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Sample records for cyclooxygenase-2 generates anti-inflammatory

  1. Viscum album Exerts Anti-Inflammatory Effect by Selectively Inhibiting Cytokine-Induced Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Pushpa; Maddur, Mohan S.; Friboulet, Alain; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Kaveri, Srini V.

    2011-01-01

    Viscum album (VA) preparations are extensively used as complementary therapy in cancer and are shown to exert anti-tumor activities which involve the cytotoxic properties, induction of apoptosis, inhibition of angiogenesis and several other immunomodulatory mechanisms. In addition to their application in cancer therapy, VA preparations have also been successfully utilized in the treatment of several inflammatory pathologies. Owing to the intricate association of inflammation and cancer and in view of the fact that several anti-tumor phytotherapeutics also exert a potent anti-inflammatory effect, we hypothesized that VA exerts an anti-inflammatory effect that is responsible for its therapeutic benefit. Since, inflammatory cytokine-induced cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of VA on regulation of cyclo-oxygenase expression and PGE2 biosynthesis by using human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549 cells) as a model. A549 cells were stimulated with IL-1β and treated with VA preparation (VA Qu Spez) for 18 hours. PGE2 was analysed in the culture supernatants by enzyme immunoassay. Expression of COX-2 and COX-1 proteins was analyzed by immunoblotting and the expression of COX-2 mRNA was assessed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. We found that VA Qu Spez inhibit the secretion of IL-1β-induced PGE2 in a dose-dependent manner. Further, we also show that this inhibitory action was associated with a reduced expression of COX-2 without modulating the COX-1 expression. Together these results demonstrate a novel anti-inflammatory mechanism of action of VA preparations wherein VA exerts an anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting cytokine-induced PGE2 via selective inhibition of COX-2. PMID:22028854

  2. Anti-inflammatory effects of essential oils from Chamaecyparis obtusa via the cyclooxygenase-2 pathway in rats.

    PubMed

    An, Beum-Soo; Kang, Ji-Houn; Yang, Hyun; Jung, Eui-Man; Kang, Hong-Seok; Choi, In-Gyu; Park, Mi-Jin; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2013-07-01

    Essential oils are concentrated hydrophobic liquids containing volatile aromatic compounds from plants. In the present study, the essential oil of Chamaecyparis obtusa (C. obtusa), which is commercially used in soap, toothpaste and cosmetics, was extracted. Essential oil extracted from C. obtusa contains several types of terpenes, which have been shown to have anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, we examined the anti-inflammatory effects of C. obtusa essential oil in vivo and in vitro following the induction of inflammation by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in rats. While LPS induced an inflammatory response through the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs), these levels were reduced when essential oil was pre-administered. Additionally, the mechanism of action underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of C. obtusa essential oil was investigated by measuring the mRNA expression of inflammation‑associated genes. LPS treatment significantly induced the expression of transforming growth factor α (TNFα) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in rats, while C. obtusa essential oil inhibited this effect. Taken together, our results demonstrate that C. obtusa essential oil exerts anti‑inflammatory effects by regulating the production of PGE2 and TNFα gene expression through the COX-2 pathway. These findings suggest that C. obtusa essential oil may constitute a novel source of anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:23652412

  3. Comparison of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors use in Australia and Nova Scotia (Canada)

    PubMed Central

    Barozzi, Nadia; Sketris, Ingrid; Cooke, Charmaine; Tett, Susan

    2009-01-01

    AIMS Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors were marketed aggressively and their rapid uptake caused safety concerns and budgetary challenges in Canada and Australia. The objectives of this study were to compare and contrast COX-2 inhibitors and nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (ns-NSAID) use in Nova Scotia (Canada) and Australia and to identify lessons learned from the two jurisdictions. METHODS Ns-NSAID and COX-2 inhibitor Australian prescription data (concession beneficiaries) were downloaded from the Medicare Australia website (2001–2006). Similar Pharmacare data were obtained for Nova Scotia (seniors and those receiving Community services). Defined daily doses per 1000 beneficiaries day−1 were calculated. COX-2 inhibitors/all NSAIDs ratios were calculated for Australia and Nova Scotia. Ns-NSAIDs were divided into low, moderate and high risk for gastrointestinal side-effects and the proportions of use in each group were determined. Which drugs accounted for 90% of use was also calculated. RESULTS Overall NSAID use was different in Australia and Nova Scotia. However, ns-NSAID use was similar. COX-2 inhibitor dispensing was higher in Australia. The percentage of COX-2 inhibitor prescriptions over the total NSAID use was different in the two countries. High-risk NSAID use was much higher in Australia. Low-risk NSAID prescribing increased in Nova Scotia over time. The low-risk/high-risk ratio was constant throughout over the period in Australia and increased in Nova Scotia. CONCLUSIONS There are significant differences in Australia and Nova Scotia in use of NSAIDs, mainly due to COX-2 prescribing. Nova Scotia has a higher proportion of low-risk NSAID use. Interventions to provide physicians with information on relative benefits and risks of prescribing specific NSAIDs are needed, including determining their impact. PMID:19660008

  4. Date syrup-derived polyphenols attenuate angiogenic responses and exhibits anti-inflammatory activity mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor and cyclooxygenase-2 expression in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Taleb, Hajer; Morris, R Keith; Withycombe, Cathryn E; Maddocks, Sarah E; Kanekanian, Ara D

    2016-07-01

    Bioactive components such as polyphenols, present in many plants, are purported to have anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic properties. Date syrup, produced from date fruit of the date palm tree, has traditionally been used to treat a wide range of diseases with etiologies involving angiogenesis and inflammation. It was hypothesized that polyphenols in date syrup reduce angiogenic responses such as cell migration, tube formation, and matrix metalloproteinase activity in an inflammatory model by exhibiting anti-inflammatory activity mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the prostaglandin enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in endothelial cells. Date syrup polyphenols at 60 and 600μg/mL reduced inflammation and suppressed several stages of angiogenesis, including endothelial cell migration, invasion, matrix metalloproteinase activity, and tube formation, without evidence of cytotoxicity. VEGF and COX-2 expression induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha at both gene expression and protein level was significantly reduced by date syrup polyphenols in comparison to untreated cells. In conclusion, polyphenols in date syrup attenuated angiogenic responses and exhibited anti-inflammatory activity mediated by VEGF and COX-2 expression in endothelial cells. PMID:27333954

  5. Rational Design of Small Peptides for Optimal Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2: Development of a Highly Effective Anti-Inflammatory Agent.

    PubMed

    Singh, Palwinder; Kaur, Sukhmeet; Kaur, Jagroop; Singh, Gurjit; Bhatti, Rajbir

    2016-04-28

    Among the small peptides 2-31, (H)Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu(OMe) (30) reduced prostaglandin production of COX-2 with an IC50 of 60 nM relative to 6000 nM for COX-1. The 5 mg kg(-1) dose of compound 30 rescued albino mice by 80% from capsaicin-induced paw licking and recovered it by 60% from carrageenan-induced inflammation. The mode of action of compound 30 for targeting COX-2, iNOS, and VGSC was investigated by using substance P, l-arginine, and veratrine, respectively, as biomarkers. The interactions of 30 with COX-2 were supported by isothermal calorimetry experiments showing a Ka of 6.10 ± 1.10 × 10(4) M(-1) and ΔG of -100.3 kJ mol(-1) in comparison to a Ka 0.41 × 10(3) ± 0.09 M(-1) and ΔG of -19.2 ± 0.06 kJ mol(-1) for COX-1. Moreover, compound 30 did not show toxicity up to a 2000 mg kg(-1) dose. Hence, we suggest peptide 30 as a highly potent and promising candidate for further development into an anti-inflammatory drug. PMID:27019010

  6. Cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 selectivity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: investigation using human peripheral monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kato, M; Nishida, S; Kitasato, H; Sakata, N; Kawai, S

    2001-12-01

    Since the pharmacological profiles of various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) might depend on their differing selectivity for cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) and 2 (COX-2), we developed a new screening method using human peripheral monocytes. Monocytes from healthy volunteers were separated, and the cells were incubated with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Monocytes without LPS stimulation exclusively expressed COX-1 on Western blotting analysis, whereas LPS stimulation induced COX-2 expression. Unstimulated monocytes (COX-1) and LPS-stimulated monocytes (COX-2) were then used to determinethe COX selectivity of various NSAIDs. The respective mean IC50 values for COX-1 and COX-2 IC50 (microM), and the COX-1/COX-2 ratio of each NSAID were as follows: celecoxib, 82, 6.8, 12; diclofenac, 0.076, 0.026, 2.9; etodolac, > 100, 53, > 1.9; ibuprofen, 12, 80, 0.15; indometacin, 0.0090, 0.31, 0.029; meloxicam, 37, 6.1, 6.1; 6-MNA (the active metabolite of nabumetone), 149, 230, 0.65; NS-398, 125, 5.6, 22; piroxicam, 47, 25, 1.9; rofecoxib, > 100, 25, > 4.0; S-2474, > 100, 8.9, > 11; SC-560, 0.0048, 1.4, 0.0034. The percentage inhibition of COX-1 activity at the IC50 of COX-2 also showed a wide variation among these NSAIDs. The bioassay system using human monocytes to assess the inhibitory effects of various NSAIDs on COX-1 and COX-2 may become a clinically useful screening method. PMID:11804398

  7. Activation of macrophage peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma by diclofenac results in the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 protein and the synthesis of anti-inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Samir S; Botting, Regina M; Joshi, Amrish N; Seed, Michael P; Colville-Nash, Paul R

    2009-07-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an inducible isoform of the COX family of enzymes central to the synthesis of pro-inflammatory prostaglandins. Induction of COX-2 is mediated by many endogenous and exogenous molecules that include pro-inflammatory cytokines and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It has been demonstrated that COX-2 can also be induced by diclofenac in cultured J774.2 macrophages. This induction was delayed compared to COX-2 induced by LPS and paracetamol selectively inhibited activity of this protein. The aim of the present study was to determine the transcription factor involved in the production of COX-2 after treatment of J774.2 cells with 500 microM diclofenac. Pre-treatment of cells with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) antagonists GW9662 (0.1-1 microM) or biphenol A Diglycidyl Ether (100-200 microM) resulted in reduction of the induction of COX-2 by diclofenac, but not by LPS. Induction of COX-2 by the PPAR-gamma agonist 15deoxyDelta(12,14)prostaglandin J(2) was also reduced when the cells were pre-treated with the PPAR-gamma antagonists BADGE or GW9662. On the other hand, pre-treatment of cells with the nuclear factor-kappa-B (NF-kappaB) Super-repressor IkappaBalpha (150-600 nM) reduced the induction of COX-2 by LPS, but not by diclofenac. We, therefore, have identified that PPAR-gamma activation is a requirement for COX-2 induction after diclofenac stimulation of J774.2 cells. These results along with the finding that treatment of J774.2 macrophages with diclofenac resulted in the release of the anti-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-beta suggest that the diclofenac-induced COX-2 protein may possess anti-inflammatory actions. PMID:19219624

  8. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors and paracetamol use in Queensland and in the whole of Australia

    PubMed Central

    Barozzi, Nadia; Tett, Susan E

    2008-01-01

    Background Cross national drug utilization studies can provide information about different influences on physician prescribing. This is important for medicines with issues around safety and quality of use, like non selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ns-NSAIDs) and cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors. To enable comparison of prescription medicine use across different jurisdictions with a range of population sizes, data first need to be compared within Australia to understand whether use in a smaller sub-population may be considered as representative of the total use within Australia. The aim of this study was to compare the utilization of non selective NSAID, COX-2 inhibitors and paracetamol between Queensland and Australia. Method Dispensing data were obtained for concession beneficiaries for Australia for ns-NSAIDs, COX-2 inhibitors and paracetamol subsidized by the PBS over the period 1997–2003. The same data were purchased for Queensland. Data were converted to Defined Daily Dose (DDD)/1000 beneficiaries/day (World Health Organization anatomical therapeutic chemical classification, 2005). Results Total NSAID and paracetamol consumption were similar in Australia and Queensland. Ns-NSAID use decreased sharply with the introduction of COX-2 inhibitors (from approximately 80 to 40 DDD/1000 beneficiaries/day). Paracetamol was constant (approximately 45 DDD/1000 beneficiaries/day). COX-2 inhibitors consumption was initially higher in Queensland than in the whole of Australia. Conclusion Despite initial divergence in celecoxib use between Queensland and Australia, the use of ns-NSAIDs, COX-2 inhibitors and paracetamol overall, in concession beneficiaries, was comparable in Australia and Queensland. PMID:18816393

  9. Cyclooxygenase-2 and 15-lipoxygenase inhibition, synthesis, anti-inflammatory activity and ulcer liability of new celecoxib analogues: Determination of region-specific pyrazole ring formation by NOESY.

    PubMed

    Abdelall, Eman K A; Lamie, Phoebe F; Ali, Waleed A M

    2016-06-15

    Two new series of 1,5-diaryl pyrazoline (3a-f) and 1,5-diaryl pyrazole (5a and 5b) were designed as both COX-2 and 15-LOX inhibitors. All the prepared compounds were fully characterized by all spectral and element analysis. Their anti-inflammatory activity and ulcer index were included. Pyrazoline 3f is the most effective with IC50=1.14 and 4.7μM against COX-2 and 15-LOX respectively, and more potent than celecoxib and meclofenamate references. In addition 3a, 3b, 5a, and 5b were safer with low ulcer index than celecoxib. Docking study was performed for the most active compounds such as 2b, 3a, and 3f on COX-2 and 15-LOX enzymes. PMID:27158139

  10. Generation and Dietary Modulation of Anti-Inflammatory Electrophilic Omega-3 Fatty Acid Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Cipollina, Chiara; Salvatore, Sonia R.; Muldoon, Matthew F.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Schopfer, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) decrease cardiovascular risk via suppression of inflammation. The generation of electrophilic α,β-unsaturated ketone derivatives of the ω-3 PUFAs docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) in activated human macrophages is catalyzed by cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2). These derivatives are potent pleiotropic anti-inflammatory signaling mediators that act via mechanisms including the activation of Nrf2-dependent phase 2 gene expression and suppression of pro-inflammatory NF-κB-driven gene expression. Herein, the endogenous generation of ω-3 PUFAs electrophilic ketone derivatives and their hydroxy precursors was evaluated in human neutrophils. In addition, their dietary modulation was assessed through a randomized clinical trial. Methods Endogenous generation of electrophilic omega-3 PUFAs and their hydroxy precursors was evaluated by mass spectrometry in neutrophils isolated from healthy subjects, both at baseline and upon stimulation with calcium ionophore. For the clinical trial, participants were healthy adults 30–55 years of age with a reported EPA+DHA consumption of ≤300 mg/day randomly assigned to parallel groups receiving daily oil capsule supplements for a period of 4 months containing either 1.4 g of EPA+DHA (active condition, n = 24) or identical appearing soybean oil (control condition, n = 21). Participants and laboratory technicians remained blinded to treatment assignments. Results 5-lypoxygenase-dependent endogenous generation of 7-oxo-DHA, 7-oxo-DPA and 5-oxo-EPA and their hydroxy precursors is reported in human neutrophils stimulated with calcium ionophore and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Dietary EPA+DHA supplementation significantly increased the formation of 7-oxo-DHA and 5-oxo-EPA, with no significant modulation of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolite levels. Conclusions The endogenous detection of these electrophilic ω-3 fatty acid ketone derivatives supports the

  11. Ibuprofen-arginine generates nitric oxide and has enhanced anti-inflammatory effects.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Clara; Di Paola, Rosanna; Perrotta, Cristiana; Mazzon, Emanuela; Cattaneo, Dario; Trabucchi, Emilio; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Clementi, Emilio

    2009-10-01

    Ibuprofen, a chiral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug chemically related to fenoprofen and naproxen, has moderate but definite anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antipyretic properties, with considerably less gastrointestinal adverse effect than other drugs in the same family. Currently available in the market are preparations in which bioavailability of ibuprofen is increased by salification with various salts. We have investigated the pharmacological properties of one such salt, ibuprofen-arginine, of biological interest because l-arginine acts as substrate of the nitric oxide (NO) synthesising enzymes. Using epithelial HeLa cells expressing the endothelial NO synthase we show that ibuprofen-arginine releases NO and that this NO protects against the cytotoxic apoptogenic effects of staurosporine. We also found that ibuprofen-arginine is endowed with enhanced anti-inflammatory effects with respect to ibuprofen, as shown by reduced hind paw oedema, neutrophil infiltration and chondrocyte apoptosis in collagen-induced mouse arthritis, a model of chronic inflammation. NO has pleiotropic beneficial effects that may contribute to limit inflammation and anti-inflammatory compounds able to release NO display higher efficacy than the parent drugs in defined clinical settings. Our results open the possibility that NO generation contributes to the enhanced anti-inflammatory effects of ibuprofen-arginine vs. ibuprofen, suggesting co-administration of anti-inflammatory drugs and arginine as an additional way to exploit the beneficial effects of NO. PMID:19539763

  12. Feijoa sellowiana Berg fruit juice: anti-inflammatory effect and activity on superoxide anion generation.

    PubMed

    Monforte, Maria T; Fimiani, Vincenzo; Lanuzza, Francesco; Naccari, Clara; Restuccia, Salvatore; Galati, Enza M

    2014-04-01

    Feijoa sellowiana Berg var. coolidge fruit juice was studied in vivo for the anti-inflammatory activity by carrageenin-induced paw edema test and in vitro for the effects on superoxide anion release from neutrophils in human whole blood. The fruit juice was analyzed by the high-performance liquid chromatography method, and quercetin, ellagic acid, catechin, rutin, eriodictyol, gallic acid, pyrocatechol, syringic acid, and eriocitrin were identified. The results showed a significant anti-inflammatory activity of F. sellowiana fruit juice, sustained also by an effective antioxidant activity observed in preliminary studies on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) test. In particular, the anti-inflammatory activity edema inhibition is significant since the first hour (44.11%) and persists until the fifth hour (44.12%) of the treatment. The effect on superoxide anion release was studied in human whole blood, in the presence of activators affecting neutrophils by different mechanisms. The juice showed an inhibiting response on neutrophils basal activity in all experimental conditions. In stimulated neutrophils, the higher inhibition of superoxide anion generation was observed at concentration of 10(-4) and 10(-2) mg/mL in whole blood stimulate with phorbol-myristate-13-acetate (PMA; 20% and 40%) and with N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP; 15% and 48%). The significant reduction of edema and the inhibition of O2(-) production, occurring mainly through interaction with protein-kinase C pathway, confirm the anti-inflammatory effect of F. sellowiana fruit juice. PMID:24433073

  13. On the induction of cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase and soluble phospholipase A2 in rat mesangial cells by a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug: the role of cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Klein, T; Ullrich, V; Pfeilschifter, J; Nüsing, R

    1998-03-01

    One of the challenges in the therapy with anti-inflammatory drugs is the avoidance of gastrointestinal side effects, which may be achieved by selective inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX) -2. CGP 28238 is reported with these characteristics inhibiting selectively the COX-2 activity at nanomolar concentrations. However, we report here on a novel action of this compound uncovered during the application of higher concentrations. In rat mesangial cells, CGP 28238 induced the mRNA and the protein of COX-2 as well as those of inducible nitric oxide synthase and soluble phospholipase A2. In the case of COX-2, this stimulation had no effect on the production of COX-2 metabolites because of the effective blockade of the enzyme. In contrast, the level of NO produced by the cells increased in a concentration-dependent manner from 1.2 to 12.5 nmol of nitrite/3 x 10(5) cells. Furthermore, in combination with low doses of IL-1 CGP 28238 superinduced the formation of nitrite. The observed effects were independent of the inhibition of prostaglandin formation, as suggested by the failure of the potent COX inhibitor diclofenac to cause similar effects. Furthermore, the activity and expression of enzymes downstream of the COX step, such as prostacyclin synthase, were unaffected by CGP 28238. The inductive action of CGP 28238 could be blocked by inhibitors for tyrosine kinases and protein kinase A, such as genistein and KT5720, respectively. The increase in intracellular cAMP concentration in rat mesangial cells and the inhibition by CGP 28238 of phosphodiesterase 4 activity with an IC50 value of 23 muM gave a rationale to explain the underlying mechanisms for the induction of the inflammatory response genes COX-2, soluble phospholipase A2 and inducible NO synthase in rat mesangial cells. PMID:9495802

  14. Discovery of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug and anticancer drug enhancing reprogramming and induced pluripotent stem cell generation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao-Shun; Lopez, Claudia G; Rana, Tariq M

    2011-10-01

    Recent breakthroughs in creating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide alternative means to obtain embryonic stem-like cells without destroying embryos by introducing four reprogramming factors (Oct3/4, Sox2, and Klf4/c-Myc or Nanog/Lin28) into somatic cells. iPSCs are versatile tools for investigating early developmental processes and could become sources of tissues or cells for regenerative therapies. Here, for the first time, we describe a strategy to analyze genomics datasets of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and embryonic stem cells to identify genes constituting barriers to iPSC reprogramming. We further show that computational chemical biology combined with genomics analysis can be used to identify small molecules regulating reprogramming. Specific downregulation by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) of several key MEF-specific genes encoding proteins with catalytic or regulatory functions, including WISP1, PRRX1, HMGA2, NFIX, PRKG2, COX2, and TGFβ3, greatly increased reprogramming efficiency. Based on this rationale, we screened only 17 small molecules in reprogramming assays and discovered that the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug Nabumetone and the anticancer drug 4-hydroxytamoxifen can generate iPSCs without Sox2. Nabumetone could also produce iPSCs in the absence of c-Myc or Sox2 without compromising self-renewal and pluripotency of derived iPSCs. In summary, we report a new concept of combining genomics and computational chemical biology to identify new drugs useful for iPSC generation. This hypothesis-driven approach provides an alternative to shot-gun screening and accelerates understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying iPSC induction. PMID:21898684

  15. Gastrointestinal and Cardiovascular Risk of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saeed, Abdulwahed

    2011-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) confer a gastrointestinal (GI) side effect profile and concerns regarding adverse cardiovascular effects have emerged associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. NSAIDs are highly effective in treating pain and inflammation, but it is well recognized that these agents are associated with substantial gastrointestinal toxicity. Cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors may also reduce the risk for gastrointestinal events, although they may increase cardiovascular adverse events. The selection of an appropriate analgesic or anti-inflammatory agent with or without gastroprotective therapy should be individualized. PMID:22253945

  16. Comparison of Anti-Oxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Effects between Fresh and Aged Black Garlic Extracts.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yi Yeong; Ryu, Ji Hyeon; Shin, Jung-Hye; Kang, Min Jung; Kang, Jae Ran; Han, Jaehee; Kang, Dawon

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that aged black garlic (ABG) has strong anti-oxidant activity. Little is known however regarding the anti-inflammatory activity of ABG. This study was performed to identify and compare the anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of ABG extract (ABGE) with those of fresh raw garlic (FRG) extract (FRGE). In addition, we investigated which components are responsible for the observed effects. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were used as a pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory stressor, respectively. ABGE showed high ABTS and DPPH radical scavenging activities and low ROS generation in RAW264.7 cells compared with FRGE. However, inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 and 5-lipooxygenase activities by FRGE was stronger than that by ABGE. FRGE reduced PGE₂, NO, IL-6, IL-1β, LTD₄, and LTE₄ production in LPS-activated RAW264.7 cells more than did ABGE. The combination of FRGE and sugar (galactose, glucose, fructose, or sucrose), which is more abundant in ABGE than in FRGE, decreased the anti-inflammatory activity compared with FRGE. FRGE-induced inhibition of NF-κB activation and pro-inflammatory gene expression was blocked by combination with sugars. The lower anti-inflammatory activity in ABGE than FRGE could result from the presence of sugars. Our results suggest that ABGE might be helpful for the treatment of diseases mediated predominantly by ROS. PMID:27043510

  17. Anti-inflammatory Activity.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is the body's first response to infection or injury and is critical for both innate and adaptive immunity. It can be considered as part of the complex biological response of vascular tissues to harmful stimuli such as pathogens, damaged cells, or irritants. The search for natural compounds and phytoconstituents that are able to interfere with these mechanisms by preventing a prolonged inflammation could be useful for human health. Here, the anti-inflammatory properties of plant-based drugs are put together with both in vitro and acute (carrageenan, egg albumin and croton oil) and chronic (cotton pellet) in vivo models. PMID:26939273

  18. Evidence That Links Loss of Cyclooxygenase-2 With Increased Asymmetric Dimethylarginine

    PubMed Central

    Ahmetaj-Shala, Blerina; Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Knowles, Rebecca; Al’Yamani, Malak; Mazi, Sarah; Wang, Zhen; Tucker, Arthur T.; Mackenzie, Louise; Armstrong, Paul C. J.; Nüsing, Rolf M.; Tomlinson, James A. P.; Warner, Timothy D.; Leiper, James

    2015-01-01

    Background— Cardiovascular side effects associated with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor drugs dominate clinical concern. Cyclooxygenase-2 is expressed in the renal medulla where inhibition causes fluid retention and increased blood pressure. However, the mechanisms linking cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition and cardiovascular events are unknown and no biomarkers have been identified. Methods and Results— Transcriptome analysis of wild-type and cyclooxygenase-2−/− mouse tissues revealed 1 gene altered in the heart and aorta, but >1000 genes altered in the renal medulla, including those regulating the endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitors asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA) and monomethyl-l-arginine. Cyclo-oxygenase-2−/− mice had increased plasma levels of ADMA and monomethyl-l-arginine and reduced endothelial nitric oxide responses. These genes and methylarginines were not similarly altered in mice lacking prostacyclin receptors. Wild-type mice or human volunteers taking cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors also showed increased plasma ADMA. Endothelial nitric oxide is cardio-protective, reducing thrombosis and atherosclerosis. Consequently, increased ADMA is associated with cardiovascular disease. Thus, our study identifies ADMA as a biomarker and mechanistic bridge between renal cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition and systemic vascular dysfunction with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug usage. Conclusions— We identify the endogenous endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor ADMA as a biomarker and mechanistic bridge between renal cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition and systemic vascular dysfunction. PMID:25492024

  19. The conjugation of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) to small peptides for generating multifunctional supramolecular nanofibers/hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiayang; Kuang, Yi; Shi, Junfeng; Gao, Yuan; Zhou, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Summary Here we report supramolecular hydrogelators made of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) and small peptides. The covalent linkage of Phe–Phe and NSAIDs results in conjugates that self-assemble in water to form molecular nanofibers as the matrices of hydrogels. When the NSAID is naproxen (1), the resultant hydrogelator 1a forms a hydrogel at a critical concentration (cgc) of 0.2 wt % at pH 7.0. Hydrogelator 1a, also acting as a general motif, enables enzymatic hydrogelation in which the precursor turns into a hydrogelator upon hydrolysis catalyzed by a phosphatase at physiological conditions. The conjugates of Phe–Phe with other NSAIDs, such as (R)-flurbiprofen (2), racemic flurbiprofen (3), and racemic ibuprofen (4), are able to form molecular hydrogels, except in the case of aspirin (5). After the conjugation with the small peptides, NSAIDs exhibit improved selectivity to their targets. In addition, the peptides made of D-amino acids help preserve the activities of NSAIDs. Besides demonstrating that common NSAIDs are excellent candidates to promote aromatic–aromatic interaction in water to form hydrogels, this work contributes to the development of functional molecules that have dual or multiple roles and ultimately may lead to new molecular hydrogels of therapeutic agents for topical use. PMID:23766806

  20. The conjugation of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) to small peptides for generating multifunctional supramolecular nanofibers/hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiayang; Kuang, Yi; Shi, Junfeng; Gao, Yuan; Zhou, Jie; Xu, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Here we report supramolecular hydrogelators made of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) and small peptides. The covalent linkage of Phe-Phe and NSAIDs results in conjugates that self-assemble in water to form molecular nanofibers as the matrices of hydrogels. When the NSAID is naproxen (1), the resultant hydrogelator 1a forms a hydrogel at a critical concentration (cgc) of 0.2 wt % at pH 7.0. Hydrogelator 1a, also acting as a general motif, enables enzymatic hydrogelation in which the precursor turns into a hydrogelator upon hydrolysis catalyzed by a phosphatase at physiological conditions. The conjugates of Phe-Phe with other NSAIDs, such as (R)-flurbiprofen (2), racemic flurbiprofen (3), and racemic ibuprofen (4), are able to form molecular hydrogels, except in the case of aspirin (5). After the conjugation with the small peptides, NSAIDs exhibit improved selectivity to their targets. In addition, the peptides made of D-amino acids help preserve the activities of NSAIDs. Besides demonstrating that common NSAIDs are excellent candidates to promote aromatic-aromatic interaction in water to form hydrogels, this work contributes to the development of functional molecules that have dual or multiple roles and ultimately may lead to new molecular hydrogels of therapeutic agents for topical use. PMID:23766806

  1. Anti-inflammatory activity of constituents isolated from Terminalia chebula ***waiting for publication date

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was aimed at the evaluation of the anti-inflammatory activity of twelve compounds isolated from the methanolic extract of fruits of Terminalia chebula. The activity was determined in terms of their ability to inhibit inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in L...

  2. Pulsed Dipolar Spectroscopy Reveals That Tyrosyl Radicals Are Generated in Both Monomers of the Cyclooxygenase-2 Dimer.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Benjamin J; Borbat, Peter P; Georgieva, Elka R; Freed, Jack H; Malkowski, Michael G

    2015-12-22

    Cyclooxygenases (COXs) are heme-containing sequence homodimers that utilize tyrosyl radical-based catalysis to oxygenate substrates. Tyrosyl radicals are formed from a single turnover of substrate in the peroxidase active site generating an oxy-ferryl porphyrin cation radical intermediate that subsequently gives rise to a Tyr-385 radical in the cyclooxygenase active site and a Tyr-504 radical nearby. We have utilized double-quantum coherence (DQC) spectroscopy to determine the distance distributions between Tyr-385 and Tyr-504 radicals in COX-2. The distances obtained with DQC confirm that Tyr-385 and Tyr-504 radicals were generated in each monomer and accurately match the distances measured in COX-2 crystal structures. PMID:26636181

  3. Rosuvastatin Alters the Proteome of High Density Lipoproteins: Generation of alpha-1-antitrypsin Enriched Particles with Anti-inflammatory Properties.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Scott M; McKenzie, Benjamin; Kemeh, Georgina; Sampson, Maureen; Perl, Shira; Young, Neal S; Fessler, Michael B; Remaley, Alan T

    2015-12-01

    Statins lower plasma cholesterol by as much as 50%, thus reducing future cardiovascular events. However, the physiological effects of statins are diverse and not all are related to low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) lowering. We performed a small clinical pilot study to assess the impact of statins on lipoprotein-associated proteins in healthy individuals (n = 10) with normal LDL-C (<130 mg/dL), who were treated with rosuvastatin (20 mg/day) for 28 days. Proteomic analysis of size-exclusion chromatography isolated LDL, large high density lipoprotein (HDL-L), and small HDL (HDL-S) fractions and spectral counting was used to compare relative protein detection before and after statin therapy. Significant protein changes were found in each lipoprotein pool and included both increases and decreases in several proteins involved in lipoprotein metabolism, complement regulation and acute phase response. The most dramatic effect of the rosuvastatin treatment was an increase in α-1-antirypsin (A1AT) spectral counts associated with HDL-L particles. Quantitative measurement by ELISA confirmed an average 5.7-fold increase in HDL-L associated A1AT. Molecular modeling predictions indicated that the hydrophobic reactive center loop of A1AT, the functional domain responsible for its protease inhibitor activity, is likely involved in lipid binding and association with HDL was found to protect A1AT against oxidative inactivation. Cell culture experiments, using J774 macrophages, demonstrated that the association of A1AT with HDL enhances its antiprotease activity, preventing elastase induced production of tumor necrosis factor α. In conclusion, we show that statins can significantly alter the protein composition of both LDL and HDL and our studies reveal a novel functional relationship between A1AT and HDL. The up-regulation of A1AT on HDL enhances its anti-inflammatory functionality, which may contribute to the non-lipid lowering beneficial effects of statins. PMID

  4. The Complement Inhibitor Factor H Generates an Anti-Inflammatory and Tolerogenic State in Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Olivar, Rut; Luque, Ana; Cárdenas-Brito, Sonia; Naranjo-Gómez, Mar; Blom, Anna M; Borràs, Francesc E; Rodriguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Zipfel, Peter F; Aran, Josep M

    2016-05-15

    The activation of the complement system is a key initiating step in the protective innate immune-inflammatory response against injury, although it may also cause harm if left unchecked. The structurally related soluble complement inhibitors C4b-binding protein (C4BP) and factor H (FH) exert a tight regulation of the classical/lectin and alternative pathways of complement activation, respectively, attenuating the activity of the C3/C5 convertases and, consequently, avoiding serious damage to host tissues. We recently reported that the acute-phase C4BP isoform C4BP lacking the β-chain plays a pivotal role in the modulation of the adaptive immune responses. In this study, we demonstrate that FH acts in the early stages of monocyte to dendritic cell (DC) differentiation and is able to promote a distinctive tolerogenic and anti-inflammatory profile on monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs) challenged by a proinflammatory stimulus. Accordingly, FH-treated and LPS-matured MoDCs are characterized by altered cytoarchitecture, resembling immature MoDCs, lower expression of the maturation marker CD83 and the costimulatory molecules CD40, CD80, and CD86, decreased production of key proinflammatory Th1-cytokines (IL-12, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-8), and preferential production of immunomodulatory mediators (IL-10 and TGF-β). Moreover, FH-treated MoDCs show low Ag uptake and, when challenged with LPS, display reduced CCR7 expression and chemotactic migration, impaired CD4(+) T cell alloproliferation, inhibition of IFN-γ secretion by the allostimulated T cells, and, conversely, induction of CD4(+)CD127(low/negative)CD25(high)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells. Thus, this novel noncanonical role of FH as an immunological brake able to directly affect the function of MoDCs in an inflammatory environment may exhibit therapeutic potential in hypersensitivity, transplantation, and autoimmunity. PMID:27076676

  5. Cyclooxygenase-2 Generates the Endogenous Mutagen trans-4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal in Enterococcus faecalis-infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingmin; Allen, Toby D.; Yang, Yonghong; Moore, Danny R.; Huycke, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Infection of macrophages by the human intestinal commensal Enterococcus faecalis generates DNA damage and chromosomal instability in mammalian cells through bystander effects. These effects are characterized by clastogenesis and damage to mitotic spindles in target cells and are mediated, in part, by trans-4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE). In this study we investigated the role of cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) in producing this reactive aldehyde using E. faecalis-infected macrophages and interleukin-10 knockout mice colonized with this commensal. 4-HNE production by E. faecalis-infected macrophages was significantly reduced by COX and LOX inhibitors. The infection of macrophages led to decreased Cox1 and Alox5 expression while COX-2 and 4-HNE increased. Silencing Alox5 and Cox1 with gene-specific siRNAs had no effect on 4-HNE production. In contrast, silencing Cox2 significantly decreased 4-HNE production by E. faecalis-infected macrophages. Depleting intracellular glutathione increased 4-HNE production by these cells. Next, to confirm COX-2 as a source for 4-HNE, we assayed the products generated by recombinant human COX-2 and found 4-HNE in a concentration-dependent manner using arachidonic acid as a substrate. Finally, tissue macrophages in colon biopsies from interleukin-10 knockout mice colonized with E. faecalis were positive for COX-2 by immunohistochemical staining. This was associated with increased staining for 4-HNE-protein adducts in surrounding stroma. These data show that E. faecalis, a human intestinal commensal, can trigger macrophages to produce 4-HNE through COX-2. Importantly, it reinforces the concept of COX-2 as a procarcinogenic enzyme capable of damaging DNA in target cells through bystander effects that contribute to colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:23321929

  6. Anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of Carica papaya.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Saurabh; Cabot, Peter J; Shaw, P Nicholas; Hewavitharana, Amitha K

    2016-07-01

    Chronic inflammation is linked with the generation and progression of various diseases such as cancer, diabetes and atherosclerosis, and anti-inflammatory drugs therefore have the potential to assist in the treatment of these conditions. Carica papaya is a tropical plant that is traditionally used in the treatment of various ailments including inflammatory conditions. A literature search was conducted by using the keywords "papaya", "anti-inflammatory and inflammation" and "immunomodulation and immune" along with cross-referencing. Both in vitro and in vivo investigation studies were included. This is a review of all studies published since 2000 on the anti-inflammatory activity of papaya extracts and their effects on various immune-inflammatory mediators. Studies on the anti-inflammatory activities of recognized phytochemicals present in papaya are also included. Although in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that papaya extracts and papaya-associated phytochemicals possess anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, clinical studies are lacking. PMID:27416522

  7. Effects of the New Generation Synthetic Reconstituted Surfactant CHF5633 on Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Cytokine Expression in Native and LPS-Stimulated Adult CD14+ Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Kirsten; Fehrholz, Markus; Curstedt, Tore; Kunzmann, Steffen; Speer, Christian P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Surfactant replacement therapy is the standard of care for the prevention and treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. New generation synthetic surfactants represent a promising alternative to animal-derived surfactants. CHF5633, a new generation reconstituted synthetic surfactant containing SP-B and SP-C analogs and two synthetic phospholipids has demonstrated biophysical effectiveness in vitro and in vivo. While several surfactant preparations have previously been ascribed immunomodulatory capacities, in vitro data on immunomodulation by CHF5633 are limited, so far. Our study aimed to investigate pro- and anti-inflammatory effects of CHF5633 on native and LPS-stimulated human adult monocytes. Methods Highly purified adult CD14+ cells, either native or simultaneously stimulated with LPS, were exposed to CHF5633, its components, or poractant alfa (Curosurf®). Subsequent expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8 and IL-10 mRNA was quantified by real-time quantitative PCR, corresponding intracellular cytokine synthesis was analyzed by flow cytometry. Potential effects on TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA and protein expression were monitored by qPCR and flow cytometry. Results Neither CHF5633 nor any of its components induced inflammation or apoptosis in native adult CD14+ monocytes. Moreover, LPS-induced pro-inflammatory responses were not aggravated by simultaneous exposure of monocytes to CHF5633 or its components. In LPS-stimulated monocytes, exposure to CHF5633 led to a significant decrease in TNF-α mRNA (0.57 ± 0.23-fold, p = 0.043 at 4h; 0.56 ± 0.27-fold, p = 0.042 at 14h). Reduction of LPS-induced IL-1β mRNA expression was not significant (0.73 ± 0.16, p = 0.17 at 4h). LPS-induced IL-8 and IL-10 mRNA and protein expression were unaffected by CHF5633. For all cytokines, the observed CHF5633 effects paralleled a Curosurf®-induced modulation of cytokine response. TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA and protein expression were not affected by CHF5633 and Curosurf

  8. Generation of the First TCR Transgenic Mouse with CD4(+) T Cells Recognizing an Anti-inflammatory Regulatory T Cell-Inducing Hsp70 Peptide.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Manon A A; van Herwijnen, Martijn J C; van Kooten, Peter J S; Hoek, Aad; van der Zee, Ruurd; van Eden, Willem; Broere, Femke

    2016-01-01

    Antigen-specific regulatory T cells (Tregs) directed at self-antigens are difficult to study since suitable specific tools to isolate and characterize these cells are lacking. A T cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic mouse would generate possibilities to study such -antigen-specific T cells. As was shown previously, immunization with the mycobacterial heat shock protein (Hsp) 70-derived peptide B29 and its mouse homologs mB29a and mB29b induced anti-inflammatory responses. Furthermore, B29 induced antigen--specific Tregs in vivo. To study mB29b-specific Tregs, we isolated the TCR from T cell hybridomas generated against mB29b and produced a TCR transgenic mouse that expresses a MHC-class II restricted mB29b-specific TCR. These TCR transgenic CD4(+) T cells were found to cross-react with the B29 epitope as identified with peptide-induced proliferation and IL-2 production. Thus, we have successfully generated a novel mouse model with antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells that recognize self and bacterial Hsp 70-derived peptides. With this novel mouse model, it will be possible to study primary antigen-specific T cells with specificity for a regulatory Hsp70 T cell epitope. This will enable the isolation and characterization CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs with a proven specificity. This will provide useful knowledge of the induction, activation, and mode of action of Hsp70-specific Tregs, for instance, during experimental arthritis. PMID:27014269

  9. Generation of the First TCR Transgenic Mouse with CD4+ T Cells Recognizing an Anti-inflammatory Regulatory T Cell-Inducing Hsp70 Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Manon A. A.; van Herwijnen, Martijn J. C.; van Kooten, Peter J. S.; Hoek, Aad; van der Zee, Ruurd; van Eden, Willem; Broere, Femke

    2016-01-01

    Antigen-specific regulatory T cells (Tregs) directed at self-antigens are difficult to study since suitable specific tools to isolate and characterize these cells are lacking. A T cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic mouse would generate possibilities to study such ­antigen-specific T cells. As was shown previously, immunization with the mycobacterial heat shock protein (Hsp) 70-derived peptide B29 and its mouse homologs mB29a and mB29b induced anti-inflammatory responses. Furthermore, B29 induced antigen-­specific Tregs in vivo. To study mB29b-specific Tregs, we isolated the TCR from T cell hybridomas generated against mB29b and produced a TCR transgenic mouse that expresses a MHC-class II restricted mB29b-specific TCR. These TCR transgenic CD4+ T cells were found to cross-react with the B29 epitope as identified with peptide-induced proliferation and IL-2 production. Thus, we have successfully generated a novel mouse model with antigen-specific CD4+ T cells that recognize self and bacterial Hsp 70-derived peptides. With this novel mouse model, it will be possible to study primary antigen-specific T cells with specificity for a regulatory Hsp70 T cell epitope. This will enable the isolation and characterization CD4+CD25+ Tregs with a proven specificity. This will provide useful knowledge of the induction, activation, and mode of action of Hsp70-specific Tregs, for instance, during experimental arthritis. PMID:27014269

  10. A fraction from Dojuksan 30% ethanol extract exerts its anti-inflammatory effects through Nrf2-dependent heme oxygenase-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Sung; Kim, Kyoung-Su; Ko, Wonmin; Bae, Gi-Sang; Park, Sung-Joo; Jang, Jun-Hyeog; Oh, Hyuncheol; Kim, Youn-Chul

    2016-02-01

    Dojuksan is a traditional herbal medicine used in Korea and China to treat urinary diseases. In the present study, we aimed to examine the anti-inflammatory effects of an ethanol solvent extract of Dojuksan and a fraction (by bioassay-guided fractionation) derived from this extract, and to elucidate the specific mechanisms involved. The Dojuksan 30% ethanol extract (DEE) had a more significant and potent anti-inflammatory effect than the Dojuksan water extract (DWE). DEE markedly inhibited the production of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), as well as nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) binding activity. We found that the anti-inflammatory effects of DEE were mediated by the induction of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-dependent heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). To further explore the anti-inflammatory effects of DEE, we generated 6 different fractions of DEE. Of these, DEE-5 decreased the production of NO more significantly than the other fractions. DEE-5 also significantly decreased the expression of iNOS and COX-2, and the production of NO, PGE2, TNF-α and IL-1β. In addition, DEE-5 also significantly increased HO-1 levels; HO-1 significanlty contributed to the inhibitory effects of DEE-5 on the production of pro-inflammatory mediators. In this study, we determined whether the choice of extraction solvent affects the biological activity of Dojuksan, a traditional herbal formula. Our findings demonstrate that DEE and a fraction derived from this extract exerts anti-inflammatory effects through Nrf2‑dependent HO-1 expression, and that DEE may thus have greater potential therapeutic application than DWE. PMID:26647788

  11. Anti-Inflammatory, Antioxidant, Anti-Angiogenic and Skin Whitening Activities of Phryma leptostachya var. asiatica Hara Extract

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyun-Joo; Cho, Young-Wook; Lim, Hye-Won; Choi, Hojin; Ji, Dam-Jung; Lim, Chang-Jin

    2013-01-01

    This work aimed to assess some pharmacological activities of P. leptostachya var. asiatica Hara. The dried roots of P. leptostachya var. asiatica Hara were extracted with 70% ethanol to generate the powdered extract, named PLE. Anti-angiogenic activity was detected using chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. In vitro anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated via analyzing nitric oxide (NO) content, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells. Antioxidant activity was determined by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay and reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in the stimulated macrophage cells. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and -2 (MMP-2) activities in the culture media were detected using zymography. PLE exhibits an anti-angiogenic activity in the CAM assay, and displays an inhibitory action on the generation of NO in the LPS-stimulated macrophage cells. In the stimulated macrophage cells, it is able to diminish the enhanced ROS level. It can potently scavenge the stable DPPH free radical. It suppresses the induction of iNOS and COX-2 and the enhanced MMP-9 activity in the stimulated macrophage cells. Both monooxygenase and oxidase activities of tyrosinase were strongly inhibited by PLE. Taken together, the dried roots of P. leptostachya var. asiatica Hara possess anti-angiogenic, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and skin whitening activities, which might partly provide its therapeutic efficacy in traditional medicine. PMID:24009862

  12. Antibacterial and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Physalis Alkekengi var. franchetii and Its Main Constituents

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Zunpeng; Xing, Na; Wang, Qiuhong; Li, Xinli; Xu, Bingqing; Li, Zhenyu; Kuang, Haixue

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether the 50% EtOH fraction from AB-8 macroporous resin fractionation of a 70% EtOH extract of P. Alkekengi (50-EFP) has antibacterial and/or anti-inflammatory activity both in vivo and in vitro and to investigate the mechanism of 50-EFP anti-inflammatory activity. Additionally, this study sought to define the chemical composition of 50-EFP. Results indicated that 50-EFP showed significant antibacterial activity in vitro and efficacy in vivo. Moreover, 50-EFP significantly reduced nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 1 (IL-1), and interleukin 6 (IL-6) production in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated THP-1 cells. Nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) (examined at the protein level) in THP-1 cells were suppressed by 50-EFP, which inhibited nuclear translocation of p65. Consistent with this anti-inflammatory activity in vitro, 50-EFP reduced inflammation in both animal models. Finally, seventeen compounds (8 physalins and 9 flavones) were isolated as major components of 50-EFP. Our data demonstrate that 50-EFP has antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities both in vitro and in vivo. The anti-inflammatory effect appears to occur, at least in part, through the inhibition of nuclear translocation of p65. Moreover, physalins and flavones are probably the active components in 50-EFP that exert antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:27057196

  13. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ mediates the anti-inflammatory effect of 3-hydroxy-4-pyridinecarboxylic acid derivatives: synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Brun, Paola; Dean, Annalisa; Di Marco, Valerio; Surajit, Pathak; Castagliuolo, Ignazio; Carta, Davide; Ferlin, Maria Grazia

    2013-04-01

    Seven 3-hydroxy-4-pyridinecarboxylic acid derivatives (HPs), aza-analogues of salicylic acid and structurally close to other potent inflammatory pyridine compounds such as aminopyridinylmethanols and aminopyridinamines, were synthesized, and their anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated. The synthesis was performed by adopting a general procedure involving an intramolecular Diels-Alder cycloaddition of oxazoles with acrylic acid to form various substituted pyridinic acids. The newly synthesized HPs did not exhibit cytotoxic activity on human monocytes-derived macrophages at concentrations up to 10(2) μM. Anti-inflammatory activity of the compounds was screened in vitro by evaluating the capability to inhibit cytokines release from lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated human macrophages. 3-Hydroxy-1-methyl-4-pyridinecarboxylic acid (24) was found to be the most active HP. At 10 μM concentration, HP 24 reduced LPS-induced and nuclear factor-κB activation and cyclooxygenase-2 expression, while increased intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-γ) mRNA transcript level. Indeed, pre-treatment of LPS-exposed human macrophages with PPAR-γ specific antagonist completely prevented HP 24-induced TNF-α and IL8 down regulation, demonstrating that the PPARγ pathway is mandatory for the HP 24 anti-inflammatory effect. Finally, daily treatment with HP 24 ameliorated the outcome of DSS-induced colitis in mice, significantly reducing colonic MPO activity and IL-1β tissue levels. PMID:23416190

  14. Anti-inflammatory effects of the chloroform extract of Pulicaria guestii ameliorated the neutrophil infiltration and nitric oxide generation in rats.

    PubMed

    Alghaithy, A A; El-Beshbishy, H A; Abdel-Naim, A B; Nagy, A A; Abdel-Sattar, E M

    2011-11-01

    Pulicaria guestii Rech.f. & Rawi is a fragrant, perennial herb, which grows wild, west of Al-Madinah, Saudi Arabia. Several reports were published on the anti-inflammatory activity of the sesquiterpene lactones, phenolics and flavonoids, which constitute the main active constituents of the members of the genus Pulicaria. The present study was designed to explore the potential anti-inflammatory effect of P. guestii in several experimental models. The methanol extract of the dried aerial parts of P. guestii was extracted with petroleum ether, chloroform and n-butanol. The chloroform extract was analysed on TLC and examined under UV and visible light in presence of AlCl(3) spray. The free radical scavenging activity and the total phenolic content in the CHCl(3) extract were estimated. The crude methanol extract and the CHCl(3) fraction were examined against carrageenin-induced paw edema and ear edema induced by croton oil application. The crude methanolic extract significantly reduced carrageenin-induced rat paw edema. After fractionation, the chloroform fraction caused significant reduction in carrageenin-induced rat paw edema in addition to diminishing prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in the inflammatory exudates. Topical application of chloroform fraction significantly reduced rat ear edema induced by croton oil application. In the same model, chloroform fraction reduced neutrophil infiltration, as indicated by the significant decrease in myeloperoxidase activity, and ameliorated histopathological changes induced by croton oil application. In lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in rat air pouch, chloroform fraction significantly reduced the nitric oxide level and tumor necrosis factor-α release. In conclusion, the chloroform fraction of P. guestii extract possesses anti-inflammatory activity in several experimental models. Further investigations are needed to identify the active constituents responsible for this anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:21505007

  15. Role of lipoxins and resolvins as anti-inflammatory and proresolving mediators in colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Janakiram, Naveena B; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2009-06-01

    Recently, lipoxins (LXs) and resolvins (Rvs) have become the topic of intense interest because of expanding views of their action, particularly in chronic disorders where unresolved inflammation is a key factor leading to colon carcinogenesis. Rvs are biosynthesized from omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentanoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) via cyclooxygenase-2/lipoxygenase (COX-2/LOX) pathways; Rvs are shown to dramatically reduce dermal inflammation, peritonitis, dendritic cell migration, and interleukin production. This explains that dietary supplementation of omega-3 fatty acids generates potent local endogenous mediators that control inflammation. LXs are biosynthesized from COX-2/LOX pathways. Metabolites of 15-LOX-1 and 2 are anti-tumorigenic; similarly, 15-epi-LXA(4) synthesized during COX-2 acetylation by low doses of aspirin too possesses anti-tumorigenic effects. Acetylating nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), like aspirin, switches COX-2 from forming PGE(2) (promoting tumorigenesis) to 15-epi-LXA(4) (antitumorigenesis). LXs and Rvs are endogenously generated during the spontaneous resolution phase. These newly identified LXs and Rvs have proved to be potent regulators of both leukocytes and cytokine productions, thereby regulating the events of interest in inflammation and resolution. In light of existing knowledge on interconnected pathways of pro-inflammatory mediators (leukotrienes, chemokines (IL8, SDF-1 alpha, MIP-1 alpha, MCP-1,2 etc), and cytokines (IL3, IL6, IL12, IL-1 beta, GM-CSF, B94, TNF-alpha etc)), the anti-inflammatory properties of pro-resolving mediators in preventing chronic inflammation which leads to carcinogenesis needs further understanding. In this review, we explore the mechanisms that trigger formation of LXs and Rvs, to highlight the relative importance of LXs and Rvs in carcinogenesis in relation to pro-inflammatory mediators. PMID:19601807

  16. Anti-Inflammatory and Antinociceptive Activities of Bufalin in Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yang; Yin, Junqiang; Lin, Wenqian

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of bufalin, a major component of “Chan-su.” We used a carrageenan-induced paw edema model to assess the anti-inflammatory activity of this compound, and Western blot analysis detected NF-κB signaling during this effect. The antinociceptive activities were evaluated by acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin, and hot-plate tests; open-field test investigated effects on the central nervous system. Our data showed that bufalin (0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg, i.p.) potently decreased carrageenan-induced paw edema. Bufalin down regulated the expression levels of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) during these treatments. Further studies demonstrated that bufalin significantly inhibited the activation of NF-κB signaling. Bufalin also reduced acetic acid-induced writhing and the licking time in the formalin test and increased hot-plate reaction latencies. Naloxone pretreatment (2 mg/kg, i.p.) in the early phases of the formalin test and hot-plate test significantly attenuated the bufalin-induced antinociception effects, which suggests the involvement of the opioid system. A reduction in locomotion was not observed in the open-field test after bufalin administration. Taken together, bufalin treatment resulted in in vivo anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects, and bufalin may be a novel, potential drug for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:24719521

  17. Intracellular Secretory Leukoprotease Inhibitor Modulates Inositol 1,4,5-Triphosphate Generation and Exerts an Anti-Inflammatory Effect on Neutrophils of Individuals with Cystic Fibrosis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Emer P.; Banville, Nessa; Ryan, Dorothy M.; O'Reilly, Niamh; Bergin, David A.; Pohl, Kerstin; Molloy, Kevin; McElvaney, Oliver J.; Alsaleh, Khalifah; Aljorfi, Ahmed; Kandalaft, Osama; O'Flynn, Eimear; Geraghty, Patrick; O'Neill, Shane J.; McElvaney, Noel G.

    2013-01-01

    Secretory leukoprotease inhibitor (SLPI) is an anti-inflammatory protein present in respiratory secretions. Whilst epithelial cell SLPI is extensively studied, neutrophil associated SLPI is poorly characterised. Neutrophil function including chemotaxis and degranulation of proteolytic enzymes involves changes in cytosolic calcium (Ca2+) levels which is mediated by production of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) in response to G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) stimuli. The aim of this study was to investigate the intracellular function of SLPI and the mechanism-based modulation of neutrophil function by this antiprotease. Neutrophils were isolated from healthy controls (n = 10), individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) (n = 5) or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (n = 5). Recombinant human SLPI significantly inhibited fMet-Leu-Phe (fMLP) and interleukin(IL)-8 induced neutrophil chemotaxis (P < 0.05) and decreased degranulation of matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9), hCAP-18, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) (P < 0.05). The mechanism of inhibition involved modulation of cytosolic IP3 production and downstream Ca2+ flux. The described attenuation of Ca2+ flux was overcome by inclusion of exogenous IP3 in electropermeabilized cells. Inhibition of IP3 generation and Ca2+ flux by SLPI may represent a novel anti-inflammatory mechanism, thus strengthening the attractiveness of SLPI as a potential therapeutic molecule in inflammatory airway disease associated with excessive neutrophil influx including CF, non-CF bronchiectasis, and COPD. PMID:24073410

  18. Crystallization of recombinant cyclo-oxygenase-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Anna M.; Pawlitz, Jennifer L.; Kurumbail, Ravi G.; Gierse, James K.; Moreland, Kirby T.; Stegeman, Roderick A.; Loduca, Jina Y.; Stallings, William C.

    1999-01-01

    The integral membrane protein, prostaglandin H 2 synthase, or cyclo-oxygenase (COX), catalyses the first step in the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins (PGs) and is the target of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Two isoforms are known. The constitutive enzyme, COX-1, is present in most tissues and is responsible for the physiological production of PGs. The isoform responsible for the elevated production of PGs during inflammation is COX-2 which is induced specifically at inflammatory sites. Three-dimensional structures of inhibitor complexes of COX-2, and of site variants of COX-2 which mimic COX-1, provide insight into the structural basis for selective inhibition of COX-2. Additionally, structures of COX-2 mutants and complexes with the substrate can provide a clearer understanding of the catalytic mechanism of the reaction. A crystallization protocol has been developed for COX-2 which reproducibly yields diffraction quality crystals. Polyethyleneglycol 550 monomethylether (MMP550) and MgCl 2 were systematically varied and used in conjunction with the detergent β- D-octylglucopyranoside ( β-OG). As a result of many crystallization trials, we determined that the initial β-OG concentration should be held constant, allowing the salt concentration to modulate the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the detergent. Over 25 crystal structures have been solved using crystals generated from this system. Most crystals belong to the space group P2 12 12, with lattice constants of a=180, b=134, c=120 Å in a pseudo body-centered lattice.

  19. NF-κB-targeted anti-inflammatory activity of Prunella vulgaris var. lilacina in macrophages RAW 264.7.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yu-Jin; Lee, Eun-Ju; Kim, Haeng-Ran; Hwang, Kyung-A

    2013-01-01

    Prunella vulgaris var. lilacina, a herbal medicine, has long been used in Korea for the treatment of sore throat, and to alleviate fever and accelerate wound healing. Although the therapeutic effect of P. vulgaris var. lilacina is likely associated with anti-inflammatory activity, the precise underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we sought to elucidate the possible mechanisms of the anti-inflammatory activity. We have investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of the various solvent fractions (hexane, butanol, chloroform and water) from the ethanol extract of P. vulgaris var. lilacina in activated macrophages. The hexane fraction exhibited higher anti-inflammatory activities, inducing inhibition of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 production as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, and tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA expression in response to lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Moreover, the hexane fraction from P. vulgaris var. lilacina significantly inhibited the activation of the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and the nuclear translocation of the NF-κB p50 and p65 subunits. These results indicate that P. vulgaris var. lilacina has an anti-inflammatory capacity in vitro, suggesting that it could be a potential source of natural anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:24177568

  20. Anti-inflammatory effects of Houttuynia cordata supercritical extract in carrageenan-air pouch inflammation model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dajeong; Park, Dongsun; Kyung, Jangbeen; Yang, Yun-Hui; Choi, Ehn-Kyoung; Lee, Yoon-Bok; Kim, Hyun-Kyu; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Kim, Yun-Bae

    2012-06-01

    Anti-inflammatory effects of Houttuynia cordata supercritical extract (HSE) were investigated in rat carrageenan-air pouch model. Oral administration of HSE (50-200 mg/kg) suppressed carrageenan-induced exudation and albumin leakage, as well as inflammatory cell infiltration at a high dose (200 mg/kg). Intraperitoneal injection of dexamethasone (2 mg/kg) only decreased exudation and cell infiltration, while indomethacin (2 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced exudate volume and albumin content without influence on the cell number. HSE lowered tumor-necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and nitric oxide (NO), as well as prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). Dexamethasone only reduced TNF-α and NO, while indomethacin decreased PGE(2). The results indicate that HSE exhibits anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting both TNF-α-NO and cyclooxygenase-2-PGE(2) pathways. PMID:22787488

  1. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Rosa taiwanensis Nakai in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Der-Shiang; Huang, Mei-Hsuen; Tsai, Jen-Chieh; Chang, Yuan-Shuang; Chiu, Yung-Jia; Lin, Yen-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we evaluated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of a 70% ethanol extract from Rosa taiwanensis Nakai (RTEtOH). The analgesic effect was determined using acetic acid-induced writhing response and formalin test. The anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by λ-carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of RTEtOH was examined by measuring the levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and malondialdehyde (MDA) in the paw edema tissue and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GRd) in the liver tissue. The betulinic acid and oleanolic acid contents of RTEtOH were assayed by HPLC. The results showed that RTEtOH decreased the acetic acid-induced writhing responses (1.0 g/kg) and the late phase of the formalin-induced licking time (0.5 and 1.0 g/kg). In the anti-inflammatory models, RTEtOH (0.5 and 1.0 g/kg) reduced the paw edema at 3, 4, and 5 h after λ-carrageenan administration. Moreover, the anti-inflammatory mechanisms might be due to the decreased levels of COX-2, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, as well as the inhibition of NO and MDA levels through increasing the activities of SOD, GPx, and GRd. The contents of two active compounds, betulinic acid and oleanolic acid, were quantitatively determined. This study demonstrated the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of RTEtOH and provided evidence to support its therapeutic use in inflammatory diseases. PMID:25494361

  2. Novel Biphasic Role of LipoxinA4 on Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Lung Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shengxing; Wang, Qian; He, Qian; Song, Xiaorong; Ye, Duyun; Gao, Fang; Jin, Shengwei; Lian, QingQuan

    2011-01-01

    Fibroblasts are important to host defence and immunity, can also as initiators of inflammation as well. As the endogenous “braking signal”, Lipoxins can regulate anti-inflammation and the resolution of inflammation. We investigated the effect of lipoxinA4 on the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated lung fibroblasts. We demonstrated that the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 protein was significantly increased and peaked initially at 6 hours, with a second increase, with maximal levels occurring 24 hours after lipopolysaccharide challenge. ProstaglandinE2 levels also peaked at 6 hours, and prostaglandinD2 levels were increased at both 6 and 24 hours. Exogenous lipoxinA4 inhibited the first peak of cyclooxygenase-2 expression as well as the production of prostaglandinE2 induced by lipopolysaccharide in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, exogenous lipoxinA4 increased the second peak of cyclooxygenase-2 expression as well as the production of prostaglandinD2 induced by lipopolysaccharide in a dose-dependent manner. LipoxinA4 receptor mRNA expression was markedly stimulated by lipopolysaccharide but inhibited by lipoxinA4. We present evidence for a novel biphasic role of lipoxinA4 on the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated lung fibroblasts, whereby LXA4 has an anti-inflammatory and proresolving activity in lung fibroblasts following LPS stimulation. PMID:21765620

  3. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Hyptis albida Chloroform Extract on Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Peritoneal Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez Miranda, Elizabeth; Pérez Ramos, Julia; Fresán Orozco, Cristina; Zavala Sánchez, Miguel Angel; Pérez Gutiérrez, Salud

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of a chloroform extract of Hyptis albida (CHA) on inflammatory responses in mouse lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced peritoneal macrophages. Our findings indicate that CHA inhibits LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). During the process, levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) increased in the mouse peritoneal macrophages; however, the extract suppressed them significantly. These results provide novel insights into the anti-inflammatory actions of CHA and support its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23970974

  4. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Hyptis albida Chloroform Extract on Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Peritoneal Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Miranda, Elizabeth; Pérez Ramos, Julia; Fresán Orozco, Cristina; Zavala Sánchez, Miguel Angel; Pérez Gutiérrez, Salud

    2013-01-01

    We examined the effects of a chloroform extract of Hyptis albida (CHA) on inflammatory responses in mouse lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced peritoneal macrophages. Our findings indicate that CHA inhibits LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF- α ) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). During the process, levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and nitric oxide (NO) increased in the mouse peritoneal macrophages; however, the extract suppressed them significantly. These results provide novel insights into the anti-inflammatory actions of CHA and support its potential use in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23970974

  5. Drug Targets for Cardiovascular-Safe Anti-Inflammatory: In Silico Rational Drug Studies

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Sajad; Sahrawat, Tammanna R.; Ray, Monalisa; Dash, Swagatika; Kar, Dattatreya; Singh, Shikha

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in memory consolidation and synaptic activity, the most fundamental functions of the brain. It converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandin endoperoxide H2. In contrast, if over-expressed, it causes inflammation in response to cytokine, pro-inflammatory molecule, and growth factor. Anti-inflammatory agents, by allosteric or competitive inhibition of COX-2, alleviate the symptoms of inflammation. Coxib family drugs, particularly celecoxib, are the most famous anti-inflammatory agents available in the market showing significant inhibitory effect on COX-2 activity. Due to high cardiovascular risk of this drug group, recent researches are focused on the investigation of new safer drugs for anti-inflammatory diseases. Natural compounds, particularly, phytochemicals are found to be good candidates for drug designing and discovery. In the present study, we performed in silico studies to quantitatively scrutinize the molecular interaction of curcumin and its structural analogs with COX-2, COX-1, FXa and integrin αIIbβIII to investigate their therapeutic potential as a cardiovascular-safe anti-inflammatory medicine (CVSAIM). The results of both ADMET and docking study indicated that out of all the 39 compounds studied, caffeic acid had remarkable interaction with proteins involved in inflammatory response. It was also found to inhibit the proteins that are involved in thrombosis, thereby, having the potential to be developed as therapeutic agent. PMID:27258084

  6. A review of anti-inflammatory agents for symptoms of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Keller, William R; Kum, Lionel M; Wehring, Heidi J; Koola, Maju Mathew; Buchanan, Robert W; Kelly, Deanna L

    2013-04-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic debilitating mental disorder that affects about 1% of the US population. The pathophysiology and etiology remain unknown, thus new treatment targets have been challenging and few novel treatments with new mechanisms of action have come to market in the past few decades. Increasing attention has been paid to the role of inflammation in schizophrenia and new data suggests that decreasing inflammation and inflammatory biomarkers may play some role in schizophrenia treatment. This review summarizes the clinical trial literature regarding medications that possess anti-inflammatory properties that have been tested for schizophrenia symptoms and covers such medications as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, such as the cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors and aspirin, omega-3 fatty acids, neurosteroids and minocycline. Overall, there is accumulating evidence, albeit mostly adjunctive treatments, that agents working on inflammatory pathways have some benefits in people with schizophrenia. In the next few years the field will begin to see data on many treatments with anti-inflammatory properties that are currently under study. Hopefully advancements in understanding inflammation and effective treatments having anti-inflammatory properties may help revolutionize our understanding and provide new targets for prevention and treatment in schizophrenia. PMID:23151612

  7. Chemoprevention in gastrointestinal physiology and disease. Anti-inflammatory approaches for colorectal cancer chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Fajardo, Alexandra M; Piazza, Gary A

    2015-07-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common human malignancies and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in developed countries. Identifying effective preventive strategies aimed at inhibiting the development and progression of CRC is critical for reducing the incidence and mortality of this malignancy. The prevention of carcinogenesis by anti-inflammatory agents including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors, and natural products is an area of considerable interest and research. Numerous anti-inflammatory agents have been identified as potential CRC chemopreventive agents but vary in their mechanism of action. This review will discuss the molecular mechanisms being studied for the CRC chemopreventive activity of NSAIDs (i.e., aspirin, sulindac, and ibuprofen), COX-2 inhibitors (i.e., celecoxib), natural products (i.e., curcumin, resveratrol, EGCG, genistein, and baicalein), and metformin. A deeper understanding of how these anti-inflammatory agents inhibit CRC will provide insight into the development of potentially safer and more effective chemopreventive drugs. PMID:26021807

  8. Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Superbacterial Properties of Sulforaphane from Shepherd's Purse

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Woo Jin; Kim, Seong Keun; Park, Hee Kuk; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2014-01-01

    Shepherd's purse, Capsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medik., has been considered a health food for centuries in Asia and is known to contain the isothiocyanate compound sulforaphane. In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties of a sulforaphane-containing solution (SCS) isolated from shepherd's purse. SCS had significant anti-inflammatory activity indicated by the decreased levels of nitric oxide (NO), cytokines (interleukin 1β [IL-1β], IL-6, and IL-10), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 murine macrophages. In addition, SCS decreased the inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) levels, which confirmed the anti-inflammatory activity of SCS. Further, SCS inhibited vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and Bacillus anthracis. The minimal inhibitory concentration was 250 µg/ml for VRE and 1,000 µg/ml for B. anthracis. Taken together, these data indicate that SCS has potential anti-inflammatory and anti-superbacterial properties, and thus it can be used as a functional food or pharmaceutical. PMID:24634594

  9. Drug Targets for Cardiovascular-Safe Anti-Inflammatory: In Silico Rational Drug Studies.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Sajad; Sahrawat, Tammanna R; Ray, Monalisa; Dash, Swagatika; Kar, Dattatreya; Singh, Shikha

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in memory consolidation and synaptic activity, the most fundamental functions of the brain. It converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandin endoperoxide H2. In contrast, if over-expressed, it causes inflammation in response to cytokine, pro-inflammatory molecule, and growth factor. Anti-inflammatory agents, by allosteric or competitive inhibition of COX-2, alleviate the symptoms of inflammation. Coxib family drugs, particularly celecoxib, are the most famous anti-inflammatory agents available in the market showing significant inhibitory effect on COX-2 activity. Due to high cardiovascular risk of this drug group, recent researches are focused on the investigation of new safer drugs for anti-inflammatory diseases. Natural compounds, particularly, phytochemicals are found to be good candidates for drug designing and discovery. In the present study, we performed in silico studies to quantitatively scrutinize the molecular interaction of curcumin and its structural analogs with COX-2, COX-1, FXa and integrin αIIbβIII to investigate their therapeutic potential as a cardiovascular-safe anti-inflammatory medicine (CVSAIM). The results of both ADMET and docking study indicated that out of all the 39 compounds studied, caffeic acid had remarkable interaction with proteins involved in inflammatory response. It was also found to inhibit the proteins that are involved in thrombosis, thereby, having the potential to be developed as therapeutic agent. PMID:27258084

  10. Chemoprevention in gastrointestinal physiology and disease. Anti-inflammatory approaches for colorectal cancer chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    Piazza, Gary A.

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common human malignancies and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in developed countries. Identifying effective preventive strategies aimed at inhibiting the development and progression of CRC is critical for reducing the incidence and mortality of this malignancy. The prevention of carcinogenesis by anti-inflammatory agents including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors, and natural products is an area of considerable interest and research. Numerous anti-inflammatory agents have been identified as potential CRC chemopreventive agents but vary in their mechanism of action. This review will discuss the molecular mechanisms being studied for the CRC chemopreventive activity of NSAIDs (i.e., aspirin, sulindac, and ibuprofen), COX-2 inhibitors (i.e., celecoxib), natural products (i.e., curcumin, resveratrol, EGCG, genistein, and baicalein), and metformin. A deeper understanding of how these anti-inflammatory agents inhibit CRC will provide insight into the development of potentially safer and more effective chemopreventive drugs. PMID:26021807

  11. Anti-inflammatory and antiarthritic activity of anthraquinone derivatives in rodents.

    PubMed

    Kshirsagar, Ajay D; Panchal, Prashant V; Harle, Uday N; Nanda, Rabindra K; Shaikh, Haidarali M

    2014-01-01

    Aloe emodin is isolated compound of aloe vera which is used traditionally as an anti-inflammatory agent. In vitro pharmacokinetic data suggest that glucuronosyl or sulfated forms of aloe emodin may provide some limitations in its absorption capacity. Aloe emodin was reported to have in vitro anti-inflammatory activity due to inhibition of inducible nitric oxide (iNO) and prostaglandin E2, via its action on murine macrophages. However, present work evidenced that molecular docking of aloe emodin modulates the anti-inflammatory activity, as well as expression of COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) in rodent. The AEC (4,5-dihydroxy-9,10-dioxo-9,10-dihydroanthracene-2 carboxylic acid) was synthesized using aloe emodin as starting material. The study was planned for evaluation of possible anti-inflammatory and antiarthritic activity in carrageenan rat induced paw oedema and complete Freund's adjuvant induced arthritis in rats. The AE (aloe emodin) and AEC significantly (P < 0.001) reduced carrageenan induced paw edema at 50 and 75 mg/kg. Complete Freund's adjuvant induced arthritis model showed significant (P < 0.001) decrease in injected and noninjected paw volume, arthritic score. AE and AEC showed significant effect on various biochemical, antioxidant, and hematological parameters. Diclofenac sodium 10 mg/kg showed significant (P < 0.001) inhibition in inflammation and arthritis. PMID:25610704

  12. Anti-inflammatory effects of enzymatic hydrolysates of velvet antler in RAW 264.7 cells in vitro and zebrafish model

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hong; Yang, Hye-Won; Ding, Yuling; Wang, Yanmei; Jeon, You-Jin; Moon, Sang-Ho; Jeon, Byong-Tae; Sung, Si-Heung

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis has been successfully used for the extraction of numerous biologically active components from a wide variety of natural sources. In the present study, velvet antler was subjected to the extraction process using Alcalase protease. We analyzed bioactive components, such as uronic acid, sulfated-glycosaminoglycans (sulfated-GAGs), and sialic acid, present in the velvet antler Alcalase hydrolysate (VAAH) and assessed their anti-inflammatory effects in zebrafish as well as in vitro using cell lines. VAAH mainly contained uronic acid (78.22 mg/g) and sulfated-GAGs (50.47 mg/g), while the amount of sialic acid was negligible (5.55 mg/g). VAAH inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cells in a dose-dependent manner and the inhibitory effect of VAAH on NO production was higher than that of hot water extracts. VAAH treatment also reduced the expression of inflammatory mediators such as nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Furthermore, we evaluated anti-inflammatory effects of VAAH using LPS-stimulated zebrafish. Treatment with LPS significantly increased cell death, NO, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in zebrafish. Notably, VAAH significantly inhibited the extent of LPS-stimulated cell death and generation of NO and ROS in zebrafish. These results suggest that VAAH alleviated inflammation and cell death by inhibiting the generation of ROS induced by LPS treatment. Thus, VAAH could be used as a potential natural remedy with a strong anti-inflammatory effect. Taken together, we believe that based on our present results, enzymatic hydrolysis of velvet antler may be an effective process to make antler products acceptable as elements of health foods and nutraceutical components with increased biological activity. PMID:27152107

  13. Nurr1 and PPARγ protect PC12 cells against MPP(+) toxicity: involvement of selective genes, anti-inflammatory, ROS generation, and antimitochondrial impairment.

    PubMed

    Jodeiri Farshbaf, Mohammad; Forouzanfar, Mahboobeh; Ghaedi, Kamran; Kiani-Esfahani, Abbas; Peymani, Maryam; Shoaraye Nejati, Alireza; Izadi, Tayebeh; Karbalaie, Khadijeh; Noorbakhshnia, Maryam; Rahgozar, Soheila; Baharvand, Hossein; Nasr-Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2016-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) can degenerate dopaminergic (DA) neurons in midbrain, substantia-nigra pars compacta. Alleviation of its symptoms and protection of normal neurons against degeneration are the main aspects of researches to establish novel therapeutic strategies. PPARγ as a member of PPARs have shown neuroprotection in a number of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and PD. Nuclear receptor related 1 protein (Nurr1) is, respectively, member of NR4A family and has received great attentions as potential target for development, maintenance, and survival of DA neurons. Based on neuroprotective effects of PPARγ and dual role of Nurr1 in anti-inflammatory pathways and development of DA neurons, we hypothesize that PPARγ and Nurr1 agonists alone and in combined form can be targets for neuroprotective therapeutic development for PD in vitro model. 1-Methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells as an in vitro model for PD studies. Treatment/cotreatment with PPARγ and Nurr1 agonists 24 h prior to MPP(+) induction enhanced the viability of PC12 cell. The viability of PC12 cells was determined by MTS test. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were detected by flow cytometry. In addition, the relative expression of four genes including TH (the marker of DA neurons), Ephrin A1, Nurr1, and Ferritin light chain were assessed by RT-qPCR. In the MPP(+)-pretreated PC12 cells, PPARγ and Nurr1 agonists and their combined form resulted in a decrease in the cell death rate. Moreover, production of intracellular ROS and MMP modulated by MPP(+) was decreased by PPARγ and Nurr1 agonists' treatment alone and in the combined form. PMID:27435855

  14. Anti-inflammatory effect of methanolic extract of Conyzacanadensis in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 murine macrophage cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Jia-Le; Yi, Ruo-Kun; Gao, Yang

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential anti-inflammatory effect of Conyzacanadeusis methanol extract (CME) using a cell model of RAW264.7 murine macrophage cell stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)(1μg/ml). Co-treatment with different concentrations (10, 50 and 100μg/ml) of CME was concentration-dependently reduced the LPS-induced generation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), nitric oxide (NO) tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6. In addition, CME also reduced the mRNA expressions of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), inducible nitric oxide (iNOS), TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. These results suggested that CME showed an anti-inflammatory activity through reduced the mRNA expression of COX-2, iNOS, TNF-α IL-1β and IL-6 and also decreased the productions of PGE2, NO, TNF-α IL-1β and IL-6in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. PMID:27166556

  15. Lactic Acid Fermentation of Cactus Cladodes (Opuntia ficus-indica L.) Generates Flavonoid Derivatives with Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Properties

    PubMed Central

    Filannino, Pasquale; Cavoski, Ivana; Thlien, Nadia; Vincentini, Olimpia; De Angelis, Maria; Silano, Marco; Gobbetti, Marco; Di Cagno, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Cactus pear (Opuntia ficus-indica L.) is widely distributed in the arid and semi-arid regions throughout the world. In the last decades, the interest towards vegetative crop increased, and cladodes are exploited for nutraceutical and health-promoting properties. This study aimed at investigating the capacity of selected lactic acid bacteria to increase the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of cactus cladodes pulp, with the perspective of producing a functional ingredient, dietary supplement or pharmaceutical preparation. Preliminarily, the antioxidant activity was determined through in vitro assays. Further, it was confirmed through ex vivo analysis on intestinal Caco-2/TC7 cells, and the profile of flavonoids was characterized. Cactus cladode pulp was fermented with lactic acid bacteria, which were previously selected from plant materials. Chemically acidified suspension, without bacterial inoculum and incubated under the same conditions, was used as the control. Lactobacillus plantarum CIL6, POM1 and 1MR20, Lactobacillus brevis POM2 and POM4, Lactobacillus rossiae 2LC8 and Pediococcus pentosaceus CILSWE5 were the best growing strains. Fermentation of cladode pulp with L. brevis POM2 and POM4 allowed the highest concentration of γ-amino butyric acid. Lactic acid fermentation had preservative effects (P<0.05) on the levels of vitamin C and carotenoids. Two flavonoid derivatives (kaemferol and isorhamnetin) were identified in the ethyl acetate extracts, which were considered to be the major compounds responsible for the increased radical scavenging activity. After inducing oxidative stress by IL-1β, the increased antioxidant activity (P<0.05) of fermented cladode pulp was confirmed using Caco-2/TC7 cells. Fermented cladode pulp had also immune-modulatory effects towards Caco-2 cells. Compared to the control, fermented cladode pulp exhibited a significantly (P<0.05) higher inhibition of IL-8, TNFα and prostaglandins PGE2 synthesis. The highest

  16. Lactic Acid Fermentation of Cactus Cladodes (Opuntia ficus-indica L.) Generates Flavonoid Derivatives with Antioxidant and Anti-Inflammatory Properties.

    PubMed

    Filannino, Pasquale; Cavoski, Ivana; Thlien, Nadia; Vincentini, Olimpia; De Angelis, Maria; Silano, Marco; Gobbetti, Marco; Di Cagno, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Cactus pear (Opuntia ficus-indica L.) is widely distributed in the arid and semi-arid regions throughout the world. In the last decades, the interest towards vegetative crop increased, and cladodes are exploited for nutraceutical and health-promoting properties. This study aimed at investigating the capacity of selected lactic acid bacteria to increase the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of cactus cladodes pulp, with the perspective of producing a functional ingredient, dietary supplement or pharmaceutical preparation. Preliminarily, the antioxidant activity was determined through in vitro assays. Further, it was confirmed through ex vivo analysis on intestinal Caco-2/TC7 cells, and the profile of flavonoids was characterized. Cactus cladode pulp was fermented with lactic acid bacteria, which were previously selected from plant materials. Chemically acidified suspension, without bacterial inoculum and incubated under the same conditions, was used as the control. Lactobacillus plantarum CIL6, POM1 and 1MR20, Lactobacillus brevis POM2 and POM4, Lactobacillus rossiae 2LC8 and Pediococcus pentosaceus CILSWE5 were the best growing strains. Fermentation of cladode pulp with L. brevis POM2 and POM4 allowed the highest concentration of γ-amino butyric acid. Lactic acid fermentation had preservative effects (P<0.05) on the levels of vitamin C and carotenoids. Two flavonoid derivatives (kaemferol and isorhamnetin) were identified in the ethyl acetate extracts, which were considered to be the major compounds responsible for the increased radical scavenging activity. After inducing oxidative stress by IL-1β, the increased antioxidant activity (P<0.05) of fermented cladode pulp was confirmed using Caco-2/TC7 cells. Fermented cladode pulp had also immune-modulatory effects towards Caco-2 cells. Compared to the control, fermented cladode pulp exhibited a significantly (P<0.05) higher inhibition of IL-8, TNFα and prostaglandins PGE2 synthesis. The highest

  17. Therapeutic potential of a non-steroidal bifunctional anti-inflammatory and anti-cholinergic agent against skin injury induced by sulfur mustard

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D.; Hahn, Rita A.; Gordon, Marion K.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Heck, Diane E.; Heindel, Ned D.; Young, Sherri C.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Casillas, Robert P.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.; Gerecke, Donald R.

    2014-10-15

    Sulfur mustard (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, SM) is a highly reactive bifunctional alkylating agent inducing edema, inflammation, and the formation of fluid-filled blisters in the skin. Medical countermeasures against SM-induced cutaneous injury have yet to be established. In the present studies, we tested a novel, bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug (NDH 4338) designed to target cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), an enzyme that generates inflammatory eicosanoids, and acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme mediating activation of cholinergic inflammatory pathways in a model of SM-induced skin injury. Adult SKH-1 hairless male mice were exposed to SM using a dorsal skin vapor cup model. NDH 4338 was applied topically to the skin 24, 48, and 72 h post-SM exposure. After 96 h, SM was found to induce skin injury characterized by edema, epidermal hyperplasia, loss of the differentiation marker, keratin 10 (K10), upregulation of the skin wound marker keratin 6 (K6), disruption of the basement membrane anchoring protein laminin 322, and increased expression of epidermal COX2. NDH 4338 post-treatment reduced SM-induced dermal edema and enhanced skin re-epithelialization. This was associated with a reduction in COX2 expression, increased K10 expression in the suprabasal epidermis, and reduced expression of K6. NDH 4338 also restored basement membrane integrity, as evidenced by continuous expression of laminin 332 at the dermal–epidermal junction. Taken together, these data indicate that a bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug stimulates repair of SM induced skin injury and may be useful as a medical countermeasure. - Highlights: • Bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug (NDH4338) tested on SM exposed mouse skin • The prodrug NDH4338 was designed to target COX2 and acetylcholinesterase. • The application of NDH4338 improved cutaneous wound repair after SM induced injury. • NDH4338 treatment demonstrated a reduction in COX2 expression on SM injured skin. • Changes of skin repair

  18. Free radicals and the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes: beta-cell cytokine-mediated free radical generation via cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Tabatabaie, Tahereh; Vasquez-Weldon, Angelica; Moore, Danny R; Kotake, Yashige

    2003-08-01

    Free radical formation evoked by proinflammatory cytokines has been suggested to be involved in the destruction of beta-cells in the course of type 1 diabetes development. However, there is no direct evidence to support this hypothesis. In this study, we used electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in conjunction with spin-trapping methodology to directly determine whether cytokines give rise to free radical formation in the islets. Our results demonstrate that direct, in vivo administration of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (1,000 units), interleukin-1beta (1,000 units), and interferon-gamma (2,000 units) into the rat pancreas through a bile duct cannula leads to the formation of lipid-derived free radicals in this tissue. These free radicals most likely are generated by the beta-cells because previous depletion of these cells by streptozotocin abolished the cytokine-induced free radical formation. Furthermore, macrophage depletion was found to decrease the production of free radicals. Inhibition of the enzyme inducible cyclooxygenase (COX-2) and the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) significantly diminished the free radicals' signal intensity, implicating these factors in the formation of free radicals. We have also demonstrated that cytokine treatment leads to the activation of NF-kappaB in the pancreatic islets of the rats. PMID:12882915

  19. The anti-inflammatory effect of Indonesian Areca catechu leaf extract in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kang Pa; Sudjarwo, Giftania Wardani; Kim, Ji-Su; Dirgantara, Septrianto; Maeng, Won Jai

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) enzyme can cause inflammation. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is also involved in the inflammatory response through regulation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB). Areca catechu is one of the known fruit plants of the Palmaceae family. It has been used for a long time as a source of herbal medicine in Indonesia. In this study, we explored the effect of Indonesian Areca catechu leaf ethanol extract (ACE) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation and carrageenan-induced paw edema models. Recently, this natural extract has been in the spotlight because of its efficacy and limited or no toxic side effects. However, the mechanism underlying its anti-inflammatory effect remains to be elucidated. MATERIALS/METHODS We measured NO production by using the Griess reagent, and determined the expression levels of inflammation-related proteins, such as iNOS, COX2, and NF-κB, by western blot. To confirm the effect of ACE in vivo, we used the carrageenan-induced paw edema model. RESULTS Compared to untreated cells, LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells treated with ACE showed reduced NO generation and reduced iNOS and COX-2 expression. We found that the acute inflammatory response was significantly reduced by ACE in the carrageenan-induced paw edema model. CONCLUSION Taken together, these results suggest that ACE can inhibit inflammation and modulate NO generation via downregulation of iNOS levels and NF-κB signaling in vitro and in vivo. ACE may have a potential medical benefit as an anti-inflammation agent. PMID:24944770

  20. Cyclooxygenase selectivity of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs in humans: ex vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Giuliano, F; Ferraz, J G; Pereira, R; de Nucci, G; Warner, T D

    2001-08-24

    We have recently described a novel assay to assess ex vivo the activity and selectivity on cyclooxygenase-1 and -2 (EC 1.14.99.1) of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) administered to rats [Br. J. Pharmacol. 126 (1999) 1824.]. Here, we have extended these studies to humans. Healthy male volunteers were given orally one of the following drugs (mg) for 5 days: etodolac (200 or 400 b.i.d.), meloxicam (7.5 or 15 q.d.), nimesulide (100 or 200 b.i.d.), nabumetone (500 or 1000 b.i.d.) or naproxen (500 b.i.d.). Blood samples were withdrawn from the volunteers before and up to 24 h after the last dose. Plasma obtained from the blood was tested for its ability to inhibit prostanoid formation in interleukin-1beta-treated A549 cells (cyclooxygenase-2 system) and human washed platelets (cyclooxygenase-1 system). Plasma from etodolac-treated subjects demonstrated a slight selectivity towards the inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2. This effect was more prominent in plasma from subjects receiving meloxicam or nimesulide. Plasma from nabumetone-treated subjects showed no or little selectivity towards cyclooxygenase-1 depending on the dose of drug administered, while plasma taken from subjects receiving naproxen was more active at inhibiting cyclooxygenase-1 than cyclooxygenase-2. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that this assay can be used to assess ex vivo the relative activity against cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 of NSAIDs consumed by human volunteers. It is to be hoped that data from such systems will aid in our understanding of the relationships between the differential inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 by NSAIDs and their reported efficacies and (gastrointestinal) toxicities. PMID:11525777

  1. Immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects of chondroitin sulphate

    PubMed Central

    du Souich, Patrick; García, Antonio G; Vergés, Josep; Montell, Eulàlia

    2009-01-01

    Chondroitin sulphate (CS) is a natural glycosaminoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is formed by the 1–3 linkage of D-glucuronic acid to N-acetylgalactosamine. In chondrocytes, CS diminishes interleukin-1 p (IL-1p)-induced increases in p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) and signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2) phosphorylation, and decreases nuclear factor-KB (NF-kB) nuclear translocation and as a consequence, reduces the formation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1 p and TNF-a, and pro-inflammatory enzymes, such as phospholipase A2 (PLA2), cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and nitric oxide synthase-2 (NOS-2). The mechanism of action of CS explains its beneficial effect on the cartilage, synovial membrane and subchondral bone. On the other hand, in vivo, CS given orally prevents hepatic NF-κB nuclear translocation, suggesting that systemic CS may elicit an anti-inflammatory effect in many tissues besides the articulation. There is preliminary evidence showing that in human beings, CS may be of benefit in other diseases where inflammation is an essential marker, such as psoriasis and atherosclerosis. The review of the literature suggest that CS might also be of interest for the treatment of other diseases with an inflammatory and/or autoimmune character, such as inflammatory bowel disease, degenerative diseases of the central nervous system and stroke, multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases. PMID:19522843

  2. Isolation and characterization of anti-inflammatory peptides derived from whey protein.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ye; Liu, Jie; Shi, Haiming; Yu, Liangli Lucy

    2016-09-01

    The present study was conducted to isolate and characterize anti-inflammatory peptides from whey protein hydrolysates using alcalase. Nine subfractions were obtained after sequential purification by ultrafiltration, Sephadex G-25 gel (GE Healthcare, Uppsala, Sweden) filtration chromatography, and preparative HPLC. Among them, subfraction F4e showed the strongest inhibitory activity on interleukin-1β (IL-1β), cyclooxygenase-2, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) mRNA expression in lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages. Eight peptides, including 2 new peptides-Asp-Tyr-Lys-Lys-Tyr (DYKKY) and Asp-Gln-Trp-Leu (DQWL)-were identified from subfractions F4c and F4e, respectively, using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Peptide DQWL showed the strongest inhibitory ability on IL-1β, cyclooxygenase-2, and TNF-α mRNA expression and production of IL-1β and TNF-α proteins at concentrations of 10 and 100μg/mL, respectively. Additionally, DQWL treatment significantly inhibited nuclear factor-κB activation by suppressing nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB p65 and blocking inhibitor κB kinase phosphorylation and inhibitor κB degradation together with p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. Our study suggests that peptide DQWL has anti-inflammatory potential; further confirmation using an in vivo model is needed. PMID:27394940

  3. Development and mechanism investigation of a new piperlongumine derivative as a potent anti-inflammatory agent.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lan-Di; Wang, Fu; Dai, Fang; Wang, Yi-Hua; Lin, Dong; Zhou, Bo

    2015-06-01

    Inflammation, especially chronic inflammation, is directly involvement in the pathogenesis of many diseases including cancer. An effective approach for managing inflammation is to employ chemicals to block activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), a key regulator for inflammatory processes. Piperlongumine (piplartine, PL), an electrophilic molecule isolated from Piper longum L., possesses excellent anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, a new PL analogue (PL-0N) was designed by replacing nitrogen atom of lactam in PL with carbon atom to increase its electrophilicity and thus anti-inflammatory activity. It was found that PL-0N is more potent than the parent compound in suppressing lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced secretion of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2 as well as expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in RAW264.7 macrophages. Mechanistic investigation implies that PL-0N exerts anti-inflammatory activity through inhibition of LPS-induced NF-κB transduction pathway, down-regulation of LPS-induced MAPKs activation and impairment of proteasomal activity, but also enhancement of LPS-induced autophagy; the inhibition of NF-κB by PL-0N is achieved at various stages by: (i) preventing phosphorylation of IKKα/β, (ii) stabilizing the suppressor protein IκBα, (iii) interfering with the nuclear translocation of NF-κB, and (iv) inhibiting the DNA-binding of NF-κB. These data indicate that nitrogen-atom-lacking pattern is a successful strategy to improve anti-inflammatory property of PL, and that the novel molecule, PL-0N may be served as a promising lead for developing natural product-directed anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:25850000

  4. Anti-inflammatory effects of Scoparia dulcis L. and betulinic acid.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jen-Chieh; Peng, Wen-Huang; Chiu, Tai-Hui; Lai, Shang-Chih; Lee, Chao-Ying

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study intended to investigate the anti-inflammatory activity of the 70% ethanol extract from Scoparia dulcis (SDE) and betulinic acid on λ-carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice. The anti-inflammatory mechanism of SDE and betulinic acid was examined by detecting the levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in the edema paw tissue and the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GRd) in the liver. The betulinic acid content in SDE was detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In the anti-inflammatory model, the results showed that SDE (0.5 and 1.0 g/kg) and betulinic acid (20 and 40 mg/kg) reduced the paw edema at 3, 4 and 5 h after λ-carrageenan administration. Moreover, SDE and betulinic acid affected the levels of COX-2, NO, TNF-α and IL1-β in the λ-carrageenan-induced edema paws. The activities of SOD, GPx and GRd in the liver tissue were increased and the MDA levels in the edema paws were decreased. It is suggested that SDE and betulinic acid possessed anti-inflammatory activities and the anti-inflammatory mechanisms appear to be related to the reduction of the levels of COX-2, NO, TNF-α and IL1-β in inflamed tissues, as well as the inhibition of MDA level via increasing the activities of SOD, GPx and GRd. The analytical result showed that the content of betulinic acid in SDE was 6.25 mg/g extract. PMID:21905284

  5. Anti-Inflammatory Iridoids of Botanical Origin

    PubMed Central

    Viljoen, A; Mncwangi, N; Vermaak, I

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a manifestation of a wide range of disorders which include; arthritis, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease, inflammatory bowel syndrome, physical injury and infection amongst many others. Common treatment modalities are usually non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, paracetamol, indomethacin and ibuprofen as well as corticosteroids such as prednisone. These however, may be associated with a host of side effects due to non-selectivity for cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes involved in inflammation and those with selectivity may be highly priced. Thus, there is a continuing search for safe and effective anti-inflammatory molecules from natural sources. Research has confirmed that iridoids exhibit promising anti-inflammatory activity which may be beneficial in the treatment of inflammation. Iridoids are secondary metabolites present in various plants, especially in species belonging to the Apocynaceae, Lamiaceae, Loganiaceae, Rubiaceae, Scrophulariaceae and Verbenaceae families. Many of these ethnobotanicals have an illustrious history of traditional use alluding to their use to treat inflammation. Although iridoids exhibit a wide range of pharmacological activities such as cardiovascular, hepatoprotection, hypoglycaemic, antimutagenic, antispasmodic, anti-tumour, antiviral, immunomodulation and purgative effects this review will acutely focus on their anti-inflammatory properties. The paper aims to present a summary for the most prominent iridoid-containing plants for which anti-inflammatory activity has been demonstrated in vitro and / or in vivo. PMID:22414102

  6. Inhibition of Nuclear Factor κB Activation and Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression by Aqueous Extracts of Hispanic Medicinal Herbs

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Amanda M.; Hunsaker, Lucy A.; Franco, Carolina R.; Royer, Robert E.; Vander Jagt, David L.; Vander Jagt, Dorothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a primary choice of therapy for diseases with a chronic inflammatory component. Unfortunately, long-term NSAID therapy is often accompanied by severe side effects, including cardiovascular and gastrointestinal complications. Because of this, there is critical need for identification of new and safer treatments for chronic inflammation to circumvent these side effects. Inflammatory diseases have been successfully remedied with natural herbs by many cultures. To better understand the potential of natural herbs in treating chronic inflammation and to identify their mechanism of action, we have evaluated the anti-inflammatory activities of 20 medicinal herbs commonly used in the Hispanic culture. We have established a standardized method for preparing aqueous extracts (teas) from the selected medicinal herbs and screened for inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), which is the central signaling pathway of the inflammatory response. A number of herbal teas were identified that exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity. In particular, tea from the herb commonly called laurel was found to be an especially potent inhibitor of NF-κB-dependent cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression and prostaglandin E2 production in cultured murine macrophages. These findings indicate that laurel tea extract contains potent anti-inflammatory compounds that function by inhibiting the major signal transduction pathway responsible for inducing an inflammatory event. Based on these results, laurel may represent a new, safe therapeutic agent for managing chronic inflammation. PMID:20482259

  7. Constituents from Vigna vexillata and Their Anti-Inflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Leu, Yann-Lii; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Kuo, Ping-Chung; Liou, Kun-Pei; Huang, Bow-Shin; Chen, Guo-Feng

    2012-01-01

    The seeds of Vigna genus are important food resources and there have already been many reports regarding their bioactivities. In our preliminary bioassay, the chloroform layer of methanol extracts of V. vexillata demonstrated significant anti-inflammatory bioactivity. Therefore, the present research is aimed to purify and identify the anti-inflammatory principles of V. vexillata. One new sterol (1) and two new isoflavones (2,3) were reported from the natural sources for the first time and their chemical structures were determined by the spectroscopic and mass spectrometric analyses. In addition, 37 known compounds were identified by comparison of their physical and spectroscopic data with those reported in the literature. Among the isolates, daidzein (23), abscisic acid (25), and quercetin (40) displayed the most significant inhibition of superoxide anion generation and elastase release. PMID:22949828

  8. In vitro anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties of umbelliprenin and methyl galbanate.

    PubMed

    Zamani Taghizadeh Rabe, Shahrzad; Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Ferula species (Apiaceae) are considered important medicinal plants. The present in vitro study sought to investigate the immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties of terpenoid coumarins isolated from Ferula szowitsiana on immune cells isolated from naïve mice and to elucidate possible underlying mechanisms of action. With splenocytes, effects of the agents on PHA-induced proliferation and interleukin (IL)-4 and interferon (IFN)-γ release were assessed. With peritoneal macrophages, anti-inflammatory potentials were evaluated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)/IFNγ-stimulated cells via measures of changes in nitric oxide (NO) and PGE(2) secretion. Expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was also determined via Western blot analysis. The results indicated that umbelliprenin (UMB) and methyl galbanate (MG) reduced remarkably PHA-induced splenocyte proliferation and both preferentially induced T(H)2 IL-4 and suppressed T(H)1 IFNγ secretion. Each also significantly suppressed LPS-induced production of NO and PGE(2) apparently and also led to reductions in inducible iNOS and COX-expression. To the authors' knowledge, the present study is the first to report on anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of UMB and MG in vitro. The present results suggest that each could potentially be exploited as a natural immunosuppressant against inflammatory and autoimmune diseases once substantial further toxicological analyses have been done to confirm overall safety in vivo. PMID:26004404

  9. Anti-inflammatory effects of a triple-bond resveratrol analog: structure and function relationship.

    PubMed

    Antus, Csenge; Radnai, Balazs; Dombovari, Peter; Fonai, Fruzsina; Avar, Peter; Matyus, Peter; Racz, Boglarka; Sumegi, Balazs; Veres, Balazs

    2015-02-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol found in grapes and red wine, showing well-characterized anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative activities. In order to exceed resveratrol׳s biological effects and to reveal the structural determinants of the molecule׳s activity, numerous derivatives were synthesized recently. Most of these resveratrol analogs vary from the original molecule in the number, position or identity of the phenolic functional groups. Investigation of the analogs provided important data regarding structure-activity relationship of the molecule. With the exception of cis- and trans-resveratrol and the reduced form dihydroresveratrol, little is known about the molecular effects of the stilbene backbone. In the present study we investigated the anti-inflammatory properties of a new, triple-bond resveratrol analog, 3,4',5-trihydroxy-diphenylacetylene (TDPA) on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW macrophages. We found that the analog had weaker antioxidant activity and stronger inhibitory effect on nuclear factor-kappaB activation, and on cyclooxygenase-2, tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin-6 production. It also prevented lipopolysaccharide-induced depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane. In contrast to resveratrol, TDPA increased the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal and p38 mitogen activated protein kinases. In summary, we identified a novel compound with better anti-inflammatory properties than resveratrol. Our results contributed to a better understanding of the structural determinants of resveratrol׳s biological activities. PMID:25528327

  10. Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Cinnamomum cassia Constituents In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jung-Chun; Deng, Jeng-Shyan; Chiu, Chuan-Sung; Hou, Wen-Chi; Huang, Shyh-Shyun; Shie, Pei-Hsin; Huang, Guang-Jhong

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of Cinnamomum cassia constituents (cinnamic aldehyde, cinnamic alcohol, cinnamic acid, and coumarin) using lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated mouse macrophage (RAW264.7) and carrageenan (Carr)-induced mouse paw edema model. When RAW264.7 macrophages were treated with cinnamic aldehyde together with LPS, a significant concentration-dependent inhibition of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels productions were detected. Western blotting revealed that cinnamic aldehyde blocked protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nuclear transcription factor kappa B (NF-κB), and IκBα, significantly. In the anti-inflammatory test, cinnamic aldehyde decreased the paw edema after Carr administration, and increased the activities of catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in the paw tissue. We also demonstrated cinnamic aldehyde attenuated the malondialdehyde (MDA) level and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in the edema paw after Carr injection. Cinnamic aldehyde decreased the NO, TNF-α, and PGE2 levels on the serum level after Carr injection. Western blotting revealed that cinnamic aldehyde decreased Carr-induced iNOS, COX-2, and NF-κB expressions in the edema paw. These findings demonstrated that cinnamic aldehyde has excellent anti-inflammatory activities and thus has great potential to be used as a source for natural health products. PMID:22536283

  11. C-phycocyanin: a biliprotein with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects.

    PubMed

    Romay, Ch; González, R; Ledón, N; Remirez, D; Rimbau, V

    2003-06-01

    Phycocyanin (Pc) is a phycobiliprotein that has been recently reported to exhibit a variety of pharmacological properties. In this regard, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective and hepatoprotective effects have been experimentally attributed to Pc. When it was evaluated as an antioxidant in vitro, it was able to scavenge alkoxyl, hydroxyl and peroxyl radicals and to react with peroxinitrite (ONOO(-);) and hypochlorous acid (HOCl). Pc also inhibits microsomal lipid peroxidation induced by Fe(+2)-ascorbic acid or the free radical initiator 2,2' azobis (2-amidinopropane) hydrochloride (AAPH). Furthermore, it reduces carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4))-induced lipid peroxidation in vivo. Pc has been evaluated in twelve experimental models of inflammation and exerted anti-inflammatory effects in a dose-dependent fashion in all of these. Thus, Pc reduced edema, histamine (Hi) release, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and the levels of prostaglandin (PGE(2)) and leukotriene (LTB(4)) in the inflamed tissues. These anti-inflammatory effects of Pc can be due to its scavenging properties toward oxygen reactive species (ROS) and its inhibitory effects on cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) activity and on Hi release from mast cells. Pc also reduced the levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) in the blood serum of mice treated with endotoxin and it showed neuroprotective effects in rat cerebellar granule cell cultures and in kainate-induced brain injury in rats. PMID:12769719

  12. Meloxicam, a cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor, supports hematopoietic recovery in gamma-irradiated mice.

    PubMed

    Hofer, M; Pospísil, M; Znojil, V; Holá, J; Vacek, A; Weiterová, L; Streitová, D; Kozubík, A

    2006-09-01

    Meloxicam, a selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase 2, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug with an improved side-effects profile in terms of gastrointestinal toxicity, has been found to stimulate hematopoiesis in whole-body gamma-irradiated mice. A distinct corroboration of this positive action of meloxicam is an enhancement of the recovery of hematopoietic progenitor cells committed to granulocyte-macrophage and erythroid development, which has been demonstrated in sublethally irradiated animals treated with meloxicam at a dose of 20 mg/kg administered intraperitoneally either singly 1 h before irradiation or repeatedly after radiation exposure. The results suggest that meloxicam can be added to the list of biological response modifiers that can be used in the treatment of hematopoietic damage induced by ionizing radiation. PMID:16953674

  13. Anti-inflammatory activity of mycelial extracts from medicinal mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Geng, Yan; Zhu, Shuiling; Lu, Zhenming; Xu, Hongyu; Shi, Jin-Song; Xu, Zheng-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Medicinal mushrooms have been essential components of traditional Chinese herbal medicines for thousands of years, and they protect against diverse health-related conditions. The components responsible for their anti-inflammatory activity have yet to be fully studied. This study investigates the anti-inflammatory activity of n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts of mycelia in submerged culture from 5 commercially available medicinal mushrooms, namely Cephalosporium sinensis, Cordyceps mortierella, Hericium erinaceus, Ganoderma lucidum, and Armillaria mellea. MTT colorimetric assay was applied to measure the cytotoxic effects of different extracts. Their anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated via inhibition against production of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) in murine macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7 cells. Of the 20 extracts, n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, and methanol extracts from C. sinensis, C. mortierella, and G. lucidum; chloroform extracts from H. erinaceus and A. mellea; and ethyl acetate extracts from A. mellea at nontoxic concentrations (<300 μg/mL) dose-dependently inhibited LPS-induced NO production. Among them, the chloroform extract from G. lucidum was the most effective inhibitor, with the lowest half maximal inhibitory concentration (64.09 ± 6.29 μg/mL) of the LPS-induced NO production. These results indicate that extracts from medicinal mushrooms exhibited anti-inflammatory activity that might be attributable to the inhibition of NO generation and can therefore be considered a useful therapeutic and preventive approach to various inflammation-related diseases. PMID:25271860

  14. Chemical Constituents from the Fruiting Bodies of Hexagonia apiaria and Their Anti-inflammatory Activity.

    PubMed

    Thang, Tran Dinh; Kuo, Ping-Chung; Ngoc, Nguyen Thi Bich; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Yang, Mei-Lin; Ta, Shih-Huang; Lee, E-Jian; Kuo, Dai-Huang; Hung, Nguyen Huy; Tuan, Nguyen Ngoc; Wu, Tian-Shung

    2015-11-25

    A chemical investigation of the fruiting bodies of Hexagonia apiaria resulted in the identification of nine compounds including five new triterpenoids, hexagonins A-E (1-5), along with four known compounds. The purified constituents were examined for their anti-inflammatory activity. Among the tested compounds, hexatenuin A displayed the most significant inhibition of superoxide anion generation and elastase release. These triterpenoids may have potentials as anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:26575215

  15. Anti-inflammatory iridoids of botanical origin.

    PubMed

    Viljoen, A; Mncwangi, N; Vermaak, I

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a manifestation of a wide range of disorders which include; arthritis, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, inflammatory bowel syndrome, physical injury and infection amongst many others. Common treatment modalities are usually nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin, paracetamol, indomethacin and ibuprofen as well as corticosteroids such as prednisone. These however, may be associated with a host of side effects due to non-selectivity for cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes involved in inflammation and those with selectivity may be highly priced. Thus, there is a continuing search for safe and effective antiinflammatory molecules from natural sources. Research has confirmed that iridoids exhibit promising anti-inflammatory activity which may be beneficial in the treatment of inflammation. Iridoids are secondary metabolites present in various plants, especially in species belonging to the Apocynaceae, Lamiaceae, Loganiaceae, Rubiaceae, Scrophulariaceae and Verbenaceae families. Many of these ethnobotanicals have an illustrious history of traditional use alluding to their use to treat inflammation. Although iridoids exhibit a wide range of pharmacological activities such as cardiovascular, hepatoprotection, hypoglycaemic, antimutagenic, antispasmodic, anti-tumour, antiviral, immunomodulation and purgative effects this review will acutely focus on their anti-inflammatory properties. The paper aims to present a summary for the most prominent iridoid-containing plants for which anti-inflammatory activity has been demonstrated in vitro and / or in vivo. PMID:22414102

  16. Anti-inflammatory activity of cationic lipids.

    PubMed

    Filion, M C; Phillips, N C

    1997-10-01

    1. The effect of liposome phospholipid composition has been assumed to be relatively unimportant because of the presumed inert nature of phospholipids. 2. We have previously shown that cationic liposome formulations used for gene therapy inhibit, through their cationic component, the synthesis by activated macrophages of the pro-inflammatory mediators nitric oxide (NO) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). 3. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of different cationic lipids to reduce footpad inflammation induced by carrageenan and by sheep red blood cell challenge. 4. Parenteral (i.p. or s.c) or local injection of the positively charged lipids dimethyldioctadecylammomium bromide (DDAB), dioleyoltrimethylammonium propane (DOTAP), dimyristoyltrimethylammonium propane (DMTAP) or dimethylaminoethanecarbamoyl cholesterol (DC-Chol) significantly reduced the inflammation observed in both models in a dose-dependent manner (maximum inhibition: 70-95%). 5. Cationic lipids associated with dioleyol- or dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine retained their anti-inflammatory activity while cationic lipids associated with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) or dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) showed no anti-inflammatory activity, indicating that the release of cationic lipids into the macrophage cytoplasm is a necessary step for anti-inflammatory activity. The anti-inflammatory activity of cationic lipids was abrogated by the addition of dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine-poly(ethylene)glycol-2000 (DPPE-PEG2000) which blocks the interaction of cationic lipids with macrophages. 6. Because of the significant role of protein kinase C (PKC) in the inflammatory process we have determined whether the cationic lipids used in this study inhibit PKC activity. The cationic lipids significantly inhibited the activity of PKC but not the activity of a non-related protein kinase, PKA. The synthesis of interleukin-6 (IL-6), which is not dependent on PKC activity for its

  17. Anti-inflammatory activity studies on the stems and roots of Jasminum lanceolarium Roxb.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wen-xia; Zhang, Jian-hua; Zhang, Yi; Meng, Da-li; Yan, Dan

    2015-08-01

    Jasminum lanceolarium Roxb is an important traditional Chinese medicine. Its stems and roots have been used for the treatment of rheumatism and fever while the leaves are used as an anti-inflammatory agent to relieve pain. In order to support its traditional Chinese medicinal uses, five animal models were designed and the anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of the 70% EtOH-H2O extracts of J. lanceolarium (EJL) were investigated. Meanwhile, biochemical parameters such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) in blood serum of rats exposed to acute (carrageenan) inflammation model were evaluated. At doses of 400 mg/kg, EJL exhibited higher anti-inflammation effect than that of indomethacin and better analgesic activity than that of aspirin (P<0.001). Furthermore, eleven isolated compounds including six lignanoids (1, 2, 6, 7, 8, and 11) and five iridoids (3, 4, 5, 9, and 10) were isolated from the active extracts and showed significant anti-inflammatory activities with the IC50 values of 1.76-5.22 mg/mL, respectively, when testing their inhibitory effects on phospholipase A2 in vitro. The results demonstrated that the possible anti-inflammatory mechanisms might be attributed to inhibit the hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids, production on both COX-2 and 5-LOX, and then finally inhibit the release of prostaglandins (PGs), which suggested that EJL had a non-selective inhibitory effect on the release or actions of these mediators, and might be a dual LOX-COX inhibitor for the treatment of inflammation from the natural resource. The studies on the animals and the inflammatory mediators, along with the bioactive compounds presumed that the existences of iridoids and lignanoids could be response for their bioactivities of the whole plants. PMID:26055344

  18. Mechanism underlying the reversal of contractility dysfunction in experimental colitis by cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Khan, I; Oriowo, M A

    2006-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are associated with reduced colonic contractility and induction of cyclooxygenase-2. In this study a possible role of cyclooxygenase-2 in and the underlying mechanism of the reduced contractility were investigated in experimental colitis. The effects of meloxicam, a cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitor were examined on colonic contractility and MAP kinase p38 and ERK(1/2) expression. Colitis was induced in Sprague-Dawley male rats by intra-colonic instillation of trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS; 40 mg/rat in 50 ethanol). The animals were divided into three groups. Group 1 (n=9) received meloxicam (3 mg/kg-day) gavage 1 h before and 1 day (Group 2) after induction of colitis. Group 3 (n=9) received phosphate buffered saline (PBS) in a similar manner and served as colitic control. The non colitic control animals received meloxicam in a similar manner. The animals were sacrificed after 5 days of treatment, colon was cleaned with PBS and colonic smooth muscle was obtained which was used in this study. Meloxicam treatment given 1 h before or 1 day after administration of colitis restored the reduced colonic contractility without affecting the sensitivity to carbachol. The levels of colonic smooth muscle IL-1beta mRNA, PGE(2), ERK(1/2), p38, malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase activity and colonic mass were increased, whereas the body weight was decreased due to TNBS. The changes except colonic muscle mass and p38 expression were reversed by meloxicam treatment. These findings indicate that restoration of reduced colonic contractility by meloxicam is mediated by ERK(1/2), and that ERK(1/2) may serve as an important anti inflammatory target for treatment of colitis. PMID:16835710

  19. A Revised Mechanism for Human Cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Roth, Justine P

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid oxidation by wild-type cyclooxygenase 2 and the Y334F variant, lacking a conserved hydrogen bond to the catalytic tyrosyl radical/tyrosine, was examined for the first time under physiologically relevant conditions. The enzymes show apparent bimolecular rate constants and deuterium kinetic isotope effects that increase in proportion to co-substrate concentrations before converging to limiting values. The trends exclude multiple dioxygenase mechanisms as well as the proposal that initial hydrogen atom abstraction from the fatty acid is the first irreversible step in catalysis. Temperature dependent kinetic studies reinforce the novel finding that hydrogen transfer from the reduced catalytic tyrosine to a terminal peroxyl radical is the first irreversible step that controls regio- and stereospecific product formation. PMID:26565028

  20. Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Effects of the Marine-Derived Compound Excavatolide B Isolated from the Culture-Type Formosan Gorgonian Briareum excavatum

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yen-You; Lin, Sung-Chun; Feng, Chien-Wei; Chen, Pei-Chin; Su, Yin-Di; Li, Chi-Min; Yang, San-Nan; Jean, Yen-Hsuan; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Duh, Chang-Yih; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several marine-derived compounds have been clinically evaluated. Diterpenes are secondary metabolites from soft coral that exhibit anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor and cytotoxic activities. In the present study, we isolated a natural diterpene product, excavatolide B, from cultured Formosan gorgonian Briareum excavatum and investigated its anti-inflammatory activities. We found that excavatolide B significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of the proinflammatory mediators, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged murine macrophages (RAW 264.7). We also examined the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects of excavatolide B on intraplantar carrageenan-induced inflammatory responses. Excavatolide B was found to significantly attenuate carrageenan-induced nociceptive behaviors, mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia, weight bearing deficits and paw edema. In addition, excavatolide B inhibited iNOS, as well as the infiltration of immune cells in carrageenan-induced inflammatory paw tissue. PMID:25923315

  1. Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Effects of the Marine-Derived Compound Excavatolide B Isolated from the Culture-Type Formosan Gorgonian Briareum excavatum.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-You; Lin, Sung-Chun; Feng, Chien-Wei; Chen, Pei-Chin; Su, Yin-Di; Li, Chi-Min; Yang, San-Nan; Jean, Yen-Hsuan; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Duh, Chang-Yih; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, several marine-derived compounds have been clinically evaluated. Diterpenes are secondary metabolites from soft coral that exhibit anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor and cytotoxic activities. In the present study, we isolated a natural diterpene product, excavatolide B, from cultured Formosan gorgonian Briareum excavatum and investigated its anti-inflammatory activities. We found that excavatolide B significantly inhibited the mRNA expression of the proinflammatory mediators, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-challenged murine macrophages (RAW 264.7). We also examined the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive effects of excavatolide B on intraplantar carrageenan-induced inflammatory responses. Excavatolide B was found to significantly attenuate carrageenan-induced nociceptive behaviors, mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia, weight bearing deficits and paw edema. In addition, excavatolide B inhibited iNOS, as well as the infiltration of immune cells in carrageenan-induced inflammatory paw tissue. PMID:25923315

  2. ATP-Binding Pocket-Targeted Suppression of Src and Syk by Luteolin Contributes to Its Anti-Inflammatory Action

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong-Oog; Jeong, Deok; Kim, Mi-Yeon; Cho, Jae Youl

    2015-01-01

    Luteolin is a flavonoid identified as a major anti-inflammatory component of Artemisia asiatica. Numerous reports have demonstrated the ability of luteolin to suppress inflammation in a variety of inflammatory conditions. However, its exact anti-inflammatory mechanism has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory mode of action in activated macrophages of luteolin from Artemisia asiatica was examined by employing immunoblotting analysis, a luciferase reporter gene assay, enzyme assays, and an overexpression strategy. Luteolin dose-dependently inhibited the secretion of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and diminished the levels of mRNA transcripts of inducible NO synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) and pam3CSK-treated macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells without displaying cytotoxicity. Luteolin displayed potent NO-inhibitory activity and also suppressed the nuclear translocation of NF-κB (p65 and p50) via blockade of Src and Syk, but not other mitogen-activated kinases. Overexpression of wild type Src and point mutants thereof, and molecular modelling studies, suggest that the ATP-binding pocket may be the luteolin-binding site in Src. These results strongly suggest that luteolin may exert its anti-inflammatory action by suppressing the NF-κB signaling cascade via blockade of ATP binding in Src and Syk. PMID:26236111

  3. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in ginger (Zingiber officinale)

    PubMed Central

    van Breemen, Richard B.; Tao, Yi; Li, Wenkui

    2010-01-01

    Ginger roots have been used to treat inflammation and have been reported to inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX). Ultrafiltration liquid chromatography mass spectrometry was used to screen a chloroform partition of a methanol extract of ginger roots for COX-2 ligands, and 10-gingerol, 12-gingerol, 8-shogaol, 10-shogaol, 6-gingerdione, 8-gingerdione, 10-gingerdione, 6-dehydro-10-gingerol, 6-paradol, and 8-paradol bound to the enzyme active site. Purified 10-gingerol, 8-shogaol and 10-shogaol inhibited COX-2 with IC50 values of 32 μM, 17.5 μM and 7.5 μM, respectively. No inhibition of COX-1 was detected. Therefore, 10-gingerol, 8-shogaol and 10-shogaol inhibit COX-2 but not COX-1, which can explain, in part, anti-inflammatory properties of ginger. PMID:20837112

  4. [Recent development of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Kawai, Shinichi

    2002-12-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs(NSAIDs) are clinically effective against the inflammatory symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. Recent attention has been focused on selective cyclooxygenase(COX)-2 inhibitors, a type of NSAID that inhibits a subtype of COX. Because of the different actions of COX-1 and COX-2, selective COX-2 inhibitors were expected to reduce adverse reactions such as gastrointestinal disorders. Various clinical studies have confirmed that the efficacy of COX-2 inhibitors for RA is similar to that of conventional NSAIDs, but they cause fewer severe gastrointestinal disorders. The incidence of complications related to renal dysfunction, such as edema and hypertension, is not different. Patients using selective COX-2 inhibitors have recently been reported to show an increase in thrombotic complications such as myocardial infarction. Therefore, more data on adverse events should be collected in the future from large-scale clinical studies to further clarify the actual value of selective COX-2 inhibitors. PMID:12510364

  5. Enhanced anti-inflammatory potential of cinnamate-zinc layered hydroxide in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Adewoyin, Malik; Mohsin, Sumaiyah Megat Nabil; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Fakurazi, Sharida

    2015-01-01

    Background Cinnamic acid (CA) is a phytochemical originally derived from Cinnamomum cassia, a plant with numerous pharmacological properties. The intercalation of CA with a nanocarrier, zinc layered hydroxide, produces cinnamate-zinc layered hydroxide (ZCA), which has been previously characterized. Intercalation is expected to improve the solubility and cell specificity of CA. The nanocarrier will also protect CA from degradation and sustain its release. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of intercalation on the anti-inflammatory capacity of CA. Methods In this study, the anti-inflammatory activity of ZCA was investigated and compared with that of nonintercalated CA. Evaluations were based on the capacity of ZCA and CA to modulate the release of nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2, interleukin (IL)-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-1β, and IL-10 in lipopolysaccharide-induced RAW 264.7 cells. Additionally, the expression of proinflammatory enzymes, ie, cyclooxygenase-2, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), were examined. Results Although both ZCA and CA downregulated nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-1β, and IL-6, ZCA clearly displayed better activity. Similarly, expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase were inhibited in samples treated with ZCA and CA. The two compounds effectively inactivated the transcription factor NF-κB, but the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, was significantly upregulated by ZCA only. Conclusion The present findings suggest that ZCA possesses better anti-inflammatory potential than CA, while zinc layered hydroxide had little or no effect, and these results were comparable with the positive control. PMID:25995619

  6. Medicinal plants with anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Maione, Francesco; Russo, Rosa; Khan, Haroon; Mascolo, Nicola

    2016-06-01

    Medicinal plants have been the main remedy to treat various ailments for a long time and nowadays, many drugs have been developed from traditional medicine. This paper reviews some medicinal plants and their main constituents which possess anti-inflammatory activities useful for curing joint inflammation, inflammatory skin disorders, cardiovascular inflammation and other inflammatory diseases. Here, we provide a brief overview of quick and easy reading on the role of medicinal plants and their main constituents in these inflammatory diseases. We hope that this overview will shed some light on the function of these natural anti-inflammatory compounds and attract the interest of investigators aiming at the design of novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of various inflammatory conditions. PMID:26221780

  7. Natural products and anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Gaofeng; Wahlqvist, Mark L; He, Guoqing; Yang, Min; Li, Duo

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this review paper was to summarise some commonly available natural products and their anti-inflammatory activity. We have collected data from MEDLINE, Current Contents and scientific journals, which included 92 publications. There are numerous natural products detailed in this literature; however we have summarized a few of the most commonly available and potent ones. In this paper, the natural products with anti-inflammatory activity including curcumin, parthenolide, cucurbitacins, 1,8-cineole, pseudopterosins, lyprinol, bromelain, flavonoids, saponins, marine sponge natural products and Boswellia serrata gum resin were reviewed. Natural products play a significant role in human health in relation to the prevention and treatment of inflammatory conditions. Further studies are being conducted to investigate the mechanism of action, metabolism, safety and long term side effect of these natural products, as well as interactions between these natural products with food and drug components. PMID:16672197

  8. The new nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Scherbel, A L; Wilke, W S

    1981-10-01

    Most physicians regard to newer short-acting anti-inflammatory drugs as a substitute for aspirin because they are less toxic. Although these drugs cannot induce remissions of rheumatoid arthritis, they do afford symptomatic relief and exert both a moderate algesic and anti-inflammatory effect in conditions like osteoarthritis, gout, pseudogout, and a variety of musculoskeletal syndromes. The many adverse reactions and toxic effects associated with these drugs are probably related to the inhibition of prostaglandin synthetase, which in turn reduces the biosynthesis of prostaglandins in widespread areas of the body. Thus limited in number, these compounds cannot play an effective role in the body's defense mechanisms. Researchers postulate that this failure accounts for the gastrointestinal and renal lesions--as well as other, as yet unexplained toxic manifestations--noted in patients taking these drugs. For safety's sake, the newer anti-inflammatory drugs should be used with large doses of aspirin, other agents that inhibit prostaglandin synthetase, or drugs that are potentially nephro-toxic. PMID:6974117

  9. Anti-inflammatory properties of cryptolepine.

    PubMed

    Olajide, Olumayokun A; Ajayi, Abayomi M; Wright, Colin W

    2009-10-01

    Cryptolepine is the major alkaloid of the West African shrub, Cryptolepis sanguinolenta. Cryptolepine has been shown to inhibit nitric oxide production, and DNA binding of Nuclear Factor-kappa B following inflammatory stimuli in vitro. In order to validate the anti-inflammatory property of this compound in vivo, we investigated its effects on a number of animal models of inflammation. Cryptolepine (10-40 mg/kg i.p.) produced significant dose-dependent inhibition of the carrageenan-induced rat paw oedema, and carrageenan-induced pleurisy in rats. These effects were compared with those of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug indomethacin (10 mg/kg). At doses of 10-40 mg/kg i.p., cryptolepine inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microvascular permeability in mice in a dose-related fashion. Oral administration of up to 40 mg/kg of the compound for four consecutive days did not induce gastric lesion formation in rats. Analgesic activity was also exhibited by cryptolepine through a dose-related (10-40 mg/kg i.p.) inhibition of writhing induced by i.p. administration of acetic acid in mice. The results of this study reveal that cryptolepine possesses in vivo anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:19288476

  10. Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs As Gatekeepers Of Colon Carcinoma Highlight New Scenarios Beyond Cyclooxygenases Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological data suggest that Non Steroidal Anti Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) and Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) inhibitors (COXibs) can exert chemopreventive and antitumour effects in many human neoplasia. This is particularly true in colon cancer (CC), where the regular assumption of these molecules has been shown to exert chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic effects. Since the late '90s, there has been a progressive increase in experimental evidence, indicating that in CC the antiproliferative effects of NSAIDs and COXibs could be both dependent on and independent of COXs inhibition, and that these effects do not necessarily exclude each other. This review will examine some of these COX-independent cellular pathways, with a focus on those involved in the inhibition of CC cells proliferation through transcription factors crosstalk. PMID:26310524

  11. Three Novel Alkaloids from Portulaca oleracea L. and Their Anti-inflammatory Effects.

    PubMed

    Li, Cui-Yu; Meng, Yi-Han; Ying, Zhe-Ming; Xu, Nan; Hao, Dong; Gao, Ming-Zhe; Zhang, Wen-Jie; Xu, Liang; Gao, Yu-Cong; Ying, Xi-Xiang

    2016-07-27

    Three novel carbon skeleton alkaloids, named oleracimine (1), oleracimine A (2), and oleracone A (3), with one novel azulene carbon skeleton compound, oleracone B (4), and one known compound, β-carboline (5), were first isolated from Portulaca oleracea L. The structures were determined using spectroscopic methods, including one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance and high-resolution electrospray ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry techniques. In addition, oleracimine (1) was used to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages. The results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, western blot, and real-time polymerase chain reaction showed that oleracimine (1) remarkably inhibited nitric oxide production and could dose-dependently decrease the secretions of interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor α, nitric oxide, and prostaglandin E2 in cell culture supernatants as well as the mRNA of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase. PMID:27396870

  12. Anti-inflammatory activity of polyphenolics from açai (Euterpe oleracea Martius) in intestinal myofibroblasts CCD-18Co cells.

    PubMed

    Dias, Manoela Maciel dos Santos; Martino, Hércia Stampini Duarte; Noratto, Giuliana; Roque-Andrade, Andrea; Stringheta, Paulo César; Talcott, Stephen; Ramos, Afonso Mota; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2015-10-01

    The demand for tropical fruits high in polyphenolics including açai (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) has been increasing based on ascribed health benefits and antioxidant properties. This study evaluated the anti-inflammatory activities of açai polyphenolics in human colon myofibroblastic CCD-18Co cells to investigate the suppression of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and mRNA and protein expression of inflammatory proteins. Non-cytotoxic concentrations of açai extract, 1-5 mg gallic acid equivalent L(-1), were selected. The generation of ROS was induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and açai extract partially reversed this effect to 0.53-fold of the LPS-control. Açai extract (5 mg GAE L(-1)) down-regulated LPS-induced mRNA-expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha, TNF-α (to 0.42-fold), cyclooxygenase 2, COX-2 (to 0.61-fold), toll-like receptor-4, TLR-4 (to 0.52-fold), TNF receptor-associated factor 6, TRAF-6 (to 0.64-fold), nuclear factor kappa-B, NF-κB (to 0.76-fold), vascular cell adhesion molecule 1, VCAM-1 (to 0.71-fold) and intercellular adhesion molecule 1, ICAM-1 (to 0.68-fold). The protein levels of COX-2, TLR-4, p-NF-κB and ICAM-1 were induced by LPS and the açai extract partially reversed this effect in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest the anti-inflammatory effect of açai polyphenolic extract in intestinal cells are at least in part mediated through the inhibition of ROS and the expression of TLR-4 and NF-κB. Results indicate the potential for açai polyphenolics in the prevention of intestinal inflammation. PMID:26243669

  13. The effects of C-glycosylation of luteolin on its antioxidant, anti-Alzheimer's disease, anti-diabetic, and anti-inflammatory activities.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae Sue; Islam, Md Nurul; Ali, Md Yousof; Kim, Young Myeong; Park, Hye Jin; Sohn, Hee Sook; Jung, Hyun Ah

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the effect of C-glycosylation at different positions of luteolin, the structure-activity relationships of luteolin and a pair of isomeric C-glycosylated derivatives orientin and isoorientin, were evaluated. We investigated the effects of C-glycosylation on the antioxidant, anti-Alzheimer's disease (AD), anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory effects of luteolin and its two C-glycosides via in vitro assays of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), total reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO), 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydraxyl (DPPH), aldose reductase, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and β-site amyloid precursor cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), and cellular assays of NO production and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)/cyclooxygenase-2 expression in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Of the three compounds, isoorientin showed the highest scavenging activity against DPPH, NO, and ONOO(-), while luteolin was the most potent inhibitor of ROS generation. In addition, luteolin showed the most potent anti-AD activity as determined by its inhibition of AChE, BChE, and BACE1. With respect to anti-diabetic effects, luteolin exerted the strongest inhibitory activity against PTP1B and rat lens aldose reductase. Luteolin also inhibited NO production and iNOS protein expression in LPS-stimulated macrophages, while orientin and isoorientin were inactive at the same concentrations. The effects of C-glycosylation at different positions of luteolin may be closely linked to the intensity and modulation of antioxidant, anti-AD, anti-diabetic, and anti-inflammatory effects of luteolin and its C-glycosylated derivatives. PMID:24988985

  14. Therapeutic Potential of a Non-Steroidal Bifunctional Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Cholinergic Agent against Skin Injury Induced by Sulfur Mustard

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D.; Hahn, Rita A.; Gordon, Marion K.; Joseph, Laurie B.; Heck, Diane E.; Heindel, Ned D.; Young, Sherri C.; Sinko, Patrick J.; Casillas, Robert P.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.; Gerecke, Donald R.

    2014-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, SM) is a highly reactive bifunctional alkylating agent inducing edema, inflammation, and the formation of fluid-filled blisters in the skin. Medical countermeasures against SM-induced cutaneous injury have yet to be established. In the present studies, we tested a novel, bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug (NDH 4338) designed to target cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), an enzyme that generates inflammatory eicosanoids, and acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme mediating activation of cholinergic inflammatory pathways in a model of SM-induced skin injury. Adult SKH-1 hairless male mice were exposed to SM using a dorsal skin vapor cup model. NDH 4338 was applied topically to the skin 24, 48, and 72 hr post-SM exposure. After 96 hr, SM was found to induce skin injury characterized by edema, epidermal hyperplasia, loss of the differentiation marker, keratin 10 (K10), upregulation of the skin wound marker keratin 6 (K6), disruption of the basement membrane anchoring protein laminin 322, and increased expression of epidermal COX2. NDH 4338 post-treatment reduced SM-induced dermal edema and enhanced skin re-epithelialization. This was associated with a reduction in COX2 expression, increased K10 expression in the suprabasal epidermis, and reduced expression of K6. NDH 4338 also restored basement membrane integrity, as evidenced by continuous expression of laminin 332 at the dermalepidermal junction. Taken together, these data indicate that a bifunctional anti-inflammatory prodrug stimulates repair of SM induced skin injury and may be useful as a medical countermeasure. PMID:25127551

  15. Anti-inflammatory effects of fermented and non-fermented Sophora flavescens: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The roots of Sophora flavescens (Leguminosae) have been used in East Asian countries as an herbal medicine and a food ingredient for thousands of years. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of S. flavescens fermentation on endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU) in rats. Methods EIU was induced in rats via a footpad injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Immediately after the LPS inoculation, fermented and non-fermented extracts of S. flavescens (FSE and NFSE, respectively) were administered orally, and the aqueous humor was collected from both eyes 24 hours later. The anti-inflammatory effects of FSE and NFSE were examined in terms of regulation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation and the expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), intercellular cell adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The regulation of maleic dialdehyde (MDA) levels and polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) infiltration by FSE and NFSE were also examined. Results Treatment with FSE significantly inhibited LPS-induced increases in IL-1β and TNF-α production and the expression of iNOS, ICAM-1 and COX-2. Moreover, FSE suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB activation, and reduced both MDA levels and infiltration by PMN. Conclusion These results indicate that solid state fermentation may enhance the anti-inflammatory effects of S. flavescens. PMID:22026927

  16. Supercritical carbon dioxide extract exhibits enhanced antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of Physalis peruviana.

    PubMed

    Wu, S J; Tsai, J Y; Chang, S P; Lin, D L; Wang, S S; Huang, S N; Ng, L T

    2006-12-01

    Physalis peruviana L. (PP) is a medicinal herb widely used in folk medicine. In this study, supercritical carbon dioxide (SFE-CO2) method was employed to obtain three different PP extracts, namely SCEPP-0, SCEPP-4 and SCEPP-5. The total flavonoid and phenol concentrations, as well as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of these extracts were analyzed and compared with aqueous and ethanolic PP extracts. Among all the extracts tested, SCEPP-5 demonstrated the highest total flavonoid (234.63+/-9.61 mg/g) and phenol (90.80+/-2.21 mg/g) contents. At concentrations 0.1-30 microg/ml, SCEPP-5 also demonstrated the strongest superoxide anion scavenging activity and xanthine oxidase inhibitory effect. At 30 microg/ml, SCEPP-5 significantly prevented lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 1 microg/ml)-induced cell cytotoxicity in murine macrophage (Raw 264.7) cells. At 10-50 microg/ml, it also significantly inhibited LPS-induced NO release and PGE2 formation in a dose-dependent pattern. SCEPP-5 at 30 microg/ml remarkably blocked the LPS induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. Taken together, these results suggest that SCEPP-5, an extract of SFE-CO2, displayed the strongest antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities as compared to other extracts. Its protection against LPS-induced inflammation could be through the inhibition of iNOS and COX-2 expression. PMID:16820275

  17. Purification and anti-inflammatory action of tripeptide from salmon pectoral fin byproduct protein hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Chang-Bum; Cho, Young-Sook; Je, Jae-Young

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the anti-inflammatory peptide from salmon pectoral fin byproduct protein hydrolysate by pepsin hydrolysis, was purified and identified using Sephadex G-25 gel permeation chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography and time-of-flight liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (TOF LC/MS/MS). The purified anti-inflammatory peptide was identified to be a tripeptide (PAY). Lipopolysaccharide treatment significantly (p<0.05) stimulated the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in RAW264.7 cells. However, PAY treatment significantly (p<0.05) inhibited the production of NO by 63.80% and PGE2 by 45.33%. Western blotting analysis revealed that PAY significantly (p<0.05) suppressed the protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2, which are responsible for the production of NO and PGE2. Additionally, PAY treatment also significantly (p<0.05) attenuated the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6 and -1β. PMID:25172694

  18. Anti-inflammatory Activity of Grains of Paradise (Aframomum melegueta Schum) Extract

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The ethanolic extract of grains of paradise (Aframomum melegueta Schum, Zingiberaceae) has been evaluated for inhibitory activity on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme, in vivo for the anti-inflammatory activity and expression of several pro-inflammatory genes. Bioactivity-guided fractionation showed that the most active COX-2 inhibitory compound in the extract was [6]-paradol. [6]-Shogaol, another compound from the extract, was the most active inhibitory compound in pro-inflammatory gene expression assays. In a rat paw edema model, the whole extract reduced inflammation by 49% at 1000 mg/kg. Major gingerols from the extract [6]-paradol, [6]-gingerol, and [6]-shogaol reduced inflammation by 20, 25 and 38%. respectively when administered individually at a dose of 150 mg/kg. [6]-Shogaol efficacy was at the level of aspirin, used as a positive control. Grains of paradise extract has demonstrated an anti-inflammatory activity, which is in part due to the inhibition of COX-2 enzyme activity and expression of pro-inflammatory genes. PMID:25293633

  19. Erdosteine: antitussive and anti-inflammatory effects.

    PubMed

    Dal Negro, Roberto W

    2008-01-01

    Erdosteine is a multifactorial drug currently used in COPD for its rheologic activity on bronchial secretions and its positive effects on bacterial adhesiveness. Erdosteine produces an active metabolite (Met 1) which was shown to produce antioxidant effects during the respiratory burst of human PMNs, due to the presence of an SH group. The substantial antitussive effects of erdosteine were first documented in clinical trials even though mucolytic agents are regarded as not consistently effective in ameliorating cough in patients with bronchitis, although they may be of benefit to this population in other ways. Actually, a mucolytic drug could exert antitussive effects if it also affects mucus consistency and enhances ciliary function. In the last decade, data from several studies on animal models pointed to the possible antitussive and anti-inflammatory properties of erdosteine and an indirect anti-inflammatory mechanism of action was suggested. Recently, data from some controlled versus placebo studies documented the antioxidant properties of erdosteine in humans and in current smokers with COPD. The mechanism of action was described as related to erdosteine's ability to inhibit some inflammatory mediators and some pro-inflammatory cytokines that are specifically involved in oxidative stress. As oxidative stress is also presumed to impair beta-adrenoceptor function and contribute to airway obstruction, specific controlled studies recently investigated the effect of antioxidant intervention on short-term airway response to salbutamol in nonreversible COPD, according to a double-blind design versus placebo and NAC. Only erdosteine consistently restored a significant short-term reversibility in COPD subjects, previously unresponsive to beta(2) adrenergics. This peculiar activity of erdosteine (to our knowledge never previously assessed) proved related to the ROS scavenging activity (which actually proved equal to that of N), and its significant inhibiting effect on

  20. Cyclooxygenase-2 in newborn hyperoxic lung injury.

    PubMed

    Britt, Rodney D; Velten, Markus; Tipple, Trent E; Nelin, Leif D; Rogers, Lynette K

    2013-08-01

    Supraphysiological O2 concentrations, mechanical ventilation, and inflammation significantly contribute to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD).Exposure of newborn mice to hyperoxia causes inflammation and impaired alveolarization similar to that seen in infants with BPD.Previously, we demonstrated that pulmonary cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression is increased in hyperoxia-exposed newborn mice.The present studies were designed to define the role of COX-2 in newborn hyperoxic lung injury.We tested the hypothesis that attenuation of COX-2 activity would reduce hyperoxia-induced inflammation and improve alveolarization.Newborn C3H/HeN micewere injected daily with vehicle, aspirin (nonselective COX-2 inhibitor), or celecoxib (selective COX-2 inhibitor) for the first 7 days of life.Additional studies utilized wild-type (C57Bl/6, COX-2(+/+)), heterozygous (COX-2(+/-)), and homozygous (COX-2(-/-)) transgenic mice.Micewere exposed to room air (21% O2) or hyperoxia (85% O2) for 14 days.Aspirin-injected and COX-2(-/-) pups had reduced levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL).Both aspirin and celecoxib treatment reduced macrophage numbers in the alveolar walls and air spaces.Aspirin and celecoxib treatment attenuated hyperoxia-induced COX activity, including altered levels of prostaglandin (PG)D2 metabolites.Decreased COX activity, however, did not prevent hyperoxia-induced lung developmental deficits.Our data suggest thatincreased COX-2 activity may contribute to proinflammatory responses, including macrophage chemotaxis, during exposure to hyperoxia.Modulation of COX-2 activity may be a useful therapeutic target to limit hyperoxia-induced inflammation in preterm infants at risk of developing BPD. PMID:23624331

  1. [The mode of anti-inflammatory action of a topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, etofenamate].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Motoyoshi, S; Ishii, K; Seto, Y; Shimoda, A; Kadokawa, T

    1987-01-01

    In order to ascertain the mode of anti-inflammatory action of a topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, etofenamate which is a diethylene glycol ester of flufenamic acid, the in vitro test for the mechanism of the action were carried out. Etofenamate (3 microM) was hydrolysed to flufenamic acid at a rate of 39.5% and 57.0% of the dose during 30 and 60 min incubation, respectively, when incubated with rat peritoneal macrophages stimulated with starch and bacto peptone in phosphate-buffered saline. PGE2 generation by these cells in MEM medium was dose-relatedly inhibited with etofenamate as well as flufenamic acid at the dosage range of 1 to 30 microM. This suggests that unchanged etofenamate is active, since the highest conversion rate of etofenamate to flufenamic acid was 15% of the dose during the incubation. Etofenamate produced a dose-related inhibition against lipoxygenase prepared from peritoneal polymorphonuclear leucocytes of guinea pigs, and its activity (IC50 = 5.3 X 10(-5) M) was stronger than that of caffeic acid; flufenamic acid was inactive. Inhibitory activity of etofenamate was one-third or less that of flufenamic acid against the hypotonic-hyperthermic lysis of rat erythrocytes and heat-denaturation of bovine serum albumin. From these results, it was suggested that topically applied etofenamate produces its anti-inflammatory action through prostaglandin synthesis inhibition by flufenamic acid produced in the inflammatory tissue and inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis by macrophages and lipoxygenase inhibition by unchanged etofenamate. PMID:2883093

  2. Acute gastrointestinal permeability responses to different non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Smecuol, E; Bai, J; Sugai, E; Vazquez, H; Niveloni, S; Pedreira, S; Maurino, E; Meddings, J

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) cause gastrointestinal damage both in the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. New anti-inflammatory drugs have been developed in an attempt to improve their gastrointestinal side effect profile. Our objective was to compare the effect on gastrointestinal permeability of acute equieffective doses of four different NSAIDs; three were designed to reduce gastrointestinal mucosal injury.
MATERIALS—Healthy volunteers underwent sugar tests in a randomised fashion, 15 days apart, at: (1) baseline; (2) after two days of 75 mg slow release (microspheres) indomethacin; (3) after two days of 7.5 mg oral meloxicam which preferentially inhibits cyclooxygenase 2; and (4) after two days of 750 mg naproxen. A subgroup of subjects was tested after two days of 200 mg celecoxib. In each test, subjects ingested a solution containing sucrose, lactulose, and mannitol and sucralose, to evaluate gastroduodenal, intestinal, and colonic permeability, respectively.
RESULTS—Gastric permeability was significantly affected by naproxen (p<0.05) but not by slow release indomethacin, meloxicam, or celecoxib. Intestinal permeability was significantly increased by the first three NSAIDs (p<0.05) but not by celecoxib. Abnormal lactulose/mannitol ratios were observed in 42% of meloxicam treatments, in 62% during indomethacin, and in 75% of subjects treated with naproxen. Finally, colonic permeability, as measured by sucralose, was not significantly increased by any of the four drugs.
CONCLUSION—Our study provides evidence that the newly developed NSAIDs reduce gastric mucosal permeability significantly. However, most produced significant alteration of small intestinal permeability. In contrast, our results suggest that celecoxib seems to exhibit the most desirable gastrointestinal side effect profile.


Keywords: permeability; non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; celecoxib; meloxican; small intestine

  3. Methanol extract of Xanthium strumarium L. possesses anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Tae; Park, Young-Mi; Won, Jong-Heon; Jung, Hyun-Ju; Park, Hee-Juhn; Choi, Jong-Won; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2005-01-01

    As an attempt to identify bioactive natural products with anti-inflammatory activity, we evaluated the effects of the methanol extract of the semen of Xanthium strumarium L. (MEXS) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production in RAW 264.7 cells. Our data indicate that MEXS is a potent inhibitor of NO, PGE2 and TNF-alpha production. Consistent with these findings, the expression levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein and iNOS, COX-2 and TNF-alpha mRNA were down-regulated in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, MEXS inhibited nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) DNA binding activity and the translocation of NF-kappaB to the nucleus by blocking the degradation of inhibitor of kappa B-alpha (IkappaB-alpha). We further evaluated the anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of MEXS in vivo. MEXS (100, 200 mg/kg/d, p.o.) reduced acute paw edema induced by carrageenin in rats, and showed analgesic activities in an acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction test and a hot plate test in mice. Thus, our study suggests that the inhibitions of iNOS, COX-2 expression, and TNF-alpha release by the methanol extract of the semen of Xanthium strumarium L. are achieved by blocking NF-kappaB activation, and that this is also responsible for its anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:15635170

  4. Anti-inflammatory activity of extracts from Conyza canadensis.

    PubMed

    Lenfeld, J; Motl, O; Trka, A

    1986-04-01

    The petroleum ether and ethanolic extract from the epigean part of Conyza canadensis exhibits a significant anti-inflammatory effect on rats with a carrageenin and formalin oedema. Eight sesquiterpenic hydrocarbons with the highest anti-inflammatory activity were found in the petroleum ether fraction (beta-santalene, beta-himachalene, cuparene, alpha-curcumene, gamma-cadinene and three other unidentified hydrocarbons). Of these substances, beta-himachalene was further studied and its anti-inflammatory activity was demonstrated. PMID:3725873

  5. Sesquiterpenes from Essential Oils and Anti-Inflammatory Activity.

    PubMed

    da Silveira e Sá, Rita de Cássia; Andrade, Luciana Nalone; de Sousa, Damião Pergentino

    2015-10-01

    This review is aimed at presenting relevant information on the therapeutic potential of essential oil sesquiterpenes with anti-inflammatory activity. The data reviewed provide a basis for seeking new anti-inflammatory drugs from natural products that do not exhibit the undesirable side effects often displayed by anti-inflammatory drugs. In this review the experimental models, possible mechanisms of action, and chemical structures of 12 sesquiterpenes are presented. PMID:26669122

  6. Use of Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors, Other Analgesics, and Risk of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Seliger, Corinna; Meier, Christoph R.; Becker, Claudia; Jick, Susan S.; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Hau, Peter; Leitzmann, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors are analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory drugs. They have been found to inhibit the development of glioma in laboratory investigations. Whether these drugs reduce the risk of glioma incidence in humans is unknown. Methods We conducted a matched case-control analysis using the U.K.-based Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). We identified 2,469 cases matched to 24,690 controls on age, sex, calendar time, general practice, and number of years of active history in the CPRD prior to the index date. We conducted conditional logistic regression analyses to determine relative risks, estimated as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of glioma in relation to use of selective COX-2 inhibitors, adjusted for several confounding variables. Results Use of selective COX-2 inhibitors was unrelated to risk of glioma (adjusted OR for 1–9 versus 0 prescriptions = 1.02; 95% CI = 0.92–1.13, 10–29 versus 0 prescriptions = 1.01; 95% CI = 0.80–1.28, ≥30 versus 0 prescriptions = 1.16; 95% CI = 0.86–1.55). Trends for increasing numbers of prescriptions for other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and non-NSAID analgesics were also not associated with glioma risk. Conclusion Further epidemiologic studies are needed to confirm the null relation of use of selective COX-2 inhibitors to glioma risk and to explain the discrepancy between laboratory investigations and our observational study. Impact: Use of selective COX-2 inhibitors is unrelated to glioma risk. PMID:26871579

  7. Intravital Microscopic Methods to Evaluate Anti-inflammatory Effects and Signaling Mechanisms Evoked by Hydrogen Sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Zuidema, Mozow Y.; Korthuis, Ronald J.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenous gaseous signaling molecule with potent anti-inflammatory properties. Exogenous application of H2S donors, administered either acutely during an inflammatory response or as an antecedent preconditioning intervention that invokes the activation of anti-inflammatory cell survival programs, effectively limits leukocyte rolling, adhesion and emigration, generation of reactive oxygen species, chemokine and cell adhesion molecule expression, endothelial barrier disruption,capillary perfusion deficits, and parenchymal cell dysfunction and injury. This chapter focuses on intravital microscopic methods that can be used to assess the anti-inflammatory effects exerted by H2S, as well as to explore the cellular signaling mechanisms by which this gaseous molecule limits the aforementioned inflammatory responses. Recent advances include use of intravital multiphoton microscopy and optical biosensor technology to explore signaling mechanisms in vivo. PMID:25747477

  8. A RECOMBINANT IgG Fc THAT RECAPITULATES THE ANTI-INFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF IVIG

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, Robert M.; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Ashline, David J.; Reinhold, Vernon N.; Paulson, James C.; Ravetch, Jeffrey V.

    2008-01-01

    High doses of monomeric IgG purified from pooled human plasma confer anti-inflammatory activity for a wide variety of autoimmune diseases. The heterogeneity of IVIG, derived from its Fab specificity, IgG subclass distribution and variable glycosylation have confounded efforts to develop a recombinant substitute for this blood-derived product. Recent studies have demonstrated that this paradoxical anti-inflammatory activity of IgG is completely dependent on sialylation of the N-linked glycan of the IgG Fc fragment. Determining the precise glycan requirements for this anti-inflammatory activity allowed appropriate glycan engineering of an IgG1 Fc fragment, leading to the generation of a fully recombinant, sialylated IgG1 Fc with greatly enhanced potency. PMID:18420934

  9. Review of Anti-Inflammatory Herbal Medicines.

    PubMed

    Ghasemian, Mona; Owlia, Sina; Owlia, Mohammad Bagher

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal plants and their secondary metabolites are progressively used in the treatment of diseases as a complementary medicine. Inflammation is a pathologic condition that includes a wide range of diseases such as rheumatic and immune-mediated conditions, diabetes, cardiovascular accident, and etcetera. We introduce some herbs which their anti-inflammatory effects have been evaluated in clinical and experimental studies. Curcuma longa, Zingiber officinale, Rosmarinus officinalis, Borago officinalis, evening primrose, and Devil's claw are some of the introduced medicinal herbs in this review. Since the treatment of inflammation is not a one-dimensional remedy, this review tries to reach a multidimensional therapeutic approach to inflammation with the help of herbal medicine and modification in lifestyle. PMID:27247570

  10. Review of Anti-Inflammatory Herbal Medicines

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemian, Mona; Owlia, Sina; Owlia, Mohammad Bagher

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal plants and their secondary metabolites are progressively used in the treatment of diseases as a complementary medicine. Inflammation is a pathologic condition that includes a wide range of diseases such as rheumatic and immune-mediated conditions, diabetes, cardiovascular accident, and etcetera. We introduce some herbs which their anti-inflammatory effects have been evaluated in clinical and experimental studies. Curcuma longa, Zingiber officinale, Rosmarinus officinalis, Borago officinalis, evening primrose, and Devil's claw are some of the introduced medicinal herbs in this review. Since the treatment of inflammation is not a one-dimensional remedy, this review tries to reach a multidimensional therapeutic approach to inflammation with the help of herbal medicine and modification in lifestyle. PMID:27247570

  11. Corneal reepithelialization and anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, B D

    1982-01-01

    These studies have demonstrated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase inhibitors) can inhibit PMN arrival in the tear fluid following corneal injury but do not inhibit the reepithelialization either by corneal epithelial cells or by conjunctival epithelial cells. Therefore, they can be used safely in ocular inflammatory conditions even when corneal epithelial defects are present. Corticosteroids, on the other hand, inhibit reepithelialization by conjunctival epithelial cells and not by corneal epithelial cells in the doses tested. This inhibition does not occur with pretreatment prior to injury, suggesting that corticosteroids can be used clinically in conditions that have intact corneal epithelium without fear of slowing down wound healing should epithelial defects occur when not on steroid therapy. Furthermore, the steroid inhibition is temporary since there is a breakthrough in steroid inhibition with time, and occurs only if the steroids have been used shortly after deepithelialization. The steroid inhibition can be reversed by specific steroid antagonist, indicating that the steroid effect is mediated through specific receptors. An exciting and new hypothesis proposes that corticosteroids induce the formation of an inhibitory protein that inhibits the phospholipase enzyme to cause a block in arachidonic acid release from cell membranes. This mechanism of action may also be prevalent in the steroid effect on corneal reepithelialization, and experiments are under way to isolate this inhibitory protein from steroid-treated conjunctival epithelium. This isolation and pharmacologic characterization of this inhibitory protein is of obvious advantage to the field of ophthalmic therapeutics since this protein may have the anti-inflammatory potential of the steroids without their steroid sideeffects. Images FIGURE 3 a FIGURE 3 b PMID:6763806

  12. Cobalt Protoporphyrin Upregulates Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression Through a Heme Oxygenase-Independent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiao-Yun; Tsai, Chon-Haw; Lin, Chingju; Yeh, Wei-Lan; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Chang, Pei-Chun; Wu, Ling-Hsuan; Lu, Dah-Yuu

    2016-09-01

    Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) is a potent HO-1 inducer and generally known to be an antioxidant in various cell types. Little is known about the CoPP-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and its downstream signaling in microglial cells. In current study, CoPP caused concentration- and time-dependent increases in COX-2 expression in microglial cells. Furthermore, activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase (ASK) 1/MAP kinase involved in CoPP-induced COX-2 expression in microglia. CoPP also induced P2X7 receptor activation, and treatment of P2X7 inhibitors effectively reduced CoPP-induced COX-2 expression. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT (PIAS) 1 is reported to be involved in modulating anti-inflammatory response through negative regulation of transcription factors. Interestingly, treatment with CoPP markedly induced PIAS1 degradation which is regulated by PI3K, Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase 3α/β (GSK3α/β) signaling pathways. These results suggest that CoPP induces COX-2 expression through activating P2X7 receptors and ASK1/MAP kinases as well as PIAS1 degradation signaling pathways. Our study provides a new insight into the regulatory effect of CoPP on neuroinflammation in microglial cells. PMID:26255181

  13. Paeoniflorin ameliorates rheumatoid arthritis in rat models through oxidative stress, inflammation and cyclooxygenase 2

    PubMed Central

    JIA, ZHILIN; HE, JIAO

    2016-01-01

    Paeoniflorin has anti-inflammatory, anti-allergy, immune regulatory and pain-relieving effects, amongst other roles. However, the mechanisms underlying the protective effects of paeoniflorin on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remain under investigation; the objective of the current study was to evaluate these protective effects in the context of an RA model. Rats were randomly divided into 5 groups, as follows: The control group, the RA rat model group, and the paeoniflorin groups, in which paeoniflorin was administered at concentrations of 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg for 3 weeks. The pain thresholds and arthritic symptoms of the RA rats were measured. Oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines were also analyzed and western blot analysis was used to evaluate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression levels. Paeoniflorin significantly increased the pain threshold and decreased the arthritic symptoms in the RA rat model. Notably, paeoniflorin reduced the malondialdehyde concentration and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Furthermore, paeoniflorin attenuated the activity of nuclear factor-κB p65 unit, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, and reduced the COX-2 protein expression level. The present study indicates that paeoniflorin ameliorates disease in rat models of RA through oxidative stress, inflammation and alterations to COX-2 expression. PMID:26893662

  14. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 impacts chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation during endochondral ossification.

    PubMed

    Welting, T J M; Caron, M M J; Emans, P J; Janssen, M P F; Sanen, K; Coolsen, M M E; Voss, L; Surtel, D A M; Cremers, A; Voncken, J W; van Rhijn, L W

    2011-01-01

    Skeletogenesis and bone fracture healing involve endochondral ossification, a process during which cartilaginous primordia are gradually replaced by bone tissue. In line with a role for cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the endochondral ossification process, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were reported to negatively affect bone fracture healing due to impaired osteogenesis. However, a role for COX-2 activity in the chondrogenic phase of endochondral ossification has not been addressed before. We show that COX-2 activity fulfils an important regulatory function in chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation. Our data reveal essential cross-talk between COX-2 and bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2) during chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation. BMP-2 mediated chondrocyte hypertrophy is associated with increased COX-2 expression and pharmacological inhibition of COX-2 activity by NSAIDs (e.g., Celecoxib) decreases hypertrophic differentiation in various chondrogenic models in vitro and in vivo, while leaving early chondrogenic development unaltered. Our findings demonstrate that COX-2 activity is a novel factor partaking in chondrocyte hypertrophy in the context of endochondral ossification and these observations provide a novel etiological perspective on the adverse effects of NSAIDs on bone fracture healing and have important implications for the use of NSAIDs during endochondral skeletal development. PMID:22183916

  15. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Apigenin on LPS-Induced Pro-Inflammatory Mediators and AP-1 Factors in Human Lung Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rajeshwari H; Babu, R L; Naveen Kumar, M; Kiran Kumar, K M; Hegde, Shubha M; Nagesh, Rashmi; Ramesh, Govindarajan T; Sharma, S Chidananda

    2016-02-01

    Apigenin is one of the plant flavonoids present in fruits and vegetables, acting as an important nutraceutical component. It is recognized as a potential antioxidant, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory molecule. In the present study, the mechanism of anti-inflammatory action of apigenin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines and activator protein-1 (AP-1) factors in human lung A549 cells was investigated. The anti-inflammatory activity of apigenin on LPS-induced inflammation was determined by analyzing the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and different AP-1 factors. Apigenin significantly inhibited the LPS-induced expression of iNOS, COX-2, expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α), and AP-1 proteins (c-Jun, c-Fos, and JunB) including nitric oxide production. Study confirms the anti-inflammatory effect of apigenin by inhibiting the expression of inflammatory mediators and AP-1 factors involved in the inflammation and its importance in the treatment of lung inflammatory diseases. PMID:26276128

  16. Anti-Inflammatory Constituents from Bidens frondosa.

    PubMed

    Le, Jiamei; Lu, Wenquan; Xiong, Xiaojuan; Wu, Zhijun; Chen, Wansheng

    2015-01-01

    A new polyacetylene glucoside (3E,5E,11E)-tridecatriene-7,9-diyne-1,2,13-triol-2-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (1), a new phenylpropanoid glucoside 2'-butoxyethylconiferin (2), and a new flavonoid glycoside 8,3',4'-trihydroxyflavone-7-O-(6''-O-p-coumaroyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside (3), have been isolated from Bidens frondosa together with fifty-three known compounds 4-56. The structures of these compounds were established by spectroscopic methods. mainly ESIMS, 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopic data. and comparison with literature data. Compounds 1-34, 36, 39, 43, 47, 51, and 52 were tested for inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in 293-NF-κB-luciferase report cell line induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and compounds 1, 2, 3, 9, 15, 21, 24 and 51 were tested for the production of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10 in RAW 264.7 macrophages induced by LPS. In conclusion, the isolated compounds 1, 2, 3, 9, 15, 21, 24 and 51 exhibited significant activity in anti-inflammatory activity assays. PMID:26473814

  17. Anti-inflammatory effect of fucoidan extracted from Ecklonia cava in zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hong; Ko, Chang-Ik; Jee, Youngheun; Jeong, Yoonhwa; Kim, Misook; Kim, Jin-Soo; Jeon, You-Jin

    2013-01-30

    Fucoidan extracted from Ecklonia cava had strong anti-inflammatory activities. However, the direct effects of fucoidan of E. cava on anti-inflammatory activities in vivo model remained to be determined. Therefore, the present study was designed to assess in vivo anti-inflammatory effect of fucoidan extracted from E. cava (ECF) using tail-cutting-induced and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated zebrafish model. Treating zebrafish model with tail-cutting and LPS-treatment significantly increased the ROS and NO level. However, ECF inhibited this tail-cutting-induced and LPS-stimulated ROS and NO generation. These results show that ECF alleviated inflammation by inhibiting the ROS and NO generation induced by tail-cutting and LPS-treatment. In addition, ECF has a protective effect against the toxicity induced by LPS exposure in zebrafish embryos. This outcome could explain the potential anti-inflammatory activity of ECF, which might have a beneficial effect during the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:23218269

  18. Anti-inflammatory properties of quebecol and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, Sébastien; Azelmat, Jabrane; Grenier, Daniel; Voyer, Normand

    2016-01-15

    Herein we report our results on the anti-inflammatory activity of quebecol, a polyphenolic compound discovered in maple syrup. Bioassays demonstrated that quebecol has an anti-inflammatory effect on LPS-induced NF-κB activation and inhibits the secretion of two pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-α. We also prepared and tested precursors of quebecol and its derivatives corresponding to its substructures of interest, with the aim to study the structure-activity relationships. Comparing the results obtained for all tested compounds allowed the identification of the main moiety responsible for the anti-inflammatory activity of quebecol. PMID:26691759

  19. Resveratrol as a Bioenhancer to Improve Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Apigenin

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Ah; Ha, Sang Keun; Cho, EunJung; Choi, Inwook

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to improve the anti-inflammatory activities of apigenin through co-treatment with resveratrol as a bioenhancer of apigenin. RAW 264.7 cells pretreated with hepatic metabolites formed by the co-metabolism of apigenin and resveratrol (ARMs) in HepG2 cells were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). ARMs prominently inhibited (p < 0.05) the production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. Otherwise no such activity was observed by hepatic metabolites of apigenin alone (AMs). ARMs also effectively suppressed protein expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Co-administration of apigenin (50 mg/kg) and resveratrol (25 mg/kg) also showed a significant reduction of carrageenan-induced paw edema in mice (61.20% to 23.81%). Co-administration of apigenin and resveratrol led to a 2.39 fold increase in plasma apigenin levels compared to administration of apigenin alone, suggesting that co-administration of resveratrol could increase bioavailability of apigenin. When the action of resveratrol on the main apigenin metabolizing enzymes, UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), was investigated, resveratrol mainly inhibited the formation of apigenin glucuronides by UGT1A9 in a non-competitive manner with a Ki value of 7.782 μM. These results suggested that resveratrol helps apigenin to bypass hepatic metabolism and maintain apigenin’s anti-inflammatory activities in the body. PMID:26610561

  20. Antioxidant and Anti-inflammatory Activities of Butanol Extract of Melaleuca leucadendron L.

    PubMed Central

    Surh, Jeonghee; Yun, Jung-Mi

    2012-01-01

    Melaleuca leucadendron L. has been used as a tranquilizing, sedating, evil-dispelling and pain-relieving agent. We examined the effects of M. leucadendron L. extracts on oxidative stress and inflammation. M. leucadendron L. was extracted with methanol (MeOH) and then fractionated with chloroform (CHCl3) and butanol (BuOH). Antioxidant activity of the MeOH extract and BuOH fraction were higher than that of both α-tocopherol and butyrated hydroxytoluene (BHT). Total phenol content in the extracts of M. leucadendron L., especially the BuOH fraction, well correlated with the antioxidant activity. The anti-inflammatory activity of BuOH extracts were investigated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages. The BuOH fraction significantly inhibited LPS-induced NO and PGE2 production. Furthermore, BuOH extract of M. leucadendron L. inhibited the expression of COX-2 and iNOS protein without an appreciable cytotoxic effect on RAW264.7 cells. The extract of M. leucadendron L. also suppressed the phosphorylation of inhibitor κBα (IκBα) and its degradation associated with nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. Furthermore, BuOH fraction inhibited LPS-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggested that M. leucadendron L. could be useful as a natural anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory resource. PMID:24471059

  1. Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Kahweol, a Coffee Diterpene

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas, Casimiro; Quesada, Ana R.; Medina, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies have shown that unfiltered coffee consumption is associated with a low incidence of cancer. This study aims to identify the effects of kahweol, an antioxidant diterpene contained in unfiltered coffee, on angiogenesis and key inflammatory molecules. Methodology/Principal Findings The experimental procedures included in vivo angiogenesis assays (both the chicken and quail choriallantoic membrane assay and the angiogenesis assay with fluorescent zebrafish), the ex vivo mouse aortic ring assay and the in vitro analysis of the effects of treatment of human endothelial cells with kahweol in cell growth, cell viability, cell migration and zymographic assays, as well as the tube formation assay on Matrigel. Additionally, two inflammation markers were determined, namely, the expression levels of cyclooxygenase 2 and the levels of secreted monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. We show for the first time that kahweol is an anti-angiogenic compound with inhibitory effects in two in vivo and one ex vivo angiogenesis models, with effects on specific steps of the angiogenic process: endothelial cell proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation on Matrigel. We also demonstrate the inhibitory effect of kahweol on the endothelial cell potential to remodel extracellular matrix by targeting two key molecules involved in the process, MMP-2 and uPA. Finally, the anti-inflammatory potential of this compound is demonstrated by its inhibition of both COX-2 expression and MCP-1 secretion in endothelial cells. Conclusion/Significance Taken together, our data indicate that, indeed, kahweol behaves as an anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic compound with potential use in antitumoral therapies. These data may contribute to the explanation of the reported antitumoral effects of kahweol, including the recent epidemiological meta-analysis showing that drinking coffee could decrease the risk of certain cancers. PMID:21858104

  2. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Agrimoniin-Enriched Fractions of Potentilla erecta.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Julia; Casetti, Federica; Bullerkotte, Ute; Haarhaus, Birgit; Vagedes, Jan; Schempp, Christoph M; Wölfle, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Potentilla erecta (PE) is a small herbaceous plant with four yellow petals belonging to the Rosaceae family. The rhizome of PE has traditionally been used as an antidiarrheal, hemostatic and antihemorrhoidal remedy. PE contains up to 20% tannins and 5% ellagitannins, mainly agrimoniin. Agrimoniin is a hydrolyzable tannin that is a potent radical scavenger. In this study we tested the anti-inflammatory effect of four PE fractions with increasing amounts of agrimoniin obtained by Sephadex column separation. First, we analyzed in HaCaT keratinocytes the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) induced by ultraviolet-B (UVB) irradiation. As COX-2 catalyzes the metabolism of arachidonic acid to prostanoids such as PGE₂, we also measured the PGE₂ concentration in cell culture supernatants. PE inhibited UVB-induced COX-2 expression in HaCaT cells and dose-dependently reduced PGE₂. The PE fraction with the highest agrimoniin amount (PE4) was the most effective in this experiment, whereas fraction PE1 containing mainly sugars had no effect. PE4 also dose dependently inhibited the phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) which plays a crucial role in UVB-mediated COX-2 upregulation. A placebo-controlled UV-erythema study with increasing concentrations of PE4 demonstrated a dose dependent inhibition of UVB-induced inflammation in vivo. Similarly, PE4 significantly reduced UVB-induced PGE₂ production in suction blister fluid in vivo. In summary, PE fractions with a high agrimoniin content display anti-inflammatory effects in vitro and in vivo in models of UVB-induced inflammation. PMID:27322232

  3. Anti-inflammatory activity of patchouli alcohol isolated from Pogostemonis Herba in animal models.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Cui; Xian, Yan-Fang; Ip, Siu-Po; Su, Zi-Ren; Su, Ji-Yan; He, Jing-Jin; Xie, Qing-Feng; Lai, Xiao-Ping; Lin, Zhi-Xiu

    2011-12-01

    Pogostemonis Herba has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. Patchouli alcohol (PA), a tricyclic sesquiterpene isolated from Pogostemonis Herba, is known to possess a variety of pharmacological activities. The present study aimed to investigate the in vivo anti-inflammatory effect of PA using two common inflammatory animal models i.e., xylene-induced ear edema in mice and carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats. The degree of edema in both inflammatory animals, as well as the protein and mRNA expression of some inflammatory mediators including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) and nitric oxide (NO) in the hind paw of carrageenan-treated rats were measured. Results showed that PA (10-40 mg/kg) significantly inhibited the ear edema induced by xylene in mice and the paw edema induced by carrageenan in rats. In addition, treatment with PA (10-40 mg/kg) also dose-dependently decreased the production of TNF-α, IL-1β, PGE₂ and NO in the hind paw of carrageenan-treated rats. Furthermore, PA treatment also suppressed the mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the hind paw of carrageenan-treated rats. These results suggest that PA possesses potent anti-inflammatory activity, which may be mediated, at least in part, by down-regulating the mRNA expression of a panel of inflammatory mediators including TNF-α, IL-1β, iNOS and COX-2. PMID:21958968

  4. Structural investigation of chitosan-based microspheres with some anti-inflammatory drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreve, Simina; Kacso, Iren; Popa, Adriana; Raita, Oana; Dragan, Felicia; Bende, A.; Borodi, Gh.; Bratu, I.

    2011-06-01

    The use of chitosan as an excipient in oral formulations, as a drug delivery vehicle for ulcerogenic anti-inflammatory drugs and as base in polyelectrolyte complex systems, to prepare solid release systems as sponges was investigated. The preparation by double emulsification of chitosan hydrogels carrying diclofenac, acetyl-salycilic acid and hydrocortisone acetate as anti-inflammatory drugs is reported. The concentration of anti-inflammatory drug in the chitosan hydrogel generating the sponges was 0.08 mmol. Chitosan-drug loaded sponges with anti-inflammatory drugs were prepared by freeze-drying at -60 °C and 0.009 atm. Structural investigations of the solid formulations were done by Fourier-transformed infrared and ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, spectrofluorimetry, differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffractometry. The results indicated that the drug molecules are forming temporary chelates in chitosan hydrogels and sponges. Electron paramagnetic resonance demonstrates the presence of free radicals in a wide range and the antioxidant activity for chitosan-drug supramolecular cross-linked assemblies.

  5. Flavonoids as anti-inflammatory agents: implications in cancer and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    García-Lafuente, Ana; Guillamón, Eva; Villares, Ana; Rostagno, Mauricio A; Martínez, José Alfredo

    2009-09-01

    Chronic inflammation is being shown to be increasingly involved in the onset and development of several pathological disturbances such as arteriosclerosis, obesity, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases and even cancer. Treatment for chronic inflammatory disorders has not been solved, and there is an urgent need to find new and safe anti-inflammatory compounds. Flavonoids belong to a group of natural substances occurring normally in the diet that exhibit a variety of beneficial effects on health. The anti-inflammatory properties of flavonoids have been studied recently, in order to establish and characterize their potential utility as therapeutic agents in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Several mechanisms of action have been proposed to explain in vivo flavonoid anti-inflammatory actions, such as antioxidant activity, inhibition of eicosanoid generating enzymes or the modulation of the production of proinflammatory molecules. Recent studies have also shown that some flavonoids are modulators of proinflammatory gene expression, thus leading to the attenuation of the inflammatory response. However, much work remains to be done in order to achieve definitive conclusions about their potential usefulness. This review summarizes the known mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory activity of flavonoids and the implications of these effects on the protection against cancer and cardiovascular disease. PMID:19381780

  6. 2-(2-Arylphenyl)benzoxazole As a Novel Anti-Inflammatory Scaffold: Synthesis and Biological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The 2-(2-arylphenyl)benzoxazole moiety has been found to be a new and selective ligand for the enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The 2-(2-arylphenyl)benzoxazoles 3a–m have been synthesized by Suzuki reaction of 2-(2-bromophenyl)benzoxazole. Further synthetic manipulation of 3f and 3i led to 3o and 3n, respectively. The compounds 3g, 3n, and 3o selectively inhibited COX-2 with selectivity index of 3n much better than that of the COX-2 selective NSAID celecoxib. The in vivo anti-inflammatory potency of 3g and 3n is comparable to that of celecoxib and the nonselective NSAID diclofenac at two different doses, and 3o showed better potency compared to these clinically used NSAIDs. PMID:24900871

  7. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Delonix regia (Boj. Ex. Hook)

    PubMed Central

    Shewale, Vaishali D.; Deshmukh, Tushar A.; Patil, Liladhar S.; Patil, Vijay R.

    2012-01-01

    The present work was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of Delonix regia leaves (Family: Caesalpiniaceae). The powder of Delonix regia leaves was subjected to extraction with ethanol in soxhlet extractor. The ethanol extract after preliminary phytochemical investigation showed the presence of sterols, triterpenoids, phenolic compounds and flavonoids. The anti-inflammatory activity was studied using carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and cotton pellet granuloma at a three different doses (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg b.w. p.o.) of ethanol extract. The ethanol extract of Delonix regia leaves was exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity at the dose of 400 mg/kg in both models when compared with control group. Indomethacin (10 mg/kg b.w. p.o) was also shown significant anti-inflammatory activity in both models. PMID:22110490

  8. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Chitooligosaccharides in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, João C.; Spindola, Humberto; de Sousa, Vanessa; Santos-Silva, Alice; Pintado, Manuela E.; Malcata, Francisco Xavier; Carvalho, João E.

    2010-01-01

    All the reports to date on the anti-inflammatory activity of chitooligosaccharides (COS) are mostly based on in vitro methods. In this work, the anti-inflammatory activity of two COS mixtures is characterized in vivo (using balb/c mice), following the carrageenan-induced paw edema method. This is a widely accepted animal model of acute inflammation to evaluate the anti-inflammatory effect of drugs. Our data suggest that COS possess anti-inflammatory activity, which is dependent on dose and, at higher doses, also on the molecular weight. A single dose of 500 mg/kg b.w. weight may be suitable to treat acute inflammation cases; however, further studies are needed to ascertain the effect upon longer inflammation periods as well as studies upon the bioavailability of these compounds. PMID:20631868

  9. Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibition Protects Against Myocardial Damage in Experimental Acute Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Carnieto, Alberto; Dourado, Paulo Magno Martins; da Luz, Protásio Lemos; Chagas, Antonio Carlos Palandri

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Acute myocardial infarction is associated with tissue inflammation. Early coronary reperfusion clearly improves the outcome but may help propagate the inflammatory response and enhance tissue damage. Cyclooxygenase-2 is an enzyme that catalyzes the initial step in the formation of inflammatory prostaglandins from arachidonic acid. Cyclooxygenase-2 levels are increased when ischemic cardiac events occur. The overall function of COX-2 in the inflammatory process generated by myocardial ischemic damage has not yet been elucidated. GOAL The objective of this study was to determine whether a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (rofecoxib) could alter the evolution of acute myocardial infarction after reperfusion. METHODS AND RESULTS This study was performed with 48 mongrel dogs divided into two groups: controls and those treated with the drug. All animals were prepared for left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion. The dogs then underwent 180 minutes of coronary occlusion, followed by 30 minutes of reperfusion. Blood samples were collected from the venous sinus immediately before coronary occlusion and after 30 minutes of reperfusion for measurements of CPK-MB, CPK-MBm and troponin I. During the experiment we observed the mean blood pressure, heart rate and coronary flow. The coronary flow and heart rate did not change, but in the control group, there was blood pressure instability, in addition to maximal levels of CPK-MB post-infarction. The same results were observed for CPK-MBm and troponin I. CONCLUSION In a canine model of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion, selective inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 with rofecoxib was not associated with early detrimental effects on the hemodynamic profile or the gross extent of infarction; in fact, it may be beneficial by limiting cell necrosis. PMID:19330252

  10. Comparative topical anti-inflammatory activity of cannabinoids and cannabivarins.

    PubMed

    Tubaro, Aurelia; Giangaspero, Anna; Sosa, Silvio; Negri, Roberto; Grassi, Gianpaolo; Casano, Salvatore; Della Loggia, Roberto; Appendino, Giovanni

    2010-10-01

    A selection of seven phytocannabinoids representative of the major structural types of classic cannabinoids and their corresponding cannabivarins was investigated for in vivo topical anti-inflammatory activity in the Croton oil mouse ear dermatitis assay. Differences in the terpenoid moiety were far more important for anti-inflammatory activity than those at the C-3 alkyl residue, suggesting the involvement not only of cannabinoid receptors, but also of other inflammatory end-points targeted by phytocannabinoids. PMID:20450962

  11. Synthesis and anti-inflammatory activity of aromatic glucosinolates.

    PubMed

    Vo, Quan V; Trenerry, Craige; Rochfort, Simone; Wadeson, Jenny; Leyton, Carolina; Hughes, Andrew B

    2013-10-01

    Aromatic GLs are important members of the glucosinolate family of compounds because of their potential biological activity and medicinal properties. This study has shown success in the high yielding synthesis of some important aromatic GLs as well as the results of testing for anti-inflammatory properties of the synthetic GLs. 3,4-Dimethoxyphenylglucosinolate was found to be the most active anti-inflammatory of the seven glucosinolates assayed. PMID:23978357

  12. Lipoxins exert antiangiogenic and anti-inflammatory effects on Kaposi's sarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Marginean, Alexandru; Sharma-Walia, Neelam

    2015-08-01

    Lipoxin A4 (LXA4) is an endogenously produced host molecule with anti-inflammatory resolution effects. Previous studies demonstrated it to be involved in anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-mediated angiogenesis and in a possible anticancer role via interaction with its receptor, lipoxin A 4 receptor (ALXR). Here, we examined the effects of LXA4 and its epimer 15-epi-LXA4 in inhibiting proinflammatory and angiogenic functions in a human Kaposi's sarcoma tumor-derived cell line (KS-IMM). KS-IMM cells expressed increased levels of inflammatory cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) pathway enzymes when compared with human microvascular dermal endothelial cells (HMVEC-d). KS-IMM cells secreted high levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and chemotactic leukotriene B4 (LTB4). Treatment with LXA4 or 15-epi-LXA4 effectively reduced the levels of COX-2, 5-LO proteins, and secretion of PGE2 and LTB4 in KS-IMM cells. LXA4 or 15-epi-LXA4 treatment also decreased secretion of proinflammatory interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-8 cytokines but induced the secretion of anti-inflammatory IL-10. LXA4 treatment reduced the phosphorylation of VEGF receptor (VEGFR) and ephrin family receptor tyrosine kinases. LXA4 treatment effectively induced dephosphorylation of multiple cellular kinases such as Focal Adhesion Kinase, Protein kinase B, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells, and Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2, and reduced angiogenic factor VEGF-C secretion in KS cells. LX treatment drastically induced the Src-homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase tyrosine (Y542) phosphatase and reduced VEGFR-2 phosphorylation at sites Y1059, Y1175, and Y1212. Treatment of KS-IMM cells with LXA4 resulted in selective localization of VEGFR-2 in nonlipid raft (non-LR) and ALXR to LR fractions. These results demonstrated that LXA4 or 15-epi-LXA4 induce anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic effects in KS cells and suggest that treatment with LXs is

  13. [Anti-inflammatory effects of methylprednisolone aceponate in animals].

    PubMed

    Ikoma, Y; Yamashita, M; Kamitani, K; Nakagawa, H

    1991-11-01

    In the case of dermal application of the drugs to croton oil-induced ear edema in rats and picryl chloride-induced delayed type hypersensitivity in mice, the anti-inflammatory effect of methylprednisolone aceponate (MPA) was slightly weaker than those of clobetasol 17-propionate and diflucortolone 21-valerate, but stronger than those of hydrocortisone 17-butyrate and hydrocortisone 17-butyrate 21-propionate. Betamethasone 17-valerate applied dermally was less and more effective than MPA to ear edema in rats and delayed type hypersensitivity in mice, respectively. The anti-inflammatory effect of MPA was weaker in subcutaneous administration than in topical application to the two inflammatory models. It was suggested that MPA has strong anti-inflammatory effects and weak systemic effects by topical application. Methylprednisolone 17-propionate (MP-17P) and methylprednisolone (MP), unesterified in only the C-21 position and in both the C-17 and 21 positions of MPA, respectively, showed weaker anti-inflammatory activities than MPA by topical application to croton oil-induced ear edema. The ratio of the anti-inflammatory effects by topical application to subcutaneous administration of MPA was higher than those of MP-17P and MP. The excellent characteristics of MPA as a dermal anti-inflammatory drug are suggested to be derived from di-esterification of MP, which has a weak activity intrinsically. PMID:1813371

  14. Hypoglycemic agents and potential anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Vishal; Galdo, John A; Mathews, Suresh T

    2016-01-01

    Current literature shows an association of diabetes and secondary complications with chronic inflammation. Evidence of these immunological changes include altered levels of cytokines and chemokines, changes in the numbers and activation states of various leukocyte populations, apoptosis, and fibrosis during diabetes. Therefore, treatment of diabetes and its complications may include pharmacological strategies to reduce inflammation. Apart from anti-inflammatory drugs, various hypoglycemic agents have also been found to reduce inflammation that could contribute to improved outcomes. Extensive studies have been carried out with thiazolidinediones (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist), dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, and metformin (AMP-activated protein kinase activator) with each of these classes of compounds showing moderate-to-strong anti-inflammatory action. Sulfonylureas and alpha glucosidase inhibitors appeared to exert modest effects, while the injectable agents, insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, may improve secondary complications due to their anti-inflammatory potential. Currently, there is a lack of clinical data on anti-inflammatory effects of sodium–glucose cotransporter type 2 inhibitors. Nevertheless, for all these glucose-lowering agents, it is essential to distinguish between anti-inflammatory effects resulting from better glucose control and effects related to intrinsic anti-inflammatory actions of the pharmacological class of compounds. PMID:27114714

  15. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2, alpha 1-acid-glycoprotein and inducible nitric oxide synthase in the developing lesions of murine leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Silva Miranda, Mayra; Rodríguez, Kendy Wek; Martínez Cordero, Erasmo; Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar

    2006-01-01

    Murine leprosy is a chronic disease of the mouse, the most popular animal model used in biomedical investigation, which is caused by Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) whose characteristic lesion is the macrophage-made granuloma. From onset to the end of the disease, the granuloma undergoes changes that gradually transform the environment into a more appropriate milieu for the growth of M. lepraemurium. The mechanisms that participate in the formation and maturation of the murine leprosy granulomas are not completely understood; however, microbial and host-factors are believed to participate in their formation. In this study, we analysed the role of various pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory proteins in granulomas of murine leprosy after 21 weeks of infection. We assessed the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), alpha acid-glycoprotein (AGP), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) at sequential stages of infection. We also looked for the nitric-oxide nitrosylation product, nitrotyrosine (NT) in the granulomatous lesions of murine leprosy. We found that a pro-inflammatory environment predominates in the early granulomas while an anti-inflammatory environment predominates in late granulomas. No obvious signs of bacillary destruction were observed during the entire period of infection, but nitrosylation products and cell alterations were observed in granulomas in the advanced stages of disease. The change from a pro-inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory environment, which is probably driven by the bacillus itself, results in a more conducive environment for both bacillus replication and the disease progression. PMID:17222216

  16. Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory-Organometallic Anticancer Compounds.

    PubMed

    Păunescu, Emilia; McArthur, Sarah; Soudani, Mylène; Scopelliti, Rosario; Dyson, Paul J

    2016-02-15

    Compounds that combine metal-based drugs with covalently linked targeted organic agents have been shown, in some instances, to exhibit superior anticancer properties compared to the individual counterparts. Within this framework, we prepared a series of organometallic ruthenium(II)- and osmium(II)-p-cymene complexes modified with the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) indomethacin and diclofenac. The NSAIDs are attached to the organometallic moieties via monodentate (pyridine/phosphine) or bidentate (bipyridine) ligands, affording piano-stool Ru(II) and Os(II) arene complexes of general formula [M(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl2(N)], where N is a pyridine-based ligand, {2-(2-(1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetoxy)ethyl-3-(pyridin-3-yl)propanoate} or {2-(2-(2-((2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino)phenyl)acetoxy)ethyl-3-(pyridin-3-yl)propanoate}, [M(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl2(P)], where P is a phosphine ligand, {2-(2-(1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetoxy)ethyl-4-(diphenylphosphanyl)benzoate} or {2-(2-(2-((2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino)phenyl)acetoxy)ethyl-4-(diphenylphosphanyl)benzoate, and [M(η(6)-p-cymene)Cl(N,N')][Cl], where N,N' is a bipyridine-based ligand, (4'-methyl-[2,2'-bipyridin]-4-yl)methyl-2-(1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetate), (4'-methyl-[2,2'-bipyridin]-4-yl)methyl-2-(2-((2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino)phenyl)acetate), (bis(2-(2-(1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetoxy)ethyl)[2,2'-bipyridine]-5,5'-dicarboxylate), or (bis(2-(2-(2-((2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino)phenyl)acetoxy)ethyl)[2,2'-bipyridine]-5,5'-dicarboxylate). The antiproliferative properties of the complexes were assessed in human ovarian cancer cells (A2780 and A2780cisR, the latter being resistant to cisplatin) and nontumorigenic human embryonic kidney (HEK-293) cells. Some of the complexes are considerably more cytotoxic than the original drugs and also display significant cancer cell selectivity. PMID:26824462

  17. Assay of Endocannabinoid Oxidation by Cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Kudalkar, Shalley N; Kingsley, Philip J; Marnett, Lawrence J

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoids, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and arachidonylethanolamide (AEA), are endogenous ligands for the cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2) and are implicated in a wide array of physiological processes. These neutral arachidonic acid (AA) derivatives have been identified as efficient substrates for the second isoform of the cyclooxygenase enzyme (COX-2). A diverse family of prostaglandin glycerol esters (PG-Gs) and prostaglandin ethanolamides (PG-EAs) is generated by the action of COX-2 (and downstream prostaglandin synthases) on 2-AG and AEA. As the biological importance of the endocannabinoid system becomes more apparent, there is a tremendous need for robust, sensitive, and efficient analytical methodology for the endocannabinoids and their metabolites. In this chapter, we describe methodology suitable for carrying out oxygenation of endocannabinoids by COX-2, and analysis of products of endocannabinoid oxygenation by COX-2 and of endocannabinoids themselves from in vitro and cell assays. PMID:27245906

  18. Anti-inflammatory and heme oxygenase-1 inducing activities of lanostane triterpenes isolated from mushroom Ganoderma lucidum in RAW264.7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Solip; Nguyen, Van Thu; Tae, Nara; Lee, Suhyun; Ryoo, Sungwoo; Min, Byung-Sun; Lee, Jeong-Hyung

    2014-11-01

    Ganoderma lucidum is a popular medicinal mushroom used in traditional medicine for preventing or treating a variety of diseases. In the present study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 inducing effects of 12 lanostane triterpenes from G. lucidum in RAW264.7 cells. Of these, seven triterpenes, butyl lucidenateE{sub 2}, butyl lucidenateD{sub 2} (GT-2), butyl lucidenate P, butyl lucidenateQ, Ganoderiol F, methyl ganodenate J and butyl lucidenate N induced HO-1 expression and suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production. Inhibiting HO-1 activity abrogated the inhibitory effects of these triterpenes on the production of NO in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, suggesting the involvement of HO-1 in the anti-inflammatory effects of these triterpenes. We further studied the anti-inflammatory and HO-1 inducing effects of GT-2. Mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors or N-acetylcysteine, an antioxidant, did not suppress GT-2-mediated HO-1 induction; however, LY294002, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, blocked GT-2-induced HO-1 mRNA and protein expression. GT-2 increased nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and knockdown of Nrf2 by small interfering RNA blocked GT-2-mediated HO-1 induction, suggesting that GT-2 induced HO-1 expression via the PI3K/AKT-Nrf2 pathway. Consistent with the notion that HO-1 has anti-inflammatory properties, GT-2 inhibited the production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 expression. These findings suggest that HO-1 inducing activities of these lanostane triterpenes may be important in the understanding of a novel mechanism for the anti-inflammatory activity of G. lucidum. - Highlights: • The anti-inflammatory effects of selected triterpenes from Ganoderma lucidum are demonstrated. • Heme oxygenase-1 induction is attributable to the anti-inflammatory properties of these

  19. Apparent tolerance of turkey vultures (Cathartes aura) to the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Whitehead, M.A.; Gasper, G.; Meteyer, C.U.; Link, W.A.; Taggart, M.A.; Meharg, A.A.; Pattee, O.H.; Pain, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac is extremely toxic to Old World Gyps vultures (median lethal dose 0.1?0.2 mg/kg), evoking visceral gout, renal necrosis, and mortality within a few days of exposure. Unintentional secondary poisoning of vultures that fed upon carcasses of diclofenac-treated livestock decimated populations in the Indian subcontinent. Because of the widespread use of diclofenac and other cyclooxygenase-2 inhibiting drugs, a toxicological study was undertaken in turkey vultures (Cathartes aura) as an initial step in examining sensitivity of New World scavenging birds. Two trials were conducted entailing oral gavage of diclofenac at doses ranging from 0.08 to 25 mg/kg body weight. Birds were observed for 7 d, blood samples were collected for plasma chemistry (predose and 12, 24, and 48 h and 7 d postdose), and select individuals were necropsied. Diclofenac failed to evoke overt signs of toxicity, visceral gout, renal necrosis, or elevate plasma uric acid at concentrations greater than 100 times the estimated median lethal dose reported for Gyps vultures. For turkey vultures receiving 8 or 25 mg/kg, the plasma half-life of diclofenac was estimated to be 6 h, and it was apparently cleared after several days as no residues were detectable in liver or kidney at necropsy. Differential sensitivity among avian species is a hallmark of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors, and despite the tolerance of turkey vultures to diclofenac, additional studies in related scavenging species seem warranted.

  20. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Haskap Cultivars is Polyphenols-Dependent.

    PubMed

    Rupasinghe, H P Vasantha; Boehm, Mannfred M A; Sekhon-Loodu, Satvir; Parmar, Indu; Bors, Bob; Jamieson, Andrew R

    2015-01-01

    Haskap (Lonicera caerulea L.) berries have long been used for their health promoting properties against chronic conditions. The current study investigated the effect of Canadian haskap berry extracts on pro-inflammatory cytokines using a human monocytic cell line THP-1 derived macrophages stimulated by lipopolysaccharide. Methanol extracts of haskap from different growing locations in Canada were prepared and characterized for their total phenolic profile using colorimetric assays and liquid chromatography-Mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Human THP-1 monocytes were seeded in 24-well plates (5 × 10⁵/well) and treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, 0.1 μg/mL) for 48 h to induce macrophage differentiation. After 48 h, the differentiated macrophages were washed with Hank's buffer and treated with various concentrations of test compounds for 4 h, followed by the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulation (18 h). Borealis cultivar showed the highest phenolic content, flavonoid content and anthocyanin content (p < 0.05). A negative correlation existed between the polyphenol concentration of the extracts and pro-inflammatory cytokines: Interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), prostaglandin (PGE2), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme. Borealis exhibited comparable anti-inflammatory effects to COX inhibitory drug, diclofenac. The results showed that haskap berry polyphenols has the potential to act as an effective inflammation inhibitor. PMID:26043379

  1. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Haskap Cultivars is Polyphenols-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Rupasinghe, H. P. Vasantha; Boehm, Mannfred M. A.; Sekhon-Loodu, Satvir; Parmar, Indu; Bors, Bob; Jamieson, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Haskap (Lonicera caerulea L.) berries have long been used for their health promoting properties against chronic conditions. The current study investigated the effect of Canadian haskap berry extracts on pro-inflammatory cytokines using a human monocytic cell line THP-1 derived macrophages stimulated by lipopolysaccharide. Methanol extracts of haskap from different growing locations in Canada were prepared and characterized for their total phenolic profile using colorimetric assays and liquid chromatography—Mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Human THP-1 monocytes were seeded in 24-well plates (5 × 105/well) and treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, 0.1 μg/mL) for 48 h to induce macrophage differentiation. After 48 h, the differentiated macrophages were washed with Hank’s buffer and treated with various concentrations of test compounds for 4 h, followed by the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulation (18 h). Borealis cultivar showed the highest phenolic content, flavonoid content and anthocyanin content (p < 0.05). A negative correlation existed between the polyphenol concentration of the extracts and pro-inflammatory cytokines: Interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), prostaglandin (PGE2), and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme. Borealis exhibited comparable anti-inflammatory effects to COX inhibitory drug, diclofenac. The results showed that haskap berry polyphenols has the potential to act as an effective inflammation inhibitor. PMID:26043379

  2. The anti-inflammatory effects of methylsulfonylmethane on lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory responses in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Hee; Kim, Dae Hwan; Lim, Hwan; Baek, Doo-Yeon; Shin, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Jin-Kyung

    2009-04-01

    Methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), also known as dimethyl sulfone and methyl sulfone, is an organic sulfur-containing compound that occurs naturally in a variety of fruits, vegetables, grains, and animals, including humans. In the present study, we demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects of MSM in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated murine macrophages, RAW264.7 cells. MSM significantly inhibited the release of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E(2) by alleviating the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, the levels of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were decreased by MSM treatment in cell culture supernatants. Further study indicated that the translocation of the p65 subunit of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB to the nucleus was inhibited by MSM treatment in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells, in which it helped block degradation of inhibitor of NF-kappaB. In addition, in vivo studies demonstrated that topical administration of MSM at 500-1250 microg/ear resulted in similar inhibitory activities in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-induced mouse ear edema. Collectively, theses results indicate that MSM inhibits LPS-induced release of pro-inflammatory mediators in murine macrophages through downregulation of NF-kappaB signaling. PMID:19336900

  3. Topical anti-inflammatory effects of isorhamnetin glycosides isolated from Opuntia ficus-indica.

    PubMed

    Antunes-Ricardo, Marilena; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A; Martínez-Vitela, Carlos; Serna-Saldívar, Sergio O

    2015-01-01

    Opuntia ficus-indica (OFI) has been widely used in Mexico as a food and for the treatment of different health disorders such as inflammation and skin aging. Its biological properties have been attributed to different phytochemicals such as the isorhamnetin glycosides which are the most abundant flavonoids. Moreover, these compounds are considered a chemotaxonomic characteristic of OFI species. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of OFI extract and its isorhamnetin glycosides on different inflammatory markers in vitro and in vivo. OFI extract was obtained by alkaline hydrolysis of OFI cladodes powder and pure compounds were obtained by preparative chromatography. Nitric oxide (NO), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, and interleukin- (IL-) 6 production were measured. NO production was tested in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells while in vivo studies were carried on croton oil-induced ear edema model. OFI extract and diglycoside isorhamnetin-glucosyl-rhamnoside (IGR) at 125 ng/mL suppressed the NO production in vitro (73.5 ± 4.8% and 68.7 ± 5.0%, resp.) without affecting cell viability. Likewise, IGR inhibited the ear edema (77.4 ± 5.7%) equating the indomethacin effects (69.5 ± 5.3%). Both IGR and OFI extract significantly inhibited the COX-2, TNF-α, and IL-6 production. IGR seems to be a suitable natural compound for development of new anti-inflammatory ingredient. PMID:25821823

  4. Topical Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Isorhamnetin Glycosides Isolated from Opuntia ficus-indica

    PubMed Central

    Antunes-Ricardo, Marilena; Gutiérrez-Uribe, Janet A.; Martínez-Vitela, Carlos; Serna-Saldívar, Sergio O.

    2015-01-01

    Opuntia ficus-indica (OFI) has been widely used in Mexico as a food and for the treatment of different health disorders such as inflammation and skin aging. Its biological properties have been attributed to different phytochemicals such as the isorhamnetin glycosides which are the most abundant flavonoids. Moreover, these compounds are considered a chemotaxonomic characteristic of OFI species. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of OFI extract and its isorhamnetin glycosides on different inflammatory markers in vitro and in vivo. OFI extract was obtained by alkaline hydrolysis of OFI cladodes powder and pure compounds were obtained by preparative chromatography. Nitric oxide (NO), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, and interleukin- (IL-) 6 production were measured. NO production was tested in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells while in vivo studies were carried on croton oil-induced ear edema model. OFI extract and diglycoside isorhamnetin-glucosyl-rhamnoside (IGR) at 125 ng/mL suppressed the NO production in vitro (73.5 ± 4.8% and 68.7 ± 5.0%, resp.) without affecting cell viability. Likewise, IGR inhibited the ear edema (77.4 ± 5.7%) equating the indomethacin effects (69.5 ± 5.3%). Both IGR and OFI extract significantly inhibited the COX-2, TNF-α, and IL-6 production. IGR seems to be a suitable natural compound for development of new anti-inflammatory ingredient. PMID:25821823

  5. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs during pregnancy and the initiation of lactation.

    PubMed

    Bloor, Melanie; Paech, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and aspirin, which are available as "over-the counter" medications in most countries, are widely used by both pregnant and lactating women. They are popular non-opioid analgesics for the treatment of pain after vaginal and operative delivery. In addition, NSAIDs are used for tocolysis in premature labor, and low-dose aspirin has a role in the prevention of preeclampsia and recurrent miscarriage in antiphospholipid syndrome. NSAIDs and aspirin may affect fertility and increase the risk of early pregnancy loss. In the second trimester their use is considered reasonably safe, but has been associated with fetal cryptorchism. In the third trimester, NSAIDs and aspirin are usually avoided because of significant fetal risks such as renal injury, oligohydramnios, constriction of the ductus arteriosus (with potential for persistent pulmonary hypertension in the newborn), necrotizing enterocolitis, and intracranial hemorrhage. Maternal administration or ingestion of most NSAIDs results in low infant exposure via breastmilk, such that both cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors are generally considered safe, and preferable to aspirin, when breastfeeding. PMID:23558845

  6. Implication of the anti-inflammatory bioactive lipid prostaglandin D2-glycerol ester in the control of macrophage activation and inflammation by ABHD6.

    PubMed

    Alhouayek, Mireille; Masquelier, Julien; Cani, Patrice D; Lambert, Didier M; Muccioli, Giulio G

    2013-10-22

    Proinflammatory macrophages are key mediators in several pathologies; thus, controlling their activation is necessary. The endocannabinoid system is implicated in various inflammatory processes. Here we show that in macrophages, the newly characterized enzyme α/β-hydrolase domain 6 (ABHD6) controls 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) levels and thus its pharmacological effects. Furthermore, we characterize a unique pathway mediating the effects of 2-AG through its oxygenation by cyclooxygenase-2 to give rise to the anti-inflammatory prostaglandin D2-glycerol ester (PGD2-G). Pharmacological blockade of cyclooxygenase-2 or of prostaglandin D synthase prevented the effects of increasing 2-AG levels by ABHD6 inhibition in vitro, as well as the 2-AG-induced increase in PGD2-G levels. Together, our data demonstrate the physiological relevance of the interaction between the endocannabinoid and prostanoid systems. Moreover, we show that ABHD6 inhibition in vivo allows for fine-tuning of 2-AG levels in mice, therefore reducing lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation, without the characteristic central side effects of strong increases in 2-AG levels obtained following monoacylglycerol lipase inhibition. In addition, administration of PGD2-G reduces lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in mice, thus confirming the biological relevance of this 2-AG metabolite. This points to ABHD6 as an interesting therapeutic target that should be relevant in treating inflammation-related conditions, and proposes PGD2-G as a bioactive lipid with potential anti-inflammatory properties in vivo. PMID:24101490

  7. Antioxidant and cyclooxygenase-2-inhibiting activity of 4,4'-biphenol, 2,2'-biphenol and phenol.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yukio; Ishii, Hiroaki; Hoshina, Syuhei; Takada, Naoki; Ueki, Ayako; Tanaka, Shoji; Kadoma, Yoshinori; Ito, Shigeru; Machino, Mamoru; Fujisawa, Seiichiro

    2009-06-01

    The anthropogenic substance 4,4'-biphenol and its analogues are estrogenic and cytotoxic. It has been previously found that synthesized ortho-dimers of phenolic compounds possess potent antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activity. To clarify the relationships between radical-scavenging and anti-inflammatory activities, the radical-scavenging activities of 4,4'-biphenol, 2,2'-biphenol and phenol were investigated by using differential scanning calorimetry to measure the induction period for polymerization of methyl methacrylate initiated by thermal decomposition of 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile. We also investigated tThe inhibitory effects of these compounds on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA and protein expression and on binding of activator-protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kappaB) to their respective consensus sequences were also investigated in RAW 264.7 cells. Furthermore, theoretical parameters such as phenolic-OH bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE) and ionization potential (IP(koopman)) were calculated at the density functional theory (DFT)/B3LYP levels. Cytotoxicity declined in the order 4,4'-biphenol > 2,2'-biphenol > phenol. 2,2'-Biphenol, but not 4,4'-biphenol, showed inhibitory effects on LPS-stimulated COX-2 expression and on AP-1 and NF-kappaB binding to their consensus sequences at 1-10 muM. Expression of COX-2 in RAW cells was enhanced by 4,4'-biphenol plus LPS, possibly because of radical-mediated transformation of 4,4'-biphenol to the cytotoxic diphenylquinone, as judged by the stoichiometric factor (n value) of 3.429 and low IP(koopman) value of this biphenol. In contrast, the anti-inflammatory activity of 2,2'-biphenol may be the result of the formation of a dimer derived from oxidation of this compound, as suggested by its n value close to 1. Phenol showed anti-inflammatory activity but did not completely inhibit COX-2 expression, even at higher concentrations. PMID:19528508

  8. Noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) Fruit Extracts Improve Colon Microflora and Exert Anti-Inflammatory Activities in Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsin-Lun; Liu, Cheng-Tzu; Chou, Ming-Chih; Ko, Chien-Hui; Wang, Chin-Kun

    2015-06-01

    Intestinal microflora and inflammation are associated with the risk of inflammatory bowel diseases. Noni (Morinda citrifolia L.) has various bioactivities, but its effect on colon health remains unknown. This study focused on the effects of fermented noni fruit extracts on colon microflora and inflammation of colon epithelial cells. The anti-inflammatory activities of ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts on Caco-2 cells were evaluated including interleukin-8 (IL-8) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The growth of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species was promoted by ethanol extract. Ethyl acetate extract decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species and significantly suppressed COX-2, IL-8, and prostaglandin E2 production and neutrophil chemotaxis by suppressing the translocation of the p65 subunit. Quercetin was the main contributor to the anti-inflammatory activity. The fermented noni fruit promoted probiotic growths and downregulated the intracellular oxidation and inflammation in Caco-2 cells. These results suggest that fermented noni fruit might protect against inflammatory diseases of the colon. PMID:25651187

  9. Synthesis and biological evaluation of boswellic acid-NSAID hybrid molecules as anti-inflammatory and anti-arthritic agents.

    PubMed

    Shenvi, Suvarna; Kiran, K R; Kumar, Krishna; Diwakar, Latha; Reddy, G Chandrasekara

    2015-06-15

    Methyl esters of the β-boswellic acid (BA) and 11-keto-β-boswellic acid (KBA) obtained from Boswellia serrata resin were subjected to Steglich esterification with the different non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) viz., ibuprofen, naproxen, diclophenac and indomethacin. The novel hybrids of methyl boswellate (5-8) and that of methyl 11-keto boswellate (9-12) were evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity by carrageenan-induced rat hind paw edema model and anti-arthritic activity by Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) induced arthritis in Wister albino rat. Significant inhibition on carrageenan-induced paw edema has been observed with 5, 6 and 10 where as in CFA induced rats, hybrids 5, 8, 9 and 12 exhibited pronounced antiarthritic activity. Hybrid molecules 5 and 9 have been found to be more effective in inhibiting in-vivo COX-2 than ibuprofen by itself, thus showing the synergistic effect. Hybrid 5 and 9 tested for in-vitro lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase-2 (LOX/COX-2) inhibitory activity. The studies revealed that both 5 and 9 inhibited COX-2 relatively better than LOX enzyme. PMID:26010018

  10. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Rosa rugosa Flower Extract in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated RAW264.7 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Tursun, Xirali; Zhao, Yongxin; Talat, Zulfiya; Xin, Xuelei; AdilaTursun; Abdulla, Rahima; AkberAisa, Haji

    2016-01-01

    Rosa rugosa Thunb, a deciduous shrub of the genus Rosa, has been widely used to treat stomach aches, diarrhoea, pain, and chronic inflammatory disease in eastern Asia. In recent years, our research team has extensively studied the Rosa rugosa flower extract, and specifically undertook pharmacological experiments which have optimized the extraction process. Our methods have yielded a standard extract enriched in phenolic compounds, named PRE. Herein, we expand our efforts and evaluated the anti-inflammatory activity of PRE on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation in RAW 264.7 macrophages. PRE significantly inhibited production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-a, interleukin (IL)-6, and interleukin 1β (IL-1β), as well as expression of their synthesizing enzymes, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase2 (COX-2). Furthermore, PRE inhibited activity of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) as well as nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway. Our findings are the first to explain the anti-inflammatory mechanism by PRE in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Given these results, we propose that PRE has therapeutic potential in the prevention of inflammatory disorders. PMID:26797110

  11. Anti-inflammatory effects of glaucocalyxin B in microglia cells.

    PubMed

    Gan, Ping; Zhang, Li; Chen, Yanke; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Fali; Zhou, Xiang; Zhang, Xiaohu; Gao, Bo; Zhen, Xuechu; Zhang, Jian; Zheng, Long Tai

    2015-05-01

    Over-activated microglia is involved in various kinds of neurodegenerative process including Parkinson, Alzheimer and HIV dementia. Suppression of microglial over activation has emerged as a novel strategy for treatment of neuroinflammation-based neurodegeneration. In the current study, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects of the ent-kauranoid diterpenoids, which were isolated from the aerial parts of Rabdosia japonica (Burm. f.) var. glaucocalyx (Maxim.) Hara, were investigated in cultured microglia cells. Glaucocalyxin B (GLB), one of five ent-kauranoid diterpenoids, significantly decreased the generation of nitric oxide (NO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated microglia cells. In addition, GLB inhibited activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in LPS-activated microglia cells. Furthermore, GLB strongly induced the expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 in BV-2 microglia cells. Finally, GLB exhibited neuroprotective effect by preventing over-activated microglia induced neurotoxicity in a microglia/neuron co-culture model. Taken together, the present study demonstrated that the GLB possesses anti-nueroinflammatory activity, and might serve as a potential therapeutic agent for treating neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:26003084

  12. Anti-inflammatory and anti-granuloma activity of Berberis aristata DC. in experimental models of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rohit; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar; Singh, Surender

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Berberis aristata (Berberidaceae) is an important medicinal plant used in traditional system of medicine for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory disorders. The aim of the present study is to scientifically validate the traditional use of BA in the treatment of inflammatory disorders. Materials and Methods: Anti-inflammatory and anti-granuloma activity of BA hydroalcoholic extract (BAHE) were evaluated in experimental models, viz., carrageenan-induced paw edema, cotton pellet-induced granuloma formation, and complete Freund's adjuvant-induced stimulation of peritoneal macrophages in rats. Expression of inflammatory mediators, viz., tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, TNF-R1, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was carried out in serum and peritoneal macrophages to derive the plausible mechanism of BAHE in activated peritoneal macrophages. Results: Pretreatment with BAHE produced a dose-dependent reduction (P < 0.01) in carrageenan-induced paw edema and cotton pellet-induced granuloma model. BAHE treatment produced significant (P < 0.01) reduction in serum inflammatory cytokine levels as compared to control. Protein expression of pro-inflammatory markers, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-R1, and COX-2, was found to be reduced in stimulated macrophages whereas anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, was upregulated in peritoneal macrophages. Conclusion: The result of the present study thus demonstrates the anti-inflammatory and anti-granuloma activity of BAHE which may be attributed to its inhibitory activity on macrophage-derived cytokine and mediators. PMID:27114638

  13. Anti-inflammatory potential of peat moss extracts in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woo-Suk; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kim, Sung Ok; Kim, Gi-Young; Kim, Byung-Woo; Kim, Cheol Min; Seo, Yong-Bae; Kim, Woe-Yeon; Lee, Sang-Yeol; Jo, Kwon-Ho; Choi, Young Ju; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Gun-Do

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects of peat moss aqueous extract (PME) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. To demonstrate the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of PME, the levels of nitric oxide (NO) and cytokines were measured using Griess reagent and cytokine ELISA kits, respectively. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis were conducted to evaluate the expression of genes and proteins. Immunofluorescence was used to measure the expression and translocation of transcription factors. Pre-treatment with PME inhibited the production of prostaglandin E(2) and NO by suppressing the gene expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and inducible NO synthase, respectively. The LPS-stimulated gene expression and the production of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β were significantly reduced by PME. In the LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells, nuclear factor‑κB (NF-κB) translocated from the cytosol to the nucleus, while pre-treatment with PME induced the sequestration of NF-κB in the cytosol through the inhibition of IκBα degradation. In the same manner, PME contributed to the inhibition of the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases. In addition, the PME-treated RAW 264.7 cells facilitated the activation of nuclear factor-like 2 (Nrf2) , and in turn, enhanced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression. These results indicate that PME exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects, and suggest that PME may neutralize inflammation and prevent cellular damage by oxidative stress. PMID:25109657

  14. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential of hesperetin metabolites obtained from hesperetin-administered rat serum: an ex vivo approach.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsin-Ling; Chen, Ssu-Ching; Senthil Kumar, K J; Yu, Kang-Ni; Lee Chao, Pei-Dawn; Tsai, Shang-Yuan; Hou, Yu-Chi; Hseu, You-Cheng

    2012-01-11

    In recent years much attention has been focused on the pharmaceutical relevance of bioflavonoids, especially hesperidin and its aglycon hesperetin in terms of their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory actions. However, the bioactivity of their metabolites, the real molecules in vivo hesperetin glucuronides/sulfates produced after ingestion, has been poorly understood. Thus, the study using an ex vivo approach is aimed to compare the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of hesperidin/hesperetin or hesperetin metabolites derived from hesperetin-administered rat serum. We found that hesperetin metabolites (2.5-20 μM) showed higher antioxidant activity against various oxidative systems, including superoxide anion scavenging, reducing power, and metal chelating effects, than that of hesperidin or hesperetin. The data also showed that pretreatment of hesperetin metabolites (1-10 μM) within the range of physiological concentrations, compared to hesperetin, significantly inhibited nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production, as evidenced by the inhibition of their precursors, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein levels without appreciable cytotoxicity on LPS-activated RAW264.7 macrophages or A7r5 smooth muscle cells. Concomitantly, hesperetin metabolites dose-dependently inhibited LPS-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, hesperetin metabolites significantly downregulate LPS-induced nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation followed by the suppression of inhibitor-κB (I-κB) degradation and phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase1/2 (JNK1/2) and p38 MAPKs after challenge with LPS. Hesperetin metabolites ex vivo showed potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity in comparison with hesperidin/hesperetin. PMID:22098419

  15. Group V Secretory Phospholipase A2 Amplifies the Induction of Cyclooxygenase 2 and Delayed Prostaglandin D2 Generation in Mouse Bone Marrow Culture-Derived Mast Cells in a Strain-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Bruno L.; Satake, Yoshiyuki; Kikawada, Eriya; Balestrieri, Barbara; Arm, Jonathan P.

    2006-01-01

    Activation of bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) with stem cell factor (SCF) or IgE and antigen elicits exocytosis and an immediate phase of prostaglandin (PG) D2 and leukotriene (LT) C4 generation. Activation of BMMC by SCF, IL-1β and IL-10 elicits a delayed phase of PGD2 generation dependent on cyclooxygenase (COX) 2 induction. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 α provides arachidonic acid in both phases and amplifies COX-2 induction. Pharmacological experiments implicate an amplifying role for secretory (s) PLA2. We used mice lacking the gene encoding group V sPLA2 (Pla2g5 −/−) to definitively test its role in eicosanoid generation by BMMC. Pla2g5 −/− BMMC on a C57BL/6 genetic background showed a modest reduction in exocytosis and immediate PGD2 generation after activation with SCF or with IgE and antigen, while LTC4 generation was not modified. Delayed-phase PGD2 generation and COX-2 induction were reduced ~35% in C57BL/6 Pla2g5 −/− BMMC and were restored by exogenous PGE2. There was no deficit in either phase of eicosanoid generation by Pla2g5 −/− BMMC on a BALB/c background. Thus, group V sPLA2 amplifies COX-2 expression and delayed phase PGD2 generation in a strain-dependent manner; it has at best a limited role in immediate eicosanoid generation by BMMC. PMID:17064958

  16. Cannabinoid-like anti-inflammatory compounds from flax fiber.

    PubMed

    Styrczewska, Monika; Kulma, Anna; Ratajczak, Katarzyna; Amarowicz, Ryszard; Szopa, Jan

    2012-09-01

    Flax is a valuable source of fibers, linseed and oil. The compounds of the latter two products have already been widely examined and have been proven to possess many health-beneficial properties. In the course of analysis of fibers extract from previously generated transgenic plants overproducing phenylpropanoids a new terpenoid compound was discovered.The UV spectra and the retention time in UPLC analysis of this new compound reveal similarity to a cannabinoid-like compound, probably cannabidiol (CBD). This was confirmed by finding two ions at m/z 174.1 and 231.2 in mass spectra analysis. Further confirmation of the nature of the compound was based on a biological activity assay. It was found that the compound affects the expression of genes involved in inflammatory processes in mouse and human fibroblasts and likely the CBD from Cannabis sativa activates the specific peripheral cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) gene expression. Besides fibers, the compound was also found in all other flax tissues. It should be pointed out that the industrial process of fabric production does not affect CBD activity.The presented data suggest for the first time that flax products can be a source of biologically active cannabinoid-like compounds that are able to influence the cell immunological response. These findings might open up many new applications for medical flax products, especially for the fabric as a material for wound dressing with anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:22706678

  17. Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Pinus roxburghii Sarg.

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Dhirender; Kumar, Ajay; Kaushik, Pawan; Rana, A. C.

    2012-01-01

    The Chir Pine, Pinus roxburghii, named after William Roxburgh, is a pine native to the Himalaya. Pinus roxburghii Sarg. (Pinaceae) is traditionally used for several medicinal purposes in India. As the oil of the plant is extensively used in number of herbal preparation for curing inflammatory disorders, the present study was undertaken to assess analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of its bark extract. Dried and crushed leaves of Pinus roxburghii Sarg. were defatted with petroleum ether and then extracted with alcohol. The alcoholic extract at the doses of 100 mg/kg, 300 mg/kg, and 500 mg/kg body weight was subjected to evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in experimental animal models. Analgesic activity was evaluated by acetic acid-induced writhing and tail immersion tests in Swiss albino mice; acute and chronic anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by carrageenan-induced paw oedema and cotton pellet granuloma in Wistar albino rats. Diclofenac sodium and indomethacin were employed as reference drugs for analgesic and anti-inflammatory studies, respectively. In the present study, the alcoholic bark extract of Pinus roxburghii Sarg. demonstrated significant analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities in the tested models. PMID:22761611

  18. Modeling Natural Anti-Inflammatory Compounds by Molecular Topology

    PubMed Central

    Galvez-Llompart, María; Zanni, Riccardo; García-Domenech, Ramón

    2011-01-01

    One of the main pharmacological problems today in the treatment of chronic inflammation diseases consists of the fact that anti-inflammatory drugs usually exhibit side effects. The natural products offer a great hope in the identification of bioactive lead compounds and their development into drugs for treating inflammatory diseases. Computer-aided drug design has proved to be a very useful tool for discovering new drugs and, specifically, Molecular Topology has become a good technique for such a goal. A topological-mathematical model, obtained by linear discriminant analysis, has been developed for the search of new anti-inflammatory natural compounds. An external validation obtained with the remaining compounds (those not used in building up the model), has been carried out. Finally, a virtual screening on natural products was performed and 74 compounds showed actual anti-inflammatory activity. From them, 54 had been previously described as anti-inflammatory in the literature. This can be seen as a plus in the model validation and as a reinforcement of the role of Molecular Topology as an efficient tool for the discovery of new anti-inflammatory natural compounds. PMID:22272145

  19. Anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of Daphne retusa Hemsl.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaojia; Jin, Huizi; Xu, Wenzheng; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Xiaohua; Yan, Shikai; Chen, Ming; Li, Jianqiang; Zhang, Wei-dong

    2008-10-30

    Daphne retusa Hemsl. belongs to the genus Daphne, a member of Thymelaeaceae family. The barks and stems of Daphne retusa are used as a folkloric medicine 'Zhu Shi Ma' in Western China because of its effects of detumescence and acesodyne. In this paper, we investigate the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects of the 75% ethanol extract of the stems and barks of Daphne retusa and different fractions partitioned with petroleum ether, methylene chloride, ethyl acetate and n-butanol, respectively. The anti-inflammatory effects were evaluated using xylene-induced ear oedema in mice and carrageenan-induced paw oedema in rats, while the acetic acid-induced writhing test and hot-plate test as models for evaluating the centrally and peripherally analgesic activity. The results showed the plant has significant anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects (P<0.05-0.01). Meanwhile, the result of the acute toxicity test at which the MTD was above 5g/kg indicates that the plant extract is relatively safe in, and/or non-toxic to, mice. The findings of these experimental animal studies indicate that the Daphne retusa ethanol extract possesses anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties, and thus provide pharmacological support to folkloric, ethnomedical uses of 'Zhu shima' in the treatment and/of management of anti-inflammatory and painful conditions in China. PMID:18692124

  20. Hesperetin derivatives: Synthesis and anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian-Qian; Shi, Jing-Bo; Chen, Chen; Huang, Cheng; Tang, Wen-Jian; Li, Jun

    2016-03-01

    Sixteen novel hesperetin derivatives containing Mannich base moiety were designed and synthesized and their anti-inflammatory activities were evaluated by inhibiting tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in mouse RAW264.7 macrophages. Compounds 3a-3k showed better hydrophilic, while compounds 3l-3p with aromatic groups was hydrophobic. The anti-inflammatory activity of title compounds was correlated with logP values, among them, compounds 3c, 3e and 3i with minus logP values exhibited best anti-inflammatory activity through decreasing both IL-6 and TNF-α. Furthermore, the expression of LPS-induced notch1 and inos was reduced by compounds 3c, 3e, and 3i, and compound 3e attenuated LPS-induced inos protein levels in a dose-dependent manner. PMID:26848111

  1. Anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic neoflavonoids and benzofurans from Pterocarpus santalinus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shou-Fang; Chang, Fang-Rong; Wang, Sheng-Yang; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Lee, Chia-Lin; Chen, Shu-Li; Wu, Chin-Chung; Wu, Yang-Chang

    2011-05-27

    Five new benzofurans, pterolinuses A-E (1-5), six new neoflavonoids, pterolinuses F-J (8-13), and five known compounds (6, 7, 14-16) were isolated from an extract of Pterocarpus santalinus heartwood. All new structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods, and configurations were confirmed by CD spectral data and optical rotation values. The isolates were evaluated for anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities. Six compounds (1, 2, 4, 6, 7, and 15) showed significant inhibition in at least one anti-inflammatory assay. Compound 2 showed the best selective effect against superoxide anion generation in human neutrophils with, an IC50 value of 0.19 μg/mL, and was 6.2-fold more potent than the positive control LY294002. Compound 14 showed the highest cytotoxicity against Ca9-22 cancer cells, with an IC50 value of 0.46 μg/mL. PMID:21488654

  2. Observing Anti-inflammatory and Anti-nociceptive Activities of Glycyrrhizin Through Regulating COX-2 and Pro-inflammatory Cytokines Expressions in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Ling; Li, Yu-Xiang; Niu, Ya-Ting; Zheng, Jie; Wu, Jing; Shi, Guang-Jiang; Ma, Lin; Niu, Yang; Sun, Tao; Yu, Jian-Qiang

    2015-12-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the potential anti-inflammatory and anti-nociceptive activities of glycyrrhizin (GL) in mice and to explore the possible related mechanisms. Xylene-induced ear edema, carrageenan-induced paw edema and acetic acid-induced vascular permeability test were used to investigate the anti-inflammatory activities of GL in mice. Anti-nociceptive effects of GL were assessed by using acetic acid-induced writhing, hot plate test and formalin test, as well as evaluation of spontaneous locomotor activity and motor performance. The mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as TNF-α, IL-6 and iNOS) and the protein expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) were explored by using real-time fluorogenic PCR and Western blot, respectively. The results showed that GL significantly reduced xylene-induced ear edema, carrageenan-induced paw edema, and acetic acid-induced vascular permeation. Additionally, GL significantly inhibited the nociceptions induced by acetic acid and formalin. However, the nociceptions could not be decreased by GL in the hot plate test, and GL did not affect spontaneous locomotor activity and motor performance. The expression levels of TNF-α, IL-6, iNOS and COX-2 were significantly downregulated by GL. In conclusion, GL exerts significant anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities by attenuating the expression levels of TNF-α, IL-6, iNOS and COX-2. PMID:26178479

  3. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of 1,3,5,7-Tetrahydroxy-8-isoprenylxanthone Isolated from Twigs of Garcinia esculenta on Stimulated Macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dan-Dan; Zhang, Hong; Lao, Yuan-zhi; Wu, Rong; Xu, Jin-wen; Murad, Ferid; Bian, Ka; Xu, Hong-Xi

    2015-01-01

    Garcinia Linn. plants having rich natural xanthones and benzophenones with anti-inflammatory activity attracted a great deal of attention to discover and develop them as potential drug candidates. Through screening targeting nitric oxide accumulation in stimulated macrophage, we found that 1,3,5,7-tetrahydroxy-8-isoprenylxanthone (TIE) had potential anti-inflammatory effect. To understand how TIE elicits its anti-inflammatory activity, we uncovered that it significantly inhibits the production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in LPS/IFNγ-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. In further study, we showed that TIE reduced the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), two key molecules responsible for the production of NO and PGE2 during inflammation progress. Additionally, TIE also suppressed the expression of inflammatory cytokines IL-6, IL-12, and TNF-α. TIE-led suppression in iNOS, COX-2, and cytokines production were probably the consequence of TIE's capability to block ERK and p38MAPK signaling pathway. Moreover, TIE blocked activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) as well as NF-κB regulation of miR155 expression. Our study suggests that TIE may represent as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:26538826

  4. Anti-inflammatory effects of apigenin in lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory in acute lung injury by suppressing COX-2 and NF-kB pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Yu-Tao; Xiao, Lu; Zhu, Lingpeng; Wang, Qiujuan; Yan, Tianhua

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate the possible mechanisms responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of apigenin lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory in acute lung injury. In this study, the anti-inflammatory effects of apigenin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury (ALI) in mice and the possible mechanisms involved in this protection were investigated. Pretreatment with apigenin prior to the administration of intratracheal LPS significantly induced a decrease in lung wet weight/dry weight ratio in total leukocyte number and neutrophil percent in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and in IL-6 and IL-1β, the tumor neurosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the BALF. These results showed that anti-inflammatory effects of apigenin against the LPS-induced ALI may be due to its ability of primary inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene expression and nuclear factor kB (NF-kB) gene expression of lung. The results presented here suggest that the protective mechanism of apigenin may be attributed partly to decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines through the inhibition of COX-2 and NF-kB activation. The results support that use of apigenin is beneficial in the treatment of ALI. PMID:24958013

  5. Anti-inflammatory effects of Lactobacillus brevis K65 on RAW 264.7 cells and in mice with dextran sulphate sodium-induced ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y-W; Ong, W-K; Su, Y-W; Hsu, C-C; Cheng, T-H; Tsai, Y-C

    2016-06-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) with anti-inflammatory effects may be beneficial to the prevention or treatment for inflammation-related diseases, such as inflammatory bowel diseases. In an in vitro assay, heat-killed Lactobacillus brevis K65 (K65) reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced production of nitric oxide, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and prostaglandin E2 in RAW 264.7 cells. In RAW 264.7 cells stably expressing an ind=ucible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) reporter, viable K65 showed greater inhibition of iNOS production than its heat-killed form. In order to further examine the in vivo anti-inflammatory effect of K65, viable K65 was orally administered to BALB/c mice before and during the period of dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced ulcerative colitis (UC). K65 improved UC symptoms, including reduced the levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-1β, and lowered the activity of myeloperoxidase. Furthermore, K65 inhibited TNF-α, cyclo-oxygenase 2, forkhead box P3, and Toll-like receptor 4 mRNA expression in the colonic tissue of DSS-induced UC mice. Taken together, K65, a LAB with in vitro anti-inflammatory activity showed preventive effects on mice with DSS-induced UC by lowering the expression of inflammatory molecules. PMID:26925602

  6. Kalanchosine dimalate, an anti-inflammatory salt from Kalanchoe brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Costa, Sônia Soares; de Souza, Maria de Lourdes Mendes; Ibrahim, Tereza; de Melo, Giany Oliveira; de Almeida, Ana Paula; Guette, Catherine; Férézou, Jean-Pierre; Koatz, Vera Lucia G

    2006-05-01

    This report describes the isolation and characterization of kalanchosine dimalate (KMC), an anti-inflammatory salt from the fresh juice of the aerial parts of Kalanchoe brasiliensis. KMC comprises the new metabolite kalanchosine (1) and malic acid (2) in a 1:2 stoichiometric ratio. Kalanchosine (1), 3,6-diamino-4,5-dihydroxyoctanedioic acid, is the first naturally occurring dimeric bis(gamma-hydroxy-beta-amino acid) and is at least partially responsible for the anti-inflammatory properties of K. brasiliensis. PMID:16724848

  7. [Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Valha, P; Zmrhal, J; Feyereisl, J

    2010-02-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, usually abbreviated to NSAIDs, are drugs with analgesic, antipyretic (lowering an elevated body temperature and relieving pain without impairing consciousness) and, in higher doses, with anti-inflammatory effects (reducing inflammation). As inhibitors of cyclooxygenase NSAIDs given during pregnancy have the potential to cause adverse maternal and fetal effects. Maternal effects include prolongation of pregnancy and labour, whereas constriction of the ductus arteriosus, renal dysfunction and haemostatic abnormalities can occur in the fetus and neonate. As weak acids, NSAIDs are excreted in small amounts into human breast milk with little risk for adverse effects in the suckling infant. PMID:20437842

  8. Vasoconstrictor and the anti-inflammatory effects of 7 corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Crijns, M B; Nater, J P; van Oostveen, F; van der Valk, P G

    1984-08-01

    The vasoconstrictor effect of 7 proprietary corticosteroid creams was compared with their effect on patches of allergic contact dermatitis provoked by patch testing in 20 subjects. A parallel between the blanching effect on the normal skin and the anti-inflammatory effect on the eczematous skin was generally found. A modified patch test method using the Finn chamber technique is described, which (with certain restrictions) offers an opportunity of studying the anti-inflammatory effect of corticosteroids on allergic dermatitis under standard conditions. PMID:6488765

  9. Colitis caused by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, S.; Keat, A. C.; Keat, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    Four cases of acute proctocolitis associated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug therapy are presented. The drugs implicated were flufenamic acid, mefenamic acid, naproxen and ibuprofen. After resolution of symptoms and signs of proctocolitis three of the four patients were subsequently rechallenged with the implicated drug: in each there was a rapid relapse. PMID:3774712

  10. The Use of Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calabrese, Leonard H.; Rooney, Theodore W.

    1986-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of the mechanism of action and clinical pharmacology of the new nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can help practitioners decide which to use and how to administer them. Indications for and effects of NSAIDs are described. (MT)

  11. Marine Diterpenoids as Potential Anti-Inflammatory Agents.

    PubMed

    González, Yisett; Torres-Mendoza, Daniel; Jones, Gillian E; Fernandez, Patricia L

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory response is a highly regulated process, and its dysregulation can lead to the establishment of chronic inflammation and, in some cases, to death. Inflammation is the cause of several diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, multiple sclerosis, and asthma. The search for agents inhibiting inflammation is a great challenge as the inflammatory response plays an important role in the defense of the host to infections. Marine invertebrates are exceptional sources of new natural products, and among those diterpenoids secondary metabolites exhibit notable anti-inflammatory properties. Novel anti-inflammatory diterpenoids, exclusively produced by marine organisms, have been identified and synthetic molecules based on those structures have been obtained. The anti-inflammatory activity of marine diterpenoids has been attributed to the inhibition of Nuclear Factor-κB activation and to the modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism. However, more research is necessary to describe the mechanisms of action of these secondary metabolites. This review is a compilation of marine diterpenoids, mainly isolated from corals, which have been described as potential anti-inflammatory molecules. PMID:26538822

  12. Glycosaminoglycan analogs as a novel anti-inflammatory strategy

    PubMed Central

    Severin, India C.; Soares, Adriano; Hantson, Jennifer; Teixeira, Mauro; Sachs, Daniela; Valognes, Delphine; Scheer, Alexander; Schwarz, Matthias K.; Wells, Timothy N. C.; Proudfoot, Amanda E. I.; Shaw, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Heparin, a glycosaminoglycan (GAG), has both anti-inflammatory and anti-coagulant properties. The clinical use of heparin against inflammation, however, has been limited by concerns about increased bleeding. While the anti-coagulant activity of heparin is well understood, its anti-inflammatory properties are less so. Heparin is known to bind to certain cytokines, including chemokines, small proteins which mediate inflammation through their control of leukocyte migration and activation. Molecules which can interrupt the chemokine-GAG interaction without inhibiting coagulation could therefore, represent a new class of anti-inflammatory agents. In the present study, two approaches were undertaken, both focusing on the heparin-chemokine relationship. In the first, a structure based strategy was used: after an initial screening of potential small molecule binders using protein NMR on a target chemokine, binding molecules were optimized through structure-based design. In the second approach, commercially available short oligosaccharides were polysulfated. In vitro, these molecules prevented chemokine-GAG binding and chemokine receptor activation without disrupting coagulation. However, in vivo, these compounds caused variable results in a murine peritoneal recruitment assay, with a general increase of cell recruitment. In more disease specific models, such as antigen-induced arthritis and delayed-type hypersensitivity, an overall decrease in inflammation was noted, suggesting that the primary anti-inflammatory effect may also involve factors beyond the chemokine system. PMID:23087686

  13. Marine Diterpenoids as Potential Anti-Inflammatory Agents

    PubMed Central

    González, Yisett; Torres-Mendoza, Daniel; Jones, Gillian E.; Fernandez, Patricia L.

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory response is a highly regulated process, and its dysregulation can lead to the establishment of chronic inflammation and, in some cases, to death. Inflammation is the cause of several diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, multiple sclerosis, and asthma. The search for agents inhibiting inflammation is a great challenge as the inflammatory response plays an important role in the defense of the host to infections. Marine invertebrates are exceptional sources of new natural products, and among those diterpenoids secondary metabolites exhibit notable anti-inflammatory properties. Novel anti-inflammatory diterpenoids, exclusively produced by marine organisms, have been identified and synthetic molecules based on those structures have been obtained. The anti-inflammatory activity of marine diterpenoids has been attributed to the inhibition of Nuclear Factor-κB activation and to the modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism. However, more research is necessary to describe the mechanisms of action of these secondary metabolites. This review is a compilation of marine diterpenoids, mainly isolated from corals, which have been described as potential anti-inflammatory molecules. PMID:26538822

  14. The present status of anti-inflammatory agents in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Stüttgen, G

    1988-01-01

    Many classes of drugs exert anti-inflammatory activity through mechanisms which affect all or part of the inflammatory process. Some of these agents are beneficial in the practice of dermatology, while others, such as penicillamine, mast cell blockers and serotonin antagonists, find little or no application. Corticosteroids, for example, are nonspecific in their anti-inflammatory effects and remain a mainstay of therapy, despite their side effect profile. Other drugs, such as the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents or gold, can be used in the treatment of diseases associated with rheumatic or autoimmune states. Moreover, antihistamines play an important role in the control of itching, but are mainly indicated in controlling non-dermatological allergic sequelae. Interestingly, chloroquine and dapsone, which were originally developed for use in malaria prophylaxis and leprosy, respectively, have value in treating a wide range of dermatological conditions via mechanisms which include the inhibition of P-450 isoenzymes. In diseases characterised by disturbed cornification (e.g. psoriasis pustulosa), retinoids are of particular value. These drugs are thought to act by inhibition of collagenases, proteases and granulocyte migration. Undoubtedly, further investigation of drug classes such as oxygen radical controllers and immunomodulators will clarify their mechanisms and establish their therapeutic usefulness among the anti-inflammatory agents now available for dermatological use. PMID:3076131

  15. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Specific Cyclooxygenase 2,5-Lipoxygenase, and Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitors on Experimental Autoimmune Anterior Uveitis (EAAU)

    PubMed Central

    Bora, Nalini S.; Sohn, Jeong-Hyeon; Bora, Puran S.; Kaplan, Henry J.; Kulkarni, Prasad

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Inflammation, in general, causes the release of a variety of inflammatory mediators that in turn induce cyclooxygenase (COX) 2, nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and 5-lipoxygense (LP) synthesis, producing large amounts of inflammatory prostaglandins (PG), nitric oxide (NO), and leukotriene (LT) B4. Therefore, inhibition of these enzymes may abrogate intraocular inflammation in experimental autoimmune anterior uveitis (EAAU). Methods Lewis rats were immunized with melanin-associated antigen (MAA) isolated from bovine iris and ciliary body. These animals were divided into three groups. The first group of rats received subcutaneous injection of COX 2 inhibitor CS 236 at different time points. The second and third groups of animals received subcutaneous aminoguanidine (AG), an iNOS inhibitor, and nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a 5-LP inhibitor, respectively. Control animals received vehicle. Rat eyes were examined daily by slit-lamp biomicroscopy from Day 7 to 30 post injection for uveitis. Animals were also sacrificed at various time points for histologic analysis. Results Control animals developed severe EAAU in both eyes. The disease started in these animals on Day 12 post immunization and lasted for ten days. Interestingly, CS 236, a potent COX 2 inhibitor, completely abrogated EAAU when the animals were treated daily from the Day 0 to 14 or Day 0 to 20 after MAA injection. Furthermore, daily CS 236 treatment after the onset of EAAU (Day 14–20) significantly reduced the severity (both clinical and histologic) of EAAU and shortened the duration of disease. iNOS inhibitor (AG) and 5-LP inhibitor (NDGA) partially attenuated EAAU. Conclusions Our results show that EAAU was partially attenuated by AG and NDGA. Interestingly, CS 236, a potent COX 2 inhibitor, completely inhibited EAAU in male Lewis rats most likely by inhibiting the initial phase and onset of the disease. PMID:16019677

  16. Bioengineered Colorectal Cancer Drugs: Orally Delivered Anti-Inflammatory Agents.

    PubMed

    Urbanska, Aleksandra Malgorzata; Zhang, Xiaoying; Prakash, Satya

    2015-07-01

    Intestinal inflammation is one of the major factors that increase colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence worldwide. Inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract is directly linked to tumor development at the early stages of the disease, thus a key issue toward the prevention and the treatment of colonic neoplasia. Thus, the use of anti-inflammatory drugs has emerged first as a strategy to reduce chronic inflammation in case of many inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), but it has proven its efficacy by reducing the risk of colonic neoplasia. This comprehensive review highlights the role of chronic inflammation, mainly in IBD, in the development of CRC including molecular and immune mechanisms that have tumorigenic effects. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that several bioactive and phytochemical compounds used as anti-inflammatory drugs have also antitumoral attributes. The uses of orally delivered cytokines and small molecules, as well as key dietary supplementation as anti-inflammatory therapeutics are discussed. In addition, comprehensive knowledge about CRC and intestinal inflammation, and the importance of the intestinal mucosal wall as a mucosal immunological barrier that comes into play during interactions with gut microbiota (pathogens and commensal), luminal secretions (bile acids, and bacterial and epithelial metabolites), and ingested chemicals (food components, high fat content, heterocyclic amines, and low intake of dietary fiber) are underscored. The multifunctionality of several anti-inflammatory drugs opens a line for their application in the treatment and prevention not only in IBD but also in CRC. Current bioengineering approaches for oral delivery of anti-inflammatory agents including cytokines, genetically modified bacteria, or small molecule inhibitors of inflammation directly contribute to the early management of CRC. Limitations of the current therapeutics, which stem from the lack of complete understanding of the complex molecular interactions

  17. Boswellia carterii liquisolid systems with promoted anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, Dina Mahmoud; Ammar, Nagwa Mohammed; Abd El-Alim, Sameh Hosam; Kassem, Ahmed Alaa; Hussein, Rehab Ali; Awad, Gamal; El-Awdan, Sally Abdul-Wanees

    2015-01-01

    Boswellia carterii (BC) Birdwood oleogum resin is an ancient remedy of inflammation processes known since Ancient Egyptian time. Of boswellic acids, 3-acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid (AKBA) is the most potent anti-inflammatory active principle. Liquisolid systems of the biologically active fraction of BC oleogum resin were prepared for improving dissolution properties using low dose oral delivery to achieve enhanced anti-inflammatory activity, in comparison with the standard oral anti-inflammatory; Indomethacin. AKBA was assayed, employing an accurate and sensitive HPLC method. Detection was carried out at 210 nm using UV/Vis detector. A solubility study for the bioactive fraction was conducted. Microcrystalline cellulose and Aeroperl®300 Pharma were used as carrier and coating materials. Angle of slide, liquid load factor and Carr's flow index were estimated. Six systems were prepared using polyethylene glycol 400, solvent and two drug loading concentrations; 20 and 40 %. For each concentration, three carrier: coat ratios were dispensed; 20:1, 10:1, and 5:1. Dissolution study was performed and two systems were selected for characterization and in vivo evaluation by investigating upper GIT ulcerogenic effect and anti-inflammatory efficacy in rats. Results indicate absence of ulcers and significantly higher and prolonged anti-inflammatory efficacy for formulations F1 and F2, with carrier: coat ratio, 5:1 and drug loads of 20 and 40 %, respectively, compared with standard oral indomethacin. We conclude higher efficacy of BC bioactive fraction liquisolids compared with Indomethacin with greater safety on GIT, longer duration of action and hence better patient compliance. PMID:25895614

  18. Anti-inflammatory drug delivery from hyaluronic acid hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Sei K; Jelacic, Sandra; Maier, Ronald V; Stayton, Patrick S; Hoffman, Allan S

    2004-01-01

    Two different types of hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels were synthesized by crosslinking HA with divinyl sulfone (DVS) and poly(ethylene glycol)-divinyl sulfone (VS-PEG-VS). Vitamin E succinate (VES), an anti-inflammatory drug, and bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model of anti-inflammatory protein drugs, were loaded into the gels and their release kinetics were measured in vitro. VES and BSA released with a burst from both HA hydrogels during the first few hours, and release continued gradually for several days. The rate of release from HA-VS-PEG-VS-HA hydrogels was faster than that from HA-DVS-HA hydrogels, presumably due to the lower crosslink density in the former. The anti-inflammatory action of released VES was tested by incubating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) on HA hydrogels with and without VES in the gel. The number of cells adhering on HA hydrogels was very low compared to that on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), which might be one of the important advantages of using HA hydrogels for implant coatings or tissue engineering applications. ELISA test results showed that the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) concentration was very low in the supernatant of the wells containing the HA hydrogel with VES in contact with the activated macrophages compared to that without VES. This is probably the effect of the released VES reducing the production of anti-inflammatory cytokine, TNF-alpha. HA hydrogels containing anti-inflammatory drugs may have potential for use in tissue engineering and also as biocompatible coatings of implants. PMID:15503629

  19. In-vitro and in-vivo anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of the methanol extract of the roots of Morinda officinalis.

    PubMed

    Kim, In-Tae; Park, Hee-Juhn; Nam, Jung-Hwan; Park, Young-Mi; Won, Jong-Heon; Choi, Jongwon; Choe, Bong-Keun; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2005-05-01

    The anti-inflammatory effects of the methanol extract of the roots of Morinda officinalis (MEMO) (Rubiaceae) were evaluated in-vitro and in-vivo. The effects of MEMO on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)induced responses in the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 were examined. MEMO potently inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. Consistent with these results, the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) at the protein level, and of iNOS, COX-2 and TNF-alpha at the mRNA level, was also inhibited by MEMO in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, MEMO inhibited the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) activation induced by LPS, and this was associated with the prevention of degradation of the inhibitor kappaB (IkappaB), and subsequently with attenuated p65 protein in the nucleus. The anti-inflammatory effect of MEMO was examined in rats using the carrageenan-induced oedema model. The antinociceptive effects of MEMO were assessed in mice using the acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction test and the hot-plate test. MEMO (100, 200 mg kg-1 per day, p.o.) exhibited anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects in these animal models. Taken together, the data demonstrate that MEMO has anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activity, inhibiting iNOS, COX-2 and TNF-alpha expression by down-regulating NF-kappaB binding activity. PMID:15901350

  20. The structure of ibuprofen bound to cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Benjamin J; Lucido, Michael J; Malkowski, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    The cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) catalyze the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins, and are the pharmacological targets of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and COX-2 selective inhibitors (coxibs). Ibuprofen (IBP) is one of the most commonly available over-the-counter pharmaceuticals in the world. The anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of IBP are thought to arise from inhibition of COX-2 rather than COX-1. While an X-ray crystal structure of IBP bound to COX-1 has been solved, no such structure exists for the cognate isoform COX-2. We have determined the crystal structure of muCOX-2 with a racemic mixture of (R/S)-IBP. Our structure reveals that only the S-isomer of IBP was bound, indicating that the S-isomer possesses higher affinity for COX-2 than the R-isomer. Mutational analysis of Arg-120 and Tyr-355 at the entrance of the cyclooxygenase channel confirmed their role in binding and inhibition of COX-2 by IBP. Our results provide the first atomic level detail of the interaction between IBP and COX-2. PMID:25463020

  1. THE STRUCTURE OF IBUPROFEN BOUND TO CYCLOOXYGENASE-2

    PubMed Central

    Orlando, Benjamin J.; Lucido, Michael J.; Malkowski, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    The cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) catalyze the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins, and are the pharmacological targets of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and COX-2 selective inhibitors (coxibs). Ibuprofen (IBP) is one of the most commonly available over-the-counter pharmaceuticals in the world. The anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of IBP are thought to arise from inhibition of COX-2 rather than COX-1. While an x-ray crystal structure of IBP bound to COX-1 has been solved, no such structure exists for the cognate isoform COX-2. We have determined the crystal structure of muCOX-2 with a racemic mixture of (R/S)-IBP. Our structure reveals that only the S-isomer of IBP was bound, indicating that the S-isomer possesses higher affinity for COX-2 than the R-isomer. Mutational analysis of Arg-120 and Tyr-355 at the entrance of the cyclooxygenase channel confirmed their role in binding and inhibition of COX-2 by IBP. Our results provide the first atomic level detail of the interaction between IBP and COX-2. PMID:25463020

  2. Controlled tetra-Fc sialylation of IVIg results in a drug candidate with consistent enhanced anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, Nathaniel; Schwab, Inessa; Ortiz, Daniel; Bhatnagar, Naveen; Lansing, Jonathan C.; Medeiros, Amy; Tyler, Steven; Mekala, Divya; Cochran, Edward; Sarvaiya, Hetal; Garofalo, Kevin; Meccariello, Robin; Meador, James W.; Rutitzky, Laura; Schultes, Birgit C.; Ling, Leona; Avery, William; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Manning, Anthony M.; Kaundinya, Ganesh V.; Bosques, Carlos J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the beneficial therapeutic effects of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) in inflammatory diseases, consistent therapeutic efficacy and potency remain major limitations for patients and physicians using IVIg. These limitations have stimulated a desire to generate therapeutic alternatives that could leverage the broad mechanisms of action of IVIg while improving therapeutic consistency and potency. The identification of the important anti-inflammatory role of fragment crystallizable domain (Fc) sialylation has presented an opportunity to develop more potent Ig therapies. However, translating this concept to potent anti-inflammatory therapeutics has been hampered by the difficulty of generating suitable sialylated products for clinical use. Therefore, we set out to develop the first, to our knowledge, robust and scalable process for generating a well-qualified sialylated IVIg drug candidate with maximum Fc sialylation devoid of unwanted alterations to the IVIg mixture. Here, we describe a controlled enzymatic, scalable process to produce a tetra-Fc–sialylated (s4-IVIg) IVIg drug candidate and its qualification across a wide panel of analytic assays, including physicochemical, pharmacokinetic, biodistribution, and in vivo animal models of inflammation. Our in vivo characterization of this drug candidate revealed consistent, enhanced anti-inflammatory activity up to 10-fold higher than IVIg across different animal models. To our knowledge, this candidate represents the first s4-IVIg suitable for clinical use; it is also a valuable therapeutic alternative with more consistent and potent anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:25733881

  3. Anti-inflammatory diterpenoids from Croton tonkinensis.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ping-Chung; Yang, Mei-Lin; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Lai, Yuan-Yu; Li, Yue-Chiun; Thang, Tran Dinh; Wu, Tian-Shung

    2013-02-22

    Phytochemical investigation of the methanolic extract of Croton tonkinensis afforded two known kauranes (1, 2), eight new ent-kauranes (3-10), and 16 known ent-kaurane-type diterpenoids (12-27). In addition, 30 known compounds were identified by comparison of their physical and spectroscopic data with reported data. Among the isolated compounds, ent-18-acetoxykaur-16-en-15-one (20) displayed the most significant inhibition of superoxide anion generation and elastase release. PMID:23347584

  4. Anti-inflammatory role of microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 in a model of neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Brenneis, Christian; Coste, Ovidiu; Altenrath, Kai; Angioni, Carlo; Schmidt, Helmut; Schuh, Claus-Dieter; Zhang, Dong Dong; Henke, Marina; Weigert, Andreas; Brüne, Bernhard; Rubin, Barry; Nusing, Rolf; Scholich, Klaus; Geisslinger, Gerd

    2011-01-21

    A major immunological response during neuroinflammation is the activation of microglia, which subsequently release proinflammatory mediators such as prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). Besides its proinflammatory properties, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-derived PGE(2) has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory effects on innate immune responses. Here, we investigated the role of microsomal PGE(2) synthase-1 (mPGES-1), which is functionally coupled to COX-2, in immune responses using a model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced spinal neuroinflammation. Interestingly, we found that activation of E-prostanoid (EP)2 and EP4 receptors, but not EP1, EP3, PGI(2) receptor (IP), thromboxane A(2) receptor (TP), PGD(2) receptor (DP), and PGF(2) receptor (FP), efficiently blocked LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) synthesis and COX-2 and mPGES-1 induction as well as prostaglandin synthesis in spinal cultures. In vivo, spinal EP2 receptors were up-regulated in microglia in response to intrathecally injected LPS. Accordingly, LPS priming reduced spinal synthesis of TNFα, interleukin 1β (IL-1β), and prostaglandins in response to a second intrathecal LPS injection. Importantly, this reduction was only seen in wild-type but not in mPGES-1-deficient mice. Furthermore, intrathecal application of EP2 and EP4 agonists as well as genetic deletion of EP2 significantly reduced spinal TNFα and IL-1β synthesis in mPGES-1 knock-out mice after LPS priming. These data suggest that initial inflammation prepares the spinal cord for a negative feedback regulation by mPGES-1-derived PGE(2) followed by EP2 activation, which limits the synthesis of inflammatory mediators during chronic inflammation. Thus, our data suggest a role of mPGES-1-derived PGE(2) in resolution of neuroinflammation. PMID:21075851

  5. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs alter vasa recta diameter via pericytes.

    PubMed

    Kennedy-Lydon, Teresa; Crawford, Carol; Wildman, Scott S; Peppiatt-Wildman, Claire M

    2015-10-01

    We have previously shown that vasa recta pericytes are known to dilate vasa recta capillaries in the presence of PGE2 and contract vasa recta capillaries when endogenous production of PGE2 is inhibited by the nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) indomethacin. In the present study, we used a live rat kidney slice model to build on these initial observations and provide novel data that demonstrate that nonselective, cyclooxygenase-1-selective, and cyclooxygenase -2-selective NSAIDs act via medullary pericytes to elicit a reduction of vasa recta diameter. Real-time images of in situ vasa recta were recorded, and vasa recta diameters at pericyte and nonpericyte sites were measured offline. PGE2 and epoprostenol (a prostacyclin analog) evoked dilation of vasa recta specifically at pericyte sites, and PGE2 significantly attenuated pericyte-mediated constriction of vasa recta evoked by both endothelin-1 and ANG II. NSAIDs (indomethacin > SC-560 > celecoxib > meloxicam) evoked significantly greater constriction of vasa recta capillaries at pericyte sites than at nonpericyte sites, and indomethacin significantly attenuated the pericyte-mediated vasodilation of vasa recta evoked by PGE2, epoprostenol, bradykinin, and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-l-penicillamine. Moreover, a reduction in PGE2 was measured using an enzyme immune assay after superfusion of kidney slices with indomethacin. In addition, immunohistochemical techniques were used to demonstrate the population of EP receptors in the medulla. Collectively, these data demonstrate that pericytes are sensitive to changes in PGE2 concentration and may serve as the primary mechanism underlying NSAID-associated renal injury and/or further compound-associated tubular damage. PMID:26202223

  6. Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Progesterone in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated BV-2 Microglia

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Beilei; Mace, Brian; Dawson, Hana N.; Warner, David S.; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; James, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Female sex is associated with improved outcome in experimental brain injury models, such as traumatic brain injury, ischemic stroke, and intracerebral hemorrhage. This implies female gonadal steroids may be neuroprotective. A mechanism for this may involve modulation of post-injury neuroinflammation. As the resident immunomodulatory cells in central nervous system, microglia are activated during acute brain injury and produce inflammatory mediators which contribute to secondary injury including proinflammatory cytokines, and nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), mediated by inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), respectively. We hypothesized that female gonadal steroids reduce microglia mediated neuroinflammation. In this study, the progesterone’s effects on tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), iNOS, and COX-2 expression were investigated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV-2 microglia. Further, investigation included nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. LPS (30 ng/ml) upregulated TNF-α, iNOS, and COX-2 protein expression in BV-2 cells. Progesterone pretreatment attenuated LPS-stimulated TNF-α, iNOS, and COX-2 expression in a dose-dependent fashion. Progesterone suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB activation by decreasing inhibitory κBα and NF-κB p65 phosphorylation and p65 nuclear translocation. Progesterone decreased LPS-mediated phosphorylation of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and extracellular regulated kinase MAPKs. These progesterone effects were inhibited by its antagonist mifepristone. In conclusion, progesterone exhibits pleiotropic anti-inflammatory effects in LPS-stimulated BV-2 microglia by down-regulating proinflammatory mediators corresponding to suppression of NF-κB and MAPK activation. This suggests progesterone may be used as a potential neurotherapeutic to treat inflammatory components of acute brain injury. PMID:25080336

  7. Centrally Synthesized Estradiol Is a Potent Anti-Inflammatory in the Injured Zebra Finch Brain.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Alyssa L; Nelson, Lars H; Saldanha, Colin J

    2016-05-01

    In homeotherms, injury to the brain, such as a penetrating wound, increases microglial cytokine expression and astroglial aromatase (estrogen synthase). In songbirds, injury-induced synthesis of estrogens is neuroprotective as aromatase inhibition and replacement with estradiol (E2) exacerbates and mitigates the extent of damage, respectively. The influence of induced aromatization on inflammation, however, remains unstudied. We hypothesized that injury-induced aromatization, via E2 synthesis, may affect neuroinflammation after a penetrating brain injury. Using adult zebra finches, we first documented an increase in the transcription of cytokines but not aromatase, 2 hours after the injury. Twenty-four hours after the injury, however, aromatase was dramatically elevated and cytokine expression had returned to baseline, suggesting that aromatization may be involved in the decrease of cytokines and neuroinflammation. In two subsequent experiments, we tested the influence of the inhibition of induced aromatization and aromatase inhibition with concomitant central E2 replacement on the transcription of the cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, the enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (cox-2), and its product prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Administration of fadrozole, an aromatase inhibitor, caused a sustained elevation of IL-1β in females and TNF-α, cox-2, and PGE2 in both sexes. This prolonged neuroinflammation appears to be due to a failure to synthesize E2 locally because intracranial E2 replacement lowered IL-1β in females, TNF-α in males, and cox-2 and PGE2 in both sexes. IL-6 was not affected by injury, aromatase inhibition, or E2 replacement in either sex. These data suggest that E2 synthesis after a penetrating brain injury is a potent and inducible anti-inflammatory signal, with specific modulation of discrete cytokine signaling. PMID:26963472

  8. Anti-inflammatory activity of β-patchoulene isolated from patchouli oil in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenbiao; Chen, Xiaoying; Chen, Hanbin; Wang, Lan; Liang, Jiali; Luo, Dandan; Liu, Yuhong; Yang, Hongmei; Li, Yucui; Xie, Jianhui; Su, Ziren

    2016-06-15

    β-Patchoulene (β-PAE) is a tricyclic sesquiterpene isolated from the oil of Pogostemon cablin (patchouli oil), which has been widely used in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of inflammatory diseases. However, as one of the major principle of patchouli oil, the biological activity of β-PAE has not been explored so far. In the present study, the anti-inflammatory activity in vivo, and the underlying mechanism, of β-PAE was investigated on experimental mice models of acute inflammation, i.e. xylene-induced ear edema, acetic acid-induced vascular permeability and carrageenan-induced paw edema. The results showed that β-PAE evoked a significant dose-dependent inhibition of ear edema induced by xylene, paw edema induced by carrageenan and suppressed the increase of vascular permeability elicited by acetic acid. Histopathological analysis indicated that β-PAE could markedly decrease the cellular infiltration in paw tissue. β-PAE was also shown to significantly decrease the malondialdehyde (MDA) level and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in edema paw. In addition, carrageenan-induced production of some pro-inflammatory cytokines: tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and nitric oxide (NO), were suppressed in a dose-dependent manner in mice subjected to β-PAE pretreatment, and it also significantly down-regulated the protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Further analysis revealed that β-PAE also inhibited the translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and stabilize the conversion of nuclear factor-κBα (IκBα) level. These results provided additional chemical and pharmacological basis for the traditional application of P. cablin in inflammatory disorders. PMID:27090925

  9. Anti-inflammatory effects and antioxidant activity of dihydroasparagusic acid in lipopolysaccharide-activated microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Salemme, Adele; Togna, Anna Rita; Mastrofrancesco, Arianna; Cammisotto, Vittoria; Ottaviani, Monica; Bianco, Armandodoriano; Venditti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The activation of microglia and subsequent release of toxic pro-inflammatory factors are crucially associated with neurodegenerative disease, characterized by increased oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, including Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases and multiple sclerosis. Dihydroasparagusic acid is the reduced form of asparagusic acid, a sulfur-containing flavor component produced by Asparagus plants. It has two thiolic functions able to coordinate the metal ions, and a carboxylic moiety, a polar function, which may enhance excretion of the complexes. Thiol functions are also present in several biomolecules with important physiological antioxidant role as glutathione. The aim of this study is to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant potential effect of dihydroasparagusic acid on microglial activation in an in vitro model of neuroinflammation. We have used lipopolysaccharide to induce an inflammatory response in primary rat microglial cultures. Our results suggest that dihydroasparagusic acid significantly prevented lipopolysaccharide-induced production of pro-inflammatory and neurotoxic mediators such as nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α, prostaglandin E2, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 protein expression and lipoxygenase activity in microglia cells. Moreover it effectively suppressed the level of reactive oxygen species and affected lipopolysaccharide-stimulated activation of mitogen activated protein kinase, including p38, and nuclear factor-kB pathway. These results suggest that dihydroasparagusic acid's neuroprotective properties may be due to its ability to dampen induction of microglial activation. It is a compound that can effectively inhibit inflammatory and oxidative processes that are important factors of the etiopathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26592472

  10. Anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities of Bursera copallifera

    PubMed Central

    Columba-Palomares, M. F. María C.; Villareal, Dra. María L.; Acevedo Quiroz, M. C. Macdiel E.; Marquina Bahena, M. C. Silvia; Álvarez Berber, Dra. Laura P.; Rodríguez-López, Dra. Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Background: The plant species Bursera copallifera (DC) bullock is used in traditional medicine to treat inflammation. The leaves of this plant can be prepared as an infusion to treat migraines, bronchitis, and dental pain Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the anti-inflammatory and cytotoxic activities of organic extracts from the stems, stem bark, and leaves of B. copallifera, which was selected based on the knowledge of its traditional use. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the ability of extracts to inhibit mouse ear inflammation in response to topical application of 12-O tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. The extracts with anti-inflammatory activity were evaluated for their inhibition of pro-inflammatory enzymes. In addition, the in vitro cytotoxic activities of the organic extracts were evaluated using the sulforhodamine B assay. Results: The hydroalcoholic extract of the stems (HAS) exhibited an anti-inflammatory activity of 54.3% (0.5 mg/ear), whereas the anti-inflammatory activity of the dichloromethane-methanol extract from the leaves (DMeL) was 55.4% at a dose of 0.1 mg/ear. Methanol extract from the leaves (MeL) showed the highest anti-inflammatory activity (IC50 = 4.4 μg/mL), hydroalcoholic extract of leaves, and DMeL also reduce the enzyme activity, (IC50 = 6.5 μg/mL, IC50 = 5.7 μg/mL), respectively, from stems HAS exhibit activity at the evaluated concentrations (IC50 =6.4 μg/mL). The hydroalcoholic extract of the stems exhibited the highest cytotoxic activity against a breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF7, IC50 = 0.90 μg/mL), whereas DMeL exhibited an IC50 value of 19.9 μg/mL. Conclusion: In conclusion, extracts from leaves and stems inhibited cyclooxygenase-1, which is the target enzyme for nonsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs, and some of these extracts demonstrated substantial antiproliferative effects against the MCF7 cell line. These results validate the traditional use of B. copallifera. PMID:26664022

  11. Curcumin attenuates cyclooxygenase-2 expression via inhibition of the NF-κB pathway in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ping; Huang, Ping; Chen, Min Wei

    2013-05-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces the expression of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), which contributes to the process of periodontitis. Curcumin, a constituent of turmeric, exhibits anti-inflammatory properties. We have investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin in human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) stimulated by P. gingivalis LPS and its mechanism of action. HGFs pretreated with curcumin were stimulated by P. gingivalis LPS. COX-2 mRNA and protein expressions were analysed by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. Activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) was analysed by the NF-κB-dependent luciferase activity and electrophoretic mobility-shift assay (EMSA). Curcumin inhibited COX-2 mRNA and protein synthesis in LPS-stimulated HGFs in a dose-dependent manner. P. gingivalis LPS activated NF-κB-dependent transcription in HGFs, which were also downregulated by pretreatment with curcumin. Therefore, curcumin can inhibit P. gingivalis LPS-induced COX-2 expression, which may be due to the inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. PMID:23494805

  12. The superoxide anion donor, potassium superoxide, induces pain and inflammation in mice through production of reactive oxygen species and cyclooxygenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Maioli, N.A.; Zarpelon, A.C.; Mizokami, S.S.; Calixto-Campos, C.; Guazelli, C.F.S.; Hohmann, M.S.N.; Pinho-Ribeiro, F.A.; Carvalho, T.T.; Manchope, M.F.; Ferraz, C.R.; Casagrande, R.; Verri, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    It is currently accepted that superoxide anion (O2 •−) is an important mediator in pain and inflammation. The role of superoxide anion in pain and inflammation has been mainly determined indirectly by modulating its production and inactivation. Direct evidence using potassium superoxide (KO2), a superoxide anion donor, demonstrated that it induced thermal hyperalgesia, as assessed by the Hargreaves method. However, it remains to be determined whether KO2 is capable of inducing other inflammatory and nociceptive responses attributed to superoxide anion. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the nociceptive and inflammatory effects of KO2. The KO2-induced inflammatory responses evaluated in mice were: mechanical hyperalgesia (electronic version of von Frey filaments), thermal hyperalgesia (hot plate), edema (caliper rule), myeloperoxidase activity (colorimetric assay), overt pain-like behaviors (flinches, time spent licking and writhing score), leukocyte recruitment, oxidative stress, and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression (quantitative PCR). Administration of KO2 induced mechanical hyperalgesia, thermal hyperalgesia, paw edema, leukocyte recruitment, the writhing response, paw flinching, and paw licking in a dose-dependent manner. KO2 also induced time-dependent cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression in the paw skin. The nociceptive, inflammatory, and oxidative stress components of KO2-induced responses were responsive to morphine (analgesic opioid), quercetin (antioxidant flavonoid), and/or celecoxib (anti-inflammatory cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor) treatment. In conclusion, the well-established superoxide anion donor KO2 is a valuable tool for studying the mechanisms and pharmacological susceptibilities of superoxide anion-triggered nociceptive and inflammatory responses ranging from mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia to overt pain-like behaviors, edema, and leukocyte recruitment. PMID:25714890

  13. The superoxide anion donor, potassium superoxide, induces pain and inflammation in mice through production of reactive oxygen species and cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Maioli, N A; Zarpelon, A C; Mizokami, S S; Calixto-Campos, C; Guazelli, C F S; Hohmann, M S N; Pinho-Ribeiro, F A; Carvalho, T T; Manchope, M F; Ferraz, C R; Casagrande, R; Verri, W A

    2015-04-01

    It is currently accepted that superoxide anion (O2•-) is an important mediator in pain and inflammation. The role of superoxide anion in pain and inflammation has been mainly determined indirectly by modulating its production and inactivation. Direct evidence using potassium superoxide (KO2), a superoxide anion donor, demonstrated that it induced thermal hyperalgesia, as assessed by the Hargreaves method. However, it remains to be determined whether KO2 is capable of inducing other inflammatory and nociceptive responses attributed to superoxide anion. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the nociceptive and inflammatory effects of KO2. The KO2-induced inflammatory responses evaluated in mice were: mechanical hyperalgesia (electronic version of von Frey filaments), thermal hyperalgesia (hot plate), edema (caliper rule), myeloperoxidase activity (colorimetric assay), overt pain-like behaviors (flinches, time spent licking and writhing score), leukocyte recruitment, oxidative stress, and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression (quantitative PCR). Administration of KO2 induced mechanical hyperalgesia, thermal hyperalgesia, paw edema, leukocyte recruitment, the writhing response, paw flinching, and paw licking in a dose-dependent manner. KO2 also induced time-dependent cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression in the paw skin. The nociceptive, inflammatory, and oxidative stress components of KO2-induced responses were responsive to morphine (analgesic opioid), quercetin (antioxidant flavonoid), and/or celecoxib (anti-inflammatory cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor) treatment. In conclusion, the well-established superoxide anion donor KO2 is a valuable tool for studying the mechanisms and pharmacological susceptibilities of superoxide anion-triggered nociceptive and inflammatory responses ranging from mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia to overt pain-like behaviors, edema, and leukocyte recruitment. PMID:25714890

  14. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition reduces stress-induced affective pathology.

    PubMed

    Gamble-George, Joyonna Carrie; Baldi, Rita; Halladay, Lindsay; Kocharian, Adrina; Hartley, Nolan; Silva, Carolyn Grace; Roberts, Holly; Haymer, Andre; Marnett, Lawrence J; Holmes, Andrew; Patel, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Mood and anxiety disorders are the most prevalent psychiatric conditions and are exacerbated by stress. Recent studies have suggested cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition could represent a novel treatment approach or augmentation strategy for affective disorders including anxiety disorders and major depression. We show that traditional COX-2 inhibitors and a newly developed substrate-selective COX-2 inhibitor (SSCI) reduce a variety of stress-induced behavioral pathologies in mice. We found that these behavioral effects were associated with a dampening of neuronal excitability in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) ex vivo and in vivo, and were mediated by small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channel and CB1 cannabinoid receptor activation. Taken together, these data provide further support for the potential utility of SSCIs, as well as traditional COX-2 inhibitors, as novel treatment approaches for stress-related psychiatric disorders. PMID:27162170

  15. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition reduces stress-induced affective pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gamble-George, Joyonna Carrie; Baldi, Rita; Halladay, Lindsay; Kocharian, Adrina; Hartley, Nolan; Silva, Carolyn Grace; Roberts, Holly; Haymer, Andre; Marnett, Lawrence J; Holmes, Andrew; Patel, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Mood and anxiety disorders are the most prevalent psychiatric conditions and are exacerbated by stress. Recent studies have suggested cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition could represent a novel treatment approach or augmentation strategy for affective disorders including anxiety disorders and major depression. We show that traditional COX-2 inhibitors and a newly developed substrate-selective COX-2 inhibitor (SSCI) reduce a variety of stress-induced behavioral pathologies in mice. We found that these behavioral effects were associated with a dampening of neuronal excitability in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) ex vivo and in vivo, and were mediated by small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channel and CB1 cannabinoid receptor activation. Taken together, these data provide further support for the potential utility of SSCIs, as well as traditional COX-2 inhibitors, as novel treatment approaches for stress-related psychiatric disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14137.001 PMID:27162170

  16. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in canine intracranial meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, J H; Robertson, J L; Zimmerman, K L; Higgins, M A; Geiger, D A

    2009-09-01

    Meningiomas are the most common canine intracranial tumour. Neurologic disability and death from treatment failure remain problematic despite current surgical and radiotherapeutic treatments for canine intracranial meningiomas. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) over-expression has been demonstrated in multiple canine malignancies, and COX-2 inhibitory treatment strategies have been shown to have both preventative and therapeutic effects in spontaneous and experimental models of cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate COX-2 expression in canine intracranial meningiomas. Immunohistochemical and Western blot (WB) analyses showed COX-2 expression in multiple tissues of the normal canine brain, and 87% (21/24) of intracranial meningiomas studied were immunoreactive to COX-2. No significant associations between COX-2 immunoreactivity and tumour grade were identified. Further studies are required to elucidate the physiologic roles of constitutive COX-2 expression in the central nervous system as well as its participation in meningioma tumourigenesis. PMID:19691646

  17. Anti-inflammatory properties of α- and γ-tocopherol

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Elke; Jiang, Qing; Christen, Stephan

    2007-01-01

    Natural vitamin E consists of four different tocopherol and four different tocotrienol homologues (α, β, γ, δ) that all have antioxidant activity. However, recent data indicate that the different vitamin E homologues also have biological activity unrelated to their antioxidant activity. In this review, we discuss the anti-inflammatory properties of the two major forms of vitamin E, α-tocopherol (αT) and γ-tocopherol (γT), and discuss the potential molecular mechanisms involved in these effects. While both tocopherols exhibit anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in vivo, supplementation with mixed (γT-enriched) tocopherols seems to be more potent than supplementation with αT alone. This may explain the mostly negative outcomes of the recent large-scale interventional chronic disease prevention trials with αT and thus warrants further investigation. PMID:17316780

  18. Anti-inflammatory effects of a Houttuynia cordata supercritical extract.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sunhee; Joo, Seong Soo; Jeon, Jeong Hee; Park, Dongsun; Jang, Min Jung; Kim, Tae Ook; Kim, Hyun Kyu; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Kim, Ki Yon; Kim, Yun Bae

    2010-09-01

    Anti-inflammatory effects of Houttuynia cordata supercritical extract (HSE) were investigated in a carrageenan-air pouch model. HSE (200 mg/kg, oral) suppressed exudation and albumin leakage, as well as inflammatory cell infiltration. Dexamethasone (2 mg/kg, i.p.) only decreased exudation and cell infiltration, while indomethacin (2 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced exudate volume and albumin content. HSE lowered tumor-necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and nitric oxide (NO), as well as prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). Dexamethasone only reduced TNF-alpha and NO, while indomethacin decreased TNF-alpha and PGE(2). The suppressive activity of HSE on NO and PGE(2) production was confirmed in RAW 264.7. These results demonstrate that HSE exerts anti-inflammatory effects by inhibiting both TNF-alpha-NO and cyclooxygenase II-PGE(2) pathways. PMID:20706037

  19. Isoflavones: Anti-Inflammatory Benefit and Possible Caveats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie; Bi, Xiaojuan; Yu, Bing; Chen, Daiwen

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation, a biological response of body tissues to harmful stimuli, is also known to be involved in a host of diseases, such as obesity, atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and even cancer. Isoflavones are a class of flavonoids that exhibit antioxidant, anticancer, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory properties. Increasing evidence has highlighted the potential for isoflavones to prevent the chronic diseases in which inflammation plays a key role, though the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Recently, some studies have raised concerns about isoflavones induced negative effects like carcinogenesis, thymic involution, and immunosuppression. Therefore, this review aims to summarize the anti-inflammatory effects of isoflavones, unravel the underlying mechanisms, and present the potential health risks. PMID:27294954

  20. Antibiotic and Anti-Inflammatory Therapies for Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chmiel, James F.; Konstan, Michael W.; Elborn, J. Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by chronic bacterial infection and an unremitting inflammatory response, which are responsible for most of CF morbidity and mortality. The median expected survival has increased from <6 mo in 1940 to >38 yr now. This dramatic improvement, although not great enough, is due to the development of therapies directed at secondary disease pathologies, especially antibiotics. The importance of developing treatments directed against the vigorous inflammatory response was realized in the 1990s. New therapies directed toward the basic defect are now visible on the horizon. However, the impact of these drugs on downstream pathological consequences is unknown. It is likely that antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs will remain an important part of the maintenance regimen for CF in the foreseeable future. Current and future antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapies for CF are reviewed. PMID:23880054

  1. Antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapies for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chmiel, James F; Konstan, Michael W; Elborn, J Stuart

    2013-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by chronic bacterial infection and an unremitting inflammatory response, which are responsible for most of CF morbidity and mortality. The median expected survival has increased from <6 mo in 1940 to >38 yr now. This dramatic improvement, although not great enough, is due to the development of therapies directed at secondary disease pathologies, especially antibiotics. The importance of developing treatments directed against the vigorous inflammatory response was realized in the 1990s. New therapies directed toward the basic defect are now visible on the horizon. However, the impact of these drugs on downstream pathological consequences is unknown. It is likely that antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs will remain an important part of the maintenance regimen for CF in the foreseeable future. Current and future antibiotic and anti-inflammatory therapies for CF are reviewed. PMID:23880054

  2. Therapeutic Potential of Hydrazones as Anti-Inflammatory Agents

    PubMed Central

    Bala, Suman; Sharma, Neha; Saini, Vipin

    2014-01-01

    Hydrazones are a special class of organic compounds in the Schiff base family. Hydrazones constitute a versatile compound of organic class having basic structure (R1R2C=NNR3R4). The active centers of hydrazone, that is, carbon and nitrogen, are mainly responsible for the physical and chemical properties of the hydrazones and, due to the reactivity toward electrophiles and nucleophiles, hydrazones are used for the synthesis of organic compound such as heterocyclic compounds with a variety of biological activities. Hydrazones and their derivatives are known to exhibit a wide range of interesting biological activities like antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticonvulsant, analgesic, antimicrobial, anticancer, antiprotozoal, antioxidant, antiparasitic, antiplatelet, cardioprotective, anthelmintic, antidiabetic, antitubercular, trypanocidal, anti-HIV, and so forth. The present review summarizes the efficiency of hydrazones as potent anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:25383223

  3. Anti-Inflammatory Drug Design Using a Molecular Hybridization Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bosquesi, Priscila Longhin; Melo, Thais Regina Ferreira; Vizioli, Ednir Oliveira; dos Santos, Jean Leandro; Chung, Man Chin

    2011-01-01

    The design of new drugs with better physiochemical properties, adequate absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion, effective pharmacologic potency and lacking toxicity remains is a challenge. Inflammation is the initial trigger of several different diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, asthma, atherosclerosis, colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, depression, cancer; and disorders such as obesity and sexual dysfunction. Although inflammation is not the direct cause of these disorders, inflammatory processes often increase related pain and suffering. New anti-inflammatory drugs developed using molecular hybridization techniques to obtain multiple-ligand drugs can act at one or multiple targets, allowing for synergic action and minimizing toxicity. This work is a review of new anti-inflammatory drugs developed using the molecular modification approach.

  4. Isoflavones: Anti-Inflammatory Benefit and Possible Caveats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jie; Bi, Xiaojuan; Yu, Bing; Chen, Daiwen

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation, a biological response of body tissues to harmful stimuli, is also known to be involved in a host of diseases, such as obesity, atherosclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and even cancer. Isoflavones are a class of flavonoids that exhibit antioxidant, anticancer, antimicrobial, and anti-inflammatory properties. Increasing evidence has highlighted the potential for isoflavones to prevent the chronic diseases in which inflammation plays a key role, though the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Recently, some studies have raised concerns about isoflavones induced negative effects like carcinogenesis, thymic involution, and immunosuppression. Therefore, this review aims to summarize the anti-inflammatory effects of isoflavones, unravel the underlying mechanisms, and present the potential health risks. PMID:27294954

  5. Anti-inflammatory and antipyretic effects of boldine.

    PubMed

    Backhouse, N; Delporte, C; Givernau, M; Cassels, B K; Valenzuela, A; Speisky, H

    1994-10-01

    Boldine, an antioxidant alkaloid isolated from Peumus boldus, exhibits a dose-dependent anti-inflammatory activity in the carrageenan-induced guinea pig paw edema test with an oral ED50 of 34 mg/kg. Boldine also reduces bacterial pyrogen-induced hyperthermia in rabbits to an extent which varied between 51% and 98% at a dose of 60 mg/kg p.o. In vitro studies carried out in rat aortal rings revealed that boldine is an effective inhibitor of prostaglandin biosynthesis, promoting 53% inhibition at 75 microM. The latter in vitro effect may be mechanistically linked to the anti-inflammatory and antipyretic effects of boldine exerted in vivo. PMID:7879695

  6. Pharmacology in rehabilitation: nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents.

    PubMed

    Biederman, Ross E

    2005-06-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) are the most commonly encountered over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription medications in physical therapy practice. Worldwide, over 73000000 prescriptions for nonsteroidal agents are written yearly. NSAIDs produce a wide range of beneficial effects to the physical therapy patient, enhancing the outcome of treatment. Helpful effects of NSAIDs include analgesia, antipyretic, anti-inflammatory, and antithrombotic properties. However, NSAIDs are also associated with frequent and significant side effects that are deleterious to treatment outcome, including delay in soft tissue and bone healing, renal and liver toxicity, hemorrhagic events, gastric irritation and ulceration, and central nervous system effects. Understanding of the pharmacological properties of these drugs, exemplified by aspirin, and the individual pharmacokinetics of specific preparations will help the therapist to screen patients for potential side effects, develop more effective plans of care, and, where allowed, effectively and safely prescribe NSAIDs. PMID:16001907

  7. Photoelectron spectroscopy of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Igor; Klasinc, Leo; Chong, Delano P.; McGlynn, Sean P.

    2013-08-01

    The electronic structures of eight non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) had been studied by UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) and high-level Green's function (GF) calculations. Our UPS data show that the electronic structure influences the measured biological activity of NSAID, but that it is not the dominating factor. The role of electronic structure needs to be considered in conjunction with other factors like steric properties of the COX active site and orientation of relevant residues in the same site.

  8. Mechanisms of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Umar, Asad; Steele, Vernon E; Menter, David G; Hawk, Ernest T

    2016-02-01

    Various clinical and epidemiologic studies show that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including aspirin and cyclooxygenase inhibitors (COXIBs) help prevent cancer. Since eicosanoid metabolism is the main inhibitory targets of these drugs the resulting molecular and biological impact is generally accepted. As our knowledge base and technology progress we are learning that additional targets may be involved. This review attempts to summarize these new developments in the field. PMID:26970125

  9. [Helicobacter pylori, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and gastroduodenal changes].

    PubMed

    Teixeira, A V

    1995-09-01

    The author discusses the possible interactions between non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and Helicobacter pylori (Hp) which may play an important role in the unleashing of gastroduodenal lesions. To our knowledge, AINEs have no influence on the prevalence of infection by Hp and the latter does not seem to influence the development and intensity of the lesions caused by NSAIDs. PMID:7484272

  10. The Anti-Inflammatory Actions of Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Michael G.; McFarlin, Brian K.; Markofski, Melissa M.

    2014-01-01

    The list of diseases with a known inflammatory etiology is growing. Cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, diabetes, geriatric cachexia, and Alzheimer’s disease have all been shown to be linked to or exacerbated by aberrantly regulated inflammatory processes. Nevertheless, there is mounting evidence that those who are physically active, or who become physically active, have a reduction in biomarkers associated with chronic inflammation. There was strong early consensus that exercise-induced reductions in inflammation were explained by body mass index or body fatness, but recent studies provide support for the contention that exercise has body fat–independent anti-inflammatory effects. With few exceptions, the anti-inflammatory effects of exercise appear to occur regardless of age or the presence of chronic diseases. What remains unclear are the mechanisms by which exercise training induces these anti-inflammatory effects, but there are several intriguing possibilities, including release of endogenous products, such as heat shock proteins; selective reduction of visceral adipose tissue mass or reducing infiltration of adipocytes by macrophages; shift in immune cell phenotype; cross-tolerizing effects; or exercise-induced shifts in accessory proteins of toll-like receptor signaling. However, future research endeavors are likely to uncover additional potential mechanisms, and it could be some time before functional mechanisms are made clear. In summary, the potential anti-inflammatory influences of exercise training may provide a low-cost, readily available, and effective treatment for low-grade systemic inflammation and could contribute significantly to the positive effects of exercise training on chronic disease. PMID:25431545

  11. Clinical Management of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Hypersensitivity diseases caused by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents are relatively common in the population. This article summarizes the present understanding on the various allergic and nonallergic clinical pictures produced through hypersensitivity to these drugs using the pathogenic classification of hypersensitivity reactions recently proposed by the Nomenclature Committee of the World Allergy Organization to guide clinicians in the diagnosis and management of patients with these conditions. PMID:23283307

  12. Analgesic, diuretic, and anti-inflammatory principle from Scoparia dulcis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, M; Shikha, H A; Sadhu, S K; Rahman, M T; Datta, B K

    2001-08-01

    Scoparinol, a diterpene, isolated from Scoparia dulcis showed significant analgesic (p < 0.001) and anti-inflammatory activity (p < 0.01) in animals. A sedative action of scoparinol was demonstrated by a marked potentiation of pentobarbital-induced sedation with a significant effect on both onset and duration of sleep (p < 0.05). Measurement of urine volume after administration of scoparinol indicated its significant diuretic action. PMID:11534346

  13. Anti-inflammatory cyclohexenyl chalcone derivatives in Boesenbergia pandurata.

    PubMed

    Tuchinda, Patoomratana; Reutrakul, Vichai; Claeson, Per; Pongprayoon, Ubonwan; Sematong, Tuanta; Santisuk, Thawatchai; Taylor, Walter C

    2002-01-01

    The cyclohexenyl chalcone derivative [(-)-hydroxypanduratin A], together with the previously known panduratin A, sakuranetin, pinostrobin, pinocembrin, and dihydro-5,6-dehydrokawain were isolated from the chloroform extract of the red rhizome variety of Boesenbergia pandurata (Robx.) Schltr. [currently known as Boesenbergia rotunda (L.) Mansf., Kulturpfl.]. Their structures were assigned on the basis of their spectroscopic data. (-)-Hydroxypanduratin A and (-)-panduratin A showed significant topical anti-inflammatory activity in the assay of TPA-induced ear edema in rats. PMID:11809452

  14. Anti-inflammatory effects of sargachromenol-rich ethanolic extract of Myagropsis myagroides on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated BV-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Excessive pro-inflammatory cytokine production from activated microglia contributes to neurodegenerative diseases, thus, microglial inactivation may delay the progress of neurodegeneration by attenuating the neuroinflammation. Among 5 selected brown algae, we found the highest antioxidant and anti-neuroinflammatory activities from Myagropsis myagroides ethanolic extract (MME) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV-2 cells. Methods The levels of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured by Griess assay and enzyme linked immunesorbent assay. The levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and Akt were measured using Western blot. Nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) were determined by immunefluorescence and reporter gene assay, respectively. Results MME inhibited the expression of iNOS and COX-2 at mRNA and protein levels, resulting in reduction of NO and PGE2 production. As a result, pro-inflammatory cytokines were reduced by MME. MME also inhibited the activation and translocation of NF-κB by preventing inhibitor κB-α (IκB-α) degradation. Moreover, MME inhibited the phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinases (ERKs) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs). Main anti-inflammatory compound in MME was identified as sargachromenol by NMR spectroscopy. Conclusions These results indicate that the anti-inflammatory effect of sargachromenol-rich MME on LPS-stimulated microglia is mainly regulated by the inhibition of IκB-α/NF-κB and ERK/JNK pathways. PMID:25005778

  15. Evaluation of Anticancer, Antioxidant, and Possible Anti-inflammatory Properties of Selected Medicinal Plants Used in Indian Traditional Medication

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Rafik; Pund, Mahesh; Dawane, Ashwini; Iliyas, Sayyed

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the anticancer, antioxidant, and possible anti-inflammatory properties of diverse medicinal plants frequently used in Indian traditional medication. The selected botanicals such as Soymida fembrifuga (Roxb.) A. Juss. (Miliaceae), Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers. (Menispermaceae), Lavandula bipinnata (L.) O. Ktze. (Lamiaceae), and Helicteres isora L. (Sterculiaceae) extracted in different solvents were evaluated for their in vitro anticancer and antioxidant activities. The results obtained indicate that H. isora has potent cytotoxic activity toward the selected cancer cells such as HeLa-B75 (34.21 ± 0.24%), HL-60 (30.25 ± 1.36%), HEP-3B (25.36 ± 1.78%), and PN-15 (29.21 ± 0.52%). Interestingly, the selected botanicals selectively inhibited cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) more than (COX-1), which are the key enzymes implicated in inflammation. COX-2 inhibition was observed to be in the range of 19.66-49.52% as compared to COX-1 inhibition (3.93-19.61%). The results of the antioxidant study revealed that the selected plants were found to be effective 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), hydroxyl (OH), and superoxide radical (SOR) scavenging agents. High-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) fingerprint of flavonoids was used as a measure of quality control of the selected plant samples. The results of the present findings strengthen the potential of the selected plants as a resource for the discovery of novel anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant agents. PMID:25379467

  16. Evaluation of Anticancer, Antioxidant, and Possible Anti-inflammatory Properties of Selected Medicinal Plants Used in Indian Traditional Medication.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Rafik; Pund, Mahesh; Dawane, Ashwini; Iliyas, Sayyed

    2014-10-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the anticancer, antioxidant, and possible anti-inflammatory properties of diverse medicinal plants frequently used in Indian traditional medication. The selected botanicals such as Soymida fembrifuga (Roxb.) A. Juss. (Miliaceae), Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers. (Menispermaceae), Lavandula bipinnata (L.) O. Ktze. (Lamiaceae), and Helicteres isora L. (Sterculiaceae) extracted in different solvents were evaluated for their in vitro anticancer and antioxidant activities. The results obtained indicate that H. isora has potent cytotoxic activity toward the selected cancer cells such as HeLa-B75 (34.21 ± 0.24%), HL-60 (30.25 ± 1.36%), HEP-3B (25.36 ± 1.78%), and PN-15 (29.21 ± 0.52%). Interestingly, the selected botanicals selectively inhibited cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) more than (COX-1), which are the key enzymes implicated in inflammation. COX-2 inhibition was observed to be in the range of 19.66-49.52% as compared to COX-1 inhibition (3.93-19.61%). The results of the antioxidant study revealed that the selected plants were found to be effective 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), hydroxyl (OH), and superoxide radical (SOR) scavenging agents. High-performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) fingerprint of flavonoids was used as a measure of quality control of the selected plant samples. The results of the present findings strengthen the potential of the selected plants as a resource for the discovery of novel anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant agents. PMID:25379467

  17. Anti-inflammatory properties of pterocarpanquinone LQB-118 in mice.

    PubMed

    Riça, Ingred G; Netto, Chaquip D; Rennó, Magdalena N; Abreu, Paula A; Costa, Paulo R R; da Silva, Alcides J M; Cavalcante, Moisés C M

    2016-09-15

    Pterocarpanquinone (+/-)-LQB-118 presents antineoplastic and antiparasitic properties and also shows great inhibitory effect on TNF-α release in vitro. Here, its anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung inflammation model in C57BL/6 mice. LPS inhalation induced a marked neutrophil infiltration to the lungs which was reduced by intraperitoneal treatment with (+/-)-LQB-118 in a similar manner to that of dexamethasone and even better than that of acetylsalicylic acid. Moreover, (+/-)-LQB-118 administration resulted in decrease of NF-κB activation and KC level in lungs, with a pronounced inhibitory effect on TNF-α release, measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Trying to understand the anti-inflammatory mechanism by which (+/-)-LQB-118 acts, we performed a molecular modeling analysis, including docking to estrogen receptors α and β. Results suggested that (+/-)-LQB-118 may bind to both receptors, with a similar orientation to 17-β-estradiol. Together, these results showed that (+/-)-LQB-118 exhibits an anti-inflammatory effect, most likely by inhibiting TNF-α release and NF-κB activation, which may be related to the estrogen receptor binding. PMID:27492193

  18. Anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities of novel pyrazole analogues.

    PubMed

    Surendra Kumar, R; Arif, Ibrahim A; Ahamed, Anis; Idhayadhulla, Akbar

    2016-09-01

    A new sequence of pyrazole derivatives (1-6) was synthesized from condensation technique under utilizing ultrasound irradiation. Synthesized compounds were characterized from IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, Mass and elemental analysis. Synthesized compounds (1-6) were screened for antimicrobial activity. Among the compounds 3 (MIC: 0.25 μg/mL) was exceedingly antibacterially active against gram negative bacteria of Escherichia coli and compound 4 (MIC: 0.25 μg/mL) was highly active against gram positive bacteria of Streptococcus epidermidis compared with standard Ciprofloxacin. Compound 2 (MIC: 1 μg/mL) was highly antifungal active against Aspergillus niger proportionate to Clotrimazole. Synthesized compounds (1-6) were screened for anti-inflammatory activity and the compound 2-((5-hydroxy-3-methyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)(4-nitrophenyl)methyl)hydrazinecarboxamide (4) was better activity against anti-inflammatory when compared with standard drugs (Diclofenac sodium). Compounds (2, 3 and 4) are the most important molecules and hence the need to develop new drugs of antibacterial, antifungal and anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:27579011

  19. Anti-inflammatory activities of selected synthetic homoisoflavanones.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Mahidansha M; Kruger, Hendrik G; Bodenstein, Johannes; Smith, Peter; du Toit, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Four homoisoflavanones of the 3-benzylidene-4-chromanone type, some of which were previously isolated from Caesalpinia pulcherrima, were synthesised to determine their anti-inflammatory activity and cytotoxicity. A range of four different homoisoflavanones (compounds 4a-4d) were synthesised from the corresponding substituted phenols. ¹H- and ¹³C-NMR data together with high-resolution mass spectroscopy data were employed to elucidate the structures. Anti-inflammatory activity was determined in mice with acute croton oil-induced auricular dermatitis. In vitro cytotoxicity was tested against a Chinese hamster ovarian cell line using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT) assay. Compound 4a exhibited a tendency to inhibit oedema in a dose-dependent manner after 3 and 6 h of treatment. Compounds 4b-4d also inhibited oedema, although a clear dose-response relationship was not observed. Compounds 4a-4c were found to be less cytotoxic than compound 4d. Compound 4b was the least cytotoxic. Compounds 4a-4d exhibited anti-inflammatory activity and varying levels of cytotoxicity. PMID:21950651

  20. Structural characterization of anti-inflammatory Immunoglobulin G Fc proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Alysia A.; Giddens, John; Pincetic, Andrew; Lomino, Joseph V.; Ravetch, Jeffrey V.; Wang, Lai-Xi; Bjorkman, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is a central mediator of host defense due to its ability to recognize and eliminate pathogens. The recognition and effector responses are encoded on distinct regions of IgGs. The diversity of the antigen recognition Fab domains accounts for IgG's ability to bind with high specificity to essentially any antigen. Recent studies have indicated that the Fc effector domain also displays considerable heterogeneity, accounting for its complex effector functions of inflammation, modulation and immune suppression. Therapeutic anti-tumor antibodies, for example, require the pro-inflammatory properties of the IgG Fc to eliminate tumor cells, while the anti-inflammatory activity of Intravenous Immunoglobulin G (IVIG) requires specific Fc glycans for activity. In particular, the anti-inflammatory activity of IVIG is ascribed to a small population of IgGs in which the Asn297-linked complex N-glycans attached to each Fc CH2 domain include terminal α2,6-linked sialic acids. We used chemoenzymatic glycoengineering to prepare fully di-sialylated IgG Fc and solved its crystal structure. Comparison of the structures of asialylated Fc, sialylated Fc, and F241A Fc, a mutant that displays increased glycan sialylation, suggests that increased conformational flexibility of the CH2 domain is associated with the switch from pro- to anti-inflammatory activity of the Fc. PMID:25036289

  1. UV Filters, Ingredients with a Recognized Anti-Inflammatory Effect

    PubMed Central

    Couteau, Céline; Chauvet, Catherine; Paparis, Eva; Coiffard, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Background To explain observed differences during SPF determination using either an in vivo or in vitro method, we hypothesized on the presence of ingredients having anti-inflammatory properties. Methodology/Principal Findings To research our hypothesis, we studied the 21 UV filters both available on the market and authorized by European regulations and subjected these filters to the phorbol-myristate-acetate test using mice. We then catalogued the 13 filters demonstrating a significant anti-inflammatory effect with edema inhibition percentages of more than 70%. The filters are: diethylhexyl butamido triazone (92%), benzophenone-5 and titanium dioxide (90%), benzophenone-3 (83%), octocrylène and isoamyl p-methoxycinnamate (82%), PEG-25 PABA and homosalate (80%), octyl triazone and phenylbenzimidazole sulfonic acid (78%), octyl dimethyl PABA (75%), bis-ethylhexyloxyphenol methoxyphenyl triazine and diethylamino hydroxybenzoyl hexylbenzoate (70%). These filters were tested at various concentrations, including their maximum authorized dose. We detected a dose-response relationship. Conclusions/Significance The anti-inflammatory effect of a sunscreen ingredient may affect the in vivo SPF value. PMID:23284607

  2. Anti-inflammatory activity and composition of Senecio salignus Kunth.

    PubMed

    González, Cuauhtemoc Pérez; Vega, Roberto Serrano; González-Chávez, Marco; Sánchez, Miguel Angel Zavala; Gutiérrez, Salud Pérez

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of Senecio salignus. This medicinal plant is often used in Mexico for the treatment of fever and rheumatism. Chloroform and methanol extracts of the plant were tested on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate- (TPA-) induced edema in mice ears. The methanol extract of the plant inhibited edema by 36 ± 4.4% compared with the control, while the chloroform extract exhibited an even greater level of inhibition (64.1%). The chloroform extract was then fractionated, and the composition of the active fraction was determined by GC-MS. The anti-inflammatory activity of this fraction was then tested on TPA-induced ear edema in mice, and we found that the active fraction could inhibit edema by 46.9%. The anti-inflammatory effect of the fraction was also tested on carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats at doses of 100 mg/kg; a 58.9 ± 2.8% reduction of the edema was observed 4 h after administration of carrageenan, and the effect was maintained for 5 h. PMID:23691512

  3. Anti-Inflammatory Activity and Composition of Senecio salignus Kunth

    PubMed Central

    Pérez González, Cuauhtemoc; Serrano Vega, Roberto; González-Chávez, Marco; Zavala Sánchez, Miguel Angel; Pérez Gutiérrez, Salud

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the anti-inflammatory activity of Senecio salignus. This medicinal plant is often used in Mexico for the treatment of fever and rheumatism. Chloroform and methanol extracts of the plant were tested on 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate- (TPA-) induced edema in mice ears. The methanol extract of the plant inhibited edema by 36 ± 4.4% compared with the control, while the chloroform extract exhibited an even greater level of inhibition (64.1%). The chloroform extract was then fractionated, and the composition of the active fraction was determined by GC-MS. The anti-inflammatory activity of this fraction was then tested on TPA-induced ear edema in mice, and we found that the active fraction could inhibit edema by 46.9%. The anti-inflammatory effect of the fraction was also tested on carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats at doses of 100 mg/kg; a 58.9 ± 2.8% reduction of the edema was observed 4 h after administration of carrageenan, and the effect was maintained for 5 h. PMID:23691512

  4. Anti-inflammatory effect of thalidomide dithiocarbamate and dithioate analogs.

    PubMed

    Talaat, Roba; El-Sayed, Waheba; Agwa, Hussein S; Gamal-Eldeen, Amira M; Moawia, Shaden; Zahran, Magdy A H

    2015-08-01

    Thalidomide has anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, and anti-angiogenic properties. It has been used to treat a variety of cancers and autoimmune diseases. This study aimed to characterize anti-inflammatory activities of novel thalidomide analogs by exploring their effects on splenocytes proliferation and macrophage functions and their antioxidant activity. MTT assay was used to assess the cytotoxic effect of thalidomide analogs against splenocytes. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB-P65) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Nitric oxide (NO) was estimated by colorimetric assay. Antioxidant activity was examined by ORAC assay. Our results demonstrated that thalidomide dithioate analog 2 and thalidomide dithiocarbamate analog 4 produced a slight increase in splenocyte proliferation compared with thalidomide. Thalidomide dithiocarbamate analog 1 is a potent inhibitor of TNF-α production, whereas thalidomide dithiocarbamate analog 5 is a potent inhibitor of both TNF-α and NO. Analog 2 has a pronounced inhibitory effect on NF-κB-P65 production level. All thalidomide analogs showed prooxidant activity against hydroxyl (OH) radical. Analog 1 and thalidomide dithioate analog 3 have prooxidant activity against peroxyl (ROO) radical in relation to thalidomide. On the other hand, analog 4 has a potent scavenging capacity against peroxyl (ROO) radical compared with thalidomide. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that thalidomide analogs might have valuable anti-inflammatory activities with more pronounced effect than thalidomide itself. PMID:26051520

  5. Anti-inflammatory activity of Pistacia khinjuk in different experimental models: isolation and characterization of its flavonoids and galloylated sugars.

    PubMed

    Esmat, Ahmed; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A; Algandaby, Mardi M; Moussa, Ashaimaa Y; Labib, Rola M; Ayoub, Nahla A; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2012-03-01

    The present study aimed at isolating and elucidating the structure of the main components of Pistacia khinjuk L. and exploring its potential anti-inflammatory effect in different experimental models. The extract was evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity by measuring paw volume in three experimental models. Then, prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) level, ear edema, tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, histopathology, nitric oxide (NO) level, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) level were assessed. Seven phenolic compounds, mainly flavonoids and galloylated compounds, were isolated from the aqueous methanol extract: gallic acid (1), methyl gallate (2), quercetin-3-O-β-D-⁴C₁-galactopyranoside (hyperin) (3), myricetin-3-O-α-L-¹C₄-rhamnopyranoside (myricitrin) (4), 1,6-digalloyl-β-D-glucose (5), 1,4-digalloyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (6), and 2,3-di-O-galloyl-(α/β)-⁴C₁-glucopyranose (nilocitin) (7). The anti-inflammatory activity was evidenced by decreased carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and PGE₂ elevation. In the croton oil-induced ear edema model, MPO activity was significantly inhibited, and inflammatory histopathological changes were ameliorated. In the rat air pouch model, NO generation and TNF-α release were significantly inhibited. The isolation and nuclear magnetic resonance spectral data of compound 6 from the genus Pistacia are revealed for the first time. Also, P. khinjuk L. aqueous methanol extract possesses anti-inflammatory activity in several experimental models. PMID:22082098

  6. The Dietary Flavonoid Kaempferol Mediates Anti-Inflammatory Responses via the Src, Syk, IRAK1, and IRAK4 Molecular Targets

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shi Hyoung; Park, Jae Gwang; Lee, Jongsung; Yang, Woo Seok; Park, Gye Won; Kim, Han Gyung; Baek, Kwang-Soo; Hossen, Muhammad Jahangir; Lee, Mi-nam; Kim, Jong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Even though a lot of reports have suggested the anti-inflammatory activity of kaempferol (KF) in macrophages, little is known about its exact anti-inflammatory mode of action and its immunopharmacological target molecules. In this study, we explored anti-inflammatory activity of KF in LPS-treated macrophages. In particular, molecular targets for KF action were identified by using biochemical and molecular biological analyses. KF suppressed the release of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), downregulated the cellular adhesion of U937 cells to fibronectin (FN), neutralized the generation of radicals, and diminished mRNA expression levels of inflammatory genes encoding inducible NO synthase (iNOS), TNF-α, and cyclooxygenase- (COX-) 2 in lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) and sodium nitroprusside- (SNP-) treated RAW264.7 cells and peritoneal macrophages. KF reduced NF-κB (p65 and p50) and AP-1 (c-Jun and c-Fos) levels in the nucleus and their transcriptional activity. Interestingly, it was found that Src, Syk, IRAK1, and IRAK4 responsible for NF-κB and AP-1 activation were identified as the direct molecular targets of KF by kinase enzyme assays and by measuring their phosphorylation patterns. KF was revealed to have in vitro and in vivo anti-inflammatory activity by the direct suppression of Src, Syk, IRAK1, and IRAK4, involved in the activation of NF-κB and AP-1. PMID:25922567

  7. D-Amino Acids Boost the Selectivity and Confer Supramolecular Hydrogels of a Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug (NSAID)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiayang; Kuang, Yi; Gao, Yuan; Du, Xuewen; Shi, Junfeng

    2012-01-01

    As systemically used therapeutics for treatmenting acute or chronic pains or inflammations, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) also associate with the adverse gastrointestinal and renal effects and cardiovascular risks. Thus, it is beneficial to develop topical gels that selectively inhibit cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) for the management of local inflammation. In this work, we demonstrate that the covalent conjugation of D-amino acids to naproxen (i.e., an NSAID) not only affords supramolecular hydrogelators for the topical gels, but also unexpectedly and significantly elevates the selectivity towards COX-2 about 20 times at little expense of the activity of naproxen. This work illustrates a previously unexplored approach that employs D-amino acids for the development of functional molecules that have dual or multiple roles and exceptional biostability, which offers a new class of molecular hydrogels of therapeutic agents. PMID:23136972

  8. Crystal Structures of mPGES-1 Inhibitor Complexes Form a Basis for the Rational Design of Potent Analgesic and Anti-Inflammatory Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Luz, John Gately; Antonysamy, Stephen; Kuklish, Steven L; Condon, Bradley; Lee, Matthew R; Allison, Dagart; Yu, Xiao-Peng; Chandrasekhar, Srinivasan; Backer, Ryan; Zhang, Aiping; Russell, Marijane; Chang, Shawn S; Harvey, Anita; Sloan, Ashley V; Fisher, Matthew J

    2015-06-11

    Microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 (mPGES-1) is an α-helical homotrimeric integral membrane inducible enzyme that catalyzes the formation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) from prostaglandin H2 (PGH2). Inhibition of mPGES-1 has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of pain, inflammation, and some cancers. Interest in mPGES-1 inhibition can, in part, be attributed to the potential circumvention of cardiovascular risks associated with anti-inflammatory cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors (coxibs) by targeting the prostaglandin pathway downstream of PGH2 synthesis and avoiding suppression of antithrombotic prostacyclin production. We determined the crystal structure of mPGES-1 bound to four potent inhibitors in order to understand their structure-activity relationships and provide a framework for the rational design of improved molecules. In addition, we developed a light-scattering-based thermal stability assay to identify molecules for crystallographic studies. PMID:25961169

  9. Cardiovascular complications of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Fosslien, Egil

    2005-01-01

    Coxibs, such as rofecoxib, celecoxib, and valdecoxib, selectively inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, the mainly inducible, pro-inflammatory COX isoform. Unlike traditional non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) most coxibs do not significantly inhibit COX-1 and are therefore less toxic to the gastrointestinal tract. Hence, coxibs widely replaced traditional NSAIDs for treatment of arthritis and other painful inflammatory conditions. In many, but not all, clinical studies, coxibs became associated with higher risks of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke. Several mechanisms may be involved in the pathogenesis of such complications. First, selective inhibition of COX-1 lowers platelet synthesis of thromboxane (TXA(2)), a thrombogenic and atherogenic eicosanoid. Selective inhibition of COX-2 limits endothelial cell synthesis of prostacyclin (PGI(2)), an arachidonic acid product that opposes the effects of thromboxane. In apoE-/- mice, interruption of TXA(2) signaling by deletion of its receptor (TP) limits atherogenesis, whereas interruption of PGI2 signaling by deletion of its receptor (IP) accelerates atherogenesis. This suggests that selective inhibition of COX-2 can disrupt the physiological balance between thromboxane and prostacyclin and thus increase atherosclerosis, thrombogenesis, and the risk of cardiovascular complications. Second, COX inhibition can raise levels of arachidonic acid, which can inhibit mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and increase OXPHOS generation of reactive oxygen species. Several NSAIDs, including coxibs and meloxicam, directly uncouple or inhibit OXPHOS. Studies of apoE-/- mice indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction plays an early role in atherogenesis. Third, many NSAIDs exhibit COX-independent properties. For example, in animal models, short-term treatment with celecoxib reduces monocyte chemotaxis by reducing expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1. However, long-term treatment results in the

  10. New cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory steroids from the soft coral Klyxum flaccidum.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Wan-Ru; Huang, Chiung-Yao; Tsai, Yi-Ying; Lin, Yun-Sheng; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Su, Jui-Hsin; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Dai, Chang-Feng; Sheu, Jyh-Horng

    2016-07-15

    Four new steroids, namely klyflaccisteroids G-J (1-4) were isolated from the Formosan soft coral Klyxum flaccidum. The structures of compounds 1-4 were established by spectral data analysis (IR, MS, 1D and 2D NMR) and comparison of spectral data with those of the related known compounds. Cytotoxicity assay revealed that 4 exhibited inhibition activity against the growth of HT-29, P388 and K562 cancer cell lines, whereas 2 showed selective cytotoxicity toward P388 cells. Compound 4 was also found to display significant anti-inflammatory activity for suppressing superoxide anion generation (O2(-)) and elastase release. PMID:27256910

  11. Antioxidant, analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of the methanolic extract of Piper betle leaves

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Badrul; Akter, Fahima; Parvin, Nahida; Sharmin Pia, Rashna; Akter, Sharmin; Chowdhury, Jesmin; Sifath-E-Jahan, Kazi; Haque, Ekramul

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to evaluate the antioxidant, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory activities of the methanolic extract of Piper betle leaves (MPBL). Materials and Methods: MPBL was evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity using carrageenan-induced hind paw edema model. Analgesic activity of MPBL was evaluated by hot plate, writhing, and formalin tests. Total phenolic and flavonoids content, total antioxidant activity, scavenging of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, peroxynitrate (ONOO) as well as inhibition of total ROS generation, and assessment of reducing power were used to evaluate antioxidant potential of MPBL. Results: The extract of MPBL, at the dose of 100 and 200 mg/kg, produced a significant (p<0.05) increase in pain threshold in hot plate method whereas significantly (p<0.05) reduced the writhing caused by acetic acid and the number of licks induced by formalin in a dose-dependent manner. The same ranges of doses of MPBL caused significant (p<0.05) inhibition of carrageenan-induced paw edema after 4 h in a dose-dependent manner. In DPPH, ONOO-, and total ROS scavenging method, MPBL showed good antioxidant potentiality with the IC50 value of 16.33±1.02, 25.16±0.61 , and 41.72±0.48 µg/ml, respectively with a significant (p<0.05) good reducing power. Conclusion: The findings of the study suggested that MPBL has strong analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant effects, conforming the traditional use of this plant for inflammatory pain alleviation to its antioxidant potentiality. PMID:25050265

  12. Postoperative non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and colorectal anastomotic leakage. NSAIDs and anastomotic leakage.

    PubMed

    Klein, Mads

    2012-03-01

    Anastomotic leakage (AL) is the most important and one of the most serious complications after colorectal resections with primary anastomosis. Any factors that contribute to increase the risk of AL should be identified and--if possible--eliminated. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are often used for treating pain after surgical procedures, among these also colorectal resections. The objective of this Ph.d. thesis was to investigate whether the use of NSAIDs in the postoperative period increases the risk of AL, and investigate the effect on pathophysiological mechanisms. In order to achieve this, the following studies were performed. Study I was a retrospective, case-control study in 75 patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal resection for colorectal cancer. 33 of these patients received the NSAID diclofenac in the postoperative period; the remaining 42 did not receive any NSAID. There were significantly more ALs among the patients receiving diclofenac (7/33 vs. 1/42, p=0.018). In uni- and multivariate logistic regression analyses, diclofenac was the only factor associated with increased AL rate. This study functioned as a hypothesis generating study and laid the ground for the subsequent studies. Study II was an experimental, randomized, case-control study in 32 Wistar rats. The rats had a colonic anastomosis performed and were randomized to diclofenac or placebo treatment. After three days, the rats were sacrificed and the anastomoses were harvested. First, the anastomotic strengths were tested by longitudinal; subsequently, the levels of the enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the anastomotic tissues were measured. There was no difference among the groups with regard to anastomotic strength, but the animals treated with diclofenac had significantly lower COX-2 levels (median (range) 1.30 (0.42-3.31) ng/mg vs. 2.44 (0.88 - 18.94) ng/mg, p<0.001). This study showed that the used dose of diclofenac was sufficient and relevant, but did not show a

  13. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Tanzawaic Acid Derivatives from a Marine-Derived Fungus Penicillium steckii 108YD142

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hee Jae; Pil, Gam Bang; Heo, Soo-Jin; Lee, Hyi-Seung; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Yeon-Ju; Lee, Jihoon; Won, Ho Shik

    2016-01-01

    Chemical investigation of a marine-derived fungus, Penicillium steckii 108YD142, resulted in the discovery of a new tanzawaic acid derivative, tanzawaic acid Q (1), together with four known analogues, tanzawaic acids A (2), C (3), D (4), and K (5). The structures of tanzawaic acid derivatives 1–5 were determined by the detailed analysis of 1D, 2D NMR and LC-MS data, along with chemical methods and literature data analysis. These compounds significantly inhibited nitric oxide (NO) production and the new tanzawaic acid Q (1) inhibited the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) proteins and mRNA expressions in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Additionally, compound 1 reduced the mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrated that the new tanzawaic acid derivative inhibits LPS-induced inflammation. This is the first report on the anti-inflammatory activity of tanzawaic acid Q (1). PMID:26761016

  14. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Tanzawaic Acid Derivatives from a Marine-Derived Fungus Penicillium steckii 108YD142.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hee Jae; Pil, Gam Bang; Heo, Soo-Jin; Lee, Hyi-Seung; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Yeon-Ju; Lee, Jihoon; Won, Ho Shik

    2016-01-01

    Chemical investigation of a marine-derived fungus, Penicillium steckii 108YD142, resulted in the discovery of a new tanzawaic acid derivative, tanzawaic acid Q (1), together with four known analogues, tanzawaic acids A (2), C (3), D (4), and K (5). The structures of tanzawaic acid derivatives 1-5 were determined by the detailed analysis of 1D, 2D NMR and LC-MS data, along with chemical methods and literature data analysis. These compounds significantly inhibited nitric oxide (NO) production and the new tanzawaic acid Q (1) inhibited the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) proteins and mRNA expressions in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Additionally, compound 1 reduced the mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines. Taken together, the results of this study demonstrated that the new tanzawaic acid derivative inhibits LPS-induced inflammation. This is the first report on the anti-inflammatory activity of tanzawaic acid Q (1). PMID:26761016

  15. Involvement of the Antioxidant Effect and Anti-inflammatory Response in Butyrate-Inhibited Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Omana P.; Ranganna, Kasturi; Milton, Shirlette G.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms by altering the expression and, in turn, functions of target genes have potential to modify cellular processes that are characteristics of atherosclerosis, including inflammation, proliferation, migration and apoptosis/cell death. Butyrate, a natural epigenetic modifier and a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi), is an inhibitor of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, a critical event in atherogenesis. Here, we examined whether glutathione peroxidases (GPxs), a family of antioxidant enzymes, are modulated by butyrate, contributing to its antiproliferation action on VSMC through the regulation of the inflammatory response by using western blotting, immunostaining methods and activity assay. Treatment of VSMC with butyrate not only upregulates glutathione peroxidase (GPx) 3 and GPx4, but also increases the overall catalytic activity of GPx supporting involvement of antioxidant effect in butyrate arrested VSMC proliferation. Moreover, analysis of the redox-sensitive NF-κB transcription factor system, the target of GPx, reveals that butyrate causes downregulation of IKKα, IKKβ, IkBα and NF-κBp65 expression and prevents NF-κBp65 phosphorylation at serine536 causing inhibition of the expression NF-κB target inflammatory genes, including inducible nitric oxide synthase, VCAM-1 and cyclooxygenase-2. Overall, these observations suggest a link between the antioxidant effect and anti-inflammatory response in butyrate-arrested VSMC proliferation, accentuating the atheroprotective and therapeutic potential of natural products, like butyrate, in vascular proliferative diseases. PMID:25390157

  16. Anti-inflammatory and joint protective effects of extra-virgin olive-oil polyphenol extract in experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rosillo, María Ángeles; Alcaraz, María José; Sánchez-Hidalgo, Marina; Fernández-Bolaños, José G; Alarcón-de-la-Lastra, Catalina; Ferrándiz, María Luisa

    2014-12-01

    The consumption of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) in Mediterranean countries has shown beneficial effects. A wide range of evidence indicates that phenolic compounds present in EVOO are endowed with anti-inflammatory properties. In this work, we evaluated the effects of EVOO-polyphenol extract (PE) in a model of rheumatoid arthritis, the collagen-induced arthritis model in mice. On day 0, DBA-1/J mice were immunized with bovine type II collagen. On day 21, mice received a booster injection. PE (100 and 200 mg/kg) was orally administered once a day from days 29 to 41 to arthritic mice. We have demonstrated that PE decreases joint edema, cell migration, cartilage degradation and bone erosion. PE significantly reduced the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and prostaglandin E2 in the joint as well as the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1. Our data indicate that PE inhibits c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p38 and signal transducer and activator of transcription-3. In addition, PE decreases nuclear factor κB translocation leading to the down-regulation of the arthritic process. These results support the interest of natural diet components in the development of therapeutic products for arthritic conditions. PMID:25294776

  17. Treatment of persistent mating-induced endometritis in mares with the non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug vedaprofen.

    PubMed

    Rojer, H; Aurich, C

    2010-12-01

    Recently, successful treatment of mares with a history of persistent mating-induced endometritis (PMIE) with dexamethasone has been reported. As systemic treatment of horses with glucocorticoids should be handled with caution, we tested the hypothesis that treatment with the non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) vedaprofen, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, may have comparative, positive effects on fertility. Barren mares with a history of repeated PMIE were treated with vedaprofen (n = 8; initially 2 mg/kg bodyweight followed by 1 mg/kg orally twice daily) from 1 day before the first insemination to 1 day after ovulation or left untreated (n = 9). All mares received oxytocin (20 I.E. s.c.) thrice daily. Uterine swabs were collected for bacteriology and cytology. The day after ovulation, fluid accumulation was detected in three control mares and four treated mares (n.s.). The percentage of neutrophils in uterine cytology was significantly increased in comparison to the day before ovulation irrespective of treatment. Pregnancy was confirmed in two of nine mares in the control group and seven of eight mares in the treatment group (p < 0.05). NSAIDs may positively affect fertility in mares with a history of PMIE. PMID:20074320

  18. Anti-inflammatory activity of Euphorbia aegyptiaca extract in rats

    PubMed Central

    Abo-dola, Marium A.; Lutfi, Mohamed F.

    2016-01-01

    Background There were no studies on the anti-inflammatory activity of Euphorbia aegyptiaca, though it is commonly used by Sudanese herbalists in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Objectives To determine phytochemical constituents of Euphorbia aegyptiaca To investigate the anti-inflammatory activity of Euphorbia aegyptiaca in rats. Methodology Plant material was extracted by ethanol and phytochemical screening was done according to standard methods. The thickness of Albino rats’ paws were measured before injection of 0.1 ml of 1% formalin in the sub planter region and then, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 24 hours after oral dose of ethanolic extract of Euphorbia aegyptiaca at a rate of 400mg/kg, 800mg/kg, indomethacin (5mg/kg) and normal saline (5ml/kg). Edema inhibition percentage (EI%) and mean paw thickness (MPT) were measured in the different groups and compared using appropriate statistical methods. Results The phytochemical screening revealed the presence of saponins, cumarins, flavonoids, tannins, sterols, triterpenes, and absence of alkaloids, anthraquinones glycosides and cyanogenic glycosides. The mean of EI% of rats treated with indomethacin at a dose of 5 mg/kg over different time intervals (64.0%) was significantly lower compared to those treated with Euphorbia aegyptiaca at a dose of 800 mg/kg (75.0%, P< 0.001), but higher compared to rats treated at higher dose of 400 mg/kg (57.4%, P< 0.001). In contrast, MPT of rats treated with indomethacin at a dose of 5 mg/kg (6.5±1.1 mm) was significantly higher compared to those treated with Euphorbia aegyptiaca at a dose of 800 mg/kg (6.1±.7 mm, P< 0.001) as well as 400 mg/kg (5.9±.5, P< 0.001). Conclusion Euphorbia aegyptiaca ethanolic extract has a sustained dose-dependent anti-inflammatory activity. PMID:27004059

  19. Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory potential of Rhododendron arboreum bark.

    PubMed

    Nisar, Muhammad; Ali, Sajid; Muhammad, Naveed; Gillani, Syed N; Shah, Muhmmad R; Khan, Haroon; Maione, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    Rhododendron arboreum Smith. (Ericaceae), an evergreen small tree, is one of the 1000 species that belongs to genus Rhododendron distributed worldwide. In folk medicine, as various parts of this plant exhibit medicinal properties, it is used in the treatment of different ailments.The present study was designed to evaluate the potential anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects of methanolic extract of R. arboreum bark, followed by activity-guided fractionation of n-hexane, n-butanol, chloroform, ethyl acetate and aqueous fractions.The ethyl acetate fraction (200 mg/kg i.p.) showed the maximum analgesic effect (82%) in acetic acid-induced writhing, followed, to a less extent, by crude extract and chloroform fraction both at a dose of 200 mg/kg i.p. (65.09% and 67.89%, respectively). In carrageenan-induced mouse paw oedema, the crude extract and its related fractions displayed in a dose-dependent manner (50-200 mg/kg i.p.) an anti-inflammatory activity for all time-courses (1-5 hrs). For the active extract/fractions (200 mg/kg i.p.), the maximum effect was observed 5 h after carrageenan injection. These evidences were also supported by in vitro lipoxygenase inhibitory properties. In conclusion, R. arboreum crude methanolic extract and its fractions exhibited anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive effects. For these reasons, this plant could be a promising source of new compounds for the management of pain and inflammatory diseases. PMID:25501256

  20. Anti-inflammatory and vascularprotective properties of 8-prenylapigenin.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Tiziana; Fallarini, Silvia; Gugliesi, Francesca; Minassi, Alberto; Appendino, Giovanni; Lombardi, Grazia

    2009-10-12

    Flavonoids display several biological activities, but exhibit poor oral absorption and rapid metabolism. To improve their pharmacological profile four C8-prenyl flavonoids, structurally related to the anti-inflammatory lead apigenin, were synthesized, and the two least cytotoxic (IC(50)>30 microM) compounds [8-prenylnaringenin (8-PN) and 8-prenylapigenin (8-PA)] in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages were assayed against a panel of biological targets. The anti-inflammatory properties of these compounds were evaluated in an in vitro model of inflammation [cells exposed to 0.1 microg/ml lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 24h]. Both 8-PN and 8-PA were equally effective and potent in inhibiting the LPS-induced gene expression [tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2] (RT-PCR) and release (ELISA) of pro-inflammatory mediators [TNF-alpha, NO, prostaglandin (PG)E(2)], through mechanisms involving the inhibition of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation (EMSA) and reactive oxygen species accumulation [2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) determination]. One-digit nM concentrations of 8-PN or 8-PA induced a significant increase in the basal production of the atheroprotective prostacyclin (PGI(2)) by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), with maximal effects at 10 nM. Both NS-398, a specific COX-2 inhibitor, and ICI 182 780, a non-selective estrogen receptor antagonist, abolished the activity of these compounds, suggesting a COX- and estrogen receptor-dependent mechanism of activity. 8-PA, a weaker estrogenic compound than 8-PN, resulted only 2-fold less potent than 8-PN in potentiating PGI(2) production by HUVEC, qualifying this C8-prenyl flavonoid as a lead for the rational design of new anti-inflammatory and vascularprotective compounds. PMID:19686724

  1. Role of cyclooxygenase-2 in intestinal injury in neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    LU, HUI; ZHU, BING

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common gastrointestinal emergency in premature neonates. The pathogenesis of NEC remains poorly understood. The present study aimed to investigate the dynamic change and role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in neonatal rats with intestinal injury. Wistar rats, <24 h in age, received an intraperitoneal injection with 5 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Ileal tissues were collected at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h following the LPS challenge for histological evaluation of NEC and for measurements of COX-2 mRNA. The correlation between the degree of intestinal injury and expression of COX-2 mRNA was determined. The LPS-injected pups showed a significant increase in injury scores compared to the control, and the most deteriorating change was at 12 h. COX-2 mRNA expression was upregulated following LPS injection. There was a significantly positive correlation between COX-2 mRNA and the grade of intestinal injury within 12 h, whereas COX-2 mRNA expression had a significantly negative correlation with the severity of intestinal injury at 24 h. COX-2 plays an important role in LPS-induced intestinal injury and the repair processes. Caution should be exerted concerning the potential therapeutic uses of COX-2 inhibitors or promoters in NEC. PMID:25279162

  2. Cyclooxygenase-2 and the inflammogenesis of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Randall E; Casto, Bruce C; Harris, Zachary M

    2014-01-01

    Cohesive scientific evidence from molecular, animal, and human investigations supports the hypothesis that constitutive overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a ubiquitous driver of mammary carcinogenesis, and reciprocally, that COX-2 blockade has strong potential for breast cancer prevention and therapy. Key findings include the following: (1) COX-2 is constitutively expressed throughout breast cancer development and expression intensifies with stage at detection, cancer progression and metastasis; (2) essential features of mammary carcinogenesis (mutagenesis, mitogenesis, angiogenesis, reduced apoptosis, metastasis and immunosuppression) are linked to COX-2-driven prostaglandin E2 (PGE-2) biosynthesis; (3) upregulation of COX-2 and PGE-2 expression induces transcription of CYP-19 and aromatase-catalyzed estrogen biosynthesis which stimulates unbridled mitogenesis; (4) extrahepatic CYP-1B1 in mammary adipose tissue converts paracrine estrogen to carcinogenic quinones with mutagenic impact; and (5) agents that inhibit COX-2 reduce the risk of breast cancer in women without disease and reduce recurrence risk and mortality in women with breast cancer. Recent sharp increases in global breast cancer incidence and mortality are likely driven by chronic inflammation of mammary adipose and upregulation of COX-2 associated with the obesity pandemic. The totality of evidence clearly supports the supposition that mammary carcinogenesis often evolves as a progressive series of highly specific cellular and molecular changes in response to induction of constitutive over-expression of COX-2 and the prostaglandin cascade in the “inflammogenesis of breast cancer”. PMID:25302170

  3. Role of cyclooxygenase-2 in gastric cancer development and progression

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jian; Fan, Xiao-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Although the incidence of gastric cancer has been declining in recent decades, it remains a major public health issue as the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. In China, gastric cancer is still the main cause of death in patients with malignant tumors. Most patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage and mortality is high. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a rate-limiting enzyme in prostanoid synthesis and plays an important role in the development and progression of gastric cancer. The expression of COX-2 in gastric cancer is upregulated and its molecular mechanisms have been investigated. Helicobacter pylori infection, tumor suppressor gene mutation and the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B may be responsible for the elevated expression of COX-2 in gastric cancer. The mechanisms of COX-2 in the development and progression of gastric cancer are probably through promoting the proliferation of gastric cancer cells, while inhibiting apoptosis, assisting angiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis, and participating in cancer invasion and immunosuppression. This review is intended to discuss, comment and summarize recent research progress on the role of COX-2 in gastric cancer development and progression, and elucidate the molecular mechanisms which might be involved in the carcinogenesis. PMID:24259966

  4. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Procyanidins from Wild Grape (Vitis amurensis) Seeds in LPS-Induced RAW 264.7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bak, Min-Ji; Truong, Van Long; Kang, Hey-Sook; Jun, Mira; Jeong, Woo-Sik

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the anti-inflammatory effect and underlying mechanisms of wild grape seeds procyanidins (WGP) were examined using lipopolysaccharide- (LPS-) stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. We used nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) assays to examine inhibitory effect of WGP and further investigated the mechanisms of WGP suppressed LPS-mediated genes and upstream expression by Western blot and confocal microscopy analysis. Our data indicate that WGP significantly reduced NO, PGE2, and ROS production and also inhibited the expression of proinflammatory mediators such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expressions. Consistently, WGP significantly reduced LPS-stimulated expression of proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and interleukin- (IL-) 1β. Moreover, WGP prevented nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) p65 subunit by reducing inhibitory κB-α (IκBα) and NFκB phosphorylation. Furthermore, we found that WGP inhibited LPS-induced phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Taken together, our results demonstrated that WGP exerts potent anti-inflammatory activity through the inhibition of iNOS and COX-2 by regulating NFκB and p38 MAPK pathway. PMID:24260615

  5. The anti-inflammatory effect of a glycosylation product derived from the high hydrostatic pressure enzymatic hydrolysate of a flatfish byproduct.

    PubMed

    Choe, In-Hu; Jeon, Hyeon Jin; Eom, Sung-Hwan; Han, Young-Ki; Kim, Yoon Sook; Lee, Sang-Hoon

    2016-06-15

    In this study, flatfish byproducts were hydrolyzed by Protamex at high hydrostatic pressure and glycosylated with ribose to utilize the protein of flatfish byproducts as a nutraceutical. We investigated the anti-inflammatory effects of glycosylated fish byproduct protein hydrolysate (GFPH) and its anti-inflammatory mechanisms were elucidated in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage. The results showed that GFPH suppresses LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) dose-dependently. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit clearly demonstrated that GFPH significantly reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as, interleukin (IL)-6, interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1. Moreover, GFPH reduced nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. These results indicate that the inhibitory effects of GFPH on LPS-induced NO and PGE2 production might be due to the suppression of the NF-κB and MAPKs signaling pathways. Therefore, these results suggest that flatfish byproducts are latent bioactive resources and GFPH may have potential as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of various inflammatory diseases. PMID:27068102

  6. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 mediates the anti-inflammatory effects of the ethanol extract of Rubus coreanus in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun Hong; Oh, Sun-Mee; Lim, Soon Sung; Lee, Yeon Sil; Shin, Hyun-Kyung; Oh, Yang-Seok; Choe, Nong-Hoon; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Kim, Jin-Kyung

    2006-12-01

    Foods of plant origin, especially fruits and vegetables, draw increased attention because of their potential benefits to human health. The aim of the present study was to determine in vitro anti-inflammatory activity of four different extracts obtained from the fruits of Rubus coreanus (aqueous and ethanol extracts of unripe and ripe fruits). Among the four extracts, the ethanol extract of unripe fruits of R. coreanus (URCE) suppressed nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 murine macrophages. We also demonstrated that URCE by itself is a potent inducer of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Inhibition of HO-1 activity by tin protoporphyrin, a specific HO-1 inhibitor, suppressed the URCE-induced reductions in the production of NO and PGE(2) as well as the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2). Our data suggest that URCE exerts anti-inflammatory effects in macrophages via activation of the HO-1 pathway and helps to elucidate the mechanism underlying the potential therapeutic value of R. coreanus extracts. PMID:17049489

  7. Alpha-Pinene Exhibits Anti-Inflammatory Activity Through the Suppression of MAPKs and the NF-κB Pathway in Mouse Peritoneal Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Seung; Lee, Hyun-Ja; Jeon, Yong-Deok; Han, Yo-Han; Kee, Ji-Ye; Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Shin, Hyun-Ji; Kang, JongWook; Lee, Beom Su; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Kim, Su-Jin; Park, Sang-Hyun; Choi, Byung-Min; Park, Sung-Joo; Um, Jae-Young; Hong, Seung-Heon

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we found that alpha-pinene (α-pinene) exhibits anti-inflammatory activity through the suppression of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway in mouse peritoneal macrophages. α-Pinene is found in the oils of many coniferous trees and rosemary. We investigated the inhibitory effects of α-Pinene on inflammatory responses induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using mouse peritoneal macrophages. α-Pinene significantly decreased the LPS-induced production of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and nitric oxide (NO). α-Pinene also inhibited inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expressions in LPS-stimulated macrophages. Additionally, the activations of MAPKs and NF-κB were attenuated by means of α-pinene treatment. These results indicate that α-pinene has an anti-inflammatory effect and that it is a potential candidate as a new drug to treat various inflammatory diseases. PMID:26119957

  8. Anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drugs and reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Østensen, Monika; Khamashta, Munther; Lockshin, Michael; Parke, Ann; Brucato, Antonio; Carp, Howard; Doria, Andrea; Rai, Raj; Meroni, Pierluigi; Cetin, Irene; Derksen, Ronald; Branch, Ware; Motta, Mario; Gordon, Caroline; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Spinillo, Arsenio; Friedman, Deborah; Cimaz, Rolando; Czeizel, Andrew; Piette, Jean Charles; Cervera, Ricard; Levy, Roger A; Clementi, Maurizio; De Carolis, Sara; Petri, Michelle; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Faden, David; Valesini, Guido; Tincani, Angela

    2006-01-01

    Rheumatic diseases in women of childbearing years may necessitate drug treatment during a pregnancy, to control maternal disease activity and to ensure a successful pregnancy outcome. This survey is based on a consensus workshop of international experts discussing effects of anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive and biological drugs during pregnancy and lactation. In addition, effects of these drugs on male and female fertility and possible long-term effects on infants exposed to drugs antenatally are discussed where data were available. Recommendations for drug treatment during pregnancy and lactation are given. PMID:16712713

  9. Terpenoids with anti-inflammatory activity from Abies chensiensis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qian-Qian; Wang, Shu-Fang; Li, Ya; Song, Qiu-Yan; Gao, Kun

    2016-06-01

    The phytochemical investigation of Abies chensiensis led to the isolation and identification of nine new compounds including eight triterpenoids (1-8) and a new abietane-type diterpene (9), along with three known compounds (10-12). The absolute configuration of 9 was assigned by X-ray diffraction analysis. Compounds 1-11 were evaluated for the anti-inflammatory activity. Among the tested compounds, 1, 2, 5 and 6 exhibited potent inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 15.97, 18.73, 20.18 and 10.97μM, respectively. PMID:27080759

  10. Anti-inflammatory activity of Abutilon indicum extract.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Priyanka; Chauhan, N S; Patel, J R

    2012-01-01

    Abutilon indicum Linn. had been broadly used for its reported biological activities in indigenous system of medicine. The ethanolic extract of the whole plant of A. indicum Linn. was evaluated for its anti-inflammatory activity at doses 250, 500 and 750 mg kg⁻¹ using the carrageenan-induced paw oedema in healthy Wistar albino rats. Results of in vivo activity led to the conclusion that the ethanolic extract of A. indicum showed predominantly significant activity in a dose-dependent manner, which is comparable to the reference standard ibuprofen. The results prove the traditional use of plant in the treatment of inflammation. PMID:21999427