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Sample records for cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition protects

  1. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition provides lasting protection against neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Fathali, Nancy; Ostrowski, Robert P.; Lekic, Tim; Jadhav, Vikram; Tong, Wenni; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The development of brain inflammation largely contributes to neonatal brain injury that may lead to a lifetime of neurologic deficits. The present study was designed to investigate whether inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a critical component of the inflammatory pathway, is neuroprotective in a neonatal rat model of cerebral hypoxia-ischemia (HI). Design Laboratory investigation. Setting University research laboratory. Subjects Postnatal day-10 Sprague-Dawley rats. Interventions Neonatal HI was induced by ligation of the right common carotid artery followed by two hours of hypoxia (8% O2). The pups in treatment groups were administered 10mg/kg (low dose) or 30mg/kg (high dose) of a known selective COX-2 inhibitor (NS398). Animals were euthanized at three time points: 72hrs, 2wks, or 6wks. Inflammation outcomes were assessed at 72hrs; brain damage was assessed at 2- and 6wks along with other organs (heart, spleen). Detailed neurobehavioral examination was performed at 6wks. Measurements and Main Results Pharmacological inhibition of COX-2 markedly increased survivability within the first 72hrs compared to untreated rats (100% vs. 72%). Low- and high-dose NS398 significantly attenuated the loss of brain and body weights observed after HI. Neurobehavioral outcomes were significantly improved in some parameters with low dose treatment; while, high dose treatment consistently improved all neurological deficits. Immunohistochemical results showed a marked decrease in macrophage, microglial, and neutrophil abundance in ipsilateral brain of NS398 treated group along with a reduction in interleukin-6 expression. Conclusions Selective COX-2 inhibition protected neonatal rats against death, progression of brain injury, growth retardation, and neurobehavioral deficits after a hypoxic-ischemic insult. PMID:20029340

  2. Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibition Protects Against Myocardial Damage in Experimental Acute Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Carnieto, Alberto; Dourado, Paulo Magno Martins; da Luz, Protásio Lemos; Chagas, Antonio Carlos Palandri

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Acute myocardial infarction is associated with tissue inflammation. Early coronary reperfusion clearly improves the outcome but may help propagate the inflammatory response and enhance tissue damage. Cyclooxygenase-2 is an enzyme that catalyzes the initial step in the formation of inflammatory prostaglandins from arachidonic acid. Cyclooxygenase-2 levels are increased when ischemic cardiac events occur. The overall function of COX-2 in the inflammatory process generated by myocardial ischemic damage has not yet been elucidated. GOAL The objective of this study was to determine whether a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (rofecoxib) could alter the evolution of acute myocardial infarction after reperfusion. METHODS AND RESULTS This study was performed with 48 mongrel dogs divided into two groups: controls and those treated with the drug. All animals were prepared for left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion. The dogs then underwent 180 minutes of coronary occlusion, followed by 30 minutes of reperfusion. Blood samples were collected from the venous sinus immediately before coronary occlusion and after 30 minutes of reperfusion for measurements of CPK-MB, CPK-MBm and troponin I. During the experiment we observed the mean blood pressure, heart rate and coronary flow. The coronary flow and heart rate did not change, but in the control group, there was blood pressure instability, in addition to maximal levels of CPK-MB post-infarction. The same results were observed for CPK-MBm and troponin I. CONCLUSION In a canine model of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion, selective inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 with rofecoxib was not associated with early detrimental effects on the hemodynamic profile or the gross extent of infarction; in fact, it may be beneficial by limiting cell necrosis. PMID:19330252

  3. Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibition Provides Lasting Protection Following Germinal Matrix Hemorrhage in Premature Infant Rats.

    PubMed

    Lekic, Tim; Krafft, Paul R; Klebe, Damon; Rolland, William B; Flores, Jerry; Tang, Jiping; Zhang, John H

    2016-01-01

    Germinal matrix hemorrhage (GMH) is a major cause of brain damage in prematurity and has long-lasting neurological implications. The development of brain inflammation contributes to brain injury, leading to a lifetime of neurologic deficits. PAR-1 and 4 receptors are involved with inflammatory pathways after brain hemorrhage in adult models of stroke, of which cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a potential mediator. We therefore hypothesized a role for PAR-1, 4/ COX-2 signaling following GMH. Postnatal day 7 Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to GMH induction, which entailed stereotactic collagenase infusion into the ganglionic eminence. Animals were euthanized at two time points: 72 h (short-term) or 4 weeks (long-term). Short-term COX-2 expression was evaluated in the context of PAR-1 (SCH-79797) and PAR-4 (P4pal10) inhibition. Pups in the long-term group were administered the selective COX-2 inhibitor (NS-398); and the neurobehavioral and pathological examinations were performed 4 weeks later. Pharmacological PAR-1, 4 antagonism normalized COX-2 expression following GMH and reduced hydrocephalus. Early inhibition of COX-2 by NS-398 improved long-term neurobehavioral outcomes. COX-2 signaling plays an important role in brain injury following neonatal GMH, possibly through upstream PAR-1, 4 receptor mechanisms. PMID:26463949

  4. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition reduces stress-induced affective pathology.

    PubMed

    Gamble-George, Joyonna Carrie; Baldi, Rita; Halladay, Lindsay; Kocharian, Adrina; Hartley, Nolan; Silva, Carolyn Grace; Roberts, Holly; Haymer, Andre; Marnett, Lawrence J; Holmes, Andrew; Patel, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Mood and anxiety disorders are the most prevalent psychiatric conditions and are exacerbated by stress. Recent studies have suggested cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition could represent a novel treatment approach or augmentation strategy for affective disorders including anxiety disorders and major depression. We show that traditional COX-2 inhibitors and a newly developed substrate-selective COX-2 inhibitor (SSCI) reduce a variety of stress-induced behavioral pathologies in mice. We found that these behavioral effects were associated with a dampening of neuronal excitability in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) ex vivo and in vivo, and were mediated by small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channel and CB1 cannabinoid receptor activation. Taken together, these data provide further support for the potential utility of SSCIs, as well as traditional COX-2 inhibitors, as novel treatment approaches for stress-related psychiatric disorders. PMID:27162170

  5. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition reduces stress-induced affective pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gamble-George, Joyonna Carrie; Baldi, Rita; Halladay, Lindsay; Kocharian, Adrina; Hartley, Nolan; Silva, Carolyn Grace; Roberts, Holly; Haymer, Andre; Marnett, Lawrence J; Holmes, Andrew; Patel, Sachin

    2016-01-01

    Mood and anxiety disorders are the most prevalent psychiatric conditions and are exacerbated by stress. Recent studies have suggested cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition could represent a novel treatment approach or augmentation strategy for affective disorders including anxiety disorders and major depression. We show that traditional COX-2 inhibitors and a newly developed substrate-selective COX-2 inhibitor (SSCI) reduce a variety of stress-induced behavioral pathologies in mice. We found that these behavioral effects were associated with a dampening of neuronal excitability in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) ex vivo and in vivo, and were mediated by small-conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK) channel and CB1 cannabinoid receptor activation. Taken together, these data provide further support for the potential utility of SSCIs, as well as traditional COX-2 inhibitors, as novel treatment approaches for stress-related psychiatric disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14137.001 PMID:27162170

  6. Inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase-2 exacerbates ischaemia-induced acute myocardial dysfunction in the rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Rossoni, Giuseppe; Muscara, Marcelo N; Cirino, Giuseppe; Wallace, John L

    2002-01-01

    The effects of treatment with a number of cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors, (celecoxib, meloxicam, DuP-697 and aspirin) on ischaemia-reperfusion-induced myocardial dysfunction were examined using an in vitro perfused rabbit heart model.Ischaemia resulted in myocardial dysfunction, as indicated by a significant increase in left ventricular end diastolic pressure and marked changes in coronary perfusion pressure and left ventricular developed pressure. In the post-ischaemic state, coronary perfusion pressure increased dramatically, left ventricular developed pressure recovered to a small degree and there were significant increases in creatinine kinase release (indicative of myocardial damage) and prostacyclin release.Pretreatment with aspirin, or with drugs that selectively inhibit cyclo-oxygenase-2 (celecoxib, meloxicam and DuP-697), resulted in a concentration-dependent exacerbation of the myocardial dysfunction and damage. Exacerbation of myocardial dysfunction and damage was evident with 10 μM concentrations of the cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors, which inhibited prostacyclin release but did not affect cyclo-oxygenase-1 activity (as measured by whole blood thromboxane synthesis).NCX-4016, a nitric oxide-releasing aspirin derivative, significantly reduced the myocardial dysfunction and damage caused by ischaemia and reperfusion. Beneficial effects were observed even at a concentration (100 μM) that significantly inhibited prostacyclin synthesis by the heart.The results suggest that prostacyclin released by cardiac tissue in response to ischaemia and reperfusion is derived, at least in part, from cyclo-oxygenase-2. Cyclo-oxygenase-2 plays an important protective role in a setting of ischaemia-reperfusion of the heart. PMID:11906968

  7. Inhibition of bacterial multidrug resistance by celecoxib, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kalle, Arunasree M; Rizvi, Arshad

    2011-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major problem in the treatment of infectious diseases and cancer. Accumulating evidence suggests that the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-specific inhibitor celecoxib would not only inhibit COX-2 but also help in the reversal of drug resistance in cancers by inhibiting the MDR1 efflux pump. Here, we demonstrate that celecoxib increases the sensitivity of bacteria to the antibiotics ampicillin, kanamycin, chloramphenicol, and ciprofloxacin by accumulating the drugs inside the cell, thus reversing MDR in bacteria. PMID:20937780

  8. Acceleration of cardiovascular disease by a dysfunctional prostacyclin receptor mutation: potential implications for cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Arehart, Eric; Stitham, Jeremiah; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Douville, Karen; MacKenzie, Todd; Fetalvero, Kristina M; Gleim, Scott; Kasza, Zsolt; Rao, Yamini; Martel, Laurie; Segel, Sharon; Robb, John; Kaplan, Aaron; Simons, Michael; Powell, Richard J; Moore, Jason H; Rimm, Eric B; Martin, Kathleen A; Hwa, John

    2008-04-25

    Recent increased adverse cardiovascular events observed with selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition led to the withdrawal of rofecoxib (Vioxx) and valdecoxib (Bextra), but the mechanisms underlying these atherothrombotic events remain unclear. Prostacyclin is the major end product of cyclooxygenase-2 in vascular endothelium. Using a naturally occurring mutation in the prostacyclin receptor, we report for the first time that a deficiency in prostacyclin signaling through its G protein-coupled receptor contributes to atherothrombosis in human patients. We report that a prostacyclin receptor variant (R212C) is defective in adenylyl cyclase activation in both patient blood and in an in vitro COS-1 overexpression system. This promotes increased platelet aggregation, a hallmark of atherothrombosis. Our analysis of patients in 3 separate white cohorts reveals that this dysfunctional receptor is not likely an initiating factor in cardiovascular disease but that it accelerates the course of disease in those patients with the greatest risk factors. R212C was associated with cardiovascular disease only in the high cardiovascular risk cohort (n=980), with no association in the low-risk cohort (n=2293). In those at highest cardiovascular risk, both disease severity and adverse cardiovascular events were significantly increased with R212C when compared with age- and risk factor-matched normal allele patients. We conclude that for haploinsufficient mutants, such as the R212C, the enhanced atherothrombotic phenotype is likely dependent on the presence of existing atherosclerosis or injury (high risk factors), analogous to what has been observed in the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition studies or prostacyclin receptor knockout mice studies. Combining both biochemical and clinical approaches, we conclude that diminished prostacyclin receptor signaling may contribute, in part, to the underlying adverse cardiovascular outcomes observed with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition. PMID:18323528

  9. Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibition Attenuates Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Progression in Hyperlipidemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Sarbani; Loftin, Charles D.

    2012-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are a chronic inflammatory disease that increase the risk of life-threatening aortic rupture. In humans, AAAs have been characterized by increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and the inactivation of COX-2 prior to disease initiation reduces AAA incidence in a mouse model of the disease. The current study examined the effectiveness of selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition on reducing AAA progression when administered after the initiation of AAA formation. AAAs were induced in hyperlipidemic apolipoprotein E-deficient mice by chronic angiotensin II (AngII) infusion and the effect of treatment with the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib was examined when initiated at different stages of the disease. Celecoxib treatment that was started 1 week after initiating AngII infusion reduced AAA incidence by 61% and significantly decreased AAA severity. Mice treated with celecoxib also showed significantly reduced aortic rupture and mortality. Treatment with celecoxib that was started at a late stage of AAA development also significantly reduced AAA incidence and severity. Celecoxib treatment significantly increased smooth muscle alpha-actin expression in the abdominal aorta and did not reduce expression of markers of macrophage-dependent inflammation. These findings indicate that COX-2 inhibitor treatment initiated after formation of AngII-induced AAAs effectively reduces progression of the disease in hyperlipidemic mice. PMID:23209546

  10. Exploring the Molecular Determinants of Substrate-Selective Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 by Lumiracoxib

    PubMed Central

    Windsor, Matthew A.; Valk, Pieter L.; Xu, Shu; Banerjee, Surajit; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2013-01-01

    Lumiracoxib is a substrate-selective inhibitor of endocannabinoid oxygenation by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). We assayed a series of lumiracoxib derivatives to identify the structural determinants of substrate-selective inhibition. The hydrogen-bonding potential of the substituents at the ortho positions of the aniline ring dictated the potency and substrate selectivity of the inhibitors. The presence of a 5’-methyl group on the phenylacetic acid ring increased the potency of molecules with a single ortho substituent. Des-fluorolumiracoxib (2) was the most potent and selective inhibitor of endocannabinoid oxygenation. The positioning of critical substituents in the binding site was identified from a 2.35 Å crystal structure of lumiracoxib bound to COX-2. PMID:24060487

  11. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase 2 in mice increases production of g-csf and induces radioprotection.

    PubMed

    Hofer, M; Pospísil, M; Holá, J; Vacek, A; Streitová, D; Znojil, V

    2008-11-01

    Meloxicam, a selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase 2, was tested to determine its ability to modulate hematopoiesis and to influence survival of mid-lethally gamma-irradiated mice. A single dose of meloxicam (20 mg/kg) administered to mice intraperitoneally 1 h before irradiation was shown to enhance serum levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) during the first 24 h after irradiation, to elevate numbers of granulocytic precursor cells in bone marrow and granulocyte counts in peripheral blood on day 10 after irradiation, and to increase 30-day survival of these mice. The results provide new evidence for the protective ability of meloxicam administration to mice irradiated with mid-lethal doses and contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms of this meloxicam action by drawing attention to the possible role of increased endogenous G-CSF production. PMID:18959461

  12. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition attenuates hypoxic cancer cells induced m2-polarization of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Dubey, P; Shrivastava, R; Tripathi, C; Jain, N K; Tewari, B N; Lone, M-U-D; Baghel, K S; Kumar, V; Misra, S; Bhadauria, S; Bhatt, M L B

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), represent a major subpopulation of tumor infiltrating immune cells. These alternatively activated M2-polarized macrophages are well known for their pro-tumor functions. Owing to their established role in potentiating tumor-neovasculogenesis and metastasis, TAMs have emerged as promising target for anti-cancer immunotherapy. One of the key TAMs related phenomenon that is amenable to therapeutic intervention is their phenotype switching into alternatively activated M2-polarized macrophages. Hindering macrophage polarization towards a pro-tumor M2 phenotype, or better still reprogramming the M2 like TAMs towards M1 subtype is being considered a beneficial anti-cancer strategy. Hypoxic tumor milieu has been proposed as one of the most plausible factor governing M2-polarization of macrophages. We recently demonstrated that hypoxic tumor cells imparted a pro—angiogenic M2 skewed phenotype to macrophages. Furthermore, sizeable body of data indicates for participation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in macrophage polarization. Concordantly, inhibition of COX-2 is associated with impaired macrophage polarization. Prompted by this in the current study we decided to explore if inhibition of COX-2 activity via chemical inhibitors may prevent hypoxic cancer cell induced M2-polarization of macrophages. We observed that treatment with Flunixin meglumine, an established preferential inhibitor of COX-2 activity markedly inhibited hypoxic cancer cell induced of M2-polarization of macrophages thereby indicating for usage of COX-2 inhibition as possible anti-cancer treatment modality. PMID:25210855

  13. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 by NS398 attenuates noise-induced hearing loss in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yu; Yu, Jintao; Lin, Xi; Tang, Wenxue

    2016-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is an important occupational disorder. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying NIHL have not been fully clarified; therefore, the condition lacks effective therapeutic methods. Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is an inducible enzyme involved in the synthesis of prostaglandins, and has been implicated in many pathophysiological events, such as oxidative stress and inflammation. In this study, we investigated the possible role of Cox-2 in the mechanisms of NIHL and the therapeutic effect of the Cox-2 inhibitor NS398 on NIHL using a mouse model. We demonstrated that Cox-2 is constitutively expressed in the mouse cochlea, and its expression could be dramatically up-regulated by high levels of noise exposure. Furthermore, we demonstrated that pre-treatment with the Cox-2 inhibitor NS398 could inhibit Cox-2 expression during noise overstimulation; and could attenuate noise-induced hearing loss and hair cell damage. Our results suggest that Cox-2 is involved in the pathogenesis of NIHL; and pharmacological inhibition of Cox-2 has considerable therapeutic potential in NIHL. PMID:26934825

  14. Selective inhibition of inducible cyclooxygenase 2 in vivo is antiinflammatory and nonulcerogenic.

    PubMed Central

    Masferrer, J L; Zweifel, B S; Manning, P T; Hauser, S D; Leahy, K M; Smith, W G; Isakson, P C; Seibert, K

    1994-01-01

    We have examined the role of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in a model of inflammation in vivo. Carrageenan administration to the subcutaneous rat air pouch induces a rapid inflammatory response characterized by high levels of prostaglandins (PGs) and leukotrienes in the fluid exudate. The time course of the induction of COX-2 mRNA and protein coincided with the production of PGs in the pouch tissue and cellular infiltrate. Carrageenan-induced COX-2 immunoreactivity was localized to macrophages obtained from the fluid exudate as well as to the inner surface layer of cells within the pouch lining. Dexamethasone inhibited both COX-2 expression and PG synthesis in the fluid exudate but failed to inhibit PG synthesis in the stomach. Furthermore, NS-398, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, and indomethacin, a nonselective COX-1/COX-2 inhibitor, blocked proinflammatory PG synthesis in the air pouch. In contrast, only indomethacin blocked gastric PG and, additionally, produced gastric lesions. These results suggest that inhibitors of COX-2 are potent antiinflammatory agents which do not produce the typical side effects (e.g., gastric ulcers) associated with the nonselective, COX-1-directed antiinflammatory drugs. Images PMID:8159730

  15. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 in hematopoietic cells results in salt-sensitive hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Yao, Bing; Wang, Yinqiu; Yang, Shilin; Wang, Suwan; Fan, Xiaofeng; Harris, Raymond C.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibition of prostaglandin (PG) production with either nonselective or selective inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity can induce or exacerbate salt-sensitive hypertension. This effect has been previously attributed to inhibition of intrinsic renal COX-2 activity and subsequent increase in sodium retention by the kidney. Here, we found that macrophages isolated from kidneys of high-salt–treated WT mice have increased levels of COX-2 and microsomal PGE synthase–1 (mPGES-1). Furthermore, BM transplantation (BMT) from either COX-2–deficient or mPGES-1–deficient mice into WT mice or macrophage-specific deletion of the PGE2 type 4 (EP4) receptor induced salt-sensitive hypertension and increased phosphorylation of the renal sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC). Kidneys from high-salt–treated WT mice transplanted with Cox2–/– BM had increased macrophage and T cell infiltration and increased M1- and Th1-associated markers and cytokines. Skin macrophages from high-salt–treated mice with either genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of the COX-2 pathway expressed decreased M2 markers and VEGF-C production and exhibited aberrant lymphangiogenesis. Together, these studies demonstrate that COX-2–derived PGE2 in hematopoietic cells plays an important role in both kidney and skin in maintaining homeostasis in response to chronically increased dietary salt. Moreover, these results indicate that inhibiting COX-2 expression or activity in hematopoietic cells can result in a predisposition to salt-sensitive hypertension. PMID:26485285

  16. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 prevents intra-abdominal adhesions by decreasing activity of peritoneal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guangbing; Chen, Xin; Wang, Guanghui; Jia, Pengbo; Xu, Qinhong; Ping, Gaofeng; Wang, Kang; Li, Xuqi

    2015-01-01

    Background Postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions are common complications after abdominal surgery. The exact molecular mechanisms that are responsible for these complications remain unclear, and there are no effective methods for preventing adhesion formation or reformation. The aim of the study reported here was to investigate the preventive effects and underlying potential molecular mechanisms of selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors in a rodent model of postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions. Materials and methods The expression of COX-2 in postoperative intra-abdominal adhe-sions and normal peritoneal tissue was examined by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Assays were performed to elucidate the effect of COX-2 inhibition on hypoxia-induced fibroblast activity in vitro and on intra-abdominal adhesion formation in vivo. Results Hypoxia-induced COX-2 expression in peritoneal fibroblasts was increased in postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions. Inhibition of COX-2 attenuated the activating effect of hypoxia on normal peritoneal fibroblasts in vitro. Data indicate that selective COX-2 inhibitor prevents in vivo intra-abdominal adhesion by inhibition of basic fibroblast growth factor and transforming growth factor-beta expression, but not through an antiangiogenic mechanism. Furthermore, using selective COX-2 inhibitors to prevent intra-abdominal adhesions did not adversely affect the weight, bowel motility, or healing of intestinal anastomoses in a rat model. Conclusion These results show that hypoxia-induced COX-2 expression in peritoneal fibroblasts is involved in the formation of intra-abdominal adhesions. Inhibition of COX-2 prevents postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions through suppression of inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26109851

  17. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 impacts chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation during endochondral ossification.

    PubMed

    Welting, T J M; Caron, M M J; Emans, P J; Janssen, M P F; Sanen, K; Coolsen, M M E; Voss, L; Surtel, D A M; Cremers, A; Voncken, J W; van Rhijn, L W

    2011-01-01

    Skeletogenesis and bone fracture healing involve endochondral ossification, a process during which cartilaginous primordia are gradually replaced by bone tissue. In line with a role for cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the endochondral ossification process, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were reported to negatively affect bone fracture healing due to impaired osteogenesis. However, a role for COX-2 activity in the chondrogenic phase of endochondral ossification has not been addressed before. We show that COX-2 activity fulfils an important regulatory function in chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation. Our data reveal essential cross-talk between COX-2 and bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2) during chondrocyte hypertrophic differentiation. BMP-2 mediated chondrocyte hypertrophy is associated with increased COX-2 expression and pharmacological inhibition of COX-2 activity by NSAIDs (e.g., Celecoxib) decreases hypertrophic differentiation in various chondrogenic models in vitro and in vivo, while leaving early chondrogenic development unaltered. Our findings demonstrate that COX-2 activity is a novel factor partaking in chondrocyte hypertrophy in the context of endochondral ossification and these observations provide a novel etiological perspective on the adverse effects of NSAIDs on bone fracture healing and have important implications for the use of NSAIDs during endochondral skeletal development. PMID:22183916

  18. Cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibition and endothelium-dependent vasodilation in younger vs. older healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Eisenach, John H; Gullixson, Leah R; Allen, Alexander R; Kost, Susan L; Nicholson, Wayne T

    2014-01-01

    Aim A major feature of endothelial dysfunction is reduced endothelium-dependent vasodilation, which in ageing may be due to decreased production of endothelial prostacyclin, or nitric oxide (NO), or both. Method We tested this hypothesis in 12 younger (age 18–38 years, six women) and 12 older healthy adults (age 55–73 years, six post-menopausal women). Endothelium-dependent vasodilation was assessed by the forearm vascular conductance (FVC) response to intra-arterial acetylcholine (ACh) (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 μg dl−1 forearm tissue min−1) before and 90 min after inhibition of the enzyme cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) with oral celecoxib (400 mg), followed by the addition of endothelial NO synthase inhibition with intra-arterial NG-monomethyl-l arginine acetate (L-NMMA). Results Ageing was associated with a significantly reduced FVC response to ACh (P = 0.009, age-by-dose interaction; highest dose FVC ± SEM in ageing: 11.2 ± 1.4 vs. younger: 17.7 ± 2.4 units, P = 0.02). Celecoxib did not reduce resting FVC or the responses to ACh in any group. L-NMMA significantly reduced resting FVC and the responses to ACh in all groups, and absolute FVC values following L-NMMA were similar between groups. Conclusion In healthy normotensive younger and older adults, there is minimal contribution of prostacyclin to ACh-mediated vasodilation, yet the NO component of vasodilation is reduced with ageing. In the clinical context, these findings suggest that acute administration of medications that inhibit prostacyclin (i.e. COX-2 inhibitors) evoke modest vascular consequences in healthy persons. Additional studies are necessary to test whether chronic use of COX-2 medications reduces endothelium dependent vasodilation in older persons with or without cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:24698105

  19. Cyclooxygenase 2 pathway and its therapeutic inhibition in superantigen-induced toxic shock.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Govindarajan; Asmann, Yan W; Lytle, Anna K; Tilahun, Ashenafi Y; Theuer, Jayne E; Smart, Michele K; Patel, Robin; David, Chella S

    2008-12-01

    Bacterial superantigens are a family of exotoxins that are the most potent T-cell activators known. Because of their ability to induce strong immune activation, superantigens have been implicated in a variety of diseases ranging from self-limiting food poisoning to more severe toxic shock syndrome (TSS) and have the potential to be used as agents of bioterrorism. Nonetheless, the precise molecular mechanisms by which T-cell activation by superantigens lead to acute systemic inflammatory response, multiple organ dysfunction, and ultimately death are unclear. Inadequate understanding of the pathogenesis has resulted in lack of development of effective therapy for superantigen-induced TSS. To fill these deficiencies, we systematically dissected the molecular pathogenesis of superantigen-induced TSS using the humanized human leukocyte antigen-DR3 transgenic mouse model by microarray-based gene expression profiling. Splenic expression of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS-2; also called cyclooxygenase 2 or COX-2) gene was increased by several hundred folds shortly after systemic superantigen (staphylococcal enterotoxin B [SEB]) exposure. In addition, expressions of several genes associated with eicosanoid pathway were significantly modulated by SEB, as analyzed by dedicated software. Given the importance of the COX-2 pathway in inflammation, we examined whether therapeutic inhibition of COX-2 by a highly selective inhibitor, CAY10404, could be beneficial. Our studies showed that i.p. administration of CAY10404 (50 mg/kg) immediately after challenge with 10 microg of SEB was unable to inhibit SEB-induced in vivo cytokine/chemokine production or T-cell activation/proliferation and did not prevent superantigen-associated thymocyte apoptosis. PMID:18496243

  20. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 aggravates secretory phospholipase A{sub 2}-mediated progression of acute liver injury

    SciTech Connect

    Bhave, Vishakha S.; Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; Latendresse, John R.; Mehendale, Harihara M.

    2008-04-15

    Our previous study [Bhave, V. S., Donthamsetty, S., Latendresse, J. R., Muskhelishvili, L., and Mehendale, H. M. 2008-this issue. Secretory phospholipase A{sub 2} mediates progression of acute liver injury in the absence of sufficient COX-2. Toxicol Appl Pharmacol] showed that in the absence of sufficient induction and co-presence of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), secretory phospholipase A{sub 2} (sPLA{sub 2}) appearing in the intercellular spaces for cleanup of post-necrotic debris seems to contribute to the progression of toxicant-initiated liver injury, possibly by hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids of hepatocytes in the perinecrotic areas. To further test our hypothesis on the protective role of COX-2, male Fisher-344 rats were administered a selective COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398, and then challenged with a moderately toxic dose of CCl{sub 4}. This led to a 5-fold increase in the susceptibility of the COX-2 inhibited rats to CCl{sub 4} hepatotoxicity and mortality. The CCl{sub 4} bioactivating enzyme CYP2E1 protein, CYP2E1 enzyme activity, and the {sup 14}CCl{sub 4}-derived radiolabel covalently bound to the liver proteins were unaffected by the COX-2 inhibitor suggesting that the increased hepatotoxic sensitivity of the COX-2 inhibited rats was not due to higher bioactivation of CCl{sub 4}. Further investigation showed that this increased mortality was due to higher plasma and hepatic sPLA{sub 2} activities, inhibited PGE{sub 2} production, and progression of liver injury as compared to the non-intervened rats{sub .} In conclusion, inhibition of COX-2 mitigates the tissue protective mechanisms associated with COX-2 induction, which promotes sPLA{sub 2}-mediated progression of liver injury in an acute liver toxicity model. Because increased sPLA{sub 2} activity in the intercellular space is associated with increased progression of injury, and induced COX-2 is associated with hepatoprotection, ratios of hepatic COX-2 and sPLA{sub 2} activities may turn out to be a

  1. Mechanism underlying the reversal of contractility dysfunction in experimental colitis by cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Khan, I; Oriowo, M A

    2006-03-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are associated with reduced colonic contractility and induction of cyclooxygenase-2. In this study a possible role of cyclooxygenase-2 in and the underlying mechanism of the reduced contractility were investigated in experimental colitis. The effects of meloxicam, a cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitor were examined on colonic contractility and MAP kinase p38 and ERK(1/2) expression. Colitis was induced in Sprague-Dawley male rats by intra-colonic instillation of trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS; 40 mg/rat in 50 ethanol). The animals were divided into three groups. Group 1 (n=9) received meloxicam (3 mg/kg-day) gavage 1 h before and 1 day (Group 2) after induction of colitis. Group 3 (n=9) received phosphate buffered saline (PBS) in a similar manner and served as colitic control. The non colitic control animals received meloxicam in a similar manner. The animals were sacrificed after 5 days of treatment, colon was cleaned with PBS and colonic smooth muscle was obtained which was used in this study. Meloxicam treatment given 1 h before or 1 day after administration of colitis restored the reduced colonic contractility without affecting the sensitivity to carbachol. The levels of colonic smooth muscle IL-1beta mRNA, PGE(2), ERK(1/2), p38, malondialdehyde, myeloperoxidase activity and colonic mass were increased, whereas the body weight was decreased due to TNBS. The changes except colonic muscle mass and p38 expression were reversed by meloxicam treatment. These findings indicate that restoration of reduced colonic contractility by meloxicam is mediated by ERK(1/2), and that ERK(1/2) may serve as an important anti inflammatory target for treatment of colitis. PMID:16835710

  2. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 attenuates urinary prostanoid excretion without affecting renal renin expression.

    PubMed

    Kammerl, M C; Nüsing, R M; Seyberth, H W; Riegger, G A; Kurtz, A; Krämer, B K

    2001-09-01

    This study aimed to assess the impact of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) on the secretion and expression of renin in the kidney cortex. For this purpose renocortical COX-2 expression was moderately stimulated by a low-salt diet or strongly stimulated (increase in mRNA about fivefold) by the combination of a low-salt diet and the angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitor ramipril in male Sprague-Dawley rats. None of these manoeuvres changed medullary COX-2 expression or cortical or medullary COX-1 expression. Treatment with low salt plus ramipril but not with low salt alone led to a three- to fourfold increase of the urinary output of all major prostanoids. The selective COX-2 inhibitor rofecoxib (10 mg/kg per day) markedly lowered basal urinary prostanoid excretion and blunted the stimulation of prostanoid excretion during treatment with low salt plus ramipril. The stimulation of renin secretion by the low-salt diet but not by low salt plus ramipril was attenuated by rofecoxib. The low-salt diet led to a moderate increase of renin gene expression, and additional treatment with ramipril caused a 15-fold increase of renin mRNA. However, no effect of rofecoxib on renin gene expression was observed in any group. These findings suggest that stimulation of COX-2 in the renal cortex leads to the increased formation of all major prostanoids. COX-2-derived prostanoids may play a role in the regulation of renin secretion but not in renin gene expression during the intake of a low-salt diet. However, no major relevance of COX-2-derived prostanoids to renin secretion or renin gene expression during ramipril treatment or a combination of ramipril and a low-salt diet was found. PMID:11680616

  3. Dual inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 and soluble epoxide hydrolase synergistically suppresses primary tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guodong; Panigrahy, Dipak; Hwang, Sung Hee; Yang, Jun; Mahakian, Lisa M.; Wettersten, Hiromi I.; Liu, Jun-Yan; Wang, Yanru; Ingham, Elizabeth S.; Tam, Sarah; Kieran, Mark W.; Weiss, Robert H.; Ferrara, Katherine W.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandins derived from the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway and epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) from the cytochrome P450/soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) pathway are important eicosanoids that regulate angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. COX-2 inhibitors, which block the formation of prostaglandins, suppress tumor growth, whereas sEH inhibitors, which increase endogenous EETs, stimulate primary tumor growth and metastasis. However, the functional interactions of these two pathways in cancer are unknown. Using pharmacological inhibitors as probes, we show here that dual inhibition of COX-2 and sEH synergistically inhibits primary tumor growth and metastasis by suppressing tumor angiogenesis. COX-2/sEH dual pharmacological inhibitors also potently suppress primary tumor growth and metastasis by inhibiting tumor angiogenesis via selective inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation. These results demonstrate a critical interaction of these two lipid metabolism pathways on tumorigenesis and suggest dual inhibition of COX-2 and sEH as a potential therapeutic strategy for cancer therapy. PMID:25024195

  4. Inhibition of Nuclear Factor κB Activation and Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression by Aqueous Extracts of Hispanic Medicinal Herbs

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Amanda M.; Hunsaker, Lucy A.; Franco, Carolina R.; Royer, Robert E.; Vander Jagt, David L.; Vander Jagt, Dorothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are a primary choice of therapy for diseases with a chronic inflammatory component. Unfortunately, long-term NSAID therapy is often accompanied by severe side effects, including cardiovascular and gastrointestinal complications. Because of this, there is critical need for identification of new and safer treatments for chronic inflammation to circumvent these side effects. Inflammatory diseases have been successfully remedied with natural herbs by many cultures. To better understand the potential of natural herbs in treating chronic inflammation and to identify their mechanism of action, we have evaluated the anti-inflammatory activities of 20 medicinal herbs commonly used in the Hispanic culture. We have established a standardized method for preparing aqueous extracts (teas) from the selected medicinal herbs and screened for inhibition of tumor necrosis factor-α-induced activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), which is the central signaling pathway of the inflammatory response. A number of herbal teas were identified that exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity. In particular, tea from the herb commonly called laurel was found to be an especially potent inhibitor of NF-κB-dependent cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression and prostaglandin E2 production in cultured murine macrophages. These findings indicate that laurel tea extract contains potent anti-inflammatory compounds that function by inhibiting the major signal transduction pathway responsible for inducing an inflammatory event. Based on these results, laurel may represent a new, safe therapeutic agent for managing chronic inflammation. PMID:20482259

  5. Viscum album Exerts Anti-Inflammatory Effect by Selectively Inhibiting Cytokine-Induced Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Pushpa; Maddur, Mohan S.; Friboulet, Alain; Bayry, Jagadeesh; Kaveri, Srini V.

    2011-01-01

    Viscum album (VA) preparations are extensively used as complementary therapy in cancer and are shown to exert anti-tumor activities which involve the cytotoxic properties, induction of apoptosis, inhibition of angiogenesis and several other immunomodulatory mechanisms. In addition to their application in cancer therapy, VA preparations have also been successfully utilized in the treatment of several inflammatory pathologies. Owing to the intricate association of inflammation and cancer and in view of the fact that several anti-tumor phytotherapeutics also exert a potent anti-inflammatory effect, we hypothesized that VA exerts an anti-inflammatory effect that is responsible for its therapeutic benefit. Since, inflammatory cytokine-induced cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, we investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of VA on regulation of cyclo-oxygenase expression and PGE2 biosynthesis by using human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549 cells) as a model. A549 cells were stimulated with IL-1β and treated with VA preparation (VA Qu Spez) for 18 hours. PGE2 was analysed in the culture supernatants by enzyme immunoassay. Expression of COX-2 and COX-1 proteins was analyzed by immunoblotting and the expression of COX-2 mRNA was assessed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. We found that VA Qu Spez inhibit the secretion of IL-1β-induced PGE2 in a dose-dependent manner. Further, we also show that this inhibitory action was associated with a reduced expression of COX-2 without modulating the COX-1 expression. Together these results demonstrate a novel anti-inflammatory mechanism of action of VA preparations wherein VA exerts an anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting cytokine-induced PGE2 via selective inhibition of COX-2. PMID:22028854

  6. Evidence That Links Loss of Cyclooxygenase-2 With Increased Asymmetric Dimethylarginine

    PubMed Central

    Ahmetaj-Shala, Blerina; Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Knowles, Rebecca; Al’Yamani, Malak; Mazi, Sarah; Wang, Zhen; Tucker, Arthur T.; Mackenzie, Louise; Armstrong, Paul C. J.; Nüsing, Rolf M.; Tomlinson, James A. P.; Warner, Timothy D.; Leiper, James

    2015-01-01

    Background— Cardiovascular side effects associated with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor drugs dominate clinical concern. Cyclooxygenase-2 is expressed in the renal medulla where inhibition causes fluid retention and increased blood pressure. However, the mechanisms linking cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition and cardiovascular events are unknown and no biomarkers have been identified. Methods and Results— Transcriptome analysis of wild-type and cyclooxygenase-2−/− mouse tissues revealed 1 gene altered in the heart and aorta, but >1000 genes altered in the renal medulla, including those regulating the endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitors asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA) and monomethyl-l-arginine. Cyclo-oxygenase-2−/− mice had increased plasma levels of ADMA and monomethyl-l-arginine and reduced endothelial nitric oxide responses. These genes and methylarginines were not similarly altered in mice lacking prostacyclin receptors. Wild-type mice or human volunteers taking cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors also showed increased plasma ADMA. Endothelial nitric oxide is cardio-protective, reducing thrombosis and atherosclerosis. Consequently, increased ADMA is associated with cardiovascular disease. Thus, our study identifies ADMA as a biomarker and mechanistic bridge between renal cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition and systemic vascular dysfunction with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug usage. Conclusions— We identify the endogenous endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor ADMA as a biomarker and mechanistic bridge between renal cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition and systemic vascular dysfunction. PMID:25492024

  7. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 alleviates liver cirrhosis via improvement of the dysfunctional gut-liver axis in rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jin-Hang; Wen, Shi-Lei; Tong, Huan; Wang, Chun-Hui; Yang, Wen-Juan; Tang, Shi-Hang; Yan, Zhao-Ping; Tai, Yang; Ye, Cheng; Liu, Rui; Huang, Zhi-Yin; Tang, Ying-Mei; Yang, Jin-Hui; Tang, Cheng-Wei

    2016-06-01

    Inflammatory transport through the gut-liver axis may facilitate liver cirrhosis. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been considered as one of the important molecules that regulates intestinal epithelial barrier function. This study was aimed to test the hypothesis that inhibition of COX-2 by celecoxib might alleviate liver cirrhosis via reduction of intestinal inflammatory transport in thiacetamide (TAA) rat model. COX-2/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)/EP-2/p-ERK integrated signal pathways regulated the expressions of intestinal zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and E-cadherin, which maintain the function of intestinal epithelial barrier. Celecoxib not only decreased the intestinal permeability to a 4-kDa FITC-dextran but also significantly increased expressions of ZO-1 and E-cadherin. When celecoxib greatly decreased intestinal levels of LPS, TNF-α, and IL-6, it significantly enhanced T cell subsets reduced by TAA. As a result, liver fibrosis induced by TAA was significantly alleviated in the celecoxib group. These data indicated that celecoxib improved the integrity of intestinal epithelial barrier, blocked inflammatory transport through the dysfunctional gut-liver axis, and ameliorated the progress of liver cirrhosis. PMID:27056726

  8. Cyclo-oxygenase 2 inhibitor, nabumetone, inhibits proliferation in chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vural, Filiz; Ozcan, Mehmet Ali; Ozsan, Güner Hayri; Ateş, Halil; Demirkan, Fatih; Pişkin, Ozden; Undar, Bülent

    2005-05-01

    The anti-tumor effect of cyclo-oxygenase (COX) inhibitors has been documented in several studies. COX2 inhibitors have attracted more attention because of the fewer side-effects and the more prominent anti-tumor effects. However, experience with these drugs in hematological malignancies is limited. In our study, a potent COX2 inhibitor, nabumetone (NBT), was investigated for its anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects in K-562 and Meg-01 chronic myeloid leukemia blastic cell lines as a single agent or in combination with adriamycin (ADR) and interferon alpha (IFN-a). In these cell lines, a dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation was observed with NBT. We observed no significant apoptotic effect of NBT. However, NBT potentiated the apoptotic effect of ADR in the K-562 cell line. Bcl-2 expression was reduced by NBT (11% vs. 2%). The combination of NBT with IFN did not have any significant effect on the K-562 cell line. We suggest that NBT inhibits proliferation and potentiates the apoptotic effect of ADR in chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines. PMID:16019514

  9. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition does not impair block bone grafts healing in rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Moreschi, Eduardo; Biguetti, Claudia Cristina; Comparim, Eliston; De Andrade Holgado, Leandro; Ribeiro-Junior, Paulo Domingos; Nary-Filho, Hugo; Matsumoto, Mariza Akemi

    2013-12-01

    Success of alveolar reconstructions using onlay autogenous block bone grafts depends on their adequate integration to the recipient bed influenced by a number of local molecules. Considering the fundamental role of cyclooxygenase (COX-2) in bone repair, the aim of this study was to analyze the effect of its inhibition in the integration of endochondral (EC) iliac crest, and intramembranous (IM) calvaria bone grafts. Thirty-two rabbits were divided into 4 groups: Calvaria Control (CC) and Iliac Control--treated with oral 0.9 % saline solution, and Calvarial-NSAID (C-NSAID) and Iliac-NSAID (I-NSAID) groups--treated with oral 6 mg/Kg non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug etoricoxib. After 7, 14, 30 and 60 days the animals were euthanized and the specimens removed for histological, histomorphometric and immunohistochemistry analysis. At day 60, a tight integration of IM blocks could be seen with the presence of remodeling bone, whereas integration of EC grafts was mainly observed at the edges of the grafts. A significant higher percentage of bone matrix in the interface region of the CC grafts in comparison to C-NSAID only at day 14, whereas no differences were detected comparing the EC grafts. No differences were observed in Runx-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) immunolabeling when comparing CC and C-NSAID groups, while a significant weaker Runx-2 and VEGF labeling was detected in I-NSAID group at day 60. Although some influence was detected in osteogenesis, it is concluded that drug induced inhibition of COX-2 does not impair onlay bone grafts' healing of both embryologic origins in rabbits. PMID:23783533

  10. Cyclooxygenase-2 impairs treatment effects of radiotherapy for cervical cancer by inhibition of radiation-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Hitoshi . E-mail: hisikawa@med.gunma-u.ac.jp; Ohno, Tatsuya; Kato, Shingo; Wakatsuki, Masaru; Iwakawa, Mayumi; Ohta, Toshie M.S.; Imai, Takashi; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Noda, Shin-ei; Nakano, Takashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays a pivotal role in regulation of radiation-induced apoptosis. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between COX-2 expression and postradiotherapy outcomes of patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Biopsy specimens from 47 consecutive patients who had undergone definitive radiotherapy alone or radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy between October 2002 and November 2004 were investigated. Results: The COX-2 expression rate of the pretreatment samples was 46.1% {+-} 21.0%, and the apoptotic index (AI) 1 week after start of radiotherapy was 2.1% {+-} 0.9%. There was a significant negative correlation between the pretreatment COX-2 expression and the AI during radiotherapy (r = -0.52, p = 0.0002). Complete response rates were 59% for COX-2-positive patients compared with 80% for COX-2-negative patients (p = 0.12). The 2-year local control rate for COX-2-positive patients was 71.3%, whereas the corresponding rate for COX-2-negative patients was 96.0% (p 0.06). Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to prove clinically that COX-2 can make cervical squamous cell carcinomas more refractory to radiotherapy by inhibition of radiation-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, expression of COX-2 may be a good indicator to predict local tumor control after radiotherapy. Although long-term results are ultimately needed, the combination therapy of radiotherapy with use of a COX-2 inhibitor could yield improved outcomes for patients with COX-2 expressing cervical cancer.

  11. Antioxidant and cyclooxygenase-2-inhibiting activity of 4,4'-biphenol, 2,2'-biphenol and phenol.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Yukio; Ishii, Hiroaki; Hoshina, Syuhei; Takada, Naoki; Ueki, Ayako; Tanaka, Shoji; Kadoma, Yoshinori; Ito, Shigeru; Machino, Mamoru; Fujisawa, Seiichiro

    2009-06-01

    The anthropogenic substance 4,4'-biphenol and its analogues are estrogenic and cytotoxic. It has been previously found that synthesized ortho-dimers of phenolic compounds possess potent antioxidative and anti-inflammatory activity. To clarify the relationships between radical-scavenging and anti-inflammatory activities, the radical-scavenging activities of 4,4'-biphenol, 2,2'-biphenol and phenol were investigated by using differential scanning calorimetry to measure the induction period for polymerization of methyl methacrylate initiated by thermal decomposition of 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile. We also investigated tThe inhibitory effects of these compounds on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA and protein expression and on binding of activator-protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-kappaB) to their respective consensus sequences were also investigated in RAW 264.7 cells. Furthermore, theoretical parameters such as phenolic-OH bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE) and ionization potential (IP(koopman)) were calculated at the density functional theory (DFT)/B3LYP levels. Cytotoxicity declined in the order 4,4'-biphenol > 2,2'-biphenol > phenol. 2,2'-Biphenol, but not 4,4'-biphenol, showed inhibitory effects on LPS-stimulated COX-2 expression and on AP-1 and NF-kappaB binding to their consensus sequences at 1-10 muM. Expression of COX-2 in RAW cells was enhanced by 4,4'-biphenol plus LPS, possibly because of radical-mediated transformation of 4,4'-biphenol to the cytotoxic diphenylquinone, as judged by the stoichiometric factor (n value) of 3.429 and low IP(koopman) value of this biphenol. In contrast, the anti-inflammatory activity of 2,2'-biphenol may be the result of the formation of a dimer derived from oxidation of this compound, as suggested by its n value close to 1. Phenol showed anti-inflammatory activity but did not completely inhibit COX-2 expression, even at higher concentrations. PMID:19528508

  12. Selenomethionine Inhibits IL-1β Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS) and Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) Expression in Primary Human Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Anthony Wai Ming; Stabler, Thomas V.; Bolognesi, Michael; Kraus, Virginia Byers

    2010-01-01

    Objective Several lines of evidence show that selenium has potential protective effects in osteoarthritis (OA), however the exact mechanism is still unclear. As IL-1β is one of the key proinflammatory cytokines contributing to the progression in OA, we investigated the effect of selenium in neutralizing the inflammatory effects of IL-1β on nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E (PGE2) production, and the signaling pathways involved. Methods Isolated primary human chondrocytes were pretreated with selenomethionine (0.5 μM SeMet) for 24 hours then co-treated without or with IL-1β (10 pg/ml or 50 pg/ml) for another 24 hours followed by RNA isolation. Gene expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) was determined by quantitative Real Time-Polymerase Chain Reaction. Culture media concentrations of NO and PGE2 were determined by nitrite assay and immunoassay respectively. For analysis of cell signaling pathways, chondrocytes were pretreated with SeMet then stimulated with IL-1β for 0 – 45 minutes. The activity of IL-1β signaling pathways was determined by Western blot screening of phosphorylation states of signal transduction proteins. Results SeMet inhibited chondrocyte gene expression of IL-1β induced iNOS (31–54%, p=0.031) and COX2 (50–65%, p=0.031) with corresponding reductions in both NO (19–47%, p=0.031) and PGE2 (24–32%, p=0.031) production. Pretreatment with SeMet attenuated IL-1β induced activation of p38 MAPK (39%, p=0.039) but not the ERK, JNK or NFkB pathways. Conclusions This study elucidates one potential protective mechanism of selenium, namely through the alteration of cell signaling and downstream transcription of pro-inflammatory effects of IL-1β. PMID:21035557

  13. Cyclooxygenase-2-dependent phosphorylation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bad inhibits tonicity-induced apoptosis in renal medullary cells.

    PubMed

    Küper, Christoph; Bartels, Helmut; Beck, Franz-X; Neuhofer, Wolfgang

    2011-11-01

    During antidiuresis, cell survival in the renal medulla requires cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity. We have recently found that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) promotes cell survival by phosphorylation and, hence, inactivation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bad during hypertonic stress in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells in vitro. Here we determine the role of COX-2-derived PGE(2) on phosphorylation of Bad and medullary apoptosis in vivo using COX-2-deficient mice. Both wild-type and COX-2-knockout mice constitutively expressed Bad in tubular epithelial cells of the renal medulla. Dehydration caused a robust increase in papillary COX-2 expression, PGE2 excretion, and Bad phosphorylation in wild-type, but not in the knockout mice. The abundance of cleaved caspase-3, a marker of apoptosis, was significantly higher in papillary homogenates, especially in tubular epithelial cells of the knockout mice. Knockdown of Bad in MDCK cells decreased tonicity-induced caspase-3 activation. Furthermore, the addition of PGE2 to cells with knockdown of Bad had no effect on caspase-3 activation; however, PGE2 caused phosphorylation of Bad and substantially improved cell survival in mock-transfected cells. Thus, tonicity-induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 synthesis in the renal medulla entails phosphorylation and inactivation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bad, thereby counteracting apoptosis in renal medullary epithelial cells. PMID:21716255

  14. Lactoferrin from Camelus dromedarius Inhibits Nuclear Transcription Factor-kappa B Activation, Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression and Prostaglandin E2 Production in Stimulated Human Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Naila; Alghasham, Abdullah; Rasheed, Zafar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteoarthritis (OA) is a progressive joint disorder, which remains the leading cause of chronic disability in aged people. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF)-κB is a major cellular event in OA and its activation by interleukin-1β (IL-1β) plays a critical role in cartilage breakdown in these patients. Objective: In this study, we examined the effect of lactoferrin on NF-κB activation, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in stimulated human articular chondrocytes. Materials and Methods: Human chondrocytes were derived from OA articular cartilage and treated with camel lactoferrin and then stimulated with IL-1β. Gene expression was determined by TaqMan assays and protein expression was studied by Western immunoblotting. NF-κB activity and PGE2 levels were determined by ELISA based assays. NF-κB activity was also determined by treatment of chondrocytes with NF-κB specific inhibitor Bay 11–7082. Results: Lactoferrin inhibited IL-1β-induced activation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 in human OA chondrocytes. Lactoferrin also inhibited mRNA/protein expression of COX-2 and production of PGE2. Moreover, Bay 11–7082 also inhibited IL-1β-induced expression of COX-2 and production of PGE2. The inhibitory effect of lactoferrin on the IL-1β induced expression of COX-2 or production of PGE2 was mediated at least in part via suppression of NF-κB activation. Conclusions: Our data determine camel lactoferrin as a novel inhibitor of IL-1β-induced activation of NF-κB signaling events and production of cartilage-degrading molecule PGE2 via inhibition of COX-2 expressions. These results may have important implications for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for the prevention/treatment of OA and other degenerative/inflammatory diseases. SUMMARY Lactoferrin shows anti-arthritic activity in IL-1β stimulated primary human chondrocytes.Lactoferrin inhibits IL-1β-induced NF-κB activation.Lactoferrin inhibits

  15. Curcumin attenuates cyclooxygenase-2 expression via inhibition of the NF-κB pathway in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ping; Huang, Ping; Chen, Min Wei

    2013-05-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induces the expression of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), which contributes to the process of periodontitis. Curcumin, a constituent of turmeric, exhibits anti-inflammatory properties. We have investigated the anti-inflammatory effect of curcumin in human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) stimulated by P. gingivalis LPS and its mechanism of action. HGFs pretreated with curcumin were stimulated by P. gingivalis LPS. COX-2 mRNA and protein expressions were analysed by real-time PCR and Western blot analysis. Activation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) was analysed by the NF-κB-dependent luciferase activity and electrophoretic mobility-shift assay (EMSA). Curcumin inhibited COX-2 mRNA and protein synthesis in LPS-stimulated HGFs in a dose-dependent manner. P. gingivalis LPS activated NF-κB-dependent transcription in HGFs, which were also downregulated by pretreatment with curcumin. Therefore, curcumin can inhibit P. gingivalis LPS-induced COX-2 expression, which may be due to the inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. PMID:23494805

  16. Harmine combined with paclitaxel inhibits tumor proliferation and induces apoptosis through down-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiao-Juan; Sun, Kun; Tang, Xiao-He; Zhou, Cun-Jin; Sun, Hui; Yan, Zhe; Fang, Ling; Wu, Hong-Wen; Xie, Yi-Kui; Gu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) serves an important role in the carcinogenesis and progression of gastric cancer. Harmine (HM) and paclitaxel (PTX) are reported as promising drug candidates for cancer therapy, but whether a synergistic anti-tumor effect of HM combined with PTX exists in human gastric cancer remains unknown. The present study evaluated the effects of HM and/or PTX on cell proliferation and apoptosis in a gastric cancer cell line, SGC-7901. HM and PTX inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Both HM and PTX alone induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. The combination of HM and PTX exerted synergistic effects on proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction in SGC-7901 cells, with down-regulation of COX-2, PCNA and Bcl-2 and up-regulation of Bax expression. The results indicated that combination chemotherapy using HM with PTX exerts an anti-tumor effect for treating gastric cancer. The combination of the two drugs inhibits gastric cancer development more effectively than each drug alone through down-regulation of COX-2 expression.

  17. Lactobacillus probiotic protects intestinal epithelium from radiation injury in a TLR-2/cyclo-oxygenase-2-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Matthew A; Riehl, Terrence E; Rao, M Suprada; Moon, Clara; Ee, Xueping; Nava, Gerardo M; Walker, Monica R; Marinshaw, Jeffrey M; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S

    2011-01-01

    Background The small intestinal epithelium is highly sensitive to radiation and is a major site of injury during radiation therapy and environmental overexposure. Objective To examine probiotic bacteria as potential radioprotective agents in the intestine. Methods 8-week-old C57BL/6 wild-type or knockout mice were administered probiotic by gavage for 3 days before 12 Gy whole body radiation. The intestine was evaluated for cell-positional apoptosis (6 h) and crypt survival (84 h). Results Gavage of 5×107 Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) improved crypt survival about twofold (p<0.01); the effect was observed when administered before, but not after, radiation. Conditioned medium (CM) from LGG improved crypt survival (1.95-fold, p<0.01), and both LGG and LGG-CM reduced epithelial apoptosis particularly at the crypt base (33% to 18%, p<0.01). LGG was detected in the distal ileal contents after the gavage cycle, but did not lead to a detectable shift in bacterial family composition. The reduction in epithelial apoptosis and improved crypt survival offered by LGG was lost in MyD88−/−, TLR-2−/− and cyclo-oxygenase-2−/− (COX-2) mice but not TLR-4−/− mice. LGG administration did not lead to increased jejunal COX-2 mRNA or prostaglandin E2 levels or a change in number of COX-2-expressing cells. However, a location shift was observed in constitutively COX-2-expressing cells of the lamina propria from the villi to a position near the crypt base (villi to crypt ratio 80:20 for control and 62:38 for LGG; p<0.001). Co-staining revealed these COX-2-expressing small intestinal lamina propria cells to be mesenchymal stem cells. Conclusions LGG or its CM reduce radiation-induced epithelial injury and improve crypt survival. A TLR-2/MyD88 signalling mechanism leading to repositioning of constitutive COX-2-expressing mesenchymal stem cells to the crypt base is invoked. PMID:22027478

  18. Suppressing cyclooxygenase-2 prevents nonalcoholic and inhibits apoptosis of hepatocytes that are involved in the Akt/p53 signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jialing; Chen, Chong; Hu, Xi; Cai, Xianbin; Guan, Yinghong; Hu, Hui; Wang, Qinjia; Chen, Xiaofeng; Cai, Bozhi; Jing, Xubin

    2016-01-22

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) can exert pro-inflammatory effects in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The aim of this study was to determine if the inhibition of COX-2 attenuates hepatocyte apoptosis in steatohepatitis and to examine the underlying molecular mechanism. Male wild type C57BL6/J mice and COX-2 knock out (COX-2-/-) mice were fed a methionine choline deficient (MCD) diet for 3 weeks. The wild type mice were also treated with celecoxib or a combination of celecoxib and a Akt specific inhibitor, miltefosine (MTF). After that, liver histology, serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, hepatic triglyceride (TG) levels, hepatocyte apoptosis, phosphorylated Akt (Ser473, pAkt) and p53 protein levels in mice livers were assessed. Celecoxib attenuated the severity of liver steatohepatitis and reduced the number of apoptotic cells, accompanied by increasing the activity of Akt and decreasing expression of p53. On the contrary, MTF can abrogate the effects of celecoxib on anti-apoptosis and anti-steatohepatitis. Moreover, the effects on the COX-2-/- mice that were fed the MCD diet were similar to that for celecoxib. The findings suggested that suppressing COX-2 can improve steatohepatitis by inhibiting hepatocyte apoptosis in mice via regulating the Akt/p53 pathway. Celecoxib treatment may be a favorable treatment option for NASH. PMID:26723251

  19. Delivery of ursolic acid (UA) in polymeric nanoparticles effectively promotes the apoptosis of gastric cancer cells through enhanced inhibition of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Xiaolin; Ding, Jing; Xu, Huae; Dai, Xinzheng; Hou, Zhibo; Zhang, Kai; Sun, Kun; Sun, Weihao

    2013-01-30

    It has been demonstrated that ursolic acid (UA) could effectively induces apoptosis of cancer cells by inhibiting the expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), which constitutively expresses in gastric cancer. However, the hydrophobicity of UA increases the difficulty in its potential clinical application, which raises the possibility for its application as a novel model drug in nanoparticle-based delivery system. UA-loaded nanoparticles (UA-NPs) were prepared by a nano-precipitation method using amphilic methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-polycaprolactone (mPEG-PCL) block copolymers as drug carriers. UA was effectively transported into SGC7901 cells by nanoparticles and localized around the nuclei in the cytoplasms. The in vitro cytotoxicity and apoptosis test indicated that UA-NPs significantly elicited more cell death at almost equivalent dose and corresponding incubation time. Moreover, UA-NPs led to more cell apoptosis through stronger inhibition of COX-2 and activation of caspase 3. The most powerful evidence from this report is that the significant differences between the cytotoxicity of free UA and UA-NPs are closely related to the expression levels of COX-2 and caspase-3, which demonstrates the superiority of UA-NPs over free UA through penetrating cell membrane. Therefore, the study offer an effective way to improve the anticancer efficiency of UA through nano-drug delivery system. PMID:23194884

  20. Mitophagy inhibits proliferation by decreasing cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in arsenic trioxide-treated HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Niu, Zhidan; Zhang, Wenya; Gu, Xueyan; Zhang, Xiaoning; Qi, Yongmei; Zhang, Yingmei

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondrial damage can trigger mitophagy and eventually suppress proliferation. However, the effect of mitophagy on proliferation remains unclear. In this study, HepG2 cells were used to assess mitophagy and proliferation arrest in response to As2O3 exposure. The stimulatory effect of As2O3 on mitophagy was investigated by assessing morphology (mitophagosome and mitolysosome) and relevant proteins (PINK1, LC3 II/I, and COX IV). Additionally, the relationship of mitophagy and proliferation was explored through the use of mitophagy inhibitors (CsA, Mdivi-1). Interestingly, the inhibition of mitophagy rescued proliferation arrest by restoring COX-2 protein level and countered the elimination of mitochondria-located COX-2 and up-regulated the COX-2 mRNA level. Taken together, our findings indicated that mitophagy can be induced and can inhibit proliferation by reducing COX-2 in HepG2 cells during As2O3 treatment. PMID:27318970

  1. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 expression by xanthanolides isolated from Xanthium strumarium.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jeong Hoon; Lim, Hyo Jin; Lee, Hwa Jin; Kim, Hee-Doo; Jeon, Raok; Ryu, Jae-Ha

    2008-03-15

    Three sesquiterpenoids, xanthatin (1), xanthinosin (2), and 4-oxo-bedfordia acid (3) were isolated from Xanthium strumarium as inhibitors of nitric oxide synthesis in activated microglia (IC(50) values: 0.47, 11.2, 136.5 microM, respectively). Compounds 1 and 2 suppressed the expression of iNOS and COX-2 and the activity of NF-kappaB through the inhibition of LPS-induced I-kappaB-alpha degradation in microglia. PMID:18276135

  2. The Bitter Barricading of Prostaglandin Biosynthesis Pathway: Understanding the Molecular Mechanism of Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibition by Amarogentin, a Secoiridoid Glycoside from Swertia chirayita

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, Durai; Thorat, Sunil S.

    2014-01-01

    Swertia chirayita, a medicinal herb inhabiting the challenging terrains and high altitudes of the Himalayas, is a rich source of essential phytochemical isolates. Amarogentin, a bitter secoiridoid glycoside from S. chirayita, shows varied activity in several patho-physiological conditions, predominantly in leishmaniasis and carcinogenesis. Experimental analysis has revealed that amarogentin downregulates the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity and helps to curtail skin carcinogenesis in mouse models; however, there exists no account on selective inhibition of the inducible cyclooxygenase (COX) isoform by amarogentin. Hence the computer-aided drug discovery methods were used to unravel the COX-2 inhibitory mechanism of amarogentin and to check its selectivity for the inducible isoform over the constitutive one. The generated theoretical models of both isoforms were subjected to molecular docking analysis with amarogentin and twenty-one other Food and Drug Authority (FDA) approved lead molecules. The post-docking binding energy profile of amarogentin was comparable to the binding energy profiles of the FDA approved selective COX-2 inhibitors. Subsequent molecular dynamics simulation analysis delineated the difference in the stability of both complexes, with amarogentin-COX-2 complex being more stable after 40ns simulation. The total binding free energy calculated by MMGBSA for the amarogentin-COX-2 complex was −52.35 KCal/mol against a binding free energy of −8.57 KCal/mol for amarogentin-COX-1 complex, suggesting a possible selective inhibition of the COX-2 protein by the natural inhibitor. Amarogentin achieves this potential selectivity by small, yet significant, structural differences inherent to the binding cavities of the two isoforms. Hypothetically, it might block the entry of the natural substrates in the hydrophobic binding channel of the COX-2, inhibiting the cyclooxygenation step. To sum up briefly, this work highlights the mechanism of the possible

  3. NO2 inhalation promotes Alzheimer’s disease-like progression: cyclooxygenase-2-derived prostaglandin E2 modulation and monoacylglycerol lipase inhibition-targeted medication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wei; Yun, Yang; Ku, Tingting; Li, Guangke; Sang, Nan

    2016-03-01

    Air pollution has been reported to be associated with increased risks of cognitive impairment and neurodegenerative diseases. Because NO2 is a typical primary air pollutant and an important contributor to secondary aerosols, NO2-induced neuronal functional abnormalities have attracted greater attention, but the available experimental evidence, modulating mechanisms, and targeting medications remain ambiguous. In this study, we exposed C57BL/6J and APP/PS1 mice to dynamic NO2 inhalation and found for the first time that NO2 inhalation caused deterioration of spatial learning and memory, aggravated amyloid β42 (Aβ42) accumulation, and promoted pathological abnormalities and cognitive defects related to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The microarray and bioinformation data showed that the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-mediated arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) played a key role in modulating this aggravation. Furthermore, increasing endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) by inhibiting monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) prevented PGE2 production, neuroinflammation-associated Aβ42 accumulation, and neurodegeneration, indicating a therapeutic target for relieving cognitive impairment caused by NO2 exposure.

  4. NO2 inhalation promotes Alzheimer’s disease-like progression: cyclooxygenase-2-derived prostaglandin E2 modulation and monoacylglycerol lipase inhibition-targeted medication

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wei; Yun, Yang; Ku, Tingting; Li, Guangke; Sang, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Air pollution has been reported to be associated with increased risks of cognitive impairment and neurodegenerative diseases. Because NO2 is a typical primary air pollutant and an important contributor to secondary aerosols, NO2-induced neuronal functional abnormalities have attracted greater attention, but the available experimental evidence, modulating mechanisms, and targeting medications remain ambiguous. In this study, we exposed C57BL/6J and APP/PS1 mice to dynamic NO2 inhalation and found for the first time that NO2 inhalation caused deterioration of spatial learning and memory, aggravated amyloid β42 (Aβ42) accumulation, and promoted pathological abnormalities and cognitive defects related to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The microarray and bioinformation data showed that the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-mediated arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) played a key role in modulating this aggravation. Furthermore, increasing endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) by inhibiting monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) prevented PGE2 production, neuroinflammation-associated Aβ42 accumulation, and neurodegeneration, indicating a therapeutic target for relieving cognitive impairment caused by NO2 exposure. PMID:26928013

  5. Antineoplastic effect of a novel chemopreventive agent, neokestose, on the Caco-2 cell line via inhibition of expression of nuclear factor-κB and cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shun-Mei; Chang, Jan-Yi; Wu, Jiann-Shing; Sheu, Dey-Chyi

    2015-07-01

    Neokestose is a 6G-fructooligosaccharide (FOS) and an important prebiotic. When FOS are ingested by patients with colorectal cancer, they may come into contact with cancer cells prior to being fermented by bifidobacteria in the colon. In the present study, the effects of neokestose on cell proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of the colorectal cancer cell line Caco-2 were investigated to evaluate its anti-cancer effect. An MTT assay showed that neokestose-treated Caco-2 cells exhibited a significant and dose-dependent loss of viability. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that the sub-G1 population of Caco-2 cells was significantly increased following treatment with neokestose, and the percentage of Caco-2 cells in the stage of late apoptosis was also significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis showed that the overexpression of nuclear factor-κB, a central molecule responsible for the transition from inflammation to cancer, and cyclooxygenase-2, an important enzyme in colorectal tumorigenesis, in colorectal carcinoma cells was inhibited by neokestose. Accordingly, the present study provided in vitro evidence that neokestose may be used as a dietary chemopreventive agent, whose application is more rational than that of COX-2 inhibitors or aspirin for preventing colorectal cancer. PMID:25815878

  6. Selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors show a differential ability to inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Ryuta; Kusunoki, Natsuko; Matsuzaki, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Shusuke; Kawai, Shinichi

    2002-11-01

    Although the influence of selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors on the proliferation of colon adenocarcinoma cells have been the subject of much investigation, relatively little research has compared the effects of different COX-2 inhibitors. Celecoxib strongly suppressed the proliferation of COX-2 expressing HT-29 cells at 10-40 microM. NS-398 and nimesulide also inhibited cell proliferation, whereas rofecoxib, meloxicam, and etodolac did not. Only celecoxib induced apoptosis of HT-29 cells, as detected on the basis of DNA fragmentation, TUNEL positivity, and caspase-3/7 activation. DNA fragmentation was also increasd in COX-2 non-expressing cell lines (SW-480 and HCT-116) by exposure to celecoxib for 6-24 h. All six COX-2 inhibitors suppressed the production of prostaglandin E(2) by HT-29 cells, suggesting that the pro-apoptotic effect of celecoxib was unrelated to inhibition of COX-2. Inactivation of Akt might explain the differential pro-apoptotic effect of these selective COX-2 inhibitors on colon adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:12417326

  7. Persistent cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition downregulates NF-{kappa}B, resulting in chronic intestinal inflammation in the min/+ mouse model of colon tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Carothers, Adelaide M; Davids, Jennifer S; Damas, Beatrice C; Bertagnolli, Monica M

    2010-06-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition prevents adenoma formation in humans and mouse models of colon cancer. The selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib reduces COX-2 and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) expression and adenomas in the intestine of Min/+ mice after treatment for several weeks, but prolonged treatment increases PGE(2) production, resulting in drug-resistant tumor formation and transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta)-dependent intestinal fibrosis. In this study, we examined pathways that regulate COX-2 expression and suppress chronic intestinal inflammation. We show that NF-kappaB signaling was inhibited in the ileum of Min/+ mice receiving long-term treatment with celecoxib. This effect was associated with inhibition of TGFbeta-associated kinase-1 and IkappaB kinase alpha/beta activities and reduced expression of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR4 that enhance colonic barrier function. Additionally, we observed reduced activities of protein kinases c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase 1 and protein kinase A and transcription factor cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein, regulators of COX-2 expression, which cross-talk with NF-kappaB. In ileum subjected to long-term celecoxib treatment, we noted relatively higher expression of COX-2, vascular endothelial growth factor, and interleukin-1beta in Paneth cells, whereas NF-kappaB and COX-2 were more strongly expressed by an expanded population of stromal myofibroblasts. Our findings argue that celecoxib resistance is an acquired adaptation to changes in the crypt microenvironment that is associated with chronic intestinal inflammation and impaired acute wound-healing responsiveness. PMID:20484034

  8. Inhibition of DNA repair as a mechanism of enhanced radioresponse of head and neck carcinoma cells by a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, celecoxib

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, Uma . E-mail: uraju@mdanderson.org; Ariga, Hisanori; Dittmann, Klaus; Nakata, Eiko; Ang, Kian K.; Milas, Luka

    2005-10-01

    Purpose: Previously, we reported that inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme enhanced murine and human tumor cell response to radiation in vitro and in vivo. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating the effects of COX-2 inhibitors are not clear. The present study was designed to investigate the ability of celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, to sensitize human head-and-neck cancer cell line, HN5, to radiation, and examine its effects on DNA repair, which may be a potential mechanism of radiosensitization. Methods and Materials: Cells were assessed for the effect of celecoxib (5-50 {mu}M), by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiozol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay for growth inhibition and by clonogenic cell survival assay for the radiosensitizing effect. Kinase assay and Western analysis were conducted to assess the effect of celecoxib on DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (PKcs) and Ku proteins. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) were performed to determine the DNA-binding activity of Ku/DNA-PKcs protein complex and nuclear factor kappa B (NF{kappa}B). Results: Celecoxib (10 and 50 {mu}M, for 2 days) inhibited the HN5 cell growth and significantly enhanced the cell radiosensitivity in a dose-dependent manner. It also reduced the shoulder region on the radiation-survival curve, suggesting that inhibition of DNA repair processes may have occurred. Western blot analysis demonstrated that celecoxib downregulated the expression of Ku70 protein and inhibited the kinase activity of DNA-PKcs, which are involved in the double-stranded DNA-break repair machinery. By EMSA, it was further shown that celecoxib reduced DNA-binding activity of Ku/DNA-PKcs protein complex. In addition, celecoxib inhibited the constitutively active NF{kappa}B and the radiation-induced NF{kappa}B in HN5 cells, suggesting that NF{kappa}B may play a role in mediating the effects of celecoxib. Conclusions: Celecoxib strongly enhanced the sensitivity of HN5 carcinoma cells

  9. Temporal expression of the PGE2 synthetic system in the kidney is associated with the time frame of renal developmental vulnerability to cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Frölich, Stefanie; Olliges, Anke; Kern, Niklas; Schreiber, Yannik; Narumiya, Shuh; Nüsing, Rolf M

    2012-07-15

    Pharmacological blockade of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) causes impairment of kidney development. The present study was aimed at determining temporal expression pattern and activity of the PGE(2) synthetic pathway during postnatal nephrogenesis in mice and its association to the time window sensitive to COX-2 inhibition. During the first 10 days after birth, we observed transient induction of mRNA and protein for microsomal PGE synthase (mPGES)-1 between postnatal days 4 (P4) and P8, but not for mPGES-2 or cytosolic PGE synthase (cPGES). PGE(2) synthetic activity using arachidonic acid and PGH(2) as substrates and also urinary excretion of PGE(2) were enhanced during this time frame. In parallel to the PGE(2) system, COX-2 but not COX-1 expression was also transiently induced. Studying glomerulogenesis in EP receptor knockout mice revealed a reduction in glomerular size in EP1(-/-), EP2(-/-), and EP4(-/-) mice, supporting the developmental role of PGE(2). The most vulnerable time window to COX-2 inhibition by SC-236 was found closely related to the temporal expression of COX-2 and mPGES-1. The strongest effects of COX-2 inhibition were achieved following 8 days of drug administration. Similar developmental damage was caused by application of rofecoxib, but not by the COX-1-selective inhibitor SC-560. COX-2 inhibition starting after P10 has had no effect on the size of glomeruli or on the relative number of superficial glomeruli; however, growth of the renal cortex was significantly diminished, indicating the requirement of COX-2 activity after P10. Effects of COX-2 inhibition on renal cell differentiation and on renal fibrosis needed a prolonged time of exposition of at least 10 days. In conclusion, temporal expression of the PGE(2) synthetic system coincides with the most vulnerable age interval for the induction of irreversible renal abnormalities. We assume that mPGES-1 is coregulated with COX-2 for PGE(2) synthesis to orchestrate postnatal kidney development and

  10. Novel di-tertiary-butyl phenylhydrazones as dual cyclooxygenase-2/5-lipoxygenase inhibitors: synthesis, COX/LOX inhibition, molecular modeling, and insights into their cytotoxicities.

    PubMed

    Ghatak, Shibnath; Vyas, Alok; Misra, Suniti; O'Brien, Paul; Zambre, Ajit; Fresco, Victor M; Markwald, Roger R; Swamy, K Venkateshwara; Afrasiabi, Zahra; Choudhury, Amitava; Khetmalas, Madhukar; Padhye, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    Although dual inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and 5-Lipoxygenase (5-LOX) enzymes is highly effective than targeting COX or LOX alone, there are only a few reports of examining such compounds in case of colorectal cancers (CRC). In the present work we report that the novel di-tert-butyl phenol-based dual inhibitors DTPSAL, DTPBHZ, DTPINH, and DTPNHZ exhibit significant cytotoxicity against human CRC cell lines. Molecular docking studies revealed a good fit of these compounds in the COX-2 and 5-LOX protein cavities. The inhibitors show significant inhibition of COX-2 and 5-LOX activities and are effective against a panel of human colon cancer cell lines including HCA-7, HT-29, SW480 and intestinal Apc10.1 cells as well as the hyaluronan synthase-2 (Has2) enzyme over-expressing colon cancer cells, through inhibition of the Hyaluronan/CD44v6 cell survival pathway. Western blot analysis and qRT-PCR analyses indicated that the di-tert-butyl phenol-based dual inhibitors reduce the expression of COX-2, 5-LOX, and CD44v6 in human colon cancer HCA-7 cells, while the combination of CD44v6shRNA and DTPSAL has an additional inhibitory effect on CD44v6 mRNA expression. The synergistic inhibitory effect of Celecoxib and Licofelone on CD44v6 mRNA expression suggests that the present dual inhibitors down-regulate cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase enzymes through CD44v6. The compounds also exhibited enhanced antiproliferative potency compared to standard dual COX/LOX inhibitor, viz. Licofelone. Importantly, the HA/CD44v6 antagonist CD44v6shRNA in combination with synthetic compounds had a sensitizing effect on the cancer cells which enhanced their antiproliferative potency, a finding which is crucial for the anti-proliferative potency of the novel synthetic di-tert-butyl phenol based dual COX-LOX inhibitors in colon cancer cells. PMID:24295787

  11. Gastrodin Inhibits Expression of Inducible NO Synthase, Cyclooxygenase-2 and Proinflammatory Cytokines in Cultured LPS-Stimulated Microglia via MAPK Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Lian-Mei; Li, Yue-Min; Zhang, Wei; Bian, Li-Gong; Ai, Qing-Long; Liu, Yi-Dan; Sun, Jun; Lu, Di

    2011-01-01

    Background Microglial activation plays an important role in neurodegenerative diseases by producing several proinflammatory enzymes and proinflammatory cytokines. The phenolic glucoside gastrodin, a main constituent of a Chinese herbal medicine, has been known to display anti-inflammatory properties. The current study investigates the potential mechanisms whereby gastrodin affects the expression of potentially pro-inflammatory proteins by cultured murine microglial BV-2 cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Methodology/Principal Findings BV-2 cells were pretreated with gastrodin (30, 40, and 60 µM) for 1 h and then stimulated with LPS (1 µg/ml) for another 4 h. The effects on proinflammatory enzymes, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), are analysed by double-immunofluorescence labeling and RT-PCR assay. To reveal the mechanisms of action of gastrodin we investigated the involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) cascades and their downstream transcription factors, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and cyclic AMP-responsive element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB). Gastrodin significantly reduced the LPS-induced protein and mRNA expression levels of iNOS, COX-2, TNF-α, IL-1β and NF-κB. LPS (1 µg/ml, 30 min)-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and this was inhibited by pretreatment of BV-2 cells with different concentrations of gastrodin (30, 40, and 60 µM). In addition, gastrodin blocked LPS-induced phosphorylation of inhibitor κB-α (IκB-α) (and hence the activation of NF-κB) and of CREB, respectively. Conclusion and Implications This study indicates that gastrodin significantly attenuate levels of neurotoxic proinflammatory mediators and proinflammatory cytokines by inhibition of

  12. MiR-26a and miR-144 inhibit proliferation and metastasis of esophageal squamous cell cancer by inhibiting cyclooxygenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Ying; Li, Peng; Zhu, Sheng-Tao; Yue, Ji-Ping; Ji, Xiao-Jun; Ma, Dan; Wang, Li; Wang, Yong-Jun; Zong, Ye; Wu, Yong-Dong; Zhang, Shu-Tian

    2016-01-01

    The altered expression of miRNAs is involved in carcinogenesis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), but whether miRNAs regulate COX-2 expression in ESCC is not clear. To this end, the expression levels of miR-26a and miR-144 in ESCC clinical tissues and cell lines were investigated by qRT-PCR. COX-2 and PEG2 were quantified by western blot and ELISA. Decrease in miR-26a and miR-144 expression in ESCC was found by a comparison between 30 pairs of ESCC tumor and adjacent normal tissues as well as in 11 ESCC cell lines (P < 0.001). Co-transfection of miR-26a and miR-144 in ESCC cell lines more significantly suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and invasion than did either miR-26a or miR-144 alone (all P < 0.001), as shown by assays of CCK8, migration and invasion and flow cytometry. The inhibitory effect of these two miRNAs in vivo was also verified in nude mice xenograft models. COX-2 was confirmed as a target of miR-26a and miR-144. In conclusion, miR-26a and miR-144 expression is downregulated in ESCC. Co-expression of miR-26a and miR-144 in ESCC cells resulted in inhibition of proliferation and metastasis in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that targeting COX-2 may be the mechanism of these two miRNAs. PMID:26959737

  13. Opposing Effects of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) on Estrogen Receptor β (ERβ) Response to 5α-Reductase Inhibition in Prostate Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Teresa T; Grubisha, Melanie J; Frahm, Krystle A; Wendell, Stacy G; Liu, Jiayan; Ricke, William A; Auchus, Richard J; DeFranco, Donald B

    2016-07-01

    Current pharmacotherapies for symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), an androgen receptor-driven, inflammatory disorder affecting elderly men, include 5α-reductase (5AR) inhibitors (i.e. dutasteride and finasteride) to block the conversion of testosterone to the more potent androgen receptor ligand dihydrotestosterone. Because dihydrotestosterone is the precursor for estrogen receptor β (ERβ) ligands, 5AR inhibitors could potentially limit ERβ activation, which maintains prostate tissue homeostasis. We have uncovered signaling pathways in BPH-derived prostate epithelial cells (BPH-1) that are impacted by 5AR inhibition. The induction of apoptosis and repression of the cell adhesion protein E-cadherin by the 5AR inhibitor dutasteride requires both ERβ and TGFβ. Dutasteride also induces cyclooxygenase type 2 (COX-2), which functions in a negative feedback loop in TGFβ and ERβ signaling pathways as evidenced by the potentiation of apoptosis induced by dutasteride or finasteride upon pharmacological inhibition or shRNA-mediated ablation of COX-2. Concurrently, COX-2 positively impacts ERβ action through its effect on the expression of a number of steroidogenic enzymes in the ERβ ligand metabolic pathway. Therefore, effective combination pharmacotherapies, which have included non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, must take into account biochemical pathways affected by 5AR inhibition and opposing effects of COX-2 on the tissue-protective action of ERβ. PMID:27226548

  14. Selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors and their influence on the protective effect of a mild irritant in the rat stomach

    PubMed Central

    Gretzer, Britta; Ehrlich, Karlheinz; Maricic, Nenad; Lambrecht, Nils; Respondek, Michael; Peskar, Brigitta M

    1998-01-01

    The effects of the non-selective cyclo-oxygenase (COX) inhibitor indomethacin and the selective COX-2 inhibitors, N-[2-(cyclohexyloxy)-4-nitrophenyl] methanesulphonamide (NS-398), 5-methanesulphonamido-6-(2,4-difluorothio-phenyl)-1-indanone (L-745,337) and 5,5-dimethyl-3-(3-fluorophenyl)-4-(4-methylsulphonyl) phenyl-2(5H)-furanone (DFU), on the protection induced by the mild irritant 20% ethanol were investigated in the rat stomach.Instillation of 20% ethanol (1 ml, p.o.) effectively protected against gastric mucosal injury induced by subsequent instillation of 70% or 96% ethanol (1 ml, p.o.).Oral administration of indomethacin (1.25–20 mg kg−1) dose-dependently counteracted the protective effect of 20% ethanol (ID50: 3.5 mg kg−1).Likewise, NS-398 (0.1–1 mg kg−1), L-745,337 (0.2–2 mg kg−1) and DFU (0.02–0.2 mg kg−1) inhibited the protective effect of 20% ethanol in a dose-dependent manner with ID50 values of 0.3 mg kg−1, 0.4 mg kg−1 and 0.06 mg kg−1, respectively.Inhibition of mild irritant-induced protection was also found when NS-398 (1 mg kg−1) was administered s.c. or when 96% ethanol was used to damage the mucosa.Pretreatment with 16,16-dimethyl-prostaglandin (PG)E2 at 4 ng kg−1, a dose that did not protect against ethanol (70%)-induced mucosal damage when given alone, completely reversed the effect of the selective COX-2 inhibitors on the mild irritant-induced protection.Pretreatment with dexamethasone (3 mg kg−1, 24 and 2 h before instillation of 20% ethanol) did not affect the protective activity of the mild irritant, indicating that enzyme induction is not involved.Indomethacin (20 mg kg−1, p.o.) did not prevent the protection conferred by sodium salicylate (100 mg kg−1), dimercaprol (30 μg kg−1), iodoacetamide (50 mg kg−1) and lithium (20 mg kg−1). Likewise, the protective effect of these agents was not counteracted by NS-398 (1 mg kg−1, p.o.).Whereas indomethacin (20

  15. Retraction: "Concurrent inhibition of NF-κB, cyclooxygenase-2, and epidermal growth factor receptor leads to greater anti-tumor activity in pancreatic cancer" by Ali et al.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    The above article, published online on March 8, 2010 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Gary S. Stein, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation from Wayne State University involving the first author and the corresponding author that found Figures 2A, 4, 6A, and 6C to be inappropriately manipulated. REFERENCE Ali S, Banerjee S, Schaffert JM, El-Rayes BF, Philip PA, Sarkar FH. 2010. Concurrent inhibition of NF-κB, cyclooxygenase-2, and epidermal growth factor receptor leads to greater anti-tumor activity in pancreatic cancer. J Cell Biochem 110:171-181; doi: 10.1002/jcb.22523. PMID:27301888

  16. Soy Saponins Meditate the Progression of Colon Cancer in Rats by Inhibiting the Activity of β-Glucuronidase and the Number of Aberrant Crypt Foci but Not Cyclooxygenase-2 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu-Wei; Chen, Yue-Hwa; Liao, Hsiang; Lin, Shyh-Hsiang

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The effect of extracted crude soybean saponins on preneoplastic lesions, aberrant crypt foci (ACF), and the related mechanism were investigated. Research Methods and Procedures. Rats were assigned into five groups according to different doses of extracted crude soybean saponins and received 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) injection in week 5. In week 15, all rats were sacrificed. The number of ACFs, the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression, the level of prostaglandins E2 (PGE2), and the activity of β-glucuronidase were examined. Results. Results revealed that the consumption of extracted crude soybean saponins decreased the number of ACFs and the activity of β-glucuronidase in rats, while the expression of COX-2 protein and PGE2 level were not affected. Conclusions. Soybean saponins were effective in inhibiting colon cancer by downregulating the activity of β-glucuronidase in colonic mucosa but not the COX-2 protein expression and PGE2 level. PMID:24224098

  17. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, inhibits melanoma cancer cell migration by reducing the expressions of cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E2 and prostaglandin E2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Tripti; Vaid, Mudit; Katiyar, Nandan; Sharma, Samriti; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2011-01-01

    Melanoma is the leading cause of death from skin disease due, in large part, to its propensity to metastasize. We have examined the effect of berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, on human melanoma cancer cell migration and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects using melanoma cell lines, A375 and Hs294. Using an in vitro cell migration assay, we show that over expression of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, its metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and PGE2 receptors promote the migration of cells. We found that treatment of A375 and Hs294 cells with berberine resulted in concentration-dependent inhibition of migration of these cells, which was associated with a reduction in the levels of COX-2, PGE2 and PGE2 receptors (EP2 and EP4). Treatment of cells with celecoxib, a COX-2 inhibitor, or transient transfection of cells with COX-2 small interfering RNA, also inhibited cell migration. Treatment of the cells with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), an inducer of COX-2 or PGE2, enhanced cell migration, whereas berberine inhibited TPA- or PGE2-promoted cell migration. Berberine reduced the basal levels as well as PGE2-stimulated expression levels of EP2 and EP4. Treatment of the cells with the EP4 agonist stimulated cell migration and berberine blocked EP4 agonist-induced cell migration activity. Moreover, berberine inhibited the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), an upstream regulator of COX-2, in A375 cells, and treatment of cells with caffeic acid phenethyl ester, an inhibitor of NF-κB, inhibited cell migration. Together, these results indicate for the first time that berberine inhibits melanoma cell migration, an essential step in invasion and metastasis, by inhibition of COX-2, PGE2 and PGE2 receptors. PMID:20974686

  18. Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-1 and Cyclooxygenase-2 Impairs Trypanosoma cruzi Entry into Cardiac Cells and Promotes Differential Modulation of the Inflammatory Response

    PubMed Central

    Malvezi, Aparecida D.; Panis, Carolina; da Silva, Rosiane V.; de Freitas, Rafael Carvalho; Lovo-Martins, Maria I.; Tatakihara, Vera L. H.; Zanluqui, Nágela G.; Neto, Edecio Cunha; Goldenberg, Samuel; Bordignon, Juliano; Yamada-Ogatta, Sueli F.; Martins-Pinge, Marli C.; Cecchini, Rubens

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, a serious disorder that affects millions of people in Latin America. Cell invasion by T. cruzi and its intracellular replication are essential to the parasite's life cycle and for the development of Chagas disease. Here, we present evidence suggesting the involvement of the host's cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes during T. cruzi invasion. Pharmacological antagonists for COX-1 (aspirin) and COX-2 (celecoxib) caused marked inhibition of T. cruzi infection when rat cardiac cells were pretreated with these nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for 60 min at 37°C before inoculation. This inhibition was associated with an increase in the production of NO and interleukin-1β and decreased production of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) by cells. Taken together, these results indicate that COX-1 more than COX-2 is involved in the regulation of anti-T. cruzi activity in cardiac cells, and they provide a better understanding of the influence of TGF-β-interfering therapies on the innate inflammatory response to T. cruzi infection and may represent a very pertinent target for new therapeutic treatments of Chagas disease. PMID:25092706

  19. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression and inducible nitric oxide synthase by 4-[(2′-O-acetyl-α-l-rhamnosyloxy)benzyl]isothiocyanate from Moringa oleifera

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eun-Jung; Cheenpracha, Sarot; Chang, Leng Chee; Kondratyuk, Tamara P.; Pezzuto, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Moringa oleifera Lamarack is commonly consumed for nutritional or medicinal properties. We recently reported the isolation and structure elucidation of novel bioactive phenolic glycosides, including 4-[(2′-O-acetyl-α-l-rhamnosyloxy)benzyl]isothiocyanate (RBITC), which was found to suppress inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and nitric oxide production in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW 264.7 mouse macrophage cells. Inhibitors of proteins such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and iNOS are potential anti-inflammatory and cancer chemopreventive agents. The inhibitory activity of RBITC on NO production (IC50 = 0.96 ± 0.23 µM) was greater than that mediated by other well-known isothiocyanates such as sulforaphane (IC50 = 2.86 ± 0.39 µM) and benzyl isothiocyanate (IC50 = 2.08 ± 0.28 µM). RBITC inhibited expression of COX-2 and iNOS at both the protein and mRNA levels. Major upstream signaling pathways involved mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). RBITC inhibited phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinase and stress-activated protein kinase, as well as ubiquitin-dependent degradation of inhibitor κBα (IκBα). In accordance with IκBα degradation, nuclear accumulation of NF-κB, and subsequent binding to NF-κB cis-acting element, was attenuated by treatment with RBITC. These data suggest RBITC should be included in the dietary armamentarium of isothiocyanates potentially capable of mediating anti-inflammatory or cancer chemopreventive activity. PMID:21774591

  20. Cyclooxygenase-2 and kidney failure.

    PubMed

    Rios, Amelia; Vargas-Robles, Hilda; Gámez-Méndez, Ana Maria; Escalante, Bruno

    2012-08-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent prostaglandins are necessary for normal kidney function. These prostaglandins are associated with inflammation, maintenance of sodium and water homeostasis, control of renin release, renal vasodilation, vasoconstriction attenuation, and prenatal renal development. COX-2 expression is regulated by the renin-angiotensin system, glucocorticoids or mineralcorticoids, and aldosterone, supporting a role for COX-2 in kidney function. Indeed, COX-2 mRNA and protein levels as well as enzyme activity are increased, along with PGE2, during kidney failure. In addition, changes in COX-2 expression are associated with increased blood pressure, urinary volume, sodium and protein and decreased urinary osmolarity. Intrarenal mechanisms such as angiotensin II (Ang II) production, increased sodium delivery, glomerular hypertension, and renal tubular inflammation have been suggested to be responsible for the increase in COX-2 expression. Although, specific COX-2 pharmacological inhibition has been related to the prevention of kidney damage, clinical studies have reported that COX-2 inhibition may cause side effects such as edema or a modest elevation in blood pressure and could possibly interfere with antihypertensive drugs and increase the risk of cardiovascular complications. Thus, administration of COX-2 inhibitors requires caution, especially in the presence of underlying cardiovascular disease. PMID:22119250

  1. Sesamol suppresses cyclooxygenase-2 transcriptional activity in colon cancer cells and modifies intestinal polyp development in ApcMin/+ mice

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Satomi; Fujii, Gen; Takahashi, Mami; Nakanishi, Ruri; Komiya, Masami; Shimura, Misato; Noma, Nobuharu; Onuma, Wakana; Terasaki, Masaru; Yano, Tomohiro; Mutoh, Michihiro

    2014-01-01

    Excessive prostaglandin production by cyclooxygenase-2 in stromal and epithelial cells is a causative factor of colorectal carcinogenesis. Thus, compounds which inhibit cyclooxygenase-2 transcriptional activity in colon epithelial cells could be candidates for anti-carcinogenic agents. A cyclooxygenase-2 transcriptional activity in the human colon cancer cell line DLD-1 has been measured using a β-galactosidase reporter gene system. Using this system, we demonstrated that the decrease in basal cyclooxygenase-2 transcriptional activities at 100 µM sesamol, one of the lignans in sesame seeds, was 50%. Other compounds in sesame seeds such as sesamin, sesamolin, ferulic acid, and syringic acid did not exhibit significant suppression of cyclooxygenase-2 transcriptional activity at up to 100 µM. In a following experiment, 6-week-old male Min mice, Apc-deficient mice, were divided into a non-treated and 500 ppm sesamol groups. At the age of 15 weeks, it was found that treatment with sesamol decreased the number of polyps in the middle part of small intestine to 66.1% of the untreated value. Moreover, sesamol suppressed cyclooxygenase-2 and cytosolic prostaglandin E2 synthase mRNA in the polyp parts. The present findings may demonstrate the novel anti-carcinogenetic property of sesamol, and imply that agents that can suppress cyclooxygenase-2 expression may be useful cancer chemopreventive agents. PMID:24688218

  2. Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitory and Antioxidant Compounds from the Truffle Elaphomyces granulatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ethanol extract of fruiting bodies of Elaphomyces granulatus, a truffle-like fungus, was evaluated for cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme inhibitory and antioxidant activities. Inhibition of COX-2 activity was evaluated in mouse macrophages (RAW 264.7). The extract of E. granulatus caused a 68% inh...

  3. A Revised Mechanism for Human Cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi; Roth, Justine P

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid oxidation by wild-type cyclooxygenase 2 and the Y334F variant, lacking a conserved hydrogen bond to the catalytic tyrosyl radical/tyrosine, was examined for the first time under physiologically relevant conditions. The enzymes show apparent bimolecular rate constants and deuterium kinetic isotope effects that increase in proportion to co-substrate concentrations before converging to limiting values. The trends exclude multiple dioxygenase mechanisms as well as the proposal that initial hydrogen atom abstraction from the fatty acid is the first irreversible step in catalysis. Temperature dependent kinetic studies reinforce the novel finding that hydrogen transfer from the reduced catalytic tyrosine to a terminal peroxyl radical is the first irreversible step that controls regio- and stereospecific product formation. PMID:26565028

  4. 5-Lipoxygenase/cyclooxygenase-2 cross-talk through cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 2 in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lötzer, Katharina; Jahn, Steffen; Kramer, Cornelia; Hildner, Markus; Nüsing, Rolf; Funk, Colin D; Habenicht, Andreas J R

    2007-11-01

    The 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) pathway generates lipid mediators, i.e. the cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) LTC(4)/LTD(4) and LTB(4). CysLT receptors are expressed in endothelial cells (EC) and EC cysLT(2)-R activation induces diverse pro-inflammatory genes in vitro. We now report that LTD(4) promotes formation of an atherosclerosis-protective and anti-thrombotic eicosanoid by markedly up-regulating EC cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). CysLT-induced COX-2 transcripts were transiently up-regulated as determined by microarray and QRT-PCR analyses though COX-2 protein remained elevated for several hours. Prostacyclin formation, measured as its stable metabolite 6-keto-PGF(1alpha), was increased several fold in LTD(4)-stimulated ECs, and was inhibited by the COX-2-specific inhibitor, NS-398. COX-2 up-regulation was Ca(2+)-dependent and was partially blocked by cyclosporin A indicating that the 5-LO/COX-2 cross-talk involved signaling through a nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) dependent pathway. Since prostacyclin is a major blood vessel-protective and anti-thrombotic eicosanoid, the EC cysLT(2)-R may limit its otherwise pro-inflammatory actions through a protective Ca(2+)/calcineurin/NFAT-dependent COX-2 feedback loop. PMID:17991613

  5. Cyclooxygenase-2 in newborn hyperoxic lung injury.

    PubMed

    Britt, Rodney D; Velten, Markus; Tipple, Trent E; Nelin, Leif D; Rogers, Lynette K

    2013-08-01

    Supraphysiological O2 concentrations, mechanical ventilation, and inflammation significantly contribute to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD).Exposure of newborn mice to hyperoxia causes inflammation and impaired alveolarization similar to that seen in infants with BPD.Previously, we demonstrated that pulmonary cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression is increased in hyperoxia-exposed newborn mice.The present studies were designed to define the role of COX-2 in newborn hyperoxic lung injury.We tested the hypothesis that attenuation of COX-2 activity would reduce hyperoxia-induced inflammation and improve alveolarization.Newborn C3H/HeN micewere injected daily with vehicle, aspirin (nonselective COX-2 inhibitor), or celecoxib (selective COX-2 inhibitor) for the first 7 days of life.Additional studies utilized wild-type (C57Bl/6, COX-2(+/+)), heterozygous (COX-2(+/-)), and homozygous (COX-2(-/-)) transgenic mice.Micewere exposed to room air (21% O2) or hyperoxia (85% O2) for 14 days.Aspirin-injected and COX-2(-/-) pups had reduced levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL).Both aspirin and celecoxib treatment reduced macrophage numbers in the alveolar walls and air spaces.Aspirin and celecoxib treatment attenuated hyperoxia-induced COX activity, including altered levels of prostaglandin (PG)D2 metabolites.Decreased COX activity, however, did not prevent hyperoxia-induced lung developmental deficits.Our data suggest thatincreased COX-2 activity may contribute to proinflammatory responses, including macrophage chemotaxis, during exposure to hyperoxia.Modulation of COX-2 activity may be a useful therapeutic target to limit hyperoxia-induced inflammation in preterm infants at risk of developing BPD. PMID:23624331

  6. Role of cyclooxygenase-2 in the prolonged regulation of renal function.

    PubMed

    Roig, Francisco; Llinás, Maria T; López, Ruth; Salazar, F Javier

    2002-11-01

    The role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the prolonged regulation of renal function was evaluated during changes in sodium intake and reduction of NO synthesis. It was evaluated in conscious dogs by administering a selective inhibitor (nimesulide) during 8 consecutive days. Nimesulide administration to dogs with normal or high sodium load did not modify glomerular filtration rate but reduced renal blood flow (16%; P<0.05). The vasoconstriction elicited by COX-2 inhibition was greater when NO production was inhibited because glomerular filtration rate decreased by >25% when nimesulide was administered to dogs with a reduced NO synthesis. During low sodium intake, COX-2 inhibition elicited a decrease (P<0.05) of both glomerular filtration rate (34%) and renal blood flow (31%). Sodium excretion only decreased (P<0.05) during the first day of COX-2 inhibition in dogs with normal or high sodium load. The increase in plasma potassium levels elicited by COX-2 inhibition was greater in dogs with low sodium intake and was enhanced when NO production was inhibited. This change in potassium was not secondary to a decrease in plasma aldosterone levels. The results of this study suggest that COX-2-derived metabolites (1) play a more important role in the long-term regulation of renal hemodynamic when sodium intake is low, (2) protect the renal vasculature from the vasoconstriction secondary to a reduction in NO, (3) are only acutely involved in regulating urinary sodium excretion, and (4) play a more important role in regulating plasma potassium concentration when NO synthesis is reduced. PMID:12411468

  7. Novel Biphasic Role of LipoxinA4 on Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Lung Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Shengxing; Wang, Qian; He, Qian; Song, Xiaorong; Ye, Duyun; Gao, Fang; Jin, Shengwei; Lian, QingQuan

    2011-01-01

    Fibroblasts are important to host defence and immunity, can also as initiators of inflammation as well. As the endogenous “braking signal”, Lipoxins can regulate anti-inflammation and the resolution of inflammation. We investigated the effect of lipoxinA4 on the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated lung fibroblasts. We demonstrated that the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 protein was significantly increased and peaked initially at 6 hours, with a second increase, with maximal levels occurring 24 hours after lipopolysaccharide challenge. ProstaglandinE2 levels also peaked at 6 hours, and prostaglandinD2 levels were increased at both 6 and 24 hours. Exogenous lipoxinA4 inhibited the first peak of cyclooxygenase-2 expression as well as the production of prostaglandinE2 induced by lipopolysaccharide in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, exogenous lipoxinA4 increased the second peak of cyclooxygenase-2 expression as well as the production of prostaglandinD2 induced by lipopolysaccharide in a dose-dependent manner. LipoxinA4 receptor mRNA expression was markedly stimulated by lipopolysaccharide but inhibited by lipoxinA4. We present evidence for a novel biphasic role of lipoxinA4 on the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated lung fibroblasts, whereby LXA4 has an anti-inflammatory and proresolving activity in lung fibroblasts following LPS stimulation. PMID:21765620

  8. Cyclooxygenase-2 and the inflammogenesis of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Randall E; Casto, Bruce C; Harris, Zachary M

    2014-01-01

    Cohesive scientific evidence from molecular, animal, and human investigations supports the hypothesis that constitutive overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a ubiquitous driver of mammary carcinogenesis, and reciprocally, that COX-2 blockade has strong potential for breast cancer prevention and therapy. Key findings include the following: (1) COX-2 is constitutively expressed throughout breast cancer development and expression intensifies with stage at detection, cancer progression and metastasis; (2) essential features of mammary carcinogenesis (mutagenesis, mitogenesis, angiogenesis, reduced apoptosis, metastasis and immunosuppression) are linked to COX-2-driven prostaglandin E2 (PGE-2) biosynthesis; (3) upregulation of COX-2 and PGE-2 expression induces transcription of CYP-19 and aromatase-catalyzed estrogen biosynthesis which stimulates unbridled mitogenesis; (4) extrahepatic CYP-1B1 in mammary adipose tissue converts paracrine estrogen to carcinogenic quinones with mutagenic impact; and (5) agents that inhibit COX-2 reduce the risk of breast cancer in women without disease and reduce recurrence risk and mortality in women with breast cancer. Recent sharp increases in global breast cancer incidence and mortality are likely driven by chronic inflammation of mammary adipose and upregulation of COX-2 associated with the obesity pandemic. The totality of evidence clearly supports the supposition that mammary carcinogenesis often evolves as a progressive series of highly specific cellular and molecular changes in response to induction of constitutive over-expression of COX-2 and the prostaglandin cascade in the “inflammogenesis of breast cancer”. PMID:25302170

  9. Role of cyclooxygenase-2 in gastric cancer development and progression

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jian; Fan, Xiao-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Although the incidence of gastric cancer has been declining in recent decades, it remains a major public health issue as the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. In China, gastric cancer is still the main cause of death in patients with malignant tumors. Most patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage and mortality is high. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a rate-limiting enzyme in prostanoid synthesis and plays an important role in the development and progression of gastric cancer. The expression of COX-2 in gastric cancer is upregulated and its molecular mechanisms have been investigated. Helicobacter pylori infection, tumor suppressor gene mutation and the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B may be responsible for the elevated expression of COX-2 in gastric cancer. The mechanisms of COX-2 in the development and progression of gastric cancer are probably through promoting the proliferation of gastric cancer cells, while inhibiting apoptosis, assisting angiogenesis and lymphatic metastasis, and participating in cancer invasion and immunosuppression. This review is intended to discuss, comment and summarize recent research progress on the role of COX-2 in gastric cancer development and progression, and elucidate the molecular mechanisms which might be involved in the carcinogenesis. PMID:24259966

  10. Cyclooxygenase-2 Mediates Anandamide Metabolism in the Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kaczocha, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mediates inflammation and contributes to neurodegeneration. Best known for its pathological up-regulation, COX-2 is also constitutively expressed within the brain and mediates synaptic transmission through prostaglandin synthesis. Along with arachidonic acid, COX-2 oxygenates the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol in vitro. Inhibition of COX-2 enhances retrograde signaling in the hippocampus, suggesting COX-2 mediates endocannabinoid tone in healthy brain. The degree to which COX-2 may regulate endocannabinoid metabolism in vivo is currently unclear. Therefore, we explored the effect of COX-2 inhibition on [3H]AEA metabolism in mouse brain. Although AEA is hydrolyzed primarily by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), ex vivo autoradiography revealed that COX-2 inhibition by nimesulide redirected [3H]AEA substrate from COX-2 to FAAH in the cortex, hippocampus, thalamus, and periaqueductal gray. These data indicate that COX-2 possesses the capacity to metabolize AEA in vivo and can compete with FAAH for AEA in several brain regions. Temporal fluctuations in COX-2 expression were observed in the brain, with an increase in COX-2 protein and mRNA in the hippocampus at midnight compared with noon. COX-2 immunolocalization was robust in the hippocampus and several cortical regions. Although most regions exhibited no temporal changes in COX-2 immunolocalization, increased numbers of immunoreactive cells were detected at midnight in layers II and III of the somatosensory and visual cortices. These temporal variations in COX-2 distribution reduced the enzyme's contribution toward [3H]AEA metabolism in the somatosensory cortex at midnight. Taken together, our findings establish COX-2 as a mediator of regional AEA metabolism in mouse brain. PMID:20702753

  11. Competition and allostery govern substrate selectivity of cyclooxygenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Mitchener, Michelle M.; Hermanson, Daniel J.; Shockley, Erin M.; Brown, H. Alex; Lindsley, Craig W.; Reese, Jeff; Rouzer, Carol A.; Lopez, Carlos F.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) oxygenates arachidonic acid (AA) and its ester analog, 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), to prostaglandins (PGs) and prostaglandin glyceryl esters (PG-Gs), respectively. Although the efficiency of oxygenation of these substrates by COX-2 in vitro is similar, cellular biosynthesis of PGs far exceeds that of PG-Gs. Evidence that the COX enzymes are functional heterodimers suggests that competitive interaction of AA and 2-AG at the allosteric site of COX-2 might result in differential regulation of the oxygenation of the two substrates when both are present. Modulation of AA levels in RAW264.7 macrophages uncovered an inverse correlation between cellular AA levels and PG-G biosynthesis. In vitro kinetic analysis using purified protein demonstrated that the inhibition of 2-AG oxygenation by high concentrations of AA far exceeded the inhibition of AA oxygenation by high concentrations of 2-AG. An unbiased systems-based mechanistic model of the kinetic data revealed that binding of AA or 2-AG at the allosteric site of COX-2 results in a decreased catalytic efficiency of the enzyme toward 2-AG, whereas 2-AG binding at the allosteric site increases COX-2’s efficiency toward AA. The results suggest that substrates interact with COX-2 via multiple potential complexes involving binding to both the catalytic and allosteric sites. Competition between AA and 2-AG for these sites, combined with differential allosteric modulation, gives rise to a complex interplay between the substrates, leading to preferential oxygenation of AA. PMID:26392530

  12. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in ginger (Zingiber officinale)

    PubMed Central

    van Breemen, Richard B.; Tao, Yi; Li, Wenkui

    2010-01-01

    Ginger roots have been used to treat inflammation and have been reported to inhibit cyclooxygenase (COX). Ultrafiltration liquid chromatography mass spectrometry was used to screen a chloroform partition of a methanol extract of ginger roots for COX-2 ligands, and 10-gingerol, 12-gingerol, 8-shogaol, 10-shogaol, 6-gingerdione, 8-gingerdione, 10-gingerdione, 6-dehydro-10-gingerol, 6-paradol, and 8-paradol bound to the enzyme active site. Purified 10-gingerol, 8-shogaol and 10-shogaol inhibited COX-2 with IC50 values of 32 μM, 17.5 μM and 7.5 μM, respectively. No inhibition of COX-1 was detected. Therefore, 10-gingerol, 8-shogaol and 10-shogaol inhibit COX-2 but not COX-1, which can explain, in part, anti-inflammatory properties of ginger. PMID:20837112

  13. Phlorofucofuroeckol A suppresses expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase-2, and pro-inflammatory cytokines via inhibition of nuclear factor-κB, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases, and Akt in microglial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, A-Reum; Lee, Min-Sup; Choi, Ji-Woong; Utsuki, Tadanobu; Kim, Jae-Il; Jang, Byeong-Churl; Kim, Hyeung-Rak

    2013-04-01

    Microglial activation has been implicated in many neurological disorders for its inflammatory and neurotrophic effects. In this study, we investigated the effects of phlorofucofuroeckol A isolated from Ecklonia stolonifera Okamura on the production of inflammatory mediators in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated microglia. Pre-treatment of phlorofucofuroeckol A attenuated the productions of nitric oxide, prostaglandin E2, and pro-inflammatory cytokines in LPS-stimulated microglia. Profoundly, phlorofucofuroeckol A treatment showed inactivation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) by preventing the degradation of inhibitor κB-α and the nuclear translocation of p65 NF-κB subunit. Moreover, phlorofucofuroeckol A inhibited the activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases (JNKs), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and Akt, but not that of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. These results indicate that phlorofucofuroeckol A inhibits the LPS-induced expression of inflammatory mediators through inactivation of NF-κB, JNKs, p38 MAPK, and Akt pathways. These findings suggest that phlorofucofuroeckol A can be considered as a nutraceutical candidate for the treatment of neuroinflammation in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22993079

  14. [Recent development of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Kawai, Shinichi

    2002-12-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs(NSAIDs) are clinically effective against the inflammatory symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis. Recent attention has been focused on selective cyclooxygenase(COX)-2 inhibitors, a type of NSAID that inhibits a subtype of COX. Because of the different actions of COX-1 and COX-2, selective COX-2 inhibitors were expected to reduce adverse reactions such as gastrointestinal disorders. Various clinical studies have confirmed that the efficacy of COX-2 inhibitors for RA is similar to that of conventional NSAIDs, but they cause fewer severe gastrointestinal disorders. The incidence of complications related to renal dysfunction, such as edema and hypertension, is not different. Patients using selective COX-2 inhibitors have recently been reported to show an increase in thrombotic complications such as myocardial infarction. Therefore, more data on adverse events should be collected in the future from large-scale clinical studies to further clarify the actual value of selective COX-2 inhibitors. PMID:12510364

  15. Endoglin regulates cyclooxygenase-2 expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Jerkic, Mirjana; Rivas-Elena, Juan V; Santibanez, Juan F; Prieto, Marta; Rodríguez-Barbero, Alicia; Perez-Barriocanal, Fernando; Pericacho, Miguel; Arévalo, Miguel; Vary, Calvin P H; Letarte, Michelle; Bernabeu, Carmelo; López-Novoa, Jose M

    2006-08-01

    The endoglin heterozygous (Eng(+/-)) mouse, which serves as a model of hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), was shown to express reduced levels of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) with impaired activity. Because of intricate changes in vasomotor function in the Eng(+/-) mice and the potential interactions between the NO- and prostaglandin-producing pathways, we assessed the expression and function of cyclooxygenase (COX) isoforms. A specific upregulation of COX-2 in the vascular endothelium and increased urinary excretion of prostaglandin E(2) were observed in the Eng(+/-) mice. Specific COX-2 inhibition with parecoxib transiently increased arterial pressure in Eng(+/-) but not in Eng(+/+) mice. Transfection of endoglin in L6E9 myoblasts, shown previously to stimulate eNOS expression, led to downregulation of COX-2 with no change in COX-1. In addition, COX-2 promoter activity and protein levels were inversely correlated with endoglin levels, in doxycyclin-inducible endothelial cells. Chronic NO synthesis inhibition with N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester induced a marked increase in COX-2 only in the normal Eng(+/+) mice. N(omega)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester also increased COX-2 expression and promoter activity in doxycyclin-inducible endoglin expressing endothelial cells, but not in control cells. The level of COX-2 expression following transforming growth factor-beta1 treatment was less in endoglin than in mock transfected L6E9 myoblasts and was higher in human endothelial cells silenced for endoglin expression. Our results indicate that endoglin is involved in the regulation of COX-2 activity. Furthermore, reduced endoglin levels and associated impaired NO production may be responsible, at least in part, for augmented COX-2 expression and activity in the Eng(+/-) mice. PMID:16840721

  16. Crystallization of recombinant cyclo-oxygenase-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Anna M.; Pawlitz, Jennifer L.; Kurumbail, Ravi G.; Gierse, James K.; Moreland, Kirby T.; Stegeman, Roderick A.; Loduca, Jina Y.; Stallings, William C.

    1999-01-01

    The integral membrane protein, prostaglandin H 2 synthase, or cyclo-oxygenase (COX), catalyses the first step in the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins (PGs) and is the target of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Two isoforms are known. The constitutive enzyme, COX-1, is present in most tissues and is responsible for the physiological production of PGs. The isoform responsible for the elevated production of PGs during inflammation is COX-2 which is induced specifically at inflammatory sites. Three-dimensional structures of inhibitor complexes of COX-2, and of site variants of COX-2 which mimic COX-1, provide insight into the structural basis for selective inhibition of COX-2. Additionally, structures of COX-2 mutants and complexes with the substrate can provide a clearer understanding of the catalytic mechanism of the reaction. A crystallization protocol has been developed for COX-2 which reproducibly yields diffraction quality crystals. Polyethyleneglycol 550 monomethylether (MMP550) and MgCl 2 were systematically varied and used in conjunction with the detergent β- D-octylglucopyranoside ( β-OG). As a result of many crystallization trials, we determined that the initial β-OG concentration should be held constant, allowing the salt concentration to modulate the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of the detergent. Over 25 crystal structures have been solved using crystals generated from this system. Most crystals belong to the space group P2 12 12, with lattice constants of a=180, b=134, c=120 Å in a pseudo body-centered lattice.

  17. The cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitor, etodolac, but not aspirin reduces neovascularization in a murine ischemic hind limb model.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kohei; Yamamoto, Yasutaka; Tsujimoto, Shunsuke; Uozumi, Naonori; Kita, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Akio; Shimizu, Takao; Hisatome, Ichiro

    2010-02-10

    Cyclooxygenase inhibitors are often prescribed to relieve severe ischemic leg pain in critical ischemic limb patients. Prescription of high doses of aspirin and selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors is reported to increase cardiovascular events through suppression of the vasodilative prostanoid prostaglandin I(2) in endothelium. Here, we evaluated the influence of aspirin and etodolac, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, on neovascularization using a murine ischemia hind limb model. C57BL/6J mice were treated with aspirin or etodolac for twenty-eight days after induction of ischemia. We exploited a concentration of the agents that suppressed cyclooxygenase activity efficiently, especially in prostaglandin I(2) production. Recovery of limb blood perfusion and capillary density in ischemic limbs was significantly suppressed by etodolac treatment when compared to the aspirin treated group and untreated group. Production of 6-keto prostaglandin F(1alpha) and prostaglandin E(2) was lower in the aspirin treated group when compared with the etodolac-treated group. Also, these concentrations were lower in both treatment groups compared with the untreated group. Immunohistochemical analysis suggested cyclooxygenase-2 was expressed in endothelium but not in inflammatory cells in ischemic tissue from the acute to chronic phase. Cyclooxygenase-1 was expressed strongly in inflammatory cells in the acute phase. Furthermore, bone marrow-derived mononuclear cell transplantation improved neovascularization, whereas aspirin and etodolac did not inhibit these effects. Production of arachidonic acid metabolites by transplanted cells was independent of the improvement of neovascularization. In conclusion, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition reduces ischemia-induced neovascularization. PMID:19879866

  18. Inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated RAW264.7 cells by carboxybutyrylated glucosamine takes place via down-regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase-mediated nuclear factor-κB signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rajapakse, Niranjan; Kim, Moon-Moo; Mendis, Eresha; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2008-01-01

    Glucosamine (GlcN) has been reported to possess several biomedical properties, and currently a great deal of attention has been focused on improving the functional properties of GlcN for different applications. Therefore, this study was conducted to introduce a carboxybutyryl functional group to GlcN and to find out the inhibitory mechanism of a novel GlcN derivative, carboxybutyrylated GlcN (CGlcN), on the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mouse macrophages (RAW264.7 cells). In the initial experiments, the production of NO and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was inhibited by CGlcN pretreatment and suggested the possibility of down-regulating their respective genes, iNOS and COX-2. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis revealed that CGlcN can affect both transcriptional and translational levels of iNOS and COX-2 expression. The data from the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) promoter gene transfection experiment supported the idea that inhibition of iNOS and COX-2 is caused by the down-regulation of their transcription factor, NF-κB. Following stimulation with LPS, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) present upstream of NF-κB signaling were also inhibited by CGlcN treatment. However, the protein level of another MAPK, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), remained unaffected. Moreover, following treatment with CGlcN, the protein expression of I-κB kinase (IKK) clearly confirmed that its down-regulation directly inhibited the degradation of IκB and release of NF-κB. Therefore, it can be concluded that CGlcN is capable of inhibiting iNOS and COX-2 expression in LPS-induced RAW264.7 cells via attenuation of NF-κB signaling by p38 MAPK and JNK, but not by ERK. PMID:18205790

  19. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor amplifies lipopolysaccharide-induced bronchoconstriction by a neutrophil- and cyclooxygenase 2-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wollin, L; Uhlig, S; Nüsing, R; Wendel, A

    2001-02-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is used to ameliorate neutropenia in patients after antineoplastic treatment. It has also been suggested as an adjunct treatment in septic patients; however, the recruitment and priming of leukocytes by GM-CSF bears the hazard of a hyperinflammatory response. In particular, the role of GM-CSF in pulmonary functions in septic lungs is still unclear. Therefore, we pretreated rats in vivo with GM-CSF (50 microg/kg, intravenous) and assessed the pulmonary functions of their subsequently prepared isolated perfused lungs when exposed to subtoxic concentrations of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 2 microg/ml). These lungs showed enhanced expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), a significant increase in thromboxane (TX) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) release into the venous perfusate, and bronchoconstriction. COX-2 inhibition or blocking of the TX receptor abolished the GM-CSF/LPS-induced bronchoconstriction, but not the TNF release. Neutralizing antibodies against TNF did not prevent GM-CSF/LPS-induced bronchoconstriction. After GM-CSF pretreatment, massive neutrophil invasion into the lung occurred. Neutropenic rats were protected against GM-CSF/ LPS-induced lung injury. Similar results were obtained in rats pretreated with G-CSF instead of GM-CSF. We conclude that GM-CSF pretreatment exacerbates pulmonary injury by low-dose LPS via COX-2 expression, TX release, and bronchoconstriction by initiating neutrophil invasion and activation. PMID:11179120

  20. Cyclooxygenase-2 prostaglandins mediate anandamide-inhibitory action on nitric oxide synthase activity in the receptive rat uterus.

    PubMed

    Sordelli, Micaela S; Beltrame, Jimena S; Cella, Maximiliano; Franchi, Ana M; Ribeiro, Maria Laura

    2012-06-15

    Anandamide, an endocannabinoid, prostaglandins derived from cyclooxygenase-2 and nitric oxide synthesized by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), are relevant mediators of embryo implantation. We adopted a pharmacological approach to investigate if anandamide modulated NOS activity in the receptive rat uterus and if prostaglandins mediated this effect. As we were interested in studying the changes that occur at the maternal side of the fetal-maternal interface, we worked with uteri obtained from pseudopregnant rats. Females were sacrificed on day 5 of pseudopregnancy, the day in which implantation would occur, and the uterus was obtained. Anandamide (2 ng/kg, i.p.) inhibited NOS activity (P<0.001) and increased the levels of prostaglandin E(2) (P<0.001) and prostaglandin F(2α) (P<0.01). These effects were mediated via cannabinoid receptor type 2, as the pre-treatment with SR144528 (10 mg/kg, i.p.), a selective cannabinoid receptor type 2 antagonist, completely reverted anandamide effect on NOS activity and prostaglandin levels. The pre-treatment with a non-selective cyclooxygenase inhibitor (indomethacin 2.5mg/kg, i.p.) or with selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors (meloxicam 4 mg/kg, celecoxib 3mg/kg, i.p.) reverted anandamide inhibition on NOS, suggesting that prostaglandins are derived from cyclooxygenase-2 mediated anandamide effect. Thus, anandamide levels seemed to modulate NOS activity, fundamental for implantation, via cannabinoid receptor type 2 receptors, in the receptive uterus. This modulation depends on the production of cyclooxygenase-2 derivatives. These data establish cannabinoid receptors and cyclooxygenase enzymes as an interesting target for the treatment of implantation deficiencies. PMID:22554772

  1. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in canine intracranial meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Rossmeisl, J H; Robertson, J L; Zimmerman, K L; Higgins, M A; Geiger, D A

    2009-09-01

    Meningiomas are the most common canine intracranial tumour. Neurologic disability and death from treatment failure remain problematic despite current surgical and radiotherapeutic treatments for canine intracranial meningiomas. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) over-expression has been demonstrated in multiple canine malignancies, and COX-2 inhibitory treatment strategies have been shown to have both preventative and therapeutic effects in spontaneous and experimental models of cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate COX-2 expression in canine intracranial meningiomas. Immunohistochemical and Western blot (WB) analyses showed COX-2 expression in multiple tissues of the normal canine brain, and 87% (21/24) of intracranial meningiomas studied were immunoreactive to COX-2. No significant associations between COX-2 immunoreactivity and tumour grade were identified. Further studies are required to elucidate the physiologic roles of constitutive COX-2 expression in the central nervous system as well as its participation in meningioma tumourigenesis. PMID:19691646

  2. Diosgenin, a plant steroid, induces apoptosis in human rheumatoid arthritis synoviocytes with cyclooxygenase-2 overexpression

    PubMed Central

    Liagre, Bertrand; Vergne-Salle, Pascale; Corbiere, Cecile; Charissoux, Jean L; Beneytout, Jean L

    2004-01-01

    In the present study, we have shown for the first time that a plant steroid, diosgenin, causes an inhibition of the growth of fibroblast-like synoviocytes from human rheumatoid arthritis, with apoptosis induction associated with cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) up-regulation. Celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, provoked a large decrease in diosgenin-induced apoptosis even in the presence of exogenous prostaglandin E2, whereas interleukin-1β, a COX-2 inducer, strongly increased diosgenin-induced apoptosis of these synoviocytes. These findings suggest that the proapoptotic effect of diosgenin is associated with overexpression of COX-2 correlated with overproduction of endogenous prostaglandin E2. We also observed a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, caspase-3 activation, and DNA fragmentation after diosgenin treatment. PMID:15225373

  3. Up-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 by product-prostaglandin E2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjandrawinata, R. R.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1997-01-01

    The development of prostate cancer has been linked to high level of dietary fat intake. Our laboratory investigates the connection between cancer cell growth and fatty acid products. Studying human prostatic carcinoma PC-3 cells, we found that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increased cell growth and up-regulated the gene expression of its own synthesizing enzyme, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). PGE2 increased COX-2 mRNA expression dose-dependently with the highest levels of stimulation seen at the 3-hour period following PGE2 addition. The NSAID flurbiprofen (5 microM), in the presence of exogenous PGE2, inhibited the up-regulation of COX-2 mRNA and cell growth. These data suggest that the levels of local intracellular PGE2 play a major role in the growth of prostate cancer cells through an activation of COX-2 gene expression.

  4. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor enhances the efficacy of a breast cancer vaccine: role of IDO.

    PubMed

    Basu, Gargi D; Tinder, Teresa L; Bradley, Judy M; Tu, Tony; Hattrup, Christine L; Pockaj, Barbara A; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2006-08-15

    We report that administration of celecoxib, a specific cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor, in combination with a dendritic cell-based cancer vaccine significantly augments vaccine efficacy in reducing primary tumor burden, preventing metastasis, and increasing survival. This combination treatment was tested in MMTV-PyV MT mice that develop spontaneous mammary gland tumors with metastasis to the lungs and bone marrow. Improved vaccine potency was associated with an increase in tumor-specific CTLs. Enhanced CTL activity was attributed to a significant decrease in levels of tumor-associated IDO, a negative regulator of T cell activity. We present data suggesting that inhibiting COX-2 activity in vivo regulates IDO expression within the tumor microenvironment; this is further corroborated in the MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell line. Thus, a novel mechanism of COX-2-induced immunosuppression via regulation of IDO has emerged that may have implications in designing future cancer vaccines. PMID:16888001

  5. Pathogenetic role of cyclooxygenase-2 in hyperprostaglandin E syndrome/antenatal Bartter syndrome: therapeutic use of the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor nimesulide.

    PubMed

    Nüsing, R M; Reinalter, S C; Peters, M; Kömhoff, M; Seyberth, H W

    2001-10-01

    Patients with hyperprostaglandin E syndrome/antenatal Bartter syndrome typically have renal salt wasting, hypercalciuria with nephrocalcinosis, and secondary hyperaldosteronism. Antenatally, these patients have fetal polyuria, leading to polyhydramnios and premature birth. Hyperprostaglandin E syndrome/antenatal Bartter syndrome is accompanied by a pathologically elevated synthesis of prostaglandin E(2), thought to be responsible for aggravation of clinical symptoms such as salt and water loss, vomiting, diarrhea, and failure to thrive. In this study administration of the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) specific inhibitor nimesulide to patients with hyperprostaglandin E syndrome/antenatal Bartter syndrome blocked renal prostaglandin E(2) formation and relieved the key parameters hyperprostaglandinuria, secondary hyperaldosteronism, and hypercalciuria. Partial suppression of serum thromboxane B(2) synthesis resulting from platelet COX-1 activity and complete inhibition of urinary 6-keto-prostaglandin F(1alpha), reflecting endothelial COX-2 activity, indicate preferential inhibition of COX-2 by nimesulide. Amelioration of the clinical symptoms by use of nimesulide indicates that COX-2 may play an important pathogenetic role in hyperprostaglandin E syndrome/antenatal Bartter syndrome. Moreover, on the basis of our data we postulate that COX-2-derived prostaglandin E(2) is an important mediator for stimulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in the kidney. PMID:11673754

  6. Desferrioxamine, an iron chelator, enhances HIF-1{alpha} accumulation via cyclooxygenase-2 signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Woo, Kyung Jin; Lee, Tae-Jin; Park, Jong-Wook; Kwon, Taeg Kyu . E-mail: kwontk@dsmc.or.kr

    2006-04-28

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an important inducible enzyme in inflammation and is overexpressed in a variety of cancers. Evidence is rapidly accumulating that chronic inflammation may contribute to carcinogenesis through increase of cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis in a number of neoplasms, including colorectal carcinoma. In the present study, we investigated some mechanistic aspects of DFX-induced hypoxia-driven COX-2 expression. Desferrioxamine (DFX), an iron chelator, is known to upregulate inflammatory mediators. DFX induced the expression of COX-2 and accumulation of HIF-1{alpha} protein in dose-dependent manners, but hypoxia mimetic agent cobalt chloride (CoCl{sub 2}) induced accumulation of HIF-1{alpha} protein but not increase of COX-2 expression. DFX-induced increase of COX-2 expression and HIF-1{alpha} protein level was attenuated by addition of ferric citrate. This result suggested that the iron chelating function of DFX was important to induce the increase of COX-2 and HIF-1{alpha} protein. PD98059 significantly inhibited the induction of COX-2 protein and accumulation of HIF-1{alpha}, suggesting that DFX-induced increase of HIF-1{alpha} and COX-2 protein was mediated, at least in part, through the ERK signaling pathway. In addition, pretreatment with NS-398 to inhibit COX-2 activity also effectively suppressed DFX-induced HIF-1{alpha} accumulation in human colon cancer cells, providing the evidence that COX-2 plays as a regulator of HIF-1{alpha} accumulation in DFX-treated colon cancer cells. Together, our findings suggest that iron metabolism may regulate stabilization of HIF-1{alpha} protein by modulating cyclooxygenase-2 signaling pathway.

  7. DNA-PKcs-Dependent Modulation of Cellular Radiosensitivity by a Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Kodym, Elisabeth; Kodym, Reinhard; Chen, Benjamin P.; Chen, David J.; Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Choy, Hak; Saha, Debabrata

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 has been shown to increase radiosensitivity. Recently, the suppression of radiation-induced DNA-dependant protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity by the selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib was reported. Given the importance of DNA-PK for repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks by nonhomologous end-joining and the clinical use of the substance, we investigated the relevance of the DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) for the modulation of cellular radiosensitivity by celecoxib. Methods and Materials: We used a syngeneic model of Chinese hamster ovarian cell lines: AA8, possessing a wild-type DNK-PKcs; V3, lacking a functional DNA-PKcs; and V3/WT11, V3 stably transfected with the DNA-PKcs. The cells were treated with celecoxib (50 {mu}M) for 24 h before irradiation. The modulation of radiosensitivity was determined using the colony formation assay. Results: Treatment with celecoxib increased the cellular radiosensitivity in the DNA-PKcs-deficient cell line V3 with a dose-enhancement ratio of 1.3 for a surviving fraction of 0.5. In contrast, clonogenic survival was increased in DNA-PKcs wild-type-expressing AA8 cells and in V3 cells transfected with DNA-PKcs (V3/WT11). The decrease in radiosensitivity was comparable to the radiosensitization in V3 cells, with a dose-enhancement ratio of 0.76 (AA8) and 0.80 (V3/WT11) for a survival of 0.5. Conclusions: We have demonstrated a DNA-PKcs-dependent differential modulation of cellular radiosensitivity by celecoxib. These effects might be attributed to alterations in signaling cascades downstream of DNA-PK toward cell survival. These findings offer an explanation for the poor outcomes in some recently published clinical trials.

  8. Role of cyclooxygenase-2 in intestinal injury in neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    LU, HUI; ZHU, BING

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common gastrointestinal emergency in premature neonates. The pathogenesis of NEC remains poorly understood. The present study aimed to investigate the dynamic change and role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in neonatal rats with intestinal injury. Wistar rats, <24 h in age, received an intraperitoneal injection with 5 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Ileal tissues were collected at 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 h following the LPS challenge for histological evaluation of NEC and for measurements of COX-2 mRNA. The correlation between the degree of intestinal injury and expression of COX-2 mRNA was determined. The LPS-injected pups showed a significant increase in injury scores compared to the control, and the most deteriorating change was at 12 h. COX-2 mRNA expression was upregulated following LPS injection. There was a significantly positive correlation between COX-2 mRNA and the grade of intestinal injury within 12 h, whereas COX-2 mRNA expression had a significantly negative correlation with the severity of intestinal injury at 24 h. COX-2 plays an important role in LPS-induced intestinal injury and the repair processes. Caution should be exerted concerning the potential therapeutic uses of COX-2 inhibitors or promoters in NEC. PMID:25279162

  9. Impact of Wines and Wine Constituents on Cyclooxygenase-1, Cyclooxygenase-2, and 5-Lipoxygenase Catalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Temml, Veronika; Maghradze, David; Vanek, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases are proinflammatory enzymes; the former affects platelet aggregation, vasoconstriction, vasodilatation and later the development of atherosclerosis. Red wines from Georgia and central and western Europe inhibited cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) activity in the range of 63–94%, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity in the range of 20–44% (tested at a concentration of 5 mL/L), and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activity in the range of 72–84% (at a concentration of 18.87 mL/L). White wines inhibited 5-LOX in the range of 41–68% at a concentration of 18.87 mL/L and did not inhibit COX-1 and COX-2. Piceatannol (IC50 = 0.76 μM) was identified as a strong inhibitor of 5-LOX followed by luteolin (IC50 = 2.25 μM), quercetin (IC50 = 3.29 μM), and myricetin (IC50 = 4.02 μM). trans-Resveratrol was identified as an inhibitor of COX-1 (IC50 = 2.27 μM) and COX-2 (IC50 = 3.40 μM). Red wine as a complex mixture is a powerful inhibitor of COX-1, COX-2, and 5-LOX, the enzymes involved in eicosanoid biosynthetic pathway. PMID:24976682

  10. Characterization of Eicosanoids Produced by Adipocyte Lipolysis: IMPLICATION OF CYCLOOXYGENASE-2 IN ADIPOSE INFLAMMATION.

    PubMed

    Gartung, Allison; Zhao, Jiawei; Chen, Simon; Mottillo, Emilio; VanHecke, Garrett C; Ahn, Young-Hoon; Maddipati, Krishna Rao; Sorokin, Andrey; Granneman, James; Lee, Menq-Jer

    2016-07-29

    Excessive adipocyte lipolysis generates lipid mediators and triggers inflammation in adipose tissue. However, the specific roles of lipolysis-generated mediators in adipose inflammation remain to be elucidated. In the present study, cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with isoproterenol to activate lipolysis and the fatty acyl lipidome of released lipids was determined by using LC-MS/MS. We observed that β-adrenergic activation elevated levels of approximately fifty lipid species, including metabolites of cyclooxygenases, lipoxygenases, epoxygenases, and other sources. Moreover, we found that β-adrenergic activation induced cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), not COX-1, expression in a manner that depended on activation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) in cultured adipocytes and in the epididymal white adipose tissue (EWAT) of C57BL/6 mice. We found that lipolysis activates the JNK/NFκB signaling pathway and inhibition of the JNK/NFκB axis abrogated the lipolysis-stimulated COX-2 expression. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of COX-2 activity diminished levels of COX-2 metabolites during lipolytic activation. Inhibition of COX-2 abrogated the induction of CCL2/MCP-1 expression by β-adrenergic activation and prevented recruitment of macrophage/monocyte to adipose tissue. Collectively, our data indicate that excessive adipocyte lipolysis activates the JNK/NFκB pathway leading to the up-regulation of COX-2 expression and recruitment of inflammatory macrophages. PMID:27246851

  11. Transcriptional activation of cyclooxygenase-2 by tumor suppressor p53 requires nuclear factor-kappaB.

    PubMed

    Benoit, V; de Moraes, E; Dar, N A; Taranchon, E; Bours, V; Hautefeuille, A; Tanière, P; Chariot, A; Scoazec, J-Y; de Moura Gallo, C V; Merville, M-P; Hainaut, P

    2006-09-21

    Overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is thought to exert antiapoptotic effects in cancer. Here we show that the tumor suppressor p53 upregulated Cox-2 in esophageal and colon cancer cell lines by inducing the binding of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) to its response element in the COX-2 promoter. Inhibition of NF-kappaB prevented p53 induction of Cox-2 expression. Cooperation between p53 and NF-kappaB was required for activation of COX-2 promoter in response to daunomycin, a DNA-damaging agent. Pharmacological inhibition of Cox-2 enhanced apoptosis in response to daunomycin, in particular in cells containing active p53. In esophageal cancer, there was a correlation between Cox-2 expression and wild-type TP53 in Barrett's esophagus (BE) and in adenocarcinoma, but not in squamous cell carcinoma (P<0.01). These results suggest that p53 and NF-kappaB cooperate in upregulating Cox-2 expression, promoting cell survival in inflammatory precursor lesions such as BE. PMID:16682957

  12. Involvement of NADPH oxidases in suppression of cyclooxygenase-2 promoter-dependent transcriptional activities by sesamol

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Satomi; Ishigamori, Rikako; Fujii, Gen; Takahashi, Mami; Onuma, Wakana; Terasaki, Masaru; Yano, Tomohiro; Mutoh, Michihiro

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been shown to play an important role in colon carcinogenesis. Moreover, one of the components of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase, NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1), dominantly expressed in the colon, is implicated in the pathogenesis of colon cancer. We have reported that sesamol, one of the lignans in sesame seeds, suppressed COX-2 gene transcriptional activity in human colon cancer cells, and also suppressed intestinal polyp formation in Apc-mutant mice. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of NADPH oxidase in the inhibition of COX-2 transcriptional activity by sesamol. We found that several NADPH oxidase inhibitors, such as apocynin, showed suppressive effects on COX-2 transcriptional activity. Moreover, sesamol significantly suppressed NOX1 mRNA levels in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, we demonstrated that knockdown of NOX1 successfully suppressed COX-2 transcriptional activity. These results suggest that inhibition of NADPH oxidase, especially NOX1, may be involved in the mechanism of the suppression of COX-2 transcriptional activity by sesamol. PMID:25759517

  13. Paeoniflorin ameliorates rheumatoid arthritis in rat models through oxidative stress, inflammation and cyclooxygenase 2

    PubMed Central

    JIA, ZHILIN; HE, JIAO

    2016-01-01

    Paeoniflorin has anti-inflammatory, anti-allergy, immune regulatory and pain-relieving effects, amongst other roles. However, the mechanisms underlying the protective effects of paeoniflorin on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remain under investigation; the objective of the current study was to evaluate these protective effects in the context of an RA model. Rats were randomly divided into 5 groups, as follows: The control group, the RA rat model group, and the paeoniflorin groups, in which paeoniflorin was administered at concentrations of 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg for 3 weeks. The pain thresholds and arthritic symptoms of the RA rats were measured. Oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines were also analyzed and western blot analysis was used to evaluate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression levels. Paeoniflorin significantly increased the pain threshold and decreased the arthritic symptoms in the RA rat model. Notably, paeoniflorin reduced the malondialdehyde concentration and increased the activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase. Furthermore, paeoniflorin attenuated the activity of nuclear factor-κB p65 unit, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, and reduced the COX-2 protein expression level. The present study indicates that paeoniflorin ameliorates disease in rat models of RA through oxidative stress, inflammation and alterations to COX-2 expression. PMID:26893662

  14. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) suppressed the proliferation and differentiation of human leukaemia cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Y; Kamijo, R; Takizawa, K; Hatori, M; Nagumo, M

    2001-08-01

    Prostaglandins (PG) are known to play important roles in the proliferation and differentiation of leukaemia cells. The effect of the inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a rate-limiting enzyme for the synthesis of PG, on the proliferation and differentiation of leukaemia cell lines was investigated. COX-2 inhibitors, NS-398 and nabumetone, suppressed the proliferation of U-937 and ML-1 cells by inducing a G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest. Cell-cycle arrest induced by these COX-2 inhibitors was not associated with an upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors. COX-2 inhibitors also inhibited the differentiation of these cells induced by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and retinoic acid (RA). Treatment with NS-398 did not suppress the levels of PGs produced by these cells. Although COX-2 antisense oligonucleotide showed a similar inhibitory effect on these cells, its inhibitory effect was smaller than that of NS-398. These results suggest that COX-2 inhibitors may suppress the proliferation and differentiation of leukaemia cells both via COX-2-dependent and -independent pathways. PMID:11506967

  15. Targeted imaging of cancer by fluorocoxib C, a near-infrared cyclooxygenase-2 probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Md. Jashim; Crews, Brenda C.; Ghebreselasie, Kebreab; Daniel, Cristina K.; Kingsley, Philip J.; Xu, Shu; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2015-05-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a promising target for the imaging of cancer in a range of diagnostic and therapeutic settings. We report a near-infrared COX-2-targeted probe, fluorocoxib C (FC), for visualization of solid tumors by optical imaging. FC exhibits selective and potent COX-2 inhibition in both purified protein and human cancer cell lines. In vivo optical imaging shows selective accumulation of FC in COX-2-overexpressing human tumor xenografts [1483 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC)] implanted in nude mice, while minimal uptake is detectable in COX-2-negative tumor xenografts (HCT116) or 1483 HNSCC xenografts preblocked with the COX-2-selective inhibitor celecoxib. Time course imaging studies conducted from 3 h to 7-day post-FC injection revealed a marked reduction in nonspecific fluorescent signals with retention of fluorescence in 1483 HNSCC tumors. Thus, use of FC in a delayed imaging protocol offers an approach to improve imaging signal-to-noise that should improve cancer detection in multiple preclinical and clinical settings.

  16. Down-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) by cannabidiolic acid in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuso; Okazaki, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Eriko; Abe, Satomi; Yoshioka, Yasushi; Watanabe, Kazuhito; Aramaki, Hironori

    2014-01-01

    Metastases are known to be responsible for approximately 90% of breast cancer-related deaths. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved not only in inflammatory processes, but also in the metastasis of cancer cells; it is expressed in 40% of human invasive breast cancers. To comprehensively analyze the effects of cannabidiolic acid (CBDA), a selective COX-2 inhibitor found in the fiber-type cannabis plant (Takeda et al., 2008), on COX-2 expression and the genes involved in metastasis, we performed a DNA microarray analysis of human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells, which are invasive breast cancer cells that express high levels of COX-2, treated with CBDA for 48 hr at 25 µM. The results obtained revealed that COX-2 and Id-1, a positive regulator of breast cancer metastasis, were down-regulated (0.19-fold and 0.52-fold, respectively), while SHARP1 (or BHLHE41), a suppressor of breast cancer metastasis, was up-regulated (1.72-fold) and CHIP (or STUB1) was unaffected (1.03-fold). These changes were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR analyses. Taken together, the results obtained here demonstrated that i) CBDA had dual inhibitory effects on COX-2 through down-regulation and enzyme inhibition, and ii) CBDA may possess the ability to suppress genes that are positively involved in the metastasis of cancer cells in vitro. PMID:25242400

  17. Circadian CLOCK Mediates Activation of Transforming Growth Factor-β Signaling and Renal Fibrosis through Cyclooxygenase 2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Dar; Yeh, Jih-Kai; Peng, Meng-Ting; Shie, Shian-Sen; Lin, Shuei-Liong; Yang, Chia-Hung; Chen, Tien-Hsing; Hung, Kuo-Chun; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Hsieh, I-Chang; Wen, Ming-Shien; Wang, Chao-Yung

    2015-12-01

    The circadian rhythm regulates blood pressure and maintains fluid and electrolyte homeostasis with central and peripheral clock. However, the role of circadian rhythm in the pathogenesis of tubulointerstitial fibrosis remains unclear. Here, we found that the amplitudes of circadian rhythm oscillation in kidneys significantly increased after unilateral ureteral obstruction. In mice that are deficient in the circadian gene Clock, renal fibrosis and renal parenchymal damage were significantly worse after ureteral obstruction. CLOCK-deficient mice showed increased synthesis of collagen, increased oxidative stress, and greater transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) expression. TGF-β mRNA expression oscillated with the circadian rhythms under the control of CLOCK-BMAL1 heterodimers. The expression of cyclooxygenase 2 was significantly higher in kidneys from CLOCK-deficient mice with ureteral obstruction. Treatment with a cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor celecoxib significantly improved renal fibrosis in CLOCK-deficient mice. Taken together, these data establish the importance of the circadian rhythm in tubulointerstitial fibrosis and suggest CLOCK/TGF-β signaling as a novel therapeutic target of cyclooxygenase inhibition. PMID:26458764

  18. Meta-analysis of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) 765G>C polymorphism and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Su, Jianhua; Wen, Shihong; Zhu, Jinlong; Liu, Ruiping; Yang, Jinsong

    2016-09-01

    The cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) 765G>C polymorphism has been extensively investigated for association with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, results of different studies have been inconsistent. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to evaluate the association between the 765G>C polymorphism of the COX-2 gene and susceptibility to AD. We searched all related subjects in PubMed, Embase, SinoMed, and China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database and identified seven studies that reported a relationship between the COX-2 765G>C polymorphism and AD. A total of 1260 cases and 1112 controls were included in the seven studies. Our data suggest that the COX-2 765G>C polymorphism may decrease the risk of AD in five genetic models. As a result, this meta-analysis suggests the 765G>C polymorphism of the COX-2 gene may be a protective factor for AD. As our sample size was limited, large-scale, well-designed studies are necessary to validate the association between the COX-2 765G>C polymorphism and AD. PMID:27443496

  19. Use of Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors, Other Analgesics, and Risk of Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Seliger, Corinna; Meier, Christoph R.; Becker, Claudia; Jick, Susan S.; Bogdahn, Ulrich; Hau, Peter; Leitzmann, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors are analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory drugs. They have been found to inhibit the development of glioma in laboratory investigations. Whether these drugs reduce the risk of glioma incidence in humans is unknown. Methods We conducted a matched case-control analysis using the U.K.-based Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD). We identified 2,469 cases matched to 24,690 controls on age, sex, calendar time, general practice, and number of years of active history in the CPRD prior to the index date. We conducted conditional logistic regression analyses to determine relative risks, estimated as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of glioma in relation to use of selective COX-2 inhibitors, adjusted for several confounding variables. Results Use of selective COX-2 inhibitors was unrelated to risk of glioma (adjusted OR for 1–9 versus 0 prescriptions = 1.02; 95% CI = 0.92–1.13, 10–29 versus 0 prescriptions = 1.01; 95% CI = 0.80–1.28, ≥30 versus 0 prescriptions = 1.16; 95% CI = 0.86–1.55). Trends for increasing numbers of prescriptions for other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and non-NSAID analgesics were also not associated with glioma risk. Conclusion Further epidemiologic studies are needed to confirm the null relation of use of selective COX-2 inhibitors to glioma risk and to explain the discrepancy between laboratory investigations and our observational study. Impact: Use of selective COX-2 inhibitors is unrelated to glioma risk. PMID:26871579

  20. Reversible Suppression of Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) Expression In Vivo by Inducible RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Zaiss, Anne K.; Zuber, Johannes; Chu, Chun; Machado, Hidevaldo B.; Jiao, Jing; Catapang, Arthur B.; Ishikawa, Tomo-o; Gil, Jose S.; Lowe, Scott W.; Herschman, Harvey R.

    2014-01-01

    Prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), also known as cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), plays a critical role in many normal physiological functions and modulates a variety of pathological conditions. The ability to turn endogenous COX-2 on and off in a reversible fashion, at specific times and in specific cell types, would be a powerful tool in determining its role in many contexts. To achieve this goal, we took advantage of a recently developed RNA interference system in mice. An shRNA targeting the Cox2 mRNA 3′untranslated region was inserted into a microRNA expression cassette, under the control of a tetracycline response element (TRE) promoter. Transgenic mice containing the COX-2-shRNA were crossed with mice encoding a CAG promoter-driven reverse tetracycline transactivator, which activates the TRE promoter in the presence of tetracycline/doxycycline. To facilitate testing the system, we generated a knockin reporter mouse in which the firefly luciferase gene replaces the Cox2 coding region. Cox2 promoter activation in cultured cells from triple transgenic mice containing the luciferase allele, the shRNA and the transactivator transgene resulted in robust luciferase and COX-2 expression that was reversibly down-regulated by doxycycline administration. In vivo, using a skin inflammation-model, both luciferase and COX-2 expression were inhibited over 80% in mice that received doxycycline in their diet, leading to a significant reduction of infiltrating leukocytes. In summary, using inducible RNA interference to target COX-2 expression, we demonstrate potent, reversible Cox2 gene silencing in vivo. This system should provide a valuable tool to analyze cell type-specific roles for COX-2. PMID:24988319

  1. Interferon-α and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor cooperatively mediates TRAIL-induced apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Chaohui; Qiu, Xiaoxin; Liu, Nianli; Yang, Darong; Xia, Man; Liu, Jingshi; Wang, Xiaohong; and others

    2015-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Interferon-alpha (IFN-α) has recently been recognized to harbor therapeutic potential in the prevention and treatment of HCC, but it remains controversial as to whether IFN-α exerts direct cytotoxicity against HCC. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is overexpressed in HCC and is considered to play a role in hepatocarcinogenesis. Therefore, we aimed to elucidate the combined effect of a COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, and IFN-α on in vitro growth suppression of HCC using the hepatoma cell line HLCZ01 and the in vivo nude mouse xenotransplantation model using HLCZ01 cells. Treatment with celecoxib and IFN-α synergistically inhibited cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Apoptosis was identified by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride and fluorescent staining. IFN-α upregulated the expression of TRAIL, while celecoxib increased the expression of TRAIL receptors. The combined regimen with celecoxib and IFN-α reduced the growth of xenotransplanted HCCs in nude mice. The regulation of IFN-α- and COX-2 inhibitor-induced cell death is impaired in a subset of TRAIL-resistant cells. The molecular mechanisms of HCC cells resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis were explored using molecular biological and immunological methods. Interferon-α and the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib synergistically increased TRAIL-induced apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma. These data suggest that IFN-α and celecoxib may offer a novel role with important implications in designing new therapeutics for TRAIL-resistant tumors. - Highlights: ●The cytotoxic effect of TRAIL on a developed HCC HLCZ01 cells infected with HBV. ●IFN-α and celecoxib induced apoptosis in HLCZ01 cells infected with HBV. ●The combined regime reduced the growth of xenotransplanted HCCs in nude mice model.

  2. Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 in Human Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Ristimäki, Ari; Nieminen, Outi; Saukkonen, Kirsi; Hotakainen, Kristina; Nordling, Stig; Haglund, Caj

    2001-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is elevated in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder and that inhibition of Cox-2 activity suppresses bladder cancer in experimental animal models. We have investigated the expression of Cox-2 protein in human TCCs (n = 85), in in situ carcinomas (Tis) of the urinary bladder (n = 17), and in nonneoplastic urinary bladder samples (n = 16) using immunohistochemistry. Cox-2 immunoreactivity was detected in 66% (67 of 102) of the carcinomas, whereas only 25% (4 of 16) of the nonneoplastic samples were positive (P < 0.005). Cox-2 immunoreactivity localized to neoplastic cells in the carcinoma samples. The rate of positivity was the same in invasive (T1–3; 70%, n = 40) and in noninvasive (Tis and Ta; 65%, n = 62) carcinomas, but noninvasive tumors had a higher frequency (32%) of homogenous pattern of staining (>90% of the tumor cells positive) than the invasive carcinomas (10%) (P < 0.05). However, several invasive TCCs exhibited the strongest intensity of Cox-2 staining in the invading cells, whereas other parts of the tumor were virtually negative. Finally, strong Cox-2 positivity was also found in nonneoplastic ulcerations (2 of 2) and in inflammatory pseudotumors (2 of 2), in which the immunoreactivity localized to the nonepithelial cells. Taken together, our data suggest that Cox-2 is highly expressed in noninvasive bladder carcinomas, whereas the highest expression of invasive tumors associated with the invading cells, and that Cox-2 may also have a pathophysiological role in nonneoplastic conditions of the urinary bladder, such as ulcerations and inflammatory pseudotumors. PMID:11238034

  3. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in hepatocytes attenuates non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and liver fibrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Motiño, Omar; Agra, Noelia; Brea Contreras, Rocío; Domínguez-Moreno, Marina; García-Monzón, Carmelo; Vargas-Castrillón, Javier; Carnovale, Cristina E; Boscá, Lisardo; Casado, Marta; Mayoral, Rafael; Valdecantos, M Pilar; Valverde, Ángela M; Francés, Daniel E; Martín-Sanz, Paloma

    2016-09-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved in different liver diseases but little is known about the significance of COX-2 in the development and progression of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). This study was designed to elucidate the role of COX-2 expression in hepatocytes in the pathogenesis of steatohepatitis and hepatic fibrosis. In the present work, hepatocyte-specific COX-2 transgenic mice (hCOX-2-Tg) and their wild-type (Wt) littermates were either fed methionine-and-choline deficient (MCD) diet to establish an experimental non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) model or injected with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) to induce liver fibrosis. In our animal model, hCOX-2-Tg mice fed MCD diet showed lower grades of steatosis, ballooning and inflammation than Wt mice, in part by reduced recruitment and infiltration of hepatic macrophages, with a corresponding decrease in serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, hCOX-2-Tg mice showed a significant attenuation of the MCD diet-induced increase in oxidative stress and hepatic apoptosis observed in Wt mice. Even more, hCOX-2-Tg mice treated with CCl4 had significantly lower stages of fibrosis and less hepatic content of collagen, hydroxyproline and pro-fibrogenic markers than Wt controls. Collectively, our data indicates that constitutive hepatocyte COX-2 expression ameliorates NASH and liver fibrosis development in mice by reducing inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis and by modulating activation of hepatic stellate cells, respectively, suggesting a possible protective role for COX-2 induction in NASH/NAFLD progression. PMID:27321932

  4. The structure of ibuprofen bound to cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Benjamin J; Lucido, Michael J; Malkowski, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    The cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) catalyze the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins, and are the pharmacological targets of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and COX-2 selective inhibitors (coxibs). Ibuprofen (IBP) is one of the most commonly available over-the-counter pharmaceuticals in the world. The anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of IBP are thought to arise from inhibition of COX-2 rather than COX-1. While an X-ray crystal structure of IBP bound to COX-1 has been solved, no such structure exists for the cognate isoform COX-2. We have determined the crystal structure of muCOX-2 with a racemic mixture of (R/S)-IBP. Our structure reveals that only the S-isomer of IBP was bound, indicating that the S-isomer possesses higher affinity for COX-2 than the R-isomer. Mutational analysis of Arg-120 and Tyr-355 at the entrance of the cyclooxygenase channel confirmed their role in binding and inhibition of COX-2 by IBP. Our results provide the first atomic level detail of the interaction between IBP and COX-2. PMID:25463020

  5. THE STRUCTURE OF IBUPROFEN BOUND TO CYCLOOXYGENASE-2

    PubMed Central

    Orlando, Benjamin J.; Lucido, Michael J.; Malkowski, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    The cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) catalyze the rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of prostaglandins, and are the pharmacological targets of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and COX-2 selective inhibitors (coxibs). Ibuprofen (IBP) is one of the most commonly available over-the-counter pharmaceuticals in the world. The anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of IBP are thought to arise from inhibition of COX-2 rather than COX-1. While an x-ray crystal structure of IBP bound to COX-1 has been solved, no such structure exists for the cognate isoform COX-2. We have determined the crystal structure of muCOX-2 with a racemic mixture of (R/S)-IBP. Our structure reveals that only the S-isomer of IBP was bound, indicating that the S-isomer possesses higher affinity for COX-2 than the R-isomer. Mutational analysis of Arg-120 and Tyr-355 at the entrance of the cyclooxygenase channel confirmed their role in binding and inhibition of COX-2 by IBP. Our results provide the first atomic level detail of the interaction between IBP and COX-2. PMID:25463020

  6. Role of the cyclooxygenase 2-thromboxane pathway in 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin-induced decrease in mesencephalic vein blood flow in the zebrafish embryo

    SciTech Connect

    Teraoka, Hiroki Kubota, Akira; Dong, Wu; Kawai, Yusuke; Yamazaki, Koji; Mori, Chisato; Harada, Yoshiteru; Peterson, Richard E.; Hiraga, Takeo

    2009-01-01

    Previously, we reported that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) evoked developmental toxicity required activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor type 2 (AHR2), using zebrafish embryos. However, the downstream molecular targets of AHR2 activation are largely unknown and are the focus of the present investigation. TCDD induces cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2), a rate-limiting enzyme for prostaglandin synthesis in certain cells. In the present study, we investigated the role of the COX2-thromboxane pathway in causing a specific endpoint of TCDD developmental toxicity in the zebrafish embryo, namely, a decrease in regional blood flow in the dorsal midbrain. It was found that the TCDD-induced reduction in mesencephalic vein blood flow was markedly inhibited by selective COX2 inhibitors, NS-398 and SC-236, and by a general COX inhibitor, indomethacin, but not by a selective COX1 inhibitor, SC-560. Gene knock-down of COX2 by two different types of morpholino antisense oligonucleotides, but not by their negative homologs, also protected the zebrafish embryos from mesencephalic vein circulation failure caused by TCDD. This inhibitory effect of TCDD on regional blood flow in the dorsal midbrain was also blocked by selective antagonists of the thromboxane receptor (TP). Treatment of control zebrafish embryos with a TP agonist also caused a reduction in mesencephalic vein blood flow and it too was blocked by a TP antagonist, without any effect on trunk circulation. Finally, gene knock-down of thromboxane A synthase 1 (TBXS) with morpholinos but not by the morpholinos' negative homologs provided significant protection against TCDD-induced mesencephalic circulation failure. Taken together, these results point to a role of the prostanoid synthesis pathway via COX2-TBXS-TP in the local circulation failure induced by TCDD in the dorsal midbrain of the zebrafish embryo.

  7. Renal Effects of Prostaglandins and Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) with best-defined renal functions are PGE2 and prostacyclin (PGI2). These vasodilatory PGs increase renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate under conditions associated with decreased actual or effective circulating volume, resulting in greater tubular flow and secretion of potassium. Under conditions of decreased renal perfusion, the production of renal PGs serves as an important compensatory mechanism. PGI2 (and possibly PGE2) increases potassium secretion mainly by stimulating secretion of renin and activating the renin-angiotensin system, which leads to increased secretion of aldosterone. In addition, PGE2 is involved in the regulation of sodium and water reabsorption and acts as a counterregulatory factor under conditions of increased sodium reabsorption. PGE2 decreases sodium reabsorption at the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle probably via inhibition of the Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter type 2 (NKCC2). Cyclooxygenase inhibitors may enhance urinary concentrating ability in part through effects to upregulate NKCC2 in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop and aquaporin-2 in the collecting duct. Thus, they may be useful to treat Bartter's syndrome and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. PMID:24459520

  8. Epidermal growth factor-induced cyclooxygenase-2 enhances head and neck squamous cell carcinoma metastasis through fibronectin up-regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jinn-Yuan; Chang, Kwang-Yu; Chen, Shang-Hung; Lee, Chung-Ta; Chang, Sheng-Tsung; Cheng, Hung-Chi; Chang, Wen-Chang; Chen, Ben-Kuen

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation is a major cause of metastasis in many cancers, such as head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). However, whether the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mediates EGF-enhanced HNSCC metastasis remains unclear. Interestingly, we found that EGF induced COX-2 expression mainly in HNSCC. The tumor cell transformation induced by EGF was repressed by COX-2 knockdown, and this repression was reversed by simultaneously treating the cells with EGF and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The down-regulation of COX-2 expression or inhibition of COX-2 activity significantly blocked EGF enhancement of cell migration and invasion, but the addition of PGE2 compensated for this inhibitory effect in COX-2-knockdown cells. COX-2 depletion inhibited EGF-induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, and fibronectin expression and Rac1/cdc42 activation. The inhibitory effect of COX-2 depletion on MMPs and the fibronectin/Rac1/cdc42 axis were reversed by co-treatment with PGE2. Furthermore, depletion of fibronectin impeded the COX-2-enhanced binding of HNSCC cells to endothelial cells and tumor cells metastatic seeding of the lungs. These results demonstrate that EGF-induced COX-2 expression enhances HNSCC metastasis via activation of the fibronectin signaling pathway. The inhibition of COX-2 expression and activation may be a potential strategy for the treatment of EGFR-mediated HNSCC metastasis. PMID:25595899

  9. Modulation of Ionizing Radiation-Induced G{sub 2} Arrest by Cyclooxygenase-2 and its Inhibitor Celecoxib

    SciTech Connect

    Jun, Hyun Jung; Kim, Young Mee; Park, Soo Yeon; Park, Ji Sun; Lee, Eun Jung; Choi, Shin Ae; Pyo, Hongryull

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: Prolongation or attenuation of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced G{sub 2}-M arrest in cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) overexpressing or celecoxib-treated cells, respectively, has been previously observed. To better understand the molecular mechanisms involved, we investigated the molecules involved in G{sub 2} checkpoint pathways after treatment with IR {+-} celecoxib. Methods and Materials: Various molecules in the G{sub 2} checkpoint pathways were investigated in HCT-116-Mock and -COX-2 cells. Western blot, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, confocal microscopy, and fluorescence activated cell sorter (FACS) analyses were performed to investigate whether expression and activity of the ataxia telangiectasia and rad3-related (ATR) could be modulated by COX-2 and its selective inhibitors. Results: COX-2 overexpression increased expression and activity of ATR after IR exposure. Celecoxib downregulated ATR in all tested cell lines independent of COX-2 expression, but downregulation was greater in COX-2 overexpressing cells after cells were irradiated. Celecoxib pretreatment before radiation caused strongly inhibited G{sub 2} arrest. Conclusions: COX-2 appears to prolong IR-induced G{sub 2} arrest by upregulating ATR. Celecoxib downregulated ATR preferentially in irradiated COX-2 overexpressing cells. Celecoxib may radiosensitize cancer cells by inhibiting G{sub 2} arrest through ATR downregulation.

  10. Low sodium and furosemide-induced stimulation of the renin system in man is mediated by cyclooxygenase 2.

    PubMed

    Kammerl, M C; Nüsing, R M; Schweda, F; Endemann, D; Stubanus, M; Kees, F; Lackner, K J; Fischereder, M; Krämer, B K

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of highly selective inhibition of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) with rofecoxib on the renin system during long-term stimulation and after short-term stimulation. Six healthy male volunteers received, in a randomized crossover design, a low-sodium diet for days 1 through 9 with or without 25 mg rofecoxib twice daily on days 5 through 9 and, in addition, 20 mg of furosemide intravenously on day 8. Plasma renin activity increased 2 to 3 times over baseline with a low-sodium diet and 5 times over baseline 30 minutes after intravenous furosemide; it was still elevated nearly 5 times on day 9. These effects were completely blocked by rofecoxib. Plasma aldosterone and urinary aldosterone concentrations basically reflected the findings with plasma renin activity. Urinary sodium excretion decreased during a low-sodium diet and increased after intravenous furosemide without being significantly affected by rofecoxib. We have concluded that low-sodium and furosemide-stimulated renin and aldosterone secretion is completely blocked in healthy volunteers during COX-2 inhibition with rofecoxib, suggesting that intact COX-2 is of major importance for stimulation of the renin system under these conditions in man. PMID:11719734

  11. Mercury induces proliferation and reduces cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells through MAPK, oxidative stress and cyclooxygenase-2 pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Aguado, Andrea; Galán, María; Zhenyukh, Olha; Wiggers, Giulia A.; Roque, Fernanda R.; Redondo, Santiago; Peçanha, Franck; Martín, Angela; Fortuño, Ana; Cachofeiro, Victoria; Tejerina, Teresa; Salaices, Mercedes; and others

    2013-04-15

    Mercury exposure is known to increase cardiovascular risk but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain undetermined. We analyzed whether chronic exposure to HgCl{sub 2} affects vascular structure and the functional properties of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2 dependent pathways. Mesenteric resistance arteries and aortas from Wistar rats treated with HgCl{sub 2} (first dose 4.6 mg kg{sup −1}, subsequent doses 0.07 mg kg{sup −1} day{sup −1}, 30 days) and cultured aortic VSMC stimulated with HgCl{sub 2} (0.05–5 μg/ml) were used. Treatment of rats with HgCl{sub 2} decreased wall thickness of the resistance and conductance vasculature, increased the number of SMC within the media and decreased SMC nucleus size. In VSMCs, exposure to HgCl{sub 2}: 1) induced a proliferative response and a reduction in cell size; 2) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity, gene and/or protein levels of the NADPH oxidase subunit NOX-1, the EC- and Mn-superoxide dismutases and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2); 3) induced activation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized the proliferative response and the altered cell size induced by HgCl{sub 2}. Blockade of ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished the HgCl{sub 2}-induced Nox1 and COX-2 expression and normalized the alterations induced by mercury in cell proliferation and size. In conclusion, long exposure of VSMC to low doses of mercury activates MAPK signaling pathways that result in activation of inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2 that in turn induce proliferation of VSMC and changes in cell size. These findings offer further evidence that mercury might be considered an environmental risk factor for cardiovascular disease. - Highlights: ► Chronic HgCl{sub 2} exposure induces vascular remodeling. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces proliferation and decreased cell size in vascular smooth muscle cells. ► HgCl{sub 2} induces

  12. RhoA mediates cyclooxygenase-2 signaling to disrupt the formation of adherens junctions and increase cell motility.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Wen E; Marlin, Jerry W; Chance, Terry W; Jakobi, Rolf

    2006-12-15

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) represents an important target for treatment and prevention of colorectal cancer. Although COX-2 signaling is implicated in promoting tumor cell growth and invasion, the molecular mechanisms that mediate these processes are largely unknown. In this study, we show that the RhoA pathway mediates COX-2 signaling to disrupt the formation of adherens junctions and increase cell motility. Disruption of adherens junctions promotes tumor cell invasion and metastasis and is often associated with tumor progression. We detected high levels of RhoA activity in HCA-7 colon carcinoma cells that constitutively express COX-2. Inhibition of COX-2 significantly reduced the levels of RhoA activity in HCA-7 cells, suggesting that constitutive expression of COX-2 stimulates RhoA activity. Interestingly, inhibition of COX-2 or silencing of COX-2 expression with small interfering RNA (siRNA) stimulated the formation of adherens junctions, concomitant with increased protein levels of E-cadherin and alpha-catenin. Furthermore, inhibition of RhoA or silencing of RhoA expression with siRNA increased the levels of E-cadherin and alpha-catenin. Inhibition of Rho kinases (ROCK), the RhoA effector proteins, also increased levels of E-cadherin and alpha-catenin and stimulated formation of adherens junctions. The motility of HCA-7 cells was significantly decreased when COX-2 or RhoA was inhibited. Therefore, our data reveal a novel molecular mechanism that links COX-2 signaling to disrupt the formation of adherens junctions; COX-2 stimulates the RhoA/ROCK pathway, which reduces levels of E-cadherin and alpha-catenin leading to disruption of adherens junction formation and increased motility. Understanding of COX-2 downstream signaling pathways that promote tumor progression is crucial for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:17178865

  13. Analysis of angiogenic factors and cyclooxygenase-2 expression in cartilaginous tumors – clinical and histological correlation

    PubMed Central

    Cintra, Francisco Fontes; Etchebehere, Mauricio; Gonçalves, José Carlos Barbi; Cassone, Alejandro Enzo; Amstalden, Eliane Maria Ingrid

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the role of angiogenesis and cyclooxygenase-2 expression in cartilaginous tumors and correlate these factors with prognosis. INTRODUCTION: For chondrosarcoma, the histological grade is the current standard for predicting tumor outcome. However, a low-grade chondrosarcoma can follow an aggressive course—as monitored by sequential imaging techniques—even when it is histologically indistinguishable from an enchondroma. Therefore, additional tools are needed to help identify the biological potential of these tumors. The degree of angiogenesis that is induced by the tumor could assist in this task. Angiogenesis can be quantified by measuring the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and CD34, and cyclooxygenase-2 can induce angiogenesis by stimulating the production of pro-angiogenic factors. METHODS: In total, 21 enchondromas and 58 conventional chondrosarcomas were studied by examining the clinical and histopathological findings in conjunction with the immunostaining markers of angiogenesis and cyclooxygenase-2 expression. RESULTS: The significant variables that were associated with poor outcome were 1) higher-grade chondrosarcomas, 2) tumors that developed in flat bones, and 3) over-expression of CD34 (with a median count that was higher than 5.9 vessels in 5 high power fields). Moreover, CD34 expression (measured using the Chalkley method) revealed significantly higher microvessel density in flat bone chondrosarcomas. DISCUSSION: Previous studies have shown a positive correlation between Chalkley microvessel density and histological grade; however, in our sample, we found that the former is predictive of the outcome. Chondrosarcomas in flat bones have been shown to correlate with a poor prognosis. We also found that CD34 microvessel density values were significantly higher in flat-bone chondrosarcomas. This could explain—at least in part—the more aggressive biological course that is taken by these tumors. CONCLUSIONS: These

  14. Systematic study of constitutive cyclooxygenase-2 expression: Role of NF-κB and NFAT transcriptional pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kirkby, Nicholas S.; Chan, Melissa V.; Zaiss, Anne K.; Garcia-Vaz, Eliana; Jiao, Jing; Berglund, Lisa M.; Verdu, Elena F.; Ahmetaj-Shala, Blerina; Wallace, John L.; Herschman, Harvey R.; Gomez, Maria F.; Mitchell, Jane A.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an inducible enzyme that drives inflammation and is the therapeutic target for widely used nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). However, COX-2 is also constitutively expressed, in the absence of overt inflammation, with a specific tissue distribution that includes the kidney, gastrointestinal tract, brain, and thymus. Constitutive COX-2 expression is therapeutically important because NSAIDs cause cardiovascular and renal side effects in otherwise healthy individuals. These side effects are now of major concern globally. However, the pathways driving constitutive COX-2 expression remain poorly understood. Here we show that in the kidney and other sites, constitutive COX-2 expression is a sterile response, independent of commensal microorganisms and not associated with activity of the inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB. Instead, COX-2 expression in the kidney but not other regions colocalized with nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcription factor activity and was sensitive to inhibition of calcineurin-dependent NFAT activation. However, calcineurin/NFAT regulation did not contribute to constitutive expression elsewhere or to inflammatory COX-2 induction at any site. These data address the mechanisms driving constitutive COX-2 and suggest that by targeting transcription it may be possible to develop antiinflammatory therapies that spare the constitutive expression necessary for normal homeostatic functions, including those important to the cardiovascular-renal system. PMID:26712011

  15. Design and synthesis of [(125)I]Pyricoxib: A novel (125)I-labeled cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tietz, Ole; Dzandzi, James; Bhardwaj, Atul; Valliant, John F; Wuest, Frank

    2016-03-15

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is the key enzyme in the prostaglandin synthesis pathway which is involved in various pathophysiological conditions. The enzyme is membrane bound and located inside of the endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear membrane. Effective perfusion of inhibitors to the active site requires lipophilic drugs, which consequently display high unspecific background accumulation, for example, in fatty tissues. The objective of this work was the development of a small molecule radiolabeled with a long-lived iodine radioisotope to enable longer imaging times and better target-to-background ratios. A group of iodinated compounds (8-10) was synthesized and identified as selective COX-2 inhibitors (COX-2 IC50=0.85-13 μM). Molecular docking results provided the theoretical support for the experimental COX-2 inhibition data. Furthermore, a novel (125)I-containing trifluoro-pyrimidine compound ([(125)I]Pyricoxib) was prepared via radioiododestannylation reaction as potent and selective COX-2 inhibitor. Radiosynthesis of [(125)I]Pyricoxib was accomplished with innovative fluorous chemistry using fluorous chloroamine-T (F-CAT) as novel oxidizing agent in high radiochemical yields of 91 ± 4%. PMID:26898334

  16. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells in an in vivo model of spontaneous metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Basu, Gargi D; Pathangey, Latha B; Tinder, Teresa L; Lagioia, Michelle; Gendler, Sandra J; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2004-11-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors are rapidly emerging as a new generation of therapeutic drug in combination with chemotherapy or radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer. The mechanisms underlying its antitumor effects are not fully understood and more thorough preclinical trials are needed to determine if COX-2 inhibition represents a useful approach for prevention and/or treatment of breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the growth inhibitory mechanism of a highly selective COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, in an in vivo oncogenic mouse model of spontaneous breast cancer that resembles human disease. The oncogenic mice carry the polyoma middle T antigen driven by the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter and develop primary adenocarcinomas of the breast. Results show that oral administration of celecoxib caused significant reduction in mammary tumor burden associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis and decreased proliferation in vivo. In vivo apoptosis correlated with significant decrease in activation of protein kinase B/Akt, a cell survival signaling kinase, with increased expression of the proapoptotic protein Bax and decreased expression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2. In addition, celecoxib treatment reduced levels of proangiogenic factor (vascular endothelial growth factor), suggesting a role of celecoxib in suppression of angiogenesis in this model. Results from these preclinical studies will form the basis for assessing the feasibility of celecoxib therapy alone or in combination with conventional therapies for treatment and/or prevention of breast cancer. PMID:15561779

  17. Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Correlates With Hypertrophic Osteoarthropathy.

    PubMed

    Rotas, Ioannis; Cito, Giovanni; Letovanec, Igor; Christodoulou, Michel; Perentes, Jean Y

    2016-02-01

    Hypertrophic osteoarthrpathy (HO) is a rare paraneoplasic syndrome associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The pathophysiology of HO is unknown but was recently related to enhanced levels of urine prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Here, we report the case of a patient that presented HO in association with a resectable left upper lobe NSCLC. Following surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy, HO resolved and did not recur with development of a brain metastasis 1 year later. Interestingly, tumor cyclooxygenase-2, an enzyme responsible the synthesis of PGE2, was expressed in the primary tumor but not in the resected metastasis. PMID:26777972

  18. Role of cyclooxygenase-2 in the development of interstitial fibrosis in kidneys following unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice.

    PubMed

    Kamata, Mariko; Hosono, Kanako; Fujita, Tomoe; Kamata, Kouju; Majima, Masataka

    2015-03-01

    Unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) induced tubulointerstitial fibrosis in kidneys mimics the pathogenesis of chronic kidney diseases and is considered a suitable model for studying the mechanisms leading to fibrosis. To study the role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in kidney fibrosis, we investigated whether a selective COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, affected renal interstitial fibrosis during UUO in mice. To induce UUO, the left proximal ureter was ligated in male C57BL/6 mice. The mice were fed a diet with or without celecoxib from the day of UUO induction. Following UUO, the renal pelvis was observed to be dilated and the kidney cortex was significantly thinner than that of sham-operated mice. Immunofluorescent staining of type I, III, and IV collagen in UUO kidneys revealed that interstitial collagen deposition was significantly increased in the celecoxib-treated group. Expression of type I, III, and IV collagen in UUO kidneys was also significantly higher in the celecoxib-treated group than in the vehicle-treated group. In the celecoxib-treated group, mRNA levels of TGF-β/FGF-2 were also significantly higher than those in the vehicle-treated group. The present study demonstrates that COX-2 plays a protective role against fibrosis in UUO kidneys and suggests that supplementation of COX-2 products, such as PG analogues, will be a good option for preventing interstitial fibrosis. PMID:25776498

  19. Genetic association of cyclooxygenase-2 gene polymorphisms with Parkinson’s disease susceptibility in Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yi; Wu, Yuquan; Li, Yansheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the genetic association of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) gene promoter region polymorphisms with Parkinson’s disease (PD) susceptibility in Chinese Han population. Methods: The genotyping of COX2 gene polymorphisms was conducted by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) in 122 patients with PD and 120 healthy persons. The association strength of gene polymorphism with disease was measured by odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) calculated using χ2 test which also evaluated the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) of gene polymorphism in controls. The linkage disequilibrium and haplotype were also analyzed as evidence in the analysis of association. Results: On condition that the genotypes distributions of COX2 -1290A>G, -1195G>A, -765G>C in the control group all conformed to HWE, however, only the homozygous genotype AA of -1195G>A polymorphism showed an association with PD (OR=0.432, 95% CI=0.196-0.950). In addition, in haplotype analysis, G-A-C haplotype frequency in cases was significantly lower than the controls, compared with the common haplotype A-G-G (P=0.031, OR=0.375, 95% CI=0.149-0.940). Conclusions: COX2 -1195G>A polymorphism might play a protective role in the onset of PD and G-A-C haplotype in this three promoter region polymorphisms also showed a negative association. PMID:26722563

  20. Uteroplacental insufficiency alters nephrogenesis and downregulates cyclooxygenase-2 expression in a model of IUGR with adult-onset hypertension.

    PubMed

    Baserga, Mariana; Hale, Merica A; Wang, Zheng Ming; Yu, Xing; Callaway, Christopher W; McKnight, Robert A; Lane, Robert H

    2007-05-01

    Clinical and animal studies indicate that intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) following uteroplacental insufficiency (UPI) reduces nephron number and predisposes toward renal insufficiency early in life and increased risk of adult-onset hypertension. In this study, we hypothesized that the inducible enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a pivotal protein in nephrogenesis, constitutes a mechanism through which UPI and subsequent glucocorticoid overexposure can decrease nephron number. We further hypothesized that UPI downregulates the key enzyme 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11beta-HSD2), which converts corticosterone to inert 11-dehydrocorticosterone, thereby protecting both the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) from the actions of corticosterone. Following bilateral uterine ligation on the pregnant rat, UPI significantly decreased renal COX-2, 11beta-HSD2, and GR mRNA and protein levels, but upregulated expression of MR at birth. At day 21 of life, 11beta-HSD2, GR, and also MR mRNA and protein levels were downregulated. UPI did not affect blood pressures (BP) at day 21 of life but significantly increased systolic BP in both genders at day 140. We conclude that in our animal model, UPI decreases fetal COX-2 expression during a period of active nephrogenesis in the IUGR rat, which is also characterized by decreased nephron number and adult-onset hypertension. PMID:17272666

  1. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 in neoplasms of the mammary gland in bitches.

    PubMed

    Badowska-Kozakiewicz, A M; Malicka, E

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the cyclooxygenase-2 expression in correlation with other neoplasm traits such as: histological type, the differentiation grade, proliferative activity, estrogenic receptor, as well as Hsp70 and p53 proteins expression. Material for the investigation comprised mammary gland tumours, collected from dogs, the patients of veterinary clinics, during surgical procedures. All together 14 adenomas, 66 complex carcinomas, 47 simple carcinomas and 6 solid carcinomas were studied. Evaluations were conducted with histopathological and immunohistochemical methods using suitable antibodies. Expression of COX-2 was observed in 95% of cancers, in case of which, the complex cancers constituted the highest percentage (48.4%). The highest expression of COX-2 was revealed in simple and complex cancers and in cancers with the 3rd degree of histological malignancy. The significant correlation between expression of COX-2 and high mean value of the mitotic index was found. The high expression of COX-2 was also correlated with the expression of protein p53 and expression of the protein Hsp 70. Obtained results suggest that cyclooxygenase-2 may be a prognostic factor, but it requires detailed clinical confirmation. PMID:20731190

  2. Breast cancer--new aspects of tumor biology: are calcitriol and cyclooxygenase-2 possible targets for breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Thill, M; Terjung, A; Friedrich, M

    2014-01-01

    Up until now there have been many advances in treatment options for breast cancers such as targeted therapies like monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, mTOR antagonists, and vaccines. Despite these advances, there are still many more that warrant further exploration. Two of these targets might be the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), the key enzyme required to convert arachidonic acid to prostaglandins, and calcitriol [1,25(OH)2D3] which is the biologically active form of vitamin D. Both calcitriol and the inhibition of COX-2 have shown antiproliferative and prodifferentiation, as well as pro-apoptotic effects in different malignancies in vitro and in vivo, and the key prostaglandin catabolic enzyme 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) is known to have tumor suppressor activity. Furthermore, the combination ofcalcitriol and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as non-selective and selective COX-2 inhibitors, acting synergistically to achieve significant cell growth inhibition in prostate cancer. Some epidemiological studies suggest that vitamin D confers a moderate benefit against breast cancer while most epidemiological studies presume that NSAIDs confer the same. Nevertheless there is growing body of evidence that COX-2 expression is a fundamental step in breast cancer carcinogenesis. To date, clinical trials have been conducted in patients with different malignancies using treatment strategies including COX-2 inhibitors and calcitriol and are showing partially encouraging results. The goal of this review is to shed light on the association between the prostaglandin as well as vitamin D metabolism relating to the incidence and therapy of breast cancers. Moreover, this review will also highlight potential treatment options, as well as extract any existing interactions between the two metabolisms. PMID:25118473

  3. Novel effects of the cyclooxygenase-2-selective inhibitor NS-398 on IL-1β-induced cyclooxygenase-2 and IL-8 expression in human ovarian granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Ou, Hui-Ling; Sun, David; Peng, Yen-Chun; Wu, Yuh-Lin

    2016-08-01

    Ovulation is a critical inflammation-like event that is central to ovarian physiology. IL-1β is an immediate early pro-inflammatory cytokine that regulates production of several other inflammatory mediators, such as cyclooxygenase 2 (COX)-2 and IL-8. NS-398 is a selective inhibitor of COX-2 bioactivity and thus this drug is able to mitigate the COX-2-mediated production of downstream prostaglandins and the subsequent inflammatory response. Here we have investigated the action of NS-398 using a human ovarian granulosa cell line, KGN, by exploring IL-1β-regulated COX-2 and IL-8 expression. First, NS-398, instead of reducing inflammation, appeared to further enhance IL-1β-mediated COX-2 and IL-8 production. Using selective inhibitors targeting various signaling molecules, MAPK and NF-κB pathways both seemed to be involved in the impact of NS-398 on IL-1β-induced COX-2 and IL-8 expression. NS-398 also promoted IL-1β-mediated NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation but had no effect on IL-1β-activated MAPK phosphorylation. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that NS-398, in combination with IL-1β, significantly enhanced cell cycle progression involving IL-8. Our findings demonstrate a clear pro-inflammatory function for NS-398 in the IL-1β-mediated inflammatory response of granulosa cells, at least in part, owing to its augmenting effect on the IL-1β-induced activation of NF-κB. PMID:27312705

  4. Inflammatory mammary carcinoma in 12 dogs: Clinical features, cyclooxygenase-2 expression, and response to piroxicam treatment

    PubMed Central

    de M. Souza, Carlos H.; Toledo-Piza, Evandro; Amorin, Renee; Barboza, Andrigo; Tobias, Karen M.

    2009-01-01

    Canine inflammatory mammary carcinoma (IMC) is a rare, locally aggressive, highly metastatic tumor that is poorly responsive to treatment. The purposes of this study were to retrospectively evaluate the history, signalment, and clinical signs of dogs with IMC; compare the outcome of affected dogs treated with traditional chemotherapy with those treated with piroxicam; evaluate Cox-2 expression of IMC cells; and correlate Cox-2 expression with outcome based on treatment. Strong cyclooxygenase-2 expression was present in all tumors. Improvement in clinical condition and disease stability was achieved in all dogs treated with piroxicam, with mean and median progression-free survival of 171 and 183 days, respectively. Median survival time of 3 dogs treated with doxorubicin-based protocols was 7 days, which was significantly less than that of dogs treated with piroxicam (median, 185 days). In conclusion, piroxicam should be considered as a single agent for the treatment of dogs with inflammatory mammary carcinoma. PMID:19436636

  5. O-desmethylquinine as a cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors using AutoDock Vina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damayanti, Sophi; Mahardhika, Andhika Bintang; Ibrahim, Slamet; Chong, Wei Lim; Lee, Vannajan Sanghiran; Tjahjono, Daryono Hadi

    2014-10-01

    Computational approach was employed to evaluate the biological activity of novel cyclooxygenase-2 COX-2 inhibitor, O-desmethylquinine, in comparison to quinine as common inhibitor which can also be used an agent of antipyretic, antimalaria, analgesic and antiinflamation. The molecular models of the compound were constructed and optimized with the density function theory with at the B3LYP/6-31G (d,p) level using Gaussian 09 program. Molecular docking studies of the compounds were done to obtain the COX-2 complex structures and their binding energies were analyzed using the AutoDock Vina. The results of docking of the two ligands were comparable and cannot be differentiated from the energy scoring function with AutoDock Vina.

  6. Meloxicam, a cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor, supports hematopoietic recovery in gamma-irradiated mice.

    PubMed

    Hofer, M; Pospísil, M; Znojil, V; Holá, J; Vacek, A; Weiterová, L; Streitová, D; Kozubík, A

    2006-09-01

    Meloxicam, a selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase 2, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug with an improved side-effects profile in terms of gastrointestinal toxicity, has been found to stimulate hematopoiesis in whole-body gamma-irradiated mice. A distinct corroboration of this positive action of meloxicam is an enhancement of the recovery of hematopoietic progenitor cells committed to granulocyte-macrophage and erythroid development, which has been demonstrated in sublethally irradiated animals treated with meloxicam at a dose of 20 mg/kg administered intraperitoneally either singly 1 h before irradiation or repeatedly after radiation exposure. The results suggest that meloxicam can be added to the list of biological response modifiers that can be used in the treatment of hematopoietic damage induced by ionizing radiation. PMID:16953674

  7. Synthesis of new thiazolo-celecoxib analogues as dual cyclooxygenase-2/15-lipoxygenase inhibitors: Determination of regio-specific different pyrazole cyclization by 2D NMR.

    PubMed

    Abdelall, Eman K A; Kamel, Gehan M

    2016-08-01

    Two new series of 1,5-diaryl pyrazoles (5a, 5b, 7a, 7b and 10) and 1,5-diaryl pyrazoline (12a and 12b) were prepared as both Cyclooxygenase-2 and 15-lipoxygenase inhibitors. Carrageenan-induced rat paw edema, ulcer index and anti-COX-1/COX-2 and 15-LOX inhibition assays were also included. Cyclization of different pyrazoles was discussed using 2D NMR such as HSQC, HMBC and NOSEY determinations. Compound 5a is more effective with ED50 = 0.98 and 3.98 μM against COX-2 and 15-lipoxygenase respectively, than the references celecoxib (1.54 μM) and meclofenamate sodium (5.64 μM). PMID:27131067

  8. Mitigation and Treatment of Radiation-Induced Thoracic Injury With a Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitor, Celecoxib

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Nancy R.; Valdecanas, David; Liao Zhongxing; Milas, Luka; Thames, Howard D.; Mason, Kathy A.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To test whether a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor (celecoxib) could reduce mortality resulting from radiation-induced pneumonitis. Methods and Materials: Celecoxib was given to mice twice daily for 40 consecutive days starting on the day of local thoracic irradiation (LTI) or 40 or 80 days later. C3Hf/KamLaw mice were observed for morbidity, and time to death was determined. Results were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results: Timing of celecoxib relative to LTI determined efficacy. A significant reduction in time to death was achieved only when celecoxib was started 80 days after LTI, corresponding to the time when pneumonitis is expressed. For these mice the reduction in mortality was quantified as a hazard ratio for mortality of treated vs untreated of 0.36 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.24-0.53), thus significantly less than 1.0. Correspondingly, the median lethal dose for treated mice (12.9 Gy; 95% CI 12.55-13.25 Gy) was significantly (P=.026) higher than for untreated mice (12.4 Gy; 95% CI 12.2-12.65 Gy). Conclusions: Celecoxib significantly reduced lung toxicity when administered months after LTI when the deleterious effects of radiation were expressed. The schedule-dependent reduction in fatal pneumonitis suggests that celecoxib could be clinically useful by reintroduction of treatment months after completion of radiation therapy. These findings may be important for designing clinical trials using cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors to treat radiation-induced lung toxicity as a complement to concurrent radiation therapy of lung cancers.

  9. Anti-inflammatory effects of essential oils from Chamaecyparis obtusa via the cyclooxygenase-2 pathway in rats.

    PubMed

    An, Beum-Soo; Kang, Ji-Houn; Yang, Hyun; Jung, Eui-Man; Kang, Hong-Seok; Choi, In-Gyu; Park, Mi-Jin; Jeung, Eui-Bae

    2013-07-01

    Essential oils are concentrated hydrophobic liquids containing volatile aromatic compounds from plants. In the present study, the essential oil of Chamaecyparis obtusa (C. obtusa), which is commercially used in soap, toothpaste and cosmetics, was extracted. Essential oil extracted from C. obtusa contains several types of terpenes, which have been shown to have anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. In the present study, we examined the anti-inflammatory effects of C. obtusa essential oil in vivo and in vitro following the induction of inflammation by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in rats. While LPS induced an inflammatory response through the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in the blood and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs), these levels were reduced when essential oil was pre-administered. Additionally, the mechanism of action underlying the anti-inflammatory effects of C. obtusa essential oil was investigated by measuring the mRNA expression of inflammation‑associated genes. LPS treatment significantly induced the expression of transforming growth factor α (TNFα) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in rats, while C. obtusa essential oil inhibited this effect. Taken together, our results demonstrate that C. obtusa essential oil exerts anti‑inflammatory effects by regulating the production of PGE2 and TNFα gene expression through the COX-2 pathway. These findings suggest that C. obtusa essential oil may constitute a novel source of anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:23652412

  10. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, nimesulide, improves radiation treatment against non-small cell lung cancer both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Grimes, Kristopher R; Warren, Graham W; Fang, Fang; Xu, Yong; St Clair, William H

    2006-10-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Despite improvements in radiation, surgery and chemotherapy the 5 year survival statistics of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have improved little over the past two decades. It has been proposed that NF-kappaB is a participant in the cytoprotection against several redox-mediated therapeutic agents including ionizing radiation. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibition has become an attractive target for enhancing the efficacy of radiation and chemotherapy. Numerous mechanistic pathways have been proposed as the means through which COX-2 inhibition enhances the efficacy of radiation. We hypothesize that the COX-2 inhibitor, nimesulide, will improve the efficacy of radiation therapy (RT), at least in part, via the suppression of NF-kappaB mediated cytoprotective pathways. In this study we used the COX-2 inhibitor nimesulide to improve the efficacy of RT when measured by tumor regrowth assays in vivo and clonegenic survival in vitro. For the in vivo assay, A549 tumor cells representing NSCLC were subcutaneously injected into the right flanks of female athymic nude mice (n=10/group). Mice were given nimesulide via drinking water at a concentration of 5 microg/g body weight (b.w.) and the water was replenished daily. Tumors were treated with 30 Gy fractionated radiation and measured bi-weekly. For our in vitro study, clonogenic survival assays were evaluated to determine the effect of nimesulide, radiation, and the combination. The NF-kappaB mediated mechanism of nimesulide was measured by Western blot analysis of NF-kappaB target genes, MnSOD and survivin. In vivo, mice that received combined treatments of 5 microg/g b.w. nimesulide and 30 Gy radiation (3 Gy/fraction, 10 daily fractions) had significant reduction in tumor size in comparison to the 30 Gy radiation control group (p<0.05). In vitro, nimesulide alone produced a significant decrease in clonogenic survival at doses from 0-300 micro

  11. The role of chemoprevention by selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in colorectal cancer patients - a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background There are limited population-based studies focusing on the chemopreventive effects of selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors against colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study is to assess the trends and dose–response effects of various medication possession ratios (MPR) of selective COX-2 inhibitor used for chemoprevention of colorectal cancer. Methods A population-based case–control study was conducted using the Taiwan Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). The study comprised 21,460 colorectal cancer patients and 79,331 controls. The conditional logistic regression was applied to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) for COX-2 inhibitors used for several durations (5 years, 3 years, 1 year, 6 months and 3 months) prior to the index date. Results In patients receiving selective COX-2 inhibitors, the OR was 0.51 (95% CI=0.29~0.90, p=0.021) for an estimated 5-year period in developing colorectal cancer. ORs showing significant protection effects were found in 10% of MPRs for 5-year, 3-year, and 1-year usage. Risk reduction against colorectal cancer by selective COX-2 inhibitors was observed as early as 6 months after usage. Conclusion Our results indicate that selective COX-2 inhibitors may reduce the development of colorectal cancer by at least 10% based on the MPRs evaluated. Given the limited number of clinical reports from general populations, our results add to the knowledge of chemopreventive effects of selective COX-2 inhibitors against cancer in individuals at no increased risk of colorectal cancer. PMID:23217168

  12. Effect of quercetin on metallothionein, nitric oxide synthases and cyclooxygenase-2 expression on experimental chronic cadmium nephrotoxicity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Morales, Ana I.; Vicente-Sanchez, Cesar; Jerkic, Mirjana; Santiago, Jose M.; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Penelope D.; Perez-Barriocanal, Fernando; Lopez-Novoa, Jose M. . E-mail: jmlnovoa@usal.es

    2006-01-15

    Inflammation can play a key role in Cd-induced dysfunctions. Quercetin is a potent oxygen free radical scavenger and a metal chelator. Our aim was to study the effect of quercetin on Cd-induced kidney damage and metallothionein expression. The study was performed in Wistar rats that were administered during 9 weeks with either cadmium (1.2 mg Cd/kg/day, s.c.), quercetin (50 mg/kg/day, i.p.) or cadmium + quercetin. Renal toxicity was evaluated by measuring blood urea nitrogen concentration and urinary excretion of enzymes marker of tubular damage. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) renal expression were assessed by Western blot. Renal expression of metallothionein 1 and 2 (MT-1, MT-2) and eNOS mRNA was assessed by Northern blot. Our data demonstrated that Cd-induced renal toxicity was markedly reduced in rats that also received quercetin. MT-1 and MT-2 mRNA levels in kidney were substantially increased during treatment with Cd, being even higher when the animals received Cd and quercetin. Renal eNOS expression was significantly higher in rats receiving Cd and quercetin than in animals receiving Cd alone or in control rats. In the group that received Cd, COX-2 and iNOS expression was markedly higher than in control rats. In the group Cd + quercetin, no changes in COX-2 and iNOS expression were observed compared with the control group. Our results demonstrate that quercetin treatment prevents Cd-induced overexpression of iNOS and COX-2, and increases MT expression. These effects can explain the protection by quercetin of Cd-induced nephrotoxicity.

  13. Inhibition of neuroinflammation in BV2 microglia by the biflavonoid kolaviron is dependent on the Nrf2/ARE antioxidant protective mechanism.

    PubMed

    Onasanwo, Samuel A; Velagapudi, Ravikanth; El-Bakoush, Abdelmeneim; Olajide, Olumayokun A

    2016-03-01

    Kolaviron is a mixture of biflavonoids found in the nut of the West African edible seed Garcinia kola, and it has been reported to exhibit a wide range of pharmacological activities. In this study, we investigated the effects of kolaviron in neuroinflammation. The effects of kolaviron on the expression of nitric oxide/inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)/cyclooxygenase-2, cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the pro-inflammatory cytokines were examined in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BV2 microglial cells. Molecular mechanisms of the effects of kolaviron on NF-κB and Nrf2/ARE signalling pathways were analysed by immunoblotting, binding assays and reporter assays. RNA interference was used to investigate the role of Nrf2 in the anti-inflammatory effect of kolaviron. Neuroprotective effect of kolaviron was assessed in a BV2 microglia/HT22 hippocampal neuron co-culture. Kolaviron inhibited the protein levels of NO/iNOS, PGE2/COX-2, cellular ROS and the pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFα and IL-6) in LPS-stimulated microglia. Further mechanistic studies showed that kolaviron inhibited neuroinflammation by inhibiting IκB/NF-κB signalling pathway in LPS-activated BV2 microglia. Kolaviron produced antioxidant effect in BV2 microglia by increasing HO-1 via the Nrf2/antioxidant response element pathway. RNAi experiments revealed that Nrf2 is needed for the anti-inflammatory effects of kolaviron. Kolaviron protected HT22 neurons from neuroinflammation-induced toxicity. Kolaviron inhibits neuroinflammation through Nrf2-dependent mechanisms. This compound may therefore be beneficial in neuroinflammation-related neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26838169

  14. Kinin B2 Receptor Mediates Induction of Cyclooxygenase-2 and Is Over-Expressed In Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weiping; Bhola, Neil; Kalyankrishna, Shailaja; Gooding, William; Hunt, Jennifer; Seethala, Raja; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Siegfried, Jill M.

    2013-01-01

    Bradykinin (BK) has been shown to promote growth and migration of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells via epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation. It has also been reported that BK can cause the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a pro-tumorigenic enzyme, via the MAPK (Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase) pathway in human airway cells. To determine whether COX-2 is up-regulated by BK in HNSCC, the current study investigated BK- induced EGFR transactivation, MAPK activation, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in human HNSCC cells. BK induced a concentration- and time-dependent induction of COX-2 protein in HNSCC, which was preceded by phosphorylation of EGFR and MAPK. These effects were abolished by the B2 receptor (B2R) antagonist Hoe 140 but not the B1 receptor (B1R) antagonist, Lys-[Leu8]des-Arg9-BK. COX-2 induction was accompanied by increased release of PGE2. No effect of a B1R agonist (des-Arg9-BK) on p-MAPK or COX-2 expression was observed. B2R protein was found to be expressed in all four head and neck cell lines tested. Immunohistochemical analysis and immunoblot analysis revealed that B2R, but not B1R, was significantly over-expressed in HNSCC tumors compared to levels in normal mucosa from the same patient. In HNSCC cells, the BK-induced expression of COX-2 was inhibited by the EGFR kinase inhibitor gefitinib or mitogen activated protein kinase kinases (MEK) inhibitors (PD98059 or U0126). These results suggest that EGFR and MAPK are required for COX-2 induction by BK. Up-regulation of the B2R in head and neck cancers suggests this pathway is involved in HNSCC tumorigenesis. PMID:19074839

  15. miR-144 and targets, c-fos and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), modulate synthesis of PGE2 in the amnion during pregnancy and labor.

    PubMed

    Li, Huanan; Zhou, Jiawei; Wei, Xiajie; Chen, Ran; Geng, Junnan; Zheng, Rong; Chai, Jin; Li, Fenge; Jiang, Siwen

    2016-01-01

    Labor is initiated as a result of hormonal changes that are induced by the activation of the inflammatory response and a series of biochemical events. The amnion, which is the primary source of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), plays an important role in the process of labor. In the present study, we uncovered a pathway in which c-fos, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) and miR-144 function as hormonal modulators in the amnions of pregnant mice and humans. miR-144 down-regulated the synthesis of PGE2 during pregnancy by directly and indirectly inhibiting COX2 expression and by directly inhibiting the expression of c-fos, a transcriptional activator of COX2 and miR-144. Estrogen (E2) activated c-fos, thus promoting the expression of miR-144 and COX2 during labor. However, the increase in COX2 resulted in the partial inhibition of COX2 expression by miR-144, thereby slightly reducing the secretion of PGE2. These observations suggest that miR-144 inhibits PGE2 secretion by section to prevent the initiation of premature labor. Up-regulated expression of miR-144, c-fos and COX2 was also observed both in preterm mice and in mice undergoing normal labor. In summary, miR-144, c-fos and COX2 play important roles in regulating PGE2 secretion in the amnion during pregnancy and labor. PMID:27297132

  16. miR-144 and targets, c-fos and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), modulate synthesis of PGE2 in the amnion during pregnancy and labor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Huanan; Zhou, Jiawei; Wei, Xiajie; Chen, Ran; Geng, Junnan; Zheng, Rong; Chai, Jin; Li, Fenge; Jiang, Siwen

    2016-01-01

    Labor is initiated as a result of hormonal changes that are induced by the activation of the inflammatory response and a series of biochemical events. The amnion, which is the primary source of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), plays an important role in the process of labor. In the present study, we uncovered a pathway in which c-fos, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) and miR-144 function as hormonal modulators in the amnions of pregnant mice and humans. miR-144 down-regulated the synthesis of PGE2 during pregnancy by directly and indirectly inhibiting COX2 expression and by directly inhibiting the expression of c-fos, a transcriptional activator of COX2 and miR-144. Estrogen (E2) activated c-fos, thus promoting the expression of miR-144 and COX2 during labor. However, the increase in COX2 resulted in the partial inhibition of COX2 expression by miR-144, thereby slightly reducing the secretion of PGE2. These observations suggest that miR-144 inhibits PGE2 secretion by section to prevent the initiation of premature labor. Up-regulated expression of miR-144, c-fos and COX2 was also observed both in preterm mice and in mice undergoing normal labor. In summary, miR-144, c-fos and COX2 play important roles in regulating PGE2 secretion in the amnion during pregnancy and labor. PMID:27297132

  17. Progressive Metaplastic and Dysplastic Changes in Mouse Pancreas Induced by Cyclooxygenase-2 Overexpression1

    PubMed Central

    Colby, Jennifer KL; Klein, Russell D; McArthur, Mark J; Conti, Claudio J; Kiguchi, Kaoru; Kawamoto, Toru; Riggs, Penny K; Pavone, Amy I; Sawicki, Janet; Fischer, Susan M

    2008-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) overexpression is an established factor linking chronic inflammation with metaplastic and neoplastic change in various tissues. We generated transgenic mice (BK5.COX-2) in which elevation of COX-2 and its effectors trigger a metaplasia-dysplasia sequence in exocrine pancreas. Histologic evaluation revealed a chronic pancreatitis-like state characterized by acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and a well-vascularized fibroinflammatory stroma that develops by 3 months. By 6 to 8 months, strongly dysplastic features suggestive of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma emerge in the metaplastic ducts. Increased proliferation, cellular atypia, and loss of normal cell/tissue organization are typical features in transgenic pancreata. Alterations in biomarkers associated with human inflammatory and neoplastic pancreatic disease were detected using immunohistochemistry. The abnormal pancreatic phenotype can be completely prevented by maintaining mice on a diet containing celecoxib, a well-characterized COX-2 inhibitor. Despite the high degree of atypia, only limited evidence of invasion to adjacent tissues was observed, with no evidence of distant metastases. However, cell lines derived from spontaneous lesions are aggressively tumorigenic when injected into syngeneic or nude mice. The progressive nature of the metaplastic/dysplastic changes observed in this model make it a valuable tool for examining the transition from chronic inflammation to neoplasia. PMID:18670639

  18. Fluorocoxib A loaded nanoparticles enable targeted visualization of cyclooxygenase-2 in inflammation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Md Jashim; Werfel, Thomas A; Crews, Brenda C; Gupta, Mukesh K; Kavanaugh, Taylor E; Kingsley, Philip J; Boyd, Kelli; Marnett, Lawrence J; Duvall, Craig L

    2016-06-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is expressed in virtually all solid tumors and its overexpression is a hallmark of inflammation. Thus, it is a potentially powerful biomarker for the early clinical detection of inflammatory disease and human cancers. We report a reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsive micellar nanoparticle, PPS-b-POEGA, that solubilizes the first fluorescent COX-2-selective inhibitor fluorocoxib A (FA) for COX-2 visualization in vivo. Pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of FA-PPS-b-POEGA nanoparticles (FA-NPs) were assessed after a fully-aqueous intravenous (i.v.) administration in wild-type mice and revealed 4-8 h post-injection as an optimal fluorescent imaging window. Carrageenan-induced inflammation in the rat and mouse footpads and 1483 HNSCC tumor xenografts were successfully visualized by FA-NPs with fluorescence up to 10-fold higher than that of normal tissues. The targeted binding of the FA cargo was blocked by pretreatment with the COX-2 inhibitor indomethacin, confirming COX-2-specific binding and local retention of FA at pathological sites. Our collective data indicate that FA-NPs are the first i.v.-ready FA formulation, provide high signal-to-noise in inflamed, premalignant, and malignant tissues, and will uniquely enable clinical translation of the poorly water-soluble FA compound. PMID:27043768

  19. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 and Cyclooxygenase 2 Pathways Cooperatively Exacerbate Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daikoku, Takiko; Terakawa, Jumpei; Hossain, Md M.; Yoshie, Mikihiro; Cappelletti, Monica; Yang, Peiying; Ellenson, Lora H.; Dey, Sudhansu K.

    2015-01-01

    The underlying causes of endometrial cancer (EMC) are poorly understood, and treatment options for patients with advanced stages of the disease are limited. Mutations in the phosphatase and tensin homologue gene are frequently detected in EMC. Cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox2) and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) are known downstream targets of the phosphatase and tensin homologue protein, and their activities are up-regulated in EMC. However, it is not clear whether Cox2 and mTORC1 are crucial players in cancer progression or whether they work in parallel or cooperatively. In this study, we used a Cox2 inhibitor, celecoxib, and an mTORC1 inhibitor, rapamycin, in mouse models of EMC and in human EMC cell lines to explore the interactive roles of Cox2 and mTORC1 signaling. We found that a combined treatment with celecoxib and rapamycin markedly reduces EMC progression. We also observed that rapamycin reduces Cox2 expression, whereas celecoxib reduces mTORC1 activity. These results suggest that Cox2 and mTORC1 signaling is cross-regulated and cooperatively exacerbate EMC. PMID:25058027

  20. Human neutrophil peptides upregulate expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and endothelin-1 by inducing oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Syeda, Farisa; Tullis, Elizabeth; Slutsky, Arthur S.; Zhang, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    The human neutrophil peptides (HNP) bind to vascular smooth muscle cells and regulate vascular tone. We hypothesized that HNP act on endothelial cells to modulate the expression of vasoactive byproducts. We observed a time- and dose-dependent increase in the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) in response to HNP stimulation, while COX-1 levels remained unchanged. Despite an upregulated expression of COX-2, HNP did not significantly enhance the production of the COX-2-derived prostaglandins PGI2 and PGE2. HNP significantly induced the release of endothelin-1 (ET-1) as well as the formation of nitrotyrosine. The HNP-induced COX-2 and ET-1 production was attenuated by the treatment with the oxygen free radical scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine, and the inhibitors of p38 MAPK and NF-κB, respectively. We conclude that HNP may play an important role in the regulation of the course of cardiovascular diseases by activating endothelial cells to produce vasoactive byproducts. PMID:18441204

  1. Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitor Reduces Hepatic Stiffness in Pediatric Chronic Liver Disease Patients Following Kasai Portoenterostomy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hye Kyung; Chang, Eun Young; Ryu, Seonae

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to define the role of cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors (COX-2i) in reducing hepatic fibrosis in pediatric patients with chronic liver disease. Materials and Methods From September 2009 to September 2010, patients over 2 years old who visited our outpatient clinic for follow-up to manage their chronic liver disease after Kasai portoenterostomy for biliary atresia, were included in this study. Volunteers were assigned to the study or control groups, according to their preference. A COX-2i was given to only the study group after obtaining consent. The degree of hepatic fibrosis (liver stiffness score, LSS) was prospectively measured using FibroScan, and liver function was examined using serum analysis before and after treatment. After 1 year, changes in LSSs and liver function were compared between the two groups. Results Twenty-five patients (18 females and 7 males) were enrolled in the study group. The control group included 44 patients (26 females and 18 males). After 1 year, the least square mean values for the LSSs were significantly decreased by 3.91±0.98 kPa (p=0.004) only in the study group. Serum total bilirubin did not decrease significantly in either group. Conclusion COX-2i treatment improved the LSS in patients with chronic liver disease after Kasai portoenterostomy for biliary atresia. PMID:27189282

  2. A cyclooxygenase-2 homologue encoded by rhesus cytomegalovirus is a determinant for endothelial cell tropism.

    PubMed

    Rue, Cary A; Jarvis, Michael A; Knoche, Amber J; Meyers, Heather L; DeFilippis, Victor R; Hansen, Scott G; Wagner, Markus; Früh, Klaus; Anders, David G; Wong, Scott W; Barry, Peter A; Nelson, Jay A

    2004-11-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a cellular enzyme in the eicosanoid synthetic pathway that mediates the synthesis of prostaglandins from arachidonic acid. The eicosanoids function as critical regulators of a number of cellular processes, including the acute and chronic inflammatory response, hemostasis, and the innate immune response. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), which does not encode a viral COX-2 isoform, has been shown to induce cellular COX-2 expression. Importantly, although the precise role of COX-2 in CMV replication is unknown, COX-2 induction was shown to be critical for normal HCMV replication. In an earlier study, we identified an open reading frame (Rh10) within the rhesus cytomegalovirus (RhCMV) genome that encoded a putative protein (designated vCOX-2) with high homology to cellular COX-2. In the current study, we show that vCOX-2 is expressed with early-gene kinetics during RhCMV infection, resulting in production of a 70-kDa protein. Consistent with the expression of a viral COX-2 isoform, cellular COX-2 expression was not induced during RhCMV infection. Finally, analysis of growth of recombinant RhCMV with vCOX-2 deleted identified vCOX-2 as a critical determinant for replication in endothelial cells. PMID:15507640

  3. A Cyclooxygenase-2 Homologue Encoded by Rhesus Cytomegalovirus Is a Determinant for Endothelial Cell Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Rue, Cary A.; Jarvis, Michael A.; Knoche, Amber J.; Meyers, Heather L.; DeFilippis, Victor R.; Hansen, Scott G.; Wagner, Markus; Früh, Klaus; Anders, David G.; Wong, Scott W.; Barry, Peter A.; Nelson, Jay A.

    2004-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is a cellular enzyme in the eicosanoid synthetic pathway that mediates the synthesis of prostaglandins from arachidonic acid. The eicosanoids function as critical regulators of a number of cellular processes, including the acute and chronic inflammatory response, hemostasis, and the innate immune response. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), which does not encode a viral COX-2 isoform, has been shown to induce cellular COX-2 expression. Importantly, although the precise role of COX-2 in CMV replication is unknown, COX-2 induction was shown to be critical for normal HCMV replication. In an earlier study, we identified an open reading frame (Rh10) within the rhesus cytomegalovirus (RhCMV) genome that encoded a putative protein (designated vCOX-2) with high homology to cellular COX-2. In the current study, we show that vCOX-2 is expressed with early-gene kinetics during RhCMV infection, resulting in production of a 70-kDa protein. Consistent with the expression of a viral COX-2 isoform, cellular COX-2 expression was not induced during RhCMV infection. Finally, analysis of growth of recombinant RhCMV with vCOX-2 deleted identified vCOX-2 as a critical determinant for replication in endothelial cells. PMID:15507640

  4. Cobalt Protoporphyrin Upregulates Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression Through a Heme Oxygenase-Independent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsiao-Yun; Tsai, Chon-Haw; Lin, Chingju; Yeh, Wei-Lan; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Chang, Pei-Chun; Wu, Ling-Hsuan; Lu, Dah-Yuu

    2016-09-01

    Cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) is a potent HO-1 inducer and generally known to be an antioxidant in various cell types. Little is known about the CoPP-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and its downstream signaling in microglial cells. In current study, CoPP caused concentration- and time-dependent increases in COX-2 expression in microglial cells. Furthermore, activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase (ASK) 1/MAP kinase involved in CoPP-induced COX-2 expression in microglia. CoPP also induced P2X7 receptor activation, and treatment of P2X7 inhibitors effectively reduced CoPP-induced COX-2 expression. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT (PIAS) 1 is reported to be involved in modulating anti-inflammatory response through negative regulation of transcription factors. Interestingly, treatment with CoPP markedly induced PIAS1 degradation which is regulated by PI3K, Akt, and glycogen synthase kinase 3α/β (GSK3α/β) signaling pathways. These results suggest that CoPP induces COX-2 expression through activating P2X7 receptors and ASK1/MAP kinases as well as PIAS1 degradation signaling pathways. Our study provides a new insight into the regulatory effect of CoPP on neuroinflammation in microglial cells. PMID:26255181

  5. Premedication with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor meloxicam reduced postoperative pain in patients after oral surgery.

    PubMed

    Aoki, T; Yamaguchi, H; Naito, H; Shiiki, K; Izawa, K; Ota, Y; Sakamoto, H; Kaneko, A

    2006-07-01

    The efficacy of the selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor meloxicam for treatment of postoperative oral surgical pain was assessed in a randomized controlled trial. Patients undergoing unilateral mandibular 3rd molar extraction surgery were allocated to 3 groups, A, B and C. After oral premedication of meloxicam 10 mg in group A, ampiroxicam 27 mg in group B and placebo in group C, surgery was completed within 30 min under local anaesthesia using 2% lidocaine. For postoperative pain relief the patients were allowed to take oral loxoprofen (60 mg per tablet). Postoperative pain was evaluated at the clinic on the 1st, 7th and 14th postoperative day (POD) using a visual analogue scale (VAS), as was the number of loxoprofen tablets consumed, and the results were compared among the 3 groups with statistical significance of P<0.05. VAS scores on 1 POD were significantly lower in group A than in group C. Loxoprofen consumption on the day of surgery and 1 POD was significantly lower in group A than in group C (P<0.01). Total analgesic consumption was significantly lower in groups A and B than in group C (P<0.02). The COX-2 inhibitor, meloxicam 10 mg used for premedication reduced postoperative pain compared with control in oral surgery. PMID:16540287

  6. Influenza A viruses suppress cyclooxygenase-2 expression by affecting its mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Sabine Eva; Nitzsche, Katja; Ludwig, Stephan; Ehrhardt, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Infection with influenza A viruses (IAV) provokes activation of cellular defence mechanisms contributing to the innate immune and inflammatory response. In this process the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) plays an important role in the induction of prostaglandin-dependent inflammation. While it has been reported that COX-2 is induced upon IAV infection, in the present study we observed a down-regulation at later stages of infection suggesting a tight regulation of COX-2 by IAV. Our data indicate the pattern-recognition receptor RIG-I as mediator of the initial IAV-induced COX-2 synthesis. Nonetheless, during on-going IAV replication substantial suppression of COX-2 mRNA and protein synthesis could be detected, accompanied by a decrease in mRNA half-life. Interestingly, COX-2 mRNA stability was not only imbalanced by IAV replication but also by stimulation of cells with viral RNA. Our results reveal tristetraprolin (TTP), which is known to bind COX-2 mRNA and promote its rapid degradation, as regulator of COX-2 expression in IAV infection. During IAV replication and viral RNA accumulation TTP mRNA synthesis was induced, resulting in reduced COX-2 levels. Accordingly, the down-regulation of TTP resulted in increased COX-2 protein expression after IAV infection. These findings indicate a novel IAV-regulated cellular mechanism, contributing to the repression of host defence and therefore facilitating viral replication. PMID:27265729

  7. Selective Visualization of Cyclooxygenase-2 in Inflammation and Cancer by Targeted Fluorescent Imaging Agents†

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Md. Jashim; Crews, Brenda C.; Blobaum, Anna L.; Kingsley, Philip J.; Gorden, D. Lee; McIntyre, J. Oliver; Matrisian, Lynn M.; Subbaramaiah, Kotha; Dannenberg, Andrew J.; Piston, David W.; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2010-01-01

    Effective diagnosis of inflammation and cancer by molecular imaging is challenging because of interference from non-selective accumulation of the contrast agents in normal tissues. Here we report a series of novel fluorescence imaging agents that efficiently target cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), which is normally absent from cells, but is found at high levels in inflammatory lesions, and in many premalignant and malignant tumors. After either intraperitoneal or intravenous injection, these reagents become highly enriched in inflamed or tumor tissue compared to normal tissue and this accumulation provides sufficient signal for in vivo fluorescence imaging. Further, we show that only the intact parent compound is found in the region of interest. COX-2-specific delivery was unambiguously confirmed using animals bearing targeted deletions of COX-2 and by blocking the COX-2 active site with high affinity inhibitors in both in vitro and in vivo models. Because of their high specificity, contrast, and detectability, these COX-2 beacons are ideal candidates for detection of inflammatory lesions or early-stage COX-2-expressing human cancers, such as those in the esophagus, oropharynx, and colon. PMID:20430759

  8. Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 in monocyte/macrophage by mucins secreted from colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Inaba, Takaaki; Sano, Hajime; Kawahito, Yutaka; Hla, Timothy; Akita, Kaoru; Toda, Munetoyo; Yamashina, Ikuo; Inoue, Mizue; Nakada, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    Up-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and overproduction of prostaglandins have been implicated in the initiation and/or progression of colon cancer. However, it is uncertain in which cells and how COX-2 is induced initially in the tumor microenvironment. We found that a conditioned medium of the colon cancer cell line, LS 180, contained a factor to induce COX-2 in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. This factor was purified biochemically and revealed to be mucins. A small amount of mucins (≈100 ng of protein per ml) could elevate prostaglandin E2 production by monocytes. The mucins induced COX-2 mRNA and protein levels of monocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner, indicating a COX-2-mediated pathway. We also have examined immunohistochemically the localization of COX-2 protein and mucins in human colorectal cancer tissues. It is noteworthy that COX-2-expressing macrophages were located around the region in which mucins were detectable, suggesting that COX-2 also was induced by mucins in vivo. These results suggest that mucins produced by colon cancer cells play a critical role in the initial induction of COX-2 in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:12598658

  9. Calpain inhibition mediates autophagy-dependent protection against polyglutamine toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Menzies, F M; Garcia-Arencibia, M; Imarisio, S; O'Sullivan, N C; Ricketts, T; Kent, B A; Rao, M V; Lam, W; Green-Thompson, Z W; Nixon, R A; Saksida, L M; Bussey, T J; O'Kane, C J; Rubinsztein, D C

    2015-01-01

    Over recent years, accumulated evidence suggests that autophagy induction is protective in animal models of a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Intense research in the field has elucidated different pathways through which autophagy can be upregulated and it is important to establish how modulation of these pathways impacts upon disease progression in vivo and therefore which, if any, may have further therapeutic relevance. In addition, it is important to understand how alterations in these target pathways may affect normal physiology when constitutively modulated over a long time period, as would be required for treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Here we evaluate the potential protective effect of downregulation of calpains. We demonstrate, in Drosophila, that calpain knockdown protects against the aggregation and toxicity of proteins, like mutant huntingtin, in an autophagy-dependent fashion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that, overexpression of the calpain inhibitor, calpastatin, increases autophagosome levels and is protective in a mouse model of Huntington's disease, improving motor signs and delaying the onset of tremors. Importantly, long-term inhibition of calpains did not result in any overt deleterious phenotypes in mice. Thus, calpain inhibition, or activation of autophagy pathways downstream of calpains, may be suitable therapeutic targets for diseases like Huntington's disease. PMID:25257175

  10. Tiagabine Protects Dopaminergic Neurons against Neurotoxins by Inhibiting Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Huang, Dongping; Xu, Jing; Tong, Jiabin; Wang, Zishan; Huang, Li; Yang, Yufang; Bai, Xiaochen; Wang, Pan; Suo, Haiyun; Ma, Yuanyuan; Yu, Mei; Fei, Jian; Huang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Microglial activation and inflammation are associated with progressive neuronal apoptosis in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, has recently been shown to play an inhibitory role in the immune system. Tiagabine, a piperidine derivative, enhances GABAergic transmission by inhibiting GABA transporter 1 (GAT 1). In the present study, we found that tiagabine pretreatment attenuated microglial activation, provided partial protection to the nigrostriatal axis and improved motor deficits in a methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. The protective function of tiagabine was abolished in GAT 1 knockout mice that were challenged with MPTP. In an alternative PD model, induced by intranigral infusion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), microglial suppression and subsequent neuroprotective effects of tiagabine were demonstrated. Furthermore, the LPS-induced inflammatory activation of BV-2 microglial cells and the toxicity of conditioned medium toward SH-SY5Y cells were inhibited by pretreatment with GABAergic drugs. The attenuation of the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and the inhibition of the generation of inflammatory mediators were the underlying mechanisms. Our results suggest that tiagabine acts as a brake for nigrostriatal microglial activation and that it might be a novel therapeutic approach for PD. PMID:26499517

  11. Neuronal NOS and cyclooxygenase-2 contribute to DNA damage in a mouse model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Tuan; Choi, Dong-Kug; Nagai, Makiko; Wu, Du-Chu; Nagata, Tetsuya; Prou, Delphine; Wilson, Glenn L; Vila, Miquel; Jackson-Lewis, Vernice; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Chesselet, Marie-Françoise; Przedborski, Serge

    2009-10-01

    DNA damage is a proposed pathogenic factor in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson disease. To probe the underpinning mechanism of such neuronal perturbation, we sought to produce an experimental model of DNA damage. We thus first assessed DNA damage by in situ nick translation and emulsion autoradiography in the mouse brain after administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP; 4 x 20 mg/kg, ip, every 2 h), a neurotoxin known to produce a model of Parkinson disease. Here we show that DNA strand breaks occur in vivo in this mouse model of Parkinson disease with kinetics and a topography that parallel the degeneration of substantia nigra neurons, as assessed by FluoroJade labeling. Previously, nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) were found to modulate MPTP-induced dopaminergic neuronal death. We thus assessed the contribution of these enzymes to DNA damage in mice lacking neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), or Cox-2. We found that the lack of Cox-2 and nNOS activities but not of iNOS activity attenuated MPTP-related DNA damage. We also found that not only nuclear, but also mitochondrial, DNA is a target for the MPTP insult. These results suggest that the loss of genomic integrity can be triggered by the concerted actions of nNOS and Cox-2 and provide further support to the view that DNA damage may contribute to the neurodegenerative process in Parkinson disease. PMID:19616617

  12. Pre-existent Asymmetry in the Human Cyclooxygenase-2 Sequence Homodimer*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Liang; Sharma, Narayan P.; Jurban, Brice J.; Smith, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthase-2 (PGHS-2), also known as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), is a sequence homodimer. However, the enzyme exhibits half-site heme and inhibitor binding and functions as a conformational heterodimer having a catalytic subunit (Ecat) with heme bound and an allosteric subunit (Eallo) lacking heme. Some recombinant heterodimers composed of a COX-deficient mutant subunit and a native subunit (i.e. Mutant/Native PGHS-2) have COX activities similar to native PGHS-2. This suggests that the presence of heme plus substrate leads to the subunits becoming lodged in a semi-stable Eallo-mutant/Ecat-Native∼heme form during catalysis. We examined this concept using human PGHS-2 dimers composed of combinations of Y385F, R120Q, R120A, and S530A mutant or native subunits. With some heterodimers (e.g. Y385F/Native PGHS-2), heme binds with significantly higher affinity to the native subunit. This correlates with near native COX activity for the heterodimer. With other heterodimers (e.g. S530A/Native PGHS-2), heme binds with similar affinities to both subunits, and the COX activity approximates that expected for an enzyme in which each monomer contributes equally to the net COX activity. With or without heme, aspirin acetylates one-half of the subunits of the native PGHS-2 dimer, the Ecat subunits. Subunits having an S530A mutation are refractory to acetylation. Curiously, aspirin acetylates only one-quarter of the monomers of S530A/Native PGHS-2 with or without heme. This implies that there are comparable amounts of two noninterchangeable species of apoenzymes, Eallo-S530A/Ecat-Native and Eallo-Native/Ecat-S530A. These results suggest that native PGHS-2 assumes a reasonably stable, asymmetric Eallo/Ecat form during its folding and processing. PMID:23955344

  13. Molecular Imaging of Cyclooxygenase-2 in Canine Transitional Cell Carcinomas In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cekanova, Maria; Uddin, Md. Jashim; Bartges, Joseph W.; Callens, Amanda; Legendre, Alfred M.; Rathore, Kusum; Wright, Laura; Carter, Amanda; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2013-01-01

    The enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is induced at high levels in tumors, but not in surrounding normal tissues, which makes it an attractive target for molecular imaging of cancer. We evaluated the ability of novel optical imaging agent, fluorocoxib A to detect urinary bladder canine transitional cell carcinomas (K9TCC). Here, we show that fluorocoxib A uptake overlapped with COX-2 expression in primary K9TCC cells in vitro. Using subcutaneously implanted primary K9TCC in athymic mice, we demonstrate specific uptake of fluorocoxib A by COX-2-expressing K9TCC xenograft tumors in vivo. Fluorocoxib A uptake by COX-2 expressing xenograft tumors was blocked by 70% (p<0.005) when pre-treated with the COX-2 selective inhibitor, celecoxib (10 mg/kg), 4 h before intravenous administration of fluorocoxib A (1 mg/kg). Fluorocoxib A was taken up by COX-2-expressing tumors, but not by COX-2 negative human UMUC-3 xenograft tumors. UMUC-3 xenograft tumors with no expression of COX-2 showed no uptake of fluorocoxib A. In addition, fluorocoxib A uptake was evaluated in 5 dogs diagnosed with TCC. Fluorocoxib A specifically detected COX-2-expressing K9TCC during cystoscopy in vivo, but was not detected in normal urothelium. Taken together, our findings show that fluorocoxib A selectively bound to COX-2 expressing primary K9TCC cells in vitro, COX-2 expressing K9TCC xenografts tumors in nude mice and heterogeneous canine TCC during cystoscopy in vivo. Spontaneous cancers in companion animals offer a unique translational model for evaluation of novel imaging and therapeutic agents using primary cancer cells in vitro and in heterogeneous cancers in vivo. PMID:23531445

  14. Pre-existent asymmetry in the human cyclooxygenase-2 sequence homodimer.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang; Sharma, Narayan P; Jurban, Brice J; Smith, William L

    2013-10-01

    Prostaglandin endoperoxide H synthase-2 (PGHS-2), also known as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), is a sequence homodimer. However, the enzyme exhibits half-site heme and inhibitor binding and functions as a conformational heterodimer having a catalytic subunit (Ecat) with heme bound and an allosteric subunit (Eallo) lacking heme. Some recombinant heterodimers composed of a COX-deficient mutant subunit and a native subunit (i.e. Mutant/Native PGHS-2) have COX activities similar to native PGHS-2. This suggests that the presence of heme plus substrate leads to the subunits becoming lodged in a semi-stable Eallo-mutant/Ecat-Native∼heme form during catalysis. We examined this concept using human PGHS-2 dimers composed of combinations of Y385F, R120Q, R120A, and S530A mutant or native subunits. With some heterodimers (e.g. Y385F/Native PGHS-2), heme binds with significantly higher affinity to the native subunit. This correlates with near native COX activity for the heterodimer. With other heterodimers (e.g. S530A/Native PGHS-2), heme binds with similar affinities to both subunits, and the COX activity approximates that expected for an enzyme in which each monomer contributes equally to the net COX activity. With or without heme, aspirin acetylates one-half of the subunits of the native PGHS-2 dimer, the Ecat subunits. Subunits having an S530A mutation are refractory to acetylation. Curiously, aspirin acetylates only one-quarter of the monomers of S530A/Native PGHS-2 with or without heme. This implies that there are comparable amounts of two noninterchangeable species of apoenzymes, Eallo-S530A/Ecat-Native and Eallo-Native/Ecat-S530A. These results suggest that native PGHS-2 assumes a reasonably stable, asymmetric Eallo/Ecat form during its folding and processing. PMID:23955344

  15. Potential Pathogenetic Implications of Cyclooxygenase-2 Overexpression in B Chronic Lymphoid Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Secchiero, Paola; Barbarotto, Elisa; Gonelli, Arianna; Tiribelli, Mario; Zerbinati, Carlotta; Celeghini, Claudio; Agostinelli, Claudio; Pileri, Stefano A.; Zauli, Giorgio

    2005-01-01

    Evidence suggests that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) increases tumorigenic potential by promoting resistance to apoptosis. Because B chronic lymphoid leukemia (B-CLL) cells exhibit a defective apoptotic response, we analyzed CD19+ B lymphocytes purified from the peripheral blood of B-CLL patients. Microarray analysis showed a variable (up to 38-fold) increase in the steady-state mRNA levels of COX-2 in B-CLL lymphocytes compared with normal CD19+ B lymphocytes. The up-regulation of COX-2 in B-CLL cells was confirmed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of B-CLL bone marrow infiltrates confirmed clear expression of COX-2 in leukemic cells. Ex vivo treatment with the COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 significantly decreased the survival of leukemic cells by increasing the rate of spontaneous apoptosis in 13 of 16 B-CLL samples examined, but it did not affect the survival of normal lymphocytes. Pretreatment with NS-398 significantly potentiated the cytotoxicity induced by chlorambucil in 8 of 16 B-CLL samples examined. Moreover, although recombinant tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL)/Apo2L showed little cytotoxic effect in most B-CLL samples examined, pretreatment with NS-398 sensitized 8 of 16 B-CLL samples to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our data indicate that COX-2 overexpression likely represents an additional mechanism of resistance to apoptosis in B-CLL and that pharmacological suppression of COX-2 might enhance chemotherapy-mediated apoptosis. PMID:16314473

  16. Secretory phospholipase A{sub 2} mediates progression of acute liver injury in the absence of sufficient cyclooxygenase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Bhave, Vishakha S.; Donthamsetty, Shashikiran; Latendresse, John R.; Muskhelishvili, Levan; Mehendale, Harihara M.

    2008-04-15

    Previous studies have shown that injury initiated by toxicants progresses even after most of the toxicant is eliminated from the body. One mechanism of progression of injury is the extracellular appearance of hydrolytic enzymes following leakage or upon cell lyses. Under normal conditions, after exposure to low to moderate doses of toxicants, secretory phospholipase A{sub 2} (sPLA{sub 2}) and other hydrolytic enzymes are known to appear in the extracellular spaces in order to cleanup the post-necrotic debris in tissues. We tested the hypothesis that sPLA{sub 2} contributes to progression of toxicant-initiated liver injury because of hydrolysis of membrane phospholipids of hepatocytes in the perinecrotic areas in the absence of sufficient cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered either a moderately hepatotoxic dose (MD, 2 ml CCl{sub 4}/kg, ip) or a highly hepatotoxic dose (HD, 3 ml CCl{sub 4}/kg, ip) of CCl{sub 4}. After MD, liver sPLA{sub 2} and COX-2 were co-localized in the necrotic and perinecrotic areas and their activities in plasma and liver increased before decreasing in tandem with liver injury (ALT and histopathology) leading to 100% survival. In contrast, after the HD, high extracellular and hepatic sPLA{sub 2} activities were accompanied by minimal COX-2 activity and localization in the liver throughout the time course. This led to progression of liver injury and 70% mortality. These data suggested a destructive role of sPLA{sub 2} in the absence of sufficient COX-2. Time- and dose-dependent destruction of hepatocytes by sPLA{sub 2} in isolated hepatocyte incubations confirmed the destructive ability of sPLA{sub 2} when present extracellularly, suggesting its ability to spread injury in vivo. These findings suggest that sPLA{sub 2}, secreted for cleanup of necrotic debris upon initiation of hepatic necrosis, requires the co-presence of sufficiently induced COX-2 activity to prevent the run-away destructive action of sPLA{sub 2

  17. Propyphenazone-based analogues as prodrugs and selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Mohamed F; Dalby, Kevin N; Kaoud, Tamer S

    2014-09-11

    Improving the gastrointestinal safety profile of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is an important goal. Herein, we report two strategies, using the nonacidic propyphenazone structure, with potential to overcome the side effects of NSAIDs. Propyphenazone was employed to temporarily mask the free acid group of the widely used NSAIDs ibuprofen, diclofenac, and ketoprofen to develop three mutual prodrugs hypothesized to have minimal GI irritation. The three prodrugs exhibit in vivo anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities with improved potency over each parent drug when compared to a nonhydrolyzable control betahistine-propyphenazone (BET-MP). Additionally, ANT-MP formed by the irreversible coupling of propyphenazone and 4-aminoantipyrine, displayed exceptional COXII selectivity (COXII IC50 of 0.97 ± 0.04 μM, compared to no observed inhibition of COXI at 160 μM). Inhibition of COXII suppresses inflammatory diseases without affecting COXI-mediated GI tract events. ANT-MP exhibited maximal analgesic effect when tested in vivo in an abdominal writhing assay (100% protection) and its anti-inflammatory activity showed a peak at 2 h in a carrageenan-induced paw edema model. Its unique selectivity toward the COXII enzyme was investigated using molecular modeling techniques. PMID:25221653

  18. Propyphenazone-Based Analogues as Prodrugs and Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Improving the gastrointestinal safety profile of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) is an important goal. Herein, we report two strategies, using the nonacidic propyphenazone structure, with potential to overcome the side effects of NSAIDs. Propyphenazone was employed to temporarily mask the free acid group of the widely used NSAIDs ibuprofen, diclofenac, and ketoprofen to develop three mutual prodrugs hypothesized to have minimal GI irritation. The three prodrugs exhibit in vivo anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities with improved potency over each parent drug when compared to a nonhydrolyzable control betahistine–propyphenazone (BET–MP). Additionally, ANT–MP formed by the irreversible coupling of propyphenazone and 4-aminoantipyrine, displayed exceptional COXII selectivity (COXII IC50 of 0.97 ± 0.04 μM, compared to no observed inhibition of COXI at 160 μM). Inhibition of COXII suppresses inflammatory diseases without affecting COXI-mediated GI tract events. ANT–MP exhibited maximal analgesic effect when tested in vivo in an abdominal writhing assay (100% protection) and its anti-inflammatory activity showed a peak at 2 h in a carrageenan-induced paw edema model. Its unique selectivity toward the COXII enzyme was investigated using molecular modeling techniques. PMID:25221653

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells alleviate airway inflammation and emphysema in COPD through down-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 via p38 and ERK MAPK pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wen; Song, Lin; Li, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Di; Guo, Xue-Jun; Xu, Wei-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been identified as one possible strategy for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Our previous studies have demonstrated that MSC administration has therapeutic potential in airway inflammation and emphysema via a paracrine mechanism. We proposed that MSCs reverse the inflammatory process and restore impaired lung function through their interaction with macrophages. In our study, the rats were exposed to cigarette smoke (CS), followed by the administration of MSCs into the lungs for 5 weeks. Here we show that MSC administration alleviated airway inflammation and emphysema through the down-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and COX-2-mediated prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production, possibly through the effect on alveolar macrophages. In vitro co-culture experiments provided evidence that MSCs down-regulated COX-2/PGE2 in macrophages through inhibition of the activation-associated phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and ERK. Our data suggest that MSCs may relieve airway inflammation and emphysema in CS-exposed rat models, through the inhibition of COX-2/PGE2 in alveolar macrophages, mediated in part by the p38 MAPK and ERK pathways. This study provides a compelling mechanism for MSC treatment in COPD, in addition to its paracrine mechanism. PMID:25736434

  20. Importance of adipocyte cyclooxygenase-2 and prostaglandin E2-prostaglandin E receptor 3 signaling in the development of obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Chan, Pei-Chi; Hsiao, Fone-Ching; Chang, Hao-Ming; Wabitsch, Martin; Hsieh, Po Shiuan

    2016-06-01

    We examined the involvement of adipocyte cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-prostaglandin E receptor (EP)3-mediated signaling during hypertrophy and hypoxia in the development of obesity-associated adipose tissue (AT) inflammation and insulin resistance. The experiments were conducted with high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese rats, db/db mice, human subjects, and 3T3-L1 and the human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) adipocytes; the groups were treated with selective inhibitors of COX-2 [celecoxib 30 mg/kg, half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) ≈ 0.04 µM] and EP3 (L-798106 100 µg/kg, IC50 ≈ 0.5 µM) or a short interfering RNA. There were strong, positive correlations between adipocyte COX-2 and EP3 gene expressions and the AT TNF-α and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 contents and the homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance in HFD-induced obese rats, as well as body mass index in human subjects. Treatment with COX-2 and EP3 inhibitors significantly reversed AT inflammatory gene and protein expressions (-50%) and impaired glucose and insulin tolerance in db/db mice. COX-2 inhibition diminished the chemotaxis of adipocytes isolated from HFD rats to macrophages and T cells. Targeting inhibition of adipocyte COX-2 and EP3 during hypertrophy and hypoxia reversed the release of the augmented proinflammatory adipokines and the diminished adiponectin and also suppressed NF-κB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α transcription activation. These findings suggest that adipocyte COX-2 PGE2-EP3-mediated signaling is crucially involved in the development of obesity-associated AT inflammation and insulin resistance.-Chan, P.-C., Hsiao, F.-C., Chang, H.-M., Wabitsch, M., Hsieh, P. S. Importance of adipocyte cyclooxygenase-2 and prostaglandin E2-prostaglandin E receptor 3 signaling in the development of obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance. PMID:26932930

  1. Regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression by cAMP response element and mRNA stability in a human airway epithelial cell line exposed to zinc

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to zinc-laden particulate matter in ambient and occupational settings has been associated with proinflammatory responses in the lung. Cyclooxygenase 2-derived eicosanoids are important modulators of airway inflammation. In this study, we characterized the transcriptional...

  2. Apigenin-7-O-β-D-glucuronide inhibits LPS-induced inflammation through the inactivation of AP-1 and MAPK signaling pathways in RAW 264.7 macrophages and protects mice against endotoxin shock.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weicheng; Wang, Xinfeng; Wu, Lei; Shen, Ting; Ji, Lilian; Zhao, Xihong; Si, Chuan-Ling; Jiang, Yunyao; Wang, Gongcheng

    2016-02-01

    Apigenin-7-O-β-D-glucuronide (AG), an active flavonoid derivative isolated from the agricultural residue of Juglans sigillata fruit husks, possesses multiple pharmacological activities, including anti-oxidant, anti-complement, and aldose reductase inhibitory activities. To date, no report has identified the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of AG. This study was therefore designed to characterize the molecular mechanisms of AG on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory cytokines in RAW 264.7 cells and on endotoxin-induced shock in mice. AG suppressed the release of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages in a dose-dependent manner without affecting cell viability. Additionally, AG suppressed LPS-induced mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and TNF-α. AG treatment decreased the translocation of c-Jun into the nucleus, and decreased activator protein-1 (AP-1)-mediated luciferase activity through the inhibition of both p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. Consistent with the in vitro observations, AG protected mice from LPS-induced endotoxin shock by inhibiting proinflammatory cytokine production. Taken together, these results suggest that AG may be used as a source of anti-inflammatory agents as well as a dietary complement for health promotion. PMID:26750400

  3. Reduction in cancer risk by selective and nonselective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Randall E; Beebe, Joanne; Alshafie, Galal A

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a series of epidemiologic studies to evaluate the chemopreventive effects of aspirin, ibuprofen, and selective cyxlooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors (coxibs) against cancers of the breast, colon, prostate, and lung. Composite results across all four cancer sites revealed that regular intake of 325 mg aspirin, 200 mg ibuprofen, or standard dosages of coxibs (200 mg celecoxib or 25 mg rofecoxib) produced risk reductions of 49%, 59%, and 64%, respectively. Use of coxibs for at least 2 years was associated with risk reductions of 71%, 70%, 55%, and 60% for breast cancer, colon cancer, prostate cancer and lung cancer, respectively. Effects of ibuprofen were similar to selective coxibs, and slightly stronger than aspirin. These observed effects are consistent with the relative COX-2 selectivity of ibuprofen, coxibs, and aspirin. Acetaminophen, an analgesic without COX-2 activity, had no effect. Overexpression of COX-2 and increased prostaglandin biosynthesis correlates with carcinogenesis and metastasis at most anatomic sites. These results indicate that regular intake of nonselective or selective COX-2 inhibiting agents protects against the development of major forms of cancer.

  4. Effects of nimesulide, acetylsalicylic acid, ibuprofen and nabumetone on cyclooxygenase-1- and cyclooxygenase-2-mediated prostanoid production in healthy volunteers ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Kerola, Markku; Vuolteenaho, Katriina; Kosonen, Outi; Kankaanranta, Hannu; Sarna, Seppo; Moilanen, Eeva

    2009-01-01

    : The beneficial actions of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been associated with inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), whereas some of their adverse effects are associated mainly with inhibition of COX-1. Selective COX-2 inhibitors reduce the risk of gastrointestinal adverse events, but increase the risk of thromboembolic events pointing to importance of optimal COX-1/COX-2 inhibition in drug safety. We compared the effects of acetylsalicylic acid, ibuprofen, nabumetone and nimesulide on COX-1 and COX-2 pathways in healthy volunteers in an ex vivo set-up using single oral doses commonly used to treat acute pain. In a randomized, double-blind four-phase cross-over study, 15 healthy volunteers were given orally a single dose of either acetylsalicylic acid 500 mg, ibuprofen 400 mg, nabumetone 1 g or nimesulide 100 mg. Blood samples were drawn before and 1, 3, 6, 24 and 48 hr after the drug for the assessment of COX-1 and COX-2 activity. COX-1 activity was measured as thromboxane(2) production during blood clotting and COX-2 activity as endotoxin-induced prostaglandin E(2) synthesis in blood leucocytes. The data show that after a single oral dose these four NSAIDs have different profiles of action on COX-1 and COX-2. As expected, acetylsalicylic acid appeared to be COX-1-selective and ibuprofen effectively inhibited both COX-1 and COX-2. Nabumetone showed only a slight inhibitory effect on COX-1 and COX-2. Nimesulide caused almost complete suppression of COX-2 activity and a partial reduction of COX-1 activity. This confirms the relative COX-2 selectivity of nimesulide. PMID:19152549

  5. Radiation Therapy Overcomes Adverse Prognostic Role of Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression on Reed-Sternberg Cells in Early Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mestre, Francisco; Gutiérrez, Antonio; Rodriguez, Jose; Ramos, Rafael; Garcia, Juan Fernando; Martinez-Serra, Jordi; Casasus, Marta; Nicolau, Cristina; Bento, Leyre; Herraez, Ines; Lopez-Perezagua, Paloma; Daumal, Jaime; Besalduch, Joan

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: To analyze the role of radiation therapy (RT) on the adverse prognostic influence of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression on Reed-Sternberg (RS) cells, in the setting of early Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treated with ABVD (adriamycin, vinblastine, bleomycin, dacarbazine). Methods and Materials: In the present study we retrospectively investigated the prognostic value of COX-2 expression in a large (n=143), uniformly treated early HL population from the Spanish Network of HL using tissue microarrays. Univariate and multivariate analyses were done, including the most recognized clinical variables and the potential role of administration of adjuvant RT. Results: Median age was 31 years; the expression of COX-2 defined a subgroup with significantly worse prognosis. Considering COX-2{sup +} patients, those who received RT had significantly better 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) (80% vs 54% if no RT; P=.008). In contrast, COX-2{sup −} patients only had a modest, nonsignificant benefit from RT in terms of 5-year PFS (90% vs 79%; P=.13). When we compared the outcome of patients receiving RT considering the expression of COX-2 on RS cells, we found a nonsignificant 10% difference in terms of PFS between COX-2{sup +} and COX-2{sup −} patients (P=.09), whereas the difference between the 2 groups was important (25%) in patients not receiving RT (P=.04). Conclusions: Cyclooxygenase-2 RS cell expression is an adverse independent prognostic factor in early HL. Radiation therapy overcomes the worse prognosis associated with COX-2 expression on RS cells, acting in a chemotherapy-independent way. Cyclooxygenase-2 RS cell expression may be useful for determining patient candidates with early HL to receive consolidation with RT.

  6. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of 5-Oxo-1,4,5,6,7,8 Hexahydroquinoline Derivatives as Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zarghi, Afshin; Sabakhi, Iman; Topuzyan, Vigen; Hajimahdi, Zahra; Daraie, Bahram

    2014-01-01

    A group of regioisomeric 5-oxo-1,4,5,6,7,8 hexahydroquinoline derivatives possessing a COX-2 SO2Me pharmacophore at the para position of the C-2 or C-4 phenyl ring, in conjunction with a C-4 or C-2 phenyl (4-H) or substituted-phenyl ring (4-F,4-Cl,4-Br,4-OMe,4-Me, 4-NO2), were designed for evaluation as selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors. These target 5-oxo-1,4,5,6,7,8 hexahydroquinolines were synthesized via a Hansch condensation reaction. In vitro COX-1/COX-2 isozyme inhibition structure-activity studies identified 7,8-dihydro- 7,7-dimethyl-2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-4-(4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl)quinolin-5(1H,4H,6H)- one (9c) as a potent COX-2 inhibitor (IC50 = 0.17 M) with a high COX-2 selectivity index (S.I. = 97.6) comparable to the reference drug celecoxib (COX-2 IC50 = 0.05 mM; COX-2 S.I= 405). A molecular modeling study where 9c was docked in active site of COX-2 showed that the p-SO2Me substituent on the C-2 phenyl ring is inserted into the secondary COX-2 binding site. The structure activity data acquired indicate that the position of the COX-2 SO2Me pharmacophore and type of substituent are important for COX-2 inhibitory activity. PMID:24711830

  7. Caveolin-1-mediated suppression of cyclooxygenase-2 via a beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef-dependent transcriptional mechanism reduced prostaglandin E2 production and survivin expression.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Diego A; Tapia, Julio C; Fernandez, Jaime G; Torres, Vicente A; Muñoz, Nicolas; Galleguillos, Daniela; Leyton, Lisette; Quest, Andrew F G

    2009-04-01

    Augmented expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and enhanced production of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) are associated with increased tumor cell survival and malignancy. Caveolin-1 is a scaffold protein that has been proposed to function as a tumor suppressor in human cancer cells, although mechanisms underlying this ability remain controversial. Intriguingly, the possibility that caveolin-1 regulates the expression of COX-2 has not been explored. Here we show that augmented caveolin-1 expression in cells with low basal levels of this protein, such as human colon cancer (HT29, DLD-1), breast cancer (ZR75), and embryonic kidney (HEK293T) cells reduced COX-2 mRNA and protein levels and beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef and COX-2 gene reporter activity, as well as the production of PGE(2) and cell proliferation. Moreover, COX-2 overexpression or PGE(2) supplementation increased levels of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein survivin by a transcriptional mechanism, as determined by PCR analysis, survivin gene reporter assays and Western blotting. Furthermore, addition of PGE(2) to the medium prevented effects attributed to caveolin-1-mediated inhibition of beta-catenin-Tcf/Lef-dependent transcription. Finally, PGE(2) reduced the coimmunoprecipitation of caveolin-1 with beta-catenin and their colocalization at the plasma membrane. Thus, by reducing COX-2 expression, caveolin-1 interrupts a feedback amplification loop involving PGE(2)-induced signaling events linked to beta-catenin/Tcf/Lef-dependent transcription of tumor survival genes including cox-2 itself and survivin. PMID:19244345

  8. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of New 2-Phenyl-4H-chromen-4-one Derivatives as Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zarghi, Afshin; Kakhki, Samaneh

    2015-01-01

    In order to develop new selective COX-2 inhibitors, a new series of 2-phenyl-4H-chromen-4-one derivatives possessing a methylsulfonyl pharmacophore group at the para position of the C-4 phenyl ring were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitory activity. In vitro COX-1/COX-2 isozyme inhibition structure-activity studies identified 3-(benzyloxy)-2-[4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl]-4H-chromen-4-one (5d) as a potent COX-2 inhibitor (IC50 = 0.07 μM) with a high COX-2 selectivity index (SI = 287.1) comparable to the reference drug celecoxib (COX-2 IC50 = 0.06 μM; COX-2 SI = 405). A molecular modeling study where 3-(benzyloxy)-2-[4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl]-4H-chromen-4-one (5d) was docked into the active site of COX-2 showed that the p-MeSO2 substituent on the C-4 phenyl ring was well-oriented in the vicinity of the COX-2 secondary pocket (Arg(513), Val(523), and His(90)) and the carbonyl group of the chromene ring could interact with Ser(530). The structure-activity data acquired indicated that the nature and size of the substituent on the C-3 chromene scaffold are important for COX-2 inhibitory activity. Our results also indicated that the chromene moiety constitutes a suitable template to design new COX-2 inhibitors. PMID:26839798

  9. USP22 acts as an oncogene by regulating the stability of cyclooxygenase-2 in non-small cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Haibo; Tian, Yue; Yang, Yang; Hu, Fengqing; Xie, Xiao; Mei, Ju; Ding, Fangbao

    2015-05-08

    The histone ubiquitin hydrolase ubiquitin-specific protease 22 (USP22) is an epigenetic modifier and an oncogene that is upregulated in many types of cancer. In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), aberrant expression of USP22 is a predictor of poor survival, as is high expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Despite its oncogenic role, few substrates of USP22 have been identified and its mechanism of action in cancer remains unclear. Here, we identified COX-2 as a direct substrate of USP22 and showed that its levels are modulated by USP22 mediated deubiquitination. Silencing of USP22 downregulated COX-2, decreased its half-life, and inhibited lung carcinoma cell proliferation by directly interacting with and modulating the stability and activity of COX-2 through the regulation of its ubiquitination status. The findings of the present study suggest a potential mechanism underlying the oncogenic role of USP22 mediated by the modulation of the stability and activity of COX-2. - Highlights: • USP22 interacts with COX-2. • USP22 deubiquitinates and stabilizes COX-2. • USP22 is required for COX-2-mediated upregulation of prostaglandin E2.

  10. Single-dose safety and pharmacokinetic evaluation of fluorocoxib A: pilot study of novel cyclooxygenase-2-targeted optical imaging agent in a canine model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cekanova, Maria; Uddin, Md. Jashim; Legendre, Alfred M.; Galyon, Gina; Bartges, Joseph W.; Callens, Amanda; Martin-Jimenez, Tomas; Marnett, Lawrence J.

    2012-11-01

    We evaluated preclinical single-dose safety, pharmacokinetic properties, and specific uptake of the new optical imaging agent fluorocoxib A in dogs. Fluorocoxib A, N-[(5-carboxy-X-rhodaminyl)but-4-yl]-2-[1-(4-chlorobenzoyl)-5-methoxy-2-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl]acetamide, selectively binds and inhibits the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme, which is overexpressed in many cancers. Safety pilot studies were performed in research dogs following intravenous (i.v.) administration of 0.1 and 1 mg/kg fluorocoxib A. Blood and urine samples collected three days after administration of each dose of fluorocoxib A revealed no evidence of toxicity, and no clinically relevant adverse events were noted on physical examination of exposed dogs over that time period. Pharmacokinetic parameters were assessed in additional research dogs from plasma collected at several time points after i.v. administration of fluorocoxib A using high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. The pharmacokinetic studies using 1 mg/kg showed a peak of fluorocoxib A (92±28 ng/ml) in plasma collected at 0.5 h. Tumor specific uptake of fluorocoxib A was demonstrated using a dog diagnosed with colorectal cancer expressing COX-2. Our data support the safe single-dose administration and in vivo efficacy of fluorocoxib A, suggesting a high potential for successful translation to clinical use as an imaging agent for improved tumor detection in humans.

  11. Localization of cyclooxygenase-2 and prostaglandin E2 receptor EP3 in the rat lumbar spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Beiche, F; Klein, T; Nüsing, R; Neuhuber, W; Goppelt-Struebe, M

    1998-08-14

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is now considered to be the major constitutively expressed COX isozyme in the central nervous system. The present immunocytochemical study details localization of COX-2 immunoreactivity in rat spinal cord along with the expression of prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype EP3. Prominent COX-2 staining was observed in the nuclear envelope of neurons throughout the spinal cord, especially in the superficial dorsal horn laminae and motoneurons of lamina IX, as well as in glial cells of the white matter. Expression of EP3 receptor was strictly confined to afferent terminal areas in the superficial dorsal horns. PMID:9726822

  12. Synthesis and crystal structure of N-[(dimethylamino)methylidene]-4-[1-(4-nitrophenyl)-1H-tetrazol-5-yl]-benzenesulfonamide: Molecular docking and bioassay studies as cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawabrah Al-Hourani, Baker; El-Barghouthi, Musa I.; McDonald, Robert; Al-Awaida, Wajdy; Sharma, Sai Kiran; Wuest, Frank

    2016-09-01

    The synthesis of N-[(dimethylamino)methylidene]-4-[1-(4-nitrophenyl)-1H-tetrazol-5-yl]benzenesulfonamide (3) has been easily approached and the structure has been determined by X-ray crystallography. Tetrazole 3 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group C2/c, with the cell parameters determined as a = 35.5408 (18) Å, b = 7.6972 (4) Å, c = 13.0700 (7) Å3, β = 96.8598 (6)°, V = 3549.9 (3) Å3, and Z = 8. Its structure refines to R1 = 0.0341 (for 2986 observed reflections [I ≥ 2σ(I)]) and wR2 = 0.0990 (for all 3637 unique reflections). The aryl rings at the 1- and 5-positions show no conjugation to the tetrazole group, and the [(Dimethylamino)methylene]aminosulfonyl (Me2NCHNSO2) group is disordered, with the two disorder conformers being related by a pseudo mirror plane. In the crystal, intermolecular interactions between adjacent molecule of 3 are dominated by weak (2.4-2.7 Å) CeH…O and CeH…N hydrogen bonds. The molecular docking studies were carried out to understand the interaction of compound 3 within the active site of the cyclooxygenase-2 enzyme, followed by a comparison study with the celecoxib drug as a reference compound. The in vitro bioassay studies of tetrazole 3 toward cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 enzymes showed that compound 3 has no inhibition potency for either enzyme.

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress eIF2α-ATF4 pathway-mediated cyclooxygenase-2 induction regulates cadmium-induced autophagy in kidney.

    PubMed

    Luo, B; Lin, Y; Jiang, S; Huang, L; Yao, H; Zhuang, Q; Zhao, R; Liu, H; He, C; Lin, Z

    2016-01-01

    The heavy metal cadmium (Cd) is nephrotoxic. Recent studies show that autophagy plays an essential role in Cd-induced kidney injury. However, the mechanisms of Cd-induced kidney injury accompanied by autophagy are still obscure. In the present study, we first confirmed that Cd induced kidney damage and dysfunction, along with autophagy, both in vivo and in vitro. Then, we observed that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and the eIF2α-ATF4 pathway of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress were induced by Cd in both kidney tissues and cultured cells. Further studies showed that inhibition of COX-2 with celecoxib or RNA interference (RNAi) inhibited the Cd-induced autophagy in kidney cells. In addition, blocking ER stress with 4-phenylbutyrate or RNAi partially counteracted COX-2 overexpression and autophagy induced by Cd, which suggested that ER stress was required for Cd-induced kidney autophagy. Significantly, our results showed that Cd activated ATF4 and induced its translocation to the nucleus. Knockdown of ATF4 inhibited Cd-induced COX-2 overexpression. While COX-2 overexpression is involved in renal dysfunction, there is no prior report on the role of COX-2 in autophagy regulation. The results of the current study suggest a novel molecular mechanism that the ER stress eIF2α-ATF4 pathway-mediated COX-2 overexpression contributes to Cd-induced kidney autophagy and injury. The present study implies that COX-2 may be a potential target for therapy against Cd-induced nephrotoxicity. PMID:27253415

  14. New Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase and Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors, Nalidixic Acid Linked to Isatin Schiff Bases via Certain l-Amino Acid Bridges.

    PubMed

    Naglah, Ahmed M; Ahmed, Atallah F; Wen, Zhi-Hong; Al-Omar, Mohamed A; Amr, Abd El-Galil E; Kalmouch, Atef

    2016-01-01

    A series of new Schiff bases were synthesized by condensation of isatins with the nalidixic acid-l-amino acid hydrazides. Prior to hydrazide formation, a peptide linkage has been prepared via coupling of nalidixic acid with appropriate l-amino acid methyl esters to yield 3a-c. The chemical structures of the new Schiff bases (5b and 5d-h) were confirmed by means of IR, NMR, mass spectroscopic, and elemental analyses. The anti-inflammatory activity of these Schiff bases was evaluated via measurement of the expressed inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 macrophage cells model. The Schiff bases exhibited significant dual inhibitory effect against the induction of the pro-inflammatory iNOS and COX-2 proteins with variable potencies. However, they strongly down-regulated the iNOS expression to the level of 16.5% ± 7.4%-42.2% ± 19.6% compared to the effect on COX-2 expression (<56.4% ± 3.1% inhibition) at the same concentration (10 μM). The higher iNOS inhibition activity of the tested Schiff bases, relative to that of COX-2, seems to be a reflection of the combined suppressive effects exerted by their nalidixic acid, isatins (4a-c), and l-amino acid moieties against iNOS expression. These synthesized nalidixic acid-l-amino acid-isatin conjugates can be regarded as a novel class of anti-inflammatory antibacterial agents. PMID:27092477

  15. Regulation of p53, nuclear factor {kappa}B and cyclooxygenase-2 expression by bromelain through targeting mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Kalra, Neetu; Bhui, Kulpreet; Roy, Preeti; Srivastava, Smita; George, Jasmine; Prasad, Sahdeo; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2008-01-01

    Bromelain is a pharmacologically active compound, present in stems and immature fruits of pineapples (Ananas cosmosus), which has been shown to have anti-edematous, anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic and anti-metastatic properties. In the present study, antitumorigenic activity of bromelain was recorded in 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-initiated and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-promoted 2-stage mouse skin model. Results showed that bromelain application delayed the onset of tumorigenesis and reduced the cumulative number of tumors, tumor volume and the average number of tumors/mouse. To establish a cause and effect relationship, we targeted the proteins involved in the cell death pathway. Bromelain treatment resulted in upregulation of p53 and Bax and subsequent activation of caspase 3 and caspase 9 with concomitant decrease in antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 in mouse skin. Since persistent induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is frequently implicated in tumorigenesis and is regulated by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B), we also investigated the effect of bromelain on Cox-2 and NF-{kappa}B expression. Results showed that bromelain application significantly inhibited Cox-2 and inactivated NF-{kappa}B by blocking phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. In addition, bromelain treatment attenuated DMBA-TPA-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Akt. Taken together, we conclude that bromelain induces apoptosis-related proteins along with inhibition of NF-{kappa}B-driven Cox-2 expression by blocking the MAPK and Akt/protein kinase B signaling in DMBA-TPA-induced mouse skin tumors, which may account for its anti-tumorigenic effects.

  16. Cannabidiolic acid as a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitory component in cannabis.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Shuso; Misawa, Koichiro; Yamamoto, Ikuo; Watanabe, Kazuhito

    2008-09-01

    In the present study it was revealed that cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) selectively inhibited cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 activity with an IC(50) value (50% inhibition concentration) around 2 microM, having 9-fold higher selectivity than COX-1 inhibition. In contrast, Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (Delta(9)-THCA) was a much less potent inhibitor of COX-2 (IC(50) > 100 microM). Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs containing a carboxyl group in their chemical structures such as salicylic acid are known to inhibit nonselectively both COX-1 and COX-2. CBDA and Delta(9)-THCA have a salicylic acid moiety in their structures. Thus, the structural requirements for the CBDA-mediated COX-2 inhibition were next studied. There is a structural difference between CBDA and Delta(9)-THCA; phenolic hydroxyl groups of CBDA are freed from the ring formation with the terpene moiety, although Delta(9)-THCA has dibenzopyran ring structure. It was assumed that the whole structure of CBDA is important for COX-2 selective inhibition because beta-resorcylic acid itself did not inhibit COX-2 activity. Methylation of the carboxylic acid moiety of CBDA led to disappearance of COX-2 selectivity. Thus, it was suggested that the carboxylic acid moiety in CBDA is a key determinant for the inhibition. Furthermore, the crude extract of cannabis containing mainly CBDA was shown to have a selective inhibitory effect on COX-2. Taken together, these lines of evidence in this study suggest that naturally occurring CBDA in cannabis is a selective inhibitor for COX-2. PMID:18556441

  17. Hispolon Protects against Acute Liver Damage in the Rat by Inhibiting Lipid Peroxidation, Proinflammatory Cytokine, and Oxidative Stress and Downregulating the Expressions of iNOS, COX-2, and MMP-9

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guan-Jhong; Deng, Jeng-Shyan; Chiu, Chuan-Sung; Liao, Jung-Chun; Hsieh, Wen-Tsong; Sheu, Ming-Jyh; Wu, Chieh-Hsi

    2012-01-01

    The hepatoprotective potential of hispolon against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver damage was evaluated in preventive models in rats. Male rats were intraperitoneally treated with hispolon or silymarin once daily for 7 consecutive days. One hour after the final hispolon or silymarin treatment, the rats were injected with CCl4. Administration with hispolon or silymarin significantly decreased the alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels in serum and increased the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione (GSH) content and decreased the malondialdehyde (MDA) content in liver compared with CCl4-treated group. Liver histopathology also showed that hispolon reduced the incidence of liver lesions induced by CCl4. In addition, hispolon decreased nitric oxide (NO) production and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activation in CCl4-treated rats. We also examined the involvement of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 in the development of CCl4-induced liver damage in rats. Hispolon inhibited the expression of MMP-9 protein, indicating that MMP-9 played an important role in the development of CCl4-induced rat liver damage. Therefore, we speculate that hispolon protects rats from liver damage through their prophylactic redox balancing ability and anti-inflammation capacity. PMID:22013489

  18. 6,6'-bieckol isolated from Ecklonia cava protects oxidative stress through inhibiting expression of ROS and proinflammatory enzymes in high-glucose-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi-Hwa; Heo, Soo-Jin; Park, Pyo-Jam; Moon, Sang-Ho; Sung, Si-Heung; Jeon, Byong-Tae; Lee, Seung-Hong

    2014-09-01

    Hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress accelerates endothelial cell dysfunctions, which cause various complications of diabetes. The protective effects of 6,6'-bieckol (BEK), one of phlorotannin compound purified from Ecklonia cava against high-glucose-induced oxidative stress was investigated using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), which is susceptible to oxidative stress. High glucose (30 mM) treatment induced HUVECs' cell death, but BEK, at concentration 10 or 50 μg/ml, significantly inhibited the high-glucose-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, treatment with BEK dose-dependently decreased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and nitric oxide level increased by high glucose. In addition, high glucose levels induced the overexpressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) proteins in HUVECs, but BEK treatment reduced the overexpressions of these proteins. These findings indicate that BEK is a potential therapeutic agent that will prevent diabetic endothelial dysfunction and related complications. PMID:25086922

  19. Cyclooxygenase-2 knockdown using retinoic acid chalcone (RAC), a promising therapeutic strategy for colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Chao; Wang, Qiong; Xu, Zhe; Li, Wei-Su; Chen, Che; Yao, Xue-Quan; Liu, Fu-Kun

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid is an effective agent in the treatment of epithelial and hematological malignancies. The present study demonstrates that retinoic acid chalcone (RAC), an analogue of retinoic acid inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in HCT-15 and CT26.WT colon cancer cell lines. In HCT-15 cells the percentage of apoptotic cells increased from 32.4 ± 3, 45.0 ± 3 to 72.6 ± 5% respectively at 10, 15 and 20 μg/mL compared to 3.7% in control. Similarly in CT26.WT cells the percentage increased from 28.6 ± 3, 41.2 ± 3 to 65.4 ± 5% on treatment with 10, 15 and 20 μg/mL concentrations of RAC after 72 h compared to 2.9 ± 1% in control. Western blotting, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis and reverse transcription-PCR assays were used to investigate these effects. RAC inhibited the overexpression of COX-2, PGE2 and PGE2 receptor (EP1 and EP4) in the colon cancer cell lines. RAC mediated inhibition of cell growth and induction of apoptosis through COX-2 inhibition was also confirmed by treating the HCT-15 and CT26.WT colon cancer cells with COX-2 inhibitor, indomethacin and transfection of cells with COX-2 small interfering RNA. In nude mice with tumor xenografts, treatment with RAC-supplemented diet caused inhibition of COX-2, PGE2, and PGE2 receptors (EP1, EP3, and EP4) in tumors. Thus RAC can be a potential candidate for the treatment of colon cancer through the inhibition of COX-2 expression and subsequent inhibition of PGE2 and PGE2 receptors. PMID:26269760

  20. The cyclin-dependent kinase 2 inhibitor down-regulates interleukin-1beta-mediated induction of cyclooxygenase-2 expression in human lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Ali, M Aktar; Nandi, Animesh; Carreon, Peter; Choy, Hak; Saha, Debabrata

    2006-02-01

    Overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is frequently observed in several human cancers, including lung, colon, and head and neck. Malignancies are also associated with the dysregulation of cell cycle events and concomitant elevated activity of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK). CDK2 is a key cell cycle regulatory protein that controls the transition of cells from G(1) to S phase. In this study, we furnish several lines of evidence that show a functional role for the CDK2 in interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta)-induced COX-2 expression in H358 human non-small cell lung carcinoma cell line by blocking CDK2 activity. First, we show that BMS-387032, a potent CDK2 inhibitor, blocks IL-1beta-induced expression as well as steady-state mRNA levels of COX-2. Second, we show that small interfering RNA that abrogates CDK2 expression also blocks IL-1beta-induced COX-2 expression. Third, results from in vitro kinase assays clearly show that IL-1beta induces CDK2 activity in H358 cells and this activity is significantly inhibited by BMS-387032. Moreover, CDK2 inhibition blocks IL-1beta-induced binding to the NF-IL6 element of the COX-2 promoter and inhibits transcription of the COX-2 gene. We also observed that BMS-387032 does not inhibit endogenous expression of COX-2 or prostaglandin synthesis in lung carcinoma cells. Finally, we provide evidence showing that IL-1beta-induced signaling events, such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, phosphorylated stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase, phosphorylated AKT, and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, are not inhibited by CDK2 inhibitor. Taken together, the data suggest that CDK2 activity may play an important event in the IL-1beta-induced COX-2 expression and prostaglandin E(2) synthesis and might represent a novel target for BMS-387032. PMID:16452236

  1. Statins Modulate Cyclooxygenase-2 and Microsomal Prostaglandin E Synthase-1 in Human Hepatic Myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Mouawad, Charbel A; Mrad, May F; El-Achkar, Ghewa A; Abdul-Sater, Ali; Nemer, Georges M; Creminon, Christophe; Lotersztajn, Sophie; Habib, Aïda

    2016-05-01

    Statins have been shown to exert anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrogenic properties in the liver. In the present study, we explored the mechanisms underlying anti-fibrogenic effects of statins in isolated hepatic myofibroblasts and focused on cyclooxyegnase-2, a major anti-proliferative pathway in these cells. We show that simvastatin and fluvastatin inhibit thymidine incorporation in hMF in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of cells with NS398, a COX-2 inhibitor, partially blunted this effect. cAMP levels, essential to the inhibition of hMF proliferation, were increased by statins and inhibited by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Since statins modify prenylation of some important proteins in gene expression, we investigated the targets involved using selective inhibitors of prenyltransferases. Inhibition of geranylgeranylation resulted in the induction of COX-2 and mPGES-1. Using gel retardation assays, we further demonstrated that statins potentially activated the NFκB and CRE/E-box binding for COX-2 promoter and the binding of GC-rich regions and GATA for mPGES-1. Together these data demonstrate that statin limit hepatic myofibroblasts proliferation via a COX-2 and mPGES-1 dependent pathway. These data suggest that statin-dependent increase of prostaglandin in hMF contributes to its anti-fibrogenic effect. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1176-1186, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26477987

  2. Cyclic stretch induces cyclooxygenase-2 gene expression in vascular endothelial cells via activation of nuclear factor kappa-{beta}

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Haige; Hiroi, Toyoko; Hansen, Baranda S.; Rade, Jeffrey J.

    2009-11-27

    Vascular endothelial cells respond to biomechanical forces, such as cyclic stretch and shear stress, by altering gene expression. Since endothelial-derived prostanoids, such as prostacyclin and thromboxane A{sub 2}, are key mediators of endothelial function, we investigated the effects of cyclic stretch on the expression of genes in human umbilical vein endothelial cells controlling prostanoid synthesis: cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), prostacyclin synthase (PGIS) and thromboxane A{sub 2} synthase (TXAS). COX-2 and TXAS mRNAs were upregulated by cyclic stretch for 24 h. In contrast, PGIS mRNA was decreased and stretch had no effect on COX-1 mRNA expression. We further show that stretch-induced upregulation of COX-2 is mediated by activation of the NF-{kappa}{beta} signaling pathway.

  3. Rational Design of Small Peptides for Optimal Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2: Development of a Highly Effective Anti-Inflammatory Agent.

    PubMed

    Singh, Palwinder; Kaur, Sukhmeet; Kaur, Jagroop; Singh, Gurjit; Bhatti, Rajbir

    2016-04-28

    Among the small peptides 2-31, (H)Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu(OMe) (30) reduced prostaglandin production of COX-2 with an IC50 of 60 nM relative to 6000 nM for COX-1. The 5 mg kg(-1) dose of compound 30 rescued albino mice by 80% from capsaicin-induced paw licking and recovered it by 60% from carrageenan-induced inflammation. The mode of action of compound 30 for targeting COX-2, iNOS, and VGSC was investigated by using substance P, l-arginine, and veratrine, respectively, as biomarkers. The interactions of 30 with COX-2 were supported by isothermal calorimetry experiments showing a Ka of 6.10 ± 1.10 × 10(4) M(-1) and ΔG of -100.3 kJ mol(-1) in comparison to a Ka 0.41 × 10(3) ± 0.09 M(-1) and ΔG of -19.2 ± 0.06 kJ mol(-1) for COX-1. Moreover, compound 30 did not show toxicity up to a 2000 mg kg(-1) dose. Hence, we suggest peptide 30 as a highly potent and promising candidate for further development into an anti-inflammatory drug. PMID:27019010

  4. Clinical significance of cyclooxygenase-2 expression in extranodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Su Jung; Yang, Woo-Ick; Shin, Eunah; Koom, Woong Sub; Kim, Yong Bae; Cho, Jae Ho; Suh, Chang Ok; Kim, Joo Hang; Kim, Gwi Eon . E-mail: gekim@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether there are any differences in therapeutic response, patterns of systemic recurrence, and prognosis of patients with extranodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type, by the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression. Patients and Methods: Thirty-four patients with Ann Arbor Stage I and II extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma who underwent chemotherapy or radiotherapy, or both, were retrospectively reviewed. These patients were divided into two groups according to their immunohistochemical staining for COX-2 expressions: a COX-2-negative group (n = 10 patients) and a COX-2-positive group (n = 24 patients). The treatment response, patterns of treatment failure, and survival data for the patients were compared between the COX-2-positive and negative groups. Results: There was no significant difference in the clinical profiles between the COX-2-negative and COX-2-positive groups. All patients (100%) in the COX-2-negative group achieved complete response after initial treatment, whereas only 14 patients (58%) in the COX-2-positive group achieved complete response (p = 0.03). Compared with the patients in the COX-2-negative group, those in the COX-2-positive group had a significantly lower 2-year systemic recurrence-free survival rate (100% for the COX-2-negative group vs. 54% for the COX-2-positive group) (p = 0.02) and a decreased 5-year overall survival rate (70% for the COX-2-negative group vs. 32% for the COX-2-positive group) (p = 0.06). Conclusion: Cyclooxygenase-2 expression can serve as a predictive factor for poor treatment response, higher systemic recurrence, and unfavorable prognosis in patients with extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type.

  5. Lack of association between the cyclooxygenase 2 -765G>C polymorphism and prostate cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Y-Q; Li, Y U; Xiao, W-D; Wang, G-X; Li, Y O

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between the cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) -765G>C (rs20417) polymorphism and prostate cancer (PC) risk using meta-analysis. A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar databases by using the terms "cyclooxygenase-2/COX-2/PTGs2", "polymorphism" or "variation", and "prostate" and "cancer" or "carcinoma" to identify relevant articles up to June 14, 2014. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were assessed for PC risk associated with COX2 -765G>C polymorphism using fixed- and random-effect models. We identified a total of nine publications, including 5952 cases and 5078 controls, to investigate the effect of COX2 -765G>C on PC risk, and found no significant association in any genetic model tested (CC vs GG: OR = 0.993, 95%CI = 0.923-1.068; GC+CC vs GG: OR = 1.041, 95%CI = 0.931-1.103; CC vs GC+GG: OR = 0.858, 95%CI = 0.689-1.067; CC vs GG: OR = 0.871, 95%CI = 0.689-1.086; GC vs GG: OR = 1.032, 95%CI = 0.945-1.127). Power analysis and tests for publication bias ensured the reliability of our results. This meta-analysis suggested that the functional COX2 -765G>C polymorphism, located in the COX2 gene promoter, is unlikely to be associated with PC risk. However, additional larger, well-designed studies are still required to reach a conclusive result on this issue. PMID:26535654

  6. Regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression by cAMP response element and mRNA stability in a human airway epithelial cell line exposed to zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Weidong Silbajoris, Robert A.; Cao Dongsun; Bromberg, Philip A.; Zhang Qiao; Peden, David B.; Samet, James M.

    2008-09-01

    Exposure to zinc-laden particulate matter in ambient and occupational settings has been associated with proinflammatory responses in the lung. Cyclooxygenase 2-derived eicosanoids are important modulators of airway inflammation. In this study, we characterized the transcriptional and posttranscriptional events that regulate COX-2 expression in a human bronchial epithelial cell line BEAS-2B exposed to Zn{sup 2+}. Zn{sup 2+} exposure resulted in pronounced increases in COX-2 mRNA and protein expression, which were prevented by pretreatment with the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, implying the involvement of transcriptional regulation. This was supported by the observation of increased COX-2 promoter activity in Zn{sup 2+}-treated BEAS-2B cells. Mutation of the cAMP response element (CRE), but not the {kappa}B-binding sites in the COX-2 promoter markedly reduced COX-2 promoter activity induced by Zn{sup 2+}. Inhibition of NF{kappa}B activation did not block Zn{sup 2+}-induced COX-2 expression. Measurement of mRNA stability demonstrated that Zn{sup 2+} exposure impaired the degradation of COX-2 mRNA in BEAS-2B cells. This message stabilization effect of Zn{sup 2+} exposure was shown to be dependent on the integrity of the 3'-untranslated region found in the COX-2 transcript. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the CRE and mRNA stability regulates COX-2 expression induced in BEAS-2B cells exposed to extracellular Zn{sup 2+}.

  7. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor-Dependent Retention of Nuclear HuR Suppresses Cigarette Smoke-Induced Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression Independent of DNA-Binding

    PubMed Central

    Zago, Michela; Sheridan, Jared A.; Nair, Parameswaran; Rico de Souza, Angela; Gallouzi, Imed-Eddine; Rousseau, Simon; Di Marco, Sergio; Hamid, Qutayba; Eidelman, David H.; Baglole, Carolyn J.

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor that responds to man-made environmental toxicants, has emerged as an endogenous regulator of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) by a mechanism that is poorly understood. In this study, we first used AhR-deficient (AhR−/−) primary pulmonary cells, together with pharmacological tools to inhibit new RNA synthesis, to show that the AhR is a prominent factor in the destabilization of Cox-2 mRNA. The destabilization of Cox-2 mRNA and subsequent suppression of cigarette smoke-induced COX-2 protein expression by the AhR was independent of its ability to bind the dioxin response element (DRE), thereby differentiating the DRE-driven toxicological AhR pathway from its anti-inflammatory abilities. We further describe that the AhR destabilizes Cox-2 mRNA by sequestering HuR within the nucleus. The role of HuR in AhR stabilization of Cox-2 mRNA was confirmed by knockdown of HuR, which resulted in rapid Cox-2 mRNA degradation. Finally, in the lungs of AhR−/− mice exposed to cigarette smoke, there was little Cox-2 mRNA despite robust COX-2 protein expression, a finding that correlates with almost exclusive cytoplasmic HuR within the lungs of AhR−/− mice. Therefore, we propose that the AhR plays an important role in suppressing the expression of inflammatory proteins, a function that extends beyond the ability of the AhR to respond to man-made toxicants. These findings open the possibility that a DRE-independent AhR pathway may be exploited therapeutically as an anti-inflammatory target. PMID:24086407

  8. Cyclooxygenase-2 is widely expressed in atherosclerotic lesions affecting native and transplanted human coronary arteries and colocalizes with inducible nitric oxide synthase and nitrotyrosine particularly in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Baker, C S; Hall, R J; Evans, T J; Pomerance, A; Maclouf, J; Creminon, C; Yacoub, M H; Polak, J M

    1999-03-01

    Inflammation appears to have a major role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions affecting native and transplanted coronary arteries. The subsequent risk of plaque rupture and acute ischemic events correlates with the degree of inflammation and may be modified by aspirin, an anti-inflammatory cyclooxygenase inhibitor. Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) are involved in the inflammatory response via the rapid and exaggerated production of prostanoids and nitric oxide, both of which may have proatherosclerotic effects. These effects may be mediated by the formation of peroxynitrite in the case of nitric oxide and involve "cross talk" between the two enzyme systems. This study aimed to investigate native and transplant atherosclerosis for the presence and distribution of Cox-2 and iNOS. Immunocytochemical studies were performed on atherosclerotic lesions from patients with native (n=12) and transplant (n=5) coronary disease by using antibodies to Cox-2, iNOS, and nitrotyrosine (an indicator of peroxynitrite production). Control tissue was obtained from unused donor hearts and at the time of autopsy. Cox-2 and iNOS colocalized predominantly in macrophages/foam cells in both types of atherosclerosis. Cox-2 expression was also detected in medial smooth muscle cells and endothelial cells, including those of the vasa vasorum. Nitrotyrosine was found in the same distribution as that of iNOS and was colocalized with Cox-2 in macrophages. Cox-2 and iNOS are coexpressed in native and transplant atherosclerosis, possibly allowing for interaction between the enzymes and suggesting an alternative mechanism for the benefits of aspirin via inhibition of Cox-2 activity. PMID:10073969

  9. Activation of macrophage peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma by diclofenac results in the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 protein and the synthesis of anti-inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Ayoub, Samir S; Botting, Regina M; Joshi, Amrish N; Seed, Michael P; Colville-Nash, Paul R

    2009-07-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is an inducible isoform of the COX family of enzymes central to the synthesis of pro-inflammatory prostaglandins. Induction of COX-2 is mediated by many endogenous and exogenous molecules that include pro-inflammatory cytokines and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). It has been demonstrated that COX-2 can also be induced by diclofenac in cultured J774.2 macrophages. This induction was delayed compared to COX-2 induced by LPS and paracetamol selectively inhibited activity of this protein. The aim of the present study was to determine the transcription factor involved in the production of COX-2 after treatment of J774.2 cells with 500 microM diclofenac. Pre-treatment of cells with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) antagonists GW9662 (0.1-1 microM) or biphenol A Diglycidyl Ether (100-200 microM) resulted in reduction of the induction of COX-2 by diclofenac, but not by LPS. Induction of COX-2 by the PPAR-gamma agonist 15deoxyDelta(12,14)prostaglandin J(2) was also reduced when the cells were pre-treated with the PPAR-gamma antagonists BADGE or GW9662. On the other hand, pre-treatment of cells with the nuclear factor-kappa-B (NF-kappaB) Super-repressor IkappaBalpha (150-600 nM) reduced the induction of COX-2 by LPS, but not by diclofenac. We, therefore, have identified that PPAR-gamma activation is a requirement for COX-2 induction after diclofenac stimulation of J774.2 cells. These results along with the finding that treatment of J774.2 macrophages with diclofenac resulted in the release of the anti-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-beta suggest that the diclofenac-induced COX-2 protein may possess anti-inflammatory actions. PMID:19219624

  10. Coordinate up-regulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor and cyclo-oxygenase-2 gene expression in human colorectal cells and in colorectal adenocarcinoma biopsies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lum, D. F.; McQuaid, K. R.; Gilbertson, V. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1999-01-01

    Many colorectal cancers have high levels of cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2), an enzyme that metabolizes the essential fatty acids into prostaglandins. Since the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) is involved in the uptake of essential fatty acids, we studied the effect of LDL on growth and gene regulation in colorectal cancer cells. DiFi cells grown in lipoprotein-deficient sera (LPDS) grew more slowly than cells with LDL. LDLr antibody caused significant inhibition of tumor cell growth but did not affect controls. In addition, LDL uptake did not change in the presence of excess LDL, suggesting that ldlr mRNA lacks normal feedback regulation in some colorectal cancers. Analysis of the ldlr mRNA showed that excess LDL in the medium did not cause down-regulation of the message even after 24 hr. The second portion of the study examined the mRNA expression of ldlr and its co-regulation with cox-2 in normal and tumor specimens from patients with colorectal adenocarcinomas. The ratio of tumor:paired normal mucosa of mRNA expression of ldlr and of cox-2 was measured in specimens taken during colonoscopy. ldlr and cox-2 transcripts were apparent in 11 of 11 carcinomas. There was significant coordinate up-regulation both of ldlr and of cox-2 in 6 of 11 (55%) tumors compared with normal colonic mucosa. There was no up-regulation of cox-2 without concomitant up-regulation of ldlr. These data suggest that the LDLr is abnormally regulated in some colorectal tumors and may play a role in the up-regulation of cox-2. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Apoptotic cell-derived sphingosine-1-phosphate promotes HuR-dependent cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA stabilization and protein expression.

    PubMed

    Johann, Axel M; Weigert, Andreas; Eberhardt, Wolfgang; Kuhn, Anne-Marie; Barra, Vera; von Knethen, Andreas; Pfeilschifter, Josef M; Brüne, Bernhard

    2008-01-15

    Removal of apoptotic cells by phagocytes is considered a pivotal immune regulatory process. Although considerable knowledge has been obtained on the postphagocytic macrophage phenotype, there is little information on molecular mechanisms, which provoke macrophage polarization. In this study, we show that human apoptotic Jurkat cells (AC) or AC-conditioned medium (CM) rapidly induces cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in mouse RAW264.7 macrophages via sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). Pharmacological inhibition of S1P release from AC or using CM from cells with a knockdown of sphingosine kinase 2 in human MCF-7 cells abrogates this effect. Expression of COX-2 resulted from an increase in mRNA stability via its 3'-untranslated region (UTR), shown by COX-2-3'-UTR and AU-rich element-driven reporter assays. Western analysis corroborated increased nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of the RNA-binding protein HuR after CM treatment. RNA EMSA analysis revealed an S1P- and CM-mediated increase in HuR-RNA binding to a COX-2-specific UTR, whereas HuR knockdown pointed to its importance for S1P in CM-induced COX-2 expression. Immunofluorescence microscopy of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and ELISA analysis of PGE2 revealed activation of PLA2 and production of PGE2 in response to CM but not S1P. S1P, released from AC, uses HuR to stabilize COX-2 mRNA and thus to increase COX-2 protein expression. However, only CM also activates PLA2 to provide the substrate for COX-2. Our data underscore the importance of S1P in AC-mediated immune regulation, by stabilizing COX-2 mRNA in macrophages, a prerequisite for PGE2 formation. PMID:18178864

  12. Topical Application of a Bioadhesive Black Raspberry Gel Modulates Gene Expression and Reduces Cyclooxygenase 2 Protein in Human Premalignant Oral Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Mallery, Susan R.; Zwick, Jared C.; Pei, Ping; Tong, Meng; Larsen, Peter E.; Shumway, Brian S.; Lu, Bo; Fields, Henry W.; Mumper, Russell J.; Stoner, Gary D.

    2010-01-01

    Reduced expression of proapoptotic and terminal differentiation genes in conjunction with increased levels of the proinflammatory and angiogenesis-inducing enzymes, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), correlate with malignant transformation of oral intraepithelial neoplasia (IEN). Accordingly, this study investigated the effects of a 10% (w/w) freeze-dried black raspberry gel on oral IEN histopathology, gene expression profiles, intraepithelial COX-2 and iNOS proteins, and microvascular densities. Our laboratories have shown that freeze-dried black raspberries possess antioxidant properties and also induce keratinocyte apoptosis and terminal differentiation. Oral IEN tissues were hemisected to provide samples for pretreatment diagnoses and establish baseline biochemical and molecular variables. Treatment of the remaining lesional tissue (0.5 g gel applied four times daily for 6 weeks) began 1 week after the initial biopsy. RNA was isolated from snap-frozen IEN lesions for microarray analyses, followed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR validation. Additional epithelial gene-specific quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analyses facilitated the assessment of target tissue treatment effects. Surface epithelial COX-2 and iNOS protein levels and microvascular densities were determined by image analysis quantified immunohistochemistry. Topical berry gel application uniformly suppressed genes associated with RNA processing, growth factor recycling, and inhibition of apoptosis. Although the majority of participants showed posttreatment decreases in epithelial iNOS and COX-2 proteins, only COX-2 reductions were statistically significant. These data show that berry gel application modulated oral IEN gene expression profiles, ultimately reducing epithelial COX-2 protein. In a patient subset, berry gel application also reduced vascular densities in the superficial connective tissues and induced genes associated with keratinocyte

  13. Does miRNA-155 Promote Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Cancer?

    PubMed

    Comer, Brian S

    2015-11-01

    Preclinical Research MicroRNA (miR)-155 and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 are both elevated in numerous cancers including colorectal cancer. MiR-155 enhances COX-2 expression and is an established regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and inflammation. Inhibition of miR-155 or COX-2 exhibit similar negative effects on tumorigenicity. Thus, it is hypothesized that miR-155 may be a promising target for antagonizing COX-2 expression in colorectal and other cancers. PMID:26303353

  14. Silkworm Thorn Stem Extract Targets RSK2 and Suppresses Solar UV-Induced Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong-Eun; Lee, Ki Won

    2015-01-01

    Excessive exposure to solar UV (sUV) is associated with numerous human skin disorders, such as carcinogenesis, skin photoaging and skin inflammation. Silkworm Thorn (Cudraniatricuspidata, SW) is a plant belonging to the Moraceae family and widely present throughout Korea, China, and Japan. Most parts of the tree (including the fruit, leaf, stem, root, and bark) is consumable as a functional food or tea. In this study, we found that SW extract (SWE) inhibited the elevated expression of sUV-induced cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 levels in both HaCaT and JB6 cells. Levels of nuclear factor-κB and activator protein-1, two crucial transcription factors involved in COX-2 expression, were elevated by sUV treatment. Treatment with SWE abolished this activation. SWE also inhibited sUV-induced histone H3 phosphorylation. However, sUV-induced phosphorylation of Akt, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 kinase remained unchanged in the presence of SWE. SWE inhibited RSK2 activity, and pull-down assays using SWE-Sepharose beads revealed that SWE binds directly with RSK2 in an ATP-competitive manner. These results suggest a potential for SWE to be developed as a cosmeceutical material and functional food constituent for the promotion of skin health. PMID:26506342

  15. Requirement of cyclooxygenase-2 expression and prostaglandins for human prostate cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Nithipatikom, Kasem; Isbell, Marilyn A; Lindholm, Paul F; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Kaul, Sushma; Campell, William B

    2002-01-01

    The PC-3 Low Invasive cells and the PC-3 High Invasive cells were used to investigate the correlation of the COX-2 expression and its arachidonic acid metabolites, prostaglandins, with their invasiveness through Matrigel using a Boyden chamber assay. The COX-2 expression in PC-3 High Invasive cells was approximately 3-fold higher than in PC-3 Low Invasive cells while the COX-1 expression was similar in both cell sublines. When incubated with arachidonic acid, PGE2 was the major prostaglandin produced by these cells. PC-3 High Invasive cells produced PGE2 approximately 2.5-fold higher than PC-3 Low Invasive cells. PGD2 was the second most abundant prostaglandin produced by these cells. Both indomethacin (a nonspecific COX inhibitor) and NS-398 (a specific COX-2 inhibitor) inhibited the production of prostaglandins and the cell invasion. PGE2 alone did not induce the cell invasion of PC-3 Low Invasive cells. However, PGE2 reversed the inhibition of cell invasion by NS-398 and enhanced the cell invasion of the PC-3 High Invasive cells. In contrast, PGD2 slightly inhibited the cell invasion. These results suggest that in the PC-3 Low Invasive cells, COX-2-derived PGE2 may not be sufficient to induce cell invasion while in the PC-3 High Invasive cells, PGE2 may be sufficient to act as an enhancer for the cell invasion. Further, PGD2 may represent a weak inhibitor and counteracts the effect of PGE2 in the cell invasion. PMID:12498388

  16. Activated human B lymphocytes express cyclooxygenase-2 and cyclooxygenase inhibitors attenuate antibody production.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Elizabeth P; Pollock, Stephen J; Pollack, Stephen J; Murant, Thomas I; Bernstein, Steven H; Felgar, Raymond E; Phipps, Richard P

    2005-03-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and target cyclooxygenases 1 and 2 (Cox-1, Cox-2) that are responsible for PG production. Newer Cox-2-selective drugs have been heavily prescribed to quench inflammation. Little is known about whether or not these drugs influence human B lymphocytes and their ability to produce Ab. We report herein that activated human B cells not only highly express Cox-2 and produce PGs, but that the NSAID indomethacin and Cox-2-selective drugs profoundly inhibit the ability of human B cells to produce IgG and IgM in vitro. Human blood B cells highly express Cox-2 mRNA and protein and produce PGs after activation with CD40L, pansorbin, or CD40L plus BCR engagement. Cox-2 is also highly expressed by human tonsil B cells, as shown by immunohistochemistry. Cox-inhibiting drugs modestly affect purified B cell proliferation but profoundly reduce Ab production. The ability of whole blood to produce IgM and IgG following stimulation is also strongly inhibited. In support that Cox-2 plays a seminal role in B lymphocyte Ab production, Cox-2 knockout mice have 64% less IgM and 35% less IgG than normal littermate controls. These findings support that NSAIDs and the new Cox-2-selective drugs have an unsuspected target, the B cell, and attenuate Ab production in humans. Use of NSAIDs may therefore influence autoantibody production in autoimmune diseases and may dampen humoral immunity in response to antigenic challenge/vaccination. PMID:15728468

  17. Remote ischemic precondition prevents radial artery endothelial dysfunction induced by ischemia and reperfusion based on a cyclooxygenase-2-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhen-Bing; Yang, Wen-Xia; Fu, Xiang-Hua; Zhao, Lin-Feng; Gao, Jun-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) and remote ischemic precondition (RIPC) are resistance to ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. They have common protective mechanism. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 participate in the mechanism of IPC. So, the purpose of this study was to determine whether RIPC protects endothelial function of radial artery in human against IR and whether COX-2 involves in this effect. Endothelial IR injury was induced by arm ischemia (20 min) and reperfusion. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the radial artery was measured before and after IR. RIPC (three 5-min cycles of ischemia of the contralateral arm) was applied immediately and 24 h before IR. All volunteers received the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib (200 mg orally twice daily) for 5 days. On day 6, all subjects experienced the same studies as described. FMD was reduced by IR without administration of RIPC (P<0.0001). RIPC prevent this impairment of FMD immediately (P=NS) and at 24 h (P=NS). Nevertheless, the COX-2 inhibiter abolished protective effect of RIPC at 24 h (P=NS), but not immediately (P=0.001). After administration of the COX-2 inhibiter, post-IR FMD after RIPC performed immediately had significant increase than after RIPC performed at 24 h (P=0.001) and without administration of RIPC (P=0.003). The COX-2 inhibiter made post-IR FMD evidently decrease after RIPC performed at 24 h (P=0.002). RIPC prevents radial artery endothelial dysfunction induced by IR. This protective effect of RIPC in the late phase is mediated by a COX-2-dependent mechanism. PMID:26885023

  18. P38 AND EGF RECEPTOR KINASE-MEDIATED ACTIVATION OF THE PHOSPHATIDYLINOSITOL 3-KINASE/AKT PATHWAY IS REQUIRED FOR ZN2+INDUCED CYCLOOXYGENASE-2 EXPRESSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) expression is induced by physiological and inflammatory stimuli. Regulation of COX-2 expression is stimulus- and cell type-specific. Exposure to Zn2+ has been associated with activation of multiple intracellular signaling pathways as well as the induction...

  19. The G-765C promoter polymorphism in cyclooxygenase-2 (PTGS2), aspirin utilization and cardiovascular disease risk: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclooxygenase-2 derived prostaglandins modulate cardiovascular disease risk. We sought to determine if the reduced function G-765C promoter polymorphism in PTGS2 was associated with incident coronary heart disease (CHD) or ischemic stroke risk, and if this was modified by aspirin utilization. Usin...

  20. A catalytically-inactive snake venom Lys49 phospholipase A₂ homolog induces expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and production of prostaglandins through selected signaling pathways in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Vanessa; de Castro Souto, Pollyana Cristina Maggio; Ramirez Vinolo, Marco Aurélio; Lomonte, Bruno; María Gutiérrez, José; Curi, Rui; Teixeira, Catarina

    2013-05-15

    The effects of a snake venom Lys-49 phospholipase A2 (PLA2) homolog named MT-II, devoid of enzymatic activity, on the biosynthesis of prostaglandins and protein expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and signaling pathways involved were evaluated in mouse macrophages in culture and in peritoneal cells ex vivo. Stimulation of macrophages with MT-II leads to production of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and protein expression of COX-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1). Inhibition of cytosolic PLA2 (cPLA2), but not Ca(2+) independent PLA2 (iPLA2) reduced release of PGD2 and PGE2 and expression of COX-2 induced by MT-II. Inhibition of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) significantly reduced MT-II-induced PGE2, but not PGD2 production and COX-2 expression. Inhibitors of either protein kinase C (PKC), protein tyrosine kinase (PTK), or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways abrogated MT-II-induced NF-κB activation and reduced COX-2 expression and PGE2 release, whereas the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) inhibitor reduced MT-II-induced COX-2 expression and PGD2 production. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) pathway abrogated MT-II-induced NF-κB activation, but affected neither prostaglandins production nor COX-2 expression. MT-II-induced production of PGD2 and PGE2 and COX-2 expression were also observed in vivo after intraperitoneal injection into mice. Collectively, our data demonstrate that a catalytically-inactive PLA2 homolog is capable of inducing prostaglandins biosynthesis and COX-2 expression in macrophages in both in vitro and in vivo models, indicating that the enzymatic activity of PLA2 is not necessary to trigger these effects. MT-II-activated NF-κB, cPLA2 and distinct protein kinases are the principal steps involved in these cellular events. PMID:23416211

  1. Involvement of cyclooxygenase-2 in carbachol-induced positive inotropic response in mouse isolated left atrium.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yukio; Ike, Asako; Tanida, Riyo; Okada, Muneyoshi; Yamawaki, Hideyuki

    2009-12-01

    The mouse heart is expected to have characteristic contractile properties. However, basic information on the function of the mouse heart has not been accumulated sufficiently. In this study, the involvement of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in carbachol (CCh)-induced inotropic response was investigated in mouse isolated left atrium. Influences of CCh and their mechanisms of action on developed tension elicited by electrical stimulation were examined pharmacologically. The presence of COX-2 in atrium was examined by Western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis. CCh (3 microM for 15 min) produced a biphasic inotropic response: a transient decrease in contractile force followed by a late increase. Atropine suppressed the biphasic inotropic response to CCh. A muscarinic M(3) receptor antagonist, 4-diphenyl-acetoxy-N-methlpiperidine, inhibited the late positive inotropic action. Blockade of prostaglandin (PG) E(2) or F(2alpha) receptor by 6-isopropoxy-9-oxoxanthene-2-carboxylic acid (AH6809) or 9alpha, 15R-dihydroxy-11beta-fluoro-15-(2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-2-yl)-16,17,18,19,20-pentanor-prosta 5Z, 13E-dien-1-oic acid (AL8810), respectively, significantly suppressed the positive inotropic response to CCh. A nonselective COX inhibitor, indomethacin, and a selective COX-2 inhibitor, N-[2-(cyclohexyloxy)-4-nitrophenyl]-methanesulfonamide (NS-398) inhibited the positive response. A COX-1 inhibitor, valeroyl salicylate, did not affect the positive response. The positive response was almost completely abolished in the endocardial endothelium-deprived atria. Existence of COX-2 in endocardial endothelium was confirmed by Western blotting and immunohistochemical analysis. The present study indicated that the CCh-induced positive inotropic response was mediated by PGs, possibly PGE(2) and PGF(2alpha), released in part from endocardial endothelium. Furthermore, for the first time, we demonstrated that the production of PGs depended in part on COX-2 in endocardial endothelium through the

  2. Cell cycle regulation and apoptotic cell death in experimental colon carcinogenesis: intervening with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Saini, Manpreet Kaur; Sanyal, Sankar Nath

    2015-01-01

    Relative imbalance in the pathways regulating cell cycle, cell proliferation, or cell death marks a prerequisite for neoplasm. C-phycocyanin, a biliprotein from Spirulina platensis and a selective COX-2 inhibitor along with piroxicam, a traditional nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug was used to investigate the role of cell cycle regulatory proteins and proinflammatory transcription factor NFκB in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH)-induced rat colon carcinogenesis. Cell cycle regulators [cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), CDK4, and p53], NFκB (p65) pathway, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were evaluated by gene and protein expression, whereas apoptosis was studied by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling and apoptotic bleb assay. Molecular docking of ligand protein interaction was done to validate the in vivo results. Cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK2, and CDK4 were overexpressed in DMH, whereas piroxicam and c-phycocyanin promoted the cell cycle arrest by downregulating them. Both drugs mediated apoptosis through p53 activation. Piroxicam and c-phycocyanin also stimulated antiproliferation by restraining PCNA expression and reduced cell survival via inhibiting NFκB (p65) pathway. Molecular docking revealed that phycocyanobilin (a chromophore of c-phycocyanin) interact with DNA binding site of NFκB. Inhibition of cyclin/CDK complex by piroxicam and c-phycocyanin affects the expression of p53 in colon cancer followed by downregulation of NFκB and PCNA levels, thus substantiating the antineoplastic role of these agents. PMID:25825916

  3. Trifluoromethyl Fluorocoxib A Detects Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Inflammatory Tissues and Human Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Fluorocoxib A is an effective COX-2-targeted optical imaging agent, used for in vivo detection of inflammatory tissues and premalignant and malignant tumors that express elevated levels of COX-2 (Uddin et al. Cancer Res. 2010, 70, 3618–3627). In an effort to discover novel optical probes for COX-2, a trifluoromethyl analogue of fluorocoxib A (CF3-fluorocoxib A) was synthesized and evaluated for its ability to inhibit COX-2 in vitro purified enzyme and human cancer cell lines. Kinetic analysis revealed that CF3-fluorocoxib A is a slow, tight binding inhibitor of COX-2 that exhibits low nanomolar inhibitory potency. While CF3-fluorocoxib A and fluorocoxib A are similar in structure, CF3-fluorocoxib A shows improved potency in inhibition of wtCOX-2 and with a series of site-directed COX-2 mutants. After intraperitoneal injection, selective uptake of CF3-fluorocoxib A is detected in inflamed mouse paws compared to noninflamed contralateral paws by optical imaging, and uptake is blocked by pretreatment with the COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib. Selective uptake is also detected in the COX-2-positive human tumor xenografts (1483 HNSCC) as compared with the COX-2-negative tumor xenografts (HCT116) in an in vivo nude mouse tumor model. These in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that binding to COX-2 is the major determinant of uptake of CF3-fluorocoxib A into the inflamed tissues and tumor xenografts. Thus, this new COX-2-targeted imaging probe should find utility in the detection and evaluation of COX-2 status in naturally occurring malignancies. PMID:24900856

  4. Role of cyclooxygenase 2 in protein kinase C beta II-mediated colon carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wangsheng; Murray, Nicole R; Weems, Capella; Chen, Lu; Guo, Huiping; Ethridge, Richard; Ceci, Jeffrey D; Evers, B Mark; Thompson, E Aubrey; Fields, Alan P

    2003-03-28

    Elevated expression of protein kinase C beta II (PKC beta II) is an early promotive event in colon carcinogenesis (Gokmen-Polar, Y., Murray, N. R., Velasco, M. A., Gatalica, Z., and Fields, A. P. (2001) Cancer Res. 61, 1375-1381). Expression of PKC beta II in the colon of transgenic mice leads to hyperproliferation and increased susceptibility to colon carcinogenesis due, at least in part, to repression of transforming growth factor beta type II receptor (TGF-beta RII) expression (Murray, N. R., Davidson, L. A., Chapkin, R. S., Gustafson, W. C., Schattenberg, D. G., and Fields, A. P. (1999) J. Cell Biol., 145, 699-711). Here we report that PKC beta II induces the expression of cyclooxygenase type 2 (Cox-2) in rat intestinal epithelial (RIE) cells in vitro and in transgenic PKC beta II mice in vivo. Cox-2 mRNA increases more than 10-fold with corresponding increases in Cox-2 protein and PGE2 production in RIE/PKC beta II cells. PKC beta II activates the Cox-2 promoter by 2- to 3-fold and stabilizes Cox-2 mRNA by at least 4-fold. The selective Cox-2 inhibitor Celecoxib restores expression of TGF-beta RII both in vitro and in vivo and restores TGF beta-mediated transcription in RIE/PKC beta II cells. Likewise, the omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), which inhibits PKC beta II activity and colon carcinogenesis, causes inhibition of Cox-2 protein expression, re-expression of TGF-beta RII, and restoration of TGF-beta1-mediated transcription in RIE/PKC beta II cells. Our data demonstrate that PKC beta II promotes colon cancer, at least in part, through induction of Cox-2, suppression of TGF-beta signaling, and establishment of a TGF-beta-resistant, hyperproliferative state in the colonic epithelium. Our data define a procarcinogenic PKC beta II --> Cox-2 --> TGF-beta signaling axis within the colonic epithelium, and provide a molecular mechanism by which dietary omega-3 fatty acids and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents such as Celecoxib suppress colon

  5. Cyclooxygenase-2 controls energy homeostasis in mice by de novo recruitment of brown adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Vegiopoulos, Alexandros; Müller-Decker, Karin; Strzoda, Daniela; Schmitt, Iris; Chichelnitskiy, Evgeny; Ostertag, Anke; Berriel Diaz, Mauricio; Rozman, Jan; Hrabe de Angelis, Martin; Nüsing, Rolf M; Meyer, Carola W; Wahli, Walter; Klingenspor, Martin; Herzig, Stephan

    2010-05-28

    Obesity results from chronic energy surplus and excess lipid storage in white adipose tissue (WAT). In contrast, brown adipose tissue (BAT) efficiently burns lipids through adaptive thermogenesis. Studying mouse models, we show that cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, a rate-limiting enzyme in prostaglandin (PG) synthesis, is a downstream effector of beta-adrenergic signaling in WAT and is required for the induction of BAT in WAT depots. PG shifted the differentiation of defined mesenchymal progenitors toward a brown adipocyte phenotype. Overexpression of COX-2 in WAT induced de novo BAT recruitment in WAT, increased systemic energy expenditure, and protected mice against high-fat diet-induced obesity. Thus, COX-2 appears integral to de novo BAT recruitment, which suggests that the PG pathway regulates systemic energy homeostasis. PMID:20448152

  6. Hsp90 inhibition protects against inherited retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Aguilà, Mònica; Bevilacqua, Dalila; McCulley, Caroline; Schwarz, Nele; Athanasiou, Dimitra; Kanuga, Naheed; Novoselov, Sergey S.; Lange, Clemens A.K.; Ali, Robin R.; Bainbridge, James W.; Gias, Carlos; Coffey, Peter J.; Garriga, Pere; Cheetham, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is important for the functional maturation of many client proteins, and inhibitors are in clinical trials for multiple indications in cancer. Hsp90 inhibition activates the heat shock response and can improve viability in a cell model of the P23H misfolding mutation in rhodopsin that causes autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). Here, we show that a single low dose of the Hsp90 inhibitor HSP990 enhanced visual function and delayed photoreceptor degeneration in a P23H transgenic rat model. This was associated with the induction of heat shock protein expression and reduced rhodopsin aggregation. We then investigated the effect of Hsp90 inhibition on a different type of rod opsin mutant, R135L, which is hyperphosphorylated, binds arrestin and disrupts vesicular traffic. Hsp90 inhibition with 17-AAG reduced the intracellular accumulation of R135L and abolished arrestin binding in cells. Hsf-1−/− cells revealed that the effect of 17-AAG on P23H aggregation was dependent on HSF-1, whereas the effect on R135L was HSF-1 independent. Instead, the effect on R135L was mediated by a requirement of Hsp90 for rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) maturation and function. Importantly, Hsp90 inhibition restored R135L rod opsin localization to wild-type (WT) phenotype in vivo in rat retina. Prolonged Hsp90 inhibition with HSP990 in vivo led to a posttranslational reduction in GRK1 and phosphodiesterase (PDE6) protein levels, identifying them as Hsp90 clients. These data suggest that Hsp90 represents a potential therapeutic target for different types of rhodopsin adRP through distinct mechanisms, but also indicate that sustained Hsp90 inhibition might adversely affect visual function. PMID:24301679

  7. Cyclooxygenase-2 in Endothelial and Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Restrains Atherogenesis in Hyperlipidemic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Soon Yew; Monslow, James; Todd, Leslie; Lawson, John; Puré, Ellen; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Placebo controlled trials of nonsteroidal antinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) selective for inhibition of COX-2 reveal an emergent cardiovascular hazard in patients selected for low risk of heart disease. Postnatal global deletion of COX-2 accelerates atherogenesis in hyperlipidemic mice, a process delayed by selective enzyme deletion in macrophages. Methods and Results Here, selective depletion of COX-2 in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) depressed biosynthesis of prostaglandin (PG)I2 and PGE2, elevated blood pressure and accelerated atherogenesis in Ldlr knockout (KO) mice. Deletion of COX-2 in VSMCs and ECs coincided with an increase in COX-2 expression in lesional macrophages and increased biosynthesis of thromboxane. Increased accumulation of less organized intimal collagen, laminin, α-smooth muscle actin and matrix-rich fibrosis was also apparent in lesions of the mutants. Conclusions Although atherogenesis is accelerated in global COX-2 KOs, consistent with evidence of risk transformation during chronic NSAID administration, this masks the contrasting effects of enzyme depletion in macrophages versus VSMCs and ECs. Targeting delivery of COX-2 inhibitors to macrophages may conserve their efficacy while limiting cardiovascular risk. PMID:24519928

  8. Isoorientin, a Selective Inhibitor of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) from the Tubers of Pueraria tuberosa.

    PubMed

    Sumalatha, Manne; Munikishore, Rachakunta; Rammohan, Aluru; Gunasekar, Duvvuru; Kumar, Kotha Anil; Reddy, Kakularam Kumar; Azad, Rajaram; Reddanna, Pallu; Bodo, Bernard

    2015-10-01

    Bioassay-guided fraction of the methanol extract of the roots of Pueraria tuberose DC yielded puerarin, an isoflavone C-glycoside (PT-1), isoorientin, a flavone C-glycoside (PT-2) and mangiferin, a xanthone C-glycoside (PT-3). The extracts and the isolated compounds were screened for potent anti-inflammatory components inhibiting the cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX), the target enzymes of inflammation, by employing spectroscopic/polorographic methods. Among these, isoorientin was found to be a potent inhibitor of COX-2with an IC50 value of 39 μM. Docking studies were carried out to understand the interactions of isorientin (PT-2) with COX-2.The structures of the isolates were determined by mass spectrometry and 2D-NMR techniques including HSQC, HMBC, NOESY and 1H-1H COSY experiments. Although isoorientin and mangiferin have been reported from several plant sources, this is the first report of their isolation from a Pueraria species. PMID:26669106

  9. Combined Effects of Cyclooxygenase-1 and Cyclooxygenase-2 Selective Inhibitors on Ovarian Carcinoma in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Wang, Jie; Jiang, Hong-Ru; Xu, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Mei-Lin; Zhai, Ling-Yun

    2011-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the combined effects of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 selective inhibitors on human ovarian SKOV-3 carcinoma cells xenograft-bearing mice. The animals were treated with 3 mg/kg SC-560 (a COX-1 selective inhibitor) alone, 25 mg/kg celecoxib (a COX-2 selective inhibitor) alone, or SC-560/celecoxib by gavage, twice a day for three weeks. To test the mechanism of inhibition of tumor growth by COX selective inhibitors, the index of proliferating cells in tumor tissues was determined by immunostaining and the index of apoptotic cells by the terminal-deoxynucleotidyl-transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling (TUNEL) method. The inhibitory rate on tumor growth in the combination group was 35.54% which is significant statistically compared with that of the control group (P < 0.05). In the combination group, the index of cell proliferation and apoptosis were 12.40% and 51.03% respectively, which are significant statistically compared with those of the control group (22.56%, 19.07%, all P < 0.05). These studies indicate that synergism between two COX inhibitors and inhibitor combination treatment has particular potential for chemoprevention of ovarian cancer growth. PMID:21340007

  10. Clinical pharmacology of lumiracoxib: a selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Rordorf, Christiane M; Choi, Les; Marshall, Paul; Mangold, James B

    2005-01-01

    Lumiracoxib (Prexige) is a selective cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor developed for the treatment of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and acute pain. Lumiracoxib possesses a carboxylic acid group that makes it weakly acidic (acid dissociation constant [pKa] 4.7), distinguishing it from other selective COX-2 inhibitors. Lumiracoxib has good oral bioavailability (74%). It is rapidly absorbed, reaching maximum plasma concentrations 2 hours after dosing, and is highly plasma protein bound. Lumiracoxib has a short elimination half-life from plasma (mean 4 hours) and demonstrates dose-proportional plasma pharmacokinetics with no accumulation during multiple dosing. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, peak lumiracoxib synovial fluid concentrations occur 3-4 hours later than in plasma and exceed plasma concentrations from 5 hours after dosing to the end of the 24-hour dosing interval. These data suggest that lumiracoxib may be associated with reduced systemic exposure, while still reaching sites where COX-2 inhibition is required for pain relief. Lumiracoxib is metabolised extensively prior to excretion, with only a small amount excreted unchanged in urine or faeces. Lumiracoxib and its metabolites are excreted via renal and faecal routes in approximately equal amounts. The major metabolic pathways identified involve oxidation of the 5-methyl group of lumiracoxib and/or hydroxylation of its dihaloaromatic ring. Major metabolites of lumiracoxib in plasma are the 5-carboxy, 4'-hydroxy and 4'-hydroxy-5-carboxy derivatives, of which only the 4'-hydroxy derivative is active and COX-2 selective. In vitro, the major oxidative pathways are catalysed primarily by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2C9 with very minor contribution from CYP1A2 and CYP2C19. However, in patients genotyped as poor CYP2C9 metabolisers, exposure to lumiracoxib (area under the plasma concentration-time curve) is not significantly increased compared with control subjects, indicating no requirement for adjustment

  11. Misoprostol Reverse Hippocampal Neuron Cyclooxygenase-2 Downstream Signaling Imbalance in Aluminum-Overload Rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuanxin; Lei, Wenjuan; Wang, Jianfeng; Hu, Xinyue; Wei, Yuling; Ji, Chaonan; Yang, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    Although COX-2 inhibition in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases has shown neuroprotection, recent studies have revealed some serious side effects (ulcers, bleeding, fatal cerebrovascular diseases etc.) and the limited benefits of COX-2 inhibitors. A more focused approach is necessary to explore the therapeutic effect of the COX downstream signaling pathway in neurological research. The aim of this study was to explore the alterations of the PGES-PGE2-EP signal pathway and the effect of misoprostol on neurodegeneration by chronic aluminum-overload in rats. Adult rats were treated by intragastric administration of aluminum gluconate. The PGE2 content and expression of PGES and EPs in the hippocampi of rats were detected using ELISA, q-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. The content of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the rat hippocampi were also detected. The misoprostol treatment dose-dependently improved spatial learning and memory function as well as healing after hippocampal neuron damage induced by chronic aluminum-overload in rats. Meanwhile, the administration of misoprostol resulted in a decrease in the PGE2 level and down-regulation of the mPGES-1, EP2 and EP4 expression levels, while there was a dosedependent up-regulation of EP3 expression. These results suggest that misoprostol possesses a neuroprotective property, and the mechanism involves affecting the EP3 level and reducing the endogenous production of PGE2 through a negative feedback mechanism, increasing the EP3 expression level, decreasing the EP2 and EP4 expression levels, and rebuilding the mPGES-1-PGE2-EP1-4 signal pathway balance. In this way, misoprostol has a counteractive effect on oxidant stress and inflammation in the central nervous system. The PGES-PGE2-EPs signaling pathway is a potential therapeutic strategy for treating neurodegeneration in patients. PMID:27033056

  12. Ozone induces synthesis of systemic prostacyclin by cyclooxygenase-2 dependent mechanism in vivo.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Siegfried; Ninke, Simone; Watzer, Bernhard; Nüsing, Rolf Michael

    2012-02-15

    Under certain pathological conditions, e.g., infectious or neoplastic diseases, application of ozone exerts therapeutic effects. However, pharmacological mechanisms are not understood. Since an interaction with the arachidonic acid metabolism is suggested we investigated the effect of intraperitoneal insufflation of ozone on prostanoid system in vivo. Upon ozone application (4 mg/kg) to rats we observed an approximate 3-fold increase in excretion rate of 6-keto-prostaglandin (PG) F1α and of 2,3-dinor-6-keto-PG F1α, the measurable stable products of prostacyclin. In plasma and vessel tissue 6-keto-PG F1α concentration was also significantly increased. In contrast, excretion rates for PGE2 and thromboxane (TX) B2 did not change. F2-isoprostanes, regarded as endogenous indicators of oxidative stress, were also unaffected by ozone application. Oxygen insufflation used as control was without any effect on prostanoid levels. Ozone caused increase in 6-keto-PG F1α by arterial but not by venous vessel tissues with peak activity 6-9h following insufflation. The increase in PGI2 synthesis was dependent on cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 activity, demonstrated by its sensitivity towards COX-2 inhibition, and by enhanced COX-2 mRNA and protein expression in vessels. Ozone exerted no rise in excretion rate of prostacyclin metabolites in COX-2(-/-) but in COX-1(-/-) mice. Enzymatic activity and mRNA expression of vascular PGI2 synthase (PGIS) was unaffected by ozone treatment. In summary our study shows for the first time that ozone insufflation causes enhanced expression of COX-2 in the vessel system leading to exclusive elevation of systemic PGI2 levels. We assume that PGI2 stimulation may contribute to the beneficial effects of ozone treatment. PMID:22155309

  13. A Cyclooxygenase-2-dependent Prostaglandin E2 Biosynthetic System in the Golgi Apparatus*

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chong; Smith, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenases (COXs) catalyze the committed step in prostaglandin (PG) biosynthesis. COX-1 is constitutively expressed and stable, whereas COX-2 is inducible and short lived. COX-2 is degraded via endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) following post-translational glycosylation of Asn-594. COX-1 and COX-2 are found in abundance on the luminal surfaces of the ER and inner membrane of the nuclear envelope. Using confocal immunocytofluorescence, we detected both COX-2 and microsomal PGE synthase-1 (mPGES-1) but not COX-1 in the Golgi apparatus. Inhibition of trafficking between the ER and Golgi retarded COX-2 ERAD. COX-2 has a C-terminal STEL sequence, which is an inefficient ER retention signal. Substituting this sequence with KDEL, a robust ER retention signal, concentrated COX-2 in the ER where it was stable and slowly glycosylated on Asn-594. Native COX-2 and a recombinant COX-2 having a Golgi targeting signal but not native COX-1 exhibited efficient catalytic coupling to mPGES-1. We conclude that N-glycosylation of Asn-594 of COX-2 occurs in the ER, leading to anterograde movement of COX-2 to the Golgi where the Asn-594-linked glycan is trimmed prior to retrograde COX-2 transport to the ER for ERAD. Having an inefficient ER retention signal leads to sluggish Golgi to ER transit of COX-2. This permits significant Golgi residence time during which COX-2 can function catalytically. Cytosolic phospholipase A2α, which mobilizes arachidonic acid for PG synthesis, preferentially translocates to the Golgi in response to physiologic Ca2+ mobilization. We propose that cytosolic phospholipase A2α, COX-2, and mPGES-1 in the Golgi comprise a dedicated system for COX-2-dependent PGE2 biosynthesis. PMID:25548276

  14. Misoprostol Reverse Hippocampal Neuron Cyclooxygenase-2 Downstream Signaling Imbalance in Aluminum-Overload Rats

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuanxin; Lei, Wenjuan; Wang, Jianfeng; Hu, Xinyue; Wei, Yuling; Ji, Chaonan; Yang, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    Although COX-2 inhibition in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases has shown neuroprotection, recent studies have revealed some serious side effects (ulcers, bleeding, fatal cerebrovascular diseases etc.) and the limited benefits of COX-2 inhibitors. A more focused approach is necessary to explore the therapeutic effect of the COX downstream signaling pathway in neurological research. The aim of this study was to explore the alterations of the PGES-PGE2-EP signal pathway and the effect of misoprostol on neurodegeneration by chronic aluminum-overload in rats. Adult rats were treated by intragastric administration of aluminum gluconate. The PGE2 content and expression of PGES and EPs in the hippocampi of rats were detected using ELISA, q-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. The content of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the rat hippocampi were also detected. The misoprostol treatment dose-dependently improved spatial learning and memory function as well as healing after hippocampal neuron damage induced by chronic aluminum-overload in rats. Meanwhile, the administration of misoprostol resulted in a decrease in the PGE2 level and down-regulation of the mPGES-1, EP2 and EP4 expression levels, while there was a dose-dependent up-regulation of EP3 expression. These results suggest that misoprostol possesses a neuroprotective property, and the mechanism involves affecting the EP3 level and reducing the endogenous production of PGE2 through a negative feedback mechanism, increasing the EP3 expression level, decreasing the EP2 and EP4 expression levels, and rebuilding the mPGES-1-PGE2-EP1-4 signal pathway balance. In this way, misoprostol has a counteractive effect on oxidant stress and inflammation in the central nervous system. The PGES-PGE2-EPs signaling pathway is a potential therapeutic strategy for treating neurodegeneration in patients. PMID:27033056

  15. Human umbilical vein: involvement of cyclooxygenase-2 pathway in bradykinin B1 receptor-sensitized responses.

    PubMed

    Errasti, A E; Rey-Ares, V; Daray, F M; Rogines-Velo, M P; Sardi, S P; Paz, C; Podestá, E J; Rothlin, R P

    2001-08-01

    In isolated human umbilical vein (HUV), the contractile response to des-Arg9-bradykinin (des-Arg9-BK), selective BK B1 receptor agonist, increases as a function of the incubation time. Here, we evaluated whether cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway is involved in BK B1-sensitized response obtained in 5-h incubated HUV rings. The effect of different concentrations of indomethacin, sodium salicylate, ibuprofen, meloxicam, lysine clonixinate or NS-398 administrated 30 min before concentration-response curves (CRC) was studied. All treatments produced a significant rightward shift of the CRC to des-Arg9-BK in a concentration-dependent manner, which provides pharmacological evidence that COX pathway is involved in the BK B1 responses. Moreover, in this tissue, the NS-398 pKb (5.2) observed suggests that COX-2 pathway is the most relevant. The strong correlation between published pIC50 for COX-2 and the NSAIDs' pKbs estimated further supports the hypothesis that COX-2 metabolites are involved in BK B1 receptor-mediated responses. In other rings, indomethacin (30, 100 micromol/l) or NS-398 (10, 30 micromol/l) produced a significant rightward shift of the CRC to BK, selective BK B2 agonist, and its pKbs were similar to the values to inhibit BK B1 receptor responses, suggesting that COX-2 pathway also is involved in BK B2 receptor responses. Western blot analysis shows that COX-1 and COX-2 isoenzymes are present before and after 5-h in vitro incubation and apparently COX-2 does not suffer additional induction. PMID:11534854

  16. Genetic Variants in Cyclooxygenase- 2 Contribute to Post-treatment Pain among Endodontic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Applebaum, Elizabeth; Nackley, Andrea G.; Bair, Eric; Maixner, William; Khan, Asma A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have a well-established analgesic efficacy for inflammatory pain. These drugs exert their effect by inhibiting the enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX) and are commonly used for the management of pain following endodontic treatment. There are two distinct isoforms of COX: COX-1, which is constitutively expressed; and COX-2, which is primarily induced by inflammation. Previous studies have shown that functional human genetic variants of the COX-2 gene may explain individual variations in acute pain. The present study extends this work by examining the potential contribution of the two COX isoforms to pain after endodontic treatment. Methods Ninety-four patients treated by endodontic residents at the University of North Carolina School of Dentistry were enrolled into a prospective cohort study. Data on potential predictors of post-treatment pain was collected and all patients submitted saliva samples for genetic analysis. Non-surgical root canal therapy was performed and participants recorded pain levels for five days following. Results In this study, 63% of patients experienced at least mild pain after root canal therapy and 24% experienced moderate to severe pain. Presence of pretreatment pain was correlated with higher post-treatment pain (p=0.01). Elevated heart rate (p=0.02) and higher diastolic blood pressure (p=0.024) were also correlated with decreased post-treatment pain. Finally, we identified genetic variants in COX-2 (haplotype composed of rs2383515 G, rs5277 G, rs5275 T, and rs2206593 A) associated with post-treatment pain following endodontic treatment (p= 0.025). Conclusion Understanding the genetic basis of pain following endodontic treatment will advance its prevention and management. PMID:26081267

  17. Group X Secretory Phospholipase A2 Regulates Insulin Secretion through a Cyclooxygenase-2-dependent Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Shridas, Preetha; Zahoor, Lubna; Forrest, Kathy J.; Layne, Joseph D.; Webb, Nancy R.

    2014-01-01

    Group X secretory phospholipase A2 (GX sPLA2) potently hydrolyzes membrane phospholipids to release arachidonic acid (AA). While AA is an activator of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), its metabolite prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a known inhibitor. In this study, we determined that GX sPLA2 is expressed in insulin-producing cells of mouse pancreatic islets and investigated its role in beta cell function. GSIS was measured in vivo in wild-type (WT) and GX sPLA2-deficient (GX KO) mice and ex vivo using pancreatic islets isolated from WT and GX KO mice. GSIS was also assessed in vitro using mouse MIN6 pancreatic beta cells with or without GX sPLA2 overexpression or exogenous addition. GSIS was significantly higher in islets isolated from GX KO mice compared with islets from WT mice. Conversely, GSIS was lower in MIN6 cells overexpressing GX sPLA2 (MIN6-GX) compared with control (MIN6-C) cells. PGE2 production was significantly higher in MIN6-GX cells compared with MIN6-C cells and this was associated with significantly reduced cellular cAMP. The effect of GX sPLA2 on GSIS was abolished when cells were treated with NS398 (a COX-2 inhibitor) or L-798,106 (a PGE2-EP3 receptor antagonist). Consistent with enhanced beta cell function, GX KO mice showed significantly increased plasma insulin levels following glucose challenge and were protected from age-related reductions in GSIS and glucose tolerance compared with WT mice. We conclude that GX sPLA2 plays a previously unrecognized role in negatively regulating pancreatic insulin secretion by augmenting COX-2-dependent PGE2 production. PMID:25122761

  18. Expression of prostaglandin synthesizing enzymes (cyclooxygenase 1 and cyclooxygenase 2) in the ovary of the ostrich (Struthio camelus).

    PubMed

    Rodler, Daniela; Sinowatz, Fred

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase is the rate limiting enzyme in the production of prostaglandins. In birds two isoforms are present: cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2). Despite evidence implicating that cyclooxygenases and PGs are critical factors in female reproduction in birds, little is known about COX expression in the avian ovary. In birds, cyclooxygenases have been studied in very few species only. In this study we report on the expression of COX-1 and COX-2 in the ovary of the ostrich (Struthio camelus) using immunohistochemistry and non-radioactive in situ hybridization techniques. Our results demonstrate that COX-1 is strongly expressed in the cytoplasm of oocytes of previtellogenic follicles, whereas COX-2 shows the strongest immunostaining in the granulosa cells of previtellogenic follicles. The signals of both isoenzymes fade significantly with increasing diameter and finally nearly vanish in the vitellogenic follicles with a size >1.8 cm. This expression pattern in the ostrich (S. camelus) is, therefore, completely different from the localization of COX-1 and COX-2 in the hen (Gallus gallus), a finding which also suggests different functions of the cyclooxygenases in the ostrich species. Non-radioactive in situ hybridization confirmed that COX-1 is synthesized in the ooplasm and COX-2 in the granulosa layers of early previtellogenic follicles. According to the results of this study it appears unlikely that COX-1 or COX-2 play a major role in ovulation and oviposition in the ostrich. PMID:25528171

  19. K-Ras and cyclooxygenase-2 coactivation augments intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and Notch1 mimicking human pancreas lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chiblak, Sara; Steinbauer, Brigitte; Pohl-Arnold, Andrea; Kucher, Dagmar; Abdollahi, Amir; Schwager, Christian; Höft, Birgit; Esposito, Irene; Müller-Decker, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Mutational activation of K-Ras is an initiating event of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) that may develop either from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) or intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN). Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is causally related to pancreatic carcinogenesis. Here, we deciphered the impact of COX-2, a key modulator of inflammation, in concert with active mutant K-RasG12D on tumor burden and gene expression signature using compound mutant mouse lines. Concomitant activation of COX-2 and K-RasG12D accelerated the progression of pancreatic intraepithelial lesions predominantly with a cystic papillary phenotype resembling human IPMN. Transcriptomes derived from laser capture microdissected preneoplastic lesions of single and compound mutants revealed a signature that was significantly enriched in Notch1 signaling components. In vitro, Notch1 signaling was COX-2-dependent. In line with these findings, human IPMN stratified into intestinal, gastric and pancreatobillary types displayed Notch1 immunosignals with high prevalence, especially in the gastric lesions. In conclusion, a yet unknown link between activated Ras, protumorigenic COX-2 and Notch1 in IPMN onset was unraveled. PMID:27381829

  20. K-Ras and cyclooxygenase-2 coactivation augments intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and Notch1 mimicking human pancreas lesions.

    PubMed

    Chiblak, Sara; Steinbauer, Brigitte; Pohl-Arnold, Andrea; Kucher, Dagmar; Abdollahi, Amir; Schwager, Christian; Höft, Birgit; Esposito, Irene; Müller-Decker, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Mutational activation of K-Ras is an initiating event of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) that may develop either from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) or intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN). Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is causally related to pancreatic carcinogenesis. Here, we deciphered the impact of COX-2, a key modulator of inflammation, in concert with active mutant K-Ras(G12D) on tumor burden and gene expression signature using compound mutant mouse lines. Concomitant activation of COX-2 and K-Ras(G12D) accelerated the progression of pancreatic intraepithelial lesions predominantly with a cystic papillary phenotype resembling human IPMN. Transcriptomes derived from laser capture microdissected preneoplastic lesions of single and compound mutants revealed a signature that was significantly enriched in Notch1 signaling components. In vitro, Notch1 signaling was COX-2-dependent. In line with these findings, human IPMN stratified into intestinal, gastric and pancreatobillary types displayed Notch1 immunosignals with high prevalence, especially in the gastric lesions. In conclusion, a yet unknown link between activated Ras, protumorigenic COX-2 and Notch1 in IPMN onset was unraveled. PMID:27381829

  1. Interaction between cyclooxygenase-2 and insulin-like growth factor in breast cancer: A new field for prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    TAROMARU, GIULIANA CÁSSIA MORRONE; DE OLIVEIRA, VILMAR MARQUES; SILVA, MARIA ANTONIETA LONGO GALVÃO; MONTOR, WAGNER RICARDO; BAGNOLI, FABIO; RINALDI, JOSÉ FRANCISCO; AOKI, TSUTOMU

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and markers of cell proliferation and apoptosis, including, Bcl-2, Bax, Ki-67 and the type I insulin-like growth factor (IGF) receptor (IGF1-R) in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and infiltrating ductal carcinoma (IDC), present in the same surgical specimen. A total of 110 cases were evaluated using tissue microarrays. Cases were classified in scores from 0 to 3 according to pre-defined methods. The results showed that the positivity rates were COX-2 in 87% of cases in DCIS and IDC; Bcl-2 in 55% of cases in DCIS and IDC; Bax in 23% of cases in IDC and 19% in DCIS, IGF-1 in 24% of cases in DCIS and IDC; and Ki-67 in 81% of cases in DCIS and IDC. We also observed a positive correlation between the expression of COX-2 and IGF1-R (p=0.045). Our results demonstrate a positive correlation between the expression of COX-2 and IGF1-R in DCIS and IDC, demonstrating that they are involved in breast cancer carcinogenesis. Further studies are required to prove the effectiveness of COX-2 and IGF1-R inhibitors for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer, as well as to explain their mechanism of action. PMID:22740976

  2. Quantitative Assessment of the Association of COX-2 (Cyclooxygenase-2) Immunoexpression with Prognosis in Human Osteosarcoma: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zengming; Wu, Hao; Wu, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Background Numerous studies examining the relationship between Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) immunoexpression and clinical outcome in osteosarcoma patients have yielded inconclusive results. Methods We accordingly conducted a meta-analysis of 9 studies (442 patients) that evaluated the correlation between COX-2 immunoexpression and clinical prognosis (death). Pooled odds ratios (OR) and risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using the random-effects or fixed-effects model. Results Meta–analysis showed no significant association between COX-2 positivity and age, gender, tumor location, histology, stage, metastasis or 90% necrosis. Conversely, COX-2 immunoexpression was associated with overall survival rate (RR=2.12; 95% CI: 1.10–3.74; P=0.009) and disease-free survival rate (RR=1.63; 95% CI: 1.17–2.28; P=0.004) at 2 years. Sensitivity analysis performed by omitting low quality studies showed that the pooled results were stable. Conclusions COX-2 positivity was associated with a lower 2-year overall survival rate and disease-free survival rate. COX-2 expression change is an independent prognostic factor in patients with osteosarcoma. PMID:24358237

  3. Cyclooxygenase-2/prostaglandin D2/CRTH2 pathway mediates double-stranded RNA-induced enhancement of allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Yoshiki; Asano, Koichiro; Niimi, Kyoko; Fukunaga, Koichi; Wakaki, Misa; Kagyo, Junko; Takihara, Takahisa; Ueda, Soichiro; Nakajima, Takeshi; Oguma, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Yusuke; Shiomi, Tetsuya; Sayama, Koichi; Kagawa, Shizuko; Ikeda, Eiji; Hirai, Hiroyuki; Nagata, Kinya; Nakamura, Masataka; Miyasho, Taku; Ishizaka, Akitoshi

    2008-01-01

    Respiratory RNA viruses responsible for the common cold often worsen airway inflammation and bronchial responsiveness, two characteristic features of human asthma. We studied the effects of dsRNA, a nucleotide synthesized during viral replication, on airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness in murine models of asthma. Intratracheal instillation of poly I:C, a synthetic dsRNA, increased the airway eosinophilia and enhanced bronchial hyperresponsiveness to methacholine in OVA-sensitized, exposed rats. These changes were associated with induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and COX-2-dependent PGD2 synthesis in the lungs, particularly in alveolar macrophages. The direct intratracheal instillation of PGD2 enhanced the eosinophilic inflammation in OVA-exposed animals, whereas pretreatment with a dual antagonist against the PGD2 receptor-(CRTH2) and the thromboxane A2 receptor, but not with a thromboxane A2 receptor-specific antagonist, nearly completely eliminated the dsRNA-induced worsening of airway inflammation and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. CRTH2-deficient mice had the same degree of allergen-induced airway eosinophilia as wild-type mice, but they did not exhibit a dsRNA-induced increase in eosinophil accumulation. Our data demonstrate that COX-2-dependent production of PGD2 followed by eosinophil recruitment into the airways via a CRTH2 receptor are the major pathogenetic factors responsible for the dsRNA-induced enhancement of airway inflammation and responsiveness. PMID:18097056

  4. Cyclooxygenase 2 (rs2745557) Polymorphism and the Susceptibility to Benign Prostate Hyperplasia and Prostate Cancer in Egyptians.

    PubMed

    Fawzy, Mohamed S; Elfayoumi, Abdel-Rahman; Mohamed, Randa H; Fatah, Ihab R Abdel; Saadawy, Sara F

    2016-06-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), an inducible isoform of cyclooxygenase, has been reported to be correlated with tumorigenesis, tumor progression, and metastasis. We aimed to evaluate the association between COX-2 (rs2745557) polymorphism and prostate cancer (PCa), benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) risk. We also assessed the influence of other risk factors such as obesity, smoking, diabetes in modulating the risk of PCa in Egyptian men. COX-2 (rs2745557) was genotyped in 112 PC patients, 111 BPH and 120 subjects as a control group. COX-2 and PSA levels were measured by ELISA. We found that GG genotype was associated with a 17-fold increased risk for PCa and 20-fold increased the risk for BPH more than AA genotype. Also, G allele carriers of COX-2 were associated with metastatic cancer (OR = 1.3, P < 0.05) and disease aggressiveness (OR = 3.5, P < 0.001). The coexistence of obesity, smoking, or diabetes with GG genotype may lead to increasing the risk of developing BPH (OR = 3.3, 4, and 2.7, respectively) and of developing PCa (OR = 2.9, 4.9, and 3.2, respectively). Our results showed evidence suggesting the involvement of the COX-2 (rs2745557) polymorphism and its protein in PCa or BPH initiation and progression. Also, the coexistence of COX-2 (rs2745557) and obesity, smoking, or diabetes may lead to the development of PCa or BPH. PMID:26920155

  5. Isomeric iodinated analogs of nimesulide: Synthesis, physicochemical characterization, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitory activity, and transport across Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yumi; Arai, Jun; Hisa, Takuya; Saito, Yohei; Mukai, Takahiro; Ohshima, Takashi; Maeda, Minoru; Yamamoto, Fumihiko

    2016-08-15

    Isomeric iodinated derivatives of nimesulide, with an iodine substituent on the phenoxy ring, were prepared with the aim of identifying potential candidate compounds for the development of imaging agents targeting cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the brain. Both the experimental logP7.4 and pKa values for these iodinated analogs were in the acceptable range for passive brain penetration. The para-iodo-substituted analog was a more potent and selective COX-2 inhibitor than nimesulide, with a potency that was comparable to the reference drug, celecoxib. Iodination at the ortho- or meta-position of the phenoxy ring was associated with a substantial loss of COX-2 inhibitory activity. Transport studies across Caco-2 cell monolayers in the presence and absence of a P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitor, verapamil, indicated that the para-iodo-substituted analog was not a P-gp transport substrate; this feature is a prerequisite for potential in vivo brain imaging compounds. The para-iodo-substituted analog of nimesulide appears to be an attractive candidate for the development of radioiodine-labeled tracers for in vivo brain imaging of COX-2 levels. PMID:27325447

  6. Low expression of microRNA-143 is related to degenerative scoliosis possibly by regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Yang, Yonghong; Zhao, Kefeng; Wang, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Aims: This study is to determine if expression level of microRNA-143 (miR-143) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) are related to the occurrence and development of degenerative scoliosis. Methods: A total of 30 patients with degenerative scoliosis, 30 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis were enrolled in this study. For control, 30 patients with spinal burst fractures were also enrolled in this study. Real-time PCR and western blotting was performed to measure the expression levels of COX-2 in intervertebral disc tissues, peripheral blood and cerebrospinal. Expression levels of miR-143 in intervertebral disc tissues, peripheral blood and cerebrospinal were detected by real-time PCR. Results: The expression levels of COX-2 were increased in intervertebral disc tissues, peripheral blood and cerebrospinal of patients with degenerative scoliosis when compared with those of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and spinal burst fractures (P < 0.05). However, the expression levels of miR-143 were decreased in intervertebral disc tissues, peripheral blood and cerebrospinal of patients with degenerative scoliosis when compared with those of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and spinal burst fractures (P < 0.05). Conclusions: COX-2 is highly expressed whereas miR-143 is lowly expressed in patients with degenerative scoliosis. Decreased expression of miR-143 may be related to the aggravation of degenerative scoliosis by regulation of COX-2. PMID:26064322

  7. Flaxseed oil increases aortic reactivity to phenylephrine through reactive oxygen species and the cyclooxygenase-2 pathway in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Flaxseed oil has the highest concentration of omega-3 α-linolenic acid, which has been associated with cardiovascular benefit. However, the mechanism underlying the vascular effects induced through flaxseed oil is not well known. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the effects of flaxseed oil on vascular function in isolated rat aortic rings. Methods Wistar rats were treated daily with flaxseed oil or a control (mineral oil) intramuscular (i.m.) for fifteen days. Isolated aortic segments were used to evaluate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression, superoxide anion levels and vascular reactivity experiments. Results Flaxseed oil treatment increased the vasoconstrictor response of aortic rings to phenylephrine. Endothelium removal increased the response to phenylephrine in aortic segments isolated from both groups, but the effect was smaller in the treated group. L-NAME incubation similarly increased the phenylephrine response in segments from both groups. The TXA2 synthase inhibitor furegrelate, the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS 398, the TP receptor antagonist SQ 29.548, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger apocynin, the superoxide anion scavengers tiron and the phospholipase A2 inhibitor dexamethasone partially reversed the flaxseed oil-induced increase in reactivity to phenylephrine. Conclusions These findings suggest that flaxseed oil treatment increased vascular reactivity to phenylephrine through an increase in ROS production and COX-2-derived TXA2 production. The results obtained in the present study provide new insight into the effects of flaxseed oil treatment (i.m.) on vascular function. PMID:24993607

  8. AIF inhibits tumor metastasis by protecting PTEN from oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Shao-Ming; Guo, Meng; Xiong, Zhong; Yu, Yun; Zhao, Xu-Yun; Zhang, Fei-Fei; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) exerts dual roles on cell death and survival, but its substrates as a putative oxidoreductase and roles in tumorigenesis remain elusive. Here, we report that AIF physically interacts with and inhibits the oxidation of phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome ten (PTEN), a tumor suppressor susceptible for oxidation-mediated inactivation. More intriguingly, we also identify PTEN as a mitochondrial protein and the ectopic expression of mitochondrial targeting sequence-carrying PTEN almost completely inhibits Akt phosphorylation in PTEN-deficient cells. AIF knockdown causes oxidation-mediated inactivation of the lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN, with ensuing activation of Akt kinase, phosphorylation of the Akt substrate GSK-3β, and activation of β-catenin signaling in cancer cells. Through its effect on β-catenin signaling, AIF inhibits epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis of cancer cells in vitro and in orthotopically implanted xenografts. Accordingly, the expression of AIF is correlated with the survival of human patients with cancers of multiple origins. These results identify PTEN as the substrate of AIF oxidoreductase and reveal a novel function for AIF in controlling tumor metastasis. PMID:26415504

  9. Chymase inhibition protects diabetic rats from renal lesions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Huang, Wen; Bai, Jing; Nie, Xiaodong; Wang, Wen

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a chymase inhibitor on renal injury in diabetic rats. A total of 24 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the following groups: The control group (n=7), the diabetes group (DM group; n=7), and the DM + chymase inhibitor group (DM + Chy‑I group; n=10). Diabetes was induced via an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (65 mg/kg). Rats in the DM + Chy‑I group were administered 1 mg/kg chymase inhibitor [Suc-Val-Pro-PheP-(OPh)2] daily for 12 weeks by intraperitoneal injection. Subsequently, kidney weight, various biochemical parameters and blood pressure were measured. In addition, the expression levels of fibronectin (FN), type IV collagen (ColIV), transforming growth factor (TGF)‑β1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were determined by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Compared with in the DM group, the levels of serum cholesterol and urinary albumin/creatinine were decreased in the DM + Chy‑I group (P<0.05). Furthermore, chymase inhibition reduced the overexpression of FN, ColIV, TGF‑β1 and VEGF (P<0.05) in the renal tissue of diabetic rats. These results indicated that chymase inhibition may reduce the excretion of urinary albumin and the deposition of extracellular matrix components in the kidney of diabetic rats. These effects may be mediated by altered expression of the VEGF and TGF‑β1 pathways. In conclusion, chymase inhibition may be considered a potential method for the treatment of renal damage. PMID:27176496

  10. Arginase inhibition protects against hypoxia‑induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wenjin; Sun, Bolin; Song, Xuepeng; Zheng, Yanbo; Wang, Ligang; Wang, Tao; Liu, Sheng

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed to determine the role of arginase (Arg) in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In vitro, human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMCs) were cultured under hypoxic conditions with, or without, the Arg inhibitor, S‑(2‑boronoethyl)‑l‑cysteine (BEC), for 48 h, following which the proliferation of the HPASMCs was determined using MTT and cell counting assays. For the in vivo investigation, 30 male rats were randomly divided into the following three groups (n=10 per group): i) control group, ii) PAH group and iii) BEC group, in which the right ventricle systolic pressure (RVSP) of the rats was assessed. The levels of cyclin D1, cyclin‑dependent kinase (CDK)4 and p27 were measured in vitro and in vivo. The phosphorylation levels of Akt and extracellular‑related kinase (ERK) were also measured in HPASMCs. In vitro, compared with the hypoxia group, Arg inhibition reduced HPASMC proliferation and reduced the expression levels of cyclin D1, CDK4, phosphorylated (p‑)Akt and p‑ERK. By contrast, Arg inhibition increased the expression of p27. In vivo, compared with the control group, the expression levels of cyclin D1 and CDK4 were reduced in the PAH group, however, the expression of p27 and the RVSP increased. In the BEC group, the opposite effects were observed. Therefore, it was suggested that Arg inhibition may reduce the RVSP of PAH rats and reduce HPASMC proliferation by decreasing the expression levels of cyclin D1 and CDK4, increasing the expression of p27, and partly reducing the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK. PMID:26126810

  11. Chymase inhibition protects diabetic rats from renal lesions

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, MEI; HUANG, WEN; BAI, JING; NIE, XIAODONG; WANG, WEN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a chymase inhibitor on renal injury in diabetic rats. A total of 24 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the following groups: The control group (n=7), the diabetes group (DM group; n=7), and the DM + chymase inhibitor group (DM + Chy-I group; n=10). Diabetes was induced via an intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (65 mg/kg). Rats in the DM + Chy-I group were administered 1 mg/kg chymase inhibitor [Suc-Val-Pro-PheP-(OPh)2] daily for 12 weeks by intraperitoneal injection. Subsequently, kidney weight, various biochemical parameters and blood pressure were measured. In addition, the expression levels of fibronectin (FN), type IV collagen (ColIV), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were determined by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Compared with in the DM group, the levels of serum cholesterol and urinary albumin/creatinine were decreased in the DM + Chy-I group (P<0.05). Furthermore, chymase inhibition reduced the overexpression of FN, ColIV, TGF-β1 and VEGF (P<0.05) in the renal tissue of diabetic rats. These results indicated that chymase inhibition may reduce the excretion of urinary albumin and the deposition of extracellular matrix components in the kidney of diabetic rats. These effects may be mediated by altered expression of the VEGF and TGF-β1 pathways. In conclusion, chymase inhibition may be considered a potential method for the treatment of renal damage. PMID:27176496

  12. Neuronal NOS and cyclooxygenase-2 contribute to DNA damage in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Tuan; Choi, Dong-Kug; Nagai, Makiko; Wu, Du-Chu; Nagata, Tetsuya; Prou, Delphine; Wilson, Glenn L.; Vila, Miquel; Jackson-Lewis, Vernice; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Chesselet, Marie-Françoise; Przedborski, Serge

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage is a proposed pathogenic factor in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease. To probe the underpinning mechanism of such neuronal perturbation, we sought to produce an experimental model of DNA damage. We thus first assessed by in situ nick translation and emulsion autoradiography in the mouse brain the effect of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP; 4 × 20mg/kg, i.p., every 2 hours), a neurotoxin known to produce a model of Parkinson’s disease, on DNA. Here we show that DNA strand breaks occur in vivo in this mouse model of Parkinson’s disease with kinetics and a topography that parallel the degeneration of substantia nigra neurons, as assessed by FluoroJade-labeling. Previously, nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) were found to modulate MPTP-induced dopaminergic neuronal death. We thus assessed the contribution of these enzymes to DNA damage in mice lacking either neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), or Cox-2. We found that the lack of Cox-2 and of nNOS, but not of iNOS activity, attenuate MPTP-related DNA damage. We also found that not only nuclear, but mitochondrial DNA as well is a target for the MPTP insult. These results suggest that the loss of genomic integrity can be triggered by the concerted actions of nNOS and Cox-2, and provide further support to the view that DNA damage may contribute to the neurodegenerative process in PD. PMID:19616617

  13. An investigation of the rate of cyclooxygenase-2 expression on the surface of adenomatous and colorectal adenocarcinoma polyps

    PubMed Central

    Baghaei, Ramin; Beiraghdar, Mozhdeh; Sobhani, Ahmad; Rafei, Rahmatolah; Kolahi, Leila; Foladi, Lotfolah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) (adenomatous, adenocarcinoma) is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in human societies. Considering the importance of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in the incidence of CRC, in this study, the rate of COX-2 gene expression on polyps and CRCs were addressed. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional descriptive analytic study carried out on the blocks of sampled tissue of adenomatous and colorectal adenocarcinoma polyps on 68 patients referred to Digestive Clinic in Isfahan Shariati Hospital in 2013. Patients were divided into two groups of polyps (n = 52) and cancer (n = 16). Given the presence of CRC or polyps by colonoscopy, samples were sent to the laboratory to measure the rate of COX-2 gene expression using immunohistochemistry. Results: In polyp group, 41 individuals (78.8%) had two or <2 polyps, 24 cases (46.2%) had a tubular polyp, and about a third of all patients had a big polyp. The most frequency of the polyp site was related to sigmoid with 19 cases (36.54%), in cancer group, it was related to the rectum with 9 cases (56.25%) that there was no significant difference between two groups (P < 0.05). The overall prevalence of COX-2 expression was positive in 51 cases (75%) and negative in 17 cases (25%). COX-2 gene expression was separately observed in 38 individuals (73.10%) in the polyp group and in 13 cases (81.25%) in the cancer group, and no significant difference was found (P > 0.05). Conclusion: There is no relationship between COX-2 gene expression and the surface of adenomatous and colorectal adenocarcinoma polyps. PMID:26601088

  14. Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression as a Predictor of Para-Aortic Lymph Node Recurrence in Uterine Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jun-Sang Li Shengjin; Kim, Jin-Man; Yeo, Seung-Gu; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Cho, Moon-June

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: The overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is associated with a worse prognosis and the development of distant metastases in cervical cancer. This matched-pair analysis examined whether COX-2 expression is associated with para-aortic lymph node (PALN) recurrence in uterine cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: For this study, we matched 20 patients with PALN recurrence after definitive or postoperative RT by stage with 20 others who did not have PALN recurrence. Of the 20 patients with PALN recurrence, definitive or postoperative RT was performed in 11 and 9 patients, respectively. COX-2 expression was assessed immunohistochemically using a mouse monoclonal antibody on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor specimens taken before RT. A logistic regression model was used to predict for PALN recurrence. Results: COX-2 was expressed in 28 (70%) of the 40 patients. The staining intensity was as follows: weak in 19 (47%), moderate in 6 (15%), and strong in 3 (8%) patients. The patients with PALN recurrence had much greater expression of COX-2 (17 patients, 85%) than did the control group (11 patients, 55%; p = 0.04). Strong staining intensity of COX-2 was seen only in the PALN recurrence group. The statistically significant factors associated with PALN recurrence were positive pelvic lymph nodes (odds ratio, 7.61; 95% confidence interval, 1.55-37.37; p = 0.01) and COX-2 expression (odds ratio, 1.47; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-2.09; p = 0.03). Conclusion: Our findings suggest that COX-2 overexpression in the initial tumor tissue might be associated with PALN recurrence after RT in cervical cancer patients.

  15. Increased expression of nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 is associated with poor survival in cervical cancer treated with radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Helen H.W.; Su, W.-C.; Chou, C.-Y.; Guo, H.-R.; Ho, S.-Y.; Que, Jenny; Lee, W.-Y. . E-mail: 7707@so-net.net.tw

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in cervical cancer and their association with clinical outcome in patients treated with radical radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: One hundred sixty-seven consecutive patients with FIGO Stages IB-IVA squamous cell cervical cancer underwent radical radiotherapy, including external-beam radiotherapy or high-dose-rate brachytherapy, or both, between 1989 and 2002. Immunohistochemical studies of their formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues were performed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify and evaluate the effects of the factors affecting patient survival. Results: Positive immunostainings of iNOS and COX-2 were observed in 58.7% and 64.1% of the participants, respectively. The expression of both iNOS and COX-2 was positively correlated (Spearman correlation coefficient = 0.49, p < 0.01), and their overexpression provided independent predictors of distant metastasis (odds ratio = 5.22 and 10.07, respectively; p < 0.01 for all). iNOS- and COX-2-expressing patients had significantly shorter disease-free survival (p < 0.01, both) and cause-specific overall survival (p = 0.01, p < 0.01, respectively). Patients with iNOS-positive/COX-2-positive tumors had the poorest survival rates. Coexpression of iNOS/COX-2, together with bulky tumor and advanced stage were independent prognostic factors for disease-free survival. Conclusion: Overexpression of iNOS or COX-2 or both was associated with decreased survival and a greater propensity to metastasize in cervical cancer patients treated with radiotherapy. Coexpression of iNOS and COX-2 may represent a useful biologic marker in patients receiving radical radiotherapy for cervical cancer.

  16. Comparison of benefit–risk preferences of patients and physicians regarding cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors using discrete choice experiments

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Ji-Hye; Kwon, Sun-Hong; Lee, Ji-Eun; Cheon, Ji-Eun; Jang, Eun-Jin; Lee, Eui-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To elucidate and compare benefit–risk preferences among Korean patients and physicians concerning cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) inhibitor treatments for arthritis. Materials and methods Subjects included 100 patients with arthritis and 60 board-certified orthopedic surgeon physicians in South Korea. Through a systematic review of the literature, beneficial attributes of using Cox-2 inhibitors were defined as a decrease in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index for pain score and improvement in physical function. Likewise, risk attributes included upper gastrointestinal (GI) complications and cardiovascular (CV) adverse events. Discrete choice experiments were used to determine preferences for these four attributes among Korean patients and physicians. Relative importance and maximum acceptable risk for improving beneficial attributes were assessed by analyzing the results of the discrete choice experiment by using a conditional logit model. Results Patients ranked the relative importance of benefit–risk attributes as follows: pain reduction (35.2%); physical function improvement (30.0%); fewer CV adverse events (21.5%); fewer GI complications (13.4%). The physicians’ ranking for the same attributes was as follows: fewer CV (33.5%); pain reduction (32.4%); fewer GI complications (18.1%); physical function improvement (16.0%). Patients were more willing than physicians to accept risks when pain improved from 20% or 45% to 55% and physical function improved from 15% or 35% to 45%. Conclusion We confirmed that patients and physicians had different benefit–risk preferences regarding Cox-2 inhibitors. Patients with arthritis prioritized the benefits of Cox-2 inhibitors over the risks; moreover, in comparison with the physicians, arthritis patients were more willing to accept the trade-off between benefits and risks to achieve the best treatment level. To reduce the preference gap and achieve treatment goals, physicians must better

  17. Comparison of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors use in Australia and Nova Scotia (Canada)

    PubMed Central

    Barozzi, Nadia; Sketris, Ingrid; Cooke, Charmaine; Tett, Susan

    2009-01-01

    AIMS Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors were marketed aggressively and their rapid uptake caused safety concerns and budgetary challenges in Canada and Australia. The objectives of this study were to compare and contrast COX-2 inhibitors and nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (ns-NSAID) use in Nova Scotia (Canada) and Australia and to identify lessons learned from the two jurisdictions. METHODS Ns-NSAID and COX-2 inhibitor Australian prescription data (concession beneficiaries) were downloaded from the Medicare Australia website (2001–2006). Similar Pharmacare data were obtained for Nova Scotia (seniors and those receiving Community services). Defined daily doses per 1000 beneficiaries day−1 were calculated. COX-2 inhibitors/all NSAIDs ratios were calculated for Australia and Nova Scotia. Ns-NSAIDs were divided into low, moderate and high risk for gastrointestinal side-effects and the proportions of use in each group were determined. Which drugs accounted for 90% of use was also calculated. RESULTS Overall NSAID use was different in Australia and Nova Scotia. However, ns-NSAID use was similar. COX-2 inhibitor dispensing was higher in Australia. The percentage of COX-2 inhibitor prescriptions over the total NSAID use was different in the two countries. High-risk NSAID use was much higher in Australia. Low-risk NSAID prescribing increased in Nova Scotia over time. The low-risk/high-risk ratio was constant throughout over the period in Australia and increased in Nova Scotia. CONCLUSIONS There are significant differences in Australia and Nova Scotia in use of NSAIDs, mainly due to COX-2 prescribing. Nova Scotia has a higher proportion of low-risk NSAID use. Interventions to provide physicians with information on relative benefits and risks of prescribing specific NSAIDs are needed, including determining their impact. PMID:19660008

  18. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2, peroxiredoxin I, peroxiredoxin 6 and nuclear factor-κB in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LEE, EUN-YOUNG; KANG, JI-YEON; KIM, KYOUNG-WON

    2015-01-01

    Tumor development and progression are multistep processes that involve local tumor growth and invasion, followed by metastasis. The aggressiveness of the tumor is the major determinant of the mortality of oral cancer patients. The present study investigates whether the expression levels of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), peroxiredoxin 1 (PRDX1) and PRDX6 are associated with the development, proliferation, differentiation and recurrence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The mRNA expression levels of COX-2, NF-κB, PRDX1 and PRDX6 were examined in 50 OSCC specimens and 19 normal oral mucosae by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). qPCR analysis showed that the mRNA levels of COX-2 in OSCC were significantly higher than those in the normal oral mucosae (P=0.021). The expression levels of PRDX1 in high-stage tumors (T3 and T4) were significantly elevated compared with those in low-stage tumors (T1) (P=0.047). Additionally, the expression levels of NF-κB in the high-grade tumor were significantly elevated compared with those in the low-grade tumors (P=0.030). Overall, it was indicated that the expression of COX-2 is strongly associated with the development of OSCC. Moreover, the enhanced expression of PRDX1 and NF-κB may function in the progression of OSCC, which serves as a useful marker for prognosis in patients with oral cancer. PMID:26722300

  19. Nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase 2, and vascular endothelial growth factor in the angiogenesis of non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Marrogi, A J; Travis, W D; Welsh, J A; Khan, M A; Rahim, H; Tazelaar, H; Pairolero, P; Trastek, V; Jett, J; Caporaso, N E; Liotta, L A; Harris, C C

    2000-12-01

    We have investigated the hypothesis that nitric oxide synthase (NOS2), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein levels individually demonstrate a direct correlation with microvessel density (MVD) and clinical outcome in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Furthermore, we hypothesized that MVD may explain the propensity of certain histological lung cancer subtypes for early metastasis via a hematological route. Immunohistochemically, we studied the protein expression levels of NOS2, COX2, and VEGF and MVD by counting CD31-reactive blood vessels (BVs) in 106 surgically resected NSCLC specimens. NOS2, COX2, and VEGF immunoreactivity were observed in 48, 48, and 58%, respectively, of the study subjects, and their levels correlated with MVD at the tumor-stromal interphase (P < or = 0.001). More adenocarcindmas and large cell carcinomas displayed overexpression of NOS2 when compared with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; r = 0.44; P < 0.001). NOS2 and COX2 levels were found to correlate positively with VEGF status (r = 0.44; P < 0.001, 0.01, and 0.03, respectively). These results attest to the significant interaction of these factors in the angiogenesis of NSCLC. Although neither angiogenic factors nor MVD correlated with patient survival, the latter correlated with tumor clinical stage in both squamous (SCC; 73 BVs/mm2) and non-SCC (78 BVs/mm2) tumors. These results indicate that angiogenesis is a complex process that involves multiple factors including NOS2, COX2, and VEGF. Furthermore, the role of angiogenesis in the biology of various histological lung cancer types may be different. The complexity of angiogenesis may explain the modest results observed in antiangiogenesis therapy that target a single protein. PMID:11156228

  20. Enhanced cyclooxygenase-2 expression levels and metalloproteinase 2 and 9 activation by Hexachlorobenzene in human endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Chiappini, Florencia; Bastón, Juan Ignacio; Vaccarezza, Agustina; Singla, José Javier; Pontillo, Carolina; Miret, Noelia; Farina, Mariana; Meresman, Gabriela; Randi, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) is an organochlorine pesticide that induces toxic reproductive effects in laboratory animals. It is a dioxin-like compound and a weak ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Endometriosis is characterized by the presence of functional endometrial tissues outside the uterine cavity. Experimental studies indicate that exposure to organochlorines can interfere with both hormonal regulation and immune function to promote endometriosis. Altered expression of metalloproteinases (MMPs) in patients with endometriosis, suggests that MMPs may play a critical role. In the endometriotic lesions, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) produced by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), binds to its EP4 receptor (EP4), and via c-Src kinase induces MMPs activation, promoting endometriosis. We examined the HCB action on MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities and expression, COX-2 levels, PGE2 signaling, and the AhR involvement in HCB-induced effects. We have used different in vitro models: (1) human endometrial stromal cell line T-HESC, (2) primary cultures of Human Uterine Fibroblast (HUF), and (3) primary cultures of endometrial stromal cells from eutopic endometrium of control (CESC) and subjects with endometriosis (EESC). Our results show that HCB enhances MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities in T-HESC, HUF and ESC cells. The MMP-9 levels were elevated in all models, while the MMP-2 expression only increased in ESC cells. HCB enhanced COX-2 and EP4 expression, PGE2 secretion and the c-Src kinase activation in T-HESC. Besides, we observed that AhR is implicated in these HCB-induced effects. In conclusion, our results show that HCB exposure could contribute to endometriosis development, affecting inflammation and invasion parameters of human endometrial cells. PMID:27038655

  1. Epigenetic regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 by methylation of c8orf4 in pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Iona C.; Barnes, Josephine L.; Garner, Ian M.; Pearce, David R.; Maher, Toby M.; Shiwen, Xu; Renzoni, Elisabetta A.; Wells, Athol U.; Denton, Christopher P.; Laurent, Geoffrey J.; Abraham, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblasts derived from the lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and systemic sclerosis (SSc) produce low levels of prostaglandin (PG) E2, due to a limited capacity to up-regulate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). This deficiency contributes functionally to the fibroproliferative state, however the mechanisms responsible are incompletely understood. In the present study, we examined whether the reduced level of COX-2 mRNA expression observed in fibrotic lung fibroblasts is regulated epigenetically. The DNA methylation inhibitor, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5AZA) restored COX-2 mRNA expression by fibrotic lung fibroblasts dose dependently. Functionally, this resulted in normalization of fibroblast phenotype in terms of PGE2 production, collagen mRNA expression and sensitivity to apoptosis. COX-2 methylation assessed by bisulfite sequencing and methylation microarrays was not different in fibrotic fibroblasts compared with controls. However, further analysis of the methylation array data identified a transcriptional regulator, chromosome 8 open reading frame 4 (thyroid cancer protein 1, TC-1) (c8orf4), which is hypermethylated and down-regulated in fibrotic fibroblasts compared with controls. siRNA knockdown of c8orf4 in control fibroblasts down-regulated COX-2 and PGE2 production generating a phenotype similar to that observed in fibrotic lung fibroblasts. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that c8orf4 regulates COX-2 expression in lung fibroblasts through binding of the proximal promoter. We conclude that the decreased capacity of fibrotic lung fibroblasts to up-regulate COX-2 expression and COX-2-derived PGE2 synthesis is due to an indirect epigenetic mechanism involving hypermethylation of the transcriptional regulator, c8orf4. PMID:26744410

  2. Investigating associations of cyclooxygenase-2 expression with angiogenesis, proliferation, macrophage and T-lymphocyte infiltration in canine melanocytic tumours.

    PubMed

    Gregório, Hugo; Raposo, Teresa P; Queiroga, Felisbina L; Prada, Justina; Pires, Isabel

    2016-08-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is known to be involved in tumour progression and has been suggested as a therapeutic target in many human and animal malignancies. A number of different pathways subjacent to cancer hallmarks are considered to be involved in COX-2-mediated tumour progression, although these are still largely undefined. Our aim is to investigate associations between COX-2 expression and angiogenesis, proliferation and the inflammatory microenvironment in canine melanocytic tumours. Understanding the involvement of COX-2 with cancer hallmarks might enable us to adapt therapeutic strategies for canine melanomas, an aggressive and often lethal malignancy with value in comparative oncology. Immunohistochemical staining of COX-2, Ki-67 (proliferation index), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), factor VIII (microvessel density), CD3 (lymphocytes) and MAC387 (macrophages) was performed in 51 melanocytic tumours (31 malignant melanomas, 20 melanocytomas). Statistical associations between COX-2 and the other parameters detected were analysed. In melanocytic tumours (n=51), both COX-2 labelling extension and intensity showed a statistically significant association with angiogenesis by factor VIII, VEGF, Ki-67, CD3+ T lymphocytes and MAC387. Within malignant melanomas, COX-2 expression has shown significant associations with microvessel density (factor VIII), lymphocyte and macrophage infiltration and, considering all melanocytic tumours, COX-2 was also associated with VEGF intensity and Ki-67 cell proliferation. Our results point to a role for COX-2 in angiogenesis and in the establishment of an inflammatory microenvironment, favourable to melanoma tumour progression. Further mechanistic studies are warranted to dissect molecular pathways in which COX-2 is involved. Present evidence suggests that COX-2 inhibitors might be useful as an adjuvant treatment to hinder canine melanoma progression. PMID:27105172

  3. Analgesic Efficacy of Firocoxib, a Selective Inhibitor of Cyclooxygenase 2, in a Mouse Model of Incisional Pain

    PubMed Central

    Reddyjarugu, Balagangadharreddy; Pavek, Todd; Southard, Teresa; Barry, Jason; Singh, Bhupinder

    2015-01-01

    Pain management in laboratory animals is generally accomplished by using opioids and NSAIDs. However, opioid use is hindered by controlled substance requirements and a relatively short duration of action. In this study, we compared the analgesic efficacy of firocoxib (a cyclooxygenase-2-selective NSAID) with that of buprenorphine in the mouse model of plantar incisional pain by objective measurement of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia using von Frey and Hargreaves equipment, respectively. Our experimental design included 5 treatment groups: firocoxib at 10 mg/kg IP every 24 h (F10 group); firocoxib at 20 mg/kg IP every 24 h (F20); buprenorphine at 0.2 mg/kg SC every 8 h; intraperitoneal normal saline every 24 h; and sham group (anesthesia, no incision) treated with firocoxib at 20 mg/kg IP every 24 h (sham+F20). All mice underwent nociceptive assays at 24 h before and 4, 24, 48, and 72 h after surgery. Buprenorphine alleviated allodynia at all time points after incision. The F10 treatment alleviated allodynia at 4, 24, and 48 h, whereas F20 alleviated allodynia at 24, 48, and 72 h. None of the treatments alleviated thermal hyperalgesia at 4h. Except for F10 and buprenorphine at 24 h, all treatments alleviated thermal hyperalgesia at 24, 48, and 72 h. No significant differences were noted between the 2 doses of firocoxib and buprenorphine regarding mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia at all time points. In conclusion, the analgesic efficacy of firocoxib is comparable to that of buprenorphine in this mouse pain model. PMID:26224441

  4. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors for non-small-cell lung cancer: A phase II trial and literature review

    PubMed Central

    YOKOUCHI, HIROSHI; KANAZAWA, KENYA; ISHIDA, TAKASHI; OIZUMI, SATOSHI; SHINAGAWA, NAOFUMI; SUKOH, NORIAKI; HARADA, MASAO; OGURA, SHIGEAKI; MUNAKATA, MITSURU; DOSAKA-AKITA, HIROTOSHI; ISOBE, HIROSHI; NISHIMURA, MASAHARU

    2014-01-01

    Several preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors are efficient for the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, two recent phase III clinical trials using COX-2 inhibitors in combination with platinum-based chemotherapy failed to demonstrate a survival benefit. Thus, validation and discussion regarding the usefulness of COX-2 inhibitors for patients with NSCLC are required. We conducted a prospective trial using COX-2 inhibitors for the treatment of 50 NSCLC patients accrued between April, 2005 and July, 2006. Patients with untreated advanced NSCLC received oral meloxicam (150 mg daily), carboplatin (area under the curve = 5 mg/ml × min on day 1) and docetaxel (60 mg/m2 on day 1) every 3 weeks. The primary endpoint was response rate. The response and disease control rates were 36.0 and 76.0%, respectively. The time-to-progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) were 5.7 months [95% confidence interval (CI): 4.6–6.7] and 13.7 months (95% CI: 11.4–15.9), respectively. The 1-year survival ratio was 56.0%. Grade 3 neuropathy was observed in only 1 patient. We performed tumor immunohistochemistry for COX-2 and p27 and investigated the correlation between their expression and clinical outcome. COX-2 expression in the tumor tended to correlate with a higher response rate (50.0% in the high- and 18.2% in the low-COX-2 group; P=0.092). Based on our results and previous reports, various trial designs, such as the prospective use of COX-2 inhibitors only for patients with COX-2-positive NSCLC, including the exploratory analysis of biomarkers associated with the COX-2 pathway, may be worth further consideration. PMID:25054040

  5. Inhibition of HDAC2 Protects the Retina From Ischemic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jie; Alsarraf, Oday; Dahrouj, Mohammad; Platt, Kenneth A.; Chou, C. James; Rice, Dennis S.; Crosson, Craig E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Protein acetylation is an essential mechanism in regulating transcriptional and inflammatory events. Studies have shown that nonselective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors can protect the retina from ischemic injury in rats. However, the role of specific HDAC isoforms in retinal degenerative processes remains obscure. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of HDAC2 isoform in a mouse model of ischemic retinal injury. Methods. Localization of HDAC2 in mice retinas was evaluated by immunohistochemical analyses. To investigate whether selective reduction in HDAC2 activity can protect the retina from ischemic injury, Hdac2+/− mice were utilized. Electroretinographic (ERG) and morphometric analyses were used to assess retinal function and morphology. Results. Our results demonstrated that HDAC2 is primarily localized in nuclei in inner nuclear and retinal ganglion cell layers, and HDAC2 activity accounted for approximately 35% of the total activities of HDAC1, 2, 3, and 6 in the retina. In wild-type mice, ERG a- and b-waves from ischemic eyes were significantly reduced when compared to pre-ischemia baseline values. Morphometric examination of these eyes revealed significant degeneration of inner retinal layers. In Hdac2+/− mice, ERG a- and b-waves from ischemic eyes were significantly greater than those measured in ischemic eyes from wild-type mice. Morphologic measurements demonstrated that Hdac2+/− mice exhibit significantly less retinal degeneration than wild-type mice. Conclusions. This study demonstrated that suppressing HDAC2 expression can effectively reduce ischemic retinal injury. Our results support the idea that the development of selective HDAC2 inhibitors may provide an efficacious treatment for ischemic retinal injury. PMID:23696608

  6. Ketamine Protects Gamma Oscillations by Inhibiting Hippocampal LTD.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lanting; Yang, Xiu-Juan; Huang, Ying; Sun, Eve Y; Sun, Mu

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptors have been widely reported to be involved in the regulation of synaptic plasticity through effects on long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). LTP and LTD have been implicated in learning and memory processes. Besides synaptic plasticity, it is known that the phenomenon of gamma oscillations is critical in cognitive functions. Synaptic plasticity has been widely studied, however it is still not clear, to what degree synaptic plasticity regulates the oscillations of neuronal networks. Two NMDA receptor antagonists, ketamine and memantine, have been shown to regulate LTP and LTD, to promote cognitive functions, and have even been reported to bring therapeutic effects in major depression and Alzheimer's disease respectively. These compounds allow us to investigate the putative interrelationship between network oscillations and synaptic plasticity and to learn more about the mechanisms of their therapeutic effects. In the present study, we have identified that ketamine and memantine could inhibit LTD, without impairing LTP in the CA1 region of mouse hippocampus, which may underlie the mechanism of these drugs' therapeutic effects. Our results suggest that NMDA-induced LTD caused a marked loss in the gamma power, and pretreatment with 10 μM ketamine prevented the oscillatory loss via its inhibitory effect on LTD. Our study provides a new understanding of the role of NMDA receptors on hippocampal plasticity and oscillations. PMID:27467732

  7. Ketamine Protects Gamma Oscillations by Inhibiting Hippocampal LTD

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lanting; Yang, Xiu-Juan; Huang, Ying; Sun, Eve Y.

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptors have been widely reported to be involved in the regulation of synaptic plasticity through effects on long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). LTP and LTD have been implicated in learning and memory processes. Besides synaptic plasticity, it is known that the phenomenon of gamma oscillations is critical in cognitive functions. Synaptic plasticity has been widely studied, however it is still not clear, to what degree synaptic plasticity regulates the oscillations of neuronal networks. Two NMDA receptor antagonists, ketamine and memantine, have been shown to regulate LTP and LTD, to promote cognitive functions, and have even been reported to bring therapeutic effects in major depression and Alzheimer’s disease respectively. These compounds allow us to investigate the putative interrelationship between network oscillations and synaptic plasticity and to learn more about the mechanisms of their therapeutic effects. In the present study, we have identified that ketamine and memantine could inhibit LTD, without impairing LTP in the CA1 region of mouse hippocampus, which may underlie the mechanism of these drugs’ therapeutic effects. Our results suggest that NMDA-induced LTD caused a marked loss in the gamma power, and pretreatment with 10 μM ketamine prevented the oscillatory loss via its inhibitory effect on LTD. Our study provides a new understanding of the role of NMDA receptors on hippocampal plasticity and oscillations. PMID:27467732

  8. Wall teichoic acid protects Staphylococcus aureus from inhibition by Congo red and other dyes

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takashi; Campbell, Jennifer; Kim, Younghoon; Swoboda, Jonathan G.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Walker, Suzanne; Gilmore, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Polyanionic polymers, including lipoteichoic acid and wall teichoic acid, are important determinants of the charged character of the staphylococcal cell wall. This study was designed to investigate the extent to which teichoic acid contributes to protection from anionic azo dyes and to identify barriers to drug penetration for development of new antibiotics for multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection. Methods We studied antimicrobial activity of azo dyes against S. aureus strains with or without inhibition of teichoic acid in vitro and in vivo. Results We observed that inhibition of wall teichoic acid expression resulted in an ∼1000-fold increase in susceptibility to azo dyes such as Congo red, reducing its MIC from >1024 to <4 mg/L. Sensitization occurred when the first step in the wall teichoic acid pathway, catalysed by TarO, was inhibited either by mutation or by chemical inhibition. In contrast, genetic blockade of lipoteichoic acid biosynthesis did not confer Congo red susceptibility. Based on this finding, combination therapy was tested using the highly synergistic combination of Congo red plus tunicamycin at sub-MIC concentrations (to inhibit wall teichoic acid biosynthesis). The combination rescued Caenorhabditis elegans from a lethal challenge of S. aureus. Conclusions Our studies show that wall teichoic acid confers protection to S. aureus from anionic azo dyes and related compounds, and its inhibition raises the prospect of development of new combination therapies based on this inhibition. PMID:22615298

  9. HDAC Inhibition Elicits Myocardial Protective Effect through Modulation of MKK3/Akt-1

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ting C.; Du, Jianfeng; Zhuang, Shugang; Liu, Paul; Zhang, Ling X.

    2013-01-01

    We and others have demonstrated that HDAC inhibition protects the heart against myocardial injury. It is known that Akt-1 and MAP kinase play an essential role in modulation of myocardial protection and cardiac preconditioning. Our recent observations have shown that Akt-1 was activated in post-myocardial infarction following HDAC inhibition. However, it remains unknown whether MKK3 and Akt-1 are involved in HDAC inhibition-induced myocardial protection in acute myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury. We sought to investigate whether the genetic disruption of Akt-1 and MKK3 eliminate cardioprotection elicited by HDAC inhibition and whether Akt-1 is associated with MKK3 to ultimately achieve protective effects. Adult wild type and MKK3−/−, Akt-1−/− mice received intraperitoneal injections of trichostatin A (0.1mg/kg), a potent inhibitor of HDACs. The hearts were subjected to 30 min myocardial ischemia/30 min reperfusion in the Langendorff perfused heart after twenty four hours to elicit pharmacologic preconditioning. Left ventricular function was measured, and infarct size was determined. Acetylation and phosphorylation of MKK3 were detected and disruption of Akt-1 abolished both acetylation and phosphorylation of MKK3. HDAC inhibition produces an improvement in left ventricular functional recovery, but these effects were abrogated by disruption of either Akt-1 or MKK3. Disruption of Akt-1 or MKK3 abolished the effects of HDAC inhibition-induced reduction of infarct size. Trichostatin A treatment resulted in an increase in MKK3 phosphorylation or acetylation in myocardium. Taken together, these results indicate that stimulation of the MKK3 and Akt-1 pathway is a novel approach to HDAC inhibition -induced cardioprotection. PMID:23762381

  10. Altered mRNA editing and expression of ionotropic glutamate receptors after kainic acid exposure in cyclooxygenase-2 deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Caracciolo, Luca; Barbon, Alessandro; Palumbo, Sara; Mora, Cristina; Toscano, Christopher D; Bosetti, Francesca; Barlati, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Kainic acid (KA) binds to the AMPA/KA receptors and induces seizures that result in inflammation, oxidative damage and neuronal death. We previously showed that cyclooxygenase-2 deficient (COX-2(-/-)) mice are more vulnerable to KA-induced excitotoxicity. Here, we investigated whether the increased susceptibility of COX-2(-/-) mice to KA is associated with altered mRNA expression and editing of glutamate receptors. The expression of AMPA GluR2, GluR3 and KA GluR6 was increased in vehicle-injected COX-2(-/-) mice compared to wild type (WT) mice in hippocampus and cortex, whereas gene expression of NMDA receptors was decreased. KA treatment decreased the expression of AMPA, KA and NMDA receptors in the hippocampus, with a significant effect in COX-2(-/-) mice. Furthermore, we analyzed RNA editing levels and found that the level of GluR3 R/G editing site was selectively increased in the hippocampus and decreased in the cortex in COX-2(-/-) compared with WT mice. After KA, GluR4 R/G editing site, flip form, was increased in the hippocampus of COX-2(-/-) mice. Treatment of WT mice with the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib for two weeks decreased the expression of AMPA/KA and NMDAR subunits after KA, as observed in COX-2(-/-) mice. After KA exposure, COX-2(-/-) mice showed increased mRNA expression of markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, such as cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), microglia (CD11b) and astrocyte (GFAP). Thus, COX-2 gene deletion can exacerbate the inflammatory response to KA. We suggest that COX-2 plays a role in attenuating glutamate excitotoxicity by modulating RNA editing of AMPA/KA and mRNA expression of all ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits and, in turn, neuronal excitability. These changes may contribute to the increased vulnerability of COX-2(-/-) mice to KA. The overstimulation of glutamate receptors as a consequence of COX-2 gene deletion suggests a functional coupling between COX-2 and the

  11. MAPK pathway activation by chronic lead-exposure increases vascular reactivity through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2-dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Simões, Maylla Ronacher; Aguado, Andrea; Fiorim, Jonaína; Silveira, Edna Aparecida; Azevedo, Bruna Fernandes; Toscano, Cindy Medice; Zhenyukh, Olha; Briones, Ana María; Alonso, María Jesús; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Salaices, Mercedes

    2015-03-01

    Chronic exposure to low lead concentration produces hypertension; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We analyzed the role of oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2-dependent pathways and MAPK in the vascular alterations induced by chronic lead exposure. Aortas from lead-treated Wistar rats (1st dose: 10 μg/100 g; subsequent doses: 0.125 μg/100 g, intramuscular, 30 days) and cultured aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from Sprague Dawley rats stimulated with lead (20 μg/dL) were used. Lead blood levels of treated rats attained 21.7 ± 2.38 μg/dL. Lead exposure increased systolic blood pressure and aortic ring contractile response to phenylephrine, reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxation and did not affect sodium nitroprusside relaxation. Endothelium removal and L-NAME left-shifted the response to phenylephrine more in untreated than in lead-treated rats. Apocynin and indomethacin decreased more the response to phenylephrine in treated than in untreated rats. Aortic protein expression of gp91(phox), Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD and COX-2 increased after lead exposure. In cultured VSMCs lead 1) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity and gene and/or protein levels of NOX-1, NOX-4, Mn-SOD, EC-SOD and COX-2 and 2) activated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity and mRNA levels of NOX-1, NOX-4 and COX-2. Blockade of the ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished lead-induced NOX-1, NOX-4 and COX-2 expression. Results show that lead activation of the MAPK signaling pathways activates inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2, suggesting a reciprocal interplay and contribution to vascular dysfunction as an underlying mechanisms for lead-induced hypertension. - Highlights: • Lead-exposure increases oxidative stress, COX-2 expression and vascular reactivity. • Lead exposure activates MAPK signaling pathway. • ROS and COX-2 activation by

  12. Expression of integrin α3β1 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) are positively correlated in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Expression of integrin α3β1 is associated with tumor progression, metastasis, and poor prognosis in several cancers, including breast cancer. Moreover, preclinical studies have revealed important pro-tumorigenic and pro-metastatic functions for this integrin, including tumor growth, survival, invasion, and paracrine induction of angiogenesis. Our previously published work in a preclinical breast cancer model showed that integrin α3β1 promotes expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2/PTGS2), a known driver of breast cancer progression. However, the clinical significance of this regulation was unknown. The objective of the current study was to assess the clinical relevance of the relationship between integrin α3β1 and COX2 by testing for their correlated expression among various forms of human breast cancer. Methods Immunohistochemistry was performed to assess co-expression of α3 and COX2 in specimens of human invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC), either on a commercial tissue microarray (n = 59 samples) or obtained from Albany Medical Center archives (n = 68 samples). Immunostaining intensity for the integrin α3 subunit or COX2 was scored, and Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient analysis was performed to assess their co-expression across and within different tumor subtypes or clinicopathologic criteria. Results Although expression of integrin α3 or COX2 varied among clinical IDC samples, a statistically significant, positive correlation was detected between α3 and COX2 in both tissue microarrays (rs = 0.49, p < 0.001, n = 59) and archived samples (rs = 0.59, p < 0.0001, n = 68). In both sample sets, this correlation was independent of hormone receptor status, histological grade, or disease stage. Conclusions COX2 and α3 are correlated in IDC independently of hormone receptor status or other clinicopathologic features, supporting the hypothesis that integrin α3β1 is a determinant of COX2 expression in human breast

  13. The superoxide anion donor, potassium superoxide, induces pain and inflammation in mice through production of reactive oxygen species and cyclooxygenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Maioli, N.A.; Zarpelon, A.C.; Mizokami, S.S.; Calixto-Campos, C.; Guazelli, C.F.S.; Hohmann, M.S.N.; Pinho-Ribeiro, F.A.; Carvalho, T.T.; Manchope, M.F.; Ferraz, C.R.; Casagrande, R.; Verri, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    It is currently accepted that superoxide anion (O2 •−) is an important mediator in pain and inflammation. The role of superoxide anion in pain and inflammation has been mainly determined indirectly by modulating its production and inactivation. Direct evidence using potassium superoxide (KO2), a superoxide anion donor, demonstrated that it induced thermal hyperalgesia, as assessed by the Hargreaves method. However, it remains to be determined whether KO2 is capable of inducing other inflammatory and nociceptive responses attributed to superoxide anion. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the nociceptive and inflammatory effects of KO2. The KO2-induced inflammatory responses evaluated in mice were: mechanical hyperalgesia (electronic version of von Frey filaments), thermal hyperalgesia (hot plate), edema (caliper rule), myeloperoxidase activity (colorimetric assay), overt pain-like behaviors (flinches, time spent licking and writhing score), leukocyte recruitment, oxidative stress, and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression (quantitative PCR). Administration of KO2 induced mechanical hyperalgesia, thermal hyperalgesia, paw edema, leukocyte recruitment, the writhing response, paw flinching, and paw licking in a dose-dependent manner. KO2 also induced time-dependent cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression in the paw skin. The nociceptive, inflammatory, and oxidative stress components of KO2-induced responses were responsive to morphine (analgesic opioid), quercetin (antioxidant flavonoid), and/or celecoxib (anti-inflammatory cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor) treatment. In conclusion, the well-established superoxide anion donor KO2 is a valuable tool for studying the mechanisms and pharmacological susceptibilities of superoxide anion-triggered nociceptive and inflammatory responses ranging from mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia to overt pain-like behaviors, edema, and leukocyte recruitment. PMID:25714890

  14. The superoxide anion donor, potassium superoxide, induces pain and inflammation in mice through production of reactive oxygen species and cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Maioli, N A; Zarpelon, A C; Mizokami, S S; Calixto-Campos, C; Guazelli, C F S; Hohmann, M S N; Pinho-Ribeiro, F A; Carvalho, T T; Manchope, M F; Ferraz, C R; Casagrande, R; Verri, W A

    2015-04-01

    It is currently accepted that superoxide anion (O2•-) is an important mediator in pain and inflammation. The role of superoxide anion in pain and inflammation has been mainly determined indirectly by modulating its production and inactivation. Direct evidence using potassium superoxide (KO2), a superoxide anion donor, demonstrated that it induced thermal hyperalgesia, as assessed by the Hargreaves method. However, it remains to be determined whether KO2 is capable of inducing other inflammatory and nociceptive responses attributed to superoxide anion. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the nociceptive and inflammatory effects of KO2. The KO2-induced inflammatory responses evaluated in mice were: mechanical hyperalgesia (electronic version of von Frey filaments), thermal hyperalgesia (hot plate), edema (caliper rule), myeloperoxidase activity (colorimetric assay), overt pain-like behaviors (flinches, time spent licking and writhing score), leukocyte recruitment, oxidative stress, and cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression (quantitative PCR). Administration of KO2 induced mechanical hyperalgesia, thermal hyperalgesia, paw edema, leukocyte recruitment, the writhing response, paw flinching, and paw licking in a dose-dependent manner. KO2 also induced time-dependent cyclooxygenase-2 mRNA expression in the paw skin. The nociceptive, inflammatory, and oxidative stress components of KO2-induced responses were responsive to morphine (analgesic opioid), quercetin (antioxidant flavonoid), and/or celecoxib (anti-inflammatory cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor) treatment. In conclusion, the well-established superoxide anion donor KO2 is a valuable tool for studying the mechanisms and pharmacological susceptibilities of superoxide anion-triggered nociceptive and inflammatory responses ranging from mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia to overt pain-like behaviors, edema, and leukocyte recruitment. PMID:25714890

  15. Alpha-lipoic acid protects cardiomyocytes against hypoxia/reoxygenation injury by inhibiting autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Xueming; Chen, Aihua Yang, Pingzhen; Song, Xudong; Liu, Yingfeng; Li, Zhiliang; Wang, Xianbao; Wang, Lizi; Li, Yunpeng

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •We observed the cell viability and death subjected to H/R in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. •We observed the degree of autophagy subjected to H/R in H9c2 cardiomyocytes. •LA inhibited the degree of autophagy in parallel to the enhanced cell survival. •LA inhibited the autophagy in parallel to the decreased total cell death. •We concluded that LA protected cardiomyocytes against H/R by inhibiting autophagy. -- Abstract: Hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) is an important in vitro model for exploring the molecular mechanisms and functions of autophagy during myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). Alpha-lipoic acid (LA) plays an important role in the etiology of cardiovascular disease. Autophagy is widely implicated in myocardial I/R injury. We assessed the degree of autophagy by pretreatment with LA exposed to H/R in H9c2 cell based on the expression levels of Beclin-1, LC3II/LC3I, and green fluorescent protein-labeled LC3 fusion proteins. Autophagic vacuoles were confirmed in H9c2 cells exposed to H/R using transmission electron microscopy. Our findings indicated that pretreatment with LA inhibited the degree of autophagy in parallel to the enhanced cell survival and decreased total cell death in H9c2 cells exposed to H/R. We conclude that LA protects cardiomyocytes against H/R injury by inhibiting autophagy.

  16. Atorvastatin protects cardiomyocytes from oxidative stress by inhibiting LOX-1 expression and cardiomyocyte apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Cheng, Linfang; Wang, Qiqi; Zhou, Dongchen; Wu, Zhigang; Shen, Ling; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Jianhua

    2015-03-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a major health problem worldwide. The most severe form of CAD is acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Recent studies have demonstrated the beneficial role of atorvastatin in ACS; however, the mechanisms underlying this effect have not been fully clarified. Growing evidence indicates that activation of the lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) plays an important role in oxidative stress-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis during ACS. In this study, we examined whether atorvastatin inhibits H2O2-induced LOX-1 expression and H9c2 cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and investigated the underlying signaling pathway. Treatment of H9c2 cardiomyocytes with H2O2 resulted in elevated expression of LOX-1 mRNA and protein, as well as increased caspase-3 and -9 protein expression and cell apoptosis. H2O2-induced LOX-1 expression, caspase protein expression, and cardiomyocyte apoptosis were attenuated by pretreatment with atorvastatin. Atorvastatin activated H2O2-inhibited phosphorylation of Akt in a concentration-dependent manner. The Akt inhibitor, LY294002, inhibited the effect of atorvastatin on inducing Akt phosphorylation and on suppressing H2O2-mediated caspase up-regulation and cell apoptosis. These findings indicate that atorvastatin protects cardiomyocyte from oxidative stress via inhibition of LOX-1 expression and apoptosis, and that activation of H2O2-inhibited phosphorylation of Akt may play an important role in the protective function of atorvastatin. PMID:25630653

  17. DNA-hypomethylating agent, 5'-azacytidine, induces cyclooxygenase-2 expression via the PI3-kinase/Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2 pathways in human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seon-Mi; Kim, Song-Ja

    2015-10-01

    The cytosine analogue 5'-azacytidine (5'-aza) induces DNA hypomethylation by inhibiting DNA methyltransferase. In clinical trials, 5'-aza is widely used in epigenetic anticancer treatments. Accumulated evidence shows that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is overexpressed in various cancers, indicating that it may play a critical role in carcinogenesis. However, few studies have been performed to explore the molecular mechanism underlying the increased COX-2 expression. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that 5'-aza regulates COX-2 expression and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production. The human fibrosarcoma cell line HT1080, was treated with various concentrations of 5'-aza for different time periods. Protein expressions of COX-2, DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), pAkt, Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and phosphorylated ERK (pERK) were determined using western blot analysis, and COX-2 mRNA expression was determined using RT-PCR. PGE2 production was evaluated using the PGE2 assay kit. The localization and expression of COX-2 were determined using immunofluorescence staining. Treatment with 5'-aza induces protein and mRNA expression of COX-2. We also observed that 5'-aza-induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production were inhibited by S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), a methyl donor. Treatment with 5'-aza phosphorylates PI3-kinase/Akt and ERK-1/2; inhibition of these pathways by LY294002, an inhibitor of PI3-kinase/Akt, or PD98059, an inhibitor of ERK-1/2, respectively, prevents 5'-aza-induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production. Overall, these observations indicate that the hypomethylating agent 5'-aza modulates COX-2 expression via the PI3-kinase/Akt and ERK-1/2 pathways in human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. PMID:26238650

  18. Topoisomerase 1 inhibition suppresses inflammatory genes and protects from death by inflammation.

    PubMed

    Rialdi, Alex; Campisi, Laura; Zhao, Nan; Lagda, Arvin Cesar; Pietzsch, Colette; Ho, Jessica Sook Yuin; Martinez-Gil, Luis; Fenouil, Romain; Chen, Xiaoting; Edwards, Megan; Metreveli, Giorgi; Jordan, Stefan; Peralta, Zuleyma; Munoz-Fontela, Cesar; Bouvier, Nicole; Merad, Miriam; Jin, Jian; Weirauch, Matthew; Heinz, Sven; Benner, Chris; van Bakel, Harm; Basler, Christopher; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Bukreyev, Alexander; Marazzi, Ivan

    2016-05-27

    The host innate immune response is the first line of defense against pathogens and is orchestrated by the concerted expression of genes induced by microbial stimuli. Deregulated expression of these genes is linked to the initiation and progression of diseases associated with exacerbated inflammation. We identified topoisomerase 1 (Top1) as a positive regulator of RNA polymerase II transcriptional activity at pathogen-induced genes. Depletion or chemical inhibition of Top1 suppresses the host response against influenza and Ebola viruses as well as bacterial products. Therapeutic pharmacological inhibition of Top1 protected mice from death in experimental models of lethal inflammation. Our results indicate that Top1 inhibition could be used as therapy against life-threatening infections characterized by an acutely exacerbated immune response. PMID:27127234

  19. PHD Inhibition Mitigates and Protects Against Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal Toxicity via HIF2

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Cullen M.; Miao, Yu Rebecca; Diep, Anh N.; Wu, Colleen; Rankin, Erinn B.; Atwood, Todd F.; Xing, Lei; Giaccia, Amato J.

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity can be a major source of morbidity and mortality after radiation exposure. There is an unmet need for effective preventative or mitigative treatments against the potentially fatal diarrhea and water loss induced by radiation damage to the GI tract. We report that prolyl hydroxylase inhibition by genetic knockout or pharmacologic inhibition of all PHD isoforms by the small molecule dimethyloxyallylglycine (DMOG) increases HIF expression, improves epithelial integrity, reduces apoptosis, and increases intestinal angiogenesis, all of which are essential for radioprotection. HIF2, but not HIF1, is both necessary and sufficient to prevent radiation-induced GI toxicity and death. Increased VEGF expression contributes to the protective effects of HIF2, since inhibition of VEGF function reversed the radioprotection and radiomitigation afforded by DMOG. Additionally, mortality is reduced from abdominal or total body irradiation even when DMOG is given 24 hours after exposure. Thus, prolyl hydroxylase inhibition represents a new treatment strategy to protect against and mitigate GI toxicity from both therapeutic radiation and potentially lethal radiation exposures. PMID:24828078

  20. NMI-1182, a gastro-protective cyclo-oxygenase-inhibiting nitric oxide donor.

    PubMed

    Ellis, James L; Augustyniak, Michael E; Cochran, Edward D; Earl, Richard A; Garvey, David S; Gordon, Laura J; Janero, David R; Khanapure, Subhash P; Letts, L Gordon; Melim, Terry L; Murty, Madhavi G; Schwalb, David J; Shumway, Matthew J; Selig, William M; Trocha, A Mark; Young, Delano V; Zemtseva, Irina S

    2005-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used to treat inflammation and to provide pain relief but suffer from a major liability concerning their propensity to cause gastric damage. As nitric oxide (NO) is known to be gastro-protective we have synthesized a NO-donating prodrug of naproxen named NMI-1182. We evaluated two cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-inhibiting nitric oxide donors (CINODs), NMI-1182 and AZD3582, for their ability to be gastro-protective compared to naproxen and for their anti-inflammatory activity. NMI-1182 and AZD3582 were found to produce similar inhibition of COX activity to that produced by naproxen. Both NMI-1182 and AZD3582 produced significantly less gastric lesions after oral administration than naproxen. All three compounds effectively inhibited paw swelling in the rat carrageenan paw edema model. In the carrageenan air pouch model all three compounds significantly reduced PGE2 levels in the pouch exudate but only NMI-1182 and naproxen inhibited leukocyte influx. These data demonstrate that NMI-1182 has comparable anti-inflammatory activity to naproxen but with a much reduced likelihood to cause gastric damage. PMID:16259719

  1. Minocycline protects PC12 cells against NMDA-induced injury via inhibiting 5-lipoxygenase activation.

    PubMed

    Song, Ying; Wei, Er-Qing; Zhang, Wei-Ping; Ge, Qiu-Fu; Liu, Jian-Ren; Wang, Meng-Ling; Huang, Xiao-Jia; Hu, Xin; Chen, Zhong

    2006-04-26

    Recently, we have reported that minocycline, a semi-synthetic tetracycline with neuroprotective effects, inhibits the in vitro ischemic-like injury and 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) activation in PC12 cells. In the present study, we further determined whether minocycline protects PC12 cells from excitotoxicity via inhibiting 5-LOX activation. We used N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA, 200 microM) to induce early (exposure for 6 h) and delayed (exposure for 6 h followed by 24 h recovery) injuries. We found that NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine, 5-LOX inhibitor caffeic acid and minocycline concentration dependently attenuated NMDA-induced early and delayed cell injuries (viability reduction and cell death). However, only ketamine (1 microM) inhibited NMDA-evoked elevation of intracellular calcium. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis showed that NMDA induced 5-LOX translocation to the nuclear membrane after 1- to 6-h exposure which was confirmed by Western blotting, indicating that 5-LOX was activated. Ketamine, caffeic acid and minocycline (each at 1 microM) inhibited 5-LOX translocation after early injury. After delayed injury, PC12 cells were shrunk, and 5-LOX was translocated to the nuclei and nuclear membrane; ketamine, caffeic acid and minocycline inhibited both cell shrinking and 5-LOX translocation. As a control, 12-LOX inhibitor baicalein showed a weak effect on cell viability and death, but no effect on 5-LOX translocation. Therefore, we conclude that the protective effect of minocycline on NMDA-induced injury is partly mediated by inhibiting 5-LOX activation. PMID:16574083

  2. Phosphorylation by the c-Abl protein tyrosine kinase inhibits parkin's ubiquitination and protective function

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Han Seok; Lee, Yunjong; Shin, Joo-Ho; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S.; Gadad, Bharathi Shrikanth; Koleske, Anthony J.; Pletnikova, Olga; Troncoso, Juan C.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in PARK2/Parkin, which encodes a ubiquitin E3 ligase, cause autosomal recessive Parkinson disease (PD). Here we show that the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl phosphorylates tyrosine 143 of parkin, inhibiting parkin's ubiquitin E3 ligase activity and protective function. c-Abl is activated by dopaminergic stress and by dopaminergic neurotoxins, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) in vitro and in vivo by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), leading to parkin inactivation, accumulation of the parkin substrates aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase-interacting multifunctional protein type 2 (AIMP2) (p38/JTV-1) and fuse-binding protein 1 (FBP1), and cell death. STI-571, a c-Abl-family kinase inhibitor, prevents the phosphorylation of parkin, maintaining parkin in a catalytically active and protective state. STI-571’s protective effects require parkin, as shRNA knockdown of parkin prevents STI-571 protection. Conditional knockout of c-Abl in the nervous system also prevents the phosphorylation of parkin, the accumulation of its substrates, and subsequent neurotoxicity in response to MPTP intoxication. In human postmortem PD brain, c-Abl is active, parkin is tyrosine-phosphorylated, and AIMP2 and FBP1 accumulate in the substantia nigra and striatum. Thus, tyrosine phosphorylation of parkin by c-Abl is a major posttranslational modification that inhibits parkin function, possibly contributing to pathogenesis of sporadic PD. Moreover, inhibition of c-Abl may be a neuroprotective approach in the treatment of PD. PMID:20823226

  3. Puerarin protects against CCl4-induced liver fibrosis in mice: possible role of PARP-1 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Shi, Xiao-Lei; Feng, Min; Wang, Xun; Zhang, Zhi-Heng; Zhao, Xin; Han, Bing; Ma, Hu-Cheng; Dai, Bo; Ding, Yi-Tao

    2016-09-01

    Liver fibrosis, which is the pathophysiologic process of the liver due to sustained wound healing in response to chronic liver injury, will eventually progress to cirrhosis. Puerarin, a bioactive isoflavone glucoside derived from the traditional Chinese medicine pueraria, has been reported to have many anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrosis properties. However, the detailed mechanisms are not well studied yet. This study aimed to investigate the effects of puerarin on liver function and fibrosis process in mice induced by CCl4. C57BL/6J mice were intraperitoneally injected with 10% CCl4 in olive oil(2mL/kg) with or without puerarin co-administration (100 and 200mg/kg intraperitoneally once daily) for four consecutive weeks. As indicated by the ameliorative serum hepatic enzymes and the reduced histopathologic abnormalities, the data collected showed that puerarin can protect against CCl4-induced chronic liver injury. Moreover, CCl4-induced development of fibrosis, as evidenced by increasing expression of alpha smooth muscle actin(α-SMA), collagen-1, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and connective tissue growth factor(CTGF) in liver, were suppressed by puerarin. Possible mechanisms related to these suppressive effects were realized by inhibition on NF-κB signaling pathway, reactive oxygen species(ROS) production and mitochondrial dysfunction in vivo. In addition, these protective inhibition mentioned above were driven by down-regulation of PARP-1 due to puerarin because puerarin can attenuate the PARP-1 expression in CCl4-damaged liver and PJ34, a kind of PARP-1 inhibitor, mimicked puerarin's protection. In conclusion, puerarin played a protective role in CCl4-induced liver fibrosis probably through inhibition of PARP-1 and subsequent attenuation of NF-κB, ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:27318789

  4. Pioglitazone Protected against Cardiac Hypertrophy via Inhibiting AKT/GSK3β and MAPK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wen-Ying; Ma, Zhen-Guo; Xu, Si-Chi; Zhang, Ning; Tang, Qi-Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ) has been closely involved in the process of cardiovascular diseases. This study was to investigate whether pioglitazone (PIO), a PPARγ agonist, could protect against pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Mice were orally given PIO (2.5 mg/kg) from 1 week after aortic banding and continuing for 7 weeks. The morphological examination and biochemical analysis were used to evaluate the effects of PIO. Neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes were also used to verify the protection of PIO against hypertrophy in vitro. The results in our study demonstrated that PIO remarkably inhibited hypertrophic response induced by aortic banding in vivo. Besides, PIO also suppressed cardiac fibrosis in vivo. PIO treatment also inhibited the activation of protein kinase B (AKT)/glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in the heart. In addition, PIO alleviated angiotensin II-induced hypertrophic response in vitro. In conclusion, PIO could inhibit cardiac hypertrophy via attenuation of AKT/GSK3β and MAPK pathways. PMID:27110236

  5. Edaravone protects osteoblastic cells from dexamethasone through inhibiting oxidative stress and mPTP opening.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wen-xiao; Zheng, Hai-ya; Lan, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Existing evidences have emphasized an important role of oxidative stress in dexamethasone (Dex)-induced osteoblastic cell damages. Here, we investigated the possible anti-Dex activity of edaravone in osteoblastic cells, and studied the underlying mechanisms. We showed that edaravone dose-dependently attenuated Dex-induced death and apoptosis of established human or murine osteoblastic cells. Further, Dex-mediated damages to primary murine osteoblasts were also alleviated by edaravone. In osteoblastic cells/osteoblasts, Dex induced significant oxidative stresses, tested by increased levels of reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation, which were remarkably inhibited by edaravone. Meanwhile, edaravone repressed Dex-induced mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening, or mitochondrial membrane potential reduction, in osteoblastic cells/osteoblasts. Significantly, edaravone-induced osteoblast-protective activity against Dex was alleviated with mPTP inhibition through cyclosporin A or cyclophilin-D siRNA. Together, we demonstrate that edaravone protects osteoblasts from Dex-induced damages probably through inhibiting oxidative stresses and following mPTP opening. PMID:26179849

  6. Astrocyte-Specific Overexpression of Nrf2 Protects Striatal Neurons from Mitochondrial Complex II Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Calkins, Marcus J.; Vargas, Marcelo R.; Johnson, Delinda A.; Johnson, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that is known to regulate a variety of cytoprotective genes through the antioxidant response element (ARE). This endogenous response is one of the major pathways by which cells are protected from xenobiotic or innate oxidative insults. Furthermore, in neural systems, astrocyte-specific activation of Nrf2 is known to protect neurons. In previous work, our laboratory found that Nrf2 protects from intrastriatal injections of the mitochondrial complex II inhibitor malonate. Here, we extend these results to show that multiple methods of astrocyte-specific Nrf2 overexpression provide protection from neurotoxicity in vivo. GFAP-Nrf2 transgenic mice are significantly more resistant to malonate lesioning. This outcome is associated with an increased basal resistance, but more so, an enhanced Nrf2 response to lesioning that attenuated the ensuing neurotoxicity. Furthermore, striatal transplantation of neuroprogenitor cells overexpressing Nrf2 that differentiate into astrocytes after grafting also significantly reduced malonate toxicity. Overall, these data establish that enhanced astrocytic Nrf2 response and Nrf2 preconditioning are both sufficient to protect from acute lesions from mitochondrial complex II inhibition. PMID:20211941

  7. Actin and DNA Protect Histones from Degradation by Bacterial Proteases but Inhibit Their Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sol, Asaf; Skvirsky, Yaniv; Blotnick, Edna; Bachrach, Gilad; Muhlrad, Andras

    2016-01-01

    Histones are small polycationic proteins located in the cell nucleus. Together, DNA and histones are integral constituents of the nucleosomes. Upon apoptosis, necrosis, and infection – induced cell death, histones are released from the cell. The extracellular histones have strong antimicrobial activity but are also cytotoxic and thought as mediators of cell death in sepsis. The antimicrobial activity of the cationic extracellular histones is inhibited by the polyanionic DNA and F-actin, which also become extracellular upon cell death. DNA and F-actin protect histones from degradation by the proteases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Porphyromonas gingivalis. However, though the integrity of the histones is protected, the activity of histones as antibacterial agents is lost. The inhibition of the histone’s antibacterial activity and their protection from proteolysis by DNA and F-actin indicate a tight electrostatic interaction between the positively charged histones and negatively charged DNA and F-actin, which may have physiological significance in maintaining the equilibrium between the beneficial antimicrobial activity of extracellular histones and their cytotoxic effects. PMID:27555840

  8. Overexpression of heme oxygenase-1 protects smooth muscle cells against oxidative injury and inhibits cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Zhang, Bao Hui; Chen, Li; An, Wei

    2002-06-01

    To investigate whether the expression of exogenous heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) gene within vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) could protect the cells from free radical attack and inhibit cell proliferation, we established an in vitro transfection of human HO-1 gene into rat VSMC mediated by a retroviral vector. The results showed that the profound expression of HO-1 protein as well as HO activity was 1.8- and 2.0-fold increased respectively in the transfected cells compared to the non-transfected ones. The treatment of VSMC with different concentrations of H2O2 led to the remarkable cell damage as indicated by survival rate and LDH leakage. However, the resistance of the HO-1 transfected VSMC against H2O2 was significantly raised. This protective effect was dramatically diminished when the transfected VSMC were pretreated with ZnPP-IX, a specific inhibitor of HO, for 24 h. In addition, we found that the growth potential of the transfected cells was significantly inhibited directly by increased activity of HO-1, and this effect might be related to decreased phosphorylation of MAPK. These results suggest that the overexpression of introduced hHO-1 is potentially able to reduce the risk factors of atherosclerosis, partially due to its cellular protection against oxidative injury and to its inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation. PMID:12118938

  9. Corosolic acid inhibits the proliferation of glomerular mesangial cells and protects against diabetic renal damage

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Qiang; Tian, Wen; Liu, Xiao-Xiao; Zhang, Kai; Huo, Jun-Cheng; Liu, Wen-Juan; Li, Ping; Xiao, Xiong; Zhao, Ming-Gao; Cao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus (DM). This study aimed to explore the effects of corosolic acid (CA) on the renal damage of DM and the mechanisms behind these effects. The renoprotective effect of CA was investigated in type 1 diabetic rats and db/db mice. The kidneys and glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs) were used to study the proliferation of GMCs by immunostaining and MTT assay. Further immunoblotting, siRNA, qPCR analysis, and detecting of NADPH oxidase activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were performed to explore relevant molecular mechanisms. In CA-treated diabetic animals, diabetes-induced albuminuria, increased serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen were significantly attenuated, and glomerular hypertrophy, mesangial expansion and fibrosis were ameliorated. Furthermore, CA significantly inhibited proliferation of GMCs and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK in both diabetic animals and high glucose (HG)-induced GMCs. CA also normalized Δψm and inhibited HG-induced NADPH oxidase activity, ROS generation and NOX4, NOX2, p22phox and p47phox expression. More importantly, CA inhibited GMC proliferation mediated by NADPH/ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways. These findings suggest that CA exert the protective effect on DN by anti-proliferation resulted from inhibition of p38 MAPK- and NADPH-mediated inactivation of ERK1/2. PMID:27229751

  10. Stanniocalcin-1 inhibits thrombin-induced signaling and protects from bleomycin-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Luping; Zhang, Lin; Ju, Huiming; Li, Qingtian; Pan, Jenny Szu-Chin; Al-Lawati, Zahraa; Sheikh-Hamad, David

    2015-01-01

    Thrombin-induced and proteinase-activated receptor 1 (PAR1)-mediated signaling increases ROS production, activates ERK, and promotes inflammation and fibroblast proliferation in bleomycin-induced lung injury. Stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) activates anti-oxidant pathways, inhibits inflammation and provides cytoprotection; hence, we hypothesized that STC1 will inhibit thrombin/PAR1 signaling and protect from bleomycin-induced pneumonitis. We determined thrombin level and activity, thrombin-induced PAR-1-mediated signaling, superoxide generation and lung pathology after intra-tracheal administration of bleomycin to WT and STC1 Tg mice. Lungs of bleomycin-treated WT mice display: severe pneumonitis; increased generation of superoxide; vascular leak; increased thrombin protein abundance and activity; activation of ERK; greater cytokine/chemokine release and infiltration with T-cells and macrophages. Lungs of STC1 Tg mice displayed none of the above changes. Mechanistic analysis in cultured pulmonary epithelial cells (A549) suggests that STC1 inhibits thrombin-induced and PAR1-mediated ERK activation through suppression of superoxide. In conclusion, STC1 blunts bleomycin-induced rise in thrombin protein and activity, diminishes thrombin-induced signaling through PAR1 to ERK, and inhibits bleomycin-induced pneumonitis. Moreover, our study identifies a new set of cytokines/chemokines, which play a role in the pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced lung injury. These findings broaden the array of potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of lung diseases characterized by thrombin activation, oxidant stress and inflammation. PMID:26640170

  11. QSAR of 2-(4-methylsulphonylphenyl)pyrimidine derivatives as cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors: simple structural fragments as potential modulators of activity.

    PubMed

    Sharma, B K; Singh, P; Pilania, P; Shekhawat, M; Prabhakar, Y S

    2012-04-01

    The cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitory activity of 2-(4-methylsulphonylphenyl)pyrimidine derivatives has been quantitatively analyzed in terms of Dragon descriptors. The derived QSAR models have provided rationales to explain the activity of titled derivatives. The descriptors (Me, Mp, GATS1p and GATS5p) identified in CP-MLR analysis have highlighted the role of atomic properties, such as Sanderson electronegativity and polarizability, to explain the inhibitory activity. Additionally, prevalence of aromatic ether functionality (descriptor nRORPh) and certain structural fragments (number of Me groups, C-001; number of H attached to heteroatom, H-050 and number of H attached to α-C, H-051) in a molecular structure are helpful to rationalize the COX-2 inhibitory activity of pyrimidine derivatives. The partial least square (PLS) analysis has also confirmed the dominance of information content of CP-MLR-identified descriptors for modelling the activity. PMID:21679051

  12. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression is related to nuclear grade in ductal carcinoma in situ and is increased in its normal adjacent epithelium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shim, Veronica; Gauthier, Mona L.; Sudilovsky, Daniel; Mantei, Kristin; Chew, Karen L.; Moore, Dan H.; Cha, Imok; Tlsty, Thea D.; Esserman, Laura J.

    2003-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is emerging as an important cancer biomarker and is now an experimental target for solid tumor treatment.However, no study has exclusively focused on COX-2 expression in early lesions such as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). We examined COX-2 expression by immunohistochemistry in 46 cases of women undergoing surgical resection for DCIS. We found that COX-2 expression was detected in 85% of all DCIS specimens, with increased COX-2 staining correlating with higher nuclear grade. Strikingly, COX-2 staining intensity in the normal adjacent epithelium was stronger than in the DCIS lesion itself. Our observations demonstrate that COX-2 is up-regulated in the normal adjacent epithelium and supports the hypothesis that the surrounding epithelial tissue is part of the disease process in DCIS.

  13. Meloxicam, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, increases the level of serum G-CSF and might be usable as an auxiliary means in G-CSF therapy.

    PubMed

    Hofer, M; Pospísil, M; Znojil, V; Holá, J; Vacek, A; Streitová, D

    2008-01-01

    Hematopoiesis-modulating action of meloxicam, a cyclooxyge-nase-2 inhibitor, has been evaluated in mice. Increased serum level of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) after meloxicam administration has been found in sublethally gamma-irradiated animals. In further experiments hematopoiesis-stimulating effects of meloxicam and G-CSF given alone or in combination have been investigated. Granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cells counts were used to monitor these effects. Meloxicam and exogenous G-CSF did not act synergistically when given in combination, but could be mutually substituted during their repeated administration. The results suggest a promising possibility of using meloxicam as an auxiliary drug reducing the high costs of G-CSF therapy of myelosuppression. PMID:17552878

  14. Inhibited ethylene and propylene glycols for corrosion and freeze protection in water-based HVAC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Roo, A.M. de; Lee, B.W.

    1997-12-31

    Industrially inhibited ethylene and propylene glycols are used extensively to provide protection against equipment damage due to corrosion and freezing. This paper will describe the proper use of these glycols, including system preparation, fluid installation, and fluid maintenance. The impact of the use of these glycols on the operation of the system is discussed along with methods for overcoming any declines in heat transfer. From this discussion, it will become clear why automotive antifreeze formulations should not be used in heating, ventilating, and airconditioning (HVAC) systems. Also included are data on the physical properties of aqueous solutions of ethylene and propylene glycol, the concept of burst vs. freeze protection, typical results of corrosion tests, and methods to use to monitor the fluid for each application.

  15. Inhibition of Granzyme B by PI-9 protects prostate cancer cells from apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Manisha; Hostetter, Daniel R.; Loeb, Carly RK; Simko, Jeffry; Craik, Charles S.

    2012-01-01

    Background In order for tumors to grow and proliferate, they must avoid recognition by immune cells and subsequent death by apoptosis. Granzyme B, a protease located in natural killer cells, initiates apoptosis in target cells. Inhibition of Granzyme B by PI-9, its natural inhibitor, can prevent apoptosis. Here we investigate whether PI-9 protects prostate cancer cells from apoptosis. Methods The expression of PI-9 was quantified by qPCR in several prostate cancer cell lines, and Granzyme B activity was tested in each cell line. PI-9 was overexpressed in LNCaP cells, which lack endogenous PI-9. Apoptosis was induced by natural killer cells in LNCaP cells that either contained or lacked PI-9, and the percent cell death in was quantified. Lastly, PI-9 levels were examined by qPCR and immunohistochemistry in prostate tumor tissue. Results Prostate cancer cell lines that expressed PI-9 could inhibit Granzyme B. Overexpression of PI-9 protected LNCaP cells from natural killer cell-mediated apoptosis. Examination of the levels of PI-9 in tissue from prostate tumors showed that PI-9 could be upregulated in low grade tumors and stochastically dysregulated in high grade tumors. Additionally, PI-9 is found consistently in high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and atrophic lesions. Conclusions These results indicate that overexpression of PI-9 can protect prostate cancer cells from apoptosis, and this effect may occur in human prostate tumors. These findings imply that early prostatic inflammation may trigger this increase in PI-9. This suggests that PI-9 upregulation is needed early in tumor progression, before additional protective mechanisms are in place. PMID:21919028

  16. Protective Effects of Alisma orientale Extract against Hepatic Steatosis via Inhibition of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Min-Kyung; Han, Yu-Ran; Nam, Jeong Soo; Han, Chang Woo; Kim, Byung Joo; Jeong, Han-Sol; Ha, Ki-Tae; Jung, Myeong Ho

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is associated with the pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis. Alisma orientale Juzepzuk is a traditional medicinal herb for diuretics, diabetes, hepatitis, and inflammation. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of methanol extract of the tuber of Alisma orientale (MEAO) against ER stress-induced hepatic steatosis in vitro and in vivo. MEAO inhibited the tunicamycin-induced increase in luciferase activity of ER stress-reporter constructs containing ER stress response element and ATF6 response element. MEAO significantly inhibited tunicamycin-induced ER stress marker expression including GRP78, CHOP, and XBP-1 in tunicamycin-treated Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells and the livers of tunicamycin-injected mice. It also inhibited tunicamycin-induced accumulation of cellular triglyceride. Similar observations were made under physiological ER stress conditions such as in palmitate (PA)-treated HepG2 cells and the livers of high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. MEAO repressed hepatic lipogenic gene expression in PA-treated HepG2 cells and the livers of HFD obese mice. Furthermore, MEAO repressed very low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) expression and improved ApoB secretion in the livers of tunicamycin-injected mice or HFD obese mice as well as in tunicamycin or PA-treated HepG2 cells. Alismol, a guaiane-type sesquiterpenes in Alisma orientale, inhibited GRP78 expression in tunicamycin-treated HepG2 cells. In conclusion, MEAO attenuates ER stress and prevents hepatic steatosis pathogenesis via inhibition of expression of the hepatic lipogenic genes and VLDLR, and enhancement of ApoB secretion. PMID:26540043

  17. Zinc inhibits glycation induced structural, functional modifications in albumin and protects erythrocytes from glycated albumin toxicity.

    PubMed

    Tupe, Rashmi; Kulkarni, Amruta; Adeshara, Krishna; Sankhe, Neena; Shaikh, Shamim; Dalal, Sayli; Bhosale, Siddharth; Gaikwad, Sushama

    2015-08-01

    The present work aims to investigate the concentration and time dependant effect of zinc on the in vitro non enzymatic modifications of albumin by diabetic levels of glucose. Further, preventive and curative effect of zinc was studied by adding zinc before and after initiation of glycation respectively. Glycation of albumin was done at different concentrations of zinc (125, 250 and 500 μM) at different time intervals (21, 28 and 35 days) with appropriate controls. The antiglycation potential of zinc was assessed by estimating different markers of albumin glycation (fructosamines, carbonyls, bound sugar, AGEs), structural modifications (free amino, thiol group, β amyloid, native PAGE, ANS binding, fluorescence lifetime decay and CD analysis) and functional properties (antioxidant activity, hemolysis). Zinc at highest concentration (500 μM) significantly reduced modifications of albumin which was comparable to aminoguanidine and also protected secondary and tertiary structure of albumin after 28 days of incubation. Zinc exhibited significant protective effect on erythrocytes by inhibiting hemolysis. Thus the present study indicate preventive mode of albumin glycation inhibition by zinc. PMID:26027608

  18. Semicarbazone EGA Inhibits Uptake of Diphtheria Toxin into Human Cells and Protects Cells from Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin is a single-chain protein toxin that invades human cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. In acidic endosomes, its translocation domain inserts into endosomal membranes and facilitates the transport of the catalytic domain (DTA) from endosomal lumen into the host cell cytosol. Here, DTA ADP-ribosylates elongation factor 2 inhibits protein synthesis and leads to cell death. The compound 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA) has been previously shown to protect cells from various bacterial protein toxins which deliver their enzymatic subunits from acidic endosomes to the cytosol, including Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin and the binary clostridial actin ADP-ribosylating toxins C2, iota and Clostridium difficile binary toxin (CDT). Here, we demonstrate that EGA also protects human cells from diphtheria toxin by inhibiting the pH-dependent translocation of DTA across cell membranes. The results suggest that EGA might serve for treatment and/or prevention of the severe disease diphtheria. PMID:27428999

  19. Transglutaminase inhibition protects against oxidative stress-induced neuronal death downstream of pathological ERK activation

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Manuela; Berlin, Jill; Li, Xia; Sleiman, Sama F.; Ko, Brendan; Haskew-Layton, Renee; Kim, Eunhee; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.; Iismaa, Siiri E.; Willis, Dianna; Cho, Sunghee; Ratan, Rajiv R.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular deletion of transglutaminase 2 (TG2) has been shown to improve function and survival in a host of neurological conditions including stroke, Huntington’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease. However, unifying schemes by which these crosslinking or polyaminating enzymes participate broadly in neuronal death have yet to be presented. Unexpectedly, we found that in addition to TG2, TG1 gene expression level is significantly induced following stroke in vivo or due to oxidative stress in vitro. Forced expression of TG1 or TG2 proteins is sufficient to induce neuronal death in Rattus novergicus cortical neurons in vitro. Accordingly, molecular deletion of TG2 alone is insufficient to protect Mus musculus neurons from oxidative death. By contrast, structurally diverse inhibitors used at concentrations that inhibit TG1 and TG2 simultaneously are neuroprotective. These small molecules inhibit increases in neuronal transamidating activity induced by oxidative stress; they also protect neurons downstream of pathological ERK activation when added well after the onset of the death stimulus. Together, these studies suggest that multiple TG isoforms, not only TG2, participate in oxidative stress-induced cell death signaling; and that isoform non-selective inhibitors of TG will be most efficacious in combating oxidative death in neurological disorders. PMID:22573678

  20. Pharmacological TLR4 Inhibition Protects against Acute and Chronic Fat-Induced Insulin Resistance in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Liang, Hanyu; Farese, Robert V.; Li, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Aims To evaluate whether pharmacological TLR4 inhibition protects against acute and chronic fat-induced insulin resistance in rats. Materials and Methods For the acute experiment, rats received a TLR4 inhibitor [TAK-242 or E5564 (2x5 mg/kg i.v. bolus)] or vehicle, and an 8-h Intralipid (20%, 8.5 mg/kg/min) or saline infusion, followed by a two-step hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. For the chronic experiment, rats were subcutaneously implanted with a slow-release pellet of TAK-242 (1.5 mg/d) or placebo. Rats then received a high fat diet (HFD) or a low fat control diet (LFD) for 10 weeks, followed by a two-step insulin clamp. Results Acute experiment; the lipid-induced reduction (18%) in insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (Rd) was attenuated by TAK-242 and E5564 (the effect of E5564 was more robust), suggesting improved peripheral insulin action. Insulin was able to suppress hepatic glucose production (HGP) in saline- but not lipid-treated rats. TAK-242, but not E5564, partially restored this effect, suggesting improved HGP. Chronic experiment; insulin-stimulated Rd was reduced ~30% by the HFD, but completely restored by TAK-242. Insulin could not suppress HGP in rats fed a HFD and TAK-242 had no effect on HGP. Conclusions Pharmacological TLR4 inhibition provides partial protection against acute and chronic fat-induced insulin resistance in vivo. PMID:26196892

  1. Ginseng Protects Against Respiratory Syncytial Virus by Modulating Multiple Immune Cells and Inhibiting Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Yu-Na; Lee, Young-Tae; Hwang, Hye Suk; Kim, Ki-Hye; Ko, Eun-Ju; Kim, Min-Chul; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2015-01-01

    Ginseng has been used in humans for thousands of years but its effects on viral infection have not been well understood. We investigated the effects of red ginseng extract (RGE) on respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection using in vitro cell culture and in vivo mouse models. RGE partially protected human epithelial (HEp2) cells from RSV-induced cell death and viral replication. In addition, RGE significantly inhibited the production of RSV-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α) in murine dendritic and macrophage-like cells. More importantly, RGE intranasal pre-treatment prevented loss of mouse body weight after RSV infection. RGE treatment improved lung viral clearance and enhanced the production of interferon (IFN-γ) in bronchoalveolar lavage cells upon RSV infection of mice. Analysis of cellular phenotypes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids showed that RGE treatment increased the populations of CD8+ T cells and CD11c+ dendritic cells upon RSV infection of mice. Taken together, these results provide evidence that ginseng has protective effects against RSV infection through multiple mechanisms, which include improving cell survival, partial inhibition of viral replication and modulation of cytokine production and types of immune cells migrating into the lung. PMID:25658239

  2. Fucoxanthin Protects Cultured Human Keratinocytes against Oxidative Stress by Blocking Free Radicals and Inhibiting Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jian; Piao, Mei Jing; Keum, Young Sam; Kim, Hye Sun; Hyun, Jin Won

    2013-01-01

    Fucoxanthin is an important carotenoid derived from edible brown seaweeds and is used in indigenous herbal medicines. The aim of the present study was to examine the cytoprotective effects of fucoxanthin against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell damage. Fucoxanthin decreased the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species, as assessed by fluorescence spectrometry performed after staining cultured human HaCaT keratinocytes with 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofl uorescein diacetate. In addition, electron spin resonance spectrometry showed that fucoxanthin scavenged hydroxyl radical generated by the Fenton reaction in a cell-free system. Fucoxanthin also inhibited comet tail formation and phospho-histone H2A.X expression, suggesting that it prevents hydrogen peroxideinduced cellular DNA damage. Furthermore, the compound reduced the number of apoptotic bodies stained with Hoechst 33342, indicating that it protected keratinocytes against hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptotic cell death. Finally, fucoxanthin prevented the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. These protective actions were accompanied by the down-regulation of apoptosispromoting mediators (i.e., B-cell lymphoma-2-associated x protein, caspase-9, and caspase-3) and the up-regulation of an apoptosis inhibitor (B-cell lymphoma-2). Taken together, the results of this study suggest that fucoxanthin defends keratinocytes against oxidative damage by scavenging ROS and inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:24244811

  3. Semicarbazone EGA Inhibits Uptake of Diphtheria Toxin into Human Cells and Protects Cells Articlefrom Intoxication.

    PubMed

    Schnell, Leonie; Mittler, Ann-Katrin; Mattarei, Andrea; Tehran, Domenico Azarnia; Montecucco, Cesare; Barth, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin is a single-chain protein toxin that invades human cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. In acidic endosomes, its translocation domain inserts into endosomal membranes and facilitates the transport of the catalytic domain (DTA) from endosomal lumen into the host cell cytosol. Here, DTA ADP-ribosylates elongation factor 2 inhibits protein synthesis and leads to cell death. The compound 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA) has been previously shown to protect cells from various bacterial protein toxins which deliver their enzymatic subunits from acidic endosomes to the cytosol, including Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin and the binary clostridial actin ADP-ribosylating toxins C2, iota and Clostridium difficile binary toxin (CDT). Here, we demonstrate that EGA also protects human cells from diphtheria toxin by inhibiting the pH-dependent translocation of DTA across cell membranes. The results suggest that EGA might serve for treatment and/or prevention of the severe disease diphtheria. PMID:27428999

  4. Verbascoside isolated from Tectona grandis mediates gastric protection in rats via inhibiting proton pump activity.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neetu; Shukla, Nivedita; Singh, Pratibha; Sharma, Rolee; Rajendran, S M; Maurya, Rakesh; Palit, Gautam

    2010-10-01

    Evidences have suggested that Tectona grandis (TG) attenuates gastric mucosal injury; however its mechanism has not yet been established. The aim of present study was to evaluate the gastroprotective mechanism of ethanolic extract of TG (E-EtOH), butanolic fraction (Fr-Bu) and to identify its active constituents. Anti-ulcer activities were evaluated against cold restraint (CRU) and pyloric ligation (PL) induced gastric ulcer models and further confirmed through H(+) K(+)-ATPase inhibitory activity. Cytoprotective activity was evaluated in alcohol (AL) induced gastric ulcer model and further through PGE(2) level. E-EtOH and Fr-Bu attenuated ulcer formation in CRU. Moreover E-EtOH and Fr-Bu displayed potent anti-secretory activity as evident through reduced free acidity and pepsin activity in PL, confirmed further by in vitro inhibition of H(+) K(+)-ATPase activity. In addition cytoprotective potential of E-EtOH and Fr-Bu were apparent with protection in AL model, increased PGE(2) content and enhanced mucin level in PL. Phytochemical investigations of Fr-Bu yielded terpenoides and a phenolic glycoside, verbascoside. The anti-secretory mechanism of verbascoside mediated apparently through inhibition of H(+) K(+)-ATPase with corresponding decrease in plasma gastrin level, is novel to our finding. Gastroprotection elicited by TG might be through proton pump inhibition and consequent augmentation of the defensive mechanism. PMID:20388534

  5. Inhibition of PKR protects against tunicamycin-induced apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Vaughn, Lauren S; Snee, Brittany; Patel, Rekha C

    2014-02-15

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dysfunction is thought to play a significant role in several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, cerebral ischemia, and the prion diseases. ER dysfunction can be mimicked by cellular stress signals such as disruption of calcium homeostasis, inhibition of protein glycosylation, and reduction of disulfide bonds, which results in accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER and leads to cell death by apoptosis. Tunicamycin, which is an inhibitor of protein glycosylation, induces ER stress and apoptosis. In this study, we examined the involvement of double stranded (ds) RNA-activated protein kinase PKR in tunicamycin-induced apoptosis. We used overexpression of the trans-dominant negative, catalytically inactive mutant K296R to inhibit PKR activity in neuroblastoma cells. We demonstrate that inhibition of PKR activation in response to tunicamycin protects neuronal cells from undergoing apoptosis. Furthermore, K296R overexpressing cells show defective PKR activation, delayed eIF2α phosphorylation, dramatically delayed ATF4 expression. In addition, both caspase-3 activation and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP, also known as GADD153) induction, which are markers of apoptotic cells, are absent from K296R overexpression cells in response to tunicamycin. These results establish that PKR activation plays a major regulatory role in induction of apoptosis in response to ER stress and indicates the potential of PKR as possible target for neuroprotective therapeutics. PMID:24334130

  6. The effects of nabumetone, a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, on cisplatin-induced 5-hydroxytryptamine release from the isolated rat ileum.

    PubMed

    Kudo, C; Minami, M; Hirafuji, M; Endo, T; Hamaue, N; Akita, K; Murakami, T; Kawaguchi, H

    2001-01-01

    In order to elucidate 5-HT release influenced by PGE2 in the background of the anticancer drug-induced emesis, the effect of nabumetone, a COX-2 inhibitor, on the release of 5-HT from the isolated rat ileum was investigated. PGE2 produced a concentration-dependent increase (10(-9) to 10 M) and decrease (10(-8) to 10(-6) M) in 5-HT release. Arachidonic acid also demonstrated a similar bell-shaped 5-HT release. The arachidonic acid-induced 5-HT release at 3 x 10(-6) M (313.04 +/- 25.90%) was significantly inhibited by the concomitant perfusion with BRL10720 (10(-6) M) (161.98 +/- 19.4%, p<0.01), an active metabolite of nabumetone, or indomethacin (3 x 10(-7) M)(190.01 +/- 16.19%, p<0.05). BRL10720 (10(-6) M)(428.57 +/- 51.72%, p<0.05) significantly inhibited the increase in 5-HT release induced by cisplatin (10(-6) M)(748.56 +/- 136.31%), suggesting that PGE2would be involved in cisplatin-induced 5-HT release. The increase in 5-HT release from the isolated ileum 72 hrs after cisplatin administration, in a delayed-emesis animal model, was significantly inhibited by the in vivo 3-day administration of nabumetone or BRL10720, but was not affected by the 3-day administration of dexamethasone. After 72 hours, however, the in vivo 3-days administration of nabumetone, BRL10720 or dexamethasone had no effect on the increase in ileal 5-HT levels induced by cisplatin. The use of COX-2 inhibitors to ameliorate delayed emesis induced by cisplatin-based anticancer chemotherapy has been proposed. On the other hand, there is a possibility that dexamethasone works through a mechanism other than 5-HT release in delayed emesis. PMID:12090350

  7. Mechanisms underlying the growth inhibitory effects of the cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Gargi D; Pathangey, Latha B; Tinder, Teresa L; Gendler, Sandra J; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Inhibitors of cyclo-oxygenase (COX)-2 are being extensively studied as anticancer agents. In the present study we evaluated the mechanisms by which a highly selective COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, affects tumor growth of two differentially invasive human breast cancer cell lines. Methods MDA-MB-231 (highly invasive) and MDA-MB-468 (moderately invasive) cell lines were treated with varying concentrations of celecoxib in vitro, and the effects of this agent on cell growth and angiogenesis were monitored by evaluating cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, and vasculogenic mimicry. The in vitro results of MDA-MB-231 cell line were further confirmed in vivo in a mouse xenograft model. Results The highly invasive MDA-MB-231 cells express higher levels of COX-2 than do the less invasive MDA-MB-468 cells. Celecoxib treatment inhibited COX-2 activity, indicated by prostaglandin E2 secretion, and caused significant growth arrest in both breast cancer cell lines. In the highly invasive MDA-MB-231 cells, the mechanism of celecoxib-induced growth arrest was by induction of apoptosis, associated with reduced activation of protein kinase B/Akt, and subsequent activation of caspases 3 and 7. In the less invasive MDA-MB-468 cells, growth arrest was a consequence of cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 checkpoint. Celecoxib-induced growth inhibition was reversed by addition of exogenous prostaglandin E2 in MDA-MB-468 cells but not in MDA-MB-231 cells. Furthermore, MDA-MB-468 cells formed significantly fewer extracellular matrix associated microvascular channels in vitro than did the high COX-2 expressing MDA-MB-231 cells. Celecoxib treatment not only inhibited cell growth and vascular channel formation but also reduced vascular endothelial growth factor levels. The in vitro findings corroborated in vivo data from a mouse xenograft model in which daily administration of celecoxib significantly reduced tumor growth of MDA-MB-231 cells, which was associated with

  8. Quantifying Protection Against Influenza Virus Infection Measured by Hemagglutination-inhibition Assays in Vaccine Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiahong; Fang, Vicky J.; Ohmit, Suzanne E.; Monto, Arnold S.; Cowling, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Correlations between hemagglutination-inhibition titers (hereafter “titers”) and protection against infection have been identified in historical studies. However, limited information is available about the dynamics of how titer influences protection. Methods: Titers were measured in randomized, placebo-controlled vaccine trials in Hong Kong among pediatrics during September 2009–December 2010 and the United States among adults during Oct 2007–April 2008. Intermediate unobserved titers were imputed using three interpolation methods. As participants were recruited at different times leading to varying exposure to infection relative to entry, a modified proportional hazards model was developed to account for staggered entry into the studies and to quantify the correlation of titers with protection against influenza infections, adjusting for waning in titers. The model was fitted using Markov chain Monte Carlo and importance sampling. Results: A titer of 1:40 was associated with a reduced infection risk of 40%–70% relative to a titer of 1:10, depending on the circulating strain; the corresponding protection associated with a titer of 1:80 was 54%–84%. Results were robust across interpolation methods. The trivalent-inactivated vaccine reduced cumulative incidence of influenza B and influenza A(H3N2) infections by six percentage points (pp; 95% credible interval = 2 pp, 10 pp) and 1 pp (95% credible interval = 0.3 pp, 2 pp) respectively, but not for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. The live-attenuated vaccine showed little efficacy against influenza A(H3N2) infections. Conclusions: Titers are correlated with protection against influenza infections. The trivalent inactivated vaccine can reduce the risk of influenza A(H3N2) and influenza B infections in the community. PMID:26427723

  9. The atypical cannabinoid O-1602 protects against experimental colitis and inhibits neutrophil recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Schicho, Rudolf; Bashashati, Mohammad; Bawa, Misha; McHugh, Douglas; Saur, Dieter; Hu, Huang-Ming; Zimmer, Andreas; Lutz, Beat; Mackie, Ken; Bradshaw, Heather B.; McCafferty, Donna-Marie; Sharkey, Keith A.; Storr, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Background Cannabinoids are known to reduce intestinal inflammation. Atypical cannabinoids produce pharmacological effects via unidentified targets. We were interested whether the atypical cannabinoid O-1602, reportedly an agonist of the putative cannabinoid receptor GPR55, reduces disease severity of dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) and trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in C57BL/6N and CD1 mice. Methods DSS (2.5% and 4%) was supplied in drinking water for one week while TNBS (4 mg) was applied as a single intrarectal bolus. Results Both treatments caused severe colitis. Injection of O-1602 (5 mg/kg i.p.) significantly reduced macroscopic and histological colitis scores, and myeloperoxidase activity. The protective effect was still present in cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) and 2 (CB2) double knockout mice and mice lacking the GPR55 gene. To investigate a potential mechanism underlying the protection by O-1602 we performed neutrophil chemotactic assays. O-1602 concentration-dependently inhibited migration of murine neutrophils to keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC), N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) and the N-formyl-peptide receptor ligand WKYMVm. The inhibitory effect of O-1602 was preserved in neutrophils from CB1/CB2 double knockout and GPR55 knockout mice. No differences were seen in locomotor activity between O-1602-treated and control mice indicating lack of central sedation by this compound. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that O-1602 is protective against experimentally induced colitis and inhibits neutrophil recruitment independently of CB1, CB2 and GPR55 receptors. Thus, atypical cannabinoids represent a novel class of therapeutics that may be useful for the treatment of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:21744421

  10. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-α Inhibition Protects Against Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicity in Mice.

    PubMed

    Rahmatollahi, Mahdieh; Baram, Somayeh Mahmoodi; Rahimian, Reza; Saeedi Saravi, Seyed Soheil; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2016-07-01

    Doxorubicin is an effective chemotherapeutic drug against a considerable number of malignancies. However, its toxic effects on myocardium are confirmed as major limit of utilization. PPAR-α is highly expressed in the heart, and its activation leads to an increased cardiac fatty acid oxidation and cardiomyocyte necrosis. This study was performed to adjust the hypothesis that PPAR-α receptor inhibition protects against doxorubicin-induced cardiac dysfunction in mice. Male Balb/c mice were used in this study. Left atria were isolated, and their contractility was measured in response to electrical field stimulation in a standard organ bath. PPAR-α activity was measured using specific PPAR-α antibody in an ELISA-based system coated with double-strand DNA containing PPAR-α response element sequence. Moreover, cardiac MDA and TNF-α levels were measured by ELISA method. Following incubation with doxorubicin (35 µM), a significant reduction in atrial contractility was observed (P < 0.001). Pretreatment of animals with a selective PPAR-α antagonist, GW6471, significantly improved doxorubicin-induced atrial dysfunction (P < 0.001). Furthermore, pretreatment of the mice with a non-selective cannabinoid agonist, WIN55212-2, significantly decreased PPAR-α activity in cardiac tissue, subsequently leading to significant improvement in doxorubicin-induced atrial dysfunction (P < 0.001). Also, GW6471 and WIN significantly reduced cardiac MDA and TNF-α levels compared with animals receiving doxorubicin (P < 0.001). The study showed that inhibition of PPAR-α is associated with protection against doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in mice, and cannabinoids can potentiate the protection by PPAR-α blockade. Moreover, PPAR-α may be considered as a target to prevent cardiotoxicity induced by doxorubicin in patients undergoing chemotherapy. PMID:26082188

  11. Inhibitory effect of etodolac, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, on stomach carcinogenesis in Helicobacter pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils

    SciTech Connect

    Magari, Hirohito; Shimizu, Yasuhito; Inada, Ken-ichi; Enomoto, Shotaro; Tomeki, Tatsuji; Yanaoka, Kimihiko; Tamai, Hideyuki; Arii, Kenji; Nakata, Hiroya; Oka, Masashi; Utsunomiya, Hirotoshi; Tsutsumi, Yutaka; Tsukamoto, Tetsuya; Tatematsu, Masae; Ichinose, Masao E-mail: ichinose@wakayama-med.ac.jp

    2005-08-26

    The effect of the selective COX-2 inhibitor, etodolac, on Helicobacter pylori (Hp)-associated stomach carcinogenesis was investigated in Mongolian gerbils (MGs). Hp-infected MGs were fed for 23 weeks with drinking water containing 10 ppm N-methyl-N-nitrosourea. They were then switched to distilled water and placed on a diet containing 5-30 mg/kg/day etodolac for 30 weeks. We found that etodolac dose-dependently inhibited the development of gastric cancer, and no cancer was detected at a dose of 30 mg/kg/day. Etodolac did not affect the extent of inflammatory cell infiltration or oxidative DNA damage, but it significantly inhibited mucosal cell proliferation and dose-dependently repressed the development of intestinal metaplasia in the stomachs of Hp-infected MGs. These results suggest that COX-2 is a key molecule in inflammation-mediated stomach carcinogenesis and that chemoprevention of stomach cancer should be possible by controlling COX-2 expression or activity.

  12. Activated hepatic stellate cells promote liver cancer by induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells through cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yaping; Zhao, Wenxiu; Xu, Jianfeng; Li, Jie; Hong, Zaifa; Yin, Zhenyu; Wang, Xiaomin

    2016-02-23

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are critical mediators of immunosuppression and the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Our previous work indicates that HSCs promote HCC progression by enhancing immunosuppressive cell populations including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs). MDSCs are induced by inflammatory cytokines (e.g., prostaglandins) and are important in immune suppression. However, how HSCs mediate expansion of MDSCs is uncertain. Thus, we studied activated HSCs that could induce MDSCs from bone marrow cells and noted that HSC-induced MDSCs up-regulated immunosuppressive activity via iNOS, Arg-1, and IL-4Rα. After treating cells with a COX-2 inhibitor or an EP4 antagonist, we established that HSC-induced MDSC accumulation was mediated by the COX2-PGE2-EP4 signaling. Furthermore, in vivo animal studies confirmed that inhibition of HSC-derived PGE2 could inhibit HSC-induced MDSC accumulation and HCC growth. Thus, our data show that HSCs are required for MDSC accumulation mediated by the COX2-PGE2-EP4 pathway, and these data are the first to link HSC and MDSC subsets in HCC immune microenvironment and provide a rationale for targeting PGE2 signaling for HCC therapy. PMID:26758420

  13. Activated hepatic stellate cells promote liver cancer by induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells through cyclooxygenase-2

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianfeng; Li, Jie; Hong, Zaifa; Yin, Zhenyu; Wang, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are critical mediators of immunosuppression and the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Our previous work indicates that HSCs promote HCC progression by enhancing immunosuppressive cell populations including myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs). MDSCs are induced by inflammatory cytokines (e.g., prostaglandins) and are important in immune suppression. However, how HSCs mediate expansion of MDSCs is uncertain. Thus, we studied activated HSCs that could induce MDSCs from bone marrow cells and noted that HSC-induced MDSCs up-regulated immunosuppressive activity via iNOS, Arg-1, and IL-4Rα. After treating cells with a COX-2 inhibitor or an EP4 antagonist, we established that HSC-induced MDSC accumulation was mediated by the COX2-PGE2-EP4 signaling. Furthermore, in vivo animal studies confirmed that inhibition of HSC-derived PGE2 could inhibit HSC-induced MDSC accumulation and HCC growth. Thus, our data show that HSCs are required for MDSC accumulation mediated by the COX2-PGE2-EP4 pathway, and these data are the first to link HSC and MDSC subsets in HCC immune microenvironment and provide a rationale for targeting PGE2 signaling for HCC therapy. PMID:26758420

  14. Hydroxysafflor Yellow A Protects Neurons From Excitotoxic Death through Inhibition of NMDARs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingtao; Ma, Zhiyuan; Fu, Zhongxiao; Gao, Su; Yang, Liu; Jin, Yan; Sun, Hui; Wang, Chaoyun; Fan, Weiming; Chen, Lin; Zheng, Qing-Yin; Bi, Guoqiang

    2016-01-01

    demonstrate for the first time that HSYA protects hippocampal neurons from excitotoxic damage through the inhibition of NMDARs. This novel finding indicates that HSYA may be a promising pharmacological candidate for the treatment of brain ischemia. PMID:27067428

  15. Hydroxysafflor Yellow A Protects Neurons From Excitotoxic Death through Inhibition of NMDARs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingtao; Ma, Zhiyuan; Fu, Zhongxiao; Gao, Su; Yang, Liu; Jin, Yan; Sun, Hui; Wang, Chaoyun; Fan, Weiming; Chen, Lin; Zheng, Qing-Yin; Bi, Guoqiang; Ma, Chun-Lei

    2016-01-01

    demonstrate for the first time that HSYA protects hippocampal neurons from excitotoxic damage through the inhibition of NMDARs. This novel finding indicates that HSYA may be a promising pharmacological candidate for the treatment of brain ischemia. PMID:27067428

  16. Inhibition of Rac1 reduces store overload-induced calcium release and protects against ventricular arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Lu, Xiangru; Gui, Le; Wu, Yan; Sims, Stephen M; Wang, Guoping; Feng, Qingping

    2016-08-01

    Rac1 is a small GTPase and plays key roles in multiple cellular processes including the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, whether Rac1 activation during myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion (I/R) contributes to arrhythmogenesis is not fully understood. We aimed to study the effects of Rac1 inhibition on store overload-induced Ca(2+) release (SOICR) and ventricular arrhythmia during myocardial I/R. Adult Rac1(f/f) and cardiac-specific Rac1 knockdown (Rac1(ckd) ) mice were subjected to myocardial I/R and their electrocardiograms (ECGs) were monitored for ventricular arrhythmia. Myocardial Rac1 activity was increased and ventricular arrhythmia was induced during I/R in Rac1(f/f) mice. Remarkably, I/R-induced ventricular arrhythmia was significantly decreased in Rac1(ckd) compared to Rac1(f/f) mice. Furthermore, treatment with Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 decreased I/R-induced ventricular arrhythmia. Ca(2+) imaging analysis showed that in response to a 6 mM external Ca(2+) concentration challenge, SOICR was induced with characteristic spontaneous intracellular Ca(2+) waves in Rac1(f/f) cardiomyocytes. Notably, SOICR was diminished by pharmacological and genetic inhibition of Rac1 in adult cardiomyocytes. Moreover, I/R-induced ROS production and ryanodine receptor 2 (RyR2) oxidation were significantly inhibited in the myocardium of Rac1(ckd) mice. We conclude that Rac1 activation induces ventricular arrhythmia during myocardial I/R. Inhibition of Rac1 suppresses SOICR and protects against ventricular arrhythmia. Blockade of Rac1 activation may represent a new paradigm for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmia in ischaemic heart disease. PMID:27222313

  17. Vinexin-β deficiency protects against cerebral ischaemia/reperfusion injury by inhibiting neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingchang; Guo, Sen; Zhang, Peng; Gong, Jun; Zheng, Ankang; Zhang, Yan; Li, Hongliang

    2015-07-01

    Vinexin-β is an adaptor protein that regulates cell adhesion, cytoskeletal organization and signal transduction. Our previous work showed that Vinexin-β protects against cardiac hypertrophy. However, its function in stroke is largely unknown. In the present study, we observed a significant increase in Vinexin-β expression in both human intracerebral haemorrhage and mouse cerebral ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury model, indicating that Vinexin-β is involved in stroke. Next, using Vinexin-β knockout mice, we further demonstrated that Vinexin-β deficiency significantly protected against cerebral I/R injury, as demonstrated by a dramatic decrease in the infarct volume and an improvement in neurological function. Additionally, immunofluorescence and western blotting showed that the deletion of Vinexin-β attenuated neuronal apoptosis. Mechanically, we found that Akt signalling was up-regulated in the brains of the Vinexin-β knockout mice compared with those of the WT control mice after ischaemic injury. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the deletion of Vinexin-β potently protects against ischaemic injury by inhibiting neuronal apoptosis, and this effect may occur via the up-regulation of Akt signalling. Our findings revealed that Vinexin-β acts as a novel modulator of ischaemic injury, suggesting that Vinexin-β may represent an attractive therapeutic target for the prevention of stroke. PMID:25824575

  18. The secreted glycoprotein lubricin protects cartilage surfaces and inhibits synovial cell overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, David K.; Marcelino, Jose; Baker, MacArthur; Gong, Yaoqin; Smits, Patrick; Lefebvre, Véronique; Jay, Gregory D.; Stewart, Matthew; Wang, Hongwei; Warman, Matthew L.; Carpten, John D.

    2005-01-01

    The long-term integrity of an articulating joint is dependent upon the nourishment of its cartilage component and the protection of the cartilage surface from friction-induced wear. Loss-of-function mutations in lubricin (a secreted glycoprotein encoded by the gene PRG4) cause the human autosomal recessive disorder camptodactyly-arthropathy-coxa vara-pericarditis syndrome (CACP). A major feature of CACP is precocious joint failure. In order to delineate the mechanism by which lubricin protects joints, we studied the expression of Prg4 mRNA during mouse joint development, and we created lubricin-mutant mice. Prg4 began to be expressed in surface chondrocytes and synoviocytes after joint cavitation had occurred and remained strongly expressed by these cells postnatally. Mice lacking lubricin were viable and fertile. In the newborn period, their joints appeared normal. As the mice aged, we observed abnormal protein deposits on the cartilage surface and disappearance of underlying superficial zone chondrocytes. In addition to cartilage surface changes and subsequent cartilage deterioration, intimal cells in the synovium surrounding the joint space became hyperplastic, which further contributed to joint failure. Purified or recombinant lubricin inhibited the growth of these synoviocytes in vitro. Tendon and tendon sheath involvement was present in the ankle joints, where morphologic changes and abnormal calcification of these structures were observed. We conclude that lubricin has multiple functions in articulating joints and tendons that include the protection of surfaces and the control of synovial cell growth. PMID:15719068

  19. Cyclooxygenase-2 overexpression and tumor formation are blocked by sulindac in a murine model of familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    Boolbol, S K; Dannenberg, A J; Chadburn, A; Martucci, C; Guo, X J; Ramonetti, J T; Abreu-Goris, M; Newmark, H L; Lipkin, M L; DeCosse, J J; Bertagnolli, M M

    1996-06-01

    Inducible cyclooxygenase (Cox-2), also known as prostaglandin H synthase 2 (PGH-2) is a key enzyme in the formation of prostaglandins and thromboxanes. Cox-2 is the product of an immediate-early gene that is expressed in response to growth factors, tumor promoters, or cytokines. Overexpression of Cox-2 is associated with both human colon cancers and suppression of apoptosis in cultured epithelia] cells, an activity that is reversed by the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, sulindac sulfide. To address the relationship between Cox-2, apoptosis, and tumor development in vivo, we studied C57BL/6J-Min/+(Min) mice, a strain containing a fully penetrant dominant mutation in the Apc gene, leading to the development of gastrointestinal adenomas by 110 days of age. Min mice were fed AIN-76A chow diet and given sulindac (0.5 +/- 0.1 mg/day) in drinking water. Control Min mice and homozygous C57BL/6J-+/+ normal littermates lacking the Apc mutation (+/+) were fed AIN-76A diet and given tap water to drink. At 110 days of age, all mice were sacrificed, and their intestinal tracts were examined. Control Min mice had 11.9 +/- 7.8 tumors per mouse compared to 0.1 +/- 0.1 tumors for sulindac-treated Min mice. As expected, +/+ littermates had no macroscopic tumors. Examination of histologically normal-appearing small bowel from Min animals revealed increased amounts of Cox-2 and prostaglandin E(2) compared to +/+ littermates. Using two different in situ techniques, terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling and a direct immunoperoxidase method, Min animals also demonstrated a 27-47% decrease in enterocyte apoptosis compared to +/+ animals. Treatment with sulindac not only inhibited tumor formation but decreased small bowel Cox-2 and prostaglandin E(2) to baseline and restored normal levels of apoptosis. These data suggest that overexpression of Cox-2 is associated with tumorigenesis in the gastrointestinal epithelium, and that both are inhibited by sulindac administration

  20. Cyclooxygenase-2 and 15-lipoxygenase inhibition, synthesis, anti-inflammatory activity and ulcer liability of new celecoxib analogues: Determination of region-specific pyrazole ring formation by NOESY.

    PubMed

    Abdelall, Eman K A; Lamie, Phoebe F; Ali, Waleed A M

    2016-06-15

    Two new series of 1,5-diaryl pyrazoline (3a-f) and 1,5-diaryl pyrazole (5a and 5b) were designed as both COX-2 and 15-LOX inhibitors. All the prepared compounds were fully characterized by all spectral and element analysis. Their anti-inflammatory activity and ulcer index were included. Pyrazoline 3f is the most effective with IC50=1.14 and 4.7μM against COX-2 and 15-LOX respectively, and more potent than celecoxib and meclofenamate references. In addition 3a, 3b, 5a, and 5b were safer with low ulcer index than celecoxib. Docking study was performed for the most active compounds such as 2b, 3a, and 3f on COX-2 and 15-LOX enzymes. PMID:27158139

  1. Artificial Neural Networks Analysis Used to Evaluate the Molecular Interactions between Selected Drugs and Human Cyclooxygenase2 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Tayarani, Ali; Baratian, Ali; Naghibi Sistani, Mohammad-Bagher; Saberi, Mohammad Reza; Tehranizadeh, Zeinab

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): A fast and reliable evaluation of the binding energy from a single conformation of a molecular complex is an important practical task. Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are strong tools for predicting nonlinear functions which are used in this paper to predict binding energy. We proposed a structure that obtains binding energy using physicochemical molecular descriptions of the selected drugs. Material and Methods: The set of 33 drugs with their binding energy to cyclooxygenase enzyme (COX2) in hand, from different structure groups, were considered. 27 physicochemical property descriptors were calculated by standard molecular modeling. Binding energy was calculated for each compound through docking and also ANN. A multi-layer perceptron neural network was used. Results: The proposed ANN model based on selected molecular descriptors showed a high degree of correlation between binding energy observed and calculated. The final model possessed a 27-4-1 architecture and correlation coefficients for learning, validating and testing sets equaled 0.973, 0.956 and 0.950, respectively. Conclusion: Results show that docking results and ANN data have a high correlation. It was shown that ANN is a strong tool for prediction of the binding energy and thus inhibition constants for different drugs in very short periods of time. PMID:24494073

  2. Advanced glycation end products impair function of late endothelial progenitor cells through effects on protein kinase Akt and cyclooxygenase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Qin; Dong Li; Wang Lian; Kang Lina; Xu Biao

    2009-04-03

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) exhibit impaired function in the context of diabetes, and advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which accumulate in diabetes, may contribute to this. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism by which AGEs impair late EPC function. EPCs from human umbilical cord blood were isolated, and incubated with AGE-modified albumin (AGE-albumin) at different concentrations found physiologically in plasma. Apoptosis, migration, and tube formation assays were used to evaluate EPC function including capacity for vasculogenesis, and expression of the receptor for AGEs (RAGE), Akt, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) were determined. Anti-RAGE antibody was used to block RAGE function. AGE-albumin concentration-dependently enhanced apoptosis and depressed migration and tube formation, but did not affect proliferation, of late EPCs. High AGE-albumin increased RAGE mRNA and protein expression, and decreased Akt and COX-2 protein expression, whilst having no effect on eNOS mRNA or protein in these cells. These effects were inhibited by co-incubation with anti-RAGE antibody. These results suggest that RAGE mediates the AGE-induced impairment of late EPC function, through down-regulation of Akt and COX-2 in these cells.

  3. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of New 5,5-Diarylhydantoin Derivatives as Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zarghi, Afshin; Javid, Farin Sattary; Ghodsi, Razieh; Dadrass, Orkideh G.; Daraei, Bahram; Hedayati, Mehdi

    2011-01-01

    A new group of 5,5-diarylhydantoin derivatives bearing a methylsulfonyl COX-2 pharmacophore at the para position of the C-5 phenyl ring were designed and synthesized as selective COX-2 inhibitors. In vitro COX-1/COX-2 inhibition structure-activity relationships identified 5-[4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl]-5-phenyl-hydantoin (4) as a highly potent and selective COX-2 inhibitor (COX-2 IC50 = 0.077 μM; selectivity index > 1298). It was more selective than the reference drug celecoxib (COX-2 IC50 = 0.060 μM; selectivity index = 405). A molecular modeling study where 4 was docked in the binding site of COX-2 indicated that the p-MeSO2 COX-2 pharmacophore group on the C-5 phenyl ring is oriented in the vicinity of the COX-2 secondary pocket. The results of this study showed that the type of substituent on the N-3 hydantoin ring substituent is important for COX-2 inhibitory activity. PMID:21886896

  4. Cyclooxygenase-2 level and culture conditions influence NS398-induced apoptosis and caspase activation in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, H C; Weng, C F

    2001-01-01

    Cyclooxygenases (COXs) catalyze the synthesis of prostaglandins (PGs) from arachidonic acid. Overexpression of COX-2 is frequently found in human cancers and is suggested to play an important role in tumorigenesis. Recent studies indicated that COX-2 inhibitors exert potent anti-cancer effects on a number of cancers. Interestingly, some COX-2 inhibitors potently induce apoptosis, while other COX-2 inhibitors primarily induce growth inhibition. Therefore, there is a variability in the effects that different COX-2 inhibitors have on cancer cells. In this study, we demonstrated that induction of apoptosis of high COX-2-expressing A549 lung cancer cells by a specific COX-2 inhibitor NS398 was observed in cells cultured under serum-free condition. However, this drug induced G1 growth arrest rather than apoptosis in A549 cells maintained in 10% serum medium. Conversely, low COX-2-expressing H226 lung cancer cells were resistant to NS398-induced apoptosis under both serum-free and serum-containing conditions. Moreover, our results showed that NS398-induced apoptosis is associated with activation of caspase-3, a cysteine protease that plays a crucial role in the execution phase of apoptosis. These results suggest that the cytotoxic effect of COX-2 inhibitors on cancer cells may be influenced by extracellular environments and the anti-cancer action of these inhibitors in vivo needs careful evaluation. Additionally, a correlation between the level of COX-2 expression and the extent of apoptosis induced by COX-2 inhibitors was found. PMID:11605058

  5. Urethane dimethacrylate induces cytotoxicity and regulates cyclooxygenase-2, hemeoxygenase and carboxylesterase expression in human dental pulp cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsiao-Hua; Chang, Mei-Chi; Wang, Hsin-Hui; Huang, Guay-Fen; Lee, Yuan-Ling; Wang, Yin-Lin; Chan, Chiu-Po; Yeung, Sin-Yuet; Tseng, Shuei-Kuen; Jeng, Jiiang-Huei

    2014-02-01

    The toxic effect of urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA), a major dental resin monomer, on human dental pulp is not fully clear. In this study, we investigated the influence of UDMA on the cytotoxicity, cell cycle distribution, apoptosis and related gene expression of dental pulp cells. The role of reactive oxygen species, hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) and carboxylesterase (CES) in UDMA cytotoxicity, was evaluated. UDMA induced morphological changes of pulp cells and decreased cell viability by 29-49% at concentrations of 0.1-0.35 mM. UDMA induced G0/G1, G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The expression of cdc2, cyclinB1 and cdc25C was inhibited by UDMA. Moreover, UDMA stimulated COX-2, HO-1 and CES2 mRNA expression of pulp cells. The cytotoxicity of UDMA was attenuated by N-acetyl-l-cysteine, catalase and esterase, but was enhanced by Zn-protoporphyrin (HO-1 inhibitor), BNPP (CES inhibitor) and loperamide (CES2 inhibitor). Exposure of UDMA may potentially induce the inflammation and toxicity of dental pulp. These findings are important for understanding the clinical response of human pulp to resin monomers after operative restoration and pulp capping, and also provide clues for improvement of dental materials. PMID:24140606

  6. Dibenzylbutyrolactone lignans from Forsythia koreana fruits attenuate lipopolysaccharide-induced inducible nitric oxide synthetase and cyclooxygenase-2 expressions through activation of nuclear factor-κb and mitogen-activated protein kinase in RAW264.7 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yun; Cho, Bong Jae; Park, Tae Wook; Park, Byoung Eun; Kim, Soo Jung; Sim, Sang Soo; Kim, Chang Jong

    2010-01-01

    Previously, we reported that dibenzylbutyrolactone lignans (DBLLs) from the fruit of Forsythia koreana NAKAI (Oleaceae) has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-asthmatic effects. In this study, to clarify the anti-inflammatory mechanisms of DBLL, we evaluated the effects of DBLLs on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expressions, nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) productions, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activations, inhibitor of κB (IκB) and inhibitor of κB kinase (IKK) phosphorylations in cytosolic proteins, and cytotoxicity in Raw264.7 cells. DBLLs potently suppressed both the enzyme expression and DNA-binding activity of NF-κB. Arctiin, arctigenin (1.0 µM) and matairesinol (10 µM) inhibited the expression of iNOS by 37.71±2.86%, 32.51±4.28%, and 27.44±2.65%, respectively, and arctiin, arctigenin (0.1 µM) and matairesinol (1.0 µM) inhibited COX-2 expression by 37.93±7.81%, 26.70±4.61% and 29.37±5.21%, respectively. The inhibitory effects of DBLLs on NO and PGE(2) productions were the same patterns as those seen for the reductions in iNOS and COX-2 expression, respectively. Arctiin, arctigenin (1.0 µM) and matairesinol (10 µM) significantly (p<0.05) inhibited NF-κB DNA binding by 44.85±6.67%, 44.16±6.61%, and 44.79±5.62%, respectively, and arctiin (0.1 µM) and arctigenin (1.0 µM) significantly (p<0.05) inhibited the phosphorylation of IκB by 20.58±3.86% and 25.99±6.18%, respectively. Furthermore, arctiin, matairesinol (1.0 µM) and arctigenin (10 µM) inhibited the phosphorylation of IKK by 38.80±6.64%, 38.33±6.65%, and 38.57±8.14%, respectively. In addition, DBLLs potently inhibited the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced activation of MAPKs (SAPK/c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK), p38, and extracellular signal receptor-activated kinase (ERK)1/2). Overall, arctiin was the most effective; its effect was nearly

  7. Selective Inhibition of the Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore Protects against Neurodegeneration in Experimental Multiple Sclerosis*

    PubMed Central

    Warne, Justin; Pryce, Gareth; Hill, Julia M.; Shi, Xiao; Lennerås, Felicia; Puentes, Fabiola; Kip, Maarten; Hilditch, Laura; Walker, Paul; Simone, Michela I.; Chan, A. W. Edith; Towers, Greg J.; Coker, Alun R.; Duchen, Michael R.; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Baker, David; Selwood, David L.

    2016-01-01

    The mitochondrial permeability transition pore is a recognized drug target for neurodegenerative conditions such as multiple sclerosis and for ischemia-reperfusion injury in the brain and heart. The peptidylprolyl isomerase, cyclophilin D (CypD, PPIF), is a positive regulator of the pore, and genetic down-regulation or knock-out improves outcomes in disease models. Current inhibitors of peptidylprolyl isomerases show no selectivity between the tightly conserved cyclophilin paralogs and exhibit significant off-target effects, immunosuppression, and toxicity. We therefore designed and synthesized a new mitochondrially targeted CypD inhibitor, JW47, using a quinolinium cation tethered to cyclosporine. X-ray analysis was used to validate the design concept, and biological evaluation revealed selective cellular inhibition of CypD and the permeability transition pore with reduced cellular toxicity compared with cyclosporine. In an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis disease model of neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis, JW47 demonstrated significant protection of axons and improved motor assessments with minimal immunosuppression. These findings suggest that selective CypD inhibition may represent a viable therapeutic strategy for MS and identify quinolinium as a mitochondrial targeting group for in vivo use. PMID:26679998

  8. Dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 Inhibition: Linking Metabolic Control to Cardiovascular Protection

    PubMed Central

    Avogaro, Angelo; de Kreutzenberg, Saula; Fadini, Gianpaolo

    2014-01-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidases 4 (DPP4) inhibitors are a new class of oral anti-hyperglycemic drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). They are also called “incretins” because they act by inhibiting the degradation of endogenous incretin hormones, in particular GLP-1, that mediates their main metabolic effects. DPP4 is an ubiquitous protease that regulates not only glucose and lipid metabolism, but also exhibits several systemic effects at different site levels. DPP4 inhibition improves endothelial function, reduces the pro-oxidative and the pro-inflammatory state, and exerts renal effects. These actions are mediated by different DPP4 ligands, such as cytokines, growth factors, neuotransmitters etc. Clinical and experimental studies have demonstrated that DPP4 inhibitors are efficient in protecting cardiac, renal and vascular systems, through antiatherosclerotic and vasculoprotective mechanisms. For these reasons DDP4 inhibitors are thought to be “cardiovascular protective” as well as anti-diabetic drugs. Clinical trials aimed to demonstrate the efficacy of DPP4 inhibitors in reducing cardiovascular events, independent of their anti-hyperglycemic action, are ongoing. These trials will also give necessary information on their safety. PMID:23844811

  9. Selective Inhibition of the Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore Protects against Neurodegeneration in Experimental Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Warne, Justin; Pryce, Gareth; Hill, Julia M; Shi, Xiao; Lennerås, Felicia; Puentes, Fabiola; Kip, Maarten; Hilditch, Laura; Walker, Paul; Simone, Michela I; Chan, A W Edith; Towers, Greg J; Coker, Alun R; Duchen, Michael R; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Baker, David; Selwood, David L

    2016-02-26

    The mitochondrial permeability transition pore is a recognized drug target for neurodegenerative conditions such as multiple sclerosis and for ischemia-reperfusion injury in the brain and heart. The peptidylprolyl isomerase, cyclophilin D (CypD, PPIF), is a positive regulator of the pore, and genetic down-regulation or knock-out improves outcomes in disease models. Current inhibitors of peptidylprolyl isomerases show no selectivity between the tightly conserved cyclophilin paralogs and exhibit significant off-target effects, immunosuppression, and toxicity. We therefore designed and synthesized a new mitochondrially targeted CypD inhibitor, JW47, using a quinolinium cation tethered to cyclosporine. X-ray analysis was used to validate the design concept, and biological evaluation revealed selective cellular inhibition of CypD and the permeability transition pore with reduced cellular toxicity compared with cyclosporine. In an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis disease model of neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis, JW47 demonstrated significant protection of axons and improved motor assessments with minimal immunosuppression. These findings suggest that selective CypD inhibition may represent a viable therapeutic strategy for MS and identify quinolinium as a mitochondrial targeting group for in vivo use. PMID:26679998

  10. Inhibition of carnitine synthesis protects against left ventricular dysfunction in rats with myocardial ischemia.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, T; Sugiura, S; Eto, Y; Yonekura, K; Matsumoto, A; Yokoyama, I; Kobayakawa, N; Omata, M; Kirimoto, T; Hayashi, Y; Momomura, S

    1997-10-01

    During myocardial ischemia, inhibition of the carnitine-mediated transportation of fatty acid may be beneficial because it facilitates glucose utilization and prevents an accumulation of fatty acid metabolites. We orally administered 3-(2,2,2-trimethyl hydrazinium) propionate (MET), an inhibitor of carnitine synthesis, for 20 days to rats. Then we evaluated left ventricular (LV) function during brief ischemia by using a buffer-perfused isovolumic heart model. After 15 min of reoxygenation after the transient ischemia, LV peak systolic pressure (PSP) almost completely returned to the baseline level in rats given MET (96 +/- 4%), whereas it was only partially (77 +/- 16%) recovered in the placebo-treated rats. We induced myocardial infarction in other rats by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery. Then the animals were given MET for 20 days, and LV function was compared. In the placebo-treated rats (with myocardial infarction, but without drug treatment), LVPSP was lower than that in the sham group [108 +/- 19 (n = 10) vs. 136 +/- 15 mm Hg (n = 13); p < 0.05], and the time constant (T) of LV pressure decay was elongated (36 +/- 4 vs. 30 +/- 7 ms; p < 0.05). In MET-treated groups, however, neither PSP nor T differed from those in the sham group. In conclusion, inhibition of the carnitine-mediated transportation of fatty acid by MET protected against left ventricular dysfunction in acute and chronic myocardial ischemia. PMID:9335406

  11. Inhibition of Cytohesins Protects against Genetic Models of Motor Neuron Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jinbin; Zhang, Lei; Mojsilovic-Petrovic, Jelena; Jian, Xiaoying; Thomas, Jeffrey; Homma, Kengo; Schmitz, Anton; Famulok, Michael; Ichijo, Hidenori; Argon, Yair; Randazzo, Paul A; Kalb, Robert G

    2015-06-17

    Mutant genes that underlie Mendelian forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and biochemical investigations of genetic disease models point to potential driver pathophysiological events involving endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy. Several steps in these cell biological processes are known to be controlled physiologically by small ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) signaling. Here, we investigated the role of ARF guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), cytohesins, in models of ALS. Genetic or pharmacological inhibition of cytohesins protects motor neurons in vitro from proteotoxic insults and rescues locomotor defects in a Caenorhabditis elegans model of disease. Cytohesins form a complex with mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), a known cause of familial ALS, but this is not associated with a change in GEF activity or ARF activation. ER stress evoked by mutant SOD1 expression is alleviated by antagonism of cytohesin activity. In the setting of mutant SOD1 toxicity, inhibition of cytohesin activity enhances autophagic flux and reduces the burden of misfolded SOD1. These observations suggest that targeting cytohesins may have potential benefits for the treatment of ALS. PMID:26085633

  12. Inhibition of Rho Kinase (ROCK) Leads to Increased Cerebral Blood Flow and Stroke Protection

    PubMed Central

    Rikitake, Yoshiyuki; Kim, Hyung-Hwan; Huang, Zhihong; Seto, Minoru; Yano, Kazuo; Asano, Toshio; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Liao, James K.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) plays a pivotal role in vascular protection. The Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, hydroxyfasudil, prevents the downregulation of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) under hypoxic conditions. However, it is unknown whether inhibition of ROCK can attenuate ischemia-induced endothelial dysfunction and tissue damage in vivo. Methods Human vascular endothelial cells were treated with increasing concentrations of hydroxyfasudil (0.1 to 100 μmol/L) and eNOS expression and activity were measured. To determine the physiological relevance of eNOS regulation by ROCK, we administered fasudil, which is metabolized to hydroxyfasudil in vivo, to mice for 2 days before subjecting them to middle cerebral artery occlusion. Cerebral blood flow, cerebral infarct size, and neurologic deficit were measured. Results In a concentration-dependent manner, hydroxyfasudil increased eNOS mRNA and protein expression, resulting in a 1.9- and 1.6-fold increase, respectively, at 10 μmol/L (P<0.05 for both). This correlated with a 1.5- and 2.3-fold increase in eNOS activity and NO production, respectively (P<0.05 for both). Fasudil increased cerebral blood flow to both ischemic and nonischemic brain areas, reduced cerebral infarct size by 33%, and improved neurologic deficit score by 37% (P<0.05). This correlated with inhibition of brain and vascular ROCK activity and increased eNOS expression and activity. Another ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632, also showed similar effects. The neuroprotective effects of fasudil were absent in eNOS-deficient mice. Conclusions These findings indicate that the neuroprotective effect of ROCK inhibition is mediated by endothelium-derived NO and suggest that ROCK may be an important therapeutic target for ischemic stroke. PMID:16141422

  13. Hydrogen sulfide [corrected] increases survival during sepsis: protective effect of CHOP inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ferlito, Marcella; Wang, Qihong; Fulton, William B; Colombani, Paul M; Marchionni, Luigi; Fox-Talbot, Karen; Paolocci, Nazareno; Steenbergen, Charles

    2014-02-15

    Sepsis is a major cause of mortality, and dysregulation of the immune response plays a central role in this syndrome. H2S, a recently discovered gaso-transmitter, is endogenously generated by many cell types, regulating a number of physiologic processes and pathophysiologic conditions. We report that H2S increased survival after experimental sepsis induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) in mice. Exogenous H2S decreased the systemic inflammatory response, reduced apoptosis in the spleen, and accelerated bacterial eradication. We found that C/EBP homologous protein 10 (CHOP), a mediator of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response, was elevated in several organs after CLP, and its expression was inhibited by H2S treatment. Using CHOP-knockout (KO) mice, we demonstrated for the first time, to our knowledge, that genetic deletion of Chop increased survival after LPS injection or CLP. CHOP-KO mice displayed diminished splenic caspase-3 activation and apoptosis, decreased cytokine production, and augmented bacterial clearance. Furthermore, septic CHOP-KO mice treated with H2S showed no additive survival benefit compared with septic CHOP-KO mice. Finally, we showed that H2S inhibited CHOP expression in macrophages by a mechanism involving Nrf2 activation. In conclusion, our findings show a protective effect of H2S treatment afforded, at least partially, by inhibition of CHOP expression. The data reveal a major negative role for the transcription factor CHOP in overall survival during sepsis and suggest a new target for clinical intervention, as well potential strategies for treatment. PMID:24403532

  14. Atorvastatin-induced cardioprotection is mediated by increasing inducible nitric oxide synthase and consequent S-nitrosylation of cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Atar, Shaul; Ye, Yumei; Lin, Yu; Freeberg, Sheldon Y; Nishi, Shawn P; Rosanio, Salvatore; Huang, Ming-He; Uretsky, Barry F; Perez-Polo, Jose R; Birnbaum, Yochai

    2006-05-01

    We determined the effects of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1; SC-560), COX-2 (SC-58125), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS; 1400W) inhibitors on atorvastatin (ATV)-induced myocardial protection and whether iNOS mediates the ATV-induced increases in COX-2. Sprague-Dawley rats received 10 mg ATV.kg(-1).day(-1) added to drinking water or water alone for 3 days and received intravenous SC-58125, SC-560, 1400W, or vehicle alone. Anesthesia was induced with ketamine and xylazine and maintained with isoflurane. Fifteen minutes after intravenous injection rats underwent 30-min myocardial ischemia followed by 4-h reperfusion [infarct size (IS) protocol], or the hearts were explanted for biochemical analysis and immunoblotting. Left ventricular weight and area at risk (AR) were comparable among groups. ATV reduced IS to 12.7% (SD 3.1) of AR, a reduction of 64% vs. 35.1% (SD 7.6) in the sham-treated group (P < 0.001). SC-58125 and 1400W attenuated the protective effect without affecting IS in the non-ATV-treated rats. ATV increased calcium-independent NOS (iNOS) [11.9 (SD 0.8) vs. 3.9 (SD 0.1) x 1,000 counts/min; P < 0.001] and COX-2 [46.7 (SD 1.1) vs. 6.5 (SD 1.4) pg/ml of 6-keto-PGF(1alpha); P < 0.001] activity. Both SC-58125 and 1400W attenuated this increase. SC-58125 did not affect iNOS activity, whereas 1400W blocked iNOS activity. COX-2 was S-nitrosylated in ATV-treated but not sham-treated rats or rats pretreated with 1400W. COX-2 immunoprecipitated with iNOS but not with endothelial nitric oxide synthase. We conclude that ATV reduced IS by increasing the activity of iNOS and COX-2, iNOS is upstream to COX-2, and iNOS activates COX-2 by S-nitrosylation. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that preconditioning effects are mediated via PG. PMID:16339820

  15. Cyclooxygenase-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 selectivity of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: investigation using human peripheral monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kato, M; Nishida, S; Kitasato, H; Sakata, N; Kawai, S

    2001-12-01

    Since the pharmacological profiles of various non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) might depend on their differing selectivity for cyclooxygenase 1 (COX-1) and 2 (COX-2), we developed a new screening method using human peripheral monocytes. Monocytes from healthy volunteers were separated, and the cells were incubated with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Monocytes without LPS stimulation exclusively expressed COX-1 on Western blotting analysis, whereas LPS stimulation induced COX-2 expression. Unstimulated monocytes (COX-1) and LPS-stimulated monocytes (COX-2) were then used to determinethe COX selectivity of various NSAIDs. The respective mean IC50 values for COX-1 and COX-2 IC50 (microM), and the COX-1/COX-2 ratio of each NSAID were as follows: celecoxib, 82, 6.8, 12; diclofenac, 0.076, 0.026, 2.9; etodolac, > 100, 53, > 1.9; ibuprofen, 12, 80, 0.15; indometacin, 0.0090, 0.31, 0.029; meloxicam, 37, 6.1, 6.1; 6-MNA (the active metabolite of nabumetone), 149, 230, 0.65; NS-398, 125, 5.6, 22; piroxicam, 47, 25, 1.9; rofecoxib, > 100, 25, > 4.0; S-2474, > 100, 8.9, > 11; SC-560, 0.0048, 1.4, 0.0034. The percentage inhibition of COX-1 activity at the IC50 of COX-2 also showed a wide variation among these NSAIDs. The bioassay system using human monocytes to assess the inhibitory effects of various NSAIDs on COX-1 and COX-2 may become a clinically useful screening method. PMID:11804398

  16. Induction of cyclo-oxygenase-2 mRNA by prostaglandin E2 in human prostatic carcinoma cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjandrawinata, R. R.; Dahiya, R.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1997-01-01

    Prostaglandins are synthesized from arachidonic acid by the enzyme cyclo-oxygenase. There are two isoforms of cyclooxygenases: COX-1 (a constitutive form) and COX-2 (an inducible form). COX-2 has recently been categorized as an immediate-early gene and is associated with cellular growth and differentiation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of exogenous dimethylprostaglandin E2 (dmPGE2) on prostate cancer cell growth. Results of these experiments demonstrate that administration of dmPGE2 to growing PC-3 cells significantly increased cellular proliferation (as measured by the cell number), total DNA content and endogenous PGE2 concentration. DmPGE2 also increased the steady-state mRNA levels of its own inducible synthesizing enzyme, COX-2, as well as cellular growth to levels similar to those seen with fetal calf serum and phorbol ester. The same results were observed in other human cancer cell types, such as the androgen-dependent LNCaP cells, breast cancer MDA-MB-134 cells and human colorectal carcinoma DiFi cells. In PC-3 cells, the dmPGE2 regulation of the COX-2 mRNA levels was both time dependent, with maximum stimulation seen 2 h after addition, and dose dependent on dmPGE2 concentration, with maximum stimulation seen at 5 microg ml(-1). The non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug flurbiprofen (5 microM), in the presence of exogenous dmPGE2, inhibited the up-regulation of COX-2 mRNA and PC-3 cell growth. Taken together, these data suggest that PGE2 has a specific role in the maintenance of human cancer cell growth and that the activation of COX-2 expression depends primarily upon newly synthesized PGE2, perhaps resulting from changes in local cellular PGE2 concentrations.

  17. BDNF/TrkB signaling protects HT-29 human colon cancer cells from EGFR inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetto de Farias, Caroline; Heinen, Tiago Elias; Pereira dos Santos, Rafael; Abujamra, Ana Lucia; Schwartsmann, Gilberto; and others

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF protected HT-29 colorectal cancer cells from the antitumor effect of cetuximab. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TrkB inhibition potentiated the antitumor effect of cetuximab. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BDNF/TrkB signaling might be involved in resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. -- Abstract: The clinical success of targeted treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) is often limited by resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy. The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB have recently emerged as anticancer targets, and we have previously shown increased BDNF levels in CRC tumor samples. Here we report the findings from in vitro experiments suggesting that BDNF/TrkB signaling can protect CRC cells from the antitumor effects of EGFR blockade. The anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab reduced both cell proliferation and the mRNA expression of BDNF and TrkB in human HT-29 CRC cells. The inhibitory effect of cetuximab on cell proliferation and survival was counteracted by the addition of human recombinant BDNF. Finally, the Trk inhibitor K252a synergistically enhanced the effect of cetuximab on cell proliferation, and this effect was blocked by BDNF. These results provide the first evidence that increased BDNF/TrkB signaling might play a role in resistance to EGFR blockade. Moreover, it is possible that targeting TrkB could potentiate the anticancer effects of anti-EGFR therapy.

  18. Phycocyanin and phycocyanobilin from Spirulina platensis protect against diabetic nephropathy by inhibiting oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jing; Inoguchi, Toyoshi; Sasaki, Shuji; Maeda, Yasutaka; McCarty, Mark F; Fujii, Masakazu; Ikeda, Noriko; Kobayashi, Kunihisa; Sonoda, Noriyuki; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2013-01-15

    We and other investigators have reported that bilirubin and its precursor biliverdin may have beneficial effects on diabetic vascular complications, including nephropathy, via its antioxidant effects. Here, we investigated whether phycocyanin derived from Spirulina platensis, a blue-green algae, and its chromophore phycocyanobilin, which has a chemical structure similar to that of biliverdin, protect against oxidative stress and renal dysfunction in db/db mice, a rodent model for Type 2 diabetes. Oral administration of phycocyanin (300 mg/kg) for 10 wk protected against albuminuria and renal mesangial expansion in db/db mice, and normalized tumor growth factor-β and fibronectin expression. Phycocyanin also normalized urinary and renal oxidative stress markers and the expression of NAD(P)H oxidase components. Similar antioxidant effects were observed following oral administration of phycocyanobilin (15 mg/kg) for 2 wk. Phycocyanobilin, bilirubin, and biliverdin also inhibited NADPH dependent superoxide production in cultured renal mesangial cells. In conclusion, oral administration of phycocyanin and phycocyanobilin may offer a novel and feasible therapeutic approach for preventing diabetic nephropathy. PMID:23115122

  19. Cyclooxygenase-2 -1195G>A (rs689466) polymorphism and cancer susceptibility: an updated meta-analysis involving 50,672 subjects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yafeng; Jiang, Heping; Liu, Tianyun; Tang, Weifeng; Ma, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    The association between cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) -1195G>A (rs689466) polymorphism and cancer risk has been extensively explored. However, the results of previous studies remain controversial. To address this gap, we performed an updated meta-analysis of fifty-eight studies involving a total of 50,672 subjects. Searching of PubMed and Embase databases was performed for publications on the association between COX-2 -1195G>A polymorphism and the risk of cancer. Statistical correlation was identified between COX-2 -1195G>A variants and overall cancer risk in five genetic models. In a sub-group analysis based on cancer type, significant association between COX-2 -1195G>A polymorphism and increased risk of gastric cancer, pancreatic cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma and other cancers was found. In a sub-group analysis by ethnicity, increased cancer risk was observed among Asians instead of Caucasians, Africans and mixed populations. Furthermore, in a sub-group analysis based on cancer system, increased cancer risk was found in digestive system cancer and other system cancer. Non-parametric “trim-and-fill” method was harnessed as a sensitivity analysis method and the results suggested our findings reliable. In summary, the results of our meta-analysis highlight that COX-2 -1195G>A polymorphism may be a risk factor for cancer. PMID:26550156

  20. Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 by ginsenoside Rd via activation of CCAAT-enhancer binding proteins and cyclic AMP response binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Hye Gwang; Pokharel, Yuba Raj; Han, Eun Hee; Kang, Keon Wook . E-mail: kwkang@chosun.ac.kr

    2007-07-20

    Panax ginseng is a widely used herbal medicine in East Asia and is reported to have a variety of pharmacological effects against cardiovascular diseases and cancers. Here we show a unique effect of ginsenoside Rd (Rd) on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in RAW264.7 macrophages. Rd (100 {mu}g/ml), but not other ginsenosides induced COX-2 and increased prostaglandin E{sub 2} production. Gel shift and Western blot analyses using nuclear fractions revealed that Rd increased both the DNA binding of and the nuclear levels of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP){alpha}/{beta} and cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB), but not of p65, in RAW264.7 cells. Moreover, Rd increased the luciferase reporter gene activity in cells transfected with a 574-bp mouse COX-2 promoter construct. Site-specific mutation analyses confirmed that Rd-mediated transcriptional activation of COX-2 gene was regulated by C/EBP and CREB. These results provide evidence that Rd activated C/EBP and CREB, and that the activation of C/EBP and CREB appears to be essential for induction of COX-2 in RAW264.7 cells.

  1. Expression of cyclooxygenase-2, alpha 1-acid-glycoprotein and inducible nitric oxide synthase in the developing lesions of murine leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Silva Miranda, Mayra; Rodríguez, Kendy Wek; Martínez Cordero, Erasmo; Rojas-Espinosa, Oscar

    2006-01-01

    Murine leprosy is a chronic disease of the mouse, the most popular animal model used in biomedical investigation, which is caused by Mycobacterium lepraemurium (MLM) whose characteristic lesion is the macrophage-made granuloma. From onset to the end of the disease, the granuloma undergoes changes that gradually transform the environment into a more appropriate milieu for the growth of M. lepraemurium. The mechanisms that participate in the formation and maturation of the murine leprosy granulomas are not completely understood; however, microbial and host-factors are believed to participate in their formation. In this study, we analysed the role of various pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory proteins in granulomas of murine leprosy after 21 weeks of infection. We assessed the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), alpha acid-glycoprotein (AGP), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) at sequential stages of infection. We also looked for the nitric-oxide nitrosylation product, nitrotyrosine (NT) in the granulomatous lesions of murine leprosy. We found that a pro-inflammatory environment predominates in the early granulomas while an anti-inflammatory environment predominates in late granulomas. No obvious signs of bacillary destruction were observed during the entire period of infection, but nitrosylation products and cell alterations were observed in granulomas in the advanced stages of disease. The change from a pro-inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory environment, which is probably driven by the bacillus itself, results in a more conducive environment for both bacillus replication and the disease progression. PMID:17222216

  2. The Role of Cyclooxygenase-2, Interleukin-1β and Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 in the Activation of Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 in Sheared-Chondrocytes and Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Pei-Pei; Guo, Jing-Wen; Yu, Xin; Wang, Yue; Wang, Tao; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Wang, Zhan-You; Wang, Pu

    2015-01-01

    MMP-1 expression is detected in fluid shear stress (20 dyn/cm2)-activated and osteoarthritic human chondrocytes, however, the precise mechanisms underlying shear-induced MMP-1 synthesis remain unknown. Using primary chondrocytes and T/C-28a2 chondrocytic cells as model systems, we report that prolonged application of high fluid shear to human chondrocytes induced the synthesis of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), which led to a marked increase in MMP-1 expression. IL-1β, COX-2-dependent PGE2 activated the PI3-K/AKT and p38 signaling pathways, which were in turn responsible for MMP-1 synthesis via NF-κB- and c-Jun-transactivating pathways. Prolonged shear stress exposure (>12 h) induced 15-Deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (15d-PGJ2) synthesis. Although 15d-PGJ2 suppressed PI3-K/AKT and p38 signaling pathways, it stimulated MMP-1 expression via activating heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1). The critical role of COX-2 in regulating MMP-1 expression in articular cartilage in vivo was demonstrated using COX-2+/− transgenic mice in the absence or presence of rofecoxib oral administration. These findings provide novel insights for developing therapeutic strategies to combat OA. PMID:25992485

  3. Cyclooxygenase-2 Silencing for the Treatment of Colitis: A Combined In Vivo Strategy Based on RNA Interference and Engineered Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Spisni, Enzo; Valerii, Maria C; De Fazio, Luigia; Cavazza, Elena; Borsetti, Francesca; Sgromo, Annamaria; Candela, Marco; Centanni, Manuela; Rizello, Fernando; Strillacci, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Nonpathogenic-invasive Escherichia coli (InvColi) bacteria are suitable for genetic transfer into mammalian cells and may act as a vehicle for RNA Interference (RNAi) in vivo. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is overexpressed in ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), two inflammatory conditions of the colon and small intestine grouped as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We engineered InvColi strains for anti-COX-2 RNAi (InvColishCOX2), aiming to investigate the in vivo feasibility of a novel COX-2 silencing strategy in a murine model of colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS). Enema administrations of InvColishCOX2 in DSS-treated mice led to COX-2 downregulation, colonic mucosa preservation, reduced colitis disease activity index (DAI) and increased mice survival. Moreover, DSS/InvColishCOX2-treated mice showed lower levels of circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines and a reduced colitis-associated shift of gut microbiota. Considering its effectiveness and safety, we propose our InvColishCOX2 strategy as a promising tool for molecular therapy in intestinal inflammatory diseases. PMID:25393372

  4. Cyclooxygenase-2 or tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors attenuate the mechanotransductive effects of pulsed focused ultrasound to suppress mesenchymal stromal cell homing to healthy and dystrophic muscle

    PubMed Central

    Tebebi, Pamela A.; Burks, Scott R.; Kim, Saejeong J.; Williams, Rashida A.; Nguyen, Ben A.; Venkatesh, Priyanka; Frenkel, Victor; Frank, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Maximal homing of infused stem cells to diseased tissue is critical for regenerative medicine. Pulsed focused ultrasound (pFUS) is a clinically relevant platform to direct stem cell migration. Through mechanotransduction, pFUS establishes local gradients of cytokines, chemokines, trophic factors (CCTF) and cell adhesion molecules (CAM) in treated skeletal muscle that subsequently infused mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) can capitalize to migrate into the parenchyma. Characterizing molecular responses to mechanical pFUS effects revealed tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) drives cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) signaling to locally increase CCTF/CAM that are necessary for MSC homing. pFUS failed to increase chemoattractants and induce MSC homing to treated muscle in mice pretreated with ibuprofen (non-specific COX inhibitor) or etanercept (TNFα inhibitor). pFUS-induced MSC homing was also suppressed in COX2-knockout mice, demonstrating ibuprofen blocked the mechanically-induced CCTF/CAM by acting on COX2. Anti-inflammatory drugs, including ibuprofen, are administered to muscular dystrophy (MD) patients and ibuprofen also suppressed pFUS-induced homing to muscle in a mouse model of MD. Drug interactions with cell therapies remain unexplored and are not controlled for during clinical cell therapy trials. This study highlights potentially negative drug-host interactions that suppress stem cell homing and could undermine cell-based approaches for regenerative medicine. PMID:25534849

  5. Date syrup-derived polyphenols attenuate angiogenic responses and exhibits anti-inflammatory activity mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor and cyclooxygenase-2 expression in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Taleb, Hajer; Morris, R Keith; Withycombe, Cathryn E; Maddocks, Sarah E; Kanekanian, Ara D

    2016-07-01

    Bioactive components such as polyphenols, present in many plants, are purported to have anti-inflammatory and antiangiogenic properties. Date syrup, produced from date fruit of the date palm tree, has traditionally been used to treat a wide range of diseases with etiologies involving angiogenesis and inflammation. It was hypothesized that polyphenols in date syrup reduce angiogenic responses such as cell migration, tube formation, and matrix metalloproteinase activity in an inflammatory model by exhibiting anti-inflammatory activity mediated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the prostaglandin enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in endothelial cells. Date syrup polyphenols at 60 and 600μg/mL reduced inflammation and suppressed several stages of angiogenesis, including endothelial cell migration, invasion, matrix metalloproteinase activity, and tube formation, without evidence of cytotoxicity. VEGF and COX-2 expression induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha at both gene expression and protein level was significantly reduced by date syrup polyphenols in comparison to untreated cells. In conclusion, polyphenols in date syrup attenuated angiogenic responses and exhibited anti-inflammatory activity mediated by VEGF and COX-2 expression in endothelial cells. PMID:27333954

  6. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of an (18)F-Labeled Radiotracer Based on Celecoxib-NBD for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Imaging of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2).

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jatinder; Tietz, Ole; Bhardwaj, Atul; Marshall, Alison; Way, Jenilee; Wuest, Melinda; Wuest, Frank

    2015-10-01

    A series of novel fluorine-containing cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors was designed and synthesized based on the previously reported fluorescent COX-2 imaging agent celecoxib-NBD (3; NBD=7-nitrobenzofurazan). In vitro COX-1/COX-2 inhibitory data show that N-(4-fluorobenzyl)-4-(5-p-tolyl-3-trifluoromethylpyrazol-1-yl)benzenesulfonamide (5; IC50 =0.36 μM, SI>277) and N-fluoromethyl-4-(5-p-tolyl-3-trifluoromethylpyrazol-1-yl)benzenesulfonamide (6; IC50 =0.24 μM, SI>416) are potent and selective COX-2 inhibitors. Compound 5 was selected for radiolabeling with the short-lived positron emitter fluorine-18 ((18) F) and evaluated as a positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agent. Radiotracer [(18) F]5 was analyzed in vitro and in vivo using human colorectal cancer model HCA-7. Although radiotracer uptake into COX-2-expressing HCA-7 cells was high, no evidence for COX-2-specific binding was found. Radiotracer uptake into HCA-7 tumors in vivo was low and similar to that of muscle, used as reference tissue. PMID:26287271

  7. Nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF{kappa}B) and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) expression in the irradiated colorectum is associated with subsequent histopathological changes

    SciTech Connect

    Yeoh, Ann S.J. . E-mail: ann.yeoh@imvs.sa.gov.au; Bowen, Joanne M.; Gibson, Rachel J.; Keefe, Dorothy M.K.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: Recent studies have proposed that mucositis development is the same throughout the gastrointestinal tract (GIT), as it is formed from one structure embryologically. Radiation-induced oral mucositis studies have outlined the key involvement of nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF{kappa}B) and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) in its pathobiology. The purpose of this study was therefore to investigate the expression of NF{kappa}B and Cox-2 in the irradiated colorectum and to correlate these with the associated histopathologic changes. Methods and Materials: Colorectal tissues from 28 colorectal cancer patients treated with preoperative radiotherapy were analyzed for histopathologic changes using a variety of tissue staining methods. The expression of NF{kappa}B and Cox-2 in these tissues was investigated using immunohistochemistry. Changes in expression of these proteins were then correlated with the histopathologic changes. Results: Radiation therapy caused injury to the normal colorectal tissue surrounding tumor site, particularly around the blood vessels. These changes were reflected in changes in NF{kappa}B and Cox-2 expression. Conclusions: We conclude that different regions of the GIT, the colorectum, and oral cavity have similar underlying mechanisms of radiation-induced mucositis. Understanding these mechanisms will allow new approaches to be developed to specifically target steps in the evolution of alimentary mucositis.

  8. Gq protein mediates UVB-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression by stimulating HB-EGF secretion from HaCaT human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, MiRan; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2010-03-05

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation induces cyclooxygenase-2 expression to produce cellular responses including aging and carcinogenesis in skin. We hypothesised that heterotrimeric G proteins mediate UV-induced COX-2 expression by stimulating secretion of soluble HB-EGF (sHB-EGF). In this study, we aimed to elucidate the role and underlying mechanism of the {alpha} subunit of Gq protein (G{alpha}q) in UVB-induced HB-EGF secretion and COX-2 induction. We found that expression of constitutively active G{alpha}q (G{alpha}qQL) augmented UVB-induced HB-EGF secretion, which was abolished by knockdown of G{alpha}q with shRNA in HaCaT human keratinocytes. G{alpha}q was found to mediate the UVB-induced HB-EGF secretion by sequential activation of phospholipase C (PLC), protein kinase C{delta} (PKC{delta}), and matrix metaloprotease-2 (MMP-2). Moreover, G{alpha}qQL mediated UVB-induced COX-2 expression in an HB-EGF-, EGFR-, and p38-dependent manner. From these results, we concluded that G{alpha}q mediates UV-induced COX-2 expression through activation of EGFR by HB-EGF, of which ectodomain shedding was stimulated through sequential activation of PLC, PKC{delta} and MMP-2 in HaCaT cells.

  9. Leptin potentiates IFN-γ-induced expression of nitric oxide synthase and cyclo-oxygenase-2 in murine macrophage J774A.1

    PubMed Central

    Raso, Giuseppina Mattace; Pacilio, Maria; Esposito, Emanuela; Coppola, Anna; Di Carlo, Raffaele; Meli, Rosaria

    2002-01-01

    Leptin, a pleiotropic hormone believed to regulate body weight, has recently been associated with inflammatory states and immune activity. Here we have studied the effect of leptin on expression of IFN-γ-induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2), both prominent markers of macrophage activation, using the murine macrophage J774A.1 cell line. After 24 h of incubation, leptin (1–10 μg ml−1) potently synergized with IFN-γ (100 U ml−1) in nitric oxide (NO) release, evaluated as nitrite and nitrate (NOx), and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in culture medium. The observed increase of NO and PGE2 was related to enhanced expression of the respective inducible enzyme isoforms, measured in mRNA and protein by RT–PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. When cells were stimulated only with leptin, a weak induction of NO and PGE2 release and of the expression of related inducible enzymes was observed. Moreover IFN-γ increased the expression of the functional form of leptin receptor (Ob-Rb) and this effect was potentiated by leptin in a concentration-dependent manner. These data suggest that macrophages, among the peripheral immune cells, represent a target for leptin and confirm the relevance of this hormone in the pathophysiology of inflammation. PMID:12411410

  10. Protection against Experimental Stroke by Ganglioside GM1 Is Associated with the Inhibition of Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Tian, Jinghua; Long, Mitchell King-Wei; Chen, Yong; Lu, Jianfei; Zhou, Changman; Wang, Tianlong

    2016-01-01

    Ganglioside GM1, which is particularly abundant in the central nervous system (CNS), is closely associated with the protection against several CNS disorders. However, controversial findings have been reported on the role of GM1 following ischemic stroke. In the present study, using a rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model, we investigated whether GM1 can protect against ischemic brain injury and whether it targets the autophagy pathway. GM1 was delivered to Sprague-Dawley male rats at 3 doses (25 mg/kg, 50 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg) by intraperitoneal injection soon after reperfusion and then once daily for 2 days. The same volume of saline was given as a control. Tat–Beclin-1, a specific autophagy inducer, was administered by intraperitoneal injection at 24 and 48 hours post-MCAO. Infarction volume, mortality and neurological function were assessed at 72 hours after ischemic insult. Immunofluorescence and Western blotting were performed to determine the expression of autophagy-related proteins P62, LC3 and Beclin-1 in the penumbra area. No significant changes in mortality and physiological variables (heart rate, blood glucose levels and arterial blood gases) were observed between the different groups. However, MCAO resulted in enhanced conversion of LC3-I into LC3-II, P62 degradation, high levels of Beclin-1, a large area infarction (26.3±3.6%) and serious neurobehavioral deficits. GM1 (50 mg/kg) treatment significantly reduced the autophagy activation, neurobehavioral dysfunctions, and infarction volume (from 26.3% to 19.5%) without causing significant adverse side effects. However, this biological function could be abolished by Tat–Beclin-1. In conclusion: GM1 demonstrated safe and robust neuroprotective effects that are associated with the inhibition of autophagy following experimental stroke. PMID:26751695

  11. Melanin protects Paracoccidioides brasiliensis from the effects of antimicrobial photodynamic inhibition and antifungal drugs.

    PubMed

    Baltazar, Ludmila Matos; Werneck, Silvia Maria Cordeiro; Soares, Betânia Maria; Ferreira, Marcus Vinicius L; Souza, Danielle G; Pinotti, Marcos; Santos, Daniel Assis; Cisalpino, Patrícia Silva

    2015-07-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a public health concern in Latin America and South America that when not correctly treated can lead to patient death. In this study, the influence of melanin produced by Paracoccidioides spp. on the effects of treatment with antimicrobial photodynamic inhibition (aPI) and antifungal drugs was evaluated. aPI was performed using toluidine blue (TBO) as a photosensitizer and a 630-nm light-emitting diode (LED) light. The antifungals tested were itraconazole and amphotericin B. We evaluated the effects of each approach, aPI or antifungals, against nonmelanized and melanized yeast cells by performing susceptibility tests and by quantifying oxidative and nitrosative bursts during the experiments. aPI reduced nonmelanized cells by 3.0 log units and melanized cells by 1.3 log units. The results showed that melanization protects the fungal cell, probably by acting as a scavenger of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species, but not of peroxynitrite. Melanin also increased the MICs of itraconazole and amphotericin B, and the drugs were fungicidal for nonmelanized and fungistatic for melanized yeast cells. Our study shows that melanin production by Paracoccidioides yeast cells serves a protective function during aPI and treatment with itraconazole and amphotericin B. The results suggest that melanin binds to the drugs, changing their antifungal activities, and also acts as a scavenger of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide, but not of peroxynitrite, indicating that peroxynitrite is the main radical that is responsible for fungal death after aPI. PMID:25896704

  12. Protective effects of genetic inhibition of Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 in experimental renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Kerroch, Monique; Alfieri, Carlo; Dorison, Aude; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Dussaule, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a progressive incurable pathology affecting millions of people. Intensive investigations aim to identify targets for therapy. We have previously demonstrated that abnormal expression of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1) is a key factor of renal disease by promoting inflammation and fibrosis. The present study investigates whether blocking the expression of DDR1 after the initiation of renal disease can delay or arrest the progression of this pathology. Severe renal disease was induced by either injecting nephrotoxic serum (NTS) or performing unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice, and the expression of DDR1 was inhibited by administering antisense oligodeoxynucleotides either at 4 or 8 days after NTS (corresponding to early or more established phases of disease, respectively), or at day 2 after ligation. DDR1 antisense administration at day 4 stopped the increase of proteinuria and protected animals against the progression of glomeruloneprhitis, as evidenced by functional, structural and cellular indexes. Antisense administration at day 8 delayed progression –but to a smaller degree- of renal disease. Similar beneficial effects on renal structure and inflammation were observed with the antisense administration of DDR1 after ureteral ligation. Thus, targeting DDR1 can be a promising strategy in the treatment of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26880216

  13. ATF4 deficiency protects hepatocytes from oxidative stress via inhibiting CYP2E1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunxia; Li, Houkai; Meng, Qingshu; Du, Ying; Xiao, Fei; Zhang, Qian; Yu, Junjie; Li, Kai; Chen, Shanghai; Huang, Zhiying; Liu, Bin; Guo, Feifan

    2014-01-01

    Activating transcription factor (ATF) 4 is involved in the regulation of oxidative stress in fibroblasts and neurons. The role of ATF4 in hepatocytes, however, is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ATF4 in hepatocytes in oxidative stress under a high-fat diet (HFD). Here, we showed that palmitate-stimulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and triglyceride (TG) accumulation is blocked by ATF4 deficiency in primary hepatocytes. Consistently, HFD-induced oxidative stress, TG accumulation and expression of cytochrome P450, family 2, subfamily, polypeptide 1 (CYP2E1) are also blocked by knocking down ATF4 expression in the mouse liver. This suggests that ATF4 might regulate oxidative stress viaCYP2E1 under an HFD. In addition, we observed that expression of CYP2E1 is indirectly regulated by ATF4 in a cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB)-dependent manner, which can directly activate the CYP2E1 promoter activity. Notably, ATF4-stimulated ROS production is inhibited in vivo by treatment with diallyl sulphide, a selective CYP2E1 inhibitor. Finally, we showed that ATF4 expression in the liver is responsible for the protective effects against HFD-induced CYP2E1 expression, oxidative stress, and TG accumulation. Taken together, these observations suggest that ATF4 is a novel regulator of oxidative stress as well as accumulation of TG in response to HFD. PMID:24373582

  14. Protective effects of genetic inhibition of Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 in experimental renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kerroch, Monique; Alfieri, Carlo; Dorison, Aude; Boffa, Jean-Jacques; Chatziantoniou, Christos; Dussaule, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is a progressive incurable pathology affecting millions of people. Intensive investigations aim to identify targets for therapy. We have previously demonstrated that abnormal expression of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 (DDR1) is a key factor of renal disease by promoting inflammation and fibrosis. The present study investigates whether blocking the expression of DDR1 after the initiation of renal disease can delay or arrest the progression of this pathology. Severe renal disease was induced by either injecting nephrotoxic serum (NTS) or performing unilateral ureteral obstruction in mice, and the expression of DDR1 was inhibited by administering antisense oligodeoxynucleotides either at 4 or 8 days after NTS (corresponding to early or more established phases of disease, respectively), or at day 2 after ligation. DDR1 antisense administration at day 4 stopped the increase of proteinuria and protected animals against the progression of glomeruloneprhitis, as evidenced by functional, structural and cellular indexes. Antisense administration at day 8 delayed progression -but to a smaller degree- of renal disease. Similar beneficial effects on renal structure and inflammation were observed with the antisense administration of DDR1 after ureteral ligation. Thus, targeting DDR1 can be a promising strategy in the treatment of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26880216

  15. Transglutaminase inhibition: A therapy to protect cells from death in neurodegeneration?

    PubMed Central

    Iannaccone, Martina; Stefanile, Alessandro; Vivo, Giulia De; Martin, Antonio; Serretiello, Enrica; Gentile, Vittorio

    2012-01-01

    Transglutaminases (TGs; E.C. 2.3.2.13) are ubiquitous enzymes which catalyze post-translational modifications of proteins. TGs and TG-catalyzed post-translational modifications of proteins have been shown to be involved in the molecular mechanisms responsible for several human diseases. In particular, TG activity has been hypothesized to also be involved also in the molecular mechanisms responsible for human neurodegenerative diseases. In support of this hypothesis, Basso et al recently demonstrated that the TG inhibition protects against oxidative stress-induced neuronal death, suggesting that multiple TG isoforms participate in oxidative stress-induced cell death and that nonselective TG isoform inhibitors will be most effective in fighting oxidative death in neurological disorders. In this commentary, we discuss the possible molecular mechanisms by which TG activity could be involved in the pathogenesis of neurological diseases, with particular reference to neurodegenerative diseases, and the possible involvement of multiple TG isoforms expressed simultaneously in the nervous system in these diseases. Moreover, therapeutic strategies based on the use of selective or nonselective TG inhibitors for the amelioration of the symptoms of patients with neurological diseases, characterized by aberrant TG activity, are also discussed. PMID:23193435

  16. Gastric protection by meciadanol. A new synthetic flavonoid inhibiting histidine decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Konturek, S J; Kitler, M E; Brzozowski, T; Radecki, T

    1986-08-01

    Flavonoids reportedly inhibit histidine decarboxylase and reduce gastric mucosal histamine content. We studied the effects of acute and chronic intragastric administration to rats of meciadanol, a new synthetic flavonoid (Zyma S.A., Nyon, Switzerland). The action of meciadanol was compared to that of 16,16-dimethyl PGE2. Meciadanol did not affect acid or pepsin output at any dose used. High doses of 16,16-dimethyl PGE2 reduced both acid and pepsin output. Meciadanol partially prevented aspirin-induced lesions but the prevention required chronic administration of meciadanol. In contrast, a single dose of meciadanol completely prevented ethanol-induced lesions. Chronic administration of meciadanol also completely prevented ethanol-induced lesions. 16,16-Dimethyl PGE2 prevented both aspirin-induced and ethanol-induced lesions in doses that did not affect acid or pepsin output. Meciadanol did not influence the effect that either aspirin or ethanol had on endogenous mucosal PGI2. Thus, the dose range of meciadanol that protected against ulcerogens did not affect either gastric acid secretion or pepsin output. Therefore, we conclude that meciadanol's action represents true cytoprotection, which was previously attributed only to prostaglandins. PMID:3525045

  17. Histone deacetylase inhibition protects hearing against acute ototoxicity by activating the Nf-κB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Layman, WS; Williams, DM; Dearman, JA; Sauceda, MA; Zuo, J

    2015-01-01

    Auditory hair cells have repeatedly been shown to be susceptible to ototoxicity from a multitude of drugs including aminoglycoside antibiotics. Here, we found that systemic HDAC inhibition using suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) on adult mice offers almost complete protection against hair cell loss and hearing threshold shifts from acute ototoxic insult from kanamycin potentiated with furosemide. We also found that the apparent lack of hair cell loss was completely independent of spontaneous or facilitated (ectopic Atoh1 induction) hair cell regeneration. Rather, SAHA treatment correlated with RelA acetylation (K310) and subsequent activation of the Nf-κB pro-survival pathway leading to expression of pro-survival genes such as Cflar (cFLIP) and Bcl2l1 (Bcl-xL). In addition, we also detected increased expression of pro-survival genes Cdkn1a (p21) and Hspa1a (Hsp70), and decreased expression of the pro-apoptosis gene Bcl2l11 (Bim). These data combined provide evidence that class I HDACs control the transcriptional activation of pro-survival pathways in response to ototoxic insult by regulating the acetylation status of transcription factors found at the crossroads of cell death and survival in the mammalian inner ear. PMID:26279947

  18. Calcium-activated butyrylcholinesterase in human skin protects acetylcholinesterase against suicide inhibition by neurotoxic organophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Schallreuter, Karin U.; University of Bradford ). E-mail: K.Schallreuter@bradford.ac.uk; Gibbons, Nicholas C.J.; Elwary, Souna M.; Parkin, Susan M.; Wood, John M.

    2007-04-20

    The human epidermis holds an autocrine acetylcholine production and degradation including functioning membrane integrated and cytosolic butyrylcholinesterase (BuchE). Here we show that BuchE activities increase 9-fold in the presence of calcium (0.5 x 10{sup -3}M) via a specific EF-hand calcium binding site, whereas acetylcholinesterase (AchE) is not affected. {sup 45}Calcium labelling and computer simulation confirmed the presence of one EF-hand binding site per subunit which is disrupted by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation. Moreover, we confirmed the faster hydrolysis by calcium-activated BuchE using the neurotoxic organophosphate O-ethyl-O-(4-nitrophenyl)-phenylphosphonothioate (EPN). Considering the large size of the human skin with 1.8 m{sup 2} surface area with its calcium gradient in the 10{sup -3}M range, our results implicate calcium-activated BuchE as a major protective mechanism against suicide inhibition of AchE by organophosphates in this non-neuronal tissue.

  19. Estrogen-Dependent Prognostic Significance of Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression in Early-Stage Invasive Breast Cancers Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Haffty, Bruce G. Yang Qifeng; Moran, Meena S.; Tan, Antoinette R.; Reiss, Michael

    2008-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the prognostic significance of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in breast cancer patients treated with conservative surgery and radiation therapy (CS+RT). Methods and Materials: Between 1975 and 2003, we retrieved specimens from 504 breast cancer patients treated with CS+RT. The specimens were constructed into tissue microarrays processed and stained for estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor, Her2/neu, and COX-2. Each core was scored as positive or negative. All data including demographics, clinical, pathologic, staging, and outcome variables were entered into a computerized database. Results: Expression of COX-2 was positive in 58% of cases and correlated with younger age (p = 0.01) and larger tumor size (p 0.001). Expression of COX-2 was predictive of local relapse (relative risk[RR], 3.248; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.340-7.871; p = 0.0091), distant metastasis (RR, 2.21; 95% CI, 1.259-3.896; p = 0.0058), and decreased survival (RR, 2.321; 95% CI, 1.324-4.071; p = 0.0033). Among ER-positive patients, COX-2 expression was predictive of worse local control (85% vs. 93%, p = 0.04), distant metastasis (75% vs. 95%, p = 0.002) and worse survival (65% vs. 94%, p = 0.002). Among ER-negative tumors COX-2 expression was not significantly correlated with local control (87 vs. 95%, p = 0.12), distant metastasis (73% vs. 78%, p = 0.39), or survival (77% vs. 87%, p 0.15). Conclusions: In breast cancer patients treated with CS+RT, COX-2 expression is associated with younger age, larger tumor size, worse local control, distant metastasis, and worse overall survival. The significance is limited to hormone receptor-positive tumors, consistent with the known effect of COX-2/PGE2 on aromatase activity. Use of COX-2 inhibitors in estrogen-dependent breast cancers warrants further investigation.

  20. Cigarette smoke condensate activates nuclear transcription factor-kappaB through phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaB(alpha): correlation with induction of cyclooxygenase-2.

    PubMed

    Anto, Ruby John; Mukhopadhyay, Asok; Shishodia, Shishir; Gairola, C Gary; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2002-09-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) contains several carcinogens known to initiate and promote tumorigenesis and metastasis. Because various genes that mediate carcinogenesis and tumorigenesis are regulated by nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB), we postulated that the effects of CS must be mediated through activation of this transcription factor. Therefore, in the present report we investigated whether cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) activates NF-kappaB, and whether the pathway employed for activation is similar to that of TNF, one of the potent activators of NF-kappaB. Our results show that the treatment of human histiocytic lymphoma U-937 cells with CSC activated NF-kappaB in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The kinetics of NF-kappaB activation by CSC was comparable with that of TNF. CSC-induced NF-kappaB activation was not cell type-specific, as it also activated NF-kappaB in T cells (Jurkat), lung cells (H1299), and head and neck squamous cell lines (1483 and 14B). Activation of NF-kappaB by CSC correlated with time-dependent degradation of IkappaB(alpha), an inhibitor of NF-kappaB. Further studies revealed that CSC induced phosphorylation of the serine residue at position 32 in IkappaB(alpha). In vitro immunocomplex kinase assays showed that CSC activated IkappaB(alpha) kinase (IKK). The suppression of CSC-activated NF-kappaB-dependent reporter gene expression by dominant negative form of IkappaB(alpha), TRAF2, NIK and IKK suggests a similarity to the TNF-induced pathway for NF-kappaB. CSC also induced the expression of cyclooxygenase-2, an NF-kappaB regulated gene product. Overall, our results indicate that through phosphorylation and degradation of IkappaB(alpha), CSC can activate NF-kappaB in a wide a variety of cells, and this may play a role in CS-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:12189195

  1. Effects of exercise on cyclooxygenase-2 expression and nuclear factor-kappaB DNA binding in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Si-Young; Jun, Tae-Won; Lee, Young-Soo; Na, Hye-Kyung; Surh, Young-Joon; Song, Wook

    2009-08-01

    There are multiple lines of compelling evidence supporting the beneficial effect of exercise on the prevention and/or improvement of certain chronic diseases. However, exhaustive or intense exercise causes oxygen free radical generation and oxidative stress, which can lead to injuries and chronic fatigue as well as inflammation. Abnormal upregulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a rate-limiting enzyme in prostaglandin biosynthesis, has been implicated in many inflammation-associated chronic disorders. Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) is a major transcription factor involved in regulation of COX-2 gene expression. To determine whether inflammation induction is dependent on intensity of exercise, COX-2 expression and NF-kappaB activation were adopted as the main targets. Thirteen volunteers who participated in the exercise program were subject to four exercise intensities [40, 60, 80, and 100% of heart rate reserve (HRR)] on a treadmill and to resting conditions. Isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were collected during the resting state and immediately after exercise and subjected to the electrophoretic mobility gel shift assay and Western blot analysis. As exercise intensity increased, both COX-2 expression and NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity were enhanced. The expression of IkappaB kinase alpha (IKKalpha) and IkappaBalpha were not significantly altered. However, exhaustive/vigorous exercise (100% HRR) could induce the phosphorylation of both IKKalpha and IkappaBalpha. In conclusion, a single bout of exercise induced COX-2 expression and DNA-binding activity of NF-kappaB in human PBMCs, and both COX-2 expression and DNA-binding activity of NF-kappaB were dependent on exercise intensity. PMID:19723090

  2. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors and paracetamol use in Queensland and in the whole of Australia

    PubMed Central

    Barozzi, Nadia; Tett, Susan E

    2008-01-01

    Background Cross national drug utilization studies can provide information about different influences on physician prescribing. This is important for medicines with issues around safety and quality of use, like non selective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (ns-NSAIDs) and cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors. To enable comparison of prescription medicine use across different jurisdictions with a range of population sizes, data first need to be compared within Australia to understand whether use in a smaller sub-population may be considered as representative of the total use within Australia. The aim of this study was to compare the utilization of non selective NSAID, COX-2 inhibitors and paracetamol between Queensland and Australia. Method Dispensing data were obtained for concession beneficiaries for Australia for ns-NSAIDs, COX-2 inhibitors and paracetamol subsidized by the PBS over the period 1997–2003. The same data were purchased for Queensland. Data were converted to Defined Daily Dose (DDD)/1000 beneficiaries/day (World Health Organization anatomical therapeutic chemical classification, 2005). Results Total NSAID and paracetamol consumption were similar in Australia and Queensland. Ns-NSAID use decreased sharply with the introduction of COX-2 inhibitors (from approximately 80 to 40 DDD/1000 beneficiaries/day). Paracetamol was constant (approximately 45 DDD/1000 beneficiaries/day). COX-2 inhibitors consumption was initially higher in Queensland than in the whole of Australia. Conclusion Despite initial divergence in celecoxib use between Queensland and Australia, the use of ns-NSAIDs, COX-2 inhibitors and paracetamol overall, in concession beneficiaries, was comparable in Australia and Queensland. PMID:18816393

  3. Mitochondrial localization of cyclooxygenase-2 and calcium-independent phospholipase A{sub 2} in human cancer cells: Implication in apoptosis resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Liou, J.-Y.; Aleksic, Nena; Chen, S.-F.; Han, T.-J.; Shyue, Song-Kun . E-mail: skshyue@ibms.sinica.edu.tw; Wu, Kenneth K. . E-mail: Kenneth.K.Wu@uth.tmc.edu

    2005-05-15

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is inducible by myriad stimuli. The inducible COX-2 in primary cultured human cells has been reported to localize to nuclear envelope, endoplasmic reticulum, nucleus and caveolae. As COX-2 plays an important role in tumor growth, we were interested in its subcellular location in cancer cells. We examined COX-2 localization in several cancer cell lines by confocal microscopy. A majority of COX-2 was colocalized with heat shock protein 60, a mitochondrial protein, in colon cancer (HT-29, HCT-15 and DLD-1), breast cancer (MCF7), hepatocellular cancer (HepG2) and lung cancer cells (A549) with a similar distribution pattern. By contrast, COX-2 was not localized to mitochondria in human foreskin fibroblasts or endothelial cells. Immunoblot analysis of COX-2 in mitochondrial and cytosolic fractions confirmed localization of COX-2 to mitochondria in HT-29 and DLD-1 cells but not in fibroblasts. Calcium-independent phospholipase A2 was colocalized with heat shock protein 60 to mitochondria not only in cancer cells (HT-29 and DLD-1) but also in fibroblasts. HT-29 which expressed more abundant mitochondrial COX-2 than DLD-1 was highly resistant to arachidonic acid and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis whereas DLD-1 was less resistant and human fibroblasts were highly susceptible. Treatment of HT-29 cells with sulindac or SC-236, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, resulted in loss of resistance to apoptosis. These results suggest that mitochondrial COX-2 in cancer cells confer resistance to apoptosis by reducing the proapoptotic arachidonic acid.

  4. Magnetic ligand fishing combination with high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-mass spectrometry to screen and characterize cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors from green tea.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xu; Shi, Shuyun; Li, Simin; Yang, Tianlun

    2014-10-22

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors may be used to efficiently treat inflammation or cancer diseases. In the present study, we established a new screening assay based on magnetic Fe3O4@SiO2-COX-2 ligand fishing combination with high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detector-mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-MS(n)) to screen and identify COX-2 inhibitors from green tea. Optimized conditions (pH at 7.4, temperature at 30°C, and incubation time for 30min) for fishing out COX-2 inhibitors were achieved by testing positive control, celecoxib, with active and inactive COX-2. Notably, immobilized COX-2 showed high stability (remained 94.7% after ten consecutive cycles), reproducibility (RSD<10% for batch-to-batch evaluation). Finally, eight catechins with COX-2 binding activity were screened in green tea, and their structures were characterized by ultraviolet (UV), accurate molecular weight, diagnostic fragment ions and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Particularly, the COX-2 inhibitory activities of two rare catechins, [(-)-epigallocatechin-3-(3″-O-methyl)-gallate (3″-O-methyl-EGCG, IC50=0.17±0.03μM 0.16±0.01), (-)-epicatechin-3-(3″-O-methyl)-gallate (3″-O-methyl-ECG, IC50=0.16±0.02μM)], were reported for the first time. The results indicated that the proposed method was a simple, robust and reproducible approach for the discovery of COX-2 inhibitors from complex matrix. PMID:25464095

  5. Deletion of cyclooxygenase-2 in the mouse increases arterial blood pressure with no impairment in renal NO production in response to chronic high salt intake.

    PubMed

    Stæhr, Mette; Hansen, Pernille B L; Madsen, Kirsten; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Nüsing, Rolf M; Jensen, Boye L

    2013-05-15

    Experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) activity attenuates the blood pressure increase during high NaCl intake by stimulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated NO synthesis in the kidney medulla. COX-2(-/-) (C57BL6) an COX-2(+/+) mice were fed a diet with 0.004% (low salt, LS) or 4% (high salt, HS) NaCl for 18 days. Arterial blood pressure was recorded continuously using indwelling catheters. Food and water intake and diuresis were measured in metabolic cages. Urine osmolality and excretion of electrolytes, cGMP, cAMP, and NOx were determined, as well as plasma NOx and cGMP. There was a significant dependence of blood pressure on salt intake and genotype: COX-2(-/-) exhibited higher blood pressure than COX-2(+/+) both on HS and LS intake. COX-2(+/+) littermates displayed an increase in blood pressure on HS versus LS (102.3 ± 1.1 mmHg vs. 91.9 ± 0.9 mmHg) day and night. The mice exhibited significant blood pressure increases during the awake phase (night) that were larger in COX-2(-/-) on HS diet compared with COX-2(+/+). Water intake, diuresis, Na(+), and osmolyte excretions and NOx and cGMP excretions were significantly and similarly elevated with HS in COX-2(-/-) and COX-2(+/+). In summary, C57BL6 mice exhibit a salt intake-dependent increase in arterial blood pressure with increased renal NO production. COX-2 activity has a general lowering effect on arterial blood pressure. COX-2 dampens NaCl-induced increases in arterial blood pressure in the awake phase. In conclusion, COX-2 activity attenuates the changes in nocturnal blood pressure during high salt intake, and COX-2 activity is not necessary for increased renal nitric oxide formation during elevated NaCl intake. PMID:23535462

  6. Arachidonoyl-ethanolamide activates endoplasmic reticulum stress-apoptosis in tumorigenic keratinocytes: Role of cyclooxygenase-2 and novel J-series prostamides.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Eman; Henderson, Kate L; Danell, Allison S; Van Dross, Rukiyah

    2016-02-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer and other epithelial tumors overexpress cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), differentiating them from normal cells. COX-2 metabolizes arachidonic acid to prostaglandins including, the J-series prostaglandins, which induce apoptosis by mechanisms including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Arachidonoyl-ethanolamide (AEA) is a cannabinoid that causes apoptosis in diverse tumor types. Previous studies from our group demonstrated that AEA was metabolized by COX-2 to J-series prostaglandins. Thus, the current study examines the role of COX-2, J-series prostaglandins, and ER stress in AEA-induced apoptosis. In tumorigenic keratinocytes that overexpress COX-2, AEA activated the PKR-like ER kinase (PERK), inositol requiring kinase-1 (IRE1), and activating transcription factor-6 (ATF6) ER stress pathways and the ER stress apoptosis-associated proteins, C/EBP homologous protein-10 (CHOP10), caspase-12, and caspase-3. Using an ER stress inhibitor, it was determined that ER stress was required for AEA-induced apoptosis. To evaluate the role of COX-2 in ER stress-apoptosis, HaCaT keratinocytes with low endogenous COX-2 expression were transfected with COX-2 cDNA or an empty vector and AEA-induced ER stress-apoptosis occurred only in the presence of COX-2. Moreover, LC-MS analysis showed that the novel prostaglandins, 15-deoxyΔ(12,14) PGJ2 -EA and Δ(12) PGJ2 /PGJ2-EA, were synthesized from AEA. These findings suggest that AEA will be selectively toxic in tumor cells that overexpress COX-2 due to the metabolism of AEA by COX-2 to J-series prostaglandin-ethanolamides (prostamides). Hence, AEA may be an ideal topical agent for the elimination of malignancies that overexpress COX-2. PMID:25557612

  7. Kainic acid-induced neurodegeneration and activation of inflammatory processes in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures: treatment with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor does not prevent neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Järvelä, Juha T; Ruohonen, Saku; Kukko-Lukjanov, Tiina-Kaisa; Plysjuk, Anna; Lopez-Picon, Francisco R; Holopainen, Irma E

    2011-06-01

    In the postnatal rodent hippocampus status epilepticus (SE) leads to age- and region-specific excitotoxic neuronal damage, the precise mechanisms of which are still incompletely known. Recent studies suggest that the activation of inflammatory responses together with glial cell reactivity highly contribute to excitotoxic neuronal damage. However, pharmacological tools to attenuate their activation in the postnatal brain are still poorly elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of inflammatory mediators in kainic acid (KA)-induced neuronal damage in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs). A specific cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor N-[2-(cyclohexyloxy)-4-nitrophenyl]-methanesulfonamide (NS-398) was used to study whether or not it could ameliorate neuronal death. Our results show that KA treatment (24 h) resulted in a dose-dependent degeneration of CA3a/b pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, COX-2 immunoreactivity was pronouncedly enhanced particularly in CA3c pyramidal neurons, microglial and astrocyte morphology changed from a resting to active appearance, the expression of the microglial specific protein, Iba1, increased, and prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) production increased. These indicated the activation of inflammatory processes. However, the expression of neither proinflammatory cytokines, i.e. tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), nor the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 mRNA was significantly altered by KA treatment as studied by real-time PCR. Despite activation of an array of inflammatory processes, neuronal damage could not be rescued either with the combined pre- and co-treatment with a specific COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398. Our results suggest that KA induces activation of a repertoire of inflammatory processes in immature OHCs, and that the timing of anti-inflammatory treatment to achieve neuroprotection is a challenge due to developmental properties and the complexity of inflammatory processes activated by

  8. Common polymorphisms of cyclooxygenase-2 and prostaglandin E2 receptor and increased risk for acute coronary syndrome in coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Szczeklik, Wojciech; Sanak, Marek; Rostoff, Pawel; Piwowarska, Wieslawa; Jakiela, Bogdan; Szczeklik, Andrew

    2008-11-01

    The arachidonic acid metabolites participate in development of coronary artery disease (CAD) and the plaque's instability. We assessed two common genetic polymorphisms: of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) (COX2.8473, rs5275) and prostaglandin EP2 receptor gene (uS5, rs708494) in patients with CAD. Out of 1,368 patients screened by coronary arteriography, two groups fulfilled the entry criteria and were studied: stable coronary disease (sCAD, n = 125) and acute coronary syndromes (ACS, n = 63). They did not differ in the main characteristics. All patients were on aspirin at least seven days prior to the study. In 70 control subjects, the same genotypes were ascertained, expression of cyclooxygenases in peripheral blood monocytes was assessed by flow cytometry, and in-vitro biosynthesis of PGE(2) was measured by mass spectrometry. COX-2 CC homozygotes (variant allele), were more common, while EP2 GG homozygotes (wild-type) were less common in ACS (p = 0.03 and p = 0.017) than in the sCAD group. A combined genotype characterized by the presence of the wild-type COX2.8743T allele and the wild type homozygous EP2uS5 genotype (TT or CT | GG) decreased risk ratio of ACS in CAD patients (relative risk 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.21-0.81). COX-2 polymorphism in control subjects did not affect the enzyme expression or PGE(2) production by peripheral blood monocytes, but production of PGE(2) increased by 40.1% in the subjects homozygous for EP2 receptor allele uS5A following lipopolysaccharide stimulation. In conclusion, the combined COX-2 (COX2.8473) and the EP2 receptor (uS5) genotypes seem to influence CAD stability, but in peripheral blood monocytes only EP2 receptor modulates PGE(2) production. PMID:18989535

  9. TCDD-induced Cyclooxygenase-2 Expression Is Mediated by the Nongenomic Pathway in Mouse MMDD1 Macula Densa Cells and Kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Bin; Nishimura, Noriko; Vogel, Christoph F; Tohyama, Chiharu; Matsumura, Fumio

    2009-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) plays a critical role in TCDD-induced hydronephrosis in mouse neonates. In this study we found that induction of Cox-2 by TCDD in MMDD1, a mouse macula densa cell line, is accompanied with a rapid increase in the enzymatic activity of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) as well as activation of protein kinases. Calcium serves as a trigger for such an action of TCDD in this cell line. These observations indicate that the basic mode of action of TCDD to induce the rapid inflammatory response in MMDD1 is remarkably similar to those mediated by the nongenomic pathway of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) found in other types of cells. Such an action of TCDD to induce Cox-2 in MMDD1 was not affected by “DRE decoy oligonucleotides” treatment or by introduction of a mutation on the DRE site of Cox-2 promoter, suggesting that this route of action of TCDD is clearly different from that mediated by the classical genomic pathway. An in vivo study with Ahrnls mouse model has shown that TCDD-induces Cox-2 and renin expression in the kidneys of the Ahrnls mice as well as Ahr+/− mice, but not in the Ahr−/− mice, indicating that this initial action of TCDD in mouse kidney does not require the translocation of AhR into the nucleus, supporting our conclusion that induction of Cox-2 by TCDD in mouse kidney is largely mediated by the nongenomic pathway of TCDD-activated AhR. PMID:19782052

  10. Improving survival rates in two models of spontaneous postoperative metastasis in mice by combined administration of a beta-adrenergic antagonist and a cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Glasner, Ariella; Avraham, Roi; Rosenne, Ella; Benish, Marganit; Zmora, Oded; Shemer, Shaily; Meiboom, Hadas; Ben-Eliyahu, Shamgar

    2010-03-01

    Clinical practice does not consider perioperative paracrine and neuroendocrine stress responses as risk factors for cancer recurrence, although recent animal studies provided supportive evidence. Suggested mechanisms include the effects of stress-hormones on tumor cells and on host physiology. In this study, in mice undergoing primary tumor excision, we tested the survival-enhancing potential of perioperative blockade of catecholamines and prostaglandins, and studied potential mediating mechanisms. C57BL/6J mice were inoculated intrafootpad with syngeneic B16F10.9-melanoma or Lewis lung carcinoma, and the paw was amputated when a developing tumor exceeded 100 microl. The clinically used beta-adrenergic antagonist propranolol, and/or the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor etodolac, were administered once before amputation, and recurrence-free survival was monitored. In different studies, NK cytotoxicity, leukocytes' molecular functional markers, and vascular endothelial growth factor secretion by tumor cells were studied in the context of surgery and drug treatments. The findings indicated that the combination of propranolol and etodolac, but neither drug alone, significantly and markedly improved survival rates in both tumor models, and was as effective as established immunostimulatory agents (IL-12 and polyinosinic-polycytiylic acid). Surgery markedly reduced NK cytotoxicity and NK cell expression of Fas ligand and CD11a, reduced all circulating lymphocyte-subtype concentrations, and increased corticosterone levels. Propranolol and etodolac administration counteracted these perturbations. B16 and 3LL secreted vascular endothelial growth factor in vitro, but secretion was not affected by catecholamine agonists, prostaglandins, corticosterone, propranolol, or etodolac. Overall, propranolol and etodolac administration, which could be applied perioperatively in most cancer patients with minimal risk and low cost, has counteracted several immunologic and endocrinologic

  11. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression is up-regulated by 2-aminobiphenyl in a ROS and MAPK-dependent signaling pathway in a bladder cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Cheng; Cheng, Yu-Yang; Chen, Ssu-Ching; Tuan, Yen-Fan; Chen, Yun-Ju; Chen, Chien-Yen; Chen, Lei-Chin

    2012-03-19

    Overexposure to biphenyl amine compounds, which are found in smoke and azo-dyes, is linked to the occurrence of bladder cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms of biphenyl amine compound-induced bladder cancer are still unclear. Many studies have demonstrated that overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in neoplastic lesions is associated with carcinogenesis. In this study, we have demonstrated that 2-aminobiphenyl (2-ABP) up-regulated the expression of COX-2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner in TSGH-8301 bladder cancer cells. This 2-ABP-induced COX-2 expression was attenuated by ROS scavenger NAC and NADPH oxidase inhibitors apocynin and DPI. The p22phox subunit of NADPH oxidase, but not p67, and Nox2 was up-regulated by 2-ABP. Knocking down p22phox by siRNA significantly reduced 2-ABP-induced COX-2 expression. Furthermore, 2-ABP also activated the ERK/JNK-AP1 pathways, and this effect was also abolished by NADPH oxidase inhibitors. Blocking the ERK/JNK-AP1 signaling pathways by pharmacological inhibitors attenuated 2-ABP-induced COX-2 expression. Overexpression of the upstream ERK activator MEK1 significantly and consistently increased 2-ABP-mediated COX-2 expression. Transfection of a dominant negative c-Jun mutant, TAM-67, blocked 2-ABP-mediated COX-2 expression, demonstrating that c-Jun was responsible for the transcriptional activation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that 2-ABP induces the carcinogenic factor COX-2 and that this induction is mediated through NADPH oxidase-derived ROS-dependent JNK/ERK-AP-1 pathways. PMID:22288910

  12. Microarray Analysis of Gene Expression Reveals that Cyclo-oxygenase-2 Gene Therapy Up-regulates Hematopoiesis and Down-regulates Inflammation During Endochondral Bone Fracture Healing

    PubMed Central

    Lau, K.-H. William; Popa, Nicoleta L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cyclo-oxygenase-2 (Cox-2) is an inflammatory mediator that is necessary for the tissue repair, including bone fracture healing. Although the application of Cox-2 gene therapy to a murine closed femoral fracture has accelerated bony union, but the beneficial effect was not observed until the endochondral stage of bone repair that is well after the inflammatory stage normally subsides. Methods To identify the molecular pathways through which Cox-2 regulates fracture healing, we examined gene expression profile in fracture tissues in response to Cox-2 gene therapy during the endochondral bone repair phase. Cox-2 gene therapy was applied to the closed murine femur fracture model. Microarray analysis was performed at 10 days post-fracture to examine global gene expression profile in the fracture tissues during the endochondral bone repair phase. The entire repertoire of significantly expressed genes was examined by gene set enrichment analysis, and the most up-regulated individual genes were evaluated further. Results The genes that normally promote inflammation were under-represented in the microarray analysis, and the expression of several inflammatory chemokines was significantly down-regulated. There was an up-regulation of two key transcription factor genes that regulate hematopoiesis and erythropoiesis. More surprisingly, there was no significant up-regulation in the genes that are normally involved in angiogenesis or bone formation. However, the expression of two tissue remodeling genes was up-regulated. Conclusions The down-regulation of the inflammatory genes in response to Cox-2 gene therapy was unexpected, given the pro-inflammatory role of prostaglandins. Cox-2 gene therapy could promote bony union through hematopoietic precursor proliferation during endochondral bone repair and thereby enhances subsequently fracture callus remodeling that leads to bony union of the fracture gap. PMID:25247155

  13. Role of Cyclooxygenase-2 in Relation to Nitric Oxide and Endothelin-1 on Pathogenesis of Cerebral Vasospasm After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rabbit.

    PubMed

    Munakata, Akira; Naraoka, Masato; Katagai, Takeshi; Shimamura, Norihito; Ohkuma, Hiroki

    2016-06-01

    Endothelial dysfunctions that include decreased nitric oxide (NO) bioactivity and increased endothelin-1 (ET-1) bioactivity have been considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of cerebral vasospasm (CVS) after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Recent cardiovascular studies have revealed that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved in a disturbance in cross-talk between NO and ET-1. COX-2 expression was detected in the endothelial cells of a spastic artery after experimental SAH; however, the pathophysiological significance of COX-2 in relation to CVS remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of COX-2 in relation to NO and ET-1 in the pathogenesis of CVS by using the COX-2 selective inhibitor, celecoxib. In the SAH group, SAH was simulated using the double-hemorrhage rabbit model. In the celecoxib group, SAH was simulated and celecoxib was administered. The basilar artery was extracted on day 5 and examined. The cross-section area of the basilar artery in the celecoxib group was significantly larger than in the SAH group. An increased expression of COX-2, ET-1, and ETA receptor (ETAR), and a decreased expression of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) were seen in the SAH group. In the celecoxib group compared to the SAH group, expression of COX-2, ET-1, and ETAR were statistically significantly decreased, and eNOS expression was significantly increased. COX-2 might be involved in the pathogenesis of CVS due to up-regulation of ET-1 and ETAR and down-regulation of eNOS, and celecoxib may potentially serve as an agent in the prevention of CVS after SAH. PMID:27044361

  14. Dietary feeding of Opuntia humifusa inhibits UVB radiation-induced carcinogenesis by reducing inflammation and proliferation in hairless mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-A; Jung, Bock-Gie; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Lee, Su-Gil; Park, Young-Seok; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2013-01-01

    It has been validated that ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation induced both squamous and basal cell carcinomas, as a tumor initiator and promoter. Opuntia humifusa is a member of the Cactaceae family which has been demonstrated in our previous study to have a chemopreventive effect in 7, 12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate induced skin carcinogenesis models. Therefore, this study was designed to determine the protective effects of O. humifusa against photocarcinogenesis. O. humifusa was administrated to mice as a dietary feeding, following exposure to UVB radiation (180 mJ/cm(2)) twice a week of 30 weeks for skin tumor development in hairless mice. Dietary O. humifusa inhibited UVB-induced epidermal hyperplasia, infiltration of leukocytes, level of myeloperoxidase and the levels of proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), in UVB exposed skin. Also, O. humifusa significantly inhibited both protein and mRNA expression level of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and cyclin D1 compared to the non-O. humifusa treated group. Collectively, these results suggest that O. humifusa could inhibit photocarcinogenesis in mouse skin and that protective effect is associated with the inhibition of not only UVB-induced inflammatory responses involving COX-2, iNOS and proinflammatory cytokines, but also the down-regulation of UVB-induced cellular proliferation. PMID:23789636

  15. Protection from hypertension in mice by the Mediterranean diet is mediated by nitro fatty acid inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Rebecca L.; Rudyk, Olena; Prysyazhna, Oleksandra; Kamynina, Alisa; Yang, Jun; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Freeman, Bruce A.; Eaton, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is inhibited by electrophilic lipids by their adduction to Cys521 proximal to its catalytic center. This inhibition prevents hydrolysis of the enzymes’ epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (EET) substrates, so they accumulate inducing vasodilation to lower blood pressure (BP). We generated a Cys521Ser sEH redox-dead knockin (KI) mouse model that was resistant to this mode of inhibition. The electrophilic lipid 10-nitro-oleic acid (NO2-OA) inhibited hydrolase activity and also lowered BP in an angiotensin II-induced hypertension model in wild-type (WT) but not KI mice. Furthermore, EET/dihydroxy-epoxyeicosatrienoic acid isomer ratios were elevated in plasma from WT but not KI mice following NO2-OA treatment, consistent with the redox-dead mutant being resistant to inhibition by lipid electrophiles. sEH was inhibited in WT mice fed linoleic acid and nitrite, key constituents of the Mediterranean diet that elevates electrophilic nitro fatty acid levels, whereas KIs were unaffected. These observations reveal that lipid electrophiles such as NO2-OA mediate antihypertensive signaling actions by inhibiting sEH and suggest a mechanism accounting for protection from hypertension afforded by the Mediterranean diet. PMID:24843165

  16. Avenanthramides inhibit proliferation of human colon cancer cell lines in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High intake of whole grain food is associated with reduced risk of colon cancer, but the mechanism underlying this protection has yet to be elucidated. Chronic inflammation and associated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in the colon epithelium are causally related to epithelial carcinogenesis, p...

  17. Selective inhibition of thromboxane synthesis partially protected while inhibition of angiotensin II formation did not protect rats against acute renal failure induced with glycerol.

    PubMed

    Papanicolaou, N; Hatziantoniou, C; Bariety, J

    1986-01-01

    Acute renal failure (ARF) was induced in 35 week-old conscious female Wistar rats, by intramuscular (IM) injection of glycerol. Intraperitoneal (IP) injection of imidazole, an inhibitor of thromboxane (TXA2) synthesis, partially protected the animals against ARF. This protection was accompanied by a significant decrease in renal TXB2 (the stable chemical metabolite of TXA2) and a significant increase in renal 6-keto-PGF1 alpha (the stable chemical metabolite of PGI2) synthesis. Intraperitoneal injection of captopril (SQ 14225) an angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor, did not protect the animals against ARF. This lack of protection was accompanied by a significant increase in renal TXB2 and a significant decrease in renal 6-keto-PGF1 alpha synthesis. The results suggest that: (a) the renin-angiotensin (R-A) system does not play a role, or has only a secondary one in the development of ARF; (b) thromboxane A2 (the most potent vasoconstrictor and platelet aggregator agent known) is the preponderant agent responsible for the development of this pathological syndrome. PMID:3513208

  18. Magnesium isoglycyrrhizinate inhibits inflammatory response through STAT3 pathway to protect remnant liver function

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Guang-Hua; Yang, Hua-Yu; Zhang, Jin-Chun; Ren, Jin-Jun; Sang, Xin-Ting; Lu, Xin; Zhong, Shou-Xian; Mao, Yi-Lei

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the protective effect of magnesium isoglycyrrhizinate (MgIG) on excessive hepatectomy animal model and its possible mechanism. METHODS: We used the standard 90% hepatectomy model in Sprague-Dawley rats developed using the modified Emond’s method, in which the left, middle, right upper, and right lower lobes of the liver were removed. Rats with 90% liver resection were divided into three groups, and were injected intraperitoneally with 3 mL saline (control group), 30 mg/kg (low-dose group) and 60 mg/kg (high-dose group) of MgIG, respectively. Animals were sacrificed at various time points and blood was drawn from the vena cava. Biochemical tests were performed with an automatic biochemical analyzer for the following items: serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), glutamyl endopeptidase, total bilirubin (TBil), direct bilirubin (DBil), total protein, albumin, blood glucose (Glu), hyper-sensitivity C-reactive protein, prothrombin time (PT), and thrombin time (TT). Postoperative survival time was observed hourly until death. Hepatocyte regeneration was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Serum inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, IL-10, and iNOS) was analyzed by ELISA. STAT3 protein and mRNA were analyzed by Western blot and quantitative reverse-transcription PCR, respectively. RESULTS: The high-dose group demonstrated a significantly prolonged survival time, compared with both the control and the low-dose groups (22.0 ± 4.7 h vs 8.9 ± 2.0 vs 10.3 ± 3.3 h, P = 0.018). There were significant differences among the groups in ALT, Glu and PT levels starting from 6 h after surgery. The ALT levels were significantly lower in the MgIG treated groups than in the control group. Both Glu and PT levels were significantly higher in the MgIG treated groups than in the control group. At 12 h, ALT, AST, TBil, DBil and TT levels showed significant differences between the MgIG treated groups and the control group. No significant

  19. Inhibition of the NMDA receptor protects the rat sciatic nerve against ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    KE, TIE; LI, RENBIN; CHEN, WENCHANG

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor by MK-801 reduces ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury in the central nervous system. However, few previous studies have evaluated the neuroprotective effects of MK-801 against peripheral I/R injury. The present study aimed to investigate the protective effects of MK-801 pretreatment against I/R injury in the rat sciatic nerve (SN). Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a sham surgery (n=8) or to a 5-h ischemic insult by femoral artery clamping (I/R and I/R+MK-801 groups; n=48 per group). I/R+MK-801 rats were intraperitoneally injected with MK-801 (0.5 ml or 1 mg/kg) at 15 min prior to reperfusion. The rats were sacrificed at 0, 6, 12, 24, 72 h, or 7 days following reperfusion. Plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) concentrations, and SN inducible NO synthase (iNOS) protein expression levels, were measured using colorimetry. In addition, the protein expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were measured using immunohistochemistry, and histological analyses of the rat SN were conducted using light and electron microscopy. Alterations in the mRNA expression levels of TNF-α and TNF-α converting enzyme (TACE) in the rat SN were detected using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In the I/R group, plasma concentrations of NO (175.3±4.2 µmol/l) and MDA (16.2±1.9 mmol/l), and the levels of iNOS (2.5±0.3) in the SN, peaked at 24 h post-reperfusion. At 24 h, pretreatment with MK-801 significantly reduced plasma NO (107.3±3.6 µmol/l) and MDA (11.8±1.6 mmol/l), and SN iNOS (1.65±0.2) levels (all P<0.01). The mRNA expression levels of TNF-α and TACE in the SN were significantly reduced in the I/R+MK-801 group, as compared with the I/R group (P<0.05). Furthermore, MK-801 pretreatment was shown to have alleviated histological signs of I/R injury, including immune cell infiltration and axon demyelination. The results of the present study suggested that pretreatment

  20. Taurine protects against methotrexate-induced toxicity and inhibits leukocyte death

    SciTech Connect

    Cetiner, Mustafa; Sener, Goeksel; Sehirli, A. Ozer; Eksioglu-Demiralp, Emel; Ercan, Feriha; Sirvanci, Serap; Gedik, Nursal; Akpulat, Sertac; Tecimer, Tuelay; Yegen, Berrak C. . E-mail: byegen@marmara.edu.tr

    2005-11-15

    The efficacy of methotrexate (MTX), a widely used cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agent, is often limited by severe side effects and toxic sequelae. Regarding the mechanisms of these side effects, several hypotheses have been put forward, among which oxidative stress is noticeable. The present study was undertaken to determine whether taurine, a potent free radical scavenger, could ameliorate MTX-induced oxidative injury and modulate immune response. Following a single dose of methotrexate (20 mg/kg), either saline or taurine (50 mg/kg) was administered for 5 days. After decapitation of the rats, trunk blood was obtained and the ileum, liver, and kidney were removed to measure malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, and collagen content, as well as histological examination. Our results showed that MTX administration increased the MDA, MPO activity, and collagen contents and decreased GSH levels in all tissues (P < 0.001), while these alterations were reversed in taurine-treated group (P < 0.05-0.01). Elevated (P < 0.001) TNF-{alpha} level observed following MTX treatment was depressed with taurine (P < 0.01). Oxidative burst of neutrophils stimulated by phorbol myristate acetate was reduced in saline-treated MTX group (P < 0.001), while taurine abolished this effect. Similarly, flow cytometric measurements revealed that leukocyte apoptosis and cell death were increased in MTX-treated animals, while taurine reversed these effects (P < 0.05). Reduced cellularity in bone marrow samples of MTX-treated group (P < 0.01) was reversed back to control levels in taurine-treated rats. Severe degeneration of the intestinal mucosa, liver parenchyma, glomerular, and tubular epithelium observed in saline-treated group was improved by taurine treatment. In conclusion, it appears that taurine protects against methotrexate-induced oxidant organ injury and inhibits leukocyte apoptosis and may be of therapeutic potential in alleviating the

  1. Use of dietary rosemary diterpenes to inhibit rancid volatiles in lamb meat packed under protective atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Ortuño, J; Serrano, R; Bañón, S

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the inhibitory effect of dietary rosemary diterpenes on the formation of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) responsible for rancid flavour in raw lamb meat. The lamb diet was supplemented during the fattening stage with two levels (200 and 400 mg/kg feed) of a dietary rosemary extract (DRE) containing carnosic acid and carnosol (1 : 1, w/w). The formation of VOCs (determined by headspace solid-phase microextraction at 40°C and MS) and odour deterioration (assessed by quantitative descriptive analysis) were monitored in meat fillets (longissimus dorsi-lumborum muscle) packed in a 70/30 O2/CO2 protective atmosphere and kept at 2°C for up to 14 days. The raw meat odour deteriorated under pro-oxidizing conditions due to the development of an incipient rancidity caused by the formation of volatiles from lipid oxidation. A total of 46 volatile compounds were determined in lamb headspace: 18 aldehydes, seven alcohols, seven organic acids, six ketones, four furan compounds, two benzene compounds, one ester and one terpenoid. The use of DRE contributed to inhibit VOC formation and rancidity. Heptanal, octanal, nonanal and 2-pentyl-furan were the only VOCs affected (P0.75; P<0.001), although similar values were obtained for the coefficients of a large number of carbonyl, alcohols and furan compounds, among other volatiles, which can be considered molecular markers of rancidity in raw lamb meat. Principal component analysis confirmed that the differences in the VOC profile make it possible to identify whether or not samples have been reinforced with dietary rosemary diterpenes. Thus, VOC profiling can be regarded as a useful tool for assessing the dietary treatments used in sheep to improve the oxidative stability of lamb meat. PMID:26940773

  2. Targeted Inhibition of Phospholipase C γ2 Adaptor Function Blocks Osteoclastogenesis and Protects from Pathological Osteolysis*

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Corinne; Hesker, Pamela; Zhang, Kaihua; Faccio, Roberta

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipase C γ2 (PLCγ2) is a critical regulator of innate immune cells and osteoclasts (OCs) during inflammatory arthritis. Both the catalytic domain and the adaptor motifs of PLCγ2 are required for OC formation and function. Due to the high homology between the catalytic domains of PLCγ2 and the ubiquitously expressed PLCγ1, molecules encompassing the adaptor motifs of PLCγ2 were designed to test the hypothesis that uncoupling the adaptor and catalytic functions of PLCγ2 could specifically inhibit osteoclastogenesis and bone erosion. Wild-type (WT) bone marrow macrophages (BMM) that overexpress the tandem Src homology 2 (SH2) domains of PLCγ2 (SH2(N+C)) failed to form mature OCs and resorb bone in vitro. Activation of the receptor activator of NF-κB (RANK) signaling pathway, which is critical for OC development, was impaired in cells expressing SH2(N+C). Arrest in OC differentiation was evidenced by a reduction of p38 and Iκ-Bα phosphorylation as well as decreased NFATc1 and c-Fos/c-Jun levels. Consistent with our hypothesis, SH2(N+C) abrogated formation of the RANK-Gab2 complex, which mediates NF-κB and AP-1 activation following RANK ligand (RANKL) stimulation. Furthermore, the ability of SH2(N+C) to prevent inflammatory osteolysis was examined in vivo following RANKL or LPS injections over the calvaria. Both models induced osteolysis in the control group, whereas the SH2(N+C)-treated cohort was largely protected from bone erosion. Collectively, these data indicate that inflammatory osteolysis can be abrogated by treatment with a molecule composed of the tandem SH2 domains of PLCγ2. PMID:24081142

  3. Subthreshold nitric oxide synthase inhibition improves synergistic effects of subthreshold MMP-2/MLCK-mediated cardiomyocyte protection from hypoxic injury.

    PubMed

    Bil-Lula, Iwona; Lin, Han-Bin; Biały, Dariusz; Wawrzyńska, Magdalena; Diebel, Lucas; Sawicka, Jolanta; Woźniak, Mieczyslaw; Sawicki, Grzegorz

    2016-06-01

    Injury of myocardium during ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) is a complex and multifactorial process involving uncontrolled protein phosphorylation, nitration/nitrosylation by increased production of nitric oxide and accelerated contractile protein degradation by matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). It has been shown that simultaneous inhibition of MMP-2 with doxycycline (Doxy) and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) with ML-7 at subthreshold concentrations protects the heart from contractile dysfunction triggered by I/R in a synergistic manner. In this study, we showed that additional co-administration of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor (1400W or L-NAME) in subthreshold concentrations improves this synergistic protection in the model of hypoxia-reoxygenation (H-R)-induced contractile dysfunction of cardiomyocytes. Isolated cardiomyocytes were subjected to 3 min. of hypoxia and 20 min. of reoxygenation in the presence or absence of the inhibitor cocktails. Contractility of cardiomyocytes was expressed as myocyte peak shortening. Inhibition of MMP-2 by Doxy (25-100 μM), MLCK by ML-7 (0.5-5 μM) and NOS by L-NAME (25-100 μM) or 1400W (25-100 μM) protected myocyte contractility after H-R in a concentration-dependent manner. Inhibition of these activities resulted in full recovery of cardiomyocyte contractility after H-R at the level of highest single-drug concentration. The combination of subthreshold concentrations of NOS, MMP-2 and MLCK inhibitors fully protected cardiomyocyte contractility and MLC1 from degradation by MMP-2. The observed protection with addition of L-NAME or 1400W was better than previously reported combination of ML-7 and Doxy. The results of this study suggest that addition of NOS inhibitor to the mixture of inhibitors is better strategy for protecting cardiomyocyte contractility. PMID:26992120

  4. Inhibition of Drp1 mitochondrial translocation provides neural protection in dopaminergic system in a Parkinson's disease model induced by MPTP.

    PubMed

    Filichia, Emily; Hoffer, Barry; Qi, Xin; Luo, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggest mitochondria-mediated pathways play an important role in dopaminergic neuronal cell death in Parkinson's disease (PD). Drp1, a key regulator of mitochondrial fission, has been shown to be activated and translocated to mitochondria under stress, leading to excessive mitochondria fission and dopaminergic neuronal death in vitro. However, whether Drp1 inhibition can lead to long term stable preservation of dopaminergic neurons in PD-related mouse models remains unknown. In this study, using a classical MPTP animal PD model, we showed for the first time Drp1 activation and mitochondrial translocation in vivo after MPTP administration. Inhibition of Drp1 activation by a selective peptide inhibitor P110, blocked MPTP-induced Drp1 mitochondrial translocation and attenuated dopaminergic neuronal loss, dopaminergic nerve terminal damage and behavioral deficits caused by MPTP. MPTP-induced microglial activation and astrogliosis were not affected by P110 treatment. Instead, inhibition of Drp1 mitochondrial translocation diminished MPTP-induced p53, BAX and PUMA mitochondrial translocation. This study demonstrates that inhibition of Drp1 hyperactivation by a Drp1 peptide inhibitor P110 is neuroprotective in a MPTP animal model. Our data also suggest that the protective effects of P110 treatment might be mediated by inhibiting the p53 mediated apoptotic pathways in neurons through inhibition of Drp1-dependent p53 mitochondrial translocation. PMID:27619562

  5. Regulation of tumorigenic Wnt signaling by cyclooxygenase-2, 5-lipoxygenase and their pharmacological inhibitors: A basis for novel drugs targeting cancer cells?

    PubMed

    Roos, Jessica; Grösch, Sabine; Werz, Oliver; Schröder, Peter; Ziegler, Slava; Fulda, Simone; Paulus, Patrick; Urbschat, Anja; Kühn, Benjamin; Maucher, Isabelle; Fettel, Jasmin; Vorup-Jensen, Thomas; Piesche, Matthias; Matrone, Carmela; Steinhilber, Dieter; Parnham, Michael J; Maier, Thorsten J

    2016-01-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling is a highly conserved pathway with a prominent role in embryogenic development, adult tissue homeostasis, cell polarization, stem cell biology, cell differentiation, and proliferation. Furthermore, canonical Wnt signaling is of pivotal importance in the pathogenesis of a number of cancer types and crucially affects tumor initiation, cancer cell proliferation, cancer cell apoptosis, and metastasis. Reports over the last decade have provided strong evidence for a pathophysiological role of Wnt signaling in non-malignant classical inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Although, several agents suppressing the Wnt pathway at different levels have been identified, the development of clinically relevant Wnt-inhibiting agents remains challenging due to selectivity and toxicity issues. Several studies have shown that long-term administration of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs protects against colon cancer and potentially other tumor types by interfering both with the COX and the Wnt pathway. Our own studies have shown that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs suppress Wnt signaling by targeting the pro-inflammatory enzyme 5-lipoxygenase which is the key enzyme pathophysiologically involved in the synthesis of leukotrienes. Furthermore, we found a direct link between the 5-lipoxygenase and Wnt signaling pathways, which is essential for the maintenance of leukemic stem cells. Accordingly, genetic and pharmacological inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase led to an impairment of Wnt-dependent acute and chronic myeloid leukemic stem cells. We believe that 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors might represent a novel type of Wnt inhibitor activating a potentially naturally occurring novel mechanism of suppression of Wnt signaling that is non-toxic, at least in mice, and is potentially well tolerated in patients. PMID:26549540

  6. 2,2',4,4'-Tetrachlorobiphenyl upregulates cyclooxygenase-2 in HL-60 cells via p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-{kappa}B

    SciTech Connect

    Bezdecny, Steven A.; Karmaus, Peer; Roth, Robert A.; Ganey, Patricia E. . E-mail: ganey@msu.edu

    2007-06-15

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous, persistent environmental contaminants that affect a number of cellular systems, including neutrophils. Among the effects caused by the noncoplanar PCB 2,2',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (2244-TCB) in granulocytic HL-60 cells are increases in superoxide anion production, activation of phospholipase A{sub 2} with subsequent release of arachidonic acid (AA) and upregulation of the inflammatory gene cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). The objective of this study was to determine the signal transduction pathways involved in the upregulation of COX-2 by 2244-TCB. Treatment of HL-60 cells with 2244-TCB led to increased expression of COX-2 mRNA. This increase was prevented by the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D in cells pretreated with 2244-TCB for 10 min. The increase in COX-2 mRNA was associated with release of {sup 3}H-AA, phosphorylation of p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, increased levels of nuclear NF-{kappa}B and increased superoxide anion production. Bromoenol lactone, an inhibitor of the calcium-independent phospholipase A{sub 2}, reduced {sup 3}H-AA release but had no effect on COX-2 mRNA, protein or activity. Pretreatment with SB-202190 or SB-203580, inhibitors of the p38 MAP kinase pathway, prevented the 2244-TCB-mediated induction of COX-2 and phosphorylation of p38 and ERK MAP kinases. These inhibitors did not alter {sup 3}H-AA release. Treatment with PD 98059 or U 0126, inhibitors of the MAP/ERK (MEK) pathway, prevented the 2244-TCB-mediated activation of ERK but had no effect on COX-2 induction or p38 phosphorylation. 2244-TCB treatment did not affect c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation. 2244-TCB exposure increased the amount of nuclear NF-{kappa}B. This increase was prevented by pretreatment with p38 MAP kinase inhibitors, but not by pretreatment with MEK inhibitors. Pretreatment with inhibitors of NF-{kappa}B prevented the 2244-TCB

  7. Opioid-sparing effect of selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors on surgical outcomes after open colorectal surgery within an enhanced recovery after surgery protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lohsiriwat, Varut

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the opioid-sparing effect of selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors on short-term surgical outcomes after open colorectal surgery. METHODS: Patients undergoing open colorectal resection within an enhanced recovery after surgery protocol from 2011 to 2015 were reviewed. Patients with combined general anesthesia and epidural anesthesia, and those with acute colonic obstruction or perforation were excluded. Patients receiving selective COX-2 inhibitor were compared with well-matched individuals without such a drug. Outcome measures included numeric pain score and morphine milligram equivalent (MME) consumption on postoperative day (POD) 1-3, gastrointestinal recovery (time to tolerate solid diet and time to defecate), complications and length of postoperative stay. RESULTS: There were 75 patients in each group. Pain score on POD 1-3 was not significantly different between two groups. However, MME consumption and MME consumption per kilogram body weight on POD 1-3 was significantly less in patients receiving a selective COX-2 inhibitor (P < 0.001). Median MME consumption per kilogram body weight on POD 1-3 was 0.09, 0.06 and nil, respectively in patients receiving a selective COX-2 inhibitor and 0.22, 0.25 and 0.07, respectively in the comparative group (P < 0.001), representing at least 59% opioid reduction. Patients prescribing a selective COX-2 inhibitor had a shorter median time to resumption of solid diet [1 (IQR 1-2) d vs 2 (IQR 2-3) d; P < 0.001] and time to first defecation [2 (IQR 2-3) d vs 3 (IQR 3-4) d; P < 0.001]. There was no significant difference in overall postoperative complications between two groups. However, median postoperative stay was significantly 1-d shorter in patients prescribing a selective COX-2 inhibitor [4 (IQR 3-5) d vs 5 (IQR 4-6) d; P < 0.001]. CONCLUSION: Perioperative administration of oral selective COX-2 inhibitors significantly decreased intravenous opioid consumption, shortened time to gastrointestinal

  8. Expression of Cyclooxygenase-2 and Transforming Growth Factor-beta1 in HCV-Induced Chronic Liver Disease and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    El-Bassiouny, Azza E.I.; Zoheiry, Mona M.K.; Nosseir, Mona M.F.; El-Ahwany, Eman G.; Ibrahim, Raafat A.; El-Bassiouni, Nora E.I.

    2007-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) were modulated in a variety of viral infections, but there is a paucity of data about their role in the pathologic process of cirrhosis and/or hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) following chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The material of the current study included 50 cases of chronic hepatitis C (CHC) without cirrhosis, 30 cases of CHC with cirrhosis, and 30 cases of HCC with HCV admitted to the Gastroenterology and Hepatology Department of Theodor Bilharz Research Institute, Giza, Egypt. Fifteen wedge liver biopsies, taken during laparoscopic cholecystectomy, were included in the study as normal controls. Laboratory investigations, serologic markers for viral hepatitis, and serum alpha fetoprotein levels (alpha-FP) were done for all cases of the study. Immunohistochemistry using primary antibodies against both factors revealed weak to faint immunoreactivity to COX-2 and TGF-beta1 in normal hepatic tissue (< 30% and < 50% of the cells, respectively). COX-2 expression was upregulated in patients with CHC with and without cirrhosis, yet 80% of positively stained cirrhotic cases showed marked staining intensity. Higher COX-2 expression was observed in well-differentiated HCC cases (80%) with marked staining intensity (75%) compared with advanced HCC tumors (P < .001). TGF-beta1 was expressed in the hepatocytes of all cases of CHC with and without cirrhosis as well as in 67% of HCC cases. Extensive cytoplasmic expression was detected in 52%, 93.3%, and 46.6% of CHC patients without cirrhosis, patients with cirrhosis, and patients with HCC, respectively. A positive correlation was observed between hepatic expression of COX-2 and TGF-beta1 (r = 0.67, P < .05); however, no correlation was detected between the latter and grade of HCC differentiation (r = 0.33, P > .05). Conclusion These findings may suggest that TGF-beta1 plays a role in hepatic cell damage following HCV infection thus stressing

  9. Leptin deficiency-induced obesity exacerbates ultraviolet B radiation-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression and cell survival signals in ultraviolet B-irradiated mouse skin

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Som D.; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2010-05-01

    Obesity has been implicated in several inflammatory diseases and in different types of cancer. Chronic inflammation induced by exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation has been implicated in various skin diseases, including melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. As the relationship between obesity and susceptibility to UV radiation-caused inflammation is not clearly understood, we assessed the role of obesity on UVB-induced inflammation, and mediators of this inflammatory response, using the genetically obese (leptin-deficient) mouse model. Leptin-deficient obese (ob/ob) mice and wild-type counterparts (C57/BL6 mice) were exposed to UVB radiation (120 mJ/cm{sup 2}) on alternate days for 1 month. The mice were then euthanized and skin samples collected for analysis of biomarkers of inflammatory responses using immunohistochemistry, western blotting, ELISA and real-time PCR. Here, we report that the levels of inflammatory responses were higher in the UVB-exposed skin of the ob/ob obese mice than those in the UVB-exposed skin of the wild-type non-obese mice. The levels of UVB-induced cyclooxygenase-2 expression, prostaglandin-E{sub 2} production, proinflammatory cytokines (i.e., tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6), and proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cell survival signals (phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and p-Akt-Ser{sup 473}) were higher in the skin of the ob/ob obese mice than the those in skin of their wild-type non-obese counterparts. Compared with the wild-type non-obese mice, the leptin-deficient obese mice also exhibited greater activation of NF-kappaB/p65 and fewer apoptotic cells in the UVB-irradiated skin. Our study suggests for the first time that obesity in mice is associated with greater susceptibility to UVB-induced inflammatory responses and, therefore, obesity may increase susceptibility to UVB-induced inflammation-associated skin diseases, including the risk of skin cancer.

  10. Effects of treadmill exercise on neural stem cells, cell proliferation, and neuroblast differentiation in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in cyclooxygenase-2 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Nam, Sung Min; Kim, Jong Whi; Yoo, Dae Young; Choi, Jung Hoon; Kim, Woosuk; Jung, Hyo Young; Won, Moo-Ho; Hwang, In Koo; Seong, Je Kyung; Yoon, Yeo Sung

    2013-12-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) function has been implicated in a number of physiological processes, including inflammatory responses, synaptic transmission, and synaptic plasticity in the brain. However, the specific role of COX-2 in exercise-induced neurogenesis is still debatable. Here, we assessed the role of COX-2 in exercise-induced plasticity by comparing COX-2 knockout mice to wild-type control littermates. We investigated the number of neural stem cells, and the degree of cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation in COX-2 knockout and its wild-type mice that either exercised or remained inactive. Wild-type and COX-2 knockout mice were put on a treadmill and were either sedentary or were forced to run 1 h/day for five consecutive days at a pace of 10-12 m/min for 5 weeks. Loss of COX-2 expression in the knockout mice was confirmed with two measures: (1) COX immunolabeling in the hippocampus, and (2) the identification of abnormal kidney development using hematoxylin and eosin staining, including subcapsular glomerular hypoplasia and hypertrophy of the deeper cortical glomeruli. Compared to wild-type mice, COX-2 knockout mice exhibited a significant reduction in the neural stem cells (nestin-positive cells), cell proliferation (Ki67-positive cells), and neuroblast differentiation (doublecortin-positive cells). In contrast, exercise significantly increased the neural stem cells, cell proliferation, and neuroblast differentiation in both the wild-type and COX-2 knockout mice although the NeuN-immunoreactive neurons were similar in all groups. Expression of phosphorylated cAMP-response element binding protein was decreased in knockout mice. Exercise increased its expression in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in both wild-type and knockout mice. These results suggest that the COX-2 pathway is one of important factors on neural stem cells, cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in sedentary mice. The ability of exercise to increase these

  11. Pterostilbene Is Equally Potent as Resveratrol in Inhibiting 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate Activated NFkappaB, AP-1, COX-2 and iNOS in Mouse Epidermis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resveratrol, a phytoalexin present in grapes, has been reported to inhibit multistage mouse skin carcinogenesis. Recent studies showed that topically applied resveratrol significantly inhibited cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression and activation of nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) induced by tumor promoter...

  12. An update on polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP), a leucine-rich repeat protein that protects crop plants against pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Kalunke, Raviraj M.; Tundo, Silvio; Benedetti, Manuel; Cervone, Felice; De Lorenzo, Giulia; D'Ovidio, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonase inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are cell wall proteins that inhibit the pectin-depolymerizing activity of polygalacturonases secreted by microbial pathogens and insects. These ubiquitous inhibitors have a leucine-rich repeat structure that is strongly conserved in monocot and dicot plants. Previous reviews have summarized the importance of PGIP in plant defense and the structural basis of PG-PGIP interaction; here we update the current knowledge about PGIPs with the recent findings on the composition and evolution of pgip gene families, with a special emphasis on legume and cereal crops. We also update the information about the inhibition properties of single pgip gene products against microbial PGs and the results, including field tests, showing the capacity of PGIP to protect crop plants against fungal, oomycetes and bacterial pathogens. PMID:25852708

  13. Genetic and Pharmacological Inhibition of the Ca2+ Influx Channel TRPC3 Protects Secretory Epithelia from Ca2+-Dependent Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Seuk; Lee, Kyu Pil; Yang, Dongki; Shin, Dong Min; Abramowitz, Joel; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Mori, Yasuo; Muallem, Shmuel

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Excessive Ca2+ influx mediates many cytotoxic processes, including those associated with autoimmune inflammatory diseases such as acute pancreatitis and Sjögren's syndrome. TRPC3 is a major Ca2+ influx channel in pancreatic and salivary gland cells. We investigated whether genetic or pharmacological inhibition of TRPC3 protects pancreas and salivary glands from Ca2+-dependent damage. Methods We developed a Ca2+-dependent model of cell damage for salivary gland acini. Acute pancreatitis was induced by injection of cerulein into wild-type and Trpc3−/− mice. Mice were also given the Trpc3-selective inhibitor pyrazole 3 (Pyr3). Results Salivary glands and pancreas of Trpc3−/− mice were protected from Ca2+-mediated cell toxicity. Analysis of Ca2+ signaling in wild-type and Trpc3−/− acini showed that Pyr3 is highly specific inhibitor of Tprc3; it protected salivary glands and pancreas cells from Ca2+-mediated toxicity by inhibiting the Trpc3-mediated component of Ca2+ influx. Conclusions TRPC3-mediated Ca2+ influx mediates damage to pancreas and salivary glands. Pharmacological inhibition of TRPC3 with the highly selective TRPC3 inhibitor Pyr3 might be developed for treatment of patients with acute pancreatitis and Sjögren's syndrome. PMID:21354153

  14. Estrogen protects against amyloid-β toxicity by estrogen receptor α-mediated inhibition of Daxx translocation.

    PubMed

    Mateos, Laura; Persson, Torbjörn; Katoozi, Shirin; Kathozi, Shirin; Gil-Bea, Francisco Javier; Cedazo-Minguez, Angel

    2012-01-11

    Estrogen was shown to promote neuronal survival against several neurotoxic insults including β-amyloid (Aβ). The proposed mechanism includes the activation of the mitogen activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Mapk/Erk), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathways and the upregulation of antiapoptotic proteins. On the other hand, Aβ neurotoxicity depends on the activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (Ask1), and both Ask1 activity and Aβ toxicity are inhibited by thioredoxin-1 (Trx1). Here, we explored the possibility that estrogen could protect cells against Aβ(1-42) toxicity by inhibiting the Ask1 cascade or by modulating Trx1. Cytosolic translocation of death-associated protein Daxx was used as indicator of Ask1 activity. Using human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, 17β-estradiol (E2) and specific agonists for estrogen receptor (ER) α or β we demonstrated that nM concentrations of E2 protected against Aβ(1-42) by a mechanism depending upon ERα stimulation, Akt activation and Ask1 inhibition. Moreover, this protection would occur independently of ERβ and the induction of Trx1 expression. Our results emphasize the importance of Ask1 cascade in Aβ toxicity, and of ERα and Ask1 as targets for developing new neuroprotective drugs. PMID:22119000

  15. Artesunate Protects Against Sepsis-Induced Lung Injury Via Heme Oxygenase-1 Modulation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tian-Hui; Jin, Song-Gen; Fei, Dong-Sheng; Kang, Kai; Jiang, Lei; Lian, Zhi-Yuan; Pan, Shang-Ha; Zhao, Ming-Ran; Zhao, Ming-Yan

    2016-04-01

    Artesunate, a derivative of artemisinin, has anti-inflammatory properties and exerts protective roles in sepsis. Heme oxygense-1 (HO-1) inhibits the inflammatory response through reduction of proinflammatory cytokines and leukocyte influx into tissues. The present study investigated the effects of artesunate on HO-1 and septic lung injury. Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was employed to induce septic lung injury. Mice pretreated with artesunate (AS) (15 mg/kg) exhibited decreased sepsis-induced mortality and lung injury and alleviated lung pathological changes and neutrophil infiltration. In addition, AS lowered the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and inhibited cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase isoform (iNOS) expression and NF-κB activation in lung tissue. In addition, AS enhanced NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) activation and HO-1 expression and enzymatic activity in lung tissue. However, the protective effects of AS on sepsis-induced lung injury were eliminated by ZnPP IX, an HO-1 competitive inhibitor. Therefore, AS plays protective roles in septic lung injury related to the upregulation of HO-1. These findings suggest an effective and applicable treatment to sepsis-induced lung injury and provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms and actions of AS. PMID:26627481

  16. Hydrogen sulfide preconditioning protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats through inhibition of endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changyong; Hu, Min; Wang, Yuan; Lu, Huan; Deng, Jing; Yan, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia reperfusion (I/R) injury is a major cause of myocardial damage. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), a gaseous signal molecule, has drawn considerable attention for its role in various pathophysiological processes. Multiple lines of evidence reveal the protective effects of H2S in various models of cardiac injury, however, the exact mechanism underlying this protective effect of H2S against myocardial I/R injury is not fully understood. The present study was designed to investigate whether H2S preconditioning attenuates myocardial I/R injury in rats and whether the observed protection is associated with reduced endo/sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) stress. We found that H2S preconditioning significantly reduced myocardial infarct size, preserved left ventricular function, and inhibited I/R-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis in vivo. Furthermore, H2S preconditioning significantly attenuated I/R-induced ER/SR stress responses, including the increased expression of glucose-regulated protein 78, C/EBP homologous protein, and activate transcription factor in myocardium. Additionally, we demonstrate that H2S preconditioning attenuates ER/SR stress and inhibits cardiomyocyte apoptosis in an in vitro model of hypoxia/reoxygenation in rat H9c2 cardiac myocytes. In conclusion, these results suggest that H2S-attenuated ER/SR stress plays an important role in its protective effects against I/R-induced myocardial injury. PMID:26339339

  17. Acetylcholine Protects against Candida albicans Infection by Inhibiting Biofilm Formation and Promoting Hemocyte Function in a Galleria mellonella Infection Model.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Ranjith; Borghi, Elisa; Falleni, Monica; Perdoni, Federica; Tosi, Delfina; Lappin, David F; O'Donnell, Lindsay; Greetham, Darren; Ramage, Gordon; Nile, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    Both neuronal acetylcholine and nonneuronal acetylcholine have been demonstrated to modulate inflammatory responses. Studies investigating the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections have revealed contradictory findings with regard to disease outcome. At present, the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of fungal infections is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether acetylcholine plays a role in fungal biofilm formation and the pathogenesis of Candida albicans infection. The effect of acetylcholine on C. albicans biofilm formation and metabolism in vitro was assessed using a crystal violet assay and phenotypic microarray analysis. Its effect on the outcome of a C. albicans infection, fungal burden, and biofilm formation were investigated in vivo using a Galleria mellonella infection model. In addition, its effect on modulation of host immunity to C. albicans infection was also determined in vivo using hemocyte counts, cytospin analysis, larval histology, lysozyme assays, hemolytic assays, and real-time PCR. Acetylcholine was shown to have the ability to inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation in vitro and in vivo. In addition, acetylcholine protected G. mellonella larvae from C. albicans infection mortality. The in vivo protection occurred through acetylcholine enhancing the function of hemocytes while at the same time inhibiting C. albicans biofilm formation. Furthermore, acetylcholine also inhibited inflammation-induced damage to internal organs. This is the first demonstration of a role for acetylcholine in protection against fungal infections, in addition to being the first report that this molecule can inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation. Therefore, acetylcholine has the capacity to modulate complex host-fungal interactions and plays a role in dictating the pathogenesis of fungal infections. PMID:26092919

  18. Acetylcholine Protects against Candida albicans Infection by Inhibiting Biofilm Formation and Promoting Hemocyte Function in a Galleria mellonella Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Rajendran, Ranjith; Borghi, Elisa; Falleni, Monica; Perdoni, Federica; Tosi, Delfina; Lappin, David F.; O'Donnell, Lindsay; Greetham, Darren; Ramage, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Both neuronal acetylcholine and nonneuronal acetylcholine have been demonstrated to modulate inflammatory responses. Studies investigating the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections have revealed contradictory findings with regard to disease outcome. At present, the role of acetylcholine in the pathogenesis of fungal infections is unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether acetylcholine plays a role in fungal biofilm formation and the pathogenesis of Candida albicans infection. The effect of acetylcholine on C. albicans biofilm formation and metabolism in vitro was assessed using a crystal violet assay and phenotypic microarray analysis. Its effect on the outcome of a C. albicans infection, fungal burden, and biofilm formation were investigated in vivo using a Galleria mellonella infection model. In addition, its effect on modulation of host immunity to C. albicans infection was also determined in vivo using hemocyte counts, cytospin analysis, larval histology, lysozyme assays, hemolytic assays, and real-time PCR. Acetylcholine was shown to have the ability to inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation in vitro and in vivo. In addition, acetylcholine protected G. mellonella larvae from C. albicans infection mortality. The in vivo protection occurred through acetylcholine enhancing the function of hemocytes while at the same time inhibiting C. albicans biofilm formation. Furthermore, acetylcholine also inhibited inflammation-induced damage to internal organs. This is the first demonstration of a role for acetylcholine in protection against fungal infections, in addition to being the first report that this molecule can inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation. Therefore, acetylcholine has the capacity to modulate complex host-fungal interactions and plays a role in dictating the pathogenesis of fungal infections. PMID:26092919

  19. Naringin protects human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced inhibition of osteogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yu-Ge; Wang, Xiu-Mei; Ma, Long-Fei; Zhang, Yuan-Min

    2015-12-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the development of osteoporosis. We show that naringin, a natural antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compound, effectively protects human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hADMSCs) against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced inhibition of osteogenic differentiation. Naringin increased viability of hAMDSCs and attenuated H2O2-induced cytotoxicity. Naringin also reversed H2O2-induced oxidative stress. Oxidative stress induced by H2O2 inhibits osteogenic differentiation by decreasing alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, calcium content and mRNA expression levels of osteogenesis marker genes RUNX2 and OSX in hADMSCs. However, addition of naringin leads to a significant recovery, suggesting the protective effects of naringin against H2O2-induced inhibition of osteogenic differentiation. Furthermore, the H2O2-induced decrease of protein expressions of β-catenin and clyclin D1, two important transcriptional regulators of Wnt-signaling, was successfully rescued by naringin treatment. Also, in the presence of Wnt inhibitor DKK-1, naringin is no longer effective in stimulating ALP activity, increasing calcium content and mRNA expression levels of RUNX2 and OSX in H2O2-exposed hADMSCs. These data clearly demonstrates that naringin protects hADMSCs against oxidative stress-induced inhibition of osteogenic differentiation, which may involve Wnt signaling pathway. Our work suggests that naringin may be a useful addition to the treatment armamentarium for osteoporosis and activation of Wnt signaling may represent attractive therapeutic strategy for the treatment of degenerative disease of bone tissue. PMID:26482937

  20. Neural circuits. Inhibition protects acquired song segments during vocal learning in zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Vallentin, Daniela; Kosche, Georg; Lipkind, Dina; Long, Michael A

    2016-01-15

    Vocal imitation involves incorporating instructive auditory information into relevant motor circuits through processes that are poorly understood. In zebra finches, we found that exposure to a tutor's song drives spiking activity within premotor neurons in the juvenile, whereas inhibition suppresses such responses upon learning in adulthood. We measured inhibitory currents evoked by the tutor song throughout development while simultaneously quantifying each bird's learning trajectory. Surprisingly, we found that the maturation of synaptic inhibition onto premotor neurons is correlated with learning but not age. We used synthetic tutoring to demonstrate that inhibition is selective for specific song elements that have already been learned and not those still in refinement. Our results suggest that structured inhibition plays a crucial role during song acquisition, enabling a piece-by-piece mastery of complex tasks. PMID:26816377

  1. Inhibition protects acquired song segments during vocal learning in zebra finches

    PubMed Central

    Vallentin, Daniela; Kosche, Georg; Lipkind, Dina; Long, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Vocal imitation involves incorporating instructive auditory information into relevant motor circuits through processes that are poorly understood. In zebra finches, we find that exposure to a tutor’s song drives spiking activity within premotor neurons in the juvenile but that inhibition suppresses such responses upon learning in adulthood. We measure inhibitory currents evoked by the tutor song throughout development while simultaneously quantifying each bird’s learning trajectory. Surprisingly, we find that the maturation of synaptic inhibition onto premotor neurons is correlated with learning but not age. We used synthetic tutoring to demonstrate that inhibition is selective for specific song elements that have already been learned and not those still in refinement. Our results suggest that structured inhibition is playing a crucial role during song acquisition, enabling a piece-by-piece mastery of complex tasks. PMID:26816377

  2. Schisandrol B protects against acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity by inhibition of CYP-mediated bioactivation and regulation of liver regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yiming; Fan, Xiaomei; Wang, Ying; Chen, Pan; Zeng, Hang; Tan, Huasen; Gonzalez, Frank J; Huang, Min; Bi, Huichang

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute liver failure. Schisandra sphenanthera is a traditional hepato-protective Chinese medicine and Schisandrol B (SolB) is one of its major active constituents. In this study, the protective effect of SolB against APAP-induced acute hepatotoxicity in mice and the involved mechanisms were investigated. Morphological and biochemical assessments clearly demonstrated a protective effect of SolB against APAP-induced liver injury. SolB pretreatment significantly attenuated the increases in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activity, and prevented elevated hepatic malondialdehyde formation and the depletion of mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) in a dose-dependent manner. SolB also dramatically altered APAP metabolic activation by inhibiting the activities of CYP2E1 and CYP3A11, which was evidenced by significant inhibition of the formation of the oxidized APAP metabolite NAPQI-GSH. A molecular docking model also predicted that SolB had potential to interact with the CYP2E1 and CYP3A4 active sites. In addition, SolB abrogated APAP-induced activation of p53 and p21, and increased expression of liver regeneration and antiapoptotic-related proteins such as cyclin D1 (CCND1), PCNA, and BCL-2. This study demonstrated that SolB exhibited a significant protective effect toward APAP-induced liver injury, potentially through inhibition of CYP-mediated APAP bioactivation and regulation of the p53, p21, CCND1, PCNA, and BCL-2 to promote liver regeneration. PMID:25319358

  3. Schisandrol B Protects Against Acetaminophen-Induced Hepatotoxicity by Inhibition of CYP-Mediated Bioactivation and Regulation of Liver Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yiming; Fan, Xiaomei; Wang, Ying; Chen, Pan; Zeng, Hang; Tan, Huasen; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Bi, Huichang

    2015-01-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most frequent cause of drug-induced acute liver failure. Schisandra sphenanthera is a traditional hepato-protective Chinese medicine and Schisandrol B (SolB) is one of its major active constituents. In this study, the protective effect of SolB against APAP-induced acute hepatotoxicity in mice and the involved mechanisms were investigated. Morphological and biochemical assessments clearly demonstrated a protective effect of SolB against APAP-induced liver injury. SolB pretreatment significantly attenuated the increases in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activity, and prevented elevated hepatic malondialdehyde formation and the depletion of mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) in a dose-dependent manner. SolB also dramatically altered APAP metabolic activation by inhibiting the activities of CYP2E1 and CYP3A11, which was evidenced by significant inhibition of the formation of the oxidized APAP metabolite NAPQI–GSH. A molecular docking model also predicted that SolB had potential to interact with the CYP2E1 and CYP3A4 active sites. In addition, SolB abrogated APAP-induced activation of p53 and p21, and increased expression of liver regeneration and antiapoptotic-related proteins such as cyclin D1 (CCND1), PCNA, and BCL-2. This study demonstrated that SolB exhibited a significant protective effect toward APAP-induced liver injury, potentially through inhibition of CYP-mediated APAP bioactivation and regulation of the p53, p21, CCND1, PCNA, and BCL-2 to promote liver regeneration. PMID:25319358

  4. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β promotes autophagy to protect mice from acute liver failure mediated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α

    PubMed Central

    Ren, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, X; Shi, H; Wen, T; Bai, L; Zheng, S; Chen, Y; Chen, D; Li, L; Duan, Z

    2016-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) activity protects mice from acute liver failure (ALF), whereas its protective and regulatory mechanism remains elusive. Autophagy is a recently recognized rudimentary cellular response to inflammation and injury. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that inhibition of GSK3β mediates autophagy to inhibit liver inflammation and protect against ALF. In ALF mice model induced by d-galactosamine (d-GalN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), autophagy was repressed compared with normal control, and d-GalN/LPS can directly induce autophagic flux in the progression of ALF mice. Autophagy activation by rapamycin protected against liver injury and its inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or autophagy gene 7 (Atg7) small interfering RNA (siRNA) exacerbated liver injury. The protective effect of GSK3β inhibition on ALF mice model depending on the induction of autophagy, because that inhibition of GSK3β promoted autophagy in vitro and in vivo, and inhibition of autophagy reversed liver protection and inflammation of GSK3β inhibition. Furthermore, inhibition of GSK3β increased the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), and the downregulated PPARα by siRNA decreased autophagy induced by GSK3β inhibition. More importantly, the expressions of autophagy-related gene and PPARα are significantly downregulated and the activity of GSK3β is significantly upregulated in liver of ALF patients with hepatitis B virus. Thus, we have demonstrated the new pathological mechanism of ALF that the increased GSK3β activity suppresses autophagy to promote the occurrence and development of ALF by inhibiting PPARα pathway. PMID:27010852

  5. Inhibition of miR-134 Protects Against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Apoptosis in Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yi; Yu, Yao; Zhou, Qiong; Li, Cheng; Yang, Lu; Pei, Chong-Gang

    2015-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been suggested to play an important role in neurological diseases. Particularly, miR-134 is reportedly involved in regulating neuron survival. However, the association between miR-134 and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival under adverse stimulus has not been extensively investigated. In this study, we aimed to explore the role and underlying mechanism of miR-134 in regulating RGC apoptosis in response to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment. Results showed that the expression of miR-134 dose- and time-dependently increased in RGC after H2O2 treatment. H2O2-induced RGC apoptosis was significantly attenuated by the inhibition of miR-134 expression by antagomiR-134 and was enhanced by miR-134 overexpression. Luciferase reporter assay revealed a direct interaction between miR-134 and the 3'-untranslated region of cyclic AMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), a critical transcription factor for neuronal protection. In H2O2-treated RGCs, the inhibition of miR-134 significantly elevated the expression of CREB and its downstream genes, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and Bcl-2. Furthermore, the inhibition of miR-134 also increased the expression of miR-132, a rapid response gene downstream of CREB. In addition, the target gene of miR-132, acetylcholinesterase was expectedly decreased by miR-134 inhibition. However, the overexpression of miR-134 exerted an opposite effect. The knockdown of CREB apparently abolished the protective effect of miR-134 inhibition against H2O2-induced RGC apoptosis. The increased expression of BDNF and Bcl-2 induced by miR-134 inhibition was also abrogated by CREB knockdown. Overall, our results suggested that the downregulation of miR-134 can effectively protect against H2O2-induced RGC apoptosis by negatively modulating CREB expression. PMID:25744098

  6. Squamosamide derivative FLZ protects dopaminergic neurons against inflammation-mediated neurodegeneration through the inhibition of NADPH oxidase activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dan; Hu, Xiaoming; Wei, Sung-Jen; Liu, Jie; Gao, Huiming; Qian, Li; Wilson, Belinda; Liu, Gengtao; Hong, Jau-Shyong

    2008-01-01

    Background Inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) through over-activation of microglia, which consequently causes the excessive production of proinflammatory and neurotoxic factors, and impacts surrounding neurons and eventually induces neurodegeneration. Hence, prevention of microglial over-activation has been shown to be a prime target for the development of therapeutic agents for inflammation-mediated neurodegenerative diseases. Methods For in vitro studies, mesencephalic neuron-glia cultures and reconstituted cultures were used to investigate the molecular mechanism by which FLZ, a squamosamide derivative, mediates anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in both lipopolysaccharide-(LPS)- and 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-(MPP+)-mediated models of PD. For in vivo studies, a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine-(MPTP-) induced PD mouse model was used. Results FLZ showed potent efficacy in protecting dopaminergic (DA) neurons against LPS-induced neurotoxicity, as shown in rat and mouse primary mesencephalic neuronal-glial cultures by DA uptake and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistochemical results. The neuroprotective effect of FLZ was attributed to a reduction in LPS-induced microglial production of proinflammatory factors such as superoxide, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Mechanistic studies revealed that the anti-inflammatory properties of FLZ were mediated through inhibition of NADPH oxidase (PHOX), the key microglial superoxide-producing enzyme. A critical role for PHOX in FLZ-elicited neuroprotection was further supported by the findings that 1) FLZ's protective effect was reduced in cultures from PHOX-/- mice, and 2) FLZ inhibited LPS-induced translocation of the cytosolic subunit of p47PHOX to the membrane and thus inhibited the activation of PHOX. The neuroprotective effect of FLZ demonstrated in primary neuronal-glial cultures was further

  7. Anandamide Protects HT22 Cells Exposed to Hydrogen Peroxide by Inhibiting CB1 Receptor-Mediated Type 2 NADPH Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Ji; Wu, Mingchun; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xiajing; Zhai, Qian; Jiang, Tao; Xiong, Lize

    2014-01-01

    Background. Endogenous cannabinoid anandamide (AEA) protects neurons from oxidative injury in rodent models; however the mechanism of AEA-induced neuroprotection remains to be determined. Activation of neuronal NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2) contributes to oxidative damage of the brain, and inhibition of Nox2 can attenuate cerebral oxidative stress. We aimed to determine whether the neuronal Nox2 was involved in protection mediated by AEA. Methods. The mouse hippocampal neuron cell line HT22 was exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to mimic oxidative injury of neurons. The protective effect of AEA was assessed by measuring cell metabolic activity, apoptosis, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, cellular morphology, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), and antioxidant and oxidant levels and Nox2 expression. Results. HT22 cells exposed to H2O2 demonstrated morphological changes, decreased LDH release, reduced metabolic activity, increased levels of intracellular ROS and oxidized glutathione (GSSG), reduced levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), and reduced glutathione (GSH) and increased expression of Nox2. AEA prevented these effects, a property abolished by simultaneous administration of CB1 antagonist AM251 or CB1-siRNA. Conclusion. Nox2 inhibition is involved in AEA-induced cytoprotection against oxidative stress through CB1 activation in HT22 cells. PMID:25136404

  8. Inhibition of glutamate carboxypeptidase II (NAALADase) protects against dynorphin A-induced ischemic spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Long, Joseph B; Yourick, Debra L; Slusher, Barbara S; Robinson, Michael B; Meyerhoff, James L

    2005-01-31

    Glutamate carboxypeptidase (GCP) II (EC 3.4.17.21), which is also known as N-acetylated-alpha-linked acidic dipeptidase (NAALADase), hydrolyses the endogenous acidic dipeptide N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG), yielding N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamate. Inhibition of this enzyme by 2-(phosphonomethyl) pentanedioic acid (2-PMPA) has been shown to protect against ischemic injury to the brain and hypoxic and metabolic injury to neuronal cells in culture, presumably by increasing and decreasing the extracellular concentrations of NAAG and glutamate, respectively. Since both NAAG and GCP II are found in especially high concentrations in the spinal cord, injuries to the spinal cord involving pathophysiological elevations in extracellular glutamate might be particularly responsive to GCP II inhibition. Lumbar subarachnoid injections of dynorphin A in rats cause ischemic spinal cord injury, elevated extracellular glutamate and a persistent hindlimb paralysis that is mediated through excitatory amino acid receptors. We therefore used this injury model to evaluate the protective effects of 2-PMPA. When coadministered with dynorphin A, 2-PMPA significantly attenuated the dynorphin A-induced elevations in cerebrospinal fluid glutamate levels and by 24 h postinjection caused significant dose-dependent improvements in motor scores that were associated with marked histopathological improvements. These results indicate that 2-PMPA provides effective protection against excitotoxic spinal cord injury. PMID:15680261

  9. Inhibition of Store-Operated Calcium Entry Protects Endothelial Progenitor Cells from H2O2-Induced Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-Wei; Zhang, Ji-Hang; Yu, Yang; Yu, Jie; Huang, Lan

    2016-01-01

    Store-operated calcium entry (SOCE), a major mode of extracellular calcium entry, plays roles in a variety of cell activities. Accumulating evidence indicates that the intracellular calcium ion concentration and calcium signaling are critical for the responses induced by oxidative stress. The present study was designed to investigate the potential effect of SOCE inhibition on H2O2-induced apoptosis in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which are the predominant cells involved in endothelial repair. The results showed that H2O2-induced EPC apoptosis was reversed by SOCE inhibition induced either using the SOCE antagonist ML-9 or via silencing of stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1), a component of SOCE. Furthermore, SOCE inhibition repressed the increases in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and ameliorated the mitochondrial dysfunction caused by H2O2. Our findings provide evidence that SOCE inhibition exerts a protective effect on EPCs in response to oxidative stress induced by H2O2 and may serve as a potential therapeutic strategy against vascular endothelial injury. PMID:27169819

  10. Inhibition of Store-Operated Calcium Entry Protects Endothelial Progenitor Cells from H2O2-Induced Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Wei; Zhang, Ji-Hang; Yu, Yang; Yu, Jie; Huang, Lan

    2016-07-01

    Store-operated calcium entry (SOCE), a major mode of extracellular calcium entry, plays roles in a variety of cell activities. Accumulating evidence indicates that the intracellular calcium ion concentration and calcium signaling are critical for the responses induced by oxidative stress. The present study was designed to investigate the potential effect of SOCE inhibition on H2O2-induced apoptosis in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which are the predominant cells involved in endothelial repair. The results showed that H2O2-induced EPC apoptosis was reversed by SOCE inhibition induced either using the SOCE antagonist ML-9 or via silencing of stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1), a component of SOCE. Furthermore, SOCE inhibition repressed the increases in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and ameliorated the mitochondrial dysfunction caused by H2O2. Our findings provide evidence that SOCE inhibition exerts a protective effect on EPCs in response to oxidative stress induced by H2O2 and may serve as a potential therapeutic strategy against vascular endothelial injury. PMID:27169819

  11. Cyclooxygenase inhibition and rosuvastatin-induced vascular protection in the setting of ischemia-reperfusion: A human in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Wilson; Liuni, Andrew; Zhou, Kangbin; Parker, John D

    2015-08-01

    The 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG Co-A) reductase inhibitors have preconditioning effects involving up-regulation of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2. We investigated the effect of selective and non-selective COX inhibition on rosuvastatin-mediated protection against ischemia-reperfusion (IR)-induced endothelial dysfunction in the human forearm. Healthy volunteers (n=66) were allocated to placebo, acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) 81mg daily, ASA 325mg daily, celecoxib 200mg twice daily or 400mg ibuprofen four times daily, each administered for 5 to 7days. On the last day of study drug therapy, subjects received a single dose of 40mg rosuvastatin. Twenty-four hours later flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the radial artery was evaluated before and after IR. In the placebo group, FMD was similar before and after IR (8.1±1.0 vs 7.2±0.8%; P=NS) indicating a significant protective effect of rosuvastatin. There was also no effect of IR on FMD in the ASA 81mg group (6.7±0.6 vs 6.1±0.7%; P=NS). In contrast, following IR there was a significant decrease in FMD in the ASA 325mg group (7.2±0.8 vs 3.3±0.7%, P<0.001), the celecoxib group (7.3±1.5 vs 2.6±1.5%, P<0.01) as well as the ibuprofen group (6.8±0.7 vs 2.6±0.8%; P<0.01). Therefore, nonselective COX inhibition with ASA 325mg and ibuprofen completely inhibit the protective effects of rosuvastatin in the setting of IR injury, as does therapy with the specific COX-2 antagonist celecoxib. In contrast, therapy with low dose ASA (81mg daily) does not have such inhibitory effects. PMID:25869511

  12. Crocin protects PC12 cells against MPP(+)-induced injury through inhibition of mitochondrial dysfunction and ER stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo-Feng; Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Gang

    2015-10-01

    The molecular machinery that mediates neuronal injury in neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's disease (PD) remains to be fully deciphered, which will hopefully provide novel therapeutic targets for these disorders. Crocin, one of the water-soluble carotenoids isolated from the Crocus sativus L (saffron) stigma, has been reported to exert therapeutic potential in many disease models. Here, we establish an in vitro PD model using 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-injured PC12 cells to investigate the protective effects of crocin. Crocin treatment significantly attenuated MPP(+)-induced cell injury and apoptosis with little toxicity, and these protective effects were still observed even if crocin treatment was delayed to 6 h after injury. Crocin also inhibited MPP(+)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, as evidenced by preservation of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and ATP synthesis, which correlates with suppressed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress through inhibiting ER chaperone and ER related apoptotic factors. In addition, ER calcium release and morphological changes in ER lumen after MPP(+) exposure were all partially prevented by crocin. By using specific targeted small interfering RNA (siRNA) to knockdown the expression of the C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), we found that crocin-induced protection and inhibition of ER stress was mediated by inverting MPP(+)-induced decrease of Wnt through the CHOP pathway. Our study demonstrates a pivotal role of ER stress in mediating PD related neuronal injury via the regulation of CHOP-Wnt pathway, and suggests the therapeutic values of crocin against ER stress-associated cytotoxicity. PMID:26209153

  13. Protective Effect of Processed Panax ginseng, Sun Ginseng on UVB-irradiated Human Skin Keratinocyte and Human Dermal Fibroblast

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyejin; Lee, Joo Yeop; Song, Kyu Choon; Kim, Jinhee; Park, Jeong Hill; Chun, Kwang-Hoon; Hwang, Gwi Seo

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the protective effects of processed Panax ginseng, sun ginseng (SG) against the UVB-irradiation on epidermal keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts. Pretreatment of SG in HaCaT keratinocytes and human dermal fibroblasts reduced UVB-induced cell damage as seen by reduced lactate dehydrogenase release. We also found that SG restored the UVB-induced decrease in anti-apoptotic gene expression (bcl-2 and bcl-xL) in these cells, indicating that SG has an anti-apoptotic effect and thus can protect cells from cell death caused by strong UVB radiation. In addition, SG inhibited the excessive expression of c-jun and c-fos gene by the UVB in HeCaT cells and human dermal fibroblasts. We also demonstrated that SG may exert an anti-inflammatory activity by reducing the nitric oxide production and inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA synthesis in HaCaT keratinocytes and human dermal fibroblasts. This was further supported by its inhibitory effects on the elevated cyclooxygenase-2 and tumor necrosis factor-α transcription which was induced by UVB-irradiation in HaCaT cells. In addition, SG may have anti-aging property in terms of induction of procollagen gene expression and inhibition of the matrix metalloprotease-1 gene expression caused by UVBexposure. These findings suggest that SG can be a potential agent that may protect against the dermal cell damage caused by UVB. PMID:23717106

  14. Cumulus expansion, nuclear maturation and connexin 43, cyclooxygenase-2 and FSH receptor mRNA expression in equine cumulus-oocyte complexes cultured in vitro in the presence of FSH and precursors for hyaluronic acid synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Dell'Aquila, Maria Elena; Caillaud, Maud; Maritato, Filippo; Martoriati, Alain; Gérard, Nadine; Aiudi, Giulio; Minoia, Paolo; Goudet, Ghylène

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate cumulus expansion, nuclear maturation and expression of connexin 43, cyclooxygenase-2 and FSH receptor transcripts in equine cumuli oophori during in vivo and in vitro maturation in the presence of equine FSH (eFSH) and precursors for hyaluronic acid synthesis. Equine cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) were cultured in a control defined medium supplemented with eFSH (0 to 5 micrograms/ml), Fetal Calf Serum (FCS), precursors for hyaluronic acid synthesis or glutamine according to the experiments. After in vitro maturation, the cumulus expansion rate was increased with 1 microgram/ml eFSH, and was the highest with 20% FCS. It was not influenced by precursors for hyaluronic acid synthesis or glutamine. The expression of transcripts related to cumulus expansion was analyzed in equine cumulus cells before maturation, and after in vivo and in vitro maturation, by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with specific primers. Connexin 43, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and FSH receptor (FSHr) mRNA were detected in equine cumulus cells before and after maturation. Their level did not vary during in vivo or in vitro maturation and was influenced neither by FSH nor by precursors for hyaluronic acid synthesis. Results indicate that previously reported regulation of connexin 43 and COX-2 proteins during equine COC maturation may involve post-transcriptional mechanisms. PMID:15212696

  15. Lactobacillus zeae Protects Caenorhabditis elegans from Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli-Caused Death by Inhibiting Enterotoxin Gene Expression of the Pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Mengzhou; Yu, Hai; Yin, Xianhua; Sabour, Parviz M.; Chen, Wei; Gong, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Background The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has become increasingly used for screening antimicrobials and probiotics for pathogen control. It also provides a useful tool for studying microbe-host interactions. This study has established a C. elegans life-span assay to preselect probiotic bacteria for controlling K88+ enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC), a pathogen causing pig diarrhea, and has determined a potential mechanism underlying the protection provided by Lactobacillus. Methodology/Principal Findings Life-span of C. elegans was used to measure the response of worms to ETEC infection and protection provided by lactic acid-producing bacteria (LAB). Among 13 LAB isolates that varied in their ability to protect C. elegans from death induced by ETEC strain JG280, Lactobacillus zeae LB1 offered the highest level of protection (86%). The treatment with Lactobacillus did not reduce ETEC JG280 colonization in the nematode intestine. Feeding E. coli strain JFF4 (K88+ but lacking enterotoxin genes of estA, estB, and elt) did not cause death of worms. There was a significant increase in gene expression of estA, estB, and elt during ETEC JG280 infection, which was remarkably inhibited by isolate LB1. The clone with either estA or estB expressed in E. coli DH5α was as effective as ETEC JG280 in killing the nematode. However, the elt clone killed only approximately 40% of worms. The killing by the clones could also be prevented by isolate LB1. The same isolate only partially inhibited the gene expression of enterotoxins in both ETEC JG280 and E. coli DH5α in-vitro. Conclusions/Significance The established life-span assay can be used for studies of probiotics to control ETEC (for effective selection and mechanistic studies). Heat-stable enterotoxins appeared to be the main factors responsible for the death of C. elegans. Inhibition of ETEC enterotoxin production, rather than interference of its intestinal colonization, appears to be the mechanism of protection

  16. Breast milk protects against the development of necrotizing enterocolitis through inhibition of Toll Like Receptor 4 in the intestinal epithelium via activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    Good, Misty; Sodhi, Chhinder P.; Egan, Charlotte E.; Afrazi, Amin; Jia, Hongpeng; Yamaguchi, Yukihiro; Lu, Peng; Branca, Maria F.; Ma, Congrong; Prindle, Thomas; Mielo, Samantha; Pompa, Anthony; Hodzic, Zerina; Ozolek, John A.; Hackam, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Breast milk is the most effective strategy to protect infants against necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a devastating disease which is characterized by severe intestinal necrosis. Previous studies have demonstrated that the lipopolysaccharide receptor toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) plays a critical role in NEC development via deleterious effects on mucosal injury and repair. We now hypothesize that breast milk protects against NEC by inhibiting TLR4 within the intestinal epithelium, and sought to determine the mechanisms involved. Breast milk protected against NEC and reduced TLR4 signaling in wild-type neonatal mice, but not in mice lacking the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), while selective removal of EGF from breast milk reduced its protective properties, indicating that breast milk inhibits NEC and attenuates TLR4 signaling via EGF/EGFR activation. Over-expression of TLR4 in the intestinal epithelium reversed the protective effects of breast milk. The protective effects of breast milk occurred via inhibition of enterocyte apoptosis and restoration of enterocyte proliferation. Importantly, in IEC-6 enterocytes, breast milk inhibited TLR4 signaling via inhibition of GSK3β. Taken together, these findings offer mechanistic insights into the protective role for breast milk in NEC, and support a link between growth factor and innate immune receptors in NEC pathogenesis. PMID:25899687

  17. Zeaxanthin and Echinenone Protect the Repair of Photosystem II from Inhibition by Singlet Oxygen in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Kusama, Yuri; Inoue, Shuhei; Jimbo, Haruhiko; Takaichi, Shinichi; Sonoike, Kintake; Hihara, Yukako; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka

    2015-05-01

    Carotenoids are important components of antioxidative systems in photosynthetic organisms. We investigated the roles of zeaxanthin and echinenone in the protection of PSII from photoinhibition in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, using mutants of the cyanobacterium that lack these carotenoids. The activity of PSII in mutant cells deficient in either zeaxanthin or echinenone was more sensitive to strong light than the activity in wild-type cells, and the activity in mutant cells deficient in both carotenoids was hypersensitive to strong light, indicating that the absence of these carotenoids increased the extent of photoinhibition. Nonetheless, the rate of photodamage to PSII, as measured in the presence of chloramphenicol, which blocks the repair of PSII, was unaffected by the absence of either carotenoid, suggesting that these carotenoids might act by protecting the repair of PSII. Knockout of the gene for the so-called orange carotenoid protein (OCP), in which the 3'-hydroxyechinenone cofactor, a derivative of echinenone, is responsible for the thermal dissipation of excitation energy, increased the extent of photoinhibition but did not affect photodamage, suggesting that thermal dissipation also protects the repair of PSII. In mutant cells lacking OCP, as well as those lacking zeaxanthin and echinenone, the production of singlet oxygen was stimulated and the synthesis de novo of various proteins, including the D1 protein, was markedly suppressed under strong light. These observations suggest that the carotenoids and thermal dissipation might protect the repair of photodamaged PSII by depressing the levels of singlet oxygen that inhibits protein synthesis. PMID:25663484

  18. Temporary protection of metals against atmospheric corrosion by saturated straight chain aliphatic monocarboxylates. Mechanisms of inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Kapin, C.; Steinmetz, P.; Steinmetz, J.

    1998-12-31

    This work was devoted to the investigations of the ability of saturated straight chain aliphatic monocarboxylates to inhibit corrosion of mild steel and zinc in aerated aqueous solutions. Performances of inhibitors were shown to be dependent on their chain length, their concentration and the immersion duration. Both crystallographic parameters and solubilities of iron and zinc carboxylates were determined. Then potential-pH diagrams of iron and zinc in water were built taking the presence of metallic soaps into account. According to these diagrams, the passivation of metals was attributed to the growth of films containing metallic soaps. This model confirms that previously proposed for inhibition of copper and magnesium by the same carboxylates.

  19. Fenamate NSAIDs inhibit the NLRP3 inflammasome and protect against Alzheimer's disease in rodent models

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Michael J. D.; Rivers-Auty, Jack; Schilling, Tom; Spencer, Nicholas G.; Watremez, William; Fasolino, Victoria; Booth, Sophie J.; White, Claire S.; Baldwin, Alex G.; Freeman, Sally; Wong, Raymond; Latta, Clare; Yu, Shi; Jackson, Joshua; Fischer, Nicolas; Koziel, Violette; Pillot, Thierry; Bagnall, James; Allan, Stuart M.; Paszek, Pawel; Galea, James; Harte, Michael K.; Eder, Claudia; Lawrence, Catherine B.; Brough, David

    2016-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) inhibit cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) and COX-2 enzymes. The NLRP3 inflammasome is a multi-protein complex responsible for the processing of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β and is implicated in many inflammatory diseases. Here we show that several clinically approved and widely used NSAIDs of the fenamate class are effective and selective inhibitors of the NLRP3 inflammasome via inhibition of the volume-regulated anion channel in macrophages, independently of COX enzymes. Flufenamic acid and mefenamic acid are efficacious in NLRP3-dependent rodent models of inflammation in air pouch and peritoneum. We also show therapeutic effects of fenamates using a model of amyloid beta induced memory loss and a transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. These data suggest that fenamate NSAIDs could be repurposed as NLRP3 inflammasome inhibitors and Alzheimer's disease therapeutics. PMID:27509875

  20. Temporal mTOR inhibition protects Fbxw7-deficient mice from radiation-induced tumor development

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yueyong; Huang, Yurong; Wang, Zeran; Huang, Yong; Li, Xiaohua; Louie, Alexander; Wei, Guangwei; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2013-01-01

    FBXW7 acts as a tumor suppressor in numerous types of human cancers through ubiquitination of different oncoproteins including mTOR. However, how the mutation/loss of Fbxw7 results in tumor development remains largely unknown. Here we report that downregulation of mTOR by radiation is Fbxw7-dependent, and short-term mTOR inhibition by rapamycin after exposure to radiation significantly postpones tumor development in Fbxw7/p53 double heterozygous (Fbxw7+/−p53+/−) mice but not in p53 single heterozygous (p53+/−) mice. Tumor latency of rapamycin treated Fbxw7+/−p53+/− mice is remarkably similar to those of p53+/− mice while placebo treated Fbxw7+/−p53+/− mice develop tumor significantly earlier than placebo treated p53+/− mice. Furthermore, we surprisingly find that, although temporal treatment of rapamycin is given at a young age, the inhibition of mTOR activity sustainably remains in tumors. These results indicate that inhibition of mTOR signaling pathway suppresses the contribution of Fbxw7 loss toward tumor development. PMID:23454868

  1. Early Exercise Protects against Cerebral Ischemic Injury through Inhibiting Neuron Apoptosis in Cortex in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pengyue; Zhang, Yuling; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Yi; Jia, Jie; Wu, Junfa; Hu, Yongshan

    2013-01-01

    Early exercise is an effective strategy for stroke treatment, but the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. Apoptosis plays a critical role after stroke. However, it is unclear whether early exercise inhibits apoptosis after stroke. The present study investigated the effect of early exercise on apoptosis induced by ischemia. Adult SD rats were subjected to transient focal cerebral ischemia by middle cerebral artery occlusion model (MCAO) and were randomly divided into early exercise group, non-exercise group and sham group. Early exercise group received forced treadmill training initiated at 24 h after operation. Fourteen days later, the cell apoptosis were detected by TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick-end labeling (TUNEL) and Fluoro-Jade-B staining (F-J-B). Caspase-3, cleaved caspase-3 and Bcl-2 were determined by western blotting. Cerebral infarct volume and motor function were evaluated by cresyl violet staining and foot fault test respectively. The results showed that early exercise decreased the number of apoptotic cells (118.74 ± 6.15 vs. 169.65 ± 8.47, p < 0.05, n = 5), inhibited the expression of caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-3 (p < 0.05, n = 5), and increased the expression of Bcl-2 (p < 0.05, n = 5). These data were consistent with reduced infarct volume and improved motor function. These results suggested that early exercise could provide neuroprotection through inhibiting neuron apoptosis. PMID:23502470

  2. Radiation protection of the gastrointestinal tract and growth inhibition of prostate cancer xenografts by a single compound

    PubMed Central

    Alexeev, Vitali; Lash, Elizabeth; Aguillard, April; Corsini, Laura; Bitterman, Avi; Ward, Keith; Dicker, Adam P.; Linnenbach, Alban; Rodeck, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity markedly reduces the therapeutic index of genotoxic anti-cancer agents including ionizing radiation. Countermeasures against tissue damage caused by radiation are limited by their potential to also protect malignant cells and tissues. Here we tested a panel of signal transduction modifiers for selective radioprotection of normal but not tumor tissues. These included three inhibitors of GSK3 (LiCl, SB216763 and SB415286) and two inhibitors of NF-κB (ethyl pyruvate and RTA 408). Among these, the thiol reactive triterpenoid RTA 408 emerged as a robust and effective protector of multiple organ systems (gastrointestinal, skin and hemopoietic) against lethal doses of radiation. RTA 408 preserved survival and proliferation of crypt cells in lethally irradiated small intestines while reducing apoptosis incidence in crypts and villi. In contrast, RTA 408 uniformly inhibited growth of established CWR-22Rv1, LNCaP/C4-2B, PC3 and DU145 xenografts either alone or combined with radiation. Anti-tumor effects in vivo were associated with reduced proliferation and intratumoral apoptosis and with inhibition of NF-κB-dependent transcription in PC3 cells. Selective protection of normal tissue compartments by RTA 408 critically depended on tissue context and could not be replicated in vitro. Collectively, these data highlight the potential of RTA 408 as a cytoprotective agent that may be safely used in chemoradiation approaches. PMID:25398830

  3. cAMP-Inhibits Cytoplasmic Phospholipase A2 and Protects Neurons against Amyloid-β-Induced Synapse Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Clive; Williams, Alun

    2015-01-01

    A key event in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the production of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides and the loss of synapses. In cultured neurons Aβ triggered synapse damage as measured by the loss of synaptic proteins. α-synuclein (αSN), aggregates of which accumulate in Parkinson’s disease, also caused synapse damage. Synapse damage was associated with activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), an enzyme that regulates synapse function and structure, and the production of prostaglandin (PG) E2. In synaptosomes PGE2 increased concentrations of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) which suppressed the activation of cPLA2 demonstrating an inhibitory feedback system. Thus, Aβ/αSN-induced activated cPLA2 produces PGE2 which increases cAMP which in turn suppresses cPLA2 and, hence, its own production. Neurons pre-treated with pentoxifylline and caffeine (broad spectrum phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors) or the PDE4 specific inhibitor rolipram significantly increased the Aβ/αSN-induced increase in cAMP and consequently protected neurons against synapse damage. The addition of cAMP analogues also inhibited cPLA2 and protected neurons against synapse damage. These results suggest that drugs that inhibit Aβ-induced activation of cPLA2 and cross the blood–brain barrier may reduce synapse damage in AD. PMID:26389963

  4. cAMP-Inhibits Cytoplasmic Phospholipase A₂ and Protects Neurons against Amyloid-β-Induced Synapse Damage.

    PubMed

    Bate, Clive; Williams, Alun

    2015-01-01

    A key event in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the production of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides and the loss of synapses. In cultured neurons Aβ triggered synapse damage as measured by the loss of synaptic proteins. α-synuclein (αSN), aggregates of which accumulate in Parkinson's disease, also caused synapse damage. Synapse damage was associated with activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A₂ (cPLA₂), an enzyme that regulates synapse function and structure, and the production of prostaglandin (PG) E₂. In synaptosomes PGE₂ increased concentrations of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) which suppressed the activation of cPLA₂ demonstrating an inhibitory feedback system. Thus, Aβ/αSN-induced activated cPLA₂ produces PGE₂ which increases cAMP which in turn suppresses cPLA₂ and, hence, its own production. Neurons pre-treated with pentoxifylline and caffeine (broad spectrum phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors) or the PDE4 specific inhibitor rolipram significantly increased the Aβ/αSN-induced increase in cAMP and consequently protected neurons against synapse damage. The addition of cAMP analogues also inhibited cPLA₂ and protected neurons against synapse damage. These results suggest that drugs that inhibit Aβ-induced activation of cPLA₂ and cross the blood-brain barrier may reduce synapse damage in AD. PMID:26389963

  5. HIF prolyl 4-hydroxylase-2 inhibition improves glucose and lipid metabolism and protects against obesity and metabolic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Rahtu-Korpela, Lea; Karsikas, Sara; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto; Lammentausta, Eveliina; Mäkelä, Kari A; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Walkinshaw, Gail; Kivirikko, Kari I; Myllyharju, Johanna; Serpi, Raisa; Koivunen, Peppi

    2014-10-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem, predisposing subjects to metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases. Specific prolyl 4-hydroxylases (P4Hs) regulate the stability of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF), a potent governor of metabolism, with isoenzyme 2 being the main regulator. We investigated whether HIF-P4H-2 inhibition could be used to treat obesity and its consequences. Hif-p4h-2-deficient mice, whether fed normal chow or a high-fat diet, had less adipose tissue, smaller adipocytes, and less adipose tissue inflammation than their littermates. They also had improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of the HIF-1 targets glucose transporters, glycolytic enzymes, and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-1 were increased in their tissues, whereas acetyl-CoA concentration was decreased. The hepatic mRNA level of the HIF-2 target insulin receptor substrate-2 was higher, whereas that of two key enzymes of fatty acid synthesis was lower. Serum cholesterol levels and de novo lipid synthesis were decreased, and the mice were protected against hepatic steatosis. Oral administration of an HIF-P4H inhibitor, FG-4497, to wild-type mice with metabolic dysfunction phenocopied these beneficial effects. HIF-P4H-2 inhibition may be a novel therapy that not only protects against the development of obesity and its consequences but also reverses these conditions. PMID:24789921

  6. Inhibiting HMGB1 with Glycyrrhizic Acid Protects Brain Injury after DAI via Its Anti-Inflammatory Effect

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Honggang; Huang, Tinqin; Li, Dandong; Zhao, Yonglin; Ma, Xudong

    2016-01-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a nuclear protein that has endogenous cytokine-like activity, is involved in several neurological diseases by mediating inflammatory response. In this study, a lateral head rotation device was used to establish a rat diffuse axonal injury (DAI) model. The dynamic expression of HMGB1, apoptosis-associated proteins, and proinflammatory cytokines were detected by Western blot, and neuronal apoptosis was observed by TUNEL staining. The extracellular release of HMGB1 and the accumulation of β-APP were observed by immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry, respectively. The brain injury was indicated by modified neurological severity score (mNSS), brain water content (BWC), and the extravasation of Evans blue. We showed that HMGB1 level obviously decreased within 48 h after DAI, accompanied by neuronal apoptosis, the activation of caspases 3 and 9, and the phosphorylation of BCL-2. Inhibiting HMGB1 with glycyrrhizic acid (GL) can suppress the activation of apoptosis-associated proteins and inhibit the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, which ameliorated motor and cognitive deficits, reduced neuronal apoptosis, and protected the integrity of blood brain barrier (BBB) and axonal injury after experimental DAI in rats. Thus, HMGB1 may be involved in the inflammatory response after DAI, and inhibition of HMGB1 release with GL can notably alleviate the brain injury after DAI. PMID:27041825

  7. 4-Phenylbutyrate protects rat skin flaps against ischemia-reperfusion injury and apoptosis by inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    YUE, ZHEN-SHUANG; ZENG, LIN-RU; QUAN, REN-FU; TANG, YANG-HUA; ZHENG, WEN-JIE; QU, GANG; XU, CAN-DA; ZHU, FANG-BING; HUANG, ZHONG-MING

    2016-01-01

    4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA) is a low molecular weight fatty acid, which has been demonstrated to regulate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. ER stress-induced cell apoptosis has an important role in skin flap ischemia; however, a pharmacological approach for treating ischemia-induced ER dysfunction has yet to be reported. In the present study, the effects of 4-PBA-induced ER stress inhibition on ischemia-reperfusion injury were investigated in the skin flap of rats, and transcriptional regulation was examined. 4-PBA attenuated ischemia-reperfusion injury and inhibited cell apoptosis in the skin flap. Furthermore, 4-PBA reversed the increased expression levels of two ER stress markers: CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein and glucose-regulated protein 78. These results suggested that 4-PBA was able to protect rat skin flaps against ischemia-reperfusion injury and apoptosis by inhibiting ER stress marker expression and ER stress-mediated apoptosis. The beneficial effects of 4-PBA may prove useful in the treatment of skin flap ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:26648447

  8. PKC{eta} confers protection against apoptosis by inhibiting the pro-apoptotic JNK activity in MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rotem-Dai, Noa; Oberkovitz, Galia; Abu-Ghanem, Sara; Livneh, Etta

    2009-09-10

    Apoptosis is frequently regulated by different protein kinases including protein kinase C family enzymes. Both inhibitory and stimulatory effects were demonstrated for several of the different PKC isoforms. Here we show that the novel PKC isoform, PKC{eta}, confers protection against apoptosis induced by the DNA damaging agents, UVC irradiation and the anti-cancer drug - Camptothecin, of the breast epithelial adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells. The induced expression of PKC{eta} in MCF-7 cells, under the control of the tetracycline-responsive promoter, resulted in increased cell survival and inhibition of cleavage of the apoptotic marker PARP-1. Activation of caspase-7 and 9 and the release of cytochrome c were also inhibited by the inducible expression of PKC{eta}. Furthermore, JNK activity, required for apoptosis in MCF-7, as indicated by the inhibition of both caspase-7 cleavage and cytochrome c release from the mitochondria in the presence of the JNK inhibitor SP600125, was also suppressed by PKC{eta} expression. Hence, in contrast to most PKC isoforms enhancing JNK activation, our studies show that PKC{eta} is an anti-apoptotic protein, acting as a negative regulator of JNK activity. Thus, PKC{eta} could represent a target for intervention aimed to reduce resistance to anti-cancer treatments.

  9. The HSP90 inhibitor, 17AAG, protects the intestinal stem cell niche and inhibits graft versus host disease development.

    PubMed

    Joly, A-L; Deepti, A; Seignez, A; Goloudina, A; Hebrard, S; Schmitt, E; Richaud, S; Fourmaux, E; Hammann, A; Collura, A; Svrcek, M; Jego, G; Robinet, E; Solary, E; Demidov, O; Kohli, E; Garrido, C

    2016-06-01

    Graft versus host disease (GvHD), which is the primary complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, can alter the intestinal barrier targeted by activated donor T-cells. Chemical inhibition of the stress protein HSP90 was demonstrated in vitro to inhibit T-cell activation and to modulate endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress to which intestinal cells are highly susceptible. Since the HSP90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-demethoxygeldanamycin (17AAG) is developed in clinics, we explored here its ability to control intestinal acute GvHD in vivo in two mouse GvHD models (C57BL/6BALB/c and FVB/NLgr5-eGFP), ex vivo in intestine organoids and in vitro in intestinal epithelial cultures. We show that 17AAG decreases GvHD-associated mortality without impairing graft versus leukemia effect. While 17AAG effect in T-cell activation is just moderate at the dose used in vivo, we observe a striking intestinal integrity protection. At the intestine level, the drug promotes the splicing of the transcription factor X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1), which is a key component of the ER stress. This effect is associated with a decrease in intestinal damage and an increase in Lgr5(+) stem cells, Paneth cells and defensins production. The importance of XBP1 splicing control is further confirmed in cultured cells and organoids of primary intestinal epithelium where XBP1 is either shRNA depleted or inhibited with toyocamycin. In conclusion, 17AAG has a protective effect on the epithelial intestinal barrier in mouse models of acute GvHD. This compound deserves to be tested in the therapeutic control of acute GvHD. PMID:26364610

  10. p53 inhibition provides a pivotal protective effect against ischemia-reperfusion injury in vitro via mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaomu; Gu, Shixin; Ling, Yan; Shen, Chao; Cao, Xiaoyun; Xie, Rong

    2015-04-24

    Tumor suppressor p53 has recently been reported to have numerous functions independent of tumorigenesis, including neuronal survival during ischemia. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway plays a central role in the regulation of metabolism, cell growth, development, and cell survival. Our recent work has demonstrated the neuroprotective effects of the mTOR pathway. Considering that p53 is also an important regulator of mTOR, to further clarify the role of p53 and the mTOR signaling pathway in neuronal ischemic-reperfusion injury, we used mouse primary mixed cultured neurons with an oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) model to mimic an ischemic-reperfusion injury in vitro. A lentiviral system was also used to inhibit or overexpress p53 to determine whether p53 alteration affects OGD and reperfusion injury. Our results show that activated p53 was induced and it suppressed mTOR expression in primary mixed cultured neurons after OGD and reperfusion. Inhibiting p53, using either a chemical inhibitor or lentiviral-mediated shRNA, exhibited neuroprotective effects in primary cultured neurons against OGD and reperfusion injury through the upregulation of mTOR activity. Such protective effects could be reversed by rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor. Conversely, p53 overexpression tended to exacerbate the detrimental effects of OGD injury by downregulating mTOR activity. These results suggest that p53 inhibition has a pivotal protective effect against an in vitro ischemia-reperfusion injury via mTOR signaling and provides a potential and promising therapeutic target for stroke treatment. PMID:25681550

  11. The role of the inhibition of glutathione-S-transferase in the protective mechanisms of ischemic postconditioning.

    PubMed

    Balatonyi, Borbála; Gasz, Balázs; Kovács, Viktória; Lantos, János; Jancsó, Gábor; Marczin, Nándor; Rőth, Erzsébet

    2013-08-01

    The antioxidant glutathione-S-transferase (GST) is a crucial determinant of the development of ischaemic-reperfusion (I/R) injury, and plays a pivotal role in the regulation of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways involved in stress response and apoptosis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether inhibition of GST can abolish the benefit of ischaemic postconditioning (IPoC). A neonatal rat cardiomyocyte cell culture was prepared and divided into 6 groups: (I) control group without treatment; (II) cells exposed to simulated I/R; (III) simulated I/R (sI/R) with IPoC; (IV) ethacrynic acid (EA) alone; (V) sI/R with EA; and (VI) sI/R and IPoC together with EA. Viability of the cells was measured by MTT assay, the quantity of apoptotic cells was assessed by flow cytometry following annexin V-FITC - propidium-iodide double staining. The activation of JNK, p38, ERK/p42-p44 MAPKs, and GSK-3β protein kinase was determined by flow-cytometric assay. GST inhibition markedly increased the apoptosis and decreased the cell viability despite IPoC. The protective effect of IPoC was lost in GST-inhibited groups for all MAPKs and GSK-3β. GST activity is required for the survival of cultured cardiomyocytes under stress conditions. GST inhibition was associated with differential activation of MAP and the protein kinases regulating these pathways in the process of ischaemic postconditioning. PMID:23888930

  12. Micheliolide inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory response and protects mice from LPS challenge

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xiangyang; Jiang, Xinru; Jiang, Xin; Wang, Yuli; Miao, Zhulei; He, Weigang; Yang, Guizhen; Lv, Zhenhui; Yu, Yizhi; Zheng, Yuejuan

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is the principal cause of fatality in the intensive care units worldwide. It involves uncontrolled inflammatory response resulting in multi-organ failure and even death. Micheliolide (MCL), a sesquiterpene lactone, was reported to inhibit dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced inflammatory intestinal disease, colitis-associated cancer and rheumatic arthritis. Nevertheless, the role of MCL in microbial infection and sepsis is unclear. We demonstrated that MCL decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS, the main cell wall component of Gram-negative bacteria)-mediated production of cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α, MCP-1, etc) in Raw264.7 cells, primary macrophages, dendritic cells and human monocytes. MCL plays an anti-inflammatory role by inhibiting LPS-induced activation of NF-κB and PI3K/Akt/p70S6K pathways. It has negligible impact on the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. In the acute peritonitis mouse model, MCL reduced the secretion of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β, MCP-1, IFN-β and IL-10 in sera, and ameliorated lung and liver damage. MCL down-regulated the high mortality rate caused by lethal LPS challenge. Collectively, our data illustrated that MCL enabled maintenance of immune equilibrium may represent a potentially new anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive drug candidate in the treatment of sepsis and septic shock. PMID:26984741

  13. Edaravone protects endotoxin-induced liver injury by inhibiting apoptosis and reducing proinflammatory cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Zong, L.; Yu, Q.H.; Du, Y.X.; Deng, X.M.

    2014-01-01

    Studies have shown that edaravone may prevent liver injury. This study aimed to investigate the effects of edaravone on the liver injury induced by D-galactosamine (GalN) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in female BALB/c mice. Edaravone was injected into mice 30 min before and 4 h after GalN/LPS injection. The survival rate was determined within the first 24 h. Animals were killed 8 h after GalN/LPS injection, and liver injury was biochemically and histologically assessed. Hepatocyte apoptosis was measured by TUNEL staining; proinflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6)] in the liver were assayed by ELISA; expression of caspase-8 and caspase-3 proteins was detected by Western blot assay; and caspase-3 activity was also determined. Results showed that GalN/LPS induced marked elevations in serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT). Edaravone significantly inhibited elevation of serum AST and ALT, accompanied by an improvement in histological findings. Edaravone lowered the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 and reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells. In addition, 24 h after edaravone treatment, caspase-3 activity and mortality were reduced. Edaravone may effectively ameliorate GalN/LPS-induced liver injury in mice by reducing proinflammatory cytokines and inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:24554039

  14. A novel pyrazole derivative protects from ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis through the inhibition of NADPH oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Jung Hee; Huh, Jeong-Eun; Lee, Jee Hyun; Park, Doo Ri; Lee, Yoonji; Lee, Seul Gee; Choi, Sun; Lee, Hwa Jeong; Song, Seong-Won; Jeong, Yongmi; Goo, Ja-Il; Choi, Yongseok; Baek, Hye Kyung; Yi, Sun Shin; Park, Soo Jin; Lee, Ji Eun; Ku, Sae Kwang; Lee, Won Jae; Lee, Kee-In; Lee, Soo Young; Bae, Yun Soo

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclast cells (OCs) are differentiated from bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) by activation of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL). Activation of NADPH oxidase (Nox) isozymes is involved in RANKL-dependent OC differentiation, implicating Nox isozymes as therapeutic targets for treatment of osteoporosis. Here, we show that a novel pyrazole derivative, Ewha-18278 has high inhibitory potency on Nox isozymes. Blocking the activity of Nox with Ewha-18278 inhibited the responses of BMMs to RANKL, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases and NF-κB, and OC differentiation. To evaluate the anti-osteoporotic function of Ewha-18278, the derivative was applied to estrogen-deficient ovariectomized (OVX) ddY mice. Oral administration of Ewha-18278 (10 mg/kg/daily, 4 weeks) into the mice recovered bone mineral density, trabecular bone volume, trabecular bone length, number and thickness, compared to control OVX ddY mice. Moreover, treatment of OVX ddY mice with Ewha-18278 increased bone strength by increasing cortical bone thickness. We provide that Ewha-18278 displayed Nox inhibition and blocked the RANKL-dependent cell signaling cascade leading to reduced differentiation of OCs. Our results implicate Ewha-18278 as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:26975635

  15. Inhibition of Janus activated kinase-3 protects against myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Young-Bin; Ahn, Min; Lee, Sang-Myeong; Koh, Hyoung-Won; Lee, Sun-Hwa; Kim, Suhn Hee; Park, Byung-Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have documented that Janus-activated kinase (JAK)–signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway can modulate the apoptotic program in a myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) model. To date, however, limited studies have examined the role of JAK3 on myocardial I/R injury. Here, we investigated the potential effects of pharmacological JAK3 inhibition with JANEX-1 in a myocardial I/R model. Mice were subjected to 45 min of ischemia followed by varying periods of reperfusion. JANEX-1 was injected 1 h before ischemia by intraperitoneal injection. Treatment with JANEX-1 significantly decreased plasma creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase activities, reduced infarct size, reversed I/R-induced functional deterioration of the myocardium and reduced myocardial apoptosis. Histological analysis revealed an increase in neutrophil and macrophage infiltration within the infarcted area, which was markedly reduced by JANEX-1 treatment. In parallel, in in vitro studies where neutrophils and macrophages were treated with JANEX-1 or isolated from JAK3 knockout mice, there was an impairment in the migration potential toward interleukin-8 (IL-8) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), respectively. Of note, however, JANEX-1 did not affect the expression of IL-8 and MCP-1 in the myocardium. The pharmacological inhibition of JAK3 might represent an effective approach to reduce inflammation-mediated apoptotic damage initiated by myocardial I/R injury. PMID:23680658

  16. Kallistatin protects against sepsis-related acute lung injury via inhibiting inflammation and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wei-Chieh; Chen, Chang-Wen; Huang, Yu-Wen; Chao, Lee; Chao, Julie; Lin, Yee-Shin; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Kallistatin, an endogenous plasma protein, exhibits pleiotropic properties in inhibiting inflammation, oxidative stress and apoptosis, as evidenced in various animal models and cultured cells. Here, we demonstrate that kallistatin levels were positively correlated with the concentration of total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALF) from patients with sepsis-related acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), indicating a compensatory mechanism. Lower ratio of kallistatin to total protein in BALF showed a significant trend toward elevated neutrophil counts (P = 0.002) in BALF and increased mortality (P = 0.046). In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated mice, expression of human kallistatin in lung by gene transfer with human kallistatin-encoding plasmid ameliorated acute lung injury (ALI) and reduced cytokine/chemokine levels in BALF. These mice exhibited attenuated lung epithelial apoptosis and decreased Fas/FasL expression compared to the control mice. Mouse survival was improved by kallistatin gene transfer or recombinant human kallistatin treatment after LPS challenge. In LPS-stimulated A549 human lung epithelial cells, kallistatin attenuated apoptosis, down-regulated Fas/FasL signaling, suppressed intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inhibited ROS-mediated NF-κB activation and inflammation. Furthermore, LPS-induced apoptosis was blocked by antioxidant N-acetylcysteine or NF-κB inhibitor via down-regulating Fas expression. These findings suggest the therapeutic potential of kallistatin for sepsis-related ALI/ARDS. PMID:26198099

  17. A Novel Compound C12 Inhibits Inflammatory Cytokine Production and Protects from Inflammatory Injury In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yong; Li, Jianling; Zhang, Yali; Ye, Faqing; Yang, Shulin; Zhang, Hui; Li, Xiaokun; Liang, Guang

    2011-01-01

    Inflammation is a hallmark of many diseases. Although steroids and cyclooxygenase inhibitors are main anti-inflammatory therapeutical agents, they may cause serious side effects. Therefore, developing non-steroid anti-inflammatory agents is urgently needed. A novel hydrosoluble compound, C12 (2,6-bis(4-(3-(dimethylamino)-propoxy)benzylidene)cyclohexanone), has been designed and synthesized as an anti-inflammatory agent in our previous study. In the present study, we investigated whether C12 can affect inflammatory processes in vitro and in vivo. In mouse primary peritoneal macrophages, C12 potently inhibited the production of the proinflammatory gene expression including TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, iNOS, COX-2 and PGE synthase. The activity of C12 was partly dependent on inhibition of ERK/JNK (but p38) phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. In vivo, C12 suppressed proinflammatory cytokine production in plasma and liver, attenuated lung histopathology, and significantly reduced mortality in endotoxemic mice. In addition, the pre-treatment with C12 reduced the inflammatory pain in the acetic acid and formalin models and reduced the carrageenan-induced paw oedema and acetic acid-increased vascular permeability. Taken together, C12 has multiple anti-inflammatory effects. These findings, coupled with the low toxicity and hydrosolubility of C12, suggests that this agent may be useful in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. PMID:21931698

  18. Verapamil Protects against Cartilage Degradation in Osteoarthritis by Inhibiting Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Takamatsu, Akira; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Sakai, Tadahiro; Ishiguro, Naoki; Ohno, Kinji

    2014-01-01

    In past years, the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway has emerged as a critical regulator of cartilage development and homeostasis. FRZB, a soluble antagonist of Wnt signaling, has been studied in osteoarthritis (OA) animal models and OA patients as a modulator of Wnt signaling. We screened for FDA-approved drugs that induce FRZB expression and suppress Wnt/β-catenin signaling. We found that verapamil, a widely prescribed L-type calcium channel blocker, elevated FRZB expression and suppressed Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human OA chondrocytes. Expression and nuclear translocation of β-catenin was attenuated by verapamil in OA chondrocytes. Lack of the verapamil effects in LiCl-treated and FRZB-downregulated OA chondrocytes also suggested that verpamil suppressed Wnt signaling by inducing FRZB. Verapamil enhanced gene expressions of chondrogenic markers of ACAN encoding aggrecan, COL2A1 encoding collagen type II α1, and SOX9, and suppressed Wnt-responsive AXIN2 and MMP3 in human OA chondrocytes. Verapamil ameliorated Wnt3A-induced proteoglycan loss in chondrogenically differentiated ATDC5 cells. Verapamil inhibited hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes in the explant culture of mouse tibiae. Intraarticular injection of verapamil inhibited OA progression as well as nuclear localizations of β-catenin in a rat OA model. We propose that verapamil holds promise as a potent therapeutic agent for OA by upregulating FRZB and subsequently downregulating Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:24658359

  19. Hemagglutination Inhibition Antibody Titers as a Correlate of Protection Against Seasonal A/H3N2 Influenza Disease

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Anne; Beran, Jiri; Devaster, Jeanne-Marie; Esen, Meral; Launay, Odile; Leroux-Roels, Geert; McElhaney, Janet E.; Oostvogels, Lidia; van Essen, Gerrit A.; Gaglani, Manjusha; Jackson, Lisa A.; Vesikari, Timo; Legrand, Catherine; Tibaldi, Fabian; Innis, Bruce L.; Dewé, Walthère

    2015-01-01

    Background. To investigate the relationship between hemagglutinin-inhibition (HI) antibody levels to the risk of influenza disease, we conducted a correlate of protection analysis using pooled data from previously published randomized trials. Methods. Data on the occurrence of laboratory-confirmed influenza and HI levels pre- and postvaccination were analyzed from 4 datasets: 3 datasets included subjects aged <65 years who received inactivated trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV) or placebo, and 1 dataset included subjects aged ≥65 years who received AS03-adjuvanted TIV (AS03-TIV) or TIV. A logistic model was used to evaluate the relationship between the postvaccination titer of A/H3N2 HI antibodies and occurrence of A/H3N2 disease. We then built a receiver-operating characteristic curve to identify a potential cutoff titer between protection and no protection. Results. The baseline odds ratio of A/H3N2 disease was higher for subjects aged ≥65 years than <65 years and higher in seasons of strong epidemic intensity than moderate or low intensity. Including age and epidemic intensity as covariates, a 4-fold increase in titer was associated with a 2-fold decrease in the risk of A/H3N2 disease. Conclusions. The modeling exercise confirmed a relationship between A/H3N2 disease and HI responses, but it did not allow an evaluation of the predictive power of the HI response. PMID:26180823

  20. Brazilin exerts protective effects against renal ischemia-reperfusion injury by inhibiting the NF-κB signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    JIA, YANYAN; ZHAO, JINYI; LIU, MEIYOU; LI, BINGLING; SONG, YING; LI, YUWEN; WEN, AIDONG; SHI, LEI

    2016-01-01

    Renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury is associated with high morbidity and mortality as there is currently no available effective therapeutic strategy with which to treat this injury. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the potential protective effects of brazilin, a major active component of the Chinese medicine Caesalpinia sappan L., against renal I/R injury in vitro and in vivo. Rats were subjected to removal of the right kidney and I/R injury to the left kidney (ischemia for 45 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h). Treatment with brazilin (30 mg/kg, administered intravenously at 30 min prior to ischemia) led to the reversal of I/R-induced changes in serum creatinine (Scr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels, and also attenuated the histopathological damage induced by I/R. Furthermore, TUNEL assay revealed that brazilin reduced cell necrosis, and significantly decreased the expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-1β in renal tissue. Moreover, HK-2 cells were used in order to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the protective effects of brazilin. The levels of phosphorylated IκBα and the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) were all evidently decreased by brazilin. These findings suggested that pre-treatment with brazilin protects against I/R-induced renal damage and suppresses the inflammatory response by inhibiting the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:27247107

  1. Discovery of a potent cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, S4, through docking-based pharmacophore screening, in vivo and in vitro estimations.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Tien-Sheng; Chuang, Show-Mei; Hsiao, Nai-Wan; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lee, Yu-Ching; Lin, Chi-Chen; Huang, Cheng; Tsai, Keng-Chang

    2016-07-19

    Cyclooxygenase (COX; EC: 1.14.99.1), the key enzyme in prostaglandin production in the human body, is a major pharmacological target for developing anti-inflammatory agents. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs exhibit anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities when inhibiting COX-2 but cause gastrointestinal toxicity and other side effects because of concurrent inhibition of COX-1. Thus, potent and safe inhibitors against COX-2 are urgently required. We constructed a novel docking-based pharmacophore model for screening selective COX-2 inhibitors and discovered compounds S1, S2, S3, and S4, which apparently inhibit COX-2. Particularly, S4 inhibits COX-2 in vitro and shows a potent anti-inflammatory effect in vivo without cytotoxicity. Molecular docking analyses revealed that S4 interacted satisfactorily with the active site of COX-2 but not with that of COX-1. This reveals that S4 more specifically inhibits COX-2 and has potential for application in developing anti-inflammatory and anticancer agents. PMID:27265567

  2. The Glucotoxicity Protecting Effect of Ezetimibe in Pancreatic Beta Cells via Inhibition of CD36

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of CD36, a fatty acid transporter, has been reported to prevent glucotoxicity and ameliorate high glucose induced beta cell dysfunction. Ezetimibe is a selective cholesterol absorption inhibitor that blocks Niemann Pick C1-like 1 protein, but may exert its effect through suppression of CD36. We attempted to clarify the beneficial effect of ezetimibe on insulin secreting cells and to determine whether this effect is related to change of CD36 expression. mRNA expression of insulin and CD36, intracellular peroxide level and glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) under normal (5.6 mM) or high glucose (30 mM) condition in INS-1 cells and primary rat islet cells were compared. Changes of the aforementioned factors with treatment with ezetimibe (20 μM) under normal or high glucose condition were also assessed. mRNA expression of insulin was decreased with high glucose, which was reversed by ezetimibe in both INS-1 cells and primary rat islets. CD36 mRNA expression was increased with high glucose, but decreased by ezetimibe in INS-1 cells and primary rat islets. Three-day treatment with high glucose resulted in an increase in intracellular peroxide level; however, it was decreased by treatment with ezetimibe. Decrease in GSIS by three-day treatment with high glucose was reversed by ezetimibe. Palmitate uptake following exposure to high glucose conditions for three days was significantly elevated, which was reversed by ezetimibe in INS-1 cells. Ezetimibe may prevent glucotoxicity in pancreatic β-cells through a decrease in fatty acid influx via inhibition of CD36. PMID:27051238

  3. Inhibition of gastric acid secretion by stress: A protective reflex mediated by cerebral nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Esplugues, J. V.; Barrachina, M. D.; Beltrán, B.; Calatayud, S.; Whittle, B. J. R.; Moncada, S.

    1996-01-01

    Moderate somatic stress inhibits gastric acid secretion. We have investigated the role of endogenously released NO in this phenomenon. Elevation of body temperature by 3°C or a reduction of 35 mmHg (1 mmHg = 133 Pa) in blood pressure for 10 min produced a rapid and long-lasting reduction of distension-stimulated acid secretion in the rat perfused stomach in vivo. A similar inhibitory effect on acid secretion was produced by the intracisternal (i.c.) administration of oxytocin, a peptide known to be released during stress. Intracisternal administration of the NO-synthase inhibitor, NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) reversed the antisecretory effect induced by all these stimuli, an action prevented by intracisternal coadministration of the NO precursor, l-arginine. Furthermore, microinjection of l-NAME into the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve reversed the acid inhibitory effects of mild hyperthermia, i.v. endotoxin, or i.c. oxytocin, an action prevented by prior microinjection of l-arginine. By contrast, microinjection of l-NAME into the nucleus tractus solitarius failed to affect the inhibitory effects of hyperthermia, i.v. endotoxin, or i.c. oxytocin. Immunohistochemical techniques demonstrated that following hyperthermia there was a significant increase in immunoreactivity to neuronal NO synthase in different areas of the brain, including the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. Thus, our results suggest that the inhibition of gastric acid secretion, a defense mechanism during stress, is mediated by a nervous reflex involving a neuronal pathway that includes NO synthesis in the brain, specifically in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. PMID:8962142

  4. The Glucotoxicity Protecting Effect of Ezetimibe in Pancreatic Beta Cells via Inhibition of CD36.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ji Sung; Moon, Jun Sung; Kim, Yong-Woon; Won, Kyu Chang; Lee, Hyoung Woo

    2016-04-01

    Inhibition of CD36, a fatty acid transporter, has been reported to prevent glucotoxicity and ameliorate high glucose induced beta cell dysfunction. Ezetimibe is a selective cholesterol absorption inhibitor that blocks Niemann Pick C1-like 1 protein, but may exert its effect through suppression of CD36. We attempted to clarify the beneficial effect of ezetimibe on insulin secreting cells and to determine whether this effect is related to change of CD36 expression. mRNA expression of insulin and CD36, intracellular peroxide level and glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) under normal (5.6 mM) or high glucose (30 mM) condition in INS-1 cells and primary rat islet cells were compared. Changes of the aforementioned factors with treatment with ezetimibe (20 μM) under normal or high glucose condition were also assessed. mRNA expression of insulin was decreased with high glucose, which was reversed by ezetimibe in both INS-1 cells and primary rat islets. CD36 mRNA expression was increased with high glucose, but decreased by ezetimibe in INS-1 cells and primary rat islets. Three-day treatment with high glucose resulted in an increase in intracellular peroxide level; however, it was decreased by treatment with ezetimibe. Decrease in GSIS by three-day treatment with high glucose was reversed by ezetimibe. Palmitate uptake following exposure to high glucose conditions for three days was significantly elevated, which was reversed by ezetimibe in INS-1 cells. Ezetimibe may prevent glucotoxicity in pancreatic β-cells through a decrease in fatty acid influx via inhibition of CD36. PMID:27051238

  5. Trichostatin A Protects Liver against Septic Injury through Inhibiting Toll-Like Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Jin; Park, Jin-Sook; Lee, Do-Won; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2016-07-01

    Sepsis, a serious clinical problem, is characterized by a systemic inflammatory response to infection and leads to organ failure. Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is intimately implicated in hyper-inflammatory responses and tissue injury during sepsis. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective mechanisms of trichostatin A (TSA), a HDAC inhibitor, associated with TLR signaling pathway during sepsis. The anti-inflammatory properties of TSA were assayed in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Polymicrobial sepsis was induced in mice by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), a clinically relevant model of sepsis. The mice were intraperitoneally received TSA (1, 2 or 5 mg/kg) 30 min before CLP. The serum and liver samples were collected 6 and 24-h after CLP. TSA inhibited the increased production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. TSA improved sepsis-induced mortality, attenuated liver injury and decreased serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels. CLP increased the levels of TLR4, TLR2 and myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88) protein expression and association of MyD88 with TLR4 and TLR2, which were attenuated by TSA. CLP increased nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B and decreased cytosolic inhibitor of kappa B (IκB) protein expression, which were attenuated by TSA. Moreover, CLP decreased acetylation of IκB kinase (IKK) and increased association of IKK with IκB and TSA attenuated these alterations. Our findings suggest that TSA attenuates liver injury by inhibiting TLR-mediated inflammatory response during sepsis. PMID:27068262

  6. Inhibition of KV7 Channels Protects the Rat Heart against Myocardial Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Elise R; Johnsen, Jacob; Povlsen, Jonas A; Jespersen, Nichlas R; Shanmuganathan, Jeffrey A; Laursen, Mia R; Kristiansen, Steen B; Simonsen, Ulf; Bøtker, Hans Erik

    2016-04-01

    The voltage-gated KV7 (KCNQ) potassium channels are activated by ischemia and involved in hypoxic vasodilatation. We investigated the effect of KV7 channel modulation on cardiac ischemia and reperfusion injury and its interaction with cardioprotection by ischemic preconditioning (IPC). Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed expression of KV7.1, KV7.4, and KV7.5 in the left anterior descending rat coronary artery and all KV7 subtypes (KV7.1-KV7.5) in the left and right ventricles of the heart. Isolated hearts were subjected to no-flow global ischemia and reperfusion with and without IPC. Infarct size was quantified by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Two blockers of KV7 channels, XE991 [10,10-bis(4-pyridinylmethyl)-9(10H)-anthracenone] (10 µM) and linopirdine (10 µM), reduced infarct size and exerted additive infarct reduction to IPC. An opener of KV7 channels, flupirtine (10 µM) abolished infarct size reduction by IPC. Hemodynamics were measured using a catheter inserted in the left ventricle and postischemic left ventricular recovery improved in accordance with reduction of infarct size and deteriorated with increased infarct size. XE991 (10 µM) reduced coronary flow in the reperfusion phase and inhibited vasodilatation in isolated small branches of the left anterior descending coronary artery during both simulated ischemia and reoxygenation. KV7 channels are expressed in rat coronary arteries and myocardium. Inhibition of KV7 channels exerts cardioprotection and opening of KV7 channels abrogates cardioprotection by IPC. Although safety issues should be further addressed, our findings suggest a potential role for KV7 blockers in the treatment of ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:26869667

  7. Calpain Inhibition Protected Spinal Cord Motoneurons against 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion and Rotenone

    PubMed Central

    Samantaray, Supriti; Knaryan, Varduhi H.; Le Gal, Charlene; Ray, Swapan K.; Banik, Naren L.

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD), characterized by selective midbrain nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration, is consistently associated with moderate systemic mitochondrial dysfunction. Downstream degeneration of spinal cord has also been suggested in PD, although the mechanisms have not been much investigated. In the present study, two mitochondrial toxicants, 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP+) and rotenone were tested in ventral spinal cord (VSC 4.1) motoneuronal cells. Cell death was assessed by morphological and biochemical means to discern a lower apoptosis-inducing concentration and LC50, which were subsequently compared in further cytoprotection experiments. Mitochondrial toxicants dose-dependently induced increase in intracellular free Ca2+ level, which was conducive for increased expression and activities of Ca2+-activated neutral protease calpain and downstream caspase-3. Thus, mitochondrial damage triggered apoptotic mechanisms in spinal cord motoneurons. Inhibition of calpain by calpeptin significantly attenuated damaging effects of MPP+ and rotenone on motoneurons, especially at low apoptosis-inducing concentrations of toxicants and partly at their LC50, as demonstrated by absence of DNA ladder formation and decrease in TUNEL-positive cells. Cytoprotection by calpeptin was observed with marked decreases in Bax:Bcl-2 ratio and activities of calpain and caspase-3, which affirmed the role of mitochondrial dysfunction and involvement of intrinsic pathway in mediation of apoptosis. These findings strongly suggested that parkinsonian toxicants MPP+ and rotenone at low doses induced cascade of cell damaging effects in spinal cord motoneurons, thus, highlighting the possibility of induction of apoptotic mechanisms in these cells, when subjected to mitochondrial stress. Cytoprotection rendered by calpeptin further validated the involvement of calpain in apoptosis and suggested calpain inhibition as a potential neuroprotective strategy. PMID:21723922

  8. Trichostatin A Protects Liver against Septic Injury through Inhibiting Toll-Like Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, So-Jin; Park, Jin-Sook; Lee, Do-Won; Lee, Sun-Mee

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis, a serious clinical problem, is characterized by a systemic inflammatory response to infection and leads to organ failure. Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling is intimately implicated in hyper-inflammatory responses and tissue injury during sepsis. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the hepatoprotective mechanisms of trichostatin A (TSA), a HDAC inhibitor, associated with TLR signaling pathway during sepsis. The anti-inflammatory properties of TSA were assayed in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. Polymicrobial sepsis was induced in mice by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), a clinically relevant model of sepsis. The mice were intraperitoneally received TSA (1, 2 or 5 mg/kg) 30 min before CLP. The serum and liver samples were collected 6 and 24-h after CLP. TSA inhibited the increased production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. TSA improved sepsis-induced mortality, attenuated liver injury and decreased serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels. CLP increased the levels of TLR4, TLR2 and myeloid differentiation primary response protein 88 (MyD88) protein expression and association of MyD88 with TLR4 and TLR2, which were attenuated by TSA. CLP increased nuclear translocation of nuclear factor kappa B and decreased cytosolic inhibitor of kappa B (IκB) protein expression, which were attenuated by TSA. Moreover, CLP decreased acetylation of IκB kinase (IKK) and increased association of IKK with IκB and TSA attenuated these alterations. Our findings suggest that TSA attenuates liver injury by inhibiting TLR-mediated inflammatory response during sepsis. PMID:27068262

  9. Paeonol Protects Memory after Ischemic Stroke via Inhibiting β-Secretase and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Su, Shan-Yu; Cheng, Chin-Yi; Tsai, Tung-Hu; Hsieh, Ching-Liang

    2012-01-01

    Poststroke dementia commonly occurs following stroke, with its pathogenesis related to β-amyloid production and apoptosis. The present study evaluate the effects of paeonol, one of the phenolic phytochemicals isolated from the Chinese herb Paeonia suffruticosa Andrews (MC), on protection from memory loss after ischemic stroke in the subacute stage. Rats were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo) with 10 min of ischemia. The data revealed that paeonol recovered the step-through latency in the retrieval test seven days after tMCAo, but did not improve the neurological deficit induced by tMCAo. Levels of Amyloid precursor protein (APP)- and beta-site APP cleaving enzyme (BACE; β-secretase)-immunoreactive cells, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells decreased in the paeonol-administered group. Western blotting revealed decreased levels of Bax protein in mitochondria and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) in cytosol following paeonol treatment. In conclusion, we speculate that paeonol protected memory after ischemic stroke via reducing APP, BACE, and apoptosis. Supression the level of Bax and blocking the release of AIF into cytosol might participate in the anti-apoptosis provided by paeonol. PMID:22474531

  10. Epalrestat protects against diabetic peripheral neuropathy by alleviating oxidative stress and inhibiting polyol pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qing-rong; Wang, Zhuo; Zhou, Wei; Fan, Shou-rui; Ma, Run; Xue, Li; Yang, Lu; Li, Ya-shan; Tan, Hong-li; Shao, Qing-hua; Yang, Hong-ying

    2016-01-01

    Epalrestat is a noncompetitive and reversible aldose reductase inhibitor used for the treatment of diabetic neuropathy. This study assumed that epalrestat had a protective effect on diabetic peripheral nerve injury by suppressing the expression of aldose reductase in peripheral nerves of diabetes mellitus rats. The high-fat and high-carbohydrate model rats were established by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. Peripheral neuropathy occurred in these rats after sustaining high blood glucose for 8 weeks. At 12 weeks after streptozotocin injection, rats were intragastrically administered epalrestat 100 mg/kg daily for 6 weeks. Transmission electron microscope revealed that the injuries to myelinated nerve fibers, non-myelinated nerve fibers and Schwann cells of rat sciatic nerves had reduced compared to rats without epalrestat administuation. Western blot assay and immunohistochemical results demonstrated that after intervention with epalrestat, the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase gradually increased, but aldose reductase protein expression gradually diminished. Results confirmed that epalrestat could protect against diabetic peripheral neuropathy by relieving oxidative stress and suppressing the polyol pathway. PMID:27073391

  11. Protection of the Transplant Kidney from Preservation Injury by Inhibition of Matrix Metalloproteinases

    PubMed Central

    Arcand, Steve; Lin, Han-Bin; Wojnarowicz, Chris; Sawicka, Jolanta; Banerjee, Tamalina; Luo, Yigang; Beck, Gavin R.; Luke, Patrick P.; Sawicki, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Background Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), particularly MMP-2 and MMP-9, play an important role in ischemic injury to the heart, yet it is not known if these MMPs are involved in the injury that occurs to the transplant kidney. We therefore studied the pharmacologic protection of transplant kidneys during machine cold perfusion. Methods Human kidney perfusates were analyzed for the presence of injury markers such as cytochrome c oxidase, lactate dehydrogenase, and neutrophil-gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL), and MMP-2 and MMP-9 were measured. The effects of MMP inhibitors MMP-2 siRNA and doxycycline were studied in an animal model of donation after circulatory determination of death (DCDD). Results Markers of injury were present in all analyzed perfusates, with higher levels seen in perfusates from human kidneys donated after controlled DCDD compared to brain death and in perfusate from kidneys with delayed graft function. When rat kidneys were perfused at 4°C for 22 hours with the addition of MMP inhibitors, this resulted in markedly reduced levels of MMP-2, MMP-9 and analyzed injury markers. Conclusions Based on our study, MMPs are involved in preservation injury and the supplementation of preservation solution with MMP inhibitors is a potential novel strategy in protecting the transplant kidney from preservation injury. PMID:27327879

  12. Corrosion protection of metals by conductive polymers III. Improved performance and inhibition in NaCl

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, W.K.; Elsenbaumer, R.L.; Chen, T.; Kulkarni, V.G.

    1998-07-01

    The use of conducting polymers for corrosion prevention is an area which has gained increasing attention during the last decade. This study explores the use of polyaniline based polymer coatings for corrosion prevention on mild steel. Data on coating degradation and passivation on electrochemically polarized painted metal specimens exposed to acid chloride solutions and artificial seawater at an ambient temperature are presented. A Systematic comparison between controls and designated coated sample sets has been made to demonstrate good corrosion protection efficiency with synergistic effects between conductive polymers and metals by classical DC monitoring techniques. Brief comparisons are made with data from simulated marine exposure. Meanwhile, in separate experiments, electrochemical data were obtained for conductive polymer primer coatings with epoxy top-coat under fully immersed conditions by using electrochemical noise (ECN) monitoring and scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) techniques to discover the initial localized corrosion phenomena in order to achieve further understanding of the protection mechanism. Additionally, electrochemical impedance (EIS) spectra were utilized for the assessment of anti-corrosion performance provided by conducting polymers to mild steel.

  13. Inhibition of hyaluronan synthesis protects against central nervous system (CNS) autoimmunity and increases CXCL12 expression in the inflamed CNS.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Andre Michael; Yoon, Bo Hyung; Sadiq, Saud Ahmed

    2014-08-15

    Hyaluronan (HA) may have proinflammatory roles in the context of CNS autoimmunity. It accumulates in demyelinated multiple sclerosis (MS) lesions, promotes antigen presentation, and enhances T-cell activation and proliferation. HA facilitates lymphocyte binding to vessels and CNS infiltration at the CNS vascular endothelium. Furthermore, HA signals through Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 to stimulate inflammatory gene expression. We assessed the role of HA in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS by administration of 4-methylumbelliferone (4MU), a well established inhibitor of HA synthesis. 4MU decreased hyaluronan synthesis in vitro and in vivo. It was protective in active EAE of C57Bl/6 mice, decreased spinal inflammatory infiltrates and spinal infiltration of Th1 cells, and increased differentiation of regulatory T-cells. In adoptive transfer EAE, feeding of 4MU to donor mice significantly decreased the encephalitogenicity of lymph node cells. The transfer of proteolipid protein (PLP)-stimulated lymph node cells to 4MU-fed mice resulted in a delayed EAE onset and delayed spinal T-cell infiltration. Expression of CXCL12, an anti-inflammatory chemokine, is reduced in MS patients in CSF cells and in spinal cord tissue during EAE. Hyaluronan suppressed production of CXCL12, whereas 4MU increased spinal CXCL12 in naive animals and during neuroinflammation. Neutralization of CXCR4, the most prominent receptor of CXCL12, by administration of AMD3100 diminished the protective impact of 4MU in adoptive transfer EAE. In conclusion, hyaluronan exacerbates CNS autoimmunity, enhances encephalitogenic T-cell responses, and suppresses the protective chemokine CXCL12 in CNS tissue. Inhibition of hyaluronan synthesis with 4MU protects against an animal model of MS and may represent an important therapeutic option in MS and other neuroinflammatory diseases. PMID:24973214

  14. Coenzyme Q10 Protects Astrocytes from ROS-Induced Damage through Inhibition of Mitochondria-Mediated Cell Death Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Li; He, Mao-Tao; Chang, Yue; Mehta, Suresh L.; He, Qing-Ping; Zhang, Jian-Zhong; Li, P. Andy

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) acts by scavenging reactive oxygen species to protect neuronal cells against oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases. The present study was designed to examine whether CoQ10 was capable of protecting astrocytes from reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated damage. For this purpose, ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation was used as a tool to induce ROS stress to cultured astrocytes. The cells were treated with 10 and 25 μg/ml of CoQ10 for 3 or 24 h prior to the cells being exposed to UVB irradiation and maintained for 24 h post UVB exposure. Cell viability was assessed by MTT conversion assay. Mitochondrial respiration was assessed by respirometer. While superoxide production and mitochondrial membrane potential were measured using fluorescent probes, levels of cytochrome C (cyto-c), cleaved caspase-9, and caspase-8 were detected using Western blotting and/or immunocytochemistry. The results showed that UVB irradiation decreased cell viability and this damaging effect was associated with superoxide accumulation, mitochondrial membrane potential hyperpolarization, mitochondrial respiration suppression, cyto-c release, and the activation of both caspase-9 and -8. Treatment with CoQ10 at two different concentrations started 24 h before UVB exposure significantly increased the cell viability. The protective effect of CoQ10 was associated with reduction in superoxide, normalization of mitochondrial membrane potential, improvement of mitochondrial respiration, inhibition of cyto-c release, suppression of caspase-9. Furthermore, CoQ10 enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis. It is concluded that CoQ10 may protect astrocytes through suppression of oxidative stress, prevention of mitochondrial dysfunction, blockade of mitochondria-mediated cell death pathway, and enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis. PMID:25552930

  15. A tetracycline derivative, minocycline, reduces inflammation and protects against focal cerebral ischemia with a wide therapeutic window.

    PubMed

    Yrjänheikki, J; Tikka, T; Keinänen, R; Goldsteins, G; Chan, P H; Koistinaho, J

    1999-11-01

    The only treatment of patients with acute ischemic stroke is thrombolytic therapy, which benefits only a fraction of stroke patients. Both human and experimental studies indicate that ischemic stroke involves secondary inflammation that significantly contributes to the outcome after ischemic insult. Minocycline is a semisynthetic second-generation tetracycline that exerts antiinflammatory effects that are completely separate from its antimicrobial action. Because tetracycline treatment is clinically well tolerated, we investigated whether minocycline protects against focal brain ischemia with a wide therapeutic window. Using a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion, we show that daily treatment with minocycline reduces cortical infarction volume by 76 +/- 22% when the treatment is started 12 h before ischemia and by 63 +/- 35% when started even 4 h after the onset of ischemia. The treatment inhibits morphological activation of microglia in the area adjacent to the infarction, inhibits induction of IL-1beta-converting enzyme, and reduces cyclooxygenase-2 expression and prostaglandin E(2) production. Minocycline had no effect on astrogliosis or spreading depression, a wave of ionic transients thought to contribute to enlargement of cortical infarction. Treatment with minocycline may act directly on brain cells, because cultured primary neurons were also salvaged from glutamate toxicity. Minocycline may represent a prototype of an antiinflammatory compound that provides protection against ischemic stroke and has a clinically relevant therapeutic window. PMID:10557349

  16. Inhibiting an Epoxide Hydrolase Virulence Factor from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Protects CFTR.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Christopher D; Hvorecny, Kelli L; Bomberger, Jennifer M; Stanton, Bruce A; Hammock, Bruce D; Morisseau, Christophe; Madden, Dean R

    2015-08-17

    Opportunistic pathogens exploit diverse strategies to sabotage host defenses. Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes the CFTR inhibitory factor Cif and thus triggers loss of CFTR, an ion channel required for airway mucociliary defense. However, the mechanism of action of Cif has remained unclear. It catalyzes epoxide hydrolysis, but there is no known role for natural epoxides in CFTR regulation. It was demonstrated that the hydrolase activity of Cif is strictly required for its effects on CFTR. A small-molecule inhibitor that protects this key component of the mucociliary defense system was also uncovered. These results provide a basis for targeting the distinctive virulence chemistry of Cif and suggest an unanticipated role of physiological epoxides in intracellular protein trafficking. PMID:26136396

  17. Ischemic preconditioning protects the brain against injury via inhibiting CaMKII-nNOS signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Qi, Da-Shi; Zhou, Cui; Han, Dong; Li, Pei-Pei; Zhang, Fang; Zhou, Xiao-Yan; Han, Meng; Di, Jie-Hui; Ye, Jun-Song; Yu, Hong-Min; Song, Yuan-Jian; Zhang, Guang-Yi

    2016-03-01

    Although studies have shown that cerebral ischemic preconditioning (IPC) can ameliorate ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) induced brain damage, but its precise mechanisms remain unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective mechanisms of IPC against ischemic brain damage induced by cerebral I/R and to explore whether the Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII)-mediated up-regulation of nNOS ser847-phosphorylation signaling pathway contributed to the protection provided by IPC. Transient global brain ischemia was induced by 4-vessel occlusion in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were pretreated with 3min of IPC alone or KN62 (selective antagonist of CaMKII) treatment before IPC, after reperfusion for 3 days, 6min ischemia was induced. Cresyl violet staining was used to examine the survival of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Immunoblotting was performed to measure the phosphorylation of CaMKII, nNOS, c-Jun and the expression of FasL. Immunoprecipitation was used to examine the binding between PSD95 and nNOS. The results showed that IPC could significantly protect neurons against cerebral I/R injury, furthermore, the combination of PSD95 and nNOS was increased, coinstantaneously the phosphorylation of CaMKII and nNOS (ser847) were up-regulated, however the activation of c-Jun and FasL were reduced. Conversely, KN62 treatment before IPC reversed all these effects of IPC. Taken together, the results suggest that IPC could diminish ischemic brain injury through CaMKII-mediated up-regulation of nNOS ser847-phosphorylation signaling pathway. PMID:26794251

  18. Inhibition of protein kinase G activity protects neonatal mouse respiratory network from hyperthermic and hypoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Gary A B; López-Guerrero, Juan J; Dawson-Scully, Ken; Peña, Fernando; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2010-01-22

    In spite of considerable research attention focused on clarifying the mechanisms by which the mammalian respiratory rhythm is generated, little attention has been given to examining how this neuronal circuit can be protected from heat stress. Hyperthermia has a profound effect on neuronal circuits including the circuit that generates breathing in mammals. As temperature of the brainstem increases, respiratory frequency concomitantly rises. If temperature continues to increase respiratory arrest (apnea) and death can occur. Previous research has implicated protein kinase G (PKG) activity in regulating neuronal thermosensitivity of neuronal circuits in invertebrates. Here we examine if pharmacological manipulation of PKG activity in a brainstem slice preparation could alter the thermosensitivity of the fictive neonatal mouse respiratory rhythm. We report a striking effect following alteration of PKG activity in the brainstem such that slices treated with the PKG inhibitor KT5823 recovered fictive respiratory rhythm generation significantly faster than control slices and slices treated with a PKG activator (8-Br-cGMP). Furthermore, slices treated with 8-Br-cGMP arrested fictive respiration at a significantly lower temperature than all other treatment groups. In a separate set of experiments we examined if altered PKG activity could regulate the response of slices to hypoxia by altering the protective switch to fictive gasping. Slices treated with 8-Br-cGMP did not switch to the fictive gasp-like pattern following exposure to hypoxia whereas slices treated with KT5823 did display fictive gasping. We propose that PKG activity inversely regulates the amount of stress the neonatal mammalian respiratory rhythm can endure. PMID:19945442

  19. Protective Effect of Thymoquinone against Cyclophosphamide-Induced Hemorrhagic Cystitis through Inhibiting DNA Damage and Upregulation of Nrf2 Expression.

    PubMed

    Gore, Prashant R; Prajapati, Chaitali P; Mahajan, Umesh B; Goyal, Sameer N; Belemkar, Sateesh; Ojha, Shreesh; Patil, Chandragouda R

    2016-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CYP) induced hemorrhagic cystitis is a dose-limiting side effect involving increased oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokines and suppressed activity of nuclear factor related erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2). Thymoquinone (TQ), an active constituent of Nigella sativa seeds, is reported to increase the expression of Nrf2, exert antioxidant action, and anti-inflammatory effects in the experimental animals. The present study was designed to explore the effects of TQ on CYP-induced hemorrhagic cystitis in Balb/c mice. Cystitis was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of CYP (200 mg/kg). TQ was administered intraperitoneally at 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg doses twice a day, for three days before and three days after the CYP administration. The efficacy of TQ was determined in terms of the protection against the CYP-induced histological perturbations in the bladder tissue, reduction in the oxidative stress, and inhibition of the DNA fragmentation. Immunohistochemistry was performed to examine the expression of Nrf2. TQ protected against CYP-induced oxidative stress was evident from significant reduction in the lipid peroxidation, restoration of the levels of reduced glutathione, catalase and superoxide dismutase activities. TQ treatment significantly reduced the DNA damage evident as reduced DNA fragmentation. A significant decrease in the cellular infiltration, edema, epithelial denudation and hemorrhage were observed in the histological observations. There was restoration and rise in the Nrf2 expression in the bladder tissues of mice treated with TQ. These results confirm that, TQ ameliorates the CYP-induced hemorrhagic cystitis in mice through reduction in the oxidative stress, inhibition of the DNA damage and through increased expression of Nrf2 in the bladder tissues. PMID:27489498

  20. Protective Effect of Thymoquinone against Cyclophosphamide-Induced Hemorrhagic Cystitis through Inhibiting DNA Damage and Upregulation of Nrf2 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Prashant R.; Prajapati, Chaitali P.; Mahajan, Umesh B.; Goyal, Sameer N.; Belemkar, Sateesh; Ojha, Shreesh; Patil, Chandragouda R.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (CYP) induced hemorrhagic cystitis is a dose-limiting side effect involving increased oxidative stress, inflammatory cytokines and suppressed activity of nuclear factor related erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2). Thymoquinone (TQ), an active constituent of Nigella sativa seeds, is reported to increase the expression of Nrf2, exert antioxidant action, and anti-inflammatory effects in the experimental animals. The present study was designed to explore the effects of TQ on CYP-induced hemorrhagic cystitis in Balb/c mice. Cystitis was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of CYP (200 mg/kg). TQ was administered intraperitoneally at 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg doses twice a day, for three days before and three days after the CYP administration. The efficacy of TQ was determined in terms of the protection against the CYP-induced histological perturbations in the bladder tissue, reduction in the oxidative stress, and inhibition of the DNA fragmentation. Immunohistochemistry was performed to examine the expression of Nrf2. TQ protected against CYP-induced oxidative stress was evident from significant reduction in the lipid peroxidation, restoration of the levels of reduced glutathione, catalase and superoxide dismutase activities. TQ treatment significantly reduced the DNA damage evident as reduced DNA fragmentation. A significant decrease in the cellular infiltration, edema, epithelial denudation and hemorrhage were observed in the histological observations. There was restoration and rise in the Nrf2 expression in the bladder tissues of mice treated with TQ. These results confirm that, TQ ameliorates the CYP-induced hemorrhagic cystitis in mice through reduction in the oxidative stress, inhibition of the DNA damage and through increased expression of Nrf2 in the bladder tissues. PMID:27489498

  1. Radiofrequency Renal Denervation Protects the Ischemic Heart via Inhibition of GRK2 and Increased Nitric Oxide Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Polhemus, David J.; Gao, Juan; Scarborough, Amy L.; Trivedi, Rishi; McDonough, Kathleen H.; Goodchild, Traci T.; Smart, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Catheter-based renal denervation (RDN) is currently under development for the treatment of resistant hypertension and is thought to reduce blood pressure via interruption of sympathetic pathways that modulate cardiovascular function. The sympathetic nervous system also plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of acute myocardial infarction and heart failure. Objective: We examined whether treatment with radiofrequency (RF)-RDN would protect the heart against subsequent myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury via direct effects on the myocardium. Methods and Results: Spontaneously hypertensive rats received either bilateral RF-RDN or sham-RDN. At 4 weeks after RF-RDN (n=14) or sham-RDN (n=14) treatment, spontaneously hypertensive rats were subjected to 30 minutes of transient coronary artery occlusion and 24 hours –7 days reperfusion. Four weeks after RF-RDN, myocardial oxidative stress was markedly attenuated, and transcription and translation of antioxidants, superoxide dismutase 1 and glutathione peroxidase-1, were significantly upregulated compared with sham-RDN spontaneously hypertensive rats. RF-RDN also inhibited myocardial G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2 pathological signaling and enhanced myocardial endothelial nitric oxide synthase function and nitric oxide signaling. RF-RDN therapy resulted in a significant reduction in myocardial infarct size per area at risk compared with sham-RDN (26.8 versus 43.9%; P<0.01) at 24 hours postreperfusion and significantly improved left ventricular function at 7 days after myocardial ischemia/reperfusion. Conclusions: RF-RDN reduced oxidative stress, inhibited G protein–coupled receptor kinase 2 signaling, increased nitric oxide bioavailability, and ameliorated myocardial reperfusion injury in the setting of severe hypertension. These findings provide new insights into the remote cardioprotective effects of RF-RDN acting directly on cardiac myocytes to attenuate cell death and protect against ischemic

  2. Mdm2 inhibition confers protection of p53-proficient cells from the cytotoxic effects of Wee1 inhibitors