CK19, CD10, β-catenin and E-cadherin could not be used to distinguish ChRCC from renal oncocytoma and CRCC. PMID:25596994

  12. CDK1-Cyclin B1 Activates RNMT, Coordinating mRNA Cap Methylation with G1 Phase Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Aregger, Michael; Kaskar, Aneesa; Varshney, Dhaval; Fernandez-Sanchez, Maria Elena; Inesta-Vaquera, Francisco A.; Weidlich, Simone; Cowling, Victoria H.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The creation of translation-competent mRNA is dependent on RNA polymerase II transcripts being modified by addition of the 7-methylguanosine (m7G) cap. The factors that mediate splicing, nuclear export, and translation initiation are recruited to the transcript via the cap. The cap structure is formed by several activities and completed by RNMT (RNA guanine-7 methyltransferase), which catalyzes N7 methylation of the cap guanosine. We report that CDK1-cyclin B1 phosphorylates the RNMT regulatory domain on T77 during G2/M phase of the cell cycle. RNMT T77 phosphorylation activates the enzyme both directly and indirectly by inhibiting interaction with KPNA2, an RNMT inhibitor. RNMT T77 phosphorylation results in elevated m7G cap methyltransferase activity at the beginning of G1 phase, coordinating mRNA capping with the burst of transcription that occurs following nuclear envelope reformation. RNMT T77 phosphorylation is required for the production of cohort of proteins, and inhibiting T77 phosphorylation reduces the cell proliferation rate. PMID:26942677

  13. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Viral Interferon Regulatory Factor 4 (vIRF4) Perturbs the G1-S Cell Cycle Progression via Deregulation of the cyclin D1 Gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye-Ra; Mitra, Jaba; Lee, Stacy; Gao, Shou-Jiang; Oh, Tae-Kwang; Kim, Myung Hee; Ha, Taekjip; Jung, Jae U

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection modulates the host cell cycle to create an environment optimal for its viral-DNA replication during the lytic life cycle. We report here that KSHV vIRF4 targets the β-catenin/CBP cofactor and blocks its occupancy on the cyclin D1 promoter, suppressing the G1-S cell cycle progression and enhancing KSHV replication. This shows that KSHV vIRF4 suppresses host G1-S transition, possibly providing an intracellular milieu favorable for its replication. PMID:26491150

  14. A Cyclin T1 point mutation that abolishes positive transcription elongation factor (P-TEFb) binding to Hexim1 and HIV tat

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) plays an essential role in activating HIV genome transcription. It is recruited to the HIV LTR promoter through an interaction between the Tat viral protein and its Cyclin T1 subunit. P-TEFb activity is inhibited by direct binding of its subunit Cyclin T (1 or 2) with Hexim (1 or 2), a cellular protein, bound to the 7SK small nuclear RNA. Hexim1 competes with Tat for P-TEFb binding. Results Mutations that impair human Cyclin T1/Hexim1 interaction were searched using systematic mutagenesis of these proteins coupled with a yeast two-hybrid screen for loss of protein interaction. Evolutionary conserved Hexim1 residues belonging to an unstructured peptide located N-terminal of the dimerization domain, were found to be critical for P-TEFb binding. Random mutagenesis of the N-terminal region of Cyclin T1 provided identification of single amino-acid mutations that impair Hexim1 binding in human cells. Furthermore, conservation of critical residues supported the existence of a functional Hexim1 homologue in nematodes. Conclusions Single Cyclin T1 amino-acid mutations that impair Hexim1 binding are located on a groove between the two cyclin folds and define a surface overlapping the HIV-1 Tat protein binding surface. One residue, Y175, in the centre of this groove was identified as essential for both Hexim1 and Tat binding to P-TEFb as well as for HIV transcription. PMID:24985203

  15. D-type cyclins and G1 progression during liver development in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Boylan, Joan M. . E-mail: Joan_Boylan@brown.edu; Gruppuso, Philip A. . E-mail: Philip_Gruppuso@brown.edu

    2005-05-13

    Initiation and progression through G1 requires the activity of signaling complexes containing cyclins (D- or E-type) and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK4/6 and CDK2, respectively). We set out to identify the G1-phase cyclins and CDKs that are operative during late gestation liver development in the rat. This is a period during which hepatocytes show a high rate of proliferation that is, at least in part, independent of the mitogenic signaling pathways that are functional in mature hepatocytes. RNase protection assay and Western immunoblotting indicated that cyclin D1 is expressed at similar levels in fetal and adult liver. When cyclin D1 was induced after partial hepatectomy, its predominant CDK-binding partner was CDK4. In contrast, cyclins D2 and D3 predominated in fetal liver and were complexed with both CDK4 and CDK6. Little CDK6 protein was expressed in quiescent or regenerating adult liver. Cyclins E1 and E2 were both transcriptionally up-regulated in fetal liver. Activity of complexes containing cyclins E1 and E2 was higher in fetal liver, as was content of the cell cycle regulator, Rb. In fetal liver, Rb was highly phosphorylated at both cyclin D- and cyclin E-dependent sites. In conclusion, liver development is associated with a switch from cyclin D2/D3-containing complexes to cyclin D1:CDK4 complexes. We speculate that the switch in D-type cyclins may be associated with the dependence on mitogenic signaling that develops as hepatocytes mature.

  16. Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 (cIAP1) can regulate E2F1 transcription factor-mediated control of cyclin transcription.

    PubMed

    Cartier, Jessy; Berthelet, Jean; Marivin, Arthur; Gemble, Simon; Edmond, Valérie; Plenchette, Stéphanie; Lagrange, Brice; Hammann, Arlette; Dupoux, Alban; Delva, Laurent; Eymin, Béatrice; Solary, Eric; Dubrez, Laurence

    2011-07-29

    The inhibitor of apoptosis protein cIAP1 (cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1) is a potent regulator of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family and NF-κB signaling pathways in the cytoplasm. However, in some primary cells and tumor cell lines, cIAP1 is expressed in the nucleus, and its nuclear function remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the N-terminal part of cIAP1 directly interacts with the DNA binding domain of the E2F1 transcription factor. cIAP1 dramatically increases the transcriptional activity of E2F1 on synthetic and CCNE promoters. This function is not conserved for cIAP2 and XIAP, which are cytoplasmic proteins. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrate that cIAP1 is recruited on E2F binding sites of the CCNE and CCNA promoters in a cell cycle- and differentiation-dependent manner. cIAP1 silencing inhibits E2F1 DNA binding and E2F1-mediated transcriptional activation of the CCNE gene. In cells that express a nuclear cIAP1 such as HeLa, THP1 cells and primary human mammary epithelial cells, down-regulation of cIAP1 inhibits cyclin E and A expression and cell proliferation. We conclude that one of the functions of cIAP1 when localized in the nucleus is to regulate E2F1 transcriptional activity. PMID:21653699

  17. Paullinia cupana Mart. var. sorbilis, guarana, increases survival of Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) bearing mice by decreasing cyclin-D1 expression and inducing a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in EAC cells.

    PubMed

    Fukumasu, Heidge; Latorre, Andreia Oliveira; Zaidan-Dagli, Maria Lucia

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to report the antiproliferative effect of P. cupana treatment in Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma (EAC)-bearing animals. Female mice were treated with three doses of powdered P. cupana (100, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg) for 7 days, injected with 10(5) EAC cells and treated up to day 21. In addition, a survival experiment was carried out with the same protocol. P. cupana decreased the ascites volume (p = 0.0120), cell number (p = 0.0004) and hemorrhage (p = 0.0054). This occurred through a G1-phase arrest (p < 0.01) induced by a decreased gene expression of Cyclin D1 in EAC cells. Furthermore, P. cupana significantly increased the survival of EAC-bearing animals (p = 0.0012). In conclusion, the P. cupana growth control effect in this model was correlated with a decreased expression of cyclin D1 and a G1 phase arrest. These results reinforce the cancer therapeutic potential of this Brazilian plant. PMID:20564499

  18. Nicotine induces cell proliferation in association with cyclin D1 up-regulation and inhibits cell differentiation in association with p53 regulation in a murine pre-osteoblastic cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Tsuyoshi Abe, Takahiro; Nakamoto, Norimichi; Tomaru, Yasuhisa; Koshikiya, Noboru; Nojima, Junya; Kokabu, Shoichiro; Sakata, Yasuaki; Kobayashi, Akio; Yoda, Tetsuya

    2008-12-05

    Recent studies have suggested that nicotine critically affects bone metabolism. Many studies have examined the effects of nicotine on proliferation and differentiation, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. We examined cell cycle regulators involved in the proliferation and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. Nicotine induced cell proliferation in association with p53 down-regulation and cyclin D1 up-regulation. In differentiated cells, nicotine reduced alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralized nodule formation in dose-dependent manners. Furthermore, p53 expression was sustained in nicotine-treated cells during differentiation. These findings indicate that nicotine promotes the cell cycle and inhibits differentiation in association with p53 regulation in pre-osteoblastic cells.

  19. An EBV recombinant deleted for residues 130-159 in EBNA3C can deregulate p53/Mdm2 and Cyclin D1/CDK6 which results in apoptosis and reduced cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    El-Naccache, Darine W.; Robertson, Erle S.

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a gamma herpes virus is associated with B-cell malignancies. EBNA-3C is critical for in vitro primary B-cell transformation. Interestingly, the N terminal domain of EBNA3C which contains residues 130–159, interacts with various cellular proteins, such as p53, Mdm2, CyclinD1/Cdk6 complex, and E2F1. In the current reverse genetics study, we deleted the residues 130-159 aa within EBNA3C open reading frame (ORF) by BACmid recombinant engineering methodology. Our experiments demonstrated that deletion of the 130-159 aa showed a reduction in cell proliferation. Also, this recombinant virus showed with higher infectivity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) compared to wild type EBV. PBMCs- infected with recombinant EBV deleted for 130-159 residues have differential expression patterns for the p53/Mdm2, CyclinD1/Cdk6 and pRb/E2F1 pathways compared to wild type EBV-infected PBMCs. PBMCs infected with recombinant virus showed increased apoptotic cell death which further resulted in activation of polymerase 1 (PARP1), an important contributor to apoptotic signaling. Interestingly, cells infected with this recombinant virus showed a dramatic decrease in chromosomal instability, indicated by the presence of increased multinucleation and micronucleation. In addition infection with recombinant virus have increased cells in G0/G1 phase and decreased cells in S-G2M phase when compared to wild type infected cells. Thus, these differences in signaling activities due to 29 amino acid residues of EBNA3C is of particular significance in deregulation of cell proliferation in EBV-infected cells. PMID:26908453

  20. Modulation of extracellular signal-related kinase, cyclin D1, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and vimentin expression in estradiol-pretreated astrocyte cultures treated with competence and progression growth factors.

    PubMed

    Bramanti, Vincenzo; Grasso, Sonia; Tibullo, Daniele; Giallongo, Cesarina; Raciti, Giuseppina; Viola, Maria; Avola, Roberto

    2015-09-01

    The present study seeks to elucidate the interactions between the "competence" growth factor basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and/or estrogen 17β-estradiol and the "progression" growth factors epidermal growth factor (EGF), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and insulin (INS) on DNA labeling and also cyclin D1, extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and vimentin expression in astroglial cultures under different experimental conditions. Pretreatment for 24 hr with bFGF and subsequent exposure for 36 hr to estradiol (E2 ) and EGF, IGF-I, or INS stimulated DNA labeling in the last 12 hr, especially when the cultures were treated with progression growth factors. bFGF pretreatment and subsequent treatment with E2 for 36 hr stimulated DNA labeling. The 36-hr E2 treatment alone did not significantly decrease DNA labeling, but contemporary addition of E2 with two or three growth factors stimulated DNA labeling remarkably. When E2 was coadded with growth factors, a significantly increased DNA labeling was observed, demonstrating an astroglial synergistic mitogenic effect evoked by contemporary treatment with growth factors in the presence of estrogens. Cyclin D1 expression was markedly increased when astrocyte cultures were pretreated for 36 hr with E2 and subsequently treated with two or three competence and progression growth factors. A highly significant increase of ERK1/2 expression was observed after all the treatments (EGF, bFGF, INS, IGF-I alone or in combination with two or three growth factors). GFAP and vimentin expression was markedly increased when the cultures were treated with two or three growth factors. In conclusion, our data demonstrate estradiol-growth factor cross-talk during astroglial cell proliferation and differentiation in culture. PMID:26053243

  1. Associations of hormone replacement therapy and oral contraceptives with risk of colorectal cancer defined by clinicopathological factors, beta-catenin alterations, expression of cyclin D1, p53, and microsatellite-instability

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Postmenopausal hormone therapy (HRT) and oral contraceptive (OC) use have in several studies been reported to be associated with a decreased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. However, data on the association between HRT and OC and risk of different clinicopathological and molecular subsets of CRC are lacking. The aim of this molecular pathological epidemiology study was therefore to evaluate the associations between HRT and OC use and risk of specific CRC subgroups, overall and by tumour site. Method In the population-based prospective cohort study Mamö Diet and Cancer, including 17035 women, 304 cases of CRC were diagnosed up until 31 December 2008. Immunohistochemical expression of beta-catenin, cyclin D1, p53 and MSI-screening status had previously been assessed in tissue microarrays with tumours from 280 cases. HRT was assessed as current use of combined HRT (CHRT) or unopposed oestrogen (ERT), and analysed among 12583 peri-and postmenopausal women. OC use was assessed as ever vs never use among all women in the cohort. A multivariate Cox regression model was applied to determine hazard ratios for risk of CRC, overall and according to molecular subgroups, in relation to HRT and OC use. Results There was no significantly reduced risk of CRC by CHRT or ERT use, however a reduced risk of T-stage 1–2 tumours was seen among CHRT users (HR: 0.24; 95% CI: 0.09-0.77). Analysis stratified by tumour location revealed a reduced overall risk of rectal, but not colon, cancer among CHRT and ERT users, including T stage 1–2, lymph node negative, distant metastasis-free, cyclin D1 - and p53 negative tumours. In unadjusted analysis, OC use was significantly associated with a reduced overall risk of CRC (HR: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.44-0.71), but this significance was not retained in adjusted analysis (HR: 1.05: 95% CI: 0.80-1.37). A similar risk reduction was seen for the majority of clinicopathological and molecular subgroups. Conclusion Our findings provide information on

  2. Triphala Extract Suppresses Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Human Colon Cancer Stem Cells via Suppressing c-Myc/Cyclin D1 and Elevation of Bax/Bcl-2 Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Vadde, Ramakrishna; Radhakrishnan, Sridhar; Reddivari, Lavanya; Vanamala, Jairam K. P.

    2015-01-01

    Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths in the USA. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have the ability to drive continued expansion of the population of malignant cells. Therefore, strategies that target CSCs could be effective against colon cancer and in reducing the risk of relapse and metastasis. In this study, we evaluated the antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of triphala, a widely used formulation in Indian traditional medicine, on HCT116 colon cancer cells and human colon cancer stem cells (HCCSCs). The total phenolic content, antioxidant activity, and phytochemical composition (LC-MS-MS) of methanol extract of triphala (MET) were also measured. We observed that MET contains a variety of phenolics including naringin, quercetin, homoorientin, and isorhamnetin. MET suppressed proliferation independent of p53 status in HCT116 and in HCCSCs. MET also induced p53-independent apoptosis in HCCSCs as indicated by elevated levels of cleaved PARP. Western blotting data suggested that MET suppressed protein levels of c-Myc and cyclin D1, key proteins involved in proliferation, and induced apoptosis through elevation of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Furthermore, MET inhibited HCCSCs colony formation, a measure of CSCs self-renewal ability. Anticancer effects of triphala observed in our study warrant future studies to determine its efficacy in vivo. PMID:26167492

  3. Maple polyphenols, ginnalins A-C, induce S- and G2/M-cell cycle arrest in colon and breast cancer cells mediated by decreasing cyclins A and D1 levels.

    PubMed

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Ma, Hang; Edmonds, Maxwell E; Seeram, Navindra P

    2013-01-15

    Polyphenols are bioactive compounds found in plant foods. Ginnalins A-C are polyphenols present in the sap and other parts of the sugar and red maple species which are used to produce maple syrup. Here we evaluated the antiproliferative effects of ginnalins A-C on colon (HCT-116) and breast (MCF-7) tumourigenic and non-tumourigenic colon (CCD-18Co) cells and investigated whether these effects were mediated through cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis. Ginnalins A-C were twofold more effective against the tumourigenic than non-tumourigenic cells. Among the polyphenols, ginnalin A (84%, HCT-116; 49%, MCF-7) was more effective than ginnalins B and C (50%, HCT-116; 30%, MCF-7) at 50 μM concentrations. Ginnalin A did not induce apoptosis of the cancer cells but arrested cell cycle (in the S- and G(2)/M-phases) and decreased cyclins A and D1 protein levels. These results suggest that maple polyphenols may have potential cancer chemopreventive effects mediated through cell cycle arrest. PMID:23122108

  4. Subtilase cytotoxin, produced by Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli, transiently inhibits protein synthesis of Vero cells via degradation of BiP and induces cell cycle arrest at G1 by downregulation of cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Morinaga, Naoko; Yahiro, Kinnosuke; Matsuura, Gen; Moss, Joel; Noda, Masatoshi

    2008-04-01

    Subtilase cytotoxin (SubAB) is a AB(5) type toxin produced by Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli, which exhibits cytotoxicity to Vero cells. SubAB B subunit binds to toxin receptors on the cell surface, whereas the A subunit is a subtilase-like serine protease that specifically cleaves chaperone BiP/Grp78. As noted previously, SubAB caused inhibition of protein synthesis. We now show that the inhibition of protein synthesis was transient and occurred as a result of ER stress induced by cleavage of BiP; it was closely associated with phosphorylation of double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase-like ER kinase (PERK) and eukaryotic initiation factor-2alpha (eIF2alpha). The phosphorylation of PERK and eIF2alpha was maximal at 30-60 min and then returned to the control level. Protein synthesis after treatment of cells with SubAB was suppressed for 2 h and recovered, followed by induction of stress-inducible C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP). BiP degradation continued, however, even after protein synthesis recovered. SubAB-treated cells showed cell cycle arrest in G1 phase, which may result from cyclin D1 downregulation caused by both SubAB-induced translational inhibition and continuous prolonged proteasomal degradation. PMID:18005237

  5. Cytochrome P450 1D1: A novel CYP1A-related gene that is not transcriptionally activated by PCB126 or TCDD

    PubMed Central

    Goldstone, J. V.; Jönsson, M. E.; Behrendt, L.; Woodin, B. R.; Jenny, M. J.; Nelson, D. R.; Stegeman, J. J.

    2009-01-01

    Enzymes in the cytochrome P450 1 family oxidize many common environmental toxicants. We identified a new CYP1, termed CYP1D1, in zebrafish. Phylogenetically, CYP1D1 is paralogous to CYP1A and the two share 45% amino acid identity and similar gene structure. In adult zebrafish, CYP1D1 is most highly expressed in liver and is relatively highly expressed in brain. CYP1D1 transcript levels were higher at 9 hours post-fertilization than at later developmental times. Treatment of zebrafish with potent aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) agonists (3,3′,4,4′,5-pentachlorobiphenyl or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin) did not induce CYP1D1 transcript expression. Morpholino oligonucleotide knockdown of AHR2, which mediates induction of other CYP1s, did not affect CYP1D1 expression. Zebrafish CYP1D1 heterologously expressed in yeast exhibited ethoxyresorufin- and methoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase activities. Antibodies against a CYP1D1 peptide specifically detected a single electrophoretically-resolved protein band in zebrafish liver microsomes, distinct from CYP1A. CYP1D1 in zebrafish is a CYP1A-like gene that could have metabolic functions targeting endogenous compounds. PMID:19103147

  6. Enhanced expression of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases in aniline-induced cell proliferation in rat spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianling; Wang Gangduo; Ma Huaxian; Khan, M. Firoze

    2011-01-15

    Aniline exposure is associated with toxicity to the spleen leading to splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis and a variety of sarcomas of the spleen on chronic exposure. In earlier studies, we have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron overload, oxidative stress and activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors, which could regulate various genes leading to a tumorigenic response in the spleen. However, molecular mechanisms leading to aniline-induced cellular proliferation in the spleen remain largely unknown. This study was, therefore, undertaken on the regulation of G1 phase cell cycle proteins (cyclins), expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and cell proliferation in the spleen, in an experimental condition preceding a tumorigenic response. Male SD rats were treated with aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water) for 30 days (controls received drinking water only), and splenocyte proliferation, protein expression of G1 phase cyclins, CDKs and pRB were measured. Aniline treatment resulted in significant increases in splenocyte proliferation, based on cell counts, cell proliferation markers including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), nuclear Ki67 protein (Ki67) and minichromosome maintenance (MCM), MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis. Western blot analysis of splenocyte proteins from aniline-treated rats showed significantly increased expression of cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E, as compared to the controls. Similarly, real-time PCR analysis showed significantly increased mRNA expression for cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E in the spleens of aniline-treated rats. The overexpression of these cyclins was associated with increases in the expression of CDK4, CDK6, CDK2 as well as phosphorylation of pRB protein. Our data suggest that increased expression of cyclins, CDKs and phosphorylation of pRB protein could be critical in cell proliferation, and may contribute to aniline-induced tumorigenic response in

  7. Redox regulation of cardiomyocyte cell cycling via an ERK1/2 and c-Myc-dependent activation of cyclin D2 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Thomas V.A.; Smyrnias, Ioannis; Schnelle, Moritz; Mistry, Rajesh K.; Zhang, Min; Beretta, Matteo; Martin, Daniel; Anilkumar, Narayana; de Silva, Shana M.; Shah, Ajay M.; Brewer, Alison C.

    2015-01-01

    Adult mammalian cardiomyocytes have a very limited capacity to proliferate, and consequently the loss of cells after cardiac stress promotes heart failure. Recent evidence suggests that administration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), can regulate redox-dependent signalling pathway(s) to promote cardiomyocyte proliferation in vitro, but the potential relevance of such a pathway in vivo has not been tested. We have generated a transgenic (Tg) mouse model in which the H2O2-generating enzyme, NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4), is overexpressed within the postnatal cardiomyocytes, and observed that the hearts of 1–3 week old Tg mice pups are larger in comparison to wild type (Wt) littermate controls. We demonstrate that the cardiomyocytes of Tg mouse pups have increased cell cycling capacity in vivo as determined by incorporation of 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine. Further, microarray analyses of the transcriptome of these Tg mouse hearts suggested that the expression of cyclin D2 is significantly increased. We investigated the molecular mechanisms which underlie this more proliferative phenotype in isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (NRCs) in vitro, and demonstrate that Nox4 overexpression mediates an H2O2-dependent activation of the ERK1/2 signalling pathway, which in turn phosphorylates and activates the transcription factor c-myc. This results in a significant increase in cyclin D2 expression, which we show to be mediated, at least in part, by cis-acting c-myc binding sites within the proximal cyclin D2 promoter. Overexpression of Nox4 in NRCs results in an increase in their proliferative capacity that is ablated by the silencing of cyclin D2. We further demonstrate activation of the ERK1/2 signalling pathway, increased phosphorylation of c-myc and significantly increased expression of cyclin D2 protein in the Nox4 Tg hearts. We suggest that this pathway acts to maintain the proliferative capacity of cardiomyocytes in Nox4 Tg pups in vivo and so delays their exit from the cell

  8. Interaction of Heat Shock Protein Cpn10 with the Cyclin E/Cdk2 Substrate Nuclear Protein Ataxia-Telangiectasia (NPAT) Is Involved in Regulating Histone Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Ling Zheng, Li; Wang, Fei Ya; Cong, Xiao Xia; Shen, Yue; Rao, Xi Sheng; Huang, Dao Sheng; Fan, Wei; Yi, Peng; Wang, Xin Bao; Zheng, Lei; Zhou, Yi Ting; Luo, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Precise modulation of histone gene transcription is critical for cell cycle progression. As a direct substrate of Cyclin E/CDK2, nuclear protein ataxia-telangiectasia (NPAT) is a crucial factor in regulating histone transcription and cell cycle progression. Here we identified that Cpn10/HSPE, a 10-kDa heat shock protein, is a novel interacting partner of NPAT. A pool of Cpn10 is colocalized with NPAT foci during G1 and S phases in nuclei. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments unraveled an essential role of Cpn10 in histone transcription. A conserved DLFD motif within Cpn10 was critical for targeting NPAT and modulating histone transcription. More importantly, knockdown of Cpn10 disrupted the focus formation of both NPAT and FADD-like interleukin-1β-converting enzyme-associated huge protein without affecting Coilin-positive Cajal bodies. Finally, Cpn10 is important for S phase progression and cell proliferation. Taken together, our finding revealed a novel role of Cpn10 in the spatial regulation of NPAT signaling and disclosed a previously unappreciated link between the heat shock protein and histone transcription regulation. PMID:26429916

  9. The effect of telomerase template antagonist GRN163L on bone-marrow-derived rat mesenchymal stem cells is reversible and associated with altered expression of cyclin d1, cdk4 and cdk6.

    PubMed

    Tokcaer-Keskin, Zeynep; Dikmen, Zeliha G; Ayaloglu-Butun, Fatma; Gultekin, Sinan; Gryaznov, Sergei M; Akcali, Kamil Can

    2010-06-01

    Telomerase activity is essential for the continued growth and survival of malignant cells, therefore inhibition of this activity presents an attractive target for anti-cancer therapy. The telomerase inhibitor GRN163L, was shown to inhibit the growth of cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) also show telomerase activity in maintaining their self-renewal; therefore the effects of telomerase inhibitors on MSCs may be an issue of concern. MSCs are multipotent cells and are important for the homeostasis of the organism. In this study, we sought to demonstrate in vitro effects of GRN163L on rat MSCs. When MSCs were treated with 1 microM GRN163L, their phenotype changed from spindle-shaped cells to rounded ones and detached from the plate surface, similar to cancer cells. Quantitative-RT-PCR and immunoblotting results revealed that GRN163L holds MSCs at the G1 state of the cell cycle, with a drastic decrease in mRNA and protein levels of cyclin D1 and its cdk counterparts, cdk4 and cdk6. This effect was not observed when MSCs were treated with a mismatch control oligonucleotide. One week after GRN163L was removed, mRNA and protein expressions of the genes, as well as the phenotype of MSCs returned to those of untreated cells. Therefore, we concluded that GRN163L does not interfere with the self-renewal and differentiation of MSCs under short term in vitro culture conditions. Our study provides additional support for treating cancers by administrating GRN163L without depleting the body's stem cell pools. PMID:20180048

  10. HR96 and BR-C modulate phenobarbital induced transcription of cytochrome P450 CYP6D1 in Drosophila S2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, G. G.-H.; Kozaki, T.; Scott, J. G.

    2010-01-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) is a prototypical inducer for studies of xenobiotic responses in animals. In mammals, nuclear receptors CAR and PXR have been identified as key transcription factors regulating PB induced transcription of xenobiotic responsive genes. In insects, much less is known about transcription factors involved in regulating PB induced transcription, although CAR and PXR have a single ortholog, HR96 (hormone receptor-like in 96), in Drosophila melanogaster. Using dual luciferase reporter assays in Drosophila S2 cells, constructs containing variable lengths of the promoter of the PB inducible cytochrome P450 CYP6D1 were evaluated in the presence and absence of PB. The promoter region between −330 and −280 (relative to the position of transcription start site, +1) was found to be critical for PB induction. Putative binding sites for Drosophila BR-C (broad-complex) and DFD (deformed) were identified within this promoter region using TFsearch. RNAi treatment of S2 cells in conjunction with CYP6D1 promoter assays showed that suppression of Drosophila HR96 and BR-C transcription in S2 cells resulted in a significant decrease and increase, respectively, of PB induction. Effects of HR96 and BR-C in mediating PB induction were PB specific and dependent. This represents new functional evidence that Drosophila HR96 and BR-C can act as an activator and repressor, respectively, regulating PB induced transcription in insects. PMID:21029232

  11. The effect of the cyclin D1 (CCND1) A870G polymorphism on colorectal cancer risk is modified by glutathione-S-transferase polymorphisms and isothiocyanate intake in the Singapore Chinese Health Study.

    PubMed

    Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Sun, Can-Lan; Van Den Berg, David; Ceschi, Michela; Koh, Woon-Puay; Yu, Mimi C

    2006-12-01

    Cyclin D1 (CCND1) regulates cellular decision between proliferation and growth arrest. Despite the functional relevance of the CCND1 A870G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) published results on its association with colorectal cancer (CRC) were inconsistent. We examined the association between this CCND1 genotype and CRC in the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a prospective investigation of diet and cancer in 63,000 Chinese men and women. We explored the hypothesis that inconsistency regarding the CCND1/CRC association may be attributable to the modifying effect of additional CRC risk factors. Since GSTM1/GSTT1 genotype and dietary isothiocyanate (ITC) intake had previously been identified as CRC risk factors in this cohort, we now explored if they influenced the CCND1/CRC association. In a nested case-control study within the Singapore Cohort, genomic DNA collected from 300 incident CRC cases and 1169 controls was examined for CCND1, GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 polymorphisms. Unconditional logistic regression was used to assess genotype effects on cancer risk. No main effect of CCND1 was observed, yet the CCND1 effect was influenced by ITC intake and GST genotypes. The presence of at least one CCND1 A-allele was associated with increased risk among low dietary ITC consumers (intake below median value for the cohort) with a high-activity GST profile (>or=2 of the 3 GST genotypes classified non-null or high-activity) [odds ratio (OR)=2.05; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.10-3.82]. In contrast, the presence of at least one A-allele was associated with a decreased risk among all remaining subjects (OR=0.56; 0.36-0.86) (P for interaction=0.01). Recent studies indicate that ITCs inhibit cell proliferation and cause apoptosis through pro-oxidant properties. The results of our current study on CRC and those of our previous breast cancer study are compatible with the notion of oxidative stress in target cells as important determinant of direction and magnitude of the CCND1

  12. Cyclin-dependent kinases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are protein kinases characterized by needing a separate subunit - a cyclin - that provides domains essential for enzymatic activity. CDKs play important roles in the control of cell division and modulate transcription in response to several extra- and intracellular cues. The evolutionary expansion of the CDK family in mammals led to the division of CDKs into three cell-cycle-related subfamilies (Cdk1, Cdk4 and Cdk5) and five transcriptional subfamilies (Cdk7, Cdk8, Cdk9, Cdk11 and Cdk20). Unlike the prototypical Cdc28 kinase of budding yeast, most of these CDKs bind one or a few cyclins, consistent with functional specialization during evolution. This review summarizes how, although CDKs are traditionally separated into cell-cycle or transcriptional CDKs, these activities are frequently combined in many family members. Not surprisingly, deregulation of this family of proteins is a hallmark of several diseases, including cancer, and drug-targeted inhibition of specific members has generated very encouraging results in clinical trials. PMID:25180339

  13. Cyclin C is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Fassl, Anne; Chick, Joel; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Li, Xiaoyu; Mansour, Marc R.; Liu, Lijun; Wang, Haizhen; King, Bryan; Shaik, Shavali; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Ordureau, Alban; Otto, Tobias; Kreslavsky, Taras; Baitsch, Lukas; Bury, Leah; Meyer, Clifford A.; Ke, Nan; Mulry, Kristin A.; Kluk, Michael J.; Roy, Moni; Kim, Sunkyu; Zhang, Xiaowu; Geng, Yan; Zagozdzon, Agnieszka; Jenkinson, Sarah; Gale, Rosemary E.; Linch, David C.; Zhao, Jean J.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Harper, J. Wade; Aster, Jon C.; Aifantis, Iannis; von Boehmer, Harald; Gygi, Steven P.; Wei, Wenyi; Look, A. Thomas; Sicinski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin C was cloned as a growth-promoting G1 cyclin, and was also shown to regulate gene transcription. Here we report that in vivo cyclin C acts as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor, by controlling Notch1 oncogene levels. Cyclin C activates an “orphan” CDK19 kinase, as well as CDK8 and CDK3. These cyclin C-CDK complexes phosphorylate Notch1 intracellular domain (ICN1) and promote ICN1 degradation. Genetic ablation of cyclin C blocks ICN1 phosphorylation in vivo, thereby elevating ICN1 levels in cyclin C-knockout mice. Cyclin C ablation or heterozygosity collaborate with other oncogenic lesions and accelerate development of T-cell-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Furthermore, the cyclin C gene is heterozygously deleted in a significant fraction of human T-ALL, and these tumors express reduced cyclin C levels. We also describe point mutations in human T-ALL that render cyclin C-CDK unable to phosphorylate ICN1. Hence, tumor cells may develop different strategies to evade cyclin C inhibitory function. PMID:25344755

  14. Iron chelators of the di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazone and 2-benzoylpyridine thiosemicarbazone series inhibit HIV-1 transcription: identification of novel cellular targets--iron, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2, and CDK9.

    PubMed

    Debebe, Zufan; Ammosova, Tatyana; Breuer, Denitra; Lovejoy, David B; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Kumar, Krishna; Jerebtsova, Marina; Ray, Patricio; Kashanchi, Fatah; Gordeuk, Victor R; Richardson, Des R; Nekhai, Sergei

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 transcription is activated by HIV-1 Tat protein, which recruits cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9)/cyclin T1 and other host transcriptional coactivators to the HIV-1 promoter. Tat itself is phosphorylated by CDK2, and inhibition of CDK2 by small interfering RNA, the iron chelator 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (311), and the iron chelator deferasirox (ICL670) inhibits HIV-1 transcription. Here we have analyzed a group of novel di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazone- and 2-benzoylpyridine thiosemicarbazone-based iron chelators that exhibit marked anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103:7670-7675, 2006; J Med Chem 50:3716-3729, 2007). Several of these iron chelators, in particular 2-benzoylpyridine 4-allyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Bp4aT) and 2-benzoylpyridine 4-ethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Bp4eT), inhibited HIV-1 transcription and replication at much lower concentrations than did 311 and ICL670. Neither Bp4aT nor Bp4eT were toxic after a 24-h incubation. However, longer incubations for 48 h or 72 h resulted in cytotoxicity. Analysis of the molecular mechanism of HIV-1 inhibition showed that the novel iron chelators inhibited basal HIV-1 transcription, but not the nuclear factor-κB-dependent transcription or transcription from an HIV-1 promoter with inactivated SP1 sites. The chelators inhibited the activities of CDK2 and CDK9/cyclin T1, suggesting that inhibition of CDK9 may contribute to the inhibition of HIV-1 transcription. Our study suggests the potential usefulness of Bp4aT or Bp4eT in antiretroviral regimens, particularly where resistance to standard treatment occurs. PMID:20956357

  15. Iron Chelators of the Di-2-pyridylketone Thiosemicarbazone and 2-Benzoylpyridine Thiosemicarbazone Series Inhibit HIV-1 Transcription: Identification of Novel Cellular Targets—Iron, Cyclin-Dependent Kinase (CDK) 2, and CDK9S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Debebe, Zufan; Ammosova, Tatyana; Breuer, Denitra; Lovejoy, David B.; Kalinowski, Danuta S.; Karla, Pradeep K.; Kumar, Krishna; Jerebtsova, Marina; Ray, Patricio; Kashanchi, Fatah; Gordeuk, Victor R.; Richardson, Des R.

    2011-01-01

    HIV-1 transcription is activated by HIV-1 Tat protein, which recruits cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9)/cyclin T1 and other host transcriptional coactivators to the HIV-1 promoter. Tat itself is phosphorylated by CDK2, and inhibition of CDK2 by small interfering RNA, the iron chelator 2-hydroxy-1-naphthylaldehyde isonicotinoyl hydrazone (311), and the iron chelator deferasirox (ICL670) inhibits HIV-1 transcription. Here we have analyzed a group of novel di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazone- and 2-benzoylpyridine thiosemicarbazone-based iron chelators that exhibit marked anticancer activity in vitro and in vivo (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 103:7670–7675, 2006; J Med Chem 50:3716–3729, 2007). Several of these iron chelators, in particular 2-benzoylpyridine 4-allyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Bp4aT) and 2-benzoylpyridine 4-ethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone (Bp4eT), inhibited HIV-1 transcription and replication at much lower concentrations than did 311 and ICL670. Neither Bp4aT nor Bp4eT were toxic after a 24-h incubation. However, longer incubations for 48 h or 72 h resulted in cytotoxicity. Analysis of the molecular mechanism of HIV-1 inhibition showed that the novel iron chelators inhibited basal HIV-1 transcription, but not the nuclear factor-κB-dependent transcription or transcription from an HIV-1 promoter with inactivated SP1 sites. The chelators inhibited the activities of CDK2 and CDK9/cyclin T1, suggesting that inhibition of CDK9 may contribute to the inhibition of HIV-1 transcription. Our study suggests the potential usefulness of Bp4aT or Bp4eT in antiretroviral regimens, particularly where resistance to standard treatment occurs. PMID:20956357

  16. Dual effects of hepatitis C virus Core protein on the transcription of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 gene.

    PubMed

    Kwun, H J; Jang, K L

    2003-07-01

    Transcription of p21 was activated in hepatitis C virus (HCV) Core-expressing HepG2 cells where its upstream p53 was stabilized. However, this effect was not absolutely required for the activation of p21 by Core, as demonstrated in Hep3B cells. In addition, an opposite effect on the transcription of p21 was observed in NIH3T3 and primary hepatocytes, where p53 was not decreased by Core. To explain the p53-independent regulation of p21 by Core, we identified a Core-responsive element between positions -74 and -83 of the p21 promoter, exactly overlapped with a tumour growth factor beta (TGF-beta)/butyrate responsive element. Furthermore, we demonstrated that Core could activate the p21 through the element by stimulating a butyrate pathway, whereas this was inhibited through a TGF-beta pathway. The opposing effects of Core protein on the transcription of p21 might be important in understanding the progression of hepatic disease in HCV-positive patients. PMID:12823590

  17. SCFCdc4 Enables Mating Type Switching in Yeast by Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-Mediated Elimination of the Ash1 Transcriptional Repressor▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingquan; Larsen, Brett; Ricicova, Marketa; Orlicky, Stephen; Tekotte, Hille; Tang, Xiaojing; Craig, Karen; Quiring, Adam; Le Bihan, Thierry; Hansen, Carl; Sicheri, Frank; Tyers, Mike

    2011-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mother cells switch mating types between a and α forms, whereas daughter cells do not. This developmental asymmetry arises because the expression of the HO endonuclease, which initiates the interconversion of a and α mating type cassettes, is extinguished by the daughter-specific Ash1 transcriptional repressor. When daughters become mothers in the subsequent cell cycle, Ash1 must be eliminated to enable a new developmental state. Here, we report that the ubiquitin ligase SCFCdc4 mediates the phosphorylation-dependent elimination of Ash1. The inactivation of SCFCdc4 stabilizes Ash1 in vivo, and consistently, Ash1 binds to and is ubiquitinated by SCFCdc4 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner in vitro. The mutation of a critical in vivo cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) phosphorylation site (Thr290) on Ash1 reduces its ubiquitination and rate of degradation in vivo and decreases the frequency of mating type switching. Ash1 associates with active Cdc28 kinase in vivo and is targeted to SCFCdc4 in a Cdc28-dependent fashion in vivo and in vitro. Ash1 recognition by Cdc4 appears to be mediated by at least three phosphorylation sites that form two redundant diphosphorylated degrons. The phosphorylation-dependent elimination of Ash1 by the ubiquitin-proteasome system thus underpins developmental asymmetry in budding yeast. PMID:21098119

  18. MiR-23b Regulates CDK-activating Kinase complex through Cyclin H Repression to Modulate Endothelial Transcription and Growth under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kuei-Chun; Nguyen, Phu; Weiss, Anna; Yeh, Yi-Ting; Chien, Hou Su; Lee, Alicia; Teng, Dayu; Subramaniam, Shankar; Li, Yi-Shuan; Chien, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Objective The site-specificity of endothelial phenotype is attributable to the local hemodynamic forces. The flow regulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) in endothelial cells (ECs) plays a significant role invascular homeostasis and diseases. The objective of this study is to elucidate the molecular mechanism by which the pulsatile shear flow (PS)-induced miR-23b exerts anti-proliferative effects on ECs. Approach and Results We used a combination of a cell perfusion system and experimental animals to examine the flow regulation of miR-23b in modulating EC proliferation. Our results demonstrated that PS induces the transcription factor KLF2 to promote miR-23b biosynthesis; the increase in miR-23b then represses cyclin H to impair the activity and integrity of CDK-activating kinase complex (CAK). The inhibitory effect of miR-23b on CAK exerts dual actions to (1) suppress cell cycle progression, and (2) reduce basal transcription by deactivating RNA polymerase II. While PS regulates the miR-23b/CAK pathway to exert anti-proliferative effects on ECs, oscillatory shear flow (OS) has little effect on the miR-23b/CAK pathway and hence does not cause EC growth arrest. Such flow pattern-dependent phenomena are validated with an in vivo model on rat carotid artery: the flow disturbance induced by partial carotid ligation led to a lower expression of miR-23b and a higher EC proliferation in comparison to the pulsatile flow regions of the unligated vessels. Local delivery of miR-23b mitigated the proliferative EC phenotype in partially ligated vessels. Conclusions Our findings unveil a novel mechanism by which hemodynamic forces modulate EC proliferative phenotype through the miR-23b/CAK pathway. PMID:24855060

  19. Initiation of stem cell differentiation involves cell cycle-dependent regulation of developmental genes by Cyclin D.

    PubMed

    Pauklin, Siim; Madrigal, Pedro; Bertero, Alessandro; Vallier, Ludovic

    2016-02-15

    Coordination of differentiation and cell cycle progression represents an essential process for embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. These mechanisms ultimately determine the quantities of specific cell types that are generated. Despite their importance, the precise molecular interplays between cell cycle machinery and master regulators of cell fate choice remain to be fully uncovered. Here, we demonstrate that cell cycle regulators Cyclin D1-3 control cell fate decisions in human pluripotent stem cells by recruiting transcriptional corepressors and coactivator complexes onto neuroectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm genes. This activity results in blocking the core transcriptional network necessary for endoderm specification while promoting neuroectoderm factors. The genomic location of Cyclin Ds is determined by their interactions with the transcription factors SP1 and E2Fs, which result in the assembly of cell cycle-controlled transcriptional complexes. These results reveal how the cell cycle orchestrates transcriptional networks and epigenetic modifiers to instruct cell fate decisions. PMID:26883361

  20. Initiation of stem cell differentiation involves cell cycle-dependent regulation of developmental genes by Cyclin D

    PubMed Central

    Pauklin, Siim; Madrigal, Pedro; Bertero, Alessandro; Vallier, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    Coordination of differentiation and cell cycle progression represents an essential process for embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. These mechanisms ultimately determine the quantities of specific cell types that are generated. Despite their importance, the precise molecular interplays between cell cycle machinery and master regulators of cell fate choice remain to be fully uncovered. Here, we demonstrate that cell cycle regulators Cyclin D1–3 control cell fate decisions in human pluripotent stem cells by recruiting transcriptional corepressors and coactivator complexes onto neuroectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm genes. This activity results in blocking the core transcriptional network necessary for endoderm specification while promoting neuroectoderm factors. The genomic location of Cyclin Ds is determined by their interactions with the transcription factors SP1 and E2Fs, which result in the assembly of cell cycle-controlled transcriptional complexes. These results reveal how the cell cycle orchestrates transcriptional networks and epigenetic modifiers to instruct cell fate decisions. PMID:26883361

  1. Crystal structure of human cyclin K, a positive regulator of cyclin-dependent kinase 9.

    PubMed

    Baek, Kyuwon; Brown, Raymond S; Birrane, Gabriel; Ladias, John A A

    2007-02-16

    Cyclin K and the closely related cyclins T1, T2a, and T2b interact with cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) forming multiple nuclear complexes, referred to collectively as positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Through phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit, distinct P-TEFb species regulate the transcriptional elongation of specific genes that play central roles in human physiology and disease development, including cardiac hypertrophy and human immunodeficiency virus-1 pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of human cyclin K (residues 11-267) at 1.5 A resolution, which represents the first atomic structure of a P-TEFb subunit. The cyclin K fold comprises two typical cyclin boxes with two short helices preceding the N-terminal box. A prominent feature of cyclin K is an additional helix (H4a) in the first cyclin box that obstructs the binding pocket for the cell-cycle inhibitor p27(Kip1). Modeling of CDK9 bound to cyclin K provides insights into the structural determinants underlying the formation and regulation of this complex. A homology model of human cyclin T1 generated using the cyclin K structure as a template reveals that the two proteins have similar structures, as expected from their high level of sequence identity. Nevertheless, their CDK9-interacting surfaces display significant structural differences, which could potentially be exploited for the design of cyclin-targeted inhibitors of the CDK9-cyclin K and CDK9-cyclin T1 complexes. PMID:17169370

  2. Crystal Structure of Human Cyclin K, a Positive Regulator of Cyclin-dependent Kinase 9

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Kyuwon; Brown, Raymond S.; Birrane, Gabriel; Ladias, John A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Cyclin K and the closely related cyclins T1, T2a, and T2b interact with cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) forming multiple nuclear complexes, collectively referred to as positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Through phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit, distinct P-TEFb species regulate the transcriptional elongation of specific genes that play central roles in human physiology and disease development, including cardiac hypertrophy and human immunodeficiency virus-1 pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of human cyclin K (residues 11-267) at 1.5 Å resolution, which represents the first atomic structure of a P-TEFb subunit. The cyclin K fold comprises two typical cyclin boxes with two short helices preceding the N-terminal box. A prominent feature of cyclin K is an additional helix (H4a) in the first cyclin box that obstructs the binding pocket for the cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip1. Modeling of CDK9 bound to cyclin K provides insights into the structural determinants underlying the formation and regulation of this complex. A homology model of human cyclin T1 generated using the cyclin K as a template reveals that the two proteins have similar structures, as expected from their high sequence identity. Nevertheless, their CDK9-interacting surfaces display significant structural differences, which could potentially be exploited for the design of cyclin-targeted inhibitors of the CDK9–cyclin K and CDK9–cyclin T1 complexes. PMID:17169370

  3. Dual Targeting of the Cyclin/Rb/E2F and Mitochondrial Pathways in Mantle Cell Lymphoma with the Translation Inhibitor Silvestrol

    PubMed Central

    Alinari, Lapo; Prince, Courtney J.; Edwards, Ryan B.; Towns, William; Mani, Rajeswaran; Lehman, Amy; Zhang, Xiaoli; Jarjoura, David; Pan, Li; Kinghorn, A. Douglas; Grever, Michael R.; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Lucas, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose During cell cycle progression, D-cyclins activate cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 4/6 to inactivate Rb, permitting E2F1-mediated S-phase gene transcription. This critical pathway is typically deregulated in cancer, and novel inhibitory strategies would be effective in a variety of tumors. The protein synthesis inhibitor silvestrol has potent activity in B-cell leukemias via the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis, and also reduces cyclin D1 expression in breast cancer and lymphoma cell lines. We hypothesized that this dual activity of silvestrol would make it especially effective in malignancies driven by aberrant cyclin D1 expression. Experimental Design Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL), characterized by elevated cyclin D1, was used as a model to test this approach. The cyclin D/Rb/E2F1 pathway was investigated in vitro using MCL cell lines and primary tumor cells. Silvestrol was also evaluated in vivo using an aggressive model of MCL. Results Silvestrol showed low nanomolar potency both in MCL cell lines and primary MCL tumor cells. D-cyclins were depleted with just 10 nM silvestrol at 16 hr, with subsequent reductions of phosphorylated Rb, E2F1 protein, and E2F1 target transcription. As demonstrated in other leukemias, silvestrol caused Mcl-1 depletion followed by mitochondrial depolarization and caspase-dependent apoptosis, effects not related to inhibition of CDK4/6. Silvestrol significantly (P<0.0001) prolonged survival in a MCL xenograft model without detectable toxicity. Conclusions These data indicate that silvestrol effectively targets the cyclin/CDK/Rb pathway, and additionally induces cytotoxicity via intrinsic apoptosis. This dual activity may be an effective therapeutic strategy in MCL and other malignancies. PMID:22791882

  4. Participation of cyclin A in Myc-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, A T; Cohen, K J; Barrett, J F; Bergstrom, D A; Dang, C V

    1994-01-01

    The involvement of c-Myc in cellular proliferation or apoptosis has been linked to differential cyclin gene expression. We observed that in both proliferating cells and cells undergoing apoptosis, cyclin A (but not B, C, D1, and E) mRNA level was elevated in unsynchronized Myc-overexpressing cells when compared with parental Rat1a fibroblasts. We further demonstrated that Zn(2+)-inducible cyclin A expression was sufficient to cause apoptosis. When Myc-induced apoptosis was blocked by coexpression of Bcl-2, the levels of cyclin C, D1, and E mRNAs were also elevated. Thus, while apoptosis induced by c-Myc is associated with an elevated cyclin A mRNA level, protection from apoptosis by coexpressed Bcl-2 is associated with a complementary increase in cyclin C, D1, and E mRNAs. Images PMID:8041712

  5. The Requirement for Cyclin D Function in Tumor Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jong; Li, Xiaoyu; Hydbring, Per; Sanda, Takaomi; Stefano, Joanna; Christie, Amanda L.; Signoretti, Sabina; Look, A. Thomas; Kung, Andrew L.; von Boehmer, Harald; Sicinski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY D-cyclins represent components of cell cycle machinery. To test the efficacy of targeting D-cyclins in cancer treatment, we engineered mouse strains which allow acute and global ablation of individual D-cyclins in a living animal. Ubiquitous shutdown of cyclin D1 or inhibition of cyclin D-associated kinase activity in mice bearing ErbB2-driven mammary carcinomas triggered tumor cell senescence, without compromising the animals’ health. Ablation of cyclin D3 in mice bearing Notch1-driven T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALL) triggered tumor cell apoptosis. Such selective killing of leukemic cells can also be achieved by inhibiting cyclin D-associated kinase activity in mouse and human T-ALL models. Inhibition of cyclin D-kinase activity represents a highly-selective anti-cancer strategy that specifically targets cancer cells without significantly affecting normal tissues. PMID:23079655

  6. Crystal Structure of Human Cyclin K, A Positive Regulator of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 9

    SciTech Connect

    Baek,K.; Brown, R.; Birrane, G.; Ladias, J.

    2007-01-01

    K and the closely related cyclins T1, T2a, and T2b interact with cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) forming multiple nuclear complexes, referred to collectively as positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Through phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit, distinct P-TEFb species regulate the transcriptional elongation of specific genes that play central roles in human physiology and disease development, including cardiac hypertrophy and human immunodeficiency virus-1 pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of human cyclin K (residues 11-267) at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution, which represents the first atomic structure of a P-TEFb subunit. The cyclin K fold comprises two typical cyclin boxes with two short helices preceding the N-terminal box. A prominent feature of cyclin K is an additional helix (H4a) in the first cyclin box that obstructs the binding pocket for the cell-cycle inhibitor p27{sup Kip1}. Modeling of CDK9 bound to cyclin K provides insights into the structural determinants underlying the formation and regulation of this complex. A homology model of human cyclin T1 generated using the cyclin K structure as a template reveals that the two proteins have similar structures, as expected from their high level of sequence identity. Nevertheless, their CDK9-interacting surfaces display significant structural differences, which could potentially be exploited for the design of cyclin-targeted inhibitors of the CDK9-cyclin K and CDK9-cyclin T1 complexes.

  7. The Origin, Development and Molecular Diversity of Rodent Olfactory Bulb Glutamatergic Neurons Distinguished by Expression of Transcription Factor NeuroD1

    PubMed Central

    Roybon, Laurent; Mastracci, Teresa L.; Li, Joyce; Stott, Simon R. W.; Leiter, Andrew B.; Sussel, Lori; Brundin, Patrik; Li, Jia-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Production of olfactory bulb neurons occurs continuously in the rodent brain. Little is known, however, about cellular diversity in the glutamatergic neuron subpopulation. In the central nervous system, the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD1 (ND1) is commonly associated with glutamatergic neuron development. In this study, we utilized ND1 to identify the different subpopulations of olfactory bulb glutamategic neurons and their progenitors, both in the embryo and postnatally. Using knock-in mice, transgenic mice and retroviral transgene delivery, we demonstrate the existence of several different populations of glutamatergic olfactory bulb neurons, the progenitors of which are ND1+ and ND1- lineage-restricted, and are temporally and regionally separated. We show that the first olfactory bulb glutamatergic neurons produced – the mitral cells – can be divided into molecularly diverse subpopulations. Our findings illustrate the complexity of neuronal diversity in the olfactory bulb and that seemingly homogenous neuronal populations can consist of multiple subpopulations with unique molecular signatures of transcription factors and expressing neuronal subtype-specific markers. PMID:26030886

  8. Hyposmotic stress induces cell growth arrest via proteasome activation and cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase degradation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Guo-Zhong; Rott, Lusijah S; Lowe, Anson W; Omary, M Bishr

    2002-05-31

    Ordered cell cycle progression requires the expression and activation of several cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). Hyperosmotic stress causes growth arrest possibly via proteasome-mediated degradation of cyclin D1. We studied the effect of hyposmotic conditions on three colonic (Caco2, HRT18, HT29) and two pancreatic (AsPC-1 and PaCa-2) cell lines. Hyposmosis caused reversible cell growth arrest of the five cell lines in a cell cycle-independent fashion, although some cell lines accumulated at the G(1)/S interface. Growth arrest was followed by apoptosis or by formation of multinucleated giant cells, which is consistent with cell cycle catastrophe. Hyposmosis dramatically decreased Cdc2, Cdk2, Cdk4, cyclin B1, and cyclin D3 expression in a time-dependent fashion, in association with an overall decrease in cellular protein synthesis. However, some protein levels remained unaltered, including cyclin E and keratin 8. Selective proteasome inhibition prevented Cdk and cyclin degradation and reversed hyposmotic stress-induced growth arrest, whereas calpain and lysosome enzyme inhibitors had no measurable effect on cell cycle protein degradation. Therefore, hyposmotic stress inhibits cell growth and, depending on the cell type, causes cell cycle catastrophe with or without apoptosis. The growth arrest is due to decreased protein synthesis and proteasome activation, with subsequent degradation of several cyclins and Cdks. PMID:11897780

  9. Cyclin Dl expression in B-cell non Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Aref, Salah; Mossad, Y; El-Khodary, T; Awad, M; El-Shahat, E

    2006-10-01

    Disorders of the cell cycle regulatory machinery play a key role in the pathogenesis of cancer. Over-expression of cyclin D1 protein has been reported in several solid tumors and certain lymphoid malignancies, but little is known about the effect of its expression on clinical behavior and outcome in B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In this study, we investigated the expression of cyclin Dl in group of patients with NHL and correlated the results with the clinical and laboratory data. The degree of expression of cyclin Dl protein was evaluated by flow cytometry in a group of NHL patients (n = 46) and in normal control group (n = 10). Cyclin Dl over expression was detected in 10 out of 46 (21.7%) patients; they were 5/5-mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) (100%) and 5/28 large B-cell lymphoma (17.8%). All other NHL subtypes showed normal cyclin D1 expression. The clinical signs (hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and B-symptoms, clinical staging) and laboratory data (hemoglobin, white cell count (WBCs), platelet count, and bone marrow infiltration) were not significantly different between NHL subgroup with cyclin Dl over expression and that with normal cyclin Dl expression. Serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels and lymphadenopathy were significantly higher in NHL group with cyclin D1 over expression as compared to those without. Also, cyclin D1 over expression is associated with poor outcome of NHL patients. Cyclin Dl over expression was evident among all cases of MCL and few cases of large B-cell lymphoma. Cyclin Dl over expression might be used as adjuvant tool for diagnosis of MCL; has role in NHL biology and is bad prognostic index in NHL. PMID:17607588

  10. The Anaphase-Promoting Complex Is a Dual Integrator That Regulates Both MicroRNA-Mediated Transcriptional Regulation of Cyclin B1 and Degradation of Cyclin B1 during Arabidopsis Male Gametophyte Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), an essential ubiquitin protein ligase, regulates mitotic progression and exit by enhancing degradation of cell cycle regulatory proteins, such as CYCB1;1, whose transcripts are upregulated by DUO POLLEN1 (DUO1). DUO1 is required for cell division in ...