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Sample records for cyclopoid copepod oithona

  1. Observations on the reproductive biology of two cyclopoid copepods: Oncaea media and O. scottodicarloi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyttis, Georgios; Demetriou, Monica; Di Capua, Iole; Samuel-Rhoads, Yianna

    2015-04-01

    The small cyclopoid copepods Oncaea media and O. scottodicarloi are important components of the zooplanktonic communities in the Mediterranean Sea due to their numerical abundance and common distribution in coastal and open waters. However, knowledge on their biology is still limited. The present study was aimed to acquire data on their reproductive traits to highlight any difference between these two co-occurring oncaeids that are very similar in size and morphology. Experiments were conducted in the laboratory by monitoring groups of Oncaea ovigerous females (O. media + O. scottodicarloi) sorted from zooplankton samples collected in February and March 2013 from coastal waters in the inner Gulf of Naples (Tyrrhenian Sea, Western Mediterranean). The females were incubated individually at in situ temperature (15 ° C) in cell culture plates containing oxygenated seawater with food particles that was changed every other day. The plates were inspected daily under an inverted microscope to count the hatched nauplii and measure the interclutch period, until all females were dead and subsequently identified as O. media or O. scottodicarloi. Both species carry the eggs in two dorsal sacs where the eggs are densely packed and cannot be precisely counted. The clutch size was therefore estimated from egg sacs detached from ovigerous females sorted from the same samples and fixed. The average number of eggs per sac was 35.2±6.6 (range 20-52) for O. media and 24.4±4.5 (range 14-32) for O. scottodicarloi. Egg production rates (EPR) were estimated to be on average 8.75 eggs female-1 day-1 for O. media and 6.15 eggs female-1 day-1 for O. scottodicarloi. The average egg development time was 8.05±3.78 days for O. media and 7.9±0.89 days for O. scottodicarloi. The interclutch period for the females that produced new egg sacs was 2.2±1.3 days for O. media and 3±2.7 days for O. scottodicarloi. The average recruitment of O. media was 7.6±3.7 nauplii f-1 d-1, with the minimum number of hatched nauplii being 4 and the maximum 93. O. scottodicarloi recruited on average 6.5±4.4 nauplii f-1 d-1, with the minimum number of hatched nauplii from one female being 17 and the maximum 50. O. media and O. scottodicarloi differed significantly (p

  2. Identification and molecular characterization of dorsal and dorsal-like genes in the cyclopoid copepod Paracyclopina nana.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Chang-Bum; Lee, Min Chul; Lee, Kyun-Woo; Seo, Jung Soo; Park, Heum Gi; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-12-01

    To date, knowledge of the immune system in aquatic invertebrates has been reported in only a few model organisms, even though all metazoans have an innate immune system. In particular, information on the copepod's immunity and the potential role of key genes in the innate immune systems is still unclear. In this study, we identified dorsal and dorsal-like genes in the cyclopoid copepod Paracyclopina nana. In silico analyses for identifying conserved domains and phylogenetic relationships supported their gene annotations. The transcriptional levels of both genes were slightly increased from the nauplius to copepodid stages, suggesting that these genes are putatively involved in copepodid development of P. nana. To examine the involvement of both genes in the innate immune response and under stressful conditions, the copepods were exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), different culture densities, salinities, and temperatures. LPS significantly upregulated mRNA expressions of dorsal and dorsal-like genes, suggesting that both genes are transcriptionally sensitive in response to immune modulators. Exposure to unfavorable culture conditions also increased mRNA levels of dorsal and dorsal-like genes. These findings suggest that transcriptional regulation of the dorsal and dorsal-like genes would be associated with environmental changes in P. nana. PMID:26297599

  3. First report of the planktonic copepod Oithona davisae in the northern Wadden Sea (North Sea): Evidence for recent invasion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornils, Astrid; Wend-Heckmann, Britta

    2015-06-01

    In October 2010, specimens of Oithona were taken from the List Tidal Basin in the northern Wadden Sea (North Sea) for a biogeographic study on Oithona similis. These specimens could not be assigned to O. similis or any of the other Oithona species known from the North Sea genetically. These specimens were identified as Oithona davisae Ferrari and Orsi 1984, a Northwest Pacific species, known as an invasive species from the Black Sea and the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. Recent sampling provided evidence that O. davisae is still present in the northern Wadden Sea and may thus now be a permanent plankton species.

  4. A new marine cyclopoid copepod of the genus Neocyclops (Cyclopidae, Halicyclopinae) from Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jimin; Chang, Cheon Young

    2015-01-01

    A new cyclopoid species of the genus Neocyclops Gurney, 1927 is described. Type specimens were collected from a beach on south-western coast of the Korean Peninsula by rinsing intertidal coarse sandy sediments. Neocyclops hoonsooi sp. n. is most characteristic in showing the conspicuous chitinized transverse ridges originating from the medial margins of the coxae of all swimming legs. The new species is most similar to Neocyclops vicinus, described from the Brazilian coast, and Neocyclops petkovskii, from Australia. All three species share a large body size (more than 750 µm long), the presence of an exopodal seta on the antenna, two setae on the mandibular palp, the same seta/spine armature on the third endopodal segment of leg 3 (3 setae + 3 spines), and the fairly long inner distal spine on the third endopodal segment of the female leg 4. However, Neocyclops hoonsooi sp. n. differs from both species by the much shorter caudal rami (less than 1.7 times as long as wide) and the shorter dorsal caudal seta VII. Furthermore, Neocyclops hoonsooi is clearly distinguished from Neocyclops vicinus by the 10-segmented antennule (vs 12 segments in Neocyclops vicinus), and from Neocyclops petkovskii by the elongate inner distal spine on leg 5 exopod and the 3-segmented leg 5 in male (vs 4-segmented in Neocyclops petkovskii). A tabular comparison of characters separating Neocyclops hoonsooi from its closest allies and a key to Neocyclops species from the Indo-Pacific Ocean are provided. This is the first record of the genus Neocyclops from the northern Pacific. PMID:26448716

  5. A new marine cyclopoid copepod of the genus Neocyclops (Cyclopidae, Halicyclopinae) from Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jimin; Chang, Cheon Young

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A new cyclopoid species of the genus Neocyclops Gurney, 1927 is described. Type specimens were collected from a beach on south-western coast of the Korean Peninsula by rinsing intertidal coarse sandy sediments. Neocyclops hoonsooi sp. n. is most characteristic in showing the conspicuous chitinized transverse ridges originating from the medial margins of the coxae of all swimming legs. The new species is most similar to Neocyclops vicinus, described from the Brazilian coast, and Neocyclops petkovskii, from Australia. All three species share a large body size (more than 750 µm long), the presence of an exopodal seta on the antenna, two setae on the mandibular palp, the same seta/spine armature on the third endopodal segment of leg 3 (3 setae + 3 spines), and the fairly long inner distal spine on the third endopodal segment of the female leg 4. However, Neocyclops hoonsooi sp. n. differs from both species by the much shorter caudal rami (less than 1.7 times as long as wide) and the shorter dorsal caudal seta VII. Furthermore, Neocyclops hoonsooi is clearly distinguished from Neocyclops vicinus by the 10-segmented antennule (vs 12 segments in Neocyclops vicinus), and from Neocyclops petkovskii by the elongate inner distal spine on leg 5 exopod and the 3-segmented leg 5 in male (vs 4-segmented in Neocyclops petkovskii). A tabular comparison of characters separating Neocyclops hoonsooi from its closest allies and a key to Neocyclops species from the Indo-Pacific Ocean are provided. This is the first record of the genus Neocyclops from the northern Pacific. PMID:26448716

  6. Community and trophic structures of pelagic copepods down to greater depths in the western subarctic Pacific (WEST-COSMIC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Watanabe, Yuji; Ishida, Hiroshi; Harimoto, Takashi; Furusawa, Kazushi; Suzuki, Shinya; Ishizaka, Joji; Ikeda, Tsutomu; Takahashi, Masayuki Mac

    2002-06-01

    As part of the research program Western Pacific Environment Study on CO 2 Ocean Sequestration for Mitigation of Climate Change (WEST-COSMIC), vertical distribution and community structure of copepods were studied at Station Knot (44°N, 155°E) down to 4000 m depth in the western subarctic Pacific. Vertical carbon flux mediated by copepod communities was also estimated. Both abundance and biomass of copepods were greatest in the near surface layer and decreased with increasing depth. Decrease of abundance with depth was best fitted to a power regression model, while that of biomass was best described by an exponential regression model. Copepod carcasses occurred throughout the layer, and carcasses/living specimens ratios were greatest in the deepest layer (the ratio was 9.3 at 3000-4000 m depth). A total of 98 calanoid copepod species belonging to 38 genera and 15 families occurred in the 0-4000 m water column (Cyclopoida, Harpacticoida and Poecilostomatoida were not identified to species). The number of genera and species showed bimodal vertical distributions with peaks at 500-1000 m and at 2000-3000 m both during day and night. Based on the species similarity indices, copepod community could be classified into epipelagic, mesopelagic and bathypelagic communities. Based on the feeding pattern, copepods were divided into four types: suspension feeders, suspension feeders in diapause, detritivores and carnivores. In terms of abundance, the most dominant group was suspension feeders (mainly the cyclopoid genus Oithona) in the epipelagic zone, and detritivores (mainly Poecilostomatoida genus Oncaea) were dominant in the meso- and bathypelagic zones. In terms of biomass, suspension feeders in diapause (calanoid genera Neocalanus and Eucalanus) were the major component (ca. 70%), especially at 200-2000 m depth. Comparison of vertical flux of particulate carbon with estimated copepod ingestion/egestion rates suggests that the suspension feeding copepods receive sufficient food. For detritivorous copepods, copepod carcasses, a possible food source, are not abundant enough, so other food sources need to be considered. As a food source for carnivorous copepods, the abundance of suspension feeding and detritivorous copepods appears to be high enough to meet their demand. Our calculation showed that an average of 32% of the particulate carbon flux is consumed by copepods in the 0-4000 m water column.

  7. Spatial patterns of copepod biodiversity in relation to a tidal front system in the main spawning and nursery area of the Argentine hake Merluccius hubbsi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temperoni, B.; Viñas, M. D.; Martos, P.; Marrari, M.

    2014-11-01

    Copepods play an important role in marine ecosystems as a direct link of energy transfer between primary producers and higher trophic level consumers, such as fish. In the Argentine Sea, the Patagonian stock of Argentine hake Merluccius hubbsi spawns from late austral spring (December) to early autumn (April) in the northern Patagonian shelf region (43°-45°30?S), in association with a highly productive tidal front system. Since hake larvae prey mainly upon copepods, the objective of this study was to assess the spatial variability in the abundance and diversity of these potential food items in different sectors of the front, as one of the possible factors affecting hake recruitment success. Two complementary mesh sizes (67 and 300 ?m) were used to accurately target the entire copepod size spectrum. The copepod community was dominated by developmental stages < 1 mm in total length (eggs, nauplii, copepodites of cyclopoids and calanoids), and adults of the species Oithona helgolandica, Microsetella norvegica, Ctenocalanus vanus and Drepanopus forcipatus. Their spatial distribution was highly influenced by the across-shelf characteristics of the tidal front system, highlighting the impact of environmental features, mainly bottom temperature and salinity, in shaping the community. Abundances were higher in the transitional relative to the stratified sector of the system. Such sector would provide the appropriate conditions to sustain M. hubbsi larval growth resulting from high availability of adequate prey, the suitable thermal ranges, and the existence of retention mechanisms.

  8. [Molecular-phylogenetic analysis of cyclopoids (Copepoda: Cyclopoida) from Lake Baikal and its water catchment basin].

    PubMed

    Ma?or, T Iu; Sheveleva, N G; Sukhanova, L V; Timoshkin, O A; Kiril'chik, S V

    2010-11-01

    Baikalian cyclopoids represent one of the richest endemic faunas of freshwater cyclopoid copepods. The genus Diacyclops Kiefer, 1927 is the most numerous by species number in the lake. In this work, molecular-phylogenetic analysis of 14 species and 1 sub-species from Lake Baikal and its water catchment basin is performed. The regions of mitochondrial cytochrom-oxydase I (COI) and of nuclear small-subunit 18S rRNA were used as evolution markers. In the obtained set of nucleotide sequences of COT gene, an effect of synonymous substitution saturation is revealed. Baikalian representatives of the genus Diacyclops form at phylogenetic schemes by two markers a monophyletic griup, it suggest their origin from a common ancestral form. Preliminary estimate of the age of this group is 20-25 My. PMID:21261066

  9. Observing free-swimming copepods mating

    PubMed Central

    Strickler, J. R.

    1998-01-01

    Planktonic copepods are small transparent animals swimming in water. To observe how a male finds its mate, special optical systems had to be designed. The animals are treated as phase objects and matched spatial filters allow three-dimensional recordings of the swimming behaviour in a 1-litre vessel. Application of the techniques described shows how a male cyclopoid copepod swims for 20 s in synchronicity with the female before mating. Results stemming from observations with this optical system are published in this volume.

  10. Species composition of Black Sea marine planktonic copepods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubanova, A.; Altukhov, D.; Stefanova, K.; Arashkevich, E.; Kamburska, L.; Prusova, I.; Svetlichny, L.; Timofte, F.; Uysal, Z.

    2014-07-01

    This paper reviews the changes in the marine planktonic copepods of the Black Sea species' list from the beginning of taxonomic research to the present day. The study was based on the SESAME biological database, unpublished data, literature and data obtained during the course of the SESAME project. Comparisons were made with the Guidebook for Marine Fauna of the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov, which revealed changes both in the taxonomic status of some species and in the structure of the copepod community. The taxonomic status of two species (Acartia clausi small form and Centropages kroyeri pontica) and the nomenclature of two species (Oihona minuta and Calanus helgolandicus) have been changed. Three native species (Acartia margalefi, Oithona nana, and Paracartia latisetosa) have disappeared. Two non-indigenous copepods (Acartia tonsa and Oithona davisae) became established in the Black Sea ecosystem in the 1970s and 2000s, respectively. The success of their establishment was determined by biological features of the species and vulnerability of the native copepod community to invasions. It is highly probable that both species were introduced to the Black Sea by vessel ballast water. The hypothesis of "mediterranization" of the Black Sea fauna does not appear to hold true for zooplankton. Numerous claims of alien copepod species in the Black Sea remain largely unverified due to insufficient information. Data on newly discovered species of the Acartia genus are not authenticated. An updated list of marine planktonic copepods of the Black Sea is hereby presented.

  11. Automated identification of copepods using digital image processing and artificial neural network

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Copepods are planktonic organisms that play a major role in the marine food chain. Studying the community structure and abundance of copepods in relation to the environment is essential to evaluate their contribution to mangrove trophodynamics and coastal fisheries. The routine identification of copepods can be very technical, requiring taxonomic expertise, experience and much effort which can be very time-consuming. Hence, there is an urgent need to introduce novel methods and approaches to automate identification and classification of copepod specimens. This study aims to apply digital image processing and machine learning methods to build an automated identification and classification technique. Results We developed an automated technique to extract morphological features of copepods' specimen from captured images using digital image processing techniques. An Artificial Neural Network (ANN) was used to classify the copepod specimens from species Acartia spinicauda, Bestiolina similis, Oithona aruensis, Oithona dissimilis, Oithona simplex, Parvocalanus crassirostris, Tortanus barbatus and Tortanus forcipatus based on the extracted features. 60% of the dataset was used for a two-layer feed-forward network training and the remaining 40% was used as testing dataset for system evaluation. Our approach demonstrated an overall classification accuracy of 93.13% (100% for A. spinicauda, B. similis and O. aruensis, 95% for T. barbatus, 90% for O. dissimilis and P. crassirostris, 85% for O. similis and T. forcipatus). Conclusions The methods presented in this study enable fast classification of copepods to the species level. Future studies should include more classes in the model, improving the selection of features, and reducing the time to capture the copepod images. PMID:26678287

  12. CYCLOPOID COPEPODS OF THE GENUS TUCCA (TUCCIDAE), PARASITIC ON DIOOONTID AND TETRAODONTID FISHES

    E-print Network

    of head, neck, trunk, and "tail." Head formed by fusion of cephalosome and first pedigerous segment lengthening in the head, but more lengthening than widening in the trunk. Some geographical variation in size: Atlantic type (with slightly bilobed lateral wings of head and less prominent posterior lobes in trunk

  13. Spatial and temporal variations of pelagic copepods in the North Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongju; Liu, Guangxing; Zhu, Yanzhong; Jiang, Qiang

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to analyze the spatial and temporal variations of the abundance and biodiversity of pelagic copepods and their relationships with the environmental factors in the North Yellow Sea (NYS). These variations were analyzed on the basis of the survey data of the NYS in four seasons from 2006 to 2007. A total of 31 copepod species that belong to 17 genera, 13 families and 4 orders were identified in the four seasons. Of these copepods, the species belonging to Calanoida is the most abundant component. The dominant species include Calanus sinicus, Centropages abdominalis, Paracalanus parvus, Acartia bifilosa, Oithona plumifera, and Corycaeus affinis. C. sinicus is the most important and widely distributed dominant species in all of the seasons. The dominant species have not shown any significant variation for the past 50 years. However, the richness of warm-water species increased. The abundance of copepods significantly varied among different seasons: the average abundance was higher in spring (608.2 ind m-3) and summer (385.1 ind m-3) than in winter (186.5 ind m-3) and autumn (128.0 ind m-3). Factor analyses showed a high correlation between the spatial distributions of dominant copepods and environmental parameters, and Chl-a was the most important factor that influenced the distribution of copepods. This research can provide the fundamental information related to zooplankton, especially pelagic copepods. This research is also beneficial for the long-term monitoring of zooplankton ecology in the NYS.

  14. Spatial and temporal variations of pelagic copepods in the North Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongju; Liu, Guangxing; Zhu, Yanzhong; Jiang, Qiang

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to analyze the spatial and temporal variations of the abundance and biodiversity of pelagic copepods and their relationships with the environmental factors in the North Yellow Sea (NYS). These variations were analyzed on the basis of the survey data of the NYS in four seasons from 2006 to 2007. A total of 31 copepod species that belong to 17 genera, 13 families and 4 orders were identified in the four seasons. Of these copepods, the species belonging to Calanoida is the most abundant component. The dominant species include Calanus sinicus, Centropages abdominalis, Paracalanus parvus, Acartia bifilosa, Oithona plumifera, and Corycaeus affinis. C. sinicus was the most important and widely distributed dominant species in all of the seasons. The dominant species have not shown any significant variation for the past 50 years. However, the richness of warm-waters species increased. The abundance of copepods significantly varied among different seasons: the average abundance was higher in spring (608.2 ind m-3) and summer (385.1 ind m-3) than in winter (186.5 ind m-3) and autumn (128.0 ind m-3). Factor analyses showed a high correlation between the spatial distributions of dominant copepods and environmental parameters, and Chl-a was the most important factor that influenced the distribution of copepods. This research can provide the fundamental information related to zooplankton, especially pelagic copepods. This research is also beneficial for the long-term monitoring of zooplankton ecology in the NYS.

  15. Using ZooImage automated system for the estimation of biovolume of copepods from the northern Argentine Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mauro, R.; Cepeda, G.; Capitanio, F.; Viñas, M. D.

    2011-08-01

    A total of 46 samples from coastal and shelf sectors from the northern Argentine Sea (34°-41° S) were digitized to compare the performance of the new ZooImage analysis method for copepod abundance and biovolume estimations. A training set of 1437 objects were used for automatic discrimination using a Random Forest algorithm with a general accuracy of 83.92%. A total of 11 taxa were automatically classified. Copepods were divided in three categories: Large calanoids, small calanoids and cyclopoids and identified with an accuracy of 83.15%, 79.5% and 85.7% respectively. The discriminant analysis revealed both the equivalent circular diameter (ECD) and the area were the best variables to differentiate the three copepod categories. Samples were previously quantified by optical methods in order to compare with automated results. Automated copepod biovolume measurements were estimated from individual calculations applying new ZooImage allometric parameters, and were compared with manual calculations using specific size/biovolume equations. It was demonstrated that ZooImage can potentially be used as a tool for abundance and biovolume estimations of calanoid and cyclopoid copepods and allow us to obtain results more rapidly by reducing the time lag involved using traditional measuring methods.

  16. Predation on the Invasive Copepod, Pseudodiaptomus forbesi, and Native Zooplankton in the Lower Columbia River: An Experimental Approach to Quantify Differences in Prey-Specific Feeding Rates

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jesse B.; Bollens, Stephen M.; Bishop, John G.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive planktonic crustaceans have become a prominent feature of aquatic communities worldwide, yet their effects on food webs are not well known. The Asian calanoid copepod, Pseudodiaptomus forbesi, introduced to the Columbia River Estuary approximately 15 years ago, now dominates the late-summer zooplankton community, but its use by native aquatic predators is unknown. We investigated whether three species of planktivorous fishes (chinook salmon, three-spined stickleback, and northern pikeminnow) and one species of mysid exhibited higher feeding rates on native copepods and cladocerans relative to P. forbesi by conducting `single-prey’ feeding experiments and, additionally, examined selectivity for prey types with `two-prey’ feeding experiments. In single-prey experiments individual predator species showed no difference in feeding rates on native cyclopoid copepods (Cyclopidae spp.) relative to invasive P. forbesi, though wild-collected predators exhibited higher feeding rates on cyclopoids when considered in aggregate. In two-prey experiments, chinook salmon and northern pikeminnow both strongly selected native cladocerans (Daphnia retrocurva) over P. forbesi, and moreover, northern pikeminnow selected native Cyclopidae spp. over P. forbesi. On the other hand, in two-prey experiments, chinook salmon, three-spined stickleback and mysids were non- selective with respect to feeding on native cyclopoid copepods versus P. forbesi. Our results indicate that all four native predators in the Columbia River Estuary can consume the invasive copepod, P. forbesi, but that some predators select for native zooplankton over P. forbesi, most likely due to one (or both) of two possible underlying casual mechanisms: 1) differential taxon-specific prey motility and escape responses (calanoids > cyclopoids > daphnids) or 2) the invasive status of the zooplankton prey resulting in naivety, and thus lower feeding rates, of native predators feeding on invasive prey. PMID:26618851

  17. Sensitivity to ocean acidification parallels natural pCO2 gradients experienced by Arctic copepods under winter sea ice.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ceri N; Brown, Kristina A; Edwards, Laura A; Cooper, Glenn; Findlay, Helen S

    2013-12-17

    The Arctic Ocean already experiences areas of low pH and high CO2, and it is expected to be most rapidly affected by future ocean acidification (OA). Copepods comprise the dominant Arctic zooplankton; hence, their responses to OA have important implications for Arctic ecosystems, yet there is little data on their current under-ice winter ecology on which to base future monitoring or make predictions about climate-induced change. Here, we report results from Arctic under-ice investigations of copepod natural distributions associated with late-winter carbonate chemistry environmental data and their response to manipulated pCO2 conditions (OA exposures). Our data reveal that species and life stage sensitivities to manipulated OA conditions were correlated with their vertical migration behavior and with their natural exposures to different pCO2 ranges. Vertically migrating adult Calanus spp. crossed a pCO2 range of >140 ?atm daily and showed only minor responses to manipulated high CO2. Oithona similis, which remained in the surface waters and experienced a pCO2 range of <75 ?atm, showed significantly reduced adult and nauplii survival in high CO2 experiments. These results support the relatively untested hypothesis that the natural range of pCO2 experienced by an organism determines its sensitivity to future OA and highlight that the globally important copepod species, Oithona spp., may be more sensitive to future high pCO2 conditions compared with the more widely studied larger copepods. PMID:24297880

  18. Sensitivity to ocean acidification parallels natural pCO2 gradients experienced by Arctic copepods under winter sea ice

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Ceri N.; Brown, Kristina A.; Edwards, Laura A.; Cooper, Glenn; Findlay, Helen S.

    2013-01-01

    The Arctic Ocean already experiences areas of low pH and high CO2, and it is expected to be most rapidly affected by future ocean acidification (OA). Copepods comprise the dominant Arctic zooplankton; hence, their responses to OA have important implications for Arctic ecosystems, yet there is little data on their current under-ice winter ecology on which to base future monitoring or make predictions about climate-induced change. Here, we report results from Arctic under-ice investigations of copepod natural distributions associated with late-winter carbonate chemistry environmental data and their response to manipulated pCO2 conditions (OA exposures). Our data reveal that species and life stage sensitivities to manipulated OA conditions were correlated with their vertical migration behavior and with their natural exposures to different pCO2 ranges. Vertically migrating adult Calanus spp. crossed a pCO2 range of >140 ?atm daily and showed only minor responses to manipulated high CO2. Oithona similis, which remained in the surface waters and experienced a pCO2 range of <75 ?atm, showed significantly reduced adult and nauplii survival in high CO2 experiments. These results support the relatively untested hypothesis that the natural range of pCO2 experienced by an organism determines its sensitivity to future OA and highlight that the globally important copepod species, Oithona spp., may be more sensitive to future high pCO2 conditions compared with the more widely studied larger copepods. PMID:24297880

  19. A new genus and species of cyclopoid (Crustacea, Copepoda, Cyclopinidae) from a coastal system in the Gulf of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Morales, Eduardo; Almeyda-Artigas, Roberto Javier

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A new, monotypic genus of the interstitial marine cyclopoid copepod family Cyclopinidae G.O. Sars, 1913 is described from male and female specimens collected at Laguna de Términos, a large coastal lagoon system in the southern Gulf of Mexico. Mexiclopina campechana gen. et sp. n. cannot be adequately placed in any extant genus within the family. It differs from other cyclopinid genera in having a unique combination of characters including: 1) absence of modified brush-like seta on the mandibular exopod; 2) maxillule exopod with stout setal elements and brush-like setae absent; 3) basis of mandible with one seta; 4) presence of a modified seta on endopod of fourth leg; 5) fifth leg exopod unsegmented, armed with three elements in the female and five in the male; 6) intercoxal sclerite of first swimming leg with two medial spiniform processes on distal margin. The new genus is monotypic and appears to be most closely related to Cyclopina Claus, 1863 and Heptnerina Ivanenko & Defaye, 2004; the new species was compared with species of Cyclopina and it resembles Cyclopina americana Herbst, 1982 and Cyclopina caissara Lotufo, 1994. This is the second record of a species of Cyclopinidae in Mexico and the first in the Gulf of Mexico; the number of cyclopinid species recorded from the Americas is now 13. PMID:26668545

  20. Ecology and role of benthic copepods in northern lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarvala, J.

    1998-06-01

    Freshwater benthic Harpacticoida consist of species capable of swimming, but mostly burrowing in organic sediments, and small, vermiform species that are poor swimmers and live in interstitial systems. Freshwater benthic Cyclopoida are either agile epibenthic and often relatively large herbivores, carnivores and omnivores, or small infaunal omnivores. Harpacticoids seem to have few, mainly invertebrate, predators, and consequently low mortality and long life span. These are evolutionarily linked to slow growth and low production to biomass ratio (typically 1-7 a -1). Cyclopoids are characterized by more rapid growth and higher production to biomass ratio (typically 3-13 a -1). Due to their active mode of life, they are preyed upon by fish and other predators, which results in high mortality and a short adult life span. Harpacticoid numbers and biomass may reach 250,000 ind/m 2 and 120 mgC/m 2. True benthic cyclopoids are usually much less abundant (up to 20,000 ind/m 2 and 9 mgC/m 2). Thus, although the quantitative importance of freshwater meiofauna as a whole may often be comparable to that of macrofauna, the few biomass and production data on benthic copepods suggest that at least harpacticoids have a minor role in the benthic food web of northern lakes.

  1. Prey detection and prey capture in copepod nauplii.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Eleonora; Andersen Borg, Christian Marc; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Copepod nauplii are either ambush feeders that feed on motile prey or they produce a feeding current that entrains prey cells. It is unclear how ambush and feeding-current feeding nauplii perceive and capture prey. Attack jumps in ambush feeding nauplii should not be feasible at low Reynolds numbers due to the thick viscous boundary layer surrounding the attacking nauplius. We use high-speed video to describe the detection and capture of phytoplankton prey by the nauplii of two ambush feeding species (Acartia tonsa and Oithona davisae) and by the nauplii of one feeding-current feeding species (Temora longicornis). We demonstrate that the ambush feeders both detect motile prey remotely. Prey detection elicits an attack jump, but the jump is not directly towards the prey, such as has been described for adult copepods. Rather, the nauplius jumps past the prey and sets up an intermittent feeding current that pulls in the prey from behind towards the mouth. The feeding-current feeding nauplius detects prey arriving in the feeding current but only when the prey is intercepted by the setae on the feeding appendages. This elicits an altered motion pattern of the feeding appendages that draws in the prey. PMID:23144712

  2. Copepod Response Behavior in Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krizan, Daniel

    The objective of this thesis is to determine copepod response to turbulence generated by obstacles in cross flow. Mainly, flow and copepod response downstream a square fractal grid is examined but experiments downstream a cylinder provides comparison. This is done by simultaneously measuring the copepods position and velocity using 3D-PTV in a measurement volume and measuring the two dimensional three component velocity vectors of the flow using stereo PIV. These measurements are done in a way that does not elicit copepod response. Tomographic PIV is done downstream the square fractal grid without copepods to gain volumetric velocity knowledge of the flow in the measurement volume. Copepods are known to execute sudden high speed jumps (or escapes) in response to sensed hydrodynamic signals. The fractal grid was shown to elicit copepod escape, specifically directly downstream with escape frequency decreasing further downstream where turbulence levels were much lower. It was found that at a slower freestream speed copepods exhibited jumps not in reaction to flow disturbances but to reorient themselves (cruise swimming). There was almost no copepod response in the wake of a cylinder, but copepods again exhibited cruise swimming behavior at a slower freestream speed. In regions with high maximum principal strain rate (MPSR) downstream of the fractal grid, copepods were observed to exhibit multiple escapes. Moreover, copepods were observed to jump towards regions of lower turbulence and against the freestream direction. From stereo PIV, instantaneous 2D MPSR values of less than 3s -1 were shown to create escape in 60% of copepod escapes analyzed. Finally, it was found that on average larger MPSR resulted in larger jumps from copepods.

  3. Toxicity of seaweed-synthesized silver nanoparticles against the filariasis vector Culex quinquefasciatus and its impact on predation efficiency of the cyclopoid crustacean Mesocyclops longisetus.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Kadarkarai; Benelli, Giovanni; Ayyappan, Suganya; Dinesh, Devakumar; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Nicoletti, Marcello; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Kumar, Palanisamy Mahesh; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Suresh, Udaiyan

    2015-06-01

    Nearly 1.4 billion people in 73 countries worldwide are threatened by lymphatic filariasis, a parasitic infection that leads to a disease commonly known as elephantiasis. Filariasis is vectored by mosquitoes, with special reference to the genus Culex. The main control tool against mosquito larvae is represented by treatments with organophosphates and insect growth regulators, with negative effects on human health and the environment. Recently, green-synthesized nanoparticles have been proposed as highly effective larvicidals against mosquito vectors. In this research, we attempted a reply to the following question: do green-synthesized nanoparticles affect predation rates of copepods against mosquito larvae? We proposed a novel method of seaweed-mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles using the frond extract of Caulerpa scalpelliformis. The toxicity of the seaweed extract and silver nanoparticles was assessed against the filarial vector Culex quinquefasciatus. Then, we evaluated the predatory efficiency of the cyclopoid crustacean Mesocyclops longisetus against larval instars of C. quinquefasciatus in a nanoparticle-contaminated water environment. Green-synthesized silver nanoparticles were characterized by UV-vis spectrum, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). In mosquitocidal assays, the LC?? values of the C. scalpelliformis extract against C. quinquefasciatus were 31.38 ppm (I), 46.49 ppm (II), 75.79 ppm (III), 102.26 ppm (IV), and 138.89 ppm (pupa), while LC?? of silver nanoparticles were 3.08 ppm, (I), 3.49 ppm (II), 4.64 ppm (III), 5.86 ppm (IV), and 7.33 ppm (pupa). The predatory efficiency of the copepod M. longisetus in the control treatment was 78 and 59% against I and II instar larvae of C. quinquefasciatus. In a nanoparticle-contaminated environment, predation efficiency was 84 and 63%, respectively. Predation was higher against first instar larvae over other instars. Overall, our study showed that seaweed-synthesized silver nanoparticles can be proposed in synergy with biological control agents against Culex larvae, since their use leads to little detrimental effects against aquatic predators, such as copepods. PMID:25782680

  4. Sensitivity and response time of three common Antarctic marine copepods to metal exposure.

    PubMed

    Zamora, Lara Marcus; King, Catherine K; Payne, Sarah J; Virtue, Patti

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the sensitivity of Antarctic marine organisms to metals is essential in order to manage environmental contamination risks. To date toxicity studies conducted on Antarctic marine species are limited. This study is the first to examine the acute effects of copper and cadmium on three common coastal Antarctic copepods: the calanoids Paralabidocera antarctica and Stephos longipes, and the cyclopoid Oncaea curvata. These copepods responded slowly to metal exposure (4-7d) emphasising that the exposure period of 48-96 h commonly used in toxicity tests with temperate and tropical species is not appropriate for polar organisms. We found that a longer 7 d exposure period was the minimum duration appropriate for Antarctic copepods. Although sensitivity to metal exposure varied between species, copper was more toxic than cadmium in all three species. P.antarctica was the most sensitive with 7d LC50 values for copper and cadmium of 20 ?g L(-1) and 237 ?g L(-1) respectively. Sensitivities to copper were similar for both O. curvata (LC50=64 ?g L(-1)) and S. longipes (LC50=56 ?g L(-1)), while O. curvata was more sensitive to cadmium (LC50=901 ?g L(-1)) than S. longipes (LC50=1250 ?g L(-1)). In comparison to copepods from lower latitudes, Antarctic copepods were more sensitive to copper and of similar sensitivity or less sensitive to cadmium. This study highlights the need for longer exposure periods in toxicity tests with slow responding Antarctic biota in order to generate relevant sensitivity data for inclusion in site-specific environmental quality guidelines for Antarctica. PMID:25128632

  5. The Kinematics of Swimming and Relocation Jumps in Copepod Nauplii

    PubMed Central

    Andersen Borg, Christian Marc; Bruno, Eleonora; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Copepod nauplii move in a world dominated by viscosity. Their swimming-by-jumping propulsion mode, with alternating power and recovery strokes of three pairs of cephalic appendages, is fundamentally different from the way other microplankters move. Protozoans move using cilia or flagella, and copepodites are equipped with highly specialized swimming legs. In some species the nauplius may also propel itself more slowly through the water by beating and rotating the appendages in a different, more complex pattern. We use high-speed video to describe jumping and swimming in nauplii of three species of pelagic copepods: Temora longicornis, Oithona davisae and Acartia tonsa. The kinematics of jumping is similar between the three species. Jumps result in a very erratic translation with no phase of passive coasting and the nauplii move backwards during recovery strokes. This is due to poorly synchronized recovery strokes and a low beat frequency relative to the coasting time scale. For the same reason, the propulsion efficiency of the nauplii is low. Given the universality of the nauplius body plan, it is surprising that they seem to be inefficient when jumping, which is different from the very efficient larger copepodites. A slow-swimming mode is only displayed by T. longicornis. In this mode, beating of the appendages results in the creation of a strong feeding current that is about 10 times faster than the average translation speed of the nauplius. The nauplius is thus essentially hovering when feeding, which results in a higher feeding efficiency than that of a nauplius cruising through the water. PMID:23115647

  6. Changes in lipid composition of copepods and Euphausia superba associated with diet and environmental conditions in the marginal ice zone, Bellingshausen Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cripps, G. C.; Hill, H. J.

    1998-08-01

    The effect of varying diet and environmental conditions at the Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ) on the fatty acid and hydrocarbon compositions of five species of copepod and krill, Euphausia superba, was investigated. Zooplankton at the MIZ experienced a range of conditions, from a low algal biomass (mainly flagellates) under pack-ice to a spring bloom dominated by diatoms in the open ocean. Principal Component Analysis classified the copepods into three dietary regimes: (i) omnivores or general algal feeders under the pack ice, (ii) dinoflagellate feeders, and (iii) diatom feeders in the open ocean. This classification was supported by the distribution of the diatom marker n-heneicosahexaene ( n-C 21:6) and a general indicator of herbivory, the isoprenoid pristane. The fatty acid and hydrocarbon composition reflected dietary preferences and availability as the season progressed. Of the copepods under the pack-ice, Oithona spp. was omnivorous whereas Calanus propinquus was feeding preferentially on flagellates. Metridia gerlachei fed on flagellates in all conditions, but also included diatoms in its diet during the bloom. Calanoides acutus and Rhincalanus gigas, which passed the winter in diapause, were feeding almost exclusively on diatoms in the open ocean. Euphausia superba, which were also mainly diatom feeders in the open ocean, were feeding on the sea-ice algae (diatoms) and suspended material from the water column (dinoflagellates) under the pack-ice.

  7. Spliced leader RNA trans-splicing discovered in copepods

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feifei; Xu, Donghui; Zhuang, Yunyun; Yi, Xiaoyan; Huang, Yousong; Chen, Hongju; Lin, Senjie; Campbell, David A.; Sturm, Nancy R.; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Copepods are one of the most abundant metazoans in the marine ecosystem, constituting a critical link in aquatic food webs and contributing significantly to the global carbon budget, yet molecular mechanisms of their gene expression are not well understood. Here we report the detection of spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing in calanoid copepods. We have examined nine species of wild-caught copepods from Jiaozhou Bay, China that represent the major families of the calanoids. All these species contained a common 46-nt SL (CopepodSL). We further determined the size of CopepodSL precursor RNA (slRNA; 108-158 nt) through genomic analysis and 3?-RACE technique, which was confirmed by RNA blot analysis. Structure modeling showed that the copepod slRNA folded into typical slRNA secondary structures. Using a CopepodSL-based primer set, we selectively enriched and sequenced copepod full-length cDNAs, which led to the characterization of copepod transcripts and the cataloging of the complete set of 79 eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (cRPs) for a single copepod species. We uncovered the SL trans-splicing in copepod natural populations, and demonstrated that CopepodSL was a sensitive and specific tool for copepod transcriptomic studies at both the individual and population levels and that it would be useful for metatranscriptomic analysis of copepods. PMID:26621068

  8. Spliced leader RNA trans-splicing discovered in copepods.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feifei; Xu, Donghui; Zhuang, Yunyun; Yi, Xiaoyan; Huang, Yousong; Chen, Hongju; Lin, Senjie; Campbell, David A; Sturm, Nancy R; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan

    2015-01-01

    Copepods are one of the most abundant metazoans in the marine ecosystem, constituting a critical link in aquatic food webs and contributing significantly to the global carbon budget, yet molecular mechanisms of their gene expression are not well understood. Here we report the detection of spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing in calanoid copepods. We have examined nine species of wild-caught copepods from Jiaozhou Bay, China that represent the major families of the calanoids. All these species contained a common 46-nt SL (CopepodSL). We further determined the size of CopepodSL precursor RNA (slRNA; 108-158 nt) through genomic analysis and 3'-RACE technique, which was confirmed by RNA blot analysis. Structure modeling showed that the copepod slRNA folded into typical slRNA secondary structures. Using a CopepodSL-based primer set, we selectively enriched and sequenced copepod full-length cDNAs, which led to the characterization of copepod transcripts and the cataloging of the complete set of 79 eukaryotic cytoplasmic ribosomal proteins (cRPs) for a single copepod species. We uncovered the SL trans-splicing in copepod natural populations, and demonstrated that CopepodSL was a sensitive and specific tool for copepod transcriptomic studies at both the individual and population levels and that it would be useful for metatranscriptomic analysis of copepods. PMID:26621068

  9. Algal Toxins Alter Copepod Feeding Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jiarong; Talapatra, Siddharth; Katz, Joseph; Tester, Patricia A.; Waggett, Rebecca J.; Place, Allen R.

    2012-01-01

    Using digital holographic cinematography, we quantify and compare the feeding behavior of free-swimming copepods, Acartia tonsa, on nutritional prey (Storeatula major) to that occurring during exposure to toxic and non-toxic strains of Karenia brevis and Karlodinium veneficum. These two harmful algal species produce polyketide toxins with different modes of action and potency. We distinguish between two different beating modes of the copepod’s feeding appendages–a “sampling beating” that has short durations (<100 ms) and involves little fluid entrainment and a longer duration “grazing beating” that persists up to 1200 ms and generates feeding currents. The durations of both beating modes have log-normal distributions. Without prey, A. tonsa only samples the environment at low frequency. Upon introduction of non-toxic food, it increases its sampling time moderately and the grazing period substantially. On mono algal diets for either of the toxic dinoflagellates, sampling time fraction is high but the grazing is very limited. A. tonsa demonstrates aversion to both toxic algal species. In mixtures of S. major and the neurotoxin producing K. brevis, sampling and grazing diminish rapidly, presumably due to neurological effects of consuming brevetoxins while trying to feed on S. major. In contrast, on mixtures of cytotoxin producing K. veneficum, both behavioral modes persist, indicating that intake of karlotoxins does not immediately inhibit the copepod’s grazing behavior. These findings add critical insight into how these algal toxins may influence the copepod’s feeding behavior, and suggest how some harmful algal species may alter top-down control exerted by grazers like copepods. PMID:22629336

  10. Annual cycle in abundance, distribution, and size in relation to hydrography of important copepod species in the western Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashjian, Carin J.; Campbell, Robert G.; Welch, Harold E.; Butler, Mari; Van Keuren, Donna

    2003-10-01

    A yearlong study of the zooplankton biomass and the abundance, vertical distribution, life stage proportions, and body size and condition for five target copepod species ( Calanus glacialis, C. hyperboreus, Metridia longa, Microcalanus pygmaeus, Oithona similis) was conducted from October 1997 to October 1998 in the Western Arctic Ocean. The research was staged from Ice Station SHEBA that drifted from Canadian Basin over the Northwind Ridge and Chukchi Plateau and back over the Basin during this period. Four hydrographic regimes were surveyed during the period of the study. Zooplankton biomass was least over the basin during the fall and winter and greatest over the Chukchi Plateau during summer, with most biomass in the 200-1500 m depth interval except during summer when greatest biomass was present in the upper 200 m. The five copepod species followed two general life history strategies: (1) sustained reproduction with all life stages present throughout the year and constant depth distribution ( M. longa, M. pygmaeus, O. similis) and (2) pulsed reproduction with overlapping cohorts present and ontogenetic redistribution of preferred depths through the year ( C. glacialis, C. hyperboreus). Body size and condition did not demonstrate consistent temporal or regional patterns. Based on population age structure, both C. hyperboreus and C. glacialis were reproducing in the Arctic Ocean. However, extremely low abundances of C. glacialis suggested that this species may not be self-sustaining in the Arctic Ocean. Plankton biomass was consistent with that observed in recent studies and supported an emerging paradigm of a more productive Arctic Ocean than traditionally believed.

  11. Molecular Systematic of Three Species of Oithona (Copepoda, Cyclopoida) from the Atlantic Ocean: Comparative Analysis Using 28S rDNA

    PubMed Central

    Cepeda, Georgina D.; Blanco-Bercial, Leocadio; Bucklin, Ann; Berón, Corina M.; Viñas, María D.

    2012-01-01

    Species of Oithona (Copepoda, Cyclopoida) are highly abundant, ecologically important, and widely distributed throughout the world oceans. Although there are valid and detailed descriptions of the species, routine species identifications remain challenging due to their small size, subtle morphological diagnostic traits, and the description of geographic forms or varieties. This study examined three species of Oithona (O. similis, O. atlantica and O. nana) occurring in the Argentine sector of the South Atlantic Ocean based on DNA sequence variation of a 575 base-pair region of 28S rDNA, with comparative analysis of these species from other North and South Atlantic regions. DNA sequence variation clearly resolved and discriminated the species, and revealed low levels of intraspecific variation among North and South Atlantic populations of each species. The 28S rDNA region was thus shown to provide an accurate and reliable means of identifying the species throughout the sampled domain. Analysis of 28S rDNA variation for additional species collected throughout the global ocean will be useful to accurately characterize biogeographical distributions of the species and to examine phylogenetic relationships among them. PMID:22558245

  12. Interactions between calanoid copepod hosts and their associated microbiota

    E-print Network

    Almada, Amalia Aruda

    2015-01-01

    Zooplankton, such as copepods, are highly abundant environmental reservoirs of many bacterial pathogens. Although copepods are known to support diverse and productive bacterial communities, little is understood about whether ...

  13. Seasonal dynamics of zooplankton in Columbia–Snake River reservoirs,with special emphasis on the invasive copepod Pseudodiaptomus forbesi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emerson, Joshua E; Bollens, Stephen M; Counihan, Timothy D.

    2014-01-01

    The Asian copepod Pseudodiaptomus forbesi has recently become established in the Columbia River. However, little is known about its ecology and effects on invaded ecosystems. We undertook a 2-year (July 2009 to June 2011) field study of the mesozooplankton in four reservoirs in the Columbia and Snake Rivers, with emphasis on the relation of the seasonal variation in distribution and abundance of P. forbesi to environmental variables. Pseudodiaptomus forbesi was abundant in three reservoirs; the zooplankton community of the fourth reservoir contained no known non-indigenous taxa. The composition and seasonal succession of zooplankton were similar in the three invaded reservoirs: a bloom of rotifers occurred in spring, native cyclopoid and cladoceran species peaked in abundance in summer, and P. forbesi was most abundant in late summer and autumn. In the uninvaded reservoir, total zooplankton abundance was very low year-round. Multivariate ordination indicated that temperature and dissolved oxygen were strongly associated with zooplankton community structure, with P. forbesi appearing to exhibit a single generation per year . The broad distribution and high abundance of P. forbesi in the Columbia–Snake River System could result in ecosystem level effects in areas intensively managed to improve conditions for salmon and other commercially and culturally important fish species. 

  14. Cymbopogon citratus-synthesized gold nanoparticles boost the predation efficiency of copepod Mesocyclops aspericornis against malaria and dengue mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Murugan, Kadarkarai; Benelli, Giovanni; Panneerselvam, Chellasamy; Subramaniam, Jayapal; Jeyalalitha, Tirupathi; Dinesh, Devakumar; Nicoletti, Marcello; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Suresh, Udaiyan; Madhiyazhagan, Pari

    2015-06-01

    Plant-borne compounds can be employed to synthesize mosquitocidal nanoparticles that are effective at low doses. However, how they affect the activity of mosquito predators in the aquatic environment is unknown. In this study, we synthesized gold nanoparticles (AuN) using the leaf extract of Cymbopogon citratus, which acted as a reducing and capping agent. AuN were characterized by a variety of biophysical methods and sorted for size in order to confirm structural integrity. C. citratus extract and biosynthesized AuN were tested against larvae and pupae of the malaria vector Anopheles stephensi and the dengue vector Aedes aegypti. LC?? of C. citratus extract ranged from 219.32?ppm to 471.36?ppm. LC?? of AuN ranged from 18.80?ppm to 41.52?ppm. In laboratory, the predatory efficiency of the cyclopoid crustacean Mesocyclops aspericornis against A. stephensi larvae was 26.8% (larva I) and 17% (larva II), while against A. aegypti was 56% (I) and 35.1% (II). Predation against late-instar larvae was minimal. In AuN-contaminated environment,predation efficiency against A. stephensi was 45.6% (I) and 26.7% (II), while against A. aegypti was 77.3% (I) and 51.6% (II). Overall, low doses of AuN may help to boost the control of Anopheles and Aedes larval populations in copepod-based control programs. PMID:25819295

  15. Choreographed swimming of copepod nauplii.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Petra H; Takagi, Daisuke; Hartline, Daniel K

    2015-11-01

    Small metazoan paddlers, such as crustacean larvae (nauplii), are abundant, ecologically important and active swimmers, which depend on exploiting viscous forces for locomotion. The physics of micropaddling at low Reynolds number was investigated using a model of swimming based on slender-body theory for Stokes flow. Locomotion of nauplii of the copepod Bestiolina similis was quantified from high-speed video images to obtain precise measurements of appendage movements and the resulting displacement of the body. The kinematic and morphological data served as inputs to the model, which predicted the displacement in good agreement with observations. The results of interest did not depend sensitively on the parameters within the error of measurement. Model tests revealed that the commonly attributed mechanism of 'feathering' appendages during return strokes accounts for only part of the displacement. As important for effective paddling at low Reynolds number is the ability to generate a metachronal sequence of power strokes in combination with synchronous return strokes of appendages. The effect of feathering together with a synchronous return stroke is greater than the sum of each factor individually. The model serves as a foundation for future exploration of micropaddlers swimming at intermediate Reynolds number where both viscous and inertial forces are important. PMID:26490629

  16. Feeding, respiration and egg production rates of copepods during austral spring in the Indian sector of the Antarctic Ocean: role of the zooplankton community in carbon transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayzaud, P.; Razouls, S.; Errhif, A.; Tirelli, V.; Labat, J. P.

    2002-06-01

    During the austral spring period of 1996, the composition, age structure and physiological activity of zooplankton were studied in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean. Zooplankton biomass ranged from less than 1 g m -2 in the Northern Polar Front Zone (PFZ) to 16 g m -2 near the ice edge in the Seasonal Ice Zone (SIZ). Zooplankton communities were dominated by copepods associated with euphausiid larvae. At all stations, species composition of copepods was dominated in number by small species ( Oithona spp, Ctenocalanus citer). Northern stations were characterized by Calanus simillimus and Metridia lucens. Southern stations showed high abundance of Calanoides acutus, Calanus propinquus and Rhincalanus gigas. Stage distribution was analyzed for the four main contributors to the copepod biomass ( Calanus simillimus, Calanoides acutus, Calanus propinquus and Rhincalanus gigas). Gut pigment content and gut transit time showed a strong day-night periodicity. Gut transit times were usually high with values ranging from 1 h ( Calanus propinquus) to 1 h 30 min ( Rhincalanus gigas). Maximum ingestion rates were recorded for Calanus propinquus and Pleuromamma robusta. Respiration rates were measured for 13 species of copepods and varied from 0.5-0.6 ?l O 2 ind -1 day -1 for smaller species to 20-62 ?l O 2 ind -1 day -1 for the larger ones. The impact of the copepod population was estimated from the CO 2 produced per m -2 and per day, which showed a release of 4.2-4.5 mmol. It corresponded to a minimum ingestion of 41.4% in the Permanent Open Ocean Zone (POOZ) and 22.6% in the SIZ of the daily primary production. The budget between carbon ingestion and respiratory requirements appears to be nearly balanced, but with the exception of Calanus propinquus, cannot accommodate the addition of the cost of egg production, which only partially relies on food intake. During austral spring, the population studied appeared to rely mostly on phytoplankton as food, though additional use of internal energy reserves and intake of protozoan cells was likely needed to fully balance the energy budget.

  17. Copepods and fishes in the Brazilian Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatcher, Vernon E.

    1998-06-01

    The Amazon basin comprises the largest river ecosystem in the world (7 million km 2) with annual high and low water peaks and a constant temperature near 29°C. Some 2000 fish species and 40 species of free-living copepods are known to occur in Amazonia. The free-living forms serve as food for most larval fishes and some adults, but they also transmit several parasites including representatives of the nematode family Camallanidae. About three dozen species of parasitic copepods have been described from the Brazilian Amazon. Females of Amazonian parasitic copepods are found on skin, gill filaments, gill rakers or within the nasal fossae. Parasitic copepods are found on fishes that are from a few millimeters long up to those over 2 m in length and they are usually quite host specific. All have body pigmentation in different patterns and colors (frequently blues, such as cerulean, cobalt, spectrum, smalt or campanula). It is suggested that the coloration serves to attract specific host fish. Copepods have evolved adaptations for attachment and feeding, especially in the second antennae and endopods. Examples of progenesis, phoresis and commensalism are shown. Some species produce pathology such as a tourniquet effect, hyperplasia, blood loss and anemia, and can kill fishes by limiting their respiration.

  18. The microbiome of North Sea copepods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdts, G.; Brandt, P.; Kreisel, K.; Boersma, M.; Schoo, K. L.; Wichels, A.

    2013-12-01

    Copepods can be associated with different kinds and different numbers of bacteria. This was already shown in the past with culture-dependent microbial methods or microscopy and more recently by using molecular tools. In our present study, we investigated the bacterial community of four frequently occurring copepod species, Acartia sp., Temora longicornis, Centropages sp. and Calanus helgolandicus from Helgoland Roads (North Sea) over a period of 2 years using DGGE (denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis) and subsequent sequencing of 16S-rDNA fragments. To complement the PCR-DGGE analyses, clone libraries of copepod samples from June 2007 to 208 were generated. Based on the DGGE banding patterns of the two years survey, we found no significant differences between the communities of distinct copepod species, nor did we find any seasonality. Overall, we identified 67 phylotypes (>97 % similarity) falling into the bacterial phyla of Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes and Proteobacteria. The most abundant phylotypes were affiliated to the Alphaproteobacteria. In comparison with PCR-DGGE and clone libraries, phylotypes of the Gammaproteobacteria dominated the clone libraries, whereas Alphaproteobacteria were most abundant in the PCR-DGGE analyses.

  19. Ocean acidification challenges copepod reproductive plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vehmaa, A.; Almén, A.-K.; Brutemark, A.; Paul, A.; Riebesell, U.; Furuhagen, S.; Engström-Öst, J.

    2015-11-01

    Ocean acidification is challenging phenotypic plasticity of individuals and populations. Calanoid copepods (zooplankton) are shown to be fairly plastic against altered pH conditions, and laboratory studies indicate that transgenerational effects are one mechanism behind this plasticity. We studied phenotypic plasticity of the copepod Acartia bifilosa in the course of a pelagic, large-volume mesocosm study that was conducted to investigate ecosystem and biogeochemical responses to ocean acidification. We measured copepod egg production rate, egg hatching success, adult female size and adult female antioxidant capacity (ORAC) as a function of acidification (fCO2 ~ 365-1231 ?atm), and as a function of quantity and quality of their diet. We used an egg transplant experiment to reveal if transgenerational effects can alleviate the possible negative effects of ocean acidification on offspring development. We found significant negative effects of ocean acidification on adult female copepod size and egg hatching success. In addition, we found a threshold of fCO2 concentration (~ 1000 ?atm), above which adaptive maternal effects cannot alleviate the negative effects of acidification on egg hatching and nauplii development. We did not find support for the hypothesis that insufficient food quantity (total particulate carbon ~ 55 ?m) or quality (C : N) weakens the transgenerational effects. However, females with high ORAC produced eggs with high hatching success. Overall, these results indicate that A. bifilosa could be affected by projected near future CO2 levels.

  20. Algal toxins alter copepod feeding behavior.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jiarong; Talapatra, Siddharth; Katz, Joseph; Tester, Patricia A; Waggett, Rebecca J; Place, Allen R

    2012-01-01

    Using digital holographic cinematography, we quantify and compare the feeding behavior of free-swimming copepods, Acartia tonsa, on nutritional prey (Storeatula major) to that occurring during exposure to toxic and non-toxic strains of Karenia brevis and Karlodinium veneficum. These two harmful algal species produce polyketide toxins with different modes of action and potency. We distinguish between two different beating modes of the copepod's feeding appendages-a "sampling beating" that has short durations (<100 ms) and involves little fluid entrainment and a longer duration "grazing beating" that persists up to 1200 ms and generates feeding currents. The durations of both beating modes have log-normal distributions. Without prey, A. tonsa only samples the environment at low frequency. Upon introduction of non-toxic food, it increases its sampling time moderately and the grazing period substantially. On mono algal diets for either of the toxic dinoflagellates, sampling time fraction is high but the grazing is very limited. A. tonsa demonstrates aversion to both toxic algal species. In mixtures of S. major and the neurotoxin producing K. brevis, sampling and grazing diminish rapidly, presumably due to neurological effects of consuming brevetoxins while trying to feed on S. major. In contrast, on mixtures of cytotoxin producing K. veneficum, both behavioral modes persist, indicating that intake of karlotoxins does not immediately inhibit the copepod's grazing behavior. These findings add critical insight into how these algal toxins may influence the copepod's feeding behavior, and suggest how some harmful algal species may alter top-down control exerted by grazers like copepods. PMID:22629336

  1. Bacteria Associated with the Surface and Gut of Marine Copepods

    PubMed Central

    Sochard, M. R.; Wilson, D. F.; Austin, B.; Colwell, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    Little is known about the nature of bacteria associated with the surface and gut of marine copepods, either in laboratory-reared animals or in the natural environment. Nor is it known whether such animals possess a gut flora. The present report deals with studies of microorganisms isolated from healthy, laboratory-reared copepods of the species Acartia tonsa Dana, from several species of wild copepods collected from a marine or estuarine environment, and from laboratory dishes containing moribund copepods. Evidence for a unique gut flora in laboratory-reared animals is presented; the predominant bacteria were represented by the genus Vibrio. Other organisms such as Pseudomonas and Cytophaga were found less abundantly associated with the copepods and not specifically associated with the gut. Images PMID:16345368

  2. Copepod Trajectory Characteristics in Thin Layers of Toxic Algal Exudates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, D. R.; True, A. C.; Weissburg, M. J.; Yen, J.

    2013-11-01

    Recently documented thin layers of toxic phytoplankton (``cryptic blooms'') are modeled in a custom flume system for copepod behavioral assays. Planar laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements quantify the spatiotemporal structure of the chemical layers ensuring a close match to in situ bloom conditions and allowing for quantification of threshold dissolved toxin levels that induce behavioral responses. Assays with the copepods Acartia tonsa (hop-sinker) and Temora longicornis (cruiser) in thin layers of toxic exudates from the common dinoflagellate Karenia brevis (cell equivalent ~ 1 - 10,000 cells/mL) examine the effects of dissolved toxic compounds and copepod species on swimming trajectory characteristics. Computation of parameters such as swimming speed and the fractal dimension of the two-dimensional trajectory (F2D) allows for statistical evaluation of copepod behavioral responses to dissolved toxic compounds associated with harmful algal blooms (HABs). Changes in copepod swimming behavior caused by toxic compounds can significantly influence predator, prey, and mate encounter rates by altering the fracticality (``diffuseness'' or ``volume-fillingness'') of a copepod's trajectory. As trophic mediators linking primary producers and higher trophic levels, copepods can significantly influence HAB dynamics and modulate large scale ecological effects through their behavioral interactions with toxic blooms.

  3. Interannual variation in diapausing copepods and associated water masses in a continental shelf basin, and implications for copepod buoyancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Kimberley T. A.; Taggart, Christopher T.; Smedbol, R. Kent

    2015-11-01

    Oceanographic surveys were conducted in Roseway Basin, western Scotian Shelf, during late-summer from 2007 through 2009 to measure the magnitude of interannual variation in the spatial distribution of diapausing copepods Calanus finmarchicus and C. hyperboreus and associated water mass characteristics. Calanus spp. abundance, energy density and hydrography were measured at depths > 50 m along transects using a Towed Underwater Biological Sampling System equipped with an Optical Plankton Counter (OPC) and a conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) sensor, as well as at fixed stations using a Biological Net and Environmental Sampling System equipped with nets, OPC and CTD. Water mass density and in some cases salinity explained variation in the deep copepod layer across both time and space, whereas temperature did not. Water mass density, copepod energy density and thickness of the copepod layer were statistically lower during 2008 than 2007 or 2009. The copepod layer was absent from the western Basin margin during 2008 where low density continental water resided that year, whereas during 2007 and 2009 higher density continental slope water and copepods were each present along the western margin. Our results suggest that water mass density is an important characteristic defining the spatial and interannual ecology of the deep copepod layer in Roseway Basin. The 26 ?t isopycnal may be a lower density limit to diapausing Calanus spp. habitat on continental shelves with shallow bathymetry, that helps the animals maintain neutral buoyancy during diapause.

  4. Novel Organization and Development of Copepod Myelin. II. Nonglial Origin

    E-print Network

    Hartline, Daniel K.

    in vertebrates, oligochaete annelids, penaeid and caridean shrimp, and calanoid copepods. In the first three, also termed ``Schwann cells,'' was shown for an oligochaete by Hama (1959), for a penaeid shrimp

  5. Physical controls on copepod aggregations in the Gulf of Maine

    E-print Network

    Woods, Nicholas W

    2013-01-01

    This thesis explores the role that the circulation in the Gulf of Maine (GOM) plays in determining the distribution of dense aggregations of copepods. These aggregations are an important part of the marine ecosystem, ...

  6. Differential dormancy of co-occurring copepods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohman, Mark D.; Drits, Aleksandr V.; Elizabeth Clarke, M.; Plourde, Stéphane

    1998-08-01

    Four species of planktonic calanoid copepods that co-occur in the California Current System ( Eucalanus californicus Johnson, Rhincalanus nasutus Giesbrecht, Calanus pacificus californicus Brodsky, and Metridia pacifica Brodsky) were investigated for evidence of seasonal dormancy in the San Diego Trough. Indices used to differentiate actively growing from dormant animals included developmental stage structure and vertical distribution; activity of aerobic metabolic enzymes (Citrate Synthase and the Electron Transfer System complex); investment in depot lipids (wax esters and triacylglycerols); in situ grazing activity from gut fluorescence; and egg production rates in simulated in situ conditions. None of the 4 species exhibited a canonical calanoid pattern of winter dormancy - i.e., synchronous developmental arrest as copepodid stage V, descent into deep waters, reduced metabolism, and lack of winter reproduction. Instead, Calanus pacificus californicus has a biphasic life history in this region, with an actively reproducing segment of the population in surface waters overlying a deep dormant segment in winter. Eucalanus californicus is dormant as both adult females and copepodid V's, although winter females respond relatively rapidly to elevated food and temperature conditions; they begin feeding and producing eggs within 2-3 days. Rhincalanus nasutus appears to enter dormancy as adult females, although the evidence is equivocal. Metridia pacifica shows no evidence of dormancy, with sustained active feeding, diel vertical migration behavior, and elevated activity of metabolic enzymes in December as well as in June. The four species also differ markedly in water content, classes of storage lipids, and specific activity of Citrate Synthase. These results suggest that copepod dormancy traits and structural composition reflect diverse adaptations to regional environmental conditions rather than a uniform, canonical series of traits that remain invariant among taxa and fixed across a species' range. Such interspecific and regional differences in life history traits need to be incorporated in models simulating Eastern Boundary Current pelagic ecosystem dynamics.

  7. Copepod Population-Specific Response to a Toxic Diatom Diet

    PubMed Central

    Lauritano, Chiara; Carotenuto, Ylenia; Miralto, Antonio; Procaccini, Gabriele; Ianora, Adrianna

    2012-01-01

    Diatoms are key phytoplankton organisms and one of the main primary producers in aquatic ecosystems. However, many diatom species produce a series of secondary metabolites, collectively termed oxylipins, that disrupt development in the offspring of grazers, such as copepods, that feed on these unicellular algae. We hypothesized that different populations of copepods may deal differently with the same oxylipin-producing diatom diet. Here we provide comparative studies of expression level analyses of selected genes of interest for three Calanus helgolandicus populations (North Sea, Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea) exposed to the same strain of the oxylipin-producing diatom Skeletonema marinoi using as control algae the flagellate Rhodomonas baltica. Expression levels of detoxification enzymes and stress proteins (e.g. glutathione S-transferase, glutathione synthase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, aldehyde dehydrogenases and heat shock proteins) and proteins involved in apoptosis regulation and cell cycle progression were analyzed in copepods after both 24 and 48 hours of feeding on the diatom or on a control diet. Strong differences occurred among copepod populations, with the Mediterranean population of C. helgolandicus being more susceptible to the toxic diet compared to the others. This study opens new perspectives for understanding copepod population-specific responses to diatom toxins and may help in underpinning the cellular mechanisms underlying copepod toxicity during diatom blooms. PMID:23056617

  8. Copepods' Response to Burgers' Vortex: Deconstructing Interactions of Copepods with Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Webster, D R; Young, D L; Yen, J

    2015-10-01

    This study examined the behavioral response of two marine copepods, Acartia tonsa and Temora longicornis, to a Burgers' vortex intended to mimic the characteristics of a turbulent vortex that a copepod is likely to encounter in the coastal or near-surface zone. Behavioral assays of copepods were conducted for two vortices that correspond to turbulent conditions with mean dissipation rates of turbulence of 0.009 and 0.096 cm(2) s(-3) (denoted turbulence level 2 and level 3, respectively). In particular, the Burgers' vortex parameters (i.e., circulation and rate of axial strain rate) were specified to match a vortex corresponding to the median rate of dissipation due to viscosity for each target level of turbulence. Three-dimensional trajectories were quantified for analysis of swimming kinematics and response to hydrodynamic cues. Acartia tonsa did not significantly respond to the vortex corresponding to turbulence level 2. In contrast, A. tonsa significantly altered their swimming behavior in the turbulence-level-3 vortex, including increased relative speed of swimming, angle of alignment of the trajectory with the axis of the vortex, ratio of net-to-gross displacement, and acceleration during escape, along with decreased turn frequency (relative to stagnant control conditions). Further, the location of A. tonsa escapes was preferentially in the core of the stronger vortex, indicating that the hydrodynamic cue triggering the distinctive escape behavior was vorticity. In contrast, T. longicornis did not reveal a behavioral response to either the turbulence level 2 or the level 3 vortex. PMID:26002348

  9. Histological Characteristics of Abnormal Protrusions on Copepods from Lake Michigan, USA

    E-print Network

    314 Histological Characteristics of Abnormal Protrusions on Copepods from Lake Michigan, USA. Cavaletto and Suzanne S. Tyler (2004) Histological characteristics of abnormal protrusions on copepods from histologically identified as ellobiopsid parasites. Other protrusions had a histology that suggested ellobiopsid

  10. Hydrocarbon Contamination Decreases Mating Success in a Marine Planktonic Copepod

    PubMed Central

    Seuront, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The mating behavior and the mating success of copepods rely on chemoreception to locate and track a sexual partner. However, the potential impact of the water-soluble fraction of hydrocarbons on these aspects of copepod reproduction has never been tested despite the widely acknowledged acute chemosensory abilities of copepods. I examined whether three concentrations of the water-soluble fraction of diesel oil (0.01%, 0.1% and 1%) impacts (i) the swimming behavior of both adult males and females of the widespread calanoid copepod Temora longcornis, and (ii) the ability of males to locate, track and mate with females. The three concentrations of the water-soluble fraction of diesel oil (WSF) significantly and non-significantly affect female and male swimming velocities, respectively. In contrast, both the complexity of male and female swimming paths significantly decreased with increasing WSF concentrations, hence suggesting a sex-specific sensitivity to WSF contaminated seawater. In addition, the three WSF concentrations impacted both T. longicornis mating behavior and mating success. Specifically, the ability of males to detect female pheromone trails, to accurately follow trails and to successfully track a female significantly decreased with increasing WSF concentrations. This led to a significant decrease in contact and capture rates from control to WSF contaminated seawater. These results indicate that hydrocarbon contamination of seawater decreases the ability of male copepods to detect and track a female, hence suggest an overall impact on population fitness and dynamics. PMID:22053187

  11. What Copepods Can Tell us About Epikarst Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culver, D. C.; Pipan, T.

    2008-05-01

    Epikarst, the skin of karst, is a complex structure with numerous cracks, fissures, and solution cavities. It is a poorly integrated aquifer in both horizontal and vertical dimensions. Nearly the only way to investigate epikarst water has been by collecting water dripping out of epikarst. Even drips a few meters away often have significant differences in water chemistry. Yes there is also significant lateral transmission of water as evidence by lateral movement of contaminant spills in epikarst. A diverse copepod fauna occurs in epikarst, and because of their minute size are in general at the mercy of water currents. We investigated whether they could be used as natural tracers to delineate subsurface drainage basins. We determined the distributions of 27 copepod species in 35 drips in four Slovenian caves (Dimnice, Postojna Planina Cave System, Skocjanske Jame, Supanova Jama) and ten species from 13 drips in one U.S. cave (Organ Cave, W.Va.). A significant fraction of the copepod species found (9 in Slovenian and 3 in West Virginia) occurred over a maximum linear extent of 100 m. These and other localized distributions probably resulted from colonization of epikarst by an ancestral surface population in a single location, with subsequent lateral spread in the direction of epikarst flow. This suggests that the distribution of copepods could potentially be used to trace major flow paths in epikarst without the need for the injection of dyes or other tracers. The genetic structure of copepod metapopulations is also of considerable interest.

  12. Rapid Enzymatic Response to Compensate UV Radiation in Copepods

    PubMed Central

    Souza, María Sol; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Hylander, Samuel; Modenutti, Beatriz; Balseiro, Esteban

    2012-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) causes physical damage to DNA, carboxylation of proteins and peroxidation of lipids in copepod crustaceans, ubiquitous and abundant secondary producers in most aquatic ecosystems. Copepod adaptations for long duration exposures include changes in behaviour, changes in pigmentation and ultimately changes in morphology. Adaptations to short-term exposures are little studied. Here we show that short-duration exposure to UVR causes the freshwater calanoid copepod, Eudiaptomus gracilis, to rapidly activate production of enzymes that prevent widespread collateral peroxidation (glutathione S-transferase, GST), that regulate apoptosis cell death (Caspase-3, Casp-3), and that facilitate neurotransmissions (cholinesterase-ChE). None of these enzyme systems is alone sufficient, but they act in concert to reduce the stress level of the organism. The interplay among enzymatic responses provides useful information on how organisms respond to environmental stressors acting on short time scales. PMID:22384136

  13. Interactions between Benthic Copepods, Bacteria and Diatoms Promote Nitrogen Retention in Intertidal Marine Sediments

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Willem; Heylen, Kim; Sabbe, Koen; Willems, Anne; De Troch, Marleen

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims at evaluating the impact of diatoms and copepods on microbial processes mediating nitrate removal in fine-grained intertidal sediments. More specifically, we studied the interactions between copepods, diatoms and bacteria in relation to their effects on nitrate reduction and denitrification. Microcosms containing defaunated marine sediments were subjected to different treatments: an excess of nitrate, copepods, diatoms (Navicula sp.), a combination of copepods and diatoms, and spent medium from copepods. The microcosms were incubated for seven and a half days, after which nutrient concentrations and denitrification potential were measured. Ammonium concentrations were highest in the treatments with copepods or their spent medium, whilst denitrification potential was lowest in these treatments, suggesting that copepods enhance dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium over denitrification. We hypothesize that this is an indirect effect, by providing extra carbon for the bacterial community through the copepods' excretion products, thus changing the C/N ratio in favour of dissimilatory nitrate reduction. Diatoms alone had no effect on the nitrogen fluxes, but they did enhance the effect of copepods, possibly by influencing the quantity and quality of the copepods' excretion products. Our results show that small-scale biological interactions between bacteria, copepods and diatoms can have an important impact on denitrification and hence sediment nitrogen fluxes. PMID:25360602

  14. Interactions between benthic copepods, bacteria and diatoms promote nitrogen retention in intertidal marine sediments.

    PubMed

    Stock, Willem; Heylen, Kim; Sabbe, Koen; Willems, Anne; De Troch, Marleen

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims at evaluating the impact of diatoms and copepods on microbial processes mediating nitrate removal in fine-grained intertidal sediments. More specifically, we studied the interactions between copepods, diatoms and bacteria in relation to their effects on nitrate reduction and denitrification. Microcosms containing defaunated marine sediments were subjected to different treatments: an excess of nitrate, copepods, diatoms (Navicula sp.), a combination of copepods and diatoms, and spent medium from copepods. The microcosms were incubated for seven and a half days, after which nutrient concentrations and denitrification potential were measured. Ammonium concentrations were highest in the treatments with copepods or their spent medium, whilst denitrification potential was lowest in these treatments, suggesting that copepods enhance dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium over denitrification. We hypothesize that this is an indirect effect, by providing extra carbon for the bacterial community through the copepods' excretion products, thus changing the C/N ratio in favour of dissimilatory nitrate reduction. Diatoms alone had no effect on the nitrogen fluxes, but they did enhance the effect of copepods, possibly by influencing the quantity and quality of the copepods' excretion products. Our results show that small-scale biological interactions between bacteria, copepods and diatoms can have an important impact on denitrification and hence sediment nitrogen fluxes. PMID:25360602

  15. Nitrogen-fixing bacteria associated with copepods in coastal waters of the North Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Scavotto, Rosemary E; Dziallas, Claudia; Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel; Riemann, Lasse; Moisander, Pia H

    2015-10-01

    The community composition of N2 -fixing microorganisms (diazotrophs) was investigated in copepods (primarily Acartia spp.) in parallel to that of seawater in coastal waters off Denmark (Øresund) and New England, USA. The unicellular cyanobacterial diazotroph UCYN-A was detected from seawater and full-gut copepods, suggesting that the new N contributed by UCYN-A is directly transferred to higher trophic levels in these waters. Deltaproteobacterial and Cluster 3 nifH sequences were detected in >?1 ?m seawater particles and full-gut copepods, suggesting that they associate with copepods primarily via feeding. The dominant communities in starved copepods were Vibrio spp. and related Gammaproteobacteria, suggesting they represent the most permanent diazotroph associations in the copepods. N2 fixation rates were up to 3.02?pmol N?copepod(-1) ?day(-1) . Although at a typical copepod density in estuarine waters, these volumetric rates are low; considering the small size of a copepod, these mesozooplanktonic crustaceans may serve as hotspots of N2 fixation, at 12.9-71.9??mol N?dm(-3) copepod biomass?day(-1) . Taken together, diazotroph associations range from more permanent attachments to copepod feeding on some groups. Similar diazotroph groups detected on the eastern and western Atlantic Ocean suggest that these associations are a general phenomenon and play a role in the coastal N cycles. PMID:25655773

  16. Detecting In Situ Copepod Diet Diversity Using Molecular Technique: Development of a Copepod/Symbiotic Ciliate-Excluding Eukaryote-Inclusive PCR Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Carpenter, Edward J.; Liu, Sheng; Lin, Senjie

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of in situ copepod diet diversity is crucial for accurately describing pelagic food web structure but is challenging to achieve due to lack of an easily applicable methodology. To enable analysis with whole copepod-derived DNAs, we developed a copepod-excluding 18S rDNA-based PCR protocol. Although it is effective in depressing amplification of copepod 18S rDNA, its applicability to detect diverse eukaryotes in both mono- and mixed-species has not been demonstrated. Besides, the protocol suffers from the problem that sequences from symbiotic ciliates are overrepresented in the retrieved 18S rDNA libraries. In this study, we designed a blocking primer to make a combined primer set (copepod/symbiotic ciliate-excluding eukaryote-common: CEEC) to depress PCR amplification of symbiotic ciliate sequences while maximizing the range of eukaryotes amplified. We firstly examined the specificity and efficacy of CEEC by PCR-amplifying DNAs from 16 copepod species, 37 representative organisms that are potential prey of copepods and a natural microplankton sample, and then evaluated the efficiency in reconstructing diet composition by detecting the food of both lab-reared and field-collected copepods. Our results showed that the CEEC primer set can successfully amplify 18S rDNA from a wide range of isolated species and mixed-species samples while depressing amplification of that from copepod and targeted symbiotic ciliate, indicating the universality of CEEC in specifically detecting prey of copepods. All the predetermined food offered to copepods in the laboratory were successfully retrieved, suggesting that the CEEC-based protocol can accurately reconstruct the diets of copepods without interference of copepods and their associated ciliates present in the DNA samples. Our initial application to analyzing the food composition of field-collected copepods uncovered diverse prey species, including those currently known, and those that are unsuspected, as copepod prey. While testing is required, this protocol provides a useful strategy for depicting in situ dietary composition of copepods. PMID:25058323

  17. Detecting in situ copepod diet diversity using molecular technique: development of a copepod/symbiotic ciliate-excluding eukaryote-inclusive PCR protocol.

    PubMed

    Hu, Simin; Guo, Zhiling; Li, Tao; Carpenter, Edward J; Liu, Sheng; Lin, Senjie

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of in situ copepod diet diversity is crucial for accurately describing pelagic food web structure but is challenging to achieve due to lack of an easily applicable methodology. To enable analysis with whole copepod-derived DNAs, we developed a copepod-excluding 18S rDNA-based PCR protocol. Although it is effective in depressing amplification of copepod 18S rDNA, its applicability to detect diverse eukaryotes in both mono- and mixed-species has not been demonstrated. Besides, the protocol suffers from the problem that sequences from symbiotic ciliates are overrepresented in the retrieved 18S rDNA libraries. In this study, we designed a blocking primer to make a combined primer set (copepod/symbiotic ciliate-excluding eukaryote-common: CEEC) to depress PCR amplification of symbiotic ciliate sequences while maximizing the range of eukaryotes amplified. We firstly examined the specificity and efficacy of CEEC by PCR-amplifying DNAs from 16 copepod species, 37 representative organisms that are potential prey of copepods and a natural microplankton sample, and then evaluated the efficiency in reconstructing diet composition by detecting the food of both lab-reared and field-collected copepods. Our results showed that the CEEC primer set can successfully amplify 18S rDNA from a wide range of isolated species and mixed-species samples while depressing amplification of that from copepod and targeted symbiotic ciliate, indicating the universality of CEEC in specifically detecting prey of copepods. All the predetermined food offered to copepods in the laboratory were successfully retrieved, suggesting that the CEEC-based protocol can accurately reconstruct the diets of copepods without interference of copepods and their associated ciliates present in the DNA samples. Our initial application to analyzing the food composition of field-collected copepods uncovered diverse prey species, including those currently known, and those that are unsuspected, as copepod prey. While testing is required, this protocol provides a useful strategy for depicting in situ dietary composition of copepods. PMID:25058323

  18. Spatial heterogeneity of zooplankton abundance and diversity in the Saudi coastal waters of the Southern Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Aidaroos, Ali; El-Sherbiny, Mohsen; Mantha, Gopikrishna

    2013-04-01

    The horizontal distribution, abundance and diversity of zooplankton has been studied at 50 stations along the Saudi coastal waters of the southern Red Sea (27 stations around Farasan archipelago, 9 around Al-Qunfodah and 14 around Al-Lith) during March-April 2011 using a plankton net of 150 µm. The zooplankton standing crop fluctuated between 1058 and 25787 individuals/m3 with an average of 5231 individuals/m3. Zooplankton was dominated by holoplanktonic forms that representing 80.26 % of total zooplankton, while meroplanktonic constituting 19.74% and dominated by mollusc larvae. Copepods appeared to be the predominant component, formed an average of 69.69 % of the total zooplankton count followed by chaetognaths and urochordates (4.5 and 4.1% of total zooplankton respectively). A total of 100 copepods species in addition to several species of other planktonic groups (cladocerans, chaetognaths, urochordates) were recorded in the study area. The copepod diversity decreased northward (94, 69 and 62 species at Farasan, Al-Qunfodah and Al-Lith respectively). In general, adult cyclopoid copepods dominated the zooplankton community in term of abundance and species number (19.55 %, 65 species) with dominance of Oncaea media, Oithona similis and Farranula carinata followed by adult calanoid copepods (19.38%, 35 species) with dominance of Paracalanus aculeatus, Clausocalanus minor, Acartia (Acanthacartia) fossae and Centropages orsinii. Harapacticoids densities were low in abundance, represented only by 5 species and dominated mainly by Euterpina acutifronis. Some copepod species decreased northward: Acartia amboinensis, Canthocalanus pauper, Labidocera acuta, Corycaeus flaccus, C. typicus, C. agilis, C. catus, C. giesbrechti, C. latus, C. furcifer and Euterpina acutifronis, while others increased northward (Acartia fossae, Undinula vulgaris and Centropages orsinii). Among copepod orders, Monstrilloida and Siphonostomatoida were observed only in southern area (Farasan archipelago). Keywords: Zooplankton, copepods, abundance, diversity, Red Sea, Saudi Arabia.

  19. Ageing and Caloric Restriction in a Marine Planktonic Copepod

    PubMed Central

    Saiz, Enric; Calbet, Albert; Griffell, Kaiene; Bersano, José Guilherme F.; Isari, Stamatina; Solé, Montserrat; Peters, Janna; Alcaraz, Miquel

    2015-01-01

    Planktonic copepods are a key group in the marine pelagic ecosystem, linking primary production with upper trophic levels. Their abundance and population dynamics are constrained by the life history tradeoffs associated with resource availability, reproduction and predation pressure. The tradeoffs associated with the ageing process and its underlying biological mechanisms are, however, poorly known. Our study shows that ageing in copepods involves a deterioration of their vital rates and a rise in mortality associated with an increase in oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation); the activity of the cell-repair enzymatic machinery also increases with age. This increase in oxidative damage is associated with an increase in the relative content of the fatty acid 22:6(n-3), an essential component of cell membranes that increases their susceptibility to peroxidation. Moreover, we show that caloric (food) restriction in marine copepods reduces their age-specific mortality rates, and extends the lifespan of females and their reproductive period. Given the overall low production of the oceans, this can be a strategy, at least in certain copepod species, to enhance their chances to reproduce in a nutritionally dilute, temporally and spatially patchy environment. PMID:26455575

  20. KARYOLOGICAL STUDY OF THE CALANOID COPEPOD 'EURYTEMORA AFFINIS'

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chromosomes of the calanoid copepod Eurytemora affinis are described. The diploid chromosome number determined from cells at metaphase is twenty. There are ten pairs of metacentric chromosomes which can be divided into three size classes. No evidence of a heteromorphic chromosome...

  1. Dissolution of coccolithophorid calcite by microzooplankton and copepod grazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antia, A. N.; Suffrian, K.; Holste, L.; Müller, M. N.; Nejstgaard, J. C.; Simonelli, P.; Carotenuto, Y.; Putzeys, S.

    2008-01-01

    Independent of the ongoing acidification of surface seawater, the majority of the calcium carbonate produced in the pelagial is dissolved by natural processes above the lysocline. We investigate to what extent grazing and passage of coccolithophorids through the guts of copepods and the food vacuoles of microzooplankton contribute to calcite dissolution. In laboratory experiments where the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi was fed to the rotifer Brachionus plicatilis, the heterotrophic flagellate Oxyrrhis marina and the copepod Acartia tonsa, calcite dissolution rates of 45-55%, 37-53% and 5-22% of ingested calcite were found. We ascribe higher loss rates in microzooplankton food vacuoles as compared to copepod guts to the strongly acidic digestion and the individual packaging of algal cells. In further experiments, specific rates of calcification and calcite dissolution were also measured in natural populations during the PeECE III mesocosm study under differing ambient pCO2 concentrations. Microzooplankton grazing accounted for between 27 and 70% of the dynamic calcite stock being lost per day, with no measurable effect of CO2 treatment. These measured calcite dissolution rates indicate that dissolution of calcite in the guts of microzooplankton and copepods can account for the calcite losses calculated for the global ocean using budget and model estimates.

  2. Novel Organization and Development of Copepod Myelin. I. Ontogeny

    E-print Network

    Hartline, Daniel K.

    by the third naupliar stage. The number of myelin layers in this trio of axon pairs increased with developmentNovel Organization and Development of Copepod Myelin. I. Ontogeny Caroline H. Wilson,1, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawai'i 96822 2 Department of Biological Sciences, University

  3. Ageing and Caloric Restriction in a Marine Planktonic Copepod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saiz, Enric; Calbet, Albert; Griffell, Kaiene; Bersano, José Guilherme F.; Isari, Stamatina; Solé, Montserrat; Peters, Janna; Alcaraz, Miquel

    2015-10-01

    Planktonic copepods are a key group in the marine pelagic ecosystem, linking primary production with upper trophic levels. Their abundance and population dynamics are constrained by the life history tradeoffs associated with resource availability, reproduction and predation pressure. The tradeoffs associated with the ageing process and its underlying biological mechanisms are, however, poorly known. Our study shows that ageing in copepods involves a deterioration of their vital rates and a rise in mortality associated with an increase in oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation); the activity of the cell-repair enzymatic machinery also increases with age. This increase in oxidative damage is associated with an increase in the relative content of the fatty acid 22:6(n-3), an essential component of cell membranes that increases their susceptibility to peroxidation. Moreover, we show that caloric (food) restriction in marine copepods reduces their age-specific mortality rates, and extends the lifespan of females and their reproductive period. Given the overall low production of the oceans, this can be a strategy, at least in certain copepod species, to enhance their chances to reproduce in a nutritionally dilute, temporally and spatially patchy environment.

  4. A New Toxicity Test Using the Freshwater Copepod Cyclops vernalis.

    PubMed

    Marus, Emma M; Elphick, James R; Bailey, Howard C

    2015-09-01

    The cladocerans Ceriodaphnia dubia and Daphnia magna are widely used in environmental toxicity testing and the test methodologies for these species are well developed. However, copepods are a much more abundant contributor to zooplankton in many lakes, but they are not routinely used in toxicity tests. Therefore, we propose toxicity test methods for the freshwater copepod, Cyclops vernalis assessing effects on its survival and growth. A case study is presented in which the proposed test was performed with a range of concentrations of total dissolved solids (TDS) and used as part of a test battery to develop a site-specific water quality objective. C. vernalis was less sensitive to TDS compared to D. magna and C. dubia, but similarly sensitive to an alga, a diatom, a rotifer, a chironomid, and two fish species. No adverse effects were observed on survival or growth of C. vernalis at TDS concentrations up to 1500 mg/L. PMID:26183385

  5. Stable Associations Masked by Temporal Variability in the Marine Copepod Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Moisander, Pia H; Sexton, Andrew D; Daley, Meaghan C

    2015-01-01

    Copepod-bacteria interactions include permanent and transient epi- and endobiotic associations that may play roles in copepod health, transfer of elements in the food web, and biogeochemical cycling. Microbiomes of three temperate copepod species (Acartia longiremis, Centropages hamatus, and Calanus finmarchicus) from the Gulf of Maine were investigated during the early summer season using high throughput amplicon sequencing. The most prominent stable component of the microbiome included several taxa within Gammaproteobacteria, with Pseudoalteromonas spp. especially abundant across copepod species. These Gammaproteobacteria appear to be promoted by the copepod association, likely benefitting from nutrient enriched microenvironments on copepods, and forming a more important part of the copepod-associated community than Vibrio spp. during the cold-water season in this temperate system. Taxon-specific associations included an elevated relative abundance of Piscirickettsiaceae and Colwelliaceae on Calanus, and Marinomonas sp. in Centropages. The communities in full and voided gut copepods had distinct characteristics, thus the presence of a food-associated microbiome was evident, including higher abundance of Rhodobacteraceae and chloroplast sequences in the transient communities. The observed variability was partially explained by collection date that may be linked to factors such as variable time since molting, gender differences, and changes in food availability and type over the study period. While some taxon-specific and stable associations were identified, temporal changes in environmental conditions, including food type, appear to be key in controlling the composition of bacterial communities associated with copepods in this temperate coastal system during the early summer. PMID:26393930

  6. Host-Specific and pH-Dependent Microbiomes of Copepods in an Extensive Rearing System

    PubMed Central

    Skovgaard, Alf; Castro-Mejia, Josue Leonardo; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris

    2015-01-01

    Copepods are to an increasing extent cultivated as feed for mariculture fish larvae with variable production success. In the temperate climate zone, this production faces seasonal limitation due to changing abiotic factors, in particular temperature and light. Furthermore, the production of copepods may be influenced by biotic factors of the culture systems, such as competing microorganisms, harmful algae, or other eukaryotes and prokaryotes that may be non-beneficial for the copepods. In this study, the composition of bacteria associated with copepods was investigated in an extensive outdoor copepod production system. Light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy revealed that bacteria were primarily found attached to the exoskeleton of copepods although a few bacteria were also found in the gut as well as internally in skeletal muscle tissue. Through 16S rRNA gene-targeted denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, a clear difference was found between the microbiomes of the two copepod species, Acartia tonsa and Centropages hamatus, present in the system. This pattern was corroborated through 454/FLX-based 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing of copepod microbiomes, which furthermore showed that the abiotic parameters pH and oxygen concentration in rearing tank water were the key factors influencing composition of copepod microbiomes. PMID:26167852

  7. Host-Specific and pH-Dependent Microbiomes of Copepods in an Extensive Rearing System.

    PubMed

    Skovgaard, Alf; Castro-Mejia, Josue Leonardo; Hansen, Lars Hestbjerg; Nielsen, Dennis Sandris

    2015-01-01

    Copepods are to an increasing extent cultivated as feed for mariculture fish larvae with variable production success. In the temperate climate zone, this production faces seasonal limitation due to changing abiotic factors, in particular temperature and light. Furthermore, the production of copepods may be influenced by biotic factors of the culture systems, such as competing microorganisms, harmful algae, or other eukaryotes and prokaryotes that may be non-beneficial for the copepods. In this study, the composition of bacteria associated with copepods was investigated in an extensive outdoor copepod production system. Light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy revealed that bacteria were primarily found attached to the exoskeleton of copepods although a few bacteria were also found in the gut as well as internally in skeletal muscle tissue. Through 16S rRNA gene-targeted denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis, a clear difference was found between the microbiomes of the two copepod species, Acartia tonsa and Centropages hamatus, present in the system. This pattern was corroborated through 454/FLX-based 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing of copepod microbiomes, which furthermore showed that the abiotic parameters pH and oxygen concentration in rearing tank water were the key factors influencing composition of copepod microbiomes. PMID:26167852

  8. Stable Associations Masked by Temporal Variability in the Marine Copepod Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Moisander, Pia H.; Sexton, Andrew D.; Daley, Meaghan C.

    2015-01-01

    Copepod-bacteria interactions include permanent and transient epi- and endobiotic associations that may play roles in copepod health, transfer of elements in the food web, and biogeochemical cycling. Microbiomes of three temperate copepod species (Acartia longiremis, Centropages hamatus, and Calanus finmarchicus) from the Gulf of Maine were investigated during the early summer season using high throughput amplicon sequencing. The most prominent stable component of the microbiome included several taxa within Gammaproteobacteria, with Pseudoalteromonas spp. especially abundant across copepod species. These Gammaproteobacteria appear to be promoted by the copepod association, likely benefitting from nutrient enriched microenvironments on copepods, and forming a more important part of the copepod-associated community than Vibrio spp. during the cold-water season in this temperate system. Taxon-specific associations included an elevated relative abundance of Piscirickettsiaceae and Colwelliaceae on Calanus, and Marinomonas sp. in Centropages. The communities in full and voided gut copepods had distinct characteristics, thus the presence of a food-associated microbiome was evident, including higher abundance of Rhodobacteraceae and chloroplast sequences in the transient communities. The observed variability was partially explained by collection date that may be linked to factors such as variable time since molting, gender differences, and changes in food availability and type over the study period. While some taxon-specific and stable associations were identified, temporal changes in environmental conditions, including food type, appear to be key in controlling the composition of bacterial communities associated with copepods in this temperate coastal system during the early summer. PMID:26393930

  9. Behavioral fractality in marine copepods: Endogenous rhythms versus exogenous stressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seuront, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    The presence of endogenous rhythms in the swimming behavior of five common species of copepods (i.e. minute marine crustaceans) was investigated through comparisons of the scaling properties of their three-dimensional trajectories and cumulative probability distribution functions of move lengths recorded during the day and at night. Beside clear inter-specific differences in their behavioral scaling properties, the five species exhibited an increase in path tortuosity at night, consistent with an increase in food foraging activity. Given the absence of food under all experimental conditions, this suggests the presence of an endogenous swimming rhythm consistent with the widely reported pattern of ascent at dusk resulting in copepods entering the food-rich surface layer at night. The impact of the stress exerted on swimming behavior by changes in the light regime (i.e. light and dark conditions respectively experienced at night and during the day) and the related copepod behavioral adaptivity was also investigated. The low and high fractal dimensions respectively observed during daytime in the dark and during night-time under conditions of simulated daytime indicate that these organisms have the ability to adjust the complexity of their swimming path depending on exogenous factors, independent of their actual endogenous rhythms. The scaling exponents of the cumulative probability distribution function of move lengths exhibit a significant decrease during daylight hours under simulated night-time conditions and during the night under simulated daytime conditions, suggesting an increase in the stress levels experienced by the five species considered. It is finally shown that the stress exerted on endogenous behavioral diel variability by exogenous cues has a species-specific effect on copepods.

  10. Global latitudinal variations in marine copepod diversity and environmental factors.

    PubMed

    Rombouts, Isabelle; Beaugrand, Grégory; Ibanez, Frédéric; Gasparini, Stéphane; Chiba, Sanae; Legendre, Louis

    2009-09-01

    Latitudinal gradients in diversity are among the most striking features in ecology. For terrestrial species, climate (i.e. temperature and precipitation) is believed to exert a strong influence on the geographical distributions of diversity through its effects on energy availability. Here, we provide the first global description of geographical variation in the diversity of marine copepods, a key trophic link between phytoplankton and fish, in relation to environmental variables. We found a polar-tropical difference in copepod diversity in the Northern Hemisphere where diversity peaked at subtropical latitudes. In the Southern Hemisphere, diversity showed a tropical plateau into the temperate regions. This asymmetry around the Equator may be explained by climatic conditions, in particular the influence of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone, prevailing mainly in the northern tropical region. Ocean temperature was the most important explanatory factor among all environmental variables tested, accounting for 54 per cent of the variation in diversity. Given the strong positive correlation between diversity and temperature, local copepod diversity, especially in extra-tropical regions, is likely to increase with climate change as their large-scale distributions respond to climate warming. PMID:19515670

  11. Copepod communities along an Atlantic Meridional Transect: Abundance, size structure, and grazing rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Eva; Anadón, Ricardo

    2008-10-01

    Large-scale variability in copepod abundance, size structure, and ingestion rates on phytoplankton was investigated during the cruise Atlantic Meridional Transect-13. The main aim of the study was to assess the relative importance of small copepods and copepod nauplii in different regions (Temperate N and S, Oligotrophic N and S, Equatorial and Mauritanian upwelling). Samples were fractionated into four size fractions (<200, 200-500, 500-1000, and >1000 ?m). The only factor that significantly affected copepod biomass was chlorophyll concentration, which explained 71% of the variation. The gut fluorescence technique was used to estimate ingestion rates and experiments were performed to obtain naupliar gut evacuation rates. We found a similar relationship between nauplii gut evacuation rates and temperature as that described by Dam and Peterson [1988. The effect of temperature on the gut clearance rate constant of planktonic copepods. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 123, 1-14] for larger copepods. Chlorophyll ingested daily by copepods was higher in regions affected by Mauritanian and Equatorial upwellings and the South Subtropical Convergence. Copepods were found to be major grazers of phytoplankton. Grazing impact upon primary production was more important for upwelling areas, with values higher than 100% of primary production at some stations. Even in oligotrophic gyres, where the relative importance of protists increases, copepods exert substantial feeding impact on their autotrophic prey. In oligotrophic gyres, small copepods and nauplii were relatively more abundant, and accounted for a higher amount of total chlorophyll ingestion than larger ones. Thus, studies with 200 ?m mesh nets in oligotrophic areas are seriously underestimating nauplii and copepod abundance and grazing impact on phytoplankton.

  12. Transport and retention of dormant copepods in the Gulf of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Catherine; Pringle, James; Chen, Changsheng

    2006-11-01

    Variability in the availability of dormant copepods to seed productive shelf areas has been hypothesized to influence the abundance of the dominant copepod species Calanus finmarchicus in several regions of the North Atlantic. One source of this variability is advection of dormant copepods in deep water. Using Lagrangian particle simulations, we examined the influence of environmental forcing and copepod behavior on transport and retention of dormant C. finmarchicus in the deep Gulf of Maine, in the northwestern Atlantic. Retention in the Gulf of Maine was relatively high, >40% over 6 months, under all conditions simulated. Transport within the Gulf of Maine was high, resulting in shifts of eastern copepods into the western Gulf and of upstream copepods, from slope and Scotian Shelf waters, into the eastern Gulf. Copepod behavior during dormancy was a major source of uncertainty, but it is probably not a major source of interannual variability in retention. Retention increased with the initial depth of dormant copepods, and vertical positioning behavior had a strong influence on retention for simulations started at depths greater than 150 m, because copepods that can stay below basin sill depths are retained. Mean cross-shore winds reduced retention slightly (<2% absolute difference), and mean alongshore winds increased retention by 4-8%. Wind-driven interannual variability in retention was low. Variability in Scotian Shelf inflow had a greater influence on retention than did variability in winds, and inflow-driven changes in retention may contribute to interannual variability in copepod abundance associated with changes in deep-water temperature. However, estimates of advective loss are relatively low compared to measured reductions in dormant copepod abundance, and mortality is probably a major factor in this reduction.

  13. J. Exp. Mar. Biol. Ecol., 1987, Vol. 112, pp. 283-296 Predation by a carnivorous marine copepod, Euchaeta

    E-print Network

    Yen, Jeannette

    consumed. Copepods fed cod larvae form black melanin-pigmented fecal pellets in which larval cod otoliths developmental stages of the predatory copepod were able to ingest larvae and form dark-pigmented fecal pellets Islands, northern Norway. Key words: Predatory copepod; Fish larva; Recruitment; Euchaeta norvegica

  14. Microbial diversity associated with copepods in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Katyanne M; Moisander, Pia H

    2015-07-01

    Patchiness of marine microbial communities has an important influence on microbial activities in the ocean, particularly in the oligotrophic open ocean where bioavailable nutrients are otherwise scarce. Such spatial heterogeneity is present in associations with dead and living particles, including zooplankton. The microbial community composition of mesozooplankton was investigated from the Sargasso Sea using 16S rRNA amplicon pyrosequencing. Zooplankton microbiomes were studied on the copepods Undinula vulgaris, Pleuromamma spp., Sapphirina metalina, Pseudocalanus spp. and Tigriopus sp., and an amphipod, Phrosina semilunata. The overall richness was lower in the zooplankton than in the seawater, and zooplankton-specific bacterial communities were distinct from the communities in seawater. Gammaproteobacteria dominated in all zooplankton studied, with Vibrio spp. highly represented. Firmicutes were detected in all copepods, providing evidence for anaerobic conditions present on the copepods. Bacterial groups known to grow on concentrated organic substrates or to prevent biofouling were highly represented in association with copepods, suggesting they benefit from copepod-derived nutrients or carbon. The described copepod microbiome has similarities to communities previously described in coastal copepods, suggesting some aspects of the copepod microbiome are not habitat specific. The communities are distinct of that in seawater, demonstrating significant microbial patchiness in association with marine zooplankton in the oligotrophic open ocean. PMID:26077986

  15. Sensory-Motor Systems of Copepods involved in their Escape from Suction Feeding

    E-print Network

    sensitivity, structure of sensors, and evasive behavior by this key prey of fish can be useful for evaluating of capture (51.5 mm from mouth), it will be eaten. The copepod, however, has an acutely sensitive array by the mechanoreceptive cuticular arrays of sensors on copepods has been shaped by over 500 million years of evolution

  16. COPEPODS AND SCOMBRID FISHES: A STUDY IN HOST-PARASITE RELATIONSHIPS

    E-print Network

    COPEPODS AND SCOMBRID FISHES: A STUDY IN HOST-PARASITE RELATIONSHIPS ROGER F. CRESSEY,I BRUCE B. COLLE'ITE,' AND JOSEPH L. Russo' ABSTRACT Host specificity ofthe copepods parasitic on scombrid fishes is the basis for an analysis ofthe host-parasite relationship. A total of 46 different species of parasitic

  17. Structural and functional responses of harpacticoid copepods to anoxia in the Northern Adriatic: an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Troch, M.; Roelofs, M.; Riedel, B.; Grego, M.

    2013-02-01

    Combined in situ and laboratory studies were conducted to document the effects of anoxia on the structure and functioning of meiobenthic communities, with special focus on harpacticoid copepods. In a first step, anoxia was created artificially by means of an underwater chamber at 24 m depth in the Northern Adriatic, Gulf of Trieste (Mediterranean). Nematodes were found as most abundant taxon, followed by harpacticoid copepods. While nematode densities were not affected by treatment (anoxia/normoxia) or sediment depth, these factors had a significant impact on copepod abundances. Harpacticoid copepod family diversity, in contrast, was not affected by anoxic conditions, only by depth. Ectinosomatidae and Cletodidae were most abundant in both normoxic and anoxic samples. The functional response of harpacticoid copepods to anoxia was studied in a laboratory tracer experiment by adding 13C pre-labelled diatoms to sediment cores in order to test (1) if there is a difference in food uptake by copepods under normoxic and anoxic conditions and (2) whether initial (normoxia) feeding of harpacticoid copepods on diatoms results in a better survival of copepods in subsequent anoxic conditions. Independent of the addition of diatoms, there was a higher survival rate in normoxia than anoxia. The supply of additional food did not result in a higher survival rate of copepods in anoxia, which might be explained by the presence of a nutritionally better food source and/or a lack of starvation before adding the diatoms. However, there was a reduced grazing pressure by copepods on diatoms in anoxic conditions. This resulted in a modified fatty acid composition of the sediment. We concluded that anoxia not only impacts the survival of consumers (direct effect) but also of primary producers (indirect effect), with important implications for the recovery phase.

  18. Astaxanthin production in marine pelagic copepods grazing on two different phytoplankton diets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Nieuwerburgh, Lies; Wänstrand, Ingrid; Liu, Jianguo; Snoeijs, Pauli

    2005-02-01

    The red carotenoid astaxanthin is a powerful natural antioxidant of great importance in aquatic food webs where it is abundant in eggs and body tissues of fish and crustaceans. Little is known about the impact of the phytoplankton diet on astaxanthin production in copepods, its major pelagic producers. We followed the transfer of carotenoids from phytoplankton to copepods in a mesocosm experiment on the northern Atlantic coast (Norway) and recorded the astaxanthin production in copepods. Wild copepods grazed on nutrient-manipulated phytoplankton blooms, which differed in community composition and nutrient status (nitrogen or silicate limitation). The copepod pigments consisted mainly of free astaxanthin and mono- and diesters of astaxanthin. We found no significant difference in astaxanthin production per copepod individual or per unit C depending on the phytoplankton community. However, in the mesocosms astaxanthin per unit C decreased compared with natural levels, probably through a lower demand for photoprotection by the copepods in the dense phytoplankton blooms. The total astaxanthin production per litre was higher in the silicate-limited mesocosms through increased copepod density. Pigment ratio comparisons suggested that the copepod diet here consisted more of diatoms than in the nitrogen-limited mesocosms. Silicate-saturated diatoms were less grazed, possibly because they could invest more in defence mechanisms against their predators. Our study suggests that the production of astaxanthin in aquatic systems can be affected by changes in nutrient dynamics mediated by phytoplankton community composition and copepod population growth. This bottom-up force may have implications for antioxidant protection at higher trophic levels in the food web.

  19. Structural and functional responses of harpacticoid copepods to anoxia in the Northern Adriatic: an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Troch, M.; Roelofs, M.; Riedel, B.; Grego, M.

    2013-06-01

    Combined in situ and laboratory studies were conducted to document the effects of anoxia on the structure and functioning of meiobenthic communities, with special focus on harpacticoid copepods. In a first step, anoxia was created artificially by means of an underwater chamber at 24 m depth in the Northern Adriatic, Gulf of Trieste (Mediterranean). Nematodes were found as the most abundant taxon, followed by harpacticoid copepods. While nematode densities were not affected by treatment (anoxia/normoxia) or sediment depth, these factors had a significant impact on copepod abundances. Harpacticoid copepod family diversity, in contrast, was not affected by anoxic conditions, only by depth. Ectinosomatidae and Cletodidae were most abundant in both normoxic and anoxic samples. The functional response of harpacticoid copepods to anoxia was studied in a laboratory tracer experiment by adding 13C pre-labelled diatoms to sediment cores in order to test (1) if there is a difference in food uptake by copepods under normoxic and anoxic conditions and (2) whether initial (normoxia) feeding of harpacticoid copepods on diatoms results in a better survival of copepods in subsequent anoxic conditions. Independent of the addition of diatoms, there was a higher survival rate in normoxia than anoxia. The supply of additional food did not result in a higher survival rate of copepods in anoxia, which might be explained by the presence of a nutritionally better food source and/or a lack of starvation before adding the diatoms. However, there was a reduced grazing pressure by copepods on diatoms in anoxic conditions. This resulted in a modified fatty acid composition of the sediment. We concluded that anoxia not only impacts the survival of consumers (direct effect) but also of primary producers (indirect effect), with important implications for the recovery phase.

  20. Assimilation and regeneration of trace elements by marine copepods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, W.-X.; Reinfelder, J.R.; Lee, B.-G.; Fisher, N.S.

    1996-01-01

    Assimilation efficiencies (AE) of five trace elements (Am, Cd, Co, Se, and Zn) and carbon by neritic copepods (Acartia tonsa and Temora longicornis) feeding at different food concentrations and on different food types (diatoms, green algae, flagellates, dinoflagellates, and Fe oxides) were measured with radiotracer techniques. Food concentration had little influence on AEs of C, Cd, Co, and Se within a range of 16-800 ?? C liter-1. AEs of Am and Zn were highest at low food concentrations (16-56 ??g C liter-1) but remained relatively constant when food levels exceeded 160 ??g C liter-1. Different algal diets had no major influence on AEs, which generally were in the order Cd > Se > Zn > Co > Am. Metals (Cd, Co, and Zn) were assimilated from Fe oxides with 50% less efficiency than from algal cells. Element regeneration into the dissolved phase was a significant route for the release of ingested elements by copepods and increased with increased food concentration. Element regeneration rates for Cd, Se, and Zn were comparable to the regeneration rates of major nutrients such as P (30-70% daily). Retention half-times of elements in decomposing fecal pellets ranged from 10 d (Am). The efficient assimilation and regeneration of Cd, Se, and Zn can significantly lengthen the residence time of these elements in ocean surface waters.

  1. Do copepods inhabit hypersaline waters worldwide? A short review and discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anufriieva, Elena V.

    2015-11-01

    A small number of copepod species have adapted to an existence in the extreme habitat of hypersaline water. 13 copepod species have been recorded in the hypersaline waters of Crimea (the largest peninsula in the Black Sea with over 50 hypersaline lakes). Summarizing our own and literature data, the author concludes that the Crimean extreme environment is not an exception: copepod species dwell in hypersaline waters worldwide. There are at least 26 copepod species around the world living at salinity above 100; among them 12 species are found at salinity higher than 200. In the Crimea Cletocamptus retrogressus is found at salinity 360×10-3 (with a density of 1 320 individuals/m3) and Arctodiaptomus salinus at salinity 300×10-3 (with a density of 343 individuals/m3). Those species are probably the most halotolerant copepod species in the world. High halotolerance of osmoconforming copepods may be explained by exoosmolyte consumption, mainly with food. High tolerance to many factors in adults, availability of resting stages, and an opportunity of long-distance transportation of resting stages by birds and/or winds are responsible for the wide geographic distribution of these halophilic copepods.

  2. Seasonality of the copepod assemblages associated with interplay waters off northeastern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Li-Chun; Hung, Jia-Jang; Chen, Qing-Chao; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated copepod assemblages in the regime around Turtle Island off northern Taiwan to trace South China Sea water (SCSW) flowing northward with the Kuroshio Current. Seasonal variations of copepod assemblages demonstrated a dynamic succession of changes in copepod populations; the average abundance for total copepods ranged from 102.58 ± 53.38 in December to 1669.89 ± 1866.17 in March (individuals m-3). A total of 87 copepod species representing 36 genera and 21 families were identified. Among all samples, Temora turbinata dominated the copepods by a relative abundance (RA) of 26.89 %, followed by Paracalanus parvus (RA: 22.34 %) and Corycaeus ( Ditrichocorycaeus) affinis (RA: 12.77 %). Only the Acrocalanus gracilis species was recorded in all samples. Results of one-way ANOVA revealed that the number of copepod species, indices of richness, evenness, and Shannon-Wiener diversity differed significantly in five different cruises. The density of five copepod species ( Gaetanus minor, Calanus sinicus, Eucalanus elongates, Rhincalanus nasutus, and Rhincalanus rostrifrons) exhibited a significant negative correlation with seawater temperature. In contrast, the density of Canthocalanus pauper and Undinula vulgaris was significantly positively correlated with seawater temperature. The cold-water indicator species, C. sinicus, recorded in samples of March and May indicated the effect of China Coast Water (CCW) on copepod communities in the study area. Furthermore, the presence of Calanoides philippinensis in May samples strongly indicated that the SCSW may reach the Turtle Island area. Consequently, C. philippinensis and C. sinicus can be used to trace SCSW and CCW, respectively, in the study area.

  3. Feeding impacts of ontogenetically migrating copepods on the spring phytoplankton bloom in the Oyashio region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobari, T.; Inoue, Y.; Nakamura, Y.; Okamura, H.; Ota, T.; Nishibe, Y.; Ichinomiya, M.

    2010-09-01

    We investigated the feeding habits and grazing rates of the ontogenetically migrating copepods in the Oyashio region to evaluate their grazing impacts on the food web during the spring phytoplankton bloom. The bloom was in progress from early to late April, although chlorophyll a concentrations fluctuated considerably with the frequent exchange of different water masses. Biomass of the copepod community reached a maximum in mid-April when late copepodites of Neocalanus cristatus, Neocalanus flemingeri and Eucalanus bungii contributed to the biomass increase. Gut pigment contents of the predominant copepods were much higher during the bloom compared with the levels in March (pre-bloom). The temporal fluctuations were not correlated with those of mean chlorophyll a concentrations in the 0-50 m layer. Feeding experiments indicated that major food items for the copepods were centric diatoms and flagellates. During the period of lower ambient chlorophyll, the copepods changed their heterotrophic prey from naked ciliates to tintinnids. Apparent clearance rates were positive for naked ciliates and negative for heterotrophic nanoplankton, Cryptophyceae and bacteria when chlorophyll was high, suggesting trophic cascade effects from copepod feeding even during the phytoplankton bloom. The carbon demands of the copepod community were estimated to be 156 mgC m -2 day -1 in early March to 797 mgC m -2 day -1 in mid-April. The grazing rates on phytoplankton reached 480 mgC m -2 day -1, equivalent to as much as 28% of primary production. Non-phytoplankton prey supported 40 to 71% of the copepod carbon requirement. These results suggest that the copepod community does not graze the phytoplankton bloom down, but it does have significant impacts on microbial food webs.

  4. Salinity-induced survival strategy of Vibrio cholerae associated with copepods in Cochin backwaters.

    PubMed

    Thomas, K U; Joseph, N; Raveendran, O; Nair, Shanta

    2006-11-01

    The occurrence of Vibrio cholerae in water, sediment and copepods was studied over a wide range of salinity using conventional and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques in the Cochin backwaters. V. cholerae occurred either as culturable or non-culturable form in this tropical estuary. During the pre monsoon period when high salinity prevailed (35.5psu) V. cholerae was associated with copepods only in non-culturable form, but with the onset of monsoon when lower salinity prevailed, copepod-associated-V. cholerae reverted back to culturable form. The optimum salinity range for culturability was found to be 15-20psu. This points to the fact that salinity is a major factor that which influences V. cholerae's culturability and its association with copepods in Cochin backwaters. PMID:16764894

  5. Physical control of the distributions of a key Arctic copepod in the Northeast Chukchi Sea

    E-print Network

    Elliott, Stephen M. (Stephen Malcolm)

    2015-01-01

    The copepod Calanus glacialis is one of the most important zooplankton taxa in the Arctic shelf seas where it serves as a key grazer, predator, and food source. Its summer distribution and abundance has direct effects on ...

  6. Copepod Aggregations: Influences of Physics and Collective Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flierl, Glenn R.; Woods, Nicholas W.

    2015-02-01

    Dense copepod aggregations form in Massachusetts Bay and provide an important resource for right whales. We re-examine the processes which might account for the high concentrations, investigating both horizontally convergent flow, which can increase the density of depth-keeping organisms, and social behavior. We argue that the two act in concert: social behavior creates small dense patches (on the scale of a few sensing radii); physical stirring brings them together so that they merge into aggregations with larger scales; it also moves them into areas of physical convergence which retain the increasingly large patch. But the turbulence can also break this apart, suggesting that the overall high density in the convergence zone will not be uniform but will instead be composed of multiple transient patches (which are still much larger than the sensing scale).

  7. Adsorption of Vibrio parahaemolyticus onto Chitin and Copepods

    PubMed Central

    Kaneko, Tatsuo; Colwell, Rita R.

    1975-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus was observed to adsorb onto chitin particles and copepods. The efficiency of adsorption was found to be dependent on pH and on the concentration of NaCl and other ions found in seawater. Highest efficiency was observed in water samples collected from Chesapeake Bay and lowest in water from the open sea. V. parahaemolyticus was found to adsorb onto chitin with the highest efficiency of the several bacterial strains tested. Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas fluorescens did not adsorb onto chitin. The adsorption effect is considered to be one of the major factors determining the distribution of this species and affecting the annual cycle of V. parahaemolyticus in the estuarine system. PMID:234715

  8. Mandibular gnathobases of marine planktonic copepods – feeding tools with complex micro- and nanoscale composite architectures

    PubMed Central

    Gorb, Stanislav N

    2015-01-01

    Summary Copepods are dominant members of the marine zooplankton. Their diets often comprise large proportions of diatom taxa whose silicified frustules are mechanically stable and offer protection against grazers. Despite of this protection, many copepod species are able to efficiently break even the most stable frustule types. This ability requires specific feeding tools with mechanically adapted architectures, compositions and properties. When ingesting food, the copepods use the gnathobases of their mandibles to grab and, if necessary, crush and mince the food items. The morphology of these gnathobases is related to the diets of the copepods. Gnathobases of copepod species that mainly feed on phytoplankton feature compact and stable tooth-like structures, so-called teeth. In several copepod species these gnathobase teeth have been found to contain silica. Recent studies revealed that the siliceous teeth are complex microscale composites with silica-containing cap-like structures located on chitinous exoskeleton sockets that are connected with rubber-like bearings formed by structures with high proportions of the soft and elastic protein resilin. In addition, the silica-containing cap-like structures exhibit a nanoscale composite architecture. They contain some amorphous silica and large proportions of the crystalline silica type ?-cristobalite and are pervaded by a fine chitinous fibre network that very likely serves as a scaffold during the silicification process. All these intricate composite structures are assumed to be the result of a coevolution between the copepod gnathobases and diatom frustules in an evolutionary arms race. The composites very likely increase both the performance of the siliceous teeth and their resistance to mechanical damage, and it is conceivable that their development has favoured the copepods’ dominance of the marine zooplankton observed today. PMID:25821707

  9. Effects of Harpacticus sp. (Harpacticoida, copepod) grazing on dimethylsulfoniopropionate and dimethylsulfide concentrations in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Juan; Tian, Ji-Yuan; Yang, Gui-Peng

    2015-05-01

    We conducted 9 d and 24 h ingestion experiments to investigate the effects of copepod grazing on the concentrations of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethylsulfide (DMS) in seawater. Data from the 9 d trial showed that copepod Harpacticus sp. (Harpacticoida, copepod) grazing increased DMS (0-20%) and dissolved DMSP (DMSPd) (0-128%) apparently, accompanied by a significant reduction of particulate DMSP (DMSPp) in algal culture (0-30%). Ingestion rates (IRs) and pellet production rates (PPRs) of Harpacticus sp. varied with diet species (Platymonas subcordiformis (PS), Nitzschia closterium (NC), Skeletonema costatum (SC), Isochrysis galbana (IG), Prymnesium parvum (PP) or Heterosigma akashiwo (HA)), algal concentration, salinity and temperature. Harpacticus sp. fed on PP showed the lowest IRs (female/male, 0.72/0.53 × 104cells copepod- 1 h- 1) and PPRs (female/male, 0.75/0.5 pellets copepod- 1 h- 1), accompanied with the largest amounts of DMS and DMSPd,p (sum of DMSPd and DMSPp). IRs, PPRs, DMS and DMSPf (DMSP in fecal pellet) increased with the increase of food concentration and peaked at 25 × 104 cells mL- 1I. galbana. High salinity decreased IRs, PPRs, DMS and DMSPf and increased DMSPz (DMSP in copepod body) and DMSPd,p. IRs, PPRs, DMS and DMSPf increased with the increase of temperature from 15 to 25 °C, whereas DMSPz and DMSPd,p contents decreased. Pearson correlation analysis results showed that DMS concentrations presented positive relationships with IRs in algal concentration, salinity and temperature experiments (r = 0.746; P < 0.01). The contribution of DMSPz, DMSPf, DMS and DMSPd,p concentration to the total amounts (DMSPz + DMSPf + DMS + DMSPd,p) was 4-37%, 3-36%, 8-42% and 9-89%, respectively, indicating that DMSP was transferred to copepod tissue and fecal pellet via grazing. Our results are helpful for further understanding of the role of copepod grazing on DMS biogeochemical cycle.

  10. High-quality RNA extraction from copepods for Next Generation Sequencing: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Asai, Sneha; Ianora, Adrianna; Lauritano, Chiara; Lindeque, Penelope K; Carotenuto, Ylenia

    2015-12-01

    Despite the ecological importance of copepods, few Next Generation Sequencing studies (NGS) have been performed on small crustaceans, and a standard method for RNA extraction is lacking. In this study, we compared three commonly-used methods: TRIzol®, Aurum Total RNA Mini Kit and Qiagen RNeasy Micro Kit, in combination with preservation reagents TRIzol® or RNAlater®, to obtain high-quality and quantity of RNA from copepods for NGS. Total RNA was extracted from the copepods Calanus helgolandicus, Centropages typicus and Temora stylifera and its quantity and quality were evaluated using NanoDrop, agarose gel electrophoresis and Agilent Bioanalyzer. Our results demonstrate that preservation of copepods in RNAlater® and extraction with Qiagen RNeasy Micro Kit were the optimal isolation method for high-quality and quantity of RNA for NGS studies of C. helgolandicus. Intriguingly, C. helgolandicus 28S rRNA is formed by two subunits that separate after heat-denaturation and migrate along with 18S rRNA. This unique property of protostome RNA has never been reported in copepods. Overall, our comparative study on RNA extraction protocols will help increase gene expression studies on copepods using high-throughput applications, such as RNA-Seq and microarrays. PMID:25546577

  11. Antibiotic-Induced Change of Bacterial Communities Associated with the Copepod Nitocra spinipes

    PubMed Central

    Edlund, Anna; Ek, Karin; Breitholtz, Magnus; Gorokhova, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Environmental pressures, such as physical factors, diet and contaminants may affect interactions between microbial symbionts and their multicellular hosts. Despite obvious relevance, effects of antimicrobial contaminants on host-symbiont relations in non-target aquatic organisms are largely unknown. We show that exposure to antibiotics had negative effects on survival and juvenile development of the copepod Nitocra spinipes and caused significant alterations in copepod-associated bacterial communities. The significant positive correlations between indices of copepod development and bacterial diversity indicate that disruption of the microflora was likely to be an important factor behind retarded juvenile development in the experimental animals. Moreover, as evidenced by ribotype distribution in the bacterial clone libraries, the exposure to antibiotics caused a shift in dominance from Betaproteobacteria to Cardinium bacteria; the latter have been shown to cause reproductive manipulations in various terrestrial arthropods. Thus, in addition to providing evidence that the antibiotic-induced perturbation of the microbial community associates with reductions in fitness-related traits of the host, this study is the first record of a copepod serving as a host for endosymbiotic Cardinium. Taken together, our results suggest that (1) antimicrobial substances and possibly other stressors can affect micobiome and symbiont-mediated interactions in copepods and other hosts, and (2) Cardinium endosymbionts may occur in other copepods and affect reproduction of their hosts. PMID:22427962

  12. Sensory-Motor Systems of Copepods involved in their Escape from Suction Feeding.

    PubMed

    Yen, Jeannette; Murphy, David W; Fan, Lin; Webster, Donald R

    2015-07-01

    Copepods escape well by detecting minute gradients in the flow field; they react quickly, and swim away strongly. As a key link in the aquatic food web, these small planktonic organisms often encounter suction-feeding fish. Studies have identified certain hydrodynamic features that are created by the approach of this visual predator and the generation of its suction flow for capturing food. Similarly, studies have identified certain hydrodynamic features that evoke the evasive response of copepods. This is a review of the copepod sensory motor system as pertains to understanding their response to suction-feeding fish. Analyses of the reaction time, threshold sensitivity, structure of sensors, and evasive behavior by this key prey of fish can be useful for evaluating the effectiveness of feeding tactics in response to suction flow. To illustrate, we present results comparing a copepod from a fishless lake (Hesperodiaptomus shoshone) to a copepod from a rich fishing ground (Calanus finmarchicus). We designed a flow mimic that produces a realistic mushroom-cap-shaped flow field and realistic accelerations of flow; the copepods treated the mimic as a threat and performed jumps directed up and away from the siphon. Calanus finmarchicus responded at an average threshold strain rate of 18.7/s, escaped at 0.46 m/s, and traveled 5.99 mm, most frequently as a single jump. Hesperodiaptomus shoshone responded at a strain rate of 15.1/s that is not significantly different, escaped more slowly at 0.22 m/s and traveled a shorter distance of 3.01 mm using a series of hops. The high variability noted in the initial angle of the body and the maximum change in body angle suggests that unpredictability in the escape maneuver is another aspect of the tactic of copepods. The speed of the escape by small copepods 2-3 mm long is overwhelmed by the speed of the attack by the much larger, faster fish; if the copepod reacts when it is within the fish's arena of capture (<1.5 mm from mouth), it will be eaten. The copepod, however, has an acutely sensitive array of mechanosensors that perceive the flow field of the fish at distances of 3-6 mm, or outside the fish's range of capture. The copepod also has a rapid and strong locomotory response, thereby increasing the odds that the copepod will survive-but speed is unlikely to be the best tactic for staying alive. Instead, the copepod accelerates from 61.3 to 96.5 m/s(2) or more than 20 times stronger than the lunge of a fish. This collection of capabilities of copepods enables them to remain one of the most abundant multicellular organisms on our planet. PMID:26015485

  13. AN INTEGRATION OF COPEPOD-BASED BAFS, LIFECYCLE TOXICITY TESTING, AND ENDOCRINE DISRUPTION METHODOLOGIES FOR RAPID POPULATION-LEVEL RISK ASSESSMENT OF PERSISTENT BIOACCUMULATIVE TOXICANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Extensive multi-generational microplate culturing (copepod hatching stage through two broods) experiments were completed with the POPs lindane, DDD and fipronil sulfide.  Identical tandem microplate experiments were run concurrently to yield sufficient copepod biomass for li...

  14. Distribution of Arctic and Pacific copepods and their habitat in the northern Bering Sea and Chukchi Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, H.; Matsuno, K.; Fujiwara, A.; Onuka, M.; Yamaguchi, A.; Ueno, H.; Watanuki, Y.; Kikuchi, T.

    2015-11-01

    The advection of warm Pacific water and the reduction of sea-ice extent in the western Arctic Ocean may influence the abundance and distribution of copepods, i.e., a key component in food webs. To understand the factors affecting abundance of copepods in the northern Bering Sea and Chukchi Sea, we constructed habitat models explaining the spatial patterns of the large and small Arctic copepods and the Pacific copepods, separately, using generalized additive models. Copepods were sampled by NORPAC net. Vertical profiles of density, temperature and salinity in the seawater were measured using CTD, and concentration of chlorophyll a in seawater was measured with a fluorometer. The timing of sea-ice retreat was determined using the satellite image. To quantify the structure of water masses, the magnitude of pycnocline and averaged density, temperature and salinity in upper and bottom layers were scored along three axes using principal component analysis (PCA). The structures of water masses indexed by the scores of PCAs were selected as explanatory variables in the best models. Large Arctic copepods were abundant in the water mass with high salinity water in bottom layer or with cold/low salinity water in upper layer and cold/high salinity water in bottom layer, and small Arctic copepods were abundant in the water mass with warm/saline water in upper layer and cold/high salinity water in bottom layers, while Pacific copepods were abundant in the water mass with warm/saline in upper layer and cold/high salinity water in bottom layer. All copepod groups were abundant in areas with deeper depth. Although chlorophyll a in upper and bottom layers were selected as explanatory variables in the best models, apparent trends were not observed. All copepod groups were abundant where the sea-ice retreated at earlier timing. Our study might indicate potential positive effects of the reduction of sea-ice extent on the distribution of all groups of copepods in the Arctic Ocean.

  15. Impacts of ontogenetically migrating copepods on downward carbon flux in the western subarctic Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobari, Toru; Steinberg, Deborah K.; Ueda, Ai; Tsuda, Atsushi; Silver, Mary W.; Kitamura, Minoru

    2008-07-01

    To evaluate the impacts of ontogenetically (seasonally) migrating copepods on carbon transport to the mesopelagic zone, we investigated depth distribution, population structure, and feeding activity of the ontogentic copepod community in the western subarctic Pacific Ocean from day-night pairs of zooplankton samples down to 1000 m during the VERtical Transport In the Global Ocean (VERTIGO) program. Over the 31 July-16 August 2005 study period, the biomass of Neocalanus cristatus and Neocalanus plumchrus predominated in the near surface waters, while Neocalanus flemingeri was already dormant at depth. We observed a strong diel migration for Metridia pacifica, and a seasonal downward migration for Eucalanus bungii. Based on gut pigment analysis, ingestion rate of the copepod community was 214-375 mg C m -2 day -1, which was equal to 26-37% of the concurrent primary production. However, comparison of grazing estimated from gut pigments to calculated carbon demand of the copepod community indicates that phytoplankton comprised 37-59% of the ingested carbon. Thus, the copepod community appears to have also relied on detritus and microzooplankton for their nutrition, likely because primary production during this time was dominated by picophytoplankton too small to be grazed by these large copepods. Fecal pellet flux by the copepod community was estimated to account for 141-223% of the sedimentary particulate organic carbon (POC) flux at 150 m, suggesting considerable fragmentation and consumption of pellets in the upper layers. Fecal pellets alone were adequate to meet copepod carbon demand in the surface 0-150 m layer. Active carbon flux by diel migration of M. pacifica (respiration, egestion, and mortality) was 4-17 mg C m -2 day -1, equal to 6-44% of sedimentary POC flux at 150 m. Active carbon flux by N. flemingeri ontogenetic migration (i.e., respiration and mortality at depth) contributed 246 mg C m -2 year -1, equal to 9% of sedimentary POC flux at 1000 m. The imminent downward migration of N. cristatus and N. plumchrus would lead to an additional ontogenetic carbon flux on the order of 1719 mg C m -2 year -1. Copepod fecal pellet transport and active transport by diel and ontogenetic migration are thus important carbon fluxes during a season dominated by small phytoplankton, and ontogenetic migrants in the subarctic Pacific Ocean play a relatively more important role in active carbon flux compared with other open-ocean regions.

  16. Trampling on coral reefs: tourism effects on harpacticoid copepods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmento, V. C.; Santos, P. J. P.

    2012-03-01

    Human trampling is a common type of disturbance associated with outdoor recreational activities in coastal ecosystems. In this study, the effect of trampling on the meiofaunal harpacticoid copepod assemblage inhabiting turfs on a coral reef was investigated. In Porto de Galinhas, northeastern Brazil, reef formations near the beach are one of the main touristic destinations in the country. To assess trampling impact, two areas were compared: a protected area and an area subject to intensive tourism. Densities of total Harpacticoida and of the most abundant harpacticoid species showed strong reductions in the trampled area. An analysis of covariance revealed that the loss of phytal habitat was not the main source of density reductions, showing that trampling affected the animals directly. In addition, multivariate analysis demonstrated differences in the structure of harpacticoid assemblages between areas. Of the 43 species identified, 12 were detected by the Indicator Species Analyses as being indicators of the protected or trampled areas. Moreover, species richness was reduced in the area open to tourism. At least 25 harpacticoids are new species for science, of these, 20 were more abundant or occurred only in the protected area, while five were more abundant or occurred only in the trampled area; thus, our results highlight the possibility of local extinction of still-unknown species as one of the potential consequences of trampling on coral reefs.

  17. Temporal Stability of Genetic Structure in a Mesopelagic Copepod

    PubMed Central

    Goetze, Erica; Andrews, Kimberly R.; Peijnenburg, Katja T. C. A.; Portner, Elan; Norton, Emily L.

    2015-01-01

    Although stochasticity in oceanographic conditions is known to be an important driver of temporal genetic change in many marine species, little is known about whether genetically distinct plankton populations can persist in open ocean habitats. A prior study demonstrated significant population genetic structure among oceanic gyres in the mesopelagic copepod Haloptilus longicornis in both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, and we hypothesized that populations within each gyre represent distinct gene pools that persist over time. We tested this expectation through basin-scale sampling across the Atlantic Ocean in 2010 and 2012. Using both mitochondrial (mtCOII) and microsatellite markers (7 loci), we show that the genetic composition of populations was stable across two years in both the northern and southern subtropical gyres. Genetic variation in this species was partitioned among ocean gyres (FCT = 0.285, P < 0.0001 for mtCOII, FCT = 0.013, P < 0.0001 for microsatellites), suggesting strong spatial population structure, but no significant partitioning was found among sampling years. This temporal persistence of population structure across a large geographic scale was coupled with chaotic genetic patchiness at smaller spatial scales, but the magnitude of genetic differentiation was an order of magnitude lower at these smaller scales. Our results demonstrate that genetically distinct plankton populations persist over time in highly-dispersive open ocean habitats, and this is the first study to rigorously test for temporal stability of large scale population structure in the plankton. PMID:26302332

  18. Long-term change in the copepod community in the southern German Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boersma, Maarten; Wiltshire, Karen H.; Kong, Sopha-Mith; Greve, Wulf; Renz, Jasmin

    2015-07-01

    The North Sea has undergone considerable change in recent years, with several reported regime shifts in the last decades, the most recent of which is thought to have occurred in the final years of the last century. As biological evidence corroborating this most recent regime shift is still rare, we investigated the reaction of the copepod community of the Helgoland Roads sampling site to this perceived shift. We observed that the densities of calanoid copepods have declined to values which are roughly 25% of the peak densities in the mid 1980s and link the decrease to the decreasing nutrient inputs into the North Sea. The initial increase in the densities of non-calanoid copepods seems to have reversed, and currently most of the copepods of the community in the southern North Sea are below their long-term average. These strong declines in densities could have major consequences for recruitment of higher trophic levels. We expect a stronger dependence of copepod densities to the larger oceanographic phenomena such as inflows of Atlantic water into the North Sea, as now that the large anthropogenic riverine inputs of nitrogen and phosphorus have decreased and these inflows were the main source of nutrients into the North Sea.

  19. The impact of polystyrene microplastics on feeding, function and fecundity in the marine copepod Calanus helgolandicus.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew; Lindeque, Pennie; Fileman, Elaine; Halsband, Claudia; Galloway, Tamara S

    2015-01-20

    Microscopic plastic debris, termed “microplastics”, are of increasing environmental concern. Recent studies have demonstrated that a range of zooplankton, including copepods, can ingest microplastics. Copepods are a globally abundant class of zooplankton that form a key trophic link between primary producers and higher trophic marine organisms. Here we demonstrate that ingestion of microplastics can significantly alter the feeding capacity of the pelagic copepod Calanus helgolandicus. Exposed to 20 ?m polystyrene beads (75 microplastics mL(–1)) and cultured algae ([250 ?g C L(–1)) for 24 h, C. helgolandicus ingested 11% fewer algal cells (P = 0.33) and 40% less carbon biomass (P < 0.01). There was a net downward shift in the mean size of algal prey consumed (P < 0.001), with a 3.6 fold increase in ingestion rate for the smallest size class of algal prey (11.6–12.6 ?m), suggestive of postcapture or postingestion rejection. Prolonged exposure to polystyrene microplastics significantly decreased reproductive output, but there were no significant differences in egg production rates, respiration or survival. We constructed a conceptual energetic (carbon) budget showing that microplastic-exposed copepods suffer energetic depletion over time. We conclude that microplastics impede feeding in copepods, which over time could lead to sustained reductions in ingested carbon biomass. PMID:25563688

  20. submitted to Deep Sea Research II Transport and retention of dormant copepods in the Gulf of Maine

    E-print Network

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    submitted to Deep Sea Research II Transport and retention of dormant copepods in the Gulf of Maine finmarchicus, copepod, dormancy, diapause, Gulf of Maine, interannual variability, zooplankton #12;Abstract and retention of dormant C. finmarchicus in the deep Gulf of Maine, in the northwestern Atlantic. Retention

  1. E. Braga R. Zardoya A. Meyer J. Yen Mitochondrial and nuclear rRNA based copepod phylogeny

    E-print Network

    Yen, Jeannette

    sequences of the mitochondrial 16S rRNA and the nu- clear 28S rRNA genes. DNA isolation, polymerase chain mitochondrial DNA sequence data to address systematic relationships among copepods, primarily within the familyE. Braga á R. Zardoya á A. Meyer á J. Yen Mitochondrial and nuclear rRNA based copepod phylogeny

  2. SWIMMING PATTERN AS AN INDICATOR OF THE ROLES OF COPEPOD SENSORY SYSTEMS IN THE RECOGNITION OF FOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    The roles of copepod sensory systems in the recognition of food were investigated using the 'Bugwatcher', a video-computer system designed to track and describe quantitatively the swimming patterns of aquatic organisms. Copepods acclimated, or non-acclimated to a chemosensory sti...

  3. Vertical migration and positioning behavior of copepods in a mangrove estuary: Interactions between tidal, diel light and lunar cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chew, Li-Lee; Chong, Ving Ching; Ooi, Ai Lin; Sasekumar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Two-hourly zooplankton samplings encompassing tidal (semi-diurnal), diel (24 h), and lunar (4 phases) cycles during the dry (July 2003) and wet (November 2003) monsoon periods were conducted in the Matang estuary to investigate the vertical distribution and behavior of five different groups of copepods (estuarine, euryhaline, marine euryhaline, stenohaline and nocturnal pontellids) in response to the tidal and light regime. Diel vertical migration (DVM) was evident for all copepod groups but the observed patterns differed among species and sampling period (wet or dry and neap or spring tide). Tidally-induced vertical migration (TVM), superimposed by DVM, was observed for estuarine, marine euryhaline and stenohaline copepods but not for euryhaline and nocturnal pontellid copepods. Estuarine copepods tended to ascend during night-flood tide and descent to the bottom during day-ebb tide; this suggests a selective mechanism to penetrate upstream and maintain position in the estuary. In contrast, the marine euryhaline and stenohaline copepods remained at the bottom especially during day-flood tide and ascended into the water column during night-ebb tide; this suggests a selective mechanism to avoid upstream transport. Euryhaline copepods did not respond to tidal advection probably due to their wide range of salinity tolerance, while the large nocturnal pontellid copepods have strong swimming ability. Adaptive vertical migration appears to be a major factor structuring the copepod community in tropical estuaries, and its occurrence in most copepods suggests that neritic marine zooplankton tidally-advected into estuaries and nearshore waters can survive better than previously thought.

  4. Occurrence of the parasitic copepod Ergasilus labracis on Threespine Sticklebacks from the south coast of Newfoundland.

    PubMed

    Eaves, Alexandra A; Ang, Keng Pee; Murray, Harry M

    2014-12-01

    A study conducted from August to October 2013 surveyed Threespine Sticklebacks Gasterosteus aculeatus (n = 822) for the presence of parasitic copepods in the vicinity of large sea-cage salmonid farms in Bay d'Espoir, Newfoundland. The majority of parasitic copepods surveyed were Ergasilus labracis (n = 4,684). Other parasitic copepods observed on Threespine Sticklebacks during the survey included chalimus-stage Lepeophtheirus spp. (n = 3), adult Argulus alosae (n = 2), and a single Thersitina gasterostei. This represents a new host record for E. labracis. The copepods were present on fish collected in a broad range of temperatures (6.9-17.7°C) and salinities (10.2-30.2 [Practical Salinity Scale]). The parasitic copepods were most commonly found on larger hosts estimated to be age 1 or older. Surprisingly, the highest infestations (approximately 65%) were found on regions of the hosts outside of the gills (behind the pectoral fins and pelvic spines); in some cases, the copepods had inflicted significant damage to the skin of their hosts. Among host fish with evidence of an additional infection, such as microsporidian tumors (xenomas) or hemorrhagic-like symptoms (dark red abdomens and bloody mucus), the prevalence of E. labracis was significantly higher (43.4%) than among healthy fish (28.9%) despite there being no significant difference in size between the two fish health groups. In contrast, intensity (mean number of individual parasites per host) was significantly higher among healthy hosts (23.6) than among unhealthy ones (7.63). Although this parasite has been listed as present in Newfoundland previously, it has a broad host range and has been reported to be pathogenic to farmed salmonids. Therefore, its potential impact on wild and farmed fish populations around Newfoundland should not be underestimated. PMID:25321153

  5. Symbolic dynamics and entropies of copepod behaviour under non-turbulent and turbulent conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moison, Maud; Schmitt, François G.; Souissi, Sami; Seuront, Laurent; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou

    2009-06-01

    We consider here behavioural activity of copepods as a succession of symbols associated with swimming states: slow swimming, fast swimming, break and grooming. We characterise these symbolic sequences using tools from symbolic dynamics: probability density function of the residence times in each state; transition probability at each time step; Shannon entropy and dynamic entropy. This approach is applied to the swimming behaviour of Centropages hamatus which we have analyzed as an example of application, in order to stress the differences associated with turbulent and non-turbulent conditions. We characterise in this theoretical framework the behavioural changes exhibited by the copepod under turbulent conditions.

  6. Prevalence of the parasitic copepod Haemobaphes intermedius on juvenile buffalo sculpins from Washington State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halpenny, C.M.; Kocan, R.M.; Hershberger, P.K.

    2004-01-01

    The parasitic copepod, Haemobaphes intermedius, was detected in 62% of juvenile buffalo sculpins Enophrys bison, a previously unreported host, from the San Juan Islands archipelago in Washington State. Most infestations were characterized by the presence of a single female copepod infestations with multiple H. intermedius occurred either unilaterally or bilaterally in 29% of parasitized individuals. Impaired condition of parasitized hosts was indicated by significantly lower total lengths and weights (34.9 mm; 1.6 g) than in unparasitized cohorts (38.9 mm; 2.1 g). Host specificity was indicated by the failure to detect H. intermedius in 43 sympatric great sculpins Myoxocephalus polyacanthocephalus from the same location.

  7. A new copepod (Siphonostomatoida: Lernanthropidae) parasitic on a Red Sea immigrant dragonet (Actinopterygii: Callionymidae), with a review of records of parasitic copepods from dragonets.

    PubMed

    El-Rashidy, Hoda H; Boxshall, Geoff A

    2012-02-01

    A new species of parasitic copepod of the family Lernanthropidae is described from an immigrant population of the blotchfin dragonet Callionymus filamentosus Valenciennes (family Callionymidae) in the Eastern Mediterranean. Both sexes are described on the basis of material caught in Egyptian waters off the Alexandria coast at Abuqir. The new species shares with Lernanthropus breviculus Kabata, 1979 the possession of a small dorsal plate on the trunk that is so narrow at its origin that it does not overlap the bases of the fourth legs, which are therefore visible in dorsal view. These species differ in the shape of the cephalothorax and in the extent of the dorsal plate, which is shorter in the new species, revealing the caudal rami in dorsal view. Previous records of parasitic copepods utilising callionymids as hosts are reviewed: most belong to the families Pennellidae and Chondracanthidae. PMID:22183918

  8. Histopathology of a mesoparasitic hatschekiid copepod in hospite: does Mihbaicola sakamakii (Copepoda: Siphonostomatoida: Hatschekiidae) fast within the host fish tissue?

    PubMed

    Hirose, Euichi; Uyeno, Daisuke

    2014-08-01

    Mihbaicola sakamakii is a mesoparasitic copepod that infests the branchiostegal membranes of groupers (Perciformes: Serranidae). In this study, we observed M. sakamakii within host tissue. Histologically, copepods were found enclosed inside a pouch composed of the thickened epidermis of the host, tightly encased on all sides by the host epidermal pouch wall. There were no host blood cells or other food resources in the pouch lumen. Since the host epidermis was intact and continuous, even in the vicinity of the oral region of the parasite, the copepod would not have access to the host blood in this state. However, the stomach (ampullary part of the mid gut) was filled with granular components, the majority of which were crystalloids that likely originated from fish erythrocyte hemoglobin. We supposed that the parasite drinks blood exuded from the lesion in the fish caused by copepod entry into the host tissue. Invasion of the parasite may elicit immune responses in the host, but there were no traces on the copepod of any cellular immune reactions, such as encapsulation. The array of minute protuberances on the copepod cuticle surface may be involved in avoidance of cell adhesion. After the lesion has healed, the copepod is enclosed in a tough epidermal pouch, in which it gradually digests the contents of its stomach and continues egg production. PMID:25088597

  9. A new copepod with transformed body plan and unique phylogenetic position parasitic in the acorn worm Ptychodera flava.

    PubMed

    Tung, Che-Huang; Cheng, Yu-Rong; Lin, Ching-Yi; Ho, Ju-Shey; Kuo, Chih-Horng; Yu, Jr-Kai; Su, Yi-Hsien

    2014-02-01

    Symbiotic copepods compose one-third of the known copepod species and are associated with a wide range of animal groups. Two parasitic copepods endoparasitic in acorn worms (Hemichordata), Ive balanoglossi and Ubius hilli, collected in the Mediterranean Sea and Australian waters, respectively, were described a century ago. Here we report a new parasitic copepod species, Ive ptychoderae sp. nov., found in Ptychodera flava, a widespread acorn worm in the Indo-Pacific Ocean and an emerging organism for developmental and evolutionary studies. The female of I. ptychoderae is characterized by having a reduced maxilliped and five pairs of annular swellings along the body that are morphologically similar but distinguishable from those in the two previously described parasitic copepods in acorn worms. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 18S rDNA sequence shows that I. ptychoderae may belong to Poecilostomatoida but represent a new family, which we name Iveidae fam. nov. Ive ptychoderae is commonly found in the acorn worm population with an average prevalence of 42% during the collecting period. The infection of the parasite induces the formation of cysts and causes localized lesions of the host tissues, suggesting that it may have negative effects on its host. Interestingly, most cysts contain a single female with one or multiple male copepods, suggesting that their sex determination may be controlled by environmental conditions. The relationships between the parasitic copepods and acorn worms thus provide a platform for understanding physiological and ecological influences and coevolution between parasites and hosts. PMID:24648208

  10. Accumulation of polyunsaturated aldehydes in the gonads of the copepod Acartia tonsa revealed by tailored fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Stefanie; Nejstgaard, Jens C; Pohnert, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) are released by several diatom species during predation. Besides other attributed activities, these oxylipins can interfere with the reproduction of copepods, important predators of diatoms. While intensive research has been carried out to document the effects of PUAs on copepod reproduction, little is known about the underlying mechanistic aspects of PUA action. Especially PUA uptake and accumulation in copepods has not been addressed to date. To investigate how PUAs are taken up and interfere with the reproduction in copepods we developed a fluorescent probe containing the ?,?,?,?-unsaturated aldehyde structure element that is essential for the activity of PUAs as well as a set of control probes. We developed incubation and monitoring procedures for adult females of the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa and show that the PUA derived fluorescent molecular probe selectively accumulates in the gonads of this copepod. In contrast, a saturated aldehyde derived probe of an inactive parent molecule was enriched in the lipid sac. This leads to a model for PUAs' teratogenic mode of action involving accumulation and covalent interaction with nucleophilic moieties in the copepod reproductive tissue. The teratogenic effect of PUAs can therefore be explained by a selective targeting of the molecules into the reproductive tissue of the herbivores, while more lipophilic but otherwise strongly related structures end up in lipid bodies. PMID:25383890

  11. Prevalent Ciliate Symbiosis on Copepods: High Genetic Diversity and Wide Distribution Detected Using Small Subunit Ribosomal RNA Gene

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhiling; Liu, Sheng; Hu, Simin; Li, Tao; Huang, Yousong; Liu, Guangxing; Zhang, Huan; Lin, Senjie

    2012-01-01

    Toward understanding the genetic diversity and distribution of copepod-associated symbiotic ciliates and the evolutionary relationships with their hosts in the marine environment, we developed a small subunit ribosomal RNA gene (18S rDNA)-based molecular method and investigated the genetic diversity and genotype distribution of the symbiotic ciliates on copepods. Of the 10 copepod species representing six families collected from six locations of Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, 9 were found to harbor ciliate symbionts. Phylogenetic analysis of the 391 ciliate 18S rDNA sequences obtained revealed seven groups (ribogroups), six (containing 99% of all the sequences) belonging to subclass Apostomatida, the other clustered with peritrich ciliate Vorticella gracilis. Among the Apostomatida groups, Group III were essentially identical to Vampyrophrya pelagica, and the other five groups represented the undocumented ciliates that were close to Vampyrophrya/Gymnodinioides/Hyalophysa. Group VI ciliates were found in all copepod species but one (Calanus sinicus), and were most abundant among all ciliate sequences obtained, indicating that they are the dominant symbiotic ciliates universally associated with copepods. In contrast, some ciliate sequences were found only in some of the copepods examined, suggesting the host selectivity and geographic differentiation of ciliates, which requires further verification by more extensive sampling. Our results reveal the wide occurrence and high genetic diversity of symbiotic ciliates on marine copepods and highlight the need to systematically investigate the host- and geography-based genetic differentiation and ecological roles of these ciliates globally. PMID:23024768

  12. Accumulation of Polyunsaturated Aldehydes in the Gonads of the Copepod Acartia tonsa Revealed by Tailored Fluorescent Probes

    PubMed Central

    Wolfram, Stefanie; Nejstgaard, Jens C.; Pohnert, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) are released by several diatom species during predation. Besides other attributed activities, these oxylipins can interfere with the reproduction of copepods, important predators of diatoms. While intensive research has been carried out to document the effects of PUAs on copepod reproduction, little is known about the underlying mechanistic aspects of PUA action. Especially PUA uptake and accumulation in copepods has not been addressed to date. To investigate how PUAs are taken up and interfere with the reproduction in copepods we developed a fluorescent probe containing the ?,?,?,?-unsaturated aldehyde structure element that is essential for the activity of PUAs as well as a set of control probes. We developed incubation and monitoring procedures for adult females of the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa and show that the PUA derived fluorescent molecular probe selectively accumulates in the gonads of this copepod. In contrast, a saturated aldehyde derived probe of an inactive parent molecule was enriched in the lipid sac. This leads to a model for PUAs' teratogenic mode of action involving accumulation and covalent interaction with nucleophilic moieties in the copepod reproductive tissue. The teratogenic effect of PUAs can therefore be explained by a selective targeting of the molecules into the reproductive tissue of the herbivores, while more lipophilic but otherwise strongly related structures end up in lipid bodies. PMID:25383890

  13. How much crude oil can zooplankton ingest? Estimating the quantity of dispersed crude oil defecated by planktonic copepods.

    PubMed

    Almeda, Rodrigo; Connelly, Tara L; Buskey, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    We investigated and quantified defecation rates of crude oil by 3 species of marine planktonic copepods (Temora turbinata, Acartia tonsa, and Parvocalanus crassirostris) and a natural copepod assemblage after exposure to mechanically or chemically dispersed crude oil. Between 88 and 100% of the analyzed fecal pellets from three species of copepods and a natural copepod assemblage exposed for 48 h to physically or chemically dispersed light crude oil contained crude oil droplets. Crude oil droplets inside fecal pellets were smaller (median diameter: 2.4-3.5 ?m) than droplets in the physically and chemically dispersed oil emulsions (median diameter: 6.6 and 8.0 ?m, respectively). This suggests that copepods can reject large crude oil droplets or that crude oil droplets are broken into smaller oil droplets before or during ingestion. Depending on the species and experimental treatments, crude oil defecation rates ranged from 5.3 to 245 ng-oil copepod(-1) d(-1), which represent a mean weight-specific defecation rate of 0.026 ?g-oil ?g-Ccopepod(1) d(-1). Considering a dispersed crude oil concentration commonly found in the water column after oil spills (1 ?l L(-1)) and copepod abundances in high productive coastal areas, copepods may defecate ?1.3-2.6 mg-oil m(-3) d(-1), which would represent ?0.15%-0.30% of the total dispersed oil per day. Our results indicate that ingestion and subsequent defecation of crude oil by planktonic copepods has a small influence on the overall mass of oil spills in the short term, but may be quantitatively important in the flux of oil from surface water to sediments and in the transfer of low-solubility, toxic petroleum hydrocarbons into food webs after crude oil spills in the sea. PMID:26586632

  14. Copepod community succession during warm season in Lagoon Notoro-ko, northeastern Hokkaido, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Yoshizumi; Ichikawa, Hideaki; Kitamura, Mitsuaki; Nishino, Yasuto; Taniguchi, Akira

    2015-06-01

    Lagoon Notoro-ko, located on the northeastern coast of Hokkaido, Japan, and connected to the Okhotsk Sea by a human-made channel, is strongly influenced by local hydrography, as water masses in the lagoon are seasonally influenced by the Soya Warm Current and the East Sakhalin Current. We here report on the succession of copepod communities during the warm season in relation to water mass exchange. Copepods were categorized into four seasonal communities (spring/early-summer, mid-summer, late-summer/fall, and early-winter) via a cluster analysis based on Bray-Curtis similarities. Spring/early-summer and early-winter communities were characterized by the temperate-boreal calanoid Pseudocalanus newmani, comprising 34.9%-77.6% of the total abundance of copepods during times of low temperature/salinity, as influenced by the prevailing East Sakhalin Current. Late-summer/fall communities were characterized by the neritic warm-water calanoid Paracalanus parvus s.l., comprising 63.9%-96.3% of the total abundance, as influenced by the Soya Warm Current. Mid-summer communities comprised approximately equal abundances of P. parvus, Eurytemora herdmani, Scolecithricella minor, and Centropages abdominalis (12.8%-28.2%); this community is transitional between those of the spring/early-summer and late-summer/fall. Copepod community succession in Lagoon Notoro-ko can be largely explained by seasonal changes in water masses.

  15. DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF A QUANTITATIVE PCR BASED METHOD TO ENUMERATE COPEPOD NAUPLII IN FIELD SAMPLES

    E-print Network

    Qiu, Bo

    surveyed the genetic diversity of copepods in the study region, optimized sample treatment for q the mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) gene copies in each P. crassirostris life stage, tested of this species was found to increase by ~1.5 orders of magnitude from early nauplii to adult. Food level

  16. Seasonal variability of meiofauna, especially harpacticoid copepods, in Posidonia oceanica macrophytodetritus accumulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascart, Thibaud; Lepoint, Gilles; Deschoemaeker, Silke; Binard, Marc; Remy, François; De Troch, Marleen

    2015-01-01

    The overall aim of this study was (1) to assess the diversity and density of meiofauna taxa, especially harpacticoid copepod species, present within accumulated seagrass macrophytodetritus on unvegetated sand patches and (2) to elucidate the community structure of detritus-associated harpacticoid copepods in relation to natural temporal variability of physico-chemical characteristics of accumulations. This was investigated in a Posidonia oceanica (L.) Delile seagrass ecosystem in the northwest Mediterranean Sea (Bay of Calvi, Corsica, 42°35?N, 8°43?E) using a triplicate macrophytodetritus core field sampling in two contrasting sites over the four seasons of 2011. Meiofauna higher taxa consisted of 50% Copepoda, of which 87% belonged to the Harpacticoida order. Nematoda was the second most abundant taxa. The copepod community displayed a wide variety of morphologically similar and ecologically different species (i.e. mesopsammic, phytal, phytal-swimmers, planktonic and parasitic). The harpacticoid copepod community followed a strong seasonal pattern with highest abundances and species diversity in May-August, revealing a link with the leaf litter epiphyte primary production cycle. Aside from the important role in sheltering, housing and feeding potential of macrophytodetritus, a harpacticoid community BEST analysis demonstrated a positive correlation with habitat complexity and a negative correlation with water movements and P. oceanica leaf litter accumulation.

  17. PHYSICAL CONTROLS ON DENSE COPEPOD AGGREGATIONS IN THE GREAT SOUTH CHANNEL

    E-print Network

    Fratantoni, David

    Atlantic right whale, feed on dense aggregations of copepods in the Great South Channel (GSC locations of actively feeding right whales to identify the broader source region for the aggregations- marchicus and its influence on right and sei whale occurrence. Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser., 423, pp 167-184 [2

  18. Changes in the distribution of copepods in the Gironde estuary: A warming and marinisation consequence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaalali, Aurélie; Chevillot, Xavier; Beaugrand, Grégory; David, Valérie; Luczak, Christophe; Boët, Philippe; Sottolichio, Aldo; Sautour, Benoît

    2013-12-01

    The Gironde is the largest estuary of South-West Europe and is one of the best monitored estuarine systems in the world. This macrotidal estuary is characterized by a low biodiversity in both oligo- and mesohaline zones. Its zooplankton community is constituted by only five major species, three calanoid copepods (including one invasive species) and two mysids. Retrospective analyses have already documented a warming associated to a phenomenon of marinisation. Here, we investigate the influence of both marinisation and warming on the spatial distribution and the abundance of copepods (i.e. Eurytemora affinis, Acartia bifilosa and neritic species) in the Gironde estuary. We modelled the environmental envelope of the copepods as a function of salinity and temperature to demonstrate that the alteration of their longitudinal distribution in the estuary between 1975 and 2003 was the result of both changing temperature and salinity. Although the upstream movement of neritic species was mostly related to salinity, we show that the augmentation of both temperature and salinity was at the origin of the upstream progression of both A. bifilosa and E. affinis. These results suggest that the distribution of copepods can be affected by both anthropogenic forcing and climatic change, which modulate the physic-chemistry of the Gironde estuary.

  19. First records of parasitic copepods (Crustacea, Siphonostomatoida) from marine fishes in Korea.

    PubMed

    Venmathi Maran, B A; Soh, H Y; Hwang, U W; Chang, C Y; Myoung, J G

    2015-06-01

    The knowledge of the biodiversity of parasitic copepods in South Korea is increasing. Interestingly we report here, some parasitic copepods considered as the first record of findings from Korea. Nine species of parasitic copepods (Siphonostomatoida) including six genera of three different families [Caligidae (7), Lernaeopodidae (1), Lernanthropidae (1)] were recovered from eight species of wild fishes in Korea: 1) Caligus hoplognathi Yamaguti & Yamasu, 1959 (?, ?) from the body surface of barred knifejaw Oplegnathus fasciatus (Temminck & Schlegel); 2) Caligus lagocephali Pillai, 1961 (?) from the gills of panther puffer Takifugu pardalis (Temminck & Schlegel); 3) Euryphorus brachypterus (Gerstaecker, 1853) (?, ?) from the opercular cavity of Atlantic bluefin tuna Thunnus thynnus (Linnaeus); 4) Euryphorus nordmanni Milne Edwards, 1840 (?, ?) from the opercular cavity of common dolphin fish Coryphaena hippurus Linnaeus; 5) Gloiopotes huttoni (Thomson) (?, ?) from the body surface of black marlin Istiompax indica (Cuvier); 6) Lepeophtheirus hapalogenyos Yamaguti & Yamasu, 1959 (?) from the gill filaments of O. fasciatus; 7) Lepeophtheirus sekii Yamaguti, 1936 (?, ?) from the body surface of red seabream Pagrus major (Temminck & Schlegel); 8) Brachiella thynni Cuvier, 1830 (?) from the body surface of longfin tuna or albacore Thunnus alalunga (Bonnaterre); 9) Lernanthropinus sphyraenae (Yamaguti & Yamasu, 1959) (?) from the gill filaments of moon fish Mene maculata (Bloch & Schneider). Since the female was already reported in Korea, it is a new record for the male of C. hoplognathi. A checklist for the parasitic copepods of the family Caligidae, Lernaeopodidae and Lernanthropidae of Korea is provided. PMID:26691264

  20. Factors controlling the summer development of copepod populations in the southern bight of the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daan, Rogier

    In two consecutive years an intensive sampling programmed was implemented at a fixed station in Dutch coastal waters to obtain a detailed record of the summer development of copepod populations in relation to phytoplankton and macroplankton abundance. The central question was whether densities of copepods are controlled by predation, in particular by invertebrate pelagic carnivores, or by food limitation. Methods applied to estimate daily predation by observed stocks of carnivores included analysis of gut contents and digestion rate, extrapolation of experimental feeding rates and of literature data on daily rations and maintenance needs. Chlorophyll- a and cell concentrations served as a rough measure for algal food supply. Since a decline in copepod densities manifested itself most clearly in decreasing naupliar numbers in both years, populations were assumed to be regulated mainly by recruitment or survival of these early life stages. Naupliar declines coincided with maximum densities of the hydromedusa Phialidium hemisphaericum, which dominated the macroplankton both in abundance and in biomass and reached a maximum density of 467 specimens·m -3 or 7 mg C·m -3. Copepod eggs appeared by far the most frequent prey item in their guts. However, these eggs are digested very slowly, if at all, and may often be ejected without any visible damage. The effect of egg predation on naupliar recruitment seems therefore relatively unimportant. Predation on swimming copepod stages was generally low. There was no evidence of selective feeding on nauplii. The maximum values of calculated predation pressure exerted by Phialidium populations matched daily copepod production only by way of exception. Impact of other invertebrate carnivores was negligible. As predation did not play a significant role, food availability seems the key factor underlying copepod population dynamics. The consequences of food limitation (reduced egg production, production of diapause eggs and enhanced cannibalism) are discussed. The observed coincidence of maximum predator abundance and minimum chlorophyll- a and diatom concentrations does not support the hypothesis that carnivores are able to indirectly benefit phytoplankton growth by reducing grazing pressure of herbivores.

  1. Explaining regional variability in copepod recruitment: Implications for a changing climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuheimer, A. B.; Gentleman, W. C.; Pepin, P.; Head, E. J. H.

    2010-10-01

    Characterizing environmental effects on copepod production and their ecological roles is complicated by multiple physical (e.g. temperature) and biological (e.g. food, predation) factors controlling multiple aspects of copepod physiology and demography. For example, data for two regions in eastern Canada (St. John’s, Newfoundland and Halifax, Nova Scotia) indicate that subtle differences in environmental conditions lead to significant differences in seasonal copepod ( Calanus finmarchicus) recruitment timing and magnitude. Here, we quantify how environmental variability influences C. finmarchicus physiology and demography leading to observed regional and seasonal variations in abundance off St. John’s and Halifax. We apply a stochastic individual-based model (IBM) for copepod population dynamics to simulate the seasonal variation in C. finmarchicus abundance of egg through copepodite 1 (C1) stages at the two sites using year-specific local forcing from multi-year data. The model includes individual variability in development, egg production and mortality rates with resulting seasonal C1 abundance averaged among years and compared to analogous observations. We find temperature has a dominant effect on both development and egg production rates while egg recruitment is affected by temperature and female abundance at both sites. We show that mortality rate characterization has a strong influence on modeled abundances, and site-specific environmentally dependent mortality rates are necessary to produce results consistent with observations (temperature vs. food vs. cannibalism via females). Results indicate that prediction of climate change effects on copepod abundance and their ecological roles requires consideration of biological (e.g. chlorophyll a, female abundance) as well as physical (e.g. temperature) factors. In particular, estimates of abundances during the onset of C1 recruitment (i.e. their arrival on the larval fish prey field) are improved by 67-94% when the influence of biological factors on mortality rates are considered.

  2. Hydrostatic pressure and temperature effects on the membranes of a seasonally migrating marine copepod.

    PubMed

    Pond, David W; Tarling, Geraint A; Mayor, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Marine planktonic copepods of the order Calanoida are central to the ecology and productivity of high latitude ecosystems, representing the interface between primary producers and fish. These animals typically undertake a seasonal vertical migration into the deep sea, where they remain dormant for periods of between three and nine months. Descending copepods are subject to low temperatures and increased hydrostatic pressures. Nothing is known about how these organisms adapt their membranes to these environmental stressors. We collected copepods (Calanoides acutus) from the Southern Ocean at depth horizons ranging from surface waters down to 1000 m. Temperature and/or pressure both had significant, additive effects on the overall composition of the membrane phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in C. acutus. The most prominent constituent of the PLFAs, the polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexanoic acid [DHA - 22:6(n-3)], was affected by a significant interaction between temperature and pressure. This moiety increased with pressure, with the rate of increase being greater at colder temperatures. We suggest that DHA is key to the physiological adaptations of vertically migrating zooplankton, most likely because the biophysical properties of this compound are suited to maintaining membrane order in the cold, high pressure conditions that persist in the deep sea. As copepods cannot synthesise DHA and do not feed during dormancy, sufficient DHA must be accumulated through ingestion before migration is initiated. Climate-driven changes in the timing and abundance of the flagellated microplankton that supply DHA to copepods have major implications for the capacity of these animals to undertake their seasonal life cycle successfully. PMID:25338196

  3. Blastodinium spp. infect copepods in the ultra-oligotrophic marine waters of the Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves-de-Souza, C.; Cornet, C.; Nowaczyk, A.; Gasparini, S.; Skovgaard, A.; Guillou, L.

    2011-08-01

    Blastodinium are chloroplast-containing dinoflagellates which infect a wide range of copepods. They develop inside the gut of their host, where they produce successive generations of sporocytes that are eventually expelled through the anus of the copepod. Here, we report on copepod infections in the oligotrophic to ultra-oligotrophic waters of the Mediterranean Sea sampled during the BOUM cruise. Based on a DNA-stain screening of gut contents, 16 % of copepods were possibly infected in samples from the Eastern Mediterranean infected, with up to 51 % of Corycaeidae, 33 % of Calanoida, but less than 2 % of Oithonidae and Oncaeidae. Parasites were classified into distinct morphotypes, with some tentatively assigned to species B. mangini, B. contortum, and B. cf. spinulosum. Based upon the SSU rDNA gene sequence analyses of 15 individuals, the genus Blastodinium was found to be polyphyletic, containing at least three independent clusters. The first cluster grouped all sequences retrieved from parasites of Corycaeidae and Oncaeidae during this study, and included sequences of Blastodinium mangini (the "mangini" cluster). Sequences from cells infecting Calanoida belonged to two different clusters, one including B. contortum (the "contortum" cluster), and the other uniting all B. spinulosum-like morphotypes (the "spinulosum" cluster). Cluster-specific oligonucleotidic probes were designed and tested by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in order to assess the distribution of dinospores, the Blastodinium dispersal and infecting stage. Probe-positive cells were all small thecate dinoflagellates, with lengths ranging from 7 to 18 ?m. Maximal abundances of Blastodinium dinospores were detected at the Deep Chlorophyll Maximum (DCM) or slightly below. This was in contrast to distributions of autotrophic pico- and nanoplankton, microplanktonic dinoflagellates, and nauplii which showed maximal concentrations above the DCM. The distinct distribution of dinospores and nauplii argues against infection during the naupliar stage. Dinospores, described as autotrophic in the literature, may escape the severe nutrient limitation of ultra-oligotrophic ecosystems by living inside copepods.

  4. Hydrostatic Pressure and Temperature Effects on the Membranes of a Seasonally Migrating Marine Copepod

    PubMed Central

    Pond, David W.; Tarling, Geraint A.; Mayor, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Marine planktonic copepods of the order Calanoida are central to the ecology and productivity of high latitude ecosystems, representing the interface between primary producers and fish. These animals typically undertake a seasonal vertical migration into the deep sea, where they remain dormant for periods of between three and nine months. Descending copepods are subject to low temperatures and increased hydrostatic pressures. Nothing is known about how these organisms adapt their membranes to these environmental stressors. We collected copepods (Calanoides acutus) from the Southern Ocean at depth horizons ranging from surface waters down to 1000 m. Temperature and/or pressure both had significant, additive effects on the overall composition of the membrane phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) in C. acutus. The most prominent constituent of the PLFAs, the polyunsaturated fatty acid docosahexanoic acid [DHA – 22:6(n-3)], was affected by a significant interaction between temperature and pressure. This moiety increased with pressure, with the rate of increase being greater at colder temperatures. We suggest that DHA is key to the physiological adaptations of vertically migrating zooplankton, most likely because the biophysical properties of this compound are suited to maintaining membrane order in the cold, high pressure conditions that persist in the deep sea. As copepods cannot synthesise DHA and do not feed during dormancy, sufficient DHA must be accumulated through ingestion before migration is initiated. Climate-driven changes in the timing and abundance of the flagellated microplankton that supply DHA to copepods have major implications for the capacity of these animals to undertake their seasonal life cycle successfully. PMID:25338196

  5. Tools for crushing diatoms – opal teeth in copepods feature a rubber-like bearing composed of resilin

    PubMed Central

    Michels, Jan; Vogt, Jürgen; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2012-01-01

    Diatoms are generally known for superior mechanical properties of their mineralised shells. Nevertheless, many copepod crustaceans are able to crush such shells using their mandibles. This ability very likely requires feeding tools with specific material compositions and properties. For mandibles of several copepod species silica-containing parts called opal teeth have been described. The present study reveals the existence of complex composite structures, which contain, in addition to silica, the soft and elastic protein resilin and form opal teeth with a rubber-like bearing in the mandibles of the copepod Centropages hamatus. These composite structures likely increase the efficiency of the opal teeth while simultaneously reducing the risk of mechanical damage. They are supposed to have coevolved with the diatom shells in the evolutionary arms race, and their development might have been the basis for the dominance of the copepods within today's marine zooplankton. PMID:22745896

  6. The reproductive effort of Lepeophtheirus pectoralis (Copepoda: Caligidae): insights into the egg production strategy of parasitic copepods.

    PubMed

    Frade, D G; Santos, M J; Cavaleiro, F I

    2016-01-01

    The reproductive effort of Lepeophtheirus pectoralis (Müller O. F., 1776), a caligid copepod, which is commonly found infecting the European flounder, Platichthys flesus (Linnaeus, 1758), is studied in detail for the first time. Seasonal variation in body dimensions and reproductive effort are analysed. Data for 120 ovigerous females, 30 from each season of the year, were considered in the analyses. Females were larger and produced a larger number of smaller eggs in winter, than during the summer. The relationship between egg number and egg size is similar to that recorded for other copepods exploiting fish hosts. Much of the recorded variation was also similar to that reported for a copepod parasitic on an invertebrate host, which suggests the possibility of a general trend in copepod reproduction. Overall, our results provide further support for the hypothesis that there is an alternation of summer and winter generations. PMID:26549240

  7. Vertical changes in abundance, biomass and community structure of copepods down to 3000 m in the southern Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homma, Tomoe; Yamaguchi, Atsushi

    2010-08-01

    Vertical changes in abundance, biomass and community structure of copepods down to 3000 m depth were studied at a single station of the Aleutian Basin of the Bering Sea (53°28'N, 177°00'W, depth 3779 m) on the 14th June 2006. Both abundance and biomass of copepods were greatest near the surface layer and decreased with increase in depth. Abundance and biomass of copepods integrated over 0-3000 m were 1,390,000 inds. m -2 and 5056 mg C m -2, respectively. Copepod carcasses occurred throughout the layer, and the carcass:living specimen ratio was the greatest in the oxygen minimum layer (750-100 m, the ratio was 2.3). A total of 72 calanoid copepod species belonging to 34 genera and 15 families occurred in the 0-3000 m water column (Cyclopoida, Harpacticoida and Poecilostomatoida were not identified to species level). Cluster analysis separated calanoid copepod communities into 5 groups (A-E). Each group was separated by depth, and the depth range of each group was at 0-75 m (A), 75-500 m (B), 500-750 m (C), 750-1500 m (D) and 1500-3000 m (E). Copepods were divided into four types based on the feeding pattern: suspension feeders, suspension feeders in diapause, detritivores and carnivores. In terms of abundance the most dominant group was suspension feeders (mainly Cyclopoida) in the epipelagic zone, and detritivores (mainly Poecilostomatoida) were dominant in the meso- and bathypelagic zones. In terms of biomass, suspension feeders in diapause (calanoid copepods Neocalanus spp. and Eucalanus bungii) were the major component (ca. 10-45%), especially in the 250-3000 m depth. These results are compared with the previous studies in the same region and that down to greater depths in the worldwide oceans.

  8. Assessment of storage lipid accumulation patterns in eucalanoid copepods from the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cass, Christine J.; Daly, Kendra L.; Wakeham, Stuart G.

    2014-11-01

    Members of the copepod family Eucalanidae are widely distributed throughout the world's oceans and have been noted for their accumulation of storage lipids in high- and low-latitude environments. However, little is known about the lipid composition of eucalanoid copepods in low-latitude environments. The purpose of this study was to examine fatty acid and alcohol profiles in the storage lipids (wax esters and triacylglycerols) of Eucalanus inermis, Rhincalanus rostrifrons, R. nasutus, Pareucalanus attenuatus, and Subeucalanus subtenuis, collected primarily in the eastern tropical north Pacific near the Tehuantepec Bowl and Costa Rica Dome regions, noted for its oxygen minimum zone, during fall 2007 and winter 2008/2009. Adult copepods and particulate material were collected in the upper 50 m and from 200 to 300 m in the upper oxycline. Lipid profiles of particulate matter were generated to help ascertain information on ecological strategies of these species and on differential accumulation of dietary and modified fatty acids in the wax ester and triacylglycerol storage lipid components of these copepods in relation to their vertical distributions around the oxygen minimum zone. Additional data on phospholipid fatty acid and sterol/fatty alcohol fractions were also generated to obtain a comprehensive lipid data set for each sample. Rhincalanus spp. accumulated relatively large amounts of storage lipids (31-80% of dry mass (DM)), while E. inermis had moderate amounts (2-9% DM), and P. attenuatus and S. subtenuis had low quantities of storage lipid (0-1% DM). E. inermis and S. subtenuis primarily accumulated triacylglycerols (>90% of storage lipids), while P. attenuatus and Rhincalanus spp. primarily accumulated wax esters (>84% of storage lipids). Based on previously generated molecular phylogenies of the Eucalanidae family, these results appear to support genetic predisposition as a major factor explaining why a given species accumulates primarily triacylglycerols or wax esters, and also potentially dictating major fatty acid and alcohol accumulation patterns within the more highly modified wax ester fraction. Comparisons of fatty acid profiles between triacylglycerol and wax ester components in copepods with that in available prey suggested that copepod triacylglycerols were more reflective of dietary fatty acids, while wax esters contained a higher proportion of modified or de novo synthesized forms. Sterols and phospholipid fatty acids were similar between species, confirming high levels of regulation within these components. Similarities between triacylglycerol fatty acid profiles of E. inermis collected in surface waters and at >200 m depth indicate little to no feeding during their ontogenetic migration to deeper, low-oxygen waters.

  9. Copepod grazing during spring blooms: Does Calanus pacificus avoid harmful diatoms?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leising, Andrew W.; Pierson, James J.; Halsband-Lenk, Claudia; Horner, Rita; Postel, James

    2005-11-01

    During late winter and spring of 2002 and 2003, 24, 2-3 day cruises were conducted to Dabob Bay, Washington State, USA, to examine the grazing, egg production, and hatching success rates of adult female Calanus pacificus and Pseudocalanus newmani. The results of the copepod grazing experiments for C. pacificus are discussed here. Each week, copepod grazing incubation experiments from two different depth layers were conducted. Grazing was measured by both changes in chlorophyll concentration and cell counts. In 2002, there was one moderate bloom consisting mainly of Thalassiosira spp. in early February, and a larger bloom in April comprised of two Chaetoceros species and Phaeocystis sp. Similarly, in 2003, there were two blooms, an early one dominated by Thalassiosira spp., and a later one consisting of Chaetoceros spp. and Thalassiosira spp. Clearance rates on individual prey species, as calculated by cell counts, showed that C. pacificus are highly selective in their feeding, and may have much higher clearance rates on individual taxa than rates calculated from bulk chlorophyll disappearance. During weeks of high phytoplankton concentration, the copepods generally ate phytoplankton. However, they often rejected the most abundant phytoplankton species, particularly certain Thalassiosira spp., even though the rejected prey were often of the same genus and similar size to the preferred prey. It is speculated that this avoidance may be related to the possible deleterious effects that certain of these diatom species have on the reproductive success of these copepods. During weeks of medium to low phytoplankton concentration, the copepods selectively ate certain species of phytoplankton, and often had high electivity for microzooplankton. The selection mechanism must consist of active particle rejection most likely based on detection of surface chemical properties, since the diatoms that were selected were of the same genus, nearly the same size, and at lower numerical abundance than those cells that were avoided. The grazing choices made by these copepods may have important consequences for the overall ecosystem function within coastal and estuarine systems through changes in the transfer efficiency of energy to higher trophic levels.

  10. Bioaccumulation of photoprotective compounds in copepods: environmental triggers and sources of intra-specific variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagarese, H. E.; García, P.; Diéguez, M. D.; Ferraro, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and temperature are two globally important abiotic factors affecting freshwater ecosystems. Planktonic organisms have developed a battery of counteracting mechanisms to minimize the risk of being damaged by UVR, which respond to three basic principles: avoid, protect, repair. Copepods are among the most successful zooplankton groups. They are highly adaptable animals, capable of displaying flexible behaviors, physiologies, and life strategies. In particular, they are well equipped to cope with harmful UVR. Their arsenal includes vertical migration, accumulation of photoprotective compounds, and photorepair. The preference for a particular strategy is affected by a plethora of environmental (extrinsic) parameters, such as the existence of a depth refuge, the risk of visual predation, and temperature. Temperature modifies the environment (e.g. the lake thermal structure), and animal metabolism (e.g., swimming speed, bioaccumulation of photoprotective compounds). In addition, the relative weight of UVR-coping strategies is also influenced by the organism (intrinsic) characteristics (e.g., inter- and intra-specific variability). The UV absorbing compounds, mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), are widely distributed among freshwater copepods. Animals are unable to synthesize MAAs, and therefore depend on external sources for accumulating these compounds. Although copepods may acquire MAAs from their food, for the few centropagic species investigated so far, the main source of MAAs are microbial (most likely prokaryotic) organisms living in close association with the copepods. Boeckella gracilipes is a common centropagic copepod in Patagonian lakes. We suspected that its occurrence in different types of lakes, hydrologically unconnected, but within close geographical proximity, could have resulted in different microbial-copepod associations (i.e., different MAAs sources) that could translate into intra-specific differences in the accumulation of MAAs when experimentally exposed to different combinations of radiation exposure and temperature. We exposed B. gracilipes individuals from two lakes (Verde: high elevation, fishless; Morenito: piedmont, with fish) to two radiation conditions (PAR+UVA vs. darkness) crossed with five temperatures (5, 8, 12, 16 and 20 C) for periods of 10 days. DNA fingerprinting (DGGE) revealed the existence of differences in microbial composition between the two copepod populations. The two populations differed in initial total MAAs concentration and composition. Exposure to PAR+UVR stimulated the accumulation of MAAs in individuals from lake Morenito and to a lesser extent in those from lake Verde. There were significant differences in the rates of MAAs accumulation between the two populations. More specifically, individuals from lake Morenito had a higher propensity to lose and gain MAAs that those from Lake Verde, which maintain a more stable MAA concentration regardless of the experimental conditions. Temperature affected the concentration of MAAs in individuals maintained in darkness. As expected, the individuals tended to lose MAAs at higher temperatures. Unexpectedly however, the lower temperatures stimulated the accumulation of MAAs, even when the copepods were in the dark. Thus, low temperature by itself may induce MAA accumulation.

  11. Effect of the copepod parasite Nicothoë astaci on haemolymph chemistry of the European lobster Homarus gammarus.

    PubMed

    Davies, Charlotte E; Vogan, Claire L; Rowley, Andrew F

    2015-03-01

    The gills of the European lobster Homarus gammarus (L.) are susceptible to parasitization by the copepod Nicothoë astaci, the lobster louse. This copepod feeds on haemolymph of the host and can damage the gills, potentially affecting gaseous exchange capabilities. To investigate the host response to the parasite, haemolymph levels of total protein, haemocyanin, glucose and ammonia were quantified in adult lobsters carrying varying parasite loads. Parasite loads correlated positively with total haemolymph protein and haemocyanin concentrations but not with glucose or ammonia concentrations. The data suggest that lobsters with gills damaged by the feeding activities of N. astaci respond by producing higher levels of haemocyanin, which is both a key defence response and may compensate for their decreased respiratory functioning. PMID:25751860

  12. Acute toxicity, uptake and accumulation kinetics of nickel in an invasive copepod species: Pseudodiaptomus marinus.

    PubMed

    Tlili, Sofiène; Ovaert, Julien; Souissi, Anissa; Ouddane, Baghdad; Souissi, Sami

    2016-02-01

    Pseudodiaptomus marinus is a marine calanoid copepod originating of the Indo-Pacific region, who has successfully colonized new areas and it was recently observed in the European side of the Mediterranean Sea as well as in the North Sea. Actually, many questions were posed about the invasive capacity of this copepod in several non-native ecosystems. In this context, the main aim of this study was to investigate the tolerance and the bioaccumulation of metallic stress in the invasive copepod P. marinus successfully maintained in mass culture at laboratory conditions since 2 years. In order to study the metallic tolerance levels of P. marinus, an emergent trace metal, the nickel, was chosen. First, lethal concentrations determination experiments were done for 24, 48, 72 and 96 h in order to calculated LC50% but also to select a relevant ecological value for the suite of experiments. Then, three types of experiments, using a single concentration of nickel (correspond the 1/3 of 96 h-LC50%) was carried in order to study the toxico-kinetics of nickel in P. marinus. Concerning lethal concentrations, we observed that P. marinus was in the same range of sensitivity compared to other calanoid copepods exposed to nickel in the same standardized experimental conditions. Results showed that the uptake of nickel in P. marinus depends from the pathways of entrance (water of food), but also that Isochrysis galbana, used as a food source, has an important bioaccumulation capacity and a rapid uptake of nickel. PMID:26519805

  13. Rates of ingestion and their variability between individual calanoid copepods: Direct observations

    SciTech Connect

    Paffenhoefer, G.A.; Lewis, K.D.; Bundy, M.H. |; Metz, C.

    1995-12-01

    The goals of this study were to determine rates of ingestion and fecal pellet release, and their variability, for individual planktonic copepods over extended periods of time (>20 min). Ingestions and rejections of individual cells of the diatom Thalassiosira eccentrica by a adult females of the calanoid Paracalanus aculeatus were directly quantified by observing individual copepods continuously at cell concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 1.2 mm{sup 3} l{sup {minus}1}. Average ingestion rates increased with increasing food concentration, but were not significantly different between 0.3 and 1.0 mm{sup 3} l{sup {minus}1} (9.8 and 32.7 {mu}g Cl{sup {minus}1}) of T.eccentrica. Rates of cell rejections were low and similar at 0.1 and 0.3. but were significantly higher at 1.0 mm{sup 3} l{sup {minus}1}. The coefficients of variation for average ingestion rates of individual copepods hardly differed between food concentrations, ranging from 17 to 22%, and were close to those for average fecal pellet release intervals which ranged from 15 to 21%. A comparison between individuals at each food concentration found no significant differences at 1.0; at 0.1 and 0.3 mm{sup 3} l{sup {minus}1}, respectively, ingestion rates of four out of five females did not differ significantly from each other. Average intervals between fecal pellet releases were similar at 0.3 and 1.0 mm{sup 3} l{sup {minus}1}. Fecal pellet release intervals between individuals were significantly different at each food concentration; these significant differences were attributed to rather narrow ranges of pellet release intervals of each individual female. Potential sources/causes of variability in the sizes and rates of copepods in the ocean are evaluated.

  14. Ammonium excretion and oxygen respiration of tropical copepods and euphausiids exposed to oxygen minimum zone conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiko, R.; Hauss, H.; Buchholz, F.; Melzner, F.

    2015-10-01

    Calanoid copepods and euphausiids are key components of marine zooplankton communities worldwide. Most euphausiids and several copepod species perform diel vertical migrations (DVMs) that contribute to the export of particulate and dissolved matter to midwater depths. In vast areas of the global ocean, and in particular in the eastern tropical Atlantic and Pacific, the daytime distribution depth of many migrating organisms corresponds to the core of the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). At depth, the animals experience reduced temperature and oxygen partial pressure (pO2) and an increased carbon dioxide partial pressure (pCO2) compared to their near-surface nighttime habitat. Although it is well known that low oxygen levels can inhibit respiratory activity, the respiration response of tropical copepods and euphausiids to relevant pCO2, pO2 and temperature conditions remains poorly parameterized. Further, the regulation of ammonium excretion at OMZ conditions is generally not well understood. It was recently estimated that DVM-mediated ammonium supply considerably fuels bacterial anaerobic ammonium oxidation - a major loss process for fixed nitrogen in the ocean. These estimates were based on the implicit assumption that hypoxia or anoxia in combination with hypercapnia (elevated pCO2) does not result in a downregulation of ammonium excretion. Here we show that exposure to OMZ conditions can result in strong depression of respiration and ammonium excretion in calanoid copepods and euphausiids from the Eastern Tropical North Atlantic and the Eastern Tropical South Pacific. These physiological responses need to be taken into account when estimating DVM-mediated fluxes of carbon and nitrogen into OMZs.

  15. Sublethal stress: Impact of solar UV radiation on protein synthesis in the copepod Acartia tonsa

    PubMed Central

    Tartarotti, Barbara; Torres, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    Aquatic organisms respond to environmental challenges such as thermal stress with the rapid induction of highly conserved polypeptides known as stress proteins or heat shock proteins (Hsps). Solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR, 280–400 nm) is an important environmental stressor in marine ecosystems. Here, we present results of experiments conducted with the marine copepod Acartia tonsa to follow the de novo protein synthesis and measure the level of constitutive and inducible isoforms of the Hsp70 gene family of stress proteins after UV exposure. Animals were collected from Tampa Bay, Florida (USA), and exposed to solar radiation (full spectrum), UV-A (320–400 nm) and PAR (400–700 nm), or PAR only, for periods of 0.5–4 h. Controls were kept in the dark. Protein synthesis was robust under all treatments when the copepods were exposed to low solar radiation intensities. Conversely, high solar radiation intensities (both UV-B and UV-A) caused an overall suppression in the protein synthesis of the copepods with no detectable induction of stress-inducible isoforms of Hsps. Immunochemical assays (western blotting) showed that UVR increased levels (3.5–4-fold increase compared to the dark control) of the constitutively expressed 70 kDa heat-shock (Hsc70) protein in A. tonsa, without indication of inducible isoform upregulation. PMID:21258623

  16. Reproduction dynamics in copepods following exposure to chemically and mechanically dispersed crude oil.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Bjørn Henrik; Salaberria, Iurgi; Olsen, Anders J; Read, Kari Ella; Øverjordet, Ida Beathe; Hammer, Karen M; Altin, Dag; Nordtug, Trond

    2015-03-17

    Conflicting reports on the contribution of chemical dispersants on crude oil dispersion toxicity have been published. This can partly be ascribed to the influence of dispersants on the physical properties of the oil in different experimental conditions. In the present study the potential contribution of dispersants to the reproductive effects of dispersed crude oil in the marine copepod Calanus finmarchicus (Gunnerus) was isolated by keeping the oil concentrations and oil droplet size distributions comparable between parallel chemically dispersed (CD, dispersant:oil ratio 1:25) and mechanically dispersed oil (MD, no dispersant) exposures. Female copepods were exposed for 96 h to CD or MD in oil concentration range of 0.2-5.5 mg·L(-1) (THC, C5-C36) after which they were subjected to a 25-day recovery period where production of eggs and nauplii were compared between treatments. The two highest concentrations, both in the upper range of dispersed oil concentrations reported during spills, caused a lower initial production of eggs/nauplii for both MD and CD exposures. However, copepods exposed to mechanically dispersed oil exhibited compensatory reproduction during the last 10 days of the recovery period, reaching control level of cumulative egg and nauplii production whereas females exposed to a mixture of oil and dispersant did not. PMID:25658869

  17. First record of Neoergasilus japonicus (Poecilostomatoida: Ergasilidae), a parasitic copepod new to the Laurentian Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, Patrick L.; Bowen, Charles A., II

    2002-01-01

    The parasitic copepod Neoergasilus japonicus, native to eastern Asia, was first collected from 4 species of fish (fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas; largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides; pumpkinseed sunfish, Lepomis gibbosus; and yellow perch, Perca flavescens) in July 1994 in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron, Michigan. Further sampling in the bay in 2001 revealed infections on 7 additional species (bluegill, Lepomis macrochirus; carp, Cyprinus carpio; channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus; goldfish, Carassius auratus; green sunfish, Lepomis cyanellus; rock bass, Ambloplites rupestris; and smallmouth bass, Micropterus dolomieu). An additional 21 species examined in 2001 were devoid of the parasite. A limited collection of fish from Lake Superior (n = 8) and Lake Michigan (n = 46) in 1994 showed no infection. Neoergasilus japonicus is most frequently found attached to the dorsal fin and, in decreasing frequency, on the anal, tail, pelvic, and pectoral fins. Prevalence generally ranged from 15 to 70 and intensity from 1 to 10. The greatest number of copepods on a single host was 44. The copepod Neoergasilus japonicus appears to disperse over long distances rather quickly, spreading across Europe in 20 yr and then moving on to North America over a span of 10 yr. Its main vehicle of transport and introduction into the Great Lakes is probably exotic fish hosts associated with the fish-culture industry.

  18. Identification and molecular characterization of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) gene in the intertidal copepod Tigriopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Chang-Bum; Kang, Hye-Min; Seo, Jung Soo; Park, Heum Gi; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2016-02-10

    In copepods, no information has been reported on the structure or molecular characterization of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) gene. In the intertidal copepod Tigriopus japonicus, we identified a NOS gene that is involved in immune responses of vertebrates and invertebrates. In silico analyses revealed that nitric oxide (NO) synthase domains, such as the oxygenase and reductase domains, are highly conserved in the T. japonicus NOS gene. The T. japonicus NOS gene was highly transcribed in the nauplii stages, implying that it plays a role in protecting the host during the early developmental stages. To examine the involvement of the T. japonicus NOS gene in the innate immune response, the copepods were exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and two Vibrio sp. After exposure to different concentrations of LPS and Vibrio sp., T. japonicus NOS transcription was significantly increased over time in a dose-dependent manner, and the NO/nitrite concentration increased as well. Taken together, our findings suggest that T. japonicus NOS transcription is induced in response to an immune challenge as part of the conserved innate immunity. PMID:26611530

  19. Label-free microscopy and stress responses reveal the functional organization of Pseudodiaptomus marinus copepod myofibrils.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Ali; Hage, Charles Henri; Souissi, Anissa; Leray, Aymeric; Héliot, Laurent; Souissi, Sami; Vandenbunder, Bernard

    2015-08-01

    Pseudodiaptomus marinus copepods are small crustaceans living in estuarine areas endowed with exceptional swimming and adaptative performances. Since the external cuticle acts as an impermeable barrier for most dyes and molecular tools for labeling copepod proteins with fluorescent tags are not available, imaging cellular organelles in these organisms requires label free microscopy. Complementary nonlinear microscopy techniques have been used to investigate the structure and the response of their myofibrils to abrupt changes of temperature or/and salinity. In contrast with previous observations in vertebrates and invertebrates, the flavin autofluorescence which is a signature of mitochondria activity and the Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) pattern assigned to T-tubules overlapped along myofibrils with the second harmonic generation (SHG) striated pattern generated by myosin tails in sarcomeric A bands. Temperature jumps from 18 to 4 °C or salinity jumps from 30 to 15 psu mostly affected flavin autofluorescence. Severe salinity jumps from 30 to 0 psu dismantled myofibril organization with major changes both in the SHG and CARS patterns. After a double stress (from 18 °C/30 psu to 4° C/0 psu) condensed and distended regions appeared within single myofibrils, with flavin autofluorescence bands located between sarcomeric A bands. These results shed light on the interactions between the different functional compartments which provide fast acting excitation-contraction coupling and adequate power supply in copepods muscles. PMID:26057347

  20. First report of ciliate (Protozoa) epibionts on deep-sea harpacticoid copepods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacek, Linda; Thistle, David; Fernandez-Leborans, Gregorio; Carman, Kevin R.; Barry, James P.

    2013-08-01

    We report the first observations of ciliate epibionts on deep-sea, benthic harpacticoid copepods. One ciliate epibiont species belonged to class Karyorelictea, one to subclass Suctoria, and one to subclass Peritrichia. Our samples came from the continental rise off central California (36.709°N, 123.523°W, 3607 m depth). We found that adult harpacticoids carried ciliate epibionts significantly more frequently than did subadult copepodids. The reason for the pattern is unknown, but it may involve differences between adults and subadult copepodids in size or in time spent swimming. We also found that the ciliate epibiont species occurred unusually frequently on the adults of two species of harpacticoid copepod; a third harpacticoid species just failed the significance test. When we ranked the 57 harpacticoid species in our samples in order of abundance, three species identified were, as a group, significantly more abundant than expected by chance if one assumes that the abundance of the group and the presence of ciliate epibionts on them were uncorrelated. High abundance may be among the reasons a harpacticoid species carries a ciliate epibiont species disproportionately frequently. For the combinations of harpacticoid species and ciliate epibiont species identified, we found one in which males and females differed significantly in the proportion that carried epibionts. Such a sex bias has also been reported for shallow-water, calanoid copepods.

  1. Transcriptome Sequencing and De Novo Analysis of the Copepod Calanus sinicus Using 454 GS FLX

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Juan; Wang, Minxiao; Li, Chaolun; Sun, Song

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite their species abundance and primary economic importance, genomic information about copepods is still limited. In particular, genomic resources are lacking for the copepod Calanus sinicus, which is a dominant species in the coastal waters of East Asia. In this study, we performed de novo transcriptome sequencing to produce a large number of expressed sequence tags for the copepod C. sinicus. Results Copepodid larvae and adults were used as the basic material for transcriptome sequencing. Using 454 pyrosequencing, a total of 1,470,799 reads were obtained, which were assembled into 56,809 high quality expressed sequence tags. Based on their sequence similarity to known proteins, about 14,000 different genes were identified, including members of all major conserved signaling pathways. Transcripts that were putatively involved with growth, lipid metabolism, molting, and diapause were also identified among these genes. Differentially expressed genes related to several processes were found in C. sinicus copepodid larvae and adults. We detected 284,154 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that provide a resource for gene function studies. Conclusion Our data provide the most comprehensive transcriptome resource available for C. sinicus. This resource allowed us to identify genes associated with primary physiological processes and SNPs in coding regions, which facilitated the quantitative analysis of differential gene expression. These data should provide foundation for future genetic and genomic studies of this and related species. PMID:23671698

  2. Copepods enhance nutritional status, growth and development in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua L.) larvae — can we identify the underlying factors?

    PubMed Central

    van der Meeren, Terje; Rønnestad, Ivar; Mangor-Jensen, Anders; Galloway, Trina F.; Kjørsvik, Elin; Hamre, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    The current commercial production protocols for Atlantic cod depend on enriched rotifers and Artemia during first-feeding, but development and growth remain inferior to fish fed natural zooplankton. Two experiments were conducted in order to identify the underlying factors for this phenomenon. In the first experiment (Exp-1), groups of cod larvae were fed either (a) natural zooplankton, mainly copepods, increasing the size of prey as the larvae grew or (b) enriched rotifers followed by Artemia (the intensive group). In the second experiment (Exp-2), two groups of larvae were fed as in Exp-1, while a third group was fed copepod nauplii (approximately the size of rotifers) throughout the larval stage. In both experiments, growth was not significantly different between the groups during the first three weeks after hatching, but from the last part of the rotifer feeding period and onwards, the growth of the larvae fed copepods was higher than that of the intensive group. In Exp-2, the growth was similar between the two copepod groups during the expeimental period, indicating that nutrient composition, not prey size caused the better growth on copepods. Analyses of the prey showed that total fatty acid composition and the ratio of phospholipids to total lipids was slightly different in the prey organisms, and that protein, taurine, astaxanthin and zinc were lower on a dry weight basis in rotifers than in copepods. Other measured nutrients as DHA, all analysed vitamins, manganese, copper and selenium were similar or higher in the rotifers. When compared to the present knowledge on nutrient requirements, protein and taurine appeared to be the most likely limiting nutrients for growth in cod larvae fed rotifers and Artemia. Larvae fed rotifers/Artemia had a higher whole body lipid content than larvae fed copepods at the end of the experiment (stage 5) after the fish had been fed the same formulated diet for approximately 2 weeks. PMID:26038712

  3. Vertical distribution of mesozooplankton in the coastal Canadian Beaufort Sea in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkusz, Wojciech; Williams, William J.; Kwasniewski, Slawomir

    2013-11-01

    This paper contributes to baseline knowledge of lower trophic levels that is necessary to monitor the impact of oil and gas development on the Canadian Beaufort Sea ecosystem. As part of the Nahidik Program, the vertical distribution of mesozooplankton was studied along two transects in the coastal Canadian Beaufort Sea in the summer of 2009. Mesozooplankton was collected with 153 ?m conical net in two hydrologically distinct layers - the upper layer which was fresher and warmer due to the Mackenzie River runoff, and the lower layer which was colder and more saline. Two separate mesozooplankton assemblages were distinguished in the individual layers. The average zooplankton abundance in the two layers was 3120 ± 2860 ind. m- 3 and 4200 ± 5550 ind. m- 3 in the upper and lower layer, respectively. The upper layer was largely inhabited by meroplanktonic Polychaeta (752 ± 1038 ind. m- 3) and Bivalvia larvae (228 ± 307 ind. m- 3) as well as by youngest stages of Pseudocalanus spp. (245 ± 499 ind. m- 3). Conversely, the lower layer was mainly occupied by typical marine taxa such as Calanus glacialis (95 ± 76 ind. m- 3), C. hyperboreus (27 ± 12 ind. m- 3) and Triconia borealis (111 ± 81 ind. m- 3). Oithona similis, a widely distributed eurytopic cyclopoid copepod, showed no consistent pattern of vertical distribution (280 and 291 ind. m- 3, in the lower and upper layer, respectively).

  4. Acute and chronic toxicities of zinc pyrithione alone and in combination with copper to the marine copepod Tigriopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Bao, Vivien W W; Lui, Gilbert C S; Leung, Kenneth M Y

    2014-12-01

    Zinc pyrithione (ZnPT) is a widely used booster biocide in combination with copper (Cu) in antifouling paints as a substitute for tributyltin. The co-occurrence of ZnPT and Cu in coastal marine environments is therefore very common, and may pose a higher risk to marine organisms if they can result in synergistic toxicity. This study comprehensively investigated the combined toxicity of ZnPT and Cu, on the marine copepod Tigriopus japonicus, for the first time, based on both 96-h acute toxicity tests using adult copepods and chronic full-life cycle tests (21 d) using nauplii <24-h old. As ZnPT has been reported to be easily trans-chelated to copper pyrithione (CuPT) in the presence of Cu, the acute toxicities of CuPT alone and in combination with Cu on adult copepods were also assessed. Our results showed that ZnPT and Cu exhibited a strong synergistic toxic effect on the copepod in both acute and chronic tests. During the acute test, the mortalities of adult copepods increased dramatically even with an addition of Cu at concentrations as low as 1-2 ?g/L compared with those exposed to ZnPT alone. Severe chronic toxicities were further observed in the copepods exposed to ZnPT-Cu mixtures, including a significant increase of naupliar mortality, postponing of development from naupliar to copepodid and from copepodid to adult stage, and a significant decrease of intrinsic population growth when compared with those of copepods exposed to ZnPT or Cu alone. Such synergistic effects might be partly attributable to the formation of CuPT by the trans-chelation of ZnPT and Cu, because CuPT was found to be more toxic than ZnPT based on the acute toxicity results. Mixtures of CuPT and Cu also led to synergistic toxic effects to the copepod, in particular at high Cu concentrations. A novel non-parametric response surface model was applied and it proved to be a powerful method for analysing and predicting the acute binary mixture toxicities of the booster biocides (i.e., ZnPT and CuPT) and Cu on the copepod. To better protect precious marine resources, it is necessary to revise and tighten existing water quality criteria for biocides, such as ZnPT and CuPT, to account for their synergistic effects with Cu at environmentally realistic levels. PMID:25456222

  5. Effect of Grazing-Mediated Dimethyl Sulfide (DMS) Production on the Swimming Behavior of the Copepod Calanus helgolandicus

    PubMed Central

    Breckels, Mark N.; Bode, Nikolai W. F.; Codling, Edward A.; Steinke, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Chemical interactions play a fundamental role in the ecology of marine foodwebs. Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is a ubiquitous marine trace gas that acts as a bioactive compound by eliciting foraging behavior in a range of marine taxa including the copepod Temora longicornis. Production of DMS can rapidly increase following microzooplankton grazing on phytoplankton. Here, we investigated whether grazing-induced DMS elicits an increase in foraging behavior in the copepod Calanus helgolandicus. We developed a semi-automated method to quantify the effect of grazing-mediated DMS on the proportion of the time budget tethered females allocate towards slow swimming, typically associated with feeding. The pooled data showed no differences in the proportion of the 25 min time budget allocated towards slow swimming between high (23.6 ± 9.74%) and low (29.1 ± 18.33%) DMS treatments. However, there was a high degree of variability between behavioral responses of individual copepods. We discuss the need for more detailed species-specific studies of individual level responses of copepods to chemical signals at different spatial scales to improve our understanding of chemical interactions between copepods and their prey. PMID:23860240

  6. Intraspecific differences in lipid content of calanoid copepods across fine-scale depth ranges within the photic layer.

    PubMed

    Zarubin, Margarita; Farstey, Viviana; Wold, Anette; Falk-Petersen, Stig; Genin, Amatzia

    2014-01-01

    Copepods are among the most abundant and diverse groups of mesozooplankton in the world's oceans. Each species has a certain depth range within which different individuals (of the same life stage and sex) are found. Lipids are accumulated in many calanoid copepods for energy storage and reproduction. Lipid content in some species increases with depth, however studies so far focused mostly on temperate and high-latitude seasonal vertically migrating copepods and compared lipid contents among individuals either from coarse layers or between diapausing, deep-dwelling copepods and individuals found in the photic, near-surface layer. Here we examined whether lipid contents of individual calanoid copepods of the same species, life stage/sex differ between finer depth layers within the upper water column of subtropical and Arctic seas. A total of 6 calanoid species were collected from samples taken at precise depths within the photic layer in both cold eutrophic and warm oligotrophic environments using SCUBA diving, MOCNESS and Multinet. Measurements of lipid content were obtained from digitized photographs of the collected individuals. The results revealed significant differences in lipid content across depth differences as small as 12-15 meters for Mecynocera clausi C5 and Ctenocalanus vanus C5 (Red Sea), Clausocalanus furcatus males and two clausocalanid C5s (Mediterranean Sea), and Calanus glacialis C5 (Arctic). We suggest two possible explanations for the differences in lipid content with depth on such a fine scale: predator avoidance and buoyancy. PMID:24667529

  7. Ocean acidification impact on copepod swimming and mating behavior: consequences for population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seuront, L.

    2010-12-01

    There is now ample evidence that ocean acidification caused by the uptake of additional carbon dioxide from the atmosphere at the ocean surface will severely impact on marine ecosystem structure and function. To date, most research effort has focused on the impact of ocean acidification on calcifying marine organisms. These include the dissolution of calcifying plankton, reduced growth and shell thickness in gastropods and echinoderms and declining growth of reef-building corals. The effects of increasing the partial pressure in carbon dioxide and decreasing carbonate concentrations on various aspects of phytoplankton biology and ecology have received some attention. It has also recently been shown that the ability of fish larvae to discriminate between the olfactory cues of different habitat types at settlement and to detect predator olfactory cues are impaired at the level of ocean acidification predicted to occur around 2100 on a business-as-usual scenario of CO2 emissions. Average ocean pH has decreased by 0.1 units since the pre-industrial times, and it is predicted to decline another 0.3-0.4 units by 2100, which nearly corresponds to a doubling PCO2. In addition, some locations are expected to exhibit an even greater than predicted rate of decline. In this context, understanding the direct and indirect links between ocean acidification and the mortality of marine species is critical, especially for minute planktonic organisms such as copepods at the base of the ocean food chains. In this context, this work tested if ocean acidification could affect copepod swimming behavior, and subsequently affect, and ultimately disrupt, the ability of male copepods to detect and follow the pheromone plume produced by conspecific females. To ensure the generality and the ecological relevance of the present work, the species used for the experimentation are two of the most common zooplankton species found in estuarine and coastal waters of the Northern Hemisphere, the calanoid copepods Eurytemora affinis and Temora longicornis. Behavioral and mating experiments were conducted under conditions of control seawater (pH = 8.1) and conditions of ocean pH expected to occur circa 2100 (i.e. pH = 7.8 to 7.6) because of present and future CO2 emissions under the SRES A2 scenario. Our results indicate that ocean acidification modifies E. affinis and T. longicornis swimming and mating behaviors, and mating success. Specifically, ocean acidification significantly (i) modifies the stochastic properties of successive displacements, leading to decrease mate encounter rates when copepods cannot rely on female pheromone plumes (i.e. under turbulent conditions) and (ii) decreases the ability of males to detect females pheromone trails, to accurately follow trails and to successfully track a female. This led to a significant decrease in contact and capture rates from control to acidified seawater. These results indicate that ocean acification decreases the ability of male copepods to detect, track and capture a female, hence suggest an overall impact on population fitness and dynamics.

  8. Trade-Offs between Predation Risk and Growth Benefits in the Copepod Eurytemora affinis with Contrasting Pigmentation

    PubMed Central

    Gorokhova, Elena; Lehtiniemi, Maiju; Motwani, Nisha H.

    2013-01-01

    Intraspecific variation in body pigmentation is an ecologically and evolutionary important trait; however, the pigmentation related trade-offs in marine zooplankton are poorly understood. We tested the effects of intrapopulation phenotypic variation in the pigmentation of the copepod Eurytemora affinis on predation risk, foraging, growth, metabolic activity and antioxidant capacity. Using pigmented and unpigmented specimens, we compared (1) predation and selectivity by the invertebrate predator Cercopagis pengoi, (2) feeding activity of the copepods measured as grazing rate in experiments and gut fluorescence in situ, (3) metabolic activity assayed as RNA:DNA ratio in both experimental and field-collected copepods, (4) reproductive output estimated as egg ratio in the population, and (5) total antioxidant capacity. Moreover, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) COI gene variation was analysed. The pigmented individuals were at higher predation risk as evidenced by significantly higher predation rate by C. pengoi on pigmented individuals and positive selection by the predator fed pigmented and unpigmented copepods in a mixture. However, the antioxidant capacity, RNA:DNA and egg ratio values were significantly higher in the pigmented copepods, whereas neither feeding rate nor gut fluorescence differed between the pigmented and unpigmented copepods. The phenotypic variation in pigmentation was not associated with any specific mtDNA genotype. Together, these results support the metabolic stimulation hypothesis to explain variation in E. affinis pigmentation, which translates into beneficial increase in growth via enhanced metabolism and antioxidant protective capacity, together with disadvantageous increase in predation risk. We also suggest an alternative mechanism for the metabolic stimulation via elevated antioxidant levels as a primary means of increasing metabolism without the increase in heat absorbance. The observed trade-offs are relevant to evolutionary mechanisms underlying plasticity and adaptation and have the capacity to modify strength of complex trophic interactions. PMID:23940745

  9. From local adaptation to ecological speciation in copepod populations from neighboring lakes.

    PubMed

    Barrera-Moreno, Omar Alfredo; Ciros-Pérez, Jorge; Ortega-Mayagoitia, Elizabeth; Alcántara-Rodríguez, José Arturo; Piedra-Ibarra, Elías

    2015-01-01

    Continental copepods have been derived from several independent invasive events from the sea, but the subsequent evolutionary processes that account for the current diversity in lacustrine environments are virtually unknown. Salinity is highly variable among lakes and constitutes a source of divergent selection driving potential reproductive isolation. We studied four populations of the calanoid copepod Leptodiaptomus cf. sicilis inhabiting four neighboring lakes with a common history (since the Late Pleistocene) located in the Oriental Basin, Mexico; one lake is shallow and varies in salinity periodically (1.4-10 g L(-1)), while three are deep and permanent, with constant salinity (0.5, 1.1 and 6.5 g L(-1), respectively). We hypothesized that (1) these populations belong to a different species than L. sicilis sensu stricto and (2) are experiencing ecologically based divergence due to salinity differences. We assessed morphological and molecular (mtDNA) COI variation, as well as fitness differences and tests of reproductive isolation. Although relationships of the Mexican populations with L. sicilis s.s. could not be elucidated, we identified a clear pattern of divergent selection driven by salinity conditions. The four populations can still be considered a single biological species (sexual recognition and hybridization are still possible in laboratory conditions), but they have diverged into at least three different phenotypes: two locally adapted, specialized in the lakes of constant salinity (saline vs. freshwater), and an intermediate generalist phenotype inhabiting the temporary lake with fluctuating salinity. The specialized phenotypes are poorly suited as migrants, so prezygotic isolation due to immigrant inviability is highly probable. This implication was supported by molecular evidence that showed restricted gene flow, persistence of founder events, and a pattern of allopatric fragmentation. This study showed how ecologically based divergent selection may explain diversification patterns in lacustrine copepods. PMID:25915059

  10. From Local Adaptation to Ecological Speciation in Copepod Populations from Neighboring Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Barrera-Moreno, Omar Alfredo; Ciros-Pérez, Jorge; Ortega-Mayagoitia, Elizabeth; Alcántara-Rodríguez, José Arturo; Piedra-Ibarra, Elías

    2015-01-01

    Continental copepods have been derived from several independent invasive events from the sea, but the subsequent evolutionary processes that account for the current diversity in lacustrine environments are virtually unknown. Salinity is highly variable among lakes and constitutes a source of divergent selection driving potential reproductive isolation. We studied four populations of the calanoid copepod Leptodiaptomus cf. sicilis inhabiting four neighboring lakes with a common history (since the Late Pleistocene) located in the Oriental Basin, Mexico; one lake is shallow and varies in salinity periodically (1.4–10 g L-1), while three are deep and permanent, with constant salinity (0.5, 1.1 and 6.5 g L-1, respectively). We hypothesized that (1) these populations belong to a different species than L. sicilis sensu stricto and (2) are experiencing ecologically based divergence due to salinity differences. We assessed morphological and molecular (mtDNA) COI variation, as well as fitness differences and tests of reproductive isolation. Although relationships of the Mexican populations with L. sicilis s.s. could not be elucidated, we identified a clear pattern of divergent selection driven by salinity conditions. The four populations can still be considered a single biological species (sexual recognition and hybridization are still possible in laboratory conditions), but they have diverged into at least three different phenotypes: two locally adapted, specialized in the lakes of constant salinity (saline vs. freshwater), and an intermediate generalist phenotype inhabiting the temporary lake with fluctuating salinity. The specialized phenotypes are poorly suited as migrants, so prezygotic isolation due to immigrant inviability is highly probable. This implication was supported by molecular evidence that showed restricted gene flow, persistence of founder events, and a pattern of allopatric fragmentation. This study showed how ecologically based divergent selection may explain diversification patterns in lacustrine copepods. PMID:25915059

  11. Fully defined saltwater medium for cultivation of and toxicity testing with marine copepod Acartia tonsa

    SciTech Connect

    Kusk, K.O.; Wollenberger, L.

    1999-07-01

    The marine copepod Acartia tonsa and the food organism Rhodomonas salina were cultured in fully defined medium for 8 months without problems. Both organisms were also cultured in natural seawater and in a commercial salt mixture for at least two generations before the sensitivities of A. tonsa to bisphenol A, potassium dichromate, and 3,5-dichlorophenol in the three different media were compared and found to be at the same level. The defined medium may be used for cultivation and testing, thus avoiding unknown background contaminants.

  12. Development and reproduction of the freshwater harpacticoid copepod Attheyella crassa for assessing sediment-associated toxicity.

    PubMed

    Turesson, Eva Ulfsdotter; Stiernström, Sara; Minten, Johanna; Adolfsson-Erici, Margaretha; Bengtsson, Bengt-Erik; Breitholtz, Magnus

    2007-07-20

    Both freshwater and marine sediments are sinks for many anthropogenic substances. This may pose a risk to benthic and epibenthic organisms and it is crucial that toxicity tests that are available for environmental risk assessment can identify potentially adverse effects of sediment-associated substances on benthic organisms, such as harpacticoid copepods. While marine harpacticoids have been protected via a number of acute and chronic sediment tests, the freshwater harpacticoid copepod community has so far been neglected in such activities. The main aim of the present study was therefore to (a) find a suitable freshwater harpacticoid copepod, (b) establish robust laboratory mass cultures and (c) develop a chronic test for assessment of sediment-associated toxicity using spiked sediments. After several cultivation trials with a number of potential test species, the choice fell on the benthic freshwater harpacticoid copepod Attheyella crassa, a species that possesses many of the characteristic features identified as prerequisites for toxicity test organisms, e.g. it has a sexual reproduction, it is relatively easy to grow and keep in mass cultures in the laboratory, and it has a small body size. Owing to the relatively long generation time of freshwater harpacticoids (in relation to many marine harpacticoids), it was decided that the test should be separated into a development part (21 days) and a reproduction part (14 days) running in parallel. As a reference substance we used the fungicide tebuconazole, which is currently subject to risk assessment and which partitions to soil and sediment. Clear concentration-related responses were observed for all endpoints analyzed. Nauplia body length was the most sensitive endpoint with a measured time weighted LOEC(water) of 20microg/L. The corresponding LOEC(water) for larval mortality and offspring production was 65 and 62microg/L, respectively. In conclusion, A. crassa is an ecologically relevant test species for freshwater ecosystems and particularly for the cold, oligotrophic and often acidic lakes of Northern Europe. Regardless of the relatively long generation time of this species, our results clearly show that sediment-associated toxicity related to development and sexual reproduction can be assessed within 2-3 weeks exposure with the developed bioassay. PMID:17512064

  13. The toxicological interaction between ocean acidity and metals in coastal meiobenthic copepods.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Pierre-Yves; Fleeger, John W; Galvez, Fernando; Carman, Kevin R

    2010-12-01

    Increased atmospheric CO(2) concentrations are causing greater dissolution of CO(2) into seawater, and are ultimately responsible for today's ongoing ocean acidification. We manipulated seawater acidity by addition of HCl and by increasing CO(2) concentration and observed that two coastal harpacticoid copepods, Amphiascoides atopus and Schizopera knabeni were both more sensitive to increased acidity when generated by CO(2). The present study indicates that copepods living in environments more prone to hypercapnia, such as mudflats where S. knabeni lives, may be less sensitive to future acidification. Ocean acidification is also expected to alter the toxicity of waterborne metals by influencing their speciation in seawater. CO(2) enrichment did not affect the free-ion concentration of Cd but did increase the free-ion concentration of Cu. Antagonistic toxicities were observed between CO(2) with Cd, Cu and Cu free-ion in A. atopus. This interaction could be due to a competition for H(+) and metals for binding sites. PMID:20875652

  14. Effects of dispersed oil on reproduction in the cold water copepod Calanus finmarchicus (Gunnerus)

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Anders Johny; Nordtug, Trond; Altin, Dag; Lervik, Morten; Hansen, Bjørn Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Following a 120-h exposure period to 3 concentrations of oil dispersions (0.022?mg?L?1, 1.8?mg?L?1, and 16.5?mg?L?1, plus controls) generated from a North Sea crude oil and a subsequent 21-d recovery, mortality, and several reproduction endpoints (egg production rates, egg hatching success, and fraction of females participating in reproduction) in Calanus finmarchicus were studied. Concentration-dependent mortality was found during exposure, averaging to 6%, 3%, 15%, and 42% for the controls and 3 exposure levels, respectively. At the start of the recovery period, mean egg production rates of surviving females from the highest concentrations were very low, but reproduction subsequently improved. In a 4-d single female reproduction test starting 13 d postexposure, no significant differences in egg production rates or hatching success were found between reproducing control and exposed copepods. However, a significantly lower portion of the surviving females from the highest exposure participated in egg production. The results indicate that although short-term exposure to oil-polluted water after an oil spill can induce severe mortality and temporarily suspend reproduction, copepods may recover and produce viable offspring soon after exposure. The results might imply that for C. finmarchicus populations, the impact from short-term exposure to an oil spill might be predicted from acute mortality and that delayed effects make only a limited contribution to population decrease. PMID:23661343

  15. Modeling filtration of dispersed crude oil droplets by the copepod Calanus finmarchicus.

    PubMed

    Nepstad, Raymond; Størdal, Ingvild Fladvad; Brönner, Ute; Nordtug, Trond; Hansen, Bjørn Henrik

    2015-04-01

    Oil droplets may form and disperse in the water column after an accidental spill of crude oil or petroleum products at sea. Micro-sized oil droplets may be available for filter feeding organisms, such as the copepod Calanus finmarchicus, which has been shown to filter oil droplets. In the present paper, a modeling approach was used to estimate potential ingestion amounts by copepod filtration of oil droplets. The new model was implemented in the OSCAR (Oil Spill Contingency and Response) software suite, and tested for a series of oil spill scenarios and key parameters. Among these, the size of the filtered droplets was found to be the most important factor influencing the model results. Given the assumptions and simplifications of the model, filtration of dispersed crude oil by C. finmarchicus was predicted to affect the fate of 1-40% of the total released oil mass, depending on the release scenario and parameter values used, with the lower end of that range being more probable in an actual spill situation. PMID:25636164

  16. Egg production rates of two common copepods in the Barents Sea in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvoretsky, Vladimir G.; Dvoretsky, Alexander G.

    2014-09-01

    Small copepod species play important roles in the pelagic food webs of the Arctic Ocean, linking primary producers to higher trophic levels. The egg production rates (EPs) and weight-specific egg production rates (SEPs) of two common copepods, Acartia longiremis and Temora longicornis, were studied under experimental conditions in Dalnezelenetskaya Bay (southern Barents Sea) during summer. The average EP and SEP at 5-10 °C were 4.7 ± 0.4 eggs female-1 day-1 and 0.025 ± 0.002 day-1, respectively, for A. longiremis and 13.1 ± 0.9 eggs female-1 day-1 and 0.075 ± 0.006 day-1, respectively, for T. longicornis. EP and SEP were significantly higher at 10°C than at 5°C for both species. The mean egg diameter correlated positively and significantly with female prosome length (PL) in each species. SEP of T. longicornis correlated negatively and significantly with PL. Daily EP and SEP were similar to rates recorded for other Acartia and Temora species in temperate and warm regions. The influence of environmental factors (temperature, salinity, and phytoplankton concentration) on EP of both species is discussed. We conclude that temperature is the main factor determining the reproduction rate and timing in A. longiremis and T. longicornis in the Barents Sea.

  17. Toxicity of nickel in the marine calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa: Nickel chloride versus nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, C; Vitiello, V; Casals, E; Puntes, V F; Iamunno, F; Pellegrini, D; Changwen, W; Benvenuto, G; Buttino, I

    2016-01-01

    Nickel compounds are widely used in industries and have been massively introduced in the environment in different chemical forms. Here we report the effect of two different chemical forms of nickel, NiCl2 and nickel nanoparticles (NiNPs), on the reproduction of the marine calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa. The behavior of nickel nanoparticles was analyzed with different techniques and with two protocols. In the "sonicated experiment" (SON) NiNP solution was sonicated while in the "non-sonicated experiment" (NON-SON) the solution was vigorously shaken by hand. Final nominal concentrations of 5, 10 and 50mgL(-1) and 1, 5 and 10mgL(-1) NiNPs were used for the acute and semichronic tests, respectively. Nanoparticle size did not change over time except for the highest concentration of 50mgL(-1) NiNPs, in which the diameter increased up to 843nm after 48h. The concentration of Ni dissolved in the water increased with NP concentration and was similar for SON and NON-SON solutions. Our results indicate that sonication does not modify toxicity for the copepod A. tonsa. Mean EC50 values were similar for NON-SON (20.2mgL(-1)) and SON experiments (22.14mgL(-1)) in the acute test. Similarly, no differences occurred between the two different protocols in the semichronic test, with an EC50 of 7.45mgL(-1) and 6.97mgL(-1) for NON-SON and SON experiments, respectively. Acute and semichronic tests, conducted exposing A. tonsa embryos to NiCl2 concentrations from 0.025 to 0.63mgL(-1), showed EC50 of 0.164 and 0.039mgL(-1), respectively. Overall, A. tonsa is more sensitive to NiCl2 than NiNPs with EC50 being one order of magnitude higher for NiNPs. Finally, we exposed adult copepods for 4 days to NiCl2 and NiNPs (chronic exposure) to study the effect on fecundity in terms of daily egg production and naupliar viability. Egg production is not affected by either form of nickel, whereas egg viability is significantly reduced by 0.025mgL(-1) NiCl2 and by 8.5mgL(-1) NiNPs. At NiNP concentration below the acute EC50 (17mgL(-1)) only 9% of embryos hatched after 4 days. Interestingly, the percentage of naupliar mortality (>82%) observed in the semichronic test at the nominal concentration of 10mgL(-1) NiNPs corresponding to almost 0.10mgL(-1) of dissolved Ni, was similar to that recorded at the same Ni salt concentration. Electron microscopical analyses revealed that A. tonsa adults ingest NiNPs and excrete them through fecal pellets. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study investigating the toxicity of two different forms of Ni on the reproductive physiology of the copepod A. tonsa and showing the ability of the calanoid copepod to ingest nanoparticles from seawater. PMID:26562184

  18. UTILITY OF A FULL LIFE-CYCLE COPEPOD BIOASSAY APPROACH FOR ASSESSMENT OF SEDIMENT-ASSOCIATED CONTAMINANT MIXTURES. (R825279)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    We compared a 21 day full life-cycle bioassay with an existing 14 day partial life-cycle bioassay for two species of meiobenthic copepods, Microarthridion littorale and Amphiascus tenuiremis. We hypothesized that full life-cycle tests would bette...

  19. Relationships between copepod community structure, rainfall regimes, and hydrological variables in a tropical mangrove estuary (Amazon coast, Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhães, André; Pereira, Luci Cajueiro Carneiro; da Costa, Rauquírio Marinho

    2015-03-01

    The influence of rainfall and hydrological variables on the abundance and diversity of the copepod community was investigated on a monthly basis over an annual cycle in the Taperaçu mangrove estuary. In general, the results show that there were no clear spatial or tidal patterns in any biological variables during the study period, which was related to the reduced horizontal gradient in abiotic parameters, determined mainly by the morphological and morphodynamic features of the estuary. Nevertheless, seasonal and monthly trends were recorded in both the hydrological data and the abundance of the dominant copepod species. In particular, Pseudodiaptomus marshi (6,004.6 ± 22,231.6 ind m-3; F = 5.0, p < 0.05) and Acartia tonsa (905.6 ± 2,400.9 ind m-3; F = 14.6, p < 0.001) predominated during the rainy season, whereas Acartia lilljeborgii (750.8 ± 808.3 ind m-3; U = 413.0, p < 0.01) was the most abundant species in the dry season. A distinct process of succession was observed in the relative abundance of these species, driven by the shift in the rainfall regime, which affected hydrological, in particular salinity, and consequently the abundance of copepod species. We suggest that this may be a general pattern governing the dynamics of copepod populations in the estuaries of the Brazilian Amazonian region.

  20. Tolerance and genetic relatedness of three meiobenthic copepod populations exposed to sediment-associated contaminant mixtures: Role of environmental history

    SciTech Connect

    Kovatch, C.E.; Schizas, N.V.; Chandler, G.T.; Coull, B.C.; Quattro, J.M.

    2000-04-01

    Meiobenthic copepod populations (Microarthridion littoral) were collected from three South Carolina, USA, estuaries having different pollution stress histories (i.e., pristine sediments, high polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon [PAH] sediments, high metals/moderate PAH sediments) and then assayed for survival and reproductive output in 14-d exposures to pristine and heavily PAH/metals-contaminated sediment mixture exhibited differential survival and reproductive outputs as a function of previous environmental histories and whether genetic relatedness among populations measured as DNA sequences of the mitochondrial gene, cytochrome apoenzyme b, were linked to copepod contaminant tolerance. Overall, adult survival and reproductive success in contaminated sediments were significantly reduced relative to controls for all three populations irrespective of environmental histories. Differential resistance to sediment-contaminant mixtures by the two copepod populations inhabiting the contaminated sites was not found, despite their previous exposures to mixed contaminants at {Sigma}PAH and {Sigma}Metal concentrations of 7,287 to 2,467 ng/g dry wt and 461 to 3,497 {micro}g/g, respectively. Significant genetic differentiation, however, was found between copepod populations from the control and the two contaminated sites. Generally, cross-population survival and reproductive outputs were not significantly different and could not be linked to genetic differentiation at the population level.

  1. Effects of the oxylipin-producing diatom Skeletonema marinoi on gene expression levels of the calanoid copepod Calanus sinicus.

    PubMed

    Lauritano, Chiara; Carotenuto, Ylenia; Vitiello, Valentina; Buttino, Isabella; Romano, Giovanna; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Ianora, Adrianna

    2015-12-01

    Diatoms are eukaryotic unicellular plants that constitute one of the major components of marine phytoplankton, comprising up to 40% of annual productivity at sea and representing 25% of global carbon-fixation. Diatoms have traditionally been considered a preferential food for zooplankton grazers such as copepods, but, in the last two decades, this beneficial role has been challenged after the discovery that many species of diatoms produce toxic metabolites, collectively termed oxylipins, that induce reproductive failure in zooplankton grazers. Diatoms are the dominant natural diet of Calanus sinicus, a cold-temperate calanoid copepod that supports secondary production of important fisheries in the shelf ecosystems of the Northwest Pacific Ocean, Yellow Sea, Sea of Japan and South China Sea. In this study, the effect of the oxylipin-producing diatom Skeletonema marinoi on C. sinicus has been evaluated by analyzing expression level changes of genes involved in defense and detoxification systems. Results show that C. sinicus is more resistant to a diet of this diatom species in terms of gene expression patterns, compared to the congeneric species Calanus helgolandicus which is an important constituent of the temperate waters of the Atlantic Ocean and northern Mediterranean Sea. These findings contribute to the better understanding of genetic and/or phenotypic flexibility of copepod species and their capabilities to cope with stress by identifying molecular markers (such as stress and detoxification genes) as biosensors for environmental perturbations (e.g. toxins and contaminants) affecting marine copepods. PMID:25666254

  2. Primers to block the amplification of symbiotic apostome ciliate 18S rRNA gene in a PCR-based copepod diet study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Huan; Liu, Guangxing

    2014-05-01

    Pelagic copepods play an important role in the marine food web. However, a full understanding of the ecological status of this zooplankton group depends on the careful study of their natural diets. In previous PCR-based copepod diet studies, we found many apostome ciliates that live symbiotically under the exoskeleton of the copepods, and their sequences were often over-represented in the 18S rRNA gene (18S rDNA) libraries. As a first step to address this issue, we designed three apostome ciliate 18S rDNA blocking primers, and tested their blocking efficiency against apostome ciliate 18s rDNA under various PCR conditions. Using a semi-quantitative PCR method, we optimized the conditions to efficiently amplify the 18S rDNA of the prey while simultaneously excluding the symbiotic apostome ciliates. This technique will facilitate PCR-based diet studies of copepods and other zooplankton in their natural environments.

  3. Observations on a lesser-known monogenean, Udonella myliobati, from a copepod parasite, Lepeophtheirus natalensis, parasitizing the spotted ragged-tooth shark, Carcharias taurus, from South African waters.

    PubMed

    Olivier, P A; Dippenaar, S M; Khalil, L F; Mokgalong, N M

    2000-06-01

    The phylogeny of the genus Udonella has been disputed for quite some time, but recent phylogenetic analysis of molecular data confirms that the genus is a monopisthocotylean monogenean. Specimens of Udonella myliobati parasitizing the copepod Lepeophtheirus natalensis, an ectoparasite of the spotted ragged-tooth shark, (Carcharias taurus), were collected and studied. A total of 771 monogenean specimens were recovered from 54 infected copepods examined, with a mean intensity of 14,3 worms per copepod. Most of the monogeneans were found attached to the dorsal surface of the lateral and frontal marginal membranes of the copepod carapace. Eggs, with filaments and adhesive discs, were found ventrally on the host, mainly attached to the maxillae and maxillipeds, in clusters of 12-14. Observations on the morphology, distribution and behaviour of this monogenean are presented with the aid of light and scanning electron microscopy. PMID:11028750

  4. Revisiting the octopicolid copepods (Octopicolidae: Octopicola Humes, 1957): comparative morphology and an updated key to species.

    PubMed

    Cavaleiro, Francisca I; Ho, Ju-Shey; Iglesias, Raúl; García-Estévez, José M; Santos, Maria J

    2013-09-01

    A review of the present state of knowledge on the octopicolid copepods (Octopicolidae: Octopicola Humes, 1957) is presented. Characteristic morphological features are illustrated with scanning electron micrographs of Octopicola superba superba Humes, 1957. Comparative morphology analysis led to the conclusion that there is sufficient evidence to justify raising the two subspecies of O. superba to full species rank. A new identification key for the four species of Octopicola Humes, 1957, i.e. O. superba Humes, 1957, O. antillensis Stock, Humes & Gooding, 1963, O. stocki Humes, 1963 and O. regalis Humes, 1974, is proposed after evaluation of the morphological characters which vary more markedly between them. Among other characters, these species differ in the ornamentation of the third antennal segment, maxilla and male maxilliped. They are further distinguished by a combination of several character states concerning the fifth pedigerous somite. PMID:23949652

  5. Life cycle of Schizochytriodinium calani nov. gen. nov. spec., a dinoflagellate parasitizing copepod eggs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbrächter, Malte

    1988-09-01

    During the Polarstern-cruise ARK IV/2 June 1987, in the Fram Strait, dinophytes parasitizing copepod eggs were observed. In the laboratory on board, vegetative reproduction was documented and re-infection of Calanus glacialis and C. hyperboreus eggs was experimentally established. During food uptake, a primary cyst produces successively several secondary cysts, all separating immediately after formation from the primary cyst. In every one of these free floating secondary cysts up to 256 dinospores are formed by palintomy. Re-infection only occurred after a “maturation time” of at least 2 days after formation of the dinospores. The life cycle is compared to that of other similar parasitic dinophyte genera: Apodinium Chatton, Chytriodinium Chatton, Dissodinium Klebs in Pascher and Myxodinium Cachon, Cachon & Bouquaheux. As the taxon under discussion does not fit in with any species or genus known so far, it is described as Schizochytriodinium calani nov. gen. nov. spec.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA polymorphism (CO1) of three dominant copepod species in the South Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupnikova, A. N.; Kulagin, D. N.; Neretina, T. V.; Mugue, N. S.

    2013-07-01

    The Southern Ocean is characterized by the complex system of oceanic fronts that maintain the latitudinal zonality of biotopes. These fronts are boundaries of water masses with different hydrophysical characteristics. We explore the genetic differentiation of the dominant zooplankton species in regards to the complex hydrophysical zonality of the Southern Ocean. The barcoding region of mitochondrial CO1 gene was sequenced for three copepod species, Calanus simillimus, Rhincalanus gigas, and Metridia lucens. These species are the most abundant in the Southern Ocean and form the basis of the zooplankton community. Genetic differentiation was found neither for Calanus simillimus nor for Rhincalanus gigas. The mitochondrial haplotypes of Metridia lucens cluster in two genetically distant groups (Subantarctic and Antarctic) found together only in the Polar Front Zone.

  7. Biosynthesis of coelenterazine in the deep-sea copepod, Metridia pacifica

    SciTech Connect

    Oba, Yuichi; Kato, Shin-ichi; Ojika, Makoto; Inouye, Satoshi

    2009-12-18

    Coelenterazine is an imidazopyrazinone compound (3,7-dihydroimidazopyrazin-3-one structure) that is widely distributed in marine organisms and used as a luciferin for various bioluminescence reactions. We have used electrospray ionization-ion trap-mass spectrometry to investigate whether the deep-sea luminous copepod Metridia pacifica is able to synthesize coelenterazine. By feeding experiments using deuterium labeled amino acids of L-tyrosine and L-phenylalanine, we have shown that coelenterazine can be synthesized from two molecules of L-tyrosine and one molecule of L-phenylalanine in M. pacifica. This is the first demonstration that coelenterazine is biosynthesized from free L-amino acids in a marine organism.

  8. Bacterial exopolymer utilization by a harpacticoid copepod: A methodology and results

    SciTech Connect

    Decho, A.W.; Moriarty, D.J.W. )

    1990-07-01

    Exopolymer mucus secretions of bacteria and diatoms are potential foods for benthic animals. These secretions are coincidently ingested by animals during consumption of microbial cells and sediments. The utilization of microbial secretions was investigated with exopolymer derived from a marine bacterium (pseudomonas sp.) from seagrass beds and a harpacticoid copepod Laophonte sp. from the same habitat. A new technique was developed to examine ingestion, absorption, and absorption efficiencies of these bacterial secretions by consumers. Exopolymer mucus (from the bacterium in stationary phase) was labeled with {sup 14}C, collected, purified, and bound onto bacterium-sized beads. The exopolymer slime coating mimicked the coatings associated with many marine bacteria. Results from feeding experiments where the coated beads were mixed with sediment demonstrated that the mucus-exopolymer secretions of bacteria were ingested and utilized by Laophonte sp. Absorption efficiencies, determined directly, were > 80% in the presence of other food resources, indicating that exopolymer is potentially a highly labile C resource for this animal.

  9. EFFECTS OF DIET ON GROWTH AND SURVIVAL OF LARVAL WALLYES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of diet quality on larval walleye (Stizostedion vitreum vitreum) growth and survival are described. The cyclopoid copepod Diacyclops thomasi consumed larval walleyes within 10 min at dense copepod concentrations and within 1 day at lower densities (500 organisms/L). A...

  10. Transgenerational effects alleviate severe fecundity loss during ocean acidification in a ubiquitous planktonic copepod.

    PubMed

    Thor, Peter; Dupont, Sam

    2015-06-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) caused by anthropogenic CO2 emission is projected for thousands of years to come, and significant effects are predicted for many marine organisms. While significant evolutionary responses are expected during such persistent environmental change, most studies consider only short-term effects. Little is known about the transgenerational effects of parental environments or natural selection on the capacity of populations to counter detrimental OA effects. In this study, six laboratory populations of the calanoid copepod Pseudocalanus acuspes were established at three different CO2 partial pressures (pCO2 of 400, 900 and 1550 ?atm) and grown for two generations at these conditions. Our results show evidence of alleviation of OA effects as a result of transgenerational effects in P. acuspes. Second generation adults showed a 29% decrease in fecundity at 900 ?atm CO2 compared to 400 ?atm CO2 . This was accompanied by a 10% increase in metabolic rate indicative of metabolic stress. Reciprocal transplant tests demonstrated that this effect was reversible and the expression of phenotypic plasticity. Furthermore, these tests showed that at a pCO2 exceeding the natural range experienced by P. acuspes (1550 ?atm), fecundity would have decreased by as much as 67% compared to at 400 ?atm CO2 as a result of this plasticity. However, transgenerational effects partly reduced OA effects so that the loss of fecundity remained at a level comparable to that at 900 ?atm CO2 . This also relieved the copepods from metabolic stress, and respiration rates were lower than at 900 ?atm CO2 . These results highlight the importance of tests for transgenerational effects to avoid overestimation of the effects of OA. PMID:25430823

  11. Plankton distribution and the impact of copepod grazing on primary production in Fram Strait, Greenland Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirche, H.-J.; Baumann, M. E. M.; Kattner, G.; Gradinger, R.

    1991-08-01

    Two hydrobiological transects across the East Greenland Shelf and the open waters of Fram Strait in summer were chosen to illustrate the distribution and production of phyto- and zooplankton in relation to water masses and ice cover. The parameters used were temperature and salinity, inorganic nutrients, chlorophyll a, primary production, phytoplankton species composition, abundance of the dominant herbivorous copepods Calanus finmarchicus, C. glacialis, C. hyperboreus, Metridia longa and egg production of C. finmarchicus and C. glacialis. Grazing impact of copepodites and adults of these four species was modelled for each station by using egg production rates as an index of growth. Seasonal development of plankton communities was closely associated with the extent of the ice cover, hydrographic conditions and the water masses typical of the different hydrographic domains. Four regions were identified from their biological activities and physical environment: The Northeast Water polynya on the East Greenland Shelf, with a springbloom of diatoms and active reproduction of herbivorous copepods. The pack ice region, dominated by small flagellates and negligible grazing activities. The marginal ice zone, with high variability and strong gradients of autotroph production related to eddies and ice tongues, an active microbial loop and low egg production. The open water, with high station-to-station variability of most of the parameters, probably related to hydrographic mesoscale activities. Here, Phaeocystis pouchetii was a prominent species in the phytoplankton communities. Its presence may at least partly be responsible for the generally low egg production in the open waters. Grazing impact on primary production was always small, due to low zooplankton biomass in the polynya and due to low ingestion in the remaining regions.

  12. Evidence for ontogenetic feeding strategies in four calanoid copepods in the East Sea (Japan Sea) in summer, revealed by stable isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Dong-Hoon; Wi, Jin Hee; Suh, Hae-Lip

    2015-09-01

    Deciphering the ontogenetic feeding ecology of copepods is essential to understanding their role in the energy transfer of marine ecosystems. We used stable isotope analysis to examine the ontogenetic feeding strategies of the four coexisting calanoid copepods, Mesocalanus tenuicornis, Metridia pacifica, Calanus sinicus, and Neocalanus plumchrus, in the East Sea (Japan Sea) in summer. Moreover, we used the stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition of small-sized plankton in three cell size fractions, pico- (< 2 ?m), nano- (2-20 ?m) and microplankton (20-200 ?m), to identify the dietary preference at each developmental stage. The relative carbon masses of pico-, nano- and microplankton were 18, 38, and 44%, respectively, and their ?13C and ?15N values gradually increased with increasing size classes. The ontogenetic trophic position of four copepods were relatively low and ranged from 2.1 to 2.6, indicating that herbivores feed on small-sized phytoplankton, pico- and nanoplankton. Among copepodid stages, the ?13C and ?15N values of M. tenuicornis and C. sinicus differed significantly, while those of M. pacifica and N. plumchrus were not significantly different. In M. tenuicornis, the smallest species among the four copepods examined, the diet preference of CIV for picoplankton changed to nanoplankton in the adult stage. When M. pacifica developed from CIV to adult, the diet preference changed from pico- to microplankton. The proportion of microplankton in the diet of C. sinicus and N. plumchrus increased from CIV to female adult and from CIII to CV, respectively. During the developmental progress in copepodid stages, the smaller copepods significantly changed their dietary preference from pico- to microplankton, while the larger copepods consistently fed on microplankton. We suggest that smaller copepods have an advantage in survival at early copepodid stages compared with larger copepods in summer when microplankton biomass is relatively low.

  13. Food-web inferences of stable isotope spatial patterns in copepods and yellowfin tuna in the pelagic eastern Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Robert J.; Popp, Brian N.; Graham, Brittany S.; López-Ibarra, Gladis A.; Galván-Magaña, Felipe; Lennert-Cody, Cleridy E.; Bocanegra-Castillo, Noemi; Wallsgrove, Natalie J.; Gier, Elizabeth; Alatorre-Ramírez, Vanessa; Ballance, Lisa T.; Fry, Brian

    2010-07-01

    Evaluating the impacts of climate and fishing on oceanic ecosystems requires an improved understanding of the trophodynamics of pelagic food webs. Our approach was to examine broad-scale spatial relationships among the stable N isotope values of copepods and yellowfin tuna ( Thunnus albacares), and to quantify yellowfin tuna trophic status in the food web based on stable-isotope and stomach-contents analyses. Using a generalized additive model fitted to abundance-weighted-average ? 15N values of several omnivorous copepod species, we examined isotopic spatial relationships among yellowfin tuna and copepods. We found a broad-scale, uniform gradient in ? 15N values of copepods increasing from south to north in a region encompassing the eastern Pacific warm pool and parts of several current systems. Over the same region, a similar trend was observed for the ? 15N values in the white muscle of yellowfin tuna caught by the purse-seine fishery, implying limited movement behavior. Assuming the omnivorous copepods represent a proxy for the ? 15N values at the base of the food web, the isotopic difference between these two taxa, “ ?YFT-COP,” was interpreted as a trophic-position offset. Yellowfin tuna trophic-position estimates based on their bulk ? 15N values were not significantly different than independent estimates based on stomach contents, but are sensitive to errors in the trophic enrichment factor and the trophic position of copepods. An apparent inshore-offshore, east to west gradient in yellowfin tuna trophic position was corroborated using compound-specific isotope analysis of amino acids conducted on a subset of samples. The gradient was not explained by the distribution of yellowfin tuna of different sizes, by seasonal variability at the base of the food web, or by known ambit distances (i.e. movements). Yellowfin tuna stomach contents did not show a regular inshore-offshore gradient in trophic position during 2003-2005, but the trophic-position estimates based on both methods had similar scales of variability. We conclude that trophic status of yellowfin tuna increased significantly from east to west over the study area based on the spatial pattern of ?YFT-COP values and the difference between the ? 15N values of glutamic acid and glycine, “trophic” and “source” amino acids, respectively. These results provide improved depictions of trophic links and biomass flows for food-web models, effective tools to evaluate climate and fishing effects on exploited ecosystems.

  14. Developmental endpoints of chronic exposure to suspected endocrine-disrupting chemicals on benthic and hyporheic freshwater copepods.

    PubMed

    Di Marzio, W D; Castaldo, D; Di Lorenzo, T; Di Cioccio, A; Sáenz, M E; Galassi, D M P

    2013-10-01

    The aims of this study were: (i) to assess if carbamate pesticides and ammonium, widely detected in European freshwater bodies, can be considered ecologically relevant endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) for benthic and interstitial freshwater copepods; and (ii) to evaluate the potential of copepods as sentinels for monitoring ecosystem health. In order to achieve these objectives, four species belonging to the harpacticoid copepod genus Bryocamptus, namely B. (E.) echinatus, B. (R.) zschokkei, B. (R.) pygmaeus and B. (B.) minutus, were subjected to chronic exposures to Aldicarb and ammonium. A significant deviation from the developmental time of unexposed control cultures was observed for all the species in test cultures. Aldicarb caused an increase in generation time over 80% in both B. minutus and B. zschokkei, but less than 35% in B. pygmaeus and B. echinatus. Ammonium increased generation time over 33% in B. minutus, and 14, 12 and 3.5% for B. pygmaeus, B. zschokkei and B. echinatus, respectively. On the basis of these results it can be concluded that chronic exposure to carbamate pesticides and ammonium alters the post-naupliar development of the test-species and propose their potential role as EDCs, leaving open the basis to search what are the mechanism underlying. A prolonged developmental time would probably produce a detrimental effect on population attributes, such as age structure and population size. These deviations from a pristine population condition may be considered suitable biological indicators of ecosystem stress, particularly useful to compare polluted to unpolluted reference sites. Due to their dominance in both benthic and interstitial habitats, and their sensitivity as test organisms, freshwater benthic and hyporheic copepods can fully be used as sentinel species for assessing health condition of aquatic ecosystems as required by world-wide water legislation. PMID:23890366

  15. The Parasitic Dinoflagellates Blastodinium spp. Inhabiting the Gut of Marine, Planktonic Copepods: Morphology, Ecology, and Unrecognized Species Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Skovgaard, Alf; Karpov, Sergey A.; Guillou, Laure

    2012-01-01

    Blastodinium is a genus of dinoflagellates that live as parasites in the gut of marine, planktonic copepods in the World’s oceans and coastal waters. The taxonomy, phylogeny, and physiology of the genus have only been explored to a limited degree and, based on recent investigations, we hypothesize that the morphological and genetic diversity within this genus may be considerably larger than presently recognized. To address these issues, we obtained 18S rDNA and ITS gene sequences for Blastodinium specimens of different geographical origins, including representatives of the type species. This genetic information was in some cases complemented with new morphological, ultrastructural, physiological, and ecological data. Because most current knowledge about Blastodinium and its effects on copepod hosts stem from publications more than half a century old, we here summarize and discuss the existing knowledge in relation to the new data generated. Most Blastodinium species possess functional chloroplasts, but the parasitic stage, the trophocyte, has etioplasts and probably a limited photosynthetic activity. Sporocytes and swarmer cells have well-developed plastids and plausibly acquire part of their organic carbon needs through photosynthesis. A few species are nearly colorless with no functional chloroplasts. The photosynthetic species are almost exclusively found in warm, oligotrophic waters, indicating a life strategy that may benefit from copepods as microhabitats for acquiring nutrients in a nutrient-limited environment. As reported in the literature, monophyly of the genus is moderately supported, but the three main groups proposed by Chatton in 1920 are consistent with molecular data. However, we demonstrate an important genetic diversity within the genus and provide evidences for new groups and the presence of cryptic species. Finally, we discuss the current knowledge on the occurrence of Blastodinium spp. and their potential impact on natural copepod populations. PMID:22973263

  16. Two new species of parasitic copepods (Crustacea) on two immigrant rabbitfishes (Family Siganidae) from the Red Sea.

    PubMed

    El-Rashidy, H H; Boxshall, G A

    2011-07-01

    Two new species of parasitic copepods, one from each of the families Hatschekiidae and Bomolochidae, are reported from two immigrant species of rabbitfishes (Family Siganidae), both of which originated from the Red Sea but are now established in the Mediterranean. The descriptions of Hatschekia siganicola n. sp. and Nothobomolochus neomediterraneus n. sp. are based on material of both sexes obtained from the gills of Siganus luridus Rüppell and S. rivulatus Forsskål, respectively, caught in Egyptian Mediterranean waters off the Alexandrian coast. PMID:21643895

  17. The metabolic response of marine copepods to environmental warming and ocean acidification in the absence of food.

    PubMed

    Mayor, Daniel J; Sommer, Ulf; Cook, Kathryn B; Viant, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Marine copepods are central to the productivity and biogeochemistry of marine ecosystems. Nevertheless, the direct and indirect effects of climate change on their metabolic functioning remain poorly understood. Here, we use metabolomics, the unbiased study of multiple low molecular weight organic metabolites, to examine how the physiology of Calanus spp. is affected by end-of-century global warming and ocean acidification scenarios. We report that the physiological stresses associated with incubation without food over a 5-day period greatly exceed those caused directly by seawater temperature or pH perturbations. This highlights the need to contextualise the results of climate change experiments by comparison to other, naturally occurring stressors such as food deprivation, which is being exacerbated by global warming. Protein and lipid metabolism were up-regulated in the food-deprived animals, with a novel class of taurine-containing lipids and the essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, changing significantly over the duration of our experiment. Copepods derive these PUFAs by ingesting diatoms and flagellated microplankton respectively. Climate-driven changes in the productivity, phenology and composition of microplankton communities, and hence the availability of these fatty acids, therefore have the potential to influence the ability of copepods to survive starvation and other environmental stressors. PMID:26364855

  18. The metabolic response of marine copepods to environmental warming and ocean acidification in the absence of food

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayor, Daniel J.; Sommer, Ulf; Cook, Kathryn B.; Viant, Mark R.

    2015-09-01

    Marine copepods are central to the productivity and biogeochemistry of marine ecosystems. Nevertheless, the direct and indirect effects of climate change on their metabolic functioning remain poorly understood. Here, we use metabolomics, the unbiased study of multiple low molecular weight organic metabolites, to examine how the physiology of Calanus spp. is affected by end-of-century global warming and ocean acidification scenarios. We report that the physiological stresses associated with incubation without food over a 5-day period greatly exceed those caused directly by seawater temperature or pH perturbations. This highlights the need to contextualise the results of climate change experiments by comparison to other, naturally occurring stressors such as food deprivation, which is being exacerbated by global warming. Protein and lipid metabolism were up-regulated in the food-deprived animals, with a novel class of taurine-containing lipids and the essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, changing significantly over the duration of our experiment. Copepods derive these PUFAs by ingesting diatoms and flagellated microplankton respectively. Climate-driven changes in the productivity, phenology and composition of microplankton communities, and hence the availability of these fatty acids, therefore have the potential to influence the ability of copepods to survive starvation and other environmental stressors.

  19. Role of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) in the environmental stressor-exposed intertidal copepod Tigriopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-Mi; Jeong, Chang-Bum; Han, Jeonghoon; Kim, Il-Chan; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2013-09-01

    To identify and characterize CHH (TJ-CHH) gene in the copepod Tigriopus japonicus, we analyzed the full-length cDNA sequence, genomic structure, and promoter region. The full-length TJ-CHH cDNA was 716 bp in length, encoding 136 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequences of TJ-CHH showed a high similarity of the CHH mature domain to other crustaceans. Six conserved cysteine residues and five conserved structural motifs in the CHH mature peptide domain were also observed. The genomic structure of the TJ-CHH gene contained three exons and two introns in its open reading frame (ORF), and several transcriptional elements were detected in the promoter region of the TJ-CHH gene. To investigate transcriptional change of TJ-CHH under environmental stress, T. japonicus were exposed to heat treatment, UV-B radiation, heavy metals, and water-accommodated fractions (WAFs) of Iranian crude oil. Upon heat stress, TJ-CHH transcripts were elevated at 30 °C and 35 °C for 96 h in a time-course experiment. UV-B radiation led to a decreased pattern of the TJ-CHH transcript 48 h and more after radiation (12 kJ/m(2)). After exposure of a fixed dose (12 kJ/m(2)) in a time-course experiment, TJ-CHH transcript was down-regulated in time-dependent manner with a lowest value at 12h. However, the TJ-CHH transcript level was increased in response to five heavy metal exposures for 96 h. Also, the level of the TJ-CHH transcript was significantly up-regulated at 20% of WAFs after exposure to WAFs for 48 h and then remarkably reduced in a dose-dependent manner. These findings suggest that the enhanced TJ-CHH transcript level is associated with a cellular stress response of the TJ-CHH gene as shown in decapod crustaceans. This study is also helpful for a better understanding of the detrimental effects of environmental changes on the CHH-triggered copepod metabolism. PMID:23797038

  20. Short-term changes of the mesozooplankton community and copepod gut pigment in the Chukchi Sea in autumn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuno, K.; Yamaguchi, A.; Nishino, S.; Inoue, J.; Kikuchi, T.

    2015-03-01

    In the Chukchi Sea, due to the recent drastic reduction of sea-ice during the summer, an increasing formation of atmospheric turbulence has been reported. However, the importance and effects of atmospheric turbulence on the marine ecosystem are not fully understood in this region. To evaluate the effect of atmospheric turbulence on the marine ecosystem, high-frequent sampling (two to four times per day) on the mesozooplankton community and the gut pigment of dominant copepods were made at a fixed station in the Chukchi Sea from 10 to 25 September 2013. During the study period, a strong wind event (SWE) was observed on 18 September. After the SWE, the standing stock of chlorophyll a (chl a) was increased, especially for micro-size (> 10 ?m) fractions. Zooplankton abundance ranged 23 610-56 809 ind. m-2 and exhibited no clear changes with SWE. In terms of abundance, calanoid copepods constituted the most dominated taxa (mean: 57%), followed by barnacle larvae (31%). Within the calanoid copepods, small-sized Pseudocalanus spp. (65%) and large-sized Calanus glacialis (30%) dominated. In the population structure of C. glacialis, copepodid stage 5 (C5) dominated, and the mean copepodid stage did not vary with SWE. The dominance of accumulated lipids in C5 and C6 females with immature gonads indicated that they were preparing for seasonal diapause. The gut pigment of C. glacialis C5 was higher at night and was correlated with ambient chl a, and a significant increase was observed after SWE (2.6 vs. 4.5 ng pigment ind.-1). Assuming C : Chl a ratio, the grazing impact by C. glacialis C5 was estimated to be 4.14 mg C m-2 day-1, which corresponded to 0.5-4.6% of the standing stock of micro-size phytoplankton. Compared with the metabolic food requirement, their feeding on phytoplankton accounted for 12.6% of their total food requirement. These facts suggest that C. glacialis could not maintain their population on solely phytoplankton food, and other food sources (i.e., microzooplankton) are important in autumn. As observed for the increase in gut pigment, temporal phytoplankton bloom, which is enhanced by the atmospheric turbulence (SWE) in autumn, may have a positive effect on copepod nutrition. However, because of the relatively long generation length of copepods, a smaller effect was detected for their abundance, population structure, lipid accumulation and gonad maturation within the short-term period (16 days).

  1. Feeding strategies of tropical and subtropical calanoid copepods throughout the eastern Atlantic Ocean - Latitudinal and bathymetric aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bode, Maya; Hagen, Wilhelm; Schukat, Anna; Teuber, Lena; Fonseca-Batista, Debany; Dehairs, Frank; Auel, Holger

    2015-11-01

    The majority of global ocean production and total export production is attributed to oligotrophic oceanic regions due to their vast regional expanse. However, energy transfers, food-web structures and trophic relationships in these areas remain largely unknown. Regional and vertical inter- and intra-specific differences in trophic interactions and dietary preferences of calanoid copepods were investigated in four different regions in the open eastern Atlantic Ocean (38°N to 21°S) in October/November 2012 using a combination of fatty acid (FA) and stable isotope (SI) analyses. Mean carnivory indices (CI) based on FA trophic markers generally agreed with trophic positions (TP) derived from ?15N analysis. Most copepods were classified as omnivorous (CI ?0.5, TP 1.8 to ?2.5) or carnivorous (CI ? 0.7, TP ? 2.9). Herbivorous copepods showed typical CIs of ?0.3. Geographical differences in ?15N values of epi- (200-0 m) to mesopelagic (1000-200 m) copepods reflected corresponding spatial differences in baseline ?15N of particulate organic matter from the upper 100 m. In contrast, species restricted to lower meso- and bathypelagic (2000-1000 m) layers did not show this regional trend. FA compositions were species-specific without distinct intra-specific vertical or spatial variations. Differences were only observed in the southernmost region influenced by the highly productive Benguela Current. Apparently, food availability and dietary composition were widely homogeneous throughout the mesotrophic oceanic regions of the tropical and subtropical Atlantic. Four major species clusters were identified by principal component analysis based on FA compositions. Vertically migrating species clustered with epi- to mesopelagic, non-migrating species, of which only Neocalanus gracilis was moderately enriched in lipids with 16% of dry mass (DM) and stored wax esters (WE) with 37% of total lipid (TL). All other species of this cluster had low lipid contents (<10% DM) without WE. Of these, the tropical epipelagic Undinula vulgaris showed highest portions of bacterial markers. Rhincalanus cornutus, R. nasutus and Calanoides carinatus formed three separate clusters with species-specific lipid profiles, high lipid contents (?41% DM), mainly accumulated as WE (?79% TL). C. carinatus and R. nasutus were primarily herbivorous with almost no bacterial input. Despite deviating feeding strategies, R. nasutus clustered with deep-dwelling, carnivorous species, which had high amounts of lipids (?37% DM) and WE (?54% TL). Tropical and subtropical calanoid copepods exhibited a wide variety of life strategies, characterized by specialized feeding. This allows them, together with vertical habitat partitioning, to maintain high abundance and diversity in tropical oligotrophic open oceans, where they play an essential role in the energy flux and carbon cycling.

  2. Endosymbiotic copepods may feed on zooxanthellae from their coral host, Pocillopora damicornis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.-R.; Dai, C.-F.

    2010-03-01

    The Xarifiidae is one of the most common families of endosymbiotic copepods that live in close association with scleractinian corals. Previous studies on xarifiids primarily focused on their taxonomy and morphology, while their influence on corals is still unknown. In this study, we collected a total of 1,579 individuals belonging to 6 species of xarifiids from 360 colonies of Pocillopora damicornis at Nanwan Bay, southern Taiwan from July 2007 to May 2008. Furthermore, using optical and electron microscopic observations, we examined the gut contents of Xarifia fissilis, the most abundant species of the Xarifiidae that we collected. We found that the gut of X. fissilis was characterized by a reddish-brown color due to the presence of numerous unicellular algae with diameters of 5-10 ?m. TEM observations indicated that the unicellular algae possessed typical characteristics of Symbiodinium including a peripheral chloroplast, stalked pyrenoids, starch sheaths, mesokaryotic nuclei, amphiesmas, an accumulation body, and mitochondria. After starving the isolated X. fissilis in the light and dark (light intensity: 140 ?mol photon m-2 s-1; photoperiod: 12 h light/12 h dark) for 2 weeks, fluorescence was clearly visible in its gut and fecal pellets under fluorescent microscopic observations. The cultivation experiment supports the hypothesis that the unicellular algae were beneficial to the survival of X. fissilis under light conditions, possibly through transferring photosynthates to the hosts. These results suggest that X. fissilis may consume and retain unicellular algae for further photosynthesis.

  3. Parental exposure to elevated pCO2 influences the reproductive success of copepods

    PubMed Central

    Cripps, Gemma; Lindeque, Penelope; Flynn, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Substantial variations are reported for egg production and hatching rates of copepods exposed to elevated carbon dioxide concentrations (pCO2). One possible explanation, as found in other marine taxa, is that prior parental exposure to elevated pCO2 (and/or decreased pH) affects reproductive performance. Previous studies have adopted two distinct approaches, either (1) expose male and female copepoda to the test pCO2/pH scenarios, or (2) solely expose egg-laying females to the tests. Although the former approach is more realistic, the majority of studies have used the latter approach. Here, we investigated the variation in egg production and hatching success of Acartia tonsa between these two experimental designs, across five different pCO2 concentrations (385–6000 µatm pCO2). In addition, to determine the effect of pCO2 on the hatching success with no prior parental exposure, eggs produced and fertilized under ambient conditions were also exposed to these pCO2 scenarios. Significant variations were found between experimental designs, with approach (1) resulting in higher impacts; here >20% difference was seen in hatching success between experiments at 1000 µatm pCO2 scenarios (2100 year scenario), and >85% at 6000 µatm pCO2. This study highlights the potential to misrepresent the reproductive response of a species to elevated pCO2 dependent on parental exposure. PMID:25221371

  4. To eat and not be eaten: optimal foraging behaviour in suspension feeding copepods

    PubMed Central

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Jiang, Houshuo

    2013-01-01

    Zooplankton feed on microscopic prey that they either entrain in a feeding current or encounter as they cruise through the water. They generate fluid disturbances as they feed and move, thus elevating their risk of being detected and encountered by predators. Different feeding modes generate different hydrodynamic signals to predators and different predator encounter speeds but may also differ in their efficiency; the optimal behaviour is that which maximizes the net energy gain over the predation risk. Here, we show by means of flow visualization and simple hydrodynamic and optimization models that copepods with a diversity of feeding behaviours converge on optimal, size-independent specific clearance rates that are consistent with observed clearance rates of zooplankton, irrespective of feeding mode, species and size. We also predict magnitudes and size-scaling of swimming speeds that are consistent with observations. The rationalization of the magnitude and scaling of the clearance rates of zooplankton makes it more suitable for development of models of marine ecosystems, and is particularly relevant in predicting the size structure and biomass of pelagic communities. PMID:23075546

  5. Large, motile epifauna interact strongly with harpacticoid copepods and polychaetes at a bathyal site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thistle, David; Eckman, James E.; Paterson, Gordon L. J.

    2008-03-01

    Strengths of interactions among groups of animals in deep-sea-sediment communities are poorly known. Large, motile epifauna (LME) such as sea cucumbers, star fishes, and demersal fishes occur in the deep sea and are sources of predation, disturbance, and habitat alteration and thus have the potential to interact strongly with infauna. At a site off the southwestern coast of the United States (32°57.3'N, 117°32.2'W, 780 m depth), we excluded the LME from five 75- ×75-cm plots with cages. After 143 d, we sampled these plots and five plots of the same size paired with them as controls. Abundances of harpacticoid copepods and polychaetes were significantly lower in cages than in controls. In several cages, nematodes and kinorhynchs were also dramatically less abundant than in paired controls. Results suggest that LME ordinarily affect the infaunal assemblage in such a way that harpacticoids and polychaetes (and perhaps nematodes and kinorhynchs) can maintain higher abundances than they can in the absence of LME, indicating that strong interactions can influence the organization of deep-sea-sediment communities. In a multivariate analysis of environmental parameters, cage and control samples were intermixed, so if the effect is transmitted by alterations of the environment by the LME, the nature of the alterations must be relatively local and remains to be discovered.

  6. Biotransformation of petroleum hydrocarbons and microbial communities in seawater with oil dispersions and copepod feces.

    PubMed

    Størdal, Ingvild Fladvad; Olsen, Anders Johny; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro; Netzer, Roman; Altin, Dag; Brakstad, Odd Gunnar

    2015-12-30

    To determine biotransformation of components in crude oil dispersions in the presence of feces from marine copepods, dispersed oil was incubated alone, with the addition of clean or oil-containing feces. We hypothesized that the feces would contribute with nutrients to bacteria, and higher concentrations of oil-degrading bacteria, respectively. Presence of clean feces resulted in higher degradation of aromatic oil compounds, but lower degradation of n-alkanes. Presence of oil-containing feces resulted in higher degradation of n-alkanes. The effect of clean feces on aromatic compounds are suggested to be due to higher concentrations of nutrients in the seawater where aromatic degradation takes place, while the lower degradation of n-alkanes are suggested to be due to a preference by bacteria for feces over these compounds. Large aggregates were observed in oil dispersions with clean feces, which may cause sedimentation of un-weathered lipophilic oil compounds towards the seafloor if formed during oil spills. PMID:26494249

  7. Development of acute and chronic sediment bioassays with the harpacticoid copepod Quinquelaophonte sp.

    PubMed

    Stringer, Tristan J; Glover, Chris N; Keesing, Vaughan; Northcott, Grant L; Gaw, Sally; Tremblay, Louis A

    2014-01-01

    Reliable environmentally realistic bioassay methodologies are increasingly needed to assess the effects of environmental pollution. This study describes two estuarine sediment bioassays, one acute (96 h) and one chronic (14 d), with the New Zealand harpacticoid copepod Quinquelaophonte sp. utilising behavioural and reproductive endpoints. Spiked sediments were used to expose Quinquelaophonte sp. to three reference compounds representing important categories of estuarine chemical stressors: zinc (a metal), atrazine (a pesticide), and phenanthrene (a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon). Acute-to-chronic ratios (ACR) were used to further characterise species responses. Acute sediment (sandy and low total organic content) 96 h EC50 values for the sublethal inhibition of mobility for zinc, atrazine and phenanthrene were 137, 5.4, and 2.6 µg/g, respectively. The chronic EC50 values for inhibition of reproduction (total offspring) were 54.5, 0.0083, and 0.067 µg/g for zinc, atrazine, and phenanthrene, respectively. For phenanthrene, a potentially novel mode of action was identified on reproduction. Quinquelaophonte sp. was found to be more sensitive than several other estuarine species indicating choice of test organism is important to characterising the effects of environmentally relevant levels of contamination. The bioassay sediment results demonstrate the sensitivity and suitability of Quinquelaophonte sp. as a tool for the assessment use of estuarine health. PMID:24176293

  8. Does the stoichiometric carbon:phosphorus knife edge apply for predaceous copepods?

    PubMed

    Laspoumaderes, Cecilia; Modenutti, Beatriz; Elser, James J; Balseiro, Esteban

    2015-06-01

    Recent work has indicated that stoichiometric food quality in terms of the carbon:phosphorus (C:P) ratio affects consumers whether the imbalance involves a deficit or an excess of nutrients; hence, organisms exist on a "stoichiometric knife edge". While previous studies have focused primarily on autotroph-herbivore trophic transfer, nutritional imbalances may also affect the interactions between species at higher trophic levels. Since the foods of carnivores are normally stoichiometrically similar to the body compositions of those carnivores, they may be more severely affected than herbivores if imbalances become pronounced. We analysed the response of the predatory copepod Parabroteas sarsi to monospecific diet treatments consisting of high and low C:P prey items. These dietary treatments strongly affected the predator's elemental composition and growth, although prey selection, excretion, egestion, and respiration rates were not affected. We suggest that, due to their low threshold elemental ratio and a narrow C:P stoichiometric knife edge, these predators are highly vulnerable to stoichiometric imbalances, whether an excess or a deficit of nutrients is involved. Our results demonstrating this high sensitivity to prey C:P ratio show that the stoichiometric knife edge may apply to not only herbivores but also higher trophic levels. Thus, predators such as P. sarsi, with a much narrower range of food quality, may also be strongly affected by fluctuations in the quality of their prey, with negative consequences for their secondary production. PMID:25663329

  9. Seasonal copepod lipid pump promotes carbon sequestration in the deep North Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Jónasdóttir, Sigrún Huld; Visser, André W; Richardson, Katherine; Heath, Michael R

    2015-09-29

    Estimates of carbon flux to the deep oceans are essential for our understanding of global carbon budgets. Sinking of detrital material ("biological pump") is usually thought to be the main biological component of this flux. Here, we identify an additional biological mechanism, the seasonal "lipid pump," which is highly efficient at sequestering carbon into the deep ocean. It involves the vertical transport and metabolism of carbon rich lipids by overwintering zooplankton. We show that one species, the copepod Calanus finmarchicus overwintering in the North Atlantic, sequesters an amount of carbon equivalent to the sinking flux of detrital material. The efficiency of the lipid pump derives from a near-complete decoupling between nutrient and carbon cycling-a "lipid shunt," and its direct transport of carbon through the mesopelagic zone to below the permanent thermocline with very little attenuation. Inclusion of the lipid pump almost doubles the previous estimates of deep-ocean carbon sequestration by biological processes in the North Atlantic. PMID:26338976

  10. The influence of food quality on the nutritional acclimation of the copepod Acartia clausi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayzaud, P.; Tirelli, V.; Bernard, J. M.; Roche-Mayzaud, O.

    1998-06-01

    The influence of food quality on the nutritional metabolism of Acartia clausi was studied experimentally using four different diets: (1) diatom cells of Thalassiosira weissflogii, (2) detritus prepared from the same culture, (3) 50 : 50 mix on a protein basis of the two previous diets, and 4) dinoflagellate cells of Prorocentrum micans. For each trophic, ingestion, gut transit time, trypsin activity and Km (half saturation constant) were measured at limiting and saturating concentration. Assimilation rates were also estimated for both pure diatoms and mixed live-detrital cell diets. Ingestion followed a Holling type 2 response for diets 1 and 4, a linear one for detritus and an intermediate response for diet 3. Gut transit time displayed different adaptive changes with food regime depending on protein concentration. Trypsin activity was lower for detrital food and trypsin Km significantly decreased with increasing concentration of live diatoms. Assimilation rates were higher for live food than for mixed live-detrital food. Results illustrated that Acartia-type copepods optimize nitrogen or protein uptake. They suggest that besides chemoreception-mediated selectivity, internal controls by digestion and assimilation also regulate ingestion (feed-back).

  11. Acute and chronic bioassays with New Zealand freshwater copepods using pentachlorophenol

    SciTech Connect

    Willis, K.J.

    1999-11-01

    The suitability for laboratory culture and comparative sensitivity of three species of New Zealand freshwater copepod (Calamoecia lucasi Brady, Boeckella delicata Percival, and Mesocyclops cf. leuckarti Claus) to pentachlorophenol (PCP) was assessed. Acute bioassays used two life stages (nauplii and adults). Acute 48-h lethality tests were conducted at 22 C with laboratory-cultured animals of all species and at varying temperatures with seasonally collected C. lucasi adults. Mean 48-h median lethal concentration values for nauplii ranged from 52 to 227 {micro}g/L PCP for C. lucasi and B. delicata, respectively, and from 106 to 173 {micro}g/L for adult C. Lucasi and M. Leuckarti, respectively. The survival rate in controls was {ge}95% in acute tests, with the exception of C. lucasi nauplii, in which it was 60%. Mean 48-h median lethal concentration values for seasonally collected C. lucasi adults were significantly higher in summer than in all other seasons. Chronic sublethal tests starting with nauplii <24 h old measured time to metamorphosis. Pentachlorophenol delayed metamorphosis in all species. Chronic toxicity values were 14.61, and 104 {micro}g/L PCP for C. lucasi, B. delicata, and M. leuckarti, respectively. The mortality rate in controls was also high in C. lucasi sublethal tests (65%), and of the three species, they were the most difficult to culture.

  12. Effects of calanoid copepod Schmackeria poplesia as a live food on the growth, survival and fatty acid composition of larvae and juveniles of Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guangxing; Xu, Donghui

    2009-12-01

    Zooplankton constitutes a major part of the diet for fish larvae in the marine food web, and it is generally believed that copepods can meet the nutritional requirements of fish larvae. In this study, calanoid copepod Schmackeria poplesia, rotifer Brachionus plicatilis and anostraca crustacean Artemia sp. were analyzed for fatty acid contents, and were used as live food for culturing larval Japanese flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus. The total content of three types of HUFAs (DHA, EPA and ARA) in S. poplesia was significantly higher than that in the other two live foods ( P<0.01). Three live organisms were used for raising larvae and juveniles of Paralichthys olivaceus respectively for 15 and 10 d. Then the growth, survival and fatty acid composition of the larvae and juveniles were investigated. The results showed that the larvae and juveniles fed with copepods ( S. poplesia) had significantly higher growth rate than those fed with the other two organisms ( P<0.01). The survival of the flounder larvae fed with copepods was significantly higher than that of the others ( P<0.01), and the survival of the juvenile fish fed with copepods was higher than that fed with Artemia ( P<0.05). The contents of three types of HUFAs (DHA, EPA and ARA) and the ratio of DHA/EPA in larval and juvenile flounder P. olivaceus were analyzed. The results showed that the contents of DHA, EPA and ARA in the larvae and juveniles fed with S. poplesia were higher than those fed with a mixed diet or Artemia only, and the ratio of EPA/ARA in larvae and juveniles of P. olivaceus fed with S. poplesia was lower than that in the case of feeding with a mixed diet or Artemia only. The present data showed that copepod is the best choice for feeding the larvae and juveniles of fish considering its effects on the survival, growth and nutrition composition of the fish.

  13. Ecotoxicological investigation of the effect of accumulation of PAH and possible impact of dispersant in resting high arctic copepod Calanus hyperboreus.

    PubMed

    Nørregaard, Rasmus Dyrmose; Gustavson, Kim; Møller, Eva Friis; Strand, Jakob; Tairova, Zhanna; Mosbech, Anders

    2015-10-01

    Due to high lipid content and a slow metabolism, there is a higher risk of bioaccumulation of oil compounds in Arctic than in temperate copepods. There is also a concern that the bioavailability of oil compounds is higher when oil is dispersed with dispersants. The purpose of this project was to increase the knowledge on how the use of dispersants on an oil spill may affect the passive uptake of PAHs in resting high arctic copepods using Calanus hyperboreus as a model organism. To evaluate this, resting high arctic C. hyperboreus were caught in Disko Bay at>250 meters depth, November 2013, and subsequent experimental work was initiated immediately after, at nearby Arctic Station at Disko Island Western Greenland. C. hyperboreus females were incubated in phenanthrene (111, 50 and 10nM), pyrene (57, 28 and 6nM) and benzo(a) pyrene (10, 5 and 1nM) for three days in treatments with and without oil (corn oil) and dispersant (AGMA DR372). After exposure, the highest measured concentrations of respectively phenanthrene, pyrene and benzo(a) pyrene in the copepods were 129, 30 and 6nmol PAH g female(-1). Results showed that with addition of oil and dispersant to the water, the accumulation of PAH was significantly reduced, due to the deposition of the PAHs in the oil phase, decreasing the available PAHs for copepod uptake. While PAH metabolites and a depuration of the PAHs were observed, the copepods still contained PAHs after 77 days of incubation in clean seawater. Differences of treatments with and without oil and dispersant on the egg production were not statistically conclusive, although it is the most likely an effect of the highly variable day-to-day egg production between individual copepods. Equally, although there was an indication that the addition of dispersant and oil increased the mortality rate, there was no statistical difference. PMID:26253790

  14. Functional characterization of P-glycoprotein in the intertidal copepod Tigriopus japonicus and its potential role in remediating metal pollution.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Chang-Bum; Kim, Bo-Mi; Kim, Rae-Kwon; Park, Heum Gi; Lee, Su-Jae; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Leung, Kenneth Mei Yee; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2014-11-01

    The intertidal copepod Tigriopus japonicus has been widely used in aquatic toxicity testing for diverse environmental pollutants including metals. Despite relatively well-characterized in vivo physiological modulations in response to aquatic pollutants, the molecular mechanisms due to toxicity and detoxification are still unclear. To better understand the mechanisms of metal transport and further detoxification, T. japonicus P-glycoprotein (TJ-P-gp) with conserved motifs/domains was cloned and measured for protein activity against the transcript and protein expression profiles in response to metal exposure. Specifically, we characterized the preliminary efflux activity and membrane topology of TJ-P-gp protein that supports a transport function for chemicals. To uncover whether the efflux activity of TJ-P-gp protein would be modulated by metal treatment, copepods were exposed to three metals (Cd, Cu, and Zn), and were observed for both dose- and time-dependency on the efflux activity of TJ-P-gp protein with or without 10?M of P-gp-specific inhibitors verapamil and zosuquidar (LY335979) for 24h over a wide range of metal concentrations. In particular, treatment with zosuquidar induced metal accumulation in the inner body of T. japonicus. In addition, three metals significantly induced the transporting activity of TJ-P-gp in a concentration-dependent manner in both transcript and protein levels within 24h. Together these data indicate that T. japonicus has a conserved P-gp-mediated metal defense system through the induction of transcriptional up-regulation of TJ-P-gp gene and TJ-P-gp protein activity. This finding provides further understanding of the molecular defense mechanisms involved in P-glycoprotein-mediated metal detoxification in copepods. PMID:25198425

  15. Spatiotemporal distribution of protozooplankton and copepod nauplii in relation to the occurrence of giant jellyfish in the Yellow Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lu; Xu, Kuidong

    2013-11-01

    The occurrence of the giant jellyfish, Nemopilema nomurai, has been a frequent phenomenon in the Yellow Sea. However, the relationship between the giant jellyfish and protozoa, in particular ciliates, remains largely unknown. We investigated the distribution of nanoflagellates, ciliates, Noctiluca scintillans, and copepod nauplii along the transect 33°N in the Yellow Sea in June and August, 2012, during an occurrence of the giant jellyfish, and in October of that year when the jellyfish was absent. The organisms studied were mainly concentrated in the surface waters in summer, while in autumn they were evenly distributed in the water column. Nanoflagellate, ciliate, and copepod nauplii biomasses increased from early June to August along with jellyfish growth, the first two decreased in October, while N. scintillans biomass peaked in early June to 3 571 ?g C/L and decreased in August and October. In summer, ciliate biomass greatly exceeded that of copepod nauplii (4.61-15.04 ?g C/L vs. 0.34-0.89 ?g C/L). Ciliate production was even more important than biomass, ranging from 6.59 to 34.19 ?g C/(L·d) in summer. Our data suggest a tight and positive association among the nano-, micro-, and meso-zooplankton in the study area. Statistical analysis revealed that the abundance and total production of ciliate as well as loricate ciliate biomass were positively correlated with giant jellyfish biomass, indicating a possible predator-prey relationship between ciliates and giant jellyfish. This is in contrast to a previous study, which reported a significant reduction in ciliate standing crops due to the mass occurrence of N. nomurai in summer. Our study indicates that, with its high biomass and, in particular, high production ciliates might support the mass occurrence of giant jellyfish.

  16. Domestication as a Novel Approach for Improving the Cultivation of Calanoid Copepods: A Case Study with Parvocalanus crassirostris

    PubMed Central

    Alajmi, Fahad; Zeng, Chaoshu; Jerry, Dean R.

    2015-01-01

    Calanoid copepods are an important food source for most fish larvae. Their role as a natural prey item means that it is important to develop culture technology for copepods to meet the requirements of larvae culture in aquaculture hatcheries. Copepods have been cultured successfully for some time; however, the implications of long-term cultivation or domestication on copepod life history traits have not yet been assessed. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine if the domesticated and wild populations of Parvocalanus crassirostris are phenotypically or physiologically different. Wild-caught P. crassirostris were compared to a long-held domesticated strain (>2 years) for size of developmental stage, fecundity and lifespan of adult females, culture density, ingestion rates, faecal pellet production and fatty acid profiles. The domesticated strain was significantly different from the wild strain in size (eggs, nauplii, copepodites and adults were larger in the domesticated strain), egg production (112.3 ± 1.8 eggs female-1 vs. 64.6 ± 3.3 eggs female-1) and adult female lifespan (8.8 ± 0.1 days vs., 7.5 ± 0.1 days). At 1, 3 and 5 adults mL-1, the domesticated strain performed significantly better than the wild strain in egg production (4189.8 ± 61.2, 11224.0 ± 71.7 and 21860.6 ± 103.6 eggs vs. 1319.5 ± 54.3, 2374.5 ± 80.9 and 4933.8 ± 269.5 eggs, respectively) and mean daily mortality rate (5.6% across all densities vs. 22.9 ± 1.6, 29.8 ± 1.2 and 31.3 ± 1.3%, respectively). The domesticated strain had significantly higher ingestion rates than the wild stain (888.4 ± 9.9 ng C l-1 and 775.3 ± 11.2 ng C l-1, respectively), while faecal pellet production was not significantly different between strains. Fatty acid profiles indicated higher levels (as % of total fatty acid) of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in the domesticated strain (36.2±0.4%) than the wild strain (16.1±0.1%). Overall, this study found that the reproductive capacity and tolerance to the culture environment of the calanoid P. crassirostris have improved significantly due to domestication. PMID:26186526

  17. Acute toxicity of naturally and chemically dispersed oil on the filter-feeding copepod Calanus finmarchicus.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Bjørn Henrik; Altin, Dag; Olsen, Anders J; Nordtug, Trond

    2012-12-01

    Following oil spills in the marine environment, natural dispersion (by breaking waves) will form micron-sized oil droplets that disperse into the pelagic environment. Enhancing the dispersion process chemically will increase the oil concentration temporarily and result in higher bioavailability for pelagic organisms exposed to oil-dispersant plume. The toxicity of dispersed oil to pelagic organisms is a critical component in evaluating the net environmental consequences of dispersant use or non-use in open waters. To assess the potential for environmental effects, numerical models are being used, and for these to reliably predict the toxicity of chemically dispersed oil, it is essential to know if the dispersant affects the specific toxicity of the oil itself. In order to test the potential changes in specific toxicity of the oil due to the presence of chemical dispersant, copepods (Calanus finmarchicus) were subjected to a continuous exposure of chemically (4 percent Dasic w/w dispersant) and naturally dispersed oil (same droplet size range and composition) for four days. On average the addition of dispersant decreased 96h LC(50)-values by a factor of 1.6, while for LC(10) and LC(90) these factors were 2.9 and 0.9, respectively. This indicates that after 96h of exposure the dispersant slightly increased the specific toxicity of the oil at median and low effect levels, but reduced the toxicity at high effect levels. Decreased filtrations for the exposed groups were confirmed using particle counting and fluorescence microscopy. However, no differences in these endpoints were found between chemically and naturally dispersed oil. The ultimate goal was to evaluate if models used for risk and damage assessment can use similar specific toxicity for both chemically and naturally dispersed oil. The slight differences in toxicity between chemically and naturally dispersed oil suggest that risk assessment should be based on the whole concentration response curve to ensure survival of C. finmarchicus. PMID:23063079

  18. Mating behaviours of Daphnia pulicaria, a cyclic parthenogen: comparisons with copepods

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    The pre-and post-contact mating behaviours of Daphnia pulicaria are investigated by direct observations of vertical distributions, swimming behaviours and male-female interactions. Analysis of vertical distributions in a 1 m deep, thermally stratified migration chamber reveals that females were always located in the upper layer of the water column but males exhibited a bimodal depth distribution, in which an individual's depth was a function of body length and water temperature. The observed distributions of males may be the result of several interacting pressures; predation avoidance, life-history optimization, and avoidance of assortative mating. Male swimming behaviour was faster and orthogonal to that of females, which is in agreement with the predictions of encounter-rate maximization models. Video recordings of males and females interacting in a 1-litre vessel showed that males both pursued and contacted other males more often than females. Thus, there was no evidence that Daphnia are able to use water-borne chemical signals to locate and identify potential mates. However, the average duration of male-female contacts (13.8 s) was much longer than those between males (1.6 s), suggesting that males can determine the sex of contacted individuals.Daphnia mating behaviour is significantly more complex than previously acknowledged. In contrast to the conventional view of Daphnia males swimming more-or-less randomly and mating with any individual encountered, they exhibit behaviours which increase the potential of mating with females while reducing the risk of predation. Several male behaviours, such as 'scanning' and the performance of area-restricted spirals upon encounter, are similar to those reported for some copepods and may be common to zooplankton that lack sophisticated chemosensory abilities. The possibility that Daphnia may also be able to assess such important female attributes as species and reproductive status is discussed.

  19. Alien parasitic copepods in mussels and oysters of the Wadden Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsner, Nikolaus O.; Jacobsen, Sabine; Thieltges, David W.; Reise, Karsten

    2011-09-01

    Molluscan intestinal parasites of the genus Mytilicola, specifically M. intestinalis, were initially introduced into bivalves in the North Sea in the 1930s. It was presumably introduced from the Mediterranean with ship-fouling mussels, then attained epidemic proportions in Mytilus edulis in the 1950s and is now widely established in the North Sea region. Mytilicola orientalis was co-introduced with Pacific oysters to France in the 1970s and in the southern North Sea in the early 1990s. Its main host Crassostrea gigas has massively invaded the Wadden Sea with a concomitant decline in mussels. To explore whether introduced mytilicolid parasites could play a role in the shifting dominance from native mussels to invasive oysters, we analysed 390 mussels and 174 oysters collected around the island of Sylt in the northern Wadden Sea. We show that M. intestinalis has a prevalence >90% and a mean intensity of 4 adult copepods in individual mussels with >50 mm shell length at all sheltered sites. By contrast, none were found in the oysters. However, at one site, we found M. orientalis in C. gigas with a prevalence of 10% and an intensity of 2 per host individual (August 2008). This constitutes the most northern record in Europe for this Pacific parasite until now. Alignments of partial sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene and the nuclear internal transcribed spacers (ITS) and 18S rDNA sequences each show a distinct difference between the two species, which confirms our morphological identification. We suggest that the high parasite load in mussels compared to oysters may benefit the continued expansion of C. gigas in the Wadden Sea.

  20. Integrated molecular and morphological biogeography of the calanoid copepod family Eucalanidae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goetze, Erica; Ohman, Mark D.

    2010-12-01

    Species range information forms the empirical data of pelagic biogeography. Early descriptions of canonical zooplankton distributions in the Pacific Ocean were based, in part, on distributional data from the planktonic copepod family Eucalanidae. A large-scale molecular survey of this group, covering Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans (1295 individuals), increased the total diversity from 24 to 39 evolutionarily significant units (ESUs). New biogeographies are presented here for 18 lineages within 10 described species in the genera Subeucalanus, Pareucalanus, and Rhincalanus. Integration of molecular and morphological data on diversity and distribution resulted in three primary outcomes: (1) the morphological species was confirmed to be valid, and the biogeographic distribution remains largely unchanged from prior reports, (2) the species was found to contain multiple ESUs, each of which has a more restricted distribution than the parent taxon, and (3) the species was found to contain multiple ESUs, whose biogeographic distributions remain unclear. Subeucalanus subtenuis, S. mucronatus, S. subcrassus, Pareucalanus attenuatus, P. langae, and P. parki are all valid genetic and morphological species, and prior distribution records from Fleminger (1973) and Lang (1965) are confirmed to be accurate. New records in the western Indian Ocean extend the biogeographic range of S. subtenuis, S. mucronatus, S. subcrassus, and P. langae. Subeucalanus pileatus, P. sewelli, and R. rostrifrons, all species with Indo-Pacific or circumglobal distributions, consist of genetically divergent, allopatric populations that subdivide the original biogeographic range. Subeucalanus crassus and Rhincalanus nasutus are species complexes containing 4-8 genetically divergent lineages, whose distributions are inadequately characterized. Although results suggest more restricted pelagic habitats for some eucalanid species, those habitats have been previously described for other zooplanktonic taxa and do not represent new pelagic distributional types.

  1. Resource utilization and trophic position of nematodes and harpacticoid copepods in and adjacent to Zostera noltii beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vafeiadou, A.-M.; Materatski, P.; Adão, H.; De Troch, M.; Moens, T.

    2014-07-01

    This study examines the resource use and trophic position of nematodes and harpacticoid copepods at the genus/species level in an estuarine food web in Zostera noltii beds and in adjacent bare sediments using the natural abundance of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes. Microphytobenthos and/or epiphytes are among the main resources of most taxa, but seagrass detritus and sediment particulate organic matter contribute as well to meiobenthos nutrition, which are also available in deeper sediment layers and in unvegetated patches close to seagrass beds. A predominant dependence on chemoautotrophic bacteria was demonstrated for the nematode genus Terschellingia and the copepod family Cletodidae. A predatory feeding mode is illustrated for Paracomesoma and other Comesomatidae, which were previously considered first-level consumers (deposit feeders) according to their buccal morphology. The considerable variation found in both resource use and trophic level among nematode genera from the same feeding type, and even among congeneric nematode species, shows that the interpretation of nematode feeding ecology based purely on mouth morphology should be avoided.

  2. ACUTE TOXICITY OF FIVE SEDIMENT-ASSOCIATED METALS, INDIVIDUALLY AND IN A MIXTURE, TO THE ESTUARINE MEIOBENTHIC HARPACTICOID COPEPOD AMPHIASCUS TENUIREMIS. (R825279)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    The acute effects of many individual, seawater-solubilized metals on meiobenthic copepods and nematodes are well known. In sediments, however, metals most often occur as mixtures, and it is not known whether such mixtures exhibit simple additive toxicity to me...

  3. First insights into genus level diversity and biogeography of deep sea benthopelagic calanoid copepods in the South Atlantic and Southern Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renz, Jasmin; Markhaseva, Elena L.

    2015-11-01

    Calanoid copepods constitute the most numerous organisms not only in the pelagic realm, but also in the benthic boundary layer, which gives them an important role in the turnover of organic matter in the benthopelagic habitat. During seven expeditions to the South Atlantic and Southern Ocean, the diversity and biogeography of deep-sea benthopelagic calanoid copepods were studied. The communities of calanoids living in the vicinity of the seabed were characterized by high diversity comparable to many pelagic habitats, but low abundance of individuals. Members of the taxon Clausocalanoidea dominated the communities, and within this taxon most individuals belonged to detritivore calanoids characterized by sensory setae on the second maxillae or aetideid copepods. 73% of all genera classified as obligate or predominantly benthopelagic copepods detected during these expeditions were new to science and a vast number of genera and species have been described since then. Comparing the communities of calanoid genera between different regions, the assemblages in the Southern Ocean differed significantly from the Southeast and Southwest Atlantic. A latitudinal diversity gradient could be observed, with highest numbers of genera in the Southwest Atlantic and low numbers at stations in the Southern Ocean. Reviewing the literature, endemism for benthopelagic calanoids appeared to be low on a latitudinal range caused by connectivity in benthopelagic habitats through spreading water masses. However, considering the habitats structuring the water column vertically, a high number of genera are endemic in the benthopelagial and specialized to living within the vicinity of the seabed.

  4. EFFECT OF SALINITY VARIATION AND PESTICIDE EXPOSURE ON AN ESTUARINE HARPACTICOID COPEPOD, MICROARTHRIDION LITTORALE (POPPE), IN THE SOUTHEASTERN US. (R827397)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The harpacticoid copepod Microarthridion littorale (Poppe) was tested for interaction effects between salinity change and acute pesticide exposure on the survival and genotypic composition of a South Carolina population. Previous data suggested a significant link betwee...

  5. Tech Quantitative Analysis of Tethered Versus Free-Swimming Copepod Flow Fields Kimberly B. Catton1 , Donald R. Webster1, Jason Brown2, and

    E-print Network

    to the swimming speed. In addition, for studies of tethered versus free-swimming bivalve larvae a uniform flowGeorgia Tech Quantitative Analysis of Tethered Versus Free-Swimming Copepod Flow Fields Kimberly B view of the free-swimming copepodid velocity field is symmetric with a maximum velocity of 1.2 cm

  6. Extensive genetic diversity and endemism across the global range of the oceanic copepod Pleuromamma abdominalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirai, Junya; Tsuda, Atsushi; Goetze, Erica

    2015-11-01

    Many oceanic zooplankton species have been described as cosmopolitan in distribution; however, recent molecular work has detected species complexity with highly divergent genetic lineages within several of these taxa. To further resolve the species complexity within these ecologically-important and widespread species, we performed both molecular and morphological analyses of the oceanic copepod Pleuromamma abdominalis using a comprehensive collection of material from 944 individuals collected at 46 sites across the global ocean. Phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I (mtCOI) sequences detected eighteen divergent evolutionary lineages within P. abdominalis, with an additional four singleton specimens that were also genetically divergent. Two phylogenetically distinct groups, PLAB1 and PLAB2, were supported by concordant sequence variation in the nuclear large subunit ribosomal RNA gene (nLSU). Within PLAB1, two mtCOI clades, 1a-1 and 1b-1 were observed, and each clade contained geographically distinct sub-clades 1a-2 and 1b-2. PLAB2 was composed of sixteen well-supported mtCOI clades (2a-2p) as well as four singletons. High genetic divergence among the mtCOI lineages within both PLAB1 and PLAB2, ranging between 9.2-11.2% and 4.3-18.9% K2P distances respectively, suggests the presence of additional species within these groups. Significant differences were observed in the presence and shape of antennule spines of adult females between sympatric clades with genetic distances greater than 5.7-7.0% (K2P). The biogeographic distributions of mtCOI clades indicated greater specialization to particular oceanographic provinces than observed in the nominal species P. abdominalis, with mtCOI clades ranging from antitropical in subtropical waters of all three ocean basins (Atlantic, Pacific and Indian; clade 1b-1 and 2a) to taxa that are endemic to a particular ocean region, for example restricted to equatorial waters of the Atlantic Ocean (clade 1b-2 and 2b). We hypothesize that many of these mtCOI clades are likely distinct, and currently undescribed species. The well-known high dominance of P. abdominalis across a range of pelagic habitats may occur as a spatial composite of genetically-distinct species with more restricted distributions and greater ecological specialization to particular marine habitats than was previously recognized.

  7. No evidence for induction or selection of mutant sodium channel expression in the copepod Acartia husdsonica challenged with the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense

    PubMed Central

    Finiguerra, Michael; Avery, David E; Dam, Hans G

    2014-01-01

    Some species in the dinoflagellate genus Alexandrium spp. produce a suite of neurotoxins that block sodium channels, known as paralytic shellfish toxins (PST), which have deleterious effects on grazers. Populations of the ubiquitous copepod grazer Acartia hudsonica that have co-occurred with toxic Alexandrium spp. are better adapted than naïve populations. The mechanism of adaptation is currently unknown. We hypothesized that a mutation in the sodium channel could account for the grazer adaptation. We tested two hypotheses: (1) Expression of the mutant sodium channel could be induced by exposure to toxic Alexandrium fundyense; (2) in the absence of induction, selection exerted by toxic A. fundyense would favor copepods that predominantly express the mutant isoform. In the copepod A. hudsonica, both isoforms are expressed in all individuals in varying proportions. Thus, in addition to comparing expression ratios of wild-type to mutant isoforms for individual copepods, we also partitioned copepods into three groups: those that predominantly express the mutant (PMI) isoform, the wild-type (PWI) isoform, or both isoforms approximately equally (EI). There were no differences in isoform expression between individuals that were fed toxic and nontoxic food after three and 6 days; induction of mutant isoform expression did not occur. Furthermore, the hypothesis that mutant isoform expression responds to toxic food was also rejected. That is, no consistent evidence showed that the wild-type to mutant isoform ratios decreased, or that the relative proportion of PMI individuals increased, due to the consumption of toxic food over four generations. However, in the selected line that was continuously exposed to toxic food sources, egg production rate increased, which suggested that adaptation occurred but was unrelated to sodium channel isoform expression. PMID:25535562

  8. Toxicity effect of Delonix elata (Yellow Gulmohr) and predatory efficiency of Copepod, Mesocyclops aspericornis for the control of dengue vector, Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Vasugi, Chellamuthu; Kamalakannan, Siva; Murugan, Kadarkarai

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the toxicity, predatory efficiency of Delonix elata (D. elata) and Mesocyclops aspericornis (M. aspericornis) against dengue vector, Aedes aegypti (Ae. aegypti). Methods A mosquitocidal bioassay was conducted at different concentration of plant extract followed by WHO standard method. The probit analysis of each tested concentration and control were observed by using software SPSS 11 version package. The each tested concentration variable was assessed by DMRT method. The predatory efficiency of copepod was followed by Deo et al., 1988. The predator, M. aspericornis was observed for mortality, abnormalities, survival and swimming activity after 24 h treatment of plant and also predation on the mosquito larvae were observed. Results D. elata were tested for biological activity against the larvae, and pupae of Ae. aegypti. Significant mortality effects were observed in each life stage. The percentage of mortality was 100% in first and second instars whereas 96%, 92% in third and fourth instars. Fitted probit-mortality curves for larvae indicated the median and 90% lethal concentrations of D. elata for instars 1-4 to be 4.91 (8.13), 5.16 (8.44), 5.95 (7.76) and 6.87 (11.23), respectively. The results indicate that leaf extract exhibits significant biological activity against life stages. The present study revealed that D. elata is potentially important in the control of Ae. aegypti. Similar studies were conducted for predatory efficiency of Copepod, M. aspericornis against mosquito vector Ae. Aegypti. This study reported that the predatory copepod fed on 39% and 25% in I and III instar larvae of mosquito and in combined treatment of D. elata and copepod maximum control of mosquito larval states and at 83%, 80%, 75% and 53% in I, II, III and IV instars, respectively. Conclusions The combined action of plant extract and predatory copepod to effectively control mosquito population and reduce the dengue transmitting diseases.

  9. Variation in tolerance to common marine pollutants among different populations in two species of the marine copepod Tigriopus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Patrick Y; Foley, Helen B; Bao, Vivien W W; Leung, Kenneth M Y; Edmands, Suzanne

    2015-10-01

    Geographical variation in chemical tolerance within a species can significantly influence results of whole animal bioassays, yet a literature survey showed that the majority of articles using bioassays did not provide detail on the original field collection site of their test specimens confounding the ability for accurate replication and comparison of results. Biological variation as a result of population-specific tolerance, if not addressed, can be misinterpreted as experimental error. Our studies of two marine copepod species, Tigriopus japonicus and Tigriopus californicus, found significant intra- and inter-specific variation in tolerance to copper and tributyltin. Because both species tolerate copper concentrations orders of magnitude higher than those found in coastal waters, difference in copper tolerance may be a by-product of adaptation to other stressors such as high temperature. Controlling for inter-population tolerance variation will greatly strengthen the application of bioassays in chemical toxicity tests. PMID:26070741

  10. A new genus and species of hatschekiid copepod (Siphonostomatoida) from groupers (Actinopterygii: Serranidae) collected off the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan.

    PubMed

    Uyeno, Daisuke

    2013-01-01

    A new genus and species of copepod, Mihbaicola sakamakii n. g., n. sp., belonging to the siphonostomatoid family Hatschekiidae, is described based on the females collected from inside the tissue of the branchiostegal membrane in three species of the groupers, Epinephelus fasciatus (Forsskål) (type-host), E. merra Bloch and Cephalopholis leopardus (Lacépède), collected off Okinawa-jima Island and Iriomote-jima Island, Ryukyu Archipelago, North Pacific Ocean. The new genus can be distinguished from other hatschekiid genera by a combination of the following characters in the female: the head is composed of the cephalosome and the pedigerous somite; the cephalothorax is expanded into a pair of posteroventral lobes carrying leg 1; legs 1 and 2 are biramous and composed of the protopod and both rami are 2-segmented; leg 3 is absent; and leg 4 is represented by a rounded lobe with a chitinous pointed apical process. PMID:23263944

  11. Multiple gene analyses of caligid copepods indicate that the reduction of a thoracic appendage in Pseudocaligus represents convergent evolution

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Caligidae is a family of parasitic copepods containing over 30 recognised genera. They are commercially important parasites as they cause disease in numerous finfish aquaculture facilities globally. Morphological features are used to distinguish between the genera and Pseudocaligus has traditionally been differentiated from Caligus solely by the presence of a much reduced form of the fourth thoracic leg. Currently there are numerous DNA sequences available for Caligus spp. but only the type species, Pseudocaligus brevipedis, has molecular data available, so systematic studies using molecular phylogenetic analyses have been limited. Methods Three gene regions, SSU rDNA, 16S and CO1, for Pseudocaligus fugu from puffer fish from Japan and Pseudocaligus uniartus from rabbit fish from Indonesia are sequenced and molecular phylogenetic analyses performed in order to infer phylogenetic relationships between Pseudocaligus and other caligid copepods. Results The analysis revealed that there was no discrete grouping of Pseudocaligus spp. and that they had a polyphyletic distribution within Caligus taxa. Pseudocaligus fugu grouped with Caligus elongatus and contained a unique synapomorphy in the SSU rDNA region only seen in members of that clade. Pseudocaligus uniartus formed a well-supported group, in the SSU rDNA analyses, with a Caligus sp. that also infects rabbit fish, but was unresolved in the other analyses. Pseudocaligus brevipedis consistently and robustly grouped with Caligus curtus and C. centrodonti in all analyses. The majority of Lepeophtheirus spp. form a monophyletic sister group to the Caligus clade; however, L. natalensis is unresolved in all analyses and does not form part of the main Lepeophtheirus clade. Conclusions These findings do not support the morphological-based distinction between Pseudocaligus and Caligus, suggesting that the reduced fourth leg is a feature that has evolved on multiple occasions throughout caligid evolution. Congruent molecular phylogenetic data support groupings based on the presence of morphological features, such as lunules, geography and host fish type rather than appendage morphology. Therefore, we support the synonymy of Pseudocaligus with Caligus. PMID:24286135

  12. Abundance, distribution and population structure of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus in a springtime right whale feeding area in the southwestern Gulf of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wishner, Karen F.; Schoenherr, Jill R.; Beardsley, Robert; Chen, Changsheng

    Springtime aggregations of the planktivorous right whale ( Eubalaena glacialis) occur in the northern Great South Channel region of the southwestern Gulf of Maine, where they feed upon dense concentrations of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus. This association was studied during the multidisciplinary South Channel Ocean Productivity Experiment (SCOPEX) in 1988 and 1989. The spatial and temporal variability of the abundance, geographic distribution, and population structure of these copepods were analyzed using data from 99 vertically-stratified or horizontally-sequenced MOCNESS plankton tows. Higher water column abundances and higher relative proportion of older copepod lifestages occurred near feeding whales compared to sites without whales, but total water column copepod biomass and Calanus abundance did not always differ between these types of locations. This suggests that the whales seek out aggregations of older copepod lifestages rather than simply the most dense aggregations. Other factors (and perhaps an element of chance) may influence which specific patches, among all patches potentially suitable in terms of copepod abundance and age composition, the whales utilize at a particular time. The times and locations of the highest Calansus water column abundances varied between years, as did the presence of feeding whales, probably because of year-to-year differences in the springtime temperature cycle and current strength. A temporal progression of lifestages occurred within the region in both years during the roughly 3-week duration of each survey, indicative of a growing rather than a diapausing population, at least up to the copepodite 4 (C4) stage. Due in part to a delay in the springtime warming in 1989 compared to 1988, the copepod development cycle, which is largely driven by in situ temperature, was delayed about 1-2 weeks in 1989. Peak abundances of younger Calanus were found in the northwestern part of the region each year, whereas peak abundances of older Calanus were found in the southwestern and northeastern part. This was probably due to the advection of maturing copepods by the regional circulation, especially the near-surface current associated with the movement of the low-salinity surface plume which forms each spring off Cape Cod. The copepod development cycle occurs within a moving frame of reference (i.e. the water itself); thus, peak abundances of the older copepods (those fed on by the whales) occurred later in the spring and further downstream in 1989 (when there were colder springtime temperatures and faster currents) than in 1988 (when the springtime temperatures were warmer and currents slower). Maximum Calanus abundances and biomass and water-colum abundances of older copepodite stages were significantly higher (about double) in 1989 than in 1988, both in the region as a whole and at sites where whales were feeding. Maximum concentrations from the MOCNESS tows were 13,300 m -3 in 1988 and 30,800 m -3 in 1989; however, a thin, visibly-red surface patch of Calanus, sampled in 1989 by a bucket, had a concentration of 331,000 m -3. Copepods were also more aggregated in the vertical (i.e. more highly concentrated at the depth of maximum abundance) in 1989 than in 1988, and samples from whale-feeding areas were more homogeneous in composition (higher proportion of Calanus relative to all zooplankton) in 1989. At smaller spatial and temporal scales, abundances varied by a factor of 1-890 X in samples from horizontal tows spanning about 0.5-1.5 km and by a factor of 1-50 X over 24 h in the same geographic location in whale-feeding areas. Some of this variability was probably due to advection by the semidiurnal tidal currents. Near feeding whales, the copepod spatial distribution was patchy on small scales (with an estimated mean patch "size" of about 500 m), but the patchiness varied in texture interannually. Copepod abundances were much lower in early spring (March 1988) than in later spring (May 1988), with the March population structure dominated by adult females and the May population

  13. Determining the Advantages, Costs, and Trade-Offs of a Novel Sodium Channel Mutation in the Copepod Acartia hudsonica to Paralytic Shellfish Toxins (PST)

    PubMed Central

    Finiguerra, Michael; Avery, David E.; Dam, Hans G.

    2015-01-01

    The marine copepod Acartia hudsonica was shown to be adapted to dinoflagellate prey, Alexandrium fundyense, which produce paralytic shellfish toxins (PST). Adaptation to PSTs in other organisms is caused by a mutation in the sodium channel. Recently, a mutation in the sodium channel in A. hudsonica was found. In this study, we rigorously tested for advantages, costs, and trade-offs associated with the mutant isoform of A. hudsonica under toxic and non-toxic conditions. We combined fitness with wild-type: mutant isoform ratio measurements on the same individual copepod to test our hypotheses. All A. hudsonica copepods express both the wild-type and mutant sodium channel isoforms, but in different proportions; some individuals express predominantly mutant (PMI) or wild-type isoforms (PWI), while most individuals express relatively equal amounts of each (EI). There was no consistent pattern of improved performance as a function of toxin dose for egg production rate (EPR), ingestion rate (I), and gross growth efficiency (GGE) for individuals in the PMI group relative to individuals in the PWI expression group. Neither was there any evidence to indicate a fitness benefit to the mutant isoform at intermediate toxin doses. No clear advantage under toxic conditions was associated with the mutation. Using a mixed-diet approach, there was also no observed relationship between individual wild-type: mutant isoform ratios and among expression groups, on both toxic and non-toxic diets, for eggs produced over three days. Lastly, expression of the mutant isoform did not mitigate the negative effects of the toxin. That is, the reductions in EPR from a toxic to non-toxic diet for copepods were independent of expression groups. Overall, the results did not support our hypotheses; the mutant sodium channel isoform does not appear to be related to adaptation to PST in A. hudsonica. Other potential mechanisms responsible for the adaptation are discussed. PMID:26075900

  14. Heavy metals induce oxidative stress and trigger oxidative stress-mediated heat shock protein (hsp) modulation in the intertidal copepod Tigriopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-Mi; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Jeong, Chang-Bum; Seo, Jung Soo; Park, Gyung Soo; Lee, Young-Mi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2014-11-01

    Heat shock proteins (hsps) are induced by a wide range of environmental stressors including heavy metals in aquatic organisms. However, the effect of heavy metals on zooplankton at the molecular level remains still unclear. In this study, we measured the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and the antioxidant enzyme activities for 96 h after exposure to five heavy metals: arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), silver (Ag), and zinc (Zn) in the intertidal copepod Tigriopus japonicus. Activities of the antioxidant enzymes were highly elevated in metal-exposed copepods, indicating that heavy metals can induce oxidative stress by generating ROS, and stimulate the involvement of antioxidant enzymes as cellular defense mechanisms. Subsequently, transcriptional changes in hsp gene families were further investigated in the metal-exposed groups for 96 h. The ROS level and glutathione (GSH) content were significantly increased in Ag-, As-, and Cu-exposed copepods, while they were only slightly elevated in Cd- and Zn-exposed groups. Based on the numbers of significantly modulated hsp genes and their expression levels for 96 h, we measured the effect of heavy metals to stress genes of T. japonicus in the following order: Cu > Zn > Ag > As > Cd, implying that Cu acts as a stronger oxidative stress inducer than other heavy metals. Of them, the expression of hsp20 and hsp70 genes was substantially modulated by exposure to heavy metals, indicating that these genes would provide a sensitive molecular biomarker for aquatic monitoring of heavy metal pollution. PMID:25058597

  15. Chemical composition and energy content of deep-sea calanoid copepods in the Western North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Tsutomu; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Matsuishi, Takashi

    2006-11-01

    Condition factor index [CFI=1000×DW/(PL) 3; DW: dry weight, PL: prosome length], water content, carbon (C), nitrogen (N), ash and energy content were determined on a total of 69 copepod species caught from the mesopelagic (500-1000 m), upper-bathypelagic (1000-2000 m), lower-bathypelagic (2000-3000 m) and abyssopelagic (3000-5000 m) zones of the western subarctic Pacific. Resultant data were grouped into these four sampling zones, four developmental stage/sex categories (C4, C5 and C6 females and males), three feeding types (carnivore, detritivore and suspension feeder), or two reaction speed groups by the presence/absence of myelinated sheath enveloping axons (fast and slow reacting species). Zone-structured data showed the overall ranges were 3.8-4.6 mm for PL, 1.6-2.6 mg for DW, 21.4-25.0 for CFI, 75.0-78.6% of wet weight (WW) for water, 51.3-53.7% of DW for C, 7.7-8.8% of DW for N, 6.2-7.0 (by weight) for C/N, 6.9-9.6% of DW for ash and 25.3-27.4 J mg -1 DW for energy. Among these components, N and ash exhibited significant between-zone differences characterized by gradual decrease downward for the former, and only the upper-bathypelagic zone>abyssopelagic zone for the latter. Stage/sex-structured data showed no significant differences among them, but energy content of C5 was higher than that of C6 females. From the analyses of feeding type-structured data, carnivores were shown to have lower water, N, ash, but higher C, C/N and energy contents than suspension feeders do. Reaction speed-structured data indicated that slow-reacting species have significantly higher water but lower CFI, C, N and energy contents than fast-reacting species. Designating these grouping criteria, PL and DW as independent variables, the attributes of these variables to the CFI, chemical composition or energy contents were evaluated by stepwise-multiple regression analysis, showing the most pronounced effect of suspension-feeder, followed by the presence of myelinated sheath, DW, C6 females and the abyssopelagic zone. Further analysis of zone-structured data, by adding epipelagic copepod data from identical thermal habitats (Arctic/Antarctic waters), revealed a more marked decline in N content from the epipelagic zone to the abyssopelagic zone, accompanied by an increase in C/N ratios downward. The decline in N (=protein or muscle) contents with depth cannot be explained by the "visual interactions" hypotheses being proposed for the metabolism of pelagic visual predators, but is consistent with the "predation-mediated selection" hypothesis for the metabolism of pelagic copepods.

  16. Eucalanoid copepod metabolic rates in the oxygen minimum zone of the eastern tropical north Pacific: Effects of oxygen and temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cass, Christine J.; Daly, Kendra L.

    2014-12-01

    The eastern tropical north Pacific Ocean (ETNP) contains one of the world's most severe oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), where oxygen concentrations are less than 2 ?mol kg-1. OMZs cause habitat compression, whereby species intolerant of low oxygen are restricted to near-surface oxygenated waters. Copepods belonging to the family Eucalanidae are dominant zooplankters in this region and inhabit a variety of vertical habitats within the OMZ. The purpose of this study was to compare the metabolic responses of three species of eucalanoid copepods, Eucalanus inermis, Rhincalanus rostrifrons, and Subeucalanus subtenuis, to changes in temperature and environmental oxygen concentrations. Oxygen consumption and urea, ammonium, and phosphate excretion rates were measured via end-point experiments at three temperatures (10, 17, and 23 °C) and two oxygen concentrations (100% and 15% air saturation). S. subtenuis, which occurred primarily in the upper 50 m of the water column at our study site, inhabiting well-oxygenated to upper oxycline conditions, had the highest metabolic rates per unit weight, while E. inermis, which was found throughout the water column to about 600 m depth in low oxygen waters, typically had the lowest metabolic rates. Rates for R. rostrifrons (found primarily between 200 and 300 m depth) were intermediate between the other two species and more variable. Metabolic ratios suggested that R. rostrifrons relied more heavily on lipids to fuel metabolism than the other two species. S. subtenuis was the only species that demonstrated a decrease in oxygen consumption rates (at intermediate 17 °C temperature treatment) when environmental oxygen concentrations were lowered. The percentage of total measured nitrogen excreted as urea (% urea-N), as well as overall urea excretion rates, responded in a complex manner to changes in temperature and oxygen concentration. R. rostrifrons and E. inermis excreted a significantly higher % of urea-N in low oxygen treatments at 10 °C. At 17 °C, the opposite trend was observed as E. inermis and S. subtenuis excreted a higher % of urea-N in the high oxygen treatment. This unique relationship has not been documented previously for crustacean zooplankton, and warrants additional research into regulation of metabolic pathways to better understand nitrogen cycling in marine systems. This study also compared metabolic data for E. inermis individuals captured near the surface versus those that were resident in the deeper OMZ. Deeper-dwelling individuals had significantly higher nitrogen excretion rates and O:N ratios, suggesting an increased reliance on lipids for energy while residing in the food-poor waters of the OMZ.

  17. Toxicity of estuarine sediments using a full life-cycle bioassay with the marine copepod Robertsonia propinqua.

    PubMed

    Hack, Lisa A; Tremblay, Louis A; Wratten, Steve D; Forrester, Guy; Keesing, Vaughan

    2008-07-01

    Estuarine sediment contamination is a growing significant ecological issue in New Zealand. Methods of assessing toxicity and ecological impacts in a cost effective way are currently limited. Further to that is a need to develop bioassays that generate data quickly and cost effectively and have ecological relevance to the wider community. A chronic full life-cycle bioassay to assess the toxicity of New Zealand estuarine sediments using the marine harpacticoid copepod Robertsonia propinqua has been investigated. Sediment samples were collected from the Bay of Plenty region and included two polluted and one reference site. Sources of pollutants in the contaminated field sites originated from a variety of sources and generally include nutrients, pesticides and herbicides and the pollutants zinc, copper, lead and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Conversely, the reference site was exposed to low levels of contaminants due to the relatively undeveloped catchment. Adult male and female copepods were exposed to field collected sediments for 24 days under flow-through conditions at 21 degrees C and 12h L:D cycles. Five endpoints were recorded: male and female survival, fecundity (number of gravid females per replicate at the end of the test), clutch size per female, number of eggs per sample and juvenile survival (number of nauplii and copepodites per replicate at the end of the test). Adult mortality was observed in all sediment samples but the number of males, gravid females, clutch size per female and number of eggs produced were not affected by either the contaminated or reference sediment samples. However, the contaminated sediments did reduce reproductive output (i.e. nauplii and copepodite production). Therefore, we conclude that reproductive endpoints provide a good measure of sediment-associated contaminant effects compared with adult R. propinqua survivorship. It may be that a change in focus from chemical thresholds without ecological relevance or lethal dose threshold methods, to more subtle but ecologically significant elements of faunal life, such as reproductive success, are a more sensitive and a long term ecologically informative method. PMID:18242700

  18. Golfingicola abyssalis gen. et sp. nov., a new endoparasitic copepod (Crustacea) in a sipunculan from abyssal depths of the Northwest Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwabe, Enrico; Maiorova, Anastassya

    2015-01-01

    Marine copepods, which inhabit the entire water column down to the seafloor, are key contributors to the food web, mainly providing a food source for many organisms in the form of zooplankton. Furthermore, they also play an important ecological role as associates or even parasites with various degrees of harm to their hosts. Copepods are found in almost all habitats and can be associated with virtually every metazoan group. A female and four males of a new endoparasitic copepod genus and species (Golfingicola abyssalis) are described from the trunk celom of the sipunculan Golfingia muricaudata (Southern, 1913), collected from the abyssal depths of the Northwest Pacific Ocean near the Kuril-Kamchatka Trench. This sipunculan species is a typical deep sea representative of the northwestern Pacific region, occurring in the Bering Sea and the abyssal regions east of the Kuril Island chain. Despite numerous records of this species, a copepod association has not been reported prior to this paper. The new parasitic copepod species is tentatively placed in the Akessonia group given its endoparasitic behavior in Sipuncula, the elongated shape, the enlarged egg strings, and the presence of subchelate antenna, as well as lateral processes in males. Golfingicola abyssalis, however, shows some peculiarities that clearly differentiate it from the remaining endoparasites in Sipuncula. As the first abyssal endoparasite in Sipuncula, the species is characterized by the complete lack of any processes in females, the presence of a mandible in females, a weakly defined prosome-urosome boundary in females, the presence of a mouth in males, the free living behavior of males, a distinctly reduced number of trunk processes in males, as well as a more modified male antenna, displaying an endopodite and a highly modified setal element. A detailed review on the morphological characters of the four species currently grouped in the Akessonia group, and systematic and biogeographic information of their relevant host taxa is provided. On the basis of morphological and ecological similarities, the new species seems to be more closely related to the northern Atlantic Akessonia occulta Bresciani and Luetzen, 1962 than to Siphonobius gephyreicola Augener, 1903 and Coelotrophus nudus Ho et al., 1981.

  19. Gamma radiation induces growth retardation, impaired egg production, and oxidative stress in the marine copepod Paracyclopina nana.

    PubMed

    Won, Eun-Ji; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2014-05-01

    Accidental nuclear radioisotope release into the ocean from nuclear power plants is of concern due to ecological and health risks. In this study, we used the marine copepod Paracyclopina nana to examine the effects of radioisotopes on marine organisms upon gamma radiation, and to measure the effects on growth and fecundity, which affect population and community structure. Upon gamma radiation, mortality (LD50 - 96 h=172 Gy) in P. nana was significantly increased in a dose-dependent manner in ovigerous P. nana females. For developmental impairment of gamma-irradiated nauplii, we observed growth retardation; in over 30 Gy-irradiated groups, offspring did not grow to adults. Particularly, over 50 Gy-irradiated ovigerous P. nana females did not have normal bilateral egg sacs, and their offspring did not develop normally to adulthood. Additionally, at over 30 Gy, we found dose-dependent increases in oxidative levels with elevated antioxidant enzyme activities and DNA repair activities. These findings indicate that gamma radiation can induce oxidative stress and DNA damage with growth retardation and impaired reproduction. PMID:24632311

  20. Sex without sex chromosomes: genetic architecture of multiple loci independently segregating to determine sex ratios in the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    PubMed

    Alexander, H J; Richardson, J M L; Edmands, S; Anholt, B R

    2015-12-01

    Sex-determining systems are remarkably diverse and may evolve rapidly. Polygenic sex-determination systems are predicted to be transient and evolutionarily unstable, yet examples have been reported across a range of taxa. Here, we provide the first direct evidence of polygenic sex determination in Tigriopus californicus, a harpacticoid copepod with no heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Using genetically distinct inbred lines selected for male- and female-biased clutches, we generated a genetic map with 39 SNPs across 12 chromosomes. Quantitative trait locus mapping of sex ratio phenotype (the proportion of male offspring produced by an F2 female) in four F2 families revealed six independently segregating quantitative trait loci on five separate chromosomes, explaining 19% of the variation in sex ratios. The sex ratio phenotype varied among loci across chromosomes in both direction and magnitude, with the strongest phenotypic effects on chromosome 10 moderated to some degree by loci on four other chromosomes. For a given locus, sex ratio phenotype varied in magnitude for individuals derived from different dam lines. These data, together with the environmental factors known to contribute to sex determination, characterize the underlying complexity and potential lability of sex determination, and confirm the polygenic architecture of sex determination in T. californicus. PMID:26332493

  1. Multigenerational exposure to ocean acidification during food limitation reveals consequences for copepod scope for growth and vital rates.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Sindre A; Håkedal, Ole Jacob; Salaberria, Iurgi; Tagliati, Alice; Gustavson, Liv Marie; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro; Olsen, Anders J; Altin, Dag

    2014-10-21

    The copepod Calanus finmarchicus is a key component of northern Atlantic food webs, linking energy-transfer from phytoplankton to higher trophic levels. We examined the effect of different ocean acidification (OA) scenarios (i.e., ambient, 1080, 2080, and 3080 ?atm CO2) over two subsequent generations under limited food availability. Determination of metabolic and feeding rates, and estimations of the scope for growth, suggests that negative effects observed on vital rates (ontogenetic development, somatic growth, fecundity) may be a consequence of energy budget constraints due to higher maintenance costs under high pCO2-environments. A significant delay in development rate among the parental generation animals exposed to 2080 ?atm CO2, but not in the following F1 generation under the same conditions, suggests that C. finmarchicus may have adaptive potential to withstand the direct long-term effects of even the more pessimistic future OA scenarios but underlines the importance of transgenerational experiments. The results also indicate that in a more acidic ocean, increased energy expenditure through rising respiration could lower the energy transfer to higher trophic levels and thus hamper the productivity of the northern Atlantic ecosystem. PMID:25225957

  2. Life history strategies in zooplankton communities: The significance of female gonad morphology and maturation types for the reproductive biology of marine calanoid copepods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niehoff, Barbara

    2007-07-01

    The present review addresses the reproductive strategies of marine calanoid copepods, as affected by their physiological preconditioning, and aims to enhance understanding of their adaptations to specific environmental conditions. Knowledge about oocyte development and internal gonad structure, especially in relation to feeding conditions, is essential for a complete understanding of the reproductive strategies of the copepods. Therefore, the foci of the review are to identify general patterns in oocyte and gonad development in calanoid copepod species from marine ecosystems worldwide and to elucidate the significance of gonad structures for reproductive strategies. Oogenesis is similar in all copepod species. During maturation, the morphology of the oocytes changes distinctly and, according to oocyte size and appearance of ooplasm and nucleus, five oocyte developmental stages are distinguished. In contrast, the gonad structure and its changes during the spawning cycle differ considerably among species, and these differences are related to specific reproductive traits. Four gonad morphology types can be distinguished: the Calanus-type, found in species from all over the world with distinctly different life history traits, is apparently most common in calanoid copepods. In this gonad type, most oocyte developmental stages are present simultaneously, and usually many oocytes mature synchronously, all of which are released in one clutch. The gonad structure allows frequent spawning and large clutches, hence, high egg production rates. This may be a preconditioning for exploiting seasonally high food supply. However, the Calanus-type was also found in species producing eggs at lower rates. In the diverticula of Pseudocalanus-type gonads, only two oocyte developmental stages are present and usually fewer oocytes mature synchronously. Accordingly, the egg production rate is generally lower as compared to the Calanus-type, and apparently only this gonad-type is structurally suitable for ovigerity. Species with Pseudocalanus-type gonads are present from polar seas to the tropics, some of them being key species. The Acartia-type was scarce, found in only one species, Acartia clausi. Here all oocyte developmental stages are present, including intermediate stages, but only a few oocytes mature synchronously and are released together. High spawning frequency compensates for the small clutches, and hence egg production rate may be as high as in Calanus-type gonads. In the Aetidius-type gonad, the total number of oocytes in the diverticula is low as is the number of oocytes maturing synchronously. Less is known about the reproductive biology of species with Aetidius-type gonads; however, their distribution and feeding patterns suggest that this type is common in species inhabiting environments of low food availability. The differences in gonad structures also lead to differences in the egg size:female size ratio, as the space available for each mature oocyte depends on the total number of oocytes. Independent from gonad-type, the eggs are relatively large in species in which the gonads contain only few oocytes, whereas small eggs are produced by species with gonads filled with many oocytes. Since all species carrying their eggs in external sacs until hatching (ovigerous species) have Pseudocalanus-type gonads, the scatter in their egg size:female size ratio is low. The broadcast spawning species are of all gonad-types, and consequently the scatter among them is high. A major factor affecting the timing and magnitude of spawning of calanoid copepods is the energy supply for gonad development. Therefore, part of the review elucidates the role of internal and external resources in fuelling egg production. In many species, freshly assimilated food is transferred into egg material within a short period of time, and clutch size and spawning frequency are the two parameters that allow adjustment of egg production to food availability and temperature. However, internal body reserves may also fuel oocyte development. The extent to which oogene

  3. Abundance, biomass, vertical migration and estimated development rate of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus in the southern Gulf of Maine during late spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbin, Edward G.; Gilman, Sharon L.; Campbell, Robert G.; Durbin, Ann G.

    Abundance, biomass, diel vertical migration and estimated in situ development in the copepod Calanus finmarchicus were investigated during late spring in 1988 and 1989 in the southern Gulf of Maine. This region is an important feeding ground for the planktivorous right whale, Eubalaena glacialis. The 1988 study took place during the declining spring bloom, with phytoplankton biomass variable, but relatively high. The 1989 study occurred after seasonal stratification, and phytoplankton biomass was low. During the 1988 cruise the dominant stage in C. finmarchicus shifted from C1-C2 to C4-C5. Stage durations during 1988 (4.0 days for C3 and 6.6 days for C4), estimated from the temporal change in stage distribution, were similar to maximal values observed in the laboratory. In contrast, during 1989 stages C4 and C5 were dominant throughout the study period and development rate was slow (estimated C4 stage duration about 24 days). Diel vertical migration patterns changed, from an absence of migration at the first two 1988 stations where younger stages predominated (C1-C3), to a very strong diel vertical migration at the later 1988 stations where stages C3-C3 predominated. This was not a simple ontogenetic change in migratory behavior since all copepodite stages at each station showed similar patterns. During 1989 dense aggregations of C. finmarchicus remained in the surface layer both day and night, and no diel vertical migration was observed. A small, nonmigratory population of late-stage C. finmarchicus was found at depth. Individual body size of these copepods was considerably greater than those found at the surface. Differences in development rate between years reflect differences in the food environment, brought about by seasonal hydrographic changes and the development of more intense stratification. Diel vertical migration patterns, however, did not show a simple relation with food availability, and it is suggested that predation may play an important role in regulating the behavior of the copepods.

  4. The complete mitogenome of the whale shark parasitic copepod Pandarus rhincodonicus norman, Newbound & Knott (Crustacea; Siphonostomatoida; Pandaridae) - a new gene order for the copepoda.

    PubMed

    Austin, Christopher M; Tan, Mun Hua; Lee, Yin Peng; Croft, Laurence J; Meekan, Mark G; Pierce, Simon J; Gan, Han Ming

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of the parasitic copepod Pandarus rhincodonicus was obtained from a partial genome scan using the HiSeq sequencing system. The Pandarus rhincodonicus mitogenome has 14,480 base pairs (62% A+T content) made up of 12 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal subunit genes, 22 transfer RNAs, and a putative 384?bp non-coding AT-rich region. This Pandarus mitogenome sequence is the first for the family Pandaridae, the second for the order Siphonostomatoida and the sixth for the Copepoda. PMID:24779605

  5. Community structure and estimated contribution of primary consumers (Nematodes and Copepods) of decomposing plant litter (Juncus roemerianus and Rhizophora mangle) in South Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Fell, J.W.; Cefalu, R.

    1984-01-01

    The paper discusses the meiofauna associated with decomposing leaf litter from two species of coastal marshland plants: the black needle rush, Juncus roemerianus and the red mangrove, Rhizophora mangle. The following aspects were investigated: (1) types of meiofauna present, especially nematodes; (2) changes in meiofaunal community structures with regard to season, station location, and type of plant litter; (3) amount of nematode and copepod biomass present on the decomposing plant litter; and (4) an estimation of the possible role of the nematodes in the decomposition process. 28 references, 5 figures, 9 tables. (ACR)

  6. Short-term changes in the mesozooplankton community and copepod gut pigment in the Chukchi Sea in autumn: reflections of a strong wind event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuno, K.; Yamaguchi, A.; Nishino, S.; Inoue, J.; Kikuchi, T.

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the effect of atmospheric turbulence on a marine ecosystem, high-frequency samplings (two to four times per day) of a mesozooplankton community and the gut pigment of dominant copepods were performed at a fixed station in the Chukchi Sea from 10 to 25 September 2013. During the study period, a strong wind event (SWE) was observed on 18 September. After the SWE, the biomass of chlorophyll a (Chl a) increased, especially for micro-size (> 10 ?m) fractions. The zooplankton abundance ranged from 23 610 to 56 809 ind. m-2 and exhibited no clear changes as a result of the SWE. In terms of abundance, calanoid copepods constituted the dominant taxa (mean: 57 %), followed by barnacle larvae (31 %). Within the calanoid copepods, small-sized Pseudocalanus spp. (65 %) and large-sized C. glacialis (30 %) dominated. In the population structure of C. glacialis, copepodid stage 5 (C5) dominated, and the mean copepodid stage did not vary with the SWE. The dominance of accumulated lipids in C5 and C6 females with immature gonads indicated that they were preparing for seasonal diapause. The gut pigment of C. glacialis C5 was higher at night and was correlated with ambient Chl a (Chl a, and a significant increase was observed after the SWE (2.6 vs. 4.5 ng pigment ind.-1). The grazing impact by C. glacialis C5 was estimated to be 4.14 mg C m-2 day-1, which corresponded to 0.5-4.6 % of the biomass of the micro-size phytoplankton. Compared with the metabolic food requirement, C. glacialis feeding on phytoplankton accounted for 12.6 % of their total food requirement. These facts suggest that C. glacialis could not maintain their population by feeding solely on phytoplankton and that other food sources (i.e., microzooplankton) must be important in autumn. As observed by the increase in gut pigment, the temporal phytoplankton bloom, which is enhanced by the atmospheric turbulence (SWE) in autumn, may have a positive effect on copepod nutrition.

  7. Long-term decline in the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa in central Chesapeake Bay, USA: An indirect effect of eutrophication?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmel, David G.; Boynton, Walter R.; Roman, Michael R.

    2012-04-01

    A long-term abundance record of the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa in the Maryland portion of Chesapeake Bay was compiled from 1966 to 2002. A significant downward trend in the summertime abundance of Acartia tonsa was found in central Chesapeake Bay. We propose that environmental and food web changes occurred as the Chesapeake Bay became increasingly impacted by human activity which eventually led to the overall decline of A. tonsa. Environmental changes included a long-term rise in water temperature and the volume of hypoxic water during the summer. These changes occurred during the same time period as increases in chlorophyll a concentration, declines in the landings of the eastern oyster Crassostrea virginica, and declines in abundance of the sea nettle Chrysaora quinquecirrha. A CUSUM analysis showed that each time-series experienced a change point during over the past 50 years. These changes occurred sequentially, with chlorophyll a concentration increasing beginning in 1969, water temperature and hypoxic volume increasing beginning in the early 1980s, more recent Maryland C. virginica landings begin declining in the early 1980s and A. tonsa and C. quinquecirrha declining starting in 1989. A stepwise regression analysis revealed that the reduction in A. tonsa abundance appeared to be most associated with a decreasing trend in C. quinquecirrha abundance, though only when trends in the two time-series were present. The drop in C. quinquecirrha abundance is associated with reduced predation on the ctenophore, Mnemiopsis leidyi, a key predator of A. tonsa. The long-term decline of A. tonsa has likely impacted trophic transfer to fish, particularly the zooplanktivorous bay anchovy (Anchoa mitchilli). A time-series of bay anchovy juvenile index showed a negative trend and the CUSUM analysis revealed 1993 as its starting point. Total fisheries landings, excluding menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus), in Chesapeake Bay have also declined during the same period and this also began in 1993, further suggesting a potential fisheries impact from the decline in A. tonsa abundance.

  8. The effect of a biologically produced structure on the benthic copepods of a deep-sea site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thistle, David; Eckman, James E.

    1990-04-01

    In deep-sea soft bottoms, a variety of organisms produce structures that persist for long periods, even after the structures are vacated. It has been hypothesized that these structures are a major source of patchiness in these communities and are important in maintaining the high diversities that characterize the deep sea. Although several studies have shown species' abundances to be correlated with structures, the mechanisms underlying the associations are not known. We attempted to discover these mechanisms, focusing on the responses of benthic copepods to mudballs made by the polychaete Tharyx luticastellus at a site at 1050 m depth in San Diego Trough (32° 52.4'N, 117°45.5'W). It was found that seven out of 40 species responded. Four were more abundant around the structure only when the worm was in residence. These species apparently benefit from some consequences of the worm's presence. Given that bacterial abundance is higher about occupied Tharyx mudballs than nearby controls, it may be that the attractiveness occupied Tharyx mudballs arises from the provision of food. Three species responded to unoccupied mudballs. We measured responses to various types of mudball mimics to determine whether responses were to a habitat provided by the mudball, to a refuge from predation in its vicinity, or to hydrodynamically mediated increases in local food availability. Two of the species appeared to use the mudball as a habitat, the third as a refuge from infaunal predators. The results indicate that biologically produced structures can persist long enough to be viewed as habitat heterogeneity by other species in the community and that this source of patchiness is important to deep-sea species.

  9. Genomic Characterization and Phylogenetic Position of Two New Species in Rhabdoviridae Infecting the Parasitic Copepod, Salmon Louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis)

    PubMed Central

    Økland, Arnfinn Lodden; Nylund, Are; Øvergård, Aina-Cathrine; Blindheim, Steffen; Watanabe, Kuninori; Grotmol, Sindre; Arnesen, Carl-Erik; Plarre, Heidrun

    2014-01-01

    Several new viruses have emerged during farming of salmonids in the North Atlantic causing large losses to the industry. Still the blood feeding copepod parasite, Lepeophtheirus salmonis, remains the major challenge for the industry. Histological examinations of this parasite have revealed the presence of several virus-like particles including some with morphologies similar to rhabdoviruses. This study is the first description of the genome and target tissues of two new species of rhabdoviruses associated with pathology in the salmon louse. Salmon lice were collected at different Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) farming sites on the west coast of Norway and prepared for histology, transmission electron microscopy and Illumina sequencing of the complete RNA extracted from these lice. The nearly complete genomes, around 11 600 nucleotides encoding the five typical rhabdovirus genes N, P, M, G and L, of two new species were obtained. The genome sequences, the putative protein sequences, and predicted transcription strategies for the two viruses are presented. Phylogenetic analyses of the putative N and L proteins indicated closest similarity to the Sigmavirus/Dimarhabdoviruses cluster, however, the genomes of both new viruses are significantly diverged with no close affinity to any of the existing rhabdovirus genera. In situ hybridization, targeting the N protein genes, showed that the viruses were present in the same glandular tissues as the observed rhabdovirus-like particles. Both viruses were present in all developmental stages of the salmon louse, and associated with necrosis of glandular tissues in adult lice. As the two viruses were present in eggs and free-living planktonic stages of the salmon louse vertical, transmission of the viruses are suggested. The tissues of the lice host, Atlantic salmon, with the exception of skin at the attachment site for the salmon louse chalimi stages, were negative for these two viruses. PMID:25402203

  10. Assessing the In Situ Fertilization Status of Two Marine Copepod Species, Temora longicornis and Eurytemora herdmani; How Common Are Unfertilized Eggs in Nature?

    PubMed Central

    Lasley-Rasher, Rachel S.; Kramer, Andrew M.; Burdett-Coutts, Victoria; Yen, Jeannette

    2014-01-01

    We utilized an egg staining technique to measure the in situ fertilization success of two marine copepod species, Temora longicornis and Eurytemora herdmani from May to October 2008 in coastal Maine and correlated fertilization success with environmental conditions in their habitat. T. longicornis is a free spawning species that releases eggs into the ambient seawater after mating. In contrast, E. herdmani carries eggs in an egg sac until they hatch. The proportion of fertilized eggs within E. herdmani egg sacs was significantly higher than the freely spawned clutches of T. longicornis. This may be a result of the asymmetrical costs associated with carrying vs. spawning unfertilized eggs. T. longicornis frequently laid both fertilized and unfertilized eggs within their clutch. T. longicornis fertilization was negatively associated with chlorophyll concentration and positively associated with population density in their local habitat. The fertilization status of E. herdmani egg sacs was high throughout the season, but the proportion of ovigerous females was negatively associated with an interaction between predators and the proportion of females in the population. This study emphasizes that, in addition to population level processes, community and ecosystem level processes strongly influence the fertilization success and subsequent productivity of copepods. PMID:25397669

  11. Reverse genetics in the tide pool: knock-down of target gene expression via RNA interference in the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Felipe S; Schoville, Sean D; Burton, Ronald S

    2015-07-01

    Reverse genetic tools are essential for characterizing phenotypes of novel genes and testing functional hypotheses generated from next-generation sequencing studies. RNA interference (RNAi) has been a widely used technique for describing or quantifying physiological, developmental or behavioural roles of target genes by suppressing their expression. The marine intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus has become an emerging model for evolutionary and physiological studies, but this species is not amenable to most genetic manipulation approaches. As crustaceans are susceptible to RNAi-mediated gene knock-down, we developed a simple method for delivery of gene-specific double-stranded RNA that results in significant suppression of target gene transcription levels. The protocol was examined on five genes of interest, and for each, at least 50% knock-down in expression was achieved. While knock-down levels did not reach 100% in any trial, a well-controlled experiment with one heat-shock gene showed unambiguously that such partial gene suppression may cause dramatic changes in phenotype. Copepods with suppressed expression of heat-shock protein beta 1 (hspb1) exhibited dramatically decreased tolerance to high temperatures, validating the importance of this gene during thermal stress, as proposed by a previous study. The application of this RNAi protocol in T. californicus will be invaluable for examining the role of genes putatively involved in reproductive isolation, mitochondrial function and local adaptation. PMID:25487181

  12. A new genus and family of copepods (Crustacea: Copepoda) parasitic
    on polychaetes of the genus Jasmineira Langerhans, 1880 (family Sabellidae) in the northeastern Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Boxshall, Geoff A; O'reilly, Myles; Sikorski, Andrey; Summerfield, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    A new genus and species of copepod, Jasmineiricola mackiei n. gen. et n. sp., parasitic on at least three species of the sabellid polychaete genus Jasmineira Langerhans, 1880 is described. The adult female is mesoparasitic, living with part of its body (the endosoma) embedded within the host and part (the ectosoma) protruding through the host's body wall. The endosoma consists of a well defined head region carried anteriorly on the trunk which has paired lateral lobes housing the ovaries. The head bears a rosette-like array of eight slender lobes, which are probably derived from the mouthparts. The only limbs present on the trunk are the subchelate maxillipeds positioned immediately posterior to the head. The ectosoma consists of a posterior genito-abdominal lobe bearing paired genital apertures. The male is unknown. The new genus cannot be placed in any of the five existing families of mesoparasitic copepods on polychaete hosts and is treated as the type of a new monotypic family, the Jasmineiricolidae. The new species occurs over a depth range from 19 to 279 m, and is widely distributed from UK coastal waters to Norwegian waters inside the Arctic Circle. PMID:26624049

  13. Identification and developmental expression of the enzymes responsible for dopamine, histamine, octopamine and serotonin biosynthesis in the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Andrew E.; Fontanilla, Tiana M.; Roncalli, Vittoria; Cieslak, Matthew C.; Lenz, Petra H.

    2013-01-01

    Neurochemicals are likely to play key roles in physiological/behavioral control in the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus, the biomass dominant zooplankton for much of the North Atlantic Ocean. Previously, a de novo assembled transcriptome consisting of 206,041 unique sequences was used to characterize the peptidergic signaling systems of Calanus. Here, this assembly was mined for transcripts encoding enzymes involved in amine biosynthesis. Using known Drosophila melanogaster proteins as templates, transcripts encoding putative Calanus homologs of tryptophan-phenylalanine hydroxylase (dopamine, octopamine and serotonin biosynthesis), tyrosine hydroxylase (dopamine biosynthesis), DOPA decarboxylase (dopamine and serotonin biosynthesis), histidine decarboxylase (histamine biosynthesis), tyrosine decarboxylase (octopamine biosynthesis), tyramine ?-hydroxylase (octopamine biosynthesis) and tryptophan hydroxylase (serotonin biosynthesis) were identified. Reverse BLAST and domain analyses show that the proteins deduced from these transcripts possess sequence homology to and the structural hallmarks of their respective enzyme families. Developmental profiling revealed a remarkably consistent pattern of expression for all transcripts, with the highest levels of expression typically seen in the early nauplius and early copepodite. These expression patterns suggest roles for amines during development, particularly in the metamorphic transitions from embryo to nauplius and from nauplius to copepodite. Taken collectively, the data presented here lay a strong foundation for future gene-based studies of aminergic signaling in this and other copepod species, in particular assessment of the roles they may play in developmental control. PMID:24148657

  14. Identification and developmental expression of the enzymes responsible for dopamine, histamine, octopamine and serotonin biosynthesis in the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus.

    PubMed

    Christie, Andrew E; Fontanilla, Tiana M; Roncalli, Vittoria; Cieslak, Matthew C; Lenz, Petra H

    2014-01-01

    Neurochemicals are likely to play key roles in physiological/behavioral control in the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus, the biomass dominant zooplankton for much of the North Atlantic Ocean. Previously, a de novo assembled transcriptome consisting of 206,041 unique sequences was used to characterize the peptidergic signaling systems of Calanus. Here, this assembly was mined for transcripts encoding enzymes involved in amine biosynthesis. Using known Drosophila melanogaster proteins as templates, transcripts encoding putative Calanus homologs of tryptophan-phenylalanine hydroxylase (dopamine, octopamine and serotonin biosynthesis), tyrosine hydroxylase (dopamine biosynthesis), DOPA decarboxylase (dopamine and serotonin biosynthesis), histidine decarboxylase (histamine biosynthesis), tyrosine decarboxylase (octopamine biosynthesis), tyramine ?-hydroxylase (octopamine biosynthesis) and tryptophan hydroxylase (serotonin biosynthesis) were identified. Reverse BLAST and domain analyses show that the proteins deduced from these transcripts possess sequence homology to and the structural hallmarks of their respective enzyme families. Developmental profiling revealed a remarkably consistent pattern of expression for all transcripts, with the highest levels of expression typically seen in the early nauplius and early copepodite. These expression patterns suggest roles for amines during development, particularly in the metamorphic transitions from embryo to nauplius and from nauplius to copepodite. Taken collectively, the data presented here lay a strong foundation for future gene-based studies of aminergic signaling in this and other copepod species, in particular assessment of the roles they may play in developmental control. PMID:24148657

  15. Sinking particles as a possible source of nutrition for the large calanoid copepod Neocalanus cristatus in the subarctic Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagg, Michael

    1993-07-01

    Shipboard incubations of Neocalanus cristatus CV in natural seawater from the subarctic Pacific Ocean near Ocean Station "P" (50°N, 145°W) indicate that ingestion of uniformly suspended phytoplankton averages 6.3 ?gC cop -1 day -1 and ingestion of protozoan microzooplankton is 3.0-4.6 ?gC cop -1 day -1. Metazoan microzooplankton may contribute an additional 2.1-4.3 ?gC cop -1 day -1. Total ingestion from these sources is considerably less than the 34-92 ?gC cop -1 day -1 required for a growth rate of only 2% body C day -1. Levels of gut chlorophyll and pheopigments indicate ingestion rates of pigment containing materials were approximately four times greater than determined by in vitro incubations. Microscopic examination of gut contents suggests that aggregated particulate material was being ingested, and the morphology, behavior and vertical distribution of N. cristatus CV further suggest that sinking aggregates may be a significant source of nutrition: (a) N. cristatus CV has a large perceptive volume. It is a large copepod, 7-9 mm long from the apex of the head to the apex of the caudal rami, and its first antennae are disproportionately long relative to its body size. In addition, it has elaborate plumose setulation at the end of its antennae and its caudal furcae; (b) N. cristatus CV is a stationary suspension feeder. It hangs motionless in the water column for long periods and uses a feeding current to bring particles within the working range of its mouthparts. It is not an efficient carnivore; (c) N. cristatus CV is concentrated below the surface mixed layer (upper 30-50 m), in the depth stratum of maximum particulate flux. Measured levels of gut pigment in N. cristatus CV could be obtained by ingestion of the particulate flux from only a few cm 2 day -1. This would provide sufficient nutrition to maintain a growth rate consistent with known rates in this region.

  16. Basin-scale population genetic structure of the planktonic copepod Calanus finmarchicus in the North Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unal, Ebru; Bucklin, Ann

    2010-10-01

    Pelagic marine invertebrates have extensive potential for gene flow, although barriers to gene flow and entrainment in ocean currents may lead to reproductive isolation or drift, and thus to genetic differentiation of populations. The planktonic calanoid copepod Calanus finmarchicus shows significant geographic variation in life history traits across subarctic zones of the N. Atlantic Ocean. Population genetic analysis of C. finmarchicus examined allelic variation at 24 single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) sites in three nuclear protein-coding genes: citrate synthase, heat-shock protein-70, and AMP-activated protein kinase. Samples were collected during 2005 from 10 areas representing the Northwest (NW), North Central (NC), and Northeast (NE) Atlantic gyres. Hypotheses of two or more distinct populations of C. finmarchicus were examined based on SNP variation within the three genes analyzed both separately and together using AMOVA ( Arlequin Ver. 3.11), CLUMPP (Ver. 1.1), GENALEX (Ver. 6.2), Genepop (Ver. 4.0.10), and Structure (Ver. 2.3). All analyses revealed evidence of small but significant differentiation among areas within gyres (e.g., FSC = 0.0306, p < 0.0001 for two populations; FSC = 0.0344, p < 0.0001 for three populations; pairwise FST values for all 10 areas ranged from 0.0000 to 0.2400), which may reflect ecologically-important, short-term (on the order of months) variation driven by geographic variation in life history traits. Support for underlying large-scale differentiation, which may reflect persistent barriers to gene flow associated with entrainment in ocean gyres, was provided by various analyses, with numbers of distinct C. finmarchicus populations ranging from two to four. Analysis of molecular variation supported two populations, while clustering and population assignment supported two, three, or four populations. The Barents Sea sample was especially distinctive: one test using AMOVA was non-significant among gyres without this sample and differentiation among area populations within gyres was reduced. Analysis of additional genes, higher resolution sampling, and comparisons across different years are needed to resolve the spatial limits and number of distinct C. finmarchicus populations across the N. Atlantic Ocean basin.

  17. Characterisation of iron regulatory protein 1A and 1B in the blood-feeding copepod Lepeophtheirus salmonis.

    PubMed

    Tröße, Christiane; Kongshaug, Heidi; Dondrup, Michael; Nilsen, Frank

    2015-10-01

    During its parasitic life stages, the marine ectoparasitic copepod Lepeophtheirus salmonis ingests large amounts of host blood, which contains high amounts of iron. Iron is an essential micronutrient, but also toxic in high dosages, and blood-feeding parasites like the salmon louse must thus possess an efficient system to handle the excess iron. Iron regulatory protein 1 and 2 (IRP1 and IRP2) are known to play crucial roles in this process, by regulating several proteins involved in iron transport and storage, depending on the cellular iron concentration. To gain knowledge about the regulation of the iron metabolism in salmon lice, two IRP homologues (LsIRP1A and LsIRP1B) were identified by sequence and predicted structure similarity to known IRPs in other species. In situ hybridisation revealed that LsIRP1A and LsIRP1B mRNAs were expressed in the ovaries, oviducts and vitellogenic oocytes of adult females. Transcription levels of LsIRP1A and LsIRP1B mRNAs did not differ significantly between the different developmental stages of the salmon louse. Adults in the absence of blood as a feed source had decreased levels of LsIRP1A, but not LsIRP1B mRNA. RNA binding experiments indicated the presence of functioning IRP in salmon lice. In order to explore the biological functions of LsIRP1A and LsIRP1B, the mRNAs of both proteins were knocked down by RNA interference (RNAi) in preadult females. The knockdown was confirmed by qRT-PCR. LsIRP1B knockdown lice produced less offspring than control lice due to slightly shorter egg strings and had decreased levels of transcripts involved in egg development. Knockdown of both LsIRP1A and LsIRP1B caused increased expression of a salmon louse Ferritin (LsFer). These results confirm that salmon lice have two IRP1 homologues, LsIRP1A and LsIRP1B, and might suggest a function in cellular iron regulation in the reproductive organs and eggs. PMID:26115940

  18. On the surprising lack of differences between two congeneric calanoid copepod species, Calanus finmarchicus and C. helgolandicus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Robert J.; Speirs, Douglas C.; Heath, Michael R.

    2015-05-01

    The important calanoid copepod species Calanus finmarchicus and C. helgolandicus have distinct geographic ranges which are changing under the influence of climate change. Understanding the mechanisms underlying their distributions is becoming increasingly important as a result of the possible ecological impacts of these range shifts. Here we review inter-species differences in key life cycle traits that influence each species' geographic distribution, in particular development and growth, fecundity, feeding behaviour, vertical migration and overwintering behaviour. The distinct temperature niche of each species leads to an a priori assumption that the response of life cycle traits to temperature is a key determinant of their contrasting geographic distributions. A new development model was created to reconcile published experimental development times for each species. Model output indicates that at temperatures below approximately 12-13 °C, C. finmarchicus is the faster developing species, but above these temperatures C. helgolandicus develops more quickly. Conventionally Calanus development time is assumed to decrease monotonically with temperature; however our model indicates that the response of development time to temperature is instead U-shaped. Differences in life cycle aspects such as seasonality and vertical structuring are interpreted in light of this development model. Body size and lipid accumulation abilities could be significant influences on each species' geographic distribution; however evidence is consistent with inter-species differences not existing for these traits. Published evidence shows that inter-species differences in egg production may exist, but do not follow a clear pattern. Diapause is an important and well studied life cycle adaptation of C. finmarchicus, but has received little attention in C. helgolandicus. We reviewed knowledge of diapause and suggest the hypothesis that C. helgolandicus is restricted to continental shelf regions as a result of an inability to diapause for significant periods. This synthesised view of each species' respective life cycle traits is that response of growth and development to temperature is the only known difference between each species, which indicates a promising direction for the extension of population models of C. finmarchicus to C. helgolandicus.

  19. Diel variations of copepod feeding and grazing impact in the high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll zone of the equatorial Pacific Ocean (0°; 3°S, 180°)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champalbert, GisèLe; Neveux, Jacques; Gaudy, Raymond; Le Borgne, Robert

    2003-12-01

    Diel variations of copepod biomass and feeding were studied at two time series stations in the high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll region of the central equatorial Pacific (0° and 3°S, 180°). During 48-hour studies at each station, samples were taken at 3-hour frequency in the neuston layer (0-1 m) and over the 0-100 m depth range. Feeding rates were assessed through the spectrofluorometric analysis of gut pigment contents. During the cycles, significant variations of biomass and gut pigment contents were found in both the neuston layer and the 0-100 depth strata. However, the amplitude of day-night variations of feeding was larger and more clearly related to the day-night cycle in the neuston layer than in the water column. Maxima in biomass and gut pigment contents did not coincide in either the surface or the water column. The differences in the mean copepod feeding activities at the equator and at 3°S were related to the mean standing stocks of chl a and to the pattern of undegraded pigments, which were different at the surface and in the water column, especially at the equator. In the surface layer, gut pheopigment minima were observed during the day, and maxima at night. This pattern clearly followed the periodicity of diel vertical migration, with intense feeding observed after the main upward ascent around sunset. Conversely, the feeding pattern in the integrated water column was more related to food abundance with a higher feeding during the day and around sunset, especially at the equator. Gut pigment contents in the water column displayed late afternoon maxima and dawn minima, coinciding with the maxima and minima of depth-integrated chlorophyll a (chl a). On the basis of standing stocks of chl a containing particles larger than 3 ?m, mean grazing pressure (i.e., specific grazing rates multiplied by copepod dry weights and divided by in situ chl a) varied between 3.0 and 4.0% in the upper 100 m and between 3.5 and 3.8% in the neuston layer. Because of the cyclical nature of feeding activities, short-term variability in grazing pressure estimates were substantial, with individual estimates ranging from a high of 17.5% d-1 to a low of 0.2% d-1 in the neuston layer and from 0.9 to 7.8% d-1 in the 0-100 m water column.

  20. Chondracanthid copepod parasites of dories (Zeiformes: Zeidae) with the description of a new species of Chondracanthus from waters off northern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Braicovich, Paola E; Lanfranchi, Ana L; Incorvaia, Inés S; Timi, Juan T

    2013-09-01

    A new species of parasitic copepod, Chondracanthus hoi sp. n. (Copepoda: Chondracanthidae), is described based on specimens of both sexes collected from the buccal cavity and gill arches of the silvery john dory, Zenopsis conchifer (Lowe) (Zeiformes: Zeidae), from waters off northern Argentina (35-36 degrees S, 53-54 degrees W). Female of C. hoi differs from its congeners by the following combination of characters: presence of five pairs of trunk processes, antennule with four knobs tipped with small setae and absence of denticles on the terminal process of maxilla. Chondracanthids and zeiform fishes have been proposed as an example of co-speciation; this assumption is derived from a series of analyses based on incomplete records of both geographical distribution and host range of some parasite species, as well as misidentification offish hosts. These inconsistences observed during our bibliographical analyses are also discussed. PMID:24261137

  1. A new parasitic copepod (Cyclopoida: Bomolochidae) from a ponyfish (Leiognathidae) caught in Egyptian Mediterranean waters, with a review of hosts and key to species of Nothobomolochus.

    PubMed

    El-Rashidy, Hoda Hassan; Boxshall, Geoffrey Allan

    2014-02-01

    A new bomolochid copepod belonging to the genus Nothobomolochus Vervoort, 1962 is described from a Red Sea fish species, a ponyfish of the family Leiognathidae that has become established in the Eastern Mediterranean. The new species, N. leiognathicola n. sp., is based on material obtained from the gill chamber of the Red Sea immigrant ponyfish Leiognathus klunzingeri (Steindachner), caught in Egyptian waters off the Alexandria coast at Abuqir. A second new species, N. monodi n. sp., is established to accommodate some material previously described as N. denticulatus (Bassett-Smith, 1898), from the host Hemiramphus far Forsskål. A review of host records reveals that Nothobomolochus species utilise hosts representing five different orders, but are most commonly found on beloniform, clupeiform and perciform fishes. A newly constructed key to the 37 valid species of Nothobomolochus is presented. PMID:24474035

  2. Crude oil exposure results in oxidative stress-mediated dysfunctional development and reproduction in the copepod Tigriopus japonicus and modulates expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes.

    PubMed

    Han, Jeonghoon; Won, Eun-Ji; Hwang, Dae-Sik; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Lee, Yong Sung; Leung, Kenneth Mei-Yee; Lee, Su-Jae; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of the water-accommodated fraction (WAF) of crude oil on the development and reproduction of the intertidal copepod Tigriopus japonicus through life-cycle experiments. Furthermore, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the toxic effects of WAF on this benthic organism by studying expression patterns of cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes. Development of T. japonicus was delayed and molting was interrupted in response to WAF exposure. Hatching rate was also significantly reduced in response to WAF exposure. Activities of antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR), and catalase (CAT) were increased by WAF exposure in a concentration-dependent manner. These results indicated that WAF exposure resulted in oxidative stress, which in turn was associated with dysfunctional development and reproduction. To evaluate the involvement of cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes, we cloned the entire repertoire of CYP genes in T. japonicus (n=52) and found that the CYP genes belonged to five different clans (i.e., Clans 2, 3, 4, mitochondrial, and 20). We then examined expression patterns of these 52 CYP genes in response to WAF exposure. Three TJ-CYP genes (CYP3024A2, CYP3024A3, and CYP3027C2) belonging to CYP clan 3 were significantly induced by WAF exposure in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. We identified aryl hydrocarbon responsive elements (AhRE), xenobiotic responsive elements (XREs), and metal response elements (MRE) in the promoter regions of these three CYP genes, suggesting that these genes are involved in detoxification of toxicants. Overall, our results indicate that WAF can trigger oxidative stress and thus induce dysfunctional development and reproduction in the copepod T. japonicus. Furthermore, we identified three TJ-CYP genes that represent potential biomarkers of oil pollution. PMID:24813263

  3. Gyrodinium undulans Hulburt, a marine dinoflagellate feeding on the bloom-forming diatom Odontella aurita, and on copepod and rotifer eggs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drebes, G.; Schnepf, E.

    1998-03-01

    The marine dinoflagellate Gyrodinium undulans was discovered as a feeder on the planktonic diatom Odontella aurita. Every year, during winter and early spring, a certain percentage of cells of this bloom-forming diatom, in the Wadden Sea along the North Sea coast, was regularly found affected by the flagellate. Supplied with the food diatom O. aurita the dinoflagellate could be maintained successfully in clonal culture. The vegetative life cylce was studied, mainly by light microscopy on live material, with special regard to the mode of food uptake. Food is taken up by a so-called phagopod, emerging from the antapex of the flagellate. Only fluid or tiny prey material could be transported through the phagopod. Larger organelles like the chloroplasts of Odontella are not ingested and are left behind in the diatom cell. Thereafter, the detached dinoflagellate reproduces by cell division, occasionally followed by a second division. As yet, stages of sexual reproduction and possible formation of resting cysts could not be recognized, neither from wild material nor from laboratory cultures. Palmelloid stages (sometimes with a delicate wall) occurring in ageing cultures may at least partly function as temporary resting stages. The winter species G. undulans strongly resembles Syltodinium listii, a summer species feeding on copepod and rotifer eggs. Surprisingly, in a few cases this prey material was accepted by G. undulans as well, at least under culture conditions. When fed with copepod eggs, the dinoflagellate developed into a large trophont, giving rise thereafter by repeated binary fission to 4, 8 or 16 flagellates, as a result of a single feeding act. A re-examination of both species under simultaneous culture conditions is planned.

  4. Investigating the molecular basis of local adaptation to thermal stress: population differences in gene expression across the transcriptome of the copepod Tigriopus californicus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Geographic variation in the thermal environment impacts a broad range of biochemical and physiological processes and can be a major selective force leading to local population adaptation. In the intertidal copepod Tigriopus californicus, populations along the coast of California show differences in thermal tolerance that are consistent with adaptation, i.e., southern populations withstand thermal stresses that are lethal to northern populations. To understand the genetic basis of these physiological differences, we use an RNA-seq approach to compare genome-wide patterns of gene expression in two populations known to differ in thermal tolerance. Results Observed differences in gene expression between the southern (San Diego) and the northern (Santa Cruz) populations included both the number of affected loci as well as the identity of these loci. However, the most pronounced differences concerned the amplitude of up-regulation of genes producing heat shock proteins (Hsps) and genes involved in ubiquitination and proteolysis. Among the hsp genes, orthologous pairs show markedly different thermal responses as the amplitude of hsp response was greatly elevated in the San Diego population, most notably in members of the hsp70 gene family. There was no evidence of accelerated evolution at the sequence level for hsp genes. Among other sets of genes, cuticle genes were up-regulated in SD but down-regulated in SC, and mitochondrial genes were down-regulated in both populations. Conclusions Marked changes in gene expression were observed in response to acute sub-lethal thermal stress in the copepod T. californicus. Although some qualitative differences were observed between populations, the most pronounced differences involved the magnitude of induction of numerous hsp and ubiquitin genes. These differences in gene expression suggest that evolutionary divergence in the regulatory pathway(s) involved in acute temperature stress may offer at least a partial explanation of population differences in thermal tolerance observed in Tigriopus. PMID:22950661

  5. Mesozooplankton grazing impact on phytoplankton in the northern regions of the Kara Sea in autumn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drits, A. V.; Arashkevich, E. G.; Nikishina, A. B.; Sergeeva, V. M.; Solovyev, K. A.; Flint, M. V.

    2015-07-01

    The role of mass zooplankton species, copepods Pseudocalanus spp. and Oithona spp. and pteropods Limacina helicina, in grazing impact on phytoplankon in the upper 50 m layer was investigated. Material was collected at 14 stations along two sections crossing the outer shelf, continental slope and adjacent deep-water regions in the western and eastern branches of St. Anna trough (Kara Sea) in September 2011. Feeding rate was measured with fluorescence method. It was shown that total grazing impact on phytoplankton varied in a wide range from 0.2 to 8.7% of biomass and from 2 to 230% of daily primary production. The main contribution to phytoplankton grazing was made by small copepods Oithona spp. and juvenile pteropods. Maximum values of grazing were found in the frontal zones over the slope, minimum-over the outer continental shelf. Significant mesoscale spatial heterogeneity in total zooplankton grazing due to the changes in zooplankton composition and abundance was observed.

  6. Seasonal dynamics of reproductive parameters of the calanoid copepods Calanus helgolandicus and Calanoides carinatus in the Cantabrian Sea (SW Bay of Biscay)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, Sara; Álvarez-Marqués, Florentina

    2006-07-01

    The seasonal reproductive dynamics of the calanoid copepods Calanus helgolandicus and Calanoides carinatus and the main driving factors that control their reproductive activity were evaluated through a three-year study performed at two shelf stations in the Cantabrian Sea (SW Bay of Biscay). As a general pattern, the seasonal dynamics showed two peaks of reproduction for both species: the highest peak was associated with the spring phytoplankton bloom, whereas a second and less intense peak coincided with the autumn bloom. Between these two blooms, copepod recruitment showed low rates, and the lowest reproductive activity was recorded in winter. Gonads started to mature in pre-bloom conditions, probably fuelled by stored lipids and concurrent feeding, but the highest RIs (Reproductive Index) and EPRs (egg production rates) were found during the spring blooms. Accordingly feeding seems to be crucial for the main recruitment event for both species. Temperature, Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration and diatom abundance explained part of the variability found in reproductive activity, with the phytoplankton biomass as the most relevant environmental factor. Temperature probably had an indirect effect on fecundity; temperature and female size were inversely correlated, and large females produced larger clutch sizes. The food assemblage seemed to be more adequate for egg hatching success (HS) than for EPR, because HS was high most of the time, but EPRs were often lower than maximum production rates, pointing to a food limitation. However, the nauplius production rates compared well with those in other areas with higher phytoplankton productivity. Interestingly, a trade-off between number of eggs produced and their viability was found; small clutch sizes with high viability were produced during inadequate food conditions. This strategy maximizes naupliar survival under short food resources by investing in egg quality rather than in quantity. The annual cycle and reproductive dynamics of C. carinatus, traditionally described for African upwelling systems, were compared with that of C. helgolandicus, a resident species in the Bay of Biscay. The high similarity between the species suggests that C. carinatus has developed a stable population in the Cantabrian Sea, which denotes a high plasticity of this species.

  7. Seasonal variation in fatty acid composition of seston and the copepod Calanus sinicus (Brodsky, 1962) in Jiaozhou Bay and its trophic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mengtan; Li, Chaolun; Sun, Song

    2011-11-01

    The fatty acid compositions of seston and Calanus sinicus were investigated to study trophic relationships in Jiaozhou Bay. Principal component analysis was carried out to ordinate the fatty acid patterns of seston in stations and months. The results showed that diatoms were most abundant in the phytoplankton at station A5 (located in the northwest of the bay: 36°9'N, 120°20'E) and least abundant at station D7 (located outside of the bay: 35°59'N, 120°26'E). By contrast, dinoflagellates were most abundant at station D7 and least abundant at station A5. According to the annual variations of 16:1?7 and 18:4?3/16:1?7, diatoms flourished mainly in spring and summer, while dinoflagellates bloomed exclusively in summer. A distinctive feature of the fatty acid composition of C. sinicus was the prevalence of 20:5?3 and 22:6?3. The higher content of 16:1?7 over 18:4?3 in females indicated that diatoms contributed more than dinoflagellates to the diet of C. sinicus. The feeding intensity of C. sinicus on diatoms was higher in spring and autumn than in other seasons. The herbivorous indicators 20:1 and 22:1 were comparatively low, suggesting that besides phytoplankton, C. sinicus might feed on a wider range of particles including organic detritus, bacteria and small copepods.

  8. High resolution vertical distribution of the copepod Calanus chilensis in relation to the shallow oxygen minimum zone off northern Peru using LOKI, a new plankton imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirche, H. J.; Barz, K.; Ayon, P.; Schulz, J.

    2014-06-01

    The vertical distribution of copepodite stage V and adult Calanus chilensis was studied on two transects across the Humboldt Current System off northern Peru using the LOKI system. LOKI is an optical plankton recorder, which simultaneously collects images of zooplankton and environmental data such as temperature, salinity, oxygen, and fluorescence. Image quality allowed determination of CV, females and males and identification of C. chilensis from 3 co-occurring Calanid copepods. C. chilensis was inhabiting the upper 250 m. Highest abundances with a maximum of ca. 44.000 Ind. m-2 were observed in a narrow band within Cold Coastal Water at stations closest to the coast, coinciding with the Poleward Undercurrent. This raises questions for the life cycle closure within the Humboldt Current system. In contrast to observations in the southern part of the Humboldt Current System, the three stages studied were most abundant in hypoxic waters at oxygen concentrations between 5 and 50 ?M. Thus C. chilensis seems to be the only species of the family Calanidae where not only a resting stage can tolerate hypoxia, but also both adult stages. This impacts availability to predators, as despite a locally high biomass only part of the population is available to anchovy and other important fish species which are restricted to waters with higher oxygen concentrations.

  9. Chronic exposure of the North Atlantic copepod Calanus finmarchicus (Gunnerus, 1770) to CO2-acidified seawater; effects on survival, growth and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, S. A.; Hansen, B. H.; Altin, D.; Olsen, A. J.

    2013-03-01

    The impact of chronic exposure to CO2-acidified seawater on survival, growth and development was investigated in the North Atlantic copepod Calanus finmarchicus. Using a custom developed microcosm system fertilized eggs and subsequent development stages were exposed to normal seawater (390 ppm CO2) or one of three different levels of CO2-induced acidification (3300, 7300, 9700 ppm CO2). Following the 28 day exposure period survival was found to be unaffected by exposure to 3300 ppm CO2, but significantly reduced at 7300 and 9700 ppm CO2. Also, the proportion of copepodite stages IV to VI observed in the different treatments was significantly affected in a manner that may indicate a CO2-induced retardation of the rate of ontogenetic development. Morphometric analysis revealed a significant increase in size (prosome length) and lipid storage volume in stage IV copepodites exposed to 3300 ppm CO2 and reduced size in stage III copepodites exposed to 7300 ppm CO2. Together, the findings indicate that a pCO2 level ?2000 ppm (the highest CO2 level expected within year 2300) will probably not directly affect survival in C. finmarchicus. Long-term experiments at more moderate CO2 levels are however necessary before the possibility that growth and development may be affected below ?2000 ppm CO2 can be ruled out.

  10. Medium-term exposure of the North Atlantic copepod Calanus finmarchicus (Gunnerus, 1770) to CO2-acidified seawater: effects on survival and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, S. A.; Hansen, B. H.; Altin, D.; Olsen, A. J.

    2013-11-01

    The impact of medium-term exposure to CO2-acidified seawater on survival, growth and development was investigated in the North Atlantic copepod Calanus finmarchicus. Using a custom developed experimental system, fertilized eggs and subsequent development stages were exposed to normal seawater (390 ppm CO2) or one of three different levels of CO2-induced acidification (3300, 7300, 9700 ppm CO2). Following the 28-day exposure period, survival was found to be unaffected by exposure to 3300 ppm CO2, but significantly reduced at 7300 and 9700 ppm CO2. Also, the proportion of copepodite stages IV to VI observed in the different treatments was significantly affected in a manner that may indicate a CO2-induced retardation of the rate of ontogenetic development. Morphometric analysis revealed a significant increase in size (prosome length) and lipid storage volume in stage IV copepodites exposed to 3300 ppm CO2 and reduced size in stage III copepodites exposed to 7300 ppm CO2. Together, the findings indicate that a pCO2 level ?2000 ppm (the highest CO2 level expected by the year 2300) will probably not directly affect survival in C. finmarchicus. Longer term experiments at more moderate CO2 levels are, however, necessary before the possibility that growth and development may be affected below 2000 ppm CO2 can be ruled out.

  11. In vivo effects of UV radiation on multiple endpoints and expression profiles of DNA repair and heat shock protein (Hsp) genes in the cycloid copepod Paracyclopina nana.

    PubMed

    Won, Eun-Ji; Han, Jeonghoon; Lee, Yeonjung; Kumar, K Suresh; Shin, Kyung-Hoon; Lee, Su-Jae; Park, Heum Gi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on energy acquisition and consumption, the copepod Paracyclopina nana was irradiated with several doses (0-3kJ/m(2)) of UV. After UV radiation, we measured the re-brooding success, growth pattern of newly hatched nauplii, ingestion rate, and assimilation of diet. In addition, we checked the modulated patterns of DNA repair and heat shock protein (hsp) chaperoning genes of P. nana. UV-B radiation induced a significant reduction (7-87%) of the re-brooding rate of ovigerous females, indicating that UV-induced egg sac damage is closely correlated with a reduction in the hatching rate of UV-irradiated ovigerous female offspring. Using chlorophyll a and stable carbon isotope incubation experiments, we found a dose-dependent decrease (P<0.05) in food ingestion and the rate of assimilation to the body in response to UV radiation, implying that P. nana has an underlying ability to shift its balanced-energy status from growth and reproduction to DNA repair and adaptation. Also, expression of P. nana base excision repair (BER)-associated genes and hsp chaperoning genes was significantly increased in response to UV radiation in P. nana. These findings indicate that even 1kJ/m(2) of UV radiation induces a reduction in reproduction and growth patterns, alters the physiological balance and inhibits the ability to cope with UV-induced damage in P. nana. PMID:26001085

  12. Are individual NOEC levels safe for mixtures? A study on mixture toxicity of brominated flame-retardants in the copepod Nitocra spinipes.

    PubMed

    Breitholtz, Magnus; Nyholm, Jenny Rattfelt; Karlsson, Jenny; Andersson, Patrik L

    2008-07-01

    In aquatic ecosystems organisms are exposed to mixtures of pollutants. Still, risk assessment focuses almost exclusively on effect characterization of individual substances. The main objective of the current study was therefore to study mixture toxicity of a common group of industrial substances, i.e., brominated flame-retardants (BFRs), in the harpacticoid copepod Nitocra spinipes. Initially, 10 BFRs with high hydrophobicity but otherwise varying chemical characteristics were selected based on multivariate chemical characterization and tested individually for effects on mortality and development using a partial life cycle test (six days) where silica gel is used as a carrier of the hydrophobic substances. Based on these findings, six of the 10 BFRs were mixed in a series of NOEC proportions (which were set to 0.008, 0.04, 0.2, 1, and five times the NOEC concentrations for each individual BFR), loaded on silica gel and tested in a full life cycle test (26 days). Significantly increased mortality was observed in N. spinipes after six and 26 days exposure at a NOEC proportion that equals the NOEC LDR value (x1) for each BFR in the mixture (p=0.0015 and p=0.0105, respectively). At the NOECx5 proportion all animals were dead. None of the other NOEC proportions caused significant negative responses related to development and reproduction. This shows that low concentrations of individual substances can cause toxicity if exposed in mixtures, which highlights the need to consider mixture toxicity to a greater extent in regulatory work. PMID:18561976

  13. Copepods in ice-covered seas—Distribution, adaptations to seasonally limited food, metabolism, growth patterns and life cycle strategies in polar seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conover, R. J.; Huntley, M.

    1991-07-01

    While a seasonal ice cover limits light penetration into both polar seas for up to ten months a year, its presence is not entirely negative. The mixed layer under sea ice will generally be shallower than in open water at the same latitude and season. Ice forms a substrate on which primary production can be concentrated, a condition which contrasts with the generally dilute nutritional conditions which prevail in the remaining ocean. The combination of a shallow, generally stable mixed layer with a close proximity to abundant food make the under-ice zone a suitable nursery for both pelagic and benthic species, an upside-down benthos for opportunistic substrate browsers, and a rich feeding environment for species often considered to be neritic in temperate environments. Where the ice cover is not continuous there may be a retreating ice edge that facilitates the seasonal production of phytoplankton primarily through increased stability from the melt water. Ice edge blooms similarly encourage secondary production by pelagic animals. Pseudocalanus acuspes, which may be the most abundant and productive copepod in north polar latitudes, initiates growth at the start of the "spring bloom" of epontic algae, reaching sexual maturity at breakup or slightly before. In the Southern Hemisphere, the small neritic copepod Paralabidocera antarctica and adult krill have been observed to utilize ice algae. Calanus hyperboreus breeds in the dark season at depth and its buoyant eggs, slowly developing on the ascent, reach the under-ice layer in April as nauplii ready to benefit from the primary production there. On the other hand, C. glacialis may initiate ontogenetic migrations and reproduction in response to increased erosion of ice algae due to solar warming and melting at the ice-water interface. While the same species in a phytoplankton bloom near the ice edge reproduces actively, those under still-consolidated ice nearby can have immature gonads. Diel migration and diel feeding rhythms under or near the ice have also been observed for several species. In the Northern Hemisphere larger zooplanktonic species may take two, three, or possibly more years to reach maturity, but the grand strategy, apparently used by all, is to assure that their young have reached active feeding stages by the time of maximum primary production in the water column so that maximum growth, often, but not always, with emphasis on lipid storage, can occur during the often brief, but usually intense, summer bloom. The rate of growth of arctic or antarctic zooplankton is not so important as assuring a high level of fecundity when maturity comes. Overwintering is probably not a great hardship and diapause may not be a useful strategy because the environmental temperature is constantly near the freezing point of sea water, and basal metabolism accordingly low. Nonetheless, feeding behaviour and metabolic rates have strong seasonal signals. In the absence of other stimuli, light must be involved in the transformation from winter to summer metabolism and visa versa but the mechanisms still remain obscure.

  14. Gene expression analyses of immune responses in Atlantic salmon during early stages of infection by salmon louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) revealed bi-phasic responses coinciding with the copepod-chalimus transition

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The salmon louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis Krøyer), an ectoparasitic copepod with a complex life cycle causes significant losses in salmon aquaculture. Pesticide treatments against the parasite raise environmental concerns and their efficacy is gradually decreasing. Improvement of fish resistance to lice, through biological control methods, needs better understanding of the protective mechanisms. We used a 21 k oligonucleotide microarray and RT-qPCR to examine the time-course of immune gene expression changes in salmon skin, spleen, and head kidney during the first 15 days after challenge, which encompassed the copepod and chalimus stages of lice development. Results Large scale and highly complex transcriptome responses were found already one day after infection (dpi). Many genes showed bi-phasic expression profiles with abrupt changes between 5 and 10 dpi (the copepod-chalimus transitions); the greatest fluctuations (up- and down-regulation) were seen in a large group of secretory splenic proteases with unknown roles. Rapid sensing was witnessed with induction of genes involved in innate immunity including lectins and enzymes of eicosanoid metabolism in skin and acute phase proteins in spleen. Transient (1-5 dpi) increase of T-cell receptor alpha, CD4-1, and possible regulators of lymphocyte differentiation suggested recruitment of T-cells of unidentified lineage to the skin. After 5 dpi the magnitude of transcriptomic responses decreased markedly in skin. Up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases in all studied organs suggested establishment of a chronic inflammatory status. Up-regulation of putative lymphocyte G0/G1 switch proteins in spleen at 5 dpi, immunoglobulins at 15 dpi; and increase of IgM and IgT transcripts in skin indicated an onset of adaptive humoral immune responses, whereas MHCI appeared to be down-regulated. Conclusions Atlantic salmon develops rapid local and systemic reactions to L. salmonis, which, however, do not result in substantial level of protection. The dramatic changes observed after 5 dpi can be associated with metamorphosis of copepod, immune modulation by the parasite, or transition from innate to adaptive immune responses. PMID:21385383

  15. Cryptic or pseudocryptic: can morphological methods inform copepod taxonomy? An analysis of publications and a case study of the Eurytemora affinis species complex

    PubMed Central

    Lajus, Dmitry; Sukhikh, Natalia; Alekseev, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Interest in cryptic species has increased significantly with current progress in genetic methods. The large number of cryptic species suggests that the resolution of traditional morphological techniques may be insufficient for taxonomical research. However, some species now considered to be cryptic may, in fact, be designated pseudocryptic after close morphological examination. Thus the “cryptic or pseudocryptic” dilemma speaks to the resolution of morphological analysis and its utility for identifying species. We address this dilemma first by systematically reviewing data published from 1980 to 2013 on cryptic species of Copepoda and then by performing an in-depth morphological study of the former Eurytemora affinis complex of cryptic species. Analyzing the published data showed that, in 5 of 24 revisions eligible for systematic review, cryptic species assignment was based solely on the genetic variation of forms without detailed morphological analysis to confirm the assignment. Therefore, some newly described cryptic species might be designated pseudocryptic under more detailed morphological analysis as happened with Eurytemora affinis complex. Recent genetic analyses of the complex found high levels of heterogeneity without morphological differences; it is argued to be cryptic. However, next detailed morphological analyses allowed to describe a number of valid species. Our study, using deep statistical analyses usually not applied for new species describing, of this species complex confirmed considerable differences between former cryptic species. In particular, fluctuating asymmetry (FA), the random variation of left and right structures, was significantly different between forms and provided independent information about their status. Our work showed that multivariate statistical approaches, such as principal component analysis, can be powerful techniques for the morphological discrimination of cryptic taxons. Despite increasing cryptic species designations, morphological techniques have great potential in determining copepod taxonomy. PMID:26120427

  16. Use of life tables and LC50 tests to evaluate chronic and acute toxicity effects of copper on the marine copepod Tisbe furcata (Baird)

    SciTech Connect

    Bechmann, R.K. . Dept. of Marine Zoology and Marine Chemistry)

    1994-09-01

    Cohorts of the epiphytic marine copepod Tisbe furcata were chronically exposed to copper in life-table experiments to test whether ecologically relevant impacts can occur at sublethal concentrations. Data on fecundity, longevity, and rate of development were used to calculate r[sub m]--the intrinsic rate of natural increase. Acute toxicity tests were done to compare the concentrations of copper affecting individual lethality and population biology. The LC50 value for Tisbe furcata nauplii was 2.8 [mu]M copper. The results from the life-table experiments show that 0.9 [mu]M copper can cause significant negative effects on demographic parameters (total production of nauplii, life span, and reproductive period for fertile females) and reduce the percentage of fertile females leading to a 61% reduction of r[sub m]. However, r[sub m] was still positive at 0.9 [mu]M copper, and the net reproductive rate (R[sub 0]) indicated a fivefold increase in population size from one generation to the next. Although there were no significant effects of copper at 0.5 [mu]M, there was a negative trend in almost all the demographic parameters, indicating that the observed 10% reduction of r[sub m] at this concentration was an effect of copper. For the substances tested so far with both acute LC50 tests and life-table experiments, r[sub m] was not reduced at concentrations below LC50/10. When life-table experiments are used as part of environmental hazard assessments, concentrations below LC50/10 should be tested to detect substances that are potentially harmful to the environment at sublethal concentrations, rather than testing concentrations close to LC50.

  17. Community structure of mesozooplankton in the western part of the Sea of Okhotsk in summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Hiroshi; Nishioka, Jun; Tsuda, Atsushi

    2014-08-01

    We investigated the community structure of mesozooplankton in the western part of the Sea of Okhotsk in late summer, 2006. We recognized four communities belonging to two assemblages. A coastal assemblage dominated by the arctic planktonic snail Limacina helicina consisted of a gulf community characterized by brackish copepods and a continental shelf community characterized by the hydrozoan medusa Aglantha digitale and the arctic copepod Calanus glacialis. The other assemblage, characterized by the oceanic copepod Neocalanus plumchrus, consisted of a continental slope community characterized by a diverse species composition and a basin community characterized by the oceanic copepod N. cristatus. The continental slope community contained species from the coastal waters and was distributed along the course of the East Sakhalin current. This community may have been assembled by the incorporation of coastal water into the oceanic waters by the strong current. Small coastal copepods such as Oithona similis and Pseudocalanus spp. were the main components in all communities in terms of numbers, but larger copepods such as Neocalanus spp. and Metridia okhotensis were important in terms of weight, especially in the continental slope and basin communities. The population structures of the dominant species suggest that overall biological production is maintained by continuous reproduction or growth (or both) of L. helicina and small coastal copepods after the onset of seasonal dormancy of the large oceanic copepods in late summer.

  18. Comparing seasonal dynamics of the Lake Huron zooplankton community between 1983-1984 and 2007 and revisiting the impact of Bythotrephes planktivory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bunnell, David B.; Keeler, Kevin M.; Puchala, Elizabeth A.; Davis, Bruce M.; Pothoven, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    Zooplankton community composition can be influenced by lake productivity as well as planktivory by fish or invertebrates. Previous analyses based on long-term Lake Huron zooplankton data from August reported a shift in community composition between the 1980s and 2000s: proportional biomass of calanoid copepods increased while that of cyclopoid copepods and herbivorous cladocerans decreased. Herein, we used seasonally collected data from Lake Huron in 1983–1984 and 2007 and reported similar shifts in proportional biomass. We also used a series of generalized additive models to explore differences in seasonal abundance by species and found that all three cyclopoid copepod species (Diacyclops thomasi, Mesocylops edax, Tropocyclops prasinus mexicanus) exhibited higher abundance in 1983–1984 than in 2007. Surprisingly, only one (Epischura lacustris) of seven calanoid species exhibited higher abundance in 2007. The results for cladocerans were also mixed with Bosmina spp. exhibiting higher abundance in 1983–1984, while Daphnia galeata mendotae reached a higher level of abundance in 2007. We used a subset of the 2007 data to estimate not only the vertical distribution of Bythotrephes longimanus and their prey, but also the consumption by Bythotrephes in the top 20 m of water. This epilimnetic layer was dominated by copepod copepodites and nauplii, and consumption either exceeded (Hammond Bay site) or equaled 65% (Detour site) of epilimnetic zooplankton production. The lack of spatial overlap between Bythotrephes and herbivorous cladocerans and cyclopoid copepod prey casts doubt on the hypothesis that Bythotrephes planktivory was the primary driver underlying the community composition changes in the 2000s.

  19. Three cDNAs encoding vitellogenin homologs from Antarctic copepod, Tigriopus kingsejongensis: Cloning and transcriptional analysis in different maturation stages, temperatures, and putative reproductive hormones.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Rin; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Ah Ran; Kim, Sanghee; Park, Hyun; Baek, Hea Ja; Kim, Hyun-Woo

    2016-02-01

    Three full-length cDNAs encoding lipoprotein homologs were identified in Tigriopus kingsejongensis, a newly identified copepod from Antarctica. Structural and transcriptional analyses revealed homology with two vitellogenin-like proteins, Tik-Vg1 and Tik-Vg2, which were 1855 and 1795 amino acids in length, respectively, along with a third protein, Tik-MEP, which produced a 1517-residue protein with similarity to a melanin engaging protein (MEP) in insects Phylogenetic analysis showed that Vgs in Maxillopods including two Tik-Vgs belong to the arthropod vitellogenin-like clade, which includes clottable proteins (CPs) in decapod crustaceans and vitellogenins in insects. Tik-MEP clustered together with insect MEPs, which appear to have evolved before the apoB-like and arthropod Vg-like clades. Interestingly, no genes orthologous to those found in the apoB clade were identified in Maxillopoda, suggesting that functions of large lipid transfer proteins (LLTPs) in reproduction and lipid metabolism may be different from those in insect and decapod crustaceans. As suggested by phylogenetic analyses, the two Tik-Vgs belonging to the arthropod Vg-like clade appear to play major roles in oocyte maturation, while Vgs belonging to the apoB clade function primarily in the reproduction of decapod crustaceans. Transcriptional analysis of Tik-Vg expression revealed a 24-fold increase in mature and ovigerous females compared with immature female, whereas expression of Tik-MEP remained low through all reproductive stages. Acute temperature changes did not affect the transcription of Tik-Vg genes, whereas Tik-MEP appeared to be affected by temperature change. Among the three hormones thought to be involved in molting and reproduction in arthropods, only farnesoic acid (FA) induced transcription of the two Tik-Vg genes. Regardless of developmental stage and hormone treatment, Tik-Vg1 and Tik-Vg2 exhibited a strong positive correlation in expression, suggesting that expression of these genes may be regulated by the same transcriptional machinery. PMID:26627129

  20. Egg production rates of the copepod Calanus marshallae in relation to seasonal and interannual variations in microplankton biomass and species composition in the coastal upwelling zone off Oregon, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, William T.; Du, Xiuning

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we assessed trophic interactions between microplankton and copepods by studying the functional response of egg production rates (EPR; eggs female-1 day-1) of the copepod Calanus marshallae to variations in microplankton biomass, species composition and community structure. Female C. marshallae and phytoplankton water samples were collected biweekly at an inner-shelf station off Newport, Oregon USA for four years, 2011-2014, during which a total of 1213 female C. marshallae were incubated in 63 experiments. On average, 80% of the females spawned with an overall mean EPR of 30.4. EPRs in spring (Apr-May, average of 40.2) were significantly higher than summer (Jun-Oct; 26.4). EPRs were intermediate in winter (Jan-Feb; 32.5). Interannually, EPRs were significantly higher in 2014 than 2011 and 2012. Total chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentration and diatom abundance both were significantly higher in summer while no seasonal differences were found in abundance of dinoflagellates, ciliates or Cryptophytes. Although total Chl a showed no interannual differences in bulk biomass of phytoplankton, community structure analysis indicated differences among years. More diverse diatom communities were observed in 2013 and 2014 compared to 2011 and 2012. Relationships between EPR and potential food variables (phytoplankton and ciliates) were significant by season: a hyperbolic functional response was found between EPR and total Chl a in winter-spring and summer, separately, and between EPR and ciliate abundance in winter-spring; a linear model fit best the functional response of EPR to diatom abundance in summer. The estimate of potential population recruitment rate (the number of females × EPR; eggs day-1 m-2) was highest in spring (Apr-May), and annually was highest in 2013 (11,660), followed by 2011 (6209), 2012 (3172) and 2014 (1480). Our observations of in situ EPR were far higher than published laboratory rates of 23.5, calling into question our past laboratory studies that used mono-algae cultures as food for copepods. Moreover, an increasing number of studies (including this study) are showing an apparent greater importance of ciliates as a nutritious food source for Calanus species demonstrating the importance of the microbial loop to secondary production.

  1. A new species of Procolobomatus Castro Romero, 1994 (Copepoda: Philichthyidae) endoparasitic in a deepwater longtail red snapper (Actinopterygii: Lutjanidae) off Ishigaki Island, Japan, with records of philichthyid copepods reported from Asian waters.

    PubMed

    Madinabeitia, Ione; Iwasaki, Sadaharu

    2013-03-01

    A new species of the Philichthyidae Vogt, 1877 (Copepoda: Poecilostomatoida), Procolobomatus hoi n. sp., is described based on adult female specimens recovered from the cephalic sensory canals of Etelis coruscans Valenciennes (Actinopterygii: Lutjanidae) caught off Ishigaki Island, the Ryukyu Islands, southern Japan. The new species differs from its congeners by having the following combination of characters: a long medial cephalic lobe about one-third the length of the body; an armature of five spines on the distal exopodal segment of leg 2; one long apical seta on the papillose leg 4; a caudal ramus armed with one medial and four terminal setae (two middle setae are inflated); and spinulose ornamentation covering the body. Procolobomatus hoi n. sp. is the first member of the genus reported from the western Pacific Ocean and from a host of the family Lutjanidae. Previous records of philichthyid copepods from Asian waters are also reported. PMID:23404758

  2. Microcrustacea in flowing water - experimental-analysis of washout times and a field-test

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richardson, W.B.

    1992-01-01

    1. Flow-chamber experiments were conducted to evaluate the ability of microcrustacea to maintain position in moving water. These results were compared to distributions of zooplankton and water velocity in a stream pool to determine the relationship of animal density to water movement and swimming ability.^2. Cladocerans exhibited negative rheotaxis (directed behaviour against a current) but poor ability to maintain position at velocities >2.5 Cm s-1. Daphnia and scapholeberis were better at avoiding washout than moina and diaphanosoma. At velocities 2.5 Cm s-1, scapholeberis >3.2 Cm s-1 and eucyclops >7.75 Cm s-1. Washout time of daphnia and scapholeberis was positively related to body size and negatively to water velocity and possession of eggs. Washout was inversely related to water velocity for eucyclops.^4. Highest densities of microcrustacea in a stream pool were found in non-flowing or downstream zones of the pool. Benthic (hydracarina, harpacticoid copepods, ostracods) and fast-swimming (cyclopoids) forms were most common in flowing zones. Facultatively benthic cladocera were abundant in regions of no flow. Rotifers and immature copepods were most abundant at the downstream end of the pool.^5. Behavioural mechanisms for remaining in stream pools at times of high flow appear to include: (i) flow avoidance (simocephalus, chydorus, scapholeberis and cyclopoids), (ii) use of benthic habitat (ostracods, harpacticoids, hydracarina), (iii) strong swimming ability (cyclopoids).

  3. Diffusible gas transmitter signaling in the copepod crustacean Calanus finmarchicus: identification of the biosynthetic enzymes of nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) using a de novo assembled transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Andrew E.; Fontanilla, Tiana M.; Roncalli, Vittoria; Cieslak, Matthew C.; Lenz, Petra H.

    2014-01-01

    Neurochemical signaling is a major component of physiological/behavioral control throughout the animal kingdom. Gas transmitters are perhaps the most ancient class of molecules used by nervous systems for chemical communication. Three gases are generally recognized as being produced by neurons: nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). As part of an ongoing effort to identify and characterize the neurochemical signaling systems of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus, the biomass dominant zooplankton in much of the North Atlantic Ocean, we have mined a de novo assembled transcriptome for sequences encoding the neuronal biosynthetic enzymes of these gases, i.e. nitric oxide synthase (NOS), heme oxygenase (HO) and cystathionine ?-synthase (CBS), respectively. Using Drosophila proteins as queries, two NOS-, one HO-, and one CBS-encoding transcripts were identified. Reverse BLAST and structural analyses of the deduced proteins suggest that each is a true member of its respective enzyme family. RNA-Seq data collected from embryos, early nauplii, late nauplii, early copepodites, late copepodites and adults revealed the expression of each transcript to be stage specific: one NOS restricted primarily to the embryo and the other was absent in the embryo but expressed in all other stages, no CBS expression in the embryo, but present in all other stages, and HO expressed across all developmental stages. Given the importance of gas transmitters in the regulatory control of a number of physiological processes, these data open opportunities for investigating the roles these proteins play under different life-stage and environmental conditions in this ecologically important species. PMID:24747481

  4. Abundance, composition, and distribution of crustacean zooplankton in relation to hypolimnetic oxygen depletion in west-central Lake Erie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heberger, Roy F.; Reynolds, James B.

    1977-01-01

    Samples of crustacean zooplankton were collected monthly in west-central Lake Erie in April and June to October 1968, and in July and August 1970, before and during periods of hypolimnetic dissolved oxygen (DO) depletion. The water column at offshore stations was thermally stratified from June through September 1968, and the hypolimnion contained no DO in mid-August of 1968 or 1970. Composition, abundance, and vertical distribution of crustacean zooplankton changed coincidentally with oxygen depletion. From July to early August, zooplankton abundance dropped 79% in 1968 and 50% in 1970. The declines were attributed largely to a sharp decrease in abundance of planktonic Cyclops bicuspidatus thomasi. Zooplankton composition shifted from mainly cyclopoid copepods in July to mainly cladocerans and copepod nauplii in middle to late August. We believe that mortality of adults and dormancy of copepodites in response to anoxia was the probable reason for the late summer decline in planktonic C. b. thomasi.

  5. The effects of Anabaena spiroides exopolysaccharides on copper accumulation in an aquatic food chain.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, P F M; Melão, M G G; Lombardi, A T; Nogueira, M M; Vieira, A A H

    2009-06-28

    The influence of Anabaena spiroides exopolysaccharides (EPS) on copper speciation (total dissolved, particulate and free Cu(2+) ions) and bioavailability in aquatic organisms was investigated. Bacteria were used as the first trophic level, Paramecium caudatum (protozoan) as the second and the copepod cyclopoid Metacyclops mendocinus as the third level. The organisms were obtained from a freshwater reservoir and held under continuous laboratory controlled conditions. Freshwater media containing EPS excreted by A. spiroides (10mgL(-1)) and copper (1.0x10(-6)molL(-1)) were used for bacteria growth. Contamined bacteria were used as food source to protozoan, which was further furnished to copepods. The results showed a reduction of EPS concentration during bacteria growth and also a smaller copper accumulation by microorganisms in the presence of EPS. We concluded that A. spiroides exopolysaccharides have reduced copper entrance into the experimental aquatic microbial food chain. PMID:19447509

  6. Zooplankton community and hydrographical properties of the Neretva Channel (eastern Adriatic Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidjak, Olja; Bojani?, Natalia; Kušpili?, Grozdan; Nin?evi? Gladan, Živana; Ti?ina, Vjekoslav

    2007-12-01

    Temporal and spatial variability of micro and mesozooplankton was studied in 1998 and 1999 at four stations in the Neretva Channel area influenced by the Neretva river and the open waters of the south Adriatic Sea. The area is orthophosphate limited, but an excessive accumulation of land derived nitrogen is prevented by phytoplankton uptake and the general circulation pattern. Microzooplankton was dominated by ciliates, with average abundances comparable to other Adriatic channel areas (122 543 ind. l-1). Non-loricate ciliates (NLC) generally peaked in the warmer periods, but a winter increase was evident towards the inner part of the channel. Tintinnid abundances generally increased in autumn. A significant relationship with temperature was not recorded for either protozoan group. An inverse relationship between NLC and salinity might be indirectly caused by their preference for the food abundant surface layer. Mesozooplankton was dominated by copepods, with distinct summer maxima throughout the area and pronounced winter maxima of >10,000 ind. m-3 at the inner stations. The community was predominantly neritic but the open sea waters were important in structuring the mesozooplankton assemblage at all stations during the autumn winter period. Although temperature regulated the seasonal dynamics of most metazoans and the species succession in the copepod community, small omnivorous copepods ( Oncaea media complex, Oithona nana and Euterpina acutifrons) dominated regardless of the season. A trophic link between copepods and ciliates was evident in winter during low phytoplankton biomass.

  7. Composition of phytoplankton communities and their contribution to secondary productivity in Carolina Bays on the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.B.

    1991-08-01

    The overall goal of the this three year project is to determine the importance of phytoplankton (microscopic algae) as a component of the food chain base in SRS cardine bays. To summarize specific year three results: Total phytoplankton abundance in Flamingo bay was greatest during early spring 1989, declined during spring and summer, but increased again during early fall. Most of this phytoplankton density was composed of genus Chlamydomonas sp. Ellenton bay demonstrated a similar decline in phytoplankton numbers during midspring 1989, but increased in density during midsummer. As observed in Flamingo bay, much of this variation was due to changes in Chlamydomonas sp. numbers. In Flamingo bay the blue-green alga Anabaena sp. was low in concentration throughout the 1989 flooded season until August, however the diatom Pinnularia sp. displayed a pattern of abundance similar to Chlamydomonas sp. In Ellenton bay Pinnularia sp. peaked during early summer and Anabaena sp. reached highest densities in late spring. For zooplankton in Flamingo bay, the calanoid copepods were higher in early and late spring, similar to the cyclopoid copepods. Cladocera in Ellenton bay were highest in numbers during May 1989, while cladocera in Flamingo bay displayed patterns similar to Flamingo bay cyclopoid copepods. Laboratory experiments exposing Chlamydomonas sp. cultures to known mixtures of {sup 13}C-CO{sub 2} and {sup 12}C-CO{sub 2} seem to indicate that some isotope preference may exist during photosynthesis, however these results have not been analyzed statistically yet. Phytoplankton samples collected for Flamingo bay indicated that a seasonal change in isotope ratios may be occurring in algae tissues, however further analyses are being conducted to determine whether this may also be due to species shifts. 3 refs., 14 figs.

  8. Gulf of Trieste: A changing ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conversi, A.; Peluso, T.; Fonda-Umani, S.

    2009-03-01

    Understanding the impact of climate change on zooplankton populations is of major importance, as they represent the basis for higher trophic levels in the marine food web. In this study we analyze the 36-year copepod abundance time series in the Gulf of Trieste, northern Adriatic, to investigate its interannual variability, with particular attention to species trends and phenology. Following the analysis of the local winter sea surface temperature, two periods are identified: 1970-1987 and 1988-2005. These periods are characterized by ecosystem-wide changes: an approximate doubling in total copepod abundance, the arrival of a new species (Diaixis pygmoea), the rise (Paracalanus parvus, Oncaea spp., Oithona spp., and Euterpina acutifrons) or decline (Pseudocalanus elongatus, Clausocalanus spp.) of several taxa, and changes in the phenology in several species, with predominantly forward shifts in the timing of the maximum peak. While Acartia clausi remains the dominant species, there is a general trend toward smaller species in the second period. Our results also indicate the large, possibly critical, reduction in the abundance of the species Pseudocalanus elongatus. We hypothesize that the changes in copepod abundances and community composition in the Gulf of Trieste are related to the general warming in the sea surface temperature and associated northerly displacement of the ecosystem and to the changes in the Mediterranean circulation that began at the end of the 1980s and affected the whole basin in the following years as part of the phenomenon called the Eastern Mediterranean Transient.

  9. Zooplankton distribution in the western Arctic during summer 2002: Hydrographic habitats and implications for food chain dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Peter V. Z.; Llinás, Leopoldo; Smith, Sharon L.; Pilz, Dora

    Global warming is presently a widely accepted phenomenon with a broad range of anticipated impacts on marine ecosystems. Alterations in temperature, circulation and ice cover in Arctic seas may result in changes in food chain dynamics, beginning with planktonic processes. As part of the Shelf-Basin Interactions (SBI) program, we conducted zooplankton surveys during summer 2002 to assess the biomass, distribution and abundance of copepods and other pelagic zooplankton over the Chukchi and Beaufort shelves, slope regions and the adjacent Canada Basin. The motivation for our fieldwork was the question, "Will global change, particularly warming, result in more large-sized zooplankton which support a pelagic food web of fish, birds, and certain mammals over the Chukchi and Beaufort shelves or in more smaller-sized zooplankton which will diminish the fish, birds and mammals and favor sedentary benthic organisms?" The objectives of the present study were 1) to census the regional zooplankton community and establish a baseline for comparisons with historical and future studies and 2) to determine whether large-bodied copepods associated with deep waters of the Bering Sea or the Canada Basin were transported to the shelves in sufficient numbers to modify the food web in a region where smaller copepods often dominate the zooplankton numerically. Spatial distributions of zooplankton communities were clearly associated with hydrographic habitats determined by the chemical, physical and biological characteristics of the upper water layer. Smaller taxa dominated the shelf communities while offshore zooplankton assemblages were characterized by large-bodied copepods. The mesozooplankton community was numerically dominated by copepod nauplii and small-bodied juveniles, including Pseudocalanus spp. and Oithona similis. We observed very few large-bodied copepods from the Bering Sea. However, much of the shelf region surveyed included relatively numerous Calanus glacialis juveniles and adults, suggesting that these copepods were advected onto the shelf and possibly reproducing there. Juvenile stages of the large-bodied copepod Calanus hyperboreus were found in relative abundance on the Chukchi shelf in the vicinity of Hanna Canyon. These observations suggest that large-bodied, deep-water species from the basin are advected onto the Chukchi Shelf where they may impact the fate of shelf-derived primary production and alter the food webs of the shelves. Regional comparisons of abundances of selected taxa enumerated in the present study with sample data from the early 1950s suggested that some taxa were more abundant in the SBI region in 2002 than ca. 50 years ago. Long-term changes in planktonic populations are expected to have significant implications for shelf-basin exchange of biogenic material in the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas and the adjacent Arctic Basin.

  10. Diet, prey selection and daily ration of Stomolophus meleagris, a filter-feeding scyphomedusa from the NE Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Ronald J.

    1991-05-01

    More than 20 prey taxa were identified from gut contents of Stomolophus meleagris medusae in the north-eastern Gulf of Mexico; seven taxa formed over 98% of the total. Bivalve veligers (mostly Crassostrea virginica) dominated, constituting 56% of the total. Other significant prey were copepod eggs, nauplii, copepodites and adults, gastropod veligers, and Oikopleura sp. Mean numbers of prey in the guts of S. meleagris medusae (bell height ranged from 1·5 to 10 cm) varied from 400 to 9300. Numbers of prey were an exponential function of medusan biomass, increasing from 700 prey at 9 g wet weight to 6000 prey at 325 g wet weight. Mean numbers of ingested prey ranged from 4000 to > 65000 prey day -1 medusa -1. Bivalve veligers made up 47% of the daily ration. The daily ration was estimated to range from 20 to 100 mg C medusa -1, depending on size of the medusa. Bivalve veligers were selected over all other kinds of prey. Fish eggs were the next preferred prey followed by harpacticoids, larvaceans and tintinnids, all with selectivities near zero. Lowest selectivity values were for copepod nauplii, and cyclopoid and calanoid copepods. Estimated in situ clearance rates were highly variable depending on the prey and size of the medusa, and ranged from < 1 to 135 l h -1 medusa -1. A description of the possible mechanism of feeding and mode of prey selection is presented. Filter-feeding in rhizostomes probably evolved in response to small prey size in tropical waters.

  11. The Bag-Sampler: A Simple Device for Collecting Zooplankton in Shallow Vegetated Ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Dagmar; Wohltmann, Andreas

    2005-12-01

    Zooplankton in temporary ponds is often collected with gear originally designed for lakes, and mostly unsuitable for sampling shallow habitats. We describe a new simple and inexpensive device for sampling zooplankton in very shallow, vegetated temporary ponds. We tested the sampling efficiency by comparing species composition and density of cyclopoid copepods, an important component of the zooplankton, by sampling with both the new bag sampler and a plastic beaker frequently employed for collections of zooplankton in small waterbodies. With the bag sampler we collected a larger number of species and higher densities of copepods due to its higher efficiency in vegetated areas and near the sediment. The beaker appeared to sample almost only the water surface. The samples collected with the bag sampler revealed a distinct distribution of copepod life cycle stages in a shallow pond, which differed between depths and microhabitats. Additional advantages of the bag sampler are its small size and weight, and the possibility of fast exchange of sample bags between sample locations, thus preventing accidental faunal exchange between sample locations. We conclude that the bag sampler is a device especially useful for sampling zooplankton of shallow ponds and wetlands rich in vegetation, for diversity studies as well as for quantitative sampling.

  12. Population dynamics and parasitation of planktonic and epibenthic crustaceans in the Baltic Schlei fjord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollasch, S.; Zander, C. D.

    1995-03-01

    The planktonic and epibenthic crustacean fauna from two sites of the brackish Schlei fjord, Northern Germany, was investigated over a six-month period. Calanoid and cyclopoid copepods were more abundant in lower salinities, whereas, benthic decapods, isopods and amphipods prevailed in the site of higher salinity. Cestodan larvae were found only in spring which may be due to the timing of the respective life-cycles. Parasites of benthic crustaceans, mostly digenean metacercariae but also cestodans, acanthocephalans and nematodes, appeared from spring to late summer. Decreasing salinities caused lower intensities of the most abundant parasite, Maritrema subdolum; only the true brackish-water species among the hosts were more heavily infested than those found in higher salinities. The correlation of parasite size and host size at infestation became apparent. Therefore, Crangon crangon is an optimal host for the large Podocotyle atomon metacercariae. Coevolutive trends between some hosts and parasites are made evident.

  13. Two new species of ochridacyclops (Kiefer, 1937) (Copepoda, Cyclopoida) from Kenya and Nepal.

    PubMed

    Tomikawa, Ko; Ito, Tomiko; Minakawa, Noboru; Mawatari, Shunsuke F

    2005-04-01

    Two species of cyclopoid copepods, Ochridacyclops kenyaensis sp. nov. and O. nepalensis sp. nov. are described as the first records of this genus from Kenya and Nepal, respectively. Ochridacyclops kenyaensis can easily be distinguished from its congeners by having a rounded and blunt distal end of the outer terminal seta (IV) on the caudal rami, and by the inner terminal spine being about equal in length to the outer terminal spine on the endopod of leg 4. Ochridacyclops nepalensis can easily be distinguished from other members of the genus by having two spines on exopodal segment 3 of leg 1, and by the proportions of the caudal rami, which are 3.4 times longer than wide. PMID:15846057

  14. Feeding of Acanthocylops robustus on zooplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu-Feng, Yang; Brandl, Zden?k

    1996-03-01

    Feeding of freshwater cyclopoid copepod Acanthocyclops robustus on zooplankton was examined by a senes of feeding experiments during August-September of 1993. Study results showed A. robustus can capture and eat all type items provided from the Starý Haklovský fishpond, a shallow eutrophic water body near Bud?jovice City, Czech Republic. Selection by the predator was determined largely by prey body-size and density, but was also affected by prey types. Variable but significant changes in feeding rates were found in various size distribution and concentration of prey types. Percentages of small (80-235?m) and large (445-610?m) prey consumed were 42.47 and 3.85%, respectively. Starvation did not cause statistically significant difference. The feeding on Ceriodaphnia quadrangula showed significant difference between large and small prey. Feeding rate increased with increasing prey concentration.

  15. Food and feeding in Northern krill (Meganyctiphanes norvegica Sars).

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    Early feeding studies on Meganyctiphanes norvegica described the morphology of the feeding appendages and the actual process of food uptake and digestion. Insights into diurnal, seasonal and ontogenetic pattern in feeding activity and diet were derived from field studies on the Clyde Sea population. Since then, technical advances have confirmed some of the early assumptions and rejected others. Submersible, remotely operated vehicles and echosounders, for instance, proved that M. norvegica stay often close to the seabed and feed on particles in the epibenthic layer and sediment-water interface. Scanning electron microscopy showed that mandibles of the so-called carnivorous M. norvegica have an elaborated grinding region, which allows efficient feeding on diatoms. Three-dimensional silhouette video imaging revealed mechanoreception, not vision, as the main sensory modality involved in proximity prey detection by M. norvegica. Fatty acid analysis and stomach content microscopy have now been conducted on M. norvegica across a range of environments including the Gulf of Maine, Greenland Sea, Barents Sea, Scandinavian fjords, the Kattegat and Mediterranean Sea. Regional and seasonal differences in the trophic environment are reflected in their daily ration and in the relative importance of copepods versus phytoplankton in their diet. Overall, phytoplankton is an important food source for M. norvegica during the spring bloom and part of the summer, but copepods are dominant in autumn and winter. Depending on their vertical co-occurrence, M. norvegica can feed on a range of copepods from early stages of Oithona spp. up to adult Calanus spp. There are clear ontogenetic differences in diet, with adults feeding more on copepods and benthic food items than early post-larvae. Future studies should link diet to simultaneously measured growth and reproduction and emphasise comparison across the spectrum of environments inhabited by this versatile species. PMID:20955891

  16. Characterization of the zooplankton community, size composition, and distribution in relation to hydrography in the Japan/East Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashjian, Carin J.; Davis, Cabell S.; Gallager, Scott M.; Alatalo, Philip

    2005-06-01

    The Japan/East Sea (JES) may be thought of as a model or microcosm of larger oceanic systems where biogeographic boundaries juxtapose at highly dynamic boundaries. The northern and southern portions of the JES are hydrographically and biologically distinct, with the southern portion being more tropical/oligotrophic and the northern portion being more boreal/eutrophic. Regional zooplankton taxonomic and size compositions and abundance and the high-resolution vertical distribution of plankton, fluorescence, and coincident hydrography were described using the Video Plankton Recorder (VPR), equipped with high- and low-magnification cameras and environmental sensors and mounted on a vertically profiling towed vehicle, in the upper 80 m of the JES during the summer of 1999. A survey was conducted over both the northern and southern regions, including the Subpolar Front (SPF), that spanned 10-12° of latitude and longitude and covered an along track distance of 7000 km. Plankton also were collected at 15 selected stations using a ring net for silhouette analysis of taxa and size. Distributional patterns in abundance (#/liter) of plankton taxa from the VPR were quantified at sea in real time, identifying plankton automatically using a neural network classifier. The most abundant taxa identified were copepods, Oithona spp., Calanus spp., copepod nauplii, protozoa, and diatoms, with copepods the dominant taxon. The northern JES, southern JES, and North Korean Cold Current were distinct based on based on temperature-salinity properties. The hydrography was complex and characterized by multiple mesoscale features including currents and the meandering of the SPF. Different taxonomic and size compositions were observed in the three hydrographic regions. The vertical distributions of copepods and fluorescence were associated with hydrographic structure, especially at fronts. Plankton abundances varied with regional hydrographic region and environmental conditions, although strong associations were not always observed. The extremely dynamic nature of the JES may effectively mix the plankton and obscure strong gradients or differences between regions.

  17. Community structure of mesozooplankton in coastal waters of Sundarban mangrove wetland, India: A multivariate approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Bhaskar Deb; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar; Rakhsit, Dibyendu; Murugan, K.; Tseng, Li-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Spatial and temporal distribution of community structure and seasonal distribution of mesozooplankton (MZ; 20-200 ?m) in the context of environmental parameters were studied in the coastal waters of Indian Sundarban wetland formed at the confluence of Hugli (Ganges) River estuary, India. The work has been aimed for better understanding of its ecological characteristics in terms of the most dominant mesozooplankton group in a tropical mesomacrotidal setting. Samples were collected from four sampling sites of different hydrodynamic set up using a ring trawl net (Hydro-Bios No. 438 700, mesh size 200 ?m) equipped with a calibrated flowmeter and both water and plankton samples were analyzed by standard methods. Distribution of MZ showed bimodality with two peak periods, primary peak during April coinciding with maximum number of copepod species (974 ind. m- 3) and the secondary one during August. Copepod was the most dominant taxon where the calanoids formed bulk of the biomass representing 33 species of 7 genera, while cyclopoids formed the next dominant group comprising 4 species of 3 genera followed by 4 monogeneric harpacticoid species. Results of correlation matrix revealed that two copepod families Acartiidae and Pseudodiaptomidae maintain negative relationship with other six families indicating that they form a group by themselves. Results of multiple regression analysis reveal that salinity, chlorophyll-a and transparency are the potential hydrological factors in the distribution and existence of the dominant copepods and total chaetognaths. An overall high diversity index values (max. 3.21) was associated with high richness index (4.39) and high evenness index (0.96) at the site of the mouth of the estuary. In terms of feeding guild, the herbivore copepods were dominant followed by omnivores. Cluster analysis confirmed an overall dominance of the calanoid copepod Bestiolina similis as a solitary group for all the sites. The chaetognath Sagitta bedoti was perennial in distribution where the contribution of juvenile form (recognized as Stage I) was dominant. Among the other MZ, hydromedusae, ctenophore, sergestid and mysid were also encountered contributing insignificant part of the total density. A long-term decadal change in copepod community was pronounced which might be due to climate-induced environmental changes which also modulate the physicochemical characteristics of water.

  18. Surface zooplankton distribution patterns during austral summer in the Indian sector of the Southern Ocean, south of Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kunio T.; Hosie, Graham W.; McLeod, David J.; Kitchener, John A.

    2011-08-01

    We investigated the composition, distribution and abundance of micro- and mesozooplankton in the Southern Ocean, south of Australia during the austral summer (December-February) of the 2007/08 season using a Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR). Four CPR tows were conducted during two separate oceanographic voyages under the CEAMARC (Collaborative East Antarctic Marine Census) project. High zooplankton abundance was recorded on each transect in the Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ) and the Inter Polar Frontal Zone (IPFZ). The community structure in these zones was dominated by common taxa including the ubiquitous small calanoid copepods, Oithona similis and Calanus simillimus, accounting for >70% of the total abundance, and copepod nauplii, foraminiferans and appendicularians of the genus Fritillaria spp. also occurred along most of the survey transects. Total zooplankton abundance was comparatively consistent along the four transects, and ranged between 119.8 and 144.7 ind m -3. The results of cluster and IndVal analyses revealed that the dominant species/taxa show similar associations, abundance and distribution patterns on all four transects. There was no evidence of a change of surface zooplankton abundance at the time of towing in this study. Detecting the various distribution patterns of micro- and mesozooplankton species/taxa, and the accumulation of high quality data collected by a consistent methodology will contribute to determining the consequences of climate change impacts on the ecosystem.

  19. copepods, ostracods, isopods, amphipods, mysids, and cumaceans, as well as

    E-print Network

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    , as well as tanaidaceans, echinoderms, tunicates and fish. While many of these animals, such as sponges, echinoderms, tunicates and fish, are normal inhabitants of the near-shore zane, others are known only from

  20. Circular Polarization of Transmitted Light by Sapphirinidae Copepods

    E-print Network

    Rosen, Joseph

    observed occurring naturally only near the water surface [3,4]. Among animals, the production of circularly. versicolor firefly larvae, in reflections from beetles of the Scarabaeidae family, in Panulirus argus microfibril layers in the exocuticle of beetles belonging to the Scarabaeidae family is usually left handed [5

  1. ORIGINAL PAPER Identifying non-invasible habitats for marine copepods

    E-print Network

    Lewis, Mark

    of environmental conditions. Net reproductive rate (R0) represents the average number of female off- spring produced by a female over its lifetime, and has been used as a metric of population persistence. We modeled. The model was based on temperature- dependent stage-structured population dynamics given by a system

  2. Scaling-up anti-predator phenotypic responses of prey: impacts over multiple generations in a complex aquatic community

    PubMed Central

    Peacor, Scott D.; Pangle, Kevin L.; Schiesari, Luis; Werner, Earl E.

    2012-01-01

    Non-consumptive effects (NCEs) of predators owing to induced changes in prey traits are predicted to influence the structure of ecological communities. However, evidence of the importance of NCEs is limited primarily to simple systems (e.g. two to four species) over relatively short periods (e.g. less than one generation). We examined the NCEs of a fish predator, arising from phenotypic plasticity in zooplankton prey traits, over multiple generations of a diverse zooplankton community. The presence of fish, caged to remove consumptive effects, strongly influenced zooplankton community structure, through both direct and indirect NCE pathways, altering the abundance of many taxa by magnitudes as large as 3 to 10-fold. Presence of fish affected different species of cladocerans and copepods both positively and negatively. A particularly striking result was the reversal of dominance in copepod taxa: presence of fish reduced the ratio of calanoids to cyclopoids from 6.3 to 0.43. Further, the NCE of fish had a strong negative trophic cascade to zooplankton resources (phytoplankton). To our knowledge, this is the first experiment to show that NCEs can influence the abundance of multiple prey species over time spans of multiple prey generations. Our findings demonstrate that adaptive phenotypic plasticity of individuals can scale-up to affect the structure of ecological communities. PMID:21593036

  3. Effects of alewife predation on zooplankton populations in Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wells, LaRue

    1970-01-01

    The zooplankton populations in southeastern Lake Michigan underwent striking, size-related changes between 1954 and 1966. Forms that decline sharply were the largest cladocerans (Leptodora kindtii, Daphnia galeata, and D. retrocurva), the largest calanoid copepods (Limnocalanus macrurus, Epischura lacustris, and Diaptomus sicilis), and the largest cyclopoid copepod (Mesocyclops edax). Two of these, D. galeata and M. edax (both abundant in 1954), became extremely rare. Certain medium-sized or small species increased in numbers: Daphnia longiremis, Holopedium gibberum, Polyphemus pediculus, Bosmina longirostris, Bosmina coregoni, Ceriodaphnia sp., Cyclops bicuspidatus, Cyclops vernalis, and Diaptomus ashlandi. Evidence is strong that the changes were due to selective predation by alewives. The alewife was uncommon in southeastern Lake Michigan in 1954 but had increased to enormous proportions by 1966; there was a massive dieoff in spring 1967, and abundance remained relatively low in 1968. The composition of zooplankton populations in 1968 generally had shifted back toward that of 1954, although D. galeata and M. edax remained rare. The average size, and size at onset of maturity, of D. retrocurva decreased noticeably between 1954 and 1966 but increased between 1966 and 1968.

  4. Spatial distribution of micro- and meso-zooplankton in the seasonal ice zone of east Antarctica during 1983-1995

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojima, Motoha; Takahashi, Kunio T.; Tanimura, Atsushi; Odate, Tsuneo; Fukuchi, Mitsuo

    2015-09-01

    Historically, most studies about the geographic distribution of zooplankton in the Southern Ocean have been focused on the macro-sized zooplankton (2-20 mm), such as the Antarctic krill and larger-sized copepods. On the other hand, despite the high abundance and biomass, the distribution patterns of micro- (20-200 ?m) and meso-sized (200 ?m-2 mm) zooplankton communities are little understood. In this study, we investigated the distribution patterns of larger micro-zooplankton (100-200 ?m) and meso-zooplankton communities in the seasonal ice zone in the Cosmonaut Sea near Syowa Station and examined the effects of environmental factors and water properties on these communities. The investigation was based on samples collected with 100 ?m mesh nets, which are appropriate to estimate the quantitative abundance and community structure of micro- and meso-zooplankton species between 1983 and 1995. Cluster analysis of the samples revealed that the distribution of macro-zooplankton species was influenced by the temperature and salinity of ocean fronts. Among the meso-zooplankton, cyclopoid and small calanoid copepods tended to be ubiquitously distributed. However, among the micro-zooplankton, the distributions of foraminiferans and tintinnids were associated with sea ice extent. The distribution of micro- and meso-zooplankton communities could be used to estimate the impact of environmental changes on the marine ecosystem in the Southern Ocean.

  5. Lake Ontario zooplankton in 2003 and 2008: community changes and vertical redistribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rudstam, Lars G.; Holeck, Kristen T.; Bowen, Kelly L.; Watkins, James M.; Weidel, Brian C.; Luckey, Frederick J.

    2014-01-01

    Lake-wide zooplankton surveys are critical for documenting and understanding food web responses to ecosystem change. Surveys in 2003 and 2008 during the binational intensive field year in Lake Ontario found that offshore epilimnetic crustacean zooplankton declined by a factor of 12 (density) and factor of 5 (biomass) in the summer with smaller declines in the fall. These declines coincided with an increase in abundance of Bythotrephes and are likely the result of direct predation by, or behavioral responses to this invasive invertebrate predator. Whole water column zooplankton density also declined from 2003 to 2008 in the summer and fall (factor of 4), but biomass only declined in the fall (factor of 2). The decline in biomass was less than the decline in density because the average size of individual zooplankton increased. This was due to changes in the zooplankton community composition from a cyclopoid/bosminid dominated community in 2003 to a calanoid dominated community in 2008. The increase in calanoid copepods was primarily due to the larger species Limnocalanus macrurus and Leptodiaptomus sicilis. These coldwater species were found in and below the thermocline associated with a deep chlorophyll layer. In 2008, most of the zooplankton biomass resided in or below the thermocline during the day. Increased importance of copepods in deeper, colder water may favor cisco and rainbow smelt over alewife because these species are better adapted to cold temperatures than Alewife.

  6. Phylogenetic Information Content of Copepoda Ribosomal DNA Repeat Units: ITS1 and ITS2 Impact

    PubMed Central

    Zagoskin, Maxim V.; Lazareva, Valentina I.; Grishanin, Andrey K.; Mukha, Dmitry V.

    2014-01-01

    The utility of various regions of the ribosomal repeat unit for phylogenetic analysis was examined in 16 species representing four families, nine genera, and two orders of the subclass Copepoda (Crustacea). Fragments approximately 2000?bp in length containing the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) 18S and 28S gene fragments, the 5.8S gene, and the internal transcribed spacer regions I and II (ITS1 and ITS2) were amplified and analyzed. The DAMBE (Data Analysis in Molecular Biology and Evolution) software was used to analyze the saturation of nucleotide substitutions; this test revealed the suitability of both the 28S gene fragment and the ITS1/ITS2 rDNA regions for the reconstruction of phylogenetic trees. Distance (minimum evolution) and probabilistic (maximum likelihood, Bayesian) analyses of the data revealed that the 28S rDNA and the ITS1 and ITS2 regions are informative markers for inferring phylogenetic relationships among families of copepods and within the Cyclopidae family and associated genera. Split-graph analysis of concatenated ITS1/ITS2 rDNA regions of cyclopoid copepods suggested that the Mesocyclops, Thermocyclops, and Macrocyclops genera share complex evolutionary relationships. This study revealed that the ITS1 and ITS2 regions potentially represent different phylogenetic signals. PMID:25215300

  7. Tidal exchange of zooplankton between Lough Hyne and the adjacent coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlinson, K. A.; Davenport, J.; Barnes, D. K. A.

    2005-01-01

    Plankton samples collected in November 2002, February, May and August 2003 were used to examine seasonal variation in tidal exchange of zooplankton biomass, abundance and species composition between Lough Hyne Marine Nature Reserve and the adjacent Atlantic coast. Micro- to mesozooplankton were collected by pump over 24-h sampling periods during spring and neap tides from the narrow channel connecting the semi-enclosed water body to the Atlantic. Sample biomass (dry weight) and total zooplankton abundance peaked in the summer and were lowest in winter, showing a positive relationship with temperature. Zooplankton biomass, total abundance and numbers of holo- and meroplankton revealed import during some diel cycles and export in others. However, the tidal import of these planktonic components was generally dominant, especially during May. The greatest import of numbers of holoplankters and meroplanktonic larvae occurred during May and August, respectively. There was no significant variation in sample biomass between periods of light and dark, but some variation in zooplankton abundance could be explained by this diel periodicity. Significant differences in sample assemblage composition between flood and ebb tide samples were always observed, except during winter neap tides. There was a net import of the copepods Temora longicornis and Oithona helgolandica and the larval stages of Mytilus edulis during spring and summer. Proceraea cornuta and Capitellid trochophores were imported during winter, and a hydrozoan of the genus Obelia during the spring spring tides. Seasonal export from the lough was shown by Pseudopolydora pulchra larvae (autumn and spring), Serpulid trochophores (autumn) and veligers of the bivalve Anomia ephippium (summer). It is suggested that the direction of tidal exchange of meroplanktonic taxa is related to the distribution of the adult populations. Copepod naupliar stages dominated the assemblages except during May spring tides when the copepod Pseudocalanus elongatus made up over 22% of the abundance. The general import of micro- to mesozooplankton may, in part, explain the higher densities of this size-class of zooplankton within the semi-enclosed system of Lough Hyne.

  8. Food habits of Juvenile American Shad and dynamics of zooplankton in the lower Columbia River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haskell, C.A.; Tiffan, K.F.; Rondorf, D.W.

    2006-01-01

    As many as 2.4 million adult American shad annually pass John Day Dam, Columbia River to spawn upriver, yet food web interactions of juvenile shad rearing in John Day Reservoir are unexplored. We collected zooplankton and conducted mid-water trawls in McNary (June-July) and John Day reservoirs (August-November) from 1994 through 1996 during the outmigration of subyearling American shad and Chinook salmon. Juvenile American shad were abundant and represented over 98% of the trawl catch in late summer. The five major taxa collected in zooplankton tows were Bosmina longirostris, Daphnia, cyclopoid cope-pods, rotifers, and calanoid copepods. We evaluated total crustacean zooplankton abundance and Daphnia biomass in relation to water temperature, flow, depth, diel period, and cross-sectional location using multiple regression. Differences in zooplankton abundance were largely due to differences in water temperature and flow. Spatial variation in total zooplankton abundance was observed in McNary Reservoir, but not in John Day Reservoir. Juvenile American shad generally fed on numerically abundant prey, despite being less preferred than larger bodied zooplankton. A decrease in cladoceran abundance and size in August coupled with large percentages of Daphnia in juvenile American shad stomachs indicated heavy planktivory. Smaller juvenile American shad primarily fed on Daphnia in August, but switched to more evasive copepods as the mean size of fish increased and Daphnia abundance declined. Because Daphnia are particularly important prey items for subyearling Chinook salmon in mainstem reservoirs in mid to late summer, alterations in the cladoceran food base is of concern for the management of outmigrating salmonids and other Columbia River fishes. ?? 2006 by the Northwest Scientific Association. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of a Halotolerant Community in the St. Lucia Estuary (South Africa) during a Hypersaline Phase

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Nicola K.; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2012-01-01

    Background The St. Lucia Estuary, Africa's largest estuarine lake, is currently experiencing unprecedented freshwater deprivation which has resulted in a northward gradient of drought effects, with hypersaline conditions in its northern lakes. Methodology/Principal Findings This study documents the changes that occurred in the biotic communities at False Bay from May 2010 to June 2011, in order to better understand ecosystem functioning in hypersaline habitats. Few zooplankton taxa were able to withstand the harsh environmental conditions during 2010. These were the flatworm Macrostomum sp., the harpacticoid copepod Cletocamptus confluens, the cyclopoid copepod Apocyclops cf. dengizicus and the ciliate Fabrea cf. salina. In addition to their exceptional salinity tolerance, they were involved in a remarkably simple food web. In June 2009, a bloom of an orange-pigmented cyanobacterium (Cyanothece sp.) was recorded in False Bay and persisted uninterruptedly for 18 months. Stable isotope analysis suggests that this cyanobacterium was the main prey item of F. cf. salina. This ciliate was then consumed by A. cf. dengizicus, which in turn was presumably consumed by flamingos as they flocked in the area when the copepods attained swarming densities. On the shore, cyanobacteria mats contributed to a population explosion of the staphylinid beetle Bledius pilicollis. Although zooplankton disappeared once salinities exceeded 130, many taxa are capable of producing spores or resting cysts to bridge harsh periods. The hypersaline community was disrupted by heavy summer rains in 2011, which alleviated drought conditions and resulted in a sharp increase in zooplankton stock and diversity. Conclusions/Significance Despite the current freshwater deprivation crisis, the False Bay region has shown to be resilient, harboring a unique biodiversity with species that are capable of enduring harsh environmental conditions. However, further freshwater deprivation may extend beyond the physiological thresholds of this community, as well as other unique biodiversity components which this system sustains. PMID:22238676

  10. Combined Effects of Turbulence and Different Predation Regimes on Zooplankton in Highly Colored Water—Implications for Environmental Change in Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Härkönen, Laura; Pekcan-Hekim, Zeynep; Hellén, Noora; Ojala, Anne; Horppila, Jukka

    2014-01-01

    In aquatic ecosystems, predation is affected both by turbulence and visibility, but the combined effects are poorly known. Both factors are changing in lakes in the Northern Hemisphere; the average levels of turbulence are predicted to increase due to increasing wind activities, while water transparency is decreasing, e.g., due to variations in precipitation, and sediment resuspension. We explored experimentally how turbulence influenced the effects of planktivorous fish and invertebrate predators on zooplankton when it was combined with low visibility caused by high levels of water color. The study was conducted as a factorial design in 24 outdoor ponds, using the natural zooplankton community as a prey population. Perch and roach were used as vertebrate predators and Chaoborus flavicans larvae as invertebrate predators. In addition to calm conditions, the turbulent dissipation rate used in the experiments was 10?6 m2 s?3, and the water color was 140 mg Pt L?1. The results demonstrated that in a system dominated by invertebrates, predation pressure on cladocerans increased considerably under intermediate turbulence. Under calm conditions, chaoborids caused only a minor reduction in the crustacean biomass. The effect of fish predation on cladocerans was slightly reduced by turbulence, while predation on cyclopoids was strongly enhanced. Surprisingly, under turbulent conditions fish reduced cyclopoid biomass, whereas in calm water it increased in the presence of fish. We thus concluded that turbulence affects fish selectivity. The results suggested that in dystrophic invertebrate-dominated lakes, turbulence may severely affect the abundance of cladocerans. In fish-dominated dystrophic lakes, on the other hand, turbulence-induced changes in planktivory may considerably affect copepods instead of cladocerans. In lakes inhabited by both invertebrates and fish, the response of top-down regulation to turbulence resembles that in fish-dominated systems, due to intraguild predation. The changes in planktivorous predation induced by abiotic factors may possibly cascade to primary producers. PMID:25375952

  11. How does mesh-size selection reshape the description of zooplankton community structure in coastal lakes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pansera, Marco; Granata, Antonia; Guglielmo, Letterio; Minutoli, Roberta; Zagami, Giacomo; Brugnano, Cinzia

    2014-12-01

    To provide evidence of the inadequacy of using conventional sampling methods to study mesozooplankton community structure in confined environments, samples from a Mediterranean meromictic coastal lake were taken using 80-?m and 200-?m mesh nets towed at three different depths (0-18 m). Mesh size significantly affected the description of the community structure of the collected zooplankton. The 80-?m-mesh catch revealed for the first time in such an environment the overwhelming abundance of the copepod species Oithona brevicornis, as two orders of magnitude greater than recorded for the 200-?m-mesh catch. The other dominant species were Paracartia latisetosa and Pseudodiaptomus marinus, which were more efficiently sampled with the 200-?m mesh. These showed a summer abundance peak for P. latisetosa near the surface layer, and for P. marinus in the deepest stratum, close to the anoxic layer. Copepod nauplii and bivalve larvae were more efficiently caught with the 80-?m-mesh, and accounted for most of the zooplankton in winter, and showed the highest loss percentage of abundance between the two mesh-size catches. The differences in the assemblages reflect different diversity patterns, with peaks in summer and winter for the communities collected with the 80-?m-mesh and 200-?m-mesh, respectively. These findings imply the need for the development of a commonly used sampling method with paired nets, to correctly take into account both the large and small fractions of the mesozooplankton in the study of closed and semi-enclosed coastal environments, and to obtain data that can be better compared across studies.

  12. Trophic structure of zooplankton in the Fram Strait in spring and autumn 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blachowiak-Samolyk, Katarzyna; Kwasniewski, Slawek; Dmoch, Katarzyna; Hop, Haakon; Falk-Petersen, Stig

    2007-11-01

    The trophic structure of zooplankton was investigated in Fram Strait (north western Svalbard) in spring and autumn of 2003. Depth-stratified zooplankton samples were collected at 12 stations on the shelf (˜200 m), across the shelf-slope (˜500 m) and over deep water (>750 m), using a Multiple Plankton Sampler equipped with 0.180-mm mesh size nets. Higher zooplankton abundance and estimated biomass were found in the shelf area. Abundance and biomass were two times higher in August, when sea-surface temperature was higher than in May. Herbivores dominated numerically in May, and omnivores in August, suggesting a seasonal sequence of domination by different trophic groups. Cirripedia nauplii and Fritillaria borealis prevailed in spring, whereas copepod nauplii and Calanus finmarchicus were numerically the most important herbivores in autumn. Small copepods, Oithona similis and Triconia borealis, were the most numerous omnivorous species in both seasons, but their abundances increased in autumn. Chaetognatha (mainly Eukrohnia hamata) accounted for the highest abundance and biomass among predatory taxa at all deep-water stations and during both seasons. Regarding vertical distribution, herbivores dominated numerically in the surface layer (0-20 m), and omnivores were concentrated somewhat deeper (20-50 m) during both seasons. Maximum abundance of predators was found in the surface layer (0-20 m) in spring, and generally in the 20-50 m layer in autumn. This paper presents the first comprehensive summary of the zooplankton trophic structure in the Fram Strait area. Our goals are to improve understanding of energy transfer through this ecosystem, and of potential climate-induced changes in Arctic marine food webs.

  13. Seasonal spatial pattern and community structure of zooplankton in waters off the Baleares archipelago (Central Western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández de Puelles, M. L.; Macias, V.; Vicente, L.; Molinero, J. C.

    2014-10-01

    We investigated the zooplankton community in two different areas of the Baleares Archipelago, Western Mediterranean, using data obtained in autumn (December 2009) and summer (July 2010). Micrometazooplankton and mesozooplankton samples were collected in the 0-200 m layer above the shelf (200 m) and the slope (900 m) of each area by a 53 ?m and a 200 ?m mesh size net respectively. The zooplankton biomass (expressed as dry weight) was higher in autumn than in summer (9.30 and 6.95 mg m- 3, respectively) with an important contribution of micrometazooplankters (29% and 41% of total biomass respectively). The latter fraction overwhelmed in the entire metazooplankton abundance, suggesting a non-negligible role as potential food for fish in the epipelagic waters of the Baleares archipelago. The abundance of micrometazooplankton was two-fold higher in December (3581 ind. m- 3) than in July (1585 ind. m- 3), represented mainly by small copepods and nauplii. Likewise, the mesozooplankton community showed smaller difference between months (554 and 390 ind. m- 3, in December and July). Micrometazooplankton abundance was higher in the northern area than in the southern area during autumn, probably linked to the presence of a front, while the opposite was found in summer. In both periods and areas copepods dominated, and within the highly diverse community ten species and their juveniles accounted for 70% of the community. In both areas, Clausocalanus (C. pergens + paululus and C. arcuicornis), Paracalanus parvus, Oncaea media, Oithona plumifera and Acartia clausi were abundant in autumn, whereas Centropages typicus, Temora stylifera and Mecynocera clausi were mainly present in summer. ANOSIM analysis revealed significant differences in the mesozooplankton community composition between months while differences between areas were detected only in summer.

  14. Modeling selenium bioaccumulation through arthropod food webs in San Francisco Bay, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlekat, C.E.; Purkerson, D.G.; Luoma, S.N.

    2004-01-01

    Trophic transfer is the main process by which upper trophic level wildlife are exposed to selenium. Transfers through lower levels of a predator's food web thus can be instrumental in determining the threat of selenium in an ecosystem. Little is known about Se transfer through pelagic, zooplankton-based food webs in San Francisco Bay ([SFB], CA, USA), which serve as an energy source for important predators such as striped bass. A dynamic multipathway bioaccumulation model was used to model Se transfer from phytoplankton to pelagic copepods to carnivorous mysids (Neomysis mercedis). Uptake rates of dissolved Se, depuration rates, and assimilation efficiencies (AE) for the model were determined for copepods and mysids in the laboratory. Small (73-250 ??m) and large (250-500 ??m) herbivorous zooplankton collected from SFB (Oithona/Limnoithona and Acartia sp.) assimilated Se with similar efficiencies (41-52%) from phytoplankton. Mysids assimilated 73% of Se from small herbivorous zooplankton; Se AE was significantly lower (61%) than larger herbivorous zooplankton. Selenium depuration rates were high for both zooplankton and mysids (12-25% d-1), especially compared to bivalves (2-3% d-1). The model predicted steady state Se concentrations in mysids similar to those observed in the field. The predicted concentration range (1.5-5.4 ??g g -1) was lower than concentrations of 4.5 to 24 ??g g-1 observed in bivalves from the bay. Differences in efflux between mysids and bivalves were the best explanation for the differences in uptake. The results suggest that the risk of selenium toxicity to predators feeding on N. mercedis would be less than the risk to predators feeding on bivalves. Management of selenium contamination should include food webs analyses to focus on the most important exposure pathways identified for a given watershed.

  15. Sea ice and the onshore offshore gradient in pre-winter zooplankton assemblages in southeastern Beaufort Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darnis, Gérald; Barber, David G.; Fortier, Louis

    2008-12-01

    Zooplankton communities were studied in southeastern Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean) in September-October 2002. Cluster analysis and non-metric multidimensional scaling revealed three distinct mesozooplankton assemblages. A neritic assemblage occurred on the Mackenzie Shelf and in Franklin Bay, while distinct off-shelf assemblages prevailed in the Cape Bathurst Polynya and on the Beaufort Slope respectively. Over 95% of the mesozooplankton was comprised of eight copepod taxa. Pseudocalanus spp. contributed predominantly to the discrimination of the three assemblages and was the only significant indicator of the Shelf assemblage. Oithona similis, Oncaea borealis, Metridia longa and Calanus hyperboreus were indicators of the Polynya assemblage. Cyclopina sp. and Microcalanus pygmaeus were indicative of the overall off-shelf community (Polynya and Slope assemblages). The importance of omnivores and carnivores increased from the shelf to the polynya and the slope. Station depth and duration of reduced ice conditions during summer (< 50% ice concentration) underpinned the distribution of the assemblages ( r2 = 0.71 and 0.45 respectively). The abundance of Pseudocalanus spp. was independent of depth and increased with the duration of reduced ice conditions ( rs = 0.438). The abundance of Cyclopina sp., M. pygmaeus and other indicators of the offshore assemblages followed the opposite trend ( rs = - 0.467 and - 0.5 respectively). Under continued climate warming, a reduction of the ice cover will affect the biogeography of mesozooplankton on and around the Mackenzie Shelf, to the potential advantage of Pseudocalanus spp. and other calanoid herbivores.

  16. The distribution and vertical flux of fecal pellets from large zooplankton in Monterey bay and coastal California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagg, Michael J.; Jackson, George A.; Checkley, David M.

    2014-12-01

    We sampled zooplankton and fecal pellets in the upper 200 m of Monterey Bay and nearby coastal regions in California, USA. On several occasions, we observed high concentrations of large pellets that appeared to be produced during night-time by dielly migrating euphausiids. High concentrations of pellets were found in near-surface waters only when euphausiids co-occurred with high concentrations of large (>10 ?m) phytoplankton. Peak concentrations of pellets at mid-depth (100 or 150 m) during the day were consistent with the calculated sinking speeds of pellets produced near the surface at night. At these high flux locations (HI group), pellet concentrations declined below mid-depth. In contrast, at locations where the phytoplankton assemblage was dominated by small phytoplankton cells (<10 ?m), pellet production and flux were low (LO group) whether or not euphausiid populations were high. Protozooplankton concentrations did not affect this pattern. We concluded that the day and night differences in pellet concentration and flux in the HI profiles were mostly due to sinking of dielly-pulsed inputs in the surface layer, and that small zooplankton (Oithona, Oncaea), heterotrophic dinoflagellates, and bacterial activity probably caused some pellet degradation or consumption below 100 m. We estimated that consumption of sinking pellets by large copepods was insignificant. High fluxes of pellets were episodic because they required both high concentrations of large phytoplankton and large stocks of euphausiids. Under these conditions, flux events overwhelmed retention mechanisms, resulting in large exports of organic matter from the upper 200 m.

  17. Responses of seabirds, in particular prions ( Pachyptila sp.), to small-scale processes in the Antarctic Polar Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Franeker, Jan A.; van den Brink, Nico W.; Bathmann, Ulrich V.; Pollard, Raymond T.; de Baar, Hein J. W.; Wolff, Wim J.

    Small-scale distribution patterns of seabirds in the Antarctic Polar Front (APF) were investigated in relation to other biological, physical, and chemical features during the ANT-XIII/2 research cruise of R.V. Polarstern from December 1995 to January 1996. The APF is characterized by steep gradients in sea-surface temperature and salinity. Within the APF, gradient zones were closely associated with elevated levels of primary production, chlorophyll- a (chl- a) concentrations, and zooplankton densities. Even broad-billed prions (' Pachyptila vittata-group'), which dominated the seabird community by 83% in carbon requirements, showed small-scale distributional patterns that were positively related to primary production, chl- a, and total zooplankton densities. The findings demonstrate a close, direct link between fine-scale physical processes in the APF and biological activity through several food web levels up to that of zooplankton-eating seabirds. Broad-billed prions appeared to forage on very small copepods ( Oithona spp.) in close association with the front. Fish- and squid-eating predators showed poor correlations with small-scale spatial structures of the APF. However, in a wider band around the APF, most top predators did occur in elevated densities, showing gradual spatio-temporal diffusion of the impact of the APF on higher trophic levels.

  18. The coastal edge of the Northeast Water polynya in spring 1993

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weslawski, J. M.; Wiktor, J.; Koszteyn, J.; Zajaczkowski, M.; Wieczorek, P.; Kotwicki, L.

    1997-01-01

    Multidisciplinary, marine ecological observations were conducted at the shallow water edge of the Northeast Water in June, 1993. Although variable in size and shape, a small polynya was constantly present at Eskimonaes, at the fast-ice edge of Ingolfsfjord. A shallow stratified layer developed at the water sufface at negative water and air temperatures—an effect of sea ice melting in cold water early in the season. Nutrients were recorded in considerable quantities, although by mid July NO 3 had become depleted. The chlorophyll and phytoplankton maxima at 8-12 m depth had peak values of 2 mg chl a m -3, typical for Arctic algal blooms. The phytoplankton included over 90 species and was dominated by the Fragillariopsis group. Zooplankton was poor in biomass and density, but over 23 taxa were found, with the copepods Oithona similis and Pseudocalanus acuspes being numerically dominant. Sedimentation was approximately 0.2 g dry weight m -2 d -1 and suspended matter concentrations ranged from 4 to 19 mg l -1. The benthos was represented by hard bottom forms only, with a surprisingly dense cover of macrophytes. Juvenile sea urchins ( Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis), brittle stars ( Ophiocten sericeum) and amphipods were dominant. Higher trophic levels were represented by benthic feeders, such as eiders and walruses. The area observed was more similar to high Arctic fjord ecosystems than to the offshore central Northeast Water polynya.

  19. Mechanisms Explaining Nursery Habitat Association: How Do Juvenile Snapper (Chrysophrys auratus) Benefit from Their Nursery Habitat?

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Darren M.; Middleton, Crispin; Spong, Keren T.; Mackay, Graeme; Smith, Matt D.; Buckthought, Dane

    2015-01-01

    Nursery habitats provide elevated survival and growth to the organisms that associate with them, and as such are a crucial early life-stage component for many fishes and invertebrates. The exact mechanisms by which these benefits are afforded to associated organisms, however, are often unclear. Here we assessed potential explanations of the nursery function of structurally complex habitats for post-settlement snapper, Chrysophrys auratus, in New Zealand. Specifically, we deployed Artificial Seagrass Units (ASUs) and used a combination of video observation, netting and diet analysis of associated post-settlement snapper as well describing potential prey within the micro-habitats surrounding ASUs. We did not observe any predation attempts and few potential predators, suggesting that for snapper the nursery value of structurally complex habitats is not as a predation refuge. The diet of post-settlement snapper mostly consisted of calanoid and cyclopoid copepods, which were most commonly sampled from within the water column. Nearly all suspected feeding events were also observed within the water column. When considering the velocity of water flow at each ASU, plankton sampling revealed a greater availability of copepods with increasing current strength, while netting and video observation demonstrated that the abundance of snapper was highest at sites with intermediate water velocity. This study highlights that the interaction between water flow and food availability may represent an important trade-off between energy expenditure and food intake for post-settlement snapper. Structurally complex habitats may mediate this relationship, allowing snapper to access sites with higher food availability while reducing swimming costs. This mechanism may have broader relevance, potentially explaining the importance of estuarine nursery habitats for other species. PMID:25803443

  20. Mechanisms explaining nursery habitat association: how do juvenile snapper (Chrysophrys auratus) benefit from their nursery habitat?

    PubMed

    Parsons, Darren M; Middleton, Crispin; Spong, Keren T; Mackay, Graeme; Smith, Matt D; Buckthought, Dane

    2015-01-01

    Nursery habitats provide elevated survival and growth to the organisms that associate with them, and as such are a crucial early life-stage component for many fishes and invertebrates. The exact mechanisms by which these benefits are afforded to associated organisms, however, are often unclear. Here we assessed potential explanations of the nursery function of structurally complex habitats for post-settlement snapper, Chrysophrys auratus, in New Zealand. Specifically, we deployed Artificial Seagrass Units (ASUs) and used a combination of video observation, netting and diet analysis of associated post-settlement snapper as well describing potential prey within the micro-habitats surrounding ASUs. We did not observe any predation attempts and few potential predators, suggesting that for snapper the nursery value of structurally complex habitats is not as a predation refuge. The diet of post-settlement snapper mostly consisted of calanoid and cyclopoid copepods, which were most commonly sampled from within the water column. Nearly all suspected feeding events were also observed within the water column. When considering the velocity of water flow at each ASU, plankton sampling revealed a greater availability of copepods with increasing current strength, while netting and video observation demonstrated that the abundance of snapper was highest at sites with intermediate water velocity. This study highlights that the interaction between water flow and food availability may represent an important trade-off between energy expenditure and food intake for post-settlement snapper. Structurally complex habitats may mediate this relationship, allowing snapper to access sites with higher food availability while reducing swimming costs. This mechanism may have broader relevance, potentially explaining the importance of estuarine nursery habitats for other species. PMID:25803443

  1. Grazing by meso- and microzooplankton on phytoplankton in the upper reaches of the Schelde estuary (Belgium/The Netherlands)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lionard, M.; Azémar, F.; Boulêtreau, S.; Muylaert, K.; Tackx, M.; Vyverman, W.

    2005-09-01

    In contrast with the marine reaches of estuaries, few studies have dealt with zooplankton grazing on phytoplankton in the upper estuarine reaches, where freshwater zooplankton species tend to dominate the zooplankton community. In spring and early summer 2003, grazing by micro- and mesozooplankton on phytoplankton was investigated at three sites in the upper Schelde estuary. Grazing by mesozooplankton was evaluated by monitoring growth of phytoplankton in 200 ?m filtered water in the presence or absence of mesozooplankton. In different experiments, the grazing impact was tested of the calanoïd copepod Eurytemora affinis, the cyclopoid copepods Acanthocyclops robustus and Cyclops vicinus and the cladocera Chydorus sphaericus, Moina affinis and Daphnia magna/ pulex. No significant grazing impact of mesozooplankton in any experiment was found despite the fact that mesozooplankton densities used in the experiments (20 or 40 ind. l -1) were higher than densities in the field (0.1-6.9 ind. l -1). Grazing by microzooplankton was evaluated by comparing growth of phytoplankton in 30 and 200 ?m filtered water. Microzooplankton in the 30-200 ?m size range included mainly rotifers of the genera Brachionus, Trichocerca and Synchaeta, which were present from 191 to 1777 ind. l -1. Microzooplankton had a significant grazing impact in five out of six experiments. They had a community grazing rate of 0.41-1.83 day -1 and grazed up to 84% of initial phytoplankton standing stock per day. Rotifer clearance rates estimated from microzooplankton community grazing rates and rotifer abundances varied from 8.3 to 41.7 ?l ind. -1 h -1. CHEMTAX analysis of accessory pigment data revealed a similar phytoplankton community composition after incubation with and without microzooplankton, indicating non-selective feeding by rotifers on phytoplankton.

  2. A new species of Metacyclops Kiefer, 1927 (Copepoda, Cyclopidae, Cyclopinae) from the Chihuahuan desert, northern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Mercado-Salas, Nancy F.; Suárez-Morales, Eduardo; Maeda-Martínez, Alejandro M.; Silva-Briano, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A new species of the freshwater cyclopoid copepod genus Metacyclops Kiefer, 1927 is described from a single pond in northern Mexico, within the binational area known as the Chihuahuan Desert. This species belongs to a group of Metacyclops species with a 3443 spine formula of swimming legs. It is morphologically similar to Metacyclops lusitanus Lindberg, 1961 but differs from this and other congeners by having a unique combination of characters, including a caudal rami length/width proportion of 3.5–3.8, a innermost terminal seta slightly longer than the outermost terminal seta, intercoxal sclerites of legs 1-4 naked, a strong apical spine of the second endopodal segment of leg 1 and one row of 6-8 small spinules at the insertion of this spine. The finding of this species represents also the first record of the genus in Mexico and the third in North America, where only two other species, Metacyclops gracilis (Lilljeborg, 1853)and Metacyclops cushae Reid, 1991 have been hitherto reported. This is also the first continental record of a species of Metacyclops from an arid environment in the Americas. This species appears to be endemic to the Chihuahuan Desert, thus emphasizing the high endemicity of this area. PMID:23794845

  3. Polymethylene-interrupted fatty acids: Biomarkers for native and exotic mussels in the Laurentian Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mezek, Tadej; Sverko, Ed; Ruddy, Martina D.; Zaruk, Donna; Capretta, Alfredo; Hebert, Craig E.; Fisk, Aaron T.; McGoldrick, Daryl J.; Newton, Teresa J.; Sutton, Trent M.; Koops, Marten A.; Muir, Andrew M.; Johnson, Timothy B.; Ebener, Mark P.; Arts, Michael T.

    2011-01-01

    Freshwater organisms synthesize a wide variety of fatty acids (FAs); however, the ability to synthesize and/or subsequently modify a particular FA is not universal, making it possible to use certain FAs as biomarkers. Herein we document the occurrence of unusual FAs (polymethylene-interrupted fatty acids; PMI-FAs) in select freshwater organisms in the Laurentian Great Lakes. We did not detect PMI-FAs in: (a) natural seston from Lake Erie and Hamilton Harbor (Lake Ontario), (b) various species of laboratory-cultured algae including a green alga (Scenedesmus obliquus), two cyanobacteria (Aphanizomenon flos-aquae and Synechococystis sp.), two diatoms (Asterionella formosa, Diatoma elongatum) and a chrysophyte (Dinobryon cylindricum) or, (c) zooplankton (Daphnia spp., calanoid or cyclopoid copepods) from Lake Ontario, suggesting that PMI-FAs are not substantively incorporated into consumers at the phytoplankton–zooplankton interface. However, these unusual FAs comprised 4-6% of total fatty acids (on a dry tissue weight basis) of native fat mucket (Lampsilis siliquoidea) and plain pocketbook (L. cardium) mussels and in invasive zebra (Dreissena polymorpha) and quagga (D. bugensis) mussels. We were able to clearly partition Great Lakes' mussels into three separate groups (zebra, quagga, and native mussels) based solely on their PMI-FA profiles. We also provide evidence for the trophic transfer of PMI-FAs from mussels to various fishes in Lakes Ontario and Michigan, further underlining the potential usefulness of PMI-FAs for tracking the dietary contribution of mollusks in food web and contaminant-fate studies.

  4. Zooplankton community resilience and aquatic environmental stability on aquaculture practices: a study using net cages.

    PubMed

    Dias, J D; Simões, N R; Bonecker, C C

    2012-02-01

    Fish farming in net cages causes changes in environmental conditions. We evaluated the resilience of zooplankton concerning this activity in Rosana Reservoir (Paranapanema River, PR-SP). Samples were taken near the net cages installed at distances upstream and downstream, before and after net cage installation. The resilience was estimated by the decrease in the groups' abundance after installing the net cages. The zooplankton community was represented by 106 species. The most abundant species were Synchaeta pectinata, S. oblonga, Conochilus coenobasis, Polyarthra dolichoptera and C. unicornis (Rotifera), Ceriodaphnia cornuta, Moina minuta, Bosmina hagmanni and C. silvestrii (Cladocera) and Notodiaptomus amazonicus (Copepoda). The resilience of microcrustaceans was affected in the growing points as this activity left the production environment for longer, delaying the natural ability of community responses. Microcrustaceans groups, mainly calanoid and cyclopoid copepods, had a different return rate. The net cage installation acted as a stress factor on the zooplankton community. Management strategies that cause fewer risks to the organisms and maximize energy flow may help in maintaining system stability. PMID:22437379

  5. A new species of Halicyclops (Copepoda, Cyclopoida, Cyclopidae) from a lagoon system of the Caribbean coast of Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Suárez-Morales, Eduardo; Fuentes-Reinés, Juan M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Plankton samples obtained from the lagoon system Laguna Navío Quebrado, in northern Colombia, yielded male and female specimens of an undescribed cyclopoid copepod of the genus Halicyclops. The new species belongs to the highly diverse and widely distributed thermophilus-complex. It closely resembles Halicyclops clarkei Herbst, 1982 from Louisiana and Halicyclops bowmani Rocha & Iliffe, 1993 from Bermuda. These species share the same armature of P1-P4EXP3, with a 3443 spine formula and the terminal antennary segment with 5 setae. However, Halicyclops gaviriai sp. n. can be separated from both Halicyclops clarkei and Halicyclops bowmani by the morphology of the anal pseudoperculum, the proportions of the fourth antennulary segment, the length of the inner basipodal spine of P1, the P1EXP/inner basipodal spine inner length ratio and the length/width ratio of the caudal rami. This is the third species of Halicyclops recorded from Colombia and the first one described from this country. With the addition of Halicyclops gaviriai sp. n., the number of species of Halicyclops known from the Neotropics increases to 19. The regional diversity of the genus is probably underestimated. PMID:25561852

  6. Change and recovery of coastal mesozooplankton community structure during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carassou, L.; Hernandez, F. J.; Graham, W. M.

    2014-12-01

    The response of mesozooplankton community structure to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the northern Gulf of Mexico was investigated using data from a long-term plankton survey off the coast of Alabama (USA). Environmental conditions observed in the study area during the oil spill (2010) were compared to historical observations (2005-2009), to support the contention that variations observed in zooplankton assemblage structure may be attributed to the oil spill, as opposed to natural climatic or environmental variations. Zooplankton assemblage structure observed during the oil spill period (May-August) in 2010 was then compared to historical observations from the same period (2005-2009). Significant variations were detected in assemblage structure in May and June 2010, but these changes were no longer significant by July 2010. The density of ostracods, cladocerans and echinoderm larvae were responsible for most of the differences observed, but patterns differed depending on taxa and months. Many taxa had higher densities during the oil spill year, including calanoid and cyclopoid copepods, ostracods, bivalve larvae and cladocerans, among others. Although this result is somewhat surprising, it is possible that increased microbial activity related to the infusion of oil carbon may have stimulated secondary production through microbial-zooplankton trophic linkages. Overall, results suggest that, although changes in zooplankton community composition were observed during the oil spill, variations were weak and recovery was rapid.

  7. A new species of Metacyclops Kiefer, 1927 (Copepoda, Cyclopidae, Cyclopinae) from the Chihuahuan desert, northern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mercado-Salas, Nancy F; Suárez-Morales, Eduardo; Maeda-Martínez, Alejandro M; Silva-Briano, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    A new species of the freshwater cyclopoid copepod genus Metacyclops Kiefer, 1927 is described from a single pond in northern Mexico, within the binational area known as the Chihuahuan Desert. This species belongs to a group of Metacyclops species with a 3443 spine formula of swimming legs. It is morphologically similar to Metacyclops lusitanus Lindberg, 1961 but differs from this and other congeners by having a unique combination of characters, including a caudal rami length/width proportion of 3.5-3.8, a innermost terminal seta slightly longer than the outermost terminal seta, intercoxal sclerites of legs 1-4 naked, a strong apical spine of the second endopodal segment of leg 1 and one row of 6-8 small spinules at the insertion of this spine. The finding of this species represents also the first record of the genus in Mexico and the third in North America, where only two other species, Metacyclops gracilis (Lilljeborg, 1853)and Metacyclops cushae Reid, 1991 have been hitherto reported. This is also the first continental record of a species of Metacyclops from an arid environment in the Americas. This species appears to be endemic to the Chihuahuan Desert, thus emphasizing the high endemicity of this area. PMID:23794845

  8. Competition between larval lake herring (Coregonus artedi) and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) for zooplankton

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Bruce M.; Todd, Thomas N.

    1998-01-01

    Diet and growth of larval lake herring (Coregonus artedi) and lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) were compared in mesocosm experiments in a small mesotrophic lake in southeastern Michigan. Fish were sampled from single-species and mixed assemblages in 2-m3 cages for 8 weeks during April and May. Both species initially ate mostly cyclopoid copepodites and small cladocerans (Bosmia spp.). Schoener's index of diet overlap showed considerable overlap (70-90%). Lake whitefish ate Daphnia spp. and adult copepods about 2 weeks earlier than did lake herring, perhaps related to their larger mean mouth gape. Lake whitefish were consistently larger than lake herring until the eighth week, especially in the sympatric treatments. Lake whitefish appeared to have a negative effect on the growth of lake herring, as lake herring in mixed-species treatments were smaller and weighed less than lake herring reared in single-species treatments. The diet similarities of lake whitefish and lake herring larvae could make them competitors for food in the Great Lakes. The greater initial size of lake whitefish could allow them to eat larger prey earlier and thereby limit availability of these prey to lake herring at a crucial period of development.

  9. Diet overlap in larval lake herring (Coregonus artedi) and bloaters (Coregonus hoyi)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Bruce M.; Todd, Thomas N.

    1992-01-01

    The food preferences of larval lake herring (Coregonus artedi) and bloater (C.hoyi) were compared in a small mesotrophic lake in southeastern Michigan. Diets of the two were increasingly similar as the experiment progressed until, by the end of 6.5 weeks, they were identical; Schoener's Index of diet overlap averaged 0.35 in the first week and reached 0.96 by the end of the study. In the first few weeks, lake herring ate mostly small cladocerans (Bosmia longirostris) and bloaters ate mostly large cladocerans (Eurycercus lamellatus). Strauss's selection index confirmed that lake herring actively fed on small cladocerans throughout the study and that bloaters relied more on cyclopoid copepods during the early part of the study and shifted to eating small and large cladocerans by the end. Both species had similar growth rates throughout the study and amount of consumed food was identical. The diet similarities of lake herring and bloater larvae could make them competitors for food in the Great Lakes, relieved only by a dissimilarity in hatching times and locations.

  10. The nearshore zone during coastal upwelling: Daily variability and coupling between primary and secondary production off central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, William T.; Arcos, Dagoberto F.; McManus, George B.; Dam, Hans; Bellantoni, Diane; Johnson, Thomas; Tiselius, Peter

    The nearshore region of central Chile is important for spawning of sardine ( Sardinops sagax) anchovy ( Engraulis ringens) and jack mackerel ( Trachurus murphyii) and the importance of fisheries for these species has led to an interest in factors controlling the area's productivity. We studied daily variations in productivity at a nearshore station (25m depth) off Dichato, Chile (36°30?S) during January 1986 to understand how wind-driven variability in the hydrography is translated into pulses of primary and secondary production of the plankton. During the study period, we observed three complete cycles of upwelling favourable/unfavourable winds. Water column destratification, as indicated by the surface-to-bottom gradient of sigma-t, lagged the wind by about one day. During active upwelling, cold water (<11.5°C) of high nitrate and low oxygen concentration (20-25?M and 1-2ml 1 -1 respectively) was found near the surface. During subsequent relaxation of upwelling, the water column became stratified as temperature, oxygen and chlorophyll increased. The size and taxonomic composition of the phytoplankton varied from one event to the next. Over the course of the study, from 15-100% of the chlorophyll could pass a 20?m mesh screen. Chain-forming diatoms, microflagellates, and the autotrophic ciliate Mesodinium rubrum dominated the first, second and third events, respectively. In rank order of abundance, Paracalanus parvus, Centropages brachiatus, Oithona spp., Acartia tonsa, Oncaea spp., Calanoides patagoniensis and Calanus chilensis dominated the copepod community. Changes in abundance of most species did not closely follow the upwelling cycle. Possibly, vertical movements or other behavioural responses caused zooplankton distributions to be uncorrelated with movements of the surface Ekman layer. Fecundity of several of the important copepod species was measured using the egg ratio and bottle incubation techniques. Compared to values reported in the literature, egg production was usually suboptimal, despite high nutritional quality of the phytoplankton, as indicated by protein/carbohydrate ratios. Food availability, due to either small phytoplankton size or spatial and temporal uncoupling of phyto- and zooplankton populations, was probably most important in limiting copepod production. Event-scale advection, both zonal and alongshore, can be important in uncoupling primary and secondary production and probably determines the degree to which upwelling-generated pulses of phytoplankton production are utilized by herbivorous plankton in the nearshore zone.

  11. Zooplankton species composition, abundance and biomass on the eastern Bering Sea shelf during summer: The potential role of water-column stability and nutrients in structuring the zooplankton community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyle, Kenneth O.; Pinchuk, Alexei I.; Eisner, Lisa B.; Napp, Jeffrey M.

    2008-08-01

    The southeastern Bering Sea sustains one of the largest fisheries in the United States, as well as wildlife resources that support valuable tourist and subsistence economies. The fish and wildlife populations in turn are sustained by a food web linking primary producers to apex predators through the zooplankton community. Recent shifts in climate toward warmer conditions may threaten these resources by altering productivity and trophic relationships in the ecosystem on the southeastern Bering Sea shelf. We examined the zooplankton community near the Pribilof Islands and on the middle shelf of the southeastern Bering Sea in summer of 1999 and 2004 to document differences and similarities in species composition, abundance and biomass by region and year. Between August 1999 and August 2004, the summer zooplankton community of the middle shelf shifted from large to small species. Significant declines were observed in the biomass of large scyphozoans ( Chrysaora melanaster), large copepods ( Calanus marshallae), arrow worms ( Sagitta elegans) and euphausiids ( Thysanoessa raschii, T. inermis) between 1999 and 2004. In contrast, significantly higher densities of the small copepods ( Pseudocalanus spp., Oithona similis) and small hydromedusae ( Euphysa flammea) were observed in 2004 relative to 1999. Stomach analyses of young-of-the-year (age 0) pollock ( Theragra chalcogramma) from the middle shelf indicated a dietary shift from large to small copepods in 2004 relative to 1999. The shift in the zooplankton community was accompanied by a 3-fold increase in water-column stability in 2004 relative to 1999, primarily due to warmer water above the thermocline, with a mean temperature of 7.3 °C in 1999 and 12.6 °C in 2004. The elevated water-column stability and warmer conditions may have influenced the zooplankton composition by lowering summer primary production and selecting for species more tolerant of a warm, oligotrophic environment. A time series of temperature from the middle shelf indicates that the warmer conditions in 2004 are part of a trend rather than an expression of interannual variability. These results suggest that if climate on the Bering Sea shelf continues to warm, the zooplankton community may shift from large to small taxa which could strongly impact apex predators and the economies they support.

  12. The planktonic food web of the Bizerte lagoon (south-western Mediterranean) during summer: I. Spatial distribution under different anthropogenic pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakka Hlaili, Asma; Grami, Boutheina; Niquil, Nathalie; Gosselin, Michel; Hamel, Dominique; Troussellier, Marc; Hadj Mabrouk, Hassine

    2008-06-01

    The structure and the trophic interactions of the planktonic food web were investigated during summer 2004 in a coastal lagoon of south-western Mediterranean Sea. Biomasses of planktonic components as well as bacterial and phytoplankton production and grazing by microzooplankton were quantified at four stations (MA, MB, MJ and R) inside the lagoon. Station MA was impacted by urban discharge, station MB was influenced by industrial activity, station MJ was located in a shellfish farming sector, while station R represented the lagoon central area. Biomasses and production rates of bacteria (7-33 mg C m -3; 17.5-35 mg C m -3 d -1) and phytoplankton (80-299 mg C m -3; 34-210 mg C m -3 d -1) showed high values at station MJ, where substantial concentrations of nutrients (NO 3- and Si(OH) 4) were found. Microphytoplankton, which dominated the total algal biomass and production (>82%), were characterized by the proliferation of several chain-forming diatoms. Microzooplankton was mainly composed of dinoflagellates ( Torodinium, Protoperidinium and Dinophysis) and aloricate ( Lohmaniellea and Strombidium) and tintinnid ( Tintinnopsis, Tintinnus, Favella and Eutintinnus) ciliates. Higher biomass of these protozoa (359 mg C m -3) was observed at station MB, where large tintinnids were encountered. Mesozooplankton mainly represented by Calanoida ( Acartia, Temora, Calanus, Eucalanus, Paracalanus and Centropages) and Cyclopoida ( Oithona) copepods, exhibited higher and lower biomasses at stations MA/MJ and MB, respectively. Bacterivory represented only 35% of bacterial production at stations MB and R, but higher fractions (65-70%) were observed at stations MA and MJ. Small heterotrophic flagellates and aloricate ciliates seemed to be the main controllers of bacteria. Pico- and nanophytoplankton represented a significant alternative carbon pool for micrograzers, which grazing represented 67-90% of pico- and nano-algal production in all stations. Microzooplankton has, however, a relatively low impact on microphytoplankton, as ?45% of microalgal production was consumed in all stations. This implies that an important fraction of diatom production would be channelled by herbivorous meso-grazers to higher consumers at stations MA and MJ where copepods were numerous. Most of the microalgal production would, however, sink particularly at station MB where copepods were scare. These different trophic interactions suggest different food web structures between stations. A multivorous food web seemed to prevail in stations MJ and MA, whereas microbial web was dominant in the other stations.

  13. Condition of larval and early juvenile Japanese temperate bass Lateolabrax japonicus related to spatial distribution and feeding in the Chikugo estuarine nursery ground in the Ariake Bay, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Md. Shahidul; Hibino, Manabu; Nakayama, Kouji; Tanaka, Masaru

    2006-02-01

    The present study investigates feeding and condition of larval and juvenile Japanese temperate bass Lateolabrax japonicus in relation to spatial distribution in the Chikugo estuary (Japan). Larvae were collected in a wide area covering the nursery grounds of the species in 2002 and 2003. Food habits of the fish were analysed by examining their gut contents. Fish condition was evaluated by using morphometric (the length-weight relationship and condition factor) and biochemical (the RNA:DNA ratio and other nucleic acid based parameters) indices and growth rates. The nucleic-acid contents in individually frozen larvae and juveniles were quantified by standard fluorometric methods. Two distinct feeding patterns, determined by the distribution of prey copepods, were identified. The first pattern showed dependence on the calanoid copepod Sinocalanus sinensis, which was the single dominant prey in low-saline upper river areas. The second pattern involved a multi-specific dietary habit mainly dominated by Acartia omorii, Oithona davisae, and Paracalanus parvus. As in the gut contents analyses, two different sets of values were observed for RNA, DNA, total protein, growth rates and for all the nucleic acid-based indices: one for the high-saline downstream areas and a second for the low-saline upstream areas, which was significantly higher than the first. The proportion of starving fish was lower upstream than downstream. Values of the allometric coefficient ( b) and the condition factor ( K) obtained from the length-weight relationships increased gradually from the sea to the upper river. Clearly, fish in the upper river had a better condition than those in the lower estuary. RNA:DNA ratios correlated positively with temperature and negatively with salinity. We hypothesise that by migration to the better foraging grounds of the upper estuary (with higher prey biomass, elevated temperature and reduced salinity), the fish reduce early mortality and attain a better condition. We conclude that utilisation of the copepod S. sinensis in the upstream nursery grounds is one of the key early survival strategies in Japanese temperate bass in the Chikugo estuary.

  14. BOMOLOCHID COPEPODS PARASITIC ON THE EYES OF INDO-WEST PACIFIC CLUPEID FISHES

    E-print Network

    : Body dor- soventrally flattened. Rostrum rounded or bilobed. Abdomen 2- or indistinctly 3-segmented. Genital segment longer than broad. Abdomen 2-segmented. Caudal rami each with one very long and five

  15. Woodson et al. (2005, 2007) showed that copepods aggregate near oceanographic structure associated with biochemical

    E-print Network

    and population-scale aggregations. Behavioral Assays Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) Mixed-sex, species illuminated with an Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) CCD camera captures 500 images at 15 Hz Particle displacement Cylindrical Lens Laser Sheet CCD Camera Computer Trigger1m 30cm Imag e Data Genin, Amatzia, Jules S. Jaffe

  16. Z .Journal of Marine Systems 16 1998 6983 Copepod diffusion within multifractal phytoplankton fields

    E-print Network

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    Modelisation Mecanique L.M.M. , UniÃ?ersite Pierre et Marie CURIE Paris 6 , C.N.R.S. - U.R.A. 229, Tour 66, 4@lmm.jussieu.fr due to the observed coupling between the distribu- tion of phytoplankton populations and the structure

  17. COPEPOD REPRODUCTIVE STRATEGIES: LIFE-HISTORY THEORY, PHYLOGENETIC PATTERN AND INVASION OF INLAND WATERS. (R824771)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Life-history theory predicts that different reproductive strategies should evolve in environments that differ in resource availability, mortality, seasonality, and in spatial or temporal variation. Within a population, the predicted optimal strategy is driven ...

  18. Global population genetic structure and biogeography of the oceanic copepods Eucalanus hyalinus and E. spinifer.

    PubMed

    Goetze, Erica

    2005-11-01

    Although theory dictates that limited gene flow between populations is a necessary precursor to speciation under allopatric and parapatric models, it is currently unclear how genetic differentiation between conspecific populations can arise in open-ocean plankton species. I examined two recently distinguished sympatric, circumglobal sister species, Eucalanus hyalinus and Eucalanus spinifer, for population genetic structure throughout their global biogeographic ranges. Here I show that oceanic zooplankton species can be highly genetically structured on macrogeographic spatial scales, despite experiencing extensive gene flow within features of the large-scale ocean circulation. Mitochondrial DNA analyses of 450 and 383 individuals of E. hyalinus and E. spinifer, respectively, revealed that habitat discontinuities at the boundaries of subtropical gyres in the North and South Pacific, as well as continental land masses, acted as effective barriers to gene flow for both species. However, the impact of specific barriers on population genetic structure varied between the sister species, despite their close phylogenetic relationship and similar circumglobal biogeogeographic distributions. The sister species differed in their oceanographic distributions, with E. spinifer dominating oligotrophic waters of the subtropical gyres and E. hyalinus more abundant along central water mass boundaries and in frontal zones and upwelling systems. This species-specific difference in the oceanographic habitat is an important factor determining the historical and contemporary patterns of dispersal of the two species. I suggest that species-specific ecological differences are likely to be a primary determinant of population genetic structure of open-ocean plankton. PMID:16396179

  19. Seasonal growth and lipid storage of the circumglobal, subantarctic copepod, Neocalanus tonsus (Brady)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohman, Mark D.; Bradford, Janet M.; Jillett, John B.

    1989-09-01

    Neocalanus tonsus (Brady) was sampled between October 1984 and September 1985 in the upper 1000 m of the water column off southeastern New Zealand. The apparent spring growth increment of copepodid stage V (CV) differed depending upon the constituent considered: dry mass increased 208 ?g, carbon 162 ?g, wax esters 143 ?g, but nitrogen only 5 ?g. Sterols and phospholipids remained relatively constant over this interval. Wax esters were consistently the dominant lipid class present in CV's, increasing seasonally from 57 to 90% of total lipids. From spring to winter, total lipid content of CV's increased from 22 to 49% of dry mass. Nitrogen declined from 10.9 to 5.4% of CV dry mass as storage compounds (wax esters) increased in importance relative to structural compounds. Egg lipids were 66% phospholipids. Upon first appearance of males and females in deep water in winter, lipid content and composition did not differ from co-occuring CV's, confirming the importance of lipids rather than particulate food as an energy source for deep winter reproduction of this species. Despite contrasting life histories, N. tonsus and subarctic Pacific Neocalanus plumchrus CV's share high lipid content, a predominance of wax esters over triacylglycerols as storage lipids, and similar wax ester fatty acid and fatty alcohol composition.

  20. Suitability of cuticular pores and sensilla for harpacticoid copepod species delineation and phylogenetic reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Karanovic, Tomislav; Kim, Kichoon

    2014-11-01

    Cuticular organs have not been described systematically in harpacticoids until recently, and they haven ever been used as characters for reconstructing phylogenetic relationships in any crustacean group. We survey cuticular pores and sensilla on somites in ten Miraciidae species, belonging to six genera, from Korea, Australia, and Russia. Nine species belong to the subfamily Stenheliinae, while the outgroup belongs to the subfamily Diosaccinae. We aim to compare phylogenetic trees reconstructed for these harpactioids based on: 1) cuticular organs (with 76 characters scored, 71% of them phylogenetically informative); 2) traditionally used macro-morphological characters (66 scored, 77% of them informative);and 3) mtCOI DNA data. All analyses suggest that cuticular organs are useful characters for harpacticoid species delineation, although not as sensitive as some fast-evolving molecular markers. Reconstructed cladograms based on all three datasets show very high bootstrap values for clades representing distinct genera, suggesting that cuticular organs are suitable characters for studying phylogenetic relationships. Bootstrap values for the more basal nodes differ among the different cladograms,as do the sister-group relationships they suggest, indicating that cuticular organs probably have different evolutionary constraints from macro-morphological characters. Cuticular organs could be quite useful in the study of old museum specimens and fossil crustaceans. PMID:25264078

  1. A Century of Copepods: The U.S. Fisheries Steamer Albatross

    E-print Network

    of oceanography. For the arrival of Louis Agassiz in 1846. length of service, areas explored, and Agassiz and his of Louis Agassiz in 1846. Charles Branch Wilson eventually added Agassiz and his students, particularly unsurpassed. bun, and Agassiz's colleague Spencer The Albatross (Fig. 1) was not the Fullerton Baird, provided

  2. Meningeal-like Organization of Neural Tissues in Calanoid Copepods (Crustacea)

    E-print Network

    Hartline, Daniel K.

    'i 96822 ABSTRACT Meninges, the connective tissue of the vertebrate cen- tral nervous system (CNS), have in the most external connective tissues (dura mater and epineurium) versus electron-lucent cells in the more internal connective tissues (pia-arachnoid and endoneurium-perineurium) was also found in the cope- pod CNS

  3. FIPRONIL-INDUCED MALE INFERTILITY IN THE MEIOBENTHIC HARPACTICOID COPEPOD, AMPHIASCUS TENUIREMIS. (R827397)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  4. Water flow around a fish mimic attracts a parasitic and deters a planktonic copepod

    E-print Network

    Yen, Jeannette

    . The fish hydrodynamic signals thus serve as attractants that guide the parasite to the fish and produce by the same sensors, produce `opposite' reactions to the fish, suggesting the evolution of different behaviour of sensors that monitor chemical and mechanical signals from the surrounding environment (Gresty et al., 1993

  5. EFFECT OF HUMIC ACID ON UPTAKE AND TRANSFER OF COPPER FROM MICROBES TO CILIATES TO COPEPODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research is part of an ongoing project designed to determine the effect of humic acid on the uptake and transfer of metals by marine organisms at the lower end of the food chain. Binding affinities for Cu, Cd, Zn, and Cr to Suwannee River humic acid were determined at variou...

  6. High dispersal potential has maintained long-term population stability in the North Atlantic copepod

    E-print Network

    Provan, Jim

    One of the main predicted effects of global climate change on the Earth's biota is a shift in species demography of the species over previous changes in Earth's climate. Our findings indicate high levels: Calanus finmarchicus; climate change; dispersal; effective population size; North Atlantic 1. INTRODUCTION

  7. Mechanoreceptors in calanoid copepods: designed for high sensitivity T.M. Weatherbya

    E-print Network

    Lenz, Petra H.

    . These receptors exceed the physiological performance of other crustacean mechanoreceptors in sensitivity to water for crustaceans and other arthropods. The scolopale tube completely encloses the distal dendrites and it is ®rmly. All rights reserved. Keywords: Crustacean; Cuticular sensilla; Sensory; Mechanotransduction

  8. DYNAMIC TUNING OF INSECT AND BIRD WINGS AND COPEPOD AND DAPHNIA APPENDAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Compressible flow theory suggests, and dimensional analysis and growing empirical evidence confirm that, to aid flight, many insects and even some birds, notably hummingbirds, tune their wing-beat frequency to a corresponding characteristic harmonic frequency of air. The same pro...

  9. Mesoscale distribution and community composition of zooplankton in the Mozambique Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggett, Jenny A.

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies have shown the Mozambique Channel to exhibit high mesoscale variability, but how mesoscale features influence the zooplankton community in this region is not known. The biovolume, biomass, vertical distribution and community composition of mesozooplankton (>200 µm) associated with mesoscale eddies in the Mozambique Channel was investigated during four cruises in September 2007, December 2008, November 2009 and April/May 2010. Stations were categorized according to their location in cyclonic (cold-core) or anticyclonic (warm-core) eddies, frontal, divergence or shelf regions. Mean mesozooplankton biovolume in the upper 200 m was 0.33 ml m-3, with zooplankton largely concentrated in the upper 100 m during all four cruises (weighted mean depth=66.6 m). Sampling depth was the most important predictor of biovolume, which was greatest for net samples with a mid-depth of 0-40 m, but declined deeper in the water column. Biovolume at the shelf (0.37 ml m-3), divergence and cyclonic eddy stations (0.31 ml m-3) was significantly greater than at frontal and anticyclonic eddy stations (0.20 ml m-3). Mean biovolume was significantly higher during 2008 and 2010 compared to 2007 and 2009, and was also significantly higher for samples collected at night (and twilight) than during the day. The mesozooplankton community in 2007 was strongly dominated by small copepods (~70-80% abundance) followed by appendicularians (10%), ostracods (8%) and chaetognaths (7%). The most abundant copepods were the Paracalanids, Oncaea spp., Oithona spp. and Corycaeus spp. Multivariate analysis showed that the communities in 2007 and 2008 were most strongly structured by depth, but classification (cyclonic/anticyclonic) was also important in 2007 when mesoscale features were more strongly developed. Zooplankton assemblages showed a high degree of homogeneity, with differences between mesoscale features largely due to differing abundances of similar taxa. These observations suggest that mesoscale eddy and shelf interactions play a fundamental role in shaping the Mozambique Channel pelagic ecosystem through the concentration, enhanced growth and redistribution of zooplankton communities. Although frontal areas between eddies were poor in zooplankton biomass, the extensive inter-eddy divergence areas were as rich in biomass as the small cyclonic eddy core regions. These patterns are important for understanding the favorability of observed foraging areas for higher trophic levels.

  10. Pattern and persistence of a nearshore planktonic ecosystem off Southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Arthur M.; Jahn, Andrew E.

    1987-01-01

    Three related data sets from a baseline environmental survey on the continental shelf at San Onofre, California, consisting of: (1) zooplankton pumped from discrete depths on transects between the 8- and 30-m contours, sampled from 1976 to 1980; (2) zooplankton from oblique net hauls on a transect from 8 to 100 m sampled at 2-week intervals for 1 y, 1978-1979; and (3) vertical profiles of temperature, nutrients and plant pigments corresponding closely in time and space to the oblique net hauls, are used to describe cross-shelf zooplankton abundance patterns, community composition, and seasonal and shorter-term variations in cross-shelf zonation and their relation to variations in physical and chemical measures. Of 15 taxa tested for multiyear average patterns, three—the copepods Acartia clausi and Oithona oculata, and barnacle larvae—had centers of abundance shoreward of the 30-m contour and near the bottom. No differences were detected in the cross-shelf pattern between San Onofre and a transect 12 km southeast. Throughout the year, nearshore and offshore assemblages were distinguishable, the change occurring at about the 30-m contour. The offshore one, represented by the copepods Calanus pacificus, Eucalanus californicus and Rhincalanus nasutus, occupied water having less chlorophyll and less near-surface nutrient, i.e. of more oceanic character. In spring and summer, most nearshore taxa shifted slightly seaward, leaving a third assemblage, characterized by a very high abundance of Acartia spp. copepodids and maximum abundances of A. clausi and O. oculata near the beach. Three upwelling episodes resulted in marked increases in chlorophyll and nutrients, but not in cross-shelf gradients of these properties, as were noted at most other times. Maximum disturbance of cross-shelf zooplankton zonation was observed during a wintertime intrusion of offshore surface water, but the zonation was never obliterated. Nearshore zooplankton patterns appear to be protected from dislocation by the shallow shelf and sustained by phytoplankton distributed in a manner peculiar to the nearshore zone. Typically, shallow nearshore waters were richer in chlorophyll and nutrients than offshore waters of the same depth. The cross-shelf chlorophyll and nutrient profiles, in turn, appear to result from increased eddy diffusion and nutrient recycling in shallow waters, perhaps augmented by longshore transport from quasi-permanent, local upwelling nodes.

  11. Impact of zooplankton grazing on Alexandrium blooms in the offshore Gulf of Maine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Jefferson T.; Borkman, David G.

    2005-09-01

    Zooplankton grazing was investigated by shipboard experiments during natural blooms of Alexandrium spp. in the offshore Gulf of Maine in spring and/or summer of 1998, 2000, and 2001. Grazing studies were done in conjunction with studies of accumulation of Alexandrium toxins in the zooplankton, as part of the ECOHAB-Gulf of Maine regional program. Several species of copepods, marine cladocerans, and appendicularians were allowed to graze upon natural phytoplankton assemblages, at ambient temperatures (14-17 °C). Grazing was measured by quantitative microscopic analyses of disappearance of phytoplankton cells in initial, control, and experimental food suspensions. Thus, we were able to examine grazing upon Alexandrium in comparison to grazing on other co-occurring phytoplankton taxa. Even during Alexandrium "blooms," this dinoflagellate was a minor component of the overall phytoplankton assemblage. It was present at stations where grazing experiments were conducted at levels of 0.12-7.57×10 3 cells l -1, or 0.03-3.93% of total phytoplankton cells. Maximum ingestion of Alexandrium accounted for only up to 3.2% of total cells ingested. Phytoplankton assemblages were dominated by athecate microflagellates, and to a lesser extent by diatoms and non-toxic dinoflagellates. Microflagellates were present at abundances of 159.62-793.93 cells ml -1, or 60.6-95.56% of total cells. Grazing on microflagellates accounted for 35.59-98.21% of total grazing. Grazing on Alexandrium spp. and microflagellates was generally non-selective, with these taxa being ingested in similar proportions to their availability in food assemblages. Grazing on diatoms was selective, with diatoms being disproportionately ingested, compared to their proportions in food assemblages. There were no apparent adverse effects of Alexandrium on grazers during incubations of 18-24 h, and grazer survival was 100%. Estimated daily zooplankton grazing impact on Alexandrium spp. field populations by field populations of experimental grazers averaged 5.79% (range=0-117%). Extrapolating experimentally determined grazing rates to total zooplankton assemblages increased potential grazing impact to 0-667.77% (mean=114.7%). However, these potential impacts are likely overestimations, because toxin accumulation data indicated that many of the most-abundant zooplankters ( Oithona similis copepodites and copepod nauplii) likely graze only minimally upon Alexandrium spp. Thus, antipredation effects of high concentrations of Alexandrium on some grazers reported from some laboratory studies may only occur rarely in nature, because of low individual zooplankter grazing rates on Alexandrium, and dilution of grazing upon it by grazing on other food sources such as abundant microflagellates and diatoms.

  12. Ecological interactions affecting population-level responses to chemical stress in Mesocyclops leuckarti.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Devdutt; Hommen, Udo; Schäffer, Andreas; Preuss, Thomas G

    2014-10-01

    Higher tiers of ecological risk assessment (ERA) consider population and community-level endpoints. At the population level, the phenomenon of density dependence is one of the most important ecological processes that influence population dynamics. In this study, we investigated how different mechanisms of density dependence would influence population-level ERA of the cyclopoid copepod Mesocyclops leuckarti under toxicant exposure. We used a combined approach of laboratory experiments and individual-based modelling. An individual-based model was developed for M. leuckarti to simulate population dynamics under triphenyltin exposure based on individual-level ecological and toxicological data from laboratory experiments. The study primarily aimed to-(1) determine which life-cycle processes, based on feeding strategies, are most significant in determining density dependence (2) explore how these mechanisms of density dependence affect extrapolation from individual-level effects to the population level under toxicant exposure. Model simulations showed that cannibalism of nauplii that were already stressed by TPT exposure contributed to synergistic effects of biotic and abiotic factors and led to a twofold stress being exerted on the nauplii, thereby resulting in a higher population vulnerability compared to the scenario without cannibalism. Our results suggest that in population-level risk assessment, it is easy to underestimate toxicity unless underlying ecological interactions including mechanisms of population-level density regulation are considered. This study is an example of how a combined approach of experiments and mechanistic modelling can lead to a thorough understanding of ecological processes in ecotoxicology and enable a more realistic ERA. PMID:25048925

  13. American shad in the Columbia River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, J.H.; Hinrichsen, R.A.; Gadomski, D.M.; Feil, D.H.; Rondorf, D.W.

    2003-01-01

    American shad Alosa sapidissima from the Hudson River, New York, were introduced into the Sacramento River, California, in 1871 and were first observed in the Columbia River in 1876. American shad returns to the Columbia River increased greatly between 1960 and 1990, and recently 2-4 million adults have been counted per year at Bonneville Dam, Oregon and Washington State (river kilometer 235). The total return of American shad is likely much higher than this dam count. Returning adults migrate as far as 600 km up the Columbia and Snake rivers, passing as many as eight large hydroelectric dams. Spawning occurs primarily in the lower river and in several large reservoirs. A small sample found returning adults were 2-6 years old and about one-third of adults were repeat spawners. Larval American shad are abundant in plankton and in the nearshore zone. Juvenile American shad occur throughout the water column during night, but school near the bottom or inshore during day. Juveniles consume a variety of zooplankton, but cyclopoid copepods were 86% of the diet by mass. Juveniles emigrate from the river from August through December. Annual exploitation of American shad by commercial and recreational fisheries combined is near 9% of the total count at Bonneville Dam. The success of American shad in the Columbia River is likely related to successful passage at dams, good spawning and rearing habitats, and low exploitation. The role of American shad within the aquatic community is poorly understood. We speculate that juveniles could alter the zooplankton community and may supplement the diet of resident predators. Data, however, are lacking or sparse in some areas, and more information is needed on the role of larval and juvenile American shad in the food web, factors limiting adult returns, ocean distribution of adults, and interactions between American shad and endangered or threatened salmonids throughout the river. ?? 2003 by the American Fisheries Society.

  14. A global comparative analysis of the feeding dynamics and environmental conditions of larval tunas, mackerels, and billfishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llopiz, Joel K.; Hobday, Alistair J.

    2015-03-01

    Scombroid fishes, including tunas, mackerels, and billfishes, constitute some of the most important fisheries in lower latitudes around the world. Though the early life stages of these taxa are relatively well-studied, worldwide patterns in larval feeding dynamics and how such patterns relate to environmental conditions are poorly resolved. We present a synthesis of feeding success (i.e. feeding incidences) and diets of larval scombroids from around the world, and relate these results to water column and sea surface properties for the several regions in which larval feeding studies have been conducted. Feeding success of larval tunas was shown to be distinctly different among regions. In some locations (the Straits of Florida and the Mediterranean Sea), nearly no larvae had empty guts, whereas in other locations (the Gulf of California and off NW Australia) ~40-60% of larvae were empty. Diets were consistently narrow in each region (dominated by cyclopoid copepods, appendicularians, nauplii, and other fish larvae), and were usually, but not always, similar for a given scombroid taxon among regions (though diets differed among taxa). Larval habitat conditions were often similar among the 9 regions examined, but some clear differences included low levels of eddy kinetic energy and cooler waters (at the surface and at depth) in the Mediterranean, and lower chlorophyll concentrations around the Nansei Islands, Japan and off NW Australia where feeding success was low. When observed zooplankton abundances are also taken into account, the compiled results on feeding and environmental conditions indicate a bottom-up influence on feeding success. Moreover, the variability among regions highlights the potential for region-specific mechanisms regulating larval survival and, ultimately, levels of adult recruitment.

  15. Diel feeding behavior and ingestion rate in the copepod Calanus finmarchicus in the southern Gulf of Maine during late spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durbin, Edward G.; Campbell, Robert G.; Gilman, Sharon L.; Durbin, Ann G.

    In situ feeding was measured on late stage Calanus finmarchicus in the southern Gulf of Maine during late spring 1988 and 1989. The region is a spring feeding ground for the planktivorous right whale, Eubalaena glacialis. Measurements in 1988 were made during the declining spring bloom, when phytoplankton showed considerable spatial variability. 1989 observations were made after summer stratification had become established, when phytoplankton biomass was low and dominated by the <7 ?m size fraction. In situ ingestion rates of C. finmarchicus reflected these differences in food, and ranged from 30.2% body C day -1 at a spring bloom station to 0.6% body C day -1 after stratification. These values compare with a maximum ingestion rate of 44.3% body C day -1 measured in a shipboard grazing experiment using cultured algae as food, and indicate that C. finmarchicus became food limited in the southern Gulf of Maine after stratification. Calanus finmarchicus diet feeding behavior and diet vertical migration patterns changed during the seasonal progression from spring bloom to summer stratification. Diet feeding rhythms and vertical migration were absent during the bloom, but developed as the bloom declined. During the post-bloom stratified conditions, diet feeding rhythms continued but vertical migration ceased. Most of the C. finmarchicus population remained near the surface, while a small population of nonmigratory individuals resided at depth and appeared to be feeding upon sedimented spring bloom diatoms. At the spring bloom station C. finmarchicus ingested only a small proportion of the phytoplankton standing stock in the > 7 ?m size fraction (2.9% day -1), reflecting the high biomass of phytoplankton and the stage composition of the C. finmarchicus population, dominated by early copepodite stages with low biomass. In contrast, at the post-bloom stations in 1989, the dense surface aggregations of C. finmarchicus populations were dominated by late copepodite stages whose total biomass was comparable to that of the phytoplankton, and C. finmarchicus consumed a significantly larger fraction of the > 7 ?m phytoplankton standing crop (up to 62.5% day -1.

  16. Within-and between-plant distribution of harpacticoid copepods in a North Atlantic bed of Laminaria ochroleuca

    E-print Network

    Maldonado, Manuel

    , Blanes 17300, Spain. P Department of Marine Science, Coastal Carolina University, Conway, SC 29528 macroalgae, such as many representatives of the order Laminariales, may provide a variety of potential

  17. An Example of How Barcodes Can Clarify Cryptic Species: The Case of the Calanoid Copepod Mastigodiaptomus albuquerquensis (Herrick)

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Aguirre, Martha Angélica; Cervantes-Martínez, Adrián; Elías-Gutiérrez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Background The freshwater calanoid Mastigodiaptomus is a genus with high richness in the Americas and is composed of nine species, seven recorded in Mexico and four that are apparently endemic to small areas. Mastigodiaptomus albuquerquensis is a common, widely distributed species ranging from the southern USA to Central America. This species can be easily identified by a notable butterfly-like sclerotization on the basis of the right fifth leg of males. Nevertheless, morphological differences observed among populations throughout this species distributional range have led to the description of several related species or subspecies, such as M. albuquerquensis patzcuarensis from Lake Pátzcuaro in the Central Plateau of Mexico. Methods Genetic results based on barcodes, morphology based on scanning electron and light microscopy images, and morphometric analyses were used to describe cryptic species within the M. albuquerquensis complex. Results The morphological analyses coincided partially with the genetic markers, suggesting the existence of at least two sibling species: M. albuquerquensis s. str. and M. patzcuarensis. A third species was genetically separated but was morphologically indistinguishable from the M. patzcuarensis group. Conclusions Hidden diversity has been a major problem in establishing real patterns of species distribution and genetic acquisition from megadiverse hotspots such as Mexico, where the Nearctic and the Neotropical regions of the Americas meet. Barcodes can help taxonomists to reveal and formally name these new species. Here, we describe two of three potential species highlighted by the use of barcodes: M. albuquerquensis s. str. in the northern semi-desert and M. patzcuarensis on the Central Plateau at more than 2000 m above sea level. PMID:24465470

  18. First record of harpacticoid copepods from Lake Tahoe, United States: two new species of Attheyella (Harpacticoida, Canthocamptidae)

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Hyun Woo; Baguley, Jeffrey G.; Moon, Heejin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Benthic harpacticoids were collected for the first time at Lake Tahoe, California-Nevada, United States. Two species were identified as members of the genus Attheyella Brady, 1880. The genus Attheyella comprises about 150 species within six subgenera, but only twelve species have previously been reported from North American freshwater habitats. The two new species of Attheyella described here have a 3-segmented endopod on P1 and 2-segmented P2–P4 endopods, the distal segment of exopod of P2–P4 has three outer spines, and the P5 has five setae on the exopod and six setae on the baseoendopod. Attheyella (Attheyella) tahoensis sp. n. most closely resembles Attheyella (Attheyella) idahoensis (Marsh, 1903) from Idaho, Montana, and Alaska (United States) and Attheyella (Attheyella) namkungi Kim, Soh & Lee, 2005 from Gosu Cave in South Korea. They differ mainly by the number of setae on the distal endopodal segment of P2–P4. In addition, intraspecific variation has been observed on the caudal rami. Attheyella (Neomrazekiella) tessiae sp. n. is characterized by the extension of P5 baseoendopod, 2-segmented endopod of female P2–P3, and naked third seta of male P5 exopod. The two new species are likely endemic to Lake Tahoe, an isolated alpine lake within the Great Basin watershed in the western United States. PMID:25685014

  19. THE EFFECT OF NUTRITION ON THE RESPONSE OF FIELD POPULATIONS OF THE CALANOID COPEPOD 'ACARTIA TONSA' TO COPPER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Continuous flow toxicity tests were conducted on field populations of adult Acartia tonsa collected from Narragansett Bay. Potential algal food at the collection site was estimated from ATP and chlorophyll analysis. There was positive correlation (P < 0.01) between chlorophyll a ...

  20. MAINTENANCE OF DISTINCT MITOCHONDRIAL DNA LINEAGES IN SYMPATRY IN COPEPOD INHABITING ESTUARINE CREEKS IN THE SOUTHEASTERN USA. (R825439)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  1. Avoidance of contaminated sediments by an amphipod (Melita plumulosa), A harpacticoid copepod (Nitocra spinipes), and a snail (Phallomedusa solida).

    PubMed

    Ward, Daniel J; Simpson, Stuart L; Jolley, Dianne F

    2013-03-01

    The distribution of contaminants is seldom homogeneous in aquatic systems. In the present study, the avoidance response of Melita plumulosa, Nitocra spinipes, and Phallomedusa solida when exposed to contaminated sediments was investigated. Test vessels were designed to allow the congruent placement of two sediments and assessment of the movement of organisms between the sediments. When exposed to reference sediment, each species dispersed evenly between test chambers regardless of differences in sediment particle size. In the presence of contaminated sediment, the magnitude and rate of avoidance varied. Avoidance assays showed that test species avoided contaminated sediment as early as 6, 6, and 24?h following exposure for N. spinipes, P. solida, and M. plumulosa, respectively. The 48-h avoidance response of M. plumulosa for nine contaminated sediments of varying toxicity showed that avoidance was generally greater for sediments which elicited greater 10-d lethality to this species. The study demonstrated that each of these species has the ability to respond to chemical cues in the environment to inhabit sediment that provides the best opportunity for survival. The avoidance response for each species indicates the potential for developing rapid screening methods to assess sediment quality. Evidence suggests that avoidance was related to sediment toxicity and that static 10-d toxicity methods are likely to overestimate toxicity for species, which would avoid contamination in heterogeneous field settings. PMID:23180416

  2. First record of harpacticoid copepods from Lake Tahoe, United States: two new species of Attheyella (Harpacticoida, Canthocamptidae).

    PubMed

    Bang, Hyun Woo; Baguley, Jeffrey G; Moon, Heejin

    2015-01-01

    Benthic harpacticoids were collected for the first time at Lake Tahoe, California-Nevada, United States. Two species were identified as members of the genus Attheyella Brady, 1880. The genus Attheyella comprises about 150 species within six subgenera, but only twelve species have previously been reported from North American freshwater habitats. The two new species of Attheyella described here have a 3-segmented endopod on P1 and 2-segmented P2-P4 endopods, the distal segment of exopod of P2-P4 has three outer spines, and the P5 has five setae on the exopod and six setae on the baseoendopod. Attheyella (Attheyella) tahoensissp. n. most closely resembles Attheyella (Attheyella) idahoensis (Marsh, 1903) from Idaho, Montana, and Alaska (United States) and Attheyella (Attheyella) namkungi Kim, Soh & Lee, 2005 from Gosu Cave in South Korea. They differ mainly by the number of setae on the distal endopodal segment of P2-P4. In addition, intraspecific variation has been observed on the caudal rami. Attheyella (Neomrazekiella) tessiaesp. n. is characterized by the extension of P5 baseoendopod, 2-segmented endopod of female P2-P3, and naked third seta of male P5 exopod. The two new species are likely endemic to Lake Tahoe, an isolated alpine lake within the Great Basin watershed in the western United States. PMID:25685014

  3. SYMPATRY OF DISTINCT MITOCHONDRIAL DNA LINEAGES IN A COPEPOD INHABITING ESTUARINE CREEKS IN THE SOUTHEASTERN USA. (R827397)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  4. Identification of xenobiotic biodegradation and metabolism-related genes in the copepod Tigriopus japonicus whole transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hui-Su; Lee, Bo-Young; Won, Eun-Ji; Han, Jeonghoon; Hwang, Dae-Sik; Park, Heum Gi; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the whole transcriptome of Tigriopus japonicus was sequenced using next generation sequencing technology. De novo assembly was performed using Trinity, which assembled 140,130 contigs. Transdecoder found 54,761 candidate coding contigs, 39,507 of which showed homology to other species covering 15,310 genes by BLAST analysis. Functional gene annotation was performed by Gene Ontology, InterProScan, and KEGG pathway analyses. In addition to various metabolism-related pathways, xenobiotic biodegradation and metabolism were other interesting pathways in T. japonicus. Transcripts encoding various enzymes (e.g. superoxide dismutase, heat shock protein, and peroxidases) in response to a variety of stimuli were identified, which might be useful candidate biomarkers for ecotoxicology studies. PMID:26024611

  5. The day and night vertical distributions of calanoid copepods in the western Gulf of Mexico, with reference to feeding relationships 

    E-print Network

    Minello, Thomas Joseph

    1974-01-01

    in this area (Nowlin, 1970). According to Nowlin & Hubertz (1970), gyres or rings of water, which have de- tacheg from the 1 o ur nt q g& +cz ~:. sf are not uncom monly found in the western Gulf region. In order to be certain that samples were taken... and dorsal musculature were missing. Harding (1973) found that bacterial infec- tion in dead Calanus finmarchicus spreads from the surface of the exoskeleton into the foregut and the intestinal tract is one of the first internal structures to decompose...

  6. A new calanoid copepod (Spinocalanidae) swarming at a cold seep site on the Gabon continental margin (Southeast Atlantic)

    E-print Network

    Ivanenko, Viatcheslav N.

    - comyid and mytilid bivalves as well as siboglinid tube- worms and other invertebrates were observed in hydrocarbon fluids, a few centimetres above vesicomyid and mytilid bivalves aggregating at the giant pockmark in revised form 30 October 2006. #12;Introduction A giant pockmark Regab, 800 m in diameter and 15 m deep

  7. Physical and biological characteristics of the pelagic system across Fram Strait to Kongsfjorden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hop, Haakon; Falk-Petersen, Stig; Svendsen, Harald; Kwasniewski, Slawek; Pavlov, Vladimir; Pavlova, Olga; Søreide, Janne E.

    2006-10-01

    The Fram Strait is very important with regard to heat and mass exchange in the Arctic Ocean, and the large quantities of heat carried north by the West Spitsbergen Current (WSC) influence the climate in the Arctic region as a whole. A large volume of water and ice is transported through Fram Strait, with net water transport of 1.7-3.2 Sv southward in the East Greenland Current and a volume ice flux in the range of 0.06-0.11 Sv. The mean annual ice flux is about 866,000 km 2 yr -1. The Kongsfjorden-Krossfjorden fjord system on the coast of Spitsbergen, or at the eastern extreme of Fram Strait, is mainly affected by the northbound transport of water in the WSC. Mixing processes on the shelf result in Transformed Atlantic Water in the fjords, and the advection of Atlantic water also carries boreal fauna into the fjords. The phytoplankton production is about 80 g C m -2 yr -1 in Fram Strait, and has been estimated both below and above this for Kongsfjorden. The zooplankton fauna is diverse, but dominated in terms of biomass by calanoid copepods, particularly Calanus glacialis and C. finmarchicus. Other important copepods include C. hyperboreus, Metridia longa and the smaller, more numerous Pseudocalanus ( P. minutus and P. acuspes), Microcalanus ( M. pusillus and M. pygmaeus) and Oithona similis. The most important species of other taxa appear to be the amphipods Themisto libellula and T. abyssorum, the euphausiids Thysanoessa inermis and T. longicaudata and the chaetognaths Sagitta elegans and Eukrohnia hamata. A comparison between the open ocean of Fram Strait and the restricted fjord system of Kongsfjorden-Krossfjorden can be made within limitations. The same species tend to dominate, but the Fram Strait zooplankton fauna differs by the presence of meso- and bathypelagic copepods. The seasonal and inter-annual variation in zooplankton is described for Kongsfjorden based on the record during July 1996-2002. The ice macrofauna is much less diverse, consisting of a handful of amphipod species and the polar cod. The ice-associated biomass transport of ice-amphipods was calculated, based on the ice area transport, at about 3.55 × 10 6 ton wet weight per year or about 4.2 × 10 5 t C yr -1. This represents a large energy input to the Greenland Sea, but also a drain on the core population residing in the multi-year pack ice (MYI) in the Arctic Ocean. A continuous habitat loss of MYI due to climate warming will likely reduce dramatically the sympagic food source. The pelagic and sympagic food web structures were revealed by stable isotopes. The carbon sources of particulate organic matter (POM), being Ice-POM and Pelagic-POM, revealed different isotopic signals in the organisms of the food web, and also provided information about the sympagic-pelagic and pelagic-benthic couplings. The marine food web and energy pathways were further determined by fatty acid trophic markers, which to a large extent supported the stable isotope picture of the marine food web, although some discrepancies were noted, particularly with regard to predator-prey relationships of ctenophores and pteropods.

  8. Climate-mediated changes in zooplankton community structure for the eastern Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisner, Lisa B.; Napp, Jeffrey M.; Mier, Kathryn L.; Pinchuk, Alexei I.; Andrews, Alexander G.

    2014-11-01

    Zooplankton are critical to energy transfer between higher and lower trophic levels in the eastern Bering Sea ecosystem. Previous studies from the southeastern Bering Sea shelf documented substantial differences in zooplankton taxa in the Middle and Inner Shelf Domains between warm and cold years. Our investigation expands this analysis into the northern Bering Sea and the south Outer Domain, looking at zooplankton community structure during a period of climate-mediated, large-scale change. Elevated air temperatures in the early 2000s resulted in regional warming and low sea-ice extent in the southern shelf whereas the late 2000s were characterized by cold winters, extensive spring sea ice, and a well-developed pool of cold water over the entire Middle Domain. The abundance of large zooplankton taxa such as Calanus spp. (C. marshallae and C. glacialis), and Parasagitta elegans, increased from warm to cold periods, while the abundance of gelatinous zooplankton (Cnidaria) and small taxa decreased. Biomass followed the same trends as abundance, except that the biomass of small taxa in the southeastern Bering Sea remained constant due to changes in abundance of small copepod taxa (increases in Acartia spp. and Pseudocalanus spp. and decreases in Oithona spp.). Statistically significant changes in zooplankton community structure and individual species were greatest in the Middle Domain, but were evident in all shelf domains, and in both the northern and southern portions of the eastern shelf. Changes in community structure did not occur abruptly during the transition from warm to cold, but seemed to begin gradually and build as the influence of the sea ice and cold water temperatures persisted. The change occurred one year earlier in the northern than the southern Middle Shelf. These and previous observations demonstrate that lower trophic levels within the eastern Bering Sea respond to climate-mediated changes on a variety of time scales, including those shorter than the commonly accepted quasi-decadal time periods. This lack of resilience or inertia at the lowest trophic levels affects production at higher trophic levels and must be considered in management strategy evaluations of living marine resources.

  9. The ice fauna in the shallow southwestern Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Andrew G.

    1992-06-01

    Sympagic fauna were studied in seasonal fast ice adjacent to Narwhal Island during the spring of 1979 and 1980, with emphasis on the origin of the fauna and its relationship to contiguous pelagic and benthic communities. The results of five subprojects are reviewed and compared with recent literature. Within Stefansson Sound, inshore of Narwhal Island, total sympagic meiofaunal densities and species diversity were low. In March 1979, the dominant taxa were polychaete larvae and crustacean nauplii, while in May the dominant group was Nematoda. Total numerical densities were low, ranging from 4500 to 8000 per m 2. During the spring of 1980 large numbers of invertebrate fauna concentrated at the undersurface of seasonal sea ice on the inner western Beaufort Sea continental shelf, seaward of Narwhal Island. The sympagic meiofauna were comprised primarily of benthic harpacticoid and cyclopoid copepods, turbellarians, nematode worms, and polychaete worm larvae. Total meiofaunal densities increased from about 6000 per m 2 in April to about 482,000 per m 2 in June. All life stages of Cyclopina gracilis (Copepoda: Cyclopoida) were present in the ice. This species appeared to reproduce continuously from early April to early June during the study period. The Harpacticus sp. (Copepoda: Harpaticoida) population consisted of one cohort whose individuals grew in size from April to early June. The sympagic macrofauna consisted entirely of amphipod crustaceans, primarily comprised of benthic species. Population size structure of the amphipod Pseudalibrotus (= Onisimus) litoralis was bimodal and there was a lack of intermediate growth stages. These characteristics indicate that this species has a two-year life cycle in the Beaufort Sea. The highest growth rate for P. litoralis coincided with maximal ice algal production. P. litoralis fed largely on meiofaunal Crustacea and amphipod fragments in April, but its diet switched to ice algae during the height of the bloom in late May-early June. Results indicate that P. litoralis, normally a shallow benthic species, uses the ice undersurface as a spawning site and a temporary nursery ground for its young during the spring. Beneath the ice, the input of total organic carbon to the bottom remained at fairly constant low levels from April through early June, 1980. Little carbon, exported from the ice community beneath the sea ice, reached the shallow sea floor. However, this food source is available to the benthos earlier than that from phytoplanktonic or benthic microalgal production that occurs later in the season after ice breakup.

  10. Development of the Southern Ocean Continuous Plankton Recorder survey [review article

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosie, G. W.; Fukuchi, M.; Kawaguchi, S.

    2003-08-01

    The Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) Type I was first used in Antarctic waters during the 1925-1927 Discovery Expedition, and has been used successfully for 70 years to monitor plankton in the North Sea and North Atlantic Ocean. Sixty-five years later the CPR as a Type II version returned to Antarctic waters when the Australian Antarctic Division initiated a survey of the Southern Ocean on RSV Aurora Australis south of Australia and west to Mawson. The objectives are to study regional, seasonal, interannual and long-term variability in zooplankton abundance, species composition and community patterns, as well as the annual abundance and distribution of krill larvae. The survey covers a large area from 60°E to 160°E, and south from about 48°S to the Antarctic coast-an area of more than 14 million km 2. Tows are conducted throughout the shipping season, normally September to April, but occasionally as early as July (midwinter). The large areal and temporal scale means that it is difficult to separate temporal and geographical variation in the data. Hence, CPRs are now also towed on the Japanese icebreaker Shirase in collaboration with the Japanese Antarctic programme. Shirase has a fixed route and time schedule, travelling south on 110°E in early December and north on 150°E in mid-March each year, and will serve as an important temporal reference for measuring long-term interannual variability and to help interpret the Australian data. Since 1991, over 90 tows have been made, providing over 36,000 nautical miles of records. The most successful seasons to date have been the 1997/1998, 1999/2000 and 2000/2001 austral summers with 20, 31 and 26 tows, respectively. The 1999/2000 season included a unique, nearly simultaneous three-ship crossing of the Southern Ocean along 25° 30’E, 110°E and 157°E. Typical CPR tows show very high abundance of zooplankton in the uppermost 20 m of the permanently open ocean zone between the sea-ice zone and the Sub-Antarctic Front; this is an area thought to be oligotrophic. Appendicularians and small calanoid and cyclopoid copepods dominate the plankton. By comparison the surface waters of the sea-ice zone have low species diversity and abundances. Zooplankton data, and hence distribution patterns, can be time- and geo-coded to GPS data and environmental data collected by the ships’ underway monitoring system (e.g. fluorescence, water temperature, salinity, and meteorological data).

  11. Linking phytoplankton community size composition with temperature, plankton food web structure and sea-air CO 2 flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilligsøe, Karen Marie; Richardson, Katherine; Bendtsen, Jørgen; Sørensen, Lise-Lotte; Nielsen, Torkel Gissel; Lyngsgaard, Maren Moltke

    2011-08-01

    Data collected at open water stations (depth>400 m) in all major ocean basins in 2006-2008 are used to examine the relationship between the size structure of the phytoplankton community (determined by size fractionated chlorophyll filtration), temperature and inorganic nutrient availability. A significant relationship ( p<0.0005) was found between community size structure and temperature, with the importance of large cells in the community decreasing with increase in temperature. Although weaker than the temperature relationship, significant relationships were also noted between community cell size and DIN (nitrate, nitrite and ammonium: p=0.034) and phosphate ( p=0.031) concentrations. When the data were divided into two groups of equal size, representing the samples with the highest and lowest DIN/phosphate concentrations, respectively, no difference could be identified between the slopes of the lines representing the relationship between size structure and temperature. There was, however, a difference in the intercepts between the two groups. If the relationship between size and temperature was only a response to nutrient availability, we would expect that the response would be the strongest in the groups with the lowest nutrient concentrations. These results suggest that, in addition to a nutrient effect, temperature may also directly influence the size structure of phytoplankton communities. The size structure of the phytoplankton community in this study correlated to the magnitude of primary production, export production (determined after Laws et al., 2000) and integrated water column chlorophyll. Significant relationships were also found between mesozooplankton production (determined using the proxy of calanoid+cyclopoid nauplii abundance as a percentage of the total number of these copepods) and both temperature and phytoplankton size, with production being the lowest in the warmest waters where phytoplankton were the smallest. In the North Atlantic, export production and community size structure appear to be related to ocean uptake of CO 2 from the atmosphere. The reported results suggest that ocean warming may directly alter plankton community structure. This, in turn, may alter the structure of marine food webs and impact the performance of the open ocean as a natural carbon sink.

  12. THE ROLE OF FLUCTUATING SELECTION AND LONG-TERM DIAPAUSE IN MICROEVOLUTION OF DIAPAUSE TIMING IN A FRESHWATER COPEPOD. (R824771)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  13. Two new stygobiotic copepod species from the Tibesti area (Northern Chad) and a re-description of Pilocamptus schroederi (van Douwe, 1915).

    PubMed

    Brancelj, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Between 4th and 18th March 2014, an international group of biologists carried out a hydrobiological expedition to the Ounianga-Tibesti area of northern Chad (Africa). The Tibesti is a desert volcanic area, intersected by the beds of ancient rivers which were active in the Tertiary. In deep canyons there are small water bodies (gueltas/aguelmans), fed by rain and spring water. They are rich in zooplankton, benthos, and even fish, but their groundwater fauna has previously been unknown. Groundwater samples collected in the vicinity of one guelta contained Syncarida, Isopoda, and Copepoda. Among the latter, two new species were recognised, Haplocyclops (H.) henrii sp. nov. and Parastenocaris joi sp. nov., together with a third species, Pilocamptus schroederi (van Douwe, 1915), previously known only from the littoral zone and wet mosses of Lake Victoria. The Tibesti area is thus the third known location of P. schroederi. All these species have a Gondwanaland distribution and are probably relicts of the Tertiary fauna, formerly widespread in the Sahara. Together with descriptions of two new species, a detailed re-description of P. schroederi is presented, along with remarks on their ecology. PMID:26250289

  14. Short-term variability during an anchor station study in the southern Benguela upwelling system: Fecundity estimates of the dominant copepod, Calanoides carinatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, D. A.; Verheye, H. M.; Kemp, A. D.

    Fecundity studies by indirect (Egg Ratio) and direct (bottle incubation) methods showed that egg production by Calanoides carinatus, downstream of a major upwelling centre, was closely coupled to hydrologically-mediated fluctuations in food availability. Fecundity estimates derived using the Egg Ratio method were lower than those from the incubation method, which we attribute to advection of egg-laden surface layers during upwelling. Improvements in understanding the fecundity-food relationship were achieved by considering phytoplankton size (cells >10 ?m), species composition and state of bloom development. Egg production was high (41.6 eggs female -1d -1) during a prolonged quiescent period while a monospecific bloom of Coscinodiscus gigas persisted, but it declined rapidly (5.4 eggs female -1d -1) on the bloom's senescence and its replacement by a surface microflagellate-dominated community. Resumption of egg production occurred with the advection of recently upwelled water supporting a healthy small diatom population. We suggest that the rapid response displayed by female C. carinatus to a pulsed and unpredictable food supply, combined with the capacity to store large lipid reserves, allows this species to successfully exploit upwelling regions.

  15. Modeling the spatial and temporal population dynamics of the copepod Centropages typicus in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea during the year 2001 using a 3D ecosystem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlotti, F.; Eisenhauer, L.; Campbell, R.; Diaz, F.

    2014-07-01

    The spatio-temporal dynamics of a simulated Centropages typicus (Kröyer) population during the year 2001 at the regional scale of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea are addressed using a 3D coupled physical-biogeochemical model. The setup of the coupled biological model comprises a pelagic plankton ecosystem model and a stage-structured population model forced by the 3D velocity and temperature fields provided by an eddy-resolving regional circulation model. The population model for C. typicus (C. t. below) represents demographic processes through five groups of developmental stages, which depend on underlying individual growth and development processes and are forced by both biotic (prey and predator fields) and abiotic (temperature, advection) factors from the coupled physical-biogeochemical model. The objective is to characterize C. t. ontogenic habitats driven by physical and trophic processes. The annual dynamics are presented for two of the main oceanographic stations in the Gulf of Lions, which are representative of shelf and open sea conditions, while the spatial distributions over the whole area are presented for three dates during the year, in early and late spring and in winter. The simulated spatial patterns of C. t. developmental stages are closely related to mesoscale hydrodynamic features and circulation patterns. The seasonal and spatial distributions on the Gulf of Lions shelf depend on the seasonal interplay between the Rhône river plume, the mesoscale eddies on the shelf and the Northern Current acting as either as a dynamic barrier between the shelf and the open sea or allowing cross-shelf exchanges. In the central gyre of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea, the patchiness of plankton is tightly linked to mesoscale frontal systems, surface eddies and filaments and deep gradients. Due to its flexibility in terms of its diet, C. t. succeeds in maintaining its population in both coastal and offshore areas year round. The simulations suggest that the winte-spring food conditions are more favorable on the shelf for C. t., whereas in late summer and fall, the offshore depth-integrated food biomasses represent a larger resource for C. t., particularly when mesoscale structures and vertical discontinuities increase food patchiness. The development and reproduction of C. t. depend on the prey field within the mesoscale structures that induce a contrasting spatial distribution of successive developmental stages on a given observation date. In late fall and winter, the results of the model suggest the existence of three refuge areas where the population maintains winter generations near the coast and within the Rhone River plume, or offshore within canyons within the shelf break, or in the frontal system related to the Northern Current. The simulated spatial and temporal distributions as well as the life cycle and physiological features of C. t. are discussed in light of recent reviews on the dynamics of C. t. in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea.

  16. MOLECULAR POPULATION STRUCTURE OF THE BENTHIC COPEPOD MICROARTHRIDION LITTORALE ALONG THE SOUTHEASTERN AND GULF COASTS OF THE UNITED STATES. (R825439)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  17. Louis Fortier Ann Villeneuve

    E-print Network

    7P4. Canada Cannibalism and predation on fish larvae by larvae of Atlantic mackerel, Scomber, the diet of mackerel larvae shifted from copepod nauplii to copep- ods and fish larvae. Mackerel selected strongly for copepod nauplii. Mackerel ~6 mm preyed indifferently on copepods li.e. in proportion

  18. Observational data on the effects of infection by the copepod Salmincola californiensis on the short- and long-term viability of juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) implanted with telemetry tags

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeman, John W.; Hansen, Amy C.; Sprando, Jamie M.

    2015-01-01

    Infection with Salmincola californiensis is common in juvenile Chinook salmon in western USA reservoirs and may affect the viability of fish used in studies of telemetered animals. Our limited assessment suggests infection by Salmincola californiensis affects the short-term morality of tagged fish and may affect long-term viability of tagged fish after release; however, the intensity of infection in the sample population did not represent the source population due to the observational nature of the data. We suggest these results warrant further study into the effects of infection bySalmincola californiensis on the results obtained through active telemetry and perhaps other methods requiring handling of infected fish.

  19. Dr. David Innes Outline of topics

    E-print Network

    Innes, David J.

    . Identify and quantify the biological processes involved: - migration and gene flow - random genetic drift levels of genetic differentiation for FW copepods and fish. Pond Daphnia ? Genetic differentiation among

  20. Tumor-like Anomalies in Lake Michigan Zooplankton Primary Investigator: Henry Vanderploeg -NOAA GLERL

    E-print Network

    have detected other protozoan parasites in copepods with and without TLA's that include an unidentified of several protozoan parasites, no one causative agent has been identified. Further investigation

  1. Response of zooplankton to improving water quality in the Scheldt estuary (Belgium)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mialet, B.; Gouzou, J.; Azémar, F.; Maris, T.; Sossou, C.; Toumi, N.; Van Damme, S.; Meire, P.; Tackx, M.

    2011-05-01

    Data obtained from 14 years of monthly samplings (1996-2009) were used to investigate the response of the crustacean zooplankton community to improving water quality in the Scheldt estuary. A strong reduction of poor water quality indicators, such as NH 4+ and BOD 5, as well as an increase in oxygen and in chlorophyll a concentrations were observed during the study period. During the study period, important changes were observed in the zooplankton community composition and spatial distribution. From 2007 onwards, most of the calanoid population, previously mainly found in the brackish water reach of the estuary, moved to the freshwater, where they reached higher abundances than previously observed. Simultaneously, cyclopoids populations strongly decreased in freshwater while cladocerans did not change their abundance, except during years with high chlorophyll a concentrations. Redundancy analyses (RDA) showed that the variability within the calanoid population can be explained by the improvement in water quality. Variability within the cyclopoids and cladoceran community is mainly explained by chlorinity and chlorophyll a concentrations. Their presence in the most polluted upstream area until 2007 suggests they are more tolerant to poor water quality than calanoids. Several hypotheses to explain the disappearance of cyclopoids after the move of calanoids to the freshwater are presented and discussed.

  2. DISTRIBUTION, SIZE, AND ABUNDANCE OF MICROCOPEPODS IN THE CALIFORNIA CURRENT SYSTEM AND THEIR POSSIBLE

    E-print Network

    system can be divided into onshore and offshore faunal zones by a copepod indicator species, Mecynocera the onshore as in the offshore zone. Feeding habits of larvae of sardines, anchovies, and jack mackerel may clausii. Near the outer edge ofthe onshore zone copepod nauplii densities were higher than usual

  3. Limnol. Oceanogr., 39(7), 1994, 1621-1629 Q 1994, by the American society of Limnology and Oceanography, Inc.

    E-print Network

    Hays, Graeme

    with carotenoid pigment levels but not with body morphology, with more heavily pigmented taxa exhibiting DVM but not with carotenoid pigment levels, with more elongate copepods not exhibiting DVM. Diel vertical migration (DVM). amplitude of DVM was greater in the copepod populations of lakes where there were plank- tivorous fish

  4. Ocean indicators Current knowledge and future directions

    E-print Network

    Larval fish biomass Salmon Survival ENSO Ocean Transport Copepod Biomass Coastal winds Sea Nettle Biomass Columbia River Flow Network Analysis ln(Sea Nettle biomass) Adultreturns #12;PDO SST Larval fish biomass Salmon Survival ENSO Ocean Transport Copepod Biomass Coastal winds Sea Nettle Biomass Columbia River Flow

  5. UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE I TbRIOR , STE\\ ART L . U ALL , ECRE RY Fish and Wildlife Ser vice , Clarenc F . P utz'c , Comml lonel

    E-print Network

    incorrectly identified as an infe tation by copepods , as sporozoan parasites , and as eggs of helminth the les ion fro m the more uniformly s ized copepods or eggs . The histologic picture is unmistakable (fig to water which contained emulsified lympho- cystis cells. MODE OF TRANSMISSION Infected host cells

  6. Life histories and abundance of crustacean zooplankton in the outlet of Lake Superior, 1971-72

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selgeby, James H.

    1975-01-01

    In sampling throughout a year, at about 3-wk intervals, of the crustacean zooplankton discharged from Lake Superior through the St. Marys River, 30 species were collected, including three not previously recorded for the lake: the copepod Cyclops strenuus, and the cladocerans Alona costata and Alonella acutirostris. Five copepods, Cyclops bicuspidatus thomasi, Diaptomus ashlandi, D. sicilis, Limnocalanus macrurus, and Senecella calanoides were present in the plankton throughout the year while three other copepods, Diaptomus minutus, Epischura lacustris, and Mesocyclops edax, along with all cladocerans, were present only during summer and fall. Five species of copepods, Diaptomus sicilis, D. minutus, Limnocalanus macrurus, Senecella calanoides, and Epischura lacustris produced a single generation annually; three other copepods and all cladocerans produced two or more generations. All species breed 1-3 mo later in Lake Superior than in lakes Michigan and Erie.

  7. Marine microalgae attack and feed on metazoans.

    PubMed

    Berge, Terje; Poulsen, Louise K; Moldrup, Morten; Daugbjerg, Niels; Juel Hansen, Per

    2012-10-01

    Free-living microalgae from the dinoflagellate genus Karlodinium are known to form massive blooms in eutrophic coastal waters worldwide and are often associated with fish kills. Natural bloom populations, recently shown to consist of the two mixotrophic and toxic species Karlodinium armiger and Karlodinium veneficum have caused fast paralysis and mortality of finfish and copepods in the laboratory, and have been associated with reduced metazooplankton biomass in-situ. Here we show that a strain of K. armiger (K-0688) immobilises the common marine copepod Acartia tonsa in a density-dependent manner and collectively ingests the grazer to promote its own growth rate. In contrast, four strains of K. veneficum did not attack or affect the motility and survival of the copepods. Copepod immobilisation by the K. armiger strain was fast (within 15 min) and caused by attacks of swarming cells, likely through the transfer and action of a highly potent but uncharacterised neurotoxin. The copepods grazed and reproduced on a diet of K. armiger at densities below 1000, cells ml(-1), but above 3500 cells ml(-1) the mixotrophic dinoflagellates immobilised, fed on and killed the copepods. Switching the trophic role of the microalgae from prey to predator of copepods couples population growth to reduced grazing pressure, promoting the persistence of blooms at high densities. K. armiger also fed on three other metazoan organisms offered, suggesting that active predation by mixotrophic dinoflagellates may be directly involved in causing mortalities at several trophic levels in the marine food web. PMID:22513533

  8. Marine microalgae attack and feed on metazoans

    PubMed Central

    Berge, Terje; Poulsen, Louise K; Moldrup, Morten; Daugbjerg, Niels; Juel Hansen, Per

    2012-01-01

    Free-living microalgae from the dinoflagellate genus Karlodinium are known to form massive blooms in eutrophic coastal waters worldwide and are often associated with fish kills. Natural bloom populations, recently shown to consist of the two mixotrophic and toxic species Karlodinium armiger and Karlodinium veneficum have caused fast paralysis and mortality of finfish and copepods in the laboratory, and have been associated with reduced metazooplankton biomass in-situ. Here we show that a strain of K. armiger (K-0688) immobilises the common marine copepod Acartia tonsa in a density-dependent manner and collectively ingests the grazer to promote its own growth rate. In contrast, four strains of K. veneficum did not attack or affect the motility and survival of the copepods. Copepod immobilisation by the K. armiger strain was fast (within 15?min) and caused by attacks of swarming cells, likely through the transfer and action of a highly potent but uncharacterised neurotoxin. The copepods grazed and reproduced on a diet of K. armiger at densities below 1000, cells ml?1, but above 3500 cells ml?1 the mixotrophic dinoflagellates immobilised, fed on and killed the copepods. Switching the trophic role of the microalgae from prey to predator of copepods couples population growth to reduced grazing pressure, promoting the persistence of blooms at high densities. K. armiger also fed on three other metazoan organisms offered, suggesting that active predation by mixotrophic dinoflagellates may be directly involved in causing mortalities at several trophic levels in the marine food web. PMID:22513533

  9. Trophic transfer of sediment-associated polychlorinated biphenyls from meiobenthos to bottom-feeding fish

    SciTech Connect

    DiPinto, L.M.; Coull, B.C.

    1997-12-01

    Experiments were conducted to examine the dynamics of the sediment-associated polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) using a benthic-based trophic transfer model (sediments to benthic copepods to juvenile fish). Field-collected benthic copepods were exposed to sublethal levels of PCB in sediments for 96 h. Accumulation of PCB was measured in the copepods, and these contaminated copepods were fed to the juvenile fish predator Leiostomus xanthurus in uncontaminated sediments. After gut clearance, whole fish were homogenized and examined for PCB accumulation. Similar experiments with L. xanthurus in which meals of uncontaminated copepods were fed in PCB-contaminated sediments were conducted to determine the relative roles of contaminated sediments and contaminated copepod prey ingestion to PCB transfer. Total PCB transfer as well as PCB congener group contributions were examined. A total of 30 congeners were grouped according to log K{sub ow} increments and according to chlorine homologue groups. Copepods exposed to PCB-contaminated sediments to 90 {micro}g/g accumulated PCBs to 326 {micro}g/g dry weight. Accumulation of PCB in fish feeding in contaminated sediments was five times higher than that in fish feeding on contaminated prey in uncontaminated sediments (p = 0.0498). In terms of congener patterns, log K{sub ow} grouping provided clearer discrimination between groups. Congener patterns were similar in PCB stock solution, sediments, and copepods and were different in the two fish treatments. K{sub ow} group relative accumulation patterns in fish were mixed. The chlorine homologue groups revealed that the fish preferentially accumulated the tetrachlorinated congeners relative to copepods and sediments.

  10. Life history of Coelomomyces psorophorae.

    PubMed Central

    Whisler, H C; Zebold, S L; Shemanchuk, J A

    1975-01-01

    The mosquito parasite, Coelomomyces psorophorae (Blastocladiales, Chytridiomycetes) alternates obligately between the larvae of Culiseta inornata and the copepod Cyclops vernalis. Isogametes, derived from heterothallic, wall-less gametangia which develop in the copepod, fuse to produce a diploid zygote that subsequently infects the mosquito host. Zoospores from the resistant sporangia which are produced in the haemocoel of the mosquito infect the copepod. A tentative life-history is proposed and implications of these discoveries for the biology, taxonomy, and possible role of Coelomomyces in biological control are discussed. Images PMID:235761

  11. Experimental records of the effect of food patchiness and predation on egg production of Acartia tonsa

    SciTech Connect

    Saiz, E.; Tiselius, P.; Verity, P.; Paffehofer, G.A. ); Jonsson, P.R. )

    1993-03-01

    The effects of predation and spatial patchiness in food distribution on egg production of the marine calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa were investigated in the laboratory. A postexperiment egg production method was developed to override the decline in number of copepods due to predation. The copepods were able to remain in food patches about 41-47% of the time, and consequently egg production rates were higher than expected from the average food concentration. Predation by the calanoid copepod Labidocera aestiva tended to increase egg production rates of A. tonsa. The interaction of patchiness and predation resulted in relatively less time spent by A. tonsa in the food patches, probably as a consequence of conflict between hunger level and predation risk. 40 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Zooplankton functional groups on the continental shelf of the yellow sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Song; Huo, Yuanzi; Yang, Bo

    2010-06-01

    Zooplankton plays a vital role in marine ecosystems. Variations in the zooplankton species composition, biomass, and secondary production will change the structure and function of the ecosystem. How to describe this process and make it easier to be modeled in the Yellow Sea ecosystem is the main purpose of this paper. The zooplankton functional groups approach, which is considered a good method of linking the structure of food webs and the energy flow in the ecosystems, is used to describe the main contributors of secondary produciton of the Yellow Sea ecosystem. The zooplankton can be classified into six functional groups: giant crustaceans, large copepods, small copepods, chaetognaths, medusae, and salps. The giant crustaceans, large copepods, and small copepods groups, which are the main food resources for fish, are defined depending on the size spectrum. Medusae and chaetognaths are the two gelatinous carnivorous groups, which compete with fish for food. The salps group, acting as passive filter-feeders, competes with other species feeding on phytoplankton, but their energy could not be efficiently transferred to higher trophic levels. From the viewpoint of biomass, which is the basis of the food web, and feeding activities, the contributions of each functional group to the ecosystem were evaluated; the seasonal variations, geographical distribution patterns, and species composition of each functional group were analyzed. The average zooplankton biomass was 2.1 g dry wt m -2 in spring, to which the giant crustaceans, large copepods, and small copepods contributed 19, 44, and 26%, respectively. High biomasses of the large copepods and small copepods were distributed at the coastal waters, while the giant crustaceans were mainly located at offshore area. In summer, the mean biomass was 3.1 g dry wt m -2, which was mostly contributed by the giant crustaceans (73%), and high biomasses of the giant crustaceans, large copepods, and small copepods were all distributed in the central part of the Yellow Sea. During autumn, the mean biomass was 1.8 g dry wt m -2, which was similarly constituted by the giant crustaceans, large copepods, and small copepods (36, 33, and 23%, respectively), and high biomasses of the giant crustaceans and large copepods occurred in the central part of the Yellow Sea, while the small copepods were mainly located at offshore stations. The giant crustaceans and large copepods dominated the zooplankton biomass (2.9 g dry wt m -2) in winter, contributing respectively 57 and 27%, and they, as well as the small copepods, were all mainly located in the central part of the Yellow Sea. The chaetognaths group was mainly located in the northern part of the Yellow Sea during all seasons, but contributed less to the biomass compared with the other groups. The medusae and salps groups were distributed unevenly, with sporadic dynamics, mainly along the coastline and at the northern part of the Yellow Sea. No more than 10 species belonging to the respective functional groups dominated the zooplankton biomass and controlled the dynamics of the zooplankton community. The clear picture of the seasonal and spatial variations of each zooplankton functional group makes the complicated Yellow Sea ecosystem easier to be understood and modeled.

  13. The life cycle of Cyclops bicuspidatus thomasi S. A. Forbes in Leavenworth County State Lake, Kansas, U.S.A. (Copepoda)

    E-print Network

    Armitage, Kenneth

    1967-01-01

    collected from Woods Reservoir, Tennessee, concluded that C. b. thomasi is a cold water copepod that appears in winter and early spring collections and disappears before mid May. The aestival season is spent as diapausing stage IV copepodids (Yeatman...

  14. Evaluation of the zooplankton community of Livingston Reservoir, Texas, as related to paddlefish food resources 

    E-print Network

    Moore, Casey Kenneth

    1993-01-01

    abundances near the Trinity River inflow and Livingston dam. Zooplankton were evenly distributed among the openwater and backwater stations. Cladocerans and copepods exhibited strong diel vertical migrations. A bioenergetics model was developed to predict...

  15. UNH Center for Freshwater Biology Research 1 (4): 45-56 (1999) Microcystins in components of twelve New Hampshire lakes

    E-print Network

    New Hampshire, University of

    1999-01-01

    ) and omnivorous copepod components of the zooplankton were separated and assayed independently for MCs and water supplies in monitoring programs for MCs to ensure the safety of animals and humans utilizing them

  16. Selective oviposition by Aedes aegypti (Diptera: culicidae) in response to Mesocyclops longisetus (Copepoda: Cyclopoidea) under laboratory and field conditions.

    PubMed

    Torres-Estrada, J L; Rodríguez, M H; Cruz-López, L; Arredondo-Jimenez, J I

    2001-03-01

    The influence of predacious Mesocyclops longisetus Thiebaud on the selection of oviposition sites by prey Aedes aegypti (L.) was studied under laboratory and field conditions. In both cases, gravid Ae. aegypti females were significantly more attracted to ovitraps containing copepods or to ovitraps with water in which copepods were held previously than to distilled water. Monoterpene and sesquiterpene compounds including 3-carene, alpha-terpinene, alpha-copaene, alpha-longipinene, alpha-cedrene, and delta-cadinene were found in hexane extracts of copepods by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry analyses. These compounds may be responsible for attracting gravid Ae. aegypti females and may increase the number of potential prey for the copepod. PMID:11296821

  17. ORIGINAL PAPER Characterizing dietary variability and trophic positions of coastal

    E-print Network

    Mazumder, Asit

    Springer-Verlag 2008 Abstract The spring zooplankton community in the Strait of Georgia (British Columbia copepods have den- sely-packed setose mouth parts better suited for crushing diatoms. Omnivores have

  18. [The family Pontellidae (Crustacea: Copepoda) in la Ventosa Bay, Oaxaca, México: systematies and basic ecology].

    PubMed

    Alvarez Silva, Carlos; Miranda Arce, María Guadalupe; De Lara-Isassi, Graciela

    2003-01-01

    A study on ecological records of planktonic copepods from The Ventosa Bay, Oaxaca, Mexico is presented. Five species were identified: Labidocera acuta, L. lubbockii, Pontella agassizi, P. tenuiremis and Pontellina plumata. The most abundant species was L. acuta and their copepodite stages conforming the 95.7% of Pontellids, followed by L. lubbockii 4.09%; other species were less than one percent. The reproductive success of L. acuta is probably favored by its resistance to the changes in temperature and salinity, because of it is an eurytherme and euryhaline organism. Total density of this family was between 18 and 472 copepods/100 m3 in 1987 and 1988. Nevertheless in 1992 and 1993 the density was between 490 to 123,030 copepods/100 m3. This copepod density increment could be related local phenomenon (upwelling) at the beginning and end of the year. PMID:15162779

  19. ICES Annual Science Conference September 19-24, 2005

    E-print Network

    North, Elizabeth W.

    , swordfish, tuna), to crustaceans (e.g., copepods, lobsters, snow crab), to molluscs (e.g., squid, oysters artefacts may create artificial patterns in results, further developments of these techniques

  20. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-print Network

    Hartline, Daniel K.

    ), vertical migration (Russell 1927, Zaret & Suffern 1976), bioluminescence (Young 1983, Herring 1988 for these migrations (For- ward 1976, Angel 1985). Bioluminescence seems to be most common among copepods that inhabit

  1. Freshwater Community Responses to Mixtures of Agricultural Pesticides: Synergistic Effects of Atrazine and Bifenthrin 

    E-print Network

    Hoagland, Kyle D.; Drenner, Ray W.

    1991-01-01

    , chlorophyll, green colonies, Bosmina, rotifers, and particulate phosphorus (>200 um and 20-200 um) on day 7. Bifenthrin had a negative impact on Bosmina, copepod nauplii, rotifers, primary productivity, chlorophyll, green colonies, and all particulate...

  2. Joseph Kane National Marine Fisheries Service. NOM

    E-print Network

    85 Joseph Kane National Marine Fisheries Service. NOM 28 Tarzwell Drive. Narragansett, Rhode Island; Grant, 1988; Kane, 1993), No description of the monthly distribution ofthe copepod in this region has

  3. Impacts of fish predation on an Ohio River zooplankton community

    E-print Network

    Thorp, James H.

    2002-01-01

    , however, for few female copepods we examined were carrying eggs. Also, the relatively short time-frame of this experiment would limit a numerical response by the copepods, even though the high river water temperatures at this time (Table I) would have...). The relationship between zooplankton biomass and water residence time has been recently examined in rivers of various sizes. In a comparison of 31 north temperate rivers, Basu and Pick (Basu and Pick, 1996) found that zooplankton biomass was directly proportional...

  4. Measurements of Complex Oceanic Flows, from Turbulence in the Coastal Ocean to Interaction of Zooplankton with its Local Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, J.

    2004-03-01

    The presentation has two parts, both dealing with flow structure, turbulence and flow-particle interactions in the ocean. The first part examines PIV data obtained in the bottom boundary layer of the coastal ocean in periods when the mean currents are higher, of the same order and weaker than the wave induced motions. The energy spectra display substantial anisotropy at all scales, and the flow consists of periods of "gusts" dominated by large vortical structures, separated by periods of quiescent flows. The frequency of these gusts increases with Reynolds number, and they disappear when the currents are weak. Conditional sampling shows that the Reynolds shear stress, and as a result the shear production, are generated only during periods of gusts. When the mean flow is weak and during quiescent periods of moderate flow the shear stresses are essentially zero. Dissipation, on the other hand, occurs continuously, and increases only slightly during gust periods. The second part focuses on interactions of zooplankton with the local flow. Digital in-line holographic cinematography is used for measuring the three-dimensional trajectory of a free-swimming copepod, and simultaneously the instantaneous 3-D velocity field around this copepod. The velocity field and trajectory of particles entrained by the copepod have a recirculating pattern in the copepod's frame of reference. This pattern is caused by the copepod sinking at a rate that is lower than its terminal sinking speed, due to the propulsive force generated by its feeding current. Consequently, the copepod has to hop periodically to scan different fluid for food. Using Stokeslets to model the velocity field, the measured velocity distributions enable us to estimate the excess weight of the copepod and the propulsive force generated by its feeding appendages. Sponsored in part by the Office of Naval Research and by the National Science Foundation.

  5. UV-induced DNA damage in Cyclops abyssorum tatricus populations from clear and turbid alpine lakes

    PubMed Central

    Tartarotti, Barbara; Saul, Nadine; Chakrabarti, Shumon; Trattner, Florian; Steinberg, Christian E. W.; Sommaruga, Ruben

    2014-01-01

    Zooplankton from clear alpine lakes thrive under high levels of solar UV radiation (UVR), but in glacially turbid ones they are more protected from this damaging radiation. Here, we present results from experiments done with Cyclops abyssorum tatricus to assess UV-induced DNA damage and repair processes using the comet assay. Copepods were collected from three alpine lakes of differing UV transparency ranging from clear to glacially turbid, and exposed to artificial UVR. In addition, photoprotection levels [mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) and lipophilic antioxidant capacity] were estimated in the test populations. Similar UV-induced DNA damage levels were observed among the copepods from all lakes, but background DNA damage (time zero and dark controls) was lowest in the copepods from the glacially turbid lake, resulting in a higher relative DNA damage accumulation. Most DNA strand breaks were repaired after recovery in the dark. Low MAA concentrations were found in the copepods from the glacially turbid lake, while the highest levels were observed in the population from the most UV transparent lake. However, the highest lipophilic antioxidant capacities were measured in the copepods from the lake with intermediate UV transparency. Photoprotection and the ability to repair DNA damage, and consequently reducing UV-induced damage, are part of the response mechanisms in zooplankton to changes in water transparency caused by glacier retreat. PMID:24616551

  6. Impact of extreme climate and bioinvasion on temporal coupling of spring herring (Clupea harengus m.) larvae and their prey.

    PubMed

    Arula, T; Ojaveer, H; Klais, R

    2014-12-01

    We used weekly observational data from mid-May to end of July in 1958-2012 in Gulf of Riga to investigate temporal coupling between spring herring larvae and their first prey - copepod nauplii, under the extreme hydroclimatic conditions. We focused on a small shallow estuary that is important nursery ground for larvae of the Gulf of Riga (Baltic Sea) herring population. We quantified the effect of extreme values of the winter air temperatures, time of ice retreat and spring water temperatures on the timing of peak abundance of herring larvae and copepod nauplii. We also assessed whether the invasion of the non-native cladoceran Cercopagis pengoi had notable effect on timing and abundance of copepod nauplii during the peak occurrence of herring larvae. In the years of earliest ice retreat the peak abundance of herring larvae was five weeks earlier than in the years of latest ice retreat, while the timing of nauplii remained unchanged. Abundant presence of the C. pengoi affected neither timing nor maximum abundance of copepod nauplii during the herring larvae first feeding period. Thus, we conclude that processes induced by climate variability are superior to invasion of C. pengoi in determining the timing and coupling of larval herring and copepod nauplii. PMID:24933435

  7. Host-parasite relationships and geographic distribution of Salmincola corpulentus (Copepoda: Lernaeopodidae) on bloater (Coregonus hoyi) stocks in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowen, Charles A.; Stedman, Ralph M.

    1990-01-01

    Examination of the branchial cavities of 8347 adult bloaters (Coregonus hoyi) collected from seven locations in Lake Huron for parasitic copepods yielded only the lernaeopodid Salmincola corpulentus; its distribution was limited to bloaters collected in the southern two-thirds of the lake. The infections were highest off Au Sable Point and on Six Fathom Bank, where 12 and 22%, of the bloaters examined were infected, respectively. All copepods seen were sexually mature females. The dorsal anterior portion of the branchial rim was the preferred site of attachment. The prevalence of S. corpulentus increased with the length of the bloaters, reaching a maximum of 40% in fish longer than 330 mm; none were seen in bloaters shorter than 182 mm. The mean intensity of S. corpulentus was unusually low (1.0-1.9) for a lernaeopodid copepod and the maximum number of copepods found on a single bloater was five. Prevalences of copepods differed significantly (P<0.05) between bloaters collected at different geographic locations, suggesting that S. corpulentus may be of value in bloater stock determination.

  8. Distribution, abundance, and predation effects of epipelagic ctenophores and jellyfish in the western Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purcell, Jennifer E.; Hopcroft, Russell R.; Kosobokova, Ksenia N.; Whitledge, Terry E.

    2010-01-01

    The Arctic Ocean is undergoing changes at an unprecedented rate because of global climate change. Especially poorly-studied in arctic waters are the gelatinous zooplankton, which are difficult to study using traditional oceanographic methods. A distinct zooplanktivore community was characterized in the surface 100 m by use of a Remotely Operated Vehicle, net collections, and SCUBA diving. The large scyphomedusa, Chrysaora melanaster, was associated with the warm Pacific water at ˜35-75 m depth. A diverse ctenophore community lived mainly above the C. melanaster layer, including Dryodora glandula, a specialized predator of larvaceans, Beroe cucumis, a predator of other ctenophores, and the extremely fragile Bolinopsis infundibulum, which was the most abundant species. Gut content analyses showed that Mertensia ovum selectively consumed the largest copepods ( Calanus spp.) and amphipods ( Parathemisto libellula); B. infundibulum consumed smaller copepods and pteropods ( Limacina helicina). Large copepods were digested by M. ovum in ˜12 h at -1.5 to 0 °C, but by B. infundibulum in only ˜4 h. We estimated that M. ovum consumed an average of ˜2% d -1 of the Calanus spp. copepods and that B. infundibulum consumed ˜4% d -1 of copepods <3 mm prosome length. These are significant consumption rates given that Calanus spp. have life-cycles of 2 or more years and are eaten by vertebrates including bowhead whales and arctic cod.

  9. Cryptofauna of the epilithic algal matrix on an inshore coral reef, Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, M. J.; Bellwood, D. R.; Bellwood, O.

    2012-12-01

    Composed of a collection of algae, detritus, sediment and invertebrates, the epilithic algal matrix (EAM) is an abundant and ubiquitous feature of coral reefs. Despite its prevalence, there is a paucity of information regarding its associated invertebrate fauna. The cryptofaunal invertebrate community of the EAM was quantitatively investigated in Pioneer Bay on Orpheus Island, Great Barrier Reef. Using a vacuum collection method, a diversity of organisms representing 10 different phyla were identified. Crustacea dominated the samples, with harpacticoid copepods being particularly abundant (2025 ± 132 100 cm-2; mean density ± SE). The volume of coarse particulate matter in the EAM was strongly correlated with the abundance of harpacticoid copepods. The estimated biomass of harpacticoid copepods (0.48 ± 0.05 g m-2; wet weight) suggests that this group is likely to be important for reef trophodynamics and nutrient cycling.

  10. Historical biogeography of the neotropical Diaptomidae (Crustacea: Copepoda)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Diaptomid copepods are prevalent throughout continental waters of the Neotropics, yet little is known about their biogeography. In this study we investigate the main biogeographical patterns among the neotropical freshwater diaptomid copepods using Parsimony Analysis of Endemicity (PAE) based on species records within ecoregions. In addition, we assess potential environmental correlates and limits for species richness. Results PAE was efficient in identifying general areas of endemism. Moreover, only ecoregion area showed a significant correlation with diaptomid species richness, although climatic factors were shown to provide possible upper limits to the species richness in a given ecoregion. Conclusion The main patterns of endemism in neotropical freshwater diaptomid copepods are highly congruent with other freshwater taxa, suggesting a strong historical signal in determining the distribution of the family in the Neotropics. PMID:25057279

  11. In situ detrimental impacts of Prorocentrum donghaiense blooms on zooplankton in the East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-Ning; Yan, Tian; Zhang, Qing-Chun; Wang, Yun-Feng; Liu, Qing; Zhou, Ming-Jiang

    2014-11-15

    Large-scale algal blooms of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum donghaiense have occurred frequently in the East China Sea (ECS) in recent decades. However, its impacts on the zooplankton in situ are still under not well understood. During a spring P. donghaiense bloom (April-May 2013) along the northern coast of Fujian Province (120°-121°30?E, 26°30?-28°N), we found that the bloom decreased the abundance of copepods and had no significant effect on chaetognaths and small jellyfish. However, the abundance of small jellyfish increased over the course of the study. The zooplankton community changed from being copepod and small jellyfish- to small jellyfish-dominated during the bloom. In the bloom areas, the copepod Calanus sinicus showed higher mortality and lower egg production rates (EPR) than those in the non-bloom areas. The results suggested that P. donghaiense blooms had detrimental effects on the structure of zooplankton community and the recruitments of C. sinicus. PMID:25242234

  12. Predation on Pseudodiaptomus annandalei (Copepoda: Calanoida) by the grouper fish larvae Epinephelus coioides under different hydrodynamic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. H.; Dahms, H. U.; Cheng, S. H.; Souissi, S.; Schmitt, F. G.; Kumar, R.; Hwang, J. S.

    2009-04-01

    The copepod Pseudodiaptomus annandalei perceived larval grouper Epinephelus coioides predators and exhibited escape reactions mediated by physical and/or chemical signals but not by visual perception. Under illumination, prey capture rates were significantly higher under moderate turbulence (747 ±104, n=3) than in the controls (calm water) (597±76, n=3) (p<0.01 Mann Whitney U test). The maximum darting speed of copepod in response to fish larvae under calm water was significantly higher (one way ANOVA P<0.05, Fig. 5) than that under either turbulent or enhanced flow condition, indicating that copepopd's ability to escape from predators was higher under calm water than either under turbulent water conditions or enhanced flow. The maximum number of copepods eaten by the fish larvae increased more under slow and medium hydrodynamic conditions than that under either calm or under high speed hydrodynamic conditions. Key words: Predator-prey relation; Behavior; Hydrodynamic disturbance; Diurnal changes; Predator avoidance; Predation efficiency

  13. Spatial variability in zooplankton abundance near feeding right whales in the Great South Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beardsley, Robert C.; Epstein, Ari W.; Chen, Changsheng; Wishner, Karen F.; Macaulay, Michael C.; Kenney, Robert D.

    On 3 June 1989, during SCOPEX'89, two right whales were observed to be feeding close to the surface at separate sites in the Great South Channel of the Gulf of Maine. The R.V. Marlin deployed and monitored a radio tag on one whale, and underway measurements were made near each whale from the R.V. Endeavor to investigate the small-scale spatial structure of water properties and zooplankton abundance in the upper water column near the whales. These measurements included two CTD tow-yos, zooplankton sampling with a MOCNESS, continuous vertical profiling of currents with a 150-kHz ADCP, and continuous vertical profiling of zooplankton concentration with a towed acoustic profiler operating at 120 and 200 kHz. The whales were feeding on a relatively homogeneous mixture of primarily two stages (copepodite IV and V) of a single copepod species ( Calanus finmarchicus), which was most abundant in the upper 10-20 m of the water column above the seasonal pycnocline. Descriptions of the spatial structure of copepod abundance in patches traversed by the whales were developed based on MOCNESS samples, acoustic backscatter, and light transmission. In particular, a high correlation was found between MOCNESS biomass measurements and certain 200-kHz acoustic biomass estimates, which enabled the acoustic data to be interpreted solely in terms of copepod abundance. Acoustic measurements made in a copepod patch while closely following one whale indicated mean and peak copepod biomasses of 6.0 and 28.4 g m -3 (corresponding to mean and peak concentrations of 8.7 × 10 3 and 4.1 × 10 4) copepods m -3 in the 4-10 m depth band, where the whale was probably feeding. With a mean energy content of 10 -3 kcal copepod -1, that whale's mean energy intake rate was 3.8 × 10 4 kcal h -1. The whale was observed to reverse course and turn back into the patch when it swam into a region of lower copepod abundance, with biomass less than roughly 1-3 g m -3 or 1.5-4.5 × 10 3 copepods m -3. This concentration is consistent with independent estimates of the minimum prey concentration required for a right whale to regain the energy it expends when it feeds. The next morning, one of the whales was found to be skim-feeding on a Calanus finmarchicus patch in which a bucket sample gave a copepod biomass of 256 g m -3 or 3.3 × 10 5 copepods m -3. If this one sample approximated the mean abundance of the patch, then the whale had a mean energy intake of 1.4 × 10 5 kcal h -1. At this rate, it could consume its daily basal metabolic energy requirement in roughly 9 min, and its annual requirement in roughly two days (assuming continuous feeding at a mean speed of 1.2 m s -1 as determined from the ADCP measurements). Although physical advection on regional and smaller scales appears to be an important element in the processes that cause such dense patches to form in this region during late spring, the lack of a clear linkage between the small-scale physical and biological data reported here suggest that some nonphysical, species-specific animal behavior like swarming must be partially responsible for creating the very densest copepod patches observed during SCOPEX'89.

  14. Concentrations of viable oil-degrading microorganisms are increased in feces from Calanus finmarchicus feeding in petroleum oil dispersions.

    PubMed

    Størdal, Ingvild Fladvad; Olsen, Anders Johny; Jenssen, Bjørn Munro; Netzer, Roman; Hansen, Bjørn Henrik; Altin, Dag; Brakstad, Odd Gunnar

    2015-09-15

    Zooplankton are suggested to be biotic contributors to the transport and weathering of oil in marine environments due to their ingestion of oil. In the present experiment, feeding activity and microbial communities in feces from Calanus finmarchicus feeding in oil dispersions were characterized. Feeding activity was significantly reduced in oil dispersions. The microbial communities in clean and oil-containing copepod feces were dominated by Rhodobacteraceae family bacteria (Lesingera, Phaeobacter, Rugeria, and Sulfitobacter), which were suggested to be indigenous to copepod feces. The results also indicated that these bacteria were metabolizing oil compounds, as a significant increase in the concentrations of viable oil degrading microorganisms was observed in oil-containing feces. This study shows that bacteria in feces from copepods feeding in dilute oil dispersions have capacity for degradation of oil. Zooplankton may therefore contribute to weathering of oil by excreting feces with microbial communities already adapted to degradation of oil. PMID:26164782

  15. Stealth predation and the predatory success of the invasive ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi.

    PubMed

    Colin, Sean P; Costello, John H; Hansson, Lars J; Titelman, Josefin; Dabiri, John O

    2010-10-01

    In contrast to higher metazoans such as copepods and fish, ctenophores are a basal metazoan lineage possessing a relatively narrow set of sensory-motor capabilities. Yet lobate ctenophores can capture prey at rates comparable to sophisticated predatory copepods and fish, and they are capable of altering the composition of coastal planktonic communities. Here, we demonstrate that the predatory success of the lobate ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi lies in its use of cilia to generate a feeding current that continuously entrains large volumes of fluid, yet is virtually undetectable to its prey. This form of stealth predation enables M. leidyi to feed as a generalist predator capturing prey, including microplankton (approximately 50 ?m), copepods (approximately 1 mm), and fish larvae (>3 mm). The efficacy and versatility of this stealth feeding mechanism has enabled M. leidyi to be notoriously destructive as a predator and successful as an invasive species. PMID:20855619

  16. The seasonal succession of zooplankton in the Southern Ocean south of Australia, part II: The Sub-Antarctic to Polar Frontal Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Brian P. V.; Hosie, Graham W.

    2006-07-01

    Between October 2001 and March 2002 six transects were completed at monthly intervals in the Sub-Antarctic Zone (SAZ) and Inter-Sub-Antarctic Front Zone (ISAFZ)/Polar Frontal Zone (PFZ) in the Southern Ocean south of Australia. Zooplankton were collected with a Continuous Plankton Recorder and NORPAC net and multivariate analysis was used to analyse the seasonal succession of communities. Despite strong, seasonally consistent, biogeographic differences between the SAZ and ISAFZ/PFZ, community structure in all zones was dominated by a suite of common taxa. These included the ubiquitous Oithona similis, foraminiferans and appendicularians (Core taxa), occurring in >97% of samples and contributing an average of 75% to total sample abundance, and Calanus simillimus, Rhincalanus gigas, Ctenocalanus citer, Clausocalanus brevipes, Clausocalanus laticeps, Oithona frigida, Limacina spp. and chaetognaths (Summer taxa), present in >57% of samples and occurring at seasonally high densities. Because of the dominance of the Core and Summer taxa, the seasonal succession was most clearly evident as a change in zooplankton densities. In October densities averaged <15 ind m -3, rising to 52 ind m -3 (max=92 ind m -3) in November, and subsequently increasing slowly through to January (ave=115 ind m -3; max=255 ind m -3). Densities peaked abruptly in February (ave=634 ind m -3; max=1593 ind m -3), and remained relatively high in March (ave=193 ind m -3; max=789 ind m -3). A latitudinal lag in seasonal development was observed with peak densities occurring first in the SAZ (February) and then in the ISAFZ/PFZ (March). The seasonal community succession was strongly influenced by species population cycles. The role of zooplankton in biogeochemical cycling in the SAZ and ISAFZ/PFZ was discussed in the light of past sediment trap data collected from the study area.

  17. Influences of diurnal sampling bias on fixed-point monitoring of plankton biodiversity determined using a massively parallel sequencing-based technique.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Satoshi; Hida, Kohsuke; Urushizaki, Shingo; Onitsuka, Goh; Yasuike, Motoshige; Nakamura, Yoji; Fujiwara, Atushi; Tajimi, Seisuke; Kimoto, Katsunori; Kobayashi, Takanori; Gojobori, Takashi; Ototake, Mitsuru

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of diurnal sampling bias on the community structure of plankton by comparing the biodiversity among seawater samples (n=9) obtained every 3h for 24h by using massively parallel sequencing (MPS)-based plankton monitoring at a fixed point conducted at Himedo seaport in Yatsushiro Sea, Japan. The number of raw operational taxonomy units (OTUs) and OTUs after re-sampling was 507-658 (558±104, mean±standard deviation) and 448-544 (467±81), respectively, indicating high plankton biodiversity at the sampling location. The relative abundance of the top 20 OTUs in the samples from Himedo seaport was 48.8-67.7% (58.0±5.8%), and the highest-ranked OTU was Pseudo-nitzschia species (Bacillariophyta) with a relative abundance of 17.3-39.2%, followed by Oithona sp. 1 and Oithona sp. 2 (Arthropoda). During seawater sampling, the semidiurnal tidal current having an amplitude of 0.3ms(-1) was dominant, and the westward residual current driven by the northeasterly wind was continuously observed during the 24-h monitoring. Therefore, the relative abundance of plankton species apparently fluctuated among the samples, but no significant difference was noted according to G-test (p>0.05). Significant differences were observed between the samples obtained from a different locality (Kusuura in Yatsushiro Sea) and at different dates, suggesting that the influence of diurnal sampling bias on plankton diversity, determined using the MPS-based survey, was not significant and acceptable. PMID:26475937

  18. Diet composition and feeding activity of larval spring-spawning herring: Importance of environmental variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arula, T.; Kotta, J.; Lankov, A.; Simm, M.; Põlme, S.

    2012-02-01

    Availability of suitable prey in sufficient quantities during the shift to exogenous feeding is an important factor determining survival and growth of larval fish. The question of what factors regulate prey consumption in larval fish has remained a focus of fisheries oceanography. In this paper feeding ecology of the larval spring-spawning herring Clupea harengus membras was studied in relation to selected environmental abiotic and biotic parameters in the shallow sheltered Pärnu Bay during the 1970s and 2000s. The copepod Eurytemora affinis was the strongly dominating dietary item during all the years while other prey items were ingested only sporadically. Feeding activity of herring larvae was governed by different environmental variables and the relationships varied amongst the size classes of herring larvae. The studied abiotic (i.e., wind speed, water temperature, water transparency) or biotic variables (i.e., density of copepod nauplii, copepodite stages I-V and adults of E. affinis, mean developmental stage of copepods and density of fish larvae) had no significant effects on the feeding activity of small larvae. The feeding activity of medium larvae was only affected by water transparency and that of large larvae by a combination of water temperature, wind speed and the structure of local copepod community, respectively. On the other hand, the diet composition of all herring larvae was best described by the density of copepod nauplii. In addition, the density of fish larvae improved the model of small larvae and the density of adult copepods that of medium larvae, respectively. Time was significant for the feeding activity of medium larvae indicating some unexplained variability that was not taken into account by the studied abiotic and biotic variables.

  19. The trophic significance of Phaeocystis blooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisse, T.; Tande, K.; Verity, P.; Hansen, F.; Gieskes, W.

    1994-04-01

    Both colonies and solitary cells of the prymnesiophyte Phaeocystis are ingested by a wide array of marine vertebrates. Grazers include protozoa, bivalves, amphipods, euphausiids and many copepod species. Common fish species such as mackerel ( Scomber scombrus) and flounder ( Pleuronectus flesus) have also been reported to feed upon Phaeocystis. While qualitative observations on the potential trophic significance of Phaeocystis exist for a long time, attempts to quantify feeding rates on Phaeocystis have begun only during the last decade. In feeding experiments, copepods have received most attention. Many copepod species appear to consume Phaeocystis colonies and solitary cells in the North Atlantic and in polar seas. Ingestion rates are highly variable depending on size and physiological state of Phaeocystis as well as on copepod species. Within the same species, large variations in individual feeding rates have been reported from different areas and investigators. When Phaeocystis co-occurs with larger amounts of diatoms, the latter seem to be preferred by some copepod species while others do not select against Phaeocystis. At present it is unclear whether this is primarily due to unsuitable size of Phaeocystis or because it is poor quality food. The relative nutritive value of Phaeocystis single cells and colonies should be investigated in more detail. Feeding of protozoa on Phaeocystis has been little studied. Ciliates and the giant dinoflagellate Noctiluca are known to consume Phaeocystis solitary cells. Protozoa might efficiently control Phaeocystis blooms during their initial phases when the share of solitary cells relative to total Phaeocystis biomass is higher than during later stages of the bloom. By switching their food preference towards heterotrophic food, copepods might benefit from enhanced protozoan biomass during Phaeocystis blooms. The potential succession of protozoan and metazoan grazers in the course of a Phaeocystis bloom awaits further research.

  20. Meiofauna abundance on the Gulf of Mexico continental shelf affected by hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murrell, Michael C.; Fleeger, John W.

    1989-12-01

    Meiofauna were sampled in shallow (8-13 m) continental shelf waters off the coast of Louisiana at three stations on 13 dates from June 1985 to August 1986. Total meiofauna abundances ranged from 525 to 3406 individuals per 10 cm 2 with a mean of 1810 individuals per 10 cm 2. Peak abundances occurred in late spring and early summer while seasonal lows occurred during late summer and winter. The three predominant taxa were Nematoda (91.8%), Copepoda (3.2%) and Kinorhyncha (2.5%). The meiobenthic copepod assemblage displayed low diversity and was dominated by three epibenthic species which together comprised 87% of the copepod fauna. Hypoxic conditions (dissolved oxygen <2mg l -1) developed seasonally on this shelf as a result of water column density stratification and eutrophication during late spring and summer. Abundances of all taxa declined during the summers of both years apparently in response to hypoxic conditions. Copepods were most dramatically affected, dropping from springtime peak abundances (several hundred per 10 cm 2) to virtually zero in a one-month period of time. Copepod density declines were spatially correlated with the onset of hypoxia, as inshore stations developed hypoxia later and underwent declines later. Densities remained low after the return of normal oxygen conditions, rising in the spring of the following year. The effect on nematodes and kinorhynchs was not as dramatic. A single collection of meiofauna from July 1983 in nearby normoxic Terrebonne Bay at similar water depths reveals a high density and diversity of copepods, further suggesting the sensitivity of copepods to hypoxia.

  1. Distribution and abundance of soft-sediment meiofauna and a predatory goby in a coral reef lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, J. St.; Jones, G. P.; Sale, P. F.

    1989-09-01

    Spatial patterns in the abundance of the softsediment meiofauna and a predatory goby, Valenciennia longipinnis, were examined in the lagoon of One Tree Reef (Great Barrier Reef). The study provided a quantitative framework to assess the importance of physical factors on and predator prey interactions between the meiofauna and V.longipinnis. Patterns of abundance were examined at two spatial scales: among four “habitats” (100's of m apart) and among “sites” (10's of m apart) within habitats. Of the four major constituents of the meiofauna (harpacticoid copepods, nematodes, polychaetes and oligochaetes), gut analyses showed that harpacticoid copepods were the primary prey of V.longipinnis. Spatial patterns of meiofaunal abundance in the lagoon were taxon specific. Polychaetes and harpacticoid copepods exhibited significant differences among habitats. Within habitats, however, polychaetes exhibited significant differences between sites whereas copepods were uniformly distributed. Abundances of nematodes and oligochaetes did not differ between habitats. Densities of nematodes differed significantly between sites while the number of oligochaetes were similar at both spatial scales. V.longipinnis was more abundant in shallow habitats than in deep ones. This study suggests that sediment type may be an important factor influencing the distribution of both the goby and the meiofauna. V.longipinnis and two of the four meiofaunal taxa (harpacticoid copepods and polychaetes) were more abundant in the shallow habitat with fine-grained sediments. There was no significant difference between abundances of meiofaunal taxa in sites where V.longipinnis was present or absent. Overall, more fish occurred in the habitat which had the highest densities of harpacticoid copepods.

  2. Ocean acidification-induced food quality deterioration constrains trophic transfer.

    PubMed

    Rossoll, Dennis; Bermúdez, Rafael; Hauss, Helena; Schulz, Kai G; Riebesell, Ulf; Sommer, Ulrich; Winder, Monika

    2012-01-01

    Our present understanding of ocean acidification (OA) impacts on marine organisms caused by rapidly rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO(2)) concentration is almost entirely limited to single species responses. OA consequences for food web interactions are, however, still unknown. Indirect OA effects can be expected for consumers by changing the nutritional quality of their prey. We used a laboratory experiment to test potential OA effects on algal fatty acid (FA) composition and resulting copepod growth. We show that elevated CO(2) significantly changed the FA concentration and composition of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana, which constrained growth and reproduction of the copepod Acartia tonsa. A significant decline in both total FAs (28.1 to 17.4 fg cell(-1)) and the ratio of long-chain polyunsaturated to saturated fatty acids (PUFA:SFA) of food algae cultured under elevated (750 µatm) compared to present day (380 µatm) pCO(2) was directly translated to copepods. The proportion of total essential FAs declined almost tenfold in copepods and the contribution of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) tripled at high CO(2). This rapid and reversible CO(2)-dependent shift in FA concentration and composition caused a decrease in both copepod somatic growth and egg production from 34 to 5 eggs female(-1) day(-1). Because the diatom-copepod link supports some of the most productive ecosystems in the world, our study demonstrates that OA can have far-reaching consequences for ocean food webs by changing the nutritional quality of essential macromolecules in primary producers that cascade up the food web. PMID:22509351

  3. Reproduction of Pseudocalanus newmani (Copepoda: Calanoida) is deleteriously affected by diatom blooms A field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halsband-Lenk, Claudia; Pierson, James J.; Leising, Andrew W.

    2005-11-01

    Copepod secondary production has traditionally been linked to the spring diatom bloom in temperate and high latitudes, but laboratory studies have recently challenged this view and have shown either reduced fecundity or viability of offspring when copepods were fed high concentrations of - mostly unialgal - diatoms. However, field evidence that diatoms affect copepod reproduction is still scarce. We analyzed the reproductive response of a common, small calanoid copepod of the boreal Pacific, Pseudocalanus newmani, to spring diatom blooms in Dabob Bay, a semi-enclosed fjord of Puget Sound, Washington, USA. Abundance patterns, egg production rates, egg hatching success, and naupliar viability of the egg-carrying copepod were examined between February and early May in the years 2002-2004. The population underwent strong variations in abundance during both years, with high abundance of all stages from February to mid-March, but dramatically decreasing individual numbers later in spring. A recovery to higher numbers occurred in July. While egg production rates were independent of chlorophyll concentrations, the reproductive success of P. newmani was negatively affected by certain phytoplankton bloom conditions. Hatching success and - more markedly - naupliar survival were reduced following peaks of Thalassiosira species that were producing anti-mitotic aldehydes, but were high during periods when phytoplankton blooms were more diverse or dominated by other prey taxa including diatoms. As a consequence, recruitment of the naupliar population was considerably affected by the Thalassiosira blooms. This study shows for the first time that the so-called diatom effect operates in nature when all prerequisites - (1) high concentration of aldehyde producers, (2) few prey alternatives, and (3) feeding of copepods on these algae - are given. However, the effect was transient in Dabob Bay and may be so in other pelagic ecosystems. It remains to discern the potential sources of mortality, such as toxicity, malnutrition, predation, and/or advection, that may have caused the strong decline of the Pseudocalanus population during April.

  4. Size distribution of particles and zooplankton across the shelf-basin system in southeast Beaufort Sea: combined results from an Underwater Vision Profiler and vertical net tows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forest, A.; Stemmann, L.; Picheral, M.; Burdorf, L.; Robert, D.; Fortier, L.; Babin, M.

    2012-04-01

    The size distribution and mean spatial trends of large particles (>100 ?m, in equivalent spherical diameter, ESD) and mesozooplankton were investigated across the Mackenzie Shelf (southeast Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean) in July-August 2009. Our main objective was to combine results from an Underwater Vision Profiler 5 (UVP5) and traditional net tows (200 ?m mesh size) to characterize the structural diversity and functioning of the Arctic shelf-basin ecosystem and to assess the large-scale correspondence between the two methodological approaches. The core dataset comprised 154 UVP5 profiles and 29 net tows conducted in the shelf (<100 m isobath), slope (100-1000 m) and basin (>1000 m) regions of the study area. The mean abundance of total particles and zooplankton in the upper water column (<75 m depth) declined exponentially with increasing distance from shore. Vertical and latitudinal patterns in total particle concentration followed those of chlorophyll a (chl a) concentration, with maximum values between 30 and 70 m depth. Based on the size-spectra derived from the UVP5 dataset, living organisms (0.1-10 mm ESD) accounted for an increasingly large proportion of total particle abundance (from 0.1 % to >50 %) when progressing offshore and as the ESD of particles was increasing. Both the UVP5 and net tows determined that copepods dominated the zooplankton community (~78-94 % by numbers) and that appendicularians were generally the second most abundant group (~1-11 %). The vertical distribution patterns of copepods and appendicularians indicated a close association between primary production and the main grazers. Manual taxonomic counts and ZooScan image analyses shed further light on the size-structure and composition of the copepod community - which was dominated at ~95 % by a guild of 10 typical taxa. The size distributions of copepods, as evaluated with the 3 methods (manual counts, ZooScan and UVP5), showed consistent patterns co-varying in the same order of magnitude over the upper size range (>1 mm ESD). Copepods <1 mm were not well quantified by the UVP5, which estimated that only ~13-25 % of the assemblage was composed of copepods <1 mm ESD compared with ~77-89 % from the net tow estimates. However, the biovolume of copepods was overwhelmingly dominated (~93-97 %) by copepods >1 mm ESD. Our results illustrate that the combination of traditional sampling methods and automated imaging techniques is a powerful approach that enabled us to conclude on the prevalence of a relatively high productivity regime and dominant herbivorous food web over the shelf when compared with the low-productive recycling system detected offshore.

  5. Size distribution of particles and zooplankton across the shelf-basin system in Southeast Beaufort Sea: combined results from an Underwater Vision Profiler and vertical net tows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forest, A.; Stemmann, L.; Picheral, M.; Burdorf, L.; Robert, D.; Fortier, L.; Babin, M.

    2011-11-01

    The size distribution and mean spatial trends of large particles (>100 ?m, in equivalent spherical diameter, ESD) and mesozooplankton were investigated across the Mackenzie Shelf (Southeast Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean) in July-August 2009. Our main objective was to combine results from an Underwater Vision Profiler 5 (UVP5) and traditional net tows (200 ?m mesh size) to characterize the structural diversity and functioning of the Arctic shelf-basin ecosystem and to assess the large-scale correspondence between the two methodological approaches. The core dataset comprised 154 UVP5 profiles and 29 net tows conducted in the shelf (<100 m isobath), slope (100-1000 m) and basin (>1000 m) regions of the study area. The mean abundance of total particles and zooplankton in the upper water column (<75 m depth) declined exponentially with increasing distance from shore. Vertical and latitudinal patterns in total particle concentration followed those of chlorophyll-a (chl-a) concentration, with maximum values between 30 and 70 m depth. Based on the size-spectra derived from the UVP5 dataset, living organisms (0.1-10 mm ESD) accounted for an increasingly large proportion of total particle abundance (from 0.1% to > 50 %) when progressing offshore and as the ESD of particles was increasing. Both the UVP5 and net tows determined that copepods dominated the zooplankton community (~78-94 % by numbers) and that appendicularians were generally the second most abundant group (~1-11 %). The vertical distribution patterns of copepods and appendicularians indicated a close association between primary production and the main grazers. Manual taxonomic counts and ZooScan image analyses shed further light on the size-structure and composition of the copepod community - which was dominated at ~95 % by a guild of 10 typical taxa. The size distributions of copepods, as evaluated with the 3 methods (manual counts, ZooScan and UVP5), showed consistent patterns co-varying in the same order of magnitude over the upper size range (>1 mm ESD). Copepods < 1 mm were not well quantified by the UVP5, which estimated that only ~13-25 % of the assemblage was composed of copepods < 1 mm ESD compared with ~77-89 % from the net tow estimates. However, the biovolume of copepods was overwhelmingly dominated (~93-97 %) by copepods >1 mm ESD. Our results illustrate that the combination of traditional sampling methods and automated imaging techniques is a powerful approach that enabled us to conclude on the prevalence of a relatively high productivity regime and dominant herbivorous food web over the shelf when compared with the low-productive recycling system detected offshore.

  6. Macrocyclops albidus (Copepoda: cyclopidae) for the Biocontrol of Aedes albopictus and Culex pipiens in Italy.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Rodolfo; Carrieri, Marco; Maccagnani, Bettina; Maini, Stefano; Bellini, Romeo

    2015-03-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the potential of Macrocyclops albidus as a biological control agent against the 1st and 2nd instars of Culex pipiens and Aedes albopictus. Under laboratory conditions of prey saturation (50 1st instars/copepod), an average of 58.98% of Cx. pipiens and 54.99% of Ae. albopictus larvae were killed by 1 copepod in 24 h. Trials run in big drums containing 200 liters of water showed that the M. albidus population, inoculated in April, efficiently controlled the mosquito population for the entire season. The predator was particularly effective against Ae. albopictus, as only 2 larvae of this species were found in the treated drums, compared to 814 larvae in untreated control drums throughout the study period. No difference was observed in the control efficacy between the 2 initial densities of copepods used. The reduction in Ae. albopictus density in the drums with 100 and 500 M. albidus with respect to the control drums was 99.90 ± 0.35% and 100.0 ± 0.0%, respectively. For Cx. pipiens, the reduction in density was 88.69 ± 13.51% and 84.65% in drums inoculated with 100 and 500 copepods, respectively. Macrocyclops albidus populations survived through the winter and continued to keep the mosquito population under control during the 2008 season. The M. albidus population developed very well both in drums placed in sunny and shaded areas and proved to be tolerant to both high (summer) and low (winter) temperatures. Trials performed on M. albidus survival in catch basins showed that after a few weeks, the copepod population dramatically decreased and subsequently disappeared. The main problem for copepod survival in catch basins seemed to be the low oxygen tension and accumulation of toxic substances, rather than copepods being flushed out in heavy rainfall episodes. During the period when copepods were present, they maintained the mosquito population under control; their partial disappearance from the catch basins, however, would require more recolonization intervention to maintain mosquito control during the season. PMID:25843174

  7. [Ectoparasite infection of some fish species in lake Pleshcheev].

    PubMed

    Zharikova, T I; Stepanova, M A; Zhokhov, A E

    2002-01-01

    Ectoparasites have been investigated on gills of the ruff, perch, white bream, roach, bream, ide, and European cisco from the Pleshcheevo lake. 13 parasite species were found: Dactylogyrus falcatus, D. distinguendus, D. cornoides, D. cornu, D. sphyrna, D. robustus, D. amphibothrium, Ancyrocephalus paradoxus, Argulus foliaceus, Ergasilus sieboldi, Achtheres percarum, Ancyrocephalus percae, and Rhipidocotyle companula. A reliable negative correlation between the number of monogeneans An. paradoxus and the copepods Ac. percarum on the perch. D. falcatus, the specific monogenean of the bream, was found on the roach. The comparison of the obtained data with those of 1939 has shown the decrease of oxyphilic copepods E. seiboldi, that prove the increasing eutrophication. PMID:12070962

  8. Influence of ocean ecosystem variation on trophic interactions and survival of juvenile coho and Chinook salmon

    E-print Network

    Miller, Jessica

    coho and Chinook salmon James P. Losee, Jessica A. Miller, William T. Peterson, David J. Teel, and Kym (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and Chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) salmon across 8 years (2002­2009) was related-poor, southern origin copepods in the coastal ocean was high during juvenile salmon outmigration from fresh water

  9. P. H. Lenz D. K. Hartline Reaction times and force production during escape behavior

    E-print Network

    Hartline, Daniel K.

    P. H. Lenz á D. K. Hartline Reaction times and force production during escape behavior. Copepods responded with rapid swims to water velocities of 36 to 86 lm sA1 . Reaction times were under 2. The behavioral reaction times and intervals between multiple responses observed in this calanoid are among

  10. Arch. Hydrobiol. 158 2 215231 Stuttgart, September 2003 Mitochondrial gene diversity of Skistodiaptomus

    E-print Network

    Schizas, Nikolaos

    ) and adjacent areas of Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina (Taylor & DeBiase, unpubl.). However, it is nearly et al. 1990, DeBiase & Taylor, unpubl.). Other species with similar distributions include invading temorid copepods. The temorids appear to have colonized the SRS in the late 1980s (DeBiase

  11. Winter and spring diving behavior of bowhead whales relative to prey

    E-print Network

    Laidre, Kristin L.

    depth recorders, and water column echo sounding data to study bowhead whale diving behavior relative. The mean speed of the horizontal bottom phase of the U-dives was 0.9 ms-1 and on average, whales spent 37 production and potential copepod abundance in the upper part of the water column. Depth and duration of dives

  12. Anomalous diffusion and multifractality enhance mating encounters in the ocean

    E-print Network

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    for copepods inhabiting the open waters of the ocean, as they typically rely on nonvisual senses for detectingAnomalous diffusion and multifractality enhance mating encounters in the ocean Laurent Seuronta, limited to laboratory experiments conducted in still water. An important open question concerns what

  13. Long term study of monsoon effect on the distribution of Calanus sinicus in the waters of Taiwan, western North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J.-S.; Souissi, S.; Li-Chun Tseng, L.-C.; Molinero, J. C.; Chen, Q.-C.; Wong, C.-K.

    2012-04-01

    Calanus sinicus (Copepoda: Calanoida) has a key role in the dynamics of marine food web and also on fish recruitment in the west Pacific Ocean, particularly in the Yellow Sea, the East China Sea and the coastal waters of Japan. The spatial distribution of this copepod can be traced further south such as north and west of Taiwan, Hong Kong, Hi-Nan Island and Vietnam. To understand the mechanism of how this key species distributes spatially and temporally, two long-term monitoring programs of the planktonic copepods have been conducted since 1998. The spatio-temporal distribution pattern of this copepod in the studied areas showed a clear relationship between the intrusions of cold-water mass of the China Coastal Currents (CCC) during the northeast monsoons into north and west Taiwan thus transporting this copepod further south with high concentrations. Calanus sinicus can be considered a biological tracer of CCC during NE monsoon originating from the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea to the north and west of Taiwan and further south up to Hong Kong, Hi-Nan and Vietnam. Keywords: Monsoon, China coastal Current, Calanus sinicus, indicator species

  14. THE INVERTEBRATE ASSEMBLAGE ASSOCIATED WITH THE GIANT KELP, MACROCYSTIS PYRIFERA, AT SANTA CATALINA

    E-print Network

    . bottom (BII. The number of species collected from all zones was 114 and ranged from 51 to 75 for any the assemblage in numbers (341c]. 60 IMI. 51 % IBIl. biomass (34 IC!. 681MI. 67% IBIl. and number of species (20, copepods, mysids, and shrimps are presented. STUDY AREA The study area was Habitat Reef, located in Big

  15. Volumetric quantification of fluid flow reveals fish's use of hydrodynamic stealth to capture evasive prey

    PubMed Central

    Gemmell, Brad J.; Adhikari, Deepak; Longmire, Ellen K.

    2014-01-01

    In aquatic ecosystems, predation on zooplankton by fish provides a major pathway for the transfer of energy to higher trophic levels. Copepods are an abundant zooplankton group that sense hydromechanical disturbances produced by approaching predators and respond with rapid escapes. Despite this capability, fish capture copepods with high success. Previous studies have focused on the predatory strike to elucidate details of this interaction. However, these raptorial strikes and resulting suction are only effective at short range. Thus, small fish must closely approach highly sensitive prey without triggering an escape in order for a strike to be successful. We use a new method, high-speed, infrared, tomographic particle image velocimetry, to investigate three-dimensional fluid patterns around predator and prey during approaches. Our results show that at least one planktivorous fish (Danio rerio) can control the bow wave in front of the head during the approach and consumption of prey (copepod). This alters hydrodynamic profiles at the location of the copepod such that it is below the threshold required to elicit an escape response. We find this behaviour to be mediated by the generation of suction within the buccopharyngeal cavity, where the velocity into the mouth roughly matches the forward speed of the fish. These results provide insight into how animals modulate aspects of fluid motion around their bodies to overcome escape responses and enhance prey capture. PMID:24227312

  16. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Nov. 2003, p. 69236931 Vol. 69, No. 11 0099-2240/03/$08.00 0 DOI: 10.1128/AEM.69.11.69236931.2003

    E-print Network

    Worden, Alexandra Z.

    and 0.1 to 9.7 day 1 (2.2 2.8 day 1 ) for bacterial assemblage. Our results suggest that dissolved. chol- erae to pelagic plankton, especially copepod zooplankters. In areas of outbreak a temporal as a regulating factor for cholera outbreaks (see references 23 and 30). Furthermore, it is thought that V. chol

  17. Deep..CwaRe~earchI ~,ol ..141No ~ pp 4,1--.-k~2.lq~3 (~'41,3"r/~';~l~III 4.-(p(]lJ PrintedmGreatBritain ~ |'.~13PergamonPressLid

    E-print Network

    Ashjian, Carin

    -associated changes m speocs abundances. The abundances of eight selected copepod ,,pectes (five Sargasso Sea specie of the selected species support the hypothesized cntra,nment and detra,nmcnt Sargasso Sea spcc=es were more~,clhng region) demonstrate cllcctl~,c tr,,nsport of Sargasso Sea/Gulf Strcana species out of the current

  18. Food Pyramids and Bio-Accumulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Valerie

    1998-01-01

    Students learn about marine food chains, bioaccumulation, the energy pyramid, and potential ocean pollutants and their effects on ocean ecosystems in this activity which involves having students pull drawings of marine organisms which include diatoms, copepods, anchovies, bonito, and killer whale out of a bag, then demonstrating the food chain by…

  19. New cave-dwelling pseudocyclopiids (Copepoda, Calanoida, Pseudocyclopiidae) from the Balearic, Canary, and Philippine archipelagos

    E-print Network

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    the Balearic, Canary, and Philippine archipelagos Damià Jaume, Audun Fosshagen & Thomas M. Iliffe Jaume D) from the Balearic, Canary, and Philippine archipelagos. Sarsia 84:391-417. Two new copepods; anchialine caves; Balearic Islands; Canary Islands; Philippines. INTRODUCTION Calanoids in the family

  20. SECTION t.-GENERAL SURVEY OF THE ANIMAL PLANKTON (ZOOPLANKTON)

    E-print Network

    . We even had no idea (incredible though it· may seem at this place and day) what we should prob- ably to be the case; for station after station, cruise after cruise, year after year, have yielded cumulative evidence), the ctenophore Pleurobrachia. pileus (p. 365), and (in deep water) the larger copepod Euchreta (p. 230

  1. A new culture system for in situ observation of the growth and development of Eucyclops serrulatus (Copepoda: Cyclopoida)

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Hee; Chang, Cheon-Young

    2005-01-01

    A practical and convenient method of rearing Eucyclops serrulatus in a microculture environment is described. A complete life cycle of E. serrulatus was maintained in a narrow space on a microscope slide glass on which a cover glass of 22 x 40 mm in size was mounted at a height of 0.8 mm. The culture medium was constituted by bottled mineral water boiled with grains of Glycine max (soybean). Chilomonas paramecium, a free-living protozoan organism, was provided as live food. Growth of nauplii hatched from eggs to the first stage of copepodite took an average of 7.7 days, and the growth of copepodite 1 to the egg-bearing adult female took an average of 20.1 days in the microculture cell with an average life time of 44.7 days. Continuous passage of copepods was successfully maintained as long as sufficient medium and food were provided. The microculture method enables an in situ microscopic observation on the growth and developmental process of helminth larvae experimentally infected to copepods as well as of copepod itself. Furthermore, it does not require anesthetization and, therefore, minimize the amount of stress exposed to copepods during the handling process. PMID:16340303

  2. Examination of data on the abundance ofadult and nauplii stages in the Narragansett Bay and

    E-print Network

    species were less than 3%. The results ofthis study in calories per gram ash- free dry weight (Table 1, assuming equivalent as- similation rates, that predators utilizing the copepods like A. tonsa with higher- ganisms for an equivalent energy intake and, given the same density of plankton, would spend more energy

  3. Crustacean parasites Of all the metazoan groups discussed in this book, the crustaceans are the most diverse and

    E-print Network

    Chapter 4 Crustacean parasites Of all the metazoan groups discussed in this book, the crustaceans of and survival on the hosts. Many copepods have great eco- nomic importance as agents of disease in wild of the Thoracica are parasitic (on dogfish and polychaetes), whereas the rhizocephalans parasitise other

  4. The sea louse Lepeophtheirus acutus (Caligidae, Siphonostomatoida, Copepoda) as a pathogen of aquarium-held elasmobranchs.

    PubMed

    Kik, M J L; Janse, M; Benz, G W

    2011-10-01

    Lepeophtheirus acutus Heegaard, 1943 (Caligidae, Siphonostomatoida, Copepoda), was collected from or observed on four of six elasmobranch species held at Burgers' Zoo (Arnhem, The Netherlands). Circumstantial evidence suggested that a zebra shark, Stegostoma fasciatum (Hermann), from the wild carried the infection into the facility, where copepods reproduced and colonized additional hosts. Copepods typically attached on and about the eyes, in the mouth and occasionally about the cloaca and on the claspers. Severe ocular lesions were associated with infections on zebra sharks, a grey reef shark, Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos (Bleeker), whitetip reef sharks, Triaenodon obesus (Rüppell), and giant shovelnose ray, Rhinobatos typus Bennett, while blacktip reef sharks, Carcharhinus melanopterus (Quoy & Gaimard), and blacktip sharks, Carcharhinus limbatus (Valenciennes), living in infested aquaria showed no sign of infection. Water treatments using trichlorfon were considered primarily responsible for the eradication of copepods from hosts and infested aquaria. This case is the first report of a copepod infection being closely associated with disease and death of an aquarium-held elasmobranch. Given its ability to infect a wide variety of elasmobranchs and promote life-threatening lesions on some hosts, L. acutus should be considered a dangerous pathogen of captive elasmobranchs. PMID:21916904

  5. Acute toxicity of eight oil spill response chemicals to temperate, boreal, and Arctic species.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Bjørn Henrik; Altin, Dag; Bonaunet, Kristin; Overjordet, Ida Beathe

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to (1) determine the acute toxicity of selected shoreline washing agents (SWA) and dispersants, and (2) assess interspecies differences in sensitivity to the products. Eight shoreline washing agents (Hela saneringsvæske, Bios, Bioversal, Absorrep K212, and Corexit 9580) and chemical dispersants (Corexit 9500, Dasic NS, and Gamlen OD4000) were tested on five marine species, algae Skeletonema costatum, planktonic copepod species Acartia tonsa (temperate species), Calanus finmarchicus (boreal species) and Calanus glacialis (Arctic species), and benthic amphipod Corophium volutator. For most products, A. tonsa was the most sensitive species, whereas C. volutator was the least sensitive; however, these species were exposed through different media (water/sediment). In general, all copepod species displayed a relatively similar sensitivity to all products. However, A. tonsa was somewhat more sensitive than other copepods to most of the tested products. Thus, A. tonsa appears to be a candidate species for boreal and Arctic copepods for acute toxicity testing, and data generated on this species may be used as to provide conservative estimates. The benthic species (C. volutator) had a different sensitivity pattern relative to pelagic species, displaying higher sensitivity to solvent-based SWA than to water-based SWA. Comparing product toxicity, the dispersants were in general most toxic while the solvent-based SWA were least toxic to pelagic species. PMID:24754387

  6. First descriptions of early- and middle-stage copepodids of Anthosoma crassum (Dichelesthiidae: Siphonostomatoida) and lesions on shortfin makos (Isurus oxyrinchus) infected with A. crassum.

    PubMed

    Benz, George W; Borucinska, Joanna D; Greenwaldt, Scott A

    2002-02-01

    Early- and middle-stage copepodids of Anthosoma crassum (Dichelesthiidae: Siphonostomatoida) and lesions associated with A. crassum infections are described from samples collected from the jaws of shortfin makos captured off southern California. The copepodids did not possess frontal filaments or frontal organs, and they resided in a headstandlike position firmly attached by their embedded antennae. Copepod larvae and small adults were lodged in shallow mucosal ulcers that basally exhibited mild, acute granulocytic stomatitis; large adults were lodged in deep tunnels encompassing the anterior aspects of their bodies. Some lesions contained more than I copepod. Examinations of lesions revealed that A. crassum infection of shortfin makos can result in severe subacute, necrotizing stomatitis with hemorrhage, granulation tissue, and lymphocytic aggregations in the mucosa, and reactive lymphocytic infiltration of the submucosal skeletal muscle. Copepod gut contents consisted of shark erythrocytes, hemosiderin granules, and necrotic host cells. These observations, along with reports of sharks heavily infected with A. crassum, suggest that this copepod may sometimes play a role in the morbidity and mortality of sharks that it infects. PMID:12053965

  7. Characterization of intermittency in zooplankton behaviour in turbulence.

    PubMed

    Michalec, François-Gaël; Schmitt, François G; Souissi, Sami; Holzner, Markus

    2015-10-01

    We consider Lagrangian velocity differences of zooplankters swimming in still water and in turbulence. Using cumulants, we quantify the intermittency properties of their motion recorded using three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry. Copepods swimming in still water display an intermittent behaviour characterized by a high probability of small velocity increments, and by stretched exponential tails. Low values arise from their steady cruising behaviour while heavy tails result from frequent relocation jumps. In turbulence, we show that at short time scales, the intermittency signature of active copepods clearly differs from that of the underlying flow, and reflects the frequent relocation jumps displayed by these small animals. Despite these differences, we show that copepods swimming in still and turbulent flow belong to the same intermittency class that can be modelled by a log-stable model with non-analytical cumulant generating function. Intermittency in swimming behaviour and relocation jumps may enable copepods to display oriented, collective motion under strong hydrodynamic conditions and thus, may contribute to the formation of zooplankton patches in energetic environments. PMID:26490249

  8. Contributions from the Biological Laboratory of the U. S. Fish Commission, Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

    E-print Network

    and the larger animals. In the ocean, as on the land, animals feed either directly on plants or on other animals one of the most important c~m stituents in the surface life of the ocean. As a food for fishes the standpoint of oceanic food supply,the copepods form an important link between the microscopic plants

  9. Microbial Grazers Lab Objective: Measure the rate at which bacteria are consumed by predators.

    E-print Network

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    ) Krill copepod #12;Phylogenetic Diversity From Caron et al. (2012) #12;Classic Food Chain CO2 DIN Z F P · The classic view of aquatic food webs was the linear food chain from phytoplankton to fish. · Although The microbial loop is a conceptualization by which DOM can be routed into the classic food chain via bacteria

  10. Vol. 155: 127-135, 1997 MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES

    E-print Network

    Yen, Jeannette

    Vol. 155: 127-135, 1997 MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser I Published August 28 i n eScience Research Center. State University of New York. Stony Brook. New York 11794-5000, USA videotaped. Since images of individual copepods appear indistinguishable on the paired 2-dixnen- sional

  11. Selenium in San Francisco Bay zooplankton: Potential effects of hydrodynamics and food web interactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purkerson, D.G.; Doblin, M.A.; Bollens, S.M.; Luoma, S.N.; Cutter, G.A.

    2003-01-01

    The potential toxicity of elevated selenium (Se) concentrations in aquatic ecosystems has stimulated efforts to measure Se concentrations in benthos, nekton, and waterfowl in San Francisco Bay (SF Bay). In September 1998, we initiated a 14 mo field study to determine the concentration of Se in SF Bay zooplankton, which play a major role in the Bay food web, but which have not previously been studied with respect to Se. Monthly vertical plankton tows were collected at several stations throughout SF Bay, and zooplankton were separated into two operationally defined size classes for Se analyses: 73-2,000 ??m, and ???2,000 ??m. Selenium values ranged 1.02-6.07 ??g Se g-1 dry weight. No spatial differences in zooplankton Se concentrations were found. However, there were inter- and intra-annual differences. Zooplankton Se concentrations were enriched in the North Bay in Fall 1999 when compared to other seasons and locations within and outside SF Bay. The abundance and biovolume of the zooplankton community varied spatially between stations, but not seasonally within each station. Smaller herbivorous-omnivorous zooplankton had higher Se concentrations than larger omnivorous-carnivorous zooplankton. Selenium concentrations in zooplankton were negatively correlated with the proportion of total copepod biovolume comprising the large carnivorous copepod Tortanus dextrilobatus, but positively correlated with the proportion of copepod biovolume comprising smaller copepods of the family Oithonidae, suggesting an important role of trophic level and size in regulating zooplankton Se concentrations.

  12. Considerations for the Management of Vernal Pool Faunal Communities1

    E-print Network

    hydrology and water chemistry, avoiding crushing cysts in the soil, avoiding the input of toxins apparent of the invertebrates and includes branchiopods (fairy shrimp, tadpole shrimp, clam shrimp, and water fleas), ostracods (seed shrimp), and copepods. These obligately aquatic organisms survive

  13. The trophic importance of algal turfs for coral reef fishes: the crustacean link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, M. J.; Bellwood, O.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2013-06-01

    On coral reefs, the epilithic algal matrix (EAM) is widely recognised as an important resource for herbivorous and detritivorous fishes. In comparison, little is known of the interaction between benthic carnivores and the EAM, despite the abundance of Crustacea within the EAM. The trophic importance of the EAM to fishes was investigated in Pioneer Bay, Orpheus Island, Great Barrier Reef. Fish densities were quantified using visual and clove oil censuses, and gut content analyses conducted on abundant fish species. Crustaceans were found to be an important dietary category, contributing between 49.5 and 100 % of the gut contents, with harpacticoid copepods being the dominant component. Of the benthic carnivores, the goby Eviota zebrina was found to consume the most harpacticoids with a mean of 249 copepods m-2 day-1. This represents approximately 0.1 % of the available harpacticoid population in the EAM. In a striking comparison, herbivorous parrotfishes were estimated to consume over 12,000 harpacticoids m-2 day-1, over 27 times more than all benthic carnivores surveyed, representing approximately 5.3 % of the available harpacticoid copepod population each day. The high consumption of harpacticoid copepods by benthic carnivores and parrotfishes indicates that harpacticoids form an important trophic link between the EAM and higher trophic levels on coral reefs.

  14. N.V. Schizas B.C. Coull G.T. Chandler J.M. Quattro

    E-print Network

    Schizas, Nikolaos

    N.V. Schizas Æ B.C. Coull Æ G.T. Chandler J.M. Quattro Sympatry of distinct mitochondrial DNA) was examined with a geographic survey of a 348 bp fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. Copepods mitochondrial clades were uncovered that differed by six to nine nucleotide changes. A rapid assay was developed

  15. EFFECTS OF COPPER AND CADMIUM ON GROWTH, SWIMMING AND PREDATOR AVOIDANCE IN 'EURYTEMORA AFFINIS' (COPEPODA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study demonstrates the sensitivity of swimming behavior and predator-escape responses of nauplii of the estuarine copepod Eurytemora affinis to sublethal doses of Cu and Cd. Behavior was generally altered at metal doses below those affecting growth rates or survival of the c...

  16. Three new genera of the Ridgewayiidae (Copepoda, Calanoida) from anchialine caves in the Bahamas

    E-print Network

    Iliffe, Thomas M.

    . The maxilliped is strongly developed, reflexed and with a condensed endopod bearing several modified setae; taxonomy; anchialine caves; Bahamas. INTRODUCTION Ridgewayiids are primitive calanoid copepods from shallow the expansion of the distal part of the second segment. Usually ridgewayiids have primitive and only slightly

  17. Marine Flora and Fauna of the Northeastern United States. Copepoda: Lernaeopodidae and Sphyriidae.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Ju-Shey

    This report is part of a sub-series to aid biology students, biologists, biological oceanographers, and informed laymen in the identification and study of marine flora and fauna of the Northeastern United States. Contents of this report include: (1) Introduction; (2) Glossary; (3) Key to the marine lernaeopodoid copepods of the Northeastern United…

  18. Mesozooplankton grazing during the Phaeocystis globosa bloom in the southern bight of the North Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasparini, S.; Daro, M. H.; Antajan, E.; Tackx, M.; Rousseau, V.; Parent, J.-Y.; Lancelot, C.

    2000-08-01

    During spring blooms 1998 and 1999, three complementary methods were used to evaluate the in situ feeding activities of the dominant copepod species of the Belgian coastal zone: gut pigment content analysis using HPLC, the 14C tracer method, and cell count experiments. The results obtained by all three methods consistently showed that Phaeocystis globosa is not an adequate food source for the spring copepods in the Belgian coastal zone. Our results demonstrated that, among the potential prey, copepods strongly selected diatoms and microzooplankton, and that these types of prey accounted for the major part of the ingested carbon. However, diatoms and microzooplankton ingestion did not always seem sufficient in terms of carbon to avoid food limitation. Comparison of clearance rates exerted on different potential prey types during the P. globosa peak with those before and after the P. globosa peak showed that the copepods' feeding pressure on diatoms was reduced during the P. globosa peak while that on microzooplankton was not. The low grazing pressure on P. globosa, together with the preferential grazing on diatoms, which reduces the competition for nutrients, and the predation on microzooplankton organisms, which reduces the microzooplankton grazing pressure on P. globosa cells, are likely to favour the P. globosa bloom in the Southern Bight of the North Sea.

  19. United States Department of the Interior, Fred A. Seaton, Secretary Fish and Wildlife Service, Arnie J. Suomela, Commissioner

    E-print Network

    - pods, as sporozoan parasites and as eggs of the helminth parasites. Careful examination under low. This lack of uniformity will help di,stinguish the lesion from the more uniformly sized copepods or eggs to water which contained emulsified lymphocystis cells. MODE OF TRANSMISSION Infected host cells

  20. Limnetic crustacean zooplankton of Lake Oahe, May-October 1969

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Selgeby, James H.

    1974-01-01

    The limnetic crustacean zooplankton of Lake Oahe was dominated by copepods. Cyclops bicuspidatus thomasi was the dominant crustacean throughout the lake. Mesocyclops edax, Diaptomus ashlandi and Daphnia pulex were major components of the zooplankton in the deep, downstream portion of the lake while Bosmina longirostris and Daphnia retrocurva were important constituents in the river-like, upstream section of the lake.

  1. Genomic resources notes accepted 1 October 2014-30 November 2014.

    PubMed

    Baratti, Mariella; Cattonaro, Federica; Di Lorenzo, Tiziana; Galassi, Diana Maria Paola; Iannilli, Valentina; Iannucci, Alessio; Jensen, Just; Larsen, Peter Foged; Nielsen, Rasmus O; Pertoldi, Cino; Postolache, Dragos; Pujolar, Jose Martin; Randi, Ettore; Ruiz-Gonzalez, Aritz; Thirstrup, Janne Pia; Vendramin, Giovanni Giuseppe; Zalewski, Andrzej

    2015-03-01

    This article documents the public availability of (i) RAD sequencing data and validated SNPs for the American mink Neovison vison and (ii) Transcriptome resources for two nonmodel freshwater crustacean species, the copepod Eucyclops serrulatus and the amphipod Echinogammarus veneris. PMID:25677171

  2. MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser

    E-print Network

    of larvae collected from inside and outside dense larval patches revealed that in 1981, larval walleye pollock consumed significantly more invertebrate eggs (x = 66.7% of the total diet) and fewer copepod resource, invertebrate eggs. Results from a bioenergetics simulation support this theory, indicating

  3. The fourbeard rockling, Enchely-opus cimbrius L., is a small gadid

    E-print Network

    with age. One-year-old fish preyed primarily upon copepods; bivalves were second in importance. The reverse; Demir et al., 1985), limited information exists about the age and growth of this spe- cies. This study (Odense and Logan, 1976), an acanthoceph- Age and growth, dietary habits, and parasitism of the fourbeard

  4. Mating behaviour of Pseudodiaptomus annandalei (Copepoda, Calanoida) in calm and turbulent waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. H.; Dahms, H. U.; Cheng, S. H.; Souissi, S.; Schmitt, F. G.; Kumar, R.; Hwang, J. S.

    2009-04-01

    Behavioral observations of male copepods reveal that they commonly follow female copepods' footprints to find their mates. Female generated environmental signals are primarily of hydromechanical or chemical quality. The intensity of hydromechanical or chemical signals is affected by the hydrodynamic conditions which in turn may modulate a copepod's ability to sense signals in their search for mates in the aquatic environment. We studied the patterns and efficiency of the copepod Pseudodiaptomus annandalei to mate at still and turbulent water conditions during day and night and in different shape and volume experimental containers. The ability of courtship in P. annandalei was recorded to be a negative function of hydromechanical disturbances as the successful mating was observed in still water only. Under turbulent condition males were not able to track a female properly. We records in the present study that both, sequential and simultaneous taxi mechanisms are used by the male P. annandalei to follow either hydromechanic or chemical signals. Our results further reveal that males follow a signal more accurately characterized as a trail. The ability of P. annandalei males to track a three-dimensional trail appears unique, and possibly depends on the persistence of fluid-borne hydromechanical or chemical signals created in low Reynolds number hydrodynamic regimes. Keywords: Mating behavior, Turbulence, Flow, Hydrodynamic conditions

  5. Freshwater Biology (1979) 9, 503-510 Stages of infection and ecological effects of a

    E-print Network

    Vincent, Warwick F.

    1979-01-01

    .S.A.). Stages in the infection process were examined by light and scanning electron microscopy and evidence of association between the fungus and animal we document, by light and scanning electron microscopy, stages.4% decrease in potential copepod recruitment in 1976 due to the onset of a severe epidemic early in the summer

  6. A foodweb model to explore uncertainties in the South Georgia shelf pelagic ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Simeon L.; Keeble, Kathryn; Atkinson, Angus; Murphy, Eugene J.

    2012-01-01

    Foodweb models provide a useful framework for compiling data on biomass, production, consumption and feeding relationships. They are particularly useful for identifying gaps and inconsistencies in the data, and for exploring plausible scenarios of change. We compiled data on the pelagic foodweb of the South Georgia shelf, which is one of the most intensively studied areas in the Southern Ocean. The data suggest that current average annual copepod production is three times that of Antarctic krill and that flying seabirds and fish are, respectively, responsible for 25% and 21% of local krill consumption. The most striking inconsistency was that estimated consumption of fish was 5 times their estimated production. We developed a static mass balance model of the foodweb representing one of many possible solutions to the inconsistencies in the data. The model included sufficient fish biomass to balance the original consumption estimate, and consequently fish became the main krill consumers. Nonetheless, only 74% of local krill production was consumed by predators, suggesting that there are additional mortality sources that we did not explicitly model. We developed further models to explore scenarios incorporating plausible climate-driven reductions in krill biomass. In scenarios with unchanged predator diets, an 80% reduction in krill biomass resulted in a 73% reduction in vertebrate biomass. However, when predators with diverse diets were able to switch to feeding on alternative zooplankton prey, total vertebrate biomass was maintained at current levels. Scenarios in which 80% of krill biomass was replaced with copepod biomass required 28% more primary production because the estimated consumption rate of copepods is higher than that of krill. The additional copepod biomass did not alter the consequences for vertebrates. These scenarios illustrate the wide range of potential consequences of a shift from a krill to a copepod dominated system in a warming climate. They suggest that both maintenance and dramatic reduction of vertebrate production are plausible outcomes, although the former requires major changes in predator diets.

  7. Plankton community structure and connectivity in the Kimberley-Browse region of NW Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, A. D.; Duggan, S.; Holliday, D.; Brinkman, R.

    2015-02-01

    We describe the zooplankton and ichthyoplankton communities of coastal waters of the Kimberley coast (North West Australia), sampled in macrotidal Camden Sound during both the wet and dry seasons of 2011, and compare these to six other Kimberley embayments during the wet season of 2013. Zooplankton abundance in Camden Sound was 7038 ± 3913 SD ind. m-3 in the wet season and 1892 ± 708 SD ind. m-3 in the dry season, with copepods accounting for 85% by number. In all, 78 species of copepods were recorded, with the families Paracalanidae and Oithonidae dominant. In Camden Sound, 48 families of larval fish occurred, with ichthyoplankton more abundant in the wet season than the dry season (1.16 ± 0.2 ind. m-3 cf 0.76 ± 0.2 ind. m-3). Larval gobiids (Subfamily Gobiinae) were most abundant, with other common families associated with either pelagic or soft-bottom habitats as adults. Multivariate analyses of both copepod and ichthyoplankton communities demonstrated strong seasonal contrasts, although an along-shelf gradient in copepod community composition was apparent along the embayments sampled in 2013. There was little spatial variation in plankton communities within Camden Sound as a result of the large tidal range (up to 11.7 m, with 2.5 m-1 velocities), although gradients in abundance and composition on cross-shelf transects occurred in the more northern embayments that had a lower tidal range, such as Napier Broome Bay. Copepod communities of the Kimberley-Browse region were placed in regional perspective by multivariate analyses of similar data collected in the eastern Indian Ocean at Scott Reef, in the Arafura Sea and on the southern North West (NW) shelf. The plankton communities of the NW shelf form a series of along-shore metacommunities linked by advection, with weaker cross-shelf connectivity. The presence of the larvae of mesopelagic fishes of the family Myctophidae in coastal waters confirms seasonal cross-shelf connectivity.

  8. Negligible effects of ocean acidification on Eurytemora affinis (Copepoda) offspring production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almén, A.-K.; Vehmaa, A.; Brutemark, A.; Bach, L.; Lischka, S.; Stuhr, A.; Furuhagen, S.; Paul, A.; Bermúdez, R.; Riebesell, U.; Engström-Öst, J.

    2015-10-01

    Ocean acidification is caused by increasing amounts of carbon dioxide dissolving in the oceans leading to lower seawater pH. We studied the effects of lowered pH on the calanoid copepod Eurytemora affinis during a mesocosm experiment conducted in a coastal area of the Baltic Sea. We measured copepod reproductive success as a function of pH, chlorophyll a concentration, diatom and dinoflagellate biomass, carbon to nitrogen (C : N) ratio of suspended particulate organic matter, as well as copepod fatty acid composition. The laboratory-based experiment was repeated four times during four consecutive weeks, with water and copepods sampled from pelagic mesocosms enriched with different CO2 concentrations. In addition, oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) of animals from the mesocosms was measured weekly to test whether the copepod's defence against oxidative stress was affected by pH. We found no effect of pH on offspring production. Phytoplankton biomass, as indicated by chlorophyll a concentration, had a strong positive effect. The concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids in the females were reflected in the eggs and had a positive effect on offspring production, whereas monounsaturated fatty acids of the females were reflected in their eggs but had no significant effect. ORAC was not affected by pH. From these experiments we conclude that E. affinis seems robust against direct exposure to ocean acidification on a physiological level, for the variables covered in the study. E. affinis may not have faced acute pH stress in the treatments as the species naturally face large pH fluctuations.

  9. Does transported seagrass provide an important trophic link in unvegetated, nearshore areas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyndes, Glenn A.; Lavery, Paul S.

    2005-06-01

    The contribution of detritus from seagrass and other primary producers to faunal production in unvegetated nearshore areas was examined primarily using stable isotopes. Fish, macroinvertebrates, meiofauna and primary producers (seagrasses, macroalgae, seston and benthic microalgae) were sampled from sites in south-western Australia. All samples were analysed for ? 13C and ? 15N values and fish gut contents were determined. ? 13C values for seagrasses in the region were high compared to other macrophytes, ranging from 49.9 to -8.2‰ compared to -19.8 to -12.6‰ for macroalgae. The ? 15N values ranged between 4.0 and 7.7‰ for the red, brown and green algae, and between 3.2 and 5.9‰ for seagrasses. Seston and benthic microalgae samples had a mean ? 13C value of -12.8 and -14.0‰, respectively, and their ? 15N values were comparable to the macroalgae. All invertebrate fauna had mean ? 13C values considerably lower than seagrasses. However, individual samples harpacticoid copepods and polychaetes had a value as high as -11.7‰. ? 15N values for consumers were higher than those of the primary producers, except for copepods and amphipods. The ? 13C values for fish had a relatively small range, between -16.6 and -13.1‰, and the ? 15N values of fish were elevated compared to the invertebrates and primary producers, ranging mostly between 10.0 and 12.6‰. Mixing model analysis based on ? 13C values indicated that seagrass ranked low as a likely carbon source for all invertebrates other than harpacticoid copepods at a single site and some samples of polychaetes. The ? 13C values for fish were similar to those of a combination of harpacticoid and calanoid copepods, amphipods and polychaetes. The consumption of harpacticoid copepods by some fish species indicates that Amphibolis and Posidonia species in south-western Australia can contribute to the food web of unvegetated nearshore areas as detritus, but brown algae is likely to make a greater contribution. At least for the time of year that was sampled, the flow of detrital seagrass material into the foodweb may be mediated by specific detrivores, in this case harpactacoid copepods, rather than by all detritivores.

  10. Ecological parameters of Lamproglena hoi (Copepoda: Lernaeidae) infection on the Bushveld smallscale yellowfish, Labeobarbus polylepis (Boulenger, 1907).

    PubMed

    Austin, A; Avenant-Oldewage, A

    2009-06-01

    This study describes the distribution and aspects of the ecology of Lamproglena hoi. Bushveld small-scale yellowfish, Labeobarbus polylepis (Boulenger, 1907) were collected during June 2006 from the Phongolo and Assegaai rivers, March 2005 and October 2006 from the Elands River, and January 2007 and June 2008 from the Komati River in Mpumalanga, South Africa and examined for the presence of parasites. Lamproglena hoi specimens were collected from the gill filaments of the host. Specimens were fixed with warm AFA (alcohol-formaldehyde-acetic acid) and preserved in 70% ethanol. The identification of parasites took place in the laboratories of the University of Johannesburg. Twenty-five copepods (prevalence 21%, mean intensity = 4.17, abundance = 0.86) were collected on 29 fish in the Phongolo River and 46 copepods (prevalence 40%, mean intensity = 3.83, abundance = 1.53) were collected on 30 fish in the Assegaai River. One hundred and sixty eight copepods (prevalence 52%, mean intensity = 12.92, abundance = 6.72) were collected on 25 fish in 2005, and 527 copepods (prevalence 95%, mean intensity = 27.74, abundance = 26.35) were collected on 20 fish in the Elands River. One hundred and sixteen copepods (prevalence 75%, mean intensity = 7.73, abundance = 5.80) were collected on 20 fish in 2007, and 273 copepods (prevalence 63%, mean intensity = 16.06, abundance = 10.11) were collected on 27 fish in 2008 in the Komati River. Labeobarbus polylepis from these four rivers was found to have a relatively high L. hoi infection. Inseminated L. hoi females (immature) attach to the host in winter and their ovaries become conspicuous (mature). In spring fertilized eggs are stored in egg sacs hanging from the body (gravid), indicating that fertilized eggs start to hatch in spring and continued hatching into summer. Parasites prefer the median part of the second gill arch for attachment. No correlation exists between the number of parasites recorded on the gills and the sizes (total lengths) of yellowfish sampled. PMID:20698442

  11. Ocean currents structuring the mesozooplankton in the Gulf of Mannar and the Palk Bay, southeast coast of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadeesan, L.; Jyothibabu, R.; Anjusha, A.; Mohan, Arya P.; Madhu, N. V.; Muraleedharan, K. R.; Sudheesh, K.

    2013-03-01

    The Gulf of Mannar and the Palk Bay, located between India and Sri Lanka, are the two least studied marine environments in the northern Indian Ocean. We hypothesis, perceptible physical barriers that exist between the deep Gulf of Mannar and shallow Palk Bay, and seasonally reversing surface circulation patterns in the region have a concerted effect on the ecology of these oceanographically important areas. In the present study, data collected from 30 locations in the Gulf of Mannar and the Palk Bay in March 2010 (Spring Intermonsoon), September 2010 (Southwest Monsoon) and January 2011 (Northeast Monsoon) were used to investigate the role of ocean currents in molding mesozooplankton community characteristics in these, geographically closer and ecologically important transitional zones. Spatial difference in salinity was evident in the area with consistently higher values in the Gulf of Mannar as compared to the Palk Bay. The surface salinity was maximal during the Southwest Monsoon followed by the Spring Intermonsoon, and the Northeast Monsoon. These variations in salinity were closely linked with the seasonally reversing ocean currents as revealed in MIKE 21 flow model results. The mesozooplankton community dominated by copepods showed significant difference in species richness between the Gulf of Mannar (81 species) and the Palk Bay (63 species). Non-metric Multidimensional Scaling (NMDS) and Agglomerative Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (AHCA) on Bray-Curtis copepod similarity clearly estranged the Gulf of Mannar and the Palk Bay waters during the Spring Intermonsoon, and the Northeast Monsoon, attributable to the truancy of durable mixing typical of these seasons. In contrast, aided by strong currents, the increased mixing resulted in a homogenous copepod population in the Gulf of Mannar and the Palk Bay during the Southwest Monsoon. Furthermore, the indicator and dominant species analysis for copepods divulged the spatial heterogeneity in species composition during the Spring Intermonsoon and the Northeast Monsoon periods. Multivariate Redundancy Analyses showed salinity as the most important variable accountable for the observed variance in copepod distribution. In general, the copepod community in the Gulf of Mannar was composed both of coastal and offshore species whereas, coastal species largely inhabited the Palk Bay. This kind of a study depicting zooplankton community organization as governed by seasonally reversing monsoon circulation patterns forms the first record from the Indian coastal waters. The findings attain absolute significance considering its ecological implications on oceanographically transitional systems like the Gulf of Mannar, and the Palk Bay.

  12. Parasitic fauna of the lake brown trout, Salmo trutta lacustris (Salmonidae), a little known endemic fish from Polish waters.

    PubMed

    Rolbiecki, Leszek; Sciazko, Mariusz; Schütz, Janusz

    2009-01-01

    The lake brown trout is a salmonids fish regarded as a stationary form of the migratory trout. Within 2003-2004, 31 lake brown trout (Salmo trutta lacustris L.) from Lake Wdzydze (Poland), were examined for the presence of parasites following commonly used procedures. The parasites found represented Digenea: Diplostomum sp., Posthodiplostomum cuticola (Nordmann, 1832), Sphaerostomum globiporum (Rudolphi, 1802); Cestoda: Eubothrium crassum (Bloch, 1779), Triaenophorus nodulosus (Pallas, 1781); Acanthocephala: Acanthocephalus lucii (Müller, 1776); Copepoda: Ergasilus sieboldi Nordmann, 1832, and Hirudinea: Piscicola geometra (Linnaeus, 1761). The overall infection level amounted to 96.7%, 249.4, and 1-440. The copepod E. sieboldi was the most frequent parasite (93.5%, 257.4, 64-438). Lake brown trout from the Lake Wdzydze are very heavily infected by parasites dominated by the copepod E. sieboldi. PMID:20209824

  13. Microsatellites for next-generation ecologists: a post-sequencing bioinformatics pipeline.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Silva, Iria; Whitney, Jonathan; Wainwright, Benjamin; Andrews, Kimberly R; Ylitalo-Ward, Heather; Bowen, Brian W; Toonen, Robert J; Goetze, Erica; Karl, Stephen A

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellites are the markers of choice for a variety of population genetic studies. The recent advent of next-generation pyrosequencing has drastically accelerated microsatellite locus discovery by providing a greater amount of DNA sequencing reads at lower costs compared to other techniques. However, laboratory testing of PCR primers targeting potential microsatellite markers remains time consuming and costly. Here we show how to reduce this workload by screening microsatellite loci via bioinformatic analyses prior to primer design. Our method emphasizes the importance of sequence quality, and we avoid loci associated with repetitive elements by screening with repetitive sequence databases available for a growing number of taxa. Testing with the Yellowstripe Goatfish Mulloidichthys flavolineatus and the marine planktonic copepod Pleuromamma xiphias we show higher success rate of primers selected by our pipeline in comparison to previous in silico microsatellite detection methodologies. Following the same pipeline, we discover and select microsatellite loci in nine additional species including fishes, sea stars, copepods and octopuses. PMID:23424642

  14. Control of algal dominance through changes in zooplankton grazing, Lake Washington - Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Hartmann, H.J.

    1983-05-31

    Mechanisms by which selective grazing and phosphorus recycling regulate phytoplankton abundance and succession were investigated. Food preferences of a cladoceran (Daphnia) and a copepod (Diaptomus) on paired mixtures of a centric diatom, a green and a filamentous blue-green alga were compared in double-isotope (P32/P33) feeding studies; phosphorus-limited growth and nutrient uptake of the algae were compared in batch-culture experiments. Zooplankton food selectivity and algal phosphorus uptake were size- and species-specific: Single-cell ingestion rates of small Daphnia and adult copepods were similar, while large Daphnia ingested 1.6 times more cells/weight than Diaptomus. Daphnia selected diatoms over green algae over a wide cell-concentration range (50 to 50,000 cells/ml). Selectivity was more significant in small than in large Daphnia.

  15. The South Channel Ocean Productivity EXperiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenney, Robert D.; Wishner, Karen F.

    The South Channel Ocean Productivity EXperiment (SCOPEX) was a multidisciplinary study of a whale-zooplankton predator-prey system in the southwestern Gulf of Maine, focusing on the oceanographic factors responsible for the development of dense patches of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus, which comprise the major prey resource for right whales ( Eubalaena glacialis). Three non-mutually exclusive hypotheses underlay the study: patch development is due to (1) extremely high in situ primary and secondary productivity; (2) large numbers of Calanus advected into the region and concentrated by hydrographic processes; and/or (3) a behavioral tendency of the copepods themselves to aggregate. The results confirmed the cooccurrence of right whales with high density Calanus patches, and also demonstrated that right whales fed on patches with higher proportions of larger lifestages. The physical oceanographic studies supported the advection hypothesis, possibly augmented by a tendency of Calanus to aggregate, but there was little evidence to support the productivity hypothesis.

  16. Unexpected Regularity in Swimming Behavior of Clausocalanus furcatus Revealed by a Telecentric 3D Computer Vision System

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, Giuseppe; Botte, Vincenzo; Dubroca, Laurent; Ribera d’Alcalà, Maurizio; Mazzocchi, Maria Grazia

    2013-01-01

    Planktonic copepods display a large repertoire of motion behaviors in a three-dimensional environment. Two-dimensional video observations demonstrated that the small copepod Clausocalanus furcatus, one the most widely distributed calanoids at low to medium latitudes, presented a unique swimming behavior that was continuous and fast and followed notably convoluted trajectories. Furthermore, previous observations indicated that the motion of C. furcatus resembled a random process. We characterized the swimming behavior of this species in three-dimensional space using a video system equipped with telecentric lenses, which allow tracking of zooplankton without the distortion errors inherent in common lenses. Our observations revealed unexpected regularities in the behavior of C. furcatus that appear primarily in the horizontal plane and could not have been identified in previous observations based on lateral views. Our results indicate that the swimming behavior of C. furcatus is based on a limited repertoire of basic kinematic modules but exhibits greater plasticity than previously thought. PMID:23826331

  17. Ingestion and transfer of microplastics in the planktonic food web.

    PubMed

    Setälä, Outi; Fleming-Lehtinen, Vivi; Lehtiniemi, Maiju

    2014-02-01

    Experiments were carried out with different Baltic Sea zooplankton taxa to scan their potential to ingest plastics. Mysid shrimps, copepods, cladocerans, rotifers, polychaete larvae and ciliates were exposed to 10 ?m fluorescent polystyrene microspheres. These experiments showed ingestion of microspheres in all taxa studied. The highest percentage of individuals with ingested spheres was found in pelagic polychaete larvae, Marenzelleria spp. Experiments with the copepod Eurytemora affinis and the mysid shrimp Neomysis integer showed egestion of microspheres within 12 h. Food web transfer experiments were done by offering zooplankton labelled with ingested microspheres to mysid shrimps. Microscopy observations of mysid intestine showed the presence of zooplankton prey and microspheres after 3 h incubation. This study shows for the first time the potential of plastic microparticle transfer via planktonic organisms from one trophic level (mesozooplankton) to a higher level (macrozooplankton). The impacts of plastic transfer and possible accumulation in the food web need further investigations. PMID:24220023

  18. Have we been underestimating the effects of ocean acidification in zooplankton?

    PubMed

    Cripps, Gemma; Lindeque, Penelope; Flynn, Kevin J

    2014-11-01

    Understanding how copepods may respond to ocean acidification (OA) is critical for risk assessments of ocean ecology and biogeochemistry. The perception that copepods are insensitive to OA is largely based on experiments with adult females. Their apparent resilience to increased carbon dioxide (pCO2 ) concentrations has supported the view that copepods are 'winners' under OA. Here, we show that this conclusion is not robust, that sensitivity across different life stages is significantly misrepresented by studies solely using adult females. Stage-specific responses to pCO2 (385-6000 ?atm) were studied across different life stages of a calanoid copepod, monitoring for lethal and sublethal responses. Mortality rates varied significantly across the different life stages, with nauplii showing the highest lethal effects; nauplii mortality rates increased threefold when pCO2 concentrations reached 1000 ?atm (year 2100 scenario) with LC50 at 1084 ?atm pCO2 . In comparison, eggs, early copepodite stages, and adult males and females were not affected lethally until pCO2 concentrations ?3000 ?atm. Adverse effects on reproduction were found, with >35% decline in nauplii recruitment at 1000 ?atm pCO2 . This suppression of reproductive scope, coupled with the decreased survival of early stage progeny at this pCO2 concentration, has clear potential to damage population growth dynamics in this species. The disparity in responses seen across the different developmental stages emphasizes the need for a holistic life-cycle approach to make species-level projections to climate change. Significant misrepresentation and error propagation can develop from studies which attempt to project outcomes to future OA conditions solely based on single life history stage exposures. PMID:24782283

  19. Nucleic Acid Content in Crustacean Zooplankton: Bridging Metabolic and Stoichiometric Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Bullejos, Francisco José; Carrillo, Presentación; Gorokhova, Elena; Medina-Sánchez, Juan Manuel; Villar-Argaiz, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic and stoichiometric theories of ecology have provided broad complementary principles to understand ecosystem processes across different levels of biological organization. We tested several of their cornerstone hypotheses by measuring the nucleic acid (NA) and phosphorus (P) content of crustacean zooplankton species in 22 high mountain lakes (Sierra Nevada and the Pyrenees mountains, Spain). The P-allocation hypothesis (PAH) proposes that the genome size is smaller in cladocerans than in copepods as a result of selection for fast growth towards P-allocation from DNA to RNA under P limitation. Consistent with the PAH, the RNA:DNA ratio was >8-fold higher in cladocerans than in copepods, although ‘fast-growth’ cladocerans did not always exhibit higher RNA and lower DNA contents in comparison to ‘slow-growth’ copepods. We also showed strong associations among growth rate, RNA, and total P content supporting the growth rate hypothesis, which predicts that fast-growing organisms have high P content because of the preferential allocation to P-rich ribosomal RNA. In addition, we found that ontogenetic variability in NA content of the copepod Mixodiaptomus laciniatus (intra- and interstage variability) was comparable to the interspecific variability across other zooplankton species. Further, according to the metabolic theory of ecology, temperature should enhance growth rate and hence RNA demands. RNA content in zooplankton was correlated with temperature, but the relationships were nutrient-dependent, with a positive correlation in nutrient-rich ecosystems and a negative one in those with scarce nutrients. Overall our results illustrate the mechanistic connections among organismal NA content, growth rate, nutrients and temperature, contributing to the conceptual unification of metabolic and stoichiometric theories. PMID:24466118

  20. INDEX TO VOLUME 61 ABUNDANCE AND AGE O~' KVICHAK RIVER RED

    E-print Network

    , and comparison of rudder fishes, Kyphosu8 secta.trix (Linnaeus) and K. i'l£i80l' (Cuvier) in 451-480 western at 53-60 CALANOID COPEPODS FROM EQUATORI....L W.~TERS OF THE P ....CIFIC OCE....N, by George D. Grice, DISTRIBUTION, AND COMPARISON OF RUDD);R b'ISHES, Kyphof1lts sectatrix (Linnaeus) AND K. incisor (Cuvier

  1. Spatial and temporal variations in deep-sea meiofauna assemblages in the Marginal Ice Zone of the Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoste, Eveline; Vanhove, Sandra; Schewe, Ingo; Soltwedel, Thomas; Vanreusel, Ann

    2007-01-01

    In order to understand the response of the deep-sea meiobenthos to a highly varying, ice-edge-related input of phytodetritus, we investigated the abundance and composition of the meiobenthos at the arctic long-term deep-sea station HAUSGARTEN (79°N, 4°E) along a bathymetric transect (1200-5500 m water depth) over 5 consecutive years (from 2000 to 2004) in relation to changes in environmental conditions. Results showed high sediment-bound pigment concentrations (chlorophyll a and degradation products) ranging from 4.5 to 41.6 ?g/cm 3, and coinciding high meiobenthic densities ranging from 149±3 to 3409±525 ind/10 cm 2. Nematodes dominated the metazoan meiofaunal communities at every depth and time (85-99% of total meiofauna abundance), followed by harpacticoid copepods (0-4.6% of total meiofauna abundance). The expected pattern of gradually decreasing meiobenthic densities with increasing water depth was not confirmed. Instead, the bathymetric transect could be subdivided into a shallow area with equally high nematode and copepod densities from 1000 to 2000 m water depth (means: 2259±157 Nematoda/10 cm 2, and 50±4 Copepoda/10 cm 2), and a deeper area from 3000 to 5500 m water depth with similar low nematode and copepod densities (means: 595±52 Nematoda/10 cm 2, and 11±2 Copepoda/10 cm 2). Depth-related investigations on the meiobenthos at the HAUSGARTEN site showed a significant correlation between meiobenthos densities, microbial exo-enzymatic activity (esterase turnover) and phytodetrital food availability (chlorophyll a and phaeophytines). In time-series investigations, our data showed inter-annual variations in meiofauna abundance. However, no consistent relationship between nematode and copepod densities, and measures for organic matter input were found.

  2. A probable non-annelid origin of pods attached to Amaeana ellobophora (Annelida: Polycirridae).

    PubMed

    Read, Geoffrey B; Nogueira, João Miguel De Matos

    2015-01-01

    There is an alternative explanation to the proposal by Nogueira et al. (2015) that the polycirrid Amaeana ellobophora Nogueira, Carrerette & Hutchings, 2015 is a species which broods eggs in attached cocoons. We suggest that the pods observed fixed to the anterior of one worm are instead highly modified parasitic copepods (Arthropoda: Crustacea: Copepoda: Poecilostomatoida), and thus do not provide any information on the reproductive mode of Amaeana Hartman species. PMID:26624756

  3. Diel distribution of zooplankton at the Mobil OTEC site (29/sup 0/N 88/sup 0/W) in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, Jr, J P; Gunter, G; Hartwig, E O

    1982-01-01

    In the study 128 copepod species and 43 other zooplankton taxa were identified from four depth strata (0 to 50 m, 50 to 100 m, 100 to 300 m and 300 to 500 m). Duplicate step-oblique tows at six hour intervals over 24 hours were taken at a site in the Gulf of Mexico. The distribution of zooplankton numbers and sizes, and species diversity, richness and evenness through a diel period are described.

  4. The impact of El Niño events on the pelagic food chain in the northern California Current.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jennifer L; Peterson, William T; Rykaczewski, Ryan R

    2015-12-01

    The zooplankton of the northern California Current are typically characterized by an abundance of lipid-rich copepods that support rapid growth and survival of ecologically, commercially, and recreationally valued fish, birds, and mammals. Disruption of this food chain and reduced ecosystem productivity are often associated with climatic variability such as El Niño events. We examined the variability in timing, magnitude, and duration of positive temperature anomalies and changes in copepod species composition in the northern California Current in relation to 10 tropical El Niño events. Measurable impacts on mesozooplankton of the northern California Current were observed during seven of 10 of these events. The occurrence of anomalously warm water and the response of the copepod community was rapid (lag of zero to 2 months) following the initiation of canonical Eastern Pacific (EP) events, but delayed (lag of 2-8 months) following 'Modoki' Central Pacific (CP) events. The variable lags in the timing of a physical and biological response led to impacts in the northern California Current peaking in winter during EP events and in the spring during CP events. The magnitude and duration of the temperature and copepod anomalies were strongly and positively related to the magnitude and duration of El Niño events, but were also sensitive to the phase of the lower frequency Pacific Decadal Oscillation. When fisheries managers and biological oceanographers are faced with the prospect of a future El Niño event, prudent management and observation will require consideration of the background oceanographic conditions, the type of event, and both the magnitude and duration of the event when assessing the potential physical and biological impacts on the northern California Current. PMID:26220498

  5. Seasonal Changes in Productivity in the Copper River Plume and Coastal Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, R. W.; Schroth, A. W.; Crusius, J.

    2010-12-01

    The Copper River is the largest point source of fresh water to the northern Gulf of Alaska, but the hydrography, biogeochemistry, and biology of the region are not well described. Oceanographic surveys were conducted in April, May, June and July 2010, along a transect line stretching from the mouth of the Copper River, across the plume, to well past the shelf break. In April, the water column was well mixed, with a very low freshwater signal nearshore; phytoplankton biomass was low, and macronutrient (nitrate, silicate, and phosphate) concentrations were high. The zooplankton was dominated by relatively scarce small bodied copepods inshore, and large pteropods and abundant large bodied copepods (Neocalanus sp.) offshore. By early May, weak temperature and salinity stratification were present, and phytoplankton biomass had increased, while nutrients showed indications of being drawn down. Although the spring bloom was at an early stage, phytoplankton biomass and nutrient drawdown were more pronounced onshore, indicating an earlier onset to production in the near shore region. Zooplankton abundance was low, and was mostly small bodied copepods and early stages of Neocalanus. By June, the spring bloom was completed, and all nutrients were depleted in the surface water, except for silicate, which was elevated in the less saline water in the vicinity of the plume. Small bodied copepods dominated the plankton at all stations, and small pteropods were abundant offshore. Surface trawls for forage fish along the transect line caught none in April and gravid Eulachon were collected near shore in May. Juvenile salmon (primarily coho and sockeye) and herring were collected in June, and abundances were low near shore, largest immediately at the river plume front, and smallest offshore of the front. No salmon were caught in July, and large numbers of stickleback were captured at the shelf break.

  6. Ingestion of Microplastics by Zooplankton in the Northeast Pacific Ocean.

    PubMed

    Desforges, Jean-Pierre W; Galbraith, Moira; Ross, Peter S

    2015-10-01

    Microplastics are increasingly recognized as being widespread in the world's oceans, but relatively little is known about ingestion by marine biota. In light of the potential for microplastic fibers and fragments to be taken up by small marine organisms, we examined plastic ingestion by two foundation species near the base of North Pacific marine food webs, the calanoid copepod Neocalanus cristatus and the euphausiid Euphausia pacifia. We developed an acid digestion method to assess plastic ingestion by individual zooplankton and detected microplastics in both species. Encounter rates resulting from ingestion were 1 particle/every 34 copepods and 1/every 17 euphausiids (euphausiids > copepods; p = 0.01). Consistent with differences in the size selection of food between these two zooplankton species, the ingested particle size was greater in euphausiids (816 ± 108 ?m) than in copepods (556 ± 149 ?m) (p = 0.014). The contribution of ingested microplastic fibres to total plastic decreased with distance from shore in euphausiids (r (2) = 70, p = 0.003), corresponding to patterns in our previous observations of microplastics in seawater samples from the same locations. This first evidence of microplastic ingestion by marine zooplankton indicate that species at lower trophic levels of the marine food web are mistaking plastic for food, which raises fundamental questions about potential risks to higher trophic level species. One concern is risk to salmon: We estimate that consumption of microplastic-containing zooplankton will lead to the ingestion of 2-7 microplastic particles/day by individual juvenile salmon in coastal British Columbia, and ?91 microplastic particles/day in returning adults. PMID:26066061

  7. Allochthonous subsidies of organic matter across a lake-river-fjord landscape in the Chilean Patagonia: Implications for marine zooplankton in inner fjord areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Cristian A.; Martinez, Rodrigo A.; San Martin, Valeska; Aguayo, Mauricio; Silva, Nelson; Torres, Rodrigo

    2011-03-01

    Ecosystems can act as both sources and sinks of allochthonous nutrients and organic matter. In this sense, fjord ecosystems are a typical interface and buffer zone between freshwater systems, glaciated continents, and the coastal ocean. In order to evaluate the potential sources and composition of organic matter across fjord ecosystems, we characterized particulate organic matter along a lake-river-fjord corridor in the Chilean Patagonia using stable isotope (? 13C) and lipid (fatty acid composition) biomarker analyses. Furthermore, estimates of zooplankton carbon ingestion rates and measurements of ? 13C and ? 15N in zooplankton (copepods) were used to evaluate the implications of allochthonous subsidies for copepods inhabiting inner fjord areas. Our results showed that riverine freshwater flows contributed an important amount of dissolved silicon but, scarce nitrate and phosphate to the brackish surface layer of the fjord ecosystem. Isotopic signatures of particulate organic matter from lakes and rivers were distinct from their counterparts in oceanic influenced stations. Terrestrial allochthonous sources could support around 68-86% of the particulate organic carbon in the river plume and glacier melting areas, whereas fatty acid concentrations were maximal in the surface waters of the Pascua and Baker river plumes. Estimates of carbon ingestion rates and ? 13C in copepods from the river plume areas indicated that terrestrial carbon could account for a significant percentage of the copepod body carbon (20-50%) during periods of food limitation. Particulate organic matter from the Pascua River showed a greater allochthonous contribution of terrigenous/vascular plant sources. Rivers may provide fjord ecosystems with allochthonous contributions from different sources because of the distinct vegetation coverage and land use along each river's watershed. These observations have significant implications for the management of local riverine areas in the context of any human project that may modify terrestrial habitats as well as the productivity, food webs, and community structure of rivers, lakes, fjords, and the coastal ocean in the Chilean Patagonia.

  8. Hydrodynamic control of mesozooplankton abundance and biomass in northern Svalbard waters (79-81°N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blachowiak-Samolyk, Katarzyna; Søreide, Janne E.; Kwasniewski, Slawek; Sundfjord, Arild; Hop, Haakon; Falk-Petersen, Stig; Nøst Hegseth, Else

    2008-10-01

    The spatial variation in mesozooplankton biomass, abundance and species composition in relation to oceanography was studied in different climatic regimes (warm Atlantic vs. cold Arctic) in northern Svalbard waters. Relationships between the zooplankton community and various environmental factors (salinity, temperature, sampling depth, bottom depth, sea-ice concentrations, algal biomass and bloom stage) were established using multivariate statistics. Our study demonstrated that variability in the physical environment around Svalbard had measurable effect on the pelagic ecosystem. Differences in bottom depth and temperature-salinity best explained more than 40% of the horizontal variability in mesozooplankton biomass (DM m -2) after adjusting for seasonal variability. Salinity and temperature also explained much (21% and 15%, respectively) of the variability in mesozooplankton vertical distribution (ind. m -3) in August. Algal bloom stage, chlorophyll- a biomass, and depth stratum accounted for additional 17% of the overall variability structuring vertical zooplankton distribution. Three main zooplankton communities were identified, including Atlantic species Fritillaria borealis, Oithona atlantica, Calanus finmarchicus, Themisto abyssorum and Aglantha digitale; Arctic species Calanus glacialis, Gammarus wilkitzkii, Mertensia ovum and Sagitta elegans; and deeper-water inhabitants Paraeuchaeta spp., Spinocalanus spp., Aetideopsis minor, Mormonilla minor, Scolecithricella minor, Gaetanus ( Gaidius) tenuispinus, Ostracoda, Scaphocalanus brevicornis and Triconia borealis. Zooplankton biomasses in Atlantic- and Arctic-dominated water masses were similar, but biological "hot-spots" were associated with Arctic communities.

  9. Effect of an oil spill from M V Sea Transporter on intertidal meiofauna at Goa, India.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Zakir Ali; Ingole, Baban

    2002-05-01

    Short and long term effects of a fuel oil spill from a grounded ship "M V Sea Transporter" on meiofauna of a sandy beach of central West Coast of India were investigated. A significant reduction in the absolute abundance of meiofauna was observed immediately after 3 days of spillage particularly at Sinquerim beach, the site of spillage. The reduction was most pronounced in density of nematodes and harpacticoid copepods, which were the most dominant groups. Long-term response showed no apparent oil-induced changes at major taxa levels. The population density improved considerably after the cessation of monsoons with a parallel decrease in petroleum hydrocarbon concentration in the sediment. Nematodes recovered more quickly than benthic copepods. No evidence for this could be due to reproductive dynamics in meiobentos. Although the effect of the oil on meiofauna could be seen initially it could not be proved conclusively on a long-term basis. The effects of the oil spill were confounded with seasonal monsoon effects and beach dynamics. The nematode:copepod ratio and the index of trophic diversity (ITD) were inadequate for detecting oil pollution effects. Therefore it may be concluded that in the presence of other environmental factors acting strongly, the effects of oil on meiofauna was strong but of a temporary nature. PMID:12146822

  10. Hydrothermal vent meiobenthos associated with mytilid mussel aggregations from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the East Pacific Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zekely, J.; Van Dover, C. L.; Nemeschkal, H. L.; Bright, M.

    2006-08-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents occur along the mid-ocean ridges and back-arc basins around the globe. There are very few community analyses of vent meiobenthos. The central objectives of this study were to identify and quantify for the first time the entire metazoan meiobenthic community associated with mussel aggregations of Bathymodiolus thermophilus Kenk and Wilson, 1985 from the EPR, 11°N and of Bathymodiolus puteoserpentis Cosel et al., 1994 from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), 23°N. Using a quantitative sampling method, abundance, biomass, sex ratio, species richness, diversity, evenness, and trophic structure were studied based on three samples from each site. Meiobenthic abundance in each sample was unexpectedly low, but similar between sites. The community was composed of nematodes, copepods, ostracods, and mites, with a total of 24 species at EPR vents, and 15 species at MAR vents. While most copepod species were vent endemics within the family Dirivultidae, nematodes and harpacticoid copepods belonged to generalist genera, which occur at a variety of habitats and are not restricted to hydrothermal vents or the deep sea. The meiobenthos of hydrothermal-vent mussel beds constitutes a unique community unlike those of other sulfidic habitats, including the thiobios of shallow-water sediments and the meiobenthos of deep-sea, cold-seep sediments. The trophic structure was dominated by primary consumers, mainly deposit feeders, followed by parasites. Predatory meiofaunal species were absent.

  11. Food of blueback herring and threadfin shad in Jocassee Reservoir, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Bruce M.; Foltz, Jeffrey W.

    1991-01-01

    Threadfin shad Dorosoma petenense and blueback herring Alosa aestivalis were introduced into Jocassee Reservoir, South Carolina, in the early 1970s as prey for large piscivores. To assess the potential for trophic competition between these clupeids, we examined their diets and the extent of diet overlap in May, August, and December 1982 and February 1983. The diet of blueback herring consisted mainly of large species of cladocerans and copepods supplemented in August with Chaoborus punctipennis and young fish. Mean length of the organisms eaten by blueback herring was 1.4 mm. Threadfin shad fed on smaller species of cladocerans and copepods, as well as on rotifers and copepod nauplii. The mean length of the organisms eaten by threadfin shad was 0.4 mm, which differed significantly from the mean length of the zooplankton population in Jocassee Reservoir (0.6 mm). Phytoplankton contributed 24 and 32% of the stomach contents of threadfin shad in August and December. Bosmina longirostris was important in the diet of both species, although blueback herring showed negative selection for it. Diet overlap between the two clupeids was low on all four dates. Although we found no evidence of trophic competition between the two species in Jocassee Reservoir, we do not recommend stocking them together, because both species are voracious planktivores and blueback herring are piscivorous.

  12. Diet affects the redox system in developing Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) larvae

    PubMed Central

    Penglase, Samuel; Edvardsen, Rolf B.; Furmanek, Tomasz; Rønnestad, Ivar; Karlsen, Ørjan; van der Meeren, Terje; Hamre, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    The growth and development of marine fish larvae fed copepods is superior to those fed rotifers, but the underlying molecular reasons for this are unclear. In the following study we compared the effects of such diets on redox regulation pathways during development of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) larvae. Cod larvae were fed a control diet of copepods or the typical rotifer/Artemia diet commonly used in commercial marine fish hatcheries, from first feeding until after metamorphosis. The oxidised and reduced glutathione levels, the redox potential, and the mRNA expression of 100 genes in redox system pathways were then compared between treatments during larval development. We found that rotifer/Artemia-fed cod larvae had lower levels of oxidised glutathione, a more reduced redox potential, and altered expression of approximately half of the redox system genes when compared to copepod-fed larvae. This rotifer/Artemia diet-induced differential regulation of the redox system was greatest during periods of suboptimal growth. Upregulation of the oxidative stress response transcription factor, nrf2, and NRF2 target genes in rotifer/Artemia fed larvae suggest this diet induced an NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response. Overall, the data demonstrate that nutritional intake plays a role in regulating the redox system in developing fish larvae. This may be a factor in dietary-induced differences observed in larval growth. PMID:26099546

  13. Transport of marine fish larvae to Saroma-ko Lagoon (Hokkaido, Japan) in relation to the availability of zooplankton prey under the winter ice cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortier, Martin; Fortier, Louis

    1997-02-01

    To assess the importance of ice-covered Saroma-ko Lagoon as a winter nursery area for young fish spawned offshore, we monitored the recruitment of marine fish larvae from the Sea of Okhotsk to the lagoon as well as the availability of larval fish prey under the ice cover from 24 February to 23 March 1992. Sand lance ( Ammodytes sp.) and walleye pollock ( Theragra chalcogramma) larvae