Science.gov

Sample records for cyclin g-associated kinase

  1. Selective inhibitors of Cyclin-G associated kinase (GAK) as anti-HCV agents

    PubMed Central

    Kovackova, Sona; Chang, Lei; Bekerman, Elena; Neveu, Gregory; Barouch-Bentov, Rina; Chaikuad, Apirat; Heroven, Christina; Šála, Michal; De Jonghe, Steven; Knapp, Stefan; Einav, Shirit; Herdewijn, Piet

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-G associated kinase (GAK) emerged as a promising drug target for the treatment of viral infections. However, no potent and selective GAK inhibitors have been reported in the literature to date. This paper describes the discovery of isothiazolo[5,4-b]pyridines as selective GAK inhibitors, with the most potent congeners displaying low nanomolar binding affinity for GAK. Co-crystallization experiments revealed that these compounds behaved as classic type I ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors. In addition, we have demonstrated that these compounds exhibit a potent activity against hepatitis C virus (HCV) by inhibiting two temporally distinct steps in the HCV lifecycle (i.e. viral entry and assembly). Hence, these GAK inhibitors represent chemical probes to study GAK function in different disease areas where GAK has been implicated (including viral infection, cancer and Parkinson's disease). PMID:25822739

  2. Structure of cyclin G-associated kinase (GAK) trapped in different conformations using nanobodies

    PubMed Central

    Chaikuad, Apirat; Keates, Tracy; Vincke, Cécile; Kaufholz, Melanie; Zenn, Michael; Zimmermann, Bastian; Gutiérrez, Carlos; Zhang, Rong-guang; Hatzos-Skintges, Catherine; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Muyldermans, Serge; Herberg, Friedrich W.; Knapp, Stefan; Müller, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    GAK (cyclin G-associated kinase) is a key regulator of clathrin-coated vesicle trafficking and plays a central role during development. Additionally, due to the unusually high plasticity of its catalytic domain, it is a frequent ‘off-target’ of clinical kinase inhibitors associated with respiratory side effects of these drugs. In the present paper, we determined the crystal structure of the GAK catalytic domain alone and in complex with specific single-chain antibodies (nanobodies). GAK is constitutively active and weakly associates in solution. The GAK apo structure revealed a dimeric inactive state of the catalytic domain mediated by an unusual activation segment interaction. Co-crystallization with the nanobody NbGAK_4 trapped GAK in a dimeric arrangement similar to the one observed in the apo structure, whereas NbGAK_1 captured the activation segment of monomeric GAK in a well-ordered conformation, representing features of the active kinase. The presented structural and biochemical data provide insight into the domain plasticity of GAK and demonstrate the utility of nanobodies to gain insight into conformational changes of dynamic molecules. In addition, we present structural data on the binding mode of ATP mimetic inhibitors and enzyme kinetic data, which will support rational inhibitor design of inhibitors to reduce the off-target effect on GAK. PMID:24438162

  3. Fragment screening of cyclin G-associated kinase by weak affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Meiby, Elinor; Knapp, Stefan; Elkins, Jonathan M; Ohlson, Sten

    2012-11-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has become a new strategy for drug discovery where lead compounds are evolved from small molecules. These fragments form low affinity interactions (dissociation constant (K(D)) = mM - μM) with protein targets, which require fragment screening methods of sufficient sensitivity. Weak affinity chromatography (WAC) is a promising new technology for fragment screening based on selective retention of fragments by a drug target. Kinases are a major pharmaceutical target, and FBDD has been successfully applied to several of these targets. In this work, we have demonstrated the potential to use WAC in combination with mass spectrometry (MS) detection for fragment screening of a kinase target-cyclin G-associated kinase (GAK). One hundred seventy fragments were selected for WAC screening by virtual screening of a commercial fragment library against the ATP-binding site of five different proteins. GAK protein was immobilized on a capillary HPLC column, and compound binding was characterized by frontal affinity chromatography. Compounds were screened in sets of 13 or 14, in combination with MS detection for enhanced throughput. Seventy-eight fragments (46 %) with K(D) < 200 μM were detected, including a few highly efficient GAK binders (K(D) of 2 μM; ligand efficiency = 0.51). Of special interest is that chiral screening by WAC may be possible, as two stereoisomeric fragments, which both contained one chiral center, demonstrated twin peaks. This ability, in combination with the robustness, sensitivity, and simplicity of WAC makes it a new method for fragment screening of considerable potential. PMID:22918538

  4. AP-2-Associated Protein Kinase 1 and Cyclin G-Associated Kinase Regulate Hepatitis C Virus Entry and Are Potential Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Neveu, Gregory; Ziv-Av, Amotz; Barouch-Bentov, Rina; Berkerman, Elena; Mulholland, Jon

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) enters its target cell via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. AP-2-associated protein kinase 1 (AAK1) and cyclin G-associated kinase (GAK) are host kinases that regulate clathrin adaptor protein (AP)-mediated trafficking in the endocytic and secretory pathways. We previously reported that AAK1 and GAK regulate HCV assembly by stimulating binding of the μ subunit of AP-2, AP2M1, to HCV core protein. We also discovered that AAK1 and GAK inhibitors, including the approved anticancer drugs sunitinib and erlotinib, could block HCV assembly. Here, we hypothesized that AAK1 and GAK regulate HCV entry independently of their effect on HCV assembly. Indeed, silencing AAK1 and GAK expression inhibited entry of pseudoparticles and cell culture grown-HCV and internalization of Dil-labeled HCV particles with no effect on HCV attachment or RNA replication. AAK1 or GAK depletion impaired epidermal growth factor (EGF)-mediated enhanced HCV entry and endocytosis of EGF receptor (EGFR), an HCV entry cofactor and erlotinib's cancer target. Moreover, either RNA interference-mediated depletion of AP2M1 or NUMB, each a substrate of AAK1 and/or GAK, or overexpression of either an AP2M1 or NUMB phosphorylation site mutant inhibited HCV entry. Last, in addition to affecting assembly, sunitinib and erlotinib inhibited HCV entry at a postbinding step, their combination was synergistic, and their antiviral effect was reversed by either AAK1 or GAK overexpression. Together, these results validate AAK1 and GAK as critical regulators of HCV entry that function in part by activating EGFR, AP2M1, and NUMB and as the molecular targets underlying the antiviral effect of sunitinib and erlotinib (in addition to EGFR), respectively. IMPORTANCE Understanding the host pathways hijacked by HCV is critical for developing host-centered anti-HCV approaches. Entry represents a potential target for antiviral strategies; however, no FDA-approved HCV entry inhibitors are currently

  5. Cyclin-G-associated kinase modifies α-synuclein expression levels and toxicity in Parkinson's disease: results from the GenePD Study

    PubMed Central

    Dumitriu, Alexandra; Pacheco, Chris D.; Wilk, Jemma B.; Strathearn, Katherine E.; Latourelle, Jeanne C.; Goldwurm, Stefano; Pezzoli, Gianni; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Lindquist, Susan; Myers, Richard H.

    2011-01-01

    Although family history is a well-established risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD), fewer than 5% of PD cases can be attributed to known genetic mutations. The etiology for the remainder of PD cases is unclear; however, neuronal accumulation of the protein α-synuclein is common to nearly all patients, implicating pathways that influence α-synuclein in PD pathogenesis. We report a genome-wide significant association (P = 3.97 × 10−8) between a polymorphism, rs1564282, in the cyclin-G-associated kinase (GAK) gene and increased PD risk, with a meta-analysis odds ratio of 1.48. This association result is based on the meta-analysis of three publicly available PD case–control genome-wide association study and genotyping from a new, independent Italian cohort. Microarray expression analysis of post-mortem frontal cortex from PD and control brains demonstrates a significant association between rs1564282 and higher α-synuclein expression, a known cause of early onset PD. Functional knockdown of GAK in cell culture causes a significant increase in toxicity when α-synuclein is over-expressed. Furthermore, knockdown of GAK in rat primary neurons expressing the A53T mutation of α-synuclein, a well-established model for PD, decreases cell viability. These observations provide evidence that GAK is associated with PD risk and suggest that GAK and α-synuclein interact in a pathway involved in PD pathogenesis. The GAK protein, a serine/threonine kinase, belongs to a family of proteins commonly targeted for drug development. This, combined with GAK's observed relationship to the levels of α-synuclein expression and toxicity, suggests that the protein is an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of PD. PMID:21258085

  6. Cyclin-dependent kinases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are protein kinases characterized by needing a separate subunit - a cyclin - that provides domains essential for enzymatic activity. CDKs play important roles in the control of cell division and modulate transcription in response to several extra- and intracellular cues. The evolutionary expansion of the CDK family in mammals led to the division of CDKs into three cell-cycle-related subfamilies (Cdk1, Cdk4 and Cdk5) and five transcriptional subfamilies (Cdk7, Cdk8, Cdk9, Cdk11 and Cdk20). Unlike the prototypical Cdc28 kinase of budding yeast, most of these CDKs bind one or a few cyclins, consistent with functional specialization during evolution. This review summarizes how, although CDKs are traditionally separated into cell-cycle or transcriptional CDKs, these activities are frequently combined in many family members. Not surprisingly, deregulation of this family of proteins is a hallmark of several diseases, including cancer, and drug-targeted inhibition of specific members has generated very encouraging results in clinical trials. PMID:25180339

  7. Pharmacological inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Knockaert, Marie; Greengard, Paul; Meijer, Laurent

    2002-09-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) regulate the cell division cycle, apoptosis, transcription and differentiation in addition to functions in the nervous system. Deregulation of CDKs in various diseases has stimulated an intensive search for selective pharmacological inhibitors of these kinases. More than 50 inhibitors have been identified, among which >20 have been co-crystallized with CDK2. These inhibitors all target the ATP-binding pocket of the catalytic site of the kinase. The actual selectivity of most known CDK inhibitors, and thus the underlying mechanism of their cellular effects, is poorly known. Pharmacological inhibitors of CDKs are currently being evaluated for therapeutic use against cancer, alopecia, neurodegenerative disorders (e.g. Alzheimer's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and stroke), cardiovascular disorders (e.g. atherosclerosis and restenosis), glomerulonephritis, viral infections (e.g. HCMV, HIV and HSV) and parasitic protozoa (Plasmodium sp. and Leishmania sp.). PMID:12237154

  8. Crystal structure of human cyclin K, a positive regulator of cyclin-dependent kinase 9.

    PubMed

    Baek, Kyuwon; Brown, Raymond S; Birrane, Gabriel; Ladias, John A A

    2007-02-16

    Cyclin K and the closely related cyclins T1, T2a, and T2b interact with cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) forming multiple nuclear complexes, referred to collectively as positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Through phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit, distinct P-TEFb species regulate the transcriptional elongation of specific genes that play central roles in human physiology and disease development, including cardiac hypertrophy and human immunodeficiency virus-1 pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of human cyclin K (residues 11-267) at 1.5 A resolution, which represents the first atomic structure of a P-TEFb subunit. The cyclin K fold comprises two typical cyclin boxes with two short helices preceding the N-terminal box. A prominent feature of cyclin K is an additional helix (H4a) in the first cyclin box that obstructs the binding pocket for the cell-cycle inhibitor p27(Kip1). Modeling of CDK9 bound to cyclin K provides insights into the structural determinants underlying the formation and regulation of this complex. A homology model of human cyclin T1 generated using the cyclin K structure as a template reveals that the two proteins have similar structures, as expected from their high level of sequence identity. Nevertheless, their CDK9-interacting surfaces display significant structural differences, which could potentially be exploited for the design of cyclin-targeted inhibitors of the CDK9-cyclin K and CDK9-cyclin T1 complexes. PMID:17169370

  9. Crystal Structure of Human Cyclin K, a Positive Regulator of Cyclin-dependent Kinase 9

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Kyuwon; Brown, Raymond S.; Birrane, Gabriel; Ladias, John A.A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Cyclin K and the closely related cyclins T1, T2a, and T2b interact with cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) forming multiple nuclear complexes, collectively referred to as positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Through phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit, distinct P-TEFb species regulate the transcriptional elongation of specific genes that play central roles in human physiology and disease development, including cardiac hypertrophy and human immunodeficiency virus-1 pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of human cyclin K (residues 11-267) at 1.5 Å resolution, which represents the first atomic structure of a P-TEFb subunit. The cyclin K fold comprises two typical cyclin boxes with two short helices preceding the N-terminal box. A prominent feature of cyclin K is an additional helix (H4a) in the first cyclin box that obstructs the binding pocket for the cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip1. Modeling of CDK9 bound to cyclin K provides insights into the structural determinants underlying the formation and regulation of this complex. A homology model of human cyclin T1 generated using the cyclin K as a template reveals that the two proteins have similar structures, as expected from their high sequence identity. Nevertheless, their CDK9-interacting surfaces display significant structural differences, which could potentially be exploited for the design of cyclin-targeted inhibitors of the CDK9–cyclin K and CDK9–cyclin T1 complexes. PMID:17169370

  10. Crystal Structure of Human Cyclin K, A Positive Regulator of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 9

    SciTech Connect

    Baek,K.; Brown, R.; Birrane, G.; Ladias, J.

    2007-01-01

    K and the closely related cyclins T1, T2a, and T2b interact with cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) forming multiple nuclear complexes, referred to collectively as positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Through phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit, distinct P-TEFb species regulate the transcriptional elongation of specific genes that play central roles in human physiology and disease development, including cardiac hypertrophy and human immunodeficiency virus-1 pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of human cyclin K (residues 11-267) at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution, which represents the first atomic structure of a P-TEFb subunit. The cyclin K fold comprises two typical cyclin boxes with two short helices preceding the N-terminal box. A prominent feature of cyclin K is an additional helix (H4a) in the first cyclin box that obstructs the binding pocket for the cell-cycle inhibitor p27{sup Kip1}. Modeling of CDK9 bound to cyclin K provides insights into the structural determinants underlying the formation and regulation of this complex. A homology model of human cyclin T1 generated using the cyclin K structure as a template reveals that the two proteins have similar structures, as expected from their high level of sequence identity. Nevertheless, their CDK9-interacting surfaces display significant structural differences, which could potentially be exploited for the design of cyclin-targeted inhibitors of the CDK9-cyclin K and CDK9-cyclin T1 complexes.

  11. Cytoplasmic Cyclin E and Phospho-Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 Are Biomarkers of Aggressive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Karakas, Cansu; Biernacka, Anna; Bui, Tuyen; Sahin, Aysegul A; Yi, Min; Akli, Said; Schafer, Jolie; Alexander, Angela; Adjapong, Opoku; Hunt, Kelly K; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2016-07-01

    Cyclin E and its co-activator, phospho-cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (p-CDK2), regulate G1 to S phase transition and their deregulation induces oncogenesis. Immunohistochemical assessments of these proteins in cancer have been reported but were based only on their nuclear expression. However, the oncogenic forms of cyclin E (low molecular weight cyclin E or LMW-E) in complex with CDK2 are preferentially mislocalized to the cytoplasm. Here, we used separate nuclear and cytoplasmic scoring systems for both cyclin E and p-CDK2 expression to demonstrate altered cellular accumulation of these proteins using immunohistochemical analysis. We examined the specificity of different cyclin E antibodies and evaluated their concordance between immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses in a panel of 14 breast cell lines. Nuclear versus cytoplasmic staining of cyclin E readily differentiated full-length from LMW-E, respectively. We also evaluated the expression of cyclin E and p-CDK2 in 1676 breast carcinoma patients by immunohistochemistry. Cytoplasmic cyclin E correlated strongly with cytoplasmic p-CDK2 (P < 0.0001), high tumor grade, negative estrogen/progesterone receptor status, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positivity (all P < 0.0001). In multivariable analysis, cytoplasmic cyclin E plus phosphorylated CDK2 (as one variable) predicted breast cancer recurrence-free and overall survival. These results suggest that cytoplasmic cyclin E and p-CDK2 can be readily detected with immunohistochemistry and used as clinical biomarkers for aggressive breast cancer. PMID:27182644

  12. Hyposmotic stress induces cell growth arrest via proteasome activation and cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase degradation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Guo-Zhong; Rott, Lusijah S; Lowe, Anson W; Omary, M Bishr

    2002-05-31

    Ordered cell cycle progression requires the expression and activation of several cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). Hyperosmotic stress causes growth arrest possibly via proteasome-mediated degradation of cyclin D1. We studied the effect of hyposmotic conditions on three colonic (Caco2, HRT18, HT29) and two pancreatic (AsPC-1 and PaCa-2) cell lines. Hyposmosis caused reversible cell growth arrest of the five cell lines in a cell cycle-independent fashion, although some cell lines accumulated at the G(1)/S interface. Growth arrest was followed by apoptosis or by formation of multinucleated giant cells, which is consistent with cell cycle catastrophe. Hyposmosis dramatically decreased Cdc2, Cdk2, Cdk4, cyclin B1, and cyclin D3 expression in a time-dependent fashion, in association with an overall decrease in cellular protein synthesis. However, some protein levels remained unaltered, including cyclin E and keratin 8. Selective proteasome inhibition prevented Cdk and cyclin degradation and reversed hyposmotic stress-induced growth arrest, whereas calpain and lysosome enzyme inhibitors had no measurable effect on cell cycle protein degradation. Therefore, hyposmotic stress inhibits cell growth and, depending on the cell type, causes cell cycle catastrophe with or without apoptosis. The growth arrest is due to decreased protein synthesis and proteasome activation, with subsequent degradation of several cyclins and Cdks. PMID:11897780

  13. The yeast carboxyl-terminal repeat domain kinase CTDK-I is a divergent cyclin-cyclin-dependent kinase complex.

    PubMed Central

    Sterner, D E; Lee, J M; Hardin, S E; Greenleaf, A L

    1995-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae CTDK-I is a protein kinase complex that specifically and efficiently hyperphosphorylates the carboxyl-terminal repeat domain (CTD) of RNA polymerase II and is composed of three subunits of 58, 38, and 32 kDa. The kinase is essential in vivo for normal phosphorylation of the CTD and for normal growth and differentiation. We have now cloned the genes for the two smaller kinase subunits, CTK2 and CTK3, and found that they form a unique, divergent cyclin-cyclin-dependent kinase complex with the previously characterized largest subunit protein CTK1, a cyclin-dependent kinase homolog. The CTK2 gene encodes a cyclin-related protein with limited homology to cyclin C, while CTK3 shows no similarity to other known proteins. Copurification of the three gene products with each other and CTDK-I activity by means of conventional chromatography and antibody affinity columns has verified their participation in the complex in vitro. In addition, null mutations of each of the genes and all combinations thereof conferred very similar growth-impaired, cold-sensitive phenotypes, consistent with their involvement in the same function in vivo. These characterizations and the availability of all of the genes encoding CTDK-I and reagents derivable from them will facilitate investigations into CTD phosphorylation and its functional consequences both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:7565723

  14. Cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors as anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Martínez, Concepción; Gelbert, Lawrence M; Lallena, María José; de Dios, Alfonso

    2015-09-01

    Sustained proliferative capacity is a hallmark of cancer. In mammalian cells proliferation is controlled by the cell cycle, where cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) regulate critical checkpoints. CDK4 and CDK6 are considered highly validated anticancer drug targets due to their essential role regulating cell cycle progression at the G1 restriction point. This review provides an overview of recent advances on cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors in general with special emphasis on CDK4 and CDK6 inhibitors and compounds under clinical evaluation. Chemical structures, structure activity relationships, and relevant preclinical properties will be described. PMID:26115571

  15. Retroviral Cyclin Controls Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 8-Mediated Transcription Elongation and Reinitiation

    PubMed Central

    Birkenheuer, Claire H.; Brewster, Connie D.; Quackenbush, Sandra L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Walleye dermal sarcoma virus (WDSV) infection is associated with the seasonal development and regression of walleye dermal sarcoma. Previous work showed that the retroviral cyclin (RV-cyclin), encoded by WDSV, has separable cyclin box and transcription activation domains. It binds to cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) and enhances its kinase activity. CDK8 is evolutionarily conserved and is frequently overexpressed in human cancers. It is normally activated by cyclin C and is required for transcription elongation of the serum response genes (immediate early genes [IEGs]) FOS, EGR1, and cJUN. The IEGs drive cell proliferation, and their expression is brief and highly regulated. Here we show that constitutive expression of RV-cyclin in the HCT116 colon cancer cell line significantly increases the level of IEG expression in response to serum stimulation. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and nuclear run-on assays provide evidence that RV-cyclin does not alter the initiation of IEG transcription but does enhance the overall rate of transcription elongation and maintains transcription reinitiation. RV-cyclin does not increase activating phosphorylation events in the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and does not inhibit decay of IEG mRNAs. At the EGR1 gene locus, RV-cyclin increases and maintains RNA polymerase II (Pol II) occupancy after serum stimulation, in conjunction with increased and extended EGR1 gene expression. The RV-cyclin increases CDK8 occupancy at the EGR1 gene locus before and after serum stimulation. Both of RV-cyclin's functional domains, i.e., the cyclin box and the activation domain, are necessary for the overall enhancement of IEG expression. RV-cyclin presents a novel and ancient mechanism of retrovirus-induced oncogenesis. IMPORTANCE The data reported here are important to both virology and cancer biology. The novel mechanism pinpoints CDK8 in the development of walleye dermal sarcoma and sheds light on CDK8's role in

  16. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases by p21.

    PubMed Central

    Harper, J W; Elledge, S J; Keyomarsi, K; Dynlacht, B; Tsai, L H; Zhang, P; Dobrowolski, S; Bai, C; Connell-Crowley, L; Swindell, E

    1995-01-01

    p21Cip1 is a cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor that is transcriptionally activated by p53 in response to DNA damage. We have explored the interaction of p21 with the currently known Cdks. p21 effectively inhibits Cdk2, Cdk3, Cdk4, and Cdk6 kinases (Ki 0.5-15 nM) but is much less effective toward Cdc2/cyclin B (Ki approximately 400 nM) and Cdk5/p35 (Ki > 2 microM), and does not associate with Cdk7/cyclin H. Overexpression of P21 arrests cells in G1. Thus, p21 is not a universal inhibitor of Cdks but displays selectivity for G1/S Cdk/cyclin complexes. Association of p21 with Cdks is greatly enhanced by cyclin binding. This property is shared by the structurally related inhibitor p27, suggesting a common biochemical mechanism for inhibition. With respect to Cdk2 and Cdk4 complexes, p27 shares the inhibitory potency of p21 but has slightly different kinase specificities. In normal diploid fibroblasts, the vast majority of active Cdk2 is associated with p21, but this active kinase can be fully inhibited by addition of exogenous p21. Reconstruction experiments using purified components indicate that multiple molecules of p21 can associate with Cdk/cyclin complexes and inactive complexes contain more than one molecule of p21. Together, these data suggest a model whereby p21 functions as an inhibitory buffer whose levels determine the threshold kinase activity required for cell cycle progression. Images PMID:7626805

  17. Cyclin A- and cyclin B-dependent protein kinases are regulated by different mechanisms in Xenopus egg extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, P R; Leiss, D; Pagano, M; Karsenti, E

    1992-01-01

    Cyclins are proteins which are synthesized and degraded in a cell cycle-dependent fashion and form integral regulatory subunits of protein kinase complexes involved in the regulation of the cell cycle. The best known catalytic subunit of a cyclin-dependent protein kinase complex is p34cdc2. In the cell, cyclins A and B are synthesized at different stages of the cell cycle and induce protein kinase activation with different kinetics. The kinetics of activation can be reproduced and studied in extracts of Xenopus eggs to which bacterially produced cyclins are added. In this paper we report that in egg extracts, both cyclin A and cyclin B associate with and activate the same catalytic subunit, p34cdc2. In addition, cyclin A binds a less abundant p33 protein kinase related to p34cdc2, the product of the cdk2/Eg1 gene. When complexed to cyclin B, p34cdc2 is subject to transient inhibition by tyrosine phosphorylation, producing a lag between the addition of cyclin and kinase activation. In contrast, p34cdc2 is only weakly tyrosine phosphorylated when bound to cyclin A and activates rapidly. This finding shows that a given kinase catalytic subunit can be regulated in a different manner depending on the nature of the regulatory subunit to which it binds. Tyrosine phosphorylation of p34cdc2 when complexed to cyclin B provides an inhibitory check on the activation of the M phase inducing protein kinase, allowing the coupling of processes such as DNA replication to the onset of metaphase. Our results suggest that, at least in the early Xenopus embryo, cyclin A-dependent protein kinases may not be subject to this checkpoint and are regulated primarily at the level of cyclin translation. Images PMID:1316271

  18. Proteomic Interaction Patterns between Human Cyclins, the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Ortholog pUL97 and Additional Cytomegalovirus Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Steingruber, Mirjam; Kraut, Alexandra; Socher, Eileen; Sticht, Heinrich; Reichel, Anna; Stamminger, Thomas; Amin, Bushra; Couté, Yohann; Hutterer, Corina; Marschall, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) ortholog pUL97 associates with human cyclin B1 and other types of cyclins. Here, the question was addressed whether cyclin interaction of pUL97 and additional viral proteins is detectable by mass spectrometry-based approaches. Proteomic data were validated by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP), Western blot, in vitro kinase and bioinformatic analyses. Our findings suggest that: (i) pUL97 shows differential affinities to human cyclins; (ii) pUL97 inhibitor maribavir (MBV) disrupts the interaction with cyclin B1, but not with other cyclin types; (iii) cyclin H is identified as a new high-affinity interactor of pUL97 in HCMV-infected cells; (iv) even more viral phosphoproteins, including all known substrates of pUL97, are detectable in the cyclin-associated complexes; and (v) a first functional validation of pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction, analyzed by in vitro kinase assay, points to a cyclin-mediated modulation of pUL97 substrate preference. In addition, our bioinformatic analyses suggest individual, cyclin-specific binding interfaces for pUL97-cyclin interaction, which could explain the different strengths of interactions and the selective inhibitory effect of MBV on pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction. Combined, the detection of cyclin-associated proteins in HCMV-infected cells suggests a complex pattern of substrate phosphorylation and a role of cyclins in the fine-modulation of pUL97 activities. PMID:27548200

  19. Proteomic Interaction Patterns between Human Cyclins, the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Ortholog pUL97 and Additional Cytomegalovirus Proteins.

    PubMed

    Steingruber, Mirjam; Kraut, Alexandra; Socher, Eileen; Sticht, Heinrich; Reichel, Anna; Stamminger, Thomas; Amin, Bushra; Couté, Yohann; Hutterer, Corina; Marschall, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) ortholog pUL97 associates with human cyclin B1 and other types of cyclins. Here, the question was addressed whether cyclin interaction of pUL97 and additional viral proteins is detectable by mass spectrometry-based approaches. Proteomic data were validated by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP), Western blot, in vitro kinase and bioinformatic analyses. Our findings suggest that: (i) pUL97 shows differential affinities to human cyclins; (ii) pUL97 inhibitor maribavir (MBV) disrupts the interaction with cyclin B1, but not with other cyclin types; (iii) cyclin H is identified as a new high-affinity interactor of pUL97 in HCMV-infected cells; (iv) even more viral phosphoproteins, including all known substrates of pUL97, are detectable in the cyclin-associated complexes; and (v) a first functional validation of pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction, analyzed by in vitro kinase assay, points to a cyclin-mediated modulation of pUL97 substrate preference. In addition, our bioinformatic analyses suggest individual, cyclin-specific binding interfaces for pUL97-cyclin interaction, which could explain the different strengths of interactions and the selective inhibitory effect of MBV on pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction. Combined, the detection of cyclin-associated proteins in HCMV-infected cells suggests a complex pattern of substrate phosphorylation and a role of cyclins in the fine-modulation of pUL97 activities. PMID:27548200

  20. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibition by the KLF6 tumor suppressor protein through interaction with cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Benzeno, Sharon; Narla, Goutham; Allina, Jorge; Cheng, George Z; Reeves, Helen L; Banck, Michaela S; Odin, Joseph A; Diehl, J Alan; Germain, Doris; Friedman, Scott L

    2004-06-01

    Kruppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) is a tumor suppressor gene inactivated in prostate and colon cancers, as well as in astrocytic gliomas. Here, we establish that KLF6 mediates growth inhibition through an interaction with cyclin D1, leading to reduced phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb) at Ser(795). Furthermore, introduction of KLF6 disrupts cyclin D1-cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) 4 complexes and forces the redistribution of p21(Cip/Kip) onto cdk2, which promotes G(1) cell cycle arrest. Our data suggest that KLF6 converges with the Rb pathway to inhibit cyclin D1/cdk4 activity, resulting in growth suppression. PMID:15172998

  1. Pharmacological cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors: Implications for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Archana; Vyas, Arpita; Deshpande, Kaivalya; Vyas, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer accounts for a significant proportion of cancer deaths worldwide. The need to develop more chemotherapeutic agents to combat this disease is critical. Cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs), along with its binding partner cyclins, serve to control the growth of cells through the cell cycle. A new class of drugs, termed CDK inhibitors, has been studied in preclinical and now clinical trials. These inhibitors are believed to act as an anti-cancer drug by blocking CDKs to block the uncontrolled cellular proliferation that is hallmark of cancers like colorectal cancer. CDK article provides overview of the emerging drug class of CDK inhibitors and provides a list of ones that are currently in clinical trials. PMID:26900281

  2. A minimal cascade model for the mitotic oscillator involving cyclin and cdc2 kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Goldbeter, A

    1991-01-01

    A minimal model for the mitotic oscillator is presented. The model, built on recent experimental advances, is based on the cascade of post-translational modification that modulates the activity of cdc2 kinase during the cell cycle. The model pertains to the situation encountered in early amphibian embryos, where the accumulation of cyclin suffices to trigger the onset of mitosis. In the first cycle of the bicyclic cascade model, cyclin promotes the activation of cdc2 kinase through reversible dephosphorylation, and in the second cycle, cdc2 kinase activates a cyclin protease by reversible phosphorylation. That cyclin activates cdc2 kinase while the kinase triggers the degradation of cyclin has suggested that oscillations may originate from such a negative feedback loop [Félix, M. A., Labbé, J. C., Dorée, M., Hunt, T. & Karsenti, E. (1990) Nature (London) 346, 379-382]. This conjecture is corroborated by the model, which indicates that sustained oscillations of the limit cycle type can arise in the cascade, provided that a threshold exists in the activation of cdc2 kinase by cyclin and in the activation of cyclin proteolysis by cdc2 kinase. The analysis shows how miototic oscillations may readily arise from time lags associated with these thresholds and from the delayed negative feedback provided by cdc2-induced cyclin degradation. A mechanism for the origin of the thresholds is proposed in terms of the phenomenon of zero-order ultrasensitivity previously described for biochemical systems regulated by covalent modification. PMID:1833774

  3. A novel partner for D-type cyclins: protein kinase A-anchoring protein AKAP95.

    PubMed Central

    Arsenijevic, Tatjana; Degraef, Chantal; Dumont, Jacques E; Roger, Pierre P; Pirson, Isabelle

    2004-01-01

    Using a yeast interaction screen to search for proteins that interact with cyclin D3 in thyroid gland, we identified the cAMP-dependent AKAP95 (protein kinase A-anchoring protein 95). AKAP95 is a scaffolding protein that primarily co-fractionates with the nuclear matrix, whereas a minor fraction associates with chromatin in interphase cells. In co-transfected Chinese-hamster ovary cells, AKAP95 strongly interacted with the three D-type cyclins, but not with CDK4 (cyclin-dependent kinase 4) or with p27kip1. CDK4 displaced the interaction between cyclin D3 and AKAP95, suggesting that AKAP95 could not be the elusive bridging adaptor between D-type cyclins and CDK4 or play a role in the regulation of cyclin D3-CDK4 activity. Interaction between endogenous AKAP95 and cyclin D3 or cyclin D1 was detected in canine thyrocytes, human fibroblasts and NIH-3T3 cells. As both AKAP95 and cyclins D were recently reported to associate with minichromosome maintenance proteins [Eide, Tasken, Carlson, Williams, Jahnsen, Tasken and Collas (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 26750-26756; Gladden and Diehl (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 9754-9760], we hypothesize that the interaction between AKAP95 and D-type cyclins might serve to facilitate the emerging regulatory role of cyclin D-CDK4 in the formation of the prereplication complex at the DNA replication origins. PMID:14641107

  4. Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 protects podocytes from apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Saurus, Pauliina; Kuusela, Sara; Dumont, Vincent; Lehtonen, Eero; Fogarty, Christopher L.; Lassenius, Mariann I.; Forsblom, Carol; Lehto, Markku; Saleem, Moin A.; Groop, Per-Henrik; Lehtonen, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Loss of podocytes is an early feature of diabetic nephropathy (DN) and predicts its progression. We found that treatment of podocytes with sera from normoalbuminuric type 1 diabetes patients with high lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activity, known to predict progression of DN, downregulated CDK2 (cyclin-dependent kinase 2). LPS-treatment of mice also reduced CDK2 expression. LPS-induced downregulation of CDK2 was prevented in vitro and in vivo by inhibiting the Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway using immunomodulatory agent GIT27. We also observed that CDK2 is downregulated in the glomeruli of obese Zucker rats before the onset of proteinuria. Knockdown of CDK2, or inhibiting its activity with roscovitine in podocytes increased apoptosis. CDK2 knockdown also reduced expression of PDK1, an activator of the cell survival kinase Akt, and reduced Akt phosphorylation. This suggests that CDK2 regulates the activity of the cell survival pathway via PDK1. Furthermore, PDK1 knockdown reduced the expression of CDK2 suggesting a regulatory loop between CDK2 and PDK1. Collectively, our data show that CDK2 protects podocytes from apoptosis and that reduced expression of CDK2 associates with the development of DN. Preventing downregulation of CDK2 by blocking the TLR pathway with GIT27 may provide a means to prevent podocyte apoptosis and progression of DN. PMID:26876672

  5. A dominant-negative cyclin D1 mutant prevents nuclear import of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and its phosphorylation by CDK-activating kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Diehl, J A; Sherr, C J

    1997-01-01

    Cyclins contain two characteristic cyclin folds, each consisting of five alpha-helical bundles, which are connected to one another by a short linker peptide. The first repeat makes direct contact with cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) subunits in assembled holoenzyme complexes, whereas the second does not contribute directly to the CDK interface. Although threonine 156 in mouse cyclin D1 is predicted to lie at the carboxyl terminus of the linker peptide that separates the two cyclin folds and is buried within the cyclin subunit, mutation of this residue to alanine has profound effects on the behavior of the derived cyclin D1-CDK4 complexes. CDK4 in complexes with mutant cyclin D1 (T156A or T156E but not T156S) is not phosphorylated by recombinant CDK-activating kinase (CAK) in vitro, fails to undergo activating T-loop phosphorylation in vivo, and remains catalytically inactive and unable to phosphorylate the retinoblastoma protein. Moreover, when it is ectopically overexpressed in mammalian cells, cyclin D1 (T156A) assembles with CDK4 in the cytoplasm but is not imported into the cell nucleus. CAK phosphorylation is not required for nuclear transport of cyclin D1-CDK4 complexes, because complexes containing wild-type cyclin D1 and a CDK4 (T172A) mutant lacking the CAK phosphorylation site are efficiently imported. In contrast, enforced overexpression of the CDK inhibitor p21Cip1 together with mutant cyclin D1 (T156A)-CDK4 complexes enhanced their nuclear localization. These results suggest that cyclin D1 (T156A or T156E) forms abortive complexes with CDK4 that prevent recognition by CAK and by other cellular factors that are required for their nuclear localization. These properties enable ectopically overexpressed cyclin D1 (T156A), or a more stable T156A/T286A double mutant that is resistant to ubiquitination, to compete with endogenous cyclin D1 in mammalian cells, thereby mobilizing CDK4 into cytoplasmic, catalytically inactive complexes and dominantly inhibiting

  6. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 regulates degranulation in human eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Odemuyiwa, Solomon O; Ilarraza, Ramses; Davoine, Francis; Logan, Michael R; Shayeganpour, Anooshirvan; Wu, Yingqi; Majaesic, Carina; Adamko, Darryl J; Moqbel, Redwan; Lacy, Paige

    2015-04-01

    Degranulation from eosinophils in response to secretagogue stimulation is a regulated process that involves exocytosis of granule proteins through specific signalling pathways. One potential pathway is dependent on cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and its effector molecules, p35 and p39, which play a central role in neuronal cell exocytosis by phosphorylating Munc18, a regulator of SNARE binding. Emerging evidence suggests a role for Cdk5 in exocytosis in immune cells, although its role in eosinophils is not known. We sought to examine the expression of Cdk5 and its activators in human eosinophils, and to assess the role of Cdk5 in eosinophil degranulation. We used freshly isolated human eosinophils and analysed the expression of Cdk5, p35, p39 and Munc18c by Western blot, RT-PCR, flow cytometry and immunoprecipitation. Cdk5 kinase activity was determined following eosinophil activation. Cdk5 inhibitors were used (roscovitine, AT7519 and small interfering RNA) to determine its role in eosinophil peroxidase (EPX) secretion. Cdk5 was expressed in association with Munc18c, p35 and p39, and phosphorylated following human eosinophil activation with eotaxin/CCL11, platelet-activating factor, and secretory IgA-Sepharose. Cdk5 inhibitors (roscovitine, AT7519) reduced EPX release when cells were stimulated by PMA or secretory IgA. In assays using small interfering RNA knock-down of Cdk5 expression in human eosinophils, we observed inhibition of EPX release. Our findings suggest that in activated eosinophils, Cdk5 is phosphorylated and binds to Munc18c, resulting in Munc18c release from syntaxin-4, allowing SNARE binding and vesicle fusion, with subsequent eosinophil degranulation. Our work identifies a novel role for Cdk5 in eosinophil mediator release by agonist-induced degranulation. PMID:25346443

  7. Sequences within the conserved cyclin box of human cyclin A are sufficient for binding to and activation of cdc2 kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Lees, E M; Harlow, E

    1993-01-01

    Cyclins are pivotal in the coordinate regulation of the cell cycle. By physical association, they are able to activate at least one of the cyclin-dependent kinases, cdc2. How this association between the catalytic moiety and cyclins leads to subsequent activation of the kinase remains unclear. In this report, we describe experiments to investigate this event at a physical level. Our approach was to map the regions required on the cyclin A molecule for interaction with cdc2. We have mapped the contact regions to two small noncontiguous stretches of amino acids, residues 189 to 241 and 275 to 320, both located within the conserved cyclin box domain of the protein. We have further shown that this region not only represents a contact site for cdc2 but apparently represents an intact functional domain with respect to cdc2 activation. This region alone is sufficient to stimulate maturation when injected into immature Xenopus laevis oocytes. This observation implies that events leading to the activation of cdc2 kinase can be mediated through small regions of the cyclin molecule that are located in the cyclin box. These regions contain some of the most highly conserved residues found between all the cyclin members so far identified. This suggests that the cyclin family members may have conserved a similar mechanism to bind and activate cyclin-dependent kinases. Images PMID:8423786

  8. Enhanced expression of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases in aniline-induced cell proliferation in rat spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianling; Wang Gangduo; Ma Huaxian; Khan, M. Firoze

    2011-01-15

    Aniline exposure is associated with toxicity to the spleen leading to splenomegaly, hyperplasia, fibrosis and a variety of sarcomas of the spleen on chronic exposure. In earlier studies, we have shown that aniline exposure leads to iron overload, oxidative stress and activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors, which could regulate various genes leading to a tumorigenic response in the spleen. However, molecular mechanisms leading to aniline-induced cellular proliferation in the spleen remain largely unknown. This study was, therefore, undertaken on the regulation of G1 phase cell cycle proteins (cyclins), expression of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and cell proliferation in the spleen, in an experimental condition preceding a tumorigenic response. Male SD rats were treated with aniline (0.5 mmol/kg/day via drinking water) for 30 days (controls received drinking water only), and splenocyte proliferation, protein expression of G1 phase cyclins, CDKs and pRB were measured. Aniline treatment resulted in significant increases in splenocyte proliferation, based on cell counts, cell proliferation markers including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), nuclear Ki67 protein (Ki67) and minichromosome maintenance (MCM), MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis. Western blot analysis of splenocyte proteins from aniline-treated rats showed significantly increased expression of cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E, as compared to the controls. Similarly, real-time PCR analysis showed significantly increased mRNA expression for cyclins D1, D2, D3 and E in the spleens of aniline-treated rats. The overexpression of these cyclins was associated with increases in the expression of CDK4, CDK6, CDK2 as well as phosphorylation of pRB protein. Our data suggest that increased expression of cyclins, CDKs and phosphorylation of pRB protein could be critical in cell proliferation, and may contribute to aniline-induced tumorigenic response in

  9. Acetylation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 is mediated by GCN5

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Juhyung; Yun, Nuri; Kim, Chiho; Song, Min-Young; Park, Kang-Sik; Oh, Young J.

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) is present as an acetylated form. • CDK5 is acetylated by GCN5. • CDK5’s acetylation site is mapped at Lys33. • Its acetylation may affect CDK5’s kinase activity. - Abstract: Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), a member of atypical serine/threonine cyclin-dependent kinase family, plays a crucial role in pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders. Its kinase activity and substrate specificity are regulated by several independent pathways including binding with its activator, phosphorylation and S-nitrosylation. In the present study, we report that acetylation of CDK5 comprises an additional posttranslational modification within the cells. Among many candidates, we confirmed that its acetylation is enhanced by GCN5, a member of the GCN5-related N-acetyl-transferase family of histone acetyltransferase. Co-immunoprecipitation assay and fluorescent localization study indicated that GCN5 physically interacts with CDK5 and they are co-localized at the specific nuclear foci. Furthermore, liquid chromatography in conjunction with a mass spectrometry indicated that CDK5 is acetylated at Lys33 residue of ATP binding domain. Considering this lysine site is conserved among a wide range of species and other related cyclin-dependent kinases, therefore, we speculate that acetylation may alter the kinase activity of CDK5 via affecting efficacy of ATP coordination.

  10. Analysis of substrate specificity and cyclin Y binding of PCTAIRE-1 kinase

    PubMed Central

    Shehata, Saifeldin N.; Hunter, Roger W.; Ohta, Eriko; Peggie, Mark W.; Lou, Hua Jane; Sicheri, Frank; Zeqiraj, Elton; Turk, Benjamin E.; Sakamoto, Kei

    2012-01-01

    PCTAIRE-1 (cyclin-dependent kinase [CDK] 16) is a highly conserved serine/threonine kinase that belongs to the CDK family of protein kinases. Little is known regarding PCTAIRE-1 regulation and function and no robust assay exists to assess PCTAIRE-1 activity mainly due to a lack of information regarding its preferred consensus motif and the lack of bona fide substrates. We used positional scanning peptide library technology and identified the substrate-specificity requirements of PCTAIRE-1 and subsequently elaborated a peptide substrate termed PCTAIRE-tide. Recombinant PCTAIRE-1 displayed vastly improved enzyme kinetics on PCTAIRE-tide compared to a widely used generic CDK substrate peptide. PCTAIRE-tide also greatly improved detection of endogenous PCTAIRE-1 activity. Similar to other CDKs, PCTAIRE-1 requires a proline residue immediately C-terminal to the phosphoacceptor site (+ 1) for optimal activity. PCTAIRE-1 has a unique preference for a basic residue at + 4, but not at + 3 position (a key characteristic for CDKs). We also demonstrate that PCTAIRE-1 binds to a novel cyclin family member, cyclin Y, which increased PCTAIRE-1 activity towards PCTAIRE-tide > 100-fold. We hypothesised that cyclin Y binds and activates PCTAIRE-1 in a way similar to which cyclin A2 binds and activates CDK2. Point mutants of cyclin Y predicted to disrupt PCTAIRE-1-cyclin Y binding severely prevented complex formation and activation of PCTAIRE-1. We have identified PCTAIRE-tide as a powerful tool to study the regulation of PCTAIRE-1. Our understanding of the molecular interaction between PCTAIRE-1 and cyclin Y further facilitates future investigation of the functions of PCTAIRE-1 kinase. PMID:22796189

  11. Greatwall kinase and cyclin B-Cdk1 are both critical constituents of M-phase-promoting factor

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Masatoshi; Abe, Yusuke; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Takayoshi; Okumura, Eiichi; Kishimoto, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    Maturation/M-phase-promoting factor is the universal inducer of M-phase in eukaryotic cells. It is currently accepted that M-phase-promoting factor is identical to the kinase cyclin B–Cdk1. Here we show that cyclin B–Cdk1 and M-phase-promoting factor are not in fact synonymous. Instead, M-phase-promoting factor contains at least two essential components: cyclin B–Cdk1 and another kinase, Greatwall kinase. In the absence of Greatwall kinase, the M-phase-promoting factor is undetectable in oocyte cytoplasm even though cyclin B–Cdk1 is fully active, whereas M-phase-promoting factor activity is restored when Greatwall kinase is added back. Although the excess amount of cyclin B–Cdk1 alone, but not Greatwall kinase alone, can induce nuclear envelope breakdown, spindle assembly is abortive. Addition of Greatwall kinase greatly reduces the amount of cyclin B–Cdk1 required for nuclear envelope breakdown, resulting in formation of the spindle with aligned chromosomes. M-phase-promoting factor is thus a system consisting of one kinase (cyclin B–Cdk1) that directs mitotic entry and a second kinase (Greatwall kinase) that suppresses the protein phosphatase 2A-B55 which opposes cyclin B–Cdk1. PMID:22968705

  12. Brk/Protein tyrosine kinase 6 phosphorylates p27KIP1, regulating the activity of cyclin D-cyclin-dependent kinase 4.

    PubMed

    Patel, Priyank; Asbach, Benedikt; Shteyn, Elina; Gomez, Cindy; Coltoff, Alexander; Bhuyan, Sadia; Tyner, Angela L; Wagner, Ralf; Blain, Stacy W

    2015-05-01

    Cyclin D and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (cdk4) are overexpressed in a variety of tumors, but their levels are not accurate indicators of oncogenic activity because an accessory factor such as p27(Kip1) is required to assemble this unstable dimer. Additionally, tyrosine (Y) phosphorylation of p27 (pY88) is required to activate cdk4, acting as an "on/off switch." We identified two SH3 recruitment domains within p27 that modulate pY88, thereby modulating cdk4 activity. Via an SH3-PXXP interaction screen, we identified Brk (breast tumor-related kinase) as a high-affinity p27 kinase. Modulation of Brk in breast cancer cells modulates pY88 and increases resistance to the cdk4 inhibitor PD 0332991. An alternatively spliced form of Brk (Alt Brk) which contains its SH3 domain blocks pY88 and acts as an endogenous cdk4 inhibitor, identifying a potentially targetable regulatory region within p27. Brk is overexpressed in 60% of breast carcinomas, suggesting that this facilitates cell cycle progression by modulating cdk4 through p27 Y phosphorylation. p27 has been considered a tumor suppressor, but our data strengthen the idea that it should also be considered an oncoprotein, responsible for cyclin D-cdk4 activity. PMID:25733683

  13. Cyclin-dependent kinases and cell-cycle transitions: does one fit all?

    PubMed

    Hochegger, Helfrid; Takeda, Shunichi; Hunt, Tim

    2008-11-01

    Cell-cycle transitions in higher eukaryotes are regulated by different cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and their activating cyclin subunits. Based on pioneering findings that a dominant-negative mutation of CDK1 blocks the cell cycle at G2-M phase, whereas dominant-negative CDK2 inhibits the transition into S phase, a model of cell-cycle control has emerged in which each transition is regulated by a specific subset of CDKs and cyclins. Recent work with gene-targeted mice has led to a revision of this model. We discuss cell-cycle control in light of overlapping and essential functions of the different CDKs and cyclins. PMID:18813291

  14. Targeting Cyclin-Dependent Kinases in Human Cancers: From Small Molecules to Peptide Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Peyressatre, Marion; Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK/Cyclins) form a family of heterodimeric kinases that play central roles in regulation of cell cycle progression, transcription and other major biological processes including neuronal differentiation and metabolism. Constitutive or deregulated hyperactivity of these kinases due to amplification, overexpression or mutation of cyclins or CDK, contributes to proliferation of cancer cells, and aberrant activity of these kinases has been reported in a wide variety of human cancers. These kinases therefore constitute biomarkers of proliferation and attractive pharmacological targets for development of anticancer therapeutics. The structural features of several of these kinases have been elucidated and their molecular mechanisms of regulation characterized in depth, providing clues for development of drugs and inhibitors to disrupt their function. However, like most other kinases, they constitute a challenging class of therapeutic targets due to their highly conserved structural features and ATP-binding pocket. Notwithstanding, several classes of inhibitors have been discovered from natural sources, and small molecule derivatives have been synthesized through rational, structure-guided approaches or identified in high throughput screens. The larger part of these inhibitors target ATP pockets, but a growing number of peptides targeting protein/protein interfaces are being proposed, and a small number of compounds targeting allosteric sites have been reported. PMID:25625291

  15. CyclinA2-Cyclin-dependent Kinase Regulates SAMHD1 Protein Phosphohydrolase Domain.

    PubMed

    Yan, Junpeng; Hao, Caili; DeLucia, Maria; Swanson, Selene; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Ahn, Jinwoo; Skowronski, Jacek

    2015-05-22

    SAMHD1 is a nuclear deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate triphosphohydrolase that contributes to the control of cellular deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pool sizes through dNTP hydrolysis and modulates the innate immune response to viruses. CyclinA2-CDK1/2 phosphorylates SAMHD1 at Thr-592, but how this modification controls SAMHD1 functions in proliferating cells is not known. Here, we show that SAMHD1 levels remain relatively unchanged during the cell division cycle in primary human T lymphocytes and in monocytic cell lines. Inactivation of the bipartite cyclinA2-CDK-binding site in the SAMHD1 C terminus described herein abolished SAMHD1 phosphorylation on Thr-592 during S and G2 phases thus interfering with DNA replication and progression of cells through S phase. The effects exerted by Thr-592 phosphorylation-defective SAMHD1 mutants were associated with activation of DNA damage checkpoint and depletion of dNTP concentrations to levels lower than those seen upon expression of wild type SAMHD1 protein. These disruptive effects were relieved by either mutation of the catalytic residues of the SAMHD1 phosphohydrolase domain or by a Thr-592 phosphomimetic mutation, thus linking the Thr-592 phosphorylation state to the control of SAMHD1 dNTPase activity. Our findings support a model in which phosphorylation of Thr-592 by cyclinA2-CDK down-modulates, but does not inactivate, SAMHD1 dNTPase in S phase, thereby fine-tuning SAMHD1 control of dNTP levels during DNA replication. PMID:25847232

  16. CyclinA2-Cyclin-dependent Kinase Regulates SAMHD1 Protein Phosphohydrolase Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Junpeng; Hao, Caili; DeLucia, Maria; Swanson, Selene; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P.; Ahn, Jinwoo; Skowronski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    SAMHD1 is a nuclear deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate triphosphohydrolase that contributes to the control of cellular deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pool sizes through dNTP hydrolysis and modulates the innate immune response to viruses. CyclinA2-CDK1/2 phosphorylates SAMHD1 at Thr-592, but how this modification controls SAMHD1 functions in proliferating cells is not known. Here, we show that SAMHD1 levels remain relatively unchanged during the cell division cycle in primary human T lymphocytes and in monocytic cell lines. Inactivation of the bipartite cyclinA2-CDK-binding site in the SAMHD1 C terminus described herein abolished SAMHD1 phosphorylation on Thr-592 during S and G2 phases thus interfering with DNA replication and progression of cells through S phase. The effects exerted by Thr-592 phosphorylation-defective SAMHD1 mutants were associated with activation of DNA damage checkpoint and depletion of dNTP concentrations to levels lower than those seen upon expression of wild type SAMHD1 protein. These disruptive effects were relieved by either mutation of the catalytic residues of the SAMHD1 phosphohydrolase domain or by a Thr-592 phosphomimetic mutation, thus linking the Thr-592 phosphorylation state to the control of SAMHD1 dNTPase activity. Our findings support a model in which phosphorylation of Thr-592 by cyclinA2-CDK down-modulates, but does not inactivate, SAMHD1 dNTPase in S phase, thereby fine-tuning SAMHD1 control of dNTP levels during DNA replication. PMID:25847232

  17. A cotton fiber associated cyclin-dependent kinase A gene: Characterization and chromosomal location

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A cotton fiber cell normally originates and elongates as a single ovular epidermal cell. The cessation of fiber cell division and ensuing elongation imply that the cell cycle is differentially regulated in fiber cells. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play a central role in the regulation of cell cy...

  18. Molecular dynamic behavior and binding affinity of flavonoid analogues to the cyclin dependent kinase 6/cyclin D complex.

    PubMed

    Khuntawee, Wasinee; Rungrotmongkol, Thanyada; Hannongbua, Supot

    2012-01-23

    The cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs), each with their respective regulatory partner cyclin that are involved in the regulation of the cell cycle, apoptosis, and transcription, are potentially interesting targets for cancer therapy. The CDK6 complex with cyclin D (CDK6/cycD) drives cellular proliferation by phosphorylation of specific key target proteins. To understand the flavonoids that inhibit the CDK6/cycD functions, molecular dynamics simulations (MDSs) were performed on three inhibitors, fisetin (FST), apigenin (AGN), and chrysin (CHS), complexed with CDK6/cycD, including the two different binding orientations of CHS: FST-like (CHS_A) and deschloro-flavopiridol-like (CHS_B). For all three inhibitors, including both CHS orientations, the conserved interaction between the 4-keto group of the flavonoid and the backbone V101 nitrogen of CDK6 was strongly detected. The 3'- and 4'-OH groups on the flavonoid phenyl ring and the 3-OH group on the benzopyranone ring of inhibitor were found to significantly increase the binding and inhibitory efficiency. Besides the electrostatic interactions, especially through hydrogen bond formation, the van der Waals (vdW) interactions with the I19, V27, F98, H100, and L152 residues of CDK6 are also important factors in the binding efficiency of flavonoids against the CDK6/cycD complex. On the basis of the docking calculation and MM-PBSA method, the order of the predicted inhibitory affinities of these three inhibitors toward the CDK6/cycD was FST > AGN > CHS, which is in good agreement with the experimental data. In addition, CHS preferentially binds to the active CDK6 in a different orientation to FST and AGN but similar to its related analog, deschloro-flavopiridol. The obtained results are useful as the basic information for the further design of potent anticancer drugs specifically targeting the CDK6 enzyme. PMID:22172011

  19. Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 is an ideal target for ovary tumors with elevated cyclin E1 expression.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liu; Fang, Dongdong; Chen, Huijun; Lu, Yiyu; Dong, Zheng; Ding, Han-Fei; Jing, Qing; Su, Shi-Bing; Huang, Shuang

    2015-08-28

    CCNE1 gene amplification is present in 15-20% ovary tumor specimens. Here, we showed that Cyclin E1 (CCNE1) was overexpressed in 30% of established ovarian cancer cell lines. We also showed that CCNE1 was stained positive in over 40% of primary ovary tumor specimens regardless of their histological types while CCNE1 staining was either negative or low in normal ovary and benign ovary tumor tissues. However, the status of CCNE1 overexpression was not associated with the tumorigenic potential of ovarian cancer cell lines and also did not correlate with pathological grades of ovary tumor specimens. Subsequent experiments with CCNE1 siRNAs showed that knockdown of CCNE1 reduced cell growth only in cells with inherent CCNE1 overexpression, indicating that these cells may have developed an addiction to CCNE1 for growth/survival. As CCNE1 is a regulatory factor of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2), we investigated the effect of Cdk2 inhibitor on ovary tumorigenecity. Ovarian cancer cells with elevated CCNE1 expression were 40 times more sensitive to Cdk2 inhibitorSNS-032 than those without inherent CCNE1 overexpression. Moreover, SNS-032 greatly prolonged the survival of mice bearing ovary tumors with inherent CCNE1 overexpression. This study suggests that ovary tumors with elevated CCNE1 expression may be staged for Cdk2-targeted therapy. PMID:26204491

  20. Isolation, characterization and expression of cyclin and cyclin-dependent kinase genes in Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.).

    PubMed

    Freeman, Donna; Riou-Khamlichi, Catherine; Oakenfull, E Ann; Murray, James A H

    2003-01-01

    Tuber explants of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) are a model system for cell-cycle re-entry from a quiescent state, involving the activation of division of tuber parenchyma cells in response to exogenous auxin. To enable molecular studies of this system, two cyclin (Heltu;CYCD1;1 and Heltu; CYCD3;1) and two cyclin-dependent kinase (Heltu; CDKA;1 and Heltu;CDKB1;1) genes have been isolated from a Jerusalem artichoke cDNA library and their expression demonstrated during the activation of cell division. It was found that CDKA;1 transcripts are present in quiescent tubers, whereas CYCD1;1, CYCD3;1 and CDKB1;1 transcripts are induced during cell-cycle re-entry as well as during bud growth of whole tubers. Both CYCD1;1 and CYCD3;1 transcripts appear shortly before, or coincident with, the onset of S phase. PMID:12493857

  1. Identification of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 3 as a new interaction partner of cyclin D3

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Maoyun; Wei Yuanyan; Yao Luyang; Xie Jianhui; Chen Xiaoning; Wang Hanzhou; Jiang Jianhai; Gu Jianxin . E-mail: jxgu@shmu.edu.cn

    2006-02-03

    Cyclin D3, like cyclin D1 and D2 isoforms, is a crucial component of the core cell cycle machinery in mammalian cells. It also exhibits its unique properties in many other physiological processes. In the present study, using yeast two-hybrid screening, we identified ERK3, an atypical mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), as a cyclin D3 binding partner. GST pull-down assays showed that cyclin D3 interacts directly and specifically with ERK3 in vitro. The binding of cyclin D3 and ERK3 was further confirmed in vivo by co-immunoprecipitation assay and confocal microscopic analysis. Moreover, carboxy-terminal extension of ERK3 was responsible for its association with intact cyclin D3. These findings further expand distinct roles of cyclin D3 and suggest the potential activity of ERK3 in cell proliferation.

  2. Crystal structure of a human cyclin-dependent kinase 6 complexwith a flavonol inhibitor, Fisetin

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Heshu; Chang, Debbie J.; Baratte, Blandine; Meijer, Laurent; Schulze-Gahmen, Ursula

    2005-01-10

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play a central role in cell cycle control, apoptosis, transcription and neuronal functions. They are important targets for the design of drugs with anti-mitotic and/or anti-neurodegenerative effects. CDK4 and CDK6 form a subfamily among the CDKs in mammalian cells, as defined by sequence similarities. Compared to CDK2 and CDK5, structural information on CDK4 and CDK6 is sparse. We describe here the crystal structure of human CDK6 in complex with a viral cyclin and a flavonol inhibitor, fisetin. Fisetin binds to the active form of CDK6, forming hydrogen bonds with the side chains of residues in the binding pocket that undergo large conformational changes during CDK activation by cyclin binding. The 4-keto group and the 3-hydroxyl group of fisetin are hydrogen bonded with the backbone in the hinge region between the N-terminal and C-terminal kinase domain, as has been observed for many CDK inhibitors. However, CDK2 and HCK kinase in complex with other flavone inhibitors such as quercetin and flavopiridol showed a different binding mode with the inhibitor rotated by about 180. The structural information of the CDK6-fisetin complex is correlated with the binding affinities of different flavone inhibitors for CDK6. This complex structure is the first description of an inhibitor complex with a kinase from the CDK4/6 subfamily and can provide a basis for selecting and designing inhibitor compounds with higher affinity and specificity.

  3. Correlation between Cyclin Dependent Kinases and Artemisinin-Induced Dormancy in Plasmodium falciparum In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Karen-Ann; Gresty, Karryn J.; Chen, Nanhua; Zhang, Veronica; Gutteridge, Clare E.; Peatey, Christopher L.; Chavchich, Marina; Waters, Norman C.; Cheng, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Background Artemisinin-induced dormancy provides a plausible explanation for recrudescence following artemisinin monotherapy. This phenomenon shares similarities with cell cycle arrest where cyclin dependent kinases (CDKs) and cyclins play an important role. Methods Transcription profiles of Plasmodium falciparum CDKs and cyclins before and after dihydroartemisinin (DHA) treatment in three parasite lines, and the effect of CDK inhibitors on parasite recovery from DHA-induced dormancy were investigated. Results After DHA treatment, parasites enter a dormancy phase followed by a recovery phase. During the dormancy phase parasites up-regulate pfcrk1, pfcrk4, pfcyc2 and pfcyc4, and down-regulate pfmrk, pfpk5, pfpk6, pfcrk3, pfcyc1 and pfcyc3. When entering the recovery phase parasites immediately up-regulate all CDK and cyclin genes. Three CDK inhibitors, olomoucine, WR636638 and roscovitine, produced distinct effects on different phases of DHA-induced dormancy, blocking parasites recovery. Conclusions The up-regulation of PfCRK1 and PfCRK4, and down regulation of other CDKs and cyclins correlate with parasite survival in the dormant state. Changes in CDK expression are likely to negatively regulate parasite progression from G1 to S phase. These findings provide new insights into the mechanism of artemisinin-induced dormancy and cell cycle regulation of P. falciparum, opening new opportunities for preventing recrudescence following artemisinin treatment. PMID:27326764

  4. Altered Subcellular Localization of Tumor-Specific Cyclin E Isoforms Affects Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 Complex Formation and Proteasomal Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Delk, Nikki A.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2009-01-01

    In tumors, alternative translation and posttranslational proteolytic cleavage of full-length cyclin E (EL) produces tumorigenic low molecular weight cyclin E (LMW-E) isoforms that lack a portion of the EL amino-terminus containing a nuclear localization sequence. Therefore, we hypothesized that LMW-E isoforms have altered subcellular localization. To explore our hypothesis, we compared EL versus LMW-E localization in cell lysates and in vivo using fractionation and protein complementation assays. Our results reveal that LMW-E isoforms preferentially accumulate in the cytoplasm where they bind the cyclin E kinase partner, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2), and have associated kinase activity. The nuclear ubiquitin ligase Fbw7 targets Cdk2-bound cyclin E for degradation; thus, we examined if altered subcellular localization affected LMW-E degradation. We found that cytoplasmic LMW-E/Cdk2 was less susceptible to Fbw7-mediated degradation. One implication of our findings is that altered LMW-E and LMW-E/Cdk2 subcellular localization may lead to aberrant LMW-E protein interactions, regulation, and activity, ultimately contributing to LMW-E tumorigenicity. PMID:19318554

  5. Effects of BP-14, a novel cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, on anaplastic thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Allegri, Lorenzo; Baldan, Federica; Mio, Catia; Puppin, Cinzia; Russo, Diego; Kryštof, Vladimir; Damante, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is an extremely aggressive human malignancy characterized by a marked degree of invasiveness, absense of features of thyroid differentiation and resistance to current medical treatment. It is well known that ATCs are characterized by deregulation of genes related to cell cycle regulation, i.e., cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and endogenous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs). Therefore, in the present study, the effect of a novel exogenous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, BP-14, was investigated in three human ATC cell lines. The ATC-derived cell lines FRO, SW1736 and 8505C were treated with BP-14 alone or in combination with the mTOR inhibitor everolimus. In all ATC cell lines, treatment with BP-14 decreased cell viability and, in two of them, BP-14 modified expression of genes involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Thus, our data indicate that BP-14 is a potential new compound effective against ATC. Combined treatment with BP-14 and the mTOR inhibitor everolimus had a strong synergistic effect on cell viability in all three cell lines, suggesting that the combined used of CDK and mTOR inhibitors may be a useful strategy for ATC treatment. PMID:26884249

  6. Cyclin-dependent protein kinase inhibitors including palbociclib as anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Roskoski, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Cyclins and cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs) are important regulatory components that are required for cell cycle progression. The levels of the cell cycle CDKs are generally constant and their activities are controlled by cyclins, proteins whose levels oscillate during each cell cycle. Additional CDK family members were subsequently discovered that play significant roles in a wide range of activities including the control of gene transcription, metabolism, and neuronal function. In response to mitogenic stimuli, cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle produce cyclins of the D type that activate CDK4/6. These activated enzymes catalyze the monophosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein. Then CDK2-cyclin E catalyzes the hyperphosphorylation of Rb that promotes the release and activation of the E2F transcription factors, which in turn lead to the generation of several proteins required for cell cycle progression. As a result, cells pass through the G1-restriction point and are committed to complete cell division. CDK2-cyclin A, CDK1-cyclin A, and CDK1-cyclin B are required for S, G2, and M-phase progression. Increased cyclin or CDK expression or decreased levels of endogenous CDK inhibitors such as INK4 or CIP/KIP have been observed in various cancers. In contrast to the mutational activation of EGFR, Kit, or B-Raf in the pathogenesis of malignancies, mutations in the CDKs that cause cancers are rare. Owing to their role in cell proliferation, CDKs represent natural targets for anticancer therapies. Abemaciclib (LY2835219), ribociclib (Lee011), and palbociclib (Ibrance(®) or PD0332991) target CDK4/6 with IC50 values in the low nanomolar range. Palbociclib and other CDK inhibitors bind in the cleft between the small and large lobes of the CDKs and inhibit the binding of ATP. Like ATP, palbociclib forms hydrogen bonds with residues in the hinge segment of the cleft. Like the adenine base of ATP, palbociclib interacts with catalytic spine residues CS6 and CS7

  7. CDK10/cyclin M is a protein kinase that controls ETS2 degradation and is deficient in STAR syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guen, Vincent J; Gamble, Carly; Flajolet, Marc; Unger, Sheila; Thollet, Aurélie; Ferandin, Yoan; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Cohen, Pascale A; Meijer, Laurent; Colas, Pierre

    2013-11-26

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) regulate a variety of fundamental cellular processes. CDK10 stands out as one of the last orphan CDKs for which no activating cyclin has been identified and no kinase activity revealed. Previous work has shown that CDK10 silencing increases ETS2 (v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 2)-driven activation of the MAPK pathway, which confers tamoxifen resistance to breast cancer cells. The precise mechanisms by which CDK10 modulates ETS2 activity, and more generally the functions of CDK10, remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that CDK10 is a cyclin-dependent kinase by identifying cyclin M as an activating cyclin. Cyclin M, an orphan cyclin, is the product of FAM58A, whose mutations cause STAR syndrome, a human developmental anomaly whose features include toe syndactyly, telecanthus, and anogenital and renal malformations. We show that STAR syndrome-associated cyclin M mutants are unable to interact with CDK10. Cyclin M silencing phenocopies CDK10 silencing in increasing c-Raf and in conferring tamoxifen resistance to breast cancer cells. CDK10/cyclin M phosphorylates ETS2 in vitro, and in cells it positively controls ETS2 degradation by the proteasome. ETS2 protein levels are increased in cells derived from a STAR patient, and this increase is attributable to decreased cyclin M levels. Altogether, our results reveal an additional regulatory mechanism for ETS2, which plays key roles in cancer and development. They also shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying STAR syndrome. PMID:24218572

  8. Cyclin-dependent kinase-5 targeting for ischaemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Slevin, Mark; Krupinski, Jerzy

    2009-04-01

    Recovery from ischaemic stroke is dependent on survival of neurones, particularly in peri-infarcted regions. Angiogenesis is critical for the development of new microvessels resulting in the re-formation of collateral circulation associated with enhanced neuronal survival and reduced morbidity and mortality. Recently, the identification of a neurovascular niche has been described, where the co-ordinated effects of angiogenesis and migration of neuroprogenitor cells to damaged stroke regions were shown to be vital in the process of tissue remodelling. Cdk5, a serine/threonine kinase is highly expressed in the central nervous system, particularly following ischaemic stroke and its aberrant activation is directly associated with neuronal apoptosis and death. In contrast, recent evidence suggests that increased expression of Cdk5 by endothelium might be protective against cell death and/or promote angiogenesis leading to increased vessel formation and reperfusion. Owing to its known interaction with over 20 substrates including caspase-3, MEF2, Tau and p53, Cdk5 could be a master switch controlling both neuronal survival and revascularisation. Therefore its cell-specific pharmacological or genetic modulation using novel nanotechnology-based delivery systems could be of benefit when considering future stroke therapies. PMID:18983942

  9. p130 and p107 use a conserved domain to inhibit cellular cyclin-dependent kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Woo, M S; Sánchez, I; Dynlacht, B D

    1997-01-01

    The pRB-related proteins p107 and p130 are thought to suppress growth in part through their associations with two important cell cycle kinases, cyclin A-cdk2 and cyclin E-cdk2, and transcription factor E2F. Although each protein plays a critical role in cell proliferation, the functional consequences of the association among growth suppressor, cyclin-dependent kinase, and transcription factor have remained elusive. In an attempt to understand the biochemical properties of such complexes, we reconstituted each of the p130-cyclin-cdk2 and p107-cyclin-cdk2 complexes found in vivo with purified, recombinant proteins. Strikingly, stoichiometric association of p107 or p130 with either cyclin E-cdk2 or cyclin A-cdk2 negated the activities of these kinases. The results of our experiments suggest that inhibition does not result from substrate competition or loss of cdk2 activation. Kinase inhibitory activity was dependent upon an amino-terminal region of p107 that is highly conserved with p130. Further, a role for this amino-terminal region in growth suppression was uncovered by using p107 mutants unable to bind E2F. To determine whether cellular complexes might display similar regulatory properties, we purified p130-cyclin A-cdk2 complexes from human cells and found that such complexes exist in two forms, one that contains E2F-4-DP-1 and one that lacks the heterodimer. These endogenous complexes behaved like the in vitro-reconstituted complexes, exhibiting low levels of associated kinase activity that could be significantly augmented by dissociation of p130. The results of these experiments suggest a mechanism whereby p130 and p107 suppress growth by inhibiting important cell cycle kinases. PMID:9199292

  10. Unexpected reduction of skin tumorigenesis on expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 6 in mouse epidermis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian; Sistrunk, Christopher; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) 4 and 6 are important regulators of the G(1) phase of the cell cycle, share 71% amino acid identity, and are expressed ubiquitously. As a result, it was assumed that each of these kinases plays a redundant role regulating normal and neoplastic proliferation. In previous reports, we have described the effects of CDK4 expression in transgenic mice, including the development of epidermal hyperplasia and increased malignant progression to squamous cell carcinoma. To study the role of CDK6 in epithelial growth and tumorigenesis, we generated transgenic mice carrying the CDK6 gene under the keratin 5 promoter (K5CDK6). Similar to K5CDK4 mice, epidermal proliferation increased substantially in K5CDK6 mice; however, no hyperplasia was observed. CDK6 overexpression also triggered keratinocyte apoptosis in interfollicular and follicular epidermis as a compensatory mechanism to override aberrant proliferation. Unexpectedly, CDK6 overexpression results in decreased skin tumor development compared with wild-type siblings. The inhibition in skin tumorigenesis was similar to that previously reported in K5-cyclin D3 mice. Furthermore, biochemical analysis of the K5CDK6 epidermis showed preferential complex formation between CDK6 and cyclin D3, suggesting that this particular complex plays an important role in tumor restraint. These studies provide in vivo evidence that CDK4 and CDK6 play a similar role as a mediator of keratinocyte proliferation but differ in apoptosis activation and skin tumor development. PMID:21224071

  11. Cyclin E-dependent protein kinase activity regulates niche retention of Drosophila ovarian follicle stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhu A.; Kalderon, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Whether stem cells have unique cell cycle machineries and how they integrate with niche interactions remains largely unknown. We identified a hypomorphic cyclin E allele WX that strongly impairs the maintenance of follicle stem cells (FSCs) in the Drosophila ovary but does not reduce follicle cell proliferation or germline stem cell maintenance. CycEWX protein can still bind to the cyclin-dependent kinase catalytic subunit Cdk2, but forms complexes with reduced protein kinase activity measured in vitro. By creating additional CycE variants with different degrees of kinase dysfunction and expressing these and CycEWX at different levels, we found that higher CycE-Cdk2 kinase activity is required for FSC maintenance than to support follicle cell proliferation. Surprisingly, cycEWX FSCs were lost from their niches rather than arresting proliferation. Furthermore, FSC function was substantially restored by expressing either excess DE-cadherin or excess E2F1/DP, the transcription factor normally activated by CycE-Cdk2 phosphorylation of retinoblastoma proteins. These results suggest that FSC maintenance through niche adhesion is regulated by inputs that normally control S phase entry, possibly as a quality control mechanism to ensure adequate stem cell proliferation. We speculate that a positive connection between central regulators of the cell cycle and niche retention may be a common feature of highly proliferative stem cells. PMID:19966222

  12. Selective anticancer activity of a hexapeptide with sequence homology to a non-kinase domain of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 4

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cyclin-dependent kinases 2, 4 and 6 (Cdk2, Cdk4, Cdk6) are closely structurally homologous proteins which are classically understood to control the transition from the G1 to the S-phases of the cell cycle by combining with their appropriate cyclin D or cyclin E partners to form kinase-active holoenzymes. Deregulation of Cdk4 is widespread in human cancer, CDK4 gene knockout is highly protective against chemical and oncogene-mediated epithelial carcinogenesis, despite the continued presence of CDK2 and CDK6; and overexpresssion of Cdk4 promotes skin carcinogenesis. Surprisingly, however, Cdk4 kinase inhibitors have not yet fulfilled their expectation as 'blockbuster' anticancer agents. Resistance to inhibition of Cdk4 kinase in some cases could potentially be due to a non-kinase activity, as recently reported with epidermal growth factor receptor. Results A search for a potential functional site of non-kinase activity present in Cdk4 but not Cdk2 or Cdk6 revealed a previously-unidentified loop on the outside of the C'-terminal non-kinase domain of Cdk4, containing a central amino-acid sequence, Pro-Arg-Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro (PRGPRP). An isolated hexapeptide with this sequence and its cyclic amphiphilic congeners are selectively lethal at high doses to a wide range of human cancer cell lines whilst sparing normal diploid keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Treated cancer cells do not exhibit the wide variability of dose response typically seen with other anticancer agents. Cancer cell killing by PRGPRP, in a cyclic amphiphilic cassette, requires cells to be in cycle but does not perturb cell cycle distribution and is accompanied by altered relative Cdk4/Cdk1 expression and selective decrease in ATP levels. Morphological features of apoptosis are absent and cancer cell death does not appear to involve autophagy. Conclusion These findings suggest a potential new paradigm for the development of broad-spectrum cancer specific therapeutics with a companion diagnostic

  13. Binding of HTm4 to cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-associated phosphatase (KAP).Cdk2.cyclin A complex enhances the phosphatase activity of KAP, dissociates cyclin A, and facilitates KAP dephosphorylation of Cdk2.

    PubMed

    Chinami, Masanobu; Yano, Yoshihiko; Yang, Xing; Salahuddin, Saira; Moriyama, Kosei; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Turner, Helen; Shirakawa, Taro; Adra, Chaker N

    2005-04-29

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdk2) activation requires phosphorylation of Thr160 and dissociation from cyclin A. The T-loop of cdk2 contains a regulatory phosphorylation site at Thr160. An interaction between cdc-associated phosphatase (KAP) and cdk2 compromises the interaction between cdk2 and cyclin A, which permits access of KAP, a Thr160-directed phosphatase, to its substrate, cdk2. We have reported that KAP is bound and activated by a nuclear membrane protein, HTm4. Here, we present in vitro data showing the direct interaction between the HTm4 C terminus and KAP Tyr141. We show that this interaction not only facilitates access of KAP to Thr160 and accelerates KAP kinetics, but also forces exclusion of cyclin A from the KAP.cdk2 complex. PMID:15671017

  14. Cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors as potential anticancer, antineurodegenerative, antiviral and antiparasitic agents.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Laurent

    2000-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) play a key role in the cell division cycle, in neuronal functions, in transcription and in apoptosis. Intensive screening with these kinases as targets has lead to the identification of highly selective and potent small - molecule inhibitors. Co-crystallization with CDK2 shows that these flat heterocyclic hydrophobic compounds bind through two or three hydrogen bonds with the side chains of two amino acids located in the ATP-binding pocket of the kinase. These inhibitors are anti-proliferative; they arrest cells in G1 and in G2/M phase. Furthermore they facilitate or even trigger apoptosis in proliferating cells while they protect neuronal cells and thymocytes from apoptosis. The potential use of these inhibitors is being extensively evaluated for cancer chemotherapy and also in other therapeutic areas: neurology (Alzheimer's disease), cardiovascular (restenosis, angiogenesis), nephrology (glomerulonephritis), parasitology (Plasmodium, Trypanosoma, Toxoplasma, etc.) and virology (cytomegalovirus, HIV, herpes virus). Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd. PMID:11498372

  15. New structural insights into phosphorylation-free mechanism for full cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-cyclin activity and substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fei; Quiocho, Florante A

    2013-10-18

    Pho85 is a versatile cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) found in budding yeast that regulates a myriad of eukaryotic cellular functions in concert with 10 cyclins (called Pcls). Unlike cell cycle CDKs that require phosphorylation of a serine/threonine residue by a CDK-activating kinase (CAK) for full activation, Pho85 requires no phosphorylation despite the presence of an equivalent residue. The Pho85-Pcl10 complex is a key regulator of glycogen metabolism by phosphorylating the substrate Gsy2, the predominant, nutritionally regulated form of glycogen synthase. Here we report the crystal structures of Pho85-Pcl10 and its complex with the ATP analog, ATPγS. The structure solidified the mechanism for bypassing CDK phosphorylation to achieve full catalytic activity. An aspartate residue, invariant in all Pcls, acts as a surrogate for the phosphoryl adduct of the phosphorylated, fully activated CDK2, the prototypic cell cycle CDK, complexed with cyclin A. Unlike the canonical recognition motif, SPX(K/R), of phosphorylation sites of substrates of several cell cycle CDKs, the motif in the Gys2 substrate of Pho85-Pcl10 is SPXX. CDK5, an important signal transducer in neural development and the closest known functional homolog of Pho85, does not require phosphorylation either, and we found that in its crystal structure complexed with p25 cyclin a water/hydroxide molecule remarkably plays a similar role to the phosphoryl or aspartate group. Comparison between Pho85-Pcl10, phosphorylated CDK2-cyclin A, and CDK5-p25 complexes reveals the convergent structural characteristics necessary for full kinase activity and the variations in the substrate recognition mechanism. PMID:24022486

  16. Isolation and characterization of new alleles of the cyclin-dependent kinase gene CDC28 with cyclin-specific functional and biochemical defects.

    PubMed

    Levine, K; Oehlen, L J; Cross, F R

    1998-01-01

    The G1 cyclin Cln2 negatively regulates the mating-factor pathway. In a genetic screen to identify factors required for this regulation, we identified an allele of CDC28 (cdc28-csr1) that blocked this function of Cln2. Cln2 immunoprecipitated from cdc28-csr1 cells was completely defective in histone H1 kinase activity, due to defects in Cdc28 binding and activation by Cln2. In contrast, Clb2-associated H1 kinase and Cdc28 binding was normal in immunoprecipitates from these cells. cdc28-csr1 was significantly deficient in other aspects of genetic interaction with Cln2. The cdc28-csr1 mutation was determined to be Q188P, in the T loop distal to most of the probable Cdk-cyclin interaction regions. We performed random mutagenesis of CDC28 to identify additional alleles incapable of causing CLN2-dependent mating-factor resistance but capable of complementing cdc28 temperature-sensitive and null alleles. Two such mutants had highly defective Cln2-associated kinase, but, surprisingly, two other mutants had levels of Cln2-associated kinase near to wild-type levels. We performed a complementary screen for CDC28 mutants that could cause efficient Cln2-dependent mating-factor resistance but not complement a cdc28 null allele. Most such mutants were found to alter residues essential for kinase activity; the proteins had little or no associated kinase activity in bulk or in association with Cln2. Several of these mutants also functioned in another assay for CLN2-dependent function not involving the mating-factor pathway, complementing the temperature sensitivity of a cln1 cln3 cdc28-csr1 strain. These results could indicate that Cln2-Cdc28 kinase activity is not directly relevant to some CLN2-mediated functions. Mutants of this sort should be useful in differentiating the function of Cdc28 complexed with different cyclin regulatory subunits. PMID:9418876

  17. Specific Inhibition of Cyclin-dependent Kinase 5 Activity Induces Motor Neuron Development in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kanungo, Jyotshnabala; Zheng, Ya-Li; Amin, Niranjana D.; Kaur, Sukhbir; Ramchandran, Ramani; Pant, Harish C.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (cdk5) is a ubiquitous protein activated by specific activators, p35 and p39. Cdk5 regulates neuronal migration, differentiation, axonogenesis, synaptic transmission and apoptosis. However, its role in motor neuron development remains unexplored. Here, using gain and loss-of-function analyses in developing zebrafish embryos, we report that cdk5 plays a critical role in spinal and cranial motor neuron development. Cdk5 knockdown results in supernumerary spinal and cranial motor neurons. While a dominant negative, kinase-dead cdk5 promotes the generation of supernumerary motor neurons; over-expression of cdk5 suppresses motor neuron development. Thus, modulating cdk5 activity seems promising in inducing motor neuron development in vivo. PMID:19523926

  18. The Yeast Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Routes Carbon Fluxes to Fuel Cell Cycle Progression.

    PubMed

    Ewald, Jennifer C; Kuehne, Andreas; Zamboni, Nicola; Skotheim, Jan M

    2016-05-19

    Cell division entails a sequence of processes whose specific demands for biosynthetic precursors and energy place dynamic requirements on metabolism. However, little is known about how metabolic fluxes are coordinated with the cell division cycle. Here, we examine budding yeast to show that more than half of all measured metabolites change significantly through the cell division cycle. Cell cycle-dependent changes in central carbon metabolism are controlled by the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk1), a major cell cycle regulator, and the metabolic regulator protein kinase A. At the G1/S transition, Cdk1 phosphorylates and activates the enzyme Nth1, which funnels the storage carbohydrate trehalose into central carbon metabolism. Trehalose utilization fuels anabolic processes required to reliably complete cell division. Thus, the cell cycle entrains carbon metabolism to fuel biosynthesis. Because the oscillation of Cdk activity is a conserved feature of the eukaryotic cell cycle, we anticipate its frequent use in dynamically regulating metabolism for efficient proliferation. PMID:27203178

  19. Vaccination with cyclin-dependent kinase tick antigen confers protection against Ixodes infestation.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Helga; Moraes, Jorge; Githaka, Naftaly; Martins, Renato; Isezaki, Masayoshi; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Logullo, Carlos; Konnai, Satoru; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2015-07-30

    Among arthropods, ticks lead as vectors of animal diseases and rank second to mosquitoes in transmitting human pathogens. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) participate in cell cycle control in eukaryotes. CDKs are serine/threonine protein kinases and these catalytic subunits are activated or inactivated at specific stages of the cell cycle. To determine the potential of using CDKs as anti-tick vaccine antigens, hamsters were immunized with recombinant Ixodes persulcatus CDK10, followed by a homologous tick challenge. Though it was not exactly unexpected, IpCDK10 vaccination significantly impaired tick blood feeding and fecundity, which manifested as low engorgement weights, poor oviposition, and a reduction in 80% of hatching rates. These findings may underpin the development of more efficacious anti-tick vaccines based on the targeting of cell cycle control proteins. PMID:26073111

  20. Nuclear association of cyclin D1 in human fibroblasts: tight binding to nuclear structures and modulation by protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Scovassi, A I; Stivala, L A; Rossi, L; Bianchi, L; Prosperi, E

    1997-11-25

    The association of cyclin D1 with nuclear structures was investigated in normal human fibroblasts by using hypotonic detergent extraction procedures, immunofluorescence quantitation with flow cytometry, and Western blot analysis. About 20% of the total cellular levels of cyclin D1 was found to be tightly bound to nuclear structures, being the complex formation resistant to DNase I treatment and to high salt extraction. Maximal levels of the insoluble form of the protein were found in the middle to late G1 phase of the cell cycle. Cell fractionation and immunoprecipitation techniques after in vivo 32P-labeling showed that both soluble and nuclear-bound forms of cyclin D1 were phosphorylated. Both fractions were reactive to an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody, while only the latter was detectable with an anti-phosphoserine antibody. Treatment with the protein kinase inhibitor staurosporine, which induces a cell cycle arrest in early G1 phase, strongly reduced cyclin D1 phosphorylation. Concomitantly, the ratio of nuclear-bound/total cyclin D1 levels was reduced by about 60%, compared with the control value. The protein kinase A specific inhibitor isoquinoline-sulfonamide (H-89) induced a similar reduction in the ratio, with no significant modification in the total amount of protein. In contrast, both calphostin C and bisindolylmaleimide, specific inhibitors of protein kinase C, consistently increased by 30-50% the ratio of nuclear-bound/total amount of the cyclin protein. These results suggest that, during the G1 phase, formation of an insoluble complex of cyclin D1 occurs at nuclear matrix structures and that this association is mediated by a protein kinase A-dependent pathway. PMID:9417875

  1. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5, a node protein in diminished tauopathy: a systems biology approach

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Alvarez, John F.; Uribe-Arias, S. Alejandro; Mejía-Raigosa, Daniel; Cardona-Gómez, Gloria P.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia worldwide. One of the main pathological changes that occurs in AD is the intracellular accumulation of hyperphosphorylated Tau protein in neurons. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) is one of the major kinases involved in Tau phosphorylation, directly phosphorylating various residues and simultaneously regulating various substrates such as kinases and phosphatases that influence Tau phosphorylation in a synergistic and antagonistic way. It remains unknown how the interaction between CDK5 and its substrates promotes Tau phosphorylation, and systemic approaches are needed that allow an analysis of all the proteins involved. In this review, the role of the CDK5 signaling pathway in Tau hyperphosphorylation is described, an in silico model of the CDK5 signaling pathway is presented. The relationship among these theoretical and computational models shows that the regulation of Tau phosphorylation by PP2A and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is essential under basal conditions and also describes the leading role of CDK5 under excitotoxic conditions, where silencing of CDK5 can generate changes in these enzymes to reverse a pathological condition that simulates AD. PMID:25225483

  2. The A- and B-type cyclin associated cdc2 kinases in Xenopus turn on and off at different times in the cell cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Minshull, J; Golsteyn, R; Hill, C S; Hunt, T

    1990-01-01

    Cyclins play a key role in the induction of mitosis. In this paper we report the isolation of a cyclin A cDNA clone from Xenopus eggs. Its cognate mRNA encodes a protein that shows characteristic accumulation and destruction during mitotic cell cycles. The cyclin A polypeptide is associated with a protein that cross-reacts with an antibody against the conserved 'PSTAIR' epitope of p34cdc2, and the cyclin A-cdc2 complex exhibits protein kinase activity that oscillates with the cell cycle. This kinase activity rises more smoothly than that of the cyclin B-cdc2 complexes and reaches a peak earlier in the cell cycle; indeed, cyclin A is destroyed before nuclear envelope breakdown. None of the cyclin-cdc2 complexes show simple relationships between the concentration of the cyclin moiety and the kinase activity. All three cyclin associated kinases (A, B1 and B2) phosphorylate identical sites on histones with the consensus XSPXK/R, although they show significant differences in their substrate preferences. We discuss possible models for the different roles of the A- and B-type cyclins in the control of cell division. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:2143983

  3. Lhx4 Deficiency: Increased Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor Expression and Pituitary Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gergics, Peter; Brinkmeier, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Defects in the Lhx4, Lhx3, and Pitx2 genes can cause combined pituitary hormone deficiency and pituitary hypoplasia in both humans and mice. Not much is known about the mechanism underlying hypoplasia in these mutants beyond generally increased cell death and poorly maintained proliferation. We identified both common and unique abnormalities in developmental regulation of key cell cycle regulator gene expression in each of these three mutants. All three mutants exhibit reduced expression of the proliferative marker Ki67 and the transitional marker p57. We discovered that expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1a (Cdkn1a or p21) is expanded dorsally in the pituitary primordium of both Lhx3 and Lhx4 mutants. Uniquely, Lhx4 mutants exhibit reduced cyclin D1 expression and have auxiliary pouch-like structures. We show evidence for indirect and direct effects of LHX4 on p21 expression in αT3-1 pituitary cells. In summary, Lhx4 is necessary for efficient pituitary progenitor cell proliferation and restriction of p21 expression. PMID:25668206

  4. Suppression of cell cycle progression by a fungal lectin: activation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Liua, W; Ho, J C; Ng, T

    2001-01-01

    The antiproliferative activity of a fungal lectin (VVL) isolated from the mushroom, Volvariella volvacea, was studied using a battery of cultured tumor cell lines. It was revealed that [(3)H]thymidine incorporation into the cell lines was markedly reduced at 0.32 microM VVL. When S180 mouse sarcoma cells were incubated for 48 hr with doses of VVL ranging from 0.32 to 0.8 microM, prominent blebs on the cell surface and large vacuoles in the cytoplasm, but not apoptotic bodies, were observed under a fluorescence microscopy. VVL did not exert ribosome-inactivating activity or induce any changes in the expression of cyclins A, D1, and E. However, it did activate the expression of cyclin kinase inhibitors, namely p21, p27, p53, and Rb, in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated an accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase in a time- and dose-dependent manner, indicating that VVL arrested cell proliferation by blocking cell cycle progression in the G2/M phase. PMID:11137706

  5. The prognostic significance of altered cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsihlias, J; Kapusta, L; Slingerland, J

    1999-01-01

    Progression through the cell cycle is governed by cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks), whose activity is inhibited by the cdk inhibitors. Cyclins, cdks, and cdk inhibitors are frequently deregulated in cancers. This chapter reviews the prognostic significance of alterations in cdk inhibitors. Loss of p27 protein provides independent prognostic information in breast, prostate, colon, and gastric carcinomas, and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining for p27 may eventually become part of routine histopathologic processing of cancers. Loss of IHC staining for p21 may be prognostic in certain cancers but conflicting results are reported in breast cancer. Reports on homozygous deletion of p16 and p15 genes suggest the value of larger, prospective studies with standardized treatment protocols to definitively establish the prognostic utility of p15/p16 deletions in acute leukemias. Larger trials and the development of a consensus on methods for deletion analysis, IHC staining, and tumor scoring will be needed to move these molecular assays from bench to bedside. PMID:10073286

  6. Atypical Regulation of a Green Lineage-Specific B-Type Cyclin-Dependent Kinase1

    PubMed Central

    Corellou, Florence; Camasses, Alain; Ligat, Laetitia; Peaucellier, Gérard; Bouget, François-Yves

    2005-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are the main regulators of cell cycle progression in eukaryotes. The role and regulation of canonical CDKs, such as the yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Cdc2 or plant CDKA, have been extensively characterized. However, the function of the plant-specific CDKB is not as well understood. Besides being involved in cell cycle control, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CDKB would integrate developmental processes to cell cycle progression. We investigated the role of CDKB in Ostreococcus (Ostreococcus tauri), a unicellular green algae with a minimal set of cell cycle genes. In this primitive alga, at the basis of the green lineage, CDKB has integrated two levels of regulations: It is regulated by Tyr phosphorylation like cdc2/CDKA and at the level of synthesis-like B-type CDKs. Furthermore, Ostreococcus CDKB/cyclin B accounts for the main peak of mitotic activity, and CDKB is able to rescue a yeast cdc28ts mutant. By contrast, Ostreococcus CDKA is not regulated by Tyr phosphorylation, and it exhibits a low and steady-state activity from DNA replication to exit of mitosis. This suggests that from a major role in the control of mitosis in green algae, CDKB has evolved in higher plants to assume other functions outside the cell cycle. PMID:15965018

  7. Foxp3 Protein Stability Is Regulated by Cyclin-dependent Kinase 2*

    PubMed Central

    Morawski, Peter A.; Mehra, Parul; Chen, Chunxia; Bhatti, Tricia; Wells, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Foxp3 is a transcription factor required for the development of regulatory T cells (Treg). Mice and humans with a loss of Foxp3 function suffer from uncontrolled autoimmunity and inflammatory disease. Expression of Foxp3 is necessary for the anti-inflammatory capacity of Treg, but whether Foxp3 activity is further subject to regulation by extracellular signals is unclear. The primary structure of Foxp3 contains four cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) motifs (Ser/Thr-Pro) within the N-terminal repressor domain, and we show that CDK2 can partner with cyclin E to phosphorylate Foxp3 at these sites. Consistent with our previous demonstration that CDK2 negatively regulates Treg function, we find that mutation of the serine or threonine at each CDK motif to alanine (S/T→A) results in enhanced Foxp3 protein stability in CD4+ T cells. T cells expressing the S/T→A mutant of Foxp3 showed enhanced induction (e.g. CD25) and repression (e.g. IL2) of canonical Foxp3-responsive genes, exhibited an increased capacity to suppress conventional T cell proliferation in vitro, and were highly effective at ameliorating colitis in an in vivo model of inflammatory bowel disease. These results indicate that CDK2 negatively regulates the stability and activity of Foxp3 and implicate CDK-coupled receptor signal transduction in the control of regulatory T cell function and stability. PMID:23853094

  8. Development of highly potent and selective diaminothiazole inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases

    PubMed Central

    Schonbrunn, Ernst; Betzi, Stephane; Alam, Riazul; Martin, Mathew P.; Becker, Andreas; Han, Huijong; Francis, Rawle; Chakrasali, Ramappa; Jakkaraj, Sudhakar; Kazi, Aslamuzzaman; Sebti, Said M.; Cubitt, Christopher L.; Gebhard, Anthony W.; Hazlehurst, Lori A.; Tash, Joseph S.; Georg, Gunda I.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are serine/threonine protein kinases that act as key regulatory elements in cell cycle progression. We describe the development of highly potent diaminothiazole inhibitors of CDK2 (IC50 = 0.0009 – 0.0015 µM) from a single hit compound with weak inhibitory activity (IC50 = 15 µM), discovered by high-throughput screening. Structure-based design was performed using 35 co-crystal structures of CDK2 liganded with distinct analogues of the parent compound. The profiling of compound 51 against a panel of 339 kinases revealed high selectivity for CDKs, with preference for CDK2 and CDK5 over CDK9, CDK1, CDK4 and CDK6. Compound 51 inhibited the proliferation of 13 out of 15 cancer cell lines with IC50 values between 0.27 and 6.9 µM, which correlated with the complete suppression of retinoblastoma phosphorylation and the onset of apoptosis. Combined, the results demonstrate the potential of this new inhibitors series for further development into CDK-specific chemical probes or therapeutics. PMID:23600925

  9. A chrysin derivative suppresses skin cancer growth by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haidan; Liu, Kangdong; Huang, Zunnan; Park, Chan-Mi; Thimmegowda, N R; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ryoo, In-Ja; He, Long; Kim, Sun-Ok; Oi, Naomi; Lee, Ki Won; Soung, Nak-Kyun; Bode, Ann M; Yang, Yifeng; Zhou, Xinmin; Erikson, Raymond L; Ahn, Jong-Seog; Hwang, Joonsung; Kim, Kyoon Eon; Dong, Zigang; Kim, Bo-Yeon

    2013-09-01

    Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), a natural flavonoid widely distributed in plants, reportedly has chemopreventive properties against various cancers. However, the anticancer activity of chrysin observed in in vivo studies has been disappointing. Here, we report that a chrysin derivative, referred to as compound 69407, more strongly inhibited EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 P(+) cells compared with chrysin. It attenuated cell cycle progression of EGF-stimulated cells at the G1 phase and inhibited the G1/S transition. It caused loss of retinoblastoma phosphorylation at both Ser-795 and Ser-807/811, the preferred sites phosphorylated by Cdk4/6 and Cdk2, respectively. It also suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. Compound 69407 reduced tumor growth in the A431 mouse xenograft model and retinoblastoma phosphorylation at Ser-795 and Ser-807/811. Immunoprecipitation kinase assay results showed that compound 69407 attenuated endogenous Cdk4 and Cdk2 kinase activities in EGF-stimulated JB6 P(+) cells. Pulldown and in vitro kinase assay results indicated that compound 69407 directly binds with Cdk2 and Cdk4 in an ATP-independent manner and inhibited their kinase activities. A binding model between compound 69407 and a crystal structure of Cdk2 predicted that compound 69407 was located inside the Cdk2 allosteric binding site. The binding was further verified by a point mutation binding assay. Overall results indicated that compound 69407 is an ATP-noncompetitive cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with anti-tumor effects, which acts by binding inside the Cdk2 allosteric pocket. This study provides new insights for creating a general pharmacophore model to design and develop novel ATP-noncompetitive agents with chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic potency. PMID:23888052

  10. Roscovitine blocks leukocyte extravasation by inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinases 5 and 9

    PubMed Central

    Berberich, Nina; Uhl, Bernd; Joore, Jos; Schmerwitz, Ulrike K; Mayer, Bettina A; Reichel, Christoph A; Krombach, Fritz; Zahler, Stefan; Vollmar, Angelika M; Fürst, Robert

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor that induces tumour cell death, is under evaluation as an anti-cancer drug. By triggering leukocyte apoptosis, roscovitine can also enhance the resolution of inflammation. Beyond death-inducing properties, we tested whether roscovitine affects leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction, a vital step in the onset of inflammation. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions were evaluated in venules of mouse cremaster muscle, using intravital microscopy. In primary human endothelial cells, we studied the influence of roscovitine on adhesion molecules and on the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. A cellular kinome array, in vitro CDK profiling and RNAi methods were used to identify targets of roscovitine. KEY RESULTS In vivo, roscovitine attenuated the tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced leukocyte adherence to and transmigration through, the endothelium. In vitro, roscovitine strongly inhibited TNF-α-evoked expression of endothelial adhesion molecules (E-selectin, intercellular cell adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule). Roscovitine blocked NF-κB-dependent gene transcription, but not the NF-κB activation cascade [inhibitor of κB (IκB) kinase activity, IκB-α degradation, p65 translocation]. Using a cellular kinome array and an in vitro CDK panel, we found that roscovitine inhibited protein kinase A, ribosomal S6 kinase and CDKs 2, 5, 7 and 9. Experiments using kinase inhibitors and siRNA showed that the decreased endothelial activation was due solely to blockade of CDK5 and CDK9 by roscovitine. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our study highlights a novel mode of action for roscovitine, preventing endothelial activation and leukocyte-endothelial cell interaction by inhibition of CDK5 and 9. This might expand its usage as a promising anti-inflammatory compound. PMID:21391976

  11. Potential use of pharmacological cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors as anti-HIV therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Pumfery, Anne; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Berro, Reem; Nekhai, Sergei; Kashanchi, Fatah; Chao, Sheng-Hao

    2006-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are key regulators of the cell cycle and RNA polymerase II transcription. Several pharmacological CDK inhibitors (PCIs) are currently in clinical trials as potential cancer therapeutics since CDK hyperactivation is detected in the majority of neoplasias. Within the last few years, the anti-viral effects of PCIs have also been observed against various viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus, and murine leukemia virus. Through the inhibition of CDK2 and 9, the cellular co-factors for HIV-1 Tat transactivation, HIV-1 replication is blocked by two specific PCIs, CYC202 and flavopiridol, respectively. In this article, we will review the inhibitory mechanisms of flavopiridol and CYC202 and discuss their possible usage in AIDS treatment. PMID:16787240

  12. NSun2 Promotes Cell Growth via Elevating Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 1 Translation

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Junyue; Yi, Jie; Cai, Xiaoyu; Tang, Hao; Liu, Zhenyun; Zhang, Xiaotian; Martindale, Jennifer L.; Yang, Xiaoling; Jiang, Bin; Gorospe, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    The tRNA methytransferase NSun2 promotes cell proliferation, but the molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Here, we report that NSun2 regulates cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) expression in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Knockdown of NSun2 decreased the CDK1 protein level, while overexpression of NSun2 elevated it without altering CDK1 mRNA levels. Further studies revealed that NSun2 methylated CDK1 mRNA in vitro and in cells and that methylation by NSun2 enhanced CDK1 translation. Importantly, NSun2-mediated regulation of CDK1 expression had an impact on the cell division cycle. These results provide new insight into the regulation of CDK1 during the cell division cycle. PMID:26391950

  13. The effect of cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitor treatment on experimental herpes simplex encephalitis mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu; Zeng, Yan-Ping; Zhou, Qin; Guan, Jing-Xia; Lu, Zu-Neng

    2016-08-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis(HSE) is the most common and serious viral encephalitis in humans. There is a lack of effective medication to date for HSE. A better understanding of the mediators of tissue damage is essential for finding new targets for therapeutic intervention. In this project, we explored the effect of cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitor olomoucine treatment on experimental HSE mice. The following results were obtained: (1) olomoucine increased survival in HSE mice; (2) olomoucine inhibited microglial activation and reduced HSV-1-induced cytokines release; (3) olomoucine prevented neural cells apoptosis and attenuated brain tissue pathological changes following HSV-1 infection; (4) olomoucine reduced brain edema and improved neurological function in HSE. Overall, olomoucine can induce a blunted inflammatory response, maintain the blood vessel wall intact, improve neurological function and increase survival in HSE mice. PMID:27241721

  14. Mitogen-activated protein kinase activation down-regulates a mechanism that inactivates cyclin B-cdc2 kinase in G2-arrested oocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Abrieu, A; Dorée, M; Picard, A

    1997-01-01

    The G2 arrest of oocytes from frogs, clams, and starfish requires that preformed cyclin B-cdc2 complexes [prematuration-promoting factor (MPF)] be kept in an inactive form that is largely due to inhibitory phosphorylation of this pre-MPF. We have investigated the role of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase in the activation of this pre-MPF. The cytoplasm of both frog and starfish oocytes contains an activity that can rapidly inactivate injected MPF. When the MAP kinase of G2-arrested starfish or Xenopus oocytes was prematurely activated by microinjection of c-mos or Ste-11 delta N fusion proteins, the rate and extent of MPF inactivation was much reduced. Both effects were suppressed by expression of the specific MAP kinase phosphatase Pyst 1. These results show that MAP kinase down-regulates a mechanism that inactivates cyclin B-cdc2 kinase in Xenopus oocytes. In starfish oocytes, however, MAP kinase activation occurs only after germinal vesicle breakdown, much after MPF activation. In this case, down-regulation of the cyclin B-cdc2 inhibiting pathway is a sensitive response to hormonal stimulation that does not require MAP kinase activation. Images PMID:9190205

  15. Transgenic Expression of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4 Results in Epidermal Hyperplasia, Hypertrophy, and Severe Dermal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Miliani de Marval, Paula L.; Gimenez-Conti, Irma B.; LaCava, Margaret; Martinez, Luis A.; Conti, Claudio J.; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L.

    2001-01-01

    In a previous report we have described the effects of expression of D-type cyclins in epithelial tissues of transgenic mice. To study the involvement of the D-type cyclin partner cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) in epithelial growth and differentiation, transgenic mice were generated carrying the CDK4 gene under the control of a keratin 5 promoter. As expected, transgenic mice showed expression of CDK4 in the epidermal basal-cell layer. Epidermal proliferation increased dramatically and basal cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy were observed. The hyperproliferative phenotype of these transgenic mice was independent of D-type cyclin expression because no overexpression of these proteins was detected. CDK4 and CDK2 kinase activities increased in transgenic animals and were associated with elevated binding of p27Kip1 to CDK4. Expression of CDK4 in the epidermis results in an increased spinous layer compared with normal epidermis, and a mild hyperkeratosis in the cornified layer. In addition to epidermal changes, severe dermal fibrosis was observed and part of the subcutaneous adipose tissue was replaced by connective tissue. Also, abnormal expression of keratin 6 associated with the hyperproliferative phenotype was observed in transgenic epidermis. This model provides in vivo evidence for the role of CDK4 as a mediator of proliferation in epithelial cells independent of D-type cyclin expression. PMID:11438484

  16. Sensitivity of breast cancer cells to erlotinib depends on cyclin-dependent kinase 2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Yamasaki, Fumiyuki; Zhang, Dongwei; Bartholomeusz, Chandra; Sudo, Tamotsu; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Kurisu, Kaoru; Ueno, Naoto T.

    2008-01-01

    Inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinases,such as erlotinib and gefitinib, have not been very effective in the treatment of breast cancer although many breast cancer cells express EGFR. To address this apparent paradox, we examined possible predictors of the sensitivity of 10 breast cancer cell lines to erlotinib in light of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), considered the farthest downstream kinase that controls cell cycling in the EGFR signaling pathway. Expression of EGFR and HER2 were not associated with sensitivity to erlotinib. Expression of phosphorylated (p-)tyrosine, p-Akt, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) 1/ERK2 (p42/p44), and p27 after treatment of erlotinib was not associated with erlotinib sensitivity. However, suppression of CDK2 activity after erlotinib treatment correlated with erlotinib sensitivity (P < 0.0001). Restoration of CDK2 activity partially restored proliferation and induced erlotinib resistance in erlotinib-sensitive cell lines, indicating that sensitivity to erlotinib in these breast cancer cells depends, at least in part, on CDK2 activity. p27, an inhibitor of CDK2, was not translocated into the nucleus in erlotinib-resistant cell lines. Knocking down p27 protein partially blocked erlotinib-induced cell death and cell cycle arrest. These findings indicate that the ability of erlotinib to suppress CDK2 activity is critical for cellular sensitivity to erlotinib, regardless of EGFR expression level, and that the presence of p27 in the cytoplasm also participates in erlotinib resistance. PMID:17671085

  17. A role for cyclin-dependent kinase(s) in the modulation of fast anterograde axonal transport: effects defined by olomoucine and the APC tumor suppressor protein

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratner, N.; Bloom, G. S.; Brady, S. T.

    1998-01-01

    Proteins that interact with both cytoskeletal and membrane components are candidates to modulate membrane trafficking. The tumor suppressor proteins neurofibromin (NF1) and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) both bind to microtubules and interact with membrane-associated proteins. The effects of recombinant NF1 and APC fragments on vesicle motility were evaluated by measuring fast axonal transport along microtubules in axoplasm from squid giant axons. APC4 (amino acids 1034-2844) reduced only anterograde movements, whereas APC2 (aa 1034-2130) or APC3 (aa 2130-2844) reduced both anterograde and retrograde transport. NF1 had no effect on organelle movement in either direction. Because APC contains multiple cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) consensus phosphorylation motifs, the kinase inhibitor olomoucine was examined. At concentrations in which olomoucine is specific for cyclin-dependent kinases (5 microM), it reduced only anterograde transport, whereas anterograde and retrograde movement were both affected at concentrations at which other kinases are inhibited as well (50 microM). Both anterograde and retrograde transport also were inhibited by histone H1 and KSPXK peptides, substrates for proline-directed kinases, including CDKs. Our data suggest that CDK-like axonal kinases modulate fast anterograde transport and that other axonal kinases may be involved in modulating retrograde transport. The specific effect of APC4 on anterograde transport suggests a model in which the binding of APC to microtubules may limit the activity of axonal CDK kinase or kinases in restricted domains, thereby affecting organelle transport.

  18. Molecular cloning and chromosomal mapping of the mouse cyclin-dependent kinase 5 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ohshima, Toshio; Nagle, J.W.; Brady, R.O.; Kozak, C.A.

    1995-08-10

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is predominantly expressed in neurons. In vitro, Cdk5 purified from the nervous tissue phosphorylates both high-molecular-weight neurofilament and microtubule-associated tau. The mouse gene encoding Cdk5 (Cdk5) was found to be 5 kb in length and divided into 12 exons. All of the exon-intron junctions matched the expected consensus sequence with the exception of the splice junction for intron 9, which has AT and AC dinucleotides instead of the usual GT and AG bordering sequence. In the 5{prime}-flanking region of mouse Cdk5, several putative promoter elements were present, including AP1, Sp1, PuF, and TATA motifs. A metal regulatory element was also identified at position -207 to -201. Nucleotide sequence analysis of mouse Cdk5 showed high identity to the homologues of other vertebrate species, indicating that this kinase is highly conserved during evolution. Mouse Cdk5 was mapped to the centromeric region of mouse chromosome 5. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Phosphorylation of drebrin by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 and its role in neuronal migration.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Kazuya; Yamazaki, Hiroyuki; Inaguma, Yutaka; Asada, Akiko; Kimura, Taeko; Takahashi, Junya; Taoka, Masato; Ohshima, Toshio; Furuichi, Teiichi; Isobe, Toshiaki; Nagata, Koh-ichi; Shirao, Tomoaki; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5)-p35 is a proline-directed Ser/Thr kinase which plays a key role in neuronal migration, neurite outgrowth, and spine formation during brain development. Dynamic remodeling of cytoskeletons is required for all of these processes. Cdk5-p35 phosphorylates many cytoskeletal proteins, but it is not fully understood how Cdk5-p35 regulates cytoskeletal reorganization associated with neuronal migration. Since actin filaments are critical for the neuronal movement and process formation, we aimed to find Cdk5 substrates among actin-binding proteins. In this study, we isolated actin gels from mouse brain extracts, which contain many actin-binding proteins, and phosphorylated them by Cdk5-p35 in vitro. Drebrin, a side binding protein of actin filaments and well known for spine formation, was identified as a phosphorylated protein. Drebrin has two isoforms, an embryonic form drebrin E and an adult type long isoform drebrin A. Ser142 was identified as a common phosphorylation site to drebrin E and A and Ser342 as a drebrin A-specific site. Phosphorylated drebrin is localized at the distal area of total drebrin in the growth cone of cultured primary neurons. By expressing nonphosphorylatable or phosphorylation mimicking mutants in developing neurons in utero, the reversible phosphorylation/dephosphorylation reaction of drebrin was shown to be involved in radial migration of cortical neurons. These results suggest that Cdk5-p35 regulates neuronal migration through phosphorylation of drebrin in growth cone processes. PMID:24637538

  20. The history and future of targeting cyclin-dependent kinases in cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Uzma; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K.; Turner, Nicholas C.; Knudsen, Erik S.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer represents a pathological manifestation of uncontrolled cell division; therefore, it has long been anticipated that our understanding of the basic principles of cell cycle control would result in effective cancer therapies. In particular, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) that promote transition through the cell cycle were expected to be key therapeutic targets because many tumorigenic events ultimately drive proliferation by impinging on CDK4 or CDK6 complexes in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Moreover, perturbations in chromosomal stability and aspects of S phase and G2/M control mediated by CDK2 and CDK1 are pivotal tumorigenic events. Translating this knowledge into successful clinical development of CDK inhibitors has historically been challenging, and numerous CDK inhibitors have demonstrated disappointing results in clinical trials. Here, we review the biology of CDKs, the rationale for therapeutically targeting discrete kinase complexes and historical clinical results of CDK inhibitors. We also discuss how CDK inhibitors with high selectivity (particularly for both CDK4 and CDK6), in combination with patient stratification, have resulted in more substantial clinical activity. PMID:25633797

  1. Protein-Protein Interaction for the De Novo Design of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Peptide Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Arumugasamy, Karthiga; Tripathi, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Poonam; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The homology of the inhibitor binding site regions on the surface of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) makes actual CDK inhibitors unable to bind specifically to their molecular targets. Most of them are ATP competitive inhibitors with low specificity that also affect the phosphorylation mechanisms of other nontarget kinases giving rise to harmful side effects. So, the search of specific and potent inhibitors able to bind to the desired CDK target is still a pending issue. Structure based drug design minimized the erroneous binding and increased the affinity of the inhibitor interaction. In the case of CDKs their activation and regulation mechanisms mainly depend on protein-protein interactions (PPIs). The design of drugs targeting these PPIs makes feasible and promising towards the discovery of new and specific CDK inhibitors. Development of peptide inhibitors for a target protein is an emerging approach in computer aided drug designing. This chapter describes in detail methodology for use of the VitAL-Viterbi algorithm for de novo peptide design of CDK2 inhibitors. PMID:26231708

  2. Fragment-Based De Novo Design of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Sunil Kumar; Singh, Poonam; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are core components of the cell cycle machinery that govern the transition between phases during cell cycle progression. Abnormalities in CDKs activity and regulation are common features of cancer, making CDK family members attractive targets for the development of anticancer drugs. One of the main bottlenecks hampering the development of drugs for kinase is the difficulty to attain selectivity. A huge variety of small molecules have been reported as CDK inhibitors, as potential anticancer agents, but none of these has been approved for commercial use. Computer-based molecular design supports drug discovery by suggesting novel new chemotypes and compound modifications for lead candidate optimization. One of the methods known as de novo ligand design technique has emerged as a complementary approach to high-throughput screening. Several automated de novo software programs have been written, which automatically design novel structures to perfectly fit in known binding site. The de novo design supports drug discovery assignments by generating novel pharmaceutically active agents with desired properties in a cost as well as time efficient approach. This chapter describes procedure and an overview of computer-based molecular de novo design methods on a conceptual level with successful examples of CDKs inhibitors. PMID:26231707

  3. Adapalene inhibits the activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    SHI, XI-NAN; LI, HONGJIAN; YAO, HONG; LIU, XU; LI, LING; LEUNG, KWONG-SAK; KUNG, HSIANG-FU; LIN, MARIE CHIA-MI

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) has been reported to be overexpressed in human colorectal cancer; it is responsible for the G1-to-S-phase transition in the cell cycle and its deregulation is a hallmark of cancer. The present study was the first to use idock, a free and open-source protein-ligand docking software developed by our group, to identify potential CDK2 inhibitors from 4,311 US Food and Drug Administration-approved small molecular drugs with a re-purposing strategy. Among the top compounds identified by idock score, nine were selected for further study. Among them, adapalene (ADA; CD271,6-[3-(1-adamantyl)-4-methoxyphenyl]-2-naphtoic acid) exhibited the highest anti-proliferative effects in LoVo and DLD1 human colon cancer cell lines. Consistent with the expected properties of CDK2 inhibitors, the present study demonstrated that ADA significantly increased the G1-phase population and decreased the expression of CDK2, cyclin E and retinoblastoma protein (Rb), as well as the phosphorylation of CDK2 (on Thr-160) and Rb (on Ser-795). Furthermore, the anti-cancer effects of ADA were examined in vivo on xenograft tumors derived from DLD1 human colorectal cancer cells subcutaneously inoculated in BALB/C nude mice. ADA (20 mg/kg orally) exhibited marked anti-tumor activity, comparable to that of oxaliplatin (40 mg/kg), and dose-dependently inhibited tumor growth (P<0.05), while combined administration of ADA and oxaliplatin produced the highest therapeutic effect. To the best of our knowledge, the present study was the first to indicate that ADA inhibits CDK2 and is a potential candidate drug for the treatment of human colorectal cancer. PMID:26398439

  4. microRNA-365-targeted nuclear factor I/B transcriptionally represses cyclin-dependent kinase 6 and 4 to inhibit the progression of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liang; Wang, Yinghui; Ou, Chengshan; Lin, Zhixiang; Wang, Jianyu; Liu, Hongxia; Zhou, Meijuan; Ding, Zhenhua

    2015-08-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases are either post-transcriptionally regulated by interacting with cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors or are transcriptionally regulated by transcription factors, but the latter mechanism has not been extensively investigated. Dysregulated transcription factors resulting from aberrantly expressed microRNAs play critical roles in tumor development and progression. Our previous work identified miR-365 as an oncogenic microRNA that promotes the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma via repression of cyclin-dependent kinase 6, while miR-365 also targets nuclear factor I/B. However, the underlying mechanism(s) of the interaction between nuclear factor I/B and cyclin-dependent kinase 6 are unclear. In this work, we demonstrate that miR-365-regulated nuclear factor I/B transcriptionally inhibits cyclin-dependent kinases 6 and 4 by binding to their promoter regions. In vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrate that the loss of nuclear factor I/B after miR-365 expression or treatment with small interfering RNAs results in the upregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases 6 and 4. This upregulation, in turn, enhances the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein and tumor progression. Characterizing this transcriptional repression of cyclin-dependent kinases 6 and 4 by nuclear factor I/B contributes to the understanding of the transcriptional regulation of cyclin-dependent kinases by transcription factors and also facilitates the development of new therapeutic regimens to improve the clinical treatment of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26072217

  5. Identification of Candidate Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) Substrates in Mitosis by Quantitative Phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Adam; Adamo, Mark E; Cheng, Chao; Kettenbach, Arminja N

    2016-07-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) is an essential regulator of many mitotic processes including the reorganization of the cytoskeleton, chromosome segregation, and formation and separation of daughter cells. Deregulation of Cdk1 activity results in severe defects in these processes. Although the role of Cdk1 in mitosis is well established, only a limited number of Cdk1 substrates have been identified in mammalian cells. To increase our understanding of Cdk1-dependent phosphorylation pathways in mitosis, we conducted a quantitative phosphoproteomics analysis in mitotic HeLa cells using two small molecule inhibitors of Cdk1, Flavopiridol and RO-3306. In these analyses, we identified a total of 24,840 phosphopeptides on 4,273 proteins, of which 1,215 phosphopeptides on 551 proteins were significantly reduced by 2.5-fold or more upon Cdk1 inhibitor addition. Comparison of phosphopeptide quantification upon either inhibitor treatment revealed a high degree of correlation (R(2) value of 0.87) between the different datasets. Motif enrichment analysis of significantly regulated phosphopeptides revealed enrichment of canonical Cdk1 kinase motifs. Interestingly, the majority of proteins identified in this analysis contained two or more Cdk1 inhibitor-sensitive phosphorylation sites, were highly connected with other candidate Cdk1 substrates, were enriched at specific subcellular structures, or were part of protein complexes as identified by the CORUM database. Furthermore, candidate Cdk1 substrates were enriched in G2 and M phase-specific genes. Finally, we validated a subset of candidate Cdk1 substrates by in vitro kinase assays. Our findings provide a valuable resource for the cell signaling and mitosis research communities and greatly increase our knowledge of Cdk1 substrates and Cdk1-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:27134283

  6. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 in the Ventral Tegmental Area Regulates Depression-Related Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Peng; Liu, Xiaojie; Zhang, Zhen; Hu, Ying; Liu, Sarah J.; Lezama-Ruiz, Martha; Joksimovic, Milan

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) govern reward and motivation and dysregulated dopaminergic transmission may account for anhedonia and other symptoms of depression. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase that regulates a broad range of brain functions through phosphorylation of a myriad of substrates, including tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme for dopamine synthesis. We investigated whether and how Cdk5 activity in VTA dopamine neurons regulated depression-related behaviors in mice. Using the Cre/LoxP system to selectively delete Cdk5 in the VTA or in midbrain dopamine neurons in Cdk5loxP/loxP mice, we showed that Cdk5 loss of function in the VTA induced anxiety- and depressive-like behaviors that were associated with decreases in TH phosphorylation at Ser31 and Ser40 in the VTA and dopamine release in its target region, the nucleus accumbens. The decreased phosphorylation of TH at Ser31 was a direct effect of Cdk5 deletion, whereas decreased phosphorylation of TH at Ser40 was likely caused by impaired cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling, because Cdk5 deletion decreased cAMP and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (p-CREB) levels in the VTA. Using Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADD) technology, we showed that selectively increasing cAMP levels in VTA dopamine neurons increased phosphorylation of TH at Ser40 and CREB at Ser133 and reversed behavioral deficits induced by Cdk5 deletion. The results suggest that Cdk5 in the VTA regulates cAMP/PKA signaling, dopaminergic neurotransmission, and depression-related behaviors. PMID:24790206

  7. CK2 regulates in vitro the activity of the yeast cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor Sic1.

    PubMed

    Barberis, Matteo; Pagano, Mario A; Gioia, Luca De; Marin, Oriano; Vanoni, Marco; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Alberghina, Lilia

    2005-11-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (Cki) Sic1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is phosphorylated in vitro by the CK2 kinase on Ser(201) residue. Moreover, we have collected evidence showing that Sic1 is functionally and structurally related to mammalian Cki p27(Kip1) and binds to the mammalian Cdk2/cyclin A complex with a similar mode of inhibition. In this paper, we use SPR analysis to investigate the binding of Sic1 to the catatytic and regulatory subunits of CK2. Evidence is presented showing that phosphorylation of Sic1 at the CK2 consensus site QES(201)EDEED increases the binding of a Sic1-derived peptide to the Cdk2/cyclin A complex, a functional homologue of the yeast Cdk1/Clb5,6. Moreover, Sic1 fully phosphorylated in vitro on Ser(201) by CK2 is shown to be a stronger inhibitor of the Cdk/cyclin complexes than the unphosphorylated protein. Taken together, these data disclose the possibility that CK2 plays a role in the regulation of Sic1 activity. PMID:16168390

  8. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Co-Ordinates Carbohydrate Metabolism and Cell Cycle in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Gang; Chen, Yuping; Carey, Lucas; Futcher, Bruce

    2016-05-19

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) control cell division in eukaryotes by phosphorylating proteins involved in division. But successful proliferation requires co-ordination between division and cellular growth in mass. Previous proteomic studies suggested that metabolic proteins, as well as cell division proteins, could potentially be substrates of cyclin-dependent kinases. Here we focus on two metabolic enzymes of the yeast S. cerevisiae, neutral trehalase (Nth1) and glycogen phosphorylase (Gph1), and show that their activities are likely directly controlled by CDK activity, thus allowing co-ordinate regulation of carbohydrate metabolism with cell division processes. In this case, co-ordinate regulation may optimize the decision to undertake a final cell division as nutrients are being exhausted. Co-regulation of cell division processes and metabolic processes by CDK activity may be a general phenomenon important for co-ordinating the cell cycle with growth. PMID:27203179

  9. Synthesis and evaluation of pyrazolo[1,5-b]pyridazines as selective cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Kirk L.; Reno, Michael J.; Alberti, Jennifer B.; Price, Daniel J.; Kane-Carson, Laurie S.; Knick, Victoria B.; Shewchuk, Lisa M.; Hassell, Anne M.; Veal, James M.; Davis, Stephen T.; Griffin, Robert J.; Peel, Michael R.

    2010-10-01

    A novel series of pyrazolo[1,5-b]pyridazines have been synthesized and identified as cyclin dependant kinase inhibitors potentially useful for the treatment of solid tumors. Modification of the hinge-binding amine or the C(2)- and C(6)-substitutions on the pyrazolopyridazine core provided potent inhibitors of CDK4 and demonstrated enzyme selectivity against VEGFR-2 and GSK3{beta}.

  10. Cell division cycle 6, a mitotic substrate of polo-like kinase 1, regulates chromosomal segregation mediated by cyclin-dependent kinase 1 and separase

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Hyungshin; Erikson, Raymond L.

    2010-01-01

    Defining the links between cell division and DNA replication is essential for understanding normal cell cycle progression and tumorigenesis. In this report we explore the effect of phosphorylation of cell division cycle 6 (Cdc6), a DNA replication initiation factor, by polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) on the regulation of chromosomal segregation. In mitosis, the phosphorylation of Cdc6 was highly increased, in correlation with the level of Plk1, and conversely, Cdc6 is hypophosphorylated in Plk1-depleted cells, although cyclin A- and cyclin B1-dependent kinases are active. Binding between Cdc6 and Plk1 occurs through the polo-box domain of Plk1, and Cdc6 is phosphorylated by Plk1 on T37. Immunohistochemistry studies reveal that Cdc6 and Plk1 colocalize to the central spindle in anaphase. Expression of T37V mutant of Cdc6 (Cdc6-TV) induces binucleated cells and incompletely separated nuclei. Wild-type Cdc6 but not Cdc6-TV binds cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1). Expression of wild-type Plk1 but not kinase-defective mutant promotes the binding of Cdc6 to Cdk1. Cells expressing wild-type Cdc6 display lower Cdk1 activity and higher separase activity than cells expressing Cdc6-TV. These results suggest that Plk1-mediated phosphorylation of Cdc6 promotes the interaction of Cdc6 and Cdk1, leading to the attenuation of Cdk1 activity, release of separase, and subsequent anaphase progression. PMID:21041660

  11. Order propensity of an intrinsically disordered protein, the cyclin-dependent-kinase inhibitor Sic1

    PubMed Central

    Brocca, Stefania; Šamalíková, Mária; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Lotti, Marina; Vanoni, Marco; Alberghina, Lilia; Grandori, Rita

    2009-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) carry out important biological functions and offer an instructive model system for folding and binding studies. However, their structural characterization in the absence of interactors is hindered by their highly dynamic conformation. The cyclin-dependent-kinase inhibitor (Cki) Sic1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a key regulator of the yeast cell cycle, which controls entrance into S phase and coordination between cell growth and proliferation. Its last 70 out of 284 residues display functional and structural homology to the inhibitory domain of mammalian p21 and p27. Sic1 has escaped systematic structural characterization until now. Here, complementary biophysical methods are applied to the study of conformational properties of pure Sic1 in solution. Based on sequence analysis, gel filtration, circular dichroism (CD), electrospray-ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and limited proteolysis, it can be concluded that the whole molecule exists in a highly disordered state and can, therefore, be classified as an IDP. However, the results of these experiments indicate, at the same time, that the protein displays some content in secondary and tertiary structure, having properties similar to those of molten globules or pre-molten globules. Proteolysis-hypersensitive sites cluster at the N-terminus and in the middle of the molecule, while the most structured region resides at the C-terminus, including part of the inhibitory domain and the casein-kinase-2 (CK2) phosphorylation target S201. The mutations S201A and S201E, which are known to affect Sic1 function, do not have significant effects on the conformational properties of the pure protein. PMID:19280601

  12. Small molecule modulators of cyclin-dependent kinases for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Senderowicz, A M

    2000-12-27

    The majority of human malignancies have aberrancies in the Retinoblastoma (Rb) pathway. Loss in Rb function results from the phosphorylation and inactivation of Rb by the cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks), main regulators of cell cycle progression. Thus, modulators of cdks may have a role in the treatment of human malignancies. Flavopiridol, the first cdk modulator tested in clinical trials, demonstrates interesting preclinical features: cell cycle block, induction of apoptosis, promotion of differentiation, inhibition of angiogenic processes and modulation of transcriptional events. Initial clinical trials with infusional flavopiridol demonstrated activity in some patients with lymphomas and renal, colon gastric carcinomas. Main side effects were diarrhea and hypotension. Phase 2 trials with infusional flavopiridol, other schedules and combination with standard chemotherapies are ongoing. The second cdk modulator tested in clinical trials, UCN-01, is a PKC inhibitor that can also modulate cdk activity. Similar to flavopiridol, UCN-01 blocks cell cycle progression and promotes apoptosis. Moreover, UCN-01 may abrogate checkpoints induced by genotoxic stress due to inhibition of chk1 kinase. The first clinical trial of UCN-01 demonstrated very prolonged half-life (approximately 600 h), due to high binding affinity of UCN-01 to the human alpha-1-acid glycoprotein. Main side effects were headaches, vomiting, hypoxemia and hyperglycemia. Clinical activity was observed in some patients with melanoma and lymphoma. Trials of shorter infusions of UCN-01 or in combination with standard chemotherapeutic agents are ongoing. Although several important basic and clinical questions remain unanswered, development of cdk modulators is a reasonable strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:11426645

  13. Regulation of hippocampal and behavioral excitability by cyclin-dependent kinase 5.

    PubMed

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Koovakkattu, Della; Hayashi, Kanehiro; Anderson, Anne E; Powell, Craig M; Sinton, Christopher M; Bibb, James A; Cooper, Donald C

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase that has been implicated in learning, synaptic plasticity, neurotransmission, and numerous neurological disorders. We previously showed that conditional loss of Cdk5 in adult mice enhanced hippocampal learning and plasticity via modulation of calpain-mediated N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) degradation. In the present study, we characterize the enhanced synaptic plasticity and examine the effects of long-term Cdk5 loss on hippocampal excitability in adult mice. Field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSPs) from the Schaffer collateral CA1 subregion of the hippocampus (SC/CA1) reveal that loss of Cdk5 altered theta burst topography and enhanced post-tetanic potentiation. Since Cdk5 governs NMDAR NR2B subunit levels, we investigated the effects of long-term Cdk5 knockout on hippocampal neuronal excitability by measuring NMDAR-mediated fEPSP magnitudes and population-spike thresholds. Long-term loss of Cdk5 led to increased Mg(2+)-sensitive potentials and a lower threshold for epileptiform activity and seizures. Biochemical analyses were performed to better understand the role of Cdk5 in seizures. Induced-seizures in wild-type animals led to elevated amounts of p25, the Cdk5-activating cofactor. Long-term, but not acute, loss of Cdk5 led to decreased p25 levels, suggesting that Cdk5/p25 may be activated as a homeostatic mechanism to attenuate epileptiform activity. These findings indicate that Cdk5 regulates synaptic plasticity, controls neuronal and behavioral stimulus-induced excitability and may be a novel pharmacological target for cognitive and anticonvulsant therapies. PMID:19529798

  14. [Expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 2-associated protein 1 in chicken embryos of different sexes].

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu; Feng, Yan-Ping; Gong, Ping; Huang, Pan; Li, Shi-Jun; Peng, Xiu-Li; Gong, Yan-Zhang

    2009-09-01

    To investigate the expression and functions of cyclin-dependent kinase 2-associated protein 1 (cdk2ap1) screened by suppression subtractive hybridization in chicken embryo development, a pair of primers was designed to amplify the cdk2ap1 fragment by RT-PCR and subsequently the fragment obtained was cloned into the plasmid pGEM-T. Sense and antisense probes labeled with digoxigenin were generated using SP6 and T7 RNA polymerases, respectively, and used to examine cdk2ap1 expression in chicken embryos of both sexes by whole-mount in situ hybridization. In both sexes, cdk2ap1 was expressed in the head mesenchyme, rhombencephalon, optic vesicles, spinal neural tube, and forelimb of 4.0-day-old embryos and the expression in males was significantly higher than that in females. In addition, in the genital ridge and hindlimb of the 4.0-day-old chicken embryo, cdk2ap1 was obviously expressed in the males but not in females. It is supposed that cdk2ap1 may play a role in the sexual differentiation and development of gonad of chicken embryo. PMID:19819846

  15. Cyclin-dependent kinase regulates the length of S phase through TICRR/TRESLIN phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Goins, Duane; Siefert, Joseph C.; Clowdus, Emily A.

    2015-01-01

    S-phase cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) stimulate replication initiation and accelerate progression through the replication timing program, but it is unknown which CDK substrates are responsible for these effects. CDK phosphorylation of the replication factor TICRR (TopBP1-interacting checkpoint and replication regulator)/TRESLIN is required for DNA replication. We show here that phosphorylated TICRR is limiting for S-phase progression. Overexpression of a TICRR mutant with phosphomimetic mutations at two key CDK-phosphorylated residues (TICRRTESE) stimulates DNA synthesis and shortens S phase by increasing replication initiation. This effect requires the TICRR region that is necessary for its interaction with MDM two-binding protein. Expression of TICRRTESE does not grossly alter the spatial organization of replication forks in the nucleus but does increase replication clusters and the number of replication forks within each cluster. In contrast to CDK hyperactivation, the acceleration of S-phase progression by TICRRTESE does not induce DNA damage. These results show that CDK can stimulate initiation and compress the replication timing program by phosphorylating a single protein, suggesting a simple mechanism by which S-phase length is controlled. PMID:25737283

  16. Identification and Characterization of the Cyclin-Dependent Kinases Gene Family in Silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinü; Jiang, Feng; Shi, Xiaofeng; Liu, Xingjian; Yang, Huipeng; Zhang, Zhifang

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs) play key roles at different checkpoint regulations of the eukaryotic cell cycle. However, only few studies of lepidoptera CDK family proteins have been reported so far. In this study, we performed the cDNA sequencing of 10 members of the CDK family in Bombyx mori. Gene structure analysis suggested that CDK12 and CDC2L1 owned two and three isoforms, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CDK genes in different species were highly conserved, implying that they evolved independently even before the split between vertebrates and invertebrates. We found that the expression levels of BmCDKs in 13 tissues of fifth-instar day 3 larvae were different: CDK1, CDK7, and CDK9 had a high level of expression, whereas CDK4 was low-level expressed and was detected only in the testes and fat body cells. Similar expression profiles of BmCDKs during embryo development were obtained. Among the variants of CDK12, CDK12 transcript variant A had the highest expression, and the expression of CDC2L1 transcript variant A was the highest among the variants of CDC2L1. It was shown from the RNAi experiments that the silencing of CDK1, CDK10, CDK12, and CDC2L1 could influence the cells from G0/G1 to S phase transition. PMID:26544066

  17. Flavopiridol: the first cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor in human clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Senderowicz, A M

    1999-01-01

    The discovery and cloning of the cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks), main regulators of cell cycle progression, allowed several investigators to design novel modulators of cdk activity. Flavopiridol (HMR 1275, L86-8275), a flavonoid derived from an indigenous plant from India, demonstrated potent and specific in vitro inhibition of all cdks tested (cdks 1, 2, 4 and 7) with clear block in cell cycle progression at the G1/S and G2/M boundaries. Moreover, preclinical studies demonstrated the capacity of flavopiridol to induce programmed cell death, promote differentiation, inhibit angiogenic processes and modulate transcriptional events. The relationship between the latter effects and cdk inhibition is still unclear. Initial testing in early clinical human trials with infusional flavopiridol showed activity in some patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, renal, prostate, colon and gastric carcinomas. Main side effects were secretory diarrhea and a pro-inflammatory syndrome associated with hypotension. Biologically active plasma concentrations of flavopiridol (approximately 300-500 nM) are easily achievable in patients receiving infusional flavopiridol. Phase 2 trials with infusional flavopiridol in several tumor types, other schedules and combination with standard chemotherapies are being assessed. In conclusion, flavopiridol is the first cdk inhibitor to be tested in clinical trials. Although important questions remain to be answered, this positive experience will stimulate the development of novel cdk modulators for cancer therapy. PMID:10665481

  18. The Indispensable Role of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 1 in Skeletal Development

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Masanori; Mulati, Mieradili; Talib, S. Zakiah A.; Kaldis, Philipp; Takeda, Shu; Okawa, Atsushi; Inose, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal development is tightly regulated through the processes of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. Although the involvement of transcription and growth factors on the regulation of skeletal development has been extensively studied, the role of cell cycle regulatory proteins in this process remains elusive. To date, through cell-specific loss-of-function experiments in vivo, no cell cycle regulatory proteins have yet been conclusively shown to regulate skeletal development. Here, we demonstrate that cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) regulates skeletal development based on chondrocyte-specific loss-of-function experiments performed in a mouse model. Cdk1 is highly expressed in columnar proliferative chondrocytes and is greatly downregulated upon differentiation into hypertrophic chondrocytes. Cdk1 is essential for proper chondrocyte proliferation and deletion of Cdk1 resulted in accelerated differentiation of chondrocytes. In vitro and ex vivo analyses revealed that Cdk1 is an essential cell cycle regulatory protein for parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) signaling pathway, which is critical to chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. These results demonstrate that Cdk1 functions as a molecular switch from proliferation to hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and thus is indispensable for skeletal development. Given the availability of inhibitors of Cdk1 activity, our results could provide insight for the treatment of diseases involving abnormal chondrocyte proliferation, such as osteoarthritis. PMID:26860366

  19. Involvement of aberrant cyclin-dependent kinase 5/p25 activity in experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yousuf, Mohammad A; Tan, Chunfeng; Torres-Altoro, Melissa I; Lu, Fang-Min; Plautz, Erik; Zhang, Shanrong; Takahashi, Masaya; Hernandez, Adan; Kernie, Steven G; Plattner, Florian; Bibb, James A

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with adverse effects on brain functions, including sensation, language, emotions and/or cognition. Therapies for improving outcomes following TBI are limited. A better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of TBI may suggest novel treatment strategies to facilitate recovery and improve treatment outcome. Aberrant activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) has been implicated in neuronal injury and neurodegeneration. Cdk5 is a neuronal protein kinase activated via interaction with its cofactor p35 that regulates numerous neuronal functions, including synaptic remodeling and cognition. However, conversion of p35 to p25 via Ca(2+) -dependent activation of calpain results in an aberrantly active Cdk5/p25 complex that is associated with neuronal damage and cell death. Here, we show that mice subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI), a well-established experimental TBI model, exhibit increased p25 levels and consistently elevated Cdk5-dependent phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein tau and retinoblastoma (Rb) protein in hippocampal lysates. Moreover, CCI-induced neuroinflammation as indicated by increased astrocytic activation and number of reactive microglia. Brain-wide conditional Cdk5 knockout mice (Cdk5 cKO) subjected to CCI exhibited significantly reduced edema, ventricular dilation, and injury area. Finally, neurophysiological recordings revealed that CCI attenuated excitatory post-synaptic potential field responses in the hippocampal CA3-CA1 pathway 24 h after injury. This neurophysiological deficit was attenuated in Cdk5 cKO mice. Thus, TBI induces increased levels of p25 generation and aberrant Cdk5 activity, which contributes to pathophysiological processes underlying TBI progression. Hence, selectively preventing aberrant Cdk5 activity may be an effective acute strategy to improve recovery from TBI. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases astrogliosis and microglial activation

  20. Development of cyclin-dependent kinase modulators as novel therapeutic approaches for hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Senderowicz, A M

    2001-01-01

    The majority of hematopoietic malignancies have aberrancies in the retinoblastoma (Rb) pathway. Loss in Rb function is, in most cases, a result of the phosphorylation and inactivation of Rb by the cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks), main regulators of cell cycle progression. Flavopiridol, the first cdk modulator tested in clinical trials, is a flavonoid that inhibits several cdks with evidence of cell cycle block. Other interesting preclinical features are the induction of apoptosis, promotion of differentiation, inhibition of angiogenic processes and modulation of transcriptional events. Initial clinical trials with infusional flavopiridol demonstrated activity in some patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, renal, prostate, colon and gastric carcinomas. Main side-effects were secretory diarrhea and a pro-inflammatory syndrome associated with hypotension. Phase 2 trials with infusional flavopiridol in CLL and mantle cell lymphoma, other schedules and combination with standard chemotherapies are ongoing. The second cdk modulator tested in clinical trials, UCN-01, is a potent protein kinase C inhibitor that inhibits cdk activity in vitro as well. UCN-01 blocks cell cycle progression and promotes apoptosis in hematopoietic models. Moreover, UCN-01 is able to abrogate checkpoints induced by genotoxic stress due to modulation in chk1 kinase. The first clinical trial of UCN-01 demonstrated very prolonged half-life (approximately 600 h), 100 times longer than the half-life observed in preclinical models. This effect is due to high binding affinity of UCN-01 to the human plasma protein alpha-1-acid glycoprotein. Main side-effects in this trial were headaches, nausea/vomiting, hypoxemia and hyperglycemia. Clinical activity was observed in patients with melanoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and leiomyosarcoma. Of interest, a patient with anaplastic large cell lymphoma refractory to high-dose chemotherapy showed no evidence of disease after 3 years of UCN-01 therapy. Trials of

  1. High Expression of PTGR1 Promotes NSCLC Cell Growth via Positive Regulation of Cyclin-Dependent Protein Kinase Complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weihe; Zhang, Yuefeng; Liu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has been the most common cancer and the main cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide for several decades. PTGR1 (prostaglandin reductase 1), as a bifunctional enzyme, has been involved in the occurrence and progression of cancer. However, its impact on human lung cancer is rarely reported. In this study, we found that PTGR1 was overexpressed in lung cancer based on the analyses of Oncomine. Moreover, lentivirus-mediated shRNA knockdown of PTGR1 reduced cell viability in human lung carcinoma cells 95D and A549 by MTT and colony formation assay. PTGR1 depletion led to G2/M phase cell cycle arrest and increased the proportion of apoptotic cells in 95D cells by flow cytometry. Furthermore, silencing PTGR1 in 95D cells resulted in decreased levels of cyclin-dependent protein kinase complex (CDK1, CDK2, cyclin A2, and cyclin B1) by western blotting and then PTGR1 is positively correlated with cyclin-dependent protein by using the data mining of the Oncomine database. Therefore, our findings suggest that PTGR1 may play a role in lung carcinogenesis through regulating cell proliferation and is a potential new therapeutic strategy for lung cancer. PMID:27429979

  2. Transcriptional regulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (p21) gene by NFI in proliferating human cells

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Stéphane; Vigneault, François; Lessard, Maryse; Leclerc, Steeve; Drouin, Régen; Guérin, Sylvain L.

    2006-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A), also known as p21 (WAF1/CIP1) modulates cell cycle, apoptosis, senescence and differentiation via specific protein–protein interactions with the cyclins, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk), and many others. Expression of the p21 gene is mainly regulated at the transcriptional level. By conducting both ligation-mediated PCR (LMPCR) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) in vivo, we identified a functional target site for the transcription factor, nuclear factor I (NFI), in the basal promoter from the p21 gene. Transfection of recombinant constructs bearing mutations in the p21 NFI site demonstrated that NFI acts as a repressor of p21 gene expression in various types of cultured cells. Inhibition of NFI in human skin fibroblasts through RNAi considerably increased p21 promoter activity suggesting that NFI is a key repressor of p21 transcription. Over-expression of each of the four NFI isoforms in HCT116 cells established that each of them contribute to various extend to the repression of the p21 gene. Most of all, over-expression of NFI-B in doxorubicin, growth-arrested HCT116 increased the proportion of cells in the S-phase of the cell cycle whereas NFI-A and NFI-X reduced it, thereby establishing a role for NFI in the cell cycle dependent expression of p21. PMID:17130157

  3. Silencing cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 inhibits the migration of breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Miao; Wang, Jianguang; Chen, Yanbin; Zhang, Like; Xie, Gangqiang; Liu, Qipeng; Zhang, Ting; Yuan, Pengfei; Liu, Dechun

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 (CDKN3) belongs to the dual-specificity protein phosphatase family, which is hypothesized to regulate cell cycle progression in tumor cells. However, whether CDKN3 is a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer remains to be elucidated. The present in vitro study aimed to investigate the potential roles of CDKN3 in breast cancer. Breast cancer cell lines were used to detect CDKN3 expression, and CDKN3 expression was silenced to investigate its role in cell apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and migration. The underlying mechanisms were screened by detecting proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), Ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA), vimentin, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) expression. CDKN3 was highly expressed in MCF-7 and BT474 cell lines. The silencing of CDKN3 in MCF-7 and BT474 cell lines promoted cell apoptosis, induced G1 phase cell cycle arrest and inhibited cell migration. The expression levels of PCNA, RhoA, vimentin and Bcl-2 were downregulated following CDKN3 silencing. Conversely, Bax expression was increased, as compared with the vehicle control. These results suggest that CDKN3 acts as an oncogene during breast cancer progression. The in vitro silencing of CDKN3 promoted apoptosis, induced G1 phase cell cycle arrest and inhibited cell migration. Possible mechanisms are associated with the regulation of PCNA, Bcl-2, vimentin, RhoA and Bax expression. CDKN3 may therefore be considered a potential target for the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:27314680

  4. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor AT7519 as a potential drug for MYCN-dependent neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Dolman, M. Emmy M.; Poon, Evon; Ebus, Marli E.; den Hartog, Ilona J.M.; van Noesel, Carel J.M.; Jamin, Yann; Hallsworth, Albert; Robinson, Simon P.; Petrie, Kevin; Sparidans, Rolf W.; Kok, Robbert J.; Versteeg, Rogier; Caron, Huib N.; Chesler, Louis; Molenaar, Jan J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose MYCN-dependent neuroblastomas have low cure rates with current multimodal treatment regimens and novel therapeutic drugs are therefore urgently needed. In previous pre-clinical studies we have shown that targeted inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) resulted in specific killing of MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cells. This study describes the in vivo pre-clinical evaluation of the CDK inhibitor AT7519. Experimental Design Pre-clinical drug testing was performed using a panel of MYCN-amplified and MYCN single copy neuroblastoma cell lines and different MYCN-dependent mouse models of neuroblastoma. Results AT7519 killed MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cell lines more potently than MYCN single copy cell lines with a median LC50 value of 1.7 compared to 8.1 μmol/L (P = 0.0053) and a significantly stronger induction of apoptosis. Preclinical studies in female NMRI homozygous (nu/nu) mice with neuroblastoma patient-derived MYCN-amplified AMC711T xenografts revealed dose-dependent growth inhibition, which correlated with intratumoural AT7519 levels. CDK2 target inhibition by AT7519 was confirmed by significant reductions in levels of phosphorylated retinoblastoma (p-Rb) and nucleophosmin (p-NPM). AT7519 treatment of Th-MYCN transgenic mice resulted in improved survival and clinically significant tumour regression (average tumour size reduction of 86% at day 7 after treatment initiation). The improved efficacy of AT7519 observed in Th-MYCN mice correlated with higher tumour exposure to the drug. Conclusions This study strongly suggests that AT7519 is a promising drug for the treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma patients with MYCN amplification. PMID:26202950

  5. Regulation of μ and δ opioid receptor functions: involvement of cyclin-dependent kinase 5

    PubMed Central

    Beaudry, H; Mercier-Blais, A-A; Delaygue, C; Lavoie, C; Parent, J-L; Neugebauer, W; Gendron, L

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Phosphorylation of δ opioid receptors (DOP receptors) by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) was shown to regulate the trafficking of this receptor. Therefore, we aimed to determine the role of CDK5 in regulating DOP receptors in rats treated with morphine or with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). As μ (MOP) and DOP receptors are known to be co-regulated, we also sought to determine if CDK5-mediated regulation of DOP receptors also affects MOP receptor functions. Experimental Approach The role of CDK5 in regulating opioid receptors in CFA- and morphine-treated rats was studied using roscovitine as a CDK inhibitor and a cell-penetrant peptide mimicking the second intracellular loop of DOP receptors (C11-DOPri2). Opioid receptor functions were assessed in vivo in a series of behavioural experiments and correlated by measuring ERK1/2 activity in dorsal root ganglia homogenates. Key Results Chronic roscovitine treatment reduced the antinociceptive and antihyperalgesic effects of deltorphin II (Dlt II) in morphine- and CFA-treated rats respectively. Repeated administrations of C11-DOPri2 also robustly decreased Dlt II-induced analgesia. Interestingly, DAMGO-induced analgesia was significantly increased by roscovitine and C11-DOPri2. Concomitantly, in roscovitine-treated rats the Dlt II-induced ERK1/2 activation was decreased, whereas the DAMGO-induced ERK1/2 activation was increased. An acute roscovitine treatment had no effect on Dlt II- or DAMGO-induced analgesia. Conclusions and Implications Together, our results demonstrate that CDK5 is a key player in the regulation of DOP receptors in morphine- and CFA-treated rats and that the regulation of DOP receptors by CDK5 is sufficient to modulate MOP receptor functions through an indirect process. PMID:25598508

  6. Chemoprevention of mouse intestinal tumorigenesis by the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor SNS-032.

    PubMed

    Boquoi, Amelie; Chen, Tina; Enders, Greg H

    2009-09-01

    Despite advances in screening and treatment, colorectal cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdk) are deregulated in colorectal cancer by silencing of the Cdk inhibitor p16(Ink4a) and other mechanisms. We tested whether the small molecule Cdk inhibitor SNS-032 (formerly BMS-387032), which targets Cdk2, Cdk7, and Cdk9, can prevent intestinal tumorigenesis in mouse models. We generated mice with high intestinal tumor loads by combining the multiple intestinal neoplasia (Min) mutation with Ink4a/Arf mutations and inducing colitis with dextran sulfate sodium. p16-null Min mice (n = 17) began dextran sulfate sodium treatment at week 5 and i.p. injection of carrier or SNS-032 at week 6. Mice were sacrificed at week 12. SNS-032 was well tolerated and reduced colon tumor burden to 36% of that in carrier-treated mice (P < 0.001). We then extended the study to Ink4/Arf-null Min mice (n = 14) and increased the drug dose frequency. SNS-032 treatment reduced the intestinal tumor number to 25% and intestinal tumor burden to 16% of carrier-treated mice (P < 0.0001). DNA synthesis in non-neoplastic and tumor epithelial cells, detected by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, was modestly reduced by acute SNS-032 treatment. The mitotic index, detected by histone H3 phosphorylation, was distinctly decreased (P < 0.03), and apoptosis, detected by caspase 3 activation, was increased (P < 0.005). These results show the chemoprevention of intestinal tumorigenesis by SNS-032. Our findings support further study of Cdk inhibitors for chemoprevention and therapy of colon cancer. PMID:19723896

  7. Differential regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Qiao, Lan; Paul, Pritha; Lee, Sora; Qiao, Jingbo; Wang, Yongsheng; Chung, Dai H.

    2013-05-31

    Highlights: •GRP-R signaling differentially regulated the expression of p21 and p27. •Silencing GRP/GRP-R downregulated p21, while p27 expression was upregulated. •Inhibition of GRP/GRP-R signaling enhanced PTEN expression, correlative to the increased expression of p27. •PTEN and p27 co-localized in cytoplasm and silencing PTEN decreased p27 expression. -- Abstract: Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and its receptor (GRP-R) are highly expressed in undifferentiated neuroblastoma, and they play critical roles in oncogenesis. We previously reported that GRP activates the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway to promote DNA synthesis and cell cycle progression in neuroblastoma cells. Conversely, GRP-R silencing induces cell cycle arrest. Here, we speculated that GRP/GRP-R signaling induces neuroblastoma cell proliferation via regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. Surprisingly, we found that GRP/GRP-R differentially induced expressions of p21 and p27. Silencing GRP/GRP-R decreased p21, but it increased p27 expressions in neuroblastoma cells. Furthermore, we found that the intracellular localization of p21 and p27 in the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments, respectively. In addition, we found that GRP/GRP-R silencing increased the expression and accumulation of PTEN in the cytoplasm of neuroblastoma cells where it co-localized with p27, thus suggesting that p27 promotes the function of PTEN as a tumor suppressor by stabilizing PTEN in the cytoplasm. GRP/GRP-R regulation of CDK inhibitors and tumor suppressor PTEN may be critical for tumoriogenesis of neuroblastoma.

  8. Involvement of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in 2,5-hexanedione-induced neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Shan; Zhang, Cui-Li; Hou, Li-Yan; Zhao, Xiu-Lan; Yang, Xi-Wei; Xie, Ke-Qin

    2008-06-01

    Occupational exposure to n-hexane produces a neuropathy characterized as a central-peripheral distal axonopathy, which is mediated by 2,5-hexanedione (HD). To investigate the mechanisms of the neuropathy induced by HD, the contents and activities of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) and activators (p35 precursor, p35 and p25) in rats' cerebrum cortex (CC), spinal cord (SC) and sciatic nerve (SN) were determined. The results showed that the levels and activities of CDK5 in CC of 200 or 400mg/kg HD-treated rats were significantly decreased in both the cytosolic and membrane fractions and negatively correlated with gait abnormality in the cytosolic fraction. However, CDK5 contents and activities in SN of rats treated with 200 or 400mg/kg HD were significantly increased and positively correlated with gait abnormality in both the cytosolic and membrane fractions. Although increases of CDK5 contents in both the cytosolic and membrane fractions of SC in 200 and 400mg/kg HD-treated rats were also observed, CDK5 activities were significantly decreased in the cytosolic fraction and negatively correlated with gait abnormality. The changes of p35 precursor, p35 and p25 contents in CC, SC and SN showed the same pattern with that of CDK5 activities. Thus, HD intoxication was associated with deregulation of CDK5 and its activator p35 or p25 in nerve tissues. The inconsistent changes of CDK5 activities in CNS and PNS might delegate the different mechanisms of HD-induced peripheral neuropathy. PMID:18423835

  9. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma and promotes tumor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Chunyang; Xie, Haiyang; Zhou, Lin; Zhou, Wuhua; Zhang, Wu; Ding, Songming; Wei, Bajin; Yu, Xiaobo; Su, Rong; Zheng, Shusen

    2012-03-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDKN3 is commonly overexpressed in HCC and is associated with poor clinical outcome. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of CDKN3 could stimulate the proliferation of HCC cells by promoting G1/S transition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDKN3 could inhibit the expression of p21 in HCC cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of CDKN3 has no effect on apoptosis and invasion of HCC cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identified 61 genes co-expressed with CDKN3, and BIRC5 was located at the center of the co-expression network. -- Abstract: Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 (CDKN3) belongs to the protein phosphatases family and has a dual function in cell cycling. The function of this gene has been studied in several kinds of cancers, but its role in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that CDKN3 was frequently overexpressed in both HCC cell lines and clinical samples, and this overexpression was correlated with poor tumor differentiation and advanced tumor stage. Functional studies showed that overexpression of CDKN3 could promote cell proliferation by stimulating G1-S transition but has no impact on cell apoptosis and invasion. Microarray-based co-expression analysis identified a total of 61 genes co-expressed with CDKN3, with most of them involved in cell proliferation, and BIRC5 was located at the center of CDKN3 co-expression network. These results suggest that CDKN3 acts as an oncogene in human hepatocellular carcinoma and antagonism of CDKN3 may be of interest for the treatment of HCC.

  10. Disrupting Cyclin Dependent Kinase 1 in Spermatocytes Causes Late Meiotic Arrest and Infertility in Mice.

    PubMed

    Clement, Tracy M; Inselman, Amy L; Goulding, Eugenia H; Willis, William D; Eddy, Edward M

    2015-12-01

    While cyclin dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) has a critical role in controlling resumption of meiosis in oocytes, its role has not been investigated directly in spermatocytes. Unique aspects of male meiosis led us to hypothesize that its role is different in male meiosis than in female meiosis. We generated a conditional knockout (cKO) of the Cdk1 gene in mouse spermatocytes to test this hypothesis. We found that CDK1-null spermatocytes undergo synapsis, chiasmata formation, and desynapsis as is seen in oocytes. Additionally, CDK1-null spermatocytes relocalize SYCP3 to centromeric foci, express H3pSer10, and initiate chromosome condensation. However, CDK1-null spermatocytes fail to form condensed bivalent chromosomes in prophase of meiosis I and instead are arrested at prometaphase. Thus, CDK1 has an essential role in male meiosis that is consistent with what is known about the role of CDK1 in female meiosis, where it is required for formation of condensed bivalent metaphase chromosomes and progression to the first meiotic division. We found that cKO spermatocytes formed fully condensed bivalent chromosomes in the presence of okadaic acid, suggesting that cKO chromosomes are competent to condense, although they do not do so in vivo. Additionally, arrested cKO spermatocytes exhibited irregular cell shape, irregular large nuclei, and large distinctive nucleoli. These cells persist in the seminiferous epithelium through the next seminiferous epithelial cycle with a lack of stage XII checkpoint-associated cell death. This indicates that CDK1 is required upstream of a checkpoint-associated cell death as well as meiotic metaphase progression in mouse spermatocytes. PMID:26490841

  11. Fluorescent peptide biosensor for monitoring CDK4/cyclin D kinase activity in melanoma cell extracts, mouse xenografts and skin biopsies.

    PubMed

    Prével, Camille; Pellerano, Morgan; González-Vera, Juan A; Henri, Pauline; Meunier, Laurent; Vollaire, Julien; Josserand, Véronique; Morris, May C

    2016-11-15

    Melanoma constitutes the most aggressive form of skin cancer, which further metastasizes into a deadly form of cancer. The p16(INK4a)-Cyclin D-CDK4/6-pRb pathway is dysregulated in 90% of melanomas. CDK4/Cyclin D kinase hyperactivation, associated with mutation of CDK4, amplification of Cyclin D or loss of p16(INK4a) leads to increased risk of developing melanoma. This kinase therefore constitutes a key biomarker in melanoma and an emerging pharmacological target, however there are no tools enabling direct detection or quantification of its activity. Here we report on the design and application of a fluorescent peptide biosensor to quantify CDK4 activity in melanoma cell extracts, skin biopsies and melanoma xenografts. This biosensor provides sensitive means of comparing CDK4 activity between different melanoma cell lines and further responds to CDK4 downregulation by siRNA or small-molecule inhibitors. By affording means of monitoring CDK4 hyperactivity consequent to cancer-associated molecular alterations in upstream signaling pathways that converge upon this kinase, this biosensor offers an alternative to immunological identification of melanoma-specific biomarkers, thereby constituting an attractive tool for diagnostic purposes, providing complementary functional information to histological analysis, of particular utility for detection of melanoma onset in precancerous lesions. This is indeed the first fluorescent peptide biosensor which has been successfully implemented to monitor kinase activity in skin samples and melanoma tumour xenografts. Moreover by enabling to monitor response to CDK4 inhibitors, this biosensor constitutes an attractive companion assay to identify compounds of therapeutic relevance for melanoma. PMID:27203461

  12. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 phosphorylation of familial prion protein mutants exacerbates conversion into amyloid structure.

    PubMed

    Rouget, Raphaël; Sharma, Gyanesh; LeBlanc, Andréa C

    2015-02-27

    Familial prion protein (PrP) mutants undergo conversion from soluble and protease-sensitive to insoluble and partially protease-resistant proteins. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) phosphorylation of wild type PrP (pPrP) at serine 43 induces a conversion of PrP into aggregates and fibrils. Here, we investigated whether familial PrP mutants are predisposed to Cdk5 phosphorylation and whether phosphorylation of familial PrP mutants increases conversion. PrP mutants representing three major familial PrP diseases and different PrP structural domains were studied. We developed a novel in vitro kinase reaction coupled with Thioflavin T binding to amyloid structure assay to monitor phosphorylation-dependent amyloid conversion. Although non-phosphorylated full-length wild type or PrP mutants did not convert into amyloid, Cdk5 phosphorylation rapidly converted these into Thioflavin T-positive structures following first order kinetics. Dephosphorylation partially reversed conversion. Phosphorylation-dependent conversion of PrP from α-helical structures into β-sheet structures was confirmed by circular dichroism. Relative to wild type pPrP, most PrP mutants showed increased rate constants of conversion. In contrast, non-phosphorylated truncated PrP Y145X (where X represents a stop codon) and Q160X mutants converted spontaneously into Thioflavin T-positive fibrils after a lag phase of over 20 h, indicating nucleation-dependent polymerization. Phosphorylation reduced the lag phase by over 50% and thus accelerated the formation of the nucleating event. Consistently, phosphorylated Y145X and phosphorylated Q160X exacerbated conversion in a homologous seeding reaction, whereas WT pPrP could not seed WT PrP. These results demonstrate an influence of both the N terminus and the C terminus of PrP on conversion. We conclude that post-translational modifications of the flexible N terminus of PrP can cause or exacerbate PrP mutant conversion. PMID:25572400

  13. Pharmacological cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors as HIV-1 antiviral therapeutics.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Cynthia; Maddukuri, Anil; Kehn, Kylene; Baylor, Shanese Y; Deng, Longwen; Pumfery, Anne; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2003-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can infect quiescent cells; however, viral production is restricted to actively proliferating cells. Recent evidence has indicated that HIV-1 viral proteins, Vpr and Tat, perturb the cell cycle to optimize HIV-1 replication. Vpr arrests the cell cycle at G2 by inactivating the cyclin B/cdk1 complex. Tat regulates the cell cycle by altering factors involved in proliferation and differentiation (i.e. the cdk inhibitor p21/waf1) and associating with cyclin/cdk complexes (i.e. cyclin E/cdk2, cyclin H/cdk7, and cyclin T/cdk9). These studies indicate the importance of host cellular factors, such as cyclin/cdk complexes, in regulating HIV-1 replication and therefore represent novel targets for antiviral therapeutics. Recently, the efficacy of pharmalogical cdk inhibitors (PCIs) in abrogating viral replication has been under development. To date there are 25-30 PCIs that have been synthesized against known cdks, several of which have been shown to inhibit HIV-1 and other AIDS-associated viruses in vitro and in vivo. Targeting these critical cyclin/cdk complexes needed for viral propagation may solve the problems inherent in current HAART therapy, including the emergence of drug-resistant viruses. Thus, PCIs have the potential to become novel therapeutic antiviral drugs that can inhibit HIV-1 transcription and opens the possibility of new avenues of treatment. PMID:15043199

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of indenopyrazoles as cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. 2. Probing the indeno ring substituent pattern.

    PubMed

    Nugiel, David A; Vidwans, Anup; Etzkorn, Anna-Marie; Rossi, Karen A; Benfield, Pamela A; Burton, Catherine R; Cox, Sarah; Doleniak, Deborah; Seitz, Steven P

    2002-11-21

    We disclose a novel series of indenopyrazole-based cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. Kinetic experiments confirmed our initial molecular modeling studies that the compounds are competitive with respect to adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and bind in the kinase ATP pocket. A unique combination of active pharmacophores led us to a series of semicarbazide-based inhibitors that are highly potent against CDK2 and CDK4 while maintaining selectivity against other relevant serine/threonine kinases. These compounds were active against a transformed human colon cancer cell line (HCT116) while maintaining an acceptable margin of activity against a normal fibroblast cell line. The compounds were found to be highly protein bound in our cell-based assay with the exception of 11k, which maintained a reasonable level of activity in the presence of human plasma proteins. PMID:12431050

  15. Preclinical activity of P276-00, a novel small-molecule cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor in the therapy of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Raje, N; Hideshima, T; Mukherjee, S; Raab, M; Vallet, S; Chhetri, S; Cirstea, D; Pozzi, S; Mitsiades, C; Rooney, M; Kiziltepe, T; Podar, K; Okawa, Y; Ikeda, H; Carrasco, R; Richardson, P G; Chauhan, D; Munshi, N C; Sharma, S; Parikh, H; Chabner, B; Scadden, D; Anderson, K C

    2009-05-01

    Cyclin D dysregulation and overexpression is noted in the majority of multiple myeloma (MM) patients, suggesting its critical role in MM pathogenesis. Here, we sought to identify the effects of targeting cyclin D in MM. We first confirmed cyclin D mRNA overexpression in 42 of 64 (65%) patient plasma cells. Silencing cyclin D1 resulted in >50% apoptotic cell death suggesting its validity as a potential therapeutic target. We next evaluated P276-00, a clinical-grade small-molecule cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor as a way to target the cyclins. P276-00 resulted in dose-dependent cytotoxicity in MM cells. Cell-cycle analysis confirmed either growth arrest or caspase-dependent apoptosis; this was preceded by inhibition of Rb-1 phosphorylation with associated downregulation of a range of cyclins suggesting a regulatory role of P276-00 in cell-cycle progression through broad activity. Proliferative stimuli such as interleukin-6, insulin-like growth factor-1 and bone-marrow stromal cell adherence induced cyclins; P276-00 overcame these growth, survival and drug resistance signals. Because the cyclins are substrates of proteasome degradation, combination studies with bortezomib resulted in synergism. Finally, in vivo efficacy of P276-00 was confirmed in an MM xenograft model. These studies form the basis of an ongoing phase I study in the treatment of relapsed/refractory MM. PMID:19151776

  16. Effect of cyclin-dependent kinase 7 silencing on cisplatin sensitivity in endometrial carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    LIU, WEN-XIN; LIU, XIANG-YU; YU, HU; CHEN, YING; HAO, QUAN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7) silencing on the sensitivity of the HEC-1-A endometrial carcinoma cell line to cisplatin [cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum (II), or DDP]. Four CDK7 siRNA fragments were designed and synthesized based on the gene sequence of CDK7 and transfected into HEC-1-A cells. The RNA interference of the fragments was confirmed by semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and western blot analyses. The CDK7-423 siRNA fragment exhibited the most marked silencing of CDK-7 (>70%), and was chosen for the subsequent experiments in HEC-1-A endometrial carcinoma cells. The sensitivity of the cells to a chemotherapeutic agent (cisplatin) was determined before and after transfection of the siRNA, using a MTT cytotoxicity assay, flow cytometry and Hoechst/propidium iodide (PI) double-staining immunofluorescence microscopy. The results of the MTT cytotoxicity assay showed that the half maximal inhibitory concentration of cisplatin was reduced from 45.12 μg/ml to 3.200 μg/ml following the inhibition of CDK7 expression levels, indicating a significantly increased cytotoxicity in the treated cells (P<0.05). The flow cytometry analysis showed that the mean rate of apoptosis in the CDK7 low-expression group was 37.57%, which was significantly higher than the rate in the parental cells (11.66%) (P<0.05). Hoechst/PI co-immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the number of apoptotic bodies in the CDK7 low-expression HEC-1-A cells was significantly increased as compared with the parental cells. Downregulation of CDK7 expression levels in HEC-1-A endometrial carcinoma cells via the transfection of CDK7 siRNA may significantly enhance cancer cell sensitivity to cisplatin chemotherapy and increasing apoptosis. CDK7 is a novel promising treatment for endometrial carcinoma that requires further in-depth study. PMID:25411854

  17. A novel quantitative model of cell cycle progression based on cyclin-dependent kinases activity and population balances.

    PubMed

    Pisu, Massimo; Concas, Alessandro; Cao, Giacomo

    2015-04-01

    Cell cycle regulates proliferative cell capacity under normal or pathologic conditions, and in general it governs all in vivo/in vitro cell growth and proliferation processes. Mathematical simulation by means of reliable and predictive models represents an important tool to interpret experiment results, to facilitate the definition of the optimal operating conditions for in vitro cultivation, or to predict the effect of a specific drug in normal/pathologic mammalian cells. Along these lines, a novel model of cell cycle progression is proposed in this work. Specifically, it is based on a population balance (PB) approach that allows one to quantitatively describe cell cycle progression through the different phases experienced by each cell of the entire population during its own life. The transition between two consecutive cell cycle phases is simulated by taking advantage of the biochemical kinetic model developed by Gérard and Goldbeter (2009) which involves cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) whose regulation is achieved through a variety of mechanisms that include association with cyclins and protein inhibitors, phosphorylation-dephosphorylation, and cyclin synthesis or degradation. This biochemical model properly describes the entire cell cycle of mammalian cells by maintaining a sufficient level of detail useful to identify check point for transition and to estimate phase duration required by PB. Specific examples are discussed to illustrate the ability of the proposed model to simulate the effect of drugs for in vitro trials of interest in oncology, regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. PMID:25601491

  18. Cyclin-dependent Kinase 5 (Cdk5)-dependent Phosphorylation of p70 Ribosomal S6 Kinase 1 (S6K) Is Required for Dendritic Spine Morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Kwok-On; Liang, Zhuoyi; Fei, Erkang; Huang, Huiqian; Ip, Nancy Y

    2015-06-01

    The maturation and maintenance of dendritic spines depends on neuronal activity and protein synthesis. One potential mechanism involves mammalian target of rapamycin, which promotes protein synthesis through phosphorylation of eIF4E-binding protein and p70 ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (S6K). Upon extracellular stimulation, mammalian target of rapamycin phosphorylates S6K at Thr-389. S6K also undergoes phosphorylation at other sites, including four serine residues in the autoinhibitory domain. Despite extensive biochemical studies, the importance of phosphorylation in the autoinhibitory domain in S6K function remains unresolved, and its role has not been explored in the cellular context. Here we demonstrated that S6K in neuron was phosphorylated at Ser-411 within the autoinhibitory domain by cyclin-dependent kinase 5. Ser-411 phosphorylation was regulated by neuronal activity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Knockdown of S6K in hippocampal neurons by RNAi led to loss of dendritic spines, an effect that mimics neuronal activity blockade by tetrodotoxin. Notably, coexpression of wild type S6K, but not the phospho-deficient S411A mutant, could rescue the spine defects. These findings reveal the importance of cyclin-dependent kinase 5-mediated phosphorylation of S6K at Ser-411 in spine morphogenesis driven by BDNF and neuronal activity. PMID:25903132

  19. Functional and Spatial Regulation of Mitotic Centromere- Associated Kinesin by Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 1▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Sanhaji, Mourad; Friel, Claire Therese; Kreis, Nina-Naomi; Krämer, Andrea; Martin, Claudia; Howard, Jonathon; Strebhardt, Klaus; Yuan, Juping

    2010-01-01

    Mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK) plays an essential role in spindle formation and in correction of improper microtubule-kinetochore attachments. The localization and activity of MCAK at the centromere/kinetochore are controlled by Aurora B kinase. However, MCAK is also abundant in the cytosol and at centrosomes during mitosis, and its regulatory mechanism at these sites is unknown. We show here that cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) phosphorylates T537 in the core domain of MCAK and attenuates its microtubule-destabilizing activity in vitro and in vivo. Phosphorylation of MCAK by Cdk1 promotes the release of MCAK from centrosomes and is required for proper spindle formation. Interfering with the regulation of MCAK by Cdk1 causes dramatic defects in spindle formation and in chromosome positioning. This is the first study demonstrating that Cdk1 regulates the localization and activity of MCAK in mitosis by directly phosphorylating the catalytic core domain of MCAK. PMID:20368358

  20. Cyclin kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 in malignant melanoma: reduced expression in metastatic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Maelandsmo, G. M.; Holm, R.; Fodstad, O.; Kerbel, R. S.; Flørenes, V. A.

    1996-01-01

    Immunohistochemical analysis of the expression of the cyclin kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 in a panel of primary and metastatic human melanocytic tumors was performed. It was found that, independent of the p53 status, approximately 30% of the primary melanomas and 40% of the metastases completely lacked expression of this cell cycle inhibitor. Some tumors were also analyzed by Northern blotting, and in most of the cases a consistant correlation between mRNA and protein expression was observed. In four benign nevi studied, WAF1/CIP1 mRNA was expressed whereas the protein was not detected, suggesting a post-transcriptional regulation of the inhibitor in these cases. In superficial spreading melanomas, a significant correlation between protein expression and tumor thickness was found, with thin lesions showing low protein levels. Interestingly, by comparing primary and metastatic specimens obtained from the same patient, a reduction in p21WAF1/CIP1 antibody staining was observed in the latter, probably reflecting a more aggressive phenotype of the metastases. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the complexity in the relationship between p21WAF1/CIP1 expression and tumor phenotype and furthermore suggest that aberrant expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor may be of importance in the development and progression of sporadic malignant melanoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8952518

  1. Huanglian, A chinese herbal extract, inhibits cell growth by suppressing the expression of cyclin B1 and inhibiting CDC2 kinase activity in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, X K; Motwani, M; Tong, W; Bornmann, W; Schwartz, G K

    2000-12-01

    Huanglian is an herb that is widely used in China for the treatment of gastroenteritis. We elected to determine whether huanglian could inhibit tumor cell growth by modulating molecular events directly associated with the cell cycle. Huanglian inhibited tumor growth and colony formation of gastric, colon, and breast cancer cell lines in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Cell growth was completely inhibited after 3 days of continuous drug exposure to 10 microg/ml of herb. This degree of growth inhibition was significantly greater than that observed with berberine, the major constituent of the herb. The inhibition of cell growth by huanglian was associated with up to 8-fold suppression of cyclin B1 protein. This resulted in complete inhibition of cdc2 kinase activity and accumulation of cells in G(2). The mRNA expression of cyclin B1 was not changed after huanglian treatment. There was no change in the protein expression of cyclins A or E. Therefore, the effect of huanglian on inhibiting tumor growth seems to be mediated by the selective suppression of cyclin B1, which results in the inhibition of cdc2 kinase activity. Inhibition of cyclin dependent kinase (cdk) activity is emerging as an attractive target for cancer chemotherapy. Huanglian represents a class of agents that can inhibit tumor cell growth by directly suppressing the expression of a cyclin subunit that is critical for cell cycle progression. These results indicate that traditional Chinese herbs may represent a new source of agents designed for selective inhibition of cyclin dependent kinases in cancer therapy. PMID:11093765

  2. Multiple Roles of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4/6 Inhibitors in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Patrick J.; Bisi, John E.; Strum, Jay C.; Combest, Austin J.; Darr, David B.; Usary, Jerry E.; Zamboni, William C.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Perou, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) regulate cell proliferation and coordinate the cell cycle checkpoint response to DNA damage. Although inhibitors with varying selectivity to specific CDK family members have been developed, selective CDK4/6 inhibitors have emerged as the most attractive antineoplastic agents because of the importance of CDK4/6 activity in regulating cell proliferation and the toxic effects associated with inhibition of other CDKs (eg, CDK1 and CDK2). Methods FVB/N wild-type mice (n = 13) were used to evaluate carboplatin-induced myelosuppression in bone marrow by complete blood cell counts after treatment with the CDK4/6 inhibitor PD0332991. Genetically engineered murine models of retinoblastoma (Rb)-competent (MMTV-c-neu) and Rb-incompetent (C3-TAg) breast cancer (n = 16 MMTV-c-neu mice in the carboplatin plus vehicle control group, n = 17 MMTV-c-neu mice in the carboplatin plus PD0332991 group, n = 17 C3-TAg mice in the carboplatin plus vehicle control group, and n = 14 C3-TAg mice in the carboplatin plus PD0332991 group) were used to investigate the antitumor activity of PD0332991 alone or in combination with chemotherapy. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Coadministration of PD0332991 with carboplatin compared with carboplatin alone in FVB/N wild-type mice increased hematocrit (51.2% vs 33.5%, difference = 17.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = −26.7% to −8.6%, P < .001), platelet counts (1321 vs 758.5 thousand cells per μL, difference = 562.5 thousand cells per μL, 95% CI = −902.8 to −222.6, P = .002), myeloid cells (granulocytes and monocytes; 3.1 vs 1.6 thousand cells per μL, difference = 1.5 thousand cells per μL, 95% CI = −2.23 to −0.67, P < .001), and lymphocytes (7.9 vs 5.4 thousand cells per μL, difference = 2.5 thousand cells per μL, 95% CI = −4.75 to −0.18, P = .02). Daily administration of PD0332991 exhibited antitumor activity in MMTV-c-neu mice as a single agent. However, the combination of

  3. Dual Suppression of the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors CDKN2C and CDKN1A in Human Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to BRAFV600E inhibitors is associated with reactivation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling at different levels in melanoma. To identify downstream effectors of MAPK signaling that could be used as potential additional therapeutic targets for BRAFV600E inhibitors, we used hTERT/CDK4R24C/p53DD-immortalized primary human melanocytes genetically modified to ectopically express BRAF V600E or NRAS G12D and observed induction of the AP-1 transcription factor family member c-Jun. Using a dominant negative approach, in vitro cell proliferation assays, western blots, and flow cytometry showed that MAPK signaling via BRAFV600E promotes melanoma cell proliferation at G1 through AP-1-mediated negative regulation of the INK4 family member, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2C (CDKN2C), and the CIP/KIP family member, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A). These effects were antagonized by pharmacological inhibition of CDKN2C and CDKN1A targets CDK2 and CDK4 in vitro. In contrast to BRAF V600E or NRAS G12D-expressing melanocytes, melanoma cells have an inherent resistance to suppression of AP-1 activity by BRAFV600E- or MEK-inhibitors. Here, CDK2/4 inhibition statistically significantly augmented the effects of BRAFV600E- or MEK-inhibitors on melanoma cell viability in vitro and growth in athymic nude Foxn1 nu mice (P = .03 when mean tumor volume at day 13 was compared for BRAFV600E inhibitor vs BRAFV600E inhibitor plus CDK2/4 inhibition; P = .02 when mean tumor volume was compared for MEK inhibitor vs MEK inhibitor plus CDK2/4 inhibition; P values were calculated by a two-sided Welch t test; n = 4–8 mice per group). PMID:22997239

  4. Counteractive Control of Polarized Morphogenesis during Mating by Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Fus3 and G1 Cyclin-dependent Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lu; Qi, Maosong; Sheff, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Cell polarization in response to external cues is critical to many eukaryotic cells. During pheromone-induced mating in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) Fus3 induces polarization of the actin cytoskeleton toward a landmark generated by the pheromone receptor. Here, we analyze the role of Fus3 activation and cell cycle arrest in mating morphogenesis. The MAPK scaffold Ste5 is initially recruited to the plasma membrane in random patches that polarize before shmoo emergence. Polarized localization of Ste5 is important for shmooing. In fus3 mutants, Ste5 is recruited to significantly more of the plasma membrane, whereas recruitment of Bni1 formin, Cdc24 guanine exchange factor, and Ste20 p21-activated protein kinase are inhibited. In contrast, polarized recruitment still occurs in a far1 mutant that is also defective in G1 arrest. Remarkably, loss of Cln2 or Cdc28 cyclin-dependent kinase restores polarized localization of Bni1, Ste5, and Ste20 to a fus3 mutant. These and other findings suggest Fus3 induces polarized growth in G1 phase cells by down-regulating Ste5 recruitment and by inhibiting Cln/Cdc28 kinase, which prevents basal recruitment of Ste5, Cdc42-mediated asymmetry, and mating morphogenesis. PMID:18256288

  5. Parkin Enhances the Expression of Cyclin-dependent Kinase 6 and Negatively Regulates the Proliferation of Breast Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Tay, Shiam-Peng; Yeo, Calvin W. S.; Chai, Chou; Chua, Pei-Jou; Tan, Hui-Mei; Ang, Alex X. Y.; Yip, Daniel L. H.; Sung, Jian-Xiong; Tan, Puay Hoon; Bay, Boon-Huat; Wong, Siew-Heng; Tang, Carol; Tan, Jeanne M. M.; Lim, Kah-Leong

    2010-01-01

    Although mutations in the parkin gene are frequently associated with familial Parkinsonism, emerging evidence suggests that parkin also plays a role in cancers as a putative tumor suppressor. Supporting this, we show here that parkin expression is dramatically reduced in several breast cancer-derived cell lines as well as in primary breast cancer tissues. Importantly, we found that ectopic parkin expression in parkin-deficient breast cancer cells mitigates their proliferation rate both in vitro and in vivo, as well as reduces the capacity of these cells to migrate. Cell cycle analysis revealed the arrestment of a significant percentage of parkin-expressing breast cancer cells at the G1-phase. However, we did not observe significant changes in the levels of the G1-associated cyclin D1 and E. On the other hand, the level of cyclin-dependent kinase 6 (CDK6) is dramatically and selectively elevated in parkin-expressing breast cancer cells, the extent of which correlates well with the expression of parkin. Interestingly, a recent study demonstrated that CDK6 restrains the proliferation of breast cancer cells. Taken together, our results support a negative role for parkin in tumorigenesis and provide a potential mechanism by which parkin exerts its suppressing effects on breast cancer cell proliferation. PMID:20630868

  6. Neurobehavioral phenotype in cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 syndrome: Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Posar, Annio; Faggioli, Raffaella; Visconti, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The phenotype of cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) syndrome includes Rett syndrome variant with early onset seizures, early onset epileptic encephalopathy; and severe developmental delay. Autistic features have often been reported in literature, but detailed reports of the behavior of these individuals are lacking. We describe the clinical picture of a girl aged 15 years 9 months affected by CDKL5 syndrome, with special attention to the neurobehavioral phenotype. The evaluation showed, apart from a profound intellectual disability, the presence of atypical features of behavior, mainly in relating to people, in imitation, and in verbal and nonverbal communication, thus justifying the diagnosis of comorbid autism spectrum disorder. A formal assessment of the behavior, through appropriate tools, is necessary to choose the most appropriate rehabilitative intervention and to characterize in more detail the CDKL5 syndrome phenotype. We propose a testing protocol for the neurobehavioral assessment of these patients. PMID:26557170

  7. A western blot assay to measure cyclin dependent kinase activity in cells or in vitro without the use of radioisotopes.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Cody W; Taylor, Ryan G; Kubara, Philip M; Marshall, Kris; Meijer, Laurent; Golsteyn, Roy M

    2013-09-17

    We developed a quantitative method to measure the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) by western blotting, without radioisotopes. We prepared a recombinant protein substrate based upon the natural Cdk1 substrate, PP1Cα. By combining this substrate in a western blot method using fluorochrome based antibodies and phospho-imager analysis, we measured the Km of ATP binding to Cdk1 to be 3.5 μM. We then measured Cdk1 activity in cell extracts from interphase or mitotic cells, and demonstrated that previously identified Cdk inhibitors could be detected by this assay. Our data show that we have a safe, reliable assay to identify Cdk1 inhibitors and measure Cdk1 activity. PMID:23954627

  8. Differential Roles of Two Homologous Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor Genes in Regulating Cell Cycle and Innate Immunity in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Hamdoun, Safae; Zhang, Chong; Gill, Manroop; Kumar, Narender; Churchman, Michelle; Larkin, John C; Kwon, Ashley; Lu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Precise cell-cycle control is critical for plant development and responses to pathogen invasion. Two homologous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes, SIAMESE (SIM) and SIM-RELATED 1 (SMR1), were recently shown to regulate Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) defense based on phenotypes conferred by a sim smr1 double mutant. However, whether these two genes play differential roles in cell-cycle and defense control is unknown. In this report, we show that while acting synergistically to promote endoreplication, SIM and SMR1 play different roles in affecting the ploidy of trichome and leaf cells, respectively. In addition, we found that the smr1-1 mutant, but not sim-1, was more susceptible to a virulent Pseudomonas syringae strain, and this susceptibility could be rescued by activating salicylic acid (SA)-mediated defense. Consistent with these results, smr1-1 partially suppressed the dwarfism, high SA levels, and cell death phenotypes in acd6-1, a mutant used to gauge the change of defense levels. Thus, SMR1 functions partly through SA in defense control. The differential roles of SIM and SMR1 are due to differences in temporal and spatial expression of these two genes in Arabidopsis tissues and in response to P. syringae infection. In addition, flow-cytometry analysis of plants with altered SA signaling revealed that SA is necessary, but not sufficient, to change cell-cycle progression. We further found that a mutant with three CYCD3 genes disrupted also compromised disease resistance to P. syringae. Together, this study reveals differential roles of two homologous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in regulating cell-cycle progression and innate immunity in Arabidopsis and provides insights into the importance of cell-cycle control during host-pathogen interactions. PMID:26561564

  9. Cyclin-dependent kinase 4 phosphorylates and positively regulates PAX3-FOXO1 in human alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lingling; Wu, Jing; Ong, Su Sien; Chen, Taosheng

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) is an aggressive childhood muscle sarcoma with a 5-year survival rate of less than 30%. More than 80% of ARMSs harbor a PAX3-FOXO1 fusion transcription factor. However, expression of PAX3-FOXO1 in muscle cells alone is not sufficient and requires the loss of function of Ink4a/ARF to promote malignant proliferation of muscle cells in vitro or initiate ARMS tumor formation in vivo. This prompted us to examine the signaling pathways required to activate the function of PAX3-FOXO1 and to explore the functional interaction between the Ink4a/ARF and PAX3-FOXO1 signaling pathways. Here we report that inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4) by fascaplysin (a small molecule selective inhibitor of Cdk4/cyclin D1 that we identified in a screen for compounds that inhibit PAX3-FOXO1) led to inhibition of the transcriptional activity of PAX3-FOXO1 in ARMS cell line Rh30. Consistent with this finding, activation of Cdk4 enhanced the activity of PAX3-FOXO1. In vitro kinase assays revealed that Cdk4 directly phosphorylated PAX3-FOXO1 at Ser(430). Whereas fascaplysin did not affect the protein level of PAX3-FOXO1, it did increase the cytoplasmic level of PAX3-FOXO1 in a portion of cells. Our findings indicate that Cdk4 phosphorylates and positively regulates PAX3-FOXO1 and suggest that inhibition of Cdk4 activity should be explored as a promising avenue for developing therapy for ARMS. PMID:23469153

  10. Identification and Structural-Functional Analysis of Cyclin-Dependent Kinases of the Cattle Tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Helga; Romeiro, Nelilma C.; Braz, Gloria R. C.; de Oliveira, Eduardo Alves Gamosa; Rodrigues, Camilla; da Fonseca, Rodrigo Nunes; Githaka, Naftaly; Isezaki, Masayoshi; Konnai, Satoru; Ohashi, Kazuhiko; da Silva Vaz, Itabajara; Logullo, Carlos; Moraes, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are a family of serine/threonine kinases essential for cell cycle progression. Herein, we describe the participation of CDKs in the physiology of Rhipicephalus microplus, the southern cattle tick and an important disease vector. Firstly, amino acid sequences homologous with CDKs of other organisms were identified from a R. microplus transcriptome database in silico. The analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of CDK1 and CDK10 from R. microplus showed that both have caspase-3/7 cleavage motifs despite their differences in motif position and length of encoded proteins. CDK1 has two motifs (DKRGD and SAKDA) located opposite to the ATP binding site while CDK10 has only one motif (SLLDN) for caspase 3–7 near the ATP binding site. Roscovitine (Rosco), a purine derivative that inhibits CDK/cyclin complexes by binding to the catalytic domain of the CDK molecule at the ATP binding site, which prevents the transfer of ATP's γphosphoryl group to the substrate. To determine the effect of Rosco on tick CDKs, BME26 cells derived from R. microplus embryo cells were utilized in vitro inhibition assays. Cell viability decreased in the Rosco-treated groups after 24 hours of incubation in a concentration-dependent manner and this was observed up to 48 hours following incubation. To our knowledge, this is the first report on characterization of a cell cycle protein in arachnids, and the sensitivity of BME26 tick cell line to Rosco treatment suggests that CDKs are potential targets for novel drug design to control tick infestation. PMID:24146826

  11. Novel role for cyclin-dependent kinase 2 in neuregulin-induced acetylcholine receptor epsilon subunit expression in differentiated myotubes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gang; Seta, Karen A; Millhorn, David E

    2005-06-10

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are a family of evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinases. CDK2 acts as a checkpoint for the G(1)/S transition in the cell cycle. Despite a down-regulation of CDK2 activity in postmitotic cells, many cell types, including muscle cells, maintain abundant levels of CDK2 protein. This led us to hypothesize that CDK2 may have a function in postmitotic cells. We show here for the first time that CDK2 can be activated by neuregulin (NRG) in differentiated C2C12 myotubes. In addition, this activity is required for expression of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) epsilon subunit. The switch from the fetal AChRgamma subunit to the adult-type AChRepsilon is required for synapse maturation and the neuromuscular junction. Inhibition of CDK2 activity with either the specific CDK2 inhibitory peptide Tat-LFG or by RNA interference abolished neuregulin-induced AChRepsilon expression. Neuregulin-induced activation of CDK2 also depended on the ErbB receptor, MAPK, and PI3K, all of which have previously been shown to be required for AChRepsilon expression. Neuregulin regulated CDK2 activity through coordinating phosphorylation of CDK2 on Thr-160, accumulation of CDK2 in the nucleus, and down-regulation of the CDK2 inhibitory protein p27 in the nucleus. In addition, we also observed a novel mechanism of regulation of CDK2 activity by a low molecular weight variant of cyclin E in response to NRG. These findings establish CDK2 as an intermediate molecule that integrates NRG-activated signals from both the MAPK and PI3K pathways to AChRepsilon expression and reveal an undiscovered physiological role for CDK2 in postmitotic cells. PMID:15824106

  12. The effect of desolvation on the binding of inhibitors to HIV-1 protease and cyclin-dependent kinases: Causes of resistance.

    PubMed

    Fong, Clifford W

    2016-08-01

    Studies of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and HIV-1 protease inhibitors have confirmed that ligand-protein binding is dependent on desolvation effects. It has been found that a four parameter linear model incorporating desolvation energy, lipophilicity, dipole moment and molecular volume of the ligands is a good model to describe the binding between ligands and kinases or proteases. The resistance shown by MDR proteases to the anti-viral drugs is multi-faceted involving varying changes in desolvation, lipophilicity and dipole moment interaction compared to the non-resistant protease. Desolvation has been shown to be the dominant factor influencing the effect of inhibitors against the cyclin-dependent kinases, but lipophilicity and dipole moment are also significant factors. The model can differentiate between the inhibitory activity of CDK2/cycE, CDK1/cycB and CDK4/cycD enzymes. PMID:27317642

  13. Involvement of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 1 during Postovulatory Aging-Mediated Abortive Spontaneous Egg Activation in Rat Eggs Cultured In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Shilpa; Koch, Biplob; Chaube, Shail K

    2016-04-01

    Freshly ovulated rat eggs do not remain arrested at metaphase II (MII) and undergo exit from MII arrest with initiation of extrusion of the second polar body (PBII), a characteristic feature of abortive spontaneous egg activation (SEA). The biochemical and molecular changes during postovulatory aging-mediated abortive SEA remain poorly understood. We investigated the morphological, cellular, and molecular changes during postovulatory aging-mediated abortive SEA in eggs cultured in vitro. Our results suggest that postovulatory egg aging in vitro induced initiation of PBII extrusion in a time-dependent manner. Postovulatory aging increased Wee1 kinase and Thr-14/Tyr-15 phosphorylated cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) levels, whereas Thr-161 phosphorylated Cdk1 and cyclin B1 levels were significantly decreased in eggs cultured in vitro. The early mitotic inhibitor 2 (Emi2) level was significantly reduced, but anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) and mitotic arrest deficient protein (MAD2) levels were increased initially and then reduced during a later period of in vitro culture. These results suggest that an increased Wee1 kinase level modulated the specific phosphorylation status of Cdk1, increased Cdk1 activity, and decreased the cyclin B1 level. Furthermore, the decreased Emi2 level was associated with an increased level of APC/C and decreased level of cyclin B1, which resulted in maturation promoting factor (MPF) destabilization and finally led to postovulatory aging-mediated abortive SEA in rat eggs cultured in vitro. PMID:26982431

  14. Cyclin-dependent kinase-like function is shared by the beta- and gamma- subset of the conserved herpesvirus protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Kuny, Chad V; Chinchilla, Karen; Culbertson, Michael R; Kalejta, Robert F

    2010-01-01

    The UL97 protein of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV, or HHV-5 (human herpesvirus 5)), is a kinase that phosphorylates the cellular retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor and lamin A/C proteins that are also substrates of cellular cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). A functional complementation assay has further shown that UL97 has authentic Cdk-like activity. The other seven human herpesviruses each encode a kinase with sequence and positional homology to UL97. These UL97-homologous proteins have been termed the conserved herpesvirus protein kinases (CHPKs) to distinguish them from other human herpesvirus-encoded kinases. To determine if the Cdk-like activities of UL97 were shared by all of the CHPKs, we individually expressed epitope-tagged alleles of each protein in human Saos-2 cells to test for Rb phosphorylation, human U-2 OS cells to monitor nuclear lamina disruption and lamin A phosphorylation, or S. cerevisiae cdc28-13 mutant cells to directly assay for Cdk function. We found that the ability to phosphorylate Rb and lamin A, and to disrupt the nuclear lamina, was shared by all CHPKs from the beta- and gamma-herpesvirus families, but not by their alpha-herpesvirus homologs. Similarly, all but one of the beta and gamma CHPKs displayed bona fide Cdk activity in S. cerevisiae, while the alpha proteins did not. Thus, we have identified novel virally-encoded Cdk-like kinases, a nomenclature we abbreviate as v-Cdks. Interestingly, we found that other, non-Cdk-related activities reported for UL97 (dispersion of promyelocytic leukemia protein nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) and disruption of cytoplasmic or nuclear aggresomes) showed weak conservation among the CHPKs that, in general, did not segregate to specific viral families. Therefore, the genomic and evolutionary conservation of these kinases has not been fully maintained at the functional level. Our data indicate that these related kinases, some of which are targets of approved or developmental antiviral drugs, are likely to

  15. Phosphorylation of TRPV1 by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 promotes TRPV1 surface localization, leading to inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiao; Du, Junxie; Yang, Yanrui; Wang, Yun

    2015-11-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is an important serine/threonine kinase that plays critical roles in many physiological processes. Recently, Cdk5 has been reported to phosphorylate TRPV1 at threonine 407 (Thr-407) in humans (Thr-406 in rats), which enhances the function of TRPV1 channel and promotes thermal hyperalgesia in the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammatory pain rats. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Cdk5 phosphorylates TRPV1 at Threonine 406 and promotes the surface localization of TRPV1, leading to inflammatory thermal hyperalgesia. The mutation of Thr-406 of TRPV1 to alanine reduced the interaction of TRPV1 with the cytoskeletal elements and decreased the binding of TRPV1 with the motor protein KIF13B, which led to reduced surface distribution of TRPV1. Disrupting the phosphorylation of TRPV1 at Thr-406 dramatically reduced the surface level of TRPV1 in HEK 293 cells after transient expression and the channel function in cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Notably, intrathecal administration of the interfering peptide against the phosphorylation of Thr-406 alleviated heat hyperalgesia and reduced the surface level of TRPV1 in inflammatory pain rats. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 at Thr-406 increases the surface level and the function of TRPV1, while the TAT-T406 peptide can effectively attenuate thermal hyperalgesia. Our studies provide a potential therapy for inflammatory pain. PMID:26376215

  16. Characterization of the cyclin-dependent kinase 6 gene in Apis cerana cerana in response to multiple environmental stresses.

    PubMed

    Luo, Lu; Kangb, Mingjiang; Liu, Kai; Guo, Xingqi; Xu, Baohua

    2012-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are serine/threonine kinases that play critical roles in the cell cycle regulation. Herein, we describe the identification of a CDK gene from Apis cerana cerana, named AccCDK6. The full-length cDNA is 1778 bp long, including an ORF of 1380 bp that encodes a polypeptide of 459 amino acid residues. Multiple sequence alignment analysis showed that the predicted AccCDK6 sequence shares a high similarity with CDK6 genes of other species, and this protein may share an evolutionary predecessor with Drosophila CDK4. The expression patterns of the gene were also analysed, and the transcript was detected throughout the larval, pupal, and adult developmental stages. Furthermore, the expression level of the mRNA of the gene in adult workers was influenced by H2O2, ultraviolet (UV) light, temperature (42 degrees C), HgCl2, and pyriproxyfen. These results indicate that AccCDK6 responds to multiple environmental stresses and may also participate in intracellular reactions of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and development processes in honey-bees. PMID:22888541

  17. Inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase CDK1 by oxindolimine ligands and corresponding copper and zinc complexes.

    PubMed

    Miguel, Rodrigo Bernardi; Petersen, Philippe Alexandre Divina; Gonzales-Zubiate, Fernando A; Oliveira, Carla Columbano; Kumar, Naresh; do Nascimento, Rafael Rodrigues; Petrilli, Helena Maria; da Costa Ferreira, Ana Maria

    2015-10-01

    Oxindolimine-copper(II) and zinc(II) complexes that previously have shown to induce apoptosis, with DNA and mitochondria as main targets, exhibit here significant inhibition of kinase CDK1/cyclin B protein. Copper species are more active than the corresponding zinc, and the free ligand shows to be less active, indicating a major influence of coordination in the process, and a further modulation by the coordinated ligand. Molecular docking and classical molecular dynamics provide a better understanding of the effectiveness and kinase inhibition mechanism by these compounds, showing that the metal complex provides a stronger interaction than the free ligand with the ATP-binding site. The metal ion introduces charge in the oxindole species, giving it a more rigid conformation that then becomes more effective in its interactions with the protein active site. Analogous experiments resulted in no significant effect regarding phosphatase inhibition. These results can explain the cytotoxicity of these metal complexes towards different tumor cells, in addition to its capability of binding to DNA, and decreasing membrane potential of mitochondria. PMID:26411703

  18. Expression of a TGF-{beta} regulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor in normal and immortalized airway epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, L.A.; Bloomfield, C.; Johnson, N.F.

    1995-12-01

    Tumors arising from epithelial cells, including lung cancers are frequently resistant to factors that regulate growth and differentiation in normal in normal cells. Once such factor is transforming growth factor-{Beta} (TGF-{Beta}). Escape from the growth-inhibitory effects of TGF-{Beta} is thought to be a key step in the transformation of airway epithelial cells. most lung cancer cell lines require serum for growth. In contrast, normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells are exquisitely sensitive to growth-inhibitory and differentiating effects of TGF-{Beta}. The recent identification of a novel cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p15{sup INK4B}, which is regulated by TGF-{Beta}, suggests a mechanism by which TGF-{Beta} mediates growth arrest in NHBE cells. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1) to determine if p15{sup INK4B} is induced by TGF-{Beta} in NHBE cells or immortalized bronchial epithelial (R.1) cells and if that induction corresponds to a G1/S cell-cycle arrest; (2) to determine the temporal relationship between p15{sup INK4B} induction, cell-cycle arrest, and the phosphorylation state of the pRB because it is thought that p15{sup INK4B} acts indirectly by preventing phosphorylation of the RB gene product. In this study, expression of p15{sup INK4B} was examined in NHBE cells and R.1 cells at different time intervals following TGF-{Beta} treatment. The expression of this kinase inhibitor and its relationship to the cell and the pRb phosphorylation state were examined in cells that were both sensitive (NHBE) and resistant (R.1) to the effects of TGF-{Beta}. These results suggest that the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p15{sup INK4B}, is involved in airway epithelial cell differentiation and that loss or reduction of expression plays a role in the resistance of transformed or neoplastic cells to the growth-inhibitory effects of TGF-{Beta}.

  19. Increased Proliferation but Decreased Steroidogenic Capacity in Leydig Cells from Mice Lacking Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor 1B1

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Han; Hu, Guo-Xin; Dong, Lei; Dong, Qiang; Mukai, Motoko; Chen, Bing-Bing; Holsberger, Denise R.; Sottas, Chantal M.; Cooke, Paul S.; Lian, Qing-Quan; Li, Xiao-Kun; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2009-01-01

    Proliferating cells express cyclins, cell cycle regulatory proteins that regulate the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). The actions of CDKs are regulated by specific inhibitors, the CDK inhibitors (CDKIs), which are comprised of the Cip/Kip and INK4 families. Expression of the Cip/Kip CDKI 1B (Cdkn1b, encoding protein CDKN1B, also called p27kip1) in developing Leydig cells (LCs) has been reported, but the function of CDKN1B in LCs is unclear. The goal of the present study was to determine the effects of CDKN1B on LC proliferation and steroidogenesis by examining these parameters in Cdkn1b knockout (Cdkn1b−/−) mice. LC proliferation was measured by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Testicular testosterone levels, mRNA levels, and enzyme activities of steroidogenic enzymes were compared in Cdkn1b−/− and Cdkn1b+/+ mice. The labeling index of LCs in Cdkn1b−/− mice was 1.5% ± 0.2%, almost 7-fold higher than 0.2% ± 0.08% (P < 0.001) in the Cdkn1b+/+ control mice. LC number per testis in Cdkn1b−/− mice was 2-fold that seen in the Cdkn1b+/+ control mice. However, testicular testosterone levels, mRNA levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (Star), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (Cyp11a1), and 3beta-hydroxtsteroid dehydrogenase 6 (Hsd3b6), and their respective proteins, were significantly lower in Cdkn1b−/− mice. We conclude that deficiency of CDKN1B increased LC proliferation, but decreased steroidogenesis. Thus, CDKN1B is an important regulator of LC development and function. PMID:19211806

  20. Biological characterization of AT7519, a small-molecule inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases, in human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Squires, Matthew S; Feltell, Ruth E; Wallis, Nicola G; Lewis, E Jonathan; Smith, Donna-Michelle; Cross, David M; Lyons, John F; Thompson, Neil T

    2009-02-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK), and their regulatory cyclin partners, play a central role in eukaryotic cell growth, division, and death. This key role in cell cycle progression, as well as their deregulation in several human cancers, makes them attractive therapeutic targets in oncology. A series of CDK inhibitors was developed using Astex's fragment-based medicinal chemistry approach, linked to high-throughput X-ray crystallography. A compound from this series, designated AT7519, is currently in early-phase clinical development. We describe here the biological characterization of AT7519, a potent inhibitor of several CDK family members. AT7519 showed potent antiproliferative activity (40-940 nmol/L) in a panel of human tumor cell lines, and the mechanism of action was shown here to be consistent with the inhibition of CDK1 and CDK2 in solid tumor cell lines. AT7519 caused cell cycle arrest followed by apoptosis in human tumor cells and inhibited tumor growth in human tumor xenograft models. Tumor regression was observed following twice daily dosing of AT7519 in the HCT116 and HT29 colon cancer xenograft models. We show that these biological effects are linked to inhibition of CDKs in vivo and that AT7519 induces tumor cell apoptosis in these xenograft models. AT7519 has an attractive biological profile for development as a clinical candidate, and the tolerability and efficacy in animal models compare favorably with other CDK inhibitors in clinical development. Studies described here formed the biological rationale for investigating the potential therapeutic benefit of AT7519 in cancer patients. PMID:19174555

  1. Anticarcinogenic effect of a flavonoid antioxidant, silymarin, in human breast cancer cells MDA-MB 468: induction of G1 arrest through an increase in Cip1/p21 concomitant with a decrease in kinase activity of cyclin-dependent kinases and associated cyclins.

    PubMed

    Zi, X; Feyes, D K; Agarwal, R

    1998-04-01

    There is an increasing interest in identifying potent cancer preventive and therapeutic agents against breast cancer. Silymarin, a flavonoid antioxidant isolated from milk thistle, exerts exceptionally high to complete anticarcinogenic effects in tumorigenesis models of epithelial origin. In this study, we investigated the anticarcinogenic effect of silymarin and associated molecular mechanisms, using human breast carcinoma cells MDA-MB 468. Silymarin treatment resulted in a significantly high to complete inhibition of both anchorage-dependent and anchorage-independent cell growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The inhibitory effects of silymarin on cell growth and proliferation were associated with a G1 arrest in cell cycle progression concomitant with an induction of up to 19-fold in the protein expression of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor Cip1/p21. Following silymarin treatment of cells, an incremental binding of Cip1/p21 with CDK2 and CDK6 paralleled a significant decrease in CDK2-, CDK6-, cyclin D1-, and cyclin E-associated kinase activity with no change in CDK2 and CDK6 expression but a decrease in G1 cyclins D1 and E. Taken together, these results suggest that silymarin may exert a strong anticarcinogenic effect against breast cancer and that this effect possibly involves an induction of Cip1/p21 by silymarin, which inhibits the threshold kinase activities of CDKs and associated cyclins, leading to a G1 arrest in cell cycle progression. PMID:9563902

  2. Gossypin as a novel selective dual inhibitor of V-RAF murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 for melanoma.

    PubMed

    Bhaskaran, Shylesh; Dileep, Kalarikkal V; Deepa, Sathyaseelan S; Sadasivan, Chittalakkottu; Klausner, Mitch; Krishnegowda, Naveen K; Tekmal, Rajeshwar R; VandeBerg, John L; Nair, Hareesh B

    2013-04-01

    Mutation in the BRAF gene (BRAFV600E) exists in nearly 70% of human melanomas. Targeted therapy against BRAFV600E kinase using a recently identified RAF-selective inhibitor, PLX4032, has been successful in early clinical trials. However, in patients with the normal BRAF allele (wild-type), PLX4032 is protumorigenic. This conundrum identifies the unmet need for novel therapeutic agents to target BRAFV600E kinase that are not counterproductive. We have identified gossypin, a pentahydroxy flavone, as a potent antimelanoma agent. Gossypin inhibited human melanoma cell proliferation, in vitro, in melanoma cell lines that harbor both BRAFV600E kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) as well as in cells with BRAF wild-type allele. Gossypin inhibited kinase activities of BRAFV600E and CDK4, in vitro, possibly through direct binding of gossypin with these kinases, as confirmed by molecular docking studies. For cells harboring the BRAFV600E, gossypin inhibited cell proliferation through abrogation of the MEK-ERK-cyclin D1 pathway and in cells with BRAF wild-type allele, through attenuation of the retinoblastoma-cyclin D1 pathway. Furthermore, gossypin significantly inhibited melanoma growth in an organotypic three-dimensional skin culture mimicking human skin. Gossypin (10 and 100 mg/kg) treatment for 10 days in human melanoma (A375) cell xenograft tumors harboring BRAFV600E significantly reduced tumor volume through induction of apoptosis and increased survival rate in mice, and the effect was significantly superior to that of PLX4032 (10 mg/kg) or roscovitine 10 mg/kg. In summary, this study identified gossypin as a novel agent with dual inhibitory effects for BRAFV600E kinase and CDK4 for treatment of melanoma. PMID:23543365

  3. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor dinaciclib potently synergizes with cisplatin in preclinical models of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiu-Jie; Lin, Feng; Pan, Shi-Shi; Gong, Li-Hua; Qiu, Jian-Ge; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Jiang, Qi-Wei; Mei, Xiao-Long; Xue, You-Qiu; Qin, Wu-Ming; Shi, Zhi; Yan, Xiao-Jian

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the most lethal of woman cancers, and its clinical therapeutic outcome currently is unsatisfied. Dinaciclib, a novel small molecule inhibitor of CDK1, CDK2, CDK5 and CDK9, is assessed in clinical trials for the treatment of several types of cancers. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effects and mechanisms of dinaciclib alone or combined with cisplatin in ovarian cancer. Dinaciclib alone actively induced cell growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis with the increased intracellular ROS levels, which were accompanied by obvious alterations of related proteins such as CDKs, Cyclins, Mcl-1, XIAP and survivin. Pretreatment with N-acety-L-cysteine significantly blocked ROS generation but only partially rescued apoptosis triggered by dinaciclib. Moreover, the combination of dinaciclib with cisplatin synergistically promoted cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, and inhibited the subcutaneous xenograft growth of ovarian cancer in nude mice. Altogether, dinaciclib potently synergizes with cisplatin in preclinical models of ovarian cancer, indicating this beneficial combinational therapy may be a promising strategy for treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:25962959

  4. Impact of meriolins, a new class of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, on malignant glioma proliferation and neo-angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jarry, Marie; Lecointre, Céline; Malleval, Céline; Desrues, Laurence; Schouft, Marie-Thérèse; Lejoncour, Vadim; Liger, François; Lyvinec, Gildas; Joseph, Benoît; Loaëc, Nadège; Meijer, Laurent; Honnorat, Jérôme; Gandolfo, Pierrick; Castel, Hélène

    2014-01-01

    Background Glioblastomas are the most frequent and most aggressive primary brain tumors in adults. The median overall survival is limited to a few months despite surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy. It is now clearly established that hyperactivity of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) is one of the processes underlying hyperproliferation and tumoral growth. The marine natural products meridianins and variolins, characterized as CDK inhibitors, display a kinase-inhibitory activity associated with cytotoxic effects. In order to improve selectivity and efficiency of these CDK inhibitors, a series of hybrid compounds called meriolins have been synthesized. Methods The potential antitumoral activity of meriolins was investigated in vitro on glioma cell lines (SW1088 and U87), native neural cells, and a human endothelial cell line (HUV-EC-C). The impact of intraperitoneal or intratumoral administrations of meriolin 15 was evaluated in vivo on 2 different nude mice-xenografted glioma models. Results Meriolins 3, 5, and 15 exhibited antiproliferative properties with nanomolar IC50 and induced cell-cycle arrest and CDK inhibition associated with apoptotic events in human glioma cell lines. These meriolins blocked the proliferation rate of HUV-EC-C through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In vivo, meriolin 15 provoked a robust reduction in tumor volume in spite of toxicity for highest doses, associated with inhibition of cell division, activation of caspase 3, reduction of CD133 cells, and modifications of the vascular architecture. Conclusion Meriolins, and meriolin 15 in particular, exhibit antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities on both glioma and intratumoral endothelial cells, constituting key promising therapeutic lead compounds for the treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:24891448

  5. Expression analyses of splice variants of zebrafish cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 and its substrate, amphiphysin 1.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Syouichi; Senga, Yukako; Oi, Ami; Miki, Yosuke; Sugiyama, Yasunori; Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Kameshita, Isamu

    2016-05-25

    Mammalian cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5) is a Ser/Thr protein kinase mainly expressed in the central nervous system and believed to be involved in neuronal functions. However, the functions of CDKL5 in fishes have not been investigated. Therefore, in this study, we cloned and characterized zebrafish CDKL5 (zCDKL5) and its substrate, amphiphysin 1 (zAmph1). Two alternative splice variants of zCDKL5, zCDKL5-Long (zCDKL5-L) and zCDKL5-Short (zCDKL5-S), and three splice variants of zAmph1, zAmph1a, zAmph1b and zAmph1c, were cloned from a zebrafish cDNA library. Using zAmph1a point mutants, we identified Ser-285 and Ser-293 as phosphorylation sites of zAmph1a by CDKL5. Transiently expressed zCDKL5-L and zCDKL5-S colocalized with zAmph1a in the cytoplasm of 293T cells. RT-PCR analysis revealed that zCDKL5-L was first observed 12hours post-fertilization (hpf) and increased thereafter, while zCDKL5-S appeared just after fertilization. zAmph1a was detected in all embryogenic stages and zAmph1b appeared from 12hpf, but the expression of zAmph1c was not observed in our experiments. In adult fish, zCDKL5-L was mainly expressed in the brain, but zCDKL5-S showed ubiquitous expression. zAmph1a was observed most abundantly in the eyes, whereas zAmph1b was predominantly expressed in the brain. zAmph1c was scarcely detected. These results suggest that phosphorylation of Amph1 by CDKL5 may be a common feature throughout animal species. PMID:26927518

  6. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activates guanine nucleotide exchange factor GIV/Girdin to orchestrate migration–proliferation dichotomy

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Deepali; Lopez-Sanchez, Inmaculada; To, Andrew; Lo, I-Chung; Aznar, Nicolas; Leyme, Anthony; Gupta, Vijay; Niesman, Ingrid; Maddox, Adam L.; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel; Farquhar, Marilyn G.; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-01-01

    Signals propagated by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) can drive cell migration and proliferation, two cellular processes that do not occur simultaneously—a phenomenon called “migration–proliferation dichotomy.” We previously showed that epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling is skewed to favor migration over proliferation via noncanonical transactivation of Gαi proteins by the guanine exchange factor (GEF) GIV. However, what turns on GIV-GEF downstream of growth factor RTKs remained unknown. Here we reveal the molecular mechanism by which phosphorylation of GIV by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) triggers GIV's ability to bind and activate Gαi in response to growth factors and modulate downstream signals to establish a dichotomy between migration and proliferation. We show that CDK5 binds and phosphorylates GIV at Ser1674 near its GEF motif. When Ser1674 is phosphorylated, GIV activates Gαi and enhances promigratory Akt signals. Phosphorylated GIV also binds Gαs and enhances endosomal maturation, which shortens the transit time of EGFR through early endosomes, thereby limiting mitogenic MAPK signals. Consequently, this phosphoevent triggers cells to preferentially migrate during wound healing and transmigration of cancer cells. When Ser1674 cannot be phosphorylated, GIV cannot bind either Gαi or Gαs, Akt signaling is suppressed, mitogenic signals are enhanced due to delayed transit time of EGFR through early endosomes, and cells preferentially proliferate. These results illuminate how GIV-GEF is turned on upon receptor activation, adds GIV to the repertoire of CDK5 substrates, and defines a mechanism by which this unusual CDK orchestrates migration–proliferation dichotomy during cancer invasion, wound healing, and development. PMID:26286990

  7. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 activates guanine nucleotide exchange factor GIV/Girdin to orchestrate migration-proliferation dichotomy.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Deepali; Lopez-Sanchez, Inmaculada; To, Andrew; Lo, I-Chung; Aznar, Nicolas; Leyme, Anthony; Gupta, Vijay; Niesman, Ingrid; Maddox, Adam L; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel; Farquhar, Marilyn G; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-09-01

    Signals propagated by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) can drive cell migration and proliferation, two cellular processes that do not occur simultaneously--a phenomenon called "migration-proliferation dichotomy." We previously showed that epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling is skewed to favor migration over proliferation via noncanonical transactivation of Gαi proteins by the guanine exchange factor (GEF) GIV. However, what turns on GIV-GEF downstream of growth factor RTKs remained unknown. Here we reveal the molecular mechanism by which phosphorylation of GIV by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) triggers GIV's ability to bind and activate Gαi in response to growth factors and modulate downstream signals to establish a dichotomy between migration and proliferation. We show that CDK5 binds and phosphorylates GIV at Ser1674 near its GEF motif. When Ser1674 is phosphorylated, GIV activates Gαi and enhances promigratory Akt signals. Phosphorylated GIV also binds Gαs and enhances endosomal maturation, which shortens the transit time of EGFR through early endosomes, thereby limiting mitogenic MAPK signals. Consequently, this phosphoevent triggers cells to preferentially migrate during wound healing and transmigration of cancer cells. When Ser1674 cannot be phosphorylated, GIV cannot bind either Gαi or Gαs, Akt signaling is suppressed, mitogenic signals are enhanced due to delayed transit time of EGFR through early endosomes, and cells preferentially proliferate. These results illuminate how GIV-GEF is turned on upon receptor activation, adds GIV to the repertoire of CDK5 substrates, and defines a mechanism by which this unusual CDK orchestrates migration-proliferation dichotomy during cancer invasion, wound healing, and development. PMID:26286990

  8. Characterization of molecular and cellular functions of the cyclin-dependent kinase CDK9 using a novel specific inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Albert, T K; Rigault, C; Eickhoff, J; Baumgart, K; Antrecht, C; Klebl, B; Mittler, G; Meisterernst, M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The cyclin-dependent kinase CDK9 is an important therapeutic target but currently available inhibitors exhibit low specificity and/or narrow therapeutic windows. Here we have used a new highly specific CDK9 inhibitor, LDC000067 to interrogate gene control mechanisms mediated by CDK9. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The selectivity of LDC000067 was established in functional kinase assays. Functions of CDK9 in gene expression were assessed with in vitro transcription experiments, single gene analyses and genome-wide expression profiling. Cultures of mouse embryonic stem cells, HeLa cells, several cancer cell lines, along with cells from patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia were also used to investigate cellular responses to LDC000067. KEY RESULTS The selectivity of LDC000067 for CDK9 over other CDKs exceeded that of the known inhibitors flavopiridol and DRB. LDC000067 inhibited in vitro transcription in an ATP-competitive and dose-dependent manner. Gene expression profiling of cells treated with LDC000067 demonstrated a selective reduction of short-lived mRNAs, including important regulators of proliferation and apoptosis. Analysis of de novo RNA synthesis suggested a wide ranging positive role of CDK9. At the molecular and cellular level, LDC000067 reproduced effects characteristic of CDK9 inhibition such as enhanced pausing of RNA polymerase II on genes and, most importantly, induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our study provides a framework for the mechanistic understanding of cellular responses to CDK9 inhibition. LDC000067 represents a promising lead for the development of clinically useful, highly specific CDK9 inhibitors. PMID:24102143

  9. A new class of cyclin dependent kinase in Chlamydomonas is required for coupling cell size to cell division

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yubing; Liu, Dianyi; López-Paz, Cristina; Olson, Bradley JSC; Umen, James G

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating cells actively control their size by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii divides by multiple fission, wherein a ‘counting’ mechanism couples mother cell-size to cell division number allowing production of uniform-sized daughters. We identified a sizer protein, CDKG1, that acts through the retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor pathway as a D-cyclin-dependent RB kinase to regulate mitotic counting. Loss of CDKG1 leads to fewer mitotic divisions and large daughters, while mis-expression of CDKG1 causes supernumerous mitotic divisions and small daughters. The concentration of nuclear-localized CDKG1 in pre-mitotic cells is set by mother cell size, and its progressive dilution and degradation with each round of cell division may provide a link between mother cell-size and mitotic division number. Cell-size-dependent accumulation of limiting cell cycle regulators such as CDKG1 is a potentially general mechanism for size control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10767.001 PMID:27015111

  10. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 controls adult neural stem cell expansion by regulating Sox2 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Marqués-Torrejón, M. Ángeles; Porlan, Eva; Banito, Ana; Gómez-Ibarlucea, Esther; Fernández-Capetillo, Óscar; Vidal, Anxo; Gil, Jesús; Torres, Josema; Fariñas, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    Summary In the adult brain, continual neurogenesis of olfactory neurons is sustained by the existence of neural stem cells (NSCs) in the subependymal niche. Elimination of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (p21) leads to premature exhaustion of the subependymal NSC pool, suggesting a relationship between cell cycle control and long-term self-renewal, but the molecular mechanisms underlying NSC maintenance by p21 remain unexplored. Here we identify a novel function of p21 in the direct regulation of the expression of pluripotency factor Sox2, a key regulator of the specification and maintenance of neural progenitors. We observe that p21 directly binds a Sox2 enhancer and negatively regulates Sox2 expression in NSCs. Augmented levels of Sox2 in p21-null cells induces replicative stress and a DNA damage response that leads to cell growth arrest mediated by increased levels of p19Arf and p53. Our results show a novel regulation of NSC expansion driven by a p21/Sox2/p53 axis. PMID:23260487

  11. Loss of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes and chromosome 9 karyotypic abnormalities in human bladder cancer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Southgate, J.; Proffitt, J.; Roberts, P.; Smith, B.; Selby, P.

    1995-01-01

    Loss of cell cycle control through the structural or functional aberration of checkpoint genes and their products is a potentially important process in carcinogenesis. In this study, a panel of well-characterised established human bladder cancer cell lines was screened by the polymerase chain reaction for homozygous loss of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes p15, p16 and p27. The results demonstrate that, whereas there was no genetic loss of p27, homozygous deletion of both p15 and p16 genes occurred in seven of 13 (54%) independent bladder cell lines tested. Differential loss of either the p15 or p16 gene was not seen. The p15 and p16 genes are known to be juxtaposed on chromosome 9p21 at the locus of a putative tumour-suppressor gene involved in the initiation of bladder cancer. Cytogenetic analysis of the cell lines revealed karyotypes ranging from near diploid to near pentaploid with complex rearrangements of some chromosomes and a high prevalence of chromosome 9p rearrangements, although all cell lines contained at least one cytogenetically normal 9p21 region. These observations support a role for p15/p16 gene inactivation in bladder carcinogenesis and/or the promotion of cell growth in vitro and lend support to the hypothesis that homozygous deletion centred on 9p21 is a mechanism by which both p15 and p16 genes are co-inactivated. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7577470

  12. A Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor, Dinaciclib, Impairs Homologous Recombination and Sensitizes Multiple Myeloma Cells to PARP Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Alagpulinsa, David A; Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Yaccoby, Shmuel; Shmookler Reis, Robert J

    2016-02-01

    PARP1/2 are required for single-strand break repair, and their inhibition causes DNA replication fork collapse and double-strand break (DSB) formation. These DSBs are primarily repaired via homologous recombination (HR), a high-fidelity repair pathway. Should HR be deficient, DSBs may be repaired via error-prone nonhomologous end-joining mechanisms, or may persist, ultimately resulting in cell death. The combined disruption of PARP and HR activities thus produces synthetic lethality. Multiple myeloma cells are characterized by chromosomal instability and pervasive DNA damage, implicating aberrant DNA repair. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK), upstream modulators of HR, are dysregulated in multiple myeloma. Here, we show that a CDK inhibitor, dinaciclib, impairs HR repair and sensitizes multiple myeloma cells to the PARP1/2 inhibitor ABT-888. Dinaciclib abolishes ABT-888-induced BRCA1 and RAD51 foci and potentiates DNA damage, indicated by increased γH2AX foci. Dinaciclib treatment reduces expression of HR repair genes, including Rad51, and blocks BRCA1 phosphorylation, a modification required for HR repair, thus inhibiting HR repair of chromosome DSBs. Cotreatment with dinaciclib and ABT-888 in vitro resulted in synthetic lethality of multiple myeloma cells, but not normal CD19(+) B cells, and slowed growth of multiple myeloma xenografts in SCID mice almost two-fold. These findings support combining dinaciclib with PARP inhibitors for multiple myeloma therapy. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(2); 241-50. ©2015 AACR. PMID:26719576

  13. Identification of Phosphorylated Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 1 Associated with Colorectal Cancer Survival Using Label-Free Quantitative Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Tyan, Yu-Chang; Hsiao, Eric S. L.; Chu, Po-Chen; Lee, Chung-Ta; Lee, Jenq-Chang; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur; Liao, Pao-Chi

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the most common form of cancer in the world, and the five-year survival rate is estimated to be almost 90% in the early stages. Therefore, the identification of potential biomarkers to assess the prognosis of early stage colorectal cancer patients is critical for further clinical treatment. Dysregulated tyrosine phosphorylation has been found in several diseases that play a significant regulator of signaling in cellular pathways. In this study, this strategy was used to characterize the tyrosine phosphoproteome of colorectal cell lines with different progression abilities (SW480 and SW620). We identified a total of 280 phosphotyrosine (pTyr) peptides comprising 287 pTyr sites from 261 proteins. Label-free quantitative analysis revealed the differential level of a total of 103 pTyr peptides between SW480 and SW620 cells. We showed that cyclin-dependent kinase I (CDK1) pTyr15 level in SW480 cells was 3.3-fold greater than in SW620 cells, and these data corresponded with the label-free mass spectrometry-based proteomic quantification analysis. High level CDK1 pTyr15 was associated with prolonged disease-free survival for stage II colorectal cancer patients (n = 79). Taken together, our results suggest that the CDK1 pTyr15 protein is a potential indicator of the progression of colorectal cancer. PMID:27383761

  14. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor butyrolactone is a potent inhibitor of p21 (WAF1/CIP1 expression).

    PubMed

    Sax, Joanna K; Dash, Bipin C; Hong, Rui; Dicker, David T; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2002-01-01

    Butyrolactone I (BL) is a competitive inhibitor of ATP for binding and activation of cyclin-dependent kinases and is a potent inhibitor of cell cycle progression. Treatment of H460 human lung and SW480 human colon cancer cells with doses of BL that exceed the Ki for CDK inhibition but which are much lower than doses required to inhibit MAPK, PKA, PKC, or EGFR lead to a rapid significant reduction of endogenous p21 protein expression. BL-dependent inhibition of p21 expression appears to be p53-independent. BL-dependent p21 degradation was blocked by lactacystin, consistent with the hypothesis that there is accelerated p21 proteasomal degradation in the presence of BL. BL also inhibited the p53-dependent increase of p21 protein expression in cells exposed to the DNA damag-ing agent etoposide, and favored a greater G2/M arrest as compared to the non-BL exposed cells. BL accelerated the degradation of exogenously expressed p21 that was not observed with a C-terminal truncated form of p21. Degradation of exogenous p21 led to a shift to G2 accumulation in the cells exposed to BL. We conclude that BL has effects on the cell cycle beyond its role as a CDK inhibitor and can be used as a novel tool to study the mechanism of p21 degradation and the consequences towards p21- dependent checkpoints. PMID:12429914

  15. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 modulates nociceptive signaling through direct phosphorylation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1

    PubMed Central

    Pareek, Tej K.; Keller, Jason; Kesavapany, Sashi; Agarwal, Nitin; Kuner, Rohini; Pant, Harish C.; Iadarola, Michael J.; Brady, Roscoe O.; Kulkarni, Ashok B.

    2007-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), a ligand-gated cation channel highly expressed in small-diameter sensory neurons, is activated by heat, protons, and capsaicin. The phosphorylation of TRPV1 provides a versatile regulation of intracellular calcium levels and is critical for TRPV1 function in responding to a pain stimulus. We have previously reported that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) activity regulates nociceptive signaling. In this article we report that the Cdk5-mediated phosphorylation of TRPV1 at threonine-407 can modulate agonist-induced calcium influx. Inhibition of Cdk5 activity in cultured dorsal root ganglia neurons resulted in a significant reduction of TRPV1-mediated calcium influx, and this effect could be reversed by restoring Cdk5 activity. Primary nociceptor-specific Cdk5 conditional-knockout mice showed reduced TRPV1 phosphorylation, resulting in significant hypoalgesia. Thus, the present study indicates that Cdk5-mediated TRPV1 phosphorylation is important in the regulation of pain signaling. PMID:17194758

  16. Molecular and cellular effects of multi-targeted cyclin-dependent kinase inhibition in myeloma: biological and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    McMillin, Douglas W; Delmore, Jake; Negri, Joseph; Buon, Leutz; Jacobs, Hannah M; Laubach, Jacob; Jakubikova, Jana; Ooi, Melissa; Hayden, Patrick; Schlossman, Robert; Munshi, Nikhil C; Lengauer, Christoph; Richardson, Paul G; Anderson, Kenneth C; Mitsiades, Constantine S

    2011-02-01

    Cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), are appealing targets for multiple myeloma (MM) therapy given the increased proliferative rates of tumour cells in advanced versus early stages of MM. We hypothesized that a multi-targeted CDK inhibitor with a different spectrum of activity compared to existing CDK inhibitors could trigger distinct molecular sequelae with therapeutic implications for MM. We therefore studied the small molecule heterocyclic compound NVP-LCQ195/AT9311 (LCQ195), which inhibits CDK1, CDK2 and CDK5, as well as CDK3 and CDK9. LCQ195 induced cell cycle arrest and eventual apoptotic cell death of MM cells, even at sub-μmol/l concentrations, spared non-malignant cells, and overcame the protection conferred to MM cells by stroma or cytokines of the bone marrow milieu. In MM cells, LCQ195 triggered decreased amplitude of transcriptional signatures associated with oncogenesis, drug resistance and stem cell renewal, including signatures of activation of key transcription factors for MM cells e.g. myc, HIF-1α, IRF4. Bortezomib-treated MM patients whose tumours had high baseline expression of genes suppressed by LCQ195 had significantly shorter progression-free and overall survival than those with low levels of these transcripts in their MM cells. These observations provide insight into the biological relevance of multi-targeted CDK inhibition in MM. PMID:21223249

  17. A new class of cyclin dependent kinase in Chlamydomonas is required for coupling cell size to cell division.

    PubMed

    Li, Yubing; Liu, Dianyi; López-Paz, Cristina; Olson, Bradley Jsc; Umen, James G

    2016-01-01

    Proliferating cells actively control their size by mechanisms that are poorly understood. The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii divides by multiple fission, wherein a 'counting' mechanism couples mother cell-size to cell division number allowing production of uniform-sized daughters. We identified a sizer protein, CDKG1, that acts through the retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor pathway as a D-cyclin-dependent RB kinase to regulate mitotic counting. Loss of CDKG1 leads to fewer mitotic divisions and large daughters, while mis-expression of CDKG1 causes supernumerous mitotic divisions and small daughters. The concentration of nuclear-localized CDKG1 in pre-mitotic cells is set by mother cell size, and its progressive dilution and degradation with each round of cell division may provide a link between mother cell-size and mitotic division number. Cell-size-dependent accumulation of limiting cell cycle regulators such as CDKG1 is a potentially general mechanism for size control. PMID:27015111

  18. Never in mitosis gene A-related kinase 6 promotes cell proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma via cyclin B modulation

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, BIAO; ZHANG, HAI; WANG, DONG; HAN, SHENG; WANG, KE; YAO, AIHUA; LI, XIANGCHENG

    2014-01-01

    Never in mitosis gene A-related kinase (Nek) 6 is a recently identified Nek that is required for mitotic cell cycle progression; however, the role and mechanism of Nek6 activity during hepatocarcinogenesis is not well known. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential roles and internal mechanism of Nek6 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development. In the present study, Nek6 was found to be overexpressed in HCC samples and cell lines by florescent real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. Furthermore, it was evidenced to contribute to oncogenesis and progression. The ectopic overexpression of Nek6 promoted cell proliferation and colony formation, whereas gene silencing of Nek6 inhibited these phenotypes, as documented in Huh7, PLC/PRF/5, Hep3B and HepG2 HCC cell lines. Mechanistic analyses indicated that Nek6 regulates the transcription of cyclin B through cdc2 activation, and promotes the accumulation of G0/G1-phase cells. In conclusion, the findings of the current study suggested that Nek6 contributes to the oncogenic potential of HCC, and may present as a potential therapeutic target in this disease. PMID:25120679

  19. Aurora Kinase A Is Not Involved in CPEB1 Phosphorylation and cyclin B1 mRNA Polyadenylation during Meiotic Maturation of Porcine Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Komrskova, Pavla; Susor, Andrej; Malik, Radek; Prochazkova, Barbora; Liskova, Lucie; Supolikova, Jaroslava; Hladky, Stepan; Kubelka, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of mRNA translation by cytoplasmic polyadenylation is known to be important for oocyte maturation and further development. This process is generally controlled by phosphorylation of cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein 1 (CPEB1). The aim of this study is to determine the role of Aurora kinase A in CPEB1 phosphorylation and the consequent CPEB1-dependent polyadenylation of maternal mRNAs during mammalian oocyte meiosis. For this purpose, we specifically inhibited Aurora kinase A with MLN8237 during meiotic maturation of porcine oocytes. Using poly(A)-test PCR method, we monitored the effect of Aurora kinase A inhibition on poly(A)-tail extension of long and short cyclin B1 encoding mRNAs as markers of CPEB1-dependent cytoplasmic polyadenylation. Our results show that inhibition of Aurora kinase A activity impairs neither cyclin B1 mRNA polyadenylation nor its translation and that Aurora kinase A is unlikely to be involved in CPEB1 activating phosphorylation. PMID:24983972

  20. Cyclin partners determine Pho85 protein kinase substrate specificity in vitro and in vivo: control of glycogen biosynthesis by Pcl8 and Pcl10.

    PubMed

    Huang, D; Moffat, J; Wilson, W A; Moore, L; Cheng, C; Roach, P J; Andrews, B

    1998-06-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, PHO85 encodes a cyclin-dependent protein kinase (Cdk) with multiple roles in cell cycle and metabolic controls. In association with the cyclin Pho80, Pho85 controls acid phosphatase gene expression through phosphorylation of the transcription factor Pho4. Pho85 has also been implicated as a kinase that phosphorylates and negatively regulates glycogen synthase (Gsy2), and deletion of PHO85 causes glycogen overaccumulation. We report that the Pcl8/Pcl10 subgroup of cyclins directs Pho85 to phosphorylate glycogen synthase both in vivo and in vitro. Disruption of PCL8 and PCL10 caused hyperaccumulation of glycogen, activation of glycogen synthase, and a reduction in glycogen synthase kinase activity in vivo. However, unlike pho85 mutants, pcl8 pcl10 cells had normal morphologies, grew on glycerol, and showed proper regulation of acid phosphatase gene expression. In vitro, Pho80-Pho85 complexes effectively phosphorylated Pho4 but had much lower activity toward Gsy2. In contrast, Pcl10-Pho85 complexes phosphorylated Gsy2 at Ser-654 and Thr-667, two physiologically relevant sites, but only poorly phosphorylated Pho4. Thus, both the in vitro and in vivo substrate specificity of Pho85 is determined by the cyclin partner. Mutation of PHO85 suppressed the glycogen storage deficiency of snf1 or glc7-1 mutants in which glycogen synthase is locked in an inactive state. Deletion of PCL8 and PCL10 corrected the deficit in glycogen synthase activity in both the snf1 and glc7-1 mutants, but glycogen synthesis was restored only in the glc7-1 mutant strain. This genetic result suggests an additional role for Pho85 in the negative regulation of glycogen accumulation that is independent of Pcl8 and Pcl10. PMID:9584169

  1. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase CRK9, Required for Spliced Leader trans Splicing of Pre-mRNA in Trypanosomes, Functions in a Complex with a New L-Type Cyclin and a Kinetoplastid-Specific Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ambrósio, Daniela L.; Kirkham, Justin K.; Günzl, Arthur

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) control the cell cycle and critical steps in gene expression. The lethal parasite Trypanosoma brucei, member of the phylogenetic order Kinetoplastida, possesses eleven CDKs which, due to high sequence divergence, were generically termed CDC2-related kinases (CRKs). While several CRKs have been implied in the cell cycle, CRK9 was the first trypanosome CDK shown to control the unusual mode of gene expression found in kinetoplastids. In these organisms, protein-coding genes are arranged in tandem arrays which are transcribed polycistronically. Individual mRNAs are processed from precursor RNA by spliced leader (SL) trans splicing and polyadenylation. CRK9 ablation was lethal in cultured trypanosomes, causing a block of trans splicing before the first transesterification step. Additionally, CRK9 silencing led to dephosphorylation of RNA polymerase II and to hypomethylation of the SL cap structure. Here, we tandem affinity-purified CRK9 and, among potential CRK9 substrates and modifying enzymes, discovered an unusual tripartite complex comprising CRK9, a new L-type cyclin (CYC12) and a protein, termed CRK9-associated protein (CRK9AP), that is only conserved among kinetoplastids. Silencing of either CYC12 or CRK9AP reproduced the effects of depleting CRK9, identifying these proteins as functional partners of CRK9 in vivo. While mammalian cyclin L binds to CDK11, the CRK9 complex deviates substantially from that of CDK11, requiring CRK9AP for efficient CRK9 complex formation and autophosphorylation in vitro. Interference with this unusual CDK rescued mice from lethal trypanosome infections, validating CRK9 as a potential chemotherapeutic target. PMID:26954683

  2. Targeting the cyclin D-cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6-retinoblastoma pathway with selective CDK 4/6 inhibitors in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer: rationale, current status, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Spring, Laura; Bardia, Aditya; Modi, Shanu

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of the cyclin D-cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6-INK4-retinoblastoma (Rb) pathway is an important contributor to endocrine therapy resistance. Recent clinical development of selective inhibitors of CDK4 and CDK6 kinases has led to renewed interest in cell cycle regulators, following experience with relatively non-selective pan-CDK inhibitors that often resulted in limited activity and poor safety profiles in the clinic. The highly selective oral CDK 4/6 inhibitors palbociclib (PD0332991), ribociclib (LEE011), and abemaciclib (LY2835219) are able to inhibit the proliferation of Rb-positive tumor cells and have demonstrated dose-dependent growth inhibition in ER+ breast cancer models. In metastatic breast cancer, all three agents are being explored in combination with endocrine therapy in Phase III studies. Results so far indicated promising efficacy and manageable safety profiles, and led to the FDA approval of palbociclib. Phase II-III studies of these agents, in combination with endocrine therapy, are also underway in early breast cancer in the neoadjuvant and adjuvant settings. Selective CDK 4/6 inhibitors are also being investigated with other targeted agents or chemotherapy in the advanced setting. This article reviews the rationale for targeting cyclin D-CDK 4/6 in hormone receptor-positive (HR+) breast cancer, provides an overview of the available preclinical and clinical data with CDK 4/6 inhibitors in breast cancer to date, and summarizes the main features of ongoing clinical trials of these new agents in breast cancer. Future trials evaluating further combination strategies with CDK 4/6 backbone and translational studies refining predictive biomarkers are needed to help personalize the optimal treatment regimen for individual patients with ER+ breast cancer. PMID:26896604

  3. Activation and inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase-2 by phosphorylation; a molecular dynamics study reveals the functional importance of the glycine-rich loop

    PubMed Central

    Bártová, Iveta; Otyepka, Michal; Kříž, Zdeněk; Koča, Jaroslav

    2004-01-01

    Nanoseconds long molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories of differently active complexes of human cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (inactive CDK2/ATP, semiactive CDK2/Cyclin A/ATP, fully active pT160-CDK2/Cyclin A/ATP, inhibited pT14-; pY15-; and pT14,pY15,pT160-CDK2/Cyclin A/ATP) were compared. The MD simulations results of CDK2 inhibition by phosphorylation at T14 and/or Y15 sites provide insight into the structural aspects of CDK2 deactivation. The inhibitory sites are localized in the glycine-rich loop (G-loop) positioned opposite the activation T-loop. Phosphorylation of T14 and both inhibitory sites T14 and Y15 together causes ATP misalignment for phosphorylation and G-loop conformational change. This conformational change leads to the opening of the CDK2 substrate binding box. The phosphorylated Y15 residue negatively affects substrate binding or its correct alignment for ATP terminal phospho-group transfer to the CDK2 substrate. The MD simulations of the CDK2 activation process provide results in agreement with previous X-ray data. PMID:15133164

  4. Recruitment of trimeric proliferating cell nuclear antigen by G1-phase cyclin-dependent kinases following DNA damage with platinum-based antitumour agents

    PubMed Central

    He, G; Kuang, J; Koomen, J; Kobayashi, R; Khokhar, A R; Siddik, Z H

    2013-01-01

    Background: In cycling tumour cells, the binary cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk4/cyclin D or Cdk2/cyclin E complex is inhibited by p21 following DNA damage to induce G1 cell-cycle arrest. However, it is not known whether other proteins are also recruited within Cdk complexes, or their role, and this was investigated. Methods: Ovarian A2780 tumour cells were exposed to the platinum-based antitumour agent 1R,2R-diaminocyclohexane(trans-diacetato)(dichloro)platinum(IV) (DAP), which preferentially induces G1 arrest in a p21-dependent manner. The Cdk complexes were analysed by gel filtration chromatography, immunoblot and mass spectrometry. Results: The active forms of Cdk4 and Cdk2 complexes in control tumour cells have a molecular size of ∼140 kDa, which increased to ∼290 kDa when inhibited following G1 checkpoint activation by DAP. Proteomic analysis identified Cdk, cyclin, p21 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the inhibited complex, and biochemical studies provided unequivocal evidence that the increase in ∼150 kDa of the inhibited complex is consistent with p21-dependent recruitment of PCNA as a trimer, likely bound to three molecules of p21. Although p21 alone was sufficient to inhibit the Cdk complex, PCNA was critical for stabilising p21. Conclusion: G1 Cdk complexes inhibited by p21 also recruit PCNA, which inhibits degradation and, thereby, prolongs activity of p21 within the complex. PMID:24104967

  5. Structure-based discovery of the first allosteric inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Rastelli, Giulio; Anighoro, Andrew; Chripkova, Martina; Carrassa, Laura; Broggini, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Allosteric targeting of protein kinases via displacement of the structural αC helix with type III allosteric inhibitors is currently gaining a foothold in drug discovery. Recently, the first crystal structure of CDK2 with an open allosteric pocket adjacent to the αC helix has been described, prospecting new opportunities to design more selective inhibitors, but the structure has not yet been exploited for the structure-based design of type III allosteric inhibitors. In this work we report the results of a virtual screening campaign that resulted in the discovery of the first-in-class type III allosteric ligands of CDK2. Using a combination of docking and post-docking analyses made with our tool BEAR, 7 allosteric ligands (hit rate of 20%) with micromolar affinity for CDK2 were identified, some of them inhibiting the growth of breast cancer cell lines in the micromolar range. Competition experiments performed in the presence of the ATP-competitive inhibitor staurosporine confirmed that the 7 ligands are truly allosteric, in agreement with their design. Of these, compound 2 bound CDK2 with an EC50 value of 3 μM and inhibited the proliferation of MDA-MB231 and ZR-75–1 breast cancer cells with IC50 values of approximately 20 μM, while compound 4 had an EC50 value of 71 μM and IC50 values around 4 μM. Remarkably, the most potent compound 4 was able to selectively inhibit CDK2-mediated Retinoblastoma phosphorylation, confirming that its mechanism of action is fully compatible with a selective inhibition of CDK2 phosphorylation in cells. Finally, hit expansion through analog search of the most potent inhibitor 4 revealed an additional ligand 4g with similar in vitro potency on breast cancer cells. PMID:24911186

  6. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 1-Mediated Bcl-xL/Bcl-2 Phosphorylation Acts as a Functional Link Coupling Mitotic Arrest and Apoptosis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Terrano, David T.; Upreti, Meenakshi; Chambers, Timothy C.

    2010-01-01

    Despite detailed knowledge of the components of the spindle assembly checkpoint, a molecular explanation of how cells die after prolonged spindle checkpoint activation, and thus how microtubule inhibitors and other antimitotic drugs ultimately elicit their lethal effects, has yet to emerge. Mitotically arrested cells typically display extensive phosphorylation of two key antiapoptotic proteins, Bcl-xL and Bcl-2, and evidence suggests that phosphorylation disables their antiapoptotic activity. However, the responsible kinase has remained elusive. In this report, evidence is presented that cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1)/cyclin B catalyzes mitotic-arrest-induced Bcl-xL/Bcl-2 phosphorylation. Furthermore, we show that CDK1 transiently and incompletely phosphorylates these proteins during normal mitosis. When mitosis is prolonged in the absence of microtubule inhibition, Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 become highly phosphorylated. Transient overexpression of nondegradable cyclin B1 caused apoptotic death, which was blocked by a phosphodefective Bcl-xL mutant but not by a phosphomimetic Bcl-xL mutant, confirming Bcl-xL as a key target of proapoptotic CDK1 signaling. These findings suggest a model whereby a switch in the duration of CDK1 activation, from transient during mitosis to sustained during mitotic arrest, dramatically increases the extent of Bcl-xL/Bcl-2 phosphorylation, resulting in inactivation of their antiapoptotic function. Thus, phosphorylation of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins acts as a sensor for CDK1 signal duration and as a functional link coupling mitotic arrest to apoptosis. PMID:19917720

  7. Novel direct and indirect cyclin-dependent kinase modulators for the prevention and treatment of human neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Senderowicz, Adrian M

    2003-07-01

    Abnormalities in the cell cycle are responsible for the majority of human neoplasias. Most abnormalities occur due to hyperphosphorylation of the tumor suppressor gene Rb by the key regulators of the cell cycle, the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). Thus, a pharmacological CDK inhibitor may be useful in the prevention and/or treatment of human neoplasms. Flavopiridol is a flavonoid with interesting preclinical properties: (1) potent CDK inhibitory activity; (2) it depletes cyclin D1 and vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA by transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms, respectively; (3) it inhibits positive elongation factor B, leading to transcription "halt"; and (4) it induces apoptosis in several preclinical models. The first phase I trial of a CDK inhibitor, flavopiridol, has been completed. Dose-limiting toxicities included secretory diarrhea and proinflammatory syndrome. Antitumor activity was observed in some patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and renal, colon, and prostate cancers. Concentrations between 300 and 500 n M-necessary to inhibit CDK-were achieved safely. Phase II trials with infusional flavopiridol and phase I infusional trials in combination with standard chemotherapy are being completed with encouraging results. A novel phase I trial of 1-h flavopiridol administration was recently completed. The maximum tolerated doses using flavopiridol daily for 5, 3, and 1 consecutive days are 37.5, 50, and 62.5 mg/m(2) per day. Dose-limiting toxicities include vomiting, neutropenia, proinflammatory syndrome, and diarrhea. Plasma flavopiridol concentrations achieved were in the range 1.5-3.5 MICRO M. Phase II/III trials using this 1-h schedule in several tumor types including non-small-cell lung cancer, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, mantle cell lymphoma, and head and neck cancer are being conducted worldwide. UCN-01, the second CDK modulator that has entered clinical trials, has unique preclinical properties: (1) it inhibits protein kinase C

  8. Molecular Determinants for the Inactivation of the Retinoblastoma Tumor Suppressor by the Viral Cyclin-dependent Kinase UL97.

    PubMed

    Iwahori, Satoko; Hakki, Morgan; Chou, Sunwen; Kalejta, Robert F

    2015-08-01

    The retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor restricts cell cycle progression by repressing E2F-responsive transcription. Cellular cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-mediated Rb inactivation through phosphorylation disrupts Rb-E2F complexes, stimulating transcription. The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL97 protein is a viral CDK (v-CDK) that phosphorylates Rb. Here we show that UL97 phosphorylates 11 of the 16 consensus CDK sites in Rb. A cleft within Rb accommodates peptides with the amino acid sequence LXCXE. UL97 contains three such motifs. We determined that the first LXCXE motif (L1) of UL97 and the Rb cleft enhance UL97-mediated Rb phosphorylation. A UL97 mutant with a non-functional L1 motif (UL97-L1m) displayed significantly reduced Rb phosphorylation at multiple sites. Curiously, however, it efficiently disrupted Rb-E2F complexes but failed to relieve Rb-mediated repression of E2F reporter constructs. The HCMV immediate early 1 protein cooperated with UL97-L1m to inactivate Rb in transfection assays, likely indicating that cells infected with a UL97-L1m mutant virus show no defects in growth or E2F-responsive gene expression because of redundant viral mechanisms to inactivate Rb. Our data suggest that UL97 possesses a mechanism to elicit E2F-dependent gene expression distinct from disruption of Rb-E2F complexes and dependent upon both the L1 motif of UL97 and the cleft region of Rb. PMID:26100623

  9. Gene expression in bovine oocytes and cumulus cells after meiotic inhibition with the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor butyrolactone I.

    PubMed

    Leal, C L V; Mamo, S; Fair, T; Lonergan, P

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of temporary inhibition of meiosis using the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor butyrolactone I (BLI) on gene expression in bovine oocytes and cumulus cells. Immature bovine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were assigned to groups: (i) Control COCs collected immediately after recovery from the ovary or (ii) after in vitro maturation (IVM) for 24 h, (iii) Inhibited COCs collected 24 h after incubation with 100 μm BLI or (iv) after meiotic inhibition for 24 h followed by IVM for a further 22 h. For mRNA relative abundance analysis, pools of 10 denuded oocytes and respective cumulus cells were collected. Transcripts related to cell cycle regulation and oocyte competence were evaluated in oocytes and cumulus cells by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Most of the examined transcripts were downregulated (p < 0.05) after IVM in control and inhibited oocytes (19 of 35). Nine transcripts remained stable (p > 0.05) after IVM in control oocytes; only INHBA did not show this pattern in inhibited oocytes. Seven genes were upregulated after IVM in control oocytes (p < 0.05), and only PLAT, RBP1 and INHBB were not upregulated in inhibited oocytes after IVM. In cumulus cells, six genes were upregulated (p < 0.05) after IVM and eight were downregulated (p < 0.05). Cells from inhibited oocytes showed the same pattern of expression regarding maturation profile, but were affected by the temporary meiosis inhibition of the oocyte when the same maturation stages were compared between inhibited and control groups. In conclusion, changes in transcript abundance in oocytes and cumulus cells during maturation in vitro were mostly mirrored after meiotic inhibition followed by maturation. PMID:22034924

  10. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors sensitize tumor cells to nutlin-induced apoptosis: a potent drug combination.

    PubMed

    Cheok, Chit Fang; Dey, Anwesha; Lane, David P

    2007-11-01

    Current chemotherapy focuses on the use of genotoxic drugs that may induce general DNA damage in cancer cells but also high levels of toxicity in normal tissues. Nongenotoxic activation of p53 by targeting specific molecular pathways therefore provides an attractive therapeutic strategy in cancers with wild-type p53. Here, we explored the antitumor potential of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors in combination with a small molecule inhibitor of p53-murine double minute 2 (MDM2) interaction. We show that low doses of CDK inhibitors roscovitine and DRB synergize with the MDM2 antagonist nutlin-3a in the induction of p53 activity and promote p53-dependent apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Statistical measurement of the combination effects shows that the drug combination is additive on the reduction of cell viability and synergistic on inducing apoptosis, a critical end point of cytotoxic drugs. The degree of apoptosis observed 24 to 48 h after drug treatment correlated with the accumulation of p53 protein and concomitant induction of proapoptotic proteins Puma and PIG3. The antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects of this drug combination are validated in a range of tumor-derived cells including melanoma, colon carcinoma, breast adenocarcinoma, and hepatocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, this drug combination does not induce phosphorylation of Ser(15) on p53 and does not induce genotoxic stress in the cell. Given that many cytotoxic drugs rely on their ability to induce apoptosis via DNA damage-mediated activation of p53, the data presented here may provide a new therapeutic approach for the use of CDK inhibitors and MDM2 antagonists in combinatorial drug therapy. PMID:18025259

  11. Control of petal and pollen development by the plant cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor ICK1 in transgenic Brassica plants.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongming; Wang, Hong; Gilmer, Susan; Whitwill, Steve; Keller, Wilf; Fowke, Larry C

    2002-06-01

    The cyclin-dependent protein kinases (CDKs) have a central role in cell cycle regulation and can be inhibited by the binding of small protein CDK inhibitors. The first plant CDK inhibitor gene ICK1 was previously identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. In comparison to known animal CDK inhibitors, ICK1 protein exhibits unique structural and functional properties. The expression of ICK1 directed by the constitutive CaMV 35S promoter was shown to inhibit cell division and plant growth. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of ICK1 overexpression on particular organs and cells. ICK1 was expressed in specific tissues or cells of Brassica napus L. plants using two tissue-specific promoters, Arabidopsis AP3 and Brassica Bgp1. Transgenic AP3-ICK1 plants were morphologically normal except for some modified flowers either without petals or with petals of reduced size. Surprisingly, petals of novel shapes such as tubular petals were also observed, indicating a profound effect of cell division inhibition on morphogenesis. The cell size in the smaller modified petals was similar to that in control petals, suggesting that the reduction of petal size is mainly due to the reduction of cell numbers and that the inhibition of cell division does not necessarily lead to an increase in cell size. Transgenic Bgp1-ICK1 plants were normal morphologically; however, dramatic decreases in seed production were observed in some plants. In those plants, the ability of pollen to germinate and pollen nuclear number were affected. These results are discussed in relation to the cell cycle and plant development. PMID:12029474

  12. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21CDKN1A as a target of anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Stivala, L A; Cazzalini, O; Prosperi, E

    2012-02-01

    p21CDKN1A (WAF1/CIP1/SDI1), the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor belonging to the Cip/Kip family, was first described as a potent inhibitor of cell proliferation and DNA replication, both in physiological conditions and after DNA damage. More recently, p21 has been recognized to play additional and fundamental roles in other important pathways, including regulation of transcription, apoptosis and DNA repair. Knock-out mouse studies combined with biochemical and functional analysis of cells in culture have indicated a tumor suppressor activity for p21. However, these lines of evidence have been complicated by other findings indicating that p21 can exhibit oncogenic properties. In fact, the evidence that p21 expression may lead to proliferation arrest, is counterbalanced by the rescue of tumor cells from drug-induced apoptosis, and by promoting a metastatic potential. For these reasons, p21 is considered a protein with a dual behavior, with potential benefits, as well as dangerous effects of its expression in malignant cells. Thus, the effectiveness of targeting p21 expression for antitumor therapy needs to be carefully evaluated accordingly. This review summarizes the functions and regulations of p21, and focuses on its involvement in human diseases (particularly cancer), and on the pharmacological approaches to target p21 expression (either positively or negatively) for anticancer therapy. Based on these approaches, the search for new molecules that are able to promote the tumor-suppressor activity, and/or to interfere with the oncogenic properties of p21, could be promising. PMID:22165965

  13. Inhibition of polyamine oxidase prevented cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor-induced apoptosis in HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gürkan, Ajda Coker; Arisan, Elif Damla; Obakan, Pinar; Palavan-Ünsal, Narçin

    2013-12-01

    Roscovitine and purvalanol are novel cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors that prevent cell proliferation and induce apoptotic cell death in various cancer cell lines. Although a number of studies have demonstrated the potential apoptotic role of roscovitine, there is limited data about the therapeutic efficiency of purvalanol on cancer cells. The natural polyamines (PAs) putrescine, spermidine, and spermine have essential roles in the regulation of cell differentiation, growth, and proliferation, and increased levels of these compounds have been associated with cancer progression. Recently, depletion of intracellular PA levels because of modulation of PA catabolic enzymes was shown to be an indicator of the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents. In this study, our aim was to investigate the potential role of PA catabolic enzymes in CDK inhibitor-induced apoptosis in HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells. Exposure of cells to roscovitine or purvalanol decreased cell viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The selected concentrations of roscovitine and purvalanol inhibited cell viability by 50 % compared with control cells and induced apoptosis by activating the mitochondria-mediated pathway in a caspase-dependent manner. However, the apoptotic effect of purvalanol was stronger than that of roscovitine in HCT 116 cells. In addition, we found that CDK inhibitors decreased PA levels and significantly upregulated expression of key PA catabolic enzymes such as polyamine oxidase (PAO) and spermine oxidase (SMO). MDL-72,527, a specific inhibitor of PAO and SMO, decreased apoptotic potential of CDK inhibitors on HCT 116 cells. Moreover, transient silencing of PAO was also reduced prevented CDK inhibitor-induced apoptosis in HCT 116 cells. We conclude that the PA catabolic pathway, especially PAO, is a critical target for understanding the molecular mechanism of CDK inhibitor-induced apoptosis. PMID:23892915

  14. 7,3',4'-Trihydroxyisoflavone inhibits epidermal growth factor-induced proliferation and transformation of JB6 P+ mouse epidermal cells by suppressing cyclin-dependent kinases and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Eun; Lee, Ki Won; Song, Nu Ry; Seo, Sang Kwon; Heo, Yong-Seok; Kang, Nam Joo; Bode, Ann M; Lee, Hyong Joo; Dong, Zigang

    2010-07-01

    Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that isoflavones exhibit anti-proliferative activity against epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor-positive malignancies of the breast, colon, skin, and prostate. 7,3',4'-Trihydroxyisoflavone (7,3',4'-THIF) is one of the metabolites of daidzein, a well known soy isoflavone, but its chemopreventive activity and the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, 7,3',4'-THIF prevented EGF-induced neoplastic transformation and proliferation of JB6 P+ mouse epidermal cells. It significantly blocked cell cycle progression of EGF-stimulated cells at the G(1) phase. As shown by Western blot, 7,3',4'-THIF suppressed the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein at Ser-795 and Ser-807/Ser-811, which are the specific sites of phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4. It also inhibited the expression of G(1) phase-regulatory proteins, including cyclin D1, CDK4, cyclin E, and CDK2. In addition to regulating the expression of cell cycle-regulatory proteins, 7,3',4'-THIF bound to CDK4 and CDK2 and strongly inhibited their kinase activities. It also bound to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), strongly inhibiting its kinase activity and thereby suppressing the Akt/GSK-3beta/AP-1 pathway and subsequently attenuating the expression of cyclin D1. Collectively, these results suggest that CDKs and PI3K are the primary molecular targets of 7,3',4'-THIF in the suppression of EGF-induced cell proliferation. These insights into the biological actions of 7,3',4'-THIF provide a molecular basis for the possible development of new chemoprotective agents. PMID:20444693

  15. Cell growth of BG-1 ovarian cancer cells is promoted by di-n-butyl phthalate and hexabromocyclododecane via upregulation of the cyclin D and cyclin-dependent kinase-4 genes.

    PubMed

    Park, Min-Ah; Hwang, Kyung-A; Lee, Hye-Rim; Yi, Bo-Rim; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2012-03-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are environmentally persistent exogenous compounds released from various industrial products such as plastics, pesticides, drugs, detergents and cosmetics. They can cause a variety of adverse effects to the reproductive, developmental, immune and nervous systems in humans and wildlife. Di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) is the main compound of phthalates and is reported to inhibit estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated gene expression and to interfere with normal fetal development of the male reproductive system. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD or HBCDD) is one of the brominated flame retardants (BFRs) which have been widely used in plastic, electronic and textile applications and are known to cause endocrine disruption with toxicity of the nervous system. In the present study, the estrogenic effects of DBP and HBCD were examined in an ovarian cancer cell line, BG-1, expressing high levels of ER via MTT assay and semi-quantitative reverse-transcription PCR. Treatment with DBP (10(-8)-10(-5) M) or HBCD (2 x 10(-8) -2 x 10(-6) M) resulted in increased cell proliferation of BG-1 cells as observed with 17-β estradiol (E2). In addition, both DBP and HBCD upregulated the expression levels of cell cycle-regulatory genes, such as cyclin D and cyclin-dependent kinase-4 (cdk-4), which are downstream target genes of ER, at 6 h after treatment. However, the expression of the p21 gene was not altered by DBP or HBCD at any time as with E2. Taken together, these results suggest that DBP and HBCD are EDCs which have apparent estrogenic activities by stimulating the cell proliferation of BG-1 cells and by inducing the expression of cyclin D and cdk-4. Our results suggest that DBP and HBCD have sufficient potency to disrupt the endocrine system and to stimulate cell growth in ER-positive cancer cells. PMID:22179484

  16. Choline availability modulates human neuroblastoma cell proliferation and alters the methylation of the promoter region of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 gene.

    PubMed

    Niculescu, Mihai D; Yamamuro, Yutaka; Zeisel, Steven H

    2004-06-01

    Choline is an important methyl donor and a component of membrane phospholipids. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that choline availability can modulate cell proliferation and the methylation of genes that regulate cell cycling. In several other model systems, hypomethylation of cytosine bases that are followed by a guanosine (CpG) sites in the promoter region of a gene is associated with increased gene expression. We found that in choline-deficient IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells, the promoter of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 gene (CDKN3) was hypomethylated. This change was associated with increased expression of CDKN3 and increased levels of its gene product, kinase-associated phosphatase (KAP), which inhibits the G(1)/S transition of the cell cycle by dephosphorylating cyclin-dependent kinases. Choline deficiency also reduced global DNA methylation. The percentage of cells that accumulated bromodeoxyuridine (proportional to cell proliferation) was 1.8 times lower in the choline-deficient cells than in the control cells. Phosphorylated retinoblastoma (p110) levels were 3 times lower in the choline-deficient cells than in control cells. These findings suggest that the mechanism whereby choline deficiency inhibits cell proliferation involves hypomethylation of key genes regulating cell cycling. This may be a mechanism for our previously reported observation that stem cell proliferation in hippocampus neuroepithelium is decreased in choline-deficient rat and mouse fetuses. PMID:15147518

  17. Modulation of Cyclins, p53 and Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Signaling in Breast Cancer Cell Lines by 4-(3,4,5-Trimethoxyphenoxy)benzoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuan-Han; Ho, Wen-Yueh; Wu, Shu-Jing; Omar, Hany A.; Huang, Po-Jui; Wang, Clay C. C.; Hung, Jui-Hsiang

    2014-01-01

    Despite the advances in cancer therapy and early detection, breast cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related deaths among females worldwide. The aim of the current study was to investigate the antitumor activity of a novel compound, 4-(3,4,5-trimethoxyphenoxy)benzoic acid (TMPBA) and its mechanism of action, in breast cancer. Results indicated the relatively high sensitivity of human breast cancer cell-7 and MDA-468 cells towards TMPBA with IC50 values of 5.9 and 7.9 μM, respectively compared to hepatocarcinoma cell line Huh-7, hepatocarcinoma cell line HepG2, and cervical cancer cell line Hela cells. Mechanistically, TMPBA induced apoptotic cell death in MCF-7 cells as indicated by 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) nuclear staining, cell cycle analysis and the activation of caspase-3. Western blot analysis revealed the ability of TMPBA to target pathways mediated by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and p53, of which the concerted action underlined its antitumor efficacy. In addition, TMPBA induced alteration of cyclin proteins’ expression and consequently modulated the cell cycle. Taken together, the current study underscores evidence that TMPBA induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells via the modulation of cyclins and p53 expression as well as the modulation of AMPK and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling. These findings support TMPBA’s clinical promise as a potential candidate for breast cancer therapy. PMID:24406729

  18. Choline availability modulates human neuroblastoma cell proliferation and alters the methylation of the promoter region of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 gene

    PubMed Central

    Niculescu, Mihai D.; Yamamuro, Yutaka; Zeisel, Steven H.

    2006-01-01

    Choline is an important methyl donor and a component of membrane phospholipids. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that choline availability can modulate cell proliferation and the methylation of genes that regulate cell cycling. In several other model systems, hypomethylation of cytosine bases that are followed by a guanosine (CpG) sites in the promoter region of a gene is associated with increased gene expression. We found that in choline-deficient IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells, the promoter of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3 gene (CDKN3) was hypomethylated. This change was associated with increased expression of CDKN3 and increased levels of its gene product, kinase-associated phosphatase (KAP), which inhibits the G1/S transition of the cell cycle by dephosphorylating cyclin-dependent kinases. Choline deficiency also reduced global DNA methylation. The percentage of cells that accumulated bromodeoxyuridine (proportional to cell proliferation) was 1.8 times lower in the choline-deficient cells than in the control cells. Phosphorylated retinoblastoma (p110) levels were 3 times lower in the choline-deficient cells than in control cells. These findings suggest that the mechanism whereby choline deficiency inhibits cell proliferation involves hypomethylation of key genes regulating cell cycling. This may be a mechanism for our previously reported observation that stem cell proliferation in hippocampus neuroepithelium is decreased in choline-deficient rat and mouse fetuses. PMID:15147518

  19. A Dominant Negative Mutant of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase A Reduces Endoreduplication but Not Cell Size or Gene Expression in Maize Endosperm

    PubMed Central

    Leiva-Neto, João T.; Grafi, Gideon; Sabelli, Paolo A.; Dante, Ricardo A.; Woo, Young-min; Maddock, Sheila; Gordon-Kamm, William J.; Larkins, Brian A.

    2004-01-01

    Cells in maize (Zea mays) endosperm undergo multiple cycles of endoreduplication, with some attaining DNA contents as high as 96C and 192C. Genome amplification begins around 10 d after pollination, coincident with cell enlargement and the onset of starch and storage protein accumulation. Although the role of endoreduplication is unclear, it is thought to provide a mechanism that increases cell size and enhances gene expression. To investigate this process, we reduced endoreduplication in transgenic maize endosperm by ectopically expressing a gene encoding a dominant negative mutant form of cyclin-dependent kinase A. This gene was regulated by the 27-kD γ-zein promoter, which restricted synthesis of the defective enzyme to the endoreduplication rather than the mitotic phase of endosperm development. Overexpression of a wild-type cyclin-dependent kinase A increased enzyme activity but had no effect on endoreduplication. By contrast, ectopic expression of the defective enzyme lowered kinase activity and reduced by half the mean C-value and total DNA content of endosperm nuclei. The lower level of endoreduplication did not affect cell size and only slightly reduced starch and storage protein accumulation. There was little difference in the level of endosperm gene expression with high and low levels of endoreduplication, suggesting that this process may not enhance transcription of genes associated with starch and storage protein synthesis. PMID:15208390

  20. The Ability of Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b To Transactivate Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transcription Depends on a Functional Kinase Domain, Cyclin T1, and Tat

    PubMed Central

    Fujinaga, Koh; Cujec, Thomas P.; Peng, Junmin; Garriga, Judit; Price, David H.; Graña, Xavier; Peterlin, B. Matija

    1998-01-01

    By binding to the transactivation response element (TAR) RNA, the transcriptional transactivator (Tat) from the human immunodeficiency virus increases rates of elongation rather than initiation of viral transcription. Two cyclin-dependent serine/threonine kinases, CDK7 and CDK9, which phosphorylate the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, have been implicated in Tat transactivation in vivo and in vitro. In this report, we demonstrate that CDK9, which is the kinase component of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) complex, can activate viral transcription when tethered to the heterologous Rev response element RNA via the regulator of expression of virion proteins (Rev). The kinase activity of CDK9 and cyclin T1 is essential for these effects. Moreover, P-TEFb binds to TAR only in the presence of Tat. We conclude that Tat–P-TEFb complexes bind to TAR, where CDK9 modifies RNA polymerase II for the efficient copying of the viral genome. PMID:9696809

  1. Potent inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 induce nuclear accumulation of wild-type p53 and nucleolar fragmentation in human untransformed and tumor-derived cells.

    PubMed

    David-Pfeuty, T

    1999-12-01

    The cdk2 gene has been identified as a human cdc2/CDC28-related gene that encodes a protein kinase essential for the G1/S transition in mammalian cells, but not for the G2/M transition, which requires Cdk1, another p34cdc2/CDC28 homolog. Novel potential functions of Cdk2 have been uncovered by using two potent and specific inhibitors of its kinase activity, roscovitine and olomoucine, on human wt p53-expresser untransformed and tumor-derived cells. At concentrations equal or superior to respectively 30- and 20-fold their in vitro IC50 values for cyclin B/Cdk1, cyclin A/Cdk2 and cyclin E/Cdk2, the Cdk inhibitors precipitately induce a dramatic nuclear accumulation of wt p53 and a delocalization of nucleolin from the nucleolus in all interphase cells, whatever their cell cycle status, acting in this way like the DNA-damaging drug, mitomycin C (7 microg/ml). These early events are soon followed by a nucleolar fragmentation in both normal and tumor cells in the presence of the Cdk inhibitors but not in the presence of the DNA-damaging drug. Yet, treatment with either type of compounds eventually triggers rapidly the death of the tumor cells and, much more slowly, that of the normal cells. The Cdk inhibitors, however, stimulate cell death from any stage of the cell cycle, whereas the DNA-damaging drug kills more efficaciously S phase cells. These observations provide a hint that the Cdk2 kinase might be involved in controlling the nuclear levels of the tumor suppressor wt p53 protein and in maintaining the nucleolar integrity and function, linking in this way the cell division cycle machinery to survival functions and overall cell metabolism via the control of nucleocytoplasmic transport and of ribosome production. PMID:10602500

  2. LPLUNC1 Inhibits Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Cell Growth via Down-Regulation of the MAP Kinase and Cyclin D1/E2F Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoling; Zhang, Wenling; Fan, Songqing; Shi, Lei; Li, Xiayu; Gong, Zhaojian; Ma, Jian; Zhou, Ming; Xiang, Juanjuan; Peng, Shuping; Xiang, Bo; Deng, Hao; Yang, Yunbo; Li, Yong; Xiong, Wei; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Li, Guiyuan

    2013-01-01

    Long-palate, lung and nasal epithelium clone 1 (LPLUNC1) gene expression is relatively tissue specific. It is highly expressed in nontumor nasopharyngeal epithelial tissues, but its expression is reduced in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), indicating that LPLUNC1 may be associated with the tumorigenesis of NPC. To study the effects of LPLUNC1 on NPC tumorigenesis, a full-length LPLUNC1 expression plasmid was stably transfected into the NPC cell line, 5-8F. Our data indicated that LPLUNC1 inhibited NPC cell proliferation in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. LPLUNC1 also delayed cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase and inhibited the expression of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and phosphorylated Rb. To further investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the suppressive effects of LPLUNC1 on NPC tumorigenesis, cDNA microarray was performed. These studies revealed that LPLUNC1 inhibited the expression of certain mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases (MAPK) kinases and cell cycle-related molecules. Western blotting confirmed that the expression of MEK1, phosphorylated ERK1/2, phosphorylated JNK1/2, c-Myc and c-Jun were inhibited by LPLUNC1. Furthermore, the transcriptional activity of AP-1 was down-regulated by LPLUNC1, suggesting that the MAPK signaling pathway is regulated by LPLUNC1. Taken together, the present study indicates that LPLUNC1 delays NPC cell growth by inhibiting the MAPK and cyclin D1/E2F pathways and suggests that LPLUNC1 may represent a promising candidate tumor suppressor gene associated with NPC. PMID:23650533

  3. Immortalization of Fetal Bovine Colon Epithelial Cells by Expression of Human Cyclin D1, Mutant Cyclin Dependent Kinase 4, and Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase: An In Vitro Model for Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Kengo; Kiyono, Tohru; Isogai, Emiko; Masuda, Mizuki; Narita, Moe; Okuno, Katsuya; Koyanagi, Yukako; Fukuda, Tomokazu

    2015-01-01

    Cattle are the economically important animals in human society. They are essential for the production of livestock products such as milk and meats. The production efficiency of livestock products is negatively impacted by infection with zoonotic pathogens. To prevent and control infectious diseases, it is important to understand the interaction between cattle tissue and pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we established an in vitro infection model of an immortalized bovine colon-derived epithelial cell line by transducing the cells with lentiviral vectors containing genes encoding cell cycle regulators cyclin D1, mutant cyclin dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). The established cell line showed continuous cell proliferation, expression of epithelial markers, and an intact karyotype, indicating that the cells maintained their original nature as colon-derived epithelium. Furthermore, we exposed the established cell line to two strains of Salmonella enterica and EHEC. Interestingly, S. Typhimurium showed higher affinity for the established cell line and invaded the cytoplasm than S. Enteritidis. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that gene expression of Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1), TLR 2 and TLR 3, whereas TLR 4, 5 and 6 were not detectable in established cells. Our established immortalized colon-derived epithelial cell should be a useful tool for studies evaluating the molecular mechanisms underlying bacterial infection. PMID:26624883

  4. Immortalization of Fetal Bovine Colon Epithelial Cells by Expression of Human Cyclin D1, Mutant Cyclin Dependent Kinase 4, and Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase: An In Vitro Model for Bacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kengo; Kiyono, Tohru; Isogai, Emiko; Masuda, Mizuki; Narita, Moe; Okuno, Katsuya; Koyanagi, Yukako; Fukuda, Tomokazu

    2015-01-01

    Cattle are the economically important animals in human society. They are essential for the production of livestock products such as milk and meats. The production efficiency of livestock products is negatively impacted by infection with zoonotic pathogens. To prevent and control infectious diseases, it is important to understand the interaction between cattle tissue and pathogenic bacteria. In this study, we established an in vitro infection model of an immortalized bovine colon-derived epithelial cell line by transducing the cells with lentiviral vectors containing genes encoding cell cycle regulators cyclin D1, mutant cyclin dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT). The established cell line showed continuous cell proliferation, expression of epithelial markers, and an intact karyotype, indicating that the cells maintained their original nature as colon-derived epithelium. Furthermore, we exposed the established cell line to two strains of Salmonella enterica and EHEC. Interestingly, S. Typhimurium showed higher affinity for the established cell line and invaded the cytoplasm than S. Enteritidis. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed that gene expression of Toll-like receptor 1 (TLR1), TLR 2 and TLR 3, whereas TLR 4, 5 and 6 were not detectable in established cells. Our established immortalized colon-derived epithelial cell should be a useful tool for studies evaluating the molecular mechanisms underlying bacterial infection. PMID:26624883

  5. Chromium-VI arrests cell cycle and decreases granulosa cell proliferation by down-regulating cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) and cyclins and up-regulating CDK-Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Jone A.; Lee, JeHoon; Nithy, Thamizh K.; Arosh, Joe A.; Burghardt, Robert C.; Banu, Sakhila K.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental contamination with hexavalent chromium (CrVI) has been increasing in the drinking water of the USA and developing countries. CrVI causes various health problems including menstrual disorders and infertility. Recently, we reported that CrVI causes granulosa cell apoptosis through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Our previous studies showed that postnatal exposure to CrVI arrests follicle development. In order to explore the underlying mechanism, primary and immortalized granulosa cells from rats were treated with 10 μM potassium dichromate and analyses of the cell cycle, and cell cycle regulatory proteins were performed. CrVI decreased cell proliferation as a result of cell cycle arrest and down-regulated cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK), cyclins, and PCNA while up-regulating CDK-inhibitors and down-regulating FSH receptor and ERβ. Vitamin C mitigated the effects of CrVI. This study shows that CrVI causes cell cycle arrest in granulosa cells by altering cell cycle regulatory proteins with potential intervention by vitamin C. PMID:21621607

  6. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor drugs as potential novel anti-inflammatory and pro-resolution agents

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, AE; Haslett, C; Rossi, AG

    2009-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKi) drugs such as R-roscovitine have emerged as potential anti-inflammatory, pharmacological agents that can influence the resolution of inflammation. Usually, once an inciting inflammatory stimulus has been eliminated, resolution proceeds by prompt, safe removal of dominant inflammatory cells. This is accomplished by programmed cell death (apoptosis) of prominent effector, inflammatory cells typified by the neutrophil. Apoptosis of neutrophils ensures that toxic neutrophil granule contents are securely packaged in apoptotic bodies and expedites phagocytosis by professional phagocytes such as macrophages. A panel of CDKi drugs have been shown to promote neutrophil apoptosis in a concentration- and time-dependent manner and the archetypal CDKi drug, R-roscovitine, overrides the anti-apoptotic effects of powerful survival factors [including lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF)]. Inflammatory cell longevity and survival signalling is integral to the inflammatory process and any putative anti-inflammatory agent must unravel a complex web of redundancy in order to be effective. CDKi drugs have also been demonstrated to have significant effects on other cell types including lymphocytes and fibroblasts indicating that they may have pleiotropic anti-inflammatory, pro-resolution activity. In keeping with this, CDKi drugs like R-roscovitine have been reported to be efficacious in resolving established animal models of neutrophil-dominant and lymphocyte-driven inflammation. However, the mechanism of action behind these powerful effects has not yet been fully elucidated. CDKs play an integral role in the regulation of the cell cycle but are also recognized as participants in processes such as apoptosis and transcriptional regulation. Neutrophils have functional CDKs, are transcriptionally active and demonstrate augmented apoptosis in response to CDKi drugs, while lymphocyte proliferation

  7. Downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor; p57{sup kip2}, is involved in the cell cycle progression of vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Noritsugu . E-mail: norida@med.hokudai.ac.jp; Urasawa, Kazushi; Takagi, Yasushi; Saito, Takahiko; Kaneta, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Susumu; Higashi, Hideaki; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Kitabatake, Akira

    2005-12-23

    Immature vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) proliferate responding to extrinsic mitogens and accumulate in neointima after arterial injuries. Cell proliferation is positively regulated by cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) complex and negatively controlled by CDK inhibitors; CKIs such as p27{sup kip1} and p57{sup kip2}. In this study, embryonic rat thoracic aorta VSMCs; A10 were G0/G1 arrested by serum starvation, re-stimulated with serum, and harvested every four hours. Both CKIs co-expressed in quiescent VSMCs and rapidly diminished by stimulation. Protein level of p27{sup kip1} was regulated by both transcription and post-transcription, but that of p57{sup kip2} was mainly by post-transcription. Supplemental overexpression of p57{sup kip2} inhibited the activations of G1 cyclin/CDKs and subsequent hyperphosphorylations of all three retinoblastoma pocket proteins as well as G1/S transition of cell cycle. Our findings suggest that the downregulations of not only p27{sup kip1}, but also p57{sup kip2} responding to mitogenic stimulation, play key roles in the cell cycle progression of VSMCs.

  8. Modulated expression of genes encoding estrogen metabolizing enzymes by G1-phase cyclin-dependent kinases 6 and 4 in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yi; Domenico, Joanne; Swasey, Christina; Wang, Meiqin; Gelfand, Erwin W; Lucas, Joseph J

    2014-01-01

    G1-phase cell cycle defects, such as alterations in cyclin D1 or cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) levels, are seen in most tumors. For example, increased cyclin D1 and decreased cdk6 levels are seen in many human breast tumors. Overexpression of cdk6 in breast tumor cells in culture has been shown to suppress proliferation, unlike the growth stimulating effects of its close homolog, cdk4. In addition to directly affecting proliferation, alterations in cdk6 or cdk4 levels in breast tumor cells also differentially influence levels of numerous steroid metabolic enzymes (SMEs), including those involved in estrogen metabolism. Overexpression of cdk6 in tumor cell lines having low cdk6 resulted in decreased levels of mRNAs encoding aldo-keto reductase (AKR)1C1, AKR1C2 and AKR1C3, which are hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) involved in steroid hormone metabolism. In contrast, increasing cdk4 dramatically increased these transcript levels, especially those encoding AKR1C3, an enzyme that converts estrone to 17β-estradiol, a change that could result in a pro-estrogenic state favoring tumor growth. Effects on other estrogen metabolizing enzymes, including cytochrome P450 (CYP) 19 aromatase, 17β-HSD2, and CYP1B1 transcripts, were also observed. Interactions of cdk6 and cdk4, but not cyclin D1, with the promoter region of a cdk-regulated gene, 17β-HSD2, were detected. The results uncover a previously unsuspected link between the cell cycle and hormone metabolism and differential roles for cdk6 and cdk4 in a novel mechanism for pre-receptor control of steroid hormone action, with important implications for the origin and treatment of steroid hormone-dependent cancers. PMID:24848372

  9. B-Myb switches from Cyclin/Cdk-dependent to Jnk- and p38 kinase-dependent phosphorylation and associates with SC35 bodies after UV stress

    PubMed Central

    Werwein, E; Dzuganova, M; Usadel, C; Klempnauer, K-H

    2013-01-01

    B-Myb is a highly conserved member of the Myb transcription factor family that has essential roles in cell-cycle progression. Recent work has suggested that B-Myb is also involved in the cellular DNA-damage response. Here, we have investigated the fate of B-Myb in UV-irradiated cells. UV stress leads to the appearance of phosphorylated B-Myb in nuclear SC35 speckles during transcriptional shutdown. Furthermore, we show that UV irradiation leads to a change of the phosphorylation pattern of B-Myb, which is caused by a switch from Cyclin/Cdk-dependent to Jnk and p38 kinase-dependent phosphorylation. Taken together, we have identified Jnk and p38 kinase as novel regulators of B-Myb and established the localization of phosphorylated B-Myb in SC35 speckles as a potential novel regulatory mechanism for B-Myb in UV irradiated cells. PMID:23449447

  10. Composite low affinity interactions dictate recognition of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor Sic1 by the SCF[superscript Cdc4] ubiquitin ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Xiaojing; Orlicky, Stephen; Mittag, Tanja; Csizmok, Veronika; Pawson, Tony; Forman-Kay, Julie D.; Sicheri, Frank; Tyers, Mike

    2012-05-24

    The ubiquitin ligase SCF{sup Cdc4} (Skp1/Cul1/F-box protein) recognizes its substrate, the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor Sic1, in a multisite phosphorylation-dependent manner. Although short diphosphorylated peptides derived from Sic1 can bind to Cdc4 with high affinity, through systematic mutagenesis and quantitative biophysical analysis we show that individually weak, dispersed Sic1 phospho sites engage Cdc4 in a dynamic equilibrium. The affinities of individual phosphoepitopes serve to tune the overall phosphorylation site threshold needed for efficient recognition. Notably, phosphoepitope affinity for Cdc4 is dramatically weakened in the context of full-length Sic1, demonstrating the importance of regional environment on binding interactions. The multisite nature of the Sic1-Cdc4 interaction confers cooperative dependence on kinase activity for Sic1 recognition and ubiquitination under equilibrium reaction conditions. Composite dynamic interactions of low affinity sites may be a general mechanism to establish phosphorylation thresholds in biological responses.

  11. AT7519, A novel small molecule multi-cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, induces apoptosis in multiple myeloma via GSK-3beta activation and RNA polymerase II inhibition.

    PubMed

    Santo, L; Vallet, S; Hideshima, T; Cirstea, D; Ikeda, H; Pozzi, S; Patel, K; Okawa, Y; Gorgun, G; Perrone, G; Calabrese, E; Yule, M; Squires, M; Ladetto, M; Boccadoro, M; Richardson, P G; Munshi, N C; Anderson, K C; Raje, N

    2010-04-22

    Dysregulated cell cycling is a universal hallmark of cancer and is often mediated by abnormal activation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and their cyclin partners. Overexpression of individual complexes are reported in multiple myeloma (MM), making them attractive therapeutic targets. In this study, we investigate the preclinical activity of a novel small-molecule multi-CDK inhibitor, AT7519, in MM. We show the anti-MM activity of AT7519 displaying potent cytotoxicity and apoptosis; associated with in vivo tumor growth inhibition and prolonged survival. At the molecular level, AT7519 inhibited RNA polymerase II (RNA pol II) phosphorylation, a CDK9, 7 substrate, associated with decreased RNA synthesis confirmed by [(3)H] Uridine incorporation. In addition, AT7519 inhibited glycogen synthase kinase 3beta (GSK-3beta) phosphorylation; conversely pretreatment with a selective GSK-3 inhibitor and shRNA GSK-3beta knockdown restored MM survival, suggesting the involvement of GSK-3beta in AT7519-induced apoptosis. GSK-3beta activation was independent of RNA pol II dephosphorylation confirmed by alpha-amanitin, a specific RNA pol II inihibitor, showing potent inhibition of RNA pol II phosphorylation without corresponding effects on GSK-3beta phosphorylation. These results offer new insights into the crucial, yet controversial role of GSK-3beta in MM and show significant anti-MM activity of AT7519, providing the rationale for its clinical evaluation in MM. PMID:20101221

  12. Interaction with cyclin H/cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CCNH/CDK7) stabilizes C-terminal binding protein 2 (CtBP2) and promotes cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuchan; Liu, Fang; Mao, Feng; Hang, Qinlei; Huang, Xiaodong; He, Song; Wang, Yingying; Cheng, Chun; Wang, Huijie; Xu, Guangfei; Zhang, Tianyi; Shen, Aiguo

    2013-03-29

    CtBP2 has been demonstrated to possess tumor-promoting capacities by virtue of up-regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and down-regulating apoptosis in cancer cells. As a result, cellular CtBP2 levels are considered a key factor determining the outcome of oncogenic transformation. How pro-tumorigenic and anti-tumorigenic factors compete for fine-tuning CtBP2 levels is incompletely understood. Here we report that the cyclin H/cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CCNH/CDK7) complex interacted with CtBP2 in vivo and in vitro. Depletion of either CCNH or CDK7 decreased CtBP2 protein levels by accelerating proteasome-dependent CtBP2 clearance. Further analysis revealed that CCNH/CDK7 competed with the tumor repressor HIPK2 for CtBP2 binding and consequently inhibited phosphorylation and dimerization of CtBP2. Phosphorylation-defective CtBP2 interacted more strongly with CCNH/CDK7 and was more resistant to degradation. Finally, overexpression of CtBP2 increased whereas depletion of CtBP2 dampened the invasive and migratory potential of breast cancer cells. CtBP2 promoted the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells in a CCNH-dependent manner. Taken together, our data have delineated a novel pathway that regulates CtBP2 stability, suggesting that targeting the CCNH/CDK7-CtBP2 axis may yield a viable anti-tumor strategy. PMID:23393140

  13. Crystal structure of human cyclin-dependent kinase-2 complex with MK2 inhibitor TEI-I01800: insight into the selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Fujino, Aiko; Fukushima, Kei; Kubota, Takaharu; Kosugi, Tomomi; Takimoto-Kamimura, Midori

    2013-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2 or MAPKAP-K2) is a Ser/Thr kinase from the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathway and plays an important role in inflammatory diseases. The crystal structure of the MK2–TEI-I01800 complex has been reported; its Gly-rich loop was found to form an α-helix, not a β-sheet as has been observed for other Ser/Thr kinases. TEI-I01800 is 177-fold selective against MK2 compared with CDK2; in order to understand the inhibitory mechanism of TEI-I01800, the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) complex structure with TEI-I01800 was determined at 2.0 Å resolution. Interestingly, the Gly-rich loop of CDK2 formed a β-sheet that was different from that of MK2. In MK2, TEI-I01800 changed the secondary structure of the Gly-rich loop from a β-sheet to an α-helix by collision between Leu70 and a p-ethoxyphenyl group at the 7-position and bound to MK2. However, for CDK2, TEI-I01800 bound to CDK2 without this structural change and lost the interaction with the substituent at the 7-position. In summary, the results of this study suggest that the reason for the selectivity of TEI-I01800 is the favourable conformation of TEI-I01800 itself, making it suitable for binding to the α-form MK2. PMID:24121337

  14. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor P1446A Induces Apoptosis in a JNK/p38 MAPK-Dependent Manner in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Cody; Godbersen, J. Claire; Soderquist, Ryan S.; Rowland, Taylor; Kilmarx, Sumner; Spurgeon, Stephen E.; Brown, Jennifer R.; Srinivasa, Sreesha P.; Danilov, Alexey V.

    2015-01-01

    CDK (cyclin-dependent kinase) inhibitors have shown remarkable activity in CLL, where its efficacy has been linked to inhibition of the transcriptional CDKs (7 and 9) and deregulation of RNA polymerase and short-lived pro-survival proteins such as MCL1. Furthermore, ER (endoplasmic reticulum) stress has been implicated in CDK inhibition in CLL. Here we conducted a pre-clinical study of a novel orally active kinase inhibitor P1446A in CLL B-cells. P1446A inhibited CDKs at nanomolar concentrations and induced rapid apoptosis of CLL cells in vitro, irrespective of chromosomal abnormalities or IGHV mutational status. Apoptosis preceded inactivation of RNA polymerase, and was accompanied by phosphorylation of stress kinases JNK (c-Jun N-terminal kinase) and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase). Pharmacologic inhibitors of JNK/p38 MAPK conferred protection from P1446A-mediated apoptosis. Treatment with P1446A led to a dramatic induction of NOXA in a JNK-dependent manner, and sensitized CLL cells to ABT-737, a BH3-mimetic. We observed concurrent activation of apoptosis stress-inducing kinase 1 (ASK1) and its interaction with inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) and tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2) in CLL cells treated with P1446A, providing insights into upstream regulation of JNK in this setting. Consistent with previous reports on limited functionality of ER stress mechanism in CLL cells, treatment with P1446A failed to induce an extensive unfolded protein response. This study provides rationale for additional investigations of P1446A in CLL. PMID:26606677

  15. Regulation of the Action of Early Mitotic Inhibitor 1 on the Anaphase-promoting Complex/Cyclosome by Cyclin-dependent Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Moshe, Yakir; Bar-On, Ortal; Ganoth, Dvora; Hershko, Avram

    2011-01-01

    Cell cycle regulation is characterized by alternating activities of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and of the ubiquitin ligase anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C). During S-phase APC/C is inhibited by early mitotic inhibitor 1 (Emi1) to allow the accumulation of cyclins A and B and to prevent re-replication. Emi1 is degraded at prophase by a Plk1-dependent pathway. Recent studies in which the degradation pathway of Emi1 was disrupted have shown that APC/C is activated at mitotic entry despite stabilization of Emi1. These results suggested the possibility of additional mechanisms other than degradation of Emi1, which release APC/C from inhibition by Emi1 upon entry into mitosis. In this study we report one such mechanism, by which the ability of Emi1 to inhibit APC/C is negatively regulated by CDKs. We show that in Plk1-inhibited cells Emi1 is stabilized and phosphorylated, that Emi1 is phosphorylated by CDKs in mitotic but not S-phase cell extracts, and that Emi1 phosphorylation by mitotic cell extracts or purified CDKs markedly reduces the ability of Emi1 to bind and to inhibit APC/C. Finally, we show that the addition of extracts from S-phase cells to extracts from mitotic cells protects Emi1 from CDK-mediated inactivation. PMID:21454540

  16. Variation in growth rate between Arabidopsis ecotypes is correlated with cell division and A-type cyclin-dependent kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Beemster, Gerrit T S; De Vusser, Kristof; De Tavernier, Evelien; De Bock, Kirsten; Inzé, Dirk

    2002-06-01

    We used a kinematic analysis to investigate the growth processes responsible for variation in primary root growth between 18 ecotypes of Arabidopsis. Root elongation rate differed 4-fold between the slowest (Landsberg erecta, 71 microm h(-1)) and fastest growing line (Wassilewskija [Ws]; 338 microm h(-1)). This difference was contributed almost equally by variations in mature cortical cell length (84 microm [Landsberg erecta] to 237 microm [Ws]) and rate of cell production (0.63 cell h(-1) [NW108] to 1.83 cell h(-1) [Ws]). Cell production, in turn, was determined by variation in cell cycle duration (19 h [Tsu] to 48 h [NW108]) and, to a lesser extent, by differences in the number of dividing cells (32 [Weiningen] to 61 [Ws]). We found no correlation between mature cell size and endoreduplication, refuting the hypothesis that the two are linked. However, there was a strong correlation between cell production rates and the activity of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDKA). The level of the protein could explain 32% of the variation in CDKA. Therefore, it is likely that regulators of CDKA, such as cyclins and inhibitors, are also involved. These data provide a functional link between cell cycle regulation and whole-plant growth rate as affected by genetic differences. PMID:12068124

  17. Sangivamycin-Like Molecule 6 (SLM6) exhibits potent anti-multiple myeloma activity through inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase-9 (CDK9)

    PubMed Central

    Dolloff, Nathan G.; Allen, Joshua E.; Dicker, David T.; Aqui, Nicole; Vogl, Dan; Malysz, Jozef; Talamo, Giampaolo; El-Deiry, Wafik S.

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant treatment advances over the past decade, multiple myeloma (MM) remains largely incurable. In this study we found that MM cells were remarkably sensitive to the death-inducing effects of a new class of sangivamycin-like molecules (SLMs). A panel of structurally related SLMs selectively induced apoptosis in MM cells but not other tumor or non-malignant cell lines at sub-micromolar concentrations. SLM6 was the most active compound in vivo, where it was well-tolerated and significantly inhibited growth and induced apoptosis of MM tumors. We determined that the anti-MM activity of SLM6 was mediated by direct inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9), which resulted in transcriptional repression of oncogenes that are known to drive MM progression (c-Maf, cyclin D1, and c-Myc). Furthermore, SLM6 demonstrated superior in vivo anti-MM activity over the CDK inhibitor flavopiridol, which is currently in clinical trials for MM. These findings demonstrate that SLM6 is a novel CDK9 inhibitor with promising preclinical activity as an anti-MM agent. PMID:22964485

  18. FGFR1 signaling stimulates proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells by inhibiting the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21(Waf1) and p27(Kip1).

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Christian; Helledie, Torben; Ling, Ling; Grünert, Martin; Canning, Claire A; Jones, C Michael; Hui, James H; Nurcombe, Victor; van Wijnen, Andre J; Cool, Simon M

    2013-12-01

    Signaling through fibroblast growth factor receptor one (FGFR1) is a known inducer of proliferation in both embryonic and human adult mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and positively regulates maintenance of stem cell viability. Leveraging the mitogenic potential of FGF2/FGFR1 signaling in stem cells for therapeutic applications necessitates a mechanistic understanding of how this receptor stimulates cell cycle progression. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA) depletion, antibody-inhibition, and small molecule inhibition, we establish that FGFR1 activity is rate limiting for self-renewal of hMSCs. We show that FGFR1 promotes stem cell proliferation through multiple mechanisms that unite to antagonize cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors. FGFR1 not only stimulates c-Myc to suppress transcription of the CDK inhibitors p21(Waf1) and p27(Kip1), thus promoting cell cycle progression but also increases the activity of protein kinase B (AKT) and the level of S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2), resulting in the nuclear exclusion and reduction of p21(Waf1). The in vivo importance of FGFR1 signaling for the control of proliferation in mesenchymal progenitor populations is underscored by defects in ventral mesoderm formation during development upon inhibition of its signaling. Collectively, these studies demonstrate that FGFR1 signaling mediates the continuation of MSC growth and establishes a receptor target for enhancing the expansion of mesenchymal progenitors while maintaining their multilineage potential. PMID:23939995

  19. Cyclin A is redundant in fibroblasts but essential in hematopoietic and embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kalaszczynska, Ilona; Geng, Yan; Iino, Tadafumi; Mizuno, Shin-ichi; Choi, Yoon; Kondratiuk, Ilona; Silver, Daniel P; Wolgemuth, Debra J; Akashi, Koichi; Sicinski, Piotr

    2009-07-23

    Cyclins are regulatory subunits of cyclin-dependent kinases. Cyclin A, the first cyclin ever cloned, is thought to be an essential component of the cell-cycle engine. Mammalian cells encode two A-type cyclins, testis-specific cyclin A1 and ubiquitously expressed cyclin A2. Here, we tested the requirement for cyclin A function using conditional knockout mice lacking both A-type cyclins. We found that acute ablation of cyclin A in fibroblasts did not affect cell proliferation, but led to prolonged expression of another cyclin, cyclin E, across the cell cycle. However, combined ablation of all A- and E-type cyclins extinguished cell division. In contrast, cyclin A function was essential for cell-cycle progression of hematopoietic and embryonic stem cells. Expression of cyclin A is particularly high in these compartments, which might render stem cells dependent on cyclin A, whereas in fibroblasts cyclins A and E play redundant roles in cell proliferation. PMID:19592082

  20. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4/6 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Breast Cancer: A Review of Preclinical and Clinical Data.

    PubMed

    Vidula, Neelima; Rugo, Hope S

    2016-02-01

    For millions of women, breast cancer remains a potentially life-endangering diagnosis. With advances in research, new therapies targeted to tumor biology are emerging to treat the most common form of this disease. Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4/6 inhibitors are a new class of therapeutic agents that have the potential to improve the outcomes of patients with hormone receptor-positive (HR(+)) breast cancer. Three CDK 4/6 inhibitors have been investigated for the treatment of HR(+) breast cancer, including palbociclib (PD 0332991), ribociclib (LEE011), and abemaciclib (LY2835219). Palbociclib recently received accelerated Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of HR(+) metastatic breast cancer in combination with letrozole, and recent data suggest improved outcome when combined with fulvestrant. In this article, the mechanism of action of CDK 4/6 inhibitors, preclinical studies on their efficacy, ongoing clinical trials in breast cancer, and toxicity profiles are reviewed. PMID:26303211

  1. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor seliciclib (R-roscovitine; CYC202) decreases the expression of mitotic control genes and prevents entry into mitosis.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Steven R; Te Poele, Robert H; Chan, Florence; Linardopoulos, Spiros; Walton, Michael I; Garrett, Michelle D; Workman, Paul

    2007-12-15

    The cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor seliciclib (R-roscovitine, CYC202) shows promising antitumor activity in preclinical models and is currently undergoing phase II clinical trials. Inhibition of the CDKs by seliciclib could contribute to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis seen with the drug. However, it is common for drugs to exert multiple effects on gene expression and biochemical pathways. To further our understanding of the molecular pharmacology of seliciclib, we employed cDNA microarrays to determine changes in gene expression profiles induced by the drug in HT29 human colon cancer cells. Concentrations of seliciclib were used that inhibited RB phosphorylation and cell proliferation. An increase in the mRNA expression for CJUN and EGR1 was confirmed by Western blotting, consistent with activation of the ERK1/2 MAPK pathway by seliciclib. Transcripts of key genes required for the progression through mitosis showed markedly reduced expression, including Aurora-A/B (AURK-A/B), Polo-like kinase (PLK), cyclin B2 (CCNB2), WEE1 and CDC25C. Reduced expression of these mitotic genes was also seen at the protein level. siRNA-mediated depletion of Aurora-A protein led to an arrest of cells in the G(2)/M phase, consistent with the effects of seliciclib treatment. Inhibition of mitotic entry following seliciclib treatment was indicated by a reduction of histone H3 phosphorylation, which is catalyzed by Aurora-B, and by decreased expression of mitotic markers, including phospho-protein phosphatase 1 alpha. The results indicate a potential mechanism through which seliciclib prevents entry into mitosis. Gene expression profiling has generated hypotheses that led to an increase in our knowledge of the cellular effects of seliciclib and could provide potential pharmacodynamic or response biomarkers for use in animal models and clinical trials. PMID:18075315

  2. Differential Roles of Two Homologous Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor Genes in Regulating Cell Cycle and Innate Immunity in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hamdoun, Safae; Zhang, Chong; Gill, Manroop; Churchman, Michelle; Larkin, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Precise cell-cycle control is critical for plant development and responses to pathogen invasion. Two homologous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor genes, SIAMESE (SIM) and SIM-RELATED 1 (SMR1), were recently shown to regulate Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) defense based on phenotypes conferred by a sim smr1 double mutant. However, whether these two genes play differential roles in cell-cycle and defense control is unknown. In this report, we show that while acting synergistically to promote endoreplication, SIM and SMR1 play different roles in affecting the ploidy of trichome and leaf cells, respectively. In addition, we found that the smr1-1 mutant, but not sim-1, was more susceptible to a virulent Pseudomonas syringae strain, and this susceptibility could be rescued by activating salicylic acid (SA)-mediated defense. Consistent with these results, smr1-1 partially suppressed the dwarfism, high SA levels, and cell death phenotypes in acd6-1, a mutant used to gauge the change of defense levels. Thus, SMR1 functions partly through SA in defense control. The differential roles of SIM and SMR1 are due to differences in temporal and spatial expression of these two genes in Arabidopsis tissues and in response to P. syringae infection. In addition, flow-cytometry analysis of plants with altered SA signaling revealed that SA is necessary, but not sufficient, to change cell-cycle progression. We further found that a mutant with three CYCD3 genes disrupted also compromised disease resistance to P. syringae. Together, this study reveals differential roles of two homologous cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors in regulating cell-cycle progression and innate immunity in Arabidopsis and provides insights into the importance of cell-cycle control during host-pathogen interactions. PMID:26561564

  3. An inhibitor of yeast cyclin-dependent protein kinase plays an important role in ensuring the genomic integrity of daughter cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nugroho, T T; Mendenhall, M D

    1994-01-01

    The gene encoding a 40-kDa protein, previously studied as a substrate and inhibitor of the yeast cyclin-dependent protein kinase, Cdc28, has been cloned. The DNA sequence reveals that p40 is a highly charged protein of 32,187 Da with no significant homology to other proteins. Overexpression of the gene encoding p40, SIC1, produces cells with an elongated but morphology similar to that of cells with depleted levels of the CLB gene products, suggesting that p40 acts as an inhibitor of Cdc28-Clb complexes in vivo. A SIC1 deletion is viable and has highly increased frequencies of broken and lost chromosomes. The deletion strain segregates out many dead cells that are primarily arrested at the G2 checkpoint in an asymmetric fashion. Only daughters and young mothers display the lethal defect, while experienced mothers appear to grow normally. These results suggest that negative regulation of Cdc28 protein kinase activity by p40 is important for faithful segregation of chromosomes to daughter cells. Images PMID:8164683

  4. SCFCdc4 Enables Mating Type Switching in Yeast by Cyclin-Dependent Kinase-Mediated Elimination of the Ash1 Transcriptional Repressor▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingquan; Larsen, Brett; Ricicova, Marketa; Orlicky, Stephen; Tekotte, Hille; Tang, Xiaojing; Craig, Karen; Quiring, Adam; Le Bihan, Thierry; Hansen, Carl; Sicheri, Frank; Tyers, Mike

    2011-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, mother cells switch mating types between a and α forms, whereas daughter cells do not. This developmental asymmetry arises because the expression of the HO endonuclease, which initiates the interconversion of a and α mating type cassettes, is extinguished by the daughter-specific Ash1 transcriptional repressor. When daughters become mothers in the subsequent cell cycle, Ash1 must be eliminated to enable a new developmental state. Here, we report that the ubiquitin ligase SCFCdc4 mediates the phosphorylation-dependent elimination of Ash1. The inactivation of SCFCdc4 stabilizes Ash1 in vivo, and consistently, Ash1 binds to and is ubiquitinated by SCFCdc4 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner in vitro. The mutation of a critical in vivo cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) phosphorylation site (Thr290) on Ash1 reduces its ubiquitination and rate of degradation in vivo and decreases the frequency of mating type switching. Ash1 associates with active Cdc28 kinase in vivo and is targeted to SCFCdc4 in a Cdc28-dependent fashion in vivo and in vitro. Ash1 recognition by Cdc4 appears to be mediated by at least three phosphorylation sites that form two redundant diphosphorylated degrons. The phosphorylation-dependent elimination of Ash1 by the ubiquitin-proteasome system thus underpins developmental asymmetry in budding yeast. PMID:21098119

  5. The cyclin-dependent kinase 2 inhibitor down-regulates interleukin-1beta-mediated induction of cyclooxygenase-2 expression in human lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Ali, M Aktar; Nandi, Animesh; Carreon, Peter; Choy, Hak; Saha, Debabrata

    2006-02-01

    Overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is frequently observed in several human cancers, including lung, colon, and head and neck. Malignancies are also associated with the dysregulation of cell cycle events and concomitant elevated activity of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK). CDK2 is a key cell cycle regulatory protein that controls the transition of cells from G(1) to S phase. In this study, we furnish several lines of evidence that show a functional role for the CDK2 in interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta)-induced COX-2 expression in H358 human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line by blocking CDK2 activity. First, we show that BMS-387032, a potent CDK2 inhibitor, blocks IL-1beta-induced expression as well as steady-state mRNA levels of COX-2. Second, we show that small interfering RNA that abrogates CDK2 expression also blocks IL-1beta-induced COX-2 expression. Third, results from in vitro kinase assays clearly show that IL-1beta induces CDK2 activity in H358 cells and this activity is significantly inhibited by BMS-387032. Moreover, CDK2 inhibition blocks IL-1beta-induced binding to the NF-IL6 element of the COX-2 promoter and inhibits transcription of the COX-2 gene. We also observed that BMS-387032 does not inhibit endogenous expression of COX-2 or prostaglandin synthesis in lung carcinoma cells. Finally, we provide evidence showing that IL-1beta-induced signaling events, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphorylated stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase, phosphorylated AKT, and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, are not inhibited by CDK2 inhibitor. Taken together, the data suggest that CDK2 activity may play an important event in the IL-1beta-induced COX-2 expression and prostaglandin E(2) synthesis and might represent a novel target for BMS-387032. PMID:16452236

  6. Molecular Characterization and Expression Profiles of Cyclin B1, B2 and Cdc2 Kinase during Oogenesis and Spermatogenesis in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The meiotic maturation of oocytes and spermatocytes is controlled by the maturation promotion factor (MPF), a complex of the Cdc2 and cyclin B proteins. To better understand the mechanism of oocyte and spermatocyte maturation in fish, the expression of cyclin B1 (CB1), cyclin B2 (CB2) and Cdc2 kinas...

  7. Fisetin inhibits the activities of cyclin-dependent kinases leading to cell cycle arrest in HT-29 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xianghua; Jung, Jae in; Cho, Han Jin; Lim, Do Young; Lee, Hyun Sook; Chun, Hyang Sook; Kwon, Dae Young; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2005-12-01

    Fisetin, a natural flavonol present in edible vegetables, fruits, and wine, was reported to exert anticarcinogenic effects. The objective of the current study was to examine the effect of fisetin on the cell cycle progression of the human colon cancer cell line HT-29. HT-29 cells were cultured in serum-free medium with 0, 20, 40, or 60 micromol/L fisetin. Fisetin dose dependently inhibited both cell growth and DNA synthesis (P < 0.05), with a 79 +/- 1% decrease in cell number observed 72 h after the addition of 60 micromol/L fisetin. Perturbed cell cycle progression from the G(1) to S phase was observed at 8 h with 60 micromol/L fisetin treatment, whereas a G(2)/M phase arrest was observed after 24 h (P < 0.05). The phosphorylation state of the retinoblastoma proteins shifted from hyperphosphorylated to hypophosphorylated in cells treated with 40 micromol/L fisetin. (P < 0.05). Fisetin decreased the activities of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK)2 and CDK4; these effects were likely attributable to decreases in the levels of cyclin E and D1 and an increase in p21(CIP1/WAF1) levels (P < 0.05). However, fisetin also inhibited CDk4 activity in a cell-free system (P < 0.05), indicating that it may directly inhibit CDk4 activity. The protein levels of cell division cycles (CDC)2 and CDC25C and the activity of CDC2 were also decreased in fisetin-treated cells (P < 0.05). These results indicate that inhibition of cell cycle progression in HT-29 cells after treatment with fisetin can be explained, at least in part, by modification of CDK activities. PMID:16317137

  8. G1-checkpoint function including a cyclin-dependent kinase 2 regulatory pathway as potential determinant of 7-hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01)-induced apoptosis and G1-phase accumulation.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, T; Sugiyama, K; Shimizu, M; Tamaoki, T; Akinaga, S

    1999-12-01

    7-Hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01), which was originally identified as a protein kinase C selective inhibitor, is currently in clinical trials as an anti-cancer drug. We previously showed that UCN-01 induced preferential G1-phase accumulation in tumor cells and this effect was associated with the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein and its regulatory factors, such as cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and CDK inhibitors p21Cip1/WAF1 and p27Kip1. We demonstrate here that G1-phase accumulation was induced by UCN-01 in Rb-proficient cell lines (WiDr and HCT116 human colon carcinomas and WI-38 human lung fibroblast), and it was accompanied by dephosphorylation of Rb. In addition, UCN-01-induced G1-phase accumulation was also demonstrated in a Rb-defective cell line (Saos-2 human osteosarcoma), but not in a simian virus 40 (SV40)-transformed cell line (WI-38 VA13). Apoptosis was induced by UCN-01 in the two Rb-deficient cell lines, but not in the other Rb-proficient cell lines. These observations suggest that G1-checkpoint function might be important for cell survival during UCN-01 treatment. In addition, there may be a UCN-01-responsive factor in the G1-checkpoint machinery other than Rb which is targeted by SV40. Further studies revealed a correlation between UCN-01-induced G1-phase accumulation and reduction of cellular CDK2 kinase activity. This reduction was strictly dependent on down-regulation of the Thr160-phosphorylated form of CDK2 protein, and coincided in part with up-regulation of p27Kip1, but it was independent of the level of the p21Cip1/WAF1 protein. These results suggest that G1-checkpoint function, including a CDK2-regulatory pathway, may be a significant determinant of the sensitivity of tumor cells to UCN-01. PMID:10665655

  9. The effect of Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 on voltage-dependent calcium channels in PC12 cells varies according to channel type and cell differentiation state.

    PubMed

    Furusawa, Kotaro; Asada, Akiko; Saito, Taro; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi

    2014-08-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a Ser/Thr kinase that plays an important role in the release of neurotransmitter from pre-synaptic terminals triggered by Ca(2+) influx into the pre-synaptic cytoplasm through voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs). It is reported that Cdk5 regulates L-, P/Q-, or N-type VDCC, but there is conflicting data as to the effect of Cdk5 on VDCC activity. To clarify the mechanisms involved, we examined the role of Cdk5 in regulating the Ca(2+) -channel property of VDCCs, using PC12 cells expressing endogenous, functional L-, P/Q-, and N-type VDCCs. The Ca(2+) influx, induced by membrane depolarization with high K(+) , was monitored with a fluorescent Ca(2+) indicator protein in both undifferentiated and nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells. Overall, Ca(2+) influx was increased by expression of Cdk5-p35 in undifferentiated PC12 cells but suppressed in differentiated PC12 cells. Moreover, we found that different VDCCs are distinctly regulated by Cdk5-p35 depending on the differentiation states of PC12 cells. These results indicate that Cdk5-p35 regulates L-, P/Q-, or N-type VDCCs in a cellular context-dependent manner. Calcium (Ca(2+) ) influx through voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (VDCCs) triggers neurotransmitter release from pre-synaptic terminal of neurons. The channel activity of VDCCs is regulated by Cdk5-p35, a neuronal Ser/Thr kinase. However, there have been debates about the regulation of VDCCs by Cdk5. Using PC12 cells, we show that Cdk5-p35 regulates VDCCs in a type (L, P/Q, and N) and differentiation-dependent manner. NGF = nerve growth factor. PMID:24766160

  10. The Down syndrome-related protein kinase DYRK1A phosphorylates p27Kip1 and Cyclin D1 and induces cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Soppa, Ulf; Schumacher, Julian; Florencio Ortiz, Victoria; Pasqualon, Tobias; Tejedor, Francisco J; Becker, Walter

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental question in neurobiology is how the balance between proliferation and differentiation of neuronal precursors is maintained to ensure that the proper number of brain neurons is generated. Substantial evidence implicates DYRK1A (dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A) as a candidate gene responsible for altered neuronal development and brain abnormalities in Down syndrome. Recent findings support the hypothesis that DYRK1A is involved in cell cycle control. Nonetheless, how DYRK1A contributes to neuronal cell cycle regulation and thereby affects neurogenesis remains poorly understood. In the present study we have investigated the mechanisms by which DYRK1A affects cell cycle regulation and neuronal differentiation in a human cell model, mouse neurons, and mouse brain. Dependent on its kinase activity and correlated with the dosage of overexpression, DYRK1A blocked proliferation of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells within 24 h and arrested the cells in G1 phase. Sustained overexpression of DYRK1A induced G0 cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that DYRK1A modulated protein stability of cell cycle-regulatory proteins. DYRK1A reduced cellular Cyclin D1 levels by phosphorylation on Thr286, which is known to induce proteasomal degradation. In addition, DYRK1A phosphorylated p27Kip1 on Ser10, resulting in protein stabilization. Inhibition of DYRK1A kinase activity reduced p27Kip1 Ser10 phosphorylation in cultured hippocampal neurons and in embryonic mouse brain. In aggregate, these results suggest a novel mechanism by which overexpression of DYRK1A may promote premature neuronal differentiation and contribute to altered brain development in Down syndrome. PMID:24806449

  11. Cyclin B-dependent kinase 1 regulates human TRF1 to modulate the resolution of sister telomeres

    PubMed Central

    McKerlie, Megan; Zhu, Xu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Cyclin B-Cdk1 is a key mediator of mitotic entry, however little is known about its role in the separation of sister chromatids. Here we report that upon mitotic entry, Cdk1 specifically phosphorylates threonine 371 of TRF1, a telomere binding protein implicated in the regulation of sister telomere cohesion. Such phosphorylation is removed in late mitosis when Cdk1 activity is inhibited, indicative of a tight regulation of T371 phosphorylation. We show that T371 phosphorylation by Cdk1 keeps TRF1 free of chromatin and this phosphorylation is associated with loss of telomere-bound TRF1 and TIN2, and a reduction in telomere heterochromatin. We find that a phosphomimic mutation at T371 of TRF1 induces telomere deprotection, resulting in telomere loss and the formation of telomere fusions whereas a non-phosphorylatable substitution of T371 blocks sister telomere resolution, promotes micronuclei formation and impairs cell proliferation. Our work suggests that Cdk1 controls TRF1 association with telomeres to facilitate temporal telomere de-protection essential for sister telomere resolution. PMID:21712819

  12. Cyclin C is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Na; Fassl, Anne; Chick, Joel; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Li, Xiaoyu; Mansour, Marc R.; Liu, Lijun; Wang, Haizhen; King, Bryan; Shaik, Shavali; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Ordureau, Alban; Otto, Tobias; Kreslavsky, Taras; Baitsch, Lukas; Bury, Leah; Meyer, Clifford A.; Ke, Nan; Mulry, Kristin A.; Kluk, Michael J.; Roy, Moni; Kim, Sunkyu; Zhang, Xiaowu; Geng, Yan; Zagozdzon, Agnieszka; Jenkinson, Sarah; Gale, Rosemary E.; Linch, David C.; Zhao, Jean J.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Harper, J. Wade; Aster, Jon C.; Aifantis, Iannis; von Boehmer, Harald; Gygi, Steven P.; Wei, Wenyi; Look, A. Thomas; Sicinski, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin C was cloned as a growth-promoting G1 cyclin, and was also shown to regulate gene transcription. Here we report that in vivo cyclin C acts as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor, by controlling Notch1 oncogene levels. Cyclin C activates an “orphan” CDK19 kinase, as well as CDK8 and CDK3. These cyclin C-CDK complexes phosphorylate Notch1 intracellular domain (ICN1) and promote ICN1 degradation. Genetic ablation of cyclin C blocks ICN1 phosphorylation in vivo, thereby elevating ICN1 levels in cyclin C-knockout mice. Cyclin C ablation or heterozygosity collaborate with other oncogenic lesions and accelerate development of T-cell-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Furthermore, the cyclin C gene is heterozygously deleted in a significant fraction of human T-ALL, and these tumors express reduced cyclin C levels. We also describe point mutations in human T-ALL that render cyclin C-CDK unable to phosphorylate ICN1. Hence, tumor cells may develop different strategies to evade cyclin C inhibitory function. PMID:25344755

  13. Acute and chronic stress differentially regulate cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in mouse brain: implications to glucocorticoid actions and major depression

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulou, A; Siamatras, T; Delgado-Morales, R; Amin, N D; Shukla, V; Zheng, Y-L; Pant, H C; Almeida, O F X; Kino, T

    2015-01-01

    Stress activates the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, which in turn increases circulating glucocorticoid concentrations and stimulates the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Chronically elevated glucocorticoids by repetitive exposure to stress are implicated in major depression and anxiety disorders. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), a molecule essential for nervous system development, function and pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, can modulate GR activity through phosphorylation. We examined potential contribution of CDK5 to stress response and pathophysiology of major depression. In mice, acute immobilized stress (AS) caused a biphasic effect on CDK5 activity, initially reducing but increasing afterwards in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (HIPPO), whereas chronic unpredictable stress (CS) strongly increased it in these brain areas, indicating that AS and CS differentially regulate this kinase activity in a brain region-specific fashion. GR phosphorylation contemporaneously followed the observed changes of CDK5 activity after AS, thus CDK5 may in part alter GR phosphorylation upon this stress. In the postmortem brains of subjects with major depression, CDK5 activity was elevated in Brodmann's area 25, but not in entire PFC and HIPPO. Messenger RNA expression of glucocorticoid-regulated/stress-related genes showed distinct expression profiles in several brain areas of these stressed mice or depressive subjects in which CDK5-mediated changes in GR phosphorylation may have some regulatory roles. Taken together, these results indicate that CDK5 is an integral component of stress response and major depression with regulatory means specific to different stressors, brain areas and diseases in part through changing phosphorylation of GR. PMID:26057048

  14. Phosphorylation of synapsin I by cyclin-dependent kinase-5 sets the ratio between the resting and recycling pools of synaptic vesicles at hippocampal synapses.

    PubMed

    Verstegen, Anne M J; Tagliatti, Erica; Lignani, Gabriele; Marte, Antonella; Stolero, Tamar; Atias, Merav; Corradi, Anna; Valtorta, Flavia; Gitler, Daniel; Onofri, Franco; Fassio, Anna; Benfenati, Fabio

    2014-05-21

    Cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (Cdk5) was reported to downscale neurotransmission by sequestering synaptic vesicles (SVs) in the release-reluctant resting pool, but the molecular targets mediating this activity remain unknown. Synapsin I (SynI), a major SV phosphoprotein involved in the regulation of SV trafficking and neurotransmitter release, is one of the presynaptic substrates of Cdk5, which phosphorylates it in its C-terminal region at Ser(549) (site 6) and Ser(551) (site 7). Here we demonstrate that Cdk5 phosphorylation of SynI fine tunes the recruitment of SVs to the active recycling pool and contributes to the Cdk5-mediated homeostatic responses. Phosphorylation of SynI by Cdk5 is physiologically regulated and enhances its binding to F-actin. The effects of Cdk5 inhibition on the size and depletion kinetics of the recycling pool, as well as on SV distribution within the nerve terminal, are virtually abolished in mouse SynI knock-out (KO) neurons or in KO neurons expressing the dephosphomimetic SynI mutants at sites 6,7 or site 7 only. The observation that the single site-7 mutant phenocopies the effects of the deletion of SynI identifies this site as the central switch in mediating the synaptic effects of Cdk5 and demonstrates that SynI is necessary and sufficient for achieving the effects of the kinase on SV trafficking. The phosphorylation state of SynI by Cdk5 at site 7 is regulated during chronic modification of neuronal activity and is an essential downstream effector for the Cdk5-mediated homeostatic scaling. PMID:24849359

  15. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Mediated Muscle Cell Survival: Central Roles for Akt and Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor p21

    PubMed Central

    Lawlor, Margaret A.; Rotwein, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Polypeptide growth factors activate specific transmembrane receptors, leading to the induction of multiple intracellular signal transduction pathways which control cell function and fate. Recent studies have shown that growth factors promote cell survival by stimulating the serine-threonine protein kinase Akt, which appears to function primarily as an antiapoptotic agent by inactivating death-promoting molecules. We previously established C2 muscle cell lines lacking endogenous expression of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II). These cells underwent apoptotic death in low-serum differentiation medium but could be maintained as viable myoblasts by IGF analogues that activated the IGF-I receptor or by unrelated growth factors such as platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB). Here we show that IGF-I promotes muscle cell survival through Akt-mediated induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. Treatment of myoblasts with IGF-I or transfection with an inducible Akt maintained muscle cell survival and enhanced production of p21, and ectopic expression of p21 was able to sustain viability in the absence of growth factors. Blocking of p21 protein accumulation through a specific p21 antisense cDNA prevented survival regulated by IGF-I or Akt but did not block muscle cell viability mediated by PDGF-BB. Our results define Akt as an intermediate and p21 as a critical effector of an IGF-controlled myoblast survival pathway that is active during early myogenic differentiation and show that growth factors are able to maintain cell viability by inducing expression of pro-survival molecules. PMID:11073997

  16. Cyclin-dependent Kinase 1-dependent Phosphorylation of cAMP Response Element-binding Protein Decreases Chromatin Occupancy*

    PubMed Central

    Trinh, Anthony T.; Kim, Sang Hwa; Chang, Hae-yoon; Mastrocola, Adam S.; Tibbetts, Randal S.

    2013-01-01

    The cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) initiates transcriptional responses to a wide variety of stimuli. CREB activation involves its phosphorylation on Ser-133, which promotes interaction between the CREB kinase-inducible domain (KID) and the KID-interacting domain of the transcriptional coactivator, CREB-binding protein (CBP). The KID also contains a highly conserved phosphorylation cluster, termed the ATM/CK cluster, which is processively phosphorylated in response to DNA damage by the coordinated actions of ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and casein kinases (CKs) 1 and 2. The ATM/CK cluster phosphorylation attenuates CBP binding and CREB transcriptional activity. Paradoxically, it was recently reported that DNA damage activates CREB through homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2-dependent phosphorylation of Ser-271 near the CREB bZIP DNA binding domain. In this study we sought to further clarify DNA damage-dependent CREB phosphorylation as well as to explore the possibility that the ATM/CK cluster and Ser-271 synergistically or antagonistically modulate CREB activity. We show that, rather than being induced by DNA damage, Ser-270 and Ser-271 of CREB cophosphorylated in a CDK1-dependent manner during G2/M phase. Functionally, we show that phosphorylation of CREB on Ser-270/Ser-271 during mitosis correlated with reduced CREB chromatin occupancy. Furthermore, CDK1-dependent phosphorylation of CREB in vitro inhibited its DNA binding activity. The combined results suggest that CDK1-dependent phosphorylation of CREB on Ser-270/Ser-271 facilitates its dissociation from chromatin during mitosis by reducing its intrinsic DNA binding potential. PMID:23814058

  17. Apoptosis of osteosarcoma cultures by the combination of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor SCH727965 and a heat shock protein 90 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Fu, W; Sharma, S S; Ma, L; Chu, B; Bui, M M; Reed, D; Pledger, W J

    2013-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is an aggressive bone cancer typically observed in adolescents and young adults. Metastatic relapse accounts primarily for treatment failure, and obstacles to improving cure rates include a lack of efficacious agents. Our studies show apoptosis of OS cells prepared from localized and metastatic tumors by a novel drug combination: SCH727965 (SCH), a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, and NVP-AUY922 (AUY) or other heat shock protein 90 inhibitor. SCH and AUY induced apoptosis when added simultaneously to cells and when AUY was added to and removed from cells before SCH addition. Sequential treatment was most effective when cells received AUY for ~12 h and when SCH was presented to cells immediately after AUY removal. The apoptotic protein Bax accumulated in mitochondria of cotreated cells but was primarily cytosolic in cells receiving either agent alone. Additional data show that SCH and AUY cooperatively induce the apoptosis of other sarcoma cell types but not of normal osteoblasts or fibroblasts, and that SCH and AUY individually inhibit cell cycle progression throughout the cell cycle. We suggest that the combination of SCH and AUY may be an effective new strategy for treatment of OS. PMID:23538447

  18. Repositioning of a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor GW8510 as a ribonucleotide reductase M2 inhibitor to treat human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Y-Y; Chou, C-J; Lo, H-L; Yang, P-M

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in males and females in the world. It is of immediate importance to develop novel therapeutics. Human ribonucleotide reductase (RRM1/RRM2) has an essential role in converting ribonucleoside diphosphate to 2'-deoxyribonucleoside diphosphate to maintain the homeostasis of nucleotide pools. RRM2 is a prognostic biomarker and predicts poor survival of CRC. In addition, increased RRM2 activity is associated with malignant transformation and tumor cell growth. Bioinformatics analyses show that RRM2 was overexpressed in CRC and might be an attractive target for treating CRC. Therefore, we attempted to search novel RRM2 inhibitors by using a gene expression signature-based approach, connectivity MAP (CMAP). The result predicted GW8510, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, as a potential RRM2 inhibitor. Western blot analysis indicated that GW8510 inhibited RRM2 expression through promoting its proteasomal degradation. In addition, GW8510 induced autophagic cell death. In addition, the sensitivities of CRC cells to GW8510 were associated with the levels of RRM2 and endogenous autophagic flux. Taken together, our study indicates that GW8510 could be a potential anti-CRC agent through targeting RRM2. PMID:27551518

  19. Upregulation of p27 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor and a C-terminus truncated form of p27 contributes to G1 phase arrest

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Takayuki; Kaida, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Potent anti-cancer compounds FR901464 and its methyl-ketal derivative spliceostatin A (SSA) inhibit cell cycle progression at G1 and G2/M phases. These compounds bind to the spliceosome and inhibit the splicing reaction. However, the molecular mechanism underlying G1 arrest after SSA treatment remains unknown. In this study, we found that ~90% of SSA-treated cells arrested at G1 phase after cell cycle synchronization. SSA treatment caused upregulation of the p27 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor both at mRNA and protein levels. In addition to p27, we observed expression of p27*, a C-terminal truncated form of p27 that is translated from CDKN1B (p27) pre-mRNA accumulated after splicing inhibition. Overexpression of p27 or p27* inhibited the exit from G1 phase after a double thymidine block. Conversely, knocking down of p27 by siRNA partially suppressed the G1 phase arrest caused by SSA treatment. There results suggest that G1 arrest in SSA-treated cells is caused, at least in part, by upregulation of p27 and p27*. PMID:27282251

  20. Differential p16/INK4A cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor expression correlates with chemotherapy efficacy in a cohort of 88 malignant pleural mesothelioma patients

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, C J; Murer, B; O'Grady, A; Hearn, L M; Harvey, B J; Kay, E W; Thomas, W

    2015-01-01

    Background: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare and essentially incurable malignancy most often linked with occupational exposure to asbestos fibres. In common with other malignancies, the development and progression of MPM is associated with extensive dysregulation of cell cycle checkpoint proteins that modulate cell proliferation, apoptosis, DNA repair and senescence. Methods: The expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p16/INK4A was evaluated by immunohistochemistry using tumour biopsy specimens from 88 MPM cases and a semi-quantitative score for p16/INK4A expression was obtained. Post-diagnosis survival and the survival benefit of chemotherapeutic intervention was correlated with p16/INK4A expression. Results: A low, intermediate and high score for p16/INK4A expression was observed for 45 (51.1%), 28 (31.8%) and 15 (17.1%) of the MPM cases, respectively. Those cases with intermediate or high p16/INK4A tumour expression had a significantly better post-diagnosis survival than those cases whose tumours lost p16 expression (log-rank P<0.001). Those patients with sustained p16/INK4A expression who received chemotherapy also had a better survival than those treated patients whose tumours had lost p16/INK4A expression (log-rank P<0.001). Conclusions: Sustained p16/INK4A expression predicts better post-diagnosis survival in MPM and also better survival following chemotherapeutic intervention. PMID:26057448

  1. Deficiency of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1} accelerates atherogenesis in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Akyuerek, Levent M.; Boehm, Manfred; Olive, Michelle; Zhou, Alex-Xianghua; San, Hong; Nabel, Elizabeth G.

    2010-05-28

    Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1}, are upregulated during vascular cell proliferation and negatively regulate growth of vascular cells. We hypothesized that absence of either p21{sup Cip1} or p27{sup Kip1} in apolipoprotein E (apoE)-deficiency may increase atherosclerotic plaque formation. Compared to apoE{sup -/-} aortae, both apoE{sup -/-}/p21{sup -/-} and apoE{sup -/-}/p27{sup -/-} aortae exhibited significantly more atherosclerotic plaque following a high-cholesterol regimen. This increase was particularly observed in the abdominal aortic regions. Deficiency of p27{sup Kip1} accelerated plaque formation significantly more than p21{sup -/-} in apoE{sup -/-} mice. This increased plaque formation was in parallel with increased intima/media area ratios. Deficiency of p21{sup Cip1} and p27{sup Kip1} accelerates atherogenesis in apoE{sup -/-} mice. These findings have significant implications for our understanding of the molecular basis of atherosclerosis associated with excessive proliferation of vascular cells.

  2. Downregulation of XIAP and induction of apoptosis by the synthetic cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor GW8510 in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dong, Fengqin; Guo, Wei; Zhang, Lidong; Wu, Shuhong; Teraishi, Fuminori; Davis, John J; Fang, Bingliang

    2006-02-01

    Small-molecule inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are known to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in certain cancer cells. In order to evaluate the antitumor activity of one such inhibitor, GW8510, against human lung cancers, we analyzed the effects of GW8510 on six nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines (A549, H1299, H460, H226, H358 and H322) and normal human fibroblast (NHFB). We treated the cells with GW8510 at concentrations of 0-10 microM, and found that it suppressed cell growth in vitro in all the lung cancer cells but not in NHFB. Subsequent study showed that GW8510 induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in the A549, H1299 and H460 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis showed that GW8510 downregulated the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) but had no detectable effect on the expression of Bax, Bak, or Bcl2. GW8510 also downregulated XIAP mRNA level, suggesting that downregulation of XIAP expression occurs at the transcriptional level. Moreover, ectopic XIAP expression diminished growth inhibition and apoptosis induction by GW8510. Importantly, GW8510 was not capable of inducing apoptosis of NHFB cells. These results suggest that GW8510 might provide a treatment strategy for human NSCLC and XIAP is an important target for GW8510-induced apoptosis of NSCLC cells that occurs through inhibition of XIAP mRNA transcription. PMID:16322690

  3. The upstream open reading frame of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A mRNA negatively regulates translation of the downstream main open reading frame

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyoung Mi; Cho, Hana; Kim, Yoon Ki

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CDKN1A mRNA is a bona fide NMD substrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The uORF of CDKN1A mRNA is efficiently translated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Translation of downstream main ORF is negatively regulated by translation of uORF in CDKN1A mRNA. -- Abstract: The first round of translation occurs on mRNAs bound by nuclear cap-binding complex (CBC), which is composed of nuclear cap-binding protein 80 and 20 (CBP80/20). During this round of translation, aberrant mRNAs are recognized and downregulated in abundance by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), which is one of the mRNA quality control mechanisms. Here, our microarray analysis reveals that the level of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A; also known as Waf1/p21) mRNAs increases in cells depleted of cellular NMD factors. Intriguingly, CDKN1A mRNA contains an upstream open reading frame (uORF), which is a NMD-inducing feature. Using chimeric reporter constructs, we find that the uORF of CDKN1A mRNA negatively modulates translation of the main downstream ORF. These findings provide biological insights into the possible role of NMD in diverse biological pathways mediated by CDKN1A.

  4. Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of KV10.1 Potassium Channels Modulate Channel Properties and Can Activate Cyclin-dependent Kinase in Xenopus Oocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Ramos Gomes, Fernanda; Romaniello, Vincenzo; Sánchez, Araceli; Weber, Claudia; Narayanan, Pratibha; Psol, Maryna; Pardo, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    KV10.1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel expressed selectively in the mammalian brain but also aberrantly in cancer cells. In this study we identified short splice variants of KV10.1 resulting from exon-skipping events (E65 and E70) in human brain and cancer cell lines. The presence of the variants was confirmed by Northern blot and RNase protection assays. Both variants completely lacked the transmembrane domains of the channel and produced cytoplasmic proteins without channel function. In a reconstituted system, both variants co-precipitated with the full-length channel and induced a robust down-regulation of KV10.1 current when co-expressed with the full-length form, but their effect was mechanistically different. E65 required a tetramerization domain and induced a reduction in the overall expression of full-length KV10.1, whereas E70 mainly affected its glycosylation pattern. E65 triggered the activation of cyclin-dependent kinases in Xenopus laevis oocytes, suggesting a role in cell cycle control. Our observations highlight the relevance of noncanonical functions for the oncogenicity of KV10.1, which need to be considered when ion channels are targeted for cancer therapy. PMID:26518875

  5. Upregulation of p27 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor and a C-terminus truncated form of p27 contributes to G1 phase arrest.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Takayuki; Kaida, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Potent anti-cancer compounds FR901464 and its methyl-ketal derivative spliceostatin A (SSA) inhibit cell cycle progression at G1 and G2/M phases. These compounds bind to the spliceosome and inhibit the splicing reaction. However, the molecular mechanism underlying G1 arrest after SSA treatment remains unknown. In this study, we found that ~90% of SSA-treated cells arrested at G1 phase after cell cycle synchronization. SSA treatment caused upregulation of the p27 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor both at mRNA and protein levels. In addition to p27, we observed expression of p27*, a C-terminal truncated form of p27 that is translated from CDKN1B (p27) pre-mRNA accumulated after splicing inhibition. Overexpression of p27 or p27* inhibited the exit from G1 phase after a double thymidine block. Conversely, knocking down of p27 by siRNA partially suppressed the G1 phase arrest caused by SSA treatment. There results suggest that G1 arrest in SSA-treated cells is caused, at least in part, by upregulation of p27 and p27*. PMID:27282251

  6. Expression and cellular distribution of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4) and connexin 43 (Cx43) in porcine oocytes before and after in vitro maturation.

    PubMed

    Kempisty, Bartosz; Ziółkowska, Agnieszka; Piotrowska, Hanna; Antosik, Paweł; Bukowska, Dorota; Zawierucha, Piotr; Jaśkowski, Jędrzej M; Brüssow, Klaus-Peter; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2014-03-01

    It is recognised that connexin 43 (Cx43) and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4) are involved in the cumulus cell-oocyte communication via gap junctions and the control of cell cycle progress. However, little is known about their mRNA expression pattern and encoded proteins distribution in porcine oocytes during in vitro maturation (IVM). Cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were collected from 31 puberal crossbred Landrace gilts and analysed for their Cdk4 and Cx43 mRNA expression using RQ-PCR and for the respective protein expression by confocal microscopic observations. An increased Cdk4 and Cx43 mRNA expression was found in oocytes after IVM (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively). Confocal microscopic observations revealed a significant increase of Cdk4 protein expression in the cytoplasm of oocytes during the maturation process. The localisation of Cx43 changed from zona pellucida before to cytoplasm of oocytes after IVM. It is supposed that the increased expression of Cdk4 and Cx43 mRNA in oocytes after IVM is linked with the accumulation of a large amount of templates during the process of oocyte maturation. The translocation especially of Cx43 from the zona pellucida into the cytoplasm may be associated with a decrease in gap junction activity in fully grown porcine oocytes. Both Cdk4 and Cx43 can be used as 'checkpoints' of oocyte maturation. PMID:24334079

  7. Mitotic regulation of SEPT9 protein by cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) and Pin1 protein is important for the completion of cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Estey, Mathew P; Di Ciano-Oliveira, Caterina; Froese, Carol D; Fung, Karen Y Y; Steels, Jonathan D; Litchfield, David W; Trimble, William S

    2013-10-18

    Precise cell division is essential for multicellular development, and defects in this process have been linked to cancer. Septins are a family of proteins that are required for mammalian cell division, but their function and mode of regulation during this process are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) phosphorylates septin 9 (SEPT9) upon mitotic entry, and this phosphorylation controls association with the proline isomerase, Pin1. Both SEPT9 and Pin1 are critical for mediating the final separation of daughter cells. Expression of mutant SEPT9 that is defective in Pin1 binding was unable to rescue cytokinesis defects caused by SEPT9 depletion but rather induced dominant-negative defects in cytokinesis. However, unlike SEPT9 depletion, Pin1 was not required for the accumulation of the exocyst complex at the midbody. These results suggest that SEPT9 plays multiple roles in abscission, one of which is regulated by the action of Cdk1 and Pin1. PMID:23990466

  8. Cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) is a key mediator for EGF-induced cell transformation mediated through the ELK4/c-Fos signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Cong; Zeng, Weiqi; Su, Juan; Kuang, Yehong; He, Yijin; Zhao, Shuang; Zhang, Jianglin; Ma, Weiya; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang; Chen, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) is a known regulator in the cell cycle control of the G1/S and S/G2 transitions. However, the role of CDK2 in tumorigenesis is controversial. Evidence from knockout mice as well as colon cancer cell lines indicated that CDK2 is dispensable for cell proliferation. In this study, we found that ectopic CDK2 enhances Ras (G12V)-induced foci formation and knocking down CDK2 expression dramatically decreases EGF-induced cell transformation mediated through the down-regulation of c-fos expression. Interestingly, CDK2 directly phosphorylates ELK4 at Thr194 and Ser387 and regulates ELK4 transcriptional activity, which serves as a mechanism to regulate c-fos expression. In addition, ELK4 is over-expressed in melanoma and knocking down ELK4 or CDK2 expression significantly attenuated the malignant phenotype of melanoma cells. Taken together, our study reveals a novel function of CDK2 in EGF-induced cell transformation and the associated signal transduction pathways. This indicates that CDK2 is a useful molecular target for chemoprevention and therapy against skin cancer. PMID:26028036

  9. Cyclin-dependent kinase-5 and p35/p25 activators in schizophrenia and major depression prefrontal cortex: basal contents and effects of psychotropic medications.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Miguel, Alfredo; Meana, J Javier; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2013-04-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (CDK5) and p35/p25 activators, interacting with the exocytotic machinery (e.g. munc18-1 and syntaxin-1A), play critical roles in neurosecretion. The basal status of CDK5/p35/p25 and the effect of psychotropic drugs (detected in blood/urine samples) were investigated in post-mortem prefrontal cortex (PFC)/Brodmann's area 9 of schizophrenia (SZ) and major depression (MD) subjects. In SZ (all subjects, n = 24), CDK5 and p35, but not p25, were reduced (-28 to -58%) compared to controls. In SZ antipsychotic-free (n = 12), activator p35 was decreased (-52%). In SZ antipsychotic-treated (n = 12), marked reductions of CDK5 (-47%), p35 (-76%) and p25 (-36%) were quantified. In MD (n = 13), including antidepressant-free/treated subgroups, CDK5, p35 and p25 were unaltered. In SZ (n = 24), CDK5, p35 or p25 correlated with munc18-1a, but not with syntaxin-1A. The results demonstrate reduced p35 basal content and down-regulation of CDK5/p35/p25 by antipsychotics in SZ. The suggested CDK5/munc18-1a functional interaction may lead to dysregulated neurosecretion in SZ PFC. PMID:22964075

  10. Small-molecule screening of PC3 prostate cancer cells identifies tilorone dihydrochloride to selectively inhibit cell growth based on cyclin-dependent kinase 5 expression

    PubMed Central

    WISSING, MICHEL D.; DADON, TIKVA; KIM, EUNICE; PIONTEK, KLAUS B.; SHIM, JOONG S.; KAELBER, NADINE S.; LIU, JUN O.; KACHHAP, SUSHANT K.; NELKIN, BARRY D.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) is a potential target for prostate cancer treatment, the enzyme being essential for prostate tumor growth and formation of metastases. In the present study, we identified agents that target prostate cancer cells based on CDK5 expression. CDK5 activity was suppressed by transfection of PC3 prostate cancer cells with a dominant-negative construct (PC3 CDK5dn). PC3 CDK5dn and PC3 control cells were screened for compounds that selectively target cells based on CDK5 expression, utilizing the Johns Hopkins Drug Library. MTS proliferation, clonogenic and 3D growth assays were performed to validate the selected hits. Screening of 3,360 compounds identified rutilantin, ethacridine lactate and cetalkonium chloride as compounds that selectively target PC3 control cells and a tilorone analog as a selective inhibitor of PC3 CDK5dn cells. A PubMed literature study indicated that tilorone may have clinical use in patients. Validation experiments confirmed that tilorone treatment resulted in decreased PC3 cell growth and invasion; PC3 cells with inactive CDK5 were inhibited more effectively. Future studies are needed to unravel the mechanism of action of tilorone in CDK5 deficient prostate cancer cells and to test combination therapies with tilorone and a CDK5 inhibitor for its potential use in clinical practice. PMID:24841903

  11. Small-molecule screening of PC3 prostate cancer cells identifies tilorone dihydrochloride to selectively inhibit cell growth based on cyclin-dependent kinase 5 expression.

    PubMed

    Wissing, Michel D; Dadon, Tikva; Kim, Eunice; Piontek, Klaus B; Shim, Joong S; Kaelber, Nadine S; Liu, Jun O; Kachhap, Sushant K; Nelkin, Barry D

    2014-07-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) is a potential target for prostate cancer treatment, the enzyme being essential for prostate tumor growth and formation of metastases. In the present study, we identified agents that target prostate cancer cells based on CDK5 expression. CDK5 activity was suppressed by transfection of PC3 prostate cancer cells with a dominant-negative construct (PC3 CDK5dn). PC3 CDK5dn and PC3 control cells were screened for compounds that selectively target cells based on CDK5 expression, utilizing the Johns Hopkins Drug Library. MTS proliferation, clonogenic and 3D growth assays were performed to validate the selected hits. Screening of 3,360 compounds identified rutilantin, ethacridine lactate and cetalkonium chloride as compounds that selectively target PC3 control cells and a tilorone analog as a selective inhibitor of PC3 CDK5dn cells. A PubMed literature study indicated that tilorone may have clinical use in patients. Validation experiments confirmed that tilorone treatment resulted in decreased PC3 cell growth and invasion; PC3 cells with inactive CDK5 were inhibited more effectively. Future studies are needed to unravel the mechanism of action of tilorone in CDK5 deficient prostate cancer cells and to test combination therapies with tilorone and a CDK5 inhibitor for its potential use in clinical practice. PMID:24841903

  12. Imprinting of the gene encoding a human cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p57KIP2, on chromosome 11p15.

    PubMed Central

    Matsuoka, S; Thompson, J S; Edwards, M C; Bartletta, J M; Grundy, P; Kalikin, L M; Harper, J W; Elledge, S J; Feinberg, A P

    1996-01-01

    Parental origin-specific alterations of chromosome 11p15 in human cancer suggest the involvement of one or more maternally expressed imprinted genes involved in embryonal tumor suppression and the cancer-predisposing Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS). The gene encoding cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p57KIP2, whose overexpression causes G1 phase arrest, was recently cloned and mapped to this band. We find that the p57KIP2 gene is imprinted, with preferential expression of the maternal allele. However, the imprint is not absolute, as the paternal allele is also expressed at low levels in most tissues, and at levels comparable to the maternal allele in fetal brain and some embryonal tumors. The biochemical function, chromosomal location, and imprinting of the p57KIP2 gene match the properties predicted for a tumor suppressor gene at 11p15.5. However, as the p57KIP2 gene is 500 kb centromeric to the gene encoding insulin-like growth factor 2, it is likely to be part of a large domain containing other imprinted genes. Thus, loss of heterozygosity or loss of imprinting might simultaneously affect several genes at this locus that together contribute to tumor and/or growth- suppressing functions that are disrupted in BWS and embryonal tumors. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8610162

  13. Phase I study of PD 0332991, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, administered in 3-week cycles (Schedule 2/1)

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, G K; LoRusso, P M; Dickson, M A; Randolph, S S; Shaik, M N; Wilner, K D; Courtney, R; O'Dwyer, P J

    2011-01-01

    Background: This phase I, open-label, first-in-human study determined dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of PD 0332991, an oral cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitor with potent anti-proliferative activity in vitro/vivo. Methods: A total of 33 patients with retinoblastoma protein-positive advanced solid tumours or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma refractory to standard therapy or for which no therapy was available received PD 0332991 once daily (QD) for 14 days followed by 7 days off treatment (21-day cycles; Schedule 2/1). Results: Six patients had DLTs (18% four receiving 200 mg QD; two receiving 225 mg QD); the MTD was 200 mg QD. Treatment-related, non-haematological adverse events occurred in 29 patients (88%) during cycle 1 and 27 patients (82%) thereafter. Adverse events were generally mild–moderate. Of 31 evaluable patients, one with testicular cancer achieved a partial response; nine had stable disease (⩾10 cycles in three cases). PD 0332991 was slowly absorbed (mean Tmax 4.2 h) and eliminated (mean half-life 26.7 h). Volume of distribution was large (mean 3241 l) with dose-proportional exposure. Using a maximum effective concentration model, neutropenia was proportional to exposure. Conclusion: PD 0332991 was generally well tolerated, with DLTs related mainly to myelosuppression. The MTD, 200 mg QD, is recommended for phase II study. PMID:21610706

  14. Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of KV10.1 Potassium Channels Modulate Channel Properties and Can Activate Cyclin-dependent Kinase in Xenopus Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ramos Gomes, Fernanda; Romaniello, Vincenzo; Sánchez, Araceli; Weber, Claudia; Narayanan, Pratibha; Psol, Maryna; Pardo, Luis A

    2015-12-18

    KV10.1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel expressed selectively in the mammalian brain but also aberrantly in cancer cells. In this study we identified short splice variants of KV10.1 resulting from exon-skipping events (E65 and E70) in human brain and cancer cell lines. The presence of the variants was confirmed by Northern blot and RNase protection assays. Both variants completely lacked the transmembrane domains of the channel and produced cytoplasmic proteins without channel function. In a reconstituted system, both variants co-precipitated with the full-length channel and induced a robust down-regulation of KV10.1 current when co-expressed with the full-length form, but their effect was mechanistically different. E65 required a tetramerization domain and induced a reduction in the overall expression of full-length KV10.1, whereas E70 mainly affected its glycosylation pattern. E65 triggered the activation of cyclin-dependent kinases in Xenopus laevis oocytes, suggesting a role in cell cycle control. Our observations highlight the relevance of noncanonical functions for the oncogenicity of KV10.1, which need to be considered when ion channels are targeted for cancer therapy. PMID:26518875

  15. Repositioning of a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor GW8510 as a ribonucleotide reductase M2 inhibitor to treat human colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Y-Y; Chou, C-J; Lo, H-L; Yang, P-M

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in males and females in the world. It is of immediate importance to develop novel therapeutics. Human ribonucleotide reductase (RRM1/RRM2) has an essential role in converting ribonucleoside diphosphate to 2′-deoxyribonucleoside diphosphate to maintain the homeostasis of nucleotide pools. RRM2 is a prognostic biomarker and predicts poor survival of CRC. In addition, increased RRM2 activity is associated with malignant transformation and tumor cell growth. Bioinformatics analyses show that RRM2 was overexpressed in CRC and might be an attractive target for treating CRC. Therefore, we attempted to search novel RRM2 inhibitors by using a gene expression signature-based approach, connectivity MAP (CMAP). The result predicted GW8510, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, as a potential RRM2 inhibitor. Western blot analysis indicated that GW8510 inhibited RRM2 expression through promoting its proteasomal degradation. In addition, GW8510 induced autophagic cell death. In addition, the sensitivities of CRC cells to GW8510 were associated with the levels of RRM2 and endogenous autophagic flux. Taken together, our study indicates that GW8510 could be a potential anti-CRC agent through targeting RRM2. PMID:27551518

  16. The Requirement for Cyclin D Function in Tumor Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jong; Li, Xiaoyu; Hydbring, Per; Sanda, Takaomi; Stefano, Joanna; Christie, Amanda L.; Signoretti, Sabina; Look, A. Thomas; Kung, Andrew L.; von Boehmer, Harald; Sicinski, Piotr

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY D-cyclins represent components of cell cycle machinery. To test the efficacy of targeting D-cyclins in cancer treatment, we engineered mouse strains which allow acute and global ablation of individual D-cyclins in a living animal. Ubiquitous shutdown of cyclin D1 or inhibition of cyclin D-associated kinase activity in mice bearing ErbB2-driven mammary carcinomas triggered tumor cell senescence, without compromising the animals’ health. Ablation of cyclin D3 in mice bearing Notch1-driven T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALL) triggered tumor cell apoptosis. Such selective killing of leukemic cells can also be achieved by inhibiting cyclin D-associated kinase activity in mouse and human T-ALL models. Inhibition of cyclin D-kinase activity represents a highly-selective anti-cancer strategy that specifically targets cancer cells without significantly affecting normal tissues. PMID:23079655

  17. Early G1 cyclin-dependent kinases as prognostic markers and potential therapeutic targets in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Amin; Bandla, Santhoshi; Reveiller, Marie; Toia, Liana; Zhou, Zhongren; Gooding, William E.; Kalatskaya, Irina; Stein, Lincoln; D’Souza, Mary; Litle, Virginia R.; Peters, Jeffrey H.; Pennathur, Arjun; Luketich, James D.; Godfrey, Tony E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Chromosomal gain at 7q21 is a frequent event in esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). However, this event has not been mapped with fine resolution in a large EAC cohort and its association with clinical endpoints and functional relevance are unclear. Experimental design We used a cohort of 116 patients to fine map the 7q21 amplification using SNP microarrays. Prognostic significance and functional role of 7q21 amplification and its gene expression were explored. Results Amplification of the 7q21 region was observed in 35% of tumors with a focal, minimal amplicon containing 6 genes. 7q21 amplification was associated with poor survival and analysis of gene expression identified CDK6 as the only gene in the minimal amplicon whose expression was also associated with poor survival. A low level amplification (10%) was observed at the 12q13 region containing the CDK6 homolog, CDK4. Both amplification and expression of CDK4 correlated with poor survival. A combined model of both CDK6 and CDK4 expression is a superior predictor of survival than either alone. Specific knockdown of CDK4 and/or CDK6 by siRNAs shows that they are required for proliferation of EAC cells and that their function is additive. PD-0332991 targets the kinase activity of both molecules and suppresses proliferation and anchorage-independence of EAC cells through activation of the pRB pathway. Conclusions We suggest that CDK6 is the driver of 7q21 amplification and that both CDK4 and CDK6 are prognostic markers and bona fide oncogenes in EAC. Targeting these molecules may constitute a viable new therapy for this disease. PMID:21593195

  18. Characterization of a Pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidine Inhibitor of Cyclin-Dependent Kinases 2 and 5 and Aurora A With Pro-Apoptotic and Anti-Angiogenic Activity In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Řezníčková, Eva; Weitensteiner, Sabine; Havlíček, Libor; Jorda, Radek; Gucký, Tomáš; Berka, Karel; Bazgier, Václav; Zahler, Stefan; Kryštof, Vladimír; Strnad, Miroslav

    2015-12-01

    Selective inhibitors of kinases that regulate the cell cycle, such as cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and aurora kinases, could potentially become powerful tools for the treatment of cancer. We prepared and studied a series of 3,5,7-trisubstituted pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidines, a new CDK inhibitor scaffold, to assess their CDK2 inhibitory and antiproliferative activities. A new compound, 2i, which preferentially inhibits CDK2, CDK5, and aurora A was identified. Both biochemical and cellular assays indicated that treatment with compound 2i caused the downregulation of cyclins A and B, the dephosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10, and the induction of mitochondrial apoptosis in the HCT-116 colon cancer cell line. It also reduced migration as well as tube and lamellipodia formation in human endothelial cells. The kinase inhibitory profile of compound 2i suggests that its anti-angiogenic activity is linked to CDK5 inhibition. This dual mode of action involving apoptosis induction in cancer cells and the blocking of angiogenesis-like activity in endothelial cells offers possible therapeutic potential. PMID:26198005

  19. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 (CDK5) Controls Melanoma Cell Motility, Invasiveness, and Metastatic Spread—Identification of a Promising Novel therapeutic target1

    PubMed Central

    Bisht, Savita; Nolting, Jens; Schütte, Ute; Haarmann, Jens; Jain, Prashi; Shah, Dhruv; Brossart, Peter; Flaherty, Patrick; Feldmann, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in recent years, the overall prognosis of metastatic malignant melanoma remains poor, and curative therapeutic options are lacking. Therefore, better understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying melanoma progression and metastasis, as well as identification of novel therapeutic targets that allow inhibition of metastatic spread, are urgently required. The current study provides evidence for aberrant cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) activation in primary and metastatic melanoma lesions by overexpression of its activator protein CDK5R1/p35. Moreover, using melanoma in vitro model systems, shRNA-mediated inducible knockdown of CDK5 was found to cause marked inhibition of cell motility, invasiveness, and anchorage-independent growth, while at the same time net cell growth was not affected. In vivo, CDK5 knockdown inhibited growth of orthotopic xenografts as well as formation of lung and liver colonies in xenogenic injection models mimicking systemic metastases. Inhibition of lung metastasis was further validated in a syngenic murine melanoma model. CDK5 knockdown was accompanied by dephosphorylation and overexpression of caldesmon, and concomitant caldesmon knockdown rescued cell motility and proinvasive phenotype. Finally, it was found that pharmacological inhibition of CDK5 activity by means of roscovitine as well as by a novel small molecule CDK5-inhibitor, N-(5-isopropylthiazol-2-yl)-3-phenylpropanamide, similarly caused marked inhibition of invasion/migration, colony formation, and anchorage-independent growth of melanoma cells. Thus, experimental data presented here provide strong evidence for a crucial role of aberrantly activated CDK5 in melanoma progression and metastasis and establish CDK5 as promising target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26310376

  20. The MLL fusion gene, MLL-AF4, regulates cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor CDKN1B (p27kip1) expression

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Zhen-Biao; Popovic, Relja; Chen, Jing; Theisler, Catherine; Stuart, Tara; Santillan, Donna A.; Erfurth, Frank; Diaz, Manuel O.; Zeleznik-Le, Nancy J.

    2005-01-01

    MLL, involved in many chromosomal translocations associated with acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemia, has >50 known partner genes with which it is able to form in-frame fusions. Characterizing important downstream target genes of MLL and of MLL fusion proteins may provide rational therapeutic strategies for the treatment of MLL-associated leukemia. We explored downstream target genes of the most prevalent MLL fusion protein, MLL-AF4. To this end, we developed inducible MLL-AF4 fusion cell lines in different backgrounds. Overexpression of MLL-AF4 does not lead to increased proliferation in either cell line, but rather, cell growth was slowed compared with similar cell lines inducibly expressing truncated MLL. We found that in the MLL-AF4-induced cell lines, the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor gene CDKN1B was dramatically changed at both the RNA and protein (p27kip1) levels. In contrast, the expression levels of CDKN1A (p21) and CDKN2A (p16) were unchanged. To explore whether CDKN1B might be a direct target of MLL and of MLL-AF4, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays and luciferase reporter gene assays. MLL-AF4 binds to the CDKN1B promoter in vivo and regulates CDKN1B promoter activity. Further, we confirmed CDKN1B promoter binding by ChIP in MLL-AF4 as well as in MLL-AF9 leukemia cell lines. Our results suggest that CDKN1B is a downstream target of MLL and of MLL-AF4, and that, depending on the background cell type, MLL-AF4 inhibits or activates CDKN1B expression. This finding may have implications in terms of leukemia stem cell resistance to chemotherapy in MLL-AF4 leukemias. PMID:16169901

  1. Inactivation of p16INK4a (inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 4A) immortalizes primary human keratinocytes by maintaining cells in the stem cell compartment.

    PubMed

    Maurelli, Riccardo; Zambruno, Giovanna; Guerra, Liliana; Abbruzzese, Claudia; Dimri, Goberdhan; Gellini, Mara; Bondanza, Sergio; Dellambra, Elena

    2006-07-01

    Replicative senescence of human keratinocytes is determined by a progressive decline of clonogenic and dividing cells, and its timing is controlled by clonal evolution (i.e., the transition from stem cells to transient amplifying and postmitotic cells). Progressive increase of p16INK4a (inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 4A) expression has been shown to correlate with keratinocyte clonal evolution. Thus, the aim of our study is to understand whether p16INK4a accumulation is a triggering mechanism of epidermal clonal evolution or a secondary event. We show that inactivation of p16INK4a, by an antisense strategy, allows primary human keratinocytes to escape replicative senescence. Specifically, p16INK4a inactivation alone blocks clonal evolution and maintains keratinocytes in the stem cell compartment. Antisense excision is followed by keratinocyte senescence, confirming that persistent p16INK4a inactivation is required for maintenance of clonal evolution block. Immortalization is accompanied by resumption of B-Cell Specific Moloney murine leukemia virus site 1 (Bmi-1) expression and telomerase activity, hallmarks of tissue regenerative capacity. In turn, Bmi-1 expression is necessary to maintain the impairment of clonal evolution induced by p16INK4a inactivation. Finally, p16INK4a down-regulation in transient amplifying keratinocytes does not affect clonal evolution, and cells undergo senescence. Thus, p16INK4a inactivation appears to selectively prevent clonal conversion in cells endowed with a high proliferative potential. These data indicate that p16INK4a regulates keratinocyte clonal evolution and that inactivation of p16INK4a in epidermal stem cells is necessary for maintaining stemness. PMID:16754749

  2. eIF4A RNA Helicase Associates with Cyclin-Dependent Protein Kinase A in Proliferating Cells and Is Modulated by Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Bush, Maxwell S; Pierrat, Olivier; Nibau, Candida; Mikitova, Veronika; Zheng, Tao; Corke, Fiona M K; Vlachonasios, Konstantinos; Mayberry, Laura K; Browning, Karen S; Doonan, John H

    2016-09-01

    Eukaryotic initiation factor 4A (eIF4A) is a highly conserved RNA-stimulated ATPase and helicase involved in the initiation of messenger RNA translation. Previously, we found that eIF4A interacts with cyclin-dependent kinase A (CDKA), the plant ortholog of mammalian CDK1. Here, we show that this interaction occurs only in proliferating cells where the two proteins coassociate with 5'-cap-binding protein complexes, eIF4F or the plant-specific eIFiso4F. CDKA phosphorylates eIF4A on a conserved threonine residue (threonine-164) within the RNA-binding motif 1b TPGR. In vivo, a phospho-null (APGR) variant of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) eIF4A1 protein retains the ability to functionally complement a mutant (eif4a1) plant line lacking eIF4A1, whereas a phosphomimetic (EPGR) variant fails to complement. The phospho-null variant (APGR) rescues the slow growth rate of roots and rosettes, together with the ovule-abortion and late-flowering phenotypes. In vitro, wild-type recombinant eIF4A1 and its phospho-null variant both support translation in cell-free wheat germ extracts dependent upon eIF4A, but the phosphomimetic variant does not support translation and also was deficient in ATP hydrolysis and helicase activity. These observations suggest a mechanism whereby CDK phosphorylation has the potential to down-regulate eIF4A activity and thereby affect translation. PMID:27388680

  3. Gene expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and effect of heparin on their expression in mice with hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Lunyin; Quinn, Deborah A.; Garg, Hari G.; Hales, Charles A. . E-mail: chales@partners.org

    2006-07-14

    The balance between cell proliferation and cell quiescence is regulated delicately by a variety of mediators, in which cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) and CDK inhibitors (CDKI) play a very important role. Heparin which inhibits pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation increases the levels of two CDKIs, p21 and p27, although only p27 is important in inhibition of PASMC growth in vitro and in vivo. In the present study we investigated the expression profile of all the cell cycle regulating genes, including all seven CDKIs (p21, p27, p57, p15, p16, p18, and p19), in the lungs of mice with hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. A cell cycle pathway specific gene microarray was used to profile the 96 genes involved in cell cycle regulation. We also observed the effect of heparin on gene expression. We found that (a) hypoxic exposure for two weeks significantly inhibited p27 expression and stimulated p18 activity, showing a 98% decrease in p27 and 81% increase in p18; (b) other CDKIs, p21, p57, p15, p16, and p19 were not affected significantly in response to hypoxia; (c) heparin treatment restored p27 expression, but did not influence p18; (d) ERK1/2 and p38 were mediators in heparin upregulation of p27. This study provides an expression profile of cell cycle regulating genes under hypoxia in mice with hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and strengthens the previous finding that p27 is the only CDKI involved in heparin regulation of PASMC proliferation and hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension.

  4. Self-Renewal and High Proliferative Colony Forming Capacity of Late-Outgrowth Endothelial Progenitors Is Regulated by Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors Driven by Notch Signaling.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jatin; Wong, Ho Yi; Wang, Weili; Alexis, Josue; Shafiee, Abbas; Stevenson, Alexander J; Gabrielli, Brian; Fisk, Nicholas M; Khosrotehrani, Kiarash

    2016-04-01

    Since the discovery of endothelial colony forming cells (ECFC), there has been significant interest in their therapeutic potential to treat vascular injuries. ECFC cultures display significant heterogeneity and a hierarchy among cells able to give rise to high proliferative versus low proliferative colonies. Here we aimed to define molecularly this in vitro hierarchy. Based on flow cytometry, CD34 expression levels distinguished two populations. Only CD34 + ECFC had the capacity to reproduce high proliferative potential (HPP) colonies on replating, whereas CD34- ECFCs formed only small clusters. CD34 + ECFCs were the only ones to self-renew in stringent single-cell cultures and gave rise to both CD34 + and CD34- cells. Upon replating, CD34 + ECFCs were always found at the centre of HPP colonies and were more likely in G0/1 phase of cell cycling. Functionally, CD34 + ECFC were superior at restoring perfusion and better engrafted when injected into ischemic hind limbs. Transcriptomic analysis identified cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) cell cycle inhibiting genes (p16, p21, and p57), the Notch signaling pathway (dll1, dll4, hes1, and hey1), and the endothelial cytokine il33 as highly expressed in CD34 + ECFC. Blocking the Notch pathway using a γ-secretase inhibitor (DAPT) led to reduced expression of cell cycle inhibitors, increased cell proliferation followed by a loss of self-renewal, and HPP colony formation capacity reflecting progenitor exhaustion. Similarly shRNA knockdown of p57 strongly affected self-renewal of ECFC colonies. ECFC hierarchy is defined by Notch signalling driving cell cycle regulators, progenitor quiescence and self-renewal potential. Stem Cells 2016;34:902-912. PMID:26732848

  5. p21 blocks irradiation-induced apoptosis downstream of mitochondria by inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase-mediated caspase-9 activation.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Dennis; Essmann, Frank; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Jänicke, Reiner U

    2006-12-01

    The role of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p21 as a mediator of p53-induced growth arrest is well established. In addition, recent data provide strong evidence for new emerging functions of p21, including a role as a modulator of apoptosis. The mechanisms, however, by which p21 interferes with the death machinery, especially following ionizing radiation (IR), are largely unknown. Here, we report that IR induced caspase-9 and caspase-3 activation and subsequent apoptosis only in p21-deficient colon carcinoma cells, whereas similar treated wild-type cells were permanently arrested in the G(2)-M phase, correlating with the induction of cellular senescence. Interestingly, activation of the mitochondrial pathway, including caspase-2 processing, depolarization of the outer mitochondrial membrane, and cytochrome c release, was achieved by IR in both cell lines, indicating that p21 inhibits an event downstream of mitochondria but preceding caspase-9 activation. IR-induced p21 protein expression was restricted to the nucleus, and no evidence for a mitochondrial or cytoplasmic association was found. In addition, p21 did neither interact with caspase-3 or caspase-9, suggesting that these events are not required for the observed protection. Consistent with this assumption, we found that CDK inhibitors potently abrogated IR-induced caspase processing and activation without affecting mitochondrial events. In addition, in vitro caspase activation assays yielded higher caspase-3 activities in extracts of irradiated p21-deficient cells compared with extracts of similar treated wild-type cells. Thus, our results strongly indicate that p21 protects cells from IR-induced apoptosis by suppression of CDK activity that seems to be required for activation of the caspase cascade downstream of the mitochondria. PMID:17145870

  6. BAI, a novel cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor induces apoptosis in A549 cells through activation of caspases and inactivation of Akt.

    PubMed

    Kim, Shin; Lee, Jinho; Jang, Byeong-Churl; Kwon, Taeg Kyu; Park, Jong-Wook

    2013-02-01

    Previously, we have synthesized a novel cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor, 2-[1,1'biphenyl]-4-yl-N-[5-(1,1-dioxo-1λ(6) -isothiazolidin-2-yl)-1H-indazol-3-yl]acetamide (BAI) and reported its anti-cancer activity in head and neck cancer cells. In this study, we further evaluated the effect of BAI on growth of various human cancer cell lines, including A549 (nonsmall cell lung cancer), HCT116 (colon), and Caki (kidney). Profoundly, results of XTT and clonogenic assays demonstrated that BAI at nanomolar concentrations (20-60 nM) inhibited growth of A549, HCT116, and Caki cells, suggesting the anti-cancer potency. We show that BAI induced a dose-dependent apoptotic cell death in these human cancer cells, as measured by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Interestingly, further biochemical analysis showed that treatment with BAI at 20 nM induced apoptosis in A549 cells in association with activation of caspases, cleavage of phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1), and inhibition of Akt in A549 cells. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition study revealed that pretreatment with z-VAD-fmk, a pan caspase inhibitor strongly blocked the BAI-induced apoptosis in A549 cells. Transfection analysis with Akt cDNA encoding constitutively active Akt further addressed the significance of Akt inhibition in the BAI-induced apoptosis in A549 cells. Notably, disruption of the PI3K/Akt pathway by LY294002, a PI3K/Akt inhibitor potentiated apoptosis in A549 cells by BAI at a subcytotoxic concentration. These findings collectively suggest that BAI potently inhibits growth of A549, HCT116, and Caki cells, and that the BAI-induced apoptosis in A549 cells is associated with activation of caspases, and inhibition of Akt. PMID:22887215

  7. Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 Mediates Adult OPC Maturation and Myelin Repair through Modulation of Akt and GsK-3β Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Luo, FuCheng; Burke, Kathryn; Kantor, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Failure of remyelination in diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), leads to permanent axonal damage and irreversible functional loss. The mechanisms controlling remyelination are currently poorly understood. Recent studies implicate the cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) in regulating oligodendrocyte (OL) development and myelination in CNS. In this study, we show that Cdk5 is also an important regulator of remyelination. Pharmacological inhibition of Cdk5 inhibits repair of lysolecithin lesions. This inhibition is a consequence of Cdk5 disruption in neural cells because remyelination in slice cultures is blocked by Cdk5 inhibitors, whereas specific deletion of Cdk5 in OLs inhibits myelin repair. In CNP-Cre;Cdk5fl/fl conditional knock-out mouse (Cdk5 cKO), myelin repair was delayed significantly in response to focal demyelinating lesions compared with wild-type animals. The lack of myelin repair was reflected in decreased expression of MBP and proteolipid protein and a reduction in the total number of myelinated axons in the lesion. The number of CC1+ cells in the lesion sites was significantly reduced in Cdk5 cKO compared with wild-type animals although the total number of oligodendrocyte lineage cells (Olig2+ cells) was increased, suggesting that Cdk5 loss perturbs the transition of early OL lineage cell into mature OL and subsequent remyelination. The failure of remyelination in Cdk5 cKO animals was associated with a reduction in signaling through the Akt pathway and an enhancement of Gsk-3β signaling pathways. Together, these data suggest that Cdk5 is critical in regulating the transition of adult oligodendrocyte precursor cells to mature OLs that is essential for myelin repair in adult CNS. PMID:25080600

  8. MiR-23b Regulates CDK-activating Kinase complex through Cyclin H Repression to Modulate Endothelial Transcription and Growth under Flow

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kuei-Chun; Nguyen, Phu; Weiss, Anna; Yeh, Yi-Ting; Chien, Hou Su; Lee, Alicia; Teng, Dayu; Subramaniam, Shankar; Li, Yi-Shuan; Chien, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Objective The site-specificity of endothelial phenotype is attributable to the local hemodynamic forces. The flow regulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) in endothelial cells (ECs) plays a significant role invascular homeostasis and diseases. The objective of this study is to elucidate the molecular mechanism by which the pulsatile shear flow (PS)-induced miR-23b exerts anti-proliferative effects on ECs. Approach and Results We used a combination of a cell perfusion system and experimental animals to examine the flow regulation of miR-23b in modulating EC proliferation. Our results demonstrated that PS induces the transcription factor KLF2 to promote miR-23b biosynthesis; the increase in miR-23b then represses cyclin H to impair the activity and integrity of CDK-activating kinase complex (CAK). The inhibitory effect of miR-23b on CAK exerts dual actions to (1) suppress cell cycle progression, and (2) reduce basal transcription by deactivating RNA polymerase II. While PS regulates the miR-23b/CAK pathway to exert anti-proliferative effects on ECs, oscillatory shear flow (OS) has little effect on the miR-23b/CAK pathway and hence does not cause EC growth arrest. Such flow pattern-dependent phenomena are validated with an in vivo model on rat carotid artery: the flow disturbance induced by partial carotid ligation led to a lower expression of miR-23b and a higher EC proliferation in comparison to the pulsatile flow regions of the unligated vessels. Local delivery of miR-23b mitigated the proliferative EC phenotype in partially ligated vessels. Conclusions Our findings unveil a novel mechanism by which hemodynamic forces modulate EC proliferative phenotype through the miR-23b/CAK pathway. PMID:24855060

  9. miR-107 regulates cisplatin chemosensitivity of A549 non small cell lung cancer cell line by targeting cyclin dependent kinase 8.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Lu; Yin, Zhi-Yi; Fan, Xing-Long; Hu, Bo; Wang, Lun-Qing; Zhang, Di

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that the acquired drug resistance of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was related to deregulation of miRNAs. However, the effects of miR-107 and the mechanism through which miR-107 affects the cisplatin chemoresistance in NSCLC have not been reported. TaqMan RT-PCR or Western blot assay was performed to detect the expression of mature miR-107 and cyclin dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) protein. The viabilities of treated cells were analyzed using MTT assay. We found that the expression level of miR-107 in A549 cells was significantly lower than that in normal human bronchial epithelial cells (0.45 ± 0.26 vs. 1.00 ± 0.29, P = 0.032). The MTT assay showed that the A549 cells transfected with miR-107 mimics were significantly more sensitive to the therapy of cisplatin than control cells. A549 cells transfected with miR-107 mimics showed a decreased CDK8 protein expression. Downregulation of CDK8 expression by siRNAs, A549 cells became more sensitive to the therapy of cisplatin. In addition, the enhanced growth-inhibitory effect by the miR-107 mimic transfection was enhanced after the addition of CDK8 siRNA. In conclusion, the present study provides the first evidence that miR-107 plays a key role in cisplatin resistance by targeting the CDK8 protein in NSCLC cell lines, suggesting that miR-107 can be used to predict a patient's response to chemotherapy as well as serve as a novel potential maker for NSCLC therapy. PMID:25400821

  10. Apoptosis, cell proliferation and modulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(cip1) in vascular remodelling during vein arterialization in the rat.

    PubMed

    Borin, Thaiz Ferraz; Miyakawa, Ayumi Aurea; Cardoso, Leandro; de Figueiredo Borges, Luciano; Gonçalves, Giovana Aparecida; Krieger, Jose Eduardo

    2009-06-01

    Neo-intima development and atherosclerosis limit long-term vein graft use for revascularization of ischaemic tissues. Using a rat model, which is technically less challenging than smaller rodents, we provide evidence that the temporal morphological, cellular, and key molecular events during vein arterialization resemble the human vein graft adaptation. Right jugular vein was surgically connected to carotid artery and observed up to 90 days. Morphometry demonstrated gradual thickening of the medial layer and important formation of neo-intima with deposition of smooth muscle cells (SMC) in the subendothelial layer from day 7 onwards. Transmission electron microscopy showed that SMCs switch from the contractile to synthetic phenotype on day 3 and new elastic lamellae formation occurs from day 7 onwards. Apoptosis markedly increased on day 1, while alpha-actin immunostaining for SMC almost disappeared by day 3. On day 7, cell proliferation reached the highest level and cellular density gradually increased until day 90. The relative magnitude of cellular changes was higher in the intima vs. the media layer (100 vs. 2 times respectively). Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKIs) p27(Kip1) and p16(INKA) remained unchanged, whereas p21(Cip1) was gradually downregulated, reaching the lowest levels by day 7 until day 90. Taken together, these data indicate for the first time that p21(Cip1) is the main CDKI protein modulated during the arterialization process the rat model of vein arterialization that may be useful to identify and validate new targets and interventions to improve the long-term patency of vein grafts. PMID:19563615