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Sample records for cyclosporine-a

  1. Cyclosporine A-Induced Renal Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, Craig; Campbell, Eric; McMorrow, Tara; Ryan, Michael P.

    2005-01-01

    Cyclosporine A, which has been the foremost immunosuppressive agent since the early 1980’s, significantly improves the success of organ transplantation. However, common complications of cyclosporine A therapy, such as severe renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis, limit the drug’s clinical use. Although the exact mechanisms driving cyclosporine A-induced tubulointerstitial fibrosis remain elusive, we hypothesized that epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) may play a major role. We investigated this in vitro by treating human proximal tubular cells with cyclosporine A. Morphological changes were observed after cyclosporine A treatment, including cell elongation (with a large degree of detachment), cytoskeletal rearrangement, and junctional disruption. In addition, expression of the myofibroblast-specific marker α-smooth muscle actin was detected in treated cells. These observations are consistent with events described during EMT. Using Affymetrix gene microarrays, we identified 128 genes that were differentially regulated in renal tubular cells after cyclosporine A treatment, including known profibrotic factors, oncogenes, and transcriptional regulators. Cyclosporine A induced a dose-dependent increase in transforming growth factor-β secretion from proximal tubular cells. Subsequent functional studies revealed that protein kinase C-β isoforms play a key role in cyclosporine A-induced effects. These findings provide novel insights into cyclosporine A-induced renal fibrosis and the molecular mechanisms underlying EMT, events that may be relevant in other disease states. PMID:16049326

  2. [Cyclosporin A--dermatologic indications].

    PubMed

    Mahrle, G; Schulze, H J

    1990-01-01

    The pharmacology, the biological action, as well as the clinical indications for systemic or topical application of cyclosporin A (CSA) is reviewed. Our studies yielded the following results: In chronic stationary psoriasis, systemic treatment with CSA in very low doses (2.5 mg/kg/d, 13 patients, 10 weeks) led to a 75% reduction of the PASI score without any side reactions. After topical application of CSA (40 patients, 1/5/10% gel and ointment), we observed a subclinical effect. CSA permeated into the deeper layers of the skin and accumulated up to a concentration of 3.880 ng/g (80-39.000 ng/g, polyclonal RIA); these quantities correspond with those found after systemic administration. In spite of this, CSA was not measurable in the blood. Topical CSA reduced the neutrophils in psoriatic skin both selectively and significantly, but did not affect the epidermal synthesis of DNA. PMID:2183505

  3. Possible Antipruritic Mechanism of Cyclosporine A in Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kyi Chan; Tominaga, Mitsutoshi; Kamata, Yayoi; Umehara, Yoshie; Matsuda, Hironori; Takahashi, Nobuaki; Kina, Katsunari; Ogawa, Mayuko; Ogawa, Hideoki; Takamori, Kenji

    2016-06-15

    Cyclosporine A is an immunosuppressive agent that suppresses pruritus and is currently used in the treatment of patients with severe atopic dermatitis. The aim of this study was to elucidate the antipruritic mechanism of cyclosporine A using a mouse model of atopic dermatitis. Intraperitoneal injection of cyclosporine A (5 mg/kg) significantly reduced epidermal nerve density, number of scratching bouts, dermatitis scores, and transepidermal water loss, as well as decreasing the numbers of inflammatory cells in the dermis and decreasing epidermal thickness. Intraperitoneal injection of cyclosporine A dose-dependently inhibited increased itch-related receptor gene expression, such as interleukin-31 receptor A and neurokinin-1 receptor, in the dorsal root ganglion of atopic dermatitis model mice. Thus, the antipruritic efficacy of cyclosporine A may involve reduced epidermal nerve density and expression levels of itch-related receptor genes in the dorsal root ganglion, as well as improvement in acanthosis and reduction in cutaneous inflammatory cell number. PMID:26671728

  4. Cyclosporine A and tacrolimus inhibit urothelial tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Eiji; Li, Yi; Zheng, Yichun; Miyamoto, Yurina; Netto, George J; Ishiguro, Hitoshi; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    The functional role of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT), while it has been extensively investigated in the immune system, remains uncertain in bladder cancer development. We here aim to assess the effects of cyclosporine A (CsA) and tacrolimus (FK506), immunosuppressants known to specifically inactivate the NFAT pathway in immune cells, on neoplastic transformation of urothelial cells. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the expression levels of NFATc1, a NFAT isoform shown to function as an oncogene in a sarcoma model, were elevated in urothelial neoplasms, compared with non-neoplastic urothelial tissues, and in low-grade and high-grade papillary urothelial carcinomas, compared with papillary urothelial neoplasms of low malignant potential. In an immortalized normal urothelial cell line SVHUC, CsA and FK506 reduced NFATc1 expression, NFAT transcriptional activity, and the expression of c-myc, a downstream target of NFATc1 signals. Treatment with CsA or FK506 in the SVHUC cells undergoing neoplastic transformation induced by exposure to a chemical carcinogen 3-methylcholanthrene resulted in strong inhibition in colony formation in vitro as well as tumor formation in NOD-SCID mice. CsA and FK506 were additionally found to up-regulate the expression of several molecules that play a protective role in bladder tumorigenesis, including p53, p21, and p27, and down-regulate that of oncogenic genes, such as cyclin D1, cyclin D3, and cyclin E, in SVHUC cells with the carcinogen challenge. Thus, CsA and FK506 likely inhibit urothelial tumorigenesis. These findings offer a potential chemopreventive approach for urothelial tumors using NFAT inhibitors. PMID:25594762

  5. [Value of protecting mitochondrial functions during treatment with cyclosporin A].

    PubMed

    Simon, N; Albengres, E; Barré, J; Jolliet, P; Urien, S; Settaf, A; Tillement, J P

    1997-01-01

    The use of cyclosporin A is often limited by its nephrotoxicity. This dose-dependent toxicity can occur in all kinds of transplantation and is reversed with drug withdrawal. Cyclosporin A induces a vasoconstriction leading to an increase of renal vascular resistance and a reduction of glomerular filtration. Histochemical studies show mitochondrial alterations and an excess of cytosolic and mitochondrial calcium leading to a decrease of ATP synthesis. Two strategies can be evoked for limiting cyclosporin-A-induced nephrotoxicity. First, the use of drugs counteracting the vasoconstriction has been proposed. Second, drugs acting by restoration of ATP synthesis could also be of interest. For example, calcium channel blockers may be used for limiting the Ca2+ fluxes into cells. Another way to protect ATP synthesis is to inhibit the cyclosporin-A-induced increase of mitochondrial Ca2+ concentrations; Trimetazidine has shown its efficiency in vitro for protecting mitochondria against these modifications of Ca2+ homeostasis and is under clinical evaluation. PMID:9231511

  6. Importance of endogenous prostaglandins for the toxicity of cyclosporin A to rat endocrine and exocrine pancreas?

    PubMed Central

    Rünzi, M; Peskar, B M; von Schönfeld, J; Müller, M K

    1992-01-01

    Previous work has shown that cyclosporin A is toxic to the endocrine and exocrine pancreas. The aim of this study was to examine whether endogenous eicosanoids play a role in controlling cyclosporin A induced toxicity. Rats were treated for eight days with indomethacin (2 mg/kg, twice daily) in addition to cyclosporin A (5 or 10 mg/kg daily). Effects of drug treatments on exocrine (as assessed by amylase and protein secretion into the pancreatic juice) and endocrine (as assessed by the glucose dependent insulin release) pancreatic functions, and pancreatic formation of prostaglandins and thromboxane were evaluated. Treatment with cyclosporin A in the doses used did not inhibit eicosanoid formation by the pancreatic tissue ex vivo. Indomethacin caused significant inhibition of pancreatic formation of prostaglandin E2, 6k prostaglandin F1 alpha and thromboxane B2. Combined treatment with indomethacin and cyclosporin A (5 or 10 mg/kg) augmented cyclosporin A induced pancreatic toxicity with further impairment of insulin release, amylase secretion, and pancreatic juice protein content, but did not result in more pronounced inhibition of pancreatic eicosanoid formation. The increased toxicity of the combined treatment was, however, associated with raised cyclosporin A whole blood concentrations. The data suggest that the potentiation of pancreatic toxicity of cyclosporin A observed during coadministration of indomethacin is not the result of suppression of endogenous pancreatic eicosanoid biosynthesis, but more likely results from altered cyclosporin A pharmacokinetic which may be caused by an interference of indomethacin with the hepatic cytochrome P-450 dependent monooxygenase involved in cyclosporin A metabolism. The possibility that coadministration of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs aggravates toxic effects in cyclosporin A treated patients should be considered. PMID:1280611

  7. Conformational Heterogeneity of Cyclosporin A in Cyclophilin 18 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Weilin; Quintero, Andres; Zhang, Yixin

    2016-01-01

    The immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A (CsA) binds to its receptor protein cyclophilin 18 (Cyp18) in two distinct kinetic phases, while the mechanism remains elusive. Stopped-flow measurements coupled with titration and competition experiments were used to investigate the puzzling two-phase process of CsA and Cyp18 interaction. This study leads to the dissection of different conformational fractions of either direct fast binding or slow binding with rate-limiting conformational inter-conversion and the real-time measurement of kon value (8.34 ± 0.22 x106 M-1s-1) in solution. Furthermore, our study indicates that the structure of CsA during dissociation from the protein possesses a distribution of conformations different from those in solution under equilibrium condition. PMID:27082870

  8. Modern approaches to the ocular delivery of cyclosporine A.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Priyanka; Rupenthal, Ilva D

    2016-06-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) has long been the mainstay treatment for dry eye syndrome (DES), one of the most common disorders of the eye. However, the poor water solubility of CsA renders it difficult to formulate it into topical ocular dosage forms. Restasis® is currently the only US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved CsA formulation, while Ikervis® has recently been launched in Europe, with both commonly associated with severe ocular discomfort. Therefore, several CsA formulations have been investigated with the aim to improve bioavailability while reducing adverse effects associated with the marketed formulations. In this review, we summarize recent advances in ocular CsA delivery that provide safer and more effective alternatives for the management of DES and other ocular inflammatory conditions. PMID:27080149

  9. Posterior encephalopathy subsequent to cyclosporin A presenting as irreversible abulia.

    PubMed

    Nishie, Makoto; Kurahashi, Kozo; Ogawa, Masaya; Yoshida, Yasuji; Midorikawa, Hiroshi

    2003-08-01

    A case of cyclosporin A (Cys A)-induced posterior encephalopathy developed into persistent abulia despite rapid and marked improvement of abnormal T2- and FLAIR MRI hyperintense regions. Diffusion-weighted MRI signal intensity was also high at the onset. This change is atypical in Cys A-induced encephalopathy and was thought to predict poor recovery from the encephalopathy. Persistent abulia was probably due to marked hypoperfusion in the whole cortex including bilateral frontal lobes and basal ganglia as detected by SPECT. Apart from the breakdown of the blood-brain barrier, direct toxicity of Cys A to the brain may play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic, irreversible encephalopathy. PMID:12924507

  10. L-arginine prevents bone loss and bone collagen breakdown in cyclosporin A-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Fiore, C E; Pennisi, P; Cutuli, V M; Prato, A; Messina, R; Clementi, G

    2000-11-24

    Cyclosporin A is implicated in the pathogenesis of post-transplantation bone disease. Because of recent evidence that cyclosporin A may cause renal and cardiovascular toxicity by inhibiting nitric oxide (NO) activity, and that NO slows bone remodeling and bone loss in animal and human studies, we investigated a possible link between NO production and beneficial effects on bone health in cyclosporin A-treated rats. Thirty-six 10-week-old male rats were assigned to six groups of six animals each, and treated for 4 weeks with: vehicle; cyclosporin A; L-arginine; N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME, a general inhibitor of NO synthase activity); a combination of cyclosporin A+L-arginine; and a combination of cyclosporin A+L-NAME. Whole body and regional (spine and pelvis) bone mineral content of rats were measured under basal conditions and at the end of the treatment period by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanning. Femur weights and serum concentrations of pyridinoline, a reliable marker of bone resorption, were measured at the end of the study period. Cyclosporin A-, L-NAME-, and cyclosporin A+L-NAME-treated rats had significantly lower bone mineral content and femur weights, and significantly higher pyridinoline levels than did control animals. The administration of L-arginine appeared to prevent bone loss caused by cyclosporin A, suggesting that this amino acid, which can be converted to produce NO, might prove useful in preventing disturbed bone modeling and inhibition of bone growth associated with cyclosporin A therapy. PMID:11090650

  11. Investigation of developmental toxicity and teratogenicity of cyclosporine A, tacrolimus and their combinations with prednisolone.

    PubMed

    Unver Dogan, Nadire; Uysal, Ismihan Ilknur; Fazliogullari, Zeliha; Karabulut, Ahmet Kagan; Acar, Hasan

    2016-06-01

    In this study, it was aimed to investigate the toxic and teratogenic effects of cyclosporine A and tacrolimus and their combinations with prednisolone using an in vitro rat embryo culture technique. Cyclosporine A (4-40 μg/ml), tacrolimus (1-20 μg/ml) and combinations of these drugs with prednisolone (20 μg/ml) at different concentrations were tested. Cyclosporine A and its combination with prednisolone were determined to have toxic effects on embryonic growth after 10 μg/ml. When used alone, the lowest dose of tacrolimus had embryotoxic effects on the total morphological score and number of somites. It was determined that cyclosporine A caused hematoma at 4 μg/ml and higher doses, and tacrolimus especially at 20 μg/ml caused an open neural tube beside hematoma. It was observed that cyclosporine A at 40 μg/ml dose initiated apoptotic effects at a very low rate, prednisolone increased this effect, tacrolimus led to excessive apoptosis after 15 μg/ml, and this effect did not change with prednisolone supplement. We are of the opinion that the doses should be determined carefully when cyclosporine A and tacrolimus are required to be administered to pregnant women with prednisolone combination, as prednisolone increases the toxic effects of cyclosporine A, and increases teratogenic effects of tacrolimus. PMID:26993750

  12. Cyclosporine A stimulated hair growth from mouse vibrissae follicles in an organ culture model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenrong; Fan, Weixin; Yao, Kun

    2012-01-01

    Hypertrichosis is one of the most common side effects of systemic cyclosporine A therapy. It has been previously shown that cyclosporine A induces anagen and inhibits catagen development in mice. In the present study, to explore the mechanisms of cyclosporine A, we investigated the effects of cyclosporine A on hair shaft elongation, hair follicle cell proliferation, apoptosis, and mRNA expression of selected growth factors using an organ culture model of mouse vibrissae. In this model, cyclosporine A stimulated hair growth of normal mouse vibrissae follicles by inhibiting catagen-like development and promoting matrix cell proliferation. In addition, cyclosporine A caused an increase in the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and nerve growth factor (NGF), and inhibited follistatin expression. Our findings provide an explanation for the clinically observed effects of cyclosporine A on hair growth. The mouse vibrissae organ culture offers an attractive model for identifying factors involved in the modulation of hair growth. PMID:23554774

  13. The in vivo effect of cyclosporine A on macrophages.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Y; Baba, T

    1990-01-01

    The macrophage disappearance reaction (MDR) was induced when muramyl dipeptide (MDP) was injected intraperitoneally into guinea pigs bearing macrophage-rich peritoneal exudate cells. Heparin could inhibit the MDR induced by MDP. In the present study, we tested the effect of the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporine A (CsA) on MDR. The MDR was significantly suppressed in guinea pigs given 20 or 100 mg/kg of CsA, although 5 mg/kg of CsA had no effect. The number of macrophages elicited by liquid paraffin was significantly reduced in guinea pigs given with 20 or 100 mg/kg of CsA, but not in those given 5 mg/kg of CsA. These results indicate that CsA could directly affect macrophages in vivo, through a relatively high dose was required. Cyclosporine A (CsA), a cyclic peptide of 11 amino acids, is a fungal metabolite with potent immunosuppressive properties. Numerous experimental and clinical trials have demonstrated its effectiveness in organ transplantation. It has been suggested that primary target cells of CsA were T-lymphocytes, and macrophages were not directly affected. However, recent studies in an in vitro system have shown that some functions of macrophage are affected by CsA. These include chemotaxis (Drath & Kahan, 1983), interleukin-1 generation (Bunjes et al., 1981), prostaglandin E production (Whisler et al., 1984) and procoagulant activity (Carlsen et al., 1985). However, the effect of CsA on macrophages has not been elucidated in vivo. The macrophage disappearance reaction (MDR) is an in vivo manifestation of cell-mediated immunity and/or delayed type hypersensitivity (Sonozaki et al., 1975). Furthermore, our previous study demonstrated a possibility that MDR was an in vivo manifestation of macrophage activation (Ochiya et al., 1982). Muramyl dipeptide (MDP; N-acetyl-muramyl-L-alanyl-D-isoglutamine), a synthetic analogue of water soluble components of bacterial cell wall peptidoglycans, is known to have the ability to activate macrophages (Nagao et al

  14. Cyclosporin A renders target cells resistant to immune cytolysis.

    PubMed

    Hudnall, S D

    1991-01-01

    Exposure of cytolytically susceptible human target cells with therapeutic concentrations of the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A renders these cells highly resistant to T cell-mediated, natural killer (NK) cell-mediated, and complement-mediated cytolysis. The resistance is dose dependent, time dependent and reversible. The resistance is accompanied by target cell growth inhibition as measured by thymidine uptake. Surprisingly, target cell growth inhibition induced by serum depletion is associated with cell-mediated cytolytic resistance. These data suggest that cyclosporin A (CsA) may block some target cell biochemical pathway(s) important in the suicidal cytolytic process which is (are) linked to some G0/G1 cell cycle events. In addition, these results suggest that the increased risk of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated lymphoproliferative disease in human organ transplant recipients may be contributed to by CsA-induced resistance of EBV-transformed B lymphocytes to immune cytolysis. In the post-transplant setting, CsA probably blocks T cell-dependent responses to EBV-transformed B lymphocytes (Bird, A.G., McLachlan, S.M. and Britton, S., Nature 1981, 289: 300) yet leaving the NK cell and antibody-dependent responses intact (Shao-Hsien, C. et al. Transplantation 1983. 35: 127). However, given the direct effect of CsA upon EBV-transformed B lymphocytes, these cells would be rendered resistant to nearly all forms of cytolytic immune control (cytotoxic T lymphocyte, natural killer, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, complement). Unregulated EBV-transformed B lymphocytes may then proliferate in the CsA-treated host thus leading to a polyclonal B cell hyperplasia. Our data would suggest that this early pre-malignant process is likely to be reversible following CsA dose reduction. Indeed, EBV-dependent polyclonal B cell hyperplasia is seen in early post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (Hanto, D.W., et al., Transplantation 1989, 47: 458

  15. S15176 and S16950 interaction with Cyclosporin A antiproliferative effect on cultured human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Albengres, E; Le Louët, H; d'Athis, P; Tillement, J P

    2001-02-01

    S15176 and S16950 are trimetazidine derivatives that antagonize more strongly than the parent drug mitochondrial toxicity, which leads to cellular hypoxia and nephrotoxicity in kidneys experimentally exposed to cyclosporin A. We have investigated whether every derivative might interact or not with the inhibitory effect of Cyclosporin A on the proliferation of cultured human lymphocytes. S15176 significantly increased the antilymphoproliferative effect of Cyclosporin A, whereas S15176 by itself neither displayed any antilymphoproliferative effect, nor did it induce any apoptotic process in cultured human lymphocytes. The effect of S16950 was not significant. PMID:11468012

  16. Cyclosporin A and intravenous immunoglobulin treatment in polymyositis/dermatomyositis

    PubMed Central

    Danieli, M; Malcangi, G; Palmieri, C; Logullo, F; Salvi, A; Piani, M; Danieli, G

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To describe the treatment of polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM) with prednisone (PRED) and cyclosporin A (CSA) alone or associated with intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) and plasmapheresis (PEX). Methods: Between 1992 and 1999 CSA and PRED were used to treat 20 patients with idiopathic myositis (12 with DM, eight with PM), diagnosed according to the Bohan and Peter criteria. In patients with refractory or relapsed disease, IVIg was added alone (seven cases) or synchronised with PEX (six cases). A standardised protocol was used to evaluate the patients, and assess disease activity and treatment response. Results: Despite a transient response to PRED and CSA in 16/20 cases, this combination did not induce full remission in 13/20 cases, which led to the IVIg trial with or without PEX. Patients receiving PRED and CSA plus IVIg had a significantly higher probability of maintaining complete remission at the end of the four year follow up period than those treated with PRED and CSA alone (p<0.001). No further benefit was added by the PEX. The presence of arthritis significantly correlated with a poorer response to treatment (p<0.05). Adverse effects were gingival hyperplasia (one patient) and transient renal dysfunction (one). Conclusions: This open study suggests that combined treatment with PRED, CSA, and IVIg is useful in patients with myositis, even those with refractory or relapsed disease; no increase in the number or type of side effects is seen. PMID:11779756

  17. Supersaturated polymeric micelles for oral cyclosporine A delivery.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongzhen; Xia, Dengning; Zhu, Quanlei; Zhu, Chunliu; Chen, Dan; Gan, Yong

    2013-11-01

    Polymeric micelles provide a promising platform for improving oral absorption of poorly soluble drugs. However, improved understanding of how drug retention within the hydrophobic micelle core can reduce drug absorption is required. We designed supersaturated polymeric micelles (Super-PMs) to increase molecularly dissolved drug concentration and gain an insight into the effect of the degree of supersaturation on oral absorption of cyclosporine A (CsA) in rats. The drug release from Super-PMs increased with an increase in initial supersaturation degrees in micelles. The cellular uptake of coumarin-6 was reduced by the retention of drug in polymer micelles. The transport flux of CsA across Caco-2 monolayer was increased with initial supersaturation degrees of 0.81-3.53 (p < 0.05). However, increase in supersaturation to 5.64 actually resulted in decreased CsA transport. The same trend was observed in a rat in vivo absorption study, in which the highest bioavailability of 134.6 ± 24.7% (relative to a commercial product, Sandimmun Neoral®, p<0.01) was achieved when the supersaturation degree was 3.53. These results demonstrated that Super-PMs were a promising drug delivery system for compounds with low aqueous solubility. This study also provided an experimental proof for the hypothesis that moderately supersaturated formulations are valuable alternative to high supersaturation formulations, resulting in optimal in vivo performance, and the degree of supersaturation should be carefully controlled to optimize drug absorption. PMID:23954511

  18. Exacerbation of allergic contact dermatitis during immunosuppression with cyclosporine A.

    PubMed

    Prignano, F; Bonciolini, V; Bonciani, D; Lotti, T

    2010-08-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is one of the commonest occupational diseases in industrialized countries, where it comprises 20-70% of all occupational diseases. Recent studies found out the top ten allergens, but there are some differences in their frequency in relation to gender and age of patients: Myroxylon pereirae and Carba mix resulted the most prevalent allergens in men, while in women the most common sensitizers were nickel sulfate, PPD, fragrance mix and cobalt chloride. ACD is an inflammatory skin disease caused by repeated skin exposure to contact allergens, in which the lesions are due to T CD8+ cells in a type IV, delayed or cell-mediated, immune reaction. The typical skin lesions of ACD in general outburst in contact areas with the specific allergens and they are erythematosus-squamous lesions with other little differences in relation to localization, for example edema, vesicular-exuding lesions or onychodystrophy. Different treatment options exist and are applied according to the severity of the lesions. Topical treatments consist of bland emollients, corticosteroids ointments, topical immunomodulators such as tacrolimus and pimecrolimus ointments, coal tar and derivatives and irradiation with ultraviolet lights or X-rays; while azathioprine, methotrexate, cyclosporine A, oral retinoids or oral corticosteroids represent systemic options of therapy. Nevertheless, the control of chronic ACD is often difficult, overall in patients with chronic ACD. PMID:20823796

  19. Cyclosporine A protects podocytes by regulating WAVE1 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuejuan; Ding, Fangrui; Wang, Suxia; Li, Baihong; Ding, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that podocytes are direct targets of many classic antiproteinuric drugs. The immunosuppressive drug cyclosporine A (CsA), which is a calcineurin inhibitor, is used to treat proteinuric kidney diseases. One novel mechanism by which CsA reduces proteinuria is by directly stabilizing the podocyte cytoskeleton. Previous studies showed that calcineurin can directly regulate WAVE1 within mouse striatal slices. In this study, WAVE1 was expressed in podocytes and was localized in the podocyte cell bodies and foot processes (FPs). WAVE1 expression increased in both in vivo and in vitro models of puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN)-induced podocyte injury. CsA restored WAVE1 expression and also partially rescued the disordered F-actin arrangement after PAN injury. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that calcineurin directly interacted with WAVE1 and regulated WAVE1 phosphorylation in podocytes. Synaptopodin is a well-characterized target of CsA. WAVE1 overexpression and synaptopodin knockdown experiments directly demonstrated that WAVE1 expression is not dependent on synaptopodin expression, and vice versa. Overexpression of WAVE1 using a WAVE1 plasmid disrupted F-actin structure and promoted podocyte migration compared with the empty vector group. Therefore, WAVE1 may be a novel molecular target for the maintenance of podocyte FPs and for antiproteinuric treatment in the future. PMID:26634693

  20. Cyclosporin-A efficacy in chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Di Leo, E; Nettis, E; Aloia, A M; Moschetta, M; Carbonara, M; Dammacco, F; Vacca, A

    2011-01-01

    Common drugs in the therapy of chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) include antihistamines alone or combined with corticosteroids, but severe unresponsive patients require alternative treatments. This retrospective study aims to evaluate clinical response and safety of low-dose and long-term oral Cyclosporin-A (CyA) in unresponsive patients. One hundred and ten CIU patients, unresponsive to a previous treatment (antihistamines plus prednisone 0.2 mg/kg/day), received additional oral CyA 1–3 mg/kg/day for 6 months. The patients were subdivided into three groups (A, B, C) according to the different CyA doses. Parameters of clinical efficacy including pruritus, and size and number of wheals were evaluated at baseline, after three and six months. All adverse events were recorded. The mean total symptom severity score decreased by 63% in Group A, 76% in Group B, and 85% in Group C after 6 months. Total disappearance of the symptoms was recorded in 43 patients (39.1%): 7 (28%) of Group A; 12 (37.5%) of Group B and 24 (45%) of Group C. After a mean of 2 months from CyA suspension, 14 patients (11%) had recurrence of symptoms. Minor side effects were noted in 8 patients (7%). Our study indicates that low-dose, long-term CyA therapy is efficacious and safe in severe unresponsive CIU. PMID:21496403

  1. Decreased cyclosporin A absorption after treatment with GoLytely lavage solution in rats.

    PubMed

    Santa, T; Nishihara, K; Horie, S; Kotaki, H; Sawada, Y; Kawabe, K; Iga, T

    1994-07-01

    Recently we observed a case in which the cyclosporin A absorption decreased after treatment with GoLytely lavage solution in a kidney transplant patient. In this study, we confirmed the decrease of the blood concentration of cyclosporin A after oral administration by GoLytely (Macrogol 3350) based on experiments with rats. The peak blood cyclosporin A concentration, and the area under the blood drug concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h in the GoLytely-administered group were significantly lower than the control group. In the case of gastrointestinal dysfunction such as diarrhoea, or in treatment with laxatives such as GoLytely lavage solution, whole blood cyclosporin levels must be carefully monitored, and intravenous cyclosporin A may be more suitable for providing adequate immunosuppression. PMID:7996392

  2. Comparative neuroprotective effects of cyclosporin A and NIM811, a nonimmunosuppressive cyclosporin A analog, following traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Mbye, Lamin HAN; Singh, Indrapal N; Carrico, Kimberly M; Saatman, Kathryn E; Hall, Edward D

    2009-01-01

    Earlier experiments have shown that cyclosporin A (CsA) and its non-calcineurin inhibitory analog NIM811 attenuate mitochondrial dysfunction after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI). Presently, we compared the neuroprotective effects of previously determined mitochondrial protective doses of CsA (20 mg/kg intraperitoneally) and NIM811 (10 mg/kg intraperitoneally) when administered at 15 mins postinjury in preventing cytoskeletal (α-spectrin) degradation, neurodegeneration, and neurological dysfunction after severe (1.0 mm) controlled cortical impact (CCI) TBI in mice. In a first set of experiments, we analyzed calpain-mediated α-spectrin proteolysis at 24 h postinjury. Both NIM811 and CsA significantly attenuated the increased α-spectrin breakdown products observed in vehicle-treated animals (P < 0.005). In a second set of experiments, treatment of animals with either NIM811 or CsA at 15 mins and again at 24 h postinjury attenuated motor function impairment at 48 h and 7 days (P < 0.005) and neurodegeneration at 7 days postinjury (P < 0.0001). Delayed administration of NIM811 out to 12 h was still able to significantly reduce α-spectrin degradation. These results show that the neuroprotective mechanism of CsA involves maintenance of mitochondrial integrity and that calcineurin inhibition plays little or no role because the non-calcineurin inhibitory analog, NIM811, is as effective as CsA. PMID:18714331

  3. [Pharmacological modulation of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation: inhibition by cyclosporine A, restoration by trimetazidine].

    PubMed

    Tillement, J P; Crevat, A; Testa, B; Le Ridant, A

    1996-01-01

    When applied to a suspension of isolated mitochondria extracted from rat hepatocytes, cyclosporine A decreases ATP synthesis and induces Ca2+ accumulation. Both effects are considered as possible determinants, even partly, of renal toxicity observed with this drug. Trimetazidine antagonizes both effects at concentrations easily reached in man with therapeutic dosages. It is concluded that the association of both drugs may improve the renal tolerance of Cyclosporine A. PMID:9008901

  4. The role of cyclosporine A on the periodontal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Jayasheela, Mallappa; Mehta, Dhoom Singh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cyclosporin A (CsA) is a known immunosuppressive agent and can be considered as a lifesaving drug in the organ transplantation cases. However, it is associated with many side-effects on different tissues and body organs including the periodontal tissues. The present animal study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of CsA targeting the tissue triad of periodontal tissues, i.e., gingiva, alveolar bone and cementum in rats. Materials and Methods: Twelve 6-week-old male Wistar rats weighing 150-200 g were considered for the case-control study in rats. The rats were divided into 2 groups: (1) CsA (test) group (2) Saline (control) group and were administered the same subcutaneously daily once for 45 days. Impressions were taken and study casts were prepared on weekly basis for the morphometric analysis. At the end of 45 days, rats were sacrificed and specimens were analyzed for histomorphometric analysis. CsA and saline groups were analyzed to test of association using the Student t-test at 99% confidence interval. Results: The morphometric examination showed significant gingival overgrowth in the CsA group, whereas no such growth in the saline group. Similarly, on histomorphometric analysis, there was a significant loss of alveolar bone in CsA group as compared with control. Furthermore, there was large amount of cementum formation accompanied by insertion of new connective tissue fibers especially in the cervical region of the tooth in CsA group rats. Conclusion: CsA targets the periodontal tissues (gingiva, alveolar bone and cementum) in different pattern. Its role in cementogenesis can be utilized for periodontal regeneration, if its local application is testified and verified in the future animal studies. PMID:24379871

  5. Cyclosporin A Disrupts Notch Signaling and Vascular Lumen Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Raghav; Botros, Mark A.; Nacev, Benjamin A.; Albig, Allan R.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CSA) suppresses immune function by blocking the cyclophilin A and calcineurin/NFAT signaling pathways. In addition to immunosuppression, CSA has also been shown to have a wide range of effects in the cardiovascular system including disruption of heart valve development, smooth muscle cell proliferation, and angiogenesis inhibition. Circumstantial evidence has suggested that CSA might control Notch signaling which is also a potent regulator of cardiovascular function. Therefore, the goal of this project was to determine if CSA controls Notch and to dissect the molecular mechanism(s) by which CSA impacts cardiovascular homeostasis. We found that CSA blocked JAG1, but not Dll4 mediated Notch1 NICD cleavage in transfected 293T cells and decreased Notch signaling in zebrafish embryos. CSA suppression of Notch was linked to cyclophilin A but not calcineurin/NFAT inhibition since N-MeVal-4-CsA but not FK506 decreased Notch1 NICD cleavage. To examine the effect of CSA on vascular development and function, double transgenic Fli1-GFP/Gata1-RFP zebrafish embryos were treated with CSA and monitored for vasculogenesis, angiogenesis, and overall cardiovascular function. Vascular patterning was not obviously impacted by CSA treatment and contrary to the anti-angiogenic activity ascribed to CSA, angiogenic sprouting of ISV vessels was normal in CSA treated embryos. Most strikingly, CSA treated embryos exhibited a progressive decline in blood flow that was associated with eventual collapse of vascular luminal structures. Vascular collapse in zebrafish embryos was partially rescued by global Notch inhibition with DAPT suggesting that disruption of normal Notch signaling by CSA may be linked to vascular collapse. However, multiple signaling pathways likely cause the vascular collapse phenotype since both cyclophilin A and calcineurin/NFAT were required for normal vascular function. Collectively, these results show that CSA is a novel inhibitor of Notch signaling and

  6. The NMR structure of cyclosporin A bound to cyclophilin in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, C.; Wilder, G.; von Freyberg, B.; Braun, W.; Wuethrich, K. ); Traber, R.; Widmer, H. )

    1991-07-02

    Cyclosporin A bound to the presumed receptor protein cyclophilin was studied in aqueous solution at pH 6.0 by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy using uniform {sup 15}N- or {sup 13}C-labeling of cyclosporin A and heteronuclear spectral editing techniques. With an input of 108 intramolecular NOEs and four vicinal {sup 3}J{sub HN{alpha}} coupling constants, the three-dimensional structure of cyclosporin A bound to cyclophilin was calculated with the distance geometry program DISMAN, and the structures resulting from 181 converged calculations were energy refined with the program FANTOM. A group of 120 conformers was selected on the basis of the residual constraint violations and energy criteria to represent the solution structure. The average of the pairwise root-mean-square distances calculated for the backbone atoms of the 120 structures was 0.58 {angstrom}. The structure represents a novel conformation of cyclosporin A, for which the backbone conformation is significantly different from the previously reported structures in single crystals and in chloroform solution. The structure has all peptide bonds in the trans form, contains no elements of regular secondary structure and no intramolecular hydrogen bonds, and exposes nearly all polar groups to its environment. The root-mean-square distance between the backbone atoms of the crystal structure of cyclosporin A and the mean of the 120 conformers representing the NMR structure of cyclosporin A bound to cyclophilin is 2.5 {angstrom}.

  7. An underlying role for hepatobiliary dysfunction in cyclosporine A nephrotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Aleo, Michael D.

    2008-07-01

    Renal-derived cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLT), such as leukotrienes C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) and D{sub 4} (LTD{sub 4}) are thought to mediate acute and chronic cyclosporine A (CSA) nephrotoxicity. However, whole-body cysLT elimination is regulated primarily by hepatobiliary excretion. Since CSA is known to alter hepatobiliary function, the effects of CSA on whole-body cysLT elimination were investigated in vivo, with respect to hepatobiliary and renal function. Male rats were anesthetized and cannulated (jugular vein, bile duct, and urinary bladder). A tracer dose of tritiated LTC{sub 4} ({sup 3}H-LTC{sub 4}) was administered systemically (i.v.) immediately following vehicle and then 90 min later after vehicle or CSA. In vehicle/vehicle controls, hepatobiliary {sup 3}H-cysLT elimination predominated over renal elimination without altering glomerular filtration rate (GFR), bile flow, and urine production. {sup 3}H-cysLT elimination kinetics were comparable between each 90 min collection period. In vehicle/CSA-treated rats, an acutely nephrotoxic dose of CSA (20 mg/kg, i.v.) reduced urine flow 74 {+-} 9% and caused a transient reduction in GFR, while total bile flow decreased 40 {+-} 13%. Hepatobiliary and renal {sup 3}H-cysLT elimination was also impaired 59 {+-} 5 and 61 {+-} 18%, respectively. In contrast, a non-nephrotoxic dose (2 mg/kg i.v.) increased renal {sup 3}H-cysLT elimination due to impaired hepatobiliary elimination without affecting GFR, bile flow or urine production. Both doses caused {sup 3}H-cysLT retention in hepatic and renal tissue. These findings demonstrate that CSA alters whole-body handling of cysLT by disrupting hepatobiliary cysLT elimination. This disruption leads to increased renal exposure to systemically derived cysLT and renal cysLT tissue retention. Renal exposure to and accumulation of systemically derived cysLT products may be underlying factors in CSA nephrotoxicity.

  8. Potential interest of anti-ischemic agents for limiting cyclosporin A nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Simon, N; Tillement, J P; Albengres, E; Jaber, K; Hestin, D; Roux, F; Olivier, P; d'Athis, P; Kessler, M; Berland, Y; Crevat, A

    1997-01-01

    Chronic administration of cyclosporin A induces nephrotoxicity in humans. This is related to a cyclosporin A-induced constriction of afferent glomerular arterioles and mesangial cells, which leads to a decrease in filtration pressure and creatinine clearance. Afterwards, cellular lesions are observed involving mainly tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis, both of which are nonspecific. The initial mechanism of its toxicity is not clearly explained. The current pharmacological approach is symptomatic in order to counteract or minimize the consequences of a prime cause, which still remains to be defined. However, cyclosporin A has a deletereous effect on mitochondrial functions and mainly on ATP synthesis, which occurs when Ca2+ accumulates in matrix mitochondria. The effects of trimetazidine, an antischemic drug used in the treatment of angina pectoris, have been assessed. This drug is effective in experimental models of hypoxia induced by cyclosporin A: it restores ATP synthesis previously decreased by Ca2+ and cyclosporin A, and releases a part of Ca2+ excess accumulated by mitochondria at concentrations reached in humans at usual dosage regimens. At higher concentrations, it reverses the mitochondrial permeability transition previously generated (opened) by Ca2+ and a pro-oxidant such as terbutylperoxide (t-BH). It was also observed that trimetazidine does not modify the immunosuppressive effects of cyclosporin A in various models. These data suggest that nephrotoxicity of cyclosporin A is not irrevocably linked to its immunosuppressive effect but that it may be possible to counteract at least partly its nephrotoxic effects without altering its effectiveness in preventing graft rejection. PMID:9526174

  9. Exposure to Nerve Growth Factor Worsens Nephrotoxic Effect Induced by Cyclosporine A in HK-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lofaro, Danilo; Toteda, Giuseppina; Lupinacci, Simona; Leone, Francesca; Gigliotti, Paolo; Papalia, Teresa; Bonofiglio, Renzo

    2013-01-01

    Nerve growth factor is a neurotrophin that promotes cell growth, differentiation, survival and death through two different receptors: TrkANTR and p75NTR. Nerve growth factor serum concentrations increase during many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, glomerulonephritis, chronic kidney disease, end-stage renal disease and, particularly, in renal transplant. Considering that nerve growth factor exerts beneficial effects in the treatment of major central and peripheral neurodegenerative diseases, skin and corneal ulcers, we asked whether nerve growth factor could also exert a role in Cyclosporine A-induced graft nephrotoxicity. Our hypothesis was raised from basic evidence indicating that Cyclosporine A-inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT pathway increases nerve growth factor expression levels. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of nerve growth factor and its receptors in the damage exerted by Cyclosporine A in tubular renal cells, HK-2. Our results showed that in HK-2 cells combined treatment with Cyclosporine A + nerve growth factor induced a significant reduction in cell vitality concomitant with a down-regulation of Cyclin D1 and up-regulation of p21 levels respect to cells treated with Cyclosporine A alone. Moreover functional experiments showed that the co-treatment significantly up-regulated human p21promoter activity by involvement of the Sp1 transcription factor, whose nuclear content was negatively regulated by activated NFATc1. In addition we observed that the combined exposure to Cyclosporine A + nerve growth factor promoted an up-regulation of p75 NTR and its target genes, p53 and BAD leading to the activation of intrinsic apoptosis. Finally, the chemical inhibition of p75NTR down-regulated the intrinsic apoptotic signal. We describe two new mechanisms by which nerve growth factor promotes growth arrest and apoptosis in tubular renal cells exposed to Cyclosporine A. PMID:24244623

  10. Beneficial effects of nilotinib, tyrosine kinase inhibitor on cyclosporine-A induced renal damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Nader, Manar A; Attia, Ghalia M

    2016-04-01

    Nilotinib is a known tyrosine kinase inhibitor that has been approved for treatment of leukemia. The possible protective effect of nilotinib on cyclosporine A-induced nephropathy was investigated in this study and the possible underlying mechanism was explored. Nilotinib (25mg/kg, orally) and cyclosporine A (15 mg/kg/day, subcutaneous) were given to male SD rats for 28 days. Cyclosporine A alone was found to significantly increase serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, lactate dehydrogenase, urinary micrototal protein, renal thiobarbituric acid reactive substance, Bax, cytosol cytochrome c release and nuclear factor kappa B activation. Moreover, cyclosporine A significantly reduced serum albumin, creatinine clearance, urinary total antioxidant, superoxide dismutase, glutathione and Bcl2 protein levels. Pathological results showed that in the model group; there was an obvious shrinkage and congestion of the glomeruli and widening of urinary spaces of renal corpuscles, in addition to marked renal tubular injury and fibrosis, while in the group pretreated with nilotinib all measured serum, renal and pathological changes were significantly reduced. This protective effect of nilotinib is linked to the enhanced antioxidant status and reduced inflammation and apoptosis induced by cyclosporine A. PMID:26844915

  11. Cyclosporin A for the treatment of graft-versus-host disease in man.

    PubMed

    Powles, R L; Barrett, A J; Clink, H; Kay, H E; Sloane, J; McElwain, T J

    Cyclosporin A was given to five patients with acute leukaemia in whom graft-versus-host disease (G.V.H.D.) had developed after bone-marrow transplantation from sibling donors. In all instances the acute erythematous skin reaction of G.V.H.D. resolved within two days, but four of the five patients died. Cyclosporin A in high doses produced anorexia, nausea, and a reversible rise in blood-urea. The four patients who died all had liver damage, but the histological changes varied. Cyclosporin A modifies the acute skin reaction of G.V.H.D. In the management of liver and gut G.V.H.D., and in prophylaxis of G.V.H.D., its role needs to be determined. PMID:82837

  12. The effect of systemic cyclosporin A on a hairless mouse model of photoaging.

    PubMed

    Moloney, S J; Learn, D B

    1992-10-01

    The mechanisms that cause skin wrinkling in response to chronic exposure to sunlight are unknown. We investigated the possibility that wrinkling of Skh-1 hairless mice is associated with an ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced immunologic alteration. Exposing Skh-1 hairless mice to a regimen of nonerythemal UV-B (290-320 nm) radiation induced skin wrinkles after 6-7 weeks. Concomitant treatment with cyclosporin A decreased the time to the onset of wrinkles to approximately 4 weeks. Exposing HRS/J hairless mice or athymic nude mice to a similar nonerythemal UV-B radiation regimen for 10 weeks failed to induce skin wrinkles. Concomitant administration of cyclosporin A and UV-B radiation for 7 weeks to HRS/J hairless mice induced no skin wrinkles. Ultraviolet-B or UV-B plus cyclosporin A exposure caused increased immunohistochemical staining for Ia and F4/80 antigens in the upper dermis of tissue from Skh-1 mice, as compared to controls. Treating Skh-1 mice with UV-B radiation plus cyclosporin A was also associated with a large increase in the number of CD3+ cells in the dermis. These staining patterns were absent in similarly treated HRS/J hairless mice. Dermal mast cell numbers in Skh-1 mice were 2-3-fold higher than in HRS/J, athymic nude or NSA mice. Treatment with cyclosporin A increased Skh-1 dermal mast cell numbers approximately 2-fold but had no effect on the dermal mast cell numbers in HRS/J or NSA mice. Based on these findings we postulate that UV-B light and cyclosporin A exacerbate an immunological condition in Skh-1 mice, one consequence of which is manifested as skin wrinkles. Thus, the induction of skin wrinkles in this mouse strain may have no relevance to the wrinkles observed in human skin after chronic exposure to sunlight. PMID:1454879

  13. Cyclosporine A and PSC833 inhibit ABCA1 function via direct binding.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Kohjiro; Maeda, Minami; Mañucat, Noralyn B; Ueda, Kazumitsu

    2013-02-01

    ATP-binding cassette protein A1 (ABCA1) plays a key role in generating high-density lipoprotein (HDL). However, the detailed mechanism of HDL formation remains unclear; in order to reveal it, chemicals that specifically block each step of HDL formation would be useful. Cyclosporine A inhibits ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux, but it is not clear whether this is mediated via inhibition of calcineurin. We analyzed the effects of cyclosporine A and related compounds on ABCA1 function in BHK/ABCA1 cells. Cyclosporine A, FK506, and pimecrolimus inhibited ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux in a concentration-dependent manner, with IC(50) of 7.6, 13.6, and 7.0μM, respectively. An mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin also inhibited ABCA1, with IC(50) of 18.8μM. The primary targets for these drugs were inhibited at much lower concentrations in BHK/ABCA1 cells, suggesting that they were not involved. Binding of [(3)H] cyclosporine A to purified ABCA1 could be clearly detected. Furthermore, a non-immunosuppressive cyclosporine, PSC833, inhibited ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux with IC(50) of 1.9μM, and efficiently competed with [(3)H] cyclosporine A binding to ABCA1. These results indicate that cyclosporine A and PSC833 inhibit ABCA1 via direct binding, and that the ABCA1 inhibitor PSC833 is an excellent candidate for further investigations of the detailed mechanisms underlying formation of HDL. PMID:23153588

  14. Cyclosporine A or intravenous cyclophosphamide for lupus nephritis: the Cyclofa-Lune study.

    PubMed

    Zavada, J; Pesickova, Ss; Rysava, R; Olejarova, M; Horák, P; Hrncír, Z; Rychlík, I; Havrda, M; Vítova, J; Lukác, J; Rovensky, J; Tegzova, D; Böhmova, J; Zadrazil, J; Hána, J; Dostál, C; Tesar, V

    2010-10-01

    Intravenous cyclophosphamide is considered to be the standard of care for the treatment of proliferative lupus nephritis. However, its use is limited by potentially severe toxic effects. Cyclosporine A has been suggested to be an efficient and safe treatment alternative to cyclophosphamide. Forty patients with clinically active proliferative lupus nephritis were randomly assigned to one of two sequential induction and maintenance treatment regimens based either on cyclophosphamide or Cyclosporine A. The primary outcomes were remission (defined as normal urinary sediment, proteinuria <0.3 g/24 h, and stable s-creatinine) and response to therapy (defined as stable s-creatinine, 50% reduction in proteinuria, and either normalization of urinary sediment or significant improvement in C3) at the end of induction and maintenance phase. Secondary outcomes were incidence of adverse events, and relapse-free survival. At the end of the induction phase, 24% of the 21 patients treated by cyclophosphamide achieved remission, and 52% achieved response, as compared with 26% and 43%, respectively of the 19 patients treated by the Cyclosporine A. At the end of the maintenance phase, 14% of patients in cyclophosphamide group, and 37% in Cyclosporine A group had remission, and 38% and 58% respectively response. Treatment with Cyclosporine A was associated with transient increase in blood pressure and reversible decrease in glomerular filtration rate. There was no significant difference in median relapse-free survival. In conclusion, Cyclosporine A was as effective as cyclophosphamide in the trial of sequential induction and maintenance treatment in patients with proliferative lupus nephritis and preserved renal function.(ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00976300) PMID:20605876

  15. Fibroadenomatosis involving bilateral breasts and axillary accessory breast tissues in a renal transplant recipient given cyclosporin A.

    PubMed

    Bulakci, Mesut; Gocmez, Ahmet; Demir, Ali Aslan; Salmaslioglu, Artur; Tukenmez, Mustafa; Yavuz, Ekrem; Acunas, Gulden

    2014-10-01

    We present the mammographic and sonographic findings in a case of fibroadenomatosis involving both breasts and axillae in a renal transplant patient after 16 years of treatment with cyclosporin A. Awareness of the fact that cyclosporin A may induce the formation of fibroadenomas, including in accessory breast tissue, is important for correct diagnosis and preventing unnecessary intervention. PMID:25131521

  16. Cyclosporine A attenuates 3-nitropropionic acid-induced Huntington-like symptoms in rats: possible nitric oxide mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Puneet; Kalonia, Harikesh; Kumar, Anil

    2010-01-01

    Cyclosporine A is a well-known immunosuppressant drug that is currently used for prevention of allograft rejection. The current study was conducted to explore the therapeutic potential of cyclosporine A against 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP)-induced neurotoxicity, an animal model of Huntington disease (HD). Systemic administration of 3-NP (10 mg/kg) for 14 days significantly impaired body weight, motor activity, biochemical parameters (raised lipid peroxidation, nitrite concentration, depletion of superoxide dismutase [SOD] and catalase), and mitochondrial enzymes. Cyclosporine A (2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg) treatment significantly attenuated behavioral, biochemical, and cellular alterations. Furthermore, L-arginine pretreatment with cyclosporine A (5 mg/kg) significantly reversed the protective effect of cyclosporine A. However, L-nitro-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 10 mg/kg) pretreatment potentiated the protective effect of cyclosporine A (5 mg/kg). Study highlights the therapeutic potential of cyclosporine A in the treatment of HP. Study suggests that nitric oxide (NO) modulation is involved in the neuroprotective effect of cyclosporine A against 3-NP neurotoxicity. PMID:20448265

  17. Recalcitrant pyoderma gangrenosum--two cases successfully treated with cyclosporin A.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, G M; Ross, J S; Cronin, E; Smith, N P; Black, M M

    1992-01-01

    The successful use of cyclosporin A (CSA) in organ transplantation is now well established. In recent years its usefulness has extended to the treatment of cutaneous autoimmune disorders, including pyoderma gangrenosum (P.G.). We report two further cases of recalcitrant P.G., both associated with rheumatoid arthritis (R.A.) which responded to low dose CSA. PMID:1424262

  18. Effect of cyclosporin A particles of varying diameters on gastric cancer cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Xing, X L; Lu, Y; Qiu, H L

    2016-01-01

    Human health is significantly threatened by gastric cancer, which is the most common malignant tumor; although drastic, surgery is currently the only way to cure it. However, high recurrence rates and low survival rates are associated with the disease. Therefore, to improve the effectiveness of gastric cancer treatment and to increase the clinical cure rate, we investigated the effect of cyclosporin A particles of varying diameter on gastric cancer cell apoptosis. Flow cytometry was used to detect apoptosis induced by Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide-double labeling. We also determined the content of reactive oxygen species and the expression level of P-glycoprotein in cells after treatment with cyclosporin A. The results indicated that increases in the concentration and action time of cyclosporin A were associated with statistically significant increases in the apoptosis rate of gastric cancer cells when the experimental and control groups were compared (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). In conclusion, during a certain action time and concentration range, cyclosporin A inhibits the proliferation of human gastric cancer cells and can induce their apoptosis. PMID:27173251

  19. Novel Oxidation of Cyclosporin A: Preparation of Cyclosporin Methyl Vinyl Ketone (Cs-MVK)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) was converted into cyclosporin methyl vinyl ketone (Cs-MVK) by either a biocatalytic method utilizing 1-hydroxybenzotriazole-mediated laccase oxidation or by a chemical oxidation using t-butyl hydroperoxide and potassium ­periodate as co-oxidants. Cs-MVK is a novel, versatile sy...

  20. Effects of gold sodium thiomalate, cyclosporin A, cyclophosphamide, and placebo on collagen-induced arthritis in rats.

    PubMed

    Cannon, G W; McCall, S; Cole, B C; Radov, L A; Ward, J R; Griffiths, M M

    1993-03-01

    The prophylactic and therapeutic effects of gold sodium thiomalate, cyclosporin A, cyclophosphamide, and placebo on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) were evaluated in DA rats. Prophylactic treatment with cyclosporin A and cyclophosphamide suppressed the arthritis incidence, clinical inflammation, destructive bone changes, and development of anti-collagen antibody in DA rats subsequently injected with porcine type-II collagen. Therapeutic treatment with cyclosporin A and cyclophosphamide had a definite suppression on established CIA when started 21 days after the initial collagen injection, but the suppression was less marked than that of prophylactic treatment. Gold had no impact on CIA in DA rats when administered either prophylactically or therapeutically. PMID:8213350

  1. The influence of cyclosporin A on experimental autoimmune thyroid disease in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, A.M.; Rennie, D.P.; Weetman, A.P.; Hassman, R.A.; Foord, S.M.; Dieguez, C.; Hall, R.

    1983-01-01

    Female PVG/c rats, thymectomised on weaning and given 4 courses of whole body irradiation to a total dose of 1000 rads, developed experimental autoimmune thyroid disease (EAITD) as assessed by histological evidence of thyroiditis and circulating levels of antithyroglobulin antibodies. Hypothyroidism resulted. Induction of the disease was associated with a highly significant fall in T lymphocyte numbers. Eight weeks after their last dose of irradiation the animals commenced treatment with cyclosporin A (10 mg/kg rat/day, intragastrically) and were treated for varying time intervals thereafter. The reversal of the T lymphocyte helper: suppressor ratio on cyclosporin A therapy was associated with a significant improvement in the disease process. The alterations in the T cell subsets and in the disease lasted only as long as the drug was administered and thereafter reverted towards that seen in the control groups of animals receiving no treatment.

  2. Development and characterization of mucoadhesive chitosan films for ophthalmic delivery of cyclosporine A.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Kris; Van den Plas, Dave; Kerimova, Sabina; Carleer, Robert; Adriaensens, Peter; Weyenberg, Wim; Ludwig, Annick

    2014-09-10

    Ocular chitosan films were prepared in order to prolong ocular delivery of cyclosporine A. The mucoadhesive films were prepared using the solvent casting evaporation method. A 2(4) full factorial design was used to evaluate the effect of 4 preparation parameters on the film thickness, swelling index and mechanical properties. Moreover, uniformity of content and in vitro drug release were investigated. Possible interactions between the film excipients were studied by FTIR analysis. In vitro experiments were performed in order to evaluate the cytotoxicity and anti-inflammatory activity of the chitosan films. Film thickness, water uptake, mechanical properties and in vitro release of cyclosporine A were dependent on film composition, especially on the amount of plasticizer. Lower drug release was measured from chitosan films containing a higher amount of plasticizer as glycerol decreased the swelling of chitosan films. FTIR spectra suggest a reorganization of hydrogen bonds between chitosan chains in the presence of glycerol and cyclodextrins. None of the film formulations showed significant cytotoxicity as compared to the negative control using human epithelial cells (HaCaT). Cyclosporine A dispersed in the various film formulations remained anti-inflammatorily active as significant suppression of interleukin-2 secretion in concanavalin A stimulated Jurkat T cells was measured. PMID:24929014

  3. Effect of Cyclosporin A on the Uptake of D3-Selective PET Radiotracers in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Zhude; Li, Shihong; Xu, Jinbin; Chu, Wenhua; Jones, Lynne A.; Luedtke, Robert R.; Mach, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Four benzamide analogs having a high affinity and selectivity for D3 versus D2 receptors were radiolabeled with 11C or 18F for in vivo evaluation. Methods Precursors were synthesized and the four D3 selective benzamide analogs were radiolabeled. The tissue distribution and brain uptake of the four compounds were evaluated in control rats and rats pretreated with cyclosporin A, a modulator of P-glycoprotein and an inhibitor of other ABC efflux transporters that contribute to the blood brain barrier. MicroPET imaging was carried out for [11C]6 in a control and a cyclosporin A pre-treated rat. Results All four compounds showed low brain uptake in control rats at 5 and 30 min post-injection; despite recently reported rat behavioral studies conducted on analogs 6 (WC-10) and 7 (WC-44). Following administration of cyclosporin A, increased brain uptake was observed with all four PET radiotracers at both 5 and 30 min post-i.v. injection. An increase in brain uptake following modulation/inhibition of the ABC transporters was also observed in the microPET study. Conclusions These data suggest that D3 selective conformationally-flexible benzamide analogs which contain a N-2-methoxyphenylpiperazine moiety are substrates for P-glycoprotein or other ABC transporters expressed at the blood-brain barrier, and that PET radiotracers containing this pharmacophore may display low brain uptake in rodents due to the action of these efflux transporters. PMID:21718948

  4. Atypical dissemination of the highly neurotropic Borna disease virus during persistent infection in cyclosporine A-treated, immunosuppressed rats.

    PubMed Central

    Stitz, L; Schilken, D; Frese, K

    1991-01-01

    In adult rats infected with Borna disease virus, the virus was found exclusively in the brain, whereas in cyclosporine A-treated rats, infectious virus was also detected in peripheral nerve fibers and, unexpectedly, in adjacent organ-specific cells. In contrast to untreated virus-infected rats, no major histocompatibility complex class II expression was found in the brain of cyclosporine A-treated animals. Images PMID:1985209

  5. A novel calcineurin-independent activity of cyclosporin A in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Singh-Babak, Sheena D; Shekhar, Tanvi; Smith, Andrew M; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Cowen, Leah E

    2012-10-01

    Fungi rely on regulatory networks to coordinate sensing of environmental stress with initiation of responses crucial for survival. Antifungal drugs are a specific type of environmental stress with broad clinical relevance. Small molecules with antifungal activity are ubiquitous in the environment, and are produced by a myriad of microbes in competitive natural communities. The echinocandins are fungal fermentation products and the most recently developed class of antifungals, with those in clinical use being semisynthetic derivatives that target the fungal cell wall by inhibiting 1,3-β-D-glucan synthase. Recent studies implicate the protein phosphatase calcineurin as a key regulator of cellular stress responses required for fungal survival of echinocandin-induced cell wall stress. Pharmacological inhibition of calcineurin can be achieved using the natural product and immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A, which inhibits calcineurin by binding to the immunophilin Cpr1. This drug-protein complex inhibits the interaction between the regulatory and catalytic subunits of calcineurin, an interaction necessary for calcineurin function. Here, we report on potent activity of cyclosporin A when combined with the echinocandin micafungin against the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is independent of its known mechanism of action of calcineurin inhibition. This calcineurin-independent synergy does not involve any of the 12 immunophilins known in yeast, individually or in combination, and is not mediated by any of the multidrug transporters encoded or controlled by YOR1, SNQ2, PDR5, PDR10, PDR11, YCF1, PDR15, ADP1, VMR1, NFT1, BPT1, YBT1, YNR070w, YOL075c, AUS1, PDR12, PDR1 and/or PDR3. Genome-wide haploinsufficiency profiling (HIP) and homozygous deletion profiling (HOP) strongly implicate the cell wall biosynthesis and integrity pathways as being central to the calcineurin-independent activity of cyclosporin A. Thus, systems level chemical genomic approaches implicate

  6. Interaction between castanospermine an immunosuppressant and cyclosporin A in rat cardiac transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hibberd, Adrian D; Clark, David A; Trevillian, Paul R; Mcelduff, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the interaction between castanospermine and cyclosporin A (CsA) and to provide an explanation for it. METHODS: The alkaloid castanospermine was prepared from the seeds of Castanospermum austral consistently achieving purity. Rat heterotopic cardiac transplantation and mixed lymphocyte reactivity were done using genetically inbred strains of PVG (donor) and DA (recipient). For the mixed lymphocyte reaction stimulator cells were irradiated with 3000 rads using a linear accelerator. Cyclosporin A was administered by gavage and venous blood collected 2 h later (C2). The blood levels of CsA (Neoral) were measured by immunoassay which consisted of a homogeneous enzyme assay (EMIT) on Cobas Mira. Statistical analyses of interactions were done by an accelerated failure time model with Weibull distribution for allograft survival and logistic regression for the mixed lymphocyte reactivity. RESULTS: Castanospermine prolonged transplant survival times as a function of dose even at relatively low doses. Cyclosporin A also prolonged transplant survival times as a function of dose particularly at doses above 2 mg/kg. There were synergistic interactions between castanospermine and CsA in the prolongation of cardiac allograft survival for dose ranges of CsA by castanospermine of (0 to 2) mg/kg by (0 to 200) mg/kg (HR = 0.986; 95%CI: 0.981-0.992; P < 0.001) and (0 to 3) mg/kg by (0 to 100) mg/kg (HR = 0.986; 95%CI: 0.981-0.992; P < 0.001) respectively. The addition of castanospermine did not significantly increase the levels of cyclosporin A on day 3 or day 6 for all doses of CsA. On the contrary, cessation of castanospermine in the presence of CsA at 2 mg/kg significantly increased the CsA level (P = 0.002). Castanospermine inhibited mixed lymphocyte reactivity in a dose dependent manner but without synergistic interaction. CONCLUSION: There is synergistic interaction between castanospermine and CsA in rat cardiac transplantation. Neither the mixed lymphocyte

  7. Conversion from Tacrolimus to Cyclosporine A Improves Glucose Tolerance in HCV-Positive Renal Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Handisurya, Ammon; Kerscher, Corinna; Tura, Andrea; Herkner, Harald; Payer, Berit Anna; Mandorfer, Mattias; Werzowa, Johannes; Winnicki, Wolfgang; Reiberger, Thomas; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra; Pacini, Giovanni; Säemann, Marcus; Schmidt, Alice

    2016-01-01

    Background Calcineurin-inhibitors and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection increase the risk of post-transplant diabetes mellitus. Chronic HCV infection promotes insulin resistance rather than beta-cell dysfunction. The objective was to elucidate whether a conversion from tacrolimus to cyclosporine A affects fasting and/or dynamic insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion or all in HCV-positive renal transplant recipients. Methods In this prospective, single-center study 10 HCV-positive renal transplant recipients underwent 2h-75g-oral glucose tolerance tests before and three months after the conversion of immunosuppression from tacrolimus to cyclosporine A. Established oral glucose tolerance test-based parameters of fasting and dynamic insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion were calculated. Data are expressed as median (IQR). Results After conversion, both fasting and challenged glucose levels decreased significantly. This was mainly attributable to a significant amelioration of post-prandial dynamic glucose sensitivity as measured by the oral glucose sensitivity-index OGIS [422.17 (370.82–441.92) vs. 468.80 (414.27–488.57) mL/min/m2, p = 0.005), which also resulted in significant improvements of the disposition index (p = 0.017) and adaptation index (p = 0.017) as markers of overall glucose tolerance and beta-cell function. Fasting insulin sensitivity (p = 0.721), insulinogenic index as marker of first-phase insulin secretion [0.064 (0.032–0.106) vs. 0.083 (0.054–0.144) nmol/mmol, p = 0.093) and hepatic insulin extraction (p = 0.646) remained unaltered. No changes of plasma HCV-RNA levels (p = 0.285) or liver stiffness (hepatic fibrosis and necroinflammation, p = 0.463) were observed after the conversion of immunosuppression. Conclusions HCV-positive renal transplant recipients show significantly improved glucose-stimulated insulin sensitivity and overall glucose tolerance after conversion from tacrolimus to cyclosporine A. Considering the HCV

  8. Successful treatment of severe arthralgia associated with palmoplantar pustulosis with low-dose oral cyclosporine A.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Kimura, K; Katayama, I; Nishioka, K

    1995-07-01

    Two patients with severe arthralgia associated with palmoplantar pustulosis (PPP) were treated with oral cyclosporine A (CsA). Clinical efficacy was assessed on a 0-4 point scale for erythema, desquamation, infiltration, and pustulation, and on a 0-3 point pain scale. Skin lesions and arthralgia improved within twelve weeks with low dose CsA ranging from 2.1 to 2.2 mg/kg/day. High levels of plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) were reduced to the normal range. PMID:7560444

  9. The effect of cyclosporin A on peripheral blood T cell subpopulations in renal allografts.

    PubMed Central

    Sweny, P; Tidman, N

    1982-01-01

    Treatment with cyclosporin A (CyA) produces a reversal of the normal ratio of OKT4+ (inducer type) to OKT84 (suppressor-cytotoxic type) cells so that renal allograft recipients on CyA alone develop a four-fold increase in the absolute number of circulating OKT8 positive cells. Conventional immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisolone reduces both populations of T cells without altering the ratio of OKT4+ to OKT8+ cells. This effect of CyA may help to explain its action as an immunosuppressive agent. PMID:6210475

  10. Gelatin-stabilised microemulsion-based organogels facilitates percutaneous penetration of Cyclosporin A in vitro and dermal pharmacokinetics in vivo.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongzhuo; Wang, Yongjun; Han, Fei; Yao, Huimin; Li, Sanming

    2007-11-01

    Gelatin-stabilised microemulsion-based organogels (MBGs) are very useful in transdermal and topical delivery of hydrophobic drugs because of their lipophilic nature. MBGs systems possessing a potentially improved skin bioavailability of Cyclosporin A were designed and explored for some characteristics. The release characteristics of drug from MBGs were studied according to drug concentration. As the concentration of drug increased, the release of drug from gel increased, showing concentration dependency. Percutaneous penetration studies using rat skin in vitro showed that the deposition of Cyclosporin A was significantly improved by MBGs compared to the control. We also evaluated the therapeutic advantage of dermal administration of Cyclosporin A in rat model. Local (subcutaneous and skin), systemic concentrations and organ distribution (liver and kidney) were evaluated serially following topical and oral application of the drug. In rat dermal applied with the MBGs containing Cyclosporin A, the deposition of the drug into skin and subcutaneous fat was, respectively, almost 55- and 3-fold higher than the concentrations compared with oral administration. Systemic distribution in blood, liver and kidney was much lower following topical than following oral administration. With high local concentrations and minimal distribution to other organs via the circulation, topical applied MBGs loaded with Cyclosporin A might deliver maximal therapeutic effect to local tissue while avoiding the side effects seen with systemic therapy. The histopathological findings revealed that the new MBGs vehicle was a safe vehicle for topical drug delivery systems. PMID:17705159

  11. Oxidative Stress and Liver Morphology in Experimental Cyclosporine A-Induced Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Czechowska, Grażyna; Irla-Miduch, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Cyclosporine A is an immunosuppressive drug used after organ's transplantation. The adverse effects on such organs as kidney or liver may limit its use. Oxidative stress is proposed as one of the mechanisms of organs injury. The study was designed to elucidate CsA-induced changes in liver function, morphology, oxidative stress parameters, and mitochondria in rat's hepatocytes. Male Wistar rats were used: group A (control) receiving physiological saline, group B cyclosporine A in a dose of 15 mg/kg/day subcutaneously, and group C the CsA-vehicle (olive oil). On the 28th day rats were anesthetized. The following biochemical changes were observed in CsA-treated animals: increased levels of ALT, AST, and bilirubin in the serum, statistically significant changes in oxidative stress parameters, and lipid peroxidation products in the liver supernatants: MDA+4HAE, GSH, GSSG, caspase 3 activity, and ADP/ATP, NAD+/NADH, and NADP+/NADPH ratios. Microscopy of the liver revealed congestion, sinusoidal dilatation, and focal hepatocytes necrosis with mononuclear cell infiltration. Electron microscope revealed marked mitochondrial damage. Biochemical studies indicated that CsA treatment impairs liver function and triggers oxidative stress and redox imbalance in rats hepatocytes. Changes of oxidative stress markers parallel with mitochondrial damage suggest that these mechanisms play a crucial role in the course of CsA hepatotoxicity. PMID:27298826

  12. Cyclosporin A and tissue antigen matching in bone transplantation. Fibular allografts studied in the dog.

    PubMed

    Welter, J F; Shaffer, J W; Stevenson, S; Davy, D T; Field, G A; Klein, L; Li, X Q; Zika, J M; Goldberg, V M

    1990-12-01

    We studied the mechanical, metabolic, and histologic properties of short-term nonvascularized cortical bone grafts in a canine fibular graft model. Sham operated nonvascularized autotransplanted and allotransplanted bones were compared. The allografts were performed between dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) class I and II matched; DLA class I and II mismatched; and cyclosporin A (CsA) treated, DLA class I and II mismatched animals. Cyclosporin was given for 1 month, and all the animals were followed for 3 months after surgery. Mechanical properties were investigated using standard torsional tests, metabolic kinetics were assessed using isotopic prelabeling techniques, and histomorphometric analysis of cross-sectional area properties and sequential fluorochrome labels were performed. Autografts were mechanically stronger and stiffer than all the types of allograft. CsA-treated, DLA-mismatched allografts performed better than matched allografts. These in turn were stronger than non-CsA-treated, mismatched allografts, which underwent nearly complete resorption. These relationships were preserved in the metabolic and histologic analyses. In this short-term animal study, although DLA matching resulted in a slight improvement in graft outcome, mismatched grafts in dogs receiving a short course of cyclosporin A fared even better. PMID:2281759

  13. Canine mammary carcinoma cell line are resistant to chemosensitizers: verapamil and cyclosporin A.

    PubMed

    Król, M; Pawłowski, K M; Majchrzak, K; Mucha, J; Motyl, T

    2014-01-01

    Cancer chemotherapy can fail in many ways. One of the most significant is the development of multiple drug resistance (MDR), which constitutes a serious clinical problem. The development of MDR relates to the expression of a major membrane pump, P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Thus, currently one of the goals of experimental and clinical oncology is to decrease its activity. So far, many different P-gp inhibitors are available, but their efficacy is still questionable and requires further study. The aim of our study was to assess an impact of classical P-gp inhibitors (verapamil and cyclosporin A) in the reversion of multidrug resistance in canine mammary cancer cells. We used two cell lines isolated from mammary tumors and two cell lines isolated from their lung metastases. All of them showed P-gp over-expression confirmed using Real-time rt-PCR, Skan(R) screening station and confocal microscopy. The FACS analysis showed that in three of the examined cell lines, treatment with verpamil/cyclosporin A was ineffective to reverse cancer chemoresistance. However, more studies in this field are required. PMID:24724465

  14. Biological conversion of a water-soluble prodrug of cyclosporine A.

    PubMed

    Lallemand, F; Varesio, E; Felt-Baeyens, O; Bossy, Leila; Hopfgartner, G; Gurny, R

    2007-09-01

    UNIL088 is a water-soluble prodrug of cyclosporine A (CsA) designed for topical ocular delivery. The pro-moiety is grafted via an ester function to CsA and the solubilizing group is a phosphate ion. The aim of this study was to elucidate the conversion mechanisms by which UNIL088 generates CsA. UNIL088 was incubated in rabbit tears at physiological temperature to study its enzymatic and chemical conversion, respectively. Metabolites and intermediates were identified using a quadrupole-time of flight (QqTOF) mass spectrometer, which allowed biotransformation pathways to be deduced. Conversion is activated by the chemical or enzymatic hydrolysis of the terminal ester function of the pro-moiety, leading to the phospho-serine-sarcosine-cyclosporine A that spontaneously converts into CsA. In addition to the main biotransformation pathway, a secondary reaction involved hydrolysis of the phosphate ester group of the pro-moiety, probably by phosphatases present in tears. PMID:17475453

  15. Expression of amelogenin and effects of cyclosporin A in developing hair follicles in rats.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hong-Il; Lee, Gye-Hyeok; Lee, Su-Young; Kang, Jee-Hae; Moon, Jung-Sun; Kim, Min-Seok; Kim, Sun-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Amelogenin, an enamel matrix protein has been considered to be exclusively expressed by ameloblasts during odontogenesis. However, burgeoning evidence indicates that amelogenin is also expressed in non-mineralizing tissues. Under the hypothesis that amelogenin may be a functional molecule in developing hair follicles which share developmental features with odontogenesis, this study for the first time elucidated the presence and functional changes of amelogenin and its receptors during rat hair follicle development. Amelogenin was specifically localized in the outer epithelial root sheath of hair follicles. Its expression appeared in the deeper portion of hair follicles, i.e. the bulbar and suprabulbar regions rather than the superficial region. Lamp-1, an amelogenin receptor, was localized in either follicular cells or outer epithelial sheath cells, reflecting functional changes during development. The expression of amelogenin splicing variants increased in a time-dependent manner during postnatal development of hair follicles. Amelogenin expression was increased by treatment with cyclosporin A, which is an inducer of anagen in the hair follicle, whereas the level of Lamp-1 and -2 was decreased by cyclosporin A treatment. These results suggest that amelogenin may be a functional molecule involved in the development of the hair follicle rather than an inert hair shaft matrix protein. PMID:26426935

  16. Differential effects of cyclosporin A on transport of bile acids by rat hepatocytes: relationship to individual serum bile acid levels.

    PubMed

    Azer, S A; Stacey, N H

    1994-02-01

    Cyclosporin A treatment has been reported to induce hepatotoxicity marked by a rise in total serum bile acid and total bilirubin. The mechanism of cyclosporin A-induced hepatotoxicity seems to be related to interference with hepatocellular transport of these substrates although this remains to be fully substantiated. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the hepatocellular uptake of the different bile acids, in the presence of cyclosporin A, is consistent with the changes in their respective individual serum bile acid concentrations. High-performance liquid chromatography has been used to assay individual serum bile acids in cyclosporin A-treated rats at doses of 0.1, 1, and 10 mg/kg/day for 4 days. Control rats were treated with Cremophor (1 ml/kg/day). At the higher doses, cyclosporin A produced a significant increase in levels of cholic acid, taurocholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, and deoxycholic acid compared with controls. Serum glycocholate was unaffected even at the highest dose. Inhibition of initial rate of uptake and accumulation of [14C]cholic acid, [14C]chenodeoxycholic acid, and [14C]deoxycholic acid by isolated rat hepatocytes was consistent with the changes in their respective serum bile acids. Coincubation of rat hepatocytes with unlabeled cholic acid (100 microM), the major serum bile acid in cyclosporin A-treated rats, showed a further inhibitory effect on [14C]cholic acid and [14C]deoxycholic acid accumulation. The initial rate of uptake of [14C]glycocholate was also inhibited. However, accumulation of glycocholic acid did not show significant changes at the longer incubation times (2-30 min). In addition, coincubation of rat hepatocytes with unlabeled cholic acid (100 microM) plus cyclosporin A did not induce any inhibition of glycocholate accumulation. Together, these differences provide an explanation for the unchanged serum levels of glycocholate. In conclusion, the changes in individual serum bile acids in cyclosporin A

  17. Safety of Eplerenone for Kidney-Transplant Recipients with Impaired Renal Function and Receiving Cyclosporine A

    PubMed Central

    Barbe, Coralie; Lavaud, Sylvie; Toupance, Olivier; Nazeyrollas, Pierre; Jaisser, Frederic; Rieu, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background Animal studies have highlighted the role of vascular mineralocorticoid receptor during Cyclosporine A-induced nephrotoxicity. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists could improve kidney survival but are not commonly used during renal impairment and in association with several immunosuppressive drugs due to a supposed higher risk of adverse events. We tested the tolerance of eplerenone according to its expected adverse events: hyperkalemia, metabolic acidosis, hypotension, acute kidney failure, or any other adverse event. Methods We conducted a single-center, prospective, open-label study in 31 kidney-transplant recipients with impaired renal function (30 and 50 mL/min/1.73m2) and receiving cyclosporine A. All patients received eplerenone 25 mg/d for 8 weeks. Serum potassium, renal function and expected adverse events were closely monitored. Results Eight patients experienced mild hyperkalemia (>5 mmol/L), one moderate hyperkalemia (>5.5 mmol/L) and had to receive potassium-exchange resin. No severe hyperkalemia (>6 mmol/L) occurred. One acute kidney failure was observed, secondary to diarrhea. Basal serum potassium and bicarbonate were independently associated with a higher risk of developing mild hyperkalemia (>5 mmol/L) under treatment (OR 6.5, p = 0.003 and 0.7, p = 0.007, respectively). A cut-off value of 4.35 mmol/L for basal serum potassium was the best factor to predict the risk of developing mild hyperkalemia (>5 mmol/L). Conclusions Until eGFR falls to 30 mL/min/1.73m2, eplerenone could be safely given to kidney-transplant recipients receiving cyclosporine A, if kalemia is closely monitored. When renal function is impaired and if basal kalemia is >4.35 mmol/L, then clinicians should properly balance risk and benefit of eplerenone use and offer dietary advice. An adequately powered prospective randomized study is now needed to test its efficiency (and safety) in this population. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01834768 PMID:27088859

  18. The new immunosuppressant, isogarcinol, binds directly to its target enzyme calcineurin, unlike cyclosporin A and tacrolimus.

    PubMed

    Cen, Juren; Wang, Mengqi; Jiang, Guohua; Yin, Yanxia; Su, Zhenyi; Tong, Li; luo, Jing; Ma, Yipeng; Gao, Yadan; Wei, Qun

    2015-04-01

    Isogarcinol, a bioactive polyisoprenylated benzophenone derivative isolated from Garcinia mangostana L., has been shown previously to exert a strong inhibitory effect on calcineurin and is thus a potential oral, low-toxicity immunomodulatory drug. In the present study, enzyme kinetic analysis showed that inhibition of calcineurin by isogarcinol was competitive. Fluorescence spectroscopy indicated that isogarcinol bound to calcineurin. Isothermal titration calorimetry showed that binding was mainly driven by enthalpy, and was exothermic because the enthalpy change exceeded the entropy reduction. The interaction force is either hydrogen bonding or Van der Waals forces. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer and molecular docking experiments indicated that there were two potential binding sites for isogarcinol in the catalytic domain of calcineurin. In summary, isogarcinol binds directly to calcineurin in vitro, unlike the classical calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporin A and tacrolimus. PMID:25701551

  19. Protective effects of 2-deoxy-D-glucose on nephrotoxicity induced by cyclosporine A in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Zizhang; Cao, Weiwei; Zhu, Shaohua; Liu, Xiaoping; Zhong, Zhihua; Lai, Xiangmao; Deng, Huirong; Jiang, Sheng; Wang, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to explore the protective effect mechanism of 2-deoxy-D-glucose on nephrotoxicity of cyclosporin A in vivo. Method: Renal toxicity of SD rats model induced by CsA was established. Serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, urine NAG, GSH and MDA were determined and the histopathological changes of rat renal cortex were observed to explore the protective effects of 2-DG on CsA-induced nephrotoxicity. Results: Serum creatinine, BUN and urinary NAG of rats were significantly changed in experimental groups. Pathological results showed that there was obvious renal tubular injury in model group, however, the renal injury was significantly reduced in pre-treated with 2-DG. Conclusions: 2-DG had obvious protective effect on nephrotoxicity especially with high dose. This protective effect could be related to the reduction of ROS induced by CsA. However, 2-DG had no effect on the expression of RIP3. PMID:25197331

  20. Neurotrophic actions of nonimmunosuppressive analogues of immunosuppressive drugs FK506, rapamycin and cyclosporin A.

    PubMed

    Steiner, J P; Connolly, M A; Valentine, H L; Hamilton, G S; Dawson, T M; Hester, L; Snyder, S H

    1997-04-01

    We show that the nonimmunosuppressive analogues of the immunosuppressive drugs FK506, rapamycin and cyclosporin A promote neurite outgrowth both in PC12 cells and sensory neuronal cultures of dorsal root ganglia with potencies resembling their immunosuppressive homologues. Neurotrophic potencies of the immunophilin ligands resemble their potencies in binding to and inhibiting the rotamase activity of FKBP-12 of cyclophilin. Since nonimmunosuppressive immunophilin ligands, which are devoid of calcineurin inhibitory activity, are equally neurotrophic, inhibition of calcineurin activity is not the mediator of the neurotrophic effects. The immunophilin ligands are neurotrophic in intact animals. FK506 and L-685,818 (the C18-hydroxy, C21-ethyl derivative of FK506) treatment of rats with crushed sciatic nerves enhances both functional and morphologic recovery. The striking potency of these agents, their bioavailability and the dissociation of neurotrophic from immunosuppressant actions argue for their therapeutic relevance in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:9095176

  1. Optimized method for measuring cyclosporin A with /sup 125/I-labeled cyclosporin

    SciTech Connect

    Felder, R.A.; Mifflin, T.E.; Bastani, B.

    1986-07-01

    We evaluated the use of the new iodinated ligand for the in vitro measurement of cyclosporin A by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Substitution of the iodinated cyclosporin (/sup 125/I-CyA) for the corresponding tritium-labeled analog (/sup 3/H-CyA) considerably simplifies and accelerates the currently available RIA, and improves its precision. Analysis of the respective dose-response curves showed that the 50% B0 value was lower for the /sup 125/I-CyA assay than for the /sup 3/H-CyA assay (37 vs 77 micrograms/L). Use of whole-blood specimens minimized interferences from temperature and hematocrit. We conclude that the use of /sup 125/I-CyA in a commercially available RIA for whole-blood specimens is accessible to most laboratories and provides rapid, reproducible data for management of transplant patients.

  2. Efficacy of AZM therapy in patients with gingival overgrowth induced by Cyclosporine A: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Clementini, Marco; Vittorini, Gianluca; Crea, Alessandro; Gualano, Maria Rosaria; Macrì, Ludovica Antonella; Deli, Giorgio; La Torre, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Background In daily clinical practice of a dental department it's common to find gingival overgrowth (GO) in periodontal patients under treatment with Cyclosporine A (CsA). The pathogenesis of GO and the mechanism of action of Azithromycin (AZM) are unclear. A systematic review was conducted in order to evaluate the efficacy of Azithromycin in patients with gingival overgrowth induced by assumption of Cyclosporine A. Methods A bibliographic search was performed using the online databases MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Central of Register Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the time period between 1966 and September 2008. Results The literature search retrieved 24 articles; only 5 were Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs), published in English, fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A great heterogeneity between proposed treatments and outcomes was found, and this did not allow to conduct a quantitative meta-analysis. The systematic review revealed that a 5-day course of Azithromycin with Scaling and Root Planing reduces the degree of gingival overgrowth, while a 7-day course of metronidazole is only effective on concomitant bacterial over-infection. Conclusion Few RCTs on the efficacy of systemic antibiotic therapy in case of GO were found in the literature review. A systemic antibiotic therapy without plaque and calculus removal is not able to reduce gingival overgrowth. The great heterogeneity of diagnostic data and outcomes is due to the lack of precise diagnostic methods and protocols about GO. Future studies need to improve both diagnostic methods and tools and adequate classification aimed to determine a correct prognosis and an appropriate therapy for gingival overgrowth. PMID:19087331

  3. Heteropterys tomentosa (A. Juss.) infusion counteracts Cyclosporin a side effects on the ventral prostate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cyclosporin A (CsA) is an immunosuppressive drug widely used in treatment of auto-immune diseases or after organ transplants. However, several side effects are commonly associated with CsA long term intake, some regarding to loss of reproductive organ function due to oxidative damage. Considering that phytotherapy is an important tool often used against oxidative stress, we would like to describe the beneficial effects of Heteropterys tomentosa intake to minimize the damage caused by CsA to the ventral prostate tissue of Wistar rats under laboratorial conditions. Methods Thirty adult Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus) were divided into: control group (water); CsA group (Cyclosporin A); Ht group (H. tomentosa infusion) and CsA + Ht group (CsA and H. tomentosa infusion). Plasmic levels of hepatotoxicity markers, triglycerides, cholesterol and glucose were quantified. The ventral prostate tissue was analyzed under light microscopy, using stereological, morphometrical and immunohistochemical techniques. Results H. tomentosa did not cause any alterations either of the plasmic parameters or of the ventral prostate structure. CsA caused alterations of GOT, total and indirect bilirubin, cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose levels in the plasma; CsA-treated rats showed alterations of the ventral prostate tissue. There were no alterations regarding the plasma levels of GOT, triglycerides and glucose of CsA + Ht animals. The same group also showed normalization of most of the parameters analyzed on the ventral prostate tissue when compared to the CsA group. The treatments did not alter the pattern of AR expression or the apoptotic index of the ventral prostate epithelium. Conclusions The results suggest a protective action of the H. tomentosa infusion against the side effects of CsA on the ventral prostate tissue, which could also be observed with plasmic biochemical parameters. PMID:23406403

  4. Skeletal muscle ischemia-reperfusion injury and cyclosporine A in the aging rat.

    PubMed

    Pottecher, Julien; Kindo, Michel; Chamaraux-Tran, Thiên-Nga; Charles, Anne-Laure; Lejay, Anne; Kemmel, Véronique; Vogel, Thomas; Chakfe, Nabil; Zoll, Joffrey; Diemunsch, Pierre; Geny, Bernard

    2016-06-01

    Old patients exhibit muscle impairments and increased perioperative risk during vascular surgery procedures. Although aging generally impairs protective mechanisms, data are lacking concerning skeletal muscle in elderly. We tested whether cyclosporine A (CsA), which protects skeletal muscle from ischemia-reperfusion (IR) in young rats, might reduce skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in aging rats submitted to hindlimb IR. Wistar rats aged 71-73 weeks were randomized to IR (3 h unilateral tourniquet application and 2 h reperfusion) or IR + CsA (10 mg/kg cyclosporine IV before reperfusion). Maximal oxidative capacity (VM ax ), acceptor control ratio (ACR), and relative contribution of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes II, III, IV (VS ucc ), and IV (VTMPD /Asc ), together with calcium retention capacity (CRC) a marker of apoptosis, and tissue reactive oxygen species (ROS) production were determined in gastrocnemius muscles from both hindlimbs. Compared to the nonischemic hindlimb, IR significantly reduced mitochondrial coupling, VMax (from 7.34 ± 1.50 to 2.87 ± 1.22 μMO2 /min/g; P < 0.05; -70%), and VS ucc (from 6.14 ± 1.07 to 3.82 ± 0.83 μMO2 /min/g; P < 0.05; -42%) but not VTMPD /Asc . IR also decreased the CRC from 15.58 ± 3.85 to 6.19 ± 0.86 μMCa(2+) /min/g; P < 0.05; -42%). These alterations were not corrected by CsA (-77%, -49%, and -32% after IR for VM ax, VS ucc , and CRC, respectively). Further, CsA significantly increased ROS production in both hindlimbs (P < 0.05; +73%). In old rats, hindlimb IR impairs skeletal muscle mitochondrial function and increases oxidative stress. Cyclosporine A did not show protective effects. PMID:26787364

  5. Bioconversion of FR901459, a novel derivative of cyclosporin A, by Lentzea sp. 7887.

    PubMed

    Sasamura, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Motoo; Muramatsu, Hideyuki; Yoshimura, Seiji; Kinoshita, Takayoshi; Ohki, Hidenori; Okada, Kazuki; Deai, Yoko; Yamagishi, Yukiko; Hashimoto, Michizane

    2015-08-01

    FR901459, a product of the fungus Stachybotrys chartarum No. 19392, is a derivative of cyclosporin A (CsA) and a powerful immunosuppressant that binds cyclophilin. Recently, it was reported that CsA was effective against hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, FR901459 lacks active moieties, which are essential for synthesizing more potent and safer derivatives of this anti-HCV agent. Here we identified an actinomycete strain (designated 7887) that was capable of efficient bioconversion of FR901459. Structural elucidation of the isolated bioconversion products (1-7) revealed that compounds 1-4 were mono-hydroxylated at the position of 1-MeBmt or 9-MeLeu, whereas compounds 5-7 were bis-hydroxylated at both positions. The results of morphological and chemical characterization, as well as phylogenetic analysis of 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA), suggested that strain 7887 belonged to the genus Lentzea. Comparison of the FR901459 conversion activity of strain 7887 with several other Lentzea strains revealed that although all examined strains metabolized FR901459, strain 7887 had a characteristic profile with respect to bioconversion products. Taken together, these findings suggest that strain 7887 can be used to derivative FR901459 to produce a chemical template for further chemical modifications that may provide more effective and safer anti-HCV drugs. PMID:25783225

  6. Preparation, characterization and in silico modeling of biodegradable nanoparticles containing cyclosporine A and coenzyme Q10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ankola, D. D.; Durbin, E. W.; Buxton, G. A.; Schäfer, J.; Bakowsky, U.; Kumar, M. N. V. Ravi

    2010-02-01

    Combination therapy will soon become a reality, particularly for those patients requiring poly-therapy to treat co-existing disease states. This becomes all the more important with the increasing cost, time and complexity of the drug discovery process prompting one to look at new delivery systems to increase the efficacy, safety and patient compliance of existing drugs. Along this line, we attempted to design nano-scale systems for simultaneous encapsulation of cyclosporine A (CsA) and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and model their encapsulation and release kinetics. The in vitro characterization of the co-encapsulated nanoparticles revealed that the surfactant nature, concentration, external phase volume, droplet size reduction method and drug loading concentration can all influence the overall performance of the nanoparticles. The semi-quantitative solubility study indicates the strong influence of CoQ10 on CsA entrapment which was thought to be due to an increase in the lipophilicity of the overall system. The in vitro dissolution profile indicates the influence of CoQ10 on CsA release (64%) to that of individual particles of CsA, where the release is faster and higher (86%) on 18th day. The attempts to model the encapsulation and release kinetics were successful, offering a possibility to use such models leading to high throughput screening of drugs and their nature, alone or in combination for a particular polymer, if chi-parameters are understood.

  7. Enhanced oral bioavailability of cyclosporine A by liposomes containing a bile salt

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Peipei; Lu, Yi; Qi, Jianping; Niu, Mengmeng; Lian, Ruyue; Hu, Fuqiang; Wu, Wei

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to evaluate liposomes containing a bile salt, sodium deoxycholate (SDC), as oral drug delivery systems to enhance the oral bioavailability of the poorly water-soluble and poorly permeable drug, cyclosporine A (CyA). Liposomes composed of soybean phosphatidylcholine (SPC) and SDC were prepared by a thin-film dispersion method followed by homogenization. Several properties of the liposomes including particle size, polydispersity index, and entrapment efficiency were characterized. The in vitro release of CyA from these liposomes was less than 5% at 12 hours as measured by a dynamic dialysis method. The pharmacokinetic results in rats showed improved absorption of CyA in SPC/SDC liposomes, compared with CyA-loaded conventional SPC/cholesterol (Chol) liposomes and microemulsion-based Sandimmune Neoral®. The relative oral bioavailability of CyA-loaded SPC/SDC and SPC/Chol liposomes was 120.3% and 98.6%, respectively, with Sandimmun Neoral as the reference. The enhanced bioavailability of CyA was probably due to facilitated absorption by the liposomes containing SDC rather than improved release rate. PMID:21720508

  8. Optimizing the formulation of cyclosporine A electret patch and the controlled release of drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. Y.; Wang, P.; Liang, Y. Y.; Guo, X.; Jiang, J.; Cui, L. L.

    2013-03-01

    The polypropylene (PP) film coated with/without aluminum electrode were charged with the gird voltages of -500 V, -1000 V and -2000 V to prepare the electrets and produce electric field for control of drug release. The model drug of cyclosporine A (CsA) was loaded on a patch and ethyl oleate was used as the chemical enhancer in the manufacturing process. The formulation of the CsA drug patch enhanced by chemical was optimized, and the in vitro release behaviours of drug in the patches were studied to explore the enhancing effect of the external electrostatic field on the CsA release from the patch. Besides, the piezoelectric d33 coefficient was also determined to study the polarization of the drug in the patch under the action of the internal electrostatic field of the electret. The results indicate that the electrostatic field produced by the electret could polarize the drug in patch and enhance the release of CsA from the patch, and the effect depended on the electrode coating condition and charging voltage of the electret.

  9. Cyclosporine A Inhibits the T-bet-Dependent Antitumor Response of CD8(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Rovira, J; Renner, P; Sabet-Baktach, M; Eggenhofer, E; Koehl, G E; Lantow, M; Lang, S A; Schlitt, H J; Campistol, J M; Geissler, E K; Kroemer, A

    2016-04-01

    Transplant recipients face an increased risk of cancer compared with the healthy population. Although several studies have examined the direct effects of immunosuppressive drugs on cancer cells, little is known about the interactions between pharmacological immunosuppression and cancer immunosurveillance. We investigated the different effects of rapamycin (Rapa) versus cyclosporine A (CsA) on tumor-reactive CD8(+) T cells. After adoptive transfer of CD8(+) T cell receptor-transgenic OTI T cells, recipient mice received either skin grafts expressing ovalbumin (OVA) or OVA-expressing B16F10 melanoma cells. Animals were treated daily with Rapa or CsA. Skin graft rejection and tumor growth as well as molecular and cellular analyses of skin- and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes were performed. Both Rapa and CsA were equally efficient in prolonging skin graft survival when applied at clinically relevant doses. In contrast to Rapa-treated animals, CsA led to accelerated tumor growth in the presence of adoptively transferred tumor-reactive CD8(+) OTI T cells. Further analyses showed that T-bet was downregulated by CsA (but not Rapa) in CD8(+) T cells and that cancer cytotoxicity was profoundly inhibited in the absence of T-bet. CsA reduces T-bet-dependent cancer immunosurveillance by CD8(+) T cells. This may contribute to the increased cancer risk in transplant recipients receiving calcineurin inhibitors. PMID:26855194

  10. Formulation Strategy for the Delivery of Cyclosporine A: Comparison of Two Polymeric Nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ritu; Macri, Lauren; Kohn, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    A wide range of nanoparticles has been explored for the delivery of highly hydrophobic drugs, but very few publications provide comparative data of the performance of different nanoparticles. To address this need, this publication compares poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles and nanospheres made from tyrosine-derived tri-block copolymers (termed TyroSpheres) for their respective performance as carriers for cyclosporine A (CSA). Using previously reported data on PLGA, we followed similar experimental protocols to evaluate the in vitro characteristics of TyroSpheres. Although there are some similarities between the two particle systems for the delivery of CSA, such as effective encapsulation and epidermal skin penetration, several differences were notable. First, the methods of preparation were different, i.e., self-assembly and emulsion-diffusion-evaporation process for TyroSpheres and PLGA, respectively. Second, TyroSpheres provided 7-day diffusion-controlled release, whereas PLGA nanoparticles provided >21-day erosion-controlled release. Third, the size of TyroSpheres was measured to be ~60-70 nm irrespective of drug loading, whereas the size of PLGA nanoparticles (~100-250 nm) was dependent on drug loading and the method of preparation. Overall, this publication provides a direct comparison between two different types of nanoparticles and illuminates the respective advantages and disadvantages, using CSA as a model for the release of highly hydrophobic drugs. PMID:26268451

  11. Treatment of Severe Alopecia Areata: Combination Therapy Using Systemic Cyclosporine A with Low Dose Corticosteroids

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Deborah; Oh, Doo Jin; Kim, Jung Wook; Park, Sung Wook; Oh, Min Kyung; Sung, Ho Suk

    2008-01-01

    Background Combination therapy using cyclosporine A (CsA) together with low-dose corticosteroids has adequate efficacy with little toxicity for the treatment of severe alopecia areata (AA). Objective We wanted to evaluate the clinical efficacy of combination therapy using CsA with low-dose corticosteroid for the treatment of severe AA and we also wanted to determine the safe therapeutic concentration of CsA in the peripheral blood. Methods We treated 34 cases of severe AA with combination therapy for 24 weeks and we evaluated the efficacy at 12 and 24 weeks. We monitored the peripheral blood concentration of CsA to determine the therapeutic range of CsA that has the fewest side effects. Results Of the patients, 77.4% (n=24) and 22.6% (n=10) were classified in the responder and poor-responder groups, respectively. The mean trough concentration of CsA was 95.1 and 101.2 ng/ml in the responder and poor-responder groups, respectively. For the patients with side effects associated with CsA, the mean CsA concentration was 195.8 ng/ml. Conclusion We found that combination therapy with systemic CsA and low-dose corticosteroids effectively treats severe AA and this therapy results in a safe, therapeutic concentration of CsA in the peripheral blood. PMID:27303186

  12. Rats taste-aversive learning with cyclosporine a is not affected by contextual changes.

    PubMed

    Tuerkmen, Akin; Bösche, Katharina; Lückemann, Laura; Engler, Harald; Schedlowski, Manfred; Hadamitzky, Martin

    2016-10-01

    In conditioned taste aversion (CTA) rats associate a novel taste (conditioned stimulus; CS) with a treatment (unconditioned stimulus; US) that induces symptoms of malaise. During retrieval, animals learn that the CS no longer predicts the US, with the consequence that the behavior elicited by the CS extinguishes. Importantly, CTA data with lithium chloride (LiCl) as US indicate that extinction learning is affected by changing the physical context. However, if this is also the case in different taste-aversion paradigms employing compounds other than LiCL as US is unknown. Against this background the present study investigated in a CTA paradigm with saccharin as CS and the immunosuppressant cyclosporine A (CsA) as US the influence of contextual changes on CTA extinction. Our results show, that extinction of a learned CS-US association with CsA is not prone to contextual changes. Due to the direct effects of CsA on CNS functioning, CTA with this immunosuppressant apparently operates under different mechanisms compared to other drugs, such as LiCl. These data indicate that taste aversive learning and its extinction are not necessarily specific to the context in which it is learned but also depends, at least in part, on the physiological and neuropharmacological effects of the drug employed as US. PMID:27316343

  13. Identification of novel indicators of cyclosporine A nephrotoxicity in a CD-1 mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, Sein; Slattery, Craig; Ryan, Michael P.; McMorrow, Tara

    2011-04-15

    The calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) is a widely used immunosuppressive agent. However, nephrotoxicity is a serious side effect observed in patients which limits clinical use of CsA. CsA nephrotoxicity is associated with tubulointerstitial injury progressing to nephropathy. This is typically diagnosed by invasive renal biopsy and is often only detected when the disease process is well advanced. Therefore identification of novel, early indicators of CsA nephrotoxicity could be clinically advantageous. This study aimed to establish a murine model of CsA nephrotoxicity and to identify urinary proteins that may indicate the onset of CsA-induced nephropathy using 2-D gel electrophoresis. CsA nephrotoxicity was induced in CD-1 mice by daily CsA administration for 4 weeks. By week 4, elevated serum creatinine and proteinuria were observed after CsA treatment indicating significant renal dysfunction. Decreased cadherin-1, increased {alpha}-smooth muscle actin and fibroblast specific protein 1 in kidney tissue indicated disruption of normal tubular architecture. Alterations in podocin and uromodulin were also observed which may indicate damage to other segments of the nephron. Proteomic analysis of urine identified a number of differentially regulated proteins that may be involved in early CsA nephropathy including cadherin 1, superoxide dismutase and vinculin. These findings suggest novel mechanisms of CsA nephrotoxicity and identify novel potential markers of the disease.

  14. Topical delivery of cyclosporin A: an in vitro study using monoolein as a penetration enhancer.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Luciana B; Collett, John H; Bentley, M Vitória L B

    2005-05-01

    Topical delivery of cyclosporin A (CysA) is of great interest for the treatment of autoimmune skin disorders, but it is frequently ineffective due to poor drug penetration in the skin. The present study was aimed at investigating whether the presence of monoolein (a lipidic penetration enhancer) in a preparation of propylene glycol can improve CysA delivery to the skin. CysA was incorporated in a propylene glycol preparation containing 5-70% (w/w) of monoolein. The topical (to the skin) and transdermal (across the skin) delivery of CysA were evaluated in vitro using porcine ear skin mounted in a Franz diffusion cell. CysA was quantified by UV-HPLC. At 5%, monoolein increased only the transdermal delivery of CysA. At 10%, it increased both topical and transdermal delivery. When the concentration of monoolein was further increased (20-70% w/w), an interesting phenomenon was observed: the topical delivery of CysA was still elevated but its transdermal delivery was substantially reduced. It was concluded that monoolein (in propylene glycol formulations) can promote the topical delivery of CysA, with reduced transdermal delivery. PMID:15848052

  15. Maintenance of new cementum formed during cyclosporin A administration after suspension of the treatment.

    PubMed

    Ayanoglou, C M; Lesty, C

    1997-10-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to examine if new cementum (NC) formed during cyclosporin A (CsA) administration was maintained after suspension of the treatment. Thirty mg/kg/d of CsA were given to 3 male Sprague-Dawley rats. Three control rats received oil-based vehicle solution. Nine wk later the drug and vehicle administration were stopped and the rats continued to be fed with the same standard laboratory diet and water ad libitum for 5 months. The rats were anaesthetized, the tissues fixed by intracardiac perfusion of fixative solution and the mandibles processed for Epon inclusion. Histological, histomorphometric and ultrastructural analysis revealed that (a) NC covered extensive areas of the root surfaces; its structural characteristics were identical to those observed in the rats killed during CsA administration. (b) collagen fibres of the adjacent connective tissue were functionally inserted into the NC. (c) In the presence of cervical NC spurs the extent of the apical downgrowth of the junctional epithelium, measured parallel to the cemento-dentinal junction, was decreased (up to 64%) compared to the one occurring in areas devoid of NC deposits. These results suggest that (a) NC deposition and its functional relations with the adjacent connective tissue are not reversible after cessation of CsA treatment and (b) in the presence of cervical NC spurs the amount of connective tissue attachment on the root surfaces is increased. PMID:9401934

  16. Cyclosporin A-induced new cementum formation: a morphometric evaluation in the periapical region of rats.

    PubMed

    Spolidorio, Luis Carlos; Spolidorio, Denise Madalena Palomari; Holzhausen, Marinella; Nassar, Carlos Augusto; Nassar, Patricia Oehlmeyer

    2007-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) is a potent immunosuppressor used in organ transplantation and in the management of various autoimmune diseases. Recent studies have shown that CsA stimulates deposition of cementum on root surfaces. The aim of this study was to evaluate the periapical cementum thickness and the apical foramen width in CsA-treated rats. Rats weighing 50 g were treated with a daily injection of 10 mg/kg body weight of CsA in the chow for 60 days. The cementum of the mandibular 1st molars was histologically and morphometricaly examined by analysis of 5-microm-thick serial buccolingual paraffin sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Histometric and stereologic analyses revealed the presence of large amounts of cementum in all root surfaces, particularly abundant in the periapical region and obliterating the foramen. The volume density of cementoblasts did not increase. Five to 90 days after the termination of CsA therapy, there was no reduction of cementum thickness. These results suggest that cementum deposition is not reversible after cessation of CsA treatment. PMID:17639196

  17. Formulation Strategy for the Delivery of Cyclosporine A: Comparison of Two Polymeric Nanospheres

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Ritu; Macri, Lauren; Kohn, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    A wide range of nanoparticles has been explored for the delivery of highly hydrophobic drugs, but very few publications provide comparative data of the performance of different nanoparticles. To address this need, this publication compares poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles and nanospheres made from tyrosine-derived tri-block copolymers (termed TyroSpheres) for their respective performance as carriers for cyclosporine A (CSA). Using previously reported data on PLGA, we followed similar experimental protocols to evaluate the in vitro characteristics of TyroSpheres. Although there are some similarities between the two particle systems for the delivery of CSA, such as effective encapsulation and epidermal skin penetration, several differences were notable. First, the methods of preparation were different, i.e., self-assembly and emulsion-diffusion-evaporation process for TyroSpheres and PLGA, respectively. Second, TyroSpheres provided 7-day diffusion-controlled release, whereas PLGA nanoparticles provided >21-day erosion-controlled release. Third, the size of TyroSpheres was measured to be ~60–70 nm irrespective of drug loading, whereas the size of PLGA nanoparticles (~100–250 nm) was dependent on drug loading and the method of preparation. Overall, this publication provides a direct comparison between two different types of nanoparticles and illuminates the respective advantages and disadvantages, using CSA as a model for the release of highly hydrophobic drugs. PMID:26268451

  18. The calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporin A exhibits synergism with antifungals against Candida parapsilosis species complex.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Macedo, Ramila de Brito; Teixeira, Carlos Eduardo Cordeiro; Marques, Francisca Jakelyne de Farias; Bandeira, Tereza de Jesus Pinheiro Gomes; Moreira, José Luciano Bezerra; Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa

    2014-07-01

    Candida parapsilosis complex comprises three closely related species, C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, Candida metapsilosis and Candida orthopsilosis. In the last decade, antifungal resistance to azoles and caspofungin among C. parapsilosis sensu lato strains has been considered a matter of concern worldwide. In the present study, we evaluated the synergistic potential of antifungals and the calcineurin inhibitor cyclosporin A (Cys) against planktonic and biofilms of C. parapsilosis complex from clinical sources. Susceptibility assays with amphotericin, fluconazole, voriconazole, caspofungin and Cys were performed by microdilution in accordance with Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Synergy testing against planktonic cells of C. parapsilosis sensu lato strains was assessed by the chequerboard method. Combinations formed by antifungals with Cys were evaluated against mature biofilms in microtitre plates. No differences in the antifungal susceptibility pattern among species were observed, but C. parapsilosis sensu stricto strains were more susceptible to Cys than C. orthopsilosis and C. metapsilosis. Synergism between antifungals and Cys was observed in C. parapsilosis sensu lato strains. Combinations formed by antifungals and Cys were able to prevent biofilm formation and showed an inhibitory effect against mature biofilms of C. parapsilosis sensu stricto, C. metapsilosis and C. orthopsilosis. These results strengthen the potential of calcineurin inhibition as a promising approach to enhance the efficiency of antifungal drugs. PMID:24722799

  19. Effects of cyclosporine A on biomembranes. Vibrational spectroscopic, calorimetric and hemolysis studies.

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, T J; Ross, P D; Lieber, M R; Levin, I W

    1986-01-01

    Cyclosporine A (CSA)-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) interactions were investigated using scanning calorimetry, infrared spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. CSA reduced both the temperature and the maximum heat capacity of the lipid bilayer gel-to-liquid crystalline phase transition; the relationship between the shift in transition temperature and CSA concentration indicates that the peptide does not partition ideally between DPPC gel and liquid crystalline phases. This nonideality can be accounted for by excluded volume interactions between peptide molecules. CSA exhibited a similar but much more pronounced effect on the pretransition; at concentrations of 1 mol % CSA the amplitude of the pretransition was less than 20% of its value in the pure lipid. Raman spectroscopy confirmed that the effects of CSA on the phase transitions are not accompanied by major structural alterations in either the lipid headgroup or acyl chain regions at temperatures away from the phase changes. Both infrared and Raman spectroscopic results demonstrated that CSA in the lipid bilayer exists largely in a beta-turn conformation, as expected from single crystal x-ray data; the lipid phase transition does not induce structural alterations in CSA. Although the polypeptide significantly affects DPPC model membrane bilayers, CSA neither inhibited hypotonic hemolysis nor caused erythrocyte hemolysis, in contrast to many chemical agents that are believed to act through membrane-mediated pathways. Thus, agents, such as CSA, that perturb phospholipid phase transitions do not necessarily cause functional changes in cell membranes. PMID:3755063

  20. Two-dimensional /sup 1/H NMR studies on cyclophilin, a cytosolic cyclosporin A binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Dalgarno, D.C.; Harding, M.W.; Lazarides, A.; Handschumacher, R.E.; Armitage, I.M.

    1986-05-01

    Cyclophilin (CyP) is a specific cytosolic cyclosporin A (CsA) binding protein (163 residues) that has been implicated in the pharmacological action of this potent immunosuppressant. One and two-dimensional /sup 1/H NMR methods are being employed to elucidate the solution structural properties of CyP particularly as they relate to the binding site of CsA. The focal point for these studies is the single Trp (residue number120) in CyP which, in the 1:1 CyP:CsA complex (K/sub d/approx.2 x 10/sup -7/M), shows a 2 fold enhancement in its intrinsic fluorescence. Using 2D /sup 1/H NMR methods, a low resolution structure has been derived for a very hydrophobic domain containing the Trp residue using interresidue n.O.e. data between assigned spin systems and a distance geometry algorithm. The structure of this hydrophobic domain will be discussed in relation to the predicted ..cap alpha../..beta.. secondary structure of this protein and comparisons made between its structure in the drug free and complexed form of the protein.

  1. An Overview on Dry Eye Treatment: Approaches for Cyclosporin A Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Burçin; Bozdağ Pehlivan, Sibel; Ünlü, Nurşen

    2012-01-01

    Dry eye syndrome (DES, Keratoconjunctivitis sicca) is a common disorder of the tear film caused by decreased tear production or increased evaporation. Changes in tear composition also promote inflammation on the ocular surface by various mechanisms. Artificial tear drops, tear retention treatment, stimulation of tear secretion, or anti-inflammatory drugs may be used for dry eye treatment according to the severity of the disease. For untreated patients, the risk of ocular infection increases at considerable level and clinical course of the disease may proceed up to infection, corneal ulcer, and blindness. Artificial tears and/or punctual occlusions are used for tear replacement or preservation. New treatment approaches are designed to modify the underlying disease process. For the treatment of severe dry eye disease, cyclosporin A (CsA), the first one of the new generation immunomodulatory drugs, which has an anti-inflammatory effect, is frequently used. CsA has immunosuppressive effects following systemic application. Following local administration of CsA, it is expected to obtain effective drug concentration at the target area and to avoid the various side effects associated with systemic delivery. Microspheres, implants, and liposomes have been developed for administration of CsA subconjunctivally in order to enhance its efficiency. PMID:22619624

  2. Influence of cyclosporine A on molecular interactions in lyotropic reverse hexagonal liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Ben Ishai, Paul; Libster, Dima; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim; Feldman, Yuri

    2010-10-14

    We present a dielectric study of H(II) mesophases (H(II)) based on a GMO/tricaprylin/phosphatidylcholine/water system seeded with the peptide Cyclosporine A (CSA). The study covers a frequency range 0.01 Hz to 1 MHz and a temperature range of 293 to 319 K, with a 3 K temperature step. Three dielectric relaxation processes are observed and discussed. This picture is further elucidated by comparison with a dielectric study of the empty H(II) mesophase system, previously published, where the same three processes were involved. A complex picture emerges whereby the CSA is intercalated between the surfactant tails yet protrudes into the interface as well. Whereas the CSA remains hydrophobic, it still influences the relaxation behavior of the GMO head and counterion movement along the interface in a nontrivial manner. The third dipolar species, the tricaprylin molecule, is also influenced by the presence of CSA. A critical temperature T(0) = 307 K is recognized and identified as the dehydration temperature of the surfactant heads. This induces a conformal transition in the CSA, drastically changing its effect on the three dielectric processes evident in the raw data. The implications of this behavior are discussed in detail. PMID:20857961

  3. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Growth of Infected T Cells by the Immunosuppressive Drugs Cyclosporin A and FK 506

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpas, Abraham; Lowdell, Mark; Jacobson, S. Kim; Hill, Fergal

    1992-09-01

    The effects of the immunosuppressive drugs cyclosporin A and FK 506 were studied on cells chronically infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) as well as on uninfected and newly infected cells. When cells chronically infected with HIV-1 or with HIV-2 were cocultivated with uninfected cells in the presence of cyclosporin A or FK 506 there was a delay in the formation of syncytia and of cytopathic effects. This inhibitory effect was not due to decreased membrane expression of CD4. In addition, there was an ≈100-fold reduction in the yield of infectious HIV-1 when the infected cells were grown in the presence of these drugs, a finding consistent with other evidence of decreased HIV expression. Both drugs were found to inhibit the growth of chronically infected cells at concentrations that did not inhibit the growth of the uninfected cells. These results, demonstrating that cyclosporin A and FK 506 interfere with HIV production and selectively inhibit the growth of infected cells, suggest that they may be useful in the treatment of this infection and indicate further cellular targets for antiviral agents.

  4. Protective effects of cyclophosphamide, cyclosporin A and FK506 against antigen-induced lung eosinophilia in guinea-pigs.

    PubMed Central

    Norris, A A; Jackson, D M; Eady, R P

    1992-01-01

    A close association has been recognized between activated T cells and eosinophils in asthma, albeit circumstantial. The present study attempted to investigate this relationship in an animal model of lung eosinophilia using the new generation of T cell-selective immunosuppressants, cyclosporin A and FK506, compared with the myelotoxic immunosuppressive agent cyclophosphamide. Antigen challenge of ovalbumin-sensitized guinea-pigs resulted in a lung eosinophilia which was assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage. All three agents caused a marked suppression of lung eosinophilia at 24 h post-challenge when the compounds were administered at the time of sensitization but not when administered for 3 days before lavage. However, the lung eosinophilia at 72 h post-challenge was reduced significantly by FK506 and by cyclophosphamide, but not by cyclosporin A, when the drugs were administered for 3 days, before lavage. These results strongly suggest the involvement of T cells in antigen-induced late phase (72 h) eosinophilia in guinea-pigs but not at 24 h. The effects of cyclophosphamide were always associated with a reduction in circulating white cell counts, whereas cyclosporin A and FK506 showed no myelotoxic properties. These results suggest the potential therapeutic use of selective, non-cytotoxic immunosuppressive agents in asthma. PMID:1381297

  5. Effects of beauverolide L and cyclosporin A on humoral and cellular immune response of the greater wax moth, Galleria mellonella.

    PubMed

    Vilcinskas, A; Jegorov, A; Landa, Z; Götz, P; Matha, V

    1999-01-01

    The effects of beauverolide L and cyclosporin A, cyclic peptidic metabolites, produced by several genera of entomopathogenic fungi on immune responses of last instar larvae of the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella have been examined. Intrahemocoelic injection of either metabolite-coated silica particles or dissolved metabolites in a concentrations ranging between 10 and 30 micrograms per larvae caused no mortality but activated humoral responses in G. mellonella larvae. The challenge induced a significant release of lysozyme and cecropin-like activity into the hemolymph, suggesting stimulatory activity on humoral immune responses. Injected metabolite-coated particles were rapidly surrounded by hemocytes which subsequently accomplished formation of melanized nodules, which increased in size and number compared with controls. In vitro assays with dissolved metabolites indicated no adverse effects of beauverolide L or cyclosporin A on attachment or spreading of isolated plasmatocytes but dose-dependent inhibition of their phagocytic activity. Isolated plasmatocytes incubated with cyclosporin A or beauverolide L exhibited cytoskeleton alterations that differed from those observed in plasmatocytes from infected G. mellonella larvae or reported from other fungal secondary metabolites. The experiments provided further data to elucidate the role of fungal secondary metabolites in development of mycoses in insects. PMID:10190031

  6. Protective effect of curcumin on cyclosporin A-induced endothelial dysfunction, antioxidant capacity, and oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Sagiroglu, Tamer; Kanter, Mehmet; Yagci, Mehmet Ali; Sezer, Atakan; Erboga, Mustafa

    2014-05-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) is the most widely used immunosuppressive drug for preventing graft rejection and autoimmune disease. However, the therapeutic treatment induces several side effects such as nephrotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, hypertension, and hepatotoxicity. Curcumin has been successfully used as a potent antioxidant against many pathophysiological states. This experimental study was performed to test, during CsA treatment, the alterations of curcumin antioxidant properties against CsA-induced endothelial dysfunction. Rats were divided into four groups: control, curcumin alone, CsA, and CsA + curcumin; each group containing eight animals. The animals in the CsA + curcumin group were treated with CsA (10 days, 25 mg/kg, orally) and curcumin (15 days, 200 mg/kg, orally, starting 5 days before CsA administration). At the end of the treatments, the animals were killed; serum and aorta tissue were treated for biochemical and morphological analyses. The results indicate that CsA-induced aortic endothelial dysfunction was characterized by morphological and ultrastructural alterations in tissue architecture, changes in malondialdehyde and ferric reducing/antioxidant power levels, and increase in endothelial nitric oxide synthase and terminal-deoxynucleotidyl-transferase mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) expression. In conclusion, our data suggest that the imbalance between production of free oxygen radicals and antioxidant defence systems, due to CsA administration, is a mechanism responsible for oxidative stress. Moreover, we show that curcumin plays a protective action against CsA-induced endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress, as supported by biochemical, ultrastructural, immunohistochemical, and TUNEL results. PMID:22903178

  7. The role of inflammation and apoptosis in cyclosporine A – induced gingival overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Mitic, Kristina; Popovska, Mirjana; Pandilova, Maja; Jovanovic, Rubens; Spasovski, Goce; Nikolov, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Cyclosporin A(CsA) - induced gingival overgrowth(GO) is a current problem of tissue-specific mechanism which is still incompletely explained. The apoptotic process has been of particular interest like a new concept in the etiology of this unwanted effect. The aim of our study was to detect the level of apoptosis, expression bcl-2 and p53, associated with the different dosis of CsA. in gingival stroma. A cohort of 84 kidney transplant recipients was divided into four subgroups based on average daily dose of therapeutically applied CsA (Ne-oral®), (100 mg, 125 mg, 150 mg and 175 mg). The control group consisted of 21 patients, clinically diagnosed with periodontitis, who were not subjected to any medicamentous treatment causing gingival overgrowth. The following indexes were analyzed: plaque index (PI), index of gingival inflammation (GI) according to Loe-Silnes, and gingival overgrowth index (GOI) according to MacGaw et al. The tissue samples were subjected to a semiquantitative analysis to detect apoptotical cells and imunohistochemically stained to detect the expression of the bcl-2 and p53 proteins. The difference in percentage of apoptotic cells between the group taking 175mg and other subgroups, as well as the control group was statistically significant (p<0.05). There was a significant difference in percentage of expression bcl-2 between the 175 mg group compared to the other three subgroups and the control (p=0.001). However, a statistically significant positive correlation between the medicament dose, p53, apoptosis, and bcl-2 was registered (p<0.05). Inflammation plays the most important role in the induction of apoptosis and proliferation in gingival tissues. PMID:23448605

  8. A Multidisciplinary Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Cyclosporine A in Dystrophic Mdx Mice

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Annamaria; Nico, Beatrice; Liantonio, Antonella; Paola Didonna, Maria; Fraysse, Bodvael; Pierno, Sabata; Burdi, Rosa; Mangieri, Domenica; Rolland, Jean-François; Camerino, Claudia; Zallone, Alberta; Confalonieri, Paolo; Andreetta, Francesca; Arnoldi, Elisa; Courdier-Fruh, Isabelle; Magyar, Josef P.; Frigeri, Antonio; Pisoni, Michela; Svelto, Maria; Conte-Camerino, Diana

    2005-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a secondary reaction of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and may contribute to disease progression. To examine whether immunosuppressant therapies could benefit dystrophic patients, we analyzed the effects of cyclosporine A (CsA) on a dystrophic mouse model. Mdx mice were treated with 10 mg/kg of CsA for 4 to 8 weeks throughout a period of exercise on treadmill, a protocol that worsens the dystrophic condition. The CsA treatment fully prevented the 60% drop of forelimb strength induced by exercise. A significant amelioration (P < 0.05) was observed in histological profile of CsA-treated gastrocnemius muscle with reductions of nonmuscle area (20%), centronucleated fibers (12%), and degenerating area (50%) compared to untreated exercised mdx mice. Consequently, the percentage of normal fibers increased from 26 to 35% in CsA-treated mice. Decreases in creatine kinase and markers of fibrosis were also observed. By electrophysiological recordings ex vivo, we found that CsA counteracted the decrease in chloride conductance (gCl), a functional index of degeneration in diaphragm and extensor digitorum longus muscle fibers. However, electrophysiology and fura-2 calcium imaging did not show any amelioration of calcium homeostasis in extensor digitorum longus muscle fibers. No significant effect was observed on utrophin levels in diaphragm muscle. Our data show that the CsA treatment significantly normalized many functional, histological, and biochemical endpoints by acting on events that are independent or downstream of calcium homeostasis. The beneficial effect of CsA may involve different targets, reinforcing the usefulness of immunosuppressant drugs in muscular dystrophy. PMID:15681831

  9. Self-micellizing solid dispersion of cyclosporine A with improved dissolution and oral bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Onoue, Satomi; Suzuki, Hiroki; Kojo, Yoshiki; Matsunaga, Saori; Sato, Hideyuki; Mizumoto, Takahiro; Yuminoki, Kayo; Hashimoto, Naofumi; Yamada, Shizuo

    2014-10-01

    The present study aimed to develop a self-micellizing solid dispersion (SMSD) of cyclosporine A (CsA) using an amphiphilic block copolymer, poly[MPC-co-BMA], to improve the biopharmaceutical properties of CsA. The cytotoxicity of poly[MPC-co-BMA] was assessed in rat intestinal IEC-6 cells, and the pMB was less cytotoxic than polysorbate 80, a non-ionic surfactant with a wide safety margin. SMSD/CsA was prepared using a wet-milling system, and its physicochemical properties were characterized in terms of morphology, crystallinity, dissolution, particle size distribution, and stability. The SMSD/CsA exhibited immediate formation of fine micelles with a mean diameter of ca. 180 nm when introduced into aqueous media. There was marked improvement in the dissolution behavior of the SMSD/CsA compared with amorphous CsA. Even after storage at 40°C/75% relative humidity, the dissolution behavior of aged SMSD/CsA seemed to be almost identical to that of its freshly prepared equivalent, and CsA in aged SMSD/CsA was still in amorphous form. After oral administration of SMSD/CsA (10 mg CsA/kg) in rats, enhanced CsA exposure was observed with increases of Cmax and BA by ca. 11- and 42-fold, respectively, compared with those of amorphous CsA. The poly[MPC-co-BMA]-based SMSD formulation system might be an efficacious dosage option for CsA to achieve improvements in oral bioavailability. PMID:24836392

  10. Cyclosporin A Promotes in vivo Myogenic Response in Collagen VI-Deficient Myopathic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gattazzo, Francesca; Molon, Sibilla; Morbidoni, Valeria; Braghetta, Paola; Blaauw, Bert; Urciuolo, Anna; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of genes encoding for collagen VI cause various muscle diseases in humans, including Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. Collagen VI null (Col6a1−/−) mice are affected by a myopathic phenotype with mitochondrial dysfunction, spontaneous apoptosis of muscle fibers, and defective autophagy. Moreover, Col6a1−/− mice display impaired muscle regeneration and defective self-renewal of satellite cells after injury. Treatment with cyclosporin A (CsA) is effective in normalizing the mitochondrial, apoptotic, and autophagic defects of myofibers in Col6a1−/− mice. A pilot clinical trial with CsA in Ullrich patients suggested that CsA may increase the number of regenerating myofibers. Here, we report the effects of CsA administration at 5 mg/kg body weight every 12 h in Col6a1−/− mice on muscle regeneration under physiological conditions and after cardiotoxin (CdTx)-induced muscle injury. Our findings indicate that CsA influences satellite cell activity and triggers the formation of regenerating fibers in Col6a1−/− mice. Data obtained on injured muscles show that under appropriate administration, regimens CsA is able to stimulate myogenesis in Col6a1−/− mice by significantly increasing the number of myogenin (MyoG)-positive cells and of regenerating myofibers at the early stages of muscle regeneration. CsA is also able to ameliorate muscle regeneration of Col6a1−/− mice subjected to multiple CdTx injuries, with a concurrent maintenance of the satellite cell pool. Our data show that CsA is beneficial for muscle regeneration in Col6a1−/− mice. PMID:25309428

  11. Cyclosporin A Promotes in vivo Myogenic Response in Collagen VI-Deficient Myopathic Mice.

    PubMed

    Gattazzo, Francesca; Molon, Sibilla; Morbidoni, Valeria; Braghetta, Paola; Blaauw, Bert; Urciuolo, Anna; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of genes encoding for collagen VI cause various muscle diseases in humans, including Bethlem myopathy and Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy. Collagen VI null (Col6a1 (-/-)) mice are affected by a myopathic phenotype with mitochondrial dysfunction, spontaneous apoptosis of muscle fibers, and defective autophagy. Moreover, Col6a1 (-/-) mice display impaired muscle regeneration and defective self-renewal of satellite cells after injury. Treatment with cyclosporin A (CsA) is effective in normalizing the mitochondrial, apoptotic, and autophagic defects of myofibers in Col6a1 (-/-) mice. A pilot clinical trial with CsA in Ullrich patients suggested that CsA may increase the number of regenerating myofibers. Here, we report the effects of CsA administration at 5 mg/kg body weight every 12 h in Col6a1 (-/-) mice on muscle regeneration under physiological conditions and after cardiotoxin (CdTx)-induced muscle injury. Our findings indicate that CsA influences satellite cell activity and triggers the formation of regenerating fibers in Col6a1 (-/-) mice. Data obtained on injured muscles show that under appropriate administration, regimens CsA is able to stimulate myogenesis in Col6a1 (-/-) mice by significantly increasing the number of myogenin (MyoG)-positive cells and of regenerating myofibers at the early stages of muscle regeneration. CsA is also able to ameliorate muscle regeneration of Col6a1 (-/-) mice subjected to multiple CdTx injuries, with a concurrent maintenance of the satellite cell pool. Our data show that CsA is beneficial for muscle regeneration in Col6a1 (-/-) mice. PMID:25309428

  12. Ubiquitous protective effects of cyclosporine A in preventing cardiac arrest-induced multiple organ failure.

    PubMed

    Cour, Martin; Abrial, Maryline; Jahandiez, Vincent; Loufouat, Joseph; Belaïdi, Elise; Gharib, Abdallah; Varennes, Annie; Monneret, Guillaume; Thibault, Hélène; Ovize, Michel; Argaud, Laurent

    2014-10-15

    Opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) appears to be a pivotal event in myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Resuscitated cardiac arrest (CA) leads to the post-CA syndrome that encompasses, not only myocardial dysfunction, but also brain injury, failure of other organs (kidney, liver, or lung), and systemic response to I/R. We aimed to determine whether cyclosporine A (CsA) might prevent multiple organ failure following CA through a ubiquitous mPTP inhibition in each distant vital organ. Anesthetized New Zealand White rabbits were subjected to 15 min of CA and 120 min of reperfusion. At the onset of resuscitation, the rabbits received CsA, its non-immunosuppressive derivative NIM811, or vehicle (controls). Survival, hemodynamics, brain damage, organ injuries, and systemic I/R response were analyzed. Fresh mitochondria were isolated from the brain, heart, kidney, liver, and lung to assess both oxidative phosphorylation and permeability transition. CsA analogs significantly improved short-term survival and prevented multiple organ failure, including brain damage and myocardial dysfunction (P < 0.05 vs. controls). Susceptibility of mPTP opening was significantly increased in heart, brain, kidney, and liver mitochondria isolated from controls, while mitochondrial respiration was impaired (P < 0.05 vs. sham). CsA analogs prevented these mitochondrial dysfunctions (P < 0.05 vs. controls). These results suggest that CsA and NIM811 can prevent the post-CA syndrome through a ubiquitous mitochondrial protective effect at the level of each major distant organ. PMID:25213634

  13. Enhancement of oral bioavailability of cyclosporine A: comparison of various nanoscale drug-delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Qi, Jianping; Weng, Tengfei; Tian, Zhiqiang; Lu, Yi; Hu, Kaili; Yin, Zongning; Wu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    A variety of nanoscale delivery systems have been shown to enhance the oral absorption of poorly water-soluble and poorly permeable drugs. However, the performance of these systems has seldom been evaluated simultaneously. The aim of this study was to compare the bioavailability enhancement effect of lipid-based nanocarriers with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) to highlight the importance of the lipid composition, with cyclosporine A (CyA) as a model drug. CyA-loaded PLGA NPs, nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs), and self-microemulsifying drug-delivery systems (SMEDDS) were prepared. The particle size of PLGA NPs (182.2±12.8 nm) was larger than that of NLCs (89.7±9.0 nm) and SMEDDS (26.9±1.9 nm). All vehicles are charged negatively. The entrapment efficiency of PLGA NPs and NLCs was 87.6%±1.6% and 80.3%±0.6%, respectively. In vitro release tests indicated that the cumulative release of CyA was lower than 4% from all vehicles, including Sandimmun Neoral®, according to the dialysis method. Both NLCs and SMEDDS showed high relative oral bioavailability, 111.8% and 73.6%, respectively, after oral gavage administration to beagle dogs, which was not statistically different from commercial Sandimmun Neoral®. However, PLGA NPs failed to achieve efficient absorption, with relative bioavailability of about 22.7%. It is concluded that lipid-based nanoscale drug-delivery systems are superior to polymeric NPs in enhancing oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble and poorly permeable drugs. PMID:25378925

  14. Enhancement of oral bioavailability of cyclosporine A: comparison of various nanoscale drug-delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Qi, Jianping; Weng, Tengfei; Tian, Zhiqiang; Lu, Yi; Hu, Kaili; Yin, Zongning; Wu, Wei

    2014-01-01

    A variety of nanoscale delivery systems have been shown to enhance the oral absorption of poorly water-soluble and poorly permeable drugs. However, the performance of these systems has seldom been evaluated simultaneously. The aim of this study was to compare the bioavailability enhancement effect of lipid-based nanocarriers with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) to highlight the importance of the lipid composition, with cyclosporine A (CyA) as a model drug. CyA-loaded PLGA NPs, nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs), and self-microemulsifying drug-delivery systems (SMEDDS) were prepared. The particle size of PLGA NPs (182.2 ± 12.8 nm) was larger than that of NLCs (89.7 ± 9.0 nm) and SMEDDS (26.9 ± 1.9 nm). All vehicles are charged negatively. The entrapment efficiency of PLGA NPs and NLCs was 87.6%± 1.6% and 80.3%± 0.6%, respectively. In vitro release tests indicated that the cumulative release of CyA was lower than 4% from all vehicles, including Sandimmun Neoral(®), according to the dialysis method. Both NLCs and SMEDDS showed high relative oral bioavailability, 111.8% and 73.6%, respectively, after oral gavage administration to beagle dogs, which was not statistically different from commercial Sandimmun Neoral(®). However, PLGA NPs failed to achieve efficient absorption, with relative bioavailability of about 22.7%. It is concluded that lipid-based nanoscale drug-delivery systems are superior to polymeric NPs in enhancing oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble and poorly permeable drugs. PMID:25378925

  15. Cyclosporin-A does not prevent cold ischemia/reperfusion injury of rat livers.

    PubMed

    Tarrab, Esther; Huet, Pierre-Michel; Brault, Antoine; Rocheleau, Bernard; Laurens, Marina; Crenesse, Dominique

    2012-06-15

    Cyclosporin-A (CsA) has been reported to protect livers from warm ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. To study if CsA has also a protective effect on cold I/R injury, two models were used: the isolated perfused rat liver (IPRL) and the orthotopic rat liver transplantation (ORLT). (1) IPRL: Livers were preserved for 24 h (5°C) in University of Wisconsin (UW) solution alone (group 1), with CsA (400 nM) dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide (50 μM) (group 2), and with dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) alone (group 3). Livers were reperfused for 60 min (37°C) (n = 8/group). Cell necrosis was evaluated by trypan blue uptake and apoptosis by laddering and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, and by caspase-3 activation. Marked and similar sinusoidal endothelial cell necrosis was found in the three groups while apoptosis was found similarly deceased in groups 2 and 3 compared with group 1. (2) ORLT: Donors received either CsA (5 mg/kg) or corn oil 24 h before transplantation. Recipients were sacrificed after 240 min; cell necrosis and apoptosis were then evaluated. No difference was found between treated and control groups. The current data strongly suggest that CsA has no protective effect on hepatic cold I/R injury. Hepatocyte apoptosis can be reduced by antioxidants, as occurred with DMSO, but introduction of CsA does not provide additional protective effect. PMID:21696775

  16. Excellent uricosuric efficacy of benzbromarone in cyclosporin-A-treated renal transplant patients: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Zürcher, R M; Bock, H A; Thiel, G

    1994-01-01

    Patients on cyclosporin A (CsA) often develop hyperuricaemia and gout. In transplant patients the use of uricosuric drugs for treating hyperuricaemia may be preferable to allopurinol because of the known interaction of the latter with azathioprine. We therefore prospectively studied the uricosuric efficacy of 100 mg benzbromarone (Bbr;Desuric) daily in 25 CsA-treated renal transplant patients with stable graft function and hyperuricaemia (> 359 mumol/l for females, > 491 mumol/l for males). Benzbromarone decreased plasma uric acid from 579 + 18 mumol/l to 313 +/- 24 mumol/l (mean +/- SEM; P < 0.0001) and thereby normalized plasma uric acid in 21 of 25 patients. The remaining four patients had creatinine clearances between 21 and 25 ml/min, the lowest of the entire study group. Mean fractional clearance of uric acid increased from 5.4 +/- 0.4% to 17.2 +/- 1.0% (P < 0.001). The relative decrease of plasma uric acid closely correlated with baseline creatinine clearance (r = 0.67; P < 0.001). CsA trough values were not influenced. None of the patients experienced any significant side-effects. As an unexpected find-ing, urinary uric acid excretion increased from 2082 +/- 175 mumol/24 h to 3233 +/- 232 mumol/24 h after 4 weeks' treatment with benzbromarone. In conclusion, benzbromarone normalized plasma uric acid in all CsA-treated renal transplant recipients with a creatinine clearance > 25 ml/min. Due to its excellent efficacy and lack of significant side-effects, benzbromarone appears to be preferable to allopurinol in CsA-treated renal transplant recipients with a creatinine clearance over 25 ml/min. PMID:8090336

  17. Host cell species-specific effect of cyclosporine A on simian immunodeficiency virus replication

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An understanding of host cell factors that affect viral replication contributes to elucidation of the mechanism for determination of viral tropism. Cyclophilin A (CypA), a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase), is a host factor essential for efficient replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in human cells. However, the role of cyclophilins in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication has not been determined. In the present study, we examined the effect of cyclosporine A (CsA), a PPIase inhibitor, on SIV replication. Results SIV replication in human CEM-SS T cells was not inhibited but rather enhanced by treatment with CsA, which inhibited HIV-1 replication. CsA treatment of target human cells enhanced an early step of SIV replication. CypA overexpression enhanced the early phase of HIV-1 but not SIV replication, while CypA knock-down resulted in suppression of HIV-1 but not SIV replication in CEM-SS cells, partially explaining different sensitivities of HIV-1 and SIV replication to CsA treatment. In contrast, CsA treatment inhibited SIV replication in macaque T cells; CsA treatment of either virus producer or target cells resulted in suppression of SIV replication. SIV infection was enhanced by CypA overexpression in macaque target cells. Conclusions CsA treatment enhanced SIV replication in human T cells but abrogated SIV replication in macaque T cells, implying a host cell species-specific effect of CsA on SIV replication. Further analyses indicated a positive effect of CypA on SIV infection into macaque but not into human T cells. These results suggest possible contribution of CypA to the determination of SIV tropism. PMID:22225545

  18. Kinetics and dynamics of cyclosporine A in three hepatic cell culture systems.

    PubMed

    Bellwon, P; Truisi, G L; Bois, F Y; Wilmes, A; Schmidt, T; Savary, C C; Parmentier, C; Hewitt, P G; Schmal, O; Josse, R; Richert, L; Guillouzo, A; Mueller, S O; Jennings, P; Testai, E; Dekant, W

    2015-12-25

    In vitro experiments have a high potential to improve current chemical safety assessment and reduce the number of animals used. However, most studies conduct hazard assessment alone, largely ignoring exposure and kinetic parameters. Therefore, in this study the kinetics of cyclosporine A (CsA) and the dynamics of CsA-induced cyclophilin B (Cyp-B) secretion were investigated in three widely used hepatic in vitro models: primary rat hepatocytes (PRH), primary human hepatocytes (PHH) and HepaRG cells. Cells were exposed daily to CsA for up to 14 days. CsA in cells and culture media was quantified by LC-MS/MS and used for pharmacokinetic modeling. Cyp-B was quantified by western blot analysis in cells and media. All cell systems took up CsA rapidly from the medium after initial exposure and all showed a time- and concentration-dependent Cyp-B cellular depletion and extracellular secretion. Only in PRH an accumulation of CsA over 14 days repeated exposure was observed. Donor-specific effects in CsA clearance were observed in the PHH model and both PHH and HepaRG cells significantly metabolized CsA, with no bioaccumulation being observed after repeated exposure. The developed kinetic models are described in detail and show that all models under-predict the in vivo hepatic clearance of CsA, but to different extents with 27-, 24- and 2-fold for PRH, PHH and HepaRG cells, respectively. This study highlights the need for more attention to kinetics in in vitro studies. PMID:26193170

  19. Antioxidant properties of repaglinide and its protections against cyclosporine A-induced renal tubular injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dao; Li, Jin; Li, Hui; Wu, Qiong; Li, Qi-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Repaglinide (RG) is an antihyperglycemic agent used for the treatment of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. It has a good safety and efficacy profile in diabetic patients with complications in renal impairment and is an appropriate treatment choice, even for individuals with more severe degrees of renal malfunctions. The aim of the present study was to examine the protective effect of RG on cyclosporine A (CsA)-induced rat renal impairment and to evaluate the antioxidant mechanisms by which RG exerts its protective actions. Materials and Methods: Fifty male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 250–300 g were randomly divided into five groups: administrations of olive oil (control, PO), RG (0.4 mg/kg, PO), CsA (30 mg/kg in olive oil, SC), RG (0.2 or 0.4 mg/kg, PO) plus CsA (30 mg/kg in olive oil SC) every day for 15 days. Results: SC administration of CsA (30 mg/kg) to rats produced marked elevations in the levels of renal impairment parameters such as urinary protein, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG), serum creatinine (SCr), and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). It also caused histologic injury to the kidneys. Oral administration of RG (0.2 and 0.4 mg/kg) markedly decreased all the aforementioned changes. In addition, CsA caused increases in the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and decreases in superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase (GSR), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and glutathione in kidney homogenate, which were reversed significantly by both doses of RG. Conclusion: The findings of our study indicate that RG may play an important role in protecting the kidney from oxidative insult.

  20. [Cyclosporin A causes oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in renal tubular cells].

    PubMed

    Pérez de Hornedo, J; de Arriba, G; Calvino, M; Benito, S; Parra, T

    2007-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in cyclosporin A (CsA) nephrotoxicity. As mitochondria are one of the main sources of ROS in cells, we evaluated the role of CsA in mitochondrial structure and function in LLC-PK1 cells. We incubated cells with CsA 1 microM for 24 hours and studies were performed with flow citometry and confocal microscopy. We studied mitochondrial NAD(P)H content, superoxide anion (O2.-) production (MitoSOX Red), oxidation of cardiolipin of inner mitochondrial membrane (NAO) and mitochondrial membrane potential (DIOC2(3)). Also we analyzed the intracellular ROS synthesis (H2DCF-DA) and reduced glutation (GSH) of cells. Our results showed that CsA decreased NAD(P)H and membrane potential, and increased O2.- in mitochondria. CsA also provoked oxidation of cardiolipin. Furthermore, CsA increased intracellular ROS production and decreased GSH content. These results suggest that CsA has crucial effects in mitochondria. CsA modified mitochondrial physiology through the decrease of antioxidant mitochondrial compounds as NAD(P)H and the dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential and increase of oxidants as O2.-. Also, CsA alters lipidic structure of inner mitochondrial membrane through the oxidation of cardiolipin. These effects trigger a chain of events that favour intracellular synthesis of ROS and depletion of GSH that can compromise cellular viability. Nephrotoxic cellular effects of CsA can be explained, at least in part, through its influence on mitochondrial functionalism. PMID:18045032

  1. In vitro and in vivo characterization on amorphous solid dispersion of cyclosporine A for inhalation therapy.

    PubMed

    Onoue, Satomi; Sato, Hideyuki; Kawabata, Yohei; Mizumoto, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Naofumi; Yamada, Shizuo

    2009-08-19

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) has been clinically used as immunosuppressant, and new application for airway inflammation was also proposed. However, the clinical use of CsA was limited due to severe adverse effects after systemic exposure and the poor solubility. In the present investigation, novel respirable powder (RP) of CsA was developed for pulmonary administration with use of solid dispersion of wet-milled CsA (WM/CsA), and the physicochemical and pharmacological properties of the WM/CsA and its RP formulation were characterized. CsA in the solid dispersion was found to be amorphous by X-ray powder diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. It exhibited the improved dissolution behavior as compared to active pharmaceutical ingredients. Laser diffraction and cascade impactor analysis of newly developed WM/CsA-RP, consisting of jet-milled WM/CsA and lactose carriers, suggested high dispersion and deposition in the respiratory organs with the emitted dose and the fine particle fraction of 96 and 54%, respectively. Intratracheal administration of WM/CsA-RP (100 microg CsA) in experimental inflammatory rats led to 71 and 85% reduction of granulocyte recruitment in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids and lung tissues, respectively, with showing ca 10(2)-fold reduced AUC and C(max) values of plasma CsA as compared to the oral dosage form of CsA at toxic concentration (10 mg/kg). Upon these findings, WM/CsA-RP would be efficacious dosage form for clinical treatment of airway inflammations with minimal systemic side effects. PMID:19376169

  2. Effect of cyclosporin A on allotransplanted pancreatic fragments to the spleen of totally pancreatectomized dogs.

    PubMed

    Du Toit, D F; Reece-Smith, H; McShane, P; Denton, T; Morris, P J

    1982-03-01

    Cyclosporin A (Cy A) was evaluated in dogs to assess its effectiveness of prolonging survival of allogeneic pancreatic islet tissue transplanted to the spleens of totally pancreatectomized mongrel dogs. Thirty-seven dogs were made diabetic by total pancreatectomy. Ten untreated pancreatectomized animals survived a mean (+/-SE) of 6.3 +/- 0.9 days and died with mean (+/-SE) plasma glucose levels of 23.2 +/- 2.7 mmol/liter. Dispersed pancreatic fragments, prepared by collagenase digestion without separation of exocrine and endocrine components, were directly implanted into the splenic pulp of 27 pancreatectomized dogs. Twelve dogs given autotransplants became normoglycemic after 4.3 +/- 0.5 days and remained so until killed at 60 days post-transplant, although normal glucose tolerance tests were not achieved. Eight nonimmunosuppressed dogs given allogeneic pancreatic fragments did not become normoglycemic but survived for 13.0 +/- 2.1 days, the dogs dying with a terminal plasma glucose of 22.7 mmol/liter. An additional seven dogs given allogeneic transplants were given Cy A (oral solution), 25 mg/kg/day, for 14 days, and, although failing to become normoglycemic, survived for 28.1 +/- 5.4 days and died with terminal plasma glucose levels of 25.1 +/- 0.6 mmol/liter. Intrasplenic complications included subcapsular hematomas, intrasplenic necrosis and cavitation, capsular perforations, and arteriolar thrombosis. The failure to achieve normoglycemia with allogeneic dispersed pancreatic tissue in dogs treated with Cy A and the complications associated with the implantation of the tissue in the spleen do not suggest that this approach is worthy of clinical trial. PMID:7039036

  3. New cementum formation induced by cyclosporin A: a histological, ultrastructural and histomorphometric study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ayanoglou, C M; Lesty, C

    1997-08-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA), a widely used immunosuppressive agent, is known to induce gingival overgrowth; 30 mg/kg/d of CsA were administrated orally in young and adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The same number of rats received oil-based vehicle solution. After 4, 9, 14 and 19 wk of CsA or vehicle administration 3 control and 3 experimental rats were anaesthetized and tissues fixed by an intracardiac perfusion of fixative solution. Upper and lower jaws were dissected, demineralized and processed for Epon inclusion. Histological examination revealed the presence of large amounts of new cementum (NC) covering extensive areas of the acellular extrinsic fibre cementum (AEFC) in all the root surfaces. NC was particularly abundant at the cervical third of the roots facing the gingival connective tissue, where it occurred as layers, spurs or in both configurations. NC was characterized by its irregular outline, globular body content and infrequent presence of incremental lines. Histomorphometric evaluation by semi-automatic image analysis indicated that the volume and the external surface of NC spurs were 2.86-6.49 and 1.29-1.97-fold increased comparative to those of the AEFC covering the same root areas. Electron microscopy revealed that NC was a functional tissue with insertion of collagen fibres perpendicularly to the long axis of the root. It can be concluded that under some experimental conditions formation of abundant amounts of NC can be achieved and that these results must be taken into account for a new approach in the treatment of periodontal disease. PMID:9379322

  4. Metabolism of cyclosporin A. I. Study in freshly isolated rabbit hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Fabre, G.; Bertault-Peres, P.; Fabre, I.; Maurel, P.; Just, S.; Cano, J.P.

    1987-05-01

    The metabolism of cyclosporin A (CsA), a widely used immunosuppressive agent, was evaluated in freshly isolated rabbit hepatocytes by HPLC which separated CsA from its major group of derivatives, e.g. first generation metabolites (monohydroxylated and N-demethylated) and second generation derivatives (dihydroxylated and dihydroxy-N-demethylated). After exposure of hepatocytes to radiolabeled CsA (0.5 mg/liter), CsA was rapidly accumulated inside the cells and metabolized. The dihydroxylated metabolites represent the major intracellular forms after 1 hr. CsA metabolites synthesized inside the cells are then rapidly detected in the extracellular compartment. Unchanged drug and the various metabolites are concentrated inside the cells with transmembrane chemical gradients ranging between 20:1 and 40:1. Transport and metabolic processes for CsA have been evaluated over the following CsA extracellular concentration range, 0.1-10 mg/liter. Metabolism appears to be the rate-limiting step. The apparent affinity constant of CsA for the enzyme system involved in its metabolism is approximately 15 microM. Besides the lipophilicity of the molecule, which is responsible for the retention of CsA and its metabolites in the intracellular compartment, the presence of a binding component(s) in the hepatocytes was also demonstrated. CsA and its metabolites seem to have similar affinities for this binding site. These studies demonstrate that CsA is rapidly transformed inside the hepatocytes to various metabolites which may play an important role in the pharmacological activity of the drug and/or in its clinical toxicity.

  5. Cyclosporin A Preserves Mitochondrial Function after Traumatic Brain Injury in the Immature Rat and Piglet

    PubMed Central

    Kilbaugh, Todd J.; Bhandare, Sunita; Lorom, David H.; Saraswati, Manda; Robertson, Courtney L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Cyclosporin A (CsA) has been shown to be neuroprotective in mature animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI), but its effects on immature animal models of TBI are unknown. In mature animal models, CsA inhibits the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP), thereby maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis following injury by inhibiting calcium influx and preserving mitochondrial membrane potential. The aim of the present study was to evaluate CsA's ability to preserve mitochondrial bioenergetic function following TBI (as measured by mitochondrial respiration and cerebral microdialysis), in two immature models (focal and diffuse), and in two different species (rat and piglet). Three groups were studied: injured+CsA, injured+saline vehicle, and uninjured shams. In addition, we evaluated CsA's effects on cerebral hemodynamics as measured by a novel thermal diffusion probe. The results demonstrate that post-injury administration of CsA ameliorates mitochondrial dysfunction, preserves cerebral blood flow (CBF), and limits neuropathology in immature animals 24 h post-TBI. Mitochondria were isolated 24 h after controlled cortical impact (CCI) in rats and rapid non-impact rotational injury (RNR) in piglets, and CsA ameliorated cerebral bioenergetic crisis with preservation of the respiratory control ratio (RCR) to sham levels. Results were more dramatic in RNR piglets than in CCI rats. In piglets, CsA also preserved lactate pyruvate ratios (LPR), as measured by cerebral microdialysis and CBF at sham levels 24 h after injury, in contrast to the significant alterations seen in injured piglets compared to shams (p<0.01). The administration of CsA to piglets following RNR promoted a 42% decrease in injured brain volume (p<0.01). We conclude that CsA exhibits significant neuroprotective activity in immature models of focal and diffuse TBI, and has exciting translational potential as a therapeutic agent for neuroprotection in children. PMID

  6. Influence of Verapamil and Cyclosporin A on bile acid metabolism and transport in rat liver slices.

    PubMed

    Barth, Astrid; Braun, Jerome; Müller, Dieter

    2006-08-01

    Verapamil (V) is a specific inhibitor of the P-glycoprotein (mdr1) in the hepatocyte canalicular membrane. Cyclosporin A (CsA) as an essential immunosuppressive drug has potentially cholestatic adverse effects on the liver, but increases the expression of mdr1. In precision-cut liver slices from 34- to 40-day-old male Wistar rats 26 individual free and conjugated bile acids (BAs) as markers of hepatic transport and synthesis function were analysed after 4 h incubation with V (100 microM) or CsA (5 microM) in Krebs-Henseleit buffer. Some slices were loaded with cholic acid (CA 5 microM) or tauro-ursodeoxycholic acid (T-UDCA 5 microM) to investigate the V and CsA effects under conditions of BA supplementation. BAs were determined in tissue and medium by HPLC with postcolumn derivatisation and fluorescence detection. V and CsA, influencing different targets in BA transport, enhanced slice concentrations of T- and glyco- (G-) conjugated CA only when exogenous CA was given additionally. This BA accumulation in tissue is more reflected at decreased medium concentrations of these BAs after V and CsA incubations. Both V and CsA also inhibited CA uptake into the slices. The acidic chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA) synthesis pathway is disturbed: T- and G-CDCA concentrations are diminished in slices and medium after V and CsA incubations. T-UDCA plus V or CsA enhanced not only its own slice concentration but also the concentration of the trihydroxylated tauro-muricholic acid (T-beta-MCA), reflecting the conversion of the accumulated dihydroxylated T-UDCA into the T-beta-MCA. The similar effects of V and CsA on BA transport and metabolism can be explained by mdr1 mediated disturbances of cellular ATP transport rather than by inhibition of individual BA transporters. PMID:16793245

  7. Readily restoring freeze-dried probilosomes as potential nanocarriers for enhancing oral delivery of cyclosporine A.

    PubMed

    Guan, Peipei; Lu, Yi; Qi, Jianping; Wu, Wei

    2016-08-01

    Formulating vesicular nanocarriers into dried precursors so as to overcome the drawbacks associated with liquid formulations is challengeable due to low efficiency of restoration. In this study, bilosomes interiorly thickened with gelatin (G-BLs) was evaluated for the ability to withstand freeze-drying stress and enhanced oral bioavailability of a model drug, cyclosporine A (CyA). The restoration efficiency of freeze-dried pro-G-BLs is investigated by comparing the particle size distribution, entrapment efficiency and morphology of the bilosomes before and after freeze-drying. Particle size and polydispersity index (PI) of pro-G-BLs after restoration was similar to that before freeze-drying, whereas freeze-dried bilosomes without gelatin thickening (pro-BLs) show irreversible damage and aggregation along with significantly increased particle size and PI after restoration. Entrapment efficiency of pro-G-BLs remains as high as 83.7%, in sharp contrast with 66.7% for pro-BLs. Pharmacokinetics in beagle dogs show improved absorption of CyA in pro-G-BLs as compared to pro-BLs, G-BLs and microemulsion-based Sandimmun Neoral(®). The relative oral bioavailability of CyA-loaded pro-G-BLs, pro-BLs and G-BLs was 165.2%, 123.5% and 130.1%, respectively, with Neoral(®) as the reference. It is concluded that interior thickening with gelatin significantly enhanced the stability against freeze-drying stress, which as a result improves the restoring efficiency and oral bioavailability. PMID:27085046

  8. Docosahexaenoic acid reverses cyclosporin A-induced changes in membrane structure and function.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, R R; Wang, O L; Zerouga, M; Stillwell, W; Haq, A; Kissling, R; Pierce, W M; Smith, N B; Miller, F N; Ehringer, W D

    2000-04-01

    The use of a fish oil vehicle for cyclosporin A (CsA) can decrease the toxic effects of CsA but the mechanism is unclear. Here we examine the mechanism by which docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a fish oil-derived polyunsaturated fatty acid, can alter the toxic effects of CsA on mouse organ function, endothelial macromolecular permeability, and membrane bilayer function. Mice given CsA and fish oil showed increased liver toxicity, kidney toxicity, incorporation of DHA, and evidence of oxidized fatty acids compared to control animals. We hypothesized that the toxic effects of CsA were primarily a result of membrane perturbation, which could be decreased if DHA were not oxidized. The presence of CsA (10 mol%) alone increased dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine membrane permeability by seven fold over control (no CsA, no DHA). However, if non-oxidized DHA (15 mol%) and CsA were added to the membrane, the permeability returned to control levels. Interestingly, if the DHA was oxidized, the antagonistic effect of DHA on CsA was completely lost. While CsA alone increased endothelial permeability to albumin, the combination of non-oxidized DHA and CsA had no effect on endothelial macromolecular permeability. However the combination of oxidized DHA and CsA was no different than the effects of CsA only. CsA increased the fluorescence anisotropy of DPH in the liquid crystalline state of DPPC, while DHA decreased fluorescence anisotropy. However the combination of CsA and DHA was no different than DHA alone. We conclude that non-oxidized DHA can reverse the membrane perturbing effects of CsA, and the increases in endothelial macromolecular permeability, which may explain how fish oil is capable of decreasing the toxicity of CsA. PMID:10742598

  9. Change in renal heme oxygenase expression in cyclosporine A-induced injury.

    PubMed

    Rezzani, Rita; Rodella, Luigi; Buffoli, Barbara; Goodman, Alvin A; Abraham, Nader G; Lianos, Elias A; Bianchi, Rossella

    2005-01-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is the first immunosuppressant used in allotransplantation. Its use is associated with side effects that include nephrotoxicity. This study explored the anatomic structures involved in CsA nephrotoxicity and the effect of heme oxygenase (HO) in preventing CsA injury. Rats were divided into four groups, which were treated with olive oil, CsA (15 mg/kg/day), CsA plus the HO inhibitor (SnMP; 30 microM/kg/day), and with the HO inducer (CoPP; 5 mg/100 g bw). Renal tissue was treated for morphological, biochemical, and immunohistochemical studies. CsA-treated rats showed degenerative changes with renal fibrosis localized mainly around proximal tubules. Collapsed vessels were sometimes seen in glomeruli. No HO-1 expression and increased expression of endothelin-1 (ET-1) were observed in CsA-treated rats compared with controls. In CsA plus SnMP-treated rats, HO-1 expression was further reduced and the morphology was not changed compared to the CsA group, whereas CsA plus CoPP-treated animals again showed normal morphology and with restoration and an increase in HO-1 levels. HO activity and immunohistochemical data showed similar alterations as HO expression. No changes were observed for HO-2 analysis. The observations indicate that HO-1 downregulation and ET-1 upregulation by CsA might be one mechanism underlying CsA-induced nephrotoxicity. Therefore, attempts to preserve HO levels attenuate CsA nephrotoxicity. PMID:15637343

  10. Protective effects of heme-oxygenase expression in cyclosporine A--induced injury.

    PubMed

    Rezzani, Rita; Rodella, Luigi; Bianchi, Rossella; Goodman, Alvin I; Lianos, Elias A

    2005-04-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is the immunosuppressant of first choice in allotransplantation. Its use is associated with side effects of nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity, which are among the most prominent. This study was undertaken to explore whether expression and activity of heme oxygenase (HO), the rate-limiting enzyme in heme degradation, is altered in a rat model of CsA-induced injury. Male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups and treated for 21 days. Group I (control) was injected with olive oil (vehicle), group II with CsA (15 mg/kg/day), group III with CsA and the HO inhibitor stannous mesoporphyrin (SnMP) (30 micromol/kg/day) and group IV with one dose of the HO inducer cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) 5 mg/100 or heme (10 mg/kg body weight), three days after onset of CsA treatment. Renal tissue was processed for light microscopy, and for HO-1 enzyme activity, assay and for Western blot analysis. In CsA-treated rats there was histological evidence of tubulointerstitial scarring. HO-1 was undetectable in CsA-treated rats compared to control while there was no change in HO-2. In animals treated with a combination of CsA and SnMP, HO-1 activity was further reduced. In animals treated with a combination of CsA and CoPP, HO-1 protein levels were partially restored. These observations indicate that downregulation of HO-1 expression by CsA could be one mechanism underlying CsA-induced toxicity. The CsA-induced decrease in HO-1 expression is partial and restorable, and attempts to preserve HO levels may attenuate CsA toxicity. PMID:16181108

  11. Gender- and dose-related effects of cyclosporin A on hepatic and bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Walter; Xu, Huiqing; Wlcek, Katrin; Schüler, Christiane; Rubel, Franz; Erben, Reinhold G

    2012-01-01

    Previous data have shown gender-related differences in the skeletal effects of the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A (CsA) in rats. To test the hypothesis that the gender-related skeletal effects of CsA are caused by gender-specific metabolism of this drug, we treated aged male and female sham-operated, gonadectomized (GX) as well as sex hormone-supplemented GX rats with 5 mg/kg CsA three times per week for 2 months, and analyzed the bone phenotype as well as the concentrations of CsA and its major metabolites AM1, AM1c, AM9, and AM4N in blood, urine, and liver tissue. CsA treatment induced high turnover osteopenia in males, but not females. Male rats showed several-fold higher CsA and CsA metabolite blood levels compared with females. Renal clearance data revealed that CsA undergoes selective tubular reabsorption in male, but not female rats. However, a mathematical modeling approach demonstrated that the higher CsA blood levels in males were almost exclusively caused by a 6-fold lower hepatic clearance rate compared with females. In addition, we subcutaneously treated female rats with up to 6-fold higher doses of CsA. Similar to males, high dose CsA induced high turnover osteopenia in female rats. Our data show that the gender-related differences in the skeletal effects of CsA are caused by a higher hepatic clearance rate for CsA in female compared to male rats, and not by a differential skeletal response to CsA. Moreover, our study indicates that CsA blood levels of ≤200 ng/ml measured by HPLC do not induce high turnover osteopenia in aged rats. PMID:22019458

  12. Effectiveness and Optical Quality of Topical 3.0% Diquafosol versus 0.05% Cyclosporine A in Dry Eye Patients following Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jang Hoon; Song, In Seok; Kim, Kyoung Lae; Yoon, Sam Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effectiveness and optical quality of 3.0% topical diquafosol versus 0.05% cyclosporine A in dry eye patients following cataract surgery. Methods. In total, 40 eyes of 40 patients newly diagnosed with dry eye syndrome 1 week after cataract surgery were randomized to receive either 3.0% diquafosol ophthalmic solution six times daily or 0.05% cyclosporine A twice daily for 3 months. Outcome measures were tear film break-up time (TBUT), results on Schirmer 1 test, ocular surface staining score, the ocular surface disease index (OSDI) score, and higher-order aberrations (HOAs). Measurements were taken at baseline and at 1, 2, and 3 months. Results. In the diquafosol group, TBUT showed higher outcomes than the cyclosporine A group at 1 and 3 months. Both groups showed increased scores on Schirmer 1 test. The ocular surface staining score decreased in all periods in both groups. Vertical coma and total HOAs decreased more in the cyclosporine A group than in the diquafosol group at 3 months. Conclusion. Both 3.0% diquafosol and 0.05% cyclosporine A were effective in treating dry eye after cataract surgery. Diquafosol was more effective in increasing the tear secretion, but cyclosporine A was more effective in improving optical aberrations. PMID:26989503

  13. Oral Cyclosporin A Inhibits CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein Activity in HIV-Infected Adults Initiating Treatment with Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hulgan, Todd; Donahue, John P.; Smeaton, Laura; Pu, Minya; Wang, Hongying; Lederman, Michael M.; Smith, Kimberly; Valdez, Hernan; Pilcher, Christopher; Haas, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose P-glycoprotein limits tissue penetration of many antiretroviral drugs. We characterized effects of the P-glycoprotein substrate cyclosporin A on T cell P-glycoprotein activity in HIV-infected AIDS Clinical Trials Group study A5138 participants. Methods We studied P-glycoprotein activity on CD4 and CD8 T cells in 16 participants randomized to receive oral cyclosporin A (n=9) or not (n=7) during initiation antiretroviral therapy (ART) that did not include protease or non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Results CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein activity decreased by a median of 8 percentage points with cyclosporin A/ART (difference between cyclosporin A/ART versus ART only P=0.001). Plasma trough cyclosporin A concentrations correlated with change in P-glycoprotein activity in several T cell subsets. Conclusions Oral cyclosporin A can inhibit peripheral blood CD4 T cell P-glycoprotein activity. Targeted P-glycoprotein inhibition might enhance delivery of ART to T cells. PMID:19779705

  14. Effectiveness and Optical Quality of Topical 3.0% Diquafosol versus 0.05% Cyclosporine A in Dry Eye Patients following Cataract Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jang Hoon; Song, In Seok; Kim, Kyoung Lae; Yoon, Sam Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the effectiveness and optical quality of 3.0% topical diquafosol versus 0.05% cyclosporine A in dry eye patients following cataract surgery. Methods. In total, 40 eyes of 40 patients newly diagnosed with dry eye syndrome 1 week after cataract surgery were randomized to receive either 3.0% diquafosol ophthalmic solution six times daily or 0.05% cyclosporine A twice daily for 3 months. Outcome measures were tear film break-up time (TBUT), results on Schirmer 1 test, ocular surface staining score, the ocular surface disease index (OSDI) score, and higher-order aberrations (HOAs). Measurements were taken at baseline and at 1, 2, and 3 months. Results. In the diquafosol group, TBUT showed higher outcomes than the cyclosporine A group at 1 and 3 months. Both groups showed increased scores on Schirmer 1 test. The ocular surface staining score decreased in all periods in both groups. Vertical coma and total HOAs decreased more in the cyclosporine A group than in the diquafosol group at 3 months. Conclusion. Both 3.0% diquafosol and 0.05% cyclosporine A were effective in treating dry eye after cataract surgery. Diquafosol was more effective in increasing the tear secretion, but cyclosporine A was more effective in improving optical aberrations. PMID:26989503

  15. Topical application of FTY720 and cyclosporin A prolong corneal graft survival in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Jiang, Jingjing; Xiao, He; Wang, Xiaokui; Li, Yan; Gong, Yubo; Wang, Dajiang

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of topical FTY720 and cyclosporin A (CsA) on allogeneic corneal transplantation in mice. Methods A total of 75 BALB/c mice received corneal grafts from C57BL/6 donors. Recipients were treated with 0.1%, 0.3%, or 0.5% FTY720 ophthalmic gel or 1% CsA eye-drops after the graft (controls received no treatment). The number of cluster of differentiation (CD)4+ T cells and CD4+CD25+forkhead box P3 (Foxp3)+ regulatory (Treg) cell phenotypes were measured by flow cytometry. Cytokine mRNA expression in corneal grafts was analyzed by real-time quantitative PCR. CD4 + T cells and cytokines in corneal samples were identified by immunohistochemical staining. Results Corneal graft survival was prolonged by treatment with topical 0.5% FTY720 (mean survival time [MST], 24.1±1.6 days) or 1% CsA eye-drops (MST 25.0±1.9 days) compared with controls (MST, 13.4±0.5 days; n=9, both p<0.01). Topical 0.5% FTY720 treatment significantly increased the percentages of CD4 + T (p<0.05) and Treg cells (p<0.01; n=5) in the cervical lymph nodes compared with controls. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) mRNA transcription in corneal grafts after topical 0.5% FTY720 increased (p<0.05, n=3), while interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) mRNA expression in corneal grafts treated with 1% CsA decreased (p<0.01, p<0.05, respectively). These cytokine results were paralleled by similar immunohistochemical staining. Topical 0.5% FTY720 and 1% CsA treatment reduced the infiltration of CD4+ Tcells in the grafts. Conclusions Topical 0.5% FTY720 and 1% CsA can effectively prolong allogeneic corneal graft survival in mice. Treatment with topical 0.5% FTY720 increases the percentage of CD4+ T cells and the percentage of Treg cells in cervical lymph nodes. The 0.5% FTY720 increased TGF-β1 mRNA expression and decreases infiltration of CD4+ T cells in corneal grafts, while topical 1% CsA down-regulated the expression of IL-2 and IFN-γ. PMID:22509094

  16. Effect of cyclosporin A on bone mineral metabolism in experimental diabetes mellitus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Epstein, S; Takizawa, M; Stein, B; Katz, I A; Joffe, I I; Romero, D F; Liang, X G; Li, M; Ke, H Z; Jee, W S

    1994-04-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) is widely used in diabetic transplant patients and early type I diabetes mellitus. Diabetes produces a low-turnover osteopenia, and CsA conversely induces high-turnover osteopenia in rats. We investigated whether CsA would exacerbate diabetic osteopenia. Four groups of 10-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 11/group) were studied: On day -6, groups A and C received saline and groups B and D received intravenous streptozotocin (55 mg/kg) to induce diabetes. From day 0, groups A and B received CsA vehicle and C and D received CsA (15 mg/kg) by daily gavage. Rats were bled on days -6, 0, 11, and 22 for serum bone gla protein (BGP), 1,25-(OH)2D, PTH, blood ionized Ca, and blood glucose determinations. Double tetracycline labeling was performed on days 9 and 20 for bone histomorphometry. After sacrifice on day 22, histomorphometric analysis was performed. Serum BGP, 1,25-(OH)2D, and PTH levels were significantly decreased in the diabetic alone (B) and diabetic plus CsA (D) groups and significantly increased in the CsA alone (group C). CsA alone (group C) induced cancellous bone loss by stimulated bone resorption. Cancellous bone loss in the diabetic alone rats (group B) was caused primarily by inhibited bone formation. No differences were found in cancellous bone mass, formation, or resorption parameters between diabetic alone (group B) and CsA-treated diabetic rats (group D). Neither CsA alone (group C) nor diabetic alone (group B) nor their combination affected cortical bone mass. CsA alone (group C) stimulated periosteal bone formation and endocortical bone resorption and inhibited endocortical formation, and diabetic alone (group B) inhibited both periosteal and endocortical bone formation. No parameters of tibial diaphyses in CsA-treated diabetic rats (group D) were different from diabetic alone. Thus the addition of CSA to the diabetic treated rats (group D) could not stimulate remodeling and appeared not to worsen significantly some of the

  17. Chronic cyclosporin A nephrotoxicity, P-glycoprotein overexpression, and relationships with intrarenal angiotensin II deposits.

    PubMed Central

    del Moral, R. G.; Andujar, M.; Ramírez, C.; Gómez-Morales, M.; Masseroli, M.; Aguilar, M.; Olmo, A.; Arrebola, F.; Guillén, M.; García-Chicano, M. J.; Nogales, F. F.; O'Valle, F.

    1997-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expels hydrophobic substances from the cell, including chemotherapeutic agents and immunosuppressants such as cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK506. Exposure of cultured renal tubular cells to CsA induces P-gp overexpression in cell membranes. Angiotensin II has recently been implicated as the principal factor responsible for progression of interstitial fibrosis induced by CsA. To investigate the in vivo relationships between histological lesions, P-gp overexpression, and intrarenal angiotensin II deposits, we developed a model of chronic CsA toxicity in Sprague-Dawley rats treated with 25 mg/kg/day CsA for 28 and 56 days and fed either a standard maintenance diet or a low-salt diet. Immunohistochemical methods were used to study the expression of P-gp in renal tubular cells and the appearance of intrarenal angiotensin II deposits. Rats treated with CsA developed chronic nephrotoxicity lesions that were more evident in the group fed the low-salt diet. Treatment with CsA induced overexpression of P-gp in tubular cells of the kidney that increased with time. We found that immunohistochemical expression of P-gp was slightly more severe in rats fed a low-salt diet. Intrarenal deposits of angiotensin II were more evident in rats treated with CsA; these deposits also increased with time. This finding was also more relevant in rats given the low-salt diet. The up-regulation of P-gp was inversely related to the incidence of hyaline arteriopathy (r = -0.65; P < 0.05), periglomerular (r = -0.58; P < 0.05) and peritubular fibrosis (r = -0.63; P < 0.05), and intrarenal angiotensin H deposits in animals with severe signs of nephrotoxicity (r = -0.65; P < 0.05). These results support the hypothesis that the role of P-gp as a detoxicant in renal cells may be related to mechanisms that control the cytoplasmic removal of both toxic metabolites from CsA and those originating from the catabolism of signal transduction proteins (methylcysteine esters), which are produced

  18. Cyclosporine A and palmitic acid treatment synergistically induce cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Yi Rana, Payal; Will, Yvonne

    2012-06-01

    Immunosuppressant cyclosporine A (CsA) treatment can cause severe side effects. Patients taking immunosuppressant after organ transplantation often display hyperlipidemia and obesity. Elevated levels of free fatty acids have been linked to the etiology of metabolic syndromes, nonalcoholic fatty liver and steatohepatitis. The contribution of free fatty acids to CsA-induced toxicity is not known. In this study we explored the effect of palmitic acid on CsA-induced toxicity in HepG2 cells. CsA by itself at therapeutic exposure levels did not induce detectible cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells. Co-treatment of palmitic acid and CsA resulted in a dose dependent increase in cytotoxicity, suggesting that fatty acid could sensitize cells to CsA-induced cytotoxicity at the therapeutic doses of CsA. A synergized induction of caspase-3/7 activity was also observed, indicating that apoptosis may contribute to the cytotoxicity. We demonstrated that CsA reduced cellular oxygen consumption which was further exacerbated by palmitic acid, implicating that impaired mitochondrial respiration might be an underlying mechanism for the enhanced toxicity. Inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) attenuated palmitic acid and CsA induced toxicity, suggesting that JNK activation plays an important role in mediating the enhanced palmitic acid/CsA-induced toxicity. Our data suggest that elevated FFA levels, especially saturated FFA such as palmitic acid, may be predisposing factors for CsA toxicity, and patients with underlying diseases that would elevate free fatty acids may be susceptible to CsA-induced toxicity. Furthermore, hyperlipidemia/obesity resulting from immunosuppressive therapy may aggravate CsA-induced toxicity and worsen the outcome in transplant patients. -- Highlights: ► Palmitic acid and cyclosporine (CsA) synergistically increased cytotoxicity. ► The impairment of mitochondrial functions may contribute to the enhanced toxicity. ► Inhibition of JNK activity attenuated

  19. Lipid nanoparticles for cyclosporine A administration: development, characterization, and in vitro evaluation of their immunosuppression activity.

    PubMed

    Guada, Melissa; Sebastián, Victor; Irusta, Silvia; Feijoó, Esperanza; Dios-Viéitez, María del Carmen; Blanco-Prieto, María José

    2015-01-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is an immunosuppressant commonly used in transplantation for prevention of organ rejection as well as in the treatment of several autoimmune disorders. Although commercial formulations are available, they have some stability, bioavailability, and toxicity related problems. Some of these issues are associated with the drug or excipients and others with the dosage forms. With the aim of overcoming these drawbacks, lipid nanoparticles (LN) have been proposed as an alternative, since excipients are biocompatible and also a large amount of surfactants and organic solvents can be avoided. CsA was successfully incorporated into LN using the method of hot homogenization followed by ultrasonication. Three different formulations were optimized for CsA oral administration, using different surfactants: Tween(®) 80, phosphatidylcholine, taurocholate and Pluronic(®) F127 (either alone or mixtures). Freshly prepared Precirol nanoparticles showed mean sizes with a narrow size distribution ranging from 121 to 202 nm, and after freeze-drying were between 163 and 270 nm, depending on the stabilizer used. Surface charge was negative in all LN developed. High CsA entrapment efficiency of approximately 100% was achieved. Transmission electron microscopy was used to study the morphology of the optimized LN. Also, the crystallinity of the nanoparticles was studied by X-ray powder diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. The presence of the drug in LN surfaces was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The CsA LN developed preserved their physicochemical properties for 3 months when stored at 4°C. Moreover, when the stabilizer system was composed of two surfactants, the LN formulations were also stable at room temperature. Finally, the new CsA formulations showed in vitro dose-dependent immuno-suppressive effects caused by the inhibition of IL-2 levels secreted from stimulated Jurkat cells. The findings obtained in this paper suggest that new lipid

  20. In vitro and ex vivo effects of cyclosporin A on phagocytic host defenses against Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed Central

    Roilides, E; Robinson, T; Sein, T; Pizzo, P A; Walsh, T J

    1994-01-01

    Because cyclosporin A (CsA) is extensively used as an immunosuppressive agent, its effects on phagocytic defenses against Aspergillus fumigatus were studied in vitro and ex vivo. After incubation with 10 to 250 ng of CsA per ml at 37 degrees C for 60 min, polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) exhibited unaltered superoxide anion (O2-) production in response to phorbol myristate acetate and N-formylmethionyl leucyl phenylalanine, whereas > or = 500 ng/ml significantly suppressed it (P < 0.01). Moreover, at < 250 ng of CsA per ml, PMNs exhibited no change in their capacity to damage unopsonized hyphae of A. fumigatus compared with controls, whereas at > or = 250 ng/ml, CsA suppressed the function (P < 0.01). Although neither CsA (250 ng/ml) nor hydrocortisone (10 micrograms/ml) suppressed PMN O2- production in response to phorbol myristate acetate and N-formylmethionyl leucyl phenylalanine, combination of the two agents reduced the function compared with that at the baseline (P < 0.05). Incubation of monocytes with 100 ng of CsA per ml for 1 or 2 days suppressed their antihyphal activity. No essential change in phagocytic activity of monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) against A. fumigatus conidia, tested as the percentage of phagocytosing MDMs and average number of MDM-associated conidia, was detected after 2 or 4 days of incubation with 10 to 1,000 ng of CsA per ml. Furthermore, in rabbits treated with CsA (up to 20 mg/kg of body weight per day intravenously for 7 days), neither O2- production and hyphal damage caused by PMNs or monocytes against hyphae nor phagocytosis of conidia by pulmonary alveolar macrophages was significantly suppressed. Thus, these results demonstrated that CsA within therapeutically relevant concentrations does not suppress antifungal activity of phagocytes except that of circulating monocytes. However, it may induce significant immunosuppression of phagocytes' antifungal function at relatively high concentrations in vitro, especially when

  1. Cyclosporine A induces apoptotic and autophagic cell death in rat pituitary GH3 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Sung; Choi, Seung-Il; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Yoo, Yeong-Min

    2014-01-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is a powerful immunosuppressive drug with side effects including the development of chronic nephrotoxicity. In this study, we investigated CsA treatment induced apoptotic and autophagic cell death in pituitary GH3 cells. CsA treatment (0.1 to 10 µM) decreased survival of GH3 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Cell viability decreased significantly with increasing CsA concentrations largely due to an increase in apoptosis, while cell death rates due to autophagy altered only slightly. Several molecular and morphological features correlated with cell death through these distinct pathways. At concentrations ranging from 1.0 to 10 µM, CsA induced a dose-dependent increase in expression of the autophagy markers LC3-I and LC3-II. Immunofluorescence staining revealed markedly increased levels of both LC3 and lysosomal-associated membrane protein 2 (Lamp2), indicating increases in autophagosomes. At the same CsA doses, apoptotic cell death was apparent as indicated by nuclear and DNA fragmentation and increased p53 expression. In apoptotic or autophagic cells, p-ERK levels were highest at 1.0 µM CsA compared to control or other doses. In contrast, Bax levels in both types of cell death were increased in a dose-dependent manner, while Bcl-2 levels showed dose-dependent augmentation in autophagy and were decreased in apoptosis. Manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) showed a similar dose-dependent reduction in cells undergoing apoptosis, while levels of the intracellular calcium ion exchange maker calbindin-D9k were decreased in apoptosis (1.0 to 5 µM CsA), but unchanged in autophagy. In conclusion, these results suggest that CsA induction of apoptotic or autophagic cell death in rat pituitary GH3 cells depends on the relative expression of factors and correlates with Bcl-2 and Mn-SOD levels. PMID:25299210

  2. Lipid nanoparticles for cyclosporine A administration: development, characterization, and in vitro evaluation of their immunosuppression activity

    PubMed Central

    Guada, Melissa; Sebastián, Victor; Irusta, Silvia; Feijoó, Esperanza; Dios-Viéitez, María del Carmen; Blanco-Prieto, María José

    2015-01-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is an immunosuppressant commonly used in transplantation for prevention of organ rejection as well as in the treatment of several autoimmune disorders. Although commercial formulations are available, they have some stability, bioavailability, and toxicity related problems. Some of these issues are associated with the drug or excipients and others with the dosage forms. With the aim of overcoming these drawbacks, lipid nanoparticles (LN) have been proposed as an alternative, since excipients are biocompatible and also a large amount of surfactants and organic solvents can be avoided. CsA was successfully incorporated into LN using the method of hot homogenization followed by ultrasonication. Three different formulations were optimized for CsA oral administration, using different surfactants: Tween® 80, phosphatidylcholine, taurocholate and Pluronic® F127 (either alone or mixtures). Freshly prepared Precirol nanoparticles showed mean sizes with a narrow size distribution ranging from 121 to 202 nm, and after freeze-drying were between 163 and 270 nm, depending on the stabilizer used. Surface charge was negative in all LN developed. High CsA entrapment efficiency of approximately 100% was achieved. Transmission electron microscopy was used to study the morphology of the optimized LN. Also, the crystallinity of the nanoparticles was studied by X-ray powder diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. The presence of the drug in LN surfaces was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The CsA LN developed preserved their physicochemical properties for 3 months when stored at 4°C. Moreover, when the stabilizer system was composed of two surfactants, the LN formulations were also stable at room temperature. Finally, the new CsA formulations showed in vitro dose-dependent immuno-suppressive effects caused by the inhibition of IL-2 levels secreted from stimulated Jurkat cells. The findings obtained in this paper suggest that new lipid

  3. Development of a cyclodextrin-based aqueous cyclosporin A eye drop formulations.

    PubMed

    Jóhannsdóttir, Sunna; Jansook, Phatsawee; Stefánsson, Einar; Loftsson, Thorsteinn

    2015-09-30

    Cyclosporin A (CyA) is a lipophilic, cyclic polypeptide drug with anti-inflammatory properties. It is used in topical treatment of dry eyes and is now commercially available in oil based surfactant containing eye drops. Surfactants can irritate the eye surface causing burning, itching and irritation of the conjunctiva, and oil-based drops can result in blurred vision. Thus, the aim of this study was to develop surfactant free aqueous 0.05% (w/v) CyA eye drops where the drug is present in an aqueous vehicle containing CyA/cyclodextrin (CyA/CD) nanoparticles. The effects of the natural α-, β- and γ-cyclodextrins (αCD, βCD and γCD), as well as of the water soluble hydroxypropyl derivatives of γCD and αCD (HPγCD, HPαCD) and randomly methylated βCD (RMβCD), were determined in pure water. αCD had the best solubilizing effect increasing the solubility of CyA above 0.05% upon addition of only 5% (w/v) αCD. γCD did not have as good solubilizing effect but was tested further due to its superior ability to form nanoparticles and its favorable toxicological profile. Seven eye drop formulations were prepared and tested. All contained 0.05% (w/v) CyA in addition to polyvinyl alcohol, benzalkonium chloride, disodium edetate and various amounts of CD (αCD, γCD and mixtures thereof). When the formulation contained only αCD most of the drug was dissolved but some small aggregates were formed with hydrodynamic diameter of about 6 and 155 nm. When the formulation contained only γCD negligible CyA/CD complexation occurred with most of the drug present as solid CyA particles. When the formulation contained a mixture of αCD and γCD, where αCD concentration was at least 3% (w/v), the entire drug content was dissolved in the media under formation of relatively large (100-2000 nm) CyA/CD nanoparticles. αCD solubilized the drug while γCD enhanced nanoparticle formation. The effect of polyvinyl alcohol, benzalkonium chloride and disodium edetate on the nanoparticle

  4. Solid self-nanoemulsifying cyclosporin A pellets prepared by fluid-bed coating: preparation, characterization and in vitro redispersibility

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yang; Lu, Yi; Qi, Jianping; Nie, Sufang; Hu, Fuqiang; Pan, Weisan; Wu, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to evaluate fluid-bed coating as a new technique to prepare a pellet-based solid self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) using cyclosporin A as a model of a poorly water-soluble drug. Methods: The rationale of this technique was to entrap a Liquid SNEDDS in the matrix of the coating material, polyvinylpyrrolidone K30, by fluid-bed coating. Pseudoternary phase diagrams were used to screen the liquid SNEDDS formulations. The optimal formulation was composed of Labrafil M® 1944 CS, Transcutol P®, and Cremophor® EL in a ratio of 9:14:7. To prepare solid SNEDDS pellets, liquid SNEDDS was first dispersed in an aqueous solution of polyvinylpyrrolidone and then sprayed onto the surface of non-pareil pellets. Upon evaporation of water, polyvinylpyrrolidone precipitated and formed tight films to entrap the liquid SNEDDS. Visual observation and scanning electron microscopic analysis confirmed good appearance of the solid SNEDDS pellets. Results: Our results indicated that up to 40% of the liquid SNEDDS could be entrapped in the coating layer. Powder x-ray diffraction analysis confirmed nonexistence of crystalline cyclosporin A in the formulation. Solid SNEDDS pellets showed a slower redispersion rate than the liquid SNEDDS. An increase in the total liquid SNEDDS loading led to faster redispersion, whereas increased coating weight (up to 400%) significantly decreased the redispersion rate. Both cyclosporin A loading and protective coating with 5% polyvinylpyrrolidone K30 did not significantly affect the redispersion rate. Conclusion: It is concluded that fluid-bed coating is a new technique with considerable potential for preparation of pellet-based solid SNEDDS formulations. PMID:21589647

  5. Total lymphoid irradiation in rat heart albgrafts: dose, fractionation, and combination with cyclosporin-A. [X-ray

    SciTech Connect

    Rynasiewicz, J.J.; Sutherland, D.E.R.; Kawahara, K.; Kim, T.; Najarian, J.S.

    1981-03-01

    The survival or organ allografts is prolonged in mice and rats treated with fractionated, high-dose total lymphoid irradiation (TLI). We have studied the effect of TLI, alone or in combination with donor bone marrow or pharmacologic immunosuppression (cyclosporin-A: CY-A), on the survival of heterotopic rat heart allografts. Specifically, we evaluated the generalized immunosuppressive effect of TLI as a function of accumulated dose and fractionation schedule. In addition, TLI and CY-A were used individually in schedules that by themselves gave only moderate graft prolongation and then subsequently in sequential combination.

  6. Treatment of pure red cell aplasia associated with multiple myeloma with biclonal gammopathy using cyclosporine A: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yali; Qian, Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    We reported a rare case of pure red cell aplasia in a 44-year-old man with multiple myeloma with biclonal gammophathy (IgG lambda and IgA lambda type) with severe anemia. After treatment with bortezomib, adriamycin, and dexamethasone, the patient achieved very good partial response with disappearance of monoclonal gammopathy. However, his anemia was not significantly improved. Bone marrow analysis revealed selective erythroid hypoplasia. Thus, cyclosporine A was administered, which resulted in a complete recovery from anemia. The present case may provide some insight into the pathogenesis of PRAC and malignant plasma cell disorder. PMID:25785163

  7. Cyclosporine a 0.05% eye drops for the treatment of subepithelial infiltrates after epidemic keratoconjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To evaluate the treatment with topical 0.05% cyclosporine A (CsA) in patients with subepithelial corneal infiltrates (SEI). Methods We reviewed 16 patients (22 eyes) before and after the treatment with 0.05% CsA eye drops. All patients had been treated previously with topical corticosteroids without any improvement and also they had to stop the medication secondary to intraocular pressure elevation. The objective data recorded included best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), evaluation of corneal subepithelial infiltrate scores (CSIS), intraocular pressure (IOP) prior to treatment and the last follow-up visit. Results Six males (37.5%) and 10 females (62.5%), mean age of 35.2 ± 16.6 years, were included. The patients’ average topical CsA use duration was 5.1 ± 3.5 months (1 – 13 months). The average follow up time of the patients was 9.2 ± 4.7 months (4 – 22 months). One patient, although he didn’t have a 0 scale of SCIS, did not show up for follow up examinations after six months. The mean BCVA (logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution) before and after the treatment were 0.15 ± 0.15 and 0.07 ± 0.07 respectively, CSIS 1.68 ± 0.89 and 0.23 ± 0.53 respectively, IOP 18.50 ± 3.82 and 16.86 ± 2.76 mmHg respectively. There were statistically significant improvements in BCVA (p = 0.002), reduction of CSIS (p = 0.002) and reduction of IOP (p < 0.001) prior to treatment and the last follow-up visit. 18 eyes (81.9%) showed clinical improvement and 4 (18.1%) had decreased SEI which did not fully disappear during the treatment period. The eyes which reached CSIS score 0 (18 eyes) were treated with CsA for 1 – 13 months; while the eyes which had clinical improvement but had not CSIS score 0 (4 eyes) were decided to discontinue of CsA treatment in last follow-up visit. There were recurrences in 2 eyes 3 months after the treatment. Patients reported reduction in the severity of symptoms after the

  8. Effects of rifampin, cyclosporine A, and probenecid on the pharmacokinetic profile of canagliflozin, a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, in healthy participants

    PubMed Central

    Devineni, Damayanthi; Vaccaro, Nicole; Murphy, Joe; Curtin, Christopher; Mamidi, Rao N.V.S.; Weiner, Sveta; Wang, Shean-Sheng; Ariyawansa, Jay; Stieltjes, Hans; Wajs, Ewa; Di Prospero, Nicholas A.; Rothenberg, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Canagliflozin, a sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, approved for the treatment of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), is metabolized by uridine diphosphate-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) 1A9 and UGT2B4, and is a substrate of P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Canagliflozin exposures may be affected by coadministration of drugs that induce (e.g., rifampin for UGT) or inhibit (e.g. probenecid for UGT; cyclosporine A for P-gp) these pathways. The primary objective of these three independent studies (single-center, open-label, fixed-sequence) was to evaluate the effects of rifampin (study 1), probenecid (study 2), and cyclosporine A (study 3) on the pharmacokinetics of canagliflozin in healthy participants. Methods: Participants received; in study 1: canagliflozin 300 mg (days 1 and 10), rifampin 600 mg (days 4 – 12); study 2: canagliflozin 300 mg (days 1 – 17), probenecid 500 mg twice daily (days 15 – 17); and study 3: canagliflozin 300 mg (days 1 – 8), cyclosporine A 400 mg (day 8). Pharmacokinetics were assessed at pre-specified intervals on days 1 and 10 (study 1); on days 14 and 17 (study 2), and on days 2 – 8 (study 3). Results: Rifampin decreased the maximum plasma canagliflozin concentration (Cmax) by 28% and its area under the curve (AUC) by 51%. Probenecid increased the Cmax by 13% and the AUC by 21%. Cyclosporine A increased the AUC by 23% but did not affect the Cmax. Conclusion: Coadministration of canagliflozin with rifampin, probenecid, and cyclosporine A was well-tolerated. No clinically meaningful interactions were observed for probenecid or cyclosporine A, while rifampin coadministration modestly reduced canagliflozin plasma concentrations and could necessitate an appropriate monitoring of glycemic control. PMID:25407255

  9. Screening for Drug-Induced Hepatotoxicity in Primary Mouse Hepatocytes Using Acetaminophen, Amiodarone, and Cyclosporin A as Model Compounds: An Omics-Guided Approach

    PubMed Central

    Van Summeren, Anke; Renes, Johan; Lizarraga, Daneida; Bouwman, Freek G.; Noben, Jean-Paul; van Delft, Joost H. M.; Kleinjans, Jos C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Drug-induced hepatotoxicity is a leading cause of attrition for candidate pharmaceuticals in development. New preclinical screening methods are crucial to predict drug toxicity prior to human studies. Of all in vitro hepatotoxicity models, primary human hepatocytes are considered as ‘the gold standard.’ However, their use is hindered by limited availability and inter-individual variation. These barriers may be overcome by using primary mouse hepatocytes. We used differential in gel electrophoresis (DIGE) to study large-scale protein expression of primary mouse hepatocytes. These hepatocytes were exposed to three well-defined hepatotoxicants: acetaminophen, amiodarone, and cyclosporin A. Each hepatotoxicant induces a different hepatotoxic phenotype. Based on the DIGE results, the mRNA expression levels of deregulated proteins from cyclosporin A-treated cells were also analyzed. We were able to distinguish cyclosporin A from controls, as well as acetaminophen and amiodarone-treated samples. Cyclosporin A induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and altered the ER-Golgi transport. Moreover, liver carboxylesterase and bile salt sulfotransferase were differentially expressed. These proteins were associated with a protective adaptive response against cyclosporin A-induced cholestasis. The results of this study are comparable with effects in HepG2 cells. Therefore, we suggest both models can be used to analyze the cholestatic properties of cyclosporin A. Furthermore, this study showed a conserved response between primary mouse hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. These findings collectively lend support for use of omics strategies in preclinical toxicology, and might inform future efforts to better link preclinical and clinical research in rational drug development. PMID:23308384

  10. Comparison of Efficacy of Two Different Topical 0.05% Cyclosporine A Formulations in the Treatment of Adenoviral Keratoconjunctivitis-Related Subepithelial Infiltrates

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktutar, Betül N.; Uçakhan, Ömur Ö.

    2016-01-01

    Subepithelial infiltrates secondary to adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis may persist for years and cause blurred vision, halos, glare, and photophobia. These infiltrates arise from immune reaction against the virus, and few studies have reported topical cyclosporine A to be effective in the treatment of subepithelial infiltrates. Herein, we describe a patient with adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis-related subepithelial infiltrates who did not respond to treatment with a new topical cyclosporine A emulsion prepared with castor oil (Depores 0.05%; Deva İlaç, Kocaeli, Turkey), while the FDA-approved nanoemulsion formulation provided improvement in symptoms and reduced the inflammatory reaction (Restasis 0.05%; Allergan, Irvine, Calif., USA). PMID:27065851

  11. Comparison of Efficacy of Two Different Topical 0.05% Cyclosporine A Formulations in the Treatment of Adenoviral Keratoconjunctivitis-Related Subepithelial Infiltrates.

    PubMed

    Bayraktutar, Betül N; Uçakhan, Ömur Ö

    2016-01-01

    Subepithelial infiltrates secondary to adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis may persist for years and cause blurred vision, halos, glare, and photophobia. These infiltrates arise from immune reaction against the virus, and few studies have reported topical cyclosporine A to be effective in the treatment of subepithelial infiltrates. Herein, we describe a patient with adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis-related subepithelial infiltrates who did not respond to treatment with a new topical cyclosporine A emulsion prepared with castor oil (Depores 0.05%; Deva İlaç, Kocaeli, Turkey), while the FDA-approved nanoemulsion formulation provided improvement in symptoms and reduced the inflammatory reaction (Restasis 0.05%; Allergan, Irvine, Calif., USA). PMID:27065851

  12. Preparation and evaluation of poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactide) micelles as nanocarriers for oral delivery of cyclosporine a.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhui; Li, Xinru; Zhou, Yanxia; Wang, Xiaoning; Fan, Yating; Huang, Yanqing; Liu, Yan

    2010-01-01

    A series of monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactide) (mPEG-PLA) diblock copolymers were designed according to polymer-drug compatibility and synthesized, and mPEG-PLA micelle was fabricated and used as a nanocarrier for solubilization and oral delivery of Cyclosporine A (CyA). CyA was efficiently encapsulated into the micelles with nanoscaled diameter ranged from 60 to 96 nm with a narrow size distribution. The favorable stabilities of CyA-loaded polymeric micelles were observed in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids. The in vitro drug release investigation demonstrated that drug release was retarded by polymeric micelles. The enhanced intestinal absorption of CyA-loaded polymeric micelles, which was comparable to the commercial formulation of CyA (Sandimmun Neoral®), was found. These suggested that polymeric micelles might be an effective nanocarrier for solubilization of poorly soluble CyA and further improving oral absorption of the drug. PMID:20671795

  13. Preparation and Evaluation of Poly(Ethylene Glycol)-Poly(Lactide) Micelles as Nanocarriers for Oral Delivery of Cyclosporine A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanhui; Li, Xinru; Zhou, Yanxia; Wang, Xiaoning; Fan, Yating; Huang, Yanqing; Liu, Yan

    2010-06-01

    A series of monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(lactide) (mPEG-PLA) diblock copolymers were designed according to polymer-drug compatibility and synthesized, and mPEG-PLA micelle was fabricated and used as a nanocarrier for solubilization and oral delivery of Cyclosporine A (CyA). CyA was efficiently encapsulated into the micelles with nanoscaled diameter ranged from 60 to 96 nm with a narrow size distribution. The favorable stabilities of CyA-loaded polymeric micelles were observed in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids. The in vitro drug release investigation demonstrated that drug release was retarded by polymeric micelles. The enhanced intestinal absorption of CyA-loaded polymeric micelles, which was comparable to the commercial formulation of CyA (Sandimmun Neoral®), was found. These suggested that polymeric micelles might be an effective nanocarrier for solubilization of poorly soluble CyA and further improving oral absorption of the drug.

  14. The Modelling Pharmacokinetic Profile of Freeze-Dried Cyclosporine A-Eudragit S100 Nanoparticle Formulation in Dogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Fang, Zhi-gang; You, Ben-Gang; Ding, Xin-yuan; Zhang, Xue-nong

    The modelling pharmacokinetic profile of freeze-dried cyclosporine A-Eudragit S100 nanoparticles (CyA-S100-NP) was studied with a random two-way crossover study in dogs. The drug blood concentration was determined by internal standard HPLC method after oral administration of CyA-S100-NP and Neoral. Pharmacokinetics modellng parameters were calculated by 3P97modelling program. The concentration-time data were fitted as a two-compartment open model. The AUC of CyA-S100-NP was higher than that of Neoral (P<0.05), while the CL significantly decreased (P<0.05). The relative bioavailability of CyA-S100-NP were 135.9% compared with Neoral. The bioavailability of CyA was significantly improved. CyA-S100-NP was a potential drug for developing a new CyA nanoparticles solid formulation.

  15. Expression of transforming growth factor-beta and determination of apoptotic index in histopathological sections for assessment of the effects of Apigenin (4', 5', 7'- Trihydroxyflavone) on Cyclosporine A induced renal damage.

    PubMed

    Chong, F W; Chakravarthi, Srikumar; Nagaraja, H S; Thanikachalam, P M; Lee, Nagarajah

    2009-06-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA), a calcineurin inhibitor produced by the fungi Trichoderma polysporum and Cylindrocarpon lucidum, is an immunosuppressant prescribed in organ transplants to prevent rejection. Its adverse effect on renal dysfunction has limited its use in a clinical setting. Apigenin (4',5',7'-Trihydroxyflavone), a herbal extract, with anti-inflammatory and anti-tumour properties, has been investigated for properties to reverse this adverse effect. This research was conducted to establish a standard protocol for immunohistochemical estimation of Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-beta) expression, as an indicator of Cyclosporine A induced damage, and to observe whether apoptotic index and TGF-beta expression can be used to assess effects of Apigenin on CsA induced renal dysfunction. Six groups of 5 male Sprague-Dawley albino rats each were dosed once daily for 21 days, as follows: (1) negative control--oral corn oil, (2) positive control--Cyclosporine A (25 mg/kg), (3) Group 3--Apigenin (20 mg/kg), (4) Group 4--Cyclosporine A (25 mg/kg) +Apigenin (10 mg/kg), (5) Group 5--Cyclosporine A (25 mg/kg) +Apigenin (15 mg/kg) and (6) Group 6--Cyclosporine A (25 mg/kg) +Apigenin (20 mg/kg). Cyclosporine A was administered intra-peritoneally while Apigenin was given orally. The rat kidneys were harvested and examined microscopically to assess the apoptotic index, and stained by immunohistochemistry for multifunctioning polypeptide TGF-beta expression. A high apoptotic index and TGF-beta intensity was observed in the Cyclosporine A group. Apigenin significantly reduced the both apoptotic index and TGF-beta intensity. The apoptotic index correlated with TGF-beta intensity, especially in glomeruli. This study indicates that Cyclosporine A can enhance the TGF-beta expression in rat kidney, signifying accelerated apoptosis. TGF-beta and apoptotic index may be used to assess Apigenin and its effect on Cyclosporine A induced renal damage. PMID:19694312

  16. Cyclosporine A regulate oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes: mechanisms via ROS generation, iNOS and Hsp70

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huei-Wen; Chien, Chiang-Ting; Yu, Sung-Liang; Lee, Yuan-Teh; Chen, Wen-Jone

    2002-01-01

    Previous study suggested that cyclosporine A (CsA) could partially reduce ischaemia/reperfusion-induced injury in isolated heart, but the mechanism was still unclear. In this study, the possible mechanisms of cyclosporine A in regulating oxidative stress-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis were examined. Morphological (cell shrinkage, apoptotic body formation, and DNA fragmentation) and biochemical (annexin-V staining for exposed phosphatidylserine residues) evidences showed that both hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hypoxia/reoxygenation could induce apoptotic change in the embryonal rat heart myoblast-derived cells (H9c2). These effects were inhibited by pre-treatment with CsA at concentration of 0.01–1.0 μM for 24 h, but were increased with 10.0 μM CsA. While examining the mechanisms of CsA in protecting cardiomyocyte apoptosis, we found that the collapse of mitochondria membrane potential (ΔΨm) induced by oxidative stress was partially reversed by CsA (0.01–1.0 μM). Compared to the control, CSA at the concentration of 0.1 and 10.0 μM significantly increased the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) to 117.2±12.4% and 234.4±9.3%, respectively. Co-incubating with the antioxidant, ascorbic acid (10.0 μM), could partially reduce the protective effect of CsA (0.01–1.0 μM) and the toxic effect of 10.0 μM CsA. Pre-treatment with CsA at concentration of 0.01–1.0 μM for 24 h produced up-regulation of heat shock protein 70 (Hsp 70), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and also induced NO production, indicating that these factors might be associated with the cell protective effects of CsA. These results suggest that CsA could protect the oxidative stress-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis not only by preventing the loss of ΔΨm in mitochondria, but also through ROS generation, Hsp70, and iNOS up-regulation. PMID:12411407

  17. Relevance of p-glycoprotein for the enteral absorption of cyclosporin A: in vitro-in vivo correlation.

    PubMed Central

    Fricker, G.; Drewe, J.; Huwyler, J.; Gutmann, H.; Beglinger, C.

    1996-01-01

    1. The interaction of cyclosporin A (CyA) with p-glycoprotein during intestinal uptake was investigated by a combination of in vitro experiments with human Caco-2 cells and an intubation study in healthy volunteers. 2. CyA uptake into the cells was not saturable and exhibited only a low temperature sensitivity, suggesting passive diffusion. When the permeation of CyA across Caco-2 monolayers from the apical to the basolateral side was determined, overall transport had an apparently saturable component up to a concentration of 1 microM. At higher concentrations permeation increased over-proportionally. Calculation of the kinetic parameters of apical to basolateral permeation suggested a diffusional process with a KD of 0.5 microliter min-1 per filter, which was overlayed by an active system in basolateral to apical direction with a KM of 3.8 microM and a Jmax of 6.5 picomol min-1 per filter. 3. CyA permeation was significantly higher when the drug was given from the basolateral side as compared to the permeation from the apical side. Apical to basolateral transport of CyA was increased in the presence of vinblastine, daunomycin and a non-immunosuppressive CyA-derivative. All compounds inhibit p-glycoprotein-mediated transport processes. Basolateral to apical permeation of CyA showed a dose-dependent decrease in the presence of vinblastine. Permeation of daunomycin across Caco-2 cell monolayers was also higher from the basolateral to the apical side than vice versa. Basolateral to apical permeation was decreased in the presence of SDZ PSC 833 and cyclosporin A. 4. Western blot analysis of Caco-2 cells with the monoclonal antibody C219 confirmed the presence of p-glycoprotein in the used cell system. 5. When the absorption of CyA in the gastrointestinal (GI)-tract of healthy volunteers was determined, a remarkable decrease of the plasma AUC could be observed dependent on the location of absorption in the rank order stomach > jejunum/ileum > colon. The decrease in

  18. Cyclosporin A and methotrexate in canine marrow transplantation: engraftment, graft-versus-host disease, and induction of intolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Deeg, H.J.; Storb, R.; Weiden, P.L.; Raff, R.F.; Sale, G.E.; Atkinson, K.; Graham, T.C.; Thomas, E.D.

    1982-07-01

    We examined the effect of methotrexate (MTX) and cyclosporin A (Cy A) on engraftment, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and the induction of tolerance in dogs prepared for marrow transplantation by 9 Gy of total body irradiation and grafted with bone marrow and buffy coat cells. Nineteen dogs were given grafts from DLA-identical littermates followed by immunosuppression with Cy A for 25 or 100 days. All had sustained engraftment, and 12 became healthy long-term chimeras. Sixty dogs were given grafts from DLA-nonidentical unrelated donors. Among nine given MTX only postgrafting, one rejected the graft nd eight died with GVHD. Among 18 dogs given Cy A only postgrafting, eight failed to achieve engraftment, seven died of various causes, and three died with GVHD. Thirty-four dogs were given both MTX and Cy A in various regimens postgrafting. The only long-term survivors were 4 of 10 dogs given MTX on days 1, 3, 6, and 11 and Cy A from days 0 through 100. Two have chronic GVHD. We conclude that Cy A can induce graft-host tolerance across minor, but not major, histocompatibility differences. The combination of MTX early after transplantation with Cy A prevents failure of engraftment of histoincompatible marrow and some recipients become long-term survivors.

  19. [Serum soluble CD44 isoform variant 5 level in patients with seropositive rheumatoid arthritis treated with cyclosporin A].

    PubMed

    Feyertag, J; Haberhauer, G; Skoumal, M; Kittl, E M; Bauer, K; Dunky, A

    2000-01-01

    CD44 is a widely expressed cell surface glycoprotein which is involved in many cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. Expression of soluble CD44 splice variants is strictly regulated and is linked to a high rate of cell division. Serum levels of soluble CD44 variant 5 (sCD44v5) were determined in 14 patients with erosive RA. Patients were divided into two groups. In group 1 cyclosporin A treatment (CYA) was initiated after the first visit. In group 2 preliminary CYA was continued. Controls were performed after 6 months. We found a significant decrease of swollen joint count (SJC) and sCD44v5 in group 1. No effect of CYA was found on c-reactive protein, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and IgM-rheumatoid factor (IgM-RF). In group 2 a significant decrease of CRP was found. Therefore we conclude that measurement of sCD44v5 might be useful in monitoring RA+ patients with CYA. PMID:11261266

  20. Cyclosporine A inhibits transcription of cytokine genes and decreases the frequencies of IL-2 producing cells in feline mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kuga, Kazufumi; Nishifuji, Koji; Iwasaki, Toshiroh

    2008-10-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) has been widely used for suppression of transplant rejection and controlling pruritus in allergic dermatitis in humans, dogs and cats. CsA is known to suppress the expression of inflammatory cytokines, including IL-2, IL-4, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha in humans, dogs and experimental mice. However, little is known about the immunomodulating effect of CsA in cats. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of CsA on the expression of inflammatory cytokines in feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Real-time PCR analyses with Concanavalin A (ConA)-stimulated PBMC obtained from 5 cats revealed that the expression of mRNAs for IL-2, IL-4, IFN- gamma and TNF-alpha was inhibited by CsA in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, an enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay, which is capable of detecting IL-2 secreting cells as single spots, revealed that the frequency of IL-2 secreting cells in ConA-stimulated feline PBMC was significantly reduced in the presence of CsA. These results might provide an explanation for the mechanisms of action of CsA in the suppression of transplant rejection and the control of pruritus in cats. PMID:18981654

  1. Cyclosporine A-induced apoptosis in renal tubular cells is related to oxidative damage and mitochondrial fission.

    PubMed

    de Arriba, Gabriel; Calvino, Miryam; Benito, Selma; Parra, Trinidad

    2013-03-27

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) nephrotoxicity has been linked to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in renal cells. We have demonstrated that the antioxidant Vitamin E (Vit E) abolished renal toxicity in vivo and in vitro models. As one of the main sources of intracellular ROS are mitochondria, we studied the effects of CsA on several mitochondrial functions in LLC-PK1 cells. CsA induced ROS synthesis and decreased reduced glutathione (GSH). The drug decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and induced physiological modifications in both the inner (IMM) and the outer mitochondrial membranes (OMM). In the IMM, CsA provoked mitochondrial permeability transition pores (MPTP) and cytochrome c was liberated into the intermembrane space. CsA also induced pore formation in the OMM, allowing that intermembrane space contents can reach cytosol. Furthermore, CsA altered the mitochondrial dynamics, inducing an increase in mitochondrial fission; CsA increased the expression of dynamin related protein 1 (Drp1) that contributes to mitochondrial fission, and decreased the expression of mitofusin 2 (Mfn2) and optic atrophy protein 1 (Opa1), proteins involved in the fusion process. All these phenomena were related to apoptosis. These effects were inhibited when cells were treated with the antioxidant Vit E suggesting that they were mediated by the synthesis of ROS. PMID:23347876

  2. Enhanced and sustained topical ocular delivery of cyclosporine A in thermosensitive hyaluronic acid-based in situ forming microgels

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yijun; Yao, Jing; Zhou, Jianping; Dahmani, Fatima Zohra

    2013-01-01

    For nearly a decade, thermoresponsive ophthalmic in situ gels have been recognized as an interesting and promising ocular topical delivery vehicle for lipophilic drugs. In this study, a series of thermosensitive copolymers, hyaluronic acid-g-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (HA-g-PNIPAAm), was synthesized, by coupling carboxylic end-capped PNIPAAm to aminated hyaluronic acid through amide bond linkages, and was used as a potential carrier for the topical ocular administration of cyclosporine A (CyA). The lower critical solution temperature of HA-g-PNIPAAm59 in aqueous solutions was measured as 32.7°C, which was not significantly affected by the polymer concentration. Moreover, HA-g-PNIPAAm59 microgels showed a high drug loading efficiency (73.92%) and a controlled release profile that are necessary for biomedical application. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations showed that HA-g-PNIPAAm microgels were spherical in shape with homogeneous size. Based on the result of the eye irritation test, the HA-g-PNIPAAm microgels formulation was shown to be safe and nonirritant for rabbit eyes. In addition, HA-g-PNIPAAm microgels achieved significantly higher CyA concentration levels in rabbit corneas (1455.8 ng/g of tissue) than both castor oil formulation and commercial CyA eye drops. Therefore, these newly described thermoresponsive HA-g-PNIPAAm microgels demonstrated attractive properties to serve as pharmaceutical delivery vehicles for a variety of ophthalmic applications. PMID:24092975

  3. A novel medium for the enhanced production of cyclosporin A by Tolypocladium inflatum MTCC 557 using solid state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Survase, Shrikant A; Shaligram, Nikhil S; Pansuriya, Ruchir C; Annapure, Uday S; Singhal, Rekha S

    2009-05-01

    Cyclosporin A (CyA) produced by Tolypocladium inflatum is a promising drug owing to its immunosuppressive and antifungal activities. From an industrial point of view, the necessity to obtain a suitable and economic medium for higher production of CyA was the aim of this work. The present study evaluated the effect of different fermentation parameters in solid state fermentation, such as selection of solid substrate, hydrolysis of substrates, initial moisture content, supplementation of salts, additional carbon, and nitrogen sources, as well as the inoculum age and size, on production of CyA by Tolypocladium inflatum MTCC 557. The fermentation was carried out at 25+/-2 degrees for 9 days. A combination of hydrolyzed wheat bran flour and coconut oil cake (1:1) at 70% initial moisture content supported a maximum production of 3,872+/-156 mg CyA/kg substrate as compared with 792+/-33 mg/kg substrate before optimization. Furthermore, supplementation of salts, glycerol (1%w/w), and ammonium sulfate (1%w/w) increased the production of CyA to 5,454+75 mg/kg substrate. Inoculation of 5 g of solid substrate with 6 ml of 72-h-old seed culture resulted in a maximum production of 6,480+95 mg CyA/kg substrate. PMID:19494693

  4. Establishing a Clinically Relevant Large Animal Model Platform for TBI Therapy Development: Using Cyclosporin A as a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Margulies, Susan S.; Kilbaugh, Todd; Sullivan, Sarah; Smith, Colin; Propert, Kathleen; Byro, Melissa; Saliga, Kristen; Costine, Beth A.; Duhaime, Ann-Christine

    2015-01-01

    We have developed the first immature large animal translational treatment trial of a pharmacologic intervention for traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children. The preclinical trial design includes multiple doses of the intervention in two different injury types (focal and diffuse) to bracket the range seen in clinical injury and uses two post-TBI delays to drug administration. Cyclosporin A (CsA) was used as a case study in our first implementation of the platform because of its success in multiple preclinical adult rodent TBI models and its current use in children for other indications. Tier 1 of the therapy development platform assessed the short-term treatment efficacy after 24 h of agent administration. Positive responses to treatment were compared with injured controls using an objective effect threshold established prior to the study. Effective CsA doses were identified to study in Tier 2. In the Tier 2 paradigm, agent is administered in a porcine intensive care unit utilizing neurological monitoring and clinically relevant management strategies, and intervention efficacy is defined as improvement in longer term behavioral endpoints above untreated injured animals. In summary, this innovative large animal preclinical study design can be applied to future evaluations of other agents that promote recovery or repair after TBI. PMID:25904045

  5. Calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporin A and tacrolimus protect against podocyte injury induced by puromycin aminonucleoside in rodent models.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiujin; Jiang, Hong; Ying, Meike; Xie, Zhoutao; Li, Xiayu; Wang, Haibing; Zhao, Jie; Lin, Chuan; Wang, Yucheng; Feng, Shi; Shen, Jia; Weng, Chunhua; Lin, Weiqiang; Wang, Huiping; Zhou, Qin; Bi, Yan; Li, Meng; Wang, Lingyan; Zhu, Tongyu; Huang, Xiaoru; Lan, Hui-Yao; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Jianghua

    2016-01-01

    Podocyte injury and the appearance of proteinuria are features of minimal-change disease (MCD). Cyclosporin A (CsA) and tacrolimus (FK506) has been reported to reduce proteinuria in patients with nephrotic syndrome, but mechanisms remain unknown. We, therefore, investigated the protective mechanisms of CsA and FK506 on proteinuria in a rat model of MCD induced by puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN) and in vitro cultured mouse podocytes. Our results showed that CsA and FK506 treatment decreased proteinuria via a mechanism associated to a reduction in the foot-process fusion and desmin, and a recovery of synaptopodin and podocin. In PAN-treated mouse podocytes, pre-incubation with CsA and FK506 restored the distribution of the actin cytoskeleton, increased the expression of synaptopodin and podocin, improved podocyte viability, and reduced the migrating activities of podocytes. Treatment with CsA and FK506 also inhibited PAN-induced podocytes apoptosis, which was associated with the induction of Bcl-xL and inhibition of Bax, cleaved caspase 3, and cleaved PARP expression. Further studies revealed that CsA and FK506 inhibited PAN-induced p38 and JNK signaling, thereby protecting podocytes from PAN-induced injury. In conclusion, CsA and FK506 inhibit proteinuria by protecting against PAN-induced podocyte injury, which may be associated with inhibition of the MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:27580845

  6. Transient inhibition of protein synthesis in the rat insular cortex delays extinction of conditioned taste aversion with cyclosporine A.

    PubMed

    Hadamitzky, Martin; Orlowski, Kathrin; Schwitalla, Jan Claudius; Bösche, Katharina; Unteroberdörster, Meike; Bendix, Ivo; Engler, Harald; Schedlowski, Manfred

    2016-09-01

    Conditioned responses gradually weaken and eventually disappear when subjects are repeatedly exposed to the conditioned stimulus (CS) in the absence of the unconditioned stimulus (US), a process called extinction. Studies have demonstrated that extinction of conditioned taste aversion (CTA) can be prevented by interfering with protein synthesis in the insular cortex (IC). However, it remained unknown whether it is possible to pharmacologically stabilize the taste aversive memory trace over longer periods of time. Thus, the present study aimed at investigating the time frame during which extinction of CTA can be efficiently prevented by blocking protein synthesis in the IC. Employing an established conditioning paradigm in rats with saccharin as CS, and the immunosuppressant cyclosporine A (CsA) as US, we show here that daily bilateral intra-insular injections of the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin (120μg/μl) immediately after retrieval significantly diminished CTA extinction over a period of five retrieval days and subsequently reached levels of saline-infused controls. These findings demonstrate that it is possible to efficiently delay but not to fully prevent CTA extinction during repeated retrieval trials by blocking protein translation with daily bilateral infusions of anisomycin in the IC. These data confirm and extent earlier reports indicating that the role of protein synthesis in CTA extinction learning is not limited to gastrointestinal malaise-inducing drugs such as lithium chloride (LiCl). PMID:27311758

  7. Evidence that cyclosporin A administration induces the formation of new cementum-like islets inside the gingival connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Ayanoglou, C M

    1998-04-01

    Two groups of 3 male Sprague-Dawley rats were given orally 30 mg/kg/d of vehicle (control group) or cyclosporin-A (experimental group) solution for 14 wk. The rats were anesthetized, tissues fixed by intracardiac perfusion of fixative solution and jaws dissected, demineralized, processed for Epon inclusion and cut by semi-thin serial sections. Histological examination revealed the presence of several islets located paravascularly inside the gingival connective tissue in the proximity of the root surfaces. The structure of these new cementum-like islets (NCLIs) was either compact and homogeneous or heterogeneous, but identical to that of the adjacent new cementum (NC) deposits. Histomorphometric evaluation indicated that the volume and the external surface of the NCLIs varied from 2354 to 679,497 micron 3 and from 465 to 47,517 micron 2, respectively. These observations (a) suggest that CsA stimulates possibly paravascular progenitor cells which secrete in situ a NC-like material and (b) provides further evidence about the high potential of CsA to induce NC formation. PMID:9651878

  8. 99mTc-DTPA and /sup 131/I-hippuran findings in liver transplant recipients treated with cyclosporin A

    SciTech Connect

    Klintmalm, G.B.; Klingensmith, W.C.; Iwatsuki, S.; Schroeter, G.P.; Starzl, T.E.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of cyclosporin A (CyA), an immunosuppressive agent that is potentially nephrotoxic, on the kidneys of 9 liver transplant recipients were studied with serial 99mTc-DTPA and 131I-hippuran scans. In addition, renal function was determined by measuring serum creatinine levels during the second postoperative week in the 9 unselected CyA-treated patients and, retrospectively, in a control group of 29 liver transplant recipients who had not been treated with CyA and who were selected because they had survived for at least 3 months postoperatively. The early postoperative creatinine level was significantly greater in the CyA group. Eight of the 9 CyA patients showed imaging abnormalities in all preoperative and postoperative studies. Five of the 8 patients showed a pattern similar to that of acute tubular necrosis (relatively preserved perfusion) in at least one study. Lowering the dosage of CyA permitted the continuation of therapy, and all 9 patients are alive after 8 to 14 months.

  9. Calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporin A and tacrolimus protect against podocyte injury induced by puromycin aminonucleoside in rodent models

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiujin; Jiang, Hong; Ying, Meike; Xie, Zhoutao; Li, Xiayu; Wang, Haibing; Zhao, Jie; Lin, Chuan; Wang, Yucheng; Feng, Shi; Shen, Jia; Weng, Chunhua; Lin, Weiqiang; Wang, Huiping; Zhou, Qin; Bi, Yan; Li, Meng; Wang, Lingyan; Zhu, Tongyu; Huang, Xiaoru; Lan, Hui-Yao; Zhou, Jing; Chen, Jianghua

    2016-01-01

    Podocyte injury and the appearance of proteinuria are features of minimal-change disease (MCD). Cyclosporin A (CsA) and tacrolimus (FK506) has been reported to reduce proteinuria in patients with nephrotic syndrome, but mechanisms remain unknown. We, therefore, investigated the protective mechanisms of CsA and FK506 on proteinuria in a rat model of MCD induced by puromycin aminonucleoside (PAN) and in vitro cultured mouse podocytes. Our results showed that CsA and FK506 treatment decreased proteinuria via a mechanism associated to a reduction in the foot-process fusion and desmin, and a recovery of synaptopodin and podocin. In PAN-treated mouse podocytes, pre-incubation with CsA and FK506 restored the distribution of the actin cytoskeleton, increased the expression of synaptopodin and podocin, improved podocyte viability, and reduced the migrating activities of podocytes. Treatment with CsA and FK506 also inhibited PAN-induced podocytes apoptosis, which was associated with the induction of Bcl-xL and inhibition of Bax, cleaved caspase 3, and cleaved PARP expression. Further studies revealed that CsA and FK506 inhibited PAN-induced p38 and JNK signaling, thereby protecting podocytes from PAN-induced injury. In conclusion, CsA and FK506 inhibit proteinuria by protecting against PAN-induced podocyte injury, which may be associated with inhibition of the MAPK signaling pathway. PMID:27580845

  10. Anti-inflammatory efficacy of low-dose cyclosporin A in psoriatic arthritis. A prospective multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Mahrle, G; Schulze, H J; Bräutigam, M; Mischer, P; Schopf, R; Jung, E G; Weidinger, G; Färber, L

    1996-11-01

    Fifty-five patients with psoriatic arthritis were treated with a low dose of cyclosporin A (CyA) (mean dose 2.7 mg/kg per day) for a period of 6 months to investigate the efficacy of CyA on disease parameters. Significant improvement in the joint complaints and inflammation parameters was observed including a decrease in the number of painful (-46%) and swollen (-45%) joints, tenderness (Ritchie Index: -50%) and degree of swelling (-46%), patient's assessment of pain (-35%), the duration of morning joint stiffness (-37%), as well as a decrease in C-reactive protein (-52%). A 50% reduction of joint complaints required a total of 24 weeks, whereas a 50% reduction of skin involvement was achieved after 5-6 weeks of treatment. Four patients left the study due to adverse events: creatinine level increase in two patients, hypertension in one patient and gastroenteritis in the fourth patient. Joint scintigraphy in 18 patients indicated an improvement or stable condition in 61% of cases after a mean follow-up of approximately 8 months. The results of this prospective study show that low-dose CyA effectively improves not only skin lesions, but also joint complaints in psoriatic arthritis. PMID:8977676

  11. Enhancement of Flow-Induced AP-1 Gene Expression by Cyclosporin A Requires NFAT-Independent Signaling in Bone Cells

    PubMed Central

    WORTON, LEAH E.; KWON, RONALD Y.; GARDINER, EDITH M.; GROSS, TED S.; SRINIVASAN, SUNDAR

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that aging compromises the ability of the skeleton to respond to anabolic mechanical stimuli. Recently, we reported that treating senescent mice with Cyclosporin A (CsA) rescued aging-related deficits in loading-induced bone formation. Given that the actions of CsA are often attributed to inhibition of the calcineurin/NFAT axis, we hypothesized that CsA enhances gene expression in bone cells exposed to fluid flow, by inhibiting nuclear NFATc1 accumulation. When exposed to flow, MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells exhibited rapid nuclear accumulation of NFATc1 that was abolished by CsA treatment. Under differentiation conditions, intermittent CsA treatment enhanced gene expression of late osteoblastic differentiation markers and activator protein 1 (AP-1) family members. Superimposing flow upon CsA further enhanced expression of the AP-1 members Fra-1 and c-Jun. To delineate the contribution of NFAT in this response, cells were treated with VIVIT, a specific inhibitor of the calcineurin/NFAT interaction. Treatment with VIVIT blocked flow-induced nuclear NFATc1 accumulation but did not recapitulate the CsA-mediated enhancement of flow-induced AP-1 component gene expression. Taken together, our study is the first to demonstrate that CsA enhances mechanically-induced gene expression of AP-1 components in bone cells, and suggests that this response requires calcineurin-dependent mechanisms that are independent of inhibiting NFATc1 nuclear accumulation. PMID:25484988

  12. Cyclosporin A prevents suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity in mice immunized with high-dose sheep erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Webster, L M; Thomson, A W

    1987-01-01

    When administered intraperitoneally to mice 2 days before immunization with a tolerogenic dose (10(9)) of sheep red blood cells (SRBC), cyclosporin A (CsA; 200 mg/kg) strikingly augmented 4-day delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) footpad reactions. These enhanced responses were similar in magnitude to those seen in animals sensitized with an immunogenic, low-dose (10(6)) SRBC. The stimulatory effect of CsA was observed over the dose range of 5-200 mg/kg and was obtained in animals given the drug in one injection, up to 7 days before sensitization. The augmentation of DTH was characterized by footpad swelling, intense mononuclear cell infiltration and increased deposition of 125I-fibrinogen within the challenge site. In addition, increased expression of procoagulant activity by spleen cells in response to antigen was observed. Cell transfer experiments showed that the CsA-enhanced DTH could be adoptively transferred to naive recipients. Additional transfers conducted at the time of antigen challenge suggested that, under the conditions described, CsA inhibited the action of a population of suppressor cells normally effective during DTH reactions. Images Figure 3 PMID:3570356

  13. Short-term effects of topical cyclosporine A 0.05% (Restasis) in long-standing prosthetic eye wearers: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Han, J W; Yoon, J S; Jang, S Y

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Long-standing prosthetic eye wearing induces ocular surface inflammation. We investigated the short-term effects of topical cyclosporine A 0.05% (Restasis) in patients with ocular discomfort resulting from long-standing prosthetic eye wearing. Methods This was a prospective, interventional case series. Patients who were unilateral prosthetic eye wearers over a period of 5 years were enrolled at a single institution from March to July 2013. The subjects were instructed to instill topical cyclosporine A 0.05% twice per day. Measurements were made pre-treatment and after 1 and 3 months of treatment. Outcome measures were the ocular symptom score, the lid margin abnormality score, the Schirmer test, and the tear meniscus amount, using Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography. Results In total, 20 consecutive patients (mean age: 60.1 years, 8 males, 12 females) were included. Ocular symptoms were improved after treatment for 1 month in all patients (ocular symptom score pre-treatment 76.83 vs 46.75 after treatment; P<0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in lid margin abnormality score or tear meniscus amount. The Schirmer test results were improved after treatment for 3 months (pre- and after treatment, 6.70 vs 11.40; P<0.001). Conclusions Topical cyclosporine A 0.05% showed a satisfactory effect in long-standing prosthetic eye wearers. Ocular symptoms were markedly relieved in all subjects after treatment for 1 month. PMID:25081289

  14. Physicochemical characterization and aerosol dispersion performance of organic solution advanced spray-dried cyclosporine A multifunctional particles for dry powder inhalation aerosol delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiao; Zhang, Weifen; Hayes, Don; Mansour, Heidi M

    2013-01-01

    In this systematic and comprehensive study, inhalation powders of the polypeptide immunosuppressant drug – cyclosporine A – for lung delivery as dry powder inhalers (DPIs) were successfully designed, developed, and optimized. Several spray drying pump rates were rationally chosen. Comprehensive physicochemical characterization and imaging was carried out using scanning electron microscopy, hot-stage microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, powder X-ray diffraction, Karl Fischer titration, laser size diffraction, and gravimetric vapor sorption. Aerosol dispersion performance was conducted using a next generation impactor with a Food and Drug Administration-approved DPI device. These DPIs displayed excellent aerosol dispersion performance with high values in emitted dose, respirable fraction, and fine particle fraction. In addition, novel multifunctional inhalation aerosol powder formulations of cyclosporine A with lung surfactant-mimic phospholipids were also successfully designed and developed by advanced organic solution cospray drying in closed mode. The lung surfactantmimic phospholipids were 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-snglycero- 3-(phosphor-rac-1-glycerol). These cyclosporine A lung surfactant-mimic aerosol powder formulations were comprehensively characterized. Powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry confirmed that the phospholipid bilayer structure in the solid state was preserved following advanced organic solution spray drying in closed mode. These novel multifunctional inhalation powders were optimized for DPI delivery with excellent aerosol dispersion performance and high aerosol performance parameters. PMID:23569375

  15. Cyclosporine A Suppressed Glucose Oxidase Induced P53 Mitochondrial Translocation and Hepatic Cell Apoptosis through Blocking Mitochondrial Permeability Transition.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weihua; Zhang, Xiaodi; Liu, Jiangzheng; Wang, Xin; Li, Shuang; Liu, Rui; Liao, Nai; Zhang, Tao; Hai, Chunxu

    2016-01-01

    P53 is known as a transcription factor to control apoptotic cell death through regulating a series of target genes in nucleus. There is accumulating evidences show that p53 can directly induce cell apoptosis through transcription independent way at mitochondria. However, the mechanism by which p53 translocation into mitochondria in response to oxidative stress remains unclear. Here, glucose oxidase (GOX) was used to induce ROS generation in HepG2 cells and liver tissues of mice. The results showed that p53 was stabilized and translocated to mitochondria in a time and dose dependent manner after GOX exposure. Interestingly, as an inhibitor of mitochondrial permeability transition, cyclosporine A (CsA) was able to effectively reduce GOX mediated mitochondrial p53 distribution without influencing on the expression of p53 target genes including Bcl-2 and Bax. These indicated that CsA could just block p53 entering into mitochondria, but not affect p53-dependent transcription. Meanwhile, CsA failed to inhibit the ROS generation induced by GOX, which indicated that CsA had no antioxidant function. Moreover, GOX induced typical apoptosis characteristics including, mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of Bax and release of cytochrome C in mitochondria, accompanied with activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. These processions were suppressed after pretreatment with CsA and pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ, a specific inhibitor of p53 mitochondrial translocation). In vivo, CsA was able to attenuate p53 mitochondrial distribution and protect mice liver against from GOX mediated apoptotic cell death. Taken together, these suggested that CsA could suppress ROS-mediated p53 mitochondrial distribution and cell apoptosis depended on its inhibition effect to mitochondrial permeability transition. It might be used to rescue the hepatic cell apoptosis in the patients with acute liver injury. PMID:26884717

  16. Cyclosporine A kinetics in brain cell cultures and its potential of crossing the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Bellwon, P; Culot, M; Wilmes, A; Schmidt, T; Zurich, M G; Schultz, L; Schmal, O; Gramowski-Voss, A; Weiss, D G; Jennings, P; Bal-Price, A; Testai, E; Dekant, W

    2015-12-25

    There is an increasing need to develop improved systems for predicting the safety of xenobiotics. However, to move beyond hazard identification the available concentration of the test compounds needs to be incorporated. In this study cyclosporine A (CsA) was used as a model compound to assess the kinetic profiles in two rodent brain cell cultures after single and repeated exposures. CsA induced-cyclophilin B (Cyp-B) secretion was also determined as CsA-specific pharmacodynamic endpoint. Since CsA is a potent p-glycoprotein substrate, the ability of this compound to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) was also investigated using an in vitro bovine model with repeated exposures up to 14 days. Finally, CsA uptake mechanisms were studied using a parallel artificial membrane assay (PAMPA) in combination with a Caco-2 model. Kinetic results indicate a low intracellular CsA uptake, with no marked bioaccumulation or biotransformation. In addition, only low CsA amounts crossed the BBB. PAMPA and Caco-2 experiments revealed that CsA is mostly trapped to lipophilic compartments and exits the cell apically via active transport. Thus, although CsA is unlikely to enter the brain at cytotoxic concentrations, it may cause alterations in electrical activity and is likely to increase the CNS concentration of other compounds by occupying the BBBs extrusion capacity. Such an integrated testing system, incorporating BBB, brain culture models and kinetics could be applied for assessing neurotoxicity potential of compounds. PMID:25683621

  17. Relationship between P-glycoprotein expression and cyclosporin A in kidney. An immunohistological and cell culture study.

    PubMed Central

    García del Moral, R.; O'Valle, F.; Andújar, M.; Aguilar, M.; Lucena, M. A.; López-Hidalgo, J.; Ramírez, C.; Medina-Cano, M. T.; Aguilar, D.; Gómez-Morales, M.

    1995-01-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), encoded in humans by the mdr-1 gene, acts physiologically as an efflux pump to expel hydrophobic substances from cells. This glycoprotein is closely related to multidrug resistance in tumor cells and can be modulated by cyclosporin A (CsA). We investigated the relationship between CsA and P-gp in 52 renal allograft biopsies and in cultures of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) renal tubule cells to determine whether the intrarenal accumulation of CsA or chronic stimulation with the drug modified the expression of P-gp. Expression of P-gp and CsA was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Immunostaining was evaluated semiquantitatively. Modulation of P-gp in MDCK cells after chronic stimulation with CsA for 7, 30, and 60 days was analyzed by flow cytometry. P-gp and CsA immunostaining in renal post-transplant biopsies showed considerable overlap in all cases (Spearman's test, r = 0.577, P < 0.001). After 7 days in vitro, the number of cells expressing P-gp increased progressively; a further increase in mean fluorescence was found after 60 days (P < 0.001, Student's t-test). Our findings suggest that in non-neoplastic cells, CsA may stimulate P-gp as a mechanism of detoxification. Individual differences in the adaptive responses to glycoprotein may be responsible for the appearance of nephrotoxicity or a CsA-resistant rejection reaction in cases of overexpression on lymphocytes and macrophages. Images Figure 1 PMID:7856751

  18. Cyclosporin A does not affect the absolute rate of cortical bone resorption at the organ level in the growing rat.

    PubMed

    Klein, L; Lemel, M S; Wolfe, M S; Shaffer, J

    1994-10-01

    The weanling rat, an animal model of rapid bone turnover, was used to evaluate the effects of various doses of cyclosporin A (CsA) on various bones during different time periods. Sprague-Dawley male rats were extensively prelabeled with 3H-tetracycline during 1-3 weeks of age. At 4 weeks of age, four groups of rats were given daily subcutaneous injections: vehicle or CsA--low dose (10 mg/kg), intermediary dose (20 mg/kg), or high dose (30 mg/kg) for 7, 14, or 28 days. Three different whole bones--the femur (low turnover), scapula (moderate turnover), and lumbar-6 vertebra (high turnover) were harvested intact at 4, 5, 6, and 8 weeks of age. The whole bones were assayed weekly for total dry defatted weight, calcium mass (formation), and loss of 3H-tetracycline (bone resorption) following treatment with CsA. Serum CsA levels, calcium creatinine, and alkaline phosphatase were measured weekly. Significant decreases in serum calcium and alkaline phosphatase were observed at 1 and 2 weeks, and were normalized by 4 weeks of treatment. No significant changes in serum creatinine were noted. For all three doses of CsA, no effect was observed on the absolute rate of cortical bone resorption of three different, whole bones over three time periods. Body weight and bone formation in treated animals was significantly smaller in a dose- and time-related fashion compared with control animals at sacrifice. However, compared with the initial control animals, body weights and bone masses of the final treated animals were much larger, suggesting that the smaller bone masses were due to insufficient growth and slow gain in bone mass.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7820781

  19. Cyclosporine A Treatment Inhibits Abcc6-Dependent Cardiac Necrosis and Calcification following Coxsackievirus B3 Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Marton, Jennifer; Albert, Danica; Wiltshire, Sean A.; Park, Robin; Bergen, Arthur; Qureshi, Salman; Malo, Danielle; Burelle, Yan; Vidal, Silvia M.

    2015-01-01

    Coxsackievirus type B3 (CVB3) is a cardiotropic enterovirus. Infection causes cardiomyocyte necrosis and myocardial inflammation. The damaged tissue that results is replaced with fibrotic or calcified tissue, which can lead to permanently altered cardiac function. The extent of pathogenesis among individuals exposed to CVB3 is dictated by a combination of host genetics, viral virulence, and the environment. Here, we aimed to identify genes that modulate cardiopathology following CVB3 infection. 129S1 mice infected with CVB3 developed increased cardiac pathology compared to 129X1 substrain mice despite no difference in viral burden. Linkage analysis identified a major locus on chromosome 7 (LOD: 8.307, P<0.0001) that controlled the severity of cardiac calcification and necrosis following infection. Sub-phenotyping and genetic complementation assays identified Abcc6 as the underlying gene. Microarray expression profiling identified genotype-dependent regulation of genes associated with mitochondria. Electron microscopy examination showed elevated deposition of hydroxyapatite-like material in the mitochondrial matrices of infected Abcc6 knockout (Abcc6-/-) mice but not in wildtype littermates. Cyclosporine A (CsA) inhibits mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening by inhibiting cyclophilin D (CypD). Treatment of Abcc6 -/- mice with CsA reduced cardiac necrosis and calcification by more than half. Furthermore, CsA had no effect on the CVB3-induced phenotype of doubly deficient CypD-/-Abcc6-/- mice. Altogether, our work demonstrates that mutations in Abcc6 render mice more susceptible to cardiac calcification following CVB3 infection. Moreover, we implicate CypD in the control of cardiac necrosis and calcification in Abcc6-deficient mice, whereby CypD inhibition is required for cardioprotection. PMID:26375467

  20. Diabetogenic effect of cyclosporin A is mediated by interference with mitochondrial function of pancreatic B-cells.

    PubMed

    Düfer, M; Krippeit-Drews, P; Lembert, N; Idahl, L A; Drews, G

    2001-10-01

    Treatment of patients after organ transplantation with the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A (CsA) is often accompanied by impaired glucose tolerance, thus promoting the development of diabetes mellitus. In the present article we show that 2 to 5 microM CsA diminishes glucose-induced insulin secretion of isolated mouse pancreatic islets in vitro by inhibiting glucose-stimulated oscillations of the cytoplasmic free-Ca(2+) concentration [Ca(2+)](c). This effect is not due to an inhibition of calcineurin, which mediates the immunosuppressive effect of CsA, because other calcineurin inhibitors, deltamethrin and tacrolimus, did not affect the oscillations in [Ca(2+)](c) of the B-cells. The CsA-induced decrease in [Ca(2+)](c) to basal values was not caused by a direct inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channels. CsA is known to be a potent inhibitor of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP), which we recently suggested to be involved in the regulation of oscillations. Consequently, CsA also inhibited the oscillations of the cell membrane potential, and it is shown that these effects could not be ascribed to cellular ATP depletion. However, the mitochondrial membrane potential Delta Psi was affected by CsA by inhibiting the oscillations in Delta Psi. Interestingly, the observed reduction in [Ca(2+)](c) could be counteracted by the K(+)(ATP) channel blocker tolbutamide, indicating that the stimulus-secretion coupling was interrupted before the closure of K(+)(ATP) channels. It is concluded that CsA alters B-cell function by inhibiting the mitochondrial PTP. This terminates the oscillatory activity that is indispensable for adequate insulin secretion. Thus, CsA acts on different targets to induce the immunosuppressive and the diabetogenic effect. PMID:11562451

  1. Influence of cyclosporine A on glomerular growth and the effect of mizoribine and losartan on cyclosporine nephrotoxicity in young rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Hong; Lee, Yeon Hee; Lim, Beom Jin; Jeong, Hyeon Joo; Kim, Pyung Kil; Shin, Jae Il

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of cyclosporine A (CsA) on glomerular growth and the effect of mizoribine (MZR) and losartan (LSAR) on CsA-induced nephropathy in young rats. Six-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats maintained on a low salt diet were given CsA (15 mg/kg), CsA and LSRT (30 mg/kg/day), CsA and MZR (5 mg/kg), or a combination of CsA, LSRT, and MZR for 4 and 7 weeks (two experiments) and compared with control group (olive oil-treated). Histopathology and glomerular size, inflammatory and fibrotic factors were studied. The score of acute CsA toxicity significantly decreased in the CsA + MZR group compared to the CsA group (p < 0.01). MZR and MZR + LSRT reduced tubulointerstitial fibrosis and TGF-β1 mRNA expression at 7 weeks. Osteopontin (OPN) mRNA expression was decreased at 7 weeks in MZR + LSRT (p < 0.01). Glomerular area decreased CsA group and recovered in MZR (p < 0.01) and MZR + LSRT (p < 0.01) at 7weeks. This study demonstrated that MZR and LSRT had suppressive effects on inflammatory process in chronic CsA nephropathy and led to improvement of tubular damage, tubulointerstitial fibrosis and arteriolopathy by down regulation of OPN and TGF-β1 and glomerular size contraction. PMID:26947764

  2. Activation and Cellular Localization of the Cyclosporine A-sensitive Transcription Factor NF-AT in Skeletal Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Karen L.; Friday, Bret B.; Thaloor, Deepa; Murphy, T.J.; Pavlath, Grace K.

    1998-01-01

    The widely used immunosuppressant cyclosporine A (CSA) blocks nuclear translocation of the transcription factor, NF-AT (nuclear factor of activated T cells), preventing its activity. mRNA for several NF-AT isoforms has been shown to exist in cells outside of the immune system, suggesting a possible mechanism for side effects associated with CSA treatment. In this study, we demonstrate that CSA inhibits biochemical and morphological differentiation of skeletal muscle cells while having a minimal effect on proliferation. Furthermore, in vivo treatment with CSA inhibits muscle regeneration after induced trauma in mice. These results suggest a role for NF-AT–mediated transcription outside of the immune system. In subsequent experiments, we examined the activation and cellular localization of NF-AT in skeletal muscle cells in vitro. Known pharmacological inducers of NF-AT in lymphoid cells also stimulate transcription from an NF-AT–responsive reporter gene in muscle cells. Three isoforms of NF-AT (NF-ATp, c, and 4/x/c3) are present in the cytoplasm of muscle cells at all stages of myogenesis tested. However, each isoform undergoes calcium-induced nuclear translocation from the cytoplasm at specific stages of muscle differentiation, suggesting specificity among NF-AT isoforms in gene regulation. Strikingly, one isoform (NF-ATc) can preferentially translocate to a subset of nuclei within a single multinucleated myotube. These results demonstrate that skeletal muscle cells express functionally active NF-AT proteins and that the nuclear translocation of individual NF-AT isoforms, which is essential for the ability to coordinate gene expression, is influenced markedly by the differentiation state of the muscle cell. PMID:9763451

  3. Cyclosporin A Inhibits Rotavirus Replication and Restores Interferon-Beta Signaling Pathway In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    He, Haiyang; Wu, Yuzhang

    2013-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is the most common cause of severe diarrhea among infants and young children. Currently, there is no specific drug available against rotavirus, largely due to the lack of an ideal target molecule which has hampered drug development. Our previous studies have revealed that cyclosporin A (CsA) might be potentially useful as an anti-RV drug. We therefore used both cellular and mouse models to study the immunological safety and effectiveness of CsA as an anti-RV drug. We found that CsA treatment of HT-29 cells before, during, and after viral infection efficiently inhibited Wa strain RV replication and restored IFN-β expression in a HT-29 cell line model. Exploring the underlying mechanisms showed that CsA promoted Interferon Regulatory Factor-5 (IRF-5) expression (a key positive regulator of the type I IFN signaling pathway), but not IRF-1, IRF-3, or IRF-7. Additionally, CsA inhibited SOCS-1 expression (the key negative regulator of IFN-α/β), but not SOCS-2 or SOCS-3. The antiviral effect of CsA was confirmed in an RV-infected neonatal mouse model by evaluation of antigen clearance and assessment of changes in intestinal tissue pathology. Also, no differences in T cell frequency or proliferation between the CsA- and vehicle-treated groups were observed. Thus, both our in vitro and in vivo findings suggest that CsA, through modulating the expression of key regulators in IFN signaling pathway, promote type I IFN-based intracellular innate immunity in RV host cells. These findings suggest that CsA may be a useful candidate to develop a new anti-RV strategy, although further evaluation and characterization of CsA on RV-induced diarrhea are warranted. PMID:23990993

  4. The P-glycoprotein inhibitor cyclosporin A differentially influences behavioural and neurochemical responses to the antidepressant escitalopram.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Fionn E; O'Connor, Richard M; Clarke, Gerard; Donovan, Maria D; Dinan, Timothy G; Griffin, Brendan T; Cryan, John F

    2014-03-15

    Recent studies have raised the possibility that P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibition may represent a putative augmentation strategy for treatment with certain antidepressants. Indeed, we have previously shown that administration of the P-gp inhibitor verapamil increased the brain distribution and behavioural effects of the antidepressant escitalopram. The aim of the current study was to investigate if similar effects occur with another P-gp inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA). CsA pre-treatment exacerbated the severity of behaviours in an escitalopram-induced mouse model of serotonin syndrome, a potentially life-threatening adverse drug reaction associated with serotonergic drugs. P-gp inhibition by CsA enhanced the brain distribution of escitalopram by 70-80%. Serotonin (5-HT) turnover in the prefrontal cortex was reduced by escitalopram, and this effect was augmented by CsA. However, CsA pre-treatment did not augment the effect of escitalopram in the tail suspension test (TST) of antidepressant-like activity. Microdialysis experiments revealed that pre-treatment with CsA failed to augment, but blunted, the increase in extracellular 5-HT in response to escitalopram administration. This blunting effect may contribute to the lack of augmentation in the TST. Taken together, the present studies demonstrate that co-administration of CsA and escitalopram produces differential effects depending on the behavioural and neurochemical assays employed. Thus, the results highlight the need for further studies involving more selective pharmacological tools to specifically evaluate the impact of P-gp inhibition on behavioural responses to antidepressants which are subject to efflux by P-gp. PMID:24280122

  5. Cyclosporine A Suppressed Glucose Oxidase Induced P53 Mitochondrial Translocation and Hepatic Cell Apoptosis through Blocking Mitochondrial Permeability Transition

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Weihua; Zhang, Xiaodi; Liu, Jiangzheng; Wang, Xin; Li, Shuang; Liu, Rui; Liao, Nai; Zhang, Tao; Hai, Chunxu

    2016-01-01

    P53 is known as a transcription factor to control apoptotic cell death through regulating a series of target genes in nucleus. There is accumulating evidences show that p53 can directly induce cell apoptosis through transcription independent way at mitochondria. However, the mechanism by which p53 translocation into mitochondria in response to oxidative stress remains unclear. Here, glucose oxidase (GOX) was used to induce ROS generation in HepG2 cells and liver tissues of mice. The results showed that p53 was stabilized and translocated to mitochondria in a time and dose dependent manner after GOX exposure. Interestingly, as an inhibitor of mitochondrial permeability transition, cyclosporine A (CsA) was able to effectively reduce GOX mediated mitochondrial p53 distribution without influencing on the expression of p53 target genes including Bcl-2 and Bax. These indicated that CsA could just block p53 entering into mitochondria, but not affect p53-dependent transcription. Meanwhile, CsA failed to inhibit the ROS generation induced by GOX, which indicated that CsA had no antioxidant function. Moreover, GOX induced typical apoptosis characteristics including, mitochondrial dysfunction, accumulation of Bax and release of cytochrome C in mitochondria, accompanied with activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. These processions were suppressed after pretreatment with CsA and pifithrin-μ (PFT-μ, a specific inhibitor of p53 mitochondrial translocation). In vivo, CsA was able to attenuate p53 mitochondrial distribution and protect mice liver against from GOX mediated apoptotic cell death. Taken together, these suggested that CsA could suppress ROS-mediated p53 mitochondrial distribution and cell apoptosis depended on its inhibition effect to mitochondrial permeability transition. It might be used to rescue the hepatic cell apoptosis in the patients with acute liver injury. PMID:26884717

  6. Treatment of autoimmune urticaria with low-dose cyclosporin A: A one-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Boubouka, Christine D; Charissi, Christina; Kouimintzis, Dimitris; Kalogeromitros, Dimitris; Stavropoulos, Panagiotis G; Katsarou, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Patients with autoimmune urticaria (AIU) and positive autologous serum skin test (ASST) represent a more serious type of chronic urticaria that does not respond to treatment with antihistamines, but responds completely to systemic corticosteroids. Because of the chronic course of the disease, there is a risk of side-effects. Cyclosporin A (CsA) is an alternative treatment for patients with AIU. In order to determine the efficacy of CsA at the lowest possible dose in patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria and positive ASST, 30 patients were included in a 5-month study with a follow-up one year after the end of treatment. All patients had positive ASST before treatment and autoantibodies were present in 73%. Twenty- three patients completed the study and responded to low-dose CsA treatment. Three patients did not respond to a dose of 2.5 mg/kg CsA, and 4 patients dropped-out due to side-effects. After the first month of treatment, an improvement of 31% was noted, reaching 88% after the fifth month of treatment. The mean dose of CsA was 2.16 mg/kg for the first month and 0.55 mg/kg for the fifth month. Three to 6 months after the end of the study, the ASST was repeated and was negative in 78.3% of patients. At the one-year follow-up, 20 patients were symptom-free (87%) and 3 had relapsed (13%). CsA, even in low-doses, can be an effective and short-term treat- ment with minimum side-effects in patients with AIU. PMID:21264453

  7. Development of cyclosporine A-loaded dry-emulsion formulation using highly purified glycerol monooleate for safe inhalation therapy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Hideyuki; Ogawa, Kumiko; Kojo, Yoshiki; Kawabata, Yohei; Mizumoto, Takahiro; Yamada, Shizuo; Onoue, Satomi

    2013-05-01

    The main objective of this study was to improve the safety and oxidative stability of glycerol monooleate (GMO)-based dry-emulsion (DE) formulation containing cyclosporine A (CsA) for inhalation therapy. GMO or highly purified GMO (hpGMO) was used as surfactant for the DE formulations (GMO/DE or hpGMO/DE), the toxicological and physicochemical properties of which were characterized with a focus on oxidative stability, in vitro/in vivo toxicity, and dissolution property. Incubation of GMO at oxidation accelerating conditions for 10 days at 60°C resulted in the formation of lipid peroxides as evidenced by increased malondialdehyde (111 μmol/mg); however, hpGMO samples exhibited increase of only 20.7 μmol/mg in malondialdehyde level. No significant acute cytotoxicity was observed in rat alveolar L2 cells exposed to hpGMO (0.28mM), and intratracheal administration of hpGMO powder in rats did not cause an increase of the plasma LDH level. The hpGMO/DE exhibited marked improvement in dissolution behavior of CsA, and stable fine micelles with a mean diameter of 320 nm were formed when suspended in water. A respirable powder formulation of hpGMO/DE (hpGMO/DE-RP) was newly prepared, and its in vitro inhalation property and in vivo efficacy were also evaluated. The hpGMO/DE-RP exhibited high dispersibility in laser diffraction analysis and significantly improved potency to attenuate recruitment of inflammatory cells into airway and thickening of airway wall in an animal model. Thus, the strategic use of hpGMO would improve oxidative stability and local toxicity compared with a GMO-based DE formulation, and its application to RP formulation could be a promising approach for effective inhalation therapy. PMID:23528280

  8. Inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition by cyclosporin A prevents pyrazole plus lipopolysaccharide-induced liver injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhuge, Jian; Cederbaum, Arthur I.

    2009-01-01

    Previous results showed that pyrazole potentiates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced liver injury in mice. Mechanisms involved overexpression of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), oxidative stress, activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). The current study was carried out to test the hypothesis that the mitochondria permeability transition (MPT) plays a role in this pyrazole plus LPS toxicity. Mice were injected intraperitoneally with pyrazole for two days, followed by a challenge with LPS with or without treatment with cyclosporin A (CsA), an inhibitor of the MPT. Serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase were increased by pyrazole plus LPS treatment, and CsA treatment could attenuate these increases. CsA also prevented pyrazole plus LPS-induced hepatocyte necrosis. Formation of 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) protein adducts and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) protein adducts in liver tissue were increased by the pyrazole plus LPS treatment, and CsA treatment blunted these increases. Swelling, cytochrome c release from mitochondria to the cytosol, and lipid peroxidation were increased in mitochondria isolated from the pyrazole plus LPS-treated mice, and CsA treatment prevented these changes. CsA did not prevent the increased levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), pp38 MAPK and p-JNK2 levels. In conclusion, while CsA does not prevent elevations in upstream mediators of the pyrazole plus LPS toxicity (iNOS, TNF-α, CYP2E1, MAPK), CsA protects mice from the pyrazole plus LPS-induced liver toxicity, by preventing MPT, release of cytochrome c and decreasing mitochondrial oxidative stress. These results indicate that mitochondria are the critical target of pyrazole plus LPS in mediating liver injury. PMID:19026739

  9. On the Performance of Trimetazidine and Vitamin E as Pharmacoprotection Agents in Cyclosporin A-Induced Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Cristina, De la Cruz Rodríguez Lilia; del Rosario, Rey María; Carmen Rosa, Araujo; Ana Veronica, Oldano

    2013-01-01

    The immunosuppressant drug cyclosporin A (CyA) has been used in diseases with immunological basis and in transplant patients. Nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity are the main adverse effects of this drug. To find a protective drug against those effects we assayed the cardioprotector Trimetazidine (TMZ) and vitamin E, used as nutritional supplements to alleviate oxidative stress. Six groups of eight male Wistar rats each were prepared (groups A–F): A, control; B, vitamin E (10 mg/Kg/day); C, TMZ (20 mg/Kg/day); D, 25 mg/Kg/day CyA; E, CyA and vitamin E (25 mg/Kg/day CyA + 10 mg/Kg/day Vit E); F, TMZ for 20 days (20 mg/kg/day); and then CyA (25 mg/kg/day) and TMZ (20 mg/Kg/day). The experiment lasted 120 days. The exposure of rats to CyA promoted nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity with an increase in serum urea, creatinine, and glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH). Structural and ultrastructural studies of liver and kidney were performed. Group D showed adverse effects induced by CyA since statistically significant differences were found with respect to the control group (A). Vitamin E (E) showed no protective effect. Pretreatment with TMZ (F) attenuated the adverse effects of CyA. We conclude that CyA-induced nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity are attenuated by the cytoprotective effect of TMZ. TMZ inhibits the reabsorption and, consequently, the accumulation of CyA in the cell. The antioxidant capacity of vitamin E did not improve the effect of CyA. PMID:23691353

  10. Successful Treatment of TAFRO Syndrome, a Variant of Multicentric Castleman's Disease, with Cyclosporine A: Possible Pathogenetic Contribution of Interleukin-2.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Yoshinobu; Takahashi, Satoshi; Nishi, Katsuyuki; Sakamaki, Taro; Mitani, Sachiko; Kaneko, Hitomi; Mizutani, Chisato; Ukyo, Naoya; Hirata, Hirokazu; Tsudo, Mitsuru

    2015-01-01

    Multicentric Castleman's disease is a systemic inflammatory disorder characterized by lymphadenopathy and excessive interleukin-6 production. A unique clinicopathologic variant of multicentric Castleman's disease, TAFRO (i.e., thrombocytopenia, anasarca, fever, renal failure or reticulin fibrosis, and organomegaly) syndrome, was recently proposed in Japan. Despite the successful use of anti-interleukin-6 therapy in some patients with TAFRO syndrome, not all patients achieve remission. The pathophysiological etiology of and suitable therapeutic strategies for this variant have not been established. Here, we present our experience of a unique case of TAFRO syndrome in a 78-year-old woman whose symptoms responded differently to several therapies. Tocilizumab, an anti-interleukin-6 receptor antibody, successfully induced remission of fever and lymphadenopathy. However, severe thrombocytopenia persisted and she developed anasarca, ascites, and pleural effusion shortly thereafter. Rituximab, an anti-CD20 antibody, and glucocorticoid therapy provided no symptom relief. In contrast, cyclosporine A, an immunosuppressive agent that blocks T cell function by inhibiting interleukin-2, yielded immediate improvements in systemic fluid retention and a gradual increase in platelet count, with complete resolution of disease symptoms. Excessive serum interleukin-2, when used as an anti-cancer agent, has been reported to cause side effects such as fluid retention, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure. Our case was unique because the anti-interleukin-2 therapy successfully improved symptoms that were not relieved with anti-interleukin-6 therapy. The present report therefore provides insight into the possible role of interleukin-2, in addition to interleukin-6, in TAFRO syndrome. This report will certainly help to clarify the pathogenesis of and optimal treatment strategies for TAFRO syndrome. PMID:26250536

  11. Combined inhibition of p38 and Akt signaling pathways abrogates cyclosporine A-mediated pathogenesis of aggressive skin SCCs

    SciTech Connect

    Arumugam, Aadithya; Walsh, Stephanie B.; Xu, Jianmin; Afaq, Farrukh; Elmets, Craig A.; Athar, Mohammad

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p38 and Akt are the crucial molecular targets in the pathogenesis of SCCs in OTRs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combined inhibition of these targets diminished tumor growth by 90%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of these targets act through downregulating mTOR signaling pathway. -- Abstract: Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) are the most common neoplasm in organ transplant recipients (OTRs). These cancers are more invasive and metastatic as compared to those developed in normal cohorts. Previously, we have shown that immunosuppressive drug, cyclosporine A (CsA) directly alters tumor phenotype of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) by activating TGF-{beta} and TAK1/TAB1 signaling pathways. Here, we identified novel molecular targets for the therapeutic intervention of these SCCs. We observed that combined blockade of Akt and p38 kinases-dependent signaling pathways in CsA-promoted human epidermoid carcinoma A431 xenograft tumors abrogated their growth by more than 90%. This diminution in tumor growth was accompanied by a significant decrease in proliferation and an increase in apoptosis. The residual tumors following the combined treatment with Akt inhibitor triciribine and p38 inhibitors SB-203580 showed significantly diminished expression of phosphorylated Akt and p38 and these tumors were less invasive and highly differentiated. Diminished tumor invasiveness was associated with the reduced epithelial-mesenchymal transition as ascertained by the enhanced E-cadherin and reduced vimentin and N-cadherin expression. Consistently, these tumors also manifested reduced MMP-2/9. The decreased p-Akt expression was accompanied by a significant reduction in p-mTOR. These data provide first important combinatorial pharmacological approach to block the pathogenesis of CsA-induced highly aggressive cutaneous neoplasm in OTRs.

  12. Safety and Tolerability of Cyclosporin A in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients: Results from a Prospective Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mazzeo, Anna Teresa; Brophy, Gretchen M.; Gilman, Charlotte B.; Alves, Óscar Luís; Robles, Jaime R.; Hayes, Ronald L.; Povlishock, John T.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Cyclosporin A (CsA) has recently been proposed for use in the early phase after traumatic brain injury (TBI), for its ability to preserve mitochondrial integrity in experimental brain injury models, and thereby provide improved behavioral outcomes as well as significant histological protection. The aim of this prospective, randomized, double-blind, dual-center, placebo-controlled trial was to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of a single intravenous infusion of CsA in patients with severe TBI. Fifty adult severe TBI patients were enrolled over a 22-month period. Within 12 h of the injury patients received 5 mg/kg of CsA infused over 24 h, or placebo. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, hemoglobin, platelets, white blood cell count (WBC), and a hepatic panel were monitored on admission, and at 12, 24, 36, and 48 h, and on days 4 and 7. Potential adverse events (AEs) were also recorded. Neurological outcome was recorded at 3 and 6 months after injury. This study revealed only transient differences in BUN levels at 24 and 48 h and for WBC counts at 24 h between the CsA and placebo patients. These modest differences were not clinically significant in that they did not negatively impact on patient course. Both BUN and creatinine values, markers of renal function, remained within their normal limits over the entire monitoring period. There were no significant differences in other mean laboratory values, or in the incidence of AEs at any other measured time point. Also, no significant difference was demonstrated for neurological outcome. Based on these results, we report a good safety profile of CsA infusion when given at the chosen dose of 5 mg/kg, infused over 24 h, during the early phase after severe head injury in humans, with the aim of neuroprotection. PMID:19621985

  13. Vitamin E protects against the mitochondrial damage caused by cyclosporin A in LLC-PK1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arriba, G. de Perez de Hornedo, J.; Ramirez Rubio, S.; Calvino Fernandez, M.; Benito Martinez, S.; Maiques Camarero, M.; Parra Cid, T.

    2009-09-15

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) has nephrotoxic effects known to involve reactive oxygen species (ROS), since antioxidants prevent the kidney damage induced by this drug. Given that mitochondria are among the main sources of intracellular ROS, the aims of our study were to examine the mitochondrial effects of CsA in the porcine renal endothelial cell line LLC-PK1 and the influence of the antioxidant Vitamin E (Vit E). Following the treatment of LLC-PK1 cells with CsA, we assessed the mitochondrial synthesis of superoxide anion, permeability transition pore opening, mitochondrial membrane potential, cardiolipin peroxidation, cytochrome c release and cellular apoptosis, using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy procedures. Similar experiments were done after Vit E preincubation of cells. CsA treatment increased superoxide anion in a dose-dependent way. CsA opened the permeability transition pores, caused Bax migration to mitochondria, and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and cardiolipin content. Also CsA released cytochrome c into cytosol and provoked cellular apoptosis. Vit E pretreatment inhibited the effects that CsA induced on mitochondrial structure and function in LLC-PK1 cells and avoided apoptosis. CsA modifies mitochondrial LLC-PK1 cell physiology with loss of negative electrochemical gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane and increased lipid peroxidation. These features are related to apoptosis and can explain the cellular damage that CsA induces. As Vit E inhibited these effects, our results suggest that they were mediated by an increase in ROS production by mitochondria.

  14. Cyclosporine A prevents ex vivo PCO formation through induction of autophagy-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Chandler, Heather L; Gervais, Kristen J; Lutz, Elizabeth A; Curto, Elizabeth M; Matusow, Rachel B; Wilkie, David A; Gemensky-Metzler, Anne J

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the Cyclosporine A (CsA) dose and minimum drug delivery time needed to prevent posterior capsule opacification (PCO) in an ex vivo canine model and evaluate the mechanism of CsA-induced cell death. Canine lens epithelial cells (LEC) were treated with CsA and changes in cell migration, proliferation, and density were monitored over time. CsA-treated LEC underwent transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immunofluorescence, and immunoblotting in the presence or absence of autophagy inhibitors to evaluate the mechanism of cell death. Lens capsules were harvested from canine cadaver eyes for an ex vivo model of PCO. Lens capsules were treated with CsA for 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, or 7 days, and subsequently maintained in culture for a total of 28 days in the absence of drug. CsA reduced LEC viability in a dose dependent manner. Morphologically, CsA-treated LEC were swollen, had intact nuclei, lacked peripheral chromatin condensation, and demonstrated prominent vacuolization; TEM revealed autophagosomes. LC3-II protein expression and acridine orange fluorescence increased in CsA-treated cells. A small non-significant induction of cleaved caspase-3 was observed in CsA-treated LEC. Lens capsules treated with 5, 6, or 7 days of 10 μg/mL CsA showed a significant decrease in ex vivo PCO formation; 6 days of drug delivery prevented PCO. This study finds that morphologic changes, formation of acidic vesicles, and increased expression of LC3-II supports the hypothesis that CsA mediates LEC death via autophagy; this is a novel finding in the lens. Induction of CsA-induced apoptosis was minimal. Six days of intracapsular CsA drug delivery prevented ex vivo PCO formation. PMID:25839646

  15. Cyclosporine A increases hair follicle growth by suppressing apoptosis-inducing factor nuclear translocation: a new mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lan, Shaowei; Liu, Feilin; Zhao, Guifang; Zhou, Tong; Wu, Chunling; Kou, Junna; Fan, Ruirui; Qi, Xiaojuan; Li, Yahui; Jiang, Yixu; Bai, Tingting; Li, Pengdong; Liu, Li; Hao, Deshun; Zhang, Lihong; Li, Yulin; Liu, Jin Yu

    2015-04-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) enhances hair growth through caspase-dependent pathways by retarding anagen-to-catagen phase transition in the hair follicle growth cycle. Whether apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), a protein that induces caspase-independent apoptosis, can regulate the hair follicle cycle in response to CsA is currently unclear. Here, we show that the pro-hair growth properties of CsA are in part due to blockage of AIF nuclear translocation. We first isolate hair follicles from murine dorsal skin. We then used Western blot, immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence to evaluate the expression and localization of AIF in hair follicles. We also determined whether modulation of AIF was responsible for the effects of CsA at the anagen-to-catagen transition. AIF was expressed in hair follicles during the anagen, catagen and telogen phases. There was significant nuclear translocation of AIF as hair follicles transitioned from anagen to late catagen phase; this was inhibited by CsA, likely due to reduced cyclophilin A expression and attenuated AIF release from mitochondria. However, we note that AIF translocation was not completely eliminated, which likely explains why the transition to catagen phase was severely retarded by CsA, rather than being completely inhibited. We speculate that blockade of the AIF signalling pathway is a critical event required for CsA-dependent promotion of hair growth in mice. The study of AIF-related signalling pathways may provide insight into hair diseases and suggest potential novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:25619112

  16. Tissue kallikrein is required for the cardioprotective effect of cyclosporin A in myocardial ischemia in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Youcef, G; Belaidi, E; Waeckel, L; Fazal, L; Clemessy, M; Vincent, M P; Zadigue, G; Richer, C; Alhenc-Gelas, F; Ovize, M; Pizard, A

    2015-03-01

    Clinical and experimental studies suggest that pharmacological postconditioning with Cyclosporin A (CsA) reduces infarct size in cardiac ischemia and reperfusion. CsA interacts with Cyclophilin D (CypD) preventing opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). Tissue kallikrein (TK) and its products kinins are involved in cardioprotection in ischemia. CypD knockout mice are resistant to the cardioprotective effects of both CsA and kinins suggesting common mechanisms of action. Using TK gene knockout mice, we investigated whether the kallikrein-kinin system is involved in the cardioprotective effect of CsA. Homozygote and heterozygote TK deficient mice (TK(-/-), TK(+/-)) and wild type littermates (TK(+/+)) were subjected to cardiac ischemia-reperfusion with and without CsA postconditioning. CsA reduced infarct size in TK(+/+) mice but had no effect in TK(+/-) and TK(-/-) mice. Cardiac mitochondria isolated from TK(-/-) mice had indistinguishable basal oxidative phosphorylation and calcium retention capacity compared to TK(+/+) mice but were resistant to CsA inhibition of mPTP opening. TK activity was documented in mouse heart and rat cardiomyoblasts mitochondria. By proximity ligation assay TK was found in close proximity to the mitochondrial membrane proteins VDAC and Tom22, and CypD. Thus, partial or total deficiency in TK induces resistance to the infarct size reducing effect of CsA in cardiac ischemia in mice, suggesting that TK level is a critical factor for cardioprotection by CsA. TK is required for the mitochondrial action of CsA and may interact with CypD. Genetic variability in TK activity has been documented in man and may influence the cardioprotective effect of CsA. PMID:25623731

  17. Nanomicelle formulation for topical delivery of cyclosporine A into the cornea: in vitro mechanism and in vivo permeation evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chuanlong; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Zhao; Li, Mengshuang; Li, Fengjie; Cui, Fenghua; Liu, Ting; Shi, Weiyun; Wu, Xianggen

    2015-01-01

    A stable topical ophthalmic cyclosporine A (CsA) formulation with good tolerance and high efficacy is still a desire in pharmaceutics and clinics. This article describes the preparation of CsA containing nanomicelles using a polyvinyl caprolactam-polyvinyl acetate-polyethylene glycol (PVCL-PVA-PEG) graft copolymer. Both the polymer itself and the CsA nanomicelles were evaluated for cytotoxicity and ocular irritation. The in vitro uptake and intracellular fate of nanomicelles were characterized. In vivo cornea permeation test performed with 0.5 mg/mL CsA containing nanomicelles, and compared with a commercially available CsA (10 mg/mL) oil-based ophthalmic solution. The CsA nanomicelle ophthalmic solution was simple to prepare and remained storage stable. PVCL-PVA-PEG had no cytotoxicity as its monomer solution, and as its micelle solution (IC50(48 h) = 14.02 mg/mL). CsA nanomicelles also had excellent ocular tolerance in rabbits. The use of nanomicelles significantly improved in vitro cellular uptake, apparently by an energy dependent intracellular endocytosis pathway that involved early endosomes, late endosomes, lysosomes, and ER. In vivo permeation showed that 0.5 mg/mL CsA nanomicelles delivered high levels of CsA into the cornea, when compared to the oil-based 10 mg/mL CsA ophthalmic solution. These findings indicated PVCL-PVA-PEG nanomicelles could be a promising topical delivery system for ocular administration of CsA.

  18. Supersaturated polymeric micelles for oral cyclosporine A delivery: The role of Soluplus-sodium dodecyl sulfate complex.

    PubMed

    Xia, Dengning; Yu, Hongzhen; Tao, Jinsong; Zeng, Jianrong; Zhu, Quanlei; Zhu, Chunliu; Gan, Yong

    2016-05-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that the retention of drug in the hydrophobic core of Soluplus micelle greatly impeded drug absorption from gastrointestinal tract. Using supersaturated polymeric micelles can improve drug release, however, insufficient maintaining of supersaturation of drug is still unfavorable for drug absorption. Here, we report adding small amount of small molecule, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), to Soluplus solution can form a Soluplus-SDS complex. This complex not only showed a higher solubilization capability for the model drug cyclosporine A (CsA), but also maintained a longer period of and higher supersaturation than was achieved with Soluplus alone. The Soluplus-SDS interactions were characterized by analyzing surface tension, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), fluorescence spectra, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that the formation of Soluplus-SDS complex via SDS adsorption on hydrophobic segments of Soluplus, which have more hydrophobic domain than that of Soluplus micelle, contributed significantly to the solubilization and stabilization of supersaturated CsA. Using this amphiphilic copolymer-small molecule surfactant system, the cellular uptake and rat in vivo absorption of CsA were more effectively achieved than pure Soluplus. The area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and the maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) achieved by CsA-loaded Soluplus-SDS complex were 1.58- and 1.8-times higher than the corresponding values for CsA-loaded pure Soluplus, respectively. This study highlighted the benefits of Soluplus-SDS complex for optimizing the solubilization and oral absorption of a drug with low aqueous solubility. PMID:26866892

  19. Procarcinogenic effects of cyclosporine A are mediated through the activation of TAK1/TAB1 signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jianmin; Walsh, Stephanie B.; Verney, Zoe M.; Kopelovich, Levy; Elmets, Craig A.; Athar, Mohammad

    2011-05-13

    Research highlights: {yields} Organ transplant recipients are highly susceptible to early skin cancer development. {yields} CsA-mediated TGFB1-dependent TAK1/TAB1 signaling augments invasive tumor growth. {yields} CsA enhances accumulation of upstream kinases, ZMP, AMPK and IRAK to activate TAK1. {yields} TAK1 mediates enhanced proliferation and reduced apoptosis via CsA-dependent NF{kappa}B. -- Abstract: Cyclosporine A (CsA) is an immunosuppressive drug commonly used for maintaining chronic immune suppression in organ transplant recipients. It is known that patients receiving CsA manifest increased growth of aggressive non-melanoma skin cancers. However, the underlying mechanism by which CsA augments tumor growth is not fully understood. Here, we show that CsA augments the growth of A431 epidermoid carcinoma xenograft tumors by activating tumor growth factor {beta}-activated kinase1 (TAK1). The activation of TAK1 by CsA occurs at multiple levels by kinases ZMP, AMPK and IRAK. TAK1 forms heterodimeric complexes with TAK binding protein 1 and 2 (TAB1/TAB2) which in term activate nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF{kappa}B) and p38 MAP kinase. Transcriptional activation of NF{kappa}B is evidenced by IKK{beta}-mediated phosphorylation-dependent degradation of I{kappa}B and consequent nuclear translocation of p65. This also leads to enhancement in the expression of its transcriptional target genes cyclin D1, Bcl2 and COX-2. Similarly, activation of p38 leads to enhanced inflammation-related signaling shown by increased phosphorylation of MAPKAPK2 and which in turn phosphorylates its substrate HSP27. Activation of both NF{kappa}B and p38 MAP kinase provide mitogenic stimuli to augment the growth of SCCs.

  20. On the performance of trimetazidine and vitamin e as pharmacoprotection agents in cyclosporin a-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Cristina, De la Cruz Rodríguez Lilia; Del Rosario, Rey María; Carmen Rosa, Araujo; Ana Veronica, Oldano

    2013-01-01

    The immunosuppressant drug cyclosporin A (CyA) has been used in diseases with immunological basis and in transplant patients. Nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity are the main adverse effects of this drug. To find a protective drug against those effects we assayed the cardioprotector Trimetazidine (TMZ) and vitamin E, used as nutritional supplements to alleviate oxidative stress. Six groups of eight male Wistar rats each were prepared (groups A-F): A, control; B, vitamin E (10 mg/Kg/day); C, TMZ (20 mg/Kg/day); D, 25 mg/Kg/day CyA; E, CyA and vitamin E (25 mg/Kg/day CyA + 10 mg/Kg/day Vit E); F, TMZ for 20 days (20 mg/kg/day); and then CyA (25 mg/kg/day) and TMZ (20 mg/Kg/day). The experiment lasted 120 days. The exposure of rats to CyA promoted nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity with an increase in serum urea, creatinine, and glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH). Structural and ultrastructural studies of liver and kidney were performed. Group D showed adverse effects induced by CyA since statistically significant differences were found with respect to the control group (A). Vitamin E (E) showed no protective effect. Pretreatment with TMZ (F) attenuated the adverse effects of CyA. We conclude that CyA-induced nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity are attenuated by the cytoprotective effect of TMZ. TMZ inhibits the reabsorption and, consequently, the accumulation of CyA in the cell. The antioxidant capacity of vitamin E did not improve the effect of CyA. PMID:23691353

  1. In vitro evaluation of the effect of cyclodextrin complexation on pulmonary deposition of a peptide, cyclosporin A.

    PubMed

    Matilainen, L; Järvinen, K; Toropainen, T; Näsi, E; Auriola, S; Järvinen, T; Jarho, P

    2006-08-01

    The effect of hydroxypropyl-alpha-cyclodextrin (HP-alpha-CD) complexation on in vitro pulmonary deposition of a cyclic peptide cyclosporin A (CsA) was studied. In addition, the effect of storage (32 days, 40 degrees C, 75% RH) on CsA/HP-alpha-CD complexes was studied. The complexation of CsA with CDs was evaluated by a phase-solubility method. Solid CsA/HP-alpha-CD complexes were prepared by freeze drying. Three inhalation formulations were prepared: CsA/lactose reference formulation (LF) (drug:carrier 1:364, w/w), CsA/HP-alpha-CD complex formulation (CDF) (drug:CD 1:269, w/w) and CsA/HP-alpha-CD complex/lactose formulation (CDLF) (complex:carrier 100:114, w/w). The inhalation studies were performed in vitro using Andersen Sampler (Ph. Eur.) and Taifun multi-dose dry powder inhalers (DPIs). Before the storage, the respirable fraction value (RF%) of CsA was 19.8+/-0.7%, 33.0+/-7.0% and 34.6+/-1.1% (mean+/-S.D., n=4 x 20) with LF, CDF and CDLF, respectively. When exposed to moisture (storage in a permeable polystyrene tube), the RF% values of CsA from formulations containing CsA/HP-alpha-CD complexes were lower than before the storage. However, when stored in the Taifun DPI, the RF% value of CsA from any of the formulations did not decrease. In conclusion, an acceptable RF% value of a peptide CsA from freeze-dried, simply micronized CsA/HP-alpha-CD complex powder was achieved before and after storage in the DPI. PMID:16624508

  2. Effect of cyclosporin A and analogues on cytosolic calcium and vasoconstriction: possible lack of relationship to immunosuppressive activity.

    PubMed Central

    Lo Russo, A.; Passaquin, A. C.; André, P.; Skutella, M.; Rüegg, U. T.

    1996-01-01

    1. The full therapeutic potential of the main immunosuppressive drug, cyclosporin A (CsA), is limited because of its side effects, namely nephrotoxicity and hypertension. Several lines of evidence suggest that the origin of both side effects could be CsA-induced vasoconstriction. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well understood. 2. Diameter measurements of rat isolated mesenteric arteries showed an increase in noradrenaline- and [Arg]8vasopressin-induced vasoconstriction when arteries were pretreated with CsA. 3. Measurements in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) of either cytosolic calcium concentration or of 45Ca2+ efflux showed that CsA potentiated the calcium influx to several vasoconstrictor hormones: [Arg]8vasopressin, angiotensin II, endothelin-1 and 5-hydroxytryptamine. On the other hand, 45Ca2+ efflux in response to thapsigargin, which depletes calcium from intracellular pools, was not potentiated by CsA. 45Ca2+ uptake was not altered by CsA or by any of the analogues tested. 4. Time-course studies in cultured VSMC showed that maximal CsA-induced Ca2+ potentiation occurred after ca. 20 h and this effect was reversed over approximately the next 20 h. 5. To investigate the possible role played by the known intracellular targets of CsA, namely cyclophilin and calcineurin, CsA derivatives with variable potencies with respect to their immunosuppressive activity, were tested on the calcium influx to [Arg]8vasopressin. Derivatives devoid of immunosuppressive activity (cyclosporin H, PSC-833) potentiated calcium signalling, while the potent immunosuppressant, FK520, a close derivative of FK506, and MeVal4CsA, an antagonist of the immunosuppressive effect of CsA did not. The latter compound was unable to reverse the calcium potentiating effect of CsA. 6. Our results show that CsA increases the calcium influx to vasoconstrictor hormones in smooth muscle cells, which presumably increases vasoconstriction. Loading of the intracellular

  3. Treatment of alkali-injured cornea by cyclosporine A-loaded electrospun nanofibers - An alternative mode of therapy.

    PubMed

    Cejkova, Jitka; Cejka, Cestmir; Trosan, Peter; Zajicova, Alena; Sykova, Eva; Holan, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    In this study we tried to develop a new approach to suppress inflammation and neovascularization in the alkali-injured rabbit cornea. For this reason Cyclosporine A (CsA)-loaded electrospun nanofibers were transferred onto the ocular surface injured with alkali (0.25 N NaOH). Damaged corneas were divided into the following groups: untreated, treated with CsA eye drops, treated with nanofibers drug-free and treated with CsA-loaded nanofibers. Healthy rabbit corneas served as controls. Drug-free nanofibers and CsA-loaded nanofibers were transferred onto the damaged corneal surface immediately after the injury and sutured to conjunctiva. On day five after the injury the nanofibers were removed. The animals from all groups were sacrificed on day twelve after the injury. The extent of the inflammatory reaction and corneal healing were examined macroscopically, immunohistochemically and biochemically. The central corneal thickness was measured using an ultrasonic pachymeter. When compared with untreated injured corneas, injured corneas treated with drug-free nanofibers or injured corneas treated with CsA eye drops, the number of CD3-positive cells (T lymphocytes) and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines were strongly reduced in corneas treated with CsA-loaded nanofibers, which was associated with the significantly decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinase 9, inducible nitric oxide synthase, vascular endothelial growth factor and active caspase-3. CsA-loaded nanofibers effectively suppressed corneal inflammation and corneal neovascularization. Central corneal thickness restored to levels before injury only in corneas treated with CsA-loaded nanofibers. Corneal transparency was highly restored in these corneas. It is suggested that the beneficial effect of CsA-loaded nanofibers was associated with the continuous release of CsA from nanofibers and continuous affection of damaged cornea by CsA. The suture of nanofibers to conjunctiva and the closed eyes

  4. Cyclosporin A and doxorubicin-ifosfamide in resistant solid tumours: a phase I and an immunological study.

    PubMed Central

    González-Manzano, R.; Cid, J.; Brugarolas, A.; Piasecki, C. C.

    1995-01-01

    In order to test whether circumvention of clinical resistance can be obtained in common solid tumours by targeting different drug resistance mechanisms, a phase I clinical and immunological study was designed. The purpose of the study was to determine the dose of cyclosporin A (CsA), in combination with doxorubicin (DOX) and ifosfamide (IFX), needed to achieve steady-state whole-blood levels of 2000 ng ml-1 and the associated toxicity of this combination. Treatment consisted of CsA 5 mg kg-1 as a 2 h loading infusion, followed by a CsA 3 day continuous infusion (c.i.) (days 1-3) at doses that were escalated from 10 to 18 mg kg-1 day-1. Chemotherapy consisted of DOX 55 mg m-2 by i.v. 24 h c.i. (day 2) and IFX 2 g m-2 i.v. over 1 h on days 1 and 3. Treatments were repeated every 4 weeks. Eighteen patients with previously treated resistant solid tumours received 39 cycles. Mean steady-state CsA levels > or = 2000 ng ml-1 were reached at 5 mg kg-1 loading dose followed by a 3 day c.i. of 16 mg kg-1 day-1 or greater. Haematological toxicity was greater than expected for the same chemotherapy alone. One patient died of intracranial haemorrhage due to severe thrombopenia. Other observed toxicities were: asymptomatic hyperbilirubinaemia (46% cycles), mild nephrotoxicity (20% cycles), hypomagnesaemia (72% cycles), mild increase in body weight (100% cycles), hypertension (15% cycles) and headache (15% cycles). Overall the toxicity was acceptable and manageable. No alterations in absolute lymphocyte number, the lymphocyte subsets studied (CD3, CD4, CD8, CD19) or CD4/CD8 ratio were observed in patients receiving more than one treatment cycle, although there were significant and non-uniform variations in the values of the different lymphocyte subsets studied when pre- and post-treatment values were compared. There was also a significant increase in the CD4/CD8 ratio. Tumour regressions were observed in two patients (epidermoid carcinoma of the cervix and Ewing's sarcoma). The

  5. Effects of immunosuppressants, FK506 and cyclosporin A, on the osteogenic differentiation of rat mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Yu-Kyung; Kim, Kyoung-Hwa; Kim, Su-Hwan; Kim, Young-Sung; Koo, Ki-Tae; Kim, Tai-Il; Seol, Yang-Jo; Ku, Young; Rhyu, In-Chul

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the immunosuppressants FK506 and cyclosporin A (CsA) on the osteogenic differentiation of rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Methods The effect of FK506 and CsA on rat MSCs was assessed in vitro. The MTT assay was used to determine the deleterious effect of immunosuppressants on stem cell proliferation at 1, 3, and 7 days. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was analyzed on days 3, 7, and 14. Alizarin red S staining was done on day 21 to check mineralization nodule formation. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was also performed to detect the expressions of bone tissue-specific genes on days 1 and 7. Results Cell proliferation was promoted more in the FK506 groups than the control or CsA groups on days 3 and 7. The FK506 groups showed increased ALP activity compared to the other groups during the experimental period. The ALP activity of the CsA groups did not differ from the control group in any of the assessments. Mineralization nodule formation was most prominent in the FK506 groups at 21 days. RT-PCR results of the FK506 groups showed that several bone-related genes-osteopontin, osteonectin, and type I collagen (Col-I)-were expressed more than the control in the beginning, but the intensity of expression decreased over time. Runx2 and Dlx5 gene expression were up-regulated on day 7. The effects of 50 nM CsA on osteonectin and Col-I were similar to those of the FK506 groups, but in the 500 nM CsA group, most of the genes were less expressed compared to the control. Conclusions These results suggest that FK506 enhances the osteoblastic differentiation of rat MSCs. Therefore, FK506 might have a beneficial effect on bone regeneration when immunosuppressants are needed in xenogenic or allogenic stem cell transplantation to treat bone defects. PMID:22803008

  6. Cyclosporine A-induced nephrotoxicity is ameliorated by dose reduction and conversion to sirolimus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sereno, J; Vala, H; Nunes, S; Rocha-Pereira, P; Carvalho, E; Alves, R; Teixeira, F; Reis, F

    2015-04-01

    Side-effect minimization strategies to avoid serious side-effects of cyclosporine A (CsA), such as nephrotoxicity, have been mainly based on dose reduction and conversion to other putatively less nephrotoxic drugs, such as sirolimus (SRL), an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin. This study intended to evaluate the impact of protocols based on CsA dose reduction and further conversion to SRL on kidney function and lesions, based on serum, urine and renal tissue markers. The following 3 groups (n=6) were tested during a 9-week protocol: control (vehicle); CsA (5 mg/kg/day) and Red + Conv (CsA 30 mg/kg/day during 3 weeks + 3 weeks with CsA 5 mg/kg/day + SRL 1 mg/kg/day during the last 3 weeks). The following parameters were analysed: blood pressure, heart rate and biochemical data; serum and urine contents and clearances of creatinine, urea and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), as well as, glomerular filtration rate; kidney lipid peroxidation and clearance; kidney lesions were evaluated and protein expression was performed by immunohistochemistry. After the first 3 weeks of CsA (30 mg/kg/day) treatment animals showed body weight loss, hypertension, tachycardia, as well as, increased serum levels of non-HDL cholesterol, glucose, triglycerides, creatinine and urea, accompanied by decreased GFR and insulin levels. In addition, a significant increase in the expression of connective tissue growth factor, kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), mammalian target of rapamycin, nuclear factor-κβ1 and transforming growth factor-β was found in the kidney, accompanied by extensive renal damage. The following 3 weeks with CsA dose reduction revealed amelioration of vascular and glomerular lesions, but without significant tubular improvement. The last 3 weeks with the conversion to sirolimus revealed high serum and urine NGAL contents but the CsA-evoked renal damage was substantially ameliorated, by reduced of connective tissue growth factor, mammalian

  7. Simultaneous measurement of cyclosporin A and tacrolimus from dried blood spots by ultra high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hinchliffe, Edward; Adaway, Joanne E; Keevil, Brian G

    2012-02-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) and tacrolimus are immunosuppressant drugs principally used in solid organ transplant recipients. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of both drugs is essential to avoid toxicity related to overdosage, and transplant rejection from underdosage. This necessitates frequent hospital visits to phlebotomy services. Capillary blood sampling onto dried blood spots (DBS) provides numerous advantages to venous whole blood sampling, including the ability for patients to send DBS to the laboratory by post, significantly reducing the number of unnecessary hospital visits. We have developed a novel, simple and rapid method for the extraction and simultaneous UPLC-MS/MS measurement of both CsA and tacrolimus from DBS. The extraction method involved a simple 30 min hot solvent extraction with ultrasonication. Extract (10 μL) was injected onto a Waters Acquity UPLC column filter unit security frit, coupled to a Waters Acquity BEH C18 UPLC column, with methanolic mobile phase gradient elution. Eluant was connected to a Waters Quattro Premier XE tandem mass spectrometer operating in ES+ mode. We detected multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) transitions of m/z 1220>1203 and 1231.9>1215.1 for CsA and d12 CsA respectively which co-eluted at 1.30min, and 821.6>768.5 and 809.6>756.5 for tacrolimus and ascomycin respectively which co-eluted at 1.17 min. Ion suppression was negligible. Mean recovery was 95.5% for CsA and 92.8% for tacrolimus. Limit of detection and limit of quantitation were both 8.5 μg/L for CsA, and 0.5 and 2.3 μg/L respectively for tacrolimus. The assay was linear up to 1500μg/L for CsA (r(2)=0.9999), and up to 50 μg/L for tacrolimus (r(2)=0.9994). Mean intra assay imprecision, inter assay imprecision and bias were all <10% for both CsA and tacrolimus. DBS were stable for at least 14 days at room temperature. Comparison of the DBS UPLC-MS/MS method and the routine venous whole blood LC-MS/MS assay demonstrated good agreement between the two methods

  8. Effects of FK506 and cyclosporin A on cytokine production studied in vitro at a single-cell level.

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, J; Nagy, S; Groth, C G; Andersson, U

    1992-01-01

    Mononuclear cells obtained from human blood were mitogen or antigen activated in vitro in the presence or absence of FK506 or cyclosporin A (CsA). Cytokine production was studied at a single-cell level by ultraviolet (UV) microscopy of fixed permeabilized cells using cytokine-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb). Phenotypic characterization of the monokine-producing cells was achieved by two-colour immunofluorescent staining. Cytokine production after antigen activation with Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin A (SEA) was significantly reduced. FK506 or CsA inhibited SEA-induced tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production both in monocytes (P less than 0.01) and in lymphocytes (P less than 0.001), at a drug concentration of 1-25 ng/ml for FK506 and 100-500 ng/ml for CsA. Lymphocyte synthesis of interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and TNF-beta after SEA activation was also significantly reduced by either of the drugs. In contrast, endotoxin-induced monokine production (TNF-alpha and IL-6) after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation was unaffected by FK506 or CsA even when added in concentrations as high as 1000 ng/ml. When the cells were stimulated by phorbol ester (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, PMA) plus calcium ionophore (ionomycin), FK506 and CsA inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, the production of IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for FK506 or CsA on the cellular synthesis of the various cytokines varied between 0.6 and 1.0 ng/ml and 20 and 60 ng/ml, respectively. Further stimulation by addition of anti-CD28 mAb to the cultures resulted in an augmented IL-2 and IFN-gamma production which was resistant to both FK506 and CsA. This report delineates extensive similarities between the two drugs in mechanisms of immunosuppression by blockade of identical interleukin production. Depending on the mode of cell activation the two drugs inhibited not only cytokine production in lymphocytes but

  9. A pharmacologically-based array to identify targets of cyclosporine A-induced toxicity in cultured renal proximal tubule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sarró, Eduard; Jacobs-Cachá, Conxita; Itarte, Emilio; Meseguer, Anna

    2012-01-15

    Mechanisms of cyclosporine A (CsA)-induced nephrotoxicity were generally thought to be hemodynamic in origin; however, there is now accumulating evidence of a direct tubular effect. Although genomic and proteomic experiments by our group and others provided overall information on genes and proteins up- or down-regulated by CsA in proximal tubule cells (PTC), a comprehensive view of events occurring after CsA exposure remains to be described. For this purpose, we applied a pharmacologic approach based on the use of known activities of a large panel of potentially protective compounds and evaluated their efficacy in preventing CsA toxicity in cultured mouse PTC. Our results show that compounds that blocked protein synthesis and apoptosis, together with the CK2 inhibitor DMAT and the PI3K inhibitor apigenin, were the most efficient in preventing CsA toxicity. We also identified GSK3, MMPs and PKC pathways as potential targets to prevent CsA damage. Additionally, heparinase-I and MAPK inhibitors afforded partial but significant protection. Interestingly, antioxidants and calcium metabolism-related compounds were unable to ameliorate CsA-induced cytotoxicity. Subsequent experiments allowed us to clarify the hierarchical relationship of targeted pathways after CsA treatment, with ER stress identified as an early effector of CsA toxicity, which leads to ROS generation, phenotypical changes and cell death. In summary, this work presents a novel experimental approach to characterizing cellular responses to cytotoxics while pointing to new targets to prevent CsA-induced toxicity in proximal tubule cells. Highlights: ► We used a novel pharmacological approach to elucidate cyclosporine (CsA) toxicity. ► The ability of a broad range of compounds to prevent CsA toxicity was evaluated. ► CsA toxicity was monitored using LDH release assay and PARP cleavage. ► Protein synthesis, PI3K, GSK3, MMP, PKC and caspase inhibitors prevented CsA toxicity. ► We also identified ER

  10. Everolimus in combination with cyclosporin a as pre- and posttransplantation immunosuppressive therapy in nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Junghanss, Christian; Rathsack, Susanne; Wacke, Rainer; Weirich, Volker; Vogel, Heike; Drewelow, Bernd; Mueller, Sabrina; Altmann, Simone; Freund, Mathias; Lange, Sandra

    2012-07-01

    Everolimus (RAD001) is an mTOR inhibitor that has been successfully used as an immunosuppressant in solid-organ transplantation. Data in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is limited. This study aimed to investigate pharmacokinetics, safety, and efficacy of RAD001 in a canine allogeneic HSCT model. First, pharmacokinetics of RAD001 were performed in healthy dogs in order to determine the appropriate dosing. Doses of 0.25 mg RAD001 twice daily in combination with 15 mg/kg cyclosporin A (CsA) twice daily were identified as appropriate starting doses to achieve the targeted range of RAD001 (3-8 μg/L) when orally administered. Subsequently, 10 dogs were transplanted using 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) for conditioning and 0.25 mg RAD001 twice daily plus 15 mg/kg CsA twice daily for pre- and posttransplantation immunosuppression. Seven of the 10 transplanted dogs were maintained at the starting RAD001 dose throughout the study. For the remaining 3 dogs, dose adjustments were necessary. RAD001 accumulation over time did not occur. All dogs initially engrafted. Five dogs eventually rejected the graft (weeks 10, 10, 13, 27, and 56). Two dogs died of pneumonia (weeks 8 and 72) but were chimeric until then. Total cholesterol rose from median 4.1 mmol/L (3.5-5.7 mmol/L) before HSCT to 6.0 mmol/l (5.0-8.5 mmol/l) at day 21 after HSCT, but remained always within normal range. Changes in creatinine and triglyceride values were not observed. Long-term engraftment rates were inferior to sirolimus/CsA and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF)/CsA regimen, respectively. RAD001/CsA caused a more pronounced reduction of platelet counts to median 2 × 10(9)/L (range: 0-21 × 10(9)/L) and longer time to platelet recovery of 21 days (range: 14-24 days) compared with MMF/CsA. CsA c(2h) levels were significantly enhanced in the RAD001/CsA regimen, but c(0h) and area under the curve from 0 to 12 hours (AUC(0-12h)) values did not differ compared with an MMF

  11. Pharmacokinetic and nephroprotective benefits of using Schisandra chinensis extracts in a cyclosporine A-based immune-suppressive regime

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Qiao; Wei, Jiabao; Mahmoodurrahman, Mohammed; Zhang, Chenxue; Quan, Shijian; Li, Tongming; Yu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is a powerful immunosuppressive drug. However, nephrotoxicity resulting from its long-term usage has hampered its prolonged therapeutic usage. Schisandra chinensis extracts (SCE) have previously been used in traditional Chinese medicine and more recently coadministered with Western medicine for the treatment of CsA-induced side effects in the People’s Republic of China. This study aimed to investigate the possible effects of SCE on the pharmacokinetics of CsA in rats and elucidate the potential mechanisms by which it hinders the development of CsA-induced nephrotoxicity. A liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method was developed and validated for determining the effect of SCE on the pharmacokinetics of CsA. Male Sprague Dawley rats, which were administered with CsA (25 mg/kg/d) alone or in combination with SCE (54 mg/kg/d and 108 mg/kg/d) for 28 days, were used to evaluate the nephroprotective effects of SCE. Our study showed that SCE increased the mean blood concentration of CsA. Furthermore, we found that the concomitant administration of SCE alongside CsA prevented the disruption of catalase activity and reduction in creatinine, urea, renal malondialdehyde, and glutathione peroxidase levels that would have otherwise occurred in the absence of SCE administration. SCE treatment markedly suppressed the expression of 4-hydroxynonenal, Bcl-2-associated X protein, cleaved caspase 3, and autophagy-related protein LC3 A/B. On the other hand, the expression of heme oxygenase-1, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), and P-glycoprotein was enhanced by the very same addition of SCE. SCE was also able to increase the systemic exposure of CsA in rats. The renoprotective effects of SCE were thought to be mediated by its antiapoptotic and antioxidant abilities, which caused the attenuation of CsA-induced autophagic cell death. All in all, these findings suggest the prospective use of SCE as an effective adjunct in a Cs

  12. Inhibition of cyclophilin D by cyclosporin A promotes retinal ganglion cell survival by preventing mitochondrial alteration in ischemic injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S Y; Shim, M S; Kim, K-Y; Weinreb, R N; Wheeler, L A; Ju, W-K

    2014-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) inhibits the opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) by interacting with cyclophilin D (CypD) and ameliorates neuronal cell death in the central nervous system against ischemic injury. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying CypD/MPTP opening-mediated cell death in ischemic retinal injury induced by acute intraocular pressure (IOP) elevation remain unknown. We observed the first direct evidence that acute IOP elevation significantly upregulated CypD protein expression in ischemic retina at 12 h. However, CsA prevented the upregulation of CypD protein expression and promoted retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival against ischemic injury. Moreover, CsA blocked apoptotic cell death by decreasing cleaved caspase-3 protein expression in ischemic retina. Of interest, although the expression level of Bcl-xL protein did not show a significant change in ischemic retina treated with vehicle or CsA at 12 h, ischemic damage induced the reduction of Bcl-xL immunoreactivity in RGCs. More importantly, CsA preserved Bcl-xL immunoreactivity in RGCs of ischemic retina. In parallel, acute IOP elevation significantly increased phosphorylated Bad (pBad) at Ser112 protein expression in ischemic retina at 12 h. However, CsA significantly preserved pBad protein expression in ischemic retina. Finally, acute IOP elevation significantly increased mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) protein expression in ischemic retina at 12 h. However, CsA significantly preserved Tfam protein expression in ischemic retina. Studies on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content in ischemic retina showed that there were no statistically significant differences in mtDNA content among control and ischemic groups treated with vehicle or CsA. Therefore, these results provide evidence that the activation of CypD-mediated MPTP opening is associated with the apoptotic pathway and the mitochondrial alteration in RGC death of ischemic retinal injury. On the basis

  13. Rasagiline prevents cyclosporine A-sensitive superoxide flashes induced by PK11195, the initial signal of mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuqiu; Shamoto-Nagai, Masayo; Maruyama, Wakako; Osawa, Toshihiko; Naoi, Makoto

    2016-05-01

    Rasagiline, a neuroprotective inhibitor of type B monoamine oxidase, prevented PK111195-induced apoptosis in SH-SY5Y cells through inhibition of mitochondrial apoptosis signaling (J Neural Transm 120:1539-1551, 2013, J Neural Transm 122:1399-1407, 2015). This paper presents that PK11195 induced superoxide flashes, the transit production burst, mediated by cyclosporine A-sensitive membrane permeability transition. Rasagiline prevented superoxide flashes, calcium efflux, and cell death by PK11195. Regulation of the initial pore formation at the inner mitochondrial membrane was confirmed as the decisive mechanism of neuroprotection by rasagiline. PMID:26931622

  14. Novel micelle carriers for cyclosporin A topical ocular delivery: in vivo cornea penetration, ocular distribution and efficacy studies.

    PubMed

    Di Tommaso, Claudia; Bourges, Jean-Louis; Valamanesh, Fatemeh; Trubitsyn, Gregory; Torriglia, Alicia; Jeanny, Jean-Claude; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Gurny, Robert; Möller, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Cornea transplantation is one of the most performed graft procedures worldwide with an impressive success rate of 90%. However, for "high-risk" patients with particular ocular diseases in addition to the required surgery, the success rate is drastically reduced to 50%. In these cases, cyclosporin A (CsA) is frequently used to prevent the cornea rejection by a systemic treatment with possible systemic side effects for the patients. To overcome these problems, it is a challenge to prepare well-tolerated topical CsA formulations. Normally high amounts of oils or surfactants are needed for the solubilization of the very hydrophobic CsA. Furthermore, it is in general difficult to obtain ocular therapeutic drug levels with topical instillations due to the corneal barriers that efficiently protect the intraocular structures from foreign substances thus also from drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate in vivo the effects of a novel CsA topical aqueous formulation. This formulation was based on nanosized polymeric micelles as drug carriers. An established rat model for the prevention of cornea graft rejection after a keratoplasty procedure was used. After instillation of the novel formulation with fluorescent labeled micelles, confocal analysis of flat-mounted corneas clearly showed that the nanosized carriers were able to penetrate into all corneal layers. The efficacy of a 0.5% CsA micelle formulation was tested and compared to a physiological saline solution and to a systemic administration of CsA. In our studies, the topical CsA treatment was carried out for 14 days, and the three parameters (a) cornea transparency, (b) edema, and (c) neovascularization were evaluated by clinical observation and scoring. Compared to the control group, the treated group showed a significant higher cornea transparency and significant lower edema after 7 and 13 days of the surgery. At the end point of the study, the neovascularization was reduced by 50% in the CsA-micelle treated

  15. A Recombinant G Protein Plus Cyclosporine A-Based Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccine Elicits Humoral and Regulatory T Cell Responses against Infection without Vaccine-Enhanced Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaofan; Zhou, Xian; Zhong, Yiwei; Li, Changgui; Dong, Aihua; He, Zhonghuai; Zhang, Shuren; Wang, Bin

    2016-02-15

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection can cause severe disease in the lower respiratory tract of infants and older people. Vaccination with a formalin-inactivated RSV vaccine (FI-RSV) and subsequent RSV infection has led to mild to severe pneumonia with two deaths among vaccinees. The vaccine-enhanced disease (VED) was recently demonstrated to be due to an elevated level of Th2 cell responses following loss of regulatory T (Treg) cells from the lungs. To induce high levels of neutralizing Abs and minimize pathogenic T cell responses, we developed a novel strategy of immunizing animals with a recombinant RSV G protein together with cyclosporine A. This novel vaccine induced not only a higher level of neutralizing Abs against RSV infection, but, most importantly, also significantly higher levels of Treg cells that suppressed VED in the lung after RSV infection. The induced responses provided protection against RSV challenge with no sign of pneumonia or bronchitis. Treg cell production of IL-10 was one of the key factors to suppress VED. These finding indicate that G protein plus cyclosporine A could be a promising vaccine against RSV infection in children and older people. PMID:26792805

  16. CD45RA+ and CD45RO+ T cells differ in susceptibility to cyclosporin A mediated inhibition of interleukin-2 production.

    PubMed

    Schwinzer, R; Siefken, R

    1996-03-01

    Lymphocytes in different states of activation use different intracellular signalling pathways and may therefore differ in their susceptibility to immunosuppressive agents. In this study we examined the proliferation and production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) by unprimed/naive CD4+CD45RA+ T cells and previously activated/memory CD4+CD45RO+ T cells from human peripheral blood when stimulated in vitro in the presence of cyclosporin A (CsA). Further, the dependency of the IL-2 response on calcium (Ca2+) ions was analysed by the addition of the chelating agent EGTA. The CD4+CD45RO+ memory T cells were shown to be less susceptible to CsA and less dependent on the level of Ca+ ions than the naive CD4+CD45RA+ T cells. The subcellular mechanisms involved in this difference and the potential clinical implications are discussed. PMID:8762014

  17. Cyclosporine A inhibits the mRNA expressions of IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-gamma, but not TNF-alpha, in canine mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Momoi, Yasuyuki; Iwasaki, Toshiroh

    2007-09-01

    The effects of the calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine A (CsA) and FK506 on the mRNA expressions of various cytokines were evaluated in dogs to determine whether the effects of CsA and FK506 in dogs were similar to those in humans. The mRNA expression levels of the cytokines IL-2, IL-4, IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha were measured in PHA-stimulated canine PBMC using real-time RT-PCR after incubation with CsA or FK506 for 5 hr. Both reagents inhibited IL-2, IL-4 and IFN-gamma mRNA expressions in a dose-dependent manner. However, CsA hardly inhibited the mRNA expression of TNF-alpha. These findings are important for assessing the indications of CsA treatment in dogs. PMID:17917372

  18. The effect of different fatty acids on the intestinal lymphatic absorption of cyclosporin-A after oral administration in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, B.K.

    1988-01-01

    Four studies were conducted in male Sprague-Dawley rats to evaluate the effect of saturated fatty acids (FA) of varying chain lengths on cyclosporin-A (CSA) intestinal lymphatic absorption. {sup 3}H-CSA was given to thoracic duct-ligated and sham rats in a nonlipid-(NL) or busyric (BA), octanoic (OA), lauric (LA), palmitic (PA), or stearic (SA) acid dosage form ({sup 14}C-FA) in an oral absorption study. The dosage forms were given to thoracic duct cannulated (TDC) rats to assess CSA intestinal lymphatic absorption. CSA blood-to-lymph transfer was assessed by intravenous {sup 3}H-CSA in TDC rats. Colchicine pretreated TDC rats received CSA in the NL and PA dosage forms. CSA and FA concentrations in blood and lymph were measured radiometrically. CSA and FA in the chylomicron and aqueous fractions were determined from ultracentrifugation of pooled lymph samples.

  19. NMR studies of (U- sup 13 C)cyclosporin A bound to cyclophilin: Bound conformation and protions of cyclosporin involved in binding

    SciTech Connect

    Fesik, S.W.; Gampe, R.T. Jr.; Eaton, H.L.; Gemmecker, G.; Olejniczak, E.T.; Neri, P.; Holzman, T.F.; Egan, D.A.; Edalji, R.; Simmer, R.; Helfrich, R.; Hochlowski, J.; Jackson, M. )

    1991-07-02

    Cyclosporin A (CsA), a potent immunosuppressant, is known to bind with high specificity to cyclophilin (CyP), a 17.7 kDa protein with peptidyl-prolyl isomerase activity. In order to investigate the three-dimensional structure of the CsA/CyP complex, the authors have applied a variety of multidimensional NMR methods in the study of uniformly {sup 13}C-labeled CsA bound to cyclophilin. The {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR signals of cyclosporin A in the bound state have been assigned, and, from a quantitative interpretation of the 3D NOE data, the bound conformation of CsA has been determined. Three-dimensional structures of CsA calculated from the NOE data by using a distance geometry/simulated annealing protocol were found to be very different form previously determined crystalline and solution conformations of uncomplexed CsA. In addition, from CsA/CyP NOEs, the portions of CsA that interact with cyclophilin were identified. For the most part, those CsA residues with NOEs to cyclophilin were the same residues important for cyclophilin binding and immunosuppressive activity as determined from sturcture/activity relationships. The structural information derived in this study together with the known structure/activity relationships for CsA analogues may prove useful in the design of improved immunosuppressants. Moreover, the approach that is described for obtaining the structural information is widely applicable to the study of small molecule/large molecule interactions.

  20. Brugia pahangi in nude mice: protective immunity to infective larvae is Thy 1.2+ cell dependent and cyclosporin A resistant.

    PubMed

    Vickery, A C; Nayar, J K

    1987-03-01

    Mechanisms of protective immunity to larvae of Brugia pahangi were studied in congenitally athymic nude C3H/HeN mice and their syngeneic heterozygous littermates. An average 11% of subcutaneous larval inocula was recovered from control nudes 28 days after inoculation. No worms were recovered from nude recipients of viable splenic Thy 1.2+ T lymphocytes from heterozygotes which had killed a priming dose of B. pahangi larvae. Primed T lymphocytes, depleted of either Lyt 1.1+ or Lyt 2.1+ cells or incubated with anti-Thy 1.2 monoclonal antibody and complement, failed to protect nude mice against a larval challenge. Nor were primed B lymphocytes depleted by Thy 1.2+ T cell contaminants protective. Treatment with cyclosporin A (CsA) did not increase the numbers of worms recovered from heterozygotes nor did CsA treatment of heterozygous cell donors abolish the ability of primed Thy 1.2+ T lymphocytes to transfer protection to nude mice. IgG but not IgM antibody titres to B. pahangi antigens were depressed in all CsA-treated mice. CsA treatment of nude mice had no direct effect upon development of B. pahangi larvae. These results show that protective immunity to larvae of B. pahangi in mice depends upon small numbers of Thy 1.2+ T cells which are CsA-resistant. PMID:3494759

  1. Analysis of cyclosporin A and a set of analogs as inhibitors of a T. cruzi cyclophilin by docking and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Roberto; Iribarne, Federico; Paulino, Margot

    2016-01-01

    Cyclophilins (CyPs) are enzymes involved in protein folding. In Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), the most abundantly expressed CyP is the isoform TcCyP19. It has been shown that TcCyP19 is inhibited by the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A (CsA) and analogs, which also proved to have potent trypanosomicidal activity in vitro. In this work, we continue and expand a previous study on the molecular interactions of CsA, and a set of analogs modeled in complexes with TcCyP19. The modeled complexes were used to evaluate binding free energies by molecular dynamics (MD), applying the Linear Interaction Energy (LIE) method. In addition, putative binding sites were identified by molecular docking. In our analysis, the binding free energy calculations did not correlate with experimental data. The heterogeneity of the non-bonded energies and the variation in the pattern of hydrogen bonds suggest that the systems may not be suitable for the application of the LIE method. Further, the docking calculations identified two other putative binding sites with comparable scoring energies to the active site, a fact that may also explain the lack of correlation found. Kinetic experiments are needed to confirm or reject the multiple binding sites hypothesis. In the meantime, MD simulations at the alternative sites, employing other methods to compute binding free energies, might be successful at finding good correlations with the experimental data. PMID:26046477

  2. Evaluation of the effect of ozonated plant oils on the quality of osseointegration of dental implants under the influence of Cyclosporin A an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    El Hadary, Amany A; Yassin, Hala H; Mekhemer, Sameh T; Holmes, Julian C; Grootveld, Martin

    2011-04-01

    Immunosuppressive agents have been recognized as factors that induce changes and modifications in bone metabolism. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of ozonated plant extracts (herein termed ozonated oil) under the influence of Cyclosporin A (CsA) on osseointegration. A total of 20 dental implants were placed in 20 rabbit tibiae assigned to Group A or B. CsA was injected at an immunosuppressive dose in Groups A and B as a single-dose treatment. At the day of surgery, Group A received a single topical ozonated oil treatment (0.55 mL) around dental implants; Group B, the control group, received no ozonated oil. Animals were sacrificed after 8 weeks. Radiographs were obtained at implant surgery and on the day of sacrifice. Bone quality was compared between the 2 groups. Radiographically, osseointegration was microscopically evaluated using scanning electron and light microscopies. In ozonated Group A specimens, light microscopic examination demonstrated evidence of more organized mature bone compared with Group B. Within the limits of this study, the results suggest that short-term administration of CsA, when administered with topical ozonated oil, may influence bone density and the quality of dental implant osseointegration. Therefore, topically applied ozonated oil may influence bone density and the quality of osseointegration around dental implants. PMID:20545531

  3. A transcriptomics-based hepatotoxicity comparison between the zebrafish embryo and established human and rodent in vitro and in vivo models using cyclosporine A, amiodarone and acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Driessen, Marja; Vitins, Alexa P; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Kienhuis, Anne S; Water, Bob van de; van der Ven, Leo T M

    2015-01-22

    The zebrafish embryo (ZFE) is a promising alternative, non-rodent model in toxicology, which has an advantage over the traditionally used models as it contains complete biological complexity and provides a medium to high-throughput setting. Here, we assess how the ZFE compares to the traditionally used models for liver toxicity testing, i.e., in vivo mouse and rat liver, in vitro mouse and rat hepatocytes, and primary human hepatocytes. For this comparison, we analyzed gene expression changes induced by three model compounds for cholestasis, steatosis, and necrosis. The three compounds, cyclosporine A, amiodarone, and acetaminophen, were chosen because of their relevance to human toxicity and these compounds displayed hepatotoxic-specific changes in the mouse in vivo data. Compound induced expression changes in the ZFE model shared similarity with both in vivo and in vitro. Comparison on single gene level revealed the presence of model specific changes and no clear concordance across models. However, concordance was identified on the pathway level. Specifically, the pathway "regulation of metabolism - bile acids regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism via FXR" was affected across all models and compounds. In conclusion, our study with three hepatotoxic model compounds shows that the ZFE model is at least as comparable to traditional models in identifying hepatotoxic activity and has the potential for use as a pre-screen to determine the hepatotoxic potential of compounds. PMID:25448281

  4. Investigation into the cardiotoxic effects of doxorubicin on contractile function and the protection afforded by cyclosporin A using the work-loop assay.

    PubMed

    Gharanei, Mayel; Hussain, Afthab; James, Rob S; Janneh, Omar; Maddock, Helen

    2014-08-01

    Doxorubicin is known to cause cardiotoxicity through multiple routes including the build-up of reactive oxygen species and disruption of the calcium homeostasis in cardiac myocytes, but the effect of drug treatment on the associated biomechanics of cardiac injury remains unclear. Detecting and understanding the adverse effects of drugs on cardiac contractility is becoming a priority in non-clinical safety pharmacology assessment. The work-loop technique enables the assessment of force-length work-loop contractions, which mimic those of the pressure-volume work-loops experienced by the heart in vivo. During this study we evaluated whether the work-loop technique could potentially provide improved insight into the biomechanics associated with drug-induced cardiac dysfunction. In order to do this we investigated the cardiotoxic effects of doxorubicin and characterised the protection afforded by the co-administration of cyclosporin A (CsA). This study provides detailed biomechanical in vitro insight into the cardiac dysfunction associated with Doxorubicin treatment, including reduction in peak force, force during shortening and power output. These effects were significantly abrogated in doxorubicin-CsA co-treatment studies. Closely mimicking the in vivo pressure-volume muscle mechanics, this assay provides a quick and easy technique to gain a better understanding of the detailed biomechanics of drug-induced cardiac dysfunction. PMID:24509045

  5. Nanoparticle-Mediated Targeting of Cyclosporine A Enhances Cardioprotection Against Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury Through Inhibition of Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore Opening

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Gentaro; Matoba, Tetsuya; Nakano, Yasuhiro; Nagaoka, Kazuhiro; Ishikita, Ayako; Nakano, Kaku; Funamoto, Daiki; Sunagawa, Kenji; Egashira, Kensuke

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury limits the therapeutic effects of early reperfusion therapy for acute myocardial infarction (MI), in which mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening plays a critical role. Our aim was to determine whether poly-lactic/glycolic acid (PLGA) nanoparticle-mediated mitochondrial targeting of a molecule that inhibits mPTP opening, cyclosporine A (CsA), enhances CsA-induced cardioprotection. In an in vivo murine IR model, intravenously injected PLGA nanoparticles were located at the IR myocardium mitochondria. Treatment with nanoparticles incorporated with CsA (CsA-NP) at the onset of reperfusion enhanced cardioprotection against IR injury by CsA alone (as indicated by the reduced MI size at a lower CsA concentration) through the inhibition of mPTP opening. Left ventricular remodeling was ameliorated 28 days after IR, but the treatment did not affect inflammatory monocyte recruitment to the IR heart. In cultured rat cardiomyocytes in vitro, mitochondrial PLGA nanoparticle-targeting was observed after the addition of hydrogen peroxide, which represents oxidative stress during IR, and was prevented by CsA. CsA-NP can be developed as an effective mPTP opening inhibitor and may protect organs from IR injury. PMID:26861678

  6. Reversion of resistance to immunosuppressive agents in three patients with psoriatic arthritis by cyclosporine A: modulation of P-glycoprotein function.

    PubMed

    Diamanti, Andrea Picchianti; Rosado, Manuela; Germano, Valentina; Scarsella, Marco; Giorda, Ezio; Podestà, Edoardo; D'Amelio, Raffaele; Carsetti, Rita; Laganà, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Secondary resistance may be a major problem in the management of autoimmune diseases. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) over-function has been described as a mechanism of drug resistance in autoimmune patients. P-gp function can in vitro be inhibited by cyclosporine A (CSA) and verapamil; moreover, P-gp reduction by CSA in systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis has been demonstrated. Here, P-gp function before and after CSA administration in three psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients, who developed a resistance to MTX/SSA, has been evaluated. P-gp function on patient cells was analyzed by measuring the changes in rhodamine-123 (Rh-123) fluorescence after verapamil incubation. CSA treatment resulted in good clinical outcome that was related with a significant P-gp function reduction at CD3+ and CD8+ levels. In addition to its immunosuppressive activity, CSA results may also be related to MTX/SSA effect restoration through P-gp inhibition. This is the first time that CSA has been demonstrated as being able to revert MTX/SSA resistance in PsA. PMID:21062675

  7. TMBIM6 (transmembrane BAX inhibitor motif containing 6) enhances autophagy and reduces renal dysfunction in a cyclosporine A-induced nephrotoxicity model.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Raj Kumar; Lee, Geum-Hwa; Lee, Hwa-Young; Li, Bo; Jung, Han-Eul; Rashid, Harun-Or; Choi, Min Kyung; Yadav, Binod Kumar; Kim, Woo-Ho; Kim, Kyung-Woon; Park, Byung-Hyun; Kim, Won; Lee, Yong-Chul; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Han-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is widely used as an immunosuppressor in transplantation. Previous studies reported that CsA induces autophagy and that chronic treatment with CsA results in accumulation of autophagosomes and reduced autophagic clearance. Autophagy is a prosurvival process that promotes recovery from acute kidney injury by degrading misfolded proteins produced in the kidney. In the present study, we used TMBIM6-expressing HK-2, human kidney tubular cells (TMBIM6 cells) and Tmbim6 knockout (tmbim6(-/-)) mice. When exposed to CsA, the TMBIM6 cells maintained autophagy activity by preventing autophagosome accumulation. With regard to signaling, PRKKA/AMPK phosphorylation and mechanistic target of rapamycin (serine/threonine kinase) complex 1 (MTORC1) expression and its downstream target TFEB (transcription factor EB), a lysosome biogenesis factor, were regulated in the TMBIM6 cells. Lysosomal activity was highly increased or stably maintained in the presence of TMBIM6. In addition, treatment of tmbim6(-/-) mice with CsA resulted in increased autophagosome formation and decreased lysosome formation and activity. We also found that tmbim6(-/-) mice were susceptible to CsA-induced kidney injury. Taken together, these results indicate that TMBIM6 protects against CsA-induced nephrotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo by inducing autophagy and activating lysosomes. PMID:26305401

  8. Transfer of mesenchymal stem cells and cyclosporine A on alkali-injured rabbit cornea using nanofiber scaffolds strongly reduces corneal neovascularization and scar formation.

    PubMed

    Cejka, Cestmir; Cejkova, Jitka; Trosan, Peter; Zajicova, Alena; Sykova, Eva; Holan, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether nanofiber scaffolds seeded with rabbit bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs nanofibers) transferred onto the damaged corneal surface and covered with cyclosporine A (CsA)-loaded nanofiber scaffolds (CsA nanofibers) enable healing of the rabbit cornea injured with 1N NaOH. The healing of damaged corneas was examined morphologically, immunohistochemically and biochemically on day 24 after the injury. Compared to untreated injured corneas, where corneal ulceration or large corneal thinning or even perforation were developed, injured corneas treated with drug free nanofibers healed without profound disturbances in a majority of cases, although with fibrosis and scar formation. In injured corneas treated with CsA nanofibers or MSCs nanofibers, the development of scar formation was reduced. Best healing results were obtained with a combination of MSCs and CsA nanofibers (MSCs-CsA nanofibers). Corneas healed with highly restored transparency. Neovascularization highly expressed in untreated injured corneas and reduced in corneas treated with CsA nanofibers or MSCs nanofibers, was suppressed in corneas treated with MSCs-CsA nanofibers. The levels of matrix metalloproteinase 9, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin 6, α-smooth muscle actin, tumor growth factor β and vascular endothelial growth factor were significantly decreased in these corneas as compared to untreated corneas, where the levels of the above mentioned markers were high. In conclusion, MSCs-CsA nanofibers were effective in the treatment of severe alkali-induced corneal injury. PMID:26797822

  9. Comparative permeability and diffusion kinetics of cyclosporine A liposomes and propylene glycol solution from human lung tissue into human blood ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Trammer, Beatrice; Amann, Annette; Haltner-Ukomadu, Eleonore; Tillmanns, Sascha; Keller, Manfred; Högger, Petra

    2008-11-01

    Aerolized cyclosporine A (CsA) has been successfully used for prevention of organ rejection in lung transplant recipients. Various formulations of CsA are available and so far no direct comparison of their pharmacokinetics has been performed. Since clinical studies are elaborate, we sought a way to predict the kinetic behaviour of a propylene glycol solution of CsA (CsA-PG) and a liposomal formulation (L-CsA). The permeability across the human bronchial cell line Calu-3 revealed low permeability for CsA with the apparent permeability for CsA-PG being twice as high as for L-CsA. Employing a previously described dialysis model, the diffusion of CsA from human lung tissue into human blood was determined ex vivo. Consistent with the cell culture model results, we observed that the degree and rate of drug transfer into human blood was more pronounced for CsA-PG than for L-CsA with the area under the curve (AUC) of CsA-PG being about 1.6 times higher than for the L-CsA formulation. The diffusion rate was more than 50% higher from CsA-PG than from the liposomes. To conclude, both model systems consistently revealed that L-CsA displayed clearly a prolonged release effect and favourable longer tissue retention than CsA-PG. PMID:18656538

  10. Characterization of Long-Lasting Oatp Inhibition by Typical Inhibitor Cyclosporine A and In Vitro-In Vivo Discrepancy in Its Drug Interaction Potential in Rats.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Takayuki; Masuo, Yusuke; Kogi, Tatsuya; Nakamichi, Noritaka; Kato, Yukio

    2016-07-01

    Quantitative assessment of potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) is one of the major focuses in drug development. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively evaluate in vitro-in vivo discrepancy of DDI potential for prototypical organic anion transporting polypeptide (Oatp) inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) using rats. Plasma concentration of pravastatin, prototypical Oatp substrate, after oral administration was increased by CsA intravenously administered at 1 d before the pravastatin administration. The ratio of the area under the curve of pravastatin to the control was much higher than the R-values calculated using the plasma unbound concentrations of CsA and the inhibition constant (Ki) assessed in isolated hepatocytes, indicating in vitro-in vivo discrepancy. This interaction with pravastatin persisted for 3 d after CsA administration, demonstrating long-lasting inhibition in vivo. The Ki value for unbound CsA in the presence of serum was comparable with that in its absence. M1, the major metabolite of CsA inhibited pravastatin uptake at much higher concentration compared with its plasma unbound concentration. Thus, the DDI potential of CsA-mediated hepatic Oatp inhibition cannot be extrapolated from in vitro data, and this could be due to the long-lasting Oatp inhibition by CsA, but not the effect of plasma protein or metabolites. PMID:27290622

  11. An N-(alkylcarbonyl)anthranilic acid derivative prolongs cardiac allograft survival synergistically with cyclosporine A in a high-responder rat model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jibing; Xia, Junjie; Axelsson, Bengt; Fritzson, Ingela; Ekberg, Henrik; Törngren, Marie; Qi, Zhongquan

    2010-08-01

    We investigated the immunosuppressive effects of the dihydroortate dehydrogenase (DHODH) inhibitor compounds ABR-222417 and ABR-224050 from Active Biotech (Sweden). We verified the inhibitory effects of these compounds on the proliferation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells in vivo by using superantigen staphylococcus enterotoxin A (SEA)-mediated proliferation test. To evaluate their efficacy, the compounds were screened in a low-responder heart allograft transplantation model in rats [heart from Piebald Virol Glaxo (PVG) transplanted to Dark Agouti (DA)]. The immunosuppressive effects of the compounds were then investigated in a high-responder model (DA to PVG). Treatment with ABR-222417 (30 mg/kg) was more efficient than that with ABR-224050 (10 mg/kg), and the former provided a longer graft median survival time (MST, 29.5 days) than the latter (MST, 18.5 days). Furthermore, there was a marked increase in graft survival time (53 days) when low doses of ABR-222417 and cyclosporine A (CsA) were used in combination. No sign of tolerability problems was detected using this combination or when ABR-222417 was used singly at a higher dose. Furthermore, T-cell proliferation studies in vitro support that the anti proliferative effect of ABR-222417 is caused by inhibition of de novo pyrimidine synthesis, which is the consequence of DHODH inhibition. These results show that ABR-222417 had marked immunosuppressive effects on the heart allograft transplantation and that it exerts an even more powerful inhibitory effect on graft rejection when used in combination with CsA, with good tolerability. PMID:20553870

  12. Do Cyclosporine A, an IL-1 Receptor Antagonist, Uridine Triphosphate, Rebamipide, and/or Bimatoprost Regulate Human Meibomian Gland Epithelial Cells?

    PubMed Central

    Kam, Wendy R.; Liu, Yang; Ding, Juan; Sullivan, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Researchers have hypothesized that treatment with cyclosporine A (CyA), interleukin-1 receptor antagonists (IL-1RA; e.g., anakinra), P2Y2 receptor agonists (e.g., uridine triphosphate; UTP), and rebamipide may alleviate human meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) and/or dry eye disease. Investigators have also proposed that prostaglandin analogues (e.g., bimatoprost) may induce MGD. Our goal was to determine whether these compounds directly influence human meibomian gland epithelial cell (HMGEC) function. Methods Multiple concentrations of each compound were tested for effects on immortalized (I) HMGEC morphology and survival. Nontoxic dosages were used for our studies. Immortalized HMGEC were cultured in the presence of vehicle, CyA, IL-1RA, UTP, rebamipide, or bimatoprost for up to 6 days in various media. Experiments included positive controls for proliferation (epidermal growth factor and bovine pituitary extract), differentiation (azithromycin), and signaling pathway activation (insulin-like growth factor 1). Cells were analyzed for neutral lipid staining, lysosome accumulation, lipid composition, and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase/Akt (AKT), phosphorylation. Results Our findings demonstrate that CyA, IL-1RA, UTP, rebamipide, and bimatoprost had no effect on the proliferation; neutral lipid content; lysosome number; or levels of free cholesterol, triglycerides, or phospholipids in IHMGECs. Cylosporine A, IL-1RA, rebamipide, and bimatoprost significantly reduced the phosphorylation of AKT, as compared to control. Of interest, tested doses of CyA above 8 nM killed the IHMGECs. Conclusions Our results show that CyA, IL-1RA, UTP, rebamipide, and bimatoprost do not influence the proliferation or differentiation of IHMGEC. However, with the exception of UTP, these compounds do decrease the activity of the AKT signaling pathway, which is known to promote cell survival. PMID:27552406

  13. In vivo microdialysis with LC-MS for analysis of spinosin and its interaction with cyclosporin A in rat brain, blood and bile.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rong-Hua; Yang, Jie; Qi, Lian-Wen; Xin, Gui-Zhong; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Yuan, Chun-Su; Wen, Xiao-Dong; Li, Ping

    2012-03-01

    Spinosin, a major bioactive herbal ingredient isolated from Semen Ziziphi Spinosae, plays an important role in sedation and hypnosis. However, the pharmacokinetic behavior of spinosin in special sites has not been reported. Microdialysis (MD) technique, as a continuous, realtime monitoring sampling technique, is very suitable for the evaluation of the disposition of diverse drugs. To obtain more useful information on spinosin, an in vivo microdialysis sampling technique with High Performance Liquid Chromatography-mass spectrograph (HPLC-MS) method was developed to investigate the pharmacokinetics of spinosin and its interaction with cyclosporin A (CsA) in the brain, blood and bile of rats. The method was validated in terms of selectivity, linearity and sensitivity, and showed advantages in monitoring the pharmacokinetic behavior of drugs. The results revealed that CsA has obvious effects on the pharmacokinetic process of spinosin. When co-administered, the area under the curve (AUC) of spinosin in blood, bile and brain increased from 205.70 to 673.51 mg min/L, 7.77 × 10(4) to 1.25 × 10(5) mg min/L, and 2.09 to 5.58 mg min/L, respectively. The t(1/2) values of spinosin in blood, bile and brain also changed from 48.07 to 95.04 min, from 97.20 to 152.21 and from 42.18 to 73.83 min, respectively. These results demonstrated that the CsA decreased the efflux of spinosin through the inhibition of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) efflux transporter and it might be used as a group of P-gp substrate. Other transporters or pathways may also be involved in the metabolism of spinosin. PMID:22169469

  14. Phosphate is not an absolute requirement for the inhibitory effects of cyclosporin A or cyclophilin D deletion on mitochondrial permeability transition.

    PubMed

    McGee, Allison M; Baines, Christopher P

    2012-04-01

    CypD (cyclophilin D) has been established as a critical regulator of the MPT (mitochondrial permeability transition) pore, and pharmacological or genetic inhibition of CypD attenuates MPT in numerous systems. However, it has recently been suggested that the inhibitory effects of CypD inhibition only manifest when P(i) (inorganic phosphate) is present, and that inhibition is lost when P(i) is replaced by As(i) (inorganic arsenate) or V(i) (inorganic vanadate). To test this, liver mitochondria were isolated from wild-type and CypD-deficient (Ppif-/-) mice and then incubated in buffer containing P(i), As(i) or V(i). MPT was induced under both energized and de-energized conditions by the addition of Ca2+, and the resultant mitochondrial swelling was measured spectrophotometrically. For pharmacological inhibition of CypD, wild-type mitochondria were pre-incubated with CsA (cyclosporin A) before the addition of Ca2+. In energized and de-energized mitochondria, Ca2+ induced MPT regardless of the anion present, although the magnitude differed between P(i), As(i) and V(i). However, in all cases, pre-treatment with CsA significantly inhibited MPT. Moreover, these effects were independent of mouse strain, organ type and rodent species. Similarly, attenuation of Ca2+-induced MPT in the Ppif-/- mitochondria was still observed irrespective of whether P(i), As(i) or V(i) was present. We conclude that the pharmacological and genetic inhibition of CypD is still able to attenuate MPT even in the absence of P(i). PMID:22236255

  15. KAP Degradation by Calpain Is Associated with CK2 Phosphorylation and Provides a Novel Mechanism for Cyclosporine A-Induced Proximal Tubule Injury

    PubMed Central

    Pascual, Gloria; Bardaji, Beatriz; Montero, M. Angeles; Salcedo, M. Teresa; Plana, Maria; López-Hellin, Joan; Itarte, Emilio; Meseguer, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The use of cyclosporine A (CsA) is limited by its severe nephrotoxicity that includes reversible vasoconstrictor effects and proximal tubule cell injury, the latter associated whith chronic kidney disease progression. The mechanisms of CsA-induced tubular injury, mainly on the S3 segment, have not been completely elucidated. Kidney androgen-regulated protein (KAP) is exclusively expressed in kidney proximal tubule cells, interacts with the CsA-binding protein cyclophilin B and its expression diminishes in kidneys of CsA-treated mice. Since we reported that KAP protects against CsA toxicity in cultured proximal tubule cells, we hypothesized that low KAP levels found in kidneys of CsA-treated mice might correlate with proximal tubule cell injury. To test this hypothesis, we used KAP Tg mice developed in our laboratory and showed that these mice are more resistant to CsA-induced tubular injury than control littermates. Furthermore, we found that calpain, which was activated by CsA in cell cultures and kidney, is involved in KAP degradation and observed that phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues found in KAP PEST sequences by protein kinase CK2 enhances KAP degradation by calpain. Moreover, we also observed that CK2 inhibition protected against CsA-induced cytotoxicity. These findings point to a novel mechanism for CsA-induced kidney toxicity that might be useful in developing therapeutic strategies aimed at preventing tubular cell damage while maintaining the immunosuppressive effects of CsA. PMID:21980535

  16. The Crystal Structure of PPIL1 Bound to Cyclosporine A Suggests a Binding Mode for a Linear Epitope of the SKIP Protein

    PubMed Central

    Stegmann, Christian M.; Lührmann, Reinhard; Wahl, Markus C.

    2010-01-01

    Background The removal of introns from pre-mRNA is carried out by a large macromolecular machine called the spliceosome. The peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase PPIL1 is a component of the human spliceosome and binds to the spliceosomal SKIP protein via a binding site distinct from its active site. Principal Findings Here, we have studied the PPIL1 protein and its interaction with SKIP biochemically and by X-ray crystallography. A minimal linear binding epitope derived from the SKIP protein could be determined using a peptide array. A 36-residue region of SKIP centred on an eight-residue epitope suffices to bind PPIL1 in pull-down experiments. The crystal structure of PPIL1 in complex with the inhibitor cyclosporine A (CsA) was obtained at a resolution of 1.15 Å and exhibited two bound Cd2+ ions that enabled SAD phasing. PPIL1 residues that have previously been implicated in binding of SKIP are involved in the coordination of Cd2+ ions in the present crystal structure. Employing the present crystal structure, the determined minimal binding epitope and previously published NMR data [1], a molecular docking study was performed. In the docked model of the PPIL1·SKIP interaction, a proline residue of SKIP is buried in a hydrophobic pocket of PPIL1. This hydrophobic contact is encircled by several hydrogen bonds between the SKIP peptide and PPIL1. Conclusion We characterized a short, linear epitope of SKIP that is sufficient to bind the PPIL1 protein. Our data indicate that this SKIP peptide could function in recruiting PPIL1 into the core of the spliceosome. We present a molecular model for the binding mode of SKIP to PPIL1 which emphasizes the versatility of cyclophilin-type PPIases to engage in additional interactions with other proteins apart from active site contacts despite their limited surface area. PMID:20368803

  17. Characterization and stability studies of a novel liposomal cyclosporin A prepared using the supercritical fluid method: comparison with the modified conventional Bangham method

    PubMed Central

    Karn, Pankaj Ranjan; Cho, Wonkyung; Park, Hee-Jun; Park, Jeong-Sook; Hwang, Sung-Joo

    2013-01-01

    A novel method to prepare cyclosporin A encapsulated liposomes was introduced using supercritical fluid of carbon dioxide (SCF-CO2) as an antisolvent. To investigate the strength of the newly developed SCF-CO2 method compared with the modified conventional Bangham method, particle size, zeta potential, and polydispersity index (PDI) of both liposomal formulations were characterized and compared. In addition, entrapment efficiency (EE) and drug loading (DL) characteristics were analyzed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Significantly larger particle size and PDI were revealed from the conventional method, while EE (%) and DL (%) did not exhibit any significant differences. The SCF-CO2 liposomes were found to be relatively smaller, multilamellar, and spherical with a smoother surface as determined by transmission electron microscopy. SCF-CO2 liposomes showed no significant differences in their particle size and PDI after more than 3 months, whereas conventional liposomes exhibited significant changes in their particle size. The initial yield (%), EE (%), and DL (%) of SCF-CO2 liposomes and conventional liposomes were 90.98 ± 2.94, 92.20 ± 1.36, 20.99 ± 0.84 and 90.72 ± 2.83, 90.24 ± 1.37, 20.47 ± 0.94, respectively, which changed after 14 weeks to 86.65 ± 0.30, 87.63 ± 0.72, 18.98 ± 0.22 and 75.04 ± 8.80, 84.59 ± 5.13, 15.94 ± 2.80, respectively. Therefore, the newly developed SCF-CO2 method could be a better alternative compared with the conventional method and may provide a promising approach for large-scale production of liposomes. PMID:23378759

  18. PEG-PE-based micelles co-loaded with paclitaxel and cyclosporine A or loaded with paclitaxel and targeted by anticancer antibody overcome drug resistance in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sarisozen, Can; Vural, Imran; Levchenko, Tatyana; Hincal, A Atilla; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2012-05-01

    The over-expression of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in cancer cells is one of the main reasons of the acquired Multidrug Resistance (MDR). Combined treatment of MDR cancer cells with P-gp inhibitors and chemotherapeutic agents could result in reversal of resistance in P-gp-expressing cells. In this study, paclitaxel (PTX) was co-encapsulated in actively targeted (anticancer mAb 2C5-modified) polymeric lipid-core PEG-PE-based micelles with Cyclosporine A (CycA), which is one of the most effective first generation P-gp inhibitors. Cell culture studies performed using MDCKII (parental and MDR1) cell lines to investigate the potential MDR reversal effect of the formulations. The average size of both empty and loaded PEG₂₀₀₀-PE/Vitamin E mixed micelles was found between 10 and 25 nm. Zeta potentials of the formulations were found between -7 and -35 mV. The percentage of PTX in the micelles was found higher than 3% for both formulations and cumulative PTX release of about 70% was demonstrated. P-gp inhibition with CycA caused an increase in the cytotoxicity of PTX. Dual-loaded micelles demonstrated significantly higher cytotoxicity in the resistant MDCKII-MDR1 cells than micelles loaded with PTX alone. Micelle modification with mAb 2C5 results in the highest cytotoxicity against resistant cells, with or without P-gp modulator, probably because of better internalization bypassing the P-gp mechanism. Our results suggest that micelles delivering a combination of P-gp modulator and anticancer drug or micelles loaded with only PTX, but targeted with mAb 2C5 represent a promising approach to overcome drug resistance in cancer cells. PMID:22506922

  19. Sirolimus and cyclosporine A alter barrier function in renal proximal tubular cells through stimulation of ERK1/2 signaling and claudin-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Martin-Martin, Natalia; Ryan, Gavin; McMorrow, Tara; Ryan, Michael P

    2010-03-01

    Alteration of the tight junction complex in renal epithelial cells can affect renal barrier function and perturb normal kidney homeostasis. The immunosuppressant drugs cyclosporine A (CsA) and sirolimus (SRL) used in combination demonstrated beneficial effects in organ transplantation but this combination can also result in increased adverse effects. We previously showed that CsA treatment alone caused an alteration of the tight junction complex, resulting in changes in transepithelial permeability in Madin-Darby canine kidney distal tubular/collecting duct cells. The potential effect of SRL on transepithelial permeability in kidney cells is unknown. In this study, subcytotoxic doses of SRL or CsA were found to decrease the paracellular permeability of the porcine proximal tubular epithelial cells, LLC-PK1 cell monolayers, which was detected as an increase in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). The cotreatment with SRL and CsA was found to increase TER in a synergistic manner. CsA treatment increased total cellular expression and membrane localization of the tight junction protein claudin-1 and this further increased with the combination of SRL/CsA. SRL and CsA treatment alone or in combination stimulated the phosphorylation of ERK1/2. The MEK-ERK1/2 pathway inhibitor, U0126, reduced the SRL, CsA, and CsA/SRL-induced increase in TER. U0126 also reduced the CsA and CsA/SRL-induced increase in the membrane localization of claudin-1. Alterations in claudin-2 and claudin-4 were also detected. However, the results suggest that the modulation in expression and localization of claudin-1 appears to be pivotal in the SRL- and CsA-induced modulation of the epithelial barrier function and that modulation is regulated by ERK1/2 signaling pathway. PMID:19955189

  20. Interleukin-1beta partially alleviates cyclosporin A-induced suppression of IgG1 isotype response to thyroglobulin in BALB/c mice in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Dalai, S K; Miriyala, B; Kar, S K

    1998-01-01

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) at 120 mg/kg body weight when injected subcutaneously into BALB/c mice along with thyroglobulin emulsified in incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA) was found to suppress antigen-specific IgG titre by 86%. Isotyping revealed that both IgG1 and IgG2a titres were suppressed by 87% and 57%, respectively. But under identical conditions when complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) was used, the suppression of antigen-specific IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a titres was 50%, 51% and 55%, respectively. Injection of anti-IL-1beta-neutralizing hamster monoclonal antibodies along with thyroglobulin and CsA emulsified in CFA increased the suppression of antigen-specific IgG titre. Under such conditions the IgG1 titre was suppressed more than the IgG2a titre. Recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (rhuIL-1ra) also enhanced the suppression caused by CsA in the presence of CFA but control hamster immunoglobulin had no such effect. Recombinant human IL-1beta, when administered along with thyroglobulin and CsA emulsified in IFA, alleviated the suppression of antigen-specific IgG titre and the IgG1 titre was alleviated more than the IgG2a titre. Under identical conditions, rhuIL-1ra did not alleviate CsA-induced suppression. Lymphocytes from the lymph nodes of thyroglobulin-sensitized BALB/c mice when stimulated in vitro by thyroglobulin in the presence of CsA, secreted very little interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and IL-4, but on addition of an optimal dose of rhuIL-1beta, IFN-gamma and IL-4 secretion was partially restored. PMID:9767461

  1. Comparative Biodistribution and Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Cyclosporine-A in the Brain upon Intranasal or Intravenous Administration in an Oil-in-Water Nanoemulsion Formulation.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Sunita; Gattacceca, Florence; Panicucci, Riccardo; Amiji, Mansoor M

    2015-05-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate comparative biodistribution and pharmacokinetics of cyclosporine-A (CsA) following intranasal (IN) administration versus intravenous (IV) administration in Sprague-Dawley rats using an oil-in-water nanoemulsion delivery system. CsA, a hydrophobic peptide that is also a substrate for P-glycoprotein, is a well-known immunosuppressive agent. In the brain, CsA has been shown to be a potent anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective agent. CsA nanoemulsions (CsA-NE) and solution formulations (CsA-S) were prepared using an ultrasonication method and were characterized for drug content, encapsulation efficiency, globule size, and zeta potential. We compared the uptake of CsA-NE and CsA-S in brain regions and peripheral organs following IN and IV administration using LC-MS/MS based bioanalytical method. CsA-NE IN resulted in the highest accumulation compared to that with any other treatment and route of administration; this was consistent for all three regions of brain that were evaluated (olfactory bulbs, mid brain, and hind brain). The brain/blood exposure ratios of 4.49, 0.01, 0.33, and 0.03 for CsA-NE (IN), CsA-NE (IV), CsA-S (IN), and CsA-S (IV), respectively, indicated that CsA-NE is capable of direct nose-to-brain transport, bypassing the blood-brain barrier. Furthermore, CsA-NE administration reduces nontarget organ exposure. These studies show that IN delivery of CsA-NE is an effective way of brain targeting compared to that of other treatment strategies. This approach not only enhances the brain concentration of the peptide but also significantly limits peripheral exposure and the potential for off-target toxicity. PMID:25785492

  2. Comparison of enalapril and valsartan in cyclosporine A-induced hypertension and nephrotoxicity in spontaneously hypertensive rats on high-sodium diet

    PubMed Central

    Lassila, Markus; Finckenberg, Piet; Pere, Anna-Kaisa; Krogerus, Leena; Ahonen, Juhani; Vapaatalo, Heikki; Nurminen, Marja-Leena

    2000-01-01

    We compared the effects of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor enalapril and the angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonist valsartan in cyclosporine A (CsA)-induced hypertension and nephrotoxicity in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR).SHR (8–9 weeks old) on high-sodium diet were given CsA (5 mg kg−1d −1 s.c.) for 6 weeks. The rats were treated concomitantly either with enalapril (30 mg kg−1d −1 p.o.) or valsartan (3 or 30 mg kg−1 d −1 p.o.). To evaluate the role of bradykinin in the action of enalapril, some rats received a bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist icatibant (HOE 140, 500 μg kg−1 d −1 s.c.) during the last 2 weeks of enalapril treatment.Blood pressure was recorded every second week by tail cuff method. Renal function was measured by serum creatinine, creatinine clearance and urinary excretion of proteins at the end of the experiment. The activity of the renal kallikrein-kinin system was estimated by urinary kallikrein excretion.CsA caused hypertension, impaired renal function and induced morphological nephrotoxicity with glomerular damage and interstitial fibrosis.Enalapril and the lower dose of valsartan attenuated the CsA-induced hypertension to the same extent, while the higher dose of valsartan totally abolished it. Icatibant did not reduce the antihypertensive effect of enalapril. Urinary kallikrein excretion was similar in all groups. Enalapril and valsartan equally prevented the CsA-induced deterioration of kidney function and morphology.The renin-angiotensin but not the kallikrein-kinin system plays a crucial role in CsA-toxicity during high intake of sodium in SHR. PMID:10903974

  3. cps1+, a Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae FKS genes whose mutation confers hypersensitivity to cyclosporin A and papulacandin B.

    PubMed Central

    Ishiguro, J; Saitou, A; Durán, A; Ribas, J C

    1997-01-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe cps1-12 (for chlorpropham supersensitive) mutant strain was originally isolated as hypersensitive to the spindle poison isopropyl N-3-chlorophenyl carbamate (chlorpropham) (J. Ishiguro and Y. Uhara, Jpn. J. Genet. 67:97-109, 1992). We have found that the cps1-12 mutation also confers (i) hypersensitivity to the immunosuppressant cyclosporin A (CsA), (ii) hypersensitivity to the drug papulacandin B, which specifically inhibits 1,3-beta-D-glucan synthesis both in vivo and in vitro, and (iii) thermosensitive growth at 37 degrees C. Under any of these restrictive treatments, cells swell up and finally lyse. With an osmotic stabilizer, cells do not lyse, but at 37 degrees C they become multiseptated and multibranched. The cps1-12 mutant, grown at a restrictive temperature, showed an increase in sensitivity to lysis by enzymatic cell wall degradation, in in vitro 1,3-beta-D-glucan synthase activity (173% in the absence of GTP in the reaction), and in cell wall biosynthesis (130% of the wild-type amount). Addition of Ca2+ suppresses hypersensitivity to papulacandin B and septation and branching phenotypes. All of these data suggest a relationship between the cps1+ gene and cell wall synthesis. A DNA fragment containing the cps1+ gene was cloned, and sequence analysis indicated that it encodes a predicted membrane protein of 1,729 amino acids with 15 to 16 transmembrane domains. S. pombe cps1p has overall 55% sequence identity with Fks1p or Fks2p, proposed to be catalytic or associated subunits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 1,3-beta-D-glucan synthase. Thus, the cps1+ product might be a catalytic or an associated copurifying subunit of the fission yeast 1,3-beta-D-glucan synthase that plays an essential role in cell wall synthesis. PMID:9401022

  4. Tumour necrosis factor-α expression and cell recruitment in Sephadex particle-induced lung inflammation: effects of dexamethasone and cyclosporin A

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Cara M M; Smith, Lance; Flanagan, Brian F; Steve Clegg, L; Coleman, John W

    1997-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) is a cytokine with diverse properties consistent with a possible role in inflammatory disease. We investigated whether TNF-α is induced during the progression of lung inflammation elicited by a particulate non-antigenic stimulus, and whether pharmacological control of TNF-α expression influences recruitment of specific inflammatory cell types. A single intravenous injection of Sephadex particles into rats led to extensive granulomatous inflammation in lung alveolar and bronchial tissue that peaked in intensity after 24–72 h. Mononuclear cells were the principal component of granulomas, but neutrophils and eosinophils were also abundant. Numbers of mononuclear cells, neutrophils and eosinophils recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) peaked at 72 h, 48 h and 72 h, respectively. Messenger RNA encoding TNF-α was induced in lung epithelial cells, lung granulomas and BAL cells 6 h after Sephadex administration and remained elevated for 72 h before declining to baseline by 7 days. In BAL cell populations TNF-α protein was localized to mononuclear cells at all times points pre- and post-Sephadex administration. Treatment of rats with dexamethasone significantly reduced the Sephadex-induced recruitment of mononuclear cells, neutrophils and eosinophils into the bronchoalveolar cavity, and significantly reduced TNF-α mRNA expression by BAL cells. Treatment of rats with cyclosporin A was without effect on Sephadex-induced elevations of mononuclear cell numbers and expression of TNF-α, but did reduce significantly recruitment of neutrophils and eosinophils to BAL cell populations. These results show that a sequential asthma-like recruitment of neutrophils, eosinophils and mononuclear cells into lung tissue can be induced by single exposure to a non-antigenic stimulus. Pharmacological and histological studies reveal that mononuclear cell mobilization relates closely to induced TNF-α expression, whereas mobilization of

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum vacuolation and unfolded protein response leading to paraptosis like cell death in cyclosporine A treated cancer cervix cells is mediated by cyclophilin B inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ram, Babul Moni; Ramakrishna, Gayatri

    2014-11-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA), a widely used immunosuppressant shows cytotoxic effects by either inducing apoptosis or redirecting the cell towards non-apoptotic cell death. However, there still remains a lacuna in understanding the mechanism of CsA induced non-apoptotic cell death. In the present study we investigated calcineurin dependent or independent cytotoxic effects of CsA, a calcineurin inhibitor, in cervical cancerous SiHa cells. Decreased cell viability and massive cytoplasmic vacuolations were observed in CsA treated SiHa cells, having increased calcineurin activity. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and unfolded protein response (UPR), accompanied by a decrease in cyclophilin B (ER resident PPIase), preceded the formation of the vacuoles. These vacuoles stained positive for many ER resident markers confirming their ER origin; but the absence of autophagosomal marker, LC3II, ruled out autophagy. Extensively vacuolated cells eventually undergo cell death which lacked the typical apoptotic features, but showed significant decrease in AIP (ALG2 interacting protein) as seen in paraptosis. ER-vacuolation was prevented by cycloheximide and salubrinal thereby indicating requirement of active protein synthesis. Inhibiting calcineurin activity by either Tacrolimus (FK506) or by knockdown of calcineurin B subunit did not result in either ER-stress or cellular vacuolation. However, knockdown of cyclophilin B by siRNA resulted in increased expression of Bip and IRE1α, together with cytoplasmic vacuolation. In conclusion, we report that persistent ER stress due to cyclophilin B inhibition in CsA treated cervical cancer cells caused cellular vacuolation which culminated in a non-apoptotic cell death response similar to paraptosis. Additionally, the paraptotic effects of CsA are independent of calcineurin inhibition. PMID:25003316

  6. Sustained-release of Cyclosporin A pellets: preparation, in vitro release, pharmacokinetic studies and in vitro-in vivo correlation in beagle dogs.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dongmei; Zeng, Jin; Zhu, Yuan; Zhou, Guanghui; Deng, Wenwen; Xu, Ximing; Yu, Jiangnan

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to develop Cyclosporin A (CsA) sustained-release pellets which could maintain CsA blood concentration within the therapeutic window throughout dosing interval and to investigate the in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) in beagle dogs. The CsA sustained-release pellets (CsA pellets) were prepared by a double coating method and characterized in vitro as well as in vivo. Consequently, the CsA pellets obtained were spherical in shape, with a desirable drug loading (7.18 ± 0.17 g/100 g), good stability and showed a sustained-release effect. The Cmax, Tmax and AUC0-24 of CsA pellets from the in vivo pharmacokinetics evaluation was 268.22 ± 15.99 ng/ml, 6 ± 0 h and 3205.00 ± 149.55 ng·h/ml, respectively. Compared with Neoral®, CsA pellets significantly prolonged the duration of action, reduced the peak blood concentration and could maintain a relatively high concentration level till 24 h. The relative bioavailability of CsA pellets was 125.68 ± 5.37% that of Neoral®. Moreover, there was a good correlation between the in vitro dissolution and in vivo absorption of the pellets. In conclusion, CsA pellets which could ensure a constant systemic blood concentration within the therapeutic window for 24 h were prepared successfully. Meanwhile, this formulation possessed a good IVIVC. PMID:26555803

  7. Preparation and evaluation of cyclosporin A-containing proliposomes: a comparison of the supercritical antisolvent process with the conventional film method

    PubMed Central

    Karn, Pankaj Ranjan; Jin, Su-Eon; Lee, Benjamin Joon; Sun, Bo Kyung; Kim, Min-Soo; Sung, Jong-Hyuk; Hwang, Sung-Joo

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to prepare cyclosporin A (CsA)-containing proliposomes using the supercritical antisolvent (SAS) process and the conventional thin film method for the comparative study of proliposomal formulations and to evaluate the physicochemical properties of these proliposomes. Methods CsA-containing proliposomes were prepared by the SAS process and the conventional film method, composed of natural and synthetic phospholipids. We investigated particle size, polydispersity index, and zeta potential of CsA-containing proliposomes. In addition, both production yield and entrapment efficiency of CsA in different proliposomes were analyzed. Physicochemical properties of CsA-containing proliposomes were also evaluated, using differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. The morphology and size of CsA-containing proliposomes were confirmed, using scanning electron microscopy. We checked the in vitro release of CsA from CsA-containing proliposomes prepared by different preparation methods, comparing them with Restasis® as a positive control and the stability of SAS-mediated proliposomes was also studied. Results CsA-containing proliposomes formed by the SAS process had a relatively smaller particle size, with a narrow size distribution and spherical particles compared with those of conventionally prepared proliposomes. The yield and entrapment efficiency of CsA in all proliposomes varied from 85% to 92% and from 86% to 89%, respectively. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the anhydrous lactose powder used in this formulation retained its crystalline form and that CsA was present in an amorphous form. Proliposome powders were rapidly converted to liposomes on contact with water. The in vitro release study of proliposomal formulations demonstrated a similar pattern to Restasis®. The SAS-mediated CsA-containing proliposomes were stable on storage, with no significant changes in particle

  8. Itraconazole for experimental pulmonary aspergillosis: comparison with amphotericin B, interaction with cyclosporin A, and correlation between therapeutic response and itraconazole concentrations in plasma.

    PubMed Central

    Berenguer, J; Ali, N M; Allende, M C; Lee, J; Garrett, K; Battaglia, S; Piscitelli, S C; Rinaldi, M G; Pizzo, P A; Walsh, T J

    1994-01-01

    Itraconazole and amphotericin B were compared by using a newly developed model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in rabbits immunosuppressed with methylprednisolone and cyclosporin A (CsA). Both itraconazole at 40 mg/kg (given orally) and amphotericin B at 1 mg/kg (given intravenously) had in vivo antifungal activity in comparison with controls. At these dosages, amphotericin B was more effective than itraconazole in reducing the tissue burden (log10 CFU per gram) of Aspergillus fumigatus (P < 0.05) and the number of pulmonary lesions (P < 0.01). However, there was considerable variation in the near-peak concentrations of itraconazole in plasma (median, 4.15 micrograms/ml; range, < 0.5 to 16.8 micrograms/ml) and a strong inverse correlation between concentrations of itraconazole in plasma and the tissue burden of A. fumigatus. An inhibitory sigmoid maximum-effect model predicted a significant pharmacodynamic relationship (r = 0.87, P < 0.001) between itraconazole concentrations in plasma and antifungal activity as a function of the tissue burden of A. fumigatus. This model demonstrated that levels in plasma of greater than 6 micrograms/ml were associated with a significantly greater antifungal effect. Levels in plasma of less than 6 micrograms/ml were associated with a rapid decline in the antifungal effect. Itraconazole, in comparison with amphotericin B, caused a twofold elevation of CsA levels (P < 0.01) but was less nephrotoxic (P < 0.01). This study of experimental pulmonary aspergillosis demonstrated that amphotericin B at 1 mg/kg/day was more active but more nephrotoxic than itraconazole at 40 mg/kg/day, that itraconazole increased concentrations of CsA in plasma, and that the antifungal activity of itraconazole strongly correlated with concentrations in plasma in an inhibitory sigmoid maximum-effect model. These findings further indicate the importance of monitoring concentrations of itraconazole in plasma as a guide to increasing dosage, improving

  9. Evidence for the involvement of P-glycoprotein on the extrusion of taken up L-DOPA in cyclosporine A treated LLC-PK1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Soares-da-Silva, P; Serrão, M P; Vieira-Coelho, M A; Pestana, M

    1998-01-01

    The present work has examined the effects of short- (30 min) and long-term (14 h) exposure to cyclosporine A (CsA) on the uptake of L-DOPA, its decarboxylation to dopamine and the cellular extrusion of taken up L-DOPA and of newly-formed amine in monolayers of LLC-PK1 cells.In the presence of benserazide (50 μM), L-DOPA was rapidly accumulated in LLC-PK1 cells (cultured in collagen-treated plastic) attaining equilibrium at 30 min of incubation. Non-linear analysis of the saturation curves revealed a Km of 113±16 μM and a Vmax of 5581±297 pmol mg−1 protein 6 min−1.In the absence of benserazide, LLC-PK1 cells incubated with increasing concentrations of L-DOPA (10 to 500 μM) for 6 min accumulate newly-formed dopamine by a saturable process with apparent Km and Vmax values of 31±6 μM and 1793±91 pmol mg−1 protein 6 min−1, respectively. The fractional outflow of newly-formed dopamine was found to be 20%. Up to 200 μM of intracellular newly-formed dopamine, the outward transfer of the amine was found to be a non-saturable process.Short-term exposure to CsA (0.3, 1.0 and 3.0 μg ml−1) was found not to change the intracellular concentrations of newly-formed dopamine, but increased the levels of dopamine in the incubation medium (143% to 224% increase) and the total amount of dopamine formed (31% to 59% increase). Long-term exposure to CsA (0.03 to 3.0 μg ml−1) reduced the total amount of dopamine (15% to 39% reduction) and the intracellular levels of the amine (11% to 56% reduction), without changing dopamine levels in the incubation medium. Both short- and long-term exposure to CsA resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in the fractional outflow of newly-formed dopamine.Short-term exposure to CsA (3.0 μg ml−1) reduced the apical extrusion of intracellular L-DOPA by 15% (P<0.05), whereas long-term exposure to CsA reverted this effect and decreased its intracellular availability (15% reduction; P<0

  10. Interaction Study of an Amorphous Solid Dispersion of Cyclosporin A in Poly-Alpha-Cyclodextrin with Model Membranes by 1H-, 2H-, 31P-NMR and Electron Spin Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Debouzy, Jean-Claude; Bourbon, Fréderic; Lahiani-Skiba, Malika; Skiba, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    The properties of an amorphous solid dispersion of cyclosporine A (ASD) prepared with the copolymer alpha cyclodextrin (POLYA) and cyclosporine A (CYSP) were investigated by 1H-NMR in solution and its membrane interactions were studied by 1H-NMR in small unilamellar vesicles and by 31P 2H NMR in phospholipidic dispersions of DMPC (dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine) in comparison with those of POLYA and CYSP alone. 1H-NMR chemical shift variations showed that CYSP really interacts with POLYA, with possible adduct formation, dispersion in the solid matrix of the POLYA, and also complex formation. A coarse approach to the latter mechanism was tested using the continuous variations method, indicating an apparent 1 : 1 stoichiometry. Calculations gave an apparent association constant of log Ka = 4.5. A study of the interactions with phospholipidic dispersions of DMPC showed that only limited interactions occurred at the polar head group level (31P). Conversely, by comparison with the expected chain rigidification induced by CYSP, POLYA induced an increase in the fluidity of the layer while ASD formation led to these effects almost being overcome at 298 K. At higher temperature, while the effect of CYSP seems to vanish, a resulting global increase in chain fluidity was found in the presence of ASD. PMID:24883210

  11. Mode of action of SDZ NIM 811, a nonimmunosuppressive cyclosporin A analog with activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1): interference with early and late events in HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Steinkasserer, A; Harrison, R; Billich, A; Hammerschmid, F; Werner, G; Wolff, B; Peichl, P; Palfi, G; Schnitzel, W; Mlynar, E

    1995-02-01

    SDZ NIM 811 is a cyclosporin A analog that is completely devoid of immunosuppressive capacity but exhibits potent and selective anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity. The mechanism of action of SDZ NIM 811 is clearly different from those of all other anti-HIV agents described so far. In cell-free assays, it is not an inhibitor of reverse transcriptase, protease, integrase, and it does not interfere with Rev or Tat function. SDZ NIM 811 does not down-regulate CD4 or inhibit fusion between infected and uninfected, CD4-expressing cells. p24 production from chronically HIV-infected cells is not impaired either. To elucidate the mode of action of SDZ NIM 811, we performed DNA PCR analysis in HIV-1 IIIB-infected MT4 cells in one cycle of virus replication. The effects of SDZ NIM 811 on the kinetics of viral DNA synthesis, appearance of two-long terminal repeat circles (2-LTR circles), and integration of DNA were studied. SDZ NIM 811 inhibited 2-LTR circle formation in a concentration-dependent manner, which is indicative of nuclear localization of preintegration complexes. Half-maximal inhibition was achieved at 0.17 microgram/ml; this concentration is close to the 50% inhibitory concentrations (0.01 to 0.2 microgram/ml) for viral growth inhibition. As expected, integration of proviral DNA into cellular DNA was also inhibited by SDZ NIM 811. Analysis of the viral particles produced by SDZ NIM 811-treated, chronically infected cells revealed amounts of capsid proteins, reverse transcriptase activity, and viral RNA comparable to those of the untreated control. However, these particles showed a dose-dependent reduction in infectivity (50% inhibitory concentration of 0.028 microgram/ml) which indicates that the assembly process is also impaired by SDZ NIM 811. Gag proteins are postulated to play a role not only in assembly but also in early steps of viral replication, e.g., nuclear localization of the preintegration complex. Recently, it was reported that

  12. Pseudotyping human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by the glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus targets HIV-1 entry to an endocytic pathway and suppresses both the requirement for Nef and the sensitivity to cyclosporin A.

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, C

    1997-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) normally enters cells by direct fusion with the plasma membrane. In this report, HIV-1 particles capable of infecting cells through an endocytic pathway are described. Chimeric viruses composed of the HIV-1 core and the envelope glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-G) were constructed and are herein termed HIV-1(VSV) pseudotypes. HIV-1(VSV) pseudotypes were 20- to 130-fold more infectious than nonpseudotyped HIV-1. Infection by HIV-1(VSV) pseudotypes was markedly diminished by ammonium chloride and concanamycin A, a selective inhibitor of vacuolar H+ ATPases, demonstrating that these viruses require endosomal acidification to achieve productive infection. HIV-1 is thus capable of performing all of the viral functions necessary for infection when entry is targeted to an endocytic route. Maximal HIV-1 infectivity requires the presence of the viral Nef protein and the cellular protein cyclophilin A (CyPA) during virus assembly. Pseudotyping by VSV-G markedly suppressed the requirement for Nef. HIV-1(VSV) particles were also resistant to inhibition by cyclosporin A; however, the deleterious effect of a gag mutation inhibiting CyPA incorporation was not relieved by VSV-G. These results suggest that Nef acts at a step of the HIV-1 life cycle that is either circumvented or facilitated by targeting virus entry to an endocytic pathway. The findings also support the hypothesis that Nef and CyPA enhance HIV-1 infectivity through independent processes and demonstrate a mechanistic difference between reduction of HIV-1 infectivity by cyclosporin A and gag mutations that decrease HIV-1 incorporation of CyPA. PMID:9223476

  13. Prevalence of Past and Reactivated Viral Infections and Efficacy of Cyclosporine A as Monotherapy or in Combination in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis—Synergy Study: A Longitudinal Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Delia; Grossi, Paolo; Marchesoni, Antonio; Di Nuzzo, Sergio; Griseta, Vito; Gargiulo, Anna; Parodi, Aurora; Bellia, Gilberto

    2014-01-01

    We have prospectively evaluated psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients for (1) seropositivity for former viral infections and seroconversion and (2) efficacy of cyclosporine A (CsA) alone or in combination with other immunosuppressants in a time period of 12 months. Screening included HBV antibodies and antigens, HCV antibodies and RNA, HSV 1-2, HZV, EBV, and CMV IgG, and IgM, HHV-6 DNA, and HIV 1-2 antibodies. PsA was evaluated by the Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), and the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). At baseline, 126 (56%) out of 225 evaluable patients had 2 or more seropositivities indicative of former infections, and 31 patients (13.8%) presented seropositivity for HCV, HBV, HSV-1 and -2, HHV-6, EBV, or parvovirus infection; one of them, positive for HBAg, was treated with lamivudine, while the remaining 30 received no specific treatment. None of the 31 patients developed virus reactivation. A reduction (P < 0.001) of PASI, BASDAI, and VAS scores was observed at 6 and 12 months. The treatment of PsA with CsA as monotherapy or in combination was safe and effective. In vitro experiments and clinical findings, including those from our study, suggest that CsA as monotherapy or in combination with biologics might be the treatment of choice in PsA HCV-positive patients. PMID:24804261

  14. Extended follow-up of the CYCLOFA-LUNE trial comparing two sequential induction and maintenance treatment regimens for proliferative lupus nephritis based either on cyclophosphamide or on cyclosporine A.

    PubMed

    Závada, J; Sinikka Pesicková, S; Rysavá, R; Horák, P; Hrncír, Z; Lukác, J; Rovensky, J; Vítová, J; Havrda, M; Rychlík, I; Böhmova, J; Vlasáková, V; Slatinská, J; Zadrazil, J; Olejárová, M; Tegzova, D; Tesar, V

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the extended follow-up of the CYCLOFA-LUNE trial, a randomized prospective trial comparing two sequential induction and maintenance treatment regimens for proliferative lupus nephritis based either on cyclophosphamide (CPH) or cyclosporine A (CyA). Patients and methods Data for kidney function and adverse events were collected by a cross-sectional survey for 38 of 40 patients initially randomized in the CYCLOFA-LUNE trial. Results The median follow-up time was 7.7 years (range 5.0-10.3). Rates of renal impairment and end-stage renal disease, adverse events (death, cardiovascular event, tumor, premature menopause) did not differ between the CPH and CyA group, nor did mean serum creatinine, 24 h proteinuria and SLICC damage score at last follow-up. Most patients in both groups were still treated with glucocorticoids, other immunosuppressant agents and blood pressure lowering drugs. Conclusion An immunosuppressive regimen based on CyA achieved similar clinical results to that based on CPH in the very long term. PMID:24213308

  15. Cyclosporin A inhibits CD11a/CD18 adhesion molecules due to inhibition of TNFα and IL-1β levels in the mouse model of pleurisy induced by carrageenan

    PubMed Central

    Dalmarco, Eduardo Monguilhott; Medeiros, Yara Santos

    2008-01-01

    The mouse model of pleurisy induced by carrageenan is characterized by a significant enhancement of cell migration due to neutrophils 4 h after pleurisy induction. Forty-eight hours after pleurisy induction, a significant increase in cell migration due to mononuclear cells occurs. Recently, studies in our laboratory have demonstrated that cyclosporine A (CsA) inhibits leukocyte migration in the pleural cavity and lungs in the mouse model of pleurisy induced by carrageenan. In the present work we evaluated whether CsA was able to downregulate CD11a/CD18 adhesion molecule in the lungs, as well as TNFα and IL-1β levels in the fluid leakage of the pleural cavity in this model. Our results showed that CsA significantly decreased CD11a/CD18 in the lungs, as well as TNFα and IL-1β levels in the fluid leakage of the pleural cavity 4 h and 48 h after pleurisy induction. It is our hypothesis that the inhibitory effect elicited by CsA upon these adhesion molecules may be also be attributed to the downregulation of TNFα and IL-1β cytokines. PMID:19262158

  16. Study protocol for a phase III multicentre, randomised, open-label, blinded-end point trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of immunoglobulin plus cyclosporin A in patients with severe Kawasaki disease (KAICA Trial)

    PubMed Central

    Aoyagi, Reiko; Hamada, Hiromichi; Sato, Yasunori; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Onouchi, Yoshihiro; Ebata, Ryota; Terauchi, Moe; Terai, Masaru; Hanaoka, Hideki; Hata, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute, self-limited vasculitis of unknown aetiology that predominantly affects infants and young children. We hypothesise that cyclosporin A (CsA) may be effective in treating KD by regulating the Ca2+/NFAT signalling pathway. This trial compares the current standard therapy of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and the combined IVIG+CsA therapy in paediatric patients with severe KD. Methods and analysis This trial is a phase III, multicentre, randomised, open-label, blinded-end point trial that evaluates the efficacy and safety of IVIG+CsA therapy. Patients with severe KD who satisfy the eligibility criteria are randomised (1:1) to receive either CsA (5 mg/kg/day for 5 days; Neoral) plus high-dose IVIG (2 g/kg for 24 h and aspirin 30 mg/kg/day), or high-dose IVIG alone (2 g/kg for 24 h and aspirin 30 mg/kg/day). The primary end point is the frequency of occurrence of coronary artery abnormalities during the trial period. An independent end point review committee will be in charge of the trial assessment. Ethics and dissemination The protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board of each institution. The trial was notified and registered at the Pharmaceutical and Medical Devices Agency, in Japan. The trial is currently on-going and is scheduled to finish in April 2017. The findings will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. Trial registration number JMA-IIA00174; Pre-results. PMID:26628527

  17. A Mutation in Alpha Helix 3 of CA Renders Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Cyclosporin A Resistant and Dependent: Rescue by a Second-Site Substitution in a Distal Region of CA▿

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruifeng; Aiken, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    The replication of many isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is enhanced by binding of the host cell protein cyclophilin A (CypA) to the viral capsid protein (CA). The immunosuppressive drug cyclosporine A (CsA) and its nonimmunosuppressive analogs bind with high affinity to CypA and inhibit HIV-1 replication. Previous studies have identified two mutations, A92E and G94D, in the CypA-binding loop of CA that confer the ability of HIV-1 to replicate in the presence of CsA. Interestingly, CsA stimulates the replication of HIV-1 mutants containing either the A92E or G94D substitution in some human cell lines. Here, we show that substitution of alanine for threonine at position 54 of CA (T54A) also confers HIV-1 resistance to and dependence on CsA. Like the previously identified CsA-resistant/dependent mutants, infection by the T54A mutant was stimulated by CsA in a target cell-specific manner. RNA interference-mediated reduction of CypA expression enhanced the permissiveness of HeLa cells to infection by the T54A mutant. A suppressor mutation, encoding a substitution of threonine for alanine at position 105 of CA (A105T), was identified through adaptation of the T54A mutant virus for growth in CEM cells. A105T rescued the impaired single-cycle infectivity and replication defects of both T54A and A92E mutants. These results indicate that CA determinants outside the CypA-binding loop can modulate the dependence of HIV-1 infection on CypA. PMID:17267487

  18. The effect of disodium cromoglycate, budesonide, and cyclosporin A on interleukin-4, interleukin-5, and interleukin-13 secretions in Der p I-stimulated T cells from house dust mite-sensitive atopic and nonatopic individuals.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jae-Won; Lee, Ha-Baik; Chung, Yong-Hoon; Choi, Yong

    2002-01-01

    Disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), budesonide, and cyclosporin A (CsA) were the well-known immunomodulators for the allergic and immunologic diseases clinically. In this study, we evaluated the characteristics of inhibition on cytokine synthesis of Der p I-stimulated T cells by the same inhibiting concentrations of DSCG, budesonide, and CsA in house-dust mite antigen (Der p I)-specific atopic and nonatopic healthy individuals. Seven house dust mite allergen specific patients were recruited for this study. Seven healthy volunteers were included on the basis of negative allergic manifestations and low serum immunoglobulin E values. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were cultured in the presence of recombinant interleukin (rIL)-2 with or without budesonide, DSCG, CsA, and Der p I for 48 hours. Cells were stained with anti-CD4 fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated monoclonal antibody, and then anti-human IL-4 phycoerythrin, IL-5, or IL-13 monoclonal antibody, respectively, was added to both blocked and stained samples. Incubation of PBMC from atopics with each immunomodulator and Der p I resulted in the reduction of IL-4 secretion compared with Der p I alone stimulation. However, IL-4 secretion in PBMC from nonatopics was not reduced with DSCG and Der p I stimulation. IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 secretions of PBMC from atopics were significantly decreased after incubation with each immunomodulator and Der p I, compared with after incubation with Der p I alone. These results might be considered to show either that DSCG has a selective inhibiting effect on cytokine production in T cells from atopics or is a weak inhibitor of cytokine secretions compared with budesonide and CsA at even strength for the inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation in normal, healthy individuals. PMID:12001789

  19. The role of peroxisome-proliferator-activating receptor gamma agonists: rosiglitazone and 15-deoxy-delta12,14-prostaglandin J2 in chronic experimental cyclosporine A-induced nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Korolczuk, A; Maciejewski, M; Smolen, A; Dudka, J; Czechowska, G; Widelska, I

    2014-12-01

    Cyclosporine A(CsA) is an immunosuppressor frequently used in the transplant surgery and in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. The therapeutic benefits of CsA are often limited by it's main side effect-nephrotoxicity. Mechanisms of chronic CsA- induced renal damage include: activation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, upregulation of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), oxidative stress. This study was undertaken to investigate the protective effect of the peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptors gamma (PPARs-γ) agonists: rosiglitazone and 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-prostaglandin J2 (PGDJ2), against CsA-induced kidney injury in male Wistar rats. CsA was administered subcutaneously at a dose of 15 mg/kg/day for 28 days. Both PPAR-γ agonists were given for 28 days 0.5 hour before the administration of CsA. Rosiglitazone was administered orally at a dose of 8 mg/kg/day and PGDJ2 was given intraperitoneally at a dose of 30 μg/kg/day. CsA induced renal failure was evidenced by increased serum levels of urea, uric acid and creatinine. Serum concentrations of GSH and GSSG, lipid peroxidation products as well as NAD+/NADH, NADP+/NADPH and ADP/ATP ratios showed, that CsA induced oxidative stress and evoked an imbalanced red-ox state in the kidney. Light and electron microscope studies showed degenerative changes within renal tubules with damage to their mitochondria, interstitial fibrosis and arteriolopathy. Immunohistochemical expression of profibrotic TGF-β was assessed. The biochemical and morphological changes induced by CsA were limited by administration of both rosiglitazone and PGDJ2. Ultrastructural examination of renal tubular epithelial cells showed marked improvement within mitochondria. Our results indicate that both PPAR-γ agonists used in the experiment may play an important role in protecting against CsA-induced damage in the kidney. PMID:25554991

  20. Infiltrating cellular pattern in kidney graft biopsies translates into forkhead box protein 3 up-regulation and p16INK4α senescence protein down-regulation in patients treated with belatacept compared to cyclosporin A

    PubMed Central

    Furuzawa-Carballeda, J; Lima, G; Alberú, J; Palafox, D; Uribe-Uribe, N; Morales-Buenrostro, L E; Reyes Acevedo, R; Mondragón, G; Chevaile, A; Llorente, L

    2012-01-01

    Renal allograft survival is related directly to cell senescence. In the transplantation scenario many cellular events – participating as immunological and non-immunological factors – could contribute to accelerate this biological process, responsible for the ultimate fate of the graft. Mechanisms concerned in tolerance versus rejection are paramount in this outcome. For this reason, immunosuppressive treatment constitutes an extremely important decision to prevent organ dysfunction and, finally, graft loss. This study was conducted to document the proportion of CD4+/interleukin (IL)-17A+-, CD16+/indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO+)-, forkhead box protein P3 (FoxP3+)-expressing cells, senescent cells (p16INK4α) and the percentage of interstitial fibrosis (IF) in graft biopsies of kidney transplant recipients participating in the BENEFIT (Bristol-Myers Squibb IM103008) study. CD4+/IL-17A+, CD16+/IDO+, FoxP3+ and p16INK4α+ cells were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, and the percentage of IF by morphometry on graft biopsies obtained at time 0 (pre-implantation) and at 12 months post-transplant. Senescent cells and CD4+/IL-17A+ cells were increased among graft biopsies in subjects receiving cyclosporin A (CsA) compared to those under belatacept treatment. Meanwhile, CD16+/IDO+ and FoxP3+-expressing cells were lower in biopsies from CsA treatment compared to patients treated with Belatacept. Histological morphometric analyses disclosed more IF in 12-month CsA-treated patients in comparison to pre-implantation biopsy findings. Summing up, renal biopsies from patients receiving belatacept showed greater amounts of FoxP3+ cells and lower amounts of CD4+/IL-17A+ and senescent cells compared to patients under CsA treatment. Along with these findings, an increase in IF in annual CsA-treated-patients biopsies compared to pre-implantation and belatacept-treated patients were observed. PMID:22236010

  1. Bax-mediated mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP), distinct from the mitochondrial permeability transition, is a key mechanism in diclofenac-induced hepatocyte injury: Multiple protective roles of cyclosporin A

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, W.P.; Pun, Pamela Boon Li; Latchoumycandane, Calivarathan; Boelsterli, Urs A.

    2008-03-15

    Diclofenac, a widely used nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, has been associated with rare but severe cases of clinical hepatotoxicity. Diclofenac causes concentration-dependent cell death in human hepatocytes (after 24-48 h) by mitochondrial permeabilization via poorly defined mechanisms. To explore whether the cyclophilin D (CyD)-dependent mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) and/or the mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) was primarily involved in mediating cell death, we exposed immortalized human hepatocytes (HC-04) to apoptogenic concentrations of diclofenac (> 500 {mu}M) in the presence or absence of inhibitors of upstream mediators. The CyD inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA, 2 {mu}M) fully inhibited diclofenac-induced cell injury, suggesting that mPT was involved. However, CyD gene silencing using siRNA left the cells susceptible to diclofenac toxicity, and CsA still protected the CyD-negative cells from lethal injury. Diclofenac induced early (9 h) activation of Bax and Bak and caused mitochondrial translocation of Bax, indicating that MOMP was involved in cell death. Inhibition of Bax protein expression by using siRNA significantly protected HC-04 from diclofenac-induced cell injury. Diclofenac also induced early Bid activation (tBid formation, 6 h), which is an upstream mechanism that initiates Bax activation and mitochondrial translocation. Bid activation was sensitive to the Ca{sup 2+} chelator, BAPTA. In conclusion, we found that Bax/Bak-mediated MOMP is a key mechanism of diclofenac-induced lethal cell injury in human hepatocytes, and that CsA can prevent MOMP through inhibition of Bax activation. These data support our concept that the Ca{sup 2+}-Bid-Bax-MOMP axis is a critical pathway in diclofenac (metabolite)-induced hepatocyte injury.

  2. Mechanism underlying the effect of combined therapy using glucosamine and low-dose cyclosporine A on the development of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Hyun; Choi, Yun-Seok; Cheong, Kyung Ah; Lee, Ai-Young

    2013-02-01

    Combination therapy is often used in the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD) to improve clinical efficacy or to spare the dose of each drug. Cyclosporine A (CsA) is a calcineurin inhibitor that was developed for the treatment of AD. Glucosamine (Glu) is a potent immunosuppressant that inhibits Th2-mediated immunity. We previously reported that Glu has an ameliorative effect on the development of the pathology in NC/Nga mice. The aims of our study were to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of combination of Glu and low-dose CsA in dermatophagoides farina (Df)-induced AD-like skin lesions in NC/Nga mice and to determine the underlying therapeutic mechanisms. The Df-induced NC/Nga mice with a clinical score of 7 were used for treatment with Glu (500mg/kg) alone, low-dose CsA (2, 5, and 10mg/kg) or in combination. The clinical scores were reduced significantly by the combination treatment with Glu and low-dose CsA. The suppression of dermatitis by combined therapy was accompanied by decrease in the plasma level of IgE and in the splenic level of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, TARC and eotaxin. Histological analysis of the skin also revealed that combination treatment significantly reduced the inflammatory cellular infiltrate, including mast cells and eosinophils. Particularly, immunological evaluation reveals an increase of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells in the combined treatment. The induction of TSLP, which leads to systemic Th2 response, was reduced in the skin on combination treatment. The protein expression of filaggrin and involucrin was recovered by combination treatment in the skin lesions, whereas the protein expression of keratin-10 and keratin-14 decreased in the combination treatment. Collectively, our findings suggest that combination treatment of Glu and low-dose CsA leads to the therapeutic effects in Df-induced AD-like skin lesion in NC/Nga mice through inhibition of IgE, inflammatory cellular infiltrate, and recovery of skin barrier function via a mechanism that may

  3. Imaging the impact of cyclosporin A and dipyridamole on P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) function at the blood-brain barrier: A [(11)C]-N-desmethyl-loperamide PET study in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Damont, Annelaure; Goutal, Sébastien; Auvity, Sylvain; Valette, Héric; Kuhnast, Bertrand; Saba, Wadad; Tournier, Nicolas

    2016-08-25

    Cyclosporin A (CsA) and dipyridamole (DPy) are potent inhibitors of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp; ABCB1) in vitro. Their efficacy at inhibiting P-gp at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is difficult to predict. Efficient and readily available (i.e. marketed) P-gp inhibitors are needed as probes to investigate the role of P-gp at the human BBB. In this study, the P-gp inhibition potency at the BBB of therapeutic doses of CsA or DPy was evaluated in baboons using Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging with [(11)C]-N-desmethyl-loperamide ([(11)C]dLop), a radiolabeled P-gp substrate. The preparation of dLop as authentic standard and [(11)C]dLop as radiotracer were revisited so as to improve their production yields. [(11)C]dLop PET imaging was performed in the absence (n=3, baseline condition) and the presence of CsA (15mg/kg/h i.v., n=3). Three animals were injected with i.v. DPy at either 0.56 or 0.96 or 2mg/kg (n=1), corresponding to the usual, maximal and twice the maximal dose in patients, respectively, administered immediately before PET. [(11)C]dLop brain kinetics as well as [(11)C]dLop kinetics and radiometabolites in arterial plasma were measured to calculate [(11)C]dLop area-under the time-activity curve from 10 to 30min in the brain (AUCbrain) and in plasma (AUCplasma). [(11)C]dLop brain uptake was described by AUCR=AUCbrain/AUCplasma. CsA as well as DPy did not measurably influence [(11)C]dLop plasma kinetics and metabolism. Baseline AUCR (0.85±0.29) was significantly enhanced in the presence of CsA (AUCR=10.8±3.6). Injection of pharmacologic dose of DPy did not enhance [(11)C]dLop brain distribution with AUCR being 1.2, 0.9 and 1.1 after administration of 0.56, 0.96 and 2mg/kg DPy doses, respectively. We used [(11)C]dLop PET imaging in baboons, a relevant in vivo model of P-gp function at the BBB, to show the P-gp inhibition potency of therapeutic dose CsA. Despite in vitro P-gp inhibition potency, usual doses DPy are not likely to inhibit P-gp function at

  4. Prevalence of acute and chronic viral seropositivity and characteristics of disease in patients with psoriatic arthritis treated with cyclosporine: a post hoc analysis from a sex point of view on the observational study of infectious events in psoriasis complicated by active psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Delia; Chimenti, Sergio; Grossi, Paolo Antonio; Marchesoni, Antonio; Bardazzi, Federico; Ayala, Fabio; Simoni, Lucia; Vassellatti, Donatella; Bellia, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Sex medicine studies have shown that there are sex differences with regard to disease characteristics in immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, including psoriasis, in immune response and susceptibility to viral infections. We performed a post hoc analysis of the Observational Study of infectious events in psoriasis complicated by active psoriatic arthritis (SYNERGY) study in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) treated with immunosuppressive regimens including cyclosporine, in order to evaluate potential between-sex differences in severity of disease and prevalence of viral infections. Methods SYNERGY was an observational study conducted in 24 Italian dermatology clinics, which included 238 consecutively enrolled patients with PsA, under treatment with immunosuppressant regimens including cyclosporin A. In this post hoc analysis, patients’ demographical data and clinical characteristics of psoriasis, severity and activity of PsA, prevalence of seropositivity for at least one viral infection, and treatments administered for PsA and infections were compared between sexes. Results A total of 225 patients were evaluated in this post hoc analysis, and 121 (54%) were males. Demographic characteristics and concomitant diseases were comparable between sexes. Statistically significant sex differences were observed at baseline in Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score (higher in males), mean number of painful joints, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, and the global activity of disease assessed by patients (all higher in females). The percentage of patients with at least one seropositivity detected at baseline, indicative of concomitant or former viral infection, was significantly higher among women than among men. No between-sex differences were detected in other measures, at other time points, and in treatments. Patients developed no hepatitis B virus or hepatitis C virus reactivation during cyclosporine treatment. Conclusion Our post hoc

  5. Amorphous cyclosporin A nanoparticles for enhanced dermal bioavailability.

    PubMed

    Romero, Gregori B; Arntjen, Anja; Keck, Cornelia M; Müller, Rainer H

    2016-02-10

    Cylosporin A (CyA) was formulated as amorphous nanoparticle suspension to increase dermal penetration, e.g. applicable in psoriasis. The suspension consisted of 5% CyA in water, stabilized with vitamin E polyethylene glycol succinate (TPGS, Kolliphor TPGS) and was produced by bead milling. The diameter of the bulk population was about 350 nm, laser diffraction diameter 99% was 690 nm. The suspension was physically stable over one year of storage at room temperature, and most important the amorphous state also remained stable. Despite the high dispersitivity and related large surface area in contact with water, the drug content reduced only by 5% over 1 year of storage. i.e. the formulation is feasible as commercial product with expiry date. The CyA nanoparticles and μm-sized CyA particles were incorporated into hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) gels and the penetration studied into fresh pig ear skin applying the tape stripping method. At tape number 30, the penetrated cumulative amount of CyA from nanoparticles was 6.3 fold higher compared to the μm-sized raw drug powder (450.1 μg/cm(2) vs. 71.3 μg/cm(2)). A theoretical mechanism is presented to explain the observed superiority in penetration. Based on amorphous CyA nanoparticles, dermal formulations for improved dermal CyA delivery seem to be feasible. PMID:26688038

  6. Cyclosporin A monotherapy versus cyclosporin A and methotrexate combination therapy in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis: a double blind randomised placebo controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Gerards, A; Landewe, R; Prins, A; Bruijn, G; Goei, T; Laan, R; Dijkmans, B

    2003-01-01

    Patients and methods: 120 patients with active RA, rheumatoid factor positive and/or erosive, were randomly allocated to receive CsA with MTX (n=60) or CsA with placebo (n=60). Treatment with CsA was started in all patients at 2.5 mg/kg/day and increased to a maximum of 5 mg/kg/day in 16 weeks. MTX was started at 7.5 mg/week and increased to a maximal dose of 15 mg/week at week 16. Primary outcomes were clinical remission (Pinals criteria) and radiological damage (Larsen score), at week 48. Results: Treatment was discontinued prematurely in 27 patients in the monotherapy group (21 because of inefficacy, and six because of toxicity) and in 26 patients in the combination therapy group (14 and 12, respectively). At week 48, clinical remission was achieved in four patients in the monotherapy group and in six patients in the combination therapy group (p=0.5). The median Larsen score increased to 10 (25th, 75th centiles: 3.5; 13.3) points in the monotherapy group and to 4 (1.0; 10.5) points in the combination therapy group (p=0.004). 28/60 (47%) of patients in the monotherapy group v 34/60 (57%) of patients in the combination therapy group had reached an American college of Rheumatology 20% (ACR20) response (p=0.36) at week 48; 15/60 (25%) v 29/60 (48%) of patients had reached an ACR50 response (p=0.013); and 7 (12%) v 12 (20%) of patients had reached an ACR70 response (p=0.11).Their was a tendency towards more toxicity in the combination therapy group. Conclusions: In patients with early RA, neither CsA plus MTX combination therapy nor CsA monotherapy is very effective in inducing clinical remission. Combination therapy is probably better at improving clinical disease activity, and definitely better at slowing radiological progression. Combination therapy should still be compared with methotrexate monotherapy. PMID:12634224

  7. The protective effect of vildagliptin in chronic experimental cyclosporine A-induced hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    El-Sherbeeny, Nagla A; Nader, Manar A

    2016-03-01

    The study examined the effect of dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitor, vildagliptin, in cyclosporine (CsA)-induced hepatotoxicity. Rats were divided into 4 groups treated for 28 days: control (vehicle), vildagliptin (10 mg/kg, orally), CsA (20 mg/kg, s.c.), and CsA-vildagliptin group. Liver function was assessed by measuring serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), gamma glutamyltransferase (γGT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and albumin, and histopathological changes of liver were examined. Oxidative stress markers were evaluated. Assessment of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity in hepatic nuclear extract, serum DPP-4, and expression of Bax and Bcl2 were also done. CsA-induced hepatotoxicity was evidenced by increase in serum levels of AST, ALT, and γGT; a decrease in serum albumin; and a significant alteration in hepatic architecture. Also, significant increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) and decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione (GSH) levels, increased expression Bax proteins with deceased expression of Bcl2, and increased hepatic activity of NF-κB and serum DPP-4 level were observed upon CsA treatment. Vildagliptin significantly improved all altered parameters induced by CsA administration. Vildagliptin has the potential to protect the liver against CsA-induced hepatotoxicity by reducing oxidative stress, DPP-4 activity, apoptosis, and inflammation. PMID:26632647

  8. Calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine A and tacrolimus induce vascular inflammation and endothelial activation through TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues-Diez, Raquel; González-Guerrero, Cristian; Ocaña-Salceda, Carlos; Rodrigues-Diez, Raúl R.; Egido, Jesús; Ortiz, Alberto; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Ramos, Adrián M.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of the calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs) cyclosporine and tacrolimus greatly reduced the rate of allograft rejection, although their chronic use is marred by a range of side effects, among them vascular toxicity. In transplant patients, it is proved that innate immunity promotes vascular injury triggered by ischemia-reperfusion damage, atherosclerosis and hypertension. We hypothesized that activation of the innate immunity and inflammation may contribute to CNI toxicity, therefore we investigated whether TLR4 mediates toxic responses of CNIs in the vasculature. Cyclosporine and tacrolimus increased the production of proinflammatory cytokines and endothelial activation markers in cultured murine endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells as well as in ex vivo cultures of murine aortas. CNI-induced proinflammatory events were prevented by pharmacological inhibition of TLR4. Moreover, CNIs were unable to induce inflammation and endothelial activation in aortas from TLR4−/− mice. CNI-induced cytokine and adhesion molecules synthesis in endothelial cells occurred even in the absence of calcineurin, although its expression was required for maximal effect through upregulation of TLR4 signaling. CNI-induced TLR4 activity increased O2−/ROS production and NF-κB-regulated synthesis of proinflammatory factors in cultured as well as aortic endothelial and VSMCs. These data provide new insight into the mechanisms associated with CNI vascular inflammation. PMID:27295076

  9. Cyclosporine A: Novel concepts in its role in drug-induced gingival overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Ponnaiyan, Deepa; Jegadeesan, Visakan

    2015-01-01

    Cyclosporine is a selective immunosuppressant that has a variety of applications in medical practice. Like phenytoin and the calcium channel blockers, the drug is associated with gingival overgrowth. This review considers the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and unwanted effects of cyclosporine, in particular the action of the drug on the gingival tissues. In addition, elucidates the current concepts in mechanisms of cyclosporine-induced gingival overgrowth. Clinical and cell culture studies suggest that the mechanism of gingival overgrowth is a result of the interaction between the drug and its metabolites with susceptible gingival fibroblasts. Plaque-induced gingival inflammation appears to enhance this interaction. However, understanding of the pathogenesis of gingival overgrowth is incomplete at best. Hence, it would be pertinent to identify and explore possible risk factors relating to both prevalence and severity of drug-induced gingival overgrowth. Newer molecular approaches are needed to clearly establish the pathogenesis of gingival overgrowth and to provide novel information for the design of future preventive and therapeutic modalities. PMID:26759584

  10. The cyclosporin A washout assay to detect HIV-1 uncoating in infected cells.

    PubMed

    Hulme, Amy E; Hope, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Uncoating is an early step of HIV-1 replication in which the viral capsid disassembles by p24 capsid (p24(CA)) protein dissociating from the viral complex. Although uncoating is required for HIV-1 replication, many questions remain about the mechanism of this process as well as its impact on other steps in viral replication. Here we describe a recently developed assay to study the process of uncoating in HIV-1-infected cells. The CsA washout assay is a cell-based assay that utilizes the HIV-1 restriction factor TRIM-CypA to detect and inhibit infection of coated viral complexes. Owl monkey kidney (OMK) cells are infected with a GFP reporter virus and TRIM-CypA restriction is switched on at various times postinfection allowing the kinetics of uncoating to be monitored in infected cells. This assay also can be used to examine the effect of different viral or cellular factors on the process of uncoating. PMID:24158812